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Sample records for agglutinins

  1. Hemagglutinins and bacterial agglutinins of earthworms.

    PubMed

    Stein, E A; Younai, S; Cooper, E L

    1987-01-01

    The biological roles of invertebrate agglutinins have been and remain an unresolved subject of controversy. Classical studies on agglutinins, beginning with the pioneer work of Noguchi (1903) on Limulus polyphemus and Homarus americanus have emphasized their hemagglutinating properties, an approach that has been criticized for its lack of biological relevance. While erythrocyte agglutination has proven useful for determining various properties of invertebrate agglutinins, it does not address the question of their natural function. More recently, invertebrate agglutinins have been investigated for their ability to interact with pathogenic agents such as bacteria (for review, see Pistole, 1982), yeast (Van der Knapp et al., 1982; Renwrantz and Stahmer, 1983) and parasitic protozoans (Ingram et al., 1984). In addition, the possible relationship of agglutinins to defense mechanisms of both vertebrates and invertebrates has been indicated by the observation that limulin, the major agglutinin of Limulus polyphemus, bears a number of similarities to vertebrate C-reactive proteins (Robey and Liu, 1981). In annelids, there have been no studies on bacterial agglutinins prior to our work with Lumbricus (Stein et al., 1985; Stein et al., submitted). Earthworms are particularly appropriate for studying bacterial agglutinins since their coelomic fluid contains constant low levels of bacteria and fungal spores, and their agglutinins are both naturally occurring and inducible. Although our initial studies on Lumbricus agglutinins were directed toward their hemagglutinating properties, our recent observations using bacteria have allowed us to reach the following conclusions: 1) Lumbricus coelomic fluid normally contains agglutinins against both erythrocytes and bacteria. After injecting worms with either erythrocytes or bacteria, agglutinin titers increase in coelomic fluid. This increase appears to be due to both an increase in numbers of agglutinins as well as levels of specific

  2. Hemagglutinins and bacterial agglutinins of earthworms.

    PubMed

    Stein, E A; Younai, S; Cooper, E L

    1987-01-01

    The biological roles of invertebrate agglutinins have been and remain an unresolved subject of controversy. Classical studies on agglutinins, beginning with the pioneer work of Noguchi (1903) on Limulus polyphemus and Homarus americanus have emphasized their hemagglutinating properties, an approach that has been criticized for its lack of biological relevance. While erythrocyte agglutination has proven useful for determining various properties of invertebrate agglutinins, it does not address the question of their natural function. More recently, invertebrate agglutinins have been investigated for their ability to interact with pathogenic agents such as bacteria (for review, see Pistole, 1982), yeast (Van der Knapp et al., 1982; Renwrantz and Stahmer, 1983) and parasitic protozoans (Ingram et al., 1984). In addition, the possible relationship of agglutinins to defense mechanisms of both vertebrates and invertebrates has been indicated by the observation that limulin, the major agglutinin of Limulus polyphemus, bears a number of similarities to vertebrate C-reactive proteins (Robey and Liu, 1981). In annelids, there have been no studies on bacterial agglutinins prior to our work with Lumbricus (Stein et al., 1985; Stein et al., submitted). Earthworms are particularly appropriate for studying bacterial agglutinins since their coelomic fluid contains constant low levels of bacteria and fungal spores, and their agglutinins are both naturally occurring and inducible. Although our initial studies on Lumbricus agglutinins were directed toward their hemagglutinating properties, our recent observations using bacteria have allowed us to reach the following conclusions: 1) Lumbricus coelomic fluid normally contains agglutinins against both erythrocytes and bacteria. After injecting worms with either erythrocytes or bacteria, agglutinin titers increase in coelomic fluid. This increase appears to be due to both an increase in numbers of agglutinins as well as levels of specific

  3. Characterization of the purified Chlamydomonas minus agglutinin

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Chlamydomonas flagellar sexual agglutinins are responsible for the adhesion of opposite mating-type (plus and minus) gametes during the first stages of mating. Purification and partial characterization of the plus agglutinin was previously reported (Adair, W. S., C. J. Hwang, and U. W. Goodenough, 1983, Cell, 33:183-193). Here we characterize the purified minus molecule. We show it to be a high molecular weight, hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein that migrates in the 3% stacking region of an SDS-polyacrylamide gel and is absent from two nonagglutinating minus mutants. Plus and minus agglutinins are remarkably similar, although nonidentical, in amino acid composition, molecular morphology, and reactivity in vivo and in vitro with monoclonal antibodies raised against the plus agglutinin. Moreover, the adhesiveness of both plus and minus agglutinins, when coupled to agarose beads, is abolished by thermolysin, trypsin, periodate, alkaline borohydride, reducing agents, or heat, but unaffected by exo- or endoglycosidases. The minus agglutinin, however, migrates just ahead of the plus molecule on SDS PAGE, is excluded from an anion-exchange (Mono Q) column, elutes earlier during hydrophobic interaction (Bio-gel TSK Phenyl 5PW) chromatography, and is sensitive to chymotrypsin digestion (unlike the plus agglutinin); therefore, it differs from the plus agglutinin in apparent molecular weight, net charge, relative hydrophobicity and proteolytic susceptibility. Nevertheless, our results generally demonstrate a high degree of homology between these complementary cell-cell recognition/adhesion molecules, which suggests that they are specified by genes that have a common evolutionary origin. PMID:2411736

  4. Cold agglutinin-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn; Randen, Ulla; Tjønnfjord, Geir E

    2015-06-01

    Cold antibody types account for about 25% of autoimmune hemolytic anemias. Primary chronic cold agglutinin disease (CAD) is characterized by a clonal lymphoproliferative disorder. Secondary cold agglutinin syndrome (CAS) complicates specific infections and malignancies. Hemolysis in CAD and CAS is mediated by the classical complement pathway and is predominantly extravascular. Not all patients require treatment. Successful CAD therapy targets the pathogenic B-cell clone. Complement modulation seems promising in both CAD and CAS. Further development and documentation are necessary before clinical use. We review options for possible complement-directed therapy.

  5. When blood runs cold: cold agglutinins and cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Findlater, Rhonda R; Schnell-Hoehn, Karen N

    2011-01-01

    Cold agglutinins are particular cold-reactive antibodies that react with red blood cells when the blood temperature drops below normal body temperature causing increased blood viscosity and red blood cell clumping. Most individuals with cold agglutinins are not aware of their presence, as these antibodies have little effect on daily living, often necessitating no treatment. However, when those with cold agglutinins are exposed to hypothermic situations or undergo procedures such as cardiopulmonary bypass with hypothermia during cardiac surgery, lethal complications of hemolysis, microvascular occlusion and organ failure can occur. By identifying those suspected of possessing cold agglutinins through a comprehensive nursing assessment and patient history, cold agglutinin screening can be performed prior to surgery to determine a diagnosis of cold agglutinin disease. With a confirmed diagnosis of cold agglutinin disease, the plan of care can be focused on measures to maintain the patient's blood temperature above the thermal amplitude throughout their hospitalization including the use of normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass with warm myocardial preservation techniques to prevent these fatal complications. Using a case report approach, the authors review the mechanism, clinical manifestations, detection and nursing management of a patient with cold agglutinins undergoing scheduled cardiac surgery. Cold agglutinin disease is rare. However, the risk to patients warrants an increased awareness of cold agglutinins and screening for those who are suspected of carrying these antibodies. PMID:21630629

  6. Antibody interactions with Ricinus communis agglutinins studied by biolayer interferometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two related agglutinins are present in the seeds of Ricinus communis (castor): ricin, a dichain ribosome-inactivating protein and Ricinus communis agglutinin-1 (RCA-1), a much less toxic hemagglutinin. Because ricin has been used for experimental cancer chemotherapy as well as for intentional poison...

  7. [Alpha and beta natural agglutinin titers in neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Gota, F

    1979-01-01

    A serological analysis of alpha and beta agglutinin titres has been carried out in cancer patients. Statistics of the patients' blood groups were also taken. The study showed an increased agglutinin titre, the expression of the functioning of the organism's defensive powers. Only in the terminal stage of the neoplastic disease were antibody titres low, the sign of low antibody reactivity of the affected organism.

  8. Sea urchin coelomic fluid agglutinin mediates coelomocyte adhesion.

    PubMed

    Canicattì, C; Pagliara, P; Stabili, L

    1992-08-01

    The sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus coelomic fluid was found to contain agglutinin which agglutinates animal erythrocytes and promotes adhesion of autologous coelomocytes. Hemagglutinating activity depended upon the presence of calcium ions and was relatively heat-stable. Through a combination of methods including ammonium sulfate precipitation and both size exclusion and ion exchange chromatographies, we purified the anti-rabbit agglutinating factor. The intact agglutinin migrates as a single band with an apparent M(r) of over 200,000. Three distinct protein bands with a calculated M(r) of 174,000, 137,000, and 76,000, respectively were observed under reducing conditions. The purified agglutinin strongly promoted the in vitro adhesion of autologous coelomocytes. PMID:1425767

  9. Binding profile of Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin (Jacalin).

    PubMed

    Wu, Albert M; Wu, June H; Lin, Li-Hua; Lin, Shin-Hua; Liu, Jia-Hau

    2003-04-01

    Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin (Jacalin) from the seeds of jack fruits has attracted considerable attention for its diverse biological activities and has been recognized as a Galbeta1-->3GalNAc (T) specific lectin. In previous studies, the information of its binding was limited to the inhibition results of monosaccharides and several T related disaccharides, but its interaction with other carbohydrate structural units occurring in natural glycans has not been characterized. For this reason, the binding profile of this lectin was studied by enzyme linked lectinosorbent assay (ELLSA) with our glycan/ligand collection. Among glycoproteins (gps) tested for binding, high density of multi-Galbeta1-->3GalNAcalpha1--> (mT(alpha)) and GalNAcalpha1-->Ser/Thr (mTn) containing gps reacted most avidly with Jacalin. As inhibitors expressed as nanograms yielding 50% inhibition, these mT(alpha) and mTn containing glycans were about 7.1 x 10(3), 4.0 x 10(5), and 7.8 x 10(5) times more potent than monomeric T(alpha), GalNAc, and Gal. Of the sugars tested and expressed as nanomoles for 50% inhibition, Tn containing peptides, T(alpha), and the human P blood group active disaccharide (P(alpha), GalNAcbeta1-->3Galalpha1-->) were the best and about 283 times more active than Gal. We conclude that the most potent ligands for this lectin are mTn, mT, and possibly P(alpha) glycotopes, while GalNAcbeta1-->4Galbeta1-->, GalNAcalpha1-->3Gal, GalNAcalpha1-->3GalNAc, and Galalpha1-->3Gal determinants were poor inhibitors. Thus, the overall binding profile of Jacalin can be defined in decreasing order as high density of mTn, and mT(alpha) > simple Tn cluster > monomeric T(alpha) > monomeric P(alpha) > monomeric Tn > monomeric T > GalNAc > Gal > Methylalpha1-->Man z.Gt; Man and Glc (inactive). Our finding should aid in the selection of this lectin for biological applications.

  10. Isolation of Soybean Agglutinin (SBA) from Soy Meal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattsangi, Prem D.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes a straight-forward and relatively inexpensive method for routine isolation of purified soybean agglutinin, suitable for use as a starting material in most studies, especially for fluorescent-labeling experiments. The process is used as a project to provide advanced laboratory training at a two-year college. (Author/JN)

  11. Diagnosis and treatment of cold agglutinin mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn; Tjønnfjord, Geir E

    2012-05-01

    Exact diagnosis of the subtype has essential therapeutic consequences in autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Cold-antibody types include primary chronic cold agglutinin disease (CAD) and rare cases of cold agglutinin syndrome (CAS) secondary to cancer or acute infection. Primary CAD is a clonal lymphoproliferative disorder. Not all patients require pharmacological therapy, but treatment seems indicated more often than previously thought. Corticosteroids should not be used to treat primary CAD. Half of the patients respond to rituximab monotherapy; median response duration is 11 months. The most efficient treatment to date is fludarabine and rituximab in combination, resulting in responses in 75%, complete responses in 20% and median response duration of more than 66 months. Toxicity may be a concern, and an individualized approach is discussed. Erythrocyte transfusions can be given provided specific precautions are undertaken. No evidence-based therapy exists in secondary CAS, but optimal treatment of the underlying disorder is essential when feasible.

  12. [Cold agglutinins with new specificity against type 2 chains].

    PubMed

    Hack, H; Kreft, H; Roelcke, D

    1994-01-01

    Two examples of IgM lambda cold agglutinins (CA) with a new specificity are characterized. 1. CAs ZI and BR react with newborn as well as with adult red cells. 2. Both CAs react with I- and i-active animal red cells. 3. The CAs are inhibited by linear and branched type 2 chains. 4. Endo-beta-galactosidase, splitting type 2 chains from human red cells, abolishes reactivity of both CAs. Both CAs recognize linear as well as branched type 2 chains.

  13. Cold agglutinin disease in sepsis: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Ravinder; Kukar, Neetu; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Kaur, Shaminder

    2015-01-01

    Cold agglutinin disease (CAgD) is a type of autoimmune hemolytic anemia which generally occurs in adults and is characterized by the presence of IgM antibodies directed against polysaccharide antigens on red blood cell surface. A 16-year-old male, having clinical picture of sepsis and anemia, presented to the Emergency Department of our Institute in an Hemodynamically unstable condition. Investigation profile revealed hemolysis due to CAgD, which responded to corticosteroids, antibiotics and supportive treatment. This case highlights the importance of recognizing this entity in such type of cases presenting with sepsis and anemia. PMID:26229347

  14. Occurrence and characterization of lympho-agglutinins in Indian plants.

    PubMed

    Arora, J S; Sandhu, R S; Kamboj, S S; Chopra, S K

    1987-01-01

    Lympho-agglutinins have been detected and characterized in 31 plant species. Out of these, 14 agglutinated only the neuraminidase-treated cells. The lectin-rich genera included Crotalaria and Erythrina (Fabaceae), Amaranthus (Amaranthaceae), Artocarpus (Moraceae) and Clerodendron (Verbenaceae). The new lectins varied in their potency and biological action spectra. The 3 Artocarpus species were found to be exceptionally potent and specific for melibiose, an alpha-D-galactoside. Among the most effective sugar inhibitors for other lectins were N-acetyl-galactosamine, lactose, galactose and asialofetuin/fetuin.

  15. The Urtica dioica Agglutinin Is a Complex Mixture of Isolectins.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Broekaert, W F; Peumans, W J

    1988-02-01

    Rhizomes of stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) contain a complex mixture of isolectins. Ion exchange chromatography with a high resolution fast protein liquid chromatography system revealed six isoforms which exhibit identical agglutination properties and carbohydrate-binding specificity and in addition have the same molecular structure and virtually identical biochemical properties. However, since the U. dioica agglutinin isolectins differ definitely with respect to their amino acid composition, it is likely that at least some of them are different polypeptides coded for by different genes. PMID:16665952

  16. Biogenesis and fate of the cell-cell adhesion molecule, agglutinin, during gametogenesis and fertilization of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Hunnicutt, G.R.

    1989-01-01

    Fertilization in Chlamydomonas begins with the species-specific recognition and adhesion between gametes of opposite mating types via agglutinin molecules on the flagellar surface. This adhesion generates a cAMP-mediated sexual signal that initiates the subsequent events of call wall release, mating structure activation, and cell fusion. Although flagella of paired gametes remain attached to each other until the zygote forms, the process is dynamic. Engaged agglutinins rapidly become inactivated and turnover, requiring the constant supply of new agglutinins to replace the lost molecules. A population of cell body associated agglutinins has been postulated to the pool of agglutinins recruited during this turnover. Cell body agglutinins, therefore were identified, purified, localized within the cells and compared to flagellar agglutinins. The relationship between these two agglutinin populations was also examined. Cell body agglutinins were biochemically indistinguishable from the flagellar form with respect to their M{sub r}, sedimentation coefficient, and hydrophobicity elution properties. Functionally, however, these molecules were inactive in situ. The calculated surface density of agglutinins in the cell body and flagellar domains was similar and thus could not explain their functional difference, but two domains contiguous and yet distinctive suggested they may be separated by a functional barrier. To test this, a method was developed, using a monoclonal antibody and cycloheximide, that removed the flagellar agglutinins so movement between the domains could be monitored. Mobilization of agglutinins onto the flagella did not occur unless sexual signaling was induced with cAMP and papaverine.

  17. Cold-agglutinin hemolytic diseases, a rheo-optical study.

    PubMed

    Plá, Laura Verónica; Stoltz, Jean François; Valverde, Juana R; Riquelme, Bibiana D

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the strength of red blood cells agglutination, induced by autoantibodies in patients with Cold-Agglutinin Hemolytic Disease (CAHD), and the hemorheological profile (deformability and osmotic fragility) by the utilization of rheo-optical techniques. The strength of the antigen-antibody reaction was approached by the work required to dissociate mechanically red blood cells agglutinates. It is focused on the evaluation of the qualitative adhesiveness of cell approached by the dissociation kinetics carried out in a Couette flow (erythroaggregameter). The analysis was performed by recording the increase of the reflectivity signal as the agglutinates are dissociated by shear into smaller ones. A total of eight patients aged <54 years with recent diagnostic of CAHD detected by positive Direct Anti-globulin Test (DAT) and very low RBC counts at 20 degrees C, were studied. Two parametric values were interesting: the dimensionless energy parameter and the characteristic dissociation time, which showed good correlation with hematological parameters. In conclusion, the dissociation method provides a powerful tool for estimating the qualitative adhesiveness of red blood cells agglutinated by autoantibodies in patients suffering of cold-agglutinin hemolytic disease and it would be very interesting to evaluate the severity of the disease. PMID:18198409

  18. Glucocorticoid-Responsive Cold Agglutinin Disease in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Honne, Kyoko; Nagashima, Takao; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Kamesaki, Toyomi; Minota, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old man with rheumatoid arthritis developed severe anemia during treatment with adalimumab plus methotrexate. Cold agglutinin disease was diagnosed because haptoglobin was undetectable, cold agglutinin was positive (1 : 2048), and the direct Coombs test was positive (only to complement). Although the cold agglutinin titer was normalized (1 : 64) after treatment with prednisolone (0.7 mg/kg/day for two weeks), the patient's hemoglobin did not increase above 8 g/dL. When cold agglutinins were reexamined using red blood cells suspended in bovine serum albumin, the titer was still positive at 1 : 1024. Furthermore, the cold agglutinin had a wide thermal amplitude, since the titer was 1 : 16 at 30°C and 1 : 1 at 37°C. This suggested that the cold agglutinin would show pathogenicity even at body temperature. After the dose of prednisolone was increased to 1 mg/kg/day, the patient's hemoglobin rapidly returned to the normal range. The thermal amplitude test using red blood cells suspended in bovine serum albumin is more sensitive than the standard test for detecting pathogenic cold agglutinins. PMID:26346552

  19. Bacterial agglutinin activity in the saliva of human identical and fraternal twins.

    PubMed

    Malamud, D; Christensen, C M; Navazesh, M; Davis, C

    1988-01-01

    The major factor in human saliva responsible for the specific aggregation of oral streptococci is a high molecular-weight glycoprotein (agglutinin). To determine if the level of this glycoprotein in whole and parotid saliva was genetically determined, agglutinin activity for Streptococcus sanguis and Streptococcus mutans in saliva obtained from identical and fraternal twins was compared. Evidence for the heritability of agglutinin activity and also parotid flow rate and total protein was obtained. There was no evidence for a significant genetic contribution to salivary sodium concentration.

  20. Characterization of Ricin and R. communis Agglutinin Reference Materials.

    PubMed

    Worbs, Sylvia; Skiba, Martin; Söderström, Martin; Rapinoja, Marja-Leena; Zeleny, Reinhard; Russmann, Heiko; Schimmel, Heinz; Vanninen, Paula; Fredriksson, Sten-Åke; Dorner, Brigitte G

    2015-11-26

    Ricinus communis intoxications have been known for centuries and were attributed to the toxic protein ricin. Due to its toxicity, availability, ease of preparation, and the lack of medical countermeasures, ricin attracted interest as a potential biological warfare agent. While different technologies for ricin analysis have been established, hardly any universally agreed-upon "gold standards" are available. Expert laboratories currently use differently purified in-house materials, making any comparison of accuracy and sensitivity of different methods nearly impossible. Technically challenging is the discrimination of ricin from R. communis agglutinin (RCA120), a less toxic but highly homologous protein also contained in R. communis. Here, we established both highly pure ricin and RCA120 reference materials which were extensively characterized by gel electrophoresis, liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI MS/MS), and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight approaches as well as immunological and functional techniques. Purity reached >97% for ricin and >99% for RCA120. Different isoforms of ricin and RCA120 were identified unambiguously and distinguished by LC-ESI MS/MS. In terms of function, a real-time cytotoxicity assay showed that ricin is approximately 300-fold more toxic than RCA120. The highly pure ricin and RCA120 reference materials were used to conduct an international proficiency test.

  1. Characterization of Ricin and R. communis Agglutinin Reference Materials.

    PubMed

    Worbs, Sylvia; Skiba, Martin; Söderström, Martin; Rapinoja, Marja-Leena; Zeleny, Reinhard; Russmann, Heiko; Schimmel, Heinz; Vanninen, Paula; Fredriksson, Sten-Åke; Dorner, Brigitte G

    2015-12-01

    Ricinus communis intoxications have been known for centuries and were attributed to the toxic protein ricin. Due to its toxicity, availability, ease of preparation, and the lack of medical countermeasures, ricin attracted interest as a potential biological warfare agent. While different technologies for ricin analysis have been established, hardly any universally agreed-upon "gold standards" are available. Expert laboratories currently use differently purified in-house materials, making any comparison of accuracy and sensitivity of different methods nearly impossible. Technically challenging is the discrimination of ricin from R. communis agglutinin (RCA120), a less toxic but highly homologous protein also contained in R. communis. Here, we established both highly pure ricin and RCA120 reference materials which were extensively characterized by gel electrophoresis, liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI MS/MS), and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight approaches as well as immunological and functional techniques. Purity reached >97% for ricin and >99% for RCA120. Different isoforms of ricin and RCA120 were identified unambiguously and distinguished by LC-ESI MS/MS. In terms of function, a real-time cytotoxicity assay showed that ricin is approximately 300-fold more toxic than RCA120. The highly pure ricin and RCA120 reference materials were used to conduct an international proficiency test. PMID:26703723

  2. Characterization of Ricin and R. communis Agglutinin Reference Materials

    PubMed Central

    Worbs, Sylvia; Skiba, Martin; Söderström, Martin; Rapinoja, Marja-Leena; Zeleny, Reinhard; Russmann, Heiko; Schimmel, Heinz; Vanninen, Paula; Fredriksson, Sten-Åke; Dorner, Brigitte G.

    2015-01-01

    Ricinus communis intoxications have been known for centuries and were attributed to the toxic protein ricin. Due to its toxicity, availability, ease of preparation, and the lack of medical countermeasures, ricin attracted interest as a potential biological warfare agent. While different technologies for ricin analysis have been established, hardly any universally agreed-upon “gold standards” are available. Expert laboratories currently use differently purified in-house materials, making any comparison of accuracy and sensitivity of different methods nearly impossible. Technically challenging is the discrimination of ricin from R. communis agglutinin (RCA120), a less toxic but highly homologous protein also contained in R. communis. Here, we established both highly pure ricin and RCA120 reference materials which were extensively characterized by gel electrophoresis, liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI MS/MS), and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight approaches as well as immunological and functional techniques. Purity reached >97% for ricin and >99% for RCA120. Different isoforms of ricin and RCA120 were identified unambiguously and distinguished by LC-ESI MS/MS. In terms of function, a real-time cytotoxicity assay showed that ricin is approximately 300-fold more toxic than RCA120. The highly pure ricin and RCA120 reference materials were used to conduct an international proficiency test. PMID:26703723

  3. Differential agglutination by soybean agglutinin of human leukemia and neuroblastoma cell lines: potential application to autologous bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Reisner, Y

    1983-11-01

    Normal human bone marrow cells were mixed with radioactively labeled tumor cells from different leukemia and neuroblastoma cell lines, and the cell mixtures were separated by differential agglutination with soybean agglutinin. It is shown that the cell fraction unagglutinated by soybean agglutinin, which was previously found to be capable of reconstituting the hematopoietic system of lethally irradiated recipients, can be purged of tumor cells with varying efficiency depending on the tumor cell expression of soybean agglutinin receptors as detected by flow cytofluorimetry with fluoresceinated soybean agglutinin.

  4. Transient cold agglutinins associated with Mycoplasma cynos pneumonia in a dog.

    PubMed

    Pinkos, Alyssa C; Friedrichs, Kristen R; Monaghan, Kelly N; Sample, Saundra H; Trepanier, Lauren A

    2015-12-01

    This report details a case of reversible cold agglutinins in a dog with Mycoplasma cynos pneumonia. An 11-month-old female spayed Rhodesian Ridgeback was presented for lethargy and cough. Thoracic radiographs revealed an alveolar pattern present bilaterally in the cranioventral lung lobes. Septic neutrophilic inflammation with suspected Mycoplasma sp. organisms was noted on cytologic examination of a trans-tracheal wash, and the dog was treated empirically with IV ampicillin/sulbactam and enrofloxacin pending culture results. Red blood cell agglutination was noted unexpectedly on several blood film reviews during hospitalization; however, the dog never developed clinical or laboratory evidence of hemolysis. Cold agglutinins were demonstrated based on the results of a saline dilution and cold agglutinin test that showed agglutination at 4°C but not at room temperature (21°C) or 37°C. Based on a positive culture for M cynos, the dog was treated for 8 weeks with oral enrofloxacin. After clinical and radiographic resolution of the pneumonia, repeated saline dilution and cold agglutinin tests of peripheral blood were negative at all temperatures. Reversible, asymptomatic cold agglutinins are common in human patients with mycoplasma pneumonia, but this is the first reported case in a dog.

  5. Urtica dioica agglutinin. A superantigenic lectin from stinging nettle rhizome.

    PubMed

    Galelli, A; Truffa-Bachi, P

    1993-08-15

    Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) is an unusual plant lectin that differs from all other known plant lectins with respect to its molecular structure and its extremely low specific agglutination activity. We recently reported that this small lectin (8.5 kDa) is a T cell mitogen distinguishable from classical T cell lectin mitogens by its ability to discriminate a particular population of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells as well as its capacity to induce an original pattern of T cell activation and cytokine production. The mechanism by which UDA activates T cells was investigated and compared with the conventional T cell mitogen Con A and the known superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin B. Our data show that T cell proliferation induced by UDA is strictly dependent on AC expressing MHC class II molecules but is not MHC restricted. This proliferation can be partially inhibited by anti-I-A or anti-I-E mAb and completely blocked by a mAb recognizing monomorphic determinants on the Ia molecule. UDA indeed binds to specific carbohydrate structures present on class II molecules. UDA-induced T cell stimulation is dependent on TCR recognition of the unprocessed intact molecule in association with various Ia molecules. T cell response to UDA is clonally expressed and correlates with particular TCR V beta gene families usage. This stimulation leads to a sixfold enrichment of V beta 8.3+ T cells within 3 days. Therefore, UDA appears to use the same molecular mechanism as structurally unrelated bacterial or retroviral superantigens and we propose that this lectin is a superantigen. UDA, which is not a pathogenicity factor, could provide a useful probe for the analysis of T cell activation by superantigens. PMID:8345184

  6. Mechanism of neutrophil chemiluminescence induced by wheat germ agglutinin: partial characterization of the antigens recognized by wheat germ agglutinin

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, Y.; Iwata, J.; Ohashi, T.

    1984-11-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) stimulated neutrophils to produce significant levels of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL). Since WGA is known to bind N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) oligomers and N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA), we attempted to determine which binding property of WGA is essential for induction of CL. The succinylated form of WGA (SuWGA), which is no longer able to bind NANA, was still able to induce CL. N-Acetylglucosamine at a concentration of 20 mmol/L almost completely inhibited WGA-induced CL production by neutrophils, whereas bovine submaxillary gland mucin, a potent blocker of NANA binding of WGA, failed to inhibit CL production. Lectins with the GlcNAc-binding property were examined for their ability to induce CL. Those that have higher valences and have a tendency to bind GlcNAc oligomers in the internal portion of glycoconjugates were able to induce CL, whereas those that have low valences and bind terminal GlcNAc of glycoconjugates failed to induce CL even at high concentrations. Attempts were made to characterize the neutrophil membrane proteins recognized by WGA. Glycoproteins with a molecular weight of 25,000 daltons were identified by a 50 mmol/L GlcNAc elution of WGA gels loaded with /sup 125/I-labeled neutrophil membrane proteins. Elution with 500 mumol/L GlcNAc trimer produced several glycoproteins of different molecular weights in addition to the glycoproteins of 25,000 daltons. /sup 125/I-labeled WGA and SuWGA were used for autoradiographic analysis of cell extracts of the neutrophils separated on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels. WGA recognized multiple glycoproteins of different molecular weights, whereas SuWGA bound only a few of them. Glycoproteins of 25,000 daltons, probably corresponding to those identified by 50 mmol/L GlcNAc elution, were also recognized.

  7. Postoperative Recurrence of Invasive Thymoma with Cold Agglutinin Disease and Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Taro; Koba, Hayato; Tanimura, Kota; Ogawa, Naohiko; Watanabe, Satoshi; Hara, Johsuke; Abo, Miki; Sone, Takashi; Kimura, Hideharu; Kasahara, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man presented to our hospital in 1995. Invasive thymoma was diagnosed and extended thymectomy and left upper lobe partial resection were performed. In 2013, he complained of dyspnea. Chest computed tomography showed postoperative recurrence of invasive thymoma. Several chemotherapies were administered. Severe anemia and an increase in the total bilirubin level were observed with chemotherapies. In additional, an examination showed that the direct Coombs test was positive. Cold agglutinin was also high. We herein experienced a rare case of postoperative recurrence of invasive thymoma with cold agglutinin disease and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. PMID:27629968

  8. Bentall Surgery in a Patient with Cold Agglutinin and Antiphospholipid Antibody: Double Trouble.

    PubMed

    Raut, Monish S; Rohra, Gulshan; Shivnani, Ganesh; Maheshwari, Arun; Dubey, Sumir; Bhathiwal, Rajpal Singh; Sharma, Deevakar

    2016-06-01

    Cold agglutinin disease is an uncommon disease with potential to cause hemolysis and thrombosis during hypothermic cardiac surgery. Antiphospholipid syndrome is also rare disease with hypercoagulation tendacy. Perioperative management of both these diseases is challenging. We present successful perioperative management of high risk Bentall surgery in patient with both these dreadful diseases. PMID:27578899

  9. Isolation and characterization of agglutinins from the hemolymph of an acorn barnacle, Megabalanus volcano.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, H; Muramoto, K; Goto, R

    1987-01-01

    Two agglutinins, MVA-1 and MVA-2, were isolated from the hemolymph of the acorn barnacle, Megabalanus volcano. They agglutinated human erythrocytes irrespective of the ABO blood group and also rabbit and sheep blood cells. Lactose and fetuin strongly inhibited the hemagglutinating activity. D-galactose, D-arabinose and N-acetylneuraminic acid were also moderate inhibitors. In sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, both MVA-1 and MVA-2 gave a single band corresponding to 38,000 daltons. It split into one major band with a molecular weight of 23,000 in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol. The two agglutinins showed the same apparent molecular weight of 116,000 by gel filtration. In isoelectric focusing MVA-1 showed one band at pH 4.8, whereas MVA-2 gave a main band at pH 4.4 with few faint ones in the range between pH 4.0 and 4.8. The agglutinins were glycoproteins containing D-mannose and L-fucose as carbohydrate components. No precipitation reaction was observed in Ouchterlony immuno-diffusion tests using rabbit antisera against the agglutinins from the phylogenetically related Megabalanus rosa.

  10. Analysis of castor by ELISAs that distinguish Ricin and Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To facilitate the analysis of castor (Ricinus communis L.) seed fractions and germplasm for ricin content, we investigated the use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods to differentiate between ricin toxin and the related Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA). Both proteins are based on ...

  11. Structure of the Chlamydomonas agglutinin and related flagellar surface proteins in vitro and in situ

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Using the quick-freeze, deep-etch technique, we compare the structure of the cane-shaped plus and minus sexual agglutinin molecules purified from gametes of Chlamydomonas reinhardi. We also describe the structure of three additional gamete-specific fibrillar molecules, called short canes, loops, and crescents, which are structurally related to the agglutinins. Four non-agglutinating mutant strains are found to produce the three latter fibrils but not canes, supporting our identification of the cane-shaped molecule as the agglutinin. The heads of the plus and minus canes are shown to differ in morphology. Moreover, two treatments that inactivate the plus agglutinin in vitro--thermolysin digestion and disulfide reduction/alkylation--bring about detectable structural changes only in the head domain of the cane, suggesting that the head may play an indispensible role in affecting gametic recognition/adhesion. We also present quick-freeze, deep-etch images of the flagellar surfaces of gametic, vegetative, and mutant cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardi. The gametic flagella are shown to carry the canes, short canes, loops, and crescents present in in vitro preparations. The cane and crescent proteins self-associate on the flagellar surface into stout fibers of uniform caliber, and they align along the longitudinal axis of the flagellum. The short canes and loops co-purify with flagella but, in the presence of mica, dissociate so that they lie to the sides of the flagella. The agglutinin canes of both mating types are oriented with their hooks at the membrane surface and their heads directed outward, where they are positioned to participate in the initial events of sexual agglutination. PMID:4030899

  12. Isotype and antigen specificity of pertussis agglutinins following whole-cell pertussis vaccination and infection with Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Mink, C M; O'Brien, C H; Wassilak, S; Deforest, A; Meade, B D

    1994-01-01

    Elevated agglutinin titers have been shown to correlate with protection from disease following whole-cell pertussis vaccination, but the isotype and antigen specificity of human agglutinating antibodies is unknown. In 13 immunoassays, immunoglobulin G antifimbria antibodies had the strongest correlation with agglutinin titers following culture-proven infection with Bordetella pertussis (R' = 0.79; P < 0.0001) and following whole-cell pertussis vaccination (R' = 0.87, P < 0.0001). PMID:7509316

  13. Differentiation of coagulase-positive and coagulase-negative staphylococci by lectins and plant agglutinins.

    PubMed

    Davidson, S K; Keller, K F; Doyle, R J

    1982-04-01

    The screening of staphylococci with a panel of 14 lectins and extracts demonstrating lectin-like activity led to the development of a rapid agglutination slide test for the differentiation of certain coagulase-negative staphylococci and human strains of Staphylococcus aureus. The coagulase-negative staphylococci were agglutinated by agglutinins from Mangifera indica, Triticum vulgaris, and crude Limulus polyphemus. The test is rapid, requiring only 5 to 15 min to identify an unknown strain of staphylococci, as opposed to the 4 to 16 h required to perform the conventional tube coagulase test.

  14. Cold agglutinin disease in fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma: a rare association with a rare cancer variant.

    PubMed

    Al-Matham, Khalid; Alabed, Iehab; Zaidi, Syed Z A; Qushmaq, Khalid A

    2011-01-01

    Cold agglutinin disease (CAD) is a rare autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Although it can occur secondary to lymphoproliferative disorders and autoimmune or infectious diseases, CAD is rarely reported as secondary to solid tumors. We report a case of a woman aged 18 years diagnosed with a well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma of the fibrolamellar subtype, who was shown to have CAD also. Her general condition, including CAD, improved after targeted therapy with sorafenib for the hepatocellular carcinoma and only conservative measures for the CAD that consisted of avoidance of cold. In summary, although it is an extremely rare association and less common than lymphoproliferative disorders, CAD can be associated with solid tumors. PMID:21293066

  15. Insect erythrocyte agglutinins. In vitro opsonization experiments with Clitumnus extradentatus and Periplaneta americana haemocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rowley, A F; Ratcliffe, N A

    1980-01-01

    The effect of naturally occurring haemagglutinins on the in vitro phagocytosis of sheep erythrocytes by the blood cells (haemocytes) of Clitumnus extradentatus and Periplaneta americana was studied. The results showed that the haemagglutinins in both species failed to act as opsonins. Indeed, in some instances, incubation of erythrocytes in haemolymph resulted in less avid ingestion as compared with the saline-incubated controls. This reduced phagocytosis was probably caused by the clumping of erythrocytes on the haemocyte monolayers, leaving fewer single red cells available for uptake. The possible roles of these erythrocyte agglutinins in the host defence systems of insects are discussed. Images Figures 1-3 Figures 6-7 PMID:7000682

  16. Differentiation of coagulase-positive and coagulase-negative staphylococci by lectins and plant agglutinins.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, S K; Keller, K F; Doyle, R J

    1982-01-01

    The screening of staphylococci with a panel of 14 lectins and extracts demonstrating lectin-like activity led to the development of a rapid agglutination slide test for the differentiation of certain coagulase-negative staphylococci and human strains of Staphylococcus aureus. The coagulase-negative staphylococci were agglutinated by agglutinins from Mangifera indica, Triticum vulgaris, and crude Limulus polyphemus. The test is rapid, requiring only 5 to 15 min to identify an unknown strain of staphylococci, as opposed to the 4 to 16 h required to perform the conventional tube coagulase test. PMID:7068834

  17. Candida albicans-induced agglutinin and immunoglobulin E responses in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Winterrowd, G E; Cutler, J E

    1983-01-01

    Mice varied in their ability to make detectable antibody responses to cell surface determinants of Candida albicans depending upon the antigen preparation and the immunization schedule used. Immunoglobulin M (IgM) appeared to be the major class of antibody responsible for the C. albicans-agglutinating activity of the immune sera. Various inbred strains of mice injected with a ribosomal fraction from C. albicans produced a low titer (average, 4 to 8) of yeast cell agglutinins and a higher titer (64 to 512) of IgE antibodies detected by passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) in rats. The two kinds of antibodies appeared to be specific for different antigens because the agglutinin, but not IgE, could be removed by absorbing the serum with a polysaccharide from the cell wall of C. albicans, but the polysaccharide did not provoke the PCA reaction. C. albicans-specific IgE antibodies showed cross-reactivity (PCA) with ribosomal antigens from a strain of C. albicans and C. tropicalis, but PCA reactions could not be elicited with similar antigen preparations from other yeast species. IgE responses were also detected in over 20% of the mice infected intravenously or intraperitoneally with live C. albicans. PMID:6190755

  18. Two cases of primary cold agglutinin disease associated with megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Imashuku, Shinsaku; Kudo, Naoko; Takagishi, Katsushige; Saigo, Katsuyasu

    2015-01-01

    We report two cases of primary cold agglutinin disease (CAD) associated with megaloblastic anemia in Japanese elderly patients. Case 1 was a 67-year-old male and Case 2 was a 55-year-old male. Both patients were diagnosed with primary CAD, with continuously high cold agglutinin titers (1 : >8,192 and 1 : 16,834, resp.), monoclonal IgM-kappa light chains, and no underlying disease. In addition, both patients had megaloblastic anemia due to vitamin B12 deficiency. One patient received rituximab and both received vitamin 12 supplementation. To date, no cooccurrence of primary CAD and megaloblastic anemia has been emphasized. Thus, the association of these hematological diseases may be incidental; however, given that CAD is an autoimmune disease which may show antibodies against intrinsic factor and gastric parietal cells, this association was thought to be probably not a coincidence. Clinicians should be aware of the possible simultaneous presence of autoimmune hemolytic/megaloblastic anemia in patients with primary CAD. PMID:25918651

  19. A chromophore-containing agglutinin from Haliclona manglaris: purification and biochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Rômulo Farias; de Almeida, Alexandra Sampaio; de Melo, Arthur Alves; de Alencar, Daniel Barroso; de Sousa, Oscarina Viana; Delatorre, Plínio; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Saker-Sampaio, Silvana; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Sampaio, Alexandre Holanda

    2015-01-01

    A new chromophore-containing agglutinin (Haliclona manglaris agglutinin (HMA)) was isolated from the tropical sponge H. manglaris. HMA was purified by a combination of hydrophobic interaction chromatography and ion exchange chromatography. Native HMA is a heterotrimer formed by two β-chains (15 kDa) and one α-chain (22 kDa). HMA is a glycoprotein and possesses three intrachain disulfide bonds. Hemagglutinating activity of HMA was stable at neutral pH and temperatures up to 60 °C. HMA was only inhibited by thyroglobulin. Mass spectrometry sequencing and Edman degradation revealed a unique amino acid sequence of about 30%. Moreover, HMA has an organic chromophore of 581 Da, and this characteristic seems to be important to its antioxidant activity. Interestingly, while HMA showed no toxicity against Artemia nauplii and was unable to agglutinate bacterial cells, it did show a high capacity to protect β-carotene against oxidation. Thus, our findings suggest the putative involvement of HMA in the protection of the sponge against oxidation. PMID:25312602

  20. A pathway for cell wall anchorage of Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha-agglutinin.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, C F; Kurjan, J; Lipke, P N

    1994-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha-agglutinin is a cell wall-anchored adhesion glycoprotein. The previously identified 140-kDa form, which contains a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor (D. Wojciechowicz, C.-F. Lu, J. Kurjan, and P. N. Lipke, Mol. Cell. Biol. 13:2554-2563, 1993), and additional forms of 80, 150, 250 to 300, and > 300 kDa had the properties of intermediates in a transport and cell wall anchorage pathway. N glycosylation and additional modifications resulted in successive increases in size during transport. The 150- and 250- to 300-kDa forms were membrane associated and are likely to be intermediates between the 140-kDa form and a cell surface GPI-anchored form of > 300 kDa. A soluble form of > 300 kDa that lacked the GPI anchor had properties of a periplasmic intermediate between the plasma membrane form and the > 300-kDa cell wall-anchored form. These results constitute experimental support for the hypothesis that GPI anchors act to localize alpha-agglutinin to the plasma membrane and that cell wall anchorage involves release from the GPI anchor to produce a periplasmic intermediate followed by linkage to the cell wall. Images PMID:8007981

  1. Enrichment for CFU-C from murine and human bone marrow using soybean agglutinin

    SciTech Connect

    Reisner, Y.; Kapoor, N.; Hodes, M.Z.; O'Reilly, R.J.; Good, R.A.

    1982-02-01

    Mouse bone marrow and spleen cells agglutinated by soybean agglutinin (SBA) or peanut agglutinin (PNA) were previously shown to be enriched for spleen colony-forming cells (CFU-S) and sufficiently depleted of graft-versus-host reaction producing cells to allow hematologic reconstitution of lethally irradiated allogeneic recipient mice. A similar enrichment for cells capable of forming colonies in soft agar culture (CFU-C) has now been found in the SBA-agglutinated fraction of mouse bone marrow cells, in contrast to the finding that in human bone marrow the majority of the CFU-C are in the fraction not agglutinated by SBA. Cytofluorometric studies with fluorescein-labeled SBA (FITC-SBA) revealed that the majority of both mouse and human bone marrow cells bind the lectin. Experiments mixing the human marrow fractions separated by SBA reveal that true enrichment for CFU-C is achieved in the unagglutinated fraction, as opposed to a possible depletion of a suppressor cell population. Granulocytic, monocytic, and mixed cell colonies were all enriched in the SBA-unagglutinated cell fraction from human bone marrow.

  2. Anti-j: human cold agglutinins recognizing linear (i) and branched (I) type 2 chains.

    PubMed

    Roelcke, D; Kreft, H; Hack, H; Stevenson, F K

    1994-01-01

    Two IgM lambda cold agglutinins (CAs) reacted with protease- and sialidase-resistant antigens expressed in equal strength on human adult (I), newborn (i), i adult, rabbit (I) and rhesus monkey (i) erythrocytes. The antibodies were inhibited by the linear type 2 sequence lacto-N-neotetraose and the branched type 2 sequence lacto-N-neohexaose. Endo-beta-galactosidase treatment of red cells, which splits type 2 chains from the surface, abolished CA reactivity. The CAs expressed the idiotype recognized by the anti-idiotype 9G4 specific for anti-I and anti-i CAs. The data suggest that the two CAs recognize linear (i) as well as branched (I) type 2 chains. It is proposed to term these CAs anti-j.

  3. IgA cold agglutinins recognize Pr and Sa antigens expressed on glycophorins.

    PubMed

    Roelcke, D; Hack, H; Kreft, H; MacDonald, B; Pereira, A; Habibi, B

    1993-06-01

    Three cases of IgA kappa cold agglutinins (CAs) were studied. One had anti-Pr1 specificity, one had anti-Pra, and one had anti-Sa. The CAs recognize O-glycans of glycophorins. The findings supplement previous data on anti-Pr1 specificities of four IgA kappa CAs. Because all IgA kappa CAs described recognize O-glycans of glycophorins, a close association between the CA IgA isotype and specificities for O-glycans becomes apparent. It is unlikely, however, that the striking association reflects interrelations between IgA CA structure and specificity, because anti-Sa specificity and all anti-Pr subspecificities were originally defined with IgM CAs.

  4. Expression of Monstera deliciosa agglutinin gene (mda) in tobacco confers resistance to peach-potato aphids.

    PubMed

    Kai, Guoyin; Ji, Qian; Lu, Yang; Qian, Zhongying; Cui, Lijie

    2012-08-01

    The aphid is one of the most serious pests that causes damage to crops worldwide. Lectins from Araceae plant had been proved useful to control the aphid. Herein, the full-length cDNA of Monstera deliciosa agglutinin (mda) gene was cloned and then introduced into tobacco and the influence of the expression of mda in transgenic tobacco against peach-potato aphids (Myzus persicae) was investigated. Among 92 regenerated plants, 59 positive tobacco lines were obtained. Real-time PCR assays and aphid bioassay test revealed that there is a positive correlation between the expression level of mda and the inhibitory effect on peach-potato aphids. The average anti-pests ability of mda transgenic tobacco was 74%, which was higher than that of other reported lectins from Araceae plant. These results indicated that MDA is one of promising insect resistance proteins selected for the control of peach-potato aphids.

  5. Wheat germ agglutinin as a counterstain for immunofluorescence studies of equine hoof lamellae.

    PubMed

    Clark, Robert K; Galantino-Homer, Hannah L

    2014-09-01

    Equine laminitis is a common, painful, debilitating condition of the hoof that is a leading cause of disability in horses, often necessitating euthanasia. The equine hoof represents an extreme evolutionary adaptation of an epidermal structure homologous to the human or murine nail units. Immunohistochemistry is frequently utilized in the study of the pathophysiology of laminitis. The complex, multilayered, extensively interdigitated epidermal-dermal lamellar interface renders precise interpretation of immunofluorescence localization difficult, especially when effective technique and reagents render non-reactive tissues completely dark. Fluorescent-conjugated wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) selectively labels dermal extracellular matrix fibres and epidermal cell membranes in tissue sections of horse hoof lamellae, is compatible with indirect immunofluorescence and augments interpretation of indirect immunofluorescence antigen localization. The current report details the use of WGA as a rapid, simple, economical counterstain for immunofluorescence studies of the equine hoof and may have application to other complex epidermal tissue structures. PMID:25040657

  6. Subunit unbinding mechanics of dimeric wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) studied by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Rehana; Ikai, Atsushi

    2014-11-28

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is an oligomeric lectin widely used as a model of sugar moieties in biochemistry. Subunit association is important for the crosslinking function of WGA, so we used atomic force microscopy to measure the subunit unbinding force of dimeric WGA. We found that the average unbinding force of dimeric WGA is ∼55 pN at ∼1 nN/s loading rate, whereas this unbinding force is increased at least up to 100 pN when WGA is bound to glycophorin A. Moreover, the dissociation rate constant of WGA was calculated to be 1–2 × 10(−2) s(−1), suggesting that dimer dissociation is relatively fast. PMID:25448988

  7. Novel dietary strategy for overcoming the antinutritional effects of soyabean whey of high agglutinin content.

    PubMed

    Pusztai, A; Grant, G; Bardocz, S; Gelencser, E; Hajos, G

    1997-06-01

    A diet-switching experiment, which aimed to improve the utilization of soyabean whey was carried out for 61 d with young rats. Feeding was arranged in such a way that after a few days on the soyabean diet, the rats were switched to a high-quality lactalbumin diet for a short period, after which the cycle was repeated several times. The weights of the rats at the end of the soyabean phases were significantly less than those of animals pair-fed on a high-quality diet throughout. However, the test group regained the weight loss after switching to the lactalbumin diet. After three cycles there were no significant differences between the weights of the test rats fed on a poor soyabean diet for over a third of the experiment and those fed on the lactalbumin diet throughout. Feed conversion was always significantly higher with test rats in the lactalbumin period than with continually pair-fed controls. Similarly, faecal N losses were significantly higher for test rats in the soyabean phase, but these differences disappeared after switching to the lactalbumin diet. At the end of the experiment there were no significant differences in body protein or lipids between the groups although the pancreas was significantly heavier while the liver was lighter in soyabean-fed rats. The high destruction of trypsin inhibitors in the gut suggests that they probably had little effect on protein digestion in the gut. In contrast, as selective depletion of the agglutinin from soyabean whey removed the nutritional benefit in the lactalbumin part of the cycle, the improved feed conversion in this period must have been the result mainly of the survival and functionality of soyabean agglutinin and the benefits due to the hyperplastic growth and faster renewal of the gut surface it induced. As processing is unnecessary, this novel method is cheap and can be easily adapted for the use of soyabean whey, regarded as a waste product. PMID:9227190

  8. Further characterization of the saccharide specificity of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Swamy, M J; Gupta, D; Mahanta, S K; Surolia, A

    1991-06-25

    2-Dansylamino-2-deoxy-D-galactose (GalNDns) has been shown to bind to peanut (Arachis hypogaea) agglutinin (PNA) in a saccharide-specific manner. This binding was accompanied by a five-fold increase in the fluorescence of GalNDns. The interaction was characterized by an association constant of 0.15 mM at 15 degrees and delta H and delta S values of -57.04 kJ.mol-1 and -118.1J.mol-1.K-1, respectively. Binding of a variety of other mono-, di- and oligo-saccharides to PNA, studied by monitoring their ability to dissociate the PNA GalNDns complex, revealed that PNA interacts with several T-antigen-related structures, such as beta-D-Galp-(1----3)-D-GalNAc, beta-D-Galp-(1----3)-alpha-D-GalpNAcOMe, and beta-D-Galp-(1----3)-alpha-D-GalpNAc-(1----3)-Ser, as well as the asialo-GM1 tetrasaccharide, with comparable affinity, thus showing that this lectin does not discriminate between saccharides in which the penultimate sugar of the beta-D-Galp-(1----3)-D-GalNAc unit is the alpha or beta anomer, in contrast to jacalin (Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin), another anti T-lectin which preferentially binds to beta-D-Galp-(1----3)-alpha-D-GalNAc and does not recognize beta-D-Galp-(1----3)-beta-D-GalNAc or the related asialo-GM1 oligosaccharide. These studies also indicated that, in the extended combining region of PNA which accommodates a disaccharide, the primary subsite (subsite A) is highly specific for D-galactose, whereas the secondary subsite (subsite B) is less specific and can accommodate various structures, such as D-galactose, 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-galactose, D-glucose, and 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose.

  9. Extensive cutaneous necrosis in a 12-year-old girl: an unusual complication of secondary cold agglutinin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Kirtisudha; Singla, Shilpy; Batra, Vineeta Vijay; Basu, Srikanta; Kumar, Praveen

    2013-12-01

    Cold agglutinin syndrome (CAS) secondary to infection is rare, usually presenting with anaemia and minor skin changes. A 12-year-old girl with secondary CAS associated with extensive cutaneous necrosis is reported. She presented with fever and multiple necrotic lesions over both cheeks, the tip of nose, ear margins, hands and buttocks, along with pallor, hepatospenomegaly, acrocyanosis and gangrene of the fifth digit of the right hand. She had anaemia, unconjugated hyperbilirubinaemia and a positive direct antiglobulin test owing to cold agglutinins of the IgM type with anti-i specificity and titres of 1:512 at 4°C. Results of bone marrow examination were normal and cryoglobulins were negative. Cold antibodies released even during a brief, self-limited febrile illness can cause widespread cutaneous gangrene. We believe this is the first report in the paediatric age group. PMID:24091086

  10. Agglutinins to Coxiella burnetii and Brucella spp, with particular reference to Brucella canis, in wild animals of southern Texas.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, A S; Kelly, V P; Baker, E F

    1977-11-01

    The prevalence of agglutinins to Coxiella burnetii and Brucella spp, particularly Brucella canis, was determined in 269 wild animals (14 species) in southern Texas. Serologic evidence of coxiellosis and brucellosis, including B canis infection, was shown for coyotes, raccoons, opossums, badgers, jackrabbits, and feral hogs. Using the microagglutination test, the seroprevalence of C burnetii, phases I and II (titer greater than or equal to 4) was 4.1 and 27.9%, respectively. For brucella agglutinins, prevalence rates were 7.1, 8.9, and 6.7%, as determined by the brucellosis card test, the rapid slide agglutination test, and the salt 2-mercaptoethanol tube agglutination (titer greater than or equal to 50) test, respectively.

  11. Large-scale production and purification of recombinant Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) expressed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Philippe; Harper, Karen; Raemaekers, Romaan J M; Durieux, Alain; Gatehouse, Angharad M R; Davies, Howard V; Taylor, Mark A

    2003-08-01

    The gene coding for agglutinin from Galanthus nivalis (GNA) was expressed in, and secreted by, the methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris. Transformants of P. pastoris were selected and a process to produce and purify gram quantities of recombinant GNA was developed. GNA was secreted at approximately 80 mg l(-1) at the 200 1 scale and was purified to 95% homogeneity using hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The recombinant protein was similar to the protein synthesised in plant with respect to structure and biological activity.

  12. Detachment of agglutinin-bonded red blood cells. III. Mechanical analysis for large contact areas.

    PubMed Central

    Berk, D.; Evans, E.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental method and analysis are introduced which provide direct quantitation of the strength of adhesive contact for large agglutinin-bonded regions between macroscopically smooth membrane capsules (e.g., red blood cells). The approach yields intrinsic properties for separation of adherent regions independent of mechanical deformation of the membrane capsules during detachment. Conceptually, the micromechanical method involves one rigid test-capsule surface (in the form of a perfect sphere) held fixed by a micropipette and a second deformable capsule maneuvered with another micropipette to force contact with the test capsule. Only the test capsule is bound with agglutinin so that the maximum number of cross-bridges can be formed without steric interference. Following formation of a large adhesion region by mechanical impingement, the deformable capsule is detached from the rigid capsule surface by progressive aspiration into the micropipette. For the particular case modeled here, the deformable capsule is assumed to be a red blood cell which is preswollen by slight osmotic hydration before the test. The caliber of the detachment pipette is chosen so that the capsule will form a smooth cylindrical "piston" inside the pipette as it is aspirated. Because of the high flexibility of the membrane, the capsule naturally seals against the tube wall by pressurization even though it does not adhere to the glass. This arrangement maintains perfect axial symmetry and prevents the membrane from folding or buckling. Hence, it is possible to rigorously analyze the mechanics of deformation of the cell body to obtain the crucial "transducer" relation between pipette suction force and the membrane tension applied directly at the perimeter of the adhesive contact. Further, the geometry of the cell throughout the detachment process is predicted which provides accurate specification of the contact angle theta c between surfaces at the perimeter of the contact. A full analysis

  13. Compact acid-induced state of Clitoria ternatea agglutinin retains its biological activity.

    PubMed

    Naeem, A; Saleemuddin, M; Khan, R H

    2009-10-01

    The effects of pH on Clitoria ternatea agglutinin (CTA) were studied by spectroscopy, size-exclusion chromatography, and by measuring carbohydrate specificity. At pH 2.6, CTA lacks well-defined tertiary structure, as seen by fluorescence and near-UV CD spectra. Far-UV CD spectra show retention of 50% native-like secondary structure. The mean residue ellipticity at 217 nm plotted against pH showed a transition around pH 4.0 with loss of secondary structure leading to the formation of an acid-unfolded state. This state is relatively less denatured than the state induced by 6 M guanidine hydrochloride. With a further decrease in pH, this unfolded state regains ~75% secondary structure at pH 1.2, leading to the formation of the A-state with native-like near-UV CD spectral features. Enhanced 8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonate binding was observed in A-state, indicating a "molten-globule" like conformation with exposed hydrophobic residues. Acrylamide quenching data exhibit reduced accessibility of quencher to tryptophan, suggesting a compact conformation at low pH. Size-exclusion chromatography shows the presence of a compact intermediate with hydrodynamic size corresponding to a monomer. Thermal denaturation of the native state was cooperative single-step transition and of the A-state was non-cooperative two-step transition. A-State regains 72% of the carbohydrate-binding activity. PMID:19916921

  14. Targeted systemic mesenchymal stem cell delivery using hyaluronate - wheat germ agglutinin conjugate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun Seop; Kong, Won Ho; Kim, Hyemin; Hahn, Sei Kwang

    2016-11-01

    A variety of receptors for hyaluronate (HA), a natural linear polysaccharide, were found in the body, which have been exploited as target sites for HA-based drug delivery systems. In this work, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were surface-modified with HA - wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) conjugate for targeted systemic delivery of MSCs to the liver. WGA was conjugated to HA by coupling reaction between aldehyde-modified HA and amine group of WGA. The conjugation of WGA to HA was corroborated by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and the successful surface modification of MSCs with HA-WGA conjugate was confirmed by confocal microscopy. The synthesized HA-WGA conjugate could be incorporated onto the cellular membrane by agglutinating the cell-associated carbohydrates. Fluorescent imaging for in vivo biodistribution visualized the targeted delivery of the HA-WGA/MSC complex to the liver after intravenous injection. This new strategy for targeted delivery of MSCs using HA-WGA conjugate might be successfully exploited for various regenerative medicines including cell therapy. PMID:27569867

  15. Wheat Germ Agglutinin Induces NADPH-Oxidase Activity in Human Neutrophils by Interaction with Mobilizable Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Anna

    1999-01-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), a lectin with specificity for N-acetylglucosamine and sialic acid, was investigated with respect to its ability to activate the NADPH-oxidase of in vivo-exudated neutrophils (obtained from a skin chamber), and the activity was compared to that of peripheral blood neutrophils. The exudate cells responded to WGA, by both releasing reactive oxygen species into the extracellular milieu and producing oxygen metabolites intracellularly. The peripheral blood cells were unresponsive. To mimic the in vivo-exuded neutrophils with regards to receptor exposure, peripheral blood neutrophils were induced to mobilize their granules and vesicles to varying degrees (in vitro priming), prior to challenge with WGA. The oxidative response to WGA increased with increasing levels of granule mobilization, and the receptor(s) could be shown to reside in the secretory vesicles and/or the gelatinase granules in resting neutrophils. Several WGA-binding glycoproteins were detected in subcellular fractions containing these organelles. The extra- and intracellular NADPH-oxidase responses showed differences in sialic acid dependency, indicating that these two responses are mediated by different receptor structures. PMID:10377127

  16. Bauhinia purprea agglutinin-modified liposomes for human prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Ikemoto, Keisuke; Shimizu, Kosuke; Ohashi, Kento; Takeuchi, Yoshihito; Shimizu, Motohiro; Oku, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Bauhinia purprea agglutinin (BPA) is a well-known lectin that recognizes galactosyl glycoproteins and glycolipids. In the present study, we firstly found that BPA bound to human prostate cancer specimens but not to normal prostate ones. Therefore, we sought to develop BPA-PEG-modified liposomes (BPA-PEG-LP) encapsulating anticancer drugs for the treatment of prostate cancer. We examined the tumor targetability of BPA-PEG-LP with human prostate cancer DU145 cells, and observed that fluorescently labeled BPA-PEG-LP dominantly associated with the cells via the interaction between liposome-surface BPA and cell-surface galactosyl molecules. We also observed that BPA-PEG-LP accumulated in the prostate cancer tissue after the i.v. injection to DU145 solid cancer-bearing mice, and strongly bound to the cancer cells. In a therapeutic study, DU145 solid cancer-bearing mice were i.v. injected thrice with BPA-PEG-LP encapsulating doxorubicin (BPA-PEG-LPDOX, 2 mg/kg/day as the DOX dosage) or PEG-modified liposomes encapsulating DOX (PEG-LPDOX). As a result, BPA-PEG-LPDOX significantly suppressed the growth of the DU145 cancer cells, whereas PEG-LPDOX at the same dosage as DOX showed little anti-cancer effect. The present study suggested that BPA-PEG-LP could be a useful drug carrier for the treatment of human prostate cancers. PMID:26495901

  17. Purification and partial characterization of an agglutinin from Octopus maya serum.

    PubMed

    Alpuche, Juan; Pereyra, Ali; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Agundis, Concepción; Rosas, Carlos; Zenteno, Edgar

    2010-05-01

    A 66-kDa lectin (OmA) was purified from the serum of the Yucatan peninsula endemic octopus (Octopus maya) by a single step affinity chromatography on glutaraldehyde-fixed stroma from rat erythrocytes. OmA corresponds to 0.8% of the total circulating protein in the hemolymph; it is composed of three equal subunits of 22kDa each, and 7.4% of linked carbohydrates. The amino acids' composition indicated that agglutinin contained mainly aspartic and glutamic acids, and cysteine and methionine were identified in minor proportion. OmA agglutinates mainly rat, guinea pig, and rabbit erythrocytes, and this activity is partially inhibited by galactosamine, melobiose, galacturonic acid, mannose, and methyl alpha and beta galactosides. Hemagglutinating activity is not dependent on divalent cations, such as Ca(2+), Mg(2+), or Mn(2+). The OmA subunits showed no identity for any lectin in databases but partial identity with the type A hemocyanin from Octopus dolfleini hemolymph; the main similarities are related to tyrosinase domains and copper A and B sites that conform to the oxygen-binding site of hemocyanin. PMID:20105460

  18. Molecular Mechanism Underlying the Entomotoxic Effect of Colocasia esculenta Tuber Agglutinin against Dysdercus cingulatus

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Amit; Das, Sampa

    2015-01-01

    Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA), a mannose binding lectin, exhibits insecticidal efficacy against different hemipteran pests. Dysdercus cingulatus, red cotton bug (RCB), has also shown significant susceptibility to CEA intoxication. However, the molecular basis behind such entomotoxicity of CEA has not been addressed adequately. The present study elucidates the mechanism of insecticidal efficacy of CEA against RCB. Confocal and scanning electron microscopic analyses documented CEA binding to insect midgut tissue, resulting in an alteration of perimicrovillar membrane (PMM) morphology. Internalization of CEA into insect haemolymph and ovary was documented by western blotting analyses. Ligand blot followed by mass spectrometric identification revealed the cognate binding partners of CEA as actin, ATPase and cytochrome P450. Deglycosylation and mannose inhibition assays indicated the interaction to probably be mannose mediated. Bioinformatic identification of putative glycosylation or mannosylation sites in the binding partners further supports the sugar mediated interaction. Correlating entomotoxicity of CEA with immune histological and binding assays to the insect gut contributes to a better understanding of the insecticidal potential of CEA and endorses its future biotechnological application.

  19. Anti-tumor and anti-viral activities of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-related lectins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Bao, Jin-Ku

    2013-04-01

    Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-related lectin family, a superfamily of strictly mannose-binding specific lectins widespread among monocotyledonous plants, is well-known to possess a broad range of biological functions such as anti-tumor, anti-viral and anti-fungal activities. Herein, we mainly focused on exploring the precise molecular mechanisms by which GNA-related lectins induce cancer cell apoptotic and autophagic death targeting mitochondria-mediated ROS-p38-p53 apoptotic or autophagic pathway, Ras-Raf and PI3K-Akt anti-apoptotic or anti-autophagic pathways. In addition, we further discussed the molecular mechanisms of GNA-related lectins exerting anti-viral activities by blocking the entry of the virus into its target cells, preventing transmission of the virus as well as forcing virus to delete glycan in its envelope protein and triggering neutralizing antibody. In conclusion, these findings may provide a new perspective of GNA-related lectins as potential drugs for cancer and virus therapeutics in the future.

  20. Identical homologs of the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin in Zea mays and Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Fouquaert, Elke; Peumans, Willy J; Gheysen, Godelieve; Van Damme, Els J M

    2011-01-01

    The structural domain corresponding to the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) is a mannose-binding motif that was originally discovered in plants but according to recent data also occurs in other eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Transcriptome analyses revealed that Fusarium verticillioides expresses a protein (FvGLLc1) identical to a recently identified cytoplasmic/nuclear GNA-like lectin from maize (ZmGLLc). The FvGLLc1 and ZmGLLc gene sequences are nearly identical in the coding region as well as in the intron and the 5 and 3 prime untranslated regions. However, whereas the Fusarium genome contains only a single gene with an intron, both an intronless and an intron containing lectin gene can be amplified from maize DNA. Southern blot analysis confirmed the presence of this cytoplasmic GNA-like gene in the maize and rice genome. A comparative analysis of the products amplified by different PCRs using genomic DNA from Fusarium species and maize DNA samples from sterile as well as contaminated plant material strongly indicated that the GNA-like sequence found in maize grown under sterile conditions is not derived from a contaminating Fusarium species. Furthermore, using a PCR-based approach it could be demonstrated that this particular type of lectin occurs also in other plants from distant taxa and is markedly conserved.

  1. Impact of snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin; GNA) on adults of the green lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunhe; Romeis, Jörg

    2009-02-01

    Based on the finding that Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) has direct negative effects on larvae of Chrysoperla carnea, laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate its toxicity to the adults. While the ingestion of GNA dissolved in an artificial diet did not affect adult longevity, there were concentration-dependent negative effects on the pre-oviposition period, daily fecundity and total fecundity (number of eggs laid). When GNA was ingested by larvae of C. carnea, it caused a significant extension of larval development time. Adults that had emerged from GNA-fed larvae did not differ from those that developed from control larvae in terms of adult fresh weight, pre-oviposition period and daily or total fecundity. However, fertility (proportion of hatching eggs) was significantly decreased in adults raised from GNA-treated larvae. Western blots revealed that GNA ingested by larvae of C. carnea was partly transferred to the adult stage and was subsequently excreted or digested within a few days. Our toxicity studies (Tier-1 tests) clearly established a hazard of GNA to adult C. carnea when administered to larvae or adults at high concentrations. Implications of these toxicity data for the non-target risk assessment of GNA-expressing transgenic crops are discussed.

  2. Synergistic antiviral effect of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin and nelfinavir against feline coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Li-En; Lin, Chao-Nan; Su, Bi-Ling; Jan, Tong-Rong; Chen, Chi-Min; Wang, Ching-Ho; Lin, Dah-Sheng; Lin, Chung-Tien; Chueh, Ling-Ling

    2010-10-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal disease in domestic and nondomestic felids caused by feline coronavirus (FCoV). Currently, no effective vaccine is available for the prevention of this disease. In searching for agents that may prove clinically effective against FCoV infection, 16 compounds were screened for their antiviral activity against a local FCoV strain in Felis catus whole fetus-4 cells. The results showed that Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) and nelfinavir effectively inhibited FCoV replication. When the amount of virus preinoculated into the test cells was increased to mimic the high viral load present in the target cells of FIP cats, GNA and nelfinavir by themselves lost their inhibitory effect. However, when the two agents were added together to FCoV-infected cells, a synergistic antiviral effect defined by complete blockage of viral replication was observed. These results suggest that the combined use of GNA and nelfinavir has therapeutic potential in the prophylaxis and treatment of cats with early-diagnosed FIP.

  3. Localization and topogenesis studies of cytoplasmic and vacuolar homologs of the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Fouquaert, Elke; Hanton, Sally L; Brandizzi, Federica; Peumans, Willy J; Van Damme, Els J M

    2007-07-01

    The Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) is synthesized as a preproprotein. To corroborate the role of the different targeting peptides in the topogenesis of GNA and related proteins, different constructs were made whereby both the complete original GNA gene and different truncated sequences were coupled to the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). In addition, a GNA ortholog from rice that lacks the signal peptide and C-terminal propeptide sequence was fused to EGFP. These fusion constructs were expressed in tobacco BY-2 cells and their localization analyzed by confocal fluorescence microscopy. We observed that the processed preproprotein of GNA was directed towards the vacuolar compartment, whereas both the truncated forms of GNA corresponding to the mature lectin polypeptide and the rice ortholog of GNA were located in the nucleus and the cytoplasm. It can be concluded, therefore, that removal of the C-terminal propeptide and the signal peptide is sufficient to change the subcellular targeting of a normally vacuolar protein to the nuclear/cytoplasmic compartment of the BY-2 cells. These findings support the proposed hypothesis that cytoplasmic/nuclear GNA-like proteins and their vacuolar homologs are evolutionarily related and that the classical GNA-related lectins might have evolved from cytoplasmic orthologs through an evolutionary event involving the insertion of a signal peptide and a C-terminal propeptide.

  4. Stress-induced accumulation of wheat germ agglutinin and abscisic acid in roots of wheat seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Cammue, B.P.A.; Broekaert, W.F.; Kellens, J.T.C.; Peumans, W.J. ); Raikhel, N.V. )

    1989-12-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) levels in roots of 2-day-old wheat seedlings increased up to three-fold when stressed by air-drying. Similar results were obtained when seedling roots were incubated either in 0.5 molar mannitol or 180 grams per liter polyethylene glycol 6,000, with a peak level of WGA after 5 hours of stress. Longer periods of osmotic treatment resulted in a gradual decline of WGA in the roots. Since excised wheat roots incorporate more ({sup 35}S)cysteine into WGA under stress conditions, the observed increase of lectin levels is due to de novo synthesis. Measurement of abscisic acid (ABA) levels in roots of control and stressed seedlings indicated a 10-fold increase upon air-drying. Similarly, a five- and seven-fold increase of ABA content of seedling roots was found after 2 hours of osmotic stress by polyethylene glycol 6,000 and mannitol, respectively. Finally, the stress-induced increase of WGA in wheat roots could be inhibited by growing seedlings in the presence of fluridone, an inhibitor of ABA synthesis. These results indicate that roots of water-stressed wheat seedlings (a) contain more WGA as a result of an increased de novo synthesis of this lectin, and (b) exhibit higher ABA levels. The stress-induced increase of lectin accumulation seems to be under control of ABA.

  5. Fluorescent imaging of endothelial glycocalyx layer with wheat germ agglutinin using intravital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hanae; Ushiyama, Akira; Kawakami, Hayato; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Matsubara, Sachie; Iijima, Takehiko

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial glycocalyx (GCX) is located on the apical surface of vascular endothelial cells and is composed of a negatively-charged network of proteoglycans and glycoproteins. The GCX plays an important role in maintaining the integrity of vascular walls and preventing leakage of plasma. Therefore, degradation of the GCX is believed to lead to pathological leakage of plasma. Because the GCX is a very thin layer, its ultrastructural image has been demonstrated on electron microscope. To explore the function of the GCX, it should be visualized by a microscope in vivo. Thus, we developed in vivo visualization technique of the GCX under fluorescence microscopy using a mouse dorsal skinfold chamber (DSC) model. To label and visualize the GCX, we used fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled lectin, which has a high specificity for sugar moieties. We examined the affinity of the different lectins to epivascular regions under an intravital fluorescent microscope. Among seven different lectins we examined, FITC labeled Triticum vulgaris (wheat germ) agglutinin (WGA) delineated the GCX most clearly. Binding of WGA to the GCX was inhibited by chitin hydrolysate, which contained WGA-binding polysaccharide chains. Furthermore, the septic condition attenuated this structure, suggesting structural degradation of endothelial GCX layer. In conclusion, FITC-labeled WGA lectin enabled visualization of endothelial GCX under in vivo fluorescence microscopy.

  6. Nematotoxicity of Marasmius oreades Agglutinin (MOA) Depends on Glycolipid Binding and Cysteine Protease Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Wohlschlager, Therese; Butschi, Alex; Zurfluh, Katrin; Vonesch, Sibylle C.; auf dem Keller, Ulrich; Gehrig, Peter; Bleuler-Martinez, Silvia; Hengartner, Michael O.; Aebi, Markus; Künzler, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Fruiting body lectins have been proposed to act as effector proteins in the defense of fungi against parasites and predators. The Marasmius oreades agglutinin (MOA) is a Galα1,3Gal/GalNAc-specific lectin from the fairy ring mushroom that consists of an N-terminal ricin B-type lectin domain and a C-terminal dimerization domain. The latter domain shows structural similarity to catalytically active proteins, suggesting that, in addition to its carbohydrate-binding activity, MOA has an enzymatic function. Here, we demonstrate toxicity of MOA toward the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. This toxicity depends on binding of MOA to glycosphingolipids of the worm via its lectin domain. We show further that MOA has cysteine protease activity and demonstrate a critical role of this catalytic function in MOA-mediated nematotoxicity. The proteolytic activity of MOA was dependent on high Ca2+ concentrations and favored by slightly alkaline pH, suggesting that these conditions trigger activation of the toxin at the target location. Our results suggest that MOA is a fungal toxin with intriguing similarities to bacterial binary toxins and has a protective function against fungivorous soil nematodes. PMID:21757752

  7. Uptake of Marasmius oreades agglutinin disrupts integrin-dependent cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Juillot, Samuel; Cott, Catherine; Madl, Josef; Claudinon, Julie; van der Velden, Niels Sebastiaan Johannes; Künzler, Markus; Thuenauer, Roland; Römer, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Background Fruiting body lectins have been proposed to act as effector proteins in the defense of fungi against parasites and predators. The Marasmius oreades agglutinin (MOA) is a lectin from the fairy ring mushroom with specificity for Galα1-3Gal containing carbohydrates. This lectin is composed of an N-terminal carbohydrate-binding domain and a C-terminal dimerization domain. The dimerization domain of MOA shows in addition calcium-dependent cysteine protease activity, similar to the calpain family. Methods Cell detachment assay, cell viability assay, immunofluorescence, live cell imaging and Western blot using MDCKII cell line. Results In this study, we demonstrate in MDCKII cells that after internalization, MOA protease activity induces profound physiological cellular responses, like cytoskeleton rearrangement, cell detachment and cell death. These changes are preceded by a decrease in FAK phosphorylation and an internalization and degradation of β1-integrin, consistent with a disruption of integrin-dependent cell adhesion signaling. Once internalized, MOA accumulates in late endosomal compartments. Conclusion Our results suggest a possible toxic mechanism of MOA, which consists of disturbing the cell adhesion and the cell viability. General significance After being ingested by a predator, MOA might exert a protective role by diminishing host cell integrity. PMID:26546712

  8. Spreading of wheat germ agglutinin-induced erythrocyte contact by formation of spatially discrete contacts.

    PubMed

    Darmani, H; Coakley, W T; Hann, A C; Brain, A

    1990-06-01

    The time dependence of agglutination and cell-cell contact spreading in human erythrocytes exposed to wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) was characterized by light and electron microscopy. Cells (3 x 10(7)/mL) had a threshold lectin concentration in the range of 0.6-2.0 micrograms/mL for initial cell contact. Spreading was essentially completed within 60 and 2 min in undisturbed and gently agitated suspensions, respectively. The cells in large WGA agglutinates retained features of their initial disk form in contrast to the convex outlines of polycation or polyethylene glycol-induced agglutinates. Spreading of contact area was accompanied by development of a pattern of discrete contact regions separated by a distance of the order of 1 micron. Freeze fracture electron microscopy and studies with ferritin-labeled WGA showed no significant aggregation of intramembrane particles or specific lectin receptors under conditions when contact spreading occurred. It is argued that flow stress effects on cells in suspended agglutinates give rise to a situation where opposite membranes, at the leading edge of cell contact, are separated by a thin aqueous layer. When this intercellular water layer exceeds a critical length, it becomes unstable. The layer breaks up by surface wave development to form an array of intracellular water spaces. Formation of the aqueous spaces causes opposite membrane regions to move synchronously toward each other. Lectin molecules crosslink the wave crests to give spatially periodic contact points.

  9. Binding of porphyrins by the tumor-specific lectin, jacalin [Jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) agglutinin].

    PubMed

    Komath, S S; Bhanu, K; Maiya, B G; Swamy, M J

    2000-08-01

    Jacalin (Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin) specifically recognizes the tumor-associated T-antigenic disaccharide structure, Gal beta13GalNAc. Porphyrins and their derivatives are currently used as photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy to treat malignant tumors. In this study, the interaction of several free base porphyrins and their metal derivatives with jacalin is investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Each lectin subunit was found to bind one porphyrin molecule and the association constants were estimated to be in the range of 2.4 x 10(3) M(-1) to 1.3 x 10(5) M(-1) at room temperature for the interaction of different porphyrins with jacalin. These values are in the same range as those obtained for the interaction of monosaccharides to jacalin. Both free lectin and lectin saturated with the specific saccharide were found to bind different porphyrins with comparable binding strength indicating that porphyrin binding takes place at a site different from the sugar binding site. Further, both anionic and cationic porphyrins were found to interact with the lectin with comparable affinity, clearly indicating that the charge on the porphyrin does not play any role in the binding process and that most likely the interaction is mediated by hydrophobic forces. These results suggest that jacalin and other lectins may potentially be useful for targeted delivery of porphyrins to tumor tissues in photodynamic therapy.

  10. Structural Insights into the Anti-HIV Activity of the Oscillatoria agardhii Agglutinin Homolog Lectin Family*

    PubMed Central

    Koharudin, Leonardus M. I.; Kollipara, Sireesha; Aiken, Christopher; Gronenborn, Angela M.

    2012-01-01

    Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin homolog (OAAH) proteins belong to a recently discovered lectin family. All members contain a sequence repeat of ∼66 amino acids, with the number of repeats varying among different family members. Apart from data for the founding member OAA, neither three-dimensional structures, information about carbohydrate binding specificities, nor antiviral activity data have been available up to now for any other members of the OAAH family. To elucidate the structural basis for the antiviral mechanism of OAAHs, we determined the crystal structures of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Myxococcus xanthus lectins. Both proteins exhibit the same fold, resembling the founding family member, OAA, with minor differences in loop conformations. Carbohydrate binding studies by NMR and x-ray structures of glycan-lectin complexes reveal that the number of sugar binding sites corresponds to the number of sequence repeats in each protein. As for OAA, tight and specific binding to α3,α6-mannopentaose was observed. All the OAAH proteins described here exhibit potent anti-HIV activity at comparable levels. Altogether, our results provide structural details of the protein-carbohydrate interaction for this novel lectin family and insights into the molecular basis of their HIV inactivation properties. PMID:22865886

  11. Internalization of Sambucus nigra agglutinins I and II in insect midgut CF-203 cells.

    PubMed

    Shahidi-Noghabi, Shahnaz; Van Damme, Els J M; De Vos, Winnok H; Smagghe, Guy

    2011-04-01

    In this project, the uptake mechanisms and localization of two lectins from Sambucus nigra, further referred to as S. nigra agglutinin (SNA)-I and SNA-II, into insect midgut CF-203 cells were studied. SNA-I is a chimeric lectin belonging to the class of ribosome-inactivating proteins, whereas SNA-II is a hololectin devoid of enzymatic activity. Internalization of the fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled lectin was investigated using confocal microscopy. Both lectins were internalized into the cytoplasm of CF-203 cells at similar rates. Preexposure of the insect midgut cells to specific inhibitors of clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis resulted in an inhibition of lectin uptake in CF-203 cells and caspase-induced cytotoxicity caused by SNA-I and SNA-II, confirming the involvement of both endocytosis pathways. Further studies demonstrated that the uptake mechanism(s) for both lectins required phosphoinositide 3-kinases, but did not depend on the actin cytoskeleton. Since the hololectin SNA-II apparently uses a similar endocytosis pathway as the chimerolectin SNA-I, it can be concluded that the endocytosis process mainly relies on the carbohydrate-binding activity of the lectins under investigation. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:21254203

  12. Identification of the zebrafish red nucleus using Wheat Germ Agglutinin transneuronal tracing

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Hideaki; Namikawa, Kazuhiko; Köster, Reinhard W.

    2014-01-01

    The red nucleus is located in the rostral midbrain of the vertebrate brain and controls motor coordination during locomotion. It receives input from the cerebellum and sends its output to the spinal cord. The presence of the red nucleus is well established in tetrapods, and its existence has also been suggested in teleosts but its presence and position has still been under discussion. By using wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) as a genetically encoded anterograde tracer, we recently identified contralateral projections from the cerebellum to a putative red nucleus in the zebrafish midbrain tegmentum. In this report we further revealed red nucleus derived from this contralateral afferent from the cerebellum using WGA and contralateral projections to the hindbrain-spinal cord junction site using DiI-mediated retrograde tracing. Thus the structure that we have identified by anterograde and retrograde tracing fulfills the anatomical demands for the red nucleus: the location in the midbrain tegmentum, contralateral afferent from the cerebellum (cerebello-ruber projection) and contralateral efferent to the spinal cord (rubro-spinal projection). PMID:26480025

  13. V beta-specific deletion of mature thymocytes induced by the plant superantigen Urtica dioica agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Delcourt, M; Peumans, W J; Wagner, M C; Truffa-Bachi, P

    1996-03-15

    Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA), a plant protein, is a superantigen activating in a MHC class II-restricted manner the V beta 8. 3-bearing T-cells (Galelli and Truffa-Bachi, J. Immunol. 151, 1821, 1993). Administration of UDA to adult mice provokes the clonal expansion of the responding cells which is followed by the deletion of the major fraction of the UDA-sensitive cells, whereas the remaining cells become anergic (Galelli et al., J. Immunol. 154, 2600, 1995). We have analyzed the effect of UDA on thymocytes. Injection of UDA resulted in a rapid, but transient, deletion of a large fraction of the V beta 8.3-bearing mature T-cells. In contrast to other exogenous superantigens, this deletion was not preceded by the clonal expansion of the UDA-responding thymocytes. Moreover, the V beta 8.3-bearing mature T-cells escaping the deletion were not anergic to an in vitro UDA restimulation. UDA and the other superantigens also differ as the general, V beta-unrestricted, thymic atrophy induced by classical superantigens was not observed with UDA. PMID:8640861

  14. Characterization of Urtica dioica agglutinin isolectins and the encoding gene family.

    PubMed

    Does, M P; Ng, D K; Dekker, H L; Peumans, W J; Houterman, P M; Van Damme, E J; Cornelissen, B J

    1999-01-01

    Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) has previously been found in roots and rhizomes of stinging nettles as a mixture of UDA-isolectins. Protein and cDNA sequencing have shown that mature UDA is composed of two hevein domains and is processed from a precursor protein. The precursor contains a signal peptide, two in-tandem hevein domains, a hinge region and a carboxyl-terminal chitinase domain. Genomic fragments encoding precursors for UDA-isolectins have been amplified by five independent polymerase chain reactions on genomic DNA from stinging nettle ecotype Weerselo. One amplified gene was completely sequenced. As compared to the published cDNA sequence, the genomic sequence contains, besides two basepair substitutions, two introns located at the same positions as in other plant chitinases. By partial sequence analysis of 40 amplified genes, 16 different genes were identified which encode seven putative UDA-isolectins. The deduced amino acid sequences share 78.9-98.9% identity. In extracts of roots and rhizomes of stinging nettle ecotype Weerselo six out of these seven isolectins were detected by mass spectrometry. One of them is an acidic form, which has not been identified before. Our results demonstrate that UDA is encoded by a large gene family. PMID:10080699

  15. Antinutritive effects of wheat-germ agglutinin and other N-acetylglucosamine-specific lectins.

    PubMed

    Pusztai, A; Ewen, S W; Grant, G; Brown, D S; Stewart, J C; Peumans, W J; Van Damme, E J; Bardocz, S

    1993-07-01

    Incorporation of N-acetylglucosamine-specific agglutinins from wheat germ (Triticum aestivum; WGA), thorn apple (Datura stramonium) or nettle (Urtica dioica) rhizomes in the diet at the level of 7 g/kg reduced the apparent digestibility and utilization of dietary proteins and the growth of rats, with WGA being the most damaging. As a result of their binding and endocytosis by the epithelial cells of the small intestine, all three lectins were growth factors for the gut and interfered with its metabolism and function to varying degrees. WGA was particularly effective; it induced extensive polyamine-dependent hyperplastic and hypertrophic growth of the small bowel by increasing its content of proteins, RNA and DNA. Furthermore, an appreciable portion of the endocytosed WGA was transported across the gut wall into the systemic circulation, where it was deposited in the walls of the blood and lymphatic vessels. WGA also induced the hypertrophic growth of the pancreas and caused thymus atrophy. Although the transfer of the gene of WGA into crop plants has been advocated to increase their insect resistance, as the presence of this lectin in the diet may harm higher animals at the concentrations required to be effective against most pests, its use in plants as natural insecticide is not without health risks for man. PMID:8399111

  16. Wheat germ agglutinin modified liposomes for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kewei; Gitter, Burkhard; Rüger, Ronny; Albrecht, Volker; Wieland, Gerhard D; Fahr, Alfred

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of bacteria is a promising approach for combating the increasing emergence of antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria. To further improve the PDI efficiency on bacteria, a bacteria-targeting liposomal formulation was investigated. A generation II photosensitizer (temoporfin) was incorporated into liposomes, followed by conjugation with a specific lectin (wheat germ agglutinin, WGA) on the liposomal surface. WGA was successfully coupled to temoporfin-loaded liposomes using an activated phospholipid containing N-hydroxylsuccinimide residue. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were selected to evaluate the WGA modified liposomes in terms of bacteria targeted delivery and in vitro PDI test. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that temoporfin was delivered to both kinds of bacteria, while flow cytometry demonstrated that WGA- modified liposomes delivered more temoporfin to bacteria compared to nonmodified liposomes. Consequently, the WGA- modified liposomes eradicated all MRSA and significantly enhanced the PDI of P. aeruginosa. In conclusion, the WGA- modified liposomes are a promising formulation for bacteria targeted delivery of temoporfin and for improving the PDI efficiency of temoporfin on both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cells.

  17. Effect of galactose on acid induced molten globule state of Soybean Agglutinin: Biophysical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Parvez; Naseem, Farha; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2015-11-01

    In the present study the formation of molten globule-like unfolding intermediate Soybean Agglutinin (SBA) in acidic pH range has been established with the help of acrylamide quenching, intrinsic fluorescence, ANS fluorescence measurement, far UV CD and dynamic light scattering measurement. A marked increase in ANS fluorescence was observed at pH 2.2. Ksv of acrylamide quenching was found to be higher at pH 2.2 than that of native SBA at pH 7. Far UV CD spectra of pH induced state suggest that SBA shows significant retention of secondary structure closure to native. Hydrodynamic radius of SBA at pH 2.2 was found be more as compared to native state and also in other pH induced states. Further we checked the effect of galactose on the molten globule state of SBA. This study suggests that SBA exist as molten globule at pH 2.2 and this study will help in acid induced molten globule state of other proteins.

  18. Identification of a ligand-binding site in an immunoglobulin fold domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae adhesion protein alpha-agglutinin.

    PubMed Central

    de Nobel, H; Lipke, P N; Kurjan, J

    1996-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae adhesion protein alpha-agglutinin (Ag alpha 1p) is expressed by alpha cells and binds to the complementary a-agglutinin expressed by a cells. The N-terminal half of alpha-agglutinin is sufficient for ligand binding and has been proposed to contain an immunoglobulin (Ig) fold domain. Based on a structural homology model for this domain and a previously identified critical residue (His292), we made Ag alpha 1p mutations in three discontinuous patches of the domain that are predicted to be in close proximity to His292 in the model. Residues in each of the three patches were identified that are important for activity and therefore define a putative ligand binding site, whereas mutations in distant loops had no effect on activity. This putative binding site is on a different surface of the Ig fold than the defined binding sites of immunoglobulins and other members of the Ig superfamily. Comparison of protein interaction sites by structural and mutational analysis has indicated that the area of surface contact is larger than the functional binding site identified by mutagenesis. The putative alpha-agglutinin binding site is therefore likely to identify residues that contribute to the functional binding site within a larger area that contacts a-agglutinin. Images PMID:8741846

  19. Effects of Soybean Agglutinin on Intestinal Barrier Permeability and Tight Junction Protein Expression in Weaned Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan; Qin, Guixin; Sun, Zewei; Che, Dongsheng; Bao, Nan; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2011-01-01

    This study was developed to provide further information on the intestinal barrier permeability and the tight junction protein expression in weaned piglets fed with different levels of soybean agglutinin (SBA). Twenty-five weaned crossbred barrows (Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire) were selected and randomly allotted to five groups, each group with five replicates. The piglets in the control group were not fed with leguminous products. 0.05, 0.1, 0.15 and 0.2% SBA was added to the control diet to form four experimental diets, respectively. After the experimental period of 7 days (for each group), all the piglets were anesthetized with excess procaine and slaughtered. The d-lactic acid in plasma and the Ileal mucosa diamine oxidase (DAO) was analyzed to observe the change in the intestinal permeability. The tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1 in the jejunum tissue distribution and relative expression were detected by immunohistochemistry and Western Blot. The results illustrated that a high dose of SBA (0.1–0.2%) could increase the intestinal permeability and reduce piglet intestinal epithelial tight junction protein occludin or ZO-1 expression, while low dose of SBA (0.05% of total diet) had no significant affects. The contents of DAO, d-lactic acid, occludin or ZO-1, had a linear relationship with the SBA levels (0–0.2%) in diets. The high dose SBA (0.1–0.2%) could increase the intestinal permeability and reduce piglet intestinal epithelial tight junction protein occludin or ZO-1 expression, while low dose of SBA (0.05% of total diet) had no affects. PMID:22272087

  20. Soybean agglutinin-conjugated silver nanoparticles nanocarriers in the treatment of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Casañas Pimentel, Rocio Guadalupe; Robles Botero, Viviana; San Martín Martínez, Eduardo; Gómez García, Consuelo; Hinestroza, Juan Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) induce diverse cell-death mechanisms, similar to those promoted by anticancer chemotherapeutics; however, they have not been tested in vivo because their action is not limited to cancer cells. Therefore, in vivo evaluations of their effectiveness should be developed with targeting systems. Breast cancer shows changes in the sugar expression patterns on cell surfaces, related to cancer progression and metastases; those changes have been identified previously by the specific binding of soybean agglutinin (SBA). Here is proposed the use of SBA to target the AgNP activity in breast cancer. For that, the present work reports the synthesis of AgNPs (3.89 ± 0.90 nm) through the polyol method, the generation of AgNP nanocarriers, and the bioconjugation protocol of the nanocarrier with SBA. The free AgNPs, the AgNP nanocarriers, and the SBA-bioconjugated AgNP nanocarriers were tested for cytotoxicity in breast cancerous (MDA-MB-231and MCF7) and non cancerous (MCF 10A) cells, using the MTT assay. AgNPs demonstrated cytotoxic activity in vitro, the non cancerous cells (MCF 10A) being more sensible than the cancerous cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7) showing LD(50) values of 128, 205, and 319 μM Ag, respectively; the nanoencapsulation decreased the cytotoxic effect of AgNPs in non cancerous cells, maintaining or increasing the effect on the cancer-derived cells, whereas the SBA-bioconjugation allowed AgNP cytotoxic activity with a similar behavior to the nanocarriers. Future experiments need to be developed to evaluate the targeting effect of the SBA-bioconjugated AgNP nanocarriers to study their functionality in vivo.

  1. Datura stramonium agglutinin: cloning, molecular characterization and recombinant production in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Keisuke; Tanaka, Kaori; Murakami, Takahiro; Nakashita, Hideo; Sakamoto, Hikaru; Oguri, Suguru

    2015-02-01

    Datura stramonium seeds contain at least three chitin-binding isolectins [termed Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA)] as homo- or heterodimers of A and B subunits. We isolated a cDNA encoding isolectin B (DSA-B) from an immature fruit cDNA library; this contained an open reading frame encoding 279 deduced amino acids, which was confirmed by partial sequencing of the native DSA-B peptide. The sequence consisted of: (i) a cysteine (Cys)-rich carbohydrate-binding domain composed of four conserved chitin-binding domains and (ii) an extensin-like domain of 37 residues containing four SerPro4-6 motifs that was inserted between the second and third chitin-binding domains (CBDs). Although each chitin-binding domain contained eight conserved Cys residues, only the second chitin-binding domain contained an extra Cys residue, which may participate in dimerization through inter-disulfide bridge formation. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry, the molecular mass of homodimeric lectin composed of two B-subunits was determined as 68,821 Da. The molecular mass of the S-pyridilethylated B-subunit were found to be 37,748 Da and that of the de-glycosylated form was 26,491 Da, which correlated with the molecular weight estimated from the deduced sequence. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the dsa-b demonstrated hemagglutinating activity. Recombinant DSA-B was produced as a homodimeric glycoprotein with a similar molecular mass to that of the native form. Moreover, the N-terminus of the purified recombinant DSA-B protein was identical to that of the native DSA-B, confirming that the cloned cDNA encoded DSA-B. PMID:25246348

  2. Insecticidal properties of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum agglutinin and its interaction with insect tissues and cells.

    PubMed

    Hamshou, Mohamad; Smagghe, Guy; Shahidi-Noghabi, Shahnaz; De Geyter, Ellen; Lannoo, Nausicaä; Van Damme, Els J M

    2010-12-01

    This project studied in detail the insecticidal activity of a fungal lectin from the sclerotes of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, referred to as S. sclerotiorum agglutinin or SSA. Feeding assays with the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) on an artificial diet containing different concentrations of SSA demonstrated a high mortality caused by this fungal lectin with a median insect toxicity value (LC50) of 66 (49-88) μg/ml. In an attempt to unravel the mode of action of SSA the binding and interaction of the lectin with insect tissues and cells were investigated. Histofluorescence studies on sections from aphids fed on an artificial liquid diet containing FITC-labeled SSA, indicated the insect midgut with its brush border zone as the primary target for SSA. In addition, exposure of insect midgut CF-203 cells to 25 μg/ml SSA resulted in a total loss of cell viability, the median cell toxicity value (EC50) being 4.0 (2.4-6.7) μg/ml. Interestingly, cell death was accompanied with DNA fragmentation, but the effect was caspase-3 independent. Analyses using fluorescence confocal microscopy demonstrated that FITC-labeled SSA was not internalized in the insect midgut cells, but bound to the cell surface. Prior incubation of the cells with saponin to achieve a higher cell membrane permeation resulted in an increased internalization of SSA in the insect midgut cells, but no increase in cell toxicity. Furthermore, since the toxicity of SSA for CF-203 cells was significantly reduced when SSA was incubated with GalNAc and asialomucin prior to treatment of the cells, the data of this project provide strong evidence that SSA binds with specific carbohydrate moieties on the cell membrane proteins to start a signaling transduction cascade leading to death of the midgut epithelial cells, which in turn results in insect mortality. The potential use of SSA in insect control is discussed.

  3. Holothuria grisea agglutinin (HGA): the first invertebrate lectin with anti-inflammatory effects.

    PubMed

    Moura, Raniere da M; Aragão, Karoline S; de Melo, Arthur A; Carneiro, Rômulo F; Osório, César B H; Luz, Patricia B; de Queiroz, Alexandre F S; Dos Santos, Elizeu A; de Alencar, Nylane M N; Cavada, Benildo S

    2013-12-01

    Holothuria grisea agglutinin (HGA) is a dimeric lectin of molecular mass 228 kDa by gel filtration with monomers of 105 kDa by SDS-PAGE. The lectin is highly thermostable as it retains full activity for 1 h at 70 °C. Unlike other lectins purified from marine invertebrates, the hemagglutination activity of HGA does not require any divalent metal ions. The affinity analysis of HGA showed that only mucin was able to inhibit the hemagglutinating activity. HGA administered intravenously was tested in classical models of nociception and inflammation. HGA was able to inhibit neutrophil migration into the peritoneal cavity induced by carrageenan. This inhibitory effect was 68% at a dose of 1 mg/kg. In acetic acid-induced writhing tests, a significant antinociceptive effect was observed by treatment with HGA (0.1; 1 or 10 mg/kg) reducing constrictions by 27, 90 and 84%, respectively. In formalin tests, HGA at a dose of 10 mg/kg showed antinociceptive effect only in the inflammatory phase (phase 2). Nevertheless, in hot-plate tests, HGA did not show any nociceptive effect. In rota-rod and open-field tests, HGA did not alter the animals' behavior. The treatment with HGA 10 mg/kg presented diminished myeloperoxidase activity activity (81.6% inhibition) and raised the circulating levels of NO by 50.4% when compared with the carrageenan group. HGA has demonstrated the ability to modulate the inflammatory response in models of inflammation in vivo. HGA is the first marine invertebrate lectin that showed an anti-inflammatory effect. This finding opens a new perspective on the potential of lectins from the marine environment. PMID:22943744

  4. Evolution of the rapidly mutating human salivary agglutinin gene (DMBT1) and population subsistence strategy

    PubMed Central

    Polley, Shamik; Louzada, Sandra; Forni, Diego; Sironi, Manuela; Balaskas, Theodosius; Hains, David S.; Yang, Fengtang; Hollox, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    The dietary change resulting from the domestication of plant and animal species and development of agriculture at different locations across the world was one of the most significant changes in human evolution. An increase in dietary carbohydrates caused an increase in dental caries following the development of agriculture, mediated by the cariogenic oral bacterium Streptococcus mutans. Salivary agglutinin [SAG, encoded by the deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) gene] is an innate immune receptor glycoprotein that binds a variety of bacteria and viruses, and mediates attachment of S. mutans to hydroxyapatite on the surface of the tooth. In this study we show that multiallelic copy number variation (CNV) within DMBT1 is extensive across all populations and is predicted to result in between 7–20 scavenger–receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domains within each SAG molecule. Direct observation of de novo mutation in multigeneration families suggests these CNVs have a very high mutation rate for a protein-coding locus, with a mutation rate of up to 5% per gamete. Given that the SRCR domains bind S. mutans and hydroxyapatite in the tooth, we investigated the association of sequence diversity at the SAG-binding gene of S. mutans, and DMBT1 CNV. Furthermore, we show that DMBT1 CNV is also associated with a history of agriculture across global populations, suggesting that dietary change as a result of agriculture has shaped the pattern of CNV at DMBT1, and that the DMBT1-S. mutans interaction is a promising model of host-pathogen-culture coevolution in humans. PMID:25848046

  5. Tumor affinity of radiolabeled peanut agglutinin compared with that of Ga-67 citrate in animal models

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, K.; Aburano, T.; Watanabe, N.; Kawabata, S.; Ishida, H.; Mukai, K.; Tonami, N.; Hisada, K.

    1985-05-01

    Peanut agglutinin (PNA) binds avidly to the immunodominant group of the tumor associated T antigen. The purpose of this study was to evaluate oncodiagnostic potential of radiolabeled PNA in animal models. PNA was labeled with I-125 or I-131 by Iodogen and also with In-111 by cyclic DTPA anhydride. The biological activity of PNA was examined by a hemaglutination titer with a photometer before and after labeling. Animal tumor models used were Lewis Lung Cancer(LLC), B-16 Melanotic Melanoma(MM), Yoshida Sarcoma(YS), Ehrlich Ascites Tumor(EAT and Hepatoma AH109A(HAH). Inflammatory tissue induced by turpentine oil was used as an abscess model. Serial scintigraphic images were obtained following IV injections of 100 ..mu..Ci of I-131 or In-111-DTPA-PNA. The tumor affinity of Ga-67 citrate was studied to compare that of radiolabeled PNA. Tissue biodistribution was studied in EAT bearing mice. All of these tumor models except HAH were clearly visible by radiolabeled PNA without subtraction techniques. In the models of LLC and EAT, PNA showed the better accumulation into the tumor tissue than Ga-67 citrate. In YS and MM, PNA represented almost the same accumulation as Ga-67 citrate. The localization of PNA into abscess tissue wasn't found although Ga-67 citrate markedly accumulated into abscess tissue as well as tumor tissue. The clearance of PNA from tumor was slower than those from any other organs. Tumor to muscle ratio was 5.1 at 48hrs. and tumor to blood ratio increased with time to 2.3 at 96hrs. These results suggested that radiolabeled PNA may have a potential in the detection of tumor.

  6. Evolution of the rapidly mutating human salivary agglutinin gene (DMBT1) and population subsistence strategy.

    PubMed

    Polley, Shamik; Louzada, Sandra; Forni, Diego; Sironi, Manuela; Balaskas, Theodosius; Hains, David S; Yang, Fengtang; Hollox, Edward J

    2015-04-21

    The dietary change resulting from the domestication of plant and animal species and development of agriculture at different locations across the world was one of the most significant changes in human evolution. An increase in dietary carbohydrates caused an increase in dental caries following the development of agriculture, mediated by the cariogenic oral bacterium Streptococcus mutans. Salivary agglutinin [SAG, encoded by the deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) gene] is an innate immune receptor glycoprotein that binds a variety of bacteria and viruses, and mediates attachment of S. mutans to hydroxyapatite on the surface of the tooth. In this study we show that multiallelic copy number variation (CNV) within DMBT1 is extensive across all populations and is predicted to result in between 7-20 scavenger-receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domains within each SAG molecule. Direct observation of de novo mutation in multigeneration families suggests these CNVs have a very high mutation rate for a protein-coding locus, with a mutation rate of up to 5% per gamete. Given that the SRCR domains bind S. mutans and hydroxyapatite in the tooth, we investigated the association of sequence diversity at the SAG-binding gene of S. mutans, and DMBT1 CNV. Furthermore, we show that DMBT1 CNV is also associated with a history of agriculture across global populations, suggesting that dietary change as a result of agriculture has shaped the pattern of CNV at DMBT1, and that the DMBT1-S. mutans interaction is a promising model of host-pathogen-culture coevolution in humans.

  7. The gene for stinging nettle lectin (Urtica dioica agglutinin) encodes both a lectin and a chitinase.

    PubMed

    Lerner, D R; Raikhel, N V

    1992-06-01

    Chitin-binding proteins are present in a wide range of plant species, including both monocots and dicots, even though these plants contain no chitin. To investigate the relationship between in vitro antifungal and insecticidal activities of chitin-binding proteins and their unknown endogenous functions, the stinging nettle lectin (Urtica dioica agglutinin, UDA) cDNA was cloned using a synthetic gene as the probe. The nettle lectin cDNA clone contained an open reading frame encoding 374 amino acids. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence revealed a 21-amino acid putative signal sequence and the 86 amino acids encoding the two chitin-binding domains of nettle lectin. These domains were fused to a 19-amino acid "spacer" domain and a 244-amino acid carboxyl extension with partial identity to a chitinase catalytic domain. The authenticity of the cDNA clone was confirmed by deduced amino acid sequence identity with sequence data obtained from tryptic digests, RNA gel blot, and polymerase chain reaction analyses. RNA gel blot analysis also showed the nettle lectin message was present primarily in rhizomes and inflorescence (with immature seeds) but not in leaves or stems. Chitinase enzymatic activity was found when the chitinase-like domain alone or the chitinase-like domain with the chitin-binding domains were expressed in Escherichia coli. This is the first example of a chitin-binding protein with both a duplication of the 43-amino acid chitin-binding domain and a fusion of the chitin-binding domains to a structurally unrelated domain, the chitinase domain. PMID:1375935

  8. Effects of detergent on the binding of solubilized sodium channels to immobilized wheat germ agglutinin: structural implications.

    PubMed

    Weiner, J S; Rudy, B

    1988-10-20

    The binding of the solubilized voltage-dependent sodium channel from rat brain to immobilized wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is detergent-dependent. When solubilized in sodium cholate, only 11% of total recovered channels bound to a WGA-Sepharose column. When solubilized in Triton X-100 or CHAPS, however, 80% and 60% could bind, respectively. The effect of cholate on sodium channel binding is relatively specific: the major rat brain glycoproteins which bind to immobilized WGA are roughly the same in either Triton or cholate, as analyzed by SDS gel electrophoresis. The structural implications for the channel are discussed.

  9. Envelope glycoproteins of HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV purified with Galanthus nivalis agglutinin induce strong immune responses.

    PubMed

    Gilljam, G

    1993-05-01

    Lectin affinity chromatography was used to purify in a single step the envelope glycoproteins of HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV. Envelope glycoproteins carry the major determinants essential for protection by the humoral immune response. The purification of these proteins has previously been a laborious procedure. The glycoproteins were purified by a one-step procedure to a high level of purity by using Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA). The purified glycoprotein had CD4-binding and antigenic reactivities. Strong immune responses to envelope proteins and peptides were seen in mice and primates after immunization with these preparations.

  10. Cold Agglutinin Autoantibodies in a Patient without a Visible Coronary Sinus Ostium: Strategies for Myocardial Protection without Using Retrograde Cardioplegia.

    PubMed

    Heath, Michele; Yalamuri, Suraj; Walker, Julie; Maxwell, Cory; Williams, Adam; McCartney, Sharon; Daneshmand, Mani

    2016-06-01

    The presence of cold agglutinins (CA) during cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass usually creates the need for an altered surgical plan. In this case, the CA were discovered after the initiation of bypass, limiting the time, and cardioplegia solutions that could be used in the new approach. The inability to cannulate the coronary sinus with a retrograde cardioplegia catheter excluded the standard approach to myocardial preservation with CA of using continuous warm blood. For this case, we used intermittent cold crystalloid delivered via the antegrade needle for the first half of the procedure and through the saphenous vein graft anastomosis during the aortic valve portion of the cross-clamp period. PMID:27578898

  11. Dietary wheat germ agglutinin modulates ovalbumin-induced immune responses in Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Watzl, B; Neudecker, C; Hänsch, G M; Rechkemmer, G; Pool-Zobel, B L

    2001-04-01

    The trend towards an increased consumption of minimally processed plant food results in a higher intake of non-nutritive compounds such as lectins. Lectins are typically globular proteins that are resistant to digestion in the gastrointestinal tract. They affect the integrity of the intestinal epithelium and the absorption of dietary antigens, and induce the release of allergic mediators from mast cells in vitro. Based on this information we have studied whether dietary wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) could be involved in triggering food allergies. Brown Norway rats were immunized intraperitoneally using ovalbumin (OVA; 10 microg/rat) and 10 d later treated for five consecutive days with WGA (10 mg/rat per d) administered intragastrically. Rats were then orally challenged with OVA (100 microg/rat) 1 h after the last WGA application, and blood was collected 4 h later. Immunological responses (anti-OVA immunoglobulins E and G, rat mast cell protease II, interferon-gamma and lymphocyte proliferation) were measured and lymphocyte subpopulations were determined. In immunized rats WGA treatment resulted in increased serum rat mast cell protease II concentrations (pre-challenge 0.26 (SE 0.08) microg/ml, post-challenge 0.49 (SE 0.09) microg/ml; P < 0.01) 4 h after the OVA challenge. After 5 d serum concentrations of anti-OVA immunoglobulin E were significantly increased only in the immunized controls (absorbance at 405 nm on days 14 and 19 was 0.09 (SE 0.008) and 0.24 (SE 0.046) respectively; P = 0.02), while in WGA-treated rats no significant increase was seen (0.08 (SE 0.004) and 0.15 (SE 0.037 respectively; P = 0.14). CD4+ : CD8+ T lymphocytes in the spleen was significantly increased at this time (OVA 1.1 (SD 0.2), 1.4 (sd 0.1), P < 0.05). The treatment did not impair the proliferation and interferon-gamma production of mesenteric lymphocytes. In conclusion, these data suggest that high dietary intake of lectins such as WGA may affect the allergic response towards oral

  12. Colchicum autumnale agglutinin activates all murine T-lymphocytes but does not induce the proliferation of all activated cells.

    PubMed

    Bemer, V; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Perret, R; Truffa-Bachi, P

    1996-08-25

    Plant lectins with mitogenic properties for T-lymphocytes have been particularly useful for the study of T-cell activation and effector functions. In the search for mitogenic lectins possessing activation features different from the ones associated with the already known mitogens, we found that an agglutinin isolated from Colchicum autumnale tubers, Colchicum autumnale agglutinin (CAA), possesses interesting properties. First, contrasting with the classical mitogens, CAA induces the proliferation of a fraction of the CD4+ and CD8+ mouse T-lymphocytes. Second, the CAA-induced proliferation requires MHC class II and CD4 molecules. Third, although only a fraction of T-cells enters into the cell cycle, all T-lymphocytes are activated and express high levels of the activation markers CD69 and CD44. Finally, CAA-stimulation is characterized by a particular pattern of the cytokine gene expression, reflected by the transcription of the IL2, IL5, and IFN-gamma genes, while the IL4 and IL10 genes remained silent. Taken together these data demonstrate that CAA activation does not conform to the pathway of T-cell triggering observed with classical mitogenes and represents a new tool for the analysis of T-cell activation.

  13. Structural studies of Helix aspersa agglutinin complexed with GalNAc: A lectin that serves as a diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Pietrzyk, Agnieszka J; Bujacz, Anna; Mak, Paweł; Potempa, Barbara; Niedziela, Tomasz

    2015-11-01

    Lectins belong to a differentiated group of proteins known to possess sugar-binding properties. Due to this fact, they are interesting research targets in medical diagnostics. Helix aspersa agglutinin (HAA) is a lectin that recognizes the epitopes containing α-d-N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), which is present at the surface of metastatic cancer cells. Although several reports have already described the use of HAA as a diagnostic tool, this protein was not characterized on the molecular level. Here, we present for the first time the structural information about lectin isolated from mucus of Helix aspersa (garden snail). The amino acid sequence of this agglutinin was determined by Edman degradation and tertiary as well as quaternary structure by X-ray crystallography. The high resolution crystal structure (1.38Å) and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis provide the detailed information about a large part of the HAA natural glycan chain. The topology of the GalNAc binding cleft and interaction with lectin are very well defined in the structure and fully confirmed by STD HSQC NMR spectroscopy. Together, this provides structural clues regarding HAA specificity and opens possibilities to rational modifications of this important diagnostic tool.

  14. The Liverwort Marchantia polymorpha Expresses Orthologs of the Fungal Agaricus bisporus Agglutinin Family1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Peumans, Willy J.; Fouquaert, Elke; Jauneau, Alain; Rougé, Pierre; Lannoo, Nausicaä; Hamada, Hiroki; Alvarez, Richard; Devreese, Bart; Van Damme, Els J.M.

    2007-01-01

    A lectin different from the previously described mannose-binding agglutinins has been isolated from the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. Biochemical characterization of the purified lectin combined with the data from earlier transcriptome analyses demonstrated that the novel M. polymorpha agglutinin is not related to any of the known plant lectin families, but closely resembles the Agaricus bisporus-type lectins, which hitherto have been found exclusively in fungi. Immunolocalization studies confirmed that lectin is exclusively associated with plant cells, ruling out the possibility of a fungal origin. Extensive screening of publicly accessible databases confirmed that, apart from fungi, the occurrence of A. bisporus-type lectins is confined to M. polymorpha and the moss Tortula ruralis. Expression of a typical fungal protein in a liverwort and a moss raises the question of the origin of the corresponding genes. Regardless of the evolutionary origin, the presence of a functional A. bisporus lectin ortholog in M. polymorpha provides evidence for the expression of an additional carbohydrate-binding domain in Viridiplantae. PMID:17041032

  15. In silico analysis of molecular mechanisms of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectin-induced cancer cell death from carbohydrate-binding motif evolution hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qi-Jia; Li, Zi-Yue; Yao, Shun; Ming, Miao; Wang, Shu-Ya; Liu, Bo; Bao, Jin-Ku

    2011-10-01

    Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectins, a superfamily of strictly mannose-binding-specific lectins widespread amongst monotyledonous plants, have drawn a rising attention for their remarkable anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing activities toward various types of cancer cells; however, the precise molecular mechanisms by which they induce tumor cell apoptosis are still only rudimentarily understood. Herein, we found that the three conserved motifs "QXDXNXVXY," the mannose-specific binding sites, could mutate at one or more amino acid sites, which might be a driving force for the sequential evolution and thus ultimately leading to the complete disappearance of the three conserved motifs. In addition, we found that the motif evolution could result in the diversification of sugar-binding types that G. nivalis agglutinin-related lectins could bind from specific mannose receptors to more types of sugar-containing receptors in cancer cells. Subsequently, we indicated that some sugar-containing receptors such as TNFR1, EGFR, Hsp90, and Hsp70 could block downstream anti-apoptotic or survival signaling pathways, which, in turn, resulted in tumor cell apoptosis. Taken together, our hypothesis that carbohydrate-binding motif evolution may impact the G. nivalis agglutinin-related lectin-induced survival or anti-apoptotic pathways would provide a new perspective for further elucidating the intricate relationships between the carbohydrate-binding specificities and complex molecular mechanisms by which G. nivalis agglutinin-related lectins induce cancer cell death.

  16. Wheat Germ Agglutinin Staining as a Suitable Method for Detection and Quantification of Fibrosis in Cardiac Tissue after Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Emde, B.; Heinen, A.; Gödecke, A.; Bottermann, K.

    2014-01-01

    The quantification of fibrotic tissue is an important task in the analysis of cardiac remodeling. The use of established fibrosis staining techniques is limited on frozen cardiac tissue sections due to a reduced color contrast compared to paraffin embedded sections. We therefore used FITC-labeled wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), which marks fibrotic tissue in comparable quality as the established picrosirius red (SR) staining, for the staining of post myocardial infarction scar tissue. The fibrosis amount was quantified in a histogram-based approach using the non-commercial image processing program ImageJ. Our results clearly demonstrate that WGA-FITC is a suitable marker for cardiac fibrosis in frozen tissue sections. In combination with the histogram-based analysis, this new quantification approach is i) easy and fast to perform; ii) suitable for raw frozen tissue sections; and iii) allows the use of additional antibodies in co-immunostaining. PMID:25578975

  17. Polyoxin D inhibits colloidal gold-wheat germ agglutinin labelling of chitin in dimorphic forms of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hilenski, L L; Naider, F; Becker, J M

    1986-06-01

    Yeasts and mycelia of the pathogen Candida albicans grown in the presence of polyoxin D, a competitive inhibitor of chitin synthase, formed chains of swollen bulbous cells as observed by fluorescence microscopy. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) complexed to colloidal gold (Au) was used as a specific label at the ultrastructural level to visualize chitin in walls of control and polyoxin-treated cells. In control cells, Au-WGA labelling was preferentially localized in the innermost wall layers and was predominant at bud scars and septa. After 4.5 h in 4 mM-polyoxin D, budding in yeasts and lateral wall growth in mycelia continued, but primary septa failed to form and no Au-WGA labelling was detected in the walls. These results demonstrated that the morphological alterations caused by polyoxin D were due to the absence of chitin, a wall component important for formation of primary septa and for maintenance of structural integrity during morphogenesis.

  18. Myosin-driven intercellular transportation of wheat germ agglutinin mediated by membrane nanotubes between human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Shu-Lin; Tian, Zhi-Quan; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Tang, Hong-Wu; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2012-11-27

    Membrane nanotubes can facilitate direct intercellular communication between cells and provide a unique channel for intercellular transfer of cellular contents. However, the transport mechanisms of membrane nanotubes remain poorly understood between cancer cells. Also largely unknown is the transport pattern mediated by membrane nanotubes. In this work, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), a widely used drug carrier and potential antineoplastic drug, was labeled with quantum dots (QDs-WGA) as a model for exploring the intercellular transportation via membrane nanotubes. We found that membrane nanotubes allowed effective transfer of QDs-WGA. Long-term single-particle tracking indicated that the movements of QDs-WGA exhibited a slow and directed motion pattern in nanotubes. Significantly, the transport of QDs-WGA was driven by myosin molecular motors in an active and unidirectional manner. These results contribute to a better understanding of cell-to-cell communication for cancer research.

  19. Structural characterisation of the native fetuin-binding protein Scilla campanulata agglutinin: a novel two-domain lectin.

    PubMed

    Wright, L M; Reynolds, C D; Rizkallah, P J; Allen, A K; Van Damme, E J; Donovan, M J; Peumans, W J

    2000-02-18

    The three-dimensional structure of a 244-residue, multivalent, fetuin-binding lectin, SCAfet, isolated from bluebell (Scilla campanulata) bulbs, has been solved at 3.3 A resolution by molecular replacement using the coordinates of the 119-residue, mannose-binding lectin, SCAman, also from bluebell bulbs. Unlike most monocot mannose-binding lectins, such as Galanthus nivalis agglutinin from snowdrop bulbs, which fold into a single domain, SCAfet contains two domains with approximately 55% sequence identity, joined by a linker peptide. Both domains are made up of a 12-stranded beta-prism II fold, with three putative carbohydrate-binding sites, one on each subdomain. SCAfet binds to the complex saccharides of various animal glycoproteins but not to simple sugars.

  20. Effect of Urtica dioica agglutinin and Arabidopsis thaliana Chia4 chitinase on the protozoan Phytomonas françai.

    PubMed

    Gomes Rocha, Graça Celeste; Nicolich, Rebecca; Romeiro, Alexandre; Margis-Pinheiro, Márcia; Attias, Márcia; Alves-Ferreira, Márcio

    2003-09-12

    The genus Phytomonas is responsible for many diseases in different crop plant species. The finding that chitin is an exposed cell surface polysaccharide in Phytomonas françai and the observation that chitinases can inhibit fungal growth raises expectations about the potential effect of plant chitinases on the P. françai cell membrane surface. The plant chitinases Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) and Arabidopsis thaliana Chia4 (ATCHIT4) proteins were over-expressed in bacteria and the interaction between these proteins and P. françai surface was analyzed by immunocytochemistry. We showed that UDA and ATCHIT4 proteins can interact with surface-exposed chitin from P. françai.

  1. Characterization of onion lectin (Allium cepa agglutinin) as an immunomodulatory protein inducing Th1-type immune response in vitro.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, Vaddi K; Venkatesh, Yeldur P

    2015-06-01

    Onion (Allium cepa), a bulb crop of economic importance, is known to have many health benefits. The major objective of the present study is to address the immunomodulatory properties of onion lectin (A. cepa agglutinin; ACA). ACA was purified from onion extract by D-mannose-agarose chromatography (yield: ~1 mg/kg). ACA is non-glycosylated and showed a molecular mass of ~12 kDa under reducing/non-reducing SDS-PAGE; glutaraldehyde cross-linking indicated that ACA is a non-covalent tetramer of ~12 kDa subunits. Its N-terminal sequence (RNVLLNNEGL; UniProt KB Accn. C0HJM8) showed 70-90% homology to mannose-specific Allium agglutinins. ACA showed specific hemagglutination activity of 8200 units/mg and is stable in the pH range 6-10 and up to 45° C. The immunomodulatory activity of ACA was assessed using the macrophage cell line, RAW264.7 and rat peritoneal macrophages; at 0.1 μg/well, it showed a significant increase (6-8-fold vs. control) in the production of nitric oxide at 24h, and significantly stimulated (2-4-fold vs. control) the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-12) at 24h. ACA (0.1 μg/well) enhanced the proliferation of murine thymocytes by ~4 fold (vs. control) at 24h; however, ACA does not proliferate B cell-enriched rat splenocytes. Further, it significantly elevated the expression levels of cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-2) over the control in murine thymocytes. Taken together, purified ACA induces a Th1-type immune response in vitro. Though present in low amounts, ACA may contribute to the immune-boosting potential of the popular spice onion since considerable amounts are consumed on a daily basis universally.

  2. Wheat germ agglutinin and other selected lectins increase synthesis of decay-accelerating factor in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bryant, R W; Granzow, C A; Siegel, M I; Egan, R W; Billah, M M

    1991-09-15

    Decay accelerating factor (DAF) is a cell-surface phosphatidylinositol-anchored protein that protects the cell from inadvertent complement attack by binding to and inactivating C3 and C5 convertases. We have measured DAF on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) by immunoradiometric assay after its removal by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C or Nonidet P-40 detergent extraction and have previously demonstrated that DAF synthesis can be stimulated by phorbol ester activation of protein kinase C. We now report that although stimulation (4-48 h) of HUVEC with various cytokines, including TNF, IL-1, and IFN-gamma, did not alter DAF levels, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) (5-50 micrograms/ml), a lectin specific for binding N-acetyl neuraminic acid and N-acetyl glucosamine residues, increased DAF levels fivefold when incubated with HUVEC for 12 to 24 h. The lectins Con A and PHA also stimulated DAF expression twofold, whereas a number of others including Ulex europaeus, Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin I, and Ricinus communis agglutinin I, which bind to endothelial cells, were inactive. The increase in DAF by WGA was inhibited by N-acetyl glucosamine (10-50 mM) but by neither N-acetyl neuraminic acid nor removal of surface N-acetyl neuraminic acid with neuraminidase. However, succinylated WGA, which has unaltered affinity for N-acetyl glucosamine but not longer binds N-acetyl neuraminic acid, was inactive. These data suggest that the binding of WGA to sugar residues alone is not sufficient to trigger DAF expression and that occupation of additional, specific sites are required. The increase in DAF levels on HUVEC was blocked by inhibitors of RNA and protein synthesis. We conclude that continuous occupation by WGA of specific binding sites on HUVEC triggers events leading to DAF synthesis. This unique, long term stimulation of endothelial cells by lectins may be relevant to cell:cell interactions at the endothelium.

  3. The heat-resistant agglutinin family includes a novel adhesin from enteroaggregative Escherichia coli strain 60A.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Justin; Weckselblatt, Brooke; Chung, Yoonjie K; Durante, Julia C; Andelman, Steven; Glaubman, Jessica; Dorff, Justin D; Bhargava, Samhita; Lijek, Rebeccah S; Unger, Katherine P; Okeke, Iruka N

    2011-09-01

    Heat-resistant agglutinin 1 (Hra1) is an accessory colonization factor of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) strain 042. Tia, a close homolog of Hra1, is an invasin and adhesin that has been described in enterotoxigenic E. coli. We devised a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism screen for the associated genes and found that they occur among 55 (36.7%) of the enteroaggregative E. coli isolates screened, as well as lower proportions of enterotoxigenic, enteropathogenic, enterohemorrhagic, and commensal E. coli isolates. Overall, 25%, 8%, and 3% of 150 EAEC strains harbored hra1 alone, tia alone, or both genes, respectively. One EAEC isolate, 60A, produced an amplicon with a unique restriction profile, distinct from those of hra1 and tia. We cloned and sequenced the full-length agglutinin gene from strain 60A and have designated it hra2. The hra2 gene was not detected in any of 257 diarrheagenic E. coli isolates in our collection but is present in the genome of Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg strain SL476. The cloned hra2 gene from strain 60A, which encodes a predicted amino acid sequence that is 64% identical to that of Hra1 and 68% identical to that of Tia, was sufficient to confer adherence on E. coli K-12. We constructed an hra2 deletion mutant of EAEC strain 60A. The mutant was deficient in adherence but not autoaggregation or invasion, pointing to a functional distinction from the autoagglutinin Hra1 and the Tia invasin. Hra1, Tia, and the novel accessory adhesin Hra2 are members of a family of integral outer membrane proteins that confer different colonization-associated phenotypes. PMID:21764925

  4. [Cold agglutinin disease -  no response to glucocorticoids and rituximab, what treatment is best for the 3rd line of therapy? Case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Adam, Z; Pejchalová, A; Chlupová, G; Ríhová, L; Pour, L; Krejčí, M; Cervinek, L; Král, Z; Mayer, J

    2013-09-01

    Acquired autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is divided according to the characteristics of immunoglobulin causing haemolysis. The most frequent are haemolytic anaemia with thermal antibodies. They bind to erythrocytes and initiate their destruction in the reticuloendothelial system cells, leading to extravascular haemolysis. Cold agglutinin disease differs significantly from haemolytic anaemia with thermal antibodies. Agglutination is caused by monoclonal antibodies, in most cases class IgM and very rarely class IgG. Under cold conditions they bind to erythrocytes and cause their agglutination and subsequent disorder of blood circulation in body parts with a lower temperature. Agglutinins binding initiate the binding of the complement to the erythrocytes. Under warm conditions the binding becomes loose but the parts of the complement, which are already bound, cause haemolysis, which is mainly of an intravascular nature. The loose haemoglobin causes haemoglobinuria. Description of a patient with the disease. The 1st symptoms of the disease, i.e. anaemia + circulatory disorders in the acral parts of the body, disappearing under warm conditions followed with haemoglobinuria, led to the dia-gnosis of cold agglutinin disease. The 1st line treatment, prednison, did not show any response. The 2nd line treatment used was rituximab and dexametazon. Rituximab was administered in doses of 500 mg/ m2 to 4 times in a row in weekly intervals. Dexametazon was administered in doses of 40 mg from 1st to 4th day and from 15th to 18th day of the cycle. This treatment, however, did not show any response either. Therefore this article brings an overview of all publications regarding the disease treatment with the aim of choosing the most effective treatment options in the case of failure of the monotherapy using rituximab. The 1st line treatment for cold agglutinin disease is rituximab in monotherapy, usually administered once per week at least for 4 weeks. This treatment shows a response

  5. Identification of two new hemagglutinins of Escherichia coli, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-specific fimbriae and a blood group M-specific agglutinin, by cloning the corresponding genes in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Rhen, M; Klemm, P; Korhonen, T K

    1986-01-01

    Genes encoding the Escherichia coli IH11165 hemagglutinins with specificity for terminal N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and blood group M antigen, respectively, were cloned by a cosmid cloning procedure. A 22-kilobase-pair subclone expressed both hemagglutination specificities in the nonhemagglutinating E. coli HB101 recipient strain. Derivatives obtained by insertion and deletion mutagenesis expressed either one of the two hemagglutination specificities. Both agglutinins were purified; the agglutinin recognizing terminal N-acetyl-D-glucosamine was associated with a new type of fimbria (G fimbria) with an apparent subunit molecular mass of 19.5 kilodaltons, whereas the blood group M agglutinin (M agglutinin) was nonfimbrial and had an apparent subunit mass of 21 kilodaltons. Images PMID:2877972

  6. Candida albicans ALS1: domains related to a Saccharomyces cerevisiae sexual agglutinin separated by a repeating motif.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, L L; Scherer, S; Shatzman, A R; Livi, G P

    1995-01-01

    Transfer of budding Candida albicans yeast cells from the rich, complex medium YEPD to the defined tissue culture medium RPMI 1640 (RPMI) at 37 degrees C and 5% CO2 causes rapid onset of hyphal induction. Among the genes induced under these conditions are hyphal-specific genes as well as genes expressed in response to changes in temperature, CO2 and specific media components. A cDNA library constructed from cells incubated for 20 min in RPMI was differentially screened with yeast (YEPD)- and hyphal (RPMI)-specific probes resulting in identification of a gene expressed in response to culture conditions but not regulated by the yeast-hyphal transition. The deduced gene product displays significant identity to Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha-agglutinin, encoded by AG alpha 1, an adhesion glycoprotein that mediates mating of haploid cells. The presence of this gene in C. albicans is curious since the organism has not been observed to undergo meiosis. We designate the C. albicans gene ALS1 (for agglutinin-like sequence). While the N- and C-termini of the predicted 1260-amino-acid ALS1 protein resemble those of the 650-amino-acid AG alpha 1, ALS1 contains a central domain of tandem repeats consisting of a highly conserved 36-amino-acid sequence not present in AG alpha 1. These repeats are also present on the nucleotide level as a highly conserved 108 bp motif. Southern and Northern blot analyses indicate a family of C. albicans genes that contain the tandem repeat motif; at least one gene in addition to ALS1 is expressed under conditions similar to those for ALS1 expression. Genomic Southern blots from several C. albicans isolates indicate that the number of copies of the tandem repeat element in ALS1 differs across strains and, in some cases, between ALS1 alleles in the same strain, suggesting a strain-dependent variability in ALS1 protein size. Potential roles for the ALS1 protein are discussed.

  7. Effects of Soybean Agglutinin on Mechanical Barrier Function and Tight Junction Protein Expression in Intestinal Epithelial Cells from Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Li; Qin, Guixin; Zhao, Yuan; Wang, Jun; Liu, Feifei; Che, Dongsheng

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we sought to investigate the role of soybean agglutinin (SBA) in mediating membrane permeability and the mechanical barrier function of intestinal epithelial cells. The IPEC-J2 cells were cultured and treated with 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, or 3.0 mg/mL SBA. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity were measured to evaluate membrane permeability. The results showed a significant decrease in TEER values (p < 0.05) in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and a pronounced increase in AP activity (p < 0.05). Cell growth and cell morphology were used to evaluate the cell viability. A significant cell growth inhibition (p < 0.05) and alteration of morphology were observed when the concentration of SBA was increased. The results of western blotting showed that the expression levels of occludin and claudin-3 were decreased by 31% and 64% compared to those of the control, respectively (p < 0.05). In addition, immunofluorescence labeling indicated an obvious decrease in staining of these targets and changes in their localizations. In conclusion, SBA increased the membrane permeability, inhibited the cell viability and reduced the levels of tight junction proteins (occludin and claudin-3), leading to a decrease in mechanical barrier function in intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:24189218

  8. Allergenicity Assessment of Allium sativum Leaf Agglutinin, a Potential Candidate Protein for Developing Sap Sucking Insect Resistant Food Crops

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Hossain Ali; Chakraborti, Dipankar; Majumder, Pralay; Roy, Pampa; Roy, Amit; Bhattacharya, Swati Gupta; Das, Sampa

    2011-01-01

    Background Mannose-binding Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL) is highly antinutritional and toxic to various phloem-feeding hemipteran insects. ASAL has been expressed in a number of agriculturally important crops to develop resistance against those insects. Awareness of the safety aspect of ASAL is absolutely essential for developing ASAL transgenic plants. Methodology/Principal Findings Following the guidelines framed by the Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization, the source of the gene, its sequence homology with potent allergens, clinical tests on mammalian systems, and the pepsin resistance and thermostability of the protein were considered to address the issue. No significant homology to the ASAL sequence was detected when compared to known allergenic proteins. The ELISA of blood sera collected from known allergy patients also failed to show significant evidence of cross-reactivity. In vitro and in vivo assays both indicated the digestibility of ASAL in the presence of pepsin in a minimum time period. Conclusions/Significance With these experiments, we concluded that ASAL does not possess any apparent features of an allergen. This is the first report regarding the monitoring of the allergenicity of any mannose-binding monocot lectin having insecticidal efficacy against hemipteran insects. PMID:22110739

  9. Synthesis of tetravalent LacNAc-glycoclusters as high-affinity cross-linker against Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Makoto; Chuma, Yasushi; Yasumoto, Yoshinori; Onoda, Takashi; Umemura, Myco; Usui, Taichi; Park, Enoch Y

    2016-01-01

    Four kinds of tetravalent double-headed glycoclusters [(LacNAc)4-DHGs] were designed with linkers of varying lengths consisting of alkanedioic carboxyamido groups (C6, C12, C18 and C24) between two bi-antennary LacNAc-glycosides. These glycoclusters served as high-affinity cross-linking ligands for the LacNAc-binding lectin Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin (ECA). The binding activity and cross-linking between each ligand and ECA were characterized by a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), a quantitative precipitation assay and dynamic light scattering (DLS). For the precipitation assay and DLS measurement, the synthesized (LacNAc)4-DHGs were found to be capable of binding and precipitating the ECA as multivalent ligands. ITC analysis indicated the binding of (LacNAc)4-DHGs was driven by a favorable enthalpy change. Furthermore, the entropy penalty from binding (LacNAc)4-DHGs clearly decreased in a spacer length-dependent manner. The binding affinities of flexible (LacNAc)4-DHGs (C18 and C24) with long spacers were found to be more favorable than those of the clusters having short spacers (C6 and C12). These results were supported by molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water molecules for the tetravalent glycoclusters with ECA. We concluded that the subtle modification in the epitope-presenting scaffolds exerts the significant effect in the recognition efficiency involved in the LacNAc moieties by ECA.

  10. Salivary agglutinin is the major component in human saliva that modulates the lectin pathway of the complement system.

    PubMed

    Gunput, Sabrina Tg; Wouters, Diana; Nazmi, Kamran; Cukkemane, Nivedita; Brouwer, Mieke; Veerman, Enno Ci; Ligtenberg, Antoon Jm

    2016-05-01

    Saliva interacts with blood after mucosal damage or leakage of gingival crevicular fluid. Surface-adsorbed salivary agglutinin (SAG) activates the lectin pathway (LP) of the complement system via mannose-binding lectin, while SAG in solution inhibits complement activation. In the present study we investigated if, next to SAG, whole and glandular saliva itself and other salivary glycoproteins activate or inhibit the LP. Complement activation was measured by detecting C4 deposition on microtiter plates coated with saliva or purified proteins. Complement inhibition was measured after incubating serum with saliva or proteins in microtiter plates coated with mannan, an LP activator. Adsorbed whole, sublingual and submandibular saliva showed LP-dependent complement activation. Blood group secretors, but not non-secretors, activated the LP. Saliva of both secretors and non-secretors inhibited C4 deposition on mannan. After depletion of SAG, saliva no longer inhibited the LP. Other salivary proteins, including amylase, MUC5B and histatin 2, did not activate or inhibit the LP. Surface-adsorbed whole saliva and glandular saliva samples activate the LP of complement, depending on the presence of SAG and the secretor status of the donor. In solution, saliva inhibits the LP, depending on the presence of SAG, but independent of the secretor status. PMID:27048414

  11. Wisteria Floribunda Agglutinin-Labeled Perineuronal Nets in the Mouse Inferior Colliculus, Thalamic Reticular Nucleus and Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Fader, Sarah M.; Imaizumi, Kazuo; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Lee, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNNs) are specialized extracellular matrix molecules that are associated with the closing of the critical period, among other functions. In the adult brain, PNNs surround specific types of neurons, however the expression of PNNs in the auditory system of the mouse, particularly at the level of the midbrain and forebrain, has not been fully described. In addition, the association of PNNs with excitatory and inhibitory cell types in these structures remains unknown. Therefore, we sought to investigate the expression of PNNs in the inferior colliculus (IC), thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) and primary auditory cortex (A1) of the mouse brain by labeling with wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA). To aid in the identification of inhibitory neurons in these structures, we employed the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT)-Venus transgenic mouse strain, which robustly expresses an enhanced yellow-fluorescent protein (Venus) natively in nearly all gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibitory neurons, thus enabling a rapid and unambiguous assessment of inhibitory neurons throughout the nervous system. Our results demonstrate that PNNs are expressed throughout the auditory midbrain and forebrain, but vary in their local distribution. PNNs are most dense in the TRN and least dense in A1. Furthermore, PNNs are preferentially associated with inhibitory neurons in A1 and the TRN, but not in the IC of the mouse. These data suggest regionally specific roles for PNNs in auditory information processing. PMID:27089371

  12. Synthesis of tetravalent LacNAc-glycoclusters as high-affinity cross-linker against Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Makoto; Chuma, Yasushi; Yasumoto, Yoshinori; Onoda, Takashi; Umemura, Myco; Usui, Taichi; Park, Enoch Y

    2016-01-01

    Four kinds of tetravalent double-headed glycoclusters [(LacNAc)4-DHGs] were designed with linkers of varying lengths consisting of alkanedioic carboxyamido groups (C6, C12, C18 and C24) between two bi-antennary LacNAc-glycosides. These glycoclusters served as high-affinity cross-linking ligands for the LacNAc-binding lectin Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin (ECA). The binding activity and cross-linking between each ligand and ECA were characterized by a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), a quantitative precipitation assay and dynamic light scattering (DLS). For the precipitation assay and DLS measurement, the synthesized (LacNAc)4-DHGs were found to be capable of binding and precipitating the ECA as multivalent ligands. ITC analysis indicated the binding of (LacNAc)4-DHGs was driven by a favorable enthalpy change. Furthermore, the entropy penalty from binding (LacNAc)4-DHGs clearly decreased in a spacer length-dependent manner. The binding affinities of flexible (LacNAc)4-DHGs (C18 and C24) with long spacers were found to be more favorable than those of the clusters having short spacers (C6 and C12). These results were supported by molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water molecules for the tetravalent glycoclusters with ECA. We concluded that the subtle modification in the epitope-presenting scaffolds exerts the significant effect in the recognition efficiency involved in the LacNAc moieties by ECA. PMID:26672510

  13. Binding of the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin to thymocytes reveals alterations in surface glycosylation during T-cell development.

    PubMed

    Sinkora, J; Kolínská, J; Reháková, Z; Cerný, J; Doubravská, L

    2002-02-01

    Surface binding of the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) to thymocyte subsets has been studied in pigs and rodents by multicolour flow cytometry. In all the species examined, analogous staining profiles have been recorded. Counter-staining with anti-CD3epsilon, anti-CD4 and anti-CD8 monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) revealed that a significant increase of the GNA targets on the cell surface occurred during early thymocyte differentiation and reached its maximum at the level of the CD3loCD4+CD8+ small cortical thymocyte. This was followed by a decrease in the GNA binding capacity upon terminal maturation to the single positive thymocytes. PAGE analysis has revealed a dominant GNA-binding glycoprotein (molar mass approx. 90 kDa) present on thymocyte plasma membranes and absent on the surface of splenic lymphocytes, although both the whole cell lysates from both organs contained GNA ligands of the same size. Our findings are in agreement with previous data showing that immature thymocytes differ from their mature counterparts and peripheral T lymphocytes in the surface glycosylation pattern, and support the hypothesis that lectin-glycoprotein interaction plays a significant role in the cell-to-cell crosstalk in the thymic cortex.

  14. Candida albicans Agglutinin-Like Sequence (Als) Family Vignettes: A Review of Als Protein Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Lois L.; Cota, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Approximately two decades have passed since the description of the first gene in the Candida albicans ALS (agglutinin-like sequence) family. Since that time, much has been learned about the composition of the family and the function of its encoded cell-surface glycoproteins. Solution of the structure of the Als adhesive domain provides the opportunity to evaluate the molecular basis for protein function. This review article is formatted as a series of fundamental questions and explores the diversity of the Als proteins, as well as their role in ligand binding, aggregative effects, and attachment to abiotic surfaces. Interaction of Als proteins with each other, their functional equivalence, and the effects of protein abundance on phenotypic conclusions are also examined. Structural features of Als proteins that may facilitate invasive function are considered. Conclusions that are firmly supported by the literature are presented while highlighting areas that require additional investigation to reveal basic features of the Als proteins, their relatedness to each other, and their roles in C. albicans biology. PMID:27014205

  15. Wisteria Floribunda Agglutinin-Labeled Perineuronal Nets in the Mouse Inferior Colliculus, Thalamic Reticular Nucleus and Auditory Cortex.

    PubMed

    Fader, Sarah M; Imaizumi, Kazuo; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Lee, Charles C

    2016-01-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNNs) are specialized extracellular matrix molecules that are associated with the closing of the critical period, among other functions. In the adult brain, PNNs surround specific types of neurons, however the expression of PNNs in the auditory system of the mouse, particularly at the level of the midbrain and forebrain, has not been fully described. In addition, the association of PNNs with excitatory and inhibitory cell types in these structures remains unknown. Therefore, we sought to investigate the expression of PNNs in the inferior colliculus (IC), thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) and primary auditory cortex (A1) of the mouse brain by labeling with wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA). To aid in the identification of inhibitory neurons in these structures, we employed the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT)-Venus transgenic mouse strain, which robustly expresses an enhanced yellow-fluorescent protein (Venus) natively in nearly all gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibitory neurons, thus enabling a rapid and unambiguous assessment of inhibitory neurons throughout the nervous system. Our results demonstrate that PNNs are expressed throughout the auditory midbrain and forebrain, but vary in their local distribution. PNNs are most dense in the TRN and least dense in A1. Furthermore, PNNs are preferentially associated with inhibitory neurons in A1 and the TRN, but not in the IC of the mouse. These data suggest regionally specific roles for PNNs in auditory information processing. PMID:27089371

  16. Major histocompatibility class I molecules present Urtica dioica agglutinin, a superantigen of vegetal origin, to T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Rovira, P; Buckle, M; Abastado, J P; Peumans, W J; Truffa-Bachi, P

    1999-05-01

    The Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) shares with the superantigens the property of activating T cell subsets bearing particular Vbeta segments of the TCR. However, UDA is a lectin capable of binding to many glycoproteins on cell membranes. The implication of MHC versus other glycoproteins in UDA presentation was presently studied. Using mutant mice lacking MHC class I (MHC-I), MHC class II (MHC-II) or both MHC antigens, we provided evidence that MHC-I and MHC-II molecules serve as UDA receptors. Presentation by either one of these molecules ensured similar T cell responses and co-stimulatory signals were mandatory for optimal T cell activation and proliferation both in MHC-I and MHC-II contexts. Remarkably, in the absence of MHC molecules, UDA could not be efficiently presented to T cells by other glycosylated proteins. Surface plasmon resonance studies were used to confirm the binding of UDA to MHC-I molecules using a fusion protein consisting of MHC-I domains and beta2-microglobulin. The results indicated that the interaction between UDA and MHC-I molecules implicated lectin-binding site(s) of UDA. Taken together, our data demonstrate that, in addition to MHC-II antigens, MHC-I molecules serve as an alternative ligand for UDA.

  17. The anti-tumor effect of Euchema serra agglutinin on colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yuki; Sugahara, Takuya; Ueno, Masashi; Fukuta, Yusuke; Ochi, Yukari; Akiyama, Koichi; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Masuda, Seizo; Kawakubo, Akihiro; Kato, Keiichi

    2006-09-01

    Eucheuma serra agglutinin (ESA) is a lectin derived from a marine red alga E. serra and binds specifically to mannose-rich sugar chains. Previous reports have indicated that ESA associates with several cancer cells via sugar chains on cell surfaces and induces apoptotic cell death. In this study, we investigated the effect of ESA on Colon26 mouse colon adenocarcinoma cells both in vitro and in vivo. ESA induced cell death against Colon26 cells in vitro, and the expression of caspase-3 and the translocation of phosphatidylserine in ESA-treated Colon26 cells suggested that this cell death was induced through apoptosis. An intravenous injection of ESA significantly inhibited the growth of Colon26 tumors in BALB/c mice; moreover, DNA fragmentation was detected in tumor cells following ESA treatment. These results indicated that ESA is effective as an anti-cancer drug not only in vitro but also in vivo. The side-effects of ESA were not considered to be serious because the decrease in body weight of the mice injected with it was negligible. These observations suggest that ESA has the potential to be an effective anti-tumor drug. PMID:16940804

  18. In vitro and in vivo anti-tumor effects of novel Span 80 vesicles containing immobilized Eucheuma serra agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Omokawa, Yousuke; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Walde, Peter; Akiyama, Koichi; Sugahara, Takuya; Masuda, Seizo; Inada, Akihiro; Ohnishi, Yasuyuki; Saeki, Toshiaki; Kato, Keiichi

    2010-04-15

    The lectin Eucheuma serra agglutinin (ESA) is known from previous studies to specifically bind to high-mannose type N-glycans and to induce apoptotic cancer cell death in vitro. In this study, Span 80 vesicles, with an average diameter between about 200 and 400 nm, containing immobilized ESA were prepared from the nonionic surfactant Span 80, also known as sorbitan monooleate. The vesicles were investigated in vitro and in vivo to evaluate the vesicles's potential applicability as novel drug delivery system. The results obtained are promising since the following was observed: (i) vesicular ESA had the same hemagglutinating activity as free ESA, demonstrating its biological activity when bound to the vesicles; (ii) vesicles containing immobilized ESA decreased the viability of Colo201 cancer cells in vitro while the growth of normal cells was not affected; (iii) the vesicles showed binding to Colo201 cells in vitro and caused inhibition of cancer cell growth in nude mice to which the vesicle-treated cells were added; (iv) the vesicles diminished tumor growth after intravenous administration to nude mice which contained an implanted Colo201 tumor; (v) the vesicles showed a tendency to accumulate at the site of the tumor 6h after i.v. administration to nude mice. Thus, all measurements carried out indicate that this type of Span 80 vesicle can be considered as promising alternatives to conventional phospholipid-based vesicles. PMID:20100554

  19. Effects of wheat germ agglutinin on human gastrointestinal epithelium: Insights from an experimental model of immune/epithelial cell interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrina, Chiara Dalla; Perbellini, Omar; Scupoli, Maria Teresa; Tomelleri, Carlo; Zanetti, Chiara; Zoccatelli, Gianni; Fusi, Marina; Peruffo, Angelo; Rizzi, Corrado; Chignola, Roberto

    2009-06-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is a plant protein that binds specifically to sugars expressed, among many others, by human gastrointestinal epithelial and immune cells. WGA is a toxic compound and an anti-nutritional factor, but recent works have shown that it may have potential as an anti-tumor drug and as a carrier for oral drugs. To quantitate the toxicity threshold for WGA on normal epithelial cells we previously investigated the effects of the lectin on differentiated Caco2 cells, and showed that in the micromolar range of concentrations WGA could alter the integrity of the epithelium layer and increase its permeability to both mannitol and dextran. WGA was shown to be uptaken by Caco2 cells and only {approx} 0.1% molecules were observed to cross the epithelium layer by transcytosis. Here we show that at nanomolar concentrations WGA is unexpectedly bioactive on immune cells. The supernatants of WGA-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) can alter the integrity of the epithelium layer when administered to the basolateral side of differentiated Caco2 cells and the effects can be partially inhibited by monoclonal antibodies against IL1, IL6 and IL8. At nanomolar concentrations WGA stimulates the synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines and thus the biological activity of WGA should be reconsidered by taking into account the effects of WGA on the immune system at the gastrointestinal interface. These results shed new light onto the molecular mechanisms underlying the onset of gastrointestinal disorders observed in vivo upon dietary intake of wheat-based foods.

  20. Development of Transgenic Cotton Lines Expressing Allium sativum Agglutinin (ASAL) for Enhanced Resistance against Major Sap-Sucking Pests

    PubMed Central

    Nunna, Hariprasad Rao; Puligundla, Sateesh Kumar; Vudem, Dashavantha Reddy; Khareedu, Venkateswara Rao

    2013-01-01

    Mannose-specific Allium sativum leaf agglutinin encoding gene (ASAL) and herbicide tolerance gene (BAR) were introduced into an elite cotton inbred line (NC-601) employing Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation. Cotton transformants were produced from the phosphinothricin (PPT)-resistant shoots obtained after co-cultivation of mature embryos with the Agrobacterium strain EHA105 harbouring recombinant binary vector pCAMBIA3300-ASAL-BAR. PCR and Southern blot analysis confirmed the presence and stable integration of ASAL and BAR genes in various transformants of cotton. Basta leaf-dip assay, northern blot, western blot and ELISA analyses disclosed variable expression of BAR and ASAL transgenes in different transformants. Transgenes, ASAL and BAR, were stably inherited and showed co-segregation in T1 generation in a Mendelian fashion for both PPT tolerance and insect resistance. In planta insect bioassays on T2 and T3 homozygous ASAL-transgenic lines revealed potent entomotoxic effects of ASAL on jassid and whitefly insects, as evidenced by significant decreases in the survival, development and fecundity of the insects when compared to the untransformed controls. Furthermore, the transgenic cotton lines conferred higher levels of resistance (1–2 score) with minimal plant damage against these major sucking pests when bioassays were carried out employing standard screening techniques. The developed transgenics could serve as a potential genetic resource in recombination breeding aimed at improving the pest resistance of cotton. This study represents the first report of its kind dealing with the development of transgenic cotton resistant to two major sap-sucking insects. PMID:24023750

  1. An atypical IgM class platelet cold agglutinin induces GPVI-dependent aggregation of human platelets.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Guiu, I M; Martínez-Martinez, I; Martínez, C; Navarro-Fernandez, J; García-Candel, F; Ferrer-Marín, F; Vicente, V; Watson, S P; Andrews, R K; Gardiner, E E; Lozano, M L; Rivera, J

    2015-08-01

    Platelet cold agglutinins (PCA) cause pseudothrombocytopenia, spurious thrombocytopenia due to ex vivo platelet clumping, complicating clinical diagnosis, but mechanisms and consequences of PCA are not well defined. Here, we characterised an atypical immunoglobulin (Ig)M PCA in a 37-year-old woman with lifelong bleeding and chronic moderate thrombocytopenia, that induces activation and aggregation of autologous or allogeneic platelets via interaction with platelet glycoprotein (GP)VI. Patient temperature-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia was EDTA-independent, but was prevented by integrin αIIbβ3 blockade. Unstimulated patient platelets revealed elevated levels of bound IgM, increased expression of activation markers (P-selectin and CD63), low GPVI levels and abnormally high thromboxane (TX)A2 production. Patient serum induced temperature- and αIIbβ3-dependent decrease of platelet count in allogeneic donor citrated platelet-rich plasma (PRP), but not in PRP from Glanzmann's thrombasthenia or afibrinogenaemia patients. In allogeneic platelets, patient plasma induced shape change, P-selectin and CD63 expression, (14)C-serotonin release, and TXA2 production. Activation was not inhibited by aspirin, cangrelor or blocking anti-Fc receptor (FcγRIIA) antibody, but was abrogated by inhibitors of Src and Syk, and by a soluble GPVI-Fc fusion protein. GPVI-deficient platelets were not activated by patient plasma. These data provide the first evidence for an IgM PCA causing platelet activation/aggregation via GPVI. The PCA activity persisted over a five-year follow-up period, supporting a causative role in patient chronic thrombocytopenia and bleeding. PMID:25994029

  2. A novel glycobiomarker, Wisteria floribunda agglutinin macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor, for predicting carcinogenesis of liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Iio, Etsuko; Ocho, Makoto; Togayachi, Akira; Nojima, Masanori; Kuno, Atsushi; Ikehara, Yuzuru; Hasegawa, Izumi; Yatsuhashi, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Kazumi; Shimada, Noritomo; Ide, Tatsuya; Shinkai, Noboru; Nojiri, Shunske; Fujiwara, Kei; Joh, Takashi; Mizokami, Masashi; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2016-03-15

    Recently, we identified a novel liver fibrosis glycobiomarker, Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA)-reactive colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (WFA(+) -CSF1R), using a glycoproteomics-based strategy. The aim of this study was to assess the value of measuring WFA(+) -CSF1R levels for the prognosis of carcinogenesis and outcome in liver cirrhosis (LC) patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV). WFA(+) -CSF1R and Total-CSF1R levels were measured in serum samples from 214 consecutive HCV-infected patients to evaluate their impact on carcinogenesis and the survival of LC patients. Serum WFA(+) -CSF1R levels were significantly higher in LC patients than chronic hepatitis (CH) patients (p < 0.001). The AUC of WFA(+) -CSF1R for predicting overall survival, calculated by time-dependent ROC analysis, was 0.691 and the HR (per 1-SD increase) was 1.80 (95% CI, 1.23-2.62, p < 0.001). Furthermore, the survival rate of LC patients with high WFA(+) -CSF1R levels (≥ 310 ng/ml) was significantly worse than those with lower levels (p < 0.01). The AUC of WFA(+) /total-CSF1R percentage (WFA(+) -CSF1R%) for predicting the cumulative carcinogenesis rate was 0.760, with an HR of 1.66 (95% CI 1.26-2.20, p < 0.001). In fact, the carcinogenesis rate was significantly higher in LC patients with a high WFA(+) -CSF1R% (≥ 35%, p = 0.006). Assessing serum levels of WFA(+) -CSF1R has diagnostic value for predicting carcinogenesis and the survival of LC patients.

  3. Crystallographic refinement and structure analysis of the complex of wheat germ agglutinin with a bivalent sialoglycopeptide from glycophorin A.

    PubMed

    Wright, C S; Jaeger, J

    1993-07-20

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) elicits a number of biological effects in erythrocytes as a result of specific binding to the transmembrane protein glycophorin A. The structure of co-crystals of WGA (isolectin 1: WGA1) with a bivalent sialoglycopeptide fragment of glycophorin A (T5), determined at 2.0 A resolution, has been further refined and analyzed with respect to ligand-induced changes in the tertiary structure, mobility, solvation, saccharide conformation and protein/saccharide interactions at three independent N-acetyl-D-neuraminic (NeuNAc) binding sites. The final model, which includes the two independent WGA1 monomers (composed of domains A, B, C and D), two positions for bound T5 sialo-tetrasaccharide (NeuNAc-alpha 2,3-Gal-beta 1,3-(alpha 2,6-NeuNAc)GalNAc) and 386 water molecules, refined to a crystallographic R-factor of 17.1% (Fo > 1.0 sigma) and an average temperature factor of 31.99 A2. Comparisons between the tertiary structures of the liganded and unliganded WGA1 dimers indicate that the largest deviations from 2-fold symmetry are localized in domains engaged in sugar binding (B1 and C2) and at the C-terminal domain of monomer II (D2), forming a strong lattice contact. Interactions of the tetrasaccharide with amino acid ligands in the three binding sites and with water were carefully analyzed and compared. Bound conformations of terminal NeuNAc match to within a root-mean-square delta r of 0.3 A. The specificity-determining N-acetyl group superimposes best in comparison with other substituents of the sugar ring. Of the five domain binding sites that are not occupied in this dimeric crosslinked complex, only one is accessible to the NeuNAc monosaccharide as determined from a difference Fourier map at 3.0 A resolution.

  4. Peripheral injury and anterograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horse radish peroxidase to the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Valtschanoff, J G; Weinberg, R J; Rustioni, A

    1992-10-01

    Previous observations have revealed labeling in the extracellular space surrounding boutons and unmyelinated fibers in superficial laminae of the spinal cord after injection of the tracer wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase in dorsal root ganglia. The degree of extracellular labeling appeared related to the extent of the damage to the ganglia at the time of the injection. To determine whether injury might produce extracellular labeling, we investigated the effects of unilateral nerve crush or transection on spinal labeling after bilateral injections of the tracer into sciatic nerves. Confirming previous reports, labeling was confined to small dorsal root ganglion cells and to spinal laminae I and II, suggesting a selective affinity of this tracer for unmyelinated fibers. Labeling of both ganglion neurons and superficial spinal laminae was increased on the injured side, probably as a result of increased efficiency of receptor-mediated endocytosis. Electron microscopical observations revealed that the tracer was largely confined to unmyelinated dorsal root fibers bilaterally; a higher percentage of these fibers were labeled on the injured side. In the dorsal horn, the tracer was predominantly within unmyelinated axons and their terminals on the control side, whereas most of the labeling was extracellular and transneuronal on the injured side. The extracellular labeling surrounded unmyelinated fibers and their terminals in the spinal cord, but was excluded from the synaptic cleft. The demonstration that injury is accompanied by significantly increased release of this tracer from the terminals of unmyelinated fibers into the extracellular space suggests that endogenous substances may be released after peripheral lesions as a central signal of injury.

  5. An atypical IgM class platelet cold agglutinin induces GPVI-dependent aggregation of human platelets.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Guiu, I M; Martínez-Martinez, I; Martínez, C; Navarro-Fernandez, J; García-Candel, F; Ferrer-Marín, F; Vicente, V; Watson, S P; Andrews, R K; Gardiner, E E; Lozano, M L; Rivera, J

    2015-08-01

    Platelet cold agglutinins (PCA) cause pseudothrombocytopenia, spurious thrombocytopenia due to ex vivo platelet clumping, complicating clinical diagnosis, but mechanisms and consequences of PCA are not well defined. Here, we characterised an atypical immunoglobulin (Ig)M PCA in a 37-year-old woman with lifelong bleeding and chronic moderate thrombocytopenia, that induces activation and aggregation of autologous or allogeneic platelets via interaction with platelet glycoprotein (GP)VI. Patient temperature-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia was EDTA-independent, but was prevented by integrin αIIbβ3 blockade. Unstimulated patient platelets revealed elevated levels of bound IgM, increased expression of activation markers (P-selectin and CD63), low GPVI levels and abnormally high thromboxane (TX)A2 production. Patient serum induced temperature- and αIIbβ3-dependent decrease of platelet count in allogeneic donor citrated platelet-rich plasma (PRP), but not in PRP from Glanzmann's thrombasthenia or afibrinogenaemia patients. In allogeneic platelets, patient plasma induced shape change, P-selectin and CD63 expression, (14)C-serotonin release, and TXA2 production. Activation was not inhibited by aspirin, cangrelor or blocking anti-Fc receptor (FcγRIIA) antibody, but was abrogated by inhibitors of Src and Syk, and by a soluble GPVI-Fc fusion protein. GPVI-deficient platelets were not activated by patient plasma. These data provide the first evidence for an IgM PCA causing platelet activation/aggregation via GPVI. The PCA activity persisted over a five-year follow-up period, supporting a causative role in patient chronic thrombocytopenia and bleeding.

  6. Wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated PLGA nanoparticles for enhanced intracellular delivery of paclitaxel to colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxia; Ho, Paul C; Lim, Lee Yong

    2010-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potentiation of the anticancer activity and enhanced cellular retention of paclitaxel-loaded PLGA nanoparticles after surface conjugation with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) against colon cancer cells. Glycosylation patterns of representative colon cancer cells confirmed the higher expression levels of WGA-binding glycoproteins in the Caco-2 and HT-29 cells, than in the CCD-18Co cells. Cellular uptake and in vitro cytotoxicity of WNP (final formulation) against colon cell lines was evaluated alongside control formulations. Confocal microscopy and quantitative analysis of intracellular paclitaxel were used to monitor the endocytosis and retention of nanoparticles inside the cells. WNP showed enhanced anti-proliferative activity against Caco-2 and HT-29 cells compared to corresponding nanoparticles without WGA conjugation (PNP). The greater efficacy of WNP was associated with higher cellular uptake and sustained intracellular retention of paclitaxel, which in turn was attributed to the over-expression of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-containing glycoprotein on the colon cell membrane. WNP also demonstrated increased intracellular retention in the Caco-2 (30% of uptake) and HT-29 (40% of uptake) cells, following post-uptake incubation with fresh medium, compared to the unconjugated PNP nanoparticles (18% in Caco-2) and (27% in HT-29), respectively. Cellular trafficking study of WNP showed endocytosed WNP could successful escape from the endo-lysosome compartment and release into the cytosol with increasing incubation time. It may be concluded that WNP has the potential to be applied as a targeted delivery platform for paclitaxel in the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:20804835

  7. Wheat Germ Agglutinin Enhanced Cerebral Uptake of Anti-Aß Antibody after Intranasal Administration in 5XFAD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Neelima B.; Davis, Francesca; Chun, Xiao

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the 6th leading cause of death in United States afflicting >5 million Americans. This number is estimated to triple by the middle of the century if effective treatments are not discovered. Current therapy for AD is mainly symptomatic. Effective disease-modifying treatments are needed that would eliminate the cause rather than the symptoms of the disease. Polymerization of monomeric beta-amyloid peptide (Aß) into dimers, soluble oligomers and insoluble fibrils is considered the prime causative factor in triggering AD pathogenesis. Based on these facts, removal/reduction of Aß has gained importance as a primary therapeutic target in treating the cause of the disease. In that regard, passive immunotherapy with direct delivery of anti-Aß antibodies to the brain has shown great promise, but awaits the challenge of overcoming greater influx of anti-Aß antibody into the brain. This investigation was undertaken to maximize direct delivery of immunotherapeutics to the brain by using Wheat Germ Agglutinin (WGA) as a novel axonal transporter-carrier to be conjugated with anti-Aß antibody (6E10) raised against EFRHDS 3-8 amino acid (aa) epitopes of Aß known to react with 1-16 aa residues of mono-/di-/oligomeric Aß. This is the first report showing the use of WGA as an efficient axonal transporter carrier that not only enhanced the influx of anti-Aß antibody directly into the brain but also resulted in greater reduction of cerebral Aß compared to the unconjugated anti-Aß antibody delivered intranasally in Alzheimer's 5XFAD model. PMID:21840361

  8. Establishment and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to carbohydrate antigens on peanut agglutinin receptor glycoprotein of gastric cancer KATO-III.

    PubMed

    Uetsuki, S; Kato, A; Nagakura, H; Fujimoto, K; Kato, Y; Itsuki, Y; Adachi, M; Nakayama, Y

    1992-08-01

    Eight mouse monoclonal antibodies, GOM-1, GOM-2, GOM-3, GOM-5, GOM-6, GOM-7, GOM-8 and GOM-9 were established that recognized carbohydrate antigens on the human gastric cancer cell line KATO-III. Their binding specificities were studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, cellular enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, flow cytometry analysis and thin layer chromatography immunostaining. All these monoclonal antibodies bound to peanut agglutinin receptor glycoproteins and neutral glycolipids extracted from KATO-III cells, but they could be divided into three groups, namely GOM-1, -3, -9 group, GOM-5 and GOM-2, -6, -7, -8 group. GOM-3 specifically bound to the Le(a) structure, Gal beta 1-3 (Fuc alpha 1-4) GlcNAc beta 1-, and GOM-5 specifically bound to the Lec structure, Gal beta 1-3GlcNAc beta-. GOM-2 showed specific binding to KATO-III, but little or no binding to various other cell lines examined or to normal human leukocytic cells. It also did not bind to the synthetic glycoconjugates tested, carrying 10 different terminal sugar chains including T, Tn, Le(a), Lec and Le(x) structures. The binding specificity of GOM-2 was also different from those of the monoclonal antibodies anti-Le(x), anti-Leb and anti-Ley. These results suggest that GOM-2 recognizes a new carbohydrate antigen on KATO-III cells that is distinct from Le(a), Leb, Lec, Le(x), Ley, T and Tn structures. PMID:1398682

  9. [Effect of presowing treatment of spring wheat seeds with wheat germ agglutinin on the chlorophyll content, lectin activity in leaves and nitrogen-fixing capacity of rhizospheric microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Kyrychenko, O V

    2008-01-01

    The response of spring wheat and rhizospheric nitrogen-fixing micro-organisms to the presowing treatment of seeds by wheat germ agglutinin was investigated in conditions of green house experiments. It was shown, that exogenous lectin induced the metabolic changes in plants and caused an increase in chlorophyll content and activity of endogenous lectins in the leaves, as well as enhanced accumulation of plants biomass and nitrogen-fixing capacity of the rhizospheric micro-organisms. These results evidence for the considerable role of exogenous lectin as a regulator of growth and development of plants and activity of the nitrogen-fixing microorganisms. PMID:18710035

  10. Urtica dioica agglutinin, a V beta 8.3-specific superantigen, prevents the development of the systemic lupus erythematosus-like pathology of MRL lpr/lpr mice.

    PubMed

    Musette, P; Galelli, A; Chabre, H; Callard, P; Peumans, W; Truffa-Bachi, P; Kourilsky, P; Gachelin, G

    1996-08-01

    The V beta 8.3-specific superantigenic lectin Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) was used to delete the V beta 8.3+ T cells in MRL lpr/lpr mice. In contrast to the systemic lupus erythematosus-like pathology which progresses with age in the phosphate-buffered saline-injected MRL lpr/lpr controls, UDA-treated animals did not develop overt clinical signs of lupus and nephritis. The pathogenic T cell clones thus reside within the V beta 8.3+ T cell population, which includes an expanded T cell clone described previously. Finally, UDA alters the production of autoantibodies in a sex-dependent manner. PMID:8765010

  11. Ultrastructural localization of wheat germ agglutinin binding sites on the sperm surface of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis). A fracture label study.

    PubMed

    Bains, H K; Pabst, M A; Werner, G; Bawa, S R

    1993-10-01

    In the present study we have examined the plasma membrane surface organization employing fluorescein isothiocyanate linked wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) of the cauda epididymal and ejaculated spermatozoa of water buffalo. Intramembrane particle distribution pattern in the various segments of the spermatozoa has also been observed. WGA-ovomucoid gold has been used to study the distribution of sialoproteins on the sperm surface. With fracture label, WGA receptor sites have been identified on the fractured membrane halves of the sperm plasma membrane overlying the acrosome as well as the middle piece and the principle piece.

  12. Analysis of dynamics and mechanism of ligand binding to Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin. A 13C and 19F NMR study.

    PubMed

    Krishna Sastry, M V; Swamy, M J; Surolia, A

    1988-10-15

    Binding of 13C-labeled N-acetylgalactosamine (13C-GalNAc) and N-trifluoroacetylgalactosamine (19F-GalNAc) to Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin has been studied using 13C and 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Binding of these saccharides resulted in broadening of the resonances, and no change in chemical shift was observed, suggesting that the alpha- and beta-anomers of 13C-GalNAc and 19F-GalNAc experience a magnetically equivalent environment in the lectin combining site. The alpha- and beta-anomers of 13C-GalNAc and 19F-GalNAc were found to be in slow exchange between free and protein bound states. Binding of 13C-GalNAc was studied as a function of temperature. From the temperature dependence of the line broadening, the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were evaluated. The association rate constants obtained for the alpha-anomers of 13C-GalNAc and 19F-GalNAc (k+1 = 1.01 x 10(5) M-1.s-1 and 0.698 x 10(5) M-1.s-1, respectively) are in close agreement with those obtained for the corresponding beta-anomers (k+1 = 0.95 x 10(5) M-1.s-1 and 0.65 x 10(5) M-1.s-1, respectively), suggesting that the two anomers bind to the lectin by a similar mechanism. In addition these values are several orders of magnitude slower than those obtained for diffusion controlled processes. The dissociation rate constants obtained are 49.9, 56.9, 42, and 43 s-1, respectively, for the alpha- and beta-anomers of 13C-GalNAc and 19F-GalNAc. A two-step mechanism has been proposed for the interaction of 13C-GalNAc and 19F-GalNAc with A. integrifolia lectin in view of the slow association rates and high activation entropies. The thermodynamic parameters obtained for the association and dissociation reactions suggest that the binding process is entropically favored and that there is a small enthalpic contribution.

  13. Antiproliferative effect of T/Tn specific Artocarpus lakoocha agglutinin (ALA) on human leukemic cells (Jurkat, U937, K562) and their imaging by QD-ALA nanoconjugate.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Urmimala; Bose, Partha Pratim; Dey, Sharmistha; Singh, Tej P; Chatterjee, Bishnu P

    2008-11-01

    T/Tn specificity of Artocarpus lakoocha agglutinin (ALA), isolated from the seeds of A. lakoocha (Moraceae) fruit and a heterodimer (16 kD and 12 kD) of molecular mass 28 kD, was further confirmed by SPR analysis using T/Tn glycan containing mammalian glycoproteins. N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis of ALA showed homology at 15, 19-21, 24-27, and 29 residues with other lectin members of Moraceae family viz., Artocarpus integrifolia (jacalin) lectin, Artocarpus hirsuta lectin, and Maclura pomifera agglutinin. It is mitogenic to human PBMC and the maximum proliferation was observed at 1 ng/ml. It showed an antiproliferative effect on leukemic cells, with the highest effect toward Jurkat cells (IC(50) 13.15 ng/ml). Synthesized CdS quantum dot-ALA nanoconjugate was employed to detect the expression of T/Tn glycans on Jurkat, U937, and K562 leukemic cells surfaces as well as normal lymphocytes by fluorescence microscopy. No green fluorescence was observed with normal lymphocytes indicating that T/Tn determinants, which are recognized as human tumor associated structures were cryptic on normal lymphocyte surfaces, whereas intense green fluorescent dots appeared during imaging of leukemic cells, where such determinants were present in unmasked form. The above results indicated that QD-ALA nanoconjugate is an efficient fluorescent marker for identification of leukemic cell lines that gives rise to high quality images.

  14. Burkholderia oklahomensis agglutinin is a canonical two-domain OAA-family lectin: structures, carbohydrate binding and anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    Whitley, Matthew J; Furey, William; Kollipara, Sireesha; Gronenborn, Angela M

    2013-05-01

    Burkholderia oklahomensis EO147 agglutinin (BOA) is a 29 kDa member of the Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin (OAA) family of lectins. Members of the OAA family recognize high-mannose glycans, and, by binding to the HIV envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120), block the virus from binding to and entering the host cell, thereby inhibiting infection. OAA-family lectins comprise either one or two homologous domains, with a single domain possessing two glycan binding sites. We solved the structure of BOA in the ligand-free form as well as in complex with four molecules of 3α,6α-mannopentaose, the core unit of the N-linked high-mannose structures found on gp120 in vivo. This is the first structure of a double-domain OAA-family lectin in which all four binding sites are occupied by ligand. The structural details of the BOA-glycan interactions presented here, together with determination of affinity constants and HIV inactivation data, shed further light onto the structure-function relationship in this important class of anti-HIV proteins.

  15. Binding of insecticidal lectin Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA) to midgut receptors of Bemisia tabaci and Lipaphis erysimi provides clues to its insecticidal potential.

    PubMed

    Roy, Amit; Gupta, Sumanti; Hess, Daniel; Das, Kali Pada; Das, Sampa

    2014-07-01

    The insecticidal potential of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectins against hemipterans has been experimentally proven. However, the basis behind the toxicity of these lectins against hemipterans remains elusive. The present study elucidates the molecular basis behind insecticidal efficacy of Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA) against Bemisia tabaci and Lipaphis erysimi. Confocal microscopic analyses highlighted the binding of 25 kDa stable homodimeric lectin to insect midgut. Ligand blots followed by LC MS/MS analyses identified binding partners of CEA as vacuolar ATP synthase and sarcoplasmic endoplasmic reticulum type Ca(2+) ATPase from B. tabaci, and ATP synthase, heat shock protein 70 and clathrin heavy chain assembly protein from L. erysimi. Internalization of CEA into hemolymph was confirmed by Western blotting. Glycoprotein nature of the receptors was identified through glycospecific staining. Deglycosylation assay indicated the interaction of CEA with its receptors to be probably glycan mediated. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed the interaction kinetics between ATP synthase of B. tabaci with CEA. Pathway prediction study based on Drosophila homologs suggested the interaction of CEA with insect receptors that probably led to disruption of cellular processes causing growth retardation and loss of fecundity of target insects. Thus, the present findings strengthen our current understanding of the entomotoxic potentiality of CEA, which will facilitate its future biotechnological applications.

  16. Binding of insecticidal lectin Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA) to midgut receptors of Bemisia tabaci and Lipaphis erysimi provides clues to its insecticidal potential.

    PubMed

    Roy, Amit; Gupta, Sumanti; Hess, Daniel; Das, Kali Pada; Das, Sampa

    2014-07-01

    The insecticidal potential of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectins against hemipterans has been experimentally proven. However, the basis behind the toxicity of these lectins against hemipterans remains elusive. The present study elucidates the molecular basis behind insecticidal efficacy of Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA) against Bemisia tabaci and Lipaphis erysimi. Confocal microscopic analyses highlighted the binding of 25 kDa stable homodimeric lectin to insect midgut. Ligand blots followed by LC MS/MS analyses identified binding partners of CEA as vacuolar ATP synthase and sarcoplasmic endoplasmic reticulum type Ca(2+) ATPase from B. tabaci, and ATP synthase, heat shock protein 70 and clathrin heavy chain assembly protein from L. erysimi. Internalization of CEA into hemolymph was confirmed by Western blotting. Glycoprotein nature of the receptors was identified through glycospecific staining. Deglycosylation assay indicated the interaction of CEA with its receptors to be probably glycan mediated. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed the interaction kinetics between ATP synthase of B. tabaci with CEA. Pathway prediction study based on Drosophila homologs suggested the interaction of CEA with insect receptors that probably led to disruption of cellular processes causing growth retardation and loss of fecundity of target insects. Thus, the present findings strengthen our current understanding of the entomotoxic potentiality of CEA, which will facilitate its future biotechnological applications. PMID:24753494

  17. Biological safety assessment of mutant variant of Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (mASAL), a novel antifungal protein for future transgenic application.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Prithwi; Roy, Amit; Chakraborty, Joydeep; Das, Sampa

    2013-12-01

    Genetic engineering has established itself to be an important tool for crop improvement. Despite the success, there is always a risk of food allergy induced by alien gene products. The present study assessed the biosafety of mutant Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (mASAL), a potent antifungal protein generated by site directed mutagenesis of Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL). mASAL was cloned in pET28a+ and expressed in E. coli, and the safety assessment was carried out according to the FAO/WHO guideline (2001). Bioinformatics analysis, pepsin digestion, and thermal stability assay showed the protein to be nonallergenic. Targeted sera screening revealed no significant IgE affinity of mASAL. Furthermore, mASAL sensitized Balb/c mice showed normal histopathology of lung and gut tissue. All results indicated the least possibility of mASAL being an allergen. Thus, mASAL appears to be a promising antifungal candidate protein suitable for agronomical biotechnology.

  18. 2.2 A resolution structure analysis of two refined N-acetylneuraminyl-lactose--wheat germ agglutinin isolectin complexes.

    PubMed

    Wright, C S

    1990-10-20

    The crystal structures of complexes of isolectins 1 and 2 of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA1 and WGA2) with N-acetylneuraminyl-lactose (NeuNAc-alpha(2-3)-Gal-beta(1-4)-Glc) have been refined on the basis of data in the 8 to 2.2 A resolution range to final crystallographic R-factors of 17.2% and 15.3% (Fo greater than 1 sigma), respectively. Specific binding interactions and water association, as well as changes in conformation and mobility of the structure upon ligand binding, were compared in the two complexes. The temperature factors (B = 16.3 A2 and 18.4 A2) were found to be much lower compared with those of their respective native structures (19 to 22 A2). Residues involved in sugar binding, dimerization and in lattice contacts exhibit the largest decreases in B-value, suggesting that sugar binding reduces the overall mobility of the protein molecules in the crystal lattice. The binding mode of this sialyl-trisaccharide, an important cell receptor analogue, has been compared in the two isolectins. Only one of the two unique binding sites (4 per dimer), located in the subunit/subunit interface, is occupied in the crystals. This site, termed the "primary" binding site, contains one of the five amino acid substitutions that differentiate WGA1 and WGA2. Superposition of the refined models in each of the independent crystallographic environments indicates a close match only of the terminal non-reducing NeuNAc residue (root-mean-square delta r of 0.5 to 0.6 A). The Gal-Glc portion was found to superimpose poorly, lack electron density, and possess high atomic thermal factors. In both complexes NeuNAc is stabilized through contact with six amino acid side-chains (Ser114 and Glu115 of subunit 1 and Ser62, Tyr64, Tyr(His)66 and Tyr73 of subunit 2), involving all NeuNAc ring substituents. Refinement has allowed accurate assessment of the contact distances for four hydrogen bonds, a strong buried non-polar contact with the acetamido CH3 group and a large number of van der

  19. Study of agglutination of mouse mammary carcinoma (FM3A) cell induced by egg agglutinin of Rana catesbiana. II. Phytohemagglutinin P and protamine.

    PubMed

    Takeda, S; Kubota, K; Endo, Y; Matsuzawa, T

    1981-01-01

    When mouse mammary carcinoma (FM3A) cells were treated with egg agglutinin of Rana catesbiana for 15 min at 25 degrees C, percent total particle number of both cell aggregates and single cells was in direct proportion to the cell electrophoretic mobility. Phytohemagglutinin P mediated agglutination proceeded with biphasic kinetics: the higher the concentration of phytohemagglutinin P the shorter was the lag period between the first and second stages of agglutination. In protamine-mediated agglutination, the percent total particle number was reduced at low concentrations, while the electrophoretic mobility reduced only at high concentrations. Agglutinating and cytotoxic activities of these three reagents were in an intimate relation: the higher the agglutinating activity, the greater was their cytotoxic activity. PMID:6969671

  20. Adsorption in vitro to Escherichia coli of antibodies and other proteins in bovine serum and colostrum and its effects on the production of E. coli agglutinins.

    PubMed Central

    Steel, E D

    1975-01-01

    IgGl, IgG2, IgA and IgM from bovine serum and colostrum are adsorbed by Escherichia coli in vitro; lactoferrin is also adsorbed from colostrum and alpha2 macroglobulin from serum. The colostral adsorbed proteins on E. coli appear to reduce formation of agglutinins when the treated bacteria are injected into rabbits and guinea-pigs. Assay of the concentration of proteins dissociated from colostrum-treated cells showed equal amounts of secretory IgA AND IgGl, half that amount of IgG2, and traces of IgM and lactoferrin. Dissociation of proteins from serum-treated E. coli yielded equal amounts of IgGl and IgG2, traces of IgA and an alpha2 macroglobulin, but no IgM. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:1095472

  1. Low-dose intragastric administration of Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin (PHA) does not induce immunoglobulin E (IgE) production in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Haas, H; Herzig, K H; André, S; Galle, J; Gronow, A; Gabius, H J

    2001-04-01

    Native Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin (PHA) poses a potential health threat, when ingested with improperly cooked red kidney beans. Since PHA triggers human basophilic granulocytes in culture to rapidly release considerable amounts of interleukin-(IL-)4 and IL-13, key cytokines for inducing immunoglobulin E (IgE) production, the question was addressed whether this lectin can evoke in vivo IgE production. IgE-low-responder (Sprague-Dawley) rats received PHA (6 mg/rat/day) intragastrically by gavage over a period of 10 days. Up to day 35, there was no IgE induction regardless of whether the animals were boostered subcutaneously with PHA or not, indicating that PHA cannot be regarded as a general IgE inducer in rats. PMID:11788794

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the complex of Maclura pomifera agglutinin with the disaccharide Gal beta 1-3GalNAc.

    PubMed

    Lee, X; Johnston, R A; Rose, D R; Young, N M

    1989-12-01

    Single crystals of Maclura pomifera agglutinin, a seed lectin from the Moraceae family, complexed with the disaccharide Gal beta 1-3GalNAc have been obtained by the method of vapor diffusion with Li2SO4 as precipitant at pH 4.5. The crystals belong to the trigonal space group P3(1)21 or P3(2)21, with a = b = 67.4 A, c = 149.3 A. They contain two subunits per asymmetric unit and diffract beyond 2.7 A. This and other evidence indicate that both this lectin and the Artocarpus integrifolia lectin, jacalin, have dimeric structures rather than the tetrameric structures previously proposed.

  3. Ricinus communis agglutinin I leads to rapid down-regulation of VEGFR-2 and endothelial cell apoptosis in tumor blood vessels.

    PubMed

    You, Weon-Kyoo; Kasman, Ian; Hu-Lowe, Dana D; McDonald, Donald M

    2010-04-01

    Ricinus communis agglutinin I (RCA I), a galactose-binding lectin from castor beans, binds to endothelial cells at sites of plasma leakage, but little is known about the amount and functional consequences of binding to tumor endothelial cells. We addressed this issue by examining the effects of RCA I on blood vessels of spontaneous pancreatic islet-cell tumors in RIP-Tag2 transgenic mice. After intravenous injection, RCA I bound strongly to tumor vessels but not to normal blood vessels. At 6 minutes, RCA I fluorescence of tumor vessels was largely diffuse, but over the next hour, brightly fluorescent dots appeared as the lectin was internalized by endothelial cells. RCA I injection led to a dose- and time-dependent decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) immunoreactivity in tumor endothelial cells, with 95% loss over 6 hours. By comparison, VEGFR-3, CD31, and CD105 had decreases in the range of 21% to 33%. Loss of VEGFR-2 was followed by increased activated caspase-3 in tumor vessels. Prior inhibition of VEGF signaling by AG-028262 decreased RCA I binding and internalization into tumor vessels. These findings indicate RCA I preferentially binds to and is internalized by tumor endothelial cells, which leads to VEGFR-2 down-regulation, endothelial cell apoptosis, and tumor vessel regression. Together, the results illustrate the selective impact of RCA I on VEGF signaling in tumor blood vessels.

  4. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence biosensing for the detection of prostate PC-3 cancer cells incorporating antibody as capture probe and ruthenium complex-labelled wheat germ agglutinin as signal probe.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haiying; Li, Zhejian; Shan, Meng; Li, Congcong; Qi, Honglan; Gao, Qiang; Wang, Jinyi; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2015-03-10

    A highly selective and sensitive electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor for the detection of prostate PC-3 cancer cells was designed using a prostate specific antibody as a capture probe and ruthenium complex-labelled wheat germ agglutinin as a signal probe. The ECL biosensor was fabricated by covalently immobilising the capture probe on a graphene oxide-coated glassy carbon electrode. Target PC-3 cells were selectively captured on the surface of the biosensor, and then, the signal probe was bound with the captured PC-3 cells to form a sandwich. In the presence of tripropylamine, the ECL intensity of the sandwich biosensor was logarithmically directly proportion to the concentration of PC-3 cells over a range from 7.0×10(2) to 3.0×10(4) cells mL(-1), with a detection limit of 2.6×10(2) cells mL(-1). The ECL biosensor was also applied to detect prostate specific antigen with a detection limit of 0.1 ng mL(-1). The high selectivity of the biosensor was demonstrated in comparison with that of a lectin-based biosensor. The strategy developed in this study may be a promising approach and could be extended to the design of ECL biosensors for highly sensitive and selective detection of other cancer-related cells or cancer biomarkers using different probes.

  5. In vivo toxicity and immunogenicity of wheat germ agglutinin conjugated poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid) nanoparticles for intranasal delivery to the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Qingfeng; Shao Xiayan; Chen Jie; Shen Yehong; Feng Chengcheng; Gao Xiaoling; Zhao Yue; Li Jingwei; Zhang Qizhi Jiang, Xinguo

    2011-02-15

    Biodegradable polymer-based nanoparticles have been widely studied to deliver therapeutic agents to the brain after intranasal administration. However, knowledge as to the side effects of nanoparticle delivery system to the brain is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vivo toxicity and immunogenicity of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) conjugated poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid) nanoparticles (WGA-NP) after intranasal instillation. Sprague-Dawley rats were intranasally given WGA-NP for 7 continuous days. Amino acid neurotransmitters, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, reduced glutathione (GSH), acetylcholine, acetylcholinesterase activity, tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) in rat olfactory bulb (OB) and brain were measured to estimate the in vivo toxicity of WGA-NP. Balb/C mice were intranasally immunized by WGA-NP and then WGA-specific antibodies in serum and nasal wash were detected by indirect ELISA. WGA-NP showed slight toxicity to brain tissue, as evidenced by increased glutamate level in rat brain and enhanced LDH activity in rat OB. No significant changes in acetylcholine level, acetylcholinesterase activity, GSH level, TNF-{alpha} level and IL-8 level were observed in rat OB and brain for the WGA-NP group. WGA-specific antibodies in mice serum and nasal wash were not increased after two intranasal immunizations of WGA-NP. These results demonstrate that WGA-NP is a safe carrier system for intranasal delivery of therapeutic agents to the brain.

  6. The effect of concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin on the ultrastructure and permeability of rat intestine. A possible model for an intestinal allergic reaction.

    PubMed

    Sjölander, A; Magnusson, K E; Latkovic, S

    1984-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to lectins, either concanavalin A (Con A) or wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). The lectins were instilled into a ligated segment of the distal small intestine together with permeability markers, fluoresceinated dextran (MW 3,000) or a mixture of differently sized polyethylene glycols (MW 400, 600 and 1,000). WGA-treated rats showed a decreased permeability to small molecules (MW less than 600) of polyethylene glycol but an increase for a larger dextran molecule (MW 3,000). These effects as well as the morphological findings might mimic the situation in patients with food allergy or celiac disease. Con A-treated rats had decreased intestinal permeability to the larger dextran molecules (MW 3,000), whereas the passage of small molecules was unaffected and the ultrastructural effects were minute. The Con A-induced changes could result from a mucotractive effect, associated with a low-grade gut allergy. These observations suggest that lectins can affect both the ultrastructure and the permeability of the intestine, in a way assumed to mimic allergic reactions to food constituents.

  7. Toxicity studies of coumarin 6-encapsulated polystyrene nanospheres conjugated with peanut agglutinin and poly(N-vinylacetamide) as a colonoscopic imaging agent in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, Shinji; Kumagai, Hironori; Shimosato, Moe; Kitamura, Tokio; Mohri, Kohta; Ikejima, Tetsuya; Hiwatari, Ken-ichiro; Koike, Seiji; Tobita, Etsuo; McClure, Richard; Gore, John C.; Pham, Wellington

    2015-01-01

    We are investigating an imaging agent that detects early-stage primary colorectal cancer on the mucosal surface in real time under colonoscopic observation. The imaging agent, which is named the nanobeacon, is fluorescent nanospheres conjugated with peanut agglutinin and poly(N-vinylacetamide). Its potential use as an imaging tool for colorectal cancer has been thoroughly validated in numerous studies. Here, toxicities of the nanobeacon were assessed in rats. The nanobeacon was prepared according to the synthetic manner which is being established as the Good Manufacturing Practice-guided production. The rat study was performed in accordance with Good Laboratory Practice regulations. No nanobeacon treatment-related toxicity was observed. The no observable adverse effect levels (NOAEL) of the nanobeacon in 7-day consecutive oral administration and single intrarectal administration were estimated to be more than 1000 mg/kg/day and 50 mg/kg/day, respectively. We concluded that the nanobeacon could be developed as a safe diagnostic agent for colonoscopy applications. PMID:25725490

  8. Comparative studies of strains Ictero No. I and RGA as the type strain of Leptospira interrogans: agglutinin absorption test, protein and antigen profiles, and enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Hata, K; Ono, E; Yanagawa, R

    1988-01-01

    Strain Ictero No. I, the first isolate of Leptospira, isolated by Inada and Ido in 1914, was found to be sufficiently qualified to be the type strain of Leptospira interrogans rather than strain RGA. In an agglutinin absorption test, anti-Ictero No. I serum was not absorbed completely with strain RGA, and 25% of the homologous titer remained unabsorbed, while anti-RGA serum was completely absorbed with strain Ictero No. I. Thus, strain Ictero No. I was not serologically identical with strain RGA, and the two strains were considered to be different serovars. A protein band with a molecular weight of approximately 33,000 daltons was detected in strain Ictero No. I but not in strain RGA by SDS-PAGE. By Western blotting, this protein band was detectable with anti-Ictero No. I serum but not with anti-RGA serum. The presence of the 33K protein in strain Ictero No. I, but not in strain RGA, was confirmed by radioimmunoprecipitation using [125I]-labeled antigens, indicating that the protein antigen was surface-exposed. Only 8 of the 89 enzymes activities were different between strains Ictero No. I and RGA (line Sapporo). From the above results, we propose that strain Ictero No. I should be designated as the type strain of L. interrogans instead of strain RGA.

  9. Direct and indirect sublethal effects of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) on the development of a potato-aphid parasitoid, Aphelinus abdominalis (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae).

    PubMed

    Couty, A; de la Viña, G; Clark, S J.; Kaiser, L; Pham-Delègue, M -H.; Poppy, G M.

    2001-06-01

    Snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin, GNA), has been shown to confer partial resistance to two potato aphids Myzus persicae and Aulacorthum solani, when incorporated in artificial diet and/or expressed in transgenic potato. First-tier laboratory-scale experiments were conducted to assess the potential effect of GNA on the aphid parasitoid Aphelinus abdominalis. GNA (0.1% w/v) was successfully delivered to Macrosiphum euphorbiae via artificial diet and induced a reduced growth rate and increased mortality compared to aphids fed a control diet. As aphid parasitoid larvae are endophagous, they may be exposed to GNA during their larval development and potential "chronic toxicity" on A. abdominalis was investigated. The amounts of GNA present in aphid and parasitoid tissues were estimated by western blotting. Results suggest that parasitoids excrete most of the GNA ingested. Sublethal effects of GNA on several parasitoid fitness parameters (parasitism success, parasitoid development and size, emergence success, progeny survival and sex ratio) were studied. No direct detrimental effect of GNA on A. abdominalis was observed. However, GNA had an indirect host-size-mediated effect on the sex ratio and the size of parasitoids developing in GNA-fed aphids. This work highlights the need to determine the exact "causes and effects" when assessing the ecological impact of transgenic plants on non-target beneficial insects. Such bioassays form the basis of a tiered risk assessment moving from laboratory studies assessing individuals towards field-scale experiments assessing populations.

  10. Sensitivity of transmitted and founder human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelopes to carbohydrate-binding agents griffithsin, cyanovirin-N and Galanthus nivalis agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bodan; Du, Tao; Li, Chang; Luo, Sukun; Liu, Yalan; Huang, Xin; Hu, Qinxue

    2015-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission often results from infection by a single transmitted/founder (T/F) virus. Here, we investigated the sensitivity of T/F HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Envs) to microbicide candidate carbohydrate-binding agents (CBAs) griffithsin (GRFT), cyanovirin-N (CV-N) and Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA), showing that T/F Envs demonstrated different sensitivity to CBAs, with IC50 values ranging from 0.006 ± 0.0003 to >10 nM for GRFT, from 0.6 ± 0.2 to 28.9 ± 2.9 nM for CV-N and from 1.3 ± 0.2 to >500 nM for GNA. We further revealed that deglycosylation at position 295 or 448 decreased the sensitivity of T/F Env to GRFT, and at 339 to both CV-N and GNA. Mutation of all the three glcyans rendered a CBA-sensitive T/F Env largely resistant to GRFT, indicating that the sensitivity of T/F Env to GRFT is mainly determined by glycans at 295, 339 and 448. Our study identified specific T/F Env residues associated with CBA sensitivity.

  11. [Obtainment of transgenic wheat with the insecticidal lectin from snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin; GNA) gene and analysis of resistance to aphid].

    PubMed

    Liang, Hui; Zhu, Yin-Feng; Zhu, Zhen; Sun, Dong-Fa; Jia, Xu

    2004-02-01

    Snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin; GNA) is toxic to sap sucking injurious insects of Homopteran. A new gna gene has been transferred into common spring wheat Zhong60634 and winter wheat Yumai66 with high yield by using the biolistic transformation method. Transgenic wheat plants have been obtained in both of the two varieties. Two transgenic plants (T0) have been obtained from the bombarded 535 immature embryos of Zhong60634. Bioassay results show that the development of aphid could be slowed down and the survival rate of young aphid could be reduced by gna gene. Seventeen transgenic plants (T0) were obtained from the bombarded 4636 immature embryos of Yumai66. Twenty plantlets with good resistance to Rhopalosiphum padi and Macrosiphum avenae, which are mainly aphid in north wheat area, were identified from the transgenic plants of T1 generation that came from 8 T0 transgenic plants with good resistance to aphid. The anti-aphid bioassay shows that resistance to the different grain aphid is not the same in transgenic wheat plants. To Rhopalosiphum padi, the rate of survival aphid 8 days after exposing transgenic plants to aphids is significantly lower than that of nontransgenic plants. To Macrosiphum avenae, growth speed of aphids is slowed down but not killed. At the same time, the death rate of young aphids is increased. Anyway, feeding of the two kinds of aphids has been controlled in a certain degree by gna gene when aphids can free to move in plants.

  12. Resistance to green leafhopper (Nephotettix virescens) and brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens) in transgenic rice expressing snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin; GNA).

    PubMed

    Foissac, X; Thi Loc, N; Christou, P; Gatehouse, A M.R.; Gatehouse, J A.

    2000-04-01

    Transgenic rice plants expressing snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin; GNA) were screened for resistance to green leafhopper (Nephotettix virescens; GLH), a major homopteran pest of rice. Survival was reduced by 29% and 53% (P<0.05) respectively, on plants where GNA expression was tissue-specific (phloem and epidermal layer) or constitutive. Similar levels of resistance in GNA-expressing transgenic rice were previously reported for rice brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens; BPH). GNA binding to glycoproteins in gut tissues showed that BPH contained more "receptors" than GLH, and that the binding affinity was stronger, particularly in the midgut. Subsequent toxicity of GNA is thus unlikely to be directly related to the amount of lectin bound. GNA was not detected in the honeydew of either insect species when they were fed on GNA-expressing plants, in contrast to results from artificial diet studies. This result suggests that GNA is not being delivered to the insect efficiently. When offered a free choice vs control plants, BPH nymphs tended to avoid plants expressing GNA; avoidance was less pronounced and took longer to develop on plants where GNA expression was tissue-specific, In contrast to BPH, GLH nymphs were attracted to plants expressing GNA, whether constitutively or in a tissue-specific manner.

  13. Peanut agglutinin appearance in the blood circulation after peanut ingestion mimics the action of endogenous galectin-3 to promote metastasis by interaction with cancer-associated MUC1.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qicheng; Duckworth, Carrie A; Wang, Weikun; Guo, Xiuli; Barrow, Hannah; Pritchard, D Mark; Rhodes, Jonathan M; Yu, Lu-Gang

    2014-12-01

    Peanut agglutinin (PNA), which accounts for ~0.15% of the weight of the common peanut, is a carbohydrate-binding protein that binds the oncofoetal Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF) disaccharide (galactoseβ1,3N-acetylgalactosamineα-) that is overexpressed by ~90% of human cancers. Previous studies have shown that PNA is highly resistant to cooking and digestion and rapidly enters the human blood circulation after peanut ingestion. This study investigates the hypothesis that PNA appearance in the circulation after peanut ingestion may mimic the actions of endogenous TF-binding human galectin-3 in metastasis promotion. It shows that PNA at concentrations similar to those found in blood circulation after peanut ingestion increases cancer cell heterotypic adhesion to the blood vascular endothelium and enhances the formation of tumour cell homotypic aggregates, two important steps in the metastasis cascade, and enhances metastasis in a mouse metastasis model. These effects of PNA are shown to result from its interaction with the cancer-associated TF disaccharide on the transmembrane mucin protein MUC1, causing MUC1 cell surface polarization that reveals underlying cell surface adhesion molecules. Thus, PNA appearance in the blood circulation after peanut ingestion mimics the actions of endogenous galectin-3 and promotes cancer cell metastatic spread by interaction with cancer-associated TF/MUC1. As metastasis accounts for the majority of cancer-associated fatality, regular consumption of peanuts by cancer patients would therefore be expected to have an adverse effect on cancer survival.

  14. Exposure of insect midgut cells to Sambucus nigra L. agglutinins I and II causes cell death via caspase-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shahidi-Noghabi, Shahnaz; Van Damme, Els J M; Iga, Masatoshi; Smagghe, Guy

    2010-09-01

    Sambucus nigra agglutinins I and II, further referred to as SNA-I and SNA-II, are two ricin-related lectins from elderberry. SNA-I is a chimeric lectin composed of an A-chain with enzymatic activity and a B-chain with carbohydrate-binding activity, and therefore belongs to the group of type 2 ribosome-inactivating proteins. In contrast, SNA-II consists only of carbohydrate-binding B-chains. The physiological effect of SNA-I was tested on different insect cell lines (midgut, ovary, fat body, embryo). In sensitive midgut CF-203 cells, SNA-I induced cell death with typical characteristics such as cell shrinkage, plasma membrane blebbing, nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation. The effect was dose-dependent with 50% death of 4-day-exposed cells at 3nM. SNA-I exposure induced caspase-3 like activities, suggesting that SNA-I can induce the apoptotic pathway. Interestingly, the hololectin SNA-II also induced apoptosis in CF-203 cells at similar doses with the same physiological events. SNA-I and SNA-II both induced caspase-dependent apoptosis at low concentrations (nM order), leading to typical symptoms of cell death in sensitive cells. This effect seems independent from the catalytic activity of the A-chain, but depends on the carbohydrate-binding B-chain.

  15. A new phosphoglycerolipid, 'phosphatidylglucose', found in human cord red cells by multi-reactive monoclonal anti-i cold agglutinin, mAb GL-1/GL-2.

    PubMed

    Nagatsuka, Y; Kasama, T; Ohashi, Y; Uzawa, J; Ono, Y; Shimizu, K; Hirabayashi, Y

    2001-05-25

    Cord red cell membranes express many differentiation-related molecules. To study such molecules, we have established human cell lines, termed GL-1 and GL-2, by the Epstein-Barr virus transformation method, both of which produce monoclonal anti-i cold agglutinin [Y. Nagatsuka et al., Immunol. Lett. 46 (1995) 93-100]. Thin layer chromatography immunoblotting analysis revealed that these antibodies had broad specificities reacting with a variety of glycolipid antigens. Of the immunoreactive lipid antigens, a new phosphoglycerolipid containing glucose from human cord red cells was found. The isolated lipid was unstable to alkaline hydrolysis and contained glucose as a sole sugar. Secondary ion mass spectrum-collision-induced dissociation mass spectrometric analysis of this lipid gave the main molecular ion peak at m/z 885 corresponding to phosphatidylhexose. This antigen was susceptible to phospholipases A2, C and D but resistant to phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy confirmed that glucose is linked to the sn-glycerol 3-phosphate residue with a beta-anomeric configuration. Based upon these combined results, we identified this lipid as phosphatidyl-beta-D-glucose. This is the first report showing the presence of the glucosylated glycerophospholipid in mammalian sources. PMID:11377429

  16. Differential binding of human blood group Sd(a+) and Sd(a-) Tamm-Horsfall glycoproteins with Dolichos biflorus and Vicia villosa-B4 agglutinins.

    PubMed

    Wu, A M; Wu, J H; Watkins, W M; Chen, C P; Song, S C; Chen, Y Y

    1998-06-16

    The binding patterns of human blood group Sd(a+) and Sd(a-) Tamm-Horsfall glycoproteins (THGPs) with respect to four GalNAc specific agglutinins were studied by quantitative precipitin assay (QPA) and enzyme linked lectinosorbent assay (ELLSA). Of the native and asialo Sd(a+) and Sd(a-) THGP tested by QPA and ELLSA, only native and asialo Sd(a+) bound well with Dolichos biflorus (DBA) and Vicia villosa-B4 (VVA-B4), while Sd(a-) THGP reacted poorly with these two lectins. Neither Sd(a+) nor Sd(a-) THGPs reacted with two other GalNAc alpha-anomer specific lectins: Codium fragile subspecies tomentosoides and Artocarpus integrifolia. Furthermore, the binding of asialo Sd(a+)THGP-VVA-B4 and native Sd(a+)THGP-DBA through GalNAc beta--> was confirmed by inhibition assay. These results demonstrate that DBA and VVA-B4 are useful reagents to differentiate between Sd(a+) and Sd(a-) THGP.

  17. Jacalin and peanut agglutinin (PNA) bindings in the taste bud cells of the rat: new reliable markers for type IV cells of the rat taste buds.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Ryo; Shi, Lei; Fujii, Masae; Ueda, Katsura; Honma, Shiho; Wakisaka, Satoshi

    2005-12-01

    Lectin histochemistry of Jacalin (Artocarpus integrifolia) and peanut agglutinin (PNA), specific lectins for galactosyl (beta-1, 3) N-acetylgalactosamine (galactosyl (beta-1, 3) GalNAc), was applied to the gustatory epithelium of the adult rat. In the ordinary lingual epithelium, Jacalin and PNA labeled the cell membrane from the basal to granular cell layer. They also bound membranes of rounded-cells at the basal portion of taste buds, but the number of PNA labeled cells was smaller than that of Jacalin labeled cells. There was no apparent difference in the binding patterns of Jacalin and PNA among the taste buds of the lingual papillae and those of the palatal epithelium. Occasionally, a few spindle-shaped cells were labeled with Jacalin, but not with PNA. Double labeling of Jacalin and alpha-gustducin, a specific marker for type II cells, revealed that Jacalin-labeled spindle-shaped taste cells were immunonegative for alpha-gustducin. Spindle-shaped cells expressing protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) immunoreactivity lacked Jacalin labeling. During the development of taste buds in circumvallate papillae, the binding pattern of Jacalin became almost identical from postnatal day 5. The present results indicate that rounded cells at the basal portion of the taste buds cells (type IV cells) bind to Jacalin and PNA, and these lectins are specific markers for type IV cells of the rat taste cells.

  18. Primary structure of a Thomsen-Friedenreich-antigen-specific lectin, jacalin [Artocarpus integrifolia (jack fruit) agglutinin]. Evidence for the presence of an internal repeat.

    PubMed

    Mahanta, S K; Sanker, S; Rao, N V; Swamy, M J; Surolia, A

    1992-05-15

    Jacalin [Artocarpus integrifolia (jack fruit) agglutinin] is made up of two types of chains, heavy and light, with M(r) values of 16,200 +/- 1200 and 2090 +/- 300 respectively (on the basis of gel-permeation chromatography under denaturing conditions). Its complete amino acid sequence was determined by manual degradation using a 4-dimethylaminoazobenzene 4'-isothiocyanate double-coupling method. Peptide fragments for sequence analysis were obtained by chemical cleavages of the heavy chain with CNBr, hydroxylamine hydrochloride and iodosobenzoic acid and enzymic cleavage with Staphylococcus aureus proteinase. The peptides were purified by a combination gel-permeation and reverse-phase chromatography. The light chains, being only 20 residues long, could be sequenced without fragmentation. Amino acid analyses and carboxypeptidase-Y-digestion C-terminal analyses of the subunits provided supportive evidence for their sequence. Computer-assisted alignment of the jacalin heavy-chain sequence failed to show sequence similarity to that of any lectin for which the complete sequence is known. Analyses of the sequence showed the presence of an internal repeat spanning residues 7-64 and 76-130. The internal repeat was found to be statistically significant.

  19. Active Targeting to Osteosarcoma Cells and Apoptotic Cell Death Induction by the Novel Lectin Eucheuma serra Agglutinin Isolated from a Marine Red Alga

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Keita; Walde, Peter; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Sakayama, Kenshi; Nakamura, Atsushi; Kameda, Kenji; Masuda, Seizo; Umakoshi, Hiroshi; Kato, Keiichi

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that the novel lectin Eucheuma serra agglutinin from a marine red alga (ESA) induces apoptotic cell death in carcinoma. We now find that ESA induces apoptosis also in the case of sarcoma cells. First, propidium iodide assays with OST cells and LM8 cells showed a decrease in cell viability after addition of ESA. With 50 μg/ml ESA, the viabilities after 24 hours decreased to 54.7 ± 11.4% in the case of OST cells and to 41.7 ± 12.3% for LM8 cells. Second, using fluorescently labeled ESA and flow cytometric and fluorescence microscopic measurements, it could be shown that ESA does not bind to cells that were treated with glycosidases, indicating importance of the carbohydrate chains on the surface of the cells for efficient ESA-cell interactions. Third, Span 80 vesicles with surface-bound ESA as active targeting ligand were shown to display sarcoma cell binding activity, leading to apoptosis and complete OST cell death after 48 hours at 2 μg/ml ESA. The findings indicate that Span 80 vesicles with surface-bound ESA are a potentially useful drug delivery system not only for the treatment of carcinoma but also for the treatment of osteosarcoma. PMID:23346404

  20. Active Targeting to Osteosarcoma Cells and Apoptotic Cell Death Induction by the Novel Lectin Eucheuma serra Agglutinin Isolated from a Marine Red Alga.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Keita; Walde, Peter; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Sakayama, Kenshi; Nakamura, Atsushi; Kameda, Kenji; Masuda, Seizo; Umakoshi, Hiroshi; Kato, Keiichi

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that the novel lectin Eucheuma serra agglutinin from a marine red alga (ESA) induces apoptotic cell death in carcinoma. We now find that ESA induces apoptosis also in the case of sarcoma cells. First, propidium iodide assays with OST cells and LM8 cells showed a decrease in cell viability after addition of ESA. With 50 μg/ml ESA, the viabilities after 24 hours decreased to 54.7 ± 11.4% in the case of OST cells and to 41.7 ± 12.3% for LM8 cells. Second, using fluorescently labeled ESA and flow cytometric and fluorescence microscopic measurements, it could be shown that ESA does not bind to cells that were treated with glycosidases, indicating importance of the carbohydrate chains on the surface of the cells for efficient ESA-cell interactions. Third, Span 80 vesicles with surface-bound ESA as active targeting ligand were shown to display sarcoma cell binding activity, leading to apoptosis and complete OST cell death after 48 hours at 2 μg/ml ESA. The findings indicate that Span 80 vesicles with surface-bound ESA are a potentially useful drug delivery system not only for the treatment of carcinoma but also for the treatment of osteosarcoma. PMID:23346404

  1. The cytotoxic effect of Eucheuma serra agglutinin (ESA) on cancer cells and its application to molecular probe for drug delivery system using lipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, T; Ohama, Y; Fukuda, A; Hayashi, M; Kawakubo, A; Kato, K

    2001-07-01

    Eucheuma serra agglutinin (ESA) derived from a marine red alga, Eucheuma serra, is a lectin that specifically binds to mannose-rich carbohydrate chains. ESA is a monomeric molecule, with a molecular weight of29,000. ESA induced cell death against several cancer cell lines, such as colon cancer Colo201 cells and cervix cancer HeLa cells. DNA ladder detection and the induction of caspase-3 activity suggested that the cell death induced by ESA against cancer cells was apoptosis. ESA bound to the cell surface of Colo201 cells in the sugar chain dependent manner. This means that the binding of ESA to the cell surface is specific for mannose-rich sugar chains recognized by ESA. The binding of ESA to the cell surface of Colo201 cells was slightly suppressed by the high concentrations of serum because of the competition with serum components possessing the mannose-rich sugar chain motifs. On the other hand, a lipid vesicle is a very useful microcapsule constructed by multilamellar structure,and adopted as drug or gene carrier. ESA was immobilized on the surface of the lipid vesicles to apply the lipid vesicles to cancer specific drug delivery system. ESA-immobilized lipid vesicles were effectively bound to cancer cell lines compared with plane vesicles. PMID:19003319

  2. An Unusual Member of the Papain Superfamily: Mapping the Catalytic Cleft of the Marasmius oreades agglutinin (MOA) with a Caspase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Cordara, Gabriele; van Eerde, André; Grahn, Elin M.; Winter, Harry C.; Goldstein, Irwin J.; Krengel, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Papain-like cysteine proteases (PLCPs) constitute the largest group of thiol-based protein degrading enzymes and are characterized by a highly conserved fold. They are found in bacteria, viruses, plants and animals and involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes, parasitic infections and host defense, making them interesting targets for drug design. The Marasmius oreades agglutinin (MOA) is a blood group B-specific fungal chimerolectin with calcium-dependent proteolytic activity. The proteolytic domain of MOA presents a unique structural arrangement, yet mimicking the main structural elements in known PLCPs. Here we present the X-ray crystal structure of MOA in complex with Z-VAD-fmk, an irreversible caspase inhibitor known to cross-react with PLCPs. The structural data allow modeling of the substrate binding geometry and mapping of the fundamental enzyme-substrate interactions. The new information consolidates MOA as a new, yet strongly atypical member of the papain superfamily. The reported complex is the first published structure of a PLCP in complex with the well characterized caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk. PMID:26901797

  3. Exposure of insect midgut cells to Sambucus nigra L. agglutinins I and II causes cell death via caspase-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shahidi-Noghabi, Shahnaz; Van Damme, Els J M; Iga, Masatoshi; Smagghe, Guy

    2010-09-01

    Sambucus nigra agglutinins I and II, further referred to as SNA-I and SNA-II, are two ricin-related lectins from elderberry. SNA-I is a chimeric lectin composed of an A-chain with enzymatic activity and a B-chain with carbohydrate-binding activity, and therefore belongs to the group of type 2 ribosome-inactivating proteins. In contrast, SNA-II consists only of carbohydrate-binding B-chains. The physiological effect of SNA-I was tested on different insect cell lines (midgut, ovary, fat body, embryo). In sensitive midgut CF-203 cells, SNA-I induced cell death with typical characteristics such as cell shrinkage, plasma membrane blebbing, nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation. The effect was dose-dependent with 50% death of 4-day-exposed cells at 3nM. SNA-I exposure induced caspase-3 like activities, suggesting that SNA-I can induce the apoptotic pathway. Interestingly, the hololectin SNA-II also induced apoptosis in CF-203 cells at similar doses with the same physiological events. SNA-I and SNA-II both induced caspase-dependent apoptosis at low concentrations (nM order), leading to typical symptoms of cell death in sensitive cells. This effect seems independent from the catalytic activity of the A-chain, but depends on the carbohydrate-binding B-chain. PMID:20230823

  4. Screening method of carbohydrate-binding proteins in biological sources by capillary affinity electrophoresis and its application to determination of Tulipa gesneriana agglutinin in tulip bulbs.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kazuki; Kinoshita, Mitsuhiro; Oda, Yasuo; Masuko, Takashi; Kaku, Hanae; Shibuya, Naoto; Kakehi, Kazuaki

    2004-09-01

    We developed capillary affinity electrophoresis (CAE) to analyze the molecular interaction between carbohydrate chains and proteins in solution state. A mixture of oligosaccharides derived from a glycoprotein was labeled with 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (APTS), and used as glycan library without isolation. Interaction of a carbohydrate-binding protein with each oligosaccharide in the mixture could be simultaneously observed, and relative affinities of oligosaccharides toward the protein were accurately determined. In this study, we applied CAE to detect the presence of lectins in some plants (Japanese elderberry bark and tulip bulb). In the crude extract of the elderberry bark, binding activity toward sialo-carbohydrate chains could be easily detected. We also examined the presence of lectins in the crude extract of tulip bulbs and determined the detailed carbohydrate-binding specificity of Tulipa gesneriana agglutinin (TGA), one of the lectins from tulip bulbs. Kinetic studies demonstrated that TGA showed novel carbohydrate-binding specificity and preferentially recognized triantennary oligosaccharides with Gal residues at nonreducing termini and a Fuc residue linked through alpha(1-6) linkage at chitobiose portion of the reducing termini but not tetraantennary carbohydrates. The results described here indicate that CAE will be a valuable method for both screening of lectins in natural sources and determination of their detailed carbohydrate-binding specificities.

  5. Derivative of wheat germ agglutinin specifically inhibits formyl-peptide-induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis by blocking re-expression (or recycling) of receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, H.D.; Elfman, F.; Lobo, E.; Sklar, L.; Chenoweth, D.; Hooper, C.

    1986-03-01

    The mechanism of action of a derivative of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA-D) which specifically and irreversibly inhibits N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP)-induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) chemotaxis was examined. At a concentration that completely inhibited PMN chemotaxis, WGA-D had no effect on either the uptake or release of (/sup 3/H)-FMLP by PMN. Similarly, WGA-D did not affect either the short-term binding to, or internalization by, PMN of a fluoresceinated FMLP analog. WGA-D did interfere, however, with the re-expression (or recycling) of FMLP receptors by PMN that had been preincubated with 1 ..mu..M FMLP for 10 min at 4/sup 0/C. This effect was specific for WGA-D, because it was not observed when concanavalin A was used. Scatchard plot analysis of FMLP binding to PMN after receptor re-expression demonstrated that WGA-D-treated PMN had a significant diminution in the number of high affinity receptors. WGA-D-mediated inhibition of FMLP receptor re-expression was associated with inhibition of FMLP-induced PMN chemotaxis, but had no effect on either FMLP-induced PMN superoxide anion generation or degranulation. Studies using (/sup 12/%I)-WGA-D demonstrated that PMN did not internalize WGA-D spontaneously. The data indicate that WGA-D perhaps by binding to the FMLP receptor, inhibits FMLP-induced PMN chemotaxis by blocking the re-expression (or recycling) of a population of receptors required for continuous migration.

  6. Crystal Structure of the C-terminal Region of Streptococcus mutans Antigen I/II and Characterization of Salivary Agglutinin Adherence Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Matthew R.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Crowley, Paula J.; Kelly, Charles; Mitchell, Tim J.; Brady, L. Jeannine; Deivanayagam, Champion

    2012-05-29

    The Streptococcus mutans antigen I/II (AgI/II) is a cell surface-localized protein that adheres to salivary components and extracellular matrix molecules. Here we report the 2.5 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the complete C-terminal region of AgI/II. The C-terminal region is comprised of three major domains: C{sub 1}, C{sub 2}, and C{sub 3}. Each domain adopts a DE-variant IgG fold, with two {beta}-sheets whose A and F strands are linked through an intramolecular isopeptide bond. The adherence of the C-terminal AgI/II fragments to the putative tooth surface receptor salivary agglutinin (SAG), as monitored by surface plasmon resonance, indicated that the minimal region of binding was contained within the first and second DE-variant-IgG domains (C{sub 1} and C{sub 2}) of the C terminus. The minimal C-terminal region that could inhibit S. mutans adherence to SAG was also confirmed to be within the C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} domains. Competition experiments demonstrated that the C- and N-terminal regions of AgI/II adhere to distinct sites on SAG. A cleft formed at the intersection between these C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} domains bound glucose molecules from the cryo-protectant solution, revealing a putative binding site for its highly glycosylated receptor SAG. Finally, electron microscopy images confirmed the elongated structure of AgI/II and enabled building a composite tertiary model that encompasses its two distinct binding regions.

  7. Impact of Wisteria floribunda Agglutinin-Positive Mac-2-Binding Protein in Patients with Hepatitis C Virus-Related Compensated Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Kunihiro; Takata, Ryo; Nishikawa, Hiroki; Enomoto, Hirayuki; Ishii, Akio; Iwata, Yoshinori; Miyamoto, Yuho; Ishii, Noriko; Yuri, Yukihisa; Nakano, Chikage; Nishimura, Takashi; Yoh, Kazunori; Aizawa, Nobuhiro; Sakai, Yoshiyuki; Ikeda, Naoto; Takashima, Tomoyuki; Iijima, Hiroko; Nishiguchi, Shuhei

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to examine the effect of Wisteria floribunda agglutinin-positive Mac-2-binding protein (WFA+-M2BP) level on survival comparing with other laboratory liver fibrosis markers in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related compensated liver cirrhosis (LC) (n = 165). For assessing prognostic performance of continuous fibrosis markers, we adapted time-dependent receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves for clinical outcome. In time-dependent ROC analysis, annual area under the ROCs (AUROCs) were plotted. We also calculated the total sum of AUROCs in all time-points (TAAT score) in each fibrosis marker. WFA+-M2BP value ranged from 0.66 cutoff index (COI) to 19.95 COI (median value, 5.29 COI). Using ROC analysis for survival, the optimal cutoff point for WFA+-M2BP was 6.15 COI (AUROC = 0.79348, sensitivity = 80.0%, specificity = 74.78%). The cumulative five-year survival rate in patients with WFA+-M2BP ≥ 6.15 COI (n = 69) was 43.99%, while that in patients with WFA+-M2BP < 6.15 COI (n = 96) was 88.40% (p < 0.0001). In the multivariate analysis, absence of hepatocellular carcinoma (p = 0.0008), WFA+-M2BP < 6.15 COI (p = 0.0132), achievement of sustained virological response (p < 0.0001) and des-γ-carboxy prothrombin < 41 mAU/mL (p = 0.0018) were significant favorable predictors linked to survival. In time-dependent ROC analysis in all cases, WFA+-M2BP had the highest TAAT score among liver fibrosis markers. In conclusion, WFA+-M2BP can be a useful predictor in HCV-related compensated LC. PMID:27626413

  8. Influence of the maillard reaction on the allergenicity of rAra h 2, a recombinant major allergen from peanut (Arachis hypogaea), its major epitopes, and peanut agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Patrick; Becker, Wolf-Meinhard; Hofmann, Thomas

    2005-03-23

    The influence of thermal processing and nonenzymatic browning reactions on the IgE-binding activity of rAra h 2 was studied and compared to findings recently reported for the allergen's natural counterpart. ELISA experiments as well as inhibition assays revealed that thermal treatment of rAra h 2 in the presence of reactive carbohydrates and carbohydrate breakdown products induces a strong increase of the IgE-binding activity, thus collaborating with the data reported for the natural protein isolated from peanuts. To localize the Ara h 2 sequences responsible for the formation of highly IgE-affine glycation sites, model peptides have been synthesized mimicking sequences which contain possible targets for glycation as well as the immunodominant epitopes. Immunological evaluation of these peptides heated in the absence or presence of reducing sugars and carbonyls, respectively, revealed that neither the two lysine residues of Ara h 2 nor its N-terminus are involved in the formation of IgE-affine structures by Maillard reaction. Also, the cysteine-containing major epitope 3 (aa 27-36) was found to lose its IgE-binding capacity upon heating. By contrast, the overlapping major epitopes 6 and 7, which do not contain any lysine or arginine moieties, showed a distinct higher level of IgE binding when subjected to Maillard reaction, thus giving the first evidence that nonbasic amino acids might be accessible for nonenzymatic glycation reactions and that these posttranslational modifications might induce increased IgE binding of the glycated Ara h 2. Analogous experiments were performed with peanut agglutinin, considered in the literature as a minor allergen. ELISA experiments revealed that the majority of tested sera samples from peanut-sensitive patients showed a high level of IgE binding to the lectin even after heat treatment. In contradiction to published data, nonenzymatic browning reactions seem to deteriorate the IgE affinity of the lectin. PMID:15769170

  9. A dopaminergic projection to the rat mammillary nuclei demonstrated by retrograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase and tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalo-Ruiz, A.; Alonso, A.; Sanz, J. M.; Llinas, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    The presence and distribution of dopaminergic neurons and terminals in the hypothalamus of the rat were studied by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunohistochemistry. Strongly labelled TH-immunoreactive neurons were seen in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, periventricular region, zona incerta, arcuate nucleus, and supramammillary nucleus. A few TH-positive neurons were also identified in the dorsal and ventral premammillary nucleus, as well as the lateral hypothalamic area. TH-immunoreactive fibres and terminals were unevenly distributed in the mammillary nuclei; small, weakly labelled terminals were scattered in the medial mammillary nucleus, while large, strongly labelled, varicose terminals were densely concentrated in the internal part of the lateral mammillary nucleus. A few dorsoventrally oriented TH-positive axon bundles were also identified in the lateral mammillary nucleus. A dopaminergic projection to the mammillary nuclei from the supramammillary nucleus and lateral hypothalamic area was identified by double labelling with retrograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase and TH-immunohistochemistry. The lateral mammillary nucleus receives a weak dopaminergic projection from the medial, and stronger projections from the lateral, caudal supramammillary nucleus. The double-labelled neurons in the lateral supramammillary nucleus appear to encapsulate the caudal end of the mammillary nuclei. The medial mammillary nucleus receives a very light dopaminergic projection from the caudal lateral hypothalamic area. These results suggest that the supramammillary nucleus is the principal source of the dopaminergic input to the mammillary nuclei, establishing a local TH-pathway in the mammillary complex. The supramammillary cell groups are able to modulate the limbic system through its dopaminergic input to the mammillary nuclei as well as through its extensive dopaminergic projection to the lateral septal nucleus.

  10. Stoichiometry of wheat germ agglutinin as a morphology controlling agent and as a morphology controlling agent and as a morphology protective agent for the human erythrocyte.

    PubMed

    Lovrien, R E; Anderson, R A

    1980-06-01

    The lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is an unusually effective agent in controlling both the forward and reverse reactions of the reversible morphology conversion discocyte in equilibrium with echinocyte for the human erythrocyte. Under conditions severe enough to drive the reactions to completion in either direction without the lectin, WGA is able to stabilize both these morphologies and to fully prevent conversion of either morphology. The lectin can quantitatively block both reactions. The ability of WGA to carry out these functions has no obvious rate limitation. Its effectiveness depends mainly on its binding stoichiometry, particularly toward the transmembrane glycoprotein, glycophorin. The critical binding stoichiometries for both the lectin and the echinocytic agent were determined in relation to the binding isotherms using 125I-labeled WGA and 35S-labeled dodecyl sulfate. There appear to be two principal stoichiometries for WGA binding that are important in its control of erythrocyte morphology. The first stoichiometry marks the threshold of obvious protection of the discocyte against strong echinocytic agents such as detergents and, likely, is simply a 1:1 stoichiometry of WGA: glycophorin, assuming currently recognized values of 3--5 x 10(5) copies of glycophorin per cell. The second important stoichiometry, whereby the cell's morphology is protected against extremely severe stress, involves binding of approximately 4--5 WGA molecules per glycophorin. The controls that WGA exerts can be instantly abolished by added N-acetylglucosamine. However, N-acetylglucosamine ligands on the erythrocyte are of less importance than membrane neuraminic acid residues in enabling WGA to control the cell's morphology, as is shown by comparing intact cells with completely desialated cells. WGA can also be used to produce elliptocytes in vitro, but it does this at levels approaching monolayer coverage of the cell with WGA.

  11. Mouse T-lymphocyte activation by Urtica dioica agglutinin. II.--Original pattern of cell activation and cytokine production induced by UDA.

    PubMed

    Le Moal, M A; Colle, J H; Galelli, A; Truffa-Bachi, P

    1992-09-01

    Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) is a T-lymphocyte-specific polyclonal activator that differs from ConA, the classical mouse T-cell mitogen, by inducing a late and limited proliferation of a distinct T-cell subset recruited among both CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes. We investigated the possibility that the particular kinetics may originate from UDA-specific activation processes in which the known early mandatory signals were completed only after an extended delay. We report that the time of contact required between lectin and the cell membrane to acquire the capacity to proceed into cell cycle was much longer (36-40 h) for UDA than for ConA (8-10 h). Addition of phorbol ester, which artificially induces PKC translocation, or ionomycin, which provokes Ca2+ mobilization, did not accelerate the proliferative kinetics, suggesting that these early mandatory signals are not the limiting factors in the delayed proliferation. The induction of c-myc was retarded in the UDA group, and there was a good correlation between the kinetics of c-myc induction and the kinetics of cell proliferation. The comparison of the level of transcription of the genes encoding different cytokines revealed additional differences between the two mitogens: the whole wave of cytokine gene expression was delayed with UDA. In particular, IL2, IL3 and IFN gamma gene expression was retarded compared to the ConA-induced single wave. An even later transcriptional wave took place at around 72 h for IL4 and IL5. Finally, this particular kinetics corresponded to an unusually high level of IL3 and IFN gamma and a low level of IL4 and IL5 gene transcripts.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1439142

  12. Selective expansion followed by profound deletion of mature V beta 8.3+ T cells in vivo after exposure to the superantigenic lectin Urtica dioica agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Galelli, A; Delcourt, M; Wagner, M C; Peumans, W; Truffa-Bachi, P

    1995-03-15

    Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) is a superantigen that, in vitro, binds to specific carbohydrate structures on class II and induces a sixfold enrichment of V beta 8.3+ BALB/c mice splenic T cells. Superantigens have pleiotropic effects in vivo, causing the activation, proliferation, and deletion of specific T cells, but are heterogenous in regard to their effects on T cell tolerization. We, therefore, compared the responses of peripheral T cells from adult BALB/c mice with the i.v. injection of 50 micrograms UDA or the bacterial superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) that also recognizes the V beta 8.3 gene product. The data presented indicate that activation, clonal expansion, anergy, and death of V beta 8.3+ T cells occur sequentially after UDA administration. Two days after UDA injection, the proportion of V beta 8.3+ T cells in the periphery is elevated to approximately twice that of normal mice. This expansion occurs in both CD4+ and CD8+ subsets. V beta 8.3+ T cells from UDA-primed mice are anergic to UDA restimulation and fail to proliferate or to produce IL-2. Futhermore, the proliferation of V beta 8.3+ T cells is followed by their rapid disappearance concomitant with their specific elimination by apoptosis. In 1 wk, all CD4+ V beta 8.3+ peripheral T cells are deleted. The decline of V beta 8.3+ T cells in the CD4+ subset is more than in the CD8+ subset. This occurs in thymectomized and in thymus-intact animals. Two months after UDA priming, the percentage of V beta 8.3+ T cells is still lower than in control mice. PMID:7876535

  13. Bi- to tetravalent glycoclusters presenting GlcNAc/GalNAc as inhibitors: from plant agglutinins to human macrophage galactose-type lectin (CD301) and galectins.

    PubMed

    André, Sabine; O'Sullivan, Shane; Koller, Christiane; Murphy, Paul V; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-14

    Emerging insights into the functional spectrum of tissue lectins leads to identification of new targets for the custom-made design of potent inhibitors, providing a challenge for synthetic chemistry. The affinity and selectivity of a carbohydrate ligand for a lectin may immensely be increased by a number of approaches, which includes varying geometrical or topological features. This perspective leads to the design and synthesis of glycoclusters and their testing using assays of physiological relevance. Herein, hydroquinone, resorcinol, benzene-1,3,5-triol and tetra(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethene have been employed as scaffolds and propargyl derivatives obtained. The triazole-containing linker to the α/β-O/S-glycosides of GlcNAc/GalNAc presented on these scaffolds was generated by copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. This strategy was used to give a panel of nine glycoclusters with bi-, tri- and tetravalency. Maintained activity for lectin binding after conjugation was ascertained for both sugars in solid-phase assays with the plant agglutinins WGA (GlcNAc) and DBA (GalNAc). Absence of cross-reactivity excluded any carbohydrate-independent reactivity of the bivalent compounds, allowing us to proceed to further testing with a biomedically relevant lectin specific for GalNAc. Macrophage galactose(-binding C)-type lectin, involved in immune defence by dendritic cells and in virus uptake, was produced as a soluble protein without/with its α-helical coiled-coil stalk region. Binding to ligands presented on a matrix and on cell surfaces was highly susceptible to the presence of the tetravalent inhibitor derived from the tetraphenylethene-containing scaffold, and presentation of GalNAc with an α-thioglycosidic linkage proved favorable. Cross-reactivity of this glycocluster to human galectins-3 and -4, which interact with Tn-antigen-presenting mucins, was rather small. Evidently, the valency and spatial display of α-GalNAc residues is a key factor to design potent and

  14. Bi- to tetravalent glycoclusters presenting GlcNAc/GalNAc as inhibitors: from plant agglutinins to human macrophage galactose-type lectin (CD301) and galectins.

    PubMed

    André, Sabine; O'Sullivan, Shane; Koller, Christiane; Murphy, Paul V; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-14

    Emerging insights into the functional spectrum of tissue lectins leads to identification of new targets for the custom-made design of potent inhibitors, providing a challenge for synthetic chemistry. The affinity and selectivity of a carbohydrate ligand for a lectin may immensely be increased by a number of approaches, which includes varying geometrical or topological features. This perspective leads to the design and synthesis of glycoclusters and their testing using assays of physiological relevance. Herein, hydroquinone, resorcinol, benzene-1,3,5-triol and tetra(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethene have been employed as scaffolds and propargyl derivatives obtained. The triazole-containing linker to the α/β-O/S-glycosides of GlcNAc/GalNAc presented on these scaffolds was generated by copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. This strategy was used to give a panel of nine glycoclusters with bi-, tri- and tetravalency. Maintained activity for lectin binding after conjugation was ascertained for both sugars in solid-phase assays with the plant agglutinins WGA (GlcNAc) and DBA (GalNAc). Absence of cross-reactivity excluded any carbohydrate-independent reactivity of the bivalent compounds, allowing us to proceed to further testing with a biomedically relevant lectin specific for GalNAc. Macrophage galactose(-binding C)-type lectin, involved in immune defence by dendritic cells and in virus uptake, was produced as a soluble protein without/with its α-helical coiled-coil stalk region. Binding to ligands presented on a matrix and on cell surfaces was highly susceptible to the presence of the tetravalent inhibitor derived from the tetraphenylethene-containing scaffold, and presentation of GalNAc with an α-thioglycosidic linkage proved favorable. Cross-reactivity of this glycocluster to human galectins-3 and -4, which interact with Tn-antigen-presenting mucins, was rather small. Evidently, the valency and spatial display of α-GalNAc residues is a key factor to design potent and

  15. Early Serologic Diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia: An Observational Study on Changes in Titers of Specific-IgM Antibodies and Cold Agglutinins

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Churl; Youn, You-Sook; Rhim, Jung-Woo; Kang, Jin-Han; Lee, Kyung-Yil

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There have been some limitations on early diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) infection because of no immunoglobulin M (IgM) responses and variable detection rates of polymerase chain reaction in the early stage of the disease. We wanted to discuss regarding early diagnostic method using short-term paired titration of MP-specific IgM and cold agglutinins (CAs) in the early stage of MP pneumonia. The participants of this study were 418 children with MP pneumonia during 2 recent epidemics (2006–2007 and 2011), and they were diagnosed by an anti-MP IgM antibody test (Serodia Myco II) examined twice during hospitalization at presentation and around discharge (mean of 3.4 ± 1.3 days apart). CA titers were simultaneously examined twice during study period. Anti-MP IgM antibody titer ≥1:40 and CA titer ≥1:4 were considered positive, respectively. The relationships between 2 IgM antibodies in the early stage were evaluated. Regarding MP-specific antibody titers, 148 patients showed a seroconversion, 245 patients exhibited increased titers, and 25 patients had unchanged higher titers (≥1:640) during hospitalization. The median MP-specific antibody titers at each examination time were 1:80 and 1:640, respectively; those of CAs were 1:8 and 1:32, respectively. Illness duration prior to admission showed a trend of association with both titers, and patients with shorter illness duration had a higher rate of negative titers or lower titers at each examination time. CAs and MP-specific antibody titers were correlated in the total patients at presentation and at 2nd examination (P < 0.001, respectively), and the diagnostic corresponding rates of CAs to IgM antibody test were 81% to 96% in patient subgroups. Short-term paired MP specific-IgM determinations in the acute stage may be used as a definitive diagnostic method for MP pneumonia. Paired CA titers showed a correlation with MP-specific antibody titers, suggesting they can be used as an adjuvant

  16. Topography of the combining region of a Thomsen-Friedenreich-antigen-specific lectin jacalin (Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin). A thermodynamic and circular-dichroism spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Mahanta, S K; Sastry, M V; Surolia, A

    1990-02-01

    Thermodynamic analysis of carbohydrate binding by Artocarpus integrifolia (jackfruit) agglutinin (jacalin) shows that, among monosaccharides, Me alpha GalNAc (methyl-alpha-N-acetylgalactosamine) is the strongest binding ligand. Despite its strong affinity for Me alpha GalNAc and Me alpha Gal, the lectin binds very poorly when Gal and GalNAc are in alpha-linkage with other sugars such as in A- and B-blood-group trisaccharides, Gal alpha 1-3Gal and Gal alpha 1-4Gal. These binding properties are explained by considering the thermodynamic parameters in conjunction with the minimum energy conformations of these sugars. It binds to Gal beta 1-3GalNAc alpha Me with 2800-fold stronger affinity over Gal beta 1-3GalNAc beta Me. It does not bind to asialo-GM1 (monosialoganglioside) oligosaccharide. Moreover, it binds to Gal beta 1-3GalNAc alpha Ser, the authentic T (Thomsen-Friedenreich)-antigen, with about 2.5-fold greater affinity as compared with Gal beta 1-3GalNAc. Asialoglycophorin A was found to be about 169,333 times stronger an inhibitor than Gal beta 1-3GalNAc. The present study thus reveals the exquisite specificity of A. integrifolia lectin for the T-antigen. Appreciable binding of disaccharides Glc beta 1-3GalNAc and GlcNAc beta 1-3Gal and the very poor binding of beta-linked disaccharides, which instead of Gal and GalNAc contain other sugars at the reducing end, underscore the important contribution made by Gal and GalNAc at the reducing end for recognition by the lectin. The ligand-structure-dependent alterations of the c.d. spectrum in the tertiary structural region of the protein allows the placement of various sugar units in the combining region of the lectin. These studies suggest that the primary subsite (subsite A) can accommodate only Gal or GalNAc or alpha-linked Gal or GalNAc, whereas the secondary subsite (subsite B) can associate either with GalNAc beta Me or Gal beta Me. Considering these factors a likely arrangement for various disaccharides in the

  17. Functional phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) expressed in Pichia pastoris correct N-terminal processing and secretion of heterologous proteins expressed using the PHA-E signal peptide.

    PubMed

    Raemaekers, R J; de Muro, L; Gatehouse, J A; Fordham-Skelton, A P

    1999-10-01

    Phytohemagglutinin (Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin; PHA; E- and L-forms) and snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin; GNA) were expressed in Pichia pastoris using native signal peptides, or the Saccharomyces alpha-factor preprosequence, to direct proteins into the secretory pathway. PHA and GNA were present as soluble, functional proteins in culture supernatants when expressed from constructs containing the alpha-factor preprosequence. The recombinant lectins, purified by affinity chromatography, agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes at concentrations similar to the respective native lectins. However, incomplete processing of the signal sequence resulted in PHA-E, PHA-L and GNA with heterogenous N-termini, with the majority of the protein containing N-terminal extensions derived from the alpha-factor prosequence. Polypeptides in which most of the alpha-factor prosequence was present were also glycosylated. Inclusion of Glu-Ala repeats at the C-terminal end of the alpha-factor preprosequence led to efficient processing N-terminal to the Glu-Ala sequence, but inefficient removal of the repeats themselves, resulting in polypeptides with heterogenous N-termini still containing N-terminal extensions. In contrast, PHA expressed with the native signal peptide was secreted, correctly processed, and also fully functional. No expression of GNA from a construct containing the native GNA signal peptide was observed. The PHA-E signal peptide directed correct processing and secretion of both GNA and green fluorescent protein (GFP) when used in expression constructs, and is suggested to have general utility for synthesis of correctly processed proteins in Pichia.

  18. Effects of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) expressed in tomato leaves on larvae of the tomato moth Lacanobia oleracea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and the effect of GNA on the development of the endoparasitoid Meteorus gyrator (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    PubMed

    Wakefield, M E; Bell, H A; Fitches, E C; Edwards, J P; Gatehouse, A M R

    2006-02-01

    The effect of ingestion of transgenic tomato leaves expressing the plant lectin Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) on development of larvae of Lacanobia oleracea (Linnaeus) was studied under laboratory conditions. When L. oleracea larvae were fed on tomato line 14.1H, expressing approximately 2.0% GNA, significant increases in the mean larval weight and in the amount of food consumed were found. This resulted in an overall reduction in the mean development time to the pupal stage of approximately 7 days. A significant increase in the percentage survival to the adult moth was also recorded when newly hatched larvae were reared on transgenic tomato leaves (72%) compared to larvae reared on untransformed leaves (40%). The effects of ingestion of GNA by L. oleracea larvae, via artificial diet or the leaves of transgenic tomato or potato plants, on the subsequent development of its solitary endoparasitoid Meteorus gyrator (Thunberg) was also studied. No significant effects on the life cycle parameters of M. gyrator developing in L. oleracea fed on GNA-containing diets were observed. Experiments with transgenic potato plants indicated that the stadium of the host larvae at parasitism had a greater influence on M. gyrator development than the presence of GNA. Potential GNA-binding glycoproteins were detected in the gut and body tissues of larval M. gyrator. Despite detection in host tissues, GNA could not be detected in adult M. gyrator and therefore it is likely that at the time of pupation M. gyrator are able to void the GNA in the meconial pellet.

  19. Determination of trace alkaline phosphatase by affinity adsorption solid substrate room temperature phosphorimetry based on wheat germ agglutinin labeled with 8-quinolineboronic acid phosphorescent molecular switch and prediction of diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia-Ming; Gao, Hui; Li, Fei-Ming; Shi, Xiu-Mei; Lin, Chang-Qing; Lin, Li-Ping; Wang, Xin-Xing; Li, Zhi-Ming

    2010-09-01

    The 8-quinolineboronic acid phosphorescent molecular switch (abbreviated as PMS-8-QBA. Thereinto, 8-QBA is 8-quinolineboronic acid, and PMS is phosphorescent molecular switch) was found for the first time. PMS-8-QBA, which was in the "off" state, could only emit weak room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) on the acetyl cellulose membrane (ACM). However, PMS-8-QBA turned "on" automatically for its changed structure, causing that the RTP of 8-QBA in the system increased, after PMS-8-QBA-WGA (WGA is wheat germ agglutinin) was formed by reaction between -OH of PMS-8-QBA and -COOH of WGA. More interesting is that the -NH 2 of PMS-8-QBA-WGA could react with the -COOH of alkaline phosphatase (AP) to form the affinity adsorption (AA) product WGA-AP-WGA-8-QBA-PMS (containing -NH-CO- bond), which caused RTP of the system to greatly increase. Thus, affinity adsorption solid substrate room temperature phosphorimetry using PMS-8-QBA as labelling reagent (PMS-8-QBA-AA-SSRTP) for the determination of trace AP was established. The method had many advantages, such as high sensitivity (the detection limit (LD) was 2.5 zg spot -1. For sample volume of 0.40 μl spot -1, corresponding concentration was 6.2 × 10 -18 g ml -1), good selectivity (the allowed concentration of coexisting material was higher, when the relative error was ±5%), high accuracy (applied to detection of AP content in serum samples, the result was coincided with those obtained by enzyme-linked immunoassay), which was suitable for the detection of trace AP content in serum samples and the forecast of human diseases. Meanwhile, the mechanism of PMS-8-QBA-AASSRTP was discussed. The new field of analytical application and clinic diagnosis technique of molecule switch are exploited, based on the phosphorescence characteristic of PMS-8-QBA, the AA reaction between WGA and AP, as well as the relation between AP content and human diseases. The research results promote the development and interpenetrate among molecule

  20. Bauhinia purpurea--a new paraffin section marker for Reed-Sternberg cells of Hodgkin's disease. A comparison with Leu-M1 (CD15), LN2 (CD74), peanut agglutinin, and Ber-H2 (CD30).

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, A. B.; Akagi, T.; Jeon, H. J.; Miyake, K.; Murakami, I.; Yoshino, T.; Takahashi, K.; Nose, S.

    1992-01-01

    Thirty-three cases of Hodgkin's disease (thirteen nodular sclerosis, four diffuse, lymphocyte predominance, and sixteen mixed cellularity) were studied with Bauhinia purpurea (BPA), peanut agglutinin (PNA), anti-Leu-M1, LN2, and Ber-H2 by the avidinbiotin-peroxidase complex (ABC) method in paraffin sections. Reed-Sternberg (RS) cells and variants were stained positively with one or more of the reagents in all cases. BPA staining was positive in 32 of 33 cases (97.0%), PNA staining was positive in 23 of 33 cases (69.7%), Leu-M1 was positive in 13 of 33 cases (39.4%), LN2 was positive in 14 of 33 cases (42.4%), and Ber-H2 was positive in 24 of 33 cases (72.7%). Many RS cells were stained moderately to strongly and were readily recognized in 31 cases (96.9%) of BPA+, 10 (43.5%) of PNA+, 8 (61.5%) of Leu-M1+, 6 (42.9%) of LN2+, and 22 (91.7%) of Ber-H2+ cases; in the remaining positive cases, the RS cells were found only after careful searching. Three staining patterns were recognized: paranuclear, diffuse cytoplasmic, and membranous. These three patterns were obtained with all markers except for LN2. LN2 showed diffuse cytoplasmic staining in most of the positive cells, and a few cells showed paranuclear deposits. BPA reactivity was not affected by formalin fixation or paraffin embedding. Except for RS cells, BPA also showed dense cytoplasmic staining reaction with macrophage-histiocytes. Sixty cases of non-Hodgkin's diffuse lymphomas (30 T- and 30 B-cell origin) were also studied. Tumor cells were not stained with BPA, PNA, and Leu-M1, but stained positively with LN2 in six T-cell lymphomas and thirteen B-cell lymphomas, and with Ber-H2 in six T-cell lymphomas and one B-cell lymphoma. In conclusion, to facilitate the detection of RS cells and related variants in paraffin sections, BPA can be accepted as a useful marker due to its high-detection rate, reproducible staining pattern, and resistance to fixatives. Images Figure 1 PMID:1352944

  1. Studies on the neuronal Golgi apparatus-complex. I. Quantitative ultrastructural autoradiographic analysis of the endocytosis into the Golgi complex of wheat germ agglutinin by cultured murine neuroblastoma cells. II. Identification of a 160 Kd polypeptide of the medial cisterns of the Golgi complex

    SciTech Connect

    Mezitis, S.G.E.

    1987-01-01

    An ultrastructural autoradiographic method is presented which quantitates the sequential endocytosis of tritiated wheat germ agglutinin (N-(acetyl-/sup 3/H)-WGA) into the Golgi complex and lysosomes of cultured murine neuroblastoma cells. Cells were incubated with /sup 3/H-WGA for one hour at 4/sup 0/C, washed and incubated in complete medium without ligand at 37/sup 0/C for 5, 15, 30, and 120 minutes. At 15 minutes, the optimized sources/..mu..m/sup 2/ of neuroblastoma cell area, which represented the grain density of each compartment, were: Golgi associated vesicles, i.e. clusters of vesicles within a one micron radius of the Golgi cisterns, (1.41 + -0.28), Golgi cisterns (0.73 + -0.41), lysosomes (0.1 + -0.09); at two hours, Golgi associated vesicles exhibited some labeling ((0.71 + -0.1), while lysosomes were heavily labeled (2.17 + -0.22). These results are consistent with the hypotheses that either the Golgi complex (cisterns and associated vesicles) is an early and intermediate step of the endocytosis of /sup 3/H-WGA into lysosomes, or that it constitutes part of a separate and quantitatively significant pathway of endocytosis of this ligand.

  2. Genetic labeling of both the axons of transduced, glutamatergic neurons in rat postrhinal cortex and their postsynaptic neurons in other neocortical areas by herpes simplex virus vectors that coexpress an axon-targeted β-galactosidase and wheat germ agglutinin from a vesicular glutamate transporter-1 promoter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-rong; Cao, Haiyan; Li, Xu; Zhao, Hua; Geller, Alfred I

    2010-11-18

    Neuronal circuits comprise the foundation for neuronal physiology and synaptic plasticity, and thus for consequent behaviors and learning, but our knowledge of neocortical circuits is incomplete. Mapping neocortical circuits is a challenging problem because these circuits contain large numbers of neurons, a high density of synapses, and numerous classes and subclasses of neurons that form many different types of synapses. Expression of specific genetic tracers in small numbers of specific subclasses of neocortical neurons has the potential to map neocortical circuits. Suitable genetic tracers have been established in neurons in subcortical areas, but application to neocortical circuits has been limited. Enabling this approach, Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) plasmid (amplicon) vectors can transduce small numbers of neurons in a specific neocortical area. Further, expression of a particular genetic tracer can be restricted to specific subclasses of neurons; in particular, the vesicular glutamate transporter-1 (VGLUT1) promoter supports expression in VGLUT1-containing glutamatergic neurons in rat postrhinal (POR) cortex. Here, we show that expression of an axon-targeted β-galactosidase (β-gal) from such vectors supports mapping specific commissural and associative projections of the transduced neurons in POR cortex. Further, coexpression of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and an axon-targeted β-gal supports mapping both specific projections of the transduced neurons and identifying specific postsynaptic neurons for the transduced neurons. The neocortical circuit mapping capabilities developed here may support mapping specific neocortical circuits that have critical roles in cognitive learning.

  3. Production of Highly Sialylated Recombinant Glycoproteins Using Ricinus communis Agglutinin-I-Resistant CHO Glycosylation Mutants.

    PubMed

    Goh, John S Y; Chan, Kah Fai; Song, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    The degree of sialylation of therapeutic glycoproteins affects its circulatory half-life and efficacy because incompletely sialylated glycoproteins are cleared from circulation by asialoglycoprotein receptors present in the liver cells. Mammalian expression systems, often employed in the production of these glycoprotein drugs, produce heterogeneously sialylated products. Here, we describe how to produce highly sialylated glycoproteins using a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell glycosylation mutant called CHO-gmt4 with human erythropoietin (EPO) as a model glycoprotein. The protocol describes how to isolate and characterize the CHO glycosylation mutants and how to assess the sialylation of the recombinant protein using isoelectric focusing (IEF). It further describes how to inactivate the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene in these cells using zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) technology to enable gene amplification and the generation of stable cell lines producing highly sialylated EPO.

  4. Dynamics of Agglutinin-Like Sequence (ALS) Protein Localization on the Surface of Candida Albicans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, David Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The ALS gene family encodes large cell-surface glycoproteins associated with "C. albicans" pathogenesis. Als proteins are thought to act as adhesin molecules binding to host tissues. Wide variation in expression levels among the ALS genes exists and is related to cell morphology and environmental conditions. "ALS1," "ALS3," and "ALS4" are three of…

  5. Precursors of ricin and Ricinus communis agglutinin. Glycosylation and processing during synthesis and intracellular transport.

    PubMed

    Lord, J M

    1985-01-15

    During synthesis in vivo the castor bean lectin precursors initially appear in the endoplasmic reticulum as a group of core glycosylated polypeptides of relative molecular mass 64 000-68 000. Pretreatment of intact castor bean endosperm tissue with tunicamycin partially inhibits the cotranslational core glycosylation step and results in the accumulation of a single sized unglycosylated precursor polypeptide of relative molecular mass 59 000. The glycosylated precursors in the endoplasmic reticulum were enzymically converted to the 59 000-Mr form by incubation with endoglucosaminidase H. Intracellular transport of the glycosylated lectin precursors from the endoplasmic reticulum to a denser vesicle fraction was accompanied by modifications to the oligosaccharide moieties which conferred resistance to the action of endoglucosaminidase H. The post-translational addition of fucose to the carbohydrate chain was identified as one of the oligosaccharide modification steps. Fucose addition was catalysed by a glycosyltransferase associated with a smooth-surfaced membrane fraction which was distinct from the endoplasmic reticulum and which was tentatively identified as the Golgi apparatus. Glycosylation was not essential for intracellular transport of the lectin precursors: unglycosylated precursor synthesized in the presence of tunicamycin gave rise to unglycosylated lectin subunits in the protein bodies. PMID:3967664

  6. Anti-Sdx: a "new" auto-agglutinin related to the Sda blood group.

    PubMed

    Marsh, W L; Johnson, C L; Oyen, R; Nichols, M E; DiNapoli, J; Young, H; Brassel, J; Cusumano, I; Bazaz, G R; Haber, J M; Wolf, C F

    1980-01-01

    Two examples of a "new" IgM saline-agglutinating auto-antibody are described. The antibodies bind complement, have the ability to cause in vivo hemolysis, and are most active at room temperature at a pH of about 6.5. Despite tests on more than 5,000 people, no nonreactive cell sample has been found. The reactive antigen is not denatured by neuraminidase, papain, or ficin, and is present on i adult red blood cells. The antibodies appear to be slightly inhibited by human saliva and milk, and more convincingly inhibited by urine from Sd(a+) persons. They are not inhibited by urine from Sd(a-) persons, but are strongly inhibited by guinea pig urine. The serologic characteristics indicate a relationship to the Sda blood group and the auto-antibody has been named antiSdx. Sdx antigen is present on red blood cells from some higher primates and is absent from rabbit, rhesus monkey, dog and sheep cells. PMID:7355457

  7. Processing, targeting, and antifungal activity of stinging nettle agglutinin in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Does, M P; Houterman, P M; Dekker, H L; Cornelissen, B J

    1999-06-01

    The gene encoding the precursor to stinging nettle (Urtica dioica L. ) isolectin I was introduced into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). In transgenic plants this precursor was processed to mature-sized lectin. The mature isolectin is deposited intracellularly, most likely in the vacuoles. A gene construct lacking the C-terminal 25 amino acids was also introduced in tobacco to study the role of the C terminus in subcellular trafficking. In tobacco plants that expressed this construct, the mutant precursor was correctly processed and the mature isolectin was targeted to the intercellular space. These results indicate the presence of a C-terminal signal for intracellular retention of stinging nettle lectin and most likely for sorting of the lectin to the vacuoles. In addition, correct processing of this lectin did not depend on vacuolar deposition. Isolectin I purified from tobacco displayed identical biological activities as isolectin I isolated from stinging nettle. In vitro antifungal assays on germinated spores of the fungi Botrytis cinerea, Trichoderma viride, and Colletotrichum lindemuthianum revealed that growth inhibition by stinging nettle isolectin I occurs at a specific phase of fungal growth and is temporal, suggesting that the fungi had an adaptation mechanism. PMID:10364393

  8. Sampling of Glycan-Bound Conformers by the Anti-HIV Lectin Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin in the Absence of Sugar.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Marta G; Koharudin, Leonardus M I; Ban, David; Sabo, T Michael; Trigo-Mourino, Pablo; Mazur, Adam; Griesinger, Christian; Gronenborn, Angela M; Lee, Donghan

    2015-05-26

    Lectins from different sources have been shown to interfere with HIV infection by binding to the sugars of viral-envelope glycoproteins. Three-dimensional atomic structures of a number of HIV-inactivating lectins have been determined, both as free proteins and in glycan-bound forms. However, details on the mechanism of recognition and binding to sugars are elusive. Herein we focus on the anti-HIV lectin OAA from Oscillatoria agardhii: We show that in the absence of sugars in solution, both the sugar-free and sugar-bound protein conformations that were observed in the X-ray crystal structures exist as conformational substates. Our results suggest that glycan recognition occurs by conformational selection within the ground state; this model differs from the popular "excited-state" model. Our findings provide further insight into molecular recognition of the major receptor on the HIV virus by OAA. These details can potentially be used for the optimization and/or development of preventive anti-HIV therapeutics. PMID:25873445

  9. Freeze-fracture cytochemistry of rat glomerular capillary tuft. Determination of wheat germ agglutinin binding sites and localization of anionic charges.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, J; Appay, M D; Wang, X Y; Bariety, J; Pinto Da Silva, P

    1987-12-01

    We propose here the use of freeze-fracture to gain access and to label in vitro glomerular components and locate WGA receptors and anionic sites. Tissues are frozen, fractured under liquid nitrogen, and thawed. Freeze-fracture rendered all glomerular structures directly accessible to the reagents. This made possible study of the nature and topology of cationized ferritin and WGA binding sites. WGA-gold complexes were observed over plasma membranes of podocytes and of endothelial and mesangial cells. Labeling of podocytes and endothelial cells was similar in the mesangial area and in the peripheral part of the capillary loop. Cross-fractures of extracellular matrices showed that WGA bound uniformly to the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) as well as to mesangial matrix. In fractured specimens treated with neuraminidase, WGA was no longer observed over podocytes but it consistently labeled the surface of endothelial and mesangial cells. Whereas in GBM cross-sections WGA binding was greatly reduced or even abolished, it remained unmodified in the mesangium. This shows that only NeuNAc (sialic acid) might account for the binding of WGA to podocytes, whereas GlcNAcs appear to be the main WGA binding sites on endothelial and mesangial cells and in the mesangial matrix. Both NeuNAc and GLcNAc residues are probably associated in GBM. With cationized ferritin (pI 8.3) at pH 7.4, intense, continuous labeling was seen all over the different plasma membranes, denser in podocytes than in endothelial cells. CF was also observed in cross-fractured profiles of extracellular matrices and never appeared agglutinated in discrete sites. PMID:3680932

  10. Identification of IgG alloantibodies in patients with high-titer IgM cold agglutinins by serum/plasma affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Stahl, D; Kreft, H; Hack, H; Schraven, B; Roelcke, D

    1997-01-01

    The detection of IgG alloantibodies in the presence of high-titer cold autoagglutinins (CAs) can be extremely difficult, especially under pressure of time when transfusion of red blood cells is urgently needed. Here we demonstrate that IgG alloantibodies in the presence of high-titer IgM CAs can be easily detected by quantitative IgG purification from serum or plasma by affinity chromatography. In comparison with the routinely used methods for IgG alloantibody identification, affinity chromatography shows better or identical results and is the method leading to results most rapidly.

  11. Luffa acutangula agglutinin: Primary structure determination and identification of a tryptophan residue involved in its carbohydrate-binding activity using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gnanesh; Mishra, Padmanabh; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2015-12-01

    A lectin from phloem exudates of Luffa acutangula (ridge gourd) was purified on chitin affinity chromatography and characterized for its amino acid sequence and to study the role of tryptophan in its activity. The purified lectin was subjected to various proteolytic digestions, and the resulting peptides were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometer. The peptide precursor ions were fragmented by collision-induced dissociation or electron transfer dissociation experiments, and a manual interpretation of MS/MS was performed to deduce amino acid sequence. This gave rise to almost complete sequence coverage of the lectin which showed high-sequence similarity with deduced sequences of phloem lectins present in the database. Chemical modification of lysine, tyrosine, histidine, arginine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid residues did not inhibit the hemagglutinating activity. However, the modification of tryptophan residues using N-bromosuccinimide showed the loss of hemagglutinating activity. Additionally, the mapping of tryptophan residues was performed to determine the extent and number of residues modified, which revealed that six residues per molecule were oxidized suggesting their accessibility. The retention of the lectin activity was seen when the modifications were performed in the presence of chitooligosaccharides due to protection of a tryptophan residue (W102) in the protein. These studies taken together have led to the identification of a particular tryptophan residue (W102) in the activity of the lectin. PMID:26597132

  12. Fullerol-fluorescein isothiocyanate-concanavalin agglutinin phosphorescent sensor for the detection of alpha-fetoprotein and forecast of human diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia-ming; Lin, Li-ping; Jiang, Shu-Lian; Cui, Ma Lin; Jiao, Li; Zhang, Xiao Yang; Zhang, Li-hong; Zheng, Zhi Yong; Lin, Xuan; Lin, Shao-qin

    2013-11-01

    Based on the reaction of the active -OH group in fullerol (F) with the dissociated -COOH group in fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to form an F-FITC and the enhanced effect of N, N-dimethylaniline (DMA) on phosphorescence signal of F-FITC, a new phosphorescent labeling reagent (DMA-F-FITC) was developed. What's more, a phosphorescent sensor for the determination of alpha-fetoprotein variant (AFP-V) has been designed via the coupling technique of the high sensitivity for affinity adsorption-solid substrate-room temperature phosphorimetry (AA-SS-RTP) with the strong specificity reaction between DMA-F-FITC-Con A and AFP-V. The DMA-F-FITC increased the number of luminescent molecules in the biological target which improved the sensitivity of phosphorescent sensor. The proposed sensor was responsive, simple, selective and sensitive, and it has been applied to the determination of trace AFP-V in human serum and the forecast of human diseases using phosphorescence emission wavelength of F or FITC, with the results agreed well with those obtained by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). Meanwhile, the mechanisms for the labeling reaction and the sensing detection of AFP-V were discussed.

  13. Synthetic assembly of novel avidin-biotin-GlcNAc (ABG) complex as an attractive bio-probe and its interaction with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA).

    PubMed

    Kumari, Amrita; Koyama, Tetsuo; Hatano, Ken; Matsuoka, Koji

    2016-10-01

    A tetravalent GlcNAc pendant glycocluster was constructed with terminal biotin through C6 linker. To acquire the multivalent carbohydrate-protein interactions, we synthesized a glycopolymer of tetrameric structure using N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNAc) as the target carbohydrate by the use of 4-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-4-methylmorpholinium chloride (DMT-MM) as coupling reagent, followed by biotin-avidin complexation leading to the formation of glycocluster of avidin-biotin-GlcNAc conjugate (ABG complex). The dynamic light scattering (DLS) system was implied for size detection and to check the binding affinity of GlcNAc conjugate with a WGA lectin we use fluorometric assay by means of specific excitation of tryptophan at λex 295nm and it was found to be very high Ka∼1.39×10(7) M(-1) in case of ABG complex as compared to GlcNAc only Ka∼1.01×10(4) M(-1) with the phenomenon proven to be due to glycocluster effect. PMID:27565114

  14. Expression of Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA-I') from elderberry bark in transgenic tobacco plants results in enhanced resistance to different insect species.

    PubMed

    Shahidi-Noghabi, Shahnaz; Van Damme, Els J M; Smagghe, Guy

    2009-04-01

    Tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum cv Samsun NN) have been transformed with the gene encoding the type-2 ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) SNA-I' from elderberry (Sambucus nigra) under the control of the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S promoter. Previous research confirmed that these plants synthesize, correctly process and assemble a fully active RIP. Variability in protein expression was observed within the transgenic lines. The effects of the type-2 RIP SNA-I' delivered through a leaf feeding assay were evaluated in the laboratory on two economically important pest insects belonging to the orders of Hemiptera, the tobacco aphid (Myzus nicotianae) and Lepidoptera, the beet armyworm (Spodoptera exigua). In the experiment with aphids, significant effects were observed on the life parameters, such as survival, intrinsic rate of increase, net reproductive rate, mean generation time and mean daily offspring, whereas with caterpillars significant reduction in fresh weight as well as retardation in development were observed. In addition, significant increases in mortality were noted for insects fed on the transgenic lines as compared to wild type plants. This information provides further support for RIPs having a role in plant resistance to insect pest species.

  15. Fluorescein Isothiocyanate-Labeled Lectin Analysis of the Surface of the Nitrogen-Fixing Bacterium Azospirillum brasilense by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Yagoda-Shagam, Janet; Barton, Larry L.; Reed, William P.; Chiovetti, Robert

    1988-01-01

    The cell surface of Azospirillum brasilense was probed by using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled lectins, with binding determined by fluorescence-activated flow cytometry. Cells from nitrogen-fixing or ammonium-assimilating cultures reacted similarly to FITC-labeled lectins, with lectin binding in the following order: Griffonia simplicifolia II agglutinin > Griffonia simplicifolia I agglutinin > Triticum vulgaris agglutinin > Glycine max agglutinin > Canavalia ensiformis agglutinin > Limax flavus agglutinin > Lotus tetragonolobus agglutinin. The fluorescence intensity of cells labeled with FITC-labeled G. simplicifolia I, C. ensiformis, T. vulgaris, and G. max agglutinins was influenced by lectin concentration. Flow cytometry measurements of lectin binding to cells was consistent with measurements of agglutination resulting from lectin-cell interaction. Capsules surrounding nitrogen-fixing and ammonium-assimilating cells were readily demonstrated by light and transmission electron microscopies. Images PMID:16347693

  16. In vitro and in vivo binding of snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin; GNA) and jackbean (Canavalia ensiformis; Con A) lectins within tomato moth (Lacanobia oleracea) larvae; mechanisms of insecticidal action.

    PubMed

    Fitches, E; Woodhouse, S D.; Edwards, J P.; Gatehouse, J A.

    2001-07-01

    When fed in semi-artificial diet the lectins from snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis: GNA: mannose-specific) and jackbean (Canavalia ensiformis: Con A: specific for glucose and mannose) were shown to accumulate in vivo in the guts, malpighian tubules and haemolymph of Lacanobia oleracea (tomato moth) larvae. Con A, but not GNA, also accumulated in the fat bodies of lectin-fed larvae. The presence of glycoproteins which bind to both lectins in vitro was confirmed using labelled lectins to probe blots of polypeptides extracted from larval tissues. Immunolocalisation studies revealed a similar pattern of GNA and Con A binding along the digestive tract with binding concentrated in midgut sections. Binding of lectins to microvilli appeared to lead to transport of the proteins into cells of the gut and malpighian tubules. These results suggested that both lectins are able to exert systemic effects via transport from the gut contents to the haemolymph across the gut epithelium. The delivery of GNA and Con A to the haemolymph was shown to be dependent on their functional integrity by feeding larvae diets containing denatured lectins. Con A, but not GNA, was shown to persist in gut and fat body tissue of lectin-fed larvae chased with control diet for three days. Con A also shows more extensive binding to larval tissues in vitro than GNA, and these two factors are suggested to contribute to the higher levels of toxicity shown by Con A, relative to GNA, in previous long term bioassays.

  17. Production and purification of active snowdrop lectin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Longstaff, M; Powell, K S; Gatehouse, J A; Raemaekers, R; Newell, C A; Hamilton, W D

    1998-02-15

    Recombinant snowdrop lectin was produced in Escherichia coli from a cDNA clone encoding mature Galanthus nivalis agglutinin. After induction with isopropylthio-beta-D-galactoside, inclusion bodies from E. coli were solubilised and the G. nivalis agglutinin purified by metal-affinity chromatography using a carboxy-terminal hexahistidine tag. The protein was refolded on the metal-affinity column prior to elution. After purification, the recombinant G. nivalis agglutinin agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes to a dilution similar to that determined for 'native' lectin purified from snowdrop, and showed similar specific binding to mannose. The toxicity of the recombinant G. nivalis agglutinin towards rice brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens) was shown to be similar to that of 'native' G. nivalis agglutinin when incorporated into an artificial diet. The recombinant G. nivalis agglutinin is thus functionally similar to 'native' snowdrop lectin.

  18. Characterization of glycans in the developmental stages of Myxobolus cerebralis (Myxozoa), the causative agent of whirling disease.

    PubMed

    Kaltner, H; Stippl, M; Knaus, M; El-Matbouli, M

    2007-11-01

    Glycans and sugar-binding molecules (lectins) form an interactive recognition system, which may enable parasitic organisms to adhere to host cells and migrate into target tissues. The aim of the present study was to analyse surface-associated glycans in the developmental stages of Myxobolus cerebralis (Hofer), the causative agent of whirling disease. A panel of biotin-labelled plant lectins was used to detect a broad spectrum of glycan motifs with high specificity. Binding sites were detected histochemically in the tissue sections of infected rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), and infected Tubifex tubifex (Müller), and were characterized by light, fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. With mannose-specific lectins [Lens culinaris agglutinin, Pisum sativum agglutinin, Canavalia ensiformis agglutinin (LCA, PSA, CanA)] mannose-containing glycans were detected in all the developmental stages and host tissues. No binding sites for galactose-specific lectins were present in M. cerebralis spores but reactivity with host tissues occurred. Diversity in glycans was detected by N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-specific lectins in sporoplasm cells of M. cerebralis and triactinomyxon spores. In the group of lectins with monosaccharide-specificity for N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc), the reactivity of Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA), Lycopersicon esculentum agglutinin (LEA) and Solanum tuberosum agglutinin (STA) was restricted to polar capsules whereas Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin II (GSA II) also bound to sporoplasm cells of stages in the fish host but not in those present in infected T. tubifex. Moreover, Triticum vulgaris (wheat germ) agglutinin (WGA) and succinylated WGA indicated the presence of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine polymers in polar capsules. No specificity for spores was observed concerning 'bisected'N-glycans and no reactivity in parasitic stages was observed with the fucose-binding lectin Ulex europaeus agglutinin (UEA) I, Sambucus nigra

  19. Interaction of lectins with human IgE: IgE-binding property and histamine-releasing activity of twelve plant lectins.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, M; Sumazaki, R; Isoyama, S; Takita, H

    1992-01-01

    We examined the IgE-binding reaction and the histamine-releasing response of basophils to a panel of 12 lectins: concanavalin A (Con A), Lens culinaris hemagglutinin (LcH), Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), soybean agglutinin (SBA), Bauhinia purpurea agglutinin (BPA), peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ricinus communis agglutinin I (RCA-I), Lotus tetragonolobus agglutinin (Lotus A), Ulex europeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), phytohemagglutinin E (PHA-E) and phytohemagglutinin L (PHA-L), IgE from allergic patients bound with high affinity to Con A, LcH, PSA, RCA-I and PHA-E, and with lower affinity to WGA, BPA, Lotus A and UEA-I, but they did not bind to SBA, PNA or PHA-L. There was no apparent individual difference in the reactivity of IgE to these lectins between 10 IgE preparations from allergic patients. The binding to these lectins, except Lotus A and UEA-I, were competitively inhibited by the lectin-specific sugars or glycopeptide. Upon stimulation by Con A, LcH, PSA, WGA, RCA-1 and PHA-E, leukocytes from allergic patients showed a significant release of histamine, but cells from IgE-deficient subjects did not respond to these lectins. The histamine-releasing responses by these lectins were also inhibited by specific sugars or glycopeptides.

  20. Histological and lectin histochemical studies on the olfactory and respiratory mucosae of the sheep.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Dalia; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2014-03-01

    The olfactory and respiratory mucosae of the Corriedale sheep were examined using lectin histochemistry in order to clarify the histochemical and glycohistochemical differences between these two tissues. The olfactory epithelium was stained with 13 lectins out of 21 lectins examined, while the respiratory epithelium was positive to 16 lectins. The free border of both of the olfactory and respiratory epithelia was stained with 12 lectins: Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), succinylated-wheat germ agglutinin (s-WGA), Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL), Solanum tuberosum lectin (STL), Datura stramonium lectin (DSL), Soybean agglutinin (SBA), Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin-I (BSL-I), Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-120), Erythrina cristagalli lectin (ECL), Concanavalin A (Con A), Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-E (PHA-E) and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-L (PHA-L). The associated glands of the olfactory mucosa, Bowman's glands, were stained with 13 lectins. While both the goblet cells and mucous nasal glands were stained with 8 lectins; five of them (WGA, s-WGA, STL, Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA) and ECL) were mutually positive among the Bowman's glands, mucous nasal glands and the goblet cells. These findings indicate that the glycohistochemical characteristics of the free borders of both olfactory and respiratory epithelia are similar to each other, suggesting that secretions from the Bowman's glands and those of the goblet cells and mucous nasal glands are partially exchanged between the surface of two epithelia to contribute the functions of the respiratory epithelium and the olfactory receptor cells, respectively. PMID:24200894

  1. Lectin binding in meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Kleinert, R; Radner, H

    1987-01-01

    Forty-two meningiomas of different morphological sub-type were examined to determine their pattern of binding to 11 different lectins which characterize cell surface components such as carbohydrate residues. Histiocytic and xanthoma cells within meningiomas could be demonstrated with six different lectins: wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), peanut agglutinin (PNA) Bauhinia purpurea agglutinin (BPA), Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA), Vicia fava agglutinin (VFA) and Soyabean agglutinin (SBA). Vascular elements including endothelial cells and intimal cells, bound Ulex europaeus agglutinin type 1 (UEA 1), WGA and HPA. The fibrous stroma in fibrous and fibroblastic meningiomas bound PNA, Laburnum alpinum agglutinin (LAA) and SBA. Tumour cells in meningotheliomatous meningiomas and some areas of anaplastic meningiomas bound Concanavalin A, PNA, LAA and VFA whereas tumour cells in fibrous and fibroblastic meningiomas bound BPA, LAA and VFA. Lectin binding has proved to be of value in detecting histiocytic and xanthoma cells together with vascular elements within meningiomas. In addition, the different lectin binding patterns allow different histological sub-types of meningioma to be distinguished although the biological significance of the binding patterns is unclear. PMID:3658105

  2. Lectin histochemistry of microvascular endothelium in chick and quail musculature.

    PubMed

    Nanka, O; Peumans, W J; Van Damme, E J; Pfüller, U; Valásek, P; Halata, Z; Schumacher, U; Grim, M

    2001-11-01

    The lectin binding pattern of muscular microvessels in chick, quail and chick/quail chimeras was analysed. Paraffin wax sections of muscles from embryonic and adult animals were used. The biotin-labelled lectins were detected by avidin-alkaline phosphatase complex. The following lectins bound to muscular microvessels including arterioles, capillaries and venules of both species: SNA-I (Sambucus nigra agglutinin), MAA (Maackia amurensis agglutinin), AIA (Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin), VAA-I, VAA-II and VAA-III (Viscum album agglutinin I-III), WGA (wheat germ agglutinin), LEA (Lycopersicon esculentum agglutinin). Endomysium and basement membranes of muscle fibres were also stained to a variable extent and intensity. Only SNA-I stained almost exclusively the endothelium of blood vessels. WFA (Wisteria floribunda agglutinin) bound to the quail endothelium only. MPA (Maclura pomifera agglutinin) marked vessels in adult muscles of chick and quail, but embryonic vessels were stained in quail only. Our results show that lectin histochemistry is a useful tool for visualisation of microvasculature in avian species. In particular, WFA and MPA can be used to determine the origin of endothelia in chick/quail chimeras.

  3. Agglutinating antibody to Aeromonas hydrophila in wild largemouth bass

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.C.; Esch, G.W.; Raker, M.L.

    1981-07-01

    Among largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides in Par Pond, South Carolina, a significantly large percentage of those with red-sore disease were positive for anti-Aeromonas hydrophila agglutinin than of uninfected fish. Highest titers occurred during summer and fall, when the prevalence of the disease was declining. Most agglutinin activity was associated with a single serum fraction; the agglutinin has an apparent molecular weight of > 340,000 daltons, suggesting it may be a macroglobulin-like antibody. Homologous agglutinin reacted better with A. hydrophila than heterologous agglutinin. Differences in severity and duration of red-sore epizootics in the southeastern United States may be due to differing virulence among strains of A. hydrophila.

  4. Hemopoietic stem cell transplantation using mouse bone marrow and spleen cells fractionated by lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Reisner, Y; Itzicovitch, L; Meshorer, A; Sharon, N

    1978-01-01

    Mouse bone marrow and spleen cells were fractionated with the aid of soybean agglutinin and peanut agglutinin. A test for spleen colony-forming units in the isolated fractions showed that the hemopoietic stem cells are agglutinated by both of these lectins. The capacity of the agglutinated fractions to reconstitute lethally irradiated allogeneic mice was investigated. A sequential fractionation of splenocytes from SWR donors by soybean agglutinin and peanut agglutinin, or a single fractionation by soybean agglutinin of splenocytes from BALB/c donors, afforded a cell fraction that successfully reconstituted lethally irradiated (BALB/c X C57BL/6)F1 mice, without complications due to graft-versus-host reaction. Images PMID:26916

  5. A lectin histochemical study on carbohydrate moieties of the gonadotropin-like substance in the epithelial cells of Hatschek's pit of Branchiostoma belcheri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Y. Q.; Welsch, U.

    1997-03-01

    The present light microscopic lectin, histochemical study suggests for the first time that the vertebrate gonadotropin-like substance in the basal part of the epithelial cells of Hatschek's pit is a sialic acid-containing glycoprotein. The binding intensity of the epithelial cells in Hatschek's pit to 6 lectins ( Limulus polyphemus agglutinin (LPA), Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA), Concanavalin A (Con A), Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA I) and Ricinus communis agglutinin I (RCA I)) indicate that the carbohydrate composition of the gonadotrophic glycoprotein is similar to that of mammals and fish, and that N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, sialic acid, glucosamine, D-mannose and L-fucose are components of the carbohydrate portion.

  6. Novel interactions of complex carbohydrates with peanut (PNA), Ricinus communis (RCA-I), Sambucus nigra (SNA-I) and wheat germ (WGA) agglutinins as revealed by the binding specificities of these lectins towards mucin core-2 O-linked and N-linked glycans and related structures.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, E V; Xue, Jun; Xia, Jie; Khaja, Siraj D; Piskorz, Conrad F; Locke, Robert D; Neelamegham, Sriram; Matta, Khushi L

    2016-10-01

    Plant lectins through their multivalent quaternary structures bind intrinsically flexible oligosaccharides. They recognize fine structural differences in carbohydrates and interact with different sequences in mucin core 2 or complex-type N-glycan chain and also in healthy and malignant tissues. They are used in characterizing cellular and extracellular glycoconjugates modified in pathological processes. We study here, the complex carbohydrate-lectin interactions by determining the effects of substituents in mucin core 2 tetrasaccharide Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ1-6(Galβ1-3)GalNAcα-O-R and fetuin glycopeptides on their binding to agarose-immobilized lectins PNA, RCA-I, SNA-I and WGA. Briefly, in mucin core 2 tetrasaccharide (i) structures modified by α2-3/6-Sialyl LacNAc, LewisX and α1-3-Galactosyl LacNAc resulted in regular binding to PNA whereas compounds with 6-sulfo LacNAc displayed no-binding; (ii) strucures bearing α2-6-sialyl 6-sulfo LacNAc, or 6-sialyl LacdiNAc carbohydrates displayed strong binding to SNA-I; (iii) structures with α2-3/6-sialyl, α1-3Gal LacNAc or LewisX were non-binder to RCA-I and compounds with 6-sulfo LacNAc only displayed weak binding; (iv) structures containing LewisX, 6-Sulfo LewisX, α2-3/6-sialyl LacNAc, α2-3/6-sialyl 6-sulfo LacNAc and GalNAc Lewis-a were non-binding to WGA, those with α1-2Fucosyl, α1-3-Galactosyl LacNAc, α2-3-sialyl T-hapten plus 3'/6'sulfo LacNAc displayed weak binding, and compounds with α2-3-sialyl T-hapten, α2.6-Sialyl LacdiNAc, α2-3-sialyl D-Fucβ1-3 GalNAc and Fucα-1-2 D-Fucβ-1-3GalNAc displaying regular binding and GalNAc LewisX and LacdiNAc plus D-Fuc β-1-3 GalNAcα resulting in tight binding. RCA-I binds Fetuin triantennary asialoglycopeptide 100 % after α-2-3 and 25 % after α-2-6 sialylation, 30 % after α-1-2 and 100 % after α-1-3 fucosylation, and 50 % after α-1-3 galactosylation. WGA binds 3-but not 6-Fucosyl chitobiose core. Thus, information on the influence of complex carbohydrate chain constituents on lectin binding is apparently essential for the potential application of lectins in glycoconjugate research.

  7. Lectin-like activity from Persea americana.

    PubMed

    Meade, N A; Staat, R H; Langley, S D; Doyle, R J

    1980-01-15

    An extract from the seeds of Persea americana possessed an erythro-agglutinating activity. The agglutinin was devoid of specificity for carbohydrates, but interacted readily with basic proteins or basic polyamino acids. The interaction between the agglutinin and egg-white lysozyme was not inhibited by chaotropic salts, but was sensitive to relatively low concentrations of urea. An affinity chromatographic procedure was developed in an effort to purify the agglutinin. Products from the chromatographic procedure were found not to contain higher specific agglutinating activities than the crude extract. Amino acid acid analyses of the extract showed the presence of relatively high proportions of glutamic and aspartic acids. In addition, the extract contained phosphorus and a visible chromophore. The agglutinin was resistant to detergents and denaturants, and proteases, nucleases, and other enzymes. The results suggest that, as opposed to other plant agglutinins, the active component from Persea is not a protein. Similarly, in contrast to many lectins, the agglutinin from Persea was not mitogenic for mouse lymphocytes. The agglutinin partially inhibited the mitogenesis of lymphocytes when the cells were treated with concanavalin A, or with bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

  8. Changes of glycoprotein patterns in sera of humans under stress.

    PubMed

    Barisic, K; Lauc, G; Dumic, J; Pavlovic, M; Flogel, M

    1996-02-01

    Stress exhibits adverse effects on many vital processes in which glycoproteins play a significant role(e.g. cell-cell/matrix interactions, immune response, neoplastic growth, implantation, prenatal development), yet only scarce attention has been directed towards studying stress induced changes in glycoprotein patterns. Using SDS-electrophoresis, blotting and digoxigenin-labelled lectins (Sambucus nigra agglutinin, Galanthus nivalis agglutinin, Datura stramonium agglutinin, Maackia amurensis agglutinin and peanut (Arachis hypogaea) agglutinin),sera were analysed from 30 individuals chosen randomly from a severely stressed population of 309 male volunteers with no specific medical symptoms. Significant changes were found in glycoprotein pattern and content, compared with healthy controls of matching age and sex. Occasionally minor non-specific deviations from the reference values for several analytes (haemoglobin, glucose, bilirubin and alanine aminotransferase) were detected in the tested group, but glycoprotein GP4S (Mr = 45 000), detected by Datura stramonium agglutinin and Sambucus nigra agglutinin, appeared in 96.7% of samples of the stressed population. The same population also revealed an approximately 500-fold increase of GP37 in comparison with the control sera. These results suggest that stress, as a non-specific syndrome, induces specific biochemical changes, which could be of diagnostic relevance as risk makers before any more serious symptoms of stress-related consequences have developed.

  9. Alterations in lectin binding to the epidermis following treatment with 8-methoxypsoralen plus long-wave ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Danno, K.; Takigawa, M.; Horio, T.

    1984-02-01

    The alterations in lectin fluorescence stainings to the epidermis were examined in guinea pig skin treated with topical application of a 1% 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) solution plus long-wave ultraviolet (UVA) radiation (1.5-3.5 J/cm2) (PUVA). Serial biopsy specimens taken up to 21 days postirradiation were stained with 8 commercially available lectins labeled with either fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) or biotin (followed by avidin D-FITC): Bandeiraea simplicifolia agglutinin I (BSA), concanavalin A (Con-A), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ricinus communis agglutinin I (RCA), soybean agglutinin (SBA), Ulex europeus agglutinin I (UEA), and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). In normal guinea pig skin UEA staining was absent. Following PUVA treatment, UEA and DBA stainings became apparent or stronger in intensity after days 7-14 (UEA) and days 4-7 (DBA), respectively, and returned to negative or weak by days 14-21. Stainings with Con-A, SBA, and WGA gave remarkable decreases in intensity after days 2-4 and recovered to the baseline by days 7-14. Intensity of BSA, PNA, and RCA stainings was decreased to a lesser degree than the other lectins. Such changes were not produced by application of 8-MOP, UVA radiation (less than 10 J/cm2), UVB radiation (900-2700 mJ/cm2), or tape stripping. These results suggest that PUVA treatment perturbs the composition or organization of epidermal cell surface glycoconjugates to induce alterations in lectin stainings.

  10. Lectin histochemical studies on the vomeronasal organ of the sheep.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Dalia; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Kazumi; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ of sheep was examined using lectin histochemistry in order to compare the types and amounts of the glycoconjugates among various components of the vomeronasal sensory and non-sensory epithelia. In the vomeronasal sensory epithelium, Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA) stained particular cells, located at the same level as the vomeronasal receptor cells, while the distribution, shape and number of the stained cells did not correspond to those of the vomeronasal receptor cells. Datura stramonium lectin (DSL), Concanavalin A (Con A), Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-E (PHA-E) and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-L (PHA-L) labeled the basal cells of both vomeronasal sensory and non-sensory epithelia. While, Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), Succinylated-wheat germ agglutinin (s-WGA), Lycopersicon esculentum lectin (LEL), Solanum tuberosum lectin (STL) and Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-120) labeled the basal cells of the sensory epithelium, and Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin-I (BSL-I) stained the basal cells of the non-sensory epithelium, respectively. Seventeen lectins labeled the free border of both vomeronasal sensory and non-sensory epithelia, while Sophora japonica agglutinin (SJA), Jacalin and Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA) labeled neither free border of the sensory nor that of non-sensory epithelia. The expression pattern of glycoconjugate was similar, but not identical, in the free border between the sensory and non-sensory epithelia. These results indicate that there are dissimilar features in the type and amount of glycoconjugates between the vomeronasal sensory and non-sensory epithelia, and at the same time, among the various cell types either in the vomeronasal sensory or non-sensory epithelium. PMID:23595118

  11. Changes in glycoconjugate expression during early chick embryo development: a lectin-binding study.

    PubMed

    Griffith, C M; Sanders, E J

    1991-10-01

    A selection of lectins was used to investigate developmentally regulated changes in the distribution of cell surface oligosaccharides during the gastrulation and neurulation stages of early chick embryo development. Lectins from three specificity classes were used: glucose/mannose specificity (concanavalin A [Con A], Lens culinaris agglutinin [LCA], Pisum sativum agglutinin [PSA]); N-acetylglucosamine specificity (Lycopersicon esculentum agglutinin [LEA], wheat germ agglutinin [WGA], succinylated WGA [sWGA]); N-acetylgalactosamine/galactose specificity (Dolichos biflorus agglutinin [DBA], soybean agglutinin [SBA], Sophora japonica agglutinin [SJA], Bandeiraea (Griffonia) simplicifolia lectin I [BSL I], peanut agglutinin [PNA], Artocarpus integrifolia lectin [Jacalin], Ricinus communis agglutinin-1 [RCA-1], Erythrina cristagalli lectin [ECL]). At gastrulation stages, patterns of lectin binding could be distinguished in the epiblast, mesoderm, and endoderm cell layers. The primitive streak failed to bind any of the lectins, but LEA and WGA bound to the epiblast in regions lateral to the streak, indicating the loss of some glucosamine residues medially in preparation for the ingression movements of gastrulation. Several lectins showed marked binding to the mesoderm cells after their passage through the primitive streak; these were LCA, PSA, WGA, sWGA, BSL, and most particularly PNA. Therefore, the epithelial-mesenchymal transformation from epiblast to mesoderm at the primitive streak is accompanied by cell surface oligosaccharide changes in the epiblast and mesoderm that involve all classes of lectins including the PNA-binding sequence Gal beta 1-3GalNAc. Ultrastructurally, PNA was shown to bind extracellularly to matrix fibrils. Jacalin, having the same sugar specificity as PNA, but binding to serine/threonine linked chains rather than asparagine linked chains showed no binding to the mesoderm.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Use of an Intravascular Warming Catheter during Off-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery in a Patient with Severe Cold Hemagglutinin Disease.

    PubMed

    Tholpady, Ashok; Bracey, Arthur W; Baker, Kelty R; Reul, Ross M; Chen, Alice J

    2016-08-01

    Cold hemagglutinin disease with broad thermal amplitude and high titers presents challenges in treating cardiac-surgery patients. Careful planning is needed to prevent the activation of cold agglutinins and the agglutination of red blood cells as the patient's temperature drops during surgery. We describe our approach to mitigating cold agglutinin formation in a 77-year-old man with severe cold hemagglutinin disease who underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery without the use of preoperative plasmapheresis. This experience shows that the use of an intravascular warming catheter can maintain normothermia and prevent the activation and subsequent formation of cold agglutinins. To our knowledge, this is the first reported use of this technique in a patient with cold hemagglutinin disease. The chief feature in this approach is the use of optimal thermal maintenance-rather than the more usual decrease in cold-agglutinin content by means of therapeutic plasma exchange. PMID:27547154

  13. Immunogenicity of specific Bordetella pertussis surface antigens in diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Blaskett, A. C.; Cox, J. C.

    1988-01-01

    The predominant causative organism of whooping cough in Australia is of a serotype which has normally been associated overseas with unvaccinated communities. Australian DTP vaccines pass the statutory mouse test for Bordetella pertussis potency but this test is now believed to be relatively insensitive to certain factors, especially the major type-specific agglutinogens, which are presumably also important in the human host-parasite relationship. Because endemic B. bronchiseptica infections make some laboratory animals unsatisfactory for testing B. pertussis agglutinin responses, we have developed a test in which young farm sheep were immunized with vaccines. Type-specific agglutinins in their sera were assayed after absorption of non-specific agglutinins by suspensions of selected bordetella strains. Three well-reputed European DTP vaccines and two recent batches of Australian DTP vaccine were tested and compared thus. All evoked significant agglutinin responses to the main agglutinogens. PMID:2897927

  14. Use of an Intravascular Warming Catheter during Off-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery in a Patient with Severe Cold Hemagglutinin Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bracey, Arthur W.; Baker, Kelty R.; Reul, Ross M.; Chen, Alice J.

    2016-01-01

    Cold hemagglutinin disease with broad thermal amplitude and high titers presents challenges in treating cardiac-surgery patients. Careful planning is needed to prevent the activation of cold agglutinins and the agglutination of red blood cells as the patient's temperature drops during surgery. We describe our approach to mitigating cold agglutinin formation in a 77-year-old man with severe cold hemagglutinin disease who underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery without the use of preoperative plasmapheresis. This experience shows that the use of an intravascular warming catheter can maintain normothermia and prevent the activation and subsequent formation of cold agglutinins. To our knowledge, this is the first reported use of this technique in a patient with cold hemagglutinin disease. The chief feature in this approach is the use of optimal thermal maintenance—rather than the more usual decrease in cold-agglutinin content by means of therapeutic plasma exchange. PMID:27547154

  15. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-09-01

    The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed.

  16. How Is Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of cryoglobulins (proteins that clump together in cool temperatures and can block blood vessels). Cold agglutinins Cold ... and kill red blood cells, especially at cooler temperatures. These dead cells can then build up and ...

  17. Lectin binding in the anterior segment of the bovine eye.

    PubMed

    Tuori, A; Virtanen, I; Uusitalo, H

    1994-10-01

    Eleven different fluorescent lectin-conjugates were used to reveal the location of carbohydrate residues in frozen sections of the anterior segment of bovine eyes. The lectins were specific for the following five major carbohydrate groups: (1) glucose/mannose group (Concanavalin A (Con A)); (2) N-acetylglucosamine group (wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)); (3) galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine group (Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA), Helix aspersa agglutinin (HAA), Psophocarpus tetragonolobus agglutinin (PTA), Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin-I-B4 (GSA-I-B4), Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin (JAC), peanut agglutinin (PNA) and Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA-I)); (4) L-fucose group (Ulex europaeus agglutinin (UEA-I)); (5) sialic acid group (wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)). All the studied lectins except UEA-I reacted widely with different structures and the results suggest that there are distinct patterns of expression of carbohydrate residues in the anterior segment of the bovine eye. UEA-I bound only to epithelial structures. Some of the lectins reacted very intensely with apical cell surfaces of conjunctival and corneal epithelia suggesting a different glycosylation at the glycocalyx of the epithelia. Also, the binding patterns of conjunctival and corneal epithelia differed with some of the lectins: PNA and RCA-I did not bind at all, and GSA-I-B4 bound only very weakly to the epithelium of the cornea, whereas they bound to the epithelium of the conjunctiva. In addition, HPA, HAA, PNA and WGA did not bind to the corneal basement membrane, but bound to the conjunctiva and vascular basement membranes. This suggests that corneal basement membrane is somehow different from other basement membranes. Lectins with the same carbohydrate specificity (DBA, HPA, HAA and PTA) reacted with the sections almost identically, but some differences were noticed: DBA did not bind to the basement membrane of the conjunctiva and the sclera and did bind to

  18. Value of a single-tube widal test in diagnosis of typhoid fever in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Parry, C M; Hoa, N T; Diep, T S; Wain, J; Chinh, N T; Vinh, H; Hien, T T; White, N J; Farrar, J J

    1999-09-01

    The diagnostic value of an acute-phase single-tube Widal test for suspected typhoid fever was evaluated with 2,000 Vietnamese patients admitted to an infectious disease referral hospital between 1993 and 1998. Test patients had suspected typhoid fever and a blood culture positive for Salmonella typhi (n= 1,400) or Salmonella paratyphi A (n = 45). Control patients had a febrile illness for which another cause was confirmed (malaria [n = 103], dengue [n = 76], or bacteremia due to another microorganism [n = 156] or tetanus (n = 265). An O-agglutinin titer of >/=100 was found in 18% of the febrile controls and 7% of the tetanus patients. Corresponding values for H agglutinins were 8 and 1%, respectively. The O-agglutinin titer was >/=100 in 83% of the blood culture-positive typhoid fever cases, and the H-agglutinin titer was >/=100 in 67%. The disease prevalence in investigated patients in this hospital was 30.8% (95% confidence interval, 26.8 to 35.1%); at this prevalence, an elevated level of H agglutinins gave better positive predictive values for typhoid fever than did O agglutinins. With a cutoff titer of >/=200 for O agglutinin or >/=100 for H agglutinin, the Widal test would diagnose correctly 74% of the blood culture-positive cases of typhoid fever. However, 14% of the positive results would be false-positive, and 10% of the negative results would be false-negative. The Widal test can be helpful in the laboratory diagnosis of typhoid fever in Vietnam if interpreted with care.

  19. Pertussis antibodies in the sera of children exposed to Bordetella pertussis by vaccination or infection.

    PubMed

    Dolby, J M; Stephens, S

    1973-03-01

    Low agglutinin titres to pertussis suspensions were found in 99% of sera from a group comprising healthy adults and non-vaccinated, non-infected infants of 1-6 months of age. These are attributable to agglutinins to heat-stable antigens and/or heat labile agglutinogen 1, and cross-absorption tests must be done on the sera in order to distinguish between the two. Agglutinins to agglutinogens 2 and 3 were found in only about 20% of adult sera. Bactericidal antibody was low in titre or absent in all sera from non-exposed individuals.Raised bactericidal antibody titres and the presence of agglutinins 2 and 3 were attributed to exposure to Bordetella pertussis antigens, either as vaccine or as infection. The variation, amongst both vaccinated and infected children, was very great. A vaccinated child who became ill responded to the infection in much the same way as a non-vaccinated child. We were unable to relate the immunity of the child to the titres either of agglutinins or of the bactericidal antibody.The protective ability of sera from vaccinated or infected children measured in mice against small, lethal brain infections was also unrelated to the state of immunity in the children, but this protective ability was correlated with the complement-mediated bactericidal antibody titres of the sera.The distribution of agglutinins, bactericidal antibody, and anti-haemagglutinin in serum IgG and IgM was different in vaccinated and infected children. PMID:4348456

  20. Glycomic profile of the human parotid gland between 18th and 26th week of fetal development.

    PubMed

    Rêgo, Moacyr J B M; Silva Filho, Antônio F; Sobral, Ana P V; Beltrão, Eduardo I C

    2016-01-01

    The formation of new and functional structural components of several organs, such as parotid glands, can be influenced by the glycocode. This study analyzed the glycobiology of parotid salivary gland tissue during fetal development using specific biochemical probes (lectins and antibodies). Eleven parotid gland samples from human fetuses were obtained from spontaneous abortions at 14-28 weeks of gestation, and tissue sections were analyzed for lectin histochemistry and immunohistochemistry. From the 18th to 26th week, Canavalia ensiformis agglutinin, wheat germ agglutinin, Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I, peanut agglutinin, Sambucus nigra agglutinin, and Vicia villosa agglutinin lectin staining were predominantly observed in the apical and/or basement membranes of the ducts and tubulo-acinar units. Moreover, the presence of galectin-1 was found in the membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus of both structures. Conversely, Gal-3 and mucin-1 were restricted to the glandular ducts. The lectin staining pattern changed during the weeks evaluated. Nevertheless, the carbohydrate subcellular localization represented a key factor in the investigation of structural distribution profiles and possible roles of these glycans in initial parotid gland development. These findings are defined by their high biological value and provide an important base for the development of subsequent studies. (J Oral Sci 58, 353-360, 2016). PMID:27665974

  1. Identification of lectin binding proteins in human tears.

    PubMed

    Kuizenga, A; van Haeringen, N J; Kijlstra, A

    1991-12-01

    The identity of glycoproteins in stimulated normal human tears was investigated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of tears onto minigels, blotting, and subsequent incubation with different biotinylated lectins (concanavalin A [Con A], peanut agglutinin [PNA], glycine max agglutinin [SBA], Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin, wheat germ agglutinin [WGA, native form], Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin [Jacalin], and Pisum sativum agglutinin). Control proteins included purified secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) from human colostrum, human milk lactoferrin, and chicken-egg lysozyme. All samples were prepared in a denaturing (SDS) buffer under nonreducing and reducing conditions. The sIgA in tears and IgA (alpha) heavy chain fragments (reduced sample) were identified with most of the lectins tested. A particular high molecular weight (greater than 200 kD) protein fraction in tears that just entered the separation gel on SDS-PAGE was detected with WGA and Jacalin. This fraction stain poorly with silver. Tear lactoferrin was identified with all lectins used, although binding was low with SBA. Purified milk lactoferrin showed a poor reaction with Jacalin, but a protein in tears of similar mobility bound this lectin (nonreduced samples). Under both nonreducing and reducing conditions, tear-specific prealbumin in tears did not bind any of the lectins tested. Tear lysozyme only reacted with lectin after reduction. The techniques described may provide additional valuable information in addition to commonly used methods for tear protein analysis and further knowledge concerning the role of glycoproteins on the ocular surface.

  2. Flow cytometric analysis of lectin binding to in vitro-cultured Perkinsus marinus surface carbohydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gauthier, J.D.; Jenkins, J.A.; La Peyre, Jerome F.

    2004-01-01

    Parasite surface glycoconjugates are frequently involved in cellular recognition and colonization of the host. This study reports on the identification of Perkinsus marinus surface carbohydrates by flow cytometric analyses of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated lectin binding. Lectin-binding specificity was confirmed by sugar inhibition and Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics. Clear, measurable fluorescence peaks were discriminated, and no parasite autofluorescence was observed. Parasites (GTLA-5 and Perkinsus-1 strains) harvested during log and stationary phases of growth in a protein-free medium reacted strongly with concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin, which bind to glucose-mannose and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, respectively. Both P. marinus strains bound with lower intensity to Maclura pomifera agglutinin, Bauhinia purpurea agglutinin, soybean agglutinin (N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-specific lectins), peanut agglutinin (PNA) (terminal galactose specific), and Griffonia simplicifolia II (GlcNAc specific). Only background fluorescence levels were detected with Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (L-fucose specific) and Limulus polyphemus agglutinin (sialic acid specific). The lectin-binding profiles were similar for the 2 strains except for a greater relative binding intensity of PNA for Perkinsus-1 and an overall greater lectin-binding capacity of Perkinsus-1 compared with GTLA-5. Growth stage comparisons revealed increased lectin-binding intensities during stationary phase compared with log phase of growth. This is the first report of the identification of surface glycoconjugates on a Perkinsus spp. by flow cytometry and the first to demonstrate that differential surface sugar expression is growth phase and strain dependent. ?? American Society of Parasitologists 2004.

  3. Epidemiological characterization of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Schalla, W O; Whittington, W L; Rice, R J; Larsen, S A

    1985-01-01

    A total of 101 isolates of penicillinase-producing and non-penicillinase-producing Neisseria gonorrhoeae with known nutritional requirements, plasmid content, and serovars, were examined for lectin agglutination patterns. These isolates were from outbreaks in Georgia, California, Hawaii, and Pennsylvania. Cell suspensions made from 16- to 18-h cultures were mixed with 14 different lectins, and the resultant agglutination patterns were classified as agglutination groups. Among the 101 isolates tested, 24 different agglutination groups were demonstrated. Of the organisms tested, 55% were located in 3 of the 24 groups, and 86% of the isolates reacted with the lectins Trichosanthes kinlowii, Griffonia simplicifolia I, peanut agglutinin, soybean agglutinin, potato agglutinin, and wheat germ agglutinin. One isolate did not react with peanut or potato agglutinin, five isolates lacked reactivity with potato agglutinin, and six isolates did not react with wheat germ agglutinin. Of the wheat germ-negative isolates, four were from Pennsylvania and were identical with regard to auxotype, plasmid content, serovar, and lectin group. The other two wheat germ-negative isolates were from California and were unrelated by the same criteria to the four Pennsylvania isolates and to each other. Among the isolates tested, there were no differences in lectin groups with regard to the sex of the patient. In the Georgia collection, agglutination with one lectin group was confined to isolates of serogroup IA. This association was not observed for the other geographic areas. Some isolates showing identical auxotype, plasmid content, and serovars could be differentiated based on lectin agglutination patterns, whereas other isolates were identical by all testing criteria. PMID:3930560

  4. Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo Infection in Cattle in the South Okanagan District of British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    Kingscote, Barbara F.

    1985-01-01

    An outbreak of leptospirosis due to Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo in the South Okanagan District of British Columbia was investigated. The infection was associated primarily with bulls, but serovar hardjo was isolated from both bulls and cows at slaughter. Kidney and cerebrospinal fluid were found to contain leptospires, independently of the presence and level of serum agglutinins. Treatment of a bull twice in six months with dihydrostreptomycin failed to diminish an agglutinin titer (1/200) which persisted for two years without reexposure of the bull. A serological survey of cull cows sold through a central auction mart revealed the presence of hardjo agglutinins in 15.4% of 1300 sera representing 163 herds in 20 locations. Thirty percent of these herds contained reactor cattle. The number of premises from which reactor cattle came in a given locality varied from 4% to 67.7%. Measures to control leptospirosis in the study are suggested. PMID:17422584

  5. Lectin histochemical studies on the olfactory epithelium and vomeronasal organ in the Japanese striped snake, Elaphe quadrivirgata.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Kazumi; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2010-10-01

    The olfactory epithelium and the vomeronasal organ of the Japanese striped snake were examined by lectin histochemistry. Of the 21 lectins used in the study, all lectins except succinylated-wheat germ agglutinin (s-WGA) showed similar binding patterns in the vomeronasal receptor cells and the olfactory receptor cells with varying intensities. The binding patterns of s-WGA varied among individuals in the vomeronasal and olfactory receptor cells, respectively. Four lectins, Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin-II (BSL-II), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), Sophora japonica agglutinin (SJA), and Erythrina cristagalli lectin (ECL) stained secretory granules and the organelles in the olfactory supporting cells and did not stain them in the vomeronasal supporting cells. These results suggest that the glycoconjugate moieties are similar in the vomeronasal and olfactory receptor cells of the Japanese striped snake. PMID:20597100

  6. Lectins with anti-HIV activity: a review.

    PubMed

    Akkouh, Ouafae; Ng, Tzi Bun; Singh, Senjam Sunil; Yin, Cuiming; Dan, Xiuli; Chan, Yau Sang; Pan, Wenliang; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai

    2015-01-01

    Lectins including flowering plant lectins, algal lectins, cyanobacterial lectins, actinomycete lectin, worm lectins, and the nonpeptidic lectin mimics pradimicins and benanomicins, exhibit anti-HIV activity. The anti-HIV plant lectins include Artocarpus heterophyllus (jacalin) lectin, concanavalin A, Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop) agglutinin-related lectins, Musa acuminata (banana) lectin, Myrianthus holstii lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin, and Urtica diocia agglutinin. The anti-HIV algal lectins comprise Boodlea coacta lectin, Griffithsin, Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin. The anti-HIV cyanobacterial lectins are cyanovirin-N, scytovirin, Microcystis viridis lectin, and microvirin. Actinohivin is an anti-HIV actinomycete lectin. The anti-HIV worm lectins include Chaetopterus variopedatus polychaete marine worm lectin, Serpula vermicularis sea worm lectin, and C-type lectin Mermaid from nematode (Laxus oneistus). The anti-HIV nonpeptidic lectin mimics comprise pradimicins and benanomicins. Their anti-HIV mechanisms are discussed. PMID:25569520

  7. Purification of rat liver arylsulfatase A and its microheterogeneity assayed by crossed affinity-immunoelectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wójczyk, B; Hoja, D; Lityńska, A

    1992-01-01

    Arylsulfatase A (arylsulfatase sulfohydrolase) EC 3.1.6.1 was purified from rat liver by a procedure consisting of differential centrifugation, Con A-Sepharose and Blue Sepharose chromatography, PBE 94 chromatofocusing, DEAE-cellulose and gel filtration chromatography followed by preparative electrophoresis. A molecular mass of 132,000 was estimated by gradient PAGE. Particular proteins were detected by immunoelectrophoresis. Isoelectric focusing combined with immunoelectrophoresis gave two peaks of arylsulfatase A, with isoelectric points of pH 3.9 and 4.5. Microheterogeneity of rat liver arylsulfatase A was studied by affinity immunoelectrophoresis with 9 different lectins. The presence of concanavalin A-, Lens culinaris agglutinin-, Lotus tetragonolobus agglutinin- and wheat germ agglutinin-reactive forms permitted assessment of the types of carbohydrate moieties in arylsulfatase A.

  8. Lectins with anti-HIV activity: a review.

    PubMed

    Akkouh, Ouafae; Ng, Tzi Bun; Singh, Senjam Sunil; Yin, Cuiming; Dan, Xiuli; Chan, Yau Sang; Pan, Wenliang; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai

    2015-01-01

    Lectins including flowering plant lectins, algal lectins, cyanobacterial lectins, actinomycete lectin, worm lectins, and the nonpeptidic lectin mimics pradimicins and benanomicins, exhibit anti-HIV activity. The anti-HIV plant lectins include Artocarpus heterophyllus (jacalin) lectin, concanavalin A, Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop) agglutinin-related lectins, Musa acuminata (banana) lectin, Myrianthus holstii lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin, and Urtica diocia agglutinin. The anti-HIV algal lectins comprise Boodlea coacta lectin, Griffithsin, Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin. The anti-HIV cyanobacterial lectins are cyanovirin-N, scytovirin, Microcystis viridis lectin, and microvirin. Actinohivin is an anti-HIV actinomycete lectin. The anti-HIV worm lectins include Chaetopterus variopedatus polychaete marine worm lectin, Serpula vermicularis sea worm lectin, and C-type lectin Mermaid from nematode (Laxus oneistus). The anti-HIV nonpeptidic lectin mimics comprise pradimicins and benanomicins. Their anti-HIV mechanisms are discussed.

  9. The natural heterohaemagglutinin in the serum of the toad Bufo regularis, and its relationship to lower vertebrate immunoglobulins.

    PubMed Central

    Balding, P; Gold, E R

    1976-01-01

    The serum of the toad Bufo regularis contains a natural heterohaemagglutinin for human erythrocytes, Which appears to have anti-(B + HP) specificity. Results of inhibition and absorption experiments indicate that only one agglutinin is present. The biochemical specificity of the agglutinin may be provisionally described as involving alpha-D-galactose residues linked (1-3) in the B determinant, of red cells possessing the H ANTIGEN. Unlike amphibian IgM, the agglutinin was insensitive to 2-mercaptoethanol treatment; moreover, it could be eluted from the alpha1 globulin region on cellulose acetate electrophoresis. These results suggest that this naturally occurring heterohaemagglutinin has a structure similar to that of plant and animal lectins. The relationship of this observation to the phylogenetic evolution of immunity is discussed. PMID:58835

  10. Purification of rat liver arylsulfatase A and its microheterogeneity assayed by crossed affinity-immunoelectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wójczyk, B; Hoja, D; Lityńska, A

    1992-01-01

    Arylsulfatase A (arylsulfatase sulfohydrolase) EC 3.1.6.1 was purified from rat liver by a procedure consisting of differential centrifugation, Con A-Sepharose and Blue Sepharose chromatography, PBE 94 chromatofocusing, DEAE-cellulose and gel filtration chromatography followed by preparative electrophoresis. A molecular mass of 132,000 was estimated by gradient PAGE. Particular proteins were detected by immunoelectrophoresis. Isoelectric focusing combined with immunoelectrophoresis gave two peaks of arylsulfatase A, with isoelectric points of pH 3.9 and 4.5. Microheterogeneity of rat liver arylsulfatase A was studied by affinity immunoelectrophoresis with 9 different lectins. The presence of concanavalin A-, Lens culinaris agglutinin-, Lotus tetragonolobus agglutinin- and wheat germ agglutinin-reactive forms permitted assessment of the types of carbohydrate moieties in arylsulfatase A. PMID:1363453

  11. Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma with sarcomatoid transformation in a dog.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Naohito; Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Murakami, Hironobu; Kagawa, Eriko; Aoki, Itirou; Nagashima, Yoji

    2010-11-01

    A 12-year-old spayed female Siberian husky dog presented with hematuria and weight loss. An abdominal ultrasonographic examination revealed a left renal tumor measuring 8 cm in diameter, and a nephrectomy was performed. The resected kidney contained a cavitated tumor with a white solid region. Histologically, this tumor was composed of large polygonal cells with abundant and cloudy cytoplasm and focal sarcomatoid change. The neoplastic epithelial cells were reactive with colloidal iron staining; Dolichos biflorus agglutinin, peanut agglutinin, and Ulex europaeus agglutinin I lectins; and cluster of differentiation 10 and c-KIT antigens but not for periodic acid-Schiff or vimentin stain. Neoplastic sarcomatoid cells stained positive for vimentin. Because these histopathologic features are identical to those of human chromophobe renal cell carcinoma, the present case was diagnosed as canine chromophobe renal cell carcinoma.

  12. Lectin histochemistry of an ovine lysosomal storage disease with deficiencies of beta-galactosidase and alpha-neuraminidase.

    PubMed Central

    Murnane, R. D.; Ahern-Rindell, A. J.; Prieur, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Lectin histochemistry is a useful technique to identify and to localize in cells and tissues the terminal carbohydrate moieties of glycoproteins and glycolipids. The specific diagnosis of some glycoprotein storage diseases was accomplished using lectin staining patterns, and such methods of diagnosis have been attempted for some glycolipid storage diseases. This technique was applied to formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded and frozen neural, hepatic, and renal tissues of sheep with an inherited lysosomal storage disease with deficiencies of beta-galactosidase and alpha-neuraminidase. The cytoplasm of central nervous system neurons of affected sheep in paraffin-embedded sections stained with peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-I), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), and soybean agglutinin (SBA). The cytoplasm of neurons in frozen sections of these tissues stained with PNA, RCA-I, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), and Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I). The cytoplasm of frozen and paraffin-embedded sections of liver and kidney of affected sheep stained with PNA, whereas paraffin-embedded sections also stained with RCA-I. These results suggest the stored material in this disease has terminal saccharide moieties consisting of beta-galactose, N-acetylneuraminic acid, and N-acetylgalactosamine. Paraffin processing altered lectin staining patterns. Although the staining pattern in this glycolipid storage disease was complex, lectin histochemistry may prove to be a useful technique for the characterization of storage products and for the diagnosis of lysosomal storage diseases. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2508478

  13. Association of IgA secretory component sialylation with leucocytospermia of infertile men - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kratz, E M; Ferens-Sieczkowska, M

    2014-12-01

    The aim of our pilot study was to check whether the differences in IgA secretory component (SC) sialylation are associated with leucocytospermia. In normozoospermic and leucocytospermic seminal plasmas, 78-kDa and 63-kDa SC immunoreactive bands were observed. The SC sialylation was analysed by lectin blotting, using sialo-specific lectins MAA (Maackia amurensis agglutinin) and SNA (Sambucus nigra agglutinin). Specific reactivity of 63-kDa SC with MAA and SNA was higher than 78-kDa SC in both analysed seminal groups. The analysis of seminal SC sialylation might be a valuable diagnosis tools for the evaluation of fertility problems related with leucocytospermia.

  14. Iron binding to human lactoferrin alters reactivity of the protein with plant lectins.

    PubMed

    Ying, L; Furmanski, P

    1993-10-29

    Binding of Fe by human apolactoferrin results in altered reactivity of the glycoprotein with plant lectins. Reaction with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and peanut agglutinin (PNA) was abolished with Fe binding. Reaction with the lectins from Datura stramonium (DSA) and Aleuria aurantia (AAA) was significantly reduced but not fully abolished on Fe binding, while reaction with the Artocarpus integrifolia lectin (Jacalin) and Sambucus nigrabark (SNA) was not changed at all. Loss of WGA reactivity occurred when only one of two Fe binding sites on the molecule was saturated. The results demonstrate conformational changes that are associated with high-avidity binding of Fe by lactoferrin.

  15. Quantitative approach to lectin-based glycoprofiling of thymic tissues in the control- and the dexamethasone-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Balcan, Erdal

    2016-06-01

    Dexamethasone (DEX) is the most commonly used synthetic glucocorticoid in treatment of various inflammatory conditions. Here we focused on evaluating the effect of DEX on apoptosis and glycan profile in the mouse thymic tissues. Histological examinations revealed that the DEX treatment cause severe alterations in thymus, such as disruption of thymic capsule, impaired epithelial cell-thymocyte contacts, cellular loss and increased apoptosis. The identification of thymic glycans in the control- and the DEX-treated mice was carried out by using a panel of five plant lectins, Maackia amurensis agglutinin (MAA), peanut agglutinin (PNA), Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), Concanavalin A (ConA) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). Lectin histochemistry results showed that glycosylation pattern of thymus changes upon DEX treatment. For further detailed quantitative analyses of the binding intensities for each lectin, histochemical data were scored as high positive (HP), mild positive (MP) and low positive (LP) and differences among signaling densities were investigated. The staining patterns of thymic regions observed with lectin histochemistry suggest that DEX can affect the thymic glycan profile as well as thymocyte apoptosis. These results are consistent with the opinion that not only sialic acid, but also other sugar motifs may be responsible for thymocyte development. PMID:27067421

  16. The Liverwort Contains a Lectin That Is Structurally and Evolutionary Related to the Monocot Mannose-Binding Lectins1

    PubMed Central

    Peumans, Willy J.; Barre, Annick; Bras, Julien; Rougé, Pierre; Proost, Paul; Van Damme, Els J.M.

    2002-01-01

    A mannose (Man)-binding lectin has been isolated and characterized from the thallus of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. N-terminal sequencing indicated that the M. polymorpha agglutinin (Marpola) shares sequence similarity with the superfamily of monocot Man-binding lectins. Searches in the databases yielded expressed sequence tags encoding Marpola. Sequence analysis, molecular modeling, and docking experiments revealed striking structural similarities between Marpola and the monocot Man-binding lectins. Activity and specificity studies further indicated that Marpola is a much stronger agglutinin than the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin and exhibits a preference for methylated Man and glucose, which is unprecedented within the family of monocot Man-binding lectins. The discovery of Marpola allows us, for the first time, to corroborate the evolutionary relationship between a lectin from a lower plant and a well-established lectin family from flowering plants. In addition, the identification of Marpola sheds a new light on the molecular evolution of the superfamily of monocot Man-binding lectins. Beside evolutionary considerations, the occurrence of a G. nivalis agglutinin homolog in a lower plant necessitates the rethinking of the physiological role of the whole family of monocot Man-binding lectins. PMID:12114560

  17. Sugar-binding proteins potently inhibit dendritic cell human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and dendritic-cell-directed HIV-1 transfer.

    PubMed

    Turville, Stuart G; Vermeire, Kurt; Balzarini, Jan; Schols, Dominique

    2005-11-01

    Both endocytic uptake and viral fusion can lead to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transfer to CD4+ lymphocytes, either through directional regurgitation (infectious transfer in trans [I-IT]) or through de novo viral production in dendritic cells (DCs) resulting in a second-phase transfer to CD4+ lymphocytes (infectious second-phase transfer [I-SPT]). We have evaluated in immature monocyte-derived DCs both pathways of transfer with regard to their susceptibilities to being blocked by potential microbicidal compounds, including cyanovirin (CNV); the plant lectins Hippeastrum hybrid agglutinin, Galanthus nivalis agglutinin, Urtica dioica agglutinin, and Cymbidium hybrid agglutinin; and the glycan mannan. I-IT was a relatively inefficient means of viral transfer compared to I-SPT at both high and low levels of the viral inoculum. CNV was able to completely block I-IT at 15 microg/ml. All other compounds except mannan could inhibit I-IT by at least 90% when used at doses of 15 microg/ml. In contrast, efficient inhibition of I-SPT was remarkably harder to achieve, as 50% effective concentration levels for plant lectins and CNV to suppress this mode of HIV-1 transfer increased significantly. Thus, our findings indicate that I-SPT may be more elusive to targeting by antiviral drugs and stress the need for drugs affecting the pronounced inhibition of the infection of DCs by HIV-1.

  18. Candida biofilms: is adhesion sexy?

    PubMed

    Soll, David R

    2008-08-26

    The development of Candida albicans biofilms requires two types of adhesion molecule - the Als proteins and Hwp1. Mutational analyses have recently revealed that these molecules play complementary roles, and their characteristics suggest that they may have evolved from primitive mating agglutinins.

  19. Candida biofilms: is adhesion sexy?

    PubMed

    Soll, David R

    2008-08-26

    The development of Candida albicans biofilms requires two types of adhesion molecule - the Als proteins and Hwp1. Mutational analyses have recently revealed that these molecules play complementary roles, and their characteristics suggest that they may have evolved from primitive mating agglutinins. PMID:18727911

  20. Lectin characterization of gonococci from an outbreak caused by penicillin-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Schalla, W O; Rice, R J; Biddle, J W; Jeanlouis, Y; Larsen, S A; Whittington, W L

    1985-01-01

    A total of 40 Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates, representing 19 penicillin-resistant isolates (from 8 heterosexual patients and 11 homosexual patients) and 21 penicillin-susceptible isolates (from 15 heterosexual patients and 6 homosexual patients) and obtained from the same geographic area, were examined. Lectin agglutination patterns were based on the reactivity of the isolates with the following 14 lectins: concanavalin A, Lens culinaris, Trichosanthes kinlowii, Griffonia simplicifolia I, Arachis hypogeae (peanut agglutinin), Glycine max (soybean agglutinin), Dolichos bifloris, Griffonia simplicifolia II, Solanum tuberosum (potato starch agglutinin), Triticum vulgaris (wheat germ agglutinin), Limax flavus, Phaseolus vulgaris, Ulex europaeus I, and Lotus tetragonolobus. All isolates were serotyped with monoclonal antibodies specific for gonococcal outer membrane protein I and auxotyped, and the plasmid content was determined. Resistant patient isolates were selected for their decreased penicillin susceptibility, and control isolates were selected for their penicillin susceptibility. Even though the patient isolates demonstrated resistance to penicillin, no phenotypic differences in lectin-grouping patterns were demonstrated between the two study groups; i.e., two predominant lectin groups were observed. No resistance-associated plasmids were detected. All patient isolates were serogroup IB (serovars IB-1, IB-2, and IB-4), whereas 12 of 21 control isolates were serogroup IA (P less than 0.05). Isolates obtained from different anatomical sites in the same patient (cervical and rectal) agreed with regard to lectin patterns and serovars but not auxotypes. PMID:3935658

  1. Lectin binding properties of liver, small intestine and tail of metamorphosing marsh frog (Pelophylax ridibundus Pallas 1771).

    PubMed

    Kaptan, Engin; Sengezer Inceli, Meliha; Sancar Bas, Serap

    2013-07-01

    In this present study, localization and variations of specific sugar moieties in the terminal carbohydrate chains of glycoconjugates in the small intestine, liver and tail have been investigated during the metamorphosis of Pelophylax ridibundus larvae. For this purpose, four lectins were used: wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin (UEA-I), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA) and peanut agglutinin (PNA), in different larval stages of the frog. Some cells stained specifically in the intestinal mucosa and in tail epidermal cells with the lectins and their affinity changed during metamorphic transformation. For the most part, they decreased in the climax and postmetamorphic periods. It was also found that WGA, DBA and UEA-I lectins exhibited strong affinity to white blood cells in the liver and their binding affinities were the highest in prometamorphosis and they gradually decreased until the end of metamorphosis. These results suggest that the changes of lectin binding in metamorphosis may be an indication of some cellular events occurring in larval metamorphosis such as cell differentiation and damage of cell adhesion between death and differentiating cells. They also can be useful markers for detection of white blood cells in amphibian hematopoietic organs.

  2. Root Tissue Response of Two Related Soybean Cultivars to Infection by Lectin-treated Meloidogyne spp.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, E. L.; Kaplan, D. T.; Dickson, D. W.; Mitchell, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Treatment of second-stage juveniles (J2) of Meloidogyne incognita race 1 and M. javanica with soybean agglutinin, Concanavalin A, wheat germ agglutinin, Lotus tetragonolobus agglutinin, or Limax flavus agglutinin or the corresponding competitive sugars for each of these lectins did not alter normal root tissue response of soybean cultivars Centennial and Pickett 71 to infection by M. incognita race 1 or M. javanica. Giant cells were frequently induced in Centennial and Pickett 71 roots 5 and 20 days after inoculation of roots with untreated J2 of a population of M. incognita race 3. Treatment of J2 of M. incognita race 3 with the lectins or carbohydrates listed above caused Centennial, but not Pickett 71, root tissue to respond in a hypersensitive manner to infection by M. incognita race 3. Penetration of soybean roots by J2 of Meloidogyne spp. was strongly inhibited in the presence of 0.1 M sialic acid. Treatment of J2 with sialic acid was not lethal to nematodes, and the inhibitory activity of sialic acid was apparently not caused by low pH. These results suggest that carbohydrates may influence plant-nematode interactions. PMID:19287600

  3. Affinity chromatography of branched oligosaccharides in rat liver beta-glucuronidase.

    PubMed

    Hoja-Lukowicz, D; Lityńska, A; Wójczyk, B S

    2001-05-01

    Rat liver microsomal and lysosomal beta-glucuronidase-derived glycopeptides were obtained by extensive Pronase digestion followed by N-[14C]acetylation and desialylation by neuraminidase treatment. These glycopeptides were studied by sequential chromatography on lectin-affinity columns such as concanavalin A, lentil lectin, Phaseolus vulgaris erythroagglutinin, Ricinus communis agglutinin I, Triticum vulgaris agglutinin, Glycine max agglutinin and Ulex europaeus agglutinin. Using serial lectin affinity chromatography approach combined with neuraminidase treatment allowed us to show the unexpected presence of complex tri- and/or tetraantennary type glycans (40.8 and 17.0% for microsomal and lysosomal enzyme, respectively). Moreover, the application of neuraminidase treatment revealed that complex biantennary type glycans, present on lysosomal beta-glucuronidase, are almost fully sialylated while the same type of glycans present on microsomal enzyme do not contain sialic acid. Furthermore, the results obtained confirmed that microsomal and lysosomal beta-glucuronidases possess high mannose and/or hybrid type glycans (19.6 and 36.6%, respectively), and complex biantennary type glycans (38.9 and 46.4%, respectively). PMID:11393703

  4. Structural assessment of beta-glucuronidase carbohydrate chains by lectin affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wójczyk, B; Hoja, D; Lityńska, A

    1993-04-01

    Rat liver beta-glucuronidase was studied by sequential lectin affinity chromatography. beta-Glucuronidase glycopeptides were obtained by extensive Pronase digestion followed by N-[14C]acetylation and desialylation by neuraminidase treatment. According to the distribution of the radioactivity in the various fractions obtained by chromatography on different lectins, and on the assumption that all glycopeptides were acetylated to the same specific radioactivity, a relative distribution of glycan structure types is proposed. The presence of complex biantennary and oligomannose type glycans (56.8% and 42.7%, respectively) was indicated by Concanavalin A-Sepharose chromatography. Ulex europaeus agglutinin-agarose chromatography revealed the presence of alpha(1-3)linked fucose in some of the complex biantennary type glycans (16.6% of the total glycopeptides). Wheat germ agglutinin chromatography indicated that the minority (0.5%) were hybrid or poly (N-acetyllactosamine) type glycans. Furthermore, the absence of O-glycans, tri-, tetra- and bisected biantennary type glycans was demonstrated by analysis of Concanavalin A-Sepharose unbound fraction by chromatography on immobilized soybean agglutinin, Ricinus communis agglutinin and Phaseolus vulgaris erythroagglutinin. PMID:8400827

  5. Seroprevalences of brucellosis, Q-fever and toxoplasmosis in slaughter livestock in Trinidad.

    PubMed

    Adesiyun, A A; Cazabon, E P

    1996-01-01

    Serum samples obtained from livestock (cattle, chickens, pigs, sheep, goats and water buffaloes) slaughtered at various slaughter houses in Trinidad were screened for agglutinins to three zoonosis causing pathogens. Of a total of 751 sera tested, 2 (0.3%) originating from chickens were positive for Brucella abortus agglutinins using the Rose Bengal test (RBT), but both were negative by the tube serum agglutination test (SAT). Thirty-six (4.8%) of 749 sera were positive for Coxiella burnetii agglutinins by the capillary agglutination test (CAT) with the highest prevalence, 11.3%, detected in pig sera and the lowest, 0%, found in sheep and goat sera. The difference was not statistically significant (P > or = 0.05; chi 2). Of the 131 sera tested, 26 (19.8%) contained Toxoplasma gondii agglutinins with prevalences ranging from 5.5% in pigs to 42.9% in goats. It was concluded that livestock in Trinidad are free of B. abortus infections, but C. burnetii and T. gondii infections exist and are being documented for the first time in the island.

  6. Distinct cytoskeletal domains revealed in sperm cells

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Antibodies against different cytoskeletal proteins were used to study the cytoskeletal organization of human spermatozoa. A positive staining with actin antibodies was seen in both the acrosomal cap region and the principal piece region of the tail. However, no staining was obtained with nitrobenzoxadiazol-phallacidin, suggesting that most of the actin was in the nonpolymerized form. Most of the myosin immunoreactivity was confirmed to a narrow band in the neck region of spermatozoa. Tubulin was located to the entire tail, whereas vimentin was only seen in a discrete band-like structure encircling the sperm head, apparently coinciding with the equatorial segment region. Surface staining of the spermatozoa with fluorochrome-coupled Helix pomatia agglutinin revealed a similar band-like structure that co-distributed with the vimentin- specific staining. Instead, other lectin conjugates used labeled either the acrosomal cap region (peanut and soybean agglutinins), both the acrosomal cap and the postacrosomal region of the head (concanavalin A), or the whole sperm cell surface membrane (wheat germ and lens culinaris agglutinins and ricinus communis agglutinin l). In lectin blotting experiments, the Helix pomatia agglutinin-binding was assigned to a 80,000-mol-wt polypeptide which, together with vimentin, also resisted treatment with Triton X-100. Only the acrosomal cap and the principal piece of the tail were decorated with rabbit and hydridoma antibodies against an immunoanalogue of erythrocyte alpha-spectrin (p230). p230 appeared to be the major calmodulin-binding polypeptide in spermatozoa, as shown by a direct overlay assay of electrophoretic blots of spermatozoa with 125I-calmodulin. The results indicate that spermatozoa have a highly specialized cytoskeletal organization and that the distribution of actin, spectrin, and vimentin can be correlated with distinct surface specializations of the sperm cells. This suggest that cytoskeleton may regulate the maintenance

  7. Retrograde labeling, enrichment, and characterization of retinal ganglion cells from the neonatal rat.

    PubMed

    Sarthy, P V; Curtis, B M; Catterall, W A

    1983-12-01

    We have developed a method for labeling retinal ganglion cells in neonatal rats by retrograde transport of the fluorescent dye, True Blue (TB), injected into the optic chiasm. Following proteolytic dissociation of labeled retinas into single cells, the labeled cells could be enriched 50- to 100-fold by centrifugation in a 5%/10% metrizamide gradient. When plated in Ham's F-10 medium in the presence of fetal calf serum and chick optic tectum-conditioned medium, the labeled cells could be maintained in vitro up to 48 hr. In these cultures, the ganglion cells (GCS) constituted 50 to 70% of the total cell population. When GC-rich fractions or GC cultures were stained with a monoclonal antibody to Thy-1 antigen, greater than 90% of the TB-labeled cells were reactive. In order to localize voltage-sensitive sodium channels, GC-rich cultures were reacted with 125I-scorpion toxin. Analysis of the autoradiograms showed that the density of silver grains was about 10-fold higher on TB-labeled cells than on nonfluorescent cells, or in controls which contained excess of unlabeled toxin. When GC cultures were incubated with micromolar concentrations of putative GC transmitters, aspartate and glutamate, the amino acids were accumulated by 15 to 20% of labeled cells. Several lectin receptors were also localized on TB-labeled cells in situ. Whereas the lectins wheat germ agglutinin, concanavalin A, peanut agglutinin, Dolichos biflorus agglutinin, and Limulus polyphemus agglutinin bound to TB-labeled cells, others such as Ricinus communis agglutinin I, Ulex, and Lotus lectins showed no binding. The lectin binding was specific since preincubation with the appropriate hapten sugar blocked lectin binding.

  8. Oligosynaptic pathways possibly relaying visceral and/or gustatory information to the olfactory bulb in the hedgehog tenrec.

    PubMed

    Künzle, H; Radtke-Schuller, S

    2001-04-27

    Using anterograde and retrograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin we showed that the parabrachial nucleus, known to receive second order visceral and gustatory afferents, might project directly to the anterior olfactory nucleus which is connected with the olfactory bulb (OfB). Only a small bulbar region is targeted directly by parabrachial fibers. This region is located immediately adjacent to the accessory OfB and may be closely related to, if not identical with the modified glomerular complex. To further substantiate the presence of true parabrachio-bulbar projections thyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry was employed. The absence of immunoreactive neurons in the parabrachial nucleus and the different distribution patterns of immunoreactive fibers and axons labeled with wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase in the target areas make it unlikely that catecholaminergic fibers were involved in the projections shown.

  9. An alternate high yielding purification method for Clitoria ternatea lectin.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Aabgeena; Ahmad, Ejaz; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2007-10-01

    In our previous publication we had reported the purification and characterization of Clitoria ternatea agglutinin from its seeds on fetuin CL agarose affinity column, designated CTA [A. Naeem, S. Haque, R.H. Khan. Protein J., 2007]. Since CTA binds beta-d-galactosides, this lectin can be used as valuable tool for glycobiology studies in biomedical and cancer research. So an attempt was made for a high yielding alternative purification method employing the use of asialofetuin CL agarose column for the above-mentioned lectin, designated CTL. The fetuin affinity purified agglutinin was found similar to asialofetuin affinity purified lectin in SDS pattern, HPLC and N-terminal sequence. The content of lectin was found to be 30mg/30g dry weight of pulse. The yield was 2.8% as compared to 0.3% obtained on fetuin column. The number of tryptophan and tyrosine estimated was four and six per subunit. PMID:17590430

  10. The immunological properties of Brucella ribosomal preparations.

    PubMed

    Corbel, M J

    1976-01-01

    Ribosomes were isolated from Brucella abortus strains 19 and 45/20 by disruption of the cells followed by differential ultracentrifugation. The ribosome preparations contained 2-3 components reacting in immunodiffusion tests but were free of detectable lipopolysaccharide-protein agglutinogen. They crossreacted with antisera to Br. abortus, Br. melitensis, Br. suis and Br. ovis and elicited intradermal delayed hypersensitivity reactions in animals infected with Br. abortus, Br. melitensis or Br. suis. The ribosomes were antigenic in rabbits, guinea pigs and mice. Those from Br. abortus S19 induced agglutinins reaction with smooth brucella strains whereas those from Br. abortus 45/20 induced agglutinins reacting with rough brucella strains. Cattle vaccinated with S19 or 45/20 vaccines or infected with Br. abortus developed pricipitins to ribosomal components at an early stage in the immune response. PMID:816681

  11. Immune and hormonal changes in early-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Everaus, H; Lehtmaa, J; Luik, E; Kŏdar, H

    1992-11-01

    Fifty-six previously untreated stage-I (according to Rai) chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients were examined for their clinical data, immunological characteristics, and hormonal values. Dysfunction of T and B lymphocytes was demonstrated by changed lymphocyte blastogenic response to stimulation with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (ConA), pisum sativatum agglutinin (PSA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), recombinant interleukin 2 (IL 2), and dextran sulfate (DxS); also by decreased immunoglobulin levels (IgG, IgA, IgE) and increased beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2-M) values. Simultaneously, dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, immune system integration, imbalance of sex hormones, and changes in thyroid hormones were observed in the same group of patients. Disturbed immunohormonal interactions in early-stage CLL may be responsible for the pathogenetic mechanisms in this lymphoproliferative malignancy.

  12. [Detection and characterization of anti-red cell autoantibodies in autoimmune hemolytic anemias].

    PubMed

    Kamesaki, T; Kajii, E

    1996-09-01

    Autoimmuine hemolytic anemias (AIHA) are classified into two groups of warm type and cold type according to the thermal properties of the anti-red cell autoantibody. A positive result of the antiglobulin test (DAT) confirms the presence of autoantibodies on red cells. DAT-negative AIHA are diagnosed by means of the elevation of red blood cell-associated IgG. The sera in low titer cold agglutinin disease show a low cold agglutinin titer but a high titer in the presence of bovine albumin. The antigenic specificity of warm reacting autoantibodies has been demonstrated, by using immunoblot and immunoprecipitation, such as Rh-related proteins, band 3, glycophorin A or Wrb antigen.

  13. Vibriocidal activity, immune globulin producing cells and immune globulin levels in Theropithecus gelada after administration of a Vibrio cholerae antigen

    PubMed Central

    Felsenfeld, Oscar; Greer, William E.

    1968-01-01

    Geladas were fed or injected with an antigen that contained Burrows' type 2 cholera toxin. Rising agglutinin and vibriocidal titres were observed in the serum, peripheral and mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen and lymphatic tissue of the upper intestine. Oral administration stimulated a more intensive vibriocidal activity in the mesenteric lymphatic nodes and intestinal lymphatic tissue, and within a shorter time than parenteral injection of the same antigen. Immune globulin synthesis paralleled largely the number of immunologically active cells. The agglutinin titres reflected the level of immune globulins and the numbers of globulin producing cells, whereas vibriocidal titres appeared independent of both. In terms of antibody site serum IgG was weight for weight more vibriocidal than serum IgM. PMID:4170509

  14. Immune and hormonal changes in early-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Everaus, H; Lehtmaa, J; Luik, E; Kŏdar, H

    1992-11-01

    Fifty-six previously untreated stage-I (according to Rai) chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients were examined for their clinical data, immunological characteristics, and hormonal values. Dysfunction of T and B lymphocytes was demonstrated by changed lymphocyte blastogenic response to stimulation with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (ConA), pisum sativatum agglutinin (PSA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), recombinant interleukin 2 (IL 2), and dextran sulfate (DxS); also by decreased immunoglobulin levels (IgG, IgA, IgE) and increased beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2-M) values. Simultaneously, dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, immune system integration, imbalance of sex hormones, and changes in thyroid hormones were observed in the same group of patients. Disturbed immunohormonal interactions in early-stage CLL may be responsible for the pathogenetic mechanisms in this lymphoproliferative malignancy. PMID:1457579

  15. Diagnostic value of interactions between members of the family Neisseriaceae and lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, R J; Nedjat-Haiem, F; Keller, K F; Frasch, C E

    1984-01-01

    The lectin slide agglutination test for Neisseria gonorrhoeae has been modified and improved. Results show that wheat germ agglutinin and soybean lectin agglutinate 100% (193 of 193 tested) of clinical isolates of N. gonorrhoeae. Lectin-reactive meningococci can be readily identified by the hydrolysis of gamma-glutamyl-beta-naphthylamide. Branhamella catarrhalis, Neisseria lactamica, Neisseria sicca, Neisseria subflava, Neisseria perflava, and meningococcal serogroups A, B, C, X, Y, and Z do not interfere with the positive identification of N. gonorrhoeae. The frequently encountered problem of autoagglutination of members of the family Neisseriaceae may be circumvented by a short treatment of cellular suspensions with DNase. Based on agglutination assays, the enzyme treatment did not result in a loss of wheat germ agglutinin receptors from the bacteria. The lectin agglutination test, coupled with the gamma-glutamyl aminopeptidase assay, is proposed as a rapid and accurate means of identifying clinical isolates of gonococci. PMID:6546936

  16. Interaction of a novel Tn (GalNAc alpha 1-->Ser/Thr) glycoprotein with Gal, GalNAc and GlcNAc specific lectins.

    PubMed

    Wu, A M; Wu, J H; Shen, F

    1994-01-14

    A naturally occurring Tn glycoprotein (Native ASG-Tn) with GalNAc alpha 1-->Ser/Thr as the only carbohydrate side chains, has been prepared from armadillo submandibular glands. In a quantitative precipitin assay, this glycoprotein completely precipitated Maclura pomifera (MPA), Vicia villosa B4 (VVL-B4) and Artocarpus integrifolia (Jacalin, AIL). It also reacted well with Helix pomatia (HPL) and Wistaria floribunda (WFL) and precipitated over 75% of the lectin nitrogen added, but poorly with Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA1), ricin, peanut (Arachis hypogaea, PNA), Abrus precatorius agglutinin (APA) and Triticum vulgaris (WGA). This finding suggests that this novel Tn-glycoprotein may serve as a useful reagent for differentiating Tn and T specific monoclonal antibodies and lectins.

  17. Serological distinction of A antigen between red blood cells and saliva in blood grouping of blood and body fluid stains.

    PubMed

    Sagisaka, K; Iwasa, M; Yokoi, T

    1984-02-01

    A antigens of red blood cells and body fluids such as saliva, semen and sweat could be serologically distinguished using rabbit or guinea pig immune anti-A. As for antisera specific for red blood cell A, A+ rabbits were intravenously immunized with A group red blood cells. The resulting antisera were absorbed with O and B red cells and with A. Se saliva. The absorbed anti-A reacted with A red cells (titer 1:32) and was not inhibited with A. Se saliva. Guinea pigs were intramuscularly injected with A. Se saliva. Crude antisera contained agglutinins to human red cells which were abolished by absorption with A red cells. After absorption with O. Se saliva, the antisera were proved to have agglutinin activity with A group saliva using latex coated with A. Se saliva. A antigens from blood or body fluid stains could be distinguished by the elution method with these anti-A sera. PMID:6719447

  18. Evaluation of a fluorescent lectin-based staining technique for some acidophilic mining bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Fife, D.J.; Bruhn, D.F.; Miller, K.S.; Stoner, D.L.

    2000-05-01

    A fluorescence-labeled wheat germ agglutinin staining technique was modified and found to be effective for staining gram-positive, acidophilic mining bacteria. Bacteria identified by others as being gram positive through 16S rRNA sequence analyses, yet clustering near the divergence of that group, stained weakly. Gram-negative bacteria did not stain. Background staining of environmental samples was negligible, and pyrite and soil particles in the samples did not interfere with the staining procedure.

  19. Identification of sialic acids on the cell surface of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Soares, R M; de A Soares, R M; Alviano, D S; Angluster, J; Alviano, C S; Travassos, L R

    2000-04-01

    The cell-surface expression of sialic acids in two isolates of Candida albicans was analyzed by thin-layer and gas chromatography, binding of lectins, colorimetry, sialidase treatment and flow cytofluorimetry with fluorescein-labeled lectins. N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA) was the only derivative found in both strains of C. albicans grown in a chemically defined medium. Its identification was confirmed by mass spectrometry in comparison with an authentic standard. The density of sialic acid residues per cell ranged from 1. 6x10(6) to 2.8x10(6). The surface distribution of sialic acids over the entire C. albicans was inferred from labeling with fluorescein-Limulus polyphemus and Limax flavus agglutinins and directly observed by optical microscopy with (FITC)-Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), abrogated by previous treatment of yeasts with bacterial sialidase. Sialidase-treated yeasts generated beta-galactopyranosyl terminal residues that reacted with peanut agglutinin. In C. albicans N-acetyl-neuraminic acids are alpha2,6- and alpha2,3-linked as indicated by yeast binding to SNA and Maackia amurensis agglutinin. The alpha2,6-linkage clearly predominated in both strains. We also investigated the contribution of sialic acids to the electronegativity of C. albicans, an important factor determining fungal interactions in vivo. Adhesion of yeast cells to a cationic solid phase substrate (poly-L-lysine) was mediated in part by sialic acids, since the number of adherent cells was significantly reduced after treatment with bacterial sialidase. The present evidence adds C. albicans to the list of pathogenic fungi that synthesize sialic acids, which contribute to the negative charge of fungal cells and have a role in their specific interaction with the host tissue.

  20. Lectin histochemistry and ultrastructure of feline kidneys from six different storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Castagnaro, M; Alroy, J; Ucci, A A; Glew, R H

    1987-01-01

    We have compared the pattern of lectin staining with the ultrastructural features of kidneys from normal cats and 19 cats with 6 different lysosomal storage diseases. The diseases studied include GM1 and GM2 gangliosidosis, mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS)-I and MPS-VI, sphingomyelin-lipidosis (i.e., Niemann-Pick disease) and mannosidosis. Ten different biotinylated lectins were used as histochemical probes for carbohydrate residues and avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex as visualant. Concanavalia ensiformis agglutinin (Con A) stained mesangial cells in all storage diseases but GM1, epithelial cells in sphingomyelin-lipidosis and mannosidosis, endothelial cells in GM1 and mannosidosis and Bowman's capsule cells in all but GM2. Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin I (GS-I) stained the glomerular endothelium in all six diseases, but not in control kidneys. Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-I) stained the glomerular epithelium only in GM1 and MPS-I. Succinylated wheat germ agglutinin (SWGA) stained the glomerular endothelium and epithelium in mannosidosis, and the glomerular epithelium and Bowman's capsule in MPS-I. Ultrastructure studies demonstrated an accumulation of oligosaccharides in cases of mannosidosis and GM1 gangliosidosis, a mixture of oligosaccharides and lipids in MPS-I, MPS-VI and GM2 gangliosidosis and only lipid storage in sphingomyelin lipidosis. These studies show that morphologic and histochemical changes are manifested in some kidney cell types in lysosomal storage diseases, even though the enzyme deficiency occurs in all cell types. Furthermore, we show that the nature of the undegraded stored material is complex and that other factors, such as rate of membrane turn over, membrane composition, and cell function may influence the amount and nature of the "stored" material. PMID:2892300

  1. [Enteritis caused by atypical Yersinia (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Baier, R; Puppel, H

    1981-02-13

    For the first time in the Federal Republic of Germany Yersinia species "frederiksenii", "kristensenii", "serovar 0 : 6" (each once) and "serovar 0 : 5" (twice) were found in the stool of 5 patients with gastroenteritic complaints. Serum agglutinins against these species could not be demonstrated. Other enteropathogenic microorganisms were excluded microscopically, by culture and serologically. These Yersinia isolates were resistant against penicillin G, ampicillin, carbenicillin, ticarcillin, and cefalotin.

  2. Lectin staining patterns in human gastric mucosae with and without exposure to Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Melo-Junior, Mario R.; Cavalcanti, Carmelita L.B.; Pontes-Filho, Nicodemos T.; Carvalho Jr, Luiz B.; Beltrão, Eduardo I. C.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate qualitative changes in the glycoconjugate expression in human gastric tissue of positive and negative patients for Helicobacter pylori, through lectins: Wheat Germ Agglutinin (WGA) and Concanavalin A (Con A). The lectins recognized differently the glycoconjugates in the superficial mucous layer at the gastric tissues. The results suggest a significant change in the carbohydrate moieties present on the surface of the gastric cells during infection. PMID:24031208

  3. Dietary Plant Lectins Appear to Be Transported from the Gut to Gain Access to and Alter Dopaminergic Neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans, a Potential Etiology of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jolene; Wang, Mingming; Wei, Wenqian; Keller, Jeffrey N.; Adhikari, Binita; King, Jason F.; King, Michael L.; Peng, Nan; Laine, Roger A.

    2016-01-01

    Lectins from dietary plants have been shown to enhance drug absorption in the gastrointestinal tract of rats, be transported trans-synaptically as shown by tracing of axonal and dendritic paths, and enhance gene delivery. Other carbohydrate-binding protein toxins are known to traverse the gut intact in dogs. Post-feeding rhodamine- or TRITC-tagged dietary lectins, the lectins were tracked from gut to dopaminergic neurons (DAergic-N) in transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) [egIs1(Pdat-1:GFP)] where the mutant has the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene fused to a dopamine transport protein gene labeling DAergic-N. The lectins were supplemented along with the food organism Escherichia coli (OP50). Among nine tested rhodamine/TRITC-tagged lectins, four, including Phaseolus vulgaris erythroagglutinin (PHA-E), Bandeiraea simplicifolia (BS-I), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), and Arachis hypogaea agglutinin (PNA), appeared to be transported from gut to the GFP-DAergic-N. Griffonia Simplicifolia and PHA-E, reduced the number of GFP-DAergic-N, suggesting a toxic activity. PHA-E, BS-I, Pisum sativum (PSA), and Triticum vulgaris agglutinin (Succinylated) reduced fluorescent intensity of GFP-DAergic-N. PHA-E, PSA, Concanavalin A, and Triticum vulgaris agglutinin decreased the size of GFP-DAergic-N, while BS-I increased neuron size. These observations suggest that dietary plant lectins are transported to and affect DAergic-N in C. elegans, which support Braak and Hawkes’ hypothesis, suggesting one alternate potential dietary etiology of Parkinson’s disease (PD). A recent Danish study showed that vagotomy resulted in 40% lower incidence of PD over 20 years. Differences in inherited sugar structures of gut and neuronal cell surfaces may make some individuals more susceptible in this conceptual disease etiology model. PMID:27014695

  4. Effect of diets containing genetically modified potatoes expressing Galanthus nivalis lectin on rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Ewen, S W; Pusztai, A

    1999-10-16

    Diets containing genetically modified (GM) potatoes expressing the lectin Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) had variable effects on different parts of the rat gastrointestinal tract. Some effects, such as the proliferation of the gastric mucosa, were mainly due to the expression of the GNA transgene. However, other parts of the construct or the genetic transformation (or both) could also have contributed to the overall biological effects of the GNA-GM potatoes, particularly on the small intestine and caecum.

  5. Antiviral activity of carbohydrate-binding agents against Nidovirales in cell culture.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, F J U M; de Haan, C A M; Schuurman, N M P; Haijema, B J; Peumans, W J; Van Damme, E J M; Delputte, P L; Balzarini, J; Egberink, H F

    2007-10-01

    Coronaviruses are important human and animal pathogens, the relevance of which increased due to the emergence of new human coronaviruses like SARS-CoV, HKU1 and NL63. Together with toroviruses, arteriviruses, and roniviruses the coronaviruses belong to the order Nidovirales. So far antivirals are hardly available to combat infections with viruses of this order. Therefore, various antiviral strategies to counter nidoviral infections are under evaluation. Lectins, which bind to N-linked oligosaccharide elements of enveloped viruses, can be considered as a conceptionally new class of virus inhibitors. These agents were recently evaluated for their antiviral activity towards a variety of enveloped viruses and were shown in most cases to inhibit virus infection at low concentrations. However, limited knowledge is available for their efficacy towards nidoviruses. In this article the application of the plant lectins Hippeastrum hybrid agglutinin (HHA), Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA), Cymbidium sp. agglutinin (CA) and Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) as well as non-plant derived pradimicin-A (PRM-A) and cyanovirin-N (CV-N) as potential antiviral agents was evaluated. Three antiviral tests were compared based on different evaluation principles: cell viability (MTT-based colorimetric assay), number of infected cells (immunoperoxidase assay) and amount of viral protein expression (luciferase-based assay). The presence of carbohydrate-binding agents strongly inhibited coronaviruses (transmissible gastroenteritis virus, infectious bronchitis virus, feline coronaviruses serotypes I and II, mouse hepatitis virus), arteriviruses (equine arteritis virus and porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus) and torovirus (equine Berne virus). Remarkably, serotype II feline coronaviruses and arteriviruses were not inhibited by PRM-A, in contrast to the other viruses tested.

  6. Comparison of the lectin-binding pattern in different human melanoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lityńska, A; Przybyło, M; Pocheć, E; Hoja-Łukowicz, D; Ciołczyk, D; Laidler, P; Gil, D

    2001-06-01

    Glycosylation is generally altered in tumour cells in comparison with their normal counterparts. These alterations are thought to be important because they contribute to the abnormal behaviour of cancer cells. Therefore, we have comparatively analysed the glycoproteins in cell extracts from human melanoma (primary site--WM35; metastatic sites-- WM239, WM9 and A375) cell lines using sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and lectin staining. The glycoprotein pattern of the WM35 line differed from that of the other cell lines in having less proteins that reacted with Sambucus nigra, Maackia amurensis and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinins. A glycoprotein of about 70 kDa had a significantly increased reaction with Sambucus nigra agglutinin in all the cell lines from metastatic sites. In the WM9, WM239 and A375 cell lines, additional bands (160-100 kDa) were stained with Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin, suggesting that cells from metastatic sites contain more glycoproteins with beta1-6 branches. On the other hand, only minor changes in the reaction with Galanthus nivalis agglutinin, a mannose-specific lectin, were detected. Among the proteins showing different lectin staining, one, with an apparent molecular weight of 133 kDa, was recognized by antibodies as N-cadherin. The present results suggest that in human melanoma the expression of branched and sialylated complex type N-oligosaccharides consistently increased in cells from metastatic sites, and support the view that carbohydrates are associated with the acquisition of the metastatic potential of tumour cells.

  7. Diagnosis of myocardial infarction based on lectin-induced erythrocyte agglutination: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocsi, József; Nieschke, Kathleen; Mittag, Anja; Reichert, Thomas; Laffers, Wiebke; Marecka, Monika; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Piltz, Joachim; Esche, Hans-Jürgen; Wolf, Günther; Dähnert, Ingo; Baumgartner, Adolf; Tarnok, Attila

    2014-03-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is an acute life-threatening disease with a high incidence worldwide. Aim of this study was to test lectin-carbohydrate binding-induced red blood cell (RBC) agglutination as an innovative tool for fast, precise and cost effective diagnosis of MI. Five lectins (Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA), Phaseolus vulgaris erythroagglutinin (PHA), Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA), Artocarpus agglutinin (ArA), Triticum agglutinin (TA)) were tested for ability to differentiate between agglutination characteristics in patients with MI (n = 101) or angina pectoris without MI (AP) (n = 34) and healthy volunteers (HV) as control (n =68) . RBC agglutination was analyzed by light absorbance of a stirred RBC suspension in the green to red light spectrum in an agglutimeter (amtec, Leipzig, Germany) for 15 min after lectin addition. Mean cell count in aggregates was estimated from light absorbance by a mathematical model. Each lectin induced RBC agglutination. RCA led to the strongest RBC agglutination (~500 RBCs/aggregate), while the others induced substantially slower agglutination and lead to smaller aggregate sizes (5-150 RBCs/aggregate). For all analyzed lectins the lectin-induced RBC agglutination of MI or AP patients was generally higher than for HV. However, only PHA induced agglutination that clearly distinguished MI from HV. Variance analysis showed that aggregate size after 15 min. agglutination induced by PHA was significantly higher in the MI group (143 RBCs/ aggregate) than in the HV (29 RBC-s/aggregate, p = 0.000). We hypothesize that pathological changes during MI induce modification of the carbohydrate composition on the RBC membrane and thus modify RBC agglutination. Occurrence of carbohydrate-lectin binding sites on RBC membranes provides evidence about MI. Due to significant difference in the rate of agglutination between MI > HV the differentiation between these groups is possible based on PHA-induced RBC-agglutination. This novel assay

  8. The A0 blood group genotype modifies the jejunal glycomic binding pattern profile of piglets early associated with a simple or complex microbiota.

    PubMed

    Priori, D; Colombo, M; Koopmans, S-J; Jansman, A J M; van der Meulen, J; Trevisi, P; Bosi, P

    2016-02-01

    The intestinal epithelium glycocalyx sugar motif is an important determinant of the bacterial-host interaction and may be affected in pigs by gut microbiota and by blood group genotype. The aim was to study the effect of intestinal association with different microbiota and A0 blood group genotypes on the expressed glycomic pattern in the small intestine. Twelve caesarean-derived pigs previously associated with a simple association (SA) or complex association (CA) microbiota were selected at 26 to 37 d of age. In each subject, different jejunal loops were perfused for 8 h with enterotoxigenic K88 (ETEC), ETEC fimbriae (F4), (LAM), or a saline control. The piglets were genotyped for A0 blood group and the glycomic profile was evaluated by microscopic screening of lectin binding: peanut agglutinin (PNA), which is galactose specific; agglutinin I (UEA), which is fucose specific; lectin II (MALii), which is sialic acid specific; concavalin A, which is mannose specific; soybean agglutinin (SBA), which is -acetyl-galactosamine specific; and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), which is -acetyl-glucosamine specific. A0 pigs had fewer UEA-positive cells, MALii-positive cells ( < 0.001), and SBA-positive cells ( < 0.10) than 00 pigs. Simple association pigs had more SBA positive cells ( < 0.01) than CA pigs. Enterotoxigenic K88-perfused intestinal loops had fewer UEA-positive cells ( < 0.01) and WGA positive cells ( < 0.001) cells and more PNA positive cells (only in SA pigs, < 0.01). No effects of introduction of F4 and LAM in the intestinal lumen were observed. The porcine A0 blood group genotype and the luminal presence of ETEC strongly affected the jejunal mucosa glycomic pattern profile whereas an early oral simple or complex microbial association had limited effects. Pig genetic background has relevance on the cross talk between intestinal epithelium glycocalyx sugar motif and ETEC and, ultimately, on the gut microbial colonization in later life. PMID:27065129

  9. Binding of the blood group-reactive lectins to human adult kidney specimens.

    PubMed

    Laitinen, L; Juusela, H; Virtanen, I

    1990-01-01

    The binding of a panel of blood group-reactive lectins to frozen sections of human kidney was studied with a special emphasis on reactivity with endothelia and basement membranes. The blood group A-reactive lectins, all specific for alpha-D-N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), Helix aspersa (HAA), Helix pomatia (HPA), and Griffonia simplicifolia I-A4 (GSA-I-A4) agglutinins bound to the endothelium in specimens with blood groups A and AB. In other samples, these lectins reacted predominantly with tubular basement membranes, as well as with certain tubules. Both Dolichos biflorus (DBA) and Vicia villosa agglutinins (VVA), reported to react with blood group A1 substance, failed to reveal endothelia in most specimens, but bound differently to tubules in all blood groups. The blood group B-reactive lectins, specific for alpha-D-galactose (alpha-Gal) or GalNAc, respectively, GSA-I-B4 and Sophora japonica agglutinin (SJA), bound to the endothelia in specimens from blood group B or AB and in other specimens bound only to certain tubules. Among the blood group O-reactive lectins, specific for alpha-L-fucose (Fuc), Ulex europaeus I agglutinin (UEA-I) conjugates, but not other lectins with a similar nominal specificity, bound strongly to endothelia in specimens with blood group O. The UEA-I conjugates bound distinctly more faintly to endothelia in specimens of other blood groups. The present results indicate that lectins, binding to defined blood group determinants, react with endothelia in specimens of the respective blood group status. Furthermore, they suggest that basement membranes and some tubules in the human kidney show a distinct heterogeneity in their expression of saccharide residues, related to their blood group status.

  10. Dietary Plant Lectins Appear to Be Transported from the Gut to Gain Access to and Alter Dopaminergic Neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans, a Potential Etiology of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jolene; Wang, Mingming; Wei, Wenqian; Keller, Jeffrey N; Adhikari, Binita; King, Jason F; King, Michael L; Peng, Nan; Laine, Roger A

    2016-01-01

    Lectins from dietary plants have been shown to enhance drug absorption in the gastrointestinal tract of rats, be transported trans-synaptically as shown by tracing of axonal and dendritic paths, and enhance gene delivery. Other carbohydrate-binding protein toxins are known to traverse the gut intact in dogs. Post-feeding rhodamine- or TRITC-tagged dietary lectins, the lectins were tracked from gut to dopaminergic neurons (DAergic-N) in transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) [egIs1(Pdat-1:GFP)] where the mutant has the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene fused to a dopamine transport protein gene labeling DAergic-N. The lectins were supplemented along with the food organism Escherichia coli (OP50). Among nine tested rhodamine/TRITC-tagged lectins, four, including Phaseolus vulgaris erythroagglutinin (PHA-E), Bandeiraea simplicifolia (BS-I), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), and Arachis hypogaea agglutinin (PNA), appeared to be transported from gut to the GFP-DAergic-N. Griffonia Simplicifolia and PHA-E, reduced the number of GFP-DAergic-N, suggesting a toxic activity. PHA-E, BS-I, Pisum sativum (PSA), and Triticum vulgaris agglutinin (Succinylated) reduced fluorescent intensity of GFP-DAergic-N. PHA-E, PSA, Concanavalin A, and Triticum vulgaris agglutinin decreased the size of GFP-DAergic-N, while BS-I increased neuron size. These observations suggest that dietary plant lectins are transported to and affect DAergic-N in C. elegans, which support Braak and Hawkes' hypothesis, suggesting one alternate potential dietary etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). A recent Danish study showed that vagotomy resulted in 40% lower incidence of PD over 20 years. Differences in inherited sugar structures of gut and neuronal cell surfaces may make some individuals more susceptible in this conceptual disease etiology model. PMID:27014695

  11. Histological and lectin histochemical studies on the olfactory mucosae of the Korean roe deer, Capreolus pygargus.

    PubMed

    Park, Changnam; Ahn, Meejung; Kim, Jeongtae; Kim, Seungjoon; Moon, Changjong; Shin, Taekyun

    2015-04-01

    The morphological features of the olfactory mucosae of Korean roe deer, Capreolus pygargus, were histologically studied using the ethmoid turbinates containing the olfactory mucosae from six roe deer (male, 2-3 years old). The ethmoid turbinates were embedded in paraffin, and histochemically evaluated in terms of the mucosal characteristics. Lectin histochemistry was performed to investigate the carbohydrate-binding specificity on the olfactory mucosa. Lectins, including Triticum vulgaris wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), and soybean agglutinin (SBA) were used for the N-acetylglucosamine, fucose and N-acetylgalactosamine carbohydrate groups, respectively. Histologically, the olfactory mucosa, positioned mainly in the caudal roof of the nasal cavity, consisted of the olfactory epithelium and the lamina propria. The olfactory epithelium consisted of protein gene product (PGP) 9.5-positive olfactory receptor cells, galectin-3-positive supporting cells and basal cells. Bowman's glands in the lamina propria were stained by both the periodic acid Schiff reagent and alcian blue (pH 2.5). Two types of lectin, WGA and SBA, were labeled in free border, receptor cells, supporting cells and Bowman's glands, with the exception of basal cells, while UEA-I was labeled in free border, supporting cells and Bowman's glands, but not in receptor cells and basal cells, suggesting that carbohydrate terminals on the olfactory mucosae of roe deer vary depending on cell type. This is the first morphological study of the olfactory mucosa of the Korean roe deer to evaluate carbohydrate terminals in the olfactory mucosae.

  12. Fluorescence emission and polarization for analyzing binding of ruthenium metalloglycocluster to lectin and tetanus toxin C-fragment.

    PubMed

    Okada, Tomoko; Makino, Taro; Minoura, Norihiko

    2009-07-01

    We have designed and synthesized ruthenium complexes bearing clustered galactose Ru(bpy-2Gal)(3) and glucose Ru(bpy-2Glc)(3). Changes in fluorescence emission (FE) and fluorescence polarization (FP) of the metalloglycoclusters were measured by adding each lectin (peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ricinus communis agglutinin 120 (RCA), concanavalin A (ConA), or wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)) or tetanus toxin c-fragment (TCF). Following the addition of PNA and ConA, the FE spectra of Ru(bpy-2Gal)(3) and Ru(bpy-2Glc)(3) showed new emission peaks, respectively. In addition, Ru(bpy-2Gal)(3) and Ru(bpy-2Glc)(3) exclusively increased the FP values by addition of PNA and ConA. Since other combinations of the metalloglycoclusters and lectin caused little change, specific bindings of galactose to PNA and glucose to ConA were confirmed by the FE and FP measurement. From the FP analyses, the dissociation constants (K(d)) of Ru(bpy-2Gal)(3) to PNA and Ru(bpy-2Glc)(3) to ConA were calculated to be ca. 6.1 x 10(-6) M and 1.8 x 10(-5) M. Furthermore, the FP analyses proved specific binding of Ru(bpy-2Gal)(3) to TCF. PMID:19537755

  13. Lectin blot studies on proteins of Myxobolus cerebralis, the causative agent of whirling disease.

    PubMed

    Knaus, Martin; El-Matbouli, Mansour

    2005-07-18

    It is known that Myxobolus cerebralis antigens, both surficial and secreted, are key modulators for, or targets of, host immune system compounds. We undertook SDS-PAGE glycoprotein characterisation of M. cerebralis developmental stages isolated from infected rainbow trout and Western blot analyses using selected biotin-labelled plant lectins (GSA-I, PHA-E, SJA, GSA-II) and anti-triactinomyxon polyclonal antibodies. Glycoproteins were isolated with lectin-affinity chromatography, and prominent bands were characterised by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-mass spectrometry (MALDI/MS). We identified glycoproteins of M. cerebralis myxospores that contained carbohydrate motifs reactive with Phaseolus vulgaris erythroagglutinin (proteins 20 to 209 kDa, PHA-E), Sophora japonica agglutinin (proteins 7 to 70 kDa, SJA), Griffonia simplicifolia Agglutinin I (proteins 10 to 209 kDa, GSA-I) and G. simplicifolia Agglutinin II (proteins 5 to 40 kDa, GSA-II). Mcgp33, a glycoprotein isolated by lectin-affinity chromatography, was reactive with SJA (about 33 kDa). Antiserum produced against M. cerebralis triactinomyxons was found to have differences in the antigenicity of isolated glycoproteins from both M. cerebralis myxospores and actinospores. We also demonstrated modified antigen expression, especially involving the glycoprotein Mcgp33, in different developmental stages of M. cerebralis. PMID:16119891

  14. Combined biochemical and cytological analysis of membrane trafficking using lectins.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Gareth W; Kail, Mark; Hollinshead, Michael; Vaux, David J

    2013-10-01

    We have tested the application of high-mannose-binding lectins as analytical reagents to identify N-glycans in the early secretory pathway of HeLa cells during subcellular fractionation and cytochemistry. Post-endoplasmic reticulum (ER) pre-Golgi intermediates were separated from the ER on Nycodenz-sucrose gradients, and the glycan composition of each gradient fraction was profiled using lectin blotting. The fractions containing the post-ER pre-Golgi intermediates are found to contain a subset of N-linked α-mannose glycans that bind the lectins Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA), Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA), and Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA) but not lectins binding Golgi-modified glycans. Cytochemical analysis demonstrates that high-mannose-containing glycoproteins are predominantly localized to the ER and the early secretory pathway. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that GNA colocalizes with the ER marker protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and the COPI coat protein β-COP. In situ competition with concanavalin A (ConA), another high-mannose specific lectin, and subsequent GNA lectin histochemistry refined the localization of N-glyans containing nonreducing mannosyl groups, accentuating the GNA vesicular staining. Using GNA and treatments that perturb ER-Golgi transport, we demonstrate that lectins can be used to detect changes in membrane trafficking pathways histochemically. Overall, we find that conjugated plant lectins are effective tools for combinatory biochemical and cytological analysis of membrane trafficking of glycoproteins.

  15. Phagocytosis stimulates alternative glycosylation of macrosialin (mouse CD68), a macrophage-specific endosomal protein.

    PubMed

    da Silva, R P; Gordon, S

    1999-03-15

    Macrosialin (mouse CD68), a macrophage-specific member of the lysosomal-associated membrane protein family, displays N-linked glycosylation and a heavily sialylated, mucin-like domain. We show that phagocytosis of zymosan by inflammatory peritoneal macrophages potently alters glycan processing of macrosialin in vitro. The phagocytic glycoform is not induced by other forms of endocytosis and depends on particle internalization. Zymosan uptake does not influence macrosialin protein synthesis, but increases the specific incorporation of D-[2-3H]mannose, D-[6-3H]galactose, N-acetyl-D-[1-3H]glucosamine and L-[5,6-3H]fucose by 2-15-fold. The phagocytic glycoform displays increased binding of agglutinins from peanut, Amaranthus caudatus and Galanthus nivalis, whereas binding of the sialic-acid-specific Maakia amurensis agglutinin is slightly reduced. Digestion by N-Glycanase abolishes the incorporation of [3H]mannose label and Galanthus nivalis agglutinin binding activity, but preserves the incorporation of galactose and N-acetylglucosamine and specific lectin binding. We also show that phagocytosis increases the complexity and length of O-linked chains. The data presented highlight the importance of differential glycosylation in the biology of macrosialin, phagosomes and macrophages in general.

  16. Characterization of Root Surface and Endorhizosphere Pseudomonads in Relation to Their Colonization of Roots

    PubMed Central

    van Peer, Ron; Punte, Helma L. M.; de Weger, Letty A.; Schippers, Bob

    1990-01-01

    An extensive colonization of the endorhizosphere by fluorescent pseudomonads was observed in tomato plants grown on artificial substrates. These studies reveal that a significantly higher percentage of pseudomonads obtained from the endorhizosphere (30%) reduced plant growth than those obtained from the root surface (4%). Lipopolysaccharide patterns, cell envelope protein patterns, and other biochemical characteristics indicated that Pseudomonas isolates obtained from the endorhizosphere are distinct from Pseudomonas isolates obtained from the root surface. Isolates from the endorhizosphere especially were able to recolonize the endorhizosphere of both sterile and nonsterile tomato roots. The ability of the endorhizosphere isolates to colonize the endorhizosphere significantly correlated with their agglutination by tomato root agglutinin but did not correlate with chemotaxis to seed exudates of tomato. No correlation between colonization of the endorhizosphere and agglutination by root agglutinin could be demonstrated for the root surface isolates. We propose that agglutination of specific Pseudomonas strains by root agglutinin is of importance in the initial phase of adherence of bacteria to the root surface. Images PMID:16348258

  17. Fatal autoimmune hemolytic anemia due to immunoglobulin g autoantibody exacerbated by epstein-barr virus.

    PubMed

    Fadeyi, Emmanuel A; Simmons, Julie H; Jones, Mary Rose; Palavecino, Elizabeth L; Pomper, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    Most cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) are caused by the production of an autoantibody that targets determinants on red blood cells (RBCs). This autoantibody can be immunoglobulin (Ig) G, IgM, or IgA. Some autoantibodies react optimally at 0° to 4°C (ie, cold agglutinin) and usually are clinically insignificant. High-titer cold agglutinins are associated with IgM autoantibody and complement fixation induced by infectious agents, including the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). This case report describes a 31-year-old man who had jaundice, a hemoglobin of 6.0 gdL, and was diagnosed with a hemolytic crisis of AIHA. He received a total of 11 RBC transfusions during a 15-hour period without sustained response and later died. The direct antiglobulin test results for this patient were positive, whereas the cold-agglutinin-testing results were negative. We detected EBV DNA in blood via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We report a rare case of AIHA associated with an IgG autoantibody and exacerbated by EBV infection, causing a fatal hemolytic anemia.

  18. Differential Expression of O-Glycans in CD4(+) T Lymphocytes from Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Martínez, Edgar; Lascurain, Ricardo; Tenorio, Eda Patricia; Sánchez-González, Antonio; Chávez-Rueda, Karina; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Jara-Quezada, Luis J; Chávez-Sánchez, Raúl; Zenteno, Edgar; Blanco-Favela, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) show a decreased activation threshold and increased apoptosis. These processes seem to be regulated by glycosylated molecules on the T cell surface. Here, we determined through flow cytometry the expression of mucin-type O-glycans on T helper cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 23 SLE patients and its relation with disease activity. We used lectins specific for the disaccharide Gal-GalNAc, such as Amaranthus leucocarpus lectin (ALL), Artocarpus integrifolia lectin (jacalin) and Arachis hypogaea lectin (peanut agglutinin, PNA), as well as lectins for sialic acid such as Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) and Maakia amurensis agglutinin (MAA). The results showed that ALL, but not jacalin or PNA, identified significant differences in O-glycan expression on T helper cells from active SLE patients (n = 10). Moreover, an inverse correlation was found between the frequency of T helper cells recognized by ALL and SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) score in SLE patients. In contrast, SNA and MAA lectins did not identify any differences between CD4(+) T cells from SLE patients. There was no difference in the recognition by ALL on activated T helper cells and T regulatory (Treg) cells. Our findings point out that activation of SLE disease diminishes the expression of O-glycans in T helper cells; ALL could be considered as a marker to determine activity of the disease. PMID:27600584

  19. Ultrastructure, Histochemistry, and Mineralization Patterns in the Ecdysial Suture of the Blue Crab, Callinectes sapidus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priester, Carolina; Dillaman, Richard M.; Gay, D. Mark

    2005-12-01

    The ecdysial suture is the region of the arthropod exoskeleton that splits to allow the animal to emerge during ecdysis. We examined the morphology and composition of the intermolt and premolt suture of the blue crab using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The suture could not be identified by routine histological techniques; however 3 of 22 fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled lectins tested (Lens culinaris agglutinin, Vicia faba agglutinin, and Pisum sativum agglutinin) differentiated the suture, binding more intensely to the suture exocuticle and less intensely to the suture endocuticle. Back-scattered electron (BSE) and secondary electron observations of fracture surfaces of intermolt cuticle showed less mineralized regions in the wedge-shaped suture as did BSE analysis of premolt and intermolt resin-embedded cuticle. The prism regions of the suture exocuticle were not calcified. X-ray microanalysis of both the endocuticle and exocuticle demonstrated that the suture was less calcified than the surrounding cuticle with significantly lower magnesium and phosphorus concentrations, potentially making its mineral more soluble. The presence or absence of a glycoprotein in the organic matrix, the extent and composition of the mineral deposited, and the thickness of the cuticle all likely contribute to the suture being removed by molting fluid, thereby ensuring successful ecdysis.

  20. Glycophenotype Evaluation in Cutaneous Tumors Using Lectins Labeled with Acridinium Ester

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Luiza Rayanna Amorim; Almeida, Sinara Mônica Vitalino; Silva, Lúcia Patrícia Bezerra Gomes; Beltrão, Eduardo Isidoro Carneiro; Carvalho Júnior, Luiz Bezerra

    2013-01-01

    Background. Tumor cells show alterations in their glycosylation patterns when compared to normal cells. Lectins can be used to evaluate these glycocode changes. Chemiluminescence assay is an effective technique for quantitative analysis of proteins, nucleic acids, and carbohydrates due to its high sensitivity, specificity, and rapid testing. Objective. To use histochemiluminescence based on lectin conjugated to acridinium ester (AE) for the investigation of glycophenotype changes in cutaneous tumors. Methods. Concanavalin A (Con A), Peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I), and Maackia amurensis agglutinin (MAA) were conjugated to acridinium ester. Biopsies of cutaneous tumors and normal skin were incubated with the lectins-AE, and chemiluminescence was quantified and expressed as Relative Light Units (RLU). Results. Actinic keratosis (AK), keratoacanthoma (KA), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) showed lower expression of α-D-glucose/mannose and α-L-fucose residues compared to normal tissue. Cutaneous tumors displayed higher expression of Gal-β(1-3)-GalNAc residues than normal tissue. AK and SCC exhibited higher expression of Neu5Ac-α(2,3)Gal residues than normal epidermis. KA and BCC showed equivalent RLU values compared to normal tissue. Conclusions. Lectin histochemiluminescence allowed quantitative assessment of the carbohydrate expression in cutaneous tissues, contributing to eliminate the subjectivity of conventional techniques used in the histopathological diagnosis. PMID:24167360

  1. Fluorescence emission and polarization analyses for evaluating binding of ruthenium metalloglycoclusters to lectins and tetanus toxin C-fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Tomoko; Minoura, Norihiko

    2011-03-01

    We develop a fluorescent ruthenium metalloglycocluster for use as a powerful molecular probe in evaluating the binding between carbohydrates and lectins by fluorescence emission (FE) and fluorescence polarization (FP) analyses. Changes in the FE and FP of these metalloglycoclusters are measured following the addition of lectin [peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ricinus communis agglutinin 120, Concanavalin A (ConA), or wheat germ agglutinin] or tetanus toxin c-fragment (TCF). After the addition of PNA, the FE spectrum of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] shows a new emission peak and the FP value of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] increases. Similarly, the FE spectrum of [Ru(bpy-2Glc)3] shows a new emission peak and the FP value increases on addition of ConA. Because other combinations of metalloglycoclusters and lectins show little change, specific binding of galactose to PNA and that of glucose to ConA are confirmed by the FE and FP measurements. Resulting dissociation constants (Kd) prove that the metalloglycoclusters with highly clustered carbohydrates show higher affinity for the respective lectins than those with less clustered carbohydrates. Furthermore, specific binding of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] to TCF was confirmed by the FP measurement.

  2. Fluorescence emission and polarization analyses for evaluating binding of ruthenium metalloglycocluster to lectin and tetanus toxin c-fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Tomoko; Minoura, Norihiko

    2010-02-01

    We have developed a fluorescent ruthenium metalloglycocluster as a powerful molecular probe for evaluating a binding event between carbohydrates and lectins by fluorescence emission (FE) and fluorescence polarization (FP) analysis. The fluorescent ruthenium metalloglycoclusters, [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] and [Ru(bpy-2Glc)3], possess clustered galactose and glucose surrounding the ruthenium center. Changes in FE and FP of these metalloglycoclusters were measured by adding each lectin (Peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ricinus communis agglutinin 120 (RCA), Concanavalin A (ConA), or Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)) or tetanus toxin c-fragment (TCF). Following the addition of PNA, the FE spectrum of [Ru(bpy- 2Gal)3] showed new emission peak and the FP value of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] increased. Similarly, the FE spectrum of [Ru(bpy-2Glc)3] showed new emission peak and the FP value increased following the addition of ConA. Since other combinations of the metalloglycoclusters and lectin caused little change, specific bindings of galactose to PNA and glucose to ConA were proved by the FE and FP measurement. From nonlinear least-squares fitting, dissociation constants (Kd) of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] to PNA was 6.1 μM, while the Kd values of [Ru(bpy)2(bpy-2Gal)] to PNA was ca. 10-4 M. Therefore, the clustered carbohydrates were proved to increase affinity to lectins. Furthermore, the FP measurements proved specific binding of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] to TCF.

  3. Bovine adenovirus serotype 3 utilizes sialic acid as a cellular receptor for virus entry.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxin; Bangari, Dinesh S; Sharma, Anurag; Mittal, Suresh K

    2009-09-30

    Bovine adenovirus serotype 3 (BAd3) and porcine adenovirus serotype 3 (PAd3) entry into the host cells is independent of Coxsackievirus adenovirus receptor and integrins. The role of sialic acid in BAd3 and PAd3 entry was investigated. Removal of sialic acid by neuraminidase, or blocking sialic acid by wheat germ agglutinin lectin significantly inhibited BAd3, but not PAd3, transduction of Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells. Maackia amurensis agglutinin or Sambucus nigra (elder) agglutinin treatment efficiently blocked BAd3 transduction suggesting that BAd3 utilized alpha(2,3)-linked and alpha(2,6)-linked sialic acid as a cell receptor. BAd3 transduction of MDBK cells was sensitive to sodium periodate, bromelain, or trypsin treatment indicating that the receptor sialoconjugate was a glycoprotein rather than a ganglioside. To determine sialic acid-containing cell membrane proteins that bind to BAd3, virus overlay protein binding assay (VOPBA) was performed and showed that sialylated cell membrane proteins in size of approximately 97 and 34 kDa bind to BAd3. The results suggest that sialic acid serves as a primary receptor for BAd3.

  4. Differential Expression of O-Glycans in CD4(+) T Lymphocytes from Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Martínez, Edgar; Lascurain, Ricardo; Tenorio, Eda Patricia; Sánchez-González, Antonio; Chávez-Rueda, Karina; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Jara-Quezada, Luis J; Chávez-Sánchez, Raúl; Zenteno, Edgar; Blanco-Favela, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) show a decreased activation threshold and increased apoptosis. These processes seem to be regulated by glycosylated molecules on the T cell surface. Here, we determined through flow cytometry the expression of mucin-type O-glycans on T helper cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 23 SLE patients and its relation with disease activity. We used lectins specific for the disaccharide Gal-GalNAc, such as Amaranthus leucocarpus lectin (ALL), Artocarpus integrifolia lectin (jacalin) and Arachis hypogaea lectin (peanut agglutinin, PNA), as well as lectins for sialic acid such as Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) and Maakia amurensis agglutinin (MAA). The results showed that ALL, but not jacalin or PNA, identified significant differences in O-glycan expression on T helper cells from active SLE patients (n = 10). Moreover, an inverse correlation was found between the frequency of T helper cells recognized by ALL and SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) score in SLE patients. In contrast, SNA and MAA lectins did not identify any differences between CD4(+) T cells from SLE patients. There was no difference in the recognition by ALL on activated T helper cells and T regulatory (Treg) cells. Our findings point out that activation of SLE disease diminishes the expression of O-glycans in T helper cells; ALL could be considered as a marker to determine activity of the disease.

  5. Interaction of native and asialo rat sublingual glycoproteins with lectins.

    PubMed

    Wu, A M; Herp, A; Song, S C; Wu, J H; Chang, K S

    1995-01-01

    The binding properties of the rat sublingual glycoprotein (RSL) and its asialo product with lectins were characterized by quantitative precipitin(QPA) and precipitin inhibition(QPIA) assays. Among twenty lectins tested for QPA, native RSL reacted well only with Artocarpus integrifolia (jacalin), but weakly or not at all with the other lectins. However, its asialo product (asialo-RSL) reacted strongly with many Gal and GalNAc specific lectins-it bound best to three of the GalNAc alpha 1-->Ser/Thr (Tn) and/or Gal beta 1-->4GlcNAc (II) active lectins [jacalin, Wistaria floribunda and Ricinus communis agglutinins] and completely precipitated each of these three lectins. Asialo-RSL also reacted well with Abrus precatorius, Glycine max, Bauhinia purpurea alba, and Maclura pomifera agglutinins, and abrin-a, but not with Arachis hypogeae and Dolichos biflorus agglutinins. The interaction between asialo-RSL and lectins were inhibited by either Gal beta 1-->4GlcNAc, p-NO2-phenyl alpha-GalNAc or both. The mapping of the precipitation and inhibition profiles leads to the conclusion that the asialo rat sublingual glycoprotein provides important ligands for II (Gal beta 1-->4GlcNAc beta 1-->) and Tn (GalNAc alpha 1-->Ser/Thr) active lectins.

  6. Purification of beta-glucuronidase and structural assessment of the carbohydrate chains by lectin affinity immunoelectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wójczyk, B; Hoja, D; Lityńska, A

    1991-08-01

    The purification of rat liver beta-glucuronidase from a lysosomal fraction by methods including affinity chromatography, chromatofocusing and preparative PAGE steps is described. Molecular weights of 300,000 and 150,000 were estimated by two dimensional gradient PAGE/immunoelectrophoresis of the lysosomal extract. Isoelectrofocusing in agarose gel followed by immunoelectrophoresis in the second dimension revealed the presence of at least five maxima in the range pH 4.3-7.4. The structural assessment of the carbohydrate chains of lysosomal and microsomal beta-glucuronidase was performed by lectin affinity immunoelectrophoresis. Reaction with Concanavalin A indicated the presence of bi-antennary complex, oligomannosidic and hybrid type structures, whereas the absence of tri- and tetra-antennary complex type structures was deduced from the lack of interaction with phytohemagglutinin-L. The reaction with Lens culinaris agglutinin, Pisum sativum agglutinin and Lotus tetragonolobus lectin revealed that part of the glycans contained a fucose alpha(1-6)-linked to the N-acetylglucosamine attached to asparagine. The presence of terminal beta(1-4)-galactose residues was detected with Ricinus communis agglutinin I. PMID:1841676

  7. Histochemical demonstration of different types of poly-N-acetyllactosamine structures in human thyroid neoplasms using lectins and endo-beta-galactosidase digestion.

    PubMed

    Ito, N; Yokota, M; Kawahara, S; Nagaike, C; Morimura, Y; Hirota, T; Matsunaga, T

    1995-08-01

    Blood-group-related antigens expressed in papillary carcinomas and other types of neoplasm of the human thyroid glands have been shown to be carried by poly-N-acetyllactosamines containing a linear domain susceptible to endo-beta-galactosidase digestion. To make clear more precisely the backbone poly-N-acetyllactosamine structures, labelled lectins specific to different types of these structures and specific to core structures with beta 1-6GlcNAc branching of N- and O-linked glycoproteins were employed in conjunction with prior endo-beta-galactosidase digestion on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded neoplasms of the human thyroid glands. In papillary carcinomas, Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA) and succinyl wheat germ agglutinin (Suc-WGA) reacted most consistently and frequently with papillary carcinomas from all the individuals examined. Pokeweed mitogen (PWM) likewise stained the cells of papillary carcinomas from all the individuals examined, but in some individuals the number of lectin-reactive cells were very small. Lycoperscion esculentum aggultinin (LEA), Solanum tuberosum agglutinin (STA), Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin L (PHA-L) and Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin (jacalin) similarly bound to the cancer cells from most of the individuals, and in these cases the number of reactive cells was usually much more restricted than was the case with DSA or PWM. In adenoma and other types of carcinoma, such as follicular carcinomas, these lectins specific to poly-N-acetyllactosamine exhibited slight or no reactivity with the cells, whereas PHA-L and jacalin similarly bound to the cells of adenomas and carcinomas from most of the individuals examined. Prior digestion with endo-beta-galactosidase completely eliminated or markedly reduced the reactivity with PWM and LEA in papillary carcinomas. Reactivity with DSA, Suc-WGA, STA, PHA-L and jacalin was slightly reduced or not at all affected by enzyme digestion. These results confirmed that poly

  8. Lectin-Like Constituents of Foods Which React with Components of Serum, Saliva, and Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, R. J.; Dankers, I.

    1981-01-01

    Hot and cold aqueous extracts were prepared from 22 commonly ingested fruits, vegetables, and seeds. When tested by agar diffusion, extracts from 13 and 10 of the foods formed precipitin bands with samples of normal rabbit serum and human saliva, respectively; extracts from four of the foods also reacted with antigen extracts of strains of Streptococcus mutans. When added to rabbit antiserum, extracts from 18 of 21 foods tested inhibited reactivity with antigen extracts derived from S. mutans MT3. Extracts from 16 foods agglutinated whole S. mutans cells, whereas those from 10 foods agglutinated human erythrocytes of blood types A and B. The lectin-like activities of extracts which reacted with human saliva were studied further. Pretreatment of saliva-coated hydroxyapatite (S-HA) beads with extracts of bananas, coconuts, carrots, alfalfa, and sunflower seeds markedly reduced the subsequent adsorption of S. mutans MT3. Pretreatment of S-HA with banana extract also strongly inhibited adsorption of S. mutans H12 and S. sanguis C1, but it had little effect on attachment of Actinomyces naeslundii L13 or A. viscosus LY7. Absorption experiments indicated that the component(s) in banana extract responsible for inhibiting streptococcal adsorption to S-HA was identical to that which bound to human erythrocytes. The banana hemagglutinin exhibited highest activity between pH 7 and 8, and it was inhibited by high concentrations of glucosamine, galactosamine, and, to a lesser extent, mannosamine. Other sugars tested had no effect. The selective bacterial adsorption-inhibiting effect noted for banana extract was also observed in studies with purified lectins. Thus, pretreating S-HA with wheat germ agglutinin and concanavalin A inhibited adsorption of S. mutans MT3 cells, whereas peanut agglutinin, Ulex agglutinin, Dolichos agglutinin, and soybean agglutinin had little effect; none of these lectins affected attachment of A. viscosus LY7. Collectively, the observations suggest that

  9. Lectin Binding to the Root and Root Hair Tips of the Tropical Legume Macroptilium atropurpureum Urb

    PubMed Central

    Ridge, R. W.; Rolfe, B. G.

    1986-01-01

    Ten fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled lectins were tested on the roots of the tropical legume Macroptilium atropurpureum Urb. Four of these (concanavalin A, peanut agglutinin, Ricinis communis agglutinin I [RCA-I], wheat germ agglutinin) were found to bind to the exterior of root cap cells, the root cap slime, and the channels between epidermal cells in the root elongation zone. One of these lectins, RCA-I, bound to the root hair tips in the mature and emerging hair zones and also to sites at which root hairs were only just emerging. There was no RCA-I binding to immature trichoblasts. Preincubation of these lectins with their hapten sugars eliminated all types of root cell binding. By using a microinoculation technique, preincubation of the root surface with RCA-I lectin was found to inhibit infection and nodulation by Rhizobium spp. Preincubation of the root surface with the RCA-I hapten β-d-galactose or a mixture of RCA-I lectin and its hapten failed to inhibit nodulation. Application of RCA-I lectin to the root surface caused no apparent detrimental effects to the root hair cells and did not prevent the growth of root hairs. The lectin did not prevent Rhizobium sp. motility or viability even after 24 h of incubation. It was concluded that the RCA-I lectin-specific sugar β-d-galactose may be involved in the recognition or early infection stages, or both, in the Rhizobium sp. infection of M. atropurpureum. Images PMID:16346989

  10. Interactions with lectins and agglutination profiles of clinical, food, and environmental isolates of Listeria.

    PubMed Central

    Facinelli, B; Giovanetti, E; Casolari, C; Varaldo, P E

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of preliminary trials with 14 collection strains of Listeria, five lectins (Canavalia ensiformis, concanavalin A; Griffonia simplicifolia lectin I; Helix pomatia agglutinin; Ricinus communis agglutinin; and Triticum vulgaris wheat germ agglutinin) were selected to set up a microtiter agglutination assay. The lectin agglutination profiles of 174 clinical, food, and environmental strains of Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria innocua, and Listeria seeligeri were investigated. Data on the standard determination of the antigenic structure were available for clinical strains; nonclinical isolates were assigned to serogroup 1 or 4 with commercial antisera. The listeria-lectin interaction was related to serological type rather than species; in particular, the strains assigned to serogroup 1 or belonging to serovars 1/2a, 1/2b, 1/2c, 3a, 3b, and 7 were never agglutinated by G. simplicifolia lectin I. The five-lectin set proved to be capable of detecting differences between serologically identical isolates of L. monocytogenes. Of the 150 isolates of this species, 144 were distributed over 15 different lectin agglutination profiles and 6 autoagglutinated, the overall typeability being 96%. However, the profiles encountered among L. monocytogenes isolates were not randomly distributed. With strains assigned to serogroup 1 or belonging to serovars 1/2a, 1/2b, 1/2c, and 3b, the clinical isolates fell into only two of the eight patterns recorded overall; with strains of serogroup 4 and serovar 4b, food and environmental isolates were distributed over eight of the nine patterns found in total, while clinical isolates were distributed over five patterns. In a comparative study of 15 epidemiologically relevant isolates of L. monocytogenes from five distinct outbreaks, strains with identical phage types and/or DNA fingerprints displayed identical lectin profiles. The heterogeneity of agglutination profiles may form the basis of a new approach to L. monocytogenes typing

  11. Projections of brainstem core cholinergic and non-cholinergic neurons of cat to intralaminar and reticular thalamic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Paré, D; Smith, Y; Parent, A; Steriade, M

    1988-04-01

    We combined the retrograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin conjugated with horseradish peroxidase with choline acetyltransferase immunohistochemistry to study the projections of cholinergic and non-cholinergic neurons of the upper brainstem core to rostral and caudal intralaminar thalamic nuclei, reticular thalamic complex and zona incerta in the cat. After wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase injections in the rostral pole of the reticular thalamic nucleus, the distribution and amount of retrogradely labeled brainstem neurons were similar to those found after tracer injection in thalamic relay nuclei (see preceding paper). After wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase injections in the caudal intralaminar centrum medianum-parafascicular complex, rostral intralaminar central lateral-paracentral wing, and zona incerta, the numbers of retrogradely labeled brainstem neurons were more than three times higher than those found after injections in thalamic relay nuclei. The larger numbers of horseradish peroxidase-positive brainstem reticular neurons after tracer injections in intralaminar or zona incerta injections results from a more substantial proportion of labeled neurons in the central tegmental field at rostral midbrain (perirubral) levels and in the ventromedial part of the pontine reticular formation, ipsi- and contralaterally to the injection site. Of all retrogradely labeled neurons in the caudal midbrain core at the level of the cholinergic peribrachial area and laterodorsal tegmental nucleus, 45-50% were also choline acetyltransferase-positive after the injections into central lateral-paracentral and reticular nuclei, while only 25% were also choline acetyltransferase-positive after the injection into the centrum medianum-parafascicular complex. These findings are discussed in the light of physiological evidence of brainstem cholinergic mechanisms involved in the blockade of synchronized oscillations and in activation processes of

  12. The evaluation of a lectin-agarose based subunit vaccine and complementary diagnostic antigen for Aujeszky's disease (pseudorabies) in the pig.

    PubMed

    Platt, K B

    1984-02-01

    Eleven out of 25 pigs were immunized with a lectin--agarose based subunit vaccine for Aujeszky's disease (AD). The vaccine was prepared by extracting protective antigens from a non-ionic detergent (Triton-X-100) extract of AD virus-infected PK-la cells with Lens culinaris agglutinin immobilized on agarose beads. Two groups of 3 and 4 pigs received 2 doses of vaccine each containing 426 micrograms of adsorbed protein. Two groups of 2 pigs each received 2 vaccine doses containing either 23 or 33 micrograms of adsorbed protein. All vaccinated pigs survived a nasal challenge of 10(8.5) PFU of virulent AD virus while 13 out of 14 (93%) uninoculated controls died between Days 5 and 9 post challenge. This immunizing preparation qualified as a practical subunit vaccine because pigs were protected with relatively small amounts of protective antigen while at the same time remained free of detectable antibody to a complementary diagnostic antigen. This antigen was obtained in relatively pure form from the maintenance medium of virus-infected cells 4 h post-inoculation. In addition both high and low dose vaccinates failed to produce detectable antibody to at least one other antigen complex. The composition of Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA) and Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA)-purified AD viral antigen preparations were also compared by crossed immunoelectrophoretic techniques. Both preparations contained two antigen complexes and two individual antigens in common. Each preparation also contained its own unique antigen complex. The RCA purified antigen preparation also contained small quantities of a single antigen that was not detectable in the LCA antigen preparation.

  13. Identification of N-acetylneuraminic acid and its 9-O-acetylated derivative on the cell surface of Cryptococcus neoformans: influence on fungal phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, M L; Rozental, S; Couceiro, J N; Angluster, J; Alviano, C S; Travassos, L R

    1997-12-01

    Sialic acids from sialoglycoconjugates present at the cell surface of Cryptococcus neoformans yeast forms were analyzed by high-performance thin-layer chromatography, binding of influenza A and C virus strains, enzymatic treatment, and flow cytofluorimetry with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled lectins. C. neoformans yeast forms grown in a chemically defined medium contain N-acetylneuraminic acid and its 9-O-acetylated derivative. A density of 3 x 10(6) residues of sialic acid per cell was found in C. neoformans. Sialic acids in cryptococcal cells are glycosidically linked to galactopyranosyl units as inferred from the increased reactivity of neuraminidase-treated yeasts with peanut agglutinin. N-Acetylneuraminic acids are alpha-2,6 and alpha-2,3 linked, as indicated by using virus strains M1/5 and M1/5 HS8, respectively, as agglutination probes. The alpha-2,6 linkage markedly predominated. These findings were essentially confirmed by the interaction of cryptococcal cells with the lectins Sambucus nigra agglutinin and Maackia amurensis agglutinin. We also investigated whether the sialyl residues present in C. neoformans are involved in the fungal interaction with a cationic solid-phase substrate and with mouse resident macrophages. Adhesion of yeast cells to poly-L-lysine was mediated, in part, by sialic acid residues, since the number of adherent cells was markedly reduced after treatment with bacterial neuraminidase. The enzymatic removal of sialic acids also made C. neoformans yeast cells more susceptible to endocytosis by macrophages. The results show that sialic acids are components of the cryptococcal cell surface that contribute to its negative charge and protect yeast forms against phagocytosis.

  14. Inheritance of immune responsiveness, life span, and disease incidence in interline crosses of mice selected for high or low multispecific antibody production.

    PubMed

    Covelli, V; Mouton, D; Di Majo, V; Bouthillier, Y; Bangrazi, C; Mevel, J C; Rebessi, S; Doria, G; Biozzi, G

    1989-02-15

    High (H) and low (L) antibody responder lines of mice separated by selective breeding present a maximal interline difference in antibody (Ab) response to Ag of different specificities (general genetic regulation). The analysis of SRBC agglutinin response in H line, L line, F1 hybrids, F2, and backcross segregants demonstrates that Ab responsiveness is a polygenic trait regulated by the additive interaction of 5 to 7 independent loci, with an incomplete dominance (44% +/- 7%) of the high response character, and a 30% +/- 10% impact of the environmental factors. The life span of H, L, F1, F2, and backcross populations is correlated positively with 2-ME-resistant agglutinin response (r = 0.97, p less than 0.001) and negatively with 2-ME-sensitive agglutinin response (r = 0.95, p = 0.01) (interpopulation correlation). Similar correlations are also observed in individuals of the various populations, especially in F1 x L backcross, in which the largest phenotypic variance is found. The positive correlation between Ab responsiveness and life span was confirmed by ELISA titration for distinct IgG isotypes (intrapopulation correlation). Malignant lymphomas and chronic nephritis were the two most common diseases observed. The age-adjusted incidence of such diseases, which is largely affected by environmental factors, accounts for the longer life span of H, as compared with L, mouse populations. The longevity of the 30% or less survivors, chiefly determined by the rate of physiologic aging, is a polygenic character regulated by the cumulative interaction of 3 to 7 independent loci, with a complete dominance of the long life trait and an impact of the environmental factors of about 60%. Thus we have grounds for regarding general Ab responsiveness and life span as polygenic traits regulated by a small number of identical or closely linked gene loci, and immune responsiveness as a defense mechanism against neoplastic and inflammatory diseases.

  15. Lectin binding and effects in culture on human cancer and non-cancer cell lines: examination of issues of interest in drug design strategies.

    PubMed

    Petrossian, Karineh; Banner, Lisa R; Oppenheimer, Steven B

    2007-01-01

    By using a non-cancer and a cancer cell line originally from the same tissue (colon), coupled with testing lectins for cell binding and for their effects on these cell lines in culture, this study describes a simple multi-parameter approach that has revealed some interesting results that could be useful in drug development strategies. Two human cell lines, CCL-220/Colo320DM (human colon cancer cells, tumorigenic in nude mice) and CRL-1459/CCD-18Co (non-malignant human colon cells) were tested for their ability to bind to agarose microbeads derivatized with two lectins, peanut agglutinin (Arachis hypogaea agglutinin, PNA) and Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), and the effects of these lectins were assessed in culture using the MTT assay. Both cell lines bound to DBA-derivatized microbeads, and binding was inhibited by N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, but not by L-fucose. Neither cell line bound to PNA-derivatized microbeads. Despite the lack of lectin binding using the rapid microbead method, PNA was mitogenic in culture at some time points and its mitogenic effect displayed a reverse-dose response. This was also seen with effects of DBA on cells in culture. While this is a simple study, the results were statistically highly significant and suggest that: (1) agents may not need to bind strongly to cells to exert biological effects, (2) cell line pairs derived from diseased and non-diseased tissue can provide useful comparative data on potential drug effects and (3) very low concentrations of potential drugs might be initially tested experimentally because reverse-dose responses should be considered. PMID:17706752

  16. Comparison of alteration of cell surface carbohydrates of the chinchilla tubotympanum and colonial opacity phenotype of Streptococcus pneumoniae during experimental pneumococcal otitis media with or without an antecedent influenza A virus infection.

    PubMed

    Tong, H H; Grants, I; Liu, X; DeMaria, T F

    2002-08-01

    Experimental and clinical studies suggest that influenza A virus promotes Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced otitis media; however, the mechanism underlying this synergistic interaction has not been completely defined. In this study, glycoconjugate expression patterns were evaluated on the cell surface in the chinchilla eustachian tube (ET) lumen of a cohort challenged intranasally (i.n.) with S. pneumoniae type 6A, which is predominantly transparent and a cohort with an antecedent influenza A virus infection, followed by i.n. inoculation with S. pneumoniae. The labeling patterns obtained with six lectin probes revealed that the binding of Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin II, succinylated wheat germ agglutinin, and peanut agglutinin were significantly increased in the lumenal surface of the ET in the cohort infected with both pathogens compared to the cohort inoculated with only S. pneumoniae, which indicated that N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and D-galactose residues were exposed. A significant decreased labeling with Sambucus nigra agglutinin in the combined influenza A virus and pneumococcus infection cohort suggested that there were few sialic acid residues remaining in the ET epithelium. In addition, the colonial opacity of S. pneumoniae during the disease course was examined. The opaque phenotype was predominant among the pneumococcus isolates from the middle-ear fluid in the cohort infected with the both pathogens. Together, these data suggest that the synergic effect of influenza A virus and S. pneumoniae on the changes of the carbohydrate moieties in the ET epithelium and that the selection of the opaque variant may facilitate the pneumococcal invasion of the middle ear.

  17. Identification of N-acetylneuraminic acid and its 9-O-acetylated derivative on the cell surface of Cryptococcus neoformans: influence on fungal phagocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, M L; Rozental, S; Couceiro, J N; Angluster, J; Alviano, C S; Travassos, L R

    1997-01-01

    Sialic acids from sialoglycoconjugates present at the cell surface of Cryptococcus neoformans yeast forms were analyzed by high-performance thin-layer chromatography, binding of influenza A and C virus strains, enzymatic treatment, and flow cytofluorimetry with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled lectins. C. neoformans yeast forms grown in a chemically defined medium contain N-acetylneuraminic acid and its 9-O-acetylated derivative. A density of 3 x 10(6) residues of sialic acid per cell was found in C. neoformans. Sialic acids in cryptococcal cells are glycosidically linked to galactopyranosyl units as inferred from the increased reactivity of neuraminidase-treated yeasts with peanut agglutinin. N-Acetylneuraminic acids are alpha-2,6 and alpha-2,3 linked, as indicated by using virus strains M1/5 and M1/5 HS8, respectively, as agglutination probes. The alpha-2,6 linkage markedly predominated. These findings were essentially confirmed by the interaction of cryptococcal cells with the lectins Sambucus nigra agglutinin and Maackia amurensis agglutinin. We also investigated whether the sialyl residues present in C. neoformans are involved in the fungal interaction with a cationic solid-phase substrate and with mouse resident macrophages. Adhesion of yeast cells to poly-L-lysine was mediated, in part, by sialic acid residues, since the number of adherent cells was markedly reduced after treatment with bacterial neuraminidase. The enzymatic removal of sialic acids also made C. neoformans yeast cells more susceptible to endocytosis by macrophages. The results show that sialic acids are components of the cryptococcal cell surface that contribute to its negative charge and protect yeast forms against phagocytosis. PMID:9393779

  18. Fatal hemolytic transfusion reaction due to anti-Ku in a Knull patient.

    PubMed

    Lin, M; Wang, C L; Chen, F S; Ho, L H

    2003-01-01

    A fatal transfusion reaction due to anti-Ku in a Knull (Ko) patient is reported. The patient was transfused with 34 units of incompatible RBCs during 44 days of hospitalization. Apart from the first transfusion, all subsequent transfusions failed to raise the patient's Hb. No serum antibody was identified until he was transferred to another hospital for dialysis. A compatibility test demonstrated a weak antibody and autocontrol reacting at room temperature by a manual polybrene method. The antibody was considered to be a "cold agglutinin." A blood sample was sent to a reference laboratory where the patient was found to be Knull and the antibody was identified as anti-Ku.

  19. Use of immunohistochemical staining panel for characterisation of ovarian neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    Ashorn, P; Helle, M; Helin, H; Ashorn, R; Krohn, K

    1988-01-01

    Eighty five ovarian epithelial and non-epithelial tumours were studied by peroxidase histochemical staining for their reactivity with six monoclonal human milk fat globule (HMFG) antibodies, peanut agglutinin (PNA) lectin, and a monoclonal cytokeratin antibody. HMFG IIIC12 and cytokeratin antibodies distinguished epithelial from non-epithelial tumours. The staining patterns of mucinous and serous tumours were essentially different from each other; poorly differentiated anaplastic carcinomas showed similar antigenic content to that of the serous cystadenocarcinomas. Furthermore, staining with PNA lectin and HMFG antibodies was useful in distinguishing clear cell carcinomas from other malignant epithelial tumours of the ovary. Images Fig 2 Fig 1 PMID:2449464

  20. Characterization of I/F1 glycoprotein as a receptor for Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Hengge, U R; Kirschfink, M; König, A L; Nicklas, W; Roelcke, D

    1992-01-01

    Serologic evidence of anti-I and anti-Fl cold agglutinins occurring in mycoplasma infections led to the isolation of I/Fl glycoprotein from human erythrocyte membranes. Mycoplasma pneumoniae bound to purified I/Fl glycoprotein in a dose-dependent fashion depending on sialylated carbohydrate determinants. This was shown by the decreased binding of mycoplasmas to either sialidase-treated I/Fl glycoprotein (dot blot analysis) or sialidase-treated erythrocytes (hemagglutination test). Structural properties of the receptor for optimal binding could be explored by hemagglutination inhibition assays. Glycophorins were excluded as receptors. These results indicate that Fl (and I) antigens are receptors for M. pneumoniae. Images PMID:1370278

  1. The complete amino acid sequence of lectin-C from the roots of pokeweed (Phytolacca americana).

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Mori, A; Funatsu, G

    1995-07-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of pokeweed lectin-C (PL-C) consisting of 126 residues has been determined. PL-C is an acidic simple protein with molecular mass of 13,747 Da and consists of three cysteine-rich domains with 51-63% homology. PL-C shows homology to chitin-binding proteins such as wheat germ agglutinin, and all eight cysteine residues in the three domains of PL-C are completely conserved in all other chitin-binding domains.

  2. Short Wavelength Cone Opsin Is Not Expressed in the Retina of Arboreal African Pangolin (Manis tricuspis).

    PubMed

    Adekanmbi, Adejoke J; Adekanmbi, Adefisayo A; Akinola, Oluwole B

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a study of cone photoreceptors present in the retina of Manis tricuspis. Specifically, the LWS (L-) opsin expressed in longwave-sensitive cones and SWS1 (S-) opsin shortwave-sensitive cones were targeted. Vertical sections revealed reactivity to a cone marker, peanut agglutinin (PNA), and to an LWS antibody, but not to an SWS1 antibody. This suggests that the Manis tricuspis visual system is not able to discriminate shorter wavelengths from longer wavelengths because the short wavelength cones are not expressed in their retina. PMID:27242946

  3. Center for Disease Control Diagnostic Immunology Proficiency Testing Program results for 1978.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, R N; Fulford, K M; Przybyszewski, V A; Pope, V

    1979-01-01

    Data from about 1,000 laboratories participating in the Diagnostic Immunology portion of the 1978 Center for Disease Control Proficiency Testing Program provided information dealing with laboratory performance and trends in testing protocols. Ninety specimens were distributed in scheduled quarterly and semiannual shipments, and five additional specimens were provided in a special survey. The specimens offered both qualitative and quantitative challenges for a wide variety of analytes which included syphilis serology, rheumatoid factor, bacterial agglutinins, hepatitis B surface antigen, immunoglobulins and other serum proteins, infectious mononucleosis, rubella, toxoplasma, antinuclear antibodies, and streptococcal exoenzymes. This paper summarizes the results of the 1978 program. PMID:230201

  4. Altered glycosylation, expression of serum haptoglobin and alpha-1-antitrypsin in chronic hepatitis C, hepatitis C induced liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Gautam; Saroha, Ashish; Bose, Partha Pratim; Chatterjee, B P

    2016-04-01

    Liver cirrhosis with hepatitis C viral infection (HCV-LC) causes high risk to develop hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Besides diagnosis of liver cirrhosis by biochemical test, imaging techniques, assessment of structural liver damage by biopsy shows several disadvantages. Our aim was to monitor the changes in the expression level of serum proteins and their glycosylation pattern among chronic hepatitis C (HCV-CH), HCV-LC and HCC patients with respect to controls. 2D gel electrophoresis of HCV-CH, HCV-LC and HCC patients' sera showed several protein spots, which were identified by LC-MS. The change in the expression of two prominent protein spots, haptoglobin (Hp) and alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) was evaluated by western blot and ELISA. The changes in glycosylation pattern of these serum proteins were assayed using different lectins. Increased level of Hp and AAT was observed in HCV-LC and HCC patients' group whereas those were found to be present less in HCV-CH patient groups with respect to control as determined by ELISA using monoclonal antibodies. Decreased level of sialylation in both Hp and AAT was observed in HCV-LC and HCV-CH patients' group whereas increased level of sialylation was observed in HCC patient groups by ELISA using Sambucus nigra agglutinin. On the other hand increased level of fucosylation in two serum glycoproteins was observed in HCV-LC and HCC patients' group using Lens culinarris agglutinin. High glycan branching was found in HCV-LC and HCC patient groups in Hp but not in HCV-CH as determined by Datura stramonium agglutinin. However, there was no such change observed in glycan branching in AAT of HCV-CH and HCV-LC patients' groups, to the contrary high glycan branching was observed in HCC patients' group. Increased level of exposed galactose in both serum proteins was observed in both HCC patients' group as determined by Ricinus communis agglutinin. The present glycoproteomics study could predict the progression of HCV-CH, HCV-LC and HCC

  5. Short Wavelength Cone Opsin Is Not Expressed in the Retina of Arboreal African Pangolin (Manis tricuspis)

    PubMed Central

    Adekanmbi, Adejoke J.; Adekanmbi, Adefisayo A.; Akinola, Oluwole B.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a study of cone photoreceptors present in the retina of Manis tricuspis. Specifically, the LWS (L-) opsin expressed in longwave-sensitive cones and SWS1 (S-) opsin shortwave-sensitive cones were targeted. Vertical sections revealed reactivity to a cone marker, peanut agglutinin (PNA), and to an LWS antibody, but not to an SWS1 antibody. This suggests that the Manis tricuspis visual system is not able to discriminate shorter wavelengths from longer wavelengths because the short wavelength cones are not expressed in their retina. PMID:27242946

  6. Short Wavelength Cone Opsin Is Not Expressed in the Retina of Arboreal African Pangolin (Manis tricuspis).

    PubMed

    Adekanmbi, Adejoke J; Adekanmbi, Adefisayo A; Akinola, Oluwole B

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a study of cone photoreceptors present in the retina of Manis tricuspis. Specifically, the LWS (L-) opsin expressed in longwave-sensitive cones and SWS1 (S-) opsin shortwave-sensitive cones were targeted. Vertical sections revealed reactivity to a cone marker, peanut agglutinin (PNA), and to an LWS antibody, but not to an SWS1 antibody. This suggests that the Manis tricuspis visual system is not able to discriminate shorter wavelengths from longer wavelengths because the short wavelength cones are not expressed in their retina.

  7. Some characteristics of salt-dependent haemagglutinating measles viruses.

    PubMed

    Shirodaria, P V; Dermott, E; Gould, E A

    1976-10-01

    Several strains of measles virus which did not agglutinate monkey erythrocytes in phosphate-buffered saline did so in buffer containing 0-8 M-ammonium sulphate. Haemadsorption to cells infected with these viruses was also salt-dependent. In a series of tests salt-dependent agglutinin was shown to be a stable structural component of the infectious virion. The relevance of these findings is discussed in the light of previous reports that many measles virus preparations do not agglutinate erythrocytes. PMID:62022

  8. Isolation of murine sialoglycoprotein using consecutive chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D J; Planas, J M

    1991-01-01

    Affinity columns and high performance liquid chromatography were employed consecutively to obtain 89, 65, 46 and 29 kilodalton sialoglycoproteins from mouse erythrocyte ghosts free of the Band 3 protein which traditionally co-purifies with these proteins. The purification scheme involves Concanavalin A, Wheat Germ Agglutinin and/or Limulus lectin Sepharose 4B columns. We have designated these glycophorin-like proteins Sialoglycoproteins 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Sialoglycoprotein 2 can be isolated independently using a Limulus column combination, while Sialoglycoproteins 3 and 4 were isolated separately during high performance liquid chromatography, demonstrating heterogeneity in binding properties between these sialoglycoproteins.

  9. Elevated alpha-fetoprotein: differential diagnosis - hepatocellular carcinoma and other disorders.

    PubMed

    Wong, Robert J; Ahmed, Aijaz; Gish, Robert G

    2015-05-01

    The incidence of cirrhosis-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is rising. Curative surgical options are available; outcomes are acceptable with early diagnosis. Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive fraction of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP-L3) and des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) are HCC risk markers. A high or increasing serum biomarker level can be predictive of the eventual development of HCC, large tumor size, advanced stage, extrahepatic metastases, portal vein thrombosis, and postoperative HCC recurrence. Based on FDA guidelines for HCC risk assessment, clinicians can consider using either the combination of AFP-L3 with DCP, or the combination of AFP-L3 with AFP and DCP. PMID:25921665

  10. Selective inhibition of gastrulation in the starfish embryo by albuside B, an inosine analogue.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, T; Hamada, K; Isomura, H; Myotoishi, Y; Ikegami, S; Kaneko, H; Dan-Sohkawa, M

    1995-08-01

    External application of 0.2-100 micrograms/ml albuside B inhibits gastrulation of the starfish (Asterina pectinifera) embryo. Treated embryos retain the late blastula morphology with the vegetal plate. However, the vegetal plate is unreactive to soybean agglutinin, a probe for observing the progenitor cells of the archenteron (mesendoderm) in a normal embryo. The effective period of the treatment is limited from 4 to 6 h after fertilization, a period immediately before the onset of blastulation. RNA synthesis is unaffected during the period of sensitivity. The selectivity of the inhibition shows that albuside B may be a useful tool for studying the mechanisms of mesendoderm differentiation.

  11. [Automated hematology analysers and spurious counts Part 3. Haemoglobin, red blood cells, cell count and indices, reticulocytes].

    PubMed

    Godon, Alban; Genevieve, Franck; Marteau-Tessier, Anne; Zandecki, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Several situations lead to abnormal haemoglobin measurement or to abnormal red blood cells (RBC) counts, including hyperlipemias, agglutinins and cryoglobulins, haemolysis, or elevated white blood cells (WBC) counts. Mean (red) cell volume may be also subject to spurious determination, because of agglutinins (mainly cold), high blood glucose level, natremia, anticoagulants in excess and at times technological considerations. Abnormality related to one measured parameter eventually leads to abnormal calculated RBC indices: mean cell haemoglobin content is certainly the most important RBC parameter to consider, maybe as important as flags generated by the haematology analysers (HA) themselves. In many circumstances, several of the measured parameters from cell blood counts (CBC) may be altered, and the discovery of a spurious change on one parameter frequently means that the validity of other parameters should be considered. Sensitive flags allow now the identification of several spurious counts, but only the most sophisticated HA have optimal flagging, and simpler ones, especially those without any WBC differential scattergram, do not share the same capacity to detect abnormal results. Reticulocytes are integrated into the CBC in many HA, and several situations may lead to abnormal counts, including abnormal gating, interference with intraerythrocytic particles, erythroblastosis or high WBC counts.

  12. Assessment of lectin inactivation by heat and digestion.

    PubMed

    Pusztai, A; Grant, G

    1998-01-01

    Proteins/glycoproteins from plants, particularly lectins, are more resistant to heat denaturation than animal proteins (1, 2). With legume seeds, whose lectin content is appreciable, this presents potentially serious problems in nutritional practice. Therefore, before they can be used safely, legume-based food/ feeds usually require thorough and expensive heat processing to inactivate antinutritive components. Indeed, dry or moist heating of seeds at 70°C for several h has little or no effect on their lectin activity (Fig. 1) and treatment at much higher temperatures is needed to inactivate the biological and antinutritional effects of legume lectins (1, 2). The safety aspect is even more serious with some monocot lectins, such as wheatgerm agglutinin or a number of oilseed lectins, such as peanut agglutinin and many others because they are extremely heat stable and normal cooking or other conventional heat treatments may fail to inactivate them (3) Thus, the best way to avoid potential harmful effects of these heat-resistant lectins is to limit their dietary intake to a minimum. Fig. 1. Loss of lectin activity during aqueous heat treatment of soybean at various temperatures. PMID:21374488

  13. PNA lectin for purifying mouse acinar cells from the inflamed pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiangwei; Fischbach, Shane; Fusco, Joseph; Zimmerman, Ray; Song, Zewen; Nebres, Philip; Ricks, David Matthew; Prasadan, Krishna; Shiota, Chiyo; Husain, Sohail Z.; Gittes, George K.

    2016-01-01

    Better methods for purifying human or mouse acinar cells without the need for genetic modification are needed. Such techniques would be advantageous for the specific study of certain mechanisms, such as acinar-to-beta-cell reprogramming and pancreatitis. Ulex Europaeus Agglutinin I (UEA-I) lectin has been used to label and isolate acinar cells from the pancreas. However, the purity of the UEA-I-positive cell fraction has not been fully evaluated. Here, we screened 20 widely used lectins for their binding specificity for major pancreatic cell types, and found that UEA-I and Peanut agglutinin (PNA) have a specific affinity for acinar cells in the mouse pancreas, with minimal affinity for other major pancreatic cell types including endocrine cells, duct cells and endothelial cells. Moreover, PNA-purified acinar cells were less contaminated with mesenchymal and inflammatory cells, compared to UEA-I purified acinar cells. Thus, UEA-I and PNA appear to be excellent lectins for pancreatic acinar cell purification. PNA may be a better choice in situations where mesenchymal cells or inflammatory cells are significantly increased in the pancreas, such as type 1 diabetes, pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. PMID:26884345

  14. Non-motoneurons in the facial and motor trigeminal nuclei projecting to the cerebellar flocculus in the cat. A fluorescent double-labelling and WGA-HRP study.

    PubMed

    Røste, G K

    1989-01-01

    The cerebellar projection from the facial and motor trigeminal nuclei was studied in the cat by means of retrograde axonal transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase and fluorescent tracers. The feline facial nucleus was cytoarchitectonically subdivided into ventromedial, ventrolateral, lateral, dorsal, intermediate and medial divisions (see Papez 1927), and the motor trigeminal nucleus into medial, ventral, intermediate, lateral and dorsal divisions. The neurons in the facial and motor trigeminal nuclei were classified as small (ovoid to round cells with a maximum diameter of the cell body of about 20 microns) or large (polygonal to round cells with maximum diameter of about 40 microns). After floccular injections of the wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase complex, retrogradely labelled cells were found throughout the facial nucleus, but especially in its medial and dorsal divisions. In the motor trigeminal nucleus, labelled neurons were found only in the ventral, intermediate and lateral divisions. Cases with tracer deposition (implants or injections) in other parts of the cerebellar cortex or nuclei were all negative. All facial and motor trigeminal neurons labelled after floccular injections were smaller than the neurons labelled after injections in the facial mimic and masticatory muscles, and only single-labelled neurons were found following floccular injections of Fluoro-Gold and muscular injections of rhodamine-B-isothiocyanate in the same animals. These observations strongly suggest that the neurons in the facial and motor trigeminal nuclei which project to flocculus are of the non-motoneuron type. PMID:2470610

  15. Anatomy, histochemistry, and immunohistochemistry of the olfactory subsystems in mice

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, Arthur W.; Núñez, Gonzalo; Sánchez Quinteiro, Pablo; Salazar, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    The four regions of the murine nasal cavity featuring olfactory neurons were studied anatomically and by labeling with lectins and relevant antibodies with a view to establishing criteria for the identification of olfactory subsystems that are readily applicable to other mammals. In the main olfactory epithelium and the septal organ the olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) are embedded in quasi-stratified columnar epithelium; vomeronasal OSNs are embedded in epithelium lining the medial interior wall of the vomeronasal duct and do not make contact with the mucosa of the main nasal cavity; and in Grüneberg's ganglion a small isolated population of OSNs lies adjacent to, but not within, the epithelium. With the exception of Grüneberg's ganglion, all the tissues expressing olfactory marker protein (OMP) (the above four nasal territories, the vomeronasal and main olfactory nerves, and the main and accessory olfactory bulbs) are also labeled by Lycopersicum esculentum agglutinin, while Ulex europaeus agglutinin I labels all and only tissues expressing Gαi2 (the apical sensory neurons of the vomeronasal organ, their axons, and their glomerular destinations in the anterior accessory olfactory bulb). These staining patterns of UEA-I and LEA may facilitate the characterization of olfactory anatomy in other species. A 710-section atlas of the anatomy of the murine nasal cavity has been made available on line. PMID:25071468

  16. Two Chitotriose-Specific Lectins Show Anti-Angiogenesis, Induces Caspase-9-Mediated Apoptosis and Early Arrest of Pancreatic Tumor Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Dhiman; Suresh, C. G.

    2016-01-01

    The antiproliferative activity of two chito- specific agglutinins purified from Benincasa hispida (BhL) and Datura innoxia (DiL9) of different plant family origin was investigated on various cancer cell lines. Both lectins showed chitotriose specificity, by inhibiting lectin hemagglutinating activity. On further studies, it was revealed that these agglutinins caused remarkable concentration-dependent antiproliferative effect on human pancreatic cancerous cells but not on the normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells even at higher doses determined using MTT assay. The GI50 values were approximately 8.4 μg ml-1 (0.247 μM) and 142 μg ml-1(14.8 μM) for BhL and DiL9, respectively, against PANC-1 cells. The growth inhibitory effect of these lectins on pancreatic cancer cells were shown to be a consequence of lectin cell surface binding and triggering G0/G1 arrest, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, sustained increase of the intracellular calcium release and the apoptotic signal is amplified by activation of caspases executing cell death. Interestingly, these lectins also showed anti-angiogenic activity by disrupting the endothelial tubulogenesis. Therefore, we report for the first time two chito-specific lectins specifically binding to tumor glycans; they can be considered to be a class of molecules with antitumor activity against pancreatic cancer cells mediated through caspase dependent mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. PMID:26795117

  17. Purification and characterization of an 80-kilodalton membrane protein from Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed Central

    White, A C; McMahon-Pratt, D

    1988-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is caused by the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani. We previously described the development of 16 monoclonal antibodies specific for L. donovani. The epitope recognized by one of these monoclonal antibodies, D13, is present at high density on nearly all isolates of L. donovani and, along with two other monoclonal antibodies, has been used to develop a sensitive and specific competitive assay for serodiagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis. In this report, we characterize the antigens recognized by D13 by immunoprecipitation of [35S]methionine-labeled promastigotes as two proteins (apparent molecular mass, 72 and 80 kilodaltons). Pulse-chase studies showed no evidence of a precursor-product relationship for the two proteins. We purified the 80-kilodalton protein (p80) to homogeneity by detergent solubilization of promastigote membranes, immunoaffinity chromatography, and ion-exchange chromatography. The epitope on p80 recognized by D13 was completely destroyed by proteolysis but was not affected by periodic acid treatment. P80 did not bind to the radioiodinated lectins concanavalin A, wheat germ agglutinin, and Ricinus communis agglutinin. Its apparent molecular mass was not affected by tunicamycin. Thus, it does not appear to be glycosylated. This protein is highly immunogenic and may prove useful for immunoprophylaxis and serodiagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis. Images PMID:3165961

  18. Detection of colorectal dysplasia using fluorescently labelled lectins

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Joe Chin-Hun; Ibrahim, Ashraf E. K.; Dawson, Sarah; Parashar, Deepak; Howat, William J.; Guttula, Kiran; Miller, Richard; Fearnhead, Nicola S.; Winton, Douglas J.; Neves, André A.; Brindle, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer screening using conventional colonoscopy lacks molecular information and can miss dysplastic lesions. We tested here the ability of fluorescently labelled lectins to distinguish dysplasia from normal tissue when sprayed on to the luminal surface epithelium of freshly resected colon tissue from the Apcmin mouse and when applied to fixed human colorectal tissue sections. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) showed significantly decreased binding to adenomas in the mouse tissue and in sections of human colon from 47 patients. Changes in WGA binding to the human surface epithelium allowed regions containing normal epithelium (NE) or hyperplastic polyps (HP) to be distinguished from regions containing low-grade dysplasia (LGD), high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or carcinoma (C), with 81% sensitivity, 87% specificity and 93% positive predictive value (PPV). Helix pomatia agglutinin (HGA) distinguished epithelial regions containing NE from regions containing HP, LGD, HGD or C, with 89% sensitivity, 87% specificity and 97% PPV. The decreased binding of WGA and HPA to the luminal surface epithelium in human dysplasia suggests that these lectins may enable more sensitive detection of disease in the clinic using fluorescence colonoscopy. PMID:27071814

  19. Separation of haemopoietic cells for biochemical investigation. Preparation of erythroid and myeloid cells from human and laboratory-animal bone marrow and the separation of erythroblasts according to their state of maturation.

    PubMed

    Harrison, F L; Beswick, T M; Chesterton, C J

    1981-03-15

    The separation of haemopoietic bone-marrow cells by centrifugation through discontinuous density gradients of Percoll is described. This method was used to prepare fractions enriched in erythroblasts, myeloid blast cells or reticulocytes from bone marrow of anaemic and non-anaemic rabbits, from the marrow of other anaemic laboratory animals and from human samples. It is a simple, rapid, reproducible and inexpensive technique that can be readily adapted to suit individual requirements. Secondly, a convenient method is presented for the separation of large quantities of bone-marrow cells into fractions enriched in erythroblasts at different stages of maturation, by velocity sedimentation through a linear gradient of 1-2% sucrose at unit gravity. In vitro, erythroblasts adhere together strongly via a mechanism almost certainly involving a beta-galactoside-specific surface lectin termed erythroid developmental agglutinin. Since the efficiency of cell-separation techniques depends heavily on the maintenance of a single cell suspension in which each unit can move independently, the presence of an adhesive molecule at the cell surface is of considerable significance. The effect of washing the marrow with a lactose-containing medium, which has been shown to remove the agglutinin, was therefore investigated in relation to both methods. The separation on Percoll gradients is considerably enhanced by this treatment. In addition, the unit-gravity sedimentation gradient can be loaded with 5-10 times more cells after lactose extraction in comparison with intact marrow. Although enrichment is less, a useful fractionation according to maturation is still obtained.

  20. Distribution patterns of influenza virus receptors and viral attachment patterns in the respiratory and intestinal tracts of seven avian species

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the presence of sialic acid α-2,3 and α-2,6 linked glycan receptors in seven avian species. The respiratory and intestinal tracts of the chicken, common quail, red-legged partridge, turkey, golden pheasant, ostrich, and mallard were tested by means of lectin histochemistry, using the lectins Maackia amurensis agglutinin II and Sambucus nigra agglutinin, which show affinity for α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors, respectively. Additionally, the pattern of virus attachment (PVA) was evaluated with virus histochemistry, using an avian-origin H4N5 virus and a human-origin seasonal H1N1 virus. There was a great variation of receptor distribution among the tissues and avian species studied. Both α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors were present in the respiratory and intestinal tracts of the chicken, common quail, red-legged partridge, turkey, and golden pheasant. In ostriches, the expression of the receptor was basically restricted to α-2,3 in both the respiratory and intestinal tracts and in mallards the α-2,6 receptors were absent from the intestinal tract. The results obtained with the lectin histochemistry were, in general, in agreement with the PVA. The differential expression and distribution of α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors among various avian species might reflect a potentially decisive factor in the emergence of new viral strains. PMID:22489675

  1. Distribution patterns of influenza virus receptors and viral attachment patterns in the respiratory and intestinal tracts of seven avian species.

    PubMed

    Costa, Taiana; Chaves, Aida J; Valle, Rosa; Darji, Ayub; van Riel, Debby; Kuiken, Thijs; Majó, Natàlia; Ramis, Antonio

    2012-04-10

    This study assessed the presence of sialic acid α-2,3 and α-2,6 linked glycan receptors in seven avian species. The respiratory and intestinal tracts of the chicken, common quail, red-legged partridge, turkey, golden pheasant, ostrich, and mallard were tested by means of lectin histochemistry, using the lectins Maackia amurensis agglutinin II and Sambucus nigra agglutinin, which show affinity for α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors, respectively. Additionally, the pattern of virus attachment (PVA) was evaluated with virus histochemistry, using an avian-origin H4N5 virus and a human-origin seasonal H1N1 virus. There was a great variation of receptor distribution among the tissues and avian species studied. Both α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors were present in the respiratory and intestinal tracts of the chicken, common quail, red-legged partridge, turkey, and golden pheasant. In ostriches, the expression of the receptor was basically restricted to α-2,3 in both the respiratory and intestinal tracts and in mallards the α-2,6 receptors were absent from the intestinal tract. The results obtained with the lectin histochemistry were, in general, in agreement with the PVA. The differential expression and distribution of α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors among various avian species might reflect a potentially decisive factor in the emergence of new viral strains.

  2. Carboxybetaine Modified Interface for Electrochemical Glycoprofiling of Antibodies Isolated from Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Impedimetric lectin biosensors capable of recognizing two different carbohydrates (galactose and sialic acid) in glycans attached to antibodies isolated from human serum were prepared. The first step entailed the modification of a gold surface by a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) deposited from a solution containing a carboxybetaine-terminated thiol applied to the subsequent covalent immobilization of lectins and to resist nonspecific protein adsorption. In the next step, Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) or Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA) was covalently attached to the SAM, and the whole process of building a bioreceptive layer was optimized and characterized using a diverse range of techniques including electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, quartz crystal microbalance, contact angle measurements, zeta-potential assays, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. In addition, the application of the SNA-based lectin biosensor in the glycoprofiling of antibodies isolated from the human sera of healthy individuals and of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was successfully validated using an SNA-based lectin microarray. The results showed that the SNA lectin, in particular, is capable of discriminating between the antibodies isolated from healthy individuals and those from RA patients based on changes in the amount of sialic acid present in the antibodies. In addition, the results obtained by the application of RCA and SNA biosensors indicate that the abundance of galactose and sialic acid in antibodies isolated from healthy individuals is age-related. PMID:26048139

  3. Acute oral candidiasis during febrile episodes in immunocompromised patients with haematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, O J; Andersen, P L

    1990-01-01

    To estimate clinical, pathogenic and serological aspects of acute oral candidiasis (AOC) during febril episodes in patients with haematologic malignancies, 23 consecutive patients who developed AOC within 7 days from start of fever were compared with 23 consecutive patients who did not develop AOC. The duration of fever and severe granulocytopenia (less than 0.5 x 10(9)/l) was significantly longer in patients with AOC than in patients without AOC, the median differences between the patients with and without AOC being 4 and 3 days, respectively. Development of AOC could not be correlated to a change in the qualitative composition of the oral microflora. The thrombocyte count was lower in patients with AOC on day 4, whereas no differences were found in leukocyte counts. The prevalences of Candida albicans agglutinin titres greater than or equal to 5 were similar in patients with (24%) and without AOC (33%), and in controls (29%). Seroconversion or a significant increase in the agglutinin titre occurred in 4 patients with AOC and long-lasting fever, who became afebrile after systemic antifungal therapy. It is concluded that AOC is associated with long-lasting fever and decreased bone marrow function as judged by low thrombocyte counts, but not related to specific bacteria in the oral cavity or to an increased occurrence of C. albicans antibodies in the serum.

  4. Local cholinergic and non-cholinergic neural pathways to the rat supraoptic nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Meeker, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    An estimated two thirds of the input to the supraoptic nucleus of the rat hypothalamus (SON) including a functionally significant cholinergic innervation, arise from local sources of unknown origin. The sources of these inputs were identified utilizing Golgi-Cox, retrograde tracing, choline acetyltransferase immunocytochemistry and anterograde tracing methodologies. Multipolar Golgi impregnated neurons located dorsal and lateral to the SON extend spiney processes into the nucleus. Injections of the retrograde tracers, wheat germ agglutinin or wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase, into the SON labeled cells bilaterally in the arcuate nucleus, and ipsilaterally in the lateral hypothalamus, anterior hypothalamus, nucleus of the diagonal band, subfornical organ, medial preoptic area, lateral preoptic area and in the region dorsolateral to the nucleus. Immunocytochemistry for choline acetyltransferase revealed cells within the ventro-caudal portion of cholinergic cell group, Ch4, which cluster dorsolateral to the SON, and extend axon- and dendrite-like processes into the SON. Cells double-labeled by choline acetyltransferase immunocytochemistry and retrograde tracer injections into the SON are localized within the same cholinergic cell group dorsolateral to the SON. Injections of the anterograde tracer, Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin, deposited dorsolateral to the SON results in labeled pre-and post-synaptic processes within the SON. The identification and characterization of endogenous immunoglobulin within the SON and other neurons innervating areas lacking a blood-brain barrier established a novel and potentially important system for direct communication of the supraoptic cells with blood-borne constitutents.

  5. Fishing for lectins from diverse sequence libraries by yeast surface display - an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Ryckaert, Stefan; Callewaert, Nico; Jacobs, Pieter P; Dewaele, Sylviane; Dewerte, Isabelle; Contreras, Roland

    2008-02-01

    The establishment of a robust technology platform for the expression cloning of carbohydrate-binding proteins remains a key challenge in glycomics. Here we explore the utility of using yeast surface display (YSD) technology in the interaction-based lectin cloning from complete cDNA libraries. This should pave the way for more detailed studies of protein-carbohydrate interactions. To evaluate the performance of this system, lectins representing three different subfamilies (galectins, siglecs, and C-type lectins) were successfully displayed on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris as a-agglutinin and/or alpha-agglutinin fusions. The predicted carbohydrate-binding activity could be detected for three out of five lectins tested (galectin-1, galectin-3, and siaoadhesin). For galectin-4 and E-selectin, no specific carbohydrate-binding activity could be detected. We also demonstrate that proteins with carbohydrate affinity can be specifically isolated from complex metazoan cDNA libraries through multiple rounds of FACS sorting, employing multivalent, fluorescent-labeled polyacrylamide-based glycoconjugates.

  6. Hormone induced changes in lactase glycosylation in developing rat intestine.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Kamaljit Kaur; Mahmood, Safrun; Mahmood, Akhtar

    2008-11-01

    Lactase exists in both soluble and membrane-bound forms in suckling rat intestine. The distribution of lactase and its glycosylated isoforms in response to thyroxine or cortisone administration has been studied in suckling rats. 75% of lactase activity was detected, associated with brush borders, compared to 24% in the soluble fraction of 8-day-old rats. Thyroxine treatment enhanced soluble lactase activity to 34%, whereas particulate fraction was reduced to 67% compared to controls. Cortisone administration reduced soluble lactase activity from 24% in controls to 12% with a concomitant increase in membrane-bound activity to 89%. Western blot analysis revealed lactase signal, corresponding to 220 kDa in both the soluble and membrane fractions, which corroborated the enzyme activity data. The elution pattern of papain solubilized lactase from agarose-Wheat Germ agglutinin, or Concanavalin A or Jacalin agglutinin columns was different in the suckling and adult rat intestines. Also the elution profile of lactase activity from agarose-lectin columns was modulated in cortisone, thyroxine, and insulin injected pups, which suggests differences in glycosylated isoforms of lactase under these conditions. These findings suggest the role of these hormones in inducing changes in lactase glycosylation during postnatal development of intestine, which may contribute to adult-type hypolactasia in rats.

  7. Lectin-induced increase in microvascular permeability to colloidal carbon in vitro may involve protein kinase C activation.

    PubMed

    Northover, A M; Northover, B J

    1994-05-01

    Two plant lectins, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and concanavalin A (Con A), which are known to bind to endothelial cells (ECs), were found to increase the leakage of colloidal carbon (CC) into the walls of microvessels in the villi of rat small intestine, when added to a gelatin-containing perfusate (GPSS) at a concentration of 10 micrograms/ml. Pretreatment of the microvessels with the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor Ro 31-8220 (1 x 10(-6) M) significantly reduced this effect. In contrast, the leakage of CC in response to A23187 (1 x 10(-4) M) was not affected by Ro 31-8220. Peanut agglutinin (PNA) and succinyl concanavalin A (SuccCon A), which do not bind to ECs, had no effect at a concentration of 10 micrograms/ml. A lower concentration of WGA (1 microgram/ml) had no significant effect of its own, but significantly reduced the leakage of CC in response to both platelet-activating factor (PAF, 5 x 10(-6) M) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, 1 x 10(-4) M), but not to beta-phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDB, 1 x 10(-6) M). These results suggest that all these effects of WGA and Con A involve cell surface receptors, albeit in a non-specific way. A possible mode of action is discussed.

  8. Overexpression of the alpha-2,6-sialyltransferase in MDCK cells increases influenza virus sensitivity to neuraminidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Matrosovich, Mikhail; Matrosovich, Tatyana; Carr, Jackie; Roberts, Noel A; Klenk, Hans-Dieter

    2003-08-01

    No reliable cell culture assay is currently available for monitoring human influenza virus sensitivity to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAI). This can be explained by the observation that because of a low concentration of sialyl-alpha2,6-galactose (Sia[alpha2,6]Gal)-containing virus receptors in conventional cell lines, replication of human virus isolates shows little dependency on viral neuraminidase. To test whether overexpression of Sia(alpha2,6)Gal moieties in cultured cells could make them suitable for testing human influenza virus sensitivity to NAI, we stably transfected MDCK cells with cDNA of human 2,6-sialyltransferase (SIAT1). Transfected cells expressed twofold-higher amounts of 6-linked sialic acids and twofold-lower amounts of 3-linked sialic acids than parent MDCK cells as judged by staining with Sambucus nigra agglutinin and Maackia amurensis agglutinin, respectively. After transfection, binding of a clinical human influenza virus isolate was increased, whereas binding of its egg-adapted variant which preferentially bound 3-linked receptors was decreased. The sensitivity of human influenza A and B viruses to the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir carboxylate was substantially improved in the SIAT1-transfected cell line and was consistent with their sensitivity in neuraminidase enzyme assay and with the hemagglutinin (HA) receptor-binding phenotype. MDCK cells stably transfected with SIAT1 may therefore be a suitable system for testing influenza virus sensitivity to NAI. PMID:12857911

  9. nES GEMMA Analysis of Lectins and Their Interactions with Glycoproteins - Separation, Detection, and Sampling of Noncovalent Biospecific Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Nicole Y.; Weiss, Victor U.; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Allmaier, Günter

    2016-09-01

    In order to better understand biological events, lectin-glycoprotein interactions are of interest. The possibility to gather more information than the mere positive or negative response for interactions brought mass spectrometry into the center of many research fields. The presented work shows the potential of a nano-electrospray gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analyzer (nES GEMMA) to detect weak, noncovalent, biospecific interactions besides still unbound glycoproteins and unreacted lectins without prior liquid phase separation. First results for Sambucus nigra agglutinin, concanavalin A, and wheat germ agglutinin and their retained noncovalent interactions with glycoproteins in the gas phase are presented. Electrophoretic mobility diameters (EMDs) were obtained by nES GEMMA for all interaction partners correlating very well with molecular masses determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) of the individual molecules. Moreover, EMDs measured for the lectin-glycoprotein complexes were in good accordance with theoretically calculated mass values. Special focus was laid on complex formation for different lectin concentrations and binding specificities to evaluate the method with respect to results obtained in the liquid phase. The latter was addressed by capillary electrophoresis on-a-chip (CE-on-a-chip). Of exceptional interest was the fact that the formed complexes could be sampled according to their size onto nitrocellulose membranes after gas-phase separation. Subsequent immunological investigation further proved that the collected complex actually retained its native structure throughout nES GEMMA analysis and sampling.

  10. Characterization of a Cry1Ac-receptor alkaline phosphatase in susceptible and resistant Heliothis virescens larvae.

    PubMed

    Jurat-Fuentes, Juan L; Adang, Michael J

    2004-08-01

    We reported previously a direct correlation between reduced soybean agglutinin binding to 63- and 68-kDa midgut glycoproteins and resistance to Cry1Ac toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis in the tobacco budworm (Heliothis virescens). In the present work we describe the identification of the 68-kDa glycoprotein as a membrane-bound form of alkaline phosphatase we term HvALP. Lectin blot analysis of HvALP revealed the existence of N-linked oligosaccharides containing terminal N-acetylgalactosamine required for [125I]Cry1Ac binding in ligand blots. Based on immunoblotting and alkaline phosphatase activity detection, reduced soybean agglutinin binding to HvALP from Cry1Ac resistant larvae of the H. virescens YHD2 strain was attributable to reduced amounts of HvALP in resistant larvae. Quantification of specific alkaline phosphatase activity in brush border membrane proteins from susceptible (YDK and F1 generation from backcrosses) and YHD2 H. virescens larvae confirmed the observation of reduced HvALP levels. We propose HvALP as a Cry1Ac binding protein that is present at reduced levels in brush border membrane vesicles from YHD2 larvae. PMID:15265032

  11. Insulin-Like Activity of Concanavalin A and Wheat Germ Agglutinin—Direct Interactions with Insulin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Cuatrecasas, Pedro; Tell, Guy P. E.

    1973-01-01

    Concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin are as effective as insulin in enhancing the rate of glucose transport and in inhibiting epinephrine-stimulated lipolysis in isolated adipocytes. These lectins, also like insulin, inhibit basal as well as epinephrine-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity of membranes obtained from homogenates of fat cells. Low concentrations of wheat germ agglutinin enhance the specific binding of insulin to receptors of fat cells and liver membranes. Higher concentrations of this plant lectin, as well as of concanavalin A, competitively displace the binding of insulin to receptors in these tissues. These effects are equally apparent in insulin-binding proteins solubilized from membranes, indicating that the plant lectins interact directly with insulin receptors. All of the effects observed with the plant lectins are reversed by simple sugars that bind specifically to these plant proteins. Agarose derivatives of the plant lectins effectively adsorb solubilized insulin-binding proteins, and these can be eluted with buffers containing specific simple sugars. The possible implications of these findings to certain biological properties (mitogenicity) of these lectins and to the mechanism of action of other growth-promoting substances are considered. PMID:4510292

  12. Precise and Reversible Protein-Microtubule-Like Structure with Helicity Driven by Dual Supramolecular Interactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Zhang, Xiang; Kochovski, Zdravko; Zhang, Yufei; Dai, Bin; Sakai, Fuji; Jiang, Lin; Lu, Yan; Ballauff, Matthias; Li, Xueming; Liu, Cong; Chen, Guosong; Jiang, Ming

    2016-02-17

    Protein microtubule is a significant self-assembled architecture found in nature with crucial biological functions. However, mimicking protein microtubules with precise structure and controllable self-assembly behavior remains highly challenging. In this work, we demonstrate that by using dual supramolecular interactions from a series of well-designed ligands, i.e., protein-sugar interaction and π-π stacking, highly homogeneous protein microtubes were achieved from tetrameric soybean agglutinin without any chemical or biological modification. Using combined cryo-EM single-particle reconstruction and computational modeling, the accurate structure of protein microtube was determined. The helical protein microtube is consisted of three protofilaments, each of which features an array of soybean agglutinin tetramer linked by the designed ligands. Notably, the microtubes resemble the natural microtubules in their structural and dynamic features such as the shape and diameter and the controllable and reversible assembly behavior, among others. Furthermore, the protein microtubes showed an ability to enhance immune response, demonstrating its great potential for biological applications.

  13. Surface array proteins of Campylobacter fetus block lectin-mediated binding to type A lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, G C; Yang, L Y; Wang, E; Blaser, M J

    1990-01-01

    Campylobacter fetus strains with type A lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and a surface array protein layer (S+) have been found to be pathogenic in humans and animals. Spontaneous laboratory mutants that lack surface array proteins (S-) are sensitive to the bactericidal activity of normal human serum. The ability of lectins to determine the presence of the S-layer and differentiate LPS type was assessed. We screened 14 lectins and found 3 (wheat germ agglutinin, Bandeiraea simplicifolia II, and Helix pomatia agglutinin) that agglutinated S- C. fetus strains with type A LPS but not S- strains with type B or type C LPS or S+ strains. However, the S+ type A strains were agglutinated after sequential water extraction, heat, or pronase treatment, all of which remove the S-layer, whereas there was no effect on the control strains. Specific carbohydrates for each lectin and purified LPS from a type A C. fetus strain specifically inhibited agglutination of an S- type A strain. In a direct enzyme-linked lectin assay, binding to the S- type A LPS strain was significantly greater than binding to the S+ strain (P = 0.01) or to a Campylobacter jejuni strain (P = 0.008). Consequently, these results indicate that the three lectins bind to the O side chains of C. fetus type A LPS but that the presence of the S-layer on intact cells blocks binding. Images PMID:2387622

  14. Red blood cell destruction in autoimmune hemolytic anemia: role of complement and potential new targets for therapy.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn; Sundic, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a collective term for several diseases characterized by autoantibody-initiated destruction of red blood cells (RBCs). Exact subclassification is essential. We provide a review of the respective types of AIHA with emphasis on mechanisms of RBC destruction, focusing in particular on complement involvement. Complement activation plays a definitive but limited role in warm-antibody AIHA (w-AIHA), whereas primary cold agglutinin disease (CAD), secondary cold agglutinin syndrome (CAS), and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria (PCH) are entirely complement-dependent disorders. The details of complement involvement differ among these subtypes. The theoretical background for therapeutic complement inhibition in selected patients is very strong in CAD, CAS, and PCH but more limited in w-AIHA. The optimal target complement component for inhibition is assumed to be important and highly dependent on the type of AIHA. Complement modulation is currently not an evidence-based therapy modality in any AIHA, but a number of experimental and preclinical studies are in progress and a few clinical observations have been reported. Clinical studies of new complement inhibitors are probably not far ahead.

  15. Two Chitotriose-Specific Lectins Show Anti-Angiogenesis, Induces Caspase-9-Mediated Apoptosis and Early Arrest of Pancreatic Tumor Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ruby; Nawale, Laxman; Sarkar, Dhiman; Suresh, C G

    2016-01-01

    The antiproliferative activity of two chito-specific agglutinins purified from Benincasa hispida (BhL) and Datura innoxia (DiL9) of different plant family origin was investigated on various cancer cell lines. Both lectins showed chitotriose specificity, by inhibiting lectin hemagglutinating activity. On further studies, it was revealed that these agglutinins caused remarkable concentration-dependent antiproliferative effect on human pancreatic cancerous cells but not on the normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells even at higher doses determined using MTT assay. The GI50 values were approximately 8.4 μg ml(-1) (0.247 μM) and 142 μg ml(-1) (14.8 μM) for BhL and DiL9, respectively, against PANC-1 cells. The growth inhibitory effect of these lectins on pancreatic cancer cells were shown to be a consequence of lectin cell surface binding and triggering G0/G1 arrest, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, sustained increase of the intracellular calcium release and the apoptotic signal is amplified by activation of caspases executing cell death. Interestingly, these lectins also showed anti-angiogenic activity by disrupting the endothelial tubulogenesis. Therefore, we report for the first time two chito-specific lectins specifically binding to tumor glycans; they can be considered to be a class of molecules with antitumor activity against pancreatic cancer cells mediated through caspase dependent mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. PMID:26795117

  16. Direct targeting of cancer cells: a multiparameter approach.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Eileen L; Welty, Lily Anne Y; Banner, Lisa R; Oppenheimer, Steven B

    2005-01-01

    Lectins have been widely used in cell surface studies and in the development of potential anticancer drugs. Many past studies that have examined lectin toxicity have only evaluated the effects on cancer cells, not their non-cancer counterparts. In addition, few past studies have evaluated the relationship between lectin-cell binding and lectin toxicity on both cell types. Here we examine these parameters in one study: lectin-cell binding and lectin toxicity with both cancer cells and their normal counterparts. We found that the human colon cancer cell line CCL-220/Colo320DM bound to agarose beads derivatized with Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin (PHA-L) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), while the non-cancer human colon cell line CRL-1459/CCD-18Co did not. When these lectins were tested for their effects on cell viability in culture, both cell lines were affected by the lectins but at 6, 48 and 72 h incubation times, PHA-L was most toxic to the cancer cell line in a concentration dependent manner. At 48 h incubation, WGA was more toxic to the cancer cell line. The results suggest that it may be possible to develop lectin protocols that selectively target cancer cells for death. In any case, examination of both malignant cells and their non-malignant counterparts, analysis of their binding characteristics to immobilized lectins, and examination of the toxicity of free lectins in culture, provides a multiparameter model for obtaining more comprehensive information than from more limited approaches. PMID:16181664

  17. Purification, characterization, and molecular cloning of a novel antifungal lectin from the roots of Ophioglossum pedunculosum.

    PubMed

    He, Xue-Mei; Ji, Na; Xiang, Xiao-Cong; Luo, Ping; Bao, Jin-Ku

    2011-12-01

    A novel mannan-specific lectin was isolated from the roots of a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, Ophioglossum pedunculosum through ion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. With a molecular mass of 19,835.7 Da demonstrated by MALDI-TOF analysis, this novel agglutinin was designated as O. pedunculosum agglutinin (OPA), specifically agglutinating human O erythrocytes and rabbit erythrocytes. The hemagglutination could be strongly inhibited by mannan and thyroglobulin, the activity of which was stable in pH range of 4.0-8.0 and at temperatures below 50 °C. Chemical modification studies indicated that tryptophan and arginine residues were essential for its hemagglutinating activity. Meanwhile, it showed antifungal activities toward Sclerotium rolfsii and Fusarium graminearum. In addition, to amplify cDNA of OPA by 3'/5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), the N-terminal 30 amino acids sequence of OPA was determined, and degenerate primers were designed. The obtained full-length cDNA of OPA contained 885 bp with an open-reading frame of 600 bp encoding a precursor protein of 199 amino acids, while the mature protein had 170 amino acids. PMID:21947760

  18. A high molecular weight glycoprotein in seminal plasma is a sperm immobilizing factor in the teleost Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Mochida, K; Kondo, T; Matsubara, T; Adachi, S; Yamauchi, K

    1999-10-01

    Sperm that have acquired potential for motility are kept immotile in seminal plasma in the teleost, Nile tilapia. In order to investigate the mechanism of immobilization, several experiments were performed using a previously characterized monoclonal antibody (TAT-30) against a molecular weight (Mr) = 120,000 protein that is secreted by Sertoli cells and epithelial cells of the sperm duct, and is also bound to the head of the spermatozoon. First, we assessed sperm motility in the seminal plasma protein fraction (SPP), and demonstrated that the sperm motility is inhibited by SPP in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, sperm motility was recovered if SPP was pretreated with TAT-30, suggesting that the TAT-30 antigen is one of the components of the sperm immobilizing factor. Calibration by gel filtration followed by sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and western blotting with TAT-30 demonstrated that the sperm immobilizing factor was more than Mr = 1,000,000 in seminal plasma, suggesting that it is a homopolymer of the Mr = 120,000-TAT-30 positive protein. Additionally, lectin blot analysis showed that the TAT-30 antigen was reactive with Lens culinarin agglutinin (LCA) and Conavalia ensiformis agglutinin (ConA), indicating that it is a glycoprotein. Immunohistochemical studies showed that the TAT-30 antigen was localized specifically on the heads of spermatozoa and on the apical surface, lysosomes and rough endoplasmic reticulum of Sertoli cells. PMID:10545034

  19. The effect of the state of differentiation on labeling of epidermal cell surface glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Brysk, M.M.; Snider, J.M.

    1982-05-01

    Epidermal cells were grown in a medium in which the Ca++ concentration controlled the stage of differentiation. Cell surface molecules of differentiated and undifferentiated cells were compared by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination, by the interaction with /sup 125/I-lectins, and by the metabolic incorporation of L-(/sup 3/H)-fucose. Molecular weights of the labeled components were determined by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. After lactoperoxidase iodination, most of the radioactivity was found in polypeptide bands of 79,000, 65,000 and 56,000 daltons. The 79,000 band is the most intense for undifferentiated cells but disappears as differentiation proceeds. The 56,000 band is present in normal cells at all stages of differentiation but is absent from neoplastic cells. Glycoproteins reacted with /sup 125/I-lectins were found at 180,000, 130,000 and 85,000 daltons. The 130,000 band was the most prominent for differentiated cells labeled with wheat germ agglutinin but was essentially absent from the undifferentiated cells. With Ricinus communis agglutinin, this band was weaker for undifferentiated than for differentiated cells but was the most intense for both. After metabolic incorporation of tritiated fucose, radioactive glycoproteins were found at 130,000 and 85,000 daltons, with comparable intensities for differentiated and undifferentiated cells.

  20. Specific glycoforms of MUC5AC and endorepellin accurately distinguish mucinous from nonmucinous pancreatic cysts.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zheng; Maupin, Kevin; Curnutte, Bryan; Fallon, Brian; Feasley, Christa L; Brouhard, Elizabeth; Kwon, Richard; West, Christopher M; Cunningham, John; Brand, Randall; Castelli, Paola; Crippa, Stefano; Feng, Ziding; Allen, Peter; Simeone, Diane M; Haab, Brian B

    2013-10-01

    Specific protein glycoforms may be uniquely informative about the pathological state of a cyst and may serve as accurate biomarkers. Here we tested that hypothesis using antibody-lectin sandwich arrays in broad screens of protein glycoforms and in targeted studies of candidate markers. We profiled 16 different glycoforms of proteins captured by 72 different antibodies in cyst fluid from mucinous and nonmucinous cysts (n = 22), and we then tested a three-marker panel in 22 addition samples and 22 blinded samples. Glycan alterations were not widespread among the proteins and were mainly confined to MUC5AC and endorepellin. Specific glycoforms of these proteins, defined by reactivity with wheat germ agglutinin and a blood group H antibody, were significantly elevated in mucinous cysts, whereas the core protein levels were not significantly elevated. A three-marker panel based on these glycoforms distinguished mucinous from nonmucinous cysts with 93% accuracy (89% sensitivity, 100% specificity) in a prevalidation sample set (n = 44) and with 91% accuracy (87% sensitivity, 100% specificity) in independent, blinded samples (n = 22). Targeted lectin measurements and mass spectrometry analyses indicated that the higher wheat germ agglutinin and blood group H reactivity was due to oligosaccharides terminating in GlcNAc or N-acetyl-lactosamine with occasional α1,2-linked fucose. The results show that MUC5AC and endorepellin glycoforms may be highly specific and sensitive biomarkers for the differentiation of mucinous from nonmucinous pancreatic cysts.

  1. Rheologic characterization of vegetal lectins by dissociation of induced erythrocyte agglutinates.

    PubMed

    Rasia, R J; Valverde, J R; Gentils, M; Cauchois, C; Stoltz, J F

    1997-01-01

    Energy evolved from hemagglutination reaction or spent in dissociating erythrocyte agglutinates has been proved to be an excellent parameter for analyzing cell-cell interactions mediated by bridging molecules such as antibodies or lectins. We developed a new rheo-optical method to estimate the energy of dissociation of red blood cell agglutinates. In a Couette shear field agglutinates can be dissociated until a suspension of monodispersed cells is obtained. Intensity of light backscattered by suspended agglutinates increases during their mechanical dissociation. Variation of backscattered light intensity correlates with the energy spent in the process. The adhesive energy of erythrocyte agglutination induced by lectins has been estimated by applying this method. Two specific lectins (Dolichus Biflorus agglutinin and Ulex Europaeus agglutinin) and a new lectin obtained from Amarantus Cruentus seeds which specificity is unknown were studied. Results obtained in this work for Dolichus Biflorus lectin are comparable with values published by other authors. An asymptotic decrease of adhesive energy was observed when the mechanical dissociation was applied several times on the same sample. Our results suggest that the cell detachment is accompanied by the extraction of membrane receptors. This finding is consistent with results obtained by other authors.

  2. Type analysis of the oligosaccharide chains on microheterogeneous components of bovine pancreatic DNAase by the lectin-nitrocellulose sheet method.

    PubMed Central

    Kijimoto-Ochiai, S; Katagiri, Y U; Hatae, T; Okuyama, H

    1989-01-01

    The oligosaccharide chains of microheterogeneous bovine pancreatic DNAases were characterized by the lectin-nitrocellulose sheet method. The active fractions of the DNAases from column chromatography showed four major and several minor spots on a two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel. They were transferred on to nitrocellulose sheets and treated with glycosidases (neuraminidase, endo-beta-N-acetyl glucosaminidase H or F, or peptide N-glycosidase F) and treated with peroxidase-coupled lectins (concanavalin A, Ricinus communis agglutinin or wheat-germ agglutinin). From the results, the most probable oligosaccharide types were proposed to be as follows: the four major spots contained components which had high-mannose type or hybrid-type oligosaccharides, such as those susceptible to endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H. In addition, spot 1 contained a complex-type biantennary oligosaccharide without sialic acid and spot 3 contained a tri- or tetra-antennary complex-type oligosaccharide with sialic acid. The component corresponding to spot 2 had a hybrid-type oligosaccharide chain with a 'bisecting' acetylglucosamine, linked 1-4 to the beta-mannose residue of the trimannosyl core, and the component corresponding to spot 4 had a high-mannose-type oligosaccharide chain. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:2920025

  3. The binucleate cell of okapi and giraffe placenta shows distinctive glycosylation compared with other ruminants: a lectin histochemical study.

    PubMed

    Jones, Carolyn J P; Wilsher, Sandra A; Wooding, F B P; Benirschke, K; Allen, W R

    2015-02-01

    The placenta of ruminants contains characteristic binucleate cells (BNC) with a highly conserved glycan structure which evolved early in Ruminant phylogenesis. Giraffe and Okapi placentae also contain these cells and it is not known whether they have a similar glycan array. We have used lectin histochemistry to examine the glycosylation of these cells in these species and compare them with bovine BNC which have a typical ruminant glycan composition. Two placentae, mid and near term, from Giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) and two term placenta of Okapi (Okapia johnstoni) were embedded in resin and stained with a panel of 23 lectins and compared with near-term bovine (Bos taurus) placenta. Significant differences were found in the glycans of Giraffe and Okapi BNC compared with those from the bovine, with little or no expression of terminal αN-acetylgalactosamine bound by Dolichos biflorus and Vicia villosa agglutinins which instead bound to placental blood vessels. Higher levels of N-acetylglucosamine bound by Lycopersicon esculentum and Phytolacca americana agglutinins were also apparent. Some differences between Okapi and Giraffe were evident. Most N-linked glycans were similarly expressed in all three species as were fucosyl residues. Interplacentomal areas in Giraffe and Bovine showed differences from the placentomal cells though no intercotyledonary BNC were apparent in Okapi. In conclusion, Giraffidae BNC developed different glycan biosynthetic pathways following their split from the Bovidae with further differences evolving as Okapi and Giraffe diverged from each other, affecting both inter and placentomal BNC which may have different functions during development. PMID:25527317

  4. Glycan-mediated uptake in urothelial primary cells: Perspectives for improved intravesical drug delivery in urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Pichl, Clara Maria; Feilhauer, Sophie; Schwaigerlehner, Rose-Marie; Gabor, Franz; Wirth, Michael; Neutsch, Lukas

    2015-11-30

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections. Despite a wide range of therapeutic options, treatment success is compromised by multiresistance and the efficient mechanism of tissue colonization of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). In advanced drug delivery systems, a similar, glycan-mediated targeting mechanism may be realized by conjugating the drug to a plant lectin. This may lead to the drug being more efficiently accumulated at the desired site of action, the bacterial reservoirs. In this study, we aimed at elucidating the potential of this biorecognitive approach. Glycan-triggered interaction cascades and uptake processes of several plant lectins with distinct carbohydrate specificities were characterized using single cells and monolayer culture. Due to pronounced cytoadhesive and cytoinvasive properties, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) emerged as a promising targeter in porcine urothelial primary cells. The lectin-cell interaction proved highly stabile in artificial urine, simulating the conditions in actual application. Colocalisation studies with internalized WGA and lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA) revealed that intracellular accumulation sites were largely identical for GlcNAc- and Mannose-specific lectins. This indicates that WGA-mediated delivery may indeed constitute a potent tool to reach bacteria taken up via a FimH-triggered invasion process. Existing pitfalls in intravesical treatment schedules may soon be overcome. PMID:26383837

  5. Alpha-galactosidase stimulates acetylcholine receptor aggregation in skeletal muscle cells via PNA-binding carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Parkhomovskiy, N; Martin, P T

    2000-04-21

    Aggregation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in skeletal muscle is an essential step in the formation of the mammalian neuromuscular junction. While proteins that bind to myotube receptors such as agrin and laminin can stimulate AChR aggregation in cultured myotubes, removal of cell surface sialic acids stimulates aggregation in a ligand-independent manner. Here, we show that removal of cell surface alpha-galactosides also stimulates AChR aggregation in the absence of added laminin or agrin. AChR aggregation stimulated by alpha-galactosidase was blocked by peanut agglutinin (PNA), which binds to lactosamine-containing disaccharides, but not by the GalNAc-binding lectin Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA-B4). AChR aggregation stimulated by alpha-galactosidase potentiated AChR clustering induced by either neural agrin or laminin-1 and could be inhibited by muscle agrin. These data suggest that capping of cell surface lactosamines or N-acetyllactosamines with alpha-galactose affects AChR aggregation much as capping with sialic acids does.

  6. The binucleate cell of okapi and giraffe placenta shows distinctive glycosylation compared with other ruminants: a lectin histochemical study.

    PubMed

    Jones, Carolyn J P; Wilsher, Sandra A; Wooding, F B P; Benirschke, K; Allen, W R

    2015-02-01

    The placenta of ruminants contains characteristic binucleate cells (BNC) with a highly conserved glycan structure which evolved early in Ruminant phylogenesis. Giraffe and Okapi placentae also contain these cells and it is not known whether they have a similar glycan array. We have used lectin histochemistry to examine the glycosylation of these cells in these species and compare them with bovine BNC which have a typical ruminant glycan composition. Two placentae, mid and near term, from Giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) and two term placenta of Okapi (Okapia johnstoni) were embedded in resin and stained with a panel of 23 lectins and compared with near-term bovine (Bos taurus) placenta. Significant differences were found in the glycans of Giraffe and Okapi BNC compared with those from the bovine, with little or no expression of terminal αN-acetylgalactosamine bound by Dolichos biflorus and Vicia villosa agglutinins which instead bound to placental blood vessels. Higher levels of N-acetylglucosamine bound by Lycopersicon esculentum and Phytolacca americana agglutinins were also apparent. Some differences between Okapi and Giraffe were evident. Most N-linked glycans were similarly expressed in all three species as were fucosyl residues. Interplacentomal areas in Giraffe and Bovine showed differences from the placentomal cells though no intercotyledonary BNC were apparent in Okapi. In conclusion, Giraffidae BNC developed different glycan biosynthetic pathways following their split from the Bovidae with further differences evolving as Okapi and Giraffe diverged from each other, affecting both inter and placentomal BNC which may have different functions during development.

  7. Partial isolation and characterisation of a hemagglutinating factor from avocado seed.

    PubMed

    Yaakobovich, Y; Neeman, I

    1983-01-01

    Extracts of ground avocado seeds (Fuerte and Hass varieties), prepared in different buffer solutions (pH 2.0-12.0), show hemagglutinating activity towards A, B, AB, and H (0) human erythrocytes. The extract showing the highest titer of aggulination was extracted at pH 10.5. The crude extract also causes hemolysis of fresh washed erythrocytes. The hemagglutinating factor is not inhibited by most of the simple sugars tested, e.g., D-glucose, D-mannose, D-galactose, and glucose-amine. The only sugars which show some inhibitory effect are N-Acetyl-neuraminic acid, melibiose, and stachiose. Basic amino acids, e.g., lysine and arginine also inhibit its activity. However the most potent inhibitors of the agglutinin are proteins and glycoproteins such as bovine serum albumin, collagen, thyroglobulin, ovalbumin, mucin, and fetuin. The agglutinin is adsorbed on polymer beads such as Sepharose 4B, Sephadex G100, Agarose, and Chitin, and it reacts with hog erythrocyte membranes. It can be partially eluted from those materials with alkaline buffers (pH 9.0-10.5).

  8. Fishing for lectins from diverse sequence libraries by yeast surface display - an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Ryckaert, Stefan; Callewaert, Nico; Jacobs, Pieter P; Dewaele, Sylviane; Dewerte, Isabelle; Contreras, Roland

    2008-02-01

    The establishment of a robust technology platform for the expression cloning of carbohydrate-binding proteins remains a key challenge in glycomics. Here we explore the utility of using yeast surface display (YSD) technology in the interaction-based lectin cloning from complete cDNA libraries. This should pave the way for more detailed studies of protein-carbohydrate interactions. To evaluate the performance of this system, lectins representing three different subfamilies (galectins, siglecs, and C-type lectins) were successfully displayed on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris as a-agglutinin and/or alpha-agglutinin fusions. The predicted carbohydrate-binding activity could be detected for three out of five lectins tested (galectin-1, galectin-3, and siaoadhesin). For galectin-4 and E-selectin, no specific carbohydrate-binding activity could be detected. We also demonstrate that proteins with carbohydrate affinity can be specifically isolated from complex metazoan cDNA libraries through multiple rounds of FACS sorting, employing multivalent, fluorescent-labeled polyacrylamide-based glycoconjugates. PMID:18086821

  9. Inhibition of cell-to-cell transmission of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 in vitro by carbohydrate-binding agents.

    PubMed

    Balestrieri, Emanuela; Ascolani, Arianna; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Oki, Toshikazu; Mastino, Antonio; Balzarini, Jan; Macchi, Beatrice

    2008-08-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy individuals can be infected by human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) upon cocultivation of the PBMCs with irradiated HTLV-1-transformed human MT-2 cells. This model system closely mimics HTLV-1 transmission through cell-to-cell contact. Carbohydrate-binding agents (CBAs) such as the alpha(1,3)/alpha(1,6)mannose-specific Hippeastrum hybrid agglutinin and the GlcNAc-specific Urtica dioica agglutinin, and also the small, nonpeptidic alpha(1,2)-mannose-specific antibiotic pradimicin A, were able to efficiently prevent cell-to-cell HTLV-1 transmission at nontoxic concentrations, as evidenced by the lack of appearance of virus-specific mRNA and of the viral protein Tax in the acceptor cells. Consistently, antivirally active doses of CBAs fully prevented HTLV-1-induced stimulation of PBMC growth. The inhibitory effects of CBAs on HTLV-1 transmission were also evident when HTLV-1-infected C5MJ cells were used in place of MT-2 cells as a virus donor cell line. The anti-HTLV-1 properties of the CBAs highlight the importance of the envelope glycans in events underlying HTLV-1 passage from cell to cell and indicate that CBAs should be further investigated for their potential to prevent HTLV-1 infection, including mother-to-child virus transmission by cell-to-cell contact through breast milk feeding. PMID:18505856

  10. Binucleate trophoblast giant cells in the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) placenta.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, A F; Klisch, K; Miglino, M A; Pereira, F T V; Bevilacqua, E

    2006-01-01

    The binucleate trophoblast giant cells (BNC) of the water buffalo, Bubalus bubalis, placenta were studied, with emphasis on the synthesis of BNC-specific proteins. Placentomal tissues of 27 water buffalos (2-10 months of pregnancy) were processed for light and electron microscopy. The frequency of BNCs was 20% of the trophoblastic cells in 2-3-month placentas and increased to 27% in the later stages. Ultrastructurally, binucleate cells displayed a prominent granular endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus, typical of cells involved with protein synthesis and exportation. The buffalo BNCs contained periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive granules and reacted with antisera against bovine placental lactogen, prolactin-related protein-I, and pregnancy-associated glycoproteins. Lectin histochemistry with Dolichos biflorus agglutinin, Vicia villosa agglutinin, and Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin showed specific staining of BNCs. Different stages of BNC migration and fusion with uterine epithelial cells were observed. Trinucleate feto-maternal hybrid cells were the typical outcome of cell fusions. These cells underwent degeneration, with typical morphological features of apoptosis. The results revealed a strong homology between water buffalo and cattle BNCs concerning cell morphology, protein expression, glycosylation pattern, and characteristics of cell migration and fusion.

  11. Purification and characterization of the human interferon-. gamma. receptor from placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Calderon, J.; Sheehan, K.C.F.; Chance, C.; Thomas, M.L.; Schreiber, R.D. )

    1988-07-01

    Purification of the human interferon-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}) receptor was facilitated by identification of human placenta as a large-scale receptor source. When analyzed in radioligand binding experiments, intact placental membranes and detergent-solubilized membrane proteins expressed 1.3 and 5.9 {times} 10{sup 12} receptors per mg of protein, respectively, values that were 13-163 times greater than that observed for U937 membranes. Two protocols were followed to purify the IFN-{gamma} receptor from octyl glucoside-solubilized membranes: (i) sequential affinity chromatography over wheat germ agglutinin- and INF-{gamma}-Sepharose and (ii) affinity chromatography over columns containing receptor-specific monoclonal antibody and wheat germ agglutinin. Both procedures resulted in fully active preparations that were 70-90% pure. Purified receptor migrated as a single molecular species of 90 kDa either when analyzed on silver-stained NaDodSO{sub 4}/polyacrylamide gels or when subjected to electrophoretic transfer blot analysis using a labeled IFN-{gamma} receptor-specific monoclonal antibody. The identity of the 90-kDa component as the receptor was confirmed by demonstrating its ability to specifically bind {sup 125}I-labeled IFN-{gamma} following NaDodSO{sub 4}/PAGE and transfer to nitrocellulose. The ligand binding site, the epitope for the receptor-specific monoclonal antibody, and all of the N-linked carbohydrate could be localized to the 55-kDa domain of the molecule.

  12. In vitro screening of plant lectins and tropical plant extracts for anthelmintic properties.

    PubMed

    Ríos-de Álvarez, L; Jackson, F; Greer, A; Bartley, Y; Bartley, D J; Grant, G; Huntley, J F

    2012-05-25

    Lectins are plant secondary metabolites (PSM) found in many forages and which may confer anthelmintic properties to gastrointestinal parasites through disrupting the development of parasitic larvae throughout its life cycle. In experiment 1, the ability of the plant lectins jacalin (JAC), concanavalin A (Con A), phytohemagglutinin E2L2 (PHA-E2L2), phytohemagglutinin L4 (PHA-L4), phytohemagglutinin E3L (PHA-E3L), kidney bean albumin (KBA), Robinia pseudoacacia agglutinin (RPA), Maackia amurensis lectin (MAA), Maclura pomifera agglutinin (MAA), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) to disrupt the feeding of the first stage larvae (L(1)) of the sheep gastro-intestinal nematodes (GIN) Teladorsagia circumcincta, Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus colubriformis was investigated using a larval feeding inhibition test (LFIT). Only PHA-E3L, WGA and Con A had a potent effect on disrupting larval feeding of all of the three species of GIN investigated. The lectin concentration required to inhibit feeding in 50% of L(1) (IC50) was 7.3±1.2, 8.3±1.4 and 4.3±1.7 μg/ml for PHA-E3L; 59.1±32.4, 58.7±11.9 and 8.1±7.0 μg/ml for Con A and 78.9±11.2, 69.4±8.1 and 28.0±14.1 μg/ml for WGA for T. circumcincta, H. contortus and T. colubriformis larvae, respectively (P=0.006). The addition of the lectin inhibitors fetuin, glucose/mannose or N-acetylglucosamine for PHA-E3L, Con A and WGA, respectively, caused an increase in the proportion of larvae that had fed at all concentrations for PHA-E3L only. In experiment 2, the effect of extracts from the tropical plants Azadiractha indica, Trichanthera gigantea, Morus alba, Gliricidia sepium and Leucaena leucocephala on the feeding behaviour of H. contortus L(1,) was examined. A. indica, T. gigantea and M. alba failed to inhibit 50% of larvae from feeding at concentrations up to 10mg plant extract per ml. In contrast, both G. sepium and L. leucocephala demonstrated

  13. Increase of glycocalyx and altered lectin agglutination profiles of Pasteurella haemolytica A1 after incubation in bovine subcutaneous tissue chambers in vivo or in ruminant serum in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Brogden, K; Clarke, C

    1997-01-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica serotype A1 (bovine strain OK) was incubated for 2 and 6 h in bovine subcutaneous tissue chambers in vivo, and ovine strain 82-25 and bovine strain L011 were incubated in vitro for 2 h in heat-inactivated ovine or bovine serum from which gamma globulin had been depleted by protein G affinity chromatography to assess changes in morphology and lectin agglutination profiles (strains 82-25 and L101 only). Cells, removed from chambers after 2 h, were covered with an extensive, dense glycocalyx extending approximately 0.5 microm from the cell surface. In many cells, the glycocalyx was separated from the cell surface by a clear, electron-transparent area. Cells, removed at 6 h, were covered with a sparse glycocalyx of fine fibers 0.2 to 0.3 microm from the cell surface. Strains 82-25 and L101, incubated for 2 h in heat-inactivated ovine or bovine serum or in heat-inactivated ovine or bovine serum depleted of gamma globulin by protein G affinity chromatography, were also covered with a glycocalyx. The glycocalyx did not bind protein A-colloidal gold and therefore did not contain aggregates of accumulated antibody. Strains 82-25 and L101 were incubated individually for 2 h in 10 mM sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) containing 0.14 M NaCl, 0.5 mM CaCl2, and 0.15 mM MgCl2 or with this buffer and either 25% heat-inactivated, gamma globulin-depleted ovine serum or 25% heat-inactivated, gamma globulin-depleted bovine serum. Agglutination profiles were then determined with 17 lectins in 10 mM HEPES-buffered saline (pH 8.4) with 0.1 mM CaCl2 and 0.08% sodium azide. Profiles did not vary with 10 of 17 lectins. However, profiles did vary with peanut agglutinin, Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin, Sophora japonica agglutinin, Maackia amurensis lectin II, Narcissus pseudonarcissus (daffodil) lectin, Griffonia simplicifolia lectin I, and Pisum sativum agglutinin. Altered profiles indicate a change in the bacterial cell surface, possibly by adsorption or

  14. Lectin mapping reveals stage-specific display of surface carbohydrates in in vitro and haemolymph-derived cells of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Wanchoo, Arun; Lewis, Michael W; Keyhani, Nemat O

    2009-09-01

    The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana and its insect host target represent a model system with which to examine host-pathogen interactions. Carbohydrate epitopes on the surfaces of fungal cells play diverse roles in processes that include adhesion, non-self recognition and immune invasion with respect to invertebrate hosts. B. bassiana produces a number of distinct cell types that include aerial conidia, submerged conidia, blastospores and haemolymph-derived cells termed in vivo blastospores or hyphal bodies. In order to characterize variations in the surface carbohydrate epitopes among these cells, a series of fluorescently labelled lectins, combined with confocal microscopy and flow cytometry to quantify the response, was used. Aerial conidia displayed the most diverse lectin binding characteristics, showing reactivity against concanavalin A (ConA), Galanthus nivalis (GNL), Griffonia simplicifolia (GSII), Helix pomatia (HPA), Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin (GSI), peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEAI) and wheatgerm agglutinin (WGA), and weak reactivity against Ricinus communis I (RCA), Sambucus nigra (SNA), Limax flavus (LFA) and Sophora japonica (SJA) lectins. Lectin binding to submerged conidia was similar to that to aerial conidia, except that no reactivity against UEAI, HPA and SJA was noted, and WGA appeared to bind strongly at specific polar spots. In contrast, the majority of in vitro blastospores were not bound by ConA, GNL, GSII, GSI, SNA, UEAI, LFA or SJA, with PNA binding in large patches, and some polarity in WGA binding noted. Significant changes in lectin binding also occurred after aerial conidial germination and in cells grown on either lactose or trehalose. For germinated conidia, differential lectin binding was noted between the conidial base, the germ tube and the hyphal tip. Fungal cells isolated from the haemolymph of the infected insect hosts Manduca sexta and Heliothis virescens appeared to shed most

  15. Differential binding properties of Gal/GalNAc specific lectins available for characterization of glycoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Wu, A M; Song, S C; Sugii, S; Herp, A

    1997-01-01

    Differentiating the binding properties of applied lectins should facilitate the selection of lectins for characterization of glycoreceptors on the cell surface. Based on the binding specificities studied by inhibition assays of lectin-glycan interactions, over twenty Gal and/or GalNAc specific lectins have been divided into eight groups according to their specificity for structural units (lectin determinants), which are the disaccharide as all or part of the determinants and of GalNAc alpha 1-->Ser (Thr) of the peptide chain. A scheme of codes for lectin determinants is illustrated as follows: (1) F (GalNAc alpha 1-->3GalNAc), Forssman specific disaccharide--Dolichos biflorus (DBL), Helix pomatia (HPL) and Wistaria floribunda (WFL) lectins. (2) A (GalNAc alpha 1-->3 Gal), blood group A specific disaccharide--Codium fragile subspecies tomentosoides (CFT), Soy bean (SBL), Vicia villosa-A4 (VVL-A4), and Wistaria floribunda (WFL) lectins. (3) Tn (GalNAc alpha 1-->Ser (Thr) of the protein core)--Vicia villosa B4 (VVL-B4), Salvia sclarea (SSL), Maclura pomifera (MPL), Bauhinia purpurea alba (BPL) and Artocarpus integrifolia (Jacalin, AIL). (4) T (Gal beta 1-->3GalNAc), the mucin type sugar sequences on the human erythrocyte membrane(T alpha), T antigen or the disaccharides at the terminal nonreducing end of gangliosides (T beta)--Peanut (PNA), Bauhinia purpurea alba (BPL), Maclura pomifera (MPL), Sophora japonica (SJL), Artocarpus lakoocha (Artocarpin) lectins and Abrus precatorius agglutinin (APA).(5) I and II (Gal beta 1-->3(4)GlcNAc)--the disaccharide residue at the nonreducing end of the carbohydrate chains derived from either N- or O-glycosidic linkage--Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA1), Datura stramonium (TAL, Thorn apple), Erythrina cristagalli (ECL, Coral tree), and Geodia cydonium (GCL). (6) B (Gal alpha 1-->3Gal), human blood group B specific disaccharide--Griffonia(Banderiaea) simplicifolia B4 (GSI-B4). (7) E (Gal alpha 1-->4Gal), receptors for pathogenic E

  16. Force profiles of protein pulling with or without cytoskeletal links studied by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Afrin, Rehana; Ikai, Atsushi . E-mail: aikai@bio.titech.ac.jp

    2006-09-15

    To test the capability of the atomic force microscope for distinguishing membrane proteins with/without cytoskeletal associations, we studied the pull-out mechanics of lipid tethers from the red blood cell (RBC). When wheat germ agglutinin, a glycophorin A (GLA) specific lectin, was used to pull out tethers from RBC, characteristic force curves for tether elongation having a long plateau force were observed but without force peaks which are usually attributed to the forced unbinding of membrane components from the cytoskeleton. The result was in agreement with the reports that GLA is substantially free of cytoskeletal interactions. On the contrary, when the Band 3 specific lectin, concanavalin A, was used, the force peaks were indeed observed together with a plateau supporting its reported cytoskeletal association. Based on these observations, we postulate that the state of cytoskeletal association of particular membrane proteins can be identified from the force profiles of their pull-out mechanics.

  17. Effects of processing on antinutritional factors in legumes: the soybean case.

    PubMed

    Liener, I E

    1996-12-01

    The author recounts his personal trail of research which has ultimately led to better understanding of the factors which contribute to the poor nutritive value of unheated soybeans. Among the techniques that were employed were the isolation of a lectin from raw soybeans, the use of affinity chromatography to remove the trypsin inhibitors, and the nutritional evaluation of soybean varieties which lacked the lectin or the Kunitz trypsin inhibitor. Based on a consideration of the results obtained by these experiments, it was estimated that the trypsin inhibitors accounted for approximately 40% of the growth inhibition on raw soy, of which two-thirds could be attributed to the Kunitz inhibitor and one-third to the Bowman-Birk inhibitor. The soybean agglutinin was deemed responsible for 50% of the inhibition of growth, and the remaining 10% is most likely due to the poor digestibility of the undenatured protein. PMID:9137638

  18. [Tumor markers for hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Tateishi, Ryosuke; Enooku, Kenichiro; Shiina, Shuichiro; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2012-05-01

    Three tumor markers for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are available in Japan: alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonists-II (PIVKA-II), and Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive fraction of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP-L3). Although AFP has drawbacks in its specificity, it is widely utilized in treatment evaluation and prognosis prediction. PIVKA-II is a unique marker that does not correlate with AFP value and can predict microvascular invasion. AFP-L3 is a highly specific marker and strong predictor of poor prognosis. These three markers are indispensable in every aspect of clinical practice of hepatocellular carcinoma including surveillance, diagnosis, treatment evaluation, and prognosis prediction.

  19. DIFFERENCES IN IMMUNIZATION AND SENSITIZATION IN RABBITS INJECTED WITH RELATIVELY AVIRULENT OR HIGHLY VIRULENT CULTURES OF THE SAME STRAIN (H) OF HEMOLYTIC STREPTOCOCCUS

    PubMed Central

    Angevine, D. Murray

    1939-01-01

    1. When a relatively avirulent strain of hemolytic streptococcus was injected into the skin of rabbits a considerable amount of skin sensitivity to streptococcus filtrate developed, and there was scant demonstrable immunity. 2. When the same strain of streptococcus was made highly virulent by repeated passages through rabbits, little sensitization and considerable immunity was produced. 3. Rabbits injected with a virulent culture of hemolytic streptococcus developed agglutinins and precipitins earlier and in larger amounts than animals injected with the avirulent form of the same organism. 4. Increase in virulence of hemolytic streptococci enhances the ability to protect against local infection and increases antibody formation but diminishes the production of sensitization. Avirulent and virulent strains of this microorganism have similar relations. PMID:19870843

  20. Chitin synthesis during in planta growth and asexual propagation of the cellulosic oomycete and obligate biotrophic grapevine pathogen Plasmopara viticola.

    PubMed

    Werner, Stefan; Steiner, Ulrike; Becher, Rayko; Kortekamp, Andreas; Zyprian, Eva; Deising, Holger B

    2002-03-01

    PCR amplification of two CHS gene fragments of the obligate biotroph Plasmopara viticola, the causal agent of downy mildew of grapevine, is described. While one fragment shows homology to fungal class IV chitin synthases, the other fragment groups with other oomycete chitin synthases to form a novel class of chitin synthases most closely related to class I-III. RT-PCR experiments indicate that PvCHS1 is constitutively expressed, whereas PvCHS2 is specifically transcribed in sporangiophores and sporangia. Analyses of wheat germ agglutinin labeling patterns by confocal laser scanning microscopy show that chitin is present on the surface of hyphal cell walls during in planta growth, and of sporangiophores and sporangia.

  1. Characterization of a subpopulation in neonatal thymus which suppress the graft-vs.-host reaction.

    PubMed

    Van Bekkum, D W; Knaan-Shanzer, S

    1983-05-01

    Thymus cells from neonatal and infant mice were found to have a high capacity to prevent mortality from acute graft-vs.-host disease as compared with spleen cells from stable radiation chimeras. This suppressive capacity of thymocytes decreases with age after birth as was demonstrated by semi-quantitative cell titrations. This suppressor activity is restricted to syngeneity of the graft-vs.-host disease-including cells. The thymic suppressor cells are Thy-1+ and Lyt-1+ and IgG- and IgM-. They do not agglutinate with peanut agglutinin and have a high electrophoretic mobility. In vitro irradiation experiments showed that the suppressor cells are radiation sensitive. These results are compared with the available information on cells suppressing delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions and those suppressing B cell responses.

  2. Self-referenced silicon nitride array microring biosensor for toxin detection using glycans at visible wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, Farshid; Eftekhar, Ali A.; Gottfried, David S.; Song, Xuezheng; Cummings, Richard D.; Adibi, Ali

    2013-02-01

    We report on application of on-chip referencing to improve the limit-of-detection (LOD) in compact silicon nitride (SiN) microring arrays. Microring resonators, fabricated by e-beam lithography and fluorine-based etching, are designed for visible wavelengths (656nm) and have a footprint of 20 x 20 μm. GM1 ganglioside is used as the specific ligand for recognition of Cholera Toxin Subunit B (CTB), with Ricinus Communis Agglutinin I (RCA I) as a negative control. Using micro-cantilever based printing less than 10 pL of glycan solution is consumed per microring. Real-time data on analyte binding is extracted from the shifts in resonance wavelengths of the microrings.

  3. N-Glycopeptide Profiling in Arabidopsis Inflorescence.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shou-Ling; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Burlingame, Alma L; Chalkley, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    This study presents the first large-scale analysis of plant intact glycopeptides. Using wheat germ agglutinin lectin weak affinity chromatography to enrich modified peptides, followed by electron transfer dissociation (ETD)(1) fragmentation tandem mass spectrometry, glycan compositions on over 1100 glycopeptides from 270 proteins found in Arabidopsis inflorescence tissue were characterized. While some sites were only detected with a single glycan attached, others displayed up to 16 different glycoforms. Among the identified glycopeptides were four modified in nonconsensus glycosylation motifs. While most of the modified proteins are secreted, membrane, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), or Golgi-localized proteins, surprisingly, N-linked sugars were detected on a protein predicted to be cytosolic or nuclear. PMID:27067053

  4. Immunoglobulin A multiple myeloma presenting with Henoch-Schönlein purpura associated with reduced sialylation of IgA1.

    PubMed

    Van Der Helm-Van Mil, Annette H M; Smith, Alice C; Pouria, Shideh; Tarelli, Edward; Brunskill, Nigel J; Eikenboom, Heroen C J

    2003-09-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura is characterized by immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) depositions in blood vessels of the skin or in glomeruli, resulting from altered hinge region O-glycosylation. Henoch-Schönlein purpura is seldom reported as a complication of IgA1 myeloma, even when the circulating IgA concentration is very high. We report two patients with IgA1 myeloma presenting with Henoch-Schönlein purpura. The O-glycosylation of these patients' IgA1 was studied. Both patients showed increased binding to peanut agglutinin lectin, suggesting a low degree of sialylation of the hinge region of IgA1 that was confirmed by mass spectrometry. IgA multiple myeloma, secreting IgA1 molecules with decreased sialylation, presenting with a Henoch-Schönlein purpura-like syndrome was diagnosed.

  5. Onion-like glycodendrimersomes from sequence-defined Janus glycodendrimers and influence of architecture on reactivity to a lectin

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qi; Zhang, Shaodong; Wang, Zhichun; Sherman, Samuel E.; Moussodia, Ralph-Olivier; Peterca, Mihai; Muncan, Adam; Williams, Dewight R.; Hammer, Daniel A.; Vértesy, Sabine; André, Sabine; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Klein, Michael L.; Percec, Virgil

    2016-01-01

    A library of eight amphiphilic Janus glycodendrimers (GDs) with d-mannose (Man) headgroups, a known routing signal for lectin-mediated transport processes, was constructed via an iterative modular methodology. Sequence-defined variations of the Janus GD modulate the surface density and sequence of Man after self-assembly into multilamellar glycodendrimersomes (GDSs). The spatial mode of Man presentation is decisive for formation of either unilamellar or onion-like GDS vesicles. Man presentation and Janus GD concentration determine GDS size and number of bilayers. Beyond vesicle architecture, Man topological display affects kinetics and plateau level of GDS aggregation by a tetravalent model lectin: the leguminous agglutinin Con A, which is structurally related to endogenous cargo transporters. The agglutination process was rapid, efficient, and readily reversible for onion-like GDSs, demonstrating their value as versatile tools to explore the nature of physiologically relevant glycan/lectin pairing. PMID:26787853

  6. Location of the three major agglutinogens of Bordetella pertussis by immuno-electronmicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Preston, N W; Zorgani, A A; Carter, E J

    1990-05-01

    When the three serotypes of Bordetella pertussis (types 1,2,3; 1,2 and 1,3) were labelled with agglutinins and protein-A gold, agglutinogen 1 was found on fimbriae and on the cell surface of types 1,2,3 and 1,2 but on the cell surface only of non-fimbriate type 1,3 organisms. In contrast, agglutinogen 2 was located on fimbriae only. Agglutinogen 3 was not labelled. When protein-A gold was replaced by immunoglobulin-G gold, agglutinogen 3 was found on the cell surface only, even of fimbriate bacteria of type 1,2,3. The implications of these findings for acellular vaccines are discussed. PMID:1971311

  7. The early serological detection of colonisation by Staphylococcus epidermidis of ventriculo-atrial shunts.

    PubMed

    Holt, R

    1980-01-01

    Simple quantitative serological tests demonstrating Staphylococcus epidermidis agglutinins and C-reactive protein were used for the early detection of ventriculo-atrial shunt colonization by this organism. Tests in normal children and adults in various age groups throughout life confirmed Bayston's ovservations that those tested attained a titre up to 1:160 TO S. epidermidis agglutinogen. In contrast, the titre in children with colonised shunts and in adults with S. epidermidis endocarditis, both conditions which are usually accompanied by bacteraemia, rose to much higher levels, sometimes up to 1:5120. The routine combination of both tests has proven to be of considerable diagnostic value, particularly in early or recent colonisation. PMID:7372358

  8. Perineuronal nets of extracellular matrix around hippocampal interneurons resist destruction by activated microglia in trimethyltin-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Schüppel, Karin; Brauer, Kurt; Härtig, Wolfgang; Grosche, Jens; Earley, Bernadette; Leonard, Brian E; Brückner, Gert

    2002-12-27

    The destruction of the extracellular matrix by inflammatory processes may induce neuronal dysfunction and accelerate neurodegeneration. We describe that chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan-immunoreactive perineuronal nets and the enwrapped interneurons persisted 2 weeks after trimethyltin intoxication of rats (TMT, 8 mg/kg, i.p.) in all regions of the severely affected hippocampus and dentate gyrus, whereas the diffuse immunoreactivity around the CA2 pyramidal cells was reduced. Fluoro-Jade staining of degenerating neurons and staining of microglia by Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin showed that net-associated neurons survived in the vicinity of damaged pyramidal cells and that perineuronal nets were not removed by activated microglia. We conclude that the extracellular matrix of perineuronal nets resists destruction after TMT treatment in the inflamed neural tissue. A permanent reconstitution of matrix components may be one of the factors that may support the viability of distinct types of neurons during neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Immunization of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) against vibriosis using the hyperosmotic infiltration technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croy, Thomas R.; Amend, Donald F.

    1977-01-01

    Various procedures of hyperosmotic infiltration (HI) and intraperitoneal injection were used to vaccinate sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) with killed Vibrio anguillarum. Excellent protection was evident against experimentally induced vibriosis in the groups immunized by HI with 10 × Hanks' balanced salt solution (HBSS), 1 × HBSS with 8.0% NaCl and 5.3% NaCl, as well as in the injected groups. Comparisons were made among the various immunization methods by vaccinating fish with ten-fold serial dilutions of bacterin, then challenging them by the water contact method after 6 or 9 weeks. Protection was somewhat better with 10 × HBSS than with 5.3% NaCl, and 1 × HBSS containing 8.0% NaCl was markedly superior to the vaccination of fish without hyperosmotic treatment. Agglutinin titers did not exceed 1 : 8 in any group.

  10. Immunoglobulin A multiple myeloma presenting with Henoch-Schönlein purpura associated with reduced sialylation of IgA1.

    PubMed

    Van Der Helm-Van Mil, Annette H M; Smith, Alice C; Pouria, Shideh; Tarelli, Edward; Brunskill, Nigel J; Eikenboom, Heroen C J

    2003-09-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura is characterized by immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) depositions in blood vessels of the skin or in glomeruli, resulting from altered hinge region O-glycosylation. Henoch-Schönlein purpura is seldom reported as a complication of IgA1 myeloma, even when the circulating IgA concentration is very high. We report two patients with IgA1 myeloma presenting with Henoch-Schönlein purpura. The O-glycosylation of these patients' IgA1 was studied. Both patients showed increased binding to peanut agglutinin lectin, suggesting a low degree of sialylation of the hinge region of IgA1 that was confirmed by mass spectrometry. IgA multiple myeloma, secreting IgA1 molecules with decreased sialylation, presenting with a Henoch-Schönlein purpura-like syndrome was diagnosed. PMID:12956761

  11. [Erythrocytic parameters Sysmex in a case of severe haemolysis].

    PubMed

    Ferrero-Vacher, Corinne; Senlis, Jean-Éric; Loustaunau, Denis; Aquaronne, Danièle; Jeandel, Pierre-Yves; Sudaka, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    We are reporting a case of severe haemolytic anemia with cold agglutinins which combines several spurious determinations. It shows the usefulness of the new erythrocytic parameters of the XE 5000 Sysmex, specially: red blood cells with optical count (RBC-O), GR-He (intra-erythocytic hemoglobin) and R-MFV (most frequent volume). Optical red blood cells act as a substitute for red cells count instead of impedance red cells and R-MFV as a substitute for MCV (mean cell volume). The hematocrit (HCT) is corrected thanks to the following formula: HCT=(RBC-O X R- MFV)/1000. Free plasmatic hemoglobin is included in the measure of hemoglobin by the analyzer but is not available for tissue oxygenation. So, hemoglobin (HGB) has to be corrected by the means of GR- He thanks to the following formula: HGB=(GR He x RBC-O)/10.

  12. Kinetics and mechanism of DNA uptake into the cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Salman, H.; Zbaida, D.; Rabin, Y.; Chatenay, D.; Elbaum, M.

    2001-01-01

    Gene transfer to eukaryotic cells requires the uptake of exogenous DNA into the cell nucleus. Except during mitosis, molecular access to the nuclear interior is limited to passage through the nuclear pores. Here we demonstrate the nuclear uptake of extended linear DNA molecules by a combination of fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule manipulation techniques, using the latter to follow uptake kinetics of individual molecules in real time. The assays were carried out on nuclei reconstituted in vitro from extracts of Xenopus eggs, which provide both a complete complement of biochemical factors involved in nuclear protein import, and unobstructed access to the nuclear pores. We find that uptake of DNA is independent of ATP or GTP hydrolysis, but is blocked by wheat germ agglutinin. The kinetics are much slower than would be expected from hydrodynamic considerations. A fit of the data to a simple model suggests femto-Newton forces and a large friction relevant to the uptake process. PMID:11390964

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a galactose-specific lectin from Dolichos lablab

    PubMed Central

    Lavanya Latha, V.; Kulkarni, Kiran A.; Nagender Rao, R.; Siva Kumar, N.; Suguna, K.

    2006-01-01

    The galactose-specific lectin from the seeds of Dolichos lablab has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique. The crystals belong to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 73.99, b = 84.13, c = 93.15 Å, α = 89.92, β = 76.01, γ = 76.99°. X-ray diffraction data to a resolution of 3.0 Å have been collected under cryoconditions (100 K) using a MAR imaging-plate detector system mounted on a rotating-anode X-ray generator. Molecular-replacement calculations carried out using the available structures of legume lectins as search models revealed that the galactose-specific lectin from D. lablab forms a tetramer similar to soybean agglutinin; two such tetramers are present in the asymmetric unit. PMID:16511291

  14. Anatomical evidence for red nucleus projections to motoneuronal cell groups in the spinal cord of the monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holstege, Gert; Blok, Bertil F.; Ralston, Diane Daly

    1988-01-01

    In four rhesus monkeys wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) injections were made in the mesencephalic tegmentum. In three cases with injections involving the red nucleus (RN), rubrospinal fibers descended mainly contralaterally to terminate in laminae V, VI and dorsal VII of the spinal cord and in the lateral motoneuronal cell groups at the level of the cervical and lumbosacral enlargements. In all four cases the area of the interstitial nucleus of Cajal (INC) was injected, which resulted in labeled interstitiospinal fibers in the medial part of the ipsilateral ventral funiculus of the spinal cord. The results indicate that there is no major qualitative difference between the mesencephalic (RN and INC) and motor cortical projections to the spinal cord.

  15. Comparative analysis of toxin detection in biological and enviromental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogert, Robert A.; Burans, James; O'Brien, Tom; Ligler, Frances S.

    1994-03-01

    The basic recognition schemes underlying the principles of standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and radioimmunoassay (RIA) protocols are increasingly being adapted for use with new detection devices. A direct comparison was made using a fiber optic biosensor that employs evanescent wave detection and an ELISA using avidin-biotin. The assays were developed for the detection of Ricinus communis agglutinin II, also known as ricin or RCA60. Detection limits between the two methods were comparable for ricin in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), however results in complex samples differed slightly. In PBS, sensitivity for ricin was 1 ng/ml using the fiber optic device and 500 pg/ml using the ELISA. The fiber optic sensor could not detect ricin directly in urine or serum spiked with 5 ng/ml ricin, however, the ELISA showed detection but at reduced levels to the PBS control.

  16. Adhesion and erythrophagocytosis of human senescent erythrocytes by autologous monocytes and their inhibition by beta-galactosyl derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Vaysse, J; Gattegno, L; Bladier, D; Aminoff, D

    1986-01-01

    Senescent human erythrocytes (RBC) are able to adhere to and be phagocytized by autologous monocytes in vitro to a greater extent than are young RBC. This adhesion and erythrophagocytosis of senescent RBC is inhibited by D-galactose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, their corresponding derivatives of bovine serum albumin, and lactose. On the other hand, D-glucose, D-mannose, L-fucose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, and their corresponding derivatives of bovine serum albumin are noninhibiting. The glycopeptides released by tryptic digestion of senescent RBC and purified on immobilized peanut agglutinin are the most effective inhibitors of both RBC adhesion and phagocytosis by autologous monocytes obtained from peripheral blood. PMID:3456592

  17. Surface plasmon resonance imaging analysis of protein binding to a sialoside-based carbohydrate microarray.

    PubMed

    Linman, Matthew J; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Cheng, Quan

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring multiple biological interactions in a multiplexed array format has numerous advantages. However, converting well-developed surface chemistry for spectroscopic measurements to array-based, high-throughput screening is not a trivial process and often proves to be the bottleneck in method development. This chapter reports the fabrication and characterization of a new carbohydrate microarray with synthetic sialosides for surface plasmon resonance imaging analysis of lectin-carbohydrate interactions. Contact printing of functional sialosides on neutravidin-coated surfaces was carried out and the properties of the resulting elements were characterized by fluorescence microscopy. Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) was used for testing on four different carbohydrate-functionalized surfaces and differential binding was analyzed. Multiplexed detection of SNA/biotinylated sialoside interactions on arrays up to 400 elements has been performed with good data correlation, demonstrating the effectiveness of the biotin-neutravidin-based biointerface to control probe orientation for reproducible and efficient protein binding to carbohydrates.

  18. [Seroepidemiologic survey of leptospirosis among environmental sanitation workers in an urban locality in the southern region of Brazil].

    PubMed

    de Almeida, L P; Martins, L F; Brod, C S; Germano, P M

    1994-02-01

    Sera from 386 environmental sanitation workers, concerned with water supply, drains and drainage galleries, sewers, garbage collection and road sweepers, were examined for leptospiral agglutinins by the microscopic agglutination test. Altogether 40 of the 386 workers (10.4%) were positive to one or more serovars; however, the difference in seropositivity between the professional categories was not significant (p < 0.05). Twelve serovars were recorded among the seropositive workers with predominance of L. castelonis and L. australis; but the difference between the serovars was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Of the seropositive workers, 86.9% had agglutination titres > or = 100 and < or = 400; the rates for titres 100 and 400 were higher than 800, 1,600 and 3,200 (p < 0.05). PMID:7997826

  19. Short peptides allowing preferential detection of Candida albicans hyphae.

    PubMed

    Kaba, Hani E J; Pölderl, Antonia; Bilitewski, Ursula

    2015-09-01

    Whereas the detection of pathogens via recognition of surface structures by specific antibodies and various types of antibody mimics is frequently described, the applicability of short linear peptides as sensor molecules or diagnostic tools is less well-known. We selected peptides which were previously reported to bind to recombinant S. cerevisiae cells, expressing members of the C. albicans Agglutinin-Like-Sequence (ALS) cell wall protein family. We slightly modified amino acid sequences to evaluate peptide sequence properties influencing binding to C. albicans cells. Among the selected peptides, decamer peptides with an "AP"-N-terminus were superior to shorter peptides. The new decamer peptide FBP4 stained viable C. albicans cells more efficiently in their mature hyphal form than in their yeast form. Moreover, it allowed distinction of C. albicans from other related Candida spp. and could thus be the basis for the development of a useful tool for the diagnosis of invasive candidiasis.

  20. Standardization and demonstration of antibody-coated Candida in urine by direct immunofluorescence test.

    PubMed

    Talwar, P; Pal, S R; Kaur, P; Kaiwar, R; Jayashree, T; Rao, M S; Vaidyanathan, S; Taiwar, P

    1986-04-01

    Acetone, carbontetrachloride, ethyl alcohol, mixture of ethyl alcohol and acetone, and heat were assessed for fixative property for direct immunofluorescent (IF) staining of antibody-coated Candida cells. The results indicated that ethyl alcohol was the most suitable fixative for the test. Antisera containing 16 units of Candida albicans type A agglutinin were found essential to get optimal detectable fluorescence of antibody-coated yeast cells. IF test showed cross reactivity between the yeasts of C. albicans and C. tropicalis. However, there was no cross reactivity with the conidia of A. flavus. The direct IF test could demonstrate antibody-coated yeast cells and pseudomycelia in deposits of urine in the direct smear. It correlated well with microscopy and culture studies. At times, it could demonstrate the antibody-coated yeasts earlier than routine significant culture. It could also differentiate the significant from non-significant fungal isolates from urine.

  1. Transcriptomic response of cowpea bruchids to N-acetylglucosamine-specific lectins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Hua; Chi, Yong Hun; Guo, Feng-Guang; Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Balfe, Susan; Fang, Ji-Chao; Pittendrigh, Barry R; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan

    2015-02-01

    Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II (GSII) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) are N-acetylglucosamine-binding lectins. Previous studies demonstrated that they have anti-insect activity, a property potentially useful in pest control. To gain some insight into the insect response to dietary lectins, we performed transcriptomic analysis using the cowpea bruchid (Callosobruchus maculatus) midgut microarray platform we built. Compared to the nonnutritional cellulose treatment, dietary lectins induced more profound changes in gene expression. Ingestion of relatively high doses of lectins for 24 h resulted in alteration of gene expression involved in sugar and lipid metabolism, transport, development, defense, and stress tolerance. Metabolic genes were largely downregulated. Moreover, we observed disorganized microvilli resulting from ingestion of WGA. This morphological change is consistent with the lectin-induced changes in genes related to midgut epithelial cell repair. In addition, suboptimal nutrient conditions may serve as a stress signal to trigger senescence processes, leading to growth arrest and developmental delay.

  2. Pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Thomer, Lena; Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus , a Gram-positive bacterium colonizing nares, skin, and the gastrointestinal tract, frequently invades the skin, soft tissues, and bloodstreams of humans. Even with surgical and antibiotic therapy, bloodstream infections are associated with significant mortality. The secretion of coagulases, proteins that associate with and activate the host hemostatic factor prothrombin, and the bacterial surface display of agglutinins, proteins that bind polymerized fibrin, are key virulence strategies for the pathogenesis of S. aureus bloodstream infections, which culminate in the establishment of abscess lesions. Pathogen-controlled processes, involving a wide spectrum of secreted factors, are responsible for the recruitment and destruction of immune cells, transforming abscess lesions into purulent exudate, with which staphylococci disseminate to produce new infectious lesions or to infect new hosts. Research on S. aureus bloodstream infections is a frontier for the characterization of protective vaccine antigens and the development of immune therapeutics aiming to prevent disease or improve outcomes. PMID:26925499

  3. Solid-phase assay of lectin activity using HRP-conjugated glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Kojima-Aikawa, Kyoko

    2014-01-01

    Various enzyme-conjugated probes have been widely used for detection of specific interactions between biomolecules. In the case of glycan-protein interaction, horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated glycoproteins (HRP-GPs) are useful for the detection of carbohydrate-binding activity of plant and animal lectins. In this chapter, a typical solid-phase assay of the carbohydrate-binding activity of Sophora japonica agglutinin I, a Gal/GalNAc-specific lectin, using HRP-conjugated asialofetuin is described. HRP-GPs are versatile tools for probing lectin activities in crude extracts, screening many samples at one time, and applicable not only for solid-phase binding assays but also samples which are dot- or Western-blotted onto the membrane. PMID:25117228

  4. Diffuse pulmonary haemorrhage accompanied by haemothorax as a rare presentation of primary lung angiosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Radzikowska, Elżbieta; Szołkowska, Małgorzata; Oniszh, Karina; Szczęsna, Magdalena; Roszkowski-Śliż, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    Primary pulmonary angiosarcoma is an extremely rare disease. Chest computed tomography demonstrates solitary or multifocal lesions, sometimes associated with ground-glass opacities or pleural effusion. Diagnosis is based on histological examination that reveals spindle-shaped epithelioid cells with positive staining for endothelial markers (factor VIII, CD 31, CD34, Fli-1, Ulex europaeus agglutinin 1, vimentin). The prognosis is poor and effective treatment is still being researched. This is a report of a 65-year-old patient with a four-month history of haemoptysis, cough, and dyspnoea. The primary radiological findings suggested interstitial lung disease. After one month the clinical presentation evolved into diffuse pulmonary haemorrhage with concomitant haemothorax. The diagnosis of primary lung angiosarcoma was based on histological and immunohistochemical examination of the lung and pleural biopsy obtained by videothoracoscopy. PMID:26855658

  5. Human placental coated vesicles contain receptor-bound transferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Booth, A G; Wilson, M J

    1981-01-01

    Human placental coated vesicles have been purified by a method involving sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation and treatment with wheat-germ agglutinin. These preparations were free of contamination by placental microvillus fragments. Crossed immunoelectrophoresis demonstrated that the coated vesicles contained a single serum protein, which was identified as transferrin. This transferrin was only observed after the vesicles were treated with a non-ionic detergent, and its behaviour during crossed hydrophobic-interaction immunoelectrophoresis suggested that a large proportion of it was receptor-bound. No other serum proteins, including immunoglobulin G, could be detected in these preparations. Receptor-bound transferrin was the only antigen common to placental coated vesicles and microvilli, implying that other plasma-membrane proteins are excluded from the region of membrane involved in coated-vesicle formation. Images PLATE 2 PLATE 1 Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:6272755

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations and MM-PBSA calculations of the lectin from snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis).

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Yizheng

    2009-12-01

    Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA), a mannose-specific lectin from snowdrop bulbs, is a member of the monocot mannose-specific lectin family and exhibits antiviral activity toward HIV. In the present study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to study the interaction between GNA and its carbohydrate ligand over a specific time span. By analysis of the secondary structures, it was observed that the GNA conformation maintains rather stable along the trajectories and the high fluctuations were only centered on the carbohydrate recognition domains. Our MD simulations also reproduced most of the hydrogen bonds observed in the x-ray crystal structure. Furthermore, the obtained MD trajectories were used to estimate the binding free energy of the complex using the molecular mechanics/Poisson Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method. It was revealed by the inspection of the binding free energy components that the major contributions to the complex stability arose from electrostatic interactions.

  7. Structure of mannose-specific snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis) lectin is representative of a new plant lectin family.

    PubMed

    Hester, G; Kaku, H; Goldstein, I J; Wright, C S

    1995-06-01

    Tetrameric Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (50,000 M(r)) belongs to a super-family of alpha-D-mannose-specific plant bulb lectins known to be potent inhibitors of retroviruses. The 2.3 A crystal structure of this lectin complexed with methyl alpha-D-mannose reveals a novel three-fold symmetric beta-sheet polypeptide fold. Three antiparallel four-stranded beta-sheets, each with a conserved mannose-binding site, are arranged as a 12-stranded beta-barrel. The tetramer displays 222 symmetry. Pairs of monomers form stable dimers through C-terminal strand exchange. The so formed hybrid beta-sheets are the sites for high affinity mannose binding in the dimer interface. Occupancy observed at corresponding sites in other beta-sheets suggests a potential for twelve sites per tetramer.

  8. Lectin histochemical aspects of mucus function in the oesophagus of the reticulated python (Python reticulatus).

    PubMed

    Meyer, W; Luz, S; Schnapper, A

    2009-08-01

    Using lectin histochemistry, the study characterizes basic functional aspects of the mucus produced by the oesophageal epithelium of the Reticulated python (Python reticulatus). Reaction staining varied as related to the two epithelium types present, containing goblet cells and ciliary cells. Remarkable intensities were achieved especially in the luminal mucus layer and the fine mucus covering the epithelial ciliary border for Con A (alpha-D-Man; alpha-D-Glc) as part of neutral glycoproteins, Limax flavus agglutinin (NeuNac = NeuNgc), emphasizing that water binding hyaluronan provides a hydrated interface conductive to the passage of material and UEA-I (alpha-L-Fuc), corroborating the view that fucose-rich highly viscous mucus is helpful against mechanical stress during prey transport.

  9. High resolution melting analysis as a new approach to discriminate gluten-containing cereals.

    PubMed

    Martín-Fernández, Begoña; Costa, Joana; de-Los-Santos-Álvarez, Noemí; López-Ruiz, Beatriz; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Mafra, Isabel

    2016-11-15

    With this work, it is intended to propose a novel approach based on high resolution melting (HRM) analysis to detect wheat and discriminate it from other gluten-containing cereals. The method consisted of a real-time PCR assay targeting the gene encoding for the germ agglutinin isolectin A protein (Tri a 18 allergen), using the fluorescent Evagreen dye combined with HRM analysis. The results enabled wheat differentiation from other phylogenetically related cereals, namely barley, rye and oat with high level of confidence. Additionally, a quantitative real-time PCR approach was proposed, allowing detecting and quantifying wheat down to 20mg/kg in rice flour and 20pg of wheat DNA (∼1.1 DNA copies). Its application was successfully achieved in the analysis of processed foods to verify labelling compliance, being considered as a cost-effective tool for the specific detection of cereals in gluten-free foods. PMID:27283646

  10. Blood Group Discrepancy-First Sign of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in a Child.

    PubMed

    Datta, Suvro Sankha; Reddy, Mahua; Basu, Sabita; Krishnan, Shekhar

    2016-06-01

    A 12-year-old male child was presented in the emergency with features of anemia and mild icterus on day+67 of HSCT. The child was suffering from Fanconi anemia and undergone HSCT from ABO-matched, fully HLA matched sibling donor. The diagnosis of mixed type AIHA due to cytomegalovirus reactivation was made in the immunohematology laboratory and blood group discrepancy was the first sign of AIHA in this patient. Though the cold agglutinin titer was not significant but the clinical symptoms and laboratory evidences were suggestive of significant hemolysis due to underlying IgG autoantibody. In addition the high complement avidity of IgM autoantibody might also be a contributing factor for clinically significant hemolysis in this case. The patient was successfully treated with phenotype matched blood transfusion, rituximab and oral steroid therapy. PMID:27408394

  11. Human plasma fibronectin inhibits adherence of Streptococcus pyogenes to hexadecane.

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, H S; Ofek, I; Simpson, W A; Whitnack, E; Beachey, E H

    1985-01-01

    The effect of human plasma fibronectin on the adherence of Streptococcus pyogenes to hexadecane droplets was investigated. Fibronectin blocked the adherence of streptococci to hexadecane in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect resulted from the binding of fibronectin to the streptococcal cells; radiolabeled fibronectin failed to bind to the hexadecane but bound readily to untreated streptococci. Chemical treatments of streptococci that decreased streptococcal binding of fibronectin also decreased their binding to hexadecane. Pretreatment of fibronectin with lipoteichoic acid blocked the binding of fibronectin to streptococci and abolished its ability to inhibit streptococcal adherence to hexadecane in a dose-related manner. In contrast, wheat germ agglutinin, which binds to N-acetylglucosamine on the surface of S. pyogenes cells, failed to alter hexadecane adherence. The data suggest that fibronectin binds to lipoteichoic acid on the surface of the streptococci, thereby preventing lipoteichoic acid from interacting with the hexadecane phase. PMID:3880729

  12. Purification and characterization of mu-specific opioid receptor from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, J.; Cho, T.M.; Ge, B.L.; Loh, H.H.

    1986-03-05

    A mu-specific opioid receptor was purified to apparent homogeneity from rat brain membranes by 6-succinylmorphine affinity chromatography, Ultrogel filtration, wheat germ agglutinin affinity chromatography, and isoelectric focusing. The purified receptor had a molecular weight of 58,000 as determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and was judged to be homogeneous by the following criteria: (1) a single band on the SDS gel; and (2) a specific opioid binding activity of 17,720 pmole/mg protein, close to the theoretical value. In addition, the 58,000 molecular weight value agrees closely with that determined by covalently labelling purified receptor with bromoacetyl-/sup 3/H-dihydromorphine or with /sup 125/I-beta-endorphin and dimethyl suberimidate. To their knowledge, this is the first complete purification of an opioid receptor that retains its ability to bind opiates.

  13. High resolution melting analysis as a new approach to discriminate gluten-containing cereals.

    PubMed

    Martín-Fernández, Begoña; Costa, Joana; de-Los-Santos-Álvarez, Noemí; López-Ruiz, Beatriz; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Mafra, Isabel

    2016-11-15

    With this work, it is intended to propose a novel approach based on high resolution melting (HRM) analysis to detect wheat and discriminate it from other gluten-containing cereals. The method consisted of a real-time PCR assay targeting the gene encoding for the germ agglutinin isolectin A protein (Tri a 18 allergen), using the fluorescent Evagreen dye combined with HRM analysis. The results enabled wheat differentiation from other phylogenetically related cereals, namely barley, rye and oat with high level of confidence. Additionally, a quantitative real-time PCR approach was proposed, allowing detecting and quantifying wheat down to 20mg/kg in rice flour and 20pg of wheat DNA (∼1.1 DNA copies). Its application was successfully achieved in the analysis of processed foods to verify labelling compliance, being considered as a cost-effective tool for the specific detection of cereals in gluten-free foods.

  14. The occurrence of leptospiral antibodies in rural inhabitants of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Myers, D M; Varela-Díaz, V M

    1979-06-01

    Sera collected during surveys of presumably healthy rural inhabitants of the Provinces of Corrientes and Neuquén, Argentina, were examined for serological evidence of leptospirosis. Significant antibody levels (1:100 or greater) were found in 8.7 per cent of 1,029 sera from residents of Corrientes Province. The most frequent reactions occurred against the serotypes australis, hebdomadis group, pomona, and icterohaemorrhagiae. The predominance of antibodies to the Australis group in the country is new and suggests the emergence of leptospirosis in an unrecognized animal reservoir host. Out of 706 sera collected from rural school students and sera from 71 adults in the Province of Neuquén, only 4 (0.5%) showed leptospiral agglutinin in the microscopic agglutination test and these were only at a 1:100 serum dilution. The higher percentage of reactors in the Corrientes population appears to reflect a more favorable environment and a greater risk of infection.

  15. Achondrogenesis type II, abnormalities of extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Horton, W A; Machado, M A; Chou, J W; Campbell, D

    1987-09-01

    Immune and lectin histochemical and microchemical methods were employed to study growth cartilage from seven cases of achondrogenesis type II (Langer-Saldino). The normal architecture of the epiphyseal and growth plate cartilage was replaced by a morphologically heterogeneous tissue. Some areas were comprised of vascular canals surrounded by extensive fibrous tissue and enlarged cells that had the appearance and histochemical characteristics of hypertrophic chondrocytes. Other areas contained a mixture of cells ranging from small to the enlarged chondrocytes. The extracellular matrix in the latter areas was more abundant and had characteristics of both precartilage mesenchymal matrix and typical cartilage matrix; it contained types I and II collagen, cartilage proteoglycan, fibronectin, and peanut agglutinin binding glycoconjugate(s). Peptide mapping of cyanogen bromide cartilage collagen peptides revealed the presence of types I and II collagen. These observations could be explained by a defect in the biosynthesis of type II collagen or in chondrocyte differentiation. PMID:3309860

  16. Facile fabrication of P(OVNG-co-NVCL) thermoresponsive double-hydrophilic glycopolymer nanofibers for sustained drug release.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mu-Ru; Shi, Meng; Bremner, David H; Sun, Kan; Nie, Hua-Li; Quan, Jing; Zhu, Li-Min

    2015-11-01

    The thermoresponsive double-hydrophilic glycopolymer (DHG), Poly (6-O-vinyl-nonanedioyl-D-galactose-co-N-vinylcaprolactam) (P(OVNG-co-NVCL)) was synthesized via a chemo-enzymatic process and a free radical copolymerization and the resulting nanofibers were fabricated using an electrospinning process. The desired lower critical solution temperature (LCST) between 32 and 40 °C of the DHG polymers was achieved by adjusting the molar fraction of galactose monomer in the copolymers during the synthesis. The thermoresponsive DHG polymers were found to have good cytocompatibility with Hela cells as determined by the MTT assay, and special recognition of the protein peanut agglutinin (PNA). The drug release properties of these newly designed thermoresponsive DHG P(OVNG-co-NVCL) nanofibers are temperature regulated, can target specific proteins and have the potential application in the field of sustained drug release. PMID:26255164

  17. Analysis of an Experimental Cortical Network: ii) Connections of Visual Areas 17 and 18 After Neonatal Injections of Ibotenic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Innocenti, G. M.; Berbel, P.

    1991-01-01

    Lesions of cortical areas 17 and 18 were produced in newborn kittens by local injections of the excitotoxin ibotenic acid. In the adult this results in a microcortex which consists of superficial layers I, II and III, in the absence of granular and infragranular layers. Horseradish peroxidase, alone or wheat germ agglutinin conjugated, was injected in the microcortex or in the contralateral, intact areas 17 and 18. The microcortex maintains several connections characteristic of normal areas 17 and 18 of the cat. It receives afferents from the dLGN, and several visual areas of the ipsilateral and contralateral hemisphere. However, it has lost its projections to dLGN, superior colliculus, and, at least in part, those to contralateral visual areas. Thus some parts of the microcortex receive from, but do not project into, the corpus callosum. In addition, the microcortex maintains afferents from ipsilateral and contralateral auditory areas AI and AII which are normally eliminated in development. PMID:1714302

  18. Glyconanosomes: disk-shaped nanomaterials for the water solubilization and delivery of hydrophobic molecules.

    PubMed

    Assali, Mohyeddin; Cid, Juan-José; Pernía-Leal, Manuel; Muñoz-Bravo, Miguel; Fernández, Inmaculada; Wellinger, Ralf E; Khiar, Noureddine

    2013-03-26

    Herein, we describe the first report on a new class of disk-shaped and quite monodisperse water-soluble nanomaterials that we named glyconanosomes (GNS). GNSs were obtained by sliding out the cylindrical structures formed upon self-organization and photopolymerization of glycolipid 1 on single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) sidewalls. GNSs present a sheltered hydrophobic inner cavity formed by the carbonated tails, surrounded by PEG and lactose moieties. The amphiphilic character of GNSs allows the water solubility of insoluble hydrophobic cargos such as a perylene-bisimide derivative, [60]fullerene, or the anti-carcinogenic drug camptothecin (CPT). GNS/C60 inclusion complexes are able to establish specific interactions between peanut agglutinin (PNA) lectin and the lactose moiety surrounding the complexes, while CPT solubilized by GNS shows higher cytotoxicity toward MCF7-type breast cancer cells than CPT alone. Thus, GNS represents an attractive extension of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems.

  19. Preparation of Glycan Arrays Using Pyridylaminated Glycans.

    PubMed

    Nakakita, Shin-Ichi; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We describe the method to prepare neoglycoproteins from the conjugation of bovine serum albumin and pyridylaminated glycans. Large quantities of glycans (>1 mg) can be pyridylaminated and then converted to their 1-amino-1-deoxy derivatives by reaction with hydrogen followed by hydrazine. These pyridylaminated glycans can then be conjugated to bovine serum albumin via esterification with N-( m-maleimidobenzoyloxy)succinimide to form a neoglycoprotein, e.g., glycosylated bovine serum albumin. As a demonstration, we prepared High-mannose bovine serum albumin, which was immobilized on an activated glass slide. Then, we showed that the neoglycoprotein bind to Cy3-labeled Lens culinaris agglutinin, a mannose-specific plant lectin, as detected using an evanescent-field-activated fluorescence scanner system. PMID:26614079

  20. Leptospira and Brucella antibodies in collared anteaters (Tamandua tetradactyla) in Brazilian zoos.

    PubMed

    Sales, Indiara dos Santos; Folly, Márcio Manhães; Garcia, Luize Néli Nunes; Ramos, Tatiane Mendes Varela; da Silva, Mariana Cristina; Pereira, Martha Maria

    2012-12-01

    The presence of Leptospira spp. and Brucella spp. antibodies was investigated in serum samples from 28 collared anteaters (Tamandua tetradactyla) kept in seven Brazilian zoos. Sera were tested against 19 Leptospira serovars using microscopic agglutination. Samples reacted to the following serovars: two (7.14%) to Patoc, three (10.71%) to Tarrasovi, three (10.71%) to both Patoc and Tarrasovi, two (7.14%) to Wolffi, and one (3.57%) to Australis. Two (7.14%) samples reacted to the buffered Brucella antigen test, but no confirmatory reaction occurred using the 2-mercaptoethanol slow slide agglutination test. No sample was reactive in the agar gel immunodiffusion test for rugose species of Brucella. The presence of anti-leptospira agglutinins in captive T. tetradactyla serum indicates that this species may be susceptible to infection by these bacteria.

  1. Versatile Route to Colloidal Stability and Surface Functionalization of Hydrophobic Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Culver, Heidi R; Steichen, Stephanie D; Herrera-Alonso, Margarita; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2016-06-01

    We introduce a general method for the stabilization and surface functionalization of hydrophobic nanoparticles using an amphiphilic copolymer, poly(maleic anhydride-alt-1-octadecene)-poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PMAO-PEGMA). Coating nanoparticles with PMAO-PEGMA results in colloidally stable nanoparticles decorated with reactive carboxylic acid and methacrylate functionalities, providing a versatile platform for chemical reactions. The versatility and ease of surface functionalization is demonstrated by varying both the core material and the chemistry used. Specifically, the carboxylic acid functionalities are used to conjugate wheat germ agglutinin to conducting polymer nanoparticles via carbodiimide-mediated coupling, and the methacrylate groups are used to link cysteamine to the surface of poly(ε-caprolactone) nanoparticles via thiol-ene click chemistry and to link temperature-responsive polymer shells to the surface of gold nanoparticles via free radical polymerization. PMID:27203863

  2. Visual detection of serum asialohaptoglobin by plasmonic sandwich ELLSA--a new platform for cirrhosis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Bose, Partha Pratim; Mandal, Gautam; Kumar, Dharmendra; Duseja, Ajay; Chatterjee, Bishnu Pada

    2016-01-01

    The cirrhotic condition of the liver has long been acknowledged as the preface to liver cancer. The desialylation status of the serum acute phase protein, haptoglobin, has been introduced as a new diagnostic analyte for liver cirrhosis. The reliability of this new diagnostic molecule has been evaluated in 30 liver cirrhosis patients having a history of earlier viral hepatitis C (HCV-LC). A novel enzyme linked lectinosorbent assay has been developed coupled with the plasmon mechanism of gold nanoparticle aggregation as the colorimetric read out which can visually distinguish the cirrhotic liver patients from the normal healthy and hepatitis C controls. The assay can be useful for rapid point-of-care detection, and even an untrained person can execute it without a specialized instrument. This method employs Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) to detect the extent of α-2,6 sialylation of serum haptoglobin, the new diagnostic molecule for liver cirrhosis. PMID:26568048

  3. Isolectins from seeds of Artocarpus lakoocha.

    PubMed

    Wongkham, S; Wongkham, C; Boonsiri, P; Simasathiansophon, S; Trisonthi, C; Atisook, K

    1995-11-01

    Two isolectins (ALA-I and ALA-II), were isolated from seed extracts of Artocarpus lakoocha by anion exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose fast flow columns at pH 8.5 and 8.0 ALA-I was unbound to the column at pH 8.5 and moved towards the cathode in non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, whereas ALA-II possessed opposite properties. The two A. lakoocha agglutinins appeared to be composed of two dissimilar subunits (alpha and beta of M(r) 14,000 and 17,200) bound non-covalently. The isolectins possessed several similar properties including: blood type agglutination; pH optimum; pH and temp stability; as well as binding specificity towards asialomucins.

  4. The J beta segment of the T cell receptor contributes to the V beta-specific T cell expansion caused by staphylococcal enterotoxin B and Urtica dioica superantigens.

    PubMed

    Musette, P; Galelli, A; Truffa-Bachi, P; Peumans, W; Kourilsky, P; Gachelin, G

    1996-03-01

    We have used a new polymerase chain reaction-based technique to analyze at the clonal level the CDR3 diversity and the J beta usage associated with the V beta-dependent T cell receptor (TCR) recognition of two superantigens: the staphylococcal enterotoxin B and the Urtica dioica agglutinin. Our results show that subset of J beta elements is preferentially expanded in a given V beta family, independently of the nature of the superantigen. By contrast, the CDR3 loop does not contribute significantly to the T cell expansion induced by the superantigens. We conclude that the J beta segment of the TCR beta chain, but not the CDR3 region, participates in superantigen binding, presumably by influencing the quaternary structure of the TCR beta chain. PMID:8605929

  5. Monoclonal antibody GOM-2 binds to blood group B-Le(y) active glycolipid antigens on human gastric cancer cells, KATO-III.

    PubMed

    Sueyoshi, S; Nagakura, H; Kato, A; Uetsuki, S; Nakayama, Y; Adachi, M

    1992-04-01

    The antigen structure of a mouse monoclonal antibody, GOM-2, established by immunization with KATO-III human gastric cancer cells, was examined. GOM-2 reactive glycolipids were prepared from KATO-III cells and treated with endoglycoceramidase. Structural studies of ten GOM-2 reactive oligosaccharides by a combination of glycosidase digestions, methylation, and affinity chromatography on an Ulex europeus agglutinin I (UEA-I) column revealed that nine of them had a Y-related B-active difucosylated determinant (B-Le(y)) and one had a B-active determinant. Affinity chromatography of the purified and modified oligosaccharides on an immobilized GOM-2 column demonstrated that GOM-2 has a novel binding specificity: it binds tightly to the biantennary structure carrying the B-Le(y) determinant at the termini or the branched structure carrying the B-Le(y) structure at two nonreducing termini. PMID:1344715

  6. Lectin coated MgO nanoparticle: its toxicity, antileishmanial activity, and macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Jebali, Ali; Hekmatimoghaddam, Seyedhossein; Kazemi, Bahram; Allaveisie, Azra; Masoudi, Alireza; Daliri, Karim; Sedighi, Najme; Ranjbari, Javad

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate toxicity of uncoated magnesium oxide nanoparticles (MgO NPs), MgO NPs coated with Peanut agglutinin (PNA) lectin, and PNA alone on the promastigotes of Leishmania major (L. major) and macrophages of BALB/c mice. On the other hand, antileishmanial property of uncoated MgO NPs, lectin coated MgO NPs, and PNA lectin alone was evaluated, and also macrophage activation was investigated after treatment with these materials by measurement of nitrite, H2O2, and some interleukins. This study showed that PNA lectin and lectin coated MgO NPs had approximately no toxicity on L. major and macrophages, but some toxic effects were observed for uncoated MgO NPs, especially at concentration of 500 µg/mL. Interestingly, lectin coated MgO NPs had the highest antileishmanial activity and macrophage activation, compared with uncoated MgO NPs and PNA lectin.

  7. A lectin from the exudate of the fruit of the vegetable marrow (Cucurbita pepo) that has a specificity for beta-1,4-linked N-acetylglucosamine oligosaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, A K

    1979-01-01

    Lectins are present in the exudate (presumably from the phloem) of the fruits of three species of the Cucurbitaceae, namely vegetable marrow (Cucurbita pepo), melon (Cucumis melo) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus). They are all strongly inhibited in their activities by chitin oligosaccharides, but only weakly by N-acetylglucosamine. Glycopeptides from soya-bean agglutinin and fetuin are also strong inhibitors of Cucurbita pepo lectin, indicating that it interacts with internal N-acetylglucosamine residues. The lectin from Cucurbita pepo fruit was purified by affinity chromatography by using chitin oligosaccharides covalently attached to Sepharose. The lectin is not a glycoprotein, and it consists of a single polypeptide chain of about 20,000 mol.wt. It is a major protein (18% of the total) of the phloem exudate and it is postulated that it may have an anti-parasitic function. PMID:534476

  8. Pichia surface display: a tool for screening single domain antibodies.

    PubMed

    De Schutter, Kristof; Callewaert, Nico

    2012-01-01

    Yeast surface display is being employed as an efficient tool for the isolation and engineering of traditional antibody fragments, both scFv and Fab, as well as single domain antibodies. Here we describe the protocols for a yeast surface display system developed in the methylothrophic yeast Pichia pastoris, the most commonly used yeast species for protein production. In this system the immune or maturated library of single domain antibodies is fused to the C-terminal domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha-agglutinin gene (SAG1) and expressed on the surface of P. pastoris cells. Labeling with ligands enables rapid and quantitative analysis in conjunction with isolation of single domain antibodies with the desired characteristics.

  9. Complement in hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Robert A

    2015-11-26

    Complement is increasingly being recognized as an important driver of human disease, including many hemolytic anemias. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) cells are susceptible to hemolysis because of a loss of the complement regulatory proteins CD59 and CD55. Patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) develop a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) that in most cases is attributable to mutations that lead to activation of the alternative pathway of complement. For optimal therapy, it is critical, but often difficult, to distinguish aHUS from other TMAs, such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; however, novel bioassays are being developed. In cold agglutinin disease (CAD), immunoglobulin M autoantibodies fix complement on the surface of red cells, resulting in extravascular hemolysis by the reticuloendothelial system. Drugs that inhibit complement activation are increasingly being used to treat these diseases. This article discusses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy for PNH, aHUS, and CAD.

  10. Complement in hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Complement is increasingly being recognized as an important driver of human disease, including many hemolytic anemias. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) cells are susceptible to hemolysis because of a loss of the complement regulatory proteins CD59 and CD55. Patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) develop a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) that in most cases is attributable to mutations that lead to activation of the alternative pathway of complement. For optimal therapy, it is critical, but often difficult, to distinguish aHUS from other TMAs, such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; however, novel bioassays are being developed. In cold agglutinin disease (CAD), immunoglobulin M autoantibodies fix complement on the surface of red cells, resulting in extravascular hemolysis by the reticuloendothelial system. Drugs that inhibit complement activation are increasingly being used to treat these diseases. This article discusses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy for PNH, aHUS, and CAD.

  11. The pepper GNA-related lectin and PAN domain protein gene, CaGLP1, is required for plant cell death and defense signaling during bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Lee, Dong Hyuk; Choi, Du Seok; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-12-01

    Carbohydrate-binding proteins, commonly referred to as lectins or agglutinins, function in defense responses to microbial pathogens. Pepper (Capsicum annuum) GNA-related lectin and PAN-domain protein gene CaGLP1 was isolated and functionally characterized from pepper leaves infected with Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv). CaGLP1 contained an amine-terminus prokaryotic membrane lipoprotein lipid attachment site, a Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-related lectin domain responsible for the recognition of high-mannose N-glycans, and a carboxyl-terminus PAN/apple domain. RNA gel blot and immunoblot analyses determined that CaGLP1 was strongly induced in pepper by compatible and incompatible Xcv infection. CaGLP1 protein localized primarily to the plasma membrane and exhibited mannose-binding specificity. CaGLP1-silenced pepper plants were more susceptible to compatible or incompatible Xcv infection compared with that of non-silenced control plants. CaGLP1 silencing in pepper leaves did not accumulate H2O2 and induce cell death during incompatible Xcv infection. Defense-related CaDEF1 (defensin) gene expression was significantly reduced in CaGLP1-silenced pepper plants. CaGLP1-overexpression in Arabidopsis thaliana enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. Defense-related AtPDF1.2 expression was elevated in CaGLP1-overexpression lines. Together, these results suggest that CaGLP1 is required for plant cell death and defense responses through the reactive oxygen species burst and downstream defense-related gene expression in response to bacterial pathogen challenge.

  12. The Pepper Mannose-Binding Lectin Gene CaMBL1 Is Required to Regulate Cell Death and Defense Responses to Microbial Pathogens1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, In Sun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2011-01-01

    Plant mannose-binding lectins (MBLs) are crucial for plant defense signaling during pathogen attack by recognizing specific carbohydrates on pathogen surfaces. In this study, we isolated and functionally characterized a novel pepper (Capsicum annuum) MBL gene, CaMBL1, from pepper leaves infected with Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria (Xcv). The CaMBL1 gene contains a predicted Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectin domain responsible for the recognition of high-mannose N-glycans but lacks a middle S-locus glycoprotein domain and a carboxyl-terminal PAN-Apple domain. The CaMBL1 protein exhibits binding specificity for mannose and is mainly localized to the plasma membrane. Immunoblotting using a CaMBL1-specific antibody revealed that CaMBL1 is strongly expressed and accumulates in pepper leaves during avirulent Xcv infection. The transient expression of CaMBL1 induces the accumulation of salicylic acid (SA), the activation of defense-related genes, and the cell death phenotype in pepper. The G. nivalis agglutinin-related lectin domain of CaMBL1 is responsible for cell death induction. CaMBL1-silenced pepper plants are more susceptible to virulent or avirulent Xcv infection compared with unsilenced control plants, a phenotype that is accompanied by lowered reactive oxygen species accumulation, reduced expression of downstream SA target genes, and a concomitant decrease in SA accumulation. In contrast, CaMBL1 overexpression in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) confers enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato and Alternaria brassicicola infection. Together, these data suggest that CaMBL1 plays a key role in the regulation of plant cell death and defense responses through the induction of downstream defense-related genes and SA accumulation after the recognition of microbial pathogens. PMID:21205632

  13. Recognition of galactose-deficient O-glycans in the hinge region of IgA1 by N-acetylgalactosamine-specific snail lectins: a comparative binding study.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Michelle M; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Brooks, Monica T; Tomana, Milan; Moldoveanu, Zina; Mestecky, Jiri; Julian, Bruce A; Novak, Jan; Herr, Andrew B

    2010-07-13

    Aberrancies in IgA1 glycosylation have been linked to the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy (IgAN), a kidney disease characterized by deposits of IgA1-containing immune complexes in the glomerular mesangium. IgA1 from IgAN patients is characterized by the presence of galactose (Gal)-deficient O-glycans in the hinge region that can act as epitopes for anti-glycan IgG or IgA1 antibodies. The resulting circulating immune complexes are trapped in the glomerular mesangium of the kidney where they trigger localized inflammatory responses by activating mesangial cells. Certain lectins recognize the terminal N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-containing O-glycans on Gal-deficient IgA1 and can be potentially used as diagnostic tools. To improve our understanding of GalNAc recognition by these lectins, we have conducted binding studies to assess the interaction of Helix aspersa agglutinin (HAA) and Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) with Gal-deficient IgA1. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy revealed that both HAA and HPA bind to a Gal-deficient synthetic hinge region glycopeptide (HR-GalNAc) as well as various aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 myeloma proteins. Despite having six binding sites, both HAA and HPA bind IgA1 in a functionally bivalent manner, with the apparent affinity for IgA1 related to the number of exposed GalNAc groups in the IgA1 hinge. Finally, HAA and HPA were shown to discriminate very effectively between the IgA1 secreted by cell lines derived from peripheral blood cells of patients with IgAN and that from cells of healthy controls. These studies provide insight into lectin recognition of the Gal-deficient IgA1 hinge region and lay the groundwork for the development of reliable diagnostic tools for IgAN.

  14. Uptake and transport of lectins from the cerebrospinal fluid by cells of the immature mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Mares, V; Borges, L F; Sidman, R L

    1984-01-01

    40 mice (C57BL/6J) 2, 3, 6, and 10 d old were injected intraventricularly with 2% wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) or soybean agglutinin (SBA). The transport of lectins from the ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) into brain parenchyma was studied by an unlabelled antibody technique ( BORGES and SIDMAN 1982). The granule product of the immunohistochemical reaction was found in the cytoplasm of ventricular ependymal cells, the choroid plexus and meninges in all age groups studied. Penetration of lectins into brain parenchyma was higher in younger animals and at more immature-cell-surrounded parts of lateral and the IVth ventricle. The stain product was dispersed throughout the neuropil excepting cell nuclei. Higher concentration of lectins appeared in nerve cell cytoplasm of some regions of the brain of younger animals (P2 to P3); in 10 d old mice granules of stain appeared in the cytoplasm of PURKINJE cells and pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus. A fiber-like staining, apparent especially in large commissures adjacent to brain ventricles (corpus callosum, fornix hippocampi) in all age groups, suggests that lectins are transported within axons, even at the earliest postnatal ages. Unlike WGA, densely stained glial cells appeared in parenchyma of SBA injected animals, especially of the younger age group (P3 to P6). The results of this study confirm earlier findings that macromolecules within the ventricular CSF can penetrate into brain parenchyma but suggest that the penetration is higher in less mature animals and at the ventricle regions surrounded by less differentiated parenchyma.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Differential expression and regulation of PNA and UEA-1 bindings in rabbit uterus during preimplantation period.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bin; Duan, Cui-Cui; Wang, Qu-Yuan; Yue, Zhan-Peng

    2013-04-01

    Peanut agglutinin (PNA) and Ulex europaeus agglutinin-1 (UEA-1) were used as probes to study the distribution of β-gal (1→3) ga1Nac and α-L-Fucose in rabbit uterus during early pregnancy. PNA binding was mainly localized on the surface of uterine glandular and luminal epithelium. There were no positive signals on day 1 of pregnancy. PNA binding gradually increased from day 2 and reached its highest level on days 3 and 4. The distribution of PNA binding gradually declined from day 5 and reached a low level on day 7. However, UEA-1 binding was only localized on the luminal epithelial during early pregnancy. A high level of UEA-1 binding had been found on the luminal epithelium on day 1 of pregnancy and low level of positive signals had been found in the uterus on days 2 and 3. UEA-1 binding increased gradually and reached its highest level on day 4. Then the distribution of UEA-1 binding sharply declined and no positive signals were found on days 5-7. The distribution of PNA and UEA-1 bindings in pseudopregnant uterus was similar to that in normal pregnant uterus. During estrus cycle, there was no detectable PNA binding signal in uterus. But, a high level of UEA-1 binding was found in the luminal epithelium of estrus uterus. In ovariectomized rabbit uterus, progesterone significantly induced the expression of PNA binding, while estrogen stimulated UEA-1 binding expression. These results suggested that the distribution of PNA and UEA-1 bindings in rabbit uterus may be related to rabbit implantation.

  16. Negative biomarker-based male fertility evaluation: sperm phenotypes associated with molecular-level anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Sutovsky, Peter; Aarabi, Mahmoud; Miranda-Vizuete, Antonio; Oko, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Biomarker-based sperm analysis elevates the treatment of human infertility and ameliorates reproductive performance in livestock. The negative biomarker-based approach focuses on proteins and ligands unique to defective spermatozoa, regardless of their morphological phenotype, lending itself to analysis by flow cytometry (FC). A prime example is the spermatid specific thioredoxin SPTRX3/TXNDC8, retained in the nuclear vacuoles and superfluous cytoplasm of defective human spermatozoa. Infertile couples with high semen SPTRX3 are less likely to conceive by assisted reproductive therapies (ART) and more prone to recurrent miscarriage while low SPTRX3 has been associated with multiple ART births. Ubiquitin, a small, proteolysis-promoting covalent posttranslational protein modifier is found on the surface of defective posttesticular spermatozoa and in the damaged protein aggregates, the aggresomes of spermiogenic origin. Semen ubiquitin content correlates negatively with fertility and conventional semen parameters, and with sperm binding of lectins LCA (Lens culinaris agglutinin; reveals altered sperm surface) and PNA (Arachis hypogaea/peanut agglutinin; reveals acrosomal malformation or damage). The Postacrosomal Sheath WWI Domain Binding Protein (PAWP), implicated in oocyte activation during fertilization, is ectopic or absent from defective human and animal spermatozoa. Consequently, FC-parameters of PAWP correlate with ART outcomes in infertile couples and with fertility in bulls. Assays based on the above biomarkers have been combined into multiplex FC semen screening protocols, and the surface expression of lectins and ubiquitin has been utilized to develop nanoparticle-based bull semen purification method validated by field artificial insemination trials. These advances go hand-in-hand with the innovation of FC-technology and genomics/proteomics-based biomarker discovery. PMID:25999356

  17. Sialic acid-specific affinity chromatography for the separation of erythropoietin glycoforms using serotonin as a ligand.

    PubMed

    Meininger, M; Stepath, M; Hennig, R; Cajic, S; Rapp, E; Rotering, H; Wolff, M W; Reichl, U

    2016-02-15

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) is an important CHO cell-derived glycoprotein and the degree of sialylation of this hormone is crucial for its in vivo bioactivity. In order to improve the purification process serotonin as a potential affinity ligand was tested for preparative chromatographic separation of rhEPO glycoforms into fractions of different degrees of sialylation. Therefore, two chromatographic matrices were prepared by immobilizing serotonin on CNBr- and NHS-Sepharose™. First it was shown both matrices bind rhEPO only in its sialylated form. Results indicate that binding is pH independent between pH 3.5 to 8 suggesting it is not only based on electrostatic interactions. Second, after optimal binding conditions were identified, semi-purified rhEPO was loaded onto both matrices and eluted using a stepwise elution gradient of sodium chloride. For comparison same affinity purification experiments were performed using wheat germ agglutinin-coupled agarose, a lectin known for its affinity towards sialylated glycoproteins. To monitor changes in N-glycan fingerprint, eluate fractions were analyzed by multiplexed capillary gel electrophoresis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence (xCGE-LIF). For the serotonin matrices an increasing degree of sialylation was observed from the first to the third elution fraction while purity of rhEPO could be increased at the same time. The late elution fractions of serotonin-coupled CNBr- and NHS-Sepharose™ also showed an overall sialylation degree exceeding that of the starting material. In contrast, for rhEPO bound to wheat germ agglutinin-coupled agarose, no distinct change in the degree of sialylation could be observed after elution. Overall, these encouraging results highlight the potential of serotonin as a chromatographic ligand for the improvement of pharmaceutical purification processes of rhEPO.

  18. Lectin-mediated agglutination of murine lymphoma cells. Cell surface deformability and reversibility of agglutination by saccharides.

    PubMed

    Nicolson, G L; Poste, G

    1979-07-01

    Agglutination of S49 mouse lymphoma cells by Ricinus communis I agglutinin can be reversed by the competing haptenic saccharide, lactose, soon after agglutination, but after further incubation in the absence of lectin the agglutination reaction could not be reversed by lactose and the cells remained as multicell aggregates. The irreversibility of S49 cell agglutination was time, temperature and lectin concentration dependent and its onset correlated with ultrastructurally observed deformation of adjacent cell surfaces and an increase in the proportion of adjacent cell surface areas in close apposition within multicell aggregates. Pretreatment of S49 cells with cytochalasin B or cytochalasin B plus vinblastine enhanced R. communis I agglutinin-mediated agglutination, while vinblastine alone and fluoride plus azide had essentially no effect. When drug-treated cells were agglutinated and then incubated in lectin-free drug-containing media for various times prior to lactose addition, the drug effects were more pronounced. Cytochalasin B alone or with vinblastine inhibited lactose reversal of S49 cell agglutination compared to the drug-free controls, while fluoride plus azide enhanced hapten reversibility. Electron microscopic analysis revealed that the onset of agglutination irreversibility correlated with cell surface deformation in the drug-treated cells. Cell aggregates that were more readily reversible by lactose (fluoride plus azide) were unchanged or less deformed, while S49 aggregates treated with cytochalasin B plus vinblastine were more deformed compared to controls without drugs. These experiments suggest a role for cell surface deformability as an important secondary effect during lectin-mediated cell agglutination of S49 lymphoma cells.

  19. Spatial segregation within the sacral parasympathetic nucleus of neurons innervating the bladder or the penis of the rat as revealed by three-dimensional reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Banrezes, B; Andrey, P; Maschino, E; Schirar, A; Peytevin, J; Rampin, O; Maurin, Y

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigations was (1) to examine the spatial organization of preganglionic neurons of the sacral parasympathetic nucleus in the lumbosacral spinal cord of male adult rats and (2) to search, in this nucleus, for a possible segregation of sub-populations of neurons innervating the penis or the bladder, respectively. To estimate their spatial organization, neurons of the sacral parasympathetic nucleus were retrogradely labeled by wheat germ agglutinin coupled to horseradish peroxidase applied to the central end of the sectioned pelvic nerve. The sub-populations of lumbosacral neurons innervating the corpus cavernosum of the penis or the dome of the bladder were identified using transsynaptic retrograde labeling by pseudorabies virus injected into these organs in different rats. In both wheat germ agglutinin-labeled and pseudorabies virus-labeled rats, serial coronal sections were cut through the spinal L5-S1 segments. Labeled neurons were revealed by histochemistry (peroxidase experiments) or immunohistochemistry (pseudorabies virus experiments). By means of a three-dimensional reconstruction software developed in our laboratory, three-dimensional models were calculated from each spinal section image series. They revealed the spatial organization of (i) preganglionic neurons and (ii) neurons innervating the bladder or the penis. The different three-dimensional models were subsequently merged into a single one which revealed the segregation, within the sacral parasympathetic nucleus, of the sub-populations of neurons. Neurons labeled by virus injected into the penis extended predominantly from the rostral part of the L6 segment to the rostral part of the S1 segment while those labeled by bladder injections were distributed predominantly from the caudal part of the L6 segment to the caudal part of the S1 segment. These results support the hypothesis of a viscerotopic organization of sacral neurons providing the spinal control of pelvic organs.

  20. Monosaccharide profiling of silkworm (Bombyx mori L.) nervous system during development and aging.

    PubMed

    Soya, Seçkin; Şahar, Umut; Karaçalı, Sabire

    2016-09-01

    Glycoconjugates have various functions in differentiation, development, aging and in all aspects of normal functioning of organisms. The reason for increased research on this topic is that glycoconjugates locate mostly on the cell surface and play crucial biological roles in the nervous system including brain development, synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. Considering their roles in the nervous system, information about their existence in the insect nervous system is rather sparse. Therefore, in order to detect monosaccharide content of N- and O-glycans, we carried out capLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis to determine the concentration changes of glucose, mannose, galactose, N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), fucose, xylose, arabinose, and ribose monosaccharides in the nervous system of Bombyx mori during development and aging processes. In addition to LC-MS, lectin blotting was done to detect quantitative changes in N- and O-glycans. Developmental stages were selected as 3rd (the youngest sample), 5th (young) larval instar, motionless prepupa (the oldest sample), and pupa (adult development). Derivatization of monosaccharides was performed with a solution of PMP agent and analyzed with capLC-ESI-MS/MS. For lectin blotting, determination of glycan types was carried out with Galanthus nivalis agglutinin and Peanut agglutinin lectins. In all stages, the most abundant monosaccharide was glucose. Although all monosaccharides were present most abundantly in the youngest stage (3rd instar), they are generally reduced gradually during the aging process. It was observed that amounts of monosaccharides increased again in the pupa stage. According to lectin blotting, N- and O-linked glycoproteins expressions were different and there were some specific glycoprotein expression differences between stages. These findings suggest that the glycosylation state of proteins in the nervous system changes during development and aging in insects in a similar

  1. Insights into carbohydrate recognition by Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin: the crystal structure at 2 A resolution in complex with alpha1-3 mannobiose.

    PubMed

    Sauerborn, M K; Wright, L M; Reynolds, C D; Grossmann, J G; Rizkallah, P J

    1999-07-01

    Carbohydrate recognition by monocot mannose-binding lectins was studied via the crystal structure determination of daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus) lectin. The lectin was extracted from daffodil bulbs, and crystallised in the presence of alpha-1,3 mannobiose. Molecular replacement methods were used to solve the structure using the partially refined model of Hippeastrum hybrid agglutinin as a search model. The structure was refined at 2.0 A resolution to a final R -factor of 18.7 %, and Rfreeof 26.7 %. The main feature of the daffodil lectin structure is the presence of three fully occupied binding pockets per monomer, arranged around the faces of a triangular beta-prism motif. The pockets have identical topology, and can bind mono-, di- or oligosaccharides. Strand exchange forms tightly bound dimers, and higher aggregation states are achieved through hydrophobic patches on the surface, completing a tetramer with internal 222-symmetry. There are therefore 12 fully occupied binding pockets per tetrameric cluster. The tetramer persists in solution, as shown with small-angle X-ray solution scattering. Extensive sideways and out-of-plane interactions between tetramers, some mediated via the ligand, make up the bulk of the lattice contacts.A fourth binding site was also observed. This is unique and has not been observed in similar structures. The site is only partially occupied by a ligand molecule due to the much lower binding affinity. A comparison with the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin/mannopentaose complex suggests an involvement of this site in the recognition mechanism for naturally occurring glycans.

  2. Fbs2 is a new member of the E3 ubiquitin ligase family that recognizes sugar chains.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yukiko; Tokunaga, Fuminori; Chiba, Tomoki; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Keiji; Tai, Tadashi

    2003-10-31

    F-box proteins are substrate recognition components of Skp1-Cullin1-F-box protein-Roc1 (SCF) E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases. We reported previously that Fbs1 (F-box protein that recognizes sugar chains; equivalent to Fbx2 or NFB42) binds specifically to proteins attached with high mannose oligosaccharides and subsequently contributes to elimination of N-glycoproteins in cytosol (Yoshida, Y., Chiba, T., Tokunaga, F., Kawasaki, H., Iwai, K., Suzuki, T., Ito, Y., Matsuoka, K., Yoshida, M., Tanaka, K., and Tai, T. (2002) Nature 418, 438-442). Here we report the identification of another F-box protein that recognizes N-glycan, Fbs2 (called Fbx6b or FBG2 previously). Although the expression of Fbs1 was restricted to the adult brain and testis, the Fbs2 transcript was widely expressed. The Fbs2 protein forms an SCFFbs2 ubiquitinligase complex that targets sugar chains in N-glycoproteins for ubiquitylation. Only glycoproteins bound to concanavalin A lectin and not to wheat germ agglutinin or Ricinus communis agglutinin interacted with Fbs2 in various tissues and cell lines. Pull-down analysis using various oligosaccharides revealed that Man3-9GlcNAc2 glycans were required for efficient Fbs2 binding, whereas modifications of mannose residues by other sugars or deletion of inner GlcNAc reduced Fbs2 binding. Fbs2 interacted with N-glycans of T-cell receptor alpha-subunit (TCRalpha), a typical substrate of the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway, and the forced expression of mutant Fbs2DeltaF, which lacks the F-box domain essential for forming the SCF complex, and decrease of endogenous Fbs2 by small interfering RNA led to inhibition of TCRalpha degradation in cells. Thus, Fbs2 is a novel member of F-box protein family that recognizes N-glycans and plays a role in ERAD. PMID:12939278

  3. Extracellular Matrix Assembly in Diatoms (Bacillariophyceae) (I. A Model of Adhesives Based on Chemical Characterization and Localization of Polysaccharides from the Marine Diatom Achnanthes longipes and Other Diatoms).

    PubMed Central

    Wustman, B. A.; Gretz, M. R.; Hoagland, K. D.

    1997-01-01

    Extracellular adhesives from the diatoms Achnanthes longipes, Amphora coffeaeformis, Cymbella cistula, and Cymbella mexicana were characterized by monosaccharide and methylation analysis, lectin-fluorescein isothiocyanate localization, and cytochemical staining. Polysaccharide was the major component of adhesives formed during cell motility, synthesis of a basal pad, and/or production of a highly organized shaft. Hot water-insoluble/hot 0.5 M NaHCO3-soluble anionic polysaccharides from A. longipes and A. coffeaeformis adhesives were primarily composed of galactosyl (64-70%) and fucosyl (32-42%) residues. In A. longipes polymers, 2,3-, t-, 3-, and 4-linked/substituted galactosyl, t-, 3-, 4-, and 2-linked fucosyl, and t- and 2-linked glucuronic acid residues predominated. Adhesive polysaccharides from C. cistula were EDTA-soluble, sulfated, consisted of 83% galactosyl (4-, 4,6-, and 3,4-linked/substituted) and 13% xylosyl (t-, 4f/5p-, and 3p-linked/substituted) residues, and contained no uronosyl residues. Ulex europaeus agglutinin uniformly localized [alpha](1,2)-L-fucose units in C. cistula and Achnanthes adhesives formed during motility and in the pads of A. longipes. D-Galactose residues were localized throughout the shafts of C. cistula and capsules of A. coffeaeformis. D-Mannose and/or D-glucose, D-galactose, and [alpha](t)-L-fucose residues were uniformly localized in the outer layers of A. longipes shafts by Cancavalia ensiformis, Abrus precatorius, and Lotus tetragonolobus agglutinin, respectively. A model for diatom cell adhesive structure was developed from chemical characterization, localization, and microscopic observation of extracellular adhesive components formed during the diatom cell-attachment process. PMID:12223660

  4. Monosaccharide profiling of silkworm (Bombyx mori L.) nervous system during development and aging.

    PubMed

    Soya, Seçkin; Şahar, Umut; Karaçalı, Sabire

    2016-09-01

    Glycoconjugates have various functions in differentiation, development, aging and in all aspects of normal functioning of organisms. The reason for increased research on this topic is that glycoconjugates locate mostly on the cell surface and play crucial biological roles in the nervous system including brain development, synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. Considering their roles in the nervous system, information about their existence in the insect nervous system is rather sparse. Therefore, in order to detect monosaccharide content of N- and O-glycans, we carried out capLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis to determine the concentration changes of glucose, mannose, galactose, N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), fucose, xylose, arabinose, and ribose monosaccharides in the nervous system of Bombyx mori during development and aging processes. In addition to LC-MS, lectin blotting was done to detect quantitative changes in N- and O-glycans. Developmental stages were selected as 3rd (the youngest sample), 5th (young) larval instar, motionless prepupa (the oldest sample), and pupa (adult development). Derivatization of monosaccharides was performed with a solution of PMP agent and analyzed with capLC-ESI-MS/MS. For lectin blotting, determination of glycan types was carried out with Galanthus nivalis agglutinin and Peanut agglutinin lectins. In all stages, the most abundant monosaccharide was glucose. Although all monosaccharides were present most abundantly in the youngest stage (3rd instar), they are generally reduced gradually during the aging process. It was observed that amounts of monosaccharides increased again in the pupa stage. According to lectin blotting, N- and O-linked glycoproteins expressions were different and there were some specific glycoprotein expression differences between stages. These findings suggest that the glycosylation state of proteins in the nervous system changes during development and aging in insects in a similar

  5. Characterization of the oligosaccharides of plasma sex hormone binding globulin from noncirrhotic alcoholic patients.

    PubMed

    Valladares, L; Erices, A; Lioi, X; Iturriaga, H

    2000-05-01

    In previous reports we have demonstrated high plasma levels of sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) in asymptomatic alcoholic men. In the present work the physicochemical properties of SHBG from plasma of noncirrhotic alcoholic patients have been further compared with SHBG of control subjects. Steroid binding to SHBG was similar for the two groups: alcoholic men, K(d) of 0.62 +/- 0.07 nM and control individuals, K(d) of 0.70 +/- 0.10 nM. The structure of oligosaccharides attached to SHBG from controls and alcoholic men were determined by using serial chromatography. Our data indicated that 7% of SHBG of control individuals was not retarded by the Con-A column, whereas approximately 30% of SHBG of alcoholic men eluted in the void volume of Con A. Approximately 46% of SHBG of alcoholics applied to Con A, possessed biantennary complex oligosaccharides, as indicated by the fact that it could be eluted with methyl-alpha-D-glucopyranoside and by its retention on wheat germ agglutinin; in contrast, when SHBG from control men was analyzed, approximately 51% was eluted with methyl-alpha-D-glucopyranoside. Approximately 9% of the biantennary complex oligosaccharides on SHBG of control men and none of those on SHBG from alcoholic men were fucosylated on the chitobiose core, as determined by chromatography on Lenn culinaris lectin. Galactosylated oligosaccharides were also present on the SHBG fraction as indicated by its interaction with Ricinus communis-I. Approximately 24% of SHBG of alcoholic men and 39% of those on SHBG from control individuals applied to Con-A were retained and could be eluted with methyl-alpha-D-mannopyranoside. Evidence based on the binding on mannoside-eluted SHBG to Con-A, wheat germ agglutinin, and R. communis-I indicated that at least the SHBG in this fraction, from alcoholics or controls, contained two glycosylation sites and that the sites were differentially glycosylated.

  6. Activation dependent expression of MMPs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells involves protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Saja, K; Chatterjee, Urmimala; Chatterjee, B P; Sudhakaran, P R

    2007-02-01

    Monocyte/Macrophages are integral cellular components of inflammation. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) produced by these cells play a crucial role in every aspect of inflammation. Results of the investigations on activation dependent upregulation of MMPs in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in culture using different lectins as an in vitro model system to mimic inflammatory monocytes are presented. Under normal physiological conditions the monocytes produced only very low amount of MMPs in an indomethacin insensitive PG/cAMP independent manner. Zymographic analysis and ELISA showed that treatment of monocyte with lectins like concanavalin A (ConA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and Artocarpus lakoocha agglutinin (ALA) caused upregulation of MMPs and the maximum effect was produced by ALA. ALA significantly upregulated MMP-9 in a concentration and time dependent manner. Immunoblot analysis and RT-PCR confirmed ALA mediated upregulation of MMP-9 production. Inhibition of ALA effect by indomethacin and reversal of the indomethacin effect by Bt(2)cAMP indicated involvement of cAMP dependent signaling pathway. Further support for the prostaglandin mediated effect was obtained by the upregulation of cyclooxygenase by ALA. H-89, an inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA), inhibited the expression of MMP-9 indicating that ALA mediated upregulation of MMP-9 is mediated through PKA pathway. Increase in MMP production and increase in cyclooxygenase activity and inhibition of the effect of ALA on MMP production by indomethacin suggested that the ALA activated monocytes in culture can be used as an in vitro model system to study the intracellular signaling process involved in the mediation of inflammatory response.

  7. Single-molecule level analysis of the subunit composition of the T cell receptor on live T cells

    PubMed Central

    James, John R.; White, Samuel S.; Clarke, Richard W.; Johansen, Adam M.; Dunne, Paul D.; Sleep, David L.; Fitzgerald, William J.; Davis, Simon J.; Klenerman, David

    2007-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) expressed on most T cells is a protein complex consisting of TCRαβ heterodimers that bind antigen and cluster of differentiation (CD) 3εδ, εγ, and ζζ dimers that initiate signaling. A long-standing controversy concerns whether there is one, or more than one, αβ heterodimer per complex. We used a form of single-molecule spectroscopy to investigate this question on live T cell hybridomas. The method relies on detecting coincident fluorescence from single molecules labeled with two different fluorophores, as the molecules diffuse through a confocal volume. The fraction of events that are coincident above the statistical background is defined as the “association quotient,” Q. In control experiments, Q was significantly higher for cells incubated with wheat germ agglutinin dual-labeled with Alexa488 and Alexa647 than for cells incubated with singly labeled wheat germ agglutinin. Similarly, cells expressing the homodimer, CD28, gave larger values of Q than cells expressing the monomer, CD86, when incubated with mixtures of Alexa488- and Alexa647-labeled antibody Fab fragments. T cell hybridomas incubated with mixtures of anti-TCRβ Fab fragments labeled with each fluorophore gave a Q value indistinguishable from the Q value for CD86, indicating that the dominant form of the TCR comprises single αβ heterodimers. The values of Q obtained for CD86 and the TCR were low but nonzero, suggesting that there is transient or nonrandom confinement, or diffuse clustering of molecules at the T cell surface. This general method for analyzing the subunit composition of protein complexes could be extended to other cell surface or intracellular complexes, and other living cells. PMID:17971442

  8. Evaluation of glycophenotype in prostatic neoplasm by chemiluminescent assay

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Lúcia Patrícia Bezerra Gomes; de Almeida, Sinara Mônica Vitalino; de Lima, Luiza Rayanna Amorim; Cavalcanti, Carmelita de Lima Bezerra; Lira, Mariana Montenegro de Melo; da Silva, Maria da Paz Carvalho; Beltrão, Eduardo Isidoro Carneiro; Júnior, Luiz Bezerra de Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the glycophenotype in normal prostate, bening prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostatic adenocarcinoma (PCa) tissues by a chemiluminescent method. Concanavalin A (Con A), Ulex europaeus agglutinin (UEA-I) and Peanut agglutinin (PNA) lectins were conjugated to acridinium ester (lectins-AE). These conjugates remained capable to recognize their specific carbohydrates. Tissue samples were incubated with lectins-AE. The chemiluminescence of the tissue-lectin-AE complex was expressed in relative light units (RLU). Transformed tissues (0.25 cm2 by 8 µm of thickness) showed statistical significant lower α-D-glucose/mannose (BPH: 226,931 ± 17,436; PCa: 239,520 ± 12,398) and Gal-β(1-3)-GalNAc (BPH: 28,754 ± 2,157; PCa: 16,728 ± 1,204) expression than normal tissues (367,566 ± 48,550 and 409,289 ± 22,336, respectively). However, higher α-L-fucose expression was observed in PCa (251,118 ± 14,193) in relation to normal (200,979 ± 21,318) and BHP (169,758 ± 10,264) tissues. It was observed an expressive decreasing of the values of RLU by inhibition of the interaction between tissues and lectins-AE using their specific carbohydrates. The relationship between RLU and tissue area showed a linear correlation for all lectin-AE in both transformed tissues. These results indicated that the used method is an efficient tool for specific, sensitive and quantitative analyses of prostatic glycophenotype. PMID:25120756

  9. Sialic acid-specific affinity chromatography for the separation of erythropoietin glycoforms using serotonin as a ligand.

    PubMed

    Meininger, M; Stepath, M; Hennig, R; Cajic, S; Rapp, E; Rotering, H; Wolff, M W; Reichl, U

    2016-02-15

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) is an important CHO cell-derived glycoprotein and the degree of sialylation of this hormone is crucial for its in vivo bioactivity. In order to improve the purification process serotonin as a potential affinity ligand was tested for preparative chromatographic separation of rhEPO glycoforms into fractions of different degrees of sialylation. Therefore, two chromatographic matrices were prepared by immobilizing serotonin on CNBr- and NHS-Sepharose™. First it was shown both matrices bind rhEPO only in its sialylated form. Results indicate that binding is pH independent between pH 3.5 to 8 suggesting it is not only based on electrostatic interactions. Second, after optimal binding conditions were identified, semi-purified rhEPO was loaded onto both matrices and eluted using a stepwise elution gradient of sodium chloride. For comparison same affinity purification experiments were performed using wheat germ agglutinin-coupled agarose, a lectin known for its affinity towards sialylated glycoproteins. To monitor changes in N-glycan fingerprint, eluate fractions were analyzed by multiplexed capillary gel electrophoresis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence (xCGE-LIF). For the serotonin matrices an increasing degree of sialylation was observed from the first to the third elution fraction while purity of rhEPO could be increased at the same time. The late elution fractions of serotonin-coupled CNBr- and NHS-Sepharose™ also showed an overall sialylation degree exceeding that of the starting material. In contrast, for rhEPO bound to wheat germ agglutinin-coupled agarose, no distinct change in the degree of sialylation could be observed after elution. Overall, these encouraging results highlight the potential of serotonin as a chromatographic ligand for the improvement of pharmaceutical purification processes of rhEPO. PMID:26851523

  10. Determination of hyperglycosylated human chorionic gonadotropin produced by malignant gestational trophoblastic neoplasias and male germ cell tumors using a lectin-based immunoassay and surface plasmon resonance

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Lisa S.; Birken, Steven; Puett, David

    2007-01-01

    The ability to reliably detect aberrant glycosylation of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) may have profound implications for the diagnosis and monitoring of malignant gestational trophoblastic neoplasia, germ cell tumors, other malignancies, and pregnancy complications. To become a clinically useful assay, however, this discrimination of glycoforms should be possible on minimally treated biological specimens. Towards this end, we have developed a lectin-based sandwich-type immunoassay to compare the glycosylation patterns of hCG among urine specimens from patients presenting with a normal pregnancy, invasive mole, choriocarcinoma, and male germ cell tumors using carbohydrate-free antibody fragments as capture reagents and a panel of eight lectins, five recognizing neutral sugars and three recognizing sialic acid. There was no significant difference in the binding of any of the lectins to hCG in the urine of women over the gestational range of 6 – 38 weeks. Three lectins, however, exhibited differential binding to urinary hCG derived from these normal pregnant controls and that from patients with malignant forms of gestational trophoblastic disease and male germ cell tumors. Galanthus nivalis agglutinin and Maackia amurensis lectin, which bind terminal mannose and α(2–3)sialic acid, respectively, preferentially bound pregnancy-derived hCG, whereas the lectin, wheat germ agglutinin, which binds sialic acid and β(1–4)N-acetylglucosamine, exhibited decreased binding to pregnancy-derived hCG compared to that from patients with male germ cell tumors and malignant gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. The differential binding observed with these three promising lectins is most encouraging and warrants further examination. The experimental paradigm also holds promise for the development of comparable assays for other glycosylated tumor markers. PMID:17081681

  11. Altered glycosylation of complexed native IgG molecules is associated with disease activity of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Sjöwall, C; Zapf, J; von Löhneysen, S; Magorivska, I; Biermann, M; Janko, C; Winkler, S; Bilyy, R; Schett, G; Herrmann, M; Muñoz, L E

    2015-05-01

    In addition to the redundancy of the receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulins, glycans result in potential ligands for a plethora of lectin receptors found in immune effector cells. Here we analysed the exposure of glycans containing fucosyl residues and the fucosylated tri-mannose N-type core by complexed native IgG in longitudinal serum samples of well-characterized patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Consecutive serum samples of a cohort of 15 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus during periods of increased disease activity and remission were analysed. All patients fulfilled the 1982 American College of Rheumatology classification criteria. Sera of 15 sex- and age-matched normal healthy blood donors served as controls. The levels and type of glycosylation of complexed random IgG was measured with lectin enzyme-immunosorbent assays. After specifically gathering IgG complexes from sera, biotinylated lectins Aleuria aurantia lectin and Lens culinaris agglutinin were employed to detect IgG-associated fucosyl residues and the fucosylated tri-mannose N-glycan core, respectively. In sandwich-ELISAs, IgG-associated IgM, IgA, C1q, C3c and C-reactive protein (CRP) were detected as candidates for IgG immune complex constituents. We studied associations of the glycan of complexed IgG and disease activity according to the physician's global assessment of disease activity and the systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index 2000 documented at the moment of blood taking. Our results showed significantly higher levels of Aleuria aurantia lectin and Lens culinaris agglutinin binding sites exposed on IgG complexes of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus than on those of normal healthy blood donors. Disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus correlated with higher exposure of Aleuria aurantia lectin-reactive fucosyl residues by immobilized IgG complexes. Top levels of Aleuria aurantia lectin-reactivity were found in samples taken during the

  12. Development of selectable marker free, insect resistant, transgenic mustard (Brassica juncea) plants using Cre/lox mediated recombination

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Antibiotic/ herbicide resistant marker genes have been proven to be very useful in plant transformation for the initial selection of desired transgenic events. However, presence of these genes in the genetically modified crops may render the crop less acceptable to the consumers. Among several different approaches, the effectiveness of Cre/lox mediated recombination strategy for selectable marker gene (SMG) elimination has previously been demonstrated by different groups in several plants including Brassica. In the present study exploiting Cre/lox mediated recombination strategy, attempt has been made for selectable marker gene elimination from Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL) expressing Brassica plants with hemipteran insect resistant phenotype. Results Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL) linked with lox flanked hygromycin resistant (hpt) gene was introduced in mustard. Cre recombinase gene cassette was also integrated in separate event. A Cre/lox mediated recombination using crossing strategy was adopted to remove the hpt gene from the subsequent generation of selected hybrid events. Reciprocal crosses were made between T1ASAL-lox-hpt-lox and cre-bar plants. Marker gene elimination was confirmed in the resulting F1 hybrid progenies by PCR analysis, using hpt, cre and ASAL specific primers followed by Southern hybridization. In marker free plants, expression of ASAL was also confirmed by western blotting and ELISA analysis. Retention of functionality of expressed ASAL was investigated by agglutination assay using rabbit erythrocytes. Expressed ASAL was also found to be thermo-sensitive. In planta insect bioassay on F1 hybrid progenies exhibited detrimental effect on the performance of devastating target pest, Lipaphis erysimi. The F1 hybrid hpt negative, ASAL positive plants were allowed to self- fertilize to obtain F2 progeny plants. In some of these plants cre gene was found to be segregated out of the ASAL gene by genetic segregation yielding

  13. Cone outer segment and Müller microvilli pericellular matrices provide binding domains for interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP).

    PubMed

    Garlipp, Mary Alice; Gonzalez-Fernandez, Federico

    2013-08-01

    The close packing of vertebrate photoreceptors presents a challenge to the exchange of molecules between the outer segments, retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE), and Müller glia. An extracellular hyaluronan scaffold separates these cells while soluble interphotoreceptor matrix (IPM) proteins traffic visual cycle retinoids, fatty acids, and other molecules between them. In the IPM, retinoids and fatty acids are carried by interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP). The fact that much of the retina's IRBP can be extracted by saline wash has led to the notion that IRBP does not bind to the retina, but freely distributes itself within the subretinal space. In this study, we challenge this idea by asking if there are specialized IPM domains that bind IRBP, perhaps facilitating its ability to target delivery/uptake of its ligands. Xenopus is an ideal animal model to study the role of the IPM in RPE-photoreceptor interactions. Here, we took advantage of the large size of its photoreceptors, ability to detach the retina in light, sustainability of the retina in short term organ culture, and the availability of recombinant full-length Xenopus IRBP and antisera directed against Xenopus IRBP. We compared the distribution of wash resistant native IRBP, and that of IRBP-Alexa 647 binding in Xenopus retina. IRBP and cone opsin were localized using anti-Xenopus IRBP serum, and monoclonal COS-1 respectively. Cone matrix sheath proteoglycans were localized with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), and diffuse IPM proteoglycans with peanut agglutinin (PNA). Wholemounts and frozen sections were compared by immunofluorescence from retinas detached under Ringer's followed by additional washes, or detached directly under 4% paraformaldehyde without Ringer's wash. Undetached Lowicryl embedded retinas were subjected to IRBP immunogold electron microscopy (EM). Immunogold labeled a diffuse network of filamentous structures, and a separate distinct flocculant material directly coating the

  14. Communication requested: Boar semen transport through the uterus and possible consequences for insemination.

    PubMed

    Rath, D; Knorr, C; Taylor, U

    2016-01-01

    Recent insemination techniques bypass the interactions between sperm and the uterine wall because the semen is deposited deep into the tip of uterine horn or directly into the oviduct. Such techniques allow high dilution of the ejaculates. After normal mating, semen entering the uterus communicates with the uterine milieu. Intact sperm of high mitochondrial membrane potential bind to uterine epithelial cells, whereas most of the unbound sperm in the uterine lumen have damaged membranes. Lectins are the most likely factors to mediate these sperm-uterine interactions. The lectin wheat germ agglutinin is known to induce the strongest binding of sperm, whereas binding is impaired when sialic acid receptors are blocked by wheat germ agglutinin. This suggests that sialic acid is involved in porcine sperm-endometrium interactions, and it is hypothesized that the use of a semen extender supplemented with sialidase would allow insemination with reduced sperm numbers. A lack of contact of sperm and seminal plasma with the uterine wall, as a result of deep insemination, may adversely affect (1) events during ovulation, (2) induction of immunologic tolerance against paternal antigens, (3) preparation of the endometrium for implantation and placentation, and (4) immunologic support required for the fetus during pregnancy. Seminal plasma is known to signal post-insemination changes in the uterine endometrium involving the redistribution of leukocytes. This may involve migration of leukocytes from the uterine wall to the ovary, as seminal plasma particularly increases the appearance of the major histocompatibility complex class II-positive cells. Uterine epithelial cells respond to sperm binding by the production of pro- or anti-inflammatory cytokines. These cytokines may include synchronizing substances, transferred through a counter-current pathway to the ipsilateral ovary, thereby accelerating the final maturation of preovulatory follicles and advancing time of ovulation. In

  15. Synthesis of stable carboxy-terminated NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+@SiO2 nanoparticles with ultrathin shell for biolabeling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fuyao; Zhao, Qi; You, Hongpeng; Wang, Zhenxin

    2013-01-01

    Here, a two-step method has been developed for synthesizing carboxy-terminated NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+@SiO2 core@shell nanoparticles (UCNP@SiO2) with ultrathin shell (1.5 nm). First, the NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+ upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) were prepared using solvothermal technology; then, silica shells (SiO2) were deposited on the nanocrystals to form core-shell structures by the hydrolysis of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS). The ultrathin SiO2 shell was obtained by increasing surfactant amount and decreasing TEOS amount in the reaction mixture. Carboxyethylsilanetriol (CTES) was used to generate the carboxy group on the particle surface. The carboxy-terminated UCNP@SiO2 are ideally suited for biolabeling and bioimaging applications because the as-prepared nanoparticles have extreme colloidal and optical stabilities, and the carboxy groups on the particle surface easily react with amino residues of biomolecules. As an example, we reported on the interactions of Ricinus Communis Agglutinin (RCA 120) conjugated UCNP@SiO2 with HeLa cells. The excellent performance of the RCA 120 conjugated UCNP@SiO2 in cellular fluorescence imaging was demonstrated.Here, a two-step method has been developed for synthesizing carboxy-terminated NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+@SiO2 core@shell nanoparticles (UCNP@SiO2) with ultrathin shell (1.5 nm). First, the NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+ upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) were prepared using solvothermal technology; then, silica shells (SiO2) were deposited on the nanocrystals to form core-shell structures by the hydrolysis of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS). The ultrathin SiO2 shell was obtained by increasing surfactant amount and decreasing TEOS amount in the reaction mixture. Carboxyethylsilanetriol (CTES) was used to generate the carboxy group on the particle surface. The carboxy-terminated UCNP@SiO2 are ideally suited for biolabeling and bioimaging applications because the as-prepared nanoparticles have extreme colloidal and optical stabilities, and the carboxy

  16. Penetration through the peritrophic matrix is a key to lectin toxicity against Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Walski, Tomasz; Van Damme, Els J M; Smagghe, Guy

    2014-11-01

    In the last decades lectins have received a lot of attention as potential tools in pest control. Despite substantial progress in the field not all the factors determining insecticidal potency and selectivity of these proteins have been described. Recently, three lectins, RSA (Rhizoctonia solani agglutinin), SNA-I and SNA-II (Sambucus nigra agglutinin I and II) have been shown to be toxic to aphids and caterpillars. In this project we investigated if these lectins are also toxic against larvae and a cell line of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, a model organism and important pest of stored products. Furthermore, we analyzed the stability of the lectins in the larval gut and used confocal microscopy to compare their efficiency in passing through the peritrophic matrix (PM). We observed that all three lectins were toxic against the T. castaneum cell line and their effectiveness in vitro was in decreasing order SNA-II>SNA-I>RSA with the respective EC50 being 0.1, 0.5 and 3.6 μg/ml. Larvae feeding for 16 day on diets containing 2% RSA, 2% SNA-II and 2% SNA-I weighed 0.14 ± 0.07 mg, 0.67 ± 0.44 mg and 1.89 ± 0.38 mg, corresponding to approximately 7%, 36% and 80% of control larvae, respectively. As a consequence, RSA increased the time to adult emergence by over 3-fold, SNA-II by 1.9-fold and SNA-I by 1.2-fold. RSA and SNA-II were stable in the larval gut, while SNA-I was digested and excreted with the feces. Finally, confocal microscopy confirmed that RSA passed through the PM more efficiently than SNA-II. In conclusion, our data suggest that the lectin ability to pass through the PM, governed by molecule dimensions, charge and size of PM pores, is one of the features that determine the toxicity of these insecticidal proteins.

  17. Latex-allergic patients sensitized to the major allergen hevein and hevein-like domains of class I chitinases show no increased frequency of latex-associated plant food allergy

    PubMed Central

    Radauer, Christian; Adhami, Farzaneh; Fürtler, Irene; Wagner, Stefan; Allwardt, Dorothee; Scala, Enrico; Ebner, Christof; Hafner, Christine; Hemmer, Wolfgang; Mari, Adriano; Breiteneder, Heimo

    2011-01-01

    Allergies to certain fruits such as banana, avocado, chestnut and kiwi are described in 30–70% of latex-allergic patients. This association is attributed to the cross-reactivity between the major latex allergen hevein and hevein-like domains (HLDs) from fruit class I chitinases. We aimed to assess the extent of cross-reactivity between hevein and HLDs using sera from latex-allergic patients with and without plant food allergy. Hevein and HLDs of latex, banana, and avocado chitinases were expressed in Escherichia coli as fusion proteins with the maltose-binding protein and purified by affinity chromatography. IgE binding to these proteins was studied in sera from 59 latex-allergic patients and 20 banana-allergic patients without latex allergy by ELISA and ELISA inhibition. Additionally, 16,408 allergic patients’ sera were tested for IgE binding to hevein, latex chitinase, and wheat germ agglutinin using an allergen microarray. Hevein-specific IgE was detected in 34/59 (58%) latex-allergic patients’ sera. HLDs of latex, banana, and avocado chitinases were recognized by 21 (36%), 20 (34%), and 9 (15%) sera, respectively. In contrast, only one of 20 banana-allergic patients without latex allergy was sensitized to chitinase HLDs. In most tested latex-allergic patients’ sera, IgE binding to hevein was only partially reduced by preincubation with HLDs. Among hevein-sensitized, latex-allergic patients, the percentage of plant food allergy (15/34 = 44%) was equal to latex-allergic patients without hevein sensitization (11/25 = 44%). In the general allergic population, 230 of 16,408 sera (1.4%) reacted to hevein and/or a hevein-like allergen. Of these, 128 sera showed an isolated sensitization to hevein, whereas only 17 bound to latex chitinase or wheat germ agglutinin without hevein sensitization. In conclusion, the IgE response to HLDs is elicited by hevein as sensitizing allergen in most cases. Despite considerable cross-reactivity between these allergens, no

  18. Expression of binding properties of Gal/GalNAc reactive lectins by mammalian glycotopes (an updated report).

    PubMed

    Wu, A M

    2001-01-01

    Expression of the binding properties of Gal/GalNAc specific lectins, based on the affinity of decreasing order of mammalian glycotopes (determinants) rather than monosaccharide inhibition pattern, is probably one of the best ways to express carbohydrate specifity and should facilitate the selection of lectins as structural probes for studying mammalian glycobiology. Eleven mammalian structural units have been selected to express the binding domain of applied lectins. They are: 1. F, GalNAcalpha1 --> 3GalNAc; 2. A, GalNAcalpha1 --> 3Gal; 3. T, Galbeta1 --> 3GalNAc; 4. I, Galbeta 1 --> 3GlcNAc; 5. II, Galbeta1 --> 4GlcNAc; 6. B, Galalpha1 --> 3Gal; 7. E, Galalpha1--> 4Gal; 8. L, Galbeta1 --> 4Glc; 9. P, GalNAcbeta1 --> 3Gal; 10. S, GalNAcbeta1 --> 4Gal and 11. Tn, GalNAcalpha1 --> 4Ser (Thr) of the peptide chain. Thus, the carbohydrate specificity of Gal/GalNAc reactive lectins can be divided into classes according to their highest affinity for the above disaccharides and/or Tn residue. Examples of the binding properties of these lectins can be demonstrated by Ricimus communis agglutinin (RCA1), grouped as II specific lectin and its binding property is II > I > B > T; Ahrus precatorius agglutinin (APA), classified as T and its carbohydrate specificity is T > I/II > E > B > Tn; Artocarpus integrifolia (jacalin, AIL), as T/Tn specific and its binding reactivity is T > Tn > I (II) and Geodia cydonium (GCL), as F/A specific, and with affinity for F > Ah [GalNAcalpha1-->43(L(Fuc)alpha1-->2)Gal] > I > L. Due to the multiple reactivity of lectins toward mammalian glycotopes, the possible existence of different combining sites or subsites in the same molecule has to be examined, and the differential binding properties of these combining sites (if any) have to be characterized. To establish the relationship among the amino acid sequences of the combining sites of plant lectins and mammalian glycotopes should be an important direction to be addressed in lectinology.

  19. Anti IH: An antibody worth mention.

    PubMed

    Mohanan, Nithya; Henry, Nittin; Rafi, Aboobacker Mohamed; Innah, Susheela J

    2016-01-01

    A 72-year-old female with co-morbidities posted for surgical correction of fracture neck of femur without any history of transfusions was noted to have a hemoglobin level of 7 g/dl and packed red blood cells transfusion was ordered. Pretransfusion tests demonstrated A1B group with D positive on forward grouping. Reverse grouping showed a varying grade of agglutination with A, B, and O cells. Agglutination being stronger at 4°C. Antibody screening showed pan-agglutination, direct Coomb's test and auto control were negative. The serum reacted with adult O cells (OIadult) but not with adult Bombay cells (Oh Iadult) or O cord (Oicord) cells. A possibility of a compound cold antibody anti IH was made and A1B compatible cells were transfused to the patient. This case report illustrates anti-IH cold agglutinin with broad thermal amplitude. Uniqueness of this case report was O group incompatibility with A1B group, which was detected earlier and a catastrophic transfusion reaction being subverted. PMID:27605855

  20. Microwave and thermal interactions with oxidative hemolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kiel, J.L.; Erwin, D.N.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of microwave radiation (2450 MHz, 3,333 pulses per second, duty factor of 0.02, and average specific absorption rate of 0.4 W/kg) on spontaneous hemolysis of human erythrocytes was examined. Cells were exposed to microwave radiation for 20 minutes at 37 degrees, 42 degrees, or 48 degrees C. Some of these cells were sensitized to oxidative damage by treatment with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and/or by coating with wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) conjugate. Microwave radiation significantly decreased spontaneous hemolysis of untreated cells at 42 degrees C but had no effect at 37 degrees or 48 degrees C. Microwave exposure significantly enhanced a CDNB membrane stabilizing effect at 42 degrees C but had no effect at 37 or 48 degrees C. At 42 degrees C, microwave exposure increased hemolysis of WGA-HRP coated cells. Cells treated with both WGA-HRP and CDNB showed no change in fragility at 42 degrees C and increased fragility at 48 degrees C without a microwave effect. The microwave effects observed appear to involve perturbation of the thermal threshold for oxidative hyperthermic hemolysis.

  1. Studies on a novel macrophage-specific calmodulin binding glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Orlow, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    The murine macrophage-like cell line J774 and peritoneal exudate cells elicited with thioglycollate or starch contain a major calmodulin-binding protein which is absent in trifluoperazine-resistant variants of J774, resident peritoneal macrophages and these elicited with concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide, proteose peptone or Bacillus Clamette Guerin. Resident murine peritoneal cells maintained in tissue culture for 3 days begin to accumulate this protein as do human peripheral blood monocytes after 7 days of culture. A specific competitive displacement radioimmunoassay was developed using a rabbit antiserum raised to the partially purified calmodulin binding protein and (/sup 125/I) calmodulin covalently crosslinked to the principal calmodulin binding protein in the preparation. The radioimmunoassay confirmed the unique cellular distribution of this protein suggesting that it may be a marker for certain stages of macrophage differentiation. Monoclonal antibodies were prepared and one of these was used to further purify the protein by immunoaffinity chromatography. A protein of molecular weight 50,000 to 60,000 was isolated. It could be selectively adsorbed to wheat germ agglutinin agarose and subsequently eluted with N-acetyl glucosamine. This property plus its sensitivity to endoglycosidase F led to the conclusion that it is a glycoprotein. The cellular distribution, subcellular localization and evidence of glycosylation suggest that this protein may be a macrophage-specific receptor with a high affinity for calcium-calmodulin.

  2. Rapid Analysis of Listeria monocytogenes Cell Wall Teichoic Acid Carbohydrates by ESI-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Eugster, Marcel R.; Loessner, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    We report the application of electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry for compositional characterization of wall teichoic acids (WTA), a major component of Gram-positive bacterial cell walls. Tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) of purified and chemically hydrolyzed monomeric WTA components provided sufficient information to identify WTA monomers and their specific carbohydrate constituents. A lithium matrix was used for ionization of uncharged WTA monomers, and successfully applied to analyze the WTA molecules of four Listeria strains differing in carbohydrate substitution on a conserved polyribitol-phosphate backbone structure. Carbohydrate residues such as N-acetylglucosamine or rhamnose linked to the WTA could directly be identified by ESI-MS/MS, circumventing the need for quantitative analysis by gas chromatography. The presence of a terminal N-acetylglucosamine residue tethered to the ribitol was confirmed using fluorescently labeled wheat-germ agglutinin. In conclusion, the mass spectrometry method described here will greatly facilitate compositional analysis and characterization of teichoic acids and similar macromolecules from diverse bacterial species, and represents a significant advance in the identification of serovar-specific carbohydrates and sugar molecules on bacteria. PMID:21738682

  3. Establishment of Gal4 transgenic zebrafish lines for analysis of development of cerebellar neural circuitry.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Miki; Matsuda, Koji; Yamaguchi, Shingo; Asakawa, Kazuhide; Miyasaka, Nobuhiko; Lal, Pradeep; Yoshihara, Yoshihiro; Koga, Akihiko; Kawakami, Koichi; Shimizu, Takashi; Hibi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is involved in some forms of motor coordination and motor learning. Here we isolated transgenic (Tg) zebrafish lines that express a modified version of Gal4-VP16 (GFF) in the cerebellar neural circuits: granule, Purkinje, or eurydendroid cells, Bergmann glia, or the neurons in the inferior olive nuclei (IO) which send climbing fibers to Purkinje cells, with the transposon Tol2 system. By combining GFF lines with Tg lines carrying a reporter gene located downstream of Gal4 binding sequences (upstream activating sequence: UAS), we investigated the anatomy and developmental processes of the cerebellar neural circuitry. Combining an IO-specific Gal4 line with a UAS reporter line expressing the photoconvertible fluorescent protein Kaede demonstrated the contralateral projections of climbing fibers. Combining a granule cell-specific Gal4 line with a UAS reporter line expressing wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) confirmed direct and/or indirect connections of granule cells with Purkinje cells, eurydendroid cells, and IO neurons in zebrafish. Time-lapse analysis of a granule cell-specific Gal4 line revealed initial random movements and ventral migration of granule cell nuclei. Transgenesis of a reporter gene with another transposon Tol1 system visualized neuronal structure at a single cell resolution. Our findings indicate the usefulness of these zebrafish Gal4 Tg lines for studying the development and function of cerebellar neural circuits.

  4. Microstructured block copolymer surfaces for control of microbe capture and aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Ryan R; Shubert, Katherine R; Morrell, Jennifer L.; Lokitz, Bradley S; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Retterer, Scott T

    2014-01-01

    The capture and arrangement of surface-associated microbes is influenced by biochemical and physical properties of the substrate. In this report, we develop lectin-functionalized substrates containing patterned, three-dimensional polymeric structures of varied shapes and densities and use these to investigate the effects of topology and spatial confinement on lectin-mediated microbe capture. Films of poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-block-4,4-dimethyl-2-vinylazlactone (PGMA-b-PVDMA) were patterned on silicon surfaces into line or square grid patterns with 5 m wide features and varied edge spacing. The patterned films had three-dimensional geometries with 900 nm film thickness. After surface functionalization with wheat germ agglutinin, the size of Pseudomonas fluorescens aggregates captured was dependent on the pattern dimensions. Line patterns with edge spacing of 5 m or less led to the capture of individual microbes with minimal formation of aggregates, while grid patterns with the same spacing also captured individual microbes with further reduction in aggregation. Both geometries allowed for increases in aggregate size distribution with increased in edge spacing. These engineered surfaces combine spatial confinement with affinity-based microbe capture based on exopolysaccharide content to control the degree of microbe aggregation, and can also be used as a platform to investigate intercellular interactions and biofilm formation in microbial populations of controlled sizes.

  5. Detection of sugar-lectin interactions by multivalent dendritic sugar functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasu, K. S.; Naresh, K.; Bagul, R. S.; Jayaraman, N.; Sood, A. K.

    2012-07-01

    We show that single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) decorated with sugar functionalized poly (propyl ether imine) (PETIM) dendrimer is a very sensitive platform to quantitatively detect carbohydrate recognizing proteins, namely, lectins. The changes in electrical conductivity of SWNT in field effect transistor device due to carbohydrate-protein interactions form the basis of present study. The mannose sugar attached PETIM dendrimers undergo charge-transfer interactions with the SWNTs. The changes in the conductance of the dendritic sugar functionalized SWNT after addition of lectins in varying concentrations were found to follow the Langmuir type isotherm, giving the concanavalin A (Con A)-mannose affinity constant to be 8.5 × 106 M-1. The increase in the device conductance observed after adding 10 nM of Con A is same as after adding 20 μM of a non-specific lectin peanut agglutinin, showing the high specificity of the Con A-mannose interactions. The specificity of sugar-lectin interactions was characterized further by observing significant shifts in Raman modes of the SWNTs.

  6. The Characterization of the Repertoire of Wheat Antigens and Peptides Involved in the Humoral Immune Responses in Patients with Gluten Sensitivity and Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vojdani, Aristo

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal T cells from gluten sensitivity/celiac disease patients respond to a heterogeneous array of peptides. Our study extended this heterogeneity to humoral immune response to various wheat proteins and peptides in patients with gluten sensitivity or Crohn's disease. IgG and IgA antibodies in sera from those patients and healthy control subjects were measured against an array of wheat antigens and peptides. In gluten-sensitive patients, IgG reacted most against transglutaminase, prodynorphin, wheat extract, and α-, γ-, and ω-gliadin; IgA reacted most against wheat then transglutaminase, glutenin, and other peptides. In the sera of Crohn's disease patients, IgG reacted most against wheat and wheat germ agglutinin then transglutaminase, prodynorphin, α-, and γ-gliadin; IgA reacted foremost against prodynorphin then transglutaminase and α-gliadin. These results showed a substantial heterogeneity in the magnitude of IgG and IgA response against various wheat antigens and peptides. Measurements of IgG and IgA antibodies against such an array of wheat peptides and antigens can enhance the sensitivity and specificity of serological assays for gluten sensitivity and celiac disease and may also detect silent celiac disease or its overlap with inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:23724236

  7. The glycoprotein toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis indicates a lectinlike receptor in the larval mosquito gut.

    PubMed Central

    Muthukumar, G; Nickerson, K W

    1987-01-01

    The mosquito-active protein crystals produced by Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis contain covalently attached aminosugars which are critical for their larvicidal activity. The 50% lethal concentrations toward Aedes aegypti larvae were increased up to 10-fold by mild periodate treatment, up to 40-fold by forming the protein crystals in the presence of tunicamycin, and up to 7-fold by the presence during the mosquito bioassays of N-acetylglucosamine or its trimer, triacetylchitotriose. Periodate-treated crystals and crystals formed in the presence of tunicamycin had greatly reduced binding capacities for wheat germ agglutinin, an N-acetylglucosamine-specific lectin. These results suggest that the B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis glycoprotein toxin binds to a lectinlike receptor in the larval mosquito gut. Furthermore, the distinct lectin-binding patterns exhibited by diptera-active versus lepidoptera-active B. thuringiensis crystals suggest that host specificity for the microbial insecticides is determined, in part, by the carbohydrate portion of their glycoprotein crystals. Images PMID:2827571

  8. Attachment and internalization of a Chlamydia trachomatis lymphogranuloma venereum strain by McCoy cells: kinetics of infectivity and effect of lectins and carbohydrates.

    PubMed Central

    Söderlund, G; Kihlström, E

    1983-01-01

    The kinetics of attachment and ingestion of Chlamydia trachomatis serotype L1 by monolayers of McCoy cells were studied by using a method that discriminated between attachment and uptake. When about 1% of the McCoy cells was infected, the proteinase K-resistant chlamydial fraction, regarded as ingested chlamydiae, reached a constant value after about 3 h of incubation at 37 degrees C. Uptake of chlamydiae at 4 degrees C could not be demonstrated. The attached and ingested chlamydial fractions were constant over an eightfold increase in chlamydial inoculum. Chitobiose and chitotriose, the di- and trisaccharides of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, reduced the association of C. trachomatis serotype L1 with McCoy cells. Higher concentrations of chitobiose also selectively inhibited ingestion of chlamydiae. A corresponding effect of chitobiose was also observed on the number of chlamydial inclusions. Wheat germ agglutinin, specific for N-acetyl-D-glucosamine residues, reduced the association of chlamydiae when incubated at 4 degrees C, but not at 37 degrees C. A small inhibiting effect of concanavalin A on association of chlamydiae, but no effect of the corresponding carbohydrates, indicates a nonspecific effect on chlamydial attachment of this lectin. These results suggest that beta 1 leads to 4-linked oligomers of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine are important in the specificity of attachment of C. trachomatis to McCoy cells. PMID:6642670

  9. Oval cell proliferation and the origin of small hepatocytes in liver injury induced by D-galactosamine.

    PubMed Central

    Lemire, J. M.; Shiojiri, N.; Fausto, N.

    1991-01-01

    Oval cells may function as facultative liver stem cells and tumor progenitors in liver carcinogenesis. The authors determined whether oval cells proliferate and if small hepatocytes might be generated from epithelial cell progenitors in noncarcinogenic liver injury. The authors found that oval cells similar to those detected in early carcinogenesis proliferate in response to D-galactosamine (GaIN). Oval cells expressed gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activity, bile duct-type cytokeratins and peanut agglutinin binding. Two unusual types of hepatocytes also appeared after injury: small hepatocytes (less than or equal to 16 microns in diameter) and hepatocytes lining atypical ductlike structures. In situ hybridization studies showed that the fetal form of alphafetoprotein mRNA was expressed by many oval cells, some bile duct cells, and occasional hepatocytes. By following the fate of epithelial cells labeled early after GaIN administration, the authors conclude that duct cells can generate both oval cells and small hepatocytes in response to GaIN. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:1716045

  10. Further characterization of protective Trypanosoma cruzi-specific CD4+ T-cell clones: T helper type 1-like phenotype and reactivity with shed trypomastigote antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Nickell, S P; Keane, M; So, M

    1993-01-01

    We previously reported the isolation from immune mice of a panel of murine clonal T-cell lines which specifically recognize antigens expressed by the trypomastigote stage of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of human Chagas' disease. Our analysis indicated that distinct clones which recognize common as well as strain-specific antigenic determinants were represented. The immunoprotective potential of several of these T-cell clones was demonstrated by adoptive transfer of protection to naive syngeneic recipients. Here we report that these T-cell clones are all of the TH1 phenotype, as determined from their lymphokine secretion patterns. Significant levels of stimulatory activity for each clone were detected in trypomastigote supernatants, and the release of this activity was time and temperature dependent. Seven of 10 T-cell clones tested responded to nitrocellulose-immunoblotted trypomastigote proteins in the range of 90 to 47 kDa; no fewer than six distinct epitopes residing on at least five distinct polypeptide species were recognized by this panel of clones. Two clones (2G8 and 4B10) previously shown to protect in vivo responded to immunoblotted proteins in the range of 65 to 53 and 90 to 80 kD, respectively. Stimulatory activity for the latter clone was shown to be expressed on the surface of trypomastigotes and to bind specifically to wheat germ agglutinin, indicating that its target antigen is an 85-kDa trypomastigote surface glycoprotein. PMID:8335358

  11. Secretion of IgA into "antigen-free" isografts of mouse small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Anne

    1974-01-01

    The immunoglobulins secreted into "antigen-free" isografts of mouse small intestine have been measured by single radial immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis of tissue extracts. IgA was detected in high concentration, and small amounts of IgG1 and IgG2 were also present. The IgA content of material within the graft lumen was considerably higher than the IgA content of the graft wall, indicating that IgA had been secreted and stored. Graft IgA increased with time after implantation, and no differences in immunoglobulin contents were found when grafts in thymus-deprived and in normal mice were compared. A group of host mice had been immunized with BSA and had high titres of circulating antibody to BSA; anti-BSA was not detected in the grafts implanted in these mice. However, graft extracts had moderately high titres of bacterial agglutinins when tested against a panel of commensal gut bacteria. These results indicate that secretion of IgA into a segment of small intestine is not dependent upon the presence of antigens within its lumen; however, the immunoglobulins secreted may have antibody activity against antigens present in small intestine elsewhere in the animal. PMID:4468869

  12. Discovery of two new inhibitors of Botrytis cinerea chitin synthase by a chemical library screening.

    PubMed

    Magellan, Hervé; Boccara, Martine; Drujon, Thierry; Soulié, Marie-Christine; Guillou, Catherine; Dubois, Joëlle; Becker, Hubert F

    2013-09-01

    Chitin synthases polymerize UDP-GlcNAC to form chitin polymer, a key component of fungal cell wall biosynthesis. Furthermore, chitin synthases are desirable targets for fungicides since chitin is absent in plants and mammals. Two potent Botrytis cinerea chitin synthase inhibitors, 2,3,5-tri-O-benzyl-d-ribose (compound 1) and a 2,5-functionalized imidazole (compound 2) were identified by screening a chemical library. We adapted the wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) test for chitin synthase activity detection to allow miniaturization and robotization of the screen. Both identified compounds inhibited chitin synthases in vitro with IC50 values of 1.8 and 10μM, respectively. Compounds 1 and 2 were evaluated for their antifungal activity and were found to be active against B. cinerea BD90 strain with MIC values of 190 and 100μM, respectively. Finally, we discovered that both compounds confer resistance to plant leaves against the attack of the fungus by reducing the propagation of lesions by 37% and 23%, respectively. Based on the inhibitory properties found in different assays, compounds 1 and 2 can be considered as antifungal hit inhibitors of chitin synthase, allowing further optimization of their pharmacological profile to improve their antifungal properties.

  13. Controversies regarding and perspectives on clinical utility of biomarkers in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Song, Pei-Pei; Xia, Ju-Feng; Inagaki, Yoshinori; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Kokudo, Norihiro; Tang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) worldwide parallels that of persistent infection with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV). According to recommendations by the World Health Organization guidelines for HBV/HCV, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) testing and abdominal ultrasound should be performed in routine surveillance of HCC every 6 mo for high-risk patients. These examinations have also been recommended worldwide by many other HCC guidelines over the past few decades. In recent years, however, the role of AFP in HCC surveillance and diagnosis has diminished due to advances in imaging modalities. AFP was excluded from the surveillance and/or diagnostic criteria in the HCC guidelines published by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases in 2010, the European Association for the Study of the Liver in 2012, and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network in 2014. Other biomarkers, including the Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive fraction of AFP (AFP-L3), des-γ-carboxyprothrombin, Dickkopf-1, midkine, and microRNA, are being studied in this regard. Furthermore, increasing attention has focused on the clinical utility of biomarkers as pre-treatment predictors for tumor recurrence and as post-treatment monitors. Serum and tissue-based biomarkers and genomics may aid in the diagnosis of HCC, determination of patient prognosis, and selection of appropriate treatment. However, further studies are needed to better characterize the accuracy and potential role of these approaches in clinical practice. PMID:26755875

  14. A lectin affinity workflow targeting glycosite-specific, cancer-related carbohydrate structures in trypsin-digested human plasma1

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Penelope M.; Schilling, Birgit; Niles, Richard K.; Braten, Miles; Johansen, Eric; Liu, Haichuan; Lerch, Michael; Sorensen, Dylan J.; Li, Bensheng; Allen, Simon; Hall, Steven C.; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Regnier, Fred E.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Fisher, Susan J.

    2011-01-01

    Glycans are cell-type specific, post-translational protein modifications that are modulated during developmental and disease processes. As such, glycoproteins are attractive biomarker candidates. Here, we describe a mass spectrometry-based workflow that incorporates lectin affinity chromatography to enrich for proteins that carry specific glycan structures. As increases in sialylation and fucosylation are prominent among cancer-associated modifications, we focused on Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) and Aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL), lectins which bind sialic acid- and fucose-containing structures, respectively. Fucosylated and sialylated glycopeptides from human lactoferrin served as positive controls, and high mannose structures from yeast invertase served as negative controls. The standards were spiked into Multiple Affinity Removal System (MARS) 14-depleted, trypsin-digested human plasma from healthy donors. Samples were loaded onto lectin columns, separated by HPLC into flow-through and bound fractions, and treated with peptide: N-glycosidase F to remove N-linked glycans. The deglycosylated peptide fractions were interrogated by ESI HPLC-MS/MS. We identified a total of 122 human plasma glycoproteins containing 247 unique glycosites. Importantly, several of the observed glycoproteins (e.g., cadherin 5 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin) typically circulate in plasma at low ng/mL levels. Together, these results provide mass spectrometry-based evidence of the utility of incorporating lectin-separation platforms into cancer biomarker discovery pipelines. PMID:20705048

  15. Oviduct fluid and heparin induce similar surface changes in bovine sperm during capacitation: a flow cytometric study using lectins.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, A I; Parrish, J J

    1996-04-01

    Eight different lectins conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) were used to screen for sperm plasma membrane changes during in vitro capacitation of bovine sperm. Analysis of lectin binding to sperm was done using flow cytometry. Of the eight lectins, only Triticum vulgaris (wheat germ agglutinin, WGA) binding to sperm was altered with capacitation. Capacitation of bovine sperm by heparin was found to decrease WGA binding to sperm by 78% (P < 0.05). The effect of capacitation by oviduct fluid was next compared with capacitation by heparin for changes in WGA binding to sperm. The effect of inhibiting capacitation with glucose on WGA binding was also determined. WGA-bound sperm were detected by flow cytometry as being present in two fluorescence peaks defined as low fluorescence (A) or high fluorescence (B) intensity. The percentage of sperm in peak A was greater for heparin and oviduct fluid-treated sperm compared to sperm incubated under noncapacitating conditions in only culture medium (P < 0.001). Capacitation with either heparin or oviduct fluid was inhibited by glucose as assessed by the ability of lysophosphatidylcholine (100 micrograms/ml) to induce acrosome reactions. Glucose also reduced the percentage of sperm in peak A for both heparin- and oviduct fluid-treated sperm (P < 0.01). We conclude that heparin or oviduct fluid induced changes on the sperm plasma membrane during capacitation. Binding sites for WGA on sperm were either structurally altered or lost during capacitation. PMID:9052948

  16. Occurrence of immune cells in the intestinal wall of Squalius cephalus infected with Pomphorhynchus laevis.

    PubMed

    Dezfuli, Bahram S; Manera, Maurizio; Giari, Luisa; DePasquale, Joseph A; Bosi, Giampaolo

    2015-11-01

    A sub-population of 34 specimens of chub, Squalius cephalus, was sampled from the River Brenta (Northern Italy) and examined for ecto- and endo-parasites. Pomphorhynchus laevis (Acanthocephala) was the only enteric helminth encountered. Immunofluorescence and ultrastructural studies were conducted on the intestines of chub. Near the site of parasite's attachment, mucous cells, mast cells (MCs), neutrophils and rodlet cells (RCs) were found to co-occur within the intestinal epithelium. The numbers of mucous cells, MCs and neutrophils were significantly higher in infected fish (Mann-Whitney U test, p < 0.05). Dual immunofluorescence staining with the lectin Dolichos Biflorus Agglutinin (DBA) and the macrophage-specific MAC387 monoclonal antibody, with parallel transmission electron microscopy, revealed that epithelial MCs often made intimate contact with the mucous cells. Degranulation of a large number of MCs around the site of the acanthocephalan's attachment and in proximity to mucous cells was also documented. MCs and neutrophils were abundant in the submucosa. Immune cells of the intestinal epithelium have been described at the ultrastructural level and their possible functions and interactions are discussed.

  17. Innervation of propatagial musculature in a flying squirrel, Glaucomys volans (Rodentia, Sciuridae).

    PubMed

    Chickering, J G; Sokoloff, A J

    1996-01-01

    The propatagium of gliding and flying mammals is of both functional and phylogenetic interest. The innervation of the propatagial muscle, platysma II, was studied with the axonal tracer wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) in a flying squirrel, Glaucomys volans. Injections of WGA-HRP into the proximal third of platysma II labeled motoneurons in the lateral part of the medial subdivision of the ipsilateral facial nucleus and in the ipsilateral ventral horn of the brachial enlargement. Injections into distal regions of platysma II labeled motoneurons in the ipsilateral ventral horn of spinal segments C5-C8 but not in the facial nucleus. Injections along the whole length of the muscle labeled afferent axons in the ipsilateral dorsal horn of spinal segments C4-T1. These results demonstrate a mixed facial and spinal motor innervation of propatagial musculature in the flying squirrel and indicate that this pattern of mixed innervation is more widespread among flying and gliding mammals than previously reported. Mixed facial and cervical propatagial innervation, independently derived in different flying and gliding mammals, may represent a common solution in the design of the propatagium. These findings complicate the use of propatagial muscle innervation patterns for the establishment of phylogenetic relationships among flying and gliding mammals. PMID:8834780

  18. Immunity to experimental fowl typhoid in chickens induced by a virulence plasmid-cured derivative of Salmonella gallinarum.

    PubMed Central

    Barrow, P A

    1990-01-01

    Chickens were immunized by two intramuscular inoculations at 1 and 14 days of age with virulence plasmid-cured derivatives of Salmonella gallinarum and were challenged 14 days later by oral inoculation of ca. 50 50% lethal doses (LD50) of fully virulent S. gallinarum 9. Mortality in the nonimmunized and immunized groups were 36 and 3%, respectively. This difference was highly significant (P less than 0.01). A significant reduction in mortality was also produced following oral challenge with 5,000 LD50 doses. The LD50 values by intramuscular inoculation of the challenge organism into nonimmunized and immunized chickens were log10 (0.13 +/- 1.57) and (9.74 +/- 2.72), respectively. Immunization was effective whether chickens were immunized at 1 and 14 days of age or at 21 and 35 days of age. Serum agglutinins were present in immunized chickens. Immunization with plasmid-cured Salmonella pullorum gave less protection, and immunization with Escherichia coli K-12 possessing the virulence plasmid of S. gallinarum gave none. The plasmid-cured S. gallinarum was made both rough by virulent bacteriophage activity and nalidixic acid resistant (Nalr) to produce a strain designated 9VP-phi rNalr. It was compared with a Nalr mutant of the rough 9R vaccine strain designated 9 Nalr for virulence and immunogenicity. 9VP-phi rNalr was slightly less protective and less virulent than was the 9R vaccine strain. PMID:2194968

  19. Isolation, proliferation, and induction of Bama mini-pig spermatogonial stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H M; Yang, H; Luo, F H; Li, M X; Zhang, S; Yang, X G; Lu, Y Q; Lu, S S; Wu, Y J; Lu, K H

    2016-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), the unique seed cells of testes, can undergo meiosis and form spermatozoa, thus transmitting genetic information to offspring. Research concerning these cells explores the mechanism underlying spermatogenesis, making possible the induction of their differentiation into spermatozoa in vitro. SSCs have therefore attracted much interest among scientists. Although the proliferation of such cells in vitro has been demonstrated, we are unaware of any long-term laboratory culture of porcine SSCs. The objective of this study was to isolate, characterize, culture, and induce the differentiation of Bama mini-pig SSCs. SSCs were isolated using differential plating and cultured for over 100 days on an STO feeder cell layer without serum. Cell clusters appeared after three passages and continuously formed during subsequent cultivation. Staining showed that these clusters were positive for UCHL1 and CDH1, could be bound by Dolichos biflorus agglutinin, and that some cells expressed OCT4. Ultrastructure observations revealed SSCs in testis tissue to be round in shape, while those cultured in vitro were flat and bound together. Our attempts at inducing differentiation showed that SSCs cultured in vitro could undergo meiosis. In this study, we describe an effective culture system for Bama mini-pig SSCs capable of producing enough cells to establish a platform for further SSC research, such as genetic manipulation or exploration of the mechanism underlying spermatogenesis. PMID:27525927

  20. Identification of bovine embryos cultured in groups by attachment of barcodes to the zona pellucida.

    PubMed

    Novo, Sergi; Morató, Roser; Penon, Oriol; Duran, Sara; Barrios, Leonardo; Nogués, Carme; Plaza, José Antonio; Pérez-García, Luisa; Mogas, Teresa; Ibáñez, Elena

    2014-06-01

    The low number of oocytes collected from unstimulated donors by ovum pick-up means that embryos produced from each individual female have to be cultured individually or in very small groups. However, it has been demonstrated that single-embryo culture is less efficient than embryo culture in groups. To overcome this limitation, we developed a direct embryo-tagging system, which allows the collective culture of embryos from different origins whilst preserving their pedigree. Presumptive bovine zygotes were tagged with eight wheat-germ agglutinin biofunctionalised polysilicon barcodes attached to the outer surface of the zona pellucida (ZP). Four different barcodes were used to encode groups of 20-25 embryos, which were then cultured in the same drop. Cleavage, Day-7 and Day-8 blastocysts and barcode retention rates were assessed. In addition, Day-7 blastocysts were vitrified and warmed. Barcode attachment to the ZP of bovine embryos affected neither in vitro embryo development nor post-warming survival of the tagged embryos. All the embryos maintained barcodes attached until Day 8 of culture (3.63±0.37 barcodes per embryo) and could be identified. In conclusion, identification of embryos by barcodes attached to the ZP is feasible and will allow the culture of embryos from different donors in the same drop. PMID:24942183

  1. A simple method for comparing fungal biomass in infected plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Ayliffe, Michael; Periyannan, Sambasivam K; Feechan, Angela; Dry, Ian; Schumann, Ulrike; Wang, Ming-Bo; Pryor, Anthony; Lagudah, Evans

    2013-06-01

    Plant phenotypes resistant and susceptible to fungal pathogens are usually scored using qualitative, subjective methods that are based upon disease symptoms or by an estimation of the amount of visible fungal growth. Given that plant resistance genes often confer partial resistance to fungal pathogens, a simple, sensitive, nonsubjective quantitative method for measuring pathogen growth would be highly advantageous. This report describes an in planta quantitative assay for fungal biomass based upon detection of chitin using wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to a fluorophore. Using this assay, the growth of wheat rust pathogens on wheat was assayed and the additivity of several adult plant and seedling resistance genes to Puccinia striiformis, P. graminis, and P. triticina was assayed on both glasshouse- and field-grown material. The assay can discriminate between individual rust pustules on a leaf segment or, alternatively, compare fungal growth on field plots. The quantification of Erysiphe necator (powdery mildew) growth on Vitis vinifera (grapevine) is also demonstrated, with resistant and susceptible cultivars readily distinguished. Given that chitin is a major cell wall component of many plant fungal pathogens, this robust assay will enable simple and accurate measurement of biomass accumulation in many plant-fungus interactions.

  2. The subrhinal paleocortex in the hedgehog tenrec: a multiarchitectonic characterization and an analysis of its connections with the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Künzle, H; Radtke-Schuller, S

    2000-12-01

    In the Madagascan hedgehog tenrec, Echinops telfairi, the entire paleocortical region (PCx) subjacent to the rhinal indentation is composed of three layers and occupies up to two thirds of the lateral hemisphere. A clear differentiation of PCx into its presumed constituents, the piriform cortex and the entorhinal cortex, as seen in other mammals, has not been obtained so far. To gain insight into location and intrinsic organization of these areas in a basal placental mammal we investigated the tenrec's PCx using cyto-, myelo- and chemoarchitectural criteria (zinc, acetylcholinesterase, NADPh-diaphorase, Wisteria floribunda agglutinin, parvalbumin, calbindin, calretinin) and analysed its connections with the olfactory bulb. The layers 2 and 3 of the tenrec's PCx differed from the corresponding layers in the rat. The layer 2 showed a complex distribution of corticobulbar cells but could not be subdivided, in contrast to layer 3. Additional cell groups in the depth of PCx were tentatively compared with subdivisions of the endopiriform region. The architectural and connectional features varied clearly along the rostrocaudal and dorso-ventral extents of PCx and gave hints for the presence of different paleocortical subdivisions. With the possible exception of an area located at the most caudal tip of the dorsomedial hemisphere, however, no conclusive evidence was obtained for the presence of a multilayered, entorhinal region. The bulbar projections to the PCx were very extensive and almost exclusively ipsilateral. The laterality of the projection is similar to that in higher mammals, but differs from that in the erinaceous hedgehog.

  3. Parabrachio-cortical connections with the lateral hemisphere in the madagascan hedgehog tenrec: prominent projections to layer 1, weak projections from layer 6.

    PubMed

    Künzle, Heinz; Radtke-Schuller, Susanne; von Stebut, Boris

    2002-03-15

    The present study was undertaken to further characterize and subdivide the rhinal cortex (insular and perirhinal areas) in the hedgehog tenrec (Echinops telfairi), a placental mammal with a rather low encephalisation index. Injections of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase into the dorsolateral pontine tegmentum revealed a prominent layer 1 projection to several rhinal target areas, while the rhinal cortex only stained weakly for the calcitonin gene-related peptide. Among the regions retrogradely labeled following tracer injections into the rhinal cortex, the parabrachial nucleus was considered the main origin of the tegmento-cortical projection. This conclusion was based on the circumscribed pattern of termination, as well as the differences noted between the pattern of anterograde labeling and the pattern obtained by thyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry. The tracer injections into the dorsolateral tegmentum also revealed numerous retrogradely labeled cells in the layer 5 of the dorsomedial frontal cortex. In contrast, the rhinal cortex only showed few labeled cells and most of these cells were located in the layer 6/7. A comparison with other species indicates that the tenrec's parabrachial nucleus gives rise to the most extensive cortical projections but receives the least prominent input from the lateral cerebral hemisphere. The layer 6/7 projection may be a common mammalian feature but it is overshadowed by the layer 5 projection in higher mammals.

  4. Tenascin-R promotes assembly of the extracellular matrix of perineuronal nets via clustering of aggrecan

    PubMed Central

    Morawski, Markus; Dityatev, Alexander; Hartlage-Rübsamen, Maike; Blosa, Maren; Holzer, Max; Flach, Katharina; Pavlica, Sanja; Dityateva, Galina; Grosche, Jens; Brückner, Gert; Schachner, Melitta

    2014-01-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNs) in the brains of tenascin-R-deficient (tn-r−/−) mice develop in temporal concordance with those of wild-type (tn-r+/+) mice. However, the histological appearance of PNs is abnormal in adult tn-r−/− mice. Here, we investigated whether similar defects are also seen in dissociated and organotypic cultures from hippocampus and forebrain of tn-r−/− mice and whether the structure of PNs could be normalized. In tn-r−/− cultures, accumulations of several extracellular matrix molecules were mostly associated with somata, whereas dendrites were sparsely covered, compared with tn-r+/+ mice. Experiments to normalize the structure of PNs in tn-r−/− organotypic slice cultures by depolarization of neurons, or by co-culturing tn-r+/+ and tn-r−/− brain slices failed to restore a normal PN phenotype. However, formation of dendritic PNs in cultures was improved by the application of tenascin-R protein and rescued by polyclonal antibodies to aggrecan and a bivalent, but not monovalent form of the lectin Wisteria floribunda agglutinin. These results show that tenascin-R and aggrecan are decisive contributors to formation and stabilization of PNs and that tenascin-R may implement these functions by clustering of aggrecan. Proposed approaches for restoration of normal PN structure are noteworthy in the context of PN abnormalities in neurological disorders, such as epilepsy, schizophrenia and addiction. PMID:25225104

  5. Distribution of cortical neurons projecting to dorsal column nuclear complex and spinal cord in the hedgehog tenrec, Echinops telfairi.

    PubMed

    Künzle, H; Rehkämper, G

    1992-01-01

    Using retrograde axonal flow and wheatgerm agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase, we studied the distribution of cortical neurons giving rise to spinal and dorsal column nuclear projections, and correlated the regions involved in the projections with the cytoarchitectonic areas recently identified in the lesser hedgehog tenrec, Echinops telfairi (Insectivora). Labeled cortical neurons were most numerous following injections of tracer into higher cervical segments, whereas almost none were found following thoracic injections. The cortical labeling appeared more prominent ipsilaterally than contralaterally after spinal injections, although it was more prominent on the contralateral side after injection into the dorsal column nuclear complex. The majority of labeled neurons found in lamina V occupied the neocortex adjacent to the interhemispheric fissure along the rostrocaudal extent of the small corpus callosum. This location corresponded to an intermediate rostrocaudal portion of the hemisphere, and particularly to area 2 of Rehkämper. In some cases, adjacent portions of areas 1 and 3 were also involved, as well as neocortical regions of the lateral hemisphere. The present data did not suggest a somatotopic organization of the projections; likewise, evidence for the presence of more than one somatosensorimotor representation was sparse.

  6. Ultrastructure of the host-pathogen interface in daylily leaves infected by the rust fungus Puccinia hemerocallidis.

    PubMed

    Mims, C W; Rodriguez-Lother, C; Richardson, E A

    2002-05-01

    Transmission electron microscopy was used to examine details of the host-pathogen interface in daylily leaf cells infected by the rust fungus Puccinia hemerocallidis. Samples were prepared for study by high-pressure freezing followed by freeze substitution. The outstanding preservation of ultrastructural details afforded by this fixation protocol greatly facilitated the study of this host-pathogen interface. The extrahaustorial membrane that separated each dikaryotic haustorium from the cytoplasm of its host cell was especially well preserved and appeared almost completely smooth in profile. Large aggregations of tubular cytoplasmic elements were present near haustoria in infected host cells. Many of these tubular elements were found to be continuous with the extrahaustorial membrane and conspicuous electron-dense deposits present in the extrahaustorial matrix extended into these elements. The use of gold-conjugated wheat germ agglutinin for labeling of chitin revealed that these deposits were not part of the haustorial wall. Portions of many of the tubular elements associated with haustoria were conspicuously beaded in appearance. Some tubular elements were found to be continuous with flattened cisternae that in turn bore short beaded chains. Distinctive tubular-vesicular complexes previously reported only in cryofixed rust haustoria also were found in the haustoria of P. hemerocallidis. PMID:12099222

  7. In vitro induction of Entamoeba histolytica cyst-like structures from trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Díaz, Hugo; Díaz-Gallardo, Martha; Laclette, Juan P; Carrero, Julio C

    2010-02-16

    Inhibition of encystment can be conceived as a potentially useful mechanism to block the transmission of Entamoeba histolytica under natural conditions. Unfortunately, amoeba encystment has not been achieved in vitro and drugs inhibiting the formation of cysts are not available. Luminal conditions inducing encystment in vivo are also unknown, but cellular stress such as exposure to reactive oxygen species from immune cells or intestinal microbiota could be involved. A role for certain divalent cations as cofactors of enzymes involved in excystment has also been described. In this study, we show that trophozoite cultures, treated with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of trace amounts of several cations, transform into small-sized spherical and refringent structures that exhibit resistance to different detergents. Ultrastructural analysis under scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed multinucleated structures (some with four nuclei) with smooth, thick membranes and multiple vacuoles. Staining with calcofluor white, as well as an ELISA binding assay using wheat germ agglutinin, demonstrated the presence of polymers of N-acetylglucosamine (chitin), which is the primary component of the natural cyst walls. Over-expression of glucosamine 6-phosphate isomerase, likely to be the rate-limiting enzyme in the chitin synthesis pathway, was also confirmed by RT-PCR. These results suggest that E. histolytica trophozoites activated encystment pathways when exposed to our treatment.

  8. Agrobacterium VirE2 protein mediates nuclear uptake of single-stranded DNA in plant cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zupan, J R; Citovsky, V; Zambryski, P

    1996-01-01

    Agrobacterium genetically transforms plant cells by transferring a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) copy of the transferred DNA (T-DNA) element, the T-strand, in a complex with Agrobacterium proteins VirD2, bound to the 5' end, and VirE2. VirE2 binds single-stranded nucleic acid cooperatively, fully coating the T-strand, and the protein localizes to the plant cell nucleus when transiently expressed. The coupling of ssDNA binding and nuclear localizing activities suggests that VirE2 alone could mediate nuclear localization of ssDNA. In this study, fluorescently labeled ssDNA accumulated in the plant cell nucleus specifically when microinjected as a complex with VirE2. Microinjected ssDNA alone remained cytoplasmic. Import of VirE2-ssDNA complex into the nucleus via a protein import pathway was supported by (i) the inhibition of VirE2-ssDNA complex import in the presence of wheat germ agglutinin or a nonhydrolyzable GTP analog, both known inhibitors of protein nuclear import, and (ii) the retardation of import when complexes were prepared from a VirE2 mutant impaired in ssDNA binding and nuclear import. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8637884

  9. Glycosylation patterns are sexually dimorphic throughout development of the olfactory system in Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Nicholas J; Hildebrand, John G; Tolbert, Leslie P

    2004-08-01

    In the moth Manduca sexta, development of the adult olfactory system depends on complex interactions between olfactory receptor neurons in the antenna, antennal-lobe neurons in the brain, and several classes of glial cells. As one approach to characterizing molecules that may play roles in these interactions, we used lectins to screen antennae and antennal lobes at different stages of adult development. We find that each of the major neural cell types has a distinct pattern of labeling by lectins. Effects of enzymatic and other treatments on lectin labeling lead us to conclude that the predominant lectin ligands are: glycosphingolipids and an O-linked, fucose-containing glycoprotein on axons of olfactory receptor neurons, O-linked glycoproteins on antennal-lobe neurons, and N-linked glycoproteins on all classes of glial cells in the primary olfactory pathway. Wheat germ agglutinin labels all olfactory axons uniformly during much of development, but labeling becomes restricted to the pheromone-responsive olfactory receptor neurons in the adult male. Succinylated WGA reveals differences in these axon classes earlier, as glomerului develop from protoglomeruli. The adult female displays a less pronounced difference in labeling of axons targeting ordinary and sexually dimorphic glomeruli. Differences in labeling of receptor axons targeted to ordinary and sexually dimorphic glomeruli may be correlated with differences in function or connectivity in different regions of the antennal lobe.

  10. Gold nanostars: surfactant-free synthesis, 3D modelling, and two-photon photoluminescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Khoury, Christopher G; Hwang, Hanjun; Wilson, Christy M; Grant, Gerald A; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the control of the optical and plasmonic properties of unique nanosystems—gold nanostars—both experimentally and theoretically permits superior design and fabrication for biomedical applications. Here, we present a new, surfactant-free synthesis method of biocompatible gold nanostars with adjustable geometry such that the plasmon band can be tuned into the near-infrared region ‘tissue diagnostic window’, which is most suitable for in vivo imaging. Theoretical modelling was performed for multiple-branched 3D nanostars and yielded absorption spectra in good agreement with experimental results. The plasmon band shift was attributed to variations in branch aspect ratio, and the plasmon band intensifies with increasing branch number, branch length, and overall star size. Nanostars showed an extremely strong two-photon photoluminescence (TPL) process. The TPL imaging of wheat-germ agglutinin (WGA) functionalized nanostars on BT549 breast cancer cells and of PEGylated nanostars circulating in the vasculature, examined through a dorsal window chamber in vivo in laboratory mouse studies, demonstrated that gold nanostars can serve as an efficient contrast agent for biological imaging applications. PMID:22260928

  11. Oviduct fluid and heparin induce similar surface changes in bovine sperm during capacitation: a flow cytometric study using lectins.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, A I; Parrish, J J

    1996-04-01

    Eight different lectins conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) were used to screen for sperm plasma membrane changes during in vitro capacitation of bovine sperm. Analysis of lectin binding to sperm was done using flow cytometry. Of the eight lectins, only Triticum vulgaris (wheat germ agglutinin, WGA) binding to sperm was altered with capacitation. Capacitation of bovine sperm by heparin was found to decrease WGA binding to sperm by 78% (P < 0.05). The effect of capacitation by oviduct fluid was next compared with capacitation by heparin for changes in WGA binding to sperm. The effect of inhibiting capacitation with glucose on WGA binding was also determined. WGA-bound sperm were detected by flow cytometry as being present in two fluorescence peaks defined as low fluorescence (A) or high fluorescence (B) intensity. The percentage of sperm in peak A was greater for heparin and oviduct fluid-treated sperm compared to sperm incubated under noncapacitating conditions in only culture medium (P < 0.001). Capacitation with either heparin or oviduct fluid was inhibited by glucose as assessed by the ability of lysophosphatidylcholine (100 micrograms/ml) to induce acrosome reactions. Glucose also reduced the percentage of sperm in peak A for both heparin- and oviduct fluid-treated sperm (P < 0.01). We conclude that heparin or oviduct fluid induced changes on the sperm plasma membrane during capacitation. Binding sites for WGA on sperm were either structurally altered or lost during capacitation.

  12. Electrochemical Impedance Immunosensor Based on Self-Assembled Monolayers for Rapid Detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 with Signal Amplification Using Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhanming; Fu, Yingchun; Fang, Weihuan; Li, Yanbin

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a predominant foodborne pathogen with severe pathogenicity, leading to increasing attention given to rapid and sensitive detection. Herein, we propose an impedance biosensor using new kinds of screen-printed interdigitated microelectrodes (SPIMs) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) for signal amplification to detect E. coli O157:H7 with high sensitivity and time-efficiency. The SPIMs integrate the high sensitivity and short response time of the interdigitated electrodes and the low cost of the screen-printed electrodes. Self-assembling of bi-functional 3-dithiobis-(sulfosuccinimidyl-propionate) (DTSP) on the SPIMs was investigated and was proved to be able to improve adsorption quantity and stability of biomaterials. WGA was further adopted to enhance the signal taking advantage of the abundant lectin-binding sites on the bacteria surface. The immunosensor exhibited a detection limit of 102 cfu·mL−1, with a linear detection range from 102 to 107 cfu·mL−1 (r2 = 0.98). The total detection time was less than 1 h, showing its comparable sensitivity and rapid response. Furthermore, the low cost of one SPIM significantly reduced the detection cost of the biosensor. The biosensor may have great promise in food safety analysis and lead to a portable biosensing system for routine monitoring of foodborne pathogens. PMID:26251911

  13. An International Proficiency Test to Detect, Identify and Quantify Ricin in Complex Matrices.

    PubMed

    Worbs, Sylvia; Skiba, Martin; Bender, Jennifer; Zeleny, Reinhard; Schimmel, Heinz; Luginbühl, Werner; Dorner, Brigitte G

    2015-11-26

    While natural intoxications with seeds of Ricinus communis (R. communis) have long been known, the toxic protein ricin contained in the seeds is of major concern since it attracts attention of those intending criminal, terroristic and military misuse. In order to harmonize detection capabilities in expert laboratories, an international proficiency test was organized that aimed at identifying good analytical practices (qualitative measurements) and determining a consensus concentration on a highly pure ricin reference material (quantitative measurements). Sample materials included highly pure ricin as well as the related R. communis agglutinin (RCA120) spiked into buffer, milk and meat extract; additionally, an organic fertilizer naturally contaminated with R. communis shred was investigated in the proficiency test. The qualitative results showed that either a suitable combination of immunological, mass spectrometry (MS)-based and functional approaches or sophisticated MS-based approaches alone successfully allowed the detection and identification of ricin in all samples. In terms of quantification, it was possible to determine a consensus concentration of the highly pure ricin reference material. The results provide a basis for further steps in quality assurance and improve biopreparedness in expert laboratories worldwide.

  14. Ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensor based on graphite oxide, Prussian blue, and PTC-NH2 for the detection of α2,6-sialylated glycans in human serum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liuliu; He, Junlin; Xu, Wailan; Zhang, Jing; Hui, Junmin; Guo, Yanlei; Li, Wenjuan; Yu, Chao

    2014-12-15

    α2,6-Sialylated glycans are crucial molecular targets for cancer diagnosis and clinical research. In this work, a novel ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensor was fabricated based on a graphite oxide (GO), Prussian blue (PB), and PTC-NH2 (an ammonolysis product of 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride) nanocomposite for the selective detection of α2,6-sialylated glycans. To increase the sensitivity of the electrochemical biosensor, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were immobilized on a GO-PB-PTC-NH2 modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). Sambucus nigra agglutinins (SNAs), which specifically bind with α2,6-sialylated glycans, were covalently immobilized on GNPs for the sensitive detection of α2,6-sialylated glycans in serum. This proposed method can be applied to human serum, and it worked well over a broad linear range (0.1 pg mL(-1)-500 ng mL(-1)) with detection limits of 0.03 pg mL(-1). Moreover, recovery of the spiked samples ranged from 100.2% to 105.0%, suggesting that this excellent electrochemical biosensor can be used for the practical detection of α2,6-sialylated glycans.

  15. [An autopsy case of malignant histiocytosis-like disorder following hypersensitive reaction to mosquito bite].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, S; Baba, K; Koide, O; Nakayama, K

    1989-03-01

    An autopsy case of an 18-year-old Japanese girl with a malignant histiocytosis-like disorder that developed during the course of a hypersensitive reaction to mosquito bite is reported. Episodes of hypersensitive reactions to mosquito bite had been repeated since she was 12 years old and at the age of 18 years she died of acute respiratory failure only 11 days after a mosquito bite. On autopsy, the dermal reaction to the last mosquito bite had already calmed down, and 'poorly differentiated histiocytes', which were presumed from their histochemical characteristics, had remarkably infiltrated into multiple organs, appearing like leukemic infiltration. Only a small number of them were noted in the lymph nodes and the bone marrow. The results of histochemical examination of 'poorly differentiated histiocytes' was as follows: (1) Neither markers for granulocytes (peroxidase and naphthyl AS-D Cl esterase) nor markers for lymphocytes and plasma cells (leukocyte common antigen and immunoglobulins) were detected. (2) Some markers for histiocytes (peanut lectin agglutinin and lysozyme) were positive in some of the proliferated cells. (3) A marker for T-zone histiocyte (s-100 protein) was negative. These results suggested that the proliferated cells included cells of the monocyte-macrophage system. These cells morphologically showed no phagocytic activity and were suggested to be immature histiocytes. Jurco et al. reported (poorly differentiated) malignant histiocytosis consisting of immature histiocytes without phagocytic activity, by using histochemical methods.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Recommended Mass Spectrometry-Based Strategies to Identify Ricin-Containing Samples

    PubMed Central

    Kalb, Suzanne R.; Schieltz, David M.; Becher, François; Astot, Crister; Fredriksson, Sten-Åke; Barr, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Ricin is a protein toxin produced by the castor bean plant (Ricinus communis) together with a related protein known as R. communis agglutinin (RCA120). Mass spectrometric (MS) assays have the capacity to unambiguously identify ricin and to detect ricin’s activity in samples with complex matrices. These qualitative and quantitative assays enable detection and differentiation of ricin from the less toxic RCA120 through determination of the amino acid sequence of the protein in question, and active ricin can be monitored by MS as the release of adenine from the depurination of a nucleic acid substrate. In this work, we describe the application of MS-based methods to detect, differentiate and quantify ricin and RCA120 in nine blinded samples supplied as part of the EQuATox proficiency test. Overall, MS-based assays successfully identified all samples containing ricin or RCA120 with the exception of the sample spiked with the lowest concentration (0.414 ng/mL). In fact, mass spectrometry was the most successful method for differentiation of ricin and RCA120 based on amino acid determination. Mass spectrometric methods were also successful at ranking the functional activities of the samples, successfully yielding semi-quantitative results. These results indicate that MS-based assays are excellent techniques to detect, differentiate, and quantify ricin and RCA120 in complex matrices. PMID:26610568

  17. Complement inhibitors to treat IgM-mediated autoimmune hemolysis

    PubMed Central

    Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Complement activation in autoimmune hemolytic anemia may exacerbate extravascular hemolysis and may occasionally result in intravascular hemolysis. IgM autoantibodies as characteristically found in cold autoantibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia, in cold agglutinin disease but also in a considerable percentage of patients with warm autoantibodies are very likely to activate complement in vivo. Therapy of IgM-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia mainly aims to decrease autoantibody production. However, most of these treatments require time to become effective and will not stop immediate ongoing complement-mediated hemolysis nor prevent hemolysis of transfused red blood cells. Therefore pharmacological inhibition of the complement system might be a suitable approach to halt or at least attenuate ongoing hemolysis and improve the recovery of red blood cell transfusion in autoimmune hemolytic anemia. In recent years, several complement inhibitors have become available in the clinic, some of them with proven efficacy in autoimmune hemolytic anemia. In the present review, we give a short introduction on the pathogenesis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia, followed by an overview on the complement system with a special focus on its regulation. Finally, we will discuss complement inhibitors with regard to their potential efficacy to halt or attenuate hemolysis in complement-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia. PMID:26521297

  18. Purification and characterization of a novel beta-D-galactosides-specific lectin from Clitoria ternatea.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Aabgeena; Haque, Shabirul; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2007-09-01

    A lectin present in seeds of Clitoria ternatea agglutinated trypsin-treated human B erythrocytes. The sugar specificity assay indicated that lectin belongs to Gal/Gal NAc-specific group. Hence the lectin, designated C. ternatea agglutinin (CTA), was purified by the combination of acetic acid precipitation, salt fractionation and affinity chromatography. HPLC gel filtration, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry indicated that the native lectin is composed of two identical subunits of molecular weight 34.7 kDa associated by non covalent bonds. The N-terminal sequence of CTA shared homology with Glycine max and Pisum sativum. Complete sequence was also found to be homologous to S-64 protein of Glycine max, suggesting that CTA probably exhibits both hemagglutination and probably sugar uptake activity. The carbohydrate binding specificity of the lectin was investigated by quantitative turbidity measurements, and percent inhibition assays. Based on these assays, we conclude that CTA binds beta-D: -galactosides, and also may has an extended specificity towards non-reducing terminal Neu5Acalpha2,6Gal. PMID:17514413

  19. Predominant binding of Theiler's viruses to a 34-kilodalton receptor protein on susceptible cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Kilpatrick, D R; Lipton, H L

    1991-01-01

    Western immunoblots of BHK-21 cell lysates probed with the highly virulent GDVII and the less virulent BeAn strains of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) revealed predominant binding to a 34-kDa membrane protein and much lower levels of binding to 100- and 18-kDa membrane proteins. Complete inhibition of virus binding to both the 34- and 18-kDa membrane species by excess unlabeled TMEV demonstrated specificity of binding. Virus binding was also blocked by wheat germ agglutinin, which specifically binds to sialic acid residues and blocks TMEV binding to whole BHK-21 cells. Radiolabeled TMEV also bound to 100-, 34-, and 18-kDa membrane proteins expressed on other TMEV permissive cell lines but not on the nonpermissive cell lines tested. These data suggest that a 34-kDa cellular protein may be the primary determinant of susceptibility to TMEV infection by mediating the binding of GDVII and BeAn viruses to susceptible cells. Images PMID:1895381

  20. Association of nerve growth factor receptors with the triton X-100 cytoskeleton of PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vale, R.D.; Ignatius, M.J.; Shooter, E.M.

    1985-10-01

    Triton X-100 solubilizes membranes of PC12 cells and leaves behind a nucleus and an array of cytoskeletal filaments. Nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors are associated with this Triton X-100-insoluble residue. Two classes of NGF receptors are found on PC12 cells which display rapid and slow dissociating kinetics. Although rapidly dissociating binding is predominant (greater than 75%) in intact cells, the majority of binding to the Triton X-100 cytoskeleton is slowly dissociating (greater than 75%). Rapidly dissociating NGF binding on intact cells can be converted to a slowly dissociating form by the plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). This lectin also increases the number of receptors which associate with the Triton X-100 cytoskeleton by more than 10-fold. SVI-NGF bound to receptors can be visualized by light microscopy autoradiography in Triton X-100-insoluble residues of cell bodies, as well as growth cones and neurites. The WGA-induced association with the cytoskeleton, however, is not specific for the NGF receptor. Concentrations of WGA which change the Triton X-100 solubility of membrane glycoproteins are similar to those required to alter the kinetic state of the NGF receptor. Both events may be related to the crossbridging of cell surface proteins induced by this multivalent lectin.

  1. Epidermal growth factor receptors on PC12 cells: alteration of binding properties by lectins

    SciTech Connect

    Vale, R.D.; Shooter, E.M.

    1983-01-01

    The PC12 cell line displays cell surface receptors for both nerve growth factor (NGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). It has been previously shown that the lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) alters the properties of NGF receptors on these cells. We now report that preincubations with either WGA or concanavalin A (Con A) decrease the binding of /sup 125/I-EGF to PC12 cells by greater than 50%. The inhibition of binding occurred at 37 degrees C and 4 degrees C and could be blocked or reversed by the addition of sugars which bind specifically to WGA or Con A. Scatchard analysis revealed that these lectins decreased binding primarily by lowering the affinity of the receptor and to a lesser extent by decreasing receptor number. Succinylation of Con A (sCon A) produced a derivative that was less effective than the native lectin in decreasing EGF binding; however, addition of an antibody against Con A restored the ability of sCon A to decrease binding. Similar to results obtained with /sup 125/I-NGF binding, WGA but not Con A was found to increase, by severalfold, the proportion of /sup 125/I-EGF binding that is resistant to solubilization by Triton X-100 detergent. A potential association of the EGF receptor with cytoskeletal elements is discussed which could account for such results.

  2. Purification and subunit structure of a putative K sup + -channel protein identified by its binding properties for dendrotoxin I

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, H.; Lazdunski, M. )

    1988-07-01

    The binding protein for the K{sup +}-channel toxin dendrotoxin I was purified from a detergent extract of rat brain membranes. The purification procedure utilized chromatography on DEAE-Trisacryl, affinity chromatography on a dendrotoxin-I-Aca 22 column, and wheat germ agglutinin-Affigel 10 with a final 3,800- to 4,600-fold enrichment and a recovery of 8-16%. The high affinity (K{sub d}, 40-100 pM) and specificity of the binding site are retained throughout the purification procedure. Analysis of the purified material on silver-stained NaDodSO{sub 4}/polyacrylamide gel revealed three bands of M{sub r} 76,000-80,000, 38,000 and 35,000. Interestingly, the binding site for {sup 125}I-labeled mast cell degranulating peptide, another putative K{sup +}-channel ligand from bee venom, which induces long-term potentiation in hippocampus, seems to reside on the same protein complex, as both binding sites copurify through the entire purification protocol.

  3. Estradiol Facilitates Functional Integration of iPSC-Derived Dopaminergic Neurons into Striatal Neuronal Circuits via Activation of Integrin α5β1.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kaneyasu; Doi, Daisuke; Samata, Bumpei; Murayama, Shigeo; Tahara, Tsuyoshi; Onoe, Hirotaka; Takahashi, Jun

    2016-04-12

    For cell transplantation therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD) to be realized, the grafted neurons should be integrated into the host neuronal circuit to restore the lost neuronal function. Here, using wheat-germ agglutinin-based transsynaptic tracing, we show that integrin α5 is selectively expressed in striatal neurons that are innervated by midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons. In addition, we found that integrin α5β1 was activated by the administration of estradiol-2-benzoate (E2B) in striatal neurons of adult female rats. Importantly, we observed that the systemic administration of E2B into hemi-parkinsonian rat models facilitates the functional integration of grafted DA neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells into the host striatal neuronal circuit via the activation of integrin α5β1. Finally, methamphetamine-induced abnormal rotation was recovered earlier in E2B-administered rats than in rats that received other regimens. Our results suggest that the simultaneous administration of E2B with stem cell-derived DA progenitors can enhance the efficacy of cell transplantation therapy for PD. PMID:26997644

  4. Rocky mountain spotted fever in Connecticut: human cases, spotted-fever group rickettsiae in ticks, and antibodies in mammals.

    PubMed

    Magnarelli, L A; Anderson, J F; Burgdorfer, W

    1979-08-01

    Three parameters were used in 1976 and 1977 to assess the status of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) in Connecticut--compilation and review of clinical data on suspected human cases for the 13-year period 1965--1977, examination of tick tissues for spotted fever-group rickettsiae by the hemolymph test and direct immunofluorescence, and analyses of mammalian sera for antibodies against Rickettsia rickettsii. There were six presumptive RMSF cases which probably originated in Connecticut. Four of these cases occurred in areas where the American dog tick, Dermacentor variabilis, abounds. A total of 2994 ticks were examined by the hemolymph test. Rickettsia-like organisms were observed in 67 (2.9%) of 2330 D. variabilis and two (0.6%) of 351 Ixodes sp. near scapularis. Fewer than one-half of these organisms stained positively with spotted fever-group conjugate. Microagglutination tests on 1093 mammalian sera indicated that eight (16%) of 49 raccoons, 14 (2.6%) of 549 white-tailed deer, eight (1.7%) of 470 white-footed mice, and one of two gray squirrels had agglutinins in titers greater than or equal to 1:8 against R. rickettsii. Spotted fever-group rickettsiae are present at low frequency in inland as well as coastal regions of Connecticut. PMID:111543

  5. Disrupting the Transmission of a Vector-Borne Plant Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Rashed, Arash; Almeida, Rodrigo P. P.

    2012-01-01

    Approaches to control vector-borne diseases rarely focus on the interface between vector and microbial pathogen, but strategies aimed at disrupting the interactions required for transmission may lead to reductions in disease spread. We tested if the vector transmission of the plant-pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa was affected by three groups of molecules: lectins, carbohydrates, and antibodies. Although not comprehensively characterized, it is known that X. fastidiosa adhesins bind to carbohydrates, and that these interactions are important for initial cell attachment to vectors, which is required for bacterial transmission from host to host. Lectins with affinity to substrates expected to occur on the cuticular surface of vectors colonized by X. fastidiosa, such as wheat germ agglutinin, resulted in statistically significant reductions in transmission rate, as did carbohydrates with N-acetylglucosamine residues. Presumably, lectins bound to receptors on the vector required for cell adhesion/colonization, while carbohydrate-saturated adhesins on X. fastidiosa's cell surface. Furthermore, antibodies against X. fastidiosa whole cells, gum, and afimbrial adhesins also resulted in transmission blockage. However, no treatment resulted in the complete abolishment of transmission, suggesting that this is a complex biological process. This work illustrates the potential to block the transmission of vector-borne pathogens without directly affecting either organism. PMID:22101059

  6. Studies on marine algae for haemagglutinic activity.

    PubMed

    Alam, M T; Usmanghani, K

    1994-07-01

    Lectins (agglutinins) are important in medical and immunological applications. Phytohaemagglutinins have been found useful in blood banking. Keeping in view of these facts, the marine algae found at Karachi coastal region have been screened for agglutinic activity by using human erythrocytes of A, B, AB and 0 group. Altogether 53 algal samples were collected and subjected to extraction, fractionation serial dilution and titre determinations. The total marine algae screened for haemagglutinic activity were 44 out of these 14, 13 and 17 belonged to Chlorophyta, Phaeophyta, and Rhodophyta respectively. Among these three groups the Rhodophyta showed the highest number of lytic activity. The green marine alga Valoniopsis pachynema showed a titre value between 2(2) and 2(3), which is statistically significant. In case of brown marine algae Colpomenia sinuosa was found to be active (titre 2(3)), while Dictyota dichotoma, D. indica and Iyengaria stellata, furnished week titre value as 2(2). The red marine algae screened were 17, out of these 4 spp. showed significant activity (titre 2(3)), and these are Gelidium usmanghani, Gracilaria foliifera Hypnea pannosa and Hynea valentiae. While Scinaia fascicularis, Scinaia indica and Champia parvula were found to be weak in their onset on human erythrocytes. The results obtained were quite in agreement with those reported in the literature. PMID:16414751

  7. Horizontal cells of the rabbit retina are non-selectively connected to the cones.

    PubMed

    Hack, I; Peichl, L

    1999-07-01

    Mammalian horizontal cells have generally been assumed to be spectrally non-selective in their cone contacts until recently, when specific contacts have been found for some species. The rabbit retina is frequently studied as a representative of dichromatic mammalian retinae. These are the reasons for elucidating the connections of the two types of horizontal cells (A-HCs and B-HCs) with the green-sensitive and blue-sensitive cones of the rabbit retina. Individual A-HCs and B-HCs were revealed by Lucifer Yellow injections, the total cone population overlying them was stained using peanut agglutinin, and the blue cones among these were identified by the antiserum JH 455 against blue cone opsin. Both A-HCs and B-HCs indiscriminately contact the two cone types available. This holds for the green cone-dominated dorsal retina and the blue cone-dominated ventral retina. No evidence was found for a third, potentially blue cone-selective, horizontal cell type [postulated by Famiglietti, E. V. (1990) Brain Res., 535, 174-179].

  8. Effect of low ionic strength on anti-Pr reactions.

    PubMed

    Leo, A; Kreft, H; Hack, H; Roelcke, D

    1996-01-01

    The effect of low ionic strength (LIS) on 28 anti-Pr, 20 anti-I and 20 anti-i cold agglutinins was investigated. The reaction of the anti-Pr CAs varies markedly. In most cases LIS has an enhancing effect. In some cases the thermal amplitude was widened so far that the reaction at 37 degrees C under LIS was stronger than at 0 degree C in PBS. With regard to the anti-Pr subspecificities anti Pr1, -Pr2 and -Pr3 or to the distinction of the immunodominant NeuNAc group (alpha a2,6- or alpha 2,3-bond) a correlation between these characteristics and the reaction in LIS could not be identified. The anti-I are not influenced by LISS, anti-i in a few cases. The reason for the variable reaction of the anti-Pr remains unclear. To further elucidate the LISS effect on anti-Pr, the contribution of the antibody structure should be regarded, but data for the use of H- and L-chain genes in anti-Pr are sparse. For compatibility testing in the routine laboratory, LISS-sensitive anti-Pr may play a role in disturbing the screening for RBC antibodies.

  9. Combining biofilm matrix measurements with biomass and viability assays in susceptibility assessments of antimicrobials against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    PubMed

    Skogman, Malena Elise; Vuorela, Pia Maarit; Fallarero, Adyary

    2012-09-01

    Despite that three types of assays (measuring biofilm viability, biomass, or matrix) are described to assess anti-biofilm activity, they are rarely used together. As infections can easily reappear if the matrix is not affected after antibiotic treatments, our goal was to explore the simultaneous effects of antibiotics on the viability, biomass and matrix of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms (ATCC 25923). Viability and biomass were quantified using resazurin and crystal violet staining sequentially in the same plate, while matrix staining was conducted with a wheat germ agglutinin-Alexa Fluor 488 fluorescent conjugate. Establishment of the detection limits and linearity ranges allowed concluding that all three methods were able to estimate biofilm formation in a similar fashion. In a susceptibility study with 18-h biofilms, two model compounds (penicillin G and ciprofloxacin) caused a reduction on the viability and biomass accompanied by an increase or not changed levels of the matrix, respectively. This response pattern was also proven for S. aureus Newman, S. epidermidis and E. coli biofilms. A classification of antibiotics based on five categories according to their effects on viability and matrix has been proposed earlier. Our data suggests a sixth group, represented by penicillin, causing decrease in bacterial viability but showing stimulatory effects on the matrix. Further, if effects on the matrix are not taken into account, the long-term chemotherapeutic effect of antibiotics can be jeopardized in spite of the positive effects on biofilms viability and biomass. Thus, measuring all these three endpoints simultaneously provide a more complete and accurate picture.

  10. The evaluation of a PCR-based method for identification of Salmonella enterica serotypes from environmental samples and various food matrices.

    PubMed

    Jean-Gilles Beaubrun, Junia; Cheng, Chorng-Ming; Chen, Kai-Shun; Ewing, Laura; Wang, Hua; Agpaoa, Maria C; Huang, Mei-Chiung J; Dickey, Erin; Du, Jamie M; Williams-Hill, Donna M; Hamilton, Brittany; Micallef, Shirley A; Rosenberg Goldstein, Rachel E; George, Ashish; Joseph, Sam W; Sapkota, Amy R; Jacobson, Andrew P; Tall, Ben D; Kothary, Mahendra H; Dudley, Kim; Hanes, Darcy E

    2012-09-01

    The most commonly used method for serotyping Salmonella spp. is based on the Kaufmann-White scheme, and is composed of serological reactions using antibodies to LPS agglutinins. The multiplex PCR used in this investigation was established by Kim et al. to serotype the 30 most common clinical Salmonella serotypes, as determined by CDC. The PCR assay consists of two five-plex reactions and a single two-plex PCR reaction, based on six genetic loci from Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium and four loci from S. enterica serotype Typhi. In this investigation, we further evaluated the method for serotyping Salmonella spp. using a reference collection, environmental samples collected from a Mid-Atlantic region tomato farm study, four food matrices spiked with different Salmonella serotypes and a proficiency test. The PCR assay was first evaluated using DNA isolated from pure cultures of isolates obtained from various clinical and environmental samples, and then DNA isolated from broth cultures of food matrices of "Red round" and Roma tomatoes, Romaine lettuce, green onions and Serrano peppers spiked with serotypes Newport, Typhimurium, Javiana and Saintpaul, respectively. The results showed that the PCR assay correctly serotyped Salmonella spp. from the clinical, environmental, spiked food matrices, and proficiency test samples. These findings are significant because the PCR assay was successful in the identification of Salmonella in the spiked samples in a broth culture containing other non-salmonella organism. This method may be a useful resource for the food safety community. PMID:22608224

  11. Isolation and characterization of the inositol trisphosphate receptor from smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, C.C.; Saito, A.; Fleischer, S. )

    1990-03-01

    The release of Ca{sup 2+} from internal stores is requisite to muscle contraction. In skeletal muscle and heart, the Ca{sup 2+} release channels (ryanodine receptor) of sarcoplasmic reticulum, involved in excitation-contraction coupling, have recently been isolated and characterized. In smooth muscle, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) is believed to mobilize Ca{sup 2+} from internal stores and thereby modulate contraction. The authors describe the isolation of an IP{sub 3} receptor from smooth muscle. Bovine aorta smooth muscle microsomes were solubilized with 3-((3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate, and the IP{sub 3} receptor was purified by sucrose gradient centrifugation and column chromatography with heparin-agarose and wheat germ agglutinin-agarose. The receptor is an oligomer of a single polypeptide with a M{sub r} of 224,000 as determined by SDS/PAGE. Negative-staining electron microscopy reveals that the receptor is a large pinwheel-like structure having surface dimensions of {approx}250 {times} 250 {angstrom} with fourfold symmetry. The IP{sub 3} receptor from smooth muscle is similar to the ryanodine receptor with regard to its large size and fourfold symmetry, albeit distinct with regard to appearance, protomer size, and ligand binding.

  12. Application of a glycoproteomics-based biomarker development method: alteration in glycan structure on colony stimulating factor 1 receptor as a possible glycobiomarker candidate for evaluation of liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Ocho, Makoto; Togayachi, Akira; Iio, Etsuko; Kaji, Hiroyuki; Kuno, Atsushi; Sogabe, Maki; Korenaga, Masaaki; Gotoh, Masanori; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Ikehara, Yuzuru; Mizokami, Masashi; Narimatsu, Hisashi

    2014-03-01

    The importance of diagnosis and therapies for liver cirrhosis (LC) is indisputable. Thus, a reliable method for monitoring the progression of liver fibrosis and resultant LC is urgently needed. Previously, using a lectin-assisted glycoproteomic method, we identified 26 serum glycoproteins as promising glycobiomarker candidates for monitoring the progression of liver diseases. In this study, we identified colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) as a promising LC marker candidate and then established Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA)-reactive CSF1R (WFA(+)-CSF1R) as a novel possible glycobiomarker candidate by utilizing a glycoproteomics-based strategy. The serum level of WFA(+)-CSF1R in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected liver disease was measured by an antibody-lectin sandwich ELISA. In a proof-of-concept experiment of the strategy preceding to future clinical studies, LC patients showed a high serum WFA(+)-CSF1R level in selected samples (P = 1.3 × 10(-17)). This result suggests WFA(+)-CSF1R is a possible biomarker candidate for evaluation of LC. Our results verified feasibility of this strategy for glycobiomarker development.

  13. Elongated fibrillar structure of a streptococcal adhesin assembled by the high-affinity association of [alpha]- and PPII-helices

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Matthew R.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Patel, Manisha H.; Robinette, Rebekah A.; Crowley, Paula J.; Michalek, Suzanne; Brady, L. Jeannine; Deivanayagam, Champion

    2010-08-18

    Streptococcus mutans antigen I/II (AgI/II) is a cell surface-localized protein adhesin that interacts with salivary components within the salivary pellicle. AgI/II contributes to virulence and has been studied as an immunological and structural target, but a fundamental understanding of its underlying architecture has been lacking. Here we report a high-resolution (1.8 {angstrom}) crystal structure of the A{sub 3}VP{sub 1} fragment of S. mutans AgI/II that demonstrates a unique fibrillar form (155 {angstrom}) through the interaction of two noncontiguous regions in the primary sequence. The A{sub 3} repeat of the alanine-rich domain adopts an extended {alpha}-helix that intertwines with the P{sub 1} repeat polyproline type II (PPII) helix to form a highly extended stalk-like structure heretofore unseen in prokaryotic or eukaryotic protein structures. Velocity sedimentation studies indicate that full-length AgI/II that contains three A/P repeats extends over 50 nanometers in length. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the high-affinity association between the A{sub 3} and P{sub 1} helices is enthalpically driven. Two distinct binding sites on AgI/II to the host receptor salivary agglutinin (SAG) were identified by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The current crystal structure reveals that AgI/II family proteins are extended fibrillar structures with the number of alanine- and proline-rich repeats determining their length.

  14. Measuring Influenza Neuraminidase Inhibition Antibody Titers by Enzyme-linked Lectin Assay.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jin; Couzens, Laura; Eichelberger, Maryna C

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies to neuraminidase (NA), the second most abundant surface protein on influenza virus, contribute toward protection against influenza. Traditional methods to measure NA inhibiting (NI) antibody titers are not practical for routine serology. This protocol describes the enzyme-linked lectin assay (ELLA), a practical alternative method to measure NI titers that is performed in 96 well plates coated with a large glycoprotein substrate, fetuin. NA cleaves terminal sialic acids from fetuin, exposing the penultimate sugar, galactose. Peanut agglutinin (PNA) is a lectin with specificity for galactose and therefore the extent of desialylation can be quantified using a PNA-horseradish peroxidase conjugate, followed by addition of a chromogenic peroxidase substrate. The optical density that is measured is proportional to NA activity. To measure NI antibody titers, serial dilutions of sera are incubated at 37 °C O/N on fetuin-coated plates with a fixed amount of NA. The reciprocal of the highest serum dilution that results in ≥50% inhibition of NA activity is designated as the NI antibody titer. The ELLA provides a practical format for routine evaluation of human antibody responses following influenza infection or vaccination. PMID:27684188

  15. Bordetella pertussis infection: pathogenesis, diagnosis, management, and the role of protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Kerr, J R; Matthews, R C

    2000-02-01

    Whooping cough is presently one of the ten most common causes of death from infectious disease worldwide. Despite a high vaccine uptake, resurgences of this disease have been observed in several countries. Virulence factors of Bordetella pertussis include agglutinogens, fimbriae, P.69/pertactin, pertussis toxin, filamentous haemagglutinin, adenylate cyclase, tracheal cytotoxin, dermonecrotic toxin, lipopolysaccharide, tracheal colonisation factor, serum resistance factor, and type III secretion. Virulence factor expression is regulated by the bvgAS locus, a two-component signal transduction system. The pathophysiologic sequence consists of attachment (fimbriae, P.69/pertactin, tracheal colonisation factor, pertussis toxin, filamentous haemagglutinin), evasion of host defence (adenylate cyclase, pertussis toxin, serum resistance factor), local effects (tracheal cytotoxin), and systemic effects (pertussis toxin). Bordetella pertussis is transmitted by respiratory droplets and causes disease only in humans. Various diagnostic methods are available, including culture, serological methods, and the polymerase chain reaction. Serotyping of isolates to detect agglutinogens 2 and 3 is useful because serotype 1,2 may be associated with higher mortality, and antibodies to these antigens (agglutinins) may be protective in both animals and humans. Immunisation using whole-cell vaccine is effective but is reactogenic. Acellular vaccines containing one to five components are being used increasingly in various countries. Protective immunity to pertussis correlates with high levels of antibody to each of pertactin, fimbriae, and pertussis toxin; however, doubt remains as to the relationship between agglutinogen 3 and fimbria 3, making results of trials investigating these virulence factors difficult to interpret. PMID:10746492

  16. Immunogenicity of killed Bordetella bronchiseptica vaccines in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Smith, I M; Baskerville, A J; Brothwell, E; Oliphant, J

    1982-03-01

    Two intramuscular injections (two weeks apart of graded doses of killed strains of Bordetella bronchiseptica from the pig (OLN 14 or LBF 1) or the dog (D1) had produced in mice circulating agglutinins ranging in mean titre (log2) per group from about 3.3 to 10.2 two weeks later. These levels depended partly on vaccinal strains and dose, and partly on the strain used as agglutinogen. Other such mice were challenged intraperitoneally with about 50 LD50 (approximately or equal to 10(7.4) viable bacteria) of two pig strains, one (293) from a British case of atrophic rhinitis and the other (N) from an American herd. Against challenge vaccinal strain OLN 14 was about 10 and LBF 1 about 100 times more immunogenic than vaccinal strain D1. In a separate experiment mice given intramuscularly amounts of LBF 1 or D1 vaccine estimated as being immunogenically equivalent were challenged intraperitoneally with one or other of seven pig or seven dog strains. On aggregate each vaccine protected to about the same extent against challenge by the pig strains, although LBF 1 vaccine was less effective than D1 vaccine against a strain of Danish origin. Both vaccines also protected more mice against challenge by the dog than the pig strans but LBF 1 vaccine was somewhat less effective than D1 vaccine, especially when challenged by strain D1. PMID:7079606

  17. Characterization of integral membrane proteins of Leishmania major by Triton X-114 fractionation and analysis of vaccination effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Murray, P J; Spithill, T W; Handman, E

    1989-07-01

    The total integral membrane proteins of promastigotes of Leishmania major were extracted by using the Triton X-114 phase separation technique and were characterized by immunoprecipitation, Western blotting (immunoblotting), and lectin chromatography. Of the 40 or more proteins which partitioned into the detergent phase, only about 10 proteins could be surface radioiodinated on live promastigotes, suggesting their surface orientation. The abundance of the gp58-63 antigen varied markedly between two strains of L. major. Sera from patients with visceral leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania donovani chagasi recognized the gp58-63 complex and an additional Mr-42,000 polypeptide shared between L. major and L. donovani chagasi. A subpopulation of six surface proteins, including the abundant gp58-63 antigen and a group of proteins of Mr 81,000 to 105,000, were glycoproteins recognized by antiserum to wheat germ agglutinin- or concanavalin A-binding proteins. The membrane proteins of the LRC-L119 isolate of L. major could successfully vaccinate genetically susceptible mice, thus opening the way for a molecularly defined subunit vaccine composed of glycolipid and membrane protein antigens.

  18. Up-regulation of the extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-R during axonal reorganization and astrogliosis in the adult rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Brenneke, Franziska; Schachner, Melitta; Elger, Christian E; Lie, Ailing A

    2004-02-01

    Interactions between cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules play a crucial role during brain development. The ECM glycoprotein tenascin-R (TN-R) has been implicated in the control of axon targeting, neural cell adhesion, migration and differentiation. Here, we have focused on the putative role of TN-R in chronic brain diseases involving increased neuronal excitability, as found in epilepsy. An episode of pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) led over a period of 3-30 days to neuron loss in the hippocampal hilus, CA3 and CA1 with reactive mossy fiber sprouting and astrogliosis in these regions. We found a focal up-regulation of granular TN-R immunoreactivity within the neuropil of segments of the CA3 pyramidal cell layer, the extent of this up-regulation paralleled the degree of pyramidal cell loss, mossy fiber sprouting and astrogliosis in these CA3 segments. In contrast, parvalbumin immunoreactivity and Wisteria floribundi agglutinin (WFA)-labeled perineuronal nets were reduced in CA3 segments with neuronal cell loss. The parallel development of increase in focal granular TN-R immunoreactivity, reactive mossy fiber sprouting and astrogliosis in CA3 implies a role for TN-R in axon targeting and synapse formation and/or in astrocytic targeting and interactions with the ECM during lesion-induced sprouting in the adult brain.

  19. Development and Structural Variety of the Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycans-Contained Extracellular Matrix in the Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Horii-Hayashi, Noriko; Sasagawa, Takayo; Matsunaga, Wataru; Nishi, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are major components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in the brain. In adult mammals, CSPGs form the specialized ECM structure perineuronal nets (PNNs) that surround somata and dendrites of certain types of neurons. PNNs restrict synaptic plasticity and regulate the closure of critical periods. Although previous studies have examined the starting period of PNN formation, focusing on primary sensory cortices, there are no systematic studies at the whole brain level. Here, we examined the starting period of PNN formation in male mice ranging in age from postnatal day 3 to week 11, mainly focusing on several cortical areas, limbic structures, hypothalamus, and brain stem, using lectin histochemistry with Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA). Results showed that early PNN formation was observed in several reticular formations of the brain stem related to the cranial nerves and primary somatosensory cortices. In the limbic system, PNN formation in the hippocampus started earlier than that of the amygdala. Furthermore, in the medial amygdaloid nucleus and some hypothalamic regions, WFA labeling did not show typical PNN-like forms. The present study suggests spatiotemporal differences at the beginning of PNN formation and a structural variety of CSPG-contained ECM in the brain.

  20. Exo-endocytotic recycling of synaptic vesicles in developing processes of cultured hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    In mature neurons synaptic vesicles (SVs) undergo cycles of exo- endocytosis at synapses. It is currently unknown whether SV exocytosis and recycling occurs also in developing axons prior to synapse formation. To address this question, we have developed an immunocytochemical assay to reveal SV exo-endocytosis in hippocampal neurons developing in culture. In this assay antibodies directed against the lumenal domain of synaptotagmin I (Syt I), an intrinsic membrane protein of SVs, are used to reveal exposure of SV membranes at the cell surface. Addition of antibodies to the culture medium of living neurons for 1 hr at 37 degrees C resulted in their rapid and specific internalization by all neuronal processes and, particularly, by axons. Double immunofluorescence and electron microscopy immunocytochemistry indicated that the antibodies were retained within SVs in cell processes and underwent cycles of exo-endocytosis in parallel with SV membranes. In contrast, another endocytotic marker, wheat germ agglutinin, was rapidly cleared from the processes and transported to the cell body. Antibody-labeled SVs were still present in axons several days after antibody loading and became clustered at presynaptic sites in parallel with synaptogenesis. These results demonstrate that SVs undergo multiple cycles of exo-endocytosis in developing neuronal processes irrespective of the presence of synaptic contacts. PMID:1577861