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Sample records for aggrecan collagen type

  1. Effects of in vivo static compressive loading on aggrecan and type II and X collagens in the rat growth plate extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Cancel, Mathilde; Grimard, Guy; Thuillard-Crisinel, Delphine; Moldovan, Florina; Villemure, Isabelle

    2009-02-01

    Mechanical loads are essential to normal bone growth, but excessive loads can lead to progressive deformities. In addition, growth plate extracellular matrix remodelling is essential to regulate the normal longitudinal bone growth process and to ensure physiological bone mineralization. In order to investigate the effects of static compression on growth plate extracellular matrix using an in vivo animal model, a loading device was used to precisely apply a compressive stress of 0.2 MPa for two weeks on the seventh caudal vertebra (Cd7) of rats during the pubertal growth spurt. Control, sham and loaded groups were studied. Growth modulation was quantified based on calcein labelling, and three matrix components (type II and X collagens, and aggrecan) were assessed using immunohistochemistry/safranin-O staining. As well, extracellular matrix components and enzymes (MMP-3 and -13, ADAMTS-4 and -5) were studied by qRT-PCR. Loading reduced Cd7 growth by 29% (p<0.05) and 15% (p=0.07) when compared to controls and shams respectively. No significant change could be observed in the mRNA expression of collagens and the proteolytic enzyme MMP-13. However, MMP-3 was significantly increased in the loaded group as compared to the control group (p<0.05). No change was observed in aggrecan and ADAMTS-4 and -5 expression. Low immunostaining for type II and X collagens was observed in 83% of the loaded rats as compared to the control rats. This in vivo study shows that, during pubertal growth spurt, two-week static compression reduced caudal vertebrae growth rates; this mechanical growth modulation occurred with decreased type II and X collagen proteins in the growth plate. PMID:18849019

  2. Age-related accumulation of pentosidine in aggrecan and collagen from normal and degenerate human intervertebral discs

    PubMed Central

    Sivan, Sarit Sara; Tsitron, Eve; Wachtel, Ellen; Roughley, Peter; Sakkee, Nico; van der Ham, Frits; Degroot, Jeroen; Maroudas, Alice

    2006-01-01

    During aging and degeneration, many changes occur in the structure and composition of human cartilaginous tissues, which include the accumulation of the AGE (advanced glycation end-product), pentosidine, in long-lived proteins. In the present study, we investigated the accumulation of pentosidine in constituents of the human IVD (intervertebral disc), i.e. collagen, aggrecan-derived PG (proteoglycan) (A1) and its fractions (A1D1–A1D6) in health and pathology. We found that, after maturity, pentosidine accumulates with age. Over the age range studied, a linear 6-fold increase was observed in pentosidine accumulation for A1 and collagen with respective rates of 0.12 and 0.66 nmol·(g of protein)−1·year−1. Using previously reported protein turnover rate constants (kT) obtained from measurements of the D-isomer of aspartic residue in collagen and aggrecan of human IVD, we could calculate the pentosidine formation rate constants (kF) for these constituents [Sivan, Tsitron, Wachtel, Roughley, Sakkee, van der Ham, DeGroot, Roberts and Maroudas (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 13009–13014; Tsitron (2006) MSc Thesis, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel]. In spite of the comparable formation rate constants obtained for A1D1 and collagen [1.81±0.25 compared with 3.71±0.26 μmol of pentosidine·(mol of lysine)−1·year−1 respectively], the higher pentosidine accumulation in collagen is consistent with its slower turnover (0.005 year−1 compared with 0.134 year−1 for A1D1). Pentosidine accumulation increased with decreasing buoyant density and decreasing turnover of the proteins from the most glycosaminoglycan-rich PG components (A1D1) to the least (A1D6), with respective kF values of 1.81±0.25 and 3.18±0.37 μmol of pentosidine·(mol of lysine)−1·year−1. We concluded that protein turnover is an important determinant of pentosidine accumulation in aggrecan and collagen of human IVD, as was found for articular cartilage. Correlation of

  3. Collagen type VI myopathies.

    PubMed

    Bushby, Kate M D; Collins, James; Hicks, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in each of the three collagen VI genes COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3 cause two main types of muscle disorders: Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy, a severe phenotype, and a mild to moderate phenotype Bethlem myopathy. Recently, two additional phenotypes, including a limb-girdle muscular dystrophy phenotype and an autosomal recessive myosclerosis reported in one family with mutations in COL6A2 have been reported. Collagen VI is an important component of the extracellular matrix which forms a microfibrillar network that is found in close association with the cell and surrounding basement membrane. Collagen VI is also found in the interstitial space of many tissues including muscle, tendon, skin, cartilage, and intervertebral discs. Thus, collagen VI mutations result in disorders with combined muscle and connective tissue involvement, including weakness, joint laxity and contractures, and abnormal skin findings.In this review we highlight the four recognized clinical phenotypes of collagen VI related - myopathies; Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), Bethlem myopathy (BM), autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy phenotype and autosomal recessive myosclerosis. We discuss the diagnostic criteria of these disorders, the molecular pathogenesis, genetics, treatment, and related disorders. PMID:24443028

  4. Type V collagen controls the initiation of collagen fibril assembly.

    PubMed

    Wenstrup, Richard J; Florer, Jane B; Brunskill, Eric W; Bell, Sheila M; Chervoneva, Inna; Birk, David E

    2004-12-17

    Vertebrate collagen fibrils are heterotypically composed of a quantitatively major and minor fibril collagen. In non-cartilaginous tissues, type I collagen accounts for the majority of the collagen mass, and collagen type V, the functions of which are poorly understood, is a minor component. Type V collagen has been implicated in the regulation of fibril diameter, and we reported recently preliminary evidence that type V collagen is required for collagen fibril nucleation (Wenstrup, R. J., Florer, J. B., Cole, W. G., Willing, M. C., and Birk, D. E. (2004) J. Cell. Biochem. 92, 113-124). The purpose of this study was to define the roles of type V collagen in the regulation of collagen fibrillogenesis and matrix assembly. Mouse embryos completely deficient in pro-alpha1(V) chains were created by homologous recombination. The col5a1-/- animals die in early embryogenesis, at approximately embryonic day 10. The type V collagen-deficient mice demonstrate a virtual lack of collagen fibril formation. In contrast, the col5a1+/- animals are viable. The reduced type V collagen content is associated with a 50% reduction in fibril number and dermal collagen content. In addition, relatively normal, cylindrical fibrils are assembled with a second population of large, structurally abnormal collagen fibrils. The structural properties of the abnormal matrix are decreased relative to the wild type control animals. These data indicate a central role for the evolutionary, ancient type V collagen in the regulation of fibrillogenesis. The complete dependence of fibril formation on type V collagen is indicative of the critical role of the latter in early fibril initiation. In addition, this fibril collagen is important in the determination of fibril structure and matrix organization. PMID:15383546

  5. Nanomechanics of Type I Collagen.

    PubMed

    Varma, Sameer; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Schieber, Jay D

    2016-07-12

    Type I collagen is the predominant collagen in mature tendons and ligaments, where it gives them their load-bearing mechanical properties. Fibrils of type I collagen are formed by the packing of polypeptide triple helices. Higher-order structures like fibril bundles and fibers are assembled from fibrils in the presence of other collagenous molecules and noncollagenous molecules. Curiously, however, experiments show that fibrils/fibril bundles are less resistant to axial stress compared to their constituent triple helices-the Young's moduli of fibrils/fibril bundles are an order-of-magnitude smaller than the Young's moduli of triple helices. Given the sensitivity of the Young's moduli of triple helices to solvation environment, a plausible explanation is that the packing of triple helices into fibrils perhaps reduces the Young's modulus of an individual triple helix, which results in fibrils having smaller Young's moduli. We find, however, from molecular dynamics and accelerated conformational sampling simulations that the Young's modulus of the buried core of the fibril is of the same order as that of a triple helix in aqueous phase. These simulations, therefore, suggest that the lower Young's moduli of fibrils/fibril bundles cannot be attributed to the specific packing of triple helices in the fibril core. It is not the fibril core that yields initially to axial stress. Rather, it must be the portion of the fibril exposed to the solvent and/or the fibril-fibril interface that bears the initial strain. Overall, this work provides estimates of Young's moduli and persistence lengths at two levels of collagen's structural assembly, which are necessary to quantitatively investigate the response of various biological factors on collagen mechanics, including congenital mutations, posttranslational modifications and ligand binding, and also engineer new collagen-based materials. PMID:27410733

  6. Heterogeneity of collagens in rabbit cornea: type III collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Cintron, C.; Hong, B.S.; Covington, H.I.; Macarak, E.J.

    1988-05-01

    Whole neonate rabbit corneas and adult corneas containing 2-week-old scars were incubated in the presence of (/sup 14/C) glycine. Radiolabeled collagen extracted from the corneas and scar tissue were analyzed by sodium dodecylsulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography to determine the types and relative quantity of collagen polypeptides present and synthesized by these tissues. In addition to other collagen types, type III was found in both neonate cornea and scar tissue from adult cornea, albeit in relatively small quantities. Type III collagen in normal cornea was associated with the residue after pepsin digestion and formic acid extraction of the tissue, and the same type of collagen was extracted from scar tissue after similar treatment. Type III collagen-specific monoclonal antibody bound to developing normal corneas and healing adult tissue sections, as determined by immunofluorescence. Antibody binding was localized to the endothelium and growing Descemet's membrane in fetal and neonate corneas, and restricted to the most posterior region of the corneal scar tissue. Although monoclonal antibody to keratan sulfate, used as a marker for stromal fibroblasts, bound to most of the scar tissue, the antibody failed to bind to the posterior scar tissue positive for type III collagen. We conclude that endothelial cells from fetal and neonate rabbit cornea and endothelium-derived fibroblasts from healing wounds of adult cornea synthesize and deposit type III collagen. Moreover, this collagen appears to be incorporated into the growing Descemet's membrane of normal corneas and narrow posterior portion of the scar tissue.

  7. Heterogeneity of collagens in rabbit cornea: type VI collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Cintron, C.; Hong, B.S.

    1988-05-01

    Normal adult rabbit corneas were digested with 5% pepsin and their collagens extracted with acetic acid. Collagen extracts were fractionated by differential salt precipitation. The 2.5 M NaCl fraction was then redissolved with tris buffer and precipitated with sodium acetate. The precipitate contained a high-molecular-weight disulfide-bonded aggregate which, upon reduction with mercaptoethanol, was converted into three distinct polypeptides having molecular weights between 45 and 66 Kd. These physical characteristics, together with the susceptibility of these polypeptides to collagenase and their amino acid composition, identified the high molecular weight aggregate as type VI collagen. Corneas from neonate rabbits and adult corneas containing 2-week-old scars were organ cultured in the presence of (/sup 14/C) glycine to incorporate radiolabel into collagen. Tissues were digested with 0.02% pepsin and their collagens extracted with formic acid. The total radioactivity of the extracts and tissue residues was determined before the collagens were separated by SDS-polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis. Radioactive collagen polypeptides bands were then stained with Coomassie blue, processed for fluorography, and analyzed by densitometry. The results show that: (1) type VI collagen is synthesized by neonate corneas and healing adult corneas; (2) it is not readily solubilized from either corneal tissue by 0.02% pepsin digestion and formic acid extraction; and (3) the proportion of type VI collagen deposited in scar tissue is markedly lower than that found in neonate corneas.

  8. Type I Collagen and Collagen Mimetics as Angiogenesis Promoting Superpolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Twardowski, T.; Fertala, A.; Orgel, J.P.R.O.; San Antonio, J.D.

    2008-07-18

    Angiogenesis, the development of blood vessels from the pre-existing vasculature, is a key component of embryogenesis and tissue regeneration. Angiogenesis also drives pathologies such as tumor growth and metastasis, and hemangioma development in newborns. On the other hand, promotion of angiogenesis is needed in tissues with vascular insufficiencies, and in bioengineering, to endow tissue substitutes with appropriate microvasculatures. Therefore, much research has focused on defining mechanisms of angiogenesis, and identifying pro- and anti-angiogenic molecules. Type I collagen, the most abundant protein in humans, potently stimulates angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Crucial to its angiogenic activity appears to be ligation and possibly clustering of endothelial cell (EC) surface {alpha}1{beta}1/{alpha}2{beta}1 integrin receptors by the GFPGER502-507 sequence of the collagen fibril. However, additional aspects of collagen structure and function that may modulate its angiogenic properties are discussed. Moreover, type I collagen and fibrin, another angiogenic polymer, share several structural features. These observations suggest strategies for creating 'angiogenic superpolymers', including: modifying type I collagen to influence its biological half-life, immunogenicity, and integrin binding capacity; genetically engineering fibrillar collagens to include additional integrin binding sites or angiogenic determinants, and remove unnecessary or deleterious sequences without compromising fibril integrity; and exploring the suitability of poly(ortho ester), PEG-lysine copolymer, tubulin, and cholesteric cuticle as collagen mimetics, and suggesting means of modifying them to display ideal angiogenic properties. The collagenous and collagen mimetic angiogenic superpolymers described here may someday prove useful for many applications in tissue engineering and human medicine.

  9. Effect of nitrogen-rich cell culture surfaces on type X collagen expression by bovine growth plate chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent evidence indicates that osteoarthritis (OA) may be a systemic disease since mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from OA patients express type X collagen, a marker of late stage chondrocyte hypertrophy (associated with endochondral ossification). We recently showed that the expression of type X collagen was suppressed when MSCs from OA patients were cultured on nitrogen (N)-rich plasma polymer layers, which we call "PPE:N" (N-doped plasma-polymerized ethylene, containing up to 36 atomic percentage (at.% ) of N. Methods In the present study, we examined the expression of type X collagen in fetal bovine growth plate chondrocytes (containing hypertrophic chondrocytes) cultured on PPE:N. We also studied the effect of PPE:N on the expression of matrix molecules such as type II collagen and aggrecan, as well as on proteases (matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) and molecules implicated in cell division (cyclin B2). Two other culture surfaces, "hydrophilic" polystyrene (PS, regular culture dishes) and nitrogen-containing cation polystyrene (Primaria®), were also investigated for comparison. Results Results showed that type X collagen mRNA levels were suppressed when cultured for 4 days on PPE:N, suggesting that type X collagen is regulated similarly in hypertrophic chondrocytes and in human MSCs from OA patients. However, the levels of type X collagen mRNA almost returned to control value after 20 days in culture on these surfaces. Culture on the various surfaces had no significant effects on type II collagen, aggrecan, MMP-13, and cyclin B2 mRNA levels. Conclusion Hypertrophy is diminished by culturing growth plate chondrocytes on nitrogen-rich surfaces, a mechanism that is beneficial for MSC chondrogenesis. Furthermore, one major advantage of such "intelligent surfaces" over recombinant growth factors for tissue engineering and cartilage repair is potentially large cost-saving. PMID:21244651

  10. Presentation of the candidate rheumatoid arthritis autoantigen aggrecan by antigen-specific B cells induces enhanced CD4(+) T helper type 1 subset differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Caroline L; Hine, Dominic W; Pradipta, Ariel; Pearson, Jeffrey P; van Eden, Willem; Robinson, John H; Knight, Andrew M

    2012-04-01

    Effective immune responses require antigen uptake by antigen-presenting cells (APC), followed by controlled endocytic proteolysis resulting in the generation of antigen-derived peptide fragments that associate with intracellular MHC class II molecules. The resultant peptide-MHC class II complexes then move to the APC surface where they activate CD4(+) T cells. Dendritic cells (DC), macrophages and B cells act as efficient APC. In many settings, including the T helper type 1 (Th1) -dependent, proteoglycan-induced arthritis model of rheumatoid arthritis, accumulating evidence demonstrates that antigen presentation by B cells is required for optimal CD4(+) T cell activation. The reasons behind this however, remain unclear. In this study we have compared the activation of CD4(+) T cells specific for the proteoglycan aggrecan following antigen presentation by DC, macrophages and B cells. We show that aggrecan-specific B cells are equally efficient APC as DC and macrophages and use similar intracellular antigen-processing pathways. Importantly, we also show that antigen presentation by aggrecan-specific B cells to TCR transgenic CD4(+) T cells results in enhanced CD4(+) T cell interferon-γ production and Th1 effector sub-set differentiation compared with that seen with DC. We conclude that preferential CD4(+) Th1 differentiation may define the requirement for B cell APC function in both proteoglycan-induced arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:22182481

  11. Variations in aggrecan localization and gene expression patterns characterize increasing stages of human intervertebral disk degeneration.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Helen E; Hoelscher, Gretchen L; Ingram, Jane A; Bethea, Synthia; Zinchenko, Natalia; Hanley, Edward N

    2011-10-01

    During disk degeneration, annulus dehydration and matrix fraying culminate in the formation of tears through which nucleus and annulus disk material may rupture, causing radicular pain. Annular tears are present in more than half of the patients in early adulthood and are almost always present in the elderly. Aggrecan, which provides the disk with a shock absorber function under loading, is a key disk extracellular matrix (ECM) component. The objective of the present study was to assess the immunolocalization of aggrecan in the annulus, and to assess molecular gene expression patterns in the annulus ECM utilizing microarray analysis. Immunohistochemistry was performed on 45 specimens using an anti-human aggrecan antibody. Affymetrix microarray gene expression studies used the extracellular matrix ontology approach to evaluate an additional 6 grade I-II, 9 grade III, and 4 grade IV disks. Grade III/IV disks were compared to healthier grade I/II disks. Healthy and less degenerated disks showed a general uniform aggrecan immunolocalization; more degenerated disks contained regions with little or no identifiable aggrecan localization. In degenerated disks, molecular studies showed a significant downregulation of aggrecan, ADAMTS-like 3, and ADAMTS10. Collagen types III and VIII, fibronectin, decorin, connective tissue growth factor, TIMP-3, latent TGF-β binding protein 2 and TGF-β1 were significantly upregulated with fold changes ranging from 2.4 to 9.8. Findings here help us better understand changes in the immunohistochemical distribution of a key proteoglycan during disk aging. Such information may have application as we work towards biologic therapies to improve the aging/degenerating disk matrix. PMID:21689646

  12. Nanoscale Mechanics of Type I Collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, H.; Cropper, E.; Bulger, A.; Choksi, U.; Koob, T. J.; Pandit, S.; Matthews, W. G.

    2009-03-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in the body by mass. Type I collagen fibrils provide mechanical strength and cellular housing within tissues exhibiting a broad range of mechanical properties. This diversity in the mechanics of tissues with similar underlying components warrants detailed study of the process by which structure and mechanics develop. While collagen mechanics have been studied at the tissue level for decades, surprising little is known about collagen mechanics at the fibril and molecular level. Presented herein is a multi-scale experimental and computational investigation of collagen I mechanics, bridging the single molecule and fibril hierarchal forms. The mechanics of single collagen molecules are explored using AFM and force spectroscopy. Moreover, atomistic molecular-dynamics simulations are performed to provide structural information not accessible to the experimental system. Fibrils then are grown from molecular collagen, and the mechanics of these fibrils are investigated using AFM. Based upon the single molecule and fibril results, a coarse-grain computational model is being developed. The outcomes include a better understanding of how the mechanics of filamentous self-organizing systems are derived and how their hierarchical forms are established.

  13. Techniques for Type I Collagen Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson-Jackson, LaTecia Diamond

    Tissue Engineering is a process in which cells, engineering, and material methods are used in amalgamation to improve biological functions. The purpose of tissue engineering is to develop alternative solutions to treat or cure tissues and organs that have been severely altered or damaged by diseases, congenital defects, trauma, or cancer. One of the most common and most promising biological materials for tissue engineering to develop scaffolds is Type I collagen. A major challenge in biomedical research is aligning Type I collagen to mimic biological structures, such as ligaments, tendons, bones, and other hierarchal aligned structures within the human body. The intent of this research is to examine possible techniques for organizing Type I collagen and to assess which of the techniques is effective for potential biological applications. The techniques used in this research to organize collagen are soft lithography with solution-assisted sonication embossing, directional freezing, and direct poling. The final concentration used for both soft lithography with solution-assisted sonication embossing and direct poling was 1 mg/ml, whereas for directional freezing the final concentration varied between 4mg/ml, 2mg/ml, and 1 mg/ml. These techniques were characterized using the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and Helium Ion Microscope (HIM). In this study, we have found that out of the three techniques, the soft lithography and directional freezing techniques have been successful in organizing collagen in a particular pattern, but not alignment. We concluded alignment may be dependent on the pH of collagen and the amount of acetic acid used in collagen solution. However, experiments are still being conducted to optimize all three techniques to align collagen in a unidirectional arrangement.

  14. Variations in aggrecan structure modulate its susceptibility to aggrecanases.

    PubMed Central

    Roughley, Peter J; Barnett, James; Zuo, Fengrong; Mort, John S

    2003-01-01

    Proteoglycan aggregates and purified aggrecan from adult and fetal bovine cartilage and adult and neonatal human cartilage were subjected to in vitro degradation by recombinant aggrecanase-1 and aggrecanase-2. The ability of the aggrecanases to cleave within the aggrecan IGD (interglobular domain) and CS2 domain (chondroitin sulphate-rich domain 2) was monitored by SDS/PAGE and immunoblotting. Aggrecanase-2 showed a similar ability to cleave within the IGD of adult and immature aggrecan, whereas aggrecanase-1 was less efficient in cleavage in the IGD of immature aggrecan, for both the bovine and the human substrates. Both aggrecanases showed a similar ability to cleave within the CS2 domain of bovine aggrecan irrespective of age, but showed a much lower ability to cleave within the CS2 domain of human aggrecan. Equivalent results were obtained whether aggrecan was present in isolation or as part of proteoglycan aggregates. When proteoglycan aggregates were used, neither aggrecanase was able to cleave link protein. Thus, for aggrecan cleavage by aggrecanases, variations in cleavage efficiency exist with respect to the species and age of the animal from which the aggrecan is derived and the type of aggrecanase being used. PMID:12859252

  15. The evolution of fibrillar collagens: a sea-pen collagen shares common features with vertebrate type V collagen.

    PubMed

    Tillet, E; Franc, J M; Franc, S; Garrone, R

    1996-02-01

    The extracellular matrix of marine primitive invertebrates (sponges, polyps and jellyfishes) contains collagen fibrils with narrow diameters. From various data, it has been hypothesized that these primitive collagens could represent ancestral forms of the vertebrate minor collagens, i.e., types V or XI. Recently we have isolated a primitive collagen from the soft tissues of the sea-pen Veretillum cynomorium. This report examines whether the sea-pen collagen shares some features with vertebrate type V collagen. Rotary shadowed images of acid-soluble collagen molecules extracted from beta-APN treated animals, positive staining of segment-long-spacing crystallites precipitated from pepsinized collagen, Western blots of the pepsinized alpha1 and alpha2 chains with antibodies to vertebrate types I, III and V collagens, and in situ gold immunolabeling of ECM collagen fibrils were examined. Our results showed that the tissue form of the sea-pen collagen is a 340-nm threadlike molecule, which is close to the vertebrate type V collagen with its voluminous terminal globular domain, the distribution of most of its polar amino-acid residues, and its antigenic properties. PMID:8653581

  16. Aggrecan, an Unusual Polyelectrolyte: Review of Solution Behavior and Physiological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Preethi L.; Horkay, Ferenc

    2011-01-01

    Aggrecan is a high molecular weight, bottlebrush-shaped, negative-charged biopolymer that forms supermolecular complexes with hyaluronic acid. In the extracellular matrix of cartilage, aggrecan-hyaluronic acid complexes are interspersed in the collagen matrix and provide the osmotic properties required to resist deswelling under compressive load. In this review we compile aggrecan solution behavior from different experimental techniques, and discuss them in the context of concentration regimes that were identified in osmotic pressure experiments. At low concentration, aggrecan exhibits microgel-like behavior. With increasing concentration, the bottlebrushes self assemble into large complexes. In the physiological concentration range (2 < caggrecan < 8 % w/w), the physical properties of the solution are dominated by repulsive electrostatic interactions between aggrecan complexes. We discuss the consequences of the bottlebrush architecture on the polyelectrolyte characteristics of the aggrecan molecule, and its implications for cartilage properties and function. PMID:21884828

  17. The Different Roles of Aggrecan Interaction Domains

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The aggregating proteoglycans of the lectican family are important components of extracellular matrices. Aggrecan is the most well studied of these and is central to cartilage biomechanical properties and skeletal development. Key to its biological function is the fixed charge of the many glycosaminoglycan chains, that provide the basis for the viscoelastic properties necessary for load distribution over the articular surface. This review is focused on the globular domains of aggrecan and their role in anchoring the proteoglycans to other extracellular matrix components. The N-terminal G1 domain is vital in that it binds the proteoglycan to hyaluronan in ternary complex with link protein, retaining the proteoglycan in the tissue. The importance of the C-terminal G3 domain interactions has recently been emphasized by two different human hereditary disorders: autosomal recessive aggrecan-type spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia and autosomal dominant familial osteochondritis dissecans. In these two conditions, different missense mutations in the aggrecan C-type lectin repeat have been described. The resulting amino acid replacements affect the ligand interactions of the G3 domain, albeit with widely different phenotypic outcomes. PMID:23019016

  18. Study of Native Type I Collagen Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, August

    2006-03-01

    Presented in this work is direct imaging and force microscopy of native, intact type I collagen fibrils extracted from the sea cucumber Cucumaria frondosa dermis with affiliated proteoglycan molecules. The prototypical collagen fibril structure is well conserved through higher mammalian species and presents a model for study of the mechanical properties of the primary individual components of the dermis and skeletal ligature. Common practice is to use reconstituted fibrils which lack the precise conformal structure and affiliated proteoglycans. We have performed force microscopy to probe the mechanical properties of native fibrils and extract the elastic modulus under natural conditions. This knowledge is combined transmission and atomic force imaging, in conjunction with applied computation models, to demonstrate an inherent semitubular structure of these fibrils.

  19. Adamts5 Deletion Blocks Murine Dermal Repair through CD44-mediated Aggrecan Accumulation and Modulation of Transforming Growth Factor β1 (TGFβ1) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, Jennifer; Li, Jun; DiPietro, Luisa; Stepp, Mary Ann; Sandy, John D.; Plaas, Anna

    2011-01-01

    ADAMTS5 has been implicated in the degradation of cartilage aggrecan in human osteoarthritis. Here, we describe a novel role for the enzyme in the regulation of TGFβ1 signaling in dermal fibroblasts both in vivo and in vitro. Adamts5−/− mice, generated by deletion of exon 2, exhibit impaired contraction and dermal collagen deposition in an excisional wound healing model. This was accompanied by accumulation in the dermal layer of cell aggregates and fibroblastic cells surrounded by a pericellular matrix enriched in full-length aggrecan. Adamts5−/− wounds exhibit low expression (relative to wild type) of collagen type I and type III but show a persistently elevated expression of tgfbRII and alk1. Aggrecan deposition and impaired dermal repair in Adamts5−/− mice are both dependent on CD44, and Cd44−/−/Adamts5−/− mice display robust activation of TGFβ receptor II and collagen type III expression and the dermal regeneration seen in WT mice. TGFβ1 treatment of newborn fibroblasts from wild type mice results in Smad2/3 phosphorylation, whereas cells from Adamts5−/− mice phosphorylate Smad1/5/8. The altered TGFβ1 response in the Adamts5−/− cells is dependent on the presence of aggrecan and expression of CD44, because Cd44−/−/Adamts5−/− cells respond like WT cells. We propose that ADAMTS5 deficiency in fibrous tissues results in a poor repair response due to the accumulation of aggrecan in the pericellular matrix of fibroblast progenitor cells, which prevents their transition to mature fibroblasts. Thus, the capacity of ADAMTS5 to modulate critical tissue repair signaling events suggests a unique role for this enzyme, which sets it apart from other members of the ADAMTS family of proteases. PMID:21566131

  20. TNF-α and IL-1β Promote a Disintegrin-like and Metalloprotease with Thrombospondin Type I Motif-5-mediated Aggrecan Degradation through Syndecan-4 in Intervertebral Disc*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianru; Markova, Dessislava; Anderson, D. Greg; Zheng, Zhaomin; Shapiro, Irving M.; Risbud, Makarand V.

    2011-01-01

    Elevated levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and a resultant increase in ADAMTS (a disintegrin-like and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type I motifs) expression is seen during disc degeneration. However, if these pro-inflammatory cytokines control ADAMTS activity is not definitively known. The goal of the investigation was to study if TNF-α and IL-1β regulate syndecan-4 (SDC4) expression, and if SDC4 was responsible for promoting aggrecan degradation through controlling ADAMTS activity in nucleus pulposus cells of the intervertebral disc. Cytokine treatment increased SDC4 expression and promoter activity. Use of inhibitor, SM7368 and co-transfections with IκBα, RelA/p50 showed that NF-κΒ regulated both basal and cytokine-dependent SDC4 transcription. SDC4 promoter harboring RelA binding site mutation was unresponsive to the cytokines. Moreover, cytokines failed to increase SDC4 promoter activity in RelA-null cells. Cytokines increased ADAMTS-4/5 expression and aggrecan degradation and promoted SDC4 interaction with ADAMTS-5. Treatment with heparinase-III and p-nitrophenyl-β-d-xylopyranoside (PNPX), an inhibitor of heparan sulfate synthesis and transfection with SDC4-shRNA partially blocked cytokine mediated aggrecan degradation. Analysis of human tissues showed increased aggrecan degradation with a concomitant increase in SDC4 and ADAMTS-5 protein expression with severity of disc disease. Likewise, SDC4, TNF-α, IL-1β, ADAMTS-4, and ADAMTS-5 mRNA expression increased in degenerate tissues. We conclude that in nucleus pulposus, TNF-α and IL-1β regulate SDC4 expression, which plays a key role in pathogenesis of degenerative disc disease by promoting aggrecan degradation by ADAMTS-5. PMID:21949132

  1. Type VI Collagen Regulates Dermal Matrix Assembly and Fibroblast Motility.

    PubMed

    Theocharidis, Georgios; Drymoussi, Zoe; Kao, Alexander P; Barber, Asa H; Lee, David A; Braun, Kristin M; Connelly, John T

    2016-01-01

    Type VI collagen is a nonfibrillar collagen expressed in many connective tissues and implicated in extracellular matrix (ECM) organization. We hypothesized that type VI collagen regulates matrix assembly and cell function within the dermis of the skin. In the present study we examined the expression pattern of type VI collagen in normal and wounded skin and investigated its specific function in new matrix deposition by human dermal fibroblasts. Type VI collagen was expressed throughout the dermis of intact human skin, at the expanding margins of human keloid samples, and in the granulation tissue of newly deposited ECM in a mouse model of wound healing. Generation of cell-derived matrices (CDMs) by human dermal fibroblasts with stable knockdown of COL6A1 revealed that type VI collagen-deficient matrices were significantly thinner and contained more aligned, thicker, and widely spaced fibers than CDMs produced by normal fibroblasts. In addition, there was significantly less total collagen and sulfated proteoglycans present in the type VI collagen-depleted matrices. Normal fibroblasts cultured on de-cellularized CDMs lacking type VI collagen displayed increased cell spreading, migration speed, and persistence. Taken together, these findings indicate that type VI collagen is a key regulator of dermal matrix assembly, composition, and fibroblast behavior and may play an important role in wound healing and tissue regeneration. PMID:26763426

  2. Ameloblasts express type I collagen during amelogenesis.

    PubMed

    Assaraf-Weill, N; Gasse, B; Silvent, J; Bardet, C; Sire, J Y; Davit-Béal, T

    2014-05-01

    Enamel and enameloid, the highly mineralized tooth-covering tissues in living vertebrates, are different in their matrix composition. Enamel, a unique product of ameloblasts, principally contains enamel matrix proteins (EMPs), while enameloid possesses collagen fibrils and probably receives contributions from both odontoblasts and ameloblasts. Here we focused on type I collagen (COL1A1) and amelogenin (AMEL) gene expression during enameloid and enamel formation throughout ontogeny in the caudate amphibian, Pleurodeles waltl. In this model, pre-metamorphic teeth possess enameloid and enamel, while post-metamorphic teeth possess enamel only. In first-generation teeth, qPCR and in situ hybridization (ISH) on sections revealed that ameloblasts weakly expressed AMEL during late-stage enameloid formation, while expression strongly increased during enamel deposition. Using ISH, we identified COL1A1 transcripts in ameloblasts and odontoblasts during enameloid formation. COL1A1 expression in ameloblasts gradually decreased and was no longer detected after metamorphosis. The transition from enameloid-rich to enamel-rich teeth could be related to a switch in ameloblast activity from COL1A1 to AMEL synthesis. P. waltl therefore appears to be an appropriate animal model for the study of the processes involved during enameloid-to-enamel transition, especially because similar events probably occurred in various lineages during vertebrate evolution. PMID:24570147

  3. Synthetic collagen heterotrimers: structural mimics of wild-type and mutant collagen type I.

    PubMed

    Gauba, Varun; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D

    2008-06-11

    Collagen type I is an AAB heterotrimer assembled from two alpha1 chains and one alpha2 chain. Missense mutations in either of these chains that substitute a glycine residue in the ubiquitous X-Y-Gly repeat with a bulky amino acid leads to osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) of varying severity. These mutations have been studied in the past using collagen-like peptide homotrimers as a model system. However, homotrimers, which by definition will contain glycine mutations in all the three chains, do not accurately mimic the mutations in their native form and result in an exaggerated effect on stability and folding. In this article, we report the design of a novel model system based upon collagen-like heterotrimers that can mimic the glycine mutations present in either the alpha1 or alpha2 chains of type I collagen. This design utilizes an electrostatic recognition motif in three chains that can force the interaction of any three peptides, including AAA (all same), AAB (two same and one different), or ABC (all different) triple helices. Therefore, the component peptides can be designed in such a way that glycine mutations are present in zero, one, two, or all three chains of the triple helix. With this design, we for the first time report collagen mutants containing one or two glycine substitutions with structures relevant to native forms of OI. Furthermore, we demonstrate the difference in thermal stability and refolding half-life times between triple helices that vary only in the frequency of glycine mutations at a particular position. PMID:18481852

  4. In vitro formation and thermal transition of novel hybrid fibrils from type I fish scale collagen and type I porcine collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Song; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Ogawa, Nobuhiro; Migita, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi; Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2010-06-01

    Novel type I collagen hybrid fibrils were fabricated by neutralizing a mixture of type I fish scale collagen solution and type I porcine collagen solution with a phosphate buffer saline at 28 °C. Their structure was discussed in terms of the volume ratio of fish/porcine collagen solution. Scanning electron and atomic force micrographs showed that the diameter of collagen fibrils derived from the collagen mixture was larger than those derived from each collagen, and all resultant fibrils exhibited a typical D-periodic unit of ~67 nm, irrespective of volume ratio of both collagens. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed only one endothermic peak for the fibrils derived from collagen mixture or from each collagen solution, indicating that the resultant collagen fibrils were hybrids of type I fish scale collagen and type I porcine collagen.

  5. Separation of type IX collagen from other cartilage collagens by hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Macek, J; Lichý, A; Tesarová, E; Adam, M

    1988-12-30

    Collagen type IX was separated from other cartilage collagens (types II and XI) by hydrophobic interaction chromatography on a 25 cm X 8 mm I.D. stainless-steel column packed with Separon HEMA 1000 Bio. The mobile phase was 0.84 M ammonium sulphate with 0.1 M potassium dihydrogenphosphate (pH 6.5). Under these conditions only collagen type IX was eluted from the column; it could be monitored with UV detection (218 nm) or selectively with fluorescence detection (excitation 330 nm, emission filter 389 nm). The method can be used for the isolation and quantitation of collagen type IX. The assay was linear in the range 0-10 micrograms, the correlation coefficient was 0.99, precision 5.5% and accuracy 13%. The detection limit was about 0.6 microgram. PMID:3246532

  6. Early and stable upregulation of collagen type II, collagen type I and YKL40 expression levels in cartilage during early experimental osteoarthritis occurs independent of joint location and histological grading

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Helga; Wenz, Wolfram; Ivancic, Mate; Steck, Eric; Richter, Wiltrud

    2005-01-01

    While morphologic and biochemical aspects of degenerative joint disease (osteoarthritis [OA]) have been elucidated by numerous studies, the molecular mechanisms underlying the progressive loss of articular cartilage during OA development remain largely unknown. The main focus of the present study was to gain more insight into molecular changes during the very early stages of mechanically induced cartilage degeneration and to relate molecular alterations to histological changes at distinct localizations of the joint. Studies on human articular cartilage are hampered by the difficulty of obtaining normal tissue and early-stage OA tissue, and they allow no progressive follow-up. An experimental OA model in dogs with a slow natural history of OA (Pond–Nuki model) was therefore chosen. Anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) was performed on 24 skeletally mature dogs to induce joint instability resulting in OA. Samples were taken from different joint areas after 6, 12, 24 and 48 weeks, and gene expression levels of common cartilage molecules were quantified in relation to the histological grading (modified Mankin score) of adjacent tissue. Histological changes reflected early progressive degenerative OA. Soon after ACLT, chondrocytes responded to the altered mechanical conditions by significant and stable elevation of collagen type II, collagen type I and YKL40 expression, which persisted throughout the study. In contrast to the mild to moderate histological alterations, these molecular changes were not progressive and were independent of the joint localization (tibia, femur, lateral, medial) and the extent of matrix degeneration. MMP13 remained unaltered until 24 weeks, and aggrecan and tenascinC remained unaltered until 48 weeks after ACLT. These findings indicate that elevated collagen type II, collagen type I and YKL40 mRNA expression levels are early and sensitive measures of ACLT-induced joint instability independent of a certain grade of morphological

  7. Cellular Origins of Type IV Collagen Networks in Developing Glomeruli

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamson, Dale R.; Hudson, Billy G.; Stroganova, Larysa; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; St. John, Patricia L.

    2009-01-01

    Laminin and type IV collagen composition of the glomerular basement membrane changes during glomerular development and maturation. Although it is known that both glomerular endothelial cells and podocytes produce different laminin isoforms at the appropriate stages of development, the cellular origins for the different type IV collagen heterotrimers that appear during development are unknown. Here, immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that endothelial cells, mesangial cells, and podocytes of immature glomeruli synthesize collagen α1α2α1(IV). However, intracellular labeling revealed that podocytes, but not endothelial or mesangial cells, contain collagen α3α4α5(IV). To evaluate the origins of collagen IV further, we transplanted embryonic kidneys from Col4a3-null mutants (Alport mice) into kidneys of newborn, wildtype mice. Hybrid glomeruli within grafts containing numerous host-derived, wildtype endothelial cells never expressed collagen α3α4α5(IV). Finally, confocal microscopy of glomeruli from infant Alport mice that had been dually labeled with anti-collagen α5(IV) and the podocyte marker anti-GLEPP1 showed immunolabeling exclusively within podocytes. Together, these results indicate that collagen α3α4α5(IV) originates solely from podocytes; therefore, glomerular Alport disease is a genetic defect that manifests specifically within this cell type. PMID:19423686

  8. Cellular origins of type IV collagen networks in developing glomeruli.

    PubMed

    Abrahamson, Dale R; Hudson, Billy G; Stroganova, Larysa; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; St John, Patricia L

    2009-07-01

    Laminin and type IV collagen composition of the glomerular basement membrane changes during glomerular development and maturation. Although it is known that both glomerular endothelial cells and podocytes produce different laminin isoforms at the appropriate stages of development, the cellular origins for the different type IV collagen heterotrimers that appear during development are unknown. Here, immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that endothelial cells, mesangial cells, and podocytes of immature glomeruli synthesize collagen alpha 1 alpha 2 alpha1(IV). However, intracellular labeling revealed that podocytes, but not endothelial or mesangial cells, contain collagen alpha 3 alpha 4 alpha 5(IV). To evaluate the origins of collagen IV further, we transplanted embryonic kidneys from Col4a3-null mutants (Alport mice) into kidneys of newborn, wildtype mice. Hybrid glomeruli within grafts containing numerous host-derived, wildtype endothelial cells never expressed collagen alpha 3 alpha 4 alpha 5(IV). Finally, confocal microscopy of glomeruli from infant Alport mice that had been dually labeled with anti-collagen alpha 5(IV) and the podocyte marker anti-GLEPP1 showed immunolabeling exclusively within podocytes. Together, these results indicate that collagen alpha 3 alpha 4 alpha 5(IV) originates solely from podocytes; therefore, glomerular Alport disease is a genetic defect that manifests specifically within this cell type. PMID:19423686

  9. A COL2A1 mutation in achondrogenesis type II results in the replacement of type II collagen by type I and III collagens in cartilage.

    PubMed

    Chan, D; Cole, W G; Chow, C W; Mundlos, S; Bateman, J F

    1995-01-27

    An autosomal dominant mutation in the COL2A1 gene was identified in a fetus with achondrogenesis type II. A transition of G2853 to A in exon 41 produced a substitution of Gly769 by Ser within the triple helical domain of the alpha 1(II) chain of type II collagen, interrupting the mandatory Gly-X-Y triplet sequence required for the normal formation of stable triple helical type II collagen molecules, resulting in the complete absence of type II collagen in the cartilage, which had a gelatinous composition. Type I and III collagens were the major species found in cartilage tissue and synthesized by cultured chondrocytes along with cartilage type XI collagen. However, cultured chondrocytes produced a trace amount of type II collagen, which was retained within the cells and not secreted. In situ hybridization of cartilage sections showed that the chondrocytes produced both type II and type I collagen mRNA. As a result, it is likely that the chondrocytes produced type II collagen molecules, which were then degraded. The close proximity of the Gly769 substitution by Ser to the mammalian collagenase cleavage site at Gly775-Leu776 may have produced an unstable domain that was highly susceptible to proteolysis. The type I and III collagens that replaced type II collagen were unable to maintain the normal structure of the hyaline cartilage but did support chondrocyte maturation, evidenced by the expression of type X collagen in the hypertrophic zone of the growth plate cartilage. PMID:7829510

  10. Structural investigations on native collagen type I fibrils using AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Strasser, Stefan; Zink, Albert; Janko, Marek; Heckl, Wolfgang M.; Thalhammer, Stefan . E-mail: stefan.thalhammer@gsf.de

    2007-03-02

    This study was carried out to determine the elastic properties of single collagen type I fibrils with the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Native collagen fibrils were formed by self-assembly in vitro characterized with the AFM. To confirm the inner assembly of the collagen fibrils, the AFM was used as a microdissection tool. Native collagen type I fibrils were dissected and the inner core uncovered. To determine the elastic properties of collagen fibrils the tip of the AFM was used as a nanoindentor by recording force-displacement curves. Measurements were done on the outer shell and in the core of the fibril. The structural investigations revealed the banding of the shell also in the core of native collagen fibrils. Nanoindentation experiments showed the same Young's modulus on the shell as well as in the core of the investigated native collagen fibrils. In addition, the measurements indicate a higher adhesion in the core of the collagen fibrils compared to the shell.

  11. Lysyl Hydroxylase 3-mediated Glucosylation in Type I Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Sricholpech, Marnisa; Perdivara, Irina; Yokoyama, Megumi; Nagaoka, Hideaki; Terajima, Masahiko; Tomer, Kenneth B.; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2012-01-01

    Recently, by employing the short hairpin RNA technology, we have generated MC3T3-E1 (MC)-derived clones stably suppressing lysyl hydroxylase 3 (LH3) (short hairpin (Sh) clones) and demonstrated the LH3 function as glucosyltransferase in type I collagen (Sricholpech, M., Perdivara, I., Nagaoka, H., Yokoyama, M., Tomer, K. B., and Yamauchi, M. (2011) Lysyl hydroxylase 3 glucosylates galactosylhydroxylysine residues in type I collagen in osteoblast culture. J. Biol. Chem. 286, 8846–8856). To further elucidate the biological significance of this modification, we characterized and compared type I collagen phenotypes produced by Sh clones and two control groups, MC and those transfected with empty vector. Mass spectrometric analysis identified five glycosylation sites in type I collagen (i.e. α1,2-87, α1,2-174, and α2-219. Of these, the predominant glycosylation site was α1-87, one of the major helical cross-linking sites. In Sh collagen, the abundance of glucosylgalactosylhydroxylysine was significantly decreased at all of the five sites with a concomitant increase in galactosylhydroxylysine at four of these sites. The collagen cross-links were significantly diminished in Sh clones, and, for the major cross-link, dihydroxylysinonorleucine (DHLNL), glucosylgalactosyl-DHLNL was diminished with a concomitant increase in galactosyl-DHLNL. When subjected to in vitro incubation, in Sh clones, the rate of decrease in DHLNL was lower, whereas the rate of increase in its maturational cross-link, pyridinoline, was comparable with controls. Furthermore, in Sh clones, the mean diameters of collagen fibrils were significantly larger, and the onset of mineralized nodule formation was delayed when compared with those of controls. These results indicate that the LH3-mediated glucosylation occurs at the specific molecular loci in the type I collagen molecule and plays critical roles in controlling collagen cross-linking, fibrillogenesis, and mineralization. PMID:22573318

  12. LARP6 Meets Collagen mRNA: Specific Regulation of Type I Collagen Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yujie; Stefanovic, Branko

    2016-01-01

    Type I collagen is the most abundant structural protein in all vertebrates, but its constitutive rate of synthesis is low due to long half-life of the protein (60–70 days). However, several hundred fold increased production of type I collagen is often seen in reparative or reactive fibrosis. The mechanism which is responsible for this dramatic upregulation is complex, including multiple levels of regulation. However, posttranscriptional regulation evidently plays a predominant role. Posttranscriptional regulation comprises processing, transport, stabilization and translation of mRNAs and is executed by RNA binding proteins. There are about 800 RNA binding proteins, but only one, La ribonucleoprotein domain family member 6 (LARP6), is specifically involved in type I collagen regulation. In the 5′untranslated region (5’UTR) of mRNAs encoding for type I and type III collagens there is an evolutionally conserved stem-loop (SL) structure; this structure is not found in any other mRNA, including any other collagen mRNA. LARP6 binds to the 5′SL in sequence specific manner to regulate stability of collagen mRNAs and their translatability. Here, we will review current understanding of how is LARP6 involved in posttranscriptional regulation of collagen mRNAs. We will also discuss how other proteins recruited by LARP6, including nonmuscle myosin, vimentin, serine threonine kinase receptor associated protein (STRAP), 25 kD FK506 binding protein (FKBP25) and RNA helicase A (RHA), contribute to this process. PMID:27011170

  13. Human recombinant type I collagen produced in plants.

    PubMed

    Shoseyov, Oded; Posen, Yehudit; Grynspan, Frida

    2013-07-01

    As a central element of the extracellular matrix, collagen is intimately involved in tissue development, remodeling, and repair and confers high tensile strength to tissues. Numerous medical applications, particularly, wound healing, cell therapy, bone reconstruction, and cosmetic technologies, rely on its supportive and healing qualities. Its synthesis and assembly require a multitude of genes and post-translational modifications, where even minor deviations can be deleterious or even fatal. Historically, collagen was always extracted from animal and human cadaver sources, but bare risk of contamination and allergenicity and was subjected to harsh purification conditions resulting in irreversible modifications impeding its biofunctionality. In parallel, the highly complex and stringent post-translational processing of collagen, prerequisite of its viability and proper functioning, sets significant limitations on recombinant expression systems. A tobacco plant expression platform has been recruited to effectively express human collagen, along with three modifying enzymes, critical to collagen maturation. The plant extracted recombinant human collagen type I forms thermally stable helical structures, fibrillates, and demonstrates bioactivity resembling that of native collagen. Deployment of the highly versatile plant-based biofactory can be leveraged toward mass, rapid, and low-cost production of a wide variety of recombinant proteins. As in the case of collagen, proper planning can bypass plant-related limitations, to yield products structurally and functionally identical to their native counterparts. PMID:23252967

  14. [Osteochondrodysplasia determined genetically by a collagen type II gene mutation].

    PubMed

    Czarny-Ratajczak, M; Rogala, P; Wolnik-Brzozowska, D; Latos-Bieleńska, A

    2001-01-01

    Chondrodysplasias are a heterogenous group of skeletal dysplasias, affecting the growing cartilage. The main part of chondrodysplasias is caused by mutations in various types of collagen genes. The current classification within this group of disorder relies on clinical, histological and radiographic features. Type II collagenopathies comprise part of chondrodysplasias, consisting of hereditary disorders caused by defects in the type II collagen. Collagen type II is coded by a large gene--COL2A1. The chromosomal location for the human COL2A1 gene is 12q13.11-q13.12. Defects in collagen type II are caused by point mutations in the COL2A1 gene. Type II collagenopathies form a wide spectrum of clinical severity ranging from lethal achondrogenesis type II, hypochondrogenesis, through severe forms like spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita, spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia congenita, Marshall syndrome, to the mild forms--Stickler syndrome and early osteoarthritis. The pathological changes in the patients are observed in the growth plate, nucleus pulposus and vitreous body, where the abnormal collagen type II is distributed. This article presents the genetic background of collagenopathies type II and the results of current molecular studies of the patients. Both the molecular and the clinical studies may promise a better understanding of the relationship between the genotype and the phenotype. We present the patients, who were diagnosed at the Department of Medical Genetics and in the Orthopaedic Department in Poznań. PMID:11481990

  15. A Sulfated Glycosaminoglycan Linkage Region Is a Novel Type of Human Natural Killer-1 (HNK-1) Epitope Expressed on Aggrecan in Perineuronal Nets

    PubMed Central

    Yabuno, Keiko; Morise, Jyoji; Kizuka, Yasuhiko; Hashii, Noritaka; Kawasaki, Nana; Takahashi, Satoru; Miyata, Shinji; Izumikawa, Tomomi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Takematsu, Hiromu; Oka, Shogo

    2015-01-01

    Human natural killer-1 (HNK-1) carbohydrate (HSO3-3GlcAβ1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc-R) is highly expressed in the brain and required for learning and neural plasticity. We previously demonstrated that expression of the HNK-1 epitope is mostly abolished in knockout mice for GlcAT-P (B3gat1), a major glucuronyltransferase required for HNK-1 biosynthesis, but remained in specific regions such as perineuronal nets (PNNs) in these mutant mice. Considering PNNs are mainly composed of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) and regulate neural plasticity, GlcAT-P-independent expression of HNK-1 in PNNs is suggested to play a role in neural plasticity. However, the function, structure, carrier glycoprotein and biosynthetic pathway for GlcAT-P-irrelevant HNK-1 epitope remain unclear. In this study, we identified a unique HNK-1 structure on aggrecan in PNNs. To determine the biosynthetic pathway for the novel HNK-1, we generated knockout mice for GlcAT-S (B3gat2), the other glucuronyltransferase required for HNK-1 biosynthesis. However, GlcAT-P and GlcAT-S double-knockout mice did not exhibit reduced HNK-1 expression compared with single GlcAT-P-knockout mice, indicating an unusual biosynthetic pathway for the HNK-1 epitope in PNNs. Aggrecan was purified from cultured cells in which GlcAT-P and -S are not expressed and we determined the structure of the novel HNK-1 epitope using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) as a sulfated linkage region of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), HSO3-GlcA-Gal-Gal-Xyl-R. Taken together, we propose a hypothetical model where GlcAT-I, the sole glucuronyltransferase required for synthesis of the GAG linkage, is also responsible for biosynthesis of the novel HNK-1 on aggrecan. These results could lead to discovery of new roles of the HNK-1 epitope in neural plasticity. PMID:26659409

  16. A Sulfated Glycosaminoglycan Linkage Region is a Novel Type of Human Natural Killer-1 (HNK-1) Epitope Expressed on Aggrecan in Perineuronal Nets.

    PubMed

    Yabuno, Keiko; Morise, Jyoji; Kizuka, Yasuhiko; Hashii, Noritaka; Kawasaki, Nana; Takahashi, Satoru; Miyata, Shinji; Izumikawa, Tomomi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Takematsu, Hiromu; Oka, Shogo

    2015-01-01

    Human natural killer-1 (HNK-1) carbohydrate (HSO3-3GlcAβ1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc-R) is highly expressed in the brain and required for learning and neural plasticity. We previously demonstrated that expression of the HNK-1 epitope is mostly abolished in knockout mice for GlcAT-P (B3gat1), a major glucuronyltransferase required for HNK-1 biosynthesis, but remained in specific regions such as perineuronal nets (PNNs) in these mutant mice. Considering PNNs are mainly composed of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) and regulate neural plasticity, GlcAT-P-independent expression of HNK-1 in PNNs is suggested to play a role in neural plasticity. However, the function, structure, carrier glycoprotein and biosynthetic pathway for GlcAT-P-irrelevant HNK-1 epitope remain unclear. In this study, we identified a unique HNK-1 structure on aggrecan in PNNs. To determine the biosynthetic pathway for the novel HNK-1, we generated knockout mice for GlcAT-S (B3gat2), the other glucuronyltransferase required for HNK-1 biosynthesis. However, GlcAT-P and GlcAT-S double-knockout mice did not exhibit reduced HNK-1 expression compared with single GlcAT-P-knockout mice, indicating an unusual biosynthetic pathway for the HNK-1 epitope in PNNs. Aggrecan was purified from cultured cells in which GlcAT-P and -S are not expressed and we determined the structure of the novel HNK-1 epitope using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) as a sulfated linkage region of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), HSO3-GlcA-Gal-Gal-Xyl-R. Taken together, we propose a hypothetical model where GlcAT-I, the sole glucuronyltransferase required for synthesis of the GAG linkage, is also responsible for biosynthesis of the novel HNK-1 on aggrecan. These results could lead to discovery of new roles of the HNK-1 epitope in neural plasticity. PMID:26659409

  17. Three-dimensional scaffold of type II collagen promote the differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells into a nucleus pulposus-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaopeng; Tao, Yiqing; Wang, Jingkai; Liu, Dongyu; Liang, Chengzhen; Li, Hao; Chen, Qixin

    2016-07-01

    Type II collagen is reported to have the capability of guiding adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) to differentiate towards a nucleus pulposus (NP)-like phenotype. So this study aimed to establish a three-dimensional (3D) collagen scaffold using N,N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethyl carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDAC/NHS) to increase the efficiency of ADSC differentiation into NP-like cells. Physical properties, such as porosity, biodegradation, and microstructure, and biological characteristics such as cytotoxicity, cell proliferation, and expression of relevant genes and proteins were measured to evaluate the efficacy of different scaffolds. Collagen scaffolds cross-linked with EDAC/NHS exhibited higher biological stability, better spatial structure, and higher gene and protein expression of functional markers such as aggrecan, SOX9 and COL2 than those of other groups. Based on the results, freeze-dried type II collagen cross-linked with EDAC/NHS formed the best 3D scaffold, for inducing ADSC proliferation and differentiation toward a NP-like phenotype. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1687-1693, 2016. PMID:26940048

  18. Changes in type I collagen following laser welding.

    PubMed

    Bass, L S; Moazami, N; Pocsidio, J; Oz, M C; LoGerfo, P; Treat, M R

    1992-01-01

    Selection of ideal laser parameters for tissue welding is inhibited by poor understanding of the mechanism. We investigated structural changes in collagen molecules extracted from rat tail tendon (> 90% type I collagen) after tissue welding using an 808 nm diode laser and indocyanine green dye applied to the weld site. Mobility patterns on SDS-PAGE were identical in the lasered and untreated tendon extracts with urea or acetic acid. Pepsin incubation after acetic acid extraction revealed a reduction of collagen alpha and beta bands in lasered compared with untreated specimens. Circular dichroism studies of rat tail tendon showed absence of helical structure in collagen from lasered tendon. No evidence for covalent bonding was present in laser-treated tissues. Collagen molecules are denatured by the laser wavelength and parameters used in this study. No significant amount of helical structure is regenerated on cooling. We conclude that non-covalent interactions between denatured collagen molecules may be responsible for the creation of tissue welding. PMID:1406002

  19. Control of melanoma cell invasion by type IV collagen.

    PubMed

    Pasco, Sylvie; Brassart, Bertrand; Ramont, Laurent; Maquart, François-Xavier; Monboisse, Jean-Claude

    2005-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is the leading cause of death from diseases of the skin. This review summarizes the data from the literature and our laboratory addressing the effects of type IV collagen on melanoma progression. Many different sequences from type IV collagen promote melanoma cell adhesion, migration and invasion. The triple helical conformation of the collagenous domain plays a critical role in some of these interactions. However, recent studies from our group demonstrated that a sequence from the alpha3(IV) NC1 domain inhibits melanoma cell proliferation, migration and invasion by decreasing MMP production and activation. Peptide sequences from the alpha1(IV), alpha2(IV) and alpha3(IV) chains named arresten, canstatin and tumstatin, respectively were shown to inhibit angiogenesis. Further investigations regarding the inhibitory effects of the alpha(IV) NC1 domains will have a paramount relevance for the design of efficient strategies to limit melanoma development. PMID:15936594

  20. Dermal type I collagen assessment by digital image analysis*

    PubMed Central

    Brianezi, Gabrielli; Grandi, Fabrizio; Bagatin, Ediléia; Enokihara, Mílvia Maria S. S.; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2015-01-01

    Type I collagen is the main dermal component, and its evaluation is relevant to quantitative studies in dermatopathology. However, visual gradation (0 to 4+) has low precision and high subjectivity levels. This study aimed to develop and validate a digital morphometric analysis technique to estimate type I collagen levels in the papillary dermis. Four evaluators visually quantified (0 to 4+) the density of type I collagen in 63 images of forearm skin biopsies marked by immunohistochemistry and two evaluators analyzed the same images using digital morphometric techniques (RGB split colors (I) and color deconvolution (II)). Automated type I collagen density estimation in the papillary dermis (two techniques) were correlated with visual evaluations (Spearman's rho coefficients of 0.48 and 0.62 (p<0.01)). With regard to the inter-observer repeatability, the four evaluators who used visual classification had an intraclass correlation coefficient (for absolute agreement) of 0.53, while the other two evaluators who used digital analysis (algorithm II) had an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.97. PMID:26560217

  1. Type V Collagen in Health, Disease, and Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mak, Ki M; Png, Chien Yi M; Lee, Danielle J

    2016-05-01

    Type V collagen (COLV) is a regulatory fibril-forming collagen. It has at least three different molecular isoforms-α1(V)2 α2(V), α1(V)3, and α1(V)α2(V)α3(V)-formed by combinations of three different polypeptide α chains-α1(V), α2(V), and α3(V). COL V is a relatively minor collagen of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Morphologically, COLV occurs as heterotypic fibrils with type I collagen (COLI), microfilaments, or 12-nm-thick fibrils. COLV is synthesized in various mesenchymal cells and its gene expression is modulated by TGF-β and growth factors. While resistant to digestion by interstitial collagenases, native and denatured COLV are degraded by metalloproteinases and gelatinases, thereby promoting ECM remodeling. COLV interacts with matrix collagens and structural proteins, conferring structural integrity to tissue scaffolds. It binds matrix macromolecules, modulating cellular behavior, and functions. COLV co-assembles with COLI into heterotypic fibrils in the cornea and skin dermis, acting as a dominant regulator of collagen fibrillogenesis. COLV deficiency is associated with loss of corneal transparency and classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, while COLV overexpression is found in cancer, granulation tissue, inflammation, atherosclerosis, and fibrosis of lungs, skin, kidneys, adipose tissue, and liver. COLV isoform containing the α3(V) chain is involved in mediating pancreatic islet cell functions. In the liver, COLV is a minor but regular component of the ECM. Increases in COLV are associated with both early and advanced hepatic fibrosis. The neoepitopes of COLV have been shown to be a useful noninvasive serum biomarker for assessing fibrotic progression and resolution in experimental hepatic fibrosis. COLV is multifunctional in health, disease, and fibrosis. PMID:26910848

  2. Type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis: identification of abnormal type II collagen.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, M; Hollister, D W

    1988-12-01

    We have extended the study of a mild case of type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis to include biochemical analyses of cartilage, bone, and the collagens produced by dermal fibroblasts. Type I collagen extracted from bone and types I and III collagen produced by dermal fibroblasts were normal, as was the hexosamine ratio of cartilage proteoglycans. Hyaline cartilage, however, contained approximately equal amounts of types I and II collagen and decreased amounts of type XI collagen. Unlike the normal SDS-PAGE mobility. Two-dimensional SDS-PAGE revealed extensive overmodification of all type II cyanogen bromide peptides in a pattern consistent with heterozygosity for an abnormal pro alpha 1(II) chain which impaired the assembly and/or folding of type II collagen. This interpretation implies that dominant mutations of the COL2A1 gene may cause type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis. More generally, emerging data implicating defects of type II collagen in the type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis-spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita spectrum and in the Kniest-Stickler syndrome spectrum suggest that diverse mutations of this gene may be associated with widely differing phenotypic outcome. PMID:3195588

  3. Alpha 1(XVIII), a collagen chain with frequent interruptions in the collagenous sequence, a distinct tissue distribution, and homology with type XV collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Rehn, M; Pihlajaniemi, T

    1994-01-01

    We report on the isolation of mouse cDNA clones which encode a collagenous sequence designated here as the alpha 1 chain of type XVIII collagen. The overlapping clones cover 2.8 kilobases and encode an open reading frame of 928 amino acid residues comprising a putative signal peptide of 25 residues, an amino-terminal noncollagenous domain of 301 residues, and a primarily collagenous stretch of 602 residues. The clones do not cover the carboxyl-terminal end of the polypeptide, since the translation stop codon is absent. Characteristic of the deduced polypeptide is the possession of eight noncollagenous interruptions varying in length from 10 to 24 residues in the collagenous amino acid sequence. Other features include the presence of several putative sites for both N-linked glycosylation and O-linked glycosaminoglycan attachment and homology of the amino-terminal noncollagenous domain with thrombospondin. It is of particular interest that five of the eight collagenous sequences of type XVIII show homology to the previously reported type XV collagen, suggesting that the two form a distinct subgroup among the diverse family of collagens. Northern blot hybridization analysis revealed a striking tissue distribution for type XVIII collagen mRNAs, as the clones hybridized strongly with mRNAs of 4.3 and 5.3 kilobases that were present only in lung and liver of the eight mouse tissues studied. Images PMID:8183894

  4. Collagen type IX from human cartilage: a structural profile of intermolecular cross-linking sites.

    PubMed Central

    Diab, M; Wu, J J; Eyre, D R

    1996-01-01

    Type IX collagen, a quantitatively minor collagenous component of cartilage, is known to be associated with and covalently cross-linked to type II collagen fibrils in chick and bovine cartilage. Type IX collagen molecules have also been shown to form covalent cross-links with each other in bovine cartilage. In the present study we demonstrate by structural analysis and location of cross-linking sites that, in human cartilage, type IX collagen is covalently cross-linked to type II collagen and to other molecules of type IX collagen. We also present evidence that, if the proteoglycan form of type IX collagen is present in human cartilage, it can only be a minor component of the matrix, similar to findings with bovine cartilage. PMID:8660302

  5. Second harmonic generation microscopy differentiates collagen type I and type III in COPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masaru; Kayra, Damian; Elliott, W. Mark; Hogg, James C.; Abraham, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    The structural remodeling of extracellular matrix proteins in peripheral lung region is an important feature in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Multiphoton microscopy is capable of inducing specific second harmonic generation (SHG) signal from non-centrosymmetric structural proteins such as fibrillar collagens. In this study, SHG microscopy was used to examine structural remodeling of the fibrillar collagens in human lungs undergoing emphysematous destruction (n=2). The SHG signals originating from these diseased lung thin sections from base to apex (n=16) were captured simultaneously in both forward and backward directions. We found that the SHG images detected in the forward direction showed well-developed and well-structured thick collagen fibers while the SHG images detected in the backward direction showed striking different morphological features which included the diffused pattern of forward detected structures plus other forms of collagen structures. Comparison of these images with the wellestablished immunohistochemical staining indicated that the structures detected in the forward direction are primarily the thick collagen type I fibers and the structures identified in the backward direction are diffusive structures of forward detected collagen type I plus collagen type III. In conclusion, we here demonstrate the feasibility of SHG microscopy in differentiating fibrillar collagen subtypes and understanding their remodeling in diseased lung tissues.

  6. Lack of type XVIII collagen results in anterior ocular defects.

    PubMed

    Ylikärppä, Ritva; Eklund, Lauri; Sormunen, Raija; Kontiola, Antti I; Utriainen, Aino; Määttä, Marko; Fukai, Naomi; Olsen, Björn R; Pihlajaniemi, Taina

    2003-12-01

    Mice lacking type XVIII collagen have defects in the posterior part of the eye, including delayed regression of the hyaloid vasculature and poor outgrowth of the retinal vessels. We report here that these mice also have a fragile iris and develop atrophy of the ciliary body. The irises of Col18a1-/- mice can be seen to adhere to the lens and cornea. After the pupils begin to function, the double layer of epithelial cells separates at the apical cell contacts, leading to defoliation of its posterior pigment epithelial cell layer, and extracellular material begins to accumulate in the basement membrane zones of the iris. In contrast to the iris epithelia, where no clear signs of cellular atrophy were detected, the lack of type XVIII collagen resulted in atrophy of the pigmented epithelial cells of the ciliary body, and there were also ultrastructural abnormalities in the basement membrane zones. These changes did not lead to chronically elevated intraocular pressures, however. Our results indicate that type XVIII collagen is needed for the integrity of the epithelial basement membranes of the iris and the ciliary body and that its gene should therefore be taken into account as a new potential cause of anterior segment disorders in the eye. PMID:14525950

  7. Molecular cloning of chicken aggrecan. Structural analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, L; Tanzer, M L

    1992-01-01

    The large, aggregating chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan of cartilage, aggrecan, has served as a generic model of proteoglycan structure. Molecular cloning of aggrecans has further defined their amino acid sequences and domain structures. In this study, we have obtained the complete coding sequence of chicken sternal cartilage aggrecan by a combination of cDNA and genomic DNA sequencing. The composite sequence is 6117 bp in length, encoding 1951 amino acids. Comparison of chicken aggrecan protein primary structure with rat, human and bovine aggrecans has disclosed both similarities and differences. The domains which are most highly conserved at 70-80% identity are the N-terminal domains G1 and G2 and the C-terminal domain G3. The chondroitin sulphate domain of chicken aggrecan is smaller than that of rat and human aggrecans and has very distinctive repeat sequences. It has two separate sections, one comprising 12 consecutive Ser-Gly-Glu repeats of 20 amino acids each, adjacent to the other which has 23 discontinuous Ser-Gly-Glu repeats of 10 amino acids each; this latter region, N-terminal to the former one, appears to be unique to chicken aggrecan. The two regions contain a total of 94 potential chondroitin sulphate attachment sites. Genomic comparison shows that, although chicken exons 11-14 are identical in size to the rat and human exons, chicken exon 10 is the smallest of the three species. This is also reflected in the size of its chondroitin sulphate coding region and in the total number of Ser-Gly pairs. The putative keratan sulphate domain shows 31-45% identity with the other species and lacks the repetitive sequences seen in the others. In summary, while the linear arrangement of specific domains of chicken aggrecan is identical to that in the aggrecans of other species, and while there is considerable identity of three separate domains, chicken aggrecan demonstrates unique features, notably in its chondroitin sulphate domain and its keratan sulphate

  8. Inorganic pyrophosphatase induces type I collagen in osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Polewski, Monika D.; Johnson, Kristen A.; Foster, Melissa; Millán, José Luis; Terkeltaub, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The physiologic selectivity of calcification in bone tissue reflects selective co-expression by osteoblasts of fibrillar collagen I and of tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP), which hydrolyzes the calcification inhibitor pyrophosphate (PPi) and generates phosphate (Pi). Humans and mice deficient in the PPi-generating ecto-enzyme NPP1 demonstrate soft tissue calcification, occurring at sites of extracellular matrix expansion. Significantly, the function in osteoblasts of cytosolic inorganic pyrophosphatase (abbreviated iPPiase), which generates Pi via PPi hydrolysis with neutral pH optimum, remains unknown. We assessed iPPiase in Enpp1−/− and wild type (WT) mouse osteoblasts and we tested the hypothesis that iPPiase regulates collagen I expression. Methods We treated mouse calvarial osteoblasts with ascorbate and β-glycerol phosphate to promote calcification, and we assessed cytosolic Pi and PPi levels, sodium-dependent Pi uptake, Pit-1 Pi co-transporter expression, and iPPiase and TNAP activity and expression. We also assessed the function of transfected Ppa1 in osteoblasts. Results Inorganic pyrophosphatase but not TNAP was elevated in Enpp1−/− calvariae in situ. Cultured primary Enpp1−/− calvarial osteoblasts demonstrated increased calcification despite flat TNAP activity rather than physiologic TNAP up-regulation seen in WT osteoblasts. Despite decreased cytosolic PPi in early culture, Enpp1−/− osteoblasts maintained cytosolic Pi levels comparable to WT osteoblasts, in association with increased iPPiase, enhanced sodium-dependent Pi uptake and expression of Pit-1, and markedly increased collagen I synthesis. Suppression of collagen synthesis in Enpp1−/− osteoblasts using 3,4-dehydroproline markedly suppressed calcification. Last, transfection of Ppa1 in WT osteoblasts increased cytosolic Pi and decreased cytosolic but not extracellular PPi, and induced both collagen I synthesis and calcification. Conclusions Increased

  9. Unconventional T-cell recognition of an arthritogenic epitope of proteoglycan aggrecan released from degrading cartilage.

    PubMed

    Falconer, Jane; Mahida, Rahul; Venkatesh, Divya; Pearson, Jeffrey; Robinson, John H

    2016-04-01

    It has been proposed that peptide epitopes bind to MHC class II molecules to form distinct structural conformers of the same MHC II-peptide complex termed type A and type B, and that the two conformers of the same peptide-MHC II complex are recognized by distinct CD4 T cells, termed type A and type B T cells. Both types recognize short synthetic peptides but only type A recognize endosomally processed intact antigen. Type B T cells that recognize self peptides from exogenously degraded proteins have been shown to escape negative selection during thymic development and so have the potential to contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. We generated and characterized mouse CD4 T cells specific for an arthritogenic epitope of the candidate joint autoantigen proteoglycan aggrecan. Cloned T-cell hybridomas specific for a synthetic peptide containing the aggrecan epitope showed two distinct response patterns based on whether they could recognize processed intact aggrecan. Fine mapping demonstrated that both types of T-cell recognized the same core epitope. The results are consistent with the generation of aggrecan-specific type A and type B T cells. Type B T cells were activated by supernatants released from degrading cartilage, indicating the presence of antigenic extracellular peptides or fragments of aggrecan. Type B T cells could play a role in the pathogenesis of proteoglycan-induced arthritis in mice, a model for rheumatoid arthritis, by recognizing extracellular peptides or protein fragments of joint autoantigens released by inflamed cartilage. PMID:26581676

  10. Bio-inspired microstructures in collagen type I hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Yahya; Verbridge, Scott S; Agah, Masoud

    2015-06-01

    This article presents a novel technique to fabricate complex type I collagen hydrogel structures, with varying depth and width defined by a single fabrication step. This technique takes advantage of reactive ion etching lag to fabricate three-dimensional (3-D) structures in silicon. Then, a polydimethylsiloxane replica was fabricated utilizing soft lithography and used as a stamp on collagen hydrogel to transfer these patterns. Endothelial cells were seeded on the hydrogel devices to measure their interaction with these more physiologically relevant cell culture surfaces. Confocal imaging was utilized to image the hydrogel devices to demonstrate the robustness of the fabrication technique, and to study the cell-extracellular matrix interaction after cell seeding. In this study, we observed that endothelial cells remodeled the sharp scallops of collagen hydrogel structures and compressed the structures with low degree of slope. Such patterning techniques will enhance the physiological relevance of existing 3-D cell culture platforms by providing a technical bridge between the high resolution yet planar techniques of standard lithography with more complex yet low resolution 3-D printing methods. PMID:25346472

  11. Temporal variation in the deposition of different types of collagen within a porous biomaterial implant.

    PubMed

    White, Jacinta F; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Bisucci, Teresa; Darby, Ian A; Ramshaw, John A M

    2014-10-01

    The deposition of new collagen in association with a medical implant has been studied using expanded polytetrafluoroethylene vascular replacement samples implanted subcutaneously in sheep, for up to 28 days. New type I collagen mRNA synthesis was followed by in situ hybridization, while the accumulation of new collagen types III, V, VI, XII, and XIV was followed by immunohistochemistry. All the collagen detected in the pores of the implant were newly deposited at various times after implantation and were not due to any pre-existing dermal collagen that may have been present around the implant. Collagen deposition was seen initially surrounding the implant and, with time, was seen to infiltrate within its pores. In situ hybridization showed that the majority of infiltrating cells had switched on mRNA that coded for type I collagen production. Histology showed that cellular infiltration increased with time, accompanied by increasing collagen deposition. The deposition of different collagen types happened at different rates. The type V and VI collagens preceded the major interstitial collagens in the newly deposited tissue, although at longer time points, detection of type V collagen appeared to decrease. After disruption of the interstitial collagens with enzyme, the "masked" type V collagen was clearly still visible by immunohistochemistry. Little type XII collagen could be seen within the porous mesh, although it was seen in the surrounding tissues. By contrast, type XIV was seen throughout the porous structure of the implanted mesh, with less being visible outside the material where type XII was more abundant. PMID:24243831

  12. Type II collagen screening in the human chondrodysplasias.

    PubMed

    Horton, W A; Campbell, D; Machado, M A; Chou, J

    1989-12-01

    Abnormalities of type II collagen have been considered strong candidates for causing human condrodysplasias. We have employed peptide mapping to screen for several types of type II colagen abnormalities in cartilage samples from 66 patients with 20 separate disorders. Except for achondrogenesis type II (Langer-Saldino) and spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED) congenita in which abnormalities have been described and diastrophic dysplasia in which the changes were probably secondary, no abnormalities were detected. Within the limitations of the screening technique, the results combined with other data from the literature suggest that abnormalities of this molecule are not common causes of chondrodysplasias outside of the achondrogenesis type II-SED congenita family of disorders. PMID:2624272

  13. Gel-like behavior in aggrecan assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horkay, Ferenc; Basser, Peter J.; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Geissler, Erik

    2008-04-01

    Aggrecan, a large biological polyelectrolyte molecule with a bottlebrush shape, forms complexes with hyaluronic acid (HA) that provide compressive resistance in cartilage. In solutions of aggrecan alone, the concentration dependence of the osmotic pressure Π is marked by self-assembly of the molecules into aggregates. When HA is added to the solution at low aggrecan concentration c, the osmotic pressure is reduced, but in the physiological concentration range this trend is reversed. The osmotic modulus c∂Π /∂c, which determines load bearing resistance, is enhanced in the HA-containing solutions. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements show that the aggregates behave like microgels and that they become denser as the aggrecan concentration increases. The degree of densification is greatest at large distance scales in the microgels, but decreases at short distance scales. Measurements at higher resolution, involving small angle neutron scattering and small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), confirm that at length scales shorter than 1000Å, the density is independent of the concentration and that the individual bottlebrushes in the microgels retain their identity. The absence of collective diffusion modes in the relaxation spectrum, measured by DLS and neutron spin echo, corroborates the lack of interpenetration among the aggrecan subunits in the microgel. Complexation with HA modifies the long-range spatial organization of the microgels. Comparison of the scattering pattern of the individual aggrecan molecules obtained from SAXS measurements with that of the complexes measured by DLS shows that the aggrecan-HA structure is denser and is more uniform than the random microgels. This enhanced space-filling property allows higher packing densities to be attained, thus, optimizing resistance to osmotic compression.

  14. An extracellular protease of Streptococcus gordonii hydrolyzes type IV collagen and collagen analogues.

    PubMed

    Juarez, Z E; Stinson, M W

    1999-01-01

    Streptococcus gordonii is a frequent cause of infective bacterial endocarditis, but its mechanisms of virulence are not well defined. In this study, streptococcal proteases were recovered from spent chemically defined medium (CDM) and fractionated by ammonium sulfate precipitation and by ion-exchange and gel filtration column chromatography. Three proteases were distinguished by their different solubilities in ammonium sulfate and their specificities for synthetic peptides. One of the enzymes cleaved collagen analogs Gly-Pro 4-methoxy-beta-naphthylamide, 2-furanacryloyl-Leu-Gly-Pro-Ala (FALGPA), and p-phenylazobenzyloxycarbonyl-Pro-Leu-Gly-Pro-Arg (pZ-peptide) and was released from the streptococci while complexed to peptidoglycan fragments. Treatment of this protease with mutanolysin reduced its 180- to 200-kDa mass to 98 kDa without loss of enzymatic activity. The purified protease cleaved bovine gelatin, human placental type IV collagen, and the Aalpha chain of fibrinogen but not albumin, fibronectin, laminin, or myosin. Enzyme activity was inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, indicating that it is a serine-type protease. Maximum production of the 98-kDa protease occurred during growth of S. gordonii CH1 in CDM containing 0.075% total amino acids at pH 7.0 with minimal aeration. Higher initial concentrations of amino acids prevented the release of the protease without reducing cell-associated enzyme levels, and the addition of an amino acid mixture to an actively secreting culture stopped further enzyme release. The purified protease was stored frozen at -20 degreesC for several months or heated at 50 degreesC for 10 min without loss of activity. These data indicate that S. gordonii produces an extracellular gelatinase/type IV collagenase during growth in medium containing minimal concentrations of free amino acids. Thus, the extracellular enzyme is a potential virulence factor in the amino acid-stringent, thrombotic, valvular lesions of bacterial

  15. Catabolism of aggrecan, decorin and biglycan in tendon.

    PubMed Central

    Rees, S G; Flannery, C R; Little, C B; Hughes, C E; Caterson, B; Dent, C M

    2000-01-01

    We have examined the catabolism of the proteoglycans aggrecan, decorin and biglycan in fresh tendon samples and in explant cultures of tissue from the tensional and compressed regions of young and mature bovine tendons. A panel of well-characterized antibodies that recognize glycosaminoglycan or protein (linear or neoepitope) sequences was used to detect proteoglycans and proteoglycan degradation products that were both retained within the tissue and released into the culture medium. In addition, a reverse-transcriptase-mediated PCR analysis was used to examine the mRNA expression patterns of tendon proteoglycans and aggrecanases. The results of this study indicate a major role for aggrecanase(s) in the catabolism of aggrecan in bovine tendon. The study also provides a characterization of glycosaminoglycan epitopes associated with the proteoglycans of tendon, illustrating age-related changes in the isomers of chondroitin sulphate disaccharides that remain attached to the core protein glycosaminoglycan linkage region after digestion with chondroitinase ABC. Evidence for a rapid turnover of the small proteoglycans decorin and biglycan was also observed, indicating additional molecular pathways that might compromise the integrity of the collagen matrix and potentially contribute to tendon dysfunction after injury and during disease. PMID:10926842

  16. Changes in gravity inhibit lymphocyte locomotion through type I collagen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellis, N. R.; Goodwin, T. J.; Risin, D.; McIntyre, B. W.; Pizzini, R. P.; Cooper, D.; Baker, T. L.; Spaulding, G. F.

    1997-01-01

    Immunity relies on the circulation of lymphocytes through many different tissues including blood vessels, lymphatic channels, and lymphoid organs. The ability of lymphocytes to traverse the interstitium in both nonlymphoid and lymphoid tissues can be determined in vitro by assaying their capacity to locomote through Type I collagen. In an attempt to characterize potential causes of microgravity-induced immunosuppression, we investigated the effects of simulated microgravity on human lymphocyte function in vitro using a specialized rotating-wall vessel culture system developed at the Johnson Space Center. This very low shear culture system randomizes gravitational vectors and provides an in vitro approximation of microgravity. In the randomized gravity of the rotating-wall vessel culture system, peripheral blood lymphocytes did not locomote through Type I collagen, whereas static cultures supported normal movement. Although cells remained viable during the entire culture period, peripheral blood lymphocytes transferred to unit gravity (static culture) after 6 h in the rotating-wall vessel culture system were slow to recover and locomote into collagen matrix. After 72 h in the rotating-wall vessel culture system and an additional 72 h in static culture, peripheral blood lymphocytes did not recover their ability to locomote. Loss of locomotory activity in rotating-wall vessel cultures appears to be related to changes in the activation state of the lymphocytes and the expression of adhesion molecules. Culture in the rotating-wall vessel system blunted the ability of peripheral blood lymphocytes to respond to polyclonal activation with phytohemagglutinin. Locomotory response remained intact when peripheral blood lymphocytes were activated by anti-CD3 antibody and interleukin-2 prior to introduction into the rotating-wall vessel culture system. Thus, in addition to the systemic stress factors that may affect immunity, isolated lymphocytes respond to gravitational changes

  17. Measurement of Elastic Modulus of Collagen Type I Single Fiber.

    PubMed

    Dutov, Pavel; Antipova, Olga; Varma, Sameer; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Schieber, Jay D

    2016-01-01

    Collagen fibers are the main components of the extra cellular matrix and the primary contributors to the mechanical properties of tissues. Here we report a novel approach to measure the longitudinal component of the elastic moduli of biological fibers under conditions close to those found in vivo and apply it to type I collagen from rat tail tendon. This approach combines optical tweezers, atomic force microscopy, and exploits Euler-Bernoulli elasticity theory for data analysis. This approach also avoids drying for measurements or visualization, since samples are freshly extracted. Importantly, strains are kept below 0.5%, which appear consistent with the linear elastic regime. We find, surprisingly, that the longitudinal elastic modulus of type I collagen cannot be represented by a single quantity but rather is a distribution that is broader than the uncertainty of our experimental technique. The longitudinal component of the single-fiber elastic modulus is between 100 MPa and 360 MPa for samples extracted from different rats and/or different parts of a single tail. Variations are also observed in the fibril-bundle/fibril diameter with an average of 325±40 nm. Since bending forces depend on the diameter to the fourth power, this variation in diameter is important for estimating the range of elastic moduli. The remaining variations in the modulus may be due to differences in composition of the fibril-bundles, or the extent of the proteoglycans constituting fibril-bundles, or that some single fibrils may be of fibril-bundle size. PMID:26800120

  18. Measurement of Elastic Modulus of Collagen Type I Single Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Dutov, Pavel; Antipova, Olga; Varma, Sameer; Orgel, Joseph P. R. O.; Schieber, Jay D.

    2016-01-01

    Collagen fibers are the main components of the extra cellular matrix and the primary contributors to the mechanical properties of tissues. Here we report a novel approach to measure the longitudinal component of the elastic moduli of biological fibers under conditions close to those found in vivo and apply it to type I collagen from rat tail tendon. This approach combines optical tweezers, atomic force microscopy, and exploits Euler-Bernoulli elasticity theory for data analysis. This approach also avoids drying for measurements or visualization, since samples are freshly extracted. Importantly, strains are kept below 0.5%, which appear consistent with the linear elastic regime. We find, surprisingly, that the longitudinal elastic modulus of type I collagen cannot be represented by a single quantity but rather is a distribution that is broader than the uncertainty of our experimental technique. The longitudinal component of the single-fiber elastic modulus is between 100 MPa and 360 MPa for samples extracted from different rats and/or different parts of a single tail. Variations are also observed in the fibril-bundle / fibril diameter with an average of 325±40 nm. Since bending forces depend on the diameter to the fourth power, this variation in diameter is important for estimating the range of elastic moduli. The remaining variations in the modulus may be due to differences in composition of the fibril-bundles, or the extent of the proteoglycans constituting fibril-bundles, or that some single fibrils may be of fibril-bundle size. PMID:26800120

  19. Non-helical type IV collagen polypeptides in human placenta.

    PubMed

    Kajimura, Daisuke; Takahashi, Seiichiro; Yoshikawa, Kiwamu; Hattori, Shunji; Sado, Yoshikazu; Imamura, Yasutada; Hayashi, Toshihiko

    2004-01-30

    Our previous reports showed that cultured human cells secrete non-disulfide-bonded non-helical alpha1(IV) and alpha2(IV) chains under physiological conditions. In the present report we show that the alpha(IV) chains in non-helical form were reactive to lectin ABA (Agaricus bisporus agglutinin), whereas the alpha(IV) chains secreted in triple-helical form were not. These results indicate that ABA could be used to distinguish the two conformational isomers of type IV collagen polypeptides. An alpha1(IV) chain isolated from human placenta with an antibody-coupled column showed a positive reaction to ABA, indicating that gelatin form of the type IV collagen alpha1(IV) chain is produced and retained in the tissue in vivo. A possible significance of the gelatin form is discussed from the finding that the non-helical alpha1(IV) chain purified with EDTA-free buffer contained degraded polypeptides including NC1-size domain and showed an apparent inhibition against activated pro-MMP-9. This is the first report to show that a gelatin form of protein exists in vivo. PMID:14715239

  20. Interaction of Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein/Thrombospondin 5 with Aggrecan*,S

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Faye Hui; Herndon, Mary E.; Patel, Nichlesh; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Tuan, Rocky S.; Lawler, Jack

    2010-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein/thrombospondin 5 (COMP/TSP5) is a major component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the musculoskeletal system. Its importance is underscored by its association with several growth disorders. In this report, we investigated its interaction with aggrecan, a major component of cartilage ECM. We also tested a COMP/TSP5 mutant, designated MUT3 that accounts for 30% of human pseudoachon-droplasia cases, to determine if the mutation affects function. Using a solid-phase binding assay, we have shown that COMP/ TSP5 can bind aggrecan. This binding was decreased with MUT3, or when COMP/TSP5 was treated with EDTA, indicating the presence of a conformation-dependent aggrecan binding site. Soluble glycosaminoglycans(GAGs)partially inhibited binding, suggesting that the interaction was mediated in part through aggrecan GAG side chains. Using affinity co-electrophoresis, we showed that COMP/TSP5, in its calcium-replete conformation, bound to heparin, chondroitin sulfates, and heparan sulfate; this binding was reduced with EDTA treatment of COMP/TSP5. MUT3 showed weaker binding than calcium-repleted COMP/TSP5. Using recombinant COMP/TSP5 fragments, we found that the “signature domain” could bind to aggrecan, suggesting that this domain can mediate the interaction of COMP/TSP5 and aggrecan. In summary, our data indicate that COMP/TSP5 is an aggrecan-binding protein, and this interaction is regulated by the calcium-sensitive conformation of COMP/TSP5; interaction of COMP with aggrecan can be mediated through the GAG side chains on aggrecan and the “signature domain” of COMP/TSP5. Our results suggest that COMP/TSP5 may function to support matrix interactions in cartilage ECM. PMID:17588949

  1. An Enzyme-sensitive PEG Hydrogel Based on Aggrecan Catabolism for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Skaalure, Stacey C.; Chu, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    A new cartilage-specific degradable hydrogel based on photoclickable thiol-ene PEG hydrogels is presented. The hydrogel crosslinks are composed of the peptide, CRDTEGE-ARGSVIDRC, derived from the aggrecanase-cleavable site in aggrecan. This new hydrogel is evaluated for use in cartilage tissue engineering by encapsulating bovine chondrocytes from different cell sources (skeletally immature (juvenile) and mature (adult) donors and adult cells stimulated with pro-inflammatory lipopolysaccharide (LPS)) and culturing for 12 weeks. Regardless of cell source, a two-fold decrease in compressive modulus is observed by 12 weeks, but without significant hydrogel swelling indicating limited bulk degradation. For juvenile cells, a connected matrix rich in aggrecan and collagen II, but minimal collagens I and X is observed. For adult cells, less matrix, but similar quality, is deposited. Aggrecanase activity is elevated, although without accelerating bulk hydrogel degradation. LPS further decreased matrix production, but did not affect aggrecanase activity. In contrast, matrix deposition in the non-degradable hydrogels consisted of aggrecan and collagens I, II and X, indicative of hypertrophic cartilage. Lastly, no inflammatory response in chondrocytes is observed by the aggrecanase-sensitive hydrogels. Overall, we demonstrate that this new aggrecanase-sensitive hydrogel, which is degradable by chondrocytes and promotes a hyaline-like engineered cartilage, is promising for cartilage regeneration. PMID:25296398

  2. Achondrogenesis type IB (Fraccaro): study of collagen in the tissue and in chondrocytes cultured in agarose.

    PubMed

    Freisinger, P; Stanescu, V; Jacob, B; Cohen-Solal, L; Maroteaux, P; Bonaventure, J

    1994-02-15

    A lethal chondrodysplasia characterized by extreme micromelia was diagnosed by ultrasound examination in two sibs whose nonconsanguineous parents were healthy. Radiographic and histopathologic data indicated that the two foetuses (18 and 21 weeks old) had achondrogenesis type IB (Fraccaro). Quantitation of total collagen extractable from dried cartilage samples demonstrated a 50% decrease when compared to an age-related control. This decrease was essentially related to type II collagen. Nevertheless, the alpha chains and the CB peptides of type II collagen had a normal electrophoretic mobility. A significant amount of collagen type I was also detected. The electrophoretic pattern of collagens type IX and XI did not differ significantly from control sample. The extracellular matrix elaborated by patient chondrocytes cultured in agarose for 10-12 days, contained less collagen type II than normal cells. Labelling with 14C-proline of cultured cells showed the presence of procollagen and type II collagen chains with a normal electrophoretic mobility, but an alpha 2(I) chain was detectable in the patient material, indicating the presence of collagen type I which supported the tissue findings. The significance of the type II collagen reduction in the patient's cartilage is unclear but it is unlikely to be the primary defect in achondrogenesis type I. PMID:8160740

  3. Critical VWF A1 Domain Residues Influence Type VI Collagen Binding

    PubMed Central

    Flood, Veronica H.; Gill, Joan Cox; Christopherson, Pamela A.; Bellissimo, Daniel B.; Friedman, Kenneth D.; Haberichter, Sandra L.; Lentz, Steven R.; Montgomery, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Von Willebrand factor (VWF) binds to subendothelial collagen at sites of vascular injury. Laboratory testing for von Willebrand disease (VWD), however, does not always include collagen binding assays (VWF:CB) and standard VWF:CB assays use type I and/or type III collagen rather than type VI collagen. Objectives We report here on several mutations that exclusively alter binding to type VI collagen. Patients/methods Healthy controls and index cases from the Zimmerman Program for the Molecular and Clinical Biology of VWD were analyzed for VWF antigen (VWF:Ag), VWF ristocetin cofactor activity, and VWF:CB with types I, III, and VI collagen. VWF gene sequencing was performed for all subjects. Results Two healthy controls and one type 1 VWD subject were heterozygous for an A1 domain sequence variation, R1399H, and displayed a selective decreased binding to type VI collagen but not types I and III. Expression of recombinant 1399H VWF resulted in absent binding to type VI collagen. Two other VWF A1 domain mutations, S1387I and Q1402P, displayed diminished binding to type VI collagen. An 11 amino acid deletion in the A1 domain also abrogated binding to type VI collagen. Conclusions VWF:CB may be useful in diagnosis of VWD, as a decreased VWF:CB/VWF:Ag ratio may reflect specific loss of collagen binding ability. Mutations that exclusively affect type VI collagen binding may be associated with bleeding, yet missed by current VWF testing. PMID:22507569

  4. Chondrocytes expressing intracellular collagen type II enter the cell cycle and co-express collagen type I in monolayer culture.

    PubMed

    Tekari, Adel; Luginbuehl, Reto; Hofstetter, Willy; Egli, Rainer J

    2014-11-01

    For autologous chondrocyte transplantation, articular chondrocytes are harvested from cartilage tissue and expanded in vitro in monolayer culture. We aimed to characterize with a cellular resolution the synthesis of collagen type II (COL2) and collagen type I (COL1) during expansion in order to further understand why these cells lose the potential to form cartilage tissue when re-introduced into a microenvironment that supports chondrogenesis. During expansion for six passages, levels of transcripts encoding COL2 decreased to <0.1%, whereas transcript levels encoding COL1 increased 370-fold as compared to primary chondrocytes. Flow cytometry for intracellular proteins revealed that chondrocytes acquired a COL2/COL1-double positive phenotype during expansion, and the COL2 positive cells were able to enter the cell cycle. While the fraction of COL2 positive cells decreased from 70% to <2% in primary chondrocytes to passage six cells, the fraction of COL1 positive cells increased from <1% to >95%. In parallel to the decrease of the fraction of COL2 positive cells, the cells' potential to form cartilage-like tissue in pellet cultures steadily decreased. Intracellular staining for COL2 enables for characterization of chondrocyte lineage cells in more detail with a cellular resolution, and it may allow predicting the effectiveness of expanded chondrocytes to form cartilage-like tissue. PMID:25043137

  5. Type VII Collagen Expression in the Human Vitreoretinal Interface, Corpora Amylacea and Inner Retinal Layers

    PubMed Central

    Wullink, Bart; Pas, Hendri H.; Van der Worp, Roelofje J.; Kuijer, Roel; Los, Leonoor I.

    2015-01-01

    Type VII collagen, as a major component of anchoring fibrils found at basement membrane zones, is crucial in anchoring epithelial tissue layers to their underlying stroma. Recently, type VII collagen was discovered in the inner human retina by means of immunohistochemistry, while proteomic investigations demonstrated type VII collagen at the vitreoretinal interface of chicken. Because of its potential anchoring function at the vitreoretinal interface, we further assessed the presence of type VII collagen at this site. We evaluated the vitreoretinal interface of human donor eyes by means of immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, immunoelectron microscopy, and Western blotting. Firstly, type VII collagen was detected alongside vitreous fibers6 at the vitreoretinal interface. Because of its known anchoring function, it is likely that type VII collagen is involved in vitreoretinal attachment. Secondly, type VII collagen was found within cytoplasmic vesicles of inner retinal cells. These cells resided most frequently in the ganglion cell layer and inner plexiform layer. Thirdly, type VII collagen was found in astrocytic cytoplasmic inclusions, known as corpora amylacea. The intraretinal presence of type VII collagen was confirmed by Western blotting of homogenized retinal preparations. These data add to the understanding of vitreoretinal attachment, which is important for a better comprehension of common vitreoretinal attachment pathologies. PMID:26709927

  6. A clinical study of canine collagen type III glomerulopathy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Collagen type III glomerulopathy (Col3GP), also known as collagenofibrotic glomerulonephropathy, is a rare renal disease with unknown pathogenesis that occurs in animals and humans. We recently described a naturally occurring canine autosomal recessive model of Col3GP, and the aim of the present work was to study the clinical features of canine Col3GP and compare with the human phenotype. In humans two different clinical syndromes with different age at onset (child- or adulthood) have been observed. In children a more aggressive course with familial occurrence is described, characterized by progressively increasing proteinuria, nephrotic syndrome, hypertension and chronic renal failure. A markedly increased serum level of the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) is considered a useful marker for the disease. Since Col3GP and concurrent hypocomplementemia have been observed in humans, we also aimed to investigate if hypocomplementemia was present in Col3GP affected dogs. A litter consisting of seven puppies, four Col3GP affected and three healthy unaffected, was observed from the day of birth until the affected puppies developed a mild or moderate renal azotemia. Results During the period of observation growth retardation, increasing blood pressure, progressive proteinuria, azotemia, hypoalbuminemia, hypercholesterolemia and increased serum PIIINP were observed in all the affected dogs. Hypocomplementemia was not detected. Affected dogs were euthanized between 109 and 144 days of age, and pathological examinations revealed ascites and massive glomerular accumulations of collagen type III, consistent with Col3GP. Conclusions Dogs with Col3GP develop juvenile chronic renal failure, preceded by nephrotic syndrome, elevated serum PIIINP and hypertension, thus have similar clinical features as the juvenile Col3GP in humans. Further studies of this naturally occurring canine phenotype may provide more information on the pathogenesis and

  7. AGGRECAN MODULATION OF GROWTH PLATE MORPHOGENESIS

    PubMed Central

    Domowicz, Miriam S.; Cortes, Mauricio; Henry, Judith G.; Schwartz, Nancy B.

    2009-01-01

    Chick and mouse embryos with heritable deficiencies of aggrecan exhibit severe dwarfism and premature death, demonstrating the essential involvement of aggrecan in development. The aggrecan-deficient nanomelic (nm) chick mutant E12 fully formed growth plate (GP) is devoid of matrix and exhibits markedly altered cytoarchitecture, proliferative capacity, and degree of cell death. While differentiation of chondroblasts to pre-hypertrophic chondrocytes (IHH expression) is normal up to E6, the extended periosteum expression pattern of PTCH (a downstream effector of IHH) indicates altered propagation of IHH signaling, as well as accelerated down-regulation of FGFR3 expression, decreased BrdU incorporation and higher levels of ERK phosphorylation, all indicating early effects on FGF signaling. By E7 reduced IHH expression and premature expression of COL10A1 foreshadow the acceleration of hypertrophy observed at E12. By E8, exacerbated co-expression of IHH and COL10A1 lead to delayed separation and establishment of the two GPs in each element. By E9, increased numbers of cells express P-SMAD1/5/8, indicating altered BMP signaling. These results indicate that the IHH, FGF and BMP signaling pathways are altered from the very beginning of GP formation in the absence of aggrecan, thereby inducing premature hypertrophic chondrocyte maturation, leading to the nanomelic long bone growth disorder. PMID:19268444

  8. Craniofacial abnormalities in mice carrying a dominant interference mutation in type X collagen.

    PubMed

    Chung, K S; Jacenko, O; Boyle, P; Olsen, B R; Nishimura, I

    1997-04-01

    Type X collagen is a short, non-fibril forming collagen restricted to hypertrophic cartilage, and has been hypothesized to play a role in endochondral ossification. The purpose of the study was to investigate the consequences resulting from the interference of type X collagen function on the growth and development of the craniofacial skeleton through analysis of transgenic mice with a dominant interference mutation for type X collagen. The craniofacial tissues of 21-day-old transgenic mice were examined by: cephalometric and radiographic densitometry analyses, conventional histology, and immunohistochemistry using antibodies specific for either endogenous mouse type X collagen or the transgene product. Genotypically positive mutant mice showed moderate but statistically significant craniofacial skeletal abnormalities, including the underdevelopment of the chondrocranium and mandible, but no cleft palate. Mean radiographic optical densities of the mutant condylar cartilage and the subchondylar areas were 32% less than the corresponding areas of normal mandibles, while mean radiographic optical density measured at the incisor tooth point remained constant. Histologically, transgene-positive mice revealed compressed hypertrophic cartilage zones and reduced trabeculae in both the mandibular condyle and the synchondroses of the chondrocranium. In the normal condyle, mouse type X collagen was localized by the monospecific antibody against a synthetic rat type X collagen NC1 peptide throughout the hypertrophic cartilage layer; in the mutant condyle, immunoreactivity to endogenous type X collagen was only seen sporadically. The truncated type X collagen transgene product, identified with the monoclonal antibody against an epitope within the chick type X collagen NC2 domain, persisted in the lower hypertrophic cartilage layer and the primary spongiosa, rather than being removed by subsequent endochondral ossification. The data suggested that the expression of the chick type

  9. Smad, but not MAPK, pathway mediates the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Hiroyuki; Hamanaka, Ryoji; Nakamura, Miki; Sumiyoshi, Hideaki; Matsuo, Noritaka; Yoshioka, Hidekatsu

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine how radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of collagen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta}1 mRNA is elevated earlier than those of collagen genes after irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smad pathway mediates the expression of collagen in radiation induced fibrosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAPK pathways are not affected in the expression of collagen after irradiation. -- Abstract: Radiation induced fibrosis occurs following a therapeutic or accidental radiation exposure in normal tissues. Tissue fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of collagen and other extracellular matrix components. This study investigated how ionizing radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of type I collagen. Real time RT-RCR showed that both {alpha}1and {alpha}2 chain of type I collagen mRNA were elevated from 48 h after irradiation with 10 Gy in NIH3T3 cells. The relative luciferase activities of both genes and type I collagen marker were elevated at 72 h. TGF-{beta}1 mRNA was elevated earlier than those of type I collagen genes. A Western blot analysis showed the elevation of Smad phosphorylation at 72 h. Conversely, treatment with TGF-{beta} receptor inhibitor inhibited the mRNA and relative luciferase activity of type I collagen. The phosphorylation of Smad was repressed with the inhibitor, and the luciferase activity was cancelled using a mutant construct of Smad binding site of {alpha}2(I) collagen gene. However, the MAPK pathways, p38, ERK1/2 and JNK, were not affected with specific inhibitors or siRNA. The data showed that the Smad pathway mediated the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis.

  10. Type IV collagen is a novel DEJ biomarker that is reduced by radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    McGuire, J D; Gorski, J P; Dusevich, V; Wang, Y; Walker, M P

    2014-10-01

    The dental basement membrane (BM) is composed of collagen types IV, VI, VII, and XVII, fibronectin, and laminin and plays an inductive role in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions during tooth development. The BM is degraded and removed during later-stage tooth morphogenesis; however, its original position defines the location of the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) in mature teeth. We recently demonstrated that type VII collagen is a novel component of the inner enamel organic matrix layer contiguous with the DEJ. Since it is frequently co-expressed with and forms functional complexes with type VII collagen, we hypothesized that type IV collagen should also be localized to the DEJ in mature human teeth. To identify collagen IV, we first evaluated defect-free erupted teeth from various donors. To investigate a possible stabilizing role, we also evaluated extracted teeth exposed to high-dose radiotherapy--teeth that manifest post-radiotherapy DEJ instability. We now show that type IV collagen is a component within the morphological DEJ of posterior and anterior teeth from individuals aged 18 to 80 yr. Confocal microscopy revealed that immunostained type IV collagen was restricted to the 5- to 10-µm-wide optical DEJ, while collagenase treatment or previous in vivo tooth-level exposure to > 60 Gray irradiation severely reduced immunoreactivity. This assignment was confirmed by Western blotting with whole-tooth crown and enamel extracts. Without reduction, type IV collagen contained macromolecular α-chains of 225 and 250 kDa. Compositionally, our results identify type IV collagen as the first macromolecular biomarker of the morphological DEJ of mature teeth. Given its network structure and propensity to stabilize the dermal-epidermal junction, we propose that a collagen-IV-enriched DEJ may, in part, explain its well-known fracture toughness, crack propagation resistance, and stability. In contrast, loss of type IV collagen may represent a biochemical rationale for the DEJ

  11. Region-dependent aggrecan degradation patterns in the rat intervertebral disc are affected by mechanical loading in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Iatridis, James C.; Godburn, Karolyn; Wuertz, Karin; Alini, Mauro; Roughley, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Structured Abstract Study Design Immunoblotting study to evaluate aggrecan degradation patterns in rat intervertebral discs(IVDs) subjected to mechanical overload. Objective To evaluate the effects of in vivo dynamic compression overloading on aggrecan degradation products associated with matrix metalloproteinase(MMP) and aggrecanase activity in different regions of the IVD. Summary of Background Data Aggrecan cleavage at the MMP and aggrecanase sites are important events in human IVD aging, with distinct cleavage patterns in the annulus and nucleus regions. No such information is available on regional variations in rat IVDs, nor on how such cleavage is affected by mechanical loading. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were instrumented with an Ilizarov-type device and subjected to dynamic compression (1 MPa and 1 Hz for 8 hours per day for 8 weeks). Control, sham, and overloaded IVDs were separated by disc region and analyzed for aggrecan degradation products using immunoblotting techniques with antibodies specific for the aggrecanase and MMP cleavage sites in the interglobular domain of aggrecan. Results Control IVDs exhibited strong regional variation in aggrecan degradation patterns with minimal degradation products being present in the nucleus pulposus(NP), degradation products associated with aggrecanase cleavage predominating in the inner annulus fibrosus(AF), and degradation products associated with MMP cleavage predominating in the outer annulus fibrosus. Dynamic compression overloading increased the amount of aggrecan degradation products associated with MMP cleavage particularly in the AF but also in the NP. Degradation profiles of sham IVDs were similar to control. Conclusions Aggrecan G1 regions resulting from proteolysis were found to have a strong regionally-specific pattern in the rat IVD, which was altered under excessive loading. The shift from aggrecanase to MMP-induced degradation products with dynamic compression overloading suggests that protein

  12. Collagen metabolism and basement membrane formation in cultures of mouse mammary epithelial cells: Induction of assembly on fibrillar type I collagen substrata

    SciTech Connect

    David, G.; van der Schueren, B.; van den Berghe, H. ); Nusgens, B.; Van Cauwenberge, D.; Lapiere, C. )

    1987-06-01

    Collagen metabolism was compared in cultures of mouse mammary epithelial cells maintained on plastic or fibrillar type I collagen gel substrata. The accumulation of dialysable and non-dialysable ({sup 3}H)hydroxyproline and the identification of the collagens produced suggest no difference between substrata in the allover rates of collagen synthesis and degradation. The proportion of the ({sup 3}H)collagen which accumulates in the monolayers of cultures on collagen, however, markedly exceeds that of cultures on plastic. Cultures on collagen deposit a sheet-like layer of extracellular matrix materials on the surface of the collagen fibers. Transformed cells on collagen produce and accumulate more ({sup 3}H)collage, yet are less effective in basement membrane formation than normal cells, indicting that the accumulation of collagen alone and the effect of interstitial collagen thereupon do not suffice. Thus, exogenous fibrillar collagen appears to enhance, but is not sufficient for proper assembly of collagenous basement membrane components near the basal epithelial cell surface.

  13. Clinical significance of serum laminin and type-IV collagen levels in cutaneous melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    TAS, FARUK; BILGIN, ELIF; KARABULUT, SENEM; DURANYILDIZ, DERYA

    2016-01-01

    Laminin and type-IV collagen constitute a significant portion of the extracellular matrix. The objective of the present study was to evaluate whether the serum concentrations of laminin and type-IV collagen may serve as biomarkers for cutaneous melanoma. Sixty pathologically confirmed melanoma patients were enrolled in the study. Serum laminin and type-IV collagen levels were assessed using an ELISA. Thirty healthy controls were also examined. No significant differences in the baseline serum levels of laminin were identified between melanoma patients and healthy controls (P=0.45). However, the baseline serum levels of type-IV collagen were significantly elevated in melanoma patients compared with those in the control group (P<0.001). Clinical parameters, including patient age, gender, localization of lesion, histopathology, stage of disease, serum lactate dehydrogenase concentrations and responsiveness to chemotherapy were found not to be associated with the serum levels of laminin and type-IV collagen (P>0.05). Furthermore, the serum levels of laminin and type-IV collagen had no prognostic value regarding the outcome for melanoma patients (P=0.36 and P=0.26, respectively). While laminin levels showed no diagnostic value, the serum concentrations of type-IV collagen were indicated to serve as a diagnostic marker in patients with cutaneous melanoma. In conclusion, type-IV collagen levels may be used as a diagnostic marker for cutaneous melanoma, while being void of any prognostic value. PMID:27330797

  14. Type IV collagen is a tumour stroma-derived biomarker for pancreas cancer

    PubMed Central

    Öhlund, D; Lundin, C; Ardnor, B; Öman, M; Naredi, P; Sund, M

    2009-01-01

    Background: Pancreas cancer is a dreaded disease with high mortality, despite progress in surgical and oncological treatments in recent years. The field is hampered by a lack of good prognostic and predictive tumour biomarkers to be used during follow-up of patients. Methods: The circulating level of type IV collagen was measured by ELISA in pancreas cancer patients and controls. The expression pattern of type IV collagen in normal pancreas, pancreas cancer tissue and in pancreas cancer cell lines was studied by immunofluorescence and Western blot techniques. Results: Patients with pancreas cancer have significantly increased circulating levels of type IV collagen. In pancreas cancer tissue high levels of type IV collagen expression was found in close proximity to cancer cells in the tumour stroma. Furthermore, pancreas cancer cells were found to produce and secrete type IV collagen in vitro, which in part can explain the high type IV collagen expression observed in pancreas cancer tissue, and the increased circulating levels in pancreas cancer patients. Of clinical importance, our results show that the circulating level of type IV collagen after surgery is strongly related to prognosis in patients treated for pancreas cancer by pancreatico-duodenectomy with curative intent. Persisting high levels of circulating type IV collagen after surgery indicates a quick relapse in disease and poor survival. Conclusion: Our results most importantly show that stroma related substances can be evaluated as potential cancer biomarkers, and thereby underline the importance of the tumour microenvironment also in this context. PMID:19491897

  15. Type I collagen aging impairs discoidin domain receptor 2-mediated tumor cell growth suppression.

    PubMed

    Saby, Charles; Buache, Emilie; Brassart-Pasco, Sylvie; El Btaouri, Hassan; Courageot, Marie-Pierre; Van Gulick, Laurence; Garnotel, Roselyne; Jeannesson, Pierre; Morjani, Hamid

    2016-05-01

    Tumor cells are confronted to a type I collagen rich environment which regulates cell proliferation and invasion. Biological aging has been associated with structural changes of type I collagen. Here, we address the effect of collagen aging on cell proliferation in a three-dimensional context (3D).We provide evidence for an inhibitory effect of adult collagen, but not of the old one, on proliferation of human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 cells. This effect involves both the activation of the tyrosine kinase Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) and the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2. DDR2 and SHP-2 were less activated in old collagen. DDR2 inhibition decreased SHP-2 phosphorylation in adult collagen and increased cell proliferation to a level similar to that observed in old collagen.In the presence of old collagen, a high level of JAK2 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation was observed while expression of the cell cycle negative regulator p21CIP1 was decreased. Inhibition of DDR2 kinase function also led to an increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation and a decrease in p21CIP1 expression. Similar signaling profile was observed when DDR2 was inhibited in adult collagen. Altogether, these data suggest that biological collagen aging could increase tumor cell proliferation by reducingthe activation of the key matrix sensor DDR2. PMID:27121132

  16. Short aggrecan gene repetitive alleles associated with lumbar degenerative disc disease in Turkish patients.

    PubMed

    Eser, O; Eser, B; Cosar, M; Erdogan, M O; Aslan, A; Yıldız, H; Solak, M; Haktanır, A

    2011-01-01

    We investigated a possible association between aggrecan gene polymorphism and lumbar degenerative disc disease in Turkish patients. One hundred 20-30-year-old patients with or without low back pain were selected for the study. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging was performed on all patients. The patient group had low back pain clinically and degenerative disc disease radiographically. The control group included patients with and without low back pain: all were negative radiographically for degenerative disc disease. Genomic DNA was extracted from all participants. A PCR assay were used to evaluate variable number of tandem repeat polymorphism of aggrecan gene alleles to determine if there was any correlation with degenerative disc disease. Significant associations were found between short repeated alleles of the aggrecan gene and severe disc degeneration. A significant association was also found between short repeated alleles of the aggrecan gene and multilevel disc herniation as well as extrusion and sequestration types of disc herniation. In Turkish population, short repeated alleles of the aggrecan gene are associated with increased disc degeneration and disc herniation. PMID:21948754

  17. Crucial role for the VWF A1 domain in binding to type IV collagen.

    PubMed

    Flood, Veronica H; Schlauderaff, Abraham C; Haberichter, Sandra L; Slobodianuk, Tricia L; Jacobi, Paula M; Bellissimo, Daniel B; Christopherson, Pamela A; Friedman, Kenneth D; Gill, Joan Cox; Hoffmann, Raymond G; Montgomery, Robert R

    2015-04-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) contains binding sites for platelets and for vascular collagens to facilitate clot formation at sites of injury. Although previous work has shown that VWF can bind type IV collagen (collagen 4), little characterization of this interaction has been performed. We examined the binding of VWF to collagen 4 in vitro and extended this characterization to a murine model of defective VWF-collagen 4 interactions. The interactions of VWF and collagen 4 were further studied using plasma samples from a large study of both healthy controls and subjects with different types of von Willebrand disease (VWD). Our results show that collagen 4 appears to bind VWF exclusively via the VWF A1 domain, and that specific sequence variations identified through VWF patient samples and through site-directed mutagenesis in the VWF A1 domain can decrease or abrogate this interaction. In addition, VWF-dependent platelet binding to collagen 4 under flow conditions requires an intact VWF A1 domain. We observed that decreased binding to collagen 4 was associated with select VWF A1 domain sequence variations in type 1 and type 2M VWD. This suggests an additional mechanism through which VWF variants may alter hemostasis. PMID:25662333

  18. Crucial role for the VWF A1 domain in binding to type IV collagen

    PubMed Central

    Schlauderaff, Abraham C.; Haberichter, Sandra L.; Slobodianuk, Tricia L.; Jacobi, Paula M.; Bellissimo, Daniel B.; Christopherson, Pamela A.; Friedman, Kenneth D.; Gill, Joan Cox; Hoffmann, Raymond G.; Montgomery, Robert R.; Abshire, T.; Dunn, A.; Bennett, C.; Lusher, J.; Rajpurkar, M.; Brown, D.; Shapiro, A.; Lentz, S.; Gill, J.; Leissinger, C.; Ragni, M.; Hord, J.; Manco-Johnson, M.; Strouse, J.; Ma, A.; Valentino, L.; Boggio, L.; Sharathkumar, A.; Gruppo, R.; Kerlin, B.; Journeycake, J.; Kulkarni, R.; Green, D.; Mahoney, D.; Mathias, L.; Bedros, A.; Diamond, C.; Neff, A.; DiMichele, D.; Giardina, P.; Cohen, A.; Paidas, M.; Werner, E.; Matsunaga, A.; Tarantino, M.; Shafer, F.; Konkle, B.; Cuker, A.; Kouides, P.; Stein, D.

    2015-01-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) contains binding sites for platelets and for vascular collagens to facilitate clot formation at sites of injury. Although previous work has shown that VWF can bind type IV collagen (collagen 4), little characterization of this interaction has been performed. We examined the binding of VWF to collagen 4 in vitro and extended this characterization to a murine model of defective VWF–collagen 4 interactions. The interactions of VWF and collagen 4 were further studied using plasma samples from a large study of both healthy controls and subjects with different types of von Willebrand disease (VWD). Our results show that collagen 4 appears to bind VWF exclusively via the VWF A1 domain, and that specific sequence variations identified through VWF patient samples and through site-directed mutagenesis in the VWF A1 domain can decrease or abrogate this interaction. In addition, VWF-dependent platelet binding to collagen 4 under flow conditions requires an intact VWF A1 domain. We observed that decreased binding to collagen 4 was associated with select VWF A1 domain sequence variations in type 1 and type 2M VWD. This suggests an additional mechanism through which VWF variants may alter hemostasis. PMID:25662333

  19. Pyridinium crosslinking and collagen types in myocardium and valve are altered in copper deficient swine

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, R.J.; Vadiamudl, R.K.; Medeiros, D.M.; Failla, M.L. Ohio State Univ., Columbus Dept. of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD )

    1991-03-15

    Weaned pigs were fed semipurified diets with either adequate or deficient Cu for 10 weeks and sacrificed at mean body wt of 49.1 and 45.8 ({minus}Cu) kg. Cu deficient pigs were characterized by decreased plasma and tissue Cu, plasma ceruloplasmin activity and hematocrit, and increased relative heart size. Collagen was extracted from left ventricle (LV) and bicuspid valves (BV) and analyzed for nonreducible collagen crosslink hydroxylsylpyridinoline (HP) by reverse phase HPLC and for type III and type I collagens by peptide mapping in SDS-PAGE after CNBr digestion. The quantity of collagen in LV and BV was not altered by Cu deficiency. However, pyridinium crosslinking was decreased in LV and in BV. Also, the proportion of type III collagen was higher in collagen extracted from LV and BV of Cu deficient pigs. These data show that dietary Cu deficiency reduced the concentration of mature crosslinks in cardiac collagen and was associated with a shift in collagen type to the form characteristic of developing tissues. Such changes in collagen may directly contribute to cardiac abnormalities associated with dietary Cu deficiency.

  20. In Situ D-periodic Molecular Structure of Type II Collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Antipova, Olga; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.

    2010-05-06

    Collagens are essential components of extracellular matrices in multicellular animals. Fibrillar type II collagen is the most prominent component of articular cartilage and other cartilage-like tissues such as notochord. Its in situ macromolecular and packing structures have not been fully characterized, but an understanding of these attributes may help reveal mechanisms of tissue assembly and degradation (as in osteo- and rheumatoid arthritis). In some tissues such as lamprey notochord, the collagen fibrillar organization is naturally crystalline and may be studied by x-ray diffraction. We used diffraction data from native and derivative notochord tissue samples to solve the axial, D-periodic structure of type II collagen via multiple isomorphous replacement. The electron density maps and heavy atom data revealed the conformation of the nonhelical telopeptides and the overall D-periodic structure of collagen type II in native tissues, data that were further supported by structure prediction and transmission electron microscopy. These results help to explain the observed differences in collagen type I and type II fibrillar architecture and indicate the collagen type II cross-link organization, which is crucial for fibrillogenesis. Transmission electron microscopy data show the close relationship between lamprey and mammalian collagen fibrils, even though the respective larger scale tissue architecture differs.

  1. Type VIII Collagen Mediates Vessel Wall Remodeling after Arterial Injury and Fibrous Cap Formation in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Joshua; Adiguzel, Eser; Gu, Steven; Liu, Shu-Lin; Hou, Guangpei; Heximer, Scott; Assoian, Richard K.; Bendeck, Michelle P.

    2014-01-01

    Collagens in the atherosclerotic plaque signal regulation of cell behavior and provide tensile strength to the fibrous cap. Type VIII collagen, a short-chain collagen, is up-regulated in atherosclerosis; however, little is known about its functions in vivo. We studied the response to arterial injury and the development of atherosclerosis in type VIII collagen knockout mice (Col8−/− mice). After wire injury of the femoral artery, Col8−/− mice had decreased vessel wall thickening and outward remodeling when compared with Col8+/+ mice. We discovered that apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is an endogenous repressor of the Col8a1 chain, and, therefore, in ApoE knockout mice, type VIII collagen was up-regulated. Deficiency of type VIII collagen in ApoE−/− mice (Col8−/−;ApoE−/−) resulted in development of plaques with thin fibrous caps because of decreased smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation and reduced accumulation of fibrillar type I collagen. In contrast, macrophage accumulation was not affected, and the plaques had large lipid-rich necrotic cores. We conclude that in atherosclerosis, type VIII collagen is up-regulated in the absence of ApoE and functions to increase smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration. This is an important mechanism for formation of a thick fibrous cap to protect the atherosclerotic plaque from rupture. PMID:23567639

  2. Secretion and assembly of type IV and VI collagens depend on glycosylation of hydroxylysines.

    PubMed

    Sipilä, Laura; Ruotsalainen, Heli; Sormunen, Raija; Baker, Naomi L; Lamandé, Shireen R; Vapola, Miia; Wang, Chunguang; Sado, Yoshikazu; Aszodi, Attila; Myllylä, Raili

    2007-11-16

    Most lysines in type IV and VI collagens are hydroxylated and glycosylated, but the functions of these unique galactosylhydroxylysyl and glucosylgalactosylhydroxylysyl residues are poorly understood. The formation of glycosylated hydroxylysines is catalyzed by multifunctional lysyl hydroxylase 3 (LH3) in vivo, and we have used LH3-manipulated mice and cells as models to study the function of these carbohydrates. These hydroxylysine-linked carbohydrates were shown recently to be indispensable for the formation of basement membranes (Ruotsalainen, H., Sipilä, L., Vapola, M., Sormunen, R., Salo, A. M., Uitto, L., Mercer, D. K., Robins, S. P., Risteli, M., Aszodi, A., Fässler, R., and Myllylä, R. (2006) J. Cell Sci. 119, 625-635). Analysis of LH3 knock-out embryos and cells in this work indicated that loss of glycosylated hydroxylysines prevents the intracellular tetramerization of type VI collagen and leads to impaired secretion of type IV and VI collagens. Mice lacking the LH activity of LH3 produced slightly underglycosylated type IV and VI collagens with abnormal distribution. The altered distribution and aggregation of type VI collagen led to similar ultrastructural alterations in muscle to those detected in collagen VI knockout and some Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy patients. Our results provide new information about the function of hydroxylysine-linked carbohydrates of collagens, indicating that they play an important role in the secretion, assembly, and distribution of highly glycosylated collagen types. PMID:17873278

  3. Matrix composition of cartilaginous anlagen in achondrogenesis type II (Langer-Saldino).

    PubMed

    Dertinger, Susanne; Söeder, Stephan; Bösch, Hubert; Aigner, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Skeletal dysplasias represent in vivo models of genetic defects. Achondrogenesis type II (Langer-Saldino), caused by a genetic defect in the major cartilage matrix protein, collagen type II, is a rare and severe skeletal dysplasia. It comprises a severe derangement of the fetal growth plate cartilage with subsequent ossification defects. In this study, we analyzed the matrix composition and cell differentiation pattern in 3 relatives with achondrogenesis type II. Most strikingly we found a strongly reduced collagen type II and moderately reduced aggrecan proteoglycan content in the dysplastic cartilage matrix. Type II collagen is, at least to some extent, replaced by collagens type I III, and VI. Ultrastructural analysis of the dysplastic cartilage matrix demonstrated a distended rER (rough endoplasmic reticulum), which is typical for this condition and most likely related to improper processing and retention of genetically altered type II collagen. Immunostaining for type IIA and X collagens suggest a severe delay in chondrocyte maturation. Thus, the genetic defect in the present cases leads most likely to a severe retention of collagen type II in the rER and, therefore, a strongly reduced collagen deposition and replacement by other interstitial collagens. However, the latter are less efficient in binding aggrecan proteoglycans in the dysplastic cartilage matrix. Additionally, a delay in chondrocyte maturation appears to be important in achondrogenesis type II. PMID:15574381

  4. Collagen degradation in rat skin but not in intestine during rapid growth: effect on collagen types I and III from skin.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, L; ChandraRajan, J

    1977-01-01

    Metabolic degradation of prelabeled collagen in whole body skin and whole intestine was compared to that of types I and III collagens from skin in young, rapidly growing rats. Pregnant rats were given [3H]proline during the last week of gestation; and after birth, littermates were compared. Between the second and sixth weeks of age, there was a 43% loss of radioactivity from dermal collagen but no significant loss of radioactivity from intestinal collagen. Pepsin treatment solubilized 90% of the dermal collagen but only 12% of intestinal collagen. Skin from 2- and 6-week-old rats yielded the same proportions of type I and type III collagens (type I, 82%; type III, 18%). The relative losses of total radioactivity from types I and III were similar to each other (50 and 44%, respectively) and to the loss from whole skin. Because types I and III collagens are known to be present in both skin and intestine, the marked degradation of both collagen types in skin but not in the intestine may be related to the amount and kind of intermolecular crosslinks present. PMID:266184

  5. Overexpression of type VI collagen in neoplastic lung tissues

    PubMed Central

    VOILES, LARRY; LEWIS, DAVID E.; HAN, LING; LUPOV, IVAN P.; LIN, TSANG-LONG; ROBERTSON, MICHAEL J.; PETRACHE, IRINA; CHANG, HUA-CHEN

    2014-01-01

    Type VI collagen (COL6), an extracellular matrix protein, is important in maintaining the integrity of lung tissue. An increase in COL6 mRNA and protein deposition was found in the lungs of patients with pulmonary fibrosis, a chronic inflammatory condition with a strong association with lung cancer. In the present study, we demonstrated overexpression of COL6 in the lungs of non-small cell lung cancers. We hypothesized that excessive COL6 in the lung interstitium may exert stimulatory effects on the adjacent cells. In vitro stimulation of monocytes with COL6 resulted in the production of IL-23, which may promote tumor development in an environment of IL-23-mediated lung inflammation, where tissue modeling occurs concurrently with excessive COL6 production. In addition, COL6 was capable of stimulating signaling pathways that activate focal adhesion kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 in lung epithelial cells, which may also facilitate the development of lung neoplasms. Taken together, our data suggest the potential role of COL6 in promoting lung neoplasia in diseased lungs where COL6 is overexpressed. PMID:25176343

  6. Relationship between serum and hepatic 7S fragments of type IV collagen in chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Suou, T; Yamada, S; Hosho, K; Yoshikawa, N; Kawasaki, H

    1996-05-01

    We evaluated the mechanism of increased serum concentrations of the 7S fragment of the N-terminal domain of type IV collagen (7S collagen) in chronic liver disease. We measured the concentrations of hepatic-free and deposited 7S collagens after extraction with Tris-HCl buffer and bacterial collagenase, then compared them with the serum levels in 8 normal controls and 48 patients with chronic liver disease. The hepatic 7S collagen levels extracted with Tris-HCl buffer and collagenase accounted for 7% and 93%, respectively, of the total 7S collagen levels in normal controls. Both hepatic 7S collagen levels as well as serum levels increased in accordance with the progress of liver disease. Serum levels of 7S collagen showed a closer correlation with the hepatic 7S collagen levels extracted with Tris-HCl buffer (r = .822), compared with those extracted with collagenase (r = .382). On the other hand, the histological degrees of liver fibrosis were highly correlated with the hepatic collagenase-extracted 7S collagen levels (r = .822), compared with serum and the hepatic Tris-HCl buffer-extracted levels (r = .478 and r = .537, respectively). Although there was no difference in serum and hepatic 7S collagen levels between B and C viral patients, the serum and hepatic Tris-HCl buffer-extracted 7S collagen levels were higher in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis than patients with viral cirrhosis. However, the hepatic collagenase-extracted levels were similar in both groups. Gel filtration demonstrated that the serum and hepatic Tris-HCl buffer-extracted 7S collagens were mainly eluted in the macromolecular 7S collagen-reactive fraction in cirrhosis, whereas the hepatic collagenase-extracted 7S collagen was eluted in the authentic 7S collagen-reactive fraction. The results suggest that serum 7S collagen levels are not a particularly reliable measure of hepatic fibrosis but reflect the enhanced metabolism, especially synthesis of type IV collagen in the liver. PMID:8621148

  7. Type I collagen gel protects murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells from TNFα-induced cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong-Ju; He, Wen-Qi; Chen, Ling; Liu, Wei-Wei; Xu, Qian; Xia, Ming-Yu; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Fujisaki, Hitomi; Hattori, Shunji; Tashiro, Shin-ichi; Onodera, Satoshi; Ikejima, Takashi

    2015-02-20

    Murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells have been used to test efficacy of proinflammatory cytokine TNFα. In the present study, we reported on protective effect of type I collagen gel used as L929 cell culture. L929 cell grew and proliferated well on collagen gel. However, the L929 cells exhibited cobblestone-like morphology which was much different from the spread fusiform shape when cultured on conventional cell dishes as well as the cells tended to aggregate. On conventional cell culture dishes, the cells treated with TNFα became round in shape and eventually died in a necroptotic manner. The cells cultured on collagen gel, however, were completely unaffected. TNFα treatment was reported to induce autophagy in L929 cells on the plastic dish, and therefore we investigated the effect of collagen gel on induction of autophagy. The results indicated that autophagy induced by TNFα treatment was much reduced when the cells were cultured on collagen gel. In conclusion, type I collagen gel protected L929 cell from TNFα-induced cell death. - Highlights: • Collagen gel culture changed the morphology of L929 cells. • L929 cell cultured on collagen gel were resistant to TNFα-induced cell death. • Collagen gel culture inhibited TNFα-induced autophagy in L929 cells.

  8. Effect of papain-based gel on type I collagen - spectroscopy applied for microstructural analysis

    PubMed Central

    Júnior, Zenildo Santos Silva; Botta, Sergio Brossi; Ana, Patricia Aparecida; França, Cristiane Miranda; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Deana, Alessandro; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil

    2015-01-01

    Considering the improvement of biomaterials that facilitate atraumatic restorative techniques in dentistry, a papain-based gel can be used in the chemomechanical removal of decayed dental tissue. However, there is no information regarding the influence of this gel on the structure of sound collagen. The aim of the present study was to investigate the adsorption of a papain-based gel (PapacarieTM) to collagen and determine collagen integrity after treatment. A pilot study was first performed with 10 samples of type I collagen membrane obtained from bovine Achilles deep tendon to compare the influence of hydration (Milli-Q water) on infrared bands of collagen. In a further experiment, 10 samples of type I collagen membrane were used to evaluate the effects of PapacarieTM on the collagen microstructure. All analyses were performed using the attenuated total reflectance technique of Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR). The results demonstrated that the application of PapacarieTM does not lead to the degradation of collagen and this product can be safely used in minimally invasive dentistry. As the integrity of sound collagen is preserved after the application of the papain-based gel, this product is indicated for the selective removal of infected dentin, leaving the affected dentin intact and capable of re-mineralization. PMID:26101184

  9. Rescue of type I collagen-deficient phenotype by retroviral-vector-mediated transfer of human pro alpha 1(I) collagen gene into Mov-13 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, A; Mulligan, R; Jaenisch, R

    1987-01-01

    A full-length cDNA clone corresponding to the human pro alpha 1(I) collagen gene was isolated and inserted into a retrovirus vector. Cell lines were obtained which produced recombinant viruses transducing the collagen cDNA (HUC virus). To test whether the transduced cDNA was functional, Mov-13 mouse cells were infected with the virus. These cells do not produce any type I collagen due to an insertional mutation of the pro alpha 1(I) gene which blocks transcription. While normal amounts of pro alpha 2(I) RNA were synthesized, no alpha 2(I) collagen chains were detectable in the mutant Mov-13 cells. Infection with HUC virus, however, resulted in the production of stable type I collagen, which was secreted into the medium. Analysis of pepsin-resistant proteins indicated that interspecies heterotrimers consisting of human alpha 1(I) and mouse alpha 2(I) collagen chains were secreted by the infected Mov-13 cells. Our results show that pro alpha (I) collagen chains from species as distant as human and mouse can associate to form stable type I collagen. The availability of a retrovirus vector transducing a functional pro alpha 1(I) collagen gene combined with the Mov-13 mutant system should enable us to study the effect of specific mutations on the synthesis, assembly, and function of type I collagen, not only in tissue culture but also in the animal. Images PMID:3599181

  10. Enterococcus faecalis adhesin, ace, mediates attachment to extracellular matrix proteins collagen type IV and laminin as well as collagen type I.

    PubMed

    Nallapareddy, S R; Qin, X; Weinstock, G M; Höök, M; Murray, B E

    2000-09-01

    Adhesin-mediated binding to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins is thought to be a crucial step in the pathogenic process of many bacterial infections. We have previously reported conditional adherence of most Enterococcus faecalis isolates, after growth at 46 degrees C, to ECM proteins collagen types I and IV and laminin; identified an E. faecalis-specific gene, ace, whose encoded protein has characteristics of a bacterial adhesin; and implicated Ace in binding to collagen type I. In this study, we constructed an ace disruption mutant from E. faecalis strain OG1RF that showed marked reduction in adherence to collagen types I and IV and laminin when compared to the parental OG1RF strain after growth at 46 degrees C. Polyclonal immune serum raised against the OG1RF-derived recombinant Ace A domain reacted with a single approximately 105-kDa band of mutanolysin extracts from OG1RF grown at 46 degrees C, while no band was detected in extracts from OG1RF grown at 37 degrees C, nor from the OG1RF ace mutant grown at 37 or 46 degrees C. IgGs purified from the anti-Ace A immune serum inhibited adherence of 46 degrees C-grown E. faecalis OG1RF to immobilized collagen type IV and laminin as well as collagen type I, at a concentration as low as 1 microg/ml, and also inhibited the 46 degrees C-evoked adherence of two clinical isolates tested. We also showed in vitro interaction of collagen type IV with Ace from OG1RF mutanolysin extracts on a far-Western blot. Binding of recombinant Ace A to immobilized collagen types I and IV and laminin was demonstrated in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and was shown to be concentration dependent. These results indicate that Ace A mediates the conditional binding of E. faecalis OG1RF to collagen type IV and laminin in addition to collagen type I. PMID:10948147

  11. Chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells on fish scale collagen.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Han-Hsiu; Uemura, Toshimasa; Yamaguchi, Isamu; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Junzo

    2016-08-01

    Fish collagen has recently been reported to be a novel biomaterial for cell and tissue culture as an alternative to conventional mammalian collagens such as bovine and porcine collagens. Fish collagen could overcome the risk of zoonosis, such as from bovine spongiform encephalopathy. Among fish collagens, tilapia collagen, the denaturing temperature of which is near 37°C, is appropriate for cell and tissue culture. In this study, we investigated chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) cultured on tilapia scale collagen fibrils compared with porcine collagen and non-coated dishes. The collagen fibrils were observed using a scanning electronic microscope. Safranin O staining, glycosaminoglycans (GAG) expression, and real-time PCR were examined to evaluate chondrogenesis of hMSCs on each type of collagen fibril. The results showed that hMSCs cultured on tilapia scale collagen showed stronger Safranin O staining and higher GAG expression at day 6. Results of real-time PCR indicated that hMSCs cultured on tilapia collagen showed earlier SOX9 expression on day 4 and higher AGGRECAN and COLLAGEN II expression on day 6 compared with on porcine collagen and non-coated dishes. Furthermore, low mRNA levels of bone gamma-carboxyglutamate, a specific marker of osteogenesis, showed that tilapia collagen fibrils specifically enhanced chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs in chondrogenic medium, as well as porcine collagen. Accordingly, tilapia scale collagen may provide an appropriate collagen source for hMSC chondrogenesis in vitro. PMID:26829997

  12. Propolis Modifies Collagen Types I and III Accumulation in the Matrix of Burnt Tissue.

    PubMed

    Olczyk, Pawel; Wisowski, Grzegorz; Komosinska-Vassev, Katarzyna; Stojko, Jerzy; Klimek, Katarzyna; Olczyk, Monika; Kozma, Ewa M

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing represents an interactive process which requires highly organized activity of various cells, synthesizing cytokines, growth factors, and collagen. Collagen types I and III, serving as structural and regulatory molecules, play pivotal roles during wound healing. The aim of this study was to compare the propolis and silver sulfadiazine therapeutic efficacy throughout the quantitative and qualitative assessment of collagen types I and III accumulation in the matrix of burnt tissues. Burn wounds were inflicted on pigs, chosen for the evaluation of wound repair because of many similarities between pig and human skin. Isolated collagen types I and III were estimated by the surface plasmon resonance method with a subsequent collagenous quantification using electrophoretic and densitometric analyses. Propolis burn treatment led to enhanced collagens and its components expression, especially during the initial stage of the study. Less expressed changes were observed after silver sulfadiazine (AgSD) application. AgSD and, with a smaller intensity, propolis stimulated accumulation of collagenous degradation products. The assessed propolis therapeutic efficacy, throughout quantitatively and qualitatively analyses of collagen types I and III expression and degradation in wounds matrix, may indicate that apitherapeutic agent can generate favorable biochemical environment supporting reepithelization. PMID:23781260

  13. Phospholipase D1 decreases type I collagen levels in hepatic stellate cells via induction of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Seo, H-Y; Jang, B-K; Jung, Y-A; Lee, E-J; Kim, H-S; Jeon, J-H; Kim, J-G; Lee, I-K; Kim, M-K; Park, K-G

    2014-06-20

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are major players in liver fibrogenesis. Accumulating evidence shows that suppression of autophagy plays an important role in the development and progression of liver disease. Phospholipase D1 (PLD1), which catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine to yield phosphatidic acid (PA) and choline, was recently shown to modulate autophagy. However, little is known about the effects of PLD1 on the production of type I collagen that characterizes liver fibrosis. Here, we examined whether PLD1 regulates type I collagen levels in HSCs through induction of autophagy. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PLD-1 (Ad-PLD1) reduced type I collagen levels in the activated human HSC lines, hTERT and LX2. Overexpression of PLD1 in HSCs led to induction of autophagy as demonstrated by increased LC3-II conversion and formation of LC3 puncta, and decreased p62 abundance. Moreover, inhibiting the induction of autophagy by treating cells with bafilomycin or a small interfering (si)RNA for ATG7 rescued Ad-PLD1-induced suppression of type I collagen accumulation in HSCs. The effects of PLD on type I collagen levels were not related to TGF-β/Smad signaling. Furthermore, treatment of cells with PA induced autophagy and inhibited type I collagen accumulation. The present study indicates that PLD1 plays a role in regulating type I collagen accumulation through induction of autophagy. PMID:24802400

  14. Aggrecan: approaches to study biophysical and biomechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Nia, Hadi Tavakoli; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Aggrecan, the most abundant extracellular proteoglycan in cartilage (~35 % by dry weight), plays a key role in the biophysical and biomechanical properties of cartilage. Here, we review several approaches based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) to probe the physical, mechanical, and structural properties of aggrecan at the molecular level. These approaches probe the response of aggrecan over a wide time (frequency) scale, ranging from equilibrium to impact dynamic loading. Experimental and theoretical methods are described for the investigation of electrostatic and fluid-solid interactions that are key mechanisms underlying the biomechanical and physicochemical functions of aggrecan. Using AFM-based imaging and nanoindentation, ultrastructural features of aggrecan are related to its mechanical properties, based on aggrecans harvested from human vs. bovine, immature vs. mature, and healthy vs. osteoarthritic cartilage. PMID:25325957

  15. Nonexpression of cartilage type II collagen in a case of Langer-Saldino achondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Eyre, D R; Upton, M P; Shapiro, F D; Wilkinson, R H; Vawter, G F

    1986-07-01

    A lethal short-limbed dwarfism was diagnosed at autopsy as the Langer-Saldino variant of achondrogenesis by radiological, histological, and gross pathological criteria. Cartilage was obtained for biochemical and ultrastructural analyses from the ends of long bones, from ribs and from a scapula of the newborn infant. At all sites, it had an abnormal gelatinous texture and translucent appearance. Biochemical analyses of the cartilages to identify pepsin-solubilized collagen alpha-chains and collagen-specific CNBr-peptides failed to detect type II collagen at any site where it would normally be the main constituent. Instead, type I was the predominant collagen present. However, three cartilage-specific minor collagen chains identified as 1 alpha, 2 alpha, and 3 alpha chains by their electrophoretic mobility were present at about 10% of the total collagen. Cartilage-specific proteoglycans also appeared to be abundant in the tissue judging by its high hexosamine content and high ratio of galactosamine to glucosamine. The findings indicate that a chondrocyte phenotype had differentiated but without the expression of type II collagen. In addition to the skeletal abnormalities, the severe pulmonary hypoplasia was also felt to be directly related to the underlying pathology in collagen expression. The term chondrogenesis imperfecta rather than achondrogenesis should be considered a more accurate description of this and related conditions. PMID:3752081

  16. Binding of human plasminogen to basement-membrane (type IV) collagen.

    PubMed

    Stack, M S; Moser, T L; Pizzo, S V

    1992-05-15

    Plasminogen, the zymogen form of the serine proteinase plasmin, has been implicated in numerous physiological and pathological processes involving extracellular-matrix remodelling. We have previously demonstrated that the activation of plasminogen catalysed by tissue plasminogen activator is dramatically stimulated in the presence of basement-membrane-specific type IV collagen [Stack, Gonzalez-Gronow & Pizzo (1990) Biochemistry 29, 4966-4970]. The present paper describes the binding of plasminogen to type IV collagen. Plasminogen binds to both the alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) chains of basement-membrane collagen, with binding to the alpha 2(IV) chain preferentially inhibited by 6-aminohexanoic acid. This binding is specific and saturable, with Kd,app. values of 11.5 and 12.7 nM for collagen and gelatin respectively. Although collagen also binds to immobilized plasminogen, this interaction is unaffected by 6-aminohexanoic acid. Limited elastase proteolysis of plasminogen generated distinct collagen-binding fragments, which were identified as the kringle 1-3 and kringle 4 domains. No binding of collagen to mini-plasminogen was observed. These studies demonstrate a specific interaction between plasminogen and type IV collagen and provide further evidence for regulation of plasminogen activation by protein components of the extracellular matrix. PMID:1599390

  17. The discrimination of type I and type II collagen and the label-free imaging of engineered cartilage tissue.

    PubMed

    Su, Ping-Jung; Chen, Wei-Liang; Li, Tsung-Hsien; Chou, Chen-Kuan; Chen, Te-Hsuen; Ho, Yi-Yun; Huang, Chi-Hsiu; Chang, Shwu-Jen; Huang, Yi-You; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2010-12-01

    Using excitation polarization-resolved second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy, we measured SHG intensity as a function of the excitation polarization angle for type I and type II collagens. We determined the second order susceptibility (χ((2))) tensor ratios of type I and II collagens at each pixel, and displayed the results as images. We found that the χ((2)) tensor ratios can be used to distinguish the two types of collagen. In particular, we obtained χ(zzz)/χ(zxx) = 1.40 ± 0.04 and χ(xzx)/χ(zxx) = 0.53 ± 0.10 for type I collagen from rat tail tendon, and χ(zzz)/χ(zxx) = 1.14 ± 0.09 and χ(xzx)/χ(zxx) = 0.29 ± 0.11 for type II collagen from rat trachea cartilage. We also applied this methodology on the label-free imaging of engineered cartilage tissue which produces type I and II collagen simultaneously. By displaying the χ((2)) tensor ratios in the image format, the variation in the χ((2)) tensor ratios can be used as a contrast mechanism for distinguishing type I and II collagens. PMID:20875682

  18. Mechanical properties of single electrospun collagen type I fibers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lanti; Fitié, Carel F C; van der Werf, Kees O; Bennink, Martin L; Dijkstra, Pieter J; Feijen, Jan

    2008-03-01

    The mechanical properties of single electrospun collagen fibers were investigated using scanning mode bending tests performed with an AFM. Electrospun collagen fibers with diameters ranging from 100 to 600 nm were successfully produced by electrospinning of an 8% w/v solution of acid soluble collagen in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFP). Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy showed that 45% of the triple helical structure of collagen molecules was denatured in the electrospun fibers. The electrospun fibers were water soluble and became insoluble after cross-linking with glutaraldehyde vapor for 24h. The bending moduli and shear moduli of both non- and cross-linked single electrospun collagen fibers were determined by scanning mode bending tests after depositing the fibers on glass substrates containing micro-channels. The bending moduli of the electrospun fibers ranged from 1.3 to 7.8 GPa at ambient conditions and ranged from 0.07 to 0.26 MPa when immersed in PBS buffer. As the diameter of the fibrils increased, a decrease in bending modulus was measured clearly indicating mechanical anisotropy of the fiber. Cross-linking of the electrospun fibers with glutaraldehyde vapor increased the shear modulus of the fiber from approximately 30 to approximately 50 MPa at ambient conditions. PMID:18082253

  19. Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome mutations in type III collagen differently stall the triple helical folding.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kazunori; Boudko, Sergei; Engel, Jürgen; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2013-06-28

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV is the most severe form of EDS. In many cases the disease is caused by a point mutation of Gly in type III collagen. A slower folding of the collagen helix is a potential cause for over-modifications. However, little is known about the rate of folding of type III collagen in patients with EDS. To understand the molecular mechanism of the effect of mutations, a system was developed for bacterial production of homotrimeric model polypeptides. The C-terminal quarter, 252 residues, of the natural human type III collagen was attached to (GPP)7 with the type XIX collagen trimerization domain (NC2). The natural collagen domain forms a triple helical structure without 4-hydroxylation of proline at a low temperature. At 33 °C, the natural collagenous part is denatured, but the C-terminal (GPP)7-NC2 remains intact. Switching to a low temperature triggers the folding of the type III collagen domain in a zipper-like fashion that resembles the natural process. We used this system for the two known EDS mutations (Gly-to-Val) in the middle at Gly-910 and at the C terminus at Gly-1018. In addition, wild-type and Gly-to-Ala mutants were made. The mutations significantly slow down the overall rate of triple helix formation. The effect of the Gly-to-Val mutation is much more severe compared with Gly-to-Ala. This is the first report on the folding of collagen with EDS mutations, which demonstrates local delays in the triple helix propagation around the mutated residue. PMID:23645670

  20. Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Mutations in Type III Collagen Differently Stall the Triple Helical Folding*

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Kazunori; Boudko, Sergei; Engel, Jürgen; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2013-01-01

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV is the most severe form of EDS. In many cases the disease is caused by a point mutation of Gly in type III collagen. A slower folding of the collagen helix is a potential cause for over-modifications. However, little is known about the rate of folding of type III collagen in patients with EDS. To understand the molecular mechanism of the effect of mutations, a system was developed for bacterial production of homotrimeric model polypeptides. The C-terminal quarter, 252 residues, of the natural human type III collagen was attached to (GPP)7 with the type XIX collagen trimerization domain (NC2). The natural collagen domain forms a triple helical structure without 4-hydroxylation of proline at a low temperature. At 33 °C, the natural collagenous part is denatured, but the C-terminal (GPP)7-NC2 remains intact. Switching to a low temperature triggers the folding of the type III collagen domain in a zipper-like fashion that resembles the natural process. We used this system for the two known EDS mutations (Gly-to-Val) in the middle at Gly-910 and at the C terminus at Gly-1018. In addition, wild-type and Gly-to-Ala mutants were made. The mutations significantly slow down the overall rate of triple helix formation. The effect of the Gly-to-Val mutation is much more severe compared with Gly-to-Ala. This is the first report on the folding of collagen with EDS mutations, which demonstrates local delays in the triple helix propagation around the mutated residue. PMID:23645670

  1. SPARC Promotes Cell Invasion In Vivo by Decreasing Type IV Collagen Levels in the Basement Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, Meghan A.; Jayadev, Ranjay; Miley, Ginger R.; Blebea, Catherine A.; Chi, Qiuyi; Ihara, Shinji; Sherwood, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of SPARC, a collagen-binding glycoprotein, is strongly associated with tumor invasion through extracellular matrix in many aggressive cancers. SPARC regulates numerous cellular processes including integrin-mediated cell adhesion, cell signaling pathways, and extracellular matrix assembly; however, the mechanism by which SPARC promotes cell invasion in vivo remains unclear. A main obstacle in understanding SPARC function has been the difficulty of visualizing and experimentally examining the dynamic interactions between invasive cells, extracellular matrix and SPARC in native tissue environments. Using the model of anchor cell invasion through the basement membrane (BM) extracellular matrix in Caenorhabditis elegans, we find that SPARC overexpression is highly pro-invasive and rescues BM transmigration in mutants with defects in diverse aspects of invasion, including cell polarity, invadopodia formation, and matrix metalloproteinase expression. By examining BM assembly, we find that overexpression of SPARC specifically decreases levels of BM type IV collagen, a crucial structural BM component. Reduction of type IV collagen mimicked SPARC overexpression and was sufficient to promote invasion. Tissue-specific overexpression and photobleaching experiments revealed that SPARC acts extracellularly to inhibit collagen incorporation into BM. By reducing endogenous SPARC, we also found that SPARC functions normally to traffic collagen from its site of synthesis to tissues that do not express collagen. We propose that a surplus of SPARC disrupts extracellular collagen trafficking and reduces BM collagen incorporation, thus weakening the BM barrier and dramatically enhancing its ability to be breached by invasive cells. PMID:26926673

  2. Akt mediated phosphorylation of LARP6; critical step in biosynthesis of type I collagen

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yujie; Stefanovic, Branko

    2016-01-01

    La ribonucleoprotein domain family, member 6 (LARP6) is the RNA binding protein, which regulates translation of collagen mRNAs and synthesis of type I collagen. Posttranslational modifications of LARP6 and how they affect type I collagen synthesis have not been studied. We show that in lung fibroblasts LARP6 is phosphorylated at 8 serines, 6 of which are located within C-terminal domain. Phosphorylation of LARP6 follows a hierarchical order; S451 phosphorylation being a prerequisite for phosphorylations of other serines. Inhibition of PI3K/Akt pathway reduced the phosphorylation of LARP6, but had no effect on the S451A mutant, suggesting that PI3K/Akt pathway targets S451 and we have identified Akt as the responsible kinase. Overexpression of S451A mutant had dominant negative effect on collagen biosynthesis; drastically reduced secretion of collagen and induced hyper-modifications of collagen α2 (I) polypeptides. This indicates that LARP6 phosphorylation at S451 is critical for regulating translation and folding of collagen polypeptides. Akt inhibitor, GSK-2141795, which is in clinical trials for treatment of solid tumors, reduced collagen production by human lung fibroblasts with EC50 of 150 nM. This effect can be explained by inhibition of LARP6 phosphorylation and suggests that Akt inhibitors may be effective in treatment of various forms of fibrosis. PMID:26932461

  3. SPARC Promotes Cell Invasion In Vivo by Decreasing Type IV Collagen Levels in the Basement Membrane.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Meghan A; Jayadev, Ranjay; Miley, Ginger R; Blebea, Catherine A; Chi, Qiuyi; Ihara, Shinji; Sherwood, David R

    2016-02-01

    Overexpression of SPARC, a collagen-binding glycoprotein, is strongly associated with tumor invasion through extracellular matrix in many aggressive cancers. SPARC regulates numerous cellular processes including integrin-mediated cell adhesion, cell signaling pathways, and extracellular matrix assembly; however, the mechanism by which SPARC promotes cell invasion in vivo remains unclear. A main obstacle in understanding SPARC function has been the difficulty of visualizing and experimentally examining the dynamic interactions between invasive cells, extracellular matrix and SPARC in native tissue environments. Using the model of anchor cell invasion through the basement membrane (BM) extracellular matrix in Caenorhabditis elegans, we find that SPARC overexpression is highly pro-invasive and rescues BM transmigration in mutants with defects in diverse aspects of invasion, including cell polarity, invadopodia formation, and matrix metalloproteinase expression. By examining BM assembly, we find that overexpression of SPARC specifically decreases levels of BM type IV collagen, a crucial structural BM component. Reduction of type IV collagen mimicked SPARC overexpression and was sufficient to promote invasion. Tissue-specific overexpression and photobleaching experiments revealed that SPARC acts extracellularly to inhibit collagen incorporation into BM. By reducing endogenous SPARC, we also found that SPARC functions normally to traffic collagen from its site of synthesis to tissues that do not express collagen. We propose that a surplus of SPARC disrupts extracellular collagen trafficking and reduces BM collagen incorporation, thus weakening the BM barrier and dramatically enhancing its ability to be breached by invasive cells. PMID:26926673

  4. Lysyl hydroxylase 3 glucosylates galactosylhydroxylysine residues in type I collagen in osteoblast culture.

    PubMed

    Sricholpech, Marnisa; Perdivara, Irina; Nagaoka, Hideaki; Yokoyama, Megumi; Tomer, Kenneth B; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2011-03-18

    Lysyl hydroxylase 3 (LH3), encoded by Plod3, is the multifunctional collagen-modifying enzyme possessing LH, hydroxylysine galactosyltransferase (GT), and galactosylhydroxylysine-glucosyltransferase (GGT) activities. Although an alteration in type I collagen glycosylation has been implicated in several osteogenic disorders, the role of LH3 in bone physiology has never been investigated. To elucidate the function of LH3 in bone type I collagen modifications, we used a short hairpin RNA technology in a mouse osteoblastic cell line, MC3T3-E1; generated single cell-derived clones stably suppressing LH3 (short hairpin (Sh) clones); and characterized the phenotype. Plod3 expression and the LH3 protein levels in the Sh clones were significantly suppressed when compared with the controls, MC3T3-E1, and the clone transfected with an empty vector. In comparison with controls, type I collagen synthesized by Sh clones (Sh collagen) showed a significant decrease in the extent of glucosylgalactosylhydroxylysine with a concomitant increase of galactosylhydroxylysine, whereas the total number of hydroxylysine residues was essentially unchanged. In an in vitro fibrillogenesis assay, Sh collagen showed accelerated fibrillogenesis compared with the controls. In addition, when recombinant LH3-V5/His protein was generated in 293 cells and subjected to GGT/GT activity assay, it showed GGT but not GT activity against denatured type I collagen. The results from this study clearly indicate that the major function of LH3 in osteoblasts is to glucosylate galactosylhydroxylysine residues in type I collagen and that an impairment of this LH3 function significantly affects type I collagen fibrillogenesis. PMID:21220425

  5. Lysyl Hydroxylase 3 Glucosylates Galactosylhydroxylysine Residues in Type I Collagen in Osteoblast Culture*

    PubMed Central

    Sricholpech, Marnisa; Perdivara, Irina; Nagaoka, Hideaki; Yokoyama, Megumi; Tomer, Kenneth B.; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2011-01-01

    Lysyl hydroxylase 3 (LH3), encoded by Plod3, is the multifunctional collagen-modifying enzyme possessing LH, hydroxylysine galactosyltransferase (GT), and galactosylhydroxylysine-glucosyltransferase (GGT) activities. Although an alteration in type I collagen glycosylation has been implicated in several osteogenic disorders, the role of LH3 in bone physiology has never been investigated. To elucidate the function of LH3 in bone type I collagen modifications, we used a short hairpin RNA technology in a mouse osteoblastic cell line, MC3T3-E1; generated single cell-derived clones stably suppressing LH3 (short hairpin (Sh) clones); and characterized the phenotype. Plod3 expression and the LH3 protein levels in the Sh clones were significantly suppressed when compared with the controls, MC3T3-E1, and the clone transfected with an empty vector. In comparison with controls, type I collagen synthesized by Sh clones (Sh collagen) showed a significant decrease in the extent of glucosylgalactosylhydroxylysine with a concomitant increase of galactosylhydroxylysine, whereas the total number of hydroxylysine residues was essentially unchanged. In an in vitro fibrillogenesis assay, Sh collagen showed accelerated fibrillogenesis compared with the controls. In addition, when recombinant LH3-V5/His protein was generated in 293 cells and subjected to GGT/GT activity assay, it showed GGT but not GT activity against denatured type I collagen. The results from this study clearly indicate that the major function of LH3 in osteoblasts is to glucosylate galactosylhydroxylysine residues in type I collagen and that an impairment of this LH3 function significantly affects type I collagen fibrillogenesis. PMID:21220425

  6. Tissue-specific expression of the human type II collagen gene in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lovell-Badge, R H; Bygrave, A; Bradley, A; Robertson, E; Tilly, R; Cheah, K S

    1987-01-01

    Type II collagen is crucial to the development of form in vertebrates as it is the major protein of cartilage. To study the factors regulating its expression we introduced a cosmid containing the human type II collagen gene, including 4.5 kilobases of 5' and 2.2 kilobases of 3' flanking DNA, into embryonic stem cells in vitro. The transformed cells contribute to all tissues in chimeric mice allowing the expression of the exogenous gene to be studied in vivo. Human type II collagen mRNA is restricted to tissues showing transcription from the endogenous gene and human type II collagen is found in extracellular matrix surrounding chondrocytes in cartilage. The results indicate that the cis-acting requirements for correct temporal and spatial regulation of the gene are contained within the introduced DNA. Images PMID:3033664

  7. Nonlinear optical properties of type I collagen fibers studied by polarization dependent second harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tuer, Adam E; Krouglov, Serguei; Prent, Nicole; Cisek, Richard; Sandkuijl, Daaf; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro; Wilson, Brian C; Barzda, Virginijus

    2011-11-10

    Collagen (type I) fibers are readily visualized with second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy though the molecular origin of the signal has not yet been elucidated. In this study, the molecular origin of SHG from type I collagen is investigated using the time-dependent coupled perturbed Hartree-Fock calculations of the hyperpolarizibilities of glycine, proline, and hydroxyproline. Two effective nonlinear dipoles are found to orient in-the-plane of the amino acids, with one of the dipoles aligning close to the pitch orientation in the triple-helix, which provides the dominant contribution to the SHG polarization properties. The calculated hyperpolarizability tensor element ratios for the collagen triple-helix models: [(Gly3)n]3, [(Gly-Pro2)n]3, and [(Gly-Pro-Hyp)n]3, are used to predict the second-order nonlinear susceptibility ratios, χ(zzz)(2)/χ(iiz)(2) and χ(zii)(2)/χ(iiz)(2) of collagen fibers. From SHG microscopy polarization in, polarization out (PIPO) measurements of type I collagen in human lung tissue, a theoretical method is used to extract the triple-helix orientation angle with respect to the collagen fiber. The study shows the dominant role of amino acid orientation in the triple-helix for determining the polarization properties of SHG and provides a method for determining the triple-helix orientation angle in the collagen fibers. PMID:21970315

  8. Carcinomas contain an MMP-resistant isoform of type I collagen exerting selective support to invasion

    PubMed Central

    Makareeva, Elena; Han, Sejin; Vera, Juan Carlos; Sackett, Dan L.; Holmbeck, Kenn; Phillips, Charlotte L.; Visse, Robert; Nagase, Hideaki; Leikin, Sergey

    2010-01-01

    Collagen fibers affect metastasis in two opposing ways, by supporting invasive cells but also generating a barrier to invasion. We hypothesized that these functions might be performed by different isoforms of type I collagen. Carcinomas are reported to contain α1(I)3 homotrimers, a type I collagen isoform normally not present in healthy tissues, but the role of the homotrimers in cancer pathophysiology is unclear. In this study, we found that these homotrimers were resistant to all collagenolytic matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). MMPs are massively produced and utilized by cancer cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts for degrading stromal collagen at the leading edge of tumor invasion. The MMP-resistant homotrimers were produced by all invasive cancer cell lines tested, both in culture and in tumor xenografts, but they were not produced by cancer-associated fibroblasts, thereby comprising a specialized fraction of tumor collagen. We observed the homotrimer fibers to be resistant to pericellular degradation, even upon stimulation of the cells with pro-inflammatory cytokines. Further, we confirmed an enhanced proliferation and migration of invasive cancer cells on the surface of homotrimeric vs. normal (heterotrimeric) type I collagen fibers. In summary, our findings suggest that invasive cancer cells may utilize homotrimers for building MMP-resistant invasion paths, supporting local proliferation and directed migration of the cells while surrounding normal stromal collagen is cleaved. Because the homotrimers are universally secreted by cancer cells and deposited as insoluble, MMP-resistant fibers, they offer an appealing target for cancer diagnostics and therapy. PMID:20460529

  9. Mussel adhesive protein provides cohesive matrix for collagen type-1α

    PubMed Central

    Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R.; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Wei, Wei; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the interactions between collagen and adhesive mussel foot proteins (mfps) can lead to improved medical and dental adhesives, particularly for collagen-rich tissues. Here we investigated interactions between collagen type-1, the most abundant loadbearing animal protein, and mussel foot protein-3 (mfp-3) using a quartz crystal microbalance and surface forces apparatus (SFA). Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic variants of mfp-3 were exploited to probe the nature of the interaction between the protein and collagen. Our chief findings are: 1) mfp-3 is an effective chaperone for tropocollagen adsorption to TiO2 and mica surfaces; 2) at pH 3, collagen addition between two mfp-3 films (Wc = 5.4 ± 0.2 mJ/m2) increased their cohesion by nearly 35%; 3) oxidation of Dopa in mfp-3 by periodate did not abolish the adhesion between collagen and mfp-3 films, and 4) collagen bridging between both hydrophilic and hydrophobic mfp-3 variant films is equally robust, suggesting that hydrophobic interactions play a minor role. Extensive H-bonding, π-cation and electrostatic interactions are more plausible to explain the reversible bridging of mfp-3 films by collagen. PMID:25770997

  10. Developmental Stage-dependent Regulation of Prolyl 3-Hydroxylation in Tendon Type I Collagen.

    PubMed

    Taga, Yuki; Kusubata, Masashi; Ogawa-Goto, Kiyoko; Hattori, Shunji

    2016-01-01

    3-Hydroxyproline (3-Hyp), which is unique to collagen, is a fairly rare post-translational modification. Recent studies have suggested a function of prolyl 3-hydroxylation in fibril assembly and its relationships with certain disorders, including recessive osteogenesis imperfecta and high myopia. However, no direct evidence for the physiological and pathological roles of 3-Hyp has been presented. In this study, we first estimated the overall alterations in prolyl hydroxylation in collagens purified from skin, bone, and tail tendon of 0.5-18-month-old rats by LC-MS analysis with stable isotope-labeled collagen, which was recently developed as an internal standard for highly accurate collagen analyses. 3-Hyp was found to significantly increase in tendon collagen until 3 months after birth and then remain constant, whereas increased prolyl 3-hydroxylation was not observed in skin and bone collagen. Site-specific analysis further revealed that 3-Hyp was increased in tendon type I collagen in a specific sequence region, including a previously known modification site at Pro(707) and newly identified sites at Pro(716) and Pro(719), at the early ages. The site-specific alterations in prolyl 3-hydroxylation with aging were also observed in bovine Achilles tendon. We postulate that significant increases in 3-Hyp at the consecutive modification sites are correlated with tissue development in tendon. The present findings suggest that prolyl 3-hydroxylation incrementally regulates collagen fibril diameter in tendon. PMID:26567337

  11. Mussel adhesive protein provides cohesive matrix for collagen type-1α.

    PubMed

    Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Wei, Wei; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the interactions between collagen and adhesive mussel foot proteins (mfps) can lead to improved medical and dental adhesives, particularly for collagen-rich tissues. Here we investigated interactions between collagen type-1, the most abundant load-bearing animal protein, and mussel foot protein-3 (mfp-3) using a quartz crystal microbalance and surface forces apparatus (SFA). Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic variants of mfp-3 were exploited to probe the nature of the interaction between the protein and collagen. Our chief findings are: 1) mfp-3 is an effective chaperone for tropocollagen adsorption to TiO2 and mica surfaces; 2) at pH 3, collagen addition between two mfp-3 films (Wc = 5.4 ± 0.2 mJ/m(2)) increased their cohesion by nearly 35%; 3) oxidation of Dopa in mfp-3 by periodate did not abolish the adhesion between collagen and mfp-3 films, and 4) collagen bridging between both hydrophilic and hydrophobic mfp-3 variant films is equally robust, suggesting that hydrophobic interactions play a minor role. Extensive H-bonding, π-cation and electrostatic interactions are more plausible to explain the reversible bridging of mfp-3 films by collagen. PMID:25770997

  12. Electrospun type 1 collagen matrices preserving native ultrastructure using benign binary solvent for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Elamparithi, Anuradha; Punnoose, Alan M; Kuruvilla, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    Electrospinning is a well-established technique that uses a high electric field to fabricate ultrafine fibrous scaffolds from both natural and synthetic polymers to mimic the cellular microenvironment. Collagen is one of the most preferred biopolymers, due to its widespread occurrence in nature and its biocompatibility. Electrospinning of collagen alone has been reported, with fluoroalcohols such as hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) and trifluoroethanol (TFE), but the resultant collagen lost its characteristic ultrastructural integrity of D-periodicity 67 nm banding, confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the fluoroalcohols used were toxic to the environment. In this study, we describe the use of glacial acetic acid and DMSO to dissolve collagen and generate electrospun nanofibers of collagen type 1, which is non-toxic and economical. TEM analysis revealed the characteristic feature of native collagen triple helical repeats, showing 67 nm D-periodicity banding pattern and confirming that the ultrastructural integrity of the collagen was maintained. Analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed fiber diameters in the range of 200-1100 nm. Biocompatibility of the three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds was established by MTT assays using rat skeletal myoblasts (L6 cell line) and confocal microscopic analysis of immunofluorescent-stained sections of collagen scaffolds for muscle-specific markers such as desmin and actin. Primary neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRVCM) seeded onto the collagen scaffolds were able to maintain their contractile function for a period of 17 days and also expressed higher levels of desmin when compared with 2D cultures. We report for the first time that collagen type 1 can be electrospun without blending with copolymers using the novel benign solvent combination, and the method can be potentially explored for applications in tissue engineering. PMID:25960178

  13. Increase in the relative level of type V collagen during development and ageing of the placenta.

    PubMed Central

    Iwahashi, M; Ooshima, A; Nakano, R

    1996-01-01

    AIM: To obtain some insight into the extracellular matrix in the placenta, changes in the composition of collagens during placental development were investigated. METHODS: Collagen was extracted from placentas (group 1, 25-30 weeks, n = 21; group 2, 31-36 weeks, n = 32; and group 3, 37-41 weeks of gestation, n = 40) and the relative concentrations of various collagens were evaluated by SDS-PAGE. RESULTS: The ratio of the intensity of the alpha 1 (III) band to that of alpha 1 (I) chain collagen in group 3 placentas were lower than those in group 1 placentas. In contrast, the ratio of the intensity of the alpha 1 (V) band to that of alpha 1 (I) chain collagen in group 3 placentas were higher than those in group 1 and group 2 placentas. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that type V collagen might play an important role in the function of the placenta and that an increased relative concentration of type V collagen might be closely associated with the development and ageing of the placenta. Images PMID:8944612

  14. Degradation of cartilage aggrecan by collagenase-3 (MMP-13).

    PubMed

    Fosang, A J; Last, K; Knäuper, V; Murphy, G; Neame, P J

    1996-02-12

    Degradation of the large cartilage proteoglycan aggrecan in arthritis involves an unidentified enzyme aggrecanase, and at least one of the matrix metalloproteinases. Proteinase-sensitive cleavage sites in the aggrecan interglobular domain (IGD) have been identified for many of the humman MMPs, as well as for aggrecanase and other proteinases. The major MMP expressed by chondrocytes stimulated with retinoic acid to degrade their matrix is collagenase-3 or MMP-13. Because of its potential role in aggrecan degradation we examined the specificity of MMP-13 for an aggrecan substrate. The results show that MMP-13 cleaves aggrecan in the IGD at the same site (..PEN314-FFG..) identified for other members of the MMP family, and also at a novel site ..VKP384-VFE.. not previously observed for other proteinases. PMID:8603731

  15. Biocompatibility of Novel Type I Collagen Purified from Tilapia Fish Scale: An In Vitro Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jia; Saito, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Type I collagen (COL-1) is the prevailing component of the extracellular matrix in a number of tissues including skin, ligament, cartilage, bone, and dentin. It is the most widely used tissue-derived natural polymer. Currently, mammalian animals, including pig, cow, and rat, are the three major sources for purification of COL-1. To reduce the risk of zoonotic infectious diseases transmission, minimize the possibility of immunogenic reaction, and avoid problems related to religious issues, exploration of new sources (other than mammalian animals) for the purification of type I collagen is highly desirable. Hence, the purpose of the current study was to investigate the in vitro responses of MDPC-23 to type I collagen isolated from tilapia scale in terms of cellular proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization. The results suggested that tilapia scale collagen exhibited comparable biocompatibility to porcine skin collagen, indicating it might be a potential alternative to type I collagen from mammals in the application for tissue regeneration in oral-maxillofacial area. PMID:26491653

  16. Biocompatibility of Novel Type I Collagen Purified from Tilapia Fish Scale: An In Vitro Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jia; Saito, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Type I collagen (COL-1) is the prevailing component of the extracellular matrix in a number of tissues including skin, ligament, cartilage, bone, and dentin. It is the most widely used tissue-derived natural polymer. Currently, mammalian animals, including pig, cow, and rat, are the three major sources for purification of COL-1. To reduce the risk of zoonotic infectious diseases transmission, minimize the possibility of immunogenic reaction, and avoid problems related to religious issues, exploration of new sources (other than mammalian animals) for the purification of type I collagen is highly desirable. Hence, the purpose of the current study was to investigate the in vitro responses of MDPC-23 to type I collagen isolated from tilapia scale in terms of cellular proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization. The results suggested that tilapia scale collagen exhibited comparable biocompatibility to porcine skin collagen, indicating it might be a potential alternative to type I collagen from mammals in the application for tissue regeneration in oral-maxillofacial area. PMID:26491653

  17. Production of type VI collagen by human macrophages: a new dimension in macrophage functional heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Schnoor, Michael; Cullen, Paul; Lorkowski, Julia; Stolle, Katrin; Robenek, Horst; Troyer, David; Rauterberg, Jürgen; Lorkowski, Stefan

    2008-04-15

    Macrophages derived from human blood monocytes perform many tasks related to tissue injury and repair. The main effect of macrophages on the extracellular matrix is considered to be destructive in nature, because macrophages secrete metalloproteinases and ingest foreign material as part of the remodeling process that occurs in wound healing and other pathological conditions. However, macrophages also contribute to the extracellular matrix and hence to tissue stabilization both indirectly, by inducing other cells to proliferate and to release matrix components, and directly, by secreting components of the extracellular matrix such as fibronectin and type VIII collagen, as we have recently shown. We now report that monocytes and macrophages express virtually all known collagen and collagen-related mRNAs. Furthermore, macrophages secrete type VI collagen protein abundantly, depending upon their mode of activation, stage of differentiation, and cell density. The primary function of type VI collagen secreted by macrophages appears to be modulation of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. We suggest that the production of type VI collagen is a marker for a nondestructive, matrix-conserving macrophage phenotype that could profoundly influence physiological and pathophysiological conditions in vivo. PMID:18390756

  18. Characterization of binding of LARP6 to the 5’ stem-loop of collagen mRNAs: Implications for synthesis of type I collagen

    PubMed Central

    Stefanovic, Lela; Longo, Liam; Zhang, Yujie; Stefanovic, Branko

    2014-01-01

    Type I collagen is composed of 2 polypeptides, α1(I) and α2(I), which fold into triple helix. Collagen α1(I) and α2(I) mRNAs have a conserved stem-loop structure in their 5’ UTRs, the 5’SL. LARP6 binds the 5’SL to regulate type I collagen expression. We show that 5 nucleotides within the single stranded regions of 5’SL contribute to the high affinity of LARP6 binding. Mutation of individual nucleotides abolishes the binding in gel mobility shift assay. LARP6 binding to 5’SL of collagen α2(I) mRNA is more stable than the binding to 5’SL of α1(I) mRNA, although the equilibrium binding constants are similar. The more stable binding to α2(I) mRNA may favor synthesis of the heterotrimeric type I collagen. LARP6 needs 2 domains to contact 5’SL, the La domain and the RRM. T133 in the La domain is critical for folding of the protein, while loop 3 in the RRM is critical for binding 5’SL. Loop 3 is also involved in the interaction of LARP6 and protein translocation channel SEC61. This interaction is essential for type I collagen synthesis, because LARP6 mutant which binds 5’SL but which does not interact with SEC61, suppresses collagen synthesis in a dominant negative manner. We postulate that LARP6 directly targets collagen mRNAs to the SEC61 translocons to facilitate coordinated translation of the 2 collagen mRNAs. The unique sequences of LARP6 identified in this work may have evolved to enable its role in type I collagen biosynthesis. PMID:25692237

  19. Type IV collagen-initiated signals provide survival and growth cues required for liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Burnier, J V; Wang, N; Michel, R P; Hassanain, M; Li, S; Lu, Y; Metrakos, P; Antecka, E; Burnier, M N; Ponton, A; Gallinger, S; Brodt, P

    2011-09-01

    The liver is a major site of metastasis for human malignancies, yet the factors that regulate tumor cell survival and growth in this organ remain elusive. Previously, we reported that M-27(IGF-IR) murine lung carcinoma cells with ectopic insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I) receptor overexpression acquired a site-specific, liver-metastasizing potential. Gene expression profiling and subsequent RNA and protein analyses revealed that this was associated with major changes to the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) protein-encoding genes including type III, IV and XVIII collagen genes, and these changes were also observed in the respective tumors in vivo. Because type IV collagen was the most prominently altered ECM protein in this model, we further analyzed its functional relevance to liver metastasis. M-27 cells stably overexpressing type IV collagen α1 and α2 chains were generated and their growth and metastatic properties investigated. We found that these cells acquired a site-selective growth advantage in the liver and this was associated with cell rescue from anoikis in a collagen IV/α2 integrin/FAK-dependent manner and increased responsiveness to IGF-I. Conversely, collagen IV or focal adhesion kinase (FAK) silencing by small-interfering RNA in highly metastatic tumor cells enhanced anoikis and decreased liver metastases formation. Moreover, analysis of human surgical specimens revealed uniformly high collagen IV expression in 65/65 hepatic metastases analyzed, regardless of tissue of origin, whereas it was variable and generally low in 50/50 primary colorectal carcinoma specimens examined. The results suggest that collagen IV-conveyed signals are essential cues for liver metastasis in diverse tumor types and identify mediators of collagen IV signaling as potential therapeutic targets in the management of hepatic metastases. PMID:21478904

  20. Posttranslational Modifications in Type I Collagen from Different Tissues Extracted from Wild Type and Prolyl 3-Hydroxylase 1 Null Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Pokidysheva, Elena; Zientek, Keith D.; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Mizuno, Kazunori; Vranka, Janice A.; Montgomery, Nathan T.; Keene, Douglas R.; Kawaguchi, Tatsuya; Okuyama, Kenji; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2013-01-01

    Type I collagen extracted from tendon, skin, and bone of wild type and prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1) null mice shows distinct patterns of 3-hydroxylation and glycosylation of hydroxylysine residues. The A1 site (Pro-986) in the α1-chain of type I collagen is almost completely 3-hydroxylated in every tissue of the wild type mice. In contrast, no 3-hydroxylation of this proline residue was found in P3H1 null mice. Partial 3-hydroxylation of the A3 site (Pro-707) was present in tendon and bone, but absent in skin in both α-chains of the wild type animals. Type I collagen extracted from bone of P3H1 null mice shows a large reduction in 3-hydroxylation of the A3 site in both α-chains, whereas type I collagen extracted from tendon of P3H1 null mice shows little difference as compared with wild type. These results demonstrate that the A1 site in type I collagen is exclusively 3-hydroxylated by P3H1, and presumably, this enzyme is required for the 3-hydroxylation of the A3 site of both α-chains in bone but not in tendon. The increase in glycosylation of hydroxylysine in P3H1 null mice in bone was found to be due to an increased occupancy of normally glycosylated sites. Despite the severe disorganization of collagen fibrils in adult tissues, the D-period of the fibrils is unchanged. Tendon fibrils of newborn P3H1 null mice are well organized with only a slight increase in diameter. The absence of 3-hydroxyproline and/or the increased glycosylation of hydroxylysine in type I collagen disturbs the lateral growth of the fibrils. PMID:23861401

  1. Nanostructure and mechanics of mummified type I collagen from the 5300-year-old Tyrolean Iceman

    PubMed Central

    Janko, Marek; Zink, Albert; Gigler, Alexander M.; Heckl, Wolfgang M.; Stark, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Skin protects the body from pathogens and degradation. Mummified skin in particular is extremely resistant to decomposition. External influences or the action of micro-organisms, however, can degrade the connective tissue and lay the subjacent tissue open. To determine the degree of tissue preservation in mummified human skin and, in particular, the reason for its durability, we investigated the structural integrity of its main protein, type I collagen. We extracted samples from the Neolithic glacier mummy known as ‘the Iceman’. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed collagen fibrils that had characteristic banding patterns of 69 ± 5 nm periodicity. Both the microstructure and the ultrastructure of dermal collagen bundles and fibrils were largely unaltered and extremely well preserved by the natural conservation process. Raman spectra of the ancient collagen indicated that there were no significant modifications in the molecular structure. However, AFM nanoindentation measurements showed slight changes in the mechanical behaviour of the fibrils. Young's modulus of single mummified fibrils was 4.1 ± 1.1 GPa, whereas the elasticity of recent collagen averages 3.2 ± 1.0 GPa. The excellent preservation of the collagen indicates that dehydration owing to freeze-drying of the collagen is the main process in mummification and that the influence of the degradation processes can be addressed, even after 5300 years. PMID:20356896

  2. Collagen gene expression by cultured human skin fibroblasts. Abundant steady-state levels of type VI procollagen messenger RNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, D R; Peltonen, J; Jaakkola, S; Chu, M L; Uitto, J

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that procollagen types I and III are the major collagenous gene products of cultured human skin fibroblasts. In this study the expression of 10 different genes, encoding the subunit polypeptides for collagen types I-VI, by human skin fibroblasts in culture was analyzed by molecular hybridizations. Northern transfer analysis demonstrated the presence of specific mRNA transcripts for collagen types I, III, IV, V, and VI, but not for type II collagen. Quantitation of the abundance of these mRNAs by slot blot hybridizations revealed that type I, III, and VI procollagens were the major collagenous gene products of skin fibroblasts in culture. The mRNAs for type IV and V collagens represented only a small percentage of the total collagenous mRNA transcripts. Further analysis by in situ hybridization demonstrated that the majority of the cultured cells coexpressed the genes for type I, III, and VI procollagen pro-alpha chains. Further in situ hybridization analyses revealed the expression of type VI collagen genes in normal human skin. These data demonstrate that human skin fibroblast cultures can be used to study the transcriptional regulation of at least nine genetically distinct procollagen genes. The data further suggest that type VI collagen, in addition to types I and III, may be a major collagenous component of human skin. Images PMID:2921321

  3. A novel component of epidermal cell-matrix and cell-cell contacts: transmembrane protein type XIII collagen.

    PubMed

    Peltonen, S; Hentula, M; Hägg, P; Ylä-Outinen, H; Tuukkanen, J; Lakkakorpi, J; Rehn, M; Pihlajaniemi, T; Peltonen, J

    1999-10-01

    Type XIII collagen is a short chain collagen which has recently been shown to be a transmembrane protein. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the presence and localization of type XIII collagen in normal human skin and cultured keratinocytes. Expression of type XIII collagen was demonstrated in normal human skin and epidermis at the RNA level using reverse transcription followed by polymerase chain reaction and at the protein level using western blotting and indirect immunofluorescence labeling. Immunolabeling of epidermis revealed type XIII collagen both in the cell-cell contact sites and in the dermal-epidermal junction. In cultured keratinocytes type XIII collagen epitopes were detected in focal contacts and in intercellular contacts. The results of this study show very little colocalization of type XIII collagen and desmosomal components at the light microscopic level. Thus, these results suggest that type XIII collagen is unlikely to be a component of desmosomes. Instead, the punctate labeling pattern of type XIII collagen at the cell-cell contact sites and high degree of colocalization with E-cadherin suggests that type XIII collagen is very likely to be closely associated with adherens type junctions, and may, in fact, be a component of these junctions. PMID:10504453

  4. Methacrylation Induces Rapid, Temperature-Dependent, Reversible Self-Assembly of Type-I Collagen

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Type-I collagen self-assembles into a fibrillar gel at physiological temperature and pH to provide a cell-adhesive, supportive, structural network. As such, it is an attractive, popular scaffold for in vitro evaluations of cellular behavior and for tissue engineering applications. In this study, type-I collagen is modified to introduce methacrylate groups on the free amines of the lysine residues to create collagen methacrylamide (CMA). CMA retains the properties of collagen such as self-assembly, biodegradability, and natural bioactivity but is also photoactive and can be rapidly cross-linked or functionalized with acrylated molecules when irradiated with ultraviolet light in the presence of a photoinitiator. CMA also demonstrates unique temperature-dependent behavior. For natural type-I collagen, the overall structure of the fiber network remains largely static over time scales of a few hours upon heating and cooling at temperatures below its denaturation point. CMA, however, is rapidly thermoreversible and will oscillate between a liquid macromer suspension and a semisolid fibrillar hydrogel when the temperature is modulated between 10 and 37 °C. Using a series of mechanical, scattering, and spectroscopic methods, we demonstrate that structural reversibility is manifest across multiple scales from the protein topology of the triple helix up through the rheological properties of the CMA hydrogel. Electron microscopy imaging of CMA after various stages of heating and cooling shows that the canonical collagen-like D-periodic banding ultrastructure of the fibers is preserved. A rapidly thermoreversible collagen-based hydrogel is expected to have wide utility in tissue engineering and drug delivery applications as a biofunctional, biocompatible material. Thermal reversibility also makes CMA a powerful model for studying the complex process of hierarchical collagen self-assembly. PMID:25208340

  5. The extracellular matrix of hydra is a porous sheet and contains type IV collagen.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroshi; Aufschnaiter, Roland; Li, Li; Sarras, Michael P; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Abrahamson, Dale R; Sado, Yoshikazu; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2008-01-01

    Hydra, as an early diploblastic metazoan, has a well-defined extracellular matrix (ECM) called mesoglea. It is organized in a tri-laminar pattern with one centrally located interstitial matrix that contains type I collagen and two sub-epithelial zones that resemble a basal lamina containing laminin and possibly type IV collagen. This study used monoclonal antibodies to the three hydra mesoglea components (type I, type IV collagens and laminin) and immunofluorescent staining to visualize hydra mesoglea structure and the relationship between these mesoglea components. In addition, hydra mesoglea was isolated free of cells and studied with immunofluorescence and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Our results show that type IV collagen co-localizes with laminin in the basal lamina whereas type I collagen forms a grid pattern of fibers in the interstitial matrix. The isolated mesoglea can maintain its structural stability without epithelial cell attachment. Hydra mesoglea is porous with multiple trans-mesoglea pores ranging from 0.5 to 1 microm in diameter and about six pores per 100 microm(2) in density. We think these trans-mesoglea pores provide a structural base for epithelial cells on both sides to form multiple trans-mesoglea cell-cell contacts. Based on these findings, we propose a new model of hydra mesoglea structure. PMID:18602803

  6. The extracellular matrix of hydra is a porous sheet and contains type IV collagen

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Hiroshi; Aufschnaiter, Roland; Li, Li; Sarras, Michael P.; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Abrahamson, Dale R.; Sado, Yoshikazu; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2008-01-01

    Hydra, as an early diploblastic metazoan, has a well defined extracellular matrix (ECM) called-mesoglea. It is organized in a tri-laminar pattern with one centrally located interstitial matrix that contains type I collagen and two sub-epithelial zones that resemble a basal lamina containing laminin and possibly type IV collagen. This study used monoclonal antibodies to the three hydra mesoglea components (type I, type IV collagens and laminin) and immunofluorescent staining to visualize hydra mesoglea structure and the relationship between these mesoglea components. In addition, hydra mesoglea was isolated free of cells and studied with immunofluorescence and SEM. Our results show that type IV collagen co-localizes with laminin in the basal lamina whereas type I collagen forms a grid pattern of fibers in the interstitial matrix. The isolated-mesoglea can maintain its structural stability without epithelial cell attachment. Hydra mesogleais porous with multiple trans-mesoglea pores ranging from 0.5 to 1 µm in diameter and about 6 pores per 100 µm2 in density. We think these trans-mesoglea pores provide a structural base for epithelial cells on both sides to form multiple trans-mesoglea cell-cell contacts. Based on these findings, we propose a new model of hydra mesoglea structure. PMID:18602803

  7. Pericellular colocalisation and interactive properties of type VI collagen and perlecan in the intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Hayes, A J; Shu, C C; Lord, M S; Little, C B; Whitelock, J M; Melrose, J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to immunolocalise type VI collagen and perlecan and determine their interactive properties in the intervertebral disc (IVD). Confocal laser scanning microscopy co-localised perlecan with type VI collagen as pericellular components of IVD cells and translamellar cross-bridges in ovine and murine IVDs. These cross-bridges were significantly less abundant in the heparin sulphate deficient Hspg2 exon 3 null mouse IVD than in wild type. This association of type VI collagen with elastic components provides clues as to its roles in conveying elastic recoil properties to annular tissues. Perlecan and type VI collagen were highly interactive in plasmon resonance studies. Pericellular colocalisation of perlecan and type VI collagen provides matrix stabilisation and cell-matrix communication which allows IVD cells to perceive and respond to perturbations in their biomechanical microenvironment. Perlecan, at the cell surface, provides an adhesive interface between the cell and its surrounding extracellular matrix. Elastic microfibrillar structures regulate tensional connective tissue development and function. The 2010 Global Burden of Disease study examined 291 disorders and identified disc degeneration and associated low back pain as the leading global musculoskeletal disorder emphasising its massive socioeconomic impact and the need for more effective treatment strategies. A greater understanding of how the IVD achieves its unique biomechanical functional properties is of great importance in the development of such therapeutic measures. PMID:27377666

  8. [Comparison of fibroblastic cell compatibility of type I collagen-immobilized titanium between electrodeposition and immersion].

    PubMed

    Kyuragi, Takeru

    2014-03-01

    Titanium is widely used for medical implants. While many techniques for surface modification have been studied for optimizing its biocompatibility with hard tissues, little work has been undertaken to explore ways of maximizing its biocompatibility with soft tissues. We investigated cell attachment to titanium surfaces modified with bovine Type I collagen immobilized by either electrodeposition or a conventional immersion technique. The apparent thickness and durability of the immobilized collagen layer were evaluated prior to incubation of the collagen-immobilized titanium surfaces with NIH/3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblasts. The initial cell attachment and expression of actin and vinculin were evaluated. We determined that the immobilized collagen layer was much thicker and more durable when placed using the electrodeposition technique than the immersion technique. Both protocols produced materials that promoted better cell attachment, growth and structural protein expression than titanium alone. However, electrodeposition was ultimately superior to immersion because it is quicker to perform and produces a more durable collagen coating. We conclude that electrodeposition is an effective technique for immobilizing type I collagen on titanium surfaces, thus improving their cytocompatibility with fibroblasts. PMID:24812763

  9. Atrial natriuretic peptide, B-type natriuretic peptide, and serum collagen markers after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Magga, Jarkko; Puhakka, Mikko; Hietakorpi, Seppo; Punnonen, Kari; Uusimaa, Paavo; Risteli, Juha; Vuolteenaho, Olli; Ruskoaho, Heikki; Peuhkurinen, Keijo

    2004-04-01

    Experimental data suggest that atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) act locally as antifibrotic factors in heart. We investigated the interrelationships of natriuretic peptides and collagen markers in 93 patients receiving thrombolytic treatment for their first acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Collagen formation following AMI, evaluated as serum levels of amino terminal propeptide of type III procollagen, correlated with NH(2)-terminal proANP (r = 0.45, P < 0.001), BNP (r = 0.55, P < 0.001) and NH(2)-terminal proBNP (r = 0.50, P < 0.01) on day 4 after thrombolysis. Levels of intact amino terminal propeptide of type I procollagen decreased by 34% (P < 0.001), and levels of carboxy terminal cross-linked telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) increased by 65% (P < 0.001). ICTP levels correlated with NH(2)-terminal proBNP (r = 0.25, P < 0.05) and BNP (r = 0.28, P < 0.05) on day 4. Our results suggest that ANP and BNP may act as regulators of collagen scar formation and left ventricular remodeling after AMI in humans. Furthermore, degradation of type I collagen is increased after AMI and may be regulated by BNP. PMID:14607848

  10. Collagen type I-coating of Ti6Al4V promotes adhesion of osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Geissler, U; Hempel, U; Wolf, C; Scharnweber, D; Worch, H; Wenzel, K

    2000-09-15

    The initial contact of osteoblasts with implant surfaces is an important event for osseointegration of implants. Osseointegration of Ti6Al4V may be improved by precoating of its surface with collagen type I. In this study, the adhesion of rat calvarial osteoblasts to uncoated and collagen type I-coated titanium alloy was investigated over a period of 24 h. Collagen type I-coating accelerates initial adhesion of osteoblasts in the presence of fetal calf serum. One hour after plating, no differences in the percentage of adherent cells between the surfaces investigated were found. Adhesion of osteoblasts to uncoated surfaces was reduced by the GRGDSP peptide by about 70%, whereas adhesion to collagen type I-coated surfaces remained unaffected by treatment of the cells with the peptide. Cell adhesion to coated materials was reduced by about 80% by anti-integrin beta1 antibody. The integrin beta1 antibody did not influence the adhesion to uncoated titanium alloy. The results suggest that osteoblasts adhere to collagen type I-coated materials via integrin beta1 but not by interacting with RGD peptides, whereas adhesion to uncoated titanium alloy is mediated by RGD sequences but not via integrin beta1. Fibronectin does not seem to be involved in the adhesion of osteoblasts to either coated or uncoated titanium alloy. PMID:10880125

  11. [Changes of type I collagen in the lungs of rats with hypoxic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Mo, X; Yan, H; Cheng, D

    2000-03-01

    The changes of type I collagen in the lung tissues of rats with hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) and its relationship to the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) were investigated. The blood dynamic indexes of pulmonary circulation were measured by using Swan-Ganz. The distribution of type I collagen in pulmonary arteries, bronchi and plumonary interstitial was observed by using streptavidin peroxidase method (SP). The morphologic changes of small pulmonary arteries and the level of type I collagen were determined by image pattern analysis technique and gray scale scanning, respectively. The results showed, compared with the controls, mPAP of the hypoxic rats elevated (from 2.12 +/- 0.25 to 3.95 +/- 0.43 kPa, P < 0.01), their small pulmonary arteries, walls thickened (MT% from 16.35 +/- 2.64 to 35.83 +/- 3.55, MA% from 26.83 +/- 3.40 to 59.68 +/- 4.90, P < 0.01) and lumen narrowed. The distribution of type I collagen was mainly in the external layer of pulmonary arterial walls; the positive degrees of gray scale scanning increased and had a positive linear relationship to the mPAP and MT%. These findings suggest that the increase of type I collagen contents in pulmonary arteries is closely related to the development of HPH. PMID:12501607

  12. Type VII Collagen Replacement Therapy in Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa-How Much, How Often?

    PubMed

    South, Andrew P; Uitto, Jouni

    2016-06-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is a devastating blistering disease caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene, which encodes type VII collagen, the major component of anchoring fibrils. The anchoring fibrils in patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa can be morphologically altered, reduced in number, or absent entirely. There is no specific treatment for this disease, but recent advances in gene, protein replacement, or cell-based therapies, with the purpose of delivering functional type VII collagen to the skin, have shown encouraging results in both preclinical and clinical settings. One critical issue is the stability of type VII collagen in anchoring fibrils, which will ultimately determine the dose and frequency of administration of the missing protein. Kühl et al. attempted to determine the half-life of type VII collagen in the skin, tongue, and esophagus of genetically altered mice that express type VII collagen constitutively, but with its expression abrogated by genetic manipulation. Their results revealed a half-life much shorter than previously anticipated, some 30 days. These findings have implications for strategies to be used for protein replacement therapy, and they also suggest that the basement membrane components at the dermal-epidermal junction are subject to ongoing remodeling and turnover. PMID:27212645

  13. Tissue Transglutaminase Regulates Chondrogenesis in Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Collagen Type XI Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugasundaram, Shobana; Logan-Mauney, Sheila; Burgos, Kaitlin

    2011-01-01

    Tissue transglutaminase (tTG) is a multifunctional enzyme with a plethora of potential applications in regenerative medicine and tissue bioengineering. In this study, we examined the role of tTG as a regulator of chondrogenesis in human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) using nanofibrous scaffolds coated with collagen type XI. Transient treatment of collagen type XI films and 3D scaffolds with tTG results in enhanced attachment of MSC and supports rounded cell morphology compared to the untreated matrices or those incubated in the continuous presence of tTG. Accordingly, enhanced cell aggregation and augmented chondrogenic differentiation have been observed on the collagen type XI-coated poly (L-lactide) - nanofibrous scaffolds treated with tTG prior to cell seeding. Exogenous tTG increases resistance to collagenolysis in collagen type XI matrices by catalyzing intermolecular cross-linking, detected by a shift in the denaturation temperature. In addition, tTG auto-crosslinks to collagen type XI as detected by western blot and immunofluorescent analysis. This study identifies tTG as a novel regulator of MSC chondrogenesis further contributing to the expanding use of these cells in cartilage bioengineering. PMID:21830118

  14. Evidence for enhanced collagen type III deposition focally in the territorial matrix of osteoarthritic hip articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Hosseininia, S.; Weis, M.A.; Rai, J.; Kim, L.; Funk, S.; Dahlberg, L.E.; Eyre, D.R.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective To determine if type III collagen is concentrated in the chymotrypsin-extractable collagen pool from osteoarthritic articular cartilage to assess its potential as a biomarker of Osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenic mechanisms. Methods Full thickness articular cartilage from grossly normal surfaces was analyzed from femoral heads, obtained at hip replacement surgery, from OA (n = 10) and fracture (n = 10) patients. Collagen, extracted by α-chymotrypsin, was characterized by SDS-PAGE/Western blot analysis, ELISA and immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies specific to collagens types II and III. Results α-Chymotrypsin extracted more collagen from OA than control cartilage. The extractable pool included collagen types II and III from both OA and control hips. Importantly, OA cartilage contained 6-fold more collagen type III than control cartilage, based on ELISA. The estimated total tissue ratio of collagen III/II was in the 1–10% range for individual OA cartilage samples, based on pepsin-solubilized collagen using SDS-PAGE densitometry. Collagen type III N-propeptide trimers were the main molecular fragments seen on Western blot analysis of OA and control extracts. The chymotrypsin-extracted type II collagen gave primarily full-length α1(II) chains and chain fragments of α1(II) on Western blot analysis from both OA and control tissues. Immunohistochemistry showed that type III collagen was more concentrated in the upper half of OA cartilage and in the territorial matrix around individual chondrocytes and chondrocyte clusters. Conclusions The findings confirm that collagen type III deposition occurs in adult articular cartilage but significantly more pronounced in osteoarthritic joints, presenting a potential marker of matrix repair or pathobiology. PMID:26790721

  15. Type I collagen degradation does not diminish with RA disease duration

    PubMed Central

    Hakala, M; Aho, K; Aman, S; Luukkainen, R; Kauppi, M; Risteli, J

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the relation between type I collagen degradation and the duration of rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
METHODS—The serum concentrations of cross linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) measured earlier in a community based series (90 patients) and a hospital based series (59 patients) were re-evaluated with reference to the duration of RA.
RESULTS—The serum ICTP showed a positive correlation with the duration of the disease in the hospital based series (rs=0.40, p<0.01) but not in the community based one (rs=0.18, p=0.10).
CONCLUSIONS—Type I collagen degradation predominantly reflecting pathological bone destruction does not seem to diminish in longlasting RA.

 PMID:11247878

  16. Dissolution of type I collagen fibrils by gingival fibroblasts isolated from patients of various periodontitis categories.

    PubMed

    Havemose-Poulsen, A; Holmstrup, P; Stoltze, K; Birkedal-Hansen, H

    1998-07-01

    The classification of periodontitis in various disease categories, including juvenile periodontitis, rapidly progressive adult periodontitis and slowly progressive adult periodontitis is based mainly on differences in disease progression and age group susceptibility. Because dissolution of collagen fibers is an integral part of periodontal attachment loss, we investigated whether the clinical differences among these periodontitis/control groups are reflected in the collagen-degrading activity of gingival fibroblasts isolated from affected tissues. All fibroblast strains isolated from the 4 groups (n = 48) displayed cell-associated collagenolytic activity when seeded in contact with a reconstituted film of type I collagen fibrils. Cells from the control group (n = 14) dissolved the collagen fibril film twice as fast as those from each of the 3 disease groups (juvenile periodontitis (n = 13), rapidly progressive adult periodontitis (n = 7), and slowly progressive adult periodontitis (n = 14)). Both interleukin-1 beta and phorbolester accelerated the rate of dissolution 2-4-fold, but even after cytokine or phorbolester stimulation control cells were still considerably more effective in dissolving the collagen fibrils than cells from the disease groups. The observation made in this study, that dissolution of collagen fibrils by gingival fibroblasts from periodontally diseased individuals is significantly slower than by cells from healthy control subjects, challenges disease paradigms based on a direct relationship between collagenolytic potential and disease activity. PMID:9777595

  17. Expression of type I and type V collagen mRNAs in the elasmoid scales of a teleost fish as revealed by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Le Guellec, D; Zylberberg, L

    1998-01-01

    The ability of scale-forming cells to produce both type I and type V collagens was investigated by in situ hybridization at the light and electron microscope levels. Biochemical analyses reported that type I collagen, the predominant component, was associated with the minor type V collagen in the collagenous matrix of the teleost scales where, thin and thick collagen fibrils formed distinct layers. Thin collagen fibrils of the external layer were produced by the episquamal scleroblasts scattered on the outer scale surface, while thick collagen fibrils forming the compact basal plate were produced by the hyposquamal scleroblasts lining the inner surface of the scale. We demonstrated that episquamal and hyposquamal scleroblasts contained mRNAs for alpha1(I) and alpha1(V) collagens. Quantification by image analysis of the relative amount of alpha1(I) and alpha1(V) mRNAs in episquamal and hyposquamal scleroblasts suggests that the gene expression of type V collagen was proportionally higher in episquamal scleroblasts. These results support our hypothesis that the diameter of the thin fibrils of the external layer is regulated by the significant amount of type V collagen that interacts with type I collagen. PMID:11063006

  18. Physical properties of type I collagen extracted from fish scales of Pagrus major and Oreochromis niloticas.

    PubMed

    Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi; Tanaka, Junzo; Walsh, Dominic; Mann, Stephen

    2003-09-01

    Type I collagens were extracted from fish scales of Pagrus major and Oreochromis niloticas as a possible underutilized resource for medical materials. The fish scales were demineralized with EDTA and digested by pepsin. The resultant type I collagens contained more than 33.6% of glycine as the most abundant amino acid. The denaturation temperatures of the collagens from P. major and O. niloticas were 303 and 308K, respectively, both of which were relatively lower than that of porcine dermis collagen (314K). CD spectra indicated that the denaturation temperatures were dependent on the amount of hydroxyproline, rather than proline residues. Raman spectra also indicated that the relative intensities of Raman lines at 879 and 855cm(-1) assigned to Hyp and Pro rings were changed due to the contents of the imino acids. Significantly, the content of sulphur-containing methionine was higher in the fish scales than in porcine dermis. The enthalpy and entropy estimated from thermal analyses could be correlated to amino acid sequences (Gly-Pro-Hyp) of type I collagens and the number of methionine amino acid residues. PMID:12957317

  19. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Sense Three Dimensional Type I Collagen through Discoidin Domain Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Lund, A.W.; Stegemann, J.P.; Plopper, G.E.

    2009-01-01

    The extracellular matrix provides structural and organizational cues for tissue development and defines and maintains cellular phenotype during cell fate determination. Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells use this matrix to tightly regulate the balance between their differentiation potential and self-renewal in the native niche. When understood, the mechanisms that govern cell-matrix crosstalk during differentiation will allow for efficient engineering of natural and synthetic matrices to specifically direct and maintain stem cell phenotype. This work identifies the discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a collagen activated receptor tyrosine kinase, as a potential link through which stem cells sense and respond to the 3D organization of their extracellular matrix microenvironment. DDR1 is dependent upon both the structure and proteolytic state of its collagen ligand and is specifically expressed and localized in three dimensional type I collagen culture. Inhibition of DDR1 expression results in decreased osteogenic potential, increased cell spreading, stress fiber formation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Additionally, loss of DDR1 activity alters the cell-mediated organization of the naïve type I collagen matrix. Taken together, these results demonstrate a role for DDR1 in the stem cell response to and interaction with three dimensional type I collagen. Dynamic changes in cell shape in 3D culture and the tuning of the local ECM microstructure, directs crosstalk between DDR1 and two dimensional mechanisms of osteogenesis that can alter their traditional roles. PMID:20589230

  20. Decreased type V collagen expression in human decidual tissues of spontaneous abortion during early pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Iwahashi, M; Nakano, R

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To provide some insight into the aetiology of spontaneous abortion, the contents of type V collagen was investigated in human decidual tissues in spontaneous abortion and normal pregnancy. METHODS: Collagens were extracted from decidual tissues in spontaneous abortion (n = 19) and normal pregnancy (n = 25). The different types of collagen alpha chains were separated by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), stained with Coomassie brilliant blue, and measured by densitometry. The relative amounts of the alpha 1 (III) and alpha 1 (V) chains were calculated by dividing the band intensities of the alpha 1 (III) and alpha 1 (V) chains by that of the alpha 1 (I) chain. RESULTS: The ratio of the alpha 1 (V) chain to that of the alpha 1 (I) chain in decidual tissues in spontaneous abortion was significantly lower than that found in normal pregnancy (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that type V collagen might play an important role in the maintenance of pregnancy and that decreased expression of this collagen could be associated with spontaneous abortion. Images PMID:9577371

  1. Molecular composition of type VI collagen. Evidence for chain heterogeneity in mammalian tissues and cultured cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kielty, C M; Boot-Handford, R P; Ayad, S; Shuttleworth, C A; Grant, M E

    1990-01-01

    The chain composition and relative abundance of type VI collagen synthesized by cells cultured from foetal bovine nuchal ligament and skin were compared with those of the type VI collagen present in these foetal tissues. Immunoprecipitation of intact collagen VI from medium and cell layers of nuchal ligament fibroblasts and skin fibroblasts at confluence revealed collagen type VI molecules with a chain composition consistent with an [alpha 1(VI)alpha 2(VI)alpha 3(VI)] monomeric assembly. Maintenance of cells in a post-confluent quiescent state promoted a marked phenotypic change in these ratios, with increased concentrations of assemblies composed of equimolar ratios of alpha 1(VI) and alpha 2(VI) chains detected in the medium of these cultures. Analysis of steady-state concentrations of mRNA for alpha 1(VI) and alpha 2(VI) chains revealed these species to be present in increased abundance at post-confluence in all the cultures, but no corresponding increase was observed in the alpha 3(VI) mRNA. In order to assess the physiological significance of these observations, the chain composition of the collagen VI content of the corresponding foetal tissues was assessed by Western blotting after extraction in guanidinium isothiocyanate under reducing conditions. Extracts of nuchal ligament revealed a collagen VI chain composition consistent with a heterotrimeric chain assembly. In contrast, the skin extracts revealed an abundance of alpha 1(VI) and alpha 2(VI) chains with only traces of the alpha 3(VI) chain detected. Increased equimolar concentrations of the alpha 1(VI)-chain and alpha 2(VI)-chain mRNAs in skin again reflected the increased concentrations of these polypeptide chains. Type VI collagen was present in greater abundance both in the nuchal ligament and in the corresponding nuchal-ligament fibroblast cultures. The results indicate that the chain composition of type VI collagen is subject to modulation at the level of transcription as a result of variations in

  2. Effects of Oral Administration of Type II Collagen on Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trentham, David E.; Dynesius-Trentham, Roselynn A.; Orav, E. John; Combitchi, Daniel; Lorenzo, Carlos; Sewell, Kathryn Lea; Hafler, David A.; Weiner, Howard L.

    1993-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory synovial disease thought to involve T cells reacting to an antigen within the joint. Type II collagen is the major protein in articular cartilage and is a potential autoantigen in this disease. Oral tolerization to autoantigens suppresses animal models of T cell-mediated autoimmune disease, including two models of rheumatoid arthritis. In this randomized, double-blind trial involving 60 patients with severe, active rheumatoid arthritis, a decrease in the number of swollen joints and tender joints occurred in subjects fed chicken type II collagen for 3 months but not in those that received a placebo. Four patients in the collagen group had complete remission of the disease. No side effects were evident. These data demonstrate clinical efficacy of an oral tolerization approach for rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. The development of a mature collagen network in cartilage from human bone marrow stem cells in Transwell culture.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, Alan D; Hardingham, Timothy E; Eyre, David R; Fernandes, Russell J

    2016-03-01

    Damaged hyaline cartilage shows a limited capacity for innate repair. Potential sources of cells to augment the clinical repair of cartilage defects include autologous chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells. We have reported that culture of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with specific growth and differentiation factors as shallow multilayers on Transwell permeable membranes provided ideal conditions for chondrogenesis. Rigid translucent cartilaginous disks formed and expressed cartilage-specific structural proteins aggrecan and type II collagen. We report here the analysis of the collagen network assembled in these cartilage constructs and identify key features of the network as it became mature during 28 days of culture. The type II collagen was co-polymerized with types XI and IX collagens in a fibrillar network stabilized by hydroxylysyl pyridinoline cross-links as in epiphyseal and hyaline cartilages. Tandem ion-trap mass-spectrometry identified 3-hydroxylation of Proline 986 and Proline 944 of the α1(II) chains, a post-translational feature of human epiphyseal cartilage type II collagen. The formation of a type II collagen based hydroxy-lysyl pyridinoline cross-linked network typical of cartilage in 28 days shows that the Transwell system not only produces, secretes and assembles cartilage collagens, but also provides all the extracellular mechanisms to modify and generate covalent cross-links that determine a robust collagen network. This organized assembly explains the stiff, flexible nature of the cartilage constructs developed from hMSCs in this culture system. PMID:26523516

  4. Preserving the longevity of long-lived type II collagen and its implication for cartilage therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tiku, Moti L; Madhan, Balaraman

    2016-07-01

    Human life expectancy has been steadily increasing at a rapid rate, but this increasing life span also brings about increases in diseases, dementia, and disability. A global burden of disease 2010 study revealed that hip and knee osteoarthritis ranked the 11th highest in terms of years lived with disability. Wear and tear can greatly influence the quality of life during ageing. In particular, wear and tear of the articular cartilage have adverse effects on joints and result in osteoarthritis. The articular cartilage uses longevity of type II collagen as the foundation around which turnover of proteoglycans and the homeostatic activity of chondrocytes play central roles thereby maintaining the function of articular cartilage in the ageing. The longevity of type II collagen involves a complex interaction of the scaffolding needs of the cartilage and its biochemical, structural and mechanical characteristics. The covalent cross-linking of heterotypic polymers of collagens type II, type IX and type XI hold together cartilage, allowing it to withstand ageing stresses. Discerning the biological clues in the armamentarium for preserving cartilage appears to be collagen cross-linking. Therapeutic methods to crosslink in in-vivo are non-existent. However intra-articular injections of polyphenols in vivo stabilize the cartilage and make it resistant to degradation, opening a new therapeutic possibility for prevention and intervention of cartilage degradation in osteoarthritis of aging. PMID:27133944

  5. CALCOSPHERULITES* ISOLATED FROM THE MINERALIZATION FRONT OF BONE INDUCE THE MINERALIZATION OF TYPE I COLLAGEN

    PubMed Central

    Midura, Ronald J.; Vasanji, Amit; Su, Xiaowei; Wang, Aimin; Midura, Sharon B.; Gorski, Jeff P.

    2007-01-01

    Previous work has suggested that “calcospherulites” actively participate in the mineralization of developing and healing bone. This study sought to directly test this hypothesis by developing a method to isolate calcospherulites and analyzing their capacity to seed mineralization of fibrillar collagen. The periosteal surface of juvenile rat tibial diaphysis was enriched in spherulites of ~0.5-micron diameter exhibiting a Ca/P ratio of 1.3. Their identity as calcospherulites was confirmed by their uptake of calcein at the tibial mineralization front 24 h following in vivo injection. Periosteum was dissected and unmineralized osteoid removed by collagenase in order to expose calcospherulites. Calcein-labeled calcospherulites were then released from the mineralization front by dispase digestion and isolated via fluorescence flow sorting. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed they contained apatite crystals (c-axis length of 17.5 ± 0.2 nm), though their Ca/P ratio of 1.3 is lower than that of hydroxyapatite. Much of their non-mineral phosphorous content was removed by ice-cold ethanol, elevating their Ca/P ratio to 1.6, suggesting the presence of phospholipids. Western blot analyses showed the presence of bone matrix proteins and type I collagen in these preparations. Incubating isolated calcospherulites in collagen hydrogels demonstrated that they could seed a mineralization reaction on type I collagen fibers in vitro. Ultrastructural analyses revealed crystals on the collagen fibers that were distributed rather uniformly along the fiber lengths. Furthermore, crystals were observed at distances well away from the observed calcospherulites. Our results directly support an active role for calcospherulites in inducing the mineralization of type I collagen fibers at the mineralization front of bone. PMID:17936099

  6. Influence of telopeptides, fibrils and crosslinking on physicochemical properties of type I collagen films.

    PubMed

    Walton, Robin S; Brand, David D; Czernuszka, Jan T

    2010-02-01

    Type I collagen is widely used in various different forms for research and commercial applications. Different forms of collagen may be classified according to their source, extraction method, crosslinking and resultant ultrastructure. In this study, afibrillar and reconstituted fibrillar films, derived from acid soluble and pepsin digested Type I collagen, were analysed using Lateral Force Microscopy (LFM), Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FTIR), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and enzymatic stability assays to asses the influence of telopeptides, fibrils and crosslinking. LFM proved to be a useful technique to confirm an afibrillar/fibrillar ultrastructure and to elucidate fibril diameters. FTIR has proved insensitive to ultrastructural differences involving telopeptides and fibrils. DSC results showed a significant increase in T(d) for crosslinked samples (+22-28 degrees C), and demonstrated that the thermal behaviour of hydrated, afibrillar films is more akin to reconstituted fibrillar films than monomeric solutions. The enzymatic stability assay has provided new evidence to show that afibrillar films of Type I collagen can be significantly more resistant to collagenase (by up to 3.5 times), than reconstituted fibrillar films, as a direct consequence of the different spatial arrangement of collagen molecules. A novel mechanism for this phenomenon is proposed and discussed. Additionally, the presence of telopeptide regions in afibrillar tropocollagen samples has been shown to increase resistance to collagenase by greater than 3.5 times compared to counterpart afibrillar atelocollagen samples. One-factor ANOVA analysis, with Fisher's LSD post-hoc test, confirms these key findings to be of statistical significance (P < 0.05). The profound physicochemical effects of collagen ultrastructure demonstrated in this study reiterates the need for comprehensive materials disclosure and classification when using these biomaterials. PMID:19851839

  7. Second Harmonic Generation Confocal Microscopy of Collagen Type I from Rat Tendon Cryosections

    PubMed Central

    Theodossiou, Theodossis A.; Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Ekwobi, Chidi; Becker, David L.

    2006-01-01

    We performed second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging of collagen in rat-tendon cryosections, using femtosecond laser scanning confocal microscopy, both in backscattering and transmission geometries. SHG transmission images of collagen fibers were spatially resolved due to a coherent, directional SHG component. This effect was enhanced with the use of an index-matching fluid (ni = 1.52). The average SHG intensity oscillated with wavelength in the backscattered geometry (isotropic SHG component), whereas the spectral profile was consistent with quasi-phase-matching conditions in transmission geometry (forward propagating, coherent SHG component) around 440 nm (λp = 880 nm). Collagen type I from bovine Achilles tendon was imaged for SHG in the backscattered geometry and its first-order effective nonlinear coefficient was determined (\\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\vert}d_{{\\mathrm{eff}}}{\\vert}\\approx 0.085({\\pm}0.025){\\times}10^{-12}{\\mathrm{mV}}^{-1}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}) by comparison to samples of inorganic materials with known effective nonlinear coefficients (LiNbO3 and LiIO3). The SHG spectral response of collagen type I from bovine Achilles tendon matched that of the rat-tendon cryosections in backscattered geometry. Collagen types I, II, and VI powders (nonfibrous) did not show any detectable SHG, indicating a lack of noncentrosymmetric crystalline structure at the molecular level. The various stages of collagen thermal denaturation were investigated in rat-tendon cryosections using SHG and bright-field imaging. Thermal denaturation resulted in the gradual destruction of the SHG signal. PMID:17130233

  8. Panax ginseng induces human Type I collagen synthesis through activation of Smad signaling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongsung; Jung, Eunsun; Lee, Jiyoung; Huh, Sungran; Kim, Jieun; Park, Mijung; So, Jungwoon; Ham, Younggeun; Jung, Kwangseon; Hyun, Chang-Gu; Kim, Yeong Shik; Park, Deokhoon

    2007-01-01

    Skin aging appears to be principally related to a decrease in levels of Type I collagen, the primary component of the dermal layer of skin. It is important to introduce an efficient agent for effective management of skin aging; this agent should have the fewest possible side effects and the greatest wrinkle-reducing effect. In the course of screening collagen production-promoting agents, we obtained Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer. This study was designed to investigate the possible collagen production-promoting activities of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer root extract (PGRE) in human dermal fibroblast cells. As a first step to this end, human COL1A2 promoter luciferase assay was performed in human dermal fibroblast cells. In this assay, PGRE activated human COL1A2 promoter activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Human Type I procollagen synthesis was also induced by PGRE. These results suggest that PGRE promotes collagen production in human dermal fibroblast cells. Additionally, we have attempted to characterize the mechanism of action of PGRE in Type I procollagen synthesis. PGRE was found to induce the phosphorylation of Smad2, an important transcription factor in the production of Type I procollagen. When applied topically in a human skin primary irritation test, PGRE did not induce any adverse reactions. Therefore, based on these results, we suggest the possibility that PGRE may be considered as an attractive, wrinkle-reducing candidate for topical application. PMID:16890388

  9. Tectorins crosslink type II collagen fibrils and connect the tectorial membrane to the spiral limbus.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Leonardo R; Salles, Felipe T; Grati, M'hamed; Manor, Uri; Kachar, Bechara

    2016-05-01

    All inner ear organs possess extracellular matrix appendices over the sensory epithelia that are crucial for their proper function. The tectorial membrane (TM) is a gelatinous acellular membrane located above the hearing sensory epithelium and is composed mostly of type II collagen, and α and β tectorins. TM molecules self-assemble in the endolymph fluid environment, interacting medially with the spiral limbus and distally with the outer hair cell stereocilia. Here, we used immunogold labeling in freeze-substituted mouse cochleae to assess the fine localization of both tectorins in distinct TM regions. We observed that the TM adheres to the spiral limbus through a dense thin matrix enriched in α- and β-tectorin, both likely bound to the membranes of interdental cells. Freeze-etching images revealed that type II collagen fibrils were crosslinked by short thin filaments (4±1.5nm, width), resembling another collagen type protein, or chains of globular elements (15±3.2nm, diameter). Gold-particles for both tectorins also localized adjacent to the type II collagen fibrils, suggesting that these globules might be composed essentially of α- and β-tectorins. Finally, the presence of gold-particles at the TM lower side suggests that the outer hair cell stereocilia membrane has a molecular partner to tectorins, probably stereocilin, allowing the physical connection between the TM and the organ of Corti. PMID:26806019

  10. Myb via TGFβ is required for collagen type 1 production and skin integrity.

    PubMed

    Sampurno, Shienny; Cross, Ryan; Pearson, Helen; Kaur, Pritinder; Malaterre, Jordane; Ramsay, Robert G

    2015-04-01

    Skin integrity requires an ongoing replacement and repair orchestrated by several cell types. We previously investigated the architecture of the skin of avian myeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog (Myb) knock-out (KO) embryos and wound repair in Myb(+/)(-) mice revealing a need for Myb in the skin, attributed to fibroblast-dependent production of collagen type 1. Here, using targeted Myb deletion in keratin-14 (K14) positive cells we reveal further Myb-specific defects in epidermal cell proliferation, thickness and ultrastructural morphology. This was associated with a severe deficit in collagen type 1 production, reminiscent of that observed in patients with ichthyosis vulgaris and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Since collagen type 1 is a product of fibroblasts, the collagen defect observed was unexpected and appears to be directed by the loss of Myb with significantly reduced tumor growth factor beta 1 (Tgfβ-1) expression by primary keratinocytes. Our findings support a specific role for Myb in K14+ epithelial cells in the preservation of adult skin integrity and function. PMID:25807069

  11. Induction of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation and cartilage formation by cross-linker-free collagen microspheres.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, M; Vigier, S; Labour, M N; Jorgensen, C; Belamie, E; Noël, D

    2014-01-01

    Because of poor self-healing ability, joint cartilage can undergo irreversible degradation in the course of various diseases or after injury. A promising approach for cartilage engineering consists of using of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and a differentiation factor combined with an injectable carrier biomaterial. We describe here a novel synthesis route for native collagen microspheres that does not involve the use of potentially toxic crosslinking agents. An emulsion was formed between a type I collagen solution and perfluorinated oil, stabilised by a biocompatible triblock perfluorinated copolymer surfactant. Spherical microparticles of fibrillar collagen were formed through a sol-gel transition induced by ammonia vapours. Electron microscopy observations showed that these self-cross-linked microspheres were constituted by a gel of striated collagen fibrils. Microspheres that were loaded with transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β)3 progressively released this differentiation factor over a four weeks period. Human MSC rapidly adhered to TGF-β3-loaded microspheres and, after 21 d of culture, exhibited typical chondrocyte morphology and produced an uncalcified matrix made of the predominant cartilage components, aggrecan and type II collagen, but devoid of the hypertrophic marker type X collagen. Subcutaneous co-injection of MSC and TGF-β3-loaded microspheres in mice consistently led to the formation of a cartilage-like tissue, which was however hypertrophic, calcified and vascularised. In conclusion, we developed cross-linker free collagen microspheres that allowed chondrogenic differentiation of MSC in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25179212

  12. The structural and optical properties of type III human collagen biosynthetic corneal substitutes.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Sally; Lewis, Phillip; Islam, M Mirazul; Doutch, James; Sorensen, Thomas; White, Tomas; Griffith, May; Meek, Keith M

    2015-10-01

    The structural and optical properties of clinically biocompatible, cell-free hydrogels comprised of synthetically cross-linked and moulded recombinant human collagen type III (RHCIII) with and without the incorporation of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) were assessed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray scattering, spectroscopy and refractometry. These findings were examined alongside similarly obtained data from 21 human donor corneas. TEM demonstrated the presence of loosely bundled aggregates of fine collagen filaments within both RHCIII and RHCIII-MPC implants, which X-ray scattering showed to lack D-banding and be preferentially aligned in a uniaxial orientation throughout. This arrangement differs from the predominantly biaxial alignment of collagen fibrils that exists in the human cornea. By virtue of their high water content (90%), very fine collagen filaments (2-9 nm) and lack of cells, the collagen hydrogels were found to transmit almost all incident light in the visible spectrum. They also transmitted a large proportion of UV light compared to the cornea which acts as an effective UV filter. Patients implanted with these hydrogels should be cautious about UV exposure prior to regrowth of the epithelium and in-growth of corneal cells into the implants. PMID:26159106

  13. The structural and optical properties of type III human collagen biosynthetic corneal substitutes

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Sally; Lewis, Phillip; Islam, M. Mirazul; Doutch, James; Sorensen, Thomas; White, Tomas; Griffith, May; Meek, Keith M.

    2015-01-01

    The structural and optical properties of clinically biocompatible, cell-free hydrogels comprised of synthetically cross-linked and moulded recombinant human collagen type III (RHCIII) with and without the incorporation of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) were assessed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray scattering, spectroscopy and refractometry. These findings were examined alongside similarly obtained data from 21 human donor corneas. TEM demonstrated the presence of loosely bundled aggregates of fine collagen filaments within both RHCIII and RHCIII-MPC implants, which X-ray scattering showed to lack D-banding and be preferentially aligned in a uniaxial orientation throughout. This arrangement differs from the predominantly biaxial alignment of collagen fibrils that exists in the human cornea. By virtue of their high water content (90%), very fine collagen filaments (2–9 nm) and lack of cells, the collagen hydrogels were found to transmit almost all incident light in the visible spectrum. They also transmitted a large proportion of UV light compared to the cornea which acts as an effective UV filter. Patients implanted with these hydrogels should be cautious about UV exposure prior to regrowth of the epithelium and in-growth of corneal cells into the implants. PMID:26159106

  14. Effects of Decorin Proteoglycan on Fibrillogenesis, Ultrastructure, and Mechanics of Type I Collagen Gels

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Shawn P.; Underwood, Clayton J.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    The proteoglycan decorin is known to affect both the fibrillogenesis and the resulting ultrastructure of in vitro polymerized collagen gels. However, little is known about its effects on mechanical properties. In this study, 3D collagen gels were polymerized into tensile test specimens in the presence of decorin proteoglycan, decorin core protein, or dermatan sulfate (DS). Collagen fibrillogenesis, ultrastructure, and mechanical properties were then quantified using a turbidity assay, 2 forms of microscopy (SEM and confocal), and tensile testing. The presence of decorin proteoglycan or core protein decreased the rate and ultimate turbidity during fibrillogenesis and decreased the number of fibril aggregates (fibers) compared to control gels. The addition of decorin and core protein increased the linear modulus by a factor of 2 compared to controls, while the addition of DS reduced the linear modulus by a factor of 3. Adding decorin after fibrillogenesis had no effect, suggesting that decorin must be present during fibrillogenesis to increase the mechanical properties of the resulting gels. These results show that the inclusion of decorin proteoglycan during fibrillogenesis of Type I collagen increases the modulus and tensile strength of resulting collagen gels. The increase in mechanical properties when polymerization occurs in the presence of the decorin proteoglycan is due to a reduction in the aggregation of fibrils into larger order structures such as fibers and fiber bundles. PMID:23608680

  15. Nanoscale characterization of isolated individual type I collagen fibrils: polarization and piezoelectricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Yu, Min-Feng

    2009-02-01

    Piezoresponse force microscopy was applied to directly study individual type I collagen fibrils with diameters of ~100 nm isolated from bovine Achilles tendon. It was revealed that single collagen fibrils behave predominantly as shear piezoelectric materials with a piezoelectric coefficient on the order of 1 pm V-1, and have unipolar axial polarization throughout their entire length. It was estimated that, under reasonable shear load conditions, the fibrils were capable of generating an electric potential up to tens of millivolts. The result substantiates the nanoscale origin of piezoelectricity in bone and tendons, and implies also the potential importance of the shear load-transfer mechanism, which has been the principle basis of the nanoscale mechanics model of collagen, in mechanoelectric transduction in bone.

  16. Physics of soft hyaluronic acid-collagen type II double network gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, Svetlana; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2015-03-01

    Many biological hydrogels are made up of multiple interpenetrating, charged components. We study the swelling, elastic diffusion, mechanical, and optical behaviors of 100 mol% ionizable hyaluronic acid (HA) and collagen type II fiber networks. Dilute, 0.05-0.5 wt% hyaluronic acid networks are extremely sensitive to solution salt concentration, but are stable at pH above 2. When swelled in 0.1M NaCl, single-network hyaluronic acid gels follow scaling laws relevant to high salt semidilute solutions; the elastic shear modulus G' and diffusion constant D scale with the volume fraction ϕ as G' ~ϕ 9 / 4 and D ~ϕ 3 / 4 , respectively. With the addition of a collagen fiber network, we find that the hyaluronic acid network swells to suspend the rigid collagen fibers, providing extra strength to the hydrogel. Results on swelling equilibria, elasticity, and collective diffusion on these double network hydrogels will be presented.

  17. Chemical shift assignments of the fibronectin III like domains 7-8 of type VII collagen.

    PubMed

    Hermsdorf, Ulrike; Seeger, Karsten

    2016-04-01

    Type VII collagen (Col7) is important for skin stability. This is underlined by the severe skin blistering phenotype in the Col7 related diseases dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA). Col7 has a large N-terminal non-collagenous domain (NC1) that is followed by the triple helical collagenous domain. The NC1 domain has subdomains with homology to adhesion molecules and mediates important interactions within the extracellular matrix. An 185 amino acid long part of the NC1-subdomain termed fibronectin III like domains 7 and 8 (FNIII7-8) was investigated. Antibodies against this region are pathogenic in a mouse model of EBA and one reported missense mutations of Col7 lies within these domains. The nearly complete NMR resonance assignment of recombinant FNIII7-8 of Col7 is reported. PMID:26364055

  18. Mechanical recruitment of N- and C-crosslinks in collagen type I.

    PubMed

    Kwansa, Albert L; De Vita, Raffaella; Freeman, Joseph W

    2014-02-01

    Collagen type I is an extracellular matrix protein found in connective tissues such as tendon, ligament, bone, skin, and the cornea of the eyes, where it functions to provide tensile strength; it also serves as a scaffold for cells and other extracellular matrix components. A single collagen type I molecule is composed of three amino acid chains that form a triple helix for most of the molecule's length; non-triple-helical extensions called N- and C-telopeptides are located at the amino/N-terminal and carboxy/C-terminal ends of the molecule, respectively. In two of the three chains, the C-telopeptide has been reported to possess a hair-pin/hook conformation, while the three N-telopeptides display a more extended structure. These telopeptides are crucial for the formation of enzymatic covalent crosslinks that form in collagens near their N- and C-ends. Such crosslinks provide structural integrity, strength, and stiffness to collagenous tissues. However, deformation mechanisms of N- and C-crosslinks and functional roles for the N- and C-telopeptide conformations are not yet well known. By performing molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrated that two dehydro-hydroxylysino-norleucine crosslinks, positioned at the N- and C-crosslinking sites, exhibited a two-stage response to the mechanical deformation of their parent molecules. We observed that the N-crosslink served as the first responder to mechanical deformation, followed by the C-crosslink. The results of our simulations suggest a mechanical recruitment mechanism for N- and C-crosslinks. Understanding this mechanism will be crucial for the development of larger-scale predictive models of the mechanical behavior of native collagenous tissues, engineered tissues, and collagen-based materials. PMID:24269790

  19. A Metalloprotease Secreted by the Type II Secretion System Links Vibrio cholerae with Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Park, Bo R.; Zielke, Ryszard A.; Wierzbicki, Igor H.; Mitchell, Kristie C.; Withey, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is autochthonous to various aquatic niches and is the etiological agent of the life-threatening diarrheal disease cholera. The persistence of V. cholerae in natural habitats is a crucial factor in the epidemiology of cholera. In contrast to the well-studied V. cholerae-chitin connection, scarce information is available about the factors employed by the bacteria for the interaction with collagens. Collagens might serve as biologically relevant substrates, because they are the most abundant protein constituents of metazoan tissues and V. cholerae has been identified in association with invertebrate and vertebrate marine animals, as well as in a benthic zone of the ocean where organic matter, including collagens, accumulates. Here, we describe the characterization of the V. cholerae putative collagenase, VchC, encoded by open reading frame VC1650 and belonging to the subfamily M9A peptidases. Our studies demonstrate that VchC is an extracellular collagenase degrading native type I collagen of fish and mammalian origin. Alteration of the predicted catalytic residues coordinating zinc ions completely abolished the protein enzymatic activity but did not affect the translocation of the protease by the type II secretion pathway into the extracellular milieu. We also show that the protease undergoes a maturation process with the aid of a secreted factor(s). Finally, we propose that V. cholerae is a collagenovorous bacterium, as it is able to utilize collagen as a sole nutrient source. This study initiates new lines of investigations aiming to uncover the structural and functional components of the V. cholerae collagen utilization program. PMID:25561716

  20. A metalloprotease secreted by the type II secretion system links Vibrio cholerae with collagen.

    PubMed

    Park, Bo R; Zielke, Ryszard A; Wierzbicki, Igor H; Mitchell, Kristie C; Withey, Jeffrey H; Sikora, Aleksandra E

    2015-03-01

    Vibrio cholerae is autochthonous to various aquatic niches and is the etiological agent of the life-threatening diarrheal disease cholera. The persistence of V. cholerae in natural habitats is a crucial factor in the epidemiology of cholera. In contrast to the well-studied V. cholerae-chitin connection, scarce information is available about the factors employed by the bacteria for the interaction with collagens. Collagens might serve as biologically relevant substrates, because they are the most abundant protein constituents of metazoan tissues and V. cholerae has been identified in association with invertebrate and vertebrate marine animals, as well as in a benthic zone of the ocean where organic matter, including collagens, accumulates. Here, we describe the characterization of the V. cholerae putative collagenase, VchC, encoded by open reading frame VC1650 and belonging to the subfamily M9A peptidases. Our studies demonstrate that VchC is an extracellular collagenase degrading native type I collagen of fish and mammalian origin. Alteration of the predicted catalytic residues coordinating zinc ions completely abolished the protein enzymatic activity but did not affect the translocation of the protease by the type II secretion pathway into the extracellular milieu. We also show that the protease undergoes a maturation process with the aid of a secreted factor(s). Finally, we propose that V. cholerae is a collagenovorous bacterium, as it is able to utilize collagen as a sole nutrient source. This study initiates new lines of investigations aiming to uncover the structural and functional components of the V. cholerae collagen utilization program. PMID:25561716

  1. Collagen Type III and VI Turnover in Response to Long-Term Immobilization

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shu; Henriksen, Kim; Karsdal, Morten A.; Byrjalsen, Inger; Rittweger, Jörn; Armbrecht, Gabriele; Belavy, Daniel L.; Felsenberg, Dieter; Nedergaard, Anders F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Muscle mass and function are perturbed by immobilization and remobilization. When muscle mass changes, the quality and quantity of the extracellular matrix protein, particularly the collagens, change with it. In this study, we investigated the temporal profile of three peptide biomarkers derived from turnover of collagen type III and type VI in a long-term immobilization and remobilization study. We also compared individual biomarker levels with Lean body Mass (LBM) and changes therein, hypothesizing that these biomarkers would be biomarkers of the remodeling processes associated with immobilization and/or remobilization. Methods In the Berlin bed rest study, 20 young men were recruited and randomly assigned to 8-week’s strict bed rest with or without resistive vibration exercise countermeasure. We measured three neo-epitope ELISA kits in the serum samples of this study: Pro-C3, measured the synthesis of collagen type III; Pro-C6, measured the synthesis of collagen type VI; and C6M measured the degradation of collagen type VI induced by MMP-2 and MMP-9 cleavage. Results Pro-C3 and Pro-C6 biomarkers are up-regulated with both immobilization and remobilization, whereas C6M is hardly affected at all. We found that Pro-C3 and C6M levels are related to LBM at baseline and that high levels of Pro-C6 are associated with smaller changes in muscle mass during both immobilization and remobilization. Conclusion The Pro-C3 and–C6 biomarkers change likely reflect remodeling changes in response to unloading or reloading, whereas C6M does not appear to respond to unloading. Pro-C3 and C6M levels correlate with LBM at baseline, while Pro-C6 is related to the anabolic and catabolic responses to unloading and reloading. PMID:26641456

  2. Concentration of mutations causing Schmid metaphyseal chondrodysplasia in the NC1 domain of type X collagen

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, I.; Abbott, M.H.; Francomano, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    Schmid metaphyseal chondrodysplasia (SMCD, MIM 156500) is an autosomal dominant disorder of the osseous skeleton resulting in short stature, coxa vara and a waddling gait. Type X collagen is an extracellular matrix protein expressed exclusively by hypertrophic chondrocytes. We have previously identified four mutations in the type X collagen gene (COL10A1) in patients with SMCD. Each of these mutations, as well as another three reported by other investigators, are in the carboxy-terminal non-collagenous domain (NC1). Here, we present data for another three mutations each predicted to cause premature termination of translation within the NC1 domain. Two are nonsense mutations, Y628X and W651X, while the third is a frameshift resulting from the deletion of two nucleotides, 1856delCC. Each of these mutations occurred de novo, resulting in sporadic cases of SMCD. Four frameshift mutations have now been reported to initiate within 10bp of each other in the NC1 domain, namely 1865delC, 1856delCC, 1856del13 and 1866del10. These findings further support the hypothesis that SMCD is the result of the mutant type X collagen molecule being unable to participate in trimerization, although a dominant-negative model of disease pathogenesis has not been formally excluded.

  3. Human type VII collagen: cDNA cloning and chromosomal mapping of the gene

    SciTech Connect

    Parente, M.G.; Chung, L.C.; Ryynaenen, J.; Monli Chu; Uitto, J. ); Woodley, D.T.; Wynn, K.C.; Bauer, E.A. ); Mattei, M.G. )

    1991-08-15

    A human keratinocyte cDNA expression library in bacteriophage {lambda}gt11 was screened with the purified IgG fraction of serum from a patient with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, which had a high titer of anti-type VII collagen antibodies. Screening of {approx}3 {times} 10{sup 5} plaques identified 8 positive clones, the largest one (K-131) being {approx}1.9 kilobases in size. Dideoxynucleotide sequencing of K-131 indicated that it consisted of 1875 base pairs and contained an open reading frame coding for a putative N-terminal noncollagenous domain of 439 amino acids and a collagenous domain was characterized by repeating Gly-Xaa-Yaa sequences that were interrupted in several positions by insertions or deletions of 1-3 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence also revealed a peptide segment that had a high degree of identity with a published type VII collagen protein sequence. The results mapped the COL7A1 to the locus 3p21. The cDNA clones characterized in this study will be valuable for understanding the protein structure and gene expression of type VII collagen present in anchoring fibrils and its aberrations in the dystrophic forms of heritable epidermolysis bullosa.

  4. Alterations in biosynthetic accumulation of collagen types I and III during growth and morphogenesis of embryonic mouse salivary glands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, P.; Spooner, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    We examined the biosynthetic patterns of interstitial collagens in mouse embryonic submandibular and sublingual glands cultured in vitro. Rudiments explanted on day 13 of gestation and cultured for 24, 48, and 72 h all synthesized collagen types I, III, and V. However, while the total incorporation of label into collagenous proteins did not change over the three-day culture period, the rate of accumulation of newly synthesized types I and III did change. At 24 h, the ratio of newly synthesized collagen types I:III was approximately 2, whereas at 72 h, the ratio was approximately 5. These data suggest that collagen types I and III may be important in initiation of branching in this organ, but that type I may become dominant in the later stages of development and in maintenance of the adult organ.

  5. Synthesis of type I collagen in healing wounds in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Haukipuro, K; Melkko, J; Risteli, L; Kairaluoma, M; Risteli, J

    1991-01-01

    To quantify wound healing in surgical patients, samples of wound fluid were collected through a silicone rubber tube for 7 postoperative days and their concentrations of the carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP) and the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) were measured with specific radioimmunoassays. The mean concentration of PICP in would fluid on day 1 was 207 +/- 92 (SD) micrograms/L, and on day 2 908 +/- 469 micrograms/L (p less than 0.001, signed rank test). On day 7, the mean concentration reached was 380 times higher than that of day 1 (79,330 +/- 54,151 micrograms/L). Only one peak of PICP antigenicity, corresponding to the intact propeptide as set free during synthesis of type I procollagen, was detected on Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration analysis of wound fluid samples. The mean concentration of PIIINP was 70 +/- 61 micrograms/L on day 1, 86 +/- 88 micrograms/L on day 2, and 180 +/- 129 micrograms/L on day 3 (p less than 0.001 when compared with day 1). Finally on day 7, a 250-fold concentration (17,812 +/- 9839 micrograms/L), compared with day 1, was reached. Methods described in the present paper allow separate and repetitive quantification of the synthesis of both type I and type III procollagen during human wound healing. PMID:1985542

  6. Pre-adsorbed type-I collagen structure-dependent changes in osteoblastic phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Hanagata, Nobutaka . E-mail: HANAGATA.Nobutaka@nims.go.jp; Takemura, Taro; Monkawa, Akira; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Junzo

    2006-06-16

    Type-I collagen is the most abundant extracellular matrix in bones and modulates various functions of osteoblasts. We prepared two different structures of type-I collagen on tissue culture grade polystylene (TCPS) surfaces, one is feltwork structure of filamentous molecules from acid solutions (ACs) and the other is network structure of fibrils from neutral solutions (NCs), to examine effects of the structures on the maturation process of osteoblast-like cells. No significant differences of cell proliferation were observed between TCPS and ACs, but NCs delayed the proliferation. In initial cell attachment, the cells on ACs had tense lamellipodia with sharp tips, while those on NCs had loose lamellipodia. No detectable differences in levels of expressed integrin {alpha}{sub 2}- and {alpha}{sub 5}-subunits were observed between the structures. Although the matrix mineralization in NCs was also delayed in comparison with TCPS and ACs, fully mineralized levels in NCs were the same as those of TCPS and ACs. In addition, although we examined the effects of densities of pre-adsorbed collagen molecules on osteoblast maturation, the effects were less serious than those of the structures. This study suggests that the structures of collagen affect proliferation and mineralization of osteoblast-like cells.

  7. Distribution of type I collagen morphologies in bone: relation to estrogen depletion.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Joseph M; Erickson, Blake; Les, Clifford M; Orr, Bradford G; Banaszak Holl, Mark M

    2010-05-01

    Bone is an amazing material evolved by nature to elegantly balance structural and metabolic needs in the body. Bone health is an integral part of overall health, but our lack of understanding of the ultrastructure of healthy bone precludes us from knowing how disease may impact nanoscale properties in this biological material. Here, we show that quantitative assessments of a distribution of Type I collagen fibril morphologies can be made using atomic force microscopy (AFM). We demonstrate that normal bone contains a distribution of collagen fibril morphologies and that changes in this distribution can be directly related to disease state. Specifically, by monitoring changes in the collagen fibril distribution of sham-operated and estrogen-depleted sheep, we have shown the ability to detect estrogen-deficiency-induced changes in Type I collagen in bone. This discovery provides new insight into the ultrastructure of bone as a tissue and the role of material structure in bone disease. The observation offers the possibility of a much-needed in vitro procedure to complement the current methods used to diagnose osteoporosis and other bone disease. PMID:19932773

  8. Transgenic Expression of an Altered Angiotensin type I AT1 Receptor Resulting in Marked Modulation of Vascular Type I Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jun; Taylor, Linda; Rich, Celeste; Toselli, Paul; Stone, Philip; Green, Daniel; Warburton, Rod; Hill, Nicholas; Goldstein, Ronald; Polgar, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1) was modified by replacing its third intracellular loop and C-terminal tail with the corresponding regions from the bradykinin B2 receptor. Transgenic mice were produced that overexpress this mutated receptor (AB3T). Considerably less collagen content in the intact aorta and in primary aortic smooth muscle (aSMCs) cultures was observed in the transgenic mice. On the other hand, elastin content remained unchanged as measured by western blot, and insoluble amino acid quantitation. The contraction of isolated aortas also remained unaltered. The aSMCs derived from the transgenic mice showed a reduction in angiotensin II responsive type I collagen production. In aSMCs from transgenic mice, the cascade of Akt to the mammalian target rapamycin (mTOR) to p70 S6 kinase (p70S6K) was not angiotensin II activated, while in the aSMCs from wild type mice the cascade was angiotensin II activated. Angiotensin activation of Smad2 and Stat3 was also reduced in the AB3T aSMCs. However, no change in the effect of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) on type I collagen production was observed. Also, the activation of ERK and JNK and G protein linked signaling remained unaltered in response to angiotensin II. Akt and PI3K activation inhibitors blocked angiotensin II stimulated type I collagen expression in WT aSMCs, whereas ERK inhibitor had no such effect. Our results point to an Akt/ mTOR/ p70S6K regulation of collagen production by angiotensin II with participation of Smad2 and Stat3 cascades in this process. PMID:21751211

  9. Molecular cloning of type I collagen cDNA and nutritional regulation of type I collagen mRNA expression in grass carp.

    PubMed

    Yu, E M; Liu, B H; Wang, G J; Yu, D G; Xie, J; Xia, Y; Gong, W B; Wang, H H; Li, Z F; Wei, N

    2014-08-01

    Grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus) are important Chinese freshwater fish, and in China, the faba bean has been used as the sole food source for grass carp to transform them into crisp grass carp. Because of this, crisp grass carp has become an economically important fish because of its increased muscle hardness. To study the nutritional regulation of type I collagen in faba bean-fed grass carp, we isolated type I collagen alpha 2 (COL1A2) on the basis of our isolation of COL1A1. The COL1A2 cDNA was found to be 4899 bp in length and included a 4059-bp coding sequence (CDS) and encoded a polypeptide of 1352 AA. The protein peptide molecular weight was 127.39 kD, and the theoretical isoelectric point was 9.37. The COL1A2 protein possessed five α-helixes, eight β-sheets, 16 regions of triple helical repeats, 21 low-complexity regions, 10 function domains and two zinc-binding sites; however, no calcium-binding sites were observed. The mRNA expression of COL1A1 and COL1A2 was assessed in eight tissues (muscle, hepatopancreas, intestine, gills, skin, fin, kidney and spleen) from grass carp and crisp grass carp by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Expression of COL1A1 in the muscle, intestines and skin of crisp grass carp was higher than that in grass carp, and expression of COL1A2 in the muscle, gills, fin and skin of crisp grass carp was higher than that in grass carp. In the muscle of crisp grass carp, expression of COL1A1 and COL1A2 was higher than that in grass carp, which was further confirmed by real-time PCR, and collagen content also was enhanced. These results demonstrated that type I collagen was closely related to the increased muscle hardness of faba bean-fed grass carp. PMID:24127725

  10. Tenascin-R promotes assembly of the extracellular matrix of perineuronal nets via clustering of aggrecan

    PubMed Central

    Morawski, Markus; Dityatev, Alexander; Hartlage-Rübsamen, Maike; Blosa, Maren; Holzer, Max; Flach, Katharina; Pavlica, Sanja; Dityateva, Galina; Grosche, Jens; Brückner, Gert; Schachner, Melitta

    2014-01-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNs) in the brains of tenascin-R-deficient (tn-r−/−) mice develop in temporal concordance with those of wild-type (tn-r+/+) mice. However, the histological appearance of PNs is abnormal in adult tn-r−/− mice. Here, we investigated whether similar defects are also seen in dissociated and organotypic cultures from hippocampus and forebrain of tn-r−/− mice and whether the structure of PNs could be normalized. In tn-r−/− cultures, accumulations of several extracellular matrix molecules were mostly associated with somata, whereas dendrites were sparsely covered, compared with tn-r+/+ mice. Experiments to normalize the structure of PNs in tn-r−/− organotypic slice cultures by depolarization of neurons, or by co-culturing tn-r+/+ and tn-r−/− brain slices failed to restore a normal PN phenotype. However, formation of dendritic PNs in cultures was improved by the application of tenascin-R protein and rescued by polyclonal antibodies to aggrecan and a bivalent, but not monovalent form of the lectin Wisteria floribunda agglutinin. These results show that tenascin-R and aggrecan are decisive contributors to formation and stabilization of PNs and that tenascin-R may implement these functions by clustering of aggrecan. Proposed approaches for restoration of normal PN structure are noteworthy in the context of PN abnormalities in neurological disorders, such as epilepsy, schizophrenia and addiction. PMID:25225104

  11. Biosynthesis and regulation of type V collagen in diploid human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, A S; Page, R C

    1983-10-10

    The biosynthesis of type V collagen and its regulation were studied using diploid human gingival fibroblasts. Cells were metabolically labeled with radioactive amino acids and labeled proteins were subjected to limited pepsin digestion, DEAE-cellulose chromatography at 15 degrees C, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Proteins eluted from DEAE-cellulose columns by 0.25 M NaCl contained a collagen species which was resistant to mammalian collagenase and had alpha chains with hydroxylysine/lysine ratios and CNBr peptide patterns similar to alpha 1(V) and alpha 2(V). Procollagen(V) fractions obtained by DEAE-cellulose chromatography and immunoprecipitates of type V collagen antibody contained polypeptides with Mr = 239,000, 219,000, 198,000, 174,000, 157,000, and 132,000. By comparing the CNBr peptide maps of these proteins with those of standard alpha 1(V) and alpha 2(V) chains, the first three polypeptides were shown to be related to alpha 1(V) and the others to alpha 2(V). It was concluded that the gingival fibroblasts synthesize type V collagen, that the pro alpha 1(V) and the pro alpha 2(V) chains have Mr = 239,000 and 174,000, respectively, and that the alpha 1(V) and alpha 2(V) chains laid in the form of fibrils have Mr = 198,000 and 132,000, respectively. A detectable amount of type V collagen was synthesized only at high cell density, and it was associated with the cell layer. The amount and proportion of type V synthesized were increased when the cells were labeled in the presence of serum, and the increase was accompanied by a decrease in type III. This effect was dependent on serum concentration. Serum obtained from platelet-poor plasma failed to elicit this effect, and it was restored by the addition of platelet-derived growth factor. Platelet-derived growth factor was effective in medium with and without platelet-poor serum. Thus, it appears that platelet-derived growth factor may be an important regulatory factor in the synthesis of types V and III

  12. Location of type XV collagen in human tissues and its accumulation in the interstitial matrix of the fibrotic kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Hägg, P. M.; Hägg, P. O.; Peltonen, S.; Autio-Harmainen, H.; Pihlajaniemi, T.

    1997-01-01

    An antipeptide antibody was produced against the carboxyl-terminal noncollagenous domain of human type XV collagen and used to localize this recently described collagen in a number of human tissues. The most conspicuous findings were powerful staining of most of the capillaries and staining of the basement membrane (BM) zones of muscle cells. Not all of the BM zones were positive, however, as shown by the lack of staining in the developing fetal alveoli and some of the tubules in developing kidney. Nor was type XV collagen staining restricted to the BM zones, as some could be observed in the fibrillar collagen matrix of the papillary dermis and placental villi, for example. Interestingly, differences in the expression of type XV collagen could be observed during kidney development, and staining of fetal lung tissue suggested that changes in its expression may also occur during the formation of vascular structures. Another intriguing finding was pronounced renal interstitial type XV collagen staining in patients with kidney fibrosis due to different pathological processes. This suggests that the accumulation of type XV collagen may accompany fibrotic processes. Full-length human type XV collagen chains with an apparent molecular mass of approximately 200 kd were produced in insect cells using a baculovirus expression system. The fact that these had a markedly higher molecular mass than the 100- to 110-kd type XV collagen chains found in homogenates of heart and kidney tissue suggests either proteolytic processing during the synthesis of type XV collagen or an inability to solubilize complete molecules from tissues. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9176399

  13. Knee joint immobilization decreases aggrecan gene expression in the meniscus.

    PubMed

    Djurasovic, M; Aldridge, J W; Grumbles, R; Rosenwasser, M P; Howell, D; Ratcliffe, A

    1998-01-01

    Aggrecan is the major proteoglycan of the meniscus, and its primary function is to give the meniscus its viscoelastic compressive properties. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of joint immobilization on aggrecan gene expression in the meniscus. The right hindlimbs of six mature beagles were knee cast-immobilized in 90 degrees of flexion and supported by a sling to prevent weightbearing, while the contralateral limb was left free to bear weight. The animals were sacrificed at 4 weeks, and the anterior and posterior halves of the medial and lateral menisci were analyzed separately. Analysis of aggrecan gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed decreased aggrecan gene expression in menisci from immobilized knees (P < 0.01, two-way analysis of variance). Aggrecan gene expression decreased by a factor of 2 to 5.5 in the different regions examined. Analysis of the composition of the meniscus also showed decreased proteoglycan content and increased water content with immobilization (P < 0.05, two-way analysis of variance). These results show that joint immobilization can significantly affect meniscal cellular activity and composition and can therefore potentially affect meniscal function. PMID:9617414

  14. A nuclear magnetic resonance study of water in aggrecan solutions

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Richard J.; Damion, Robin A.; Baboolal, Thomas G.; Smye, Stephen W.; Ries, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Aggrecan, a highly charged macromolecule found in articular cartilage, was investigated in aqueous salt solutions with proton nuclear magnetic resonance. The longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates were determined at two different field strengths, 9.4 T and 0.5 T, for a range of temperatures and aggrecan concentrations. The diffusion coefficients of the water molecules were also measured as a function of temperature and aggrecan concentration, using a pulsed field gradient technique at 9.4 T. Assuming an Arrhenius relationship, the activation energies for the various relaxation processes and the translational motion of the water molecules were determined from temperature dependencies as a function of aggrecan concentration in the range 0–5.3% w/w. The longitudinal relaxation rate and inverse diffusion coefficient were approximately equally dependent on concentration and only increased by upto 20% from that of the salt solution. The transverse relaxation rate at high field demonstrated greatest concentration dependence, changing by an order of magnitude across the concentration range examined. We attribute this primarily to chemical exchange. Activation energies appeared to be approximately independent of aggrecan concentration, except for that of the low-field transverse relaxation rate, which decreased with concentration. PMID:27069663

  15. Aspirin suppresses cardiac fibroblast proliferation and collagen formation through downregulation of angiotensin type 1 receptor transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xianwei Lu, Jingjun; Khaidakov, Magomed; Mitra, Sona; Ding, Zufeng; Raina, Sameer; Goyal, Tanu; Mehta, Jawahar L.

    2012-03-15

    Aspirin (acetyl salicylic acid, ASA) is a common drug used for its analgesic and antipyretic effects. Recent studies show that ASA not only blocks cyclooxygenase, but also inhibits NADPH oxidase and resultant reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, a pathway that underlies pathogenesis of several ailments, including hypertension and tissue remodeling after injury. In these disease states, angiotensin II (Ang II) activates NADPH oxidase via its type 1 receptor (AT1R) and leads to fibroblast growth and collagen synthesis. In this study, we examined if ASA would inhibit NADPH oxidase activation, upregulation of AT1R transcription, and subsequent collagen generation in mouse cardiac fibroblasts challenged with Ang II. Mouse heart fibroblasts were isolated and treated with Ang II with or without ASA. As expected, Ang II induced AT1R expression, and stimulated cardiac fibroblast growth and collagen synthesis. The AT1R blocker losartan attenuated these effects of Ang II. Similarly to losartan, ASA, and its SA moiety suppressed Ang II-mediated AT1R transcription and fibroblast proliferation as well as expression of collagens and MMPs. ASA also suppressed the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits (p22{sup phox}, p47{sup phox}, p67{sup phox}, NOX2 and NOX4) and ROS generation. ASA did not affect total NF-κB p65, but inhibited its phosphorylation and activation. These observations suggest that ASA inhibits Ang II-induced NADPH oxidase expression, NF-κB activation and AT1R transcription in cardiac fibroblasts, and fibroblast proliferation and collagen expression. The critical role of NADPH oxidase activity in stimulation of AT1R transcription became apparent in experiments where ASA also inhibited AT1R transcription in cardiac fibroblasts challenged with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Since SA had similar effect as ASA on AT1R expression, we suggest that ASA's effect is mediated by its SA moiety. -- Highlights: ► Aspirin in therapeutic concentrations decreases mouse cardiac fibroblast

  16. Compositional and in Vitro Evaluation of Nonwoven Type I Collagen/Poly-dl-lactic Acid Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Xiangchen; Russell, Stephen J.; Yang, Xuebin; Tronci, Giuseppe; Wood, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Poly-dl-lactic acid (PDLLA) was blended with type I collagen to attempt to overcome the instantaneous gelation of electrospun collagen scaffolds in biological environments. Scaffolds based on blends of type I collagen and PDLLA were investigated for material stability in cell culture conditions (37 °C; 5% CO2) in which post-electrospinning glutaraldehyde crosslinking was also applied. The resulting wet-stable webs were cultured with bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSC) for five weeks. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) and biochemical assays were used to characterise the scaffolds and the consequent cell-scaffold constructs. To investigate any electrospinning-induced denaturation of collagen, identical PDLLA/collagen and PDLLA/gelatine blends were electrospun and their potential to promote osteogenic differentiation investigated. PDLLA/collagen blends with w/w ratios of 40/60, 60/40 and 80/20 resulted in satisfactory wet stabilities in a humid environment, although chemical crosslinking was essential to ensure long term material cell culture. Scaffolds of PDLLA/collagen at a 60:40 weight ratio provided the greatest stability over a five-week culture period. The PDLLA/collagen scaffolds promoted greater cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation compared to HMBSCs seeded on the corresponding PDLLA/gelatine scaffolds, suggesting that any electrospinning-induced collagen denaturation did not affect material biofunctionality within 5 weeks in vitro. PMID:26251924

  17. Polycaprolactone nanofiber interspersed collagen type-I scaffold for bone regeneration: a unique injectable osteogenic scaffold.

    PubMed

    Baylan, Nuray; Bhat, Samerna; Ditto, Maggie; Lawrence, Joseph G; Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda

    2013-08-01

    There is an increasing demand for an injectable cell coupled three-dimensional (3D) scaffold to be used as bone fracture augmentation material. To address this demand, a novel injectable osteogenic scaffold called PN-COL was developed using cells, a natural polymer (collagen type-I), and a synthetic polymer (polycaprolactone (PCL)). The injectable nanofibrous PN-COL is created by interspersing PCL nanofibers within pre-osteoblast cell embedded collagen type-I. This simple yet novel and powerful approach provides a great benefit as an injectable bone scaffold over other non-living bone fracture stabilization polymers, such as polymethylmethacrylate and calcium content resin-based materials. The advantages of injectability and the biomimicry of collagen was coupled with the structural support of PCL nanofibers, to create cell encapsulated injectable 3D bone scaffolds with intricate porous internal architecture and high osteoconductivity. The effects of PCL nanofiber inclusion within the cell encapsulated collagen matrix has been evaluated for scaffold size retention and osteocompatibility, as well as for MC3T3-E1 cells osteogenic activity. The structural analysis of novel bioactive material proved that the material is chemically stable enough in an aqueous solution for an extended period of time without using crosslinking reagents, but it is also viscous enough to be injected through a syringe needle. Data from long-term in vitro proliferation and differentiation data suggests that novel PN-COL scaffolds promote the osteoblast proliferation, phenotype expression, and formation of mineralized matrix. This study demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of creating a structurally competent, injectable, cell embedded bone tissue scaffold. Furthermore, the results demonstrate the advantages of mimicking the hierarchical architecture of native bone with nano- and micro-size formation through introducing PCL nanofibers within macron-size collagen fibers and in

  18. Membrane Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase Regulates Monocyte Migration and Collagen Destruction in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sathyamoorthy, Tarangini; Tezera, Liku B.; Walker, Naomi F.; Brilha, Sara; Saraiva, Luisa; Mauri, Francesco A.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Friedland, Jon S.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global pandemic and drug resistance is rising. Multicellular granuloma formation is the pathological hallmark of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. The membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP or MMP-14) is a collagenase that is key in leukocyte migration and collagen destruction. In patients with TB, induced sputum MT1-MMP mRNA levels were increased 5.1-fold compared with matched controls and correlated positively with extent of lung infiltration on chest radiographs (r = 0.483; p < 0.05). M. tuberculosis infection of primary human monocytes increased MT1-MMP surface expression 31.7-fold and gene expression 24.5-fold. M. tuberculosis–infected monocytes degraded collagen matrix in an MT1-MMP–dependent manner, and MT1-MMP neutralization decreased collagen degradation by 73%. In human TB granulomas, MT1-MMP immunoreactivity was observed in macrophages throughout the granuloma. Monocyte–monocyte networks caused a 17.5-fold increase in MT1-MMP surface expression dependent on p38 MAPK and G protein–coupled receptor-dependent signaling. Monocytes migrating toward agarose beads impregnated with conditioned media from M. tuberculosis–infected monocytes expressed MT1-MMP. Neutralization of MT1-MMP activity decreased this M. tuberculosis network–dependent monocyte migration by 44%. Taken together, we demonstrate that MT1-MMP is central to two key elements of TB pathogenesis, causing collagen degradation and regulating monocyte migration. PMID:26091717

  19. Collagen Type I Improves the Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells towards Definitive Endoderm.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Camilla Holzmann; Petersen, Dorthe Roenn; Moeller, Jonas Bech; Hansson, Mattias; Dufva, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have the ability to generate all cell types in the body and can potentially provide an unlimited source of cells for cell replacement therapy to treat degenerative diseases such as diabetes. Current differentiation protocols of human embryonic stem cells towards insulin producing beta cells focus on soluble molecules whereas the impact of cell-matrix interactions has been mainly unattended. In this study almost 500 different extracellular matrix protein combinations were screened to systemically identify extracellular matrix proteins that influence differentiation of human embryonic stem cells to the definitive endoderm lineage. The percentage of definitive endoderm cells after differentiation on collagen I and fibronectin was >85% and 65%, respectively. The cells on collagen I substrates displayed different morphology and gene expression during differentiation as assessed by time lapse studies compared to cells on the other tested substrates. Global gene expression analysis showed that cells differentiated on collagen I were largely similar to cells on fibronectin after completed differentiation. Collectively, the data suggest that collagen I induces a more rapid and consistent differentiation of stem cells to definitive endoderm. The results shed light on the importance of extracellular matrix proteins for differentiation and also points to a cost effective and easy method to improve differentiation. PMID:26713616

  20. Collagen Type I Improves the Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells towards Definitive Endoderm

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Camilla Holzmann; Petersen, Dorthe Roenn; Moeller, Jonas Bech

    2015-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have the ability to generate all cell types in the body and can potentially provide an unlimited source of cells for cell replacement therapy to treat degenerative diseases such as diabetes. Current differentiation protocols of human embryonic stem cells towards insulin producing beta cells focus on soluble molecules whereas the impact of cell-matrix interactions has been mainly unattended. In this study almost 500 different extracellular matrix protein combinations were screened to systemically identify extracellular matrix proteins that influence differentiation of human embryonic stem cells to the definitive endoderm lineage. The percentage of definitive endoderm cells after differentiation on collagen I and fibronectin was >85% and 65%, respectively. The cells on collagen I substrates displayed different morphology and gene expression during differentiation as assessed by time lapse studies compared to cells on the other tested substrates. Global gene expression analysis showed that cells differentiated on collagen I were largely similar to cells on fibronectin after completed differentiation. Collectively, the data suggest that collagen I induces a more rapid and consistent differentiation of stem cells to definitive endoderm. The results shed light on the importance of extracellular matrix proteins for differentiation and also points to a cost effective and easy method to improve differentiation. PMID:26713616

  1. Differential expression of collagen types I and III in consequential and primary fibrosis in irradiated mouse colon

    SciTech Connect

    Followill, D.S.; Travis, E.L.

    1995-12-01

    These studies were undertaken to understand further the pathogenesis of consequential and primary fibrosis in mouse colon after irradiation. The distal 2.5 cm of colon of C3Hf/Kam mice was irradiated with either a single dose of 27 Gy or a split dose of 2 x 14.75 Gy separated by 10 days to induce a consequential or primary fibrotic lesion, respectively. The amount of total collagen in the two lesions was quantified by hydroxyproline, and tensile strength, an assay of tissue rigidity, was measured as a function of dose and time after irradiation. The relative distribution of collagen types I, III and IV in the colon was visualized by immunohistochemistry. Collagen types I, III and IV were quantified by immunoblot techniques, and in situ hybridization was used to identify and score the cells producing procollagen mRNA types I and III as a function of time after irradiation. The hydroxyproline and tensile strength measurements demonstrated that both lesions contained significantly increased amounts of collagen compared to controls. However, the ulcerated lesion of consequential fibrosis contained three times as much collagen and required a three- to fourfold increase in the peak force to rupture the colon as did the non-ulcerative lesion of primary fibrosis. The fibrosis accompanying the consequential lesion contained elevated levels of both collagen types I and III, but primary fibrosis contained only elevated levels of type I collagen compared to controls. The in situ hybridization studies showed cells producing increased amounts of procollagen mRNA 8 and 25 weeks before the elevated levels of collagen were detected for consequential and primary fibrosis, respectively. The cells producing the excess collagen mRNA were identified as fibroblasts. No distinction between the two lesions could be made based on the cell types producing the collagen. 48 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Type 1 regulatory T cells specific for collagen type II as an efficient cell-based therapy in arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Regulatory T (Treg) cells play a crucial role in preventing autoimmune diseases and are an ideal target for the development of therapies designed to suppress inflammation in an antigen-specific manner. Type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells are defined by their capacity to produce high levels of interleukin 10 (IL-10), which contributes to their ability to suppress pathological immune responses in several settings. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of collagen type II–specific Tr1 (Col-Treg) cells in two models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in mice. Methods Col-Treg clones were isolated and expanded from collagen-specific TCR transgenic mice. Their cytokine secretion profile and phenotype characterization were studied. The therapeutic potential of Col-Treg cells was evaluated after adoptive transfer in collagen-antibody– and collagen-induced arthritis models. The in vivo suppressive mechanism of Col-Treg clones on effector T-cell proliferation was also investigated. Results Col-Treg clones are characterized by their specific cytokine profile (IL-10highIL-4negIFN-γint) and mediate contact-independent immune suppression. They also share with natural Tregs high expression of GITR, CD39 and granzyme B. A single infusion of Col-Treg cells reduced the incidence and clinical symptoms of arthritis in both preventive and curative settings, with a significant impact on collagen type II antibodies. Importantly, injection of antigen-specific Tr1 cells decreased the proliferation of antigen-specific effector T cells in vivo significantly. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of Col-Treg cells in two models of RA, providing evidence that Col-Treg could be an efficient cell-based therapy for RA patients whose disease is refractory to current treatments. PMID:24886976

  3. A Novel Role of Annexin A2 in Human Type I Collagen Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hitchcock, Jessica K.; Shaw, Tamlyn M.; Katz, Arieh A.; Parker, M. Iqbal

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The fibrillar collagen scaffold of the extracellular matrix provides a structural framework for cells in tissues and regulates intercellular communication; its disregulation has been associated with tumour development and progression. Previous work has shown that expression of type I collagen, the most abundant mammalian extracellular matrix protein, is decreased in chemically or virally transformed cells. This negative regulation could be mapped to a proximal COL1A2 promoter element spanning a CME (Collagen Modulating Element) site in SV40‐transformed human fibroblasts (SV‐WI38) that binds an unknown repressing protein. By magnetic bead pull‐down, we observed a multi‐protein complex bound to the CME with preference for single‐stranded over conventional double‐stranded DNA. MALDI‐TOF mass spectrometry of the CME‐binding protein complex revealed involvement of nuclear annexin A2 (AnxA2) which was increased in SV40‐transformed cells. Further EMSA analysis demonstrated that AnxA2 did not directly bind to the DNA but stabilised the complex and led to an increase in protein binding to the CME in SV‐WI38 but not untransformed WI38 cells. Knockdown of AnxA2 by siRNA increased type I collagen production in both WI38 and SV‐WI38 cells; however, these effects were not mediated at the transcriptional level. Rather, our data indicate a novel functional role of AnxA2 in the negative post‐transcriptional regulation of type I collagen synthesis in human fibroblasts. In SV40‐transformed cells, AnxA2 is accumulated at the proximal COL1A2 promoter region, suggesting close association with the transcriptional machinery that possibly facilitates binding to the emerging mRNA, eventually contributing to overall repression of type I collagen protein synthesis. J. Cell. Biochem. 116: 408–417, 2015. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25290763

  4. Cyclophilin-B Modulates Collagen Cross-linking by Differentially Affecting Lysine Hydroxylation in the Helical and Telopeptidyl Domains of Tendon Type I Collagen.

    PubMed

    Terajima, Masahiko; Taga, Yuki; Chen, Yulong; Cabral, Wayne A; Hou-Fu, Guo; Srisawasdi, Sirivimol; Nagasawa, Masako; Sumida, Noriko; Hattori, Shunji; Kurie, Jonathan M; Marini, Joan C; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2016-04-29

    Covalent intermolecular cross-linking provides collagen fibrils with stability. The cross-linking chemistry is tissue-specific and determined primarily by the state of lysine hydroxylation at specific sites. A recent study on cyclophilin B (CypB) null mice, a model of recessive osteogenesis imperfecta, demonstrated that lysine hydroxylation at the helical cross-linking site of bone type I collagen was diminished in these animals (Cabral, W. A., Perdivara, I., Weis, M., Terajima, M., Blissett, A. R., Chang, W., Perosky, J. E., Makareeva, E. N., Mertz, E. L., Leikin, S., Tomer, K. B., Kozloff, K. M., Eyre, D. R., Yamauchi, M., and Marini, J. C. (2014) PLoS Genet 10, e1004465). However, the extent of decrease appears to be tissue- and molecular site-specific, the mechanism of which is unknown. Here we report that although CypB deficiency resulted in lower lysine hydroxylation in the helical cross-linking sites, it was increased in the telopeptide cross-linking sites in tendon type I collagen. This resulted in a decrease in the lysine aldehyde-derived cross-links but generation of hydroxylysine aldehyde-derived cross-links. The latter were absent from the wild type and heterozygous mice. Glycosylation of hydroxylysine residues was moderately increased in the CypB null tendon. We found that CypB interacted with all lysyl hydroxylase isoforms (isoforms 1-3) and a putative lysyl hydroxylase-2 chaperone, 65-kDa FK506-binding protein. Tendon collagen in CypB null mice showed severe size and organizational abnormalities. The data indicate that CypB modulates collagen cross-linking by differentially affecting lysine hydroxylation in a site-specific manner, possibly via its interaction with lysyl hydroxylases and associated molecules. This study underscores the critical importance of collagen post-translational modifications in connective tissue formation. PMID:26934917

  5. Growth Factors Cross-Linked to Collagen Microcarriers Promote Expansion and Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Bertolo, Alessandro; Arcolino, Fanny; Capossela, Simona; Taddei, Anna Rita; Baur, Martin; Pötzel, Tobias; Stoyanov, Jivko

    2015-10-01

    Tissue engineering is a field in progressive expansion and requires constant updates in methods and devices. One of the central fields is the development of biocompatible, biodegradable, and injectable scaffolds, such as collagen microcarriers. To enhance cell attachment and produce a cost-effective cell culture solution with local stimulation of cells, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) was covalently immobilized on microcarriers either by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) or riboflavin/UV (RB/UV) light-mediated cross-linking. Collagen microcarriers cross-linked with bFGF or TGF-β1 were used for expansion and chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Evaluation methods included cell viability test, chondrogenic marker expression (aggrecan and collagen type I and type II), histological detection of proteoglycans, and immunohistochemical analysis. Cross-linking strengthened the collagen structure of the microcarriers and reduced collagenase-mediated degradation. MSCs effectively proliferated on microcarriers cross-linked with bFGF, especially by EDC/NHS cross-linking. Chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs was induced by TGF-β1 cross-linked on microcarriers, promoting gene expression and protein accumulation of aggrecan and collagen type I and type II, as well as proteoglycans. Cross-linking by RB/UV enhanced chondrogenesis more than any other group. In addition, cross-linking reduced scaffold shrinkage exerted by MSCs during chondrogenesis, a desirable feature for microcarriers if used as tissue defect filler. In conclusion, cross-linking of bFGF or TGF-β1 to collagen microcarriers supported in vitro proliferation and chondrogenesis, respectively. If translated in vivo and in clinical practice, such approach might lead a step closer to development of a cost-effective and locally acting device for cell-based therapy. PMID:26222829

  6. Irradiation Alters MMP-2/TIMP-2 System and Collagen Type IV Degradation in Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Won Hee; Warrington, Junie P.; Sonntag, William E.; Lee, Yong Woo

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is one of the major consequences of radiation-induced normal tissue injury in the central nervous system. We examined the effects of whole-brain irradiation on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)/tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) and extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation in the brain. Methods and Materials: Animals received either whole-brain irradiation (a single dose of 10 Gy {gamma}-rays or a fractionated dose of 40 Gy {gamma}-rays, total) or sham-irradiation and were maintained for 4, 8, and 24 h following irradiation. mRNA expression levels of MMPs and TIMPs in the brain were analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The functional activity of MMPs was measured by in situ zymography, and degradation of ECM was visualized by collagen type IV immunofluorescent staining. Results: A significant increase in mRNA expression levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 was observed in irradiated brains compared to that in sham-irradiated controls. In situ zymography revealed a strong gelatinolytic activity in the brain 24 h postirradiation, and the enhanced gelatinolytic activity mediated by irradiation was significantly attenuated in the presence of anti-MMP-2 antibody. A significant reduction in collagen type IV immunoreactivity was also detected in the brain at 24 h after irradiation. In contrast, the levels of collagen type IV were not significantly changed at 4 and 8 h after irradiation compared with the sham-irradiated controls. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates for the first time that radiation induces an imbalance between MMP-2 and TIMP-2 levels and suggests that degradation of collagen type IV, a major ECM component of BBB basement membrane, may have a role in the pathogenesis of brain injury.

  7. Characterization of a type II collagen gene (COL2A1) mutation identified in cultured chondrocytes from human hypochondrogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Horton, W A; Machado, M A; Ellard, J; Campbell, D; Bartley, J; Ramirez, F; Vitale, E; Lee, B

    1992-01-01

    A subtle mutation in the type II collagen gene COL2A1 was detected in a case of human hypochondrogenesis by using a chondrocyte culture system and PCR-cDNA scanning analysis. Chondrocytes obtained from cartilage biopsies were dedifferentiated and expanded in monolayer culture and then redifferentiated by culture over agarose. Single-strand conformation polymorphism and direct sequencing analysis identified a G----A transition, resulting in a glycine substitution at amino acid 574 of the pro alpha 1(II) collagen triple-helical domain. Morphologic assessment of cartilage-like structures produced in culture and electrophoretic analysis of collagens synthesized by the cultured chondrocytes suggested that the glycine substitution interferes with conversion of type II procollagen to collagen, impairs intracellular transport and secretion of the molecule, and disrupts collagen fibril assembly. This experimental approach has broad implications for the investigation of human chondrodysplasias as well as human chondrocyte biology. Images PMID:1374906

  8. Laminin and Type IV Collagen Isoform Substitutions Occur in Temporally and Spatially Distinct Patterns in Developing Kidney Glomerular Basement Membranes

    PubMed Central

    St. John, Patricia L.; Stroganova, Larysa; Zelenchuk, Adrian; Steenhard, Brooke M.

    2013-01-01

    Kidney glomerular basement membranes (GBMs) undergo laminin and type IV collagen isoform substitutions during glomerular development, which are believed to be required for maturation of the filtration barrier. Specifically, GBMs of earliest glomeruli contain laminin α1β1γ1 and collagen α1α2α1(IV), whereas mature glomeruli contain laminin α5β2γ1 and collagen α3α4α5(IV). Here, we used confocal microscopy to simultaneously evaluate expression of different laminin and collagen IV isoforms in newborn mouse GBMs. Our results show loss of laminin α1 from GBMs in early capillary loop stages and continuous linear deposition of laminin bearing the α5 chain thereafter. In contrast, collagen α1α2α1(IV) persisted in linear patterns into late capillary loop stages, when collagen α3α4α5(IV) first appeared in discontinuous, non-linear patterns. This patchy pattern for collagen α3α4α5(IV) continued into maturing glomeruli where there were lengths of linear, laminin α5-positive GBM entirely lacking either isoform of collagen IV. Relative abundance of laminin and collagen IV mRNAs in newborn and 5-week-old mouse kidneys also differed, with those encoding laminin α1, α5, β1, β2, and γ1, and collagen α1(IV) and α2(IV) chains all significantly declining at 5 weeks, but α3(IV) and α4(IV) were significantly upregulated. We conclude that different biosynthetic mechanisms control laminin and type IV collagen expression in developing glomeruli. PMID:23896970

  9. Ultrastructure of type VI collagen in human skin and cartilage suggests an anchoring function for this filamentous network

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    An mAb was used in conjunction with immunoelectron microscopy to study the ultrastructure and distribution of the type VI collagen network. Type VI collagen in femoral head and costal cartilage was found distributed throughout the matrix but concentrated in areas surrounding chondrocytes. Three-dimensional information gained from high voltage stereo pair electron microscopy showed that the type VI collagen network in skin was organized into a highly branched, open, filamentous network that encircled interstitial collagen fibers, but did not appear to interact directly with them. Type VI collagen was also found concentrated near basement membranes of nerves, blood vessels, and fat cells although in a less organized state. Labeling was conspicuously reduced close to the epithelial basement membrane in the region of the anchoring fibrils. No labeling of basement membranes was seen. Based on these observations it is suggested that the type VI collagen forms a flexible network that anchors large interstitial structures such as nerves, blood vessels, and collagen fibers into surrounding connective tissues. PMID:3182942

  10. Osteopontin Is Essential for Type I Collagen Secretion in Reparative Dentin.

    PubMed

    Saito, K; Nakatomi, M; Ida-Yonemochi, H; Ohshima, H

    2016-08-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a highly phosphorylated glycoprotein that is a prominent component of the mineralized extracellular matrix of bone. The secretion of OPN by immunocompetent cells plays a role in the differentiation of odontoblast-like cells during pulpal healing following tooth transplantation. This study aimed to clarify the role of OPN during reparative dentinogenesis. A groove-shaped cavity was prepared on the mesial surface of the upper first molars of wild-type (WT) and Opn knockout (KO) mice, and the samples were collected at intervals of 1 to 14 d. The demineralized sections were processed for immunohistochemistry for Ki67, nestin, OPN, dentin sialoprotein (DSP), integrin αvβ3, and type I collagen; in situ hybridization for Opn, col1a1, and dentin sialophosphoprotein (Dspp); and apoptosis assay. For the loss and gain of function experiments, an in vitro culture assay for evaluating dentin-pulp complex regeneration was performed. On day 1 in WT mice, odontoblasts beneath the affected dentin lost nestin immunoreactivity. On day 3, the expression of Opn was recognized at the mesial dental pulp, and OPN was deposited along the predentin-dentin border. Nestin-positive newly differentiated odontoblast-like cells expressed both Dspp and col1a1 and showed positive immunoreactivity for integrin αvβ3, DSP, and type I collagen. Until day 14, reparative dentin formation continued next to the preexisting dentin at the mesial coronal pulp. In contrast, there was no reparative dentin in the Opn KO mice where nestin- and DSP-positive newly differentiated odontoblast-like cells lacked immunoreaction for type I collagen. The in vitro organ culture demonstrated that the administration of recombinant OPN rescued the type I collagen secretion by odontoblast-like cells in the Opn KO mice. The results suggested that the deposition of OPN at the calcification front is essential for the type I collagen secretion by newly differentiated odontoblast-like cells to form

  11. Dominant mutations in the type II collagen gene, COL2A1, produce spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, Strudwick type.

    PubMed

    Tiller, G E; Polumbo, P A; Weis, M A; Bogaert, R; Lachman, R S; Cohn, D H; Rimoin, D L; Eyre, D R

    1995-09-01

    The chondrodysplasias are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by abnormal growth or development of cartilage. Current classification is based on mode of inheritance as well as clinical, histologic, and/or radiographic features. A clinical spectrum of chondrodysplasia phenotypes, ranging from mild to perinatal lethal, is due to defects in the gene for type II collagen, COL2A1. This spectrum includes Stickler syndrome, Kniest dysplasia, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC), achondrogenesis type II, and hypochondrogenesis. Individuals affected with these disorders exhibit abnormalities of the growth plate, nucleus pulposus, and vitreous humor, which are tissues that contain type II collagen. The Strudwick type of spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMD) is characterized by disproportionate short stature, pectus carinatum, and scoliosis, as well as dappled metaphyses (which are not seen in SEDC). The phenotype was first described by Murdoch and Walker in 1969, and a series of 14 patients was later reported by Anderson et al. The observation of two affected sibs born to unaffected parents led to the classification of SEMD Strudwick as an autosomal recessive disorder. We now describe the biochemical characterization of defects in alpha 1(II) collagen in three unrelated individuals with SEMD Strudwick, each of which is due to heterozygosity for a unique mutation in COL2A1. Our data support the hypothesis that some cases, if not all cases, of this distinctive chondrodysplasia result from dominant mutations in COL2A1, thus expanding the clinical spectrum of phenotypes associated with this gene. PMID:7550321

  12. Sources of variability in platelet accumulation on type 1 fibrillar collagen in microfluidic flow assays.

    PubMed

    Neeves, Keith B; Onasoga, Abimbola A; Hansen, Ryan R; Lilly, Jessica J; Venckunaite, Diana; Sumner, Meghan B; Irish, Andrew T; Brodsky, Gary; Manco-Johnson, Marilyn J; Di Paola, Jorge A

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic flow assays (MFA) that measure shear dependent platelet function have potential clinical applications in the diagnosis and treatment of bleeding and thrombotic disorders. As a step towards clinical application, the objective of this study was to measure how phenotypic and genetic factors, as well as experimental conditions, affect the variability of platelet accumulation on type 1 collagen within a MFA. Whole blood was perfused over type 1 fibrillar collagen at wall shear rates of 150, 300, 750 and 1500 s⁻¹ through four independent channels with a height of 50 µm and a width of 500 µm. The accumulation of platelets was characterized by the lag time to 1% platelet surface coverage (Lag(T)), the rate of platelet accumulation (V(PLT)), and platelet surface coverage (SC). A cohort of normal donors was tested and the results were correlated to plasma von Willebrand factor (VWF) levels, platelet count, hematocrit, sex, and collagen receptors genotypes. VWF levels were the strongest determinant of platelet accumulation. VWF levels were positively correlated to V(PLT) and SC at all wall shear rates. A longer Lag(T) for platelet accumulation at arterial shear rates compared to venous shear rates was attributed to the time required for plasma proteins to adsorb to collagen. There was no association between platelet accumulation and hematocrit or platelet count. Individuals with the AG genotype of the GP6 gene had lower platelet accumulation than individuals with the AA genotype at 150 s⁻¹ and 300 s⁻¹. Recalcified blood collected into sodium citrate and corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI) resulted in diminished platelet accumulation compared to CTI alone, suggesting that citrate irreversibly diminishes platelet function. This study the largest association study of MFA in healthy donors (n = 104) and will likely set up the basis for the determination of the normal range of platelet responses in this type of assay. PMID:23355889

  13. Type III Collagen Directs Stromal Organization and Limits Metastasis in a Murine Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brisson, Becky K.; Mauldin, Elizabeth A.; Lei, Weiwei; Vogel, Laurie K.; Power, Ashley M.; Lo, Albert; Dopkin, Derek; Khanna, Chand; Wells, Rebecca G.; Puré, Ellen; Volk, Susan W.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer metastasis is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide. Collagen in the tumor microenvironment plays a crucial role in regulating tumor progression. We have shown that type III collagen (Col3), a component of tumor stroma, regulates myofibroblast differentiation and scar formation after cutaneous injury. During the course of these wound-healing studies, we noted that tumors developed at a higher frequency in Col3+/− mice compared to wild-type littermate controls. We, therefore, examined the effect of Col3 deficiency on tumor behavior, using the murine mammary carcinoma cell line 4T1. Notably, tumor volume and pulmonary metastatic burden after orthotopic injection of 4T1 cells were increased in Col3+/− mice compared to Col3+/+ littermates. By using murine (4T1) and human (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cells grown in Col3-poor and Col3-enriched microenvironments in vitro, we found that several major events of the metastatic process were suppressed by Col3, including adhesion, invasion, and migration. In addition, Col3 deficiency increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis of 4T1 cells both in vitro and in primary tumors in vivo. Mechanistically, Col3 suppresses the procarcinogenic microenvironment by regulating stromal organization, including density and alignment of fibrillar collagen and myofibroblasts. We propose that Col3 plays an important role in the tumor microenvironment by suppressing metastasis-promoting characteristics of the tumor-associated stroma. PMID:25795282

  14. Functional characterization of neostatins, the MMP-derived, enzymatic cleavage products of type XVIII collagen.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jin-Hong; Javier, Joel A D; Chang, Gene-Yuan; Oliveira, Hailton B; Azar, Dimitri T

    2005-07-01

    Several anti-angiogenic factors are derived from proteolytic processing of large molecules including endostatin from type XVIII collagen and angiostatin from plasminogen. In previous studies we showed that neostatin-7, the C-terminal 28kDa endostatin-spanning proteolytic fragment, is generated from the proteolytic action of matrix metalloproteinase matrilysin (MMP)-7 on type XVIII collagen. Now, we report a second member of the neostatin family of proteins, neostatin-14. Given the small quantities of neostatin-7 and -14 generated by the breakdown of naturally occurring collagen XVIII (using MMP-7 and -14, respectively), we used two other approaches to characterize the anti-angiogenic properties of these molecules: murine recombinant neostatin in vitro, and gene therapy. We demonstrate that murine recombinant neostatin-7 inhibits calf pulmonary artery endothelial cell proliferation and that microinjection of neostatin-7 and neostatin-14 naked DNA into the corneal stroma of mice results in significant reduction of basic fibroblast growth factor-induced corneal neovascularization. These results provide supportive evidence of the possible anti-angiogenic effect of neostatins. PMID:15978592

  15. Prostaglandins in the perilymph of guinea pig with type II collagen induced ear diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, T.; Chiang, T.; Kitano, H.; Sudo, N.; Kim, S.Y.; Ha, S.; Woo, V.; Wolf, B.; Floyd, R.; Yoo, T.J.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have studied the prostaglandins (PGs) in the perilymph from guinea pig with type II collagen induced autoimmune ear disease. Hartly guinea pigs were immunized with type II collagen in CFA and auditory brain stem responses (ABR) were measured at 2, 3, 4, and 6 months after initial immunization perilymph was obtained and the levels of PGE2 and 6 keto-PGFl..cap alpha.. were measured by radioimmunoassays. Temporal bones were examined for the histopathologic changes. Immunized guinea pigs showed the evidence of hearing loss by ABR. The temporal bones showed the following changes: spiral ganglia degeneration, mild to moderate degree of degeneration in organ of Corti, infrequent very mild endolymphatic hydrops and labrynthitis. The perilymph from immunized animals contained about 5 times more PGE2 and about 3 times more 6 keto-PGFl..cap alpha.. than control animals. However, between these two groups, there was no difference in the CSF and sera levels of PGE2 and 6 keto-PGFl..cap alpha... Thus, this study suggests that these inflammatory mediators might be involved in the pathogenesis of collagen induced autoimmune inner ear disease.

  16. Cleavage of Type I Collagen by Fibroblast Activation Protein-α Enhances Class A Scavenger Receptor Mediated Macrophage Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, Anna; Holthoff, Emily; Vadali, Shanthi; Kelly, Thomas; Post, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Pathophysiological conditions such as fibrosis, inflammation, and tumor progression are associated with modification of the extracellular matrix (ECM). These modifications create ligands that differentially interact with cells to promote responses that drive pathological processes. Within the tumor stroma, fibroblasts are activated and increase the expression of type I collagen. In addition, activated fibroblasts specifically express fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP), a post-prolyl peptidase. Although FAP reportedly cleaves type I collagen and contributes to tumor progression, the specific pathophysiologic role of FAP is not clear. In this study, the possibility that FAP-mediated cleavage of type I collagen modulates macrophage interaction with collagen was examined using macrophage adhesion assays. Our results demonstrate that FAP selectively cleaves type I collagen resulting in increased macrophage adhesion. Increased macrophage adhesion to FAP-cleaved collagen was not affected by inhibiting integrin-mediated interactions, but was abolished in macrophages lacking the class A scavenger receptor (SR-A/CD204). Further, SR-A expressing macrophages localize with activated fibroblasts in breast tumors of MMTV-PyMT mice. Together, these results demonstrate that FAP-cleaved collagen is a substrate for SR-A-dependent macrophage adhesion, and suggest that by modifying the ECM, FAP plays a novel role in mediating communication between activated fibroblasts and macrophages. PMID:26934296

  17. Two-Dimensional Nanoscale Structural and Functional Imaging in Individual Collagen Type I Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Harnagea, Catalin; Vallières, Martin; Pfeffer, Christian P.; Wu, Dong; Olsen, Bjorn R.; Pignolet, Alain; Légaré, François; Gruverman, Alexei

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The piezoelectric properties of single collagen type I fibrils in fascia were imaged with sub-20 nm spatial resolution using piezoresponse force microscopy. A detailed analysis of the piezoresponse force microscopy signal in controlled tip-fibril geometry revealed shear piezoelectricity parallel to the fibril axis. The direction of the displacement is preserved along the whole fiber length and is independent of the fiber conformation. It is shown that individual fibrils within bundles in skeletal muscle fascia can have opposite polar orientations and are organized into domains, i.e., groups of several fibers having the same polar orientation. We were also able to detect piezoelectric activity of collagen fibrils in the high-frequency range up to 200 kHz, suggesting that the mechanical response time of biomolecules to electrical stimuli can be ∼5 μs. PMID:20550920

  18. Molecular Mechanism of Type I Collagen Homotrimer Resistance to Mammalian Collagenases*

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sejin; Makareeva, Elena; Kuznetsova, Natalia V.; DeRidder, Angela M.; Sutter, Mary Beth; Losert, Wolfgang; Phillips, Charlotte L.; Visse, Robert; Nagase, Hideaki; Leikin, Sergey

    2010-01-01

    Type I collagen cleavage is crucial for tissue remodeling, but its homotrimeric isoform is resistant to all collagenases. The homotrimers occur in fetal tissues, fibrosis, and cancer, where their collagenase resistance may play an important physiological role. To understand the mechanism of this resistance, we studied interactions of α1(I)3 homotrimers and normal α1(I)2α2(I) heterotrimers with fibroblast collagenase (MMP-1). Similar MMP-1 binding to the two isoforms and similar cleavage efficiency of unwound α1(I) and α2(I) chains suggested increased stability and less efficient unwinding of the homotrimer triple helix at the collagenase cleavage site. The unwinding, necessary for placing individual chains inside the catalytic cleft of the enzyme, was the rate-limiting cleavage step for both collagen isoforms. Comparative analysis of the homo- and heterotrimer cleavage kinetics revealed that MMP-1 binding promotes stochastic helix unwinding, resolving the controversy between different models of collagenase action. PMID:20463013

  19. Collagen type IV of Drosophila is stockpiled in the growing oocyte and differentially located during early stages of embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Knibiehler, B; Mirre, C; Le Parco, Y

    1990-05-01

    We have developed and characterized a battery of specific polyclonal antibodies directed against specific portions of the alpha-chain of collagen type IV synthesized in Drosophila by the gene DCg1. Here, we describe the use of these antibodies together with in situ hybridization experiments in an attempt to study the expression and localization of collagen type IV during Drosophila oogenesis and early embryogenesis. The results clearly demonstrate that DCg1 is maternally expressed by follicle cells and that the collagen type IV chain produced is stockpiled in the growing oocyte. During the gastrulation stages, this component of Drosophila basement membranes concentrated on cells involved in the gradual invaginations leading to morphogenetic furrows. The presence of collagen type IV, which is an RGD-bearing molecule, during early stages of Drosophila development is discussed in comparison with the crucial, active role its vertebrate counterpart is supposed to play in morphogenetic processes. PMID:2117479

  20. [Reactivity of antibodies to collagen types I to IV and antibodies to chondroitin sulfate in the spleen].

    PubMed

    Galbavý, S; Ruzicková, M; Surmíková, E; Danihel, L; Porubský, J; Papincák, J; Holesa, S; Trnka, J

    1996-02-01

    Antibodies to collagen type I and III reacted negatively, antibodies to collagen type IV positively with reticulin, trabeculae and circumferent reticulum of lymphatic sheaths, poorly positively with capsula, strongly positively with subcapsular zone. Antibodies to collagen type II reacted positively with capsula, poorly with subcapsular zone, strongly with sinus wall and poorly with trabeculae. They did not react with circumferent reticulum of periarterial lymphoid sheaths. Antibodies to collagen type II and IV reacted positively with central arteries. Antibodies to chondroitinsulphate C reacted poorly and antibodies to chondroitinsulphate B strongly positively with sinus walls and oval cells spread in the white and red pulpa. Antibodies to chondroitin sulphate A reacted similarly as antibodies to chondroitinsulphate B. PMID:9560890

  1. 150-kD von Willebrand factor binding protein extracted from human vascular subendothelium is type VI collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Rand, J H; Patel, N D; Schwartz, E; Zhou, S L; Potter, B J

    1991-01-01

    We have previously shown that von Willebrand factor (vWF), a glycoprotein which plays a critical role in the adhesion of platelets to injured blood vessels, is present within vascular subendothelium. We investigated the identity of the subendothelial binding site(s) for vWF by examining vWF binding to subendothelial constituents and solubilized a 150-kD protein with SDS-urea that bound vWF. This protein had an amino-acid composition similar to that of the type VI collagen alpha-1/alpha-2 chains, was recognized by specific polyclonal antibodies against type VI collagen, and had a similar acidic isoelectric point. Furthermore, we found that purified type VI collagen also bound vWF. Thus, we have identified the extracted 150-kD protein as type VI collagen. This protein may play a significant role in the binding of vWF to vascular subendothelium in vivo. Images PMID:2056120

  2. Interstitial Perfusion Culture with Specific Soluble Factors Inhibits Type I Collagen Production from Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes in Clinical-Grade Collagen Sponges.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Nathalie; Lopa, Silvia; Talò, Giuseppe; Lovati, Arianna B; Pasdeloup, Marielle; Riboldi, Stefania A; Moretti, Matteo; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage has poor healing ability and cartilage injuries often evolve to osteoarthritis. Cell-based strategies aiming to engineer cartilaginous tissue through the combination of biocompatible scaffolds and articular chondrocytes represent an alternative to standard surgical techniques. In this context, perfusion bioreactors have been introduced to enhance cellular access to oxygen and nutrients, hence overcoming the limitations of static culture and improving matrix deposition. Here, we combined an optimized cocktail of soluble factors, the BIT (BMP-2, Insulin, Thyroxin), and clinical-grade collagen sponges with a bidirectional perfusion bioreactor, namely the oscillating perfusion bioreactor (OPB), to engineer in vitro articular cartilage by human articular chondrocytes (HACs) obtained from osteoarthritic patients. After amplification, HACs were seeded and cultivated in collagen sponges either in static or dynamic conditions. Chondrocyte phenotype and the nature of the matrix synthesized by HACs were assessed using western blotting and immunohistochemistry analyses. Finally, the stability of the cartilaginous tissue produced by HACs was evaluated in vivo by subcutaneous implantation in nude mice. Our results showed that perfusion improved the distribution and quality of cartilaginous matrix deposited within the sponges, compared to static conditions. Specifically, dynamic culture in the OPB, in combination with the BIT cocktail, resulted in the homogeneous production of extracellular matrix rich in type II collagen. Remarkably, the production of type I collagen, a marker of fibrous tissues, was also inhibited, indicating that the association of the OPB with the BIT cocktail limits fibrocartilage formation, favoring the reconstruction of hyaline cartilage. PMID:27584727

  3. Vitamin A-containing lipocytes and formation of type III collagen in liver injury.

    PubMed

    Kent, G; Gay, S; Inouye, T; Bahu, R; Minick, O T; Popper, H

    1976-10-01

    Hepatocellular necrosis in carbon tetracholride-induced injury of rats is associated with an accumulation of lipocytes (perisinusoidal cells or Ito cells) containing fat droplets and giving vitamin A fluorescence. In the subsequent formation of connective tissue septa, transitional cells having morphologic characteristics of lipocytes and fibroblasts are abundant and are associated with the appearance of type III collage-. The features suggest that the lipocyte is the precursor of the fibroblasts responsible for parenchymal fibrillogenesis and under these conditions forms type III collagen. The process is a postulated link between hepatocellular necrosis and fibrosis. PMID:1068482

  4. Biochemical and immunohistochemical characterization of human type XIX defines a novel class of basement membrane zone collagens.

    PubMed Central

    Myers, J. C.; Li, D.; Bageris, A.; Abraham, V.; Dion, A. S.; Amenta, P. S.

    1997-01-01

    Nineteen types, the product of 33 genes, comprise the collagen family of proteins. Types I, II, III, V, and XI constitute the fibrillar collagens, whereas types IV, VI to X, and XII to XIX represent the structurally diverse, nonfibrillar members. Type XIX collagen was discovered from the sequence of rhabdomyosarcoma cDNA clones. The type XIX chain consists of 1142 amino acids that contribute primarily to a unique five subdomain triple-helical region. To characterize the protein, to determine the tissue distribution, and to provide some insight into its function, we generated two type XIX-specific polyclonal antibodies. One was directed against a recombinant molecule containing amino-terminal sequences, and the second was derived from a synthetic peptide corresponding to most of the short carboxy terminus. These antibodies were used in immunoblot assays of rhabdomyosarcoma cell/matrix homogenates to identify a 165-kd disulfide-bonded and bacterial collagenase-sensitive protein. Immunohistochemical analysis of type XIX collagen was performed for human skeletal muscle, spleen, prostate, kidney, liver, placenta, colon, and skin. In contrast to Northern blot hybridizations, which showed very low levels of the 12-kb transcript in few tissues, the protein was found in all tissues examined. The type XIX collagen distribution was restricted to vascular, neuronal, mesenchymal, and some epithelial basement membrane zones, which is similar to the profile recently established (Ref. 8) and further extended here for type XV collagen. Nevertheless, localization of type XIX exhibited significant differences from type XV collagen that were particularly evident in the kidney, liver, and spleen. This report, in conjunction with the type XV results and other studies of type XVIII collagen, indicates the existence of a new collagen subgroup founded on their widespread presence in basement membrane zones regardless of chain homology. In addition to their role in basement membrane

  5. Collagen type II in Langer-Saldino achondrogenesis: absence of major abnormalities in a less severe case.

    PubMed

    Bätge, B; Nerlich, A; Brenner, R; Yang, C; Müller, P K

    1992-02-01

    Collagen extracted either from cartilage or synthesized in vitro was analyzed to identify possible molecular defects in the cartilaginous matrix of a male fetus suffering from a mild form of type II achondrogenesis (Langer-Saldino). The tissue architecture of the patient's cartilage was markedly altered and showed numerous fibrous vascular canals which were focally stained by antibodies against collagens I and III. Collagen II was present, although heterogenously distributed throughout the cartilaginous matrix. Upon electrophoretic separation, however, the patient's femoral head cartilage showed the presence of collagens II, IX and XI only, which was similar to an age-matched control. The hydroxyproline/hydroxylysine ratio of collagen II of the patient was not significantly different from that of the control. Likewise, the compositions of collagens synthesized by cultured chondrocytes as well as fibroblasts were similar in the patient and the control. The results provide strong evidence that, in the present mild case of Langer-Saldino achondrogenesis, collagen II is expressed and regularly hydroxylated at its lysyl residues. This may indicate that cartilage components other than collagen II may be responsible for the altered tissue organization observed. Along with previous observations, our data suggest that the degree of biochemical matrix alterations may be related to the severity of the clinical phenotype. PMID:1515761

  6. Label-free nonenzymatic glycation monitoring of collagen scaffolds in type 2 diabetic mice by confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Panpan; Liu, Hanping; Deng, Xiaoyuan; Jin, Ying; Wang, Qiannan; Liu, Hao; Chen, Maosheng; Han, Xue

    2015-02-01

    Collagen is the key target of nonenzymatic glycation during physiopathological processes such as diabetes. The induced changes in the biochemical property of collagen by nonenzymatic glycation remain a major challenge to probe. This study investigated the use of confocal Raman microspectroscopy to label-free monitor the nonenzymatic glycation of collagen scaffolds from type 2 diabetic (T2D) mice at different timepoints (0, 4, 8, and 12 weeks). The glycated collagen scaffolds were obtained through the decellularized dermal matrix method to remove the epidermis layer, subcutaneous tissue, and cells in the dermis and to retain the collagen fibrils. Raman spectra showed no changes in Raman peak positions, which indicated that nonenzymatic glycation could produce no significant changes in the triple-helix structure of collagen in T2D mice. However, the relative intensity of the Raman bands at 921, 1033, 1244, 1274, 1346, 1635, and 1672 cm-1 increased as diabetic time progressed. Correlation analysis suggested that the spectra of these bands had a high positive correlation with the expression of anti-advanced glycation end products obtained by immunofluorescence imaging of the same collagen scaffolds. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy proves a potential tool to label-free monitor the collagen changes caused by nonenzymatic glycation in T2D mice.

  7. Type I collagen and its daughter peptides for targeting mucosal healing in ulcerative colitis: A new treatment strategy.

    PubMed

    Ramadass, Satiesh Kumar; Jabaris, Sugin Lal; Perumal, Ramesh Kannan; HairulIslam, Villianur Ibrahim; Gopinath, Arun; Madhan, Balaraman

    2016-08-25

    Ulcerative colitis, particularly the chronic persistent form is characterized by the presence of active inflammation and extensive areas of ulceration in the colonic mucosa. The existing treatment protocol aims at only reducing intestinal inflammation, rather than targeting mucosal ulceration. In this study, type I collagen and its daughter peptides called collagen hydrolysate, highly popular reconstructive materials for tissue engineering applications, are hypothesized as healing matrices to target the recuperation of internal mucosal ulceration. The clinical assessments on day 10 of dextran sodium sulfate induced colitis in mice model revealed that both the collagen (1.56±0.29) and collagen hydrolysate treatments (1.33±0.33) showed a significant reduction in the rectal bleeding compared to the reference mesalamine treatment (2.50±0.33) and untreated negative control (2.40±0.40). VEGF, a potent angiogenic growth factor, over expressed during UC was down-regulated by collagen hydrolysate (1.06±0.25) and collagen (1.76±0.45) to a greater extent than by mesalamine (2.59±0.51) and untreated control (4.17±0.15). The down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 also follows the same pattern. Histological observations were in accordance with the clinical indicators. Both collagen and collagen hydrolysate treatments showed significant reduction in mucosal damage score and facilitated faster regeneration of damaged mucosa. PMID:27185300

  8. Induction of dermal-epidermal separation in mice by passive transfer of antibodies specific to type VII collagen

    PubMed Central

    Sitaru, Cassian; Mihai, Sidonia; Otto, Christoph; Chiriac, Mircea T.; Hausser, Ingrid; Dotterweich, Barbara; Saito, Hitoshi; Rose, Christian; Ishiko, Akira; Zillikens, Detlef

    2005-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is a subepidermal blistering disorder associated with tissue-bound and circulating autoantibodies specific to type VII collagen, a major constituent of the dermal-epidermal junction. Previous attempts to transfer the disease by injection of patient autoantibodies into mice have been unsuccessful. To study the pathogenic relevance of antibodies specific to type VII collagen in vivo, we generated and characterized rabbit antibodies specific to a murine form of this antigen and passively transferred them into adult nude, BALB/c, and C57BL/6 mice. Immune rabbit IgG bound to the lamina densa of murine skin and immunoblotted type VII collagen. Mice injected with purified IgG specific to type VII collagen, in contrast to control mice, developed subepidermal skin blisters, reproducing the human disease at the clinical, histological, electron microscopical, and immunopathological levels. Titers of rabbit IgG in the serum of mice correlated with the extent of the disease. F(ab′)2 fragments of rabbit IgG specific to type VII collagen were not pathogenic. When injected into C5-deficient mice, antibodies specific to type VII collagen failed to induce the disease, whereas C5-sufficient mice were susceptible to blister induction. This animal model for EBA should facilitate further dissection of the pathogenesis of this disease and development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:15841176

  9. Polymerized-Type I Collagen Induces Upregulation of Foxp3-Expressing CD4 Regulatory T Cells and Downregulation of IL-17-Producing CD4+ T Cells (Th17) Cells in Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Furuzawa-Carballeda, Janette; Macip-Rodríguez, Perla; Galindo-Feria, Angeles S.; Cruz-Robles, David; Soto-Abraham, Virgina; Escobar-Hernández, Sergio; Aguilar, Diana; Alpizar-Rodríguez, Deshiré; Férez-Blando, Karen; Llorente, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies showed that polymerized-type I collagen (polymerized collagen) exhibits potent immunoregulatory properties. This work evaluated the effect of intramuscular administration of polymerized collagen in early and established collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice and analyzed changes in Th subsets following therapy. Incidence of CIA was of 100% in mice challenged with type II collagen. Clinimorphometric analysis showed a downregulation of inflammation after administration of all treatments (P < 0.05). Histological analysis showed that the CIA-mice group had extensive bone erosion, pannus and severe focal inflammatory infiltrates. In contrast, there was a remarkable reduction in the severity of arthritis in mice under polymerized collagen, methotrexate or methotrexate/polymerized collagen treatment. Polymerized Collagen but not methotrexate induced tissue joint regeneration. Polymerized Collagen and methotrexate/polymerized collagen but not methotrexate alone induces downregulation of CD4+/IL17A+ T cells and upregulation of Tregs and CD4+/IFN-γ+ T cells. Thus, Polymerized Collagen could be an effective therapeutic agent in early and established rheumatoid arthritis by exerting downregulation of autoimmune inflammation. PMID:22028728

  10. Molecular basis for T cell response induced by altered peptide ligand of type II collagen.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeoung-Eun; Cullins, David; Zalduondo, Lillian; Barnett, Stacey L; Yi, Ae-Kyung; Kleinau, Sandra; Stuart, John M; Kang, Andrew H; Myers, Linda K

    2012-06-01

    Mounting evidence from animal models has demonstrated that alterations in peptide-MHC interactions with the T cell receptor (TCR) can lead to dramatically different T cell outcomes. We have developed an altered peptide ligand of type II collagen, referred to as A9, which differentially regulates TCR signaling in murine T cells leading to suppression of arthritis in the experimental model of collagen-induced arthritis. This study delineates the T cell signaling pathway used by T cells stimulated by the A9·I-A(q) complex. We have found that T cells activated by A9 bypass the requirement for Zap-70 and CD3-ζ and signal via FcRγ and Syk. Using collagen-specific T cell hybridomas engineered to overexpress either Syk, Zap-70, TCR-FcRγ, or CD3-ζ, we demonstrate that A9·I-A(q) preferentially activates FcRγ/Syk but not CD3-ζ/Zap-70. Moreover, a genetic absence of Syk or FcRγ significantly reduces the altered peptide ligand induction of the nuclear factor GATA3. By dissecting the molecular mechanism of A9-induced T cell signaling we have defined a new alternate pathway that is dependent upon FcRγ and Syk to secrete immunoregulatory cytokines. Given the interest in using Syk inhibitors to treat patients with rheumatoid arthritis, understanding this pathway may be critical for the proper application of this therapy. PMID:22511761

  11. Modeling of bovine type-I collagen fibrils: interaction with pickling and retanning agents.

    PubMed

    Bulo, Rosa E; Siggel, Lorenz; Molnar, Ferenc; Weiss, Horst

    2007-02-12

    Bovine Type I collagen was investigated, building on a large scale computer model of a collagen fibril in water, and focusing on two stages of the leather manufacturing process. The effects of different salts (NaCl, CaCl(2), and Na(2)SO(4)) on the swelling behavior of collagen at low pH (the pickling process) were studied. The salts suppress the swelling of the fibrils at low pH and we find specific stabilizing influences for CaCl(2) and Na(2)SO(4), due to weak Ca(2+)/Cl(-) and strong SO(4) (2-)/lysine/arginine interactions, respectively. Using state-of-the-art sampling techniques, such as the metadynamics algorithm, to allow an efficient exploration of configuration space, we were able to investigate the effect of polyacrylate and poly(methyl acrylate) - two polymeric retanning agents - on the fibril. Both polymers interact with the ammonium groups on the surface, but polyacrylate shows significantly stronger interactions. We suggest that it is this stronger interaction that contributes to the reduced suitability of PAA as a tanning agent. PMID:17295396

  12. Molecular organization of type IV collagen: polymer liquid crystal-like aspects.

    PubMed

    Gathercole, L J; Barnard, K; Atkins, E D

    1989-12-01

    A new X-ray diffraction pattern from type IV collagen is described, which can be interpreted on the basis of crystalline and liquid crystalline origins of the reflections. Bovine anterior lens capsules extracted with 1 M NaCl and oriented by extension of 60% under constant load gave medium angle X-ray diffraction patterns showing many of the characteristics typical of liquid crystals. Prominent features, apart from those wide angle features attributable to the collagen triple helix, are (1) a four-point pattern of broad reflections at d-spacing 3.9 nm, and layer line spacing near 5 nm. (2) A broad intense equatorial peak centred at 1.24 nm, indicative of liquid-like lateral molecular associations. (3) A set of five sharp, streaked meridional reflections (previously obscured by the broad peak near 5 nm in unextracted capsules). (4) A further six higher angle reflections of a diffuse, arced and broad appearance on the meridian. The sharp streaked meridional reflections emanate from a long-range periodicity of units 8-9 nm in diameter. These features form a self-consistent system if interpreted on the basis of a staggered liquid crystal-like array of collagen molecules, in which case the first five meridionals and remaining broad reflections, sampled on the meridian, can all be indexed as orders of 21 nm. PMID:2489101

  13. A Chemical Phosphorylation-inspired Design for Type I Collagen Biomimetic Remineralization

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Li-sha; Kim, Jongryul; Kim, Young Kyung; Liu, Yan; Dickens, Sabine H.; Pashley, David H.; Ling, Jun-qi; Tay, Franklin R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Type I collagen alone cannot initiate tissue mineralization. Sodium trimetaphosphate (STMP) is frequently employed as a chemical phosphorylating reagent in the food industry. This study examined the feasibility of using STMP as a functional analog of matrix phosphoproteins for biomimetic remineralization of resin-bonded dentin. Methods Equilibrium adsorption and desorption studies of STMP were performed using demineralized dentin powder (DDP). Interaction between STMP and DDP was examined using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Based on those results, a bio-inspired mineralization scheme was developed for chemical phosphorylation of acid-etched dentin with STMP, followed by infiltration of the STMP-treated collagen matrix with two etch-and-rinse adhesives. Resin-dentin interfaces were remineralized in a Portland cement-simulated body fluid system, with or without the use of polyacrylic acid (PAA) as a dual biomimetic analog. Remineralized resin-dentin interfaces were examined unstained using transmission electron microscopy. Results Analysis of saturation binding curves revealed the presence of irreversible phosphate group binding sites on the surface of the DDP. FT-IR provided additional evidence of chemical interaction between STMP and DDP, with increased in the peak intensities of the P=O and P–O–C stretching modes. Those peaks returned to their original intensities after alkaline phosphatase treatment. Evidence of intrafibrillar apatite formation could be seen in incompletely resin-infiltrated, STMP-phosphorylated collagen matrices only when PAA was present in the SBF. Significance These results reinforce the importance of PAA for sequestration of amorphous calcium phosphate nanoprecursors in the biomimetic remineralization scheme. They also highlight the role of STMP as a templating analog of dentin matrix phosphoproteins for inducing intrafibrillar remineralization of apatite nanocrystals within the collagen matrix of incompletely resin

  14. Preparation and some properties of type I collagen from fish scales.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Y; Sakai, H; Ishii, Y; Shirai, K

    1996-12-01

    Soluble collagen from fish (sardine) scales was yielded at about 5% with 0.5 M acetic acid after demineralization with EDTA, while a great portion of the collagen remained insoluble. The solubility of this insoluble collagen was about 20% at 45 degrees C (denaturation temperature of soluble collagen) for 24 h. The remaining 80% of the insoluble collagen was denatured in the form of insoluble gelatin, and that may be an interesting food material. PMID:8988647

  15. Zebrafish Collagen Type I: Molecular and Biochemical Characterization of the Major Structural Protein in Bone and Skin.

    PubMed

    Gistelinck, C; Gioia, R; Gagliardi, A; Tonelli, F; Marchese, L; Bianchi, L; Landi, C; Bini, L; Huysseune, A; Witten, P E; Staes, A; Gevaert, K; De Rocker, N; Menten, B; Malfait, F; Leikin, S; Carra, S; Tenni, R; Rossi, A; De Paepe, A; Coucke, P; Willaert, A; Forlino, A

    2016-01-01

    Over the last years the zebrafish imposed itself as a powerful model to study skeletal diseases, but a limit to its use is the poor characterization of collagen type I, the most abundant protein in bone and skin. In tetrapods collagen type I is a trimer mainly composed of two α1 chains and one α2 chain, encoded by COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes, respectively. In contrast, in zebrafish three type I collagen genes exist, col1a1a, col1a1b and col1a2 coding for α1(I), α3(I) and α2(I) chains. During embryonic and larval development the three collagen type I genes showed a similar spatio-temporal expression pattern, indicating their co-regulation and interdependence at these stages. In both embryonic and adult tissues, the presence of the three α(I) chains was demonstrated, although in embryos α1(I) was present in two distinct glycosylated states, suggesting a developmental-specific collagen composition. Even though in adult bone, skin and scales equal amounts of α1(I), α3(I) and α2(I) chains are present, the presented data suggest a tissue-specific stoichiometry and/or post-translational modification status for collagen type I. In conclusion, this data will be useful to properly interpret results and insights gained from zebrafish models of skeletal diseases. PMID:26876635

  16. Zebrafish Collagen Type I: Molecular and Biochemical Characterization of the Major Structural Protein in Bone and Skin

    PubMed Central

    Gistelinck, C.; Gioia, R.; Gagliardi, A.; Tonelli, F.; Marchese, L.; Bianchi, L.; Landi, C.; Bini, L.; Huysseune, A.; Witten, P. E.; Staes, A.; Gevaert, K.; De Rocker, N.; Menten, B.; Malfait, F.; Leikin, S.; Carra, S.; Tenni, R.; Rossi, A.; De Paepe, A.; Coucke, P.; Willaert, A.; Forlino, A.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last years the zebrafish imposed itself as a powerful model to study skeletal diseases, but a limit to its use is the poor characterization of collagen type I, the most abundant protein in bone and skin. In tetrapods collagen type I is a trimer mainly composed of two α1 chains and one α2 chain, encoded by COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes, respectively. In contrast, in zebrafish three type I collagen genes exist, col1a1a, col1a1b and col1a2 coding for α1(I), α3(I) and α2(I) chains. During embryonic and larval development the three collagen type I genes showed a similar spatio-temporal expression pattern, indicating their co-regulation and interdependence at these stages. In both embryonic and adult tissues, the presence of the three α(I) chains was demonstrated, although in embryos α1(I) was present in two distinct glycosylated states, suggesting a developmental-specific collagen composition. Even though in adult bone, skin and scales equal amounts of α1(I), α3(I) and α2(I) chains are present, the presented data suggest a tissue-specific stoichiometry and/or post-translational modification status for collagen type I. In conclusion, this data will be useful to properly interpret results and insights gained from zebrafish models of skeletal diseases. PMID:26876635

  17. Effects of Native Type II Collagen Treatment on Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bakilan, Fulya; Armagan, Onur; Ozgen, Merih; Tascioglu, Funda; Bolluk, Ozge; Alatas, Ozkan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this randomized controlled study was to evaluate the efficacy of oral native type II collagen treatment on the symptoms and biological markers of cartilage degradation, when given concomitantly with acetaminophen in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Materials and Methods: Thirty-nine patients diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis were included and randomly distributed into two groups: one treated with 1500 mg/day of acetaminophen (group AC; n=19) and the other treated with 1500 mg/day of acetaminophen plus 10 mg/day of native type II collagen (group AC+CII; n=20) for 3 months. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) at rest and during walking, Western Ontario McMaster (WOMAC) pain, WOMAC function, and Short Form-36 (SF-36) scores, were recorded. Coll2-1, Coll2-1NO2 and Fibulin-3 levels were quantified in urine as biomarkers of disease progression. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02237989. Results: After 3 months of treatment, significant improvements compared to baseline were reported in joint pain (VAS walking), function (WOMAC) and quality of life (SF-36) in the AC+CII group, while only improvements in some subscales of the SF-36 survey and VAS walking were detected in the AC group. Comparisons between the groups revealed a significant difference in VAS walking score in favour of the AC+CII group as compared to AC group. Biochemical markers of cartilage degradation in urine did not significantly improve in any of the groups. Conclusion: All in all, these results suggest that native type II collagen treatment combined with acetaminophen is superior to only acetaminophen for symptomatic treatment of patients with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:27551171

  18. Type III collagen regulates osteoblastogenesis and the quantity of trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Volk, Susan W; Shah, Shalin R; Cohen, Arthur J; Wang, Yanjian; Brisson, Becky K; Vogel, Laurie K; Hankenson, Kurt D; Adams, Sherrill L

    2014-06-01

    Type III collagen (Col3), a fibril-forming collagen, is a major extracellular matrix component in a variety of internal organs and skin. It is also expressed at high levels during embryonic skeletal development and is expressed by osteoblasts in mature bone. Loss of function mutations in the gene encoding Col3 (Col3a1) are associated with vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). Although the most significant clinical consequences of this syndrome are associated with catastrophic failure and impaired healing of soft tissues, several studies have documented skeletal abnormalities in vascular EDS patients. However, there are no reports of the role of Col3 deficiency on the murine skeleton. We compared craniofacial and skeletal phenotypes in young (6-8 weeks) and middle-aged (>1 year) control (Col3(+/+)) and haploinsufficient (Col3(+/-)) mice, as well as young null (Col3(-/-)) mice by microcomputed tomography (μCT). Although Col3(+/-) mice did not have significant craniofacial abnormalities based upon cranial morphometrics, μCT analysis of distal femur trabecular bone demonstrated significant reductions in bone volume (BV), bone volume fraction (BV/TV), connectivity density, structure model index and trabecular thickness in young adult female Col3(+/-) mice relative to wild-type littermates. The reduction in BV/TV persisted in female mice at 1 year of age. Next, we evaluated the role of Col3 in vitro. Osteogenesis assays revealed that cultures of mesenchymal progenitors collected from Col3(-/-) embryos display decreased alkaline phosphatase activity and reduced capacity to undergo mineralization. Consistent with this data, a reduction in expression of osteogenic markers (type I collagen, osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein) correlates with reduced bone Col3 expression in Col3(+/-) mice and with age in vivo. A small but significant reduction in osteoclast numbers was found in Col3(+/-) compared to Col3(+/+) bones. Taken together, these findings indicate that Col3 plays a

  19. Type II collagen and gelatin from silvertip shark (Carcharhinus albimarginatus) cartilage: isolation, purification, physicochemical and antioxidant properties.

    PubMed

    Jeevithan, Elango; Bao, Bin; Bu, Yongshi; Zhou, Yu; Zhao, Qingbo; Wu, Wenhui

    2014-07-01

    Type II acid soluble collagen (CIIA), pepsin soluble collagen (CIIP) and type II gelatin (GII) were isolated from silvertip shark (Carcharhinus albimarginatus) cartilage and examined for their physicochemical and antioxidant properties. GII had a higher hydroxyproline content (173 mg/g) than the collagens and cartilage. CIIA, CIIP and GII were composed of two identical α1 and β chains and were characterized as type II. Amino acid analysis of CIIA, CIIP and GII indicated imino acid contents of 150, 156 and 153 amino acid residues per 1000 residues, respectively. Differing Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of CIIA, CIIP and GII were observed, which suggested that the isolation process affected the secondary structure and molecular order of collagen, particularly the triple-helical structure. The denaturation temperature of GII (32.5 °C) was higher than that of CIIA and CIIP. The antioxidant activity against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals and the reducing power of CIIP was greater than that of CIIA and GII. SEM microstructure of the collagens depicted a porous, fibrillary and multi-layered structure. Accordingly, the physicochemical and antioxidant properties of type II collagens (CIIA, CIIP) and GII isolated from shark cartilage were found to be suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:24979271

  20. Type II Collagen and Gelatin from Silvertip Shark (Carcharhinus albimarginatus) Cartilage: Isolation, Purification, Physicochemical and Antioxidant Properties

    PubMed Central

    Jeevithan, Elango; Bao, Bin; Bu, Yongshi; Zhou, Yu; Zhao, Qingbo; Wu, Wenhui

    2014-01-01

    Type II acid soluble collagen (CIIA), pepsin soluble collagen (CIIP) and type II gelatin (GII) were isolated from silvertip shark (Carcharhinus albimarginatus) cartilage and examined for their physicochemical and antioxidant properties. GII had a higher hydroxyproline content (173 mg/g) than the collagens and cartilage. CIIA, CIIP and GII were composed of two identical α1 and β chains and were characterized as type II. Amino acid analysis of CIIA, CIIP and GII indicated imino acid contents of 150, 156 and 153 amino acid residues per 1000 residues, respectively. Differing Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of CIIA, CIIP and GII were observed, which suggested that the isolation process affected the secondary structure and molecular order of collagen, particularly the triple-helical structure. The denaturation temperature of GII (32.5 °C) was higher than that of CIIA and CIIP. The antioxidant activity against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals and the reducing power of CIIP was greater than that of CIIA and GII. SEM microstructure of the collagens depicted a porous, fibrillary and multi-layered structure. Accordingly, the physicochemical and antioxidant properties of type II collagens (CIIA, CIIP) and GII isolated from shark cartilage were found to be suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:24979271

  1. Type I macrophage scavenger receptor contains α-helical and collagen-like coiled coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Freeman, Mason; Rohrer, Lucia; Zabrecky, James; Matsudaira, Paul; Krieger, Monty

    1990-02-01

    The macrophage scavenger receptor is a trimeric membrane glycoprotein with unusual ligand-binding properties which has been implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. The trimeric structure of the bovine type I scavenger receptor, deduced by complementary DNA cloning, contains three extracellular C-terminal cysteine-rich domains connected to the transmembrane domain by a long fibrous stalk. This stalk structure, composed of an a-helical coiled coil and a collagen-like triple helix, has not previously been observed in an integral membrane protein.

  2. Expression of collagen and related growth factors in rat tendon and skeletal muscle in response to specific contraction types

    PubMed Central

    Heinemeier, K M; Olesen, J L; Haddad, F; Langberg, H; Kjaer, M; Baldwin, K M; Schjerling, P

    2007-01-01

    Acute exercise induces collagen synthesis in both tendon and muscle, indicating an adaptive response in the connective tissue of the muscle–tendon unit. However, the mechanisms of this adaptation, potentially involving collagen-inducing growth factors (such as transforming growth factor-β-1 (TGF-β-1)), as well as enzymes related to collagen processing, are not clear. Furthermore, possible differential effects of specific contraction types on collagen regulation have not been investigated. Female Sprague–Dawley rats were subjected to 4 days of concentric, eccentric or isometric training (n = 7–9 per group) of the medial gastrocnemius, by stimulation of the sciatic nerve. RNA was extracted from medial gastrocnemius and Achilles tendon tissue 24 h after the last training bout, and mRNA levels for collagens I and III, TGF-β-1, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), lysyl oxidase (LOX), metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and -9) and their inhibitors (TIMP-1 and 2) were measured by Northern blotting and/or real-time PCR. In tendon, expression of TGF-β-1 and collagens I and III (but not CTGF) increased in response to all types of training. Similarly, enzymes/factors involved in collagen processing were induced in tendon, especially LOX (up to 37-fold), which could indicate a loading-induced increase in cross-linking of tendon collagen. In skeletal muscle, a similar regulation of gene expression was observed, but in contrast to the tendon response, the effect of eccentric training was significantly greater than the effect of concentric training on the expression of several transcripts. In conclusion, the study supports an involvement of TGF-β-1 in loading-induced collagen synthesis in the muscle–tendon unit and importantly, it indicates that muscle tissue is more sensitive than tendon to the specific mechanical stimulus. PMID:17540706

  3. Tensile mechanical properties of collagen type I and its enzymatic crosslinks.

    PubMed

    Kwansa, Albert L; De Vita, Raffaella; Freeman, Joseph W

    2016-01-01

    Collagen type I crosslink type and prevalence can be influenced by age, tissue type, and health; however, the role that crosslink chemical structure plays in mechanical behavior is not clear. Molecular dynamics simulations of ~65-nm-long microfibril units were used to predict how difunctional (deH-HLNL and HLKNL) and trifunctional (HHL and PYD) crosslinks respond to mechanical deformation. Low- and high-strain stress-strain regions were observed, corresponding to crosslink alignment. The high-strain elastic moduli were 37.7, 37.9, 39.9, and 42.4GPa for the HLKNL, deH-HLNL, HHL, and PYD-crosslinked models, respectively. Bond dissociation analysis suggests that PYD is more brittle than HHL, with deH-HLNL and HLKNL being similarly ductile. These results agree with the tissues in which these crosslinks are found (e.g., deH-HLNL/HLKNL in developing tissues, HHL in mature skin, and PYD in mature bone). Chemical structure-function relationships identified for these crosslinks can aid the development of larger-scale models of collagenous tissues and materials. PMID:27160969

  4. Diminished Type III Collagen Promotes Myofibroblast Differentiation and Increases Scar Deposition in Cutaneous Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Susan W.; Wang, Yanjian; Mauldin, Elizabeth A.; Liechty, Kenneth W.; Adams, Sherrill L.

    2011-01-01

    The repair of cutaneous wounds in the postnatal animal is associated with the development of scar tissue. Directing cell activities to efficiently heal wounds while minimizing the development of scar tissue is a major goal of wound management and the focus of intensive research efforts. Type III collagen (Col3), expressed in early granulation tissue, has been proposed to play a prominent role in cutaneous wound repair, although little is known about its role in this process. To establish the role of Col3 in cutaneous wound repair, we examined the healing of excisional wounds in a previously described murine model of Col3 deficiency. Col3 deficiency (Col3+/–) in aged mice resulted in accelerated wound closure with increased wound contraction. In addition, Col3-deficient mice had increased myofibroblast density in the wound granulation tissue as evidenced by an increased expression of the myofibroblast marker, α-smooth muscle actin. In vitro, dermal fibroblasts obtained from Col3-deficient embryos (Col3+/– and –/–) were more efficient at collagen gel contraction and also displayed increased myofibroblast differentiation compared to those harvested from wild-type (Col3+/+) embryos. Finally, wounds from Col3-deficient mice also had significantly more scar tissue area on day 21 postwounding compared to wild-type mice. The effect of Col3 expression on myofibroblast differentiation and scar formation in this model suggests a previously undefined role for this ECM protein in tissue regeneration and repair. PMID:21252470

  5. Keratocytes are induced to produce collagen type II: A new strategy for in vivo corneal matrix regeneration.

    PubMed

    Greene, Carol Ann; Green, Colin R; Dickinson, Michelle E; Johnson, Virginia; Sherwin, Trevor

    2016-09-10

    The stroma, the middle layer of the cornea, is a connective tissue making up most of the corneal thickness. The stromal extracellular matrix (ECM) consists of highly organised lamellae which are made up of tightly packed fibrils primarily composed of collagens type I and V. This layer is interspersed with keratocytes, mesenchymal cells of neural crest origin. We have previously shown that adult corneal keratocytes exhibit phenotypic plasticity and can be induced into a neuronal phenotype. In the current study we evaluated the potential of keratocytes to produce collagen type II via phenotypic reprogramming with exogenous chondrogenic factors. The cornea presents a challenge to tissue engineers owing to its high level of organisation and the phenotypic instability of keratocytes. Traditional approaches based on a scar model do not support the engineering of functional stromal tissue. Type II collagen is not found in the adult cornea but is reported to be expressed during corneal development, raising the possibility of using such an approach to regenerate the corneal ECM. Keratocytes in culture and within intact normal and diseased tissue were induced to produce collagen type II upon treatment with transforming growth factor Beta3 (TGFβ3) and dexamethasone. In vivo treatment of rat corneas also resulted in collagen type II deposition and a threefold increase in corneal hardness and elasticity. Furthermore, the treatment of corneas and subsequent deposition of collagen type II did not cause opacity, fibrosis or scarring. The induction of keratocytes with specific exogenous factors and resulting deposition of type II collagen in the stroma can potentially be controlled by withdrawal of the factors. This might be a promising new approach for in vivo corneal regeneration strategies aimed at increasing corneal integrity in diseases associated with weakened ectatic corneal tissue such as keratoconus. PMID:27539660

  6. Role of CD14 and TLR4 in type I, type III collagen expression, synthesis and secretion in LPS-induced normal human skin fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongming; Li, Juncong; Wang, Yihe; Hu, Quan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The primary aim of this study was to investigate the role of CD14 and TLR4 in type I, type III collagen expression, synthesis and secretion in LPS-induced normal human skin fibroblasts. The secondary aim was to provide theoretical basis for the molecular mechanisms of scar formation induced by LPS. Methods: The normal skin fibroblasts cultured in vitro were randomly divided into four groups: 0.1 μg/mL LPS reference group, CD14 pretreatment + LPS, TLR4 pretreatment + LPS, CD14 and TLR4 pretreatment + LPS. The collagen DNA synthesis was assessed by 3H-proline incorporation method. Real-time Quantitative PCR was used to detect type I, type III collagen mRNA expression. Results: Similar results were revealed for mRNA expression levels. The immunofluorescence staining suggested that type I and type III collagen were expressed in all investigated groups and that the expression was differentially downregulated in groups B, C, D. ELISA demonstrated markedly decreased levels in secreting type I, type III collagens and hydroxyproline in groups B, C, D (P<0.05), and the lowest level was detected in group D (P<0.01). Conclusion: Pretreatment with CD14 or TLR4 alone or their combination can significantly reduce the levels of type I and type III collagen expression, synthesis and secretion, with the most notable reduction detected in case of CD14 and TLR4 combined. We could thus conclude that both CD14 and TLR4 are involved in type I and type III collagen expression, synthesis and secretion in LPS-induced skin fibroblasts. PMID:25932184

  7. Increased type I collagen degradation correlates with disease severity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Hakala, M; Risteli, L; Manelius, J; Nieminen, P; Risteli, J

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To assess the extent and clinical significance of type I collagen degradation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS--Serum samples from 90 consecutive patients with RA from a cross-sectional population based study and 90 age- and sex-matched controls were analysed with the new assay of cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP). RESULTS--Patients with RA had significantly higher concentrations of ICTP than the controls. ICTP correlated strongly with measures of impairment in RA, such as the erosive state of joint disease (ES) (r = 0.57, p < 0.001) and Keitel function test (KFT) (r = 0.49, p < 0.001), and more weakly with various disease activity markers. When erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), ES or KFT were used as indicators of disease severity among the patients with disease duration over five years, ICTP distinguished the more serious RA from milder cases. CONCLUSIONS--Elevated serum concentrations of ICTP are common in RA and are associated with signs of aggressive disease. PMID:8311537

  8. L-arginine mediated renaturation enhances yield of human, α6 type IV collagen non-collagenous domain from bacterial inclusion bodies

    PubMed Central

    Gunda, Venugopal; Boosani, Chandra Shekhar; Verma, Raj Kumar; Guda, Chittibabu; Akul Sudhakar, Yakkanti

    2012-01-01

    The anti-angiogenic, carboxy terminal non-collagenous domain (NC1) derived from human Collagen type IV alpha 6 chain, [α6(IV)NC1] or hexastatin, was earlier obtained using different recombinant methods of expression in bacterial systems. However, the effect of L-arginine mediated renaturation in enhancing the relative yields of this protein from bacterial inclusion bodies has not been evaluated. In the present study, direct stirring and on-column renaturation methods using L-arginine and different size exclusion chromatography matrices were applied for enhancing the solubility in purifying the recombinant α6(IV)NC1 from bacterial inclusion bodies. This methodology enabled purification of higher quantities of soluble protein from inclusion bodies, which inhibited endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation. Thus, the scope for L-arginine mediated renaturation in obtaining higher yields of soluble, biologically active NC1 domain from bacterial inclusion bodies was evaluated. PMID:22512648

  9. Origin of the autoreactive anti-type II collagen response. II. Specificities, antibody isotypes and usage of V gene families of anti-type II collagen B cells.

    PubMed

    Holmdahl, R; Bailey, C; Enander, I; Mayer, R; Klareskog, L; Moran, T; Bona, C

    1989-03-15

    Autoantibodies play an important role in the pathogenesis of type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice. We have earlier reported a high frequency of cells producing anti-CII autoantibodies and a low frequency of cells producing multispecific antibodies, in regional lymph nodes 9 to 11 days after primary immunization with CII. It is shown here that anti-CII antibodies produced during primary immune response are IgG-antibodies mainly of IgG2a, IgG1 and IgG2b subclasses while IgM antibodies dominate primary responses elicited by OVA and denatured CII as analyzed with a large panel of hybridomas. Anti-CII antibodies generated during the primary response recognize at least five different epitopes on the CII molecule. The specificities of these antibodies for various epitopes result from combinational association of products encoded by genes derived from various VH and VK families and/or by the occurrence of somatic mutations. It is suggested that the primary anti-CII autoantibody response involves activation of memory B cells and is in this aspect different from the origin of "natural" autoantibodies. PMID:2493500

  10. Laboratory Indicators of Aggrecan Turnover in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Winsz-Szczotka, Katarzyna; Kuźnik-Trocha, Kornelia; Komosińska-Vassev, Katarzyna; Jura-Półtorak, Agnieszka; Olczyk, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Evaluation of chondroitin sulfate (CS), as an early marker of aggrecan degradation, and chondroitin sulfate 846 epitope (CS846), as a biomarker of CS synthesis, is an attempt at answering the question whether the therapy used in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients contributes to the normalization of biochemical changes in aggrecan. Methods and Results. Serum levels of CS and CS846 as well as catalase (CT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities in erythrocyte were assessed in patients before and after treatment. In the course of JIA, aggrecan metabolism is disturbed, which is reflected by a decrease (p < 0.001) in CS serum level and an increase (p < 0.05) in CS846 concentration. Furthermore, increased (p < 0.001) activities of CT, SOD, and GPx in untreated JIA patients were recorded. The anti-inflammatory treatment resulted in the normalization of CS846 level and SOD and GPx activities. In untreated patients, we have revealed a significant correlation between serum CS and CS846, CT, CRP, ESR, MMP-3, and ADAMTS-4, respectively, as well as between CS846 and CT, GPx, CRP, ESR, and TGF-β1, respectively. Conclusion. The observed changes of CS and CS846 in JIA patients indicate a further need of the therapy continuation aimed at protecting a patient from a possible disability. PMID:26924871

  11. Monoclonal antibodies to human type IV collagen: useful reagents to demonstrate the heterotrimeric nature of the molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Odermatt, B F; Lang, A B; Rüttner, J R; Winterhalter, K H; Trüeb, B

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been prepared against type IV collagen isolated from human kidney. Two mAbs, designated CIV 22 and CIV 16, were extensively characterized. CIV 22 reacted only with native type IV collagen, whereas CIV 16 also bound to fragments derived from the alpha 1(IV) chain after reduction and alkylation of the molecule. Therefore, CIV 22 recognizes a conformational epitope on the triple helical type IV collagen, whereas CIV 16 binds to a sequential determinant in the carboxyl-terminal half of the alpha 1(IV) chain. By immunofluorescence, typical basement membrane structures were stained with both mAbs on frozen sections of different human organs. The mAbs were used to investigate the chain composition of type IV collagen. Radiolabeled type IV collagen bound to CIV 22, proving its triple helical configuration. These native probes, containing both the alpha 1(IV) and the alpha 2(IV) chains, also bound to CIV 16. Since CIV 16 does not react with the isolated alpha 2(IV) chain, both chains must be arranged in a single triple helical molecule (heterotrimer). Images PMID:6209713

  12. Type IV collagen is an activating ligand for the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor GPR126.

    PubMed

    Paavola, Kevin J; Sidik, Harwin; Zuchero, J Bradley; Eckart, Michael; Talbot, William S

    2014-08-12

    GPR126 is an orphan heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is essential for the development of diverse organs. We found that type IV collagen, a major constituent of the basement membrane, binds to Gpr126 and activates its signaling function. Type IV collagen stimulated the production of cyclic adenosine monophosphate in rodent Schwann cells, which require Gpr126 activity to differentiate, and in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells expressing exogenous Gpr126. Type IV collagen specifically bound to the extracellular amino-terminal region of Gpr126 containing the CUB (complement, Uegf, Bmp1) and pentraxin domains. Gpr126 derivatives lacking the entire amino-terminal region were constitutively active, suggesting that this region inhibits signaling and that ligand binding relieves this inhibition to stimulate receptor activity. A new zebrafish mutation that truncates Gpr126 after the CUB and pentraxin domains disrupted development of peripheral nerves and the inner ear. Thus, our findings identify type IV collagen as an activating ligand for GPR126, define its mechanism of activation, and highlight a previously unrecognized signaling function of type IV collagen in basement membranes. PMID:25118328

  13. An improved method for the preparation of type I collagen from skin.

    PubMed

    Pacak, Christina A; MacKay, Allison A; Cowan, Douglas B

    2014-01-01

    Soluble type 1 collagen (COL1) is used extensively as an adhesive substrate for cell cultures and as a cellular scaffold for regenerative applications. Clinically, this protein is widely used for cosmetic surgery, dermal injections, bone grafting, and reconstructive surgery. The sources of COL1 for these procedures are commonly nonhuman, which increases the potential for inflammation and rejection as well as xenobiotic disease transmission. In view of this, a method to efficiently and quickly purify COL1 from limited quantities of autologously-derived tissues would circumvent many of these issues; however, standard isolation protocols are lengthy and often require large quantities of collagenous tissues. Here, we demonstrate an efficient COL1 extraction method that reduces the time needed to isolate and purify this protein from about 10 days to less than 3 hr. We chose the dermis as our tissue source because of its availability during many surgical procedures. This method uses traditional extraction buffers combined with forceful agitation and centrifugal filtration to obtain highly-pure, soluble COL1 from small amounts of corium. Briefly, dermal biopsies are washed thoroughly in ice-cold dH2O after removing fat, connective tissue, and hair. The skin samples are stripped of noncollagenous proteins and polysaccharides using 0.5 M sodium acetate and a high speed bench-top homogenizer. Collagen from residual solids is subsequently extracted with a 0.075 M sodium citrate buffer using the homogenizer. These extracts are purified using 100,000 MW cut-off centrifugal filters that yield COL1 preparations of comparable or superior quality to commercial products or those obtained using traditional procedures. We anticipate this method will facilitate the utilization of autologously-derived COL1 for a multitude of research and clinical applications. PMID:24473107

  14. Minor Type IV Collagen α5 Chain Promotes Cancer Progression through Discoidin Domain Receptor-1

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qian; Jiang, Yan; Liu, Qingbo; Yue, Jiao; Liu, Chunying; Zhao, Xiaotong; Qiao, Yuemei; Ji, Hongbin; Chen, Jianfeng; Ge, Gaoxiang

    2015-01-01

    Type IV collagens (Col IV), components of basement membrane, are essential in the maintenance of tissue integrity and proper function. Alteration of Col IV is related to developmental defects and diseases, including cancer. Col IV α chains form α1α1α2, α3α4α5 and α5α5α6 protomers that further form collagen networks. Despite knowledge on the functions of major Col IV (α1α1α2), little is known whether minor Col IV (α3α4α5 and α5α5α6) plays a role in cancer. It also remains to be elucidated whether major and minor Col IV are functionally redundant. We show that minor Col IV α5 chain is indispensable in cancer development by using α5(IV)-deficient mouse model. Ablation of α5(IV) significantly impeded the development of KrasG12D-driven lung cancer without affecting major Col IV expression. Epithelial α5(IV) supports cancer cell proliferation, while endothelial α5(IV) is essential for efficient tumor angiogenesis. α5(IV), but not α1(IV), ablation impaired expression of non-integrin collagen receptor discoidin domain receptor-1 (DDR1) and downstream ERK activation in lung cancer cells and endothelial cells. Knockdown of DDR1 in lung cancer cells and endothelial cells phenocopied the cells deficient of α5(IV). Constitutively active DDR1 or MEK1 rescued the defects of α5(IV)-ablated cells. Thus, minor Col IV α5(IV) chain supports lung cancer progression via DDR1-mediated cancer cell autonomous and non-autonomous mechanisms. Minor Col IV can not be functionally compensated by abundant major Col IV. PMID:25992553

  15. Effects of Type I Collagen Degradation on the Durability of Three Adhesive Systems in the Early Phase of Dentin Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lin; Xiao, Yu-hong; Fang, Ming; Gao, Yu; Huang, Li; Jia, An-qi; Chen, Ji-hua

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study was designed to evaluate the effects of type I collagen degradation on the durability of three adhesive systems in the early phase of dentin bonding. Methods Bonded dentin specimens were prepared using three different types of adhesive systems. Micro-tensile bond strength and degradation of collagen were tested before, and after 1 month or 4 months of aging in artificial saliva. The relationship between micro-tensile bond strength and collagen degradation was analyzed by calculating their Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results Aging induced time-dependent reduction in micro-tensile bond strengths for all the tested adhesive systems, although such reduction for the single-step self-etching adhesive G-Bond (GB) was not statistically significant. The bond strength of the two-step self-etching primer adhesive system Clearfil SE Bond (SEB) was similar to that of the two-step etch-and-rinse self-priming adhesive system Single Bond 2 (SB), and they were both significantly reduced after one or four months of aging. A negative correlation was found between the degree of collagen degradation and magnitude of micro-tensile bond strength (r = - 0.65, p = 0.003). The Pearson’s correlation coefficient was 0.426, indicating that 42.6% of the aging-induced reduction in bond strength can be explained by the degradation of collagen. Conclusions In the early phase of dentin bonding, there was a negative correlation between the degree of collagen degradation and the magnitude of micro-tensile bond strength. The reduction of bond strength was accompanied by the degradation of collagen. These results provide evidence for the causative relationship between the degradation of collagen and the deterioration of dentin-adhesive interface. PMID:25689141

  16. Identification of the epitope for a monoclonal antibody that blocks platelet aggregation induced by type III collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Glattauer, V; Werkmeister, J A; Kirkpatrick, A; Ramshaw, J A

    1997-01-01

    A library of eight conformation-dependent monoclonal antibodies that react with distinct epitopes on native human type III collagen has been examined for the ability of these antibodies to inhibit platelet aggregation induced by this collagen. Six of these antibodies had no effects; one, 1E7-D7/Col3, delayed the onset and slowed the rate of platelet aggregation, while another, 2G8-B1/Col3, completely inhibited aggregation. In order to identify the epitope recognized by this inhibitory antibody, a series of peptides that could fold to form triple-helical fragments was examined. Each peptide included six Gly-Xaa-Yaa triplets from the human type III collagen sequence, where Xaa and Yaa represent the particular amino acids in the sequence, and a C-terminal (Gly-Pro-Hyp)4 sequence to enhance triple-helical stability. Using these peptides we have identified the epitope as a nine-amino-acid sequence, GLAGAOGLR (where O is the one-letter code for 4-hydroxyproline), starting at position 520 in the human type III collagen helical domain. This sequence is proximal to the site proposed for the interaction of type III collagen with alpha2beta1-integrin of platelets. PMID:9173900

  17. Pseudo-hyperelastic model of tendon hysteresis from adaptive recruitment of collagen type I fibrils.

    PubMed

    Ciarletta, Pasquale; Dario, Paolo; Micera, Silvestro

    2008-02-01

    Understanding the functional relationship between the viscoelasticity and the morphology of soft collagenous tissues is fundamental for many applications in bioengineering science. This work presents a pseudo-hyperelastic constitutive theory aiming at describing the time-dependant hysteretic response of tendons subjected to uniaxial tensile loads. A macroscopic tendon is modeled as a composite homogeneous tissue with the anisotropic reinforcement of collagen type I fibrils. The tissue microstructure is considered as an adaptive network of fibrillar units connected in temporary junctions. The processes of breakage and reformation of active fibrils are thermally activated, and are occurring at random times. An internal softening variable and a dissipation energy function account for the adaptive arrangement of the fibrillar network in the pseudo-hyperelastic model. Cyclic uniaxial tensile tests have been performed in vitro on porcine flexor digital tendons. The theoretical predictions fit accurately the experimental stress-strain data both for the loading and the unloading processes. The hysteresis behavior reflects the improvement in the efficiency and performance of the motion of the muscle-tendon unit at high strain rates. The results of the model demonstrate the microstructural importance of proteoglycans in determining the functional viscoelastic adaptability of the macroscopic tendon. PMID:17997481

  18. MMPs are less efficient than ADAMTS5 in cleaving aggrecan core protein.

    PubMed

    Durigova, Michaela; Nagase, Hideaki; Mort, John S; Roughley, Peter J

    2011-03-01

    Aggrecan degradation in articular cartilage occurs predominantly through proteolysis and has been attributed to the action of members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) families. Both families of enzymes cleave aggrecan at specific sites within the aggrecan core protein. One cleavage site within the interglobular domain (IGD), between Glu(373-374)Ala and five additional sites in the chondroitin sulfate-2 (CS-2) region of aggrecan were characterized as "aggrecanase" (ADAMTS) cleavage sites, while cleavage between Ser(341-342)Phe within the IGD of bovine aggrecan is attributed to MMP action. The objective of this study was to assess the cleavage efficiency of MMPs relative to ADAMTS and their contribution to aggrecan proteolysis in vitro. The analysis of aggrecan IGD degradation in bovine articular cartilage explants treated with catabolic cytokines over a 19-day period showed that MMP-mediated degradation of aggrecan within the IGD can only be observed following day 12 of culture. This delay is associated with the lack of activation of proMMPs during the first 12 days of culture. Analysis of MMP1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9, 12, 13 and ADAMTS5 efficiencies at cleaving within the aggrecan IGD and CS-2 region in vitro was carried out by the digestion of bovine aggrecan with the various enzymes and Western blot analysis using aggrecan anti-G1 and anti-G3 antibodies. Of these MMPs, MMP12 was the most efficient at cleaving within the aggrecan IGD. In addition to cleavage in the IGD, MMP, 3, 7, 8 and 12 were also able to degrade the aggrecan CS-2 region. MMP3 and MMP12 were able to degrade aggrecan at the very C-terminus of the CS-2 region, cleaving the Glu(2047-2048)Ala bond which was previously shown to be cleaved by ADAMTS5. However, in comparison to ADAMTS5, MMP3 was about 100 times and 10 times less efficient at cleaving within the aggrecan IGD and CS-2 regions, respectively. Collectively, our results

  19. Demineralized bone promotes chondrocyte or osteoblast differentiation of human marrow stromal cells cultured in collagen sponges.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuanhu; Yates, Karen E; Eid, Karim; Glowacki, Julie

    2005-01-01

    Demineralized bone implants have been used for many types of craniomaxillofacial, orthopedic, periodontal, and hand reconstruction procedures. In previous studies, we showed that demineralized bone powder (DBP) induces chondrogenesis of human dermal fibroblasts in a DBP/collagen sponge system that optimized interactions between particles of DBP and target cells in cell culture. In this study, we test the hypothesis that DBP promotes chondrogenesis or osteogenesis of human marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) in 3-D collagen sponge culture, depending upon the culture conditions. We first confirmed that hMSCs have chondrogenic potential when treated with TGF-beta, either in 2-D monolayer cultures or in 3-D porous collagen sponges. Second, we found that DBP markedly enhanced chondrogenesis in hMSCs in 3-D sponges, as assessed by metachromasia and expression of chondrocyte-specific genes AGGRECAN, COL II, and COL X. Human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs) were used to define mechanisms of chondroinduction because unlike hMSCs they have no inherent chondrogenic potential. In situ hybridization revealed that hDFs vicinal to DBPs express chondrocyte-specific genes AGGRECAN or COL II. Macroarray analysis showed that DBP activates TGF-beta/BMP signaling pathway genes in hDFs. Finally, DBP induced hMSCs to express the osteoblast phenotype when cultured with osteogenic supplements. These studies show how culture conditions can influence the differentiation pathway that human marrow stromal cells follow when stimulated by DBP. These results support the potential to engineer cartilage or bone in vitro by using human bone marrow stromal cells and DBP/collagen scaffolds. PMID:15735899

  20. Immunohistochemical expression of types I and III collagen antibodies in the temporomandibular joint disc of human foetuses

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, L.O.C.; Lodi, F.R.; Gomes, T.S.; Marques, S.R.; Oshima, C.T.F.; Lancellotti, C.L.P.; Rodríguez-Vázquez, J.F.; Mérida-Velasco, J.R.; Alonso, L.G.

    2011-01-01

    The objective was to study the morphology of the articular disc and analyse the immunohistochemical expression of types I and III collagen markers in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc of human foetuses of different gestational ages. Twenty TMJ from human foetuses supplied by Universidade Federal de Uberaba with gestational ages from 17 to 24 weeks were studied. The gestational age of the foetuses was determined by measuring the crown-rump (CR) length. Macroscopically, the foetuses were fixed in 10% formalin solution and dissected by removing the skin and subcutaneous tissue and exposing the deep structures. Immunohistochemical markers of type I and III were used to characterize the existence of collagen fibres. Analysis of the immunohistochemical markers of types I and III collagen revealed the presence of heterotypical fibril networks. PMID:22073371

  1. Production of bioactive, post-translationally modified, heterotrimeric, human recombinant type-I collagen in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Stein, Hanan; Wilensky, Michal; Tsafrir, Yehuda; Rosenthal, Michal; Amir, Rachel; Avraham, Tal; Ofir, Keren; Dgany, Or; Yayon, Avner; Shoseyov, Oded

    2009-09-14

    Collagen's biocompatibility, biodegradability and low immunogenicity render it advantageous for extensive application in pharmaceutical or biotechnological disciplines. However, typical collagen extraction from animal or cadaver sources harbors risks including allergenicity and potential sample contamination with pathogens. In this work, two human genes encoding recombinant heterotrimeric collagen type I (rhCOL1) were successfully coexpressed in tobacco plants with the human prolyl-4-hydroxylase (P4H) and lysyl hydroxylase 3 (LH3) enzymes, responsible for key posttranslational modifications of collagen. Plants coexpressing all five vacuole-targeted proteins generated intact procollagen yields of approximately 2% of the extracted total soluble proteins. Plant-extracted rhCOL1 formed thermally stable triple helical structures and demonstrated biofunctionality similar to human tissue-derived collagen supporting binding and proliferation of adult peripheral blood-derived endothelial progenitor-like cells. Through a simple, safe and scalable method of rhCOL1 production and purification from tobacco plants, this work broadens the potential applications of human recombinant collagen in regenerative medicine. PMID:19678700

  2. Immunohistochemical analysis of type III collagen expression in the lingual mucosa of rats during organogenesis of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Shin-Ichi; Asami, Tomoichiro; Wanichanon, Chaitip; Yoshizawa, Hideki; Aoyagi, Hidekazu

    2008-07-01

    We examined the distribution of immunofluorescence due to immunostaining of type III collagen, differential interference contrast (DIC) images and images obtained in the transmission mode after toluidine blue staining by laser-scanning microscopy of semi-ultrathin sections of epoxy resin-embedded samples, during morphogenesis of the filiform papillae, keratinization of the lingual epithelium, and myogenesis of the rat tongue. Immunoreactivity specific for type III collagen was distributed widely in the mesenchymal connective tissue in fetuses on day 15 after conception (E15), at which time the lingual epithelium was composed of one or two layers of cuboidal cells and the lingual muscle was barely recognizable. Immunoreactivity specific for type III collagen was clearly detected on the lamina propria in fetuses on E17 and E19, and it was relatively distinct just beneath the lingual epithelium. Immunoreactivity specific for type III collagen was sparsely distributed on the connective tissue around the developing lingual muscle. In fetuses on E19, the epithelium became clearly stratified and squamous. At postnatal stages from newborn (P0) to postnatal day 14 (P14), keratinization of the lingual epithelium advanced gradually with the development of filiform papillae. On P0, myogenesis of the tongue was almost completed. The intensity of the fluorescence immunoreactivity specific for type III collagen at postnatal stages was almost same as that on E19. The immunoreactivity around the fully mature muscle was relatively distinct between P0 and P14. Thus, type III collagen appeared in conjunction with the morphogenesis of filiform papillae and the keratinization of the lingual epithelium as well as in the connective tissue that surrounded the lingual muscle during myogenesis of the rat tongue. PMID:18661199

  3. Triplex Forming Oligonucleotides against Type α 1(I) Collagen attenuates Liver Fibrosis induced by Bile Duct ligation

    PubMed Central

    Panakanti, Ravikiran; Pratap, Akshay; Yang, Ningning; Jackson, John S.; Mahato, Ram I.

    2010-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a consequence of chronic liver disorders which lead to the accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM). Particularly, there is an increased accumulation of collagen in the fibrotic liver. We have therefore used a triplex forming oligonucleotide (TFO) against the type α 1 (I) collagen and evaluated, whether it can attenuate liver fibrosis induced by common bile duct ligation (CBDL) in rats. There was a significant decrease in hydroxyproline levels and Masson’s trichrome staining for collagen in TFO-treated CBDL groups compared to non-treated CBDL group. There was over expression of type α1(I) collagen, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and TGF-β1 expression in the CBDL group compared to TFO-treated CBDL group. Also, the serum alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) concentrations were less in the TFO treated group compared to non-treated CBDL group. There was also less neutrophils accumulation in TFO treated CBDL group assayed by myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay. These results suggests that TFO can be used to downregulate type 1 collagen gene expression and can alleviate liver fibrosis induced by common bile duct ligation. PMID:20816672

  4. miRNA-29a targets COL3A1 to regulate the level of type III collagen in pig.

    PubMed

    Chuan-Hao, Li; Wei, Chen; Jia-Qing, Hu; Yan-Dong, Wang; Shou-Dong, Wang; Yong-Qing, Zeng; Hui, Wang

    2016-10-30

    COL3A1 encodes the protein, collagen type III alpha 1, which is an important component of collagen. Collagen can have a considerable effect on the processing quality of meat, and is nutritious. Bioinformatic analysis using Targetscan showed that COL3A1 could be a target gene of miRNA-29a. Moreover, we found that Laiwu pigs have higher levels of type III collagen and lower levels of miRNA-29a than Landrace pigs. Therefore, we hypothesized that miRNA-29a suppresses the expression of COL3A1 by targeting its 3'-UTR. miRNA-29a appears to play an inhibitory role in the regulation of COL3A1 in PK15 cells because of the following: (1) overexpression of miRNA-29a resulted in a significant down-regulation of COL3A1 protein levels (2) overexpression of miRNA-29a significantly decreased the level of COL3A1 mRNA. (3) The activity of a COL3A1 luciferase reporter was significant reduced by miRNA-29a. Furthermore, the levels of miRNA-29a and collagen type III in four tissues in Laiwu and Landrace pigs were consistent with the above observations. In this study, we identified COL3A1 as a direct target for miRNA-29a, which will inform further studies of meat quality. PMID:27476968

  5. N-Phenethyl caffeamide and photodamage: protecting skin by inhibiting type I procollagen degradation and stimulating collagen synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Hsiu-Mei; Chen, Chien-Wen; Lin, Tzu-Yu; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung

    2014-10-01

    Skin is mainly damaged by genetic and environmental factors such as ultraviolet (UV) light and pollutants. UV light is a well-known factor that causes various types of skin damage and premature aging. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage by activating the metalloproteinases that break down type I collagen. This study investigated the antioxidant and antiphotodamage activity and mechanisms of N-phenethyl caffeamide (K36) in human skin fibroblasts. The results indicated that K36 demonstrated strong 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) scavenging activity, which dose-dependently reduced the production of UVB-induced intracellular ROS in human dermal fibroblasts. K36 prevented UVB-irradiation-induced type I collagen degradation by inhibiting the expression of matrix metalloproteins-1, -3, and -9 and the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. Furthermore, K36 elevated collagen synthesis in skin fibroblasts by inhibiting UVB-induced Smad7 overexpression. K36 downregulated the expression of the transcription factor, activator protein-1 (AP-1). Our results indicated that K36 exhibited antioxidant properties and prevented skin collagen degradation caused by UV exposure and the stimulation of collagen synthesis, which suggests the potential use of K36 in preventing photodamage. PMID:25019243

  6. Type V Collagen Induced Tolerance Suppresses Collagen Deposition, TGF-β and Associated Transcripts in Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Vittal, Ragini; Mickler, Elizabeth A.; Fisher, Amanda J.; Zhang, Chen; Rothhaar, Katia; Gu, Hongmei; Brown, Krista M.; Emtiazdjoo, Amir; Lott, Jeremy M.; Frye, Sarah B.; Smith, Gerald N.; Sandusky, George E.; Cummings, Oscar W.; Wilkes, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fatal interstitial lung disease characterized by progressive scarring and matrix deposition. Recent reports highlight an autoimmune component in IPF pathogenesis. We have reported anti-col(V) immunity in IPF patients. The objective of our study was to determine the specificity of col(V) expression profile and anti-col(V) immunity relative to col(I) in clinical IPF and the efficacy of nebulized col(V) in pre-clinical IPF models. Methods Col(V) and col(I) expression profile was analyzed in normal human and IPF tissues. C57-BL6 mice were intratracheally instilled with bleomycin (0.025 U) followed by col(V) nebulization at pre-/post-fibrotic stage and analyzed for systemic and local responses. Results Compared to normal lungs, IPF lungs had higher protein and transcript expression of the alpha 1 chain of col(V) and col(I). Systemic anti-col(V) antibody concentrations, but not of anti-col(I), were higher in IPF patients. Nebulized col(V), but not col(I), prevented bleomycin-induced fibrosis, collagen deposition, and myofibroblast differentiation. Col(V) treatment suppressed systemic levels of anti-col(V) antibodies, IL-6 and TNF-α; and local Il-17a transcripts. Compared to controls, nebulized col(V)-induced tolerance abrogated antigen-specific proliferation in mediastinal lymphocytes and production of IL-17A, IL-6, TNF-α and IFN-γ. In a clinically relevant established fibrosis model, nebulized col(V) decreased collagen deposition. mRNA array revealed downregulation of genes specific to fibrosis (Tgf-β, Il-1β, Pdgfb), matrix (Acta2, Col1a2, Col3a1, Lox, Itgb1/6, Itga2/3) and members of the TGF-β superfamily (Tgfbr1/2, Smad2/3, Ltbp1, Serpine1, Nfkb/Sp1/Cebpb). Conclusions Anti-col(V) immunity is pathogenic in IPF, and col(V)-induced tolerance abrogates bleomycin-induced fibrogenesis and down regulates TGF- β-related signaling pathways. PMID:24204629

  7. Influence of functionalized nanoparticles on conformational stability of type I collagen for possible biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Kandamchira, Aswathy; Selvam, Sangeetha; Marimuthu, Nidhin; Janardhanan, Sreeram Kalarical; Fathima, Nishter Nishad

    2013-12-01

    Collagen-nanoparticle interactions are vital for many biomedical applications including drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. Iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized using starch template according to our earlier reported procedures were functionalized by treating them with Gum Arabic (GA), a biocompatible polysaccharide, so as to enhance the interaction between nanoparticle surfaces and collagen. Viscosity, circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques have been used to study the collagen-nanoparticle interactions. The relative viscosity for collagen-nanoparticle conjugate was found to increase with increase in concentration of the nanoparticle within the concentration range investigated, which is due to the aggregation of protein onto the surface of nanoparticle. The CD spectra for the collagen-nanoparticle at different concentration ratios do not have much variation in the Rpn values (ratio of positive peak intensity over negative peak intensity) after functionalization with GA. The variation of molar ellipticity values for collagen-nanoparticle is due to the glycoprotein present in GA. The collagen triple helical structure is maintained after interaction with nanoparticles. The FTIR spectra of native collagen, Coll-Fs (nanoparticle without functionalization) and Coll-FsG (nanoparticle functionalized with GA) show clearly the amide I, II, III bands, with respect to collagen. The ability of polysaccharide stabilized/functionalized nanoparticles to maintain the collagen properties would help in its biomedical applications. PMID:24094214

  8. The collagen type I segment long spacing (SLS) and fibrillar forms: Formation by ATP and sulphonated diazo dyes.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Robin; Lewis, Richard J

    2016-07-01

    The collagen type I segment long spacing (SLS) crystallite is a well-ordered rod-like molecular aggregate, ∼300nm in length, which is produced in vitro under mildly acidic conditions (pH 2.5-3.5) in the presence of 1mM ATP. The formation of the SLS crystallite amplifies the inherent linear structural features of individual collagen heterotrimers, due to the punctate linear distribution and summation of the bulkier amino acid side chains along the length of individual collagen heterotrimers. This can be correlated structurally with the 67nm D-banded collagen fibril that is found in vivo, and formed in vitro. Although first described many years ago, the range of conditions required for ATP-induced SLS crystallite formation from acid-soluble collagen have not been explored extensively. Consequently, we have addressed biochemical parameters such as the ATP concentration, pH, speed of formation and stability so as to provide a more complete structural understanding of the SLS crystallite. Treatment of collagen type I with 1mM ATP at neutral and higher pH (6.0-9.0) also induced the formation of D-banded fibrils. Contrary to previous studies, we have shown that the polysulphonated diazo dyes Direct red (Sirius red) and Evans blue, but not Congo red and Methyl blue, can also induce the formation of SLS-like aggregates of collagen, but under markedly different ionic conditions to those employed in the presence of ATP. Specifically, pre-formed D-banded collagen fibrils, prepared in a higher than the usual physiological NaCl concentration (e.g. 500mM NaCl, 20mM Tris-HCl pH7.4 or x3 PBS), readily form SLS aggregates when treated with 0.1mM Direct red and Evans blue, but this did not occur at lower NaCl concentrations. These new data are discussed in relation to the anion (Cl(-)) and polyanion (phosphate and sulphonate) binding by the collagen heterotrimer and their likely role in collagen fibrillogenesis and SLS formation. PMID:27162200

  9. The Mouse MC13 Mutant Is a Novel ENU Mutation in Collagen Type II, Alpha 1

    PubMed Central

    Cionni, Megan; Menke, Chelsea; Stottmann, Rolf W.

    2014-01-01

    Phenotype-driven mutagenesis experiments are a powerful approach to identifying novel alleles in a variety of contexts. The traditional disadvantage of this approach has been the subsequent task of identifying the affected locus in the mutants of interest. Recent advances in bioinformatics and sequencing have reduced the burden of cloning these ENU mutants. Here we report our experience with an ENU mutagenesis experiment and the rapid identification of a mutation in a previously known gene. A combination of mapping the mutation with a high-density SNP panel and a candidate gene approach has identified a mutation in collagen type II, alpha I (Col2a1). Col2a1 has previously been studied in the mouse and our mutant phenotype closely resembles mutations made in the Col2a1 locus. PMID:25541700

  10. Preparation and characterisation of type I and V collagens from the skin of Amur sturgeon (Acipenser schrenckii).

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Liang, Qiufang; Wang, Zhenbin; Xu, Junmin; Liu, Yang; Ma, Haile

    2014-04-01

    The collagen in Amur sturgeon was extracted by pepsin digestion and separated into two fractions, P₂.₄ (92.40%) and P₄.₀ (2.16%), by sodium chloride precipitation. SDS-PAGE and amino acid profile suggested that the P₂.₄ and P₄.₀ might be classified as type I collagen (PSC-I) and type V collagen (PSC-V), respectively. These collagens appeared to be dense sheet-like film linked by random-coiled filaments under SEM. The denaturation and melting temperatures of PSC-V (35.92 and 122.86 °C) were significantly higher than PSC-I (32.52 and 116.01 °C) assessed by CD and DSC, which could be attributed to its higher imino acid content (23.43%) and degree of hydroxylation (52.18%). FTIR confirmed their triple helical structure, and indicated more intermolecular crosslinks in PSC-I and more hydrogen bond in PSC-V. These results provide some basis for their large-scale production and further application as alternatives to mammalian collagen. PMID:24262576

  11. Human placenta type V collagens. Evidence for the existence of an alpha 1(V) alpha 2(V) alpha 3(V) collagen molecule.

    PubMed

    Niyibizi, C; Fietzek, P P; van der Rest, M

    1984-11-25

    Human type V collagen was purified from placenta and found to contain alpha 1(V), alpha 2(V), and alpha 3(V) chains in varying ratios. Using any of three independent nondenaturing methods (phosphocellulose chromatography, high-performance ion-exchange chromatography on IEX-540 DEAE, and ammonium sulfate precipitation), this preparation could be resolved into two fractions. Analysis of the two fractions by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that one fraction contained alpha 1(V) and alpha 2(V) in a 2:1 ratio and the other contained alpha 1(V), alpha 2(V), and alpha 3(V) in a 1:1:1 ratio. When the crude placental type V collagen was electrophoresed under nondenaturing conditions, two bands were observed, one co-migrating with purified (alpha 1(V]2 alpha 2(V) and the other co-migrating with the fractions containing alpha 1(V), alpha 2(V), and alpha 3(V) chains in a 1:1:1 ratio. Electrophoresis in a second dimension under denaturing conditions confirmed that the fast-migrating band contained (alpha 1(V]2 alpha 2(V) and that the slow-migrating band contained the three chains in equimolar ratio. CD spectra of the two fractions and resistance to trypsin-chymotrypsin digestion confirmed that the two fractions contain triple helical collagen. Thermal denaturations were monitored by the changes in CD signal at 221 nm. The two fractions purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation melted at 39.1 and 36.4 degrees C for the (alpha 1(V]2 alpha 2(V) and alpha 1(V) alpha 2(V) alpha 3(V) fractions, respectively. Trypsin cleavage of these two native fractions at temperatures near melting produced completely different fragmentation patterns, indicating different partial unwinding sites of the alpha 1(V) and alpha 2(V) chains in the two preparations and thus different molecular assemblies. Our data demonstrate the existence of two different molecular assemblies of type V collagen in human placenta consisting of (alpha 1(V]2 alpha 2(V) and alpha 1(V

  12. Phenotypic characterization of type II collagen-induced arthritis in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    SONG, HOU-PAN; LI, XIN; YU, RONG; ZENG, GUANG; YUAN, ZHEN-YI; WANG, WEI; HUANG, HUI-YONG; CAI, XIONG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine a more specific, efficient and simple method for the induction of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats. Different strains of rats were injected at the base of the tail with bovine type II collagen (CII) emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA). The onset and severity of arthritis were evaluated by clinical assessment. The established CIA model was analyzed using a comprehensive examination of clinical, hematological, histological and radiological parameters. The results demonstrated that Wistar rats were the most susceptible strain to CIA followed by Wistar Furth rats, with Sprague Dawley rats being the least susceptible. Following primary and booster immunization, female Wistar rats developed severe arthritis, with an incidence of >83% and low variability in clinical signs. The development of arthritis was accompanied by a significantly elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate compared with that in the control rats. The radiographic examination revealed bone matrix resorption, considerable soft tissue swelling, periosteal new bone formation and bone erosion in the arthritic joints of the CIA rats. Histopathologically, the synovial joints of CIA rats were characterized by synovial hyperplasia, pannus formation, marked cellular infiltration, bone and cartilage erosion and narrowing of the joint space. The administration of an intradermal injection of only 200 µg bovine CII emulsified in IFA at the base of the tail therefore leads to the successful development of a CIA rat model. This well-characterized CIA rat model could be specifically used to study the pathophysiology of human rheumatoid arthritis as well as to test and develop anti-arthritic agents for humans. PMID:26622511

  13. Palmitoylethanolamide and luteolin ameliorate development of arthritis caused by injection of collagen type II in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA) is an endogenous fatty acid amide belonging to the family of the N-acylethanolamines (NAEs). Recently, several studies demonstrated that PEA is an important analgesic, antiinflammatory, and neuroprotective mediator. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of co-ultramicronized PEA + luteolin formulation on the modulation of the inflammatory response in mice subjected to collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Methods CIA was induced by an intradermally injection of 100 μl of the emulsion (containing 100 μg of bovine type II collagen (CII)) and complete Freund adjuvant (CFA) at the base of the tail. On day 21, a second injection of CII in CFA was administered. Mice subjected to CIA were administered PEA (10 mg/kg 10% ethanol, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) or co-ultramicronized PEA + luteolin (1 mg/kg, i.p.) every 24 hours, starting from day 25 to 35. Results Mice developed erosive hind-paw arthritis when immunized with CII in CFA. Macroscopic clinical evidence of CIA first appeared as periarticular erythema and edema in the hindpaws. The incidence of CIA was 100% by day 28 in the CII-challenged mice, and the severity of CIA progressed over a 35-day period with a resorption of bone. The histopathology of CIA included erosion of the cartilage at the joint. Treatment with PEA or PEA + luteolin ameliorated the clinical signs at days 26 to 35 and improved histologic status in the joint and paw. The degree of oxidative and nitrosative damage was significantly reduced in PEA + luteolin-treated mice, as indicated by nitrotyrosine and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Plasma levels of the proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were significantly reduced by PEA + luteolin treatment. Conclusions We demonstrated that PEA co-ultramicronized with luteolin exerts an antiinflammatory effect during chronic inflammation and ameliorates CIA. PMID:24246048

  14. Investigation of bone disease using isomerized and racemized fragments of type I collagen.

    PubMed

    Cloos, P A C; Fledelius, C; Christgau, S; Christiansen, C; Engsig, M; Delmas, P; Body, J-J; Garnero, P

    2003-01-01

    In the collagen type I C-telopeptide an aspartyl-glycine site within the sequence AHDGGR is susceptible to molecular rearrangement. In newly synthesized collagen this site is in the native form, denoted alpha L. During aging a spontaneous reaction occurs resulting in three age-modified forms: an isomerized form (beta L) a racemized form (alpha D), and an isomerized/racemized form (beta D). In this study, we measured the urinary excretion of the four forms of C-telopeptides (CTX) in healthy adults and in patients with bone diseases. Levels of all CTX forms were higher in healthy postmenopausal women (P<0.001) compared with premenopausal controls. Levels decreased within 3 days of bisphosphonate treatment indicating that all CTX forms reflect bone resorption. In hyperthyroidism, characterized by a generalized increased bone turnover, native (alpha L) and age-modified (beta L, alpha D and beta D) forms increased to a similar extent compared to controls, resulting in normal ratios between the alpha L and age-modified forms of CTX. Conversely, in Paget's disease and prostate cancer-induced bone metastases, conditions characterized by focal increased bone turnover, alpha L CTX levels were more elevated than those of age-related CTX forms, resulting in increased ratios between native and age-modified CTX. For example, the ratio alpha L/alpha D was increased 7-fold in Paget's disease (P<0.001) and 2-fold in prostate cancer-induced bone metastases (P<0.002). In conclusion, the study suggests that in conditions with a localized alteration in bone turnover the ratio between alpha L CTX and the age-modified forms is significantly elevated. This may provide a new diagnostic and monitoring tool for diseases such as metastatic bone cancer and Paget's disease. PMID:12384813

  15. Differential distribution of aggrecan isoforms in perineuronal nets of the human cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Virgintino, Daniela; Perissinotto, Daniela; Girolamo, Francesco; Mucignat, Maria T; Montanini, Luisa; Errede, Mariella; Kaneiwa, Tomoyuki; Yamada, Shushei; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Roncali, Luisa; Perris, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Aggrecan is a component of the CNS extracellular matrix (ECM) and we show here that the three primary alternative spliced transcripts of the aggrecan gene found in cartilage are also present in the adult CNS. Using a unique panel of core protein-directed antibodies against human aggrecan we further show that different aggrecan isoforms are deposited in perineuronal nets (PNNs) and neuropil ECM of Brodmann’s area 6 of the human adult cerebral cortex. According to their distribution pattern, the identified cortical aggrecan isoforms were subdivided into five clusters spanning from cluster 1, comprised isoforms that appeared widespread throughout the cortex, to cluster 5, which was an aggrecan-free subset. Comparison of brain and cartilage tissues showed a different relative abundance of aggrecan isoforms, with cartilage-specific isoforms characterizing cluster 5, and PNN-associated isoforms lacking keratan sulphate chains. In the brain, isoforms of cluster 1 were disclosed in PNNs surrounding small-medium interneurons of layers II–V, small-medium pyramidal neurons of layers III and V and large interneurons of layer VI. Aggrecan PNNs enveloped both neuron bodies and neuronal processes, encompassing pre-terminal nerve fibres, synaptic boutons and terminal processes of glial cells and aggrecan was also observed in continuous ‘coats’ associated with satellite, neuron-associated cells of a putative glial nature. Immunolabelling for calcium-binding proteins and glutamate demonstrated that aggrecan PNNs were linked to defined subsets of cortical interneurons and pyramidal cells. We suggest that in the human cerebral cortex, discrete, layer-specific PNNs are assembled through the participation of selected aggrecan isoforms that characterize defined subsets of cortical neurons. PMID:19220578

  16. Effects of low molecular weight chondroitin sulfate on type II collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice.

    PubMed

    Cho, So Yean; Sim, Joon-Soo; Jeong, Choon Sik; Chang, Seung Yeup; Choi, Don Woong; Toida, Toshihiko; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2004-01-01

    In order to evaluate the improvement in the treatment of chronic arthritis, we investigated chondroitin sulfate depolymerization product (low molecular weight chondroitin sulfate, LMWCS) and intact chondroitin sulfate (CS) in vitro and in vivo. LMWCS was prepared by a chemical depolymerization process induced by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of copper salts. LMWCS (300 mg/kg) and CS (1200 mg/kg) were orally administered to DBA/1J mice once daily for 14 d prior to initial immunization with type II collagen. Their elastase activities and the production of cytokines in sera were examined on type II collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice. We also compared the paracellular transport of LMWCS and CS across Caco-2 cell monolayers and examined the inhibitory effects on elastase activities. LMWCS inhibited elastase activity slightly, but CS did not show inhibition. Hind paw edema was significantly decreased by LMWCS treatment. Levels of anti-type II collagen antibody and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in sera were also reduced by LMWCS treatment but not in case of CS, although no significant difference was observed between LMWCS and CS on interleukin-6 (IL-6) induction. The LMWCS preparation showed preventive effects on the type II collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice and better permeability through Caco-2 cells. PMID:14709897

  17. Experience from the use of absorbable type I collagen as haemostatic agent in obstetric and gynecological operations

    PubMed Central

    Karagiannis, V; Daniilidis, A; Rousso, D; Palapelas, V; Karagiannis, T; Kiskinis, D

    2006-01-01

    During the third stage of labour there are a lot of causes of significant hemorrhage. The commonest causes of acute hemorrhage are the uterine atony, the retained placenta, the lower tract lacerations, uterine rupture, placenta accreta, hereditary coagulopathy. Also, there could be significant bleeding, during caesarian section, usually at the time of removal of the placenta in cases of low lying placenta or placenta previa. A lot of times we have to confront serious hemorrhages in gynecological procedures like hysterectomies in cases of cervical, uterine or ovarian cancers. In order to deal with these problems successfully, general and specific measures are being taken. In cases of atonic uterus when all the other methods are unsuccessful we have to proceed to ligation of the internal iliac artery or even hysterectomy. Material-Methods: We have tried to use the hemostatic type I collagen in obstetrical and gynecological cases in order to control the bleeding. We have used the collagen type I totally in 8 cases. Five of them were cases of atonic uterus after normal delivery or caesarian section and three of them were gynecological cases of uterine fibroids and ovarian cancer. Results: By placing the collagen type I over the bleeding surfaces we have realized that in a very short period of time, there has been satisfactory control of the bleeding and immediate clinical improvement of the patient. In four out of five obstetrical cases that we have used the type I collagen, we have managed to avoid the hysterectomy. PMID:22087058

  18. Upregulation of heme oxygenase and collagen type III in the rat bladder after partial bladder outlet obstruction.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Mitsuhiko; Ukimura, Osamu; Yaoi, Takeshi; Kawauchi, Akihiro; Fushiki, Shinji; Miki, Tsuneharu

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate possible changes of the gene expression and localization of the enzymes, heme oxygenase and nitric oxide synthase (NOS), with reference to increase of collagen type III in response to the partial obstruction of the bladder. Following initial obstruction, whole rat bladders were removed for real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated significantly enhanced expression of HO (p < 0.01) and collagen type III (p < 0.001) gene on postoperative day 14. Enhanced expression of NOS gene was seen only on postoperative day 4 (p < 0.01). Immunohistochemistry revealed that immunoreactivity to HO-1 had much in common in neural cells and fibers, although immunoreactivity to HO-2 and iNOS was relatively weak. This study suggested gene expression of HO, especially HO-1, was more dramatically changed than NOS, and was upregulated simultaneously with increase of collagen type III after obstruction. HO systems could be involved in the pathogenesis of bladder dysfunction related to increase of collagen type III after obstruction. PMID:17406140

  19. Oleanane-type triterpene saponins with collagen synthesis-promoting activity from the flowers of Bellis perennis.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Toshio; Ninomiya, Kiyofumi; Takamori, Yasunobu; Nishida, Eriko; Yasue, Misato; Hayakawa, Takao; Muraoka, Osamu; Li, Xuezheng; Nakamura, Seikou; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Matsuda, Hisashi

    2015-08-01

    The methanol extract from Bellis perennis (Asteraceae) flowers was found to promote collagen synthesis in normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs). Seven oleanane-type triterpene saponins, perennisosides XIII-XIX, and two known saponins, bellissaponins BS5 and BS9, were isolated from the methanol extract. The structures were determined based on chemical and physicochemical data, and confirmed using previously isolated related compounds as references. Among the isolates, including 19 previously reported saponins, perennisosides XVIII, I, II, VII, IX, and XI, asterbatanoside D, bernardioside B2, and bellissaponins BS5 and BS9 significantly promoted collagen synthesis at 3-30μM without cytotoxicity. PMID:26028520

  20. Localization of type III collagen in the lingual mucosa of rats during the morphogenesis of circumvallate papillae.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Shin-ichi; Yoshizawa, Hideki; Aoyagi, Hidekazu

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to identify a possible role for type III collagen in the morphogenesis of circumvallate papillae on the surface of the rat tongue, we examined its appearance by fluorescent immunostaining, in conjunction with differential interference contrast images and images obtained, after staining with toluidine blue, in the transmission mode by laser-scanning microscopy. We analyzed semi-ultrathin sections of epoxy resin-embedded samples of the lingual mucosa of embryonic and juvenile rats, 13 days after conception (E13) to day 21 after birth (P21). Immunoreactivity specific for type III collagen was recognized first in the mesenchymal connective tissue just beneath the circumvallate papilla placode in fetuses on E13. At this stage, most of the lingual epithelium with the exception of the circumvallate papilla placode was pseudostratified epithelium composed of one or two layers of cuboidal cells. However, the epithelium of the circumvallate papilla placode was composed of several layers of cuboidal cells. Immunoreactivity specific for type III collagen was detected mainly on the lamina propria just beneath the lingual epithelium of the rudiment of the circumvallate papilla and the developing circumvallate papilla in fetuses on E15 and E17, and slight immunostaining was detected on the lamina propria around the rudiment. In fetuses on E19, immunoreactivity specific for type III collagen was widely and densely distributed on the connective tissue around the developing circumvallate papillae and, also, on the connective tissue that surrounded the lingual muscle. However, the immunoreactivity specific for type III collagen was sparsely distributed on the lamina propria of each central papillar structure. After birth, from P0 to P14, morphogenesis of the circumvallate papillae advanced gradually with the increase in the total volume of the tongue. At these postnatal stages, the intensity of the fluorescence due to immunoreactivity specific for type III collagen was

  1. Elemental distribution analysis of type I collagen fibrils in tilapia fish scale with energy-filtered transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Mitsuhiro; Takeguchi, Masaki; Tagaya, Motohiro; Tonegawa, Toru; Hashimoto, Ayako; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Ikoma, Toshiyuki

    2009-01-01

    Elemental distribution of calcium, phosphorus, oxygen, and carbon in a single collagen fibril obtained from tilapia fish scales was identified with an electron energy-loss spectroscopy and an energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy, for the first time. The carbon intensity profile of the single collagen fibril showed the specific D-periodic pattern at 67 nm of type I collagen fibrils. The calcium L(2,3)-edge and oxygen K-edge peak positions were detected at 347/350 eV and 137 eV, respectively, and these positions were identical to those of hydroxyapatite. Calcium, phosphorus, and oxygen were present in the hole zones as the amorphous phase, while carbon was present in the overlap zone. Our results indicated that the hole zones preferentially attract calcium and phosphate ions and thus serve as possible nucleation sites for mineralization. PMID:19419879

  2. Data on cell spread area and directional contraction in human umbilical vein endothelial cells on fibronectin and on collagen type I-coated micro-posts

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jing-Jing; Tan, Hui-Foon; Feng, Chen; Wee, Wei-Kiat; Tee, Shang-You; Tan, Suet-Mien

    2016-01-01

    Fibronectin and collagen type I are abundant extracellular matrix proteins that modulate cell mechanics and they regulate angiogenic sprouting. In this data article, fibronectin- or collagen type I-coated micro-posts were used to examine the traction force, cell spread area and directional contraction of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). PMID:26937451

  3. Development and utilization of a bovine type I collagen microfibril model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The structure of fibrous collagen, a long triple helix that self-associates in a staggered array to form a matrix of fibrils, fibers and fiber bundles, makes it uniquely suitable as a scaffold for biomaterial engineering. A major challenge for this application is to stabilize collagen structure by m...

  4. The TATA-containing core promoter of the type II collagen gene (COL2A1) is the target of interferon-gamma-mediated inhibition in human chondrocytes: requirement for Stat1 alpha, Jak1 and Jak2.

    PubMed Central

    Osaki, Makoto; Tan, Lujian; Choy, Bob K; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Cheah, Kathryn S E; Auron, Philip E; Goldring, Mary B

    2003-01-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) inhibits the synthesis of the cartilage-specific extracellular matrix protein type II collagen, and suppresses the expression of the type II collagen gene ( COL2A1 ) at the transcriptional level. To further examine this mechanism, the responses of COL2A1 regulatory sequences to IFN-gamma and the role of components of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway were examined in the immortalized human chondrocyte cell line, C-28/I2. IFN-gamma inhibited the mRNA levels of COL2A1 and aggrecan, but not Sox9, L-Sox5 and Sox6, all of which were expressed by these cells as markers of the differentiated phenotype. IFN-gamma suppressed the expression of luciferase reporter constructs containing sequences of the COL2A1 promoter spanning -6368 to +125 bp in the absence and presence of the intronic enhancer and stimulated activity of the gamma-interferon-activated site (GAS) luciferase reporter vector, associated with induction of Stat1 alpha-binding activity in nuclear extracts. These responses to IFN-gamma were blocked by overexpression of the JAK inhibitor, JAK-binding protein (JAB), or reversed by dominant-negative Stat1 alpha Y701F containing a mutation at Tyr-701, the JAK phosphorylation site. IFN-gamma had no effect on COL2A1 promoter expression in Jak1 (U4A)-, Jak2 (gamma 2A)- and Stat1 alpha (U3A)-deficient cell lines. In the U3A cell line, the response to IFN-gamma was rescued by overexpression of Stat1 alpha, but not by either Stat1 alpha Y701F or Stat1 beta. Functional analysis using deletion constructs showed that the IFN-gamma response was retained in the COL2A1 core promoter region spanning -45 to +11 bp, containing the TATA-box and GC-rich sequences but no Stat1-binding elements. Inhibition of COL2A1 promoter activity by IFN-gamma persisted in the presence of multiple deletions within the -45/+11 bp region. Our results indicate that repression of COL2A1 gene transcription by IFN

  5. Preparation of collagen modified photopolymers: a new type of biodegradable gel for cell growth.

    PubMed

    Bayramoğlu, Gülay; Kayaman-Apohan, Nilhan; Akçakaya, Handan; Vezir Kahraman, Memet; Erdem Kuruca, Serap; Güngör, Atilla

    2010-02-01

    In this study a new branched methacrylated poly(propylene glycol-co-lactic acid) (PPG-PLA-IEM) and methacrylated cellulose acetate butyrate resin (CAB-IEM) were synthesized. Hydrogels with various amounts of PPG-PLA-IEM and CAB-IEM (25, 50 and 75 wt% IEM modified) were prepared by photopolymerization. Collagen tethered PEG-monoacrylate (PEGMA-collagen) was prepared and introduced as a bioactive moiety to modify the hydrogel in order to enhance cell affinity. In vitro attachment and growth of 3T3 mouse fibroblasts and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) on the hydrogels with and without collagen were also investigated. It was observed that, the collagen improves the cell adhesion onto the hydrogel surface. With the increasing amount of collagen, cell viability increased by 28% for ECV304 (P < 0.05) and 30% for 3T3 (P < 0.05). PMID:19936889

  6. The Collagen Family

    PubMed Central

    Ricard-Blum, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Collagens are the most abundant proteins in mammals. The collagen family comprises 28 members that contain at least one triple-helical domain. Collagens are deposited in the extracellular matrix where most of them form supramolecular assemblies. Four collagens are type II membrane proteins that also exist in a soluble form released from the cell surface by shedding. Collagens play structural roles and contribute to mechanical properties, organization, and shape of tissues. They interact with cells via several receptor families and regulate their proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Some collagens have a restricted tissue distribution and hence specific biological functions. PMID:21421911

  7. Altered stress fibers and integrin expression in the Malpighian epithelium of Drosophila type IV collagen mutants

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, András A.; Popovics, Nikoletta; Szabó, Gábor; Csiszár, Katalin; Mink, Mátyás

    2016-01-01

    Basement membranes (BMs) are highly specialized extracellular matrices (ECMs) that provide support and polarization cues for epithelial cells. Proper adhesion to the BM is pivotal in epithelial cell function and survival. Type IV collagens are the predominant components of all types of BMs, that form an irregular, polygonal lattice and serve as a scaffold for numerous other BM components and BM-associated cells. Mutations in the ubiquitous human BM components COL4A1 and COL4A2 cause a multisystem disorder involving nephropathy. Affected patients develop renal dysfunction and chronic kidney failure with or without hematuria. Mouse Col4a1 and Col4a2 mutants recapitulate the human symptoms. In vertebrates, excretion is accomplished by the kidneys and by the Malpighian tubules in insects, including the fruit fly Drosophila. Our present results with dominant, temperature-sensitive mutation of the Drosophila col4a1 gene demonstrate altered integrin expression and amplified effects of mechanical stress on the Malpighian epithelial cytoskeleton. PMID:27077087

  8. Altered stress fibers and integrin expression in the Malpighian epithelium of Drosophila type IV collagen mutants.

    PubMed

    Kiss, András A; Popovics, Nikoletta; Szabó, Gábor; Csiszár, Katalin; Mink, Mátyás

    2016-06-01

    Basement membranes (BMs) are highly specialized extracellular matrices (ECMs) that provide support and polarization cues for epithelial cells. Proper adhesion to the BM is pivotal in epithelial cell function and survival. Type IV collagens are the predominant components of all types of BMs, that form an irregular, polygonal lattice and serve as a scaffold for numerous other BM components and BM-associated cells. Mutations in the ubiquitous human BM components COL4A1 and COL4A2 cause a multisystem disorder involving nephropathy. Affected patients develop renal dysfunction and chronic kidney failure with or without hematuria. Mouse Col4a1 and Col4a2 mutants recapitulate the human symptoms. In vertebrates, excretion is accomplished by the kidneys and by the Malpighian tubules in insects, including the fruit fly Drosophila. Our present results with dominant, temperature-sensitive mutation of the Drosophila col4a1 gene demonstrate altered integrin expression and amplified effects of mechanical stress on the Malpighian epithelial cytoskeleton. PMID:27077087

  9. AGGRECAN IS EXPRESSED BY EMBRYONIC BRAIN GLIA AND REGULATES ASTROCYTE DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Domowicz, Miriam S.; Sanders, Timothy A.; Ragsdale, Clifton W.; Schwartz, Nancy B.

    2008-01-01

    Determination of the molecules that regulate astrocyte development has been hindered by the paucity of markers that identify astrocytic precursors in vivo. Here we report that the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan aggrecan both regulates astrocyte development and is expressed by embryonic glial precursors. During chick brain development, the onset of aggrecan expression precedes that of the astrocytic marker GFAP and is concomitant with detection of the early glial markers GLAST and glutamine synthetase. In co-expression studies, we established that aggrecan-rich cells contain the radial glial markers nestin, BLBP and GLAST and later in embryogenesis, the astroglial marker GFAP. Parallel in vitro studies showed that ventricular zone cultures, enriched in aggrecan-expressing cells, could be directed to a GFAP -positive fate in G5-supplemented differentiation media. Analysis of the chick aggrecan mutant nanomelia revealed marked increases in expression of the astrocyte differentiation genes GFAP, GLAST and GS in the absence of extracellular aggrecan. These increases in astrocytic marker gene expression could not be accounted for by changes in precursor proliferation or cell death, suggesting that aggrecan regulates the rate of astrocyte differentiation. Taken together, these results indicate a major role for aggrecan in the control of glial cell maturation during brain development. PMID:18207138

  10. Role of α1 and α2 chains of type IV collagen in early fibrotic lesions of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias and migration of lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Urushiyama, Hirokazu; Terasaki, Yasuhiro; Nagasaka, Shinya; Terasaki, Mika; Kunugi, Shinobu; Nagase, Takahide; Fukuda, Yuh; Shimizu, Akira

    2015-08-01

    Early fibrotic lesions are thought to be the initial findings of fibrogenesis in idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, but little is known about their properties. Type IV collagen comprises six gene products, α1-α6, and although it is known as a major basement membrane component, its abnormal deposition is seen in fibrotic lesions of certain organs. We studied the expression of type I and III collagen and all α chains of type IV collagen in lung specimens from patients with usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) or organizing pneumonia (OP) via immunohistochemistry. With cultured lung fibroblasts, we analyzed the expression and function of all α chains of type IV collagen via immunohistochemistry, western blotting, real-time quantitative PCR, and a Boyden chamber migration assay after the knockdown of α1 and α2 chains. Although we observed type I and III collagens in early fibrotic lesions of both UIP and OP, we found type IV collagen, especially α1 and α2 chains, in early fibrotic lesions of UIP but not OP. Fibroblasts enhanced the expression of α1 and α2 chains of type IV collagen after transforming growth factor-β1 stimulation. Small interfering RNA against α1 and α2 chains increased fibroblast migration, with upregulated phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and adding medium containing fibroblast-produced α1 and α2 chains reduced the increased levels of fibroblast migration and phosphorylation of FAK. Fibroblasts in OP were positive for phosphorylated FAK but fibroblasts in UIP were not. These results suggest that fibroblasts in UIP with type IV collagen deposition, especially α1 and α2 chains, have less ability to migrate from early fibrotic lesions than fibroblasts in OP without type IV collagen deposition. Thus, type IV collagen deposition in early fibrotic lesions of UIP may be implicated in refractory pathophysiology including migration of lesion fibroblasts via a FAK pathway. PMID:26006016

  11. Type I collagen degradation during tissue repair: comparison of mechanisms following fracture and acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Stansfield, Rachel; Gossiel, Fatma; Morton, Allison; Newman, Christopher; Eastell, Richard

    2014-12-01

    There is turnover of type I collagen during tissue repair. The degradation of type I collagen by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is reflected by serum ICTP and that by cathepsins by CTX-I. There is evidence for increases in ICTP after acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and in CTX-I during fracture repair. The involvement of the MMP pathway in fracture repair and cathepsins after myocardial infarction is unclear. We studied 74 men; 22 were admitted to the hospital on the day of their ACS (ST or non-ST elevation myocardial infarction) (mean age 56 years, range 39 to 82) and 9 attended hospital on the day of their tibial shaft fracture (mean age 33 years, range 21 to 79); we had 43 age-matched controls (mean age 54 years, range 20 to 82). Subjects with ACS and tibial shaft fracture were followed up for up to one year; control subjects were used to establish a reference interval. We measured serum ICTP by ELISA (reference interval 1.1 to 17.6 ng/mL) and CTX-I by chemiluminescence (reference interval 0.094 to 0.991 ng/mL). After ACS, the mean ICTP increased from 5.41 to 6.60 ng/mL within one day of admission (p<0.05); the mean CTX-I increased from 0.263 to 0.414 ng/mL (p<0.05). In two cases, the CTX increased to above the reference interval. After tibial shaft fracture, the mean ICTP increased from 5.51 to maximum of 8.71 ng/mL within 28 days of admission (p<0.01); the mean CTX increased from 0.200 to 0.374 ng/mL (p<0.001). In four cases, the CTX increased to above the reference interval. We conclude that the MMP and cathepsin pathways are both implicated in tissue repair in the bone and heart. This may have clinical implications; drugs that block either pathway (TIMPs, cathepsin K inhibitors) may affect the repair of both tissues. PMID:25193029

  12. Structural Basis for Platelet Collagen Responses by the Immune-type Receptor Glycoprotein VI

    SciTech Connect

    Horii,K.; Kahn, M.; Herr, A.

    2006-01-01

    Activation of circulating platelets by exposed vessel wall collagen is a primary step in the pathogenesis of heart attack and stroke, and drugs to block platelet activation have successfully reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In humans and mice, collagen activation of platelets is mediated by glycoprotein VI (GPVI), a receptor that is homologous to immune receptors but bears little sequence similarity to known matrix protein adhesion receptors. Here we present the crystal structure of the collagen-binding domain of human GPVI and characterize its interaction with a collagen-related peptide. Like related immune receptors, GPVI contains 2 immunoglobulin-like domains arranged in a perpendicular orientation. Significantly, GPVI forms a back-to-back dimer in the crystal, an arrangement that could explain data previously obtained from cell-surface GPVI inhibition studies. Docking algorithms identify 2 parallel grooves on the GPVI dimer surface as collagen-binding sites, and the orientation and spacing of these grooves precisely match the dimensions of an intact collagen fiber. These findings provide a structural basis for the ability of an immunetype receptor to generate signaling responses to collagen and for the development of GPVI inhibitors as new therapies for human cardiovascular disease.

  13. Preferential sites for intramolecular glucosepane cross-link formation in type I collagen: A thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Collier, Thomas A; Nash, Anthony; Birch, Helen L; de Leeuw, Nora H

    2015-10-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) undergoes progressive age-related stiffening and loss of proteolytic digestibility due to an increase in concentration of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). The most abundant AGE, glucosepane, accumulates in collagen with concentrations over 100 times greater than all other AGEs. Detrimental collagen stiffening properties are believed to play a significant role in several age-related diseases such as osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. Currently little is known of the potential location of covalently cross-linked glucosepane formation within collagen molecules; neither are there reports on how the respective cross-link sites affect the physical and biochemical properties of collagen. Using fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations (MD) we have identified six sites where the formation of a covalent intra-molecular glucosepane cross-link within a single collagen molecule in a fibrillar environment is energetically favourable. Identification of these favourable sites enables us to align collagen cross-linking with experimentally observed changes to the ECM. For example, formation of glucosepane was found to be energetically favourable within close proximity of the Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 (MMP1) binding site, which could potentially disrupt collagen degradation. PMID:26049074

  14. Preferential sites for intramolecular glucosepane cross-link formation in type I collagen: A thermodynamic study

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Thomas A.; Nash, Anthony; Birch, Helen L.; de Leeuw, Nora H.

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) undergoes progressive age-related stiffening and loss of proteolytic digestibility due to an increase in concentration of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). The most abundant AGE, glucosepane, accumulates in collagen with concentrations over 100 times greater than all other AGEs. Detrimental collagen stiffening properties are believed to play a significant role in several age-related diseases such as osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. Currently little is known of the potential location of covalently cross-linked glucosepane formation within collagen molecules; neither are there reports on how the respective cross-link sites affect the physical and biochemical properties of collagen. Using fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations (MD) we have identified six sites where the formation of a covalent intra-molecular glucosepane cross-link within a single collagen molecule in a fibrillar environment is energetically favourable. Identification of these favourable sites enables us to align collagen cross-linking with experimentally observed changes to the ECM. For example, formation of glucosepane was found to be energetically favourable within close proximity of the Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 (MMP1) binding site, which could potentially disrupt collagen degradation. PMID:26049074

  15. Type VII Collagen is Enriched in the Enamel Organic Matrix Associated with the Dentin-Enamel Junction of Mature Human Teeth

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Jacob D.; Walker, Mary P.; Mousa, Ahmad; Wang, Yong; Gorski, Jeff P.

    2014-01-01

    The inner enamel region of erupted teeth is known to exhibit higher fracture toughness and crack growth resistance than bulk phase enamel. However, an explanation for this behavior has been hampered by the lack of compositional information for the residual enamel organic matrix. Since enamel-forming ameloblasts are known to express type VII collagen and type VII collagen null mice display abnormal amelogenesis, the aim of this study was to determine whether type VII collagen is a component of the enamel organic matrix at the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) of mature human teeth. Immunofluorescent confocal microscopy of demineralized tooth sections localized type VII collagen to the organic matrix surrounding individual enamel rods near the DEJ. Morphologically, immunoreactive type VII collagen helical-bundles resembled the gnarled-pattern of enamel rods detected by Coomassie Blue staining. Western blotting of whole crown or enamel matrix extracts also identified characteristic Mr=280 and 230 kDa type VII dimeric forms, which resolved into 75 and 25 kDa bands upon reduction. As expected, the collagenous domain of type VII collagen was resistant to pepsin digestion, but was susceptible to purified bacterial collagenase. These results demonstrate the inner enamel organic matrix in mature teeth contains macromolecular type VII collagen. Based on its physical association with the DEJ and its well-appreciated capacity to complex with other collagens, we hypothesize that enamel embedded type VII collagen fibrils may contribute not only to the structural resilience of enamel, but may also play a role in bonding enamel to dentin. PMID:24594343

  16. Activated hepatic stellate cells are dependent on self-collagen, cleaved by membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase for their growth.

    PubMed

    Birukawa, Naoko Kubo; Murase, Kazuyuki; Sato, Yasushi; Kosaka, Akemi; Yoneda, Akihiro; Nishita, Hiroki; Fujita, Ryosuke; Nishimura, Miyuki; Ninomiya, Takafumi; Kajiwara, Keiko; Miyazaki, Miyono; Nakashima, Yusuke; Ota, Sigenori; Murakami, Yuya; Tanaka, Yasunobu; Minomi, Kenjiro; Tamura, Yasuaki; Niitsu, Yoshiro

    2014-07-18

    Stellate cells are distributed throughout organs, where, upon chronic damage, they become activated and proliferate to secrete collagen, which results in organ fibrosis. An intriguing property of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is that they undergo apoptosis when collagen is resolved by stopping tissue damage or by treatment, even though the mechanisms are unknown. Here we disclose the fact that HSCs, normal diploid cells, acquired dependence on collagen for their growth during the transition from quiescent to active states. The intramolecular RGD motifs of collagen were exposed by cleavage with their own membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP). The following evidence supports this conclusion. When rat activated HSCs (aHSCs) were transduced with siRNA against the collagen-specific chaperone gp46 to inhibit collagen secretion, the cells underwent autophagy followed by apoptosis. Concomitantly, the growth of aHSCs was suppressed, whereas that of quiescent HSCs was not. These in vitro results are compatible with the in vivo observation that apoptosis of aHSCs was induced in cirrhotic livers of rats treated with siRNAgp46. siRNA against MT1-MMP and addition of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP-2), which mainly inhibits MT1-MMP, also significantly suppressed the growth of aHSCs in vitro. The RGD inhibitors echistatin and GRGDS peptide and siRNA against the RGD receptor αVβ1 resulted in the inhibition of aHSCs growth. Transduction of siRNAs against gp46, αVβ1, and MT1-MMP to aHSCs inhibited the survival signal of PI3K/AKT/IκB. These results could provide novel antifibrosis strategies. PMID:24867951

  17. Glycosylation Modulates Melanoma Cell α2β1 and α3β1 Integrin Interactions with Type IV Collagen*

    PubMed Central

    Stawikowski, Maciej J.; Aukszi, Beatrix; Stawikowska, Roma; Cudic, Mare; Fields, Gregg B.

    2014-01-01

    Although type IV collagen is heavily glycosylated, the influence of this post-translational modification on integrin binding has not been investigated. In the present study, galactosylated and nongalactosylated triple-helical peptides have been constructed containing the α1(IV)382–393 and α1(IV)531–543 sequences, which are binding sites for the α2β1 and α3β1 integrins, respectively. All peptides had triple-helical stabilities of 37 °C or greater. The galactosylation of Hyl393 in α1(IV)382–393 and Hyl540 and Hyl543 in α1(IV)531–543 had a dose-dependent influence on melanoma cell adhesion that was much more pronounced in the case of α3β1 integrin binding. Molecular modeling indicated that galactosylation occurred on the periphery of α2β1 integrin interaction with α1(IV)382–393 but right in the middle of α3β1 integrin interaction with α1(IV)531–543. The possibility of extracellular deglycosylation of type IV collagen was investigated, but no β-galactosidase-like activity capable of collagen modification was found. Thus, glycosylation of collagen can modulate integrin binding, and levels of glycosylation could be altered by reduction in expression of glycosylation enzymes but most likely not by extracellular deglycosylation activity. PMID:24958723

  18. Complete primary structure of the sixth chain of human basement membrane collagen, alpha 6(IV). Isolation of the cDNAs for alpha 6(IV) and comparison with five other type IV collagen chains.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Ding, M; Zhao, Z; Reeders, S T

    1994-05-01

    Basement membranes were previously believed to contain five distinct type IV collagen subunits. We have recently isolated part of the cDNA for a novel type IV collagen, alpha 6(IV), and shown that COL4A6, the gene encoding this new chain, is deleted in Alport syndrome-associated leiomyomatosis (Zhou, J., Mochizuki, T., Smeets, H., Antignac, C., Laurila, P., de Paepe, A., Tryggvason, K., and Reeders, S. T. (1993) Science 261, 1167-1169). Here, we describe the entire human alpha 6(IV) cDNA and show that the gene encodes a classical type IV collagen with homology throughout its length to all the other five chains. There is a 21-residue signal peptide, a 1417-residue collagenous domain interrupted at 25 points, and a 228-residue carboxyl-terminal non-collagenous domain. When the complete primary structure of this new chain was compared with all the other known chains, it became clear that alpha 6(IV) has the most resemblance to alpha 2(IV) and alpha 4(IV). The evolution of the six chains was deduced, allowing a new classification of the type IV collagen family. The alpha 6(IV) chain is a candidate gene for X-linked Alport syndrome; knowledge of the complete structure of the chain will permit us to screen systematically for mutations in patients and to generate recombinant proteins and synthetic peptides for further study of cell-matrix interactions involving the alpha 6(IV) chain. PMID:8175748

  19. RB1CC1 Protein Suppresses Type II Collagen Synthesis in Chondrocytes and Causes Dwarfism*

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Ichiro; Chano, Tokuhiro; Kita, Hiroko; Matsusue, Yoshitaka; Okabe, Hidetoshi

    2011-01-01

    RB1-inducible coiled-coil 1 (RB1CC1) functions in various processes, such as cell growth, differentiation, senescence, apoptosis, and autophagy. The conditional transgenic mice with cartilage-specific RB1CC1 excess that were used in the present study were made for the first time by the Cre-loxP system. Cartilage-specific RB1CC1 excess caused dwarfism in mice without causing obvious abnormalities in endochondral ossification and subsequent skeletal development from embryo to adult. In vitro and in vivo analysis revealed that the dwarf phenotype in cartilaginous RB1CC1 excess was induced by reductions in the total amount of cartilage and the number of cartilaginous cells, following suppressions of type II collagen synthesis and Erk1/2 signals. In addition, we have demonstrated that two kinds of SNPs (T-547C and C-468T) in the human RB1CC1 promoter have significant influence on the self-transcriptional level. Accordingly, human genotypic variants of RB1CC1 that either stimulate or inhibit RB1CC1 transcription in vivo may cause body size variations. PMID:22049074

  20. Tenascin-C promotes migration of hepatic stellate cells and production of type I collagen.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian-Cang; Huang, Xin; Shen, Ya-Wei; Zheng, Chen; Su, Qing-Hua; Xu, Jin-Kai; Zhao, Jun

    2016-08-01

    Tenascin-C (TN-C) is an extracellular matrix glycoprotein markedly upregulated during liver fibrosis. The study is performed to explore the role of TN-C during the growth and activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). We found that TN-C was accumulated accompanying with the HSC activation. Our data on cell migration assay revealed that the rTN-C treatment enhanced HSC migration in a dose- and time-dependent manner, but did not influence their proliferation. HSCs transfected with pTARGET-TN-C overexpression vector displayed increased the type I collagen (Col I) production. TN-C overexpression enhanced the process of HSC activation through TGF-β1 signaling. Moreover, the anti-α9β1 integrin antibody treatment blocked the TN-C-driven Col I increase in rat HSCs. Collectively, TN-C had a positive role in activation of HSCs mediated by TGF-β1 and α9β1 integrin, manifesting elevation of Col I production and promotion of cell migration. Our results provide a potential insight for the therapy of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:27031437

  1. Type I collagen and polyvinyl alcohol blend fiber scaffold for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cai, Changbin; Chen, Cheng; Chen, Guangxing; Wang, Fuyou; Guo, Lin; Yin, Li; Feng, Dehong; Yang, Liu

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to perform an evaluation of a braided fiber scaffold for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The scaffold was composed of 50% type I collagen (Col-I) and 50% polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). First, the biocompatibility and in vitro weight loss of the scaffold were tested. Then, the scaffolds were used to reconstruct the ACL in China Bama mimi pigs. At 24 weeks post-operation, the mechanical properties and histology of the regenerated ACL were analyzed. The maximum load and tensile strength were 472.43± 15.2 N and 29.71± 0.96 MPa, respectively; both were ~75% of those of native ACL and ~90% of those of fiber scaffold. This indicated that the scaffold maintained a large portion of native ACL's mechanical properties, and tissue formation on the scaffold compensated most of the tensile strength loss caused by scaffold degradation. Histology and immunohistology analysis showed the morphology and major extracellular matrix components of the regenerated ligament resembled the native ACL. Thus, the Col-I/PVA blend fiber ACL scaffold showed good potential for clinical applications. PMID:23531980

  2. Differential alleleic expression of the type II collagen gene (COL2A2) in osteoarthritic cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Loughlin, J.; Irven, C.; Sykes, B.; Athanasou, N.; Carr, A.

    1995-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common debilitating disease resulting from the degeneration of articular cartilage. The major protein of cartilage is type II collagen, which is encoded by the COL2A1 gene. Mutations at this locus have been discovered in several individuals with inherited disorders of cartilage. We have identified 27 primary OA patients who are heterozygous for sequence dimorphisms located in the coding region of COL2A1. These dimorphisms were used to distinguish the mRNA output from each of the two COL2A1 alleles in articular cartilage obtained from each patient. Three patients demonstrated differential allelic expression and produced <12% of the normal level of mRNA from one of their COL2A1 alleles. The same allele shows reduced expression in a well-defined OA population than in a control group, suggesting the possible existence of a rare COL2A1 allele that predisposes to OA. 31 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. RB1CC1 protein suppresses type II collagen synthesis in chondrocytes and causes dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Ichiro; Chano, Tokuhiro; Kita, Hiroko; Matsusue, Yoshitaka; Okabe, Hidetoshi

    2011-12-23

    RB1-inducible coiled-coil 1 (RB1CC1) functions in various processes, such as cell growth, differentiation, senescence, apoptosis, and autophagy. The conditional transgenic mice with cartilage-specific RB1CC1 excess that were used in the present study were made for the first time by the Cre-loxP system. Cartilage-specific RB1CC1 excess caused dwarfism in mice without causing obvious abnormalities in endochondral ossification and subsequent skeletal development from embryo to adult. In vitro and in vivo analysis revealed that the dwarf phenotype in cartilaginous RB1CC1 excess was induced by reductions in the total amount of cartilage and the number of cartilaginous cells, following suppressions of type II collagen synthesis and Erk1/2 signals. In addition, we have demonstrated that two kinds of SNPs (T-547C and C-468T) in the human RB1CC1 promoter have significant influence on the self-transcriptional level. Accordingly, human genotypic variants of RB1CC1 that either stimulate or inhibit RB1CC1 transcription in vivo may cause body size variations. PMID:22049074

  4. Identification of novel type VII collagen gene mutations resulting in severe recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Massé, M; Cserhalmi-Friedman, P B; Falanga, V; Celebi, J T; Martinez-Mir, A; Christiano, A M

    2005-05-01

    In this work, we studied the proband in a small nuclear family of Chinese and Dutch/German descent and identified two novel mutations in the type VII collagen gene leading to recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, Hallopeau-Siemens variant (HS-RDEB). The maternal mutation is a single base pair deletion of a cytosine nucleotide in exon 26, designated 3472delC, resulting in a frameshift and a premature termination codon (PTC) within the same exon, 7 bp downstream of the site of the mutation. The paternal mutation is a G-->A transition located at the 5' donor splice site within intron 51, designated IVS51 + 1G-->A. This mutation leads to the activation of a cryptic splice site, 32 bp downstream of the mutation site and to subsequent aberrant out-of-frame splicing, resulting in two alternative mRNA transcripts and a downstream PTC. To our knowledge, these two mutations have not been previously reported. These findings extend the body of evidence for compound heterozygous mutations leading to HS-RDEB and provide the basis for prenatal diagnosis in this family. PMID:15807692

  5. Fibrochondrogenesis Results from Mutations in the COL11A1 Type XI Collagen Gene

    PubMed Central

    Tompson, Stuart W.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Safina, Nicole P.; Bober, Michael B.; Proud, Virginia K.; Funari, Tara; Wangler, Michael F.; Nevarez, Lisette; Ala-Kokko, Leena; Wilcox, William R.; Eyre, David R.; Krakow, Deborah; Cohn, Daniel H.

    2010-01-01

    Fibrochondrogenesis is a severe, autosomal-recessive, short-limbed skeletal dysplasia. In a single case of fibrochondrogenesis, whole-genome SNP genotyping identified unknown ancestral consanguinity by detecting three autozygous regions. Because of the predominantly skeletal nature of the phenotype, the 389 genes localized to the autozygous intervals were prioritized for mutation analysis by correlation of their expression with known cartilage-selective genes via the UCLA Gene Expression Tool, UGET. The gene encoding the α1 chain of type XI collagen (COL11A1) was the only cartilage-selective gene among the three candidate intervals. Sequence analysis of COL11A1 in two genetically independent fibrochondrogenesis cases demonstrated that each was a compound heterozygote for a loss-of-function mutation on one allele and a mutation predicting substitution for a conserved triple-helical glycine residue on the other. The parents who were carriers of missense mutations had myopia. Early-onset hearing loss was noted in both parents who carried a loss-of-function allele, suggesting COL11A1 as a locus for mild, dominantly inherited hearing loss. These findings identify COL11A1 as a locus for fibrochondrogenesis and indicate that there might be phenotypic manifestations among carriers. PMID:21035103

  6. Fibrochondrogenesis results from mutations in the COL11A1 type XI collagen gene.

    PubMed

    Tompson, Stuart W; Bacino, Carlos A; Safina, Nicole P; Bober, Michael B; Proud, Virginia K; Funari, Tara; Wangler, Michael F; Nevarez, Lisette; Ala-Kokko, Leena; Wilcox, William R; Eyre, David R; Krakow, Deborah; Cohn, Daniel H

    2010-11-12

    Fibrochondrogenesis is a severe, autosomal-recessive, short-limbed skeletal dysplasia. In a single case of fibrochondrogenesis, whole-genome SNP genotyping identified unknown ancestral consanguinity by detecting three autozygous regions. Because of the predominantly skeletal nature of the phenotype, the 389 genes localized to the autozygous intervals were prioritized for mutation analysis by correlation of their expression with known cartilage-selective genes via the UCLA Gene Expression Tool, UGET. The gene encoding the α1 chain of type XI collagen (COL11A1) was the only cartilage-selective gene among the three candidate intervals. Sequence analysis of COL11A1 in two genetically independent fibrochondrogenesis cases demonstrated that each was a compound heterozygote for a loss-of-function mutation on one allele and a mutation predicting substitution for a conserved triple-helical glycine residue on the other. The parents who were carriers of missense mutations had myopia. Early-onset hearing loss was noted in both parents who carried a loss-of-function allele, suggesting COL11A1 as a locus for mild, dominantly inherited hearing loss. These findings identify COL11A1 as a locus for fibrochondrogenesis and indicate that there might be phenotypic manifestations among carriers. PMID:21035103

  7. Torilin ameliorates type II collagen-induced arthritis in mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Endale, Mehari; Lee, Whi Min; Kwak, Yi-Seong; Kim, Na-Mi; Kim, Bok-Kyu; Kim, Seung-Hyung; Cho, Jaeyoul; Kim, Suk; Park, Seung-Chun; Yun, Bong-Sik; Ko, Dukhwan; Rhee, Manhee

    2013-06-01

    Advancements in rheumatoid-arthritis-(RA) therapies have shown considerable progresses in the comprehension of disease. However, the development of new potential agents with relative safety and efficacy continues and natural compounds have been considered as alternatives to identify new entities. Since previous in-vivo data and our in-vitro findings showed that torilin has a strong anti-inflammatory property, we further investigated its effect against collagen-induced-arthritis-(CIA) in mice. CIA-induced DBA/1J mice were treated with torilin or methotrexate (MTX) for 5-weeks. Arthritis severity was evaluated by arthritic score and joint histopathology. Draining lymph node (dLN), joint and peripheral-blood mononuclear-cell (PBMC) counts, and activation/localization of T-/B-lymphocytes, dendritic cells (DCs) and neutrophils were examined by FACS analysis. Serum anti-type-II-collagen-(CII) antibody levels and cultured-splenocyte and serum cytokines were also evaluated. Torilin markedly reduced CIA-induced arthritic score, histopathology and leukocyte counts. Besides, torilin suppressed CIA-activated T-cells including CD3+, CD3+/CD69+, CD8+, CD4+ and CD4+/CD25+ in dLNs or joints. It also modified CD19+ or CD20+/CD23+ (B-cells), MHCII+/CD11c+ (DCs) and Gr-1+/CD11b+ (neutrophil) subpopulations. It further depressed total anti-CII-IgG, anti-CII-IgG1 and anti-CII-IgG2a antibody productions. Moreover, while IFN-γ and IL-10 were not affected, torilin suppressed CIA-induced serum TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 levels. Interestingly, torilin also blocked IFN-γ, IL-17 and IL-6 cytokines while it did not affect IL-10 but enhanced IL-4 in splenocytes. These results show that torilin attenuated arthritis severity, modified leukocyte activations in dLNs or joints, and restored serum and splenocyte cytokine imbalances. Torilin may have immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties with the capacity to ameliorate the inflammatory response in CIA-mice. PMID:23623942

  8. Phenotypic analysis of bovine chondrocytes cultured in 3D collagen sponges: effect of serum substitutes.

    PubMed

    Yates, Karen E; Allemann, Florin; Glowacki, Julie

    2005-01-01

    Repair of damaged cartilage usually requires replacement tissue or substitute material. Tissue engineering is a promising means to produce replacement cartilage from autologous or allogeneic cell sources. Scaffolds provide a three-dimensional (3D) structure that is essential for chondrocyte function and synthesis of cartilage-specific matrix proteins (collagen type II, aggrecan) and sulfated proteoglycans. In this study, we assessed porous, 3D collagen sponges for in vitro engineering of cartilage in both standard and serum-free culture conditions. Bovine articular chondrocytes (bACs) cultured in 3D sponges accumulated and maintained cartilage matrix over 4 weeks, as assessed by quantitative measures of matrix content, synthesis, and gene expression. Chondrogenesis by bACs cultured with Nutridoma as a serum replacement was equivalent or better than control cultures in serum. In contrast, chondrogenesis in insulin-transferrin-selenium (ITS(+3)) serum replacement cultures was poor, apparently due to decreased cell survival. These data indicate that porous 3D collagen sponges maintain chondrocyte viability, shape, and synthetic activity by providing an environment favorable for high-density chondrogenesis. With quantitative assays for cartilage-specific gene expression and biochemical measures of chondrogenesis in these studies, we conclude that the collagen sponges have potential as a scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:15735900

  9. Evaluation of anti-citrullinated type II collagen and anti-citrullinated vimentin antibodies in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To determine the prevalence and significance of anti-citrullinated vimentin and anti-citrullinated type II collagen antibodies and elucidate their role in the disease process of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods Sera were obtained from 95 patients with various subtypes of JIA, 19 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, and 10 healthy children. Antibodies were measured in the sera against citrullinated and native type II collagen and vimentin (vim1-16 and vim 59-74) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Samples were compared to anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibody and rheumatoid factor (RF) isotypes, and our previously measured anti-citrullinated fibrinogen and α-enolase antibodies on the same patient population, in addition to erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein. The relationship between the anti-citrullinated antibody profile and disease activity and joint damage were also investigated. Results Twenty-three JIA patients (24%) demonstrated reactivity to anti-citrullinated type II collagen. Ten JIA patients (10.5%) demonstrated reactivity to anti-citrullinated vimentin 1–16 antibodies and 7 (7.4%) to anti-citrullinated vimentin 59–74 antibodies. One IgM RF-positive polyarticular patient was positive for all 5 of the citrullinated autoantibodies tested. Thirty-seven different subsets of patients were identified based on their anti-citrullinated autoantibody and RF isotype profile. No significant associations were noted with anti-citrullinated type II collagen and anti-citrullinated vimentin antibodies with joint damage or disease activity. Anti-citrullinated vimentin 59–74 antibodies demonstrated the highest overall specificity at 89.7%, with anti-citrullinated vimentin 1–16 and anti-citrullinated type II collagen antibodies at 86.2%. Conclusion This study demonstrates that antibodies to multiple citrullinated epitopes are present in the sera of patients with various subtypes of JIA. It also

  10. Characterization of type I collagen fibril formation using thioflavin T fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Koichi; Kawabata, Kazuya; Kunii, Saori; Hamano, Kaori; Saito, Takuya; Tonomura, Ben'ichiro

    2009-05-01

    Collagen is composed of fibrils that are formed by self-assembly of smaller units, monomers which are triple-helical polypeptide. However, the mechanism of fibril formation at the level of individual molecules has remained to be clarified. We found that the fluorescence of thioflavin T, which has been widely used as a specific dye for amyloid fibrils, also increased by binding with fibrils of atelocollagen prepared from yellowfin tuna skin. There was a linear correlation between the fluorescence increase and the amount of atelocollagen within a collagen concentration range of 0-0.15 mg/ml at pH 6.5 with 50 microM thioflavin T. In contrast, neither actinidain-processed collagen that keeps monomeric nature nor heat-denatured collagen could cause the fluorescence increase of thioflavin T at all. The relationship between the fluorescence increase and thioflavin T concentration was fit to a theoretical binary binding curve. An apparent dissociation constant, K(d), and a maximal fluorescence increase, DeltaF(max), were calculated at various pHs. The values of K(d) and DeltaF(max) were dependent on pH (K(d) was 9.4 microM at pH 6.5). The present finding demonstrates that thioflavin T specifically binds to collagen fibrils and may be used as a sensitive tool for the study of collagen structure. PMID:19204013

  11. Calcium alginate enhances wound healing by up-regulating the ratio of collagen types I/III in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Gu, Qisheng; Zhao, Jun; Mei, Jiacai; Shao, Mingzhe; Pan, Ye; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Haisheng; Zhang, Zhen; Liu, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Calcium alginate has been proved to favor the skin ulcer healing and collagen synthesis was a critical factor for the wound closure. The present study was to elucidate the mechanism of calcium alginate on the diabetes skin ulceration. Calcium alginate dressing was applied daily on the full-thickness exercising wound created on the back of diabetic rat model as Alg-group (n=6), and the vaseline dressing was used as control (n=6). Rats were respectively sacrificed and the wound tissues were removed and used for the evaluation of various biochemical analysis contained collagen (type I and III) by Western blotting and hydroxyproline level changes by ELISA assay at 3 d, 7 d and 14 d after wounding. The expression of skin collagen I in Alg-group was enhanced from day 3 (0.66±0.25 vs. 0.42±0.09, P<0.05) to day 14 (1.09±0.14 vs. 0.78±0.16, P<0.05). However, no significant difference of collagen III expression was found between two groups during wound healing (P>0.05). And the ratio of collagen I/III in Alg-group was greater than that of Vas-group at day 7 (1.07±0.31 vs. 0.77±0.11, P<0.05) and 14 (1.18±0.30 vs. 0.83±0.14, P<0.05). The hydroxyproline level in skin homogenate of Alg-group was higher than that of Vas-group from day 3 (30.29±0.92 ng/ml vs. 27.52±0.83 ng/ml, P<0.05) to day 14 (89.58±4.97 ng/ml vs. 79.30±4.42 ng/ml, P<0.05). Calcium alginate accelerates the process of wound healing through improving type I collagen synthesis and increasing ratio of collagen I/III in diabetic rats. PMID:26261545

  12. Calcium alginate enhances wound healing by up-regulating the ratio of collagen types I/III in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Gu, Qisheng; Zhao, Jun; Mei, Jiacai; Shao, Mingzhe; Pan, Ye; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Haisheng; Zhang, Zhen; Liu, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Calcium alginate has been proved to favor the skin ulcer healing and collagen synthesis was a critical factor for the wound closure. The present study was to elucidate the mechanism of calcium alginate on the diabetes skin ulceration. Calcium alginate dressing was applied daily on the full-thickness exercising wound created on the back of diabetic rat model as Alg-group (n=6), and the vaseline dressing was used as control (n=6). Rats were respectively sacrificed and the wound tissues were removed and used for the evaluation of various biochemical analysis contained collagen (type I and III) by Western blotting and hydroxyproline level changes by ELISA assay at 3 d, 7 d and 14 d after wounding. The expression of skin collagen I in Alg-group was enhanced from day 3 (0.66 ± 0.25 vs. 0.42 ± 0.09, P<0.05) to day 14 (1.09 ± 0.14 vs. 0.78 ± 0.16, P<0.05). However, no significant difference of collagen III expression was found between two groups during wound healing (P>0.05). And the ratio of collagen I/III in Alg-group was greater than that of Vas-group at day 7 (1.07 ± 0.31 vs. 0.77 ± 0.11, P<0.05) and 14 (1.18 ± 0.30 vs. 0.83 ± 0.14, P<0.05). The hydroxyproline level in skin homogenate of Alg-group was higher than that of Vas-group from day 3 (30.29 ± 0.92 ng/ml vs. 27.52 ± 0.83 ng/ml, P<0.05) to day 14 (89.58 ± 4.97 ng/ml vs. 79.30 ± 4.42 ng/ml, P<0.05). Calcium alginate accelerates the process of wound healing through improving type I collagen synthesis and increasing ratio of collagen I/III in diabetic rats. PMID:26261545

  13. Myocardial infarction resulting from coronary artery dissection in an adolescent with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV due to a type III collagen mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Adès, L. C.; Waltham, R. D.; Chiodo, A. A.; Bateman, J. F.

    1995-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome encompasses a group of inherited disorders of connective tissue, some of which are characterised by abnormalities of collagen metabolism. The chromosomal location, identified genes and biochemical defects, inheritance pattern, and clinical features for the various known subtypes are outlined. Prenatal diagnosis is possible for types IV, VI, VIIA1, and VIIA2. An unusual presentation of type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome in a 16 year old boy with an anterior myocardial infarction resulting from dissection of the left anterior descending coronary artery is reported here. A clinical diagnosis of type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was made subsequently and confirmed by the reduced production, impaired secretion, and abnormally slow electrophoretic migration of type III collagen, indicating an underlying mutation in the COL3A1 gene. This patient represents the first case of type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with symptomatic coronary artery dissection. Images PMID:7546986

  14. Serum Collagen Type II Cleavage Epitope and Serum Hyaluronic Acid as Biomarkers for Treatment Monitoring of Dogs with Hip Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, José M.; Rubio, Mónica; Spinella, Giuseppe; Cuervo, Belén; Sopena, Joaquín; Cugat, Ramón; Garcia-Balletbó, Montserrat; Dominguez, Juan M.; Granados, Maria; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Ceron, José J.; Carrillo, José M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of serum type II collagen cleavage epitope and serum hyaluronic acid as biomarkers for treatment monitoring in osteoarthritic dogs. For this purpose, a treatment model based on mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue combined with plasma rich in growth factors was used. This clinical study included 10 dogs with hip osteoarthritis. Both analytes were measured in serum at baseline, just before applying the treatment, and 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. These results were compared with those obtained from force plate analysis using the same animals during the same study period. Levels of type II collagen cleavage epitope decreased and those of hyaluronic acid increased with clinical improvement objectively verified via force plate analysis, suggesting these two biomarkers could be effective as indicators of clinical development of joint disease in dogs. PMID:26886592

  15. Sika Deer Antler Collagen Type I-Accelerated Osteogenesis in Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells via the Smad Pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Zhang, Min; Drummen, Gregor P C; Zhao, Yu; Tan, Yin Fen; Luo, Su; Qu, Xiao Bo

    2016-01-01

    Deer antler preparations have been used to strengthen bones for centuries. It is particularly rich in collagen type I. This study aimed to unravel part of the purported bioremedial effect of Sika deer antler collagen type I (SDA-Col I) on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The results suggest that SDA-Col I might be used to promote and regulate osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. SDA-Col I might potentially provide the basis for novel therapeutic strategies in the treatment of bone injury and/or in scaffolds for bone replacement strategies. Finally, isolation of SDA-Col I from deer antler represents a renewable, green, and uncomplicated way to obtain a biomedically valuable therapeutic. PMID:27066099

  16. Sika Deer Antler Collagen Type I-Accelerated Osteogenesis in Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells via the Smad Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Zhang, Min; Drummen, Gregor P. C.; Zhao, Yu; Tan, Yin Fen; Luo, Su; Qu, Xiao Bo

    2016-01-01

    Deer antler preparations have been used to strengthen bones for centuries. It is particularly rich in collagen type I. This study aimed to unravel part of the purported bioremedial effect of Sika deer antler collagen type I (SDA-Col I) on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The results suggest that SDA-Col I might be used to promote and regulate osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. SDA-Col I might potentially provide the basis for novel therapeutic strategies in the treatment of bone injury and/or in scaffolds for bone replacement strategies. Finally, isolation of SDA-Col I from deer antler represents a renewable, green, and uncomplicated way to obtain a biomedically valuable therapeutic. PMID:27066099

  17. Blocking aggrecanase cleavage in the aggrecan interglobular domain abrogates cartilage erosion and promotes cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Little, Christopher B.; Meeker, Clare T.; Golub, Suzanne B.; Lawlor, Kate E.; Farmer, Pamela J.; Smith, Susan M.; Fosang, Amanda J.

    2007-01-01

    Aggrecan loss from cartilage in arthritis is mediated by aggrecanases. Aggrecanases cleave aggrecan preferentially in the chondroitin sulfate–2 (CS-2) domain and secondarily at the E373↓374A bond in the interglobular domain (IGD). However, IGD cleavage may be more deleterious for cartilage biomechanics because it releases the entire CS-containing portion of aggrecan. Recent studies identifying aggrecanase-2 (ADAMTS-5) as the predominant aggrecanase in mouse cartilage have not distinguished aggrecanolysis in the IGD from aggrecanolysis in the CS-2 domain. We generated aggrecan knockin mice with a mutation that rendered only the IGD resistant to aggrecanases in order to assess the contribution of this specific cleavage to cartilage pathology. The knockin mice were viable and fertile. Aggrecanase cleavage in the aggrecan IGD was not detected in knockin mouse cartilage in situ nor following digestion with ADAMTS-5 or treatment of cartilage explant cultures with IL-1α. Blocking cleavage in the IGD not only diminished aggrecan loss and cartilage erosion in surgically induced osteoarthritis and a model of inflammatory arthritis, but appeared to stimulate cartilage repair following acute inflammation. We conclude that blocking aggrecanolysis in the aggrecan IGD alone protects against cartilage erosion and may potentiate cartilage repair. PMID:17510707

  18. Incorporation of aggrecan in interpenetrating network hydrogels to improve cellular performance for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ingavle, Ganesh C; Frei, Anthony W; Gehrke, Stevin H; Detamore, Michael S

    2013-06-01

    Interpenetrating network (IPN) hydrogels were recently introduced to the cartilage tissue engineering literature, with the approach of encapsulating cells in thermally gelling agarose that is then soaked in a poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) solution, which is then photopolymerized. These IPNs possess significantly enhanced mechanical performance desirable for cartilage regeneration, potentially allowing patients to return to weight-bearing activities quickly after surgical implantation. In an effort to improve cell viability and performance, inspiration was drawn from previous studies that have elicited positive chondrogenic responses to aggrecan, the proteoglycan largely responsible for the compressive stiffness of cartilage. Aggrecan was incorporated into the IPNs in conservative concentrations (40 μg/mL), and its effect was contrasted with the incorporation of chondroitin sulfate (CS), the primary glycosaminoglycan associated with aggrecan. Aggrecan was incorporated by physical entrapment within agarose and methacrylated CS was incorporated by copolymerization with PEGDA. The IPNs incorporating aggrecan or CS exhibited over 50% viability with encapsulated chondrocytes after 6 weeks. Both aggrecan and CS improved cell viability by 15.6% and 20%, respectively, relative to pure IPNs at 6 weeks culture time. In summary, we have introduced the novel approach of including a raw material from cartilage, namely aggrecan, to serve as a bioactive signal to cells encapsulated in IPN hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering, which led to improved performance of encapsulated chondrocytes. PMID:23379843

  19. Structurally abnormal type II collagen in a severe form of Kniest dysplasia caused by an exon 24 skipping mutation.

    PubMed

    Weis, M A; Wilkin, D J; Kim, H J; Wilcox, W R; Lachman, R S; Rimoin, D L; Cohn, D H; Eyre, D R

    1998-02-20

    Type II collagen mutations have been identified in a phenotypic continuum of chondrodysplasias that range widely in clinical severity. They include achondrogenesis type II, hypochondrogenesis, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita, spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, Kniest dysplasia, and Stickler syndrome. We report here results that define the underlying genetic defect and consequent altered structure of assembled type II collagen in a neonatal lethal form of Kniest dysplasia. Electrophoresis of a cyanogen bromide (CNBr) (CB) digest of sternal cartilage revealed an alpha1(II)CB11 peptide doublet and a slightly retarded mobility for all major CB peptides, which implied post-translational overmodification. Further peptide mapping and sequence analysis of CB11 revealed equal amounts of a normal alpha1(II) sequence and a chain lacking the 18 residues (361-378 of the triple helical domain) corresponding to exon 24. Sequence analysis of an amplified genomic DNA fragment identified a G to A transition in the +5 position of the splice donor consensus sequence of intron 24 in one allele. Cartilage matrix analysis showed that the short alpha1(II) chain was present in collagen molecules that had become cross-linked into fibrils. Trypsin digestion of the pepsin-extracted native type II collagen selectively cleaved the normal length alpha1(II) chains within the exon 24 domain. These findings support a hypothesis that normal and short alpha-chains had combined to form heterotrimeric molecules in which the chains were in register in both directions from the deletion site, accommodated effectively by a loop out of the normal chain exon 24 domain. Such an accommodation, with potential overall shortening of the helical domain and hence misalignment of intermolecular relationships within fibrils, offers a common molecular mechanism by which a group of different mutations might act to produce the Kniest phenotype. PMID:9468540

  20. Type IV Collagen Controls the Axogenesis of Cerebellar Granule Cells by Regulating Basement Membrane Integrity in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Miki; Yamaguchi, Shingo; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Kakiguchi, Kisa; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Takashi; Hibi, Masahiko

    2015-10-01

    Granule cells (GCs) are the major glutamatergic neurons in the cerebellum, and GC axon formation is an initial step in establishing functional cerebellar circuits. In the zebrafish cerebellum, GCs can be classified into rostromedial and caudolateral groups, according to the locations of their somata in the corresponding cerebellar lobes. The axons of the GCs in the caudolateral lobes terminate on crest cells in the dorsal hindbrain, as well as forming en passant synapses with Purkinje cells in the cerebellum. In the zebrafish mutant shiomaneki, the caudolateral GCs extend aberrant axons. Positional cloning revealed that the shiomaneki (sio) gene locus encodes Col4a6, a subunit of type IV collagen, which, in a complex with Col4a5, is a basement membrane (BM) component. Both col4a5 and col4a6 mutants displayed similar abnormalities in the axogenesis of GCs and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Although type IV collagen is reported to control axon targeting by regulating the concentration gradient of an axonal guidance molecule Slit, Slit overexpression did not affect the GC axons. The structure of the BM surrounding the tectum and dorsal hindbrain was disorganized in the col4a5 and col4a6 mutants. Moreover, the abnormal axogenesis of the caudolateral GCs and the RGCs was coupled with aberrant BM structures in the type IV collagen mutants. The regrowth of GC axons after experimental ablation revealed that the original and newly formed axons displayed similar branching and extension abnormalities in the col4a6 mutants. These results collectively suggest that type IV collagen controls GC axon formation by regulating the integrity of the BM, which provides axons with the correct path to their targets. PMID:26451951

  1. Type IV Collagen Controls the Axogenesis of Cerebellar Granule Cells by Regulating Basement Membrane Integrity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Miki; Yamaguchi, Shingo; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Kakiguchi, Kisa; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Takashi; Hibi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Granule cells (GCs) are the major glutamatergic neurons in the cerebellum, and GC axon formation is an initial step in establishing functional cerebellar circuits. In the zebrafish cerebellum, GCs can be classified into rostromedial and caudolateral groups, according to the locations of their somata in the corresponding cerebellar lobes. The axons of the GCs in the caudolateral lobes terminate on crest cells in the dorsal hindbrain, as well as forming en passant synapses with Purkinje cells in the cerebellum. In the zebrafish mutant shiomaneki, the caudolateral GCs extend aberrant axons. Positional cloning revealed that the shiomaneki (sio) gene locus encodes Col4a6, a subunit of type IV collagen, which, in a complex with Col4a5, is a basement membrane (BM) component. Both col4a5 and col4a6 mutants displayed similar abnormalities in the axogenesis of GCs and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Although type IV collagen is reported to control axon targeting by regulating the concentration gradient of an axonal guidance molecule Slit, Slit overexpression did not affect the GC axons. The structure of the BM surrounding the tectum and dorsal hindbrain was disorganized in the col4a5 and col4a6 mutants. Moreover, the abnormal axogenesis of the caudolateral GCs and the RGCs was coupled with aberrant BM structures in the type IV collagen mutants. The regrowth of GC axons after experimental ablation revealed that the original and newly formed axons displayed similar branching and extension abnormalities in the col4a6 mutants. These results collectively suggest that type IV collagen controls GC axon formation by regulating the integrity of the BM, which provides axons with the correct path to their targets. PMID:26451951

  2. Investigation on interaction of tannic acid with type I collagen and its effect on thermal, enzymatic, and conformational stability for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Velmurugan, Punitha; Singam, Ettayapuram Ramaprasad Azhagiya; Jonnalagadda, Raghava Rao; Subramanian, Venkatesan

    2014-05-01

    Collagen is an essential component of tissues, which is the most abundant component in extracellular matrix and highly conserved across the animal kingdom. It can assemble into fiber and play an essential role in cell adhesion and growth and could be extremely useful in tissue engineering. In this study, the effect of tannic acid (TA) on the thermal, enzymatic and conformational stability of type I collagen has been investigated for the development of collagen-based biomaterials. Interaction of TA with collagen demonstrates the role of hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interaction in providing the thermal and enzymatic stability. Thermal analysis studies reveal that, hydrothermal stability of collagen increases as well as inhibits the breakdown of collagenase by formation of hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. TA binds to the collagen with high affinity because the structural flexibility of the collagen compensates for the structural rigidity of the phenolics. Increase in concentration of TA induces significant change in the conformation of triple helix. The free binding energy of TA with collagen-like peptide was determined to be in the range of -9.4 to -11.2 kcal mol(-1), which was calculated by using Autodock Vina software and showed numerous hydrophobic and hydrogen bond interactions. We anticipate that these collagen-based biomaterials hold great potential for biomedical applications. PMID:23996786

  3. Highlighting the impact of aging on type I collagen: label-free investigation using confocal reflectance microscopy and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in 3D matrix model

    PubMed Central

    Terryn, Christine; Garnotel, Roselyne; Jeannesson, Pierre; Sockalingum, Ganesh D.; Manfait, Michel; Perraut, François; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Koenig, Anne; Piot, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    During aging, alterations of extracellular matrix proteins contribute to various pathological phenotypes. Among these alterations, type I collagen cross-linking and associated glycation products accumulation over time detrimentally affects its physico-chemical properties, leading to alterations of tissue biomechanical stability. Here, different-age collagen 3D matrices using non-destructive and label-free biophotonic techniques were analysed to highlight the impact of collagen I aging on 3D constructs, at macroscopic and microscopic levels. Matrices were prepared with collagens extracted from tail tendons of rats (newborns, young and old adults) to be within the physiological aging process. The data of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy reveal that aging leads to an inhibition of fibril assembly and a resulting decrease of gel density. Investigations by confocal reflectance microscopy highlight poor-fibrillar structures in oldest collagen networks most likely related to the glycation products accumulation. Complementarily, an infrared analysis brings out marked spectral variations in the Amide I profile, specific of the peptidic bond conformation and for carbohydrates vibrations as function of collagen-age. Interestingly, we also highlight an unexpected behavior for newborn collagen, exhibiting poorly-organized networks and microscopic features close to the oldest collagen. These results demonstrate that changes in collagen optical properties are relevant for investigating the incidence of aging in 3D matrix models. PMID:26885896

  4. Regional alterations of type I collagen in rat tibia induced by skeletal unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiiba, Masashi; Arnaud, Sara B.; Tanzawa, Hideki; Kitamura, Eiji; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2002-01-01

    Skeletal unloading induces loss of mineral density in weight-bearing bones that leads to inferior bone mechanical strength. This appears to be caused by a failure of bone formation; however, its mechanisms still are not well understood. The objective of this study was to characterize collagen, the predominant matrix protein in bone, in various regions of tibia of rats that were subjected to skeletal unloading by 4 weeks tail suspension. Sixteen male Sprague-Dawley rats (4 months old) were divided into tail suspension and ambulatory controls (eight rats each). After the tail suspension, tibias from each animal were collected and divided into five regions and collagen was analyzed. The collagen cross-linking and the extent of lysine (Lys) hydroxylation in unloaded bones were significantly altered in proximal epiphysis, diaphysis, and, in particular, proximal metaphysis but not in distal regions. The pool of immature/nonmineralized collagen measured by its extractability with a chaotropic solvent was significantly increased in proximal metaphysis. These results suggest that skeletal unloading induced an accumulation of post-translationally altered nonmineralized collagen and that these changes are bone region specific. These alterations might be caused by impaired osteoblastic function/differentiation resulting in a mineralization defect.

  5. Process integration for recovery of recombinant collagen type I α1 from corn seed.

    PubMed

    Setina, Christopher M; Haase, Jason P; Glatz, Charles E

    2016-01-01

    Because of safety concerns and product consistency issues with the use of animal-derived collagen, several recombinant protein expression hosts have been considered for recombinant collagen corn seed. Full length, triple-helical, recombinant collagen (rCIα1) is expressed as a fusion with a foldon domain, which must later be removed. Here we have examined integration of purification and foldon removal by comparing advantages of removal before or after purification, using salt precipitation as the main purification step. Because expression levels in available maize lines are low, Pichia-produced recombinant collagens, both with and without foldon, were added to corn seed germ at the extraction step. Salt precipitation of an acidic corn seed extract yielded 100% of the collagen without foldon at >70% purity without the pepsin pretreatment. With pepsin pretreatment, yield was 94.0% with purity of 76.5%. Analysis of the protein molecular weight distribution of the pre- and post-treatment extracts showed that the corn proteins are largely resistant to pepsin proteolysis, explaining why little benefit was obtained by pepsin treatment. In the absence of pepsin treatment, the recovery of rCIα1 with foldon was still above 90% but the purity was only 44%. This still represented at about 13-fold purification with a 2.7-fold volume reduction which would reduce the pepsin requirement for post-recovery foldon cleavage. PMID:26518757

  6. The effect of various denier capillary channel polymer fibers on the alignment of NHDF cells and type I collagen.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Kristofer D; Webb, Ken; Brown, Philip J

    2010-12-15

    If tissue engineers are to successfully repair and regenerate native tendons and ligaments, it will be essential to implement contact guidance to induce cellular and type I collagen alignment to replicate the native structure. Capillary channel polymer (CC-P) fibers fabricated by melt-extrusion have aligned micrometer scale surface channels that may serve the goal of achieving biomimetic, physical templates for ligament growth and regeneration. Previous work characterizing the behavior of normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF), on the 19 denier per filament (dpf) CC-P fibers, demonstrated a need for improved cellular and type I collagen alignment. Therefore, 5 and 9 dpf CC-P fibers were manufactured to determine whether their channel dimensions would achieve greater alignment. A 29 dpf CC-P fiber was also examined to determine whether cellular guidance could still be achieved within the larger dimensions of the fiber's channels. The 9 dpf CC-P fiber appeared to approach the topographical constraints necessary to induce the cellular and type I collagen architecture that most closely mirrored that of native ACL tissue. This work demonstrated that the novel cross-section of the CC-P fiber geometry could approach the necessary surface topography to align NHDF cells along the longitudinal axis of each fiber. PMID:20925084

  7. Glomerular basement membrane expansion in passive Heymann nephritis. Absence of increased synthesis of type IV collagen, laminin, or fibronectin.

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, M. A.; Boyd, C. D.; Leardkamolkarn, V.; Abrahamson, D. R.; Minto, A. W.; Salant, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The distribution and synthetic rate of glomerular basement membrane components was examined in the Passive Heymann Nephritis model of experimental membranous nephropathy. The extensive tissue injury that developed included subepithelial electron-dense deposits, podocyte foot process effacement, and expansion of the glomerular basement membrane. Levels of mRNA for type IV collagen, laminin, and fibronectin from isolated glomeruli was quantitated by slot-blot analysis and showed no change in experimental animals as compared to controls at either 1 week, 3 weeks, or 3 months after disease induction. Immunoelectron microscopy with gold-labeled anti-laminin IgG revealed no difference in the number of particles bound to the glomerular basement membrane of experimental animals and controls. Immunofluorescence with both type IV collagen antisera and anti-laminin antibody showed no difference in the intensity or pattern of staining. Despite extensive glomerular damage and glomerular basement membrane thickening, no evidence was found for either an increase in the synthetic rate of type IV collagen, laminin, or fibronectin or for an accumulation of basement membrane laminin within the damaged glomeruli. Alternate processes, such as diminished density of matrix components or accumulation of other unmeasured matrix constituents, presumably account for the expansion of the glomerular basement membrane seen in experimental membranous nephropathy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1992771

  8. Autoantibody profile in the experimental model of scleroderma induced by type V human collagen

    PubMed Central

    Callado, Maria R M; Viana, Vilma S T; Vendramini, Margarete B G; Leon, Elaine P; Bueno, Cleonice; Velosa, Ana P P; Teodoro, Walcy R; Yoshinari, Natalino H

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the humoral autoimmune response in the experimental model of systemic sclerosis (SSc) induced by human type V collagen (huCol V). New Zealand rabbits were immunized with huCol V in Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) and boosted twice with 15 days intervals with huCol V in Freund's incomplete adjuvant. Control groups included animals injected only with FCA or bovine serum albumin. Bleeding was done at days 0, 30, 75 and 120. Tissue specimens were obtained for histopathological investigation. Serological analysis included detection of antibodies against huCol V and anti-topoisomerase I (Anti-Scl70) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, antinuclear antibodies (ANA) by indirect immunofluorescence, and rheumatoid factor (RF) by a latex agglutination test. Target antigens were characterized by immunoblot. Histological analysis revealed extracellular matrix remodeling with fibrosis and vasculitis. Anti-Scl70 and ANA were detected as early as 30 days in all huCol V animals. The universal ANA staining pattern was Golgi-like. This serum reactivity was not abolished by previous absorption with huCol V. Characterization of the target antigen by immunoblot revealed two major protein fractions of 175 000 and 220 000 MW. Similarly to ANA, there was a gradual increase of reactivity throughout the immunization and also it was not abolished by preincubation of serum samples with huCol V. RF testing was negative in hyperimmune sera. Conclusion: The production of autoantibodies, including anti-Scl70, a serological marker for SSc associated with histopathological alterations, validates huCol V induced-experimental model and brings out its potential for understanding the pathophysiology of SSc. PMID:17442023

  9. Dynamic Reorganization and Enzymatic Remodeling of Type IV Collagen at Cell-Biomaterial Interface.

    PubMed

    Coelho, N M; Llopis-Hernández, V; Salmerón-Sánchez, M; Altankov, G

    2016-01-01

    Vascular basement membrane remodeling involves assembly and degradation of its main constituents, type IV collagen (Col IV) and laminin, which is critical during development, angiogenesis, and tissue repair. Remodeling can also occur at cell-biomaterials interface altering significantly the biocompatibility of implants. Here we describe the fate of adsorbed Col IV in contact with endothelial cells adhering on positively charged NH2 or hydrophobic CH3 substrata, both based on self-assembly monolayers (SAMs) and studied alone or mixed in different proportions. AFM studies revealed distinct pattern of adsorbed Col IV, varying from single molecular deposition on pure NH2 to network-like assembly on mixed SAMs, turning to big globular aggregates on bare CH3. Human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs) interact better with Col IV adsorbed as single molecules on NH2 surface and readily rearrange it in fibril-like pattern that coincide with secreted fibronectin fibrils. The cells show flattened morphology and well-developed focal adhesion complexes that are rich on phosphorylated FAK while expressing markedly low pericellular proteolytic activity. Conversely, on hydrophobic CH3 substrata HUVECs showed abrogated spreading and FAK phosphorylation, combined with less reorganization of the aggregated Col IV and significantly increased proteolytic activity. The later involves both MMP-2 and MMP-9, as measured by zymography and FITC-Col IV release. The mixed SAMs support intermediate remodeling activity. Taken together these results show that chemical functionalization combined with Col IV preadsorption provides a tool for guiding the endothelial cells behavior and pericellular proteolytic activity, events that strongly affect the fate of cardiovascular implants. PMID:27567485

  10. Alteration of Type I collagen microstructure induced by estrogen depletion can be prevented with drug treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cauble, Meagan A; Rothman, Edward; Welch, Kathleen; Fang, Ming; Duong, Le T; Pennypacker, Brenda L; Orr, Bradford G; Banaszak Holl, Mark M

    2015-01-01

    Two independent biological replicates of estrogen depletion were employed with differing drug treatment conditions. Data Set I consisted of 9-month-old New Zealand white female rabbits treated as follows: sham-operated (n=11), ovariectomized (OVX; n=12), OVX+200 μg kg−1 alendronate (ALN), 3 × a week for 27 weeks (n=12) and OVX+10 mg kg−1 Cathepsin-K inhibitor (CatKI) daily for 27 weeks. Data Set II consisted of 6-month-old New Zealand white female rabbits that were sham-operated (n=12), OVX (n=12) or OVX+0.05 mg kg−1 17β-estradiol (ERT) 3 × a week for 13 weeks (n=12). Samples from the cortical femur were polished and demineralized to make them suitable for atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging. Type I collagen fibrils present in bundles or sheets, running parallel to each other, were combined into a class termed Parallel. Fibrils present outside of such structures, typically in images with an angular range of non-parallel fibrils, were combined into a class termed Oblique. The percentage of fibrils coded as Parallel for Sham animals in Data Sets I and II was 52% and 53%, respectively. The percentage of fibrils coded as Parallel for OVX animals in Data Sets I and II was 35% in both cases. ALN and ERT drug treatments reduced the change from 18 to 12%, whereas CatKI treatment reduced the change to 5%. PMID:26131356

  11. COLLAGEN STRUCTURE AND STABILITY

    PubMed Central

    Shoulders, Matthew D.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2010-01-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in animals. This fibrous, structural protein comprises a right-handed bundle of three parallel, left-handed polyproline II-type helices. Much progress has been made in elucidating the structure of collagen triple helices and the physicochemical basis for their stability. New evidence demonstrates that stereoelectronic effects and preorganization play a key role in that stability. The fibrillar structure of type I collagen–the prototypical collagen fibril–has been revealed in detail. Artificial collagen fibrils that display some properties of natural collagen fibrils are now accessible using chemical synthesis and self-assembly. A rapidly emerging understanding of the mechanical and structural properties of native collagen fibrils will guide further development of artificial collagenous materials for biomedicine and nanotechnology. PMID:19344236

  12. Defective splicing of mRNA from one COL1A1 allele of type I collagen in nondeforming (type I) osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed Central

    Stover, M L; Primorac, D; Liu, S C; McKinstry, M B; Rowe, D W

    1993-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I is the mildest form of heritable bone fragility resulting from mutations within the COL1A1 gene. We studied fibroblasts established from a child with OI type I and demonstrated underproduction of alpha 1 (I) collagen chains and alpha 1 (I) mRNA. Indirect RNase protection suggested two species of alpha 1 (I) mRNA, one of which was not collinear with fully spliced alpha 1 (I) mRNA. The noncollinear population was confined to the nuclear compartment of the cell, and contained the entire sequence of intron 26 and a G-->A transition in the first position of the intron donor site. The G-->A transition was also identified in the genomic DNA. The retained intron contained an in-frame stop codon and introduced an out-of-frame insertion within the collagen mRNA producing stop codons downstream of the insertion. These changes probably account for the failure of the mutant RNA to appear in the cytoplasm. Unlike other splice site mutations within collagen mRNA that resulted in exon skipping and a truncated but inframe RNA transcript, this mutation did not result in production of a defective collagen pro alpha 1 (I) chain. Instead, the mild nature of the disease in this case reflects failure to process the defective mRNA and thus the absence of a protein product from the mutant allele. Images PMID:8408653

  13. Dense type I collagen matrices that support cellular remodeling and microfabrication for studies of tumor angiogenesis and vasculogenesis in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Valerie L.; Zheng, Ying; Choi, Nak Won; Verbridge, Scott S.; Sutermaster, Bryan A.; Bonassar, Lawrence J.; Fischbach, Claudia; Stroock, Abraham D.

    2010-01-01

    Type I collagen is a favorable substrate for cell adhesion and growth and is remodelable by many tissue cells; these characteristics make it an attractive material for the study of dynamic cellular processes. Low mass fraction (1.0–3.0 mg/ml), hydrated collagen matrices used for three-dimensional cell culture permit cellular movement and remodeling, but their microstructure and mechanics fail to mimic characteristics of many extracellular matrices in vivo and limit the definition of fine-scale geometrical features (< 1 mm) within scaffolds. In this study, we worked with hydrated type I collagen at mass fractions between 3.0 and 20 mg/ml to define the range of densities over which the matrices support both microfabrication and cellular remodeling. We present pore and fiber dimensions based on confocal microscopy and longitudinal modulus and hydraulic permeability based on confined compression. We demonstrate faithful reproduction of simple pores of 50 µm-diameter over the entire range and formation of functional microfluidic networks for mass fractions greater than 10.0 mg/ml. We present quantitative characterization of the rate and extent of cellular remodelability using human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Finally, we present a co-culture with tumor cells and discuss the implications of integrating microfluidic control within scaffolds as a tool to study spatial and temporal signaling during tumor angiogenesis and vascularization of tissue-engineered constructs. PMID:20727585

  14. Localization of type IV collagen a 1 to a 6 chains in basement membrane during mouse molar germ development.

    PubMed

    Nagai, N; Nakano, K; Sado, Y; Naito, I; Gunduz, M; Tsujigiwa, H; Nagatsuka, H; Ninomiya, Y; Siar, C H

    2001-10-01

    The dental basement membrane (BM) putatively mediates epithelial-mesenchymal interactions during tooth morphogenesis and cytodifferentiation. Type IV collagen alpha chains, a major network-forming protein of the dental BM, was studied and results disclosed distinct expression patterns at different stages of mouse molar germ development. At the dental placode and bud stage, the BM of the oral epithelium expressed alpha 1, alpha 2, alpha 5 and alpha 6 chains while the gubernaculum dentis, in addition to the above four chains, also expressed a 4 chain. An asymmetrical expression for alpha 4, alpha 5 and alpha 6 chains was observed at the bud stage. At the early bell stage, the BM associated with the inner enamel epithelium (IEE) of molar germ expressed alpha 1, alpha 2 and alpha 4 chains while the BM of the outer enamel epithelium (OEE) expressed only alpha 1 and a 2 chains. With the onset of dentinogenesis, the collagen a chain profile of the IEE BM gradually disappeared. Howeverfrom the early to late bell stage, the gubernaculum dentis consistently expressed alpha 1, alpha 2, alpha 5 and a 6 chains resembling fetal oral mucosa. These findings suggest that stage- and position-specific distribution of type IV collagen alpha subunits occur during molar germ development and that these changes are essential for molar morphogenesis and cytodifferentiation. PMID:11732842

  15. ACAT1 deletion in murine macrophages associated with cytotoxicity and decreased expression of collagen type 3A1

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Annabelle . E-mail: arodrig5@jhmi.edu; Ashen, M. Dominique; Chen, Edward S.

    2005-05-27

    In contrast to some published studies of murine macrophages, we previously showed that ACAT inhibitors appeared to be anti-atherogenic in primary human macrophages in that they decreased foam cell formation without inducing cytotoxicity. Herein, we examined foam cell formation and cytotoxicity in murine ACAT1 knockout (KO) macrophages in an attempt to resolve the discrepancies. Elicited peritoneal macrophages from normal C57BL6 and ACAT1 KO mice were incubated with DMEM containing acetylated LDL (acLDL, 100 {mu}g protein/ml) for 48 h. Cells became cholesterol enriched and there were no differences in the total cholesterol mass. Esterified cholesterol mass was lower in ACAT1 KO foam cells compared to normal macrophages (p < 0.04). Cytotoxicity, as measured by the cellular release of [{sup 14}C]adenine from macrophages, was approximately 2-fold greater in ACAT1 KO macrophages as compared to normal macrophages (p < 0.0001), and this was independent of cholesterol enrichment. cDNA microarray analysis showed that ACAT1 KO macrophages expressed substantially less collagen type 3A1 (26-fold), which was confirmed by RT-PCR. Total collagen content was also significantly reduced (57%) in lung homogenates isolated from ACAT1 KO mice (p < 0.02). Thus, ACAT1 KO macrophages show biochemical changes consistent with increased cytotoxicity and also a novel association with decreased expression of collagen type 3A1.

  16. Autoantibodies to type II collagen: occurrence in rheumatoid arthritis, other arthritides, autoimmune connective tissue diseases, and chronic inflammatory syndromes.

    PubMed Central

    Choi, E K; Gatenby, P A; McGill, N W; Bateman, J F; Cole, W G; York, J R

    1988-01-01

    Serum IgG antibodies to native and denatured human type II collagen (Col II) were measured using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). One hundred and thirty one patients with various forms of arthritis such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), psoriatic arthritis (PSA). Reiter's Syndrome (RS), osteoarthritis (OA), and gout, 60 with autoimmune connective tissue disease, and 37 with the chronic inflammatory conditions--graft versus host disease and leprosy--were studied. With the exception of RS, PSA, OA, and gout, significant levels of Col II antibodies were detected in each disease group. Blocking studies with types I and II collagen on selected serum samples confirmed the specificity to native Col II, though some cross reactivity was apparent with denatured collagen. The patients with RA who were Col II antibody positive tended to fall into stage III of disease progression. There was, however, no correlation with rheumatoid factor, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, or disease duration and this, together with the finding that Col II antibodies are present in a wide array of diseases, makes their role in the pathogenesis of RA questionable. They may arise as a secondary disease perpetuating mechanism in some patients, or in turn may be an epiphenomenon secondary to generalised disturbed immunoregulation or B cell hyperreactivity, or both, that characterises these clinical conditions. PMID:3365030

  17. Statins accelerate the onset of collagen type II-induced arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Statins (hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors) are effective in reducing the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with hyperlipidemia, hypertension, or type II diabetes. Next to their cholesterol-lowering activity, statins have immunomodulatory properties. Based on these properties, we hypothesized that statin use may eventually lead to dysregulation of immune responses, possibly resulting in autoimmunity. We have recently shown in an observational study that statin use was associated with an increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis. Our objective was to investigate whether a causal relationship could be established for this finding. Methods The mouse collagen type II (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) model was used, with immunization, challenge, and euthanasia at days 0, 21, and 42, respectively. Statins were given orally before (day -28 until day 21) or after (day 21 until day 42) CIA induction. Atorvastatin (0.2 mg/day) or pravastatin (0.8 mg/day) was administered. Arthritis was recorded three times a week. Serum anti-CII autoantibodies and cytokines in supernatants from Concanavalin-A-stimulated lymph node cells and CII-stimulated spleen cells were measured. Results Statin administration accelerated arthritis onset and resulted in 100% arthritic animals, whereas only seven out of 12 nonstatin control animals developed arthritis. Atorvastatin administration after CIA induction resulted in earlier onset than atorvastatin administration before induction, or than pravastatin administration before or after induction. The arthritic score of animals given pravastatin before CIA induction was similar to that of the nonstatin controls, whereas the other groups that received statins showed higher arthritic scores. Atorvastatin administration, especially before CIA induction, increased anti-CII autoantibody production. IL-2 and IL-17 production by lymph node and spleen cells was higher in CIA animals than in PBS

  18. Childhood Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita: Confirmation of Diagnosis by Skin Deficient in Type VII Collagen, Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay, and Immunoblotting

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Nupur; Rao, Raghavendra; Balachandran, C; Pai, Sathish; Bhogal, Balbir S; Schmidt, Enno; Zillikens, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is an acquired subepidermal bullous disorder characterized by autoantibodies against Type VII collagen. It usually affects adults; childhood EBA is rare. We describe a 10-year-old girl presenting with recurrent tense blisters predominantly on legs, dorsa of hands and feet accompanied by oral erosions since the age of 5 years. Direct immunofluorescence (IF) microscopy showed linear deposition of IgG and C3 along the basement membrane zone (BMZ); indirect IF microscopy on salt-split skin revealed staining of IgG to the dermal side of the split. The patient's serum did not show BMZ staining in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa skin deficient for Type VII collagen, thus confirming autoantibody reactivity against Type VII collagen. Circulating antibodies against the immunodominant noncollagenous 1 domain of Type VII collagen were detected by ELISA and immunoblotting studies. The patient was treated with oral corticosteroids and dapsone with good improvement. PMID:27293257

  19. Childhood Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita: Confirmation of Diagnosis by Skin Deficient in Type VII Collagen, Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay, and Immunoblotting.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Nupur; Rao, Raghavendra; Balachandran, C; Pai, Sathish; Bhogal, Balbir S; Schmidt, Enno; Zillikens, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is an acquired subepidermal bullous disorder characterized by autoantibodies against Type VII collagen. It usually affects adults; childhood EBA is rare. We describe a 10-year-old girl presenting with recurrent tense blisters predominantly on legs, dorsa of hands and feet accompanied by oral erosions since the age of 5 years. Direct immunofluorescence (IF) microscopy showed linear deposition of IgG and C3 along the basement membrane zone (BMZ); indirect IF microscopy on salt-split skin revealed staining of IgG to the dermal side of the split. The patient's serum did not show BMZ staining in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa skin deficient for Type VII collagen, thus confirming autoantibody reactivity against Type VII collagen. Circulating antibodies against the immunodominant noncollagenous 1 domain of Type VII collagen were detected by ELISA and immunoblotting studies. The patient was treated with oral corticosteroids and dapsone with good improvement. PMID:27293257

  20. Exercise prevents β-aminopropionitrile-induced morphological changes to type I collagen in murine bone

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Max A; Wallace, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of reduced enzymatic crosslinking, exercise and the ability of exercise to prevent the deleterious impact of reduced crosslinking on collagen D-spacing. Eight-week-old female mice were divided into four weight-matched groups receiving daily injections of either phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or 300 mg kg−1 β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN) while undergoing normal cage activity (Sed) or 30 min per day of treadmill exercise (Ex) for 21 consecutive days. BAPN caused a downward shift in the D-spacing distribution in Sed BAPN compared with Sed PBS (P<0.001) but not in Ex BAPN (P=0.429), indicating that exercise can prevent changes in collagen morphology caused by BAPN. Exercise had no effect on D-spacing in PBS control mice (P=0.726), which suggests that exercise-induced increases in lysyl oxidase may be a possible mechanism for preventing BAPN-induced changes in D-spacing. The D-spacing changes were accompanied by an increase in mineral crystallinity/maturity due to the main effect of BAPN (P=0.016). However, no changes in nanoindentation, reference point indentation or other Raman spectroscopy parameters were observed. The ability of exercise to rescue BAPN-driven changes in collagen morphology necessitates further research into the use of mechanical stimulation as a preventative therapy for collagen-based diseases. PMID:25798234

  1. Prevention of liver fibrosis by triple helix-forming oligodeoxyribonucleotides targeted to the promoter region of type I collagen gene.

    PubMed

    Koilan, Subramaniyan; Hamilton, David; Baburyan, Narina; Padala, Mythili K; Weber, Karl T; Guntaka, Ramareddy V

    2010-10-01

    Hepatic fibrosis leading to cirrhosis remains a global health problem. The most common etiologies are alcoholism and viral infections. Liver fibrosis is associated with major changes in both quantity and composition of extracellular matix and leads to disorganization of the liver architecture and irreversible damage to the liver function. As of now there is no effective therapy to control fibrosis. The end product of fibrosis is abnormal synthesis and accumulation of type I collagen in the extracellular matrix, which is produced by activated stellate or Ito cells in the damaged liver. Therefore, inhibition of transcription of type I collagen should in principle inhibit its production and accumulation in liver. Normally, DNA exists in a duplex form. However, under some circumstances, DNA can assume triple helical (triplex) structures. Intermolecular triplexes, formed by the addition of a sequence-specific third strand to the major groove of the duplex DNA, have the potential to serve as selective gene regulators. Earlier, we demonstrated efficient triplex formation between the exogenously added triplex-forming oligodeoxyribonucleotides (TFOs) and a specific sequence in the promoter region of the COL1A1 gene. In this study we used a rat model of liver fibrosis, induced by dimethylnitrosamine, to test whether these TFOs prevent liver fibrosis. Our results indicate that both the 25-mer and 18-mer TFOs, specific for the upstream nucleotide sequence from -141 to -165 (relative to the transcription start site) in the 5' end of collagen gene promoter, effectively prevented accumulation of liver collagen and fibrosis. We also observed improvement in liver function tests. However, mutations in the TFO that eliminated formation of triplexes are ineffective in preventing fibrosis. We believe that these TFOs can be used as potential antifibrotic therapeutic molecules. PMID:20818932

  2. Prevention of Liver Fibrosis by Triple Helix-Forming Oligodeoxyribonucleotides Targeted to the Promoter Region of Type I Collagen Gene

    PubMed Central

    Koilan, Subramaniyan; Hamilton, David; Baburyan, Narina; Padala, Mythili K.; Weber, Karl T.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis leading to cirrhosis remains a global health problem. The most common etiologies are alcoholism and viral infections. Liver fibrosis is associated with major changes in both quantity and composition of extracellular matix and leads to disorganization of the liver architecture and irreversible damage to the liver function. As of now there is no effective therapy to control fibrosis. The end product of fibrosis is abnormal synthesis and accumulation of type I collagen in the extracellular matrix, which is produced by activated stellate or Ito cells in the damaged liver. Therefore, inhibition of transcription of type I collagen should in principle inhibit its production and accumulation in liver. Normally, DNA exists in a duplex form. However, under some circumstances, DNA can assume triple helical (triplex) structures. Intermolecular triplexes, formed by the addition of a sequence-specific third strand to the major groove of the duplex DNA, have the potential to serve as selective gene regulators. Earlier, we demonstrated efficient triplex formation between the exogenously added triplex-forming oligodeoxyribonucleotides (TFOs) and a specific sequence in the promoter region of the COL1A1 gene. In this study we used a rat model of liver fibrosis, induced by dimethylnitrosamine, to test whether these TFOs prevent liver fibrosis. Our results indicate that both the 25-mer and 18-mer TFOs, specific for the upstream nucleotide sequence from −141 to −165 (relative to the transcription start site) in the 5′ end of collagen gene promoter, effectively prevented accumulation of liver collagen and fibrosis. We also observed improvement in liver function tests. However, mutations in the TFO that eliminated formation of triplexes are ineffective in preventing fibrosis. We believe that these TFOs can be used as potential antifibrotic therapeutic molecules. PMID:20818932

  3. Species Identification of Bovine, Ovine and Porcine Type 1 Collagen; Comparing Peptide Mass Fingerprinting and LC-Based Proteomics Methods

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is one of the most ubiquitous proteins in the animal kingdom and the dominant protein in extracellular tissues such as bone, skin and other connective tissues in which it acts primarily as a supporting scaffold. It has been widely investigated scientifically, not only as a biomedical material for regenerative medicine, but also for its role as a food source for both humans and livestock. Due to the long-term stability of collagen, as well as its abundance in bone, it has been proposed as a source of biomarkers for species identification not only for heat- and pressure-rendered animal feed but also in ancient archaeological and palaeontological specimens, typically carried out by peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) as well as in-depth liquid chromatography (LC)-based tandem mass spectrometric methods. Through the analysis of the three most common domesticates species, cow, sheep, and pig, this research investigates the advantages of each approach over the other, investigating sites of sequence variation with known functional properties of the collagen molecule. Results indicate that the previously identified species biomarkers through PMF analysis are not among the most variable type 1 collagen peptides present in these tissues, the latter of which can be detected by LC-based methods. However, it is clear that the highly repetitive sequence motif of collagen throughout the molecule, combined with the variability of the sites and relative abundance levels of hydroxylation, can result in high scoring false positive peptide matches using these LC-based methods. Additionally, the greater alpha 2(I) chain sequence variation, in comparison to the alpha 1(I) chain, did not appear to be specific to any particular functional properties, implying that intra-chain functional constraints on sequence variation are not as great as inter-chain constraints. However, although some of the most variable peptides were only observed in LC-based methods, until the range of

  4. Autoantibodies to Type VII Collagen Mediate Fcγ-Dependent Neutrophil Activation and Induce Dermal-Epidermal Separation in Cryosections of Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Sitaru, Cassian; Kromminga, Arno; Hashimoto, Takashi; Bröcker, Eva B.; Zillikens, Detlef

    2002-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita is an autoimmune subepidermal blistering disease associated with autoantibodies to type VII collagen, the major constituent of anchoring fibrils. Previous attempts to demonstrate the blister-inducing potential of autoantibodies to this protein have failed. To address this question, we used an in vitro model involving cryosections of human skin incubated with patients’ autoantibodies and leukocytes from healthy donors. We show that sera from 14 of 16 epidermolysis bullosa acquisita patients, in contrast to sera from healthy controls, induced dermal-epidermal separation in the cryosections. Recruitment and activation of neutrophils at the dermal-epidermal junction was necessary for split induction, whereas mononuclear cells were not required. Importantly, patients’ autoantibodies affinity-purified against a recombinant form of the noncollagenous 1 domain of type VII collagen retained their blister-inducing capacity in a dose-dependent manner, whereas patients’ IgG that was depleted of reactivity to type VII collagen lost this ability. Monoclonal antibody LH7.2 to the noncollagenous 1 domain of type VII collagen also induced subepidermal splits in the cryosections; F(ab′)2 fragments of autoantibodies to type VII collagen were not pathogenic. We demonstrate the capacity of autoantibodies to type VII collagen to trigger an Fcγ-dependent inflammation leading to split formation in cryosections of human skin. PMID:12107115

  5. The Activation of β1-integrin by Type I Collagen Coupling with the Hedgehog Pathway Promotes the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wanxing; Ma, Jiguang; Ma, Qingyong; Xu, Qinhong; Lei, Jianjun; Han, Liang; Li, Xuqi; Wang, Zheng; Wu, Zheng; Lv, Shifang; Ma, Zhenhua; Liu, Mouzhu; Wang, Fengfei; Wu, Erxi

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by the excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM), which is thought to contribute to this tumor's malignant behavior. However, the detailed mechanism and the contribution of excessive deposition of ECM in PDAC progression remain unclear. A better understanding of the mechanism involved in this process is essential for the design of new effective therapies. In this study, we demonstrated that pancreatic cancer cells exhibited increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis in response to type I collagen. In addition, PDAC cells exposed to type I collagen lost the expression of E-cadherin and increased expression of mesenchymal markers, including N-cadherin and vimentin. This epithelial- mesenchymal transition (EMT) was correlated with enhanced cell migration and invasiveness. Knockdown of β1-integrin abolished the effects induced by type I collagen, and further investigation revealed that type I collagen activates β1-integrin (marked by phosphorylation of β1 integrin downstream effectors, focal adhesion kinase [FAK], AKT, and ERK) accompanied by markedly up-regulation of Gli-1, a component of the Hedgehog (HH) pathway. Knockdown of Gli-1 reversed the effects of type I collagen on PDAC invasion and EMT. These results suggest that there is cross-talk between the β1-integrin signaling pathway and the HH pathway in pancreatic cancer and that activation of the HH pathway plays a key role in the type I collagen-induced effects on pancreatic cancer. PMID:24720337

  6. Hyperglycemic glucose concentrations up-regulate the expression of type VI collagen in vitro. Relevance to alterations of peripheral nerves in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    Muona, P.; Jaakkola, S.; Zhang, R. Z.; Pan, T. C.; Pelliniemi, L.; Risteli, L.; Chu, M. L.; Uitto, J.; Peltonen, J.

    1993-01-01

    Electron microscopy of peripheral nerves obtained from two diabetic patients revealed large deposits of microfibrils and the presence of Luse bodies in the vicinity of perineurial cells. Microfibrils were found to accumulate also in the sciatic nerves of diabetic BB rats; these microfibrillar deposits were shown to contain type VI collagen by immunoelectron microscopy. Connective tissue cells cultured from rat sciatic nerves were exposed to high glucose concentrations. High glucose concentrations up-regulated the mRNA steady-state levels of alpha 1(VI), alpha 2(VI), and alpha 3(VI) chains of type VI collagen and caused accumulation of type VI collagen-containing fibrils in the cultures. Immunostaining and in situ hybridizations demonstrated that perineurial cells, Schwann cells, and fibroblasts expressed type VI collagen at the mRNA and protein levels. The results suggest that the turnover and supramolecular assembly of type VI collagen are perturbed in diabetic nerves and that glucose per se increases the expression of type VI collagen in vitro. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8494053

  7. Pirfenidone inhibits TGF-β1-induced over-expression of collagen type I and heat shock protein 47 in A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pirfenidone is a novel anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory agent that inhibits the progression of fibrosis in animal models and in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). We previously showed that pirfenidone inhibits the over-expression of collagen type I and of heat shock protein (HSP) 47, a collagen-specific molecular chaperone, in human lung fibroblasts stimulated with transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 in vitro. The increased numbers of HSP47-positive type II pneumocytes as well as fibroblasts were also diminished by pirfenidone in an animal model of pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin. The present study evaluates the effects of pirfenidone on collagen type I and HSP47 expression in the human alveolar epithelial cell line, A549 cells in vitro. Methods The expression of collagen type I, HSP47 and E-cadherin mRNAs in A549 cells stimulated with TGF-β1 was evaluated by Northern blotting or real-time PCR. The expression of collagen type I, HSP47 and fibronectin proteins was assessed by immunocytochemical staining. Results TGF-β1 stimulated collagen type I and HSP47 mRNA and protein expression in A549 cells, and pirfenidone significantly inhibited this process. Pirfenidone also inhibited over-expression of the fibroblast phenotypic marker fibronectin in A549 cells induced by TGF-β1. Conclusion We concluded that the anti-fibrotic effects of pirfenidone might be mediated not only through the direct inhibition of collagen type I expression but also through the inhibition of HSP47 expression in alveolar epithelial cells, which results in reduced collagen synthesis in lung fibrosis. Furthermore, pirfenidone might partially inhibit the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PMID:22694981

  8. Increased skin collagen extractability and proportions of collagen type III are not normalized after 6 months healing of human excisional wounds.

    PubMed

    Robins, Simon P; Milne, George; Duncan, Alexander; Davies, Claire; Butt, Richard; Greiling, Doris; James, Ian T

    2003-08-01

    In an attempt to identify potential staging markers of effective healing, changes in connective tissue properties were measured in a human skin excisional wound healing model in which tissue was re-excised at intervals up to 6 months after injury. The proportion of collagen III relative to collagen I increased significantly (p<0.001) up to 6 weeks after initial injury and remained elevated up to 6 months, at which time the proportion of collagen III was 70% above baseline values. Extractability of biopsy tissue collagen by pepsin increased significantly throughout the study (baseline, 32.8+/-6.8%; 6 months, 89.1+/-8.9%), with inverse changes in the mature skin cross-link, histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (baseline, 1.18+/-0.11 mol/mol collagen; 6 months, 0.27+/-0.09 mol/mol collagen). Pyridinoline content increased over the period of the study, although remaining at relatively low concentrations (baseline, 0.037+/-0.011; 6 months, 0.063+/-0.014 mol/mol collagen), and the pyridinoline/deoxypyridinoline ratio was significantly higher (baseline, 3.5+/-0.6; 6 months, 10.3+/-2.2). Elastin content, measured as desmosine cross-links, decreased significantly in the first 3 weeks and continued to decline over the period of study. Overall, the data suggest that remodeling of the wound tissue continues at least up to 6 months after injury. The close inverse correlation between histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine concentrations and extractability by pepsin (r2=0.89, p<0.0001) suggests a causal relationship, consistent with the likely effects of a substantial network of mature, inter-helical bonds in collagen. PMID:12880417

  9. siRNA knockdown of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 in keloid fibroblasts leads to degradation of collagen type I.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Masayo; Miyake, Koichi; Ogawa, Rei; Dohi, Teruyuki; Akaishi, Satoshi; Hyakusoku, Hiko; Shimada, Takashi

    2014-03-01

    Keloids are defined as overgrowths of scar tissue resulting from abnormal wound healing. They are characterized by excessive dermal deposition of thick, hyalinized collagen bundles resulting from an imbalance between the production and degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) are two important regulators of ECM degradation and remodeling. To evaluate the role played by knockdown of TIMPs in keloid formation, we transduced human keloid-derived fibroblasts (KFs) with small interfering RNAs targeting TIMP-1 or -2 (siTIMP-1 or siTIMP-2) using a lentiviral vector and assessed the biological effects. We found that MMP-1/TIMP-1 and MMP-1/TIMP-2 complexes were suppressed and that MMP-2 activity was upregulated in KFs expressing siTIMP-1 or siTIMP-2. In addition, increased degradation of collagen type I was observed in the supernatant of KFs expressing siTIMP-1, but not siTIMP-2, with the suppression of cell viability and induction of apoptosis. These results suggest that targeting TIMP-1 using small interfering RNA has significant therapeutic potential as an approach to treating keloids through degradation of their thick collagen bundles. PMID:24042342

  10. Aggrecan nanoscale solid-fluid interactions are a primary determinant of cartilage dynamic mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Nia, Hadi Tavakoli; Han, Lin; Bozchalooi, Iman Soltani; Roughley, Peter; Youcef-Toumi, Kamal; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Ortiz, Christine

    2015-03-24

    Poroelastic interactions between interstitial fluid and the extracellular matrix of connective tissues are critical to biological and pathophysiological functions involving solute transport, energy dissipation, self-stiffening and lubrication. However, the molecular origins of poroelasticity at the nanoscale are largely unknown. Here, the broad-spectrum dynamic nanomechanical behavior of cartilage aggrecan monolayer is revealed for the first time, including the equilibrium and instantaneous moduli and the peak in the phase angle of the complex modulus. By performing a length scale study and comparing the experimental results to theoretical predictions, we confirm that the mechanism underlying the observed dynamic nanomechanics is due to solid-fluid interactions (poroelasticity) at the molecular scale. Utilizing finite element modeling, the molecular-scale hydraulic permeability of the aggrecan assembly was quantified (kaggrecan = (4.8 ± 2.8) × 10(-15) m(4)/N·s) and found to be similar to the nanoscale hydraulic permeability of intact normal cartilage tissue but much lower than that of early diseased tissue. The mechanisms underlying aggrecan poroelasticity were further investigated by altering electrostatic interactions between the molecule's constituent glycosaminoglycan chains: electrostatic interactions dominated steric interactions in governing molecular behavior. While the hydraulic permeability of aggrecan layers does not change across species and age, aggrecan from adult human cartilage is stiffer than the aggrecan from newborn human tissue. PMID:25758717

  11. Effects of hydroxycamptothecin on the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), tissue inhibitor of MMP-1, and type I collagen in rats with pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hu, G-X; Yao, S-T; Zeng, L-H; Peng, Y-Z; Zheng, J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) on the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), tissue inhibitor of MMP-1 (TIMP-1), and type I collagen in the lung tissue of rats with pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin A5. We used hematoxylin eosin staining to observe the degree of pulmonary fibrosis in rats; Masson staining, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry were used to observe the expression of collagen, MMP-1, and TIMP-1, and type I collagen. The expression of MMP-1 in the model group decreased significantly, while the expression of TIMP-1 and type I collagen significantly increased. After treatment with HCPT, the degree of pulmonary fibrosis and the expression of TIMP-1 and type I collagen decreased in all treatment groups. However, the expression of MMP-1 increased in a dose-dependent manner. Our results showed that HCPT decreased the pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin A5 in rats, and an increase in MMP-1 expression and decrease in the TIMP-1 and type I collagen expression may be the mechanism that regulates the metabolism of the extracellular matrix. PMID:25966236

  12. Hemocyte-Secreted Type IV Collagen Enhances BMP Signaling to Guide Renal Tubule Morphogenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Bunt, Stephanie; Hooley, Clare; Hu, Nan; Scahill, Catherine; Weavers, Helen; Skaer, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Summary Details of the mechanisms that determine the shape and positioning of organs in the body cavity remain largely obscure. We show that stereotypic positioning of outgrowing Drosophila renal tubules depends on signaling in a subset of tubule cells and results from enhanced sensitivity to guidance signals by targeted matrix deposition. VEGF/PDGF ligands from the tubules attract hemocytes, which secrete components of the basement membrane to ensheath them. Collagen IV sensitizes tubule cells to localized BMP guidance cues. Signaling results in pathway activation in a subset of tubule cells that lead outgrowth through the body cavity. Failure of hemocyte migration, loss of collagen IV, or abrogation of BMP signaling results in tubule misrouting and defective organ shape and positioning. Such regulated interplay between cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions is likely to have wide relevance in organogenesis and congenital disease. PMID:20708591

  13. New index for the stability of a type I collagen affected by hydrophobic environment.

    PubMed

    Nezu, Takashi; Morikawa, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Kaori; Saitoh, Setsuo; Taira, Masayuki; Terada, Yoshihiro; Araki, Yoshima

    2007-05-01

    Effects of hydrophobic environment adjusted by various alcohols on the structural stability of calfskin collagen (CSC) were studied to elucidate the nature of collagen-monomer interaction in adhesion. The stability of CSC in aqueous alcohol solutions was represented by its denaturation temperature, Td, measured by DSC. The hydrophobicity of the alcohol solutions was quantified with their specific dielectric constants, epsilon(r), calculated from their concentrations. The effect of each alcohol to stabilize or destabilize CSC was evaluated by the initial slope of each Td vs. epsilon(r) plot, denoted as -(dTd/d epsilon(r))ini and termed as stabilization power. Results showed that a hydrophobic environment with a smaller epsilon(r) lowered the stabilization power. Stabilization power ranged from -3 (strong destabilization) for phenol (epsilon(r) =12) to +0.3 (weak stabilization) for glycerol (epsilon(r)=47). In view of the encouraging results obtained in this study, the new index was therefore helpful in predicting the effects of new dental materials of known epsilon(r) values on the stability of dentinal collagen. PMID:17694747

  14. Incidence and specificity of antibodies to types I, II, III, IV, and V collagen in rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases as measured by 125I-radioimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, J.M.; Huffstutter, E.H.; Townes, A.S.; Kang, A.H.

    1983-07-01

    Antibodies to human native and denatured types I, II, III, IV, and V collagens were measured using 125I-radioimmunoassay. Mean levels of binding by sera from 30 rheumatoid arthritis patients were significantly higher than those from 20 normal subjects against all of the collagens tested. The relative antibody concentration was higher in synovial fluid than in simultaneously obtained serum. Many patients with gout or various other rheumatic diseases also had detectable anticollagen antibodies. With a few notable exceptions, the majority of the reactivity detected in all patient groups was directed against covalent structural determinants present on all of the denatured collagens, suggesting a secondary reaction to tissue injury.

  15. Abnormal Type I Collagen Post-translational Modification and Crosslinking in a Cyclophilin B KO Mouse Model of Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Wayne A.; Perdivara, Irina; Weis, MaryAnn; Terajima, Masahiko; Blissett, Angela R.; Chang, Weizhong; Perosky, Joseph E.; Makareeva, Elena N.; Mertz, Edward L.; Leikin, Sergey; Tomer, Kenneth B.; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Eyre, David R.; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Marini, Joan C.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclophilin B (CyPB), encoded by PPIB, is an ER-resident peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) that functions independently and as a component of the collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation complex. CyPB is proposed to be the major PPIase catalyzing the rate-limiting step in collagen folding. Mutations in PPIB cause recessively inherited osteogenesis imperfecta type IX, a moderately severe to lethal bone dysplasia. To investigate the role of CyPB in collagen folding and post-translational modifications, we generated Ppib−/− mice that recapitulate the OI phenotype. Knock-out (KO) mice are small, with reduced femoral areal bone mineral density (aBMD), bone volume per total volume (BV/TV) and mechanical properties, as well as increased femoral brittleness. Ppib transcripts are absent in skin, fibroblasts, femora and calvarial osteoblasts, and CyPB is absent from KO osteoblasts and fibroblasts on western blots. Only residual (2–11%) collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation is detectable in KO cells and tissues. Collagen folds more slowly in the absence of CyPB, supporting its rate-limiting role in folding. However, treatment of KO cells with cyclosporine A causes further delay in folding, indicating the potential existence of another collagen PPIase. We confirmed and extended the reported role of CyPB in supporting collagen lysyl hydroxylase (LH1) activity. Ppib−/− fibroblast and osteoblast collagen has normal total lysyl hydroxylation, while increased collagen diglycosylation is observed. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis of bone and osteoblast type I collagen revealed site-specific alterations of helical lysine hydroxylation, in particular, significantly reduced hydroxylation of helical crosslinking residue K87. Consequently, underhydroxylated forms of di- and trivalent crosslinks are strikingly increased in KO bone, leading to increased total crosslinks and decreased helical hydroxylysine- to lysine-derived crosslink ratios. The altered

  16. Megakaryocytes contribute to the bone marrow-matrix environment by expressing fibronectin, type IV collagen and laminin

    PubMed Central

    Malara, Alessandro; Currao, Manuela; Gruppi, Cristian; Celesti, Giuseppe; Viarengo, Gianluca; Buracchi, Chiara; Laghi, Luigi; Kaplan, David L.; Balduini, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Megakaryocytes associate with the bone marrow vasculature where they convert their cytoplasm into proplatelets that protrude through the vascular endothelium into the lumen and release platelets. The extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironment plays a critical role in regulating these processes. In this work we demonstrate that, among bone marrow ECM components, fibronectin, type IV collagen and laminin are the most abundant around bone marrow sinusoids and constitute a peri-cellular matrix surrounding megakaryocytes. Most importantly, we report, for the first time, that megakaryocytes express components of the basement membrane and that these molecules contribute to the regulation of megakaryocyte development and bone marrow ECM homeostasis both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, fibronectin induced a three-fold increase in the proliferation rate of mouse hematopoietic stem cells leading to higher megakaryocyte output with respect to cells treated only with thrombopoietin or other matrices. However, megakaryocyte ploidy level in fibronectin-treated cultures was significantly reduced. Stimulation with type IV collagen resulted in a 1.4-fold increase in megakaryocyte output, while all tested matrices supported proplatelet formation to a similar extent in megakaryocytes derived from fetal liver progenitor cells. In vivo, megakaryocyte expression of fibronectin and basement membrane components was up-regulated during bone marrow reconstitution upon 5-fluorouracil induced myelosuppression, while only type IV collagen resulted up-regulated upon induced thrombocytopenia. In conclusion, this work demonstrates that ECM components impact megakaryocyte behavior differently during their differentiation and highlights a new role for megakaryocyte as ECM-producing cells for the establishment of cell niches during bone marrow regeneration. PMID:24357118

  17. Proteinuria in passive Heymann nephritis is associated with lipid peroxidation and formation of adducts on type IV collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Neale, T J; Ojha, P P; Exner, M; Poczewski, H; Rüger, B; Witztum, J L; Davis, P; Kerjaschki, D

    1994-01-01

    Passive Heymann nephritis (PHN) is a model of human membranous nephropathy that is characterized by formation of granular subepithelial immune deposits in the glomerular capillary wall which results in complement activation. This is causally related to damage of the filtration barrier and subsequent proteinuria. The local accumulation of injurious reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a major effector mechanism in PHN. ROS may induce tissue damage by initiating lipid peroxidation (LPO). In turn, this leads to adduct formation between breakdown products of LPO with structural proteins, such as formation of malondialdehyde (MDA) or 4-hydroxynonenal-lysine adducts. To examine the role of LPO in the development of proteinuria we have localized MDA and 4-hydroxynonenal-lysine adducts in glomeruli of PHN rats by immunofluorescence microscopy, using specific monoclonal antibodies. By immunogold electron microscopy, MDA adducts were localized to cytoplasmic vesicles and cell membranes of glomerular epithelial cells, to the glomerular basement membrane (GBM), and also to immune deposits. Type IV collagen was specifically identified as being modified by MDA adducts, using a variety of techniques. Collagenase pretreatment of GBM extracts indicated that the NC-1 domain of type IV collagen was a site of adduct formation. When LPO was inhibited by pretreatment of PHN rats with the antioxidant probucol, proteinuria was reduced by approximately 85%, and glomerular immunostaining for dialdehyde adducts was markedly reduced, even though the formation of immune deposits was not affected. By contrast, lowering of the serum cholesterol levels had no influence on the development of proteinuria. These findings are consistent with the premise that ROS-induced glomerular injury in PHN involves LPO and that this results not only in damage of cell membranes but in modification of type IV collagen in the GBM as well. The close temporal correlation of the occurrence of LPO with proteinuria and the

  18. Construction and Characterization of Mutations within the Klebsiella mrkD1P Gene That Affect Binding to Collagen Type V

    PubMed Central

    Sebghati, Tricia A.; Clegg, Steven

    1999-01-01

    The fimbria-associated MrkD1P protein mediates adherence of type 3 fimbriate strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae to collagen type V. Currently, three different MrkD adhesins have been described in Klebsiella species, and each possesses a distinctive binding pattern. Therefore, the binding abilities of mutants possessing defined mutations within the mrkD1P gene were examined in order to determine whether specific regions of the adhesin molecule were responsible for collagen binding. Both site-directed and chemically induced mutations were constructed within mrkD1P, and the ability of the gene products to be incorporated into fimbrial appendages or bind to collagen was determined. Binding to type V collagen was not associated solely with one particular region of the MrkD1P protein, and two classes of nonadhesive mutants were isolated. In one class of mutants, the MrkD adhesin was not assembled into the fimbrial shaft, whereas in the second class of mutants, the adhesin was associated with fimbriae but did not bind to collagen. Both hemagglutinating and collagen-binding activities were associated with the MrkD1P molecule, since P pili and type 3 fimbriae carrying adhesive MrkD proteins exhibited identical binding properties. PMID:10085002

  19. Serum enzymes of collagen synthesis and type III procollagen amino-propeptide in Nigerian patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Bolarin, M

    1986-07-01

    Serum immunoreactive prolyl hydroxylase protein, galactosylhydroxylysyl glucosyltransferase activity and the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen were measured in 20 patients with sickle cell disease and the values were compared with those in 20 apparently healthy Nigerians. The means for the two enzymes and serum aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen were significantly higher in the sickle cell disease patients. Significant correlations were found between the values for the two enzymes and the protein serum aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen within the sickle cell disease patients. The data confirm that collagen formation is found in the liver, bone and other organs of patients with this disease. The measurement of serum immunoreactive prolyl hydroxylase protein, serum galactosylhydroxylysyl glucosyltransferase activity and serum aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen in prospective studies might be helpful in predicting hepatic, bone or diffuse fibrogenesis in sickle cell disease. PMID:3016143

  20. Identification and Evaluation of Cryoprotective Peptides from Chicken Collagen: Ice-Growth Inhibition Activity Compared to That of Type I Antifreeze Proteins in Sucrose Model Systems.

    PubMed

    Du, Lihui; Betti, Mirko

    2016-06-29

    The ability of chicken collagen peptides to inhibit the growth of ice crystals was evaluated and compared to that of fish antifreeze proteins (AFPs). This ice inhibition activity was assessed using a polarized microscope by measuring ice crystal dimensions in a sucrose model system with and without collagen peptides after seven thermal cycles. The system was stabilized at -25 °C and cycled between -16 and -12 °C. Five candidate peptides with ice inhibition activity were identified using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry and were then synthesized. Their ice inhibition capacity was compared to that of type I AFPs in a 23% sucrose model system. Specific collagen peptides with certain amino acid sequences reduced the extent of ice growth by approximately 70% at a relatively low concentration (1 mg/mL). These results suggest that specific collagen peptides may act in a noncolligative manner, inhibiting ice crystal growth like type I AFPs, but less efficiently. PMID:27293017

  1. Gene encoding the collagen type I and thrombospondin receptor CD36 is located on chromosome 7q11. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Ruiz, E.; Armesilla, A.L.; Sanchez-Madrid, F.; Vega, M.A. )

    1993-09-01

    The human CD36 is a member of a gene family of structurally related glycoproteins and functions as a receptor for collagen type I and thrombospondin. CD36 also binds to red blood cells infected with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. In the present study, the CD36 gene was assigned to chromosome 7 by using the polymerase chain reaction with DNA from human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. Furthermore, the use of a CD36 genomic probe has allowed the localization of the CD36 locus to the 7q11.2 band by fluorescence in situ hybridization coupled with GTG-banding. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  2. The absence of type II collagen and changes in proteoglycan structure of hyaline cartilage in a case of Langer-Saldino achondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Feshchenko, S P; Rebrin, I A; Sokolnik, V P; Sher, B M; Sokolov, B P; Kalinin, V N; Lazjuk, G I

    1989-04-01

    Structural analysis of hyaline cartilage extracellular matrix components from the ribs and knee joint of a stillborn female with type II achondrogenesis was carried out. The absence of type II collagen, a decrease in the amount of proteoglycans (PG), and structural changes in PG, namely, increased electrophoretic mobility of PG, lower relative content of chondroitin 4-sulfate (Ch4-S), lower molecular weight and decreased total chondroitin sulfate (ChS) sulfation, were detected. Increased amounts of type I and type III collagens, atypical for hyaline cartilage, were revealed. Among the link proteins (LPs), a large protein with a mol. wt. of 48 kDa was predominant. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of the pathogenesis of achondrogenesis ("chondrogenesis imperfecta") are discussed. The data obtained suggest that the primary defect in type II achondrogenesis involves ChS or type II collagen synthesis. PMID:2714779

  3. Comparative evaluation of envelope type of advanced flap with and without type I collagen membrane (NEOMEM™) in the treatment of multiple buccal gingival recession defects: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Priyanka; Gupta, Harinder

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to compare and evaluate the clinical outcome of the envelope-type of coronally advanced flap (CAF) alone versus envelope type of coronally advanced flap plus type I collagen membrane (NEOMEM) in the treatment of multiple buccal gingival recessions, using the split mouth study. Materials and Methods: Ten patients in the age group of 20-50 years showing bilateral gingival recessions were treated. The defects in each patient were randomly assigned as Group A, which were treated with the envelope type of CAF, and those in Group B were treated with envelope type of CAF along with the Type I collagen membrane (NEOMEM). The recession depth (RD), probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), and width of the keratinized tissue (KT) were measured at baseline, at three and six month intervals. Results: Forty-six Miller's class I and II gingival recessions were treated. In the CAF + Type I collagen membrane (NEOMEM)-treated (Group B) sites the baseline gingival recession was 2.34 ± 0.48 mm, while in the CAFtreated (Group A) sites it was 2.52 ± 0.84 mm. Both the treatments resulted in significant recession depth reduction (P < 0.001), but the reduction was significantly greater (P < 0.01) for Group B than Group A. The probing depth changes were significant (P < 0.01) for both groups, but the difference was nonsignificant. Similarly, a significant gain of CAL was seen in Group B (2.23 ± 0.75 mm, P < 0.001) as well as in group A (1.60 ± 0.86 mm, P < 0.001) showing a significant difference (P < 0.01) between the two groups. The width of keratinized tissue was also significantly (P < 0.001) increased in both groups, but the increase was significantly greater (P < 0.001) in group B (2.30 ± 1.06 mm) than in group A (1.21 ± 0.67 mm). Conclusion: The envelope type of CAF along with Type I collagen membrane (NEOMEM) was more effective than envelope type of CAF alone, in producing root coverage in multiple gingival recession defects

  4. Multi-Hierarchical Self-Assembly of Collagen Mimetic Peptides into AAB Type Heterotrimers, Nanofibers and Hydrogels Driven by Charged Pair Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Leary, Lesley Russell

    2011-12-01

    Replicating the multi-hierarchical self-assembly of collagen (peptide chain to triple helix to nanofiber and, finally, to a hydrogel) has long attracted scientists, both from the fundamental science perspective of supramolecular chemistry and for the potential biomedical applications perceived in tissue engineering. In terms of triple helical formation, collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body with at least 28 types, yet research involving collagen mimetic systems has only recently began to consider the innate ability of collagen to control helix composition and register. Collagen triple helices can be homotrimeric or heterotrimeric and while some types of natural collagen form only one specific composition of helix, others can form multiple. It is critical to fully understand and, if possible, reproduce the control that native collagen has on helix composition and register. In terms of nanofiber formation, many approaches to drive the self-assembly of synthetic systems through the same steps as natural collagen have been partially successful, but none have simultaneously demonstrated all levels of structural assembly. In this work, advancements in the ability to control helix composition and replicate the multi-hierarchical assembly of collagen are described. Both positive and negative design for the assembly of AAB type collagen heterotrimers were utilized by promoting heterotrimer formation though the use of charged amino acids to form intra-helix electrostatic interactions, while simultaneously discouraging homotrimers, resulting in the identification of multiple peptide systems with full control over the composition of the resulting triple helix. Similar salt-bridged hydrogen bonds between charged residues were incorporated into nanofiber forming peptides, one of which successfully assembled into sticky-ended triple helices, nanofibers with characteristic triple helical packing visible in the solution state, and strong hydrogels that are

  5. Differential expression of human lysyl hydroxylase genes, lysine hydroxylation, and cross-linking of type I collagen during osteoblastic differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Uzawa, K; Grzesik, W J; Nishiura, T; Kuznetsov, S A; Robey, P G; Brenner, D A; Yamauchi, M

    1999-08-01

    The pattern of lysyl hydroxylation in the nontriple helical domains of collagen is critical in determining the cross-linking pathways that are tissue specific. We hypothesized that the tissue specificity of type I collagen cross-linking is, in part, due to the differential expression of lysyl hydroxylase genes (Procollagen-lysine,2-oxyglutarate,5-dioxygenase 1, 2, and 3 [PLOD1, PLOD2, and PLOD3]). In this study, we have examined the expression patterns of these three genes during the course of in vitro differentiation of human osteoprogenitor cells (bone marrow stromal cells [BMSCs]) and normal skin fibroblasts (NSFs). In addition, using the medium and cell layer/matrix fractions in these cultures, lysine hydroxylation of type I collagen alpha chains and collagen cross-linking chemistries have been characterized. High levels of PLOD1 and PLOD3 genes were expressed in both BMSCs and NSFs, and the expression levels did not change in the course of differentiation. In contrast to the PLOD1 and PLOD3 genes, both cell types showed low PLOD2 gene expression in undifferentiated and early differentiated conditions. However, fully differentiated BMSCs, but not NSFs, exhibited a significantly elevated level (6-fold increase) of PLOD2 mRNA. This increase coincided with the onset of matrix mineralization and with the increase in lysyl hydroxylation in the nontriple helical domains of alpha chains of type I collagen molecule. Furthermore, the collagen cross-links that are derived from the nontriple helical hydroxylysine-aldehyde were found only in fully differentiated BMSC cultures. The data suggests that PLOD2 expression is associated with lysine hydroxylation in the nontriple helical domains of collagen and, thus, could be partially responsible for the tissue-specific collagen cross-linking pattern. PMID:10457259

  6. Differential expression of human lysyl hydroxylase genes, lysine hydroxylation, and cross-linking of type I collagen during osteoblastic differentiation in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uzawa, K.; Grzesik, W. J.; Nishiura, T.; Kuznetsov, S. A.; Robey, P. G.; Brenner, D. A.; Yamauchi, M.

    1999-01-01

    The pattern of lysyl hydroxylation in the nontriple helical domains of collagen is critical in determining the cross-linking pathways that are tissue specific. We hypothesized that the tissue specificity of type I collagen cross-linking is, in part, due to the differential expression of lysyl hydroxylase genes (Procollagen-lysine,2-oxyglutarate,5-dioxygenase 1, 2, and 3 [PLOD1, PLOD2, and PLOD3]). In this study, we have examined the expression patterns of these three genes during the course of in vitro differentiation of human osteoprogenitor cells (bone marrow stromal cells [BMSCs]) and normal skin fibroblasts (NSFs). In addition, using the medium and cell layer/matrix fractions in these cultures, lysine hydroxylation of type I collagen alpha chains and collagen cross-linking chemistries have been characterized. High levels of PLOD1 and PLOD3 genes were expressed in both BMSCs and NSFs, and the expression levels did not change in the course of differentiation. In contrast to the PLOD1 and PLOD3 genes, both cell types showed low PLOD2 gene expression in undifferentiated and early differentiated conditions. However, fully differentiated BMSCs, but not NSFs, exhibited a significantly elevated level (6-fold increase) of PLOD2 mRNA. This increase coincided with the onset of matrix mineralization and with the increase in lysyl hydroxylation in the nontriple helical domains of alpha chains of type I collagen molecule. Furthermore, the collagen cross-links that are derived from the nontriple helical hydroxylysine-aldehyde were found only in fully differentiated BMSC cultures. The data suggests that PLOD2 expression is associated with lysine hydroxylation in the nontriple helical domains of collagen and, thus, could be partially responsible for the tissue-specific collagen cross-linking pattern.

  7. Enigmatic insight into collagen.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen. PMID:27601823

  8. Enigmatic insight into collagen

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen. PMID:27601823

  9. Biomimetic Intrafibrillar Mineralization of Type I Collagen with Intermediate Precursors-loaded Mesoporous Carriers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Luo, Xiao-juan; Niu, Li-na; Yang, Hong-ye; Yiu, Cynthia K Y; Wang, Tian-da; Zhou, Li-qun; Mao, Jing; Huang, Cui; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2015-01-01

    Limited continuous replenishment of the mineralization medium is a restriction for in-situ solution-based remineralization of hypomineralized body tissues. Here, we report a process that generated amine-functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles for sustained release of biomimetic analog-stabilized amorphous calcium phosphate precursors. Both two-dimensional and three-dimensional collagen models can be intrafibrillarly mineralized with these released fluidic intermediate precursors. This represents an important advance in the translation of biomineralization concepts into regimes for in-situ remineralization of bone and teeth. PMID:26053330

  10. Biomimetic Intrafibrillar Mineralization of Type I Collagen with Intermediate Precursors-loaded Mesoporous Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Luo, Xiao-juan; Niu, Li-na; Yang, Hong-ye; Yiu, Cynthia K.Y.; Wang, Tian-da; Zhou, Li-qun; Mao, Jing; Huang, Cui; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2015-01-01

    Limited continuous replenishment of the mineralization medium is a restriction for in-situ solution-based remineralization of hypomineralized body tissues. Here, we report a process that generated amine-functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles for sustained release of biomimetic analog-stabilized amorphous calcium phosphate precursors. Both two-dimensional and three-dimensional collagen models can be intrafibrillarly mineralized with these released fluidic intermediate precursors. This represents an important advance in the translation of biomineralization concepts into regimes for in-situ remineralization of bone and teeth. PMID:26053330

  11. Skin Collagen Glycation, Glycoxidation, and Crosslinking Are Lower in Subjects With Long-Term Intensive Versus Conventional Therapy of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Monnier, Vincent M.; Bautista, Oliver; Kenny, David; Sell, David R.; Fogarty, John; Dahms, William; Cleary, Patricia A.; Lachin, John; Genuth, Saul

    2010-01-01

    The relationships between long-term intensive control of glycemia and indicators of skin collagen glycation (furosine), glycoxidation (pentosidine and N∊-[carboxymethyl]-lysine [CML]), and crosslinking (acid and pepsin solubility) were examined in 216 patients with type 1 diabetes from the primary prevention and secondary intervention cohorts of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial. By comparison with conventional treatment, 5 years of intensive treatment was associated with 30–32% lower furosine, 9% lower pentosidine, 9–13% lower CML, 24% higher acid-soluble collagen, and 50% higher pepsin-soluble collagen. All of these differences were statistically significant in the subjects of the primary prevention cohort (P < 0 .006–0.001) and also of the secondary intervention cohort (P < 0.015–0.001) with the exception of CML and acid-soluble collagen. Age- and duration-adjusted collagen variables were significantly associated with the HbA1c value nearest the biopsy and with cumulative prior HbA1c values. Multiple logistic regression analyses with six nonredundant collagen parameters as independent variables and various expressions of retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy outcomes as dependent variables showed that the complications were significantly associated with the full set of collagen variables. Surprisingly, the percentage of total variance (R2) in complications explained by the collagen variables ranged from 19 to 36% with the intensive treatment and from 14 to 51% with conventional treatment. These associations generally remained significant even after adjustment for HbA1c, and, most unexpectedly, in conventionally treated subjects, glycated collagen was the parameter most consistently associated with diabetic complications. Continued monitoring of these subjects may determine whether glycation products in the skin, and especially the early Amadori product (furosine), have the potential to be predictors of the future risk of developing

  12. Kynurenine Modulates MMP-1 and Type-I Collagen Expression Via Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation in Dermal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Poormasjedi-Meibod, Malihe-Sadat; Salimi Elizei, Sanam; Leung, Victor; Baradar Jalili, Reza; Ko, Frank; Ghahary, Aziz

    2016-12-01

    Dermal fibrosis is characterized by a high deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) and tissue cellularity. Unfortunately all means of treating this condition are unsatisfactory. We have previously reported the anti-fibrotic effects of Kynurenine (Kyn), a tryptophan metabolite, in fibrotic rabbit ear model. Here, we report the mechanism by which Kyn modulates the expression of key ECM components in dermal fibroblasts. The results showed that Kyn activates aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) nuclear translocation and up-regulates cytochrome-P450 (CYP1A-1) expression, the AHR target gene. A specific AHR antagonist, 6,2',4'-trimethoxyflavone, inhibited the Kyn-dependent modulation of CYP1A-1, MMP-1, and type-I collagen expression. Establishing the anti-fibrogenic effect of Kyn and its mechanism of action, we then developed nano-fibrous Kyn slow-releasing dressings and examined their anti-fibrotic efficacy in vitro and in a rat model. Our results showed the feasibility of incorporating Kyn into PVA/PLGA nanofibers, prolonging the Kyn release up to 4 days tested. Application of medicated-dressings significantly improved the dermal fibrosis indicated by MMP-1 induction, alpha-smooth muscle actin and type-I collagen suppression, and reduced tissue cellularity, T-cells and myofibroblasts. This study clarifies the mechanism by which Kyn modulates ECM expression and reports the development of a new slow-releasing anti-fibrogenic dressing. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2749-2760, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26992058

  13. Overexpression of HMGA2-LPP fusion transcripts promotes expression of the {alpha} 2 type XI collagen gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Takahiro; Matsui, Yoshito . E-mail: ymatsui@sb4.so-net.ne.jp; Goto, Tomohiro; Yukata, Kiminori; Yasui, Natsuo

    2006-02-10

    In a subset of human lipomas, a specific t (3; 12) chromosome translocation gives rise to HMGA2-LPP fusion protein, containing the amino (N)-terminal DNA binding domains of HMGA2 fused to the carboxyl (C)-terminal LIM domains of LPP. In addition to its role in adipogenesis, several observations suggest that HMGA2-LPP is linked to chondrogenesis. Here, we analyzed whether HMGA2-LPP promotes chondrogenic differentiation, a marker of which is transactivation of the {alpha} 2 type XI collagen gene (Col11a2). Real-time PCR analysis showed that HMGA2-LPP and COL11A2 were co-expressed. Luciferase assay demonstrated that either of HMGA2-LPP, wild-type HMGA2 or the N-terminal HMGA2 transactivated the Col11a2 promoter in HeLa cells, while the C-terminal LPP did not. RT-PCR analysis revealed that HMGA2-LPP transcripts in lipomas with the fusion were 591-fold of full-length HMGA2 transcripts in lipomas without the fusion. These results indicate that in vivo overexpression of HMGA2-LPP promotes chondrogenesis by upregulating cartilage-specific collagen gene expression through the N-terminal DNA binding domains.

  14. Bone marrow stromal cells enhance prostate cancer cell invasion through type I collagen in an MMP-12 dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Nabha, Sanaa M.; dos Santos, Emanuel Burck; Yamamoto, Hamilto A.; Belizi, Abdelfettah; Dong, Zhong; Meng, Hong; Saliganan, Allen; Sabbota, Aaron; Bonfil, R. Daniel; Cher, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    At the cellular level, the process of bone metastasis involves many steps. Circulating cancer cells enter the marrow, proliferate, induce neovascularization, and ultimately expand into a clinically detectable, often symptomatic, metastatic deposit. Although the initial establishment and later expansion of the metastatic deposit in bone require tumor cells to possess invasive capability, the exact proteases responsible for this phenotype are not well known. The objective of our study was to take an unbiased approach to determine which proteases were expressed and functional during the initial interactions between prostate cancer cells and bone marrow stromal (BMS) cells. We found that the combination of human prostate cancer PC3 and BMS cells stimulates the invasive ability of cancer cells through type I collagen. The use of inhibitors for each of the major protease families indicated that 1 or more MMPs was/were responsible for the BMS-induced invasion. Gene profiling and semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed an increased expression of several MMP genes because of PC3/BMS cell interaction. However, only MMP-12 showed an increase in protein expression. Downregulation of MMP-12 expression in PC3 cells by siRNA inhibited the enhanced invasion induced by PC3/BMS cell interaction. In vivo, MMP-12 was found to be primarily expressed by prostate cancer cells growing in bone. Our data suggest that BMS cells induce MMP-12 expression in prostate cancer cells, which results in invasive cells capable of degradation of type I collagen. PMID:18324629

  15. Enhancement of chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit mesenchymal stem cells by oriented nanofiber yarn-collagen type I/hyaluronate hybrid.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xianyou; Wang, Wei; Liu, Shen; Wu, Jinglei; Li, Fengfeng; Cao, Lei; Liu, Xu-dong; Mo, Xiumei; Fan, Cunyi

    2016-01-01

    Cartilage defects cause joint pain and loss of mobility. It is crucial to induce the chondrogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) by both biological and structural signals in cartilage tissue engineering. Sponge-like scaffolds fabricated using native cartilage extracellular matrix components can induce the BMSC differentiation by biological signals and limited structural signals. In this study, an oriented poly(L-lactic acid)-co-poly(ε-caprolactone) P(LLA-CL)/collagen type I (Col-I) nanofiber yarn mesh, fabricated by dynamic liquid electrospinning served as a skeleton for a freeze-dried Col-I/hyaluronate (HA) chondral phase (SPONGE) containing both structural and biological signals to guide BMSC chondrogenic differentiation. In vitro results show that the Yarn Col-I/HA hybrid scaffold (Yarn-CH) promotes orientation, adhesion and proliferation of BMSCs better than SPONGE. Furthermore, BMSCs seeded on the Yarn-CH scaffold demonstrated a large increase in the glycosaminoglycan content and expression of collagen type II following a 21-day culture. PMID:26478405

  16. Mechanical properties and solubility in water of corn starch-collagen composite films: Effect of starch type and concentrations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Wang, Wenhang; Ye, Ran; Liu, Anjun; Xiao, Jingdong; Liu, Yaowei; Zhao, Yana

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated the possibility of enhancing the properties of collagen with three different maize starches: waxy maize starch, normal starch, and high amylose starch. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed that starch-collagen films had a rougher surface compared to pure collagen films which became smoother upon heating. Amylose starch and normal starch increased the tensile strength of unheated collagen films in both dry and wet states, while all starches increased tensile strength of collagen film by heating. Depending upon the amylose content and starch concentrations, film solubility in water decreased with the addition of starch. DSC thermograms demonstrated that addition of all starches improved the thermal stability of the collagen film. Moreover, X-ray diffraction results indicated that except for high amylose starch, the crystallinity of both starch and collagen was significantly decreased when subject to heating. FTIR spectra indicated that intermolecular interactions between starch and collagen were enhanced upon heating. PMID:27596411

  17. Report of five novel and one recurrent COL2A1 mutations with analysis of genotype-phenotype correlation in patients with a lethal type II collagen disorder.

    PubMed

    Mortier, G R; Weis, M; Nuytinck, L; King, L M; Wilkin, D J; De Paepe, A; Lachman, R S; Rimoin, D L; Eyre, D R; Cohn, D H

    2000-04-01

    Achondrogenesis II-hypochondrogenesis and severe spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC) are lethal forms of dwarfism caused by dominant mutations in the type II collagen gene (COL2A1). To identify the underlying defect in seven cases with this group of conditions, we used the combined strategy of cartilage protein analysis and COL2A1 mutation analysis. Overmodified type II collagen and the presence of type I collagen was found in the cartilage matrix of all seven cases. Five patients were heterozygous for a nucleotide change that predicted a glycine substitution in the triple helical domain (G313S, G517V, G571A, G910C, G943S). In all five cases, analysis of cartilage type II collagen suggested incorporation of the abnormal alpha1(II) chain in the extracellular collagen trimers. The G943S mutation has been reported previously in another unrelated patient with a strikingly similar phenotype, illustrating the possible specific effect of the mutation. The radiographically less severely affected patient was heterozygous for a 4 bp deletion in the splice donor site of intron 35, likely to result in aberrant splicing. One case was shown to be heterozygous for a single nucleotide change predicted to result in a T1191N substitution in the carboxy-propeptide of the proalpha1(II) collagen chain. Study of the clinical, radiographic, and morphological features of the seven cases supports evidence for a phenotypic continuum between achondrogenesis II-hypochondrogenesis and lethal SEDC and suggests a relationship between the amount of type I collagen in the cartilage and the severity of the phenotype. PMID:10745044

  18. Chondroitin 6-Sulfation Regulates Perineuronal Net Formation by Controlling the Stability of Aggrecan

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Shinji; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNNs) are lattice-like extracellular matrix structures composed of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs). The appearance of PNNs parallels the decline of neural plasticity, and disruption of PNNs reactivates neural plasticity in the adult brain. We previously reported that sulfation patterns of chondroitin sulfate (CS) chains on CSPGs influenced the formation of PNNs and neural plasticity. However, the mechanism of PNN formation regulated by CS sulfation remains unknown. Here we found that overexpression of chondroitin 6-sulfotransferase-1 (C6ST-1), which catalyzes 6-sulfation of CS chains, selectively decreased aggrecan, a major CSPG in PNNs, in the aged brain without affecting other PNN components. Both diffuse and PNN-associated aggrecans were reduced by overexpression of C6ST-1. C6ST-1 increased 6-sulfation in both the repeating disaccharide region and linkage region of CS chains. Overexpression of 6-sulfation primarily impaired accumulation of aggrecan in PNNs, whereas condensation of other PNN components was not affected. Finally, we found that increased 6-sulfation accelerated proteolysis of aggrecan by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain with thrombospondin motif (ADAMTS) protease. Taken together, our results indicate that sulfation patterns of CS chains on aggrecan influenced the stability of the CSPG, thereby regulating formation of PNNs and neural plasticity. PMID:27057358

  19. Persistence of collagen type II-specific T-cell clones in the synovial membrane of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Londei, M.; Savill, C.M.; Verhoef, A.; Brennan, F.; Leech, Z.A.; Feldmann, M. ); Duance, V. ); Maini, R.N. )

    1989-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease characterized by T-cell infiltration of the synovium of joints. Analysis of the phenotype and antigen specificity of the infiltrating cells may thus provide insight into the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. T cells were cloned with interleukin 2, a procedure that selects for in vivo-activated cells. All clones had the CD4 CDW29 phenotype. Their antigen specificity was tested by using a panel of candidate joint autoantigens. Four of 17 reacted against autologous blood mononuclear cells. Two clones proliferated in response to collagen type II. After 21 months, another set of clones was derived from synovial tissue of the same joint. One of eight clones tested showed a strong proliferative response against collagen type II. The uncloned synovial T cells of a third operation from another joint also responded to collagen type II. The persistence of collagen type II-specific T cells in active rheumatoid joints over a period of 3 years suggests that collagen type II could be one of the autoantigens involved in perpetuating the inflammatory process in rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. Comprehensive molecular analysis demonstrates type V collagen mutations in over 90% of patients with classic EDS and allows to refine diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Symoens, Sofie; Syx, Delfien; Malfait, Fransiska; Callewaert, Bert; De Backer, Julie; Vanakker, Olivier; Coucke, Paul; De Paepe, Anne

    2012-10-01

    Type V collagen mutations are associated with classic Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS), but it is unknown for which proportion they account and to what extent other genes are involved. We analyzed COL5A1 and COL5A2 in 126 patients with a diagnosis or suspicion of classic EDS. In 93 patients, a type V collagen defect was found, of which 73 were COL5A1 mutations, 13 were COL5A2 mutations and seven were COL5A1 null-alleles with mutation unknown. The majority of the 73 COL5A1 mutations generated a COL5A1 null-allele, whereas one-third were structural mutations, scattered throughout COL5A1. All COL5A2 mutations were structural mutations. Reduced availability of type V collagen appeared to be the major disease-causing mechanism, besides other intra- and extracellular contributing factors. All type V collagen defects were identified within a group of 102 patients fulfilling all major clinical Villefranche criteria, that is, skin hyperextensibility, dystrophic scarring and joint hypermobility. No COL5A1/COL5A2 mutation was detected in 24 patients who displayed skin and joint hyperextensibility but lacked dystrophic scarring. Overall, over 90% of patients fulfilling all major Villefranche criteria for classic EDS were shown to harbor a type V collagen defect, which indicates that this is the major--if not only--cause of classic EDS. PMID:22696272

  1. Metastatic dissemination of human ovarian epithelial carcinoma is promoted by alpha2beta1-integrin-mediated interaction with type I collagen.

    PubMed

    Fishman, D A; Kearns, A; Chilukuri, K; Bafetti, L M; O'Toole, E A; Georgacopoulos, J; Ravosa, M J; Stack, M S

    1998-01-01

    Metastatic dissemination of epithelial ovarian carcinoma is thought to be mediated via tumor cell exfoliation into the peritoneal cavity, followed by adhesion to and invasion through the mesothelium which overlies the contents of the peritoneal cavity. In this study, we have utilized short-term primary cultures to analyze the effect of specific extracellular matrix proteins on properties of human ovarian epithelial carcinoma cells which contribute to the invasive phenotype. Analysis of cell:matrix adhesive profiles indicated that ovarian carcinoma cells adhere preferentially to type I collagen. Immunoprecipitation analyses demonstrated the presence of the collagen-binding alpha2beta1 integrin in biotin-labeled ovarian carcinoma cell membranes, and cellular adhesion was inhibited by blocking antibodies directed against the alpha2 and beta1 integrin subunits. The alpha2beta1-binding peptide Asp-Gly-Glu-Ala (DGEA) was also moderately effective at blocking adhesion to collagen relative to the control peptide Ala-Gly-Glu-Ala (AGEA). Analysis of cell motility on protein-coated colloidal gold coverslips demonstrated that ovarian carcinoma cells migrate preferentially on type I collagen coated surfaces. Type I collagen promoted migration in a concentration-dependent, saturable manner, with maximal migration observed at a collagen-coating concentration of 50 microg/ml. Migration on collagen was inhibited by antibodies directed against the alpha2 and beta1 integrin subunits and by DGEA peptide, providing evidence for the role of the alpha2beta1 integrin in ovarian carcinoma cell motility. Culturing ovarian carcinoma cells on type I collagen gels led to a significant increase in conversion of the matrix metalloproteinase 2 zymogen to the 66-kD form, suggesting that adhesion to collagen also influences matrix-degrading proteinases. These data suggest that alpha2beta1-integrin-mediated interaction of ovarian carcinoma cells with type I collagen, a protein prevalent both in the

  2. Stress Heterogeneities in Sheared Type-I Collagen Networks Revealed by Boundary Stress Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Arevalo, Richard C.; Kumar, Pramukta; Urbach, Jeffrey S.; Blair, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    Disordered fiber networks provide structural support to a wide range of important materials, and the combination of spatial and dynamic complexity may produce large inhomogeneities in mechanical properties, an effect that is largely unexplored experimentally. In this work, we introduce Boundary Stress Microscopy to quantify the non-uniform surface stresses in sheared collagen gels. We find local stresses exceeding average stresses by an order of magnitude, with variations over length scales much larger than the network mesh size. The strain stiffening behavior observed over a wide range of network mesh sizes can be parameterized by a single characteristic strain and associated stress, which describes both the strain stiffening regime and network yielding. The characteristic stress is approximately proportional to network density, but the peak boundary stress at both the characteristic strain and at yielding are remarkably insensitive to concentration. PMID:25734484

  3. In PC3 prostate cancer cells ephrin receptors crosstalk to β1-integrins to strengthen adhesion to collagen type I

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Miao; Wang, Jinghe; Muller, Daniel J.; Helenius, Jonne

    2015-01-01

    Eph receptor (Eph) and ephrin signaling can play central roles in prostate cancer and other cancer types. Exposed to ephrin-A1 PC3 prostate cancer cells alter adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. However, whether PC3 cells increase or reduce adhesion, and by which mechanisms they change adhesion to the ECM remains to be characterized. Here, we assay how ephrin-A1 stimulates PC3 cells to adhere to ECM proteins using single-cell force spectroscopy. We find that PC3 cells binding to immobilized ephrin-A1 but not to solubilized ephrin-A1 specifically strengthen adhesion to collagen I. This Eph-ephrin-A1 signaling, which we suppose is based on mechanotransduction, stimulates β1-subunit containing integrin adhesion via the protein kinase Akt and the guanine nucleotide-exchange factor cytohesin. Inhibiting the small GTPases, Rap1 or Rac1, generally lowered adhesion of PC3 prostate cancer cells. Our finding suggests a mechanism by which PC3 prostate cancer cells exposed to ephrins crosstalk to β1-integrins and preferably metastasize in bone, a collagen I rich tissue. PMID:25644492

  4. Induction of tolerance against the arthritogenic antigen with type-II collagen peptide-linked soluble MHC class II molecules.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoon-Kyung; Jung, Sundo; Park, Se-Ho

    2016-06-01

    In murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), self-reactive T cells can recognize peptide antigens derived from type-II collagen (CII). Activation of T cells is an important mediator of autoimmune diseases. Thus, T cells have become a focal point of study to treat autoimmune diseases. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of recombinant MHC class II molecules in the regulation of antigen-specific T cells by using a self peptide derived from CII (CII260-274; IAGFKGEQGPKGEPG) linked to mouse I-A(q) in a murine CIA model. We found that recombinant I-A(q)/CII260-274 molecules could be recognized by CII-specific T cells and inhibit the same T cells in vitro. Furthermore, the development of CIA in mice was successfully prevented by in vivo injection of recombinant I-A(q)/CII260-274 molecules. Thus, treatment with recombinant soluble MHC class II molecules in complex with an immunodominant self-peptide might offer a potential therapeutic for chronic inflammation in autoimmune disease such as rheumatoid arthritis. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(6): 331-336]. PMID:26779996

  5. Collagen type IV-related nephropathies in Portugal: pathogenic COL4A5 mutations and clinical characterization of 22 families.

    PubMed

    Nabais Sá, M J; Sampaio, S; Oliveira, A; Alves, S; Moura, C P; Silva, S E; Castro, R; Araújo, J A; Rodrigues, M; Neves, F; Seabra, J; Soares, C; Gaspar, M A; Tavares, I; Freitas, L; Sousa, T C; Henriques, A C; Costa, F T; Morgado, E; Sousa, F T; Sousa, J P; da Costa, A G; Filipe, R; Garrido, J; Montalban, J; Ponce, P; Alves, R; Faria, B; Carvalho, M F; Pestana, M; Carvalho, F; Oliveira, J P

    2015-11-01

    Alport syndrome (AS) is caused by pathogenic mutations in the genes encoding α3, α4 or α5 chains of collagen IV (COL4A3/COL4A4/COL4A5), resulting in hematuria, chronic renal failure (CRF), sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and ocular abnormalities. Mutations in the X-linked COL4A5 gene have been identified in 85% of the families (XLAS). In this study, 22 of 60 probands (37%) of unrelated Portuguese families, with clinical diagnosis of AS and no evidence of autosomal inheritance, had pathogenic COL4A5 mutations detected by Sanger sequencing and/or multiplex-ligation probe amplification, of which 12 (57%) are novel. Males had more severe and earlier renal and extrarenal complications, but microscopic hematuria was a constant finding irrespective of gender. Nonsense and splice site mutations, as well as small and large deletions, were associated with younger age of onset of SNHL in males, and with higher risk of CRF and SNHL in females. Pathogenic COL4A3 or COL4A4 mutations were subsequently identified in more than half of the families without a pathogenic mutation in COL4A5. The lower than expected prevalence of XLAS in Portuguese families warrants the use of next-generation sequencing for simultaneous COL4A3/COL4A4/COL4A5 analysis, as first-tier approach to the genetic diagnosis of collagen type IV-related nephropathies. PMID:25307721

  6. The NC1/endostatin domain of Caenorhabditis elegans type XVIII collagen affects cell migration and axon guidance.

    PubMed

    Ackley, B D; Crew, J R; Elamaa, H; Pihlajaniemi, T; Kuo, C J; Kramer, J M

    2001-03-19

    Type XVIII collagen is a homotrimeric basement membrane molecule of unknown function, whose COOH-terminal NC1 domain contains endostatin (ES), a potent antiangiogenic agent. The Caenorhabditis elegans collagen XVIII homologue, cle-1, encodes three developmentally regulated protein isoforms expressed predominantly in neurons. The CLE-1 protein is found in low amounts in all basement membranes but accumulates at high levels in the nervous system. Deletion of the cle-1 NC1 domain results in viable fertile animals that display multiple cell migration and axon guidance defects. Particular defects can be rescued by ectopic expression of the NC1 domain, which is shown to be capable of forming trimers. In contrast, expression of monomeric ES does not rescue but dominantly causes cell and axon migration defects that phenocopy the NC1 deletion, suggesting that ES inhibits the promigratory activity of the NC1 domain. These results indicate that the cle-1 NC1/ES domain regulates cell and axon migrations in C. elegans. PMID:11257122

  7. Collagen type I and III synthesis by Tenon's capsule fibroblasts in culture: individual patient characteristics and response to mitomycin C, 5-fluorouracil, and ascorbic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, R L

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study was performed to better understand the differences between patients in specific components of wound healing as it may pertain to glaucoma filtration surgery, including the use of antimetabolites. METHODS: Human Tenon's capsule fibroblasts were obtained at the time of glaucoma filtering surgery and established in individual cell cultures from 35 glaucoma patients. The dose-response to 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and mitomycin C (MMC) was determined. The individual cell lines were exposed to the antimetabolites and ascorbic acid with measurement of collagen type I and III production by an ELISA-type dot blot assay. These results were then statistically compared to the individual patient characteristics including age, race, previous surgery and medications, and type of glaucoma. RESULTS: 5-FU had little effect on collagen type I and III production or protein synthesis. MMC had an inhibitory effect on collagen secretion and total protein synthesis with increasing concentration. Photomicrographs of the cells after each treatment condition revealed characteristic morphologic changes when compared to controls. There was a large range of collagen type I and III production with correlation between the amounts of each collagen type secreted in response to the antimetabolites. However, there was no correlation with accepted risk factors for filtration failure. CONCLUSION: These antimetabolites act similarly on different cell lines in a nonspecific manner. The results suggest that the increased risk of filtration failure due to age, race, diagnosis, and previous conjunctival surgery is not due to differences in secretion of collagen types I and III by Tenon's capsule fibroblasts. Images FIGURE 3 PMID:10703140

  8. Role of factor VIII-von Willebrand factor and fibronectin in the interaction of platelets in flowing blood with monomeric and fibrillar human collagen types I and III.

    PubMed

    Houdijk, W P; Sakariassen, K S; Nievelstein, P F; Sixma, J J

    1985-02-01

    Platelet adhesion to monomeric collagen types I and III, which were purified from human umbilical arteries, was studied in a perfusion chamber under well defined flow conditions. For this purpose, glass coverslips were coated with 20-30 micrograms/cm2 of collagen types I and III by spraying a solution of these collagens with a retouching air brush. Platelet deposition increased with the time of perfusion. Adhesion to both collagen types was similar in the first 3 min, but increased platelet deposition occurred on collagen type III after 3 min due to thrombus formation. Adhesion at a shear rate of 800 s-1 was strongly impaired with plasma of a patient with von Willebrand's disease or with fibronectin-free plasma. Addition of purified fibronectin to fibronectin-free plasma restored adhesion to the level obtained with normal plasma. Platelet deposition in normal plasma increased with increasing shear rates. Platelet deposition in VWD-plasma was normal at 490 s-1, but there was no increase at higher shear rates. Platelet deposition in fibronectin-free plasma was diminished at all shear rates studied from 490 to 1,300 s-1. Perfusion with a human albumin solution (HAS) to which purified Factor VIII-von Willebrand factor complex (FVIII-VWF) and fibronectin had been added gave similar platelet deposition as with normal plasma. Preincubation of collagen with FVIII-VWF and perfusion with HAS containing fibronectin, or, conversely, preincubation with fibronectin and perfusion with HAS containing FVIII-VWF, also resulted in adhesion similar to that observed in normal plasma. Similar adhesion was also observed after preincubation with both FVIII-VWF and fibronectin and subsequent perfusion with HAS alone. Sequential preincubations with first FVIII-VWF and then fibronectin, or with first fibronectin and then FVIII-VWF followed by perfusion with HAS, also gave a similar adhesion as observed with normal plasma. These data indicate that platelet adhesion to monomeric collagen types

  9. Role of factor VIII-von Willebrand factor and fibronectin in the interaction of platelets in flowing blood with monomeric and fibrillar human collagen types I and III.

    PubMed Central

    Houdijk, W P; Sakariassen, K S; Nievelstein, P F; Sixma, J J

    1985-01-01

    Platelet adhesion to monomeric collagen types I and III, which were purified from human umbilical arteries, was studied in a perfusion chamber under well defined flow conditions. For this purpose, glass coverslips were coated with 20-30 micrograms/cm2 of collagen types I and III by spraying a solution of these collagens with a retouching air brush. Platelet deposition increased with the time of perfusion. Adhesion to both collagen types was similar in the first 3 min, but increased platelet deposition occurred on collagen type III after 3 min due to thrombus formation. Adhesion at a shear rate of 800 s-1 was strongly impaired with plasma of a patient with von Willebrand's disease or with fibronectin-free plasma. Addition of purified fibronectin to fibronectin-free plasma restored adhesion to the level obtained with normal plasma. Platelet deposition in normal plasma increased with increasing shear rates. Platelet deposition in VWD-plasma was normal at 490 s-1, but there was no increase at higher shear rates. Platelet deposition in fibronectin-free plasma was diminished at all shear rates studied from 490 to 1,300 s-1. Perfusion with a human albumin solution (HAS) to which purified Factor VIII-von Willebrand factor complex (FVIII-VWF) and fibronectin had been added gave similar platelet deposition as with normal plasma. Preincubation of collagen with FVIII-VWF and perfusion with HAS containing fibronectin, or, conversely, preincubation with fibronectin and perfusion with HAS containing FVIII-VWF, also resulted in adhesion similar to that observed in normal plasma. Similar adhesion was also observed after preincubation with both FVIII-VWF and fibronectin and subsequent perfusion with HAS alone. Sequential preincubations with first FVIII-VWF and then fibronectin, or with first fibronectin and then FVIII-VWF followed by perfusion with HAS, also gave a similar adhesion as observed with normal plasma. These data indicate that platelet adhesion to monomeric collagen types

  10. Development and application of a new Silent reporter system to quantitate the activity of enhancer elements in the type II Collagen Gene.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kazuo; Shinomura, Tamayuki

    2016-07-01

    Type II collagen is a major component of cartilage, which provide structural stiffness to the tissue. As a sufficient amount of type II collagen is critical for maintaining the biomechanical properties of cartilage, its expression is tightly regulated in chondrocytes. Therefore, it is essential to elucidate in detail the transcriptional mechanism that controls expression of type II collagen, in particular by two enhancer elements we recently discovered. To systematically analyze and compare enhancer activities, we developed a novel reporter assay system that exploits site-specific integration of promoter and enhancer elements to activate a transcriptionally silent reporter gene. Using this system, we found that the enhancer elements have distinct characteristics, with one exhibiting additive effects and the other exhibiting synergistic effects when repeated in tandem. PMID:26992640

  11. Serum anti-collagen type IV IgM antibodies and development of diabetic nephropathy in diabetics with essential hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Tsinlikov, Ivan; Tsinlikova, Ivanka; Nicoloff, George; Blazhev, Alexander; Garev, Antoan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and aims Arterial hypertension and diabetic vascular complications are connected with an elevated degradation of elastic tissue. This process leads to an increased production of antibodies to collagen type IV (ACIV Abs). In the present investigation we studied whether the serum levels of antibodies (IgG, IgM and IgA) to collagen are related with microvascular complications. Material and methods Serum levels of antibodies to collagen type IV (ACIV) IgG, IgM and IgA were measured using an ELISA method in 93 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and arterial hypertension (AH) (mean age 61.4 ±11.3 years, diabetes duration 9.88 ±3.12 years; hypertension duration 9.28 ±4.98). These values were compared to serum antibodies to CIV in 42 age and sex matched controls. Results ACIV IgM antibodies levels in patients with AH and T2DM were statisticaly significantly higher than controls 0.178 (0.145÷0.220) vs. 0.142 (0.118÷0.173) (KW = 6.31; p = 0.01). Group 1 (patients with microvascular complications) showed significantly higher levels of ACIV IgM than controls 0.180 (0.136÷0.223) vs. 0.142 (0.118÷0.173) (KW = 5.03; p = 0.02). Patients from Group 2 showed statistically significantly higher levels of ACIV IgM than controls 0.176 (0.151÷0.202) vs. 0.142 (0.118÷0.173) (KW = 6.15; p = 0.01). ACIV IgM antibodies showed correlation with microalbuminuria (r = 0.21); (p = 0.04), BMI (r = 0.19); (p = 0.04), creatinine clearance (r = –0.36); (p = 0.01) and GFR (r = –0.34); (p = 0.02). Conclusions Our study showed an association between elevation of serum levels of ACIV IgM and development of diabetic nephropathy. We suggest that levels of ACIV IgM can be useful method for identfying a high risk for development of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:27095927

  12. COLLAGEN PROCESSING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Collagen dispersions, produced from fibrils recovered from milled bovine collagen, have shown promise in environmental remediation in applications as settling aids, filtration aids, fractionation media, oil drop stabilizers, and water purification aids. Macroporous structures, processed by controll...

  13. CD44/chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan and alpha 2 beta 1 integrin mediate human melanoma cell migration on type IV collagen and invasion of basement membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, J R; Iida, J; Fields, G B; McCarthy, J B

    1996-01-01

    Tumor cell invasion of basement membranes (BM) represents one of the critical steps in the metastatic process. Tumor cell recognition of individual BM matrix components may involve individual cell adhesion receptors, such as integrins or cell surface proteoglycans, or may involve a coordinate action of both types of receptors. In this study, we have focused on the identification of a cell surface CD44/chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) and alpha 2 beta 1 integrin on human melanoma cells that are both directly involved in the in vitro invasion of reconstituted BM via a type IV collagen-dependent mechanism. Interfering with cell surface expression of human melanoma CSPG with either p-nitro-phenyl-beta-D-xylopyranoside treatment or anti-CD44 monoclonal antibody (mAb) preincubation (mAb) preincubation inhibits melanoma cell invasion through reconstituted BM. These treatments also strongly inhibit melanoma cell migration on type IV collagen, however, they are ineffective at inhibiting cell adhesion to type IV collagen. Purified melanoma cell surface CD44/CSPG, or purified chondroitin sulfate, bind to type IV collagen affinity columns, consistent with a role for CD44/CSPG-type IV collagen interactions in mediating tumor cell invasion. In contrast, melanoma cell migration on laminin (LM) does not involve CD44/CSPG, nor does CD44/CSPG bind to LM, suggesting that CD44/CSPG-type IV collagen interactions are specific in nature. Additionally, anti-alpha 2 and anti-beta 1 integrin mAbs are capable of blocking melanoma cell invasion of reconstituted BM. Both of these anti-integrin mAbs inhibit melanoma cell adhesion and migration on type IV collagen, whereas only anti-beta 1 mAb inhibits cell adhesion to LM. Collectively, these results indicate that melanoma cell adhesion to type IV collagen is an important consideration in invasion of reconstituted BM in vitro, and suggest that CD44/CSPG and alpha 2 beta 1 integrin may collaborate to promote human melanoma cell adhesion

  14. Dopamine D2 Receptor Is Involved in Alleviation of Type II Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jian-Hua; Liu, Yi-Qian; Deng, Qiao-Wen; Peng, Yu-Ping; Qiu, Yi-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Human and murine lymphocytes express dopamine (DA) D2-like receptors including DRD2, DRD3, and DRD4. However, their roles in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are less clear. Here we showed that lymphocyte DRD2 activation alleviates both imbalance of T-helper (Th)17/T-regulatory (Treg) cells and inflamed symptoms in a mouse arthritis model of RA. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was prepared by intradermal injection of chicken collagen type II (CII) in tail base of DBA/1 mice or Drd2−/− C57BL/6 mice. D2-like receptor agonist quinpirole downregulated expression of proinflammatory Th17-related cytokines interleukin- (IL-) 17 and IL-22 but further upregulated expression of anti-inflammatory Treg-related cytokines transforming growth factor- (TGF-) β and IL-10 in lymphocytes in vitro and in ankle joints in vivo in CIA mice. Quinpirole intraperitoneal administration reduced both clinical arthritis score and serum anti-CII IgG level in CIA mice. However, Drd2−/− CIA mice manifested more severe limb inflammation and higher serum anti-CII IgG level and further upregulated IL-17 and IL-22 expression and downregulated TGF-β and IL-10 expression than wild-type CIA mice. In contrast, Drd1−/− CIA mice did not alter limb inflammation or anti-CII IgG level compared with wild-type CIA mice. These results suggest that DRD2 activation is involved in alleviation of CIA symptoms by amelioration of Th17/Treg imbalance. PMID:26693483

  15. Effect of collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffold pore size on matrix mineralization and cellular behavior in different cell types.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Ciara M; Duffy, Garry P; Schindeler, Aaron; O'brien, Fergal J

    2016-01-01

    We have previously examined osteoblast behavior on porous collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) scaffolds with a range of mean pore sizes demonstrating superior cell attachment and migration in scaffolds with the largest pores (325 μm). Scaffolds provide a framework for construct development; therefore, it is crucial to identify the optimal pore size for augmented tissue formation. Utilizing the same range of scaffolds (85 μm - 325 μm), this study aimed to examine the effects of mean pore size on subsequent osteoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization, and to understand the mechanism by which pore size influences behavior of different cell types. Consequently, primary mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were assessed and their behavior compared to osteoblasts. Results demonstrated that scaffolds with the largest pore size (325 μm) facilitated improved osteoblast infiltration, earlier expression of mature bone markers osteopontin (OPN) and osteocalcin (OCN), and increased mineralization. MSCs responded similarly to osteoblasts whereby cell attachment and scaffold infiltration improved with increasing pore size. However, MSCs showed reduced cell motility, proliferation, and scaffold infiltration compared to osteoblasts. This was associated with differences in the profile of integrin subunits (α2) and collagen receptors (CD44), indicating that osteoblasts have a stronger affinity for CG scaffolds compared to MSCs. In summary, these results reveal how larger pores promote improved cell infiltration, essential for construct development, however the optimal scaffold pore size can be cell type specific. As such, this study highlights a necessity to tailor both scaffold micro-architecture and cell-type when designing constructs for successful bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:26386362

  16. Dopamine D2 Receptor Is Involved in Alleviation of Type II Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jian-Hua; Liu, Yi-Qian; Deng, Qiao-Wen; Peng, Yu-Ping; Qiu, Yi-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Human and murine lymphocytes express dopamine (DA) D2-like receptors including DRD2, DRD3, and DRD4. However, their roles in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are less clear. Here we showed that lymphocyte DRD2 activation alleviates both imbalance of T-helper (Th)17/T-regulatory (Treg) cells and inflamed symptoms in a mouse arthritis model of RA. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was prepared by intradermal injection of chicken collagen type II (CII) in tail base of DBA/1 mice or Drd2 (-/-) C57BL/6 mice. D2-like receptor agonist quinpirole downregulated expression of proinflammatory Th17-related cytokines interleukin- (IL-) 17 and IL-22 but further upregulated expression of anti-inflammatory Treg-related cytokines transforming growth factor- (TGF-) β and IL-10 in lymphocytes in vitro and in ankle joints in vivo in CIA mice. Quinpirole intraperitoneal administration reduced both clinical arthritis score and serum anti-CII IgG level in CIA mice. However, Drd2 (-/-) CIA mice manifested more severe limb inflammation and higher serum anti-CII IgG level and further upregulated IL-17 and IL-22 expression and downregulated TGF-β and IL-10 expression than wild-type CIA mice. In contrast, Drd1 (-/-) CIA mice did not alter limb inflammation or anti-CII IgG level compared with wild-type CIA mice. These results suggest that DRD2 activation is involved in alleviation of CIA symptoms by amelioration of Th17/Treg imbalance. PMID:26693483

  17. The Initiator Methionine tRNA Drives Secretion of Type II Collagen from Stromal Fibroblasts to Promote Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Cassie J.; Berg, Tracy J.; Birch, Joanna; Ennis, Darren; Mitchell, Louise; Cloix, Catherine; Campbell, Andrew; Sumpton, David; Nixon, Colin; Campbell, Kirsteen; Bridgeman, Victoria L.; Vermeulen, Peter B.; Foo, Shane; Kostaras, Eleftherios; Jones, J. Louise; Haywood, Linda; Pulleine, Ellie; Yin, Huabing; Strathdee, Douglas; Sansom, Owen; Blyth, Karen; McNeish, Iain; Zanivan, Sara; Reynolds, Andrew R.; Norman, Jim C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Expression of the initiator methionine tRNA (tRNAiMet) is deregulated in cancer. Despite this fact, it is not currently known how tRNAiMet expression levels influence tumor progression. We have found that tRNAiMet expression is increased in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts, implicating deregulated expression of tRNAiMet in the tumor stroma as a possible contributor to tumor progression. To investigate how elevated stromal tRNAiMet contributes to tumor progression, we generated a mouse expressing additional copies of the tRNAiMet gene (2+tRNAiMet mouse). Growth and vascularization of subcutaneous tumor allografts was enhanced in 2+tRNAiMet mice compared with wild-type littermate controls. Extracellular matrix (ECM) deposited by fibroblasts from 2+tRNAiMet mice supported enhanced endothelial cell and fibroblast migration. SILAC mass spectrometry indicated that elevated expression of tRNAiMet significantly increased synthesis and secretion of certain types of collagen, in particular type II collagen. Suppression of type II collagen opposed the ability of tRNAiMet-overexpressing fibroblasts to deposit pro-migratory ECM. We used the prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor ethyl-3,4-dihydroxybenzoate (DHB) to determine whether collagen synthesis contributes to the tRNAiMet-driven pro-tumorigenic stroma in vivo. DHB had no effect on the growth of syngeneic allografts in wild-type mice but opposed the ability of 2+tRNAiMet mice to support increased angiogenesis and tumor growth. Finally, collagen II expression predicts poor prognosis in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma. Taken together, these data indicate that increased tRNAiMet levels contribute to tumor progression by enhancing the ability of stromal fibroblasts to synthesize and secrete a type II collagen-rich ECM that supports endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis. PMID:26948875

  18. The Initiator Methionine tRNA Drives Secretion of Type II Collagen from Stromal Fibroblasts to Promote Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Cassie J; Berg, Tracy J; Birch, Joanna; Ennis, Darren; Mitchell, Louise; Cloix, Catherine; Campbell, Andrew; Sumpton, David; Nixon, Colin; Campbell, Kirsteen; Bridgeman, Victoria L; Vermeulen, Peter B; Foo, Shane; Kostaras, Eleftherios; Jones, J Louise; Haywood, Linda; Pulleine, Ellie; Yin, Huabing; Strathdee, Douglas; Sansom, Owen; Blyth, Karen; McNeish, Iain; Zanivan, Sara; Reynolds, Andrew R; Norman, Jim C

    2016-03-21

    Expression of the initiator methionine tRNA (tRNAi(Met)) is deregulated in cancer. Despite this fact, it is not currently known how tRNAi(Met) expression levels influence tumor progression. We have found that tRNAi(Met) expression is increased in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts, implicating deregulated expression of tRNAi(Met) in the tumor stroma as a possible contributor to tumor progression. To investigate how elevated stromal tRNAi(Met) contributes to tumor progression, we generated a mouse expressing additional copies of the tRNAi(Met) gene (2+tRNAi(Met) mouse). Growth and vascularization of subcutaneous tumor allografts was enhanced in 2+tRNAi(Met) mice compared with wild-type littermate controls. Extracellular matrix (ECM) deposited by fibroblasts from 2+tRNAi(Met) mice supported enhanced endothelial cell and fibroblast migration. SILAC mass spectrometry indicated that elevated expression of tRNAi(Met) significantly increased synthesis and secretion of certain types of collagen, in particular type II collagen. Suppression of type II collagen opposed the ability of tRNAi(Met)-overexpressing fibroblasts to deposit pro-migratory ECM. We used the prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor ethyl-3,4-dihydroxybenzoate (DHB) to determine whether collagen synthesis contributes to the tRNAi(Met)-driven pro-tumorigenic stroma in vivo. DHB had no effect on the growth of syngeneic allografts in wild-type mice but opposed the ability of 2+tRNAi(Met) mice to support increased angiogenesis and tumor growth. Finally, collagen II expression predicts poor prognosis in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma. Taken together, these data indicate that increased tRNAi(Met) levels contribute to tumor progression by enhancing the ability of stromal fibroblasts to synthesize and secrete a type II collagen-rich ECM that supports endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis. PMID:26948875

  19. MMP Mediated Degradation of Type VI Collagen Is Highly Associated with Liver Fibrosis – Identification and Validation of a Novel Biochemical Marker Assay

    PubMed Central

    Veidal, Sanne Skovgård; Karsdal, Morten Asser; Vassiliadis, Efstathios; Nawrocki, Arkadiusz; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Nguyen, Quoc Hai Trieu; Hägglund, Per; Luo, Yunyun; Zheng, Qinlong; Vainer, Ben; Leeming, Diana Julie

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims During fibrogenesis, in which excessive remodeling of the extracellular matrix occurs, both the quantity of type VI collagen and levels of matrix metalloproteinases, including MMP-2 and MMP-9, increase significantly. Proteolytic degradation of type VI collagen into small fragments, so-called neo-epitopes, may be specific biochemical marker of liver fibrosis. The aim of this study was to develop an ELISA detecting a fragment of type VI collagen generated by MMP-2 and MMP-9, and evaluate this assay in two preclinical models of liver fibrosis. Methods Mass spectrometric analysis of cleaved type VI collagen revealed a large number of protease-generated neo-epitopes. A fragment unique to type VI collagen generated by MMP-2 and MMP-9 was selected for ELISA development. The CO6-MMP assay was evaluated in two rat models of liver fibrosis: bile duct ligation (BDL) and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-treated rats. Results Intra- and inter-assay variation was 4.1% and 10.1% respectively. CO6-MMP levels were significantly elevated in CCl4-treated rats compared to vehicle-treated rats at weeks 12 (mean 30.9 ng/mL vs. 12.8 ng/mL, p = 0.002); week 16 (mean 34.0 ng/mL vs. 13.7 ng/mL, p = 0.0018); and week 20 (mean 35.3 ng/mL vs. 13.3 ng/mL, p = 0.0033) with a tight correlation between hepatic collagen content and serum levels of CO6-MMP (R2 = 0.58, p<0.0001) in CCl4- treated rats. In BDL rats, serum levels of CO6-MMP were significantly elevated compared to the levels in sham-operated animals both at 2 weeks (mean 29.5 ng/mL vs. 14.2 ng/mL, p = 0.0001) and 4 weeks (mean 33.0 ng/mLvs. 11.8 ng/mL, p = 0.0003). Conclusions This novel ELISA is the first assay enabling assessment of MMP degraded type VI collagen, allowing quantification of type VI collagen degradation, which would be relevant for different pathologies. The marker was highly associated with liver fibrosis in two liver fibrosis animal models, suggesting type VI turnover to be a

  20. Micromechanical analysis of native and cross-linked collagen type I fibrils supports the existence of microfibrils.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; van der Werf, K O; Dijkstra, P J; Feijen, J; Bennink, M L

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical properties of individual collagen fibrils of approximately 200 nm in diameter were determined using a slightly adapted AFM system. Single collagen fibrils immersed in PBS buffer were attached between an AFM cantilever and a glass surface to perform tensile tests at different strain rates and stress relaxation measurements. The stress-strain behavior of collagen fibrils immersed in PBS buffer comprises a toe region up to a stress of 5 MPa, followed by the heel and linear region at higher stresses. Hysteresis and strain-rate dependent stress-strain behavior of collagen fibrils were observed, which suggest that single collagen fibrils have viscoelastic properties. The stress relaxation process of individual collagen fibrils could be best fitted using a two-term Prony series. Furthermore, the influence of different cross-linking agents on the mechanical properties of single collagen fibrils was investigated. Based on these results, we propose that sliding of microfibrils with respect to each other plays a role in the viscoelastic behavior of collagen fibrils in addition to the sliding of collagen molecules with respect to each other. Our finding provides a better insight into the relationship between the structure and mechanical properties of collagen and the micro-mechanical behavior of tissues. PMID:22301184

  1. Chondrogenesis in the regenerating antler tip in red deer: expression of collagen types I, IIA, IIB, and X demonstrated by in situ nucleic acid hybridization and immunocytochemistry.

    PubMed

    Price, J S; Oyajobi, B O; Nalin, A M; Frazer, A; Russell, R G; Sandell, L J

    1996-03-01

    The annual regrowth of antlers in male deer is a unique example of complete bone regeneration occurring in an adult animal. Growth is initiated at the distal antler tip, which is similar to the epiphyseal growth plate in some respects. However, there is some debate as to whether this process represents "true" endochondral ossification. As part of the characterization of the developmental process in pre-osseus antler tissue, we have studied, by in situ hybridization, the spatial expression of mRNAs for types I, II, and X collagen. Viewed in a coronal plane, type I procollagen mRNA was observed in skin, the fibrous perichondrium, and the densely cellular area immediately adjacent to the perichondrium. Below this area, as cells began to assume a columnar arrangement and coincident with the appearance of a vasculature and synthesis of a cartilaginous matrix, transcripts for types I, IIA, IIB procollagen and X collagen were detected. Further down in the cartilage zone, the pattern of type I procollagen mRNA expression was altered. Here, the signal was detected only in a morphologically distinct subpopulation of small, flattened cells within the intercellular matrix at the periphery of the columns of chondrocytes. The alternative splice form of type II procollagen mRNA (IIA), characteristic of chondroprogenitor cells (Sandell et al. [1991] J. Cell Biol. 114:1307-1319), was expressed by a subset of cells in the upper region of the columns, indicating that this zone contains a population of prechondrocytic cells. Positive hybridization to type IIA was most abundant in these cells. In contrast, transcripts for the other procollagen splice form (IIB) and type X collagen were expressed by chondrocytes throughout the whole of the cartilage region studied. The translation and export of type II collagen and type X collagen were confirmed by detecting specific immunoreactivity for each. The spatial distribution of immunoreactivity for collagen types II and X was consistent with

  2. [Building of defects of the bladder wall by membrane, created on the basis of type I collagen (an experimental study)].

    PubMed

    Kamalov, A A; Mksimov, V A; Kirpatovskiĭ, V I; Kudriavtsev, Iu V; Karpov, V K; Tokarev, F K; Kamalov, D M; Burov, V N; Okhobotov, D A

    2012-01-01

    Experimental study was performed on 24 Chinchilla rabbits, which underwent resection of the bladder with building of defect by membrane "Collost", created on the basis of type I collagen. The functional state of the bladder in situ was assessed by infusion cystomanometry during repeated surgery at 7, 14 day and at 1, 3, 6 months, and at 1 and 1.5 years. It is found that developing detrusor pressure during bladder contractions was decreased by 10 times in the first week of the study; it was in line with the subcompensation after 3 months, and was restored at 6 month. At 1 and 1.5 years, increase of cumulative function of bladder while saving detrusor pressure was observed. Dilating cystoplastics using biopolymer "Collost" provides good long-term functional results. PMID:23379236

  3. Serum enzymes of collagen synthesis and type III procollagen aminopropeptide in Nigerian patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Bolarin, D M

    1986-07-01

    Serum immunoreactive prolyl hydroxylase protein (S-IRPH), galactosylhydroxylysyl glucosyltransferase activity (S-GGT), and the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (S-Pro(III)-N-P) were measured in 20 patients with sickle cell disease and the values were compared with those in 20 apparently healthy Nigerians. The means for the two enzymes and S-Pro(III)-N-P were significantly elevated in the sickle cell disease patients. Significant correlations were found between the values of the two enzymes and the protein (S-Pro(III)-N-P) within the sickle cell disease patients. The data confirm that collagen formation is found in the bone, liver, or other organs of patients with this disease. The measurement of S-GGT and S-Pro(III)-N-P in prospective studies might be helpful in predicting general and hepatic fibrogenesis in sickle cell disease. PMID:3018272

  4. Serum Enzymes of Collagen Synthesis and Type III Procollagen Aminopropeptide in Nigerian Patients With Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bolarin, Debayo M.

    1986-01-01

    Serum immunoreactive prolyl hydroxylase protein (S-IRPH), galactosylhydroxylysyl glucosyltransferase activity (S-GGT), and the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (S-Pro(III)-N-P) were measured in 20 patients with sickle cell disease and the values were compared with those in 20 apparently healthy Nigerians. The means for the two enzymes and S-Pro(III)-N-P were significantly elevated in the sickle cell disease patients. Significant correlations were found between the values of the two enzymes and the protein (S-Pro(III)-N-P) within the sickle cell disease patients. The data confirm that collagen formation is found in the bone, liver, or other organs of patients with this disease. The measurement of S-GGT and S-Pro(III)-N-P in prospective studies might be helpful in predicting general and hepatic fibrogenesis in sickle cell disease. PMID:3018272

  5. Chum salmon egg extracts induce upregulation of collagen type I and exert antioxidative effects on human dermal fibroblast cultures.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Atsushi; Polouliakh, Natalia; Meguro, Akira; Takeuchi, Masaki; Kawagoe, Tatsukata; Mizuki, Nobuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Components of fish roe possess antioxidant and antiaging activities, making them potentially very beneficial natural resources. Here, we investigated chum salmon eggs (CSEs) as a source of active ingredients, including vitamins, unsaturated fatty acids, and proteins. We incubated human dermal fibroblast cultures for 48 hours with high and low concentrations of CSE extracts and analyzed changes in gene expression. Cells treated with CSE extract showed concentration-dependent upregulation of collagen type I genes and of multiple antioxidative genes, including OXR1, TXNRD1, and PRDX family genes. We further conducted in silico phylogenetic footprinting analysis of promoter regions. These results suggested that transcription factors such as acute myeloid leukemia-1a and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein may be involved in the observed upregulation of antioxidative genes. Our results support the idea that CSEs are strong candidate sources of antioxidant materials and cosmeceutically effective ingredients. PMID:27621603

  6. Chum salmon egg extracts induce upregulation of collagen type I and exert antioxidative effects on human dermal fibroblast cultures

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Atsushi; Polouliakh, Natalia; Meguro, Akira; Takeuchi, Masaki; Kawagoe, Tatsukata; Mizuki, Nobuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Components of fish roe possess antioxidant and antiaging activities, making them potentially very beneficial natural resources. Here, we investigated chum salmon eggs (CSEs) as a source of active ingredients, including vitamins, unsaturated fatty acids, and proteins. We incubated human dermal fibroblast cultures for 48 hours with high and low concentrations of CSE extracts and analyzed changes in gene expression. Cells treated with CSE extract showed concentration-dependent upregulation of collagen type I genes and of multiple antioxidative genes, including OXR1, TXNRD1, and PRDX family genes. We further conducted in silico phylogenetic footprinting analysis of promoter regions. These results suggested that transcription factors such as acute myeloid leukemia-1a and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein may be involved in the observed upregulation of antioxidative genes. Our results support the idea that CSEs are strong candidate sources of antioxidant materials and cosmeceutically effective ingredients. PMID:27621603

  7. Computational Characterization of Type I collagen-based Extra-cellular Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Long; Jones, Christopher Allen Rucksack; Lin, Daniel; Jiao, Yang; Sun, Bo

    2015-03-01

    A model of extracellular matrix (ECM) of collagen fibers has been built, in which cells could communicate with distant partners via fiber-mediated long-range-transmitted stress states. The ECM is modeled as a spring-like fiber network derived from skeletonized confocal microscopy data. Different local and global perturbations have been performed on the network, each followed by an optimized global Monte-Carlo (MC) energy minimization leading to the deformed network in response to the perturbations. In the optimization, a highly efficient local energy update procedure is employed and force-directed MC moves are used, which results in a convergence to the energy minimum state 20 times faster than the commonly used random displacement trial moves in MC. Further analysis and visualization of the distribution and correlation of the resulting force network reveal that local perturbations can give rise to global impacts: the force chains formed with a linear extent much further than the characteristic length scale associated with the perturbation sites and average fiber length. This behavior provides a strong evidence for our hypothesis of fiber-mediated long-range force transmission in ECM networks and the resulting long-range cell-cell mechanical signaling. ASU Seed Grant.

  8. Complete primary structure of the triple-helical region and the carboxyl-terminal domain of a new type IV collagen chain, alpha 5(IV).

    PubMed

    Pihlajaniemi, T; Pohjolainen, E R; Myers, J C

    1990-08-15

    We have isolated and characterized overlapping cDNA clones which code for a previously unidentified human collagen chain. Although the cDNA-derived primary structure of this new polypeptide is very similar to the basement membrane collagen alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) chains, the carboxyl-terminal collagenous/non-collagenous junction sequence does not correspond to the junction sequence in either of the newly described alpha 3(IV) or alpha 4(IV) chains (Butkowski, R.J., Langeveld, J.P.M., Wieslander, J., Hamilton, J., and Hudson, B. G. (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 7874-7877). Thus the protein presented here has been designated the alpha 5 chain of type IV collagen. Four clones encode an open reading frame of 1602 amino acids that cover about 95% of the entire chain including half of the amino-terminal 7S domain and all of the central triple-helical region and carboxyl-terminal NC1 domain. The collagenous region of the alpha 5(IV) chain contains 22 interruptions which are in most cases identical in distribution to those in both the alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) chains. Despite the relatively low degree of conservation among the amino acids in the triple-helical region of the three type IV collagen chains, analysis of the sequences clearly showed that alpha 5(IV) is more related to alpha 1(IV) than to alpha 2(IV). This similarity between the alpha 5(IV) and alpha 1(IV) chains is particularly evident in the NC1 domains where the two polypeptides are 83% identical in contrast to the alpha 5(IV) and alpha 2(IV) identity of 63%. In addition to greatly increasing the complexity of basement membranes, the alpha 5 chain of type IV collagen may be responsible for specialized functions of some of these extracellular matrices. In this regard, it is important to note that we have recently assigned the alpha 5(IV) gene to the region of the X chromosome containing the locus for a familial type of hereditary nephritis known as Alport syndrome (Myers, J.C., Jones, T.A., Pohjalainen, E

  9. Looping Mediated Interaction between the Promoter and 3′ UTR Regulates Type II Collagen Expression in Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jash, Arijita; Yun, Kangsun; Sahoo, Anupama; So, Jae-Seon; Im, Sin-Hyeog

    2012-01-01

    Type II collagen is the major component of articular cartilage and is mainly synthesized by chondrocytes. Repeated sub-culturing of primary chondrocytes leads to reduction of type II collagen gene (Col2a1) expression, which mimics the process of chondrocyte dedifferentiation. Although the functional importance of Col2a1 expression has been extensively investigated, mechanism of transcriptional regulation during chondrocyte dedifferentiation is still unclear. In this study, we have investigated the crosstalk between cis-acting DNA element and transcription factor on Col2a1 expression in primary chondrocytes. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the potential regulatory regions in the Col2a1 genomic locus. Among them, promoter and 3′ untranslated region (UTR) showed highly accessible chromatin architecture with enriched recruitment of active chromatin markers in primary chondrocytes. 3′ UTR has a potent enhancer function which recruits Lef1 (Lymphoid enhancer binding factor 1) transcription factor, leading to juxtaposition of the 3′ UTR with the promoter through gene looping resulting in up-regulation of Col2a1 gene transcription. Knock-down of endogenous Lef1 level significantly reduced the gene looping and subsequently down-regulated Col2a1 expression. However, these regulatory loci become inaccessible due to condensed chromatin architecture as chondrocytes dedifferentiate which was accompanied by a reduction of gene looping and down-regulation of Col2a1 expression. Our results indicate that Lef1 mediated looping between promoter and 3′ UTR under the permissive chromatin architecture upregulates Col2a1 expression in primary chondrocytes. PMID:22815835

  10. The effects of different crossing-linking conditions of genipin on type I collagen scaffolds: an in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiujie; Chen, Xueying; Yang, Ting; Zhang, Naili; Dong, Li; Ma, Shaoying; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhou, Mo; Li, Baoxing

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the properties of fabricating rat tail type I collagen scaffolds cross-linked with genipin under different conditions. The porous genipin cross-linked scaffolds are obtained through a two step freeze-drying process. To find out the optimal cross-link condition, we used different genipin concentrations and various cross-linked temperatures to prepare the scaffolds in this study. The morphologies of the scaffolds were characterized by scanning electron microscope, and the mechanical properties of the scaffolds were evaluated under dynamic compression. Additionally, the cross-linking degree was assessed by ninhydrin assay. To investigate the swelling ratio and the in vitro degradation of the collagen scaffold, the tests were also carried out by immersion of the scaffolds in a PBS solution or digestion in a type I collagenase respectively. The morphologies of the non-cross-linked scaffolds presented a lattice-like structure while the cross-linked ones displayed a sheet-like framework. The morphology of the genipin cross-linked scaffolds could be significantly changed by either increasing genipin concentration or the temperature. The swelling ratio of each cross-linked scaffold was much lower than that of the control (non-cross-linked).The ninhydrin assay demonstrated that the higher temperature and genipin concentration could obviously increase the cross-linking efficiency. The in vitro degradation studies indicated that genipin cross-linking can effectively elevate the biostability of the scaffolds. The biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of the scaffolds was evaluated by culturing rat chondrocytes on the scaffold in vitro and by MTT. The results of MTT and the fact that the chondrocytes adhered well to the scaffolds demonstrated that genipin cross-linked scaffolds possessed an excellent biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity. Based on these results, 0.3 % genipin concentrations and 37 °C cross-linked temperatures are

  11. Articular cartilage repair with recombinant human type II collagen/polylactide scaffold in a preliminary porcine study.

    PubMed

    Muhonen, Virpi; Salonius, Eve; Haaparanta, Anne-Marie; Järvinen, Elina; Paatela, Teemu; Meller, Anna; Hannula, Markus; Björkman, Mimmi; Pyhältö, Tuomo; Ellä, Ville; Vasara, Anna; Töyräs, Juha; Kellomäki, Minna; Kiviranta, Ilkka

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of a novel recombinant human type II collagen/polylactide scaffold (rhCo-PLA) in the repair of full-thickness cartilage lesions with autologous chondrocyte implantation technique (ACI). The forming repair tissue was compared to spontaneous healing (spontaneous) and repair with a commercial porcine type I/III collagen membrane (pCo). Domestic pigs (4-month-old, n = 20) were randomized into three study groups and a circular full-thickness chondral lesion with a diameter of 8 mm was created in the right medial femoral condyle. After 3 weeks, the chondral lesions were repaired with either rhCo-PLA or pCo together with autologous chondrocytes, or the lesion was only debrided and left untreated for spontaneous repair. The repair tissue was evaluated 4 months after the second operation. Hyaline cartilage formed most frequently in the rhCo-PLA treatment group. Biomechanically, there was a trend that both treatment groups resulted in better repair tissue than spontaneous healing. Adverse subchondral bone reactions developed less frequently in the spontaneous group (40%) and the rhCo-PLA treated group (50%) than in the pCo control group (100%). However, no statistically significant differences were found between the groups. The novel rhCo-PLA biomaterial showed promising results in this proof-of-concept study, but further studies will be needed in order to determine its effectiveness in articular cartilage repair. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:745-753, 2016. PMID:26573959

  12. Recurrent nonsense mutations within the type VII collagen gene in patients with severe recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

    SciTech Connect

    Hovnanian, A.; Hilal, L.; Goossens, M. ); Blanchet-Bardon, C.; Prost, Y. de ); Christiano, A.M.; Uitto, J. )

    1994-08-01

    The generalized mutilating form of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (i.e., the Hallopeau-Siemens type; HS-RDEB) is a life-threatening disease characterized by extreme mucocutaneous fragility associated with absent or markedly altered anchoring fibrils (AF). Recently, the authors reported linkage between HS-RDEB and the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1), which encodes the major component of AF. In this study, they investigated 52 unrelated HS-RDEB patients and 2 patients with RDEB inversa for the presence, at CpG dinucleotides, of mutations changing CGA arginine codons to premature stop codons TGA within the COL7A1 gene. Eight exons containing 10 CGA codons located in the amino-terminal domain of the COL7A1 gene were studied. Mutation analysis was performed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified genomic fragments. Direct sequencing of PCR-amplified products with altered electrophoretic mobility led to the characterization of three premature stop codons, each in a single COL7A1 allele, in four patients. Two patients (one affected with HS-RDEB and the other with RDEB inversa) have the same C-to-T transition at arginine codon 109. Two other HS-RDEB patients have a C-to-T transition at arginine 1213 and 1216, respectively. These nonsense mutations predict the truncation of [approximately]56%-92% of the polypeptide, including the collagenous and the noncollagenous NC-2 domains. On the basis of linkage analysis, which showed no evidence for locus heterogeneity in RDEB, it is expected that these patients are compound heterozygotes and have additional mutations on the other COL7A1 allele, leading to impaired AF formation. These results indicate that stop mutations within the COL7A1 gene can underlie both HS-RDEB and RDEB inversa, thus providing further evidence for the implication of this gene in RDEB. 46 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. An echistatin C-terminal peptide activates GPIIbIIIa binding to fibrinogen, fibronectin, vitronectin and collagen type I and type IV.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, P S; Saudek, V; Owen, T J; Harbeson, S L; Bitonti, A J

    1993-01-01

    Integrin binding to proteins often involves recognition of domains containing the arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) motif. Different binding affinities and specificities of the integrin-ligand protein interactions involve additional protein domains. The n.m.r. structure of the snake-venom protein echistatin suggested that the C-terminal portion of the molecule might be important, in addition to the RGD domain, in binding to the integrin glycoprotein IIbIIIa (GPIIbIIIa) [Saudek, Atkinson and Pelton (1991) Biochem. 30, 7369-7372]. The synthetic C-terminal peptide, echistatin-(40-49), PRNPHKGPAT, (1) inhibited binding of GPIIbIIIa to immobilized echistatin (IC50 3-6 mM), but did not inhibit binding of GPIIbIIIa to immobilized fibrinogen (up to 5 mM peptide), (2) activated GPIIbIIIa binding to fibronectin and vitronectin, usual ligands for the activated integrin, (3) activated binding of GPIIbIIIa to collagen type I and type IV, proteins not usually regarded as ligands for the integrin, and (4) stimulated 125I-fibrinogen binding by human platelets. These findings argue for an interaction of this non-RGD domain in echistatin with GPIIbIIIa, leading to activation of the integrin and extension of the ligand specificity to include immobilized collagen. PMID:7687129

  14. Gel electrophoretic studies of photochemical cross-linking of type I collagen with brominated 1,8-naphthalimide dyes and visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judy, Millard M.; Fuh, L.; Matthews, James Lester; Lewis, David E.; Utecht, Ronald E.

    1994-09-01

    Insoluble Type I collagen from bovine Achilles tendon (Sigma C9879) was suspended in a 3 mM solution of the dye diEd66Br dissolved in Cremophor ELR (BASF) to give a molecular concentration ratio. Fifty-microliter aliquots in 5-mm-diameter wells were exposed to 458 J/cm2 (225 mW/cm2, 1800 sec) of 457.9-nm light from an argon ion laser; similar aliquots with and without dye were kept in the dark to serve as controls. Following pelleting of the collagen by centrifugation and 3x washing in phosphate-buffered saline, aliquots of light-treated and control sample pellets were (1) digested in collagenase (Sigma C9891) or (2) extracted in 0.5 M acetic acid, followed by centrifugative ultrafiltration (10-kd cutoff) in 0.01 M acetic acid. Aliquots of the supernatant of the acid-extracted collagen also were digested in pepsin. Electrophoretic protein migration in 8% to 25% gradient polyacrylamide gels following SDS solubilization disclosed numerous, densely packed, essentially contiguous protein bands. These studies indicate that the dye and light treatment of insoluble Type I collagen (1) results in cross-linking of collagen molecules and (2) does not denature the trimer conformation sufficiently to enable significant digestion by pepsin.

  15. A membrane-type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP)-discoidin domain receptor 1 axis regulates collagen-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Assent, Delphine; Bourgot, Isabelle; Hennuy, Benoît; Geurts, Pierre; Noël, Agnès; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Maquoi, Erik

    2015-01-01

    During tumour dissemination, invading breast carcinoma cells become confronted with a reactive stroma, a type I collagen-rich environment endowed with anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties. To develop metastatic capabilities, tumour cells must acquire the capacity to cope with this novel microenvironment. How cells interact with and respond to their microenvironment during cancer dissemination remains poorly understood. To address the impact of type I collagen on the fate of tumour cells, human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells were cultured within three-dimensional type I collagen gels (3D COL1). Using this experimental model, we have previously demonstrated that membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), a proteinase overexpressed in many aggressive tumours, promotes tumour progression by circumventing the collagen-induced up-regulation of BIK, a pro-apoptotic tumour suppressor, and hence apoptosis. Here we performed a transcriptomic analysis to decipher the molecular mechanisms regulating 3D COL1-induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. Control and MT1-MMP expressing MCF-7 cells were cultured on two-dimensional plastic plates or within 3D COL1 and a global transcriptional time-course analysis was performed. Shifting the cells from plastic plates to 3D COL1 activated a complex reprogramming of genes implicated in various biological processes. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a 3D COL1-mediated alteration of key cellular functions including apoptosis, cell proliferation, RNA processing and cytoskeleton remodelling. By using a panel of pharmacological inhibitors, we identified discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a receptor tyrosine kinase specifically activated by collagen, as the initiator of 3D COL1-induced apoptosis. Our data support the concept that MT1-MMP contributes to the inactivation of the DDR1-BIK signalling axis through the cleavage of collagen fibres and/or the alteration of DDR1 receptor signalling unit, without triggering a

  16. cDNA cloning and chromosomal mapping of the mouse type VII collagen gene (Col7a1): Evidence for rapid evolutionary divergence of the gene

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Kehua; Christiano, A.M.; Chu, Mon Li; Uitto, J. Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA ); Copeland, N.G.; Gilbert, D.J. )

    1993-06-01

    Type VII collagen is the major component of anchoring fibrils, critical attachment structures at the dermal-epidermal basement membrane zone. Genetic linkage analyses with recently cloned human type VII collagen cDNAs have indicated that the corresponding gene, COL7A1, is the candidate gene in the dystrophic forms of epidermolysis bullosa. To gain insight into the evolutionary conservation of COL7A1, in this study the authors have isolated mouse type VII collagen cDNAs by screening a mouse epidermal keratinocyte cDNA library with a human COL7A1 cDNA. Two overlapping mouse cDNAs were isolated, and Northern hybridization of mouse epidermal keratinocyte RNA with one of them revealed the presence of a mRNA transcript of [approximately]9.5 kb, the approximate size of the human COL7A1 mRNA. Nucleotide sequencing of the mouse cDNAs revealed a 2760-bp open reading frame that encodes the 5[prime] half of the collagenous domain and a segment of the NC-1, the noncollagenous amino-terminal domain of type VII collagen. Comparison of the mouse amino acid sequences with the corresponding human sequences deduced from cDNAs revealed 82.5% identity. The evolutionary divergence of the gene was relatively rapid in comparison to other collagen genes. Despite the high degree of sequence variation, several sequences, including the size and the position of noncollagenous imperfections and interruptions within the Gly-X-Y repeat sequence, were precisely conserved. Finally, the mouse Col7a1 gene was located by interspecific backcross mapping to mouse Chromosome 9, a region that corresponds to human chromosome 3p21, the position of human COL7Al. This assignment confirms and extends the relationship between the mouse and the human chromosomes in this region of the genome. 33 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Collagen: Biochemistry, biomechanics, biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Nimni, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date reference for new ideas, information, and concepts in collagen research. The first volume emphasizes the relationship between the molecular structure and function of collagen, including descriptions of collagen types which exist in tissues as well as how these molecules organize into fibrils and the nature of the chemical crosslinks which stabilize them. In Volume II the biomechanical behavior of various specialized tissues, abnormal accumulation of collagen in the form of scars of fibrous infiltration are examined/and wound healing, tissue regulation and repair are covered in detail. Volume III explores the increasing application of collagen technology to the field of bioprosthesis, including the production of heart valve bioprosthesis, blood vessels, ligament substitutes, and bone substitutes.

  18. Correlating chemical changes in subchondral bone mineral due to aging or defective type II collagen by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehring, Karen A.; Roessler, Blake J.; Morris, Michael D.

    2007-02-01

    We show that early indicators of osteoarthritis are observed in Raman spectroscopy by probing femur surfaces excised from mouse models of early-onset osteoarthritis. Current clinical methods to examine arthritic joints include radiological examination of the joint, but may not be capable of detecting subtle chemical changes in the bone tissue, which may provide the earliest indications of osteoarthritis. Recent research has indicated that the subchondral bone may have a more significant role in the onset of osteoarthritis than previously realized. We will report the effect of age and defective type II collagen on Raman band area ratios used to describe bone structure and function. The carbonate-to-phosphate ratio is used to assess carbonate substitution into the bone mineral and the mineral-to-matrix ratio is used to measure bone mineralization. Mineral-to-matrix ratios indicate that subchondral bone becomes less mineralized as both the wild-type and Del1 (+/-) transgenic mice age. Moreover, the mineral-to-matrix ratios show that the subchondral bone of Del1 (+/-) transgenic mice is less mineralized than that of the wild-type mice. Carbonate-to-phosphate ratios from Del1 (+/-) transgenic mice follow the same longitudinal trend as wild-type mice. The ratio is slightly higher in the transgenic mice, indicating more carbonate content in the bone mineral. Raman characterization of bone mineralization provides an invaluable insight into the process of cartilage degeneration and the relationship with subchondral bone at the ultrastructural level.

  19. Phenotypic expressions of a Gly154Arg mutation in type II collagen in two unrelated patients with spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMD)

    SciTech Connect

    Kaitila, I.; Marttinen, E.; Koerkkoe, J.; Ala-Kokko, L.

    1996-05-03

    Type II collagenopathies consist of chondrodysplasia ranging from lethal to mild in severity. A large number of mutations has been found in the COL2A1 gene. Glycine substitutions have been the most common types of mutation. Genotype-phenotype correlations in type II collagenopathies have not been established, partly because of insufficient clinical and radiographic description of the patients. We found a glycine-to-arginine substitution at position 154 in type II collagen in two unrelated isolated propositi with spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia and provide a comparative clinical and radiographic analysis from birth to young adulthood for this condition. The clinical phenotype was disproportionate short stature with varus/valgus deformities of the lower limbs requiring corrective osteotomies, and lumbar lordosis. The skeletal radiographs showed an evolution from short tubular bones, delayed epiphyseal development, and mild vertebral involvement to severe metaphyseal dysplasia with dappling irregularities, and hip {open_quotes}dysplasia.{close_quotes} The metaphyseal abnormalities disappeared by adulthood. 27 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Comparison of sensory neuron growth cone and filopodial responses to structurally diverse aggrecan variants, in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Beller, Justin A.; Kulengowski, Brandon; Kobraei, Edward M.; Curinga, Gabrielle; Calulot, Christopher M.; Bahrami, Azita; Hering, Thomas M.; Snow, Diane M.

    2013-01-01

    Following spinal cord injury, a regenerating neurite encounters a glial scar enriched in chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), which presents a major barrier. There are two points at which a neurite makes contact with glial scar CSPGs: initially, filopodia surrounding the growth cone extend and make contact with CSPGs, then the peripheral domain of the entire growth cone makes CSPG contact. Aggrecan is a CSPG commonly used to model the effect CSPGs have on elongating or regenerating neurites. In this study, we investigated filopodial and growth cone responses to contact with structurally diverse aggrecan variants using the common stripe assay. Using time-lapse imaging with 15-sec intervals, we measured growth cone area, growth cone width, growth cone length, filopodia number, total filopodia length, and the length of the longest filopodia following contact with aggrecan. Responses were measured after both filopodia and growth cone contact with five different preparations of aggrecan: two forms of aggrecan derived from bovine articular cartilage (purified and prepared using different techniques), recombinant aggrecan lacking chondroitin sulfate side chains (produced in CHO-745 cells) and two additional recombinant aggrecan preparations with varying lengths of chondroitin sulfate side chains (produced in CHO-K1 and COS-7 cells). Responses in filopodia and growth cone behavior differed between the structurally diverse aggrecan variants. Mutant CHO-745 aggrecan (lacking chondroitin sulfate chains) permitted extensive growth across the PG stripe. Filopodia contact with the CHO-745 aggrecan caused a significant increase in growth cone width and filopodia length (112.7% ± 4.9 and 150.9% ± 7.2 respectively, p<0.05), and subsequently upon growth cone contact, growth cone width remained elevated along with a reduction in filopodia number (121.9% ± 4.2; 72.39% ± 6.4, p<0.05). COS-7 derived aggrecan inhibited neurite outgrowth following growth cone contact. Filopodia

  1. Plasma levels of N-telopeptide of Type I collagen in periodontal health, disease and after treatment

    PubMed Central

    Aruna, Ganganna

    2016-01-01

    Background: To determine plasma concentrations of bone resorption marker cross-linked N-terminal telopeptide (NTx) of Type I collagen in periodontal health, disease and after nonsurgical periodontal therapy in chronic periodontitis group. In addition, to know the association between plasma NTx levels and the different clinical parameters. Materials and Methods: Thirty subjects were divided on the basis of their periodontal status and were categorized as Group I: Healthy, Group II: Gingivitis, and Group III: Chronic periodontitis. Group III subjects were treated with scaling and root planing, 6-8 weeks later blood samples were analyzed, and they constituted Group IV. NTx levels in plasma were analyzed by competitive - enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All data were analyzed using statistical software (SPSS) (α = 0.05). Results: All the samples tested positive for the presence of NTx. The mean NTx concentration was highest in Group III (18.77 nanomole Bone Collagen Equivalent [nm BCE]) and the lowest in Group IV (16.02 nm BCE). The values of Group I and Group II fell between the highest and the lowest values (16.23 nm BCE and 16.70 nm BCE, respectively). The difference in mean NTx levels in Group III and Group IV were statistically significant. NTx levels in all the groups positively correlated with the clinical parameters. All data were analyzed using statistical software (SPSS) (α = 0.05). Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, it may be suggested that plasma NTx levels may provide distinguishing data between periodontally healthy diseased sites and after nonsurgical therapy of diseased sites. PMID:26962311

  2. CYTOKINE-INDUCED CHROMATIN MODIFICATIONS OF THE TYPE I COLLAGEN ALPHA 2 GENE DURING INTESTINAL ENDOTHELIAL-TO-MESENCHYMAL TRANSITION

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, Tammy; Scarpa, Melania; Rieder, Florian; West, Gail; Stylianou, Eleni

    2013-01-01

    Background Fibrosis of the intestine is currently an irreversible complication of Inflammatory Bowel Disease yet little is understood of the underlying pathogenesis and anti-fibrotic strategies remain elusive. To develop effective therapies, knowledge of the mechanism of transcription and excessive deposition of type I collagen - a hallmark of fibrosis, is needed. We have shown previously that endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndoMT) contributes to the pool of intestinal fibrotic cells and that a cytokine cocktail (IL1-β, TNF-α and TGF-β) induces Collagen I alpha 2 (COL1A2) mRNA and protein. Methods Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays on pure cultures of human intestinal mucosal endothelial cells undergoing EndoMT were performed with antibodies to specific histone modifications and RNA polymerase II. RT-PCR was used to quantify the levels of Col1A2 and endothelial specific von Willebrand factor (vWF) mRNA. Results We show that cytokines induce selective chromatin modifications (histone 4 hyperacetylation and hypermethylation of histone 3) and phosphorylated RNA polymerase II at the COL1A2 promoter. Hypoacetylated and hypomethylated histone 3 was detected on the repressed vWF gene. Prolonged exposure to cytokines (16 days) retained hyperacetylation of select lysines in H4 on the COL1A2 promoter. Removal of cytokines after 16 days and continued culture for 10 days, showed persistent hyperacetylation at lysine 16 in histone H4. Conclusion This is the first study to show that COL1A2 gene expression is associated with cytokine-induced, temporally ordered and persistent chromatin modifications and suggests that these are important determinants of gene expression in EndoMT and intestinal fibrosis. PMID:23635716

  3. Expression and characterization of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) matrix metalloproteinase-2 and its activity against type I collagen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ci; Zhan, Chun-Lan; Cai, Qiu-Feng; Du, Cui-Hong; Liu, Guang-Ming; Su, Wen-Jin; Cao, Min-Jie

    2014-05-10

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play essential roles in the metabolism of animal collagen while few reports are available for MMPs in aquatic animals. In this study, we report the complete sequence of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) gene from common carp (Cyprinus carpio) skeletal muscle. The full-length cDNA of MMP-2 was 2792bp which contains an open reading frame of 1974bp, corresponding to a protein of 657 amino acid residues. Based on the structural feature of MMP-2, the gene of the catalytic domain containing 351 amino acid residues was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. SDS-PAGE showed that the truncated recombinant MMP-2 (trMMP-2) with molecular mass of approximately 38kDa was in the form of inclusion body. The trMMP-2 was further purified by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. After renaturation, similar to native MMP-2, the trMMP-2 exhibited high hydrolyzing activity toward gelatin as appeared on gelatin zymography and optimal activity was at pH 8.0 and 40°C. The activity of the trMMP-2 was completely suppressed by metalloproteinase inhibitors, including EDTA, EGTA and 1,10-phenanthroline while other proteinase inhibitors did not show any inhibitory effect. Divalent metal ion Ca(2+) was necessary for the gelatinolytic activity, suggesting it is a calcium-dependent metalloproteinase. Moreover, the trMMP-2 effectively hydrolyzed native type I collagen at 37°C and even at 4°C, implying its potential application value as a collagenase for preparation of biologically active oligopeptides. PMID:24613299

  4. Recombinant growth factor mixtures induce cell cycle progression and the upregulation of type I collagen in human skin fibroblasts, resulting in the acceleration of wound healing processes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do Hyun; Choi, Kyung-Ha; Cho, Jae-We; Kim, So Young; Kwon, Tae Rin; Choi, Sun Young; Choi, Yoo Mi; Lee, Jay; Yoon, Ho Sang; Kim, Beom Joon

    2014-05-01

    Application of growth factor mixtures has been used for wound healing and anti-wrinkles agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of recombinant growth factor mixtures (RGFM) on the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins, type I collagen, and wound healing processes of acute animal wound models. The results showed that RGFM induced increased rates of cell proliferation and cell migration of human skin fibroblasts (HSF). In addition, expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)4, and Cdk2 proteins was markedly increased with a growth factor mixtures treatment in fibroblasts. Expression of type I collagen was also increased in growth factor mixtures-treated HSF. Moreover, growth factor mixtures-induced the upregulation of type I collagen was associated with the activation of Smad2/3. In the animal model, RGFM-treated mice showed accelerated wound closure, with the closure rate increasing as early as on day 7, as well as re-epithelization and reduced inflammatory cell infiltration than phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-treated mice. In conclusion, the results indicated that RGFM has the potential to accelerate wound healing through the upregulation of type I collagen, which is partly mediated by activation of Smad2/3-dependent signaling pathway as well as cell cycle progression in HSF. The topical application of growth factor mixtures to acute and chronic skin wound may accelerate the epithelization process through these molecular mechanisms. PMID:24626875

  5. Biomaterials/scaffolds. Design of bioactive, multiphasic PCL/collagen type I and type II-PCL-TCP/collagen composite scaffolds for functional tissue engineering of osteochondral repair tissue by using electrospinning and FDM techniques.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Detlef; Ekaputra, Andrew K; Lam, Christopher X F; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2007-01-01

    Current clinical therapies for traumatic or chronic injuries involving osteochondral tissue result in temporary pain reduction and filling of the defect but with biomechanically inferior repair tissue. Tissue engineering of osteochondral repair tissue using autologous cells and bioactive biomaterials has the potential to overcome the current limitations and results in native-like repair tissue with good integration capabilities. For this reason, we applied two modem biomaterial design techniques, namely, electrospinning and fused deposition modeling (FDM), to produce bioactive poly(epsilon-caprolactone)/collagen (PCL/Col) type I and type II-PCL-tri-calcium phosphate (TCP)/Col composites for precursor cell-based osteochondral repair. The application of these two design techniques (electrospinning and FDM) allowed us to specifically produce the a suitable three-dimensional (3D) environment for the cells to grow into a particular tissue (cartilage and bone) in vitro prior to in vivo implantation. We hypothesize that our new designed biomaterials, seeded with autologous bone marrow-derived precursor cells, in combination with bioreactor-stimulated cell-culture techniques can be used to produce clinically relevant osteochondral repair tissue. PMID:18085205

  6. Bone resorption analysis of platelet-derived growth factor type BB application on collagen for bone grafts secured by titanium mesh over a pig jaw defect model

    PubMed Central

    Herford, Alan Scott; Cicciù, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this investigation was to evaluate whether the addition of the platelet derived growth factor type BB (PDGF-BB) to a collagen matrix applied on a titanium mesh would favor healing and resorption onto the grafted bone. A histologic and radiographic study of two different groups (test and control) was performed. Designs: A surgical procedure was performed on 8 pigs to obtain 16 bilateral mandibular alveolar defects. All the defects were then reconstructed with a mixture of autogenous bovine bone using titanium mesh positioning. Two groups, with a total of 16 defects were created: The first to study collagen sponge and PDGF-BB and the second to control collagen only. The collagen matrix was positioned directly over the mesh and soft tissue was closed without tensions onto both groups without attempting to obtain primary closure. Possible exposure of the titanium mesh as well as the height and volume of the new bone was recorded. Results: New bone formation averaged about 6.68 mm in the test group studied; the control group had less regenerated bone at 4.62 mm. Conclusion: PDGF-BB addition to the collagen matrix induced a strong increase in hard and soft tissue healing and favored bone formation, reducing bone resorption even if the mesh was exposed. PMID:23833493

  7. Glycine substitutions in the triple-helical region of type VII collagen result in a spectrum of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa phenotypes and patterns of inheritance

    SciTech Connect

    Christiano, A.M.; McGrath, J.A.; Uitto, J.; Kong Chong Tan

    1996-04-01

    The dystrophic forms of epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) are characterized by fragility of the skin and mucous membranes. DEB can be inherited in either an autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive pattern, and the spectrum of clinical severity is highly variable. The unifying diagnostic hallmark of DEB is abnormalities in the anchoring fibrils, which consist of type VII collagen, and recently, mutations in the corresponding gene, COL7A1, have been disclosed in a number of families. In this study, we report six families with glycine substitution mutations in the triple-helical region of type VII collagen. Among the six families, two demonstrated a mild phenotype, and the inheritance of the mutation was consistent with the dominantly inherited form of DEB. In the four other families, the mutation was silent in the heterozygous state but, when present in the homozygous state, or combined with a second mutation, resulted in a recessively inherited DEB phenotype. Type VII collagen is, therefore, unique among the collagen genes, in that different glycine substitutions can be either silent in heterozygous individuals or result in a dominantly inherited DEB. Inspection of the locations of the glycine substitutions along the COL7A1 polypeptide suggests that the consequences of these mutations, in terms of phenotype and pattern of inheritance, are position independent. 29 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Precipitation of Calcium Phosphates in the Presence of Collagen Type I on Four Different Bioactive Titanium Surfaces: an in Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Olander, Julia; Kjellin, Per; Currie, Fredrik; Sul, Young-Taeg; Anna, Arvidsson

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To compare the properties of calcium phosphate precipitation on four different bioactive surface preparations and one control surface in the simulated body fluid model with added collagen type I. Material and Methods Blasted titanium discs were treated with four different surface modifications, alkali and heat, sodium fluoride, anodic oxidation and hydroxyapatite coating. The discs were divided into five groups where one group, the blasted, served as control. The discs were immersed in simulated body fluid and collagen for 24 h, 3 days, 1 week and 2 weeks and then analysed by optical interferometry, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results All surfaces show small precipitates after 3 days which with longer immersion times increase. After 2 weeks the surfaces were completely covered with precipitates, and Ca/P ratios were approximately 1.3, independently on surface preparation. The fluoridated discs showed significantly (P ≤ 0.05) higher degree of CaP after one week of immersion as compared to the other surface preparations. The collagen type I content increased with time, as reflected by increased nitrogen content. Conclusions The results from this study indicate that a fluoridated titanium surface may favour precipitation of calcium phosphate in the presence of collagen type I, as compared to the other surface treatments of the present study. PMID:26904178

  9. Enhanced immunoregulation of mesenchymal stem cells by IL-10-producing type 1 regulatory T cells in collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jung-Yeon; Im, Keon-Il; Lee, Eun-Sol; Kim, Nayoun; Nam, Young-Sun; Jeon, Young-Woo; Cho, Seok-Goo

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess immunomodulatory properties and have potential, however, there have been conflicting reports regarding their effects in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), which causes inflammation and destruction of the joints. Through a comparative analysis of regulatory T (Treg) and IL-10-producing type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells, we hypothesized that Tr1 cells enhance the immunoregulatory functions of MSCs, and that a combinatorial approach to cell therapy may exert synergistic immunomodulatory effects in an experimental animal model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A combination of MSCs and Tr1 cells prevented the development of destructive arthritis compared to single cell therapy. These therapeutic effects were associated with an increase in type II collagen (CII)-specific CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells and inhibition of CII-specific CD4+IL-17+ T cells. We observed that Tr1 cells produce high levels of IL-10-dependent interferon (IFN)-β, which induces toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 expression in MSCs. Moreover, induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by TLR3 involved an autocrine IFN-β that was dependent on STAT1 signaling. Furthermore, we observed that production of IFN-β and IL-10 in Tr1 cells synergistically induces IDO in MSCs through the STAT1 pathway. These findings suggest co-administration of MSCs and Tr1 cells to be a novel therapeutic modality for clinical autoimmune diseases. PMID:27246365

  10. Premature termination codons in the Type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) underlie severe, mutilating recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

    SciTech Connect

    Christiano, A.M.; Uitto, J. ); Anhalt, G. ); Gibbons, S.; Bauer, E.A. )

    1994-05-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a group of heritable mechano-bullous skin diseases classified into three major categories on the basis of the level of tissue separation within the dermal-epidermal basement membrane zone. The most severe, dystrophic (scarring) forms of EB demonstrate blister formation below the cutaneous basement membrane at the level of the anchoring fibrils. Ultrastructural observations of altered anchoring fibrils and genetic linkage to the gene encoding type VII collagen (COL7A1), the major component of anchoring fibrils, have implicated COL7A1 as the candidate gene in the dystrophic forms of EB. The authors have recently cloned the entire cDNA and gene for human COL7A1, which has been mapped to 3p21. In this study, they describe mutations in four COL7A1 alleles in three patients with severe, mutilating recessive dystrophic EB (Hallopeau-Siemens type, HS-RDEB). Each of these mutations resulted in a premature termination codon (PTC) in the amino-terminal portion of COL7A1. One of the patients was a compound heterozygote for two different mutations. The heterozygous carriers showed an [approximately] 50% reduction in anchoring fibrils, yet were clinically unaffected. Premature termination codons in both alleles of COL7A1 may thus be a major underlying cause of the severe, recessive dystrophic forms of EB. 40 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Immunosuppressive activity of deer antler extracts of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe, on type II collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Koo; Kim, Kap-Sung; Kim, Sung-Il; Chung, Kang-Hyun; Lee, In-Seon; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2006-01-01

    Unossified horn or pilose antler cut from deer, which belong to the Cervidae generally is termed Nokyong. Nokyong is one of the most famous Korean traditional medicines and has been considered to possess sexual-reinforcing and antiaging actions. In this study, water extract of deer antler extract (DAA) prepared from the growing antler of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe was used to investigate the efficacy of the DAA on the development of type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats. Male rats were immunized with an emulsion of 200 microg of CII and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). The rats then were administered by injection a suspension of DAA or phosphate-buffered saline. The effect of DAA on cellular responses to CII was examined. The injection of DAA suppressed the CII-specific secretion of interferon (IFN)-gamma from splenocytes ex vivo. The influence of DAA also was evaluated on the incidence and development of arthritis in rat CIA. Rats were immunized twice at a 3-wk interval with bovine CII, with DAA being given by injection once a d for 14 d with four different regimens. A 14-d course of DAA treatment at a daily dose of 100 microg/kg, which began on the d of the first CII immunization, suppressed the development of arthritis, as well as antibody formation and delayed-type hypersensitivity to CII. Treatment with DAA resulted in inhibition of development of arthritis and immune responses to CII. PMID:16759146

  12. Enhanced immunoregulation of mesenchymal stem cells by IL-10-producing type 1 regulatory T cells in collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jung-Yeon; Im, Keon-Il; Lee, Eun-Sol; Kim, Nayoun; Nam, Young-Sun; Jeon, Young-Woo; Cho, Seok-Goo

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess immunomodulatory properties and have potential, however, there have been conflicting reports regarding their effects in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), which causes inflammation and destruction of the joints. Through a comparative analysis of regulatory T (Treg) and IL-10-producing type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells, we hypothesized that Tr1 cells enhance the immunoregulatory functions of MSCs, and that a combinatorial approach to cell therapy may exert synergistic immunomodulatory effects in an experimental animal model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A combination of MSCs and Tr1 cells prevented the development of destructive arthritis compared to single cell therapy. These therapeutic effects were associated with an increase in type II collagen (CII)-specific CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells and inhibition of CII-specific CD4+IL-17+ T cells. We observed that Tr1 cells produce high levels of IL-10-dependent interferon (IFN)-β, which induces toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 expression in MSCs. Moreover, induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by TLR3 involved an autocrine IFN-β that was dependent on STAT1 signaling. Furthermore, we observed that production of IFN-β and IL-10 in Tr1 cells synergistically induces IDO in MSCs through the STAT1 pathway. These findings suggest co-administration of MSCs and Tr1 cells to be a novel therapeutic modality for clinical autoimmune diseases. PMID:27246365

  13. Cloning of the human type XVII collagen gene (COL17A1), and detection of novel mutations in generalized atrophic benign epidermolysis bullosa

    SciTech Connect

    Gatalica, B.; Pulkkinen, L.; Li, K.

    1997-02-01

    Generalized atrophic benign epidermolysis bullosa (GABEB) is a nonlethal variant of junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB). Previous findings have suggested that type XVII collagen is the candidate gene for mutations in this disease. We now have cloned the entire human type XVII collagen gene (COL17A1) and have elucidated its intron-exon organization. The gene comprises 56 distinct exons, which span {approximately}52 kb of the genome, on the long arm of chromosome 10. It encodes a polypeptide, the {alpha}1(XVII) chain, consisting of an intracellular globular domain, a transmembrane segment, and an extracellular domain that contains 15 separate collagenous subdomains, the largest consisting of 242 amino acids. We also have developed a strategy to identify mutations in COL17A1 by use of PCR amplification of genomic DNA, using primers placed on the flanking introns. The PCR products are scanned for sequence variants by heteroduplex analysis using conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis and then are subjected to direct automated sequencing. We have identified several intragenic polymorphisms in COL17A1, as well as mutations, in both alleles, in two Finnish families with GABEB. The probands in both families showed negative immunofluorescence staining with an anti-type XVII collagen antibody. In one family, the proband was homozygous for a 5-bp deletion, 2944del5, which resulted in frameshift and a premature termination codon of translation. The proband in the other family was a compound heterozygote, with one allele containing the 2944del5 mutation and the other containing a nonsense mutation, Q1023X. These results expand the mutation database in different variants of JEB, and they attest to the functional importance of type XVII collagen as a transmembrane component of the hemidesmosomes at the dermal/epidermal junction. 48 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Relation of Internal Elastic Lamellar Layer Disruption to Neointimal Cellular Proliferation and Type III Collagen Deposition in Human Peripheral Artery Restenosis.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Prakash; Purushothaman, K-Raman; Purushothaman, Meerarani; Baber, Usman; Tarricone, Arthur; Vasquez, Miguel; Wiley, Jose; Kini, Annapoorna; Sharma, Samin K; O'Connor, William N; Moreno, Pedro R

    2016-04-01

    Smooth muscle cell proliferation and extracellular matrix formation are responsible for disease progression in de novo and restenotic atherosclerosis. Internal elastic lamella (IEL) layer maintains the structural integrity of intima, and disruption of IEL may be associated with alterations in neointima, type III collagen deposition, and lesion progression in restenosis. Nineteen restenotic plaques (12 patients) procured during peripheral interventions were compared with 13 control plaques (12 patients) without restenosis. Hematoxylin & Eosin and elastic trichrome stains were used to measure length and percentage of IEL disruption, cellularity, and inflammation score. Type I and III collagens, smooth muscle cell (smc), fibroblast density, and nuclear proliferation (Ki67) percentage were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. IEL disruption percentage (28 ± 3.6 vs 6.1 ± 2.4; p = 0.0006), type III collagen content (0.33 ± 0.06 vs 0.17 ± 0.07; p = 0.0001), smc density (2014 ± 120 vs 923 ± 150; p = 0.0001), fibroblast density (2,282 ± 297 vs 906 ± 138; p = 0.0001), and Ki67 percentage (21.6 ± 2 vs 8.2 ± 0.65; p = 0.0001) were significantly increased in restenotic plaques compared to de novo plaques. Logistic regression analysis identified significant correlation between IEL disruption and neointimal smc density (r = 0.45; p = 0.01) and with type III collagen deposition (r = 0.61; p = 0.02) in restenosis. Increased IEL disruption may trigger cellular proliferation, altering collagen production, and enhancing restenotic neointima. In conclusion, understanding the pathologic and molecular basis of restenosis and meticulous-guided interventions oriented to minimize IEL damage may aid to reduce neointimal proliferation and the occurrence of restenosis. PMID:26857165

  15. Vasopressin inhibits type-I collagen and albumin gene expression in primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chojkier, M.; Brenner, D.A.; Leffert, H.L.

    1989-06-05

    The mechanisms that regulate collagen gene expression in hepatic cells are poorly understood. Accelerated Ca2+ fluxes are associated with inhibiting collagen synthesis selectively in human fibroblasts. In suspension cultures of isolated hepatocytes, the Ca2+ agonist vasopressin increases cytosolic levels of free Ca2+. However, whether vasopressin's interactions with plasma membrane V1 receptors attenuate hepatic collagen production is unknown. We investigated this problem by studying vasopressin's effects on collagen synthesis and Ca2+ efflux in long-term primary cultures of differentiated and proliferation-competent adult rat hepatocytes. Twelve-day-old quiescent cultures were exposed to test substances and labeled with (5-3H)proline. Determinations of radioactivity in collagenase-sensitive and collagenase-resistant proteins were used to calculate the relative levels of collagen production. Synthetic (8-arg)vasopressin stimulated 45Ca2+ efflux within 1 min and inhibited hepatocyte collagen production within 3 h by 50%; overall rates of protein synthesis were not affected significantly. In cultures labeled with (35S)methionine, vasopressin also decreased the levels of newly synthesized and secreted albumin, but not fibrinogen, detected in specific immunoprecipitates analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Northern blot analyses using specific (32P)cDNA probes revealed 70% decreases in hybridizable levels of collagen alpha 1(I) mRNA in hepatocyte cultures treated with either vasopressin or Ca2+ ionophore A23187; hybridizable levels of albumin mRNA also fell approximately 50% following vasopressin treatment.

  16. MAP-kinase activity necessary for TGFbeta1-stimulated mesangial cell type I collagen expression requires adhesion-dependent phosphorylation of FAK tyrosine 397.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Tomoko; Wu, Ming-Hua; Pierce, Amy; Poncelet, Anne-Christine; Varga, John; Schnaper, H William

    2007-12-01

    The signals mediating transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta)-stimulated kidney fibrogenesis are poorly understood. We previously reported TGFbeta-stimulated, Smad-mediated collagen production by human kidney mesangial cells, and that ERK MAP kinase activity optimizes collagen expression and enhances phosphorylation of the Smad3 linker region. Furthermore, we showed that disrupting cytoskeletal integrity decreases type I collagen production. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK, PTK2) activity could integrate these findings. Adhesion-dependent FAK Y397 phosphorylation was detected basally, whereas FAK Y925 phosphorylation was TGFbeta1-dependent. By immunocytochemistry, TGFbeta1 stimulated the merging of phosphorylated FAK with the ends of thickening stress fibers. Cells cultured on poly-L-lysine (pLL) to promote integrin-independent attachment spread less than those on control substrate and failed to demonstrate focal adhesion (FA) engagement with F-actin. FAK Y397 phosphorylation and ERK activity were also decreased under these conditions. In cells with decreased FAK Y397 phosphorylation from either plating on pLL or overexpressing a FAK Y397F point mutant, serine phosphorylation of the Smad linker region, but not of the C-terminus, was reduced. Y397F and Y925F FAK point mutants inhibited TGFbeta-induced Elk-Gal activity, but only the Y397F mutant inhibited TGFbeta-stimulated collagen-promoter activity. The inhibition by the Y397F mutant or by culture on pLL was prevented by co-transfection of constitutively active ERK MAP kinase kinase (MEK), suggesting that FAK Y397 phosphorylation promotes collagen expression via ERK MAP kinase activity. Finally, Y397 FAK phosphorylation, and both C-terminal and linker-region Smad3 phosphorylation were detected in murine TGFbeta-dependent kidney fibrosis. Together, these data demonstrate adhesion-dependent FAK phosphorylation promoting TGFbeta-induced responses to regulate collagen production. PMID:18032789

  17. Identification of the NC1 Domain of α3 Chain as Critical for α3α4α5 Type IV Collagen Network Assembly

    PubMed Central

    LeBleu, Valerie; Sund, Malin; Sugimoto, Hikaru; Birrane, Gabriel; Kanasaki, Keizo; Finan, Elizabeth; Miller, Caroline A.; Gattone, Vincent H.; McLaughlin, Heather; Shield, Charles F.; Kalluri, Raghu

    2010-01-01

    The network organization of type IV collagen consisting of α3, α4, and α5 chains in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) is speculated to involve interactions of the triple helical and NC1 domain of individual α-chains, but in vivo evidence is lacking. To specifically address the contribution of the NC1 domain in the GBM collagen network organization, we generated a mouse with specific loss of α3NC1 domain while keeping the triple helical α3 chain intact by connecting it to the human α5NC1 domain. The absence of α3NC1 domain leads to the complete loss of the α4 chain. The α3 collagenous domain is incapable of incorporating the α5 chain, resulting in the impaired organization of the α3α4α5 chain-containing network. Although the α5 chain can assemble with the α1, α2, and α6 chains, such assembly is incapable of functionally replacing the α3α4α5 protomer. This novel approach to explore the assembly type IV collagen in vivo offers novel insights in the specific role of the NC1 domain in the assembly and function of GBM during health and disease. PMID:20847057

  18. Plexin D1 determines body fat distribution by regulating the type V collagen microenvironment in visceral adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Minchin, James E. N.; Dahlman, Ingrid; Harvey, Christopher J.; Mejhert, Niklas; Singh, Manvendra K.; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Arner, Peter; Torres-Vázquez, Jesús; Rawls, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have implicated PLEXIN D1 (PLXND1) in body fat distribution and type 2 diabetes. However, a role for PLXND1 in regional adiposity and insulin resistance is unknown. Here we use in vivo imaging and genetic analysis in zebrafish to show that Plxnd1 regulates body fat distribution and insulin sensitivity. Plxnd1 deficiency in zebrafish induced hyperplastic morphology in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and reduced lipid storage. In contrast, subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) growth and morphology were unaffected, resulting in altered body fat distribution and a reduced VAT:SAT ratio in zebrafish. A VAT-specific role for Plxnd1 appeared conserved in humans, as PLXND1 mRNA was positively associated with hypertrophic morphology in VAT, but not SAT. In zebrafish plxnd1 mutants, the effect on VAT morphology and body fat distribution was dependent on induction of the extracellular matrix protein collagen type V alpha 1 (col5a1). Furthermore, after high-fat feeding, zebrafish plxnd1 mutant VAT was resistant to expansion, and excess lipid was disproportionately deposited in SAT, leading to an even greater exacerbation of altered body fat distribution. Plxnd1-deficient zebrafish were protected from high-fat-diet-induced insulin resistance, and human VAT PLXND1 mRNA was positively associated with type 2 diabetes, suggesting a conserved role for PLXND1 in insulin sensitivity. Together, our findings identify Plxnd1 as a novel regulator of VAT growth, body fat distribution, and insulin sensitivity in both zebrafish and humans. PMID:25831505

  19. Plexin D1 determines body fat distribution by regulating the type V collagen microenvironment in visceral adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Minchin, James E N; Dahlman, Ingrid; Harvey, Christopher J; Mejhert, Niklas; Singh, Manvendra K; Epstein, Jonathan A; Arner, Peter; Torres-Vázquez, Jesús; Rawls, John F

    2015-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies have implicated PLEXIN D1 (PLXND1) in body fat distribution and type 2 diabetes. However, a role for PLXND1 in regional adiposity and insulin resistance is unknown. Here we use in vivo imaging and genetic analysis in zebrafish to show that Plxnd1 regulates body fat distribution and insulin sensitivity. Plxnd1 deficiency in zebrafish induced hyperplastic morphology in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and reduced lipid storage. In contrast, subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) growth and morphology were unaffected, resulting in altered body fat distribution and a reduced VAT:SAT ratio in zebrafish. A VAT-specific role for Plxnd1 appeared conserved in humans, as PLXND1 mRNA was positively associated with hypertrophic morphology in VAT, but not SAT. In zebrafish plxnd1 mutants, the effect on VAT morphology and body fat distribution was dependent on induction of the extracellular matrix protein collagen type V alpha 1 (col5a1). Furthermore, after high-fat feeding, zebrafish plxnd1 mutant VAT was resistant to expansion, and excess lipid was disproportionately deposited in SAT, leading to an even greater exacerbation of altered body fat distribution. Plxnd1-deficient zebrafish were protected from high-fat-diet-induced insulin resistance, and human VAT PLXND1 mRNA was positively associated with type 2 diabetes, suggesting a conserved role for PLXND1 in insulin sensitivity. Together, our findings identify Plxnd1 as a novel regulator of VAT growth, body fat distribution, and insulin sensitivity in both zebrafish and humans. PMID:25831505

  20. Bioengineered collagens

    PubMed Central

    Ramshaw, John AM; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Dumsday, Geoff J

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian collagen has been widely used as a biomedical material. Nevertheless, there are still concerns about the variability between preparations, particularly with the possibility that the products may transmit animal-based diseases. Many groups have examined the possible application of bioengineered mammalian collagens. However, translating laboratory studies into large-scale manufacturing has often proved difficult, although certain yeast and plant systems seem effective. Production of full-length mammalian collagens, with the required secondary modification to give proline hydroxylation, has proved difficult in E. coli. However, recently, a new group of collagens, which have the characteristic triple helical structure of collagen, has been identified in bacteria. These proteins are stable without the need for hydroxyproline and are able to be produced and purified from E. coli in high yield. Initial studies indicate that they would be suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:24717980

  1. Aminoglycosides Restore Full-length Type VII Collagen by Overcoming Premature Termination Codons: Therapeutic Implications for Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Cogan, Jon; Weinstein, Jacqueline; Wang, Xinyi; Hou, Yingping; Martin, Sabrina; South, Andrew P; Woodley, David T; Chen, Mei

    2014-01-01

    Patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) have severe, incurable skin fragility, blistering, and multiple skin wounds due to mutations in the gene encoding type VII collagen (C7), the major component of anchoring fibrils mediating epidermal-dermal adherence. Nearly 10–25% of RDEB patients carry nonsense mutations leading to premature stop codons (PTCs) that result in truncated C7. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of using aminoglycosides to suppress PTCs and induce C7 expression in two RDEB keratinocyte cell lines (Q251X/Q251X and R578X/R906) and two primary RDEB fibroblasts (R578X/R578X and R163X/R1683X). Incubation of these cells with aminoglycosides (geneticin, gentamicin, and paromomycin) resulted in the synthesis and secretion of a full-length C7 in a dose-dependent and sustained manner. Importantly, aminoglycoside-induced C7 reversed the abnormal RDEB cell phenotype and incorporated into the dermal-epidermal junction of skin equivalents. We further demonstrated the general utility of aminoglycoside-mediated readthrough in 293 cells transiently transfected with expression vectors encoding 22 different RDEB nonsense mutations. This is the first study demonstrating that aminoglycosides can induce PTC readthrough and restore functional C7 in RDEB caused by nonsense mutations. Therefore, aminoglycosides may have therapeutic potential for RDEB patients and other inherited skin diseases caused by nonsense mutations. PMID:25155989

  2. A novel type II collagen gene mutation in a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and extensive intrafamilial phenotypic diversity.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yasuharu; Sakamoto, Yuma; Nishimura, Gen; Ikegawa, Shiro; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia caused by a novel type II collagen gene (COL2A1) mutation and the family's phenotypic diversity. Clinical and radiographic examinations of skeletal dysplasia were conducted on seven affected family members across two generations. The entire coding region of COL2A1, including the flanking intron regions, was analyzed with PCR and direct sequencing. The stature of the subjects ranged from extremely short to within normal height range. Hip deformity and advanced osteoarthritis were noted in all the subjects, ranging from severe coxa plana to mild acetabular dysplasia. Atlantoaxial subluxation combined with a hypoplastic odontoid process was found in three of the subjects. Various degrees of platyspondyly were confirmed in all subjects. Genetically, a novel COL2A1 mutation (c.1349G>C, p.Gly450Ala) was identified in all the affected family members; however, it was not present in the one unaffected family member tested. We described a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and a novel COL2A1 mutation (c.1349G>C, p.Gly450Ala). Phenotypes were diverse even among individuals with the same mutation and within the same family. PMID:27274858

  3. A novel type II collagen gene mutation in a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and extensive intrafamilial phenotypic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Yasuharu; Sakamoto, Yuma; Nishimura, Gen; Ikegawa, Shiro; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia caused by a novel type II collagen gene (COL2A1) mutation and the family’s phenotypic diversity. Clinical and radiographic examinations of skeletal dysplasia were conducted on seven affected family members across two generations. The entire coding region of COL2A1, including the flanking intron regions, was analyzed with PCR and direct sequencing. The stature of the subjects ranged from extremely short to within normal height range. Hip deformity and advanced osteoarthritis were noted in all the subjects, ranging from severe coxa plana to mild acetabular dysplasia. Atlantoaxial subluxation combined with a hypoplastic odontoid process was found in three of the subjects. Various degrees of platyspondyly were confirmed in all subjects. Genetically, a novel COL2A1 mutation (c.1349G>C, p.Gly450Ala) was identified in all the affected family members; however, it was not present in the one unaffected family member tested. We described a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and a novel COL2A1 mutation (c.1349G>C, p.Gly450Ala). Phenotypes were diverse even among individuals with the same mutation and within the same family. PMID:27274858

  4. Cell-surface serglycin promotes adhesion of myeloma cells to collagen type I and affects the expression of matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Skliris, Antonis; Labropoulou, Vassiliki T; Papachristou, Dionysios J; Aletras, Alexios; Karamanos, Nikos K; Theocharis, Achilleas D

    2013-05-01

    Serglycin (SG) is mainly expressed by hematopoetic cells as an intracellular proteoglycan. Multiple myeloma cells constitutively secrete SG, which is also localized on the cell surface in some cell lines. In this study, SG isolated from myeloma cells was found to interact with collagen type I (Col I), which is a major bone matrix component. Notably, myeloma cells positive for cell-surface SG (csSG) adhered significantly to Col I, compared to cells lacking csSG. Removal of csSG by treatment of the cells with chondroitinase ABC or blocking of csSG by an SG-specific polyclonal antibody significantly reduced the adhesion of myeloma cells to Col I. Significant up-regulation of expression of the matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 at both the mRNA and protein levels was observed when culturing csSG-positive myeloma cells on Col I-coated dishes or in the presence of soluble Col I. MMP-9 and MMP-2 were also expressed in increased amounts by myeloma cells in the bone marrow of patients with multiple myeloma. Our data indicate that csSG of myeloma cells affects key functional properties, such as adhesion to Col I and the expression of MMPs, and imply that csSG may serve as a potential prognostic factor and/or target for pharmacological interventions in multiple myeloma. PMID:23387827

  5. IL-17 induces type V collagen overexpression and EMT via TGF-β-dependent pathways in obliterative bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Vittal, Ragini; Fan, Lin; Greenspan, Daniel S.; Mickler, Elizabeth A.; Gopalakrishnan, Bagavathi; Gu, Hongmei; Benson, Heather L.; Zhang, Chen; Burlingham, William; Cummings, Oscar W.

    2013-01-01

    Obliterative bronchiolitis (OB), a fibrotic airway lesion, is the leading cause of death after lung transplantation. Type V collagen [col(V)] overexpression and IL-17-mediated anti-col(V) immunity are key contributors to OB pathogenesis. Here, we report a previously undefined role of IL-17 in inducing col(V) overexpression, leading to epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) and subsequent OB. We observed IL-17-mediated induction of col(V) α1 chains [α1 (V)] in normal airway epithelial cells in vitro and detected α1 (V)-specific antibodies in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of lung transplant patients. Overexpression of IL-17 and col(V) was detected in OB lesions in patient lung biopsies and in a murine OB model. IL-17 is shown to induce EMT, TGF-β mRNA expression, and SMAD3 activation, whereas downregulating SMAD7 expression in vitro. Pharmacological inhibition of TGF-βRI tyrosine kinase, p38 MAPK, or focal adhesion kinase prevented col(V) overexpression and EMT. In murine orthotopic lung transplants, neutralizing IL-17 significantly decreased TGF-β mRNA and protein expression and prevented epithelial repair/OB. Our findings highlight a feed-forward loop between IL-17 and TGF-β, leading to induction of col(V) and associated epithelial repair, thus providing one possible link between autoimmunity and OB after lung transplantation. PMID:23262228

  6. Osteochondral regeneration using an oriented nanofiber yarn-collagen type I/hyaluronate hybrid/TCP biphasic scaffold.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shen; Wu, Jinglei; Liu, Xudong; Chen, Desheng; Bowlin, Gary L; Cao, Lei; Lu, Jianxi; Li, Fengfeng; Mo, Xiumei; Fan, Cunyi

    2015-02-01

    Osteochondral defects affect both the articular cartilage and the underlying subchondral bone, but poor osteochondral regeneration is still a daunting challenge. Although the tissue engineering technology provides a promising approach for osteochondral repair, an ideal biphasic scaffold is in high demand with regards to proper biomechanical strength. In this study, an oriented poly(l-lacticacid)-co-poly(ε-caprolactone) P(LLA-CL)/collagen type I(Col-I) nanofiber yarn mesh, fabricated by dynamic liquid electrospinning served as a skeleton for a freeze-dried Col-I/Hhyaluronate (HA) chondral phase (SPONGE) to enhance the mechanical strength of the scaffold. In vitro results show that the Yarn Col-I/HA hybrid scaffold (Yarn-CH) can allow the cell infiltration like sponge scaffolds. Using porous beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) as the osseous phase, the Yarn-CH/TCP biphasic scaffold was then assembled by freeze drying. After combination of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, the biphasic complex was successfully used to repair the osteochondral defects in a rabbit model with greatly improved repairing scores and compressive modulus. PMID:24771686

  7. Constructing bio-layer of heparin and type IV collagen on titanium surface for improving its endothelialization and blood compatibility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Chen, Jun-ying; Qin, Wei; Li, Jing-an; Guan, Fang-xia; Huang, Nan

    2016-04-01

    The modification of cardiovascular stent surface for a better micro-environment has gradually changed to multi-molecule, multi-functional designation. In this study, heparin (Hep) and type IV collagen (IVCol) were used as the functional molecule to construct a bifunctional micro-environment of anticoagulation and promoting endothelialization on titanium (Ti). The surface characterization results (AFM, Alcian Blue 8GX Staining and fluorescence staining of IVCol) indicated that the bio-layer of Hep and IVCol were successfully fabricated on the Ti surface through electrostatic self-assembly. The APTT and platelet adhesion test demonstrated that the bionic layer possessed better blood compatibility compared with Ti surface. The adhesion, proliferation, migration and apoptosis tests of endothelial cells proved that the Hep/IVCol layer was able to enhance the endothelialization of the Ti surface. The in vivo animal implantation results manifested that the bionic surface could encourage new endothelialization. This work provides an important reference for the construction of multifunction micro-environment on the cardiovascular scaffold surface. PMID:26936367

  8. Mutations in collagen, type XVII, alpha 1 (COL17A1) cause epithelial recurrent erosion dystrophy (ERED).

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Frida; Byström, Berit; Davidson, Alice E; Backman, Ludvig J; Kellgren, Therese G; Tuft, Stephen J; Koskela, Timo; Rydén, Patrik; Sandgren, Ola; Danielson, Patrik; Hardcastle, Alison J; Golovleva, Irina

    2015-04-01

    Corneal dystrophies are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited disorders that bilaterally affect corneal transparency. They are defined according to the corneal layer affected and by their genetic cause. In this study, we identified a dominantly inherited epithelial recurrent erosion dystrophy (ERED)-like disease that is common in northern Sweden. Whole-exome sequencing resulted in the identification of a novel mutation, c.2816C>T, p.T939I, in the COL17A1 gene, which encodes collagen type XVII alpha 1. The variant segregated with disease in a genealogically expanded pedigree dating back 200 years. We also investigated a unique COL17A1 synonymous variant, c.3156C>T, identified in a previously reported unrelated dominant ERED-like family linked to a locus on chromosome 10q23-q24 encompassing COL17A1. We show that this variant introduces a cryptic donor site resulting in aberrant pre-mRNA splicing and is highly likely to be pathogenic. Bi-allelic COL17A1 mutations have previously been associated with a recessive skin disorder, junctional epidermolysis bullosa, with recurrent corneal erosions being reported in some cases. Our findings implicate presumed gain-of-function COL17A1 mutations causing dominantly inherited ERED and improve understanding of the underlying pathology. PMID:25676728

  9. Abnormal formation of collagen cross-links in skin fibroblasts cultured from patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VI.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, M; Still, M J; Vales, T; Rosen, R I; Evinger, J D; Dembure, P P; Longo, N; Elsas, L J

    1997-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VI (EDS VI) is an autosomal recessive disorder of connective tissue characterized by hyperextensible, friable skin and joint hypermobility. Severe scoliosis and ocular fragility are present in some patients. This disease is caused by defective collagen lsyl hydroxylase, a vitamin C-dependent enzyme that converts lysyl residues to hydroxylysine on procollagen peptides. Hydroxylysine is essential for the formation of the covalent pyridinium cross-links pyridinoline (Pyr) and deoxypyridinoline (Dpyr), among mature collagen molecules. Pyr derives from three hydroxylysyl residues, whereas Dpyr derives from one lysyl and two hydroxylysyl residues. Patients with EDS VI have high urinary excretion of Dpyr, resulting in a high ratio of Dpyr-Pyr. In this study, we evaluate content and production of pyridinium cross-links in the skin and cultured fibroblasts from patients with EDS VI. The skin of normal controls contained both Pyr and Dpyr, with a marked predominance of Pyr as observed in normal urine. The skin of patients with EDS VI had reduced total content of pyridinium cross-links, with the presence of Dpyr but not Pyr. Long-term cultures of control fibroblasts produced both Pyr and Dpyr, with a pattern resembling that of normal skin. By contrast, cross-links were not detected in dermal fibroblasts cultured from patients with EDS VI. Vitamin C, which improves the clinical manifestations of some patients with EDS VI, decreased Dpyr accumulation though only minimally affecting Pyr content in control cells. By contrast, addition of vitamin C to fibroblasts from patients with EDS VI stimulated the formation of Dpyr more than that of Pyr and greatly increased total pyridinium cross-link formation. These results indicate that qualitative and quantitative alterations of pyridinium cross-links occur in skin and in cultured dermal fibroblasts of patients with EDS VI and may be responsible for their abnormal skin findings. The vitamin C

  10. 17β-Estradiol Protects Rat Annulus Fibrosus Cells Against Apoptosis via α1 Integrin-Mediated Adhesion to Type I Collagen: An In-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chun-Ming; Chen, Qian; Zhang, Wen-Jie; Huang, Ai-Bing; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Hui-Lin; Zhang, Zhi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background 17β-Estradiol (E2) has been reported to protect annulus fibrosus (AF) cells in vitro against interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-induced apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. However, its time-response effect remains unexplored. In addition, integrin α2/collagen II interaction has been reported to influence the apoptosis of nucleus pulposus cells in vitro. Thus, we hypothesized that integrin α1/collagen II might play a role in exerting the anti-apoptosis effect by E2. The aim of the current study was to further investigate the anti-apoptotic effect of E2 and determine the role of integrin α1/collagen II interaction. Material/Methods Rat AF cells were primary cultured and used for the following experiments. AF cells were identified by immunocytochemistry of type I collagen. Cell apoptosis was detected by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. The activity of active caspase-3 was determined by use of a caspase-3 detection kit. AF cell adhesion to type I collagen was determined by cell adhesion assay. Protein level of integrin subunit α1 was quantified by Western blot and mRNA expression was determined by real-time qPCR. Results The immunocytochemistry of type I collagen revealed that cell purity was eligible for the following experiments with 98% of purity. FACS analysis indicated time-dependent anti-apoptosis effect of E2 at time points of 6 h, 12 h, and 24 h, which was confirmed by Caspase-3 activity. Furthermore, cell adhesion assay showed that E2 significantly increased cell binding to 95% of control, and qPCR and Western blot analysis showed that E2 effectively upregulated integrin α1. However, estrogen receptor antagonist ICI182780 prohibi