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Sample records for aggrecan core protein

  1. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry of versican, aggrecan and link protein, and histochemistry of hyaluronan in the developing mouse limb bud cartilage.

    PubMed

    Shibata, S; Fukada, K; Imai, H; Abe, T; Yamashita, Y

    2003-10-01

    We investigated the expression pattern of versican, aggrecan, link protein and hyaluronan in the developing limb bud cartilage of the fetal mouse using in situ hybridization and/or immunohistochemistry. Versican mRNA and immunostaining were detected in the mesenchymal cell condensation of the future digital bone at E13. Versican mRNA expression rapidly disappeared from the tibial cartilage, as cartilage formation progressed during E13-15, but the immunostaining was gradually replaced by aggrecan immunostaining from the diaphysis. Immunostaining for both molecules thus had a 'nega-posi' pattern and consequently versican immunostaining was still detected at the epiphyseal end at E15. This result indicated that versican functions as a temporary framework in newly formed cartilage matrix. An aggrecan-positive region within the cartilage invariably had intense hyaluronan staining, whereas a versican-positive region also had affinity for hyaluronan within the cartilage, but not in the mesenchymal cell condensation. Therefore, the presence of versican aggregates was not confirmed in the developing limb bud cartilage. Furthermore, although link protein was more closely related with aggrecan than versican during limb bud cartilage formation, there was a discrepancy between the expression of aggrecan and link protein in tibial cartilage at E15. In particular, only a link protein-positive region was present in the marginal area of the metaphysis and the epiphysis at this stage. This finding may indicate a novel role for link protein.

  2. Aggrecan: Beyond cartilage and into the brain.

    PubMed

    Morawski, M; Brückner, G; Arendt, T; Matthews, R T

    2012-05-01

    Aggrecan is well-studied in cartilage but its expression and function in the central nervous system has only recently begun to be appreciated. Aggrecan plays an important role in the organization of the neural extracellular space by binding and organizing hyaluronan to the cell surface through interactions with link protein and tenascins forming a large aggregated quaternary complex. While all members of the lectican family to which aggrecan belongs are thought to mediate similar roles in organizing the neural matrix, aggrecan is unique in that it is the only family member found almost exclusively in an enigmatic matrix substructure called the perineuronal net. Current work has established a critical role for perineuronal nets and aggrecan in regulating developmental neural plasticity and in the recover from injury. In this review we focus on the structure, expression and function of aggrecan in the central nervous system.

  3. Aggrecan is required for growth plate cytoarchitecture and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lauing, Kristen L; Cortes, Mauricio; Domowicz, Miriam S; Henry, Judith G; Baria, Alexis T; Schwartz, Nancy B

    2014-12-15

    The proteoglycan aggrecan is a prominent component of the extracellular matrix in growth plate cartilage. A naturally occurring, recessive, perinatally lethal mutation in the aggrecan core protein gene, cmd(bc) (Acan(cmd-Bc)), that deletes the entire protein-coding sequence provided a model in which to characterize the phenotypic and morphologic effects of aggrecan deletion on skeletal development. We also generated a novel transgenic mouse, Tg(COL2A1-ACAN), that has the chick ACAN coding sequence driven by the mouse COL2A1 promoter to enable the production of cmd(bc)/cmd(bc); Tg(COL2A1-ACAN) rescue embryos. These were used to assess the impact of aggrecan on growth plate organization, chondrocyte survival and proliferation, and the expression of mRNAs encoding chondrocyte differentiation markers and growth factors. Homozygous mutant (cmd(bc)/cmd(bc)) embryos exhibited severe defects in all skeletal elements with deformed and shortened (50%) limb elements. Expression of aggrecan in rescue embryos reversed the skeletal defects to varying degrees with a 20% increase in limb element length and near-full reversal (80%) of size and diameter of the ribcage and vertebrae. Aggrecan-null growth plates were devoid of matrix and lacked chondrocyte organization and differentiation, while those of the rescue embryos exhibited matrix production concomitant with partial zonation of chondrocytes having proliferative and hypertrophic morphologies. Deformation of the trachea, likely the cause of the mutation's lethality, was reduced in the rescue embryos. Aggrecan-null embryos also had abnormal patterns of COL10A1, SOX9, IHH, PTCH1, and FGFR3 mRNA expression in the growth plate. Expression of chick aggrecan in the rescue embryos notably increased COLX expression, accompanied by the reappearance of a hypertrophic zone and IHH expression. Significantly, in transgenic rescue embryos, the cell death and decreased proliferation phenotypes exhibited by the mutants were reversed; both were

  4. Molecular cloning of chicken aggrecan. Structural analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, L; Tanzer, M L

    1992-01-01

    The large, aggregating chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan of cartilage, aggrecan, has served as a generic model of proteoglycan structure. Molecular cloning of aggrecans has further defined their amino acid sequences and domain structures. In this study, we have obtained the complete coding sequence of chicken sternal cartilage aggrecan by a combination of cDNA and genomic DNA sequencing. The composite sequence is 6117 bp in length, encoding 1951 amino acids. Comparison of chicken aggrecan protein primary structure with rat, human and bovine aggrecans has disclosed both similarities and differences. The domains which are most highly conserved at 70-80% identity are the N-terminal domains G1 and G2 and the C-terminal domain G3. The chondroitin sulphate domain of chicken aggrecan is smaller than that of rat and human aggrecans and has very distinctive repeat sequences. It has two separate sections, one comprising 12 consecutive Ser-Gly-Glu repeats of 20 amino acids each, adjacent to the other which has 23 discontinuous Ser-Gly-Glu repeats of 10 amino acids each; this latter region, N-terminal to the former one, appears to be unique to chicken aggrecan. The two regions contain a total of 94 potential chondroitin sulphate attachment sites. Genomic comparison shows that, although chicken exons 11-14 are identical in size to the rat and human exons, chicken exon 10 is the smallest of the three species. This is also reflected in the size of its chondroitin sulphate coding region and in the total number of Ser-Gly pairs. The putative keratan sulphate domain shows 31-45% identity with the other species and lacks the repetitive sequences seen in the others. In summary, while the linear arrangement of specific domains of chicken aggrecan is identical to that in the aggrecans of other species, and while there is considerable identity of three separate domains, chicken aggrecan demonstrates unique features, notably in its chondroitin sulphate domain and its keratan sulphate

  5. Unconventional T-cell recognition of an arthritogenic epitope of proteoglycan aggrecan released from degrading cartilage.

    PubMed

    Falconer, Jane; Mahida, Rahul; Venkatesh, Divya; Pearson, Jeffrey; Robinson, John H

    2016-04-01

    It has been proposed that peptide epitopes bind to MHC class II molecules to form distinct structural conformers of the same MHC II-peptide complex termed type A and type B, and that the two conformers of the same peptide-MHC II complex are recognized by distinct CD4 T cells, termed type A and type B T cells. Both types recognize short synthetic peptides but only type A recognize endosomally processed intact antigen. Type B T cells that recognize self peptides from exogenously degraded proteins have been shown to escape negative selection during thymic development and so have the potential to contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. We generated and characterized mouse CD4 T cells specific for an arthritogenic epitope of the candidate joint autoantigen proteoglycan aggrecan. Cloned T-cell hybridomas specific for a synthetic peptide containing the aggrecan epitope showed two distinct response patterns based on whether they could recognize processed intact aggrecan. Fine mapping demonstrated that both types of T-cell recognized the same core epitope. The results are consistent with the generation of aggrecan-specific type A and type B T cells. Type B T cells were activated by supernatants released from degrading cartilage, indicating the presence of antigenic extracellular peptides or fragments of aggrecan. Type B T cells could play a role in the pathogenesis of proteoglycan-induced arthritis in mice, a model for rheumatoid arthritis, by recognizing extracellular peptides or protein fragments of joint autoantigens released by inflamed cartilage. PMID:26581676

  6. The Different Roles of Aggrecan Interaction Domains

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The aggregating proteoglycans of the lectican family are important components of extracellular matrices. Aggrecan is the most well studied of these and is central to cartilage biomechanical properties and skeletal development. Key to its biological function is the fixed charge of the many glycosaminoglycan chains, that provide the basis for the viscoelastic properties necessary for load distribution over the articular surface. This review is focused on the globular domains of aggrecan and their role in anchoring the proteoglycans to other extracellular matrix components. The N-terminal G1 domain is vital in that it binds the proteoglycan to hyaluronan in ternary complex with link protein, retaining the proteoglycan in the tissue. The importance of the C-terminal G3 domain interactions has recently been emphasized by two different human hereditary disorders: autosomal recessive aggrecan-type spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia and autosomal dominant familial osteochondritis dissecans. In these two conditions, different missense mutations in the aggrecan C-type lectin repeat have been described. The resulting amino acid replacements affect the ligand interactions of the G3 domain, albeit with widely different phenotypic outcomes. PMID:23019016

  7. Structure of Individual Cartilage Aggrecan Macromolecules and Their Constituent Glycosaminoglycan Chains Visualized via Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Laurel; Grodzinsky, Alan; Sandy, John; Plaas, Anna; Ortiz, Christine

    2003-03-01

    Aggrecan, a member of the hyalectan family of large aggregating proteoglycans is composed of a core protein, which may be substituted with ˜100 chondroitin sulfate (CS) chains and ˜25 keratan sulfate (KS) chains. This tissue-bound polyanionic structure provides >50equilibrium compressive modulus in cartilage. To visualize this structure, bovine aggrecan from fetal epiphyseal and mature nasal cartilages was adsorbed to mica that had been previously functionalized with 3-amino-propyltriethoxysilane to produce a monolayer and then imaged using tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM.) Individual aggrecan molecules were clearly visualized, as well as the N-terminal globular (G1) domain and individual CS-GAG chains. The core protein contour length, CS-GAG length, and height were recorded and analyzed statistically, and found to complement that obtained by electron microscopy and biochemical assays (e.g. Fluorophore Assisted Carbohydrate Electrophoresis (FACE), Western Blots). The high resolution obtained via AFM should provide new insights into conformational aspects of hyalectans at the single molecule level.

  8. Perineuronal net formation and structure in aggrecan knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Giamanco, K A; Morawski, M; Matthews, R T

    2010-11-10

    Perineuronal nets (PNNs) are specialized substructures of the neural extracellular matrix (ECM) which envelop the cell soma and proximal neurites of particular sets of neurons with apertures at sites of synaptic contact. Previous studies have shown that PNNs are enriched with chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) and hyaluronan, however, a complete understanding of their precise molecular composition has been elusive. In addition, identifying which specific PNN components are critical to the formation of this structure has not been demonstrated. Previous work in our laboratory has demonstrated that the CSPG, aggrecan, is a key activity-dependent component of PNNs in vivo. In order to assess the contribution of aggrecan to PNN formation, we utilized cartilage matrix deficiency (cmd) mice, which lack aggrecan. Herein, we utilized an in vitro model, dissociated cortical culture, and an ex vivo model, organotypic slice culture, to specifically investigate the role aggrecan plays in PNN formation. Our work demonstrates that staining with the lectin, Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA), considered a broad PNN marker, is eliminated in the absence of aggrecan, suggesting the loss of PNNs. However, in contrast, we found that the expression patterns of other PNN markers, including hyaluronan and proteoglycan link protein 1 (HAPLN1), tenascin-R, brevican, and hyaluronan are unaffected by the absence of aggrecan. Lastly, we determined that while all PNN components are bound to the surface in a hyaluronan-dependent manner, only HAPLN1 remains attached to the cell surface when neurons are treated with chondroitinase. These results suggest a different model for the molecular association of PNNs to the cell surface. Together our work has served to assess the contribution of aggrecan to PNN formation while providing key evidence concerning the molecular composition of PNNs in addition to determining how these components ultimately form PNNs.

  9. Perineuronal net formation and structure in aggrecan knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Giamanco, K A; Morawski, M; Matthews, R T

    2010-11-10

    Perineuronal nets (PNNs) are specialized substructures of the neural extracellular matrix (ECM) which envelop the cell soma and proximal neurites of particular sets of neurons with apertures at sites of synaptic contact. Previous studies have shown that PNNs are enriched with chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) and hyaluronan, however, a complete understanding of their precise molecular composition has been elusive. In addition, identifying which specific PNN components are critical to the formation of this structure has not been demonstrated. Previous work in our laboratory has demonstrated that the CSPG, aggrecan, is a key activity-dependent component of PNNs in vivo. In order to assess the contribution of aggrecan to PNN formation, we utilized cartilage matrix deficiency (cmd) mice, which lack aggrecan. Herein, we utilized an in vitro model, dissociated cortical culture, and an ex vivo model, organotypic slice culture, to specifically investigate the role aggrecan plays in PNN formation. Our work demonstrates that staining with the lectin, Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA), considered a broad PNN marker, is eliminated in the absence of aggrecan, suggesting the loss of PNNs. However, in contrast, we found that the expression patterns of other PNN markers, including hyaluronan and proteoglycan link protein 1 (HAPLN1), tenascin-R, brevican, and hyaluronan are unaffected by the absence of aggrecan. Lastly, we determined that while all PNN components are bound to the surface in a hyaluronan-dependent manner, only HAPLN1 remains attached to the cell surface when neurons are treated with chondroitinase. These results suggest a different model for the molecular association of PNNs to the cell surface. Together our work has served to assess the contribution of aggrecan to PNN formation while providing key evidence concerning the molecular composition of PNNs in addition to determining how these components ultimately form PNNs. PMID:20732394

  10. Domain organization, genomic structure, evolution, and regulation of expression of the aggrecan gene family.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, N B; Pirok, E W; Mensch, J R; Domowicz, M S

    1999-01-01

    Proteoglycans are complex macromolecules, consisting of a polypeptide backbone to which are covalently attached one or more glycosaminoglycan chains. Molecular cloning has allowed identification of the genes encoding the core proteins of various proteoglycans, leading to a better understanding of the diversity of proteoglycan structure and function, as well as to the evolution of a classification of proteoglycans on the basis of emerging gene families that encode the different core proteins. One such family includes several proteoglycans that have been grouped with aggrecan, the large aggregating chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan of cartilage, based on a high number of sequence similarities within the N- and C-terminal domains. Thus far these proteoglycans include versican, neurocan, and brevican. It is now apparent that these proteins, as a group, are truly a gene family with shared structural motifs on the protein and nucleotide (mRNA) levels, and with nearly identical genomic organizations. Clearly a common ancestral origin is indicated for the members of the aggrecan family of proteoglycans. However, differing patterns of amplification and divergence have also occurred within certain exons across species and family members, leading to the class-characteristic protein motifs in the central carbohydrate-rich region exclusively. Thus the overall domain organization strongly suggests that sequence conservation in the terminal globular domains underlies common functions, whereas differences in the central portions of the genes account for functional specialization among the members of this gene family.

  11. Up-regulation of niacinamide in intervertebral disc aggrecan in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaoqian; Yang, Shuhua; Shao, Zengwu; Liu, Xin; Zhan, Zirui; Duan, Deyu

    2006-01-01

    The regulatory effects of niacinamide (Nia) on intervertebral disc (IVD) aggrecan in vitro was investigated. Chiba's 10 ng/mL interleukin-1 (IL-1)-induced rabbit IVD degeneration model in vitro was established. 0.5, 0.25 and 0.05 mg/mL Nia was added to normal and degenerated IVDs for intervention. On the first and second week after intervention, safranin O-fast green staining intensity and glycosaminoglycan (GS) content were measured. The expression of aggrecan core protein was detected by RT-PCR. The results showed: (1) After treatment with 0.5 mg/mL Nia for one week, the GS content in nucleus pulposus (NP) was increased by 44.8% as compared with control group (P < 0 01); The GS content in IL-1 induction groups was increased with the increase of Nia concentrations: After treatment with 0.5 mg/mL for one week, the GS content in NP was increased by 68.3% as compared with control group (P < 0.01). After two weeks, GS content in NP and fibrous rings was still higher than in control group at the same period (P < 0.01) and untreated group (P < 0.01). (2) Safranin O-fast green staining revealed that with the increase of Nia concentrations, staining density in NP and fibrous rings was increased and histological structure damage to IVDs by IL-1beta was alleviated. (3) RT-PCR showed that the expression of core protein gene in IL-1beta-induced degenerated IVDS was increased with the increase of Nia concentrations. It was concluded that under conditions in vitro, Nia could up-regulate the expression of aggrecan in IVDs and protect IVDs from IL-1beta-induced degeneration at least partially, which offers a potential choice for IVD degeneration clinical therapy.

  12. Aggrecan: approaches to study biophysical and biomechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Nia, Hadi Tavakoli; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Aggrecan, the most abundant extracellular proteoglycan in cartilage (~35 % by dry weight), plays a key role in the biophysical and biomechanical properties of cartilage. Here, we review several approaches based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) to probe the physical, mechanical, and structural properties of aggrecan at the molecular level. These approaches probe the response of aggrecan over a wide time (frequency) scale, ranging from equilibrium to impact dynamic loading. Experimental and theoretical methods are described for the investigation of electrostatic and fluid-solid interactions that are key mechanisms underlying the biomechanical and physicochemical functions of aggrecan. Using AFM-based imaging and nanoindentation, ultrastructural features of aggrecan are related to its mechanical properties, based on aggrecans harvested from human vs. bovine, immature vs. mature, and healthy vs. osteoarthritic cartilage. PMID:25325957

  13. Degradation of cartilage aggrecan by collagenase-3 (MMP-13).

    PubMed

    Fosang, A J; Last, K; Knäuper, V; Murphy, G; Neame, P J

    1996-02-12

    Degradation of the large cartilage proteoglycan aggrecan in arthritis involves an unidentified enzyme aggrecanase, and at least one of the matrix metalloproteinases. Proteinase-sensitive cleavage sites in the aggrecan interglobular domain (IGD) have been identified for many of the humman MMPs, as well as for aggrecanase and other proteinases. The major MMP expressed by chondrocytes stimulated with retinoic acid to degrade their matrix is collagenase-3 or MMP-13. Because of its potential role in aggrecan degradation we examined the specificity of MMP-13 for an aggrecan substrate. The results show that MMP-13 cleaves aggrecan in the IGD at the same site (..PEN314-FFG..) identified for other members of the MMP family, and also at a novel site ..VKP384-VFE.. not previously observed for other proteinases. PMID:8603731

  14. Human cartilage aggrecan CS1 region contains cryptic T-cell recognition sites.

    PubMed Central

    Goodacre, J A; Middleton, S; Lynn, S; Ross, D A; Pearson, J

    1993-01-01

    Cartilage proteoglycan aggregates (PG) are candidate T-cell autoantigens in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We have investigated the possibility that responses to class II-restricted T-cell recognition sites in human cartilage aggrecan (core protein) may depend upon whether these sites are available as free peptide antigens or as part of intact monomers. Analysis of mouse T-cell responses to intact or deglycosylated monomers, purified from human articular cartilage, and to synthetic peptides of the chondroitin sulphate (CS) attachment region homologous repeat sequence showed that recognition of T-cell epitopes in the CS1 region was strongly dependent upon the form of antigen used. The results show that the CS1 region contains cryptic T-cell recognition sites and raise the possibility that fragments of PG, released through the action of extracellular proteases in inflamed joints, may be capable of activating T cells with specificities for epitopes which are not made available following processing of intact PG. T cells with specificities for cryptic epitopes in PG may play a role in the pathogenesis of RA. PMID:8388364

  15. Age-related changes in the content of the C-terminal region of aggrecan in human articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Dudhia, J; Davidson, C M; Wells, T M; Vynios, D H; Hardingham, T E; Bayliss, M T

    1996-01-01

    The content of the C-terminal region of aggrecan was investigated in samples of articular cartilage from individuals ranging in age from newborn to 65 years. This region contains the globular G3 domain which is known to be removed from aggrecan in mature cartilage, probably by proteolytic cleavage, but the age-related changes in its abundance in human cartilage have not been described previously. The analysis was performed by immunosorbant assay using an antiserum (JD5) against recombinant amino acid residues of human aggrecan, on crude extracts of cartilage without further purification of aggrecan. The results showed that the content of the C-terminal region decreased with age relative to the G1 domain content (correlation coefficient = 0.463). This represented a 92% fall in the content of this region of the molecule from newborn to 65 years of age. furthermore, when the G1 content of the cartilage extracts was corrected to only include the G1 attached to aggrecan and to exclude the G1 fragments which accumulate as a by-product of normal aggrecan turnover (free G1), the age-related decrease in the C-terminal region remained very pronounced. Analysis by composite agarose/PAGE showed that the number of subpopulations of aggrecan resolved increased from one in newborn to three in adult cartilage. All of these reacted with an antiserum to the human G1 domain, but only the slowest migrating species reacted with the C-terminal region antiserum (JD5). Similar analysis by SDS/PAGE confirmed the presence of high-molecular-mass (200 kDa) proteins reactive with JD5, but no reactive fragments of lower electrophoretic mobility were detected. In contrast, when probed with the antiserum to the human G1 domain, the immunoblots showed protein species corresponding to the free G1 and G1-G2 fragments, which were present at high concentrations in adult cartilage. The results suggest that the loss of the C-terminal region is not directly part of the process of aggrecan turnover, but

  16. Random close packing in protein cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohern, Corey

    Shortly after the determination of the first protein x-ray crystal structures, researchers analyzed their cores and reported packing fractions ϕ ~ 0 . 75 , a value that is similar to close packing equal-sized spheres. A limitation of these analyses was the use of `extended atom' models, rather than the more physically accurate `explicit hydrogen' model. The validity of using the explicit hydrogen model is proved by its ability to predict the side chain dihedral angle distributions observed in proteins. We employ the explicit hydrogen model to calculate the packing fraction of the cores of over 200 high resolution protein structures. We find that these protein cores have ϕ ~ 0 . 55 , which is comparable to random close-packing of non-spherical particles. This result provides a deeper understanding of the physical basis of protein structure that will enable predictions of the effects of amino acid mutations and design of new functional proteins. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Institute for Biological, Physical, and Engineering Sciences, National Library of Medicine training grant T15LM00705628 (J.C.G.), and National Science Foundation DMR-1307712 (L.R.).

  17. Tenascin-R promotes assembly of the extracellular matrix of perineuronal nets via clustering of aggrecan

    PubMed Central

    Morawski, Markus; Dityatev, Alexander; Hartlage-Rübsamen, Maike; Blosa, Maren; Holzer, Max; Flach, Katharina; Pavlica, Sanja; Dityateva, Galina; Grosche, Jens; Brückner, Gert; Schachner, Melitta

    2014-01-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNs) in the brains of tenascin-R-deficient (tn-r−/−) mice develop in temporal concordance with those of wild-type (tn-r+/+) mice. However, the histological appearance of PNs is abnormal in adult tn-r−/− mice. Here, we investigated whether similar defects are also seen in dissociated and organotypic cultures from hippocampus and forebrain of tn-r−/− mice and whether the structure of PNs could be normalized. In tn-r−/− cultures, accumulations of several extracellular matrix molecules were mostly associated with somata, whereas dendrites were sparsely covered, compared with tn-r+/+ mice. Experiments to normalize the structure of PNs in tn-r−/− organotypic slice cultures by depolarization of neurons, or by co-culturing tn-r+/+ and tn-r−/− brain slices failed to restore a normal PN phenotype. However, formation of dendritic PNs in cultures was improved by the application of tenascin-R protein and rescued by polyclonal antibodies to aggrecan and a bivalent, but not monovalent form of the lectin Wisteria floribunda agglutinin. These results show that tenascin-R and aggrecan are decisive contributors to formation and stabilization of PNs and that tenascin-R may implement these functions by clustering of aggrecan. Proposed approaches for restoration of normal PN structure are noteworthy in the context of PN abnormalities in neurological disorders, such as epilepsy, schizophrenia and addiction. PMID:25225104

  18. Idiopathic Short Stature due to Novel Heterozygous Mutation of the Aggrecan Gene

    PubMed Central

    Quintos, Jose Bernardo; Guo, Michael H.; Dauber, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently, whole exome sequencing identified heterozygous defects in the Aggrecan gene (ACAN) in three families with short stature and advanced bone age. Objective We report a novel frameshift mutation in ACAN in a family with dominantly inherited short stature, advanced bone age, and premature growth cessation. This is the first case of targeted sequencing of ACAN in this phenotype and confirms that ACAN sequencing is warranted in patients with this rare constellation of findings. Results We present a 5 1/2 year old male with a family history of short stature in 3 generations. The maternal grandfather stands 144.5 cm (Ht SDS -4.7), mother 147.7 cm (Ht SDS -2.6), and index case 99.2 cm (Ht SDS -2.7). Our prepubertal patient has significant bone age advancement (bone age 8 years at chronologic age 5 1/2 years) resulting in a poor predicted adult height of 142 cm (Ht SDS -5.1). DNA sequencing identified a novel heterozygous variant in ACAN, which encodes aggrecan, a proteoglycan in the extracellular matrix of growth plate and other cartilaginous tissues. The mutation (p.Gly1797Glyfs*52) results in premature truncation and presumed loss of protein function. Conclusion Mutations in aggrecan gene should be included in the differential diagnosis of the child with idiopathic short stature or familial short stature and bone age advancement. PMID:25741789

  19. The hydrogen exchange core and protein folding.

    PubMed Central

    Li, R.; Woodward, C.

    1999-01-01

    A database of hydrogen-deuterium exchange results has been compiled for proteins for which there are published rates of out-exchange in the native state, protection against exchange during folding, and out-exchange in partially folded forms. The question of whether the slow exchange core is the folding core (Woodward C, 1993, Trends Biochem Sci 18:359-360) is reexamined in a detailed comparison of the specific amide protons (NHs) and the elements of secondary structure on which they are located. For each pulsed exchange or competition experiment, probe NHs are shown explicitly; the large number and broad distribution of probe NHs support the validity of comparing out-exchange with pulsed-exchange/competition experiments. There is a strong tendency for the same elements of secondary structure to carry NHs most protected in the native state, NHs first protected during folding, and NHs most protected in partially folded species. There is not a one-to-one correspondence of individual NHs. Proteins for which there are published data for native state out-exchange and theta values are also reviewed. The elements of secondary structure containing the slowest exchanging NHs in native proteins tend to contain side chains with high theta values or be connected to a turn/loop with high theta values. A definition for a protein core is proposed, and the implications for protein folding are discussed. Apparently, during folding and in the native state, nonlocal interactions between core sequences are favored more than other possible nonlocal interactions. Other studies of partially folded bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (Barbar E, Barany G, Woodward C, 1995, Biochemistry 34:11423-11434; Barber E, Hare M, Daragan V, Barany G, Woodward C, 1998, Biochemistry 37:7822-7833), suggest that developing cores have site-specific energy barriers between microstates, one disordered, and the other(s) more ordered. PMID:10452602

  20. Differential Stoichiometry among Core Ribosomal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Slavov, Nikolai; Semrau, Stefan; Airoldi, Edoardo; Budnik, Bogdan; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Summary Understanding the regulation and structure of ribosomes is essential to understanding protein synthesis and its dysregulation in disease. While ribosomes are believed to have a fixed stoichiometry among their core ribosomal proteins (RPs), some experiments suggest a more variable composition. Testing such variability requires direct and precise quantification of RPs. We used mass spectrometry to directly quantify RPs across monosomes and polysomes of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) and budding yeast. Our data show that the stoichiometry among core RPs in wild-type yeast cells and ESC depends both on the growth conditions and on the number of ribosomes bound per mRNA. Furthermore, we find that the fitness of cells with a deleted RP-gene is inversely proportional to the enrichment of the corresponding RP in polysomes. Together, our findings support the existence of ribosomes with distinct protein composition and physiological function. PMID:26565899

  1. Differential Stoichiometry among Core Ribosomal Proteins.

    PubMed

    Slavov, Nikolai; Semrau, Stefan; Airoldi, Edoardo; Budnik, Bogdan; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the regulation and structure of ribosomes is essential to understanding protein synthesis and its dysregulation in disease. While ribosomes are believed to have a fixed stoichiometry among their core ribosomal proteins (RPs), some experiments suggest a more variable composition. Testing such variability requires direct and precise quantification of RPs. We used mass spectrometry to directly quantify RPs across monosomes and polysomes of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) and budding yeast. Our data show that the stoichiometry among core RPs in wild-type yeast cells and ESC depends both on the growth conditions and on the number of ribosomes bound per mRNA. Furthermore, we find that the fitness of cells with a deleted RP-gene is inversely proportional to the enrichment of the corresponding RP in polysomes. Together, our findings support the existence of ribosomes with distinct protein composition and physiological function. PMID:26565899

  2. A nuclear magnetic resonance study of water in aggrecan solutions

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Richard J.; Damion, Robin A.; Baboolal, Thomas G.; Smye, Stephen W.; Ries, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Aggrecan, a highly charged macromolecule found in articular cartilage, was investigated in aqueous salt solutions with proton nuclear magnetic resonance. The longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates were determined at two different field strengths, 9.4 T and 0.5 T, for a range of temperatures and aggrecan concentrations. The diffusion coefficients of the water molecules were also measured as a function of temperature and aggrecan concentration, using a pulsed field gradient technique at 9.4 T. Assuming an Arrhenius relationship, the activation energies for the various relaxation processes and the translational motion of the water molecules were determined from temperature dependencies as a function of aggrecan concentration in the range 0–5.3% w/w. The longitudinal relaxation rate and inverse diffusion coefficient were approximately equally dependent on concentration and only increased by upto 20% from that of the salt solution. The transverse relaxation rate at high field demonstrated greatest concentration dependence, changing by an order of magnitude across the concentration range examined. We attribute this primarily to chemical exchange. Activation energies appeared to be approximately independent of aggrecan concentration, except for that of the low-field transverse relaxation rate, which decreased with concentration. PMID:27069663

  3. Aggrecan, an Unusual Polyelectrolyte: Review of Solution Behavior and Physiological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Preethi L.; Horkay, Ferenc

    2011-01-01

    Aggrecan is a high molecular weight, bottlebrush-shaped, negative-charged biopolymer that forms supermolecular complexes with hyaluronic acid. In the extracellular matrix of cartilage, aggrecan-hyaluronic acid complexes are interspersed in the collagen matrix and provide the osmotic properties required to resist deswelling under compressive load. In this review we compile aggrecan solution behavior from different experimental techniques, and discuss them in the context of concentration regimes that were identified in osmotic pressure experiments. At low concentration, aggrecan exhibits microgel-like behavior. With increasing concentration, the bottlebrushes self assemble into large complexes. In the physiological concentration range (2 < caggrecan < 8 % w/w), the physical properties of the solution are dominated by repulsive electrostatic interactions between aggrecan complexes. We discuss the consequences of the bottlebrush architecture on the polyelectrolyte characteristics of the aggrecan molecule, and its implications for cartilage properties and function. PMID:21884828

  4. Proteomic profiling of cellular proteins interacting with the hepatitis C virus core protein.

    PubMed

    Kang, Su-Min; Shin, Min-Jung; Kim, Jung-Hee; Oh, Jong-Won

    2005-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a causative agent of chronic hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The core protein of HCV packages the viral RNA genome to form a nucleocapsid. In addition to its function as a structural protein, core protein is involved in regulation of cellular transcription, virus-induced transformation, and pathogenesis. To gain insights into cellular functions of the core protein by identification of cellular proteins interacting with the core protein, we employed a proteomic approach. Hepatocytes soluble cytoplasmic proteins were applied to the core proteins immobilized on Ni-nitrilotriacetic resin and total bound cellular proteins were resolved by 2-DE. Analyses of interacting proteins by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry allowed identification of 14 cellular proteins binding to the core protein. These proteins include DEAD-box polypeptide 5, similar in function to a known protein identified previously by yeast two-hybrid screening and 13 newly identified cellular proteins. Interestingly, nine protein spots were identified as intermediate microfilament proteins, including cytokeratins (five spots for cytokeratin 8, two for cytokeratin 19, and one for cytokeratin 18) and vimentin. Cytokeratin 8 and vimentin, which were previously shown to be involved in the infection processes of other viruses, were further analyzed to confirm their in vivo interactions with the core protein by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. We discuss the functional implications of the interactions of the core protein with newly identified cellular proteins in HCV infection and pathogenesis.

  5. De novo design of the hydrophobic cores of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Desjarlais, J. R.; Handel, T. M.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed and experimentally tested a novel computational approach for the de novo design of hydrophobic cores. A pair of computer programs has been written, the first of which creates a "custom" rotamer library for potential hydrophobic residues, based on the backbone structure of the protein of interest. The second program uses a genetic algorithm to globally optimize for a low energy core sequence and structure, using the custom rotamer library as input. Success of the programs in predicting the sequences of native proteins indicates that they should be effective tools for protein design. Using these programs, we have designed and engineered several variants of the phage 434 cro protein, containing five, seven, or eight sequence changes in the hydrophobic core. As controls, we have produced a variant consisting of a randomly generated core with six sequence changes but equal volume relative to the native core and a variant with a "minimalist" core containing predominantly leucine residues. Two of the designs, including one with eight core sequence changes, have thermal stabilities comparable to the native protein, whereas the third design and the minimalist protein are significantly destabilized. The randomly designed control is completely unfolded under equivalent conditions. These results suggest that rational de novo design of hydrophobic cores is feasible, and stress the importance of specific packing interactions for the stability of proteins. A surprising aspect of the results is that all of the variants display highly cooperative thermal denaturation curves and reasonably dispersed NMR spectra. This suggests that the non-core residues of a protein play a significant role in determining the uniqueness of the folded structure. PMID:8535237

  6. CRISPR/Cas9 mediated generation of stable chondrocyte cell lines with targeted gene knockouts; analysis of an aggrecan knockout cell line.

    PubMed

    Yang, Maozhou; Zhang, Liang; Stevens, Jeff; Gibson, Gary

    2014-12-01

    The Swarm rat chondrosarcoma (RCS) cell lines derived from a spontaneous neoplasm in a rat spine several decades ago have provided excellent models of chondrosarcoma tumor development. In addition the robust chondrocyte phenotype (expression of a large panel of genes identical to that seen in normal rat cartilage) and the ability to generate cell clones have facilitated their extensive use in the identification of chondrocyte proteins and genes. The clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) technology employing the RNA-guided nuclease Cas9 has rapidly dominated the genome engineering field as a unique and powerful gene editing tool. We have generated a stable RCS cell line (RCS Cas9) expressing the nuclease Cas9 that enables the editing of any target gene or non-coding RNA by simple transfection with a guide RNA. As proof of principle, stable cell lines with targeted ablation of aggrecan expression (Acan KO) were generated and characterized. The studies show that stable chondrocyte cell lines with targeted genome editing can be quickly generated from RCS Cas9 cells using this system. The Acan KO cell lines also provided a tool for characterizing the response of chondrocytes to aggrecan loss and the role of aggrecan in chondrosarcoma development. Loss of aggrecan expression while not affecting the chondrocyte phenotype resulted in a much firmer attachment of cells to their substrate in culture. Large changes in the expression of several genes were observed in response to the absence of the proteoglycan matrix, including those for several small leucine rich proteoglycans (SLRPs), transcription factors and membrane transporters. Acan KO cells failed to form a substantial chondrosarcoma when injected subcutaneously in nude mice consistent with previous suggestions that the glycosaminoglycan-rich matrix surrounding the chondrosarcoma protects it from destruction by the host immune system. The studies provide new understanding of aggrecan

  7. Incorporation of aggrecan in interpenetrating network hydrogels to improve cellular performance for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ingavle, Ganesh C; Frei, Anthony W; Gehrke, Stevin H; Detamore, Michael S

    2013-06-01

    Interpenetrating network (IPN) hydrogels were recently introduced to the cartilage tissue engineering literature, with the approach of encapsulating cells in thermally gelling agarose that is then soaked in a poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) solution, which is then photopolymerized. These IPNs possess significantly enhanced mechanical performance desirable for cartilage regeneration, potentially allowing patients to return to weight-bearing activities quickly after surgical implantation. In an effort to improve cell viability and performance, inspiration was drawn from previous studies that have elicited positive chondrogenic responses to aggrecan, the proteoglycan largely responsible for the compressive stiffness of cartilage. Aggrecan was incorporated into the IPNs in conservative concentrations (40 μg/mL), and its effect was contrasted with the incorporation of chondroitin sulfate (CS), the primary glycosaminoglycan associated with aggrecan. Aggrecan was incorporated by physical entrapment within agarose and methacrylated CS was incorporated by copolymerization with PEGDA. The IPNs incorporating aggrecan or CS exhibited over 50% viability with encapsulated chondrocytes after 6 weeks. Both aggrecan and CS improved cell viability by 15.6% and 20%, respectively, relative to pure IPNs at 6 weeks culture time. In summary, we have introduced the novel approach of including a raw material from cartilage, namely aggrecan, to serve as a bioactive signal to cells encapsulated in IPN hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering, which led to improved performance of encapsulated chondrocytes. PMID:23379843

  8. Incorporation of Aggrecan in Interpenetrating Network Hydrogels to Improve Cellular Performance for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ingavle, Ganesh C.; Frei, Anthony W.; Gehrke, Stevin H.

    2013-01-01

    Interpenetrating network (IPN) hydrogels were recently introduced to the cartilage tissue engineering literature, with the approach of encapsulating cells in thermally gelling agarose that is then soaked in a poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) solution, which is then photopolymerized. These IPNs possess significantly enhanced mechanical performance desirable for cartilage regeneration, potentially allowing patients to return to weight-bearing activities quickly after surgical implantation. In an effort to improve cell viability and performance, inspiration was drawn from previous studies that have elicited positive chondrogenic responses to aggrecan, the proteoglycan largely responsible for the compressive stiffness of cartilage. Aggrecan was incorporated into the IPNs in conservative concentrations (40 μg/mL), and its effect was contrasted with the incorporation of chondroitin sulfate (CS), the primary glycosaminoglycan associated with aggrecan. Aggrecan was incorporated by physical entrapment within agarose and methacrylated CS was incorporated by copolymerization with PEGDA. The IPNs incorporating aggrecan or CS exhibited over 50% viability with encapsulated chondrocytes after 6 weeks. Both aggrecan and CS improved cell viability by 15.6% and 20%, respectively, relative to pure IPNs at 6 weeks culture time. In summary, we have introduced the novel approach of including a raw material from cartilage, namely aggrecan, to serve as a bioactive signal to cells encapsulated in IPN hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering, which led to improved performance of encapsulated chondrocytes. PMID:23379843

  9. Blocking aggrecanase cleavage in the aggrecan interglobular domain abrogates cartilage erosion and promotes cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Little, Christopher B.; Meeker, Clare T.; Golub, Suzanne B.; Lawlor, Kate E.; Farmer, Pamela J.; Smith, Susan M.; Fosang, Amanda J.

    2007-01-01

    Aggrecan loss from cartilage in arthritis is mediated by aggrecanases. Aggrecanases cleave aggrecan preferentially in the chondroitin sulfate–2 (CS-2) domain and secondarily at the E373↓374A bond in the interglobular domain (IGD). However, IGD cleavage may be more deleterious for cartilage biomechanics because it releases the entire CS-containing portion of aggrecan. Recent studies identifying aggrecanase-2 (ADAMTS-5) as the predominant aggrecanase in mouse cartilage have not distinguished aggrecanolysis in the IGD from aggrecanolysis in the CS-2 domain. We generated aggrecan knockin mice with a mutation that rendered only the IGD resistant to aggrecanases in order to assess the contribution of this specific cleavage to cartilage pathology. The knockin mice were viable and fertile. Aggrecanase cleavage in the aggrecan IGD was not detected in knockin mouse cartilage in situ nor following digestion with ADAMTS-5 or treatment of cartilage explant cultures with IL-1α. Blocking cleavage in the IGD not only diminished aggrecan loss and cartilage erosion in surgically induced osteoarthritis and a model of inflammatory arthritis, but appeared to stimulate cartilage repair following acute inflammation. We conclude that blocking aggrecanolysis in the aggrecan IGD alone protects against cartilage erosion and may potentiate cartilage repair. PMID:17510707

  10. Steric interactions determine side-chain conformations in protein cores.

    PubMed

    Caballero, D; Virrueta, A; O'Hern, C S; Regan, L

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the role of steric interactions in defining side-chain conformations in protein cores. Previously, we explored the strengths and limitations of hard-sphere dipeptide models in defining sterically allowed side-chain conformations and recapitulating key features of the side-chain dihedral angle distributions observed in high-resolution protein structures. Here, we show that modeling residues in the context of a particular protein environment, with both intra- and inter-residue steric interactions, is sufficient to specify which of the allowed side-chain conformations is adopted. This model predicts 97% of the side-chain conformations of Leu, Ile, Val, Phe, Tyr, Trp and Thr core residues to within 20°. Although the hard-sphere dipeptide model predicts the observed side-chain dihedral angle distributions for both Thr and Ser, the model including the protein environment predicts side-chain conformations to within 20° for only 60% of core Ser residues. Thus, this approach can identify the amino acids for which hard-sphere interactions alone are sufficient and those for which additional interactions are necessary to accurately predict side-chain conformations in protein cores. We also show that our approach can predict alternate side-chain conformations of core residues, which are supported by the observed electron density.

  11. Immunological Properties of Hepatitis B Core Antigen Fusion Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Michael J.; Hastings, Gillian Z.; Brown, Alan L.; Grace, Ken G.; Rowlands, David J.; Brown, Fred; Clarke, Berwyn E.

    1990-04-01

    The immunogenicity of a 19 amino acid peptide from foot-and-mouth disease virus has previously been shown to approach that of the inactivated virus from which it was derived after multimeric particulate presentation as an N-terminal fusion with hepatitis B core antigen. In this report we demonstrate that rhinovirus peptide-hepatitis B core antigen fusion proteins are 10-fold more immunogenic than peptide coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin and 100-fold more immunogenic than uncoupled peptide with an added helper T-cell epitope. The fusion proteins can be readily administered without adjuvant or with adjuvants acceptable for human and veterinary application and can elicit a response after nasal or oral dosing. The fusion proteins can also act as T-cell-independent antigens. These properties provide further support for their suitability as presentation systems for "foreign" epitopes in the development of vaccines.

  12. Interaction of structural core protein of Classical Swine Fever Virus with endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathway protein OS9

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) Core protein is involved in virus RNA protection, transcription regulation and virus virulence. To discover additional Core protein functions a yeast two-hybrid system was used to identify host proteins that interact with Core. Among the identified host proteins, t...

  13. Increasing Sequence Diversity with Flexible Backbone Protein Design: The Complete Redesign of a Protein Hydrophobic Core

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Grant S.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Miley, Michael J.; Machius, Mischa; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian

    2015-10-15

    Protein design tests our understanding of protein stability and structure. Successful design methods should allow the exploration of sequence space not found in nature. However, when redesigning naturally occurring protein structures, most fixed backbone design algorithms return amino acid sequences that share strong sequence identity with wild-type sequences, especially in the protein core. This behavior places a restriction on functional space that can be explored and is not consistent with observations from nature, where sequences of low identity have similar structures. Here, we allow backbone flexibility during design to mutate every position in the core (38 residues) of a four-helix bundle protein. Only small perturbations to the backbone, 12 {angstrom}, were needed to entirely mutate the core. The redesigned protein, DRNN, is exceptionally stable (melting point >140C). An NMR and X-ray crystal structure show that the side chains and backbone were accurately modeled (all-atom RMSD = 1.3 {angstrom}).

  14. Chondroitin 6-Sulfation Regulates Perineuronal Net Formation by Controlling the Stability of Aggrecan.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Shinji; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNNs) are lattice-like extracellular matrix structures composed of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs). The appearance of PNNs parallels the decline of neural plasticity, and disruption of PNNs reactivates neural plasticity in the adult brain. We previously reported that sulfation patterns of chondroitin sulfate (CS) chains on CSPGs influenced the formation of PNNs and neural plasticity. However, the mechanism of PNN formation regulated by CS sulfation remains unknown. Here we found that overexpression of chondroitin 6-sulfotransferase-1 (C6ST-1), which catalyzes 6-sulfation of CS chains, selectively decreased aggrecan, a major CSPG in PNNs, in the aged brain without affecting other PNN components. Both diffuse and PNN-associated aggrecans were reduced by overexpression of C6ST-1. C6ST-1 increased 6-sulfation in both the repeating disaccharide region and linkage region of CS chains. Overexpression of 6-sulfation primarily impaired accumulation of aggrecan in PNNs, whereas condensation of other PNN components was not affected. Finally, we found that increased 6-sulfation accelerated proteolysis of aggrecan by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain with thrombospondin motif (ADAMTS) protease. Taken together, our results indicate that sulfation patterns of CS chains on aggrecan influenced the stability of the CSPG, thereby regulating formation of PNNs and neural plasticity.

  15. Phosphorylation of vaccinia virus core proteins during transcription in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Moussatche, N; Keller, S J

    1991-01-01

    The phosphorylation of vaccinia virus core proteins has been studied in vitro during viral transcription. The incorporation of [gamma-32P]ATP into protein is linear for the first 2 min of the reaction, whereas incorporation of [3H]UTP into RNA lags for 1 to 2 min before linear synthesis. At least 12 different proteins are phosphorylated on autoradiograms of acrylamide gels, and the majority of label is associated with low-molecular-weight proteins. If the transcription reaction is reduced by dropping the pH to 7 from its optimal of 8.5, two proteins (70 and 80 kDa) are no longer phosphorylated. RNA isolated from the pH 7 transcription reaction hybridized primarily to the vaccinia virus HindIII DNA fragments D to F, whereas the transcripts synthesized at pH 8.5 hybridized to almost all of the HindIII-digested vaccinia virus DNA fragments. The differences between the pH 7.0 and 8.5 transcription reactions in phosphorylation and transcription could be eliminated by preincubating the viral cores with 2 mM ATP. In sum, the results suggest that the phosphorylation of the 70- and 80-kDa peptides may contribute to the regulation of early transcription. Images PMID:2016772

  16. Assembly and solution structure of the core retromer protein complex.

    PubMed

    Norwood, Suzanne J; Shaw, Daniel J; Cowieson, Nathan P; Owen, David J; Teasdale, Rohan D; Collins, Brett M

    2011-01-01

    Retromer is a peripheral membrane protein complex that has pleiotropic roles in endosomal membrane trafficking. The core of retromer possesses three subunits, VPS35, VPS29 and VPS26, that play different roles in binding to cargo, regulatory proteins and complex stabilization. We have performed an investigation of the thermodynamics of core retromer assembly using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) demonstrating that VPS35 acts as the central subunit to which VPS29 and VPS26 bind independently. Furthermore, we confirm that the conserved PRLYL motif of the large VPS35 subunit is critical for direct VPS26 interaction. Heat capacity measurements of VPS29 and VPS26 binding to VPS35 indicate extensive binding interfaces and suggest conformational alterations in VPS29 or VPS35 upon complex formation. Solution studies of the retromer core using small-angle X-ray scattering allow us to propose a model whereby VPS35 forms an extended platform with VPS29 and VPS26 bound at distal ends, with the potential for forming dimeric assemblies. PMID:20875039

  17. Homogeneous Protein Analysis by Magnetic Core-Shell Nanorod Probes.

    PubMed

    Schrittwieser, Stefan; Pelaz, Beatriz; Parak, Wolfgang J; Lentijo-Mozo, Sergio; Soulantica, Katerina; Dieckhoff, Jan; Ludwig, Frank; Altantzis, Thomas; Bals, Sara; Schotter, Joerg

    2016-04-13

    Studying protein interactions is of vital importance both to fundamental biology research and to medical applications. Here, we report on the experimental proof of a universally applicable label-free homogeneous platform for rapid protein analysis. It is based on optically detecting changes in the rotational dynamics of magnetically agitated core-shell nanorods upon their specific interaction with proteins. By adjusting the excitation frequency, we are able to optimize the measurement signal for each analyte protein size. In addition, due to the locking of the optical signal to the magnetic excitation frequency, background signals are suppressed, thus allowing exclusive studies of processes at the nanoprobe surface only. We study target proteins (soluble domain of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 - sHER2) specifically binding to antibodies (trastuzumab) immobilized on the surface of our nanoprobes and demonstrate direct deduction of their respective sizes. Additionally, we examine the dependence of our measurement signal on the concentration of the analyte protein, and deduce a minimally detectable sHER2 concentration of 440 pM. For our homogeneous measurement platform, good dispersion stability of the applied nanoprobes under physiological conditions is of vital importance. To that end, we support our measurement data by theoretical modeling of the total particle-particle interaction energies. The successful implementation of our platform offers scope for applications in biomarker-based diagnostics as well as for answering basic biology questions.

  18. Homogeneous Protein Analysis by Magnetic Core-Shell Nanorod Probes.

    PubMed

    Schrittwieser, Stefan; Pelaz, Beatriz; Parak, Wolfgang J; Lentijo-Mozo, Sergio; Soulantica, Katerina; Dieckhoff, Jan; Ludwig, Frank; Altantzis, Thomas; Bals, Sara; Schotter, Joerg

    2016-04-13

    Studying protein interactions is of vital importance both to fundamental biology research and to medical applications. Here, we report on the experimental proof of a universally applicable label-free homogeneous platform for rapid protein analysis. It is based on optically detecting changes in the rotational dynamics of magnetically agitated core-shell nanorods upon their specific interaction with proteins. By adjusting the excitation frequency, we are able to optimize the measurement signal for each analyte protein size. In addition, due to the locking of the optical signal to the magnetic excitation frequency, background signals are suppressed, thus allowing exclusive studies of processes at the nanoprobe surface only. We study target proteins (soluble domain of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 - sHER2) specifically binding to antibodies (trastuzumab) immobilized on the surface of our nanoprobes and demonstrate direct deduction of their respective sizes. Additionally, we examine the dependence of our measurement signal on the concentration of the analyte protein, and deduce a minimally detectable sHER2 concentration of 440 pM. For our homogeneous measurement platform, good dispersion stability of the applied nanoprobes under physiological conditions is of vital importance. To that end, we support our measurement data by theoretical modeling of the total particle-particle interaction energies. The successful implementation of our platform offers scope for applications in biomarker-based diagnostics as well as for answering basic biology questions. PMID:27023370

  19. Cartilage elasticity resides in shape module decoran and aggrecan sumps of damping fluid: implications in osteoarthrosis.

    PubMed

    Scott, John E; Stockwell, Robin A

    2006-08-01

    Cartilage ultrastructure is based on collagen fibrils tied together by proteoglycans (PGs). Interfibrillar orthogonal PG bridges ('shape modules') were located by electron histochemistry using Cupromeronic blue methodology. Their frequency and size, similar to those in tendon, cornea, etc., were compatible with biochemical estimates of tissue decoran (formerly decorin), the PG component of shape module bridges. Digestion by hyaluronanase and chondroitinase AC helped to identify aggrecan and decoran and exemplified the destruction of shape modular organization by glycan-splitting agents. The anionic glycosaminoglycan (AGAG) of decoran, dermochondan sulphate (DS, formerly dermatan sulphate), contains L-iduronate, an elastic sugar unit. Chondroitan, keratan (present in aggrecan) and hyaluronan are not similarly elastic but can participate in sliding-filament reversible deformability. Mechanical properties predicted for the interfibrillar bridges accord with anisotropic stress/strain responses of articular cartilage to compressive or tensile stresses. We propose that fluid from pericellular aggrecan-rich domains moves under pressure into the interterritorial fibrillar arrays against the elastic resistance of the shape modules, which return the fluid, post-compression, to its original position. Cartilage is tendon-like, with the addition of expansile aggrecan-rich reservoirs of aqueous shock absorber fluid. Rupture or loss of interfibrillar ties would allow expansile PG to force the collagenous matrix apart, imbibing water, increasing swelling and fissuring--characteristic manifestations of osteoarthrosis (OA), a joint disease of major economic importance. Decoran may be a primary target of the OA disease process. PMID:16581860

  20. ProCoCoA: A quantitative approach for analyzing protein core composition.

    PubMed

    Bottini, Silvia; Bernini, Andrea; De Chiara, Matteo; Garlaschelli, Diego; Spiga, Ottavia; Dioguardi, Marco; Vannuccini, Elisa; Tramontano, Anna; Niccolai, Neri

    2013-04-01

    Defining the amino acid composition of protein cores is fundamental for understanding protein folding, as different architectures might achieve structural stability only in the presence of specific amino acid networks. Quantitative characterization of protein cores in relation to the corresponding structures and dynamics is needed to increase the reliability of protein engineering procedures. Unambiguous criteria based on atom depth considerations were established to assign amino acid residues to protein cores and, hence, for classifying inner and outer molecular moieties. These criteria were summarized in a new tool named ProCoCoA, Protein Core Composition Analyzer. An user-friendly web interface was developed, available at the URL: http://www.sbl.unisi.it/prococoa. An accurate estimate of protein core composition for six protein architectures selected from the CATH database of solved structures has been carried out, and the obtained results indicate the presence of specific patterns of amino acid core composition in different protein folds.

  1. Cancerogenic effect of different fragments of the hepatitis C virus core protein.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Heqiu; Liu, Hezhong; Song, Xiaoguo; Wang, Guohua; Chen, Kun; Ling, Shigan

    2007-08-01

    The hepatitis C virus core protein plays an extremely important role in the hepatocarcinogenesis of hepatitis C virus. Little, however, is known about the oncogenic potency of fragments. Thus, the purpose of the present study is to investigate the cancerogenic effects of the different core protein fragments. Two series of recombinant plasmids containing hepatitis C virus core gene fragments encoding the different-length core protein were constructed using plasmid enhanced green fluorescent protein (pEGFP)-C1 and pcDNA3.1(+), respectively. Human hepatocyte L02 cells transiently transfected with pEGFP-C1-based plasmids were subjected to confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis to determine the localization of the different core protein fragments. The stably transfected L02 cells with the pcDNA3.1(+)-based core protein plasmids were used to investigate the ultrastructural effects of the core protein and the tumorigenicity of L02 cells expressing core protein fragments in athymic nude mice. The full-length core protein and Core130-191 were completely localized in the cytoplasm, while Core1-59 existed exclusively in the nucleus. On the other hand, Core50-140 and Core1-140 were observed in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Ultrastructural changes of L02 cells expressing the full-length core protein were comprehensive and included, for example, irregular nuclear, increased nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio and mitochondria swelling. The slight changes were observed in the cells expressing Core50-140 and Core130-191, whereas the ultrastructure of the cells expressing Core1-59 remained normal. All the L02 cells stably expressing different fragments of the core protein, with the exception of the C-terminal truncated fragment Core1-59, could induce the occurrence of tumor in the nude mice. The N-terminal fragment of the core protein, Core1-59, was not oncogenic, while the intermediate and posterior segments of the hepatitis C virus core protein had the cancerogenic potency. In

  2. The interaction between aggrecan gene VNTR polymorphism and obesity in predicting incident symptomatic lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Cong, Lin; Zhu, Yue; Pang, Hao; Guanjun, T U

    2014-01-01

    An association between aggrecan gene variable number of tandem repeats polymorphism (VNTR) and symptomatic lumbar disc herniation (LDH) has been reported in Chinese Han of Northern China, and obesity had previously been suspected of causing severe LDH. However, the interaction between aggrecan VNTR and obesity in symptomatic LDH has not been well studied. To examine the interaction between aggrecan VNTR and obesity in the susceptibility of symptomatic LDH, 259 participants participated in this study and donated a blood sample. The disease group comprised 61 patients already diagnosed with symptomatic LDH. The control group consisted of 198 healthy blood donors without symptoms of LDH who were not diagnosed with LDH. The aggrecan gene VNTR region was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction. The data indicated that between the two groups, participants carrying one or two alleles ≤25 repeats who were non-obese people showed a 1.057-fold increase in risk for symptomatic LDH (p = 0.895, changing the number of repeat alleles to <25 repeats alone did not demonstrably change the risk of LDH), and participants carrying two alleles >25 repeats who were obese people showed an 1.061-fold higher risk (p = 0.885, adding obesity to the mix alone did not demonstrably increase the risk of LDH), while participants carrying one or two alleles ≤25 repeats who were obese people showed a 4.667-fold increase in risk for symptomatic LDH (p = 0.0003, adding obesity plus changing the repeat allele number significantly increased the risk of LDH by 4.667). Overall, the findings suggest an underlying interaction between aggrecan VNTR and obesity in symptomatic LDH.

  3. Core protein: a pleiotropic keystone in the HBV lifecycle

    PubMed Central

    Zlotnick, Adam; Venkatakrishnan, Balasubramanian; Tan, Zhenning; Lewellyn, Eric; Turner, William; Francis, Samson

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) is a small virus whose genome has only four open reading frames. We argue that the simplicity of the virion correlates with a complexity of functions for viral proteins. We focus on the HBV core protein (Cp), a small (183 residue) protein that self-assembles to form the viral capsid. However, its functions are a little more complicated than that. In an infected cell Cp modulates every step of the viral lifecycle. Cp is bound to nuclear viral DNA and affects its epigenetics. Cp correlates with RNA specificity. Cp assembles specifically on a reverse transcriptase-viral RNA complex or, apparently, nothing at all. Indeed Cp has been one of the model systems for investigation of virus self-assembly. Cp participates in regulation of reverse transcription. Cp signals completion of reverse transcription to support virus secretion. Cp carries both nuclear localization signals and HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) binding sites; both of these functions appear to be regulated by contents of the capsid. Cp can be targeted by antivirals -- while self-assembly is the most accessible of Cp activities, we argue that it makes sense to engage the broader spectrum of Cp function. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on “From the discovery of the Australia antigen to the development of new curative therapies for hepatitis B: an unfinished story.” PMID:26129969

  4. Core protein: A pleiotropic keystone in the HBV lifecycle.

    PubMed

    Zlotnick, Adam; Venkatakrishnan, Balasubramanian; Tan, Zhenning; Lewellyn, Eric; Turner, William; Francis, Samson

    2015-09-01

    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) is a small virus whose genome has only four open reading frames. We argue that the simplicity of the virion correlates with a complexity of functions for viral proteins. We focus on the HBV core protein (Cp), a small (183 residue) protein that self-assembles to form the viral capsid. However, its functions are a little more complicated than that. In an infected cell Cp modulates almost every step of the viral lifecycle. Cp is bound to nuclear viral DNA and affects its epigenetics. Cp correlates with RNA specificity. Cp assembles specifically on a reverse transcriptase-viral RNA complex or, apparently, nothing at all. Indeed Cp has been one of the model systems for investigation of virus self-assembly. Cp participates in regulation of reverse transcription. Cp signals completion of reverse transcription to support virus secretion. Cp carries both nuclear localization signals and HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) binding sites; both of these functions appear to be regulated by contents of the capsid. Cp can be targeted by antivirals - while self-assembly is the most accessible of Cp activities, we argue that it makes sense to engage the broader spectrum of Cp function. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on "From the discovery of the Australia antigen to the development of new curative therapies for hepatitis B: an unfinished story." PMID:26129969

  5. Importin β Can Bind Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein and Empty Core-Like Particles and Induce Structural Changes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Wang, Joseph Che-Yen; Pierson, Elizabeth E; Keifer, David Z; Delaleau, Mildred; Gallucci, Lara; Cazenave, Christian; Kann, Michael; Jarrold, Martin F; Zlotnick, Adam

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids are found in many forms: immature single-stranded RNA-filled cores, single-stranded DNA-filled replication intermediates, mature cores with relaxed circular double-stranded DNA, and empty capsids. A capsid, the protein shell of the core, is a complex of 240 copies of core protein. Mature cores are transported to the nucleus by a complex that includes both importin α and importin β (Impα and Impβ), which bind to the core protein's C-terminal domains (CTDs). Here we have investigated the interactions of HBV core protein with importins in vitro. Strikingly, empty capsids and free core protein can bind Impβ without Impα. Cryo-EM image reconstructions show that the CTDs, which are located inside the capsid, can extrude through the capsid to be bound by Impβ. Impβ density localized on the capsid exterior near the quasi-sixfold vertices, suggested a maximum of 30 Impβ per capsid. However, examination of complexes using single molecule charge-detection mass spectrometry indicate that some complexes include over 90 Impβ molecules. Cryo-EM of capsids incubated with excess Impβ shows a population of damaged particles and a population of "dark" particles with internal density, suggesting that Impβ is effectively swallowed by the capsids, which implies that the capsids transiently open and close and can be destabilized by Impβ. Though the in vitro complexes with great excess of Impβ are not biological, these results have implications for trafficking of empty capsids and free core protein; activities that affect the basis of chronic HBV infection. PMID:27518410

  6. Characterization and Localization of Citrullinated Proteoglycan Aggrecan in Human Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Glant, Tibor T.; Ocsko, Timea; Markovics, Adrienn; Szekanecz, Zoltan; Katz, Robert S.; Rauch, Tibor A.; Mikecz, Katalin

    2016-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease of the synovial joints. The autoimmune character of RA is underscored by prominent production of autoantibodies such as those against IgG (rheumatoid factor), and a broad array of joint tissue-specific and other endogenous citrullinated proteins. Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) can be detected in the sera and synovial fluids of RA patients and ACPA seropositivity is one of the diagnostic criteria of RA. Studies have demonstrated that RA T cells respond to citrullinated peptides (epitopes) of proteoglycan (PG) aggrecan, which is one of the most abundant macromolecules of articular cartilage. However, it is not known if the PG molecule is citrullinated in vivo in human cartilage, and if so, whether citrulline-containing neoepitopes of PG (CitPG) can contribute to autoimmunity in RA. Methods CitPG was detected in human cartilage extracts using ACPA+ RA sera in dot blot and Western blot. Citrullination status of in vitro citrullinated recombinant G1 domain of human PG (rhG1) was confirmed by antibody-based and chemical methods, and potential sites of citrullination in rhG1 were explored by molecular modeling. CitPG-specific serum autoantibodies were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and CitPG was localized in osteoarthritic (OA) and RA cartilage using immunohistochemistry. Findings Sera from ACPA+ RA patients reacted with PG purified from normal human cartilage specimens. PG fragments (mainly those containing the G1 domain) from OA or RA cartilage extracts were recognized by ACPA+ sera but not by serum from ACPA- individuals. ACPA+ sera also reacted with in vitro citrullinated rhG1 and G3 domain-containing fragment(s) of PG. Molecular modeling suggested multiple sites of potential citrullination within the G1 domain. The immunohistochemical localization of CitPG was different in OA and RA cartilage. Conclusions CitPG is a new member of citrullinated proteins identified in human

  7. Both core and F proteins of hepatitis C virus could enhance cell proliferation in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Wen-Ta; Li, Hui-Chun; Lee, Shen-Kao; Ma, Hsin-Chieh; Yang, Chee-Hing; Chen, Hung-Ling; Lo, Shih-Yen

    2013-05-24

    Highlights: •HCV core and F proteins could induce hepatocyte proliferation in the transgenic mice. •β-Catenin signaling pathway was activated by core protein in the transgenic mice. •β-Catenin signaling pathway was activated by myc-F protein in the transgenic mice. •Expression of SMA protein was enhanced by core but not myc-F protein. -- Abstract: The role of the protein encoded by the alternative open reading frame (ARF/F/core+1) of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome in viral pathogenesis remains unknown. The different forms of ARF/F/core+1 protein were labile in cultured cells, a myc-tag fused at the N-terminus of the F protein made it more stable. To determine the role of core and F proteins in HCV pathogenesis, transgenic mice with either protein expression under the control of Albumin promoter were generated. Expression of core protein and F protein with myc tag (myc-F) could be detected by Western blotting analysis in the livers of these mice. The ratio of liver to body weight is increased for both core and myc-F transgenic mice compared to that of wild type mice. Indeed, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein, a proliferation marker, was up-regulated in the transgenic mice with core or myc-F protein. Further analyses by microarray and Western blotting suggested that β-catenin signaling pathway was activated by either core or myc-F protein in the transgenic mice. These transgenic mice were further treated with either Diethynitrosamine (a tumor initiator) or Phenobarbital (a tumor promoter). Phenobarbital but not Diethynitrosamine treatment could increase the liver/body weight ratio of these mice. However, no tumor formation was observed in these mice. In conclusion, HCV core and myc-F proteins could induce hepatocyte proliferation in the transgenic mice possibly through β-catenin signaling pathway.

  8. Trafficking of Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein during Virus Particle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Counihan, Natalie A.; Rawlinson, Stephen M.; Lindenbach, Brett D.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is directed to the surface of lipid droplets (LD), a step that is essential for infectious virus production. However, the process by which core is recruited from LD into nascent virus particles is not well understood. To investigate the kinetics of core trafficking, we developed methods to image functional core protein in live, virus-producing cells. During the peak of virus assembly, core formed polarized caps on large, immotile LDs, adjacent to putative sites of assembly. In addition, LD-independent, motile puncta of core were found to traffic along microtubules. Importantly, core was recruited from LDs into these puncta, and interaction between the viral NS2 and NS3-4A proteins was essential for this recruitment process. These data reveal new aspects of core trafficking and identify a novel role for viral nonstructural proteins in virus particle assembly. PMID:22028650

  9. The Expanded FindCore Method for Identification of a Core Atom Set for Assessment of Protein Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, David A.; Grullon, Jennifer; Huang, Yuanpeng J.; Tejero, Roberto; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2014-01-01

    Maximizing the scientific impact of NMR-based structure determination requires robust and statistically sound methods for assessing the precision of NMR-derived structures. In particular, a method to define a core atom set for calculating superimpositions and validating structure predictions is critical to the use of NMR-derived structures as targets in the CASP competition. FindCore (D.A. Snyder and G.T. Montelione PROTEINS 2005;59:673–686) is a superimposition independent method for identifying a core atom set, and partitioning that set into domains. However, as FindCore optimizes superimposition by sensitively excluding not-well-defined atoms, the FindCore core may not comprise all atoms suitable for use in certain applications of NMR structures, including the CASP assessment process. Adapting the FindCore approach to assess predicted models against experimental NMR structures in CASP10 required modification of the FindCore method. This paper describes conventions and a standard protocol to calculate an “Expanded FindCore” atom set suitable for validation and application in biological and biophysical contexts. A key application of the Expanded FindCore method is to identify a core set of atoms in the experimental NMR structure for which it makes sense to validate predicted protein structure models. We demonstrate the application of this Expanded FindCore method in characterizing well-defined regions of 18 NMR-derived CASP10 target structures. The Expanded FindCore protocol defines “expanded core atom sets” that match an expert’s intuition of which parts of the structure are sufficiently well-defined to use in assessing CASP model predictions. We also illustrate the impact of this analysis on the CASP GDT assessment scores. PMID:24327305

  10. Importin β Can Bind Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein and Empty Core-Like Particles and Induce Structural Changes

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Elizabeth E.; Keifer, David Z.; Delaleau, Mildred; Gallucci, Lara; Cazenave, Christian; Kann, Michael; Jarrold, Martin F.; Zlotnick, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids are found in many forms: immature single-stranded RNA-filled cores, single-stranded DNA-filled replication intermediates, mature cores with relaxed circular double-stranded DNA, and empty capsids. A capsid, the protein shell of the core, is a complex of 240 copies of core protein. Mature cores are transported to the nucleus by a complex that includes both importin α and importin β (Impα and Impβ), which bind to the core protein’s C-terminal domains (CTDs). Here we have investigated the interactions of HBV core protein with importins in vitro. Strikingly, empty capsids and free core protein can bind Impβ without Impα. Cryo-EM image reconstructions show that the CTDs, which are located inside the capsid, can extrude through the capsid to be bound by Impβ. Impβ density localized on the capsid exterior near the quasi-sixfold vertices, suggested a maximum of 30 Impβ per capsid. However, examination of complexes using single molecule charge-detection mass spectrometry indicate that some complexes include over 90 Impβ molecules. Cryo-EM of capsids incubated with excess Impβ shows a population of damaged particles and a population of “dark” particles with internal density, suggesting that Impβ is effectively swallowed by the capsids, which implies that the capsids transiently open and close and can be destabilized by Impβ. Though the in vitro complexes with great excess of Impβ are not biological, these results have implications for trafficking of empty capsids and free core protein; activities that affect the basis of chronic HBV infection. PMID:27518410

  11. An enzyme-sensitive PEG hydrogel based on aggrecan catabolism for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Skaalure, Stacey C; Chu, Stanley; Bryant, Stephanie J

    2015-02-18

    A new cartilage-specific degradable hydrogel based on photoclickable thiol-ene poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels is presented. The hydrogel crosslinks are composed of the peptide, CRDTEGE-ARGSVIDRC, derived from the aggrecanase-cleavable site in aggrecan. This new hydrogel is evaluated for use in cartilage tissue engineering by encapsulating bovine chondrocytes from different cell sources (skeletally immature (juvenile) and mature (adult) donors and adult cells stimulated with proinflammatory lipopolysaccharide (LPS)) and culturing for 12 weeks. Regardless of cell source, a twofold decrease in compressive modulus is observed by 12 weeks, but without significant hydrogel swelling indicating limited bulk degradation. For juvenile cells, a connected matrix rich in aggrecan and collagen II, but minimal collagens I and X is observed. For adult cells, less matrix, but similar quality, is deposited. Aggrecanase activity is elevated, although without accelerating bulk hydrogel degradation. LPS further decreases matrix production, but does not affect aggrecanase activity. In contrast, matrix deposition in the nondegradable hydrogels consists of aggrecan and collagens I, II, and X, indicative of hypertrophic cartilage. Lastly, no inflammatory response in chondrocytes is observed by the aggrecanase-sensitive hydrogels. Overall, it is demonstrated that this new aggrecanase-sensitive hydrogel, which is degradable by chondrocytes and promotes a hyaline-like engineered cartilage, is promising for cartilage regeneration.

  12. An Enzyme-sensitive PEG Hydrogel Based on Aggrecan Catabolism for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Skaalure, Stacey C.; Chu, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    A new cartilage-specific degradable hydrogel based on photoclickable thiol-ene PEG hydrogels is presented. The hydrogel crosslinks are composed of the peptide, CRDTEGE-ARGSVIDRC, derived from the aggrecanase-cleavable site in aggrecan. This new hydrogel is evaluated for use in cartilage tissue engineering by encapsulating bovine chondrocytes from different cell sources (skeletally immature (juvenile) and mature (adult) donors and adult cells stimulated with pro-inflammatory lipopolysaccharide (LPS)) and culturing for 12 weeks. Regardless of cell source, a two-fold decrease in compressive modulus is observed by 12 weeks, but without significant hydrogel swelling indicating limited bulk degradation. For juvenile cells, a connected matrix rich in aggrecan and collagen II, but minimal collagens I and X is observed. For adult cells, less matrix, but similar quality, is deposited. Aggrecanase activity is elevated, although without accelerating bulk hydrogel degradation. LPS further decreased matrix production, but did not affect aggrecanase activity. In contrast, matrix deposition in the non-degradable hydrogels consisted of aggrecan and collagens I, II and X, indicative of hypertrophic cartilage. Lastly, no inflammatory response in chondrocytes is observed by the aggrecanase-sensitive hydrogels. Overall, we demonstrate that this new aggrecanase-sensitive hydrogel, which is degradable by chondrocytes and promotes a hyaline-like engineered cartilage, is promising for cartilage regeneration. PMID:25296398

  13. Hepatitis C virus core protein interacts with the cytoplasmic tail of lymphotoxin-beta receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, M; Hsieh, T Y; Zhu, N; VanArsdale, T; Hwang, S B; Jeng, K S; Gorbalenya, A E; Lo, S Y; Ou, J H; Ware, C F; Lai, M M

    1997-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is a multifunctional protein. We examined whether it can interact with cellular proteins, thus contributing to viral pathogenesis. Using the HCV core protein as a bait to screen a human liver cDNA library in a yeast two-hybrid screening system, we have isolated several positive clones encoding cellular proteins that interact with the HCV core protein. Interestingly, more than half of these clones encode the cytoplasmic domain of lymphotoxin-beta receptor (LT betaR), which is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family. Their binding was confirmed by in vitro glutathione S-transferase fusion protein binding assay and protein-protein blotting assay to be direct and specific. The binding sites were mapped within a 58-amino-acid region of the cytoplasmic tail of LT betaR. The binding site in the HCV core protein was localized within amino acid residues 36 to 91 from the N terminus, corresponding to the hydrophilic region of the protein. In mammalian cells, the core protein was found to be associated with the membrane-bound LT betaR. Since the LT betaR is involved in germinal center formation and developmental regulation of peripheral lymphoid organs, lymph node development, and apoptotic signaling, the binding of HCV core protein to LT betaR suggests the possibility that this viral protein has an immunomodulating function and may explain the mechanism of viral persistence and pathogenesis of HCV. PMID:8995654

  14. Aggrecan-based extracellular matrix shows unique cortical features and conserved subcortical principles of mammalian brain organization in the Madagascan lesser hedgehog tenrec (Echinops telfairi Martin, 1838).

    PubMed

    Morawski, M; Brückner, G; Jäger, C; Seeger, G; Künzle, H; Arendt, T

    2010-02-01

    The Madagascan tenrecs (Afrotheria), an ancient mammalian clade, are characterized by unique brain anatomy. Striking features are an expanded paleocortex but a small and poorly differentiated neocortex devoid of a distinct granular layer IV. To investigate the organization of cortical areas we analyzed extracellular matrix components in perineuronal nets (PNs) using antibodies to aggrecan, lectin staining and hyaluronan-binding protein. Selected subcortical regions were studied to correlate the cortical patterns with features in evolutionary conserved systems. In the neocortex, paleocortex and hippocampus PNs were associated with nonpyramidal neurons. Quantitative analysis in the cerebral cortex revealed area-specific proportions and laminar distribution patterns of neurons ensheathed by PNs. Cortical PNs showed divergent structural phenotypes. Diffuse PNs forming a cotton wool-like perisomatic rim were characteristic of the paleocortex. These PNs were associated with a dense pericellular plexus of calretinin-immunoreactive fibres. Clearly contoured PNs were devoid of a calretinin-positive plexus and predominated in the neocortex and hippocampus. The organization of the extracellular matrix in subcortical nuclei followed the widely distributed mammalian type. We conclude that molecular properties of the aggrecan-based extracellular matrix are conserved during evolution of mammals; however, the matrix scaffold is adapted to specific wiring patterns of cortical and subcortical neuronal networks.

  15. Aggrecan and chondroitin-6-sulfate abnormalities in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: a postmortem study on the amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Pantazopoulos, H; Markota, M; Jaquet, F; Ghosh, D; Wallin, A; Santos, A; Caterson, B; Berretta, S

    2015-01-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNNs) are specialized extracellular matrix aggregates surrounding distinct neuronal populations and regulating synaptic functions and plasticity. Previous findings showed robust PNN decreases in amygdala, entorhinal cortex and prefrontal cortex of subjects with schizophrenia (SZ), but not bipolar disorder (BD). These studies were carried out using a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) lectin marker. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the CSPG aggrecan, and 6-sulfated chondroitin sulfate (CS-6) chains highly represented in aggrecan, may contribute to these abnormalities. Antibodies against aggrecan and CS-6 (3B3 and CS56) were used in the amygdala of healthy control, SZ and BD subjects. In controls, aggrecan immunoreactivity (IR) was observed in PNNs and glial cells. Antibody 3B3, but not CS56, also labeled PNNs in the amygdala. In addition, dense clusters of CS56 and 3B3 IR encompassed CS56- and 3B3-IR glia, respectively. In SZ, numbers of aggrecan- and 3B3-IR PNNs were decreased, together with marked reductions of aggrecan-IR glial cells and CS-6 (3B3 and CS56)-IR ‘clusters'. In BD, numbers of 3B3-IR PNNs and CS56-IR clusters were reduced. Our findings show disruption of multiple PNN populations in the amygdala of SZ and, more modestly, BD. Decreases of aggrecan-IR glia and CS-6-IR glial ‘clusters', in sharp contrast to increases of CSPG/lectin-positive glia previously observed, indicate that CSPG abnormalities may affect distinct glial cell populations and suggest a potential mechanism for PNN decreases. Together, these abnormalities may contribute to a destabilization of synaptic connectivity and regulation of neuronal functions in the amygdala of subjects with major psychoses. PMID:25603412

  16. RNA chaperoning and intrinsic disorder in the core proteins of Flaviviridae

    PubMed Central

    Ivanyi-Nagy, Roland; Lavergne, Jean-Pierre; Gabus, Caroline; Ficheux, Damien; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    RNA chaperone proteins are essential partners of RNA in living organisms and viruses. They are thought to assist in the correct folding and structural rearrangements of RNA molecules by resolving misfolded RNA species in an ATP-independent manner. RNA chaperoning is probably an entropy-driven process, mediated by the coupled binding and folding of intrinsically disordered protein regions and the kinetically trapped RNA. Previously, we have shown that the core protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a potent RNA chaperone that can drive profound structural modifications of HCV RNA in vitro. We now examined the RNA chaperone activity and the disordered nature of core proteins from different Flaviviridae genera, namely that of HCV, GBV-B (GB virus B), WNV (West Nile virus) and BVDV (bovine viral diarrhoea virus). Despite low-sequence similarities, all four proteins demonstrated general nucleic acid annealing and RNA chaperone activities. Furthermore, heat resistance of core proteins, as well as far-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy suggested that a well-defined 3D protein structure is not necessary for core-induced RNA structural rearrangements. These data provide evidence that RNA chaperoning—possibly mediated by intrinsically disordered protein segments—is conserved in Flaviviridae core proteins. Thus, besides nucleocapsid formation, core proteins may function in RNA structural rearrangements taking place during virus replication. PMID:18033802

  17. Normal and Shear Interactions between Hyaluronan–Aggrecan Complexes Mimicking Possible Boundary Lubricants in Articular Cartilage in Synovial Joints

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Using a surface force balance, normal and shear interactions have been measured between two atomically smooth surfaces coated with hyaluronan (HA), and with HA/aggrecan (Agg) complexes stabilized by cartilage link protein (LP). Such HA/Agg/LP complexes are the most abundant mobile macromolecular species permeating articular cartilage in synovial joints and have been conjectured to be present as boundary lubricants at its surface. The aim of the present study is to gain insight into the extremely efficient lubrication when two cartilage surfaces slide past each other in healthy joints, and in particular to elucidate the possible role in this of the HA/Agg/LP complexes. Within the range of our parameters, our results reveal that the HA/Agg/LP macromolecular surface complexes are much better boundary lubricants than HA alone, likely because of the higher level of hydration, due to the higher charge density, of the HA/Agg/LP layers with respect to the HA alone. However, the friction coefficients (μ) associated with the mutual interactions and sliding of opposing HA/Agg/LP layers (μ ≈ 0.01 up to pressure P of ca. 12 atm, increasing sharply at higher P) suggest that such complexes by themselves cannot account for the remarkable boundary lubrication observed in mammalian joints (up to P > 50 atm). PMID:23074968

  18. TRC8-dependent degradation of hepatitis C virus immature core protein regulates viral propagation and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Aizawa, Sayaka; Okamoto, Toru; Sugiyama, Yukari; Kouwaki, Takahisa; Ito, Ayano; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Ono, Chikako; Fukuhara, Takasuke; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Okochi, Masayasu; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Imamura, Michio; Chayama, Kazuaki; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Shoji, Ikuo; Moriishi, Kohji; Moriya, Kyoji; Koike, Kazuhiko; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Signal-peptide peptidase (SPP) is an intramembrane protease that participates in the production of the mature core protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Here we show that SPP inhibition reduces the production of infectious HCV particles and pathogenesis. The immature core protein produced in SPP-knockout cells or by treatment with an SPP inhibitor is quickly degraded by the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. Oral administration of the SPP inhibitor to transgenic mice expressing HCV core protein (CoreTg) reduces the expression of core protein and ameliorates insulin resistance and liver steatosis. Moreover, the haploinsufficiency of SPP in CoreTg has similar effects. TRC8, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is required for the degradation of the immature core protein. The expression of the HCV core protein alters endoplasmic reticulum (ER) distribution and induces ER stress in SPP/TRC8 double-knockout cells. These data suggest that HCV utilizes SPP cleavage to circumvent the induction of ER stress in host cells. PMID:27142248

  19. Hepatitis C virus core+1/ARF protein decreases hepcidin transcription through an AP1 binding site.

    PubMed

    Kotta-Loizou, Ioly; Vassilaki, Niki; Pissas, George; Kakkanas, Athanassios; Bakiri, Latifa; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Mavromara, Penelope

    2013-07-01

    Chronic viral hepatitis C is characterized by iron accumulation in the liver, and hepcidin regulates iron absorption. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core+1/ARFP is a novel protein produced by a second functional ORF within the core gene. Here, using reporter assays and HCV bicistronic replicons, we show that, similarly to core, core+1/ARFP decreases hepcidin expression in hepatoma cells. The activator protein 1 (AP1) binding site of the human hepcidin promoter, shown here to be relevant to basal promoter activity and to the repression by core, is essential for the downregulation by core+1/ARFP while the previously described C/EBP (CCAAT/enhancer binding protein) and STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) sites are not. Consistently, expression of the AP1 components c-jun and c-fos obliterated the repressive effect of core and core+1/ARFP. In conclusion, we provide evidence that core+1/ARFP downregulates AP1-mediated transcription, providing new insights into the biological role of core+1/ARFP, as well as the transcriptional modulation of hepcidin, the main regulator of iron metabolism. PMID:23580428

  20. Dynamics of lipid droplets induced by the hepatitis C virus core protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lyn, Rodney K.; Kennedy, David C.; Stolow, Albert; Ridsdale, Andrew; Pezacki, John Paul

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Hepatitis C virus uses lipid droplets (LD) onto which HCV core proteins bind. {yields} HCV core proteins on LDs facilitate viral particle assembly. {yields} We used a novel combination of CARS, two-photon fluorescence, and DIC microscopies. {yields} Particle tracking experiments show that core slowly affects LD localization. {yields} Particle tracking measured the change in speed and directionality of LD movement. -- Abstract: The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a global health problem, with limited treatment options and no vaccine available. HCV uses components of the host cell to proliferate, including lipid droplets (LD) onto which HCV core proteins bind and facilitate viral particle assembly. We have measured the dynamics of HCV core protein-mediated changes in LDs and rates of LD movement on microtubules using a combination of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), two-photon fluorescence (TPF), and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopies. Results show that the HCV core protein induces rapid increases in LD size. Particle tracking experiments show that HCV core protein slowly affects LD localization by controlling the directionality of LD movement on microtubules. These dynamic processes ultimately aid HCV in propagating and the molecules and interactions involved represent novel targets for potential therapeutic intervention.

  1. The bioactivity of agarose-PEGDA interpenetrating network hydrogels with covalently immobilized RGD peptides and physically entrapped aggrecan

    PubMed Central

    Ingavle, Ganesh C.; Gehrke, Stevin H.; Detamore, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Our previous reports of interpenetrating networks (IPNs) have demonstrated drastic improvements in mechanical performance relative to individual constituent networks while maintaining viability of encapsulated cells. The current study investigated whether covalent linkage of RGD to the poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) network could improve upon cell viability and performance of agarose-PEGDA IPNs compared to unmodified IPNs (control) and to IPNs with different concentrations of physically entrapped aggrecan, providing a point of comparison to previous work. The inclusion of RGD or aggrecan generally did not adversely affect mechanical performance, and significantly improved chondrocyte viability and performance. Although both 4 and 100 μ g/mL of aggrecan improved cell viability, only 100 μ g/mL aggrecan was clearly beneficial to improving biosynthesis, whereas 100 μg/mL of RGD was beneficial to both chondrocyte viability and biosynthesis. Interestingly, clustering of cells within the IPNs with RGD and the higher aggrecan concentration were observed, likely indicating cell migration and/or preferred regional proliferation. This clustering resulted in a clearly visible enhancement of matrix production compared to the other IPNs. With this cell migration, we also observed significant cell proliferation and matrix synthesis beyond the periphery of the IPN, which could have important implications in facilitating integration with surrounding cartilage in vivo. With RGD and aggrecan (at its higher concentration) providing substantial and comparable improvements in cell performance, RGD would be the recommended bioactive signal for this particular IPN formulation and cell source given the significant cost savings and potentially more straightforward regulatory pathway in commercialization. PMID:24462353

  2. Sequential processing of hepatitis C virus core protein by host cell signal peptidase and signal peptide peptidase: a reassessment.

    PubMed

    Pène, V; Hernandez, C; Vauloup-Fellous, C; Garaud-Aunis, J; Rosenberg, A R

    2009-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is believed to play critical roles in the virus morphogenesis and pathogenesis. In HCV polyprotein, core protein terminates with a signal peptide followed by E1 envelope protein. It has remained unclear whether cleavage by host cell signal peptidase (SP) at the core-E1 junction to generate the complete form of core protein, which is anchored in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, is absolutely required for cleavage within the signal peptide by host cell signal peptide peptidase (SPP) to liberate the mature form of core protein, which is then free for trafficking to lipid droplets. In this study, the possible sources of disagreement in published reports have been examined, and we conclude that a product generated upon inhibition of SP-catalysed cleavage at the core-E1 junction in heterologous expression systems was incorrectly identified as mature core protein. Moreover, inhibition of this cleavage in the most relevant model of human hepatoma cells replicating a full-length HCV genome was shown to abolish interaction of core protein with lipid droplets and production of infectious progeny virus. These results firmly establish that SPP-catalysed liberation of mature core protein is absolutely dependent on prior cleavage by SP at the correct core-E1 site to generate the complete form of core protein, consistent with this obligatory order of processing playing a role in HCV infectious cycle. PMID:19281487

  3. A Cul-3-BTB ubiquitylation pathway regulates junctional levels and asymmetry of core planar polarity proteins

    PubMed Central

    Strutt, Helen; Searle, Elizabeth; Thomas-MacArthur, Victoria; Brookfield, Rosalind; Strutt, David

    2013-01-01

    The asymmetric localisation of core planar polarity proteins at apicolateral junctions is required to specify cell polarity in the plane of epithelia. This asymmetric distribution of the core proteins is proposed to require amplification of an initial asymmetry by feedback loops. In addition, generation of asymmetry appears to require the regulation of core protein levels, but the importance of such regulation and the underlying mechanisms is unknown. Here we show that ubiquitylation acts through more than one mechanism to control core protein levels in Drosophila, and that without this regulation cellular asymmetry is compromised. Levels of Dishevelled at junctions are regulated by a Cullin-3-Diablo/Kelch ubiquitin ligase complex, the activity of which is most likely controlled by neddylation. Furthermore, activity of the deubiquitylating enzyme Fat facets is required to maintain Flamingo levels at junctions. Notably, ubiquitylation does not alter the total cellular levels of Dishevelled or Flamingo, but only that of the junctional population. When junctional core protein levels are either increased or decreased by disruption of the ubiquitylation machinery, their asymmetric localisation is reduced and this leads to disruption of planar polarity at the tissue level. Loss of asymmetry by altered core protein levels can be explained by reference to feedback models for amplification of asymmetry. PMID:23487316

  4. Intramembrane proteolysis promotes trafficking of hepatitis C virus core protein to lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    McLauchlan, John; Lemberg, Marius K; Hope, Graham; Martoglio, Bruno

    2002-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the major causative pathogen associated with liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The virus has a positive-sense RNA genome encoding a single polyprotein with the virion components located in the N-terminal portion. During biosynthesis of the polyprotein, an internal signal sequence between the core protein and the envelope protein E1 targets the nascent polypeptide to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane for translocation of E1 into the ER. Following membrane insertion, the signal sequence is cleaved from E1 by signal peptidase. Here we provide evidence that after cleavage by signal peptidase, the signal peptide is further processed by the intramembrane-cleaving protease SPP that promotes the release of core protein from the ER membrane. Core protein is then free for subsequent trafficking to lipid droplets. This study represents an example of a potential role for intramembrane proteolysis in the maturation of a viral protein. PMID:12145199

  5. Effect of puromycin aminonucleoside on HSPG core protein content of glomerular epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kasinath, B.S.; Singh, A.K.; Kanwar, Y.S.; Lewis, E.J. )

    1988-10-01

    It has been suggested that the glomerular basement membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) is an important determinant of the glomerular permselectivity barrier. Derangements in the content of basement membrane heparan sulfate have been implicated in alterations in glomerular permselectivity seen in many glomerular diseases such as aminonucleoside nephrosis. The cellular origin and metabolism of the glomerular basement membrane HSPG have not been studied in detail. The authors have detected the expression of the proteoglycan by cloned glomerular visceral epithelial cells of the rat by employing a specific antibody against the core protein of HSPG isolated from the rat glomerular basement membrane. These findings suggest that in the rat in vivo glomerular visceral epithelial cells are one source of heparan sulfate present in the glomerular basement membrane. The effect of puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN) on the HSPG core protein content of the cloned glomerular epithelial cells was studied. By a quantitative immunoperoxidase method, the aminonucleoside caused a 28% reduction in the core protein content of the epithelial cells following 72 h of incubation. However, the content of Heymann nephritis-related antigen, Fx1A was unchanged. Studies employing ({sup 3}H)leucine incorporation showed that PAN was a weak inhibitor of de novo protein synthesis at 24 h of incubation, with complete recovery at 48 and 72 h. These data suggest that PAN effect on heparan sulfate core protein cannot be attributed to generalized inhibition of protein synthesis. The precise mechanism underlying the aminonucleoside effect on heparan sulfate core protein remains to be elucidated.

  6. Advantages to the use of rodent hepadnavirus core proteins as vaccine platforms.

    PubMed

    Billaud, Jean-Noel; Peterson, Darrell; Lee, Byung O; Maruyama, Toshiyuki; Chen, Antony; Sallberg, Matti; Garduño, Fermin; Goldstein, Phillip; Hughes, Janice; Jones, Joyce; Milich, David

    2007-02-19

    The hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) has been proposed as a useful particulate carrier platform for poorly immunogenic peptidic and carbohydrate B cell epitopes. However, biochemical and immunologic impediments have plagued this technology. Specifically, the "assembly" problem characterized by the low yield of unstable hybrid particles resulting from the insertion of foreign sequences and the "pre-existing immunity" problem due to the fact that the HBcAg is derived from a human pathogen have limited the development of this carrier technology. As a means of addressing the "pre-existing immunity" problem we have used the core proteins from the rodent hepdnaviruses. A number of advantages to the use of the rodent hepadnaviral core proteins as opposed to the HBcAg for vaccine design were defined including: equal or superior immunogenicity at the T and B cell levels; the use of the rodent core proteins does not compromise the anti-HBc diagnostic assay; the efficacy of the rodent core proteins as vaccine carriers will not be limited by pre-existing anti-HBc antibodies that are present in previously and currently HBV-infected persons; and the HBcAg-specific tolerance present in HBV chronic carriers can be circumvented by the use of the rodent core proteins. PMID:17178179

  7. HCV core protein promotes hepatocyte proliferation and chemoresistance by inhibiting NR4A1.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yongsheng; Li, Yan

    2015-10-23

    This study investigated the effect of HCV core protein on the proliferation of hepatocytes and hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCC), the influence of HCV core protein on HCC apoptosis induced by the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin, and the mechanism through which HCV core protein acts as a potential oncoprotein in HCV-related HCC by measuring the levels of NR4A1 and Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3), which are associated with tumor suppression and chemotherapy resistance. In the present study, PcDNA3.1-core and RUNX3 siRNA were transfected into LO2 and HepG2 cells using Lipofectamine 2000. LO2-core, HepG2-core, LO2-RUNX3 (low) and control cells were treated with different concentrations of cisplatin for 72 h, and cell proliferation and apoptosis were assayed using the CellTiter 96(®)Aqueous Non-Radioactive Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Western blot and real time PCR analyses were used to detect NR4A1, RUNX3, smad7, Cyclin D1 and BAX. Confocal microscopy was used to determine the levels of NR4A1 in HepG2 and HepG2-core cells. The growth rate of HepG2-core cells was considerably greater than that of HepG2 cells. HCV core protein increased the expression of cyclin D1 and decreased the expressions of NR4A1 and RUNX3. In LO2 - RUNX3 (low), the rate of cell proliferation and the level of cisplatin resistance were the same as in the LO2 -core. These results suggest that HCV core protein decreases the sensitivity of hepatocytes to cisplatin by inhibiting the expression of NR4A1 and promoting the expression of smad7, which negatively regulates the TGF-β pathway. This effect results in down regulation of RUNX3, a target of the TGF-β pathway. Taken together, these findings indicate that in hepatocytes, HCV core protein increases drug resistance and inhibits cell apoptosis by inhibiting the expressions of NR4A1 and RUNX3.

  8. HCV core protein promotes hepatocyte proliferation and chemoresistance by inhibiting NR4A1.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yongsheng; Li, Yan

    2015-10-23

    This study investigated the effect of HCV core protein on the proliferation of hepatocytes and hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCC), the influence of HCV core protein on HCC apoptosis induced by the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin, and the mechanism through which HCV core protein acts as a potential oncoprotein in HCV-related HCC by measuring the levels of NR4A1 and Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3), which are associated with tumor suppression and chemotherapy resistance. In the present study, PcDNA3.1-core and RUNX3 siRNA were transfected into LO2 and HepG2 cells using Lipofectamine 2000. LO2-core, HepG2-core, LO2-RUNX3 (low) and control cells were treated with different concentrations of cisplatin for 72 h, and cell proliferation and apoptosis were assayed using the CellTiter 96(®)Aqueous Non-Radioactive Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Western blot and real time PCR analyses were used to detect NR4A1, RUNX3, smad7, Cyclin D1 and BAX. Confocal microscopy was used to determine the levels of NR4A1 in HepG2 and HepG2-core cells. The growth rate of HepG2-core cells was considerably greater than that of HepG2 cells. HCV core protein increased the expression of cyclin D1 and decreased the expressions of NR4A1 and RUNX3. In LO2 - RUNX3 (low), the rate of cell proliferation and the level of cisplatin resistance were the same as in the LO2 -core. These results suggest that HCV core protein decreases the sensitivity of hepatocytes to cisplatin by inhibiting the expression of NR4A1 and promoting the expression of smad7, which negatively regulates the TGF-β pathway. This effect results in down regulation of RUNX3, a target of the TGF-β pathway. Taken together, these findings indicate that in hepatocytes, HCV core protein increases drug resistance and inhibits cell apoptosis by inhibiting the expressions of NR4A1 and RUNX3. PMID:26392314

  9. Sensory deprivation alters aggrecan and perineuronal net expression in the mouse barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    McRae, Paulette A; Rocco, Mary M; Kelly, Gail; Brumberg, Joshua C; Matthews, Russell T

    2007-05-16

    An important role for the neural extracellular matrix in modulating cortical activity-dependent synaptic plasticity has been established by a number of recent studies. However, identification of the critical molecular components of the neural matrix that mediate these processes is far from complete. Of particular interest is the perineuronal net (PN), an extracellular matrix component found surrounding the cell body and proximal neurites of a subset of neurons. Because of the apposition of the PN to synapses and expression of this structure coincident with the close of the critical period, it has been hypothesized that nets could play uniquely important roles in synapse stabilization and maturation. Interestingly, previous work has also shown that expression of PNs is dependent on appropriate sensory stimulation in the visual system. Here, we investigated whether PNs in the mouse barrel cortex are expressed in an activity-dependent manner by manipulating sensory input through whisker trimming. Importantly, this manipulation did not lead to a global loss of PNs but instead led to a specific decrease in PNs, detected with the antibody Cat-315, in layer IV of the barrel cortex. In addition, we identified a key activity-regulated component of PNs is the proteoglycan aggrecan. We also demonstrate that these Cat-315-positive neurons virtually all also express parvalbumin. Together, these data are in support of an important role for aggrecan in the activity-dependent formation of PNs on parvalbumin-expressing cells and suggest a role for expression of these nets in regulating the close of the critical period.

  10. Purified thick filaments from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans: evidence for multiple proteins associated with core structures

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The thick filaments of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, arising predominantly from the body-wall muscles, contain two myosin isoforms and paramyosin as their major proteins. The two myosins are located in distinct regions of the surfaces, while paramyosin is located within the backbones of the filaments. Tubular structures constitute the cores of the polar regions, and electron-dense material is present in the cores of the central regions (Epstein, H.F., D.M. Miller, I. Ortiz, and G.C. Berliner. 1985. J. Cell Biol. 100:904-915). Biochemical, genetic, and immunological experiments indicate that the two myosins and paramyosin are not necessary core components (Epstein, H.F., I. Ortiz, and L.A. Traeger Mackinnon. 1986. J. Cell Biol. 103:985-993). The existence of the core structures suggests, therefore, that additional proteins may be associated with thick filaments in C. elegans. To biochemically detect minor associated proteins, a new procedure for the isolation of thick filaments of high purity and structural preservation has been developed. The final step, glycerol gradient centrifugation, yielded fractions that are contaminated by, at most, 1-2% with actin, tropomyosin, or ribosome-associated proteins on the basis of Coomassie Blue staining and electron microscopy. Silver staining and radioautography of gel electrophoretograms of unlabeled and 35S-labeled proteins, respectively, revealed at least 10 additional bands that cosedimented with thick filaments in glycerol gradients. Core structures prepared from wild-type thick filaments contained at least six of these thick filament-associated protein bands. The six proteins also cosedimented with thick filaments purified by gradient centrifugation from CB190 mutants lacking myosin heavy chain B and from CB1214 mutants lacking paramyosin. For these reasons, we propose that the six associated proteins are potential candidates for putative components of core structures in the thick filaments of body-wall muscles of

  11. HCV Core Protein Uses Multiple Mechanisms to Induce Oxidative Stress in Human Hepatoma Huh7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Alexander V.; Smirnova, Olga A.; Petrushanko, Irina Y.; Ivanova, Olga N.; Karpenko, Inna L.; Alekseeva, Ekaterina; Sominskaya, Irina; Makarov, Alexander A.; Bartosch, Birke; Kochetkov, Sergey N.; Isaguliants, Maria G.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is accompanied by the induction of oxidative stress, mediated by several virus proteins, the most prominent being the nucleocapsid protein (HCV core). Here, using the truncated forms of HCV core, we have delineated several mechanisms by which it induces the oxidative stress. The N-terminal 36 amino acids of HCV core induced TGFβ1-dependent expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases 1 and 4, both of which independently contributed to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The same fragment also induced the expression of cyclo-oxygenase 2, which, however, made no input into ROS production. Amino acids 37–191 of HCV core up-regulated the transcription of a ROS generating enzyme cytochrome P450 2E1. Furthermore, the same fragment induced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1α. The latter triggered efflux of Ca2+ from ER to mitochondria via mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter, leading to generation of superoxide anions, and possibly also H2O2. Suppression of any of these pathways in cells expressing the full-length core protein led to a partial inhibition of ROS production. Thus, HCV core causes oxidative stress via several independent pathways, each mediated by a distinct region of the protein. PMID:26035647

  12. HCV core protein uses multiple mechanisms to induce oxidative stress in human hepatoma Huh7 cells.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Alexander V; Smirnova, Olga A; Petrushanko, Irina Y; Ivanova, Olga N; Karpenko, Inna L; Alekseeva, Ekaterina; Sominskaya, Irina; Makarov, Alexander A; Bartosch, Birke; Kochetkov, Sergey N; Isaguliants, Maria G

    2015-05-29

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is accompanied by the induction of oxidative stress, mediated by several virus proteins, the most prominent being the nucleocapsid protein (HCV core). Here, using the truncated forms of HCV core, we have delineated several mechanisms by which it induces the oxidative stress. The N-terminal 36 amino acids of HCV core induced TGF\\(\\upbeta\\)1-dependent expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases 1 and 4, both of which independently contributed to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The same fragment also induced the expression of cyclo-oxygenase 2, which, however, made no input into ROS production. Amino acids 37-191 of HCV core up-regulated the transcription of a ROS generating enzyme cytochrome P450 2E1. Furthermore, the same fragment induced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1\\(\\upalpha\\). The latter triggered efflux of Ca2+ from ER to mitochondria via mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter, leading to generation of superoxide anions, and possibly also H2O2. Suppression of any of these pathways in cells expressing the full-length core protein led to a partial inhibition of ROS production. Thus, HCV core causes oxidative stress via several independent pathways, each mediated by a distinct region of the protein.

  13. Structural proteins of ribonucleic acid tumor viruses. Purification of envelope, core, and internal components.

    PubMed

    Strand, M; August, J T

    1976-01-25

    Murine type C virus structural proteins, the envelope glycopeptides, 30,000 dalton major core protein, and 15,000 dalton internal protein have each been purified to near homogeneity and in high yield from the smae batch of virus by use of phosphocellulose column chromatography and gel filtration procedures. Evidence that these proteins are specified by the viral genome was obtained by competition radioimmunoassay analysis, comparing these polypeptides from Rauscher virus cultivated in a variety of mammalian cell lines; all of the reactive antigenic determinants of these proteins appeared to be virus-specific.

  14. Sequence and structural implications of a bovine corneal keratan sulfate proteoglycan core protein. Protein 37B represents bovine lumican and proteins 37A and 25 are unique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funderburgh, J. L.; Funderburgh, M. L.; Brown, S. J.; Vergnes, J. P.; Hassell, J. R.; Mann, M. M.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Amino acid sequence from tryptic peptides of three different bovine corneal keratan sulfate proteoglycan (KSPG) core proteins (designated 37A, 37B, and 25) showed similarities to the sequence of a chicken KSPG core protein lumican. Bovine lumican cDNA was isolated from a bovine corneal expression library by screening with chicken lumican cDNA. The bovine cDNA codes for a 342-amino acid protein, M(r) 38,712, containing amino acid sequences identified in the 37B KSPG core protein. The bovine lumican is 68% identical to chicken lumican, with an 83% identity excluding the N-terminal 40 amino acids. Location of 6 cysteine and 4 consensus N-glycosylation sites in the bovine sequence were identical to those in chicken lumican. Bovine lumican had about 50% identity to bovine fibromodulin and 20% identity to bovine decorin and biglycan. About two-thirds of the lumican protein consists of a series of 10 amino acid leucine-rich repeats that occur in regions of calculated high beta-hydrophobic moment, suggesting that the leucine-rich repeats contribute to beta-sheet formation in these proteins. Sequences obtained from 37A and 25 core proteins were absent in bovine lumican, thus predicting a unique primary structure and separate mRNA for each of the three bovine KSPG core proteins.

  15. Redesigning the hydrophobic core of a four-helix-bundle protein.

    PubMed Central

    Munson, M.; O'Brien, R.; Sturtevant, J. M.; Regan, L.

    1994-01-01

    Rationally redesigned variants of the 4-helix-bundle protein Rop are described. The novel proteins have simplified, repacked, hydrophobic cores and yet reproduce the structure and native-like physical properties of the wild-type protein. The repacked proteins have been characterized thermodynamically and their equilibrium and kinetic thermal and chemical unfolding properties are compared with those of wild-type Rop. The equilibrium stability of the repacked proteins to thermal denaturation is enhanced relative to that of the wild-type protein. The rate of chemically induced folding and unfolding of wild-type Rop is extremely slow when compared with other small proteins. Interestingly, although the repacked proteins are more thermally stable than the wild type, their rates of chemically induced folding and unfolding are greatly increased in comparison to wild type. Perhaps as a consequence of this, their equilibrium stabilities to chemical denaturants are slightly reduced in comparison to the wild type. PMID:7535612

  16. The Contribution of Missense Mutations in Core and Rim Residues of Protein-Protein Interfaces to Human Disease.

    PubMed

    David, Alessia; Sternberg, Michael J E

    2015-08-28

    Missense mutations at protein-protein interaction sites, called interfaces, are important contributors to human disease. Interfaces are non-uniform surface areas characterized by two main regions, "core" and "rim", which differ in terms of evolutionary conservation and physicochemical properties. Moreover, within interfaces, only a small subset of residues ("hot spots") is crucial for the binding free energy of the protein-protein complex. We performed a large-scale structural analysis of human single amino acid variations (SAVs) and demonstrated that disease-causing mutations are preferentially located within the interface core, as opposed to the rim (p<0.01). In contrast, the interface rim is significantly enriched in polymorphisms, similar to the remaining non-interacting surface. Energetic hot spots tend to be enriched in disease-causing mutations compared to non-hot spots (p=0.05), regardless of their occurrence in core or rim residues. For individual amino acids, the frequency of substitution into a polymorphism or disease-causing mutation differed to other amino acids and was related to its structural location, as was the type of physicochemical change introduced by the SAV. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the different distribution and properties of disease-causing SAVs and polymorphisms within different structural regions and in relation to the energetic contribution of amino acid in protein-protein interfaces, thus highlighting the importance of a structural system biology approach for predicting the effect of SAVs. PMID:26173036

  17. Mitochondrial iron accumulation exacerbates hepatic toxicity caused by hepatitis C virus core protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sekine, Shuichi; Ito, Konomi; Watanabe, Haruna; Nakano, Takafumi; Moriya, Kyoji; Shintani, Yoshizumi; Fujie, Hajime; Tsutsumi, Takeya; Miyoshi, Hideyuki; Fujinaga, Hidetake; Shinzawa, Seiko; Koike, Kazuhiko; Horie, Toshiharu

    2015-02-01

    Patients with long-lasting hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are at major risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Iron accumulation in the livers of these patients is thought to exacerbate conditions of oxidative stress. Transgenic mice that express the HCV core protein develop HCC after the steatosis stage and produce an excess of hepatic reactive oxygen species (ROS). The overproduction of ROS in the liver is the net result of HCV core protein-induced dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This study examined the impact of ferric nitrilacetic acid (Fe-NTA)-mediated iron overload on mitochondrial damage and ROS production in HCV core protein-expressing HepG2 (human HCC) cells (Hep39b cells). A decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS production were observed following Fe-NTA treatment. After continuous exposure to Fe-NTA for six days, cell toxicity was observed in Hep39b cells, but not in mock (vector-transfected) HepG2 cells. Moreover, mitochondrial iron ({sup 59}Fe) uptake was increased in the livers of HCV core protein-expressing transgenic mice. This increase in mitochondrial iron uptake was inhibited by Ru360, a mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} uniporter inhibitor. Furthermore, the Fe-NTA-induced augmentation of mitochondrial dysfunction, ROS production, and cell toxicity were also inhibited by Ru360 in Hep39b cells. Taken together, these results indicate that Ca{sup 2+} uniporter-mediated mitochondrial accumulation of iron exacerbates hepatocyte toxicity caused by the HCV core protein. - Highlights: • Iron accumulation in the livers of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is thought to exacerbate oxidative stress. • The impact of iron overload on mitochondrial damage and ROS production in HCV core protein-expressing cells were examined. • Mitochondrial iron uptake was increased in the livers of HCV core protein-expressing transgenic mice. • Ca{sup 2+} uniporter-mediated mitochondrial accumulation of iron exacerbates

  18. Core-Cone Structured Monodispersed Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles with Ultra-large Cavity for Protein Delivery.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chun; Yu, Meihua; Noonan, Owen; Zhang, Jun; Song, Hao; Zhang, Hongwei; Lei, Chang; Niu, Yuting; Huang, Xiaodan; Yang, Yannan; Yu, Chengzhong

    2015-11-25

    A new type of monodispersed mesoporous silica nanoparticles with a core-cone structure (MSN-CC) has been synthesized. The large cone-shaped pores are formed by silica lamellae closely packed encircling a spherical core, showing a structure similar to the flower dahlia. MSN-CC has a large pore size of 45 nm and a high pore volume of 2.59 cm(3) g(-1). MSN-CC demonstrates a high loading capacity of large proteins and successfully delivers active β-galactosidase into cells, showing their potential as efficient nanocarriers for the cellular delivery of proteins with large molecular weights. PMID:26426420

  19. Role of solvation in the energy stabilization inside the hydrophobic core of the protein rubredoxin.

    PubMed

    Riley, Kevin E; Merz, Kenneth M

    2006-08-17

    There are many forces that contribute to the stability of a protein; among these are dispersion interactions, hydrogen bonding, and solvation effects. In a recent work, Vondrasek et al. estimated the in vacuo stabilization energy of the hydrophobic core of the protein rubredoxin using high level ab initio methods (Vondrasek, J.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 2615). In this work, we evaluate the effects of solvation on the stability of the hydrophobic core of this protein. Solvation calculations are made using the polarizable continuum method at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory. It is found that, in a protein-like environment (mimicked by a continuum solvent with a dielectric constant of approximately 4), the stability of rubredoxin's hydrophobic core is decreased by 40-50%. We also observed that the stabilization energy of the hydrophobic core is only slightly lower in a protein-like medium than in an aqueous one (DeltaGether-DeltaGwater approximately 1.0-3.5 kcal/mol).

  20. Distribution of DNA-condensing protein complexes in the adenovirus core

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Berná, Ana J.; Marion, Sanjin; Chichón, F. Javier; Fernández, José J.; Winkler, Dennis C.; Carrascosa, José L.; Steven, Alasdair C.; Šiber, Antonio; San Martín, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Genome packing in adenovirus has long evaded precise description, since the viral dsDNA molecule condensed by proteins (core) lacks icosahedral order characteristic of the virus protein coating (capsid). We show that useful insights regarding the organization of the core can be inferred from the analysis of spatial distributions of the DNA and condensing protein units (adenosomes). These were obtained from the inspection of cryo-electron tomography reconstructions of individual human adenovirus particles. Our analysis shows that the core lacks symmetry and strict order, yet the adenosome distribution is not entirely random. The features of the distribution can be explained by modeling the condensing proteins and the part of the genome in each adenosome as very soft spheres, interacting repulsively with each other and with the capsid, producing a minimum outward pressure of ∼0.06 atm. Although the condensing proteins are connected by DNA in disrupted virion cores, in our models a backbone of DNA linking the adenosomes is not required to explain the experimental results in the confined state. In conclusion, the interior of an adenovirus infectious particle is a strongly confined and dense phase of soft particles (adenosomes) without a strictly defined DNA backbone. PMID:25820430

  1. Characterization of the fusion core in zebrafish endogenous retroviral envelope protein.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jian; Zhang, Huaidong; Gong, Rui; Xiao, Gengfu

    2015-05-01

    Zebrafish endogenous retrovirus (ZFERV) is the unique endogenous retrovirus in zebrafish, as yet, containing intact open reading frames of its envelope protein gene in zebrafish genome. Similarly, several envelope proteins of endogenous retroviruses in human and other mammalian animal genomes (such as syncytin-1 and 2 in human, syncytin-A and B in mouse) were identified and shown to be functional in induction of cell-cell fusion involved in placental development. ZFERV envelope protein (Env) gene appears to be also functional in vivo because it is expressible. After sequence alignment, we found ZFERV Env shares similar structural profiles with syncytin and other type I viral envelopes, especially in the regions of N- and C-terminal heptad repeats (NHR and CHR) which were crucial for membrane fusion. We expressed the regions of N + C protein in the ZFERV Env (residues 459-567, including predicted NHR and CHR) to characterize the fusion core structure. We found N + C protein could form a stable coiled-coil trimer that consists of three helical NHR regions forming a central trimeric core, and three helical CHR regions packing into the grooves on the surface of the central core. The structural characterization of the fusion core revealed the possible mechanism of fusion mediated by ZFERV Env. These results gave comprehensive explanation of how the ancient virus infects the zebrafish and integrates into the genome million years ago, and showed a rational clue for discovery of physiological significance (e.g., medicate cell-cell fusion). PMID:25804638

  2. Down-regulation of PTEN by HCV core protein through activating nuclear factor-κB

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Rong-Qing; Feng, Xu-Dong; Zhang, Yan-Hua; Wang, Li

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is an important causative agent in HCV related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Tumor suppressor gene PTEN appears to act in the liver at the crossroad of processes controlling cell proliferation. In this study we investigated the effect of the HCV core protein on the PTEN pathway in hepatocarcinogenesis. The HCV core was transfected stably into HepG2 cell. The effect of HCV core on cell proliferation and viability were detected by 3-(4, 5)-dimethylthiahiazo-(-z-y1)-3, 5-di-phenytetrazoliumromide (MTT) assay, clonogenic survival assay and Fluorescence Activating Cell Sorter (FACS) analysis. The expressions of PTEN were detected by real time RT-PCR and/or Western blot analysis, also the mechanism of down-regulation of PTEN was explored by western blot, luciferase assay and RNA interference. We found the HCV core promoted cell proliferation, survival and G2/M phase accumulation. It downregulated PTEN at mRNA and protein level and activated PTEN downstream gene Akt accompanied with NF-κB activation. Furthermore, the inhibition of HCV core by its specific shRNAs decreased the effect of growth promotion and G2/M phase arrest, inhibited the expression of nuclear p65 and increased PTEN expression. The activity of PTEN was restored when treated with NF-κB inhibitor PDTC. By luciferase assay we found that NF-κB inhibited PTEN promoter transcription activity directly in HCV core cells, while PDTC was contrary. Our study suggests that HCV proteins could modulate PTEN by activating NF-κB. Furthermore strategies designed to restore the expression of PTEN may be promising therapies for preventing HCV dependent hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:25550771

  3. Protease-like sequence in hepatitis B virus core antigen is not involved in the cleavage processes of core protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hwang, L H; Lin, Y J; Lai, W C; Lo, M S

    1991-02-01

    A DNA fragment, coding for hepatitis core antigen (HBcAg), was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and inserted into a lambda PL promoter-derived expression vector. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into Escherichia coli and proteins produced after heat induction were analyzed. In addition to the 21 kDa HBcAg protein, several smaller related polypeptides, particularly one of 17 kDa in size, were also detected with rabbit anti-HBcAg antiserum. Whether the protease-like sequence of core protein involved in the self-cleavage process to form the 17 kDa polypeptide was investigated by a deletion experiment. Our results with a mutant in which 7 amino acids of the conserved protease-like region in the core protein have been deleted suggest that the cleavage does not depend on the presence of these protease-like sequence. In addition, the core protein synthesized from in vitro translation reaction was not cleaved. Core particles from E. coli lysate were purified by sucrose and cesium chloride density gradient centrifugations and subsequently treated with 0.2% of SDS and 0.2% of beta-mecaptoethanol. Immunoblotting analysis, however, did not reveal any conversion of the 21 kDa protein to smaller ones. In conclusion, our results suggest that the protease-like domain at the N-terminus of the core protein does not contain intrinsic autocleavage activity, nor could the HBcAg be converted to smaller antigens by detergent treatment. PMID:1935370

  4. [Research Progress in the Core Proteins of the Classical Swine Fever Virus].

    PubMed

    Hou, Yuzhen; Zhao, Dantong; Liu, Guoying; He, Fan; Liu, Bin; Fu, Shaoyin; Hao, Yongqing; Zhang, Wenguang

    2015-09-01

    The core protein (CP) of the classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is one of its structural proteins. Apart from forming the nucleocapsid to protect internal viral genomic RNA, this protein is involved in transcriptional regulation. Also, during viral infection, the CP is involved in interactions with many host proteins. In this review, we combine study of this protein with its disorders, structural/functional characteristics, as well as its interactions with the non-structural proteins NS3, NS5B and host proteins such as SUMO-1, UBC9, OS9 and IQGAP1. We also summarize the important part played by the CP in CSFV pathogenicity, virulence and replication of genomic RNA. We also provide guidelines for further studies in the CP of the CSFV. PMID:26738299

  5. The iron-sulfur core in Rieske proteins is not symmetric.

    PubMed

    Ali, Md Ehesan; Nair, Nisanth N; Retegan, Marius; Neese, Frank; Staemmler, Volker; Marx, Dominik

    2014-12-01

    At variance with ferredoxins, Rieske-type proteins contain a chemically asymmetric iron-sulfur cluster. Nevertheless, X-ray crystallography apparently finds their [2Fe-2S] cores to be structurally symmetric or very close to symmetric (i.e. the four iron-sulfur bonds in the [2Fe-2S] core are equidistant). Using a combination of advanced density-based approaches, including finite-temperature molecular dynamics to access thermal fluctuations and free-energy profiles, in conjunction with correlated wavefunction-based methods we clearly predict an asymmetric core structure. This reveals a fundamental and intrinsic difference within the iron-sulfur clusters hosted by Rieske proteins and ferredoxins and thus opens up a new dimension for the ongoing efforts in understanding the role of Rieske-type [2Fe-2S] cluster in electron transfer processes that occur in almost all biological systems.

  6. Hepatitis C virus core protein cooperates with ras and transforms primary rat embryo fibroblasts to tumorigenic phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Ray, R B; Lagging, L M; Meyer, K; Ray, R

    1996-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein regulates cellular protooncogenes at the transcriptional level; this observation implicates core protein in the alteration of normal hepatocyte growth. In the present study, the transforming potential of the HCV core gene was investigated by using primary rat embryo fibroblast (REF) cells which were transfected with or without cooperative oncogenes. Integration of the HCV core gene resulted in expression of the viral protein in REF stable transformants. REF cells cotransfected with HCV core and H-ras genes became transformed and exhibited rapid proliferation, anchor-independent growth, and tumor formation in athymic nude mice. Results from these studies suggest that the core protein plays an important role in the regulation of HCV-infected cell growth and in the transformation to tumorigenic phenotype. These observations suggest a possible mechanism for this viral protein in the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma in HCV-infected humans. PMID:8676467

  7. A core viral protein binds host nucleosomes to sequester immune danger signals.

    PubMed

    Avgousti, Daphne C; Herrmann, Christin; Kulej, Katarzyna; Pancholi, Neha J; Sekulic, Nikolina; Petrescu, Joana; Molden, Rosalynn C; Blumenthal, Daniel; Paris, Andrew J; Reyes, Emigdio D; Ostapchuk, Philomena; Hearing, Patrick; Seeholzer, Steven H; Worthen, G Scott; Black, Ben E; Garcia, Benjamin A; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2016-07-01

    Viral proteins mimic host protein structure and function to redirect cellular processes and subvert innate defenses. Small basic proteins compact and regulate both viral and cellular DNA genomes. Nucleosomes are the repeating units of cellular chromatin and play an important part in innate immune responses. Viral-encoded core basic proteins compact viral genomes, but their impact on host chromatin structure and function remains unexplored. Adenoviruses encode a highly basic protein called protein VII that resembles cellular histones. Although protein VII binds viral DNA and is incorporated with viral genomes into virus particles, it is unknown whether protein VII affects cellular chromatin. Here we show that protein VII alters cellular chromatin, leading us to hypothesize that this has an impact on antiviral responses during adenovirus infection in human cells. We find that protein VII forms complexes with nucleosomes and limits DNA accessibility. We identified post-translational modifications on protein VII that are responsible for chromatin localization. Furthermore, proteomic analysis demonstrated that protein VII is sufficient to alter the protein composition of host chromatin. We found that protein VII is necessary and sufficient for retention in the chromatin of members of the high-mobility-group protein B family (HMGB1, HMGB2 and HMGB3). HMGB1 is actively released in response to inflammatory stimuli and functions as a danger signal to activate immune responses. We showed that protein VII can directly bind HMGB1 in vitro and further demonstrated that protein VII expression in mouse lungs is sufficient to decrease inflammation-induced HMGB1 content and neutrophil recruitment in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Together, our in vitro and in vivo results show that protein VII sequesters HMGB1 and can prevent its release. This study uncovers a viral strategy in which nucleosome binding is exploited to control extracellular immune signaling.

  8. A core viral protein binds host nucleosomes to sequester immune danger signals.

    PubMed

    Avgousti, Daphne C; Herrmann, Christin; Kulej, Katarzyna; Pancholi, Neha J; Sekulic, Nikolina; Petrescu, Joana; Molden, Rosalynn C; Blumenthal, Daniel; Paris, Andrew J; Reyes, Emigdio D; Ostapchuk, Philomena; Hearing, Patrick; Seeholzer, Steven H; Worthen, G Scott; Black, Ben E; Garcia, Benjamin A; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2016-07-01

    Viral proteins mimic host protein structure and function to redirect cellular processes and subvert innate defenses. Small basic proteins compact and regulate both viral and cellular DNA genomes. Nucleosomes are the repeating units of cellular chromatin and play an important part in innate immune responses. Viral-encoded core basic proteins compact viral genomes, but their impact on host chromatin structure and function remains unexplored. Adenoviruses encode a highly basic protein called protein VII that resembles cellular histones. Although protein VII binds viral DNA and is incorporated with viral genomes into virus particles, it is unknown whether protein VII affects cellular chromatin. Here we show that protein VII alters cellular chromatin, leading us to hypothesize that this has an impact on antiviral responses during adenovirus infection in human cells. We find that protein VII forms complexes with nucleosomes and limits DNA accessibility. We identified post-translational modifications on protein VII that are responsible for chromatin localization. Furthermore, proteomic analysis demonstrated that protein VII is sufficient to alter the protein composition of host chromatin. We found that protein VII is necessary and sufficient for retention in the chromatin of members of the high-mobility-group protein B family (HMGB1, HMGB2 and HMGB3). HMGB1 is actively released in response to inflammatory stimuli and functions as a danger signal to activate immune responses. We showed that protein VII can directly bind HMGB1 in vitro and further demonstrated that protein VII expression in mouse lungs is sufficient to decrease inflammation-induced HMGB1 content and neutrophil recruitment in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Together, our in vitro and in vivo results show that protein VII sequesters HMGB1 and can prevent its release. This study uncovers a viral strategy in which nucleosome binding is exploited to control extracellular immune signaling. PMID:27362237

  9. Preparation and recognition of surface molecularly imprinted core-shell microbeads for protein in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yan; Yan, Chang-Ling; Gao, Shu-Yan

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, a surface molecular imprinting technique was reported for preparing core-shell microbeads of protein imprinting, and bovine hemoglobin or bovine serum albumin were used as model proteins for studying the imprinted core-shell microbeads. 3-Aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) was polymerized onto the surface of polystyrene microbead in the presence of the protein templates to create protein-imprinted core-shell microbeads. The various samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) methods. The effect of pH on rebinding of the template hemoglobin, the specific binding and selective recognition were studied for the imprinted microbeads. The results show that the bovine hemoglobin-imprinted core-shell microbeads were successfully created. The shell was a sort of imprinted thin films with porous structure and larger surface areas. The imprinted microbeads have good selectivity for templates and high stability. Due to the recognition sites locating at or closing to the surface, these imprinted microbeads have good property of mass-transport. Unfortunately, the imprint technology was not successfully applied to imprinting bovine serum albumin (BSA).

  10. Characterization of the fusion core in zebrafish endogenous retroviral envelope protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Jian; Zhang, Huaidong; Gong, Rui; Xiao, Gengfu

    2015-05-08

    Zebrafish endogenous retrovirus (ZFERV) is the unique endogenous retrovirus in zebrafish, as yet, containing intact open reading frames of its envelope protein gene in zebrafish genome. Similarly, several envelope proteins of endogenous retroviruses in human and other mammalian animal genomes (such as syncytin-1 and 2 in human, syncytin-A and B in mouse) were identified and shown to be functional in induction of cell–cell fusion involved in placental development. ZFERV envelope protein (Env) gene appears to be also functional in vivo because it is expressible. After sequence alignment, we found ZFERV Env shares similar structural profiles with syncytin and other type I viral envelopes, especially in the regions of N- and C-terminal heptad repeats (NHR and CHR) which were crucial for membrane fusion. We expressed the regions of N + C protein in the ZFERV Env (residues 459–567, including predicted NHR and CHR) to characterize the fusion core structure. We found N + C protein could form a stable coiled-coil trimer that consists of three helical NHR regions forming a central trimeric core, and three helical CHR regions packing into the grooves on the surface of the central core. The structural characterization of the fusion core revealed the possible mechanism of fusion mediated by ZFERV Env. These results gave comprehensive explanation of how the ancient virus infects the zebrafish and integrates into the genome million years ago, and showed a rational clue for discovery of physiological significance (e.g., medicate cell–cell fusion). - Highlights: • ZFERV Env shares similar structural profiles with syncytin and other type I viral envelopes. • The fusion core of ZFERV Env forms stable coiled-coil trimer including three NHRs and three CHRs. • The structural mechanism of viral entry mediated by ZFERV Env is disclosed. • The results are helpful for further discovery of physiological function of ZFERV Env in zebrafish.

  11. Experimental evaluation of CH-π interactions in a protein core.

    PubMed

    Pace, Christopher J; Kim, Diane; Gao, Jianmin

    2012-05-01

    CH-π stacks up! Using the protein α(2) D as a model system, we estimate that a CH-π contact between cyclohexylalanine (Cha) and phenylalanine (F) contributes approximately -0.7 kcal  mol(-1) to the protein stability. The stacking F-Cha pairs are sequestered in the core of the protein, where water interference does not exist (see figure). Therefore, the observed energetic gain should represent the inherent magnitude and upper limit of the CH-π interactions.

  12. Immune Recognition of Citrullinated Proteoglycan Aggrecan Epitopes in Mice with Proteoglycan-Induced Arthritis and in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Markovics, Adrienn; Ocskó, Tímea; Katz, Robert S.; Buzás, Edit I.; Glant, Tibor T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease affecting the joints. Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) are frequently found in RA. Previous studies identified a citrullinated epitope in cartilage proteoglycan (PG) aggrecan that elicited pro-inflammatory cytokine production by RA T cells. We recently reported the presence of ACPA-reactive (citrullinated) PG in RA cartilage. Herein, we sought to identify additional citrullinated epitopes in human PG that are recognized by T cells or antibodies from RA patients. Methods We used mice with PG-induced arthritis (PGIA) as a screening tool to select citrulline (Cit)-containing PG peptides that were more immunogenic than the arginine (R)-containing counterparts. The selected peptide pairs were tested for induction of pro-inflammatory T-cell cytokine production in RA and healthy control peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures using ELISA and flow cytometry. Anti-Cit and anti-R peptide antibodies were detected by ELISA. Results Splenocytes from mice with PGIA exhibited greater T-cell cytokine secretion in response to the Cit than the R version of PG peptide 49 (P49) and anti-P49 antibodies were found in PGIA serum. PBMC from ACPA+ and ACPA- RA patients, but not from healthy controls, responded to Cit49 with robust cytokine production. High levels of anti-Cit49 antibodies were found in the plasma of a subset of ACPA+ RA patients. Another PG peptide (Cit13) similar to the previously described T-cell epitope induced greater cytokine responses than R13 by control (but not RA) PBMC, however, anti-Cit13 antibodies were rarely detected in human plasma. Conclusions We identified a novel citrullinated PG epitope (Cit49) that is highly immunogenic in mice with PGIA and in RA patients. We also describe T-cell and antibody reactivity with Cit49 in ACPA+ RA. As citrullinated PG might be present in RA articular cartilage, Cit PG epitope-induced T-cell activation or antibody deposition may

  13. Analysis of core-periphery organization in protein contact networks reveals groups of structurally and functionally critical residues.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Arnold Emerson; Sinha, Sitabhra

    2015-10-01

    The representation of proteins as networks of interacting amino acids, referred to as protein contact networks (PCN), and their subsequent analyses using graph theoretic tools, can provide novel insights into the key functional roles of specific groups of residues. We have characterized the networks corresponding to the native states of 66 proteins (belonging to different families) in terms of their core-periphery organization. The resulting hierarchical classification of the amino acid constituents of a protein arranges the residues into successive layers - having higher core order - with increasing connection density, ranging from a sparsely linked periphery to a densely intra-connected core (distinct from the earlier concept of protein core defined in terms of the three-dimensional geometry of the native state, which has least solvent accessibility). Our results show that residues in the inner cores are more conserved than those at the periphery. Underlining the functional importance of the network core, we see that the receptor sites for known ligand molecules of most proteins occur in the innermost core. Furthermore, the association of residues with structural pockets and cavities in binding or active sites increases with the core order. From mutation sensitivity analysis, we show that the probability of deleterious or intolerant mutations also increases with the core order. We also show that stabilization centre residues are in the innermost cores, suggesting that the network core is critically important in maintaining the structural stability of the protein. A publicly available Web resource for performing core-periphery analysis of any protein whose native state is known has been made available by us at http://www.imsc.res.in/ ~sitabhra/proteinKcore/index.html.

  14. Control of vertebrate core planar cell polarity protein localization and dynamics by Prickle 2

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Mitchell T.; Wallingford, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) is a ubiquitous property of animal tissues and is essential for morphogenesis and homeostasis. In most cases, this fundamental property is governed by a deeply conserved set of ‘core PCP’ proteins, which includes the transmembrane proteins Van Gogh-like (Vangl) and Frizzled (Fzd), as well as the cytoplasmic effectors Prickle (Pk) and Dishevelled (Dvl). Asymmetric localization of these proteins is thought to be central to their function, and understanding the dynamics of these proteins is an important challenge in developmental biology. Among the processes that are organized by the core PCP proteins is the directional beating of cilia, such as those in the vertebrate node, airway and brain. Here, we exploit the live imaging capabilities of Xenopus to chart the progressive asymmetric localization of fluorescent reporters of Dvl1, Pk2 and Vangl1 in a planar polarized ciliated epithelium. Using this system, we also characterize the influence of Pk2 on the asymmetric dynamics of Vangl1 at the cell cortex, and we define regions of Pk2 that control its own localization and those impacting Vangl1. Finally, our data reveal a striking uncoupling of Vangl1 and Dvl1 asymmetry. This study advances our understanding of conserved PCP protein functions and also establishes a rapid, tractable platform to facilitate future in vivo studies of vertebrate PCP protein dynamics. PMID:26293301

  15. Interaction between core protein of classical swine fever virus with cellular IQGAP1 proetin appears essential for virulence in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we show that IQGAP1, a cellular protein that plays a pivotal role as a regulator of the cytoskeleton affecting cell adhesion, polarization and migration, interacts with Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) Core protein. Sequence analyses identified a defined set of residues within CSFV Core prote...

  16. Structural insights into yeast histone chaperone Hif1: a scaffold protein recruiting protein complexes to core histones.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hejun; Zhang, Mengying; He, Wei; Zhu, Zhongliang; Teng, Maikun; Gao, Yongxiang; Niu, Liwen

    2014-09-15

    Yeast Hif1 [Hat1 (histone acetyltransferase 1)-interacting factor], a homologue of human NASP (nuclear autoantigenic sperm protein), is a histone chaperone that is involved in various protein complexes which modify histones during telomeric silencing and chromatin reassembly. For elucidating the structural basis of Hif1, in the present paper we demonstrate the crystal structure of Hif1 consisting of a superhelixed TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) domain and an extended acid loop covering the rear of TPR domain, which represent typical characteristics of SHNi-TPR [Sim3 (start independent of mitosis 3)-Hif1-NASP interrupted TPR] proteins. Our binding assay indicates that Hif1 could bind to the histone octamer via histones H3 and H4. The acid loop is shown to be crucial for the binding of histones and may also change the conformation of the TPR groove. By binding to the core histone complex Hif1 may recruit functional protein complexes to modify histones during chromatin reassembly.

  17. Structure of the TatC core of the twin-arginine protein transport system.

    PubMed

    Rollauer, Sarah E; Tarry, Michael J; Graham, James E; Jääskeläinen, Mari; Jäger, Franziska; Johnson, Steven; Krehenbrink, Martin; Liu, Sai-Man; Lukey, Michael J; Marcoux, Julien; McDowell, Melanie A; Rodriguez, Fernanda; Roversi, Pietro; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Robinson, Carol V; Sansom, Mark S P; Palmer, Tracy; Högbom, Martin; Berks, Ben C; Lea, Susan M

    2012-12-13

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway is one of two general protein transport systems found in the prokaryotic cytoplasmic membrane and is conserved in the thylakoid membrane of plant chloroplasts. The defining, and highly unusual, property of the Tat pathway is that it transports folded proteins, a task that must be achieved without allowing appreciable ion leakage across the membrane. The integral membrane TatC protein is the central component of the Tat pathway. TatC captures substrate proteins by binding their signal peptides. TatC then recruits TatA family proteins to form the active translocation complex. Here we report the crystal structure of TatC from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus. This structure provides a molecular description of the core of the Tat translocation system and a framework for understanding the unique Tat transport mechanism.

  18. First principles design of a core bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer protein.

    PubMed

    Goparaju, Geetha; Fry, Bryan A; Chobot, Sarah E; Wiedman, Gregory; Moser, Christopher C; Dutton, P Leslie; Discher, Bohdana M

    2016-05-01

    Here we describe the design, Escherichia coli expression and characterization of a simplified, adaptable and functionally transparent single chain 4-α-helix transmembrane protein frame that binds multiple heme and light activatable porphyrins. Such man-made cofactor-binding oxidoreductases, designed from first principles with minimal reference to natural protein sequences, are known as maquettes. This design is an adaptable frame aiming to uncover core engineering principles governing bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer function and recapitulate protein archetypes proposed to represent the origins of photosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson.

  19. Core mutations switch monomeric protein GB1 into an intertwined tetramer.

    PubMed

    Kirsten Frank, M; Dyda, Fred; Dobrodumov, Anatoliy; Gronenborn, Angela M

    2002-11-01

    The structure of a mutant immunoglobulin-binding B1 domain of streptococcal protein G (GB1), which comprises five conservative changes in hydrophobic core residues, was determined by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. The oligomeric state and quaternary structure of the mutant protein are drastically changed from the wild type protein. The mutant structure consists of a symmetric tetramer, with intermolecular strand exchange involving all four units. Four of the five secondary structure elements present in the monomeric wild type GB1 structure are retained in the tetrameric structure, although their intra- and intermolecular interactions are altered. Our results demonstrate that through the acquisition of a moderate number of pivotal point mutations, proteins such as GB1 are able to undergo drastic structural changes, overcoming reduced stability of the monomeric unit by multimerization. The present structure is an illustrative example of how proteins exploit the breadth of conformational space.

  20. First principles design of a core bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer protein.

    PubMed

    Goparaju, Geetha; Fry, Bryan A; Chobot, Sarah E; Wiedman, Gregory; Moser, Christopher C; Dutton, P Leslie; Discher, Bohdana M

    2016-05-01

    Here we describe the design, Escherichia coli expression and characterization of a simplified, adaptable and functionally transparent single chain 4-α-helix transmembrane protein frame that binds multiple heme and light activatable porphyrins. Such man-made cofactor-binding oxidoreductases, designed from first principles with minimal reference to natural protein sequences, are known as maquettes. This design is an adaptable frame aiming to uncover core engineering principles governing bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer function and recapitulate protein archetypes proposed to represent the origins of photosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. PMID:26672896

  1. Heterologous Expression of Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein in Oil Seeds of Brassica napus L.

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadzadeh, Sara; Roohvand, Farzin; Ajdary, Soheila; Ehsani, Parastoo; Hatef Salmanian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis c virus (HCV), prevalent among 3% of the world population, is a major worldwide public health concern and an effective vaccination could help to overcome this problem. Plant seeds as low-cost vaccine expression platforms are highly desirable to produce antigens. Objectives: The present study was aimed at investigating the possible expression of recombinant HCV core protein, as a leading HCV vaccine candidate, in canola (Brassica napus) plant seeds in order to be used as an effective immunogen for vaccine researches. Materials and Methods: A codon-optimized gene harboring the Kozak sequence, 6 × His-tag, HCVcp (1 - 122 residues) and KDEL (Lys-Asp-Glu-Leu) peptide in tandem was designed and expressed under the control of the seed specific promoter, fatty acid elongase 1 (FAE1), to accumulate the recombinant protein in canola (B. napus L.) seeds. Transgenic lines were screened and the presence of the transgene was confirmed in the T0 plants by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The quantity and quality of the HCV core protein (HCVcp) in transgenic seeds were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blot, respectively. Results: Western blot analysis using anti-His antibody confirmed the presence of a 15 kDa protein in the seeds of T1 transgenic lines. The amount of antigenic protein accumulated in the seeds of these transgenic lines was up to 0.05% of the total soluble protein (TSP). Conclusions: The canola oilseeds could provide a useful expression system to produce HCV core protein as a vaccine candidate. PMID:26855744

  2. Polyproteins related to the major core protein of mouse mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, C; Atterwill, M

    1978-01-01

    The mouse mammary tumor virus (MuMTV) contains several low-molecular-weight proteins which, together with the genomic RNA, constitute the core structure of the virion. The most abundant protein in the core is the 27,000-dalton protein (p27), and, by analogy to the type C viruses, this protein probably forms the core shell. In mouse mammary tumor cell lines (GR and Mm5MT) producing MuMTV the major p57 antigenic specificity resides in a large protein, which migrates in polyacrylamide gels as a doublet of 77,000 and 75,000 daltons (p 77/75). A series of lower-molecular-weight proteins, p61, p48, p38, and p34, is also present in small amounts and is probably derived by proteolytic cleavage of the p 77/75. These proteins have been identified by immunoprecipitation with monospecific antiserum, and their sequence relatedness to p27 has been determined by an analysis of the peptides after trypsin digestion. After a 15-min pulse with [35S]-methionine, all of the p27-related proteins in these cell lines were labelled and, during a subsequent chase, progressively disappeared. The p27 was labeled poorly during the pulse, but the amount of label in this protein increased during the chase. A quantitation of these experiments suggested that the majority of the p27-related proteins were quite rapidly turned over in these cell lines. Hence, if p27 is derived by a progressive proteolytic cleavage mechanism, then the process is inefficient in the GR cells and only moderately efficient in the Mm5MT cells. When MuMTV was isolated from the culture medium of these cells harvested at 5-min intervals, the major p27-related protein was p34. The p27 accounted for only 29% of the anti-p27 serum immunoprecipitable proteins compared to 95% in virus isolated from an 18-h harvest. Incubation of the rapid-harvest virus at 37 degrees C for 2 h resulted in some conversion of p34 to p27. These results suggest that some of the p27 in MuMTV is formed in the virions by proteolytic cleavage of p34

  3. Hepatitis C virus core protein triggers hepatic angiogenesis by a mechanism including multiple pathways.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mohamed; Selimovic, Denis; Ghozlan, Hanan; Abdel-kader, Ola

    2009-05-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with the production of serum cytokines, including transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta2. Despite the occurrence of hepatic angiogenesis in liver conditions, the role of HCV proteins in this context is currently unknown. We demonstrated that the development of hepatic neoangiogenesis in patients infected with HCV is associated with the expression of TGF-beta2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and with activation of endothelial cells, as evidenced by CD34 expression. The analysis of liver biopsies of HCV-positive and HCV-negative patients using immunostaining showed significant elevation of TGF-beta2, VEGF, and CD34 expression in patients who were HCV-positive. Using an HCV established culture system, we confirmed further the production of both TGF-beta2 and VEGF proteins, in the hepatoma cell lines HepG2 and Huh7 by transfection with full-length HCV RNA (JFH1) or by the regulated expression of core. In addition, regulated expression of core protein in HepG2 or Huh7 cells was found to induce expression and activation of the transcription factor E2F1 and apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1), activation of c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38, and extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK), and transcription factors activator protein 1 (AP-1), activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2), cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding (CREB), E2F1, hypoxia inducing factor 1 alpha (HIF-1alpha), and specificity protein 1. Furthermore, data obtained from inhibitor experiments revealed the importance of E2F1 and ASK1 in the modulation of core-induced activation of JNK and p38 pathways and suggested an essential role for JNK, p38, and ERK pathways in the regulation of core-induced production of TGF-beta2 and VEGF proteins. Thus, our data provide insight into the molecular mechanisms whereby core protein mediates the development of hepatic angiogenesis in patients with chronic HCV infection.

  4. ROCK inhibition enhances aggrecan deposition and suppresses matrix metalloproteinase-3 production in human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Furumatsu, Takayuki; Matsumoto-Ogawa, Emi; Tanaka, Takaaki; Lu, Zhichao; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2014-04-01

    Homeostasis of articular cartilage is maintained by a balance between catabolism and anabolism. Matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) catabolism of cartilaginous extracellular matrix (ECM), including aggrecan (AGN), is an important factor in osteoarthritis progression. We previously reported that inhibition of Rho-associated coiled-coil forming kinase (ROCK), an effector of Rho family GTPases, activates the chondrogenic transcription factor SRY-type high-mobility-group box (SOX) 9 and prevents dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes. We hypothesized that ROCK inhibition prevents chondrocyte dedifferentiation by altering the transcriptional balance between MMP-3 and AGN. Normal human articular chondrocytes were cultured in the presence or absence of ROCK inhibitor (ROCKi, Y-27632). Expression of MMP-3 and AGN during monolayer cultivation was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analysis. Chondrogenic redifferentiation potential of ROCKi-treated chondrocytes was evaluated by immunohistological analysis of pellet cultures. ROCKi treatment suppressed MMP-3 expression in monolayer- and pellet-cultured chondrocytes but increased AGN expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that the association between transcription factors E26 transformation specific (ETS)-1 and SOX9 and their target genes MMP-3 and AGN, respectively, was affected by ROCKi treatment. ROCKi decreased the association between ETS-1 and its binding sites on the MMP-3 promoter, whereas ROCKi promoted the interaction between SOX9 and the AGN promoter. Our results suggest that ROCK inhibition may have an important role in modulating the balance between degradation and synthesis of cartilaginous ECM, a finding that may facilitate development of techniques to prepare differentiated chondrocytes for cartilage regeneration therapy.

  5. In vitro inhibition of protein synthesis by purified cores from vaccinia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Hamida, F; Beaud, G

    1978-01-01

    The mechanism of the shutoff of cellular protein synthesis in vaccinia virus-infected cells has been investigated by using in vitro systems. Purified vaccinia cores cause inhibition of endogenous mRNA translation in nonpreincubated reticulocyte lysates and Ehrlich ascites tumor cell-free systems. Translation of viral mRNA from turnip yellow mosaic virus is also impaired in wheat germ cell-free extracts. The block induced by vaccinia cores in protein synthesis is not due to a decrease in the availability of mRNA but rather to an alteration of the cellular translational machinery. No nucleolytic activity able of digesting mRNA could be detected in purified vaccinia cores with three sensitive tests. There is a lack of inhibition in the poly(Phe)-poly(U) system, which bypasses the normal initiation process. An almost complete disaggregation of polyribosomes in the reticulocyte lysate appears when vaccinia cores are present. These results indicate that mRNA translation in a cell-free system is affected predominantly at the level of polypeptide chain initiation. PMID:272632

  6. Structure binding relationship of human surfactant protein D and various lipopolysaccharide inner core structures.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Anika; Wehle, Marko; Geissner, Andreas; Crouch, Erika C; Kang, Yu; Yang, You; Anish, Chakkumkal; Santer, Mark; Seeberger, Peter H

    2016-09-01

    As a major player of the innate immune system, surfactant protein D (SP-D) recognizes and promotes elimination of various pathogens such as Gram-negative bacteria. SP-D binds to l-glycero-d-manno-heptose (Hep), a constituent of the partially conserved lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inner core of many Gram-negative bacteria. Binding and affinity of trimeric human SP-D to Hep in distinct LPS inner core glycans differing in linkages and adjacent residues was elucidated using glycan array and surface plasmon resonance measurements that were compared to in silico interaction studies. The combination of in vitro assays using defined glycans and molecular docking and dynamic simulation approaches provides insights into the interaction of trimeric SP-D with those glycan ligands. Trimeric SP-D wildtype recognized larger LPS inner core oligosaccharides with slightly enhanced affinity than smaller compounds suggesting the involvement of stabilizing secondary interactions. A trimeric human SP-D mutant D324N+D325N+R343K resembling rat SP-D bound to various LPS inner core structures in a similar pattern as observed for the wildtype but with higher affinity. The selective mutation of SP-D promotes targeting of LPS inner core oligosaccharides on Gram-negative bacteria to develop novel therapeutic agents. PMID:27350640

  7. A role for the perlecan protein core in the activation of the keratinocyte growth factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Ghiselli, G; Eichstetter, I; Iozzo, R V

    2001-01-01

    Perlecan, a widespread heparan sulphate (HS) proteoglycan, is directly involved in the storing of angiogenic growth factors, mostly members of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) gene family. We have previously shown that antisense targeting of the perlecan gene causes a reduced growth and responsiveness to FGF7 [also known as keratinocyte growth factor (KGF)] in human cancer cells, and that the perlecan protein core interacts specifically with FGF7. In the present paper, we have investigated human colon carcinoma cells in which the perlecan gene was disrupted by targeted homologous recombination. After screening over 1000 clones, we obtained two clones heterozygous for the null mutation with no detectable perlecan, indicating that the other allele was non-functioning. The perlecan-deficient cells grew more slowly, did not respond to FGF7 with or without the addition of heparin, and were less tumorigenic than control cells. Paradoxically, the perlecan-deficient cells displayed increased FGF7 surface binding. However, the perlecan protein core was required for functional activation of the KGF receptor and downstream signalling. Because heparin could not substitute for perlecan, the HS chains are not critical for FGF7-mediated signalling in this cell system. These results provide the first genetic evidence that the perlecan protein core is a molecular entity implicated in FGF7 binding and activation of its receptor. PMID:11563979

  8. Repacking protein cores with backbone freedom: structure prediction for coiled coils.

    PubMed

    Harbury, P B; Tidor, B; Kim, P S

    1995-08-29

    Progress in homology modeling and protein design has generated considerable interest in methods for predicting side-chain packing in the hydrophobic cores of proteins. Present techniques are not practically useful, however, because they are unable to model protein main-chain flexibility. Parameterization of backbone motions may represent a general and efficient method to incorporate backbone relaxation into such fixed main-chain models. To test this notion, we introduce a method for treating explicitly the backbone motions of alpha-helical bundles based on an algebraic parameterization proposed by Francis Crick in 1953 [Crick, F. H. C. (1953) Acta Crystallogr. 6, 685-689]. Given only the core amino acid sequence, a simple calculation can rapidly reproduce the crystallographic main-chain and core side-chain structures of three coiled coils (one dimer, one trimer, and one tetramer) to within 0.6-A root-mean-square deviations. The speed of the predictive method [approximately 3 min per rotamer choice on a Silicon Graphics (Mountain View, CA) 4D/35 computer] permits it to be used as a design tool.

  9. Transcriptional Activation of the Interleukin-2 Promoter by Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bergqvist, Anders; Rice, Charles M.

    2001-01-01

    Most patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) become chronic carriers. Viruses that efficiently establish persistent infections must have effective ways of evading host defenses. In the case of HCV, little is known about how chronic infections are established or maintained. Besides hepatocytes, several reports suggest that HCV can infect T and B lymphocytes. Since T cells are essential for viral clearance, direct or indirect effects of HCV on T-cell function could influence the outcome of infection. Given that T-cell growth and differentiation require the cytokine interleukin 2 (IL-2), we asked whether HCV might modulate synthesis of IL-2. Portions of the HCV polyprotein were expressed in Jurkat cells under a variety of conditions. We found that the highly conserved HCV core protein, in combination with other stimuli, was able to dramatically activate transcription from the IL-2 promoter. The carboxy-terminal hydrophobic portion of the core protein was required for this activity. Activation was dependent on nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), occurred in cells deficient in the tyrosine kinase p56lck, and could be blocked by addition of cyclosporin A and by depletion of calcium. These results suggest that the HCV core protein can activate transcription of the IL-2 promoter through the NFAT pathway. This novel activity may have consequences for T-cell development and establishment of persistent infections. PMID:11134290

  10. The Core of Chloroplast Nucleoids Contains Architectural SWIB Domain Proteins[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Melonek, Joanna; Matros, Andrea; Trösch, Mirl; Mock, Hans-Peter; Krupinska, Karin

    2012-01-01

    A highly enriched fraction of the transcriptionally active chromosome from chloroplasts of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) was analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to identify proteins involved in structuring of the nucleoid core. Among such plastid nucleoid-associated candidate proteins a 12-kD SWIB (SWI/SNF complex B) domain–containing protein was identified. It belongs to a subgroup of low molecular mass SWIB domain proteins, which in Arabidopsis thaliana has six members (SWIB-1 to SWIB-6) with predictions for localization in the two DNA-containing organelles. Green/red fluorescent protein fusions of four of them were shown to be targeted to chloroplasts, where they colocalize with each other as well as with the plastid envelope DNA binding protein in structures corresponding to plastid nucleoids. For SWIB-6 and SWIB-4, a second localization in mitochondria and nucleus, respectively, could be observed. SWIB-4 has a histone H1 motif next to the SWIB domain and was shown to bind to DNA. Moreover, the recombinant SWIB-4 protein was shown to induce compaction and condensation of nucleoids and to functionally complement a mutant of Escherichia coli lacking the histone-like nucleoid structuring protein H-NS. PMID:22797472

  11. High-resolution crystal structure of a hepatitis B virus replication inhibitor bound to the viral core protein.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Klaus; Lam, Angela M; Lukacs, Christine; Vogel, Robert; Ren, Suping; Espiritu, Christine; Baydo, Ruth; Atkins, Kateri; Abendroth, Jan; Liao, Guochun; Efimov, Andrey; Hartman, George; Flores, Osvaldo A

    2015-12-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein is essential for HBV replication and an important target for antiviral drug discovery. We report the first, to our knowledge, high-resolution crystal structure of an antiviral compound bound to the HBV core protein. The compound NVR-010-001-E2 can induce assembly of the HBV core wild-type and Y132A mutant proteins and thermostabilize the proteins with a Tm increase of more than 10 °C. NVR-010-001-E2 binds at the dimer-dimer interface of the core proteins, forms a new interaction surface promoting protein-protein interaction, induces protein assembly, and increases stability. The impact of naturally occurring core protein mutations on antiviral activity correlates with NVR-010-001-E2 binding interactions determined by crystallography. The crystal structure provides understanding of a drug efficacy mechanism related to the induction and stabilization of protein-protein interactions and enables structure-guided design to improve antiviral potency and drug-like properties.

  12. High-resolution crystal structure of a hepatitis B virus replication inhibitor bound to the viral core protein.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Klaus; Lam, Angela M; Lukacs, Christine; Vogel, Robert; Ren, Suping; Espiritu, Christine; Baydo, Ruth; Atkins, Kateri; Abendroth, Jan; Liao, Guochun; Efimov, Andrey; Hartman, George; Flores, Osvaldo A

    2015-12-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein is essential for HBV replication and an important target for antiviral drug discovery. We report the first, to our knowledge, high-resolution crystal structure of an antiviral compound bound to the HBV core protein. The compound NVR-010-001-E2 can induce assembly of the HBV core wild-type and Y132A mutant proteins and thermostabilize the proteins with a Tm increase of more than 10 °C. NVR-010-001-E2 binds at the dimer-dimer interface of the core proteins, forms a new interaction surface promoting protein-protein interaction, induces protein assembly, and increases stability. The impact of naturally occurring core protein mutations on antiviral activity correlates with NVR-010-001-E2 binding interactions determined by crystallography. The crystal structure provides understanding of a drug efficacy mechanism related to the induction and stabilization of protein-protein interactions and enables structure-guided design to improve antiviral potency and drug-like properties. PMID:26598693

  13. Differential Effects of Hydrophobic Core Packing Residues for Thermodynamic and Mechanical Stability of a Hyperthermophilic Protein.

    PubMed

    Tych, Katarzyna M; Batchelor, Matthew; Hoffmann, Toni; Wilson, Michael C; Hughes, Megan L; Paci, Emanuele; Brockwell, David J; Dougan, Lorna

    2016-07-26

    Proteins from organisms that have adapted to environmental extremes provide attractive systems to explore and determine the origins of protein stability. Improved hydrophobic core packing and decreased loop-length flexibility can increase the thermodynamic stability of proteins from hyperthermophilic organisms. However, their impact on protein mechanical stability is not known. Here, we use protein engineering, biophysical characterization, single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to measure the effect of altering hydrophobic core packing on the stability of the cold shock protein TmCSP from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima. We make two variants of TmCSP in which a mutation is made to reduce the size of aliphatic groups from buried hydrophobic side chains. In the first, a mutation is introduced in a long loop (TmCSP L40A); in the other, the mutation is introduced on the C-terminal β-strand (TmCSP V62A). We use MD simulations to confirm that the mutant TmCSP L40A shows the most significant increase in loop flexibility, and mutant TmCSP V62A shows greater disruption to the core packing. We measure the thermodynamic stability (ΔGD-N) of the mutated proteins and show that there is a more significant reduction for TmCSP L40A (ΔΔG = 63%) than TmCSP V62A (ΔΔG = 47%), as might be expected on the basis of the relative reduction in the size of the side chain. By contrast, SMFS measures the mechanical stability (ΔG*) and shows a greater reduction for TmCSP V62A (ΔΔG* = 8.4%) than TmCSP L40A (ΔΔG* = 2.5%). While the impact on the mechanical stability is subtle, the results demonstrate the power of tuning noncovalent interactions to modulate both the thermodynamic and mechanical stability of a protein. Such understanding and control provide the opportunity to design proteins with optimized thermodynamic and mechanical properties. PMID:27338140

  14. Purification and properties of the intact P-700 and Fx-containing Photosystem I core protein.

    PubMed

    Parrett, K G; Mehari, T; Warren, P G; Golbeck, J H

    1989-02-28

    The intact Photosystem I core protein, containing the psaA and psaB polypeptides, and electron transfer components P-700 through FX, was isolated from cyanobacterial and higher plant Photosystem I complexes with chaotropic agents followed by sucrose density ultracentrifugation. The concentrations of NaClO4, NaSCN, NaI, NaBr or urea required for the functional removal of the 8.9 kDa, FA/FB polypeptide was shown to be inversely related to the strength of the chaotrope. The Photosystem I core protein, which was purified to homogeniety, contains 4 mol of acid-labile sulfide and has the following properties: (i) the FX-containing core consists of the 82 and 83 kDa reaction center polypeptides but is totally devoid of the low-molecular-mass polypeptides; (ii) methyl viologen and other bipyridilium dyes have the ability to accept electrons directly from FX; (iii) the difference spectrum of FX from 400 to 900 nm is characteristic of an iron-sulfur cluster; (iv) the midpoint potential of FX, determined optically at room temperature, is 60 mV more positive than in the control; (v) there is indication by ESR spectroscopy of low-temperature heterogeneity within FX; and (vi) the heterogeneity is seen by optical spectroscopy as inefficiency in low-temperature electron flow to FX. The constraints imposed by the amount of non-heme iron and labile sulfide in the Photosystem I core protein, the cysteine content of the psaA and psaB polypeptides, and the stoichiometry of high-molecular-mass polypeptides, cause us to re-examine the possibility that FX is a [4Fe-4S] rather than a [2Fe-2S] cluster ligated by homologous cysteine residues on the psaA and psaB heterodimer.

  15. On the mineral core of ferritin-like proteins: structural and magnetic characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Prieto, A.; Alonso, J.; Muñoz, D.; Marcano, L.; Abad Díaz de Cerio, A.; Fernández de Luis, R.; Orue, I.; Mathon, O.; Muela, A.; Fdez-Gubieda, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    It is generally accepted that the mineral core synthesized by ferritin-like proteins consists of a ferric oxy-hydroxide mineral similar to ferrihydrite in the case of horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and an oxy-hydroxide-phosphate phase in plant and prokaryotic ferritins. The structure reflects a dynamic process of deposition and dissolution, influenced by different biological, chemical and physical variables. In this work we shed light on this matter by combining a structural (High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Fe K-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS)) and a magnetic study of the mineral core biomineralized by horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and three prokaryotic ferritin-like proteins: bacterial ferritin (FtnA) and bacterioferritin (Bfr) from Escherichia coli and archaeal ferritin (PfFtn) from Pyrococcus furiosus. The prokaryotic ferritin-like proteins have been studied under native conditions and inside the cells for the sake of preserving their natural attributes. They share with HoSF a nanocrystalline structure rather than an amorphous one as has been frequently reported. However, the presence of phosphorus changes drastically the short-range order and magnetic response of the prokaryotic cores with respect to HoSF. The superparamagnetism observed in HoSF is absent in the prokaryotic proteins, which show a pure atomic-like paramagnetic behaviour attributed to phosphorus breaking the Fe-Fe exchange interaction.It is generally accepted that the mineral core synthesized by ferritin-like proteins consists of a ferric oxy-hydroxide mineral similar to ferrihydrite in the case of horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and an oxy-hydroxide-phosphate phase in plant and prokaryotic ferritins. The structure reflects a dynamic process of deposition and dissolution, influenced by different biological, chemical and physical variables. In this work we shed light on this matter by combining a structural (High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM

  16. Charge separation, stabilization, and protein relaxation in photosystem II core particles with closed reaction center.

    PubMed

    Szczepaniak, M; Sander, J; Nowaczyk, M; Müller, M G; Rögner, M; Holzwarth, A R

    2009-01-01

    The fluorescence kinetics of cyanobacterial photosystem II (PSII) core particles with closed reaction centers (RCs) were studied with picosecond resolution. The data are modeled in terms of electron transfer (ET) and associated protein conformational relaxation processes, resolving four different radical pair (RP) states. The target analyses reveal the importance of protein relaxation steps in the ET chain for the functioning of PSII. We also tested previously published data on cyanobacterial PSII with open RCs using models that involved protein relaxation steps as suggested by our data on closed RCs. The rationale for this reanalysis is that at least one short-lived component could not be described in the previous simpler models. This new analysis supports the involvement of a protein relaxation step for open RCs as well. In this model the rate of ET from reduced pheophytin to the primary quinone Q(A) is determined to be 4.1 ns(-1). The rate of initial charge separation is slowed down substantially from approximately 170 ns(-1) in PSII with open RCs to 56 ns(-1) upon reduction of Q(A). However, the free-energy drop of the first RP is not changed substantially between the two RC redox states. The currently assumed mechanistic model, assuming the same early RP intermediates in both states of RC, is inconsistent with the presented energetics of the RPs. Additionally, a comparison between PSII with closed RCs in isolated cores and in intact cells reveals slightly different relaxation kinetics, with a approximately 3.7 ns component present only in isolated cores.

  17. A single aromatic core mutation converts a designed "primitive" protein from halophile to mesophile folding.

    PubMed

    Longo, Liam M; Tenorio, Connie A; Kumru, Ozan S; Middaugh, C Russell; Blaber, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The halophile environment has a number of compelling aspects with regard to the origin of structured polypeptides (i.e., proteogenesis) and, instead of a curious niche that living systems adapted into, the halophile environment is emerging as a candidate "cradle" for proteogenesis. In this viewpoint, a subsequent halophile-to-mesophile transition was a key step in early evolution. Several lines of evidence indicate that aromatic amino acids were a late addition to the codon table and not part of the original "prebiotic" set comprising the earliest polypeptides. We test the hypothesis that the availability of aromatic amino acids could facilitate a halophile-to-mesophile transition by hydrophobic core-packing enhancement. The effects of aromatic amino acid substitutions were evaluated in the core of a "primitive" designed protein enriched for the 10 prebiotic amino acids (A,D,E,G,I,L,P,S,T,V)-having an exclusively prebiotic core and requiring halophilic conditions for folding. The results indicate that a single aromatic amino acid substitution is capable of eliminating the requirement of halophile conditions for folding of a "primitive" polypeptide. Thus, the availability of aromatic amino acids could have facilitated a critical halophile-to-mesophile protein folding adaptation-identifying a selective advantage for the incorporation of aromatic amino acids into the codon table.

  18. High-resolution crystal structure of a hepatitis B virus replication inhibitor bound to the viral core protein

    PubMed Central

    Klumpp, Klaus; Lam, Angela M.; Lukacs, Christine; Vogel, Robert; Ren, Suping; Espiritu, Christine; Baydo, Ruth; Atkins, Kateri; Abendroth, Jan; Liao, Guochun; Efimov, Andrey; Hartman, George; Flores, Osvaldo A.

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein is essential for HBV replication and an important target for antiviral drug discovery. We report the first, to our knowledge, high-resolution crystal structure of an antiviral compound bound to the HBV core protein. The compound NVR-010–001-E2 can induce assembly of the HBV core wild-type and Y132A mutant proteins and thermostabilize the proteins with a Tm increase of more than 10 °C. NVR-010–001-E2 binds at the dimer–dimer interface of the core proteins, forms a new interaction surface promoting protein–protein interaction, induces protein assembly, and increases stability. The impact of naturally occurring core protein mutations on antiviral activity correlates with NVR-010–001-E2 binding interactions determined by crystallography. The crystal structure provides understanding of a drug efficacy mechanism related to the induction and stabilization of protein–protein interactions and enables structure-guided design to improve antiviral potency and drug-like properties. PMID:26598693

  19. Core Amino Acid Residues in the Morphology-Regulating Protein, Mms6, for Intracellular Magnetite Biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Ayana; Narumiya, Kaori; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Arakaki, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms produce finely tuned biomineral architectures with the aid of biomineral-associated proteins. The functional amino acid residues in these proteins have been previously identified using in vitro and in silico experimentation in different biomineralization systems. However, the investigation in living organisms is limited owing to the difficulty in establishing appropriate genetic techniques. Mms6 protein, isolated from the surface of magnetite crystals synthesized in magnetotactic bacteria, was shown to play a key role in the regulation of crystal morphology. In this study, we have demonstrated a defect in the specific region or substituted acidic amino acid residues in the Mms6 protein for observing their effect on magnetite biomineralization in vivo. Analysis of the gene deletion mutants and transformants of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 expressing partially truncated Mms6 protein revealed that deletions in the N-terminal or C-terminal regions disrupted proper protein localization to the magnetite surface, resulting in a change in the crystal morphology. Moreover, single amino acid substitutions at Asp123, Glu124, or Glu125 in the C-terminal region of Mms6 clearly indicated that these amino acid residues had a direct impact on magnetite crystal morphology. Thus, these consecutive acidic amino acid residues were found to be core residues regulating magnetite crystal morphology. PMID:27759096

  20. Rotavirus RNA polymerase requires the core shell protein to synthesize the double-stranded RNA genome.

    PubMed

    Patton, J T; Jones, M T; Kalbach, A N; He, Y W; Xiaobo, J

    1997-12-01

    Rotavirus cores contain the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) genome, RNA polymerase VP1, and guanylyltransferase VP3 and are enclosed within a lattice formed by the RNA-binding protein VP2. Analysis of baculovirus-expressed core-like particles (CLPs) has shown that VP1 and VP2 assemble into the simplest core-like structures with replicase activity and that VP1, but not VP3, is essential for replicase activity. To further define the role of VP1 and VP2 in the synthesis of dsRNA from viral mRNA, recombinant baculoviruses containing gene 1 (rBVg1) and gene 2 (rBVg2) of SA11 rotavirus were generated and used to express recombinant VP1 (rVP1) and rVP2, respectively. After purification, the proteins were assayed individually and together for the ability to catalyze the synthesis of dsRNA in a cell-free replication system. The results showed that dsRNA was synthesized only in assays containing rVP1 and rVP2, thus establishing that both proteins are essential for replicase activity. Even in assays containing a primer-linked mRNA template, neither rVP1 nor rVP2 alone directed RNA synthesis. Characterization of the cis-acting replication signals in mRNA recognized by the replicase of rVP1 and rVP2 showed that they were the same as those recognized by the replicase of virion-derived cores, thus excluding a role for VP3 in recognition of the mRNA template by the replicase. Analysis of RNA-protein interactions indicated that the mRNA template binds strongly to VP2 in replicase assays but that the majority of the dsRNA product neither is packaged nor stably associates with VP2. The results of replicase assays performed with mutant VP2 containing a deletion in its RNA-binding domain suggests that the essential role for VP2 in replication is linked to the protein's ability to bind the mRNA template for minus-strand synthesis.

  1. TRF2 Protein Interacts with Core Histones to Stabilize Chromosome Ends*

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Takashi; Shimizu, Shigeomi

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian chromosome ends are protected by a specialized nucleoprotein complex called telomeres. Both shelterin, a telomere-specific multi-protein complex, and higher order telomeric chromatin structures combine to stabilize the chromosome ends. Here, we showed that TRF2, a component of shelterin, binds to core histones to protect chromosome ends from inappropriate DNA damage response and loss of telomeric DNA. The N-terminal Gly/Arg-rich domain (GAR domain) of TRF2 directly binds to the globular domain of core histones. The conserved arginine residues in the GAR domain of TRF2 are required for this interaction. A TRF2 mutant with these arginine residues substituted by alanine lost the ability to protect telomeres and induced rapid telomere shortening caused by the cleavage of a loop structure of the telomeric chromatin. These findings showed a previously unnoticed interaction between the shelterin complex and nucleosomal histones to stabilize the chromosome ends. PMID:27514743

  2. Heterogeneous Expression of the Core Circadian Clock Proteins among Neuronal Cell Types in Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Zhijing; Ribelayga, Christophe P.

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in metabolism, physiology, and behavior originate from cell-autonomous circadian clocks located in many organs and structures throughout the body and that share a common molecular mechanism based on the clock genes and their protein products. In the mammalian neural retina, despite evidence supporting the presence of several circadian clocks regulating many facets of retinal physiology and function, the exact cellular location and genetic signature of the retinal clock cells remain largely unknown. Here we examined the expression of the core circadian clock proteins CLOCK, BMAL1, NPAS2, PERIOD 1(PER1), PERIOD 2 (PER2), and CRYPTOCHROME2 (CRY2) in identified neurons of the mouse retina during daily and circadian cycles. We found concurrent clock protein expression in most retinal neurons, including cone photoreceptors, dopaminergic amacrine cells, and melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive ganglion cells. Remarkably, diurnal and circadian rhythms of expression of all clock proteins were observed in the cones whereas only CRY2 expression was found to be rhythmic in the dopaminergic amacrine cells. Only a low level of expression of the clock proteins was detected in the rods at any time of the daily or circadian cycle. Our observations provide evidence that cones and not rods are cell-autonomous circadian clocks and reveal an important disparity in the expression of the core clock components among neuronal cell types. We propose that the overall temporal architecture of the mammalian retina does not result from the synchronous activity of pervasive identical clocks but rather reflects the cellular and regional heterogeneity in clock function within retinal tissue. PMID:23189207

  3. Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein Promotes miR-122 Destabilization by Inhibiting GLD-2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Geon-Woo; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Cho, Hee; Kim, Minwoo; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Oh, Jong-Won

    2016-01-01

    The liver-specific microRNA miR-122, which has essential roles in liver development and metabolism, is a key proviral factor for hepatitis C virus (HCV). Despite its crucial role in the liver and HCV life cycle, little is known about the molecular mechanism of miR-122 expression regulation by HCV infection. Here, we show that the HCV core protein downregulates the abundance of miR-122 by promoting its destabilization via the inhibition of GLD-2, a non-canonical cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerase. The decrease in miR-122 expression resulted in the dysregulation of the known functions of miR-122, including its proviral activity for HCV. By high-throughput sequencing of small RNAs from human liver biopsies, we found that the 22-nucleotide (nt) prototype miR-122 is modified at its 3′ end by 3′-terminal non-templated and templated nucleotide additions. Remarkably, the proportion of miR-122 isomers bearing a single nucleotide tail of any ribonucleotide decreased in liver specimens from patients with HCV. We found that these single-nucleotide-tailed miR-122 isomers display increased miRNA activity and stability over the 22-nt prototype miR-122 and that the 3′-terminal extension is catalyzed by the unique terminal nucleotidyl transferase activity of GLD-2, which is capable of adding any single ribonucleotide without preference of adenylate to the miR-122 3′ end. The HCV core protein specifically inhibited GLD-2, and its interaction with GLD-2 in the cytoplasm was found to be responsible for miR-122 downregulation. Collectively, our results provide new insights into the regulatory role of the HCV core protein in controlling viral RNA abundance and miR-122 functions through miR-122 stability modulation. PMID:27366906

  4. Hepatitis C virus core protein impairs metabolic disorder of liver cell via HOTAIR-Sirt1 signalling.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Qin; Gu, Xin-Yu; Hu, Jin-Xing; Ping, Yu; Li, Hua; Yan, Jing-Ya; Li, Juan; Sun, Ran; Yu, Zu-Jing; Zhang, Yi

    2016-07-01

    It has been suggested that Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is associated with metabolic disorders of liver cell. However, the precise mechanism is still unclear. The aim of the present study was to explore the impact of HCV core protein on hepatocyte metabolism by HepG2 and the possible involvement of long non-coding (lnc) RNAs in this process. The effect of HCV core protein on lncRNAs expression was examined with quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). Manipulation of HVC core protein and lncRNA HOTAIR was to evaluate the role of interaction between them on cell metabolism-related gene expression and cellular metabolism. The potential downstream Sirt1 signal was examined by western blotting and qRT-PCR. Our data suggested that suppression of HOTAIR abrogates HCV core protein-induced reduction in Sirt1 and differential expression of glucose- and lipid-metabolism-related genes. Also it benefits for metabolic homoeostasis of hepatocyte indicated by restoration of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and NAD/NADH ratio. By manipulation of HOTAIR, we concluded that HOTAIR negatively regulates Sirt1 expression through affecting its promotor methylation. Moreover, overexpression of Sirt1 reverses pcDNA-HOTAIR-induced glucose- and lipid-metabolism-related gene expression. Our study suggests that HCV core protein causes dysfunction of glucose and lipid metabolism in liver cells through HOTAIR-Sirt1 signalling pathway. PMID:27129296

  5. MicroRNA-185-5p mediates regulation of SREBP2 expression by hepatitis C virus core protein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Wang, Qi; Liu, Shun-Ai; Zhang, Jin-Qian; Ju, Wei; Quan, Min; Feng, Sheng-Hu; Dong, Jin-Ling; Gao, Ping; Cheng, Jun

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the molecular mechanism for regulation of cholesterol metabolism by hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein in HepG2 cells. METHODS: HCV genotype 1b core protein was cloned and expressed in HepG2 cells. The cholesterol content was determined after transfection. The expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 (SREBP2) and the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis (HMGCR) was measured by quantitative real-time PCR and immunoblotting after transfection. The effects of core protein on the SREBP2 promoter and 3’-untranslated region were analyzed by luciferase assay. We used different target predictive algorithms, microRNA (miRNA) mimics/inhibitors, and site-directed mutation to identify a putative target of a particular miRNA. RESULTS: HCV core protein expression in HepG2 cells increased the total intracellular cholesterol level (4.05 ± 0.17 vs 6.47 ± 0.68, P = 0.001), and this increase corresponded to an increase in SREBP2 and HMGCR mRNA levels (P = 0.009 and 0.037, respectively) and protein expression. The molecular mechanism study revealed that the HCV core protein increased the expression of SREBP2 by enhancing its promoter activity (P = 0.004). In addition, miR-185-5p expression was tightly regulated by the HCV core protein (P = 0.041). Moreover, overexpression of miR-185-5p repressed the SREBP2 mRNA level (P = 0.022) and protein expression. In contrast, inhibition of miR-185-5p caused upregulation of SREBP2 protein expression. miR-185-5p was involved in the regulation of SREBP2 expression by HCV core protein. CONCLUSION: HCV core protein disturbs the cholesterol homeostasis in HepG2 cells via the SREBP2 pathway; miR-185-5p is involved in the regulation of SREBP2 by the core protein. PMID:25914460

  6. Detection of specific antibodies to HCV-ARF/CORE+1 protein in patients treated with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Karamitros, T; Kakkanas, A; Katsoulidou, A; Sypsa, V; Dalagiorgou, G; Mavromara, P; Hatzakis, A

    2012-03-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause for chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. The HCV-ARF/core+1 protein is an alternative product of HCV core-encoding sequence of unknown biological function. Highly purified HCV core and ARF/core+1 recombinant proteins from HCV genotype 1a and HCV-ARF/core+1 recombinant protein from HCV genotype 3a were expressed in Escherichia coli. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we assessed the prevalence of anti-ARF/core+1 antibodies in 90 chronic hepatitis C patients infected with HCV genotypes 1a/1b or 3a, treated with pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN-a-2a) plus ribavirin. Samples derived from 92 healthy blood donors were used as negative controls. All HCV-RNA-positive serum samples reacted with core 1a antigen, while 15 (37.5%) of 40 and 14 (28%) of 50 patients infected with HCV-1a/1b and HCV-3a, respectively, were found to have anti-ARF/core+1 antibodies into their serum before treatment initiation. These antibodies were persistently present during treatment follow-up and linked to elevated levels of HCV-RNA at baseline. PMID:22329372

  7. Structure of Protein Phosphatase 2A Core Enzyme Bound to Tumor-Inducing Toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Xing,Y.; Xu, Y.; Chen, Y.; Jeffrey, P.; Chao, Y.; Lin, Z.; Li, Z.; Strack, S.; Stock, J.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The serine/threonine phosphatase protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays an essential role in many aspects of cellular functions and has been shown to be an important tumor suppressor. The core enzyme of PP2A comprises a 65 kDa scaffolding subunit and a 36 kDa catalytic subunit. Here we report the crystal structures of the PP2A core enzyme bound to two of its inhibitors, the tumor-inducing agents okadaic acid and microcystin-LR, at 2.6 and 2.8 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The catalytic subunit recognizes one end of the elongated scaffolding subunit by interacting with the conserved ridges of HEAT repeats 11-15. Formation of the core enzyme forces the scaffolding subunit to undergo pronounced structural rearrangement. The scaffolding subunit exhibits considerable conformational flexibility, which is proposed to play an essential role in PP2A function. These structures, together with biochemical analyses, reveal significant insights into PP2A function and serve as a framework for deciphering the diverse roles of PP2A in cellular physiology.

  8. Structure of the protein core of the glypican Dally-like and localization of a region important for hedgehog signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Min-Sung; Saunders, Adam M.; Hamaoka, Brent Y.; Beachy, Philip A.; Leahy, Daniel J.

    2011-09-20

    Glypicans are heparan sulfate proteoglycans that modulate the signaling of multiple growth factors active during animal development, and loss of glypican function is associated with widespread developmental abnormalities. Glypicans consist of a conserved, approximately 45-kDa N-terminal protein core region followed by a stalk region that is tethered to the cell membrane by a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchor. The stalk regions are predicted to be random coil but contain a variable number of attachment sites for heparan sulfate chains. Both the N-terminal protein core and the heparan sulfate attachments are important for glypican function. We report here the 2.4-{angstrom} crystal structure of the N-terminal protein core region of the Drosophila glypican Dally-like (Dlp). This structure reveals an elongated, {alpha}-helical fold for glypican core regions that does not appear homologous to any known structure. The Dlp core protein is required for normal responsiveness to Hedgehog (Hh) signals, and we identify a localized region on the Dlp surface important for mediating its function in Hh signaling. Purified Dlp protein core does not, however, interact appreciably with either Hh or an Hh:Ihog complex.

  9. Thermodynamic origins of protein folding, allostery, and capsid formation in the human hepatitis B virus core protein.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Crispin G; Jürgens, Maike C; Shepherd, Dale A; Freund, Stefan M V; Ashcroft, Alison E; Ferguson, Neil

    2013-07-23

    HBc, the capsid-forming "core protein" of human hepatitis B virus (HBV), is a multidomain, α-helical homodimer that aggressively forms human HBV capsids. Structural plasticity has been proposed to be important to the myriad functions HBc mediates during viral replication. Here, we report detailed thermodynamic analyses of the folding of the dimeric HBc protomer under conditions that prevented capsid formation. Central to our success was the use of ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry and microscale thermophoresis, which allowed folding mechanisms to be characterized using just micrograms of protein. HBc folds in a three-state transition with a stable, dimeric, α-helical intermediate. Extensive protein engineering showed thermodynamic linkage between different structural domains. Unusual effects associated with mutating some residues suggest structural strain, arising from frustrated contacts, is present in the native dimer. We found evidence of structural gatekeepers that, when mutated, alleviated native strain and prevented (or significantly attenuated) capsid formation by tuning the population of alternative native conformations. This strain is likely an evolved feature that helps HBc access the different structures associated with its diverse essential functions. The subtle balance between native and strained contacts may provide the means to tune conformational properties of HBc by molecular interactions or mutations, thereby conferring allosteric regulation of structure and function. The ability to trap HBc conformers thermodynamically by mutation, and thereby ablate HBV capsid formation, provides proof of principle for designing antivirals that elicit similar effects.

  10. Pulsatile protein release from monodisperse liquid-core microcapsules of controllable shell thickness

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yujie; Pack, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Pulsatile delivery of proteins, in which release occurs over a short time after a period of little or no release, is desirable for many applications. This paper investigates the effect of biodegradable polymer shell thickness on pulsatile protein release from biodegradable polymer microcapsules. Methods Using precision particle fabrication (PPF) technology, monodisperse microcapsules were fabricated encapsulating bovine serum albumin (BSA) in a liquid core surrounded by a drug-free poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) shell of uniform, controlled thickness from 14 to 19 μm. Results When using high molecular weight PLG (Mw 88 kDa), microparticles exhibited the desired core-shell structure with high BSA loading and encapsulation efficiency (55-65%). These particles exhibited very slow release of BSA for several weeks followed by rapid release of 80-90% of the encapsulated BSA within seven days. Importantly, with increasing shell thickness the starting time of the pulsatile release could be controlled from 25 to 35 days. Conclusions Biodegradable polymer microcapsules with precisely controlled shell thickness provide pulsatile release with enhanced control of release profiles. PMID:24831313

  11. The glycosylation-dependent interaction of perlecan core protein with LDL: implications for atherosclerosis[S

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yu-Xin; Ashline, David; Liu, Li; Tassa, Carlos; Shaw, Stanley Y.; Ravid, Katya; Layne, Matthew D.; Reinhold, Vernon; Robbins, Phillips W.

    2015-01-01

    Perlecan is a major heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycan in the arterial wall. Previous studies have linked it to atherosclerosis. Perlecan contains a core protein and three HS side chains. Its core protein has five domains (DI–DV) with disparate structures and DII is highly homologous to the ligand-binding portion of LDL receptor (LDLR). The functional significance of this domain has been unknown. Here, we show that perlecan DII interacts with LDL. Importantly, the interaction largely relies on O-linked glycans that are only present in the secreted DII. Among the five repeat units of DII, most of the glycosylation sites are from the second unit, which is highly divergent and rich in serine and threonine, but has no cysteine residues. Interestingly, most of the glycans are capped by the negatively charged sialic acids, which are critical for LDL binding. We further demonstrate an additive effect of HS and DII on LDL binding. Unlike LDLR, which directs LDL uptake through endocytosis, this study uncovers a novel feature of the perlecan LDLR-like DII in receptor-mediated lipoprotein retention, which depends on its glycosylation. Thus, perlecan glycosylation may play a role in the early LDL retention during the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:25528754

  12. Aquareovirus NS80 Initiates Efficient Viral Replication by Retaining Core Proteins within Replication-Associated Viral Inclusion Bodies.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liming; Zhang, Jie; Guo, Hong; Yan, Shicui; Chen, Qingxiu; Zhang, Fuxian; Fang, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Viral inclusion bodies (VIBs) are specific intracellular compartments for reoviruses replication and assembly. Aquareovirus nonstructural protein NS80 has been identified to be the major constituent for forming globular VIBs in our previous study. In this study, we investigated the role of NS80 in viral structural proteins expression and viral replication. Immunofluorescence assays showed that NS80 could retain five core proteins or inner-capsid proteins (VP1-VP4 and VP6), but not outer-capsid proteins (VP5 and VP7), within VIBs in co-transfected or infected cells. Further co-immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed that NS80 could interact with each core protein respectively. In addition, we found that newly synthesized viral RNAs co-localized with VIBs. Furthermore, time-course analysis of viral structural proteins expression showed that the expression of NS80 was detected first, followed by the detection of inner shell protein VP3, and then of other inner-capsid proteins, suggesting that VIBs were essential for the formation of viral core frame or progeny virion. Moreover, knockdown of NS80 by shRNA not only inhibited the expression of aquareovirus structural proteins, but also inhibited viral infection. These results indicated that NS80-based VIBs were formed at earlier stage of infection, and NS80 was able to coordinate the expression of viral structural proteins and viral replication.

  13. Hepatitis C virus core protein abrogates the DDX3 function that enhances IPS-1-mediated IFN-beta induction.

    PubMed

    Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Masanori; Matsumoto, Misako; Watanabe, Ayako; Takeuchi, Osamu; Akira, Shizuo; Kato, Nobuyuki; Shimotohno, Kunitada; Seya, Tsukasa

    2010-01-01

    The DEAD box helicase DDX3 assembles IPS-1 (also called Cardif, MAVS, or VISA) in non-infected human cells where minimal amounts of the RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) protein are expressed. DDX3 C-terminal regions directly bind the IPS-1 CARD-like domain as well as the N-terminal hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein. DDX3 physically binds viral RNA to form IPS-1-containing spots, that are visible by confocal microscopy. HCV polyU/UC induced IPS-1-mediated interferon (IFN)-beta promoter activation, which was augmented by co-transfected DDX3. DDX3 spots localized near the lipid droplets (LDs) where HCV particles were generated. Here, we report that HCV core protein interferes with DDX3-enhanced IPS-1 signaling in HEK293 cells and in hepatocyte Oc cells. Unlike the DEAD box helicases RIG-I and MDA5, DDX3 was constitutively expressed and colocalized with IPS-1 around mitochondria. In hepatocytes (O cells) with the HCV replicon, however, DDX3/IPS-1-enhanced IFN-beta-induction was largely abrogated even when DDX3 was co-expressed. DDX3 spots barely merged with IPS-1, and partly assembled in the HCV core protein located near the LD in O cells, though in some O cells IPS-1 was diminished or disseminated apart from mitochondria. Expression of DDX3 in replicon-negative or core-less replicon-positive cells failed to cause complex formation or LD association. HCV core protein and DDX3 partially colocalized only in replicon-expressing cells. Since the HCV core protein has been reported to promote HCV replication through binding to DDX3, the core protein appears to switch DDX3 from an IFN-inducing mode to an HCV-replication mode. The results enable us to conclude that HCV infection is promoted by modulating the dual function of DDX3. PMID:21170385

  14. Characteristic Formation of Hyaluronan-Cartilage Link Protein-Proteoglycan Complex in Salivary Gland Tumors.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Hiroko; Nishikado, Akira; Hayasaki, Hana; Isogai, Zenzo; Yoneda, Masahiko; Kawata, Ryo; Hirose, Yoshinobu

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) and its binding molecules, cartilage link protein (LP) and proteoglycan (PG), are structural components of the hydrated extracellular matrix. Because these molecules play important roles in the tumor microenvironment, we examined the distribution of HA, LP, versican, and aggrecan in salivary gland tumors using histochemical and immunohistochemical methods, including double staining. LP was present in pleomorphic adenoma (PA) and adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) tissues, and aggrecan was absent in the malignant tumors that we investigated. LP colocalized with both HA and aggrecan in the chondromyxoid matrix of PA, suggesting the presence of a HA-LP-aggrecan complex. Furthermore, the HA-LP-versican complex could be observed in the pseudocystic space of the cribriform structures in ACC. The characteristic HA-LP-PG complex in PA and ACC might play a role in the behavior of tumors, and immunohistochemical analysis of these molecules could represent a diagnostic adjunct for salivary gland tumors.

  15. Visualizing and Quantifying Intracellular Behavior and Abundance of the Core Circadian Clock Protein PERIOD2.

    PubMed

    Smyllie, Nicola J; Pilorz, Violetta; Boyd, James; Meng, Qing-Jun; Saer, Ben; Chesham, Johanna E; Maywood, Elizabeth S; Krogager, Toke P; Spiller, David G; Boot-Handford, Raymond; White, Michael R H; Hastings, Michael H; Loudon, Andrew S I

    2016-07-25

    Transcriptional-translational feedback loops (TTFLs) are a conserved molecular motif of circadian clocks. The principal clock in mammals is the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. In SCN neurons, auto-regulatory feedback on core clock genes Period (Per) and Cryptochrome (Cry) following nuclear entry of their protein products is the basis of circadian oscillation [1, 2]. In Drosophila clock neurons, the movement of dPer into the nucleus is subject to a circadian gate that generates a delay in the TTFL, and this delay is thought to be critical for oscillation [3, 4]. Analysis of the Drosophila clock has strongly influenced models of the mammalian clock, and such models typically infer complex spatiotemporal, intracellular behaviors of mammalian clock proteins. There are, however, no direct measures of the intracellular behavior of endogenous circadian proteins to support this: dynamic analyses have been limited and often have no circadian dimension [5-7]. We therefore generated a knockin mouse expressing a fluorescent fusion of native PER2 protein (PER2::VENUS) for live imaging. PER2::VENUS recapitulates the circadian functions of wild-type PER2 and, importantly, the behavior of PER2::VENUS runs counter to the Drosophila model: it does not exhibit circadian gating of nuclear entry. Using fluorescent imaging of PER2::VENUS, we acquired the first measures of mobility, molecular concentration, and localization of an endogenous circadian protein in individual mammalian cells, and we showed how the mobility and nuclear translocation of PER2 are regulated by casein kinase. These results provide new qualitative and quantitative insights into the cellular mechanism of the mammalian circadian clock. PMID:27374340

  16. Defining a core set of actin cytoskeletal proteins critical for actin-based motility of Rickettsia.

    PubMed

    Serio, Alisa W; Jeng, Robert L; Haglund, Cat M; Reed, Shawna C; Welch, Matthew D

    2010-05-20

    Many Rickettsia species are intracellular bacterial pathogens that use actin-based motility for spread during infection. However, while other bacteria assemble actin tails consisting of branched networks, Rickettsia assemble long parallel actin bundles, suggesting the use of a distinct mechanism for exploiting actin. To identify the underlying mechanisms and host factors involved in Rickettsia parkeri actin-based motility, we performed an RNAi screen targeting 115 actin cytoskeletal genes in Drosophila cells. The screen delineated a set of four core proteins-profilin, fimbrin/T-plastin, capping protein, and cofilin--as crucial for determining actin tail length, organizing filament architecture, and enabling motility. In mammalian cells, these proteins were localized throughout R. parkeri tails, consistent with a role in motility. Profilin and fimbrin/T-plastin were critical for the motility of R. parkeri but not Listeria monocytogenes. Our results highlight key distinctions between the evolutionary strategies and molecular mechanisms employed by bacterial pathogens to assemble and organize actin. PMID:20478540

  17. SplitCore: An exceptionally versatile viral nanoparticle for native whole protein display regardless of 3D structure

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Andreas; Skamel, Claudia; Nassal, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles displaying native proteins are attractive for many applications, including vaccinology. Virus-based nanoparticles are easily tailored by genetic means, commonly by inserting heterologous sequences into surface-exposed loops. The strategy works well with short peptides but is incompatible with the structures of most native proteins, except those with closely juxtaposed termini. Here we overcome this constraint by splitting the capsid protein of hepatitis B virus, one of the most advanced and most immunogenic display platforms, inside the insertion loop (SplitCore). The split parts, coreN and coreC, efficiently form capsid-like particles (CLPs) in E. coli and so do numerous fusions to coreN and/or coreC of differently structured proteins, including human disease related antigens of >300 amino acids in length. These CLPs induced high-titer antibodies, including neutralizing ones, in mice. The concept was easily expanded to triple-layer CLPs carrying reporter plus targeting domains, and should be applicable to protein-based nanoparticle design in general. PMID:22355524

  18. Studies on beef heart ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase. Topological studies on the core proteins using proteolytic digestion and immunoreplication.

    PubMed

    Mendel-Hartvig, I; Nelson, B D

    1983-02-01

    The topology of beef heart Complex III has been studied by tryptic and chymotryptic digestion of isolated Complex III, Mg2+-ATP submitochondrial particles, and mitoplasts. Degradation products were detected by the immunoreplication technique using specific antibodies against core protein 1 (50 K) and core protein 2 (47 K). It can be shown that both peptides are digested from the matrix side of the inner membrane. However, no evidence was found that these peptides were digested by trypsin or chymotrypsin from the cytoplasmic side. It is concluded that the beef heart core proteins are membrane-bound peptides containing tryptic and chymotryptic digestion sites only on the matrix surface of the inner membrane. The data also suggest that beef heart core protein 2 contains multiple domains which are inserted into the membrane from the matrix surface. Proteolytic treatment of submitochondrial particles under conditions which digested at least 50% of the core proteins from the matrix surface did not, however, influence NADH oxidation rates or the respiratory control ratios.

  19. The H1 linker histones: multifunctional proteins beyond the nucleosomal core particle

    PubMed Central

    Hergeth, Sonja P; Schneider, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The linker histone H1 family members are a key component of chromatin and bind to the nucleosomal core particle around the DNA entry and exit sites. H1 can stabilize both nucleosome structure and higher-order chromatin architecture. In general, H1 molecules consist of a central globular domain with more flexible tail regions at both their N- and C-terminal ends. The existence of multiple H1 subtypes and a large variety of posttranslational modifications brings about a considerable degree of complexity and makes studying this protein family challenging. Here, we review recent progress in understanding the function of linker histones and their subtypes beyond their role as merely structural chromatin components. We summarize current findings on the role of H1 in heterochromatin formation, transcriptional regulation and embryogenesis with a focus on H1 subtypes and their specific modifications. PMID:26474902

  20. Strategies for crystallizing a chromatin protein in complex with the nucleosome core particle.

    PubMed

    Makde, Ravindra D; Tan, Song

    2013-11-15

    The molecular details of how chromatin factors and enzymes interact with the nucleosome are critical to understanding fundamental genetic processes including cell division and gene regulation. A structural understanding of such processes has been hindered by the difficulty in producing diffraction-quality crystals of chromatin proteins in complex with the nucleosome. We describe here the steps used to grow crystals of the 300-kDa RCC1 chromatin factor/nucleosome core particle complex that diffract to 2.9-Å resolution. These steps include both pre- and postcrystallization strategies potentially useful to other complexes. We screened multiple variant RCC1/nucleosome core particle complexes assembled using different RCC1 homologs and deletion variants, and nucleosomes containing nucleosomal DNA with different sequences and lengths, as well as histone deletion variants. We found that using RCC1 from different species produced different crystal forms of the RCC1/nucleosome complex consistent with key crystal packing interactions mediated by RCC1. Optimization of postcrystallization soaks to dehydrate the crystals dramatically improved the diffraction quality of the RCC1/nucleosome crystal from 5.0- to 2.9-Å resolution.

  1. Adamts5 Deletion Blocks Murine Dermal Repair through CD44-mediated Aggrecan Accumulation and Modulation of Transforming Growth Factor β1 (TGFβ1) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, Jennifer; Li, Jun; DiPietro, Luisa; Stepp, Mary Ann; Sandy, John D.; Plaas, Anna

    2011-01-01

    ADAMTS5 has been implicated in the degradation of cartilage aggrecan in human osteoarthritis. Here, we describe a novel role for the enzyme in the regulation of TGFβ1 signaling in dermal fibroblasts both in vivo and in vitro. Adamts5−/− mice, generated by deletion of exon 2, exhibit impaired contraction and dermal collagen deposition in an excisional wound healing model. This was accompanied by accumulation in the dermal layer of cell aggregates and fibroblastic cells surrounded by a pericellular matrix enriched in full-length aggrecan. Adamts5−/− wounds exhibit low expression (relative to wild type) of collagen type I and type III but show a persistently elevated expression of tgfbRII and alk1. Aggrecan deposition and impaired dermal repair in Adamts5−/− mice are both dependent on CD44, and Cd44−/−/Adamts5−/− mice display robust activation of TGFβ receptor II and collagen type III expression and the dermal regeneration seen in WT mice. TGFβ1 treatment of newborn fibroblasts from wild type mice results in Smad2/3 phosphorylation, whereas cells from Adamts5−/− mice phosphorylate Smad1/5/8. The altered TGFβ1 response in the Adamts5−/− cells is dependent on the presence of aggrecan and expression of CD44, because Cd44−/−/Adamts5−/− cells respond like WT cells. We propose that ADAMTS5 deficiency in fibrous tissues results in a poor repair response due to the accumulation of aggrecan in the pericellular matrix of fibroblast progenitor cells, which prevents their transition to mature fibroblasts. Thus, the capacity of ADAMTS5 to modulate critical tissue repair signaling events suggests a unique role for this enzyme, which sets it apart from other members of the ADAMTS family of proteases. PMID:21566131

  2. Grafted block complex coacervate core micelles and their effect on protein adsorption on silica and polystyrene.

    PubMed

    Brzozowska, Agata M; de Keizer, Arie; Norde, Willem; Detrembleur, Christophe; Cohen Stuart, Martien A

    2010-07-01

    We have studied the formation and the stability of grafted block complex coacervate core micelles (C3Ms) in solution and the influence of grafted block C3M coatings on the adsorption of the proteins beta-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin, and lysozyme. The C3Ms consist of a grafted block copolymer PAA(21)-b-PAPEO(14) (poly(acrylic acid)-b-poly(acrylate methoxy poly(ethylene oxide)), with a negatively charged PAA block and a neutral PAPEO block and a positively charged homopolymer P2MVPI (poly(N-methyl 2-vinyl pyridinium iodide). In solution, these C3Ms partly disintegrate at salt concentrations between 50 and 100 mM NaCl. Adsorption of C3Ms and proteins has been studied with fixed-angle optical reflectometry, at salt concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 mM NaCl. In comparison with the adsorption of PAA(21)-b-PAPEO(14) alone adsorption of C3Ms significantly increases the amount of PAA(21)-b-PAPEO(14) on the surface. This results in a higher surface density of PEO chains. The stability of the C3M coatings and their influence on protein adsorption are determined by the composition and the stability of the C3Ms in solution. A C3M-PAPEO(14)/P2MVPI(43) coating strongly suppresses the adsorption of all proteins on silica and polystyrene. The reduction of protein adsorption is the highest at 100 mM NaCl (>90%). The adsorbed C3M-PAPEO(14)/P2MVPI(43) layer is partly removed from the surface upon exposure to an excess of beta-lactoglobulin solution, due to formation of soluble aggregates consisting of beta-lactoglobulin and P2MVPI(43). In contrast, C3M-PAPEO(14)/P2MVPI(228) which has a fivefold longer cationic block enhances adsorption of the negatively charged proteins on both surfaces at salt concentrations above 1 mM NaCl. A single PAA(21)-b-PAPEO(14) layer causes only a moderate reduction of protein adsorption.

  3. Role of inter-domain cavity in the attachment of the orange carotenoid protein to the phycobilisome core and to the fluorescence recovery protein.

    PubMed

    Zlenko, Dmitry V; Krasilnikov, Pavel M; Stadnichuk, Igor N

    2016-01-01

    Using molecular modeling and known spatial structure of proteins, we have derived a universal 3D model of the orange carotenoid protein (OCP) and phycobilisome (PBS) interaction in the process of non-photochemical PBS quenching. The characteristic tip of the phycobilin domain of the core-membrane linker polypeptide (LCM) forms the attachment site on the PBS core surface for interaction with the central inter-domain cavity of the OCP molecule. This spatial arrangement has to be the most advantageous one because the LCM, as the major terminal PBS-fluorescence emitter, accumulates energy from the most other phycobiliproteins within the PBS before quenching by OCP. In agreement with the constructed model, in cyanobacteria, the small fluorescence recovery protein is wedged in the OCP's central cavity, weakening the PBS and OCP interaction. The presence of another one protein, the red carotenoid protein, in some cyanobacterial species, which also can interact with the PBS, also corresponds to this model. PMID:25905572

  4. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of proteoglycans by human fibroblasts involves recognition of the protein core.

    PubMed Central

    Glössl, J; Schubert-Prinz, R; Gregory, J D; Damle, S P; von Figura, K; Kresse, H

    1983-01-01

    Endocytosis by cultured human skin fibroblasts of 35SO4(2-)-labelled or [3H]leucine-labelled proteoglycans from fibroblast secretions and of 125I-proteodermatan sulphate from pig skin was quantitatively investigated. The following results were obtained. (1) Core proteins prepared by digestion with chondroitin ABC lyase were at least as efficiently endocytosed as native proteoglycans. Pig skin proteodermatan sulphate was a competitive inhibitor of endocytosis of 35SO4(2-)-labelled proteoglycans. (2) Proteoglycans produced in the presence of tunicamycin and native proteoglycans degraded with endoglycosaminidase H were internalized at a normal rate. Several monosaccharides that can be bound by mammalian lectins were unable to influence the internalization of proteoglycans. Treatment of proteoglycans with neuraminidase, however, resulted in an increased clearance rate. (3) Reductive methylation or acetoacetylation of lysine residues was accompanied by a parallel decrease in the rate of proteoglycan endocytosis. Reversal of acetoacetylation normalized the uptake properties. Endocytosis of native proteoglycans was also reduced in the presence of poly-L-lysine, and this reduction in endocytosis was observed as well with proteoglycans synthesized in the presence of the lysine analogue S-2-aminoethylcysteine. These results suggest that the recognition marker required for receptor-mediated endocytosis of proteodermatan sulphate resides in its protein moiety and involves lysine residues. Images Fig. 2. PMID:6316923

  5. Hepatitis B virus DNA-negative dane particles lack core protein but contain a 22-kDa precore protein without C-terminal arginine-rich domain.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tatsuji; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Terada, Nobuo; Rokuhara, Akinori; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Yagi, Shintaro; Tanaka, Eiji; Kiyosawa, Kendo; Ohno, Shinichi; Maki, Noboru

    2005-06-10

    DNA-negative Dane particles have been observed in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected sera. The capsids of the empty particles are thought to be composed of core protein but have not been studied in detail. In the present study, the protein composition of the particles was examined using new enzyme immunoassays for the HBV core antigen (HBcAg) and for the HBV precore/core proteins (core-related antigens, HBcrAg). HBcrAg were abundant in fractions slightly less dense than HBcAg and HBV DNA. Three times more Dane-like particles were observed in the HBcrAg-rich fraction than in the HBV DNA-rich fraction by electron microscopy. Western blots and mass spectrometry identified the HBcrAg as a 22-kDa precore protein (p22cr) containing the uncleaved signal peptide and lacking the arginine-rich domain that is involved in binding the RNA pregenome or the DNA genome. In sera from 30 HBV-infected patients, HBcAg represented only a median 10.5% of the precore/core proteins in enveloped particles. These data suggest that most of the Dane particles lack viral DNA and core capsid but contain p22cr. This study provides a model for the formation of the DNA-negative Dane particles. The precore proteins, which lack the arginine-rich nucleotide-binding domain, form viral RNA/DNA-negative capsid-like particles and are enveloped and released as empty particles.

  6. Significance of the photosystem II core phosphatase PBCP for plant viability and protein repair in thylakoid membranes.

    PubMed

    Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Woodiwiss, Timothy; Knoerdel, Ryan; Zia, Ahmad; Wood, Magnus; Hoehner, Ricarda; Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2014-07-01

    PSII undergoes photodamage, which results in photoinhibition-the light-induced loss of photosynthetic activity. The main target of damage in PSII is the reaction center protein D1, which is buried in the massive 1.4 MDa PSII holocomplex. Plants have evolved a PSII repair cycle that degrades the damaged D1 subunit and replaces it with a newly synthesized copy. PSII core proteins, including D1, are phosphorylated in high light. This phosphorylation is important for the mobilization of photoinhibited PSII from stacked grana thylakoids to the repair machinery in distant unstacked stroma lamellae. It has been recognized that the degradation of the damaged D1 is more efficient after its dephosphorylation by a protein phosphatase. Recently a protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C)-type PSII core phosphatase (PBCP) has been discovered, which is involved in the dephosphorylation of PSII core proteins. Its role in PSII repair, however, is unknown. Using a range of spectroscopic and biochemical techniques, we report that the inactivation of the PBCP gene affects the growth characteristic of plants, with a decreased biomass and altered PSII functionality. PBCP mutants show increased phosphorylation of core subunits in dark and photoinhibitory conditions and a diminished degradation of the D1 subunit. Our results on D1 turnover in PBCP mutants suggest that dephosphorylation of PSII subunits is required for efficient D1 degradation. PMID:24793754

  7. Conformational Stability of Mammalian Prion Protein Amyloid Fibrils Is Dictated by a Packing Polymorphism within the Core Region*

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Nathan J.; Apostol, Marcin I.; Chen, Shugui; Smirnovas, Vytautas; Surewicz, Witold K.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian prion strains are believed to arise from the propagation of distinct conformations of the misfolded prion protein PrPSc. One key operational parameter used to define differences between strains has been conformational stability of PrPSc as defined by resistance to thermal and/or chemical denaturation. However, the structural basis of these stability differences is unknown. To bridge this gap, we have generated two strains of recombinant human prion protein amyloid fibrils that show dramatic differences in conformational stability and have characterized them by a number of biophysical methods. Backbone amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments revealed that, in sharp contrast to previously studied strains of infectious amyloid formed from the yeast prion protein Sup35, differences in β-sheet core size do not underlie differences in conformational stability between strains of mammalian prion protein amyloid. Instead, these stability differences appear to be dictated by distinct packing arrangements (i.e. steric zipper interfaces) within the amyloid core, as indicated by distinct x-ray fiber diffraction patterns and large strain-dependent differences in hydrogen/deuterium exchange kinetics for histidine side chains within the core region. Although this study was limited to synthetic prion protein amyloid fibrils, a similar structural basis for strain-dependent conformational stability may apply to brain-derived PrPSc, especially because large strain-specific differences in PrPSc stability are often observed despite a similar size of the PrPSc core region. PMID:24338015

  8. Glycosaminoglycan-free small proteoglycan core protein is secreted by fibroblasts from a patient with a syndrome resembling progeroid.

    PubMed Central

    Kresse, H; Rosthøj, S; Quentin, E; Hollmann, J; Glössl, J; Okada, S; Tønnesen, T

    1987-01-01

    A male patient, 4 years 9 mo old and having progeroidal appearance, exhibited delayed mental development and multiple abnormalities of connective tissues including growth failure, osteopenia of all and dysplasia of some bones, defective deciduous teeth, loose but elastic skin, delayed wound healing with formation of thin atrophic scars, scanty scalp hair, hypotonic muscles, and hypermobile joints. Skin fibroblasts of the patient converted only about half of the core protein of the small proteodermatan sulfate to a mature glycosaminoglycan chain-bearing proteoglycan. The remaining core protein, which contained complex-type asparagine-bound oligosaccharides, was secreted with almost normal kinetics. Xylosyltransferase activity and the synthesis of other proteoglycan types were normal. Normal induction of glycosaminoglycan synthesis occurred in the presence of 1 mM, but there was very little induction in the presence of 0.01 mM p-nitrophenyl-beta-xyloside. An antibody against an N-terminal pentadecapeptide of the core protein recognized the glycosaminoglycan-free core protein from the patient less well than the chain-bearing protein treated with chondroitin ABC lyase. Though these results do not define the basic defect unambiguously, they provide the first report of a disorder being due to an abnormality in small proteoglycan biosynthesis. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:3631078

  9. Protein-loaded microspheres prepared by sequential adsorption of dextran sulphate and protamine on melamine formaldehyde core.

    PubMed

    Balabushevich, Nadezda G; Larionova, Natalia I

    2009-11-01

    Polyelectrolyte multilayer microspheres were fabricated by layer-by-layer self-assembly of a dextran sulphate and a protamine on melamine formaldehyde cores, followed by the partial decomposition of the core. Effects of pH on the encapsulation of proteins and enzymes with different physico-chemical properties (insulin, aprotinin, peroxidase, glucose oxidase (GOD), catalase (Cat)) in the prepared microspheres were then studied. This method of protein encapsulation demonstrated a high loading capacity and efficiency. The protein incorporation and release was regulated by the pH of the solution. Encapsulated enzymes retained a high specific activity depending on the amount of protein incorporated. Bienzyme system GOD/Cat immobilized in the microspheres was suitable for the glucose content assay.

  10. Removal of Available Decorin Core-Protein from Powdered Bovine Hide by Treatments used to Process Intact Hides into Leather

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using a modification of a previously developed sandwich Elisa procedure to measure decorin core-protein (DCP), we determined the available decorin content of a sample of raw powdered bovine hide before and after treatment with the reagents used in the early steps of the process for converting a hide...

  11. Co-incubation with core proteins of HBV and HCV leads to modulation of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Amogh; Samrat, Subodh K; Agrawal, Babita; Tyrrell, D Lorne J; Kumar, Rakesh

    2014-10-01

    Hepatitis B and C (HBV and HCV) are hepatotropic viruses in humans with approximately 350 and 170 million chronic carriers respectively. Since both viruses have similar modes of transmission, many people are co-infected. Co-infection is common in intravenous drug users, HIV-positive individuals, and transplant recipients. Compared to mono-infected patients, co-infected patients exhibit exacerbated liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver failure. Some of the pathogenic effects may be attributed in part to the structural core proteins of both viruses-ones that have displayed immunomodulatory properties. Yet, the effects of their combined interaction on the human immune system remain a mystery. We aimed to elucidate the combined effects of HBV and HCV core proteins on human dendritic cells' (DCs) ability to present antigens and stimulate antigen-specific T-cells. We observed that when DCs, differentiated from human peripheral blood monocytes, were co-incubated with both core proteins, IL-10 production was dramatically enhanced, IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-12 production was significantly reduced, and HLA-DR expression was downregulated. This instant functional and phenotypic modulation of DCs induced by a combination of HBV and HCV core proteins can allow them to behave like tolerizing DCs, inefficiently presenting antigens to CD4+ T-cells and even suppressing induction of the cellular immune response. These results reveal an important mechanism by which HBV and HCV synergistically induce immune tolerance early in infection that may be instrumental in establishing chronic, persistent infections.

  12. Effect of protein modification by malondialdehyde on the interaction between the oxygen-evolving complex 33 kDa protein and photosystem II core proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Yasuo; Sugimoto, Yukihiro

    2010-04-01

    Previously we observed that the oxygen-evolving complex 33 kDa protein (OEC33) which stabilizes the Mn cluster in photosystem II (PSII), was modified with malondialdehyde (MDA), an end-product of peroxidized polyunsaturated fatty acids, and the modification increased in heat-stressed plants (Yamauchi et al. 2008). In this study, we examined whether the modification of OEC33 with MDA affects its binding to the PSII complex and causes inactivation of the oxygen-evolving complex. Purified OEC33 and PSII membranes that had been removed of extrinsic proteins of the oxygen-evolving complex (PSIIOEE) of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) were separately treated with MDA. The binding was diminished when both OEC33 and PSIIOEE were modified, but when only OEC33 or PSIIOEE was treated, the binding was not impaired. In the experiment using thylakoid membranes, release of OEC33 from PSII and corresponding loss of oxygen-evolving activity were observed when thylakoid membranes were treated with MDA at 40 degrees C but not at 25 degrees C. In spinach leaves treated at 40 degrees C under light, maximal efficiency of PSII photochemistry (F(v)/F(m) ratio of chlorophyll fluorescence) and oxygen-evolving activity decreased. Simultaneously, MDA contents in heat-stressed leaves increased, and OEC33 and PSII core proteins including 47 and 43 kDa chlorophyll-binding proteins were modified with MDA. In contrast, these changes were to a lesser extent at 40 degrees C in the dark. These results suggest that MDA modification of PSII proteins causes release of OEC33 from PSII and it is promoted in heat and oxidative conditions.

  13. Controlled protein embedment onto Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles for immuno-labeling of nanosilver surface.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Hwan; Lee, Jeong Min; Jung, Yongwon

    2014-05-28

    Difficulties in stable conjugation of biomolecules to nanosilver surfaces have severely limited the use of silver nanostructures in biological applications. Here, we report a facile antibody conjugation onto gold/silver (Au/Ag) core-shell nanoparticles by stable and uniform embedment of an antibody binding protein, protein G, in silver nanoshells. A rigid helical peptide linker with a terminal cysteine residue was fused to protein G. A mixture of the peptide-fused protein G and space-filling free peptide was reacted with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to form a protein G-linked peptide layer on the particle surface. Uniform silver nanoshells were successfully formed on these protein G-AuNPs, while stably embedding protein G-linked peptide layers. Protein G specifically targets the Fc region of an antibody and thus affords properly orientated antibodies on the particle surface. Compared to Au nanoparticles of similar size with randomly adsorbed antibodies, the present immuno-labeled Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles offered nearly 10-fold higher sensitivities for naked-eye detection of surface bound antigens. In addition, small dye molecules that were bonded to the peptide layer on Au nanoparticles exhibited highly enhanced surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals upon Ag shell formation. The present strategy provides a simple but efficient way to conjugate antibodies to nanosilver surfaces, which will greatly facilitate wider use of the superior optical properties of silver nanostructures in biological applications. PMID:24801432

  14. Vitamin D Receptor Gene and Aggrecan Gene Polymorphisms and the Risk of Intervertebral Disc Degeneration — A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinlin; Han, Luo

    2012-01-01

    Background A series of studies have been conducted to evaluate the associations between vitamin D receptor (VDR) and aggrecan variable numbers of tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphisms and the risk of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD), but produced conflicting results. Objective we performed a meta-analysis to address a more accurate estimation of the associations between the above gene polymorphisms and the risk of IDD. Methods A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify all the relevant studies. The fixed or random effect model was selected based on the heterogeneity test among studies evaluated using the I2. Publication bias was estimated using Begg's funnel plots and Egger's regression test. Results A total of 9, 5, 3, and 7 studies were finally included in the analyses for the associations between the VDR TaqI (rs731236), FokI (rs2228570), ApaI (rs7975232), or aggrecan VNTR polymorphisms and the risk of IDD, respectively. The combined results showed that none of the VDR (TaqI, FokI, ApaI) polymorphisms were significantly associated with the risk of IDD. In contrast, the alleles with shorter VNTR length was found to significantly increase the risk of IDD (≦25 vs. >25: OR = 1.850, 95%CI 1.477–2.318; ≦23 vs. >23: OR = 1.955, 95%CI 1.41–2.703). Subgroup analysis confirmed the above results. After excluding studies deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) in controls, no other studies were found to significantly influence the pooled effects in each genetic model. No potential publication bias was detected. Conclusion This meta-analysis suggested that the alleles with shorter VNTR length significantly increased the risk of IDD, while the VDR (TaqI, FokI, ApaI) gene polymorphisms were not significantly associated with the risk of IDD. Since potential confounders could not be ruled out completely, further studies are needed to confirm these results. PMID:23209686

  15. pH/sugar dual responsive core-cross-linked PIC micelles for enhanced intracellular protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jie; Zhang, Yanxin; Zhang, Ju; Gao, Hongjun; Liu, Gan; Ma, Rujiang; An, Yingli; Kong, Deling; Shi, Linqi

    2013-10-14

    Herein, a series of biocompatible, robust, pH/sugar-sensitive, core-cross-linked, polyion complex (PIC) micelles based on phenylboronic acid-catechol interaction were developed for protein intracellular delivery. The rationally designed poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(glutamic acid-co-glutamicamidophenylboronic acid) (PEG-b-P(Glu-co-GluPBA)) and poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(l-lysine-co-ε-3,4-dihydroxyphenylcarboxyl-L-lysine) (PEG-b-P(Lys-co-LysCA)) copolymers were successfully synthesized and self-assembled under neutral aqueous condition to form uniform micelles. These micelles possessed a distinct core-cross-linked core-shell structure comprised of the PEG outer shell and the PGlu/PLys polyion complex core bearing boronate ester cross-linking bonds. The cross-linked micelles displayed superior physiological stabilities compared with their non-cross-linked counterparts while swelling and disassembling in the presence of excess fructose or at endosomal pH. Notably, either negatively or positively charged proteins can be encapsulated into the micelles efficiently under mild conditions. The in vitro release studies showed that the release of protein cargoes under physiological conditions was minimized, while a burst release occurred in response to excess fructose or endosomal pH. The cytotoxicity of micelles was determined by cck-8 assay in HepG2 cells. The cytochrome C loaded micelles could efficiently delivery proteins into HepG2 cells and exhibited enhanced apoptosis ability. Hence, this type of core-cross-linked PIC micelles has opened a new avenue to intracellular protein delivery.

  16. Protein corona hampers targeting potential of MUC1 aptamer functionalized SN-38 core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Varnamkhasti, Behrang Shiri; Hosseinzadeh, Hosniyeh; Azhdarzadeh, Morteza; Vafaei, Seyed Yaser; Esfandyari-Manesh, Mehdi; Mirzaie, Zahra H; Amini, Mohsen; Ostad, Seyed Nasser; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2015-10-15

    Nanoparticles have been considered to improve delivery and physicochemical characteristics of bioactive agents in recent years. In this study, a core-shell chitosan nanoparticulate system was prepared for the targeted delivery of SN-38. SN-38, an active metabolite of camptothecin, conjugated to hyaluronic acid (HA) was used as the shell of chitosan nanoparticles decorated with MUC1 aptamer. The conjugation was confirmed by UV and (1)H NMR techniques. Targeting efficiency was evaluated by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. It was shown that MUC1 decoration increased the uptake of nanoparticles by HT29 cells, MUC1 positive cell line, while CHO as MUC1 negative cell line showed no enhanced uptake of decorated nanoparticles. Compared to non-targeted nanoparticles, flow cytometric annexin V/PI analyses showed that the nanoparticles exert cytotoxicity through apoptosis. It was, however, shown that protein corona adsorption at the surface of nanoparticles hampered the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles, as there was no difference between the cytotoxicity of targeted and non-targeted nanoparticles, when treated with bovine serum albumin prior to cytotoxicity study.

  17. Analysis of the binding of high mobility group protein 17 to the nucleosome core particle by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cook, G R; Minch, M; Schroth, G P; Bradbury, E M

    1989-01-25

    The binding of high mobility group (HMG) protein 17 to the nucleosome core particle has been studied in D2O solution using 1H NMR at 500 MHz. Spectra were obtained for purified HMG 17, purified nucleosome core particles, and the reconstituted HMG 17-nucleosome core particle complex at 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 M NaCl. Subtraction of the core particle spectra from spectra of the core particle reconstituted with HMG 17 demonstrated those regions of HMG 17 which interact with the nucleosome at different ionic strengths; the resonance peaks of interacting groups are broadened due to their restricted mobility. At 0.1 M NaCl, the mobility of all the amino acid side chains of HMG 17 was restricted, indicating complete binding of HMG 17 to the much larger nucleosome core particle. At 0.2 M NaCl most of the amino acids were free with the exception of arginine and proline which are confined to or predominant in the basic central region of HMG 17. These amino acids were completely free only at 0.4 M NaCl. We conclude that the entire HMG 17 molecule interacts with the nucleosome core particle at physiological ionic strength. The acidic COOH-terminal region of HMG 17 is released from interaction with the core histones at an NaCl concentration between 0.1 and 0.2 M and so binds weakly at physiological ionic strength. The basic central region binds more strongly to the core particle DNA, being completely released only at much higher ionic strength, between 0.3 and 0.4 M NaCl.

  18. Papain digestion of crude Trichoderma reesei cellulase: Purification and properties of cellobiohydrolase I and II core proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Brown, J.P.; Evans, B.R.; Affholter, K.A.

    1992-12-01

    Papain digestion of a crude Trichoderma reesei cellulose preparation followed by gel filtration on a Superdex column resulted in the separation of cellobiohydrolase (CBH) I and II core proteins (cp). They were further purified to apparent homogeneity by chromatofocusing. N-terminal protein sequencing of the CBH II cp preparation confirmed its identity. A comparison of the catalytic activity and cellulose-binding ability of these core proteins was made. The major differences between them were the findings that CBH II cp possessed a sixfold higher specific activity toward p-nitrophenylcellobioside than the native CBH II preparation and still bound to microcrystalline cellulose, unlike CBH I cp. Neither CBH I cp nor CBH II cp had activity toward carboxymethylcellulose, but both were able to hydrolyze barley b-glucan. These data suggest that removal of the cellulose-binding domain and hinge region from CBH I and II have different effects on their properties.

  19. Papain digestion of crude Trichoderma reesei cellulase: Purification and properties of cellobiohydrolase I and II core proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Brown, J.P.; Evans, B.R.; Affholter, K.A.

    1992-01-01

    Papain digestion of a crude Trichoderma reesei cellulose preparation followed by gel filtration on a Superdex column resulted in the separation of cellobiohydrolase (CBH) I and II core proteins (cp). They were further purified to apparent homogeneity by chromatofocusing. N-terminal protein sequencing of the CBH II cp preparation confirmed its identity. A comparison of the catalytic activity and cellulose-binding ability of these core proteins was made. The major differences between them were the findings that CBH II cp possessed a sixfold higher specific activity toward p-nitrophenylcellobioside than the native CBH II preparation and still bound to microcrystalline cellulose, unlike CBH I cp. Neither CBH I cp nor CBH II cp had activity toward carboxymethylcellulose, but both were able to hydrolyze barley b-glucan. These data suggest that removal of the cellulose-binding domain and hinge region from CBH I and II have different effects on their properties.

  20. Interaction of hepatitis C virus core protein with janus kinase is required for efficient production of infectious viruses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choongho

    2013-03-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is responsible for the development of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV core protein plays not only a structural role in the virion morphogenesis by encapsidating a virus RNA genome but also a non-structural role in HCV-induced pathogenesis by blocking innate immunity. Especially, it has been shown to regulate JAK-STAT signaling pathway through its direct interaction with Janus kinase (JAK) via its proline-rich JAK-binding motif ((79)PGYPWP(84)). However, little is known about the physiological significance of this HCV core-JAK association in the context of the virus life cycle. In order to gain an insight, a mutant HCV genome (J6/JFH1-79A82A) was constructed to express the mutant core with a defective JAK-binding motif ((79)AGYAWP(84)) using an HCV genotype 2a infectious clone (J6/JFH1). When this mutant HCV genome was introduced into hepatocarcinoma cells, it was found to be severely impaired in its ability to produce infectious viruses in spite of its robust RNA genome replication. Taken together, all these results suggest an essential requirement of HCV core-JAK protein interaction for efficient production of infectious viruses and the potential of using core-JAK blockers as a new anti-HCV therapy.

  1. The 45 kDa collagen-binding fragment of fibronectin induces matrix metalloproteinase-13 synthesis by chondrocytes and aggrecan degradation by aggrecanases.

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Heather; Ung, Linh; Fosang, Amanda J

    2002-01-01

    Fragments of fibronectin occur naturally in vivo and are increased in the synovial fluid of arthritis patients. We have studied the 45 kDa fragment (Fn-f 45), representing the N-terminal collagen-binding domain of fibronectin, for its ability to modulate the expression of metalloproteinases by porcine articular chondrocytes in vitro. We report that stimulation of cultured chondrocytes, or cartilage explants, with Fn-f 45 increased the levels of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13; collagenase-3) released into the conditioned medium in a dose-dependent manner. Increased levels of MMP-13 were due to stimulation of MMP-13 synthesis, rather than release of MMP-13 from accumulated matrix stores. Fn-f 45 also stimulated the synthesis of MMP-3 (stromelysin-1) from cultured chondrocytes and cartilage cultures. The Fn-f 45-induced increase in MMP-3 and MMP-13 synthesis occurred via an interleukin 1-independent mechanism, since the receptor antagonist of interleukin-1 was unable to block the increased synthesis. The gelatinases, MMP-2 and MMP-9, were not modulated by Fn-f 45 in these culture systems. Fn-f 45 also stimulated the release of aggrecan from cartilage explants into conditioned medium. Neoepitope antibodies specific for aggrecan fragments generated by MMPs or aggrecanases showed that the Fn-f 45-induced aggrecan loss was mediated by aggrecanases, and not by MMPs. Extracts of cultured cartilage contained elevated levels of the aggrecanase-derived ITEGE(373)-G1 domain, whereas levels of the matrix metalloproteinase-derived DIPEN(341)-G1 domain were unchanged. These studies show that Fn-f 45 can induce a catabolic phenotype in articular chondrocytes by up-regulating the expression of metalloproteinases specific for the degradation of collagen and aggrecan. PMID:11988091

  2. The N-Terminus of Murine Leukaemia Virus p12 Protein Is Required for Mature Core Stability

    PubMed Central

    Wight, Darren J.; Boucherit, Virginie C.; Wanaguru, Madushi; Elis, Efrat; Hirst, Elizabeth M. A.; Li, Wilson; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Bacharach, Eran; Bishop, Kate N.

    2014-01-01

    The murine leukaemia virus (MLV) gag gene encodes a small protein called p12 that is essential for the early steps of viral replication. The N- and C-terminal regions of p12 are sequentially acting domains, both required for p12 function. Defects in the C-terminal domain can be overcome by introducing a chromatin binding motif into the protein. However, the function of the N-terminal domain remains unknown. Here, we undertook a detailed analysis of the effects of p12 mutation on incoming viral cores. We found that both reverse transcription complexes and isolated mature cores from N-terminal p12 mutants have altered capsid complexes compared to wild type virions. Electron microscopy revealed that mature N-terminal p12 mutant cores have different morphologies, although immature cores appear normal. Moreover, in immunofluorescent studies, both p12 and capsid proteins were lost rapidly from N-terminal p12 mutant viral cores after entry into target cells. Importantly, we determined that p12 binds directly to the MLV capsid lattice. However, we could not detect binding of an N-terminally altered p12 to capsid. Altogether, our data imply that p12 stabilises the mature MLV core, preventing premature loss of capsid, and that this is mediated by direct binding of p12 to the capsid shell. In this manner, p12 is also retained in the pre-integration complex where it facilitates tethering to mitotic chromosomes. These data also explain our previous observations that modifications to the N-terminus of p12 alter the ability of particles to abrogate restriction by TRIM5alpha and Fv1, factors that recognise viral capsid lattices. PMID:25356837

  3. Differential regulation of SOCS-1 signalling in B and T lymphocytes by hepatitis C virus core protein

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhi Qiang; Prayther, Deborah; Trabue, Christopher; Dong, Zhi Ping; Moorman, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is characterized by a strong propensity toward chronicity, autoimmune phenomena and lymphomagenesis, supporting a role for lymphocyte dysregulation during persistent viral infection. We have shown that HCV core protein inhibits T-cell functions through interaction with a complement receptor, gC1qR. Here, we further report that B cells also express gC1qR that can be bound by HCV core protein. Importantly, using flow cytometry, we demonstrated differential regulation of B and T lymphocytes by the HCV core–gC1qR interaction, with down-regulation of CD69 activation in T cells but up-regulation of CD69 activation and cell proliferation in B cells. HCV core treatment led to decreased interferon-γ production in CD8+ T cells but to increased immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G production as well as cell surface expression of costimulatory and chemokine receptors, including CD86 (B7-2), CD154 (CD40L) and CD195 (CCR5), in CD20+ B cells. Finally, we showed down-regulation of suppressor of cytokine signalling-1 (SOCS-1) using real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, accompanied by up-regulation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1) phosphorylation in B cells in response to HCV core protein, with the opposite pattern observed in HCV core-treated T cells. This study demonstrates differential regulation of B and T lymphocytes by HCV core and supports a mechanism by which lymphocyte dysregulation occurs in the course of persistent HCV infection. PMID:18397267

  4. ADAMTS4 and ADAMTS5 Knockout Mice Are Protected from Versican but Not Aggrecan or Brevican Proteolysis during Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Demircan, Kadir; Topcu, Vehap; Takigawa, Tomoyuki; Akyol, Sumeyya; Yonezawa, Tomoko; Ozturk, Gulfer; Ugurcu, Veli; Hasgul, Rukiye; Yigitoglu, M. Ramazan

    2014-01-01

    The chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) aggrecan, versican, and brevican are large aggregating extracellular matrix molecules that inhibit axonal growth of the mature central nervous system (CNS). ADAMTS proteoglycanases, including ADAMTS4 and ADAMTS5, degrade CSPGs, representing potential targets for ameliorating axonal growth-inhibition by CSPG accumulation after CNS injury. We investigated the proteolysis of CSPGs in mice homozygous for Adamts4 or Adamts5 null alleles after spinal cord injury (SCI). ADAMTS-derived 50–60 kDa aggrecan and 50 kDa brevican fragments were observed in Adamts4−/−, Adamts5−/−, and wt mice but not in the sham-operated group. By contrast Adamts4−/− and Adamts5−/− mice were both protected from versican proteolysis with an ADAMTS-generated 70 kDa versican fragment predominately observed in WT mice. ADAMTS1, ADAMTS9, and ADAMTS15 were detected by Western blot in Adamts4−/− mice' spinal cords after SCI. Immunohistochemistry showed astrocyte accumulation at the injury site. These data indicate that aggrecan and brevican proteolysis is compensated in Adamts4−/− or Adamts5−/− mice by ADAMTS proteoglycanase family members but a threshold of versican proteolysis is sensitive to the loss of a single ADAMTS proteoglycanase during SCI. We show robust ADAMTS activity after SCI and exemplify the requirement for collective proteolysis for effective CSPG clearance during SCI. PMID:25101296

  5. Unexpectedly strong energy stabilization inside the hydrophobic core of small protein rubredoxin mediated by aromatic residues: correlated ab initio quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Vondrásek, Jirí; Bendová, Lada; Klusák, Vojtech; Hobza, Pavel

    2005-03-01

    The formation of a hydrophobic core of globular proteins is believed to be the consequence of exterior hydrophobic forces of entropic nature. This, together with the low occurrence of hydrogen bonds in the protein core, leads to the opinion that the energy contribution of core formation to protein folding and stability is negligible. We show that stabilization inside the hydrophobic core of a small protein, rubredoxin, determined by means of high-level correlated ab initio calculations (complete basis set limit of MP2 stabilization energy + CCSD(T) correction term), amounted to approximately 50 kcal/mol. These results clearly demonstrate strong attraction inside a hydrophobic core. This finding may lead to substantial changes in the current view of protein folding. We also point out the inability of the DFT/B3LYP method to describe a strong attraction between studied amino acids.

  6. Decorin Core Protein (Decoron) Shape Complements Collagen Fibril Surface Structure and Mediates Its Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.; Eid, Aya; Antipova, Olga; Bella, Jordi; Scott, John E.

    2010-02-11

    Decorin is the archetypal small leucine rich repeat proteoglycan of the vertebrate extracellular matrix (ECM). With its glycosaminoglycuronan chain, it is responsible for stabilizing inter-fibrillar organization. Type I collagen is the predominant member of the fibrillar collagen family, fulfilling both organizational and structural roles in animal ECMs. In this study, interactions between decoron (the decorin core protein) and binding sites in the d and e1 bands of the type I collagen fibril were investigated through molecular modeling of their respective X-ray diffraction structures. Previously, it was proposed that a model-based, highly curved concave decoron interacts with a single collagen molecule, which would form extensive van der Waals contacts and give rise to strong non-specific binding. However, the large well-ordered aggregate that is the collagen fibril places significant restraints on modes of ligand binding and necessitates multi-collagen molecular contacts. We present here a relatively high-resolution model of the decoron-fibril collagen complex. We find that the respective crystal structures complement each other well, although it is the monomeric form of decoron that shows the most appropriate shape complementarity with the fibril surface and favorable calculated energies of interaction. One molecule of decoron interacts with four to six collagen molecules, and the binding specificity relies on a large number of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions, primarily with the collagen motifs KXGDRGE and AKGDRGE (d and e{sub 1} bands). This work helps us to understand collagen-decorin interactions and the molecular architecture of the fibrillar ECM in health and disease.

  7. Decorin core protein (decoron) shape complements collagen fibril surface structure and mediates its binding.

    PubMed

    Orgel, Joseph P R O; Eid, Aya; Antipova, Olga; Bella, Jordi; Scott, John E

    2009-01-01

    Decorin is the archetypal small leucine rich repeat proteoglycan of the vertebrate extracellular matrix (ECM). With its glycosaminoglycuronan chain, it is responsible for stabilizing inter-fibrillar organization. Type I collagen is the predominant member of the fibrillar collagen family, fulfilling both organizational and structural roles in animal ECMs. In this study, interactions between decoron (the decorin core protein) and binding sites in the d and e(1) bands of the type I collagen fibril were investigated through molecular modeling of their respective X-ray diffraction structures. Previously, it was proposed that a model-based, highly curved concave decoron interacts with a single collagen molecule, which would form extensive van der Waals contacts and give rise to strong non-specific binding. However, the large well-ordered aggregate that is the collagen fibril places significant restraints on modes of ligand binding and necessitates multi-collagen molecular contacts. We present here a relatively high-resolution model of the decoron-fibril collagen complex. We find that the respective crystal structures complement each other well, although it is the monomeric form of decoron that shows the most appropriate shape complementarity with the fibril surface and favorable calculated energies of interaction. One molecule of decoron interacts with four to six collagen molecules, and the binding specificity relies on a large number of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions, primarily with the collagen motifs KXGDRGE and AKGDRGE (d and e(1) bands). This work helps us to understand collagen-decorin interactions and the molecular architecture of the fibrillar ECM in health and disease.

  8. Conformational Changes in the Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein Are Consistent with a Role for Allostery in Virus Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Packianathan, Charles; Katen, Sarah P.; Dann, III, Charles E.; Zlotnick, Adam

    2010-01-12

    In infected cells, virus components must be organized at the right place and time to ensure assembly of infectious virions. From a different perspective, assembly must be prevented until all components are available. Hypothetically, this can be achieved by allosterically controlling assembly. Consistent with this hypothesis, here we show that the structure of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein dimer, which can spontaneously self-assemble, is incompatible with capsid assembly. Systematic differences between core protein dimer and capsid conformations demonstrate linkage between the intradimer interface and interdimer contact surface. These structures also provide explanations for the capsid-dimer selectivity of some antibodies and the activities of assembly effectors. Solution studies suggest that the assembly-inactive state is more accurately an ensemble of conformations. Simulations show that allostery supports controlled assembly and results in capsids that are resistant to dissociation. We propose that allostery, as demonstrated in HBV, is common to most self-assembling viruses.

  9. Intrinsic hepatocyte dedifferentiation is accompanied by upregulation of mesenchymal markers, protein sialylation and core alpha 1,6 linked fucosylation

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Anand; Comunale, Mary Ann; Rawat, Siddhartha; Casciano, Jessica C.; Lamontagne, Jason; Herrera, Harmin; Ramanathan, Aarti; Betesh, Lucy; Wang, Mengjun; Norton, Pamela; Steel, Laura F.; Bouchard, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in N-linked glycosylation have long been associated with cancer but for the most part, the reasons why have remained poorly understood. Here we show that increased core fucosylation is associated with de-differentiation of primary hepatocytes and with the appearance of markers indicative of a transition of cells from an epithelial to a mesenchymal state. This increase in core fucosylation was associated with increased levels of two enzymes involved in α-1,6 linked fucosylation, GDP-mannose 4, 6-dehydratase (Gmds) and to a lesser extent fucosyltransferase 8 (Fut8). In addition, the activation of cancer-associated cellular signaling pathways in primary rat hepatocytes can increase core fucosylation and induce additional glycoform alterations on hepatocyte proteins. Specifically, we show that increased levels of protein sialylation and α-1,6-linked core fucosylation are observed following activation of the β-catenin pathway. Activation of the Akt signaling pathway or induction of hypoxia also results in increased levels of fucosylation and sialylation. We believe that this knowledge will help in the better understanding of the genetic factors associated with altered glycosylation and may allow for the development of more clinically relevant biomarkers. PMID:27328854

  10. Expression of neuronal and signaling proteins in penumbra around a photothrombotic infarction core in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Demyanenko, S V; Panchenko, S N; Uzdensky, A B

    2015-06-01

    Photodynamic impact on animal cerebral cortex using water-soluble Bengal Rose as a photosensitizer, which does not cross the blood-brain barrier and remains in blood vessels, induces platelet aggregation, vessel occlusion, and brain tissue infarction. This reproduces ischemic stroke. Irreversible cell damage within the infarction core propagates to adjacent tissue and forms a transition zone - the penumbra. Tissue necrosis in the infarction core is too fast (minutes) to be prevented, but much slower penumbral injury (hours) can be limited. We studied the changes in morphology and protein expression profile in penumbra 1 h after local photothrombotic infarction induced by laser irradiation of the cerebral cortex after Bengal Rose administration. Morphological study using standard hematoxylin/eosin staining showed a 3-mm infarct core surrounded by 1.5-2.0 mm penumbra. Morphological changes in the penumbra were lesser and decreased towards its periphery. Antibody microarrays against 224 neuronal and signaling proteins were used for proteomic study. The observed upregulation of penumbra proteins involved in maintaining neurite integrity and guidance (NAV3, MAP1, CRMP2, PMP22); intercellular interactions (N-cadherin); synaptic transmission (glutamate decarboxylase, tryptophan hydroxylase, Munc-18-1, Munc-18-3, and synphilin-1); mitochondria quality control and mitophagy (PINK1 and Parkin); ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis and tissue clearance (UCHL1, PINK1, Parkin, synphilin-1); and signaling proteins (PKBα and ERK5) could be associated with tissue recovery. Downregulation of PKC, PKCβ1/2, and TDP-43 could also reduce tissue injury. These changes in expression of some neuronal proteins were directed mainly to protection and tissue recovery in the penumbra. Some upregulated proteins might serve as markers of protection processes in a penumbra.

  11. Crystallization of the avian reovirus double-stranded RNA-binding and core protein σA

    PubMed Central

    Hermo-Parrado, X. Lois; Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Fox, Gavin C.; Vazquez-Iglesias, Lorena; Martínez-Costas, José; Benavente, Javier; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2007-01-01

    The avian reovirus protein σA plays a dual role: it is a structural protein forming part of the transcriptionally active core, but it has also been implicated in the resistance of the virus to interferon by strongly binding double-stranded RNA and thus inhibiting the double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase. The σA protein has been crystallized from solutions containing ammonium sulfate at pH values around 6. Crystals belonging to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.2, b = 129.9, c = 144.0 Å, α = 93.8, β = 105.1, γ = 98.2° were grown and a complete data set has been collected to 2.3 Å resolution. The self-rotation function suggests that σA may form symmetric arrangements in the crystals. PMID:17565188

  12. Suitability of magnetic single- and multi-core nanoparticles to detect protein binding with dynamic magnetic measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remmer, Hilke; Dieckhoff, Jan; Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the binding of biotinylated proteins to various streptavidin functionalized magnetic nanoparticles with different dynamic magnetic measurement techniques to examine their potential for homogeneous bioassays. As particle systems, single-core nanoparticles with a nominal core diameter of 30 nm as well as multi-core nanoparticles with hydrodynamic sizes varying between nominally 60 nm and 100 nm were chosen. As experimental techniques, fluxgate magnetorelaxometry (MRX), complex ac susceptibility (ACS) and measurements of the phase lag between rotating field and sample magnetization are applied. MRX measurements are only suited for the detection of small analytes if the multivalency of functionalized nanoparticles and analytes causes cross-linking, thus forming larger aggregates. ACS measurements showed for all nanoparticle systems a shift of the imaginary part's maximum towards small frequencies. In rotating field measurements only the single-core nanoparticle systems with dominating Brownian mechanism exhibit an increase of the phase lag upon binding in the investigated frequency range. The coexistence of Brownian and Néel relaxation processes can cause a more complex phase lag change behavior, as demonstrated for multi-core nanoparticle systems.

  13. Crystallization of the avian reovirus double-stranded RNA-binding and core protein σA

    SciTech Connect

    Hermo-Parrado, X. Lois; Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Fox, Gavin C.; Vazquez-Iglesias, Lorena; Martínez-Costas, José; Benavente, Javier; Raaij, Mark J. van

    2007-05-01

    The avian reovirus double-stranded RNA-binding and core protein σA has been crystallized in space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.2, b = 129.9, c = 144.0 Å, α = 93.8, β = 105.1, γ = 98.2°. A complete data set has been collected to 2.3 Å resolution and analyzed. The avian reovirus protein σA plays a dual role: it is a structural protein forming part of the transcriptionally active core, but it has also been implicated in the resistance of the virus to interferon by strongly binding double-stranded RNA and thus inhibiting the double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase. The σA protein has been crystallized from solutions containing ammonium sulfate at pH values around 6. Crystals belonging to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.2, b = 129.9, c = 144.0 Å, α = 93.8, β = 105.1, γ = 98.2° were grown and a complete data set has been collected to 2.3 Å resolution. The self-rotation function suggests that σA may form symmetric arrangements in the crystals.

  14. Synergistic transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of ESC characteristics by core pluripotency transcription factors in protein-protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Leijie; Zhang, Liangcai; Liu, Guiyou; Feng, Rennan; Jiang, Yongshuai; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Shihua; Liao, Mingzhi; Hua, Jinlian

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanism that maintains the pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is not well understood but may be reflected in complex biological networks. However, there have been few studies on the effects of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation during the development of ESCs from the perspective of computational systems biology. In this study, we analyzed the topological properties of the "core" pluripotency transcription factors (TFs) OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG in protein-protein interaction networks (PPINs). Further, we identified synergistic interactions between these TFs and microRNAs (miRNAs) in PPINs during ESC development. Results show that there were significant differences in centrality characters between TF-targets and non-TF-targets in PPINs. We also found that there was consistent regulation of multiple "core" pluripotency TFs. Based on the analysis of shortest path length, we found that the module properties were not only within the targets regulated by common or multiple "core" pluripotency TFs but also between the groups of targets regulated by different TFs. Finally, we identified synergistic regulation of these TFs and miRNAs. In summary, the synergistic effects of "core" pluripotency TFs and miRNAs were analyzed using computational methods in both human and mouse PPINs. PMID:25171496

  15. Effects of extracellular matrix proteins in chondrocyte-derived matrices on chondrocyte functions.

    PubMed

    Hoshiba, Takashi; Lu, Hongxu; Kawazoe, Naoki; Yamada, Tomoe; Chen, Guoping

    2013-01-01

    Loss of cartilaginous phenotype during in vitro expansion culture of chondrocytes is a major barrier to the application of chondrocytes for tissue engineering. In previous study, we showed that dedifferentiation of chondrocytes during the passage culture was delayed by matrices formed by primary chondrocytes (P0-ECM). In this study, we investigated bovine chondrocyte functions when being cultured on isolated extracellular matrix (ECM) protein-coated substrata and P0-ECM. Low chondrocyte attachment was observed on aggrecan-coated substratum and P0-ECM. Cell proliferation on aggrecan- and type II collagen/aggrecan-coated substrata and P0-ECM was lower than that on the other ECM protein (type I collagen and type II collagen)-coated substrata. When chondrocytes were subcultured on aggrecan-coated substratum, decline of cartilaginous gene expression was delayed, which was similar to the cells subcultured on P0-ECM. These results indicate that aggrecan plays an important role in the regulation of chondrocyte functions and P0-ECM may be a good experimental control for investigating the role of each ECM protein in cartilage ECM.

  16. A meiotic chromosomal core consisting of cohesin complex proteins recruits DNA recombination proteins and promotes synapsis in the absence of an axial element in mammalian meiotic cells.

    PubMed

    Pelttari, J; Hoja, M R; Yuan, L; Liu, J G; Brundell, E; Moens, P; Santucci-Darmanin, S; Jessberger, R; Barbero, J L; Heyting, C; Höög, C

    2001-08-01

    The behavior of meiotic chromosomes differs in several respects from that of their mitotic counterparts, resulting in the generation of genetically distinct haploid cells. This has been attributed in part to a meiosis-specific chromatin-associated protein structure, the synaptonemal complex. This complex consist of two parallel axial elements, each one associated with a pair of sister chromatids, and a transverse filament located between the synapsed homologous chromosomes. Recently, a different protein structure, the cohesin complex, was shown to be associated with meiotic chromosomes and to be required for chromosome segregation. To explore the functions of the two different protein structures, the synaptonemal complex and the cohesin complex, in mammalian male meiotic cells, we have analyzed how absence of the axial element affects early meiotic chromosome behavior. We find that the synaptonemal complex protein 3 (SCP3) is a main determinant of axial-element assembly and is required for attachment of this structure to meiotic chromosomes, whereas SCP2 helps shape the in vivo structure of the axial element. We also show that formation of a cohesin-containing chromosomal core in meiotic nuclei does not require SCP3 or SCP2. Our results also suggest that the cohesin core recruits recombination proteins and promotes synapsis between homologous chromosomes in the absence of an axial element. A model for early meiotic chromosome pairing and synapsis is proposed. PMID:11463847

  17. Phosphoproteomic analysis of protein kinase C signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals Slt2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent phosphorylation of eisosome core components.

    PubMed

    Mascaraque, Victoria; Hernáez, María Luisa; Jiménez-Sánchez, María; Hansen, Rasmus; Gil, Concha; Martín, Humberto; Cid, Víctor J; Molina, María

    2013-03-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway of the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been thoroughly studied as a paradigm of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. It consists of a classic MAPK module comprising the Bck1 MAPK kinase kinase, two redundant MAPK kinases (Mkk1 and Mkk2), and the Slt2 MAPK. This module is activated under a variety of stimuli related to cell wall homeostasis by Pkc1, the only member of the protein kinase C family in budding yeast. Quantitative phosphoproteomics based on stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture is a powerful tool for globally studying protein phosphorylation. Here we report an analysis of the yeast phosphoproteome upon overexpression of a PKC1 hyperactive allele that specifically activates CWI MAPK signaling in the absence of external stimuli. We found 82 phosphopeptides originating from 43 proteins that showed enhanced phosphorylation in these conditions. The MAPK S/T-P target motif was significantly overrepresented in these phosphopeptides. Hyperphosphorylated proteins provide putative novel targets of the Pkc1-cell wall integrity pathway involved in diverse functions such as the control of gene expression, protein synthesis, cytoskeleton maintenance, DNA repair, and metabolism. Remarkably, five components of the plasma-membrane-associated protein complex known as eisosomes were found among the up-regulated proteins. We show here that Pkc1-induced phosphorylation of the eisosome core components Pil1 and Lsp1 was not exerted directly by Pkc1, but involved signaling through the Slt2 MAPK module.

  18. Regulation of HepG2 cell apoptosis by hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein via the sirt1-p53-bax pathway.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shenghu; Li, Min; Zhang, Jinqian; Liu, Shunai; Wang, Qi; Quan, Min; Zhang, Mengran; Cheng, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein stimulates many signaling pathways related to apoptosis inhibition resulting in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It has been reported that sirt1 is involved in regulating apoptosis; therefore, we investigated the influence of HCV core protein on sirt1 expression and apoptosis in human HepG2 cells. Our study showed that HCV core protein inhibited apoptosis of HepG2 cells as well as caspase-3 expression and activity (P < 0.05). At the same time, sirt1 expression was increased at both the mRNA (P < 0.05) and protein (P < 0.05) levels. Furthermore, apoptosis inhibition was reversed when sirt1 was knocked down (P < 0.05). Our study provides further evidence that the sirt1-p53-Bax signaling pathway plays an important role in regulating the suppression of cell apoptosis induced by HCV core protein.

  19. Lasso Peptide Biosynthetic Protein LarB1 Binds Both Leader and Core Peptide Regions of the Precursor Protein LarA

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lasso peptides are a member of the superclass of ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs). Like all RiPPs, lasso peptides are derived from a gene-encoded precursor protein. The biosynthesis of lasso peptides requires two enzymatic activities: proteolytic cleavage between the leader peptide and the core peptide in the precursor protein, accomplished by the B enzymes, and ATP-dependent isopeptide bond formation, accomplished by the C enzymes. In a subset of lasso peptide biosynthetic gene clusters from Gram-positive organisms, the B enzyme is split between two proteins. One such gene cluster is found in the organism Rhodococcus jostii, which produces the antimicrobial lasso peptide lariatin. The B enzyme in R. jostii is split between two open reading frames, larB1 and larB2, both of which are required for lariatin biosynthesis. While the cysteine catalytic triad is found within the LarB2 protein, LarB1 is a PqqD homologue expected to bind to the lariatin precursor LarA based on its structural homology to other RiPP leader peptide binding domains. We show that LarB1 binds to the leader peptide of the lariatin precursor protein LarA with a sub-micromolar affinity. We used photocrosslinking with the noncanonical amino acid p-azidophenylalanine and mass spectrometry to map the interaction of LarA and LarB1. This analysis shows that the LarA leader peptide interacts with a conserved motif within LarB1 and, unexpectedly, the core peptide of LarA also binds to LarB1 in several positions. A Rosetta model built from distance restraints from the photocrosslinking experiments shows that the scissile bond between the leader peptide and core peptide in LarA is in a solvent-exposed loop. PMID:27800552

  20. Hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits E6AP expression via DNA methylation to escape from ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Juri; Shim, Joo Hee; Tiwari, Indira; Jang, Kyung Lib

    2016-09-28

    The E6-associated protein (E6AP) is a ubiquitin ligase that mediates ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein. Given the role of HCV core protein as a major component of the viral nucleocapsid, as well as a multifunctional protein involved in viral pathogenesis and hepatocarcinogenesis, HCV has likely evolved a strategy to counteract the host anti-viral defense mechanism of E6AP and maximize its potential to produce infectious virus particles. In the present study, we found that HCV core protein derived from either ectopic expression or HCV infection inhibits E6AP expression via promoter hypermethylation in human hepatocytes. As a result, the potential of E6AP to ubiquitinate and degrade HCV core protein through the ubiquitin-proteasome system was severely impaired, which in turn led to stimulation of virus propagation. The effects of HCV core protein were almost completely abolished when the E6AP level was restored by ectopic expression of E6AP, treatment with a universal DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor, 5-Aza-2'dC, or knock-down of DNMT1. In conclusion, HCV core protein inhibits E6AP expression via DNA methylation to protect itself from ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation and stimulate virus propagation, providing a potential target for the development of anti-viral drugs against HCV.

  1. Construct design, biophysical, and biochemical characterization of the fusion core from mouse hepatitis virus (a coronavirus) spike protein.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanhui; Cole, David K; Lou, Zhiyong; Liu, Yiwei; Qin, Lan; Li, Xu; Bai, Zhihong; Yuan, Fang; Rao, Zihe; Gao, George F

    2004-11-01

    Membrane fusion between virus and host cells is the key step for enveloped virus entry and is mediated by the viral envelope fusion protein. In murine coronavirus, mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), the spike (S) protein mediates this process. Recently, the formation of anti-parallel 6-helix bundle of the MHV S protein heptad repeat (HR) regions (HR1 and HR2) has been confirmed, implying coronavirus has a class I fusion protein. This bundle is also called fusion core. To facilitate the solution of the crystal structure of this fusion core, we deployed an Escherichia coli in vitro expression system to express the HR1 and HR2 regions linked together by a flexible linker as a single chain (named 2-helix). This 2-helix polypeptide subsequently assembled into a typical 6-helix bundle. This bundle has been analyzed by a series of biophysical and biochemical techniques and confirmed that the design technique can be used for coronavirus as we successfully used for members of paramyxoviruses.

  2. The Replacement of 10 Non-Conserved Residues in the Core Protein of JFH-1 Hepatitis C Virus Improves Its Assembly and Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Etienne, Loïc; Blanchard, Emmanuelle; Boyer, Audrey; Desvignes, Virginie; Gaillard, Julien; Meunier, Jean-Christophe; Roingeard, Philippe; Hourioux, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) assembly is still poorly understood. It is thought that trafficking of the HCV core protein to the lipid droplet (LD) surface is essential for its multimerization and association with newly synthesized HCV RNA to form the viral nucleocapsid. We carried out a mapping analysis of several complete HCV genomes of all genotypes, and found that the genotype 2 JFH-1 core protein contained 10 residues different from those of other genotypes. The replacement of these 10 residues of the JFH-1 strain sequence with the most conserved residues deduced from sequence alignments greatly increased virus production. Confocal microscopy of the modified JFH-1 strain in cell culture showed that the mutated JFH-1 core protein, C10M, was present mostly at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, but not at the surface of the LDs, even though its trafficking to these organelles was possible. The non-structural 5A protein of HCV was also redirected to ER membranes and colocalized with the C10M core protein. Using a Semliki forest virus vector to overproduce core protein, we demonstrated that the C10M core protein was able to form HCV-like particles, unlike the native JFH-1 core protein. Thus, the substitution of a few selected residues in the JFH-1 core protein modified the subcellular distribution and assembly properties of the protein. These findings suggest that the early steps of HCV assembly occur at the ER membrane rather than at the LD surface. The C10M-JFH-1 strain will be a valuable tool for further studies of HCV morphogenesis. PMID:26339783

  3. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of human ribosomal protein L10 core domain

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Mitsuhiro; Kaminishi, Tatsuya; Kawazoe, Masahito; Shirouzu, Mikako; Takemoto, Chie; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Tanaka, Akiko; Sugano, Sumio; Yoshida, Takuya; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Kobayashi, Yuji

    2007-11-01

    A truncated variant of human ribosomal protien L10 was prepared and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. Eukaryotic ribosomal protein L10 is an essential component of the large ribosomal subunit, which organizes the architecture of the aminoacyl-tRNA binding site. The human L10 protein is also called the QM protein and consists of 214 amino-acid residues. For crystallization, the L10 core domain (L10CD, Phe34–Glu182) was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. A hexagonal crystal of L10CD was obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The L10CD crystal diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution and belongs to space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21.

  4. The crystal structure of a heptameric archaeal Sm protein: Implications for the eukaryotic snRNP core.

    PubMed

    Mura, C; Cascio, D; Sawaya, M R; Eisenberg, D S

    2001-05-01

    Sm proteins form the core of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs), making them key components of several mRNA-processing assemblies, including the spliceosome. We report the 1.75-A crystal structure of SmAP, an Sm-like archaeal protein that forms a heptameric ring perforated by a cationic pore. In addition to providing direct evidence for such an assembly in eukaryotic snRNPs, this structure (i) shows that SmAP homodimers are structurally similar to human Sm heterodimers, (ii) supports a gene duplication model of Sm protein evolution, and (iii) offers a model of SmAP bound to single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) that explains Sm binding-site specificity. The pronounced electrostatic asymmetry of the SmAP surface imparts directionality to putative SmAP-RNA interactions.

  5. The F-box protein Ppa is a common regulator of core EMT factors Twist, Snail, Slug, and Sip1.

    PubMed

    Lander, Rachel; Nordin, Kara; LaBonne, Carole

    2011-07-11

    A small group of core transcription factors, including Twist, Snail, Slug, and Sip1, control epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMTs) during both embryonic development and tumor metastasis. However, little is known about how these factors are coordinately regulated to mediate the requisite behavioral and fate changes. It was recently shown that a key mechanism for regulating Snail proteins is by modulating their stability. In this paper, we report that the stability of Twist is also regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. We found that the same E3 ubiquitin ligase known to regulate Snail family proteins, Partner of paired (Ppa), also controlled Twist stability and did so in a manner dependent on the Twist WR-rich domain. Surprisingly, Ppa could also target the third core EMT regulatory factor Sip1 for proteasomal degradation. Together, these results indicate that despite the structural diversity of the core transcriptional regulatory factors implicated in EMT, a common mechanism has evolved for controlling their stability and therefore their function.

  6. A Sulfated Glycosaminoglycan Linkage Region is a Novel Type of Human Natural Killer-1 (HNK-1) Epitope Expressed on Aggrecan in Perineuronal Nets.

    PubMed

    Yabuno, Keiko; Morise, Jyoji; Kizuka, Yasuhiko; Hashii, Noritaka; Kawasaki, Nana; Takahashi, Satoru; Miyata, Shinji; Izumikawa, Tomomi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Takematsu, Hiromu; Oka, Shogo

    2015-01-01

    Human natural killer-1 (HNK-1) carbohydrate (HSO3-3GlcAβ1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc-R) is highly expressed in the brain and required for learning and neural plasticity. We previously demonstrated that expression of the HNK-1 epitope is mostly abolished in knockout mice for GlcAT-P (B3gat1), a major glucuronyltransferase required for HNK-1 biosynthesis, but remained in specific regions such as perineuronal nets (PNNs) in these mutant mice. Considering PNNs are mainly composed of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) and regulate neural plasticity, GlcAT-P-independent expression of HNK-1 in PNNs is suggested to play a role in neural plasticity. However, the function, structure, carrier glycoprotein and biosynthetic pathway for GlcAT-P-irrelevant HNK-1 epitope remain unclear. In this study, we identified a unique HNK-1 structure on aggrecan in PNNs. To determine the biosynthetic pathway for the novel HNK-1, we generated knockout mice for GlcAT-S (B3gat2), the other glucuronyltransferase required for HNK-1 biosynthesis. However, GlcAT-P and GlcAT-S double-knockout mice did not exhibit reduced HNK-1 expression compared with single GlcAT-P-knockout mice, indicating an unusual biosynthetic pathway for the HNK-1 epitope in PNNs. Aggrecan was purified from cultured cells in which GlcAT-P and -S are not expressed and we determined the structure of the novel HNK-1 epitope using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) as a sulfated linkage region of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), HSO3-GlcA-Gal-Gal-Xyl-R. Taken together, we propose a hypothetical model where GlcAT-I, the sole glucuronyltransferase required for synthesis of the GAG linkage, is also responsible for biosynthesis of the novel HNK-1 on aggrecan. These results could lead to discovery of new roles of the HNK-1 epitope in neural plasticity.

  7. Perinatal exposure to vitamin A differentially regulates chondrocyte growth and the expression of aggrecan and matrix metalloprotein genes in the femur of neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Wray, Amanda E; Ross, A Catharine

    2012-04-01

    Vitamin A (VA) and its active form, retinoic acid (RA), are regulators of skeletal development. In the present study, we investigated if maternal VA intake during pregnancy and lactation, as well as direct oral supplementation of neonates with VA + RA (VARA) in early life, alters neonatal bone formation and chondrocyte gene expression. Offspring of dams fed 3 levels of VA (marginal, adequate, and supplemented) for 10 wk were studied at birth (P0) and postnatal day 7 (P7). One-half of the newborns received an oral supplement of VARA on P1, P4, and P7. Tissues were collected on P0 and 6 h after the last dose on P7. Pup plasma and liver retinol concentrations were increased by both maternal VA intake and VARA (P < 0.01). Although maternal VA did not affect bone mineralization as assessed by von Kossa staining, newborn femur length was increased with maternal VA (P < 0.05). VARA supplementation of neonates increased the length of the hypertrophic zone only in VA-marginal pups, close to that in neonates from VA-adequate dams, suggesting VARA caused a catching up of growth that was limited by low maternal VA intake. Maternal diet did not alter type X nor type II collagen mRNA. However, VARA-treated pups from VA-supplemented dams had reduced mRNA for aggrecan, a major component of cartilage matrix, and increased mRNA for matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)13, which catalyzes the degradation of aggrecan and collagens. These results suggest that moderately high maternal VA intake combined with neonatal VARA supplementation can reduce the ratio of aggrecan:MMP, which may unfavorably alter early bone development.

  8. A longitudinal study of cartilage matrix metabolism in patients with cruciate ligament rupture--synovial fluid concentrations of aggrecan fragments, stromelysin-1 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, L; Fridén, T; Roos, H; Lark, M W; Lohmander, L S

    1994-12-01

    This is the first study which quantifies aggrecan fragments, stromelysin-1 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) in SF samples prospectively obtained from the same patient at different time intervals after a cruciate ligament injury of the knee. Aggrecan fragment concentrations were determined by dye precipitation with Alcian Blue. Stromelysin-1 and TIMP-1 were analysed by immunoassay. Ten healthy volunteers formed the reference group. Immediately after knee injury, all marker concentrations were higher as compared to the reference group. The high marker concentrations decreased gradually with time, and in samples obtained between 6 months and 6 years after the injury, median concentrations of some of the markers were not different compared to reference levels. This was in contrast to results from previous cross-sectional studies, where chronic phase median concentrations of all markers were consistently higher than reference levels. In previous cross-sectional studies, however, the samples were obtained at arthroscopy done because of knee complaints at different times after a knee injury. In the present study, the knee injured patients visited the orthopaedic outpatient ward only for SF sampling, and they had no or only minor knee symptoms. We conclude that the temporal changes of marker concentrations in joint fluid after knee injury, suggested from cross-sectional studies, have now been confirmed in a longitudinal, prospective cohort study. We further find that in patients with mild knee symptoms in the chronic phase after cruciate ligament injury, median SF levels of aggrecan fragments, stromelysin-1, and TIMP-1 are lower than in patients with significant knee complaints after the same type of injury.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Alcohol induced hepatic degeneration in a hepatitis C virus core protein transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Noh, Dong-Hyung; Lee, Eun-Joo; Kim, Ah-Young; Lee, Eun-Mi; Min, Chang-Woo; Kang, Kyung-Ku; Lee, Myeong-Mi; Kim, Sang-Hyeob; Sung, Soo-Eun; Hwang, Meeyul; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has become a major public health issue. It is prevalent in most countries. HCV infection frequently begins without clinical symptoms, before progressing to persistent viremia, chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the majority of patients (70% to 80%). Alcohol is an independent cofactor that accelerates the development of HCC in chronic hepatitis C patients. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate ethanol-induced hepatic changes in HCV core-Tg mice and mutant core Tg mice. Wild type (NTG), core wild-Tg mice (TG-K), mutant core 116-Tg mice (TG-116) and mutant core 99-Tg mice (TG-99) were used in this investigation. All groups were given drinking water with 10% ethanol and 5% sucrose for 13 weeks. To observe liver morphological changes, we performed histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations. Histopathologically, NTG, TG-K and TG-116 mice showed moderate centrilobular necrosis, while severe centrilobular necrosis and hepatocyte dissociation were observed in TG-99 mice with increasing lymphocyte infiltration and piecemeal necrosis. In all groups, a small amount of collagen fiber was found, principally in portal areas. None of the mice were found to have myofibroblasts based on immunohistochemical staining specific for α-SMA. CYP2E1-positive cells were clearly detected in the centrilobular area in all groups. In the TG-99 mice, we also observed cells positive for CK8/18, TGF-β1 and phosphorylated (p)-Smad2/3 and p21 around the necrotic hepatocytes in the centrilobular area (p < 0.01). Based on our data, alcohol intake induced piecemeal necrosis and hepatocyte dissociation in the TG-99 mice. These phenomena involved activation of the TGF-β1/p-Smad2/3/p21 signaling pathway in hepatocytes. Data from this study will be useful for elucidating the association between alcohol intake and HCV infection.

  10. Disulfide bonds in a recombinant protein modeled after a core repeat in an aquatic insect's silk protein.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S. V.; Correia, J. J.; Case, S. T.

    1995-01-01

    We constructed a gene encoding rCAS, recombinant constant and subrepeat protein, modeled after tandem repeats found in the major silk proteins synthesized by aquatic larvae of the midge, Chironomus tentans. Bacterially synthesized rCAS was purified to near homogeneity and characterized by several biochemical and biophysical methods including amino-terminal sequencing, amino acid compositional analysis, sedimentation equilibrium ultracentrifugation, and mass spectrometry. Complementing these techniques with quantitative sulfhydryl assays, we discovered that the four cysteines present in rCAS form two intramolecular disulfide bonds. Mapping studies revealed that the disulfide bonds are heterogeneous. When reduced and denatured rCAS was allowed to refold and its disulfide bonding state monitored, it again adopted a conformation with two intramolecular disulfide bonds. The inherent ability of rCAS to quantitatively form two intramolecular disulfide bonds may reflect a previously unknown feature of the in vivo silk proteins from which it is derived. PMID:7663350

  11. Aminoacylase 3 binds to and cleaves the N-terminus of the hepatitis C virus core protein

    PubMed Central

    Tsirulnikov, Kirill; Abuladze, Natalia; Vahi, Ritu; Hasnain, Huma; Phillips, Martin; Ryan, Christopher M.; Atanasov, Ivo; Faull, Kym F.; Kurtz, Ira; Pushkin, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Aminoacylase 3 (AA3) mediates deacetylation of N-acetyl aromatic amino acids and mercapturic acids. Deacetylation of mercapturic acids of exo- and endobiotics are likely involved in their toxicity. AA3 is predominantly expressed in kidney, and to a lesser extent in liver, brain, and blood. AA3 has been recently reported to interact with the hepatitis C virus core protein (HCVCP) in the yeast two-hybrid system. Here we demonstrate that AA3 directly binds to HCVCP (Kd~10 μM) that may by implicated in HCV pathogenesis. AA3 also revealed a weak endopeptidase activity towards the N-terminus of HCVCP. PMID:23010594

  12. Preparation of Core-Shell Hybrid Materials by Producing a Protein Corona Around Magnetic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, A.; Gräfe, C.; von der Lühe, M.; Remmer, H.; Clement, J. H.; Eberbeck, D.; Ludwig, F.; Müller, R.; Schacher, F. H.; Dutz, S.

    2015-07-01

    Nanoparticles experience increasing interest for a variety of medical and pharmaceutical applications. When exposing nanomaterials, e.g., magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNP), to human blood, a protein corona consisting of various components is formed immediately. The composition of the corona as well as its amount bound to the particle surface is dependent on different factors, e.g., particle size and surface charge. The actual composition of the formed protein corona might be of major importance for cellular uptake of magnetic nanoparticles. The aim of the present study was to analyze the formation of the protein corona during in vitro serum incubation in dependency of incubation time and temperature. For this, MNP with different shells were incubated in fetal calf serum (FCS, serving as protein source) within a water bath for a defined time and at a defined temperature. Before and after incubation the particles were characterized by a variety of methods. It was found that immediately (seconds) after contact of MNP and FCS, a protein corona is formed on the surface of MNP. This formation led to an increase of particle size and a slight agglomeration of the particles, which was relatively constant during the first minutes of incubation. A longer incubation (from hours to days) resulted in a stronger agglomeration of the FCS incubated MNP. Quantitative analysis (gel electrophoresis) of serum-incubated particles revealed a relatively constant amount of bound proteins during the first minutes of serum incubation. After a longer incubation (>20 min), a considerably higher amount of surface proteins was determined for incubation temperatures below 40 °C. For incubation temperatures above 50 °C, the influence of time was less significant which might be attributed to denaturation of proteins during incubation. Overall, analysis of the molecular weight distribution of proteins found in the corona revealed a clear influence of incubation time and temperature on corona

  13. Preparation of Core-Shell Hybrid Materials by Producing a Protein Corona Around Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Weidner, A; Gräfe, C; von der Lühe, M; Remmer, H; Clement, J H; Eberbeck, D; Ludwig, F; Müller, R; Schacher, F H; Dutz, S

    2015-12-01

    Nanoparticles experience increasing interest for a variety of medical and pharmaceutical applications. When exposing nanomaterials, e.g., magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNP), to human blood, a protein corona consisting of various components is formed immediately. The composition of the corona as well as its amount bound to the particle surface is dependent on different factors, e.g., particle size and surface charge. The actual composition of the formed protein corona might be of major importance for cellular uptake of magnetic nanoparticles. The aim of the present study was to analyze the formation of the protein corona during in vitro serum incubation in dependency of incubation time and temperature. For this, MNP with different shells were incubated in fetal calf serum (FCS, serving as protein source) within a water bath for a defined time and at a defined temperature. Before and after incubation the particles were characterized by a variety of methods. It was found that immediately (seconds) after contact of MNP and FCS, a protein corona is formed on the surface of MNP. This formation led to an increase of particle size and a slight agglomeration of the particles, which was relatively constant during the first minutes of incubation. A longer incubation (from hours to days) resulted in a stronger agglomeration of the FCS incubated MNP. Quantitative analysis (gel electrophoresis) of serum-incubated particles revealed a relatively constant amount of bound proteins during the first minutes of serum incubation. After a longer incubation (>20 min), a considerably higher amount of surface proteins was determined for incubation temperatures below 40 °C. For incubation temperatures above 50 °C, the influence of time was less significant which might be attributed to denaturation of proteins during incubation. Overall, analysis of the molecular weight distribution of proteins found in the corona revealed a clear influence of incubation time and temperature on

  14. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of hepatitis B virus core protein dimerized via a peptide linker containing an EGFP insertion.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Masaki; Iwabuchi, Shinichiro; Kikkou, Tatsuhiko; Noguchi, Keiichi; Odaka, Masafumi; Yohda, Masafumi; Kawata, Masaaki; Sato, Chikara; Matsumoto, Osamu

    2013-08-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) have many potentially useful applications. The core proteins of human hepatitis B virus self-assemble into icosahedral VLPs. As previously reported, core protein dimers (CPDs), produced by connecting two core proteins via a peptide linker, can also assemble into VLPs. CPDs in which heterologous proteins were connected to the C-terminus (CPD1) were found to rearrange into symmetrical octahedra during crystallization. In this study, a heterologous protein was inserted into the peptide linker of the CPD (CPD2). CPD2 was expressed in Escherichia coli, assembled into VLPs, purified and crystallized. A single crystal diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution and belonged to the cubic space group F432, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 218.6 Å. Single-crystal analysis showed that CPD1 and CPD2 rearranged into the same octahedral organization in a crystallization solution.

  15. Protein-energy malnutrition induces an aberrant acute-phase response and modifies the circadian rhythm of core temperature.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shari E; Ramos, Rafaela Andrade; Refinetti, Roberto; Farthing, Jonathan P; Paterson, Phyllis G

    2013-08-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM), present in 12%-19% of stroke patients upon hospital admission, appears to be a detrimental comorbidity factor that impairs functional outcome, but the mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Because ischemic brain injury is highly temperature-sensitive, the objectives of this study were to investigate whether PEM causes sustained changes in temperature that are associated with an inflammatory response. Activity levels were recorded as a possible explanation for the immediate elevation in temperature upon introduction to a low protein diet. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats (7 weeks old) were fed a control diet (18% protein) or a low protein diet (PEM, 2% protein) for either 7 or 28 days. Continuous core temperature recordings from bioelectrical sensor transmitters demonstrated a rapid increase in temperature amplitude, sustained over 28 days, in response to a low protein diet. Daily mean temperature rose transiently by day 2 (p = 0.01), falling to normal by day 4 (p = 0.08), after which mean temperature continually declined as malnutrition progressed. There were no alterations in activity mean (p = 0.3) or amplitude (p = 0.2) that were associated with the early rise in mean temperature. Increased serum alpha-2-macroglobulin (p < 0.001) and decreased serum albumin (p ≤ 0.005) combined with a decrease in serum alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (p < 0.001) suggest an atypical acute-phase response. In contrast, a low protein diet had no effect on the signaling pathway of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor, NFκB, in the hippocampus. In conclusion, PEM induces an aberrant and sustained acute-phase response coupled with long-lasting effects on body temperature.

  16. Production of unstable proteins through the formation of stable core complexes.

    PubMed

    Levy, Nicolas; Eiler, Sylvia; Pradeau-Aubreton, Karine; Maillot, Benoit; Stricher, François; Ruff, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Purification of proteins that participate in large transient complexes is impeded by low amounts, heterogeneity, instability and poor solubility. To circumvent these difficulties we set up a methodology that enables the production of stable complexes for structural and functional studies. This procedure is benchmarked and applied to two challenging protein families: the human steroid nuclear receptors (SNR) and the HIV-1 pre-integration complex. In the context of transcriptional regulation studies, we produce and characterize the ligand-binding domains of the glucocorticoid nuclear receptor and the oestrogen receptor beta in complex with a TIF2 (transcriptional intermediary factor 2) domain containing the three SNR-binding motifs. In the context of retroviral integration, we demonstrate the stabilization of the HIV-1 integrase by formation of complexes with partner proteins and DNA. This procedure provides a powerful research tool for structural and functional studies of proteins participating in non-covalent macromolecular complexes. PMID:26983699

  17. Production of unstable proteins through the formation of stable core complexes

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Nicolas; Eiler, Sylvia; Pradeau-Aubreton, Karine; Maillot, Benoit; Stricher, François; Ruff, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Purification of proteins that participate in large transient complexes is impeded by low amounts, heterogeneity, instability and poor solubility. To circumvent these difficulties we set up a methodology that enables the production of stable complexes for structural and functional studies. This procedure is benchmarked and applied to two challenging protein families: the human steroid nuclear receptors (SNR) and the HIV-1 pre-integration complex. In the context of transcriptional regulation studies, we produce and characterize the ligand-binding domains of the glucocorticoid nuclear receptor and the oestrogen receptor beta in complex with a TIF2 (transcriptional intermediary factor 2) domain containing the three SNR-binding motifs. In the context of retroviral integration, we demonstrate the stabilization of the HIV-1 integrase by formation of complexes with partner proteins and DNA. This procedure provides a powerful research tool for structural and functional studies of proteins participating in non-covalent macromolecular complexes. PMID:26983699

  18. Insight into the Unfolding Properties of Chd64, a Small, Single Domain Protein with a Globular Core and Disordered Tails

    PubMed Central

    Dobryszycki, Piotr; Kaus-Drobek, Magdalena; Dadlez, Michał; Ożyhar, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Two major lipophilic hormones, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and juvenile hormone (JH), govern insect development and growth. While the mode of action of 20E is well understood, some understanding of JH-dependent signalling has been attained only in the past few years, and the crosstalk of the two hormonal pathways remains unknown. Two proteins, the calponin-like Chd64 and immunophilin FKBP39 proteins, have recently been found to play pivotal roles in the formation of dynamic, multiprotein complex that cross-links these two signalling pathways. However, the molecular mechanism of the interaction remains unexplored. The aim of this work was to determine structural elements of Chd64 to provide an understanding of molecular basis of multiple interactions. We analysed Chd64 in two unrelated insect species, Drosophila melanogaster (DmChd64) and Tribolium castaneum (TcChd64). Using hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS), we showed that both Chd64 proteins have disordered tails that outflank the globular core. The folds of the globular cores of both Chd64 resemble the calponin homology (CH) domain previously resolved by crystallography. Monitoring the unfolding of DmChd64 and TcChd64 by far-ultraviolet (UV) circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) revealed a highly complex process. Chd64 unfolds and forms of a molten globule (MG)—like intermediate state. Furthermore, our data indicate that in some conditions, Chd64 may exists in discrete structural forms, indicating that the protein is pliable and capable of easily acquiring different conformations. The plasticity of Chd64 and the existence of terminal intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) may be crucial for multiple interactions with many partners. PMID:26325194

  19. Pokemon siRNA Delivery Mediated by RGD-Modified HBV Core Protein Suppressed the Growth of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jing; Liu, Xiaoping; Jia, Jianbo; Wu, Jinsheng; Wu, Ning; Chen, Jun; Fang, Fang

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a deadly human malignant tumor that is among the most common cancers in the world, especially in Asia. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has been well established as a high risk factor for hepatic malignance. Studies have shown that Pokemon is a master oncogene for HCC growth, suggesting it as an ideal therapeutic target. However, efficient delivery system is still lacking for Pokemon targeting treatment. In this study, we used core proteins of HBV, which is modified with RGD peptides, to construct a biomimetic vector for the delivery of Pokemon siRNAs (namely, RGD-HBc-Pokemon siRNA). Quantitative PCR and Western blot assays revealed that RGD-HBc-Pokemon siRNA possessed the highest efficiency of Pokemon suppression in HCC cells. In vitro experiments further indicated that RGD-HBc-Pokemon-siRNA exerted a higher tumor suppressor activity on HCC cell lines, evidenced by reduced proliferation and attenuated invasiveness, than Pokemon-siRNA or RGD-HBc alone. Finally, animal studies demonstrated that RGD-HBc-Pokemon siRNA suppressed the growth of HCC xenografts in mice by a greater extent than Pokemon-siRNA or RGD-HBc alone. Based on the above results, Pokemon siRNA delivery mediated by RGD-modified HBV core protein was shown to be an effective strategy of HCC gene therapy. PMID:26356810

  20. A comparison of three methods for detection of antibodies against the major core protein p24 of human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Lindhardt, B O; Pedersen, C; Ulrich, K; Kusk, P

    1988-12-01

    The native major core protein p24 of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was immunoaffinity purified by a monoclonal antibody and used to develop an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (inELISA) for detecting p24 antibodies in human sera. Its ability to detect p24 antibodies was compared to that of the immunoblotting test (IBT) and a commercial available competition ELISA (compELISA) employing recombinant HIV core protein. In tests on 60 serum samples the overall agreement of the inELISA and the IBT was 93.3%. Fifty-two samples were p24 antibody positive in both the inELISA and the IBT and of these 24 (46.2%) were positive in the compELISA. All compELISA positive samples were derived from healthy individuals, whereas of the 28 (53.8%) compELISA negative samples 1 was from a patient with acute HIV infection, 18 from healthy individuals and 9 from ARC/AIDS patients. The compELISA was able to distinguish among healthy persons with normal or low T-helper cell count (P = 0.048), as was the inELISA when p24 antibodies were titrated (P = 0.027). The inELISA equals IBT in specificity and sensitivity, is convenient and is very suitable for titration of p24 antibodies.

  1. Pokemon siRNA Delivery Mediated by RGD-Modified HBV Core Protein Suppressed the Growth of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jing; Liu, Xiaoping; Jia, Jianbo; Wu, Jinsheng; Wu, Ning; Chen, Jun; Fang, Fang

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a deadly human malignant tumor that is among the most common cancers in the world, especially in Asia. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has been well established as a high risk factor for hepatic malignance. Studies have shown that Pokemon is a master oncogene for HCC growth, suggesting it as an ideal therapeutic target. However, efficient delivery system is still lacking for Pokemon targeting treatment. In this study, we used core proteins of HBV, which is modified with RGD peptides, to construct a biomimetic vector for the delivery of Pokemon siRNAs (namely, RGD-HBc-Pokemon siRNA). Quantitative PCR and Western blot assays revealed that RGD-HBc-Pokemon siRNA possessed the highest efficiency of Pokemon suppression in HCC cells. In vitro experiments further indicated that RGD-HBc-Pokemon-siRNA exerted a higher tumor suppressor activity on HCC cell lines, evidenced by reduced proliferation and attenuated invasiveness, than Pokemon-siRNA or RGD-HBc alone. Finally, animal studies demonstrated that RGD-HBc-Pokemon siRNA suppressed the growth of HCC xenografts in mice by a greater extent than Pokemon-siRNA or RGD-HBc alone. Based on the above results, Pokemon siRNA delivery mediated by RGD-modified HBV core protein was shown to be an effective strategy of HCC gene therapy.

  2. The Conserved VPS-50 Protein Functions in Dense-Core Vesicle Maturation and Acidification and Controls Animal Behavior.

    PubMed

    Paquin, Nicolas; Murata, Yasunobu; Froehlich, Allan; Omura, Daniel T; Ailion, Michael; Pender, Corinne L; Constantine-Paton, Martha; Horvitz, H Robert

    2016-04-01

    The modification of behavior in response to experience is crucial for animals to adapt to environmental changes. Although factors such as neuropeptides and hormones are known to function in the switch between alternative behavioral states, the mechanisms by which these factors transduce, store, retrieve, and integrate environmental signals to regulate behavior are poorly understood. The rate of locomotion of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans depends on both current and past food availability. Specifically, C. elegans slows its locomotion when it encounters food, and animals in a food-deprived state slow even more than animals in a well-fed state. The slowing responses of well-fed and food-deprived animals in the presence of food represent distinct behavioral states, as they are controlled by different sets of genes, neurotransmitters, and neurons. Here we describe an evolutionarily conserved C. elegans protein, VPS-50, that is required for animals to assume the well-fed behavioral state. Both VPS-50 and its murine homolog mVPS50 are expressed in neurons, are associated with synaptic and dense-core vesicles, and control vesicle acidification and hence synaptic function, likely through regulation of the assembly of the V-ATPase complex. We propose that dense-core vesicle acidification controlled by the evolutionarily conserved protein VPS-50/mVPS50 affects behavioral state by modulating neuropeptide levels and presynaptic neuronal function in both C. elegans and mammals. PMID:26948874

  3. Antibiotic Resistance, Core-Genome and Protein Expression in IncHI1 Plasmids in Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Kubasova, Tereza; Cejkova, Darina; Matiasovicova, Jitka; Sekelova, Zuzana; Polansky, Ondrej; Medvecky, Matej; Rychlik, Ivan; Juricova, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Conjugative plasmids from the IncHI1 incompatibility group play an important role in transferring antibiotic resistance in Salmonella Typhimurium. However, knowledge of their genome structure or gene expression is limited. In this study, we determined the complete nucleotide sequences of four IncHI1 plasmids transferring resistance to antibiotics by two different next generation sequencing protocols and protein expression by mass spectrometry. Sequence data including additional 11 IncHI1 plasmids from GenBank were used for the definition of the IncHI1 plasmid core-genome and pan-genome. The core-genome consisted of approximately 123 kbp and 122 genes while the total pan-genome represented approximately 600 kbp. When the core-genome sequences were used for multiple alignments, the 15 tested IncHI1 plasmids were separated into two main lineages. GC content in core-genome genes was around 46% and 50% in accessory genome genes. A multidrug resistance region present in all 4 sequenced plasmids extended over 20 kbp and, except for tet(B), the genes responsible for antibiotic resistance were those with the highest GC content. IncHI1 plasmids therefore represent replicons that evolved in low GC content bacteria. From their original host, they spread to Salmonella and during this spread these plasmids acquired multiple accessory genes including those coding for antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic-resistance genes belonged to genes with the highest level of expression and were constitutively expressed even in the absence of antibiotics. This is the likely mechanism that facilitates host cell survival when antibiotics suddenly emerge in the environment. PMID:27189997

  4. Antibiotic Resistance, Core-Genome and Protein Expression in IncHI1 Plasmids in Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Kubasova, Tereza; Cejkova, Darina; Matiasovicova, Jitka; Sekelova, Zuzana; Polansky, Ondrej; Medvecky, Matej; Rychlik, Ivan; Juricova, Helena

    2016-06-13

    Conjugative plasmids from the IncHI1 incompatibility group play an important role in transferring antibiotic resistance in Salmonella Typhimurium. However, knowledge of their genome structure or gene expression is limited. In this study, we determined the complete nucleotide sequences of four IncHI1 plasmids transferring resistance to antibiotics by two different next generation sequencing protocols and protein expression by mass spectrometry. Sequence data including additional 11 IncHI1 plasmids from GenBank were used for the definition of the IncHI1 plasmid core-genome and pan-genome. The core-genome consisted of approximately 123 kbp and 122 genes while the total pan-genome represented approximately 600 kbp. When the core-genome sequences were used for multiple alignments, the 15 tested IncHI1 plasmids were separated into two main lineages. GC content in core-genome genes was around 46% and 50% in accessory genome genes. A multidrug resistance region present in all 4 sequenced plasmids extended over 20 kbp and, except for tet(B), the genes responsible for antibiotic resistance were those with the highest GC content. IncHI1 plasmids therefore represent replicons that evolved in low GC content bacteria. From their original host, they spread to Salmonella and during this spread these plasmids acquired multiple accessory genes including those coding for antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic-resistance genes belonged to genes with the highest level of expression and were constitutively expressed even in the absence of antibiotics. This is the likely mechanism that facilitates host cell survival when antibiotics suddenly emerge in the environment.

  5. Formation of irregular giant peroxisomes by overproduction of the crystalloid core protein methanol oxidase in the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha.

    PubMed Central

    Roggenkamp, R; Didion, T; Kowallik, K V

    1989-01-01

    The crystalloid core in peroxisomes of the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha is composed of the octameric flavoprotein methanol oxidase (MOX). We transformed yeast cells with a high-copy-number vector harboring the cloned MOX gene in order to study the effects on regulation, protein import, and peroxisome biosynthesis. In transformed wild-type cells, no increase in expression of MOX was detectable. Mutants defective in MOX activity were isolated by a specific selection procedure. Two structural MOX mutants are described that allow overproduction of a fully active enzyme upon transformation at quantities of about two-thirds of the total cellular protein. The overproduced protein was imported into peroxisomes, altering their morphology (in thin sections) and stability in cell lysates; the organelles showed a tendency to form rectangular bodies, and their lumina were completely filled with the crystalloid structure. The overall size of the peroxisomes was increased severalfold in comparison with the size of nontransformed yeast cells. The results suggest high capacities of peroxisomal growth conferred by overproduction and import of a single protein. Images PMID:2657394

  6. CCN: core regulatory proteins in the microenvironment that affect the metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Qingan; Dong, Qiongzhu; Qin, Lunxiu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) results from an underlying chronic liver inflammatory disease, such as chronic hepatitis B or C virus infections, and the general prognosis of patients with HCC still remains extremely dismal because of the high frequency of HCC metastases. Throughout the process of tumor metastasis, tumor cells constantly communicate with the surrounding microenvironment and improve their malignant phenotype. Therefore, there is a strong rationale for targeting the tumor microenvironment as primary treatment of HCC therapies. Recently, CCN family proteins have emerged as localized multitasking signal integrators in the inflammatory microenvironment. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of CCN family proteins in inflammation and the tumor. We also propose that the CCN family proteins may play a central role in signaling the tumor microenvironment and regulating the metastasis of HCC. PMID:26497214

  7. A Conserved Hydrophobic Core in Gαi1 Regulates G Protein Activation and Release from Activated Receptor.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Ali I; Lokits, Alyssa D; Gilbert, James A; Iverson, T M; Meiler, Jens; Hamm, Heidi E

    2016-09-01

    G protein-coupled receptor-mediated heterotrimeric G protein activation is a major mode of signal transduction in the cell. Previously, we and other groups reported that the α5 helix of Gαi1, especially the hydrophobic interactions in this region, plays a key role during nucleotide release and G protein activation. To further investigate the effect of this hydrophobic core, we disrupted it in Gαi1 by inserting 4 alanine amino acids into the α5 helix between residues Gln(333) and Phe(334) (Ins4A). This extends the length of the α5 helix without disturbing the β6-α5 loop interactions. This mutant has high basal nucleotide exchange activity yet no receptor-mediated activation of nucleotide exchange. By using structural approaches, we show that this mutant loses critical hydrophobic interactions, leading to significant rearrangements of side chain residues His(57), Phe(189), Phe(191), and Phe(336); it also disturbs the rotation of the α5 helix and the π-π interaction between His(57) and Phe(189) In addition, the insertion mutant abolishes G protein release from the activated receptor after nucleotide binding. Our biochemical and computational data indicate that the interactions between α5, α1, and β2-β3 are not only vital for GDP release during G protein activation, but they are also necessary for proper GTP binding (or GDP rebinding). Thus, our studies suggest that this hydrophobic interface is critical for accurate rearrangement of the α5 helix for G protein release from the receptor after GTP binding.

  8. Deletion of core components of the plastid protein import machinery causes differential arrest of embryo development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hust, B; Gutensohn, M

    2006-01-01

    Among the genes that have recently been pinpointed to be essential for plant embryo development a large number encodes plastid proteins suggesting that embryogenesis is linked to plastid localized processes. However, nuclear encoded plastid proteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytosol and subsequently have to be transported across the plastid envelopes by a complex import machinery. We supposed that deletion of components of this machinery should allow a more general assessment of the role of plastids in embryogenesis since it will not only affect single proteins but instead inhibit the accumulation of most plastid proteins. Here we have characterized three Arabidopsis thaliana mutants lacking core components of the Toc complex, the protein translocase in the outer plastid envelope membrane, which indeed show embryo lethal phenotypes. Remarkably, embryo development in the atToc75-III mutant, lacking the pore forming component of the translocase, was arrested extremely early at the two-cell stage. In contrast, despite the complete or almost complete lack of the import receptors Toc34 and Toc159, embryo development in the a tToc33/34 and atToc132/159 mutants proceeded slowly and was arrested later at the transition to the globular and the heart stage, respectively. These data demonstrate a strict dependence of cell division and embryo development on functional plastids as well as specific functions of plastids at different stages of embryogenesis. In addition, our analysis suggest that not all components of the translocase are equally essential for plastid protein import in vivo. PMID:16435266

  9. Elastin-based protein polymer nanoparticles carrying drug at both corona and core suppress tumor growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Pu; Aluri, Suhaas; Lin, Yi-An; Shah, Mihir; Edman-Woolcott, Maria; Dhandhukia, Jugal; Cui, Honggang; MacKay, J. Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Numerous nanocarriers of small molecules depend on either non-specific physical encapsulation or direct covalent linkage. In contrast, this manuscript explores an alternative encapsulation strategy based on high-specificity avidity between a small molecule drug and its cognate protein target fused to the corona of protein polymer nanoparticles. With the new strategy, the drug associates tightly to the carrier and releases slowly, which may decrease toxicity and promote tumor accumulation via the enhanced permeability and retention effect. To test this hypothesis, the drug Rapamycin (Rapa) was selected for its potent anti-proliferative properties, which give it immunosuppressant and anti-tumor activity. Despite its potency, Rapa has low solubility, low oral bioavailability, and rapid systemic clearance, which make it an excellent candidate for nanoparticulate drug delivery. To explore this approach, genetically engineered diblock copolymers were constructed from elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) that assemble small (<100 nm) nanoparticles. ELPs are protein polymers of the sequence (Val-Pro-Gly-Xaa-Gly)n, where the identity of Xaa and n determine their assembly properties. Initially, a screening assay for model drug encapsulation in ELP nanoparticles was developed, which showed that Rose Bengal and Rapa have high non-specific encapsulation in the core of ELP nanoparticles with a sequence where Xaa = Ile or Phe. While excellent at entrapping these drugs, their release was relatively fast (2.2 h half-life) compared to their intended mean residence time in the human body. Having determined that Rapa can be non-specifically entrapped in the core of ELP nanoparticles, FK506 binding protein 12 (FKBP), which is the cognate protein target of Rapa, was genetically fused to the surface of these nanoparticles (FSI) to enhance their avidity towards Rapa. The fusion of FKBP to these nanoparticles slowed the terminal half-life of drug release to 57.8 h. To determine if this class

  10. Optimisation of Downscaled Tandem Affinity Purifications to Identify Core Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Haura, Eric B.; Sacco, Roberto; Li, Jiannong; Müller, André C.; Grebien, Florian; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Bennett, Keiryn L.

    2013-01-01

    In this study we show that via stable, retroviral-expression of tagged EGFR del (L747-S752 deletion mutant) in the PC9 lung cancer cell line and stable doxycycline-inducible expression of tagged Grb2 using a Flp-mediated recombination HEK293 cell system, the SH-TAP can be downscaled to 5 to 12.5 mg total protein input (equivalent to 0.5 - 1 × 15 cm culture plate or 4 - 8 × 106 cells). The major constituents of the EGFR del complex (USB3B, GRB2, ERRFI, HSP7C, GRP78, HSP71) and the Grb2 complex (ARHG5, SOS1, ARG35, CBL, CBLB, PTPRA, SOS2, DYN2, WIPF2, IRS4) were identified. Adjustment of the quantity of digested protein injected into the mass spectrometer reveals that optimisation is required as high quantities of material led to a decrease in protein sequence coverage and the loss of some interacting proteins. This investigation should aid other researchers in performing tandem affinity purifications in general, and in particular, from low quantities of input material. PMID:24077984

  11. Inhibitory effect of miR-125b on hepatitis C virus core protein-induced TLR2/MyD88 signaling in THP-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Cheng; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Wen-Jing; Jie, Sheng-Hua; Tong, Qiao-Xia; Lu, Meng-Ji; Yang, Dong-Liang

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of miR-125b in regulating monocyte immune responses induced by hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein. METHODS: Monocytic THP-1 cells were treated with various concentrations of recombinant HCV core protein, and cytokines and miR-125b expression in these cells were analyzed. The requirement of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) or MyD88 gene for HCV core protein-induced immune responses was determined by the transfection of THP-1 cells with gene knockdown vectors expressing either TLR2 siRNA or MyD88 siRNA. The effect of miR-125b overexpression on TLR2/MyD88 signaling was examined by transfecting THP-1 cells with miR-125b mimic RNA oligos. RESULTS: In response to HCV core protein stimulation, cytokine production was up-regulated and miR-125b expression was down-regulated in THP-1 cells. The modulatory effect of HCV core protein on cellular events was dose-dependent and required functional TLR2 or MyD88 gene. Forced miR-125b expression abolished the HCV core protein-induced enhancement of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-10 expression by 66%, 54%, and 66%, respectively (P < 0.001), by inhibiting MyD88-mediated signaling, including phosphorylation of NF-κBp65, ERK, and P38. CONCLUSION: The inverse correlation between miR-125b and cytokine expression after HCV core challenge suggests that miR-125b may negatively regulate HCV-induced immune responses by targeting TLR2/MyD88 signaling in monocytes. PMID:27158204

  12. Regulated transport into the nucleus of herpesviridae DNA replication core proteins.

    PubMed

    Gualtiero, Alvisi; Jans, David A; Camozzi, Daria; Avanzi, Simone; Loregian, Arianna; Ripalti, Alessandro; Palù, Giorgio

    2013-09-16

    The Herpesvirdae family comprises several major human pathogens belonging to three distinct subfamilies. Their double stranded DNA genome is replicated in the nuclei of infected cells by a number of host and viral products. Among the latter the viral replication complex, whose activity is strictly required for viral replication, is composed of six different polypeptides, including a two-subunit DNA polymerase holoenzyme, a trimeric primase/helicase complex and a single stranded DNA binding protein. The study of herpesviral DNA replication machinery is extremely important, both because it provides an excellent model to understand processes related to eukaryotic DNA replication and it has important implications for the development of highly needed antiviral agents. Even though all known herpesviruses utilize very similar mechanisms for amplification of their genomes, the nuclear import of the replication complex components appears to be a heterogeneous and highly regulated process to ensure the correct spatiotemporal localization of each protein. The nuclear transport process of these enzymes is controlled by three mechanisms, typifying the main processes through which protein nuclear import is generally regulated in eukaryotic cells. These include cargo post-translational modification-based recognition by the intracellular transporters, piggy-back events allowing coordinated nuclear import of multimeric holoenzymes, and chaperone-assisted nuclear import of specific subunits. In this review we summarize these mechanisms and discuss potential implications for the development of antiviral compounds aimed at inhibiting the Herpesvirus life cycle by targeting nuclear import of the Herpesvirus DNA replicating enzymes.

  13. Sec59 encodes a membrane protein required for core glycosylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, M; Kepes, F; Schekman, R

    1989-01-01

    When incubated at a restrictive temperature, Saccharomyces cerevisiae sec59 mutant cells accumulate inactive and incompletely glycosylated forms of secretory proteins. Three different secretory polypeptides (invertase, pro-alpha-factor, and pro-carboxypeptidase Y) accumulated within a membrane-bounded organelle, presumably the endoplasmic reticulum, and resisted proteolytic degradation unless the membrane was permeabilized with detergent. Molecular cloning and DNA sequence analysis of the SEC59 gene predicted an extremely hydrophobic protein product of 59 kilodaltons. This prediction was confirmed by reconstitution of the sec59 defect in vitro. The alpha-factor precursor, which was translated in a soluble fraction from wild-type cells, was translocated into, but inefficiently glycosylated within, membranes from sec59 mutant cells. Residual glycosylation activity of membranes of sec59 cells was thermolabile compared with the activity of wild-type membranes. Partial restoration of glycosylation was obtained in reactions that were supplemented with mannose or GDP-mannose, but not those supplemented with other sugar nucleotides. These results were consistent with a role for the Sec59 protein in the transfer of mannose to dolichol-linked oligosaccharide. Images PMID:2657387

  14. Muted protein is involved in the targeting of CD63 to large dense-core vesicles of chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Zhenhua, Hao; Wei, Li

    2016-08-01

    Large dense-core vesicles (LDCVs) are characterized as a class of lysosome-related organelles (LROs), which undergo regulated release and play important roles in development, metabolism and homeostasis. The Muted protein is a subunit of the biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex-1 (BLOC-1), which functions in the biogenesis of lysosomes and LROs. CD63 is a membrane component of lysosomes and LROs. Whether and how CD63 is sorted into LDCVs is largely unknown. In this study, we aim to identify the localization of CD63 in chromaffin cells by colocalization, living cell imaging and cell fractionation. We found that a proportion of CD63-YFP colocalized with NPY-dsRed labeled LDCVs. By sucrose density gradient fractionation, a proportion of CD63 was found to be highly enriched in LDCVs fractions. The Muted mutant mouse is a model of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS). We also found that the level of CD63 was significantly decreased in Muted-deficient adrenal glands, suggesting that the Muted protein is important for the steady-state level of CD63. Our results suggest that CD63 is a membrane component of LDCVs and the stability of CD63 is dependent on the Muted protein, which provides a clue to the pathogenesis of LRO defects in HPS. PMID:27531610

  15. Structure of the protein core of translation initiation factor 2 in apo, GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms

    SciTech Connect

    Simonetti, Angelita; Fabbretti, Attilio; Hazemann, Isabelle; Jenner, Lasse; Gualerzi, Claudio O.; Klaholz, Bruno P.

    2013-06-01

    The crystal structures of the eubacterial translation initiation factor 2 in apo form and with bound GDP and GTP reveal conformational changes upon nucleotide binding and hydrolysis, notably of the catalytically important histidine in the switch II region. Translation initiation factor 2 (IF2) is involved in the early steps of bacterial protein synthesis. It promotes the stabilization of the initiator tRNA on the 30S initiation complex (IC) and triggers GTP hydrolysis upon ribosomal subunit joining. While the structure of an archaeal homologue (a/eIF5B) is known, there are significant sequence and functional differences in eubacterial IF2, while the trimeric eukaryotic IF2 is completely unrelated. Here, the crystal structure of the apo IF2 protein core from Thermus thermophilus has been determined by MAD phasing and the structures of GTP and GDP complexes were also obtained. The IF2–GTP complex was trapped by soaking with GTP in the cryoprotectant. The structures revealed conformational changes of the protein upon nucleotide binding, in particular in the P-loop region, which extend to the functionally relevant switch II region. The latter carries a catalytically important and conserved histidine residue which is observed in different conformations in the GTP and GDP complexes. Overall, this work provides the first crystal structure of a eubacterial IF2 and suggests that activation of GTP hydrolysis may occur by a conformational repositioning of the histidine residue.

  16. Tandem fusion of hepatitis B core antigen allows assembly of virus-like particles in bacteria and plants with enhanced capacity to accommodate foreign proteins.

    PubMed

    Peyret, Hadrien; Gehin, Annick; Thuenemann, Eva C; Blond, Donatienne; El Turabi, Aadil; Beales, Lucy; Clarke, Dean; Gilbert, Robert J C; Fry, Elizabeth E; Stuart, David I; Holmes, Kris; Stonehouse, Nicola J; Whelan, Mike; Rosenberg, William; Lomonossoff, George P; Rowlands, David J

    2015-01-01

    The core protein of the hepatitis B virus, HBcAg, assembles into highly immunogenic virus-like particles (HBc VLPs) when expressed in a variety of heterologous systems. Specifically, the major insertion region (MIR) on the HBcAg protein allows the insertion of foreign sequences, which are then exposed on the tips of surface spike structures on the outside of the assembled particle. Here, we present a novel strategy which aids the display of whole proteins on the surface of HBc particles. This strategy, named tandem core, is based on the production of the HBcAg dimer as a single polypeptide chain by tandem fusion of two HBcAg open reading frames. This allows the insertion of large heterologous sequences in only one of the two MIRs in each spike, without compromising VLP formation. We present the use of tandem core technology in both plant and bacterial expression systems. The results show that tandem core particles can be produced with unmodified MIRs, or with one MIR in each tandem dimer modified to contain the entire sequence of GFP or of a camelid nanobody. Both inserted proteins are correctly folded and the nanobody fused to the surface of the tandem core particle (which we name tandibody) retains the ability to bind to its cognate antigen. This technology paves the way for the display of natively folded proteins on the surface of HBc particles either through direct fusion or through non-covalent attachment via a nanobody. PMID:25830365

  17. A Sulfated Glycosaminoglycan Linkage Region is a Novel Type of Human Natural Killer-1 (HNK-1) Epitope Expressed on Aggrecan in Perineuronal Nets.

    PubMed

    Yabuno, Keiko; Morise, Jyoji; Kizuka, Yasuhiko; Hashii, Noritaka; Kawasaki, Nana; Takahashi, Satoru; Miyata, Shinji; Izumikawa, Tomomi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Takematsu, Hiromu; Oka, Shogo

    2015-01-01

    Human natural killer-1 (HNK-1) carbohydrate (HSO3-3GlcAβ1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc-R) is highly expressed in the brain and required for learning and neural plasticity. We previously demonstrated that expression of the HNK-1 epitope is mostly abolished in knockout mice for GlcAT-P (B3gat1), a major glucuronyltransferase required for HNK-1 biosynthesis, but remained in specific regions such as perineuronal nets (PNNs) in these mutant mice. Considering PNNs are mainly composed of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) and regulate neural plasticity, GlcAT-P-independent expression of HNK-1 in PNNs is suggested to play a role in neural plasticity. However, the function, structure, carrier glycoprotein and biosynthetic pathway for GlcAT-P-irrelevant HNK-1 epitope remain unclear. In this study, we identified a unique HNK-1 structure on aggrecan in PNNs. To determine the biosynthetic pathway for the novel HNK-1, we generated knockout mice for GlcAT-S (B3gat2), the other glucuronyltransferase required for HNK-1 biosynthesis. However, GlcAT-P and GlcAT-S double-knockout mice did not exhibit reduced HNK-1 expression compared with single GlcAT-P-knockout mice, indicating an unusual biosynthetic pathway for the HNK-1 epitope in PNNs. Aggrecan was purified from cultured cells in which GlcAT-P and -S are not expressed and we determined the structure of the novel HNK-1 epitope using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) as a sulfated linkage region of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), HSO3-GlcA-Gal-Gal-Xyl-R. Taken together, we propose a hypothetical model where GlcAT-I, the sole glucuronyltransferase required for synthesis of the GAG linkage, is also responsible for biosynthesis of the novel HNK-1 on aggrecan. These results could lead to discovery of new roles of the HNK-1 epitope in neural plasticity. PMID:26659409

  18. A Sulfated Glycosaminoglycan Linkage Region Is a Novel Type of Human Natural Killer-1 (HNK-1) Epitope Expressed on Aggrecan in Perineuronal Nets

    PubMed Central

    Yabuno, Keiko; Morise, Jyoji; Kizuka, Yasuhiko; Hashii, Noritaka; Kawasaki, Nana; Takahashi, Satoru; Miyata, Shinji; Izumikawa, Tomomi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Takematsu, Hiromu; Oka, Shogo

    2015-01-01

    Human natural killer-1 (HNK-1) carbohydrate (HSO3-3GlcAβ1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc-R) is highly expressed in the brain and required for learning and neural plasticity. We previously demonstrated that expression of the HNK-1 epitope is mostly abolished in knockout mice for GlcAT-P (B3gat1), a major glucuronyltransferase required for HNK-1 biosynthesis, but remained in specific regions such as perineuronal nets (PNNs) in these mutant mice. Considering PNNs are mainly composed of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) and regulate neural plasticity, GlcAT-P-independent expression of HNK-1 in PNNs is suggested to play a role in neural plasticity. However, the function, structure, carrier glycoprotein and biosynthetic pathway for GlcAT-P-irrelevant HNK-1 epitope remain unclear. In this study, we identified a unique HNK-1 structure on aggrecan in PNNs. To determine the biosynthetic pathway for the novel HNK-1, we generated knockout mice for GlcAT-S (B3gat2), the other glucuronyltransferase required for HNK-1 biosynthesis. However, GlcAT-P and GlcAT-S double-knockout mice did not exhibit reduced HNK-1 expression compared with single GlcAT-P-knockout mice, indicating an unusual biosynthetic pathway for the HNK-1 epitope in PNNs. Aggrecan was purified from cultured cells in which GlcAT-P and -S are not expressed and we determined the structure of the novel HNK-1 epitope using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) as a sulfated linkage region of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), HSO3-GlcA-Gal-Gal-Xyl-R. Taken together, we propose a hypothetical model where GlcAT-I, the sole glucuronyltransferase required for synthesis of the GAG linkage, is also responsible for biosynthesis of the novel HNK-1 on aggrecan. These results could lead to discovery of new roles of the HNK-1 epitope in neural plasticity. PMID:26659409

  19. Hepatitis C virus core, NS3, NS4B and NS5A are the major immunogenic proteins in humoral immunity in chronic HCV infection

    PubMed Central

    Sillanpää, Maarit; Melén, Krister; Porkka, Päivi; Fagerlund, Riku; Nevalainen, Kaisu; Lappalainen, Maija; Julkunen, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Background The viral genome of hepatitis C virus constitutes a 9.6-kb single-stranded positive-sense RNA which encodes altogether 11 viral proteins. In order to study the humoral immune responses against different HCV proteins in patients suffering from chronic HCV infection, we produced three structural (core, E1 and E2) and six nonstructural proteins (NS2, NS3, NS4A, NS4B, NS5A and NS5B) in Sf9 insect cells by using the baculovirus expression system. Results The recombinant HCV core, E1, E2, NS2, NS3, NS4A, NS4B, NS5A and NS5B proteins were purified and used in Western blot analysis to determine antibody responses against individual HCV protein in 68 HCV RNA and antibody positive human sera that were obtained from patients suffering from genotype 1, 2, 3 or 4 infection. These sera were also analysed with INNO-LIA Score test for HCV antibodies against core, NS3, NS4AB and NS5A, and the results were similar to the ones obtained by Western blot method. Based on our Western blot analyses we found that the major immunogenic HCV antigens were the core, NS4B, NS3 and NS5A proteins which were recognized in 97%, 86%, 68% and 53% of patient sera, respectively. There were no major genotype specific differences in antibody responses to individual HCV proteins. A common feature within the studied sera was that all except two sera recognized the core protein in high titers, whereas none of the sera recognized NS2 protein and only three sera (from genotype 3) recognised NS5B. Conclusion The data shows significant variation in the specificity in humoral immunity in chronic HCV patients. PMID:19549310

  20. IL-10 plays a central regulatory role in the cytokines induced by hepatitis C virus core protein and polyinosinic acid:polycytodylic acid.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiaoli; Wang, Zhaoxia; Zhai, Naicui; Zhang, Qianqian; Song, Hongxiao; Zhang, Yujiao; Li, Tianyang; Li, Haijun; Su, Lishan; Niu, Junqi; Tu, Zhengkun

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) can cause persistent infection and chronic liver disease, and viral factors are involved in HCV persistence. HCV core protein, a highly conserved viral protein, not only elicits an immunoresponse, but it also regulates it. In addition, HCV core protein interacts with toll-like receptors (TLRs) on monocytes, inducing them to produce cytokines. Polyinosinic acid:polycytodylic acid (polyI:C) is a synthetic analogue of double-stranded RNA that binds to TLR3 and can induce secretion of type I IFN from monocytes. Cytokine response against HCV is likely to affect the natural course of infection as well as HCV persistence. However, possible effects of cytokines induced by HCV core protein and polyI:C remain to be investigated. In this study, we isolated CD14(+) monocytes from healthy donors, cultured them in the presence of HCV core protein and/or polyI:C, and characterized the induced cytokines, phenotypes and mechanisms. We demonstrated that HCV core protein- and polyI:C-stimulated CD14(+) monocytes secreted tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-10, and type I interferon (IFN). Importantly, TNF-α and IL-1β regulated the secretion of IL-10, which then influenced the expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) and subsequently the production of type I IFN. Interestingly, type I IFN also regulated the production of IL-10, which in turn inhibited the nuclear factor (NF)-κB subunit, reducing TNF-α and IL-1β levels. Therefore, IL-10 appears to play a central role in regulating the production of cytokines induced by HCV core protein and polyI:C. PMID:27337528

  1. The repeat domain of the melanosome fibril protein Pmel17 forms the amyloid core promoting melanin synthesis

    PubMed Central

    McGlinchey, Ryan P.; Shewmaker, Frank; McPhie, Peter; Monterroso, Begoña; Thurber, Kent; Wickner, Reed B.

    2009-01-01

    Pmel17 is a melanocyte protein necessary for eumelanin deposition 1 in mammals and found in melanosomes in a filamentous form. The luminal part of human Pmel17 includes a region (RPT) with 10 copies of a partial repeat sequence, pt.e.gttp.qv., known to be essential in vivo for filament formation. We show that this RPT region readily forms amyloid in vitro, but only under the mildly acidic conditions typical of the lysosome-like melanosome lumen, and the filaments quickly become soluble at neutral pH. Under the same mildly acidic conditions, the Pmel filaments promote eumelanin formation. Electron diffraction, circular dichroism, and solid-state NMR studies of Pmel17 filaments show that the structure is rich in beta sheet. We suggest that RPT is the amyloid core domain of the Pmel17 filaments so critical for melanin formation. PMID:19666488

  2. The reovirus M1 gene, encoding a viral core protein, is associated with the myocarditic phenotype of a reovirus variant.

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, B; Fields, B N

    1989-01-01

    Reoviruses contain a genome composed of 10 double-stranded RNA gene segments. A reovirus reassortant, 8B, derived from type 1 Lang (T1L) and type 3 Dearing (T3D), displayed a phenotype unlike that of either of its parents in that it efficiently induced numerous macroscopic external cardiac lesions in neonatal mice (B. Sherry, F. J. Schoen, E. Wenske, and B. N. Fields, J. Virol. 63:4840-4849, 1989). A panel of T1L/T3D reassortants and a panel of reassortants derived from 8B were used to determine whether novel T1L/T3D gene associations in 8B were responsible for its myocarditic phenotype. The results eliminated the possibility that any T1L/T3D gene combination found in 8B, from 2 genes to all 10 genes, was the explanation for its induction of cardiac lesions. This suggested that a mutation(s) in an 8B gene(s) might be responsible for induction of the myocarditis. Statistical analysis of experiments with 31 reassortants derived from 8B revealed a highly significant association (P = 0.002) of the 8B M1 gene with induction of cardiac lesions. The reovirus M1 gene encodes a viral core protein of unknown function, although evidence suggests a potential role in core structure and/or viral RNA synthesis. This represents the first report of the association of a viral gene with induction of myocarditis. PMID:2552158

  3. A 28,000-dalton protein of normal mouse serum binds specifically to the inner core region of bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Brade, L; Brade, H

    1985-12-01

    Normal mouse serum was found to contain a protein, referred to here as factor, which binds to the inner core region of lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) of various bacterial families. Since factor-LPS interactions resulted in activation of guinea pig complement, factor activity could be assayed by a passive hemolysis test with sheep erythrocytes coated with LPS or lipid A from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus (which was found earlier to bind particularly well to factor). Factor was purified by G-50 and hydroxyapatite chromatography whereby the specific hemolytic activity was enriched 1,675-fold. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions revealed the presence of a 28,000-dalton protein as the main band. The identity of this band was determined by absorption experiments with LPS-coated sheep erythrocytes or latex beads, whereby the 28,000-dalton band disappeared after specific absorption and could be recovered from the absorbent. The binding specificity of factor was determined in a passive hemolysis inhibition assay with defined oligosaccharides representative for the inner core region of LPS. Thus, the di- and trisaccharides alpha-D-mannoheptopyranosyl-(1----5)-2-keto-3-deoxy-D-mannoocto nic acid and alpha-D-mannoheptopyranosyl-(1----3)-alpha-D-mannoheptopyranosy l-(1----5)-2- keto-3-deoxy-D-mannooctonic acid, respectively, were able to inhibit binding of factor to LPS. The results are in accordance with our earlier observation that the heptose-2-keto-3-deoxy-D-mannooctonic acid region represents a common antigen of bacterial LPS. Rabbit hyperimmune serum directed against this common antigen and purified factor was found to exhibit the same specificity for LPS. Factor activity was followed in mice in vivo after injection of LPS; it disappeared completely 15 min after the injection of LPS and reappeared within 1 h.

  4. A 28,000-dalton protein of normal mouse serum binds specifically to the inner core region of bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Brade, L; Brade, H

    1985-01-01

    Normal mouse serum was found to contain a protein, referred to here as factor, which binds to the inner core region of lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) of various bacterial families. Since factor-LPS interactions resulted in activation of guinea pig complement, factor activity could be assayed by a passive hemolysis test with sheep erythrocytes coated with LPS or lipid A from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus (which was found earlier to bind particularly well to factor). Factor was purified by G-50 and hydroxyapatite chromatography whereby the specific hemolytic activity was enriched 1,675-fold. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions revealed the presence of a 28,000-dalton protein as the main band. The identity of this band was determined by absorption experiments with LPS-coated sheep erythrocytes or latex beads, whereby the 28,000-dalton band disappeared after specific absorption and could be recovered from the absorbent. The binding specificity of factor was determined in a passive hemolysis inhibition assay with defined oligosaccharides representative for the inner core region of LPS. Thus, the di- and trisaccharides alpha-D-mannoheptopyranosyl-(1----5)-2-keto-3-deoxy-D-mannoocto nic acid and alpha-D-mannoheptopyranosyl-(1----3)-alpha-D-mannoheptopyranosy l-(1----5)-2- keto-3-deoxy-D-mannooctonic acid, respectively, were able to inhibit binding of factor to LPS. The results are in accordance with our earlier observation that the heptose-2-keto-3-deoxy-D-mannooctonic acid region represents a common antigen of bacterial LPS. Rabbit hyperimmune serum directed against this common antigen and purified factor was found to exhibit the same specificity for LPS. Factor activity was followed in mice in vivo after injection of LPS; it disappeared completely 15 min after the injection of LPS and reappeared within 1 h. Images PMID:4066028

  5. Analysis of Coiled-Coil Interactions between Core Proteins of the Spindle Pole Body

    SciTech Connect

    Zizlsperger, N.; Malashkevich, V; Pillay, S; Keating, A

    2008-01-01

    The spindle pole body (SPB) is a multiprotein complex that organizes microtubules in yeast. Due to its large size and association with the nuclear membrane, little is known about its detailed structure. In particular, although many SPB components and some of the interactions between them have been identified, the molecular details of how most of these interactions occur are not known. The prevalence of predicted coiled-coil regions in SPB proteins suggests that some interactions may occur via coiled coils. Here this hypothesis is supported by biochemical characterization of isolated coiled-coil peptides derived from SPB proteins. Formation of four strongly self-associating coiled-coil complexes from Spc29, Spc42, and Spc72 was demonstrated by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay. Many weaker self- and heteroassociations were also detected by CD, FRET, and/or cross-linking. The thermal stabilities of nine candidate homooligomers were assessed; six unfolded cooperatively with melting temperatures ranging from <11 to >50 C. Solution studies established that coiled-coil peptides derived from Spc42 and Spc72 form parallel dimers, and this was confirmed for Spc42 by a high-resolution crystal structure. These data contribute to a growing body of knowledge that will ultimately provide a detailed model of the SPB structure.

  6. Conserved function of core clock proteins in the gymnosperm Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst).

    PubMed

    Karlgren, Anna; Gyllenstrand, Niclas; Källman, Thomas; Lagercrantz, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    From studies of the circadian clock in the plant model species Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), a number of important properties and components have emerged. These include the genes CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (CCA1), GIGANTEA (GI), ZEITLUPE (ZTL) and TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION 1 (TOC1 also known as PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR 1 (PRR1)) that via gene expression feedback loops participate in the circadian clock. Here, we present results from ectopic expression of four Norway spruce (Picea abies) putative homologs (PaCCA1, PaGI, PaZTL and PaPRR1) in Arabidopsis, their flowering time, circadian period length, red light response phenotypes and their effect on endogenous clock genes were assessed. For PaCCA1-ox and PaZTL-ox the results were consistent with Arabidopsis lines overexpressing the corresponding Arabidopsis genes. For PaGI consistent results were obtained when expressed in the gi2 mutant, while PaGI and PaPRR1 expressed in wild type did not display the expected phenotypes. These results suggest that protein function of PaCCA1, PaGI and PaZTL are at least partly conserved compared to Arabidopsis homologs, however further studies are needed to reveal the protein function of PaPRR1. Our data suggest that components of the three-loop network typical of the circadian clock in angiosperms were present before the split of gymnosperms and angiosperms.

  7. Role of Decorin Core Protein in Collagen Organisation in Congenital Stromal Corneal Dystrophy (CSCD)

    PubMed Central

    Kamma-Lorger, Christina S.; Pinali, Christian; Martínez, Juan Carlos; Harris, Jon; Young, Robert D.; Bredrup, Cecilie; Crosas, Eva; Malfois, Marc; Rødahl, Eyvind

    2016-01-01

    The role of Decorin in organising the extracellular matrix was examined in normal human corneas and in corneas from patients with Congenital Stromal Corneal Dystrophy (CSCD). In CSCD, corneal clouding occurs due to a truncating mutation (c.967delT) in the decorin (DCN) gene. Normal human Decorin protein and the truncated one were reconstructed in silico using homology modelling techniques to explore structural changes in the diseased protein. Corneal CSCD specimens were also examined using 3-D electron tomography and Small Angle X-ray diffraction (SAXS), to image the collagen-proteoglycan arrangement and to quantify fibrillar diameters, respectively. Homology modelling showed that truncated Decorin had a different spatial geometry to the normal one, with the truncation removing a major part of the site that interacts with collagen, compromising its ability to bind effectively. Electron tomography showed regions of abnormal stroma, where collagen fibrils came together to form thicker fibrillar structures, showing that Decorin plays a key role in the maintenance of the order in the normal corneal extracellular matrix. Average diameter of individual fibrils throughout the thickness of the cornea however remained normal. PMID:26828927

  8. Conserved Function of Core Clock Proteins in the Gymnosperm Norway Spruce (Picea abies L. Karst)

    PubMed Central

    Karlgren, Anna; Gyllenstrand, Niclas; Källman, Thomas; Lagercrantz, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    From studies of the circadian clock in the plant model species Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), a number of important properties and components have emerged. These include the genes CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (CCA1), GIGANTEA (GI), ZEITLUPE (ZTL) and TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION 1 (TOC1 also known as PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR 1 (PRR1)) that via gene expression feedback loops participate in the circadian clock. Here, we present results from ectopic expression of four Norway spruce (Picea abies) putative homologs (PaCCA1, PaGI, PaZTL and PaPRR1) in Arabidopsis, their flowering time, circadian period length, red light response phenotypes and their effect on endogenous clock genes were assessed. For PaCCA1-ox and PaZTL-ox the results were consistent with Arabidopsis lines overexpressing the corresponding Arabidopsis genes. For PaGI consistent results were obtained when expressed in the gi2 mutant, while PaGI and PaPRR1 expressed in wild type did not display the expected phenotypes. These results suggest that protein function of PaCCA1, PaGI and PaZTL are at least partly conserved compared to Arabidopsis homologs, however further studies are needed to reveal the protein function of PaPRR1. Our data suggest that components of the three-loop network typical of the circadian clock in angiosperms were present before the split of gymnosperms and angiosperms. PMID:23555899

  9. The Dense Core Vesicle Protein IA-2, but not IA-2β, is Required for Active Avoidance Learning

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Gilberto Nepthali; Nishimura, Takuya; Schindler, Charles Weber; Panlilio, Leigh Vincent; Notkins, Abner Louis

    2014-01-01

    The islet-antigens IA-2 and IA-2β are major autoantigens in type-1 diabetes and transmembrane proteins in dense core vesicles (DCV). Recently we showed that deletion of both IA-2 and IA-2β alters the secretion of hormones and neurotransmitters and impairs behavior and learning. The present study was designed to evaluate the contribution to learning of each of these genes by using single knockout (SKO) and double knockout (DKO) mice in an active avoidance test. After 5 days of training, wild type (WT) mice showed 60–70% active avoidance responses, whereas the DKO mice showed only 10–15% active avoidance responses. The degree of active avoidance responses in the IA-2 SKO mice was similar to that of the DKO mice, but in contrast, the IA-2β SKO mice behaved like WT mice showing 60–70% active avoidance responses. Molecular studies revealed a marked decrease in the phosphorylation of the cAMP Response Element-Binding Protein (CREB) and Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II (CAMKII) in the striatum and hippocampus of the IA-2 SKO and DKO mice, but not in the IA-2β SKO mice. To evaluate the role of CREB and CAMKII in the SKO and DKO mice, GBR-12909, which selectively blocks the dopamine uptake transporter and increases CREB and CAMKII phosphorylation, was administered. GBR-12909 restored the phosphorylation of CREB and CAMKII and increased active avoidance learning in the DKO and IA-2 SKO to near the normal levels found in the WT and IA-2β SKO mice. We conclude that in the absence of the DCV protein IA-2, active avoidance learning is impaired. PMID:24662847

  10. The dense core vesicle protein IA-2, but not IA-2β, is required for active avoidance learning.

    PubMed

    Carmona, G N; Nishimura, T; Schindler, C W; Panlilio, L V; Notkins, A L

    2014-06-01

    The islet-antigens IA-2 and IA-2β are major autoantigens in type-1 diabetes and transmembrane proteins in dense core vesicles (DCV). Recently we showed that deletion of both IA-2 and IA-2β alters the secretion of hormones and neurotransmitters and impairs behavior and learning. The present study was designed to evaluate the contribution to learning of each of these genes by using single knockout (SKO) and double knockout (DKO) mice in an active avoidance test. After 5 days of training, wild-type (WT) mice showed 60-70% active avoidance responses, whereas the DKO mice showed only 10-15% active avoidance responses. The degree of active avoidance responses in the IA-2 SKO mice was similar to that of the DKO mice, but in contrast, the IA-2β SKO mice behaved like WT mice showing 60-70% active avoidance responses. Molecular studies revealed a marked decrease in the phosphorylation of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CAMKII) in the striatum and hippocampus of the IA-2 SKO and DKO mice, but not in the IA-2β SKO mice. To evaluate the role of CREB and CAMKII in the SKO and DKO mice, GBR-12909, which selectively blocks the dopamine uptake transporter and increases CREB and CAMKII phosphorylation, was administered. GBR-12909 restored the phosphorylation of CREB and CAMKII and increased active avoidance learning in the DKO and IA-2 SKO to near the normal levels found in the WT and IA-2β SKO mice. We conclude that in the absence of the DCV protein IA-2, active avoidance learning is impaired.

  11. A Single Amino Acid Substitution in the Core Protein of West Nile Virus Increases Resistance to Acidotropic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Acebes, Miguel A.; Blázquez, Ana-Belén; de Oya, Nereida Jiménez; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Shi, Pei-Yong; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2013-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a worldwide distributed mosquito-borne flavivirus that naturally cycles between birds and mosquitoes, although it can infect multiple vertebrate hosts including horses and humans. This virus is responsible for recurrent epidemics of febrile illness and encephalitis, and has recently become a global concern. WNV requires to transit through intracellular acidic compartments at two different steps to complete its infectious cycle. These include fusion between the viral envelope and the membrane of endosomes during viral entry, and virus maturation in the trans-Golgi network. In this study, we followed a genetic approach to study the connections between viral components and acidic pH. A WNV mutant with increased resistance to the acidotropic compound NH4Cl, which blocks organelle acidification and inhibits WNV infection, was selected. Nucleotide sequencing revealed that this mutant displayed a single amino acid substitution (Lys 3 to Glu) on the highly basic internal capsid or core (C) protein. The functional role of this replacement was confirmed by its introduction into a WNV infectious clone. This single amino acid substitution also increased resistance to other acidification inhibitor (concanamycin A) and induced a reduction of the neurovirulence in mice. Interestingly, a naturally occurring accompanying mutation found on prM protein abolished the resistant phenotype, supporting the idea of a genetic crosstalk between the internal C protein and the external glycoproteins of the virion. The findings here reported unveil a non-previously assessed connection between the C viral protein and the acidic pH necessary for entry and proper exit of flaviviruses. PMID:23874963

  12. A single amino acid substitution in the core protein of West Nile virus increases resistance to acidotropic compounds.

    PubMed

    Martín-Acebes, Miguel A; Blázquez, Ana-Belén; de Oya, Nereida Jiménez; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Shi, Pei-Yong; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2013-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a worldwide distributed mosquito-borne flavivirus that naturally cycles between birds and mosquitoes, although it can infect multiple vertebrate hosts including horses and humans. This virus is responsible for recurrent epidemics of febrile illness and encephalitis, and has recently become a global concern. WNV requires to transit through intracellular acidic compartments at two different steps to complete its infectious cycle. These include fusion between the viral envelope and the membrane of endosomes during viral entry, and virus maturation in the trans-Golgi network. In this study, we followed a genetic approach to study the connections between viral components and acidic pH. A WNV mutant with increased resistance to the acidotropic compound NH4Cl, which blocks organelle acidification and inhibits WNV infection, was selected. Nucleotide sequencing revealed that this mutant displayed a single amino acid substitution (Lys 3 to Glu) on the highly basic internal capsid or core (C) protein. The functional role of this replacement was confirmed by its introduction into a WNV infectious clone. This single amino acid substitution also increased resistance to other acidification inhibitor (concanamycin A) and induced a reduction of the neurovirulence in mice. Interestingly, a naturally occurring accompanying mutation found on prM protein abolished the resistant phenotype, supporting the idea of a genetic crosstalk between the internal C protein and the external glycoproteins of the virion. The findings here reported unveil a non-previously assessed connection between the C viral protein and the acidic pH necessary for entry and proper exit of flaviviruses.

  13. Subunit Protein Vaccine Delivery System for Tuberculosis Based on Hepatitis B Virus Core VLP (HBc-VLP) Particles.

    PubMed

    Dhanasooraj, Dhananjayan; Kumar, R Ajay; Mundayoor, Sathish

    2016-01-01

    Despite the development of modern medicine, tuberculosis (TB), caused by the pathogenic bacterium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), remains one of the deadliest diseases. This bacterium can lay dormant in individuals and get activated when immunity goes down and has also shown considerable prowess in mutating into drug resistant forms. The global emergence of such drug resistant Mtb and the lack of efficacy of Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG), the only vaccine available so far, have resulted in a situation which cries out for a safe and effective tuberculosis vaccine.Number of different strategies has been used for developing new anti-TB vaccines and several protective antigens have been identified so far. One strategy, the use of protein subunits, has the potential to develop into a powerful tuberculosis vaccine, not only because of its efficacy and safety, but also because they are economical. The proper delivery of protein subunit vaccines with adjuvants or novel delivery systems is necessary for inducing protective immune responses. The available adjuvants or delivery systems are inadequate for generating such a response. In the present method, we have constructed a vaccine delivery system for tuberculosis based on Virus-Like Particles (VLPs). Hepatitis B Virus core antigen gene was recombinantly modified using Overlap Extension PCR (OEPCR). The final construct was designed to express HBc-VLP carrying external antigen (fusion VLP). Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen CFP-10 was used for the construction of fusion VLP. The recombinant gene for the construct was cloned into a pET expression system and transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3) and induced with IPTG to express the protein. The fusion protein was purified using the Histidine tag and allowed to form VLPs. The preformed VLPs were purified by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The VLPs were characterized using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). PMID:27076312

  14. Protein-Protein Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Analysis of Nucleosome Core Particles Containing H2A and H2A.Z

    PubMed Central

    Hoch, Duane A.; Stratton, Jessica J.; Gloss, Lisa M.

    2007-01-01

    A protein-protein Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) system, employing probes at multiple positions, was designed to specifically monitor the dissociation of the H2A-H2B dimer from the nucleosome core particle (NCP). Tryptophan donors and Cys-AEDANS acceptors were chosen because, in comparison to fluorophores used in previous NCP FRET studies, they: 1) are smaller and less hydrophobic which should minimize perturbations of histone and NCP structure; and 2) have an R0 of 20 Å, which is much less than the dimensions of the NCP (~50 Å width and ~100 Å diameter). CD and FL equilibrium protein unfolding titrations indicate that the donor and acceptor moieties have minimal effects on the stability of the H2A-H2B dimer and (H3-H4)2 tetramer. NCPs containing the various FRET pairs were reconstituted with the 601 artificial positioning DNA sequence. Equilibrium NaCl-induced dissociation of the modified NCPs showed that the 601 sequence stabilized the NCP to dimer dissociation as compared to previous studies using weaker positioning sequences. This finding implies a significant role for the H2A-H2B dimers in determining the DNA sequence dependence of NCP stability. The free energy of dissociation determined from reversible and well-defined sigmoidal transitions revealed two distinct phases reflecting the dissociation of each H2A-H2B dimer, confirming cooperativity in dimer dissociation. While cooperativity in the association/dissociation of the H2A-H2B dimers has been suggested previously, these data allow its quantitative description. The protein-protein FRET system was then used to study the effects of the histone variant H2A.Z on NCP stability; previous studies have reported both destabilizing and stabilizing effects. Comparison of the H2A and H2A.Z FRET NCP dissociation transitions suggest a slight increase in stability but a significant increase in cooperativity for dimer dissociation from H2A.Z NCPs. Thus, the utility of this protein-protein FRET system to

  15. Genetically programmable thermoresponsive plasmonic gold/silk-elastin protein core/shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yinan; Xia, Xiaoxia; Wang, Ming; Wang, Qianrui; An, Bo; Tao, Hu; Xu, Qiaobing; Omenetto, Fiorenzo; Kaplan, David L

    2014-04-22

    The design and development of future molecular photonic/electronic systems pose the challenge of integrating functional molecular building blocks in a controlled, tunable, and reproducible manner. The modular nature and fidelity of the biosynthesis method provides a unique chemistry approach to one-pot synthesis of environmental factor-responsive chimeric proteins capable of energy conversion between the desired forms. In this work, facile tuning of dynamic thermal response in plasmonic nanoparticles was facilitated by genetic engineering of the structure, size, and self-assembly of the shell silk-elastin-like protein polymers (SELPs). Recombinant DNA techniques were implemented to synthesize a new family of SELPs, S4E8Gs, with amino acid repeats of [(GVGVP)4(GGGVP)(GVGVP)3(GAGAGS)4] and tunable molecular weight. The temperature-reversible conformational switching between the hydrophilic random coils and the hydrophobic β-turns in the elastin blocks were programmed to between 50 and 60 °C by site-specific glycine mutation, as confirmed by variable-temperature proton NMR and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, to trigger the nanoparticle aggregation. The dynamic self-aggregation/disaggregation of the Au-SELPs nanoparticles was regulated in size and pattern by the β-sheet-forming, thermally stable silk blocks, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The thermally reversible, shell dimension dependent, interparticle plasmon coupling was investigated by both variable-temperature UV-vis spectroscopy and finite-difference time-domain (FDTD)-based simulations. Good agreement between the calculated and measured spectra sheds light on design and synthesis of responsive plasmonic nanostructures by independently tuning the refractive index and size of the SELPs through genetic engineering. PMID:24712906

  16. Genetically Programmable Thermoresponsive Plasmonic Gold/Silk-Elastin Protein Core/Shell Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The design and development of future molecular photonic/electronic systems pose the challenge of integrating functional molecular building blocks in a controlled, tunable, and reproducible manner. The modular nature and fidelity of the biosynthesis method provides a unique chemistry approach to one-pot synthesis of environmental factor-responsive chimeric proteins capable of energy conversion between the desired forms. In this work, facile tuning of dynamic thermal response in plasmonic nanoparticles was facilitated by genetic engineering of the structure, size, and self-assembly of the shell silk-elastin-like protein polymers (SELPs). Recombinant DNA techniques were implemented to synthesize a new family of SELPs, S4E8Gs, with amino acid repeats of [(GVGVP)4(GGGVP)(GVGVP)3(GAGAGS)4] and tunable molecular weight. The temperature-reversible conformational switching between the hydrophilic random coils and the hydrophobic β-turns in the elastin blocks were programmed to between 50 and 60 °C by site-specific glycine mutation, as confirmed by variable-temperature proton NMR and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, to trigger the nanoparticle aggregation. The dynamic self-aggregation/disaggregation of the Au-SELPs nanoparticles was regulated in size and pattern by the β-sheet-forming, thermally stable silk blocks, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The thermally reversible, shell dimension dependent, interparticle plasmon coupling was investigated by both variable-temperature UV–vis spectroscopy and finite-difference time-domain (FDTD)-based simulations. Good agreement between the calculated and measured spectra sheds light on design and synthesis of responsive plasmonic nanostructures by independently tuning the refractive index and size of the SELPs through genetic engineering. PMID:24712906

  17. Identification and targeting of an interaction between a tyrosine motif within hepatitis C virus core protein and AP2M1 essential for viral assembly.

    PubMed

    Neveu, Gregory; Barouch-Bentov, Rina; Ziv-Av, Amotz; Gerber, Doron; Jacob, Yves; Einav, Shirit

    2012-01-01

    Novel therapies are urgently needed against hepatitis C virus infection (HCV), a major global health problem. The current model of infectious virus production suggests that HCV virions are assembled on or near the surface of lipid droplets, acquire their envelope at the ER, and egress through the secretory pathway. The mechanisms of HCV assembly and particularly the role of viral-host protein-protein interactions in mediating this process are, however, poorly understood. We identified a conserved heretofore unrecognized YXXΦ motif (Φ is a bulky hydrophobic residue) within the core protein. This motif is homologous to sorting signals within host cargo proteins known to mediate binding of AP2M1, the μ subunit of clathrin adaptor protein complex 2 (AP-2), and intracellular trafficking. Using microfluidics affinity analysis, protein-fragment complementation assays, and co-immunoprecipitations in infected cells, we show that this motif mediates core binding to AP2M1. YXXΦ mutations, silencing AP2M1 expression or overexpressing a dominant negative AP2M1 mutant had no effect on HCV RNA replication, however, they dramatically inhibited intra- and extracellular infectivity, consistent with a defect in viral assembly. Quantitative confocal immunofluorescence analysis revealed that core's YXXΦ motif mediates recruitment of AP2M1 to lipid droplets and that the observed defect in HCV assembly following disruption of core-AP2M1 binding correlates with accumulation of core on lipid droplets, reduced core colocalization with E2 and reduced core localization to trans-Golgi network (TGN), the presumed site of viral particles maturation. Furthermore, AAK1 and GAK, serine/threonine kinases known to stimulate binding of AP2M1 to host cargo proteins, regulate core-AP2M1 binding and are essential for HCV assembly. Last, approved anti-cancer drugs that inhibit AAK1 or GAK not only disrupt core-AP2M1 binding, but also significantly inhibit HCV assembly and infectious virus production

  18. Difference in fibril core stability between two tau four-repeat domain proteins: a hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry study.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Gayathri; Udgaonkar, Jayant B

    2013-12-10

    One of the signatures of Alzheimer's disease and tauopathies is fibrillization of the microtubule-associated protein tau. The purpose of this study was to compare the high-resolution structure of fibrils formed by two different tau four-repeat domain constructs, tau4RD and tauK18, using hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry as a tool. While the two fibrils are found to be constructed on similar structural principles, the tauK18 fibril has a slightly more stable core. This difference in fibril core stability appears to be reflective of the mechanistic differences in the aggregation pathways of the two proteins. PMID:24256615

  19. Coat Protein-Dependent Behavior of Poly(ethylene glycol) Tails in Iron Oxide Core Virus-like Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Malyutin, Andrey G; Cheng, Hu; Sanchez-Felix, Olivia R; Carlson, Kenneth; Stein, Barry D; Konarev, Petr V; Svergun, Dmitri I; Dragnea, Bogdan; Bronstein, Lyudmila M

    2015-06-10

    Here we explore the formation of virus-like nanoparticles (VNPs) utilizing 22-24 nm iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) as cores and proteins derived from viral capsids of brome mosaic virus (BMV) or hepatitis B virus (HBV) as shells. To accomplish that, hydrophobic FeO/Fe3O4 NPs prepared by thermal decomposition of iron oleate were coated with poly(maleic acid-alt-octadecene) modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) tails of different lengths and grafting densities. MRI studies show high r2/r1 relaxivity ratios of these NPs that are practically independent of the polymer coating type. The versatility and flexibility of the viral capsid protein are on display as they readily form shells that exceed their native size. The location of the long PEG tails upon shell formation was investigated by electron microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. PEG tails were located differently in the BMV and HBV VNPs, with the BMV VNPs preferentially entrapping the tails in the interior and the HBV VNPs allowing the tails to extend through the capsid, which highlights the differences between intersubunit interactions in these two icosahedral viruses. The robustness of the assembly reaction and the protruding PEG tails, potentially useful in modulating the immune response, make the systems introduced here a promising platform for biomedical applications. PMID:25989427

  20. Different intracellular distribution of avian reovirus core protein sigmaA in cells of avian and mammalian origin

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez-Iglesias, Lorena; Lostale-Seijo, Irene; Martinez-Costas, Jose; Benavente, Javier

    2012-10-25

    A comparative analysis of the intracellular distribution of avian reovirus (ARV) core protein sigmaA in cells of avian and mammalian origin revealed that, whereas the viral protein accumulates in the cytoplasm and nucleolus of avian cells, most sigmaA concentrates in the nucleoplasm of mammalian cells in tight association with the insoluble nuclear matrix fraction. Our results further showed that sigmaA becomes arrested in the nucleoplasm of mammalian cells via association with mammalian cell-specific factors and that this association prevents nucleolar targeting. Inhibition of RNA polymerase II activity, but not of RNA polymerase I activity, in infected mammalian cells induces nucleus-to-cytoplasm sigmaA translocation through a CRM1- and RanGTP-dependent mechanism, yet a heterokaryon assay suggests that sigmaA does not shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm. The scarcity of sigmaA in cytoplasmic viral factories of infected mammalian cells could be one of the factors contributing to limited ARV replication in mammalian cells.

  1. Identifying the lowest electronic states of the chlorophylls in the CP47 core antenna protein of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    De Weerd, Frank L; Palacios, Miguel A; Andrizhiyevskaya, Elena G; Dekker, Jan P; Van Grondelle, Rienk

    2002-12-24

    CP47 is a pigment-protein complex in the core of photosystem II that tranfers excitation energy to the reaction center. Here we report on a spectroscopic investigation of the isolated CP47 complex. By deconvoluting the 77 K absorption and linear dichroism, red-most states at 683 and 690 nm have been identified with oscillator strengths corresponding to approximately 3 and approximately 1 chlorophyll, respectively. Both states contribute to the 4 K emission, and the Stark spectrum shows that they have a large value for the difference polarizability between their ground and excited states. From site-selective polarized triplet-minus-singlet spectra, an excitonic origin for the 683 nm state was found. The red shift of the 690 nm state is most probably due to strong hydrogen bonding to a protein ligand, as follows from the position of the stretch frequency of the chlorophyll 13(1) keto group (1633 cm(-)(1)) in the fluorescence line narrowing spectrum at 4 K upon red-most excitation. We discuss how the 683 and 690 nm states may be linked to specific chlorophylls in the crystal structure [Zouni, A., Witt, H.-T., Kern, J., Fromme, P., Krauss, N., Saenger, W., and Orth, P. (2001) Nature 409, 739-743].

  2. Coevolved Mutations Reveal Distinct Architectures for Two Core Proteins in the Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    PubMed Central

    Pandini, Alessandro; Kleinjung, Jens; Rasool, Shafqat; Khan, Shahid

    2015-01-01

    Switching of bacterial flagellar rotation is caused by large domain movements of the FliG protein triggered by binding of the signal protein CheY to FliM. FliG and FliM form adjacent multi-subunit arrays within the basal body C-ring. The movements alter the interaction of the FliG C-terminal (FliGC) “torque” helix with the stator complexes. Atomic models based on the Salmonella entrovar C-ring electron microscopy reconstruction have implications for switching, but lack consensus on the relative locations of the FliG armadillo (ARM) domains (amino-terminal (FliGN), middle (FliGM) and FliGC) as well as changes during chemotaxis. The generality of the Salmonella model is challenged by the variation in motor morphology and response between species. We studied coevolved residue mutations to determine the unifying elements of switch architecture. Residue interactions, measured by their coevolution, were formalized as a network, guided by structural data. Our measurements reveal a common design with dedicated switch and motor modules. The FliM middle domain (FliMM) has extensive connectivity most simply explained by conserved intra and inter-subunit contacts. In contrast, FliG has patchy, complex architecture. Conserved structural motifs form interacting nodes in the coevolution network that wire FliMM to the FliGC C-terminal, four-helix motor module (C3-6). FliG C3-6 coevolution is organized around the torque helix, differently from other ARM domains. The nodes form separated, surface-proximal patches that are targeted by deleterious mutations as in other allosteric systems. The dominant node is formed by the EHPQ motif at the FliMMFliGM contact interface and adjacent helix residues at a central location within FliGM. The node interacts with nodes in the N-terminal FliGc α-helix triad (ARM-C) and FliGN. ARM-C, separated from C3-6 by the MFVF motif, has poor intra-network connectivity consistent with its variable orientation revealed by structural data. ARM-C could

  3. Coevolved Mutations Reveal Distinct Architectures for Two Core Proteins in the Bacterial Flagellar Motor.

    PubMed

    Pandini, Alessandro; Kleinjung, Jens; Rasool, Shafqat; Khan, Shahid

    2015-01-01

    Switching of bacterial flagellar rotation is caused by large domain movements of the FliG protein triggered by binding of the signal protein CheY to FliM. FliG and FliM form adjacent multi-subunit arrays within the basal body C-ring. The movements alter the interaction of the FliG C-terminal (FliGC) "torque" helix with the stator complexes. Atomic models based on the Salmonella entrovar C-ring electron microscopy reconstruction have implications for switching, but lack consensus on the relative locations of the FliG armadillo (ARM) domains (amino-terminal (FliGN), middle (FliGM) and FliGC) as well as changes during chemotaxis. The generality of the Salmonella model is challenged by the variation in motor morphology and response between species. We studied coevolved residue mutations to determine the unifying elements of switch architecture. Residue interactions, measured by their coevolution, were formalized as a network, guided by structural data. Our measurements reveal a common design with dedicated switch and motor modules. The FliM middle domain (FliMM) has extensive connectivity most simply explained by conserved intra and inter-subunit contacts. In contrast, FliG has patchy, complex architecture. Conserved structural motifs form interacting nodes in the coevolution network that wire FliMM to the FliGC C-terminal, four-helix motor module (C3-6). FliG C3-6 coevolution is organized around the torque helix, differently from other ARM domains. The nodes form separated, surface-proximal patches that are targeted by deleterious mutations as in other allosteric systems. The dominant node is formed by the EHPQ motif at the FliMMFliGM contact interface and adjacent helix residues at a central location within FliGM. The node interacts with nodes in the N-terminal FliGc α-helix triad (ARM-C) and FliGN. ARM-C, separated from C3-6 by the MFVF motif, has poor intra-network connectivity consistent with its variable orientation revealed by structural data. ARM-C could be

  4. The internal organization of mycobacterial partition assembly: does the DNA wrap a protein core?

    PubMed

    Qian, Shuo; Dean, Rebecca; Urban, Volker S; Chaudhuri, Barnali N

    2012-01-01

    Before cell division in many bacteria, the ParBs spread on a large segment of DNA encompassing the origin-proximal parS site(s) to form the partition assembly that participates in chromosome segregation. Little is known about the structural organization of chromosomal partition assembly. We report solution X-ray and neutron scattering data characterizing the size parameters and internal organization of a nucleoprotein assembly formed by the mycobacterial chromosomal ParB and a 120-meric DNA containing a parS-encompassing region from the mycobacterial genome. The cross-sectional radii of gyration and linear mass density describing the rod-like ParB-DNA assembly were determined from solution scattering. A "DNA outside, protein inside" mode of partition assembly organization consistent with the neutron scattering hydrogen/deuterium contrast variation data is discussed. In this organization, the high scattering DNA is positioned towards the outer region of the partition assembly. The new results presented here provide a basis for understanding how ParBs organize the parS-proximal chromosome, thus setting the stage for further interactions with the DNA condensins, the origin tethering factors and the ParA. PMID:23285150

  5. Immunity to malaria elicited by hybrid hepatitis B virus core particles carrying circumsporozoite protein epitopes

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) nucleocapsid antigen (HBcAg) was investigated as a carrier moiety for the immunodominant circumsporozoite (CS) protein repeat epitopes of Plasmodium falciparum and the rodent malaria agent P. berghei. For this purpose hybrid genes coding for [NANP]4 (C75CS2) or [DP4NPN]2 (C75CS1) as internal inserts in HBcAg (between amino acids 75 and 81) were constructed and expressed in recombinant Salmonella typhimurium. The resulting hybrid HBcAg-CS polypeptides purified from S. typhimurium were particulate and displayed CS and HBc antigenicity, however, the HBc antigenicity was reduced compared to native recombinant HBcAg. Immunization of several mouse strains with HBcAg-CS1 and HBcAg-CS2 particles resulted in high titer, P.berghei- or P.falciparum-specific anti-CS antibodies representing all murine immunoglobulin G isotypes. The possible influence of carrier-specific immunosuppression was examined, and preexisting immunity to HBcAg did not significantly affect the immunogenicity of the CS epitopes within HBcAg-CS1 particles. Similarly, the choice of adjuvant did not significantly alter the immunogenicity of HBcAg-CS hybrid particles. Immunization in complete or incomplete Freund's adjuvant or alum resulted in equivalent anti-HBc and anti-CS humoral responses. Examination of T cell recognition of HBcAg-CS particles revealed that HBcAg-specific T cells were universally primed and CS-specific T cells were primed if the insert contained a CS-specific T cell recognition site. This indicates that the internal site in HBcAg is permissive for the inclusion of heterologous pathogen-specific T as well as B cell epitopes. Most importantly, 90 and 100% of BALB/c mice immunized with HBcAg-CS1 particles were protected against a P. berghei challenge infection in two independent experiments. Therefore, hybrid HBcAg-CS particles may represent a useful approach for future malaria vaccine development. PMID:7520465

  6. Protein-protein Förster resonance energy transfer analysis of nucleosome core particles containing H2A and H2A.Z.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Duane A; Stratton, Jessica J; Gloss, Lisa M

    2007-08-24

    A protein-protein Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) system, employing probes at multiple positions, was designed to specifically monitor the dissociation of the H2A-H2B dimer from the nucleosome core particle (NCP). Tryptophan donors and Cys-AEDANS acceptors were chosen because, compared to previous NCP FRET fluorophores, they: (1) are smaller and less hydrophobic, which should minimize perturbations of histone and NCP structure; and (2) have an R0 of 20 A, which is much less than the dimensions of the NCP (approximately 50 A width and approximately 100 A diameter). Equilibrium protein unfolding titrations indicate that the donor and acceptor moieties have minimal effects on the stability of the H2A-H2B dimer and (H3-H4)2 tetramer. NCPs containing the various FRET pairs were reconstituted with the 601 DNA positioning element. Equilibrium NaCl-induced dissociation of the modified NCPs showed that the 601 sequence stabilized the NCP to dimer dissociation relative to weaker positioning sequences. This finding implies a significant role for the H2A-H2B dimers in determining the DNA sequence dependence of NCP stability. The free energy of dissociation determined from reversible and well-defined sigmoidal transitions revealed two distinct phases reflecting the dissociation of individual H2A-H2B dimers, confirming cooperativity as suggested previously; these data allow quantitative description of the cooperativity. The FRET system was then used to study the effects of the histone variant H2A.Z on NCP stability; previous studies have reported both destabilizing and stabilizing effects. H2A.Z FRET NCP dissociation transitions suggest a slight increase in stability but a significant increase in cooperativity of the dimer dissociations. Thus, the utility of this protein-protein FRET system to monitor the effects of histone variants on NCP dynamics has been demonstrated, and the system appears equally well-suited for dissection of the kinetic processes of dimer

  7. Accumulation of p21 proteins at DNA damage sites independent of p53 and core NHEJ factors following irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Manabu; Yutoku, Yasutomo; Koike, Aki

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} p21 accumulated rapidly at laser-irradiated sites via its C-terminal region. {yields} p21 colocalized with the DSB marker {gamma}-H2AX and the DSB sensor Ku80. {yields} Accumulation of p21 is dependent on PCNA, but not p53 and the NHEJ core factors. {yields} Accumulation activity of p21 was conserved among human and animal cells. {yields} p21 is a useful tool as a detection marker of DNA damaged sites. -- Abstract: The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p21 plays key roles in p53-dependent DNA-damage responses, i.e., cell cycle checkpoints, senescence, or apoptosis. p21 might also play a role in DNA repair. p21 foci arise at heavy-ion-irradiated DNA-double-strand break (DSB) sites, which are mainly repaired by nonhomologous DNA-end-joining (NHEJ). However, no mechanisms of p21 accumulation at double-strand break (DSB) sites have been clarified in detail. Recent works indicate that Ku70 and Ku80 are essential for the accumulation of other NHEJ core factors, e.g., DNA-PKcs, XRCC4 and XLF, and other DNA damage response factors, e.g., BRCA1. Here, we show that p21 foci arise at laser-irradiated sites in cells from various tissues from various species. The accumulation of EGFP-p21 was detected in not only normal cells, but also transformed or cancer cells. Our results also showed that EGFP-p21 accumulated rapidly at irradiated sites, and colocalized with the DSB marker {gamma}-H2AX and with the DSB sensor protein Ku80. On the other hand, the accumulation occurred in Ku70-, Ku80-, or DNA-PKcs-deficient cell lines and in human papillomavirus 18-positive cells, whereas the p21 mutant without the PCNA-binding region (EGFP-p21(1-146)) failed to accumulate at the irradiated sites. These findings suggest that the accumulation of p21, but not functional p53 and the NHEJ core factors, is dependent on PCNA. These findings also suggest that the accumulation activity of p21 at DNA damaged sites is conserved among human and animal cells, and p21 is a useful

  8. Cross-linking of soybean protein isolate-chitosan coacervate with transglutaminase utilizing capsanthin as the model core.

    PubMed

    Huang, G Q; Xiao, J X; Qiu, H W; Yang, J

    2014-01-01

    Transglutaminase (TG) is an alternative coacervate cross-linking agent to aldehydes due to its safety. In this work, the cross-linking conditions of soybean protein isolate (SPI)-chitosan coacervates with TG-utilizing capsanthin as the model core were optimized and its cross-linking effectiveness was compared with that of glutaraldehyde. Results indicated that the optimum capsanthin microcapsule cross-linking conditions were as follows: a suspension pH of 6.0, an incubation duration of 3 h, a TG concentration of 18.75 U/g SPI and a reaction temperature of 45 °C. Under these conditions, TG provided a cross-linking effectiveness comparable with that of glutaraldehyde in regards to microcapsule stability against swelling in 80 °C water and heating at 150 °C. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis revealed that TG cross-linking increased the integrity of the microcapsule walls. It was concluded that the SPI-chitosan coacervation pair has potential applications in the food industry in terms of cross-linker safety and effectiveness.

  9. GM-CSF reduces expression of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) core proteins in TGF-β-treated primary astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung-Kyoung; Park, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Kil Hwan; Park, So Ra; Lee, Seok-Geun; Choi, Byung Hyune

    2014-12-01

    GM-CSF plays a role in the nervous system, particularly in cases of injury. A therapeutic effect of GM-CSF has been reported in rat models of various central nervous system injuries. We previously showed that GM-CSF could enhance long-term recovery in a rat spinal cord injury model, inhibiting glial scar formation and increasing the integrity of axonal structure. Here, we investigated molecular the mechanism(s) by which GM-CSF suppressed glial scar formation in an in vitro system using primary astrocytes treated with TGF-β. GM-CSF repressed the expression of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) core proteins in astrocytes treated with TGF-β. GM-CSF also inhibited the TGF-β-induced Rho-ROCK pathway, which is important in CSPG expression. Finally, the inhibitory effect of GM-CSF was blocked by a JAK inhibitor. These results may provide the basis for GM-CSF's effects in glial scar inhibition and ultimately for its therapeutic effect on neural cell injuries.

  10. Rapid Histone-Catalyzed DNA Lesion Excision and Accompanying Protein Modification in Nucleosomes and Nucleosome Core Particles.

    PubMed

    Weng, Liwei; Greenberg, Marc M

    2015-09-01

    C5'-Hydrogen atoms are frequently abstracted during DNA oxidation. The oxidized abasic lesion 5'-(2-phosphoryl-1,4-dioxobutane) (DOB) is an electrophilic product of the C5'-radical. DOB is a potent irreversible inhibitor of DNA polymerase β, and forms interstrand cross-links in free DNA. We examined the reactivity of DOB within nucleosomes and nucleosome core particles (NCPs), the monomeric component of chromatin. Depending upon the position at which DOB is generated within a NCP, it is excised from nucleosomal DNA at a rate 275-1500-fold faster than that in free DNA. The half-life of DOB (7.0-16.8 min) in NCPs is shorter than any other abasic lesion. DOB's lifetime in NCPs is also significantly shorter than the estimated lifetime of an abasic site within a cell, suggesting that the observed chemistry would occur intracellularly. Histones also catalyze DOB excision when the lesion is present in the DNA linker region of a nucleosome. Schiff-base formation between DOB and histone proteins is detected in nucleosomes and NCPs, resulting in pyrrolone formation at the lysine residues. The lysines modified by DOB are often post-translationally modified. Consequently, the histone modifications described herein could affect the regulation of gene expression and may provide a chemical basis for the cytotoxicity of the DNA damaging agents that produce this lesion.

  11. Identification of residues in the hepatitis C virus core protein that are critical for capsid assembly in a cell-free system.

    PubMed

    Klein, Kevin C; Dellos, Sheri R; Lingappa, Jaisri R

    2005-06-01

    Significant advances have been made in understanding hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication through development of replicon systems. However, neither replicon systems nor standard cell culture systems support significant assembly of HCV capsids, leaving a large gap in our knowledge of HCV virion formation. Recently, we established a cell-free system in which over 60% of full-length HCV core protein synthesized de novo in cell extracts assembles into HCV capsids by biochemical and morphological criteria. Here we used mutational analysis to identify residues in HCV core that are important for capsid assembly in this highly reproducible cell-free system. We found that basic residues present in two clusters within the N-terminal 68 amino acids of HCV core played a critical role, while the uncharged linker domain between them was not. Furthermore, the aspartate at position 111, the region spanning amino acids 82 to 102, and three serines that are thought to be sites of phosphorylation do not appear to be critical for HCV capsid formation in this system. Mutation of prolines important for targeting of core to lipid droplets also failed to alter HCV capsid assembly in the cell-free system. In addition, wild-type HCV core did not rescue assembly-defective mutants. These data constitute the first systematic and quantitative analysis of the roles of specific residues and domains of HCV core in capsid formation. PMID:15890921

  12. Protein glycosylation in the phytopathogen Ustilago maydis: From core oligosaccharide synthesis to the ER glycoprotein quality control system, a genomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Alvarez, Alfonso; Elías-Villalobos, Alberto; Ibeas, José I

    2010-09-01

    The corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis has, over recent decades, become established as a robust pathogenic model for studying fungi-plant relationships. This use of U. maydis can be attributed to its biotrophic host interaction, easy culture and genetic manipulation in the laboratory, and the severe disease symptoms it induces in infected maize. Recent studies have shown that normal protein glycosylation is essential for pathogenic development, but dispensable for the saprophytic growth or mating. Given the relevance of protein glycosylation for U. maydis virulence, and consequently its role in the plant pathogenesis, here we review the main actors and events implicated in protein glycosylation. Furthermore, we describe the results of an in silico search, where we identify all the conserved members of the N- and O-glycosylation pathways in U. maydis at each stage: core oligosaccharide synthesis, addition of the core oligosaccharide to nascent target proteins, maturation and extension of the core oligosaccharide, and the quality control system used by the cell to avoid the presence of unfolded glycoproteins. Finally, we discuss how these genes could affect U. maydis virulence and their biotechnological implications.

  13. Crystal Structure of the Core Region of Hantavirus Nucleocapsid Protein Reveals the Mechanism for Ribonucleoprotein Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu; Wang, Wenming; Sun, Yuna; Ma, Chao; Wang, Xu; Wang, Xin; Liu, Pi; Shen, Shu; Li, Baobin; Lin, Jianping; Deng, Fei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hantaviruses, which belong to the genus Hantavirus in the family Bunyaviridae, infect mammals, including humans, causing either hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) or hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in humans with high mortality. Hantavirus encodes a nucleocapsid protein (NP) to encapsidate the genome and form a ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP) together with viral polymerase. Here, we report the crystal structure of the core domains of NP (NPcore) encoded by Sin Nombre virus (SNV) and Andes virus (ANDV), which are two representative members that cause HCPS in the New World. The constructs of SNV and ANDV NPcore exclude the N- and C-terminal portions of full polypeptide to obtain stable proteins for crystallographic study. The structure features an N lobe and a C lobe to clamp RNA-binding crevice and exhibits two protruding extensions in both lobes. The positively charged residues located in the RNA-binding crevice play a key role in RNA binding and virus replication. We further demonstrated that the C-terminal helix and the linker region connecting the N-terminal coiled-coil domain and NPcore are essential for hantavirus NP oligomerization through contacts made with two adjacent protomers. Moreover, electron microscopy (EM) visualization of native RNPs extracted from the virions revealed that a monomer-sized NP-RNA complex is the building block of viral RNP. This work provides insight into the formation of hantavirus RNP and provides an understanding of the evolutionary connections that exist among bunyaviruses. IMPORTANCE Hantaviruses are distributed across a wide and increasing range of host reservoirs throughout the world. In particular, hantaviruses can be transmitted via aerosols of rodent excreta to humans or from human to human and cause HFRS and HCPS, with mortalities of 15% and 50%, respectively. Hantavirus is therefore listed as a category C pathogen. Hantavirus encodes an NP that plays essential roles both in RNP formation and

  14. Protein-Assisted Assembly of Modular 3D Plasmonic Raspberry-like Core/Satellite Nanoclusters: Correlation of Structure and Optical Properties.

    PubMed

    Höller, Roland P M; Dulle, Martin; Thomä, Sabrina; Mayer, Martin; Steiner, Anja Maria; Förster, Stephan; Fery, Andreas; Kuttner, Christian; Chanana, Munish

    2016-06-28

    We present a bottom-up assembly route for a large-scale organization of plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) into three-dimensional (3D) modular assemblies with core/satellite structure. The protein-assisted assembly of small spherical gold or silver NPs with a hydrophilic protein shell (as satellites) onto larger metal NPs (as cores) offers high modularity in sizes and composition at high satellite coverage (close to the jamming limit). The resulting dispersions of metal/metal nanoclusters exhibit high colloidal stability and therefore allow for high concentrations and a precise characterization of the nanocluster architecture in dispersion by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Strong near-field coupling between the building blocks results in distinct regimes of dominant satellite-to-satellite and core-to-satellite coupling. High robustness against satellite disorder was proved by UV/vis diffuse reflectance (integrating sphere) measurements. Generalized multiparticle Mie theory (GMMT) simulations were employed to describe the electromagnetic coupling within the nanoclusters. The close correlation of structure and optical property allows for the rational design of core/satellite nanoclusters with tailored plasmonics and well-defined near-field enhancement, with perspectives for applications such as surface-enhanced spectroscopies.

  15. Protein-Assisted Assembly of Modular 3D Plasmonic Raspberry-like Core/Satellite Nanoclusters: Correlation of Structure and Optical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Höller, Roland P. M.; Dulle, Martin; Thomä, Sabrina; Mayer, Martin; Steiner, Anja Maria; Förster, Stephan; Fery, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We present a bottom-up assembly route for a large-scale organization of plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) into three-dimensional (3D) modular assemblies with core/satellite structure. The protein-assisted assembly of small spherical gold or silver NPs with a hydrophilic protein shell (as satellites) onto larger metal NPs (as cores) offers high modularity in sizes and composition at high satellite coverage (close to the jamming limit). The resulting dispersions of metal/metal nanoclusters exhibit high colloidal stability and therefore allow for high concentrations and a precise characterization of the nanocluster architecture in dispersion by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Strong near-field coupling between the building blocks results in distinct regimes of dominant satellite-to-satellite and core-to-satellite coupling. High robustness against satellite disorder was proved by UV/vis diffuse reflectance (integrating sphere) measurements. Generalized multiparticle Mie theory (GMMT) simulations were employed to describe the electromagnetic coupling within the nanoclusters. The close correlation of structure and optical property allows for the rational design of core/satellite nanoclusters with tailored plasmonics and well-defined near-field enhancement, with perspectives for applications such as surface-enhanced spectroscopies. PMID:26982386

  16. Protein-Assisted Assembly of Modular 3D Plasmonic Raspberry-like Core/Satellite Nanoclusters: Correlation of Structure and Optical Properties.

    PubMed

    Höller, Roland P M; Dulle, Martin; Thomä, Sabrina; Mayer, Martin; Steiner, Anja Maria; Förster, Stephan; Fery, Andreas; Kuttner, Christian; Chanana, Munish

    2016-06-28

    We present a bottom-up assembly route for a large-scale organization of plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) into three-dimensional (3D) modular assemblies with core/satellite structure. The protein-assisted assembly of small spherical gold or silver NPs with a hydrophilic protein shell (as satellites) onto larger metal NPs (as cores) offers high modularity in sizes and composition at high satellite coverage (close to the jamming limit). The resulting dispersions of metal/metal nanoclusters exhibit high colloidal stability and therefore allow for high concentrations and a precise characterization of the nanocluster architecture in dispersion by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Strong near-field coupling between the building blocks results in distinct regimes of dominant satellite-to-satellite and core-to-satellite coupling. High robustness against satellite disorder was proved by UV/vis diffuse reflectance (integrating sphere) measurements. Generalized multiparticle Mie theory (GMMT) simulations were employed to describe the electromagnetic coupling within the nanoclusters. The close correlation of structure and optical property allows for the rational design of core/satellite nanoclusters with tailored plasmonics and well-defined near-field enhancement, with perspectives for applications such as surface-enhanced spectroscopies. PMID:26982386

  17. A Panel of Recombinant Mucins Carrying a Repertoire of Sialylated O-Glycans Based on Different Core Chains for Studies of Glycan Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Reeja Maria; Jin, Chunsheng; Liu, Jining; Karlsson, Niclas G; Holgersson, Jan

    2015-08-12

    Sialylated glycans serve as key elements of receptors for many viruses, bacteria, and bacterial toxins. The microbial recognition and their binding specificity can be affected by the linkage of the terminal sugar residue, types of underlying sugar chains, and the nature of the entire glycoconjugate. Owing to the pathobiological significance of sialylated glycans, we have engineered Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to secrete mucin-type immunoglobulin-fused proteins carrying terminal α2,3- or α2,6-linked sialic acid on defined O-glycan core saccharide chains. Besides stably expressing P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1/mouse immunoglobulin G2b cDNA (PSGL-1/mIgG2b), CHO cells were stably transfected with plasmids encoding glycosyltransferases to synthesize core 2 (GCNT1), core 3 (B3GNT6), core 4 (GCNT1 and B3GNT6), or extended core 1 (B3GNT3) chains with or without the type 1 chain-encoding enzyme B3GALT5 and ST6GAL1. Western blot and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the presence of core 1, 2, 3, 4, and extended core 1 chains carrying either type 1 (Galb3GlcNAc) or type 2 (Galb4GlcNAc) outer chains with or without α2,6-linked sialic acids. This panel of recombinant mucins carrying a repertoire of sialylated O-glycans will be important tools in studies aiming at determining the fine O-glycan binding specificity of sialic acid-specific microbial adhesins and mammalian lectins.

  18. A Panel of Recombinant Mucins Carrying a Repertoire of Sialylated O-Glycans Based on Different Core Chains for Studies of Glycan Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Maria Cherian, Reeja; Jin, Chunsheng; Liu, Jining; Karlsson, Niclas G.; Holgersson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Sialylated glycans serve as key elements of receptors for many viruses, bacteria, and bacterial toxins. The microbial recognition and their binding specificity can be affected by the linkage of the terminal sugar residue, types of underlying sugar chains, and the nature of the entire glycoconjugate. Owing to the pathobiological significance of sialylated glycans, we have engineered Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to secrete mucin-type immunoglobulin-fused proteins carrying terminal α2,3- or α2,6-linked sialic acid on defined O-glycan core saccharide chains. Besides stably expressing P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1/mouse immunoglobulin G2b cDNA (PSGL-1/mIgG2b), CHO cells were stably transfected with plasmids encoding glycosyltransferases to synthesize core 2 (GCNT1), core 3 (B3GNT6), core 4 (GCNT1 and B3GNT6), or extended core 1 (B3GNT3) chains with or without the type 1 chain-encoding enzyme B3GALT5 and ST6GAL1. Western blot and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the presence of core 1, 2, 3, 4, and extended core 1 chains carrying either type 1 (Galβ3GlcNAc) or type 2 (Galβ4GlcNAc) outer chains with or without α2,6-linked sialic acids. This panel of recombinant mucins carrying a repertoire of sialylated O-glycans will be important tools in studies aiming at determining the fine O-glycan binding specificity of sialic acid-specific microbial adhesins and mammalian lectins. PMID:26274979

  19. The Effect of Lipopolysaccharide Core Oligosaccharide Size on the Electrostatic Binding of Antimicrobial Proteins to Models of the Gram Negative Bacterial Outer Membrane.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Luke A; Ciesielski, Filip; Skoda, Maximilian W A; Paracini, Nicolò; Holt, Stephen A; Lakey, Jeremy H

    2016-04-12

    Understanding the electrostatic interactions between bacterial membranes and exogenous proteins is crucial to designing effective antimicrobial agents against Gram-negative bacteria. Here we study, using neutron reflecometry under multiple isotopic contrast conditions, the role of the uncharged sugar groups in the outer core region of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in protecting the phosphate-rich inner core region from electrostatic interactions with antimicrobial proteins. Models of the asymmetric Gram negative outer membrane on silicon were prepared with phopshatidylcholine (PC) in the inner leaflet (closest to the silicon), whereas rough LPS was used to form the outer leaflet (facing the bulk solution). We show how salt concentration can be used to reversibly alter the binding affinity of a protein antibiotic colicin N (ColN) to the anionic LPS confirming that the interaction is electrostatic in nature. By examining the interaction of ColN with two rough LPS types with different-sized core oligosaccharide regions we demonstrate the role of uncharged sugars in blocking short-range electrostatic interactions between the cationic antibiotics and the vulnerable anionic phosphate groups. PMID:27003358

  20. Hepatitis B Virus Nucleocapsids Formed by Carboxy-Terminally Mutated Core Proteins Contain Spliced Viral Genomes but Lack Full-Size DNA

    PubMed Central

    Köck, Josef; Nassal, Michael; Deres, Karl; Blum, Hubert E.; von Weizsäcker, Fritz

    2004-01-01

    The carboxy-terminal sequence of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein constitutes a nucleic acid binding domain that is rich in arginine residues and contains three serine phosphorylation sites. While dispensable for capsid assembly, this domain is involved in viral replication, as demonstrated by the effects of mutations on RNA packaging and/or reverse transcription; however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we tested a series of core protein mutants in which the three serine phosphorylation sites were replaced by glutamic acid, in parallel with a previously described deletion variant lacking the 19 C-terminal amino acid residues, for their ability to support viral replication in transfected hepatoma cells. Replacement of all serines and the deletion gave rise to nucleocapsids containing a smaller than wild-type DNA genome. Rather than a single-stranded DNA intermediate, as previously thought, this was a 2.0-kbp double-stranded DNA molecule derived from spliced pregenomic RNA (pgRNA). Interestingly, full-length pgRNA was associated with nucleocapsids but was found to be sensitive to nuclease digestion, while encapsidated spliced RNA and 3′ truncated RNA species were nuclease resistant. These findings suggest that HBV pgRNA encapsidation is directional and that a packaging limit is determined by the C-terminal portion of the core protein. PMID:15564489

  1. The Effect of Lipopolysaccharide Core Oligosaccharide Size on the Electrostatic Binding of Antimicrobial Proteins to Models of the Gram Negative Bacterial Outer Membrane

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the electrostatic interactions between bacterial membranes and exogenous proteins is crucial to designing effective antimicrobial agents against Gram-negative bacteria. Here we study, using neutron reflecometry under multiple isotopic contrast conditions, the role of the uncharged sugar groups in the outer core region of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in protecting the phosphate-rich inner core region from electrostatic interactions with antimicrobial proteins. Models of the asymmetric Gram negative outer membrane on silicon were prepared with phopshatidylcholine (PC) in the inner leaflet (closest to the silicon), whereas rough LPS was used to form the outer leaflet (facing the bulk solution). We show how salt concentration can be used to reversibly alter the binding affinity of a protein antibiotic colicin N (ColN) to the anionic LPS confirming that the interaction is electrostatic in nature. By examining the interaction of ColN with two rough LPS types with different-sized core oligosaccharide regions we demonstrate the role of uncharged sugars in blocking short-range electrostatic interactions between the cationic antibiotics and the vulnerable anionic phosphate groups. PMID:27003358

  2. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence determination of C-reactive protein with carboxyl CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shijun; Harris, Emma; Shi, Jian; Chen, Alfred; Parajuli, Suman; Jing, Xiaohui; Miao, Wujian

    2010-09-14

    Electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) of water-soluble core/shell CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) coated with carboxylated polyethylene glycol polymers ("Qdot 625") was investigated in aqueous solutions using 2-(dibutylamino)ethanol (DBAE) and tri-n-propylamine (TPrA) as ECL coreactants. In both cases, ECL emissions at glassy carbon (GC) electrode appeared at the same potential of approximately 0.80 V vs. Ag/AgCl (3.0 M KCl), which was approximately 200 and approximately 150 mV more positive compared with the oxidation potentials for DBAE (approximately +0.60 V vs. Ag/AgCl) and TPrA (approximately +0.65 V vs. Ag/AgCl), respectively. The ECL intensity, however, was significantly affected by the type and the concentration of the ECL coreactant used as well as the nature of the working electrode. Under the present experimental conditions, ECL from DBAE was approximately 17 times stronger than that from TPrA. The maximum ECL was obtained at GC electrode when [DBAE] approximately = 53 mM, where a ratio of 11:3:1 in ECL intensity was evaluated for GC, Au, and Pt electrodes, respectively. The ECL emission of the Qdot 625/DBAE system had an apparent peak value of approximately 625 nm that matched well the fluorescence data. The QD as a label for ECL-based immunoassays of C-reactive protein (CRP) was realized by covalent binding of avidin on its surface, which allowed biotinylated anti-CRP to be attached and interacted with solution-phase CRP and the anti-CRP linked to micro-sized magnetic beads. The newly formed sandwich type aggregates were separated magnetically from the solution matrix, followed by the ECL generation at partially transparent Au nanoparticle-coated ITO electrode or Au/CD electrode in the presence of DBAE. Much stronger ECL responses were observed from the Au/CD electrode, at which a dynamic range of 1.0-10.0 microg mL(-1) CRP and a limit of detection of 1.0 microg mL(-1) CRP were obtained, respectively.

  3. Downregulation of miRNA-30c and miR-203a is associated with hepatitis C virus core protein-induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition in normal hepatocytes and hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Dongjing; Wu, Jilin; Liu, Meizhou; Yin, Hui; He, Jiantai; Zhang, Bo

    2015-09-04

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) Core protein has been demonstrated to induce epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and is associated with cancer progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, how the Core protein regulates EMT is still unclear. In this study, HCV Core protein was overexpressed by an adenovirus. The protein levels of EMT markers were measured by Western blot. The xenograft animal model was established by inoculation of HepG2 cells. Results showed that ectopic expression of HCV core protein induced EMT in L02 hepatocytes and HepG2 tumor cells by upregulating vimentin, Sanl1, and Snal2 expression and downregulating E-cadherin expression. Moreover, Core protein downregulated miR-30c and miR-203a levels in L02 and HepG2 cells, but artificial expression of miR-30c and miR-203a reversed Core protein-induced EMT. Further analysis showed that ectopic expression of HCV core protein stimulated cell proliferation, inhibited apoptosis, and increased cell migration, whereas artificial expression of miR-30c and miR-203a significantly reversed the role of Core protein in these cell functions in L02 and HepG2 cells. In the HepG2 xenograft tumor models, artificial expression of miR-30c and miR-203a inhibited EMT and tumor growth. Moreover, L02 cells overexpressing Core protein can form tumors in nude mice. In HCC patients, HCV infection significantly shortened patients' survival time, and loss of miR-30c and miR-203 expression correlated with poor survival. In conclusion, HCV core protein downregulates miR-30c and miR-203a expression, which results in activation of EMT in normal hepatocytes and HCC tumor cells. The Core protein-activated-EMT is involved in the carcinogenesis and progression of HCC. Loss of miR-30c and miR-203a expression is a marker for the poor prognosis of HCC. - Highlights: • HCV core protein downregulates miR-30c and miR-203a expression. • Downregulation of miR-30c and miR-203a activates EMT. • Activated-EMT is involved in the

  4. Electrostatic Architecture of the Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus (ISAV) Core Fusion Protein Illustrates a Carboxyl-Carboxylate pH Sensor*

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Jonathan D.; Soto-Montoya, Hazel; Korpela, Markus K.; Lee, Jeffrey E.

    2015-01-01

    Segment 5, ORF 1 of the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) genome, encodes for the ISAV F protein, which is responsible for viral-host endosomal membrane fusion during a productive ISAV infection. The entry machinery of ISAV is composed of a complex of the ISAV F and ISAV hemagglutinin esterase (HE) proteins in an unknown stoichiometry prior to receptor engagement by ISAV HE. Following binding of the receptor to ISAV HE, dissociation of the ISAV F protein from HE, and subsequent endocytosis, the ISAV F protein resolves into a fusion-competent oligomeric state. Here, we present a 2.1 Å crystal structure of the fusion core of the ISAV F protein determined at low pH. This structure has allowed us to unambiguously demonstrate that the ISAV entry machinery exhibits typical class I viral fusion protein architecture. Furthermore, we have determined stabilizing factors that accommodate the pH-dependent mode of ISAV transmission, and our structure has allowed the identification of a central coil that is conserved across numerous and varied post-fusion viral glycoprotein structures. We then discuss a mechanistic model of ISAV fusion that parallels the paramyxoviral class I fusion strategy wherein attachment and fusion are relegated to separate proteins in a similar fashion to ISAV fusion. PMID:26082488

  5. Electrostatic Architecture of the Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus (ISAV) Core Fusion Protein Illustrates a Carboxyl-Carboxylate pH Sensor.

    PubMed

    Cook, Jonathan D; Soto-Montoya, Hazel; Korpela, Markus K; Lee, Jeffrey E

    2015-07-24

    Segment 5, ORF 1 of the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) genome, encodes for the ISAV F protein, which is responsible for viral-host endosomal membrane fusion during a productive ISAV infection. The entry machinery of ISAV is composed of a complex of the ISAV F and ISAV hemagglutinin esterase (HE) proteins in an unknown stoichiometry prior to receptor engagement by ISAV HE. Following binding of the receptor to ISAV HE, dissociation of the ISAV F protein from HE, and subsequent endocytosis, the ISAV F protein resolves into a fusion-competent oligomeric state. Here, we present a 2.1 Å crystal structure of the fusion core of the ISAV F protein determined at low pH. This structure has allowed us to unambiguously demonstrate that the ISAV entry machinery exhibits typical class I viral fusion protein architecture. Furthermore, we have determined stabilizing factors that accommodate the pH-dependent mode of ISAV transmission, and our structure has allowed the identification of a central coil that is conserved across numerous and varied post-fusion viral glycoprotein structures. We then discuss a mechanistic model of ISAV fusion that parallels the paramyxoviral class I fusion strategy wherein attachment and fusion are relegated to separate proteins in a similar fashion to ISAV fusion.

  6. A C-terminal Hydrophobic, Solvent-protected Core and a Flexible N-terminus are Potentially Required for Human Papillomavirus 18 E7 Protein Functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Tian, Y; Greenaway, F; Sun, M

    2010-01-01

    The oncogenic potential of the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) relies on the expression of genes specifying the E7 and E6 proteins. To investigate further the variation in oligomeric structure that has been reported for different E7 proteins, an HPV-18 E7 cloned from a Hispanic woman with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia was purified to homogeneity most probably as a stable monomeric protein in aqueous solution. We determined that one zinc ion is present per HPV-18 E7 monomer by amino acid and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy analysis. Intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic results indicate that the zinc ion is important for the correct folding and thermal stability of HPV-18 E7. Hydroxyl radical mediated protein footprinting coupled to mass spectrometry and other biochemical and biophysical data indicate that near the C-terminus, the four cysteines of the two Cys-X{sub 2}-Cys motifs that are coordinated to the zinc ion form a solvent inaccessible core. The N-terminal LXCXE pRb binding motif region is hydroxyl radical accessible and conformationally flexible. Both factors, the relative flexibility of the pRb binding motif at the N-terminus and the C-terminal metal-binding hydrophobic solvent-protected core, combine together and facilitate the biological functions of HPV-18 E7.

  7. HCV core protein binds to gC1qR to induce A20 expression and inhibit cytokine production through MAPKs and NF-κB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaotian; Yao, Zhiyan; Yang, Jianling; Zhang, Zhengzheng; Deng, Yuqing; Li, Miao; Ma, Cuiqing; Yang, Lijuan; Gao, Xue; Li, Wenjian; Liu, Jianguo; Wei, Lin

    2016-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is characterized by a strong propensity toward chronicity. During chronic HCV infection, HCV core protein is implicated in deregulating cytokine expression that associates with chronic inflammation. A20 is known as a powerful suppressor in cytokine signaling, in this study, we explored the A20 expression in macrophages induced by HCV core protein and the involved signaling pathways. Results demonstrated that HCV core protein induced A20 expression in macrophages. Silencing A20 significantly enhanced the secretion of IL-6, IL-1β and TGF-β1, but not IL-8 and TNF. Additionally, HCV core protein interacted with gC1qR, but not TLR2, TLR3 and TLR4 in pull-down assay. Silencing gC1qR abrogated core-induced A20 expression. Furthermore, HCV core protein activated MAPK, NF-κB and PI3K/AKT pathways in macrophages. Inhibition of P38, JNK and NF-κB but not ERK and AKT activities greatly reduced the A20 expression. In conclusion, the study suggests that HCV core protein ligates gC1qR to induce A20 expression in macrophages via P38, JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways, which leads to a low-grade chronic inflammation during HCV infection. It represents a novel mechanism by which HCV usurps the host for persistence.

  8. HCV core protein binds to gC1qR to induce A20 expression and inhibit cytokine production through MAPKs and NF-κB signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianling; Zhang, Zhengzheng; Deng, Yuqing; Li, Miao; Ma, Cuiqing; Yang, Lijuan; Gao, Xue; Li, Wenjian; Liu, Jianguo; Wei, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is characterized by a strong propensity toward chronicity. During chronic HCV infection, HCV core protein is implicated in deregulating cytokine expression that associates with chronic inflammation. A20 is known as a powerful suppressor in cytokine signaling, in this study, we explored the A20 expression in macrophages induced by HCV core protein and the involved signaling pathways. Results demonstrated that HCV core protein induced A20 expression in macrophages. Silencing A20 significantly enhanced the secretion of IL-6, IL-1β and TGF-β1, but not IL-8 and TNF. Additionally, HCV core protein interacted with gC1qR, but not TLR2, TLR3 and TLR4 in pull-down assay. Silencing gC1qR abrogated core-induced A20 expression. Furthermore, HCV core protein activated MAPK, NF-κB and PI3K/AKT pathways in macrophages. Inhibition of P38, JNK and NF-κB but not ERK and AKT activities greatly reduced the A20 expression. In conclusion, the study suggests that HCV core protein ligates gC1qR to induce A20 expression in macrophages via P38, JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways, which leads to a low-grade chronic inflammation during HCV infection. It represents a novel mechanism by which HCV usurps the host for persistence. PMID:27183919

  9. Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 phosphorylates s/t-p sites in the hepadnavirus core protein C-terminal domain and is incorporated into viral capsids.

    PubMed

    Ludgate, Laurie; Ning, Xiaojun; Nguyen, David H; Adams, Christina; Mentzer, Laura; Hu, Jianming

    2012-11-01

    Phosphorylation of the hepadnavirus core protein C-terminal domain (CTD) is important for viral RNA packaging, reverse transcription, and subcellular localization. Hepadnavirus capsids also package a cellular kinase. The identity of the host kinase that phosphorylates the core CTD or gets packaged remains to be resolved. In particular, both the human hepatitis B virus (HBV) and duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) core CTDs harbor several conserved serine/threonine-proline (S/T-P) sites whose phosphorylation state is known to regulate CTD functions. We report here that the endogenous kinase in the HBV capsids was blocked by chemical inhibitors of the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), in particular, CDK2 inhibitors. The kinase phosphorylated the HBV CTD at the serine-proline (S-P) sites. Furthermore, we were able to detect CDK2 in purified HBV capsids by immunoblotting. Purified CDK2 phosphorylated the S/T-P sites of the HBV and DHBV CTD in vitro. Inhibitors of CDKs, of CDK2 in particular, decreased both HBV and DHBV CTD phosphorylation in vivo. Moreover, CDK2 inhibitors blocked DHBV CTD phosphorylation, specifically at the S/T-P sites, in a mammalian cell lysate. These results indicate that cellular CDK2 phosphorylates the functionally critical S/T-P sites of the hepadnavirus core CTD and is incorporated into viral capsids.

  10. Isolation and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies Against a Virion Core Protein of Orf Virus Strain NA1/11 As Potential Diagnostic Tool for Orf Viruses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Jiafeng; Hao, Wenbo; Peng, Yongzheng; Li, Hong; Li, Wei; Li, Ming; Luo, Shuhong

    2015-08-01

    Orf is caused by the orf virus (ORFV) and is a non-systemic, widespread disease afflicting sheep, goats, wild ruminants, and humans. Recent outbreaks in sheep and goats in Jilin and other northern Chinese provinces raise concerns about orf control in China. Thirty-five hybridoma clones were constructed from splenocytes of BALB/c mice immunized with natural orf virus protein. These hybridomas were used to produce antibodies targeting ORFV proteins. Immunological characterization of these monoclonal antibodies (MAb) showed that the 5F2D8 hybridoma line produced MAb that can recognize the 100, 70, and 20 kDa bands from total viral lysate. This hybridoma was further characterized by immunoprecipitation and peptide sequencing. The results indicate that 5F2D8 specifically recognizes orf virus encoded protein ORFV086, a late expression virion core protein that plays important roles in progeny virus particle assembly, morphogenesis, and maturity. Further experiments demonstrate that this MAb did not react with other viral proteins of ORFV orthopoxviruses, but reacted strongly to different field isolates of orf viruses from China. Additionally, this anti-ORFV086 MAb possesses ORFV neutralizing capability. Sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis determined that ORFV086 of NA1/11, clustered together with NZ2 and IA82, is highly conserved and has structural similarities with the Vaccinia virus core protein P4a. As such, this MAb has great potential as a diagnostic tool for orf viruses, in the further exploration of orf pathogenesis, and in disease control and prevention.

  11. Downregulation of miRNA-30c and miR-203a is associated with hepatitis C virus core protein-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in normal hepatocytes and hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongjing; Wu, Jilin; Liu, Meizhou; Yin, Hui; He, Jiantai; Zhang, Bo

    2015-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) Core protein has been demonstrated to induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and is associated with cancer progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, how the Core protein regulates EMT is still unclear. In this study, HCV Core protein was overexpressed by an adenovirus. The protein levels of EMT markers were measured by Western blot. The xenograft animal model was established by inoculation of HepG2 cells. Results showed that ectopic expression of HCV core protein induced EMT in L02 hepatocytes and HepG2 tumor cells by upregulating vimentin, Sanl1, and Snal2 expression and downregulating E-cadherin expression. Moreover, Core protein downregulated miR-30c and miR-203a levels in L02 and HepG2 cells, but artificial expression of miR-30c and miR-203a reversed Core protein-induced EMT. Further analysis showed that ectopic expression of HCV core protein stimulated cell proliferation, inhibited apoptosis, and increased cell migration, whereas artificial expression of miR-30c and miR-203a significantly reversed the role of Core protein in these cell functions in L02 and HepG2 cells. In the HepG2 xenograft tumor models, artificial expression of miR-30c and miR-203a inhibited EMT and tumor growth. Moreover, L02 cells overexpressing Core protein can form tumors in nude mice. In HCC patients, HCV infection significantly shortened patients' survival time, and loss of miR-30c and miR-203 expression correlated with poor survival. In conclusion, HCV core protein downregulates miR-30c and miR-203a expression, which results in activation of EMT in normal hepatocytes and HCC tumor cells. The Core protein-activated-EMT is involved in the carcinogenesis and progression of HCC. Loss of miR-30c and miR-203a expression is a marker for the poor prognosis of HCC.

  12. Convergent effects of lithium and valproate on the expression of proteins associated with large dense core vesicles in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Mara L; Gundersen, Cameron B; Umbach, Joy A

    2004-01-01

    Lithium and valproate are chemically unrelated compounds that are used to treat manic-depressive illness. Previously, we reported that lithium ions upregulate genes encoding proteins primarily associated with large dense core vesicles (LDCV) in nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells, but not in undifferentiated PC12 cells. Moreover, lithium did not alter the expression of proteins associated with small-clear, synaptic-like vesicles (SSV) in these cells. Based on these observations, we investigated whether valproate had actions similar to those of lithium in PC12 cells. Thus, undifferentiated or NGF-differentiated PC12 cells were exposed to lithium (1 mM) or valproate (1 mM) for 48 h. Extracts from these cells were submitted to semiquantitative Northern and Western analyses. In NGF-differentiated cells, both agents increased the expression of proteins associated with LDCV, the vesicular monoamine transporter 1 (VMAT1), and cysteine string protein (CSP). These same treatments did not alter the expression of proteins primarily associated with SSV, the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), and synaptophysin (SY). Furthermore, neither drug affected the expression of these proteins in undifferentiated cells. Interestingly, secretion of (3)H-dopamine was increased in cells exhibiting the increase of VMAT1 and csp. Taken together, the convergent effects of these chemically diverse compounds suggest that altered dynamics of LDCV may play a vital role in the biochemical pathway, leading to the relief of the symptoms of manic depression.

  13. The Crystal Structure of the Core Domain of a Cellulose Induced Protein (Cip1) from Hypocrea jecorina, at 1.5 Å Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Frida; Karkehabadi, Saeid; Hansson, Henrik; Goedegebuur, Frits; Wallace, Louise; Mitchinson, Colin; Piens, Kathleen; Stals, Ingeborg; Sandgren, Mats

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to characterise the whole transcriptome of the fungus Hypocrea jecorina, cDNA clones of this fungus were identified that encode for previously unknown proteins that are likely to function in biomass degradation. One of these newly identified proteins, found to be co-regulated with the major H. jecorina cellulases, is a protein that was denoted Cellulose induced protein 1 (Cip1). This protein consists of a glycoside hydrolase family 1 carbohydrate binding module connected via a linker region to a domain with yet unknown function. After cloning and expression of Cip1 in H. jecorina, the protein was purified and biochemically characterised with the aim of determining a potential enzymatic activity for the novel protein. No hydrolytic activity against any of the tested plant cell wall components was found. The proteolytic core domain of Cip1 was then crystallised, and the three-dimensional structure of this was determined to 1.5 Å resolution utilising sulphur single-wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing (sulphor-SAD). A calcium ion binding site was identified in a sequence conserved region of Cip1 and is also seen in other proteins with the same general fold as Cip1, such as many carbohydrate binding modules. The presence of this ion was found to have a structural role. The Cip1 structure was analysed and a structural homology search was performed to identify structurally related proteins. The two published structures with highest overall structural similarity to Cip1 found were two poly-lyases: CsGL, a glucuronan lyase from H. jecorina and vAL-1, an alginate lyase from the Chlorella virus. This indicates that Cip1 may be a lyase. However, initial trials did not detect significant lyase activity for Cip1. Cip1 is the first structure to be solved of the 23 currently known Cip1 sequential homologs (with a sequence identity cut-off of 25%), including both bacterial and fungal members. PMID:24039705

  14. Colloidal Gold--Collagen Protein Core--Shell Nanoconjugate: One-Step Biomimetic Synthesis, Layer-by-Layer Assembled Film, and Controlled Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Xing, Ruirui; Jiao, Tifeng; Yan, Linyin; Ma, Guanghui; Liu, Lei; Dai, Luru; Li, Junbai; Möhwald, Helmuth; Yan, Xuehai

    2015-11-11

    The biogenic synthesis of biomolecule-gold nanoconjugates is of key importance for a broad range of biomedical applications. In this work, a one-step, green, and condition-gentle strategy is presented to synthesize stable colloidal gold-collagen core-shell nanoconjugates in an aqueous solution at room temperature, without use of any reducing agents and stabilizing agents. It is discovered that electrostatic binding between gold ions and collagen proteins and concomitant in situ reduction by hydroxyproline residues are critically responsible for the formation of the core-shell nanoconjugates. The film formed by layer-by-layer assembly of such colloidal gold-collagen nanoconjugates can notably improve the mechanical properties and promote cell adhesion, growth, and differentiation. Thus, the colloidal gold-collagen nanoconjugates synthesized by such a straightforward and clean manner, analogous to a biomineralization pathway, provide new alternatives for developing biologically based hybrid biomaterials toward a range of therapeutic and diagnostic applications.

  15. The Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein Inhibits Adipose Triglyceride Lipase (ATGL)-mediated Lipid Mobilization and Enhances the ATGL Interaction with Comparative Gene Identification 58 (CGI-58) and Lipid Droplets*

    PubMed Central

    Camus, Gregory; Schweiger, Martina; Herker, Eva; Harris, Charles; Kondratowicz, Andrew S.; Tsou, Chia-Lin; Farese, Robert V.; Herath, Kithsiri; Previs, Stephen F.; Roddy, Thomas P.; Pinto, Shirly; Zechner, Rudolf; Ott, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Liver steatosis is a common health problem associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and an important risk factor for the development of liver fibrosis and cancer. Steatosis is caused by triglycerides (TG) accumulating in lipid droplets (LDs), cellular organelles composed of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids. The HCV nucleocapsid core localizes to the surface of LDs and induces steatosis in cultured cells and mouse livers by decreasing intracellular TG degradation (lipolysis). Here we report that core at the surface of LDs interferes with the activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the key lipolytic enzyme in the first step of TG breakdown. Expressing core in livers or mouse embryonic fibroblasts of ATGL−/− mice no longer decreases TG degradation as observed in LDs from wild-type mice, supporting the model that core reduces lipolysis by engaging ATGL. Core must localize at LDs to inhibit lipolysis, as ex vivo TG hydrolysis is impaired in purified LDs coated with core but not when free core is added to LDs. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed that core does not directly interact with the ATGL complex but, unexpectedly, increased the interaction between ATGL and its activator CGI-58 as well as the recruitment of both proteins to LDs. These data link the anti-lipolytic activity of the HCV core protein with altered ATGL binding to CGI-58 and the enhanced association of both proteins with LDs. PMID:25381252

  16. The hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL)-mediated lipid mobilization and enhances the ATGL interaction with comparative gene identification 58 (CGI-58) and lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Camus, Gregory; Schweiger, Martina; Herker, Eva; Harris, Charles; Kondratowicz, Andrew S; Tsou, Chia-Lin; Farese, Robert V; Herath, Kithsiri; Previs, Stephen F; Roddy, Thomas P; Pinto, Shirly; Zechner, Rudolf; Ott, Melanie

    2014-12-26

    Liver steatosis is a common health problem associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and an important risk factor for the development of liver fibrosis and cancer. Steatosis is caused by triglycerides (TG) accumulating in lipid droplets (LDs), cellular organelles composed of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids. The HCV nucleocapsid core localizes to the surface of LDs and induces steatosis in cultured cells and mouse livers by decreasing intracellular TG degradation (lipolysis). Here we report that core at the surface of LDs interferes with the activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the key lipolytic enzyme in the first step of TG breakdown. Expressing core in livers or mouse embryonic fibroblasts of ATGL(-/-) mice no longer decreases TG degradation as observed in LDs from wild-type mice, supporting the model that core reduces lipolysis by engaging ATGL. Core must localize at LDs to inhibit lipolysis, as ex vivo TG hydrolysis is impaired in purified LDs coated with core but not when free core is added to LDs. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed that core does not directly interact with the ATGL complex but, unexpectedly, increased the interaction between ATGL and its activator CGI-58 as well as the recruitment of both proteins to LDs. These data link the anti-lipolytic activity of the HCV core protein with altered ATGL binding to CGI-58 and the enhanced association of both proteins with LDs. PMID:25381252

  17. The hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL)-mediated lipid mobilization and enhances the ATGL interaction with comparative gene identification 58 (CGI-58) and lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Camus, Gregory; Schweiger, Martina; Herker, Eva; Harris, Charles; Kondratowicz, Andrew S; Tsou, Chia-Lin; Farese, Robert V; Herath, Kithsiri; Previs, Stephen F; Roddy, Thomas P; Pinto, Shirly; Zechner, Rudolf; Ott, Melanie

    2014-12-26

    Liver steatosis is a common health problem associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and an important risk factor for the development of liver fibrosis and cancer. Steatosis is caused by triglycerides (TG) accumulating in lipid droplets (LDs), cellular organelles composed of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids. The HCV nucleocapsid core localizes to the surface of LDs and induces steatosis in cultured cells and mouse livers by decreasing intracellular TG degradation (lipolysis). Here we report that core at the surface of LDs interferes with the activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the key lipolytic enzyme in the first step of TG breakdown. Expressing core in livers or mouse embryonic fibroblasts of ATGL(-/-) mice no longer decreases TG degradation as observed in LDs from wild-type mice, supporting the model that core reduces lipolysis by engaging ATGL. Core must localize at LDs to inhibit lipolysis, as ex vivo TG hydrolysis is impaired in purified LDs coated with core but not when free core is added to LDs. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed that core does not directly interact with the ATGL complex but, unexpectedly, increased the interaction between ATGL and its activator CGI-58 as well as the recruitment of both proteins to LDs. These data link the anti-lipolytic activity of the HCV core protein with altered ATGL binding to CGI-58 and the enhanced association of both proteins with LDs.

  18. Roles of small, acid-soluble spore proteins and core water content in survival of Bacillus subtilis spores exposed to environmental solar UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Ralf; Setlow, Peter; Reitz, Günther; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2009-08-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis contain a number of small, acid-soluble spore proteins (SASP) which comprise up to 20% of total spore core protein. The multiple alpha/beta-type SASP have been shown to confer resistance to UV radiation, heat, peroxides, and other sporicidal treatments. In this study, SASP-defective mutants of B. subtilis and spores deficient in dacB, a mutation leading to an increased core water content, were used to study the relative contributions of SASP and increased core water content to spore resistance to germicidal 254-nm and simulated environmental UV exposure (280 to 400 nm, 290 to 400 nm, and 320 to 400 nm). Spores of strains carrying mutations in sspA, sspB, and both sspA and sspB (lacking the major SASP-alpha and/or SASP-beta) were significantly more sensitive to 254-nm and all polychromatic UV exposures, whereas the UV resistance of spores of the sspE strain (lacking SASP-gamma) was essentially identical to that of the wild type. Spores of the dacB-defective strain were as resistant to 254-nm UV-C radiation as wild-type spores. However, spores of the dacB strain were significantly more sensitive than wild-type spores to environmental UV treatments of >280 nm. Air-dried spores of the dacB mutant strain had a significantly higher water content than air-dried wild-type spores. Our results indicate that alpha/beta-type SASP and decreased spore core water content play an essential role in spore resistance to environmentally relevant UV wavelengths whereas SASP-gamma does not.

  19. Clusters of isoleucine, leucine, and valine side chains define cores of stability in high-energy states of globular proteins: Sequence determinants of structure and stability.

    PubMed

    Kathuria, Sagar V; Chan, Yvonne H; Nobrega, R Paul; Özen, Ayşegül; Matthews, C Robert

    2016-03-01

    Measurements of protection against exchange of main chain amide hydrogens (NH) with solvent hydrogens in globular proteins have provided remarkable insights into the structures of rare high-energy states that populate their folding free-energy surfaces. Lacking, however, has been a unifying theory that rationalizes these high-energy states in terms of the structures and sequences of their resident proteins. The Branched Aliphatic Side Chain (BASiC) hypothesis has been developed to explain the observed patterns of protection in a pair of TIM barrel proteins. This hypothesis supposes that the side chains of isoleucine, leucine, and valine (ILV) residues often form large hydrophobic clusters that very effectively impede the penetration of water to their underlying hydrogen bond networks and, thereby, enhance the protection against solvent exchange. The linkage between the secondary and tertiary structures enables these ILV clusters to serve as cores of stability in high-energy partially folded states. Statistically significant correlations between the locations of large ILV clusters in native conformations and strong protection against exchange for a variety of motifs reported in the literature support the generality of the BASiC hypothesis. The results also illustrate the necessity to elaborate this simple hypothesis to account for the roles of adjacent hydrocarbon moieties in defining stability cores of partially folded states along folding reaction coordinates.

  20. The T=1 Capsid Protein of Penicillium chrysogenum Virus Is Formed by a Repeated Helix-Rich Core Indicative of Gene Duplication▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Luque, Daniel; González, José M.; Garriga, Damiá; Ghabrial, Said A.; Havens, Wendy M.; Trus, Benes; Verdaguer, Nuria; Carrascosa, José L.; Castón, José R.

    2010-01-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum virus (PcV), a member of the Chrysoviridae family, is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) fungal virus with a multipartite genome, with each RNA molecule encapsidated in a separate particle. Chrysoviruses lack an extracellular route and are transmitted during sporogenesis and cell fusion. The PcV capsid, based on a T=1 lattice containing 60 subunits of the 982-amino-acid capsid protein, remains structurally undisturbed throughout the viral cycle, participates in genome metabolism, and isolates the virus genome from host defense mechanisms. Using three-dimensional cryoelectron microscopy, we determined the structure of the PcV virion at 8.0 Å resolution. The capsid protein has a high content of rod-like densities characteristic of α-helices, forming a repeated α-helical core indicative of gene duplication. Whereas the PcV capsid protein has two motifs with the same fold, most dsRNA virus capsid subunits consist of dimers of a single protein with similar folds. The spatial arrangement of the α-helical core resembles that found in the capsid protein of the L-A virus, a fungal totivirus with an undivided genome, suggesting a conserved basic fold. The encapsidated genome is organized in concentric shells; whereas the inner dsRNA shells are well defined, the outermost layer is dense due to numerous interactions with the inner capsid surface, specifically, six interacting areas per monomer. The outermost genome layer is arranged in an icosahedral cage, sufficiently well ordered to allow for modeling of an A-form dsRNA. The genome ordering might constitute a framework for dsRNA transcription at the capsid interior and/or have a structural role for capsid stability. PMID:20463071

  1. The T=1 capsid protein of Penicillium chrysogenum virus is formed by a repeated helix-rich core indicative of gene duplication.

    PubMed

    Luque, Daniel; González, José M; Garriga, Damiá; Ghabrial, Said A; Havens, Wendy M; Trus, Benes; Verdaguer, Nuria; Carrascosa, José L; Castón, José R

    2010-07-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum virus (PcV), a member of the Chrysoviridae family, is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) fungal virus with a multipartite genome, with each RNA molecule encapsidated in a separate particle. Chrysoviruses lack an extracellular route and are transmitted during sporogenesis and cell fusion. The PcV capsid, based on a T=1 lattice containing 60 subunits of the 982-amino-acid capsid protein, remains structurally undisturbed throughout the viral cycle, participates in genome metabolism, and isolates the virus genome from host defense mechanisms. Using three-dimensional cryoelectron microscopy, we determined the structure of the PcV virion at 8.0 A resolution. The capsid protein has a high content of rod-like densities characteristic of alpha-helices, forming a repeated alpha-helical core indicative of gene duplication. Whereas the PcV capsid protein has two motifs with the same fold, most dsRNA virus capsid subunits consist of dimers of a single protein with similar folds. The spatial arrangement of the alpha-helical core resembles that found in the capsid protein of the L-A virus, a fungal totivirus with an undivided genome, suggesting a conserved basic fold. The encapsidated genome is organized in concentric shells; whereas the inner dsRNA shells are well defined, the outermost layer is dense due to numerous interactions with the inner capsid surface, specifically, six interacting areas per monomer. The outermost genome layer is arranged in an icosahedral cage, sufficiently well ordered to allow for modeling of an A-form dsRNA. The genome ordering might constitute a framework for dsRNA transcription at the capsid interior and/or have a structural role for capsid stability.

  2. Protein architecture and core residues in unwound α-helices provide insights to the transport function of plant AtCHX17.

    PubMed

    Czerny, Daniel D; Padmanaban, Senthilkumar; Anishkin, Andriy; Venema, Kees; Riaz, Zoya; Sze, Heven

    2016-09-01

    Using Arabidopsis thaliana AtCHX17 as an example, we combine structural modeling and mutagenesis to provide insights on its protein architecture and transport function which is poorly characterized. This approach is based on the observation that protein structures are significantly more conserved in evolution than linear sequences, and mechanistic similarities among diverse transporters are emerging. Two homology models of AtCHX17 were obtained that show a protein fold similar to known structures of bacterial Na(+)/H(+) antiporters, EcNhaA and TtNapA. The distinct secondary and tertiary structure models highlighted residues at positions potentially important for CHX17 activity. Mutagenesis showed that asparagine-N200 and aspartate-D201 inside transmembrane5 (TM5), and lysine-K355 inside TM10 are critical for AtCHX17 activity. We reveal previously unrecognized threonine-T170 and lysine-K383 as key residues at unwound regions in the middle of TM4 and TM11 α-helices, respectively. Mutation of glutamate-E111 located near the membrane surface inhibited AtCHX17 activity, suggesting a role in pH sensing. The long carboxylic tail of unknown purpose has an alternating β-sheet and α-helix secondary structure that is conserved in prokaryote universal stress proteins. These results support the overall architecture of AtCHX17 and identify D201, N200 and novel residues T170 and K383 at the functional core which likely participates in ion recognition, coordination and/or translocation, similar to characterized cation/H(+) exchangers. The core of AtCHX17 models according to EcNhaA and TtNapA templates faces inward and outward, respectively, which may reflect two conformational states of the alternating access transport mode for proteins belonging to the plant CHX family. PMID:27179641

  3. Structure of the cytoplasmic domain of TcpE, the inner membrane core protein required for assembly of the Vibrio cholerae toxin-coregulated pilus.

    PubMed

    Kolappan, Subramaniapillai; Craig, Lisa

    2013-04-01

    Type IV pili are long thin surface-displayed polymers of the pilin subunit that are present in a diverse group of bacteria. These multifunctional filaments are critical to virulence for pathogens such as Vibrio cholerae, which use them to form microcolonies and to secrete the colonization factor TcpF. The type IV pili are assembled from pilin subunits by a complex inner membrane machinery. The core component of the type IV pilus-assembly platform is an integral inner membrane protein belonging to the GspF superfamily of secretion proteins. These proteins somehow convert chemical energy from ATP hydrolysis by an assembly ATPase on the cytoplasmic side of the inner membrane to mechanical energy for extrusion of the growing pilus filament out of the inner membrane. Most GspF-family inner membrane core proteins are predicted to have N-terminal and central cytoplasmic domains, cyto1 and cyto2, and three transmembrane segments, TM1, TM2 and TM3. Cyto2 and TM3 represent an internal repeat of cyto1 and TM1. Here, the 1.88 Å resolution crystal structure of the cyto1 domain of V. cholerae TcpE, which is required for assembly of the toxin-coregulated pilus, is reported. This domain folds as a monomeric six-helix bundle with a positively charged membrane-interaction face at one end and a hydrophobic groove at the other end that may serve as a binding site for partner proteins in the pilus-assembly complex.

  4. Cancer-preventive peptide lunasin from Solanum nigrum L. inhibits acetylation of core histones H3 and H4 and phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (Rb).

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin Boo; Jeong, Hyung Jin; Park, Jae Ho; Lee, Sun Hee; Lee, Jeong Rak; Lee, Hee Kyeong; Chung, Gyu Young; Choi, Jeong Doo; de Lumen, Ben O

    2007-12-26

    Lunasin, a unique 43 amino acid, 4.8 kDa cancer-chemopreventive peptide initially reported in soybean and now found in barley and wheat, has been shown to be cancer-chemopreventive in mammalian cells and in a skin cancer mouse model against oncogenes and chemical carcinogens. To identify bioactive components in traditional herbal medicines and in search for new sources of lunasin, we report here the properties of lunasin from Solanum nigrum L. (SNL), a plant indigenous to northeast Asia. Lunasin was screened in the crude extracts of five varieties of the medicinal plants of Solanaceae origin and seven other major herbal plants. An in vitro digestion stability assay for measuring bioavailability was carried out on SNL crude protein and autoclaved SNL using pepsin and pancreatin. A nonradioactive histone acetyltransferase (HAT) assay and HAT activity colorimetric assay were used to measure the inhibition of core histone acetylation. The inhibitory effect of lunasin on the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (Rb) was determined by immunoblotting against phospho-Rb. Lunasin isolated from autoclaved SNL inhibited core histone H3 and H4 acetylation, the activities of the HATs, and the phosphorylation of the Rb protein. Lunasin in the crude protein and in the autoclaved crude protein was very stable to pepsin and pancreatin in vitro digestion, while the synthetic pure lunasin was digested at 2 min after the reaction. We conclude that lunasin is a bioactive and bioavailable component in SNL and that consumption of SNL may play an important role in cancer prevention. PMID:18038993

  5. Protein architecture and core residues in unwound α-helices provide insights to the transport function of plant AtCHX17.

    PubMed

    Czerny, Daniel D; Padmanaban, Senthilkumar; Anishkin, Andriy; Venema, Kees; Riaz, Zoya; Sze, Heven

    2016-09-01

    Using Arabidopsis thaliana AtCHX17 as an example, we combine structural modeling and mutagenesis to provide insights on its protein architecture and transport function which is poorly characterized. This approach is based on the observation that protein structures are significantly more conserved in evolution than linear sequences, and mechanistic similarities among diverse transporters are emerging. Two homology models of AtCHX17 were obtained that show a protein fold similar to known structures of bacterial Na(+)/H(+) antiporters, EcNhaA and TtNapA. The distinct secondary and tertiary structure models highlighted residues at positions potentially important for CHX17 activity. Mutagenesis showed that asparagine-N200 and aspartate-D201 inside transmembrane5 (TM5), and lysine-K355 inside TM10 are critical for AtCHX17 activity. We reveal previously unrecognized threonine-T170 and lysine-K383 as key residues at unwound regions in the middle of TM4 and TM11 α-helices, respectively. Mutation of glutamate-E111 located near the membrane surface inhibited AtCHX17 activity, suggesting a role in pH sensing. The long carboxylic tail of unknown purpose has an alternating β-sheet and α-helix secondary structure that is conserved in prokaryote universal stress proteins. These results support the overall architecture of AtCHX17 and identify D201, N200 and novel residues T170 and K383 at the functional core which likely participates in ion recognition, coordination and/or translocation, similar to characterized cation/H(+) exchangers. The core of AtCHX17 models according to EcNhaA and TtNapA templates faces inward and outward, respectively, which may reflect two conformational states of the alternating access transport mode for proteins belonging to the plant CHX family.

  6. Amyloid Core Formed of Full-Length Recombinant Mouse Prion Protein Involves Sequence 127–143 but Not Sequence 107–126

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Biswanath; Lee, Chung-Yu; Lin, Chen; Chen, Eric H.-L.; Huang, Chao-Li; Yang, Chien-Chih; Chen, Rita P.-Y.

    2013-01-01

    The principal event underlying the development of prion disease is the conversion of soluble cellular prion protein (PrPC) into its disease-causing isoform, PrPSc. This conversion is associated with a marked change in secondary structure from predominantly α-helical to a high β-sheet content, ultimately leading to the formation of aggregates consisting of ordered fibrillar assemblies referred to as amyloid. In vitro, recombinant prion proteins and short prion peptides from various species have been shown to form amyloid under various conditions and it has been proposed that, theoretically, any protein and peptide could form amyloid under appropriate conditions. To identify the peptide segment involved in the amyloid core formed from recombinant full-length mouse prion protein mPrP(23–230), we carried out seed-induced amyloid formation from recombinant prion protein in the presence of seeds generated from the short prion peptides mPrP(107–143), mPrP(107–126), and mPrP(127–143). Our results showed that the amyloid fibrils formed from mPrP(107–143) and mPrP(127–143), but not those formed from mPrP(107–126), were able to seed the amyloidogenesis of mPrP(23–230), showing that the segment residing in sequence 127–143 was used to form the amyloid core in the fibrillization of mPrP(23–230). PMID:23844138

  7. The polymerase-like core of brome mosaic virus 2a protein, lacking a region interacting with viral 1a protein in vitro, maintains activity and 1a selectivity in RNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Smirnyagina, E; Lin, N S; Ahlquist, P

    1996-01-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV), a member of the alphavirus-like super-family of positive-strand RNA viruses, encodes two proteins required for viral RNA replication: 1a and 2a. 1a contains m7G methyltransferase- and helicase-like domains, while 2a contains a polymerase (pol)-like core flanked by N- and C-terminal extensions. Genetic studies show that BMV RNA replication requires 1a-2a compatibility implying direct or indirect 1a-2a interaction in vivo. In vitro, la interacts with the N-terminal 125-amino-acid segment of 2a preceding the pol-like core, and prior deletion studies suggested that this 2a segment was essential for RNA replication. We have now used protein fusions and deletions to explore possible parallels between noncovalent 1a-2a interaction and covalent fusion of similar protein domains in tobacco mosaic virus and to see whether the N-terminal 2a-1a interaction was the primary basis for 1a-2a compatibility in vivo. We found that 2a can function as part of a tobacco mosaic virus-like 1a-2a fusion and that a 2a segment (amino acids 162 to 697) comprising the pol-like core was sufficient to provide 2a functions in such a fusion. Unexpectedly, the unfused 2a core segment also supported RNA replication when it and wild-type la were expressed as separate proteins. Moreover, in gene reassortant experiments with the related cowpea chlorotic mottle virus, the unfused 2a core segment showed the same 1a compatibility requirements as did wild-type BMV 2a. Thus, the pol-like core of 2a must interact with la in a way that is selective and essential for RNA synthesis, and 1a-2a interactions are more complex than the single, previously mapped interaction of the N-terminal 2a segment with 1a. PMID:8676500

  8. A truncated fragment of Ov-ASP-1 consisting of the core pathogenesis-related-1 (PR-1) domain maintains adjuvanticity as the full-length protein.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingjing; Yang, Yi; Xiao, Wenjun; Sun, Weilai; Yu, Hong; Du, Lanying; Lustigman, Sara; Jiang, Shibo; Kou, Zhihua; Zhou, Yusen

    2015-04-15

    The Onchocerca volvulus activation-associated secreted protein-1 (Ov-ASP-1) has good adjuvanticity for a variety of antigens and vaccines, probably due to its ability activate antigen-processing cells (APCs). However, the functional domain of Ov-ASP-1 as an adjuvant is not clearly defined. Based on the structural prediction of this protein family, we constructed a 16-kDa recombinant protein of Ov-ASP-1 that contains only the core pathogenesis-related-1 (PR-1) domain (residues 10-153), designated ASPPR. We found that ASPPR exhibits adjuvanticity similar to that of the full-length Ov-ASP-1 (residues 10-220) for various antigens, including ovalbumin (OVA), HBsAg protein antigen, and the HIV peptide 5 (Pep5) antigen, but it is more suitable for vaccine design in ASPPR-antigen fusion proteins, and more stable in PBS than Ov-ASP-1 stored at -70 °C. These results suggest that ASPPR might be the functional region of Ov-ASP-1 as an adjuvant, and therefore could be developed as an adjuvant for human use. PMID:25736195

  9. A truncated fragment of Ov-ASP-1 consisting of the core pathogenesis-related-1 (PR-1) domain maintains adjuvanticity as the full-length protein.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingjing; Yang, Yi; Xiao, Wenjun; Sun, Weilai; Yu, Hong; Du, Lanying; Lustigman, Sara; Jiang, Shibo; Kou, Zhihua; Zhou, Yusen

    2015-04-15

    The Onchocerca volvulus activation-associated secreted protein-1 (Ov-ASP-1) has good adjuvanticity for a variety of antigens and vaccines, probably due to its ability activate antigen-processing cells (APCs). However, the functional domain of Ov-ASP-1 as an adjuvant is not clearly defined. Based on the structural prediction of this protein family, we constructed a 16-kDa recombinant protein of Ov-ASP-1 that contains only the core pathogenesis-related-1 (PR-1) domain (residues 10-153), designated ASPPR. We found that ASPPR exhibits adjuvanticity similar to that of the full-length Ov-ASP-1 (residues 10-220) for various antigens, including ovalbumin (OVA), HBsAg protein antigen, and the HIV peptide 5 (Pep5) antigen, but it is more suitable for vaccine design in ASPPR-antigen fusion proteins, and more stable in PBS than Ov-ASP-1 stored at -70 °C. These results suggest that ASPPR might be the functional region of Ov-ASP-1 as an adjuvant, and therefore could be developed as an adjuvant for human use.

  10. Zasp52, a Core Z-disc Protein in Drosophila Indirect Flight Muscles, Interacts with α-Actinin via an Extended PDZ Domain

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Kuo An; González-Morales, Nicanor

    2016-01-01

    Z-discs are organizing centers that establish and maintain myofibril structure and function. Important Z-disc proteins are α-actinin, which cross-links actin thin filaments at the Z-disc and Zasp PDZ domain proteins, which directly interact with α-actinin. Here we investigate the biochemical and genetic nature of this interaction in more detail. Zasp52 is the major Drosophila Zasp PDZ domain protein, and is required for myofibril assembly and maintenance. We show by in vitro biochemistry that the PDZ domain plus a C-terminal extension is the only area of Zasp52 involved in the interaction with α-actinin. In addition, site-directed mutagenesis of 5 amino acid residues in the N-terminal part of the PDZ domain, within the PWGFRL motif, abolish binding to α-actinin, demonstrating the importance of this motif for α-actinin binding. Rescue assays of a novel Zasp52 allele demonstrate the crucial importance of the PDZ domain for Zasp52 function. Flight assays also show that a Zasp52 mutant suppresses the α-actinin mutant phenotype, indicating that both proteins are core structural Z-disc proteins required for optimal Z-disc function. PMID:27783625

  11. MPP2 is a postsynaptic MAGUK scaffold protein that links SynCAM1 cell adhesion molecules to core components of the postsynaptic density

    PubMed Central

    Rademacher, Nils; Schmerl, Bettina; Lardong, Jennifer A.; Wahl, Markus C.; Shoichet, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    At neuronal synapses, multiprotein complexes of trans-synaptic adhesion molecules, scaffold proteins and neurotransmitter receptors assemble to essential building blocks required for synapse formation and maintenance. Here we describe a novel role for the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) protein MPP2 (MAGUK p55 subfamily member 2) at synapses of rat central neurons. Through interactions mediated by its C-terminal SH3-GK domain module, MPP2 binds to the abundant postsynaptic scaffold proteins PSD-95 and GKAP and localises to postsynaptic sites in hippocampal neurons. MPP2 also colocalises with the synaptic adhesion molecule SynCAM1. We demonstrate that the SynCAM1 C-terminus interacts directly with the MPP2 PDZ domain and that MPP2 does not interact in this manner with other highly abundant postsynaptic transmembrane proteins. Our results highlight a previously unexplored role for MPP2 at postsynaptic sites as a scaffold that links SynCAM1 cell adhesion molecules to core proteins of the postsynaptic density. PMID:27756895

  12. Genome-wide annotation, expression profiling, and protein interaction studies of the core cell-cycle genes in Phalaenopsis aphrodite.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsiang-Yin; Chen, Jhun-Chen; Wei, Miao-Ju; Lien, Yi-Chen; Li, Huang-Hsien; Ko, Swee-Suak; Liu, Zin-Huang; Fang, Su-Chiung

    2014-01-01

    Orchidaceae is one of the most abundant and diverse families in the plant kingdom and its unique developmental patterns have drawn the attention of many evolutionary biologists. Particular areas of interest have included the co-evolution of pollinators and distinct floral structures, and symbiotic relationships with mycorrhizal flora. However, comprehensive studies to decipher the molecular basis of growth and development in orchids remain scarce. Cell proliferation governed by cell-cycle regulation is fundamental to growth and development of the plant body. We took advantage of recently released transcriptome information to systematically isolate and annotate the core cell-cycle regulators in the moth orchid Phalaenopsis aphrodite. Our data verified that Phalaenopsis cyclin-dependent kinase A (CDKA) is an evolutionarily conserved CDK. Expression profiling studies suggested that core cell-cycle genes functioning during the G1/S, S, and G2/M stages were preferentially enriched in the meristematic tissues that have high proliferation activity. In addition, subcellular localization and pairwise interaction analyses of various combinations of CDKs and cyclins, and of E2 promoter-binding factors and dimerization partners confirmed interactions of the functional units. Furthermore, our data showed that expression of the core cell-cycle genes was coordinately regulated during pollination-induced reproductive development. The data obtained establish a fundamental framework for study of the cell-cycle machinery in Phalaenopsis orchids.

  13. Hepatitis C virus core protein enhances HIV-1 replication in human macrophages through TLR2, JNK, and MEK1/2-dependent upregulation of TNF-α and IL-6.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Gokul; Pascual, Daniel; Rival, Germaine; Perales-Linares, Renzo; Martin-Garcia, Julio; Navas-Martin, Sonia

    2014-09-17

    Despite their differential cell tropisms, HIV-1 and HCV dramatically influence disease progression in coinfected patients. Macrophages are important target cells of HIV-1. We hypothesized that secreted HCV core protein might modulate HIV-1 replication. We demonstrate that HCV core significantly enhances HIV-1 replication in human macrophages by upregulating TNF-α and IL-6 via TLR2-, JNK-, and MEK1/2-dependent pathways. Furthermore, we show that TNF-α and IL-6 secreted from HCV core-treated macrophages reactivates monocytic U1 cells latently infected with HIV-1. Our studies reveal a previously unrecognized role of HCV core by enhancing HIV-1 infection in macrophages.

  14. The C Terminus of the Core β-Ladder Domain in Japanese Encephalitis Virus Nonstructural Protein 1 Is Flexible for Accommodation of Heterologous Epitope Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Li-Chen; Liao, Jia-Teh; Lee, Hwei-Jen; Chou, Wei-Yuan; Chen, Chun-Wei; Lin, Yi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT NS1 is the only nonstructural protein that enters the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where NS1 is glycosylated, forms a dimer, and is subsequently secreted during flavivirus replication as dimers or hexamers, which appear to be highly immunogenic to the infected host, as protective immunity can be elicited against homologous flavivirus infections. Here, by using a trans-complementation assay, we identified the C-terminal end of NS1 derived from Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), which was more flexible than other regions in terms of housing foreign epitopes without a significant impact on virus replication. This mapped flexible region is located in the conserved tip of the core β-ladder domain of the multimeric NS1 structure and is also known to contain certain linear epitopes, readily triggering specific antibody responses from the host. Despite becoming attenuated, recombinant JEV with insertion of a neutralizing epitope derived from enterovirus 71 (EV71) into the C-terminal end of NS1 not only could be normally released from infected cells, but also induced dual protective immunity for the host to counteract lethal challenge with either JEV or EV71 in neonatal mice. These results indicated that the secreted multimeric NS1 of flaviviruses may serve as a natural protein carrier to render epitopes of interest more immunogenic in the C terminus of the core β-ladder domain. IMPORTANCE The positive-sense RNA genomes of mosquito-borne flaviviruses appear to be flexible in terms of accommodating extra insertions of short heterologous antigens into their virus genes. Here, we illustrate that the newly identified C terminus of the core β-ladder domain in NS1 could be readily inserted into entities such as EV71 epitopes, and the resulting NS1-epitope fusion proteins appeared to maintain normal virus replication, secretion ability, and multimeric formation from infected cells. Nonetheless, such an insertion attenuated the recombinant JEV in mice

  15. Proteins of the exocytotic core complex mediate platelet alpha-granule secretion. Roles of vesicle-associated membrane protein, SNAP-23, and syntaxin 4.

    PubMed

    Flaumenhaft, R; Croce, K; Chen, E; Furie, B; Furie, B C

    1999-01-22

    To understand the molecular basis of granule release from platelets, we examined the role of vesicle-associated membrane protein, SNAP-23, and syntaxin 4 in alpha-granule secretion. A vesicle-associated membrane protein, SNAP-23, and syntaxin 4 were detected in platelet lysate. These proteins form a SDS-resistant complex that disassembles upon platelet activation. To determine whether these proteins are involved in alpha-granule secretion, we developed a streptolysin O-permeabilized platelet model of alpha-granule secretion. Streptolysin O-permeabilized platelets released alpha-granules, as measured by surface expression of P-selectin, in response to Ca2+ up to 120 min after permeabilization. Incubation of streptolysin O-permeabilized platelets with an antibody directed against vesicle-associated membrane protein completely inhibited Ca2+-induced alpha-granule release. Tetanus toxin cleaved platelet vesicle-associated membrane protein and inhibited Ca2+-induced alpha-granule secretion from streptolysin O-permeabilized platelets. An antibody to syntaxin 4 also inhibited Ca2+-induced alpha-granule release by approximately 75% in this system. These results show that vesicle-associated membrane protein, SNAP-23, and syntaxin 4 form a heterotrimeric complex in platelets that disassembles with activation and demonstrate that alpha-granule release is dependent on vesicle SNAP receptor-target SNAP receptor (vSNARE-tSNARE) interactions. PMID:9891020

  16. Evaluation of a new wide-pore superficially porous material with carbon core and nanodiamond-polymer shell for the separation of proteins.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Szabolcs; Jensen, David S; Zukowski, Janusz; Guillarme, Davy

    2015-10-01

    In this study, reversed phase liquid chromatographic columns packed with superficially porous material made of a carbon core and nanodiamond-polymer shell were evaluated for the analytical characterization of proteins. The emphasis was put on the impact of pore size on the kinetic performance when analyzing large molecules. Three different types of columns possessing an average pore size of 120, 180, and 250Å were thus evaluated. As expected, the peak capacities were improved with the 180 and above all the 250Å pore size, while the kinetic performance achieved with the 120Å were systematically lower. It was also shown that a trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) concentration of 0.3-0.5% was required when analyzing proteins, to achieve suitable peak shapes (limited broadening and tailing) with this material. Elevated temperature (>60°C) is mandatory when analyzing proteins with silica-based stationary phases, but this was not the case with this particular column made with a carbon core and nanodiamond-polymer shell, since the peak capacities were not improved at high temperature. However, there was a need to increase mobile phase temperature in the range 70-90°C when analyzing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), to limit adsorption that often occur in RPLC with this specific class of biomolecules. Finally, the FLARE(®) wide-pore column was applied to real life samples of native, oxidative stressed and reduced therapeutic proteins as well as reduced, digested mAbs and antibody drug conjugates (ADCs), to highlight the possibilities offered by this column technology. PMID:26456222

  17. Evaluation of a new wide-pore superficially porous material with carbon core and nanodiamond-polymer shell for the separation of proteins.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Szabolcs; Jensen, David S; Zukowski, Janusz; Guillarme, Davy

    2015-10-01

    In this study, reversed phase liquid chromatographic columns packed with superficially porous material made of a carbon core and nanodiamond-polymer shell were evaluated for the analytical characterization of proteins. The emphasis was put on the impact of pore size on the kinetic performance when analyzing large molecules. Three different types of columns possessing an average pore size of 120, 180, and 250Å were thus evaluated. As expected, the peak capacities were improved with the 180 and above all the 250Å pore size, while the kinetic performance achieved with the 120Å were systematically lower. It was also shown that a trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) concentration of 0.3-0.5% was required when analyzing proteins, to achieve suitable peak shapes (limited broadening and tailing) with this material. Elevated temperature (>60°C) is mandatory when analyzing proteins with silica-based stationary phases, but this was not the case with this particular column made with a carbon core and nanodiamond-polymer shell, since the peak capacities were not improved at high temperature. However, there was a need to increase mobile phase temperature in the range 70-90°C when analyzing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), to limit adsorption that often occur in RPLC with this specific class of biomolecules. Finally, the FLARE(®) wide-pore column was applied to real life samples of native, oxidative stressed and reduced therapeutic proteins as well as reduced, digested mAbs and antibody drug conjugates (ADCs), to highlight the possibilities offered by this column technology.

  18. AJUBA LIM Proteins Limit Hippo Activity in Proliferating Cells by Sequestering the Hippo Core Kinase Complex in the Cytosol

    PubMed Central

    Jagannathan, Radhika; Schimizzi, Gregory V.; Zhang, Kun; Loza, Andrew J.; Yabuta, Norikazu; Nojima, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo pathway controls organ growth and is implicated in cancer development. Whether and how Hippo pathway activity is limited to sustain or initiate cell growth when needed is not understood. The members of the AJUBA family of LIM proteins are negative regulators of the Hippo pathway. In mammalian epithelial cells, we found that AJUBA LIM proteins limit Hippo regulation of YAP, in proliferating cells only, by sequestering a cytosolic Hippo kinase complex in which LATS kinase is inhibited. At the plasma membranes of growth-arrested cells, AJUBA LIM proteins do not inhibit or associate with the Hippo kinase complex. The ability of AJUBA LIM proteins to inhibit YAP regulation by Hippo and to associate with the kinase complex directly correlate with their capacity to limit Hippo signaling during Drosophila wing development. AJUBA LIM proteins did not influence YAP activity in response to cell-extrinsic or cell-intrinsic mechanical signals. Thus, AJUBA LIM proteins limit Hippo pathway activity in contexts where cell proliferation is needed. PMID:27457617

  19. Dual delivery of active antibactericidal agents and bone morphogenetic protein at sustainable high concentrations using biodegradable sheath-core-structured drug-eluting nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yung-Hen; Lin, Chang-Tun; Yu, Yi-Hsun; Chou, Ying-Chao; Liu, Shih-Jung; Chan, Err-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed biodegradable sheath-core-structured drug-eluting nanofibers for sustainable delivery of antibiotics (vancomycin and ceftazidime) and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP-2) via electrospinning. To prepare the biodegradable sheath-core nanofibers, we first prepared solutions of poly(d,l)-lactide-co-glycolide, vancomycin, and ceftazidime in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol and rhBMP-2 in phosphate-buffered solution. The poly(d,l)-lactide-co-glycolide/antibiotics and rhBMP-2 solutions were then fed into two different capillary tubes controlled by two independent pumps for coaxial electrospinning. The electrospun nanofiber morphology was observed under a scanning electron microscope. We further characterized the in vitro antibiotic release from the nanofibers via high-performance liquid chromatography and that of rhBMP-2 via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and alkaline phosphatase activity. We showed that the biodegradable coaxially electrospun nanofibers could release high vancomycin/ceftazidime concentrations (well above the minimum inhibition concentration [MIC]90) and rhBMP-2 for >4 weeks. These experimental results demonstrate that novel biodegradable nanofibers can be constructed with various pharmaceuticals and proteins for long-term drug deliveries. PMID:27574423

  20. Dual delivery of active antibactericidal agents and bone morphogenetic protein at sustainable high concentrations using biodegradable sheath-core-structured drug-eluting nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yung-Hen; Lin, Chang-Tun; Yu, Yi-Hsun; Chou, Ying-Chao; Liu, Shih-Jung; Chan, Err-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed biodegradable sheath-core-structured drug-eluting nanofibers for sustainable delivery of antibiotics (vancomycin and ceftazidime) and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP-2) via electrospinning. To prepare the biodegradable sheath-core nanofibers, we first prepared solutions of poly(d,l)-lactide-co-glycolide, vancomycin, and ceftazidime in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol and rhBMP-2 in phosphate-buffered solution. The poly(d,l)-lactide-co-glycolide/antibiotics and rhBMP-2 solutions were then fed into two different capillary tubes controlled by two independent pumps for coaxial electrospinning. The electrospun nanofiber morphology was observed under a scanning electron microscope. We further characterized the in vitro antibiotic release from the nanofibers via high-performance liquid chromatography and that of rhBMP-2 via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and alkaline phosphatase activity. We showed that the biodegradable coaxially electrospun nanofibers could release high vancomycin/ceftazidime concentrations (well above the minimum inhibition concentration [MIC]90) and rhBMP-2 for >4 weeks. These experimental results demonstrate that novel biodegradable nanofibers can be constructed with various pharmaceuticals and proteins for long-term drug deliveries. PMID:27574423

  1. Dual delivery of active antibactericidal agents and bone morphogenetic protein at sustainable high concentrations using biodegradable sheath-core-structured drug-eluting nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yung-Hen; Lin, Chang-Tun; Yu, Yi-Hsun; Chou, Ying-Chao; Liu, Shih-Jung; Chan, Err-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed biodegradable sheath-core-structured drug-eluting nanofibers for sustainable delivery of antibiotics (vancomycin and ceftazidime) and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP-2) via electrospinning. To prepare the biodegradable sheath-core nanofibers, we first prepared solutions of poly(d,l)-lactide-co-glycolide, vancomycin, and ceftazidime in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol and rhBMP-2 in phosphate-buffered solution. The poly(d,l)-lactide-co-glycolide/antibiotics and rhBMP-2 solutions were then fed into two different capillary tubes controlled by two independent pumps for coaxial electrospinning. The electrospun nanofiber morphology was observed under a scanning electron microscope. We further characterized the in vitro antibiotic release from the nanofibers via high-performance liquid chromatography and that of rhBMP-2 via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and alkaline phosphatase activity. We showed that the biodegradable coaxially electrospun nanofibers could release high vancomycin/ceftazidime concentrations (well above the minimum inhibition concentration [MIC]90) and rhBMP-2 for >4 weeks. These experimental results demonstrate that novel biodegradable nanofibers can be constructed with various pharmaceuticals and proteins for long-term drug deliveries.

  2. Possible Involvement of the Double-Stranded RNA-Binding Core Protein ςA in the Resistance of Avian Reovirus to Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Costas, José; González-López, Claudia; Vakharia, Vikram N.; Benavente, Javier

    2000-01-01

    Treatment of primary cultures of chicken embryo fibroblasts with a recombinant chicken alpha/beta interferon (rcIFN) induces an antiviral state that causes a strong inhibition of vaccinia virus and vesicular stomatitis virus replication but has no effect on avian reovirus S1133 replication. The fact that avian reovirus polypeptides are synthesized normally in rcIFN-treated cells prompted us to investigate whether this virus expresses factors that interfere with the activation and/or the activity of the IFN-induced, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-dependent enzymes. Our results demonstrate that extracts of avian-reovirus-infected cells, but not those of uninfected cells, are able to relieve the translation-inhibitory activity of dsRNA in reticulocyte lysates, by blocking the activation of the dsRNA-dependent enzymes. In addition, our results show that protein ςA, an S1133 core polypeptide, binds to dsRNA in an irreversible manner and that clearing this protein from extracts of infected cells abolishes their protranslational capacity. Taken together, our results raise the interesting possibility that protein ςA antagonizes the IFN-induced cellular response against avian reovirus by blocking the intracellular activation of enzyme pathways dependent on dsRNA, as has been suggested for several other viral dsRNA-binding proteins. PMID:10627522

  3. The core and carboxyl-terminal domains of the integrase protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 each contribute to nonspecific DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, A; Hickman, A B; Craigie, R

    1994-01-01

    The integrase protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 removes two nucleotides from the 3' ends of reverse-transcribed human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA (3' processing) and covalently inserts the processed ends into a target DNA (DNA strand transfer). Mutant integrase proteins that lack the amino-and/or carboxyl-terminal domains are incapable of catalyzing 3' processing and DNA strand transfer but are competent for an apparent reversal of the DNA strand transfer reaction (disintegration) in vitro. Here, we investigate the binding of integrase to DNA by UV cross-linking. Cross-linked complexes form with a variety of DNA substrates independent of the presence of divalent metal ion. Analysis with amino- and carboxyl-terminal deletion mutant proteins shows that residues 213 to 266 of the 288-residue protein are required for efficient cross-linking in the absence of divalent metal ion. Carboxyl-terminal deletion mutants that lack this region efficiently cross-link only to the branched disintegration DNA substrate, and this reaction is dependent on the presence of metal ion. Both the core and C-terminal domains of integrase therefore contribute to nonspecific DNA binding. Images PMID:8057470

  4. Evidence for posttranslational protein flavinylation in the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and biochemical insights from the catalytic core of a periplasmic flavin-trafficking protein

    DOE PAGES

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2015-05-05

    The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete’s periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redoxmore » system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg²⁺-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg²⁺-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp’s dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg²⁺ in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm.« less

  5. Evidence for Posttranslational Protein Flavinylation in the Syphilis Spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and Biochemical Insights from the Catalytic Core of a Periplasmic Flavin-Trafficking Protein

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete’s periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redox system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg2+-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg2+-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp’s dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg2+ in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm. PMID:25944861

  6. Composite Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Spang & Company's new configuration of converter transformer cores is a composite of gapped and ungapped cores assembled together in concentric relationship. The net effect of the composite design is to combine the protection from saturation offered by the gapped core with the lower magnetizing requirement of the ungapped core. The uncut core functions under normal operating conditions and the cut core takes over during abnormal operation to prevent power surges and their potentially destructive effect on transistors. Principal customers are aerospace and defense manufacturers. Cores also have applicability in commercial products where precise power regulation is required, as in the power supplies for large mainframe computers.

  7. Dynamic behavior of Arabidopsis eIF4A-III, putative core protein of exon junction complex: fast relocation to nucleolus and splicing speckles under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Koroleva, O A; Calder, G; Pendle, A F; Kim, S H; Lewandowska, D; Simpson, C G; Jones, I M; Brown, J W S; Shaw, P J

    2009-05-01

    Here, we identify the Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog of the mammalian DEAD box helicase, eIF4A-III, the putative anchor protein of exon junction complex (EJC) on mRNA. Arabidopsis eIF4A-III interacts with an ortholog of the core EJC component, ALY/Ref, and colocalizes with other EJC components, such as Mago, Y14, and RNPS1, suggesting a similar function in EJC assembly to animal eIF4A-III. A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-eIF4A-III fusion protein showed localization to several subnuclear domains: to the nucleoplasm during normal growth and to the nucleolus and splicing speckles in response to hypoxia. Treatment with the respiratory inhibitor sodium azide produced an identical response to the hypoxia stress. Treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 led to accumulation of GFP-eIF4A-III mainly in the nucleolus, suggesting that transition of eIF4A-III between subnuclear domains and/or accumulation in nuclear speckles is controlled by proteolysis-labile factors. As revealed by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis, the nucleoplasmic fraction was highly mobile, while the speckles were the least mobile fractions, and the nucleolar fraction had an intermediate mobility. Sequestration of eIF4A-III into nuclear pools with different mobility is likely to reflect the transcriptional and mRNA processing state of the cell. PMID:19435936

  8. PrionW: a server to identify proteins containing glutamine/asparagine rich prion-like domains and their amyloid cores.

    PubMed

    Zambrano, Rafael; Conchillo-Sole, Oscar; Iglesias, Valentin; Illa, Ricard; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; Sabate, Raimon; Daura, Xavier; Ventura, Salvador

    2015-07-01

    Prions are a particular type of amyloids with the ability to self-perpetuate and propagate in vivo. Prion-like conversion underlies important biological processes but is also connected to human disease. Yeast prions are the best understood transmissible amyloids. In these proteins, prion formation from an initially soluble state involves a structural conversion, driven, in many cases, by specific domains enriched in glutamine/asparagine (Q/N) residues. Importantly, domains sharing this compositional bias are also present in the proteomes of higher organisms, thus suggesting that prion-like conversion might be an evolutionary conserved mechanism. We have recently shown that the identification and evaluation of the potency of amyloid nucleating sequences in putative prion domains allows discrimination of genuine prions. PrionW is a web application that exploits this principle to scan sequences in order to identify proteins containing Q/N enriched prion-like domains (PrLDs) in large datasets. When used to scan the complete yeast proteome, PrionW identifies previously experimentally validated prions with high accuracy. Users can analyze up to 10 000 sequences at a time, PrLD-containing proteins are identified and their putative PrLDs and amyloid nucleating cores visualized and scored. The output files can be downloaded for further analysis. PrionW server can be accessed at http://bioinf.uab.cat/prionw/.

  9. PrionW: a server to identify proteins containing glutamine/asparagine rich prion-like domains and their amyloid cores

    PubMed Central

    Zambrano, Rafael; Conchillo-Sole, Oscar; Iglesias, Valentin; Illa, Ricard; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; Sabate, Raimon; Daura, Xavier; Ventura, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    Prions are a particular type of amyloids with the ability to self-perpetuate and propagate in vivo. Prion-like conversion underlies important biological processes but is also connected to human disease. Yeast prions are the best understood transmissible amyloids. In these proteins, prion formation from an initially soluble state involves a structural conversion, driven, in many cases, by specific domains enriched in glutamine/asparagine (Q/N) residues. Importantly, domains sharing this compositional bias are also present in the proteomes of higher organisms, thus suggesting that prion-like conversion might be an evolutionary conserved mechanism. We have recently shown that the identification and evaluation of the potency of amyloid nucleating sequences in putative prion domains allows discrimination of genuine prions. PrionW is a web application that exploits this principle to scan sequences in order to identify proteins containing Q/N enriched prion-like domains (PrLDs) in large datasets. When used to scan the complete yeast proteome, PrionW identifies previously experimentally validated prions with high accuracy. Users can analyze up to 10 000 sequences at a time, PrLD-containing proteins are identified and their putative PrLDs and amyloid nucleating cores visualized and scored. The output files can be downloaded for further analysis. PrionW server can be accessed at http://bioinf.uab.cat/prionw/. PMID:25977297

  10. Dynamic behavior of Arabidopsis eIF4A-III, putative core protein of exon junction complex: fast relocation to nucleolus and splicing speckles under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Koroleva, O A; Calder, G; Pendle, A F; Kim, S H; Lewandowska, D; Simpson, C G; Jones, I M; Brown, J W S; Shaw, P J

    2009-05-01

    Here, we identify the Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog of the mammalian DEAD box helicase, eIF4A-III, the putative anchor protein of exon junction complex (EJC) on mRNA. Arabidopsis eIF4A-III interacts with an ortholog of the core EJC component, ALY/Ref, and colocalizes with other EJC components, such as Mago, Y14, and RNPS1, suggesting a similar function in EJC assembly to animal eIF4A-III. A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-eIF4A-III fusion protein showed localization to several subnuclear domains: to the nucleoplasm during normal growth and to the nucleolus and splicing speckles in response to hypoxia. Treatment with the respiratory inhibitor sodium azide produced an identical response to the hypoxia stress. Treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 led to accumulation of GFP-eIF4A-III mainly in the nucleolus, suggesting that transition of eIF4A-III between subnuclear domains and/or accumulation in nuclear speckles is controlled by proteolysis-labile factors. As revealed by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis, the nucleoplasmic fraction was highly mobile, while the speckles were the least mobile fractions, and the nucleolar fraction had an intermediate mobility. Sequestration of eIF4A-III into nuclear pools with different mobility is likely to reflect the transcriptional and mRNA processing state of the cell.

  11. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of the protein module (BIV2-Helix) in the fusion core of bovine immunodeficiency-like virus (BIV) gp40

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaodong; Li, Ming; Xu, Yanhui; Lou, Zhiyong; Meng, Zhaohui; Li, Shu; Tian, Bo; Gao, George F.; Rao, Zihe

    2005-01-01

    The fusion core of bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) gp40 is proposed to be involved in membrane fusion. However, no crystal structures are yet available. A predicted protein module BIV2-Helix of BIVgp40 has been expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by chromatography. Recombinant BIV2-Helix was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique at 291 K. The crystals were grown in MPD and belonged to the primitive rhombohedral space group R3, with unit-cell parameters a = 39.17, b = 39.17, c = 295.05 Å and two molecules per asymmetric unit. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.76 Å in the home laboratory from a single crystal. PMID:16511008

  12. Crystal Structure of a Complex of Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) and Haemophilus influenzae Lipopolysaccharide Reveals Shielding of Core Structures in SP-D-Resistant Strains

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Howard W.; Mackay, Rose-Marie; Deadman, Mary E.; Hood, Derek W.; Madsen, Jens; Moxon, E. Richard; Townsend, J. Paul; Reid, Kenneth B. M.; Ahmed, Abdul; Shaw, Amy J.; Greenhough, Trevor J.

    2016-01-01

    The carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs) of lung collectin surfactant protein D (SP-D) recognize sugar patterns on the surface of lung pathogens and promote phagocytosis. Using Haemophilus influenzae Eagan strains expressing well-characterized lipopolysaccharide (LPS) surface structures of various levels of complexity, we show that bacterial recognition and binding by SP-D is inversely related to LPS chain extent and complexity. The crystal structure of a biologically active recombinant trimeric SP-D CRD complexed with a delipidated Eagan 4A LPS suggests that efficient LPS recognition by SP-D requires multiple binding interactions utilizing the three major ligand-binding determinants in the SP-D binding pocket, with Ca-dependent binding of inner-core heptose accompanied by interaction of anhydro-Kdo (4,7-anhydro-3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid) with Arg343 and Asp325. Combined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) binding analyses, our results show that extended LPS structures previously thought to be targets for collectins are important in shielding the more vulnerable sites in the LPS core, revealing a mechanism by which pathogens with complex LPS extensions efficiently evade a first-line mucosal innate immune defense. The structure also reveals for the first time the dominant form of anhydro-Kdo. PMID:26953329

  13. Crystal Structure of a Complex of Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) and Haemophilus influenzae Lipopolysaccharide Reveals Shielding of Core Structures in SP-D-Resistant Strains.

    PubMed

    Clark, Howard W; Mackay, Rose-Marie; Deadman, Mary E; Hood, Derek W; Madsen, Jens; Moxon, E Richard; Townsend, J Paul; Reid, Kenneth B M; Ahmed, Abdul; Shaw, Amy J; Greenhough, Trevor J; Shrive, Annette K

    2016-05-01

    The carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs) of lung collectin surfactant protein D (SP-D) recognize sugar patterns on the surface of lung pathogens and promote phagocytosis. Using Haemophilus influenzae Eagan strains expressing well-characterized lipopolysaccharide (LPS) surface structures of various levels of complexity, we show that bacterial recognition and binding by SP-D is inversely related to LPS chain extent and complexity. The crystal structure of a biologically active recombinant trimeric SP-D CRD complexed with a delipidated Eagan 4A LPS suggests that efficient LPS recognition by SP-D requires multiple binding interactions utilizing the three major ligand-binding determinants in the SP-D binding pocket, with Ca-dependent binding of inner-core heptose accompanied by interaction of anhydro-Kdo (4,7-anhydro-3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid) with Arg343 and Asp325. Combined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) binding analyses, our results show that extended LPS structures previously thought to be targets for collectins are important in shielding the more vulnerable sites in the LPS core, revealing a mechanism by which pathogens with complex LPS extensions efficiently evade a first-line mucosal innate immune defense. The structure also reveals for the first time the dominant form of anhydro-Kdo.

  14. Clusters of branched aliphatic side chains serve as cores of stability in the native state of the HisF TIM barrel protein.

    PubMed

    Gangadhara, Basavanapura N; Laine, Jennifer M; Kathuria, Sagar V; Massi, Francesca; Matthews, C Robert

    2013-03-25

    Imidazole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase is a heterodimeric allosteric enzyme that catalyzes consecutive reactions in imidazole biosynthesis through its HisF and HisH subunits. The unusually slow unfolding reaction of the isolated HisF TIM barrel domain from the thermophilic bacteria, Thermotoga maritima, enabled an NMR-based site-specific analysis of the main-chain hydrogen bonds that stabilize its native conformation. Very strong protection against exchange with solvent deuterium in the native state was found in a subset of buried positions in α-helices and pervasively in the underlying β-strands associated with a pair of large clusters of isoleucine, leucine and valine (ILV) side chains located in the α7(βα)8(βα)1-2 and α2(βα)3-6β7 segments of the (βα)8 barrel. The most densely packed region of the large cluster, α3(βα)4-6β7, correlates closely with the core of stability previously observed in computational, protein engineering and NMR dynamics studies, demonstrating a key role for this cluster in determining the thermodynamic and structural properties of the native state of HisF. When considered with the results of previous studies where ILV clusters were found to stabilize the hydrogen-bonded networks in folding intermediates for other TIM barrel proteins, it appears that clusters of branched aliphatic side chains can serve as cores of stability across the entire folding reaction coordinate of one of the most common motifs in biology.

  15. Effect of a buried ion pair in the hydrophobic core of a protein: An insight from constant pH molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Arup K

    2015-03-01

    Constant pH molecular dynamics (CpHMD) is a commonly used sampling method, which incorporates the coupling of conformational flexibility and protonation state of a protein during the simulation by using pH as an external parameter. The effects on the structure and stability of a hyperstable variant of staphylococcal nuclease (Δ+PHS) protein of an artificial charge pair buried in its hydrophobic core are investigated by applying both CpHMD and accelerated molecular dynamics coupled with constant pH (CpHaMD) methods. Generalized Born electrostatics is used to model the solvent water. Two sets of starting coordinates of V23E/L36K variant of Δ+PHS, namely, Maestro generated coordinates from Δ+PHS and crystal structure coordinates of the same are considered for detail investigations. On the basis of root mean square displacement (RMSD) and root mean square fluctuations (RMSF) calculations, it is observed that this variant is stable over a wide range of pH. The calculated pKa values for aspartate and glutamate residues based on both CpHMD and CpHaMD simulations are consistent with the reported experimental values (within ± 0.5 to ± 1.5 pH unit), which clearly indicates that the local chemical environment of the carboxylic acids in V23E/L36K variant are comparable to the parent form. The strong salt bridge interaction between the mutated pair, E23/K36 and additional hydrogen bonds formed in the V23E/L36K variant, may help to compensate for the unfavorable self-energy experienced by the burial of these residues in the hydrophobic core. However, from RMSD, RMSF, and pKa analysis, no significant change in the global conformation of V23E/L36K variant with respect to the parent form, Δ+PHS is noticed. PMID:25363335

  16. Variability within a pea core collection of LEAM and HSP22, two mitochondrial seed proteins involved in stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Avelange-Macherel, Marie-Hélène; Payet, Nicole; Lalanne, David; Neveu, Martine; Tolleter, Dimitri; Burstin, Judith; Macherel, David

    2015-07-01

    LEAM, a late embryogenesis abundant protein, and HSP22, a small heat shock protein, were shown to accumulate in the mitochondria during pea (Pisum sativum L.) seed development, where they are expected to contribute to desiccation tolerance. Here, their expression was examined in seeds of 89 pea genotypes by Western blot analysis. All genotypes expressed LEAM and HSP22 in similar amounts. In contrast with HSP22, LEAM displayed different isoforms according to apparent molecular mass. Each of the 89 genotypes harboured a single LEAM isoform. Genomic and RT-PCR analysis revealed four LEAM genes differing by a small variable indel in the coding region. These variations were consistent with the apparent molecular mass of each isoform. Indels, which occurred in repeated domains, did not alter the main properties of LEAM. Structural modelling indicated that the class A α-helix structure, which allows interactions with the mitochondrial inner membrane in the dry state, was preserved in all isoforms, suggesting functionality is maintained. The overall results point out the essential character of LEAM and HSP22 in pea seeds. LEAM variability is discussed in terms of pea breeding history as well as LEA gene evolution mechanisms. PMID:25367071

  17. Variability within a pea core collection of LEAM and HSP22, two mitochondrial seed proteins involved in stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Avelange-Macherel, Marie-Hélène; Payet, Nicole; Lalanne, David; Neveu, Martine; Tolleter, Dimitri; Burstin, Judith; Macherel, David

    2015-07-01

    LEAM, a late embryogenesis abundant protein, and HSP22, a small heat shock protein, were shown to accumulate in the mitochondria during pea (Pisum sativum L.) seed development, where they are expected to contribute to desiccation tolerance. Here, their expression was examined in seeds of 89 pea genotypes by Western blot analysis. All genotypes expressed LEAM and HSP22 in similar amounts. In contrast with HSP22, LEAM displayed different isoforms according to apparent molecular mass. Each of the 89 genotypes harboured a single LEAM isoform. Genomic and RT-PCR analysis revealed four LEAM genes differing by a small variable indel in the coding region. These variations were consistent with the apparent molecular mass of each isoform. Indels, which occurred in repeated domains, did not alter the main properties of LEAM. Structural modelling indicated that the class A α-helix structure, which allows interactions with the mitochondrial inner membrane in the dry state, was preserved in all isoforms, suggesting functionality is maintained. The overall results point out the essential character of LEAM and HSP22 in pea seeds. LEAM variability is discussed in terms of pea breeding history as well as LEA gene evolution mechanisms.

  18. The antibacterial toxin colicin N binds to the inner core of lipopolysaccharide and close to its translocator protein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christopher L; Ridley, Helen; Marchetti, Roberta; Silipo, Alba; Griffin, David C; Crawford, Lucy; Bonev, Boyan; Molinaro, Antonio; Lakey, Jeremy H

    2014-05-01

    Colicins are a diverse family of large antibacterial protein toxins, secreted by and active against Escherichia coli and must cross their target cell's outer membrane barrier to kill. To achieve this, most colicins require an abundant porin (e.g. OmpF) plus a low-copy-number, high-affinity, outer membrane protein receptor (e.g. BtuB). Recently, genetic screens have suggested that colicin N (ColN), which has no high-affinity receptor, targets highly abundant lipopolysaccharide (LPS) instead. Here we reveal the details of this interaction and demonstrate that the ColN receptor-binding domain (ColN-R) binds to a specific region of LPS close to the membrane surface. Data from in vitro studies using calorimetry and both liquid- and solid-state NMR reveal the interactions behind the in vivo requirement for a defined oligosaccharide region of LPS. Delipidated LPS (LPS(Δ) (LIPID) ) shows weaker binding; and thus full affinity requires the lipid component. The site of LPS binding means that ColN will preferably bind at the interface and thus position itself close to the surface of its translocon component, OmpF. ColN is, currently, unique among colicins in requiring LPS and, combined with previous data, this implies that the ColN translocon is distinct from those of other known colicins.

  19. [Spiral cores of synaptonemal complex lateral elements at the diplotene stage in rye include the ASY1 protein].

    PubMed

    Simanovsky, S A; Matveevsky, S N; Iordanskaya, I V; Spangenberg, V E; Kolomiets, O L; Bogdanov, Yu B

    2014-10-01

    After completing their functioning, synaptonemal complexes (SCs) degrade during the diplotene stage. In the pollen mother cells of rye Secale cereal L., this occurs through the formation of gaps in lateral elements of the SCs and the shortening of fragments of SCs until their complete disappearance. However, when contrasting SCs with silver nitrate solution at a pH of 3.5-4.5, these gaps appear to be filled with threads associated with SC lateral elements. As the diplotene stage proceeds and gradual degradation of SC fragments continues, these threads turn into submicroscopic spirals. In this study, we found that the threads and spirals associated with degrading synaptonemal complexes are stained by antibodies to the ASY1 protein ofArabidopsis thaliana lateral elements and thus are degradation products of the lateral elements of SCs. PMID:25720257

  20. The core microprocessor component DiGeorge syndrome critical region 8 (DGCR8) is a nonspecific RNA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Roth, Braden M; Ishimaru, Daniella; Hennig, Mirko

    2013-09-13

    MicroRNA (miRNA) biogenesis follows a conserved succession of processing steps, beginning with the recognition and liberation of an miRNA-containing precursor miRNA hairpin from a large primary miRNA transcript (pri-miRNA) by the Microprocessor, which consists of the nuclear RNase III Drosha and the double-stranded RNA-binding domain protein DGCR8 (DiGeorge syndrome critical region protein 8). Current models suggest that specific recognition is driven by DGCR8 detection of single-stranded elements of the pri-miRNA stem-loop followed by Drosha recruitment and pri-miRNA cleavage. Because countless RNA transcripts feature single-stranded-dsRNA junctions and DGCR8 can bind hundreds of mRNAs, we explored correlations between RNA binding properties of DGCR8 and specific pri-miRNA substrate processing. We found that DGCR8 bound single-stranded, double-stranded, and random hairpin transcripts with similar affinity. Further investigation of DGCR8/pri-mir-16 interactions by NMR detected intermediate exchange regimes over a wide range of stoichiometric ratios. Diffusion analysis of DGCR8/pri-mir-16 interactions by pulsed field gradient NMR lent further support to dynamic complex formation involving free components in exchange with complexes of varying stoichiometry, although in vitro processing assays showed exclusive cleavage of pri-mir-16 variants bearing single-stranded flanking regions. Our results indicate that DGCR8 binds RNA nonspecifically. Therefore, a sequential model of DGCR8 recognition followed by Drosha recruitment is unlikely. Known RNA substrate requirements are broad and include 70-nucleotide hairpins with unpaired flanking regions. Thus, specific RNA processing is likely facilitated by preformed DGCR8-Drosha heterodimers that can discriminate between authentic substrates and other hairpins.

  1. Cloning, expression and purification of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) core protein and its use in the development of an indirect ELISA for serologic detection of DHBV infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Jia, Renyong; Wang, Mingshu; Huang, Juan; Zhu, Dekang; Chen, Shun; Yin, Zhongqiong; Wang, Yin; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2014-05-01

    Infecting ducks with duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) is widely accepted as a relevant model for studying aspects of human HBV infection. However, efficient and sensitive diagnostic methods for the various infection models are limited. In order to provide a more simple and convenient method for serologic diagnosis, we improved the production of recombinant DHBV viral capsid protein (core protein) and then used it to develop an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detecting anti-DHBc antibodies (DHBcAg ELISA) in DHBV-infected ducks. Given the positive/negative cut-off value, the maximum dilution of duck sera in which anti-DHBc antibodies could be detected was 1:12,800. In addition, the DHBcAg ELISA displayed no cross reactivity with duck antisera against duck circovirus (DuCV), duck plague virus (DPV), duck hepatitis virus (DHV), duck swollen head septicemia virus (DSHSV), avian influenza virus (AIV), Riemerella anatipestifer, Salmonella anatum, or Escherichia coli. Furthermore, the coefficients of variation (CVs) of inter-assay and intra-assay experiments were both below than 10 %. When compared to PCR for accuracy on clinical samples from cases of suspected DHBV infection, the DHBcAg showed 95.45 % coincidence with PCR. In conclusion, recombinant DHBc was readily produced and used to establish a simple DHBcAg ELISA that provided a highly specific and sensitive method for analysis of clinical samples.

  2. MacA, a periplasmic membrane fusion protein of the macrolide transporter MacAB-TolC, binds lipopolysaccharide core specifically and with high affinity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shuo; Zgurskaya, Helen I

    2013-11-01

    The Escherichia coli MacAB-TolC transporter has been implicated in efflux of macrolide antibiotics and secretion of enterotoxin STII. In this study, we found that purified MacA, a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, contains one tightly bound rough core lipopolysaccharide (R-LPS) molecule per MacA molecule. R-LPS was bound specifically to MacA protein with affinity exceeding that of polymyxin B. Sequence analyses showed that MacA contains two high-density clusters of positively charged amino acid residues located in the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain and the periplasmic C-terminal domain. Substitutions in the C-terminal cluster reducing the positive-charge density completely abolished binding of R-LPS. At the same time, these substitutions significantly reduced the functionality of MacA in the protection of E. coli against macrolides in vivo and in the in vitro MacB ATPase stimulation assays. Taken together, our results suggest that R-LPS or a similar glycolipid is a physiological substrate of MacAB-TolC. PMID:23974027

  3. Utilization of fluorescent microspheres and a green fluorescent protein-marked strain for assessment of microbiological contamination of permafrost and ground ice core samples from the Canadian High Arctic.

    PubMed

    Juck, D F; Whissell, G; Steven, B; Pollard, W; McKay, C P; Greer, C W; Whyte, L G

    2005-02-01

    Fluorescent microspheres were applied in a novel fashion during subsurface drilling of permafrost and ground ice in the Canadian High Arctic to monitor the exogenous microbiological contamination of core samples obtained during the drilling process. Prior to each drill run, a concentrated fluorescent microsphere (0.5-microm diameter) solution was applied to the interior surfaces of the drill bit, core catcher, and core tube and allowed to dry. Macroscopic examination in the field demonstrated reliable transfer of the microspheres to core samples, while detailed microscopic examination revealed penetration levels of less than 1 cm from the core exterior. To monitor for microbial contamination during downstream processing of the permafrost and ground ice cores, a Pseudomonas strain expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) was painted on the core exterior prior to processing. Contamination of the processed core interiors with the GFP-expressing strain was not detected by culturing the samples or by PCR to detect the gfp marker gene. These methodologies were quick, were easy to apply, and should help to monitor the exogenous microbiological contamination of pristine permafrost and ground ice samples for downstream culture-dependent and culture-independent microbial analyses.

  4. Utilization of Fluorescent Microspheres and a Green Fluorescent Protein-Marked Strain for Assessment of Microbiological Contamination of Permafrost and Ground Ice Core Samples from the Canadian High Arctic

    PubMed Central

    Juck, D. F.; Whissell, G.; Steven, B.; Pollard, W.; McKay, C. P.; Greer, C. W.; Whyte, L. G.

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescent microspheres were applied in a novel fashion during subsurface drilling of permafrost and ground ice in the Canadian High Arctic to monitor the exogenous microbiological contamination of core samples obtained during the drilling process. Prior to each drill run, a concentrated fluorescent microsphere (0.5-μm diameter) solution was applied to the interior surfaces of the drill bit, core catcher, and core tube and allowed to dry. Macroscopic examination in the field demonstrated reliable transfer of the microspheres to core samples, while detailed microscopic examination revealed penetration levels of less than 1 cm from the core exterior. To monitor for microbial contamination during downstream processing of the permafrost and ground ice cores, a Pseudomonas strain expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) was painted on the core exterior prior to processing. Contamination of the processed core interiors with the GFP-expressing strain was not detected by culturing the samples or by PCR to detect the gfp marker gene. These methodologies were quick, were easy to apply, and should help to monitor the exogenous microbiological contamination of pristine permafrost and ground ice samples for downstream culture-dependent and culture-independent microbial analyses. PMID:15691963

  5. Expression and Characterization of an Ice Binding Protein from a Bacterium Isolated at a Depth of 3,519 Meters in the Vostok Ice Core, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christner, B. C.; Achberger, A.; Brox, T. I.; Skidmore, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    The cryopreservation of microorganisms in ancient glacial ice is possible if lethal levels of macromolecular damage are not incurred and cellular integrity is not compromised via intracellular ice formation or recrystallization. There are numerous examples of cold-adapted species that prevent or limit ice crystal growth by producing ice-binding proteins (IBP). Previously, a bacterium (isolate 3519-10; Flavobacteriaceae family) recovered from a depth of 3,519 meters below the surface in the Vostok ice core was shown to produce and secrete an IBP that inhibits the recrystallization of ice. To explore the phenotypic advantage that IBPs confer to ice-entrapped cells, experiments were designed to examine the expression of 3519-10's IBP gene and protein at different temperatures, assess the effect of the IBP on bacterial viability in ice, and determine how the IBP influences the physical structure of the ice. Total RNA isolated from aerobic cultures grown at temperatures between 4C to 25C and analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR indicated constitutive expression of the IBP gene. Additionally, SDS-PAGE analysis of 3519-10's extracellular proteins revealed a polypeptide corresponding to the predicted size of the 54 kDa IBP at all temperatures tested. The total extracellular protein fraction was subsequently used in assays with Escherichia coli to examine the effect of the IBP on bacterial survival in warm ice (-5C) and after freeze-thaw cycling. In the presence of 100 μg mL-1 of extracellular protein from 3519-10, the survival of E. coli was increased by greater than 100-fold; however, the survival of E. coli suspensions containing the same concentration of bovine serum albumin was not significantly different than controls (p<0.05). Microscopic analysis of ice formed in the presence of the IBP indicated that in a mm^2 field of view, there were 5 times as many crystals as in ice formed in the presence of washed 3519-10 cells and non-IBP producing bacteria, and 10 times as

  6. Nuclear Export of Human Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein and Pregenomic RNA Depends on the Cellular NXF1-p15 Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ching-Chun; Huang, Er-Yi; Li, Hung-Cheng; Su, Pei-Yi; Shih, Chiaho

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein (HBc) can shuttle between nucleus and cytoplasm. Cytoplasm-predominant HBc is clinically associated with severe liver inflammation. Previously, we found that HBc arginine-rich domain (ARD) can associate with a host factor NXF1 (TAP) by coimmunoprecipitation. It is well known that NXF1-p15 heterodimer can serve as a major export receptor of nuclear mRNA as a ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP). In the NXF1-p15 pathway, TREX (transcription/export) complex plays an important role in coupling nuclear pre-mRNA processing with mRNA export in mammalian cells. Here, we tested the hypothesis whether HBc and HBV specific RNA can be exported via the TREX and NXF1-p15 mediated pathway. We demonstrated here that HBc can physically and specifically associate with TREX components, and the NXF1-p15 export receptor by coimmunoprecipitation. Accumulation of HBc protein in the nucleus can be induced by the interference with TREX and NXF1-p15 mediated RNA export machinery. HBV transcripts encodes a non-spliced 3.5 kb pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) which can serve as a template for reverse transcription. Cytoplasmic HBV pgRNA appeared to be reduced by siRNA treatment specific for the NXF1-p15 complex by quantitative RT-qPCR and Northern blot analyses. This result suggests that the pgRNA was also exported via the NXF1-p15 machinery. We entertain the hypothesis that HBc protein can be exported as an RNP cargo via the mRNA export pathway by hijacking the TREX and NXF1-p15 complex. In our current and previous studies, HBc is not required for pgRNA accumulation in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, HBc ARD can mediate nuclear export of a chimeric protein containing HBc ARD in a pgRNA-independent manner. Taken together, it suggests that while both pgRNA and HBc protein exports are dependent on NXF1-p15, they are using the same export machinery in a manner independent of each other. PMID:25360769

  7. Comparative Analysis of the 15.5kD Box C/D snoRNP Core Protein in the Primitive Eukaryote Giardia lamblia Reveals Unique Structural and Functional Features

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Shyamasri; Buhrman, Greg; Gagnon, Keith; Mattos, Carla; Brown, II, Bernard A.; Maxwell, E. Stuart

    2012-07-11

    Box C/D ribonucleoproteins (RNP) guide the 2'-O-methylation of targeted nucleotides in archaeal and eukaryotic rRNAs. The archaeal L7Ae and eukaryotic 15.5kD box C/D RNP core protein homologues initiate RNP assembly by recognizing kink-turn (K-turn) motifs. The crystal structure of the 15.5kD core protein from the primitive eukaryote Giardia lamblia is described here to a resolution of 1.8 {angstrom}. The Giardia 15.5kD protein exhibits the typical {alpha}-{beta}-{alpha} sandwich fold exhibited by both archaeal L7Ae and eukaryotic 15.5kD proteins. Characteristic of eukaryotic homologues, the Giardia 15.5kD protein binds the K-turn motif but not the variant K-loop motif. The highly conserved residues of loop 9, critical for RNA binding, also exhibit conformations similar to those of the human 15.5kD protein when bound to the K-turn motif. However, comparative sequence analysis indicated a distinct evolutionary position between Archaea and Eukarya. Indeed, assessment of the Giardia 15.5kD protein in denaturing experiments demonstrated an intermediate stability in protein structure when compared with that of the eukaryotic mouse 15.5kD and archaeal Methanocaldococcus jannaschii L7Ae proteins. Most notable was the ability of the Giardia 15.5kD protein to assemble in vitro a catalytically active chimeric box C/D RNP utilizing the archaeal M. jannaschii Nop56/58 and fibrillarin core proteins. In contrast, a catalytically competent chimeric RNP could not be assembled using the mouse 15.5kD protein. Collectively, these analyses suggest that the G. lamblia 15.5kD protein occupies a unique position in the evolution of this box C/D RNP core protein retaining structural and functional features characteristic of both archaeal L7Ae and higher eukaryotic 15.5kD homologues.

  8. Identification of the gC1qR sites for the HIV-1 viral envelope protein gp41 and the HCV core protein: Implications in viral-specific pathogenesis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pednekar, Lina; Valentino, Alisa; Ji, Yan; Tumma, Nithin; Valentino, Christopher; Kadoor, Adarsh; Hosszu, Kinga K.; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; Kew, Richard R.; Kishore, Uday; Peerschke, Ellinor I.B.; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane

    2016-01-01

    A substantial body of evidence accumulated over the past 20 years supports the concept that gC1qR is a major pathogen-associated pattern recognition receptor (PRR). This conclusion is based on the fact that, a wide range of bacterial and viral ligands are able to exploit gC1qR to either suppress the host’s immune response and thus enhance their survival, or to gain access into cells to initiate disease. Of the extensive array of viral ligands that have affinity for gC1qR, the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp41, and the core protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) are of major interest as they are known to contribute to the high morbidity and mortality caused by these pathogens. While the HCV core protein binds gC1qR and suppresses T cell proliferation resulting in a significantly diminished immune response, the gp41 employs gC1qR to induce the surface expression of the NK cell ligand, NKp44L, on uninfected CD4+ T cells, thereby rendering them susceptible to autologous destruction by NKp44 receptor expressing NK cells. Because of the potential for the design of peptide-based or antibody-based therapeutic options, the present studies were undertaken to define the gC1qR interaction sites for these pathogen-associated molecular ligands. Employing a solid phase microplate-binding assay, we examined the binding of each viral ligand to wild type gC1qR and 11 gC1qR deletion mutants. The results obtained from these studies have identified two major HCV core protein sites on a domain of gC1qR comprising of residues 144–148 and 196–202. Domain 196–202 in turn, is located in the last half of the larger gC1qR segment encoded by exons IV–VI (residues 159–282), which was proposed previously to contain the site for HCV core protein. The major gC1qR site for gp41 on the other hand, was found to be in a highly conserved region encoded by exon IV and comprises of residues 174–180. Interestingly, gC1qR residues 174–180 also constitute the cell surface-binding site for soluble

  9. Characterization of T-cell response to woodchuck hepatitis virus core protein and protection of woodchucks from infection by immunization with peptides containing a T-cell epitope.

    PubMed Central

    Menne, S; Maschke, J; Tolle, T K; Lu, M; Roggendorf, M

    1997-01-01

    Specific activation of T cells appears to be a prerequisite for viral clearance during hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The T-cell response to HBV core protein is essential in determining an acute or chronic outcome of HBV infection, but how this immune response contributes to the course of infection remains unclear. This is due to results obtained from humans, which are restricted to phenomenological observations occurring during the clinical onset after HBV infection. Thus, a useful animal model is needed. Characterization of the T-cell response to the core protein (WHcAg) of woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) in woodchucks contributes to the understanding of these mechanisms. Therefore, we investigated the response of woodchuck peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to WHcAg and WHcAg-derived peptides, using our 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine assay. We demonstrated WHcAg-specific proliferation of PBMCs and nylon wool-nonadherent cells from acutely WHV-infected woodchucks. Using a cross-reacting anti-human T-cell (CD3) antiserum, we identified nonadherent cells as woodchuck T cells. T-cell epitope mapping with overlapping peptides, covering the entire WHcAg, revealed T-cell responses of acutely WHV-infected woodchucks to peptide1-20, peptide100-119, and peptide112-131. Detailed epitope analysis in the WHcAg region from amino acids 97 to 140 showed that T cells especially recognized peptide97-110. Establishment of polyclonal T-cell lines with WHcAg or peptide97-110 revealed reciprocal stimulation by peptide97-110 or WHcAg, respectively. We vaccinated woodchucks with peptide97-110 or WHcAg to prove the importance of this immunodominant T-cell epitope. All woodchucks immunized with peptide97-110 or WHcAg were protected. Our results show that the cellular immune response to WHcAg or to one T-cell epitope protects woodchucks from WHV infection. PMID:8985324

  10. The rfaE gene from Escherichia coli encodes a bifunctional protein involved in biosynthesis of the lipopolysaccharide core precursor ADP-L-glycero-D-manno-heptose.

    PubMed

    Valvano, M A; Marolda, C L; Bittner, M; Glaskin-Clay, M; Simon, T L; Klena, J D

    2000-01-01

    The intermediate steps in the biosynthesis of the ADP-L-glycero-D-manno-heptose precursor of inner core lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are not yet elucidated. We isolated a mini-Tn10 insertion that confers a heptoseless LPS phenotype in the chromosome of Escherichia coli K-12. The mutation was in a gene homologous to the previously reported rfaE gene from Haemophilus influenzae. The E. coli rfaE gene was cloned into an expression vector, and an in vitro transcription-translation experiment revealed a polypeptide of approximately 55 kDa in mass. Comparisons of the predicted amino acid sequence with other proteins in the database showed the presence of two clearly separate domains. Domain I (amino acids 1 to 318) shared structural features with members of the ribokinase family, while Domain II (amino acids 344 to 477) had conserved features of the cytidylyltransferase superfamily that includes the aut gene product of Ralstonia eutrophus. Each domain was expressed individually, demonstrating that only Domain I could complement the rfaE::Tn10 mutation in E. coli, as well as the rfaE543 mutation of Salmonella enterica SL1102. DNA sequencing of the rfaE543 gene revealed that Domain I had one amino acid substitution and a 12-bp in-frame deletion resulting in the loss of four amino acids, while Domain II remained intact. We also demonstrated that the aut::Tn5 mutation in R. eutrophus is associated with heptoseless LPS, and this phenotype was restored following the introduction of a plasmid expressing the E. coli Domain II. Thus, both domains of rfaE are functionally different and genetically separable confirming that the encoded protein is bifunctional. We propose that Domain I is involved in the synthesis of D-glycero-D-manno-heptose 1-phosphate, whereas Domain II catalyzes the ADP transfer to form ADP-D-glycero-D-manno-heptose. PMID:10629197

  11. An early intermediate in the folding reaction of the B1 domain of protein G contains a native-like core.

    PubMed

    Park, S H; O'Neil, K T; Roder, H

    1997-11-25

    The folding kinetics of a 57-residue IgG binding domain of streptococcal protein G has been studied under varying solvent conditions, using stopped-flow fluorescence methods. Although GB1 has been cited as an example of a protein that obeys a two-state folding mechanism, the following kinetic observations suggest the presence of an early folding intermediate. Under stabilizing conditions (low denaturant concentrations, especially in the presence of sodium sulfate), the kinetics of folding shows evidence of a major unresolved fluorescence change during the 1.5 ms dead time of the stopped-flow experiment (burst phase). Together with some curvature in the rate profile for the single observable folding phase, this provides clear evidence of the rapid formation of compact states with native-like fluorescence for the single tryptophan at position 43. In refolding experiments at increasing denaturant concentrations, the amplitude of the sub-millisecond phase decreases sharply and the corresponding slope (m value) is only about 30% lower than that of the equilibrium unfolding curve indicative of a pre-equilibrium transition involving cooperative unfolding of an ensemble of compact intermediates. The dependence on guanidine hydrochloride concentration of both rates and amplitudes (including the equilibrium transition) is described quantitatively by a sequential three-state mechanism, U [symbol: see text] I [symbol: see text] N, where an intermediate (I) in rapid equilibrium with the unfolded state (U) precedes the rate-limiting formation of the native state (N). A 66-residue fragment of GB1 with an N-terminal extension containing five apolar side chains exhibits three-state kinetic behavior virtually identical to that of the 57-residue fragment. This is consistent with the presence of a well-shielded native-like core excluding the N-terminal tail in the early folding intermediate and argues against a mechanism involving random hydrophobic collapse, which would predict a

  12. Modulation of Bone-Specific Tissue Regeneration by Incorporating Bone Morphogenetic Protein and Controlling the Shell Thickness of Silk Fibroin/Chitosan/Nanohydroxyapatite Core-Shell Nanofibrous Membranes.

    PubMed

    Shalumon, K T; Lai, Guo-Jyun; Chen, Chih-Hao; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2015-09-30

    The presence of both osteoconductive and osteoinductive factors is important in promoting stem cell differentiation toward the osteogenic lineage. In this study, we prepared silk fibroin/chitosan/nanohydroxyapatite/bone morphogenetic protein-2 (SF/CS/nHAP/BMP-2, SCHB2) nanofibrous membranes (NFMs) by incorporating BMP-2 in the core and SF/CS/nHAP as the shell layer of a nanofiber with two different shell thicknesses (SCHB2-thick and SCHB-thin). The physicochemical properties of SCHB2 membranes were characterized and compared with those of SF/CS and SF/CS/nHAP NFMs. When tested in release studies, the release rate of BMP-2 and the concentration of BMP-2 in the release medium were higher for SCHB2-thin NFMs because of reduced shell thickness. The BMP-2 released from the nanofiber retained its osteoinductive activity toward human-bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Compared with SF/CS and SF/CS/nHAP NFMs, the incorporation of BMP-2-promoted osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs and the SCHB-thin NFM is the best scaffold during in vitro cell culture. Gene expression analysis by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction detected the evolution of both early and late marker genes of bone formation. The relative mRNA expression is in accordance with the effect of BMP-2 incorporation and shell thickness, while the same was reconfirmed through the quantification of bone marker protein osteocalcin. In vivo experiments were carried out by subcutaneously implanting hMSC-seeded SCHB2-thin NFMs and acellular controls on the back sides of nude mice. Immunohistochemical and histological staining confirmed ectopic bone formation and osteogenesis of hMSCs in SCHB2-thin NFMs. In conclusion, the SCHB2-thin NFM could be suggested as a promising scaffold for bone tissue engineering. PMID:26355766

  13. The rfaE Gene from Escherichia coli Encodes a Bifunctional Protein Involved in Biosynthesis of the Lipopolysaccharide Core Precursor ADP-l-glycero-d-manno-Heptose

    PubMed Central

    Valvano, Miguel A.; Marolda, Cristina L.; Bittner, Mauricio; Glaskin-Clay, Mike; Simon, Tania L.; Klena, John D.

    2000-01-01

    The intermediate steps in the biosynthesis of the ADP-l-glycero-d-manno-heptose precursor of inner core lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are not yet elucidated. We isolated a mini-Tn10 insertion that confers a heptoseless LPS phenotype in the chromosome of Escherichia coli K-12. The mutation was in a gene homologous to the previously reported rfaE gene from Haemophilus influenzae. The E. coli rfaE gene was cloned into an expression vector, and an in vitro transcription-translation experiment revealed a polypeptide of approximately 55 kDa in mass. Comparisons of the predicted amino acid sequence with other proteins in the database showed the presence of two clearly separate domains. Domain I (amino acids 1 to 318) shared structural features with members of the ribokinase family, while Domain II (amino acids 344 to 477) had conserved features of the cytidylyltransferase superfamily that includes the aut gene product of Ralstonia eutrophus. Each domain was expressed individually, demonstrating that only Domain I could complement the rfaE::Tn10 mutation in E. coli, as well as the rfaE543 mutation of Salmonella enterica SL1102. DNA sequencing of the rfaE543 gene revealed that Domain I had one amino acid substitution and a 12-bp in-frame deletion resulting in the loss of four amino acids, while Domain II remained intact. We also demonstrated that the aut::Tn5 mutation in R. eutrophus is associated with heptoseless LPS, and this phenotype was restored following the introduction of a plasmid expressing the E. coli Domain II. Thus, both domains of rfaE are functionally different and genetically separable confirming that the encoded protein is bifunctional. We propose that Domain I is involved in the synthesis of d-glycero-d-manno-heptose 1-phosphate, whereas Domain II catalyzes the ADP transfer to form ADP-d-glycero-d-manno-heptose. PMID:10629197

  14. Monitoring Aromatic ps-ns Dynamics in Proteins via 13C Relaxation: Expanding Perturbation Mapping of the Rigidifying Core Mutation, V54A, in eglin c†

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Joshua A.; Lee, Andrew L.

    2010-01-01

    Long-range effects, such as allostery, have evolved in proteins as a means of regulating function via communication between distal sites. An NMR-based perturbation mapping approach was used to more completely probe the dynamic response of the core mutation V54A in the protein eglin c by monitoring changes in ps-ns aromatic side-chain dynamics and H/D exchange stabilities. Previous side-chain dynamics studies on this mutant were limited to methyl-bearing residues, most of which were found to rigidify on the ps-ns timescale in the form of a contiguous ‘network’. Here, high precision 13C relaxation data from 13 aromatic side chains were acquired by applying canonical relaxation experiments to a newly-developed carbon labeling scheme [Teilum K. et al. (2006) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 128, 2506–2507]. The fitting of model-free parameters yielded S2 variability which is intermediate with respect to backbone and methyl-bearing side chain variability and τe values that are approximately one nanosecond. Inclusion of the aromatic dynamic response results in an expanded network of dynamically coupled residues, with some aromatics showing increases in flexibility, which partially offsets the rigidification in methyl side chains. Using amide hydrogen exchange, dynamic propagation on a slower timescale was probed in response to the V54A perturbation. Surprisingly, regional stabilization (slowed exchange) 10–12 angstroms from the site of mutation was observed despite a global destabilization of 1.5 kcal·mol−1. Furthermore, this unlikely pocket of stabilized residues co-localizes with increases in aromatic flexibility on the faster timescale. Because the converse is also true (destabilized residues co-localize with rigidification on the fast timescale), a plausible entropy-driven mechanism is discussed for relating co-localization of opposing dynamic trends on vastly different timescales. PMID:18393447

  15. HCV core protein inhibits polarization and activity of both M1 and M2 macrophages through the TLR2 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qianqian; Wang, Yang; Zhai, Naicui; Song, Hongxiao; Li, Haijun; Yang, Yang; Li, Tianyang; Guo, Xiaolin; Chi, Baorong; Niu, Junqi; Crispe, Ian Nicholas; Su, Lishan; Tu, Zhengkun

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) establishes persistent infection in most infected patients, and eventually causes chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma in some patients. Monocytes and macrophages provide the first line of defense against pathogens, but their roles in HCV infection remains unclear. We have reported that HCV core protein (HCVc) manipulates human blood-derived dendritic cell development. In the present study, we tested whether HCVc affects human blood-derived monocyte differentiating into macrophages. Results showed that HCVc inhibits monocyte differentiation to either M1 or M2 macrophages through TLR2, associated with impaired STATs signaling pathway. Moreover, HCVc inhibits phagocytosis activity of M1 and M2 macrophages, M1 macrophage-induced autologous and allogeneic CD4+ T cell activation, but promotes M2 macrophage-induced autologous and allogeneic CD4+ T cell activation. In conclusion, HCVc inhibits monocyte-derived macrophage polarization via TLR2 signaling, leading to dysfunctions of both M1 and M2 macrophages in chronic HCV infected patients. This may contribute to the mechanism of HCV persistent infection, and suggest that blockade of HCVc might be a novel therapeutic approach to treating HCV infection. PMID:27786268

  16. A small non-coding RNA of the invasion gene island (SPI-1) represses outer membrane protein synthesis from the Salmonella core genome.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Verena; Sittka, Alexandra; Tomer, Raju; Tedin, Karsten; Brinkmann, Volker; Vogel, Jörg

    2007-12-01

    The Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI-1) encodes approximately 35 proteins involved in assembly of a type III secretion system (T3SS) which endows Salmonella with the ability to invade eukaryotic cells. We have discovered a novel SPI-1 gene, invR, which expresses an abundant small non-coding RNA (sRNA). The invR gene, which we identified in a global search for new Salmonella sRNA genes, is activated by the major SPI-1 transcription factor, HilD, under conditions that favour host cell invasion. The RNA chaperone, Hfq, is essential for the in vivo stability of the approximately 80 nt InvR RNA. Hfq binds InvR with high affinity in vitro, and InvR co-immunoprecipitates with FLAG epitope-tagged Hfq in Salmonella extracts. Surprisingly, deletion/overexpression of invR revealed no phenotype in SPI-1 regulation. In contrast, we find that InvR represses the synthesis of the abundant OmpD porin encoded by the Salmonella core genome. As invR is conserved in the early branching Salmonella bongori, we speculate that porin repression by InvR may have aided successful establishment of the SPI-1 T3SS after horizontal acquisition in the Salmonella lineage. This study identifies the first regulatory RNA of an enterobacterial pathogenicity island, and new roles for Hfq and HilD in SPI-1 gene expression.

  17. Dense core secretory vesicles revealed as a dynamic Ca2+ store in neuroendocrine cells with a vesicle-associated membrane protein aequorin chimaera

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Kathryn J.; Pinton, Paolo; Varadi, Aniko; Tacchetti, Carlo; Ainscow, Edward K.; Pozzan, Tullio; Rizzuto, Rosario; Rutter, Guy A.

    2001-01-01

    The role of dense core secretory vesicles in the control of cytosolic-free Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]c) in neuronal and neuroendocrine cells is enigmatic. By constructing a vesicle-associated membrane protein 2–synaptobrevin.aequorin chimera, we show that in clonal pancreatic islet β-cells: (a) increases in [Ca2+]c cause a prompt increase in intravesicular-free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]SV), which is mediated by a P-type Ca2+-ATPase distinct from the sarco(endo) plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase, but which may be related to the PMR1/ATP2C1 family of Ca2+ pumps; (b) steady state Ca2+ concentrations are 3–5-fold lower in secretory vesicles than in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or Golgi apparatus, suggesting the existence of tightly bound and more rapidly exchanging pools of Ca2+; (c) inositol (1,4,5) trisphosphate has no impact on [Ca2+]SV in intact or permeabilized cells; and (d) ryanodine receptor (RyR) activation with caffeine or 4-chloro-3-ethylphenol in intact cells, or cyclic ADPribose in permeabilized cells, causes a dramatic fall in [Ca2+]SV. Thus, secretory vesicles represent a dynamic Ca2+ store in neuroendocrine cells, whose characteristics are in part distinct from the ER/Golgi apparatus. The presence of RyRs on secretory vesicles suggests that local Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release from vesicles docked at the plasma membrane could participate in triggering exocytosis. PMID:11571310

  18. Dense core secretory vesicles revealed as a dynamic Ca(2+) store in neuroendocrine cells with a vesicle-associated membrane protein aequorin chimaera.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, K J; Pinton, P; Varadi, A; Tacchetti, C; Ainscow, E K; Pozzan, T; Rizzuto, R; Rutter, G A

    2001-10-01

    The role of dense core secretory vesicles in the control of cytosolic-free Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)](c)) in neuronal and neuroendocrine cells is enigmatic. By constructing a vesicle-associated membrane protein 2-synaptobrevin.aequorin chimera, we show that in clonal pancreatic islet beta-cells: (a) increases in [Ca(2+)](c) cause a prompt increase in intravesicular-free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]SV), which is mediated by a P-type Ca(2+)-ATPase distinct from the sarco(endo) plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase, but which may be related to the PMR1/ATP2C1 family of Ca(2+) pumps; (b) steady state Ca(2+) concentrations are 3-5-fold lower in secretory vesicles than in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or Golgi apparatus, suggesting the existence of tightly bound and more rapidly exchanging pools of Ca(2+); (c) inositol (1,4,5) trisphosphate has no impact on [Ca(2+)](SV) in intact or permeabilized cells; and (d) ryanodine receptor (RyR) activation with caffeine or 4-chloro-3-ethylphenol in intact cells, or cyclic ADPribose in permeabilized cells, causes a dramatic fall in [Ca(2+)](SV). Thus, secretory vesicles represent a dynamic Ca(2+) store in neuroendocrine cells, whose characteristics are in part distinct from the ER/Golgi apparatus. The presence of RyRs on secretory vesicles suggests that local Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release from vesicles docked at the plasma membrane could participate in triggering exocytosis.

  19. HBV core promoter mutations and AKT upregulate S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 to promote postoperative hepatocellular carcinoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lubiao; Gu, Lin; Gu, Yurong; Wang, Hongbo; Deng, Meihai; Stamataki, Zania; Oo, Ye Htun; Huang, Yuehua

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the hepatitis B virus (HBV) core promoter (CP) have been shown to be associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The CP region overlaps HBV X gene, which activates AKT to regulate hepatocyte survival. However, the cooperation between these two cascades in HCC progression remains poorly understood. Here, we assayed virological factors and AKT expression in liver tissues from 56 HCC patients with better prognoses (BHCC, ≥5-year survival) and 58 with poor prognoses (PHCC, <5-year survival) after partial liver resection. Results showed double mutation A1762T/G1764A (TA) combined with other mutation(s) (TACO) in HBV genome and phosphorylated AKT (pAKT) were more common in PHCC than BHCC. TACO and pAKT levels correlated with proliferation and microvascularization but inversely correlated with apoptosis in HCC samples. These were more pronounced when TACO and pAKT co-expressed. Levels of p21 and p27 were decreased in TACO or pAKT overexpressing HCC due to SKP2 upregulation. Levels of E2F1 and both mRNA and protein of SKP2 were increased in TACO expressing HCC. Levels of 4EBP1/2 decreased and SKP2 mRNA level remained constant in pAKT-overexpressing HCC. Therefore, TACO and AKT are two independent predictors of postoperative survival in HCC. Their co-target, SKP2 may be a diagnostic or therapeutic marker. PMID:27779207

  20. Increased outer arm and core fucose residues on the N-glycans of mutated alpha-1 antitrypsin protein from alpha-1 antitrypsin deficient individuals.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Cormac; Saldova, Radka; O'Brien, M Emmet; Bergin, David A; Carroll, Tomás P; Keenan, Joanne; Meleady, Paula; Henry, Michael; Clynes, Martin; Rudd, Pauline M; Reeves, Emer P; McElvaney, Noel G

    2014-02-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is the major physiological inhibitor of a range of serine proteases, and in the lung, it maintains a protease-antiprotease balance. AAT deficiency (AATD) is an autosomal co-dominant condition with the Z mutation being the most common cause. Individuals homozygous for Z (PiZZ) have low levels of circulating mutant Z-AAT protein leading to premature emphysematous lung disease. Extensive glycoanalysis has been performed on normal AAT (M-AAT) from healthy individuals and the importance of glycosylation in affecting the immune modulatory roles of AAT is documented. However, no glycoanalysis has been carried out on Z-AAT from deficient individuals to date. In this study, we investigate whether the glycans present on Z-AAT differ to those found on M-AAT from healthy controls. Plasma AAT was purified from 10 individuals: 5 AATD donors with the PiZZ phenotype and 5 PiMM healthy controls. Glycoanalysis was performed employing N-glycan release, exoglycosidase digestion and UPLC analysis. No difference in branched glycans was identified between AATD and healthy controls. However, a significant increase in both outer arm (α1-3) (p = 0.04) and core (α1-6) fucosylated glycans (p < 0.0001) was found on Z-AAT compared to M-AAT. This study has identified increased fucosylation on N-glycans of Z-AAT indicative of ongoing inflammation in AATD individuals with implications for early therapeutic intervention.

  1. Crystal structure of YwpF from Staphylococcus aureus reveals its architecture comprised of a β-barrel core domain resembling type VI secretion system proteins and a two-helix pair.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Jae; Lee, Kyu-Yeon; Lee, Ki-Young; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Kim, Soon-Jong; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2015-04-01

    The ywpF gene (SAV2097) of the Staphylococcus aureus strain Mu50 encodes the YwpF protein, which may play a role in antibiotic resistance. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the YwpF superfamily from S. aureus at 2.5-Å resolution. The YwpF structure consists of two regions: an N-terminal core β-barrel domain that shows structural similarity to type VI secretion system (T6SS) proteins (e.g., Hcp1, Hcp3, and EvpC) and a C-terminal two-helix pair. Although the monomer structure of S. aureus YwpF resembles those of T6SS proteins, the dimer/tetramer model of S. aureus YwpF is distinct from the functionally important hexameric ring of T6SS proteins. We therefore suggest that the S. aureus YwpF may have a different function compared to T6SS proteins.

  2. Overview of the HUPO Plasma Proteome Project: Results from the pilot phase with 35 collaborating laboratories and multiple analytical groups, generating a core dataset of 3020 proteins and a publicly-available database

    SciTech Connect

    Omenn, Gilbert; States, David J.; Adamski, Marcin; Blackwell, Thomas W.; Menon, Rajasree; Hermjakob, Henning; Apweiler, Rolf; Haab, Brian B.; Simpson, Richard; Eddes, James; Kapp, Eugene; Moritz, Rod; Chan, Daniel W.; Rai, Alex J.; Admon, Arie; Aebersold, Ruedi; Eng, Jimmy K.; Hancock, William S.; Hefta, Stanley A.; Meyer, Helmut; Paik, Young-Ki; Yoo, Jong-Shin; Ping, Peipei; Pounds, Joel G.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Qian, Xiaohong; Wang, Rong; Wasinger, Valerie; Wu, Chi Yue; Zhao, Xiaohang; Zeng, Rong; Archakov, Alexander; Tsugita, Akira; Beer, Ilan; Pandey, Akhilesh; Pisano, Michael; Andrews, Philip; Tammen, Harald; Speicher, David W.; Hanash, Samir M.

    2005-08-13

    HUPO initiated the Plasma Proteome Project (PPP) in 2002. Its pilot phase has (1) evaluated advantages and limitations of many depletion, fractionation, and MS technology platforms; (2) compared PPP reference specimens of human serum and EDTA, heparin, and citrate-anticoagulated plasma; and (3) created a publicly-available knowledge base (www.bioinformatics. med.umich.edu/hupo/ppp; www.ebi.ac.uk/pride). Thirty-five participating laboratories in 13 countries submitted datasets. Working groups addressed (a) specimen stability and protein concentrations; (b) protein identifications from 18 MS/MS datasets; (c) independent analyses from raw MS-MS spectra; (d) search engine performance, subproteome analyses, and biological insights; (e) antibody arrays; and (f) direct MS/SELDI analyses. MS-MS datasets had 15 710 different International Protein Index (IPI) protein IDs; our integration algorithm applied to multiple matches of peptide sequences yielded 9504 IPI proteins identified with one or more peptides and 3020 proteins identified with two or more peptides (the Core Dataset). These proteins have been characterized with Gene Ontology, InterPro, Novartis Atlas, OMIM, and immunoassay based concentration determinations. The database permits examination of many other subsets, such as 1274 proteins identified with three or more peptides. Reverse protein to DNA matching identified proteins for 118 previously unidentified ORFs. We recommend use of plasma instead of serum, with EDTA (or citrate) for anticoagulation. To improve resolution, sensitivity and reproducibility of peptide identifications and protein matches, we recommend combinations of depletion, fractionation, and MS/MS technologies, with explicit criteria for evaluation of spectra, use of search algorithms, and integration of homologous protein matches. This Special Issue of PROTEOMICS presents papers integral to the collaborative analysis plus many reports of supplementary work on various aspects of the PPP workplan

  3. Core domain mutant Y220C of p53 protein has a key role in copper homeostasis in case of free fatty acids overload.

    PubMed

    Arciello, Mario; Longo, Alessia; Viscomi, Carmela; Capo, Concetta; Angeloni, Antonio; Rossi, Luisa; Balsano, Clara

    2015-12-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a pathology that includes a wide variety of clinical conditions ranging from simple steatosis to end-stage liver diseases. Despite the huge amount of researches, the molecular basis of NAFLD are still not fully understood. Recently, it was suggested a role for p53 in NAFLD pathogenesis. Among its targets there is Synthesis of Cytochrome c Oxidase 2 (SCO2), a copper chaperone, involved in both aerobic respiration and metal cellular excretion. Copper seems to play a role in NAFLD. It was demonstrated a low hepatic copper content in NAFLD patients, which correlates with metabolic syndrome parameters. Copper homeostasis deregulation, in fact, seems to be related to lipid metabolism alteration and insulin resistance. Here we provide evidence on the role of p53 in the modulation of copper homeostasis, in an experimental model of NAFLD. We used two different hepatoma cell lines, HepG2 and Huh 7.5.1, characterized by the presence of wt p53 and its Y220C mutant, respectively, treated with a free fatty acids (FFAs) solution. Interestingly, p53 activation correlated with the intracellular copper level maintenance. We demonstrated that, in hepatoma cell lines, core domain mutant Y220C of p53 affects the modulation of SCO2 and Copper transporter 1 (CTR1), influencing, in this way, intracellular copper homeostasis in presence of FFAs accumulation, and that the 220 residue of the protein is crucial for such control. The role of p53 we highlighted may have deep implications in clinical conditions where copper homeostasis is deregulated.

  4. Three-dimensional Structure of Victorivirus HvV190S Suggests Coat Proteins in Most Totiviruses Share a Conserved Core

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Sarah E.; Li, Hua; Cardone, Giovanni; Nibert, Max L.; Ghabrial, Said A.; Baker, Timothy S.

    2013-01-01

    Double-stranded (ds)RNA fungal viruses are currently assigned to six different families. Those from the family Totiviridae are characterized by nonsegmented genomes and single-layer capsids, 300–450 Å in diameter. Helminthosporium victoriae virus 190S (HvV190S), prototype of recently recognized genus Victorivirus, infects the filamentous fungus Helminthosporium victoriae (telomorph: Cochliobolus victoriae), which is the causal agent of Victoria blight of oats. The HvV190S genome is 5179 bp long and encompasses two large, slightly overlapping open reading frames that encode the coat protein (CP, 772 aa) and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp, 835 aa). To our present knowledge, victoriviruses uniquely express their RdRps via a coupled termination–reinitiation mechanism that differs from the well-characterized Saccharomyces cerevisiae virus L-A (ScV-L-A, prototype of genus Totivirus), in which the RdRp is expressed as a CP/RdRp fusion protein due to ribosomal frameshifting. Here, we used transmission electron cryomicroscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction to determine the structures of HvV190S virions and two types of virus-like particles (capsids lacking dsRNA and capsids lacking both dsRNA and RdRp) at estimated resolutions of 7.1, 7.5, and 7.6 Å, respectively. The HvV190S capsid is thin and smooth, and contains 120 copies of CP arranged in a “T = 2” icosahedral lattice characteristic of ScV-L-A and other dsRNA viruses. For aid in our interpretations, we developed and used an iterative segmentation procedure to define the boundaries of the two, chemically identical CP subunits in each asymmetric unit. Both subunits have a similar fold, but one that differs from ScV-L-A in many details except for a core α-helical region that is further predicted to be conserved among many other totiviruses. In particular, we predict the structures of other victoriviruses to be highly similar to HvV190S and the structures of most if not all totiviruses

  5. 24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES FOR A BRASS GATE VALVE BODY MADE ON A CORE BOX, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  6. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  7. Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells in the body. They are macromolecules that comprise 1 or more chains of amino acids that vary in their sequence and length and are folded into specific 3-dimensional structures. The sizes and conformations of proteins, therefor...

  8. Unusual features of fibrillarin cDNA and gene structure in Euglena gracilis: evolutionary conservation of core proteins and structural predictions for methylation-guide box C/D snoRNPs throughout the domain Eucarya.

    PubMed

    Russell, Anthony G; Watanabe, Yoh-ichi; Charette, J Michael; Gray, Michael W

    2005-01-01

    Box C/D ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles mediate O2'-methylation of rRNA and other cellular RNA species. In higher eukaryotic taxa, these RNPs are more complex than their archaeal counterparts, containing four core protein components (Snu13p, Nop56p, Nop58p and fibrillarin) compared with three in Archaea. This increase in complexity raises questions about the evolutionary emergence of the eukaryote-specific proteins and structural conservation in these RNPs throughout the eukaryotic domain. In protists, the primarily unicellular organisms comprising the bulk of eukaryotic diversity, the protein composition of box C/D RNPs has not yet been extensively explored. This study describes the complete gene, cDNA and protein sequences of the fibrillarin homolog from the protozoon Euglena gracilis, the first such information to be obtained for a nucleolus-localized protein in this organism. The E.gracilis fibrillarin gene contains a mixture of intron types exhibiting markedly different sizes. In contrast to most other E.gracilis mRNAs characterized to date, the fibrillarin mRNA lacks a spliced leader (SL) sequence. The predicted fibrillarin protein sequence itself is unusual in that it contains a glycine-lysine (GK)-rich domain at its N-terminus rather than the glycine-arginine-rich (GAR) domain found in most other eukaryotic fibrillarins. In an evolutionarily diverse collection of protists that includes E.gracilis, we have also identified putative homologs of the other core protein components of box C/D RNPs, thereby providing evidence that the protein composition seen in the higher eukaryotic complexes was established very early in eukaryotic cell evolution.

  9. Core layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, S. A.; Rubie, D. C.; Hernlund, J. W.; Morbidelli, A.

    2015-12-01

    We have created a planetary accretion and differentiation model that self-consistently builds and evolves Earth's core. From this model, we show that the core grows stably stratified as the result of rising metal-silicate equilibration temperatures and pressures, which increases the concentrations of light element impurities into each newer core addition. This stable stratification would naturally resist convection and frustrate the onset of a geodynamo, however, late giant impacts could mechanically mix the distinct accreted core layers creating large homogenous regions. Within these regions, a geodynamo may operate. From this model, we interpret the difference between the planetary magnetic fields of Earth and Venus as a difference in giant impact histories. Our planetary accretion model is a numerical N-body integration of the Grand Tack scenario [1]—the most successful terrestrial planet formation model to date [2,3]. Then, we take the accretion histories of Earth-like and Venus-like planets from this model and post-process the growth of each terrestrial planet according to a well-tested planetary differentiation model [4,5]. This model fits Earth's mantle by modifying the oxygen content of the pre-cursor planetesimals and embryos as well as the conditions of metal-silicate equilibration. Other non-volatile major, minor and trace elements included in the model are assumed to be in CI chondrite proportions. The results from this model across many simulated terrestrial planet growth histories are robust. If the kinetic energy delivered by larger impacts is neglected, the core of each planet grows with a strong stable stratification that would significantly impede convection. However, if giant impact mixing is very efficient or if the impact history delivers large impacts late, than the stable stratification can be removed. [1] Walsh et al. Nature 475 (2011) [2] O'Brien et al. Icarus 223 (2014) [3] Jacobson & Morbidelli PTRSA 372 (2014) [4] Rubie et al. EPSL 301

  10. Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnier, Fred E.; Gooding, Karen M.

    Because of the complexity of cellular material and body fluids, it is seldom possible to analyze a natural product directly. Qualitative and quantitative analyses must often be preceded by some purification step that separates the molecular species being examined from interfering materials. In the case of proteins, column liquid chromatography has been used extensively for these fractionations. With the advent of gel permeation, cation exchange, anion exchange, hydrophobic, and affinity chromatography, it became possible to resolve proteins through their fundamental properties of size, charge, hydrophobicity, and biological affinity. The chromatographic separations used in the early isolation and characterization of many proteins later became analytical tools in their routine analysis. Unfortunately, these inherently simple and versatile column chromatographic techniques introduced in the 50s and 60s have a severe limitation in routine analysis-separation time. It is common to encounter 1-24 h separation times with the classical gel-type supports.

  11. Propagating human genome information into the real world of protein function using scanned probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppell, Steven J.

    2002-03-01

    Efforts to link protein structure and biochemical function have focused mostly on primary structure, largely because of the abundance of information at this level; all of the amino acid sequences of the 30,000 proteins in the human proteonome are known, whereas the three-dimensional crystal structures of only 1000 proteins have been solved. Clearly, techniques that provide details concerning three-dimensional protein structure are needed to discover mechanisms governing biological function. Here, we have identified a motif in protein tertiary structure at sites of biochemical activity using scanning force microscopy (SFM). We show that sites on aggrecan, a cartilage proteoglycan, that are susceptible to catabolic enzymes are more flexible than other regions of the molecule. The results demonstrate a powerful new technique for investigating molecular scale structure-function relationships and suggest the role of flexibility in aggrecan degradation. This model system will be used to show how tip asymmetries can be accounted for using morphological processing coupled with monte carlo simulation. In addition, we will demonstrate that near-surface high speed force field mapping may be used to extract 6-12 type potentials that exist under physiological conditions. This type of measurement holds some promise toward connecting physical constitutive parameters of biomolecules to their biological specificity.

  12. Helicobacter pylori CheZ(HP) and ChePep form a novel chemotaxis-regulatory complex distinct from the core chemotaxis signaling proteins and the flagellar motor.

    PubMed

    Lertsethtakarn, Paphavee; Howitt, Michael R; Castellon, Juan; Amieva, Manuel R; Ottemann, Karen M

    2015-09-01

    Chemotaxis is important for Helicobacter pylori to colonize the stomach. Like other bacteria, H. pylori uses chemoreceptors and conserved chemotaxis proteins to phosphorylate the flagellar rotational response regulator, CheY, and modulate the flagellar rotational direction. Phosphorylated CheY is returned to its non-phosphorylated state by phosphatases such as CheZ. In previously studied cases, chemotaxis phosphatases localize to the cellular poles by interactions with either the CheA chemotaxis kinase or flagellar motor proteins. We report here that the H. pylori CheZ, CheZ(HP), localizes to the poles independently of the flagellar motor, CheA, and all typical chemotaxis proteins. Instead, CheZ(HP) localization depends on the chemotaxis regulatory protein ChePep, and reciprocally, ChePep requires CheZ(HP) for its polar localization. We furthermore show that these proteins interact directly. Functional domain mapping of CheZ(HP) determined the polar localization motif lies within the central domain of the protein and that the protein has regions outside of the active site that participate in chemotaxis. Our results suggest that CheZ(HP) and ChePep form a distinct complex. These results therefore suggest the intriguing idea that some phosphatases localize independently of the other chemotaxis and motility proteins, possibly to confer unique regulation on these proteins' activities.

  13. Helicobacter pylori CheZHP and ChePep form a novel chemotaxis-regulatory complex distinct from the core chemotaxis signaling proteins and the flagellar motor

    PubMed Central

    Lertsethtakarn, Paphavee; Howitt, Michael R.; Castellon, Juan; Amieva, Manuel R.; Ottemann, Karen M.

    2015-01-01

    Chemotaxis is important for Helicobacter pylori to colonize the stomach. Like other bacteria, H. pylori uses chemoreceptors and conserved chemotaxis proteins to phosphorylate the flagellar rotational response regulator, CheY, and modulate the flagellar rotational direction. Phosphorylated CheY is returned to its non-phosphorylated state by phosphatases such as CheZ. In previously studied cases, chemotaxis phosphatases localize to the cellular poles by interactions with either the CheA chemotaxis kinase or flagellar motor proteins. We report here that the H. pylori CheZ, CheZHP, localizes to the poles independently of the flagellar motor, CheA, and all typical chemotaxis proteins. Instead, CheZHP localization depends on the chemotaxis regulatory protein ChePep and reciprocally, ChePep requires CheZHP for its polar localization. We furthermore show that these proteins interact directly. Functional domain mapping of CheZHP determined the polar localization motif lies within the central domain of the protein, and that the protein has regions outside of the active site that participate in chemotaxis. Our results suggest that CheZHP and ChePep form a distinct complex. These results therefore suggest the intriguing idea that some phosphatases localize independently of the other chemotaxis and motility proteins, possibly to confer unique regulation on these proteins’ activities. PMID:26061894

  14. Impact of the core components of the phosphoenolpyruvate-carbohydrate phosphotransferase system, HPr and EI, on differential protein expression in Ralstonia eutropha H16.

    PubMed

    Kaddor, Chlud; Voigt, Birgit; Hecker, Michael; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    In Ralstonia eutropha H16, seven genes encoding proteins being involved in the phosphoenolpyruvate-carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PEP-PTS) were identified. In order to provide more insights into the poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB)-leaky phenotype of the HPr/EI deletion mutants H16ΔptsH, H16ΔptsI, and H16ΔptsHI when grown on the non-PTS substrate gluconate, parallel fermentations for comparison of their growth behavior were performed. Samples from the exponential, the early stationary, and late stationary growth phases were investigated by microscopy, gas chromatography and (phospho-) proteome analysis. A total of 71 differentially expressed proteins were identified using 2D-PAGE, Pro-Q Diamond and Coomassie staining, and MALDI-TOF analysis. Detected proteins were classified into five major functional groups: carbon metabolism, energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, translation, and membrane transport/outer membrane proteins. Proteome analyses revealed enhanced expression of proteins involved in the Entner-Doudoroff pathway and in subsequent reactions in cells of strain H16 compared to the mutant H16ΔptsHI. Furthermore, proteins involved in PHB accumulation showed increased abundance in the wild-type. This expression pattern allowed us to identify proteins affecting carbon metabolism/PHB biosynthesis in strain H16 and translation/amino acid metabolism in strain H16ΔptsHI, and to gain insight into the molecular response of R. eutropha to the deletion of HPr/EI. PMID:22630130

  15. Comparison of the Properties of γ-Fe_22O3 Nanoparticles Synthesized Inside of Ferritin Protein Cages to the Native Iron Oxy-hydroxide Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, Keith

    2004-03-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of native iron oxy-hydroxide in ferritin and γ-Fe_22O3 artificially mineralized inside of horse spleen ferritin have been compared. While the native material has been studied in detail, little work has been done on artificially mineralized materials. Such synthetic materials can form highly uniform, self assembling systems which can be used in magnetic recording and other applications. We show that the mineralized iron oxide has more favorable magnetic properties for these applications than the native material. Specifically, through XAS and XAFS spectra, we conclude that the native cores are highly disordered and non-uniform while the mineralized sample is uniform and ordered γ-Fe_22O_3. γ-Fe_22O3 is ferrimagnetic while it has been shown that the native material is antiferromagnetic. Alternating current susceptibility measurements reveal that, relative to the native material, the mineralized sample has a higher blocking temperature by a factor of two, is about 20 times more susceptible to magnetization, and has a larger anisotropy energy by 150also been extracted from the AC data indicating a mean diameter of 5 nm for the native cores and 6 nm for the mineralized cores. DC magnetic measurements provide supporting evidence of the magnetic structure, blocking temperatures, and crystalline disorder of the two samples. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using of biological containers as reaction vessels to synthesize uniform ensembles of novel magnetic nanoparticles.

  16. Mercury's Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peale, S. J.

    2005-05-01

    In determining Mercury's core structure from its rotational properties, the location of Cassini state 1 is crucial. Convincing radar evidence indicates that the mantle rests on a liquid layer (Margot et al. 2005), but there are no empirical constraints on the moment of inertia C/MR2, which constraints must wait for the determination of the gravitational coefficients J2 and C22 from the MESSENGER orbiting spacecraft, and an accurate determination of the obliquity of the Cassini state. Tidal and core-mantle dissipation drive the spin to the Cassini state with a time scale O(105) years, so the spin should occupy the Cassini state and thereby define its obliquity---unless there has been a recent excitation of a free precession of the spin. Another way the spin might be displaced from the Cassini state is if the variations in the orbital elements, which change the position of the Cassini state, cause the spin axis to lag behind as it attempts to follow the state. Fortunately, the solid angle the spin axis encloses as it precesses around the Cassini state is an adiabatic invariant, and it is conserved if the orbital element variations are slow compared to the precession rate. As the precession period is O(1000) years, and the time scales of orbital parameter variations are O(105) years, the spin axis should remain very close to the Cassini state if it were ever close. But how close is close? The increasing precision of the radar and eventual spacecraft measurements warrants a check on the likely proximity of the spin axis to the Cassini state. By numerically following the positions of the spin axis and Cassini state with orbital parameters varying with time scales and amplitudes comparable to the real variations, we show that the spin should remain within 1″ of the Cassini state once dissipative torques bring it there. The current spin axis position should thus define the Cassini state sufficiently to put reasonably tight constraints on the core structure

  17. Comparative Dynamics of Leucine Methyl Groups in FMOC-Leucine and in a Protein Hydrophobic Core Probed by Solid-State Deuteron Nuclear Magnetic Resonance over 7-324 K Temperature Range

    SciTech Connect

    Vugmeyster, Liliya; Ostrovsky, Dmitry; Moses, Mark; Ford, Joseph J.; Lipton, Andrew S.; Hoatson, Gina; Vold, Robert L.

    2010-12-09

    Quantitative dynamics of methyl groups in 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl-leucine (FMOC-leu) have been analyzed and compared with earlier studies of methyl dynamics in chicken villin headpiece subdomain protein (HP36) labeled at L69, a key hydrophobic core position. A combination of deuteron solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance experiments over the temperature range of 7-324 K and computational modeling indicated that while the two compounds show the same modes of motions, there are marked differences in the best-fit parameters of these motions. One of the main results is that the crossover observed in the dynamics of the methyl groups in the HP36 sample at 170 K is absent in FMOC-leu. A second crossover at around 95-88 K is present in both samples. The differences in the behavior of the two compounds suggest that some of the features of methyl dynamics reflect the complexity of the protein hydrophobic core and are not determined solely by local interactions.

  18. Core labeling of adenovirus with EGFP

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Long P.; Le, Helen N.; Nelson, Amy R.; Matthews, David A.; Yamamoto, Masato; Curiel, David T. . E-mail: curiel@uab.edu

    2006-08-01

    The study of adenovirus could greatly benefit from diverse methods of virus detection. Recently, it has been demonstrated that carboxy-terminal EGFP fusions of adenovirus core proteins Mu, V, and VII properly localize to the nucleus and display novel function in the cell. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that the core proteins may serve as targets for labeling the adenovirus core with fluorescent proteins. To this end, we constructed various chimeric expression vectors with fusion core genes (Mu-EGFP, V-EGFP, preVII-EGFP, and matVII-EGFP) while maintaining expression of the native proteins. Expression of the fusion core proteins was suboptimal using E1 expression vectors with both conventional CMV and modified (with adenovirus tripartite leader sequence) CMV5 promoters, resulting in non-labeled viral particles. However, robust expression equivalent to the native protein was observed when the fusion genes were placed in the deleted E3 region. The efficient Ad-wt-E3-V-EGFP and Ad-wt-E3-preVII-EGFP expression vectors were labeled allowing visualization of purified virus and tracking of the viral core during early infection. The vectors maintained their viral function, including viral DNA replication, viral DNA encapsidation, cytopathic effect, and thermostability. Core labeling offers a means to track the adenovirus core in vector targeting studies as well as basic adenovirus virology.

  19. De novo design of a non-natural fold for an iron-sulfur protein: alpha-helical coiled-coil with a four-iron four-sulfur cluster binding site in its central core.

    PubMed

    Grzyb, Joanna; Xu, Fei; Weiner, Lev; Reijerse, Eduard J; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Nanda, Vikas; Noy, Dror

    2010-03-01

    Using a 'metal-first' approach, we computationally designed, prepared, and characterized a four-iron four-sulfur (Fe(4)S(4)) cluster protein with a non-natural alpha-helical coiled-coil fold. The novelty of this fold lies in the placement of a Fe(4)S(4) cluster within the hydrophobic core of a four-helix bundle, making it unique among previous iron-sulfur (FeS) protein designs, and different from known natural FeS proteins. The apoprotein, recombinantly expressed and purified from E. coli, readily self-assembles with Fe(4)S(4) clusters in vitro. UV-Vis absorption and CD spectroscopy, elemental analysis, gel filtration, and analytical ultracentrifugation confirm that the protein is folded and assembled as designed, namely, alpha-helical coiled-coil binding a single Fe(4)S(4) cluster. Dithionite-reduced holoprotein samples have characteristic rhombic EPR spectra, typical of low-potential, [Fe(4)S(4)](+) (S=1/2), with g values of g(zy)=(1.970, 1.975), and g(x)=2.053. The temperature, and power dependence of the signal intensity were also characteristic of [Fe(4)S(4)](+) clusters with very efficient spin relaxation, but almost without any interaction between adjacent clusters. The new design is very promising although optimization is required, particularly for preventing aggregation, and adding second shell interactions to stabilize the reduced state. Its main advantage is its extendibility into a multi-FeS cluster protein by simply duplicating and translating the binding site along the coiled-coil axis. This opens new possibilities for designing protein-embedded redox chains that may be used as "wires" for coupling any given set of redox enzymes. PMID:20035711

  20. Selection of peptide inhibitors of interactions involved in complex protein assemblies: association of the core and surface antigens of hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Dyson, M R; Murray, K

    1995-01-01

    As an example for studies of contacts involved in complex biological systems, peptide ligands that bind to the core antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBcAg) have been selected from a random hexapeptide library displayed on filamentous phage. Affinity-purified phage bearing aa sequence LLGRMK, or some related sequences, bound full-length or truncated HBcAg but did not bind denatured HBcAg. The long (L), but not the short (S), hepatitis B virus envelope polypeptide, when synthesized in an in vitro system, bound firmly to HBcAg, indicating that interaction between HBcAg and the pre-S region of the L polypeptide is critical for virus morphogenesis. This interaction was inhibited by peptide ALLGRMKG, suggesting that this and related small molecules may inhibit viral assembly. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7892246

  1. An N-terminal extension to the hepatitis B virus core protein forms a poorly ordered trimeric spike in assembled virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    McGonigle, Richard; Yap, Wei Boon; Ong, Swee Tin; Gatherer, Derek; Bakker, Saskia E; Tan, Wen Siang; Bhella, David

    2015-02-01

    Virus-like particles composed of the core antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBcAg) have been shown to be an effective platform for the display of foreign epitopes in vaccine development. Heterologous sequences have been successfully inserted at both amino and carboxy termini as well as internally at the major immunodominant epitope. We used cryogenic electron microscopy (CryoEM) and three-dimensional image reconstruction to investigate the structure of VLPs assembled from an N-terminal extended HBcAg that contained a polyhistidine tag. The insert was seen to form a trimeric spike on the capsid surface that was poorly resolved, most likely owing to it being flexible. We hypothesise that the capacity of N-terminal inserts to form trimers may have application in the development of multivalent vaccines to trimeric antigens. Our analysis also highlights the value of tools for local resolution assessment in studies of partially disordered macromolecular assemblies by cryoEM.

  2. Tandem assays of protein and glucose with functionalized core/shell particles based on magnetic separation and surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xianming; Yu, Qian; Lv, Zhongpeng; Du, Xuezhong

    2013-10-11

    Tandem assays of protein and glucose in combination with mannose-functionalized Fe3 O4 @SiO2 and Ag@SiO2 tag particles have promising potential in effective magnetic separation and highly sensitive and selective SERS assays of biomaterials. It is for the first time that tandem assay of glucose is developed using SERS based on the Con A-sandwiched microstructures between the functionalized magnetic and tag particles.

  3. Controlled Immobilization Strategies to Probe Short Hyaluronan-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Minsky, Burcu Baykal; Antoni, Christiane H.; Boehm, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Well-controlled grafting of small hyaluronan oligosaccharides (sHA) enables novel approaches to investigate biological processes such as angiogenesis, immune reactions and cancer metastasis. We develop two strategies for covalent attachment of sHA, a fast high-density adsorption and a two-layer system that allows tuning the density and mode of immobilization. We monitored the sHA adlayer formation and subsequent macromolecular interactions by label-free quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). The modified surfaces are inert to unspecific protein adsorption, and yet retain the specific binding capacity of sHA. Thus they are an ideal tool to study the interactions of hyaluronan-binding proteins and short hyaluronan molecules as demonstrated by the specific recognition of LYVE-1 and aggrecan. Both hyaladherins recognize sHA and the binding is independent to the presence of the reducing end. PMID:26883791

  4. Controlled Immobilization Strategies to Probe Short Hyaluronan-Protein Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minsky, Burcu Baykal; Antoni, Christiane H.; Boehm, Heike

    2016-02-01

    Well-controlled grafting of small hyaluronan oligosaccharides (sHA) enables novel approaches to investigate biological processes such as angiogenesis, immune reactions and cancer metastasis. We develop two strategies for covalent attachment of sHA, a fast high-density adsorption and a two-layer system that allows tuning the density and mode of immobilization. We monitored the sHA adlayer formation and subsequent macromolecular interactions by label-free quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). The modified surfaces are inert to unspecific protein adsorption, and yet retain the specific binding capacity of sHA. Thus they are an ideal tool to study the interactions of hyaluronan-binding proteins and short hyaluronan molecules as demonstrated by the specific recognition of LYVE-1 and aggrecan. Both hyaladherins recognize sHA and the binding is independent to the presence of the reducing end.

  5. Immunization with Recombinant Adenoviral Vectors Expressing HCV Core or F Proteins Leads to T Cells with Reduced Effector Molecules Granzyme B and IFN-γ: A Potential New Strategy for Immune Evasion in HCV Infection.

    PubMed

    Samrat, Subodh Kumar; Vedi, Satish; Singh, Shakti; Li, Wen; Kumar, Rakesh; Agrawal, Babita

    2015-01-01

    Multispecific, broad, and potent T cell responses have been correlated with viral clearance in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, the majority of infected patients develop chronic infection, suggesting that natural infection mostly leads to development of inefficient T cell immunity. Multiple mechanisms of immune modulation and evasion have been shown in HCV infection through various investigations. This study examined the generation and modulation of T cell responses against core and frameshift (F) proteins of HCV. A single immunization of mice with replication incompetent recombinant adenovirus vectors encoding for F or core antigens induces poor T cell responses and leads to generation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells with low granzyme B (GrB) expression. These T cells have impaired GrB enzyme activity and are unable to kill peptide loaded target cells. The low intracellular expression of GrB is not due to degranulation of cytotoxic granules containing cytotoxic T cells. Addition of exogenous IL-2 in in vitro cultures leads to partial recovery of GrB production, whereas immunization with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist poly I:C leads to complete restoration of GrB expression in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Thus, a possible new strategy of T cell modulation is recognized wherein effector T cells are caused to be dysfunctional by HCV-derived antigens F or core, and strategies are also delineated to overcome this dysfunction. These studies are important in the investigation of prophylactic vaccine and immunotherapy strategies for HCV infection.

  6. Non-collagenous protein screening in the human chondrodysplasias: link proteins, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), and fibromodulin.

    PubMed

    Stanescu, V; Do, T P; Chaminade, F; Maroteaux, P; Stanescu, R

    1994-05-15

    A gel-electrophoretic screening for link proteins, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), and fibromodulin abnormalities was performed in fetuses, newborn infants, and children with various types of chondrodysplasia. Microdissected freeze-dried sections of upper tibial growth cartilage were extracted with 4M guanidinium chloride in the presence of proteolysis inhibitors. After dialysis against 8M urea, the extracts were submitted to stepwise ion-exchange chromatography to separate the large proteoglycans (aggrecans) from the other components. The latter were analyzed by gel electrophoresis, electrotransferred onto nitrocellulose membranes, and reacted with specific antibodies. Control samples from individuals with apparently normal growth were analyzed in the same runs. Two link protein bands with abnormal electrophoretic migration were found in a sporadic case of spondylometaphyseal dysplasia, Kozlowski type. Three link protein bands with the same migration as in the control samples were found in thanatophoric dysplasia, homozygous achondroplasia, achondrogenesis type II, hypochondrogenesis, Goldblatt syndrome, Desbuquois dysplasia, pseudoachondroplasia, and diastrophic dysplasia. In several pathologic cases with normal electrophoretic pattern of the link proteins, small link protein fragments appeared after reduction. The gel electrophoretic pattern of COMP was studied in thanatophoric dysplasia, diastrophic dysplasia, homozygous achondroplasia, fibrochondrogenesis, hypochondrogenesis, Goldblatt syndrome, and Kniest dysplasia. In all these cases the pattern was the same as in the control samples. The main band of fibromodulin had a normal migration rate in fibrochondrogenesis, Desbuquois dysplasia, Kniest dysplasia, and pseudoachondroplasia. It was delayed in diastrophic dysplasia. PMID:8030664

  7. Bound or free: interaction of the C-terminal domain of Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB) with the tetrameric core of SSB.

    PubMed

    Su, Xun-Cheng; Wang, Yao; Yagi, Hiromasa; Shishmarev, Dmitry; Mason, Claire E; Smith, Paul J; Vandevenne, Marylène; Dixon, Nicholas E; Otting, Gottfried

    2014-04-01

    Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein (SSB) protects ssDNA from degradation and recruits other proteins for DNA replication and repair. Escherichia coli SSB is the prototypical eubacterial SSB in a family of tetrameric SSBs. It consists of a structurally well-defined ssDNA binding domain (OB-domain) and a disordered C-terminal domain (C-domain). The eight-residue C-terminal segment of SSB (C-peptide) mediates the binding of SSB to many different SSB-binding proteins. Previously published nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data of the monomeric state at pH 3.4 showed that the C-peptide binds to the OB-domain at a site that overlaps with the ssDNA binding site, but investigating the protein at neutral pH is difficult because of the high molecular mass and limited solubility of the tetramer. Here we show that the C-domain is highly mobile in the SSB tetramer at neutral pH and that binding of the C-peptide to the OB-domain is so weak that most of the C-peptides are unbound even in the absence of ssDNA. We address the problem of determining intramolecular binding affinities in the situation of fast exchange between two states, one of which cannot be observed by NMR and cannot be fully populated. The results were confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and microscale thermophoresis. The C-peptide-OB-domain interaction is shown to be driven primarily by electrostatic interactions, so that binding of 1 equiv of (dT)35 releases practically all C-peptides from the OB-domain tetramer. The interaction is much more sensitive to NaCl than to potassium glutamate, which is the usual osmolyte in E. coli. As the C-peptide is predominantly in the unbound state irrespective of the presence of ssDNA, long-range electrostatic effects from the C-peptide may contribute more to regulating the activity of SSB than any engagement of the C-peptide by the OB-domain.

  8. Characterization of the DNA-binding properties of the myeloid zinc finger protein MZF1: two independent DNA-binding domains recognize two DNA consensus sequences with a common G-rich core.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, J F; Hromas, R; Rauscher, F J

    1994-01-01

    The myeloid zinc finger gene 1, MZF1, encodes a transcription factor which is expressed in hematopoietic progenitor cells that are committed to myeloid lineage differentiation. MZF1 contains 13 C2H2 zinc fingers arranged in two domains which are separated by a short glycine- and proline-rich sequence. The first domain consists of zinc fingers 1 to 4, and the second domain is formed by zinc fingers 5 to 13. We have determined that both sets of zinc finger domains bind DNA. Purified, recombinant MZF1 proteins containing either the first set of zinc fingers or the second set were prepared and used to affinity select DNA sequences from a library of degenerate oligonucleotides by using successive rounds of gel shift followed by PCR amplification. Surprisingly, both DNA-binding domains of MZF1 selected similar DNA-binding consensus sequences containing a core of four or five guanine residues, reminiscent of an NF-kappa B half-site: 1-4, 5'-AGTGGGGA-3'; 5-13, 5'-CGGGnGAGGGGGAA-3'. The full-length MZF1 protein containing both sets of zinc finger DNA-binding domains recognizes synthetic oligonucleotides containing either the 1-4 or 5-13 consensus binding sites in gel shift assays. Thus, we have identified the core DNA consensus binding sites for each of the two DNA-binding domains of a myeloid-specific zinc finger transcription factor. Identification of these DNA-binding sites will allow us to identify target genes regulated by MZF1 and to assess the role of MZF1 as a transcriptional regulator of hematopoiesis. Images PMID:8114711

  9. Dual-core antiresonant hollow core fibers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuesong; Fan, Zhongwei; Shi, Zhaohui; Ma, Yunfeng; Yu, Jin; Zhang, Jing

    2016-07-25

    In this work, dual-core antiresonant hollow core fibers (AR-HCFs) are numerically demonstrated, based on our knowledge, for the first time. Two fiber structures are proposed. One is a composite of two single-core nested nodeless AR-HCFs, exhibiting low confinement loss and a circular mode profile in each core. The other has a relatively simple structure, with a whole elliptical outer jacket, presenting a uniform and wide transmission band. The modal couplings of the dual-core AR-HCFs rely on a unique mechanism that transfers power through the air. The core separation and the gap between the two cores influence the modal coupling strength. With proper designs, both of the dual-core fibers can have low phase birefringence and short modal coupling lengths of several centimeters.

  10. Histidine switch controlling pH-dependent protein folding and DNA binding in a transcription factor at the core of synthetic network devices.

    PubMed

    Deochand, D K; Perera, I C; Crochet, R B; Gilbert, N C; Newcomer, M E; Grove, A

    2016-07-19

    Therapeutic strategies have been reported that depend on synthetic network devices in which a urate-sensing transcriptional regulator detects pathological levels of urate and triggers production or release of urate oxidase. The transcription factor involved, HucR, is a member of the multiple antibiotic resistance (MarR) protein family. We show that protonation of stacked histidine residues at the pivot point of long helices that form the scaffold of the dimer interface leads to reversible formation of a molten globule state and significantly attenuated DNA binding at physiological temperatures. We also show that binding of urate to symmetrical sites in each protein lobe is communicated via the dimer interface. This is the first demonstration of regulation of a MarR family transcription factor by pH-dependent interconversion between a molten globule and a compact folded state. Our data further suggest that HucR may be utilized in synthetic devices that depend on detection of pH changes. PMID:27282811

  11. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Anisotropy Study of the Interaction Between DNA and a Peptide Truncated from the p53 Protein Core Domain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengxuan; Liang, Gaiting; Liu, Zhen; Zu, Lily

    2014-03-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy spectroscopy was applied to study the interaction between a peptide truncated from the binding site of tumor suppressor p53 protein and the DNAs covalently labeled with 6-carboxyfluorescein (FAM) dye. Fluorescence intensity quenching and changes of anisotropy decay lifetime were monitored when FAM labeled DNA formed complex with the peptide. The results demonstrated that the sequence of DNA could not define the binding specificity between the peptide and DNA. But the anisotropy decay of FAM can be used to examine the binding affinity of the peptide to DNA. The fluorescent dynamics of FAM can also be used to represent the rigidity of the complex formed between the peptide and DNA.

  12. Functional Epitope Core Motif of the Anaplasma marginale Major Surface Protein 1a and Its Incorporation onto Bioelectrodes for Antibody Detection

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Luciano P.; Santos, Fabiana A. A.; Faria, Paula C. B.; Martins, João R. S.; Brito-Madurro, Ana G.; Madurro, João M.; Goulart, Luiz R.

    2012-01-01

    Anaplasmosis, a persistent intraerythrocytic infection of cattle by Anaplasma marginale, causes severe anemia and a higher rate of abortion, resulting in significant loss to both dairy and beef industries. Clinical diagnosis is based on symptoms and confirmatory laboratory tests are required. Currently, all the diagnostic assays have been developed with whole antigens with indirect ELISA based on multiple epitopes. In a pioneer investigation we demonstrated the use of critical motifs of an epitope as biomarkers for immunosensor applications. Mimotopes of the MSP1a protein functional epitope were obtained through Phage Display after three cycles of selection of a 12-mer random peptide library against the neutralizing monoclonal antibody 15D2. Thirty-nine clones were randomly selected, sequenced, translated and aligned with the native sequence. The consensus sequence SxSSQSEASTSSQLGA was obtained, which is located in C-terminal end of the 28-aa repetitive motif of the MSP1a protein, but the alignment and sequences' variation among mimotopes allowed us to map the critical motif STSSxL within the consensus sequence. Based on these results, two peptides were chemically synthesized: one based on the critical motif (STSSQL, Am1) and the other based on the consensus sequence aligned with the native epitope (SEASTSSQLGA, Am2). Sera from 24 infected and 52 healthy animals were tested by ELISA for reactivity against Am1 and Am2, which presented sensitivities of 96% and 100%, respectively. The Am1 peptide was incorporated onto a biolectrode (graphite modified with poly-3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid) and direct serum detection was demonstrated by impedance, differential pulse voltammetry, and atomic force microscopy. The electrochemical sensor system proved to be highly effective in discriminating sera from positive and negative animals. These immunosensors were highly sensitive and selective for positive IgG, contaminants did not affect measurements, and were based on a simple

  13. Cell type-specific gene expression in the neuroendocrine system. A neuroendocrine-specific regulatory element in the promoter of chromogranin A, a ubiquitous secretory granule core protein.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, H; Rozansky, D J; Webster, N J; O'Connor, D T

    1994-01-01

    The acidic secretory protein chromogranin A universally occurs in amine and peptide hormone and neurotransmitter storage granules throughout the neuroendocrine system. What factors govern the activity of the chromogranin A gene, to yield such a widespread yet neuroendocrine-selective pattern of expression? To address this question, we isolated the mouse chromogranin A gene promoter. The promoter conferred cell type-specific expression in several neuroendocrine cell types (adrenal medullary chromaffin cells, anterior pituitary corticotropes, and anterior pituitary somatolactotropes) but not in control (fibroblast or kidney) cells. In neuroendocrine cells, analysis of promoter deletions established both positive and negative transcriptional regulatory domains. A distal positive domain (-4.8/-2.2 kbp) was discovered, as well as negative (-258/-181 bp) and positive (-147/-61 bp) domains in the proximate promoter. The proximate promoter contained a minimal neuroendocrine-specific element between -77 and -61 bp. Sequence alignment of the mouse promoter with corresponding regions in rat and bovine clones indicated that the mouse sequence shares over 85% homology with rat and 52% with bovine promoters. DNaseI footprinting and electrophoretic gel mobility shift assays demonstrated the presence of nuclear factors in neuroendocrine cells that recognized the proximate promoter. We conclude that the chromogranin A promoter contains both positive and negative domains governing its cell type-specific pattern of transcription, and that a small proximate region of the promoter, containing novel as well as previously described elements, interacts specifically with neuroendocrine nuclear proteins, and is thereby sufficient to ensure widespread neuroendocrine expression of the gene. Images PMID:8040254

  14. Evidence for posttranslational protein flavinylation in the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and biochemical insights from the catalytic core of a periplasmic flavin-trafficking protein

    SciTech Connect

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2015-05-05

    The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete’s periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redox system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg²⁺-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg²⁺-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp’s dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg²⁺ in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm.

  15. Dephosphorylation of the Core Septin, AspB, in a Protein Phosphatase 2A-Dependent Manner Impacts Its Localization and Function in the Fungal Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Muñiz, José M; Renshaw, Hilary; Richards, Amber D; Waitt, Greg; Soderblom, Erik J; Moseley, Martin A; Asfaw, Yohannes; Juvvadi, Praveen R; Steinbach, William J

    2016-01-01

    Septins are a conserved family of GTPases that form hetero-oligomeric complexes and perform diverse functions in higher eukaryotes, excluding plants. Our previous studies in the human fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus revealed that the core septin, AspB, a CDC3 ortholog, is required for septation, conidiation, and conidial cell wall organization. Although AspB is important for these cellular functions, nothing is known about the role of kinases or phosphatases in the posttranslational regulation and localization of septins in A. fumigatus. In this study, we assessed the function of the Gin4 and Cla4 kinases and the PP2A regulatory subunit ParA, in the regulation of AspB using genetic and phosphoproteomic approaches. Gene deletion analyses revealed that Cla4 and ParA are indispensable for hyphal extension, and Gin4, Cla4, and ParA are each required for conidiation and normal septation. While deletion of gin4 resulted in larger interseptal distances and hypervirulence, a phenotype mimicking aspB deletion, deletion of cla4 and parA caused hyperseptation without impacting virulence, indicating divergent roles in regulating septation. Phosphoproteomic analyses revealed that AspB is phosphorylated at five residues in the GTPase domain (S134, S137, S247, T297, and T301) and two residues at its C-terminus (S416 and S461) in the wild-type, Δgin4 and Δcla4 strains. However, concomitant with the differential localization pattern of AspB and hyperseptation in the ΔparA strain, AspB remained phosphorylated at two additional residues, T68 in the N-terminal polybasic region and S447 in the coiled-coil domain. Generation of nonphosphorylatable and phosphomimetic strains surrounding each differentially phosphorylated residue revealed that only AspB (mt) -T68E showed increased interseptal distances, suggesting that dephosphorylation of T68 is important for proper septation. This study highlights the importance of septin phosphorylation/dephosphorylation in the regulation of A

  16. Dephosphorylation of the Core Septin, AspB, in a Protein Phosphatase 2A-Dependent Manner Impacts Its Localization and Function in the Fungal Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Muñiz, José M.; Renshaw, Hilary; Richards, Amber D.; Waitt, Greg; Soderblom, Erik J.; Moseley, Martin. A.; Asfaw, Yohannes; Juvvadi, Praveen R.; Steinbach, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Septins are a conserved family of GTPases that form hetero–oligomeric complexes and perform diverse functions in higher eukaryotes, excluding plants. Our previous studies in the human fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus revealed that the core septin, AspB, a CDC3 ortholog, is required for septation, conidiation, and conidial cell wall organization. Although AspB is important for these cellular functions, nothing is known about the role of kinases or phosphatases in the posttranslational regulation and localization of septins in A. fumigatus. In this study, we assessed the function of the Gin4 and Cla4 kinases and the PP2A regulatory subunit ParA, in the regulation of AspB using genetic and phosphoproteomic approaches. Gene deletion analyses revealed that Cla4 and ParA are indispensable for hyphal extension, and Gin4, Cla4, and ParA are each required for conidiation and normal septation. While deletion of gin4 resulted in larger interseptal distances and hypervirulence, a phenotype mimicking aspB deletion, deletion of cla4 and parA caused hyperseptation without impacting virulence, indicating divergent roles in regulating septation. Phosphoproteomic analyses revealed that AspB is phosphorylated at five residues in the GTPase domain (S134, S137, S247, T297, and T301) and two residues at its C-terminus (S416 and S461) in the wild-type, Δgin4 and Δcla4 strains. However, concomitant with the differential localization pattern of AspB and hyperseptation in the ΔparA strain, AspB remained phosphorylated at two additional residues, T68 in the N-terminal polybasic region and S447 in the coiled-coil domain. Generation of nonphosphorylatable and phosphomimetic strains surrounding each differentially phosphorylated residue revealed that only AspBmt-T68E showed increased interseptal distances, suggesting that dephosphorylation of T68 is important for proper septation. This study highlights the importance of septin phosphorylation/dephosphorylation in the regulation of A

  17. Dephosphorylation of the Core Septin, AspB, in a Protein Phosphatase 2A-Dependent Manner Impacts Its Localization and Function in the Fungal Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Muñiz, José M; Renshaw, Hilary; Richards, Amber D; Waitt, Greg; Soderblom, Erik J; Moseley, Martin A; Asfaw, Yohannes; Juvvadi, Praveen R; Steinbach, William J

    2016-01-01

    Septins are a conserved family of GTPases that form hetero-oligomeric complexes and perform diverse functions in higher eukaryotes, excluding plants. Our previous studies in the human fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus revealed that the core septin, AspB, a CDC3 ortholog, is required for septation, conidiation, and conidial cell wall organization. Although AspB is important for these cellular functions, nothing is known about the role of kinases or phosphatases in the posttranslational regulation and localization of septins in A. fumigatus. In this study, we assessed the function of the Gin4 and Cla4 kinases and the PP2A regulatory subunit ParA, in the regulation of AspB using genetic and phosphoproteomic approaches. Gene deletion analyses revealed that Cla4 and ParA are indispensable for hyphal extension, and Gin4, Cla4, and ParA are each required for conidiation and normal septation. While deletion of gin4 resulted in larger interseptal distances and hypervirulence, a phenotype mimicking aspB deletion, deletion of cla4 and parA caused hyperseptation without impacting virulence, indicating divergent roles in regulating septation. Phosphoproteomic analyses revealed that AspB is phosphorylated at five residues in the GTPase domain (S134, S137, S247, T297, and T301) and two residues at its C-terminus (S416 and S461) in the wild-type, Δgin4 and Δcla4 strains. However, concomitant with the differential localization pattern of AspB and hyperseptation in the ΔparA strain, AspB remained phosphorylated at two additional residues, T68 in the N-terminal polybasic region and S447 in the coiled-coil domain. Generation of nonphosphorylatable and phosphomimetic strains surrounding each differentially phosphorylated residue revealed that only AspB (mt) -T68E showed increased interseptal distances, suggesting that dephosphorylation of T68 is important for proper septation. This study highlights the importance of septin phosphorylation/dephosphorylation in the regulation of A

  18. Two Rab2 interactors regulate dense-core vesicle maturation.

    PubMed

    Ailion, Michael; Hannemann, Mandy; Dalton, Susan; Pappas, Andrea; Watanabe, Shigeki; Hegermann, Jan; Liu, Qiang; Han, Hsiao-Fen; Gu, Mingyu; Goulding, Morgan Q; Sasidharan, Nikhil; Schuske, Kim; Hullett, Patrick; Eimer, Stefan; Jorgensen, Erik M

    2014-04-01

    Peptide neuromodulators are released from a unique organelle: the dense-core vesicle. Dense-core vesicles are generated at the trans-Golgi and then sort cargo during maturation before being secreted. To identify proteins that act in this pathway, we performed a genetic screen in Caenorhabditis elegans for mutants defective in dense-core vesicle function. We identified two conserved Rab2-binding proteins: RUND-1, a RUN domain protein, and CCCP-1, a coiled-coil protein. RUND-1 and CCCP-1 colocalize with RAB-2 at the Golgi, and rab-2, rund-1, and cccp-1 mutants have similar defects in sorting soluble and transmembrane dense-core vesicle cargos. RUND-1 also interacts with the Rab2 GAP protein TBC-8 and the BAR domain protein RIC-19, a RAB-2 effector. In summary, a pathway of conserved proteins controls the maturation of dense-core vesicles at the trans-Golgi network. PMID:24698274

  19. Complex coacervate core micelles.

    PubMed

    Voets, Ilja K; de Keizer, Arie; Cohen Stuart, Martien A

    2009-01-01

    In this review we present an overview of the literature on the co-assembly of neutral-ionic block, graft, and random copolymers with oppositely charged species in aqueous solution. Oppositely charged species include synthetic (co)polymers of various architectures, biopolymers - such as proteins, enzymes and DNA - multivalent ions, metallic nanoparticles, low molecular weight surfactants, polyelectrolyte block copolymer micelles, metallo-supramolecular polymers, equilibrium polymers, etcetera. The resultant structures are termed complex coacervate core/polyion complex/block ionomer complex/interpolyelectrolyte complex micelles (or vesicles); i.e., in short C3Ms (or C3Vs) and PIC, BIC or IPEC micelles (and vesicles). Formation, structure, dynamics, properties, and function will be discussed. We focus on experimental work; theory and modelling will not be discussed. Recent developments in applications and micelles with heterogeneous coronas are emphasized.

  20. In vivo roles of BamA, BamB and BamD in the biogenesis of BamA, a core protein of the β-barrel assembly machine of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Misra, Rajeev; Stikeleather, Ryan; Gabriele, Rebecca

    2015-03-13

    Assembly of the β-barrel outer membrane proteins (OMPs) is an essential cellular process in Gram-negative bacteria and in the mitochondria and chloroplasts of eukaryotes--two organelles of bacterial origin. Central to this process is the conserved β-barrel OMP that belongs to the Omp85 superfamily. In Escherichia coli, BamA is the core β-barrel OMP and, together with four outer membrane lipoproteins, BamBCDE, constitutes the β-barrel assembly machine (BAM). In this paper, we investigated the roles of BamD, an essential lipoprotein, and BamB in BamA biogenesis. Depletion of BamD caused impairment in BamA biogenesis and cessation of cell growth. These defects of BamD depletion were partly reversed by single-amino-acid substitutions mapping within the β-barrel domain of BamA. However, in the absence of BamB, the positive effects of the β-barrel substitutions on BamA biogenesis under BamD depletion conditions were nullified. By employing a BamA protein bearing one such substitution, F474L, it was demonstrated that the mutant BamA protein could not only assemble without BamD but also facilitate the assembly of wild-type BamA expressed in trans. Based on these data, we propose a model in which the Bam lipoproteins, which are localized to the outer membrane by the BAM-independent Lol pathway, aid in the creation of new BAM complexes by serving as outer membrane receptors and folding factors for nascent BamA molecules. The newly assembled BAM holocomplex then catalyzes the assembly of substrate OMPs and BamA. These in vivo findings are corroborated by recently published in vitro data. PMID:24792419

  1. Half-sandwich RuCl2(η(6)-p-cymene) core complexes containing sulfur donor aroylthiourea ligands: DNA and protein binding, DNA cleavage and cytotoxic studies.

    PubMed

    Jeyalakshmi, Kumaramangalam; Haribabu, Jebiti; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai S P; Karvembu, Ramasamy

    2016-08-01

    A series of Ru(ii)(η(6)-p-cymene) complexes (1-4) bearing the general formula [RuCl2(η(6)-p-cymene)L] (L = monodentate aroylthiourea ligand) has been synthesized and characterized by analytical and various spectroscopic techniques. The neutral monodentate coordination of aroylthiourea with Ru via an S atom was confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction study. The complexes were tested for their ability to interact with DNA and protein. The complexes bound with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) with the intrinsic binding constant value in the order of 10(4) M(-1). The intercalative mode of binding was confirmed by the ethidium bromide (EB) displacement study. The interaction of the complexes with CT DNA was further supported by viscosity measurements and circular dichroic (CD) spectra. The Ru(ii) complexes cleaved the supercoiled DNA without the need of any external agent. The spectroscopic evidence showed good binding efficacy of the complexes with BSA (Bovine Serum Albumin). The alterations in the secondary structure of BSA by the Ru(ii) complexes were confirmed by synchronous fluorescence spectra. Cytotoxicity examination by MTT assay was carried out in two cancer cell lines (MCF7 and A549) and one non-cancerous cell line (L929). Complex 4 showed significant activity [IC50 = 52.3 (MCF7) and 54.6 (A549) μM] which was comparable with that of similar known complexes. The morphological changes assessed by Hoechst staining revealed that the cell death occurred by apoptosis. PMID:27435011

  2. Core-core and core-valence correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of (1s) core correlation on properties and energy separations was analyzed using full configuration-interaction (FCI) calculations. The Be 1 S - 1 P, the C 3 P - 5 S and CH+ 1 Sigma + or - 1 Pi separations, and CH+ spectroscopic constants, dipole moment and 1 Sigma + - 1 Pi transition dipole moment were studied. The results of the FCI calculations are compared to those obtained using approximate methods. In addition, the generation of atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets, as a method for contracting a primitive basis set for both valence and core correlation, is discussed. When both core-core and core-valence correlation are included in the calculation, no suitable truncated CI approach consistently reproduces the FCI, and contraction of the basis set is very difficult. If the (nearly constant) core-core correlation is eliminated, and only the core-valence correlation is included, CASSCF/MRCI approached reproduce the FCI results and basis set contraction is significantly easier.

  3. Membrane fusion by an RGD-containing sequence from the core protein VP3 of hepatitis A virus and the RGA-analogue: implications for viral infection.

    PubMed

    Chávez, A; Pujol, M; Haro, I; Alsina, M A; Cajal, Y

    2001-01-01

    The interaction of an RGD-containing epitope from the hepatitis A virus VP3 capsid protein and its RGA-analogue with lipid membranes was studied by biophysical methods. Two types of model membrane were used: vesicles and monolayers spread at the air/water interface, with a composition that closely resembles the lipid moiety of hepatocyte membranes: PC/SM/PE/PC (40:33:12:15; PC: 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylglycero-sn-3-phosphocholine; SM: sphingomyelin from chicken egg yolk; PE, 1,2-dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine; PS: L-alpha-phosphatidyl-L-serine from bovine brain). In addition, zwitterionic PC/SM/PE (47:39:14) and cationic PC/SM/PE/DOTAP (40:33:12:15; DOTAP: 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) membranes were also prepared in order to dissect the electrostatic and hydrophobic components in the interaction. Changes in tryptophan fluorescence, acrylamide quenching, and resonance energy transfer experiments in the presence of vesicles, as well as the kinetics of insertion in monolayers, indicate that both peptides bind to the three types of membrane at neutral and acidic pH; however, binding is irreversible only at low pH. Membrane-destabilizing and fusogenic activities are triggered by acidification at pH 4-6, characteristic of the endosome. Fluorescence experiments show that VP3-RGD and VP3-RGA induce mixing of lipids and leakage or mixing of aqueous contents in anionic and cationic vesicles at pH 4-6, indicating leaky fusion. Interaction with zwitterionic vesicles (PC/SM/PE) results in leakage without lipid mixing, indicating pore formation. Replacement of aspartic acid in the RGD motif by alanine maintains the membrane-destabilizing properties of the peptide at low pH, but not its antigenicity. Since the RGD tripeptide is related to receptor-mediated cell adhesion and antigenicity, results suggest that receptor binding is not a molecular requirement for fusion. The possible involvement of peptide-induced membrane destabilization in the mechanism of hepatitis A

  4. Dephosphorylation of the core clock protein KaiC in the cyanobacterial KaiABC circadian oscillator proceeds via an ATP synthase mechanism.

    PubMed

    Egli, Martin; Mori, Tetsuya; Pattanayek, Rekha; Xu, Yao; Qin, Ximing; Johnson, Carl H

    2012-02-28

    The circadian clock of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus can be reconstituted in vitro from three proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC in the presence of ATP, to tick in a temperature-compensated manner. KaiC, the central cog of this oscillator, forms a homohexamer with 12 ATP molecules bound between its N- and C-terminal domains and exhibits unusual properties. Both the N-terminal (CI) and C-terminal (CII) domains harbor ATPase activity, and the subunit interfaces between CII domains are the sites of autokinase and autophosphatase activities. Hydrolysis of ATP correlates with phosphorylation at threonine and serine sites across subunits in an orchestrated manner, such that first T432 and then S431 are phosphorylated, followed by dephosphorylation of these residues in the same order. Although structural work has provided insight into the mechanisms of ATPase and kinase, the location and mechanism of the phosphatase have remained enigmatic. From the available experimental data based on a range of approaches, including KaiC crystal structures and small-angle X-ray scattering models, metal ion dependence, site-directed mutagenesis (i.e., E318, the general base), and measurements of the associated clock periods, phosphorylation patterns, and dephosphorylation courses as well as a lack of sequence motifs in KaiC that are typically associated with known phosphatases, we hypothesized that KaiCII makes use of the same active site for phosphorylation and dephosphorlyation. We observed that wild-type KaiC (wt-KaiC) exhibits an ATP synthase activity that is significantly reduced in the T432A/S431A mutant. We interpret the first observation as evidence that KaiCII is a phosphotransferase instead of a phosphatase and the second that the enzyme is capable of generating ATP, both from ADP and P(i) (in a reversal of the ATPase reaction) and from ADP and P-T432/P-S431 (dephosphorylation). This new concept regarding the mechanism of dephosphorylation is also supported by the

  5. Dephosphorylation of the Core Clock Protein KaiC in the Cyanobacterial KaiABC Circadian Oscillator Proceeds via an ATP Synthase Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Egli, Martin; Mori, Tetsuya; Pattanayek, Rekha; Xu, Yao; Qin, Ximing; Johnson, Carl H.

    2014-10-02

    The circadian clock of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus can be reconstituted in vitro from three proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC in the presence of ATP, to tick in a temperature-compensated manner. KaiC, the central cog of this oscillator, forms a homohexamer with 12 ATP molecules bound between its N- and C-terminal domains and exhibits unusual properties. Both the N-terminal (CI) and C-terminal (CII) domains harbor ATPase activity, and the subunit interfaces between CII domains are the sites of autokinase and autophosphatase activities. Hydrolysis of ATP correlates with phosphorylation at threonine and serine sites across subunits in an orchestrated manner, such that first T432 and then S431 are phosphorylated, followed by dephosphorylation of these residues in the same order. Although structural work has provided insight into the mechanisms of ATPase and kinase, the location and mechanism of the phosphatase have remained enigmatic. From the available experimental data based on a range of approaches, including KaiC crystal structures and small-angle X-ray scattering models, metal ion dependence, site-directed mutagenesis (i.e., E318, the general base), and measurements of the associated clock periods, phosphorylation patterns, and dephosphorylation courses as well as a lack of sequence motifs in KaiC that are typically associated with known phosphatases, we hypothesized that KaiCII makes use of the same active site for phosphorylation and dephosphorlyation. We observed that wild-type KaiC (wt-KaiC) exhibits an ATP synthase activity that is significantly reduced in the T432A/S431A mutant. We interpret the first observation as evidence that KaiCII is a phosphotransferase instead of a phosphatase and the second that the enzyme is capable of generating ATP, both from ADP and P{sub i} (in a reversal of the ATPase reaction) and from ADP and P-T432/P-S431 (dephosphorylation). This new concept regarding the mechanism of dephosphorylation is also supported by the

  6. Monoclonal antibody Cat-315 detects a glycoform of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/phosphacan early in CNS development that localizes to extrasynaptic sites prior to synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Dino, M R; Harroch, S; Hockfield, S; Matthews, R T

    2006-11-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNs) are lattice-like condensations of the extracellular matrix (ECM) that envelop synapses and decorate the surface of subsets of neurons in the CNS. Previous work has suggested that, despite the fact that PNs themselves are not visualized until later in development, some PN component molecules are expressed in the rodent CNS even before synaptogenesis. In the adult mammalian brain, monoclonal antibody Cat-315 recognizes a glycoform of aggrecan, a major component of PNs. In primary cortical cultures, a Cat-315-reactive chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) is also expressed on neuronal surfaces and is secreted into culture media as early as 24 h after plating. In this study, we show that in primary cortical cultures, the Cat-315 CSPG detected in early neural development is expressed in extrasynaptic sites prior to synapse formation. This suggests that ECM components in the CNS, as in the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), may prepattern neuronal surfaces prior to innervation. We further show that while the Cat-315-reactive carbohydrate decorates aggrecan in the adult, it decorates a different CSPG in the developing CNS. Using receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta (RPTPbeta/protein tyrosine phosphatase zeta) knock-out mice and immunoprecipitation techniques, we demonstrate here that in the developing rodent brain Cat-315 recognizes RPTPbeta isoforms. Our further examination of the Cat-315 epitope suggests that it is an O-mannose linked epitope in the HNK-1 family. The presence of the Cat-315 reactive carbohydrate on different PN components--RPTPbeta and aggrecan--at different stages of synapse development suggests a potential role for this neuron-specific carbohydrate motif in synaptogenesis.

  7. Academic Rigor: The Core of the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Some educators see the Common Core State Standards as reason for stress, most recognize the positive possibilities associated with them and are willing to make the professional commitment to implementing them so that academic rigor for all students will increase. But business leaders, parents, and the authors of the Common Core are not the only…

  8. Mapping the structure of folding cores in TIM barrel proteins by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry: the roles of motif and sequence for the indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase from Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhenyu; Zitzewitz, Jill A; Matthews, C Robert

    2007-04-27

    To test the roles of motif and amino acid sequence in the folding mechanisms of TIM barrel proteins, hydrogen-deuterium exchange was used to explore the structure of the stable folding intermediates for the of indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase from Sulfolobus solfataricus (sIGPS). Previous studies of the urea denaturation of sIGPS revealed the presence of an intermediate that is highly populated at approximately 4.5 M urea and contains approximately 50% of the secondary structure of the native (N) state. Kinetic studies showed that this apparent equilibrium intermediate is actually comprised of two thermodynamically distinct species, I(a) and I(b). To probe the location of the secondary structure in this pair of stable on-pathway intermediates, the equilibrium unfolding process of sIGPS was monitored by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. The intact protein and pepsin-digested fragments were studied at various concentrations of urea by electrospray and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, respectively. Intact sIGPS strongly protects at least 54 amide protons from hydrogen-deuterium exchange in the intermediate states, demonstrating the presence of stable folded cores. When the protection patterns and the exchange mechanisms for the peptides are considered with the proposed folding mechanism, the results can be interpreted to define the structural boundaries of I(a) and I(b). Comparison of these results with previous hydrogen-deuterium exchange studies on another TIM barrel protein of low sequence identify, alpha-tryptophan synthase (alphaTS), indicates that the thermodynamic states corresponding to the folding intermediates are better conserved than their structures. Although the TIM barrel motif appears to define the basic features of the folding free energy surface, the structures of the partially folded states that appear during the folding reaction depend on the amino acid sequence. Markedly, the good

  9. Core Design Applications

    1995-07-12

    CORD-2 is intended for core desigh applications of pressurized water reactors. The main objective was to assemble a core design system which could be used for simple calculations (such as frequently required for fuel management) as well as for accurate calculations (for example, core design after refueling).

  10. Banded transformer cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W. T. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A banded transformer core formed by positioning a pair of mated, similar core halves on a supporting pedestal. The core halves are encircled with a strap, selectively applying tension whereby a compressive force is applied to the core edge for reducing the innate air gap. A dc magnetic field is employed in supporting the core halves during initial phases of the banding operation, while an ac magnetic field subsequently is employed for detecting dimension changes occurring in the air gaps as tension is applied to the strap.

  11. A core activity associated with the N terminus of the yeast RAD52 protein is revealed by RAD51 overexpression suppression of C-terminal rad52 truncation alleles.

    PubMed Central

    Asleson, E N; Okagaki, R J; Livingston, D M

    1999-01-01

    C-terminal rad52 truncation and internal deletion mutants were characterized for their ability to repair MMS-induced double-strand breaks and to produce viable spores during meiosis. The rad52-Delta251 allele, encoding the N-terminal 251 amino acids of the predicted 504-amino-acid polypeptide, supports partial activity for both functions. Furthermore, RAD51 overexpression completely suppresses the MMS sensitivity of a rad52-Delta251 mutant. The absence of the C terminus in the truncated protein makes it likely that suppression occurs by bypassing the C-terminal functions of Rad52p. RAD51 overexpression does not suppress the low level of spore viability that the rad52-Delta251 allele causes and only partially suppresses the defect in rad52 alleles encoding the N-terminal 292 or 327 amino acids. The results of this study also show that intragenic complementation between rad52 alleles is governed by a complex relationship that depends heavily on the two alleles involved and their relative dosage. In heteroallelic rad52 diploids, the rad52-Delta251 allele does not complement rad52 missense mutations altering residues 61 or 64 in the N terminus. However, complementation is achieved with each of these missense alleles when the rad52-Delta251 allele is overexpressed. Complementation also occurs between rad52-Delta327 and an internal deletion allele missing residues 210 through 327. We suggest that the first 251 amino acids of Rad52p constitute a core domain that provides critical RAD52 activities. PMID:10511548

  12. Crystal Structure of the Human Cytomegalovirus pUL50-pUL53 Core Nuclear Egress Complex Provides Insight into a Unique Assembly Scaffold for Virus-Host Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Walzer, Sascha A; Egerer-Sieber, Claudia; Sticht, Heinrich; Sevvana, Madhumati; Hohl, Katharina; Milbradt, Jens; Muller, Yves A; Marschall, Manfred

    2015-11-13

    Nuclear replication of cytomegalovirus relies on elaborate mechanisms of nucleocytoplasmic egress of viral particles. Thus, the role of two essential and conserved viral nuclear egress proteins, pUL50 and pUL53, is pivotal. pUL50 and pUL53 heterodimerize and form a core nuclear egress complex (NEC), which is anchored to the inner nuclear membrane and provides a scaffold for the assembly of a multimeric viral-cellular NEC. Here, we report the crystal structure of the pUL50-pUL53 heterodimer (amino acids 1-175 and 50-292, respectively) at 2.44 Å resolution. Both proteins adopt a globular fold with mixed α and β secondary structure elements. pUL53-specific features include a zinc-binding site and a hook-like N-terminal extension, the latter representing a hallmark element of the pUL50-pUL53 interaction. The hook-like extension (amino acids 59-87) embraces pUL50 and contributes 1510 Å(2) to the total interface area (1880 Å(2)). The pUL50 structure overall resembles the recently published NMR structure of the murine cytomegalovirus homolog pM50 but reveals a considerable repositioning of the very C-terminal α-helix of pUL50 upon pUL53 binding. pUL53 shows structural resemblance with the GHKL domain of bacterial sensory histidine kinases. A close examination of the crystal structure indicates partial assembly of pUL50-pUL53 heterodimers to hexameric ring-like structures possibly providing additional scaffolding opportunities for NEC. In combination, the structural information on pUL50-pUL53 considerably improves our understanding of the mechanism of HCMV nuclear egress. It may also accelerate the validation of the NEC as a unique target for developing a novel type of antiviral drug and improved options of broad-spectrum antiherpesviral therapy.

  13. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate formation comprised of coarse, large

  14. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 provokes interleukin-18-induced human intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ye, S.; Ju, B.; Wang, H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Interleukin 18 (IL-18) is a regulatory cytokine that degrades the disc matrix. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) stimulates synthesis of the disc extracellular matrix. However, the combined effects of BMP-2 and IL-18 on human intervertebral disc degeneration have not previously been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the anabolic cytokine BMP-2 and the catabolic cytokine IL-18 on human nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF) cells and, therefore, to identify potential therapeutic and clinical benefits of recombinant human (rh)BMP-2 in intervertebral disc degeneration. Methods Levels of IL-18 were measured in the blood of patients with intervertebral disc degenerative disease and in control patients. Human NP and AF cells were cultured in a NP cell medium and treated with IL-18 or IL-18 plus BMP-2. mRNA levels of target genes were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and protein levels of aggrecan, type II collagen, SOX6, and matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13) were assessed by western blot analysis. Results The serum level of patients (IL-18) increased significantly with the grade of IVD degeneration. There was a dramatic alteration in IL-18 level between the advanced degeneration (Grade III to V) group and the normal group (p = 0.008) Furthermore, IL-18 induced upregulation of the catabolic regulator MMP13 and downregulation of the anabolic regulators aggrecan, type II collagen, and SOX6 at 24 hours, contributing to degradation of disc matrix enzymes. However, BMP-2 antagonised the IL-18 induced upregulation of aggrecan, type II collagen, and SOX6, resulting in reversal of IL-18 mediated disc degeneration. Conclusions BMP-2 is anti-catabolic in human NP and AF cells, and its effects are partially mediated through provocation of the catabolic effect of IL-18. These findings indicate that BMP-2 may be a unique therapeutic option for prevention and reversal of disc degeneration. Cite this article: S. Ye

  15. 23. CORE WORKER OPERATING A COREBLOWER THAT PNEUMATICALLY FILLED CORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. CORE WORKER OPERATING A CORE-BLOWER THAT PNEUMATICALLY FILLED CORE BOXES WITH RESIGN IMPREGNATED SAND AND CREATED A CORE THAT THEN REQUIRED BAKING, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  16. Core-Cutoff Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gheen, Darrell

    2007-01-01

    A tool makes a cut perpendicular to the cylindrical axis of a core hole at a predetermined depth to free the core at that depth. The tool does not damage the surrounding material from which the core was cut, and it operates within the core-hole kerf. Coring usually begins with use of a hole saw or a hollow cylindrical abrasive cutting tool to make an annular hole that leaves the core (sometimes called the plug ) in place. In this approach to coring as practiced heretofore, the core is removed forcibly in a manner chosen to shear the core, preferably at or near the greatest depth of the core hole. Unfortunately, such forcible removal often damages both the core and the surrounding material (see Figure 1). In an alternative prior approach, especially applicable to toxic or fragile material, a core is formed and freed by means of milling operations that generate much material waste. In contrast, the present tool eliminates the damage associated with the hole-saw approach and reduces the extent of milling operations (and, hence, reduces the waste) associated with the milling approach. The present tool (see Figure 2) includes an inner sleeve and an outer sleeve and resembles the hollow cylindrical tool used to cut the core hole. The sleeves are thin enough that this tool fits within the kerf of the core hole. The inner sleeve is attached to a shaft that, in turn, can be attached to a drill motor or handle for turning the tool. This tool also includes a cutting wire attached to the distal ends of both sleeves. The cutting wire is long enough that with sufficient relative rotation of the inner and outer sleeves, the wire can cut all the way to the center of the core. The tool is inserted in the kerf until its distal end is seated at the full depth. The inner sleeve is then turned. During turning, frictional drag on the outer core pulls the cutting wire into contact with the core. The cutting force of the wire against the core increases with the tension in the wire and

  17. De novo design of the hydrophobic core of ubiquitin.

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, G. A.; Desjarlais, J. R.; Handel, T. M.

    1997-01-01

    We have previously reported the development and evaluation of a computational program to assist in the design of hydrophobic cores of proteins. In an effort to investigate the role of core packing in protein structure, we have used this program, referred to as Repacking of Cores (ROC), to design several variants of the protein ubiquitin. Nine ubiquitin variants containing from three to eight hydrophobic core mutations were constructed, purified, and characterized in terms of their stability and their ability to adopt a uniquely folded native-like conformation. In general, designed ubiquitin variants are more stable than control variants in which the hydrophobic core was chosen randomly. However, in contrast to previous results with 434 cro, all designs are destabilized relative to the wild-type (WT) protein. This raises the possibility that beta-sheet structures have more stringent packing requirements than alpha-helical proteins. A more striking observation is that all variants, including random controls, adopt fairly well-defined conformations, regardless of their stability. This result supports conclusions from the cro studies that non-core residues contribute significantly to the conformational uniqueness of these proteins while core packing largely affects protein stability and has less impact on the nature or uniqueness of the fold. Concurrent with the above work, we used stability data on the nine ubiquitin variants to evaluate and improve the predictive ability of our core packing algorithm. Additional versions of the program were generated that differ in potential function parameters and sampling of side chain conformers. Reasonable correlations between experimental and predicted stabilities suggest the program will be useful in future studies to design variants with stabilities closer to that of the native protein. Taken together, the present study provides further clarification of the role of specific packing interactions in protein structure and

  18. Core sample extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, James; Cobb, Billy; Hart, Steve; Leaptrotte, Jeff; Milhollin, James; Pernik, Mark

    1989-01-01

    The problem of retrieving and storing core samples from a hole drilled on the lunar surface is addressed. The total depth of the hole in question is 50 meters with a maximum diameter of 100 millimeters. The core sample itself has a diameter of 60 millimeters and will be two meters in length. It is therefore necessary to retrieve and store 25 core samples per hole. The design utilizes a control system that will stop the mechanism at a certain depth, a cam-linkage system that will fracture the core, and a storage system that will save and catalogue the cores to be extracted. The Rod Changer and Storage Design Group will provide the necessary tooling to get into the hole as well as to the core. The mechanical design for the cam-linkage system as well as the conceptual design of the storage device are described.

  19. Kβ Valence to Core X-ray Emission Studies of Cu(I) Binding Proteins with Mixed Methionine - Histidine Coordination. Relevance to the Reactivity of the M- and H-sites of Peptidylglycine Monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Martin-Diaconescu, Vlad; Chacón, Kelly N; Delgado-Jaime, Mario Ulises; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; DeBeer, Serena; Blackburn, Ninian J

    2016-04-01

    Biological systems use copper as a redox center in many metalloproteins, where the role of the metal is to cycle between its +1 and +2 oxidation states. This chemistry requires the redox potential to be in a range that can stabilize both Cu(I) and Cu(II) states and often involves protein-derived ligand sets involving mixed histidine-methionine coordination that balance the preferences of both oxidation states. Transport proteins, on the other hand, utilize copper in the Cu(I) state and often contain sites comprised predominately of the cuprophilic residue methionine. The electronic factors that allow enzymes and transporters to balance their redox requirements are complex and are often elusive due to the dearth of spectroscopic probes of the Cu(I) state. Here we present the novel application of X-ray emission spectroscopy to copper proteins via a study of a series of mixed His-Met copper sites where the ligand set varies in a systematic way between the His3 and Met3 limits. The sites are derived from the wild-type peptidylglycine monooxygenase (PHM), two single-site variants which replicate each of its two copper sites (CuM-site and CuH-site), and the transporters CusF and CusB. Clear differences are observed in the Kβ2,5 region at the Met3 and His3 limits. CusB (Met3) has a distinct peak at 8978.4 eV with a broad shoulder at 8975.6 eV, whereas CuH (His3) has two well-resolved features: a more intense feature at 8974.8 eV and a second at 8977.2 eV. The mixed coordination sphere CusF (Met2His) and the PHM CuM variant (Met1His2) have very similar spectra consisting of two features at 8975.2 and 8977.8 eV. An analysis of DFT calculated spectra indicate that the intensity of the higher energy peak near 8978 eV is mediated by mixing of ligand-based orbitals into the Cu d(10) manifold, with S from Met providing more intensity by facilitating increased Cu p-d mixing. Furthermore, reaction of WT PHM with CO (an oxygen analogue) produced the M site CO complex, which showed

  20. The core paradox.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, G. C.; Higgins, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rebuttal of suggestions from various critics attempting to provide an escape from the seeming paradox originated by Higgins and Kennedy's (1971) proposed possibility that the liquid in the outer core was thermally stably stratified and that this stratification might prove a powerful inhibitor to circulation of the outer core fluid of the kind postulated for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. These suggestions are examined and shown to provide no reasonable escape from the core paradox.

  1. Core-core and core-valence correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of 1s core correlation on properties and energy separations are analyzed using full configuration-interaction (FCI) calculations. The Be1S - 1P, the C 3P - 5S,m and CH(+) 1Sigma(+) - 1Pi separations, and CH(+) spectroscopic constants, dipole moment, and 1Sigma(+) - 1Pi transition dipole moment have been studied. The results of the FCI calculations are compared to those obtained using approximate methods.

  2. AN Core Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbarino, Andrea; Tomatis, Daniele

    2014-06-01

    Several alternative approximations of neutron transport have been proposed in years to move around the known limitations imposed by neutron diffusion in the modeling of nuclear cores. However, only a few complied with the industrial requirements of fast numerical computation, concentrating more on physical accuracy. In this work, the AN transport methodology is discussed with particular interest in core performance calculations. The implementation of the methodology in full core codes is discussed with particular attention to numerical issues and to the integration within the entire simulation process. Finally, first results from core studies in AN transport are analyzed in detail and compared to standard results of neutron diffusion.

  3. Core Research Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hicks, Joshua; Adrian, Betty

    2009-01-01

    The Core Research Center (CRC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), located at the Denver Federal Center in Lakewood, Colo., currently houses rock core from more than 8,500 boreholes representing about 1.7 million feet of rock core from 35 States and cuttings from 54,000 boreholes representing 238 million feet of drilling in 28 States. Although most of the boreholes are located in the Rocky Mountain region, the geologic and geographic diversity of samples have helped the CRC become one of the largest and most heavily used public core repositories in the United States. Many of the boreholes represented in the collection were drilled for energy and mineral exploration, and many of the cores and cuttings were donated to the CRC by private companies in these industries. Some cores and cuttings were collected by the USGS along with other government agencies. Approximately one-half of the cores are slabbed and photographed. More than 18,000 thin sections and a large volume of analytical data from the cores and cuttings are also accessible. A growing collection of digital images of the cores are also becoming available on the CRC Web site Internet http://geology.cr.usgs.gov/crc/.

  4. Can Psychiatric Rehabilitation Be Core to CORE?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olney, Marjorie F.; Gill, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, we seek to determine whether psychiatric rehabilitation principles and practices have been more fully incorporated into the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) standards, the extent to which they are covered in four rehabilitation counseling "foundations" textbooks, and how they are reflected in the…

  5. Expression of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins: a macroarray study.

    PubMed

    Futyma, Konrad; Miotła, Paweł; Różyńska, Krystyna; Zdunek, Małgorzata; Semczuk, Andrzej; Rechberger, Tomasz; Wojcierowski, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is one of the most common gynecological malignancies in Poland, with well-established risk factors. Genetic instability and molecular alterations responsible for endometrial carcinogenesis have been systematically investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate, by means of cDNA macroarrays, the expression profiles of genes encoding extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in ECs. Tissue specimens were collected during surgical procedures from 40 patients with EC, and control tissue was collected from 9 patients with uterine leiomyomas. RNA was isolated and RT-PCR with radioisotope-labeled cDNA was performed. The levels of ECM protein gene expression in normal endometrial tissues were compared to the expression of these genes in EC specimens. Statistically significant differences in gene expression, stratified by clinical stage of the ECs, were detected for aggrecan, vitronectin, tenascin R, nidogen and two collagen proteins: type VIII chain α1 and type XI chain α2. All of these proteins were overexpressed in stage III endometrial carcinomas compared to levels in stage I and II uterine neoplasms. In conclusion, increased expression of genes encoding ECM proteins may play an important role in facilitating accelerated disease progression of human ECs.

  6. Core binding factor beta (Cbfβ) controls the balance of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation by upregulating Indian hedgehog (Ihh) expression and inhibiting parathyroid hormone-related protein receptor (PPR) expression in postnatal cartilage and bone formation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fei; Wu, Mengrui; Deng, Lianfu; Zhu, Guochun; Ma, Junqing; Gao, Bo; Wang, Lin; Li, Yi-Ping; Chen, Wei

    2014-07-01

    Core binding factor beta (Cbfβ) is essential for embryonic bone morphogenesis. Yet the mechanisms by which Cbfβ regulates chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation as well as postnatal cartilage and bone formation remain unclear. Hence, using paired-related homeobox transcription factor 1-Cre (Prx1-Cre) mice, mesenchymal stem cell-specific Cbfβ-deficient (Cbfβ(f/f) Prx1-Cre) mice were generated to study the role of Cbfβ in postnatal cartilage and bone development. These mutant mice survived to adulthood but exhibited severe sternum and limb malformations. Sternum ossification was largely delayed in the Cbfβ(f/f) Prx1-Cre mice and the xiphoid process was noncalcified and enlarged. In newborn and 7-day-old Cbfβ(f/f) Prx1-Cre mice, the resting zone was dramatically elongated, the proliferation zone and hypertrophic zone of the growth plates were drastically shortened and disorganized, and trabecular bone formation was reduced. Moreover, in 1-month-old Cbfβ(f/f) Prx1-Cre mice, the growth plates were severely deformed and trabecular bone was almost absent. In addition, Cbfβ deficiency impaired intramembranous bone formation both in vivo and in vitro. Interestingly, although the expression of Indian hedgehog (Ihh) was largely reduced, the expression of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) receptor (PPR) was dramatically increased in the Cbfβ(f/f) Prx1-Cre growth plate, indicating that that Cbfβ deficiency disrupted the Ihh-PTHrP negative regulatory loop. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis and promoter luciferase assay demonstrated that the Runx/Cbfβ complex binds putative Runx-binding sites of the Ihh promoter regions, and also the Runx/Cbfβ complex directly upregulates Ihh expression at the transcriptional level. Consistently, the expressions of Ihh target genes, including CyclinD1, Ptc, and Pthlh, were downregulated in Cbfβ-deficient chondrocytes. Taken together, our study reveals not only that Cbfβ is essential for chondrocyte

  7. Mercury's core evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deproost, Marie-Hélène; Rivoldini, Attilio; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing data of Mercury's surface by MESSENGER indicate that Mercury formed under reducing conditions. As a consequence, silicon is likely the main light element in the core together with a possible small fraction of sulfur. Compared to sulfur, which does almost not partition into solid iron at Mercury's core conditions and strongly decreases the melting temperature, silicon partitions almost equally well between solid and liquid iron and is not very effective at reducing the melting temperature of iron. Silicon as the major light element constituent instead of sulfur therefore implies a significantly higher core liquidus temperature and a decrease in the vigor of compositional convection generated by the release of light elements upon inner core formation.Due to the immiscibility in liquid Fe-Si-S at low pressure (below 15 GPa), the core might also not be homogeneous and consist of an inner S-poor Fe-Si core below a thinner Si-poor Fe-S layer. Here, we study the consequences of a silicon-rich core and the effect of the blanketing Fe-S layer on the thermal evolution of Mercury's core and on the generation of a magnetic field.

  8. Ice Core Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  9. NFE Core Bibliographies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Inst. for International Studies in Education.

    This collection of core bibliographies, which expands on an initial bibliography published in 1979 of the core resources housed in the Non-Formal Education Information Center at Michigan State University, comprises a basic stock of materials on nonformal education and women in development that have been contributed by development planners,…

  10. CORE - Performance Feedback System

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-02

    CORE is an architecture to bridge the gaps between disparate data integration and delivery of disparate information visualization. The CORE Technology Program includes a suite of tools and user-centered staff that can facilitate rapid delivery of a deployable integrated information to users.

  11. Iowa Core Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    One central component of a great school system is a clear set of expectations, or standards, that educators help all students reach. In Iowa, that effort is known as the Iowa Core. The Iowa Core represents the statewide academic standards, which describe what students should know and be able to do in math, science, English language arts, and…

  12. Making an Ice Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Explains an activity in which students construct a simulated ice core. Materials required include only a freezer, food coloring, a bottle, and water. This hands-on exercise demonstrates how a glacier is formed, how ice cores are studied, and the nature of precision and accuracy in measurement. Suitable for grades three through eight. (Author/PVD)

  13. Internal core tightener

    DOEpatents

    Brynsvold, Glen V.; Snyder, Jr., Harold J.

    1976-06-22

    An internal core tightener which is a linear actuated (vertical actuation motion) expanding device utilizing a minimum of moving parts to perform the lateral tightening function. The key features are: (1) large contact areas to transmit loads during reactor operation; (2) actuation cam surfaces loaded only during clamping and unclamping operation; (3) separation of the parts and internal operation involved in the holding function from those involved in the actuation function; and (4) preloaded pads with compliant travel at each face of the hexagonal assembly at the two clamping planes to accommodate thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling. The latter feature enables use of a "fixed" outer core boundary, and thus eliminates the uncertainty in gross core dimensions, and potential for rapid core reactivity changes as a result of core dimensional change.

  14. Lunar Core and Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2,3,4] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening, which in the past has been marginal but improving [3,4,5], now seems significant. Direct detection of the core moment has not yet been achieved.

  15. Mars' core and magnetism.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, D J

    2001-07-12

    The detection of strongly magnetized ancient crust on Mars is one of the most surprising outcomes of recent Mars exploration, and provides important insight about the history and nature of the martian core. The iron-rich core probably formed during the hot accretion of Mars approximately 4.5 billion years ago and subsequently cooled at a rate dictated by the overlying mantle. A core dynamo operated much like Earth's current dynamo, but was probably limited in duration to several hundred million years. The early demise of the dynamo could have arisen through a change in the cooling rate of the mantle, or even a switch in convective style that led to mantle heating. Presently, Mars probably has a liquid, conductive outer core and might have a solid inner core like Earth.

  16. Finding your next core business.

    PubMed

    Zook, Chris

    2007-04-01

    How do you know when your core needs to change? And how do you determine what should replace it? From an in-depth study of 25 companies, the author, a strategy consultant, has discovered that it's possible to measure the vitality of a business's core. If it needs reinvention, he says, the best course is to mine hidden assets. Some of the 25 companies were in deep crisis when they began the process of redefining themselves. But, says Zook, management teams can learn to recognize early signs of erosion. He offers five diagnostic questions with which to evaluate the customers, key sources of differentiation, profit pools, capabilities, and organizational culture of your core business. The next step is strategic regeneration. In four-fifths of the companies Zook examined, a hidden asset was the centerpiece of the new strategy. He provides a map for identifying the hidden assets in your midst, which tend to fall into three categories: undervalued business platforms, untapped insights into customers, and underexploited capabilities. The Swedish company Dometic, for example, was manufacturing small absorption refrigerators for boats and RVs when it discovered a hidden asset: its understanding of, and access to, customers in the RV market. The company took advantage of a boom in that market to refocus on complete systems for live-in vehicles. The Danish company Novozymes, which produced relatively low-tech commodity enzymes such as those used in detergents, realized that its underutilized biochemical capability in genetic and protein engineering was a hidden asset and successfully refocused on creating bioengineered specialty enzymes. Your next core business is not likely to announce itself with fanfare. Use the author's tools to conduct an internal audit of possibilities and pinpoint your new focus.

  17. 34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES CORES THAT ARE NOT MADE ON HEATED OR COLD BOX CORE MACHINES, TO SET BINDING AGENTS MIXED WITH THE SAND CREATING CORES HARD ENOUGH TO WITHSTAND THE FLOW OF MOLTEN IRON INSIDE A MOLD. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  18. s-core network decomposition: A generalization of k-core analysis to weighted networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidsaa, Marius; Almaas, Eivind

    2013-12-01

    A broad range of systems spanning biology, technology, and social phenomena may be represented and analyzed as complex networks. Recent studies of such networks using k-core decomposition have uncovered groups of nodes that play important roles. Here, we present s-core analysis, a generalization of k-core (or k-shell) analysis to complex networks where the links have different strengths or weights. We demonstrate the s-core decomposition approach on two random networks (ER and configuration model with scale-free degree distribution) where the link weights are (i) random, (ii) correlated, and (iii) anticorrelated with the node degrees. Finally, we apply the s-core decomposition approach to the protein-interaction network of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the context of two gene-expression experiments: oxidative stress in response to cumene hydroperoxide (CHP), and fermentation stress response (FSR). We find that the innermost s-cores are (i) different from innermost k-cores, (ii) different for the two stress conditions CHP and FSR, and (iii) enriched with proteins whose biological functions give insight into how yeast manages these specific stresses.

  19. Multiple Core Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R.H.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Nuclei of galaxies often show complicated density structures and perplexing kinematic signatures. In the past we have reported numerical experiments indicating a natural tendency for galaxies to show nuclei offset with respect to nearby isophotes and for the nucleus to have a radial velocity different from the galaxy's systemic velocity. Other experiments show normal mode oscillations in galaxies with large amplitudes. These oscillations do not damp appreciably over a Hubble time. The common thread running through all these is that galaxies often show evidence of ringing, bouncing, or sloshing around in unexpected ways, even though they have not been disturbed by any external event. Recent observational evidence shows yet another phenomenon indicating the dynamical complexity of central regions of galaxies: multiple cores (M31, Markarian 315 and 463 for example). These systems can hardly be static. We noted long-lived multiple core systems in galaxies in numerical experiments some years ago, and we have more recently followed up with a series of experiments on multiple core galaxies, starting with two cores. The relevant parameters are the energy in the orbiting clumps, their relative.masses, the (local) strength of the potential well representing the parent galaxy, and the number of cores. We have studied the dependence of the merger rates and the nature of the final merger product on these parameters. Individual cores survive much longer in stronger background potentials. Cores can survive for a substantial fraction of a Hubble time if they travel on reasonable orbits.

  20. Global Core Plasma Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort, R. H.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract. The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) provides, empirically derived, core plasma density as a function of geomagnetic and solar conditions throughout the inner magnetosphere. It is continuous in value and gradient and is composed of separate models for the ionosphere, the plasmasphere, the plasmapause, the trough, and the polar cap. The relative composition of plasmaspheric H+, He+, and O+ is included in the GCPM. A blunt plasmaspheric bulge and rotation of the bulge with changing geomagnetic conditions is included. The GCPM is an amalgam of density models, intended to serve as a framework for continued improvement as new measurements become available and are used to characterize core plasma density, composition, and temperature.

  1. Core shroud corner joints

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Forsyth, David R.

    2013-09-10

    A core shroud is provided, which includes a number of planar members, a number of unitary corners, and a number of subassemblies each comprising a combination of the planar members and the unitary corners. Each unitary corner comprises a unitary extrusion including a first planar portion and a second planar portion disposed perpendicularly with respect to the first planar portion. At least one of the subassemblies comprises a plurality of the unitary corners disposed side-by-side in an alternating opposing relationship. A plurality of the subassemblies can be combined to form a quarter perimeter segment of the core shroud. Four quarter perimeter segments join together to form the core shroud.

  2. Biotinylated hyaluronan: a versatile and highly sensitive probe capable of detecting nanogram levels of hyaluronan binding proteins (hyaladherins) on electroblots by a novel affinity detection procedure.

    PubMed

    Melrose, J; Numata, Y; Ghosh, P

    1996-01-01

    Hyaluronan influences cellular proliferation and migration in developing, regenerating and remodelling tissues and in tissues undergoing malignant tumour-cell invasion. The widespread occurrence of hyaluronan-binding proteins indicates that the recognition of hyaluronan is important to tissue organisation and the control of cellular behaviour. A number of extracellular matrix and cellular proteins, which have been termed the hyaladherins, have specific affinities for hyaluronan. These include cartilage link-protein, hyaluronectin, neurocan, versican and aggrecan, which all bind to HA within the extracellular matrix. Cellular receptors for hyaluronan such as CD44 and RHAMM (receptor for hyaluronate-mediated motility) have also been identified. In the present study biotinylated hyaluronan (bHA) was prepared by reacting adipic dihydrazide with a 170 kDa hyaluronan sample using the bifunctional reagent 1-ethyl-3-[3-(dimethylamino) propyl] carbodiimide. The resultant free amine moeity of the hydrazido-hyaluronan was then reacted with biotin succinimidyl ester (sulfo-NHS-biotin) to prepare the bHA. After 4-20% gradient sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and electroblotting to nitrocellulose membranes, bHA and avidin alkaline phosphatase conjugate could be used in conjunction with nitroblue tetrazolium/5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate substrates to specifically visualise with high sensitivity (> or = 2 ng), bovine nasal cartilage link-protein, aggrecan hyaluronan binding region, and human fibroblast hyaluronan receptors such as CD-44. Conventional Western blotting using specific monoclonal antibodies to these proteins was also used to confirm the identities of these proteins. PMID:8907541

  3. Contaminated Sediment Core Profiling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluating the environmental risk of sites containing contaminated sediments often poses major challenges due in part to the absence of detailed information available for a given location. Sediment core profiling is often utilized during preliminary environmental investigations ...

  4. Midland Core Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, Noel

    2000-08-14

    This report summarizes activities for this quarter in one table. Industrial users of this repository viewed and/or checked out 163 boxes of drill cores and cuttings samples from 18 wells during the quarter.

  5. Core helium flash

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, P.W.; Deupree, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    The role of convection in the core helium flash is simulated by two-dimensional eddies interacting with the thermonuclear runaway. These eddies are followed by the explicit solution of the 2D conservation laws with a 2D finite difference hydrodynamics code. Thus, no phenomenological theory of convection such as the local mixing length theory is required. The core helium flash is violent, producing a deflagration wave. This differs from the detonation wave (and subsequent disruption of the entire star) produced in previous spherically symmetric violent core helium flashes as the second dimension provides a degree of relief which allows the expansion wave to decouple itself from the burning front. Our results predict that a considerable amount of helium in the core will be burned before the horizontal branch is reached and that some envelope mass loss is likely.

  6. Biospecimen Core Resource - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Biospecimen Core Resource centralized laboratory reviews and processes blood and tissue samples and their associated data using optimized standard operating procedures for the entire TCGA Research Network.

  7. Core assembly storage structure

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jr., Charles E.; Brunings, Jay E.

    1988-01-01

    A structure for the storage of core assemblies from a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The structure comprises an enclosed housing having a substantially flat horizontal top plate, a bottom plate and substantially vertical wall members extending therebetween. A plurality of thimble members extend downwardly through the top plate. Each thimble member is closed at its bottom end and has an open end adjacent said top plate. Each thimble member has a length and diameter greater than that of the core assembly to be stored therein. The housing is provided with an inlet duct for the admission of cooling air and an exhaust duct for the discharge of air therefrom, such that when hot core assemblies are placed in the thimbles, the heat generated will by convection cause air to flow from the inlet duct around the thimbles and out the exhaust duct maintaining the core assemblies at a safe temperature without the necessity of auxiliary powered cooling equipment.

  8. Core-Noise Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015 (N+1), 2020 (N+2), and 2025 (N+3) timeframes; SFW strategic thrusts and technical challenges; SFW advanced subsystems that are broadly applicable to N+3 vehicle concepts, with an indication where further noise research is needed; the components of core noise (compressor, combustor and turbine noise) and a rationale for NASA's current emphasis on the combustor-noise component; the increase in the relative importance of core noise due to turbofan design trends; the need to understand and mitigate core-noise sources for high-efficiency small gas generators; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about forthcoming updates to NASA's Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP) core-noise prediction capabilities, two NRA efforts (Honeywell International, Phoenix, AZ and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, respectively) to improve the understanding of core-noise sources and noise propagation through the engine core, and an effort to develop oxide/oxide ceramic-matrix-composite (CMC) liners for broadband noise attenuation suitable for turbofan-core application. Core noise must be addressed to ensure that the N+3 noise goals are met. Focused, but long-term, core-noise research is carried out to enable the advanced high-efficiency small gas-generator subsystem, common to several N+3 conceptual designs, needed to meet NASA's technical challenges. Intermediate updates to prediction tools are implemented as the understanding of the source structure and engine-internal propagation effects is improved. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The

  9. Micro coring apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, David; Brooks, Marshall; Chen, Paul; Dwelle, Paul; Fischer, Ben

    1989-01-01

    A micro-coring apparatus for lunar exploration applications, that is compatible with the other components of the Walking Mobile Platform, was designed. The primary purpose of core sampling is to gain an understanding of the geological composition and properties of the prescribed environment. This procedure has been used extensively for Earth studies and in limited applications during lunar explorations. The corer is described and analyzed for effectiveness.

  10. Nuclear core positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Garkisch, Hans D.; Yant, Howard W.; Patterson, John F.

    1979-01-01

    A structural support system for the core of a nuclear reactor which achieves relatively restricted clearances at operating conditions and yet allows sufficient clearance between fuel assemblies at refueling temperatures. Axially displaced spacer pads having variable between pad spacing and a temperature compensated radial restraint system are utilized to maintain clearances between the fuel elements. The core support plates are constructed of metals specially chosen such that differential thermal expansion produces positive restraint at operating temperatures.

  11. MCNP LWR Core Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Noah A.

    2012-08-14

    The reactor core input generator allows for MCNP input files to be tailored to design specifications and generated in seconds. Full reactor models can now easily be created by specifying a small set of parameters and generating an MCNP input for a full reactor core. Axial zoning of the core will allow for density variation in the fuel and moderator, with pin-by-pin fidelity, so that BWR cores can more accurately be modeled. LWR core work in progress: (1) Reflectivity option for specifying 1/4, 1/2, or full core simulation; (2) Axial zoning for moderator densities that vary with height; (3) Generating multiple types of assemblies for different fuel enrichments; and (4) Parameters for specifying BWR box walls. Fuel pin work in progress: (1) Radial and azimuthal zoning for generating further unique materials in fuel rods; (2) Options for specifying different types of fuel for MOX or multiple burn assemblies; (3) Additional options for replacing fuel rods with burnable poison rods; and (4) Control rod/blade modeling.

  12. Emergency core cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Schenewerk, William E.; Glasgow, Lyle E.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor provided with an emergency core cooling system includes a reactor vessel which contains a reactor core comprising an array of fuel assemblies and a plurality of blanket assemblies. The reactor core is immersed in a pool of liquid metal coolant. The reactor also includes a primary coolant system comprising a pump and conduits for circulating liquid metal coolant to the reactor core and through the fuel and blanket assemblies of the core. A converging-diverging venturi nozzle with an intermediate throat section is provided in between the assemblies and the pump. The intermediate throat section of the nozzle is provided with at least one opening which is in fluid communication with the pool of liquid sodium. In normal operation, coolant flows from the pump through the nozzle to the assemblies with very little fluid flowing through the opening in the throat. However, when the pump is not running, residual heat in the core causes fluid from the pool to flow through the opening in the throat of the nozzle and outwardly through the nozzle to the assemblies, thus providing a means of removing decay heat.

  13. Core-Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation is a technical progress report and near-term outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external work on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Noise-Aircraft Technical Challenge; the current research activities in the core-noise area, with some additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustion-noise prediction capability; the need for a core-noise diagnostic capability to generate benchmark data for validation of both high-fidelity work and improved models, as well as testing of future noise-reduction technologies; relevant existing core-noise tests using real engines and auxiliary power units; and examples of possible scenarios for a future diagnostic facility. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Noise-Aircraft Technical Challenge aims to enable concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical for enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor designs could increase

  14. Allosteric Inhibition Through Core Disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, James R.; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2010-03-05

    Although inhibitors typically bind pre-formed sites on proteins, it is theoretically possible to inhibit by disrupting the folded structure of a protein or, in the limit, to bind preferentially to the unfolded state. Equilibria defining how such molecules act are well understood, but structural models for such binding are unknown. Two novel inhibitors of {beta}-lactamase were found to destabilize the enzyme at high temperatures, but at lower temperatures showed no preference for destabilized mutant enzymes versus stabilized mutants. X-ray crystal structures showed that both inhibitors bound to a cryptic site in {beta}-lactamase, which the inhibitors themselves created by forcing apart helixes 11 and 12. This opened up a portion of the hydrophobic core of the protein, into which these two inhibitors bind. Although this binding site is 16 {angstrom} from the center of the active site, the conformational changes were transmitted through a sequence of linked motions to a key catalytic residue, Arg244, which in the complex adopts conformations very different from those in catalytically competent enzyme conformations. These structures offer a detailed view of what has heretofore been a theoretical construct, and suggest the possibility for further design against this novel site.

  15. Degenerated human intervertebral discs contain autoantibodies against extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Capossela, S; Schläfli, P; Bertolo, A; Janner, T; Stadler, B M; Pötzel, T; Baur, M; Stoyanov, J V

    2014-04-04

    Degeneration of intervertebral discs (IVDs) is associated with back pain and elevated levels of inflammatory cells. It has been hypothesised that discogenic pain is a direct result of vascular and neural ingrowth along annulus fissures, which may expose the avascular nucleus pulposus (NP) to the systemic circulation and induce an autoimmune reaction. In this study, we confirmed our previous observation of antibodies in human degenerated and post-traumatic IVDs cultured in vitro. We hypothesised that the presence of antibodies was due to an autoimmune reaction against specific proteins of the disc. Furthermore we identified antigens which possibly trigger an autoimmune response in degenerative disc diseases. We demonstrated that degenerated and post-traumatic IVDs contain IgG antibodies against typical extracellular proteins of the disc, particularly proteins of the NP. We identified IgGs against collagen type II and aggrecan, confirming an autoimmune reaction against the normally immune privileged NP. We also found specific IgGs against collagens types I and V, but not against collagen type III. In conclusion, this study confirmed the association between disc degeneration and autoimmunity, and may open the avenue for future studies on developing prognostic, diagnostic and therapy-monitoring markers for degenerative disc diseases.

  16. Core Noise - Increasing Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustor-noise prediction capability as well as activities supporting the development of improved reduced-order, physics-based models for combustor-noise prediction. The need for benchmark data for validation of high-fidelity and modeling work and the value of a potential future diagnostic facility for testing of core-noise-reduction concepts are indicated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor

  17. Pressure Core Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamarina, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates form under high fluid pressure and low temperature, and are found in permafrost, deep lakes or ocean sediments. Hydrate dissociation by depressurization and/or heating is accompanied by a multifold hydrate volume expansion and host sediments with low permeability experience massive destructuration. Proper characterization requires coring, recovery, manipulation and testing under P-T conditions within the stability field. Pressure core technology allows for the reliable characterization of hydrate bearing sediments within the stability field in order to address scientific and engineering needs, including the measurement of parameters used in hydro-thermo-mechanical analyses, and the monitoring of hydrate dissociation under controlled pressure, temperature, effective stress and chemical conditions. Inherent sampling effects remain and need to be addressed in test protocols and data interpretation. Pressure core technology has been deployed to study hydrate bearing sediments at several locations around the world. In addition to pressure core testing, a comprehensive characterization program should include sediment analysis, testing of reconstituted specimens (with and without synthetic hydrate), and in situ testing. Pressure core characterization technology can be used to study other gas-charged formations such as deep sea sediments, coal bed methane and gas shales.

  18. Core Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core noise area. Recent work1 on the turbine-transmission loss of combustor noise is briefly described, two2,3 new NRA efforts in the core-noise area are outlined, and an effort to develop CMC-based acoustic liners for broadband noise reduction suitable for turbofan-core application is delineated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project's Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries.

  19. Mars' Inner Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This figure shows a cross-section of the planet Mars revealing an inner, high density core buried deep within the interior. Dipole magnetic field lines are drawn in blue, showing the global scale magnetic field that one associates with dynamo generation in the core. Mars must have one day had such a field, but today it is not evident. Perhaps the energy source that powered the early dynamo has shut down. The differentiation of the planet interior - heavy elements like iron sinking towards the center of the planet - can provide energy as can the formation of a solid core from the liquid.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  20. Molten core retention assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1976-06-22

    Molten fuel produced in a core overheating accident is caught by a molten core retention assembly consisting of a horizontal baffle plate having a plurality of openings therein, heat exchange tubes having flow holes near the top thereof mounted in the openings, and a cylindrical, imperforate baffle attached to the plate and surrounding the tubes. The baffle assembly is supported from the core support plate of the reactor by a plurality of hanger rods which are welded to radial beams passing under the baffle plate and intermittently welded thereto. Preferably the upper end of the cylindrical baffle terminates in an outwardly facing lip to which are welded a plurality of bearings having slots therein adapted to accept the hanger rods.

  1. CORE SATURATION BLOCKING OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Spinrad, R.J.

    1961-10-17

    A blocking oscillator which relies on core saturation regulation to control the output pulse width is described. In this arrangement an external magnetic loop is provided in which a saturable portion forms the core of a feedback transformer used with the thermionic or semi-conductor active element. A first stationary magnetic loop establishes a level of flux through the saturation portion of the loop. A second adjustable magnet moves the flux level to select a saturation point giving the desired output pulse width. (AEC)

  2. Massive Magnetic Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    The massive magnetic core of the Space Radiation Effects Laboratory's Synchrocyclotron at NASA's Langley Research Center. The 3000 ton (6 million pound), 36' x 21'x 19.5' assembly of forged steel serves as the heart of the 600 million electron volt, high energy proton accelerator.

  3. Looking for Core Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Margie

    2010-01-01

    People who view themselves as leaders, not just managers or teachers, are innovators who focus on clarifying core values and aligning all aspects of the organization with these values to grow their vision. A vision for an organization can't be just one person's idea. Visions grow by involving people in activities that help them name and create…

  4. Ultrasonic Drilling and Coring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    1998-01-01

    A novel drilling and coring device, driven by a combination, of sonic and ultrasonic vibration, was developed. The device is applicable to soft and hard objects using low axial load and potentially operational under extreme conditions. The device has numerous potential planetary applications. Significant potential for commercialization in construction, demining, drilling and medical technologies.

  5. The Uncommon Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohler, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This author contends that the United States neglects creativity in its education system. To see this, he states, one may look at the Common Core State Standards. If one searches the English Language Arts and Literacy standards for the words "creative," "innovative," and "original"--and any associated terms, one will find scant mention of the words…

  6. Some Core Contested Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and…

  7. Core Directions in HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This document consists of four papers presented at a symposium on core directions in human resource development (HRD) moderated by Verna Willis at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Reengineering the Organizational HRD Function: Two Case Studies" (Neal Chalofsky) reports an action research study in which the…

  8. University City Core Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia City Planning Commission, PA.

    A redevelopment plan for an urban core area of about 300 acres was warranted by--(1) unsuitable building conditions, (2) undesirable land usage, and (3) faulty traffic circulation. The plan includes expansion of two universities and creation of a regional science center, high school, and medical center. Guidelines for proposed land use and zoning…

  9. Languages for Dublin Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Focusing on languages for the Dublin Core, examines the experience of some related ways to seek semantic interoperability through simplicity: planned languages, interlingua constructs, and pidgins. Also defines the conceptual and organizational problem of maintaining a metadata standard in multiple languages. (AEF)

  10. Navagating the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McShane, Michael Q.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a debate over the Common Core State Standards Initiative as it has rocketed to the forefront of education policy discussions around the country. The author contends that there is value in having clear cross state standards that will clarify the new online and blended learning that the growing use of technology has provided…

  11. Electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Olich, Eugene E.; Dahl, Leslie R.

    1995-01-01

    A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter.

  12. NUCLEAR REACTOR CORE DESIGN

    DOEpatents

    Mahlmeister, J.E.; Peck, W.S.; Haberer, W.V.; Williams, A.C.

    1960-03-22

    An improved core design for a sodium-cooled, graphitemoderated nuclear reactor is described. The improved reactor core comprises a number of blocks of moderator material, each block being in the shape of a regular prism. A number of channels, extending the length of each block, are disposed around the periphery. When several blocks are placed in contact to form the reactor core, the channels in adjacent blocks correspond with each other to form closed conduits extending the length of the core. Fuel element clusters are disposed in these closed conduits, and liquid coolant is forced through the annulus between the fuel cluster and the inner surface of the conduit. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the moderator blocks are in the form of hexagonal prisms with longitudinal channels cut into the corners of the hexagon. The main advantage of an "edge-loaded" moderator block is that fewer thermal neutrons are absorbed by the moderator cladding, as compared with a conventional centrally loaded moderator block.

  13. From Context to Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campus Technology, 2008

    2008-01-01

    At Campus Technology 2008, Arizona State University Technology Officer Adrian Sannier mesmerized audiences with his mandate to become more efficient by doing only the "core" tech stuff--and getting someone else to slog through the context. This article presents an excerpt from Sannier's hour-long keynote address at Campus Technology '08. Sannier…

  14. Theory of core excitons

    SciTech Connect

    Dow, J. D.; Hjalmarson, H. P.; Sankey, O. F.; Allen, R. E.; Buettner, H.

    1980-01-01

    The observation of core excitons with binding energies much larger than those of the valence excitons in the same material has posed a long-standing theoretical problem. A proposed solution to this problem is presented, and Frenkel excitons and Wannier excitons are shown to coexist naturally in a single material. (GHT)

  15. Resolving Supercritical Orion Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Di; Chapman, N.; Goldsmith, P.; Velusamy, T.

    2009-01-01

    The theoretical framework for high mass star formation (HMSF) is unclear. Observations reveal a seeming dichotomy between high- and low-mass star formation, with HMSF occurring only in Giant Molecular Clouds (GMC), mostly in clusters, and with higher star formation efficiencies than low-mass star formation. One crucial constraint to any theoretical model is the dynamical state of massive cores, in particular, whether a massive core is in supercritical collapse. Based on the mass-size relation of dust emission, we select likely unstable targets from a sample of massive cores (Li et al. 2007 ApJ 655, 351) in the nearest GMC, Orion. We have obtained N2H+ (1-0) maps using CARMA with resolution ( 2.5", 0.006 pc) significantly better than existing observations. We present observational and modeling results for ORI22. By revealing the dynamic structure down to Jeans scale, CARMA data confirms the dominance of gravity over turbulence in this cores. This work was performed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  16. Why a Core?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, James Bernard

    2006-01-01

    Sadly, amidst a vast profusion of knowledge, universities abrogate responsibility for showing young learners what is essential. Left to select for themselves, most students arrive late, if at all, to an awareness of what they want and need out of college. Thus, according to James Bernard Murphy, a well-constructed core of courses, presented in the…

  17. The Earth's Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeanloz, Raymond

    1983-01-01

    The nature of the earth's core is described. Indirect evidence (such as that determined from seismological data) indicates that it is an iron alloy, solid toward its center but otherwise liquid. Evidence also suggests that it is the turbulent flow of the liquid that generates the earth's magnetic field. (JN)

  18. A World Core Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Robert Muller's "World Core Curriculum" is designed to give children: a good picture of planet Earth and the universe; a correct picture of the commonalities and diversity of the human family; an accurate picture of the time period into which they are born; and a sense of their own importance and the role that they can play in society. (MDM)

  19. Lunar Polar Coring Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, David; Bealmear, David; Benarroche, Patrice; Henry, Alan; Hudson, Raymond; Rivellini, Tommaso; Tolmachoff, Alex

    1990-01-01

    Plans to build a lunar base are presently being studied with a number of considerations. One of the most important considerations is qualifying the presence of water on the Moon. The existence of water on the Moon implies that future lunar settlements may be able to use this resource to produce things such as drinking water and rocket fuel. Due to the very high cost of transporting these materials to the Moon, in situ production could save billions of dollars in operating costs of the lunar base. Scientists have suggested that the polar regions of the Moon may contain some amounts of water ice in the regolith. Six possible mission scenarios are suggested which would allow lunar polar soil samples to be collected for analysis. The options presented are: remote sensing satellite, two unmanned robotic lunar coring missions (one is a sample return and one is a data return only), two combined manned and robotic polar coring missions, and one fully manned core retrieval mission. One of the combined manned and robotic missions has been singled out for detailed analysis. This mission proposes sending at least three unmanned robotic landers to the lunar pole to take core samples as deep as 15 meters. Upon successful completion of the coring operations, a manned mission would be sent to retrieve the samples and perform extensive experiments of the polar region. Man's first step in returning to the Moon is recommended to investigate the issue of lunar polar water. The potential benefits of lunar water more than warrant sending either astronauts, robots or both to the Moon before any permanent facility is constructed.

  20. Adult equine bone marrow stromal cells produce a cartilage-like ECM mechanically superior to animal-matched adult chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kopesky, P W; Lee, H-Y; Vanderploeg, E J; Kisiday, J D; Frisbie, D D; Plaas, A H K; Ortiz, C; Grodzinsky, A J

    2010-06-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the age-dependent mechanical phenotype of bone marrow stromal cell- (BMSC-) and chondrocyte-produced cartilage-like neo-tissue and to elucidate the matrix-associated mechanisms which generate this phenotype. Cells from both immature (2-4 month-old foals) and skeletally-mature (2-5 year-old adults) mixed-breed horses were isolated from animal-matched bone marrow and cartilage tissue, encapsulated in self-assembling-peptide hydrogels, and cultured with and without TGF-beta1 supplementation. BMSCs and chondrocytes from both donor ages were encapsulated with high viability. BMSCs from both ages produced neo-tissue with higher mechanical stiffness than that produced by either young or adult chondrocytes. Young, but not adult, chondrocytes proliferated in response to TGF-beta1 while BMSCs from both age groups proliferated with TGF-beta1. Young chondrocytes stimulated by TGF-beta1 accumulated ECM with 10-fold higher sulfated-glycosaminoglycan content than adult chondrocytes and 2-3-fold higher than BMSCs of either age. The opposite trend was observed for hydroxyproline content, with BMSCs accumulating 2-3-fold more than chondrocytes, independent of age. Size-exclusion chromatography of extra