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Sample records for aggregate concrete rac

  1. Assessing relationships among properties of demolished concrete, recycled aggregate and recycled aggregate concrete using regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Tam, Vivian W Y; Wang, K; Tam, C M

    2008-04-01

    Recycled demolished concrete (DC) as recycled aggregate (RA) and recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) is generally suitable for most construction applications. Low-grade applications, including sub-base and roadwork, have been implemented in many countries; however, higher-grade activities are rarely considered. This paper examines relationships among DC characteristics, properties of their RA and strength of their RAC using regression analysis. Ten samples collected from demolition sites are examined. The results show strong correlation among the DC samples, properties of RA and RAC. It should be highlighted that inferior quality of DC will lower the quality of RA and thus their RAC. Prediction of RAC strength is also formulated from the DC characteristics and the RA properties. From that, the RAC performance from DC and RA can be estimated. In addition, RAC design requirements can also be developed at the initial stage of concrete demolition. Recommendations are also given to improve the future concreting practice. PMID:17764837

  2. Comparative environmental assessment of natural and recycled aggregate concrete.

    PubMed

    Marinković, S; Radonjanin, V; Malešev, M; Ignjatović, I

    2010-11-01

    Constant and rapid increase in construction and demolition (C&D) waste generation and consumption of natural aggregate for concrete production became one of the biggest environmental problems in the construction industry. Recycling of C&D waste represents one way to convert a waste product into a resource but the environment benefits through energy consumption, emissions and fallouts reductions are not certain. The main purpose of this study is to determine the potentials of recycled aggregate concrete (concrete made with recycled concrete aggregate) for structural applications and to compare the environmental impact of the production of two types of ready-mixed concrete: natural aggregate concrete (NAC) made entirely with river aggregate and recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) made with natural fine and recycled coarse aggregate. Based on the analysis of up-to-date experimental evidence, including own tests results, it is concluded that utilization of RAC for low-to-middle strength structural concrete and non-aggressive exposure conditions is technically feasible. The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is performed for raw material extraction and material production part of the concrete life cycle including transport. Assessment is based on local LCI data and on typical conditions in Serbia. Results of this specific case study show that impacts of aggregate and cement production phases are slightly larger for RAC than for NAC but the total environmental impacts depend on the natural and recycled aggregates transport distances and on transport types. Limit natural aggregate transport distances above which the environmental impacts of RAC can be equal or even lower than the impacts of NAC are calculated for the specific case study. PMID:20434898

  3. A closed-loop life cycle assessment of recycled aggregate concrete utilization in China.

    PubMed

    Ding, Tao; Xiao, Jianzhuang; Tam, Vivian W Y

    2016-10-01

    This paper studies the potential environmental impact of recycled coarse aggregate (RCA) for concrete production in China. According to the cradle-to-cradle theory, a closed-loop life cycle assessment (LCA) on recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) utilization in China with entire local life cycle inventory (LCI) is performed, regarding the environmental influence of cement content, aggregate production, transportation and waste landfilling. Special attention is paid on the primary resource and energy conservation, as well as climate protection induced by RAC applications. Environmental impact between natural aggregate concrete (NAC) and RAC are also compared. It is shown that cement proportion and transportation are the top two contributors for carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and energy consumption for both NAC and RAC. Sensitivity analysis also proves that long delivery distances for natural coarse aggregate (NCA) leave a possible opportunity for lowering environmental impact of RAC in China. PMID:27297045

  4. Compressive strength and hydration processes of concrete with recycled aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Koenders, Eduardus A.B.; Pepe, Marco; Martinelli, Enzo

    2014-02-15

    This paper deals with the correlation between the time evolution of the degree of hydration and the compressive strength of Recycled Aggregate Concrete (RAC) for different water to cement ratios and initial moisture conditions of the Recycled Concrete Aggregates (RCAs). Particularly, the influence of such moisture conditions is investigated by monitoring the hydration process and determining the compressive strength development of fully dry or fully saturated recycled aggregates in four RAC mixtures. Hydration processes are monitored via temperature measurements in hardening concrete samples and the time evolution of the degree of hydration is determined through a 1D hydration and heat flow model. The effect of the initial moisture condition of RCAs employed in the considered concrete mixtures clearly emerges from this study. In fact, a novel conceptual method is proposed to predict the compressive strength of RAC-systems, from the initial mixture parameters and the hardening conditions. -- Highlights: •The concrete industry is more and more concerned with sustainability issues. •The use of recycled aggregates is a promising solution to enhance sustainability. •Recycled aggregates affect both hydration processes and compressive strength. •A fundamental approach is proposed to unveil the influence of recycled aggregates. •Some experimental comparisons are presented to validate the proposed approach.

  5. Effects of Elevated Temperature on Concrete with Recycled Coarse Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salau, M. A.; Oseafiana, O. J.; Oyegoke, T. O.

    2015-11-01

    This paper discusses the effects of heating temperatures of 200°C, 400°C and 600°C each for 2 hours at a heating rate of 2.5°C/min on concrete with the content of Natural Coarse Aggregates (NCA) partially replaced with Recycled Coarse Aggregates (RCA), obtained from demolished building in the ratio of 0%, 15% and 30%.There was an initial drop in strength from 100°C to 200°C which is suspected to be due to the relatively weak interfacial bond between the RCA and the hardened paste within the concrete matrix;a gradual increase in strength continued from 200°C to 450°C and steady drop occurred again as it approached 600°C.With replacement proportion of 0%, 15% and 30% of NCA and exposure to peak temperature of 600°C, a relative concrete strength of 23.6MPa, 25.3MPa and 22.2MPa respectively can be achieved for 28 days curing age. Furthermore, RAC with 15% NCA replacement when exposed to optimum temperature of 450°C yielded high compressive strength comparable to that of control specimen (normal concrete). In addition, for all concrete samples only slight surface hairline cracks were noticed as the temperature approached 400°C. Thus, the RAC demonstrated behavior just like normal concrete and may be considered fit for structural use.

  6. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Recycled Aggregate Concrete in Seawater Environment

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Pengjun; Tan, Zhuoying; Guo, Zhiying

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to conduct research about the microstructure and basic properties of recycled aggregate concrete under seawater corrosion. Concrete specimens were fabricated and tested with different replacement percentages of 0%, 30%, and 60% after immersing in seawater for 4, 8, 12, and 16 months, respectively. The basic properties of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) including the compressive strength, the elastic modulus, and chloride penetration depth were explicitly investigated. And the microstructure of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) was revealed to find the seawater corrosion by using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results showed that higher amount of the RCA means more porosity and less strength, which could lower both the compressive strength and resistance to chloride penetration. This research could be a guide in theoretical and numerical analysis for the design of RAC structures. PMID:24453830

  7. Microstructure and mechanical properties of recycled aggregate concrete in seawater environment.

    PubMed

    Yue, Pengjun; Tan, Zhuoying; Guo, Zhiying

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to conduct research about the microstructure and basic properties of recycled aggregate concrete under seawater corrosion. Concrete specimens were fabricated and tested with different replacement percentages of 0%, 30%, and 60% after immersing in seawater for 4, 8, 12, and 16 months, respectively. The basic properties of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) including the compressive strength, the elastic modulus, and chloride penetration depth were explicitly investigated. And the microstructure of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) was revealed to find the seawater corrosion by using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results showed that higher amount of the RCA means more porosity and less strength, which could lower both the compressive strength and resistance to chloride penetration. This research could be a guide in theoretical and numerical analysis for the design of RAC structures. PMID:24453830

  8. Study of the seismic response of a recycled aggregate concrete frame structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changqing; Xiao, Jianzhuang

    2013-12-01

    Based on six-degree-of-freedom three-dimensional shaking table tests, the seismic response of a recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) frame was obtained. The analysis results indicate that the maximum story shear force and overturning moment reduce proportionally along the height of the model under the same earthquake wave. The story shear force, base shear coefficient and overturning moment of the structure increase progressively as the acceleration amplitude increases. The base shear coefficient is primarily controlled by the peak ground acceleration (PGA). The relationships between the PGA and the shear coefficient as well as between the PGA and the dynamic amplification factor are obtained by mathematical fitting. The dynamic amplification factor decreases rapidly at the elastic-plastic stage, but decreases slowly with the development of the elastic-plasticity stage. The results show that the RAC frame structure has reasonable deformability when compared with natural aggregate concrete frame structures. The maximum inter-story drift ratios of the RAC frame model under frequent and rare intensity 8 test phases are 1/266 and 1/29, respectively, which are larger than the allowable value of 1/500 and 1/50 according to Chinese seismic design requirements. Nevertheless, the RAC frame structure does not collapse under base excitations with PGAs from 0.066 g up to 1.170 g.

  9. Concrete Waste Recycling Process for High Quality Aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikura, Takeshi; Fujii, Shin-ichi

    2008-01-15

    Large amount of concrete waste generates during nuclear power plant (NPP) dismantling. Non-contaminated concrete waste is assumed to be disposed in a landfill site, but that will not be the solution especially in the future, because of decreasing tendency of the site availability and natural resources. Concerning concrete recycling, demand for roadbeds and backfill tends to be less than the amount of dismantled concrete generated in a single rural site, and conventional recycled aggregate is limited of its use to non-structural concrete, because of its inferior quality to ordinary natural aggregate. Therefore, it is vital to develop high quality recycled aggregate for general uses of dismantled concrete. If recycled aggregate is available for high structural concrete, the dismantling concrete is recyclable as aggregate for industry including nuclear field. Authors developed techniques on high quality aggregate reclamation for large amount of concrete generated during NPP decommissioning. Concrete of NPP buildings has good features for recycling aggregate; large quantity of high quality aggregate from same origin, record keeping of the aggregate origin, and little impurities in dismantled concrete such as wood and plastics. The target of recycled aggregate in this development is to meet the quality criteria for NPP concrete as prescribed in JASS 5N 'Specification for Nuclear Power Facility Reinforced Concrete' and JASS 5 'Specification for Reinforced Concrete Work'. The target of recycled aggregate concrete is to be comparable performance with ordinary aggregate concrete. The high quality recycled aggregate production techniques are assumed to apply for recycling for large amount of non-contaminated concrete. These techniques can also be applied for slightly contaminated concrete dismantled from radiological control area (RCA), together with free release survey. In conclusion: a technology on dismantled concrete recycling for high quality aggregate was developed

  10. Microstructural characterization of concrete prepared with recycled aggregates.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Mafalda; Evangelista, Luís; de Brito, Jorge; Ferro, Alberto C

    2013-10-01

    Several authors have reported the workability, mechanical properties, and durability of concrete produced with construction waste replacing the natural aggregate. However, a systematic microstructural characterization of recycled aggregate concrete has not been reported. This work studies the use of fine recycled aggregate to replace fine natural aggregate in the production of concrete and reports the resulting microstructures. The used raw materials were natural aggregate, recycled aggregate obtained from a standard concrete, and Portland cement. The substitution extent was 0, 10, 50, and 100 vol%; hydration was stopped at 9, 24, and 96 h and 28 days. Microscopy was focused on the cement/aggregate interfacial transition zone, enlightening the effect of incorporating recycled aggregate on the formation and morphology of the different concrete hydration products. The results show that concretes with recycled aggregates exhibit typical microstructural features of the transition zone in normal strength concrete. Although overall porosity increases with increasing replacement, the interfacial bond is apparently stronger when recycled aggregates are used. An addition of 10 vol% results in a decrease in porosity at the interface with a corresponding increase of the material hardness. This provides an opportunity for development of increased strength Portland cement concretes using controlled amounts of concrete waste. PMID:23673273

  11. High Modulus Asphalt Concrete with Dolomite Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haritonovs, V.; Tihonovs, J.; Smirnovs, J.

    2015-11-01

    Dolomite is one of the most widely available sedimentary rocks in the territory of Latvia. Dolomite quarries contain about 1,000 million tons of this material. However, according to Latvian Road Specifications, this dolomite cannot be used for average and high intensity roads because of its low quality, mainly, its LA index (The Los Angeles abrasion test). Therefore, mostly the imported magmatic rocks (granite, diabase, gabbro, basalt) or imported dolomite are used, which makes asphalt expensive. However, practical experience shows that even with these high quality materials roads exhibit rutting, fatigue, and thermal cracks. The aim of the research is to develop a high performance asphalt concrete for base and binder courses using only locally available aggregates. In order to achieve resistance against deformations at a high ambient temperature, a hard grade binder was used. Workability, fatigue and thermal cracking resistance, as well as sufficient water resistance is achieved by low porosity (3-5%) and higher binder content compared to traditional asphalt mixtures. The design of the asphalt includes a combination of empirical and performance based tests, which in laboratory circumstances allow simulating traffic and environmental loads. High performance AC 16 base asphalt concrete was created using local dolomite aggregate with polymer modified (PMB 10/40-65) and hard grade (B20/30) bitumen. The mixtures were specified based on fundamental properties in accordance with EN 13108-1 standard.

  12. Recycling of PET bottles as fine aggregate in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Frigione, Mariaenrica

    2010-06-15

    An attempt to substitute in concrete the 5% by weight of fine aggregate (natural sand) with an equal weight of PET aggregates manufactured from the waste un-washed PET bottles (WPET), is presented. The WPET particles possessed a granulometry similar to that of the substituted sand. Specimens with different cement content and water/cement ratio were manufactured. Rheological characterization on fresh concrete and mechanical tests at the ages of 28 and 365 days were performed on the WPET/concretes as well as on reference concretes containing only natural fine aggregate in order to investigate the influence of the substitution of WPET to the fine aggregate in concrete. It was found that the WPET concretes display similar workability characteristics, compressive strength and splitting tensile strength slightly lower that the reference concrete and a moderately higher ductility.

  13. Recycling of PET bottles as fine aggregate in concrete.

    PubMed

    Frigione, Mariaenrica

    2010-06-01

    An attempt to substitute in concrete the 5% by weight of fine aggregate (natural sand) with an equal weight of PET aggregates manufactured from the waste un-washed PET bottles (WPET), is presented. The WPET particles possessed a granulometry similar to that of the substituted sand. Specimens with different cement content and water/cement ratio were manufactured. Rheological characterization on fresh concrete and mechanical tests at the ages of 28 and 365days were performed on the WPET/concretes as well as on reference concretes containing only natural fine aggregate in order to investigate the influence of the substitution of WPET to the fine aggregate in concrete. It was found that the WPET concretes display similar workability characteristics, compressive strength and splitting tensile strength slightly lower that the reference concrete and a moderately higher ductility. PMID:20176466

  14. Concrete using waste oil palm shells as aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Basri, H.B.; Mannan, M.A.; Zain, M.F.M.

    1999-04-01

    Concrete with oil palm shells (OPS) as coarse aggregate was investigated for its workability, density, and compressive strength development over 56 days under three curing conditions. The effect of fly ash as partial cement replacement was also studied. Fresh OPS concrete was found to have better workability while its 28-day air-dry density was 19--20% lower than ordinary concrete. Compressive strength after 56 days was found to be 41--50% lower than ordinary concrete. These results were still within the normal range for structural lightweight concrete. Fly ash was found to lower the compressive strength of OPS concrete, which was the opposite of its effect on normal concrete.

  15. Determination of the dynamic elastic constants of recycled aggregate concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoumani, A. A.; Barkoula, N.-M.; Matikas, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    Nowadays, construction and demolition waste constitutes a major portion of the total solid waste production in the world. Due to both environmental and economical reasons, an increasing interest concerning the use of recycled aggregate to replace aggregate from natural sources is generated. This paper presents an investigation on the properties of recycled aggregate concrete. Concrete mixes are prepared using recycled aggregates at a substitution level between 0 and 100% of the total coarse aggregate. The influence of this replacement on strengthened concrete's properties is being investigated. The properties estimated are: density and dynamic modulus of elasticity at the age of both 7 and 28 days. Also, flexural strength of 28 days specimens is estimated. The determination of the dynamic elastic modulus was made using the ultrasonic pulse velocity method. The results reveal that the existence of recycled aggregates affects the properties of concrete negatively; however, in low levels of substitution the influence of using recycled aggregates is almost negligible. Concluding, the controlled use of recycled aggregates in concrete production may help solve a vital environmental issue apart from being a solution to the problem of inadequate concrete aggregates.

  16. Ceramic ware waste as coarse aggregate for structural concrete production.

    PubMed

    García-González, Julia; Rodríguez-Robles, Desirée; Juan-Valdés, Andrés; Morán-Del Pozo, Julia M; Guerra-Romero, M Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    The manufacture of any kind of product inevitably entails the production of waste. The quantity of waste generated by the ceramic industry, a very important sector in Spain, is between 5% and 8% of the final output and it is therefore necessary to find an effective waste recovery method. The aim of the study reported in the present article was to seek a sustainable means of managing waste from the ceramic industry through the incorporation of this type of waste in the total replacement of conventional aggregate (gravel) used in structural concrete. Having verified that the recycled ceramic aggregates met all the technical requirements imposed by current Spanish legislation, established in the Code on Structural Concrete (EHE-08), then it is prepared a control concrete mix and the recycled concrete mix using 100% recycled ceramic aggregate instead of coarse natural aggregate. The concretes obtained were subjected to the appropriate tests in order to conduct a comparison of their mechanical properties. The results show that the concretes made using ceramic sanitary ware aggregate possessed the same mechanical properties as those made with conventional aggregate. It is therefore possible to conclude that the reuse of recycled ceramic aggregate to produce recycled concrete is a feasible alternative for the sustainable management of this waste. PMID:25188783

  17. Acoustic emission monitoring of recycled aggregate concrete under bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoumani, A. A.; Barkoula, N.-M.; Matikas, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    The amount of construction and demolition waste has increased considerably over the last few years, making desirable the reuse of this waste in the concrete industry. In the present study concrete specimens are subjected at the age of 28 days to four-point bending with concurrent monitoring of their acoustic emission (AE) activity. Several concrete mixtures prepared using recycled aggregates at various percentages of the total coarse aggregate and also a reference mix using natural aggregates, were included to investigate their influence of the recycled aggregates on the load bearing capacity, as well as on the fracture mechanisms. The results reveal that for low levels of substitution the influence of using recycled aggregates on the flexural strength is negligible while higher levels of substitution lead into its deterioration. The total AE activity, as well as the AE signals emitted during failure, was related to flexural strength. The results obtained during test processing were found to be in agreement with visual observation.

  18. Behaviour of Recycled Coarse Aggregate Concrete: Age and Successive Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Kirtikanta; Pathappilly, Robin Davis; Sarkar, Pradip

    2016-05-01

    Recycled Coarse Aggregate (RCA) concrete construction technique can be called as `green concrete', as it minimizes the environmental hazard of the concrete waste disposal. Indian standard recommends target mean compressive strength of the conventional concrete in terms of water cement ratio (w/c). The present work is an attempt to study the behaviour of RCA concrete from two samples of parent concrete having different age group with regard to the relationship of compressive strength with water cement ratios. Number of recycling may influence the mechanical properties of RCA concrete. The influence of age and successive recycling on the properties such as capillary water absorption, drying shrinkage strain, air content, flexural strength and tensile splitting strength of the RCA concrete are examined. The relationship between compressive strength at different w/c ratios obtained experimentally is investigated for the two parameters such as age of parent concrete and successive recycling. The recycled concrete using older recycled aggregate shows poor quality. While the compressive strength reduces with successive recycling gradually, the capillary water absorption increases abruptly, which leads to the conclusion that further recycling may not be advisable.

  19. Behaviour of Recycled Coarse Aggregate Concrete: Age and Successive Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Kirtikanta; Pathappilly, Robin Davis; Sarkar, Pradip

    2016-06-01

    Recycled Coarse Aggregate (RCA) concrete construction technique can be called as `green concrete', as it minimizes the environmental hazard of the concrete waste disposal. Indian standard recommends target mean compressive strength of the conventional concrete in terms of water cement ratio ( w/ c). The present work is an attempt to study the behaviour of RCA concrete from two samples of parent concrete having different age group with regard to the relationship of compressive strength with water cement ratios. Number of recycling may influence the mechanical properties of RCA concrete. The influence of age and successive recycling on the properties such as capillary water absorption, drying shrinkage strain, air content, flexural strength and tensile splitting strength of the RCA concrete are examined. The relationship between compressive strength at different w/ c ratios obtained experimentally is investigated for the two parameters such as age of parent concrete and successive recycling. The recycled concrete using older recycled aggregate shows poor quality. While the compressive strength reduces with successive recycling gradually, the capillary water absorption increases abruptly, which leads to the conclusion that further recycling may not be advisable.

  20. Use of recycled fine aggregate in concretes with durable requirements.

    PubMed

    Zega, Claudio Javier; Di Maio, Angel Antonio

    2011-11-01

    The use of construction waste materials as aggregates for concrete production is highly attractive compared to the use of non-renewable natural resources, promoting environmental protection and allowing the development of a new raw material. Several countries have recommendations for the use of recycled coarse aggregate in structural concrete, whereas the use of the fine fraction is limited because it may produce significant changes in some properties of concrete. However, during the last decade the use of recycled fine aggregates (RFA) has achieved a great international interest, mainly because of economic implications related to the shortage of natural sands suitable for the production of concrete, besides to allow an integral use of this type of waste. In this study, the durable behaviour of structural concretes made with different percentage of RFA (0%, 20%, and 30%) is evaluated. Different properties related to the durability of concretes such as absorption, sorptivity, water penetration under pressure, and carbonation are determined. In addition, the results of compressive strength, static modulus of elasticity and drying shrinkage are presented. The obtained results indicate that the recycled concretes have a suitable resistant and durable behaviour, according to the limits indicated by different international codes for structural concrete. PMID:21775123

  1. Adenylyl cyclase localization to the uropod of aggregating Dictyostelium cells requires RacC.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Jung, D; Cao, Z; Chung, C Y

    2015-09-25

    The localization of adenylyl cyclase A (ACA) to uropod of cells is required for the stream formation during Dictyostelium development. RacC is a Dictyostelium orthologue of Cdc42. We identified a streaming defect of racC(-) cells as they are clearly less polarized and form smaller and fragmented streams. ACA-YFP is mainly associated with intracellular vesicular structures, but not with the plasma membrane in racC(-) cells. racC(-) cells have a slightly higher number of vesicles than Ax3 cells, suggesting that the defect of ACA trafficking is not simply due to the lack of vesicle formation. While the ACA-YFP vesicles traveled with an average velocity of 9.1 μm/min in Ax3 cells, a slow and diffusional movement without direction with an average velocity of 4 μm/min was maintained in racC(-) cells. Images acquired by using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis revealed that a significantly decreased number of ACA-YFP vesicles appeared near the cell membrane, indicating a defect in ACA-YFP vesicle trafficking. These results suggest an important role of RacC in the rapid and directional movements of ACA vesicles on microtubules to the plasma membrane, especially to the back of polarized cell. PMID:26315268

  2. Properties of Concrete with Tire Derived Aggregate Partially Replacing Coarse Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Siringi, Gideon; Abolmaali, Ali; Aswath, Pranesh B.

    2015-01-01

    Tire derived aggregate (TDA) has been proposed as a possible lightweight replacement for mineral aggregate in concrete. The role played by the amount of TDA replacing coarse aggregate as well as different treatment and additives in concrete on its properties is examined. Conventional concrete (without TDA) and concrete containing TDA are compared by examining their compressive strength based on ASTM C39, workability based on ASTM C143, splitting tensile strength based on ASTM C496, modulus of rupture (flexural strength) based on ASTM C78, and bond stress based on ASTM C234. Results indicate that while replacement of coarse aggregates with TDA results in reduction in strength, it may be mitigated with addition of silica fume to obtain the desired strength. The greatest benefit of using TDA is in the development of a higher ductile product while utilizing recycled TDA. PMID:26161440

  3. Properties of Concrete with Tire Derived Aggregate Partially Replacing Coarse Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Siringi, Gideon; Abolmaali, Ali; Aswath, Pranesh B

    2015-01-01

    Tire derived aggregate (TDA) has been proposed as a possible lightweight replacement for mineral aggregate in concrete. The role played by the amount of TDA replacing coarse aggregate as well as different treatment and additives in concrete on its properties is examined. Conventional concrete (without TDA) and concrete containing TDA are compared by examining their compressive strength based on ASTM C39, workability based on ASTM C143, splitting tensile strength based on ASTM C496, modulus of rupture (flexural strength) based on ASTM C78, and bond stress based on ASTM C234. Results indicate that while replacement of coarse aggregates with TDA results in reduction in strength, it may be mitigated with addition of silica fume to obtain the desired strength. The greatest benefit of using TDA is in the development of a higher ductile product while utilizing recycled TDA. PMID:26161440

  4. Properties of concrete blocks prepared with low grade recycled aggregates.

    PubMed

    Poon, Chi-Sun; Kou, Shi-cong; Wan, Hui-wen; Etxeberria, Miren

    2009-08-01

    Low grade recycled aggregates obtained from a construction waste sorting facility were tested to assess the feasibility of using these in the production of concrete blocks. The characteristics of the sorted construction waste are significantly different from that of crushed concrete rubbles that are mostly derived from demolition waste streams. This is due to the presence of higher percentages of non-concrete components (e.g. >10% soil, brick, tiles etc.) in the sorted construction waste. In the study reported in this paper, three series of concrete block mixtures were prepared by using the low grade recycled aggregates to replace (i) natural coarse granite (10mm), and (ii) 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% replacement levels of crushed stone fine (crushed natural granite <5mm) in the concrete blocks. Test results on properties such as density, compressive strength, transverse strength and drying shrinkage as well as strength reduction after exposure to 800 degrees C are presented below. The results show that the soil content in the recycled fine aggregate was an important factor in affecting the properties of the blocks produced and the mechanical strength deceased with increasing low grade recycled fine aggregate content. But the higher soil content in the recycled aggregates reduced the reduction of compressive strength of the blocks after exposure to high temperature due probably to the formation of a new crystalline phase. The results show that the low grade recycled aggregates obtained from the construction waste sorting facility has potential to be used as aggregates for making non-structural pre-cast concrete blocks. PMID:19398196

  5. Mechanical and physical properties of polyester polymer concrete using recycled aggregates from concrete sleepers.

    PubMed

    Carrión, Francisco; Montalbán, Laura; Real, Julia I; Real, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Currently, reuse of solid waste from disused infrastructures is an important environmental issue to study. In this research, polymer concrete was developed by mixing orthophthalic unsaturated polyester resin, artificial microfillers (calcium carbonate), and waste aggregates (basalt and limestone) coming from the recycling process of concrete sleepers. The variation of the mechanical and physical properties of the polymer concrete (compressive strength, flexural strength, modulus of elasticity, density, and water absorption) was analyzed based on the modification of different variables: nature of the recycled aggregates, resin contents (11 wt%, 12 wt%, and 13 wt%), and particle-size distributions of microfillers used. The results show the influence of these variables on mechanical performance of polymer concrete. Compressive and flexural strength of recycled polymer concrete were improved by increasing amount of polyester resin and by optimizing the particle-size distribution of the microfillers. Besides, the results show the feasibility of developing a polymer concrete with excellent mechanical behavior. PMID:25243213

  6. Mechanical and Physical Properties of Polyester Polymer Concrete Using Recycled Aggregates from Concrete Sleepers

    PubMed Central

    Carrión, Francisco; Montalbán, Laura; Real, Julia I.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, reuse of solid waste from disused infrastructures is an important environmental issue to study. In this research, polymer concrete was developed by mixing orthophthalic unsaturated polyester resin, artificial microfillers (calcium carbonate), and waste aggregates (basalt and limestone) coming from the recycling process of concrete sleepers. The variation of the mechanical and physical properties of the polymer concrete (compressive strength, flexural strength, modulus of elasticity, density, and water absorption) was analyzed based on the modification of different variables: nature of the recycled aggregates, resin contents (11 wt%, 12 wt%, and 13 wt%), and particle-size distributions of microfillers used. The results show the influence of these variables on mechanical performance of polymer concrete. Compressive and flexural strength of recycled polymer concrete were improved by increasing amount of polyester resin and by optimizing the particle-size distribution of the microfillers. Besides, the results show the feasibility of developing a polymer concrete with excellent mechanical behavior. PMID:25243213

  7. Assesment of Alkali Resistance of Basalt Used as Concrete Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    al-Swaidani, Aref M.; Baddoura, Mohammad K.; Aliyan, Samira D.; Choeb, Walid

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to report a part of an ongoing research on the influence of using crushed basalt as aggregates on one of durability-related properties of concrete (i.e. alkali-silica reaction which is the most common form of Alkali-Aggregate Reaction). Alkali resistance has been assessed through several methods specified in the American Standards. Results of petrographic examination, chemical test (ASTM C289) and accelerated mortar bar test (ASTM C1260) have particularly been reported. In addition, the weight change and compressive strength of 28 days cured concrete containing basaltic aggregates were also reported after 90 days of exposure to 10% NaOH solution. Dolomite aggregate were used in the latter test for comparison. The experimental results revealed that basaltic rocks quarried from As-Swaida'a region were suitable for production of aggregates for concrete. According to the test results, the studied basalt aggregates can be classified as innocuous with regard to alkali-silica reaction. Further, the 10% sodium hydroxide attack did not affect the compressive strength of concrete.

  8. The effect of recycled concrete aggregate properties on the bond strength between RCA concrete and steel reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, L. West, J.S.; Tighe, S.L.

    2011-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence that replacing natural coarse aggregate with recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) has on concrete bond strength with reinforcing steel. Two sources of RCA were used along with one natural aggregate source. Numerous aggregate properties were measured for all aggregate sources. Two types of concrete mixture proportions were developed replacing 100% of the natural aggregate with RCA. The first type maintained the same water-cement ratios while the second type was designed to achieve the same compressive strengths. Beam-end specimens were tested to determine the relative bond strength of RCA and natural aggregate concrete. On average, natural aggregate concrete specimens had bond strengths that were 9 to 19% higher than the equivalent RCA specimens. Bond strength and the aggregate crushing value seemed to correlate well for all concrete types.

  9. Chemical-mineralogical characterisation of coarse recycled concrete aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Limbachiya, M.C. . E-mail: m.limbachiya@kingston.ac.uk; Marrocchino, E.; Koulouris, A.

    2007-07-01

    The construction industry is now putting greater emphasis than ever before on increasing recycling and promoting more sustainable waste management practices. In keeping with this approach, many sectors of the industry have actively sought to encourage the use of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) as an alternative to primary aggregates in concrete production. The results of a laboratory experimental programme aimed at establishing chemical and mineralogical characteristics of coarse RCA and its likely influence on concrete performance are reported in this paper. Commercially produced coarse RCA and natural aggregates (16-4 mm size fraction) were tested. Results of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyses showed that original source of RCA had a negligible effect on the major elements and a comparable chemical composition between recycled and natural aggregates. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses results indicated the presence of calcite, portlandite and minor peaks of muscovite/illite in recycled aggregates, although they were directly proportioned to their original composition. The influence of 30%, 50%, and 100% coarse RCA on the chemical composition of equal design strength concrete has been established, and its suitability for use in a concrete application has been assessed. In this work, coarse RCA was used as a direct replacement for natural gravel in concrete production. Test results indicated that up to 30% coarse RCA had no effect on the main three oxides (SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CaO) of concrete, but thereafter there was a marginal decrease in SiO{sub 2} and increase in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CaO contents with increase in RCA content in the mix, reflecting the original constituent's composition.

  10. Leaching assessment of concrete made of recycled coarse aggregate: physical and environmental characterisation of aggregates and hardened concrete.

    PubMed

    Galvín, A P; Agrela, F; Ayuso, J; Beltrán, M G; Barbudo, A

    2014-09-01

    Each year, millions of tonnes of waste are generated worldwide, partially through the construction and demolition of buildings. Recycling the resulting waste could reduce the amount of materials that need to be manufactured. Accordingly, the present work has analysed the potential reuse of construction waste in concrete manufacturing by replacing the natural aggregate with recycled concrete coarse aggregate. However, incorporating alternative materials in concrete manufacturing may increase the pollutant potential of the product, presenting an environmental risk via ground water contamination. The present work has tested two types of concrete batches that were manufactured with different replacement percentages. The experimental procedure analyses not only the effect of the portion of recycled aggregate on the physical properties of concrete but also on the leaching behaviour as indicative of the contamination degree. Thus, parameters such as slump, density, porosity and absorption of hardened concrete, were studied. Leaching behaviour was evaluated based on the availability test performed to three aggregates (raw materials of the concrete batches) and on the diffusion test performed to all concrete. From an environmental point of view, the question of whether the cumulative amount of heavy metals that are released by diffusion reaches the availability threshold was answered. The analysis of concentration levels allowed the establishment of different groups of metals according to the observed behaviour, the analysis of the role of pH and the identification of the main release mechanisms. Finally, through a statistical analysis, physical parameters and diffusion data were interrelated. It allowed estimating the relevance of porosity, density and absorption of hardened concrete on diffusion release of the metals in study. PMID:24889792

  11. Recovery of MSWI and soil washing residues as concrete aggregates.

    PubMed

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Abbà, Alessandro; Collivignarelli, Carlo

    2011-02-01

    The aim of the present work was to study if municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) residues and aggregates derived from contaminated soil washing could be used as alternative aggregates for concrete production. Initially, chemical, physical and geometric characteristics (according to UNI EN 12620) of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ashes and some contaminated soils were evaluated; moreover, the pollutants release was evaluated by means of leaching tests. The results showed that the reuse of pre-treated MSWI bottom ash and washed soil is possible, either from technical or environmental point of view, while it is not possible for the raw wastes. Then, the natural aggregate was partially and totally replaced with these recycled aggregates for the production of concrete mixtures that were characterized by conventional mechanical and leaching tests. Good results were obtained using the same dosage of a high resistance cement (42.5R calcareous Portland cement instead of 32.5R); the concrete mixture containing 400 kg/m(3) of washed bottom ash and high resistance cement was classified as structural concrete (C25/30 class). Regarding the pollutants leaching, all concrete mixtures respected the limit values according to the Italian regulation. PMID:20537523

  12. Laboratory-scale sodium-carbonate aggregate concrete interactions. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Westrich, H.R.; Stockman, H.W.; Suo-Anttila, A.

    1983-09-01

    A series of laboratory-scale experiments was made at 600/sup 0/C to identify the important heat-producing chemical reactions between sodium and carbonate aggregate concretes. Reactions between sodium and carbonate aggregate were found to be responsible for the bulk of heat production in sodium-concrete tests. Exothermic reactions were initiated at 580+-30/sup 0/C for limestone and dolostone aggregates as well as for hydrated limestone concrete, and at 540+-10/sup 0/C for dehydrated limestone concrete, but were ill-defined for dolostone concrete. Major reaction products included CaO, MgO, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, Na/sub 2/O, NaOH, and elemental carbon. Sodium hydroxide, which forms when water is released from cement phases, causes slow erosion of the concrete with little heat production. The time-temperature profiles of these experiments have been modeled with a simplified version of the SLAM computer code, which has allowed derivation of chemical reaction rate coefficients.

  13. Constituents of aggregates for radiation-shielding concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The nomenclature is intended to give accurate descriptions of some common or important naturally occurring and synthetic constituents of aggregates that are not common or important constituents of concrete aggregates in general use. Heavy or high density aggregates that are described include hematite, hematite ores, ilmenite, ilmenite ores, lepidocrocite, geothite, geothite ores, limonite, magnetite, magnetite ores, witherite, barite, and ferrophosphorus. Minerals and synthetic glasses of substantial boron content that are particularly effective in absorbing thermal neutrons without producing highly penetrating gamma rays include paigeite and tourmaline. Boron-Frit glasses are included because of their frequent use. (JMT)

  14. Spall Strength Measurements of Concrete for Varying Aggregate Sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, Lalit C.; Kipp, Marlin E.; Reinhart, William D.; Wilson, Leonard T.

    1999-05-05

    Controlled impact experiments have been performed to determine the spall strength of four different concrete compositions. The four concrete compositions are identified as, `SAC-5, CSPC', ("3/4") large, and ("3/8") small, Aggregate. They differ primarily in aggregate size but with average densities varying by less than five percent. Wave profiles from sixteen experiments, with shock amplitudes of 0.07 to 0.55 GPa, concentrate primarily within the elastic regime. Free-surface particle velocity measurements indicate consistent pullback signals in the release profiles, denoting average span strength of approximately 40 MPa. It is the purpose of this paper to present spall measurements under uniaxial strain loading. Notwithstanding considerable wave structure that is a unique characteristic to the heterogeneous nature of the scaled concrete, the spall amplitudes appear reproducible and consistent over the pressure range reported in this study.

  15. Hot Mix Asphalt Using Light Weight Aggregate Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awwad, Mohammad T.

    Hot mix asphalt concrete is produced by properly blending asphalt, coarse and fine aggregates in addition to filler at temperatures ranging from 80 to 165°C. This research is directed to study the effect of replacing the conventional aggregates by the recycled Light Weight Aggregate Concrete (LWAC) on the properties of the produced asphalt mix. The research studied the optimum asphalt content and the effect of some parameters on the properties of the recycled LWAC. The research included studying thirty-six Marshal Specimens lie in four main groups. Each group was made from crushed LWAC in addition to a comparison group used the pumice instead of the crushed LWAC. The LWAC mixes contained (0, 10, 15 and 20%) of silica powder content. The density, stability, flow, percentages of the air Voids in the Compacted Mixture (VTM), compacted mineral aggregate (VMA) and the Voids Filled by Asphalt (VFA) were investigated for all the studied specimens. The main conclusions drawn from the current research implies that the optimum percent of asphalt was 7.5% for the different percentages of silica powder ratios. The presence of voids in the light weight aggregates and the porosity of the obtained concrete affected largely the behavior of the obtained mix.

  16. Environmental performance and mechanical analysis of concrete containing recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) and waste precast concrete as aggregate.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Savaş; Blankson, Marva Angela

    2014-01-15

    The overall objective of this research project was to investigate the feasibility of incorporating 100% recycled aggregates, either waste precast concrete or waste asphalt planning, as replacements for virgin aggregates in structural concrete and to determine the mechanical and environmental performance of concrete containing these aggregates. Four different types of concrete mixtures were designed with the same total water cement ratio (w/c=0.74) either by using natural aggregate as reference or by totally replacing the natural aggregate with recycled material. Ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS) was used as a mineral addition (35%) in all mixtures. The test results showed that it is possible to obtain satisfactory performance for strength characteristics of concrete containing recycled aggregates, if these aggregates are sourced from old precast concrete. However, from the perspective of the mechanical properties, the test results indicated that concrete with RAP aggregate cannot be used for structural applications. In terms of leaching, the results also showed that the environmental behaviour of the recycled aggregate concrete is similar to that of the natural aggregate concrete. PMID:24316812

  17. Effects of maximum aggregate size on UPV of brick aggregate concrete.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Tarek Uddin; Mahmood, Aziz Hasan

    2016-07-01

    Investigation was carried out to study the effects of maximum aggregate size (MAS) (12.5mm, 19.0mm, 25.0mm, 37.5mm, and 50.0mm) on ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) of concrete. For investigation, first class bricks were collected and broken to make coarse aggregate. The aggregates were tested for specific gravity, absorption capacity, unit weight, and abrasion resistance. Cylindrical concrete specimens were made with different sand to aggregate volume ratio (s/a) (0.40 and 0.45), W/C ratio (0.45, 0.50, and 0.55), and cement content (375kg/m(3) and 400kg/m(3)). The specimens were tested for compressive strength and Young's modulus. UPV through wet specimen was measured using Portable Ultrasonic Non-destructive Digital Indicating Tester (PUNDIT). Results indicate that the pulse velocity through concrete increases with an increase in MAS. Relationships between UPV and compressive strength; and UPV and Young's modulus of concrete are proposed for different maximum sizes of brick aggregate. PMID:27085110

  18. VERIFICATION OF 3-PHASES COMPOSITE MODEL FOR DRYING SHRINKAGE OF CONCRETE WITH DEFFERENT AGGREGATE PROPERTIES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kie; Shima, Hiroshi

    Properties of aggregate are not taken into account in current codes for drying shrinkage of concrete although the drying shrinkage is affected by the properties of aggregate. Aggregate restrains cement paste from shrinkage so that the drying shrinkage of concrete is controlled by drying shrinkage and Young's modulus of aggregate itself. The effect of the aggregate properties on drying shrinkage of concrete can be calculated by composite model in which concrete consists of cement paste and aggregate. Several different kind of coarse aggregate were used in order to verify a 3-phases composite model for drying shrinkage. Drying shrinkage and Young's modulus of cement paste, aggregate and concrete were measured. It was verified that drying shrinkage of concrete can be estimated accurately by the composite model associating with both drying shrinkage and Young's modulus of aggregate.

  19. Use of waste plastic in concrete mixture as aggregate replacement.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Zainab Z; Al-Hashmi, Enas A

    2008-11-01

    Industrial activities in Iraq are associated with significant amounts of non-biodegradable solid waste, waste plastic being among the most prominent. This study involved 86 experiments and 254 tests to determine the efficiency of reusing waste plastic in the production of concrete. Thirty kilograms of waste plastic of fabriform shapes was used as a partial replacement for sand by 0%, 10%, 15%, and 20% with 800 kg of concrete mixtures. All of the concrete mixtures were tested at room temperature. These tests include performing slump, fresh density, dry density, compressive strength, flexural strength, and toughness indices. Seventy cubes were molded for compressive strength and dry density tests, and 54 prisms were cast for flexural strength and toughness indices tests. Curing ages of 3, 7, 14, and 28 days for the concrete mixtures were applied in this work. The results proved the arrest of the propagation of micro cracks by introducing waste plastic of fabriform shapes to concrete mixtures. This study insures that reusing waste plastic as a sand-substitution aggregate in concrete gives a good approach to reduce the cost of materials and solve some of the solid waste problems posed by plastics. PMID:17931848

  20. Stress wave communication in concrete: I. Characterization of a smart aggregate based concrete channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu, Sam; Ji, Qing; Wu, Wenhao; Song, Gangbing; Ding, Zhi

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we explore the characteristics of a concrete block as a communication medium with piezoelectric transducers. Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) is a piezoceramic material used in smart materials intended for structural health monitoring (SHM). Additionally, a PZT based smart aggregate (SA) is capable of implementing stress wave communications which is utilized for investigating the properties of an SA based concrete channel. Our experiments characterize single-input single-output and multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) concrete channels in order to determine the potential capacity limits of SAs for stress wave communication. We first provide estimates and validate the concrete channel response. Followed by a theoretical upper bound for data rate capacity of our two channels, demonstrating a near-twofold increase in channel capacity by utilizing multiple transceivers to form an MIMO system. Our channel modeling techniques and results are also helpful to researchers using SAs with regards to SHM, energy harvesting and stress wave communications.

  1. Alkali-aggregate reaction in concrete containing high-alkali cement and granite aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Owsiak, Z

    2004-01-01

    The paper discusses results of the research into the influence of high-alkali Portland cement on granite aggregate. The deformation of the concrete structure occurred after 18 months. The research was carried out by means of a scanning electron microscope equipped with a high-energy dispersive X-ray analyzer that allowed observation of unpolished sections of concrete bars exhibiting the cracking pattern typical of the alkali-silica reaction. Both the microscopic observation and the X-ray elemental analysis confirm the presence of alkali-silica gel and secondary ettringite in the cracks.

  2. Reclamation chain of waste concrete: A case study of Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jianzhuang; Ma, Zhiming; Ding, Tao

    2016-02-01

    A mass of construction and demolition (C&D) waste are generated in Shanghai every year, and it has become a serious environment problem. Reclaiming the waste concrete to produce recycled aggregate (RA) and recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) is an effective method to reduce the C&D waste. This paper develops a reclamation chain of waste concrete based on the researches and practices in Shanghai. C&D waste management, waste concrete disposition, RA production and RAC preparation are discussed respectively. In addition, technical suggestions are also given according to the findings in practical engineering, which aims to optimize the reclamation chain. The results show that the properties of RA and RAC can well meet the requirement of design and practical application through a series of technical measures. The reclamation chain of waste concrete is necessary and appropriate for Shanghai, which provides more opportunities for the wider application of RA and RAC, and it shows a favorable environmental benefit. PMID:26452425

  3. Crushed cement concrete substitution for construction aggregates; a materials flow analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    An analysis of the substitution of crushed cement concrete for natural construction aggregates is performed by using a materials flow diagram that tracks all material flows into and out of the cement concrete portion of the products made with cement concrete: highways, roads, and buildings. Crushed cement concrete is only one of the materials flowing into these products, and the amount of crushed cement concrete substituted influences the amount of other materials in the flow. Factors such as availability and transportation costs, as well as physical properties, that can affect stability and finishability, influence whether crushed cement concrete or construction aggregates should be used or predominate for a particular end use.

  4. Properties of concrete with tire derived aggregate and crumb rubber as a lighthweight substitute for mineral aggregates in the concrete mix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siringi, Gideon Momanyi

    Scrap tires continue to be a nuisance to the environment and this research proposes one way of recycling them as a lightweight aggregate which can substitute for mineral aggregates in concrete. Aggregates derived from scrap tires are often referred to as Tire Derived Aggregate (TDA). First, the focus is how much mineral aggregate can be replaced by these waste tires and how the properties of concrete are affected with the introduction of rubber. This is being mindful of the fact that for a new material to be acceptable as an engineering material, its properties and behavior has to be well understood, the materials must perform properly and be acceptable to the regulating agencies. The role played by the quantity of TDA and Crumb Rubber replacing coarse aggregate and fine aggregate respectively as well as different treatment and additives in concrete on its properties are examined. Conventional concrete (without TDA) and concrete containing TDA are compared by examining their compressive strength based on ASTM C39, workability based on ASTM C143, Splitting Tensile Strength based on ASTM C496, Modulus of Rupture (flexural strength) based on ASTM C78 and Bond strength of concrete developed with reinforcing steel based on ASTM C234.Through stress-strain plots, the rubberized concrete is compared in terms of change in ductility, toughness and Elastic Modulus. Results indicate that while replacement of mineral aggregates with TDA results in reduction in compressive strength, this may be mitigated by addition of silica fume or using a smaller size of TDA to obtain the desired strength. The greatest benefit of using TDA is in the development of a higher ductile product with lower density while utilizing recycled TDA. From the results, it is observed that 7-10% of weight of mineral aggregates can be replaced by an equal volume of TDA to produce concrete with compressive strength of up to 4000 psi (27.5 MPa). Rubberized concrete would have higher ductility and toughness with

  5. Aggregate assesment and durability evaluation of optimized graded concrete in the state of Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaeezadeh, Ashkan

    This research is a part of a larger project that emphasizes on creating a more scientific approach to designing concrete mixtures for concrete pavements that use less cement and more aggregate which is called optimized graded concrete. The most challenging obstacle in optimized mixtures is reaching enough workability so that one doesn't have to add more cement or super-plasticizer to reach the desired level of flowability. Aggregate gradation and characteristics have found to be very important when it comes to the workabaility of optimized graded concrete. In this research a new automated method of aggregate assessment was used to compare the shape and the surface of different aggregates as well as their influence on the concrete flowability. At the end, the performance of optimized graded concrete against drying shrinkage and freezing and thawing condition were investigated.

  6. Standard descriptive nomenclature of constituents of aggregates for radiation-shielding concrete. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1992-05-01

    This nomenclature is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee C-9 on Concrete and Concrete Aggregates and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee C09.41 on Concrete for Radiation Shielding. Current edition approved Mar. 15, 1992 and published May 1992. Originally published as C 638-73. Last previous edition was C 638-84(1990). It was reapproved 1997.

  7. Effects of lightweight fly ash aggregate properties on the behavior of lightweight concretes.

    PubMed

    Kockal, Niyazi Ugur; Ozturan, Turan

    2010-07-15

    Influence of different lightweight fly ash aggregates on the behavior of concrete mixtures was discussed. The performance characteristics of lightweight concretes (LWCs) and normalweight concrete (NWC) were investigated through compressive strength, modulus of elasticity and splitting tensile strength representing the mechanical behavior; through rapid chloride permeability representing the transport properties and through rapid freezing and thawing cycling representing the durability of concrete. In order to investigate the aggregate-cement paste interfacial transition zone (ITZ), SEM observations were performed. Regression and graphical analysis of the experimental data obtained were also performed. An increase in compressive strength was observed with the increase in oven-dry density. The ratios of splitting tensile strength to compressive strength of lightweight aggregate concretes were found to be similar to that of normalweight concrete. All the 28- and 56-day concrete specimens had a durability factor greater than 85 and 90, respectively, which met the requirement for freezing and thawing durability. PMID:20399557

  8. Evaluation of Fracture in Concrete with Recycled Aggregate by Acoustic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishibata, Sayaka; Watanabe, Takeshi; Hashimoro, Chikanori; Kohno, Kiyoshi

    This research revealed fracture behavior of concrete in using recycled aggregates by Acoustic Emission as one of the Non-destructive Inspection. The phenomenon of acoustic emission (AE) is the propagation of elastic waves generated from a source, known as a micro-crack in an elastic material. There were taken to use low-treated recycled aggregate, crushed returned ready mixed concrete for aggregate and normal aggregate. Examination measured AE under the uniaxial compression test. The condition of load is repeated loading. As a result, fracture behavior due to low treated recycled aggregate was detected by AE. It is clarified that AE of concrete with low treated recycled aggregate appeared in low stress level. It has been understood that difference of aggregates becomes clear from Kaiser effect in repeated loading. In relation between RA value and average frequency, it has been understood the adhesion properties of the cement paste in recycled aggregate are appreciable.

  9. Investigations on Fresh and Hardened Properties of Recycled Aggregate Self Compacting Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revathi, P.; Selvi, R. S.; Velin, S. S.

    2013-09-01

    In the recent years, construction and demolition waste management issues have attracted the attention from researchers around the world. In the present study, the potential usage of recycled aggregate obtained from crushed demolition waste for making self compacting concrete (SCC) was researched. The barriers in promoting the use of recycled material in new construction are also discussed. In addition, the results of an experimental study involving the use of recycled concrete aggregate as coarse aggregates for producing self-compacting concrete to study their flow and strength characteristics are also presented. Five series of mixture were prepared with 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 % coarse recycled aggregate adopting Nan Su's mix proportioning method. The fresh concrete properties were evaluated through the slump flow, J-ring and V-funnel tests. Compressive and tensile strengths were also determined. The results obtained showed that SCC could be successfully developed by incorporating recycled aggregates.

  10. Drying shrinkage of fibre-reinforced lightweight aggregate concrete containing fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Kayali, O.; Haque, M.N.; Zhu, B.

    1999-11-01

    Lightweight aggregate concretes containing fly ash with a compressive strength between 61 to 67 NPa were produced. The lightweight aggregate used was sintered fly ash. The concretes were reinforced with either polypropylene or steel fibres. The fibres did not affect the compressive strength, but did increase the tensile strength of these concretes. The modulus of elasticity of all the lightweight concretes tested was about 21 GPa, compared to 35 GPa for the normal-weight concrete. Fibre reinforcement did not affect the value of the elastic modulus. This type of lightweight concrete, containing fly ash as 23% of the total cementitious content, resulted in long-term shrinkage that is nearly twice as large as normal-weight concrete of somewhat similar strength. Polypropylene fibre reinforcement did not reduce drying shrinkage, while steel fibres did. Early shrinkage behavior of this type of lightweight concrete was similar to normal-weight concrete. However, the rate of shrinkage of the lightweight concrete remained constant until nearly 100 days of drying. This is different from normal-weight concrete that showed appreciably after 56 days. Shrinkage of normal-weight concrete stabilized after 400 days, which shrinkage of lightweight concrete did not appear to stabilize after a similar period of continuous drying.

  11. Influence of recycled aggregate quality and proportioning criteria on recycled concrete properties.

    PubMed

    López-Gayarre, F; Serna, P; Domingo-Cabo, A; Serrano-López, M A; López-Colina, C

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental research using concrete produced by substituting part of the natural coarse aggregates with recycled aggregates from concrete demolition. The influence of the quality of the recycled aggregate (amount of declassified and source of aggregate), the percentage of replacement on the targeted quality of the concrete to be produced (strength and workability) has been evaluated. The granular structure of concrete and replacement criteria were analyzed in this study, factors which have not been analyzed in other studies. The following properties of recycled concretes were analyzed: density, absorption, compressive strength, elastic modulus, amount of occluded air, penetration of water under pressure and splitting tensile strength. A simplified test program was designed to control the costs of the testing while still producing sufficient data to develop reliable conclusions in order to make the number of tests viable whilst guaranteeing the reliability of the conclusions. Several factors were analyzed including the type of aggregate, the percentage of replacement, the type of sieve curve, the declassified content, the strength of concrete and workability of concrete and the replacement criteria. The type of aggregate and the percentage of replacement were the only factors that showed a clear influence on most of the properties. Compressive strength is clearly affected by the quality of recycled aggregates. If the water-cement ratio is kept constant and the loss of workability due to the effect of using recycled aggregate is compensated for with additives, the percentage of replacement of the recycled aggregate will not affect the compressive strength. The elastic modulus is affected by the percentage of replacement. If the percentage of replacement does not exceed 50%, the elastic modulus will only change slightly. PMID:19709870

  12. Integrating service-life modeling and life-cycle assessment for recycled-aggregate concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, Todd Lee

    The development and implementation of one-dimensional (a) analytical and (b) numerical service-life models for chloride-induced corrosion of reinforced concrete containing both recycled-aggregates and supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) are presented in this work. Both the analytical and numerical models account for initial chloride contamination levels due to previous applications. The effects of aggregate type (e.g., virgin, recycled aggregate, recycled mortar), aggregate replacement ratio, severity of chloride contamination levels, severity of in-service chloride exposure, reinforcement cover depth, SCM type (e.g., fly ash, slag, slice fume, metakaolin), and SCM replacement ratio on the expected service life of recycled-aggregate reinforced concrete were investigated. Results illustrated trends between concrete mixes and life cycle costs, which were employed to make conclusions on the trade-offs presented by cost, sustainability, and service life.

  13. Compressive strength and resistance to chloride ion penetration and carbonation of recycled aggregate concrete with varying amount of fly ash and fine recycled aggregate.

    PubMed

    Sim, Jongsung; Park, Cheolwoo

    2011-11-01

    Construction and demolition waste has been dramatically increased in the last decade, and social and environmental concerns on the recycling have consequently been increased. Recent technology has greatly improved the recycling process for waste concrete. This study investigates the fundamental characteristics of concrete using recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) for its application to structural concrete members. The specimens used 100% coarse RCA, various replacement levels of natural aggregate with fine RCA, and several levels of fly ash addition. Compressive strength of mortar and concrete which used RCA gradually decreased as the amount of the recycled materials increased. Regardless of curing conditions and fly ash addition, the 28 days strength of the recycled aggregate concrete was greater than the design strength, 40 MPa, with a complete replacement of coarse aggregate and a replacement level of natural fine aggregate by fine RCA up to 60%. The recycled aggregate concrete achieved sufficient resistance to the chloride ion penetration. The measured carbonation depth did not indicate a clear relationship to the fine RCA replacement ratio but the recycled aggregate concrete could also attain adequate carbonation resistance. Based on the results from the experimental investigations, it is believed that the recycled aggregate concrete can be successfully applied to structural concrete members. PMID:21784626

  14. Time-dependent behaviour of high performance concrete: influence of coarse aggregate characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makani, A.; Vidal, T.; Pons, G.; Escadeillas, G.

    2010-06-01

    This paper examines the influence of coarse aggregate characteristics on the time-dependent deformations of High Performances Concretes (HPC). Four concretes made using the same cement paste but incorporating different types of aggregate (rolled siliceous gravel, crushed granite, crushed limestone and crushed siliceous gravels) were studied in order to investigate the effect of aggregate properties on the compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, shrinkage and creep. The results indicate that the aggregate type has a significant effect on creep and shrinkage deformations of HPC. An influence of the shape of aggregate on time-dependent deformations has also been observed. On the basis of these results, long-term behaviour seems to be correlated to the characteristics of the Interfacial Transition Zone (ITZ) strongly depending on the mineralogical nature and properties of aggregates. The experimental results are compared with the values calculated using the current Eurocode 2 model in order to assess the accuracy of the predictions.

  15. Properties of lightweight aggregate concrete prepared with PVC granules derived from scraped PVC pipes.

    PubMed

    Kou, S C; Lee, G; Poon, C S; Lai, W L

    2009-02-01

    This paper aims to investigate the fresh and hardened properties of lightweight aggregate concretes that are prepared with the use of recycled plastic waste sourced from scraped PVC pipes to replace river sand as fine aggregates. A number of laboratory prepared concrete mixes were tested, in which river sand was partially replaced by PVC plastic waste granules in percentages of 0%, 5%, 15%, 30% and 45% by volume. Two major findings are identified. The positive side shows that the concrete prepared with a partial replacement by PVC was lighter (lower density), was more ductile (greater Poisson's ratios and reduced modulus of elasticity), and had lower drying shrinkage and higher resistance to chloride ion penetration. The negative side reveals that the workability, compressive strength and tensile splitting strength of the concretes were reduced. The results gathered would form a part of useful information for recycling PVC plastic waste in lightweight concrete mixes. PMID:18691863

  16. Flexural Behaviour Of Reinforced Concrete Beams Containing Expanded Glass As Lightweight Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatib, Jamal; Jefimiuk, Adrian; Khatib, Sammy

    2015-12-01

    The flexural properties of reinforced concrete beams containing expanded glass as a partial fine aggregate (sand) replacement are investigated. Four concrete mixes were employed to conduct this study. The fine aggregate was replaced with 0%, 25%, 50% and 100% (by volume) expanded glass. The results suggest that the incorporation of 50% expanded glass increased the workability of the concrete. The compressive strength was decreasing linearly with the increasing amount of expanded glass. The ductility of the concrete beam significantly improved with the incorporation of the expanded glass. However, the load-carrying capacity of the beam and load at which the first crack occurs was reduced. It was concluded that the inclusion of expanded glass in structural concrete applications is feasible.

  17. Eco-friendly porous concrete using bottom ash aggregate for marine ranch application.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Jae; Prabhu, G Ganesh; Lee, Bong Chun; Kim, Yun Yong

    2016-03-01

    This article presents the test results of an investigation carried out on the reuse of coal bottom ash aggregate as a substitute material for coarse aggregate in porous concrete production for marine ranch applications. The experimental parameters were the rate of bottom ash aggregate substitution (30%, 50% and 100%) and the target void ratio (15%, 20% and 25%). The cement-coated granular fertiliser was substituted into a bottom ash aggregate concrete mixture to improve marine ranch applications. The results of leaching tests revealed that the bottom ash aggregate has only a negligible amount of the ten deleterious substances specified in the Ministry of Environment - Enforcement Regulation of the Waste Management Act of Republic Korea. The large amount of bubbles/air gaps in the bottom ash aggregate increased the voids of the concrete mixtures in all target void ratios, and decreased the compressive strength of the porous concrete mixture; however, the mixture substituted with 30% and 10% of bottom ash aggregate and granular fertiliser, respectively, showed an equal strength to the control mixture. The sea water resistibility of the bottom ash aggregate substituted mixture was relatively equal to that of the control mixture, and also showed a great deal of improvement in the degree of marine organism adhesion compared with the control mixture. No fatality of fish was observed in the fish toxicity test, which suggested that bottom ash aggregate was a harmless material and that the combination of bottom ash aggregate and granular fertiliser with substitution rates of 30% and 10%, respectively, can be effectively used in porous concrete production for marine ranch application. PMID:26687102

  18. Material property assessment and crack identification of recycled concrete with embedded smart cement modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Pizhong; Fan, Wei; Chen, Fangliang

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, the material property assessment and crack identification of concrete using embedded smart cement modules are presented. Both the concrete samples with recycled aggregates (RA) and natural aggregates (NA) were prepared. The smart cement modules were fabricated and embedded in concrete beams to serve as either the actuators or sensors, and the elastic wave propagation-based technique was developed to detect the damage (crack) in the recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) beams and monitor the material degradation of RAC beams due to the freeze/thaw (F/T) conditioning cycles. The damage detection results and elastic modulus reduction monitoring data demonstrate that the proposed smart cement modules and associated damage detection and monitoring techniques are capable of identifying crack-type damage and monitoring material degradation of the RAC beams. Both the RAC and natural aggregate concrete (NAC) beams degrade with the increased F/T conditioning cycles. Though the RAC shows a lower reduction percentage of the modulus of elasticity from both the dynamic modulus and wave propagation tests at the given maximum F/T conditioning cycle (i.e., 300 in this study), the RAC tends to degrade faster after the 180 F/T cycles. As observed in this study, the material properties and degradation rate of RAC are comparable to those of NAC, thus making the RAC suitable for transportation construction. The findings in development of damage detection and health monitoring techniques using embedded smart cement modules resulted from this study promote the widespread application of recycled concrete in transportation construction and provide viable and effective health monitoring techniques for concrete structures in general.

  19. Neutron attenuation characteristics of polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, and heavy aggregate concrete and mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Abdul-Majid, S.; Othman, F.

    1994-03-01

    Polyethylene and polyvinyl chloride pellets were introduced into concrete to improve its neutron attenuation characteristics while several types of heavy coarse aggregates were used to improve its gamma ray attenuation properties. Neutron and gamma ray attenuation were studied in concrete samples containing coarse aggregates of barite, pyrite, basalt, hematite, and marble as well as polyethylene and polyvinyl chloride pellets in narrow-beam geometry. The highest neutron attenuation was shown by polyethylene mortar, followed by polyvinyl chloride mortar; barite and pyrite concrete showed higher gamma ray attenuation than ordinary concrete. Broad-beam and continuous (infinite) medium geometries were used to study the neutron attenuation of samples containing polymers at different concentrations with and without heavy aggregates, the fitting equations were established, and from these the neutron removal coefficients were deduced. In a radiation field of neutrons and gamma rays, the appropriate concentration of polymer and heavy aggregate can be selected to give the optimum total dose attenuation depending on the relative intensities of each type of radiation. This would give much better design flexibility over ordinary concrete. The compressive strength tests performed on mortar and concrete samples showed that their value, in general, decreases as polymer concentration increases and that the polyvinyl chloride mortar showed higher values than the polyethylene mortar. For general construction purposes, the compression strength was considered acceptable in these samples. 34 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Comminution and sizing processes of concrete block waste as recycled aggregates.

    PubMed

    Gomes, P C C; Ulsen, C; Pereira, F A; Quattrone, M; Angulo, S C

    2015-11-01

    Due to the environmental impact of construction and demolition waste (CDW), recycling is mandatory. It is also important that recycled concrete aggregates (RCA) are used in concrete to meet market demands. In the literature, the influence of RCAs on concrete has been investigated, but very limited studies have been conducted on how the origin of concrete waste and comminution processes influence RCA characteristics. This paper aims to investigate the influence of three different comminution and sizing processes (simple screening, crushing and grinding) on the composition, shape and porosity characteristics of RCA obtained from concrete block waste. Crushing and grinding implies a reduction of RCA porosity. However, due to the presence of coarse quartz rounded river pebbles in the original concrete block mixtures, the shape characteristics deteriorated. A large amount of powder (<0.15 mm) without detectable anhydrous cement was also generated. PMID:26168872

  1. Effect of Different Coarse Aggregate Sizes on the Strength Characteristics of Laterized Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salau, M. A.; Busari, A. O.

    2015-11-01

    The high cost of conventional concrete materials is a major factor affecting housing delivery in developing countries such as Nigeria. Since Nigeria is blessed with abundant locally available materials like laterite, researchers have conducted comprehensive studies on the use of laterite to replace river sand partially or fully in the concrete. However, the works did not consider the optimum use of coarse aggregate to possibly improve the strength of the laterized concrete, since it is normally lower than that of normal concrete. The results of the tests showed that workability, density and compressive strength at constant water-cement ratio increase with the increase in the coarse aggregate particle size and also with curing age. As the percentage of laterite increases, there was a reduction in all these characteristics even with the particle size of coarse aggregate reduction due to loss from the aggregate-paste interface zone. Also, when sand was replaced by 25% of laterite, the 19.5mm and 12.5mm coarse aggregate particle sizes gave satisfactory results in terms of workability and compressive strength respectively at 28 days of curing age, compared to normal concrete. However, in case of 50% up to 100% laterite contents, the workability and compressive strength values were very low.

  2. The Feasibility of Palm Kernel Shell as a Replacement for Coarse Aggregate in Lightweight Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itam, Zarina; Beddu, Salmia; Liyana Mohd Kamal, Nur; Ashraful Alam, Md; Issa Ayash, Usama

    2016-03-01

    Implementing sustainable materials into the construction industry is fast becoming a trend nowadays. Palm Kernel Shell is a by-product of Malaysia’s palm oil industry, generating waste as much as 4 million tons per annum. As a means of producing a sustainable, environmental-friendly, and affordable alternative in the lightweight concrete industry, the exploration of the potential of Palm Kernel Shell to be used as an aggregate replacement was conducted which may give a positive impact to the Malaysian construction industry as well as worldwide concrete usage. This research investigates the feasibility of PKS as an aggregate replacement in lightweight concrete in terms of compressive strength, slump test, water absorption, and density. Results indicate that by using PKS for aggregate replacement, it increases the water absorption but decreases the concrete workability and strength. Results however, fall into the range acceptable for lightweight aggregates, hence it can be concluded that there is potential to use PKS as aggregate replacement for lightweight concrete.

  3. Size-dependent enrichment of waste slag aggregate fragments abraded from asphalt concrete.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Fumitake; Shimaoka, Takayuki; Gardner, Kevin; Kida, Akiko

    2011-10-30

    Authors consider the environmental prospects of using melted waste slag as the aggregate for asphalt pavement. In particular, the enrichment of slag-derived fragments in fine abrasion dust particles originated from slag asphalt concrete and its size dependency were concerned. A series of surface abrasion tests for asphalt concrete specimens, containing only natural aggregates as reference or 30 wt% of substituted slag aggregates, were performed. Although two of three slag-asphalt concretes generated 1.5-3.0 times larger amount of abrasion dust than the reference asphalt concrete did, it could not be explained only by abrasion resistance of slag. The enrichment of slag-derived fragments in abrasion dust, estimated on the basis of the peak intensity of quartz and heavy metal concentrations, had size dependency for all slag-asphalt concretes. Slag-derived fragments were enriched in abrasion dust particles with diameters of 150-1000 μm. Enrichment factors were 1.4-2.1. In contrast, there was no enrichment in abrasion dust particles with diameter less than 75 μm. This suggests that prior airborne-size fragmentation of substituted slag aggregates does not need to be considered for tested slag aggregates when environmental risks of abrasion dust of slag-asphalt pavement are assessed. PMID:21868161

  4. Very early age concrete hydration characterization monitoring using piezoceramic based smart aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Qingzhao; Hou, Shuang; Ji, Qing; Mo, Y. L.; Song, Gangbing

    2013-08-01

    Very early age (0-20 h) concrete hydration is a complicated chemical reaction. During the very early age period, the concrete condition dramatically changes from liquid state to solid state. This paper presents the authors’ recent research on monitoring very early age concrete hydration characterization by using piezoceramic based smart aggregates. The smart aggregate (SA) transducer is designed as a sandwich structure using two marble blocks and a pre-soldered lead zirconate titanate (PZT) patch. Based on the electromechanical property of piezo materials, the PZT patches function as both actuators and sensors. In addition, the marble blocks provide reliable protection to the fragile PZT patch and develop the SA into a robust embedded actuator or sensor in the structure. The active-sensing approach, which involved a pair of smart aggregates with one as an actuator and the other one as a sensor, was applied in this paper’s experimental investigation of concrete hydration characterization monitoring. In order to completely understand the hydration condition of the inhomogeneous, over-cluttering, high-scattering characteristics of concrete (specifically of very early concrete), a swept sine wave and several constant frequency sine waves were chosen and produced by a function generator to excite the embedded actuating smart aggregate. The PZT vibration induced ultrasonic wave propagated through the concrete and was sent to the other smart aggregate sensor. The electrical signal transferred from the smart aggregate sensor was recorded during the test. As the concrete hydration reaction was occurring, the characteristic of the electrical signal continuously changed. This paper describes the successful investigation of the three states (the fluid state, the transition state, and the hardened state) of very early age concrete hydration based on classification of the received electrical signal. Specifically, the amplitude and frequency response of the electrical signal

  5. Temperature-Dependent Thermal Conductivity of High Strength Lightweight Raw Perlite Aggregate Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandiroglu, Ahmet

    2010-06-01

    Twenty-four types of high strength lightweight concrete have been designed with raw perlite aggregate (PA) from the Erzincan Mollaköy region as new low-temperature insulation material. The effects of the water/cement ratio, the amount of raw PA, and the temperature on high strength lightweight raw perlite aggregate concrete (HSLWPAC) have been investigated. Three empirical equations were derived to correlate the thermal conductivity of HSLWPAC as a function of PA percentage and temperature depending on the water/cement ratio. Experimentally observed thermal conductivities of concrete samples were predicted 92 % of the time for each set of concrete matrices within 97 % accuracy and over the range from 1.457 W · m-1 · K-1 to 1.777 W · m-1 · K-1. The experimental investigation revealed that the usage of raw PA from the Erzincan Mollaköy region in concrete production reduces the concrete unit mass, increases the concrete strength, and furthermore, the thermal conductivity of the concrete has been improved. The proposed empirical correlations of thermal conductivity were considered to be applicable within the range of temperatures 203.15 K ≤ T ≤ 303.15 K in the form of λ = a( PAP b ) + c( T d ).

  6. The shakeout scenario: Meeting the needs for construction aggregates, asphalt, and concrete

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, W.H.

    2011-01-01

    An Mw 7.8 earthquake as described in the ShakeOut Scenario would cause significantdamage to buildings and infrastructure. Over 6 million tons of newly mined aggregate would be used for emergency repairs and for reconstruction in the five years following the event. This aggregate would be applied mostly in the form of concrete for buildings and bridges, asphalt or concrete for pavement, and unbound gravel for applications such as base course that goes under highway pavement and backfilling for foundations and pipelines. There are over 450 aggregate, concrete, and asphalt plants in the affected area, some of which would be heavily damaged. Meeting the increased demand for construction materials would require readily available permitted reserves, functioning production facilities, a supply of cement and asphalt, a source of water, gas, and electricity, and a trained workforce. Prudent advance preparations would facilitate a timely emergency response and reconstruction following such an earthquake. ?? 2011, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  7. Utilization of power plant bottom ash as aggregates in fiber-reinforced cellular concrete.

    PubMed

    Lee, H K; Kim, H K; Hwang, E A

    2010-02-01

    Recently, millions tons of bottom ash wastes from thermoelectric power plants have been disposed of in landfills and coastal areas, regardless of its recycling possibility in construction fields. Fiber-reinforced cellular concrete (FRCC) of low density and of high strength may be attainable through the addition of bottom ash due to its relatively high strength. This paper focuses on evaluating the feasibility of utilizing bottom ash of thermoelectric power plant wastes as aggregates in FRCC. The flow characteristics of cement mortar with bottom ash aggregates and the effect of aggregate type and size on concrete density and compressive strength were investigated. In addition, the effects of adding steel and polypropylene fibers for improving the strength of concrete were also investigated. The results from this study suggest that bottom ash can be applied as a construction material which may not only improve the compressive strength of FRCC significantly but also reduce problems related to bottom ash waste. PMID:19910181

  8. Drops in concrete strength in summer related to the aggregate temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Mouret, M.; Bascoul, A.; Escadeillas, G.

    1997-03-01

    Drops in compressive strengths may occur for hot weather concreting. They are observed on specimens for manufacturing control tested in laboratory at 28 days. On the other hand, 7-day compressive strength seems not to be affected. An experimental program was carried out. It constituted a quantitative approach to evaluate the effect of the aggregate temperature on the performances of plain concrete. So, this paper presents the results of tests for compressive and splitting tensile strengths conducted on normal strength concrete specimens. Cylinders (11 cm x 22 cm) were prepared with different aggregate temperatures ranging from 20--70 C and cured under either controlled laboratory conditions (20 C) or simulated conditions of hot weather (35 C). Results show that both the 28-day compressive strength and the splitting tensile strength of concrete are reduced with the increase in aggregate temperature by as much as 15% and 17% respectively. The aggregate temperature rise also implies an increase in the water demand of the concrete mixes which, in turn, cannot fully explain the drops in strength.

  9. COIN Project: Towards a zero-waste technology for concrete aggregate production in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepuritis, Rolands; Willy Danielsen, Svein

    2014-05-01

    COIN Project: Towards a zero-waste technology for concrete aggregate production in Norway Rolands Cepuritis, Norcem/NTNU and Svein Willy Danielsen, SINTEF Aggregate production is a mining operation where no purification of the "ore" is necessary. Still it is extremely rare that an aggregate production plant is operating on the basis of zero-waste concept. This is since historically the fine crushed aggregate (particles with a size of less than 2, 4 or sometimes 8 mm) has been regarded as a by-product or waste of the more valuable coarse aggregate production. The reason is that the crushed coarse aggregates can easily replace coarse rounded natural stones in almost any concrete composition; while, the situation with the sand is different. The production of coarse aggregate normally yields fine fractions with rough surface texture, flaky or elongated particles an inadequate gradation. When such a material replaces smooth and rounded natural sand grains in a concrete mix, the result is usually poor and much more water and cement has to be used to achieve adequate concrete flow. The consequences are huge stockpiles of the crushed fine fractions that can't be sold (mass balance problems) for the aggregate producers, sustainability problems for the whole industry and environmental issues for society due to dumping and storing of the fine co-generated material. There have been attempts of utilising the material in concrete before; however, they have mostly ended up in failure. There have been attempts to adjust the crushed sand to the properties of the natural sand, which would still give a lot of waste, especially if the grading would have to be adjusted and the high amounts of fines abundantly present in the crushed sand would have to be removed. Another fundamental reason for failure has been that historically such attempts have mainly ended up in a research carried out by people (both industrial and academic) with aggregate background (= parties willing to find market

  10. Effect of surrogate aggregates on the thermal conductivity of concrete at ambient and elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Yun, Tae Sup; Jeong, Yeon Jong; Youm, Kwang-Soo

    2014-01-01

    The accurate assessment of the thermal conductivity of concretes is an important part of building design in terms of thermal efficiency and thermal performance of materials at various temperatures. We present an experimental assessment of the thermal conductivity of five thermally insulated concrete specimens made using lightweight aggregates and glass bubbles in place of normal aggregates. Four different measurement methods are used to assess the reliability of the thermal data and to evaluate the effects of the various sensor types. The concrete specimens are also assessed at every 100 °C during heating to ~800 °C. Normal concrete is shown to have a thermal conductivity of ~2.25 W m(-1) K(-1). The surrogate aggregates effectively reduce the conductivity to ~1.25 W m(-1) K(-1) at room temperature. The aggregate size is shown not to affect thermal conduction: fine and coarse aggregates each lead to similar results. Surface contact methods of assessment tend to underestimate thermal conductivity, presumably owing to high thermal resistance between the transducers and the specimens. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that the stages of mass loss of the cement paste correspond to the evolution of thermal conductivity upon heating. PMID:24696666

  11. Effect of Surrogate Aggregates on the Thermal Conductivity of Concrete at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Tae Sup; Jeong, Yeon Jong; Youm, Kwang-Soo

    2014-01-01

    The accurate assessment of the thermal conductivity of concretes is an important part of building design in terms of thermal efficiency and thermal performance of materials at various temperatures. We present an experimental assessment of the thermal conductivity of five thermally insulated concrete specimens made using lightweight aggregates and glass bubbles in place of normal aggregates. Four different measurement methods are used to assess the reliability of the thermal data and to evaluate the effects of the various sensor types. The concrete specimens are also assessed at every 100°C during heating to ~800°C. Normal concrete is shown to have a thermal conductivity of ~2.25 W m−1 K−1. The surrogate aggregates effectively reduce the conductivity to ~1.25 W m−1 K−1 at room temperature. The aggregate size is shown not to affect thermal conduction: fine and coarse aggregates each lead to similar results. Surface contact methods of assessment tend to underestimate thermal conductivity, presumably owing to high thermal resistance between the transducers and the specimens. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that the stages of mass loss of the cement paste correspond to the evolution of thermal conductivity upon heating. PMID:24696666

  12. An investigation on the use of shredded waste PET bottles as aggregate in lightweight concrete.

    PubMed

    Akçaözoğlu, Semiha; Atiş, Cengiz Duran; Akçaözoğlu, Kubilay

    2010-02-01

    In this work, the utilization of shredded waste Poly-ethylene Terephthalate (PET) bottle granules as a lightweight aggregate in mortar was investigated. Investigation was carried out on two groups of mortar samples, one made with only PET aggregates and, second made with PET and sand aggregates together. Additionally, blast-furnace slag was also used as the replacement of cement on mass basis at the replacement ratio of 50% to reduce the amount of cement used and provide savings. The water-binder (w/b) ratio and PET-binder (PET/b) ratio used in the mixtures were 0.45 and 0.50, respectively. The size of shredded PET granules used in the preparation of mortar mixtures were between 0 and 4 mm. The results of the laboratory study and testing carried out showed that mortar containing only PET aggregate, mortar containing PET and sand aggregate, and mortars modified with slag as cement replacement can be drop into structural lightweight concrete category in terms of unit weight and strength properties. Therefore, it was concluded that there is a potential for the use of shredded waste PET granules as aggregate in the production of structural lightweight concrete. The use of shredded waste PET granules due to its low unit weight reduces the unit weight of concrete which results in a reduction in the death weight of a structural concrete member of a building. Reduction in the death weight of a building will help to reduce the seismic risk of the building since the earthquake forces linearly dependent on the dead-weight. Furthermore, it was also concluded that the use of industrial wastes such as PET granules and blast-furnace slag in concrete provides some advantages, i.e., reduction in the use of natural resources, disposal of wastes, prevention of environmental pollution, and energy saving. PMID:19853433

  13. Standard test method for compressive strength of grouts for preplaced-aggregate concrete in the laboratory. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    DoD adopted. This test method is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee C-9 on Concrete and Concrete Aggregates and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee C09.41 on Concrete for Radiation Shielding. Current edition approved Feb. 10, 1986 and published October 1998. Originally published as C 942-81. Last previous edition was C 942-86(1991).

  14. Modeling of alkali aggregate reaction effects in concrete dams

    SciTech Connect

    Capra, B.; Bournazel, J.P.; Bourdarot, E.

    1995-12-31

    Alkali Aggregate Reactions (AAR) are difficult to model due to the random distribution of the reactive sites and the imperfect knowledge of these chemical reactions. A new approach, using fracture mechanics and probabilities, capable to describe the anisotropic swelling of a structure is presented.

  15. Microscopic analysis of alkali-aggregate reaction products in a 50-year-old concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, Isabel . E-mail: ifernand@fc.up.pt; Noronha, Fernando . E-mail: fmnoronh@fc.up.pt; Teles, Madalena . E-mail: mteles@fe.up.pt

    2004-11-15

    Fifty-year-old concrete from a large dam was examined in the scope of an investigation program concerning the properties of granite as aggregate material for concrete. Site inspection, which was developed in order to detect possible signs of deterioration of the concrete, revealed the existence of efflorescence and exudations. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) analyses were attempted to identify the composition of these materials and their morphology. From the analyses, it was concluded that some of the exudations were composed by alkali-silica gel. In these samples, an interesting behavior was observed in different moments after a 3-month interval. It was noticed that the initially noncrystalline alkali-silica gel transformed into sodium-rich needles and tablets after a few months kept in a desiccator in the laboratory. Therefore, it was concluded that the materials identified corresponded to different stages of evolution of an alkali-aggregate reaction product.

  16. Photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide modified concrete materials - influence of utilizing recycled glass cullets as aggregates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Poon, Chi-Sun

    2009-08-01

    Combining the use of photocatalysts with cementitious materials is an important development in the field of photocatalytic air pollution mitigation. This paper presents the results of a systematic study on assessing the effectiveness of pollutant degradation by concrete surface layers that incorporate a photocatalytic material - Titanium Dioxide. The photocatalytic activity of the concrete samples was determined by photocatalytic oxidation of nitric oxide (NO) in the laboratory. Recycled glass cullets, derived from crushed waste beverage bottles, were used to replace sand in preparing the concrete surface layers. Factors, which may affect the pollutant removal performance of the concrete layers including glass color, aggregate size and curing age, were investigated. The results show a significant enhancement of the photocatalytic activity due to the use of glass cullets as aggregates in the concrete layers. The samples fabricated with clear glass cullets exhibited threefold NO removal efficiency compared to the samples fabricated with river sand. The light transmittance property of glass was postulated to account for the efficiency improvement, which was confirmed by a separate simulation study. But the influence of the size of glass cullets was not evident. In addition, the photocatalytic activity of concrete surface layers decreased with curing age, showing a loss of 20% photocatalytic activity after 56-day curing. PMID:19540649

  17. Comparative performance of various smart aggregates during strength gain and damage states of concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jothi Saravanan, T.; Balamonica, K.; Bharathi Priya, C.; Likhith Reddy, A.; Gopalakrishnan, N.

    2015-08-01

    Information regarding the early strength gain of fresh concrete determines the time for the removal of form work and the transfer of pre-stressing forces for pre-stressed concrete. An ultrasonic based non-destructive evaluation of early strength gain may not work for concrete in fluid and semi-solid phases. A possible alternative is a lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-based smart aggregate embedded in concrete, which can evaluate the micro-structural and rheological properties right from the fluid phase. A set of five smart aggregates embedded in a concrete cube were investigated for their suitability to evaluate electromechanical impedance (EMI) signatures. Cubes were loaded to failure and the EMI during progressive strength loss under compressive loads was studied. To show the generalized applicability of this, experimental results for the performance of typical smart aggregates on a larger specimen, namely a concrete beam, are also discussed. Different statistical metrics were examined computationally on a three peak admittance curve with a parametric variation of stiffness, damping and simple scaling. The root mean square deviation (RMSD), mean absolute percentage deviation (MAPD), cross correlation (CC) and modified cross correlation (MCC) were investigated, in addition to the rate of change of the RMSD. Variations between the reference and modified states were studied. Both stiffness and mass gains occur for the smart aggregates, resulting in an increase or decrease of frequency and amplitude peaks due to progressive C-S-H gel formation. The trend of increasing stiffness and the consequent rightward shift of the resonant peaks and decrease of damping, with the consequent upward shift of amplitudes that happens during curing and strength gain, was observed to be reversed during the application of damaging loads.

  18. Using a centrifuge for quality control of pre-wetted lightweight aggregate in internally cured concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Albert E.

    Early age shrinkage of cementitious systems can result in an increased potential for cracking which can lead to a reduction in service life. Early age shrinkage cracking can be particularly problematic for high strength concretes, which are often specified due to their high strength and low permeability. However, these high strength concretes frequently exhibit a reduction in the internal relative humidity (RH) due to the hydration reaction (chemical shrinkage) and self-desiccation which results in a bulk shrinkage, termed autogenous shrinkage, which is substantial at early ages. Due to the low permeability of these concretes, standard external curing is not always efficient in addressing this reduction in internal RH since the penetration of water can be limited. Internal curing has been developed to reduce autogenous shrinkage. Internally cured mixtures use internal reservoirs filled with fluid (generally water) that release this fluid at appropriate times to counteract the effects of self-desiccation thereby maintaining a high internal RH. Internally cured concrete is frequently produced in North America using pre-wetted lightweight aggregate. One important aspect associated with preparing quality internally cured concrete is being able to determine the absorbed moisture and surface moisture associated with the lightweight aggregate which enables aggregate moisture corrections to be made for the concrete mixture. This thesis represents work performed to develop a test method using a centrifuge to determine the moisture state of pre-wetted fine lightweight aggregate. The results of the test method are then used in a series of worksheets that were developed to assist field technicians when performing the tests and applying the results to a mixture design. Additionally, research was performed on superabsorbent polymers to assess their ability to be used as an internal curing reservoir.

  19. Generation of urban road dust from anti-skid and asphalt concrete aggregates.

    PubMed

    Tervahattu, Heikki; Kupiainen, Kaarle J; Räisänen, Mika; Mäkelä, Timo; Hillamo, Risto

    2006-04-30

    Road dust forms an important component of airborne particulate matter in urban areas. In many winter cities the use of anti-skid aggregates and studded tires enhance the generation of mineral particles. The abrasion particles dominate the PM10 during springtime when the material deposited in snow is resuspended. This paper summarizes the results from three test series performed in a test facility to assess the factors that affect the generation of abrasion components of road dust. Concentrations, mass size distribution and composition of the particles were studied. Over 90% of the particles were aluminosilicates from either anti-skid or asphalt concrete aggregates. Mineral particles were observed mainly in the PM10 fraction, the fine fraction being 12% and submicron size being 6% of PM10 mass. The PM10 concentrations increased as a function of the amount of anti-skid aggregate dispersed. The use of anti-skid aggregate increased substantially the amount of PM10 originated from the asphalt concrete. It was concluded that anti-skid aggregate grains contribute to pavement wear. The particle size distribution of the anti-skid aggregates had great impact on PM10 emissions which were additionally enhanced by studded tires, modal composition, and texture of anti-skid aggregates. The results emphasize the interaction of tires, anti-skid aggregate, and asphalt concrete pavement in the production of dust emissions. They all must be taken into account when measures to reduce road dust are considered. The winter maintenance and springtime cleaning must be performed properly with methods which are efficient in reducing PM10 dust. PMID:16426748

  20. Role of alkalis of aggregate origin in the deterioration of CAC concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Varela, M.T.

    2005-09-01

    Both hexagonal and cubic calcium aluminate cement (CAC) hydrates react with atmospheric CO{sub 2}, bringing about mineralogical changes in concrete, which may, on occasion, lead to loss of mechanical strength. Alkaline hydrolysis or carbonation in the presence of alkalis is a highly destructive process. The purpose of the study was to determine what caused CAC concrete deterioration in a prestressed beam that had suffered intense external damage and showed signs of alkaline hydrolysis or a reaction between the aggregate and the cement. Samples of the internal (sound) and external (damaged) parts of the concrete were studied using XRF, XRD, FTIR, OM, SEM/EDX, and BSE techniques, and mechanical strength was measured on microspecimens extracted from both zones. The conclusion drawn from these analyses was that alkaline hydrolysis took place on or near the surface of the concrete. The white deposits observed around the alkali-containing aggregate were found to consist primarily of bayerite whose very loose consistency undermined the aggregate-matrix bond, greatly weakening the material.

  1. Study on the mechanical and environmental properties of concrete containing cathode ray tube glass aggregate.

    PubMed

    Romero, Diego; James, Jacqueline; Mora, Rodrigo; Hays, Carol D

    2013-07-01

    Cathode ray tube (CRT) glass is considered a hazardous material due to its lead toxicity. In addition, current disposal practices are being phased out due to their adverse environmental impacts. In this project, CRT glass was used as a fine aggregate replacement in concrete. Life-cycle material characterization was conducted by evaluating the durability and strength of the CRT-Concrete. Leaching tests were also conducted to investigate whether the material meets drinking water limits for Pb. Test results show that the plastic state of the CRT-Concrete was affected by the angularity of the glass particles. Moreover, the compressive strength of CRT-Concrete met and exceeded that of the control specimen. However, CRT-Concrete was susceptible to expansive alkali-silica reactions when more than 10% CRT replacement was used. Environmental leaching results show that lead concentrations from CRT-Concrete are below the drinking water limits depending on the CRT volume replacement and if biopolymers are used. PMID:23628215

  2. Intermediate-scale tests of sodium interactions with calcite and dolomite aggregate concretes. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Randich, E.; Acton, R.U.

    1983-09-01

    Two intermediate-scale tests were performed to compare the behavior of calcite and dolomite aggregate concretes when attacked by molten sodium. The tests were performed as part of an interlaboratory comparison between Sandia National Laboratories and Hanford Engineering Development Laboratories. Results of the tests at Sandia National Laboratories are reported here. The results show that both concretes exhibit similar exothermic reactions with molten sodium. The large difference in reaction vigor suggested by thermodynamic considerations of CO/sub 2/ release from calcite and dolomite was not realized. Penetration rates of 1.4 to 1.7 mm/min were observed for short periods of time with reaction zone temperatures in excess of 800/sup 0/C during the energetic attack. The penetration was not uniform over the entire sodium-concrete contact area. Rapid attack may be localized due to inhomogeneities in the concrete. The chemical reaction zone is less then one cm thick for the calcite concrete but is about seven cm thick for the dolomite concrete.

  3. Microstructure of Concrete with Aggregates from Construction and Demolition Waste Recycling Plants.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Miguel; Santos Silva, António; de Brito, Jorge; Evangelista, Luís

    2016-02-01

    This paper intends to analyze the microstructure of concrete with recycled aggregates (RA) from construction and demolition waste from various Portuguese recycling plants. To that effect, several scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses were performed. Various concrete mixes were evaluated in order to analyze the influence of the RA's collection point and consequently of their composition on the mixes' characteristics. Afterward all the mixes were subjected to the capillary water absorption test in order to quantitatively evaluate their porosity. Results from the SEM/EDS analysis were compared with those from capillary water absorption test. The SEM/EDS analysis showed that the bond capacity of aggregates to the new cement paste is greatly influenced by the RA's nature. On the other hand, there was an increase in porosity with the incorporation of RA. PMID:26700727

  4. Humidity and aggregate content correction factors for air-coupled ultrasonic evaluation of concrete.

    PubMed

    Berriman, J; Purnell, P; Hutchins, D A; Neild, A

    2005-02-01

    This paper describes the use of non-contact ultrasound for the evaluation of concrete. Micromachined capacitance transducers are used to transmit ultrasonic longitudinal chirp signals through concrete samples using air as the coupling medium, and a pulse compression technique is then employed for measurement of time of flight through the sample. The effect on the ultrasonic wave speed of storing concrete samples, made with the same water/cement ratio, at different humidity levels is investigated. It is shown that there is a correlation between humidity and speed of sound, allowing a correction factor for humidity to be derived. A strong positive linear correlation between aggregate content and speed of sound was then observed; there was no obvious correlation between compressive strength and speed of sound. The results from the non-contact system are compared with that from a contact system, and conclusions drawn concerning coupling of energy into the samples. PMID:15567195

  5. Effects of waste PET bottles aggregate on the properties of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yun-Wang; Moon, Dae-Joong; Chung, Jee-Seung; Cho, Sun-Kyu

    2005-04-01

    This paper investigates the surface microstructure of waste polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles lightweight aggregate (WPLA) to examine the effect of granulated blast-furnace slag (GBFS) on WPLA. The WPLA was made from the waste PET bottles and GBFS, and experimental tests were conducted on compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, slump, and density of waste PET bottles lightweight aggregate concrete (WPLAC). The 28-day compressive strength of WPLAC with the replacement ratio of 75% reduces about 33% compared to the control concrete in the water-cement ratio of 45%. The density of WPLAC varies from 1940 to 2260 kg/m{sup 3} by the influence of WPLA. The structural efficiency of WPLAC decreases as the replacement ratio increases. The workability of concrete with 75% WPLA improves about 123% compared to that of the normal concrete in the water-cement ratio of 53%. The adhered GBFS is able to strengthen the surface of WPLA and to narrow the transition zone owing to the reaction with calcium hydroxide.

  6. Effects of oil palm shell coarse aggregate species on high strength lightweight concrete.

    PubMed

    Yew, Ming Kun; Bin Mahmud, Hilmi; Ang, Bee Chin; Yew, Ming Chian

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of different species of oil palm shell (OPS) coarse aggregates on the properties of high strength lightweight concrete (HSLWC). Original and crushed OPS coarse aggregates of different species and age categories were investigated in this study. The research focused on two OPS species (dura and tenera), in which the coarse aggregates were taken from oil palm trees of the following age categories (3-5, 6-9, and 10-15 years old). The results showed that the workability and dry density of the oil palm shell concrete (OPSC) increase with an increase in age category of OPS species. The compressive strength of specimen CD3 increases significantly compared to specimen CT3 by 21.8%. The maximum achievable 28-day and 90-day compressive strength is 54 and 56 MPa, respectively, which is within the range for 10-15-year-old crushed dura OPS. The water absorption was determined to be within the range for good concrete for the different species of OPSC. In addition, the ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) results showed that the OPS HSLWC attain good condition at the age of 3 days. PMID:24982946

  7. Effects of Oil Palm Shell Coarse Aggregate Species on High Strength Lightweight Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Yew, Ming Kun; Bin Mahmud, Hilmi; Ang, Bee Chin; Yew, Ming Chian

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of different species of oil palm shell (OPS) coarse aggregates on the properties of high strength lightweight concrete (HSLWC). Original and crushed OPS coarse aggregates of different species and age categories were investigated in this study. The research focused on two OPS species (dura and tenera), in which the coarse aggregates were taken from oil palm trees of the following age categories (3–5, 6–9, and 10–15 years old). The results showed that the workability and dry density of the oil palm shell concrete (OPSC) increase with an increase in age category of OPS species. The compressive strength of specimen CD3 increases significantly compared to specimen CT3 by 21.8%. The maximum achievable 28-day and 90-day compressive strength is 54 and 56 MPa, respectively, which is within the range for 10–15-year-old crushed dura OPS. The water absorption was determined to be within the range for good concrete for the different species of OPSC. In addition, the ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) results showed that the OPS HSLWC attain good condition at the age of 3 days. PMID:24982946

  8. Use of plastic waste (poly-ethylene terephthalate) in asphalt concrete mixture as aggregate replacement.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Abolfazl; Ganjidoust, Hossein; Maghanaki, Amir Abedin

    2005-08-01

    One of the environmental issues in most regions of Iran is the large number of bottles made from poly-ethylene terephthalate (PET) deposited in domestic wastes and landfills. Due to the high volume of these bottles, more than 1 million m3 landfill space is needed for disposal every year. The purpose of this experimental study was to investigate the possibility of using PET waste in asphalt concrete mixes as aggregate replacement (Plastiphalt) to reduce the environmental effects of PET disposal. For this purpose the mechanical properties of plastiphalt mixes were compared with control samples. This study focused on the parameters of Marshall stability, flow, Marshall quotient (stability-to-flow ratio) and density. The waste PET used in this study was in the form of granules of about 3 mm diameter which would replace (by volume) a portion of the mineral coarse aggregates of an equal size (2.36-4.75 mm). In all prepared mixes the determined 6.6% optimum bitumen content was used. In this investigation, five different percentages of coarse aggregate replacement were used. The results showed that the aggregate replacement of 20% by volume with PET granules would result in a reduction of 2.8% in bulk compacted mix density. The value of flow in the plastiphalt mix was lower than that of the control samples. The results also showed that when PET was used as partial aggregate replacement, the corresponding Marshall stability and Marshall quotient were almost the same as for the control samples. According to most of specification requirement, these results introduce an asphalt mix that has properties that makes it suitable for practical use and furthermore, the recycling of PET for asphalt concrete roads helps alleviate an environmental problem and saves energy. PMID:16200982

  9. Observations on dedolomitization of carbonate concrete aggregates, implications for ACR and expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Prinčič, Tina; Štukovnik, Petra; Pejovnik, Stane; De Schutter, Geert; Bokan Bosiljkov, Violeta

    2013-12-15

    Some carbonate aggregates used in concrete are unstable in a high alkaline solution, which is present also in pore solution of cement binder. This paper investigates the process of dedolomitization of carbonate aggregate rocks and mortar bars. Selected aggregates, limestone and dolostone are of high purity without reactive silica involvement confirmed by the XRD and the XRF. For the process of dedolomitization the effect of various temperatures, solutions and time was examined. In this investigation, measurements of expansion, optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) and X-ray diffraction were used. Te results indicate that the process of dedolomitization occurred not only in the NaOH solution but also in the water on the mortar bar with virgin dolostone aggregate. Elevated temperature, 60 °C, increased the rate of reaction. Furthermore, the rate of reaction significantly correlates with time, which has also been confirmed through the Rietveld analysis. -- Highlights: •The dedolomitization caused no expansion. •It occurs in the dolostone aggregate without reactive silica involvement. •It has taken place already with the presence of the cement binder. •A significant alteration occurred: formation of rims, new pores and phases.

  10. Field site leaching from recycled concrete aggregates applied as sub-base material in road construction.

    PubMed

    Engelsen, Christian J; Wibetoe, Grethe; van der Sloot, Hans A; Lund, Walter; Petkovic, Gordana

    2012-06-15

    The release of major and trace elements from recycled concrete aggregates used in an asphalt covered road sub-base has been monitored for more than 4 years. A similar test field without an asphalt cover, directly exposed to air and rain, and an asphalt covered reference field with natural aggregates in the sub-base were also included in the study. It was found that the pH of the infiltration water from the road sub-base with asphalt covered concrete aggregates decreased from 12.6 to below pH 10 after 2.5 years of exposure, whereas this pH was reached within only one year for the uncovered field. Vertical temperature profiles established for the sub-base, could explain the measured infiltration during parts of the winter season. When the release of major and trace elements as function of field pH was compared with pH dependent release data measured in the laboratory, some similar pH trends were found. The field concentrations of Cd, Ni, Pb and Zn were found to be low throughout the monitoring period. During two of the winter seasons, a concentration increase of Cr and Mo was observed, possibly due to the use of de-icing salt. The concentrations of the trace constituents did not exceed Norwegian acceptance criteria for ground water and surface water Class II. PMID:22554532

  11. Bond slip detection of steel plate and concrete beams using smart aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Feng; Kong, Qingzhao; Li, Mo; Mo, Y. L.; Song, Gangbing; Fan, Feng

    2015-11-01

    The newly emerged steel plate concrete (SC), benefited from a composite effect of steel and concrete materials, has been applied to shield building and internal structures of AP1000 nuclear power plants. The detection of bond-slip between steel plate and concrete is of great importance to provide early warnings of steel plate and concrete debonding and to ensure the safety of SC structures. In this paper, an active sensing approach using smart aggregates (SAs) is developed to detect the initiation and to monitor the development of bond-slip. A SA, designed by sandwiching a fragile piezoceramic patch between protection materials, can be utilized as both actuator and sensor by taking advantage of the piezoelectricity of piezoceramic material. Two SC beams with distinct shear reinforcement ratios ≤ft({ρ }t\\right) were experimentally investigated. Based on the wavelet packet decomposition of the received signals from SAs, the initiation of bond-slip is detected, and the development of bond-slip is quantitatively monitored to better understand the structural performance of SC beams, including the stiffness and capacity. The bond-slip severities of the two SC beams are compared to study the improvement of bond-slip condition rendered by providing more shear reinforcement.

  12. How to staff for RACs.

    PubMed

    Brocato, Lori; Hirschl, Nancy; Padfield, Stanley

    2010-01-01

    To meet the challenges presented by recovery audit contractors (RACs), hospitals should perform six tasks that require appropriate investments in staff: conduct a financial risk assessment of the impact of RAC reviews on the organization; establish a RAC team and assign a coordinator; receive and fill RAC requests; track RAC activity; manage RAC appeals; analyze RAC audit outcomes. PMID:20088469

  13. Feasibility of water seepage monitoring in concrete with embedded smart aggregates by P-wave travel time measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Dujian; Liu, Tiejun; Huang, Yongchao; Zhang, Fuyao; Du, Chengcheng; Li, Bo

    2014-06-01

    Water seepage in concrete threatens the safety of marine constructions and reduces the durability of concrete structures. This note presents a smart aggregate-based monitoring method to monitor the travel time evolution of a harmonic stress wave during the water infiltrating process in concrete structures. An experimental investigation, in which two plain concrete columns were examined under different water infiltration cases, verified the validity of the proposed monitoring method. The test results show that the travel time of the harmonic stress wave is sensitive to the development of water seepage in concrete and decreases with increasing water seepage depth. The proposed active monitoring method provides an innovative approach to monitor water seepage in concrete structures.

  14. Cathodoluminescence microscopy and petrographic image analysis of aggregates in concrete pavements affected by alkali-silica reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stastna, A.; Sachlova, S.; Pertold, Z.; Prikryl, R.; Leichmann, J.

    2012-03-15

    Various microscopic techniques (cathodoluminescence, polarizing and electron microscopy) were combined with image analysis with the aim to determine a) the modal composition and degradation features within concrete, and b) the petrographic characteristics and the geological types (rocks, and their provenance) of the aggregates. Concrete samples were taken from five different portions of Highway Nos. D1, D11, and D5 (the Czech Republic). Coarse and fine aggregates were found to be primarily composed of volcanic, plutonic, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, as well as of quartz and feldspar aggregates of variable origins. The alkali-silica reaction was observed to be the main degradation mechanism, based upon the presence of microcracks and alkali-silica gels in the concrete. Use of cathodoluminescence enabled the identification of the source materials of the quartz aggregates, based upon their CL characteristics (i.e., color, intensity, microfractures, deformation, and zoning), which is difficult to distinguish only employing polarizing and electron microscopy. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASR in concrete pavements on the Highways Nos. D1, D5 and D11 (Czech Republic). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cathodoluminescence was combined with various microscopic techniques and image analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASR was attributed to aggregates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Source materials of aggregates were identified based on cathodoluminescence characteristics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quartz comes from different volcanic, plutonic and metamorphic parent rocks.

  15. Assessment of optimum threshold and particle shape parameter for the image analysis of aggregate size distribution of concrete sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozen, Murat; Guler, Murat

    2014-02-01

    Aggregate gradation is one of the key design parameters affecting the workability and strength properties of concrete mixtures. Estimating aggregate gradation from hardened concrete samples can offer valuable insights into the quality of mixtures in terms of the degree of segregation and the amount of deviation from the specified gradation limits. In this study, a methodology is introduced to determine the particle size distribution of aggregates from 2D cross sectional images of concrete samples. The samples used in the study were fabricated from six mix designs by varying the aggregate gradation, aggregate source and maximum aggregate size with five replicates of each design combination. Each sample was cut into three pieces using a diamond saw and then scanned to obtain the cross sectional images using a desktop flatbed scanner. An algorithm is proposed to determine the optimum threshold for the image analysis of the cross sections. A procedure was also suggested to determine a suitable particle shape parameter to be used in the analysis of aggregate size distribution within each cross section. Results of analyses indicated that the optimum threshold hence the pixel distribution functions may be different even for the cross sections of an identical concrete sample. Besides, the maximum ferret diameter is the most suitable shape parameter to estimate the size distribution of aggregates when computed based on the diagonal sieve opening. The outcome of this study can be of practical value for the practitioners to evaluate concrete in terms of the degree of segregation and the bounds of mixture's gradation achieved during manufacturing.

  16. Recycling of waste glass as a partial replacement for fine aggregate in concrete.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Zainab Z; Al-Hashmi, Enas A

    2009-02-01

    Waste glass creates serious environmental problems, mainly due to the inconsistency of waste glass streams. With increasing environmental pressure to reduce solid waste and to recycle as much as possible, the concrete industry has adopted a number of methods to achieve this goal. The properties of concretes containing waste glass as fine aggregate were investigated in this study. The strength properties and ASR expansion were analyzed in terms of waste glass content. An overall quantity of 80 kg of crushed waste glass was used as a partial replacement for sand at 10%, 15%, and 20% with 900 kg of concrete mixes. The results proved 80% pozzolanic strength activity given by waste glass after 28 days. The flexural strength and compressive strength of specimens with 20% waste glass content were 10.99% and 4.23%, respectively, higher than those of the control specimen at 28 days. The mortar bar tests demonstrated that the finely crushed waste glass helped reduce expansion by 66% as compared with the control mix. PMID:18848773

  17. Estimation of air void and aggregate spatial distributions in concrete under uniaxial compression using computer tomography scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.C.K. . E-mail: rckwong@ucalgary.ca; Chau, K.T.

    2005-08-01

    Normal- and high-strength concrete cylinders (designed compressive strengths of 30 and 90 MPa at 28 days) were loaded uniaxially. Computer tomography (CT) scanning technique was used to examine the evolution of air voids inside the specimens at various loading states up to 85% of the ultimate compressive strength. The normal-strength concrete yielded a very different behaviour in changes of internal microstructure as compared to the high-strength concrete. There were significant instances of nucleation and growth in air voids in the normal-strength concrete specimen, while the increase in air voids in the high-strength concrete specimen was insignificant. In addition, CT images were used for mapping the aggregate spatial distributions within the specimens. No intrinsic anisotropy was detected from the fabric analysis.

  18. Recycling ground granulated blast furnace slag as cold bonded artificial aggregate partially used in self-compacting concrete.

    PubMed

    Gesoğlu, Mehmet; Güneyisi, Erhan; Mahmood, Swara Fuad; Öz, Hatice Öznur; Mermerdaş, Kasım

    2012-10-15

    Ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS), a by-product from iron industry, was recycled as artificial coarse aggregate through cold bonding pelletization process. The artificial slag aggregates (ASA) replaced partially the natural coarse aggregates in production of self-compacting concrete (SCC). Moreover, as being one of the most widely used mineral admixtures in concrete industry, fly ash (FA) was incorporated as a part of total binder content to impart desired fluidity to SCCs. A total of six concrete mixtures having various ASA replacement levels (0%, 20%, 40%, 60%, and 100%) were designed with a water-to-binder (w/b) ratio of 0.32. Fresh properties of self-compacting concretes (SCC) were observed through slump flow time, flow diameter, V-funnel flow time, and L-box filling height ratio. Compressive strength of hardened SCCs was also determined at 28 days of curing. It was observed that increasing the replacement level of ASA resulted in decrease in the amount of superplasticizer to achieve a constant slump flow diameter. Moreover, passing ability and viscosity of SCC's enhanced with increasing the amount of ASA in the concrete. The maximum compressive strength was achieved for the SCC having 60% ASA replacement. PMID:22951223

  19. Damage Evaluation in Shear-Critical Reinforced Concrete Beam using Piezoelectric Transducers as Smart Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalioris, Constantin E.; Papadopoulos, Nikos A.; Angeli, Georgia M.; Karayannis, Chris G.; Liolios, Asterios A.; Providakis, Costas P.

    2015-10-01

    Damage detection at early cracking stages in shear-critical reinforced concrete beams, before further deterioration and their inevitable brittle shear failure is crucial for structural safety and integrity. The effectiveness of a structural health monitoring technique using the admittance measurements of piezoelectric transducers mounted on a reinforced concrete beam without shear reinforcement is experimentally investigated. Embedded "smart aggregate" transducers and externally bonded piezoelectric patches have been placed in arrays at both shear spans of the beam. Beam were tested till total shear failure and monitored at three different states; healthy, flexural cracking and diagonal cracking. Test results showed that transducers close to the critical diagonal crack provided sound and graduated discrepancies between the admittance responses at the healthy state and thedamage levels.Damage assessment using statistical indices calculated from the measurements of all transducers was also attempted. Rational changes of the index values were obtained with respect to the increase of the damage. Admittance responses and index values of the transducers located on the shear span where the critical diagonal crack formed provided cogent evidence of damage. On the contrary, negligible indication of damage was yielded by the responses of the transducers located on the other shear span, where no diagonal cracking occurred.

  20. Progressive collapse of a two-story reinforced concrete frame with embedded smart aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskar, Arghadeep; Gu, Haichang; Mo, Y. L.; Song, Gangbing

    2009-07-01

    This paper reports the experimental and analytical results of a two-story reinforced concrete frame instrumented with innovative piezoceramic-based smart aggregates (SAs) and subjected to a monotonic lateral load up to failure. A finite element model of the frame is developed and analyzed using a computer program called Open system for earthquake engineering simulation (OpenSees). The finite element analysis (FEA) is used to predict the load-deformation curve as well as the development of plastic hinges in the frame. The load-deformation curve predicted from FEA matched well with the experimental results. The sequence of development of plastic hinges in the frame is also studied from the FEA results. The locations of the plastic hinges, as obtained from the analysis, were similar to those observed during the experiment. An SA-based approach is also proposed to evaluate the health status of the concrete frame and identify the development of plastic hinges during the loading procedure. The results of the FEA are used to validate the SA-based approach for detecting the locations and occurrence of the plastic hinges leading to the progressive collapse of the frame. The locations and sequential development of the plastic hinges obtained from the SA-based approach corresponds well with the FEA results. The proposed SA-based approach, thus validated using FEA and experimental results, has a great potential to be applied in the health monitoring of large-scale civil infrastructures.

  1. Rac1 promotes chondrogenesis by regulating STAT3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoin; Sonn, Jong Kyung

    2016-09-01

    The small GTPase protein Rac1 is involved in a wide range of biological processes including cell differentiation. Previously, Rac1 was shown to promote chondrogenesis in micromass cultures of limb mesenchyme. However, the pathways mediating Rac1's role in chondrogenesis are not fully understood. This study aimed to explore the molecular mechanisms by which Rac1 regulates chondrogenic differentiation. Phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) was increased as chondrogenesis proceeded in micromass cultures of chick wing bud mesenchyme. Inhibition of Rac1 with NSC23766, janus kinase 2 (JAK2) with AG490, or STAT3 with stattic inhibited chondrogenesis and reduced phosphorylation of STAT3. Conversely, overexpression of constitutively active Rac1 (Rac L61) increased phosphorylation of STAT3. Rac L61 expression resulted in increased expression of interleukin 6 (IL-6), and treatment with IL-6 increased phosphorylation of STAT3. NSC23766, AG490, and stattic prohibited cell aggregation, whereas expression of Rac L61 increased cell aggregation, which was reduced by stattic treatment. Our studies indicate that Rac1 induces STAT3 activation through expression and action of IL-6. Overexpression of Rac L61 increased expression of bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4). BMP4 promoted chondrogenesis, which was inhibited by K02288, an activin receptor-like kinase-2 inhibitor, and increased phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase. Overexpression of Rac L61 also increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, which was reduced by K02288. These results suggest that Rac1 activates STAT3 by expression of IL-6, which in turn increases expression and activity of BMP4, leading to the promotion of chondrogenesis. PMID:27306109

  2. High performance of treated and washed MSWI bottom ash granulates as natural aggregate replacement within earth-moist concrete.

    PubMed

    Keulen, A; van Zomeren, A; Harpe, P; Aarnink, W; Simons, H A E; Brouwers, H J H

    2016-03-01

    Municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash was treated with specially designed dry and wet treatment processes, obtaining high quality bottom ash granulate fractions (BGF) suitable for up to 100% replacement of natural gravel in concrete. The wet treatment (using only water for separating and washing) significantly lowers the leaching of e.g. chloride and sulfate, heavy metals (antimony, molybdenum and copper) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Two potential bottom ash granulate fractions, both in compliance with the standard EN 12620 (aggregates for concrete), were added into earth-moist concrete mixtures. The fresh and hardened concrete physical performances (e.g. workability, strength and freeze-thaw) of high strength concrete mixtures were maintained or improved compared with the reference mixtures, even after replacing up to 100% of the initial natural gravel. Final element leaching of monolithic and crushed granular state BGF containing concretes, showed no differences with the gravel references. Leaching of all mixtures did not exceed the limit values set by the Dutch Soil Quality Degree. In addition, multiple-life-phase emission (pH static test) for the critical elements of input bottom ash, bottom ash granulate (BGF) and crushed BGF containing concrete were assessed. Simulation pH lowering or potential carbonation processes indicated that metal (antimony, barium, chrome and copper) and sulfate element leaching behavior are mainly pH dominated and controlled, although differ in mechanism and related mineral abundance. PMID:26856445

  3. Impact load-induced micro-structural damage and micro-structure associated mechanical response of concrete made with different surface roughness and porosity aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Erdem, Savas Dawson, Andrew Robert; Thom, Nicholas Howard

    2012-02-15

    The relationship between the nature of micro damage under impact loading and changes in mechanical behavior associated with different microstructures is studied for concretes made with two different coarse aggregates having significant differences mainly in roughness and porosity - sintered fly ash and uncrushed gravel. A range of techniques including X-ray diffraction, digital image analysis, mercury porosimetry, X-ray computed tomography, laser surface profilometry and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the aggregates and micro-structures. The concrete prepared with lightweight aggregates was stronger in compression than the gravel aggregate concrete due to enhanced hydration as a result of internal curing. In the lightweight concrete, it was deduced that an inhomogeneous micro-structure led to strain incompatibilities and consequent localized stress concentrations in the mix, leading to accelerated failure. The pore structure, compressibility, and surface texture of the aggregates are of paramount importance for the micro-cracking growth.

  4. Coniston Dam: The rehabiliation of a 50-year-old concrete dam affected by alkali aggregate reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Read, P.H.; Thomas, M.

    1995-12-31

    This paper discusses the rehabilitation of the Coniston main dam in Ontario, with particular emphasis on the alkali-aggregate reaction (AAR) related aspects of the investigation and the influence of these on the design approach adopted, including measures taken to allow for possible future expansion of the original gravity section concrete. The rehabilitation program was primarily undertaken to increase the stability of the gravity sections and log chute which did not meet current dam safety criteria. However, all parts of the structure were found to be affected by AAR and the downstream face of the gravity sections were severely deteriorated due to the combined effects of AAR and freeze-thaw cycles. Field and laboratory investigations were undertaken to determine the extent of deterioration of the dam structures and to assess the potential for continued deterioration. Based on the findings from these studies, a rehabilitation and upgrade strategy was developed which included removal of badly deteriorated concrete, placement of reinforced concrete liners (upstream and downstream), addition of mass concrete buttresses along the length of the gravity sections, replacement of the deck and epoxy injection of the cracked sluiceway piers. Particular attention was paid to the design of the new concrete mixes (to limit the supply of alkalis to the existing concrete) and to the relief of stress between the original concrete core and new concrete liners. The new gravity section liner was debonded from the core concrete to reduce the transfer of stress due to continued expansion of the core; furthermore, the reinforcement of the liner was designed to resist tensile stresses induced by future expansion. Consideration was also given to minimizing the ingress of water to the dam core in order to reduce the degree of saturation and likelihood of further AAR and freeze-thaw action.

  5. The Properties and Characteristics of Concretes Containing Calcium Carbonate (CaCO3) and Synthetic Lightweight Aggregate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Matthew J.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of precipitated calcium carbonate as a means for enhancing the mechanical and environmental favorability of concretes containing synthetic lightweight aggregates (SLA), which are comprised of recycled mixed plastic and fly ash. Compressive strength tests show that 2% calcium carbonate additions are able to mitigate strength decreases induced by SLA as well as decrease concrete density when compared to NWA concretes. SLA concretes containing 5% calcium carbonate do not show the same trend. Instead, strength decreases and density increases are observed. Furthermore, increases in aluminum trisulphate (AFt) phase mineralization are observed through scanning electron microscopy. Results suggest that calcium carbonate additions increase early hydration and stabilize AFt minerals thaumasite and ettringite throughout hydration. It is proposed that increased AFt phase mineralization causes reductions in concrete density. However, a limit to this relationship was observed as additions of greater than 2% calcium carbonate exceed the potential for increased hydration, causing a threshold effect that resulted in calcium carbonate acting as filler, which increases density. Improved mechanical properties and the ability to stabilize waste plastics, fly ash, and CO2 emissions make the use of 2% calcium carbonate in conjunction with SLA a favorable alternative to ordinary concretes.

  6. Properties of concrete made with north carolina recycled coarse and fine aggregates. Final report, 1 July 1994-30 June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, S.H.; Fisher, D.G.; Sackett, K.W.

    1996-06-30

    Reconstruction of roadways generates large quantities of waste material and requires considerable amounts of aggregate. The recycling of concrete from old deteriorated pavements into aggregates for construction of new pavements reduces disposal costs as well as providing a source of aggregates to replace natural supplies. In this study, recycled coarse and fine aggregates were obtained from a portion of concrete pavement which was removed from Interstate 40 in North Carolina. Various amounts of recycled coarse and fine aggregates were volumerically substituted for natural coarse and fine aggregates of a control mixture. A relatively higher cement factor was used for the control mix, compared to NCDOT standard. The effects on plastic and hardened concrete properties were investigated.

  7. Insulating polymer concrete. [Perlite or glass nodule aggregates bound together with a polyester resin

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, J.J.

    1984-04-01

    An insulating polymer concrete (IPC) composite has been developed under contract to the Gas Research Institute for possible use as a dike insulation material at Liquid Natural Gas (LNG) storage facilities. In the advent of an LNG spill into the impounding dike area, the boiloff rate of the LNG can be substantially reduced if the surfaces of the dike are insulated. This increased safety at the LNG facility will tend to reduce the hazardous explosive mixture with atmospheric air in the surrounding region. The dike insulation material must have a low thermal conductivity and be unaffected by environmental conditions. The IPC composites developed consist of perlite or glass nodule aggregates bound together as a closed cell structure with a polyester resin. In addition to low thermal conductivity and porosity, these composites have correspondingly high strengths and, therefore, can carry transient loads of workmen and maintenance equipment. Prefabricated IPC panels have been installed experimentally and at least one utility is currently considering a complete installation at its LNG facility. 4 references, 8 tables.

  8. Identification of microstructural characteristics in lightweight aggregate concretes by micromechanical modelling including the interfacial transition zone (ITZ)

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Y.; Ortola, S.; Beaucour, A.L.; Dumontet, H.

    2010-11-15

    An approach which combines both experimental techniques and micromechanical modelling is developed in order to characterise the elastic behaviour of lightweight aggregate concretes (LWAC). More than three hundred LWAC specimens with various lightweight aggregate types (5) of several volume ratios and three different mortar matrices (normal, HP, VHP) are tested. The modelling is based on iterative homogenisation process and includes the ITZ specificities experimentally observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In agreement with experimental measurements, the effects of mix design parameters as well as of the interfacial transition zone (ITZ) on concrete mechanical performances are quantitatively analysed. Confrontations with experimental results allow identifying the elastic moduli of LWA which are difficult to determine experimentally. Whereas the traditional empirical formulas are not sufficiently precise, predictions of LWAC elastic behaviours computed with the micromechanical models appear in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  9. Dynamic testing of concrete under high confined pressure. Influence of saturation ratio and aggregate size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forquin, P.; Piotrowska, E.; Gary, G.

    2015-09-01

    Concrete structures can be exposed to intense pressure loadings such as projectile-impact or detonation near a concrete structural element. To investigate the mechanical behaviour of concrete under high confining pressure, dynamic quasi-oedometric compression tests have been performed with a large diameter (80 mm) Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus. The concrete sample is placed within a steel confining ring and compressed along its axial direction. Hydrostatic pressures as high as 800 MPa and axial strain of about - 10% are reached during the tests. In the present work, experiments have been conducted on two types of concrete: MB50 microconcrete with a maximum grain size of 2 mm and R30A7 ordinary concrete of maximum grain size about 8 mm. Both concretes are tested in dry or saturated conditions. According to these dynamic experiments it is noted that grain size has a small influence whereas water content has a strong effect on the confined behaviour of concrete.

  10. Effects of extraction methods and factors on leaching of metals from recycled concrete aggregates.

    PubMed

    Bestgen, Janile O; Cetin, Bora; Tanyu, Burak F

    2016-07-01

    Leaching of metals (calcium (Ca), chromium (Cr), copper, (Cu), iron (Fe), and zinc (Zn)) of recycled concrete aggregates (RCAs) were investigated with four different leachate extraction methods (batch water leach tests (WLTs), toxicity leaching procedure test (TCLP), synthetic precipitation leaching procedure test (SPLP), and pH-dependent leach tests). WLTs were also used to perform a parametric study to evaluate factors including (i) effects of reaction time, (ii) atmosphere, (iii) liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio, and (iv) particle size of RCA. The results from WLTs showed that reaction time and exposure to atmosphere had impact on leaching behavior of metals. An increase in L/S ratio decreased the effluent pH and all metal concentrations. Particle size of the RCA had impact on some metals but not all. Comparison of the leached concentrations of metals from select RCA samples with WLT method to leached concentrations from TCLP and SPLP methods revealed significant differences. For the same RCA samples, the highest metal concentrations were obtained with TCLP method, followed by WLT and SPLP methods. However, in all tests, the concentrations of all four (Cr, Cu, Fe, and Zn) metals were below the regulatory limits determined by EPA MCLs in all tests with few exceptions. pH-dependent batch water leach tests revealed that leaching pattern for Ca is more cationic whereas for other metals showed more amphoteric. The results obtained from the pH-dependent tests were evaluated with geochemical modeling (MINTEQA2) to estimate the governing leaching mechanisms for different metals. The results indicated that the releases of the elements were solubility-controlled except Cr. PMID:26996910

  11. Investigation of Self Consolidating Concrete Containing High Volume of Supplementary Cementitious Materials and Recycled Asphalt Pavement Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patibandla, Varun chowdary

    The use of sustainable technologies such as supplementary cementitiuous materials (SCMs), and/or recycled materials is expected to positively affect the performance of concrete mixtures. However, it is important to study and qualify such mixtures and check if the required specifications of their intended application are met before they can be implemented in practice. This study presents the results of a laboratory investigation of Self Consolidating concrete (SCC) containing sustainable technologies. A total of twelve concrete mixtures were prepared with various combinations of fly ash, slag, and recycled asphalt pavement (RAP). The mixtures were divided into three groups with constant water to cementitiuous materials ratio of 0.37, and based on the RAP content; 0, 25, and 50% of coarse aggregate replaced by RAP. All mixtures were prepared to achieve a target slump flow equal to or higher than 500 mm (24in). A control mixture for each group was prepared with 100% Portland cement whereas all other mixtures were designed to have up to 70% of portland cement replaced by a combination of supplementary cementitiuous materials (SCMs) such as class C fly ash and granulated blast furnace slag. The properties of fresh concrete investigated in this study include flowability, deformability; filling capacity, and resistance to segregation. In addition, the compressive strength at 3, 14, and 28 days, the tensile strength, and the unrestrained shrinkage up to 80 days was also investigated. As expected the inclusion of the sustainable technologies affected both fresh and hardened concrete properties. Analysis of the experimental data indicated that inclusion of RAP not only reduces the ultimate strength, but it also affected the compressive strength development rate. Moreover, several mixes satisfied compressive strength requirements for pavements and bridges; those mixes included relatively high percentages of SCMs and RAP. Based on the results obtained in this study, it is not

  12. The Method of Evaluation and Implementation of the Non-destructive Test on Aggregate denuded Concrete Structure for Irrigation and Drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Hidehiko; Sato, Shushi; Hattori, Kunio

    The surfaces of the servicing concrete structure for irrigation and drainage have the denuding aggregates. Various diagnoses can't be done properly by the test method for ultrasonic pulse velocity, because close adhesion between pulse terminal and aggregate denuded concrete surface is insufficient. In this research, the solution of this problem by coating method that mediated material is applied to the concrete was examined. As a result, the ultrarapid hardening cement and the epoxy clay were suitable as a mediated material, and the method to evaluate ultrasonic pulse velocity of the coated concrete by the mediated material were clarified. Moreover, the method to evaluate rebound number and impact points of the coated concrete by the mediated material was recommended.

  13. Hyrdo-Quebec`s experience using deep slot cutting to rehabilitate concrete gravity dams affected by alkali-aggregate reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Veilleux, M.

    1995-12-31

    In recent years, Hydro-Qu{acute e}bec has cut vertical slots in concrete dams to solve structural problems stemming from aging of concrete subject to thermal cycles and alkali-aggregate reaction (AAR). In most cases, the structural disorders caused large cracks and permanent displacement. This paper describes Hydro-Qu{acute e}bec`s experience using a new slot-cutting and sealing technology to rehabilitate concrete gravity dams affected by AAR, among them rehabilitation of the Paugan (1991), La Tuque (1992-1993), Rapides Farmers (1993-1994) and Chelsea (1994) hydroelectric developments. The aim of this technology is to relieve internal stress and to create an effective expansion joint which can accommodate reversible and irreversible displacement induced by thermal cycles as well as permanent movement due to chemical concrete swelling caused by AAR. This method of rehabilitation is generally used in conjunction with grouting and drainage work and sometimes with post-tensioned anchor rods or cables.

  14. Aggregate-cement paste transition zone properties affecting the salt-frost damage of high-performance concretes

    SciTech Connect

    Cwirzen, Andrzej; Penttala, Vesa

    2005-04-01

    The influence of the cement paste-aggregate interfacial transition zone (ITZ) on the frost durability of high-performance silica fume concrete (HPSFC) has been studied. Investigation was carried out on eight non-air-entrained concretes having water-to-binder (W/B) ratios of 0.3, 0.35 and 0.42 and different additions of condensed silica fume. Studies on the microstructure and composition of the cement paste have been made by means of environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM)-BSE, ESEM-EDX and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) analysis. The results showed that the transition zone initiates and accelerates damaging mechanisms by enhancing movement of the pore solution within the concrete during freezing and thawing cycles. Cracks filled with ettringite were primarily formed in the ITZ. The test concretes having good frost-deicing salt durability featured a narrow transition zone and a decreased Ca/Si atomic ratio in the transition zone compared to the bulk cement paste. Moderate additions of silica fume seemed to densify the microstructure of the ITZ.

  15. Radiation attenuation and nuclear properties of high density concrete made with steel aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashter, I. I.

    The fast neutron and gamma ray spectra measured behind different thickness of steel scrap concrete with density of 4 g/cm3 have been studied. The mix proportions by weight of this type of concrete were 1 cement: 6.89 steel scrap: 2.9 sand and 0.5 Water. Comparison with a standard ordinary concrete of density 2.3 g/cm3 have been carried out. The measurements were made using a collimated beam of both gamma rays and neutrons emitted from one of the horizontal channel of the Egyptian Research Reactor-1. A fast neutron and gamma ray spectrometer with a stilbene crystal was used to measure the spectra of fast neutrons and gamma rays. Pulse shape discrimination using the zero cross over technique was used to separate the photon pulses from the electron pulses. The equation due to Schmidt has been modified and applied for determining the neutron effective removal cross sections (˜R) for steel scrap, ordinary, hematite-serpentine, ilmenite-limonite and ilmenite concretes. This equation gives results which are in good agreement with the measured values. The derived empirical equation in a previous work to calculate the neutron integral flux behind different thicknesses of different types of concretes, gives good results for steel scrap concrete under investigation comparing with the corresponding experimental data. Total neutron macroscopic cross sections, linear attenuation coefficients for gamma rays and the half-value layers for both radiations at different energies have been obtained for steel scrap concrete and comparing with the corresponding values of ordinary concrete. The results show that steel scrap concrete is better than ordinary, hematite-serpentine, ilmenite-limonite and ilmenite concretes from the radiation shielding point of view.

  16. Investigation of the effect of aggregates' morphology on concrete creep properties by numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lavergne, F.; Sab, K.; Sanahuja, J.; Bornert, M.; Toulemonde, C.

    2015-05-15

    Prestress losses due to creep of concrete is a matter of interest for long-term operations of nuclear power plants containment buildings. Experimental studies by Granger (1995) have shown that concretes with similar formulations have different creep behaviors. The aim of this paper is to numerically investigate the effect of size distribution and shape of elastic inclusions on the long-term creep of concrete. Several microstructures with prescribed size distribution and spherical or polyhedral shape of inclusions are generated. By using the 3D numerical homogenization procedure for viscoelastic microstructures proposed by Šmilauer and Bažant (2010), it is shown that the size distribution and shape of inclusions have no measurable influence on the overall creep behavior. Moreover, a mean-field estimate provides close predictions. An Interfacial Transition Zone was introduced according to the model of Nadeau (2003). It is shown that this feature of concrete's microstructure can explain differences between creep behaviors.

  17. Chapter K: Progress in the Evaluation of Alkali-Aggregate Reaction in Concrete Construction in the Pacific Northwest, United States and Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shrimer, Fred H.

    2005-01-01

    The supply of aggregates suitable for use in construction and maintenance of infrastructure in western North America is a continuing concern to the engineering and resources-management community. Steady population growth throughout the region has fueled demand for high-quality aggregates, in the face of rapid depletion of existing aggregate resources and slow and difficult permitting of new sources of traditional aggregate types. In addition to these challenges, the requirement for aggregates to meet various engineering standards continues to increase. In addition to their physical-mechanical properties, other performance characteristics of construction aggregates specifically depend on their mineralogy and texture. These properties can result in deleterious chemical reactions when aggregate is used in concrete mixes. When this chemical reaction-termed 'alkali-aggregate reaction' (AAR)-occurs, it can pose a major problem for concrete structures, reducing their service life and requiring expensive repair or even replacement of the concrete. AAR is thus to be avoided in order to promote the longevity of concrete structures and to ensure that public moneys invested in infrastructure are well spent. Because the AAR phenomenon is directly related to the mineral composition, texture, and petrogenesis of the rock particles that make up aggregates, an understanding of the relation between the geology and the performance of aggregates in concrete is important. In the Pacific Northwest, some aggregates have a moderate to high AAR potential, but many others have no or only a low AAR potential. Overall, AAR is not as widespread or serious a problem in the Pacific Northwest as in other regions of North America. The identification of reactive aggregates in the Pacific Northwest and the accurate prediction of their behavior in concrete continue to present challenges for the assessment and management of geologic resources to the owners and operators of pits and quarries and to the

  18. Multi-scale finite element analysis of chloride diffusion in concrete incorporating paste/aggregate ITZs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li; Guo, XiaoMing; Mi, ChangWen

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a concurrent multi-scale finite element (FE) model coupling equations of the degree of freedoms of meso-scale model of ITZs and macroscopic model of bulk pastes. The multi-scale model is subsequently implemented and integrated into ABAQUS resulting in easy application to complex concrete structures. A few benchmark numerical examples are performed to test both the accuracy and efficiency of the developed model in analyzing chloride diffusion in concrete. These examples clearly demonstrate that high diffusivity of ITZs, primarily because of its porous microstructure, tends to accelerate chloride penetration along concentration gradient. The proposed model provides new guidelines for the durability analysis of concrete structures under adverse operating conditions.

  19. A Study on Suitability of EAF Oxidizing Slag in Concrete: An Eco-Friendly and Sustainable Replacement for Natural Coarse Aggregate.

    PubMed

    Sekaran, Alan; Palaniswamy, Murthi; Balaraju, Sivagnanaprakash

    2015-01-01

    Environmental and economic factors increasingly encourage higher utility of industrial by-products. The basic objective of this study was to identify alternative source for good quality aggregates which is depleting very fast due to fast pace of construction activities in India. EAF oxidizing slag as a by-product obtained during the process in steel making industry provides great opportunity to utilize it as an alternative to normally available coarse aggregates. The primary aim of this research was to evaluate the physical, mechanical, and durability properties of concrete made with EAF oxidizing slag in addition to supplementary cementing material fly ash. This study presents the experimental investigations carried out on concrete grades of M20 and M30 with three mixes: (i) Mix A, conventional concrete mix with no material substitution, (ii) Mix B, 30% replacement of cement with fly ash, and (iii) Mix C, 30% replacement of cement with fly ash and 50% replacement of coarse aggregate with EAF oxidizing slag. Tests were conducted to determine mechanical and durability properties up to the age of 90 days. The test results concluded that concrete made with EAF oxidizing slag and fly ash (Mix C) had greater strength and durability characteristics when compared to Mix A and Mix B. Based on the overall observations, it could be recommended that EAF oxidizing slag and fly ash could be effectively utilized as coarse aggregate replacement and cement replacement in all concrete applications. PMID:26421315

  20. Mineralogical and chemical assessment of concrete damaged by the oxidation of sulfide-bearing aggregates: Importance of thaumasite formation on reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, A.; Duchesne, J.; Fournier, B.; Durand, B.; Rivard, P.; Shehata, M.

    2012-10-15

    Damages in concrete containing sulfide-bearing aggregates were recently observed in the Trois-Rivieres area (Quebec, Canada), characterized by rapid deterioration within 3 to 5 years after construction. A petrographic examination of concrete core samples was carried out using a combination of tools including: stereomicroscopic evaluation, polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analysis. The aggregate used to produce concrete was an intrusive igneous rock with different metamorphism degrees and various proportions of sulfide minerals. In the rock, sulfide minerals were often surrounded by a thin layer of carbonate minerals (siderite). Secondary reaction products observed in the damaged concrete include 'rust' mineral forms (e.g. ferric oxyhydroxides such as goethite, limonite (FeO (OH) nH{sub 2}O) and ferrihydrite), gypsum, ettringite and thaumasite. In the presence of water and oxygen, pyrrhotite oxidizes to form iron oxyhydroxides and sulphuric acid. The acid then reacts with the phases of the cement paste/aggregate and provokes the formation of sulfate minerals. Understanding both mechanisms, oxidation and internal sulfate attack, is important to be able to duplicate the damaging reaction in laboratory conditions, thus allowing the development of a performance test for evaluating the potential for deleterious expansion in concrete associated with sulfide-bearing aggregates.

  1. A Study on Suitability of EAF Oxidizing Slag in Concrete: An Eco-Friendly and Sustainable Replacement for Natural Coarse Aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Sekaran, Alan; Palaniswamy, Murthi; Balaraju, Sivagnanaprakash

    2015-01-01

    Environmental and economic factors increasingly encourage higher utility of industrial by-products. The basic objective of this study was to identify alternative source for good quality aggregates which is depleting very fast due to fast pace of construction activities in India. EAF oxidizing slag as a by-product obtained during the process in steel making industry provides great opportunity to utilize it as an alternative to normally available coarse aggregates. The primary aim of this research was to evaluate the physical, mechanical, and durability properties of concrete made with EAF oxidizing slag in addition to supplementary cementing material fly ash. This study presents the experimental investigations carried out on concrete grades of M20 and M30 with three mixes: (i) Mix A, conventional concrete mix with no material substitution, (ii) Mix B, 30% replacement of cement with fly ash, and (iii) Mix C, 30% replacement of cement with fly ash and 50% replacement of coarse aggregate with EAF oxidizing slag. Tests were conducted to determine mechanical and durability properties up to the age of 90 days. The test results concluded that concrete made with EAF oxidizing slag and fly ash (Mix C) had greater strength and durability characteristics when compared to Mix A and Mix B. Based on the overall observations, it could be recommended that EAF oxidizing slag and fly ash could be effectively utilized as coarse aggregate replacement and cement replacement in all concrete applications. PMID:26421315

  2. The influence of coarse aggregate size and volume on the fracture behavior and brittleness of self-compacting concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Beygi, Morteza H.A.; Kazemi, Mohammad Taghi; Nikbin, Iman M.; Vaseghi Amiri, Javad; Rabbanifar, Saeed; Rahmani, Ebrahim

    2014-12-15

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation on fracture characteristics and brittleness of self-compacting concrete (SCC), involving the tests of 185 three point bending beams with different coarse aggregate size and content. Generally, the parameters were analyzed by the work of fracture method (WFM) and the size effect method (SEM). The results showed that with increase of size and content of coarse aggregate, (a) the fracture energy increases which is due to the change in fractal dimensions, (b) behavior of SCC beams approaches strength criterion, (c) characteristic length, which is deemed as an index of brittleness, increases linearly. It was found with decrease of w/c ratio that fracture energy increases which may be explained by the improvement in structure of aggregate-paste transition zone. Also, the results showed that there is a correlation between the fracture energy measured by WFM (G{sub F}) and the value measured through SEM (G{sub f}) (G{sub F} = 3.11G{sub f})

  3. Mechanical properties and microstructure analysis of fly ash geopolymeric recycled concrete.

    PubMed

    Shi, X S; Collins, F G; Zhao, X L; Wang, Q Y

    2012-10-30

    Six mixtures with different recycled aggregate (RA) replacement ratios of 0%, 50% and 100% were designed to manufacture recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) and alkali-activated fly ash geopolymeric recycled concrete (GRC). The physical and mechanical properties were investigated indicating different performances from each other. Optical microscopy under transmitted light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were carried out in this study in order to identify the mechanism underlying the effects of the geopolymer and RA on concrete properties. The features of aggregates, paste and interfacial transition zone (ITZ) were compared and discussed. Experimental results indicate that using alkali-activated fly ash geopolymer as replacement of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) effectively improved the compressive strength. With increasing of RA contents in both RAC and GRC, the compressive strength decreased gradually. The microstructure analysis shows that, on one hand, the presence of RA weakens the strength of the aggregates and the structure of ITZs; on the other hand, due to the alkali-activated fly ash in geopolymer concrete, the contents of Portlandite (Ca(OH)(2)) and voids were reduced, as well as improved the matrix homogeneity. The microstructure of GRC was changed by different reaction products, such as aluminosilicate gel. PMID:22954605

  4. The Value Compressive Strength and Split Tensile Strength on Concrete Mixture With Expanded Polystyrene Coated by Surfactant Span 80 as a Partial Substitution of Fine Aggregate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Irpan; Siauwantara, Alice

    2014-03-01

    The value of the density normal concrete which ranges between 2200-2400 kg/m3. Therefore the use of Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) as a subitute to fine aggregate can reduce the density of concrete. The purpose this research is to reduce the density of normal concrete but increase compressive strength of EPS concrete, with use surfactant as coating for the EPS. Variables of substitution percentage of EPS and EPS coated by surfactant are 5%,10%,15%,20%,25%. Method of concrete mix design based on SNI 03-2834-2000 "Tata Cara Pembuatan Rencana Campuran Beton Normal (Provisions for Proportioning Normal Concrete Mixture)". The result of testing, every increase percentage of EPS substitution will decrease the compressive strength around 1,74 MPa and decrease density 34,03 kg/m3. Using Surfactant as coating of EPS , compressive strength increase from the EPS's compressive strength. Average of increasing compressive strength 0,19 MPa and increase the density 20,03 kg/m3,average decrease of the tensile split strength EPS coated surfaktan is 0,84 MPa.

  5. Evaluation of laboratory test method for determining the potential alkali contribution from aggregate and the ASR safety of the Three-Gorges dam concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Duyou . E-mail: duyoulu@njut.edu.cn; Zhou, Xiaoling; Xu Zhongzi; Lan Xianghui; Tang Mingshu; Fournier, Benoit

    2006-06-15

    The releasable alkali from granite, which was used in the Three-Gorges concrete dam project in China, and from gneiss and feldspar was estimated by extraction in distilled water and super-saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solution. Results show that: i) the finer the particles and the higher the temperature, the greater and faster the release of alkali; ii) compared with extraction by distilled water, super-saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solution had a stronger activation on feldspar than on granite and gneiss; iii) for the three rocks tested, thermal activation had the largest effect on gneiss and a lower and similar effect on granite and feldspar. For very fine particles, temperature had a similar effect on the release of alkali by all three rocks. Because the aggregate used in the Three-Gorges dam concrete is non-reactive and a low calcium fly ash was used in the concrete, ASR would not be an issue for the dam, despite the release of alkali from the aggregate into the concrete.

  6. Simultaneous and independent tuning of RhoA and Rac1 activity with orthogonally inducible promoters

    PubMed Central

    MacKay, Joanna L.

    2014-01-01

    The GTPases RhoA and Rac1 are key regulators of cell spreading, adhesion, and migration, and they exert distinct effects on the actin cytoskeleton. While RhoA classically stimulates stress fiber assembly and contraction, Rac1 promotes branched actin polymerization and membrane protrusion. These competing influences are reinforced by antagonistic crosstalk between RhoA and Rac1, which has complicated efforts to identify the specific mechanisms by which each GTPase regulates cell behavior. We therefore wondered whether RhoA and Rac1 are intrinsically coupled or whether they can be manipulated independently. To address this question, we placed constitutively active (CA) RhoA under a doxycycline-inducible promoter and CA Rac1 under an orthogonal cumate-inducible promoter, and we stably introduced both constructs into glioblastoma cells. We found that doxycycline addition increased RhoA activity without altering Rac1 and similarly cumate addition increased Rac1 activity without altering RhoA. Furthermore, co-expression of both mutants enabled high activation of RhoA and Rac1 simultaneously. When cells were cultured on collagen hydrogels, RhoA activation prevented cell spreading and motility, whereas Rac1 activation stimulated migration and dynamic cell protrusions. Interestingly, high activation of both GTPases induced a third phenotype, in which cells migrated at intermediate speeds similar to control cells but also aggregated into large, contractile clusters. In addition, we demonstrate dynamic and reversible switching between high RhoA and high Rac1 phenotypes. Overall, this approach represents a unique way to access different combinations of RhoA and Rac1 activity levels in a single cell and may serve as a valuable tool for multiplexed dissection and control of mechanobiological signals. PMID:25044255

  7. The cause and influence of self-cementing properties of fine recycled concrete aggregates on the properties of unbound sub-base

    SciTech Connect

    Poon, C.-S. . E-mail: cecspoon@polyu.edu.hk; Qiao, X.C.; Chan, Dixon

    2006-07-01

    The use of coarse recycled concrete aggregates (CRCA) in conjunction with fine recycled concrete aggregates (FRCA) as sub-base materials has been widely studied. Although research results indicate that it is feasible to employ both CRCA and FRCA as granular sub-base, the influence of the unhydrated cement in the adhered mortar of the RCA on the properties of the sub-base materials has not been thoroughly studied. Generally, it is known that the strength of the sub-base materials prepared with RCA increases over time. However, this mechanism, known as the self-cementing properties, is not well understood and is believed to be governed by the properties of the fine portion of the RCA (<5 mm). This paper presents an investigation on the cause of the self-cementing properties by measuring X-ray diffraction patterns, pH values, compressive strength and permeability of various size fractions of the FRCA obtained from a commercially operated construction and demolition waste recycling plant. Their influence on the overall sub-base materials was determined. The results indicate that the size fractions of <0.15 and 0.3-0.6 mm (active fractions) were most likely to be the principal cause of the self-cementing properties of the FRCA. However, the effects on the properties of the overall RCA sub-base materials were minimal if the total quantity of the active fractions was limited to a threshold by weight of the total fine aggregate.

  8. The cause and influence of self-cementing properties of fine recycled concrete aggregates on the properties of unbound sub-base.

    PubMed

    Poon, Chi-Sun; Qiao, X C; Chan, Dixon

    2006-01-01

    The use of coarse recycled concrete aggregates (CRCA) in conjunction with fine recycled concrete aggregates (FRCA) as sub-base materials has been widely studied. Although research results indicate that it is feasible to employ both CRCA and FRCA as granular sub-base, the influence of the unhydrated cement in the adhered mortar of the RCA on the properties of the sub-base materials has not been thoroughly studied. Generally, it is known that the strength of the sub-base materials prepared with RCA increases over time. However, this mechanism, known as the self-cementing properties, is not well understood and is believed to be governed by the properties of the fine portion of the RCA (<5mm). This paper presents an investigation on the cause of the self-cementing properties by measuring X-ray diffraction patterns, pH values, compressive strength and permeability of various size fractions of the FRCA obtained from a commercially operated construction and demolition waste recycling plant. Their influence on the overall sub-base materials was determined. The results indicate that the size fractions of <0.15 and 0.3-0.6mm (active fractions) were most likely to be the principal cause of the self-cementing properties of the FRCA. However, the effects on the properties of the overall RCA sub-base materials were minimal if the total quantity of the active fractions was limited to a threshold by weight of the total fine aggregate. PMID:16488593

  9. Applicability of the DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide) aggregate degradation test to determine moisture-induced distress in asphalt-concrete mixes. Final report, June 1986-June 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Heinicke, J.J.; Vinson, T.S.; Wilson, J.E.

    1987-06-01

    A laboratory investigation was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the dimethyl sulfoxide accelerated weathering test (DMSO test) to predict moisture-induced distress in asphalt-concrete mixtures. Asphalt-concrete specimens were fabricated using aggregates from three quarries. The specimens were conditioned using vacuum saturation and a series of five freeze/thaw cycles. The resilient modulus (M{sub r}) was obtained before and after each conditioning cycle and the Index of Retained Resilient Modulus (IRM{sub r}) was determined. The results indicate the DMSO test may be used to identify the potential for moisture-induced distress in asphalt-concrete mixtures. However, no correlation was determined between the DMSO test results and the IRM{sub r} or fatigue life test results. The strain and temperature dependencies of the M{sub r} were determined for a dense-graded asphalt-concrete mixture. It was concluded that constant stress testing may result in a misinterpretation of the IRM{sub r} and tests conducted within the currently accepted temperature range may result in a plus or minus 20% deviation in the IRM{sub r}. In an accompanying analytical program, the effect of diametral test boundary conditions on the measured value of M{sub r} was evaluated using two- and three-dimensional finite element models. The results indicate that the resilient modulus diametral test is adequately represented by elastic theory and an assumed plane stress condition.

  10. The prediction of the freeze/thaw durability of coarse aggregate in concrete by mercury intrusion porosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, M. N.

    1980-10-01

    Aggregates from fifty-two Indiana highway cores were tested as were five rock samples supplied by the Portland Cement Association. The Expected Durability Factor values were determined from the pore size distributions, and an average value was assigned to each pavement associated with the cores. These values were then compared with the field performance of the pavement to ascertain the borderline between EDF values for durable and for nondurable aggregates. A good correlation between the field performance and the average EDF values was found. A pavement will be durable if its coarse aggregate has an EDF value greater than 50 for 90% or more of the aggregate. This criterion applies to stone and gravel aggregates with a maximum size of 1-1/2 to 2-1/2 inches. The pavement will be durable for at lest thirty years.

  11. Cooperation of distinct Rac-dependent pathways to stabilise E-cadherin adhesion.

    PubMed

    Erasmus, Jennifer C; Welsh, Natalie J; Braga, Vania M M

    2015-09-01

    The precise mechanisms via which Rac1 is activated by cadherin junctions are not fully known. In keratinocytes Rac1 activation by cadherin junctions requires EGFR signalling, but how EGFR does so is unclear. To address which activator could mediate E-cadherin signalling to Rac1, we investigated EGFR and two Rac1 GEFs, SOS1 and DOCK180. EGFR RNAi prevented junction-induced Rac1 activation and led to fragmented localization of E-cadherin at cadherin contacts. In contrast, depletion of another EGFR family member, ErbB3, did not interfere with either process. DOCK180 RNAi, but not SOS1, prevented E-cadherin-induced Rac1 activation. However, in a strong divergence from EGFR RNAi phenotype, DOCK180 depletion did not perturb actin recruitment or cadherin localisation at junctions. Rather, reduced DOCK180 levels impaired the resistance to mechanical stress of pre-formed cell aggregates. Thus, within the same cell type, EGFR and DOCK180 regulate Rac1 activation by newly-formed contacts, but control separate cellular events that cooperate to stabilise junctions. PMID:25957131

  12. Cooperation of distinct Rac-dependent pathways to stabilise E-cadherin adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Erasmus, Jennifer C.; Welsh, Natalie J.; Braga, Vania M.M.

    2015-01-01

    The precise mechanisms via which Rac1 is activated by cadherin junctions are not fully known. In keratinocytes Rac1 activation by cadherin junctions requires EGFR signalling, but how EGFR does so is unclear. To address which activator could mediate E-cadherin signalling to Rac1, we investigated EGFR and two Rac1 GEFs, SOS1 and DOCK180. EGFR RNAi prevented junction-induced Rac1 activation and led to fragmented localization of E-cadherin at cadherin contacts. In contrast, depletion of another EGFR family member, ErbB3, did not interfere with either process. DOCK180 RNAi, but not SOS1, prevented E-cadherin-induced Rac1 activation. However, in a strong divergence from EGFR RNAi phenotype, DOCK180 depletion did not perturb actin recruitment or cadherin localisation at junctions. Rather, reduced DOCK180 levels impaired the resistance to mechanical stress of pre-formed cell aggregates. Thus, within the same cell type, EGFR and DOCK180 regulate Rac1 activation by newly-formed contacts, but control separate cellular events that cooperate to stabilise junctions. PMID:25957131

  13. Influence of the micro- and nanoscale local mechanical properties of the interfacial transition zone on impact behavior of concrete made with different aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Erdem, Savas Dawson, Andrew Robert; Thom, Nicholas Howard

    2012-02-15

    The influence of the microscale local mechanical properties of the interfacial transition zone (ITZ) on macro-level mechanical response and impact behavior is studied for concretes made with copper slag and gravel aggregates. 3D nanotech vertical scanning interferometry, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray micro-analysis, digital image analysis, and 3D X-ray computed tomography were used to characterize the microstructures and the ITZs. It was deduced that a stronger and denser ITZ in the copper slag specimen would reduce its vulnerability to stiffness loss and contribute to its elastic and more ductile response under impact loading. The analysis also indicated that a significant degeneration in the pore structure of the gravel specimen associated with a relatively weaker and non-homogeneous ITZ occurred under impact. Finally, it was also concluded that increased roughness of ITZ may contribute to the load-carrying capacity of concrete under impact by improving contact point interactions and energy dissipation.

  14. Strengthening College Students' Success through the RAC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Trela; Kim, Ji Young

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how Fayetteville State University's Reading Across the Curriculum (RAC) model developed for use with underprepared students can effectively improve the literacy and academic language skills of those students. The primary goals and objectives of the RAC program are to train faculty members from various disciplines to create…

  15. Strengthening lightweight concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auskern, A.

    1972-01-01

    Polymer absorption by lightweight concretes to improve bonding between cement and aggregate and to increase strength of cement is discussed. Compressive strength of treated cement is compared with strength of untreated product. Process for producing polymers is described.

  16. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, T.I.; Bolen, W.P.

    2007-01-01

    Construction aggregates, primarily stone, sand and gravel, are recovered from widespread naturally occurring mineral deposits and processed for use primarily in the construction industry. They are mined, crushed, sorted by size and sold loose or combined with portland cement or asphaltic cement to make concrete products to build roads, houses, buildings, and other structures. Much smaller quantities are used in agriculture, cement manufacture, chemical and metallurgical processes, glass production and many other products.

  17. Redox regulation of Rac1 by thiol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, G Aaron; Mitchell, Lauren E; Arrington, Megan E; Gunawardena, Harsha P; DeCristo, Molly J; Loeser, Richard F; Chen, Xian; Cox, Adrienne D; Campbell, Sharon L

    2015-02-01

    The Rac1 GTPase is an essential and ubiquitous protein that signals through numerous pathways to control critical cellular processes, including cell growth, morphology, and motility. Rac1 deletion is embryonic lethal, and its dysregulation or mutation can promote cancer, arthritis, cardiovascular disease, and neurological disorders. Rac1 activity is highly regulated by modulatory proteins and posttranslational modifications. Whereas much attention has been devoted to guanine nucleotide exchange factors that act on Rac1 to promote GTP loading and Rac1 activation, cellular oxidants may also regulate Rac1 activation by promoting guanine nucleotide exchange. Herein, we show that Rac1 contains a redox-sensitive cysteine (Cys(18)) that can be selectively oxidized at physiological pH because of its lowered pKa. Consistent with these observations, we show that Rac1 is glutathiolated in primary chondrocytes. Oxidation of Cys(18) by glutathione greatly perturbs Rac1 guanine nucleotide binding and promotes nucleotide exchange. As aspartate substitutions have been previously used to mimic cysteine oxidation, we characterized the biochemical properties of Rac1(C18D). We also evaluated Rac1(C18S) as a redox-insensitive variant and found that it retains structural and biochemical properties similar to those of Rac1(WT) but is resistant to thiol oxidation. In addition, Rac1(C18D), but not Rac1(C18S), shows greatly enhanced nucleotide exchange, similar to that observed for Rac1 oxidation by glutathione. We employed Rac1(C18D) in cell-based studies to assess whether this fast-cycling variant, which mimics Rac1 oxidation by glutathione, affects Rac1 activity and function. Expression of Rac1(C18D) in Swiss 3T3 cells showed greatly enhanced GTP-bound Rac1 relative to Rac1(WT) and the redox-insensitive Rac1(C18S) variant. Moreover, expression of Rac1(C18D) in HEK-293T cells greatly promoted lamellipodia formation. Our results suggest that Rac1 oxidation at Cys(18) is a novel

  18. Differential Rac1 signalling by guanine nucleotide exchange factors implicates FLII in regulating Rac1-driven cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Marei, Hadir; Carpy, Alejandro; Woroniuk, Anna; Vennin, Claire; White, Gavin; Timpson, Paul; Macek, Boris; Malliri, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase Rac1 has been implicated in the formation and dissemination of tumours. Upon activation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), Rac1 associates with a variety of proteins in the cell thereby regulating various functions, including cell migration. However, activation of Rac1 can lead to opposing migratory phenotypes raising the possibility of exacerbating tumour progression when targeting Rac1 in a clinical setting. This calls for the identification of factors that influence Rac1-driven cell motility. Here we show that Tiam1 and P-Rex1, two Rac GEFs, promote Rac1 anti- and pro-migratory signalling cascades, respectively, through regulating the Rac1 interactome. In particular, we demonstrate that P-Rex1 stimulates migration through enhancing the interaction between Rac1 and the actin-remodelling protein flightless-1 homologue, to modulate cell contraction in a RhoA-ROCK-independent manner. PMID:26887924

  19. Generation of rac3 Null Mutant Mice: Role of Rac3 in Bcr/Abl-Caused Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young Jin; Zhang, Bin; Kaartinen, Vesa; Haataja, Leena; de Curtis, Ivan; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2005-01-01

    Numerous studies indirectly implicate Rac GTPases in cancer. To investigate if Rac3 contributes to normal or malignant cell function, we generated rac3 null mutants through gene targeting. These mice were viable, fertile, and lacked an obvious external phenotype. This shows Rac3 function is dispensable for embryonic development. Bcr/Abl is a deregulated tyrosine kinase that causes chronic myelogenous leukemia and Ph-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia in humans. Vav1, a hematopoiesis-specific exchange factor for Rac, was constitutively tyrosine phosphorylated in primary lymphomas from Bcr/Abl P190 transgenic mice, suggesting inappropriate Rac activation. rac3 is expressed in these malignant hematopoietic cells. Using lysates from BCR/ABL transgenic mice that express or lack rac3, we detected the presence of activated Rac3 but not Rac1 or Rac2 in the malignant precursor B-lineage lymphoblasts. In addition, in female P190 BCR/ABL transgenic mice, lack of rac3 was associated with a longer average survival. These data are the first to directly show a stimulatory role for Rac in leukemia in vivo. Moreover, our data suggest that interference with Rac3 activity, for example, by using geranyl-geranyltransferase inhibitors, may provide a positive clinical benefit for patients with Ph-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:15964830

  20. RAC/ROP GTPases and auxin signaling.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hen-ming; Hazak, Ora; Cheung, Alice Y; Yalovsky, Shaul

    2011-04-01

    Auxin functions as a key morphogen in regulating plant growth and development. Studies on auxin-regulated gene expression and on the mechanism of polar auxin transport and its asymmetric distribution within tissues have provided the basis for realizing the molecular mechanisms underlying auxin function. In eukaryotes, members of the Ras and Rho subfamilies of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases function as molecular switches in many signaling cascades that regulate growth and development. Plants do not have Ras proteins, but they contain Rho-like small G proteins called RACs or ROPs that, like fungal and metazoan Rhos, are regulators of cell polarity and may also undertake some Ras functions. Here, we discuss the advances made over the last decade that implicate RAC/ROPs as mediators for auxin-regulated gene expression, rapid cell surface-located auxin signaling, and directional auxin transport. We also describe experimental data indicating that auxin-RAC/ROP crosstalk may form regulatory feedback loops and theoretical modeling that attempts to connect local auxin gradients with RAC/ROP regulation of cell polarity. We hope that by discussing these experimental and modeling studies, this perspective will stimulate efforts to further refine our understanding of auxin signaling via the RAC/ROP molecular switch. PMID:21478442

  1. 75 FR 54297 - Humboldt Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Humboldt Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Humboldt Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet in Eureka, California....

  2. 75 FR 27703 - Humboldt Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Humboldt Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Humboldt Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet in Eureka, California....

  3. 76 FR 2883 - Humboldt Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Humboldt Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: The Humboldt Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet in Eureka, California....

  4. 76 FR 14897 - Humboldt County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Humboldt County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Humboldt County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet in...

  5. 75 FR 36061 - Humboldt Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Humboldt Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Humboldt Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet in Eureka, California....

  6. 75 FR 43140 - Humboldt Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Humboldt Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Humboldt Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet in Eureka, California....

  7. 76 FR 9540 - Humboldt County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Humboldt County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Humboldt County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet in...

  8. 75 FR 69620 - Humboldt Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Humboldt Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Humboldt Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet in Eureka, California....

  9. How Concrete Is Concrete?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gravemeijer, Koeno

    2011-01-01

    If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, "manipulatives", in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own,…

  10. Supervillin Binds the Rac/Rho-GEF Trio and Increases Trio-mediated Rac1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Son, Kyonghee; Smith, Tara C.; Luna, Elizabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated cross-talk between the membrane-associated, myosin II-regulatory protein supervillin and the actin-regulatory small GTPases Rac1, RhoA, and Cdc42. Supervillin knockdown reduced Rac1-GTP loading, but not the GTP loading of RhoA or Cdc42, in HeLa cells with normal levels of the Rac1-activating protein Trio. No reduction in Rac1-GTP loading was observed when supervillin levels were reduced in Trio-depleted cells. Conversely, overexpression of supervillin isoform 1 (SV1) or, especially, isoform 4 (SV4) increased Rac1 activation. Inhibition of the Trio-mediated Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange (GEF) activity with ITX3 partially blocked the SV4-mediated increase in Rac1-GTP. Both SV4 and SV1 co-localized with Trio at or near the plasma membrane in ruffles and cell surface projections. Two sequences within supervillin bound directly to Trio spectrin repeats 4–7: SV1-171, which contains N-terminal residues found in both SV1 and SV4 and the SV4-specific differentially spliced coding exons 3, 4, and 5 within SV4 (SV4-E345; SV4 amino acids 276 – 669). In addition, SV4-E345 interacted with the homologous sequence in rat kalirin (repeats 4–7, amino acids 531 – 1101). Overexpressed SV1-174 and SV4-E345 affected Rac1-GTP loading, but only in cells with endogenous levels of Trio. Trio residues 771 – 1057, which contain both supervillin-interaction sites, exerted a dominant-negative effect on cell spreading. Supervillin and Trio knockdowns, separately or together, inhibited cell spreading, suggesting that supervillin regulates the Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange activity of Trio, and potentially also kalirin, during cell spreading and lamellipodia extension. PMID:25655724

  11. 76 FR 20942 - Elko County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-14

    ... Forest Service Elko County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Elko County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will hold its first meeting... committee members; (4) Selection of RAC Committee Chairman; (5) Overview of project selection process;...

  12. Coevolution of RAC Small GTPases and their Regulators GEF Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Sánchez, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    RAC proteins are small GTPases involved in important cellular processes in eukaryotes, and their deregulation may contribute to cancer. Activation of RAC proteins is regulated by DOCK and DBL protein families of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Although DOCK and DBL proteins act as GEFs on RAC proteins, DOCK and DBL family members are evolutionarily unrelated. To understand how DBL and DOCK families perform the same function on RAC proteins despite their unrelated primary structure, phylogenetic analyses of the RAC, DBL, and DOCK families were implemented, and interaction patterns that may suggest a coevolutionary process were searched. Interestingly, while RAC and DOCK proteins are very well conserved in humans and among eukaryotes, DBL proteins are highly divergent. Moreover, correlation analyses of the phylogenetic distances of RAC and GEF proteins and covariation analyses between residues in the interacting domains showed significant coevolution rates for both RAC–DOCK and RAC–DBL interactions. PMID:27226705

  13. Physiological Function of Rac Prophage During Biofilm Formation and Regulation of Rac Excision in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoxiao; Li, Yangmei; Guo, Yunxue; Zeng, Zhenshun; Li, Baiyuan; Wood, Thomas K; Cai, Xingsheng; Wang, Xiaoxue

    2015-01-01

    Rac or rac-like prophage harbors many genes with important physiological functions, while it remains excision-proficient in several bacterial strains including Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp. and Shigella spp. Here, we found that rac excision is induced during biofilm formation, and the isogenic stain without rac is more motile and forms more biofilms in nutrient-rich medium at early stages in E. coli K-12. Additionally, the presence of rac genes increases cell lysis during biofilm development. In most E. coli strains, rac is integrated into the ttcA gene which encodes a tRNA-thioltransferase. Rac excision in E. coli K-12 leads to a functional change of TtcA, which results in reduced fitness in the presence of carbenicillin. Additionally, we demonstrate that YdaQ (renamed as XisR) is the excisionase of rac in E. coli K-12, and that rac excision is induced by the stationary sigma factor RpoS through inducing xisR expression. Taken together, our results reveal that upon rac integration, not only are new genes introduced into the host, but also there is a functional change in a host enzyme. Hence, rac excision is tightly regulated by host factors to control its stability in the host genome under different stress conditions. PMID:26530864

  14. Physiological Function of Rac Prophage During Biofilm Formation and Regulation of Rac Excision in Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoxiao; Li, Yangmei; Guo, Yunxue; Zeng, Zhenshun; Li, Baiyuan; Wood, Thomas K.; Cai, Xingsheng; Wang, Xiaoxue

    2015-01-01

    Rac or rac-like prophage harbors many genes with important physiological functions, while it remains excision-proficient in several bacterial strains including Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp. and Shigella spp. Here, we found that rac excision is induced during biofilm formation, and the isogenic stain without rac is more motile and forms more biofilms in nutrient-rich medium at early stages in E. coli K-12. Additionally, the presence of rac genes increases cell lysis during biofilm development. In most E. coli strains, rac is integrated into the ttcA gene which encodes a tRNA-thioltransferase. Rac excision in E. coli K-12 leads to a functional change of TtcA, which results in reduced fitness in the presence of carbenicillin. Additionally, we demonstrate that YdaQ (renamed as XisR) is the excisionase of rac in E. coli K-12, and that rac excision is induced by the stationary sigma factor RpoS through inducing xisR expression. Taken together, our results reveal that upon rac integration, not only are new genes introduced into the host, but also there is a functional change in a host enzyme. Hence, rac excision is tightly regulated by host factors to control its stability in the host genome under different stress conditions. PMID:26530864

  15. Antifouling marine concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Vind, H P; Mathews, C W

    1980-07-01

    Various toxic agents were evaluated as the their capability to prevent or inhibit the attachment of marine fouling organisms to concrete. Creosote and bis-(tri-n-butyltin) oxide (TBTO) were impregnated into porous aggregate which was used in making concrete. Cuprous oxide, triphenyltin hydroxide (TPTH), and 2-2-bis-(p-methoxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (methoxychlor) were used as dry additives. Two proprietary formulations were applied as coatings on untreated concrete. Test specimens were exposed at Port Hueneme, CA, and Key Biscayne, FL. The efficacy of toxicants was determined by periodically weighing the adhering fouling organisms. Concrete prepared with an aggregate impregnated with a TBTO/creosote mixture has demonstrated the best antifouling performance of those specimens exposed for more than one year. The two proprietary coatings and the concrete containing methoxychlor, TPTH, and cuprous oxide as dry additives have exhibited good antifouling properties, but they have been exposed for a shorter time. The strength of concrete containing the toxicants was acceptable, and the toxicants did not increase the corrosion rate of reinforcing rods. Organotin compounds were essentially unchanged in concrete specimens exposed 6 1/2 years in seawater.

  16. Antifouling marine concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Vind, H P; Mathews, C W

    1980-07-01

    Various toxic agents were evaluated as to their capability to prevent or inhibit the attachment of marine fouling organisms to concrete for OTEC plants. Creosote and bis-(tri-n-butyltin) oxide (TBTO) were impregnated into porous aggregate which was used in making concrete. Cuprous oxide, triphenyltin hydroxide (TPTH), and 2-2-bis-(p-methoxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (methoxychlor) were used as dry additives. Two proprietary formulations were applied as coatings on untreated concrete. Test specimens were exposed at Port Hueneme, CA, and Key Biscayne, FL. The efficacy of toxicants was determined by periodically weighing the adhering fouling organisms. Concrete prepared with an aggregate impregnated with a TBTO/creosote mixture has demonstrated the best antifouling performance of those specimens exposed for more than one year. The two proprietary coatings and the concrete containing methoxychlor, TPTH, and cuprous oxide as dry additives have exhibited good antifouling properties, but they have been exposed for a shorter time. The strength of concrete containing the toxicants was acceptable, and the toxicants did not increase the corrosion rate of reinforcing rods. Organotin compounds were essentially unchanged in concrete specimens exposed 6-1/2 years in seawater.

  17. Concrete density estimation by rebound hammer method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Mohamad Pauzi bin; Jefri, Muhamad Hafizie Bin; Abdullah, Mahadzir Bin; Masenwat, Noor Azreen bin; Sani, Suhairy bin; Mohd, Shukri; Isa, Nasharuddin bin; Mahmud, Mohamad Haniza bin

    2016-01-01

    Concrete is the most common and cheap material for radiation shielding. Compressive strength is the main parameter checked for determining concrete quality. However, for shielding purposes density is the parameter that needs to be considered. X- and -gamma radiations are effectively absorbed by a material with high atomic number and high density such as concrete. The high strength normally implies to higher density in concrete but this is not always true. This paper explains and discusses the correlation between rebound hammer testing and density for concrete containing hematite aggregates. A comparison is also made with normal concrete i.e. concrete containing crushed granite.

  18. Serine-71 phosphorylation of Rac1 modulates downstream signaling.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Janett; Proff, Julia; Hävemeier, Anika; Ladwein, Markus; Rottner, Klemens; Barlag, Britta; Pich, Andreas; Tatge, Helma; Just, Ingo; Gerhard, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The Rho GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42 regulate a variety of cellular functions by signaling to different signal pathways. It is believed that the presence of a specific effector at the location of GTPase activation determines the route of downstream signaling. We previously reported about EGF-induced Ser-71 phosphorylation of Rac1/Cdc42. By using the phosphomimetic S71E-mutants of Rac1 and Cdc42 we investigated the impact of Ser-71 phosphorylation on binding to selected effector proteins. Binding of the constitutively active (Q61L) variants of Rac1 and Cdc42 to their specific interaction partners Sra-1 and N-WASP, respectively, as well as to their common effector protein PAK was abrogated when Ser-71 was exchanged to glutamate as phosphomimetic substitution. Interaction with their common effector proteins IQGAP1/2/3 or MRCK alpha was, however, hardly affected. This ambivalent behaviour was obvious in functional assays. In contrast to Rac1 Q61L, phosphomimetic Rac1 Q61L/S71E was not able to induce increased membrane ruffling. Instead, Rac1 Q61L/S71E allowed filopodia formation, which is in accordance with abrogation of the dominant Sra-1/Wave signalling pathway. In addition, in contrast to Rac1 transfected cells Rac1 S71E failed to activate PAK1/2. On the other hand, Rac1 Q61L/S71E was as effective in activation of NF-kappaB as Rac1 Q61L, illustrating positive signal transduction of phosphorylated Rac1. Together, these data suggest that phosphorylation of Rac1 and Cdc42 at serine-71 represents a reversible mechanism to shift specificity of GTPase/effector coupling, and to preferentially address selected downstream pathways. PMID:22970203

  19. Refractory concretes

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.

    1979-01-01

    Novel concrete compositions comprise particles of aggregate material embedded in a cement matrix, said cement matrix produced by contacting an oxide selected from the group of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, La.sub.2 O.sub.3, Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3, Sm.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3 and Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with an aqueous solution of a salt selected from the group of NH.sub.4 NO.sub.3, NH.sub.4 Cl, YCl.sub.3 and Mg(NO.sub.3).sub.2 to form a fluid mixture; and allowing the fluid mixture to harden.

  20. RAC: Repository of Antibiotic resistance Cassettes

    PubMed Central

    Tsafnat, Guy; Copty, Joseph; Partridge, Sally R.

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in bacteria is often due to acquisition of resistance genes associated with different mobile genetic elements. In Gram-negative bacteria, many resistance genes are found as part of small mobile genetic elements called gene cassettes, generally found integrated into larger elements called integrons. Integrons carrying antibiotic resistance gene cassettes are often associated with mobile elements and here are designated ‘mobile resistance integrons’ (MRIs). More than one cassette can be inserted in the same integron to create arrays that contribute to the spread of multi-resistance. In many sequences in databases such as GenBank, only the genes within cassettes, rather than whole cassettes, are annotated and the same gene/cassette may be given different names in different entries, hampering analysis. We have developed the Repository of Antibiotic resistance Cassettes (RAC) website to provide an archive of gene cassettes that includes alternative gene names from multiple nomenclature systems and allows the community to contribute new cassettes. RAC also offers an additional function that allows users to submit sequences containing cassettes or arrays for annotation using the automatic annotation system Attacca. Attacca recognizes features (gene cassettes, integron regions) and identifies cassette arrays as patterns of features and can also distinguish minor cassette variants that may encode different resistance phenotypes (aacA4 cassettes and bla cassettes-encoding β-lactamases). Gaps in annotations are manually reviewed and those found to correspond to novel cassettes are assigned unique names. While there are other websites dedicated to integrons or antibiotic resistance genes, none includes a complete list of antibiotic resistance gene cassettes in MRI or offers consistent annotation and appropriate naming of all of these cassettes in submitted sequences. RAC thus provides a unique resource for researchers, which should reduce confusion

  1. Crossroads of PI3K and Rac pathways

    PubMed Central

    Campa, Carlo C; Ciraolo, Elisa; Ghigo, Alessandra; Germena, Giulia; Hirsch, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Rac and PI3Ks are intracellular signal transducers able to regulate multiple signaling pathways fundamental for cell behavior. PI3Ks are lipid kinases that produce phosphorylated lipids which, in turn, transduce extracellular cues within the cell, while Rac is a small G protein that impacts on actin organization. Compelling evidence indicates that in multiple circumstances the 2 signaling pathways appear intermingled. For instance, phosphorylated lipids produced by PI3Ks recruit and activate GEF and GAP proteins, key modulators of Rac function. Conversely, PI3Ks interact with activated Rac, leading to Rac signaling amplification. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms underlying the cross-talk between Rac and PI3K signaling in 2 different processes, cell migration and ROS production. PMID:25942647

  2. High temperature polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, J.J.; Reams, W.

    1984-05-29

    This invention is concerned with a polymer concrete composition, which is a two-component composition useful with many bases including metal. Component A, the aggregate composition, is broadly composed of silica, silica flour, portland cement, and acrylamide, whereas Component B, which is primarily vinyl and acrylyl reactive monomers, is a liquid system.

  3. Charge-based fractionation of oxyanion-forming metals and metalloids leached from recycled concrete aggregates of different degrees of carbonation: a comparison of laboratory and field leaching tests.

    PubMed

    Mulugeta, Mesay; Engelsen, Christian J; Wibetoe, Grethe; Lund, Walter

    2011-02-01

    The release and charge-based fractionation of As, Cr, Mo, Sb, Se and V were evaluated in leachates generated from recycled concrete aggregates (RCA) in a laboratory and at a field site. The leachates, covering the pH range 8.4-12.6, were generated from non-carbonated, and artificially and naturally carbonated crushed concrete samples. Comparison between the release of the elements from the non-carbonated and carbonated samples indicated higher solubility of the elements from the latter. The laboratory leaching tests also revealed that the solubility of the elements is low at the "natural pH" of the non-carbonated materials and show enhancement when the pH is decreased. The charge-based fractionation of the elements was determined by ion-exchange solid phase extraction (SPE); it was found that all the target elements predominantly existed as anions in both the laboratory and field leachates. The high fraction of the anionic species of the elements in the leachates from the carbonated RCA materials verified the enhanced solubility of the oxyanionic species of the elements as a result of carbonation. The concentrations of the elements in the leachates and SPE effluents were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). PMID:20542679

  4. Performance of "Waterless Concrete"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toutanji, H. A.; Grugel, R. N.

    2009-01-01

    Waterless concrete consists of molten elementary sulfur and aggregate. The aggregates in a lunar environment will be lunar rocks and soil. Sulfur is present on the Moon in Troilite soil (FeS) and, by oxidation of the soil, iron and sulfur can be produced. Sulfur concrete specimens were cycled between liquid nitrogen (approx.]91 C) and room temperature (^21 C) to simulate exposure to a lunar environment. Cycled and control specimens were subsequently tested in compression at room temperatures (^21 C) and ^-101 C. Test results showed that due to temperature cycling, the compressive strength of cycled specimens was 20% of those non-cycled. This reduction in strength can be attributed to the large differences in thermal coefficients of expansion of the materials constituting the concrete which promoted cracking. Similar sulfur concrete mixtures were strengthened with short and long glass fibres. The lunar regolith simulant was melted in a 25 cc Pt- Rh crucible in a Sybron Thermoline high temperature MoSi2 furnace at melting temperatures of 1450 to 1600 C for times of 30 min to i hour. Glass fibres and small rods were pulled from the melt. The glass fibres were used to reinforce sulfur concrete plated to improve the flexural strength of the sulfur concrete. Beams strengthened with glass fibres showed to exhibit an increase in the flexural strength by as much as 45%.

  5. Hospital industry pushes back against the RACs.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    Groups ranging from the American Hospital Association to the U.S. Congress have taken up the issues posed by the Recovery Audit Contractors and other Medicare and Medicaid auditors. The high percentage of denials overturned upon appeal and large number of records requests are getting attention. Hospitals may get relief, but it's not likely to be immediate so they should continue preparing for the audits. Meanwhile, in addition to the Recovery Audit Contractors (RACs), hospitals are facing scrutiny from the Zoned Program Integrity Contractors (ZPICs), Medicare Prepayment Reviews, and Medicare Administrative Contractor (MAC) on-site audits. PMID:23339269

  6. 75 FR 54846 - Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Action of meeting. SUMMARY: The Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee (RAC... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For more information regarding this meeting, contact Connie Athman; Mt....

  7. 75 FR 21220 - Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-23

    ... Forest Service Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Action of meeting. SUMMARY: The Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet on Tuesday... meeting, contact Connie Athman; Mt. Hood National Forest; 16400 Champion Way; Sandy, Oregon 97055;...

  8. 75 FR 18144 - Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Hood/Willamette Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet on... INFORMATION CONTACT: For more information regarding this meeting, contact Connie Athman; Mt. Hood...

  9. 76 FR 39434 - Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council (RAC) AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council (RAC). SUMMARY: In accordance with... Park & Ride, and Friday, August 5, 2011, (8:30 a.m.--3:30 p.m.) in Salt Lake City, Utah. ADDRESSES:...

  10. 75 FR 11104 - Del Norte Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ... Forest Service Del Norte Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Del Norte Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet in Crescent City... and Designated Federal Official roles and (5) review operational guidelines; (6) selection of...

  11. Roles of Rac1 and Rac3 GTPases during the development of cortical and hippocampal GABAergic interneurons

    PubMed Central

    de Curtis, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Rac GTPases are regulators of the cytoskeleton that play an important role in several aspects of neuronal and brain development. Two distinct Rac GTPases are expressed in the developing nervous system, the widely expressed Rac1 and the neural-specific Rac3 proteins. Recent experimental evidence supports a central role of these two Rac proteins in the development of inhibitory GABAergic interneurons, important modulatory elements of the brain circuitry. The combined inactivation of the genes for the two Rac proteins has profound effects on distinct aspects of interneuron development, and has highlighted a synergistic contribution of the two proteins to the postmitotic maturation of specific populations of cortical and hippocampal interneurons. Rac function is modulated by different types of regulators, and can influence the activity of specific effectors. Some of these proteins have been associated to the development and maturation of interneurons. Cortical interneuron dysfunction is implicated in several neurological and psychiatric diseases characterized by cognitive impairment. Therefore the description of the cellular processes regulated by the Rac GTPases, and the identification of the molecular networks underlying these processes during interneuron development is relevant to the understanding of the role of GABAergic interneurons in cognitive functions. PMID:25309333

  12. Rac1 activity regulates proliferation of aggressive metastatic melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Natalie N. Chen Yihwen; Samant, Rajeev S.; Shevde, Lalita A.; Fodstad, Oystein

    2007-11-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying the different capacity of two in vivo selected human melanoma cell variants to form experimental metastases were studied. The doubling times of the FEMX-I and FEMX-V cell sublines in vitro were 15 and 25 h, respectively. The invasive capacity of FEMX-I cells was 8-fold higher than FEMX-V cells, and the time to form approximately 10 mm s.c. tumors in nude mice was 21 versus 35 days. FEMX-I displayed a spindle-like formation in vitro, whereas FEMX-V cells had a rounded shape. Hence, we examined known determinants of cell shape and proliferation, the small GTPases. The four studied showed equal expression in both cell types, but Rac1 activity was significantly decreased in FEMX-V cells. Rac1 stimulates NF{kappa}B, and we found that endogenous NF{kappa}B activity of FEMX-V cells was 2% of that of FEMX-I cells. Inhibition of Rac1 resulted in blocked NF{kappa}B activity. Specific inhibition of either Rac1 or NF{kappa}B significantly reduced proliferation and invasion of FEMX-I cells, the more pronounced effects observed with Rac1 inhibition. These data indicate that Rac1 activity in FEMX cells regulates cell proliferation and invasion, in part via its effect on NF{kappa}B, signifying Rac1 as a key molecule in melanoma progression and metastasis.

  13. Optogenetics: optical control of a photoactivatable Rac in living cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Taofei; Wu, Yi I

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in optogenetics have extended optical control of signaling to intracellular proteins, including Rac, a small G protein in the Rho family. A blue light-sensing LOV (light, oxygen, or voltage) domain derived from Avena sativa (oat) phototropin was fused to the N-terminus of a constitutively active mutant of Rac, via an α-helix (Jα) that is conserved among plant phototropins. The fused LOV domain occluded binding of downstream effectors to Rac in the dark. Exposure to blue light caused a conformational change of the LOV domain and unwinding of the Jα helix, relieving steric inhibition. The LOV domain incorporates a flavin as the photon-absorbing cofactor and can be activated by light in a reversible and repeatable fashion. In cultured cells, global illumination with blue light rapidly activated Rac and led to cell spreading and membrane ruffling. Localized and pulsed illumination generated a gradient of Rac activity and induced directional migration. In this chapter, we will describe the techniques in detail and present some examples of applications of using photoactivatable Rac (PA-Rac) in living cells. PMID:25391805

  14. 75 FR 52551 - Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council (RAC) Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council (RAC) Meeting AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council (RAC) Meeting. SUMMARY: In... Advisory Council (RAC) will meet as indicated below. DATES: The Utah RAC will meet Monday, September...

  15. The impact of RAC audits on US hospitals.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jeffrey P; Barksdale, Rachel M

    2013-01-01

    The Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA) authorized a three-year demonstration program using recovery audit contractors (RACs) to identify and correct improper payments in the Medicare Fee-For-Service program. More recently, Section 6411 of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) expanded the RAC program to include the Medicaid program. This shows the Cent ers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) believe RAC audits are a cost-effective method to ensure health care providers are paid correctly and thereby protect the Medicare Trust Fund. RAC audits are highly complex and require significant manpower to handle the large volume of requests received during a short period of time. Additionally, the RAC audit appeal process is complicated and requires a high level of technical expertise. The demonstration project found that RAC audits resulted in sizeable amounts of overpayments collected ("take-backs") from many providers. This research study assesses the potential impact of the RAC audit program on US acute care hospitals. Data obtained from CMS show that RAC overpayments collected for FY 2010 were $75.4 million, increased to $797.4 million in FY 2011, and increased to $986.2 million in the first six months of FY 2012. According to the American Hospital Association (AHA) RACTrac audit survey, the vast majority of these collections represent complex denials where hospitals are required to provide medical record documents in support of their billed claims. This study found that the RAC audit program collections are increasing significantly over time. As a result, these collections are having a significant negative impact on the profitability of US hospitals. PMID:24003757

  16. Rac1 modulates cardiomyocyte adhesion during mouse embryonic development

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Issa, Radwan

    2015-01-24

    Highlights: • Conditional knockout of Rac1 using Nkx2.5 Cre line is lethal at E13.5. • The myocardium of the mutant is thin and disorganized. • The phenotype is not due to cardiomyocyte low proliferation or apoptosis. • The phenotype is due to specific defect in cardiomyocyte adhesion. - Abstract: Rac1, a member of the Rho subfamily of small GTPases, is involved in morphogenesis and differentiation of many cell types. Here we define a role of Rac1 in cardiac development by specifically deleting Rac1 in the pre-cardiac mesoderm using the Nkx2.5-Cre transgenic driver line. Rac1-conditional knockout embryos initiate heart development normally until embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5); their cardiac mesoderm is specified, and the heart tube is formed and looped. However, by E12.5-E13.5 the mutant hearts start failing and embryos develop edema and hemorrhage which is probably the cause for the lethality observed soon after. The hearts of Rac1-cKO embryos exhibit disorganized and thin myocardial walls and defects in outflow tract alignment. No significant differences of cardiomyocyte death or proliferation were found between developing control and mutant embryos. To uncover the role of Rac1 in the heart, E11.5 primary heart cells were cultured and analyzed in vitro. Rac1-deficient cardiomyocytes were less spread, round and loosely attached to the substrate and to each other implying that Rac1-mediated signaling is required for appropriate cell–cell and/or cellmatrix adhesion during cardiac development.

  17. Rac1 Regulates Endometrial Secretory Function to Control Placental Development.

    PubMed

    Davila, Juanmahel; Laws, Mary J; Kannan, Athilakshmi; Li, Quanxi; Taylor, Robert N; Bagchi, Milan K; Bagchi, Indrani C

    2015-08-01

    During placenta development, a succession of complex molecular and cellular interactions between the maternal endometrium and the developing embryo ensures reproductive success. The precise mechanisms regulating this maternal-fetal crosstalk remain unknown. Our study revealed that the expression of Rac1, a member of the Rho family of GTPases, is markedly elevated in mouse decidua on days 7 and 8 of gestation. To investigate its function in the uterus, we created mice bearing a conditional deletion of the Rac1 gene in uterine stromal cells. Ablation of Rac1 did not affect the formation of the decidua but led to fetal loss in mid gestation accompanied by extensive hemorrhage. To gain insights into the molecular pathways affected by the loss of Rac1, we performed gene expression profiling which revealed that Rac1 signaling regulates the expression of Rab27b, another GTPase that plays a key role in targeting vesicular trafficking. Consequently, the Rac1-null decidual cells failed to secrete vascular endothelial growth factor A, which is a critical regulator of decidual angiogenesis, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4, which regulates the bioavailability of insulin-like growth factors that promote proliferation and differentiation of trophoblast cell lineages in the ectoplacental cone. The lack of secretion of these key factors by Rac1-null decidua gave rise to impaired angiogenesis and dysregulated proliferation of trophoblast cells, which in turn results in overexpansion of the trophoblast giant cell lineage and disorganized placenta development. Further experiments revealed that RAC1, the human ortholog of Rac1, regulates the secretory activity of human endometrial stromal cells during decidualization, supporting the concept that this signaling G protein plays a central and conserved role in controlling endometrial secretory function. This study provides unique insights into the molecular mechanisms regulating endometrial secretions that mediate stromal

  18. Rac1 Regulates Endometrial Secretory Function to Control Placental Development

    PubMed Central

    Davila, Juanmahel; Laws, Mary J.; Kannan, Athilakshmi; Li, Quanxi; Taylor, Robert N.; Bagchi, Milan K.; Bagchi, Indrani C.

    2015-01-01

    During placenta development, a succession of complex molecular and cellular interactions between the maternal endometrium and the developing embryo ensures reproductive success. The precise mechanisms regulating this maternal-fetal crosstalk remain unknown. Our study revealed that the expression of Rac1, a member of the Rho family of GTPases, is markedly elevated in mouse decidua on days 7 and 8 of gestation. To investigate its function in the uterus, we created mice bearing a conditional deletion of the Rac1 gene in uterine stromal cells. Ablation of Rac1 did not affect the formation of the decidua but led to fetal loss in mid gestation accompanied by extensive hemorrhage. To gain insights into the molecular pathways affected by the loss of Rac1, we performed gene expression profiling which revealed that Rac1 signaling regulates the expression of Rab27b, another GTPase that plays a key role in targeting vesicular trafficking. Consequently, the Rac1-null decidual cells failed to secrete vascular endothelial growth factor A, which is a critical regulator of decidual angiogenesis, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4, which regulates the bioavailability of insulin-like growth factors that promote proliferation and differentiation of trophoblast cell lineages in the ectoplacental cone. The lack of secretion of these key factors by Rac1-null decidua gave rise to impaired angiogenesis and dysregulated proliferation of trophoblast cells, which in turn results in overexpansion of the trophoblast giant cell lineage and disorganized placenta development. Further experiments revealed that RAC1, the human ortholog of Rac1, regulates the secretory activity of human endometrial stromal cells during decidualization, supporting the concept that this signaling G protein plays a central and conserved role in controlling endometrial secretory function. This study provides unique insights into the molecular mechanisms regulating endometrial secretions that mediate stromal

  19. Chemoenzymatic resolution of rac-malathion

    PubMed Central

    Hitt, David M.; Belabassi, Yamina; Suhy, Joyce; Berkman, Clifford E.; Thompson, Charles M.

    2014-01-01

    Malathion, diethyl 2-[(dimethoxyphosphorothioyl)sulfanyl]butanedioate, is an organophosphate used to control insect pests. Malathion contains a diethyl succinate moiety that is a known functional group susceptible to desymmetrizing enzymes such as esterases that selectively react with a single enantiomer. Purified rac-malathion was subjected to hydrolysis at the diethyl succinate moiety of malathion under various conditions using wild type pig liver esterase to form (S)-malathion (12 % ee) and ~ 3:2 mixture of α- and β-monoacids of (R)-malathion. Technical malathion could not be enriched due to the presence of esterase inhibitors. Further investigation of this resolution using a panel of six PLE isoenzymes also demonstrated formation of (S)-malathion, however, an improvement of up to 56 % ee was obtained. PMID:24839353

  20. Technology meets aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.; Swan, C.

    2007-07-01

    New technology carried out at Tufts University and the University of Massachusetts on synthetic lightweight aggregate has created material from various qualities of fly ash from coal-fired power plants for use in different engineered applications. In pilot scale manufacturing tests an 'SLA' containing 80% fly ash and 20% mixed plastic waste from packaging was produced by 'dry blending' mixed plastic with high carbon fly ash. A trial run was completed to produce concrete masonry unit (CMU) blocks at a full-scale facility. It has been shown that SLA can be used as a partial substitution of a traditional stone aggregate in hot asphalt mix. 1 fig., 2 photos.

  1. Loss of Either Rac1 or Rac3 GTPase Differentially Affects the Behavior of Mutant Mice and the Development of Functional GABAergic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Pennucci, Roberta; Talpo, Francesca; Astro, Veronica; Montinaro, Valentina; Morè, Lorenzo; Cursi, Marco; Castoldi, Valerio; Chiaretti, Sara; Bianchi, Veronica; Marenna, Silvia; Cambiaghi, Marco; Tonoli, Diletta; Leocani, Letizia; Biella, Gerardo; D'Adamo, Patrizia; de Curtis, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Rac GTPases regulate the development of cortical/hippocampal GABAergic interneurons by affecting the early development and migration of GABAergic precursors. We have addressed the function of Rac1 and Rac3 proteins during the late maturation of hippocampal interneurons. We observed specific phenotypic differences between conditional Rac1 and full Rac3 knockout mice. Rac1 deletion caused greater generalized hyperactivity and cognitive impairment compared with Rac3 deletion. This phenotype matched with a more evident functional impairment of the inhibitory circuits in Rac1 mutants, showing higher excitability and reduced spontaneous inhibitory currents in the CA hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Morphological analysis confirmed a differential modification of the inhibitory circuits: deletion of either Rac caused a similar reduction of parvalbumin-positive inhibitory terminals in the pyramidal layer. Intriguingly, cannabinoid receptor-1-positive terminals were strongly increased only in the CA1 of Rac1-depleted mice. This increase may underlie the stronger electrophysiological defects in this mutant. Accordingly, incubation with an antagonist for cannabinoid receptors partially rescued the reduction of spontaneous inhibitory currents in the pyramidal cells of Rac1 mutants. Our results show that Rac1 and Rac3 have independent roles in the formation of GABAergic circuits, as highlighted by the differential effects of their deletion on the late maturation of specific populations of interneurons. PMID:26582364

  2. Rac1 drives intestinal stem cell proliferation and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Myant, Kevin B; Scopelliti, Alessandro; Haque, Sara; Vidal, Marcos; Sansom, Owen J; Cordero, Julia B

    2013-01-01

    Adult stem cells are responsible for maintaining the balance between cell proliferation and differentiation within self-renewing tissues. The molecular and cellular mechanisms mediating such balance are poorly understood. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has emerged as an important mediator of stem cell homeostasis in various systems. Our recent work demonstrates that Rac1-dependent ROS production mediates intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation in mouse models of colorectal cancer (CRC). Here, we use the adult Drosophila midgut and the mouse small intestine to directly address the role of Rac1 in ISC proliferation and tissue regeneration in response to damage. Our results demonstrate that Rac1 is necessary and sufficient to drive ISC proliferation and regeneration in an ROS-dependent manner. Our data point to an evolutionarily conserved role of Rac1 in intestinal homeostasis and highlight the value of combining work in the mammalian and Drosophila intestine as paradigms to study stem cell biology. PMID:23974108

  3. Non-prenylatable, cytosolic Rac1 alters neurite outgrowth while retaining the ability to be activated.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Jairus M; Samuel, Filsy G; McConnell, Jordan A; Reddy, Cristina P; Beck, Brian W; Hynds, DiAnna L

    2015-03-01

    Rac1 is an important regulator of axon extension, cell migration and actin reorganization. Like all Rho guanine triphosphatases (GTPases), Rac1 is targeted to the membrane by the addition of a geranylgeranyl moiety, an action thought to result in Rac1 guanosine triphosphate (GTP) binding. However, the role that Rac1 localization plays in its activation (GTP loading) and subsequent activation of effectors is not completely clear. To address this, we developed a non-prenylatable emerald green fluorescent protein (EmGFP)-Rac1 fusion protein (EmGFP-Rac1(C189A)) and assessed how expressing this construct affected neurite outgrowth, Rac1 localization and activation in neuroblastoma cells. Expression of EmGFP-Rac1(C189A) increased localization to the cytosol and induced cell clustering while increasing neurite initiation. EmGFP-Rac1(C189A) expression also increased Rac1 activation in the cytosol, compared to cells expressing wild-type Rac1 (EmGFP-Rac1). These results suggest that activation of Rac1 may not require plasma membrane localization, potentially leading to differential activation of cytosolic signaling pathways that alter cell morphology. Understanding the consequences of differential localization and activation of Rho GTPases, including Rac1, could lead to new therapeutic targets for treating neurological disorders. PMID:25479592

  4. Rac1 expression in epithelial ovarian cancer: effect on cell EMT and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Leng, Ruobing; Liao, Gang; Wang, Haixia; Kuang, Jun; Tang, Liangdan

    2015-02-01

    Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (rac1) has been implicated in tumor epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT); however, limited information is available regarding the role of rac1 in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). This study aimed to evaluate the correlation of rac1 expression with EMT and EOC prognosis. Rac1 protein levels of 150 EOC specimens were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. Survival analysis was performed to determine the correlation between rac1 expression and survival. Cellular and molecular changes were also examined after rac1 in ovarian cancer cells was silenced in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism of rac1 on EMT was investigated by Western blot analysis. Rac1 was highly expressed in EOC. Rac1 overexpression was closely associated with advanced stage based on International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics, poor grade, serum Ca-125, and residual tumor size. Survival analyses demonstrated that patients with high rac1 expression levels were more susceptible to early tumor recurrence with very poor prognosis. This study revealed that rac1 downregulation decreased cell EMT and proliferation capability in vitro and in vivo. Rac1 expression possibly altered cell EMT by interacting with p21-activated kinase 1 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. The present study showed that rac1 overexpression is associated with cell EMT and poor EOC prognosis. Rac1 possibly plays an important role in predicting EOC metastasis. PMID:25585684

  5. 8. Photocopied August 1978. BREAKING CONCRETE BARS, JULY 1898. TESTING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Photocopied August 1978. BREAKING CONCRETE BARS, JULY 1898. TESTING MACHINE USED BY VON SCHON IN EXPERIMENTS ON METHODS OF MIXING CONCRETE AND ON CONCRETE AGGREGATES WHICH USED LOCAL MATERIALS. (4) - Michigan Lake Superior Power Company, Portage Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  6. Innovative process routes for a high-quality concrete recycling.

    PubMed

    Menard, Y; Bru, K; Touze, S; Lemoign, A; Poirier, J E; Ruffie, G; Bonnaudin, F; Von Der Weid, F

    2013-06-01

    This study presents alternative methods for the processing of concrete waste. The mechanical stresses needed for the embrittlement of the mortar matrix and further selective crushing of concrete were generated by either electric impulses or microwaves heating. Tests were carried out on lab-made concrete samples representative of concrete waste from concrete mixer trucks and on concrete waste collected on a French demolition site. The results obtained so far show that both techniques can be used to weaken concrete samples and to enhance aggregate selective liberation (that is the production of cement paste-free aggregates) during crushing and grinding. Electric pulses treatment seems to appear more efficient, more robust and less energy consuming (1-3 kWh t(-1)) than microwave treatment (10-40 kWh t(-1)) but it can only be applied on samples in water leading to a major drawback for recycling aggregates or cement paste in the cement production process. PMID:23490359

  7. Regulating Rac in the Nervous System: Molecular Function and Disease Implication of Rac GEFs and GAPs

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yanyang; Xiang, Xiaoliang; Liang, Chunmei

    2015-01-01

    Rho family GTPases, including RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 as the most studied members, are master regulators of actin cytoskeletal organization. Rho GTPases control various aspects of the nervous system and are associated with a number of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. The activity of Rho GTPases is controlled by two families of regulators, guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) as the activators and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) as the inhibitors. Through coordinated regulation by GEFs and GAPs, Rho GTPases act as converging signaling molecules that convey different upstream signals in the nervous system. So far, more than 70 members of either GEFs or GAPs of Rho GTPases have been identified in mammals, but only a small subset of them have well-known functions. Thus, characterization of important GEFs and GAPs in the nervous system is crucial for the understanding of spatiotemporal dynamics of Rho GTPase activity in different neuronal functions. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of GEFs and GAPs for Rac1, with emphasis on the molecular function and disease implication of these regulators in the nervous system. PMID:25879033

  8. Rac regulates vascular endothelial growth factor stimulated motility.

    PubMed

    Soga, N; Connolly, J O; Chellaiah, M; Kawamura, J; Hruska, K A

    2001-01-01

    During angiogenesis endothelial cells migrate towards a chemotactic stimulus. Understanding the mechanism of endothelial cell migration is critical to the therapeutic manipulation of angiogenesis and ultimately cancer prevention. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent chemotactic stimulus of endothelial cells during angiogenesis. The endothelial cell signal transduction pathway of VEGF represents a potential target for cancer therapy, but the mechanisms of post-receptor signal transduction including the roles of rho family GTPases in regulating the cytoskeletal effects of VEGF in endothelial cells are not understood. Here we analyze the mechanisms of cell migration in the mouse brain endothelial cell line (bEND3). Stable transfectants containing a tetracycline repressible expression vector were used to induce expression of Rac mutants. Endothelial cell haptotaxis was stimulated by constitutively active V12Rac on collagen and vitronectin coated supports, and chemotaxis was further stimulated by VEGF. Osteopontin coated supports were the most stimulatory to bEND3 haptotaxis, but VEGF was not effective in further increasing migration on osteopontin coated supports. Haptotaxis on support coated with collagen, vitronectin, and to a lesser degree osteopontin was inhibited by N17 Rac. N17 Rac expression blocked stimulation of endothelial cell chemotaxis by VEGF. As part of the chemotactic stimulation, VEGF caused a loss of actin organization at areas of cell-cell contact and increased stress fiber expression in endothelial cells which were directed towards pores in the transwell membrane. N17 Rac prevented the stimulation of cell-cell contact disruption and the stress fiber stimulation by VEGF. These data demonstrate two pathways of regulating endothelial cell motility, one in which Rac is activated by matrix/integrin stimulation and is a crucial modulator of endothelial cell haptotaxis. The other pathway, in the presence of osteopontin, is Rac independent

  9. Inhibition of Rac1 reduces store overload-induced calcium release and protects against ventricular arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Lu, Xiangru; Gui, Le; Wu, Yan; Sims, Stephen M; Wang, Guoping; Feng, Qingping

    2016-08-01

    Rac1 is a small GTPase and plays key roles in multiple cellular processes including the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, whether Rac1 activation during myocardial ischaemia and reperfusion (I/R) contributes to arrhythmogenesis is not fully understood. We aimed to study the effects of Rac1 inhibition on store overload-induced Ca(2+) release (SOICR) and ventricular arrhythmia during myocardial I/R. Adult Rac1(f/f) and cardiac-specific Rac1 knockdown (Rac1(ckd) ) mice were subjected to myocardial I/R and their electrocardiograms (ECGs) were monitored for ventricular arrhythmia. Myocardial Rac1 activity was increased and ventricular arrhythmia was induced during I/R in Rac1(f/f) mice. Remarkably, I/R-induced ventricular arrhythmia was significantly decreased in Rac1(ckd) compared to Rac1(f/f) mice. Furthermore, treatment with Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 decreased I/R-induced ventricular arrhythmia. Ca(2+) imaging analysis showed that in response to a 6 mM external Ca(2+) concentration challenge, SOICR was induced with characteristic spontaneous intracellular Ca(2+) waves in Rac1(f/f) cardiomyocytes. Notably, SOICR was diminished by pharmacological and genetic inhibition of Rac1 in adult cardiomyocytes. Moreover, I/R-induced ROS production and ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2) oxidation were significantly inhibited in the myocardium of Rac1(ckd) mice. We conclude that Rac1 activation induces ventricular arrhythmia during myocardial I/R. Inhibition of Rac1 suppresses SOICR and protects against ventricular arrhythmia. Blockade of Rac1 activation may represent a new paradigm for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmia in ischaemic heart disease. PMID:27222313

  10. A genetically-encoded photoactivatable Rac controls the motility of living cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yi I.; Frey, Daniel; Lungu, Oana I.; Jaehrig, Angelika; Schlichting, Ilme; Kuhlman, Brian; Hahn, Klaus M.

    2009-01-01

    The precise spatio-temporal dynamics of protein activity are often critical in determining cell behaviour, yet for most proteins they remain poorly understood; it remains difficult to manipulate protein activity at precise times and places within living cells. Protein activity has been controlled by light, through protein derivatization with photocleavable moieties1 or using photoreactive small molecule ligands2. However, this requires use of toxic UV wavelengths, activation is irreversible, and/or cell loading is accomplished via disruption of the cell membrane (i.e. through microinjection). We have developed a new approach to produce genetically-encoded photo-activatable derivatives of Rac1, a key GTPase regulating actin cytoskeletal dynamics3,4. Rac1 mutants were fused to the photoreactive LOV (light oxygen voltage) domain from phototropin5,6, sterically blocking Rac1 interactions until irradiation unwound a helix linking LOV to Rac1. Photoactivatable Rac1 (PA-Rac1) could be reversibly and repeatedly activated using 458 or 473 nm light to generate precisely localized cell protrusions and ruffling. Localized Rac activation or inactivation was sufficient to produce cell motility and control the direction of cell movement. Myosin was involved in Rac control of directionality but not in Rac-induced protrusion, while PAK was required for Rac-induced protrusion. PA-Rac1 was used to elucidate Rac regulation of RhoA in cell motility. Rac and Rho coordinate cytoskeletal behaviours with seconds and submicron precision7,8. Their mutual regulation remains controversial9, with data indicating that Rac inhibits and/or activates Rho10,11. Rac was shown to inhibit RhoA in living cells, with inhibition modulated at protrusions and ruffles. A PA-Rac crystal structure and modelling revealed LOV-Rac interactions that will facilitate extension of this photoactivation approach to other proteins. PMID:19693014

  11. Use of incinerator bottom ash in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Pera, J.; Coutaz, L.; Ambroise, J.; Chababbet, M.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to show if municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash could be an alternative aggregate for the production of building concrete presenting a characteristic 28-day compressive strength of 25 MPa. The aggregates passing the 20-mm sieve and retained on the 4-mm sieve were considered for investigation. They showed lower density, higher water absorption, and lower strength than natural gravel. They could be considered as average quality aggregates for use in concrete. When directly introduced in concrete, they led to swelling and cracking of specimens, due to the reaction between cement and metallic aluminium. Therefore, a treatment by sodium hydroxide was proposed to avoid such degradation, which made possible the partial replacement (up to 50%) of gravel in concrete without affecting the durability.

  12. Cohesive fracture model for functionally graded fiber reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Kyoungsoo; Paulino, Glaucio H.; Roesler, Jeffery

    2010-06-15

    A simple, effective, and practical constitutive model for cohesive fracture of fiber reinforced concrete is proposed by differentiating the aggregate bridging zone and the fiber bridging zone. The aggregate bridging zone is related to the total fracture energy of plain concrete, while the fiber bridging zone is associated with the difference between the total fracture energy of fiber reinforced concrete and the total fracture energy of plain concrete. The cohesive fracture model is defined by experimental fracture parameters, which are obtained through three-point bending and split tensile tests. As expected, the model describes fracture behavior of plain concrete beams. In addition, it predicts the fracture behavior of either fiber reinforced concrete beams or a combination of plain and fiber reinforced concrete functionally layered in a single beam specimen. The validated model is also applied to investigate continuously, functionally graded fiber reinforced concrete composites.

  13. Marine concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, A.L.

    1990-01-01

    This book examines how the chemical and physical properties of the oceans affect the durability, fatigue, and corrosion of structures. Structure types addressed include oil platforms, arctic structures, and sea walls. Reviews qualities of plain, reinforced, prestressed, and floating concrete. Discusses the inspection, maintenance, and repair of concrete structures.

  14. Fracture properties of lightweight concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, T.P.; Shieh, M.M.

    1996-02-01

    This study presents the experimental results of fracture properties of concrete incorporating two kinds of domestic lightweight aggregate (LWA) manufactured through either a cold-bonding or a sintering process. The cold-bonded aggregates were mainly made of pulverized fly-ash through a cold-pelletization process at ambient temperature, while the sintered aggregates were made of clay and shale expanded by heat at a temperature near 1,200 C. Experimental results show that the 28-day compressive strengths of {phi} 100 x 200 mm cylindrical concrete specimen made of those LWAs range from 30.1 (sintered) to 33.9 MPa (cold-bonded). By means of size effect law, it is found that the fracture energies, G{sub f}, were 34.42 N/m (sintered) and 37.2 N/m (cold-bonded), respectively.

  15. Semi lightweight concretes produced by volcanic slags

    SciTech Connect

    Topcu, I.B.

    1997-01-01

    The properties of the semi-lightweight concretes produced by using volcanic slags as coarse aggregate were investigated. The volcanic slags were brought from the quarry crushed and then classified according to their aggregate sizes of 0--8, 0--16, 0--31.5, 4--8, and 8--16 mm. The concrete series of five different volcanic slag sizes were produced by addition of a specific cement paste in volume fractions of 0.15, 0.30, 0.45 and 0.60. The cubic, cylindrical and prismatic specimens were made from each of the concrete series. The physical and mechanical properties of the concrete series were determined by conducting unit weight, slump, ultrasound velocity, Schmidt hardness, cylindrical and cubic compressive, bending and splitting tensile strength tests. The results indicated that the volcanic slags can be safely used in the production of semi lightweight concrete.

  16. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiying; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang

    2009-09-04

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  17. SPARC Controls Melanoma Cell Plasticity through Rac1

    PubMed Central

    Salvatierra, Edgardo; Alvarez, Mariano J.; Leishman, Claudia C.; Rivas Baquero, Elvia; Lutzky, Viviana P.; Chuluyan, H. Eduardo; Podhajcer, Osvaldo L.

    2015-01-01

    Cell transition to a more aggressive mesenchymal-like phenotype is a hallmark of cancer progression that involves different steps and requires tightly regulated cell plasticity. SPARC (Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine) is a matricellular protein that promotes this transition in various malignant cell types, including melanoma cells. We found that suppression of SPARC expression in human melanoma cells compromised cell migration, adhesion, cytoskeleton structure, and cell size. These changes involved the Akt/mTOR pathway. Re-expression of SPARC or protein addition restored all the cell features. Suppression of SPARC expression was associated with increased Rac1-GTP levels and its membrane localization. Expression of the dominant negative mutant of Rac1 counteracted almost all the changes observed in SPARC-deficient cells. Overall, these data suggest that most of the SPARC-mediated effects occurred mainly through the blockade of Rac1 activity. PMID:26248315

  18. Micro Environmental Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanez, M.; Oudjit, M. N.; Zenati, A.; Arroudj, K.; Bali, A.

    Reactive powder concretes (RPC) are characterized by a particle diameter not exceeding 600 μm and having very high compressive and tensile strengths. This paper describes a new generation of micro concrete, which has an initial as well as a final high physicomechanical performance. To achieve this, 15% by weight of the Portland cement have been substituted by materials rich in Silica (Slag and Dune Sand). The results obtained from the tests carried out on the RPC show that compressive and tensile strengths increase when incorporating the addition, thus improving the compactness of mixtures through filler and pozzolanic effects. With a reduction in the aggregate phase in the RPC and the abundance of the dune sand (southern of Algeria) and slag (industrial by-product of the blast furnace), the use of the RPC will allow Algeria to fulfil economical as well as ecological requirements.

  19. Laser ablation of concrete.

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.

    1998-10-05

    Laser ablation is effective both as an analytical tool and as a means of removing surface coatings. The elemental composition of surfaces can be determined by either mass spectrometry or atomic emission spectroscopy of the atomized effluent. Paint can be removed from aircraft without damage to the underlying aluminum substrate, and environmentally damaged buildings and sculptures can be restored by ablating away deposited grime. A recent application of laser ablation is the removal of radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. We present the results of ablation tests on concrete samples using a high power pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied on various model systems consisting of Type I Portland cement with varying amounts of either fine silica or sand in an effort to understand the effect of substrate composition on ablation rates and mechanisms. A sample of non-contaminated concrete from a nuclear power plant was also studied. In addition, cement and concrete samples were doped with non-radioactive isotopes of elements representative of cooling waterspills, such as cesium and strontium, and analyzed by laser-resorption mass spectrometry to determine the contamination pathways. These samples were also ablated at high power to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants are removed and captured. The results show that the neat cement matrix melts and vaporizes when little or no sand or aggregate is present. Surface flows of liquid material are readily apparent on the ablated surface and the captured aerosol takes the form of glassy beads up to a few tens of microns in diameter. The presence of sand and aggregate particles causes the material to disaggregate on ablation, with intact particles on the millimeter size scale leaving the surface. Laser resorption mass spectrometric analysis showed that cesium and potassium have similar chemical environments in the

  20. Aggregates: Waste and recycled materials; new rapid evaluation technology. Soils, geology, and foundations; materials and construction. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    ;Contents: Engineering Properties of Shredded Tires in Lightweight Fill Applications; Using Recovered Glass as Construction Aggregate Feedstock; Utilization of Phosphogypsum-Based Slag Aggregate in Portland Cement Concrete Mixtures; Waste Foundry Sand in Asphalt Concrete; Toward Automating Size-Gradation Analysis of Mineral Aggregate; Evaluation of Fine Aggregate Angularity Using National Aggregate Association Flow Test; Siliceous Content Determination of Sands Using Automatic Image Analysis; and Methodology for Improvement of Oxide Residue Models for Estimation of Aggregate Performance Using Stoichiometric Analysis.

  1. Proteomic analysis of Rac1 signaling regulation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    PubMed

    Marei, Hadir; Carpy, Alejandro; Macek, Boris; Malliri, Angeliki

    2016-08-01

    The small GTPase Rac1 is implicated in various cellular processes that are essential for normal cell function. Deregulation of Rac1 signaling has also been linked to a number of diseases, including cancer. The diversity of Rac1 functioning in cells is mainly attributed to its ability to bind to a multitude of downstream effectors following activation by Guanine nucleotide Exchange Factors (GEFs). Despite the identification of a large number of Rac1 binding partners, factors influencing downstream specificity are poorly defined, thus hindering the detailed understanding of both Rac1's normal and pathological functions. In a recent study, we demonstrated a role for 2 Rac-specific GEFs, Tiam1 and P-Rex1, in mediating Rac1 anti- versus pro-migratory effects, respectively. Importantly, via conducting a quantitative proteomic screen, we identified distinct changes in the Rac1 interactome following activation by either GEF, indicating that these opposing effects are mediated through GEF modulation of the Rac1 interactome. Here, we present the full list of identified Rac1 interactors together with functional annotation of the differentially regulated Rac1 binding partners. In light of this data, we also provide additional insights into known and novel signaling cascades that might account for the GEF-mediated Rac1-driven cellular effects. PMID:27152953

  2. Proteomic analysis of Rac1 signaling regulation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors

    PubMed Central

    Marei, Hadir; Carpy, Alejandro; Macek, Boris; Malliri, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The small GTPase Rac1 is implicated in various cellular processes that are essential for normal cell function. Deregulation of Rac1 signaling has also been linked to a number of diseases, including cancer. The diversity of Rac1 functioning in cells is mainly attributed to its ability to bind to a multitude of downstream effectors following activation by Guanine nucleotide Exchange Factors (GEFs). Despite the identification of a large number of Rac1 binding partners, factors influencing downstream specificity are poorly defined, thus hindering the detailed understanding of both Rac1's normal and pathological functions. In a recent study, we demonstrated a role for 2 Rac-specific GEFs, Tiam1 and P-Rex1, in mediating Rac1 anti- versus pro-migratory effects, respectively. Importantly, via conducting a quantitative proteomic screen, we identified distinct changes in the Rac1 interactome following activation by either GEF, indicating that these opposing effects are mediated through GEF modulation of the Rac1 interactome. Here, we present the full list of identified Rac1 interactors together with functional annotation of the differentially regulated Rac1 binding partners. In light of this data, we also provide additional insights into known and novel signaling cascades that might account for the GEF-mediated Rac1-driven cellular effects. PMID:27152953

  3. Poisson's ratio of high-performance concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, B.

    1999-10-01

    This article outlines an experimental and numerical study on Poisson's ratio of high-performance concrete subjected to air or sealed curing. Eight qualities of concrete (about 100 cylinders and 900 cubes) were studied, both young and in the mature state. The concretes contained between 5 and 10% silica fume, and two concretes in addition contained air-entrainment. Parallel studies of strength and internal relative humidity were carried out. The results indicate that Poisson's ratio of high-performance concrete is slightly smaller than that of normal-strength concrete. Analyses of the influence of maturity, type of aggregate, and moisture on Poisson's ratio are also presented. The project was carried out from 1991 to 1998.

  4. 76 FR 51344 - Butte County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ...The Butte County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will hold a meeting on August 29, 2011 in Oroville, CA. The purpose of the meeting is to review Cycle 2 project applications for potential funding recommendations to Lassen, Plumas or Mendocino National Forest Supervisors. The funding is made available under Title II provisions of the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act......

  5. Exome sequencing identifies recurrent somatic RAC1 mutations in melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Krauthammer, Michael; Kong, Yong; Ha, Byung Hak; Evans, Perry; Bacchiocchi, Antonella; McCusker, James P.; Cheng, Elaine; Davis, Matthew J.; Goh, Gerald; Choi, Murim; Ariyan, Stephan; Narayan, Deepak; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Capatana, Ana; Holman, Edna C.; Bosenberg, Marcus; Sznol, Mario; Kluger, Harriet M.; Brash, Douglas E.; Stern, David F.; Materin, Miguel A.; Lo, Roger S.; Mane, Shrikant; Ma, Shuangge; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Lifton, Richard P.; Schlessinger, Joseph; Boggon, Titus J.; Halaban, Ruth

    2012-10-11

    We characterized the mutational landscape of melanoma, the form of skin cancer with the highest mortality rate, by sequencing the exomes of 147 melanomas. Sun-exposed melanomas had markedly more ultraviolet (UV)-like C>T somatic mutations compared to sun-shielded acral, mucosal and uveal melanomas. Among the newly identified cancer genes was PPP6C, encoding a serine/threonine phosphatase, which harbored mutations that clustered in the active site in 12% of sun-exposed melanomas, exclusively in tumors with mutations in BRAF or NRAS. Notably, we identified a recurrent UV-signature, an activating mutation in RAC1 in 9.2% of sun-exposed melanomas. This activating mutation, the third most frequent in our cohort of sun-exposed melanoma after those of BRAF and NRAS, changes Pro29 to serine (RAC1{sup P29S}) in the highly conserved switch I domain. Crystal structures, and biochemical and functional studies of RAC1{sup P29S} showed that the alteration releases the conformational restraint conferred by the conserved proline, causes an increased binding of the protein to downstream effectors, and promotes melanocyte proliferation and migration. These findings raise the possibility that pharmacological inhibition of downstream effectors of RAC1 signaling could be of therapeutic benefit.

  6. Salado mass concrete: Mixture development and preliminary characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Wakeley, L.D.; Ernzen, J.J.; Neeley, B.D.; Hansen, F.D.

    1994-06-01

    A salt-saturated concrete proportioned with Class H oilwell cement, Class F fly ash, and a shrinkage compensating component was developed to meet performance requirements for mass placement as seal components at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Target properties of the concrete included 8-in. slump 3 hr after mixing, no aggregate segregation, heat rise of < 25{degrees}F 4 hr after mixing, compressive strength of 4,500 psi at 180 days, minimal volume change, and probable geochemical stability for repository conditions. Thermal and mechanical properties of promising candidate concrete mixtures were measured. Modulus of elasticity and creep behavior were similar to those of ordinary portland cement mass concretes. Thermal expansion for the salt-saturated concrete developed here was typical of ordinary concrete with similar silicate aggregates. Thermal conductivity, diffusivity, and specific heat approximated values measured for other mass concretes and were similar to values of the host salt rock.

  7. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    Part of the 1994 Industrial Minerals Review. The production, consumption, and applications of construction aggregates are reviewed. In 1994, the production of construction aggregates, which includes crushed stone and construction sand and gravel combined, increased 7.7 percent to 2.14 Gt compared with the previous year. These record production levels are mostly a result of funding for highway construction work provided by the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991. Demand is expected to increase for construction aggregates in 1995.

  8. Inhibition of Rac1 Activity in the Hippocampus Impairs the Forgetting of Contextual Fear Memory.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lizhu; Mao, Rongrong; Zhou, Qixin; Yang, Yuexiong; Cao, Jun; Ding, Yuqiang; Yang, Yuan; Zhang, Xia; Li, Lingjiang; Xu, Lin

    2016-03-01

    Fear is crucial for survival, whereas hypermnesia of fear can be detrimental. Inhibition of the Rac GTPase is recently reported to impair the forgetting of initially acquired memory in Drosophila. Here, we investigated whether inhibition of Rac1 activity in rat hippocampus could contribute to the hypermnesia of contextual fear. We found that spaced but not massed training of contextual fear conditioning caused inhibition of Rac1 activity in the hippocampus and heightened contextual fear. Furthermore, intrahippocampal injection of the Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 heightened contextual fear in massed training, while Rac1 activator CN04-A weakened contextual fear in spaced training rats. Our study firstly demonstrates that contextual fear memory in rats is actively regulated by Rac1 activity in the hippocampus, which suggests that the forgetting impairment of traumatic events in posttraumatic stress disorder may be contributed to the pathological inhibition of Rac1 activity in the hippocampus. PMID:25613020

  9. Fluctuation of Rac1 activity is associated with the phenotypic and transcriptional heterogeneity of glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Yukinaga, Hiroko; Shionyu, Clara; Hirata, Eishu; Ui-Tei, Kumiko; Nagashima, Takeshi; Kondo, Shinji; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Naoki, Honda; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2014-04-15

    Phenotypic heterogeneity of cancer cells is caused not only by genetic and epigenetic alterations but also by stochastic variation of intracellular signaling molecules. Using cells that stably express Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensors, we show here a correlation between a temporal fluctuation in the activity of Rac1 and the invasive properties of C6 glioma cells. By using long-term time-lapse imaging, we found that Rac1 activity in C6 glioma cells fluctuated over a timescale that was substantially longer than that of the replication cycle. Because the relative level of Rac1 activity in each cell was unaffected by a suspension-adhesion procedure, we were able to sort C6 glioma cells according to the levels of Rac1 activity, yielding Rac1(high) and Rac1(low) cells. The Rac1(high) cells invaded more efficiently than did Rac1(low) cells in a Matrigel invasion assay. We assessed the transcriptional profiles of Rac1(high) and Rac1(low) cells and performed gene ontology analysis. Among the 14 genes that were most associated with the term 'membrane' (membrane-related genes) in Rac1(high) cells, we identified four genes that were associated with glioma invasion and Rac1 activity by using siRNA knockdown experiments. Among the transcription factors upregulated in Rac1(high) cells, Egr2 was found to positively regulate expression of the four membrane-related invasion-associated genes. The identified signaling network might cause the fluctuations in Rac1 activity and the heterogeneity in the invasive capacity of glioma cells. PMID:24522191

  10. Concrete waterproofing in nuclear industry.

    PubMed

    Scherbyna, Alexander N; Urusov, Sergei V

    2005-01-01

    One of the main points of aggregate safety during the transportation and storage of radioactive materials is to supply waterproofing for all constructions having direct contact with radiating substances and providing strength, seismic shielding etc. This is the problem with all waterside structures in nuclear industry and concrete installations in the treatment and storage of radioactive materials. In this connection, the problem of developing efficient techniques both for the repair of operating constructions and the waterproofing of new objects of the specified assignment is genuine. Various techniques of concrete waterproofing are widely applied in the world today. However, in conditions of radiation many of these techniques can bring not a profit but irreparable damage of durability and reliability of a concrete construction; for instance, when waterproofing materials contain organic constituents, polymers etc. Application of new technology or materials in basic construction elements requires in-depth analysis and thorough testing. The price of an error might be very large. A comparative analysis shows that one of the most promising types of waterproofing materials for radiation loaded concrete constructions is "integral capillary systems" (ICS). The tests on radiation, thermal and strength stability of ICS and ICS-treated concrete samples were initiated and fulfilled in RFNC-VNIITF. The main result is--ICS applying is increasing of waterproofing and strength properties of concrete in conditions of readiation The paper is devoted to describing the research strategy, the tests and their results and also to planning of new tests. PMID:16604701

  11. Weighted aggregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiveson, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The use of a weighted aggregation technique to improve the precision of the overall LACIE estimate is considered. The manner in which a weighted aggregation technique is implemented given a set of weights is described. The problem of variance estimation is discussed and the question of how to obtain the weights in an operational environment is addressed.

  12. RAC1 activation drives pathologic interactions between the epidermis and immune cells.

    PubMed

    Winge, Mårten C G; Ohyama, Bungo; Dey, Clara N; Boxer, Lisa M; Li, Wei; Ehsani-Chimeh, Nazanin; Truong, Allison K; Wu, Diane; Armstrong, April W; Makino, Teruhiko; Davidson, Matthew; Starcevic, Daniela; Kislat, Andreas; Nguyen, Ngon T; Hashimoto, Takashi; Homey, Bernard; Khavari, Paul A; Bradley, Maria; Waterman, Elizabeth A; Marinkovich, M Peter

    2016-07-01

    Interactions between the epidermis and the immune system govern epidermal tissue homeostasis. These epidermis-immune interactions are altered in the inflammatory disease psoriasis; however, the pathways that underlie this aberrant immune response are not well understood. Here, we determined that Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (RAC1) is a key mediator of epidermal dysfunction. RAC1 activation was consistently elevated in psoriatic epidermis and primary psoriatic human keratinocytes (PHKCs) exposed to psoriasis-related stimuli, but not in skin from patients with basal or squamous cell carcinoma. Expression of a constitutively active form of RAC1 (RACV12) in mice resulted in the development of lesions similar to those of human psoriasis that required the presence of an intact immune system. RAC1V12-expressing mice and human psoriatic skin showed similar RAC1-dependent signaling as well as transcriptional overlap of differentially expressed epidermal and immune pathways. Coculture of PHKCs with immunocytes resulted in the upregulation of RAC1-dependent proinflammatory cytokines, an effect that was reproduced by overexpressing RAC1 in normal human keratinocytes. In keratinocytes, modulating RAC1 activity altered differentiation, proliferation, and inflammatory pathways, including STAT3, NFκB, and zinc finger protein 750 (ZNF750). Finally, RAC1 inhibition in xenografts composed of human PHKCs and immunocytes abolished psoriasiform hyperplasia and inflammation in vivo. These studies implicate RAC1 as a potential therapeutic target for psoriasis and as a key orchestrator of pathologic epidermis-immune interactions. PMID:27294528

  13. Epithelial-specific knockout of the Rac1 gene leads to enamel defects

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhan; Kim, Jieun; Lacruz, Rodrigo; Bringas, Pablo; Kaartinen, Vesa M.; Snead, Malcolm L.

    2015-01-01

    Rac1 encodes a 21kDa GTP-binding protein belonging to the RAS superfamily. RAS members play important roles in controlling focal adhesion complex formation and cytoskeleton contraction; activities with consequences to cell growth, adhesion, migration, and differentiation. To examine the role(s) played by Rac1 protein in cell-to-matrix interaction and in enamel matrix biomineralization we used the Cre/loxP binary recombination system to characterize enamel matrix proteins expression and enamel formation in Rac1 knockout mice. Mating between mice bearing the floxed Rac1 allele with mice bearing a keratin14-Cre transgene generate animals in which Rac1 is absent from epithelial organs. The enamel of Rac1 conditional knockout mouse was characterized by computerized tomography (microCT), light microscopy, histochemistry, and back-scatter electron microscopy. Enamel matrix protein expression was analyzed by Western blotting. Major findings showed that the Tomes’ processes of Rac1−/− ameloblasts loose contact with the forming enamel matrix in un-erupted teeth. The abundance of amelogenin and ameloblastin was reduced in the Rac1−/− ameloblasts. After eruption, the enamel from the Rac1−/− mice displayed severe structural defects with the complete loss of enamel. These results support an essential role for Rac1 function in the dental epithelium involving cell-matrix interaction and matrix biomineralization. PMID:22243243

  14. Thin, applied surfacing for improving skid resistance of concrete pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholer, C. F.

    1980-12-01

    The use of select aggregate in a thin wearing surface of portland cement mortar to prolone or restore a concrete pavement's ability to develop high friction was accomplished. Two fine aggregates, blast furnace slag and lightweight expanded shale were found to exhibit skid resistance greater than the other aggregates evaluated. The British polishing wheel was used in the laboratory evaluation of aggregate to simulate wear. The need for a method of restoring friction to a worn, but otherwise sound concrete pavement led to a field evaluation of several different techniques for placing a very thin overlay. The successful method was a broomed, very thin layer of mortar, 3 mm thick.

  15. Ultrasonic testing of reactive powder concrete.

    PubMed

    Washer, Glenn; Fuchs, Paul; Graybeal, Benjamin A; Hartmann, Joseph Lawrence

    2004-02-01

    Concrete is a critical material for the construction of infrastructure facilities throughout the world. Traditional concretes consist of cement paste and aggregates ranging in size from 6 to 25 mm that form a heterogeneous material with substantial compressive strength and a very low tensile strength. Steel reinforcement is used to provide tensile strength for reinforced concrete structures and as a composite the material is useful for structural applications. A new material known as reactive powder concrete (RPC) is becoming available. It differs significantly from traditional concrete; RPC has no large aggregates, and contains small steel fibers that provide additional strength and, in some cases, can replace traditional steel reinforcement. Due to its high density and lack of aggregates, ultrasonic inspections at frequencies 10 to 20 times that of traditional concrete inspections are possible. This paper reports on the initial findings of research conducted to determine the applicability of ultrasonic testing techniques for the condition assessment of RPC. Pulse velocities for shear and longitudinal waves and ultrasonic measurement of the modulus of elasticity for RPC are reported. Ultrasonic crack detection for RPC also is investigated. PMID:15055809

  16. Mechanical properties of concrete containing a high volume of tire-rubber particles.

    PubMed

    Khaloo, Ali R; Dehestani, M; Rahmatabadi, P

    2008-12-01

    Due to the increasingly serious environmental problems presented by waste tires, the feasibility of using elastic and flexible tire-rubber particles as aggregate in concrete is investigated in this study. Tire-rubber particles composed of tire chips, crumb rubber, and a combination of tire chips and crumb rubber, were used to replace mineral aggregates in concrete. These particles were used to replace 12.5%, 25%, 37.5%, and 50% of the total mineral aggregate's volume in concrete. Cylindrical shape concrete specimens 15 cm in diameter and 30 cm in height were fabricated and cured. The fresh rubberized concrete exhibited lower unit weight and acceptable workability compared to plain concrete. The results of a uniaxial compressive strain control test conducted on hardened concrete specimens indicate large reductions in the strength and tangential modulus of elasticity. A significant decrease in the brittle behavior of concrete with increasing rubber content is also demonstrated using nonlinearity indices. The maximum toughness index, indicating the post failure strength of concrete, occurs in concretes with 25% rubber content. Unlike plain concrete, the failure state in rubberized concrete occurs gently and uniformly, and does not cause any separation in the specimen. Crack width and its propagation velocity in rubberized concrete are lower than those of plain concrete. Ultrasonic analysis reveals large reductions in the ultrasonic modulus and high sound absorption for tire-rubber concrete. PMID:18372166

  17. 45. EXPOSEDAGGREGATE CONCRETE AT NICHE, NORTH BOUNDARY, SEVERAL TEXTURES POURED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. EXPOSED-AGGREGATE CONCRETE AT NICHE, NORTH BOUNDARY, SEVERAL TEXTURES POURED AT ONE TIME, October 1987 - Meridian Hill Park, Bounded by Fifteenth, Sixteenth, Euclid & W Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  18. Physical and microstructural aspects of iron sulfide degradation in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Thomas; Gallucci, Emanuel; Scrivener, Karen

    2011-03-15

    The microstructural aspects of iron sulfide degradation in dam concrete were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) in both dam concrete samples and laboratory concrete. The results show that iron sulfide inclusions with a diameter of a few micrometers in the aggregates are reactive and appear to generate expansion first in the aggregates and consequently in the cement paste. The expansion from the iron sulfides is a consequence of the increase in volume of the reaction products formed. The types of iron sulfide present in the aggregate, mainly pyrrhotite (FeS) and pyrite (FeS{sub 2}), show similar reaction behavior in the aggregates. The released sulfate can lead to a secondary ettringite formation in the concrete matrix, but the degradation associated with this appears to be minor. The reaction of the iron sulfides was found to be very slow even when laboratory samples were exposed to elevated temperatures.

  19. Effective Young's modulus estimation of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G.; Zhao, Y.; Pang, S.S.; Li, Y.

    1999-09-01

    A two-step analytical procedure is proposed to evaluate the quantitative influence of the maximum aggregate size and aggregate gradation on the effective Young's modulus of concrete. In the first step, the effective Young's modulus of a specified basic element, which is composed of an aggregate coated with interfacial transition zone and again covered with cement paste, is obtained based on a proposed four-phase sphere model. The theory of elasticity and Eshelby's equivalent medium theory are used to achieve the goal. In the second step, the rule of mixture method is used to estimate the effective Young's modulus of concrete. Following the two-step procedure, the maximum aggregate size and aggregate gradation are included in the formulations for the effective Young's modulus of concrete. The calculated results are compared with experimental results from the literature. The comparison results show a reasonable agreement when isostrain is assumed for every basic element in the second step. Parameters influencing the effective Young's modulus of concrete are discussed via calculated results.

  20. Scalable Total Synthesis of rac-Jungermannenones B and C.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weilong; Li, Houhua; Cai, Pei-Jun; Wang, Zhen; Yu, Zhi-Xiang; Lei, Xiaoguang

    2016-02-24

    Reported is the first scalable synthesis of rac-jungermannenones B and C starting from the commercially available and inexpensive geraniol in 10 and 9 steps, respectively. The unique jungermannenone framework is rapidly assembled by an unprecedented regioselective 1,6-dienyne reductive cyclization reaction which proceeds through a vinyl radical cyclization/allylic radical isomerization mechanism. DFT calculations explain the high regioselectivity observed in the 1,6-dienyne reductive radical cyclization. PMID:26823176

  1. Evaluation of concrete recycling system efficiency for ready-mix concrete plants.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Luiz de Brito Prado; Figueiredo, Antonio Domingues de

    2016-10-01

    The volume of waste generated annually in concrete plants is quite large and has important environmental and economic consequences. The use of fresh concrete recyclers is an interesting way for the reuse of aggregates and water in new concrete production. This paper presents a study carried out for over one year by one of the largest ready-mix concrete producers in Brazil. This study focused on the evaluation of two recyclers with distinct material separation systems, herein referred to as drum-type and rotary sieve-type equipment. They were evaluated through characterization and monitoring test programs to verify the behaviour of recovered materials (aggregates, water, and slurry). The applicability of the recovered materials (water and aggregates) was also evaluated in the laboratory and at an industrial scale. The results obtained with the two types of recyclers used were equivalent and showed no significant differences. The only exception was in terms of workability. The drum-type recycler generated fewer cases that required increased pumping pressure. The analysis concluded that the use of untreated slurry is unfeasible because of its intense negative effects on the strength and workability of concrete. The reclaimed water, pre-treated to ensure that its density is less than 1.03g/cm(3), can be used on an industrial scale without causing any harm to the concrete. The use of recovered aggregates consequently induces an increase in water demand and cement consumption to ensure the workability conditions of concrete that is proportional to the concrete strength level. Therefore, the viability of their use is restricted to concretes with characteristic strengths lower than 25MPa. PMID:27478022

  2. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, W.H.; Tepordei, V.V.; Bolen, W.P.

    2000-01-01

    Construction aggregates consist primarily of crushed stone and construction sand and gravel. Total estimated production of construction aggregates increased in 1999 by about 2% to 2.39 Gt (2.64 billion st) compared with 1998. This record production level continued an expansion that began in 1992. By commodities, crushed stone production increased 3.3%, while sand and gravel production increased by about 0.5%.

  3. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    Part of a special section on industrial minerals in 1993. The 1993 production of construction aggregates increased 6.3 percent over the 1992 figure, to reach 2.01 Gt. This represents the highest estimated annual production of combined crushed stone and construction sand and gravel ever recorded in the U.S. The outlook for construction aggregates and the issues facing the industry are discussed.

  4. The Apparent Thermal Conductivity of Pozzolana Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessenouci, M. Z.; Triki, N. E. Bibi; Khelladi, S.; Draoui, B.; Abene, A.

    The recent development of some lightweight construction materials, such as light concrete, can play an important role as an insulator, while maintaining sufficient levels of mechanical performance. The quality of insulation to provide depends on the climate, the exposure of the walls and also the materials used in the construction. The choice of a material to be used as an insulator, obviously, depends on its availability and its cost. This is a study of natural pozzolanas as basic components in building materials. It is intended to highlight their thermal advantage. It is economically advantageous to use pozzolana in substitution for a portion of the clinker as hydraulically active additions, as well as in compositions of lightweight concretes in the form of pozzolanic aggregate mixtures, which provide mechanical strengths that comply with current standards. A theoretical study is conducted on the apparent thermal conductivity of building materials, namely concrete containing pozzolana. Thermal modeling, apparent to that commonly used for porous materials, has been applied to pozzolana concrete. Experimental results on measurements of the apparent thermal conductivity of pozzolana concrete are reported in this study, using an approach that considers that concrete is composed of two solid ingredients, a binding matrix (hydrated cement paste) and all aggregates. A second comparative theoretical approach is used for the case where concrete consists of a solid phase and a fluid phase (air).

  5. Recycling process water in ready-mixed concrete operations. Final report, 1 September 1997--31 December 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Chini, A.R.; Muszynski, L.C.; Ellis, B.S.

    1999-02-22

    The objective of this study was to investigate water quality standards and the possibility of reusing concrete wastewater as aggregated irrigation and/or batch mixing water in the production of fresh concrete.

  6. IAPs as E3 ligases of Rac1: shaping the move.

    PubMed

    Oberoi-Khanuja, Tripat Kaur; Rajalingam, Krishnaraj

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitors of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) are well-studied E3 ubiquitin ligases predominantly known for regulation of apoptosis. We uncovered that IAPs can function as a direct E3 ubiquitin ligase of RhoGTPase Rac1. cIAP1 and XIAP directly conjugate polyubiquitin chains to Lysine 147 of activated Rac1 and target it for proteasomal degradation. Consistently, loss of these IAPs by various strategies led to stabilization of Rac1 and mesenchymal mode of migration in tumor cells. IAPs also regulate Rac1 degradation upon RhoGDI1 depletion and CNF1 toxin treatment. Our observations revealed an evolutionarily conserved role of IAPs in regulating Rac1 stability shedding light on to the mechanisms behind ubiquitination-dependent inactivation of Rac1 signaling. PMID:22790203

  7. Nanogranular origin of concrete creep

    PubMed Central

    Vandamme, Matthieu; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-01-01

    Concrete, the solid that forms at room temperature from mixing Portland cement with water, sand, and aggregates, suffers from time-dependent deformation under load. This creep occurs at a rate that deteriorates the durability and truncates the lifespan of concrete structures. However, despite decades of research, the origin of concrete creep remains unknown. Here, we measure the in situ creep behavior of calcium–silicate–hydrates (C–S–H), the nano-meter sized particles that form the fundamental building block of Portland cement concrete. We show that C–S–H exhibits a logarithmic creep that depends only on the packing of 3 structurally distinct but compositionally similar C–S–H forms: low density, high density, ultra-high density. We demonstrate that the creep rate (≈1/t) is likely due to the rearrangement of nanoscale particles around limit packing densities following the free-volume dynamics theory of granular physics. These findings could lead to a new basis for nanoengineering concrete materials and structures with minimal creep rates monitored by packing density distributions of nanoscale particles, and predicted by nanoscale creep measurements in some minute time, which are as exact as macroscopic creep tests carried out over years. PMID:19541652

  8. Nanogranular origin of concrete creep.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, Matthieu; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-06-30

    Concrete, the solid that forms at room temperature from mixing Portland cement with water, sand, and aggregates, suffers from time-dependent deformation under load. This creep occurs at a rate that deteriorates the durability and truncates the lifespan of concrete structures. However, despite decades of research, the origin of concrete creep remains unknown. Here, we measure the in situ creep behavior of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the nano-meter sized particles that form the fundamental building block of Portland cement concrete. We show that C-S-H exhibits a logarithmic creep that depends only on the packing of 3 structurally distinct but compositionally similar C-S-H forms: low density, high density, ultra-high density. We demonstrate that the creep rate ( approximately 1/t) is likely due to the rearrangement of nanoscale particles around limit packing densities following the free-volume dynamics theory of granular physics. These findings could lead to a new basis for nanoengineering concrete materials and structures with minimal creep rates monitored by packing density distributions of nanoscale particles, and predicted by nanoscale creep measurements in some minute time, which are as exact as macroscopic creep tests carried out over years. PMID:19541652

  9. Experimental study on dynamic splitting of recycled concrete using SHPB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yubin; Yu, Shuisheng; Cai, Yong

    2015-09-01

    To study the recycled concrete splitting tensile properties and fracture state with various recycled coarse aggregate replacement percentage (i.e. 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%), the dynamic splitting test of recycled concrete was carried out using large diameter (75 mm) split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB). The results show that the recycled concrete splitting tensile strength increases with the increase of loading rate, and the loading rate also affects the recycled concrete fracture state, which indicates that the recycled concrete has obvious rate sensitivity. The damage state of the recycled concrete is not only the destruction of the interface between coarse aggregate and cement mortar, but also associates with the fracture damage of aggregates. Under the same water cement ratio, when the replacement percentage of coarse aggregates is around 50%-75%, the gradation of natural and recycled coarse aggregate is optimal, and thus the splitting tensile strength is the largest. This study offers theoretical basis for the engineering applications of recycled concrete.

  10. Activated Rac1 requires gp130 for Stat3 activation, cell proliferation and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Arulanandam, Rozanne; Geletu, Mulu; Feracci, Helene; Raptis, Leda

    2010-03-10

    Rac1 (Rac) is a member of the Rho family of small GTPases which controls cell migration by regulating the organization of actin filaments. Previous results suggested that mutationally activated forms of the Rho GTPases can activate the Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription-3 (Stat3), but the exact mechanism is a matter of controversy. We recently demonstrated that Stat3 activity of cultured cells increases dramatically following E-cadherin engagement. To better understand this pathway, we now compared Stat3 activity levels in mouse HC11 cells before and after expression of the mutationally activated Rac1 (Rac{sup V12}), at different cell densities. The results revealed for the first time a dramatic increase in protein levels and activity of both the endogenous Rac and Rac{sup V12} with cell density, which was due to inhibition of proteasomal degradation. In addition, Rac{sup V12}-expressing cells had higher Stat3, tyrosine-705 phosphorylation and activity levels at all densities, indicating that Rac{sup V12} is able to activate Stat3. Further examination of the mechanism of Stat3 activation showed that Rac{sup V12} expression caused a surge in mRNA of Interleukin-6 (IL6) family cytokines, known potent Stat3 activators. Knockdown of gp130, the common subunit of this family reduced Stat3 activity, indicating that these cytokines may be responsible for the Stat3 activation by Rac{sup V12}. The upregulation of IL6 family cytokines was required for cell migration and proliferation induced by Rac{sup V12}, as shown by gp130 knockdown experiments, thus demonstrating that the gp130/Stat3 axis represents an essential effector of activated Rac for the regulation of key cellular functions.

  11. Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Kukacka, Lawrence E.; Horn, William H.

    1985-01-01

    Quick setting polymer concrete compositions with excellent structural properties are disclosed; these polymer concrete compositions are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate, which may be wet, and with a source of bivalent metallic ions.

  12. Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.H.

    1981-11-04

    Quick setting polymer concrete compositions which are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate which may be wet and a source of bivalent metallic ions which will set to polymer concrete with excellent structural properties.

  13. Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.H.

    1983-05-13

    Quick setting polymer concrete compositions are described which are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate which may be wet and a source of bivalent metallic ions which will set to polymer concrete with excellent structural properties.

  14. Environmental evaluation of green concretes versus conventional concrete by means of LCA.

    PubMed

    Turk, Janez; Cotič, Zvonko; Mladenovič, Ana; Šajna, Aljoša

    2015-11-01

    A number of green concrete mixes having similar basic properties were evaluated from the environmental point of view by means of the Life Cycle Assessment method, and compared with a corresponding conventional concrete mix. The investigated green concrete mixes were prepared from three different types of industrial by-products, i.e. (1) foundry sand, and (2) steel slag, both of which were used as manufactured aggregates, and (3) fly ash, which was used as a mineral admixture. Some green concrete mixes were also prepared from a recycled aggregate, which was obtained from reinforced concrete waste. In some of the green concrete mixes the recycled aggregate was used in combination with the above-mentioned types of manufactured aggregate and fly ash. All of these materials are able, to some extent, to replace natural aggregate or Portland cement in concrete mixes, thus providing an environmental benefit from the point of view of the saving of natural resources. Taking into account consequential modelling, the credit related to the avoidance of the need to dispose of the waste materials is considered as a benefit. In case of the recycling of waste concrete into aggregate, credit is attributed to the recovery of scrap iron from the steel reinforcement. In the case of the use of steel slag, credit is attributed to the recovery of metals, which are extracted from the slag before being used as an alternative material. The disadvantage of using alternative materials and recycled aggregates can sometimes be their relatively long delivery distance. For this reason, a transport sensitivity analysis was carried out. The results indicate that the use of the discussed alternative and recycled materials is beneficial in the concrete production industry. Preference is given to the fly ash and foundry sand scenarios, and especially to those scenarios which are based on the combined use of recycled aggregate with these two alternative materials. It was found that longer delivery

  15. Modeling of anisotropic ablation of the concrete during Molten Core Concrete Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kyoung Min

    This work proposes a model to explain concrete anisotropic ablation by corium during a Molten Corium Concrete Interaction (MCCI). As a result of recent MCCI prototypic material experiments, CCI and VULCANO tests, one observes that concrete ablation behavior consistently depends on the concrete materials used in the experiments. Specifically, tests with Limestone-Common-Sand (LCS) concrete yielded isotropic concrete ablation; i.e., equal axial and radial concrete erosion. This is in comparison to anisotropic ablation in tests with Siliceous (SIL) concrete, where radial ablation was much larger than axial ablation. This was an unexpected result, because prior results of many MCCI simulant experiments indicated that nearly isotropic ablation was expected in prototypic material experiments regardless of concrete type. A new phenomenological model is proposed in this work based on a hypothesis that unifies the result of both previous simulant and prototypic material experiments; i.e., heat transfer area enhancement and delayed gas release caused by the presence of un-melted solid aggregate material that enters the molten pool. This model offers a logical and phenomenological explanation concerning anisotropic ablation as well as the capability to simulate anisotropic ablation. This model is implemented into the CORQUENCH code as part of this work. Comparisons of simulation results obtained with this new model to the CCI experiments for cases with siliceous concrete and anisotropic ablation show better agreement with the test data than the existing model.

  16. SA-based concrete seismic stress monitoring: a case study for normal strength concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, S.; Zhang, H. B.; Ou, J. P.

    2016-09-01

    The stress history of concrete structures that have survived an earthquake can serve as a critical index to evaluate the health of the structure. There are currently few reliable monitoring methods to assess concrete stress after a seismic event. Piezoelectric-based smart aggregate (SA) provides an innovative experimental approach to monitor stress on concrete. The principle of SA-based concrete seismic stress monitoring is based on the assumption that concrete stress can be reliably predicted by the average output voltages of limited SAs with an acceptable margin of error. In this study, the meso-scale randomness of concrete was evaluated throughout the overall stress range of concrete and the influence of different load paths was considered. Four cylindrical specimens of normal strength concrete were embedded with a total of 24 SAs. The SA output sensitivity curve in the paths of loading–unloading with different amplitudes and monotonic loading up to failure was obtained. Monitoring errors were analyzed during pre- and post-peak stages from the experimental results. This research suggests that SA-based concrete seismic stress monitoring for normal strength concrete is reliable.

  17. Regulation of Rac1 translocation and activation by membrane domains and their boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Moissoglu, Konstadinos; Kiessling, Volker; Wan, Chen; Hoffman, Brenton D.; Norambuena, Andres; Tamm, Lukas K.; Schwartz, Martin Alexander

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The activation of Rac1 and related Rho GTPases involves dissociation from Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor proteins and translocation to membranes, where they bind effectors. Previous studies have suggested that the binding of Rac1 to membranes requires, and colocalizes with, cholesterol-rich liquid-ordered (lo) membrane domains (lipid rafts). Here, we have developed a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay that robustly detects Rac1 membrane targeting in living cells. Surprisingly, FRET with acceptor constructs that were targeted to either raft or non-raft areas indicated that Rac1 was present in both regions. Functional studies showed that Rac1 localization to non-raft regions decreased GTP loading as a result of inactivation by GTPase-activating proteins. In vitro, Rac1 translocation to supported lipid bilayers also required lo domains, yet Rac1 was concentrated in the liquid-disordered (ld) phase. Single-molecule analysis demonstrated that translocation occurred preferentially at lo–ld boundaries. These results, therefore, suggest that Rac1 translocates to the membrane at domain boundaries, then diffuses into raft and non-raft domains, which controls interactions. These findings resolve discrepancies in our understanding of Rac biology and identify novel mechanisms by which lipid rafts modulate Rho GTPase signaling. PMID:24695858

  18. Extending the Impact of RAC1b Overexpression to Follicular Thyroid Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Faria, Márcia; Capinha, Liliana; Simões-Pereira, Joana; Bugalho, Maria João; Silva, Ana Luísa

    2016-01-01

    RAC1b is a hyperactive variant of the small GTPase RAC1 known to be a relevant molecular player in different cancers. Previous studies from our group lead to the evidence that its overexpression in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is associated with an unfavorable prognosis. In the present study, we intended to extend the analysis of RAC1b expression to thyroid follicular neoplasms and to seek for clinical correlations. RAC1b expression levels were determined by RT-qPCR in thyroid follicular tumor samples comprising 23 follicular thyroid carcinomas (FTCs) and 33 follicular thyroid adenomas (FTAs). RAC1b was found to be overexpressed in 33% of carcinomas while no RAC1b overexpression was documented among follicular adenomas. Patients with a diagnosis of FTC were divided into two groups based on longitudinal evolution and final outcome. RAC1b overexpression was significantly associated with both the presence of distant metastases (P = 0.01) and poorer clinical outcome (P = 0.01) suggesting that, similarly to that previously found in PTCs, RAC1b overexpression in FTCs is also associated with worse outcomes. Furthermore, the absence of RAC1b overexpression in follicular adenomas hints its potential as a molecular marker likely to contribute, in conjunction with other putative markers, to the preoperative differential diagnosis of thyroid follicular lesions. PMID:27127508

  19. Extending the Impact of RAC1b Overexpression to Follicular Thyroid Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Márcia; Capinha, Liliana; Simões-Pereira, Joana; Bugalho, Maria João; Silva, Ana Luísa

    2016-01-01

    RAC1b is a hyperactive variant of the small GTPase RAC1 known to be a relevant molecular player in different cancers. Previous studies from our group lead to the evidence that its overexpression in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is associated with an unfavorable prognosis. In the present study, we intended to extend the analysis of RAC1b expression to thyroid follicular neoplasms and to seek for clinical correlations. RAC1b expression levels were determined by RT-qPCR in thyroid follicular tumor samples comprising 23 follicular thyroid carcinomas (FTCs) and 33 follicular thyroid adenomas (FTAs). RAC1b was found to be overexpressed in 33% of carcinomas while no RAC1b overexpression was documented among follicular adenomas. Patients with a diagnosis of FTC were divided into two groups based on longitudinal evolution and final outcome. RAC1b overexpression was significantly associated with both the presence of distant metastases (P = 0.01) and poorer clinical outcome (P = 0.01) suggesting that, similarly to that previously found in PTCs, RAC1b overexpression in FTCs is also associated with worse outcomes. Furthermore, the absence of RAC1b overexpression in follicular adenomas hints its potential as a molecular marker likely to contribute, in conjunction with other putative markers, to the preoperative differential diagnosis of thyroid follicular lesions. PMID:27127508

  20. Melatonin suppresses hypoxia-induced migration of HUVECs via inhibition of ERK/Rac1 activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ling; Zheng, Jianchao; Xu, Rui; Zhang, Yujie; Gu, Luo; Dong, Jing; Zhu, Yichao; Zhou, Ruijue; Zheng, Lu; Zhang, Xiaoying; Du, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin, a naturally-occurring hormone, possesses antioxidant properties and ameliorates vascular endothelial dysfunction. In this study, we evaluate the impact of melatonin on the migratory capability of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to hypoxia and further investigate whether ERK/Rac1 signaling is involved in this process. Here, we found that melatonin inhibited hypoxia-stimulated hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression and cell migration in a dose-dependent manner. Mechanistically, melatonin inhibited Rac1 activation and suppressed the co-localized Rac1 and F-actin on the membrane of HUVECs under hypoxic condition. In addition, the blockade of Rac1 activation with ectopic expression of an inactive mutant form of Rac1-T17N suppressed HIF-1α expression and cell migration in response to hypoxia, as well, but constitutive activation of Rac1 mutant Rac1-V12 restored HIF-1α expression, preventing the inhibition of melatonin on cell migration. Furthermore, the anti-Rac1 effect of melatonin in HUVECs appeared to be associated with its inhibition of ERK phosphorylation, but not that of the PI3k/Akt signaling pathway. Taken together, our work indicates that melatonin exerts an anti-migratory effect on hypoxic HUVECs by blocking ERK/Rac1 activation and subsequent HIF-1α upregulation. PMID:25123138

  1. Environmentalism and natural aggregate mining

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drew, L.J.; Langer, W.H.; Sachs, J.S.

    2002-01-01

    Sustaining a developed economy and expanding a developing one require the use of large volumes of natural aggregate. Almost all human activity (commercial, recreational, or leisure) is transacted in or on facilities constructed from natural aggregate. In our urban and suburban worlds, we are almost totally dependent on supplies of water collected behind dams and transported through aqueducts made from concrete. Natural aggregate is essential to the facilities that produce energy-hydroelectric dams and coal-fired powerplants. Ironically, the utility created for mankind by the use of natural aggregate is rarely compared favorably with the environmental impacts of mining it. Instead, the empty quarries and pits are seen as large negative environmental consequences. At the root of this disassociation is the philosophy of environmentalism, which flavors our perceptions of the excavation, processing, and distribution of natural aggregate. The two end-member ideas in this philosophy are ecocentrism and anthropocentrism. Ecocentrism takes the position that the natural world is a organism whose arteries are the rivers-their flow must not be altered. The soil is another vital organ and must not be covered with concrete and asphalt. The motto of the ecocentrist is "man must live more lightly on the land." The anthropocentrist wants clean water and air and an uncluttered landscape for human use. Mining is allowed and even encouraged, but dust and noise from quarry and pit operations must be minimized. The large volume of truck traffic is viewed as a real menace to human life and should be regulated and isolated. The environmental problems that the producers of natural aggregate (crushed stone and sand and gravel) face today are mostly difficult social and political concerns associated with the large holes dug in the ground and the large volume of heavy truck traffic associated with quarry and pit operations. These concerns have increased in recent years as society's demand for

  2. Nanomechanics and Multiscale Modeling of Sustainable Concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanjani Zadeh, Vahid

    The work presented in this dissertation is aimed to implement and further develop the recent advances in material characterization for porous and heterogeneous materials and apply these advances to sustainable concretes. The studied sustainable concretes were concrete containing fly ash and slag, Kenaf fiber reinforced concrete, and lightweight aggregate concrete. All these cement-based materials can be categorized as sustainable concrete, by achieving concrete with high strength while reducing cement consumption. The nanoindentation technique was used to infer the nanomechanical properties of the active hydration phases in bulk cement paste. Moreover, the interfacial transition zone (ITZ) of lightweight aggregate, normal aggregate, and Kenaf fibers were investigated using nanoindentation and imagine techniques, despite difficulties regarding characterizing this region. Samples were also tested after exposure to high temperature to evaluate the damage mechanics of sustainable concretes. It has been shown that there is a direct correlation between the nature of the nanoscale structure of a cement-based material with its macroscopic properties. This was addressed in two steps in this dissertation: (i) Nanoscale characterization of sustainable cementitious materials to understand the different role of fly ash, slag, lightweight aggregate, and Kenaf fibers on nanoscale (ii) Link the nanoscale mechanical properties to macroscale ones with multiscale modeling. The grid indentation technique originally developed for normal concrete was extended to sustainable concretes with more complex microstructure. The relation between morphology of cement paste materials and submicron mechanical properties, indentation modulus, hardness, and dissipated energy is explained in detail. Extensive experimental and analytical approaches were focused on description of the materials' heterogeneous microstructure as function of their composition and physical phenomenon. Quantitative

  3. Characterization of the Rac-GAP (Rac-GTPase-activating protein) activity of beta2-chimaerin, a 'non-protein kinase C' phorbol ester receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Caloca, Maria Jose; Wang, HongBin; Kazanietz, Marcelo G

    2003-01-01

    The regulation and function of beta2-chimaerin, a novel receptor for the phorbol ester tumour promoters and the second messenger DAG (diacylglycerol), is largely unknown. As with PKC (protein kinase C) isoenzymes, phorbol esters bind to beta2-chimaerin with high affinity and promote its subcellular distribution. beta2-Chimaerin has GAP (GTPase-activating protein) activity for the small GTP-binding protein Rac1, but for not Cdc42 or RhoA. We show that acidic phospholipids enhanced its catalytic activity markedly in vitro, but the phorbol ester PMA had no effect. beta2-Chimaerin and other chimaerin isoforms decreased cellular levels of Rac-GTP markedly in COS-1 cells and impaired GTP loading on to Rac upon EGF (epidermal growth factor) receptor stimulation. Deletional and mutagenesis analysis determined that the beta2-chimaerin GAP domain is essential for this effect. Interestingly, PMA has a dual effect on Rac-GTP levels in COS-1 cells. PMA increased Rac-GTP levels in the absence of a PKC inhibitor, whereas under conditions in which PKC activity is inhibited, PMA markedly decreased Rac-GTP levels and potentiated the effect of beta2-chimaerin. Chimaerin isoforms co-localize at the plasma membrane with active Rac, and these results were substantiated by co-immunoprecipitation assays. In summary, the novel phorbol ester receptor beta2-chimaerin regulates the activity of the Rac GTPase through its GAP domain, leading to Rac inactivation. These results strongly emphasize the high complexity of DAG signalling due to the activation of PKC-independent pathways, and cast doubts regarding the selectivity of phorbol esters and DAG analogues as selective PKC activators. PMID:12877655

  4. Cloning and characterization of bovine low molecular weight GTPases (Rac1 and Rac2) and rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor 2 (D4-GDI).

    PubMed

    Davis, A R; Clements, M K; Bunger, P L; Siemsen, D W; Quinn, M T

    2000-05-23

    GTPases of the Rho family play important roles in human leukocyte signal transduction pathways; however, little is known about the function of these proteins in bovine cells. In the present studies, we isolated molecular clones of bovine Rac1, Rac2, and the Rac/Rho GTPase regulatory protein D4-GDP dissociation inhibitor (D4-GDI) from a bovine bone marrow cDNA library. These clones contained complete open reading frames, encoding 192, 192, and 200 amino acids, respectively. Comparison of the bovine amino acid sequences with those of other species demonstrated a high degree of identity of these proteins across all species, suggesting that these proteins likely play conserved functional roles in bovine leukocyte signal transduction pathways. Comparative Western blotting of these proteins in human and bovine neutrophil cytosol demonstrated that Rac2 was the predominant Rac species and that D4-GDI was the predominant GDI species in bovine neutrophil cytosol. Despite the high degree of homology between human and bovine Rac2, some of the anti-peptide antibody probes prepared against human Rac2 failed to recognize the bovine homologue. We also showed by subcellular fractionation techniques that Rac2 is localized primarily to the cytosolic compartment of resting bovine neutrophils, but is translocated to the plasma membrane after stimulation with PMA. These findings suggest that Rac2 does play a role in bovine neutrophil activation. In addition, these data will be helpful in developing more specific probes for investigating the role of these proteins in bovine leukocyte signal transduction pathways and for studying various inflammatory diseases in cattle. PMID:10802295

  5. Standard test method for resistance of concrete to rapid freezing and thawing. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    This test method is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee C-9 on Concrete and Concrete Aggregates and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee C09.67 on Resistance of Concrete to Its Environment. Current edition approved Jun. 10, 1997 and published June 1998. Originally published as C 666-71. Last previous edition was C 666-92.

  6. The optimization of concrete mixtures for use in highway applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moini, Mohamadreza

    Portland cement concrete is most used commodity in the world after water. Major part of civil and transportation infrastructure including bridges, roadway pavements, dams, and buildings is made of concrete. In addition to this, concrete durability is often of major concerns. In 2013 American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) estimated that an annual investment of 170 billion on roads and 20.5 billion for bridges is needed on an annual basis to substantially improve the condition of infrastructure. Same article reports that one-third of America's major roads are in poor or mediocre condition [1]. However, portland cement production is recognized with approximately one cubic meter of carbon dioxide emission. Indeed, the proper and systematic design of concrete mixtures for highway applications is essential as concrete pavements represent up to 60% of interstate highway systems with heavier traffic loads. Combined principles of material science and engineering can provide adequate methods and tools to facilitate the concrete design and improve the existing specifications. In the same manner, the durability must be addressed in the design and enhancement of long-term performance. Concrete used for highway pavement applications has low cement content and can be placed at low slump. However, further reduction of cement content (e.g., versus current specifications of Wisconsin Department of Transportation to 315-338 kg/m 3 (530-570 lb/yd3) for mainstream concrete pavements and 335 kg/m3 (565 lb/yd3) for bridge substructure and superstructures) requires delicate design of the mixture to maintain the expected workability, overall performance, and long-term durability in the field. The design includes, but not limited to optimization of aggregates, supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs), chemical and air-entraining admixtures. This research investigated various theoretical and experimental methods of aggregate optimization applicable for the reduction of cement content

  7. Monte Carlo simulations for optimization of neutron shielding concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Tomasz; Tefelski, Dariusz; Polański, Aleksander; Skubalski, Janusz

    2012-06-01

    Concrete is one of the main materials used for gamma and neutron shielding. While in case of gamma rays an increase in density is usually efficient enough, protection against neutrons is more complex. The aim of this paper is to show the possibility of using the Monte Carlo codes for evaluation and optimization of concrete mix to reach better neutron shielding. Two codes (MCNPX and SPOT — written by authors) were used to simulate neutron transport through a wall made of different concretes. It is showed that concrete of higher compressive strength attenuates neutrons more effectively. The advantage of heavyweight concrete (with barite aggregate), usually used for gamma shielding, over the ordinary concrete was not so clear. Neutron shielding depends on many factors e.g. neutron energy, barrier thickness and atomic composition. All this makes a proper design of concrete as a very important issue for nuclear power plant safety assurance.

  8. Laser ablation studies of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.; Xu, Z.; Wang, Y.; Reed, C.; Pellin, M.

    1999-10-20

    Laser ablation was studied as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. The authors present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied using cement and high density concrete as targets. Ablation efficiency and material removal rates were determined as functions of irradiance and pulse overlap. Doped samples were also ablated to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants were removed and captured in the effluent. The results show that the cement phase of the material melts and vaporizes, but the aggregate portion (sand and rock) fragments. The effluent consists of both micron-size aerosol particles and chunks of fragmented aggregate material. Laser-induced optical emission spectroscopy was used to analyze the surface during ablation. Analysis of the effluent showed that contaminants such as cesium and strontium were strongly segregated into different regions of the particle size distribution of the aerosol.

  9. New insights into the dimerization of small GTPase Rac/ROP guanine nucleotide exchange factors in rice

    PubMed Central

    Akamatsu, Akira; Uno, Kazumi; Kato, Midori; Wong, Hann Ling; Shimamoto, Ko; Kawano, Yoji

    2015-01-01

    Molecular links between receptor-kinases and Rac/ROP family small GTPases mediated by activator guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) govern diverse biological processes. However, it is unclear how the Rac/ROP GTPases orchestrate such a wide variety of activities. Here, we show that rice OsRacGEF1 forms homodimers, and heterodimers with OsRacGEF2, at the plasma membrane (PM) and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). OsRacGEF2 does not bind directly to the receptor-like kinase (RLK) OsCERK1, but forms a complex with OsCERK1 through OsRacGEF1 at the ER. This complex is transported from ER to the PM and there associates with OsRac1, resulting in the formation of a stable immune complex. Such RLK-GEF heterodimer complexes may explain the diversity of Rac/ROP family GTPase signalings. PMID:26251883

  10. Evaluating damage potential of cryogenic concrete using acoustic emission sensors and permeability testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogbara, Reginald B.; Parsaei, Boback; Iyengar, Srinath R.; Grasley, Zachary C.; Masad, Eyad A.; Zollinger, Dan G.

    2014-04-01

    This study evaluates the damage potential of concrete of different mix designs subjected to cryogenic temperatures, using acoustic emission (AE) and permeability testing. The aim is to investigate design methodologies that might be employed to produce concrete that resists damage when cooled to cryogenic temperatures. Such concrete would be suitable for primary containment of liquefied natural gas (LNG) and could replace currently used 9% Ni steel, thereby leading to huge cost savings. In the experiments described, concrete cubes, 150 mm x 150 mm x 150 mm, were cast using four different mix designs. The four mixes employed siliceous river sand as fine aggregate. Moreover, limestone, sandstone, trap rock and lightweight aggregate were individually used as coarse aggregates in the mixes. The concrete samples were then cooled from room temperature (20°C) to cryogenic temperature (-165°C) in a temperature chamber. AE sensors were placed on the concrete cubes during the cryogenic freezing process. The damage potential was evaluated in terms of the growth of damage as determined from AE, as a function of temperature and concrete mixture design. The damage potential observed was validated with water permeability testing. Initial results demonstrate the effects of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the aggregates on damage growth. Concrete damage (cracking) resistance generally decreased with increasing coarse aggregate CTE, and was in the order, limestone ≥ trap rock << lightweight aggregate ≥ sandstone. Work is in progress to fully understand thermal dilation and damage growth in concrete due to differential CTE of its components.

  11. Waste tyre rubberized concrete: properties at fresh and hardened state.

    PubMed

    Aiello, M A; Leuzzi, F

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to investigate the properties of various concrete mixtures at fresh and hardened state, obtained by a partial substitution of coarse and fine aggregate with different volume percentages of waste tyres rubber particles, having the same dimensions of the replaced aggregate. Workability, unit weight, compressive and flexural strength and post-cracking behaviour were evaluated and a comparison of the results for the different rubcrete mixtures were proposed in order to define the better mix proportions in terms of mechanical properties of the rubberized concrete. Results showed in this paper were also compared to data reported in literature. Moreover, a preliminary geometrical, physical and mechanical characterization on scrap tyre rubber shreds was made. The rubberized concrete mixtures showed lower unit weight compared to plain concrete and good workability. The results of compressive and flexural tests indicated a larger reduction of mechanical properties of rubcrete when replacing coarse aggregate rather than fine aggregate. On the other hand, the post-cracking behaviour of rubberized concrete was positively affected by the substitution of coarse aggregate with rubber shreds, showing a good energy absorption and ductility indexes in the range observed for fibrous concrete, as suggested by standard (ASTM C1018-97, 1997). PMID:20207128

  12. MYADM regulates Rac1 targeting to ordered membranes required for cell spreading and migration.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Juan F; Reglero-Real, Natalia; Kremer, Leonor; Marcos-Ramiro, Beatriz; Ruiz-Sáenz, Ana; Calvo, María; Enrich, Carlos; Correas, Isabel; Millán, Jaime; Alonso, Miguel A

    2011-04-15

    Membrane organization into condensed domains or rafts provides molecular platforms for selective recruitment of proteins. Cell migration is a general process that requires spatiotemporal targeting of Rac1 to membrane rafts. The protein machinery responsible for making rafts competent to recruit Rac1 remains elusive. Some members of the MAL family of proteins are involved in specialized processes dependent on this type of membrane. Because condensed membrane domains are a general feature of the plasma membrane of all mammalian cells, we hypothesized that MAL family members with ubiquitous expression and plasma membrane distribution could be involved in the organization of membranes for cell migration. We show that myeloid-associated differentiation marker (MYADM), a protein with unique features within the MAL family, colocalizes with Rac1 in membrane protrusions at the cell surface and distributes in condensed membranes. MYADM knockdown (KD) cells had altered membrane condensation and showed deficient incorporation of Rac1 to membrane raft fractions and, similar to Rac1 KD cells, exhibited reduced cell spreading and migration. Results of rescue-of-function experiments by expression of MYADM or active Rac1L61 in cells knocked down for Rac1 or MYADM, respectively, are consistent with the idea that MYADM and Rac1 act on parallel pathways that lead to similar functional outcomes. PMID:21325632

  13. Corticosterone regulates fear memory via Rac1 activity in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Gan, Ping; Ding, Ze-Yang; Gan, Cheng; Mao, Rong-Rong; Zhou, Heng; Xu, Lin; Zhou, Qi-Xin

    2016-09-01

    Stressful events can generate enduring memories, which may induce certain psychiatric disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms in these processes remain unclear. In this study, we examined whether the active form of the small G protein Rac1, Rac1-GTP, is involved in fear memory. Firstly, we detected the time course changes of Rac1-GTP after foot shocks (a strong stressor) and exogenous corticosterone (CORT) treatment. The data showed that stress and CORT induced the downregulation of Rac1-GTP in the hippocampus. Changes in the serum CORT level were negatively correlated with the level of Rac1-GTP. Additionally, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, RU38486, not only recovered the expression of Rac1-GTP but also impaired fear memory. Furthermore, systemic administration of NSC23766, an inhibitor of Rac1-GTP, improved fear memory at 1.5 and 24h. Therefore, Rac1 activity plays a critical role in stress-related cognition and may be a potential target in stress-related disorders. PMID:27249795

  14. The Rac1 hypervariable region in targeting and signaling: a tail of many stories.

    PubMed

    Lam, B Daniel; Hordijk, Peter L

    2013-01-01

    Cellular signaling by small GTPases is critically dependent on proper spatio-temporal orchestration of activation and output. In addition to their core G (guanine nucleotide binding)-domain, small GTPases comprise a hypervariable region (HVR) and a lipid anchor that are generally accepted to control subcellullar localization. The HVR encodes in many small GTPases a polybasic region (PBR) that permits charge-mediated association to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane or to intracellular organelles. Over the past 15-20 years, evidence has accumulated for specific protein-protein interactions, mediated by the HVR, that control both targeting and signaling specificity of small GTPases. Using the RhoGTPase Rac1 as a paradigm we here review a series of protein partners that require the Rac1 HVR for association and that control various aspects of localized Rac1 signaling. Some of these proteins represent Rac1 activators, whereas others mediate Rac1 inactivation and degradation and yet others potentiate Rac1 downstream signaling. Finally, evidence is discussed which shows that the HVR of Rac1 also contributes to effector interactions, co-operating with the N-terminal effector domain. The complexity of localized Rac1 signaling, reviewed here, is most likely exemplary for many other small GTPases as well, representing a challenge to identify and define similar mechanisms controlling the specific signaling induced by small GTPases. PMID:23354415

  15. Aluminium salalens vs. salans: "Initiator Design" for the isoselective polymerisation of rac-lactide.

    PubMed

    McKeown, Paul; Davidson, Matthew G; Kociok-Köhn, Gabriele; Jones, Matthew D

    2016-08-16

    We report the rationalised design of aluminium initiators and their application for ROP of rac-lactide (rac-LA). A very minor change to the ligand backbone (imine reduction) to give secondary amines was found to have a dramatic effect on activity and selectivity with isotactic PLA being realised. PMID:27487791

  16. Rac1 is a novel regulator of contraction-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sylow, Lykke; Jensen, Thomas E; Kleinert, Maximilian; Mouatt, Joshua R; Maarbjerg, Stine J; Jeppesen, Jacob; Prats, Clara; Chiu, Tim T; Boguslavsky, Shlomit; Klip, Amira; Schjerling, Peter; Richter, Erik A

    2013-04-01

    In skeletal muscle, the actin cytoskeleton-regulating GTPase, Rac1, is necessary for insulin-dependent GLUT4 translocation. Muscle contraction increases glucose transport and represents an alternative signaling pathway to insulin. Whether Rac1 is activated by muscle contraction and regulates contraction-induced glucose uptake is unknown. Therefore, we studied the effects of in vivo exercise and ex vivo muscle contractions on Rac1 signaling and its regulatory role in glucose uptake in mice and humans. Muscle Rac1-GTP binding was increased after exercise in mice (~60-100%) and humans (~40%), and this activation was AMP-activated protein kinase independent. Rac1 inhibition reduced contraction-stimulated glucose uptake in mouse muscle by 55% in soleus and by 20-58% in extensor digitorum longus (EDL; P < 0.01). In agreement, the contraction-stimulated increment in glucose uptake was decreased by 27% (P = 0.1) and 40% (P < 0.05) in soleus and EDL muscles, respectively, of muscle-specific inducible Rac1 knockout mice. Furthermore, depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton decreased contraction-stimulated glucose uptake by 100% and 62% (P < 0.01) in soleus and EDL muscles, respectively. These are the first data to show that Rac1 is activated during muscle contraction in murine and human skeletal muscle and suggest that Rac1 and possibly the actin cytoskeleton are novel regulators of contraction-stimulated glucose uptake. PMID:23274900

  17. Rac1 Is a Novel Regulator of Contraction-Stimulated Glucose Uptake in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sylow, Lykke; Jensen, Thomas E.; Kleinert, Maximilian; Mouatt, Joshua R.; Maarbjerg, Stine J.; Jeppesen, Jacob; Prats, Clara; Chiu, Tim T.; Boguslavsky, Shlomit; Klip, Amira; Schjerling, Peter; Richter, Erik A.

    2013-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, the actin cytoskeleton-regulating GTPase, Rac1, is necessary for insulin-dependent GLUT4 translocation. Muscle contraction increases glucose transport and represents an alternative signaling pathway to insulin. Whether Rac1 is activated by muscle contraction and regulates contraction-induced glucose uptake is unknown. Therefore, we studied the effects of in vivo exercise and ex vivo muscle contractions on Rac1 signaling and its regulatory role in glucose uptake in mice and humans. Muscle Rac1-GTP binding was increased after exercise in mice (∼60–100%) and humans (∼40%), and this activation was AMP-activated protein kinase independent. Rac1 inhibition reduced contraction-stimulated glucose uptake in mouse muscle by 55% in soleus and by 20–58% in extensor digitorum longus (EDL; P < 0.01). In agreement, the contraction-stimulated increment in glucose uptake was decreased by 27% (P = 0.1) and 40% (P < 0.05) in soleus and EDL muscles, respectively, of muscle-specific inducible Rac1 knockout mice. Furthermore, depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton decreased contraction-stimulated glucose uptake by 100% and 62% (P < 0.01) in soleus and EDL muscles, respectively. These are the first data to show that Rac1 is activated during muscle contraction in murine and human skeletal muscle and suggest that Rac1 and possibly the actin cytoskeleton are novel regulators of contraction-stimulated glucose uptake. PMID:23274900

  18. Individual Rac GTPases Mediate Aspects of Prostate Cancer Cell and Bone Marrow Endothelial Cell Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Moumita; Sequeira, Linda; Jenkins-Kabaila, Mashariki; Dubyk, Cara W.; Pathak, Surabhi; van Golen, Kenneth L.

    2011-01-01

    The Rho GTPases organize the actin cytoskeleton and are involved in cancer metastasis. Previously, we demonstrated that RhoC GTPase was required for PC-3 prostate cancer cell invasion. Targeted down-regulation of RhoC led to sustained activation of Rac1 GTPase and morphological, molecular and phenotypic changes reminiscent of epithelial to mesenchymal transition. We also reported that Rac1 is required for PC-3 cell diapedesis across a bone marrow endothelial cell layer. In the current study, we queried whether Rac3 and RhoG GTPases also have a role in prostate tumor cell diapedesis. Using specific siRNAs we demonstrate roles for each protein in PC-3 and C4-2 cell adhesion and diapedesis. We have shown that the chemokine CCL2 induces tumor cell diapedesis via Rac1 activation. Here we find that RhoG partially contributes to CCL2-induced tumor cell diapedesis. We also find that Rac1 GTPase mediates tight binding of prostate cancer cells to bone marrow endothelial cells and promotes retraction of endothelial cells required for tumor cell diapedesis. Finally, Rac1 leads to β1 integrin activation, suggesting a mechanism that Rac1 can mediate tight binding with endothelial cells. Together, our data suggest that Rac1 GTPase is key mediator of prostate cancer cell-bone marrow endothelial cell interactions. PMID:21776386

  19. Inhibition of Rac1 activity in the hippocampus impaired extinction of contextual fear.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lizhu; Mao, Rongrong; Tong, Jianbin; Li, Jinnan; Chai, Anping; Zhou, Qixin; Yang, Yuexiong; Wang, Liping; Li, Lingjiang; Xu, Lin

    2016-10-01

    Promoting extinction of fear memory is the main treatment of fear disorders, especially post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, fear extinction is often incomplete in these patients. Our previous study had shown that Rac1 activity in hippocampus plays a crucial role in the learning of contextual fear memory in rats. Here, we further investigated whether Rac1 activity also modulated the extinction of contextual fear memory. We found that massed extinction obviously upregulated hippocampal Rac1 activity and induced long-term extinction of contextual fear in rats. Intrahippocampal injection of the Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 prevents extinction of contextual fear in massed extinction training rats. In contrast, long-spaced extinction downregulated Rac1 activity and caused less extinction. And Rac1 activator CN04-A promotes extinction of contextual fear in long-spaced extinction rats. Our study demonstrates that inhibition of Rac1 activity in the hippocampus impaired extinction of contextual fear, suggesting that modulating Rac1 activity of the hippocampus may be promising therapy of fear disorders. PMID:27329554

  20. 76 FR 8334 - White Pine-Nye County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service White Pine-Nye County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The White Pine-Nye County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will...

  1. 76 FR 13600 - White Pine-Nye County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service White Pine-Nye County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The White Pine-Nye County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will...

  2. 76 FR 85 - Nye/White Pine County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Nye/White Pine County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Nye/White Pine County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will...

  3. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Human Leukemic Stem/Progenitor Cells upon Loss of RAC2

    PubMed Central

    Capala, Marta E.; Maat, Henny; Bonardi, Francesco; van den Boom, Vincent; Kuipers, Jeroen; Vellenga, Edo; Giepmans, Ben N. G.; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Leukemic stem cells (LSCs) reside within bone marrow niches that maintain their relatively quiescent state and convey resistance to conventional treatment. Many of the microenvironmental signals converge on RAC GTPases. Although it has become clear that RAC proteins fulfill important roles in the hematopoietic compartment, little has been revealed about the downstream effectors and molecular mechanisms. We observed that in BCR-ABL-transduced human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) depletion of RAC2 but not RAC1 induced a marked and immediate decrease in proliferation, progenitor frequency, cobblestone formation and replating capacity, indicative for reduced self-renewal. Cell cycle analyses showed reduced cell cycle activity in RAC2-depleted BCR-ABL leukemic cobblestones coinciding with an increased apoptosis. Moreover, a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential was observed upon RAC2 downregulation, paralleled by severe mitochondrial ultrastructural malformations as determined by automated electron microscopy. Proteome analysis revealed that RAC2 specifically interacted with a set of mitochondrial proteins including mitochondrial transport proteins SAM50 and Metaxin 1, and interactions were confirmed in independent co-immunoprecipitation studies. Downregulation of SAM50 also impaired the proliferation and replating capacity of BCR-ABL-expressing cells, again associated with a decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. Taken together, these data suggest an important role for RAC2 in maintaining mitochondrial integrity. PMID:26016997

  4. 77 FR 11127 - Medicaid Program; Announcement of Medicaid Recovery Audit Contractors (RACs) Contingency Fee Update

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... FR 57808), we published a final rule entitled: ``Medicaid Program; Recovery Audit Contractors.'' This... Medicaid RAC programs. In the September 16, 2011 Federal Register (76 FR 57808), we published a final rule... Recovery Audit Contractors (RACs) Contingency Fee Update AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid...

  5. 75 FR 64741 - Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council (RAC) Subcommittee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council (RAC) Subcommittee Meeting AGENCY.... Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) Utah Resource Advisory Council (RAC... floor conference room. ADDRESSES: The UDAF is located at 350 North Redwood Road, Salt Lake City,...

  6. Endothelial Rac1 is essential for hematogenous metastasis to the lung.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hongyi; Shi, Wei; Wu, Junsong; Xu, Chengyun; Wang, Jirong; Shao, Yanan; Wu, Ximei; Zhang, Zhongmiao

    2015-07-10

    A variety of vasoactive stimuli induce endothelial permeability through Rac1, a membrane of Rho small GTPases. Here, we determine whether tumor-secreted vasoactive stimulant through Rac1 inducing permeability contributes to hematogenous metastasis. Activation of Rac1 was assayed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), transendothelial passages were measured by Transwell chambers, and hematogenously metastatic mouse model was generated by intravenous injection with Lewis lung carcinoma cells (LLC). LLC secreted abundant vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the culture media and sera of mice bearing LLC xenografts or metastatic LLC, and VEGF activated Rac1 through VEGF receptors/PI3Kβ signaling cascade, resulting in hyperoxidative stress and consequent hyperpermeability in HUVEC. Moreover, in co-culture of LLC and HUVEC, significant increases in endothelial permeability and transendothelial migration of LLC were robustly attenuated by either anti-VEGF neutralizing antibody or Rac1 knockdown in HUVEC. Finally, in metastatic mouse model, deletion of one copy of Rac1 in endothelium not only significantly attenuated LLC-induced vascular permeability, but robustly reduced the metastasis of LLC to lungs. This study supports that tumor-secreted vasoactive stimuli activate Rac1 to induce permeability and consequent transendothelial migration of tumor cells, and that loss of Rac1 function in endothelium is an effective therapeutic intervention for hematogenous metastasis. PMID:25991673

  7. A Cdc42- and Rac-interactive binding (CRIB) domain mediates functions of coronin.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Karthic; Müller-Taubenberger, Annette; Faix, Jan; Rivero, Francisco; Noegel, Angelika A

    2014-01-01

    The Cdc42- and Rac-interactive binding motif (CRIB) of coronin binds to Rho GTPases with a preference for GDP-loaded Rac. Mutation of the Cdc42- and Rac-interactive binding motif abrogates Rac binding. This results in increased 1evels of activated Rac in coronin-deficient Dictyostelium cells (corA(-)), which impacts myosin II assembly. corA(-) cells show increased accumulation of myosin II in the cortex of growth-phase cells. Myosin II assembly is regulated by myosin heavy chain kinase-mediated phosphorylation of its tail. Kinase activity depends on the activation state of the p21-activated kinase a. The myosin II defect of corA(-) mutant is alleviated by dominant-negative p21-activated kinase a. It is rescued by wild-type coronin, whereas coronin carrying a mutated Cdc42- and Rac-interactive binding motif failed to rescue the myosin defect in corA(-) mutant cells. Ectopically expressed myosin heavy chain kinases affinity purified from corA(-) cells show reduced kinase activity. We propose that coronin through its affinity for GDP-Rac regulates the availability of GTP-Rac for activation of downstream effectors. PMID:24347642

  8. IAPs regulate the plasticity of cell migration by directly targeting Rac1 for degradation.

    PubMed

    Oberoi, Tripat Kaur; Dogan, Taner; Hocking, Jennifer C; Scholz, Rolf-Peter; Mooz, Juliane; Anderson, Carrie L; Karreman, Christiaan; Meyer zu Heringdorf, Dagmar; Schmidt, Gudula; Ruonala, Mika; Namikawa, Kazuhiko; Harms, Gregory S; Carpy, Alejandro; Macek, Boris; Köster, Reinhard W; Rajalingam, Krishnaraj

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) are a highly conserved class of multifunctional proteins. Rac1 is a well-studied Rho GTPase that controls numerous basic cellular processes. While the regulation of nucleotide binding to Rac1 is well understood, the molecular mechanisms controlling Rac1 degradation are not known. Here, we demonstrate X-linked IAP (XIAP) and cellular IAP1 (c-IAP1) directly bind to Rac1 in a nucleotide-independent manner to promote its polyubiquitination at Lys147 and proteasomal degradation. These IAPs are also required for degradation of Rac1 upon CNF1 toxin treatment or RhoGDI depletion. Consistently, downregulation of XIAP or c-IAP1 by various strategies led to an increase in Rac1 protein levels in primary and tumour cells, leading to an elongated morphology and enhanced cell migration. Further, XIAP counteracts Rac1-dependent cellular polarization in the developing zebrafish hindbrain and promotes the delamination of neurons from the normal tissue architecture. These observations unveil an evolutionarily conserved role of IAPs in controlling Rac1 stability thereby regulating the plasticity of cell migration and morphogenesis. PMID:22117219

  9. 76 FR 17106 - Secure Rural Schools Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ...On April 14, 2011, the U.S Forest Service will host a meeting of the federally designated Secure Rural Schools Resource Advisory Committee (RAC). The public is invited to attend the meeting and provide input. A Secure Rural Schools RAC provides advice and recommendations to the Forest Service on the development and implementation of special projects as authorized under the Secure Rural Schools......

  10. 44 CFR 352.23 - Functions of a Regional Assistance Committee (RAC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Under 44 CFR part 351, the role of a RAC is to assist State and local government officials to develop.... (b) Prior to a determination under subpart A (44 CFR 352.6(d)) that Federal facilities and resources... under subpart A (44 CFR 352.6(d)) that Federal facilities and resources are needed, the RAC will...

  11. Endothelial Rac1 is essential for hematogenous metastasis to the lung

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Junsong; Xu, Chengyun; Wang, Jirong; Shao, Yanan; Wu, Ximei; Zhang, Zhongmiao

    2015-01-01

    A variety of vasoactive stimuli induce endothelial permeability through Rac1, a membrane of Rho small GTPases. Here, we determine whether tumor-secreted vasoactive stimulant through Rac1 inducing permeability contributes to hematogenous metastasis. Activation of Rac1 was assayed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), transendothelial passages were measured by Transwell chambers, and hematogenously metastatic mouse model was generated by intravenous injection with Lewis lung carcinoma cells (LLC). LLC secreted abundant vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the culture media and sera of mice bearing LLC xenografts or metastatic LLC, and VEGF activated Rac1 through VEGF receptors/PI3Kβ signaling cascade, resulting in hyperoxidative stress and consequent hyperpermeability in HUVEC. Moreover, in co-culture of LLC and HUVEC, significant increases in endothelial permeability and transendothelial migration of LLC were robustly attenuated by either anti-VEGF neutralizing antibody or Rac1 knockdown in HUVEC. Finally, in metastatic mouse model, deletion of one copy of Rac1 in endothelium not only significantly attenuated LLC-induced vascular permeability, but robustly reduced the metastasis of LLC to lungs. This study supports that tumor-secreted vasoactive stimuli activate Rac1 to induce permeability and consequent transendothelial migration of tumor cells, and that loss of Rac1 function in endothelium is an effective therapeutic intervention for hematogenous metastasis. PMID:25991673

  12. 44 CFR 352.23 - Functions of a Regional Assistance Committee (RAC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Under 44 CFR part 351, the role of a RAC is to assist State and local government officials to develop.... (b) Prior to a determination under subpart A (44 CFR 352.6(d)) that Federal facilities and resources... under subpart A (44 CFR 352.6(d)) that Federal facilities and resources are needed, the RAC will...

  13. Recycling of rubble from building demolition for low-shrinkage concretes.

    PubMed

    Corinaldesi, Valeria; Moriconi, Giacomo

    2010-04-01

    In this project concrete mixtures were prepared that were characterized by low ductility due to desiccation by using debris from building demolition, which after a suitable treatment was used as aggregate for partial replacement of natural aggregates. The recycled aggregate used came from a recycling plant, in which rubble from building demolition was selected, crushed, cleaned, sieved, and graded. Such aggregates are known to be more porous as indicated by the Saturated Surface Dry (SSD) moisture content. The recycled concrete used as aggregates were added to the concrete mixture in order to study their influence on the fresh and hardened concrete properties. They were added either after water pre-soaking or in dry condition, in order to evaluate the influence of moisture in aggregates on the performance of concrete containing recycled aggregate. In particular, the effect of internal curing, due to the use of such aggregates, was studied. Concrete behavior due to desiccation under dehydration was studied by means of both drying shrinkage test and German angle test, through which shrinkage under the restrained condition of early age concrete can be evaluated. PMID:20022737

  14. Performance of Lightweight Concrete based on Granulated Foamglass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, M.; Zakrevskaya, L.; Vaganov, V.; Hempel, S.; Mechtcherine, V.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents an investigation of lightweight concretes properties, based on granulated foamglass (GFG-LWC) aggregates. The application of granulated foamglass (GFG) in concrete might significantly reduce the volume of waste glass and enhance the recycling industry in order to improve environmental performance. The conducted experiments showed high strength and thermal properties for GFG-LWC. However, the use of GFG in concrete is associated with the risk of harmful alkali-silica reactions (ASR). Thus, one of the main aims was to study ASR manifestation in GFG-LWC. It was found that the lightweight concrete based on porous aggregates, and ordinary concrete, have different a mechanism of ASR. In GFG-LWC, microstructural changes, partial destruction of granules, and accumulation of silica hydro-gel in pores were observed. According to the existing methods of analysis of ASR manifestation in concrete, sample expansion was measured, however, this method was found to be not appropriate to indicate ASR in concrete with porous aggregates. Microstructural analysis and testing of the concrete strength are needed to evaluate the damage degree due to ASR. Low-alkali cement and various pozzolanic additives as preventive measures against ASR were chosen. The final composition of the GFG-LWC provides very good characteristics with respect to compressive strength, thermal conductivity and durability. On the whole, the potential for GFG-LWC has been identified.

  15. Porosity, pore size distribution and in situ strength of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rakesh; Bhattacharjee, B

    2003-01-01

    In this study, in situ strength of concrete was determined through compression test of cores drilled out from laboratory cast beams. The apparent porosity and pore size distribution of the same concrete were determined through mercury intrusion porosimetry, performed on small-drilled cores. The normal-strength concrete mixes used in the experimental investigation were designed to exhibit a wide variation in their strengths. To ensure further variation in porosity, pore size distribution and strength, two modes of compaction, two varieties of coarse aggregates, different levels of age, curing period and exposure condition of concrete were also introduced in experimental scheme. With the data so generated, an appraisal of the most frequently referred relationships involving strength, porosity and pore size of cement-based materials was carried out. Finally, a new empirical model relating the in situ strength of concrete with porosity, pore size characteristics, cement content, aggregate type, exposure conditions, etc., is presented.

  16. Compressive behaviour of dam concrete at higher strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caverzan, A.; Peroni, M.; Solomos, G.

    2016-05-01

    The mechanical behaviour of concrete when subjected to impact or blast has still many aspects requiring further study. Dam concrete is characterized by large coarse aggregates, hence large specimen sizes are needed in order to study a representative volume of the material. Exploiting an innovative equipment, based on Hopkinson bar techniques, the dynamic behaviour of concrete of 64 mm maximum aggregate size has been investigated. Direct dynamic compression tests have been performed on medium and large size cylindrical samples. Full stress-strain curves have been obtained, which have allowed the estimation of fracturing energies and of the relevant dynamic increase factor. The experimental campaign has also included a reference standard concrete in order to highlight the peculiarity of the dam concrete at high strain rates and to validate the transition of this type of testing to very large specimens.

  17. Aegeline from Aegle marmelos stimulates glucose transport via Akt and Rac1 signaling, and contributes to a cytoskeletal rearrangement through PI3K/Rac1.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Sudeep; Ishrat, Nayab; Singh, Rohit; Narender, Tadigoppula; Srivastava, Arvind K

    2015-09-01

    Aegeline is an alkaloidal-amide, isolated from the leaves of Aegle marmelos and have shown antihyperglycemic as well as antidyslipidemic activities in the validated animal models of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Here we delineate, aegeline enhanced GLUT4 translocation mediated 2-deoxy-glucose uptake in both time and concentration-dependent manner. 2-deoxy-glucose uptake was completely stymied by the transport inhibitors (wortmannin and genistein) in C2C12 myotubes. Pharmacological inhibition of Akt (also known as protein kinase B) and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) suggest that both Akt and Rac1 operate aegeline-stimulated glucose transport via distinct parallel pathways. Moreover, aegeline activates p21 protein-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) and cofilin (an actin polymerization regulator). Rac1 inhibitor (Rac1 inhib II) and PAK1 inhibitor (IPA-3) completely blocked aegeline-induced phosphorylation of cofilin and p21 protein-activated kinase 1 (PAK1). In summary, these findings suggest that aegeline stimulates the glucose transport through Akt and Rac1 dependent distinct parallel pathways and have cytoskeletal roles via stimulation of the PI3-kinase-Rac1-PAK1-cofilin pathway in the skeletal muscle cells. Therefore, multiple targets of aegeline in the improvement of insulin sensitivity of the skeletal muscle cells may be suggested. PMID:26102565

  18. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    Part of a special section on the market performance of industrial minerals in 1992. Production of construction aggregates increased by 4.6 percent in 1992. This increase was due, in part, to the increased funding for transportation and infrastructure projects. The U.S. produced about 1.05 Gt of crushed stone and an estimated 734 Mt of construction sand and gravel in 1992. Demand is expected to increase by about 5 percent in 1993.

  19. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Part of the Annual Commodities Review 1995. Production of construction aggregates such as crushed stone and construction sand and gravel showed a marginal increase in 1995. Most of the 1995 increases were due to funding for highway construction work. The major areas of concern to the industry included issues relating to wetlands classification and the classification of crystalline silica as a probable human carcinogen. Despite this, an increase in demand is anticipated for 1996.

  20. Rac Regulates Giardia lamblia Encystation by Coordinating Cyst Wall Protein Trafficking and Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Krtková, Jana; Thomas, Elizabeth B.; Alas, Germain C. M.; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; Behjatnia, Habib R.; Hehl, Adrian B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Encystation of the common intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia involves the production, trafficking, and secretion of cyst wall material (CWM). However, the molecular mechanism responsible for the regulation of these sequential processes remains elusive. Here, we examined the role of GlRac, Giardia’s sole Rho family GTPase, in the regulation of endomembrane organization and cyst wall protein (CWP) trafficking. Localization studies indicated that GlRac is associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi apparatus-like encystation-specific vesicles (ESVs). Constitutive GlRac signaling increased levels of the ER marker PDI2, induced ER swelling, reduced overall CWP1 production, and promoted the early maturation of ESVs. Quantitative analysis of cells expressing constitutively active hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged GlRac (HA-RacCA) revealed fewer but larger ESVs than control cells. Consistent with the phenotype of premature maturation of ESVs in HA-RacCA-expressing cells, constitutive GlRac signaling resulted in increased CWP1 secretion and, conversely, morpholino depletion of GlRac blocked CWP1 secretion. Wild-type cells unexpectedly secreted large quantities of CWP1 into the medium, and free CWP1 was used cooperatively during cyst formation. These results, in part, could account for the previously reported observation that G. lamblia encysts more efficiently at high cell densities. These studies of GlRac show that it regulates encystation at several levels, and our findings support its coordinating role as a regulator of CWP trafficking and secretion. The central role of GlRac in regulating membrane trafficking and the cytoskeleton, both of which are essential to Giardia parasitism, further suggests its potential as a novel target for drug development to treat giardiasis. PMID:27555307

  1. Hippocampal Activation of Rac1 Regulates the Forgetting of Object Recognition Memory.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunlong; Du, Shuwen; Lv, Li; Lei, Bo; Shi, Wei; Tang, Yikai; Wang, Lianzhang; Zhong, Yi

    2016-09-12

    Forgetting is a universal feature for most types of memories. The best-defined and extensively characterized behaviors that depict forgetting are natural memory decay and interference-based forgetting [1, 2]. Molecular mechanisms underlying the active forgetting remain to be determined for memories in vertebrates. Recent progress has begun to unravel such mechanisms underlying the active forgetting [3-11] that is induced through the behavior-dependent activation of intracellular signaling pathways. In Drosophila, training-induced activation of the small G protein Rac1 mediates natural memory decay and interference-based forgetting of aversive conditioning memory [3]. In mice, the activation of photoactivable-Rac1 in recently potentiated spines in a motor learning task erases the motor memory [12]. These lines of evidence prompted us to investigate a role for Rac1 in time-based natural memory decay and interference-based forgetting in mice. The inhibition of Rac1 activity in hippocampal neurons through targeted expression of a dominant-negative Rac1 form extended object recognition memory from less than 72 hr to over 72 hr, whereas Rac1 activation accelerated memory decay within 24 hr. Interference-induced forgetting of this memory was correlated with Rac1 activation and was completely blocked by inhibition of Rac1 activity. Electrophysiological recordings of long-term potentiation provided independent evidence that further supported a role for Rac1 activation in forgetting. Thus, Rac1-dependent forgetting is evolutionarily conserved from invertebrates to vertebrates. PMID:27593377

  2. Recycled lightweight concrete made from footwear industry waste and CDW.

    PubMed

    Lima, Paulo Roberto Lopes; Leite, Mônica Batista; Santiago, Ediela Quinteiro Ribeiro

    2010-06-01

    In this paper two types of recycled aggregate, originated from construction and demolition waste (CDW) and ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) waste, were used in the production of concrete. The EVA waste results from cutting off the EVA expanded sheets used to produce insoles and innersoles of shoes in the footwear industry. The goal of this study was to evaluate the influence of the use of these recycled aggregates as replacements of the natural coarse aggregate, upon density, compressive strength, tensile splitting strength and flexural behavior of recycled concrete. The experimental program was developed with three w/c ratios: 0.49, 0.63 and 0.82. Fifteen mixtures were produced with different aggregate substitution rates (0%, 50% EVA, 50% CDW, 25% CDW-25% EVA and 50% CDW-50% EVA), by volume. The results showed that it is possible to use the EVA waste and CDW to produce lightweight concrete having semi-structural properties. PMID:20189792

  3. Inhibition of Rac1 activity by controlled release of NSC23766 from chitosan microspheres effectively ameliorates osteoarthritis development in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shouan; Lu, Ping; Liu, Huanhuan; Chen, Pengfei; Wu, Yan; Wang, Yanyan; Sun, Heng; Zhang, Xiaolei; Xia, Qingqing; Heng, Boon Chin; Zhou, Yiting; Ouyang, Hong Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease characterised by cartilage degradation and chondrocyte hypertrophy. A recent study showed that Rac1 promoted expression of MMP13 and chondrocyte hypertrophy within the growth plate. These findings warrant further investigations on the roles of Rac1 in OA development and therapy in animal models. Objective To investigate the role and mechanistic pathway of Rac1 involvement in pathological changes of OA chondrocytes in vitro and OA development in vivo, as well as to develop a strategy of modulating Rac1 activity for OA treatment. Material and methods OA and normal cartilage from human or mice were used for immunohistochemical study and Rac1 activity assay. Chondrocytes treated with IL1β and the untreated control were subjected to the Rac1 activity assay. Chondrocytes transfected with CA-Rac1, DN-Rac1 or GFP were cultured under conditions for inducing calcification. To evaluate the effect of Rac1 in OA development, an OA model was created by anterior cruciate ligament transection in mice. CA-Rac1, DN-Rac1 and GFP lentivirus, or NSC23766, were injected intra-articularly. Joints were subjected to histological analysis. Results It was found that there is aberrant Rac1 activation in human OA cartilage. Rac1 activity could also be elevated by IL1β. Additionally, activated Rac1 promoted expression of MMP13, ADAMTS-5 and COLX by chondrocytes, partially through the β-catenin pathway. Moreover, activation of Rac1 in knee joints by CA-Rac1 lentivirus accelerated OA progression, while inhibition of Rac1 activity by DN-Rac1 lentivirus or Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 delayed OA development. Therefore, we developed a strategy of controlled release of NSC23766 from chitosan microspheres to OA joints, which effectively protected cartilage from destruction. Conclusions These findings demonstrated that Rac1 activity is implicated in OA development. Also, controlled release of Rac1 inhibitor is a promising strategy for OA

  4. Propagation characteristics of electromagnetic waves in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halabe, Udaya B.; Maser, Kenneth; Kausel, Eduardo

    1989-03-01

    This research develops models which can predict the velocity and attenuation of electromagnetic waves in concrete as a function of frequency, temperature, moisture content, chloride content and concrete mix constituents. These models were proposed to predict the electromagnetic properties of concrete by aggregating the electromagnetic properties of its constituents. Water and the dissolved salt are the constituents having the most prominent effect on the dielectric behavior of concrete. A comparative study of three existing three-phase mixture models was carried out. Numerical results were generated using the most representative Discrete model. These results have shown that the real part of complex concrete permittivity (and therefore the velocity of electromagnetic waves) is independent of salinity or frequency in the 0.6 to 3.0 GHz frequency range. On the other hand, these results show that the attenuation coefficient and dielectric conductivity vary almost linearly with frequency in this same frequency range. The real part of concrete permittivity and the attenuation coefficient also show a linear dependence with respect to the degree of saturation of water in the concrete mixture. This suggests that future research should focus on approximating the complex models presented in this research by simple equations.

  5. High temperature polymer concrete compositions

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, Jack J.; Reams, Walter

    1985-01-01

    This invention is concerned with a polymer concrete composition, which is a two-component composition useful with many bases including metal. Component A, the aggregate composition, is broadly composed of silica, silica flour, portland cement, and acrylamide, whereas Component B, which is primarily vinyl and acrylyl reactive monomers, is a liquid system. A preferred formulation emphasizing the major necessary components is as follows: ______________________________________ Component A: Silica sand 60-77 wt. % Silica flour 5-10 wt. % Portland cement 15-25 wt. % Acrylamide 1-5 wt. % Component B: Styrene 50-60 wt. % Trimethylolpropane 35-40 wt. % trimethacrylate ______________________________________ and necessary initiators, accelerators, and surfactants.

  6. Concrete Materials and Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wilby, C.B.

    1991-12-31

    Concrete Materials and Structures provides one of the most comprehensive treatments on the topic of concrete engineering. The author covers a gamut of concrete subjects ranging from concrete mix design, basic reinforced concrete theory, prestressed concrete, shell roofs, and two-way slabs-including a through presentation of Hillerborg`s strip method. Prior to Wilby`s book, the scope of these topics would require at least four separate books to cover. With this new book he has succeeded, quite remarkably, in condensing a fairly complete knowledge of concrete engineering into one single easy-to-carry volume.

  7. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bolen, W.P.; Tepordei, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    The estimated production during 2000 of construction aggregates, crushed stone, and construction sand and gravel increased by about 2.6% to 2.7 Gt (3 billion st), compared with 1999. The expansion that started in 1992 continued with record production levels for the ninth consecutive year. By commodity, construction sand and gravel production increased by 4.5% to 1.16 Gt (1.28 billion st), while crushed stone production increased by 1.3% to 1.56 Gt (1.72 billion st).

  8. Mechanical properties of GFRP tube confined recycled concrete under axial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaogang; Liang, Chaofeng; Zhou, Zechenglong; Dong, Lanqi; Ding, Kewei; Huang, Jialun

    2015-07-01

    This article outlines the recycled aggregate replacement rate and thick-diameter rate of GFRP tube confined in recycled concrete, which has an important impact on the material's compressive strength. Overall, under the same conditions of using recycled concrete, the bearing capacity of short concrete columns can be improved by using broader GFRP tubes. There is a four-fold increase in the bearing capacity of short concrete columns compared to the short column without the restriction of a GFRP tube. The bearing capacity of a short column crafted by recycled coarse aggregate is much lower (about 30%). than those made by common concrete column Additionally, the bearing capacity of short columns made by recycled fine aggregates is also lower than those made by common concrete (approximately 20%). Finally, we find that there is no significant difference between experimental and theoretical data.

  9. Shaking table experimental study of recycled concrete frame-shear wall structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianwei; Cao, Wanlin; Meng, Shaobin; Yu, Cheng; Dong, Hongying

    2014-06-01

    In this study, four 1/5 scaled shaking table tests were conducted to investigate the seismic performance of recycled concrete frame-shear wall structures with different recycled aggregates replacement rates and concealed bracing detail. The four tested structures included one normal concrete model, one recycled coarse aggregate concrete model, and two recycled coarse and fine aggregate concrete models with or without concealed bracings inside the shear walls. The dynamic characteristics, dynamic response and failure mode of each model were compared and analyzed. Finite element models were also developed and nonlinear time-history response analysis was conducted. The test and analysis results show that the seismic performance of the recycled coarse aggregate concrete frame-shear wall structure is slightly worse than the normal concrete structure. The seismic resistance capacity of the recycled concrete frame-shear wall structure can be greatly improved by setting up concealed bracings inside the walls. With appropriate design, the recycled coarse aggregate concrete frame-shear wall structure and recycled concrete structure with concealed bracings inside the walls can be applied in buildings.

  10. SUSTAINABLE CONCRETE FOR WIND TURBINE FOUNDATIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    BERNDT,M.L.

    2004-06-01

    The use of wind power to generate electricity continues to grow, especially given commitments by various countries throughout the world to ensure that a significant percentage of energy comes from renewable sources. In order to meet such objectives, increasingly larger turbines with higher capacity are being developed. The engineering aspects of larger turbine development tend to focus on design and materials for blades and towers. However, foundations are also a critical component of large wind turbines and represent a significant cost of wind energy projects. Ongoing wind research at BNL is examining two areas: (a) structural response analysis of wind turbine-tower-foundation systems and (b) materials engineering of foundations. This work is investigating the dynamic interactions in wind turbine systems, which in turn assists the wind industry in achieving improved reliability and more cost efficient foundation designs. The results reported herein cover initial studies of concrete mix designs for large wind turbine foundations and how these may be tailored to reduce cost and incorporate sustainability and life cycle concepts. The approach taken was to investigate material substitutions so that the environmental, energy and CO{sub 2}-impact of concrete could be reduced. The use of high volumes of ''waste'' materials in concrete was examined. These materials included fly ash, blast furnace slag and recycled concrete aggregate. In addition, the use of steel fiber reinforcement as a means to improve mechanical properties and potentially reduce the amount of bar reinforcement in concrete foundations was studied. Four basic mixes were considered. These were: (1) conventional mix with no material substitutions, (2) 50% replacement of cement with fly ash, (3) 50% replacement of cement with blast furnace slag and (4) 25% replacement of cement with fly ash and 25% replacement with blast furnace slag. Variations on these mixes included the addition of 1% by volume steel

  11. An evolutionary analysis of RAC2 identifies haplotypes associated with human autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Sironi, Manuela; Guerini, Franca Rosa; Agliardi, Cristina; Biasin, Mara; Cagliani, Rachele; Fumagalli, Matteo; Caputo, Domenico; Cassinotti, Andrea; Ardizzone, Sandro; Zanzottera, Milena; Bolognesi, Elisabetta; Riva, Stefania; Kanari, Yasuyoshi; Miyazawa, Masaaki; Clerici, Mario

    2011-12-01

    The human RAC2 gene encodes a small GTP-binding protein with a pivotal role in immune activation and in the induction of peripheral immune tolerance through restimulation-induced cell death (RICD). Different human pathogens target the protein product of RAC2, suggesting that the gene may be subject to natural selection, and that variants in RAC2 may affect immunological phenotypes in humans. We scanned the genomic region encompassing the entire transcription unit for the presence of putative noncoding regulatory elements conserved across mammals. This information was used to select two RAC2 gene regions and analyze their intraspecific genetic diversity. Results suggest that a region covering the 3' untranslated region has been a target of multiallelic balancing selection (or diversifying selection), and three major RAC2 haplogroups occur in human populations. Haplotypes belonging to one of these clades are associated with increased susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (P = 0.022) and earlier onset of disease symptoms (P = 0.025). This same haplogroup is significantly more common in patients with Crohn's disease compared with healthy controls (P = 0.048). These data reinforce recent evidences that susceptibility alleles/haplotypes are shared among multiple autoimmune disorders and support a causal "role for RAC2" variants in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Other genes with a role in RICD have previously been associated with autoimmunity in humans, suggesting that this pathway and RAC2 may represent novel therapeutic targets in autoimmune disorders. PMID:21680873

  12. Rac1 Protein Regulates Glycogen Phosphorylase Activation and Controls Interleukin (IL)-2-dependent T Cell Proliferation*

    PubMed Central

    Arrizabalaga, Onetsine; Lacerda, Hadriano M.; Zubiaga, Ana M.; Zugaza, José L.

    2012-01-01

    Small GTPases of the Rho family have been implicated in important cellular processes such as cell migration and adhesion, protein secretion, and/or gene transcription. In the lymphoid system, these GTPases participate in the signaling cascades that are activated after engagement of antigen receptors. However, little is known about the role that Rho GTPases play in IL-2-mediated responses. Here, we show that IL-2 induces Rac1 activation in Kit 225 T cells. We identified by mass spectrometry the muscle isoform of glycogen phosphorylase (PYGM) as a novel Rac1 effector molecule in IL-2-stimulated cells. The interaction between the active form of Rac1 (Rac1-GTP) and PYGM was established directly through a domain comprising amino acids 191–270 of PYGM that exhibits significant homology with the Rac binding domain of PAK1. The integrity of this region was crucial for PYGM activation. Importantly, IL-2-dependent cellular proliferation was inhibited upon blocking both the activation of Rac1 and the activity of PYGM. These results reveal a new role for Rac1 in cell signaling, showing that this GTPase triggers T cell proliferation upon IL-2 stimulation by associating with PYGM and modulating its enzymatic activity. PMID:22337875

  13. Eiger-induced cell death relies on Rac1-dependent endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Ruan, W; Srinivasan, A; Lin, S; Kara, K-I; Barker, P A

    2016-01-01

    Signaling via tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily members regulates cellular life and death decisions. A subset of mammalian TNFR proteins, most notably the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), induces cell death through a pathway that requires activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs). However the receptor-proximal signaling events that mediate this remain unclear. Drosophila express a single tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ligand termed Eiger (Egr) that activates JNK-dependent cell death. We have exploited this model to identify phylogenetically conserved signaling events that allow Egr to induce JNK activation and cell death in vivo. Here we report that Rac1, a small GTPase, is specifically required in Egr-mediated cell death. rac1 loss of function blocks Egr-induced cell death, whereas Rac1 overexpression enhances Egr-induced killing. We identify Vav as a GEF for Rac1 in this pathway and demonstrate that dLRRK functions as a negative regulator of Rac1 that normally acts to constrain Egr-induced death. Thus dLRRK loss of function increases Egr-induced cell death in the fly. We further show that Rac1-dependent entry of Egr into early endosomes is a crucial prerequisite for JNK activation and for cell death and show that this entry requires the activity of Rab21 and Rab7. These findings reveal novel regulatory mechanisms that allow Rac1 to contribute to Egr-induced JNK activation and cell death. PMID:27054336

  14. The Role of Rac1 in the Growth Cone Dynamics and Force Generation of DRG Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sayyad, Wasim A.; Fabris, Paolo; Torre, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    We used optical tweezers, video imaging, immunocytochemistry and a variety of inhibitors to analyze the role of Rac1 in the motility and force generation of lamellipodia and filopodia from developing growth cones of isolated Dorsal Root Ganglia neurons. When the activity of Rac1 was inhibited by the drug EHop-016, the period of lamellipodia protrusion/retraction cycles increased and the lamellipodia retrograde flow rate decreased; moreover, the axial force exerted by lamellipodia was reduced dramatically. Inhibition of Arp2/3 by a moderate amount of the drug CK-548 caused a transient retraction of lamellipodia followed by a complete recovery of their usual motility. This recovery was abolished by the concomitant inhibition of Rac1. The filopodia length increased upon inhibition of both Rac1 and Arp2/3, but the speed of filopodia protrusion increased when Rac1 was inhibited and decreased instead when Arp2/3 was inhibited. These results suggest that Rac1 acts as a switch that activates upon inhibition of Arp2/3. Rac1 also controls the filopodia dynamics necessary to explore the environment. PMID:26766136

  15. RotundRacGAP functions with Ras during spermatogenesis and retinal differentiation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Bergeret, E; Pignot-Paintrand, I; Guichard, A; Raymond, K; Fauvarque, M O; Cazemajor, M; Griffin-Shea, R

    2001-09-01

    Our analysis of rotund (rn) null mutations in Drosophila melanogaster revealed that deletion of the rn locus affects both spermatid and retinal differentiation. In the male reproductive system, the absence of RnRacGAP induced small testes, empty seminal vesicles, short testicular cysts, reduced amounts of interspermatid membrane, the absence of individualization complexes, and incomplete mitochondrial condensation. Flagellar growth continued within the short rn null cysts to produce large bulbous terminations of intertwined mature flagella. Organization of the retina was also severely perturbed as evidenced by grossly misshapen ommatidia containing reduced numbers of photoreceptor and pigment cells. These morphological phenotypes were rescued by genomic rnRacGAP transgenes, demonstrating that RnRacGAP function is critical to spermatid and retinal differentiation. The testicular phenotypes were suppressed by heterozygous hypomorphic mutations in the Dras1 and drk genes, indicating cross talk between RacGAP-regulated signaling and that of the Ras pathway. The observed genetic interactions are consistent with a model in which Rac signaling is activated by Ras and negatively regulated by RnRacGAP during spermatid differentiation. RnRacGAP and Ras cross talk also operated during retinal differentiation; however, while the heterozygous hypomorphic drk mutation continued to act as a suppressor of the rn null mutation, the heterozygous hypomorphic Dras1 mutation induced novel retinal phenotypes. PMID:11509670

  16. The involvement of mutant Rac1 in the formation of invadopodia in cultured melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Revach, Or-Yam; Winograd-Katz, Sabina E; Samuels, Yardena; Geiger, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the complex involvement of a Rho-family GTPase, Rac1, in cell migration and in invadopodia-mediated matrix degradation. We discuss the involvement of invadopodia in invasive cell migration, and their capacity to promote cancer metastasis. Considering the regulation of invadopodia formation, we describe studies that demonstrate the role of Rac1 in the metastatic process, and the suggestion that this effect is attributable to the capacity of Rac1 to promote invadopodia formation. This notion is demonstrated here by showing that knockdown of Rac1 in melanoma cells expressing a wild-type form of this GTPase, reduces invadopodia-dependent matrix degradation. Interestingly, we also show that excessive activity of Rac1, displayed by the P29S, hyperactive, “fast cycling” mutant of Rac1, which is present in 5–10% of melanoma tumors, inhibits invadopodia function. Moreover, knockdown of this hyperactive mutant enhanced matrix degradation, indicating that excessive Rac1 activity by this mutant can negatively regulate invadopodia formation and function. PMID:26873115

  17. A novel pathway spatiotemporally activates Rac1 and redox signaling in response to fluid shear stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yunhao; Collins, Caitlin; Kiosses, William B.; Murray, Ann M.; Joshi, Monika; Shepherd, Tyson R.; Fuentes, Ernesto J.

    2013-01-01

    Hemodynamic forces regulate embryonic organ development, hematopoiesis, vascular remodeling, and atherogenesis. The mechanosensory stimulus of blood flow initiates a complex network of intracellular pathways, including activation of Rac1 GTPase, establishment of endothelial cell (EC) polarity, and redox signaling. The activity of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase can be modulated by the GTP/GDP state of Rac1; however, the molecular mechanisms of Rac1 activation by flow are poorly understood. Here, we identify a novel polarity complex that directs localized Rac1 activation required for downstream reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Vav2 is required for Rac1 GTP loading, whereas, surprisingly, Tiam1 functions as an adaptor in a VE-cadherin–p67phox–Par3 polarity complex that directs localized activation of Rac1. Furthermore, loss of Tiam1 led to the disruption of redox signaling both in vitro and in vivo. Our results describe a novel molecular cascade that regulates redox signaling by the coordinated regulation of Rac1 and by linking components of the polarity complex to the NADPH oxidase. PMID:23733346

  18. Eiger-induced cell death relies on Rac1-dependent endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, W; Srinivasan, A; Lin, S; Kara, k-I; Barker, P A

    2016-01-01

    Signaling via tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily members regulates cellular life and death decisions. A subset of mammalian TNFR proteins, most notably the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), induces cell death through a pathway that requires activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs). However the receptor-proximal signaling events that mediate this remain unclear. Drosophila express a single tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ligand termed Eiger (Egr) that activates JNK-dependent cell death. We have exploited this model to identify phylogenetically conserved signaling events that allow Egr to induce JNK activation and cell death in vivo. Here we report that Rac1, a small GTPase, is specifically required in Egr-mediated cell death. rac1 loss of function blocks Egr-induced cell death, whereas Rac1 overexpression enhances Egr-induced killing. We identify Vav as a GEF for Rac1 in this pathway and demonstrate that dLRRK functions as a negative regulator of Rac1 that normally acts to constrain Egr-induced death. Thus dLRRK loss of function increases Egr-induced cell death in the fly. We further show that Rac1-dependent entry of Egr into early endosomes is a crucial prerequisite for JNK activation and for cell death and show that this entry requires the activity of Rab21 and Rab7. These findings reveal novel regulatory mechanisms that allow Rac1 to contribute to Egr-induced JNK activation and cell death. PMID:27054336

  19. Temporal Rac1 - HIF-1 crosstalk modulates hypoxic survival of aged neurons.

    PubMed

    Güntert, Tanja; Gassmann, Max; Ogunshola, Omolara O

    2016-07-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are frequently associated with hypoxic conditions. During hypoxia the neuronal cytoskeleton is rapidly reorganized and such abnormalities are directly linked to adverse outcomes. Besides their roles as master regulators of the cytoskeleton, the Rho GTPases are also involved in cellular processes stimulated by hypoxic stress. We investigated the contribution of Rac1-mediated signaling to hypoxic responses of mature neurons using primary cortical cells cultured for 17 days in vitro. We show Rac1 is both upregulated and activated during hypoxia. Pharmacological inhibition of Rac1, but not RhoA, completely abrogated hypoxic HIF-1α stabilization and expression of the HIF-1 targets VEGF and GLUT1. Furthermore activity of JNK and GSK3β were also highly dependent on Rac1 activity and biphasic effects were observed after 6 and 24h of exposure. Notably, inhibition of either pathway suppressed HIF-1α accumulation. Although inhibition of Rac1 did not affect neuronal viability during acute exposure cell death was strongly induced after 24h revealing a time-dependent effect of Rac1 signaling on survival. Thus hypoxia-activated Rac1 is critical for neuronal HIF-1α stabilization and survival during oxygen deprivation via integration of complex signaling cascades. PMID:27018294

  20. The influence of recycled expanded polystyrene (EPS) on concrete properties: Influence on flexural strength, water absorption and shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsalah, Jamaleddin; Al-Sahli, Yosra; Akish, Ahmed; Saad, Omar; Hakemi, Abdurrahman

    2013-12-01

    Expanded polystyrene waste in a granular form was used as a lightweight aggregate in order to produce lightweight concretë Lightweight EPS concrete composites were produced by replacing the coarse aggregate, either partially or fully with equal volume of EPS aggregates. The coarse aggregate replacements levels used were 25, 50, 75, and 100%, which corresponded to (9.20, 18.40, 27.60, and 36.8%) from total volume. The investigation is directed towards the development and performance evaluation of the concrete composites containing EPS aggregates, without addition of either bonding additives, or super-plasticizers on some concrete properties such as flexure strength, water absorption and change in length (or shrinkage). Experimental results showed that a density reduction of 12% caused flexure strength to decrease by 25.3% at a replacement level of 25% EPS. However, the reduction percentage strongly depends upon the replacement level of EPS granules. Moreover, the lower strength concretes showed a higher water absorption values compared to higher strength concrete, i.e., increasing the volume percentage of EPS increases the water absorption as well as the negative strain (shrinkage). The negative strain was higher at concretes of lower density (containing a high amount of EPS aggregate). The water to cement ratio of EPS aggregate concrete is found to be slightly lower than that of conventional concrete.

  1. Polymer concrete patching manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, J. J.; Bartholomew, J.

    1982-06-01

    The practicality of using polymer concrete to repair deteriorated portland cement concrete bridge decks and pavements was demonstrated. This manual outlines the procedures for using polymer concrete as a rapid patching material to repair deteriorated concrete. The process technology, materials, equipment, and safety provisions used in manufacturing and placing polymer concrete are discussed. Potential users are informed of the various steps necessary to insure successful field applications of the material.

  2. Nuclear expression of Rac1 in cervical premalignant lesions and cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Abnormal expression of Rho-GTPases has been reported in several human cancers. However, the expression of these proteins in cervical cancer has been poorly investigated. In this study we analyzed the expression of the GTPases Rac1, RhoA, Cdc42, and the Rho-GEFs, Tiam1 and beta-Pix, in cervical pre-malignant lesions and cervical cancer cell lines. Methods Protein expression was analyzed by immunochemistry on 102 cervical paraffin-embedded biopsies: 20 without Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions (SIL), 51 Low- grade SIL, and 31 High-grade SIL; and in cervical cancer cell lines C33A and SiHa, and non-tumorigenic HaCat cells. Nuclear localization of Rac1 in HaCat, C33A and SiHa cells was assessed by cellular fractionation and Western blotting, in the presence or not of a chemical Rac1 inhibitor (NSC23766). Results Immunoreacivity for Rac1, RhoA, Tiam1 and beta-Pix was stronger in L-SIL and H-SIL, compared to samples without SIL, and it was significantly associated with the histological diagnosis. Nuclear expression of Rac1 was observed in 52.9% L-SIL and 48.4% H-SIL, but not in samples without SIL. Rac1 was found in the nucleus of C33A and SiHa cells but not in HaCat cells. Chemical inhibition of Rac1 resulted in reduced cell proliferation in HaCat, C33A and SiHa cells. Conclusion Rac1 is expressed in the nucleus of epithelial cells in SILs and cervical cancer cell lines, and chemical inhibition of Rac1 reduces cellular proliferation. Further studies are needed to better understand the role of Rho-GTPases in cervical cancer progression. PMID:22443139

  3. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms that Increase Expression of the GTPase RAC1 are Associated with Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Muise, Aleixo M; Walters, Thomas; Xu, Wei; Shen-Tu, Grace; Guo, Cong-Hui; Fattouh, Ramzi; Lam, Grace Y; Wolters, Victorien M; Bennitz, Joshua; Van Limbergen, Johan; Renbaum, Paul; Kasirer, Yair; Ngan, Bo-Yee; Turner, Dan; Denson, Lee A; Sherman, Philip M; Duerr, Richard H; Cho, Judy; Lees, Charlie W; Satsangi, Jack; Wilson, David C; Paterson, Andrew D; Griffiths, Anne M; Glogauer, Michael; Silverberg, Mark S; Brumell, John H

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims RAC1 is a GTPase that has an evolutionarily conserved role in coordinating immune defenses, from plants to mammals. Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with dysregulation of immune defenses. We studied the role of RAC1 in IBD using human genetic and functional studies and animal models of colitis. Methods We used a candidate gene approach to HapMap-Tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a discovery cohort; findings were confirmed in 2 additional cohorts. RAC1 mRNA expression was examined from peripheral blood cells of patients. Colitis was induced in mice with conditional disruption of Rac1 in phagocytes by administration of dextran sulphate sodium (DSS). Results We observed a genetic association between RAC1 with ulcerative colitis (UC) in a discovery cohort, 2 independent replication cohorts, and in combined analysis for the SNPs rs10951982 (Pcombined UC = 3.3 × 10–8, odds ratio [OR]=1.43 [1.26–1.63]) and rs4720672 (Pcombined UC=4.7 × 10–6, OR=1.36 [1.19–1.58]). Patients with IBD who had the rs10951982 risk allele had increased expression of RAC1, compared to those without this allele. Conditional disruption of Rac1 in macrophage and neutrophils of mice protected them against DSS-induced colitis. Conclusion Studies of human tissue samples and knockout mice demonstrated a role for the GTPase RAC1 in the development of UC; increased expression of RAC1 was associated with susceptibility to colitis. PMID:21684284

  4. Rac2-deficiency leads to exacerbated and protracted colitis in response to Citrobacter rodentium infection.

    PubMed

    Fattouh, Ramzi; Guo, Cong-Hui; Lam, Grace Y; Gareau, Melanie G; Ngan, Bo-Yee; Glogauer, Michael; Muise, Aleixo M; Brumell, John H

    2013-01-01

    Recent genetic-based studies have implicated a number of immune-related genes in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Our recent genetic studies showed that RAC2 is associated with human IBD; however, its role in disease pathogenesis is unclear. Given Rac2's importance in various fundamental immune cell processes, we investigated whether a defect in Rac2 may impair host immune responses in the intestine and promote disease in the context of an infection-based (Citrobacter rodentium) model of colitis. In response to infection, Rac2(-/-) mice showed i) worsened clinical symptoms (days 13-18), ii) increased crypt hyperplasia at days 11 and 22 (a time when crypt hyperplasia was largely resolved in wild-type mice; WT), and iii) marked mononuclear cell infiltration characterized by higher numbers of T (CD3(+)) cells (day 22), compared to WT-infected mice. Moreover, splenocytes harvested from infected Rac2(-/-) mice and stimulated in vitro with C. rodentium lysate produced considerably higher levels of interferon-γ and interleukin-17A. The augmented responses observed in Rac2(-/-) mice did not appear to stem from Rac2's role in NADPH oxidase-driven reactive oxygen species production as no differences in crypt hyperplasia, nor inflammation, were observed in infected NOX2(-/-) mice compared to WT. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that Rac2(-/-) mice develop more severe disease when subjected to a C. rodentium-induced model of infectious colitis, and suggest that impaired Rac2 function may promote the development of IBD in humans. PMID:23613889

  5. Rac2-Deficiency Leads to Exacerbated and Protracted Colitis in Response to Citrobacter rodentium Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fattouh, Ramzi; Guo, Cong-Hui; Lam, Grace Y.; Gareau, Melanie G.; Ngan, Bo-Yee; Glogauer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Recent genetic-based studies have implicated a number of immune-related genes in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Our recent genetic studies showed that RAC2 is associated with human IBD; however, its role in disease pathogenesis is unclear. Given Rac2’s importance in various fundamental immune cell processes, we investigated whether a defect in Rac2 may impair host immune responses in the intestine and promote disease in the context of an infection-based (Citrobacter rodentium) model of colitis. In response to infection, Rac2−/− mice showed i) worsened clinical symptoms (days 13–18), ii) increased crypt hyperplasia at days 11 and 22 (a time when crypt hyperplasia was largely resolved in wild-type mice; WT), and iii) marked mononuclear cell infiltration characterized by higher numbers of T (CD3+) cells (day 22), compared to WT-infected mice. Moreover, splenocytes harvested from infected Rac2−/− mice and stimulated in vitro with C. rodentium lysate produced considerably higher levels of interferon-γ and interleukin-17A. The augmented responses observed in Rac2−/− mice did not appear to stem from Rac2’s role in NADPH oxidase-driven reactive oxygen species production as no differences in crypt hyperplasia, nor inflammation, were observed in infected NOX2−/− mice compared to WT. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that Rac2−/− mice develop more severe disease when subjected to a C. rodentium-induced model of infectious colitis, and suggest that impaired Rac2 function may promote the development of IBD in humans. PMID:23613889

  6. Increasing exfiltration from pervious concrete and temperature monitoring.

    PubMed

    Tyner, J S; Wright, W C; Dobbs, P A

    2009-06-01

    Pervious concrete typically has an infiltration rate far exceeding any expectation of precipitation rate. The limiting factor of a retention based pervious concrete system is often defined by how quickly the underlying soil subgrade will infiltrate the water temporarily stored within the concrete and/or aggregate base. This issue is of particular importance when placing a pervious concrete system on compacted fine textured soils. This research describes the exfiltration from twelve pervious concrete plots constructed on a compacted clay soil in eastern Tennessee, USA. Several types of treatments were applied to the clay soil prior to placement of the stone aggregate base and pervious concrete in an attempt to increase the exfiltration rate, including: 1) control--no treatment; 2) trenched--soil trenched and backfilled with stone aggregate; 3) ripped--soil ripped with a subsoiler; and 4) boreholes--placement of shallow boreholes backfilled with sand. The average exfiltration rates were 0.8 cm d(-1) (control), 4.6 cm d(-1) (borehole), 10.0 cm d(-1) (ripped), and 25.8 cm d(-1) (trenched). The trenched treatment exfiltrated fastest, followed by the ripped and then the borehole treatments, although the ripped and borehole treatments were not different from one another at the 5% level of significance. The internal temperature of the pervious concrete and aggregate base was monitored throughout the winter of 2006-2007. Although the temperature of the pervious concrete dropped below freezing 24 times, freezing concrete temperatures never coincided with free water being present in the large pervious concrete pores. The coldest recorded air temperature was -9.9 degrees C, and the corresponding coldest recorded pervious concrete temperature was -7.1 degrees C. The temperature of the pervious concrete lagged diurnal air temperature changes and was generally buffered in amplitude, particularly when free water was present since the addition of water increases the thermal

  7. Synthesis and antioxidant profile of all-rac-alpha-selenotocopherol.

    PubMed

    Shanks, David; Amorati, Riccardo; Fumo, Maria Grazia; Pedulli, Gian Franco; Valgimigli, Luca; Engman, Lars

    2006-02-01

    all-rac-alpha-Selenotocopherol (6c) has been synthesized in 11 steps in 6.6% total yield. Key steps include chloromethylation to approach the persubstituted aromatic 9b and cyclization of alcohol precursor 10 by radical homolytic substitution at selenium to form the selenotocopherol heterocycle. Determination of the OH bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE) of 6c by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) equilibration techniques gave a value of 78.1 +/- 0.3 kcal mol(-1), approximately 1 kcal mol(-1) higher than that of alpha-tocopherol. Kinetic studies performed by measuring oxygen uptake of the induced oxidation of styrene in the presence of an antioxidant showed that selenotocopherol (6c) was a slightly poorer inhibitor than alpha-tocopherol, in agreement with the BDE values. In contrast to simpler selenotocopherol analogues, 6c was not regenerable in the presence of a stoichiometric coreductant in a two-phase lipid peroxidation model. PMID:16438517

  8. Prediction of creep of polymer concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Khristova, Yu.; Aniskevich, K.

    1995-11-01

    We studied the applicability of the phenomenological approach to the prediction of long-time creep of polymer concrete consisting of polyester binder with diabase filler and diabase aggregate. We discovered that the principles of temperature-time analogy, of moisture-time analogy, and of temperature-moisture-time analogy are applicable to the description of the diagrams of short-time creep and to the prediction of long-time creep of polymer concrete at different temperatures and constant moisture content of the material.

  9. Use of wastes derived from earthquakes for the production of concrete masonry partition wall blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Zhao; Ling, Tung-Chai; Kou, Shi-Cong; Wang Qingyuan; Poon, Chi-Sun

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Solved the scientific and technological challenges impeding use of waste rubble derived from earthquake, by providing an alternative solution of recycling the waste in moulded concrete block products. > Significant requirements for optimum integration on the utilization of the waste aggregates in the production of concrete blocks are investigated. > A thorough understanding of the mechanical properties of concrete blocks made with waste derived from earthquake is reported. - Abstract: Utilization of construction and demolition (C and D) wastes as recycled aggregates in the production of concrete and concrete products have attracted much attention in recent years. However, the presence of large quantities of crushed clay brick in some the C and D waste streams (e.g. waste derived collapsed masonry buildings after an earthquake) renders the recycled aggregates unsuitable for high grade use. One possibility is to make use of the low grade recycled aggregates for concrete block production. In this paper, we report the results of a comprehensive study to assess the feasibility of using crushed clay brick as coarse and fine aggregates in concrete masonry block production. The effects of the content of crushed coarse and fine clay brick aggregates (CBA) on the mechanical properties of non-structural concrete block were quantified. From the experimental test results, it was observed that incorporating the crushed clay brick aggregates had a significant influence on the properties of blocks. The hardened density and drying shrinkage of the block specimens decreased with an increase in CBA content. The use of CBA increased the water absorption of block specimens. The results suggested that the amount of crushed clay brick to be used in concrete masonry blocks should be controlled at less than 25% (coarse aggregate) and within 50-75% for fine aggregates.

  10. Provider experiences with RAC appeals point to opportunities for program improvement.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Robert; Scott, Bonnie; Flood, Elizabeth; Scott, Ellen

    2011-03-01

    Review by an administrative law judge (ALJ) constitutes the third level of appeal for healthcare providers seeking to overturn reverse recovery audit contractor (RAC) findings of overpayment of Medicare claims. An analysis of the results of RAC appeals submitted by 30 New York hospitals during the demonstration project has disclosed two deficiencies in the ALJ review process: inconsistent ALJ decision making and a lack of an appropriate feedback mechanism to correct erroneous overpayment determinations. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services should take advantage of feedback from such studies as an impetus to reevaluate and streamline the RAC appeals process. PMID:21449307

  11. Use of wastes derived from earthquakes for the production of concrete masonry partition wall blocks.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhao; Ling, Tung-Chai; Kou, Shi-Cong; Wang, Qingyuan; Poon, Chi-Sun

    2011-08-01

    Utilization of construction and demolition (C&D) wastes as recycled aggregates in the production of concrete and concrete products have attracted much attention in recent years. However, the presence of large quantities of crushed clay brick in some the C&D waste streams (e.g. waste derived collapsed masonry buildings after an earthquake) renders the recycled aggregates unsuitable for high grade use. One possibility is to make use of the low grade recycled aggregates for concrete block production. In this paper, we report the results of a comprehensive study to assess the feasibility of using crushed clay brick as coarse and fine aggregates in concrete masonry block production. The effects of the content of crushed coarse and fine clay brick aggregates (CBA) on the mechanical properties of non-structural concrete block were quantified. From the experimental test results, it was observed that incorporating the crushed clay brick aggregates had a significant influence on the properties of blocks. The hardened density and drying shrinkage of the block specimens decreased with an increase in CBA content. The use of CBA increased the water absorption of block specimens. The results suggested that the amount of crushed clay brick to be used in concrete masonry blocks should be controlled at less than 25% (coarse aggregate) and within 50-75% for fine aggregates. PMID:21570277

  12. Use of recycled plastics in concrete: A critical review.

    PubMed

    Gu, Lei; Ozbakkaloglu, Togay

    2016-05-01

    Plastics have become an essential part of our modern lifestyle, and the global plastic production has increased immensely during the past 50years. This has contributed greatly to the production of plastic-related waste. Reuse of waste and recycled plastic materials in concrete mix as an environmental friendly construction material has drawn attention of researchers in recent times, and a large number of studies reporting the behavior of concrete containing waste and recycled plastic materials have been published. This paper summarizes the current published literature until 2015, discussing the material properties and recycling methods of plastic and the influence of plastic materials on the properties of concrete. To provide a comprehensive review, a total of 84 studies were considered, and they were classified into sub categories based on whether they dealt with concrete containing plastic aggregates or plastic fibers. Furthermore, the morphology of concrete containing plastic materials is described in this paper to explain the influence of plastic aggregates and plastic fibers on the properties of concrete. The properties of concretes containing virgin plastic materials were also reviewed to establish their similarities and differences with concrete containing recycled plastics. PMID:26970843

  13. Influence of Elevated Temperatures on Pet-Concrete Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albano, C.; Camacho, N.; Hernández, M.; Matheus, A.; Gutiérrez, A.

    2008-08-01

    Lightweight aggregate is an important material in reducing the unit weight of concrete complying with special concrete structures of large high-rise buildings. Besides, the use of recycled PET bottles as lightweight aggregate in concrete is an effective contribution for environment preservation. So, the objective of the present work was to study experimentally the flexural strength of the PET -concrete blends and the thermal degradation of the PET in the concrete, when the blends with 10 and 20% in volume of PET were exposed to different temperatures (200, 400, 600 °C). The flexural strength of concrete-PET exposed to a heat source is strongly dependent on the temperature, water/cement ratio, as well as the content and particle size of PET. However, the activation energy is affected by the temperature, location of the PET particles on the slabs and the water/cement ratio. Higher water content originates thermal and hydrolytic degradation on the PET, while on the concrete, a higher vapor pressure which causes an increase in crack formation. The values of the activation energy are higher on the center of the slabs than on the surface, since concrete is a poor heat conductor.

  14. Electromagnetic Metrology on Concrete and Corrosion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung; Surek, Jack; Baker-Jarvis, James

    2011-01-01

    To augment current methods for the evaluation of reinforcing bar (rebar) corrosion within concrete, we are exploring unique features in the dielectric and magnetic spectra of pure iron oxides and corrosion samples. Any signature needs to be both prominent and consistent in order to identify corrosion within concrete bridge deck or other structures. In order to measure the permittivity and propagation loss through concrete as a function of temperature and humidity, we cut and carefully fitted samples from residential concrete into three different waveguides. We also poured and cured a mortar sample within a waveguide that was later measured after curing 30 days. These measurements were performed from 45 MHz to 12 GHz. Our concrete measurements showed that the coarse granite aggregate that occupied about half the sample volume reduced the electromagnetic propagation loss in comparison to mortar. We also packed ground corrosion samples and commercially available iron-oxide powders into a transmission-line waveguide and found that magnetite and corrosion sample spectra are similar, with a feature between 0.5 GHz and 2 GHz that may prove useful for quantifying corrosion. We also performed reflection (S 11) measurements at various corrosion surfaces and in loose powders from 45 MHz to 50 GHz. These results are a first step towards quantifying rebar corrosion in concrete. PMID:26989590

  15. Electromagnetic Metrology on Concrete and Corrosion*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung; Surek, Jack; Baker-Jarvis, James

    2011-01-01

    To augment current methods for the evaluation of reinforcing bar (rebar) corrosion within concrete, we are exploring unique features in the dielectric and magnetic spectra of pure iron oxides and corrosion samples. Any signature needs to be both prominent and consistent in order to identify corrosion within concrete bridge deck or other structures. In order to measure the permittivity and propagation loss through concrete as a function of temperature and humidity, we cut and carefully fitted samples from residential concrete into three different waveguides. We also poured and cured a mortar sample within a waveguide that was later measured after curing 30 days. These measurements were performed from 45 MHz to 12 GHz. Our concrete measurements showed that the coarse granite aggregate that occupied about half the sample volume reduced the electromagnetic propagation loss in comparison to mortar. We also packed ground corrosion samples and commercially available iron-oxide powders into a transmission-line waveguide and found that magnetite and corrosion sample spectra are similar, with a feature between 0.5 GHz and 2 GHz that may prove useful for quantifying corrosion. We also performed reflection (S11) measurements at various corrosion surfaces and in loose powders from 45 MHz to 50 GHz. These results are a first step towards quantifying rebar corrosion in concrete. PMID:26989590

  16. Organic compounds in concrete from demolition works.

    PubMed

    Van Praagh, M; Modin, H; Trygg, J

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to verify the effect of physically removing the outer surface of contaminated concrete on total contents and on potential mobility of pollutants by means of leaching tests. Reclaimed concrete from 3 industrial sites in Sweden were included: A tar impregnated military storage, a military tar track-depot, as well as concrete constructions used for disposing of pesticide production surplus and residues. Solid materials and leachates from batch and column leaching tests were analysed for metals, Cl, F, SO4, DOC and contents of suspected organic compounds (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAH, and pesticides/substances for pesticide production such as phenoxy acids, chlorophenols and chlorocresols, respectively). In case of PAH contaminated concrete, results indicate that removing 1 or 5 mm of the surface lead to total concentrations below the Swedish guidelines for recycling of aggregates and soil in groundwork constructions. 3 out of 4 concrete samples contaminated with pesticides fulfilled Swedish guidelines for contaminated soil. Results from batch and column leaching tests indicated, however, that concentrations above environmental quality standards for certain PAH and phenoxy acids, respectively, might occur at site when the crushed concrete is recycled in groundwork constructions. As leaching tests engaged in the study deviated from leaching test standards with a limited number of samples, the potential impact of the leaching tests' equipment on measured PAH and pesticide leachate concentrations has to be evaluated in future work. PMID:26164853

  17. Rac1 controls epithelial tube length through the apical secretion and polarity pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sollier, Kévin; Gaudé, Helori-Mael; Chartier, François J.-M.; Laprise, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The morphometric parameters of epithelial tubes are critical to the physiology and homeostasis of most organs. In addition, many human diseases are associated with tube-size defects. Here, we show that Rac1 limits epithelial tube elongation in the developing fly trachea by promoting Rab5-dependent endocytosis of the apical determinant Crumbs. Rac1 is also involved in a positive feedback loop with the septate junction protein Coracle. Thereby, Rac1 precludes paracellular diffusion and contributes to the septate junction-dependent secretion of the chitin-modifying enzymes Vermiform and Serpentine, which restrict epithelial tube length independently of Crumbs. Thus, Rac1 is a critical component of two important pathways controlling epithelial tube morphogenesis. PMID:26700724

  18. Rac1 controls epithelial tube length through the apical secretion and polarity pathways.

    PubMed

    Sollier, Kévin; Gaudé, Helori-Mael; Chartier, François J-M; Laprise, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The morphometric parameters of epithelial tubes are critical to the physiology and homeostasis of most organs. In addition, many human diseases are associated with tube-size defects. Here, we show that Rac1 limits epithelial tube elongation in the developing fly trachea by promoting Rab5-dependent endocytosis of the apical determinant Crumbs. Rac1 is also involved in a positive feedback loop with the septate junction protein Coracle. Thereby, Rac1 precludes paracellular diffusion and contributes to the septate junction-dependent secretion of the chitin-modifying enzymes Vermiform and Serpentine, which restrict epithelial tube length independently of Crumbs. Thus, Rac1 is a critical component of two important pathways controlling epithelial tube morphogenesis. PMID:26700724

  19. Natural aggregates of the conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, William H.

    1988-01-01

    adversely when used as concrete aggregate. In areas where suitable natural aggregate is not available or accessible, it may become necessary to improve the quality of existing aggregate, to import aggregate from outside the area, or to substitute artificial aggregate for natural aggregate. In most cases, all of these alternatives add substantially to the cost of the final product. Even though an area may be blessed with an abundance of aggregate suitable for the intended purpose, existing land uses, zoning, or regulations may preclude commercial exploitation of the aggregate. This report also discusses the aggregate industry in general terms, including exploration, mining, and processing, as well as aggregate production rates. Proper long-range planning based on an understanding of the aggregate industry can help assure adequate supplies of aggregate.

  20. Development of construction materials using nano-silica and aggregates recycled from construction and demolition waste.

    PubMed

    Mukharjee, Bibhuti Bhusan; Barai, Sudhirkumar V

    2015-06-01

    The present work addresses the development of novel construction materials utilising commercial grade nano-silica and recycled aggregates retrieved from construction and demolition waste. For this, experimental work has been carried out to examine the influence of nano-silica and recycled aggregates on compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, water absorption, density and volume of voids of concrete. Fully natural and recycled aggregate concrete mixes are designed by replacing cement with three levels (0.75%, 1.5% and 3%) of nano-silica. The results of the present investigation depict that improvement in early days compressive strength is achieved with the incorporation of nano-silica in addition to the restoration of reduction in compressive strength of recycled aggregate concrete mixes caused owing to the replacement of natural aggregates by recycled aggregates. Moreover, the increase in water absorption and volume of voids with a reduction of bulk density was detected with the incorporation of recycled aggregates in place of natural aggregates. However, enhancement in density and reduction in water absorption and volume of voids of recycled aggregate concrete resulted from the addition of nano-silica. In addition, the results of the study reveal that nano-silica has no significant effect on elastic modulus of concrete. PMID:25986048

  1. Relating damage evolution of concrete cooled to cryogenic temperatures to permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogbara, Reginald B.; Iyengar, Srinath R.; Grasley, Zachary C.; Rahman, Syeda; Masad, Eyad A.; Zollinger, Dan G.

    2014-11-01

    Typically, 9% Ni steel is used for primary containment of liquefied natural gas (LNG). Utilization of concrete in place of 9% Ni steel for primary containment would lead to significant cost savings. Hence, this study investigates changes in the microstructure of concrete due to cryogenic freezing that would affect its relevant engineering properties for containment. The study also evaluates the effect of aggregate type on the damage potential of concrete subjected to cryogenic freezing. The aim is to investigate design methodologies to produce damage-resistant cryogenic concrete. The study employed four concrete mixture designs involving river sand as fine aggregate, and coarse aggregates with different coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) values. Specifically, the coarse aggregates were limestone, sandstone, trap rock and lightweight aggregate. Concrete cubes were cured under water for at least 28 days and thereafter frozen from ambient (20 °C) to cryogenic temperature (-165 °C). Acoustic emission (AE) sensors were placed on the concrete cubes during freezing. X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) was employed to study the microstructure of concrete cores, before and after cryogenic freezing. The impact of the microstructural evolution thus obtained from AE and XRCT on relevant engineering properties was determined via water and chloride permeability tests. Microcrack propagation determined from AE correlated with changes in permeability. There were no observable cracks in majority of the concrete mixtures after freezing. This implies that microcracks detected via AE and increased permeability was very well distributed and smaller than the XRCT's resolution. Damage (microcracking) resistance of the concrete with different aggregates was in the order limestone ⩾ trap rock ≫ lightweight aggregate ⩾ sandstone.

  2. Investigating Radiation Shielding Properties of Different Mineral Origin Heavyweight Concretes

    SciTech Connect

    Basyigit, Celalettin; Uysal, Volkan; Kilincarslan, Semsettin; Akkas, Ayse; Mavi, Betuel; Guenoglu, Kadir; Akkurt, Iskender

    2011-12-26

    The radiation although has hazardous effects for human health, developing technologies bring lots of usage fields to radiation like in medicine and nuclear power station buildings. In this case protecting from undesirable radiation is a necessity for human health. Heavyweight concrete is one of the most important materials used in where radiation should be shielded, like those areas. In this study, used heavyweight aggregates of different mineral origin (Limonite, Siderite), in order to prepare different series in concrete mixtures and investigated radiation shielding properties. The experimental results on measuring the radiation shielding, the heavyweight concrete prepared with heavyweight aggregates of different mineral origin show that, are useful radiation absorbents when they used in concrete mixtures.

  3. GABARAP proteins as scaffolds in localized TIAM1-RAC1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Genau, Heide Marika; Behrends, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Spatially restricted signaling is a hallmark of RAC1 signaling. Recent work has uncovered a novel role of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor-associated proteins (GABARAPs), a subfamily of human ATG8 ubiquitin-like modifiers, in providing a scaffold for recruitment of an ubiquitin E3 ligase complex to its substrate, T-lymphoma invasion and metastasis-inducing protein 1 (TIAM1), to enable ubiquitylation and thereby local control of RAC1 activity. PMID:27308540

  4. Regulation of Rac1 and Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Response to Infection of Gastrointestinal Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Ablack, Amber; Hall, Emily H.; Butcher, Lindsay D.; Bhattacharyya, Asima; Eckmann, Lars; Harris, Paul R.; Das, Soumita; Ernst, Peter B.; Crowe, Sheila E.

    2016-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during infection is an immediate host defense leading to microbial killing. APE1 is a multifunctional protein induced by ROS and after induction, protects against ROS-mediated DNA damage. Rac1 and NAPDH oxidase (Nox1) are important contributors of ROS generation following infection and associated with gastrointestinal epithelial injury. The purpose of this study was to determine if APE1 regulates the function of Rac1 and Nox1 during oxidative stress. Gastric or colonic epithelial cells (wild-type or with suppressed APE1) were infected with Helicobacter pylori or Salmonella enterica and assessed for Rac1 and NADPH oxidase-dependent superoxide production. Rac1 and APE1 interactions were measured by co-immunoprecipitation, confocal microscopy and proximity ligation assay (PLA) in cell lines or in biopsy specimens. Significantly greater levels of ROS were produced by APE1-deficient human gastric and colonic cell lines and primary gastric epithelial cells compared to control cells after infection with either gastric or enteric pathogens. H. pylori activated Rac1 and Nox1 in all cell types, but activation was higher in APE1 suppressed cells. APE1 overexpression decreased H. pylori-induced ROS generation, Rac1 activation, and Nox1 expression. We determined that the effects of APE1 were mediated through its N-terminal lysine residues interacting with Rac1, leading to inhibition of Nox1 expression and ROS generation. APE1 is a negative regulator of oxidative stress in the gastrointestinal epithelium during bacterial infection by modulating Rac1 and Nox1. Our results implicate APE1 in novel molecular interactions that regulate early stress responses elicited by microbial infections. PMID:26761793

  5. Rac2 Controls Tumor Growth, Metastasis and M1-M2 Macrophage Differentiation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shweta; Singh, Alok R.; Zulcic, Muamera; Bao, Lei; Messer, Karen; Ideker, Trey; Dutkowski, Janusz; Durden, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    Although it is well-established that the macrophage M1 to M2 transition plays a role in tumor progression, the molecular basis for this process remains incompletely understood. Herein, we demonstrate that the small GTPase, Rac2 controls macrophage M1 to M2 differentiation and the metastatic phenotype in vivo. Using a genetic approach, combined with syngeneic and orthotopic tumor models we demonstrate that Rac2-/- mice display a marked defect in tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Microarray, RT-PCR and metabolomic analysis on bone marrow derived macrophages isolated from the Rac2-/- mice identify an important role for Rac2 in M2 macrophage differentiation. Furthermore, we define a novel molecular mechanism by which signals transmitted from the extracellular matrix via the α4β1 integrin and MCSF receptor lead to the activation of Rac2 and potentially regulate macrophage M2 differentiation. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a macrophage autonomous process by which the Rac2 GTPase is activated downstream of the α4β1 integrin and the MCSF receptor to control tumor growth, metastasis and macrophage differentiation into the M2 phenotype. Finally, using gene expression and metabolomic data from our Rac2-/- model, and information related to M1-M2 macrophage differentiation curated from the literature we executed a systems biologic analysis of hierarchical protein-protein interaction networks in an effort to develop an iterative interactome map which will predict additional mechanisms by which Rac2 may coordinately control macrophage M1 to M2 differentiation and metastasis. PMID:24770346

  6. Remedial Strategies in Structural Proteomics: Expression, Purification, And Crystallization of the Vav1/Rac1 Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Brooun, A.; Foster, S.A.; Chrencik, H.E.; Chien, E.Y.T.; Kolatkar, A.R.; Streiff, M.; Ramage, P.; Widmer, H.; Weckbecker, G.; Kuhn, P.

    2007-07-03

    The signal transduction pathway involving the Vav1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) and the Rac1 GTPase plays several key roles in the immune response mediated by the T cell receptor. Vav1 is also a unique member of the GEF family in that it contains a cysteine-rich domain (CRD) that is critical for Rac1 binding and maximal guanine nucleotide exchange activity, and thus may provide a unique protein-protein interface compared to other GEF/GTPase pairs. Here, we have applied a number of remedial structural proteomics strategies, such as construct and expression optimization, surface mutagenesis, limited proteolysis, and protein formulation to successfully express, purify, and crystallize the Vav1-DH-PH-CRD/Rac1 complex in an active conformation. We have also systematically characterized various Vav1 domains in a GEF assay and Rac1 in vitro binding experiments. In the context of Vav1-DH-PH-CRD, the zinc finger motif of the CRD is required for the expression of stable Vav1, as well as for activity in both a GEF assay and in vitro formation of a Vav1/Rac1 complex suitable for biophysical and structural characterization. Our data also indicate that the isolated CRD maintains a low level of specific binding to Rac1, appears to be folded based on 1D NMR analysis and coordinates two zinc ions based on ICP-MS analysis. The protein reagents generated here are essential tools for the determination of a three dimensional Vav1/Rac1 complex crystal structure and possibly for the identification of inhibitors of the Vav1/Rac1 protein-protein interaction with potential to inhibit lymphocyte activation.

  7. STUDY ON THE EVALUATION FOR DRYING SHRINKAGE PROPERTIES OF COARSE AGGREGATE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Katahira, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    Drying shrinkage of coarse aggregate is one of principal indexes to evaluate drying shrinkage of concrete. However, testing of drying shrinkage of a coarse aggregate particle has not been commonly conducted. We carried out measurement of drying shrinkage of a coarse aggregate particle using wire strain gauges and discussed the variation in the measurement. We found that variation among particles in drying shrinkage strain of coarse aggregate is intrinsic and much bigger than test result due to the simplified unidirectional strain measurement under the assumption of ignoring multi-axial strain field. Strong relationship between the mean value of drying shrinkage strain of coarse aggregate and drying shrinkage strain of concrete prism specimens was observed, which indicates that measured drying shrinkage strain of aggregate particles intrinsically contains large variation, however the mean value is an effective index to estimate drying shrinkage of concrete.

  8. The Rac-GAP alpha2-chimaerin regulates hippocampal dendrite and spine morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Chris M; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Beg, Asim A

    2016-09-01

    Dendritic spines are fine neuronal processes where spatially restricted input can induce activity-dependent changes in one spine, while leaving neighboring spines unmodified. Morphological spine plasticity is critical for synaptic transmission and is thought to underlie processes like learning and memory. Significantly, defects in dendritic spine stability and morphology are common pathogenic features found in several neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. The remodeling of spines relies on proteins that modulate the underlying cytoskeleton, which is primarily composed of filamentous (F)-actin. The Rho-GTPase Rac1 is a major regulator of F-actin and is essential for the development and plasticity of dendrites and spines. However, the key molecules and mechanisms that regulate Rac1-dependent pathways at spines and synapses are not well understood. We have identified the Rac1-GTPase activating protein, α2-chimaerin, as a critical negative regulator of Rac1 in hippocampal neurons. The loss of α2-chimaerin significantly increases the levels of active Rac1 and induces the formation of aberrant polymorphic dendritic spines. Further, disruption of α2-chimaerin signaling simplifies dendritic arbor complexity and increases the presence of dendritic spines that appear poly-innervated. Our data suggests that α2-chimaerin serves as a "brake" to constrain Rac1-dependent signaling to ensure that the mature morphology of spines is maintained in response to network activity. PMID:27297944

  9. Inhibition of Rac and ROCK Signalling Influence Osteoblast Adhesion, Differentiation and Mineralization on Titanium Topographies

    PubMed Central

    Prowse, Paul D. H.; Elliott, Christopher G.; Hutter, Jeff; Hamilton, Douglas W.

    2013-01-01

    Reducing the time required for initial integration of bone-contacting implants with host tissues would be of great clinical significance. Changes in osteoblast adhesion formation and reorganization of the F-actin cytoskeleton in response to altered topography are known to be upstream of osteoblast differentiation, and these processes are regulated by the Rho GTPases. Rac and RhoA (through Rho Kinase (ROCK)). Using pharmacological inhibitors, we tested how inhibition of Rac and ROCK influenced osteoblast adhesion, differentiation and mineralization on PT (Pre-treated) and SLA (sandblasted large grit, acid etched) topographies. Inhibition of ROCK, but not Rac, significantly reduced adhesion number and size on PT, with adhesion size consistent with focal complexes. After 1 day, ROCK, but not Rac inhibition increased osteocalcin mRNA levels on SLA and PT, with levels further increasing at 7 days post seeding. ROCK inhibition also significantly increased bone sialoprotein expression at 7 days, but not BMP-2 levels. Rac inhibition significantly reduced BMP-2 mRNA levels. ROCK inhibition increased nuclear translocation of Runx2 independent of surface roughness. Mineralization of osteoblast cultures was greater on SLA than on PT, but was increased by ROCK inhibition and attenuated by Rac inhibition on both topographies. In conclusion, inhibition of ROCK signalling significantly increases osteoblast differentiation and biomineralization in a topographic dependent manner, and its pharmacological inhibition could represent a new therapeutic to speed bone formation around implanted metals and in regenerative medicine applications. PMID:23505566

  10. Rac1 functions as a reversible tension modulator to stabilize VE-cadherin trans-interaction.

    PubMed

    Daneshjou, Nazila; Sieracki, Nathan; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P; Schwartz, Martin A; Komarova, Yulia A; Malik, Asrar B; Conway, Daniel E

    2015-01-01

    The role of the RhoGTPase Rac1 in stabilizing mature endothelial adherens junctions (AJs) is not well understood. In this paper, using a photoactivatable probe to control Rac1 activity at AJs, we addressed the relationship between Rac1 and the dynamics of vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin). We demonstrated that Rac1 activation reduced the rate of VE-cadherin dissociation, leading to increased density of VE-cadherin at AJs. This response was coupled to a reduction in actomyosin-dependent tension across VE-cadherin adhesion sites. We observed that inhibiting myosin II directly or through photo-release of the caged Rho kinase inhibitor also reduced the rate of VE-cadherin dissociation. Thus, Rac1 functions by stabilizing VE-cadherin trans-dimers in mature AJs by counteracting the actomyosin tension. The results suggest a new model of VE-cadherin adhesive interaction mediated by Rac1-induced reduction of mechanical tension at AJs, resulting in the stabilization of VE-cadherin adhesions. PMID:25559184

  11. Rac1 GTPase silencing counteracts microgravity-induced effects on osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Guignandon, Alain; Faure, Céline; Neutelings, Thibaut; Rattner, Aline; Mineur, Pierre; Linossier, Marie-Thérèse; Laroche, Norbert; Lambert, Charles; Deroanne, Christophe; Nusgens, Betty; Demets, René; Colige, Alain; Vico, Laurence

    2014-09-01

    Bone cells exposed to real microgravity display alterations of their cytoskeleton and focal adhesions, two major mechanosensitive structures. These structures are controlled by small GTPases of the Ras homology (Rho) family. We investigated the effects of RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 modulation of osteoblastic cells under microgravity conditions. Human MG-63 osteoblast-like cells silenced for RhoGTPases were cultured in the automated Biobox bioreactor (European Space Agency) aboard the Foton M3 satellite and compared to replicate ground-based controls. The cells were fixed after 69 h of microgravity exposure for postflight analysis of focal contacts, F-actin polymerization, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and matrix targeting. We found that RhoA silencing did not affect sensitivity to microgravity but that Rac1 and, to a lesser extent, Cdc42 abrogation was particularly efficient in counteracting the spaceflight-related reduction of the number of focal contacts [-50% in silenced, scrambled (SiScr) controls vs. -15% for SiRac1], the number of F-actin fibers (-60% in SiScr controls vs. -10% for SiRac1), and the depletion of matrix-bound VEGF (-40% in SiScr controls vs. -8% for SiRac1). Collectively, these data point out the role of the VEGF/Rho GTPase axis in mechanosensing and validate Rac1-mediated signaling pathways as potential targets for counteracting microgravity effects. PMID:24903274

  12. Activation of Rac1 by RhoG regulates cell migration.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Hironori; Hiramoto, Kiyo; Negishi, Manabu

    2006-01-01

    Cell migration is essential for normal development and many pathological processes. Rho-family small GTPases play important roles in this event. In particular, Rac regulates lamellipodia formation at the leading edge during migration. The small GTPase RhoG activates Rac through its effector ELMO and the ELMO-binding protein Dock180, which functions as a Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor. Here we investigated the role of RhoG in cell migration. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of RhoG in HeLa cells reduced cell migration in Transwell and scratch-wound migration assays. In RhoG-knockdown cells, activation of Rac1 and formation of lamellipodia at the leading edge in response to wounding were attenuated. By contrast, expression of active RhoG promoted cell migration through ELMO and Dock180. However, the interaction of Dock180 with Crk was dispensable for the activation of Rac1 and promotion of cell migration by RhoG. Taken together, these results suggest that RhoG contributes to the regulation of Rac activity in migrating cells. PMID:16339170

  13. Rac-mediated Stimulation of Phospholipase Cγ2 Amplifies B Cell Receptor-induced Calcium Signaling.

    PubMed

    Walliser, Claudia; Tron, Kyrylo; Clauss, Karen; Gutman, Orit; Kobitski, Andrei Yu; Retlich, Michael; Schade, Anja; Röcker, Carlheinz; Henis, Yoav I; Nienhaus, G Ulrich; Gierschik, Peter

    2015-07-10

    The Rho GTPase Rac is crucially involved in controlling multiple B cell functions, including those regulated by the B cell receptor (BCR) through increased cytosolic Ca(2+). The underlying molecular mechanisms and their relevance to the functions of intact B cells have thus far remained unknown. We have previously shown that the activity of phospholipase Cγ2 (PLCγ2), a key constituent of the BCR signalosome, is stimulated by activated Rac through direct protein-protein interaction. Here, we use a Rac-resistant mutant of PLCγ2 to functionally reconstitute cultured PLCγ2-deficient DT40 B cells and to examine the effects of the Rac-PLCγ2 interaction on BCR-mediated changes of intracellular Ca(2+) and regulation of Ca(2+)-regulated and nuclear-factor-of-activated-T-cell-regulated gene transcription at the level of single, intact B cells. The results show that the functional Rac-PLCγ2 interaction causes marked increases in the following: (i) sensitivity of B cells to BCR ligation; (ii) BCR-mediated Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores; (iii) Ca(2+) entry from the extracellular compartment; and (iv) nuclear translocation of the Ca(2+)-regulated nuclear factor of activated T cells. Hence, Rac-mediated stimulation of PLCγ2 activity serves to amplify B cell receptor-induced Ca(2+) signaling. PMID:25903139

  14. Proapoptotic and antiinvasive activity of Rac1 small molecule inhibitors on malignant glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cardama, Georgina A; Gonzalez, Nazareno; Ciarlantini, Matias; Gandolfi Donadío, Lucia; Comin, María Julieta; Alonso, Daniel F; Menna, Pablo Lorenzano; Gomez, Daniel E

    2014-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are characterized by an intrinsic ability to invade diffusely throughout the normal brain tissue. This feature contributes mainly to the failure of existing therapies. Deregulation of small GTPases signaling, in particular Rac1 activity, plays a key role in the invasive phenotype of gliomas. Here we report the effect of ZINC69391, a specific Rac1 inhibitor developed by our group, on human glioma cell lines LN229 and U-87 MG. ZINC69391 is able to interfere with the interaction of Rac1 with Dock180, a relevant Rac1 activator in glioma invasion, and to reduce Rac1-GTP levels. The kinase Pak1, a downstream effector of Dock180–Rac1 signaling, was also downregulated upon ZINC69391 treatment. ZINC69391 reduced cell proliferation, arrested cells in G1 phase, and triggered apoptosis in glioma cells. Importantly, ZINC69391 dramatically affected cell migration and invasion in vitro, interfering with actin cytoskeleton dynamics. We also evaluated the effect of analog 1A-116, a compound derived from ZINC69391 structure. 1A-116 showed an improved antiproliferative and antiinvasive activity on glioma cells. These findings encourage further preclinical testing in clinically relevant animal models. PMID:25378937

  15. Compression Strength of Sulfur Concrete Subjected to Extreme Cold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.

    2008-01-01

    Sulfur concrete cubes were cycled between liquid nitrogen and room temperature to simulate extreme exposure conditions. Subsequent compression testing showed the strength of cycled samples to be roughly five times less than those non-cycled. Fracture surface examination showed de-bonding of the sulfur from the aggregate material in the cycled samples but not in those non-cycled. The large discrepancy found, between the samples is attributed to the relative thermal properties of the materials constituting the concrete.

  16. Nonlinear fracture of concrete and ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, Albert S.; Du, Jia-Ji; Hawkins, Niel M.; Bradt, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    The nonlinear fracture process zones in an impacted unnotched concrete bend specimen, a prenotched ceramic bend specimen, and an unnotched ceramic/ceramic composite bend specimen were estimated through hybrid experimental numerical analysis. Aggregate bridging in concrete, particulate bridging in ceramics, and fiber bridging in ceramic/ceramic composite are modeled by Barenblatt-type cohesive zones which are incorporated into the finite-element models of the bend specimens. Both generation and propagation analyses are used to estimate the distribution of crack closure stresses in the nonlinear fracture process zones. The finite-element models are then used to simulate fracture tests consisting of rapid crack propagation in an impacted concrete bend specimen, and stable crack growth and strain softening in a ceramic and ceramic/ceramic composite bend specimens.

  17. Lunar concrete for construction

    SciTech Connect

    Cullingford, H.S.; Keller, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Feasibility of using concrete for lunar-base construction has been discussed recently without relevant data for the effects of vacuum on concrete. Our experimental studies performed earlier at Los Alamos have shown that concrete is stable in vacuum with no deterioration of its quality as measured by the compressive strength. Various considerations of using concrete successfully on the moon are provided in this paper along with specific conclusions from the existing data base. 10 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Lunar concrete for construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullingford, Hatice S.; Keller, M. Dean

    1988-01-01

    Feasibility of using concrete for lunar-base construction has been discussed recently without relevant data for the effects of vacuum on concrete. Experimental studies performed earlier at Los Alamos have shown that concrete is stable in vacuum with no deterioration of its quality as measured by the compressive strength. Various considerations of using concrete successfully on the moon are provided in this paper along with specific conclusions from the existing data base.

  19. Lunar concrete for construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullingford, Hatice S.; Keller, M. Dean

    1992-01-01

    Feasibility of using concrete for lunar base construction was discussed recently without relevant data for the effects of vacuum on concrete. Our experimental studies performed earlier at Los Alamos have shown that concrete is stable in vacuum with no deterioration of its quality as measured by the compressive strength. Various considerations of using concrete successfully on the Moon are provided in this paper, along with specific conclusions from the existing database.

  20. Deletion of Rac1GTPase in the Myeloid Lineage Protects against Inflammation-Mediated Kidney Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nagase, Miki; Kurihara, Hidetake; Aiba, Atsu; Young, Morag J.; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage-mediated inflammation has been implicated in various kidney diseases. We previously reported that Rac1, a Rho family small GTP-binding protein, was overactivated in several chronic kidney disease models, and that Rac1 inhibitors ameliorated renal injury, in part via inhibition of inflammation, but the detailed mechanisms have not been clarified. In the present study, we examined whether Rac1 in macrophages effects cytokine production and the inflammatory mechanisms contributing to kidney derangement. Myeloid-selective Rac1 flox control (M-Rac1 FC) and knockout (M-Rac1 KO) mice were generated using the cre-loxP system. Renal function under basal conditions did not differ between M-Rac1 FC and KO mice. Accordingly, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-evoked kidney injury model was created. LPS elevated blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine, enhanced expressions of kidney injury biomarkers, Kim-1 and Ngal, and promoted tubular injury in M-Rac1 FC mice. By contrast, deletion of myeloid Rac1 almost completely prevented the LPS-mediated renal impairment. LPS triggered a marked induction of macrophage-derived inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNFα, in M-Rac1 FC mice, which was accompanied by Rac1 activation, stimulation of reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase, and reactive oxygen species overproduction. These changes were inhibited in M-Rac1 KO mice. LPS evoked F4/80-positive macrophages accumulation in the kidney, which was not affected by myeloid Rac1 deficiency. We further tested the role of Rac1 signaling in cytokine production using macrophage cell line, RAW264.7. Exposure to LPS increased IL-6 and TNFα mRNA expression. The LPS-driven cytokine induction was dose-dependently blocked by the Rac1 inhibitor EHT1864, NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium, and NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082. In conclusion, genetic ablation of Rac1 in the myeloid lineage protected against LPS-induced renal inflammation and injury, by suppressing

  1. Deletion of Rac1GTPase in the Myeloid Lineage Protects against Inflammation-Mediated Kidney Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nagase, Miki; Kurihara, Hidetake; Aiba, Atsu; Young, Morag J; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage-mediated inflammation has been implicated in various kidney diseases. We previously reported that Rac1, a Rho family small GTP-binding protein, was overactivated in several chronic kidney disease models, and that Rac1 inhibitors ameliorated renal injury, in part via inhibition of inflammation, but the detailed mechanisms have not been clarified. In the present study, we examined whether Rac1 in macrophages effects cytokine production and the inflammatory mechanisms contributing to kidney derangement. Myeloid-selective Rac1 flox control (M-Rac1 FC) and knockout (M-Rac1 KO) mice were generated using the cre-loxP system. Renal function under basal conditions did not differ between M-Rac1 FC and KO mice. Accordingly, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-evoked kidney injury model was created. LPS elevated blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine, enhanced expressions of kidney injury biomarkers, Kim-1 and Ngal, and promoted tubular injury in M-Rac1 FC mice. By contrast, deletion of myeloid Rac1 almost completely prevented the LPS-mediated renal impairment. LPS triggered a marked induction of macrophage-derived inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNFα, in M-Rac1 FC mice, which was accompanied by Rac1 activation, stimulation of reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase, and reactive oxygen species overproduction. These changes were inhibited in M-Rac1 KO mice. LPS evoked F4/80-positive macrophages accumulation in the kidney, which was not affected by myeloid Rac1 deficiency. We further tested the role of Rac1 signaling in cytokine production using macrophage cell line, RAW264.7. Exposure to LPS increased IL-6 and TNFα mRNA expression. The LPS-driven cytokine induction was dose-dependently blocked by the Rac1 inhibitor EHT1864, NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium, and NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082. In conclusion, genetic ablation of Rac1 in the myeloid lineage protected against LPS-induced renal inflammation and injury, by suppressing

  2. The optimization of concrete mixtures for use in highway applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moini, Mohamadreza

    Portland cement concrete is most used commodity in the world after water. Major part of civil and transportation infrastructure including bridges, roadway pavements, dams, and buildings is made of concrete. In addition to this, concrete durability is often of major concerns. In 2013 American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) estimated that an annual investment of 170 billion on roads and 20.5 billion for bridges is needed on an annual basis to substantially improve the condition of infrastructure. Same article reports that one-third of America's major roads are in poor or mediocre condition [1]. However, portland cement production is recognized with approximately one cubic meter of carbon dioxide emission. Indeed, the proper and systematic design of concrete mixtures for highway applications is essential as concrete pavements represent up to 60% of interstate highway systems with heavier traffic loads. Combined principles of material science and engineering can provide adequate methods and tools to facilitate the concrete design and improve the existing specifications. In the same manner, the durability must be addressed in the design and enhancement of long-term performance. Concrete used for highway pavement applications has low cement content and can be placed at low slump. However, further reduction of cement content (e.g., versus current specifications of Wisconsin Department of Transportation to 315-338 kg/m 3 (530-570 lb/yd3) for mainstream concrete pavements and 335 kg/m3 (565 lb/yd3) for bridge substructure and superstructures) requires delicate design of the mixture to maintain the expected workability, overall performance, and long-term durability in the field. The design includes, but not limited to optimization of aggregates, supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs), chemical and air-entraining admixtures. This research investigated various theoretical and experimental methods of aggregate optimization applicable for the reduction of cement content

  3. Sulfur "Concrete" for Lunar Applications - Sublimation Concerns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Toutanji, Houssam

    2006-01-01

    Melting sulfur and mixing it with an aggregate to form "concrete" is commercially well established and constitutes a material that is particularly well-suited for use in corrosive environments. Discovery of the mineral troilite (FeS) on the moon poses the question of extracting the sulfur for use as a lunar construction material. This would be an attractive alternative to conventional concrete as it does not require water. However, the viability of sulfur concrete in a lunar environment, which is characterized by lack of an atmosphere and extreme temperatures, is not well understood. Here it is assumed that the lunar ore can be mined, refined, and the raw sulfur melded with appropriate lunar regolith to form, for example, bricks. This study evaluates pure sulfur and two sets of small sulfur concrete samples that have been prepared using JSC-1 lunar stimulant and SiO2 powder as aggregate additions. Each set was subjected to extended periods in a vacuum environment to evaluate sublimation issues. Results from these experiments are presented and discussed within the context of the lunar environment.

  4. Use of selected waste materials in concrete mixes

    SciTech Connect

    Batayneh, Malek Marie, Iqbal; Asi, Ibrahim

    2007-07-01

    A modern lifestyle, alongside the advancement of technology has led to an increase in the amount and type of waste being generated, leading to a waste disposal crisis. This study tackles the problem of the waste that is generated from construction fields, such as demolished concrete, glass, and plastic. In order to dispose of or at least reduce the accumulation of certain kinds of waste, it has been suggested to reuse some of these waste materials to substitute a percentage of the primary materials used in the ordinary portland cement concrete (OPC). The waste materials considered to be recycled in this study consist of glass, plastics, and demolished concrete. Such recycling not only helps conserve natural resources, but also helps solve a growing waste disposal crisis. Ground plastics and glass were used to replace up to 20% of fine aggregates in concrete mixes, while crushed concrete was used to replace up to 20% of coarse aggregates. To evaluate these replacements on the properties of the OPC mixes, a number of laboratory tests were carried out. These tests included workability, unit weight, compressive strength, flexural strength, and indirect tensile strength (splitting). The main findings of this investigation revealed that the three types of waste materials could be reused successfully as partial substitutes for sand or coarse aggregates in concrete mixtures.

  5. Synthesis report: D-cracking in portland cement concrete pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S. R.; Olsen, M. P. J.; Dempsey, B. J.

    1980-06-01

    The mechanisms and testing procedures for D-cracking in portland cement concrete pavements are examined. Benefication procedures are also investigated. The three general responses to freezing in the aggregate/paste system include elastic accommodation, high internal pressure, and high external pressure. It is found that the critical aggregate parameters influencing D-cracking are degree of saturation, maximum particle size, permeability, porosity, and pore size distribution. Evaluation of present laboratory testing procedures indicated that the ASTM C666, VPI slow-cool, Mercury Porosimetry, and Iowa Pore Index Tests correlated the best with field performance of concrete with respect to D-cracking.

  6. Quick setting water-compatible furfuryl alcohol polymer concretes

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Kukacka, Lawrence E.; Horn, William H.

    1982-11-30

    A novel quick setting polymer concrete composite comprising a furfuryl alcohol monomer, an aggregate containing a maximum of 8% by weight water, and about 1-10% trichlorotoluene initiator and about 20-80% powdered metal salt promoter, such as zinc chloride, based on the weight of said monomer, to initiate and promote polymerization of said monomer in the presence of said aggregate, within 1 hour after mixing at a temperature of -20.degree. C. to 40.degree. C., to produce a polymer concrete having a 1 hour compressive strength greater than 2000 psi.

  7. Effect of Cement on Properties of Over-Burnt Brick Bituminous Concrete Mixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Dipankar; Pal, Manish

    2016-05-01

    The present investigation is carried out to propose the use of cement coated over burnt brick aggregate in the preparation of bituminous concrete mix. The effect of cement on various mechanical properties such as Marshall stability, flow, Marshall quotient (stability to flow ratio), indirect tensile strength, stripping, rutting and fatigue life of bituminous concrete overlay has been evaluated. In this study, different cement percentages such as 2, 3, 4 and 5 % by weight of aggregate have been mixed with Over Burnt Brick Aggregate (OBBA). The laboratory results indicate that bituminous concrete prepared by 4 % cement coated OBBA gives the highest Marshall stability. The bituminous concrete mix with 4 % cement shows considerable improvement in various mechanical properties of the mix compared to the plain OBBA concrete mix.

  8. Effect of Cement on Properties of Over-Burnt Brick Bituminous Concrete Mixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Dipankar; Pal, Manish

    2016-06-01

    The present investigation is carried out to propose the use of cement coated over burnt brick aggregate in the preparation of bituminous concrete mix. The effect of cement on various mechanical properties such as Marshall stability, flow, Marshall quotient (stability to flow ratio), indirect tensile strength, stripping, rutting and fatigue life of bituminous concrete overlay has been evaluated. In this study, different cement percentages such as 2, 3, 4 and 5 % by weight of aggregate have been mixed with Over Burnt Brick Aggregate (OBBA). The laboratory results indicate that bituminous concrete prepared by 4 % cement coated OBBA gives the highest Marshall stability. The bituminous concrete mix with 4 % cement shows considerable improvement in various mechanical properties of the mix compared to the plain OBBA concrete mix.

  9. Tailoring the fresh state properties of concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tregger, Nathan Allen

    In this research, two types of concrete whose performance relies on their fresh-state abilities will be discussed. The first is self-consolidating concrete, which possesses high flowability without aggregate segregation. Quality control of flowability is typically predicted by the final diameter ( Df) of the slump-flow test, which in turn, has been related to yield stress of the fresh concrete. Currently, there are no reliable measures of viscosity from a field-friendly test such as the slump-flow test. It will be demonstrated that the viscosity can be related to the time to final diameter (Tf) from the minislump-flow tests for cement pastes. This relationship is extended to concrete systems where T f of the slump-flow test is correlated to dynamic segregation. For the concrete system, Tf was increased systematically using a viscosity modifying agent, while the Df was kept constant by adjusting the superplasticizer content. Segregation is determined by measuring the radial aggregate distribution from the slump-flow test. The results demonstrate that increasing the Tf improves dynamic segregation resistance. Furthermore, Tf was more indicative of viscosity than the time to reach a diameter of 50 cm (T50), which is currently used in the field as a measure of viscosity. Computational models are implemented to investigate these relationships for both cement and concrete systems. The second type of concrete is an improved slipform concrete with the ability to consolidate under minimal external energy yet maintain shape stability after being slipformed. This balance between flowability and shape stability is achieved through combination of fly ash and small dosages of micro and nano clays. A microstructural investigation of the effect of clays on the fresh state is carried out to relate macro behaviors with changes in the paste microstructure. Shear and compressive rheology techniques are used to measure how the solids volume fraction of the suspensions with different

  10. Materials development and field demonstration of high-recycled-content concrete for energy-efficient building construction

    SciTech Connect

    Ostowari, Ken; Nosson, Ali

    2000-09-30

    The project developed high-recycled-content concrete material with balanced structural and thermal attributes for use in energy-efficient building construction. Recycled plastics, tire, wool, steel and concrete were used as replacement for coarse aggregates in concrete and masonry production. With recycled materials the specific heat and thermal conductivity of concrete could be tailored to enhance the energy-efficiency of concrete buildings. A comprehensive field project was implemented which confirmed the benefits of high-recycled-content concrete for energy-efficient building construction.

  11. Biodeterioration of concrete piling in the Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect

    Jadkowski, T.K.; Wiltsie, E.A.

    1985-03-01

    Concrete is one of the most widely used materials in marine construction because of its characteristic durability in sea environments. Recent inspection of concrete piles installed in the Arabian Gulf has revealed that concrete with high content of calcareous aggregate is susceptible to biodeterioration. Marine rock borers and sponges, which are common in areas where the seabed is composed of limestone rock, have been identified as the marine species responsible for the biodeterioration. Boring organisms pose a significant threat to concrete pile structural integrity. Boreholes deteriorate concrete and expose outer pile reinforcement to seawater. This paper describes the causes and magnitude of biodeterioration of piles installed in the Arabian Gulf and presents design parameters and material specifications for the selected preventive repair system.

  12. Protein Kinase CK2 Interacts at the Neuromuscular Synapse with Rapsyn, Rac1, 14-3-3γ, and Dok-7 Proteins and Phosphorylates the Latter Two*

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Dustin; Straubinger, Marion; Hashemolhosseini, Said

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that the protein kinase CK2 associates with and phosphorylates the receptor tyrosine kinase MuSK (muscle specific receptor tyrosine kinase) at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), thereby preventing fragmentation of the NMJs (Cheusova, T., Khan, M. A., Schubert, S. W., Gavin, A. C., Buchou, T., Jacob, G., Sticht, H., Allende, J., Boldyreff, B., Brenner, H. R., and Hashemolhosseini, S. (2006) Genes Dev. 20, 1800–1816). Here, we asked whether CK2 interacts with other proteins involved in processes at the NMJ, which would be consistent with the previous observation that CK2 appears enriched at the NMJ. We identified the following proteins to interact with protein kinase CK2: (a) the α and β subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with weak interaction, (b) dishevelled (Dsh), and (c) another four proteins, Rapsyn, Rac1, 14-3-3γ, and Dok-7, with strong interaction. CK2 phosphorylated 14-3-3γ at serine residue 235 and Dok-7 at several serine residues but does not phosphorylate Rapsyn or Rac1. Furthermore, phosphomimetic Dok-7 mutants aggregated nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in C2C12 myotubes with significantly higher frequency than wild type Dok-7. Additionally, we mapped the interacting epitopes of all four binding partners to CK2 and thereby gained insights into the potential role of the CK2/Rapsyn interaction. PMID:26198629

  13. Sustainable construction: composite use of tyres and ash in concrete.

    PubMed

    Snelson, D G; Kinuthia, J M; Davies, P A; Chang, S-R

    2009-01-01

    An investigation was carried out to establish the physical, mechanical and chemical characteristics of a non-standard (unprocessed) pulverised fuel ash (PFA) and waste tyres from a former landfill site at the Power Station Hill near Church Village, South Wales, United Kingdom. Investigations are on-going to establish the suitability of the fly ash and/or tyres in road construction (embankment and pavement) and also in concrete to be used in the construction of the proposed highway. This paper reports on concrete-based construction where concrete blends (using various levels of PFA as partial replacement for Portland cement (PC), and shredded waste tyres (chips 15-20mm) as aggregate replacement) were subjected to unconfined compressive strength tests to establish performance, hence, optimising mix designs. Strength development up to 180 days for the concrete made with PC-PFA blends as binders (PC-PFA concrete), with and without aggregate replacement with tyre chips, is reported. The binary PC-PFA concrete does not have good early strength but tends to improve at longer curing periods. The low early strength observed means that PC-PFA concrete cannot be used for structures, hence, only as low to medium strength applications such as blinding, low-strength foundations, crash barriers, noise reduction barriers, cycle paths, footpaths and material for pipe bedding. PMID:18799299

  14. Sustainable construction: Composite use of tyres and ash in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Snelson, D.G.; Kinuthia, J.M.; Davies, P.A.; Chang, S.R.

    2009-01-15

    An investigation was carried out to establish the physical, mechanical and chemical characteristics of a non-standard (unprocessed) pulverised fuel ash (PFA) and waste tyres from a former landfill site at the Power Station Hill near Church Village, South Wales, United Kingdom. Investigations are on-going to establish the suitability of the fly ash and/or tyres in road construction (embankment and pavement) and also in concrete to be used in the construction of the proposed highway. This paper reports on concrete-based construction where concrete blends (using various levels of PFA as partial replacement for Portland cement (PC), and shredded waste tyres (chips 15-20 mm) as aggregate replacement) were subjected to unconfined compressive strength tests to establish performance, hence, optimising mix designs. Strength development up to 180 days for the concrete made with PC-PFA blends as binders (PC-PFA concrete), with and without aggregate replacement with tyre chips, is reported. The binary PC-PFA concrete does not have good early strength but tends to improve at longer curing periods. The low early strength observed means that PC-PFA concrete cannot be used for structures, hence, only as low to medium strength applications such as blinding, low-strength foundations, crash barriers, noise reduction barriers, cycle paths, footpaths and material for pipe bedding.

  15. Effect of processing cement to concrete on hexavalent chromium levels.

    PubMed

    Turk, K; Rietschel, R L

    1993-04-01

    Hexavalent chromium sensitization is known to occur from exposure to cement. Concrete is a mixture of cement, sand, rock, and water. Admixtures are compounds used to retard or accelerate concrete setting time. Some countries use ferrous sulfate to reduce hexavalent chromium in cement. We evaluated and compared hexavalent chromium levels in cement, rock (aggregate), and wet and dry concrete in samples from Singapore, Ireland, Denmark, Australia, and the United States. Cement from Denmark contains ferrous sulfate. The effect of representative admixtures on hexavalent chromium concentration in concrete was also evaluated, but technical limitations made evaluation difficult. Soluble chromium levels in cement ranged from 0.225 mg/kg in the US sample to 0.036 mg/kg in the Singapore sample. Aggregate chromium levels ranged from 0.083 mg/kg in the Denmark sample to < 0.002 mg/kg in the Ireland sample. Fresh US concrete, with 1.27 mg/kg hexavalent chromium, contained the highest level. The Denmark sample, with ferrous sulfate added, was lowest (< 0.01 mg/kg). Hardened concrete levels ranged from 0.104 mg/kg from the Ireland sample to 0.002 mg/kg from the Singapore sample. Therefore, hexavalent chromium levels do appear to be influenced by admixtures and by processing from powdered cement to dry concrete. Ferrous sulfate significantly reduced hexavalent chromium levels in fresh cement. PMID:8508629

  16. Measurements of Accelerator-Produced Leakage Neutron and Photon Transmission through Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Walter R

    2002-07-04

    Optimum shielding of the radiation from particle accelerators requires knowledge of the attenuation characteristics of the shielding material. The most common material for shielding this radiation is concrete, which can be made using various materials of different densities as aggregates. These different concrete mixes can have very different attenuation characteristics. Information about the attenuation of leakage photons and neutrons in ordinary and heavy concrete is, however, very limited. To increase our knowledge and understanding of the radiation attenuation in concrete of various compositions, we have performed measurements of the transmission of leakage radiation, photons and neutrons, from a Varian Clinac 2100C medical linear accelerator operating at maximum electron energies of 6 and 18 MeV. We also calculated, using Monte Carlo techniques, the leakage neutron spectra and its transmission through concrete. The results of these measurements and calculations extend the information currently available for designing shielding for medical electron accelerators. Photon transmission characteristics depend more on the manufacturer of the concrete than on the atomic composition. A possible cause for this effect is a non-uniform distribution of the high density aggregate, typically iron, in the concrete matrix. Errors in estimated transmission of photons can exceed a factor of three, depending on barrier thickness, if attenuation in high-density concrete is simply scaled from that of normal density concrete. We found that neutron transmission through the high-density concretes can be estimated most reasonably and conservatively by using the linear tenth-value layer of normal concrete if specific values of the tenth-value layer of the high-density concrete are not known. The reason for this is that the neutron transmission depends primarily on the hydrogen content of the concrete, which does not significantly depend on concrete density. Errors of factors of two to

  17. Molecular insights into DNA binding and anchoring by the Bacillus subtilis sporulation kinetochore-like RacA protein

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Maria A.; Lee, Jeehyun; Zeng, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    During Bacillus subtilis sporulation, segregating sister chromosomes are anchored to cell poles and the chromosome is remodeled into an elongated structure called the axial filament. Data indicate that a developmentally regulated protein called RacA is involved in these functions. To gain insight into how RacA performs these diverse processes we performed a battery of structural and biochemical analyses. These studies show that RacA contains an N-terminal winged-helix-turn-helix module connected by a disordered region to a predicted coiled-coil domain. Structures capture RacA binding the DNA using distinct protein–protein interfaces and employing adjustable DNA docking modes. This unique DNA binding mechanism indicates how RacA can both specifically recognize its GC-rich centromere and also non-specifically bind the DNA. Adjacent RacA molecules within the protein–DNA structure interact leading to DNA compaction, suggesting a mechanism for axial filament formation. We also show that the RacA C-domain coiled coil directly contacts the coiled coil region of the polar protein DivIVA, which anchors RacA and hence the chromosome to the pole. Thus, our combined data reveal unique DNA binding properties by RacA and provide insight into the DNA remodeling and polar anchorage functions of the protein. PMID:27085804

  18. The Fer tyrosine kinase regulates interactions of Rho GDP-Dissociation Inhibitor α with the small GTPase Rac

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background RhoGDI proteins are important regulators of the small GTPase Rac, because they shuttle Rac from the cytoplasm to membranes and also protect Rac from activation, deactivation and degradation. How the binding and release of Rac from RhoGDI is regulated is not precisely understood. Results We report that the non-receptor tyrosine kinase Fer is able to phosphorylate RhoGDIα and form a direct protein complex with it. This interaction is mediated by the C-terminal end of RhoGDIα. Activation of Fer by reactive oxygen species caused increased phosphorylation of RhoGDIα and pervanadate treatment further augmented this. Tyrosine phosphorylation of RhoGDIα by Fer prevented subsequent binding of Rac to RhoGDIα, but once a RhoGDIα-Rac complex was formed, the Fer kinase was not able to cause Rac release through tyrosine phosphorylation of preformed RhoGDIα-Rac complexes. Conclusions These results identify tyrosine phosphorylation of RhoGDIα by Fer as a mechanism to regulate binding of RhoGDIα to Rac. PMID:21122136

  19. Molecular insights into DNA binding and anchoring by the Bacillus subtilis sporulation kinetochore-like RacA protein.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Maria A; Lee, Jeehyun; Zeng, Wenjie

    2016-06-20

    During Bacillus subtilis sporulation, segregating sister chromosomes are anchored to cell poles and the chromosome is remodeled into an elongated structure called the axial filament. Data indicate that a developmentally regulated protein called RacA is involved in these functions. To gain insight into how RacA performs these diverse processes we performed a battery of structural and biochemical analyses. These studies show that RacA contains an N-terminal winged-helix-turn-helix module connected by a disordered region to a predicted coiled-coil domain. Structures capture RacA binding the DNA using distinct protein-protein interfaces and employing adjustable DNA docking modes. This unique DNA binding mechanism indicates how RacA can both specifically recognize its GC-rich centromere and also non-specifically bind the DNA. Adjacent RacA molecules within the protein-DNA structure interact leading to DNA compaction, suggesting a mechanism for axial filament formation. We also show that the RacA C-domain coiled coil directly contacts the coiled coil region of the polar protein DivIVA, which anchors RacA and hence the chromosome to the pole. Thus, our combined data reveal unique DNA binding properties by RacA and provide insight into the DNA remodeling and polar anchorage functions of the protein. PMID:27085804

  20. Structural and functional regulation of tight junctions by RhoA and Rac1 small GTPases.

    PubMed

    Jou, T S; Schneeberger, E E; Nelson, W J

    1998-07-13

    Tight junctions (TJ) govern ion and solute diffusion through the paracellular space (gate function), and restrict mixing of membrane proteins and lipids between membrane domains (fence function) of polarized epithelial cells. We examined roles of the RhoA and Rac1 GTPases in regulating TJ structure and function in MDCK cells using the tetracycline repressible transactivator to regulate RhoAV14, RhoAN19, Rac1V12, and Rac1N17 expression. Both constitutively active and dominant negative RhoA or Rac1 perturbed TJ gate function (transepithelial electrical resistance, tracer diffusion) in a dose-dependent and reversible manner. Freeze-fracture EM and immunofluoresence microscopy revealed abnormal TJ strand morphology and protein (occludin, ZO-1) localization in RhoAV14 and Rac1V12 cells. However, TJ strand morphology and protein localization appeared normal in RhoAN19 and Rac1N17 cells. All mutant GTPases disrupted the fence function of the TJ (interdomain diffusion of a fluorescent lipid), but targeting and organization of a membrane protein in the apical membrane were unaffected. Expression levels and protein complexes of occludin and ZO-1 appeared normal in all mutant cells, although ZO-1 was more readily solubilized from RhoAV14-expressing cells with Triton X-100. These results show that RhoA and Rac1 regulate gate and fence functions of the TJ, and play a role in the spatial organization of TJ proteins at the apex of the lateral membrane. PMID:9660866

  1. Predicting the remaining service life of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, J.F.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear power plants are providing, currently, about 17 percent of the U.S. electricity and many of these plants are approaching their licensed life of 40 years. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Laboratory are carrying out a program to develop a methodology for assessing the remaining safe-life of the concrete components and structures in nuclear power plants. This program has the overall objective of identifying potential structural safety issues, as well as acceptance criteria, for use in evaluations of nuclear power plants for continued service. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is contributing to this program by identifying and analyzing methods for predicting the remaining life of in-service concrete materials. This report examines the basis for predicting the remaining service lives of concrete materials of nuclear power facilities. Methods for predicting the service life of new and in-service concrete materials are analyzed. These methods include (1) estimates based on experience, (2) comparison of performance, (3) accelerated testing, (4) stochastic methods, and (5) mathematical modeling. New approaches for predicting the remaining service lives of concrete materials are proposed and recommendations for their further development given. Degradation processes are discussed based on considerations of their mechanisms, likelihood of occurrence, manifestations, and detection. They include corrosion, sulfate attack, alkali-aggregate reactions, frost attack, leaching, radiation, salt crystallization, and microbiological attack.

  2. Aggregate expansivity due to sulfide oxidation. 2: Physico-chemical modeling of sulfate attack

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, I.; Aguado, A.; Agullo, L.

    1997-11-01

    Weathering of sulfide-bearing aggregates in concrete causes the release of sulfate ions that can react with cement components to yield expansive products. The extent of the sulfate attack of the paste is controlled by the composition and size of the aggregate, the kinetics of sulfide oxidation, the composition of cement and mixing proportioning of concrete. The extent of sulfate attack has been successfully simulated using a combined kinetic-thermodynamic approach.

  3. Mechanical Properties and Durability of "Waterless Concrete"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toutanji, Houssam; Grugel, Richard N.

    2008-01-01

    Waterless concrete consists of molten elementary sulfur and aggregate. The aggregates in lunar environment will be lunar rocks and soil. Sulfur is present on the Moon in Troilite soil (FeS) and by oxidation soil iron and sulfur can be produced. Iron can be used to reinforce the sulfur concrete. Sulfur concrete specimens were cycled between liquid nitrogen (approximately 191 C) and room temperature (approximately 21 C) to simulate exposure to a lunar environment. Cycled and control specimens were subsequently tested in compression at room temperatures (approximately 21 C) and approximately 101 C. Test results showed that due to temperature cycling, compressive strength of cycled specimens was 20% of those non-cycled. Microscopic examination of the fracture surfaces from the cycled samples showed clear de-bonding of the sulfur from the aggregate material whereas it was seen well bonded in those non-cycled. This reduction in strength can be attributed to the large differences in thermal coefficients of expansion of the materials constituting the concrete which promoted cracking. Similar sulfur concrete mixtures were strengthened with short and long glass fibers. The glass fibers from lunar regolith simulant was melted in a 25 cc Pt-Rh crucible in a Sybron Thermoline high temperature MoSi2 furnace at melting temperatures of 1450 to 1600 C for times of 30 min to 1 hour. Glass fibers were cast from the melt into graphite crucibles and were annealed for a couple of hours at 600 C. Glass fibers and small rods were pulled from the melt. The glass melt wets the ceramic rod and long continuous glass fibers were easily hand drawn. The glass fibers were immediately coated with a protective polymer to maintain the mechanical strength. The glass fibers were used to reinforce sulfur concrete plated to improve the flexural strength of the sulfur concrete. Prisms beams strengthened with glass fibers were tested in 4-point bending test. Beams strengthened with glass fiber showed to

  4. The Investigation of Properties of Insulating Refractory Concrete with Portland Cement Binder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudžma, A.; Antonovič, V.; Stonys, R.; Škamat, J.

    2015-11-01

    The present work contains the results of experimental study on properties of insulating refractory concrete created on the basis of Portland cement (PC) binder and modified with microsilica (MS). The experimental compositions were made using Portland cement, lightweight aggregates (expanded clay and vermiculite) and microsilica additives. It was established that MS additives enable significant improvement of mechanical properties and thermal shock resistance of PC-based insulating concrete with values comparable to insulating refractory concrete based on calcium aluminate cement.

  5. Development of lightweight concrete mixes for construction industry at the state of Arkansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almansouri, Mohammed Abdulwahab

    As the construction industry evolved, the need for more durable, long lasting infrastructure increased. Therefore, more efforts have been put to find new methods to improve the properties of the concrete to prolong the service life of the structural elements. One of these methods is the use of lightweight aggregate as an internal curing agent to help reducing self-desiccation and shrinkage. This research studied the effects of using locally available lightweight aggregate (expanded clay), as a partial replacement of normal weight aggregate in the concrete matrix. The concrete mixtures contained lightweight aggregate with a replacement percentage of 12.5, 25, 37.5, and 50 percent by volume. Fresh properties as well as compressive strength, modulus of rupture, and drying shrinkage were measured. While was effective in reducing drying shrinkage, the use of lightweight aggregate resulted in slightly reducing both the compressive strength and modulus of rupture.

  6. Sulfate and acid resistant concrete and mortar

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction and other applications, which hardenable mixtures demonstrate significant levels of acid and sulfate resistance while maintaining acceptable compressive strength properties. The acid and sulfate hardenable mixtures of the invention containing fly ash comprise cementitious materials and a fine aggregate. The cementitous materials may comprise fly ash as well as cement. The fine aggregate may comprise fly ash as well as sand. The total amount of fly ash in the hardenable mixture ranges from about 60% to about 120% of the total amount of cement, by weight, whether the fly ash is included as a cementious material, fine aggregate, or an additive, or any combination of the foregoing. In specific examples, mortar containing 50% fly ash and 50% cement in cementitious materials demonstrated superior properties of corrosion resistance.

  7. Sulfate and acid resistant concrete and mortar

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1998-06-30

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction and other applications, which hardenable mixtures demonstrate significant levels of acid and sulfate resistance while maintaining acceptable compressive strength properties. The acid and sulfate hardenable mixtures of the invention containing fly ash comprise cementitious materials and a fine aggregate. The cementitous materials may comprise fly ash as well as cement. The fine aggregate may comprise fly ash as well as sand. The total amount of fly ash in the hardenable mixture ranges from about 60% to about 120% of the total amount of cement, by weight, whether the fly ash is included as a cementious material, fine aggregate, or an additive, or any combination of the foregoing. In specific examples, mortar containing 50% fly ash and 50% cement in cementitious materials demonstrated superior properties of corrosion resistance. 6 figs.

  8. Lunar concrete: Prospects and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khitab, Anwar; Anwar, Waqas; Mehmood, Imran; Kazmi, Syed Minhaj Saleem; Munir, Muhammad Junaid

    2016-02-01

    The possibility of using concrete as a construction material at the Moon surface is considered. Dissimilarities between the Earth and the Moon and their possible effects on concrete are also emphasized. Availability of constituent materials for concrete at lunar surface is addressed. An emphasis is given to two types of materials, namely, hydraulic concrete and sulfur concrete. Hydraulic concrete necessitates the use of water and sulfur concrete makes use of molten sulfur in lieu of cement and water.

  9. Metaconcrete: designed aggregates to enhance dynamic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Stephanie J.; Pandolfi, Anna; Ortiz, Michael

    2014-04-01

    We propose a new type of concrete for the attenuation of elastic waves induced by dynamic excitation. In this metamaterial, which we call metaconcrete, the stone, sand, and gravel aggregates of standard concrete are replaced with spherical inclusions consisting of a heavy metal core coated with a soft outer layer. These engineered aggregates can be tuned so that particular frequencies of a propagating blast wave will activate resonant oscillations of the heavy mass within the inclusions. The resonant behavior causes the system to exhibit negative effective mass, and this interaction between the wave motion and the resonant aggregates results in the attenuation of the applied dynamic loading. We introduce the concept of negative mass by deriving the effective momentum mass for the system and we define the geometrical and material parameters for the design of resonant aggregates. We develop finite element models for the analysis of metaconcrete behavior, defining a section of slab containing a periodic arrangement of inclusions. By computing the energy histories for the system when subject to a blast load, we show that there is a transfer of energy between the inclusions and the surrounding mortar. The inclusions are able to absorb a significant portion of the applied energy, resulting in a reduction in the amount of stress carried by the mortar phase and greatly improving the ability of the material to resist damage under explosive dynamic loading.

  10. Identification, characterization and immunological analysis of Ras related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) from grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella.

    PubMed

    Hu, Mo-Yan; Shen, Yu-Bang; Xu, Xiao-Yan; Yu, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Meng; Dang, Yun-Fei; Li, Jia-Le

    2016-01-01

    Rac1, a Rho GTPase, serves critical immunological functions in mammals. Here, a Rac1 homolog (gcRac1) was identified in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). The full-length 2023-base pair gcRac1 cDNA contained a 579-bp open reading frame encoding a 192-residue protein, including a conserved RHO domain and nuclear localization signal. The gcRac1 protein shares high identity with other Rac1 counterparts and phylogenetically clustered with Danio rerio Rac1. The gcRac1 transcript showed wide tissue distribution and was inducible by Aeromonas hydrophila in vivo and in vitro; its expression also fluctuated with LPS or flagellin stimulation in vitro. With gcRac1 over-expression, gcPAK1, gcIL1-β, gcTNF-α and gcIFN were basically up-regulated by A. hydrophila and bacterial PAMPs induction, while gcRac1 knockdown decreased these transcripts after A. hydrophila challenge. Over-expression of gcRac1 reduced, while its suppression facilitated, bacterial invasion. Moreover, gcRac1 could activate NF-κB signaling. These findings implicate the vital role of gcRac1 in grass carp innate immunity. PMID:26315145

  11. Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor-Y Boosts Yersinia Effector Translocation by Activating Rac Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Wolters, Manuel; Boyle, Erin C.; Lardong, Kerstin; Trülzsch, Konrad; Steffen, Anika; Rottner, Klemens; Ruckdeschel, Klaus; Aepfelbacher, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic Yersinia spp. translocate the effectors YopT, YopE, and YopO/YpkA into target cells to inactivate Rho family GTP-binding proteins and block immune responses. Some Yersinia spp. also secrete the Rho protein activator cytotoxic necrotizing factor-Y (CNF-Y), but it has been unclear how the bacteria may benefit from Rho protein activation. We show here that CNF-Y increases Yop translocation in Yersinia enterocolitica-infected cells up to 5-fold. CNF-Y strongly activated RhoA and also delayed in time Rac1 and Cdc42, but when individually expressed, constitutively active mutants of Rac1, but not of RhoA, increased Yop translocation. Consistently, knock-out or knockdown of Rac1 but not of RhoA, -B, or -C inhibited Yersinia effector translocation in CNF-Y-treated and control cells. Activation or knockdown of Cdc42 also affected Yop translocation but much less efficiently than Rac. The increase in Yop translocation induced by CNF-Y was essentially independent of the presence of YopE, YopT, or YopO in the infecting Yersinia strain, indicating that none of the Yops reported to inhibit translocation could reverse the CNF-Y effect. In summary, the CNF-Y activity of Yersinia strongly enhances Yop translocation through activation of Rac. PMID:23803609

  12. CD81 regulates cell migration through its association with Rac GTPase.

    PubMed

    Tejera, Emilio; Rocha-Perugini, Vera; López-Martín, Soraya; Pérez-Hernández, Daniel; Bachir, Alexia I; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Vázquez, Jesús; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Yáñez-Mo, María

    2013-02-01

    CD81 is a member of the tetraspanin family that has been described to have a key role in cell migration of tumor and immune cells. To unravel the mechanisms of CD81-regulated cell migration, we performed proteomic analyses that revealed an interaction of the tetraspanin C-terminal domain with the small GTPase Rac. Direct interaction was confirmed biochemically. Moreover, microscopy cross-correlation analysis demonstrated the in situ integration of both molecules into the same molecular complex. Pull-down experiments revealed that CD81-Rac interaction was direct and independent of Rac activation status. Knockdown of CD81 resulted in enhanced protrusion rate, altered focal adhesion formation, and decreased cell migration, correlating with increased active Rac. Reexpression of wild-type CD81, but not its truncated form lacking the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain, rescued these effects. The phenotype of CD81 knockdown cells was mimicked by treatment with a soluble peptide with the C-terminal sequence of the tetraspanin. Our data show that the interaction of Rac with the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of CD81 is a novel regulatory mechanism of the GTPase activity turnover. Furthermore, they provide a novel mechanism for tetraspanin-dependent regulation of cell motility and open new avenues for tetraspanin-targeted reagents by the use of cell-permeable peptides. PMID:23264468

  13. Rac1 inactivation by lethal toxin from Clostridium sordellii modifies focal adhesions upstream of actin depolymerization.

    PubMed

    Geny, Blandine; Grassart, Alexandre; Manich, Maria; Chicanne, Gaëtan; Payrastre, Bernard; Sauvonnet, Nathalie; Popoff, Michel R

    2010-02-01

    Inactivation of different small GTPases upon their glucosylation by lethal toxin from Clostridium sordellii strain IP82 (LT-82) is already known to lead to cell rounding, adherens junction (AJ) disorganization and actin depolymerization. In the present work, we observed that LT-82 induces a rapid dephosphorylation of paxillin, a protein regulating focal adhesion (FA), independently of inactivation of paxillin kinases such as Src, Fak and Pyk2. Among the small GTPases inactivated by this toxin, including Rac, Ras, Rap and Ral, we identified Rac1, as responsible for paxillin dephosphorylation using cells overexpressing Rac1(V12). Rac1 inactivation by LT-82 modifies interactions between proteins from AJ and FA complexes as shown by pull-down assays. We showed that in Triton X-100-insoluble membrane proteins from these complexes, namely E-cadherin, beta-catenin, p120-catenin and talin, are decreased upon LT-82 intoxication, a treatment that also induces a rapid decrease in cell phosphoinositide content. Therefore, we proposed that Rac inactivation by LT-82 alters phosphoinositide metabolism leading to FA and AJ complex disorganization and actin depolymerization. PMID:19840028

  14. Distinct predictive performance of Rac1 and Cdc42 in cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Yamao, Masataka; Naoki, Honda; Kunida, Katsuyuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Ishii, Shin

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new computation-based approach for elucidating how signaling molecules are decoded in cell migration. In this approach, we performed FRET time-lapse imaging of Rac1 and Cdc42, members of Rho GTPases which are responsible for cell motility, and quantitatively identified the response functions that describe the conversion from the molecular activities to the morphological changes. Based on the identified response functions, we clarified the profiles of how the morphology spatiotemporally changes in response to local and transient activation of Rac1 and Cdc42, and found that Rac1 and Cdc42 activation triggers laterally propagating membrane protrusion. The response functions were also endowed with property of differentiator, which is beneficial for maintaining sensitivity under adaptation to the mean level of input. Using the response function, we could predict the morphological change from molecular activity, and its predictive performance provides a new quantitative measure of how much the Rho GTPases participate in the cell migration. Interestingly, we discovered distinct predictive performance of Rac1 and Cdc42 depending on the migration modes, indicating that Rac1 and Cdc42 contribute to persistent and random migration, respectively. Thus, our proposed predictive approach enabled us to uncover the hidden information processing rules of Rho GTPases in the cell migration. PMID:26634649

  15. CD81 regulates cell migration through its association with Rac GTPase

    PubMed Central

    Tejera, Emilio; Rocha-Perugini, Vera; López-Martín, Soraya; Pérez-Hernández, Daniel; Bachir, Alexia I.; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Vázquez, Jesús; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Yáñez-Mo, María

    2013-01-01

    CD81 is a member of the tetraspanin family that has been described to have a key role in cell migration of tumor and immune cells. To unravel the mechanisms of CD81-regulated cell migration, we performed proteomic analyses that revealed an interaction of the tetraspanin C-terminal domain with the small GTPase Rac. Direct interaction was confirmed biochemically. Moreover, microscopy cross-correlation analysis demonstrated the in situ integration of both molecules into the same molecular complex. Pull-down experiments revealed that CD81-Rac interaction was direct and independent of Rac activation status. Knockdown of CD81 resulted in enhanced protrusion rate, altered focal adhesion formation, and decreased cell migration, correlating with increased active Rac. Reexpression of wild-type CD81, but not its truncated form lacking the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain, rescued these effects. The phenotype of CD81 knockdown cells was mimicked by treatment with a soluble peptide with the C-terminal sequence of the tetraspanin. Our data show that the interaction of Rac with the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of CD81 is a novel regulatory mechanism of the GTPase activity turnover. Furthermore, they provide a novel mechanism for tetraspanin-dependent regulation of cell motility and open new avenues for tetraspanin-targeted reagents by the use of cell-permeable peptides. PMID:23264468

  16. TIPE1 induces apoptosis by negatively regulating Rac1 activation in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Liang, X; Gao, L; Ma, H; Liu, X; Pan, Y; Yan, W; Shan, H; Wang, Z; Chen, Y H; Ma, C

    2015-05-14

    TIPE1 (tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8-like 1 or TNFAIP8L1) is a newly identified member of the TIPE (TNFAIP8) family, which play roles in regulating cell death. However, the biologic functions of TIPE1 in physiologic and pathologic conditions are largely unknown. Here, we report the roles of TIPE1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Evaluated by immunohistochemical staining, HCC tissues showed significantly downregulated TIPE1 expression compared with adjacent non-tumor tissues, which positively correlated with tumor pathologic grades and patient survival. Using a homograft tumor model in Balb/c mice, we discovered that TIPE1 significantly diminished the growth and tumor weight of murine liver cancer homografts. Consistently, TIPE1 inhibited both cell growth and colony formation ability of cultured HCC cell lines, which was further identified to be due to TIPE1-inducing apoptosis in a caspase-independent, necrostatin-1 (Nec-1)-insensitive manner. Furthermore, mechanistic investigations revealed that TIPE1 interacted with Rac1, and inhibited the activation of Rac1 and its downstream p65 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway. Moreover, overexpression of constitutively active Rac1 partially rescued the apoptosis induced by TIPE1, and Rac1 knockdown significantly restored the deregulated cell growth induced by TIPE1 small interfering RNA. Our findings revealed that TIPE1 induced apoptosis in HCC cells by negatively regulating Rac1 pathway, and loss of TIPE1 might be a new prognostic indicator for HCC patients. PMID:25043299

  17. The Rac1 Inhibitor NSC23766 Suppresses CREB Signaling by Targeting NMDA Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Hailong; Chávez, Andrés E.; Wang, Chih-Chieh; Yang, Hongtian; Gu, Hua; Siddoway, Benjamin A.; Hall, Benjamin J.; Castillo, Pablo E.

    2014-01-01

    NMDA receptor signaling plays a complex role in CREB activation and CREB-mediated gene transcription, depending on the subcellular location of NMDA receptors, as well as how strongly they are activated. However, it is not known whether Rac1, the prototype of Rac GTPase, plays a role in neuronal CREB activation induced by NMDA receptor signaling. Here, we report that NSC23766, a widely used specific Rac1 inhibitor, inhibits basal CREB phosphorylation at S133 (pCREB) and antagonizes changes in pCREB levels induced by NMDA bath application in rat cortical neurons. Unexpectedly, we found that NSC23766 affects the levels of neuronal pCREB in a Rac1-independent manner. Instead, our results indicate that NSC23766 can directly regulate NMDA receptors as indicated by their strong effects on both exogenous and synaptically evoked NMDA receptor-mediated currents in mouse and rat neurons, respectively. Our findings strongly suggest that Rac1 does not affect pCREB signaling in cortical neurons and reveal that NSC23766 could be a novel NMDA receptor antagonist. PMID:25319697

  18. The NKD1/Rac1 feedback loop regulates the invasion and migration ability of hepatocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Sheng; Hu, Qing; Zhang, Kang; Jin, Jianbin; Zheng, Xuqing; Yin, Zhenyu; Wang, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is complicated by aggressive migration and invasion, which contribute to the increased mortality of HCC patients. The NKD1 protein is abnormally expressed in many neoplasms and plays an important role in tumor progression. However, the regulation and underlying molecular mechanisms of NKD1 in HCC cell invasion and migration remain poorly understood. In the present study, ectopic expression of NKD1 in HCC cells attenuated migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo by down-regulating Rac1 expression level and activity, which affected the HCC cell cytoskeleton and E-cadherin expression. Mechanistic studies showed that NKD1 interacted with Rac1 in the cytoplasm and promoted its degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Over-expression of Rac1 enhanced the transcription of the NKD1 gene and protein expression conversely owing to its negative regulation of EZH2. Analysis of clinical samples showed that abnormal expression of NKD1 and Rac1 was associated with the poor prognosis of HCC patients. In summary, our data indicate a new role for NKD1 as a regulator of HCC cell invasion and migration via a feedback loop involving Rac1. PMID:27231134

  19. Tum/RacGAP functions as a switch activating the Pav/kinesin-6 motor.

    PubMed

    Tao, Li; Fasulo, Barbara; Warecki, Brandt; Sullivan, William

    2016-01-01

    Centralspindlin is essential for central spindle and cleavage furrow formation. Drosophila centralspindlin consists of a kinesin-6 motor (Pav/kinesin-6) and a GTPase-activating protein (Tum/RacGAP). Centralspindlin localization to the central spindle is mediated by Pav/kinesin-6. While Tum/RacGAP has well-documented scaffolding functions, whether it influences Pav/kinesin-6 function is less well-explored. Here we demonstrate that both Pav/kinesin-6 and the centralspindlin complex (co-expressed Pav/Tum) have strong microtubule bundling activity. Centralspindlin also has robust plus-end-directed motility. In contrast, Pav/kinesin-6 alone cannot move microtubules. However, the addition of Tum/RacGAP or a 65 amino acid Tum/RacGAP fragment to Pav/kinesin-6 restores microtubule motility. Further, ATPase assays reveal that microtubule-stimulated ATPase activity of centralspindlin is seven times higher than that of Pav/kinesin-6. These findings are supported by in vivo studies demonstrating that in Tum/RacGAP-depleted S2 Drosophila cells, Pav/kinesin-6 exhibits severely reduced localization to the central spindle and an abnormal concentration at the centrosomes. PMID:27091402

  20. DOCK2 is a Rac activator that regulates motility and polarity during neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Kunisaki, Yuya; Nishikimi, Akihiko; Tanaka, Yoshihiko; Takii, Ryosuke; Noda, Mayuko; Inayoshi, Ayumi; Watanabe, Ken-ichi; Sanematsu, Fumiyuki; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Sasaki, Takehiko; Fukui, Yoshinori

    2006-08-28

    Neutrophils are highly motile leukocytes, and they play important roles in the innate immune response to invading pathogens. Neutrophil chemotaxis requires Rac activation, yet the Rac activators functioning downstream of chemoattractant receptors remain to be determined. We show that DOCK2, which is a mammalian homologue of Caenorhabditis elegans CED-5 and Drosophila melanogaster Myoblast City, regulates motility and polarity during neutrophil chemotaxis. Although DOCK2-deficient neutrophils moved toward the chemoattractant source, they exhibited abnormal migratory behavior with a marked reduction in translocation speed. In DOCK2-deficient neutrophils, chemoattractant-induced activation of both Rac1 and Rac2 were severely impaired, resulting in the loss of polarized accumulation of F-actin and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3) at the leading edge. On the other hand, we found that DOCK2 associates with PIP3 and translocates to the leading edge of chemotaxing neutrophils in a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent manner. These results indicate that during neutrophil chemotaxis DOCK2 regulates leading edge formation through PIP3-dependent membrane translocation and Rac activation. PMID:16943182

  1. The NKD1/Rac1 feedback loop regulates the invasion and migration ability of hepatocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Sheng; Hu, Qing; Zhang, Kang; Jin, Jianbin; Zheng, Xuqing; Yin, Zhenyu; Wang, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is complicated by aggressive migration and invasion, which contribute to the increased mortality of HCC patients. The NKD1 protein is abnormally expressed in many neoplasms and plays an important role in tumor progression. However, the regulation and underlying molecular mechanisms of NKD1 in HCC cell invasion and migration remain poorly understood. In the present study, ectopic expression of NKD1 in HCC cells attenuated migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo by down-regulating Rac1 expression level and activity, which affected the HCC cell cytoskeleton and E-cadherin expression. Mechanistic studies showed that NKD1 interacted with Rac1 in the cytoplasm and promoted its degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Over-expression of Rac1 enhanced the transcription of the NKD1 gene and protein expression conversely owing to its negative regulation of EZH2. Analysis of clinical samples showed that abnormal expression of NKD1 and Rac1 was associated with the poor prognosis of HCC patients. In summary, our data indicate a new role for NKD1 as a regulator of HCC cell invasion and migration via a feedback loop involving Rac1. PMID:27231134

  2. Rac1 at the crossroad of actin dynamics and neuroinflammation in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    D’Ambrosi, Nadia; Rossi, Simona; Gerbino, Valeria; Cozzolino, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Rac1 is a major player of the Rho family of small GTPases that controls multiple cell signaling pathways, such as the organization of cytoskeleton (including adhesion and motility), cell proliferation, apoptosis and activation of immune cells. In the nervous system, in particular, Rac1 GTPase plays a key regulatory function of both actin and microtubule cytoskeletal dynamics and thus it is central to axonal growth and stability, as well as dendrite and spine structural plasticity. Rac1 is also a crucial regulator of NADPH-dependent membrane oxidase (NOX), a prominent source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), thus having a central role in the inflammatory response and neurotoxicity mediated by microglia cells in the nervous system. As such, alterations in Rac1 activity might well be involved in the processes that give rise to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), a complex syndrome where cytoskeletal disturbances in motor neurons and redox alterations in the inflammatory compartment play pivotal and synergic roles in the final disease outcomes. Here we will discuss the genetic and mechanistic evidence indicating the relevance of Rac1 dysregulation in the pathogenesis of ALS. PMID:25249940

  3. MicroRNA-224 promotes the sensitivity of osteosarcoma cells to cisplatin by targeting Rac1.

    PubMed

    Geng, Shuo; Gu, Lina; Ju, Fang; Zhang, Hepeng; Wang, Yiwen; Tang, Han; Bi, ZhengGang; Yang, Chenglin

    2016-09-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumour in children and adolescents. Accumulating evidence has shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) participate in the development of almost all types of cancer. Here, we investigated the role of miR-224 in the development and progression of osteosarcoma. We demonstrated that miR-224 was down-regulated in osteosarcoma cell lines and tissues. Lower miR-224 levels were correlated with shorter survivalin osteosarcoma patients. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-224 suppressed osteosarcoma cell proliferation, migration and invasion and contributed to the increased sensitivity of MG-63 cells to cisplatin. We identified Rac1 as a direct target gene of miR-224 in osteosarcoma. Rac1 expression was up-regulated in the osteosarcoma cell lines and tissues, and there was an inverse correlation between Rac1 and miR-224 expression in osteosarcoma tissues. Furthermore, rescuing Rac1 expression decreased the sensitivity of miR-224-overexpressing MG-63 cells to cisplatin. We also demonstrated that ectopic expression of Rac1 promoted the proliferation, migration and invasion of miR-224-overexpressing MG-63 cells. These data suggest that miR-224 plays a tumour suppressor role in the development of osteosarcoma and is related to the sensitivity of osteosarcoma to cisplatin. PMID:27222381

  4. Tum/RacGAP functions as a switch activating the Pav/kinesin-6 motor

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Li; Fasulo, Barbara; Warecki, Brandt; Sullivan, William

    2016-01-01

    Centralspindlin is essential for central spindle and cleavage furrow formation. Drosophila centralspindlin consists of a kinesin-6 motor (Pav/kinesin-6) and a GTPase-activating protein (Tum/RacGAP). Centralspindlin localization to the central spindle is mediated by Pav/kinesin-6. While Tum/RacGAP has well-documented scaffolding functions, whether it influences Pav/kinesin-6 function is less well-explored. Here we demonstrate that both Pav/kinesin-6 and the centralspindlin complex (co-expressed Pav/Tum) have strong microtubule bundling activity. Centralspindlin also has robust plus-end-directed motility. In contrast, Pav/kinesin-6 alone cannot move microtubules. However, the addition of Tum/RacGAP or a 65 amino acid Tum/RacGAP fragment to Pav/kinesin-6 restores microtubule motility. Further, ATPase assays reveal that microtubule-stimulated ATPase activity of centralspindlin is seven times higher than that of Pav/kinesin-6. These findings are supported by in vivo studies demonstrating that in Tum/RacGAP-depleted S2 Drosophila cells, Pav/kinesin-6 exhibits severely reduced localization to the central spindle and an abnormal concentration at the centrosomes. PMID:27091402

  5. RhoB controls endothelial barrier recovery by inhibiting Rac1 trafficking to the cell border.

    PubMed

    Marcos-Ramiro, Beatriz; García-Weber, Diego; Barroso, Susana; Feito, Jorge; Ortega, María C; Cernuda-Morollón, Eva; Reglero-Real, Natalia; Fernández-Martín, Laura; Durán, Maria C; Alonso, Miguel A; Correas, Isabel; Cox, Susan; Ridley, Anne J; Millán, Jaime

    2016-05-01

    Endothelial barrier dysfunction underlies chronic inflammatory diseases. In searching for new proteins essential to the human endothelial inflammatory response, we have found that the endosomal GTPase RhoB is up-regulated in response to inflammatory cytokines and expressed in the endothelium of some chronically inflamed tissues. We show that although RhoB and the related RhoA and RhoC play additive and redundant roles in various aspects of endothelial barrier function, RhoB specifically inhibits barrier restoration after acute cell contraction by preventing plasma membrane extension. During barrier restoration, RhoB trafficking is induced between vesicles containing RhoB nanoclusters and plasma membrane protrusions. The Rho GTPase Rac1 controls membrane spreading and stabilizes endothelial barriers. We show that RhoB colocalizes with Rac1 in endosomes and inhibits Rac1 activity and trafficking to the cell border during barrier recovery. Inhibition of endosomal trafficking impairs barrier reformation, whereas induction of Rac1 translocation to the plasma membrane accelerates it. Therefore, RhoB-specific regulation of Rac1 trafficking controls endothelial barrier integrity during inflammation. PMID:27138256

  6. Ring-opening polymerization of rac-lactide mediated by tetrametallic lithium and sodium diamino-bis(phenolate) complexes.

    PubMed

    Alhashmialameer, Dalal; Ikpo, Nduka; Collins, Julie; Dawe, Louise N; Hattenhauer, Karen; Kerton, Francesca M

    2015-12-14

    Lithium and sodium compounds supported by tetradentate amino-bis(phenolato) ligands, [Li2(N2O2(BuBuPip))] (1), [Na2(N2O2(BuBuPip))] (2) (where [N2O2(BuBuPip)] = 2,2'-N,N'-homopiperazinyl-bis(2-methylene-4,6-tert-butylphenol), and [Li2(N2O2(BuMePip))] (3), [Na2(N2O2(BuMePip))] (4) (where [N2O2(BuMePip)] = 2,2'-N,N'-homopiperazinyl-bis(2-methylene-4-methyl-6-tert-butylphenol) were synthesized and characterized by NMR spectroscopy and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Variable temperature NMR experiments were performed to understand solution-phase dynamics. The solid-state structures of 1 and 4 were determined by X-ray diffraction and reveal tetrametallic species. PGSE NMR spectroscopic data suggests that 1 maintains its aggregated structure in CD2Cl2. The complexes exhibit good activity for controlled ring-opening polymerization of rac-lactide (LA) both solvent free and in solution to yield PLA with low dispersities. Stoichiometric reactions suggest that the formation of PLA may proceed by the typical coordination-insertion mechanism. For example, (7)Li NMR experiments show growth of a new resonance when 1 is mixed with 1 equiv. LA and (1)H NMR data suggests formation of a Li-alkoxide species upon reaction of 1 with BnOH. PMID:26538475

  7. Coronin7 regulates WASP and SCAR through CRIB mediated interaction with Rac proteins.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Karthic; Stumpf, Maria; Müller, Rolf; Horn, Anna-Carolin; Schmidbauer, Julia; Eichinger, Ludwig; Müller-Taubenberger, Annette; Faix, Jan; Noegel, Angelika A

    2015-01-01

    Coronin7 (CRN7) stabilizes F-actin and is a regulator of processes associated with the actin cytoskeleton. Its loss leads to defects in phagocytosis, motility and development. It harbors a CRIB (Cdc42- and Rac-interactive binding) domain in each of its WD repeat domains which bind to Rac GTPases preferably in their GDP-loaded forms. Expression of wild type CRN7 in CRN7 deficient cells rescued these defects, whereas proteins with mutations in the CRIB motifs which were associated with altered Rac binding were effective to varying degrees. The presence of one functional CRIB was sufficient to reestablish phagocytosis, cell motility and development. Furthermore, by molecular modeling and mutational analysis we identified the contact regions between CRN7 and the GTPases. We also identified WASP, SCAR and PAKa as downstream effectors in phagocytosis, development and cell surface adhesion, respectively, since ectopic expression rescued these functions. PMID:26411260

  8. Coronin7 regulates WASP and SCAR through CRIB mediated interaction with Rac proteins

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Karthic; Stumpf, Maria; Müller, Rolf; Horn, Anna-Carolin; Schmidbauer, Julia; Eichinger, Ludwig; Müller-Taubenberger, Annette; Faix, Jan; Noegel, Angelika A.

    2015-01-01

    Coronin7 (CRN7) stabilizes F-actin and is a regulator of processes associated with the actin cytoskeleton. Its loss leads to defects in phagocytosis, motility and development. It harbors a CRIB (Cdc42- and Rac-interactive binding) domain in each of its WD repeat domains which bind to Rac GTPases preferably in their GDP-loaded forms. Expression of wild type CRN7 in CRN7 deficient cells rescued these defects, whereas proteins with mutations in the CRIB motifs which were associated with altered Rac binding were effective to varying degrees. The presence of one functional CRIB was sufficient to reestablish phagocytosis, cell motility and development. Furthermore, by molecular modeling and mutational analysis we identified the contact regions between CRN7 and the GTPases. We also identified WASP, SCAR and PAKa as downstream effectors in phagocytosis, development and cell surface adhesion, respectively, since ectopic expression rescued these functions. PMID:26411260

  9. miR-101 inhibits cell proliferation by targeting Rac1 in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LIN, XIAOJIE; GUAN, HONGYU; LI, HAI; LIU, LIEHUA; LIU, JUAN; WEI, GUOHONG; HUANG, ZHIMIN; LIAO, ZHIHONG; LI, YANBING

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that some microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) progression. However, it remains necessary to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms involved. In the present study, we investigated the role of microRNA-101 (miR-101) in PTC via targeting of Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1). The results showed that miR-101 was significantly downregulated in PTC tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues. Restoration of miR-101 expression significantly inhibited cell proliferation in the K1 PTC cell line. Moreover, algorithm-based and experimental strategies verified Rac1 as a direct target of miR-101 in the K1 cell line. Taken together, these findings suggest that miR-101 inhibited PTC growth via the downregulation of Rac1 expression, providing a better understanding of miRNA-modulated signaling networks for future cancer therapeutics. PMID:24649082

  10. Three-dimensional shape analysis of coarse aggregates: New techniques for and preliminary results on several different coarse aggregates and reference rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Erdogan, S.T.; Quiroga, P.N.; Fowler, D.W.; Saleh, H.A.; Livingston, R.A.; Garboczi, E.J. . E-mail: edward.garboczi@nist.gov; Ketcham, P.M.; Hagedorn, J.G.; Satterfield, S.G.

    2006-09-15

    The shape of aggregates used in concrete is an important parameter that helps determine many concrete properties, especially the rheology of fresh concrete and early-age mechanical properties. This paper discusses the sample preparation and image analysis techniques necessary for obtaining an aggregate particle image in 3-D, using X-ray computed tomography, which is then suitable for spherical harmonic analysis. The shapes of three reference rocks are analyzed for uncertainty determination via direct comparison to the geometry of their reconstructed images. A Virtual Reality Modeling Language technique is demonstrated that can give quick and accurate 3-D views of aggregates. Shape data on several different kinds of coarse aggregates are compared and used to illustrate potential mathematical shape analyses made possible by the spherical harmonic information.

  11. Self-assembling particle-siloxane coatings for superhydrophobic concrete.

    PubMed

    Flores-Vivian, Ismael; Hejazi, Vahid; Kozhukhova, Marina I; Nosonovsky, Michael; Sobolev, Konstantin

    2013-12-26

    We report here, for the first time in the literature, a method to synthesize hydrophobic and superhydrophobic concrete. Concrete is normally a hydrophilic material, which significantly reduces the durability of concrete structures and pavements. To synthesize water-repellent concrete, hydrophobic emulsions were fabricated and applied on portland cement mortar tiles. The emulsion was enriched with the polymethyl-hydrogen siloxane oil hydrophobic agent as well as metakaolin (MK) or silica fume (SF) to induce the microroughness and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers to create hierarchical surfaces. Various emulsion types were investigated by using different mixing procedures, and single- and double-layer hydrophobic coatings were applied. The emulsions and coatings were characterized with optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM), and their wetting properties, including the water contact angle (CA) and roll-off angle, were measured. A theoretical model for coated and non-coated concrete, which can be generalized for other types of materials, was developed to predict the effect of surface roughness and composition on the CA. An optimized distance between the aggregates was found where the CA has the highest value. The maximal CA measured was 156° for the specimen with PVA fibers treated with MK based emulsion. Since water penetration is the main factor leading to concrete deterioration, hydrophobic water-repellent concretes have much longer durability then regular concretes and can have a broad range of applications in civil and materials engineering. PMID:24245777

  12. Crack depth measurement in concrete using diffuse ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In, Chi Won; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, Laurence L.; Kurtis, Kimberly

    2012-05-01

    Cracking in concrete structures is problematic because these cracks can significantly influence the stability of a concrete structure and compromise its durability. The first step to evaluate the serviceability of an in-field concrete structure is to have accurate information on existing crack depth. It is thus of paramount importance to be able to accurately determine the depth of cracks in these concrete structures. This research employs a diffusive ultrasonic technique to measure the depth of surface cracks in concrete. Ultrasonic measurements on a 25.4 × 33 × 60.96 cm3 concrete block containing an artificial crack with varying depths from 2.54 to 10.16 cm are conducted. Contact transducers with one transmitting and the other receiving the ultrasonic signals are mounted on the concrete surface on opposite sides of the crack. A pulse signal with the duration of 2μs is transmitted. In this frequency regime, wavelengths are sufficiently short (comparable with the aggregate size) so that a diffuse ultrasonic signal is detected. The arrival of the diffuse ultrasonic energy at the receiver is delayed by the existence of the crack. This lag-time and the diffusivity of the concrete sample are measured, and a finite element model is employed to solve the inverse problem to determine the crack depth from these measured diffuse ultrasonic parameters.

  13. Applications for concrete offshore

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The report collects and summarizes the various proposals for development offshore which have in common the use of concrete as the main structural material, and where possible, indicates their relative feasibility. A study encompassing such diverse schemes as offshore windmills, concrete LNG carriers, hydrocarbon production platforms and floating airports cannot be completely exhaustive on each subject, so references to sources of further information have been given wherever possible. Details of individual projects and proposals are included for Power plants, Hydrocarbon production platforms, Concrete ships, Storage systems and industrial plants, Subsea systems, Offshore islands, Coastal works and Other concrete structures.

  14. 77 FR 41447 - Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council (RAC)/Recreation Resource Advisory Council (RRAC) Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council (RAC)/Recreation Resource Advisory... Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) Utah Resource Advisory Council (RAC)/Recreation..., and lessons learned on the Washington County lands bill; proposal to increase campground...

  15. The Transcriptomic Signature of RacA Activation and Inactivation Provides New Insights into the Morphogenetic Network of Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Min Jin; Nitsche, Benjamin M.; Arentshorst, Mark; Jørgensen, Thomas R.; Ram, Arthur F. J.; Meyer, Vera

    2013-01-01

    RacA is the main Rho GTPase in Aspergillus niger regulating polarity maintenance via controlling actin dynamics. Both deletion and dominant activation of RacA (RacG18V) provoke an actin localization defect and thereby loss of polarized tip extension, resulting in frequent dichotomous branching in the ΔracA strain and an apolar growing phenotype for RacG18V. In the current study the transcriptomics and physiological consequences of these morphological changes were investigated and compared with the data of the morphogenetic network model for the dichotomous branching mutant ramosa-1. This integrated approach revealed that polar tip growth is most likely orchestrated by the concerted activities of phospholipid signaling, sphingolipid signaling, TORC2 signaling, calcium signaling and CWI signaling pathways. The transcriptomic signatures and the reconstructed network model for all three morphology mutants (ΔracA, RacG18V, ramosa-1) imply that these pathways become integrated to bring about different physiological adaptations including changes in sterol, zinc and amino acid metabolism and changes in ion transport and protein trafficking. Finally, the fate of exocytotic (SncA) and endocytotic (AbpA, SlaB) markers in the dichotomous branching mutant ΔracA was followed, demonstrating that hyperbranching does not per se result in increased protein secretion. PMID:23894378

  16. Cleavage of Hyaluronan and CD44 Adhesion Molecule Regulate Astrocyte Morphology via Rac1 Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Anna; Zeug, Andre; Skupien, Anna; Kaza, Beata; Mueller, Franziska; Chwedorowicz, Agnieszka; Ponimaskin, Evgeni; Wilczynski, Grzegorz M.; Dzwonek, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Communication of cells with their extracellular environment is crucial to fulfill their function in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. The literature data provide evidence that such a communication is also important in case of astrocytes. Mechanisms that contribute to the interaction between astrocytes and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins are still poorly understood. Hyaluronan is the main component of ECM in the brain, where its major receptor protein CD44 is expressed by a subset of astrocytes. Considering the fact that functions of astrocytes are tightly coupled with changes in their morphology (e.g.: glutamate clearance in the synaptic cleft, migration, astrogliosis), we investigated the influence of hyaluronan cleavage by hyaluronidase, knockdown of CD44 by specific shRNA and CD44 overexpression on astrocyte morphology. Our results show that hyaluronidase treatment, as well as knockdown of CD44, in astrocytes result in a “stellate”-like morphology, whereas overexpression of CD44 causes an increase in cell body size and changes the shape of astrocytes into flattened cells. Moreover, as a dynamic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is supposed to be responsible for morphological changes of cells, and this reorganization is controlled by small GTPases of the Rho family, we hypothesized that GTPase Rac1 acts as a downstream effector for hyaluronan and CD44 in astrocytes. We used FRET-based biosensor and a dominant negative mutant of Rac1 to investigate the involvement of Rac1 activity in hyaluronidase- and CD44-dependent morphological changes of astrocytes. Both, hyaluronidase treatment and knockdown of CD44, enhances Rac1 activity while overexpression of CD44 reduces the activity state in astrocytes. Furthermore, morphological changes were blocked by specific inhibition of Rac1 activity. These findings indicate for the first time that regulation of Rac1 activity is responsible for hyaluronidase and CD44-driven morphological changes of

  17. Testing of a Receiver-Absorber-Converter (RAC) for the Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerman, Kurt O.; Miles, Barry J.

    1998-01-01

    The Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) is a solar bi-modal system based on a concept developed by Babcock & Wilcox in 1992. ISUS will provide advanced power and propulsion capabilities that will enable spacecraft designers to either increase the mass to orbit or decrease the cost to orbit for their satellites. In contrast to the current practice of using chemical propulsion for orbit transfer and photovoltaic conversion/battery storage for electrical power, ISUS uses a single collection, storage, and conversion system for both the power and propulsion functions. The ISUS system is currently being developed by the Air Force's Phillips Laboratory. The ISUS program consists of a systems analysis, design, and integration (SADI) effort, and three major sub-system development efforts: the Concentrator Array and Tracking (CATS) sub-system which tracks the sun and collects/focuses the energy; the Receiver-Absorber-Converter (RAC) sub-system which receives and stores the solar energy, transfers the stored energy to the propellant during propulsion operations, and converts the stored energy to electricity during power operations; and the Cryogenic Storage and Propellant Feed Sub-system (CSPFS) which stores the liquid hydrogen propellant and provides it to the RAC during propulsion operations. This paper discuses the evolution of the RAC sub-system as a result of the component level testing, and provides the initial results of systems level ground testing. A total of 5 RACs were manufactured as part of the Phillips Laboratory ISUS Technology Development program. The first series of component tests were carried out at the Solar Rocket Propulsion Laboratory at Edwards AFB, California. These tests provided key information on the propulsion mode of operations. The second series of RAC tests were performed at the Thermionic Evaluation Facility (TEF) in Albuquerque, New Mexico and provided information on the electrical performance of the RAC. The systems level testing was

  18. Cyclooxygenase-2 knockdown using retinoic acid chalcone (RAC), a promising therapeutic strategy for colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chao; Wang, Qiong; Xu, Zhe; Li, Wei-Su; Chen, Che; Yao, Xue-Quan; Liu, Fu-Kun

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid is an effective agent in the treatment of epithelial and hematological malignancies. The present study demonstrates that retinoic acid chalcone (RAC), an analogue of retinoic acid inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in HCT-15 and CT26.WT colon cancer cell lines. In HCT-15 cells the percentage of apoptotic cells increased from 32.4 ± 3, 45.0 ± 3 to 72.6 ± 5% respectively at 10, 15 and 20 μg/mL compared to 3.7% in control. Similarly in CT26.WT cells the percentage increased from 28.6 ± 3, 41.2 ± 3 to 65.4 ± 5% on treatment with 10, 15 and 20 μg/mL concentrations of RAC after 72 h compared to 2.9 ± 1% in control. Western blotting, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis and reverse transcription-PCR assays were used to investigate these effects. RAC inhibited the overexpression of COX-2, PGE2 and PGE2 receptor (EP1 and EP4) in the colon cancer cell lines. RAC mediated inhibition of cell growth and induction of apoptosis through COX-2 inhibition was also confirmed by treating the HCT-15 and CT26.WT colon cancer cells with COX-2 inhibitor, indomethacin and transfection of cells with COX-2 small interfering RNA. In nude mice with tumor xenografts, treatment with RAC-supplemented diet caused inhibition of COX-2, PGE2, and PGE2 receptors (EP1, EP3, and EP4) in tumors. Thus RAC can be a potential candidate for the treatment of colon cancer through the inhibition of COX-2 expression and subsequent inhibition of PGE2 and PGE2 receptors. PMID:26269760

  19. Multiscale Constitutive Modeling of Asphalt Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Benjamin Shane

    Multiscale modeling of asphalt concrete has become a popular technique for gaining improved insight into the physical mechanisms that affect the material's behavior and ultimately its performance. This type of modeling considers asphalt concrete, not as a homogeneous mass, but rather as an assemblage of materials at different characteristic length scales. For proper modeling these characteristic scales should be functionally definable and should have known properties. Thus far, research in this area has not focused significant attention on functionally defining what the characteristic scales within asphalt concrete should be. Instead, many have made assumptions on the characteristic scales and even the characteristic behaviors of these scales with little to no support. This research addresses these shortcomings by directly evaluating the microstructure of the material and uses these results to create materials of different characteristic length scales as they exist within the asphalt concrete mixture. The objectives of this work are to; 1) develop mechanistic models for the linear viscoelastic (LVE) and damage behaviors in asphalt concrete at different length scales and 2) develop a mechanistic, mechanistic/empirical, or phenomenological formulation to link the different length scales into a model capable of predicting the effects of microstructural changes on the linear viscoelastic behaviors of asphalt concrete mixture, e.g., a microstructure association model for asphalt concrete mixture. Through the microstructural study it is found that asphalt concrete mixture can be considered as a build-up of three different phases; asphalt mastic, fine aggregate matrix (FAM), and finally the coarse aggregate particles. The asphalt mastic is found to exist as a homogenous material throughout the mixture and FAM, and the filler content within this material is consistent with the volumetric averaged concentration, which can be calculated from the job mix formula. It is also

  20. Shock and Release Properties of Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, D. E.

    1996-03-01

    Structural concrete is a composite of rock aggregate and cement-based grout, and is representative of a complex brittle solid material for which current activities in material response research and computational modeling is extensive. The present investigation has focused on dynamic equation-of-state properties and modeling studies of aggregate concrete. Unique shock compression experiments have been developed and pursued which yield material test data on dynamic strength, pore crush, shock Hugoniot and adiabatic decompression properties of concrete. Experimental data have been obtained which range from relatively low impact stresses to nearly 25 GPa, and encompass a wide range of dynamic response. New analytic studies have been pursued to infer equation-of-state properties from dynamic test data. Experimental adiabatic release data reveal unexpectedly shallow paths and low residual strains. Both thermal expansion and decompression dilatancy could contribute to the observed ! behavior and modeling of these eff ects has been pursued. This work performed at Sandia National Laboratories supported by the U. S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. Rac1-Rab11-FIP3 regulatory hub coordinates vesicle traffic with actin remodeling and T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Bouchet, Jérôme; Del Río-Iñiguez, Iratxe; Lasserre, Rémi; Agüera-Gonzalez, Sonia; Cuche, Céline; Danckaert, Anne; McCaffrey, Mary W; Di Bartolo, Vincenzo; Alcover, Andrés

    2016-06-01

    The immunological synapse generation and function is the result of a T-cell polarization process that depends on the orchestrated action of the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton and of intracellular vesicle traffic. However, how these events are coordinated is ill defined. Since Rab and Rho families of GTPases control intracellular vesicle traffic and cytoskeleton reorganization, respectively, we investigated their possible interplay. We show here that a significant fraction of Rac1 is associated with Rab11-positive recycling endosomes. Moreover, the Rab11 effector FIP3 controls Rac1 intracellular localization and Rac1 targeting to the immunological synapse. FIP3 regulates, in a Rac1-dependent manner, key morphological events, like T-cell spreading and synapse symmetry. Finally, Rab11-/FIP3-mediated regulation is necessary for T-cell activation leading to cytokine production. Therefore, Rac1 endosomal traffic is key to regulate T-cell activation. PMID:27154205

  2. Metaconcrete: Engineered aggregates for enhanced dynamic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Stephanie J.

    This work presents the development and investigation of a new type of concrete for the attenuation of waves induced by dynamic excitation. Recent progress in the field of metamaterials science has led to a range of novel composites which display unusual properties when interacting with electromagnetic, acoustic, and elastic waves. A new structural metamaterial with enhanced properties for dynamic loading applications is presented, which is named metaconcrete. In this new composite material the standard stone and gravel aggregates of regular concrete are replaced with spherical engineered inclusions. Each metaconcrete aggregate has a layered structure, consisting of a heavy core and a thin compliant outer coating. This structure allows for resonance at or near the eigenfrequencies of the inclusions, and the aggregates can be tuned so that resonant oscillations will be activated by particular frequencies of an applied dynamic loading. The activation of resonance within the aggregates causes the overall system to exhibit negative effective mass, which leads to attenuation of the applied wave motion. To investigate the behavior of metaconcrete slabs under a variety of different loading conditions a finite element slab model containing a periodic array of aggregates is utilized. The frequency dependent nature of metaconcrete is investigated by considering the transmission of wave energy through a slab, which indicates the presence of large attenuation bands near the resonant frequencies of the aggregates. Applying a blast wave loading to both an elastic slab and a slab model that incorporates the fracture characteristics of the mortar matrix reveals that a significant portion of the supplied energy can be absorbed by aggregates which are activated by the chosen blast wave profile. The transfer of energy from the mortar matrix to the metaconcrete aggregates leads to a significant reduction in the maximum longitudinal stress, greatly improving the ability of the material

  3. Desorption and use of saturated lightweight aggregate in internal curing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briatka, P.; Makýš, P.

    2011-09-01

    Roughly 20 years ago there was a brand new concrete-curing concept presented in the U.S. based on providing "extra curing" water from inside the concrete. The extra water shoul be added to concrete during mixing, but is bound to some kind of carrier, so it does not alter the water-cement ratio. This technique, known as Internal Curing (IC) keeps the cement paste moist from the first moment when it normally would start to desiccate and is not mature enough to apply conventional means of curing. The durability and effectiveness of IC depend on the boundary conditions at the site as well as the properties of the carrier - in this case, Lightweight Aggregate (LWA), which, after the water soaking, replaces some part of the Normalweight Aggregate (NWA). This work deals with LWA (available on the European market) in the context of its properties affecting the efficiency of IC.

  4. Ras, Rac1, and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling in nitric oxide induced endothelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Eller-Borges, Roberta; Batista, Wagner L; da Costa, Paulo E; Tokikawa, Rita; Curcio, Marli F; Strumillo, Scheilla T; Sartori, Adriano; Moraes, Miriam S; de Oliveira, Graciele A; Taha, Murched O; Fonseca, Fábio V; Stern, Arnold; Monteiro, Hugo P

    2015-05-01

    The small GTP-binding proteins Ras and Rac1 are molecular switches exchanging GDP for GTP and converting external signals in response to a variety of stimuli. Ras and Rac1 play an important role in cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and cell migration. Rac1 is directly involved in the reorganization and changes in the cytoskeleton during cell motility. Nitric oxide (NO) stimulates the Ras - ERK1/2 MAP kinases signaling pathway and is involved in the interaction between Ras and the phosphatidyl-inositol-3 Kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway and cell migration. This study utilizes bradykinin (BK), which promotes endogenous production of NO, in an investigation of the role of NO in the activation of Rac1 in rabbit aortic endothelial cells (RAEC). NO-derived from BK stimulation of RAEC and incubation of the cells with the s-nitrosothiol S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) activated Rac1. NO-derived from BK stimulation promoted RAEC migration over a period of 12 h. The use of RAEC permanently transfected with the dominant negative mutant of Ras (Ras(N17)) or with the non-nitrosatable mutant of Ras (Ras(C118S)); and the use of specific inhibitors of: Ras, PI3K, and Rac1 resulted in inhibition of NO-mediated Rac1 activation. BK-stimulated s-nitrosylation of Ras in RAEC mediates Rac1 activation and cell migration. Inhibition of NO-mediated Rac1 activation resulted in inhibition of endothelial cell migration. In conclusion, the NO indirect activation of Rac1 involves the direct participation of Ras and PI3K in the migration of endothelial cells stimulated with BK. PMID:25819133

  5. Rac1 is required for Prkar1a-mediated Nf2 suppression in Schwann cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Manchanda, Parmeet K.; Jones, Georgette N.; Lee, Audrey A.; Pringle, Daphne R.; Zhang, Mei; Yu, Lianbo; La Perle, Krista M. D.; Kirschner, Lawrence S.

    2012-01-01

    Schwannomas are peripheral nerve sheath tumors that often occur in the setting of an inherited tumor predisposition syndrome, including Neurofibromatosis Types 1 (NF1) and 2 (NF2), Familial Schwannomatosis (FS) and Carney Complex (CNC). Loss of the NF2 tumor suppressor (encoding NF2, or Merlin) is associated with upregulation of the Rac1 small GTPase, which is thought to play a key role in mediating tumor formation. In prior studies, we generated a mouse model of schwannomas by performing tissue-specific knockout of the CNC gene Prkar1a, which encodes the type 1A regulatory subunit of Protein Kinase A. These tumors exhibited down-regulation of Nf2 protein and an increase in activated Rac1. To assess the requirement for Rac1 in schwannoma formation, we generated a double knockout of Prkar1a and Rac1 in Schwann cells and monitored tumor formation. Loss of Rac1 reduced tumor formation by reducing proliferation and enhancing apoptosis. Surprisingly, the reduction of tumor formation was accompanied by re-expression of the Nf2 protein. Furthermore, activated Rac1 was able to downregulate Nf2 in vitro in a Pak-dependent manner. These in vivo data indicate that activation of Rac1 is responsible for suppression of Nf2 protein production; deficiency of Nf2 in Schwann cells leads to loss of cellular growth control and tumor formation.. Further, PKA activation through mutation in Prkar1a is sufficient to initiate Rac1 signaling, with subsequent reduction of Nf2 and schwannomagenesis. Although in vitro evidence has shown that loss of Nf2 activates Rac1, our data indicates that signaling between Nf2 and Rac1 occurs in a bidirectional fashion, and these interactions are modulated by PKA. PMID:23045281

  6. Expression and activity of Rac1 is negatively affected in the dehydroepiandrosterone induced polycystic ovary of mouse

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is characterized by the presence of multiple follicular cysts, giving rise to infertility due to anovulation. This syndrome affects about 10% of women, worldwide. The exact molecular mechanism leading to PCOS remains obscure. RhoGTPase has been associated with oogenesis, but its role in PCOS remains unexplored. Therefore, we attempted to elucidate the Vav-Rac1 signaling in PCOS mice model. Methods We generated a PCOS mice model by injecting dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) for a period of 20 days. The expression levels of Rac1, pRac1, Vav, pVav and Caveolin1 were analyzed by employing immuno-blotting and densitometry. The association between Vav and Rac1 proteins were studied by immuno-precipitation. Furthermore, we analyzed the activity of Rac1 and levels of inhibin B and 17β-estradiol in ovary using biochemical assays. Results The presence of multiple follicular cysts in ovary were confirmed by histology. The activity of Rac1 (GTP bound state) was significantly reduced in the PCOS ovary. Similarly, the expression levels of Rac1 and its phosphorylated form (pRac1) were decreased in PCOS in comparison to the sham ovary. The expression level and activity (phosphorylated form) of guanine nucleotide exchanger of Rac1, Vav, was moderately down-regulated. We observed comparatively increased expressions of Caveolin1, 17β-estradiol, and inhibin B in the polycystic ovary. Conclusion We conclude that hyperandrogenization (PCOS) by DHEA diminishes ovarian Rac1 and Vav expression and activity along with an increase in expression of Caveolin1. This is accompanied by an increase in the intra-ovarian level of '17 β-estradiol and inhibin B. PMID:24628852

  7. Rac1 is required for Prkar1a-mediated Nf2 suppression in Schwann cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Manchanda, P K; Jones, G N; Lee, A A; Pringle, D R; Zhang, M; Yu, L; La Perle, K M D; Kirschner, L S

    2013-07-25

    Schwannomas are peripheral nerve sheath tumors that often occur in the setting of an inherited tumor predisposition syndrome, including neurofibromatosis types 1 (NF1) and 2 (NF2), familial schwannomatosis and Carney complex. Loss of the NF2 tumor suppressor (encoding NF2, or Merlin) is associated with upregulation of the Rac1 small GTPase, which is thought to have a key role in mediating tumor formation. In prior studies, we generated a mouse model of schwannomas by performing tissue-specific knockout (KO) of the Carney complex gene Prkar1a, which encodes the type 1A regulatory subunit of protein kinase A. These tumors exhibited down-regulation of Nf2 protein and an increase in activated Rac1. To assess the requirement for Rac1 in schwannoma formation, we generated a double KO (DKO) of Prkar1a and Rac1 in Schwann cells and monitored tumor formation. Loss of Rac1 reduced tumor formation by reducing proliferation and enhancing apoptosis. Surprisingly, the reduction of tumor formation was accompanied by re-expression of the Nf2 protein. Furthermore, activated Rac1 was able to downregulate Nf2 in vitro in a Pak-dependent manner. These in vivo data indicate that activation of Rac1 is responsible for suppression of Nf2 protein production; deficiency of Nf2 in Schwann cells leads to loss of cellular growth control and tumor formation. Further, PKA activation through mutation in Prkar1a is sufficient to initiate Rac1 signaling, with subsequent reduction of Nf2 and schwannomagenesis. Although in vitro evidence has shown that loss of Nf2 activates Rac1, our data indicate that signaling between Nf2 and Rac1 occurs in a bidirectional fashion, and these interactions are modulated by PKA. PMID:23045281

  8. Regulation of Pathogenic Spore Germination by CgRac1 in the Fungal Plant Pathogen Colletotrichum gloeosporioides ▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Nesher, Iris; Minz, Anna; Kokkelink, Leonie; Tudzynski, Paul; Sharon, Amir

    2011-01-01

    Colletotrichum gloeosporioides is a facultative plant pathogen: it can live as a saprophyte on dead organic matter or as a pathogen on a host plant. Different patterns of conidial germination have been recognized under saprophytic and pathogenic conditions, which also determine later development. Here we describe the role of CgRac1 in regulating pathogenic germination. The hallmark of pathogenic germination is unilateral formation of a single germ tube following the first cell division. However, transgenic strains expressing a constitutively active CgRac1 (CA-CgRac1) displayed simultaneous formation of two germ tubes, with nuclei continuing to divide in both cells after the first cell division. CA-CgRac1 also caused various other abnormalities, including difficulties in establishing and maintaining cell polarity, reduced conidial and hyphal adhesion, and formation of immature appressoria. Consequently, CA-CgRac1 isolates were completely nonpathogenic. Localization studies with cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-CgRac1 fusion protein showed that the CgRac1 protein is abundant in conidia and in hyphal tips. Although the CFP signal was equally distributed in both cells of a germinating conidium, reactive oxygen species accumulated only in the cell that produced a germ tube, indicating that CgRac1 was active only in the germinating cell. Collectively, our results show that CgRac1 is a major regulator of asymmetric development and that it is involved in the regulation of both morphogenesis and nuclear division. Modification of CgRac1 activity disrupts the morphogenetic program and prevents fungal infection. PMID:21460190

  9. Assessment of the recycling potential of fresh concrete waste using a factorial design of experiments.

    PubMed

    Correia, S L; Souza, F L; Dienstmann, G; Segadães, A M

    2009-11-01

    Recycling of industrial wastes and by-products can help reduce the cost of waste treatment prior to disposal and eventually preserve natural resources and energy. To assess the recycling potential of a given waste, it is important to select a tool capable of giving clear indications either way, with the least time and work consumption, as is the case of modelling the system properties using the results obtained from statistical design of experiments. In this work, the aggregate reclaimed from the mud that results from washout and cleaning operations of fresh concrete mixer trucks (fresh concrete waste, FCW) was recycled into new concrete with various water/cement ratios, as replacement of natural fine aggregates. A 3(2) factorial design of experiments was used to model fresh concrete consistency index and hardened concrete water absorption and 7- and 28-day compressive strength, as functions of FCW content and water/cement ratio, and the resulting regression equations and contour plots were validated with confirmation experiments. The results showed that the fresh concrete workability worsened with the increase in FCW content but the water absorption (5-10 wt.%), 7-day compressive strength (26-36 MPa) and 28-day compressive strength (32-44 MPa) remained within the specified ranges, thus demonstrating that the aggregate reclaimed from FCW can be recycled into new concrete mixtures with lower natural aggregate content. PMID:19596189

  10. Compressive strength evaluation of structural lightweight concrete by non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity method.

    PubMed

    Bogas, J Alexandre; Gomes, M Glória; Gomes, Augusto

    2013-07-01

    In this paper the compressive strength of a wide range of structural lightweight aggregate concrete mixes is evaluated by the non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity method. This study involves about 84 different compositions tested between 3 and 180 days for compressive strengths ranging from about 30 to 80 MPa. The influence of several factors on the relation between the ultrasonic pulse velocity and compressive strength is examined. These factors include the cement type and content, amount of water, type of admixture, initial wetting conditions, type and volume of aggregate and the partial replacement of normal weight coarse and fine aggregates by lightweight aggregates. It is found that lightweight and normal weight concretes are affected differently by mix design parameters. In addition, the prediction of the concrete's compressive strength by means of the non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity test is studied. Based on the dependence of the ultrasonic pulse velocity on the density and elasticity of concrete, a simplified expression is proposed to estimate the compressive strength, regardless the type of concrete and its composition. More than 200 results for different types of aggregates and concrete compositions were analyzed and high correlation coefficients were obtained. PMID:23351273

  11. Platelet aggregation test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003669.htm Platelet aggregation test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The platelet aggregation blood test checks how well platelets , a ...

  12. Thermodynamics of Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Kenneth L.; Barz, Bogdan; Bachmann, Michael; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloid protein aggregation characterizes many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Creutz- feldt-Jakob disease. Evidence suggests that amyloid aggregates may share similar aggregation pathways, implying simulation of full-length amyloid proteins is not necessary for understanding amyloid formation. In this study we simulate GNNQQNY, the N-terminal prion-determining domain of the yeast protein Sup35 to investigate the thermodynamics of structural transitions during aggregation. We use a coarse-grained model with replica-exchange molecular dynamics to investigate the association of 3-, 6-, and 12-chain GNNQQNY systems and we determine the aggregation pathway by studying aggregation states of GN- NQQNY. We find that the aggregation of the hydrophilic GNNQQNY sequence is mainly driven by H-bond formation, leading to the formation of /3-sheets from the very beginning of the assembly process. Condensation (aggregation) and ordering take place simultaneously, which is underpinned by the occurrence of a single heat capacity peak only.

  13. Platelet aggregation test

    MedlinePlus

    The platelet aggregation blood test checks how well platelets , a part of blood, clump together and cause blood to clot. ... Decreased platelet aggregation may be due to: Autoimmune ... Fibrin degradation products Inherited platelet function defects ...

  14. An attempt to validate the ultra-accelerated microbar and the concrete performance test with the degree of AAR-induced damage observed in concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Leemann, Andreas; Merz, Christine

    2013-07-15

    There is little knowledge about the relation between AAR-induced damage observed in structures and the expansion potential obtained with accelerated tests. In this study, aggregates used in structures damaged by AAR were tested with the microbar test (MBT/AFNOR XP 18-594) and the concrete performance test (CPT/AFNOR P18-454). After the tests, the samples were examined using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Based on the results, the significance of the microbar test has to be examined very critically. The agreement of measured expansion, reacted rock types and the composition of the reaction products between the on-site concrete and the reproduced concrete subjected to the CPT clearly indicates that the reaction mechanisms in the structure and in the concrete performance test are comparable. As such, the concrete performance test seems to be an appropriate tool to test the potential reactivity of specific concrete mixtures.

  15. Self Healing Concrete: A Biological Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonkers, Henk M.

    Concrete can be considered as a kind of artificial rock with properties more or less similar to certain natural rocks. As it is strong, durable, and relatively cheap, concrete is, since almost two centuries, the most used construction material worldwide, which can easily be recognized as it has changed the physiognomy of rural areas. However, due to the heterogeneity of the composition of its principle components, cement, water, and a variety of aggregates, the properties of the final product can widely vary. The structural designer therefore must previously establish which properties are important for a specific application and must choose the correct composition of the concrete ingredients in order to ensure that the final product applies to the previously set standards. Concrete is typically characterized by a high-compressive strength, but unfortunately also by a rather low-tensile strength. However, through the application of steel or other material reinforcements, the latter can be compensated for as such reinforcements can take over tensile forces.

  16. Sulfur 'Concrete' for Lunar Applications - Environmental Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.

    2008-01-01

    Commercial use of sulfur concrete on Earth is well established, particularly in corrosive, e.g., acid and salt, environments. Having found troilite (FeS) on the Moon raises the question of using extracted sulfur as a lunar construction material, an attractive alternative to conventional concrete as it does not require water. For the purpose of this Technical Memorandum, it is assumed that lunar ore is mined, refined, and the raw sulfur processed with appropriate lunar regolith to form, for example, bricks. With this stipulation, it is then noted that the viability of sulfur concrete in a lunar environment, which is characterized by lack of an atmosphere and extreme temperatures, is not well understood. The work presented here evaluates two sets of small sulfur concrete samples that have been prepared using JSC-1 lunar simulant as an aggregate addition. One set was subjected to extended periods in high vacuum to evaluate sublimation issues, and the other was cycled between room and liquid nitrogen temperatures to investigate their subsequent mechanical integrity. Results are presented from both investigations, discussed, and put into the context of the lunar environment.

  17. A STUDY ON DEF-RELATED EXPANSION IN HEAT-CURED CONCRETE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Yuichiro; Matsushita, Hiromichi

    This paper reports the requirements for deleterious expansion due to delayed ettringite formation (DEF) based on field experience. In recent years, the delete rious expansion of concrete have been reported. The concrete have been characterized by expansion and cracking after several years of service in environments exposed in wet conditions. In many cases, the concrete consists of white cement, limestone and copper slag and it has been manufactured at elevated temperatures for early shipment. From detailed analysis, it was made clear that the cause of deleterious expansion was DEF. The gaps which are featured in DEF-damaged concrete were observed around limest one aggregate. There was a possibility that use of limestone aggregate affects DEF-related expansion while the condition of steam curing was the most effective factor for DEF-related expansion. Based on experimental data, the mechanism of DEF-related expansion and the methodology of diagnosing DEF-deterior ated concrete structures were discussed in this paper.

  18. Engineering properties of inorganic polymer concretes (IPCs)

    SciTech Connect

    Sofi, M.; Deventer, J.S.J. van . E-mail: jannie@unimelb.edu.au; Mendis, P.A. . E-mail: pamendis@unimelb.edu.au; Lukey, G.C.

    2007-02-15

    This paper presents the engineering properties of inorganic polymer concretes (IPCs) with a compressive strength of 50 MPa. The study includes a determination of the modulus of elasticity, Poisson's ratio, compressive strength, and the splitting tensile strength and flexural strength of IPCs, formulated using three different sources of Class-F fly ash. Six IPC mix designs were adopted to evaluate the effects of the inclusion of coarse aggregates and granulated blast furnace slag into the mixes. A total of 90 cylindrical and 24 small beam specimens were investigated, and all tests were carried out pursuant to the relevant Australian Standards. Although some variability between the mixes was observed, the results show that, in most cases, the engineering properties of IPCs compare favorably to those predicted by the relevant Australian Standards for concrete mixtures.

  19. Junctional actin assembly is mediated by Formin-like 2 downstream of Rac1

    PubMed Central

    Grikscheit, Katharina; Frank, Tanja; Wang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial integrity is vitally important, and its deregulation causes early stage cancer. De novo formation of an adherens junction (AJ) between single epithelial cells requires coordinated, spatial actin dynamics, but the mechanisms steering nascent actin polymerization for cell–cell adhesion initiation are not well understood. Here we investigated real-time actin assembly during daughter cell–cell adhesion formation in human breast epithelial cells in 3D environments. We identify formin-like 2 (FMNL2) as being specifically required for actin assembly and turnover at newly formed cell–cell contacts as well as for human epithelial lumen formation. FMNL2 associates with components of the AJ complex involving Rac1 activity and the FMNL2 C terminus. Optogenetic control of Rac1 in living cells rapidly drove FMNL2 to epithelial cell–cell contact zones. Furthermore, Rac1-induced actin assembly and subsequent AJ formation critically depends on FMNL2. These data uncover FMNL2 as a driver for human epithelial AJ formation downstream of Rac1. PMID:25963818

  20. Junctional actin assembly is mediated by Formin-like 2 downstream of Rac1.

    PubMed

    Grikscheit, Katharina; Frank, Tanja; Wang, Ying; Grosse, Robert

    2015-05-11

    Epithelial integrity is vitally important, and its deregulation causes early stage cancer. De novo formation of an adherens junction (AJ) between single epithelial cells requires coordinated, spatial actin dynamics, but the mechanisms steering nascent actin polymerization for cell-cell adhesion initiation are not well understood. Here we investigated real-time actin assembly during daughter cell-cell adhesion formation in human breast epithelial cells in 3D environments. We identify formin-like 2 (FMNL2) as being specifically required for actin assembly and turnover at newly formed cell-cell contacts as well as for human epithelial lumen formation. FMNL2 associates with components of the AJ complex involving Rac1 activity and the FMNL2 C terminus. Optogenetic control of Rac1 in living cells rapidly drove FMNL2 to epithelial cell-cell contact zones. Furthermore, Rac1-induced actin assembly and subsequent AJ formation critically depends on FMNL2. These data uncover FMNL2 as a driver for human epithelial AJ formation downstream of Rac1. PMID:25963818

  1. Phosphorylation of EBP50 negatively regulates β-PIX-dependent Rac1 activity in anoikis.

    PubMed

    Chen, J-Y; Lin, Y-Y; Jou, T-S

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrated a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent phosphorylation of canine ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM)-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50) at serine 347/348 by site-directed mutagenesis and a phospho-specific antibody. Cell fractionation and confocal imaging revealed the relocation of EBP50 from the plasma membrane to cytosol that accompanied this phosphorylation event. Increased phosphorylation at these serine residues led to the dissociation of EBP50 from ezrin and β-PIX, which are two upstream regulators of Rac1 activation. Cells overexpressing an EBP50 mutant, mimicking serine 347/348 phosphorylation, became refractory to hepatocyte growth factor-induced cell spreading and scattering, which is normally mediated by Rac1 activation. Detachment of cells from the substratum also elicited an increase in EBP50 phosphorylation, apparently due to counteracting activities of PKC and protein phosphastase 2A, which resulted in decreased Rac1 activation and induction of anoikis. Cells overexpressing an EBP50 mutant defective in serine 347/348 phosphorylation did not undergo apoptosis in suspension culture. These studies reveal a signaling cascade in which different phosphorylation states and subcellular localization of EBP50 regulate Rac1 function. PMID:22301917

  2. Rac1/Pak1/p38/MMP-2 axis regulates angiogenesis in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Villasana, Vianey; Fuentes-Mattei, Enrique; Ivan, Cristina; Dalton, Heather J.; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Fernandez-de Thomas, Ricardo J.; Aslan, Burcu; Monroig, Paloma del C.; Velazquez-Torres, Guermarie; Previs, Rebecca A.; Pradeep, Sunila; Kahraman, Nermin; Wang, Huamin; Kanlikilicer, Pinar; Ozpolat, Bulent; Calin, George; Sood, Anil K.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Zoledronic acid (ZA) is being increasingly recognized for its anti-tumor properties, but the underlying functions are not well understood. In this study, we hypothesized that ZA inhibits ovarian cancer (OC) angiogenesis preventing Rac1 activation. Experimental Design The biological effects of ZA were examined using a series of in vitro (cell invasion, cytokine production, Rac1 activation, reverse-phase protein array and in vivo (orthotopic mouse models) experiments. Results There was significant inhibition of OC (HeyA8-MDR and OVCAR-5) cell invasion as well as reduced production of pro-angiogenic cytokines in response to ZA treatment. Furthermore, ZA inactivated Rac1 and decreased the levels of Pak1/p-38/matrix metalloproteinase-2 in OC cells. In vivo, ZA reduced tumor growth, angiogenesis and cell proliferation and inactivated Rac1 in both HeyA8-MDR and OVCAR-5 models. These in vivo antitumor effects were enhanced in both models when ZA was combined with nab-paclitaxel. Conclusion ZA has robust anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic activity and merits further clinical development as OC treatment. PMID:25595279

  3. Antiviral activity of a Rac GEF inhibitor characterized with a sensitive HIV/SIV fusion assay

    SciTech Connect

    Pontow, Suzanne; Harmon, Brooke; Campbell, Nancy; Ratner, Lee

    2007-11-10

    A virus-dependent fusion assay was utilized to examine the activity of a panel of HIV-1, -2, and SIV isolates of distinct coreceptor phenotypes. This assay allowed identification of entry inhibitors, and characterization of an antagonist of a Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factor, as an inhibitor of HIV-mediated fusion.

  4. Nuclear localization of coactivator RAC3 is mediated by a bipartite NLS and importin {alpha}3

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, Percy Luk; Zhang, Aihua; Chen, J. Don . E-mail: chenjd@umdnj.edu

    2006-09-15

    The nuclear receptor coactivator RAC3 (also known as SRC-3/ACTR/AIB1/p/CIP/TRAM-1) belongs to the p160 coactivator family, which are involved in several physiological processes and diseases. Here we have investigated how RAC3 is translocated into the nucleus and show that it is mediated through a bipartite NLS and importin {alpha}3. This bipartite NLS is located within the conserved bHLH domain, and its mutation abolished nuclear localization. The NLS is also sufficient to cause nuclear import of EGFP, and the activity requires basic amino acids within the NLS. RAC3 binds strongly to importin {alpha}3, which also depends on the basic amino acids. Functionally, RAC3 cytoplasmic mutant loses its ability to enhance transcription, suggesting that nuclear localization is essential for coactivator function. Together, these results reveal a previous unknown mechanism for nuclear translocation of p160 coactivators and a critical function of the conserved bHLH within the coactivator.

  5. Inhibition of the GTPase Rac1 mediates the antimigratory effects of metformin in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dirat, Béatrice; Ader, Isabelle; Golzio, Muriel; Massa, Fabienne; Mettouchi, Amel; Laurent, Kathiane; Larbret, Frédéric; Malavaud, Bernard; Cormont, Mireille; Lemichez, Emmanuel; Cuvillier, Olivier; Tanti, Jean François; Bost, Frédéric

    2015-02-01

    Cell migration is a critical step in the progression of prostate cancer to the metastatic state, the lethal form of the disease. The antidiabetic drug metformin has been shown to display antitumoral properties in prostate cancer cell and animal models; however, its role in the formation of metastases remains poorly documented. Here, we show that metformin reduces the formation of metastases to fewer solid organs in an orthotopic metastatic prostate cancer cell model established in nude mice. As predicted, metformin hampers cell motility in PC3 and DU145 prostate cancer cells and triggers a radical reorganization of the cell cytoskeleton. The small GTPase Rac1 is a master regulator of cytoskeleton organization and cell migration. We report that metformin leads to a major inhibition of Rac1 GTPase activity by interfering with some of its multiple upstream signaling pathways, namely P-Rex1 (a Guanine nucleotide exchange factor and activator of Rac1), cAMP, and CXCL12/CXCR4, resulting in decreased migration of prostate cancer cells. Importantly, overexpression of a constitutively active form of Rac1, or P-Rex, as well as the inhibition of the adenylate cyclase, was able to reverse the antimigratory effects of metformin. These results establish a novel mechanism of action for metformin and highlight its potential antimetastatic properties in prostate cancer. PMID:25527635

  6. Dock4 is regulated by RhoG and promotes Rac-dependent cell migration.

    PubMed

    Hiramoto, Kiyo; Negishi, Manabu; Katoh, Hironori

    2006-12-10

    Cell migration is essential for normal development and many pathological processes including tumor metastasis. Rho family GTPases play important roles in this event. In particular, Rac is required for lamellipodia formation at the leading edge during migration. Dock4 is a member of the Dock180 family proteins, and Dock4 mutations are present in a subset of human cancer cell lines. However, the function and the regulatory mechanism of Dock4 remain unclear. Here we show that Dock4 is regulated by the small GTPase RhoG and its effector ELMO and promotes cell migration by activating Rac1. Dock4 formed a complex with ELMO, and expression of active RhoG induced translocation of the Dock4-ELMO complex from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane and enhanced the Dock4- and ELMO-dependent Rac1 activation and cell migration. On the other hand, RNA interference-mediated knockdown of Dock4 in NIH3T3 cells reduced cell migration. Taken together, these results suggest that Dock4 plays an important role in the regulation of cell migration through activation of Rac1, and that RhoG is a key upstream regulator for Dock4. PMID:17027967

  7. An evolutionarily conserved autoinhibitory molecular switch in ELMO proteins regulates Rac signaling.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manishha; Margaron, Yoran; Fradet, Nadine; Yang, Qi; Wilkes, Brian; Bouvier, Michel; Hofmann, Kay; Côté, Jean-François

    2010-11-23

    Dedicator of cytokinesis (DOCK) proteins are guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) controlling the activity of Rac1/Cdc42 during migration, phagocytosis, and myoblast fusion [1-4]. Engulfment and cell motility (ELMO) proteins bind a subset of DOCK members and are emerging as critical regulators of Rac signaling [5-10]. Although formation of a DOCK180/ELMO complex is not essential for Rac1 activation, ELMO mutants deficient in binding to DOCK180 are unable to promote cytoskeleton remodeling [11]. How ELMO regulates signaling through DOCK GEFs is poorly understood. Here, we identify an autoinhibitory switch in ELMO presenting homology to a regulatory unit described for Dia formins. One part of the switch, composed of a Ras-binding domain (RBD) and Armadillo repeats, is positioned N-terminally while the other is housed in the C terminus. We demonstrate interaction between these fragments, suggesting autoinhibition of ELMO. Using a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer biosensor, we establish that ELMO undergoes conformational changes upon disruption of autoinhibition. We found that engagement of ELMO to RhoG, or with DOCK180, promotes the relief of autoinhibition in ELMO. Functionally, we found that ELMO mutants with impaired autoregulatory activity promote cell elongation. These results demonstrate an unsuspected level of regulation for Rac1 signaling via autoinhibition of ELMO. PMID:21035343

  8. Sbds is required for Rac2-mediated monocyte migration and signaling downstream of RANK during osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Leung, Roland; Cuddy, Karl; Wang, Yongqiang; Rommens, Johanna; Glogauer, Michael

    2011-02-10

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) results from mutations in the SBDS gene, characterized by exocrine pancreatic insufficiency and hematologic and skeletal abnormalities. Neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are hallmark features of SDS; however, causes for the bone defects are unknown. Dysfunction of bone-resorbing osteoclasts, formed by the fusion of monocytic progenitors derived from the same granulocytic precursors as neutrophils, could be responsible. We report that Sbds is required for in vitro and in vivo osteoclastogenesis (OCG). Sbds-null murine monocytes formed osteoclasts of reduced number and size because of impaired migration and fusion required for OCG. Phenotypically, Sbds-null mice exhibited low-turnover osteoporosis consistent with findings in SDS patients. Western blotting of Rho GTPases that control actin dynamics and migration showed a 5-fold decrease in Rac2, whereas Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA were unchanged or only mildly reduced. Although migration was rescued on Rac2 supplementation, OCG was not. This was attributed to impaired signaling downstream of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK) and reduced expression of the RANK-ligand-dependent fusion receptor DC-STAMP. We conclude that Sbds is required for OCG by regulating monocyte migration via Rac2 and osteoclast differentiation signaling downstream of RANK. Impaired osteoclast formation could disrupt bone homeostasis, resulting in skeletal abnormalities seen in SDS patients. PMID:21084708

  9. Responsible Adult Culture (RAC): Cognitive and Behavioral Changes at a Community-Based Correctional Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, Renee S.; Gibbs, John C.

    2010-01-01

    This article examined cognitive and behavioral changes among participants in Responsible Adult Culture (RAC), a cognitive-behavioral (especially, cognitive restructuring) treatment program in use at the Franklin County Community-Based Correctional Facility (CBCF). Participants were adult felony offenders (approximately three-fourths male). A…

  10. Staphylococcus aureus keratinocyte invasion is mediated by integrin-linked kinase and Rac1.

    PubMed

    Sayedyahossein, Samar; Xu, Stacey X; Rudkouskaya, Alena; McGavin, Martin J; McCormick, John K; Dagnino, Lina

    2015-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major component of the skin microbiota and causes a large number of serious infections. S. aureus first interacts with epidermal keratinocytes to breach the epidermal barrier through mechanisms not fully understood. By use of primary keratinocytes from mice with epidermis-restricted Ilk gene inactivation and control integrin-linked kinase (ILK)-expressing littermates, we investigated the role of ILK in epidermal S. aureus invasion. Heat-killed, but not live, bacteria were internalized to Rab5- and Rab7-positive phagosomes, and incubation with keratinocyte growth factor increased their uptake 2.5-fold. ILK-deficient mouse keratinocytes internalized bacteria 2- to 4-fold less efficiently than normal cells. The reduced invasion by live S. aureus of ILK-deficient cells was restored in the presence of exogenous, constitutively active Rac1. Thus, Rac1 functions downstream from ILK during invasion. Further, invasion by S. aureus of Rac1-deficient cells was 2.5-fold lower than in normal cells. Paradoxically, staphylococcal cutaneous penetration of mouse skin explants with ILK-deficient epidermis was 35-fold higher than that of normal skin, indicating defects in epidermal barrier function in the absence of ILK. Thus, we identified an ILK-Rac1 pathway essential for bacterial invasion of keratinocytes, and established ILK as a key contributor to prevent invasive staphylococcal cutaneous infection. PMID:25416549

  11. 75 FR 5563 - Notice of a Meeting of the Northeast Oregon Forests Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ... Forest Service Notice of a Meeting of the Northeast Oregon Forests Resource Advisory Committee (RAC... Federal Advisory Committees Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Northeast Oregon Forest Resource Advisory Committee... a Committee to discuss selection of Title II projects under Public Law 110-343, H.R. 1424,...

  12. The PREX1/Rac signaling axis: Potential as a biomarker and therapeutic target in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Lloye M; Miller, Todd W

    2015-01-01

    PREX1 is a Rac guanine exchange factor that coordinates signaling inputs from G protein-coupled receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). PREX1 creates a positive feedback loop to drive RTK, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT, and MEK/ERK signaling. High PREX1 levels predict sensitivity to PI3K inhibitors in breast cancer cells. PMID:27308485

  13. Structural details of light activation of the LOV2-based photoswitch PA-Rac1.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Andreas; Barends, Thomas R M; Udvarhelyi, Anikó; Lenherr-Frey, Daniel; Lomb, Lukas; Menzel, Andreas; Schlichting, Ilme

    2015-02-20

    Optical control of cellular processes is an emerging approach for studying biological systems, affording control with high spatial and temporal resolution. Specifically designed artificial photoswitches add an interesting extension to naturally occurring light-regulated functionalities. However, despite a great deal of structural information, the generation of new tools cannot be based fully on rational design yet; in many cases design is limited by our understanding of molecular details of light activation and signal transduction. Our biochemical and biophysical studies on the established optogenetic tool PA-Rac1, the photoactivatable small GTPase Rac1, reveal how unexpected details of the sensor-effector interface, such as metal coordination, significantly affect functionally important structural elements of this photoswitch. Together with solution scattering experiments, our results favor differences in the population of pre-existing conformations as the underlying allosteric activation mechanism of PA-Rac1, rather than the assumed release of the Rac1 domain from the caging photoreceptor domain. These results have implications for the design of new optogenetic tools and highlight the importance of including molecular details of the sensor-effector interface, which is however difficult to assess during the initial design of novel artificial photoswitches. PMID:25368973

  14. Concrete sample point: 304 Concretion Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rollison, M.D.

    1995-03-10

    This report contains information concerning the analysis of concretes for volatile organic compounds. Included are the raw data for these analysis and the quality control data, the standards data, and all of the accompanying chains-of-custody records and requests for special analysis.

  15. Performance of Waterless Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toutanji, Houssam; Evans, Steve; Grugel, Richard N.

    2010-01-01

    The development of permanent lunar bases is constrained by performance of construction materials and availability of in-situ resources. Concrete seems a suitable construction material for the lunar environment, but water, one of its major components, is an extremely scarce resource on the Moon. This study explores an alternative to hydraulic concrete by replacing the binding mix of concrete (cement and water) with sulfur. Sulfur is a volatile element on the lunar surface that can be extracted from lunar soils by heating. Sulfur concrete mixes were prepared to investigate the effect of extreme environmental conditions on the properties of sulfur concrete. A hypervelocity impact test was conducted, having as its target a 5-cm cubic sample of sulfur concrete. This item consisted of JSC-1 lunar regolith simulant (65%) and sulfur (35%). The sample was placed in the MSFC Impact Test Facility s Micro Light Gas Gun target chamber, and was struck by a 1-mm diameter (1.4e-03 g) aluminum projectile at 5.85 km/s. In addition, HZTERN code, provided by NASA was used to study the effectiveness of sulfur concrete when subjected to space radiation.

  16. RAC1 inhibition as a therapeutic target for gefitinib-resistant non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaneto, Naoki; Yokoyama, Satoru; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Kato, Shinichiro; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Saiki, Ikuo

    2014-01-01

    Although epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKI), including gefitinib, provide a significant clinical benefit in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, the acquisition of drug resistance has been known to limit the efficacy of EGFR-TKI therapy. In this study, we demonstrated the involvement of EGF-EGFR signaling in NSCLC cell migration and the requirement of RAC1 in EGFR-mediated progression of NSCLC. We showed the significant role of RAC1 pathway in the cell migration or lamellipodia formation by using gene silencing of RAC1 or induction of constitutive active RAC1 in EGFR-mutant NSCLC cells. Importantly, the RAC1 inhibition suppressed EGFR-mutant NSCLC cell migration and growth in vitro, and growth in vivo even in the gefitinib-resistant cells. In addition, these suppressions by RAC1 inhibition were mediated through MEK or PI3K independent mechanisms. Collectively, these results open up a new opportunity to control the cancer progression by targeting the RAC1 pathway to overcome the resistance to EGFR-TKI in NSCLC patients. PMID:24750242

  17. Clostridium perfringens TpeL Glycosylates the Rac and Ras Subfamily Proteins▿

    PubMed Central

    Nagahama, Masahiro; Ohkubo, Akiko; Oda, Masataka; Kobayashi, Keiko; Amimoto, Katsuhiko; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Sakurai, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens TpeL belongs to a family of large clostridial cytotoxins that encompasses Clostridium difficile toxin A (TcdA) and B (TcdB) and Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin (TcsL). We report here the identification of the TpeL-catalyzed modification of small GTPases. A recombinant protein (TpeL1-525) derived from the TpeL N-terminal catalytic domain in the presence of streptolysin O (SLO) induced the rounding of Vero cells and the glycosylation of cellular Rac1. Among several hexoses tested, UDP-N-acetyl-glucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) and UDP-glucose (UDP-Glc) served as cosubstrates for TpeL1-525-catalyzed modifications. TpeL1-525 catalyzed the incorporation of UDP-Glc into Ha-Ras, Rap1B, and RalA and of UDP-GlcNAc into Rac1, Ha-Ras, Rap1B, and RalA. In Rac1, TpeL and TcdB share the same acceptor amino acid for glycosylation, Thr-35. In Vero cells treated with TpeL1-525 in the presence of SLO, glycosylation leads to a translocation of the majority of Rac1 and Ha-Ras to the membrane. We demonstrate for first time that TpeL uses both UDP-GlcNAc and UDP-Glc as donor cosubstrates and modifies the Rac1 and Ras subfamily by glycosylation to mediate its cytotoxic effects. PMID:21098103

  18. The Rac Inhibitor EHop-016 Inhibits Mammary Tumor Growth and Metastasis in a Nude Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Pichardo, Linette; Humphries-Bickley, Tessa; De La Parra, Columba; Forestier-Roman, Ingrid; Martinez-Ferrer, Magaly; Hernandez, Eliud; Vlaar, Cornelis; Ferrer-Acosta, Yancy; Washington, Anthony V.; Cubano, Luis A.; Rodriguez-Orengo, Jose; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic disease still lacks effective treatments, and remains the primary cause of cancer mortality. Therefore, there is a critical need to develop better strategies to inhibit metastatic cancer. The Rho family GTPase Rac is an ideal target for anti-metastatic cancer therapy, because Rac is a key molecular switch that is activated by a myriad of cell surface receptors to promote cancer cell migration/invasion and survival. Previously, we reported the design and development of EHop-016, a small molecule compound, which inhibits Rac activity of metastatic cancer cells with an IC50 of 1 μM. EHop-016 also inhibits the activity of the Rac downstream effector p21-activated kinase (PAK), lamellipodia extension, and cell migration in metastatic cancer cells. Herein, we tested the efficacy of EHop-016 in a nude mouse model of experimental metastasis, where EHop-016 administration at 25 mg/kg body weight (BW) significantly reduced mammary fat pad tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis. As quantified by UPLC MS/MS, EHop-016 was detectable in the plasma of nude mice at 17 to 23 ng/ml levels at 12 h following intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of 10 to 25 mg/kg BW EHop-016. The EHop-016 mediated inhibition of angiogenesis In Vivo was confirmed by immunohistochemistry of excised tumors and by In Vitro tube formation assays of endothelial cells. Moreover, EHop-016 affected cell viability by down-regulating Akt and Jun kinase activities and c-Myc and Cyclin D expression, as well as increasing caspase 3/7 activities in metastatic cancer cells. In conclusion, EHop-016 has potential as an anticancer compound to block cancer progression via multiple Rac-directed mechanisms. PMID:25389450

  19. Effect of insulating concrete forms in concrete compresive strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Jerez, Silvio R.

    The subject presented in this thesis is the effect of Insulating Concrete Forms (ICF's) on concrete compressive strength. This work seeks to identify if concrete cured in ICF's has an effect in compressive strength due to the thermal insulation provided by the forms. Modern construction is moving to energy efficient buildings and ICF's is becoming more popular in new developments. The thesis used a concrete mixture and a mortar mixture to investigate the effects of ICF's on concrete compressive strength. After the experimentations were performed, it was concluded that the ICF's do affect concrete strength. It was found that the forms increase concrete strength without the need for additional curing water. An increase of 50% in strength at 56 days was obtained. It was concluded that the longer concrete cures inside ICF's, the higher strength it reaches, and that ICF's effect on concrete strength is proportional to volume of concrete.

  20. Advanced Numerical Model for Irradiated Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Giorla, Alain B.

    2015-03-01

    In this report, we establish a numerical model for concrete exposed to irradiation to address these three critical points. The model accounts for creep in the cement paste and its coupling with damage, temperature and relative humidity. The shift in failure mode with the loading rate is also properly represented. The numerical model for creep has been validated and calibrated against different experiments in the literature [Wittmann, 1970, Le Roy, 1995]. Results from a simplified model are shown to showcase the ability of numerical homogenization to simulate irradiation effects in concrete. In future works, the complete model will be applied to the analysis of the irradiation experiments of Elleuch et al. [1972] and Kelly et al. [1969]. This requires a careful examination of the experimental environmental conditions as in both cases certain critical information are missing, including the relative humidity history. A sensitivity analysis will be conducted to provide lower and upper bounds of the concrete expansion under irradiation, and check if the scatter in the simulated results matches the one found in experiments. The numerical and experimental results will be compared in terms of expansion and loss of mechanical stiffness and strength. Both effects should be captured accordingly by the model to validate it. Once the model has been validated on these two experiments, it can be applied to simulate concrete from nuclear power plants. To do so, the materials used in these concrete must be as well characterized as possible. The main parameters required are the mechanical properties of each constituent in the concrete (aggregates, cement paste), namely the elastic modulus, the creep properties, the tensile and compressive strength, the thermal expansion coefficient, and the drying shrinkage. These can be either measured experimentally, estimated from the initial composition in the case of cement paste, or back-calculated from mechanical tests on concrete. If some

  1. A study on high strength concrete prepared with large volumes of low calcium fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Poon, C.S.; Lam, L.; Wong, Y.L.

    2000-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a laboratory study on high strength concrete prepared with large volumes of low calcium fly ash. The parameters studied included compressive strength, heat of hydration, chloride diffusivity, degree of hydration, and pore structures of fly ash/cement concrete and corresponding pastes. The experimental results showed that concrete with a 28-day compressive strength of 80 MPA could be obtained with a water-to-binder (w/b) ratio of 0.24, with a fly ash content of 45%. Such concrete has lower heat of hydration and chloride diffusivity than the equivalent plain cement concrete or concrete prepared with lower fly ash contents. The test results showed that at lower w/b ratios, the contribution to strength by the fly ash was higher than in the mixes prepared with higher w/b ratios. The study also quantified the reaction rates of cement and fly ash in the cementitious materials. The results demonstrated the dual effects of fly ash in concrete: (1) act as a micro-aggregate and (2) being a pozzolana. It was also noted that the strength contribution of fly ash in concrete was better than in the equivalent cement/fly ash pastes suggesting the fly ash had improved the interfacial bond between the past and the aggregates in the concrete. Such an improvement was also reflected in the results of the mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) test.

  2. R-Ketorolac Targets Cdc42 and Rac1 and Alters Ovarian Cancer Cell Behaviors Critical for Invasion and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuna; Kenney, S Ray; Muller, Carolyn Y; Adams, Sarah; Rutledge, Teresa; Romero, Elsa; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Prekeris, Rytis; Sklar, Larry A; Hudson, Laurie G; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2015-10-01

    Cdc42 (cell division control protein 42) and Rac1 (Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1) are attractive therapeutic targets in ovarian cancer based on established importance in tumor cell migration, adhesion, and invasion. Despite a predicted benefit, targeting GTPases has not yet been translated to clinical practice. We previously established that Cdc42 and constitutively active Rac1b are overexpressed in primary ovarian tumor tissues. Through high-throughput screening and computational shape homology approaches, we identified R-ketorolac as a Cdc42 and Rac1 inhibitor, distinct from the anti-inflammatory, cyclooxygenase inhibitory activity of S-ketorolac. In the present study, we establish R-ketorolac as an allosteric inhibitor of Cdc42 and Rac1. Cell-based assays validate R-ketorolac activity against Cdc42 and Rac1. Studies on immortalized human ovarian adenocarcinoma cells (SKOV3ip) and primary patient-derived ovarian cancer cells show that R-ketorolac is a robust inhibitor of growth factor or serum-dependent Cdc42 and Rac1 activation with a potency and cellular efficacy similar to small-molecule inhibitors of Cdc42 (CID2950007/ML141) and Rac1 (NSC23766). Furthermore, GTPase inhibition by R-ketorolac reduces downstream p21-activated kinases (PAK1/PAK2) effector activation by >80%. Multiple assays of cell behavior using SKOV3ip and primary patient-derived ovarian cancer cells show that R-ketorolac significantly inhibits cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. In summary, we provide evidence for R-ketorolac as a direct inhibitor of Cdc42 and Rac1 that is capable of modulating downstream GTPase-dependent, physiologic responses, which are critical to tumor metastasis. Our findings demonstrate the selective inhibition of Cdc42 and Rac1 GTPases by an FDA-approved drug, racemic ketorolac, that can be used in humans. PMID:26206334

  3. Regulation of Adherens Junctions in Trabecular Meshwork Cells by Rac GTPase and their influence on Intraocular Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Pattabiraman, Padmanabhan P; Epstein, David L; Rao, Ponugoti Vasantha

    2013-01-01

    Intercellular adherens junctions and cell-extracellular matrix interactions are presumed to influence aqueous humor (AH) drainage via the conventional route, however, their direct role in modulation of intraocular pressure (IOP) is not well understood. Here, we investigated the role of Rac GTPase signaling in basal and growth factor-induced formation of adherens junctions in human trabecular meshwork (HTM) cells as compared to human umbilical vascular endothelial cells, and evaluated the effects of inhibition of Rac GTPase activity on IOP in rabbits. Expression of a constitutively active Rac1 GTPase or treatment with platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), a known activator of Rac GTPase, induced formation of β-catenin-based adherens junctions, actin cytoskeletal reorganization and membrane ruffle in HTM cells. In contrast, treatment of HTM cells with inhibitors of Rac GTPase caused cell-cell separation, a decrease in adherens junctions, and reorganization of actin stress fibers to the cell cortical regions and focal adhesion to the cell leading edges. Both, constitutively active Rac1 and PDGF stimulated generation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in HTM cells, and ROS were found to increase adherens junction formation and transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) in HTM cells. Topical application of Rac GTPase inhibitors (EHT1864 and NSC23766), however, only marginally influenced IOP in rabbit eyes. Taken together, these data reveal that while Rac GTPase signaling plays a significant role in regulation of adherens junctions, ROS production and TEER in cells of the AH outflow pathway, Rac inhibitors showed only a marginal influence on IOP in live rabbits. PMID:24932460

  4. Regulation of Adherens Junctions in Trabecular Meshwork Cells by Rac GTPase and their influence on Intraocular Pressure.

    PubMed

    Pattabiraman, Padmanabhan P; Epstein, David L; Rao, Ponugoti Vasantha

    2013-06-01

    Intercellular adherens junctions and cell-extracellular matrix interactions are presumed to influence aqueous humor (AH) drainage via the conventional route, however, their direct role in modulation of intraocular pressure (IOP) is not well understood. Here, we investigated the role of Rac GTPase signaling in basal and growth factor-induced formation of adherens junctions in human trabecular meshwork (HTM) cells as compared to human umbilical vascular endothelial cells, and evaluated the effects of inhibition of Rac GTPase activity on IOP in rabbits. Expression of a constitutively active Rac1 GTPase or treatment with platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), a known activator of Rac GTPase, induced formation of β-catenin-based adherens junctions, actin cytoskeletal reorganization and membrane ruffle in HTM cells. In contrast, treatment of HTM cells with inhibitors of Rac GTPase caused cell-cell separation, a decrease in adherens junctions, and reorganization of actin stress fibers to the cell cortical regions and focal adhesion to the cell leading edges. Both, constitutively active Rac1 and PDGF stimulated generation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in HTM cells, and ROS were found to increase adherens junction formation and transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) in HTM cells. Topical application of Rac GTPase inhibitors (EHT1864 and NSC23766), however, only marginally influenced IOP in rabbit eyes. Taken together, these data reveal that while Rac GTPase signaling plays a significant role in regulation of adherens junctions, ROS production and TEER in cells of the AH outflow pathway, Rac inhibitors showed only a marginal influence on IOP in live rabbits. PMID:24932460

  5. Compressive Strength and Water Absorption of Pervious Concrete that Using the Fragments of Ceramics and Roof Tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahara, E.; Meilani

    2014-03-01

    Pervious concrete was introduced in America in 2003, popularized by Dan Brown and used as a rigid pavement in the open parking lot. Rigid pavement using pervious concrete can absorb water in the surface to go straight through the concrete to the ground below.This water flow is one of the benefit of using the pervious concrete. Using of wastes such as broken roof and ceramics tiles are not commonly used in Indonesia. Utilization these kind of wastes is predicted lower the compressive strength of pervious concrete as they are used as a substitute for coarse aggregate.In this research, pervious concrete is made using a mixture of the fragment of ceramics and roof tiles.This research using broken ceramics and roof tiles with a grain size that loose from 38 mm sieve, retained on 19 mm sieve and the coarse aggregate from crushed stone that loose 12.5 mm sieve, retained on 9.5 mm sieve. The water cement ratio is 0.3 and to assist the mixing process, the addition of addictive in pervious concrete is used.The size of coarse aggregate used in the mixture affects the strength of pervious concrete. The larger the size of aggregate, the obtained compressive strength becomes smaller. It also affects the density of pervious concrete. The using of mixture of ceramics and roof tiles only reduce 2 MPa of pervious concrete compressive strength so this mixture can be used as a substitute for coarse aggregate with a maximum portion of 30 %. The high porosity of the specimens causes the reduction of pervious concrete density that affect the compressive strength. This high level of porosity can be seen from the high level of water absorption that exceed the required limit of water infiltration.

  6. Electrokenitic Corrosion Treatment of Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardenas, Henry E (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method and apparatus for strengthening cementitious concrete by placing a nanoparticle carrier liquid in contact with a first surface of a concrete section and inducing a current across the concrete section at sufficient magnitude and for sufficient time that nanoparticles in the nanoparticle carrier liquid migrate through a significant depth of the concrete section.

  7. Use of vitrified MSWI bottom ashes for concrete production.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, Monica; Salvo, Milena; Ventrella, Andrea; Buzzi, Luigi; Veglia, Massimo

    2009-03-01

    Bottom ashes from a north Italian municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) were vitrified at 1450 degrees C without adding any vitrifying agent, then ground and sieved to different granulometry (ranging from 50 microm to 20mm), and used as filler, sand, or aggregate for concrete. Samples were characterized via slump tests (UNI 9418), alkali-silica reactivity (UNI 8520/22 and ASTM C 298), and compression strength tests (UNI 6132, 6132/72, 6686/72), and compared to reference samples obtained without vitrified bottom ashes (VBA). Our results show that vitrified bottom ashes are unsuitable as a sand substitute; however, concrete containing up to 20 wt.% of VBA filler used as a substitute for cement and up to 75 vol.% of VBA as a substitute for natural aggregate retains the same mechanical properties as reference samples. Alkali-silica or other detrimental reactions were not observed in VBA-containing concrete samples after a period of two years. The results of this work demonstrate that vitrified bottom ashes from MSWI can be used instead of natural aggregates in mortar and concrete production. PMID:18845429

  8. The role of Rac1 in the regulation of NF-kB activity, cell proliferation, and cell migration in non-small cell lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gastonguay, Adam; Berg, Tracy; Hauser, Andrew D.; Schuld, Nathan; Lorimer, Ellen; Williams, Carol L.

    2012-01-01

    The small GTPase Rac1 regulates many cellular processes, including cytoskeletal reorganization, cell migration, proliferation, and survival. Additionally, Rac1 plays a major role in activating NF-κB-mediated transcription. Both Rac1 and NF-κB regulate many properties of the malignant phenotype, including anchorage-independent proliferation and survival, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Despite these findings, the roles of Rac1and NF-κB in non-small cell lung carcinoma, a leading cause of cancer deaths, have not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we compared the effects of Rac1 siRNA to that of the Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 on multiple features of the NSCLC malignant phenotype, including NF-κB activity. We show that the siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in lung cancer cells results in decreased cell proliferation and migration. The decrease in proliferation was observed in both anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent assays. Furthermore, cells with decreased Rac1 expression have a slowed progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle. These effects induced by Rac1 siRNA correlated with a decrease in NF-κB transcriptional activity. Additionally, inhibition of NF-κB signaling with BAY 11–7082 inhibited proliferation; indicating that the loss of cell proliferation and migration induced by the silencing of Rac1 expression may be attributed in part to loss of NF-κB activity. Interestingly, treatment with the Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 strongly inhibits cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and NF-κB activity in lung cancer cells, to an even greater extent than the inhibition induced by Rac1 siRNA. These findings indicate that Rac1 plays an important role in lung cancer cell proliferation and migration, most likely through its ability to promote NF-κB activity, and highlight Rac1 pathways as therapeutic targets for the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:22549160

  9. Production of high strength concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Peterman, M.B.; Carrasquillo, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The criteria for selection of concrete materials and their proportions to producer uniform, economical, high strength concrete are presented in this book. The recommendations provided are based on a study of the interactions among components of plain concrete and mix proportions, and of their contribution to the compressive strength of high strength concrete. These recommendations will serve as guidelines to practicing engineers, in the selection of materials and their proportions for the production of high strength concrete. Increasing demands for improved efficiency and reduced construction costs have resulted in engineers beginning to design large structures using higher strength concrete at higher stress levels. There are definite advantages, both technical and economical, in using high strength concrete. For example, for a given cross section, prestresses concrete bridge girders can carry greater service loads across longer spans if made using high strength concrete. In addition, cost comparisons have shown that the savings obtained are significantly greater than the added cost of the higher quality concrete.

  10. Production of lightweight aggregate from industrial waste and carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Gunning, Peter J; Hills, Colin D; Carey, Paula J

    2009-10-01

    The concomitant recycling of waste and carbon dioxide emissions is the subject of developing technology designed to close the industrial process loop and facilitate the bulk-re-use of waste in, for example, construction. The present work discusses a treatment step that employs accelerated carbonation to convert gaseous carbon dioxide into solid calcium carbonate through a reaction with industrial thermal residues. Treatment by accelerated carbonation enabled a synthetic aggregate to be made from thermal residues and waste quarry fines. The aggregates produced had a bulk density below 1000 kg/m(3) and a high water absorption capacity. Aggregate crushing strengths were between 30% and 90% stronger than the proprietary lightweight expanded clay aggregate available in the UK. Cast concrete blocks containing the carbonated aggregate achieve compressive strengths of 24 MPa, making them suitable for use with concrete exposed to non-aggressive service environments. The energy intensive firing and sintering processes traditionally required to produce lightweight aggregates can now be augmented by a cold-bonding, low energy method that contributes to the reduction of green house gases to the atmosphere. PMID:19577916

  11. Concrete decontamination scoping tests

    SciTech Connect

    Archibald, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    This report details the research efforts and scoping tests performed at the Idaho Chemical Process Plant using scabbling, chemical, and electro-osmotic decontamination techniques on radiologically contaminated concrete.

  12. Permeability of Clay Concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, F.; Ekolu, S. O.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the effect of clay addition on water permeability and air permeability of concretes. Clay concrete mixes consisted of 0 to 40% clay content incorporated as cement replacement. Flow methods using triaxial cells and air permeameters were used for measuring the injected water and air flows under pressure. It was found that the higher the clay content in the mixture, the greater the permeability. At higher water-cement ratios (w/c), the paste matrix is less dense and easily allows water to ingress into concrete. But at high clay contents of 30 to 40% clay, the variation in permeability was significantly diminished among different concrete mixtures. It was confirmed that air permeability results were higher than the corresponding water permeability values when all permeability coefficients were converted to intrinsic permeability values.

  13. Concrete production floating platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Letourneur, O.; Falcimaigne, J.

    1981-01-01

    The floating production platforms operating in the North Sea are adapted from drilling semisubmersibles which allow only a limited payload capacity. Experience of concrete production platforms constructed for the North Sea has led Sea Tank Co. to propose a floating platform which offers large payload and oil storage capacities similar to those of existing fixed platforms. Sea Tank Co. and Institut Francais du Petrole joined forces in early 1976 to study the feasibility of a concrete floating production platform incorporating the structure and the production riser together. The results of this 3-yr program show that the concrete floating structure is economically attractive for permanent utilization on a production site. Furthermore, concrete has definite advantages over other materials, in its long term behavior.

  14. Influence of stress restraint on the expansive behaviour of concrete affected by alkali-silica reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Berra, M.; Faggiani, G.; Mangialardi, T.; Paolini, A.E.

    2010-09-15

    The primary objective of this study was to ascertain whether the Threshold Alkali Level (TAL) of the concrete aggregates may be taken as a suitable reactivity parameter for the selection of aggregates susceptible of alkali-silica reaction (ASR), even when ASR expansion in concrete develops under restrained conditions. Concrete mixes made with different alkali contents and two natural siliceous aggregates with very different TALs were tested for their expansivity at 38 {sup o}C and 100% RH under unrestrained and restrained conditions. Four compressive stress levels over the range from 0.17 to 3.50 N/mm{sup 2} were applied by using a new appositely designed experimental equipment. The lowest stress (0.17 N/mm{sup 2}) was selected in order to estimate the expansive pressure developed by the ASR gel under 'free' expansion conditions. It was found that, even under restrained conditions, the threshold alkali level proves to be a suitable reactivity parameter for designing concrete mixes that are not susceptible of deleterious ASR expansion. An empirical relationship between expansive pressure, concrete alkali content and aggregate TAL was developed in view of its possible use for ASR diagnosis and/or safety evaluation of concrete structures.

  15. Shear Resistance between Concrete-Concrete Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovačovic, Marek

    2013-12-01

    The application of precast beams and cast-in-situ structural members cast at different times has been typical of bridges and buildings for many years. A load-bearing frame consists of a set of prestressed precast beams supported by columns and diaphragms joined with an additionally cast slab deck. This article is focused on the theoretical and experimental analyses of the shear resistance at an interface. The first part of the paper deals with the state-of-art knowledge of the composite behaviour of concrete-concrete structures and a comparison of the numerical methods introduced in the relevant standards. In the experimental part, a set of specimens with different interface treatments was tested until failure in order to predict the composite behaviour of coupled beams. The experimental part was compared to the numerical analysis performed by means of FEM basis nonlinear software.

  16. Application of near-field microwave sensing techniques for segregation detection in concrete members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bois, K. J.; Benally, A. D.; Zoughi, R.; Nowak, P. S.

    2000-05-01

    In this presentation, a simple, low-cost near-field microwave nondestructive inspection technique for segregation detection in concrete members is presented. This process employs information from the measured magnitude of reflection coefficient at the aperture of an open-ended rectangular waveguide sensor. These measurements, whose results will be presented, were conducted using a Hewlett-Packard HP8510B network analyzer. However, in practice a simple and relatively inexpensive inspection apparatus constructed from discrete microwave components can easily be employed. It is shown that the standard deviation of magnitude of reflection coefficient measurement is linearly correlated with the aggregate density in concrete. Furthermore, for concrete in which the aggregate has segregated, this measurable parameter will change as a function of vertical position of the microwave scan. Results correlating the microwave measurements to the actual aggregate density of a well consolidated concrete specimen and a specimen in which the aggregate has segregated will be presented. Finally, the simple and low cost application of this method for in situ detection of aggregate segregation in concrete structures will be discussed.

  17. Value-added utilisation of recycled concrete in hot-mix asphalt

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Yiik Diew; Sun, Darren Delai . E-mail: ddsun@ntu.edu.sg; Lai, Dickson

    2007-07-01

    The feasibility of partial substitution of granite aggregate in hot-mix asphalt (HMA) with waste concrete aggregate was investigated. Three hybrid HMA mixes incorporating substitutions of granite fillers/fines with 6%, 45% untreated, and 45% heat-treated concrete were evaluated by the Marshall mix design method; the optimum binder contents were found to be 5.3%, 6.5% and 7.0% of grade Pen 60/70 bitumen, respectively. All three hybrid mixes satisfied the Marshall criteria of the Singapore Land Transport Authority (LTA) W3B wearing course specification. The hybrid mix with 6% concrete fillers gave comparable resilient modulus and creep resistance as the conventional W3B mix, while hybrid mixes with higher concrete substitutions achieved better performance. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed the distinct presence of free lime in the heat-treated concrete, while the scanning electron microscope (SEM) provided an in-depth perspective of the concrete grains in the HMA matrix. The results suggest feasible use of waste concrete as partial aggregate substitution in HMA.

  18. Promoting the use of crumb rubber concrete in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Batayneh, Malek K; Marie, Iqbal; Asi, Ibrahim

    2008-11-01

    The use of accumulated waste materials in third world countries is still in its early phases. It will take courage for contractors and others in the construction industry to recycle selected types of waste materials in the concrete mixes. This paper addresses the recycling of rubber tires accumulated every year in Jordan to be used in concrete mixes. The main objectives of this research were to provide more scientific evidence to support the use of legislation or incentive-based schemes to promote the reuse of accumulated waste tires. This research focused on using crumb tires as a replacement for a percentage of the local fine aggregates used in the concrete mixes in Jordan. Different concrete specimens were prepared and tested in terms of uniaxial compression and splitting tension. The main variable in the mixture was the volumetric percentage of crumb tires used in the mix. The test results showed that even though the compressive strength is reduced when using the crumb tires, it can meet the strength requirements of light weight concrete. In addition, test results and observations indicated that the addition of crumb rubber to the mix has a limited effect toward reducing the workability of the mixtures. The mechanical test results demonstrated that the tested specimens of the crumb rubber concrete remained relatively intact after failure compared to the conventional concrete specimens. It is also concluded that modified concrete would contribute to the disposal of the non-decaying scrap tires, since the amount being accumulated in third world countries is creating a challenge for proper disposal. Thus, obliging authorities to invest in facilitating the use of waste tires in concrete, a fundamental material to the booming construction industry in theses countries, serves two purposes. PMID:18956487

  19. IbeA and OmpA of Escherichia coli K1 exploit Rac1 activation for invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Maruvada, Ravi; Kim, Kwang Sik

    2012-06-01

    Meningitis-causing Escherichia coli K1 internalization of the blood-brain barrier is required for penetration into the brain, but the host-microbial interactions involved in E. coli entry of the blood-brain barrier remain incompletely understood. We show here that a meningitis-causing E. coli K1 strain RS218 activates Rac1 (GTP-Rac1) of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) in a time-dependent manner. Both activation and bacterial invasion were significantly inhibited in the presence of a Rac1 inhibitor. We further showed that the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav2, not β-Pix, was involved in E. coli K1-mediated Rac1 activation. Since activated STAT3 is known to bind GTP-Rac1, the relationship between STAT3 and Rac1 was examined in E. coli K1 invasion of HBMEC. Downregulation of STAT3 resulted in significantly decreased E. coli invasion compared to control HBMEC, as well as a corresponding decrease in GTP-Rac1, suggesting that Rac1 activation in response to E. coli is under the control of STAT3. More importantly, two E. coli determinants contributing to HBMEC invasion, IbeA and OmpA, were shown to affect both Rac1 activation and their association with STAT3. These findings demonstrate for the first time that specific E. coli determinants regulate a novel mechanism of STAT3 cross talk with Rac1 in E. coli K1 invasion of HBMEC. PMID:22451524

  20. Rac1 augments Wnt signaling by stimulating β-catenin-lymphoid enhancer factor-1 complex assembly independent of β-catenin nuclear import.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Cara; Lui, Christina; Brocardo, Mariana G; Martino-Echarri, Estefania; Henderson, Beric R

    2015-11-01

    β-Catenin transduces the Wnt signaling pathway and its nuclear accumulation leads to gene transactivation and cancer. Rac1 GTPase is known to stimulate β-catenin-dependent transcription of Wnt target genes and we confirmed this activity. Here we tested the recent hypothesis that Rac1 augments Wnt signaling by enhancing β-catenin nuclear import; however, we found that silencing/inhibition or up-regulation of Rac1 had no influence on nuclear accumulation of β-catenin. To better define the role of Rac1, we employed proximity ligation assays (PLA) and discovered that a significant pool of Rac1-β-catenin protein complexes redistribute from the plasma membrane to the nucleus upon Wnt or Rac1 activation. More importantly, active Rac1 was shown to stimulate the formation of nuclear β-catenin-lymphoid enhancer factor 1 (LEF-1) complexes. This regulation required Rac1-dependent phosphorylation of β-catenin at specific serines, which when mutated (S191A and S605A) reduced β-catenin binding to LEF-1 by up to 50%, as revealed by PLA and immunoprecipitation experiments. We propose that Rac1-mediated phosphorylation of β-catenin stimulates Wnt-dependent gene transactivation by enhancing β-catenin-LEF-1 complex assembly, providing new insight into the mechanism of cross-talk between Rac1 and canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:26403202

  1. Rac1 augments Wnt signaling by stimulating β-catenin–lymphoid enhancer factor-1 complex assembly independent of β-catenin nuclear import

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson, Cara; Lui, Christina; Brocardo, Mariana G.; Martino-Echarri, Estefania; Henderson, Beric R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT β-Catenin transduces the Wnt signaling pathway and its nuclear accumulation leads to gene transactivation and cancer. Rac1 GTPase is known to stimulate β-catenin-dependent transcription of Wnt target genes and we confirmed this activity. Here we tested the recent hypothesis that Rac1 augments Wnt signaling by enhancing β-catenin nuclear import; however, we found that silencing/inhibition or up-regulation of Rac1 had no influence on nuclear accumulation of β-catenin. To better define the role of Rac1, we employed proximity ligation assays (PLA) and discovered that a significant pool of Rac1–β-catenin protein complexes redistribute from the plasma membrane to the nucleus upon Wnt or Rac1 activation. More importantly, active Rac1 was shown to stimulate the formation of nuclear β-catenin–lymphoid enhancer factor 1 (LEF-1) complexes. This regulation required Rac1-dependent phosphorylation of β-catenin at specific serines, which when mutated (S191A and S605A) reduced β-catenin binding to LEF-1 by up to 50%, as revealed by PLA and immunoprecipitation experiments. We propose that Rac1-mediated phosphorylation of β-catenin stimulates Wnt-dependent gene transactivation by enhancing β-catenin–LEF-1 complex assembly, providing new insight into the mechanism of cross-talk between Rac1 and canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:26403202

  2. Geometry sensing through POR1 regulates Rac1 activity controlling early osteoblast differentiation in response to nanofiber diameter.

    PubMed

    Higgins, A M; Banik, B L; Brown, J L

    2015-02-01

    Bone grafting procedures in the United States rely heavily upon autografts and allografts, which are donor-dependent, cause donor site pain, and can transmit disease. Synthetic bone grafts can reduce these risks; however, synthetics lack the bone differentiating (osteoinductive) abilities of auto- and allografts. Achieving innate osteoinductive properties of synthetics through surface modifications is currently under investigation. This study focuses on nanofibers, with emphasis on how fiber diameter and the potential curvature sensor POR1 affect the activation of the signaling molecules Rac1 and Arf1, and leading to expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), an osteoinductive marker. Diameters of 0.1, 0.3, and 1.0 μm were compared against a flat control. The highest level of Rac1 activation was achieved on the smallest fibers (0.1 μm), a trend that was lost in POR1 knockdowns. This supports the hypothesis that on small nanofibers, POR1 favorably binds to highly curved cell membranes, which allows Rac1 to subsequently dissociate and activate. When the curvature is insufficient to bind POR1, POR1 binds to inactive Rac1 and competitively inhibits its activation. Arf1 activation followed an opposite trend, with the largest nanofibers exhibiting the highest activity. This trend reinforces the known interaction between Rac1 and Arf1 through the GIT-PIX complex, an Arf1 GAP and Rac1 GEF, respectively. Large, (1.0 μm), nanofibers demonstrated the highest ALP activity, indicating that ALP expression is inversely dependent on Rac1 activation. Knockdown of POR1 resulted in increased ALP activity across the substrates but without regard to the curvature sensing trend seen previously. Thus, POR1 senses curvature and increases Rac1 activity, which negatively regulates bone differentiation. PMID:25539497

  3. Validation of the RVACS (Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System)/RACS (Reactor Air Cooling System) model in SASSYS-1

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, F.E.

    1987-01-01

    The SASSYS-1 LMR systems analysis code contains a model for transient analysis of heat removal by a RVACS (Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System) or a RACS (Reactor Air Cooling System) in an LMR (Liquid Metal Reactor). This model has been validated by comparisons of model predictions with experimental data from a large scale RVACS/RACS simulation experiment performed at Argonne National Laboratory. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Rab5 is required in metastatic cancer cells for Caveolin-1-enhanced Rac1 activation, migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Jorge; Mendoza, Pablo; Ortiz, Rina; Díaz, Natalia; Leyton, Lisette; Stupack, Dwayne; Quest, Andrew F G; Torres, Vicente A

    2014-06-01

    Rab5 is a small GTPase that regulates early endosome trafficking and other cellular processes, including cell adhesion and migration. Specifically, Rab5 promotes Rac1 activation and cancer cell migration, but little is known about the upstream regulators of Rab5. We have previously shown that the scaffolding protein Caveolin-1 (CAV1) promotes Rac1 activation and migration of cancer cells. Here, we hypothesized that CAV1 stimulates Rab5 activation, leading to increased Rac1 activity and cell migration. Expression of CAV1 in B16-F10 mouse melanoma and HT-29(US) human colon adenocarcinoma cells increased the GTP loading of Rab5, whereas shRNA-mediated targeting of endogenous CAV1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells decreased Rab5-GTP levels. Accordingly, shRNA-mediated downregulation of Rab5 decreased CAV1-mediated Rac1 activation, cell migration and invasion in B16-F10 and HT-29(US) cells. Expression of CAV1 was accompanied by increased recruitment of Tiam1, a Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), to Rab5-positive early endosomes. Using the inhibitor NSC23766, Tiam1 was shown to be required for Rac1 activation and cell migration induced by CAV1 and Rab5. Mechanistically, we provide evidence implicating p85α (also known as PIK3R1), a Rab5 GTPase-activating protein (GAP), in CAV1-dependent effects, by showing that CAV1 recruits p85α, precluding p85α-mediated Rab5 inactivation and increasing cell migration. In summary, these studies identify a novel CAV1-Rab5-Rac1 signaling axis, whereby CAV1 prevents Rab5 inactivation, leading to increased Rac1 activity and enhanced tumor cell migration and invasion. PMID:24659799

  5. Insulating polymer concrete for LNG impounding dikes. [Polymer concretes

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, J.J.; Steinberg, M.

    1986-03-01

    An insulating polymer concrete (IPC) composite has been developed under contract to the Gas Research Institute for possible use as a dike insulation material at Liquid Natural Gas (LNG) storage facilities. In the advent of an LNG spill into the impounding dike area, the boiloff rate of the LNG can be substantially reduced if the surfaces of the dike are insulated. This increased safety at the LNG facility will tend to reduce the hazardous explosive mixture with atmospheric air in the surrounding region. The dike insulation material must have a low thermal conductivity and be unaffected by environmental conditions. The IPC composites developed consist of perlite or glass nodule aggregates bound together as a closed cell structure with a polyester resin. In addition to low thermal conductivity and porosity, these composites have correspondingly high strengths and, therefore, can carry transient loads of workmen and maintenance equipment. Prefabricated IPC panels have been installed experimentally and at least one utility is currently considering a complete installation at its LNG facility. 5 refs., 5 tabs.

  6. The small Rho GTPase Rac1 controls normal human dermal fibroblasts proliferation with phosphorylation of the oncoprotein c-myc

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolova, Ekaterina; Mitev, Vanio; Zhelev, Nikolai; Deroanne, Christophe F. . E-mail: yves.poumay@fundp.ac.be

    2007-08-03

    Proliferation of dermal fibroblasts is crucial for the maintenance of skin. The small Rho GTPase, Rac1, has been identified as a key transducer of proliferative signals in various cell types, but in normal human dermal fibroblasts its significance to cell growth control has not been studied. In this study, we applied the method of RNA interference to suppress endogenous Rac1 expression and examined the consequences on human skin fibroblasts. Rac1 knock-down resulted in inhibition of DNA synthesis. This effect was not mediated by inhibition of the central transducer of proliferative stimuli, ERK1/2 or by activation of the pro-apoptotic p38. Rather, as a consequence of the suppressed Rac1 expression we observed a significant decrease in phosphorylation of c-myc, revealing for the first time that in human fibroblasts Rac1 exerts control on proliferation through c-myc phosphorylation. Thus Rac1 activates proliferation of normal fibroblasts through stimulation of c-myc phosphorylation without affecting ERK1/2 activity.

  7. TGFbeta1-induced aortic endothelial morphogenesis requires signaling by small GTPases Rac1 and RhoA.

    PubMed

    Varon, Christine; Basoni, Caroline; Reuzeau, Edith; Moreau, Violaine; Kramer, I Jsbrand; Génot, Elisabeth

    2006-11-01

    TGFbeta is a potent regulator of cell differentiation in many cell types. On aortic endothelial cells, TGFbeta1 displays angiogenic properties in inducing capillary-like tube formation in collagen I gels, in vitro. We investigated cytoskeletal changes that precede tube formation and related these alterations to the effects of TGFbeta1 on the activation state of members of the RhoGTPase family. TGFbeta1 promotes cell elongation and stress fiber formation in aortic endothelial cells. Using cell lines with inducible expression of Rac1 mutants, we show that these events are mimicked by expression of dominant-negative Rac1 whereas the constitutively active mutant prevents the TGFbeta1-mediated change of phenotype. Although TGFbeta1 induces an initial rise in the Rac1-GTP content, this phase is followed by a prolonged loss of the active form. In contrast, RhoA activity increases progressively and reaches a plateau when Rac1-GTP is no longer detectable. Prolonged inhibition of Rac1 appears necessary and sufficient for the increase in RhoA-GTP. In situ examination of Rho activity in TGFbeta1-treated cells provides evidence that active RhoA relocalizes to the tips of elongated cells. Inhibiting the Rho effector ROCK abrogates tube formation. Thus, Rac1 and RhoA are regulated by TGFbeta1 in the process of endothelial tube formation in collagen I gels. PMID:16978608

  8. The Rac-GAP Bcr is a novel regulator of the Par complex that controls cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Anjana S.; Reyes, Steve B.; Um, Kyongmi; McCarty, Joseph H.; Tolias, Kimberley F.

    2013-01-01

    Cell polarization is essential for many biological processes, including directed cell migration, and loss of polarity contributes to pathological conditions such as cancer. The Par complex (Par3, Par6, and PKCζ) controls cell polarity in part by recruiting the Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor T-lymphoma invasion and metastasis 1 (Tiam1) to specialized cellular sites, where Tiam1 promotes local Rac1 activation and cytoskeletal remodeling. However, the mechanisms that restrict Par-Tiam1 complex activity to the leading edge to maintain cell polarity during migration remain unclear. We identify the Rac-specific GTPase-activating protein (GAP) breakpoint cluster region protein (Bcr) as a novel regulator of the Par-Tiam1 complex. We show that Bcr interacts with members of the Par complex and inhibits both Rac1 and PKCζ signaling. Loss of Bcr results in faster, more random migration and striking polarity defects in astrocytes. These polarity defects are rescued by reducing PKCζ activity or by expressing full-length Bcr, but not an N-terminal deletion mutant or the homologous Rac-GAP, Abr, both of which fail to associate with the Par complex. These results demonstrate that Bcr is an integral member of the Par-Tiam1 complex that controls polarized cell migration by locally restricting both Rac1 and PKCζ function. PMID:24152735

  9. [RAC3 nuclear receptor co-activator has a protective role in the apoptosis induced by different stimuli].

    PubMed

    Coló, Georgina P; Rubio, María F; Alvarado, Cecilia V; Costas, Mónica A

    2007-01-01

    RAC3 belongs to the family of p160 nuclear receptors coactivators and it is over-expressed in several tumors. We have previously shown that RAC3 is a NF-kappaB coactivator. In this paper, we investigated the role of RAC3 in cell-sensitivity to apoptosis, using H2O2 in the human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK293), and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) in a human chronic myeloid leukemia cell line (K562) naturally resistant to TRAIL. We observed that the tumoral K562 cells have high levels of RAC3 if compared with the non-tumoral HEK293 cells. The normal or transfected coactivator over-expression inhibits apoptosis through a diminished caspase activity and AIF nuclear translocation, increased NF-kappaB, AKT and p38, and decreased ERK activities. In contrast, inhibition of RAC3 by siRNA induced sensitivity of K562 to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Such results suggest that over-expression of RAC3 contributes to tumor development through molecular mechanisms that do not depend strictly on acetylation and/or steroid hormones, which control cell death. This could be a possible target for future tumor therapies. PMID:18051230

  10. Rac-mediated Stimulation of Phospholipase Cγ2 Amplifies B Cell Receptor-induced Calcium Signaling*♦

    PubMed Central

    Walliser, Claudia; Tron, Kyrylo; Clauss, Karen; Gutman, Orit; Kobitski, Andrei Yu.; Retlich, Michael; Schade, Anja; Röcker, Carlheinz; Henis, Yoav I.; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich; Gierschik, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Rho GTPase Rac is crucially involved in controlling multiple B cell functions, including those regulated by the B cell receptor (BCR) through increased cytosolic Ca2+. The underlying molecular mechanisms and their relevance to the functions of intact B cells have thus far remained unknown. We have previously shown that the activity of phospholipase Cγ2 (PLCγ2), a key constituent of the BCR signalosome, is stimulated by activated Rac through direct protein-protein interaction. Here, we use a Rac-resistant mutant of PLCγ2 to functionally reconstitute cultured PLCγ2-deficient DT40 B cells and to examine the effects of the Rac-PLCγ2 interaction on BCR-mediated changes of intracellular Ca2+ and regulation of Ca2+-regulated and nuclear-factor-of-activated-T-cell-regulated gene transcription at the level of single, intact B cells. The results show that the functional Rac-PLCγ2 interaction causes marked increases in the following: (i) sensitivity of B cells to BCR ligation; (ii) BCR-mediated Ca2+ release from intracellular stores; (iii) Ca2+ entry from the extracellular compartment; and (iv) nuclear translocation of the Ca2+-regulated nuclear factor of activated T cells. Hence, Rac-mediated stimulation of PLCγ2 activity serves to amplify B cell receptor-induced Ca2+ signaling. PMID:25903139

  11. Expression of tumor-related Rac1b antagonizes B-Raf-induced senescence in colorectal cells.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Andreia F A; Barros, Patrícia; Moyer, Mary Pat; Matos, Paulo; Jordan, Peter

    2015-12-28

    Mutations in the BRAF oncogene have been identified as a tumor-initiating genetic event in mainly melanoma, thyroid and colon cancer, resulting in an initial proliferative stimulus that is followed by a growth arrest period known as oncogene-induced senescence (OIS). It remains unknown what triggers subsequent escape from OIS to allow further tumor progression. A previous analysis revealed that around 80% of colorectal tumors carrying a mutation in BRAF also overexpress splice variant Rac1b. We used normal NCM460 colonocytes as a model to express oncogenic B-Raf-V600E in the presence or absence of co-transfected Rac1b and then analyzed the effect on expression of senescence markers. When oncogenic B-Raf-V600E was expressed we observed the induction of the senescence-associated β-galactosidase and of the cell-cycle inhibitors p14, p15 and p21 whereas proliferation marker Ki67 was suppressed. Upon co-expression of splice variant Rac1b, but not of Rac1, the B-Raf-induced senescence phenotype was reverted and expression of the cell-cycle inhibitors downregulated in a reactive oxygen-species dependent manner. We thus provide evidence that co-expression of splice variant Rac1b counteracts B-Raf-induced senescence, indicating the selection for increased Rac1b expression as one potential mechanism by which colorectal tumor cells can escape from B-Raf-induced OIS. PMID:26341689

  12. The Calponin Family Member CHDP-1 Interacts with Rac/CED-10 to Promote Cell Protrusions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingyan; Liu, Jia-Jia; Wang, Yingchun; Ding, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells extend a variety of surface protrusions to direct cell motility. Formation of protrusions is mediated by coordinated actions between the plasma membrane and the underlying actin cytoskeleton. Here, we found that the single calponin homology (CH) domain-containing protein CHDP-1 induces the formation of cell protrusions in C. elegans. CHDP-1 is anchored to the cortex through its amphipathic helix. CHDP-1 associates through its CH domain with the small GTPase Rac1/CED-10, which is a key regulator of the actin cytoskeleton. CHDP-1 preferentially binds to the GTP-bound active form of the CED-10 protein and preserves the membrane localization of GTP-CED-10. Hence, by coupling membrane expansion to Rac1-mediated actin dynamics, CHDP-1 promotes the formation of cellular protrusions in vivo. PMID:27415421

  13. Stereoselective Alkali-Metal Catalysts for Highly Isotactic Poly(rac-lactide) Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yangyang; Xiong, Jiao; Dai, Zhongran; Pan, Xiaobo; Tang, Ning; Wu, Jincai

    2016-01-01

    A high degree of chain end control in the isoselective ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of rac-lactide is a challenging research goal. In this work, eight highly active sodium and potassium phenolates as highly isoselective catalysts for the ROP of rac-lactide are reported. The best isoselectivity value of Pm = 0.94 is achieved. The isoselective mechanism is chain-end control through the analysis of the stereoerrors in the microstructure of a final polymer; thus, isotactic multiblock structure polymers are obtained, and the highest melt point can reach 192.5 °C. The donating group in phenolate can clearly accelerate the ROP reaction, potassium complexes are more active than the analogous sodium complexes, and the big spacial hindrance of the ligand can decrease the activity. The high isoselectivities of these complexes mostly result from their sandwich structure constructed by the plane of the crown and the plane of the anthryl group. PMID:26684962

  14. The Calponin Family Member CHDP-1 Interacts with Rac/CED-10 to Promote Cell Protrusions.

    PubMed

    Guan, Liying; Ma, Xuehua; Zhang, Jingyan; Liu, Jia-Jia; Wang, Yingchun; Ding, Mei

    2016-07-01

    Eukaryotic cells extend a variety of surface protrusions to direct cell motility. Formation of protrusions is mediated by coordinated actions between the plasma membrane and the underlying actin cytoskeleton. Here, we found that the single calponin homology (CH) domain-containing protein CHDP-1 induces the formation of cell protrusions in C. elegans. CHDP-1 is anchored to the cortex through its amphipathic helix. CHDP-1 associates through its CH domain with the small GTPase Rac1/CED-10, which is a key regulator of the actin cytoskeleton. CHDP-1 preferentially binds to the GTP-bound active form of the CED-10 protein and preserves the membrane localization of GTP-CED-10. Hence, by coupling membrane expansion to Rac1-mediated actin dynamics, CHDP-1 promotes the formation of cellular protrusions in vivo. PMID:27415421

  15. Rac-1 and Raf-1 kinases, components of distinct signaling pathways, activate myotonic dystrophy protein kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, M.; Wang, W.; Walch, E. T.; Dunne, P. W.; Epstein, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) is a serine-threonine protein kinase encoded by the myotonic dystrophy (DM) locus on human chromosome 19q13.3. It is a close relative of other kinases that interact with members of the Rho family of small GTPases. We show here that the actin cytoskeleton-linked GTPase Rac-1 binds to DMPK, and coexpression of Rac-1 and DMPK activates its transphosphorylation activity in a GTP-sensitive manner. DMPK can also bind Raf-1 kinase, the Ras-activated molecule of the MAP kinase pathway. Purified Raf-1 kinase phosphorylates and activates DMPK. The interaction of DMPK with these distinct signals suggests that it may play a role as a nexus for cross-talk between their respective pathways and may partially explain the remarkable pleiotropy of DM.

  16. A PERMEABLE ACTIVE AMENDMENT CONCRETE (PAAC) FOR CONTAMINANT REMEDIATION AND EROSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, A.; Paller, M.; Dixon, K.

    2012-06-29

    The final project report for SEED SERDP ER - 2134 describes the development of permeable active amendment concrete (PAAC), which was evaluated through four tasks: 1) development of PAAC; 2) assessment of PAAC for contaminant removal; 3) evaluation of promising PAAC formulations for potential environmental impacts; and 4) assessment of the hydraulic, physical, and structural properties of PAAC. Conventional permeable concrete (often referred to as pervious concrete) is concrete with high porosity as a result of an extensive and interconnected void content. It is made from carefully controlled amounts of water and cementitious materials used to create a paste that forms a coating around aggregate particles. The mixture has a substantial void content (e.g., 15% - 25%) that results in a highly permeable structure that drains quickly. In PAAC, the aggregate material is partly replaced by chemically-active amendments that precipitate or adsorb contaminants in water that flows through the concrete interstices. PAAC combines the relatively high structural strength, ample void space, and water permeability of pervious concrete with the contaminant sequestration ability of chemically-active amendments to produce a new material with superior durability and ability to control contaminant mobility. The high surface area provided by the concrete interstices in PAAC provides significant opportunity for contaminants to react with the amendments incorporated into the concrete matrix. PAAC has the potential to immobilize a large variety of organic and inorganic contaminants by incorporating different active sequestering agents including phosphate materials (rock phosphate), organoclays, zeolite, and lime individually or in combinations.

  17. Primer on Durability of Nuclear Power Plant Reinforced Concrete Structures - A Review of Pertinent Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, Dan J

    2007-02-01

    The objective of this study was to provide a primer on the environmental effects that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant concrete structures. As concrete ages, changes in its properties will occur as a result of continuing microstructural changes (i.e., slow hydration, crystallization of amorphous constituents, and reactions between cement paste and aggregates), as well as environmental influences. These changes do not have to be detrimental to the point that concrete will not be able to meet its performance requirements. Concrete, however, can suffer undesirable changes with time because of improper specifications, a violation of specifications, or adverse performance of its cement paste matrix or aggregate constituents under either physical or chemical attack. Contained in this report is a discussion on concrete durability and the relationship between durability and performance, a review of the historical perspective related to concrete and longevity, a description of the basic materials that comprise reinforced concrete, and information on the environmental factors that can affect the performance of nuclear power plant concrete structures. Commentary is provided on the importance of an aging management program.

  18. Fatigue behavior of high-strength concrete under marine conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Mor, A.

    1987-01-01

    In this study, 24 high-strength reinforced concrete beams were tested in fatigue under simulated marine conditions. Low-cycle, high-magnitude loading was imposed on beams, some of which were exposed to air, and others which were submerged in water. The beams were cycled at 1 Hz, to 80% of their yield capacity in negative and positive flexure. Four concrete mixes were compared. Half of the specimens were made with lightweight aggregate (LWA), and half were made with river gravel (NWA). Half of each group contained silica-fume as partial replacement of cement (13%). By manipulating the water/cement ratio, the 28-day compressive strength of all concretes was 9500 {plus minus} 300 psi. The previously reported phenomenon of water pumping through the cracks was observed, but did not appear to be directly related to the subsequent failure. When silica fume is added to the concrete mix, the adhesion is greatly improved. LWA concrete utilizes this additional adhesion effectively. NWA concrete with silica-fume, on the other hand, is not able to utilize the increased adhesion due to microcracking. Main findings of both the fatigue and pull-out bond tests are listed.

  19. Monitoring of concrete structures using the ultrasonic pulse velocity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaiskos, G.; Deraemaeker, A.; Aggelis, D. G.; Van Hemelrijck, D.

    2015-11-01

    Concrete is the material most produced by humanity. Its popularity is mainly based on its low production cost and great structural design flexibility. Its operational and ambient loadings including environmental effects have a great impact in the performance and overall cost of concrete structures. Thus, the quality control, the structural assessment, the maintenance and the reliable prolongation of the operational service life of the existing concrete structures have become a major issue. In the recent years, non-destructive testing (NDT) is becoming increasingly essential for reliable and affordable quality control and integrity assessment not only during the construction of new concrete structures, but also for the existing ones. Choosing the right inspection technique is always followed by a compromise between its performance and cost. In the present paper, the ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) method, which is the most well known and widely accepted ultrasonic concrete NDT method, is thoroughly reviewed and compared with other well-established NDT approaches. Their principles, inherent limitations and reliability are reviewed. In addition, while the majority of the current UPV techniques are based on the use of piezoelectric transducers held on the surface of the concrete, special attention is paid to a very promising technique using low-cost and aggregate-size piezoelectric transducers embedded in the material. That technique has been evaluated based on a series of parameters, such as the ease of use, cost, reliability and performance.

  20. Zinc Complexes of Sequential Tetradentate Monoanionic Ligands in the Isoselective Polymerization of rac-Lactide.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Tomer; Popowski, Yanay; Goldberg, Israel; Kol, Moshe

    2016-08-01

    Zinc complexes of {ONNN}-type sequential tetradentate monoanionic ligands reacted with diethylzinc to give the mononuclear ethylzinc complexes. The benzyloxy complexes were formed readily and were found to be highly active as well as living/immortal catalysts for ring-opening polymerization of rac-lactic acid with a clear isospecific inclination. Chiral gas chromatography analysis revealed a mild preference for a given lactide enantiomer by the chiral catalysts. PMID:27325142

  1. Plexin-B2 negatively regulates macrophage motility, Rac, and Cdc42 activation.

    PubMed

    Roney, Kelly E; O'Connor, Brian P; Wen, Haitao; Holl, Eda K; Guthrie, Elizabeth H; Davis, Beckley K; Jones, Stephen W; Jha, Sushmita; Sharek, Lisa; Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Bear, James E; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2011-01-01

    Plexins are cell surface receptors widely studied in the nervous system, where they mediate migration and morphogenesis though the Rho family of small GTPases. More recently, plexins have been implicated in immune processes including cell-cell interaction, immune activation, migration, and cytokine production. Plexin-B2 facilitates ligand induced cell guidance and migration in the nervous system, and induces cytoskeletal changes in overexpression assays through RhoGTPase. The function of Plexin-B2 in the immune system is unknown. This report shows that Plexin-B2 is highly expressed on cells of the innate immune system in the mouse, including macrophages, conventional dendritic cells, and plasmacytoid dendritic cells. However, Plexin-B2 does not appear to regulate the production of proinflammatory cytokines, phagocytosis of a variety of targets, or directional migration towards chemoattractants or extracellular matrix in mouse macrophages. Instead, Plxnb2(-/-) macrophages have greater cellular motility than wild type in the unstimulated state that is accompanied by more active, GTP-bound Rac and Cdc42. Additionally, Plxnb2(-/-) macrophages demonstrate faster in vitro wound closure activity. Studies have shown that a closely related family member, Plexin-B1, binds to active Rac and sequesters it from downstream signaling. The interaction of Plexin-B2 with Rac has only been previously confirmed in yeast and bacterial overexpression assays. The data presented here show that Plexin-B2 functions in mouse macrophages as a negative regulator of the GTPases Rac and Cdc42 and as a negative regulator of basal cell motility and wound healing. PMID:21966369

  2. Regulation of valve endothelial cell vasculogenic network architectures with ROCK and Rac inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Arevalos, C. Alexander; Walborn, Amanda T.; Rupert, Amanda A.; Berg, Jonathan M.; Godfrey, Elizabeth L.; Nguyen, Jacqueline M.V.; Grande-Allen, K. Jane

    2016-01-01

    Objective The age- and disease-dependent presence of microvessels within heart valves is an understudied characteristic of these tissues. Neovascularization involves endothelial cell (EC) migration and cytoskeletal reorientation, which are heavily regulated by the Rho family of GTPases. Given that valve ECs demonstrate unique mesenchymal transdifferentiation and cytoskeletal mechanoresponsiveness, compared to vascular ECs, this study quantified the effect of inhibiting two members of the Rho family on vasculogenic network formation by valve ECs. Approach and results A tubule-like structure vasculogenesis assay (assessing lacunarity, junction density, and vessel density) was performed with porcine aortic valve ECs treated with small molecule inhibitors of Rho-associated serine-threonine protein kinase (ROCK), Y-27632, or the Rac1 inhibitor, NSC-23766. Actin coordination, cell number, and cell migration were assessed through immunocytochemistry, MTT assay, and scratch wound healing assay. ROCK inhibition reduced network lacunarity and interrupted proper cell–cell adhesion and actin coordination. Rac1 inhibition increased lacunarity and delayed actin-mediated network formation. ROCK inhibition alone significantly inhibited migration, whereas both ROCK and Rac1 inhibition significantly reduced cell number over time compared to controls. Compared to a vascular EC line, the valve ECs generated a network with larger total vessel length, but a less smooth appearance. Conclusions Both ROCK and Rac1 inhibition interfered with key processes in vascular network formation by valve ECs. This is the first report of manipulation of valve EC vasculogenic organization in response to small molecule inhibitors. Further study is warranted to comprehend this facet of valvular cell biology and pathology and how it differs from vascular biology. PMID:25660064

  3. 76 FR 24854 - Notice of a Meeting of the Northeast Oregon Forests Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ...Pursuant to the authorities in the Federal Advisory Committees Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Northeast Oregon Forest Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet on May 19, 2011 in John Day, Oregon. The purpose of the meeting is to meet as a Committee to discuss selection of Title II projects under Public Law 110-343, H.R. 1424, the Reauthorization of the Secure Rural Schools and community Self-......

  4. 75 FR 33241 - Notice of a Meeting of the Northeast Oregon Forests Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ...Pursuant to the authorities in the Federal Advisory Committees Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Northeast Oregon Forest Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet on June 22, 2010 in John Day, Oregon. The purpose of the meeting is to meet as a Committee to discuss selection of Title II projects under Public Law 110-343, H.R. 1424, the Reauthorization of the Secure Rural Schools and community Self-......

  5. Aggregations in Flatworms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liffen, C. L.; Hunter, M.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a school project to investigate aggregations in flatworms which may be influenced by light intensity, temperature, and some form of chemical stimulus released by already aggregating flatworms. Such investigations could be adopted to suit many educational levels of science laboratory activities. (DS)

  6. 26. Evening view of concrete mixing plant, concrete placement tower, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Evening view of concrete mixing plant, concrete placement tower, cableway tower, power line and derrick. Photographer unknown, 1927. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  7. Nodal signaling regulates endodermal cell motility and actin dynamics via Rac1 and Prex1

    PubMed Central

    Housley, Michael P.; Weiner, Orion D.

    2012-01-01

    Embryo morphogenesis is driven by dynamic cell behaviors, including migration, that are coordinated with fate specification and differentiation, but how such coordination is achieved remains poorly understood. During zebrafish gastrulation, endodermal cells sequentially exhibit first random, nonpersistent migration followed by oriented, persistent migration and finally collective migration. Using a novel transgenic line that labels the endodermal actin cytoskeleton, we found that these stage-dependent changes in migratory behavior correlated with changes in actin dynamics. The dynamic actin and random motility exhibited during early gastrulation were dependent on both Nodal and Rac1 signaling. We further identified the Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor Prex1 as a Nodal target and showed that it mediated Nodal-dependent random motility. Reducing Rac1 activity in endodermal cells caused them to bypass the random migration phase and aberrantly contribute to mesodermal tissues. Together, our results reveal a novel role for Nodal signaling in regulating actin dynamics and migration behavior, which are crucial for endodermal morphogenesis and cell fate decisions. PMID:22945937

  8. CDC-42 and RAC-1 regulate opposite chemotropisms in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Lichius, Alexander; Goryachev, Andrew B; Fricker, Mark D; Obara, Boguslaw; Castro-Longoria, Ernestina; Read, Nick D

    2014-05-01

    Cell polarization and fusion are crucial developmental processes that occur in response to intracellular and extracellular signals. Asexual spores (conidia) of the mold Neurospora crassa differentiate two types of polarized cell protrusions, germ tubes and conidial anastomosis tubes (CATs), which exhibit negative and positive chemotropism, respectively. We provide the first evidence that shared and separate functions of the Rho-type GTPases CDC-42 and RAC-1 regulate these opposite chemotropisms. We demonstrate that RAC-1 is essential for CAT formation and cell fusion, whereas CDC-42 is necessary and sufficient for normal germ tube development. Cdc42-Rac-interactive-binding (CRIB) reporters were constructed to exclusively label locally activated GTP-bound GTPases. Time course analyses showed that repositioning of these activated GTPase clusters within germ tube and CAT tip apices controls directional growth in the absence of a tip-localized vesicle supply center (Spitzenkörper). We propose a model in which the local assembly of a plasma-membrane-associated GTPase-PAK-MAPK signaling platform regulates chemoattractant perception and secretion in order to synchronize oscillatory cell-cell communication and directional CAT tip growth. PMID:24790223

  9. Regulation of hyphal morphogenesis by cdc42 and rac1 homologues in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Virag, Aleksandra; Lee, Maurice P; Si, Haoyu; Harris, Steven D

    2007-12-01

    The ability of filamentous fungi to form hyphae requires the establishment and maintenance of a stable polarity axis. Based on studies in yeasts and animals, the GTPases Cdc42 and Rac1 are presumed to play a central role in organizing the morphogenetic machinery to enable axis formation and stabilization. Here, we report that Cdc42 (ModA) and Rac1 (RacA) share an overlapping function required for polarity establishment in Aspergillus nidulans. Nevertheless, Cdc42 appears to have a more important role in hyphal morphogenesis in that it alone is required for the timely formation of lateral branches. In addition, we provide genetic evidence suggesting that the polarisome components SepA and SpaA function downstream of Cdc42 in a pathway that may regulate microfilament formation. Finally, we show that microtubules become essential for the establishment of hyphal polarity when the function of either Cdc42 or SepA is compromised. Our results are consistent with the action of parallel Cdc42 and microtubule-based pathways in regulating the formation of a stable axis of hyphal polarity in A. nidulans. PMID:18005099

  10. MT1-MMP is required for myeloid cell fusion via regulation of Rac1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalo, Pilar; Guadamillas, Marta C.; Hernández-Riquer, Mª Victoria; Pollán, Ángela; Grande-García, Araceli; Bartolomé, Rubén A.; Vasanji, Amit; Ambrogio, Chiara; Chiarle, Roberto; Teixidó, Joaquín; Risteli, Juha; Apte, Suneel S.; del Pozo, Miguel A.; Arroyo, Alicia G.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Cell fusion is essential for fertilization, myotube formation, and inflammation. Macrophages fuse in various circumstances but the molecular signals involved in the distinct steps of their fusion are not fully characterized. Using null mice and derived cells, we show that the protease MT1-MMP is necessary for macrophage fusion during osteoclast and giant cell formation in vitro and in vivo. Specifically, MT1-MMP is required for lamellipodia formation and for proper cell morphology and motility of bone marrow myeloid progenitors prior to membrane fusion. These functions of MT1-MMP do not depend on MT1-MMP catalytic activity or downstream pro-MMP-2 activation. Instead, MT1-MMP-null cells show a decreased Rac1 activity and reduced membrane targeting of Rac1 and the adaptor protein p130Cas. Retroviral rescue experiments and protein binding assays delineate a signaling pathway in which MT1-MMP, via its cytosolic tail, contributes to macrophage migration and fusion by regulating Rac1 activity through an association with p130Cas. PMID:20152179

  11. Computer simulation of fracture processes of concrete using mesolevel models of lattice structures

    SciTech Connect

    Leite, J.P.B.; Slowik, V.; Mihashi, H

    2004-06-01

    Mesolevel simulations were used to describe fracture processes in concrete. A new stochastic-heuristic algorithm was developed for generating the composite structure of concrete in 3-D space, producing specimens with comparably high aggregate content and realistic distribution. Aggregate particles were described as ellipsoids, allowing control in shape and size distributions. The continuum was discretised into lattices of linear elements, in structural analyses. For 2-D analyses, slices from the 3-D specimen were idealised as planar trusses/frames, while for the 3-D analyses the specimens were idealised as space structures. Fibre-reinforced concrete (FRC) was also modelled by introducing additional linear elements interconnecting distant nodes of the lattice. Compression, direct tension and wedge-splitting tests were simulated. Parametrical study was carried out to investigate the effect of different material properties and proportions in concrete admixtures. Simulation results are in agreement with experimental observations. Applicability and enhancements for such models are discussed and future research directions are proposed.

  12. Effect of Silica Fume on two-stage Concrete Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelgader, H. S.; El-Baden, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    Two-stage concrete (TSC) is an innovative concrete that does not require vibration for placing and compaction. TSC is a simple concept; it is made using the same basic constituents as traditional concrete: cement, coarse aggregate, sand and water as well as mineral and chemical admixtures. As its name suggests, it is produced through a two-stage process. Firstly washed coarse aggregate is placed into the formwork in-situ. Later a specifically designed self compacting grout is introduced into the form from the lowest point under gravity pressure to fill the voids, cementing the aggregate into a monolith. The hardened concrete is dense, homogeneous and has in general improved engineering properties and durability. This paper presents the results from a research work attempt to study the effect of silica fume (SF) and superplasticizers admixtures (SP) on compressive and tensile strength of TSC using various combinations of water to cement ratio (w/c) and cement to sand ratio (c/s). Thirty six concrete mixes with different grout constituents were tested. From each mix twenty four standard cylinder samples of size (150mm×300mm) of concrete containing crushed aggregate were produced. The tested samples were made from combinations of w/c equal to: 0.45, 0.55 and 0.85, and three c/s of values: 0.5, 1 and 1.5. Silica fume was added at a dosage of 6% of weight of cement, while superplasticizer was added at a dosage of 2% of cement weight. Results indicated that both tensile and compressive strength of TSC can be statistically derived as a function of w/c and c/s with good correlation coefficients. The basic principle of traditional concrete, which says that an increase in water/cement ratio will lead to a reduction in compressive strength, was shown to hold true for TSC specimens tested. Using a combination of both silica fume and superplasticisers caused a significant increase in strength relative to control mixes.

  13. Smart aggregate based damage detection of circular RC columns under cyclic combined loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moslehy, Yashar; Gu, Haichang; Belarbi, Abdeldjelil; Mo, Y. L.; Song, Gangbing

    2010-06-01

    Structural health monitoring is an important issue for the maintenance of large-scale civil infrastructures, especially for bridge columns. In this paper, an innovative piezoceramic-based approach is developed for the structural health monitoring of reinforced concrete columns. An innovative piezoceramic-based device, the smart aggregate, is utilized as a transducer for the purpose of health monitoring. To investigate the seismic behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) bridge columns, structural health monitoring tests were performed on two bridge columns under combined reversed cyclic loading at the Missouri University of Science and Technology. The proposed smart aggregate based approach successfully evaluated the health status of concrete columns during the loading procedure. Sensor energy plots and 3D normalized sensor energy plots demonstrated that the damage inside attenuated the transmitted energy. The wavelet packet based damage index and sensor history damage index evaluate the damage development in concrete columns under cyclic loading.

  14. Electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Lomasney, H.

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has assigned a priority to the advancement of technology for decontaminating concrete surfaces which have become contaminated with radionuclides, heavy metals, and toxic organics. This agency is responsible for decontamination and decommissioning of thousands of buildings. Electrokinetic extraction is one of the several innovative technologies which emerged in response to this initiative. This technique utilizes an electropotential gradient and the subsequent electrical transport mechanism to cause the controlled movement of ionics species, whereby the contaminants exit the recesses deep within the concrete. This report discusses the technology and use at the Oak Ridge k-25 plant.

  15. Reinforced concrete offshore platform

    SciTech Connect

    Martyshenko, J.P.; Martyshenko, S.J.; Kotelnikov, J.S.; Kutukhtin, E.G.; Petrosian, M.S.; Ilyasova, N.I.; Volkov, J.S.; Vardanian, A.M.

    1987-10-20

    A reinforced concrete offshore platform is described comprising a honeycomb foundation (A), a supporting structure (B) and an above-surface section (C) carrying appropriate equipment. The honeycomb foundation (A) and the supporting structure (B) are made of prefabricated reinforced concrete elements which are polyhedral hollow prisms arranged with gaps between the external sides thereof and joined by a system of prestressed vertical diaphragm walls and horizontal diaphragm walls formed by pre-tensioning reinforcing bars placed in the gaps between the faces of the prisms and casting in-situ the gaps later on.

  16. Advance Organizers: Concret Versus Abstract.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corkill, Alice J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Two experiments examined the relative effects of concrete and abstract advance organizers on students' memory for subsequent prose. Results of the experiments are discussed in terms of the memorability, familiarity, and visualizability of concrete and abstract verbal materials. (JD)

  17. Testing of action of direct flame on concrete.

    PubMed

    Bodnarova, Lenka; Valek, Jaroslav; Novosad, Petr

    2015-01-01

    The paper states results of experimental exposition of concrete test specimens to direct flame. Concrete test specimens made from various mixtures differing in the type of aggregate, binder, dispersed reinforcement, and technological procedure were subjected to thermal load. Physicomechanical and other properties of all test specimens were tested before exposition to open flame: density, compressive strength, flexural strength, moisture content, and surface appearance. The specimens were visually observed during exposition to open flame and changes were recorded. Exposed surface was photographically documented before thermal load and at 10-minute intervals. Development of temperature of the specimens was documented with a thermocamera. After exposition to thermal load and cooling down, concrete specimens were visually observed, network of cracks was photographically documented, and maximal depth of spalled area was measured. PMID:25830162

  18. Testing of Action of Direct Flame on Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Valek, Jaroslav; Novosad, Petr

    2015-01-01

    The paper states results of experimental exposition of concrete test specimens to direct flame. Concrete test specimens made from various mixtures differing in the type of aggregate, binder, dispersed reinforcement, and technological procedure were subjected to thermal load. Physicomechanical and other properties of all test specimens were tested before exposition to open flame: density, compressive strength, flexural strength, moisture content, and surface appearance. The specimens were visually observed during exposition to open flame and changes were recorded. Exposed surface was photographically documented before thermal load and at 10-minute intervals. Development of temperature of the specimens was documented with a thermocamera. After exposition to thermal load and cooling down, concrete specimens were visually observed, network of cracks was photographically documented, and maximal depth of spalled area was measured. PMID:25830162

  19. Crack detection and leakage monitoring on reinforced concrete pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qian; Kong, Qingzhao; Huo, Linsheng; Song, Gangbing

    2015-11-01

    Reinforced concrete underground pipelines are some of the most widely used types of structures in water transportation systems. Cracks and leakage are the leading causes of pipeline structural failures which directly results in economic losses and environmental hazards. In this paper, the authors propose a piezoceramic based active sensing approach to detect the cracks and the further leakage of concrete pipelines. Due to the piezoelectric properties, piezoceramic material can be utilized as both the actuator and the sensor in the active sensing approach. The piezoceramic patch, which is sandwiched between protective materials called ‘smart aggregates,’ can be safely embedded into concrete structures. Circumferential and axial cracks were investigated. A wavelet packet-based energy analysis was developed to distinguish the type of crack and determine the further leakage based on different stress wave energy attenuation propagated through the cracks.

  20. Production of manufactured aggregates from flue gas desulfurization by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, M.M.; McCoy, D.C.; Fenger, M.L.; Scandrol, R.O.; Winschel, R.A.; Withum, J.A.; Statnick, R.M.

    1999-07-01

    CONSOL R and D has developed a disk pelletization process to produce manufactured aggregates from the by-products of various technologies designed to reduce sulfur emissions produced from coal utilization. Aggregates have been produced from the by-products of the Coolside and LIMB sorbent injection, the fluidized-bed combustion (FBC), spray dryer absorption (SDA), and lime and limestone wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes. The aggregates produced meet the general specifications for use as road aggregate in road construction and for use as lightweight aggregate in concrete masonry units. Small field demonstrations with 1200 lb to 5000 lb of manufactured aggregates were conducted using aggregates produced from FBC ash and lime wet FGD sludge in road construction and using aggregates made from SDA ash and lime wet FGD sludge to manufacture concrete blocks. The aggregates for this work were produced with a bench-scale (200--400 lb batch) unit. In 1999, CONSOL R and D constructed and operated a 500 lb/hr integrated, continuous pilot plant. A variety of aggregate products were produced from lime wet FGD sludge. The pilot plant test successfully demonstrated the continuous, integrated operation of the process. The pilot plant demonstration was a major step toward commercialization of manufactured aggregate production from FGD by-products. In this paper, progress made in the production of aggregates from dry FGD (Coolside, LIMB, SDA) and FBC by-products, and lime wet FGD sludge is discussed. The discussion covers bench-scale and pilot plant aggregate production and aggregate field demonstrations.