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Sample records for aggregate culture system

  1. Brain Aggregates: An Effective In Vitro Cell Culture System Modeling Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kalume, Franck; Pitstick, Rose; Oehler, Abby; Carlson, George; DeArmond, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Drug discovery for neurodegenerative diseases is particularly challenging because of the discrepancies in drug effects between in vitro and in vivo studies. These discrepancies occur in part because current cell culture systems used for drug screening have many limitations. First, few cell culture systems accurately model human aging or neurodegenerative diseases. Second, drug efficacy may differ between dividing and stationary cells, the latter resembling nondividing neurons in the CNS. Brain aggregates (BrnAggs) derived from embryonic day 15 gestation mouse embryos may represent neuropathogenic processes in prion disease and reflect in vivo drug efficacy. Here, we report a new method for the production of BrnAggs suitable for drug screening and suggest that BrnAggs can model additional neurological diseases such as tauopathies. We also report a functional assay with BrnAggs by measuring electrophysiological activities. Our data suggest that BrnAggs could serve as an effective in vitro cell culture system for drug discovery for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26851378

  2. Scaling up a chemically-defined aggregate-based suspension culture system for neural commitment of human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Cláudia C; Fernandes, Tiago G; Diogo, M Margarida; Cabral, Joaquim M S

    2016-12-01

    The demand of high cell numbers for applications in cellular therapies and drug screening requires the development of scalable platforms capable to generating highly pure populations of tissue-specific cells from human pluripotent stem cells. In this work, we describe the scaling-up of an aggregate-based culture system for neural induction of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) under chemically-defined conditions. A combination of non-enzymatic dissociation and rotary agitation was successfully used to produce homogeneous populations of hiPSC aggregates with an optimal (140 μm) and narrow distribution of diameters (coefficient of variation of 21.6%). Scalable neural commitment of hiPSCs as 3D aggregates was performed in 50 mL spinner flasks, and the process was optimized using a factorial design approach, involving parameters such as agitation rate and seeding density. We were able to produce neural progenitor cell cultures, that at the end of a 6-day neural induction process contained less than 3% of Oct4-positive cells and that, after replating, retained more than 60% of Pax6-positive neural cells. The results here presented should set the stage for the future generation of a clinically relevant number of human neural progenitors for transplantation and other biomedical applications using controlled, automated and reproducible large-scale bioreactor culture systems.

  3. Characterization of Aggregate Size in Taxus Suspension Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Kolewe, Martin E.; Henson, Michael A.; Roberts, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells grow as aggregates in suspension culture, but little is known about the dynamics of aggregation, and no routine methodology exists to measure aggregate size. In this study, we evaluate several different methods to characterize aggregate size in Taxus suspension cultures, in which aggregate diameters range from 50 μm to 2000 μm, including filtration and image analysis, and develop a novel method using a specially equipped Coulter counter system. We demonstrate the suitability of this technology to measure plant cell culture aggregates, and show that it can be reliably used to measure total biomass accumulation compared to standard methods such as dry weight. Furthermore, we demonstrate that all three methods can be used to measure an aggregate size distribution, but that the Coulter counter is more reliable and much faster, and also provides far better resolution. While absolute measurements of aggregate size differ based on the three evaluation techniques, we show that linear correlations are sufficient to account for these differences (R2 > 0.99). We then demonstrate the utility of the novel Coulter counter methodology by monitoring the dynamics of a batch process and find that the mean aggregate size increases by 55% during the exponential growth phase, but decreases during stationary phase. The results indicate that the Coulter counter method can be routinely used for advanced process characterization, particularly to study the relationship between aggregate size and secondary metabolite production, as well as a source of reliable experimental data for modeling aggregation dynamics in plant cell culture. PMID:20217417

  4. Culture temperature modulates aggregation of recombinant antibody in cho cells.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Natalia; Subramanian, Jayashree; Ouyang, Jun; Nguyen, Mary D H; Hutchinson, Matthew; Sharma, Vikas K; Lin, Andy A; Yuk, Inn H

    2012-01-01

    During production of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAb), it is highly desirable to remove and control antibody aggregates in the manufacturing process to minimize the potential risk of immunogenicity to patients. During process development for the production of a recombinant IgG in a CHO cell line, we observed atypical high variability from 1 to 20% mAb aggregates formed during cell culture that negatively impacted antibody purification. Analytical characterization revealed the IgG aggregates were mediated by hydrophobic interactions likely caused by misfolded antibody during intracellular processing. Strikingly, data analysis showed an inverse correlation of lower cell culture temperature producing higher aggregate levels. All cultures at 37°C exhibited ≤ 5% aggregates at harvest. Aggregate levels increased 4-12-fold in 33°C cultures when compared to 37°C, with a corresponding 2-4-fold increase in heavy chain (HC) and light chain (LC) mRNA. Additionally, 37°C cases showed a greater excess of LC to HC mRNA levels. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone expression and ER size also increased 25-75% at 33°C versus 37°C but to a lesser extent than LC and HC mRNA, consistent with a potential limiting ER folding capacity at 33°C for this cell line. Finally, we identified a 2-5-fold increase in mAb aggregate formation at 33°C compared to 37°C cultures for three additional CHO cell lines. Taken together, our observations indicate that low culture temperature can increase antibody aggregate formation in CHO cells by increasing LC and HC transcripts coupled with limited ER machinery.

  5. Monitoring aggregate formation in organotypic slice cultures from transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Smith, Donna L; Bates, Gillian P

    2004-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the first exon of the HD gene. It encodes a protein known as huntingtin, which aggregates in the nuclei of affected neurons. These aggregates are an obvious therapeutic target, thus an organotypic slice culture assay has been designed to screen potential antiaggregation compounds using the R6/2 mouse model of HD. This assay allows the aggregates to be fully quantified using fluorescent confocal microscopy and gives additional information perturbing to drug solubility, delivery, toxicity, concentration, and efficacy of inhibitors. This information is essential to the planning and application of an in vivo drug trial in the R6/2 mice.

  6. Cultural Consensus Theory: Aggregating Continuous Responses in a Finite Interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelder, William H.; Strashny, Alex; Romney, A. Kimball

    Cultural consensus theory (CCT) consists of cognitive models for aggregating responses of "informants" to test items about some domain of their shared cultural knowledge. This paper develops a CCT model for items requiring bounded numerical responses, e.g. probability estimates, confidence judgments, or similarity judgments. The model assumes that each item generates a latent random representation in each informant, with mean equal to the consensus answer and variance depending jointly on the informant and the location of the consensus answer. The manifest responses may reflect biases of the informants. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods were used to estimate the model, and simulation studies validated the approach. The model was applied to an existing cross-cultural dataset involving native Japanese and English speakers judging the similarity of emotion terms. The results sharpened earlier studies that showed that both cultures appear to have very similar cognitive representations of emotion terms.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 preferentially grows as aggregates in liquid batch cultures and disperses upon starvation.

    PubMed

    Schleheck, David; Barraud, Nicolas; Klebensberger, Janosch; Webb, Jeremy S; McDougald, Diane; Rice, Scott A; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2009-01-01

    In both natural and artificial environments, bacteria predominantly grow in biofilms, and bacteria often disperse from biofilms as freely suspended single-cells. In the present study, the formation and dispersal of planktonic cellular aggregates, or 'suspended biofilms', by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in liquid batch cultures were closely examined, and compared to biofilm formation on a matrix of polyester (PE) fibers as solid surface in batch cultures. Plankton samples were analyzed by laser-diffraction particle-size scanning (LDA) and microscopy of aggregates. Interestingly, LDA indicated that up to 90% of the total planktonic biomass consisted of cellular aggregates in the size range of 10-400 microm in diameter during the growth phase, as opposed to individual cells. In cultures with PE surfaces, P. aeruginosa preferred to grow in biofilms, as opposed to planktonicly. However, upon carbon, nitrogen or oxygen limitation, the planktonic aggregates and PE-attached biofilms dispersed into single cells, resulting in an increase in optical density (OD) independent of cellular growth. During growth, planktonic aggregates and PE-attached biofilms contained densely packed viable cells and extracellular DNA (eDNA), and starvation resulted in a loss of viable cells, and an increase in dead cells and eDNA. Furthermore, a release of metabolites and infective bacteriophage into the culture supernatant, and a marked decrease in intracellular concentration of the second messenger cyclic di-GMP, was observed in dispersing cultures. Thus, what traditionally has been described as planktonic, individual cell cultures of P. aeruginosa, are in fact suspended biofilms, and such aggregates have behaviors and responses (e.g. dispersal) similar to surface associated biofilms. In addition, we suggest that this planktonic biofilm model system can provide the basis for a detailed analysis of the synchronized biofilm life cycle of P. aeruginosa.

  8. The Effect of Underwater Blast on Aggregating Brain Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Thomas W; Lee, Julian J; Villanueva, Mercy; Wang, Yushan; Nelson, Peggy; Song, Yanfeng; Fan, Chengyang; Barnes, Julia; McLaws, Lori

    2017-01-15

    Although the deleterious effects of primary blast on gas-filled organs are well accepted, the effect of blast-induced shock waves on the brain is less clear because of factors that complicate the interpretation of clinical and experimental data. Brain cell aggregate cultures are comprised of multiple differentiated brain cell types and were used to examine the effects of underwater blast. Suspensions of these cultures encased in dialysis tubing were exposed to explosive-generated underwater blasts of low (∼300 kPa), medium (∼2,700 kPa), or high (∼14,000 kPa) intensities and harvested at 1-28 days post-exposure. No changes in gross morphology were noted immediately or weeks after blast wave exposure, and no increases in either apoptotic (caspase-3) or necrotic (lactate dehydrogenase) cell death were observed. Changes in neuronal (neurofilament H, acetylcholinesterase, and choline acetyltransferase) and glial (glial fibrillary acidic protein, glutamine synthetase) endpoints did not occur. However, significant time- and pressure-related increases in Akt (protein kinase B) phosphorylation were noted, as well as declines in vascular endothelial growth factor levels, implicating pathways involved in cellular survival mechanisms. The free-floating nature of the aggregates during blast wave exposure, coupled with their highly hydrolyzed dialysis tubing containment, results in minimized boundary effects, thus enabling accurate assessment of brain cell response to a simplified shock-induced stress wave. This work shows that, at its simplest, blast-induced shock waves produce subtle changes in brain tissue. This study has mechanistic implications for the study of primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury and supports the thesis that underwater blast may cause subtle changes in the brains of submerged individuals.

  9. Expansion of undifferentiated murine embryonic stem cells as aggregates in suspension culture bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Cormier, Jaymi T; zur Nieden, Nicole I; Rancourt, Derrick E; Kallos, Michael S

    2006-11-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have recently been considered as a primary material for regenerating tissues lost to injuries and degenerative diseases. For clinical implementation of this technology, a quality controlled, reproducible culture system is necessary for the expansion and differentiation of the cells. Used in many bioprocess applications, suspension bioreactors have gained considerable attention for the regulated large-scale expansion of cells. The current study presents a bioreactor process for the large-scale expansion of undifferentiated murine ESCs as aggregates. In this system, the level of ESC aggregation and differentiation was effectively controlled by adjusting shear forces and inoculation density, achieving a 31-fold expansion in 5 days. Pluripotency markers Oct-4, Nanog, SSEA-1, ALP, and rex-1 were assessed using flow cytometry analysis and gene expression profiles and showed that the undifferentiated nature of the cells within the ESC aggregates was maintained. Colony-forming efficiencies and embryoid body formation tests of the expanded cultures demonstrated that characteristic functional attributes of undifferentiated cells were not lost. Overcoming a major impediment in the area of ESC expansion, this study describes a successful process for the controlled and reproducible largescale expansion of ESCs using suspension culture bioreactors.

  10. Fractal Aggregates in Tennis Ball Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabin, J.; Bandin, M.; Prieto, G.; Sarmiento, F.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new practical exercise to explain the mechanisms of aggregation of some colloids which are otherwise not easy to understand. We have used tennis balls to simulate, in a visual way, the aggregation of colloids under reaction-limited colloid aggregation (RLCA) and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation (DLCA) regimes. We have used the…

  11. Small file aggregation in a parallel computing system

    DOEpatents

    Faibish, Sorin; Bent, John M.; Tzelnic, Percy; Grider, Gary; Zhang, Jingwang

    2014-09-02

    Techniques are provided for small file aggregation in a parallel computing system. An exemplary method for storing a plurality of files generated by a plurality of processes in a parallel computing system comprises aggregating the plurality of files into a single aggregated file; and generating metadata for the single aggregated file. The metadata comprises an offset and a length of each of the plurality of files in the single aggregated file. The metadata can be used to unpack one or more of the files from the single aggregated file.

  12. 21 CFR 864.5700 - Automated platelet aggregation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... addition of an aggregating reagent to a platelet-rich plasma. (b) Classification. Class II (performance... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Automated platelet aggregation system. 864.5700... § 864.5700 Automated platelet aggregation system. (a) Identification. An automated platelet...

  13. 21 CFR 864.5700 - Automated platelet aggregation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... addition of an aggregating reagent to a platelet-rich plasma. (b) Classification. Class II (performance... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated platelet aggregation system. 864.5700... § 864.5700 Automated platelet aggregation system. (a) Identification. An automated platelet...

  14. Influence of dispersing additive on asphaltenes aggregation in model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshkov, A. M.; Shishmina, L. V.; Tukhvatullina, A. Z.; Ismailov, Yu R.; Ges, G. A.

    2016-09-01

    The work is devoted to investigation of the dispersing additive influence on asphaltenes aggregation in the asphaltenes-toluene-heptane model system by photon correlation spectroscopy method. The experimental relationship between the onset point of asphaltenes and their concentration in toluene has been obtained. The influence of model system composition on asphaltenes aggregation has been researched. The estimation of aggregative and sedimentation stability of asphaltenes in model system and system with addition of dispersing additive has been given.

  15. A microwell cell culture platform for the aggregation of pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Abigail B; Lin, Chien-Chi; Anseth, Kristi S

    2012-08-01

    Cell-cell contact between pancreatic β-cells is important for maintaining survival and normal insulin secretion. Various techniques have been developed to promote cell-cell contact between β-cells, but a simple yet robust method that affords precise control over three-dimensional (3D) β-cell cluster size has not been demonstrated. To address this need, we developed a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel microwell platform using photolithography. This microwell cell-culture platform promotes the formation of 3D β-cell aggregates of defined sizes from 25 to 210 μm in diameter. Using this platform, mouse insulinoma 6 (MIN6) β-cells formed aggregates with cell-cell adherin junctions. These naturally formed cell aggregates with controllable sizes can be removed from the microwells for macroencapsulation, implantation, or other biological assays. When removed and subsequently encapsulated in PEG hydrogels, the aggregated cell clusters demonstrated improved cellular viability (>90%) over 7 days in culture, while the β-cells encapsulated as single cells maintained only 20% viability. Aggregated MIN6 cells also exhibited more than fourfold higher insulin secretion in response to a glucose challenge compared with encapsulated single β-cells. Further, the cell aggregates stained positively for E-cadherin, indicative of the formation of cell junctions. Using this hydrogel microwell cell-culture method, viable and functional β-cell aggregates of specific sizes were created, providing a platform from which other biologically relevant questions may be answered.

  16. Cultural Heritage Content Re-Use: An Aggregators's Point of View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilis, D.; Ioannides, M.; Theofanous, E.

    2015-08-01

    This paper introduces a use case of re-using aggregated and enriched metadata for the tourism creative industry. The MORe aggregation and enrichment framework is presented along with an example for enriching cultural heritage objects harvested from a number of Omeka repositories. The enriched content is then published both to the EU Digital Library Europeana (http://www.europeana.eu) and to an Elastic Search component that feeds a portal aimed at providing tourists with interesting information.

  17. Simplification of aggregate culture of human mesenchymal stem cells as a chondrogenic screening assay.

    PubMed

    Welter, Jean F; Solchaga, Luis A; Penick, Kitsie J

    2007-06-01

    Aggregate culture provides a three-dimensional (3-D) environment for differentiating or differentiated cells; it is particularly useful to study in vitro chondrogenesis and cartilage biology. We have recently ported this method from a conical tube-based format to a 96-well plate format for the study of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis. The microplate format has greatly reduced the workload and materials cost, while maintaining reproducible chondrogenic differentiation. A long-term goal is to fully automate aggregate culture--this requires critically identifying all the indispensable steps of the protocol. Robotic laboratory equipment for manipulating microplate assays are commercially available; however centrifugation steps are difficult to implement automatically. We, therefore, tested whether the centrifugation step can be eliminated, thus significantly streamlining the assay workflow. By comparing aggregates prepared from human bone marrow-derived MSCs (hMSCs) that were formed either through centrifugation or through free sedimentation, we found that both methods produce aggregates with similar formation kinetics, and that there was no perceptible difference in the timing of the appearance of markers of chondrogenesis. Thus, it appears safe to eliminate the centrifugation step from the aggregate culture protocol. This results in significant time and effort savings and paves the way for future full automation of the aggregate assay.

  18. Anaerobic thermophilic culture system

    DOEpatents

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Wiegel, Jurgen K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A mixed culture system of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC31550 and the microorganism Clostridium thermocellum ATCC31549 is described. In a mixed nutrient culture medium that contains cellulose, these microorganisms have been coupled and cultivated to efficiently ferment cellulose to produce recoverable quantities of ethanol under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions.

  19. Characterization Techniques for Aggregated Nanomaterials in Biological and Environmental Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Seongho

    Nanoparticles, which are defined as objects with characteristic lengths in the 10--9 -- 10--7 m (nanoscale) size range, are used with increasing frequency in a wide of applications, leading to increases in nanomaterial interactions with biological and environmental systems. There is therefore considerable interest in studying the influence nanomaterials can have when inside the human body or dispersed in the ambient environment. However, nanoparticles persist as homo aggregates or heterogeneous mixtures with organic matters, such as proteins, in biological and environmental systems. A large and growing body of research confirm that nanomaterial morphology as well as the degree of aggregation between nanomaterials influences nanomaterial interactions with their surroundings. Specifically, the structures/morphologies of nanoparticles determine their overall surface areas and corresponding surface reactivity (e.g. their catalytic activity). Nanoparticle transport properties (e.g. diffusion coefficient and extent of cellular uptake) are also determined by both their structures and surface properties. Unfortunately, techniques to characterize nanomaterial size and shape quantitatively, when nanomaterials have complex geometries or persist as aggregates, are lacking. Hydrodynamic sizes of nanoparticles and their aggregates can be inferred by dynamic light scattering (DLS) or nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA). However, since these techniques are relied on the scattering light intensity properties, sizes of polydisperse sub 30 nm particles cannot be effectively measured in those techniques. For structure inference of aggregated nanomaterials, microscopy images have been used for qualitative visual analysis, but the quantitative morphology analysis technique is yet to be developed. Five studies in this dissertation are hence aimed to develop new techniques to provide improved morphology characterization of aggregated nanomaterials in various biological and environmental

  20. Organic Aggregation of Knowledge Objects in Educational Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paquette, Gilbert; Rosca, Ioan

    2002-01-01

    Proposes an organic approach to educational Web-based systems where learning objects (educational resources), operations on these objects, and actors that perform them are aggregated in meaningful ways. Proposes to reference models of learning systems with educational ontologies developed for instructional engineering and provides examples in the…

  1. Reduced receptor aggregation and altered cytoskeleton in cultured myocytes after space-flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruener, R.; Roberts, R.; Reitstetter, R.

    1994-01-01

    We carried out parallel experiments first on the slow clinostat and then in space-flight to examine the effects of altered gravity on the aggregation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and the structure of the cytoskeleton in cultured Xenopus embryonic muscle cells. By examining the concordance between results from space flight and the clinostat, we tested whether the slow clinostat is a relevant simulation paradigm. Space-flown cells showed marked changes in the distribution and organization of actin filaments and had a reduced incidence of acetylcholine receptor aggregates at the site of contact with polystyrene beads. Similar effects were found after clinostat rotation. The sensitivity of synaptic receptor aggregation and cytoskeletal morphology suggests that in the microgravity of space cell behavior may be importantly altered.

  2. Culture systems: air quality.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Theodore

    2012-01-01

    Poor laboratory air quality is a known hazard to the culture of human gametes and embryos. Embryologists and chemists have employed analytical methods for identifying and measuring bulk and select air pollutants to assess the risk they pose to the embryo culture system. However, contaminant concentrations that result in gamete or embryotoxicity are poorly defined. Combating the ill effects of poor air quality requires an understanding of how toxicants can infiltrate the laboratory, the incubator, and ultimately the culture media. A further understanding of site-specific air quality can then lead to the consideration of laboratory design and management strategies that can minimize the deleterious effects that air contamination may have on early embryonic development in vitro.

  3. Information Fusion and Aggregation for Cooperative Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-29

    34 International Journal of General Systems 36, 251-262, 2007. • Yager, R. R., " OWA trees and their role in security modeling using attack trees," Information...Symposium on Evolving Fuzzy Systems, 3-7, 2006. Publications to Appear • Yager, R. R., "Centered OWA operators," Soft Computing Journal, (To Appear...34 International Journal of Approximate Reasoning, (To Appear). • Yager, R. R., "Using stress functions to obtain OWA operators," IEEE Transactions on Fuzzy

  4. 21 CFR 864.5700 - Automated platelet aggregation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Automated platelet aggregation system. 864.5700 Section 864.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology...

  5. 21 CFR 864.5700 - Automated platelet aggregation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Automated platelet aggregation system. 864.5700 Section 864.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology...

  6. 21 CFR 864.5700 - Automated platelet aggregation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Automated platelet aggregation system. 864.5700 Section 864.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology...

  7. A Method of Data Aggregation for Wearable Sensor Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bo; Fu, Jun-Song

    2016-01-01

    Data aggregation has been considered as an effective way to decrease the data to be transferred in sensor networks. Particularly for wearable sensor systems, smaller battery has less energy, which makes energy conservation in data transmission more important. Nevertheless, wearable sensor systems usually have features like frequently dynamic changes of topologies and data over a large range, of which current aggregating methods can’t adapt to the demand. In this paper, we study the system composed of many wearable devices with sensors, such as the network of a tactical unit, and introduce an energy consumption-balanced method of data aggregation, named LDA-RT. In the proposed method, we develop a query algorithm based on the idea of ‘happened-before’ to construct a dynamic and energy-balancing routing tree. We also present a distributed data aggregating and sorting algorithm to execute top-k query and decrease the data that must be transferred among wearable devices. Combining these algorithms, LDA-RT tries to balance the energy consumptions for prolonging the lifetime of wearable sensor systems. Results of evaluation indicate that LDA-RT performs well in constructing routing trees and energy balances. It also outperforms the filter-based top-k monitoring approach in energy consumption, load balance, and the network’s lifetime, especially for highly dynamic data sources. PMID:27347953

  8. A Method of Data Aggregation for Wearable Sensor Systems.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bo; Fu, Jun-Song

    2016-06-23

    Data aggregation has been considered as an effective way to decrease the data to be transferred in sensor networks. Particularly for wearable sensor systems, smaller battery has less energy, which makes energy conservation in data transmission more important. Nevertheless, wearable sensor systems usually have features like frequently dynamic changes of topologies and data over a large range, of which current aggregating methods can't adapt to the demand. In this paper, we study the system composed of many wearable devices with sensors, such as the network of a tactical unit, and introduce an energy consumption-balanced method of data aggregation, named LDA-RT. In the proposed method, we develop a query algorithm based on the idea of 'happened-before' to construct a dynamic and energy-balancing routing tree. We also present a distributed data aggregating and sorting algorithm to execute top-k query and decrease the data that must be transferred among wearable devices. Combining these algorithms, LDA-RT tries to balance the energy consumptions for prolonging the lifetime of wearable sensor systems. Results of evaluation indicate that LDA-RT performs well in constructing routing trees and energy balances. It also outperforms the filter-based top-k monitoring approach in energy consumption, load balance, and the network's lifetime, especially for highly dynamic data sources.

  9. Manuals of Cultural Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballonoff, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Ethnography often studies social networks including empirical descriptions of marriages and families. We initially concentrate on a special subset of networks which we call configurations. We show that descriptions of the possible outcomes of viable histories form a manual, and an orthoalgebra. We then study cases where family sizes vary, and show that this also forms a manual. In fact, it demonstrates adiabatic invariance, a property often associated with physical system conservation laws, and which here expresses conservation of the viability of a cultural system.

  10. Serum replacement with albumin-associated lipids prevents excess aggregation and enhances growth of induced pluripotent stem cells in suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Ikki; Sakai, Yasuyuki

    2016-07-08

    Suspension culture systems are currently under investigation for the mass production of pluripotent stem (PS) cells for tissue engineering; however, the control of cell aggregation in suspension culture remains challenging. Existing methods to control aggregation such as microwell culture are difficult to scale up. To address this issue, in this study a novel method that incorporates the addition of KnockOut Serum Replacement (KSR) to the PS cell culture medium was described. The method regulated cellular aggregation and significantly improved cell growth (a 2- to 10-fold increase) without any influence on pluripotency. In addition, albumin-associated lipids as the major working ingredient of KSR responsible for this inhibition of aggregation were identified. This is one of the simplest methods described to date to control aggregation and requires only chemically synthesizable reagents. Thus, this method has the potential to simplify the mass production process of PS cells and thus lower their cost. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1009-1016, 2016.

  11. Effect of aggregate size in cell cultures of Saussurea medusa on cell growth and jaceosidin production.

    PubMed

    Zhao, D; Huang, Y; Jin, Z; Qu, W; Lu, D

    2003-07-01

    Cell suspension cultures of Saussurea medusa were grown in shake flasks and a 5-l stirred tank bioreactor. Biomass and jaceosidin distribution in cell aggregates of different sizes were investigated during the cultivation period. The results showed that on day 10, jaceosidin accumulation showed an increase with increasing size of the cell aggregate to 4 mm in diameter, with the highest jaceosidin accumulation being 12.2 mg/g. An inverse tendency was observed with cell aggregates larger than 4 mm in diameter, with the lowest accumulation being 3.1 mg/g. However, all of the cell aggregates, despite their size, synthesized almost the same amount of jaceosidin at day 12. Oxygen diffusion limitation and cell-cell contact may explain this behavior. In comparison with cells cultivated in shake flasks, decreased biomass and decreased jaceosidin concentration were observed when the cells were cultivated in a stirred tank bioreactor. The sublytic effects caused by the hydrodynamic stress in combination with insufficient nutrients in the bioreactor may cause cell damage.

  12. The in vitro biokinetics of chlorpromazine and diazepam in aggregating rat brain cell cultures after repeated exposure.

    PubMed

    Broeders, Jessica J W; Hermens, Joop L M; Blaauboer, Bas J; Zurich, Marie-Gabrielle

    2015-12-25

    Neurotoxic effects of compounds can be tested in vitro using cell systems. One example is aggregating rat brain cell cultures. For the extrapolation of in vitro data to the in vivo situation, it is important to take the biokinetics of the test compound into account. In addition, the exposure in vivo is often for a longer period of time; therefore, it is crucial to incorporate this into in vitro assays as well. In this study, aggregating rat brain cell cultures were exposed to chlorpromazine (CPZ) and diazepam (DZP) for 12-days with repeated exposure. Samples were taken from the stocks, test media, cell culture media and cells at specific time points on the first and last exposure day. These samples were analysed by HPLC-UV. The amount of CPZ in the medium decreased over time, whereas the amount in the cells showed an increase. Accumulation of CPZ in the cells was seen over the 12-day repeated exposure. The amount of DZP in the medium remained stable over time and only up to 2% of DZP added was found in the cells. Different biokinetic behaviour was found for CPZ and DZP. Possible explanations are differences in uptake into the cells or efflux out of the cells. The decrease of CPZ in the medium versus the stable amount of DZP results in differences in exposure concentrations over time, which should be taken into account when interpreting in vitro effect data.

  13. Culture and Social Systems Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Talcott

    1972-01-01

    A brief statement of the history of the relation between culture concepts is given, then, proceeding on the assumption that all human societies are interpenetrated with culture, the author attempts a relatively systematic outline of the structure of cultural systems and of their modes of articulation in social systems. (JB)

  14. Cellular aggregate size as the critical factor for flavonoid production by suspension cultures of Saussurea medusa.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chun-xiang; Zhao, De-xiu; Huang, Yan; Ma, Feng-shan

    2005-01-01

    Three previously established cell lines (yellow, red and white) of Saussurea medusa were investigated for jaceosidin and hispidulin production. Maximum yields of the jaceosidin and hispidulin were obtained in the red cell line at 75+/-0.41 and 6.4+/-0.31 mg l-1. Production of jaceosidin and hispidulin correlated with the sizes of compact callus aggregates (CCA) and cellular viability. In the red cell line, the sizes of CCA were predominantly of 2-4 mm diameter and accounted for 64% biomass. This line had a sustained cell viability over 10 successive sub-cultures.

  15. Convex aggregative modelling of infinite memory nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachel, Paweł

    2016-08-01

    The convex aggregation technique is applied for modelling general class of nonlinear systems with unknown structure and infinite memory. The finite sample size properties of the algorithm are formally established and compared to the standard least-squares counterpart of the method. The proposed algorithm demonstrates its advantages when the a-priori knowledge and the measurement data are both scarce, that is, when the information about the actual system structure is unknown or uncertain and the measurement set is small and disturbed by a noise. Numerical experiments illustrate application and practical benefits of the method for various nonlinear systems.

  16. Aggregated Alpha-Synuclein Transfer Efficiently between Cultured Human Neuron-Like Cells and Localize to Lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Severinsson, Emelie; Agholme, Lotta; Bergström, Joakim; Ingelsson, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease and other alpha-synucleinopathies are progressive neurodegenerative diseases characterized by aggregates of misfolded alpha-synuclein spreading throughout the brain. Recent evidence suggests that the pathological progression is likely due to neuron-to-neuron transfer of these aggregates between neuroanatomically connected areas of the brain. As the impact of this pathological spreading mechanism is currently debated, we aimed to investigate the transfer and subcellular location of alpha-synuclein species in a novel 3D co-culture human cell model based on highly differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. Fluorescently-labeled monomeric, oligomeric and fibrillar species of alpha-synuclein were introduced into a donor cell population and co-cultured with an EGFP-expressing acceptor-cell population of differentiated neuron-like cells. Subsequent transfer and colocalization of the different species were determined with confocal microscopy. We could confirm cell-to-cell transfer of all three alpha-synuclein species investigated. Interestingly the level of transferred oligomers and fibrils and oligomers were significantly higher than monomers, which could affect the probability of seeding and pathology in the recipient cells. Most alpha-synuclein colocalized with the lysosomal/endosomal system, both pre- and postsynaptically, suggesting its importance in the processing and spreading of alpha-synuclein. PMID:28030591

  17. An Intracellular Arrangement of Histoplasma capsulatum Yeast-Aggregates Generates Nuclear Damage to the Cultured Murine Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Pitangui, Nayla de Souza; Sardi, Janaina de Cássia Orlandi; Voltan, Aline R.; dos Santos, Claudia T.; da Silva, Julhiany de Fátima; da Silva, Rosangela A. M.; Souza, Felipe O.; Soares, Christiane P.; Rodríguez-Arellanes, Gabriela; Taylor, Maria Lucia; Mendes-Giannini, Maria J. S.; Fusco-Almeida, Ana M.

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum is responsible for a human systemic mycosis that primarily affects lung tissue. Macrophages are the major effector cells in humans that respond to the fungus, and the development of respiratory disease depends on the ability of Histoplasma yeast cells to survive and replicate within alveolar macrophages. Therefore, the interaction between macrophages and H. capsulatum is a decisive step in the yeast dissemination into host tissues. Although the role played by components of cell-mediated immunity in the host's defense system and the mechanisms used by the pathogen to evade the host immune response are well understood, knowledge regarding the effects induced by H. capsulatum in host cells at the nuclear level is limited. According to the present findings, H. capsulatum yeast cells display a unique architectural arrangement during the intracellular infection of cultured murine alveolar macrophages, characterized as a formation of aggregates that seem to surround the host cell nucleus, resembling a “crown.” This extranuclear organization of yeast-aggregates generates damage on the nucleus of the host cell, producing DNA fragmentation and inducing apoptosis, even though the yeast cells are not located inside the nucleus and do not trigger changes in nuclear proteins. The current study highlights a singular intracellular arrangement of H. capsulatum yeast near to the nucleus of infected murine alveolar macrophages that may contribute to the yeast's persistence under intracellular conditions, since this fungal pathogen may display different strategies to prevent elimination by the host's phagocytic mechanisms. PMID:26793172

  18. Mass algal culture system

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Lawrence P.

    1981-01-01

    An apparatus and process for the culture of algae in a liquid medium is disclosed. The medium circulates through an open trough and is exposed to an atmosphere which is temperature regulated. The nutrient content of the liquid medium is regulated to control the chemical composition growth and reproduction characteristics of the cultured algae. Before it is allowed to strike the medium, sunlight is passed through a filter to remove wavelengths which are not photosynthetically active. Heat energy can be recovered from the filter.

  19. Mass algal culture system

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Lawrence P.

    1982-01-01

    An apparatus and process for the culture of algae in a liquid medium is disclosed. The medium circulates through an open trough and is exposed to an atmosphere which is temperature regulated. The nutrient content of the liquid medium is regulated to control the chemical composition growth and reproduction characteristics of the cultured algae. Before it is allowed to strike the medium, sunlight is passed through a filter to remove wavelengths which are not photosynthetically active. Heat energy can be recovered from the filter.

  20. High density cell culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An annular culture vessel for growing mammalian cells is constructed in a one piece integral and annular configuration with an open end which is closed by an endcap. The culture vessel is rotatable about a horizontal axis by use of conventional roller systems commonly used in culture laboratories. The end wall of the endcap has tapered access ports to frictionally and sealingly receive the ends of hypodermic syringes. The syringes permit the introduction of fresh nutrient and withdrawal of spent nutrients. The walls are made of conventional polymeric cell culture material and are subjected to neutron bombardment to form minute gas permeable perforations in the walls.

  1. A Multiagent System for Dynamic Data Aggregation in Medical Research

    PubMed Central

    Urovi, Visara; Barba, Imanol; Aberer, Karl; Schumacher, Michael Ignaz

    2016-01-01

    The collection of medical data for research purposes is a challenging and long-lasting process. In an effort to accelerate and facilitate this process we propose a new framework for dynamic aggregation of medical data from distributed sources. We use agent-based coordination between medical and research institutions. Our system employs principles of peer-to-peer network organization and coordination models to search over already constructed distributed databases and to identify the potential contributors when a new database has to be built. Our framework takes into account both the requirements of a research study and current data availability. This leads to better definition of database characteristics such as schema, content, and privacy parameters. We show that this approach enables a more efficient way to collect data for medical research. PMID:27975063

  2. Cluster-cluster aggregation with particle replication and chemotaxy: a simple model for the growth of animal cells in culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, S. G.; Martins, M. L.

    2010-09-01

    Aggregation of animal cells in culture comprises a series of motility, collision and adhesion processes of basic relevance for tissue engineering, bioseparations, oncology research and in vitro drug testing. In the present paper, a cluster-cluster aggregation model with stochastic particle replication and chemotactically driven motility is investigated as a model for the growth of animal cells in culture. The focus is on the scaling laws governing the aggregation kinetics. Our simulations reveal that in the absence of chemotaxy the mean cluster size and the total number of clusters scale in time as stretched exponentials dependent on the particle replication rate. Also, the dynamical cluster size distribution functions are represented by a scaling relation in which the scaling function involves a stretched exponential of the time. The introduction of chemoattraction among the particles leads to distribution functions decaying as power laws with exponents that decrease in time. The fractal dimensions and size distributions of the simulated clusters are qualitatively discussed in terms of those determined experimentally for several normal and tumoral cell lines growing in culture. It is shown that particle replication and chemotaxy account for the simplest cluster size distributions of cellular aggregates observed in culture.

  3. Multiple discrete soluble aggregates influence polyglutamine toxicity in a Huntington’s disease model system

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Wen; Wang, Xin; Laue, Thomas M.; Denis, Clyde L.

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) results from expansions of polyglutamine stretches (polyQ) in the huntingtin protein (Htt) that promote protein aggregation, neurodegeneration, and death. Since the diversity and sizes of the soluble Htt-polyQ aggregates that have been linked to cytotoxicity are unknown, we investigated soluble Htt-polyQ aggregates using analytical ultracentrifugation. Soon after induction in a yeast HD model system, non-toxic Htt-25Q and cytotoxic Htt-103Q both formed soluble aggregates 29S to 200S in size. Because current models indicate that Htt-25Q does not form soluble aggregates, reevaluation of previous studies may be necessary. Only Htt-103Q aggregation behavior changed, however, with time. At 6 hr mid-sized aggregates (33S to 84S) and large aggregates (greater than 100S) became present while at 24 hr primarily only mid-sized aggregates (20S to 80S) existed. Multiple factors that decreased cytotoxicity of Htt-103Q (changing the length of or sequences adjacent to the polyQ, altering ploidy or chaperone dosage, or deleting anti-aging factors) altered the Htt-103Q aggregation pattern in which the suite of mid-sized aggregates at 6 hr were most correlative with cytotoxicity. Hence, the amelioration of HD and other neurodegenerative diseases may require increased attention to and discrimination of the dynamic alterations in soluble aggregation processes. PMID:27721444

  4. Non-specific pinocytosis by human endothelial cells cultured as multicellular aggregates: uptake of lucifer yellow and horse radish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Catizone, A; Chiantore, M V; Andreola, F; Coletti, D; Medolago Albani, L; Alescio, T

    1996-12-01

    We have analyzed the pattern of time-dependent and concentration-dependent incorporation of Lucifer Yellow CH (LY) and Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP) by human umbilical vein endothelial cells cultured on a non-adhesive substratum, where they they become organized into stable, multicellular aggregates. The data were compared with those previously obtained from low-density cultures of non-growing endothelial cells adherent to plastic. While the linear trend of the incorporation kinetics is preserved, the rate of uptake with both time and concentrations is highly dependent on the culture conditions, namely typology of cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions. An at least two-fold increase of the rate of uptake was observed with both markers in the aggregated cells. The extracellular concentration of LY required to saturate the binding capacity of the cell surface shifts from approximately 0.25 mg/ml, with the adherent cells, to approximately 0.5 mg/ml in the aggregated cells; the rate of uptake of three different forms of HRP shows, besides a sharp quantitative increase, also qualitative variations, testified by differential changes of their incorporation rates. These results are entirely consistent with the assumption that the association of the endothelial cells into multicellular aggregates increases the rate of pinocytic uptake by modifying the physicochemical properties of the cell surface, thereby increasing its differential affinity for the extracellular markers.

  5. Method for Producing Non-Neoplastic, Three Dimensional, Mammalian Tissue and Cell Aggregates Under Microgravity Culture Conditions and the Products Produced Therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Prewett, Tracey L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural, and blood tissue. The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cells aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  6. Enzymatically degradable poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels for the 3D culture and release of human embryonic stem cell derived pancreatic precursor cell aggregates.

    PubMed

    Amer, Luke D; Holtzinger, Audrey; Keller, Gordon; Mahoney, Melissa J; Bryant, Stephanie J

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to develop a three dimensional culture platform for aggregates of human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived pancreatic progenitors that enables long-term culture, maintains aggregate size and morphology, does not adversely affect differentiation and provides a means for aggregate recovery. A platform was developed with poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels containing collagen type I, for cell-matrix interactions, and peptide crosslinkers, for facile recovery of aggregates. The platform was first demonstrated with RIN-m5F cells, showing encapsulation and subsequent release of single cells and aggregates without adversely affecting viability. Aggregates of hESC-derived pancreatic progenitors with an effective diameter of 82 (15)μm were either encapsulated in hydrogels or cultured in suspension for 28 days. At day 14, aggregate viability was maintained in the hydrogels, but significantly reduced (88%) in suspension culture. However by day 28, viability was reduced under both culture conditions. Aggregate size was maintained in the hydrogels, but in suspension was significantly higher (∼ 2-fold) by day 28. The ability to release aggregates followed by a second enzyme treatment to achieve single cells enabled assessment by flow cytometry. Prior to encapsulation, there were 39% Pdx1(+)/Nkx6.1(+) cells, key endocrine markers required for β-cell maturation. The fraction of doubly positive cells was not affected in hydrogels but was slightly and significantly lower in suspension culture by 28 days. In conclusion, we demonstrate that a MMP-sensitive PEG hydrogel containing collagen type I is a promising platform for hESC-derived pancreatic progenitors that maintains viable aggregates, aggregate size, and progenitor state and offers facile recovery of aggregates.

  7. Components of Torpedo electric organ and muscle that cause aggregation of acetylcholine receptors on cultured muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The synaptic portion of a muscle fiber's basal lamina sheath has molecules tightly bound to it that cause aggregation of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) on regenerating myofibers. Since basal lamina and other extracellular matrix constituents are insoluble in isotonic saline and detergent solutions, insoluble detergent-extracted fractions of tissues receiving cholinergic input may provide an enriched source of the AChR-aggregating molecules for detailed characterization. Here we demonstrate that such an insoluble fraction from Torpedo electric organ, a tissue with a high concentration of cholinergic synapses, causes AChRs on cultured chick muscle cells to aggregate. We have partially characterized the insoluble fraction, examined the response of muscle cells to it, and devised ways of extracting the active components with a view toward purifying them and learning whether they are similar to those in the basal lamina at the neuromuscular junction. The insoluble fraction from the electric organ was rich in extracellular matrix constituents; it contained structures resembling basal lamina sheaths and had a high density of collagen fibrils. It caused a 3- to 20-fold increase in the number of AChR clusters on cultured myotubes without significantly affecting the number or size of the myotubes. The increase was first seen 2-4 h after the fraction was added to cultures and it was maximal by 24 h. The AChR-aggregating effect was dose dependent and was due, at least in part, to lateral migration of AChRs present in the muscle cell plasma membrane at the time the fraction was applied. Activity was destroyed by heat and by trypsin. The active component(s) was extracted from the insoluble fraction with high ionic strength or pH 5.5 buffers. The extracts increased the number of AChR clusters on cultured myotubes without affecting the number or degradation rate of surface AChRs. Antiserum against the solubilized material blocked its effect on AChR distribution and bound to the

  8. An online detection system for aggregate sizes and shapes based on digital image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianhong; Chen, Sijia

    2017-02-01

    Traditional aggregate size measuring methods are time-consuming, taxing, and do not deliver online measurements. A new online detection system for determining aggregate size and shape based on a digital camera with a charge-coupled device, and subsequent digital image processing, have been developed to overcome these problems. The system captures images of aggregates while falling and flat lying. Using these data, the particle size and shape distribution can be obtained in real time. Here, we calibrate this method using standard globules. Our experiments show that the maximum particle size distribution error was only 3 wt%, while the maximum particle shape distribution error was only 2 wt% for data derived from falling aggregates, having good dispersion. In contrast, the data for flat-lying aggregates had a maximum particle size distribution error of 12 wt%, and a maximum particle shape distribution error of 10 wt%; their accuracy was clearly lower than for falling aggregates. However, they performed well for single-graded aggregates, and did not require a dispersion device. Our system is low-cost and easy to install. It can successfully achieve online detection of aggregate size and shape with good reliability, and it has great potential for aggregate quality assurance.

  9. An online detection system for aggregate sizes and shapes based on digital image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianhong; Chen, Sijia

    2016-07-01

    Traditional aggregate size measuring methods are time-consuming, taxing, and do not deliver online measurements. A new online detection system for determining aggregate size and shape based on a digital camera with a charge-coupled device, and subsequent digital image processing, have been developed to overcome these problems. The system captures images of aggregates while falling and flat lying. Using these data, the particle size and shape distribution can be obtained in real time. Here, we calibrate this method using standard globules. Our experiments show that the maximum particle size distribution error was only 3 wt%, while the maximum particle shape distribution error was only 2 wt% for data derived from falling aggregates, having good dispersion. In contrast, the data for flat-lying aggregates had a maximum particle size distribution error of 12 wt%, and a maximum particle shape distribution error of 10 wt%; their accuracy was clearly lower than for falling aggregates. However, they performed well for single-graded aggregates, and did not require a dispersion device. Our system is low-cost and easy to install. It can successfully achieve online detection of aggregate size and shape with good reliability, and it has great potential for aggregate quality assurance.

  10. Inflammatory responses in aggregating rat brain cell cultures subjected to different demyelinating conditions.

    PubMed

    Defaux, Antoinette; Zurich, Marie-Gabrielle; Honegger, Paul; Monnet-Tschudi, Florianne

    2010-09-24

    To study inflammatory reactions occurring in relation to demyelination, aggregating rat brain cell cultures were subjected to three different demyelinating insults, i.e., (i) lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), (ii) interferon-gamma combined with lipopolysaccharide (IFN-gamma+LPS), and (iii) anti-MOG antibodies plus complement (alpha-MOG+C). Demyelination was assessed by measuring the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), and the activity of 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphohydrolase (CNP). The accompanying inflammatory reactions were examined by the quantification of microglia-specific staining, by immunostaining for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and by measuring the mRNA expression of a panel of inflammation-related genes. It was found that all three demyelinating insults decreased the expression of MBP and MOG, and induced microglial reactivity. LPC and alpha-MOG+C, but not IFN-gamma+LPS, decreased CNP activity; they also caused the appearance of macrophagic microglia, and increased GFAP staining indicating astrogliosis. LPC affected also the integrity of neurons and astrocytes. LPC and IFN-gamma+LPS upregulated the expression of the inflammation-related genes IL-6, TNF-alpha, Ccl5, Cxcl1, and iNOS, although to different degrees. Other inflammatory markers were upregulated by only one of the three insults, e.g., Cxcl2 by LPC; IL-1beta and IL-15 by IFN-gamma+LPS; and IFN-gamma by alpha-MOG+C. These findings indicate that each of the three demyelinating insults caused distinct patterns of demyelination and inflammatory reactivity, and that of the demyelinating agents tested only LPC exhibited general toxicity.

  11. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 stimulates synthesis of proteoglycan aggregates in calf articular cartilage organ cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, T.I. )

    1991-04-01

    Previous work showed that transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1), added alone to bovine cartilage organ cultures, stimulated (35S)sulfate incorporation into macromolecular material but did not investigate the fidelity of the stimulated system to maintain synthesis of cartilage-type proteoglycans. This paper provides evidence that chondrocytes synthesize the appropriate proteoglycan matrix under TGF-beta 1 stimulation: (1) there is a coordinated increase in hyaluronic acid and proteoglycan monomer synthesis, (2) link-stable proteoglycan aggregates are assembled, (3) the hybrid chondroitin sulfate/keratan sulfate monomeric species is synthesized, and (4) there is an increase in protein core synthesis. Some variation in glycosylation patterns was observed when proteoglycans synthesized under TGF-beta 1 stimulation were compared to those synthesized under basal conditions. Thus comparing TGF-beta 1 to basal samples respectively, the monomers were larger (Kav on Sepharose CL-2B = 0.29 vs 0.41), the chondroitin sulfate chains were longer by approximately 3.5 kDa, the percentage of total glycosaminoglycan in keratan sulfate increased slightly from approximately 4% (basal) to approximately 6%, and the unsulfated disaccharide decreased from 28% (basal) to 12%. All of these variations are in the direction of a more anionic proteoglycan. Since the ability of proteoglycans to confer resiliency to the cartilage matrix is directly related to their anionic nature, these changes would presumably have a beneficial effect on tissue function.

  12. Aggregation, sedimentation, dissolution and bioavailability of quantum dots in estuarine systems.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To understand their fate and transport in estuarine systems, the aggregation, sedimentation, and dissolution of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) in seawater were investigated. Hydrodynamic size increased from 40 to 60 nm to >1 mm within 1 h in seawater, and the aggregates were highly p...

  13. a Cultural Landscape Information System Developed with Open Source Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudyk, C.; Müller, H.; Uhler, M.; Würriehausen, F.

    2013-07-01

    Since 2010, the state of Rhineland-Palatinate in Germany has developed a cultural landscape information system as a process to secure and further enrich aggregate data about its cultural assets. In an open dialogue between governing authorities and citizens, the intention of the project is an active cooperation of public and private actors. A cultural landscape information system called KuLIS was designed as a web platform, combining semantic wiki software with a geographic information system. Based on data sets from public administrations, the information about cultural assets can be extended and enhanced by interested participants. The developed infrastructure facilitates local information accumulation through a crowdsourcing approach. This capability offers new possibilities for e-governance and open data developments. The collaborative approach allows governing authorities to manage and supervise official data, while public participation enables affordable information acquisition. Gathered cultural heritage information can provide incentives for touristic valorisation of communities or concepts for strengthening regional identification. It can also influence political decisions in defining significant cultural regions worth of protecting from industrial influences. The presented cultural landscape information allows citizens to influence the statewide development of cultural landscapes in a democratic way.

  14. Regulation of embryonic size in early mouse development in vitro culture system.

    PubMed

    Hisaki, Tomoka; Kawai, Ikuma; Sugiura, Koji; Naito, Kunihiko; Kano, Kiyoshi

    2014-08-01

    Mammals self-regulate their body size throughout development. In the uterus, embryos are properly regulated to be a specific size at birth. Previously, size and cell number in aggregated embryos, which were made from two or more morulae, and half embryos, which were halved at the 2-cell stage, have been analysed in vivo in preimplantation and post-implantation development in mice. Here, we examined whether or not the mouse embryo has the capacity to self-regulate growth using an in vitro culture system. To elucidate embryonic histology, cells were counted in aggregated or half embryos in comparison with control embryos. Both double- and triple-aggregated embryos contained more cells than did control embryos during all culture periods, and the relative growth ratios showed no growth inhibition in an in vitro culture system. Meanwhile, half embryos contained fewer cells than control embryos, but the number grew throughout the culture period. Our data suggest that the growth of aggregated embryos is not affected and continues in an in vitro culture system. On the other hand, the growth of half embryos accelerates and continues in an in vitro culture system. This situation, in turn, implied that post-implantation mouse embryos might have some potential to regulate their own growth and size as seen by using an in vitro culture system without uterus factors. In conclusion, our results indicated that embryos have some ways in which to regulate their own size in mouse early development.

  15. Arginine–glycine–aspartic acid–polyethylene glycol–polyamidoamine dendrimer conjugate improves liver-cell aggregation and function in 3-D spheroid culture

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhanfei; Lian, Fen; Wang, Xiaoqian; Chen, Yanling; Tang, Nanhong

    2016-01-01

    The polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer, a type of macromolecule material, has been used in spheroidal cell culture and drug delivery in recent years. However, PAMAM is not involved in the study of hepatic cell-spheroid culture or its biological activity, particularly in detoxification function. Here, we constructed a PAMAM-dendrimer conjugate decorated by an integrin ligand: arginine–glycine–aspartic acid (RGD) peptide. Our studies demonstrate that RGD–polyethylene glycol (PEG)–PAMAM conjugates can promote singly floating hepatic cells to aggregate together in a sphere-like growth with a weak reactive oxygen species. Moreover, RGD-PEG-PAMAM conjugates can activate the AKT–MAPK pathway in hepatic cells to promote cell proliferation and improve basic function and ammonia metabolism. Together, our data support the hepatocyte sphere treated by RGD-PEG-PAMAM conjugates as a potential source of hepatic cells for a biological artificial liver system. PMID:27621619

  16. Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-polyethylene glycol-polyamidoamine dendrimer conjugate improves liver-cell aggregation and function in 3-D spheroid culture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhanfei; Lian, Fen; Wang, Xiaoqian; Chen, Yanling; Tang, Nanhong

    The polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer, a type of macromolecule material, has been used in spheroidal cell culture and drug delivery in recent years. However, PAMAM is not involved in the study of hepatic cell-spheroid culture or its biological activity, particularly in detoxification function. Here, we constructed a PAMAM-dendrimer conjugate decorated by an integrin ligand: arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide. Our studies demonstrate that RGD-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-PAMAM conjugates can promote singly floating hepatic cells to aggregate together in a sphere-like growth with a weak reactive oxygen species. Moreover, RGD-PEG-PAMAM conjugates can activate the AKT-MAPK pathway in hepatic cells to promote cell proliferation and improve basic function and ammonia metabolism. Together, our data support the hepatocyte sphere treated by RGD-PEG-PAMAM conjugates as a potential source of hepatic cells for a biological artificial liver system.

  17. Cellular aggregation and trauma in cardiotomy suction systems.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, G; Sanderson, J M

    1979-01-01

    Experiments in dogs showed that the high levels of cellular aggregation and trauma caused by cariodtomy suction can be considerably reduced by the avoidance of air aspiration. A hypothesis is proposed to explain this on the basis of shear stresses in the inlet cannula. Roller pump suction was also found to be slightly more traumatic than vaccum suction, but contact of the blood with the pericardium had no effect so long as the pericardium and epicardium had been previously washed with saline. PMID:515984

  18. Mobile phone usage in complex urban systems: a space-time, aggregated human activity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranos, Emmanouil; Nijkamp, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The present study aims to demonstrate the importance of digital data for investigating space-time dynamics of aggregated human activity in urban systems. Such dynamics can be monitored and modelled using data from mobile phone operators regarding mobile telephone usage. Using such an extensive dataset from the city of Amsterdam, this paper introduces space-time explanatory models of aggregated human activity patterns. Various modelling experiments and results are presented, which demonstrate that mobile telephone data are a good proxy of the space-time dynamics of aggregated human activity in the city.

  19. The formalism of fractal aggregation phenomena of colloidal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Pippa, Natassa; Demetzos, Costas; Danezis, Emmanuel

    2012-03-01

    Classical Newtonian Physics and Euclidean Geometry are currently used to describe biological phenomena and the processes of drug formulation, which are characterized by homogeneity and linearity. On the other hand, at the mesoscopic level, the principles and the laws of physics are quite different from the Classical Newtonian Physics and Euclidean approach especially at nanoscale dimension. The investigation of the aggregation process of liposomes is of paramount importance due to their applications in pharmaceutical nanotechnology as drug delivery systems and as membrane models, in biosciences. The physical stability and the aggregation process of colloidal systems as well as the surface phenomena are described using the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. The elucidation of the dimensionality of liposome aggregates obeys the fractal approach because the aggregation phenomena are irreversible. This approach can be correlated with the extended DLVO theory, which includes the hydration energy, too.

  20. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol accumulation, metabolism and cell-type-specific adverse effects in aggregating brain cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Monnet-Tschudi, Florianne Hazekamp, Arno; Perret, Nicolas; Zurich, Marie-Gabrielle; Mangin, Patrice; Giroud, Christian; Honegger, Paul

    2008-04-01

    Despite the widespread use of Cannabis as recreational drug or as medicine, little is known about its toxicity. The accumulation, metabolism and toxicity of THC were analyzed 10 days after a single treatment, and after repeated exposures during 10 days. Mixed-cell aggregate cultures of fetal rat telencephalon were used as in vitro model, as well as aggregates enriched either in neurons or in glial cells. It was found that THC accumulated preferentially in neurons, and that glia-neuron interactions decreased THC accumulation. The quantification of 11-OH-THC and of THC-COOH showed that brain aggregates were capable of THC metabolism. No cell-type difference was found for the metabolite 11-OH-THC, whereas the THC-COOH content was higher in mixed-cell cultures. No cell death was found at THC concentrations of 2 {mu}M in single treatment and of 1 {mu}M and 2 {mu}M in repeated treatments. Neurons, and particularly GABAergic neurons, were most sensitive to THC. Only the GABAergic marker was affected after the single treatment, whereas the GABAergic, cholinergic and astrocytic markers were decreased after the repeated treatments. JWH 015, a CB2 receptor agonist, showed effects similar to THC, whereas ACEA, a CB1 receptor agonist, had no effect. The expression of the cytokine IL-6 was upregulated 48 h after the single treatment with 5 {mu}M of THC or JWH 015, whereas the expression of TNF-{alpha} remained unchanged. These results suggest that the adverse effects of THC were related either to THC accumulation or to cannabinoid receptor activation and associated with IL-6 upregulation.

  1. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol accumulation, metabolism and cell-type-specific adverse effects in aggregating brain cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Monnet-Tschudi, Florianne; Hazekamp, Arno; Perret, Nicolas; Zurich, Marie-Gabrielle; Mangin, Patrice; Giroud, Christian; Honegger, Paul

    2008-04-01

    Despite the widespread use of Cannabis as recreational drug or as medicine, little is known about its toxicity. The accumulation, metabolism and toxicity of THC were analyzed 10 days after a single treatment, and after repeated exposures during 10 days. Mixed-cell aggregate cultures of fetal rat telencephalon were used as in vitro model, as well as aggregates enriched either in neurons or in glial cells. It was found that THC accumulated preferentially in neurons, and that glia-neuron interactions decreased THC accumulation. The quantification of 11-OH-THC and of THC-COOH showed that brain aggregates were capable of THC metabolism. No cell-type difference was found for the metabolite 11-OH-THC, whereas the THC-COOH content was higher in mixed-cell cultures. No cell death was found at THC concentrations of 2 microM in single treatment and of 1 microM and 2 microM in repeated treatments. Neurons, and particularly GABAergic neurons, were most sensitive to THC. Only the GABAergic marker was affected after the single treatment, whereas the GABAergic, cholinergic and astrocytic markers were decreased after the repeated treatments. JWH 015, a CB2 receptor agonist, showed effects similar to THC, whereas ACEA, a CB1 receptor agonist, had no effect. The expression of the cytokine IL-6 was upregulated 48 h after the single treatment with 5 microM of THC or JWH 015, whereas the expression of TNF-alpha remained unchanged. These results suggest that the adverse effects of THC were related either to THC accumulation or to cannabinoid receptor activation and associated with IL-6 upregulation.

  2. Differentiation of mammalian skeletal muscle cells cultured on microcarrier beads in a rotating cell culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgan, C. E.; Burge, S. S.; Collinsworth, A. M.; Truskey, G. A.; Kraus, W. E.

    2000-01-01

    The growth and repair of adult skeletal muscle are due in part to activation of muscle precursor cells, commonly known as satellite cells or myoblasts. These cells are responsive to a variety of environmental cues, including mechanical stimuli. The overall goal of the research is to examine the role of mechanical signalling mechanisms in muscle growth and plasticity through utilisation of cell culture systems where other potential signalling pathways (i.e. chemical and electrical stimuli) are controlled. To explore the effects of decreased mechanical loading on muscle differentiation, mammalian myoblasts are cultured in a bioreactor (rotating cell culture system), a model that has been utilised to simulate microgravity. C2C12 murine myoblasts are cultured on microcarrier beads in a bioreactor and followed throughout differentiation as they form a network of multinucleated myotubes. In comparison with three-dimensional control cultures that consist of myoblasts cultured on microcarrier beads in teflon bags, myoblasts cultured in the bioreactor exhibit an attenuation in differentiation. This is demonstrated by reduced immunohistochemical staining for myogenin and alpha-actinin. Western analysis shows a decrease, in bioreactor cultures compared with control cultures, in levels of the contractile proteins myosin (47% decrease, p < 0.01) and tropomyosin (63% decrease, p < 0.01). Hydrodynamic measurements indicate that the decrease in differentiation may be due, at least in part, to fluid stresses acting on the myotubes. In addition, constraints on aggregate size imposed by the action of fluid forces in the bioreactor affect differentiation. These results may have implications for muscle growth and repair during spaceflight.

  3. Erythrocyte: A systems model of the control of aggregation and deformability.

    PubMed

    Bazanovas, Antonina N; Evstifeev, Aleksandr I; Khaiboullina, Svetlana F; Sadreev, Ildar I; Skorinkin, Andrey I; Kotov, Nikolay V

    2015-05-01

    Human erythrocytes are highly specialized enucleate cells that are involved in providing efficient gas transport. Erythrocytes have been extensively studied both experimentally and by mathematical modeling in recent years. However, understanding of how aggregation and deformability are regulated is limited. These properties of the erythrocyte are essential for the physiological functioning of the cell. In this work, we propose a novel mathematical model of the molecular system that controls the aggregation and deformability of the erythrocyte. This model is based on the experimental results of previously published studies. Our model suggests fundamentally new mechanisms that regulate aggregation and deformability in a latch-like manner. The results of this work could be used as a general explanation of how the erythrocytes regulate their aggregation and deformability, and are essential in understanding erythrocyte disorders and aging.

  4. Impacts of Cropping Systems on Aggregates Associated Organic Carbon and Nitrogen in a Semiarid Highland Agroecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jiashu; Zhang, Tianzhe; Chang, Weidong; Zhang, Dan; Zulfiqar, Saman; Fu, Aigen; Hao, Yaqi

    2016-01-01

    The effect of cropping system on the distribution of organic carbon (OC) and nitrogen (N) in soil aggregates has not been well addressed, which is important for understanding the sequestration of OC and N in agricultural soils. We analyzed the distribution of OC and N associated with soil aggregates in three unfertilized cropping systems in a 27-year field experiment: continuously cropped alfalfa, continuously cropped wheat and a legume-grain rotation. The objectives were to understand the effect of cropping system on the distribution of OC and N in aggregates and to examine the relationships between the changes in OC and N stocks in total soils and in aggregates. The cropping systems increased the stocks of OC and N in total soils (0–40 cm) at mean rates of 15.6 g OC m-2 yr-1 and 1.2 g N m-2 yr-1 relative to a fallow control. The continuous cropping of alfalfa produced the largest increases at the 0–20 cm depth. The OC and N stocks in total soils were significantly correlated with the changes in the >0.053 mm aggregates. 27-year of cropping increased OC stocks in the >0.053 mm size class of aggregates and N stocks in the >0.25 mm size class but decreased OC stocks in the <0.053 mm size class and N stocks in the <0.25 mm size class. The increases in OC and N stocks in these aggregates accounted for 99.5 and 98.7% of the total increases, respectively, in the continuous alfalfa system. The increases in the OC and N stocks associated with the >0.25 mm aggregate size class accounted for more than 97% of the total increases in the continuous wheat and the legume-grain rotation systems. These results suggested that long-term cropping has the potential to sequester OC and N in soils and that the increases in soil OC and N stocks were mainly due to increases associated with aggregates >0.053 mm. PMID:27764209

  5. Chained Aggregation and Control System Design:; A Geometric Approach.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    Automatic Control, Vol. AC-27, Feb. 1982, pp. 159-164. 50. F. M. Callier, W. S. Chan, and C. A. Desoer , "Input-Output Stability of Interconnected Systems...of Large Scale Composite Systems," IEEE Trans. on Circuits and Systems, Vol. CAS-22, July 1975, pp. 618-622. 55. V. Saksena, J. B. Cruz, Jr., W. R

  6. Enhanced effect of aggregated gold nanoparticles on luminol chemiluminescence system and its analytical application.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yingying; Li, Baoxin

    2013-07-01

    Some organic compounds containing groups of OH, NH2, or SH, which could induce the aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), were observed to enhance effectively the luminol-H2O2-2.6 nm AuNPs CL system. It was found that the aggregation of AuNPs was an important effect factor for the catalytic activity of AuNPs on luminol CL system. The aggregated AuNPs could effectively enhance luminol CL signal compared with the dispersed one. The enhanced effect was closely related to the sizes of AuNPs. Among the studied AuNPs with seven sizes, 2.6 nm AuNPs had the greatest enhancement effect on luminol CL system after its aggregation. The CL enhancement mechanism was investigated, and the marked enhancement of aggregated 2.6 nm AuNPs for luminol CL system was supposed to originate from the decrease of AuNPs' surface negative charge density compared to its dispersed state. For the luminol-H2O2-2.6 nm AuNPs CL system in the presence of organic compounds containing groups of OH, NH2, or SH, more than one factor played the role in influencing the CL intensity. It was found that the enhanced effect of aggregated 2.6 nm AuNPs induced by such organic compounds was much more significant than the inhibition effect of reducing groups of OH, NH2, or SH, which made it applicable for the determination of this kind of compounds.

  7. Enhanced effect of aggregated gold nanoparticles on luminol chemiluminescence system and its analytical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yingying; Li, Baoxin

    2013-07-01

    Some organic compounds containing groups of OH, NH2, or SH, which could induce the aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), were observed to enhance effectively the luminol-H2O2-2.6 nm AuNPs CL system. It was found that the aggregation of AuNPs was an important effect factor for the catalytic activity of AuNPs on luminol CL system. The aggregated AuNPs could effectively enhance luminol CL signal compared with the dispersed one. The enhanced effect was closely related to the sizes of AuNPs. Among the studied AuNPs with seven sizes, 2.6 nm AuNPs had the greatest enhancement effect on luminol CL system after its aggregation. The CL enhancement mechanism was investigated, and the marked enhancement of aggregated 2.6 nm AuNPs for luminol CL system was supposed to originate from the decrease of AuNPs' surface negative charge density compared to its dispersed state. For the luminol-H2O2-2.6 nm AuNPs CL system in the presence of organic compounds containing groups of OH, NH2, or SH, more than one factor played the role in influencing the CL intensity. It was found that the enhanced effect of aggregated 2.6 nm AuNPs induced by such organic compounds was much more significant than the inhibition effect of reducing groups of OH, NH2, or SH, which made it applicable for the determination of this kind of compounds.

  8. The rich detail of cultural symbol systems.

    PubMed

    Read, Dwight W

    2014-08-01

    The goal of forming a science of intentional behavior requires a more richly detailed account of symbolic systems than is assumed by the authors. Cultural systems are not simply the equivalent in the ideational domain of culture of the purported Baldwin Effect in the genetic domain.

  9. Studying the concentration dependence of the aggregation number of a micellar model system by SANS.

    PubMed

    Amann, Matthias; Willner, Lutz; Stellbrink, Jörg; Radulescu, Aurel; Richter, Dieter

    2015-06-07

    We present a small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) structural characterization of n-alkyl-PEO polymer micelles in aqueous solution with special focus on the dependence of the micellar aggregation number on increasing concentration. The single micellar properties in the dilute region up to the overlap concentration ϕ* are determined by exploiting the well characterized unimer exchange kinetics of the model system in a freezing and diluting experiment. The micellar solutions are brought to thermodynamic equilibrium at high temperatures, where unimer exchange is fast, and are then cooled to low temperatures and diluted to concentrations in the limit of infinite dilution. At low temperatures the kinetics, and therefore the key mechanism for micellar rearrangement, is frozen on the experimental time scale, thus preserving the micellar structure in the dilution process. Information about the single micellar structure in the semidilute and concentrated region are extracted from structure factor analysis at high concentrations where the micelles order into fcc and bcc close packed lattices and the aggregation number can be calculated by geometrical arguments. This approach enables us to investigate the aggregation behavior in a wide concentration regime from dilute to 6·ϕ*, showing a constant aggregation number with concentration over a large concentration regime up to a critical concentration about three times ϕ*. When exceeding this critical concentration, the aggregation number was found to increase with increasing concentration. This behavior is compared to scaling theories for star-like polymer micelles.

  10. Collective behavior in two-dimensional biological systems: Receptor clustering and beta-sheet aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chinlin

    We studied two particular biomedical systems which exhibit collective molecular behavior. One is clustering of tumor necrosis factor receptor I (TNFR1), and another is β-sheet folding and aggregation. Receptor clustering has been shown to be a crucial step in many signaling events but its biological meaning has not been adequately addressed. Here, via a simple lattice model, we show how cells use this clustering machinery to enhance sensitivity as well as robustness. On the other hand, intracellular deposition of aggregated protein rich in β-sheet is a prominent cytopathological feature of most neurodegenerative diseases. How this aggregation occurs and how it responds to therapy is not completely understood. Here, we started from a reconstruction of the H-bond potential and carry out a full investigation of β-sheet thermodynamics as well as kinetics. We show that β-sheet aggregation is most likely due to molecular stacking and found that the minimal length of an aggregate mutant polymer corresponds well with the number observed in adult Huntington's disease. We have also shown that molecular agents such as dendrimers might fail at high-dose therapy; instead, a potential therapy strategy is to block β-turn formation. Our predictions can be used for future experimental tests and clinical trials.

  11. Data Aggregation in Multi-Agent Systems in the Presence of Hybrid Faults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, Satish Mahadevan

    2010-01-01

    Data Aggregation (DA) is a set of functions that provide components of a distributed system access to global information for purposes of network management and user services. With the diverse new capabilities that networks can provide, applicability of DA is growing. DA is useful in dealing with multi-value domain information and often requires…

  12. Breakage of the energy equipartition and aggregate formation in sheared system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baibolatov, Y.; Spahn, F.

    2015-10-01

    In classical thermodynamics any mixture of gases with different masses with any sort of initial temperature differences tend to relax into a stationary state with a unique temperature along the whole system. But this is not true in case of granular mixtures, where energy is dissipated during each collision between particles. As a result, in a granular mixture of species with different masses, the system does not have a unique thermodynamic temperature but each species has its own temperature. This effect has been paid much attention recently [1, 2, 3]. Apart from the dissipative particle interaction, the main reason for this behaviour is due to the mass difference of the colliding particles, causing an asymmetric energy loss of particles. The loss of energy can be compensated by external heating of the system. In the case of planetary rings system, the role of heating is played by gravitational shear caused by the planet. In this work we consider the model consisting of identical spherical and adhesive particles. Although the constituents are identical, they can form aggregates and effectively create particles with larger masses. The differences in masses lead to different velocity dispersions (granular temperatures) of the aggregates. This interplay between heat transfer among aggregates and the distribution of the aggregate sizes under the gravitational shear is of crucial importance for the formulation of mean-field balance equations for the ring particle ensembles.

  13. Effect of aggregated silver nanoparticles on luminol chemiluminescence system and its analytical application.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yingying; Li, Baoxin; Xiu, Furong

    2014-07-15

    We found that after silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) aggregated, its catalytic activity on luminol CL reaction obviously changed, and the change characteristic was closely related to the sizes of AgNPs. UV-visible spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectra, zeta potential and transmission electron microscopy studies were carried out to investigate the CL effect mechanism. The different CL responses of aggregated AgNPs with different size were suggested to be due to the two effects of quantum size and electron density in nanoparticle's conduction bands, and which one played a major role. The poisonous organic contaminants such as anilines, could induce the aggregation of AgNPs, were observed to affect effectively the luminol-H2O2-7 nm and 15 nm AgNPs CL systems and were detectable by use of a flow injection method with the enhanced or inhibited CL detection.

  14. Effect of aggregated silver nanoparticles on luminol chemiluminescence system and its analytical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yingying; Li, Baoxin; Xiu, Furong

    2014-07-01

    We found that after silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) aggregated, its catalytic activity on luminol CL reaction obviously changed, and the change characteristic was closely related to the sizes of AgNPs. UV-visible spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectra, zeta potential and transmission electron microscopy studies were carried out to investigate the CL effect mechanism. The different CL responses of aggregated AgNPs with different size were suggested to be due to the two effects of quantum size and electron density in nanoparticle's conduction bands, and which one played a major role. The poisonous organic contaminants such as anilines, could induce the aggregation of AgNPs, were observed to affect effectively the luminol-H2O2-7 nm and 15 nm AgNPs CL systems and were detectable by use of a flow injection method with the enhanced or inhibited CL detection.

  15. Challenges in Scheduling Aggregation in CyberPhysical Information Processing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Horey, James L; Lagesse, Brent J

    2011-01-01

    Data aggregation (a.k.a reduce operations) is an important element in information processing systems, including MapReduce clusters and cyberphysical networks. Unlike simple sensor networks, all the data in information processing systems must be eventually aggregated. Our goal is to lower overall latency in these systems by intelligently scheduling aggregation on intermediate routing nodes. Unlike previous models, our model explicitly takes into account link latency and computa- tion time. Our model also considers heterogeneous computing capabilities. In order to understand the potential challenges associated with constructing a distributed scheduler that minimizes la- tency, we ve developed a simulation of our model and tested the results of randomly scheduling nodes. Although these experiments were designed to provide data for a null-model, preliminary results have yielded a few interesting observations. We show that in cases where the computation time is larger than transmission time, in-network aggregation can have a large effect (reducing latency by 50% or more), but that naive scheduling can have a detrimental effect. Specifically, we show that when the root node (a.k.a the basestation) is faster than the other nodes, the latency can increase with increased coverage, and that these effects vary with the number of nodes present.

  16. Culture systems: mineral oil overlay.

    PubMed

    Morbeck, Dean E; Leonard, Phoebe H

    2012-01-01

    Mineral oil overlay microdrop is commonly used during in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures. Though mineral oil appears homogeneous, it is an undefined product that can vary in quality. Here, we describe the history, chemistry, processing, and optimal use of mineral oil for IVF and embryo culture.

  17. Economic Systems: A Modular Approach. Cultural Anthropology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassebaum, Peter

    Designed for use as supplementary instructional material in a cultural anthropology course, this learning module uses a systems approach to allow students to see the connections and similarities which most cultural groups share on the basis of the type of economic organization that they exhibit. The module begins with a general discussion of…

  18. Constructing a High Density Cell Culture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An annular culture vessel for growing mammalian cells is constructed in a one piece integral and annular configuration with an open end which is closed by an endcap. The culture vessel is rotatable about a horizontal axis by use of conventional roller systems commonly used in culture laboratories. The end wall of the endcap has tapered access ports to frictionally and sealingly receive the ends of hypodermic syringes. The syringes permit the introduction of fresh nutrient and withdrawal of spent nutrients. The walls are made of conventional polymeric cell culture material and are subjected to neutron bombardment to form minute gas permeable perforations in the walls.

  19. Normal and system lupus erythematosus red blood cell interactions studied by double trap optical tweezers: direct measurements of aggregation forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlova, Maria D.; Lyubin, Eugeny V.; Zhdanov, Alexander G.; Rykova, Sophia Yu.; Sokolova, Irina A.; Fedyanin, Andrey A.

    2012-02-01

    Direct measurements of aggregation forces in piconewton range between two red blood cells in pair rouleau are performed under physiological conditions using double trap optical tweezers. Aggregation and disaggregation properties of healthy and pathologic (system lupus erythematosis) blood samples are analyzed. Strong difference in aggregation speed and behavior is revealed using the offered method which is proposed to be a promising tool for SLE monitoring at single cell level.

  20. α-Synuclein propagates from mouse brain to grafted dopaminergic neurons and seeds aggregation in cultured human cells

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Christian; Angot, Elodie; Bergström, Ann-Louise; Steiner, Jennifer A.; Pieri, Laura; Paul, Gesine; Outeiro, Tiago F.; Melki, Ronald; Kallunki, Pekka; Fog, Karina; Li, Jia-Yi; Brundin, Patrik

    2011-01-01

    Post-mortem analyses of brains from patients with Parkinson disease who received fetal mesencephalic transplants show that α-synuclein–containing (α-syn–containing) Lewy bodies gradually appear in grafted neurons. Here, we explored whether intercellular transfer of α-syn from host to graft, followed by seeding of α-syn aggregation in recipient neurons, can contribute to this phenomenon. We assessed α-syn cell-to-cell transfer using microscopy, flow cytometry, and high-content screening in several coculture model systems. Coculturing cells engineered to express either GFP– or DsRed-tagged α-syn resulted in a gradual increase in double-labeled cells. Importantly, α-syn–GFP derived from 1 neuroblastoma cell line localized to red fluorescent aggregates in other cells expressing DsRed–α-syn, suggesting a seeding effect of transmitted α-syn. Extracellular α-syn was taken up by cells through endocytosis and interacted with intracellular α-syn. Next, following intracortical injection of recombinant α-syn in rats, we found neuronal uptake was attenuated by coinjection of an endocytosis inhibitor. Finally, we demonstrated in vivo transfer of α-syn between host cells and grafted dopaminergic neurons in mice overexpressing human α-syn. In summary, intercellularly transferred α-syn interacts with cytoplasmic α-syn and can propagate α-syn pathology. These results suggest that α-syn propagation is a key element in the progression of Parkinson disease pathology. PMID:21245577

  1. CEACAM1 mediates B cell aggregation in central nervous system autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rovituso, Damiano M.; Scheffler, Laura; Wunsch, Marie; Dörck, Sebastian; Ulzheimer, Jochen; Bayas, Antonios; Steinman, Lawrence; Ergün, Süleyman; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    B cell aggregates in the central nervous system (CNS) have been associated with rapid disease progression in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Here we demonstrate a key role of carcinoembryogenic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule1 (CEACAM1) in B cell aggregate formation in MS patients and a B cell-dependent mouse model of MS. CEACAM1 expression was increased on peripheral blood B cells and CEACAM1+ B cells were present in brain infiltrates of MS patients. Administration of the anti-CEACAM1 antibody T84.1 was efficient in blocking aggregation of B cells derived from MS patients. Along these lines, application of the monoclonal anti-CEACAM1 antibody mCC1 was able to inhibit CNS B cell aggregate formation and significantly attenuated established MS-like disease in mice in the absence of any adverse effects. CEACAM1 was co-expressed with the regulator molecule T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain −3 (TIM-3) on B cells, a novel molecule that has recently been described to induce anergy in T cells. Interestingly, elevated coexpression on B cells coincided with an autoreactive T helper cell phenotype in MS patients. Overall, these data identify CEACAM1 as a clinically highly interesting target in MS pathogenesis and open new therapeutic avenues for the treatment of the disease. PMID:27435215

  2. RBC aggregation based system for long-term photoplethysmography (PPG): new prospects for PPG applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvartsman, Leonid D.; Tverskoy, Boris

    2015-03-01

    We present system for long-term continuous PPG monitoring, and physical model for PPG analysis. The system is based on ideology of light scattering modulated by the process of RBC aggregation. OXIRATE's system works in reflection geometry. The sensor is tiny, completely mobile phone compatible, it can be placed nearly everywhere on the body surface. These technical features allow all-night comfortable PPG monitoring that was performed and analyzed. We can define various sleep stages on the basis of different reproducible time-behavior of PPG signal. Our system of PPG monitoring was used also for reflection pulse oximetry and for extreme PPG studies, such as diving.

  3. Red-light-emitting system based on aggregation of donor-acceptor derivatives in polar aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Ishi-i, Tsutomu; Ikeda, Kei; Kichise, Yuki; Ogawa, Michiaki

    2012-06-01

    Glowing together: An efficient red-light-emitting system has been created in polar water media based on the aggregation of donor-acceptor molecules. In the THF/water mixture, the emission was quenched when a small volume of water was used, whereas it was recovered and enhanced upon aggregate formation with a large water volume.

  4. The Relationship Between Carbon Input, Aggregation, and Soil Organic Carbon Stabilization in Sustainable Cropping Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, A. Y.; Six, J.; Bryant, D. C.; Denison, R.; van Kessel, C.

    2003-12-01

    Approximately 10% of the earth's soil C is stored within agricultural soil ecosystems. Because farming systems hold promise for sequestering C, their sustainability, environmental impact, and potential role in mitigating rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations must be addressed. Our current challenges are to provide credible evidence that agricultural practices can sequester significant amounts of C and to quantify the mechanisms, capacity, and longevity of agricultural lands as C sinks. Agronomic practices that influence yield and, therefore, affect the proportion of crop residues returned to the soil (e.g. cover cropping, irrigation, fertilizer addition, and compost application) are likely to influence soil organic carbon (SOC). The objectives of this study were (1) to determine the influence of C input on C sequestration in SOC fractions and (2) to evaluate how aggregation (MWD) relates to SOC and cumulative C input, across 10 different cropping systems. Using SOM fractionation techniques, soil samples from 10 cropping systems at LTRAS (Long-term Research on Agricultural Systems, Davis, CA) were separated into four aggregate size classes (LM: >2000μ m, sM: 250-2000μ m, m: 53-250μ m, and silt&clay: <53μ m) and into three SOM fractions within LM and sM (cPOM:250-2000μ m, mM: 53-250μ m, and silt&clay: <53μ m). All fractions were analyzed for their C content. Empirically derived relationships between yield and aboveground biomass-C plus yield and belowground biomass-C were used to quantify C input from corn, wheat, and tomato residues as well as for legume cover crops and compost for the different cropping systems. We found a positive correlation between cumulative C input and SOC (R2=0.45, P<0.0001). After 9 years, MWD increased linearly with greater C input (R2=0.64, P<0.0001) and SOC (R2=0.61, P<0.0001), respectively. We observed that aggregate-C shifts from the microaggregate fraction (53-250μ m) in low C input systems to macroaggregate fractions (>2000

  5. [Bacteria ecology in planting-culturing system].

    PubMed

    Huang, Fenglian; Xia, Beicheng; Dai, Xin; Chen, Guizhu

    2004-06-01

    Planting-culturing system in inter-tidal zone is a new type eco-culturing model. The survey on bacteria biomass and water quality in the designed planting-culturing system in inter-tidal zone showed that the mangrove planted in the system improved water quality and made water quality to II-III type, better than the IV and V type in the control pond. Designed ponds made heterotrophic bacteria, vibrio, phosphorus bacteria and enzyme-producing bacteria populations 1-2 order lower than the control pond without mongrove planting. Correlation analyses with CORREL software showed that the biomass of these bacteria was positively related with the nitrogen and phosphorus contents in water of the system, and the correlation coefficient for heterogeneous bacteria and vibrio was up to 0.9205. Heterotrophic bacteria and vibrio could be used as the water-quality monitoring organisms.

  6. Supramolecular guest-host systems: combining high dye doping level with low aggregation tendency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priimagi, Arri; Cattaneo, Stefano; Ras, Robin H. A.; Valkama, Sami; Ikkala, Olli; Kauranen, Martti

    2006-08-01

    We demonstrate that the aggregation tendency of dye molecules in a host polymer can be significantly reduced by exploiting non-covalent interactions between the host polymer and guest dye molecules. Such interactions occur spontaneously with no need for chemical synthesis, and could thus be utilized to combine the ease of processing of traditional guest-host systems with the high dye concentrations achievable in covalently linked systems. We studied the aggregation properties of the common azo-dye Disperse Red 1 in polymers with different functional groups. Compared to a nonpolar polymer (polystyrene), dye aggregation tendency is substantially reduced in polar polymer matrices containing hydrogen-bond donating [poly(vinylphenol)] or hydrogen-bond accepting [poly(4-vinylpyridine)] functional sites. Furthermore, by forming a polyelectrolyte-dye complex [Disperse Red 1/poly(styrenesulfonic acid)], a dye monomer can be attached to approximately each polymer unit, resulting in dye concentration of 63 wt. %. Complexation through proton transfer was further studied by using a fluorescent dye 5-phenyl-2-(4-pyridyl)oxazole. Our results indicate that polymer-dye complexes could provide a facile route for new type of optical materials, with potential applications in various fields of optics and photonics.

  7. Occurrence and fate of acrylamide in water-recycling systems and sludge in aggregate industries.

    PubMed

    Junqua, Guillaume; Spinelli, Sylvie; Gonzalez, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    Acrylamide is a hazardous substance having irritant and toxic properties as well as carcinogen, mutagen, and impaired fertility possible effects. Acrylamide might be found in the environment as a consequence of the use of polyacrylamides (PAMs) widely added as a flocculant for water treatment. Acrylamide is a monomer used to produce polyacrylamide (PAM) polymers. This reaction of polymerization can be incomplete, and acrylamide molecules can be present as traces in the commercial polymer. Thus, the use of PAMs may generate a release of acrylamide in the environment. In aggregate industries, PAM is widely involved in recycling process and water reuse (aggregate washing). Indeed, these industries consume large quantities of water. Thus, European and French regulations have favored loops of recycling of water in order to reduce water withdrawals. The main goal of this article is to study the occurrence and fate of acrylamide in water-recycling process as well as in the sludge produced by the flocculation treatment process in aggregate production plants. Moreover, to strengthen the relevance of this article, the objective is also to demonstrate if the recycling system leads to an accumulation effect in waters and sludge and if free acrylamide could be released by sludge during their storage. To reach this objective, water sampled at different steps of recycling water process has been analyzed as well as different sludge corresponding to various storage times. The obtained results reveal no accumulation effect in the water of the water-recycling system nor in the sludge.

  8. An interacting particle system modelling aggregation behavior: from individuals to populations.

    PubMed

    Morale, Daniela; Capasso, Vincenzo; Oelschläger, Karl

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the stochastic modelling of a spatially structured biological population subject to social interaction. The biological motivation comes from the analysis of field experiments on a species of ants which exhibits a clear tendency to aggregate, still avoiding overcrowding. The model we propose here provides an explanation of this experimental behavior in terms of "long-ranged" aggregation and "short-ranged" repulsion mechanisms among individuals, in addition to an individual random dispersal described by a Brownian motion. Further, based on a "law of large numbers", we discuss the convergence, for large N, of a system of stochastic differential equations describing the evolution of N individuals (Lagrangian approach) to a deterministic integro-differential equation describing the evolution of the mean-field spatial density of the population (Eulerian approach).

  9. Mixed-host aggregations and helminth parasite sharing in an East African wildlife-livestock system.

    PubMed

    VanderWaal, Kimberly; Omondi, George Paul; Obanda, Vincent

    2014-09-15

    Parasitic infections transmitted between livestock and wildlife pose a significant risk to wildlife conservation efforts and constrain livestock productivity in tropical regions of the world. Gastrointestinal helminths are among the most ubiquitous parasites, and many parasites within this taxon can readily infect a wide range of host species. Factors shaping bidirectional transmission of parasites in wildlife-livestock systems are understudied. In this study, we investigate the prevalence and diversity of helminth infections in an East African community of wild and domestic ungulates. We also identify pairs of host species between which transmission may be possible based on shared parasite taxa, and explore the role of multi-host aggregations in shaping patterns of parasite sharing. Helminth taxa detected included Trichostrongylus, Trichuris, Paramphistomum, Skrjabinema, Strongyloides, Strongylus spp., and other strongyle-type nematodes. We found that nearly 50% of individuals harbored at least one species of helminth, but certain species, such as zebra and impala, exhibited higher prevalence than others. High canopy feeders, like giraffe, had lower prevalence than hosts feeding at medium and low foraging heights. For helminths, patterns of parasite sharing likely emerge from shared space use, which is mediated in part by mixed-species aggregations. The frequency with which host species associated together in mixed-species aggregations was positively correlated with the number of parasite taxa shared. We suggest that variation among species in their tendency to form mixed-species aggregations creates heterogeneity in transmission opportunities, and consequently, parasite sharing across ungulate species. These results enhance our understanding of the role of spatiotemporal relationships among host species in shaping parasite communities in mixed wildlife-livestock grazing systems.

  10. Modelling and Laboratory Studies on the Adhesion Fatigue Performance for Thin-Film Asphalt and Aggregate System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongsheng; Feng, Decheng

    2014-01-01

    Adhesion between asphalt and aggregate plays an important role in the performance of asphalt mixtures. A low-frequency adhesion fatigue test was proposed in this paper to study the effect of environment on the asphalt-aggregate adhesion system. The stress-based fatigue model had been utilized to describe the fatigue behavior of thin-film asphalt and aggregate system. The factors influencing the adhesion fatigue performance were also investigated. Experiment results show that asphalt has more important effect on the adhesion performance comparing with aggregate. Basalt, which is regarded as hydrophobic aggregates with low silica content, has better adhesion performance to asphalt binder when compared with granite. The effects of aging on the adhesion fatigue performance are different for PG64-22 and rubber asphalt. Long-term aging is found to reduce the adhesion fatigue lives for rubber asphalt and aggregate system, while the effect of long-term aging for aggregate and PG64-22 binder system is positive. Generally the increased stress amplitude and test temperature could induce greater damage and lead to less fatigue lives for adhesion test system. PMID:25054187

  11. Modelling and laboratory studies on the adhesion fatigue performance for thin-film asphalt and aggregate system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongsheng; Yi, Junyan; Feng, Decheng

    2014-01-01

    Adhesion between asphalt and aggregate plays an important role in the performance of asphalt mixtures. A low-frequency adhesion fatigue test was proposed in this paper to study the effect of environment on the asphalt-aggregate adhesion system. The stress-based fatigue model had been utilized to describe the fatigue behavior of thin-film asphalt and aggregate system. The factors influencing the adhesion fatigue performance were also investigated. Experiment results show that asphalt has more important effect on the adhesion performance comparing with aggregate. Basalt, which is regarded as hydrophobic aggregates with low silica content, has better adhesion performance to asphalt binder when compared with granite. The effects of aging on the adhesion fatigue performance are different for PG64-22 and rubber asphalt. Long-term aging is found to reduce the adhesion fatigue lives for rubber asphalt and aggregate system, while the effect of long-term aging for aggregate and PG64-22 binder system is positive. Generally the increased stress amplitude and test temperature could induce greater damage and lead to less fatigue lives for adhesion test system.

  12. The aggregation-mediated conjugation system of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis: host range and kinetics of transfer.

    PubMed

    Jensen, G B; Andrup, L; Wilcks, A; Smidt, L; Poulsen, O M

    1996-10-01

    The aggregation-mediated conjugation system in Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis encoded on the plasmid pXO16 is characterized by the formation of aggregates when Agr+ and Agr- cells are socialized in exponential growth. Using the aggregation phenotypes, we have identified potential recipients of the aggregation-plasmid pXO16 among Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus sphaericus, and 24 subspecies of B. thuringiensis. We found 14 Agr- strains, i.e., potential recipients of the aggregation system encoded by plasmid pXO16. Five strains contained a conjugative apparatus of their own and were excluded from further examinations. To monitor the transfer of plasmid pXO16, we constructed a transposon insertion of the plasmid with Tn5401. The study of the plasmid transfer of pXO16::Tn5401 indicated the secretion of bacteriocins from both donor strain and recipient strains. Only one out of the nine strains examined was unable to receive the aggregation-plasmid pXO16 and express the aggregation phenotype and the conjugative abilities. It was found that the transfer of plasmid pXO16 to Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Agr- strains was 100%. All recipients had acquired the aggregation-plasmid pXO16 and converted to the Agr+ phenotype.

  13. Design of a microfluidic system for red blood cell aggregation investigation.

    PubMed

    Mehri, R; Mavriplis, C; Fenech, M

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to design a microfluidic apparatus capable of providing controlled flow conditions suitable for red blood cell (RBC) aggregation analysis. The linear velocity engendered from the controlled flow provides constant shear rates used to qualitatively analyze RBC aggregates. The design of the apparatus is based on numerical and experimental work. The numerical work consists of 3D numerical simulations performed using a research computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver, Nek5000, while the experiments are conducted using a microparticle image velocimetry system. A Newtonian model is tested numerically and experimentally, then blood is tested experimentally under several conditions (hematocrit, shear rate, and fluid suspension) to be compared to the simulation results. We find that using a velocity ratio of 4 between the two Newtonian fluids, the layer corresponding to blood expands to fill 35% of the channel thickness where the constant shear rate is achieved. For blood experiments, the velocity profile in the blood layer is approximately linear, resulting in the desired controlled conditions for the study of RBC aggregation under several flow scenarios.

  14. Developing Defined and Scalable 3D Culture Systems for Culturing Human Pluripotent Stem Cells at High Densities.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yuguo; Jeong, Daeun; Xiao, Jifang; Schaffer, David V

    2014-06-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) - including embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) - are very promising candidates for cell therapies, tissue engineering, high throughput pharmacology screens, and toxicity testing. These applications require large numbers of high quality cells; however, scalable production of human pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives at a high density and under well-defined conditions has been a challenge. We recently reported a simple, efficient, fully defined, scalable, and good manufacturing practice (GMP) compatible 3D culture system based on a thermoreversible hydrogel for hPSC expansion and differentiation. Here, we describe additional design rationale and characterization of this system. For instance, we have determined that culturing hPSCs as a suspension in a liquid medium can exhibit lower volumetric yields due to cell agglomeration and possible shear force-induced cell loss. By contrast, using hydrogels as 3D scaffolds for culturing hPSCs reduces aggregation and may insulate from shear forces. Additionally, hydrogel-based 3D culture systems can support efficient hPSC expansion and differentiation at a high density if compatible with hPSC biology. Finally, there are considerable opportunities for future development to further enhance hydrogel-based 3D culture systems for producing hPSCs and their progeny.

  15. McrEngine: A Scalable Checkpointing System Using Data-Aware Aggregation and Compression

    DOE PAGES

    Islam, Tanzima Zerin; Mohror, Kathryn; Bagchi, Saurabh; ...

    2013-01-01

    High performance computing (HPC) systems use checkpoint-restart to tolerate failures. Typically, applications store their states in checkpoints on a parallel file system (PFS). As applications scale up, checkpoint-restart incurs high overheads due to contention for PFS resources. The high overheads force large-scale applications to reduce checkpoint frequency, which means more compute time is lost in the event of failure. We alleviate this problem through a scalable checkpoint-restart system, mcrEngine. McrEngine aggregates checkpoints from multiple application processes with knowledge of the data semantics available through widely-used I/O libraries, e.g., HDF5 and netCDF, and compresses them. Our novel scheme improves compressibility ofmore » checkpoints up to 115% over simple concatenation and compression. Our evaluation with large-scale application checkpoints show that mcrEngine reduces checkpointing overhead by up to 87% and restart overhead by up to 62% over a baseline with no aggregation or compression.« less

  16. LPS-protein aggregation influences protein partitioning in aqueous two-phase micellar systems.

    PubMed

    Lopes, André Moreni; Santos-Ebinuma, Valéria de Carvalho; Novaes, Leticia Celia de Lencastre; Molino, João Vitor Dutra; Barbosa, Leandro Ramos Souza; Pessoa, Adalberto; Rangel-Yagui, Carlota de Oliveira

    2013-07-01

    Lipopolysaccharide endotoxins (LPS) are the most common pyrogenic substances in recombinant peptides and proteins purified from Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli. In this respect, aqueous two-phase micellar systems (ATPMS) have already proven to be a good strategy to purify recombinant proteins of pharmaceutical interest and remove high LPS concentrations. In this paper, we review our recent experimental work in protein partitioning in Triton X-114 ATPMS altogether with some new results and show that LPS-protein aggregation can influence both protein and LPS partitioning. Green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) was employed as a model protein. The ATPMS technology proved to be effective for high loads of LPS removal into the micelle-rich phase (%REM(LPS) > 98 %) while GFPuv partitioned preferentially to the micelle-poor phase (K GFP(uv) < 1.00) due to the excluded-volume interactions. However, theoretically predicted protein partition coefficient values were compared with experimentally obtained ones, and good agreement was found only in the absence of LPS. Dynamic light scattering measurements showed that protein-LPS interactions were taking place and influenced the partitioning process. We believe that this phenomenon should be considered in LPS removal employing any kind of aqueous two-phase system. Nonetheless, ATPMS can still be considered as an efficient strategy for high loads of LPS removal, but being aware that the excluded-volume partitioning theory available might overestimate partition coefficient values due to the presence of protein-LPS aggregation.

  17. Constructing compact and effective graphs for recommender systems via node and edge aggregations

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sangkeun; Kahng, Minsuk; Lee, Sang-goo

    2014-12-10

    Exploiting graphs for recommender systems has great potential to flexibly incorporate heterogeneous information for producing better recommendation results. As our baseline approach, we first introduce a naive graph-based recommendation method, which operates with a heterogeneous log-metadata graph constructed from user log and content metadata databases. Although the na ve graph-based recommendation method is simple, it allows us to take advantages of heterogeneous information and shows promising flexibility and recommendation accuracy. However, it often leads to extensive processing time due to the sheer size of the graphs constructed from entire user log and content metadata databases. In this paper, we propose node and edge aggregation approaches to constructing compact and e ective graphs called Factor-Item bipartite graphs by aggregating nodes and edges of a log-metadata graph. Furthermore, experimental results using real world datasets indicate that our approach can significantly reduce the size of graphs exploited for recommender systems without sacrificing the recommendation quality.

  18. Constructing compact and effective graphs for recommender systems via node and edge aggregations

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Sangkeun; Kahng, Minsuk; Lee, Sang-goo

    2014-12-10

    Exploiting graphs for recommender systems has great potential to flexibly incorporate heterogeneous information for producing better recommendation results. As our baseline approach, we first introduce a naive graph-based recommendation method, which operates with a heterogeneous log-metadata graph constructed from user log and content metadata databases. Although the na ve graph-based recommendation method is simple, it allows us to take advantages of heterogeneous information and shows promising flexibility and recommendation accuracy. However, it often leads to extensive processing time due to the sheer size of the graphs constructed from entire user log and content metadata databases. In this paper, we proposemore » node and edge aggregation approaches to constructing compact and e ective graphs called Factor-Item bipartite graphs by aggregating nodes and edges of a log-metadata graph. Furthermore, experimental results using real world datasets indicate that our approach can significantly reduce the size of graphs exploited for recommender systems without sacrificing the recommendation quality.« less

  19. Thermodynamics of Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Kenneth L.; Barz, Bogdan; Bachmann, Michael; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloid protein aggregation characterizes many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Creutz- feldt-Jakob disease. Evidence suggests that amyloid aggregates may share similar aggregation pathways, implying simulation of full-length amyloid proteins is not necessary for understanding amyloid formation. In this study we simulate GNNQQNY, the N-terminal prion-determining domain of the yeast protein Sup35 to investigate the thermodynamics of structural transitions during aggregation. We use a coarse-grained model with replica-exchange molecular dynamics to investigate the association of 3-, 6-, and 12-chain GNNQQNY systems and we determine the aggregation pathway by studying aggregation states of GN- NQQNY. We find that the aggregation of the hydrophilic GNNQQNY sequence is mainly driven by H-bond formation, leading to the formation of /3-sheets from the very beginning of the assembly process. Condensation (aggregation) and ordering take place simultaneously, which is underpinned by the occurrence of a single heat capacity peak only.

  20. The Corticostriatal System in Dissociated Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Fiona E.; Garcia-Munoz, Marianela; Vickers, Catherine; Schock, Sarah C.; Staines, William A.; Arbuthnott, Gordon W.

    2011-01-01

    The sparse connectivity within the striatum in vivo makes the investigation of individual corticostriatal synapses very difficult. Most studies of the corticostriatal input have been done using electrical stimulation under conditions where it is hard to identify the precise origin of the cortical input. We have employed an in vitro dissociated cell culture system that allows the identification of individual corticostriatal pairs and have been developing methods to study individual neuron inputs to striatal neurons. In mixed corticostriatal cultures, neurons had resting activity similar to the system in vivo. Up/down states were obvious and seemed to encompass the entire culture. Mixed cultures of cortical neurons from transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein with striatal neurons from wild-type mice of the same developmental stage allowed visual identification of individual candidate corticostriatal pairs. Recordings were performed between 12 and 37 days in vitro (DIV). To investigate synaptic connections we recorded from 69 corticostriatal pairs of which 44 were connected in one direction and 25 reciprocally. Of these connections 41 were corticostriatal (nine inhibitory) and 53 striatocortical (all inhibitory). The observed excitatory responses were of variable amplitude (−10 to −370 pA, n = 32). We found the connections very secure – with negligible failures on repeated stimulation (approximately 1 Hz) of the cortical neuron. Inhibitory corticostriatal responses were also observed (−13 to −314 pA, n = 9). Possibly due to the mixed type of culture we found an inhibitory striatocortical response (−14 to −598 pA, n = 53). We are now recording from neurons in separate compartments to more closely emulate neuroanatomical conditions but still with the possibility of the easier identification of the connectivity. PMID:21743806

  1. Enhanced hepatic differentiation of rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in spheroidal aggregate culture on a decellularized liver scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Ji; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Yujia; Li, Yi; Li, Li; Chen, Fei; Wu, Xiujuan; Xie, Mingjun; Bu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to determine whether the combination of aggregate culture and decellularized liver scaffolds (DLSs) promoted the hepatic differentiation of murine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) into high yields of mature hepatocytes in vitro. Four culturing methods for differentiation [single cell (2D), spheroids (3D), 2D + DLS and 3D + DLS] were studied. To determine the differentiation stages of the MSCs, RT-qPCR of the hepatocyte genes, immunostaining of hepatocyte markers, and functional analyses were all performed. Compared with the other groups, hepatocyte-like cells which differentiated from BM-MSC spheroids on extracellular matrix (ECM) exhibited more intensive staining of stored glycogen, an elevated level of urea biosynthesis and albumin secretion as well as the higher expression of hepatocyte-specific genes. Our results indicated that DLSs combined with spheroidal aggregate culture may be used as an effective method to facilitate the hepatic maturation of BM-MSCs and may have future applications in stem cell-based liver regenerative medicine. PMID:27314916

  2. M-BRIDGE: Wireless portable onbody aggregator and visualizer system for Wireless Body Sensor Network.

    PubMed

    Phyo Wai, Aung Aung; Ge, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Advances made in electronics, intelligent and wireless technologies enable individuals to self-observe their health states anywhere anytime. The shift in self care becomes a promising paradigm to alleviate burdens on centralized institutional care. As a result, Wireless Body Sensor Network (WBSN) personal health solutions can be seen increasingly although medical community still has concerns on their usability and applicability. Especially, there is still lacking in portable wireless wearable gateway to integrate WBSN into existing healthcare solutions. To fulfill this gap, we design and develop MobilE on-Body aGgregator and vIsualizer Device (M-BRIDGE) system using Android smart phone. Our proposed solution fully supports the needs of flexible device interfacing, data aggregation, efficient data distribution and user-friendly visualization. We also explain how M-BRIDGE's unique features and operation can complement with and fulfill the deficiency of existing WBSN healthcare solutions. We finally present the details of implementation and technical evaluation as well as discussion on the potential issues and future works.

  3. DNA packaging induced by micellar aggregates: a novel in vitro DNA condensation system.

    PubMed

    Ghirlando, R; Wachtel, E J; Arad, T; Minsky, A

    1992-08-11

    Evidence for a conceptually novel DNA packaging process is presented. X-ray scattering, electron microscopy, and circular dichroism measurements indicate that in the presence of positively charged micellar aggregates and flexible anionic polymers, such as negatively charged polypeptides or single-stranded RNA species, a complex is formed in which DNA molecules are partially embedded within a micellar scaffold and partially condensed into highly packed chiral structures. Based on studies of micelle-DNA and micelle-flexible anionic polymer systems, as well as on the known effects of a high charge density upon the micellar organization, a DNA packaging model is proposed. According to this model, the DNA induces the elongation of the micelles into rodlike aggregates, forming a closely packed matrix in which the DNA molecules are immobilized. In contrast, the flexible anionic polymers stabilize clusters of spherical micelles which are proposed to effect a capping of the rodlike micelles, thus arresting their elongation and creating surfactant-free segments of the DNA that are able to converge and collapse. Thus, unlike other in vitro DNA packaging systems, in which condensation follows encounters between charge-neutralized DNA molecules, a prepackaging phase where the DNA is immobilized within a matrix is proposed in this case. Cellular and nuclear membranes have been implicated in DNA packaging processes in vivo, and negatively charged polyelectrolytes were shown to be involved in the processes. These observations, combined with the basic tenets of the DNA condensation system described here, allow for the progression to the study of more elaborate model systems and thus might lead to insights into the nature and roles of the intricate in vivo DNA-membrane complexes.

  4. Laboratory Drop Towers for the Experimental Simulation of Dust-aggregate Collisions in the Early Solar System

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Jürgen; Beitz, Eike; Bukhari, Mohtashim; Gundlach, Bastian; Hagemann, Jan-Hendrik; Heißelmann, Daniel; Kothe, Stefan; Schräpler, Rainer; von Borstel, Ingo; Weidling, René

    2014-01-01

    For the purpose of investigating the evolution of dust aggregates in the early Solar System, we developed two vacuum drop towers in which fragile dust aggregates with sizes up to ~10 cm and porosities up to 70% can be collided. One of the drop towers is primarily used for very low impact speeds down to below 0.01 m/sec and makes use of a double release mechanism. Collisions are recorded in stereo-view by two high-speed cameras, which fall along the glass vacuum tube in the center-of-mass frame of the two dust aggregates. The other free-fall tower makes use of an electromagnetic accelerator that is capable of gently accelerating dust aggregates to up to 5 m/sec. In combination with the release of another dust aggregate to free fall, collision speeds up to ~10 m/sec can be achieved. Here, two fixed high-speed cameras record the collision events. In both drop towers, the dust aggregates are in free fall during the collision so that they are weightless and match the conditions in the early Solar System. PMID:24962693

  5. Laboratory drop towers for the experimental simulation of dust-aggregate collisions in the early solar system.

    PubMed

    Blum, Jürgen; Beitz, Eike; Bukhari, Mohtashim; Gundlach, Bastian; Hagemann, Jan-Hendrik; Heißelmann, Daniel; Kothe, Stefan; Schräpler, Rainer; von Borstel, Ingo; Weidling, René

    2014-06-05

    For the purpose of investigating the evolution of dust aggregates in the early Solar System, we developed two vacuum drop towers in which fragile dust aggregates with sizes up to ~10 cm and porosities up to 70% can be collided. One of the drop towers is primarily used for very low impact speeds down to below 0.01 m/sec and makes use of a double release mechanism. Collisions are recorded in stereo-view by two high-speed cameras, which fall along the glass vacuum tube in the center-of-mass frame of the two dust aggregates. The other free-fall tower makes use of an electromagnetic accelerator that is capable of gently accelerating dust aggregates to up to 5 m/sec. In combination with the release of another dust aggregate to free fall, collision speeds up to ~10 m/sec can be achieved. Here, two fixed high-speed cameras record the collision events. In both drop towers, the dust aggregates are in free fall during the collision so that they are weightless and match the conditions in the early Solar System.

  6. Dynamic cell culture system (7-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogoli, Augusto

    1992-01-01

    This experiment is one of the Biorack experiments being flown on the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (MIL-1) mission as part of an investigation studying cell proliferation and performance in space. One of the objectives of this investigation is to assess the potential benefits of bioprocessing in space with the ultimate goal of developing a bioreactor for continuous cell cultures in space. This experiment will test the operation of an automated culture chamber that was designed for use in a Bioreactor in space. The device to be tested is called the Dynamic Cell Culture System (DCCS). It is a simple device in which media are renewed or chemicals are injected automatically, by means of osmotic pumps. This experiment uses four Type I/O experiment containers. One DCCS unit, which contains a culture chamber with renewal of medium and a second chamber without a medium supply fits in each container. Two DCCS units are maintained under zero gravity conditions during the on-orbit period. The other two units are maintained under 1 gh conditions in a 1 g centrifuge. The schedule for incubator transfer is given.

  7. Diatom-associated bacteria are required for aggregation of Thalassiosira weissflogii

    PubMed Central

    Gärdes, Astrid; Iversen, Morten H; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Passow, Uta; Ullrich, Matthias S

    2011-01-01

    Aggregation of algae, mainly diatoms, is an important process in marine systems leading to the settling of particulate organic carbon predominantly in the form of marine snow. Exudation products of phytoplankton form transparent exopolymer particles (TEP), which acts as the glue for particle aggregation. Heterotrophic bacteria interacting with phytoplankton may influence TEP formation and phytoplankton aggregation. This bacterial impact has not been explored in detail. We hypothesized that bacteria attaching to Thalassiosira weissflogii might interact in a yet-to-be determined manner, which could impact TEP formation and aggregate abundance. The role of individual T. weissflogii-attaching and free-living new bacterial isolates for TEP production and diatom aggregation was investigated in vitro. T. weissflogii did not aggregate in axenic culture, and striking differences in aggregation dynamics and TEP abundance were observed when diatom cultures were inoculated with either diatom-attaching or free-living bacteria. The data indicated that free-living bacteria might not influence aggregation whereas bacteria attaching to diatom cells may increase aggregate formation. Interestingly, photosynthetically inactivated T. weissflogii cells did not aggregate regardless of the presence of bacteria. Comparison of aggregate formation, TEP production, aggregate sinking velocity and solid hydrated density revealed remarkable differences. Both, photosynthetically active T. weissflogii and specific diatom-attaching bacteria were required for aggregation. It was concluded that interactions between heterotrophic bacteria and diatoms increased aggregate formation and particle sinking and thus may enhance the efficiency of the biological pump. PMID:20827289

  8. Composition analysis of fractions of extracellular polymeric substances from an activated sludge culture and identification of dominant forces affecting microbial aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xuan; Wang, Xu; Liu, Junxin

    2016-06-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) appear to play a critical role in the formation of bioaggregates, such as sludge flocs, in activated sludge processes. Here, we systematically investigated the composition and chemical structure of various EPS fractions excreted from an activated sludge culture using multi-analysis techniques to examine the ability of the sludge to aggregate. Chemical analysis was used with a three-dimensional excitation emission matrix and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, applying inter-particle forces theory. The combined findings revealed that hydrophobic groups, especially protein-related N–H, were present in a greater proportion in tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS). This result, which explained the specificity of TB-EPS in the chemical structure, was consistent with data indicating that TB-EPS contained a large amount of protein-like substances (86.7 mg/g of mixed liquor volatile suspended solids, 39.7% of the total EPS). Subsequently, a novel experimental procedure was developed to pinpoint key inter-particle forces in sludge aggregation. The result revealed that hydrogen bonds are the predominant triggers that promote sludge aggregation. This comprehensive analysis indicated that hydrophobic proteins in TB-EPS are responsible for the critical role played by hydrogen bonds in sludge formation. Our findings highlight the need to elucidate the mechanisms of TB-EPS-mediated flocculation in future efforts.

  9. Composition analysis of fractions of extracellular polymeric substances from an activated sludge culture and identification of dominant forces affecting microbial aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xuan; Wang, Xu; Liu, Junxin

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) appear to play a critical role in the formation of bioaggregates, such as sludge flocs, in activated sludge processes. Here, we systematically investigated the composition and chemical structure of various EPS fractions excreted from an activated sludge culture using multi-analysis techniques to examine the ability of the sludge to aggregate. Chemical analysis was used with a three-dimensional excitation emission matrix and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, applying inter-particle forces theory. The combined findings revealed that hydrophobic groups, especially protein-related N–H, were present in a greater proportion in tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS). This result, which explained the specificity of TB-EPS in the chemical structure, was consistent with data indicating that TB-EPS contained a large amount of protein-like substances (86.7 mg/g of mixed liquor volatile suspended solids, 39.7% of the total EPS). Subsequently, a novel experimental procedure was developed to pinpoint key inter-particle forces in sludge aggregation. The result revealed that hydrogen bonds are the predominant triggers that promote sludge aggregation. This comprehensive analysis indicated that hydrophobic proteins in TB-EPS are responsible for the critical role played by hydrogen bonds in sludge formation. Our findings highlight the need to elucidate the mechanisms of TB-EPS-mediated flocculation in future efforts. PMID:27311788

  10. Human language is a culturally evolving system.

    PubMed

    Steels, Luc

    2017-02-01

    It is well accepted that languages change rapidly in a process of cultural evolution. But some animal communication systems, in particular bird song, also exhibit cultural change. So where exactly is the difference? This article argues that the main selectionist pressure on human languages is not biological-that is, related to survival and fecundity-but instead is linked to producing enough expressive power for the needs of the community, maximizing communicative success, and reducing cognitive effort. The key question to be answered by an "evolutionary linguistics" approach to language is, What are the causal mechanisms sustaining an evolutionary dynamic based on these selection criteria? In other words, what cognitive mechanisms and social interaction patterns are needed, and how do they allow a language to emerge and remain shared, despite profound variation and never-ending change?

  11. In Situ Probing Nucleation, Growth, and Aggregation of Iron Oxides in Geochemical Aquatic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Y.; Hu, Y.; Ray, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Nucleation, growth, and aggregation of iron oxide nanoparticles can significantly alter the fate of organic and inorganic contaminants in geochemical aquatic systems. This talk will address how we can improve our understanding of nucleation, growth, and aggregation of iron oxide nanoparticles by providing more accurate quantitative and qualitative empirical information. In this study, a novel environmental setup—which allows time-resolved simultaneous measurements of small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and grazing incidence small-angle scattering (GISAXS) in the presence of bulk solution—was utilized for real-time monitoring of nanoparticle formation at water-mineral interfaces. This setup enabled us to probe the size, shape, and location of iron oxide nanoparticles on the substrate and in solution without dehydration of samples. Experiments were conducted with 10-4 M ferric ions in the presence of environmentally important and abundant anions (nitrate, chlorite, sulfate) and cations (aluminum) at pH = 3.7 ± 0.1. The substrates used were geologically ubiquitous media such as quartz, mica, and organic polymer-coated surfaces. Once ferric solutions were introduced, the homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation of iron oxides occurred and the size and volume evolution of nanoparticles were monitored. To complement these observations, atomic force microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution x-ray diffraction, contact angle analysis, dynamic light scattering, and electrophoretic mobility analysis were utilized. Based on in situ measurements of initial nuclei evolution at aqueous interfaces, this approach provided new, important information for upscaling such as size, volume, surface area, and location (i.e., in solution vs. on mineral surfaces) of iron oxides precipitates formed in the presence of organic matter and different substrate morphological and chemical properties. Using this quantitative information, we identified the

  12. Modified iterative aggregation procedure for maintenance optimisation of multi-component systems with failure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhuoqi; Wu, Su; Lee, Seungchul; Ni, Jun

    2014-12-01

    This paper studies maintenance policies for multi-component systems which have failure interaction among their components. Component failure might accelerate deterioration processes or induce instantaneous failures of the remaining components. We formulate this maintenance problem as a Markov decision process (MDP) with an objective of minimising a total discounted maintenance cost. However, the action set and state space in MDP exponentially grow as the number of components increases. This makes traditional approaches computationally intractable. To deal with this curse of dimensionality, a modified iterative aggregation procedure (MIAP) is proposed. We mathematically prove that iterations in MIAP guarantee the convergence and the policy obtained is optimal. Numerical case studies find that failure interaction should not be ignored in a maintenance policy decision making and the proposed MIAP is faster and requires less computational memory size than that of linear programming.

  13. Reactivation of Aggregated Proteins by the ClpB/DnaK Bi-chaperone System

    PubMed Central

    Zolkiewski, Michal; Chesnokova, Liudmila S.; Witt, Stephan N.

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a common problem in protein biochemistry and is linked to many cellular pathologies and human diseases. The molecular chaperone ClpB can resolubilize and reactivate aggregated proteins. This unit describes the procedure for following reactivation of an aggregated enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mediated by ClpB from Escherichia coli in cooperation with another molecular chaperone DnaK. The procedures for purification of these chaperones are also described. PMID:26836408

  14. Family systems theory, attachment theory, and culture.

    PubMed

    Rothbaum, Fred; Rosen, Karen; Ujiie, Tatsuo; Uchida, Nobuko

    2002-01-01

    Family systems theory and attachment theory have important similarities and complementarities. Here we consider two areas in which the theories converge: (a) in family system theorists' description of an overly close, or "enmeshed," mother-child dyad, which attachment theorists conceptualize as the interaction of children's ambivalent attachment and mothers' preoccupied attachment; (b) in family system theorists' description of the "pursuer-distance cycle" of marital conflict, which attachment theorists conceptualize as the interaction of preoccupied and dismissive partners. We briefly review family systems theory evidence, and more extensively review attachment theory evidence, pertaining to these points of convergence. We also review cross-cultural research, which leads us to conclude that the dynamics described in both theories reflect, in part, Western ways of thinking and Western patterns of relatedness. Evidence from Japan suggests that extremely close ties between mother and child are perceived as adaptive, and are more common, and that children experience less adverse effects from such relationships than do children in the West. Moreover, in Japan there is less emphasis on the importance of the exclusive spousal relationship, and less need for the mother and father to find time alone to rekindle romantic, intimate feelings and to resolve conflicts by openly communicating their differences. Thus, the "maladaptive" pattern frequently cited by Western theorists of an extremely close mother-child relationship, an unromantic, conflictual marriage characterized by little verbal communication and a peripheral, distant father, may function very differently in other cultures. While we believe that both theories will be greatly enriched by their integration, we caution against the application of either theory outside the cultures in which they were developed.

  15. A novel, smart microsphere with K(+)-induced shrinking and aggregating properties based on a responsive host-guest system.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ming-Yue; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Fang, Lu; Liu, Zhuang; Yu, Hai-Rong; Jiang, Lu; Wang, Wei; Xie, Rui; Chen, Qianming; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2014-01-01

    A novel type of smart microspheres with K(+)-induced shrinking and aggregating properties is designed and developed on the basis of a K(+)-recognition host-guest system. The microspheres are composed of cross-linked poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acryloylamidobenzo-15-crown-5) (P(NIPAM-co-AAB15C5)) networks. Due to the formation of stable 2:1 "sandwich-type" host-guest complexes between 15-crown-5 units and K(+) ions, the P(NIPAM-co-AAB15C5) microspheres significantly exhibit isothermally and synchronously K(+)-induced shrinking and aggregating properties at a low K(+) concentration, while other cations (e.g., Na(+), H(+), NH4(+), Mg(2+), or Ca(2+)) cannot trigger such response behaviors. Effects of chemical compositions of microspheres on the K(+)-induced shrinking and aggregating behaviors are investigated systematically. The K(+)-induced aggregating sensitivity of the P(NIPAM-co-AAB15C5) microspheres can be enhanced by increasing the content of crown ether units in the polymeric networks; however, it is nearly not influenced by varying the monomer and cross-linker concentrations in the microsphere preparation. State diagrams of the dispersed-to-aggregated transformation of P(NIPAM-co-AAB15C5) microspheres in aqueous solutions as a function of temperature and K(+) concentration are constructed, which provide valuable information for tuning the dispersed/aggregated states of microspheres by varying environmental K(+) concentration and temperature. The microspheres with synchronously K(+)-induced shrinking and aggregating properties proposed in this study provide a brand-new model for designing novel targeted drug delivery systems.

  16. Systems biology for organotypic cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Grego, Sonia; Dougherty, Edward R; Alexander, Francis J; Auerbach, Scott S; Berridge, Brian R; Bittner, Michael L; Casey, Warren; Cooley, Philip C; Dash, Ajit; Ferguson, Stephen S; Fennell, Timothy R; Hawkins, Brian T; Hickey, Anthony J; Kleensang, Andre; Liebman, Michael N J; Martin, Florian; Maull, Elizabeth A; Paragas, Jason; Qiao, Guilin Gary; Ramaiahgari, Sreenivasa; Sumner, Susan J; Yoon, Miyoung

    2016-11-14

    Translating in vitro biological data into actionable information related to human health holds the potential to improve disease treatment and risk assessment of chemical exposures. While genomics has identified regulatory pathways at the cellular level, translation to the organism level requires a multiscale approach accounting for intra-cellular regulation, inter-cellular interaction, and tissue/organ-level effects. Tissue-level effects can now be probed in vitro thanks to recently developed systems of three-dimensional (3D), multicellular, "organotypic" cell cultures, which mimic functional responses of living tissue. However, there remains a knowledge gap regarding interactions across different biological scales, complicating accurate prediction of health outcomes from molecular/genomic data and tissue responses. Systems biology aims at mathematical modeling of complex, non-linear biological systems. We propose to apply a systems biology approach to achieve a computational representation of tissue-level physiological responses by integrating empirical data derived from organotypic culture systems with computational models of intracellular pathways to better predict human responses. Successful implementation of this integrated approach will provide a powerful tool for faster, more accurate and cost-effective screening of potential toxicants and therapeutics. On September 11, 2015, an interdisciplinary group of scientists, engineers, and clinicians gathered for a workshop in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, to discuss this ambitious goal. Participants represented laboratory-based and computational modeling approaches to pharmacology and toxicology, as well as the pharmaceutical industry, government, non-profits, and academia. Discussions focused on identifying critical system perturbations to model, the computational tools required, and the experimental approaches best suited to generating key data.

  17. Systems Biology for Organotypic Cell Cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Grego, Sonia; Dougherty, Edward R.; Alexander, Francis J.; Auerbach, Scott S.; Berridge, Brian R.; Bittner, Michael L.; Casey, Warren; Cooley, Philip C.; Dash, Ajit; Ferguson, Stephen S.; Fennell, Timothy R.; Hawkins, Brian T.; Hickey, Anthony J.; Kleensang, Andre; Liebman, Michael N.; Martin, Florian; Maull, Elizabeth A.; Paragas, Jason; Qiao, Guilin; Ramaiahgari, Sreenivasa; Sumner, Susan J.; Yoon, Miyoung

    2016-08-04

    Translating in vitro biological data into actionable information related to human health holds the potential to improve disease treatment and risk assessment of chemical exposures. While genomics has identified regulatory pathways at the cellular level, translation to the organism level requires a multiscale approach accounting for intra-cellular regulation, inter-cellular interaction, and tissue/organ-level effects. Tissue-level effects can now be probed in vitro thanks to recently developed systems of three-dimensional (3D), multicellular, “organotypic” cell cultures, which mimic functional responses of living tissue. However, there remains a knowledge gap regarding interactions across different biological scales, complicating accurate prediction of health outcomes from molecular/genomic data and tissue responses. Systems biology aims at mathematical modeling of complex, non-linear biological systems. We propose to apply a systems biology approach to achieve a computational representation of tissue-level physiological responses by integrating empirical data derived from organotypic culture systems with computational models of intracellular pathways to better predict human responses. Successful implementation of this integrated approach will provide a powerful tool for faster, more accurate and cost-effective screening of potential toxicants and therapeutics. On September 11, 2015, an interdisciplinary group of scientists, engineers, and clinicians gathered for a workshop in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, to discuss this ambitious goal. Participants represented laboratory-based and computational modeling approaches to pharmacology and toxicology, as well as the pharmaceutical industry, government, non-profits, and academia. Discussions focused on identifying critical system perturbations to model, the computational tools required, and the experimental approaches best suited to generating key data. This consensus report summarizes the discussions held.

  18. Where the wild things are: predicting hotspots of seabird aggregations in the California Current System.

    PubMed

    Nur, Nadav; Jahncke, Jaime; Herzog, Mark P; Howar, Julie; Hyrenbach, K David; Zamon, Jeannette E; Ainley, David G; Wiens, John A; Morgan, Ken; Ballance, Lisa T; Stralberg, Diana

    2011-09-01

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) provide an important tool for conservation of marine ecosystems. To be most effective, these areas should be strategically located in a manner that supports ecosystem function. To inform marine spatial planning and support strategic establishment of MPAs within the California Current System, we identified areas predicted to support multispecies aggregations of seabirds ("hotspots"). We developed habitat-association models for 16 species using information from at-sea observations collected over an 11-year period (1997-2008), bathymetric data, and remotely sensed oceanographic data for an area from north of Vancouver Island, Canada, to the USA/Mexico border and seaward 600 km from the coast. This approach enabled us to predict distribution and abundance of seabirds even in areas of few or no surveys. We developed single-species predictive models using a machine-learning algorithm: bagged decision trees. Single-species predictions were then combined to identify potential hotspots of seabird aggregation, using three criteria: (1) overall abundance among species, (2) importance of specific areas ("core areas") to individual species, and (3) predicted persistence of hotspots across years. Model predictions were applied to the entire California Current for four seasons (represented by February, May, July, and October) in each of 11 years. Overall, bathymetric variables were often important predictive variables, whereas oceanographic variables derived from remotely sensed data were generally less important. Predicted hotspots often aligned with currently protected areas (e.g., National Marine Sanctuaries), but we also identified potential hotspots in Northern California/Southern Oregon (from Cape Mendocino to Heceta Bank), Southern California (adjacent to the Channel Islands), and adjacent to Vancouver Island, British Columbia, that are not currently included in protected areas. Prioritization and identification of multispecies hotspots will

  19. Texture development and slip systems in bridgmanite and bridgmanite + ferropericlase aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagi, L.; Wenk, H.-R.

    2016-09-01

    Bridgmanite (Mg,Fe)SiO3 and ferropericlase (Mg,Fe)O are the most abundant phases in the lower mantle and localized regions of the D″ layer just above the core mantle boundary. Seismic anisotropy is observed near subduction zones at the top of the lower mantle and in the D″ region. One source of anisotropy is dislocation glide and associated texture (crystallographic preferred orientation) development. Thus, in order to interpret seismic anisotropy, it is important to understand texture development and slip system activities in bridgmanite and bridgmanite + ferropericlase aggregates. Here we report on in situ texture development in bridgmanite and bridgmanite + ferropericlase aggregates deformed in the diamond anvil cell up to 61 GPa. When bridgmanite is synthesized from enstatite, it exhibits a strong (4.2 m.r.d.) 001 transformation texture due to a structural relationship with the precursor enstatite phase. When bridgmanite + ferropericlase are synthesized from olivine or ringwoodite, bridgmanite exhibits a relatively weak 100 transformation texture (1.2 and 1.6 m.r.d., respectively). This is likely due to minimization of elastic strain energy as a result of Young's modulus anisotropy. In bridgmanite, 001 deformation textures are observed at pressures <55 GPa. The 001 texture is likely due to slip on (001) planes in the [100], [010] and < {110} rangle directions. Stress relaxation by laser annealing to 1500-1600 K does not result in a change in this texture type. However, at pressures >55 GPa a change in texture to a 100 maximum is observed, consistent with slip on the (100) plane. Ferropericlase, when deformed with bridgmanite, does not develop a coherent texture. This is likely due to strain heterogeneity within the softer ferropericlase grains. Thus, it is plausible that ferropericlase is not a significant source of anisotropy in the lower mantle.

  20. Where the wild things are: Predicting hotspots of seabird aggregations in the California Current System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nur, N.; Jahncke, J.; Herzog, M.P.; Howar, J.; Hyrenbach, K.D.; Zamon, J.E.; Ainley, D.G.; Wiens, J.A.; Morgan, K.; Balance, L.T.; Stralberg, D.

    2011-01-01

    Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) provide an important tool for conservation of marine ecosystems. To be most effective, these areas should be strategically located in a manner that supports ecosystem function. To inform marine spatial planning and support strategic establishment of MPAs within the California Current System, we identified areas predicted to support multispecies aggregations of seabirds ("hotspot????). We developed habitat-association models for 16 species using information from at-sea observations collected over an 11-year period (1997-2008), bathymetric data, and remotely sensed oceanographic data for an area from north of Vancouver Island, Canada, to the USA/Mexico border and seaward 600 km from the coast. This approach enabled us to predict distribution and abundance of seabirds even in areas of few or no surveys. We developed single-species predictive models using a machine-learning algorithm: bagged decision trees. Single-species predictions were then combined to identify potential hotspots of seabird aggregation, using three criteria: (1) overall abundance among species, (2) importance of specific areas ("core area????) to individual species, and (3) predicted persistence of hotspots across years. Model predictions were applied to the entire California Current for four seasons (represented by February, May, July, and October) in each of 11 years. Overall, bathymetric variables were often important predictive variables, whereas oceanographic variables derived from remotely sensed data were generally less important. Predicted hotspots often aligned with currently protected areas (e.g., National Marine Sanctuaries), but we also identified potential hotspots in Northern California/Southern Oregon (from Cape Mendocino to Heceta Bank), Southern California (adjacent to the Channel Islands), and adjacent to Vancouver Island, British Columbia, that are not currently included in protected areas. Prioritization and identification of multispecies hotspots

  1. A 3D sphere culture system containing functional polymers for large-scale human pluripotent stem cell production.

    PubMed

    Otsuji, Tomomi G; Bin, Jiang; Yoshimura, Azumi; Tomura, Misayo; Tateyama, Daiki; Minami, Itsunari; Yoshikawa, Yoshihiro; Aiba, Kazuhiro; Heuser, John E; Nishino, Taito; Hasegawa, Kouichi; Nakatsuji, Norio

    2014-05-06

    Utilizing human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) in cell-based therapy and drug discovery requires large-scale cell production. However, scaling up conventional adherent cultures presents challenges of maintaining a uniform high quality at low cost. In this regard, suspension cultures are a viable alternative, because they are scalable and do not require adhesion surfaces. 3D culture systems such as bioreactors can be exploited for large-scale production. However, the limitations of current suspension culture methods include spontaneous fusion between cell aggregates and suboptimal passaging methods by dissociation and reaggregation. 3D culture systems that dynamically stir carrier beads or cell aggregates should be refined to reduce shearing forces that damage hPSCs. Here, we report a simple 3D sphere culture system that incorporates mechanical passaging and functional polymers. This setup resolves major problems associated with suspension culture methods and dynamic stirring systems and may be optimal for applications involving large-scale hPSC production.

  2. The self-assembly, aggregation and phase transitions of food protein systems in one, two and three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzenga, Raffaele; Fischer, Peter

    2013-04-01

    The aggregation of proteins is of fundamental relevance in a number of daily phenomena, as important and diverse as blood coagulation, medical diseases, or cooking an egg in the kitchen. Colloidal food systems, in particular, are examples that have great significance for protein aggregation, not only for their importance and implications, which touches on everyday life, but also because they allow the limits of the colloidal science analogy to be tested in a much broader window of conditions, such as pH, ionic strength, concentration and temperature. Thus, studying the aggregation and self-assembly of proteins in foods challenges our understanding of these complex systems from both the molecular and statistical physics perspectives. Last but not least, food offers a unique playground to study the aggregation of proteins in three, two and one dimensions, that is to say, in the bulk, at air/water and oil/water interfaces and in protein fibrillation phenomena. In this review we will tackle this very ambitious task in order to discuss the current understanding of protein aggregation in the framework of foods, which is possibly one of the broadest contexts, yet is of tremendous daily relevance.

  3. Aggregation and Push-Based Distribution of THREDDS Catalogs in Operational Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzella, G. M.; Mazzetti, P.; Nativi, S.; Bigagli, L.; Pecci, L.

    2006-12-01

    We present a solution for the implementation of a catalog service in the context of an European infrastructure; this has the strategic objective of providing an integrated service for global and regional ocean resources to intermediate users and policy makers. The current European information systems (e.g. MERSEA Marine Environment and Security for the European Area, MOON Mediterranean Operational Oceanography Network and SeaDataNet PanEuropean infrastructure for Ocean and marine data management) are characterized by a three-level hierarchy. At the bottom level we find the regional and local data sources, providing observation data and model outputs. At the intermediate level, the operational projects have Thematic Portals (TEP's) aggregating the information on logical basis, e.g. Observation data portals (In situ and Satellite), Forcing (meteorological portal), Modelling/forecasting portals. At the top level, the Information Management Portal provides query services and links to TEP's. Currently, several architectural and technological general solutions are available for implementing catalog services, for typical use-cases in the context of geospatial information systems. However, if we consider Operational Oceanography a particular case, characterised by tighter non-functional characteristics -such as seamless integration with other services, responsiveness, etc.- we must conceive a tailored architectural solution. In the particular cases of operational projects, the hierarchical structure of the information system can be considered near-static and the needed scalability in terms of data sources is small; thus, a simpler solution based on datasets aggregation can be suitable and profitable. In such a schema, upper level catalogs are built merging lower-level catalogs. On the other hand, to adopt this approach, it is necessary that any update is notified to the upper-level catalogs, whenever a lower level catalog is modified. Hence, our solution implemented a push

  4. The cell aggregating propensity of probiotic actinobacterial isolates: isolation and characterization of the aggregation inducing peptide pheromone.

    PubMed

    Muthu Selvam, Ramu; Vinothini, Gopal; Palliyarai Thaiyammal, Sethuramalingam; Latha, Selvanathan; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Dhanasekaran, Dharumadurai; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Ali Alharbi, Sulaiman; Archunan, Govindaraju

    2016-01-01

    The auto-aggregating ability of a probiotic is a prerequisite for colonization and protection of the gastrointestinal tract, whereas co-aggregation provides a close interaction with pathogenic bacteria. Peptide pheromone mediated signaling has been studied in several systems. However, it has not yet been explored in prokaryotes, especially actinobacteria. Hence, in the present study, the diffusible aggregation promoting factor was purified from the culture supernatant of a potent actinobacterial probiont and characterized using 20 different actinobacterial cultures isolated from the gut region of chicken and goat. The results showed that the pheromone-like compound induces the aggregation propensity of treated isolates. The factor was found to be a heat stable, acidic pH resistant, low molecular weight peptide which enhances the biofilm forming ability of other actinobacterial isolates. The aggregation promoting factor represents a bacterial sex factor (pheromone) and its characterization confirms its usage in the probiotic formulation.

  5. Importance of heterogeneous aggregation for NP fate in natural and engineered systems.

    PubMed

    Therezien, Mathieu; Thill, Antoine; Wiesner, Mark R

    2014-07-01

    The growing interest in nanoparticles (NP) is inevitably translating into an increase of their emissions in the environment. On the other hand, the necessary knowledge about the fate and transport of these NPs in the environment remains limited. In particular it is critically important to understand how the interactions of NPs with the particles already present in environmental matrices affect their fate, transport, and eventually persistence in the environment. In this study we present a computer model that expands upon the existing simple homogeneous aggregation models to account for heterogeneous aggregation between NPs and the distribution of natural particles already present in environmental waters. The model follows the concentrations of purely nanoparticle aggregates, purely background particles aggregates, and mixed aggregates, as well as the composition of mixed aggregates. After analytical evaluation, we ran simulations to illustrate the complexity of heterogeneous aggregation and its impact on the fate of NPs. The model predicts that the impact of NP size on their persistence in the environment is accentuated for low affinity between NPs and background particles, and for low background particle concentration.

  6. Micro 3D cell culture systems for cellular behavior studies: Culture matrices, devices, substrates, and in-situ sensing methods.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jonghoon; Lee, Eun Kyu; Choo, Jaebum; Yuh, Junhan; Hong, Jong Wook

    2015-09-01

    Microfabricated systems equipped with 3D cell culture devices and in-situ cellular biosensing tools can be a powerful bionanotechnology platform to investigate a variety of biomedical applications. Various construction substrates such as plastics, glass, and paper are used for microstructures. When selecting a construction substrate, a key consideration is a porous microenvironment that allows for spheroid growth and mimics the extracellular matrix (ECM) of cell aggregates. Various bio-functionalized hydrogels are ideal candidates that mimic the natural ECM for 3D cell culture. When selecting an optimal and appropriate microfabrication method, both the intended use of the system and the characteristics and restrictions of the target cells should be carefully considered. For highly sensitive and near-cell surface detection of excreted cellular compounds, SERS-based microsystems capable of dual modal imaging have the potential to be powerful tools; however, the development of optical reporters and nanoprobes remains a key challenge. We expect that the microsystems capable of both 3D cell culture and cellular response monitoring would serve as excellent tools to provide fundamental cellular behavior information for various biomedical applications such as metastasis, wound healing, high throughput screening, tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug discovery and development.

  7. Effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on α-synuclein aggregation and the ubiquitin-proteasome system in dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Xie, Hongjun

    2016-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons (PC12 cells) were treated with different doses of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs), to investigate their effects on α-Synuclein (α-Syn) aggregation and their mechanism of action. Western blotting and immunofluorescent staining were performed. Exposure to TiO2-NPs increased α-Syn expression (p < 0.05) and induced dose-dependent α-Syn aggregation. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine partially inhibited α-Syn expression induced by a 200 μg/ml dose of TiO2-NPs. TiO2-NPs reduced the expressions of parkin and ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase protein, and were associated with oxidative stress in PC12 cells. Dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system also contributed to α-Syn aggregation. The potentially neurotoxic TiO2-NPs may cause Parkinson's disease.

  8. Leveraging Human-environment Systems in Residential Buildings for Aggregate Energy Efficiency and Sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoqi

    Reducing the energy consumed in the built environment is a key objective in many sustainability initiatives. Existing energy saving methods have consisted of physical interventions to buildings and/or behavioral modifications of occupants. However, such methods may not only suffer from their own disadvantages, e.g. high cost and transient effect, but also lose aggregate energy saving potential due to the oftentimes-associated single-building-focused view and an isolated examination of occupant behaviors. This dissertation attempts to overcome the limitations of traditional energy saving research and practical approaches, and enhance residential building energy efficiency and sustainability by proposing innovative energy strategies from a holistic perspective of the aggregate human-environment systems. This holistic perspective features: (1) viewing buildings as mutual influences in the built environment, (2) leveraging both the individual and contextualized social aspects of occupant behaviors, and (3) incorporating interactions between the built environment and human behaviors. First, I integrate three interlinked components: buildings, residents, and the surrounding neighborhood, and quantify the potential energy savings to be gained from renovating buildings at the inter-building level and leveraging neighborhood-contextualized occupant social networks. Following the confirmation of both the inter-building effect among buildings and occupants' interpersonal influence on energy conservation, I extend the research further by examining the synergy that may exist at the intersection between these "engineered" building networks and "social" peer networks, focusing specifically on the additional energy saving potential that could result from interactions between the two components. Finally, I seek to reach an alignment of the human and building environment subsystems by matching the thermostat preferences of each household with the thermal conditions within their

  9. Investigating the feasibility of scale up and automation of human induced pluripotent stem cells cultured in aggregates in feeder free conditions☆

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Filipa A.C.; Chandra, Amit; Thomas, Robert J.; Pedersen, Roger A.; Vallier, Ludovic; Williams, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The transfer of a laboratory process into a manufacturing facility is one of the most critical steps required for the large scale production of cell-based therapy products. This study describes the first published protocol for scalable automated expansion of human induced pluripotent stem cell lines growing in aggregates in feeder-free and chemically defined medium. Cells were successfully transferred between different sites representative of research and manufacturing settings; and passaged manually and using the CompacT SelecT automation platform. Modified protocols were developed for the automated system and the management of cells aggregates (clumps) was identified as the critical step. Cellular morphology, pluripotency gene expression and differentiation into the three germ layers have been used compare the outcomes of manual and automated processes. PMID:24440272

  10. Testing a theory of organizational culture, climate and youth outcomes in child welfare systems: a United States national study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Nathaniel J; Glisson, Charles

    2014-04-01

    Theories of organizational culture and climate (OCC) applied to child welfare systems hypothesize that strategic dimensions of organizational culture influence organizational climate and that OCC explains system variance in youth outcomes. This study provides the first structural test of the direct and indirect effects of culture and climate on youth outcomes in a national sample of child welfare systems and isolates specific culture and climate dimensions most associated with youth outcomes. The study applies multilevel path analysis (ML-PA) to a U.S. nationwide sample of 2,380 youth in 73 child welfare systems participating in the second National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being. Youths were selected in a national, two-stage, stratified random sample design. Youths' psychosocial functioning was assessed by caregivers' responses to the Child Behavior Checklist at intake and at 18-month follow-up. OCC was assessed by front-line caseworkers' (N=1,740) aggregated responses to the Organizational Social Context measure. Comparison of the a priori and subsequent trimmed models confirmed a reduced model that excluded rigid organizational culture and explained 70% of the system variance in youth outcomes. Controlling for youth- and system-level covariates, systems with more proficient and less resistant organizational cultures exhibited more functional, more engaged, and less stressful climates. Systems with more proficient cultures and more engaged, more functional, and more stressful climates exhibited superior youth outcomes. Findings suggest child welfare administrators can support service effectiveness with interventions that improve specific dimensions of culture and climate.

  11. Implications of Aggregated DoD Information Systems for Information Assurance Certification and Accreditation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    designated accrediting authority based on an assessment of the implementation status of the assigned IA controls. Medium- low DATO The DoD IS is... based on interdependencies Step 1: Make accredita- tion determination for each aggregate DoD IS Nav DATO Weapons DATO Comm DATO ISR IATO Nav DATO ...pedigree to be applied effec- tively to IA C&A aggregation efforts, a precise definition is needed. Based on our analysis of existing policies, we make the

  12. PAVS: A New Privacy-Preserving Data Aggregation Scheme for Vehicle Sensing Systems

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chang; Lu, Rongxing; Wang, Huaxiong; Zhu, Liehuang; Huang, Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Air pollution has become one of the most pressing environmental issues in recent years. According to a World Health Organization (WHO) report, air pollution has led to the deaths of millions of people worldwide. Accordingly, expensive and complex air-monitoring instruments have been exploited to measure air pollution. Comparatively, a vehicle sensing system (VSS), as it can be effectively used for many purposes and can bring huge financial benefits in reducing high maintenance and repair costs, has received considerable attention. However, the privacy issues of VSS including vehicles’ location privacy have not been well addressed. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a new privacy-preserving data aggregation scheme, called PAVS, for VSS. Specifically, PAVS combines privacy-preserving classification and privacy-preserving statistics on both the mean E(·) and variance Var(·), which makes VSS more promising, as, with minimal privacy leakage, more vehicles are willing to participate in sensing. Detailed analysis shows that the proposed PAVS can achieve the properties of privacy preservation, data accuracy and scalability. In addition, the performance evaluations via extensive simulations also demonstrate its efficiency. PMID:28273795

  13. Abnormal clearance of soluble aggregates of human immunoglobulin G in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Lobatto, S; Daha, M R; Breedveld, F C; Pauwels, E K; Evers-Schouten, J H; Voetman, A A; Cats, A; Van Es, L A

    1988-04-01

    In the present study, we tested mononuclear phagocyte system function in nine healthy controls and 15 SLE patients with complement activating 123I-labelled aggregates of human IgG (AIgG). Clearance half-time of AIgG was 26 +/- 8 min in controls, compared to 58 +/- 27 min in patients (P less than 0.005). Binding of AIgG to erythrocytes was significantly lower in patients, 9.3 +/- 8.1 vs 24 +/- 20% (P less than 0.05). The increase of C3a-levels in plasma was significantly lower in patients than in controls (P less than 0.05 at 3 and 8 min), suggesting less complement activation. Liver and spleen uptake of 123I-AIgG was measured with a gamma camera and expressed as liver/spleen uptake ratios. In patients, the liver/spleen uptake ratios were significantly higher than in controls at 15 min, 3.8 +/- 2.0 vs 2.31 +/- 0.7 (P less than 0.05), due to less splenic uptake of AIgG. Correlations between clearance half-time or liver/spleen uptake ratios and immune complex levels or disease activity were not found. This study indicates that clearance of soluble AIgG is abnormal in patients with SLE, due to decreased splenic uptake of AIgG.

  14. From aggregative adsorption to surface depletion: Aqueous systems of CnEm amphiphiles at hydrophilic surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Rother, Gernot; Müter, Dirk; Bock, Henry; ...

    2017-03-27

    Adsorption of a short-chain nonionic amphiphile (C6E3) at the surface of mesoporous silica glass (CPG-10) was studied by a combination of adsorption measurements and mesoscale simulations. Adsorption measurements covering a wide composition range of the C6E3 + water system show that no adsorption occurs up to the critical micelle concentration (cmc), at which a sharp increase of adsorption is observed that is attributed to ad-micelle formation at the pore walls. Intriguingly, as the concentration is increased further, the surface excess of the amphiphile begins to decrease and eventually becomes negative, which corresponds to preferential adsorption of water rather than amphiphilemore » at high amphiphile concentrations. The existence of such a surface-azeotropic point has not previously been reported in the surfactant adsorption field. Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations were performed to reveal the structural origin of this transition from aggregative adsorption to surface depletion. Finally, the simulations indicate that this transition can be attributed to the repulsive interaction between head groups, causing amphiphilic depletion in the region around the corona of the surface micelles.« less

  15. PAVS: A New Privacy-Preserving Data Aggregation Scheme for Vehicle Sensing Systems.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chang; Lu, Rongxing; Wang, Huaxiong; Zhu, Liehuang; Huang, Cheng

    2017-03-03

    Air pollution has become one of the most pressing environmental issues in recent years. According to a World Health Organization (WHO) report, air pollution has led to the deaths of millions of people worldwide. Accordingly, expensive and complex air-monitoring instruments have been exploited to measure air pollution. Comparatively, a vehicle sensing system (VSS), as it can be effectively used for many purposes and can bring huge financial benefits in reducing high maintenance and repair costs, has received considerable attention. However, the privacy issues of VSS including vehicles' location privacy have not been well addressed. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a new privacy-preserving data aggregation scheme, called PAVS, for VSS. Specifically, PAVS combines privacy-preserving classification and privacy-preserving statistics on both the mean E(·) and variance Var(·), which makes VSS more promising, as, with minimal privacy leakage, more vehicles are willing to participate in sensing. Detailed analysis shows that the proposed PAVS can achieve the properties of privacy preservation, data accuracy and scalability. In addition, the performance evaluations via extensive simulations also demonstrate its efficiency.

  16. Aggregating data for computational toxicology applications: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Aggregated Computational Toxicology Resource (ACToR) System.

    PubMed

    Judson, Richard S; Martin, Matthew T; Egeghy, Peter; Gangwal, Sumit; Reif, David M; Kothiya, Parth; Wolf, Maritja; Cathey, Tommy; Transue, Thomas; Smith, Doris; Vail, James; Frame, Alicia; Mosher, Shad; Cohen Hubal, Elaine A; Richard, Ann M

    2012-01-01

    Computational toxicology combines data from high-throughput test methods, chemical structure analyses and other biological domains (e.g., genes, proteins, cells, tissues) with the goals of predicting and understanding the underlying mechanistic causes of chemical toxicity and for predicting toxicity of new chemicals and products. A key feature of such approaches is their reliance on knowledge extracted from large collections of data and data sets in computable formats. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed a large data resource called ACToR (Aggregated Computational Toxicology Resource) to support these data-intensive efforts. ACToR comprises four main repositories: core ACToR (chemical identifiers and structures, and summary data on hazard, exposure, use, and other domains), ToxRefDB (Toxicity Reference Database, a compilation of detailed in vivo toxicity data from guideline studies), ExpoCastDB (detailed human exposure data from observational studies of selected chemicals), and ToxCastDB (data from high-throughput screening programs, including links to underlying biological information related to genes and pathways). The EPA DSSTox (Distributed Structure-Searchable Toxicity) program provides expert-reviewed chemical structures and associated information for these and other high-interest public inventories. Overall, the ACToR system contains information on about 400,000 chemicals from 1100 different sources. The entire system is built using open source tools and is freely available to download. This review describes the organization of the data repository and provides selected examples of use cases.

  17. Heat capacity anomaly in a self-aggregating system: Triblock copolymer 17R4 in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumancas, Lorenzo V.; Simpson, David E.; Jacobs, D. T.

    2015-05-01

    The reverse Pluronic, triblock copolymer 17R4 is formed from poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO): PPO14 - PEO24 - PPO14, where the number of monomers in each block is denoted by the subscripts. In water, 17R4 has a micellization line marking the transition from a unimer network to self-aggregated spherical micelles which is quite near a cloud point curve above which the system separates into copolymer-rich and copolymer-poor liquid phases. The phase separation has an Ising-like, lower consolute critical point with a well-determined critical temperature and composition. We have measured the heat capacity as a function of temperature using an adiabatic calorimeter for three compositions: (1) the critical composition where the anomaly at the critical point is analyzed, (2) a composition much less than the critical composition with a much smaller spike when the cloud point curve is crossed, and (3) a composition near where the micellization line intersects the cloud point curve that only shows micellization. For the critical composition, the heat capacity anomaly very near the critical point is observed for the first time in a Pluronic/water system and is described well as a second-order phase transition resulting from the copolymer-water interaction. For all compositions, the onset of micellization is clear, but the formation of micelles occurs over a broad range of temperatures and never becomes complete because micelles form differently in each phase above the cloud point curve. The integrated heat capacity gives an enthalpy that is smaller than the standard state enthalpy of micellization given by a van't Hoff plot, a typical result for Pluronic systems.

  18. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    Part of the 1994 Industrial Minerals Review. The production, consumption, and applications of construction aggregates are reviewed. In 1994, the production of construction aggregates, which includes crushed stone and construction sand and gravel combined, increased 7.7 percent to 2.14 Gt compared with the previous year. These record production levels are mostly a result of funding for highway construction work provided by the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991. Demand is expected to increase for construction aggregates in 1995.

  19. Cultural systems for growing potatoes in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, T.; Bula, R.; Corey, R.; Morrow, R.

    1988-01-01

    Higher plants are being evaluated for life support to provide needed food, oxygen and water as well as removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The successful utilization of plants in space will require the development of not only highly productive growing systems but also highly efficient bioregenerative systems. It will be necessary to recycle all inedible plant parts and all human wastes so that the entire complement of elemental compounds can be reused. Potatoes have been proposed as one of the desirable crops because they are 1) extremely productive, yielding more than 100 metric tons per hectare from field plantings, 2) the edible tubers are high in digestible starch (70%) and protein (10%) on a dry weight basis, 3) up to 80% of the total plant production is in tubers and thus edible, 4) the plants are easily propagated either from tubers or from tissue culture plantlets, 5) the tubers can be utilized with a minimum of processing, and 6) potatoes can be prepared in a variety of different forms for the human diet (Tibbitts et al., 1982). However potatoes have a growth pattern that complicates the development of growing the plants in controlled systems. Tubers are borne on underground stems that are botanically termed 'rhizomes', but in common usage termed 'stolons'. The stolons must be maintained in a dark, moist area with sufficient provision for enlargement of tubers. Stems rapidly terminate in flowers forcing extensive branching and spreading of plants so that individual plants will cover 0.2 m2 or more area. Thus the growing system must be developed to provide an area that is darkened for tuber and root growth and of sufficient size for plant spread. A system developed for growing potatoes, or any plants, in space will have certain requirements that must be met to make them a useful part of a life support system. The system must 1) be constructed of materials, and involve media, that can be reused for many successive cycles of plant growth, 2

  20. Cultural systems for growing potatoes in space.

    PubMed

    Tibbitts, T; Bula, R; Corey, R; Morrow, R

    1988-01-01

    Higher plants are being evaluated for life support to provide needed food, oxygen and water as well as removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The successful utilization of plants in space will require the development of not only highly productive growing systems but also highly efficient bioregenerative systems. It will be necessary to recycle all inedible plant parts and all human wastes so that the entire complement of elemental compounds can be reused. Potatoes have been proposed as one of the desirable crops because they are 1) extremely productive, yielding more than 100 metric tons per hectare from field plantings, 2) the edible tubers are high in digestible starch (70%) and protein (10%) on a dry weight basis, 3) up to 80% of the total plant production is in tubers and thus edible, 4) the plants are easily propagated either from tubers or from tissue culture plantlets, 5) the tubers can be utilized with a minimum of processing, and 6) potatoes can be prepared in a variety of different forms for the human diet (Tibbitts et al., 1982). However potatoes have a growth pattern that complicates the development of growing the plants in controlled systems. Tubers are borne on underground stems that are botanically termed 'rhizomes', but in common usage termed 'stolons'. The stolons must be maintained in a dark, moist area with sufficient provision for enlargement of tubers. Stems rapidly terminate in flowers forcing extensive branching and spreading of plants so that individual plants will cover 0.2 m2 or more area. Thus the growing system must be developed to provide an area that is darkened for tuber and root growth and of sufficient size for plant spread. A system developed for growing potatoes, or any plants, in space will have certain requirements that must be met to make them a useful part of a life support system. The system must 1) be constructed of materials, and involve media, that can be reused for many successive cycles of plant growth, 2

  1. Gelation by phase separation in a whey protein system: in-situ kinetics of aggregation.

    PubMed

    Renard, D; Robert, P; Garnier, C; Dufour, E; Lefebvre, J

    2000-05-26

    The aggregation and gelation properties of beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), a globular protein from milk, was studied in aqueous ethanol solutions at room temperature. The phase state diagrams as a function of pH and ethanol concentration showed that a gel structure appeared after a period ranging from 1 min to 1 week, depending on the physico-chemical conditions. The in-situ kinetics of aggregation were followed by several methods in order to obtain a better understanding of the building of aggregates by the addition of ethanol. It was shown that the aggregation kinetics highly depended upon the pH, the process being fastest at pH 7. Viscoelasticity and infrared measurements indicated that alcohol-induced gelation would proceed via a two-step mechanism: small aggregates loosely connected between them were first built up; a real network took place in a second step. The coarse and irregular structures formed in aqueous ethanol gels revealed by confocal laser scanning microscopy could be analysed in terms of a phase separation. This observation was supported by a syneresis phenomenon visible in the final gel state. BLG in water-ethanol solution would undergo either an inhibition of the demixing by gelation or a binary phase separation accompanied by an irreversible gelation transition.

  2. A 3D human neural cell culture system for modeling Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Hye; Choi, Se Hoon; D’Avanzo, Carla; Hebisch, Matthias; Sliwinski, Christopher; Bylykbashi, Enjana; Washicosky, Kevin J.; Klee, Justin B.; Brüstle, Oliver; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Kim, Doo Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell technologies have facilitated the development of human cellular disease models that can be used to study pathogenesis and test therapeutic candidates. These models hold promise for complex neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) because existing animal models have been unable to fully recapitulate all aspects of pathology. We recently reported the characterization of a novel three-dimensional (3D) culture system that exhibits key events in AD pathogenesis, including extracellular aggregation of β-amyloid and accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau. Here we provide instructions for the generation and analysis of 3D human neural cell cultures, including the production of genetically modified human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) with familial AD mutations, the differentiation of the hNPCs in a 3D matrix, and the analysis of AD pathogenesis. The 3D culture generation takes 1–2 days. The aggregation of β-amyloid is observed after 6-weeks of differentiation followed by robust tau pathology after 10–14 weeks. PMID:26068894

  3. A 3D human neural cell culture system for modeling Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Hye; Choi, Se Hoon; D'Avanzo, Carla; Hebisch, Matthias; Sliwinski, Christopher; Bylykbashi, Enjana; Washicosky, Kevin J; Klee, Justin B; Brüstle, Oliver; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Kim, Doo Yeon

    2015-07-01

    Stem cell technologies have facilitated the development of human cellular disease models that can be used to study pathogenesis and test therapeutic candidates. These models hold promise for complex neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), because existing animal models have been unable to fully recapitulate all aspects of pathology. We recently reported the characterization of a novel 3D culture system that exhibits key events in AD pathogenesis, including extracellular aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) and accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau. Here we provide instructions for the generation and analysis of 3D human neural cell cultures, including the production of genetically modified human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) with familial AD mutations, the differentiation of the hNPCs in a 3D matrix and the analysis of AD pathogenesis. The 3D culture generation takes 1-2 d. The aggregation of Aβ is observed after 6 weeks of differentiation, followed by robust tau pathology after 10-14 weeks.

  4. Slip system domains. 2. Kinematic aspects of fabric development in polycrystalline aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gapais, Denis; Cobbold, Peter Robert

    1987-07-01

    In the first paper of the present series (Cobbold and Gapais, 1986), we develop theoretical models of plane strain domainal deformation by slip along inextensible and indestructible fibres. For such extreme mechanical conditions, we show that deformation is largely controlled by kinematic factors. We use our models to explain domainal patterns of natural slip systems, including bedding and foliation planes, faults, ductile shear zones and lattice planes. The present paper focusses on kinematic aspects of fabric development in polycrystalline aggregates. A three-dimensional kinematic model is developed. It reveals that common quartz fabrics may develop domainally by reorientation and selection of inextensible slip directions () axes) or slip planes with initially random orientation. Stable orientations of slip directions are close to both surfaces of no finite extension and orientations of large amount of shear. We explain (1) common patterns of quartz and c-axis fabrics (e.g., small circles and crossed girdles) (2)characteristic differences between fabric patterns according to the shape of the finite strain ellipsoid (3)development of asymmetric fabrics during non coaxial deformation histories. This last process involves selective destruction or replacement of certain orientation domains, so that a preferred orientation of slip lines develops, close to the bulk shear direction. Rotation recrystallization is shown to be an efficient natural selection mechanism. The models also account for many microstructural features found in oriented polycrystalline rocks, especially (1)alternating band-like (or kink-like) domains of twinned preferred orientations (2) individual grains or clusters of grains with retort-like shapes and extensive recrystallisation at boundaries (3) small-scale shear bands, formed by strain partitioning and shear localization.

  5. Aggregation behavior of western spotted cucumber beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in vegetable cropping systems.

    PubMed

    Luna, J M; Xue, L

    2009-06-01

    Aggregation behavior of adult western spotted cucumber beetles (Diabrotica undecimpunctata undecimpunctata Mannerheim) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) was examined in six snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) fields adjacent to corn fields in western Oregon in 2004-2006. In the 2004 and 2005 studies, sweep net sampling was used to estimate beetle numbers along transect lines running perpendicular to the edges of the bean fields next to sweet corn fields. Beetles were collected from the fields and dissected to determine sex and egg development. Beetles were highly aggregated along the edge of the snap bean field next to the sweet corn, with the highest number of beetles occurring within the first meter next to the edge. Beetles in the aggregation areas were mostly females (average female to male ratio of 8.4 to 1), whereas beetles in the field section away from the edges were mostly male (female to male ratio of 0.6 to 1). Of the females collected in the aggregation areas, an average of 53% contained developing or fully developed eggs. In the 2006 study, beetle densities in the field edges were compared with densities within the fields in 40 bean fields with adjacent corn fields. Linear regression analysis showed that, across fields, nearly two times as many beetles were found in the field borders as in the rest of the field. These data suggest modifying traditional field scouting protocol to include field margins when a bean field is adjacent to or near a sweet corn field. A pest management strategy of only spraying the edges of bean fields containing beetle aggregations shows potential for significant pesticide reduction, as well as reducing risk of economic loss from crops harvested from the highly aggregated areas.

  6. Aggregating Data for Computational Toxicology Applications: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Aggregated Computational Toxicology Resource (ACToR) System

    PubMed Central

    Judson, Richard S.; Martin, Matthew T.; Egeghy, Peter; Gangwal, Sumit; Reif, David M.; Kothiya, Parth; Wolf, Maritja; Cathey, Tommy; Transue, Thomas; Smith, Doris; Vail, James; Frame, Alicia; Mosher, Shad; Cohen Hubal, Elaine A.; Richard, Ann M.

    2012-01-01

    Computational toxicology combines data from high-throughput test methods, chemical structure analyses and other biological domains (e.g., genes, proteins, cells, tissues) with the goals of predicting and understanding the underlying mechanistic causes of chemical toxicity and for predicting toxicity of new chemicals and products. A key feature of such approaches is their reliance on knowledge extracted from large collections of data and data sets in computable formats. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed a large data resource called ACToR (Aggregated Computational Toxicology Resource) to support these data-intensive efforts. ACToR comprises four main repositories: core ACToR (chemical identifiers and structures, and summary data on hazard, exposure, use, and other domains), ToxRefDB (Toxicity Reference Database, a compilation of detailed in vivo toxicity data from guideline studies), ExpoCastDB (detailed human exposure data from observational studies of selected chemicals), and ToxCastDB (data from high-throughput screening programs, including links to underlying biological information related to genes and pathways). The EPA DSSTox (Distributed Structure-Searchable Toxicity) program provides expert-reviewed chemical structures and associated information for these and other high-interest public inventories. Overall, the ACToR system contains information on about 400,000 chemicals from 1100 different sources. The entire system is built using open source tools and is freely available to download. This review describes the organization of the data repository and provides selected examples of use cases. PMID:22408426

  7. Oxygenation of intensive cell-culture system.

    PubMed

    Emery, A N; Jan, D C; al-Rubeai, M

    1995-11-01

    The abilities of various methods of oxygenation to meet the demands of high-cell-density culture were investigated using a spin filter perfusion system in a bench-top bioreactor. Oxygen demand at high cell density could not be met by sparging with air inside a spin filter (oxygen transfer values in this condition were comparable with those for surface aeration). Sparging with air outside a spin filter gave adequate oxygen transfer for the support of cell concentrations above 10(7) ml-1 in fully aerobic conditions but the addition of antifoam to control foaming caused blockage of the spinfilter mesh. Bubble-free aeration through immersed silicone tubing with pure oxygen gave similar oxygen transfer rates to that of sparging with air but without the problems of bubble damage and fouling of the spin filter. A supra-optimal level of dissolved oxygen (478% air saturation) inhibited cell growth. However, cells could recover from this stress and reach high density after reduction of the dissolved oxygen level to 50% air saturation.

  8. Enantiomer-specific oriented attachment: formation of macroscopic homochiral crystal aggregates from a racemic system.

    PubMed

    Viedma, Cristóbal; McBride, J Michael; Kahr, Bart; Cintas, Pedro

    2013-09-27

    Let's get together: Racemic samples of d- and l-enantiomorphous NaBrO3 (or NaClO3) crystals aggregate with nearly complete enantioselection. Centimeter-sized enantiopure megacrystals are often produced, and these can be sorted easily.

  9. Depletion of E. coli in permeable pavement mineral aggregate storage and reuse systems.

    PubMed

    Myers, B R; Beecham, S; van Leeuwen, J A; Keegan, A

    2009-01-01

    Permeable pavement reservoirs provide an important opportunity for the harvesting and storage of stormwater for reuse. This research aims to determine whether storage in dolomite, calcite and quartzite mineral aggregates in the base course of a permeable pavement impacts on the survival of the pathogen indicator organism Escherichia coli (E. coli) in storage. The reasons for depletion were also investigated. Twelve model permeable pavement storage reservoirs were filled, in triplicate, with dolomite, calcite and quartzite. Three reservoirs contained no aggregate. After filling with pathogen spiked rainwater, the concentration of E. coli was examined for 22 days in the reservoirs. The reservoirs were then agitated to determine if there was E. coli present which was not in aqueous suspension. The results of the experiments show that there is no significant difference in the depletion of E. coli found in reservoirs without aggregate, and those filled with dolomite or calcite. The rate of depletion was found to be significantly lower in the quartzite filled reservoirs. Agitation of the reservoirs yielded increases in the aqueous concentration of E. coli in all reservoir types, suggesting that the bacteria are adhering to the surface of the mineral aggregate and to the reservoir walls.

  10. Sociocultural Systems: The Next Step in Army Cultural Capability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Research Product 2013-02 Sociocultural Systems: The Next Step in Army Cultural Capability Editors Beret E . Strong...NUMBER 622785 6. AUTHOR(S) Editors: Beret E . Strong; LisaRe Brooks Babin & Michelle Ramsden Zbylut; Linda Roan 5c. PROJECT NUMBER A790...Sociocultural Systems: The Next Step in Army Cultural Capability Editors Beret E . Strong eCrossCulture Corporation LisaRe Brooks Babin

  11. The famous versus the inconvenient - or the dawn and the rise of 3D-culture systems.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Brigitte; Welle, Alexander; Giselbrecht, Stefan; Truckenmüller, Roman; Gottwald, Eric

    2009-12-31

    One of the greatest impacts on in vitro cell biology was the introduction of three-dimensional (3D) culture systems more than six decades ago and this era may be called the dawn of 3D-tissue culture. Although the advantages were obvious, this field of research was a "sleeping beauty" until the 1970s when multicellular spheroids were discovered as ideal tumor models. With this rebirth, organotypical culture systems became valuable tools and this trend continues to increase. While in the beginning, simple approaches, such as aggregation culture techniques, were favored due to their simplicity and convenience, now more sophisticated systems are used and are still being developed. One of the boosts in the development of new culture techniques arises from elaborate manufacturing and surface modification techniques, especially micro and nano system technologies that have either improved dramatically or have evolved very recently. With the help of these tools, it will soon be possible to generate even more sophisticated and more organotypic-like culture systems. Since 3D perfused or superfused systems are much more complex to set up and maintain compared to use of petri dishes and culture flasks, the added value of 3D approaches still needs to be demonstrated.

  12. The famous versus the inconvenient - or the dawn and the rise of 3D-culture systems

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, Brigitte; Welle, Alexander; Giselbrecht, Stefan; Truckenmüller, Roman; Gottwald, Eric

    2009-01-01

    One of the greatest impacts on in vitro cell biology was the introduction of three-dimensional (3D) culture systems more than six decades ago and this era may be called the dawn of 3D-tissue culture. Although the advantages were obvious, this field of research was a “sleeping beauty” until the 1970s when multicellular spheroids were discovered as ideal tumor models. With this rebirth, organotypical culture systems became valuable tools and this trend continues to increase. While in the beginning, simple approaches, such as aggregation culture techniques, were favored due to their simplicity and convenience, now more sophisticated systems are used and are still being developed. One of the boosts in the development of new culture techniques arises from elaborate manufacturing and surface modification techniques, especially micro and nano system technologies that have either improved dramatically or have evolved very recently. With the help of these tools, it will soon be possible to generate even more sophisticated and more organotypic-like culture systems. Since 3D perfused or superfused systems are much more complex to set up and maintain compared to use of petri dishes and culture flasks, the added value of 3D approaches still needs to be demonstrated. PMID:21607106

  13. Functional Systems and Culturally-Determined Cognitive Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Richard L.

    Noting that one means of better understanding the nature of cultural differences is to elucidate the cognitive differences between members of differing cultures, this paper examines Alexander Luria's sociohistorical theory of functional cognitive systems. The paper first describes Luria's notion of functional systems, the crux of which postulates…

  14. Soil 13C Dynamics in Aggregates Across a Soil Profile Under an Established Miscanthus System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dondini, M.; Groenigen, K. J.; Jones, M.

    2008-12-01

    Soils are the largest pool of terrestrial organic carbon (C), containing nearly three times the amount of C as the atmosphere. Environmental changes that affect soil C dynamics could slow down the rise in atmospheric CO2 and associated warming by promoting soil C storage. Our capacity to predict the consequences for global change therefore depends on a better understanding of the distribution and controls of soil organic C and how vegetation change may affect SOC distributions. One land cover change of particular interest involves the establishment of bio energy crop stands. The full mitigation potential of bio energy crops cannot be considered without taking into account their effect on soil C dynamics. Miscanthus, a perennial C4 grass from Eastern Asia, has recently received considerable interest as a bio-energy crop. For that reason, we analyzed the C content and the 13C signatures across the soil profile in a 14 year old Miscanthus system, established on former arable land. We combined SOM fractionation techniques by size and density, allowing us to investigate small shifts in soil C stores that would be significant in the long term, but that might not be detected by conventional methodologies. The 13C signal of the various SOM fractions allowed us to distinguish between Miscanthus-derived vs. native soil organic C. Soils under Miscanthus contained 796 g C/m2 in the 0-15 cm layer, and 1233g C/m2 in the 15- 30 cm layer. These values are significantly higher than soil C contents in the arable land. Macroaggregates under Miscanthus contain more than twice as much C compared to arable land, showing a decrease in soil C content with decreasing aggregate size. These differences are largely caused by soil C storage in the microaggregate within macroaggregates fraction. Under Miscanthus, this fraction contains 440 g C/m2 and 488 g C/m2 at 0-15 cm and 15-30 cm respectively, while under the arable land it has mean values of 174 g C/m2 and 353 g C/m2. Our data suggest a

  15. Fibronectin Aggregation and Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Tomoo; Erickson, Harold P.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of fibronectin (FN) assembly and the self-association sites are still unclear and contradictory, although the N-terminal 70-kDa region (I1–9) is commonly accepted as one of the assembly sites. We previously found that I1–9 binds to superfibronectin, which is an artificial FN aggregate induced by anastellin. In the present study, we found that I1–9 bound to the aggregate formed by anastellin and a small FN fragment, III1–2. An engineered disulfide bond in III2, which stabilizes folding, inhibited aggregation, but a disulfide bond in III1 did not. A gelatin precipitation assay showed that I1–9 did not interact with anastellin, III1, III2, III1–2, or several III1–2 mutants including III1–2KADA. (In contrast to previous studies, we found that the III1–2KADA mutant was identical in conformation to wild-type III1–2.) Because I1–9 only bound to the aggregate and the unfolding of III2 played a role in aggregation, we generated a III2 domain that was destabilized by deletion of the G strand. This mutant bound I1–9 as shown by the gelatin precipitation assay and fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis, and it inhibited FN matrix assembly when added to cell culture. Next, we introduced disulfide mutations into full-length FN. Three disulfide locks in III2, III3, and III11 were required to dramatically reduce anastellin-induced aggregation. When we tested the disulfide mutants in cell culture, only the disulfide bond in III2 reduced the FN matrix. These results suggest that the unfolding of III2 is one of the key factors for FN aggregation and assembly. PMID:21949131

  16. Three-dimensional Huh7 cell culture system for the study of Hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Sainz, Bruno; TenCate, Veronica; Uprichard, Susan L

    2009-01-01

    Background In order to elucidate how Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) interacts with polarized hepatocytes in vivo and how HCV-induced alterations in cellular function contribute to HCV-associated liver disease, a more physiologically relevant hepatocyte culture model is needed. As such, NASA-engineered three-dimensional (3-D) rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors were used in effort to promote differentiation of HCV-permissive Huh7 hepatoma cells. Results When cultured in the RWV, Huh7 cells became morphologically and transcriptionally distinct from more standard Huh7 two-dimensional (2-D) monolayers. Specifically, RWV-cultured Huh7 cells formed complex, multilayered 3-D aggregates in which Phase I and Phase II xenobiotic drug metabolism genes, as well as hepatocyte-specific transcripts (HNF4α, Albumin, TTR and α1AT), were upregulated compared to 2-D cultured Huh7 cells. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that these HCV-permissive 3-D cultured Huh7 cells were more polarized than their 2D counterparts with the expression of HCV receptors, cell adhesion and tight junction markers (CD81, scavenger receptor class B member 1, claudin-1, occludin, ZO-1, β-Catenin and E-Cadherin) significantly increased and exhibiting apical, lateral and/or basolateral localization. Conclusion These findings show that when cultured in 3-D, Huh7 cells acquire a more differentiated hepatocyte-like phenotype. Importantly, we show that these 3D cultures are highly permissive for HCV infection, thus providing an opportunity to study HCV entry and the effects of HCV infection on host cell function in a more physiologically relevant cell culture system. PMID:19604376

  17. Charged Dust Aggregate Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    A proper understanding of the behavior of dust particle aggregates immersed in a complex plasma first requires a knowledge of the basic properties of the system. Among the most important of these are the net electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments on the dust aggregate as well as the manner in which the aggregate interacts with the local electrostatic fields. The formation of elongated, fractal-like aggregates levitating in the sheath electric field of a weakly ionized RF generated plasma discharge has recently been observed experimentally. The resulting data has shown that as aggregates approach one another, they can both accelerate and rotate. At equilibrium, aggregates are observed to levitate with regular spacing, rotating about their long axis aligned parallel to the sheath electric field. Since gas drag tends to slow any such rotation, energy must be constantly fed into the system in order to sustain it. A numerical model designed to analyze this motion provides both the electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments of the aggregate while including the forces due to thermophoresis, neutral gas drag, and the ion wakefield. This model will be used to investigate the ambient conditions leading to the observed interactions. This research is funded by NSF Grant 1414523.

  18. Biona-C Cell Culture pH Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedericks, C.

    1999-01-01

    Sensors 2000! is developing a system to demonstrate the ability to perform accurate, real-time measurements of pH and CO2 in a cell culture media in Space. The BIONA-C Cell Culture pH Monitoring System consists of S2K! developed ion selective sensors and control electronics integrated with the fluidics of a cell culture system. The integrated system comprises a "rail" in the Cell Culture Module (CCM) of WRAIR (Space Biosciences of Walter Read Army Institute of Research). The CCM is a Space Shuttle mid-deck locker experiment payload. The BIONA-C is displayed along with associated graphics and text explanations. The presentation will stimulate interest in development of sensor technology for real-time cell culture measurements. The transfer of this technology to other applications will also be of interest. Additional information is contained in the original document.

  19. Evaluation of Verigene Blood Culture Test Systems for Rapid Identification of Positive Blood Cultures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Seok; Kang, Go-Eun; Kim, Han-Sung; Kim, Hyun Soo; Song, Wonkeun; Lee, Kyu Man

    2016-01-01

    The performance of molecular tests using the Verigene Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Blood Culture nucleic acid tests (BC-GP and BC-GN, resp.; Naosphere, Northbrook, IL, USA) was evaluated for the identification of microorganisms detected from blood cultures. Ninety-nine blood cultures containing Gram-positive bacteria and 150 containing Gram-negative bacteria were analyzed using the BC-GP and BC-GN assays, respectively. Blood cultures were performed using the Bactec blood culture system (BD Diagnostic Systems, Franklin Lakes, NJ, USA) and conventional identification and antibiotic-susceptibility tests were performed using a MicroScan system (Siemens, West Sacramento, CA, USA). When a single strain of bacteria was isolated from the blood culture, Verigene assays correctly identified 97.9% (94/96) of Gram-positive bacteria and 93.8% (137/146) of Gram-negative bacteria. Resistance genes mecA and vanA were correctly detected by the BC-GP assay, while the extended-spectrum β-lactamase CTX-M and the carbapenemase OXA resistance gene were detected from 30 cases cultures by the BC-GN assay. The BC-GP and BC-GN assays showed high agreement with conventional identification and susceptibility tests. These tests are useful for rapid identification of microorganisms and the detection of clinically important resistance genes from positive Bactec blood cultures.

  20. Performance of Gram staining on blood cultures flagged negative by an automated blood culture system.

    PubMed

    Peretz, A; Isakovich, N; Pastukh, N; Koifman, A; Glyatman, T; Brodsky, D

    2015-08-01

    Blood is one of the most important specimens sent to a microbiology laboratory for culture. Most blood cultures are incubated for 5-7 days, except in cases where there is a suspicion of infection caused by microorganisms that proliferate slowly, or infections expressed by a small number of bacteria in the bloodstream. Therefore, at the end of incubation, misidentification of positive cultures and false-negative results are a real possibility. The aim of this work was to perform a confirmation by Gram staining of the lack of any microorganisms in blood cultures that were identified as negative by the BACTEC™ FX system at the end of incubation. All bottles defined as negative by the BACTEC FX system were Gram-stained using an automatic device and inoculated on solid growth media. In our work, 15 cultures that were defined as negative by the BACTEC FX system at the end of the incubation were found to contain microorganisms when Gram-stained. The main characteristic of most bacteria and fungi growing in the culture bottles that were defined as negative was slow growth. This finding raises a problematic issue concerning the need to perform Gram staining of all blood cultures, which could overload the routine laboratory work, especially laboratories serving large medical centers and receiving a large number of blood cultures.

  1. Optical spectroscopy and system-bath interactions in molecular aggregates with full configuration interaction Frenkel exciton model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibt, Joachim; Sláma, Vladislav; Mančal, Tomáš

    2016-12-01

    Standard application of the Frenkel exciton model neglects resonance coupling between collective molecular aggregate states with different number of excitations. These inter-band coupling terms are, however, of the same magnitude as the intra-band coupling between singly excited states. We systematically derive the Frenkel exciton model from quantum chemical considerations, and identify it as a variant of the configuration interaction method. We discuss all non-negligible couplings between collective aggregate states, and provide compact formulae for their calculation. We calculate absorption spectra of molecular aggregate of carotenoids and identify significant band shifts as a result of inter-band coupling. The presence of inter-band coupling terms requires renormalization of the system-bath coupling with respect to standard formulation, but renormalization effects are found to be weak. We present detailed discussion of molecular dimer and calculate its time-resolved two-dimensional Fourier transformed spectra to find weak but noticeable effects of peak amplitude redistribution due to inter-band coupling.

  2. INTERDISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Aggregation Behaviors of a Two-Species System with Lose-Lose Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mei-Xia; Lin, Zhen-Quan; Li, Xiao-Dong; Ke, Jian-Hong

    2010-06-01

    We propose an aggregation evolution model of two-species (A- and B-species) aggregates to study the prevalent aggregation phenomena in social and economic systems. In this model, A- and B-species aggregates perform self-exchange-driven growths with the exchange rate kernels K (k,l) = Kkl and L(k,l) = Lkl, respectively, and the two species aggregates perform self-birth processes with the rate kernels J1(k) = J1k and J2(k) = J2k, and meanwhile the interaction between the aggregates of different species A and B causes a lose-lose scheme with the rate kernel H(k,l) = Hkl. Based on the mean-field theory, we investigated the evolution behaviors of the two species aggregates to study the competitions among above three aggregate evolution schemes on the distinct initial monomer concentrations A0 and B0 of the two species. The results show that the evolution behaviors of A- and B-species are crucially dominated by the competition between the two self-birth processes, and the initial monomer concentrations A0 and B0 play important roles, while the lose-lose scheme play important roles in some special cases.

  3. Growing B Lymphocytes in a Three-Dimensional Culture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. H. David; Bottaro, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) culture system for growing long-lived B lymphocytes has been invented. The capabilities afforded by the system can be expected to expand the range of options for immunological research and related activities, including testing of immunogenicity of vaccine candidates in vitro, generation of human monoclonal antibodies, and immunotherapy. Mature lymphocytes, which are the effectors of adaptive immune responses in vertebrates, are extremely susceptible to apoptotic death, and depend on continuous reception of survival-inducing stimulation (in the forms of cytokines, cell-to-cell contacts, and antigen receptor signaling) from the microenvironment. For this reason, efforts to develop systems for long-term culture of functional, non-transformed and non-activated mature lymphocytes have been unsuccessful until now. The bone-marrow microenvironment supports the growth and differentiation of many hematopoietic lineages, in addition to B-lymphocytes. Primary bone-marrow cell cultures designed to promote the development of specific cell types in vitro are highly desirable experimental systems, amenable to manipulation under controlled conditions. However, the dynamic and complex network of stromal cells and insoluble matrix proteins is disrupted in prior plate- and flask-based culture systems, wherein the microenvironments have a predominantly two-dimensional (2D) character. In 2D bone-marrow cultures, normal B-lymphoid cells become progressively skewed toward precursor B-cell populations that do not retain a normal immunophenotype, and such mature B-lymphocytes as those harvested from the spleen or lymph nodes do not survive beyond several days ex vivo in the absence of mitogenic stimulation. The present 3D culture system is a bioreactor that contains highly porous artificial scaffolding that supports the long-term culture of bone marrow, spleen, and lymph-node samples. In this system, unlike in 2D culture systems, B-cell subpopulations developing

  4. Identification of biofloc microscopic composition as the natural bioremediation in zero water exchange of Pacific white shrimp, Penaeus vannamei, culture in closed hatchery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manan, Hidayah; Moh, Julia Hwei Zhong; Kasan, Nor Azman; Suratman, Suhaimi; Ikhwanuddin, Mhd

    2016-06-01

    Study on the microscopic composition of biofloc in closed hatchery culture system was carried out to determine the interaction between the aggregation flocs in the bioremediation process for the decomposition and degradation of organic matter loaded in the shrimp culture tanks. The study was done for 105 days of culture period in zero water exchange. All of the organic loaded in the culture tanks identified comes from the shrimp feces, uneaten fed, and the decomposed macro- and microorganisms died in the culture tanks. All of the microscopic organisms in the biofloc were identified using Advance microscopes Nikon 80i. From the present study, there were abundances and high varieties of phytoplankton, zooplankton, protozoa, nematodes and algae species identified as aggregates together in the flocs accumulation. All of these microscopic organisms identified implemented the symbiotic process together for food supply, become the algae grazer, act as natural water stabilizer in regulating the nutrients in culture tank and serve as decomposer for dead organic matter in the water environment. Heterotrophic bacteria identified from Pseudomonas and Aeromonas family consumed the organic matter loaded at the bottom of culture tank and converted items through chemical process as useful protein food to be consumed back by the shrimp. Overall it can be concluded that the biofloc organisms identified really contributed as natural bioremediation agents in zero water exchange culture system to ensure the water quality in the optimal condition until the end of culture period.

  5. Differentiating sepsis from non-infectious systemic inflammation based on microvesicle-bacteria aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, I. K.; Bertazzo, S.; O'Callaghan, D. J. P.; Schlegel, A. A.; Kallepitis, C.; Antcliffe, D. B.; Gordon, A. C.; Stevens, M. M.

    2015-08-01

    Sepsis is a severe medical condition and a leading cause of hospital mortality. Prompt diagnosis and early treatment has a significant, positive impact on patient outcome. However, sepsis is not always easy to diagnose, especially in critically ill patients. Here, we present a conceptionally new approach for the rapid diagnostic differentiation of sepsis from non-septic intensive care unit patients. Using advanced microscopy and spectroscopy techniques, we measure infection-specific changes in the activity of nano-sized cell-derived microvesicles to bind bacteria. We report on the use of a point-of-care-compatible microfluidic chip to measure microvesicle-bacteria aggregation and demonstrate rapid (<=1.5 hour) and reliable diagnostic differentiation of bacterial infection from non-infectious inflammation in a double-blind pilot study. Our study demonstrates the potential of microvesicle activities for sepsis diagnosis and introduces microvesicle-bacteria aggregation as a potentially useful parameter for making early clinical management decisions.Sepsis is a severe medical condition and a leading cause of hospital mortality. Prompt diagnosis and early treatment has a significant, positive impact on patient outcome. However, sepsis is not always easy to diagnose, especially in critically ill patients. Here, we present a conceptionally new approach for the rapid diagnostic differentiation of sepsis from non-septic intensive care unit patients. Using advanced microscopy and spectroscopy techniques, we measure infection-specific changes in the activity of nano-sized cell-derived microvesicles to bind bacteria. We report on the use of a point-of-care-compatible microfluidic chip to measure microvesicle-bacteria aggregation and demonstrate rapid (<=1.5 hour) and reliable diagnostic differentiation of bacterial infection from non-infectious inflammation in a double-blind pilot study. Our study demonstrates the potential of microvesicle activities for sepsis diagnosis and

  6. Physiology of fish in intensive culture systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedemeyer, Gary

    1996-01-01

    Fish culture in hatcheries and other aquacultural facilities is becoming much more intensive all over the world. The success of all kinds of fish rearing depends on the quality of management and this depends, in turn, on understanding the biology of fishes and the aquatic environment in which they live. This book directly addresses the relationship between the aquatic environment and the fishes. An understanding of this by the reader will result in a reduction of disease outbreaks through improved management.

  7. Composite alginate hydrogel microparticulate delivery system of zidovudine hydrochloride based on counter ion induced aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Harekrishna; Rao, P. Venkateswar; Panda, Sanjay Kumar; Biswal, Asim Kumar; Parida, Kirti Ranjan; Dash, Jharana

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The present study deals with preparation of zidovudine loaded microparticle by counter ion induced aggregation method. During this study effect of polyacrylates and hypromellose polymers on release study were investigated. Materials and Methods: The ion induced aggregated alginate based microparticles were characterized for surface morphology, particle size analysis, drug entrapment study, in-vitro study, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study. Results and Discussion: The result showed Eudragit RL-100 (ERL) based formulations had smoother surface as well as their mean particle sizes were found greater compared with Eudragit RS-100 (ERS) microparticles. Furthermore, drug entrapments were found to be more in ERL formulae as compared with ERS. RL3 released 101.05% drug over a period of 8th h and followed Higuchi profile and Fickian diffusion. Moreover, data obtained illustrated that, higher amount of quaternary ammonium group, alkali value, and glass transition temperature may be possible reason for improving permeability of ERL based formulations. It was also noticed, hyroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) K4M premium grade polymer sustained drug release more than HPMC K15M. In addition, drug-excipient interaction study was carried out by FTIR and DSC study. PMID:25298940

  8. Organ culture system as a means to detect celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Picarelli, Antonio; Libanori, Valerio; De Nitto, Daniela; Saponara, Annarita; Di Tola, Marco; Donato, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Anti-endomysial and anti-transglutaminase antibodies can be produced in vitro by the intestinal mucosa of celiac disease (CD) patients in clinical remission, when the culture is performed in the presence of gliadin peptides. Our aim was to use this organ culture system as a means to detect the pathognomonic antibodies of celiac disease (CD) in the culture supernatants. Organ culture was performed in the presence of three different activators to evaluate which one induced the strongest antibody response in intestinal mucosa from patients in clinical remission of CD. Our data confirm the high efficiency of synthetic peptide 31-43 as a specific immunological activator in CD and demonstrate its capability to stimulate production/secretion of CD-specific antibodies. We envision that this organ culture system may prove to be useful as a new technique for CD diagnosis.

  9. Miniature Bioreactor System for Long-Term Cell Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Kleis, Stanley J.; Geffert, Sandara K.

    2010-01-01

    A prototype miniature bioreactor system is designed to serve as a laboratory benchtop cell-culturing system that minimizes the need for relatively expensive equipment and reagents and can be operated under computer control, thereby reducing the time and effort required of human investigators and reducing uncertainty in results. The system includes a bioreactor, a fluid-handling subsystem, a chamber wherein the bioreactor is maintained in a controlled atmosphere at a controlled temperature, and associated control subsystems. The system can be used to culture both anchorage-dependent and suspension cells, which can be either prokaryotic or eukaryotic. Cells can be cultured for extended periods of time in this system, and samples of cells can be extracted and analyzed at specified intervals. By integrating this system with one or more microanalytical instrument(s), one can construct a complete automated analytical system that can be tailored to perform one or more of a large variety of assays.

  10. Effects of biodegradable plastics on the predominant culturable bacteria associated with soil aggregate formation and stability after 9 months of incubation in natural soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An in vitro study of the effects of biodegradable plastics on the predominant soil aggregating bacteria associated to soil aggregate formation and stability after 9 months of incubation in soil. Caesar-TonThat TC, Fukui R*, Caesar AJ., Lartey, RT, and Gaskin, JF. USDA-Agricultural Research Service, ...

  11. Unique cell culture systems for ground based research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Marian L.

    1990-01-01

    The horizontally rotating fluid-filled, membrane oxygenated bioreactors developed at NASA Johnson for spacecraft applications provide a powerful tool for ground-based research. Three-dimensional aggregates formed by cells cultured on microcarrier beads are useful for study of cell-cell interactions and tissue development. By comparing electron micrographs of plant seedlings germinated during Shuttle flight 61-C and in an earth-based rotating bioreactor it is shown that some effects of microgravity are mimicked. Bioreactors used in the UAH Bioreactor Laboratory will make it possible to determine some of the effects of altered gravity at the cellular level. Bioreactors can be valuable for performing critical, preliminary-to-spaceflight experiments as well as medical investigations such as in vitro tumor cell growth and chemotherapeutic drug response; the enrichment of stem cells from bone marrow; and the effect of altered gravity on bone and muscle cell growth and function and immune response depression.

  12. Class, Culture and the Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarado, Manuel

    1977-01-01

    Recognizes the fact that an elaboration of a particular theory of education and of the position film studies occupy within the educational system will determine system strategies and understanding. (MH)

  13. Evaluation of the effects of amyloid β aggregation from seaweed extracts by a microliter-scale high-throughput screening system with a quantum dot nanoprobe.

    PubMed

    Ogara, Toshiki; Takahashi, Tomohito; Yasui, Hajime; Uwai, Koji; Tokuraku, Kiyotaka

    2015-07-01

    Inhibitors of amyloid β (Aβ) aggregation have the potential to serve as lead compounds for anti-Alzheimer's disease (AD) agents because Aβ aggregation is a key step in AD pathogenesis. Recently, we developed a novel microliter-scale high-throughput screening (MSHTS) system for Aβ aggregation inhibitors that applied fluorescence microscopic analysis with quantum dot nanoprobes, and attempted to comprehensively screen the inhibitors from spices using this system (Ishigaki et al., PLoS One, 8, e72992, 2013). In this study, we tried to evaluate the inhibitory activities of 11 seaweed extracts on Aβ aggregation using the MSHTS system. The half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) of the ethanolic extracts from all seaweeds exceeded 4.9 mg/ml, indicating that the extracts inhibit Aβ aggregation although this activity was significantly lower than that displayed by members of the Lamiaceae, a family of herbal spices that showed highest activity among 52 spices tested in our 2013 study. On the other hand, the EC50 of boiling water extracts was 0.013-0.42 mg/ml which was comparable with the EC50 of the extracts from the Lamiaceae family. These results suggest that the extraction efficiency of the inhibitors by boiling water extraction was higher than that by ethanolic extraction. Moreover, analysis of fluorescence micrographs, which were obtained from the MSHTS system, revealed that the morphology of the Aβ aggregates coincubated with boiling water extracts differed from control aggregates, suggesting that the MSHTS system is also useful for screening substances that affect the morphology of aggregates.

  14. Influence of Natural Organic Matter on Aggregation, Deposition, and Transport of Fullerene Colloids in Aqueous Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Rattanaudompol, U.; Powell, T.; Bouchard, D.

    2011-12-01

    Engineered fullerenes are increasingly being used in commercial products (e.g., skin and eye creams, tennis racquets, and lubricants) that may become a significant source for environmental release. A thorough understanding of fullerenes' aggregation in aqueous phase and deposition/transport in porous media is needed for evaluating the environmental persistence of fullerenes and subsequent human or ecological exposure. A number of recent studies have shown that fullerenes form stable colloidal aggregates in aqueous media and that their environmental behaviors largely depend on solution chemistry including ionic strength, solution pH, and the presence of natural organic matter (NOM). Nonetheless, the lack of systematic studies on NOM interaction with fullerene colloids and the coupling of this interaction with ionic strength and solution pH make predicting environmental behaviors of fullerenes a difficult task. In this study, electrophoretic mobility (EM), particle size, and aggregation kinetics of C60 colloidal suspensions were measured under a range of ionic strength (1.5-500.5 mM), solution pH (4, 7.8, and 10), and humic (0-9 mg C/L) or fulvic (0-11 mg C/L) acid concentrations. The EM data could be modeled with Ohshima's soft particle theory to probe thickness, softness, and charge density of adsorbed NOM layers on fullerene colloids. Under select conditions that represent low and high mobility, deposition studies using a quartz crystal microbalance and transport experiments in saturated and unsaturated sand columns will be conducted. It is anticipated that NOM may alter the transport of fullerene C60 differently in unsaturated media compared with saturated media. Our preliminary results showed that humic acid is more effective than fulvic acid in stabilizing fullerene suspensions and the extent of this stabilizing effect is a function of ionic strength when buffered at pH 7.8 with 0.5 mM NaHCO3. The findings of this study will help better assess the fate and

  15. Aggregated Modeling of Thermostatic Loads in Demand Response: A Systems and Control Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Kalsi, Karanjit; Chassin, Forrest S.; Chassin, David P.

    2011-12-12

    Demand response is playing an increasingly important role in smart grid research and technologies being examined in recently undertaken demonstration projects. The behavior of load as it is affected by various load control strategies is important to understanding the degree to which different classes of end-use load can contribute to demand response programs at various times. This paper focuses on developing aggregated models for a homogeneous population of thermostatically controlled loads. The different types of loads considered in this paper include, but are not limited to, water heaters and HVAC units. The effects of demand response and user over-ride on the load population dynamics are investigated. The controllability of the developed lumped models is validated which forms the basis for designing different control strategies.

  16. Seven essential strategies for promoting and sustaining systemic cultural competence.

    PubMed

    Delphin-Rittmon, Miriam E; Andres-Hyman, Raquel; Flanagan, Elizabeth H; Davidson, Larry

    2013-03-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities are disturbing facets of the American healthcare system that document the reality of unequal treatment. Research consistently shows that patients of color experience poorer quality of care and health outcomes contributing to increased risks and accelerated mortality rates relative to their white counterparts. While initially conceptualized as an approach for increasing the responsiveness of children's behavioral health care, cultural competence has been adopted as a key strategy for eliminating racial and ethnic health disparities across the healthcare system. However, cultural competence research and practices largely focus on improving provider competencies, while agency and system level approaches for meeting the service needs of diverse populations are given less attention. In this article we offer seven essential strategies for promoting and sustaining organizational and systemic cultural competence. These strategies are to: (1) Provide executive level support and accountability, (2) Foster patient, community and stakeholder participation and partnerships, (3) Conduct organizational cultural competence assessments, (4) Develop incremental and realistic cultural competence action plans, (5) Ensure linguistic competence, (6) Diversify, develop, and retain a culturally competent workforce, and (7) Develop an agency or system strategy for managing staff and patient grievances. For each strategy we offer several recommendations for implementation.

  17. Design of a Miniature Tissue Culture System to Culture Mouse Heart Valves

    PubMed Central

    Lieber, Samuel C.; Kruithof, Boudewijn P. T.; Aubry, Nadine; Vatner, Stephen F.; Gaussin, Vinciane

    2010-01-01

    Valvular heart disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in adults but little is known about the underlying etiology. A better understanding of the genetic and hemodynamic mechanisms involved in growth and remodeling of heart valves during physiological and pathological conditions is needed for a better understanding of valvular heart disease. Here, we report the design of a miniature tissue culture system (MTCS) that allows the culture of mitral valves from perinatal to adult mice. The design of the MTCS is novel in that fine positioning and cannulation can be conducted with hearts of different sizes (perinatal to adult). Perfusion of the heart and hence, culture of the mitral valve in its natural position, occurs in a hydraulically sealed culture bath environment. Using the MTCS, we successfully cultured the mitral valve of adult mouse hearts for 3 days. Histological analysis indicated that the cultured valves remained viable and their extracellular matrix organization was similar to age-matched native valves. Gene expression could also be modified in cultured valves by perfusion with medium containing beta-galactosidase-expressing adenovirus. Thus, the MTCS is a new tool to study the genetic and hemodynamic mechanisms underlying the three-dimensional organization of the heart valves, which could provide insights in the pathology of valvular heart disease and be used in animal models for the development of tissue-engineered heart valves. PMID:20099034

  18. A model for the kinetics of homotypic cellular aggregation under static conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neelamegham, S.; Munn, L. L.; Zygourakis, K.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    We present the formulation and testing of a mathematical model for the kinetics of homotypic cellular aggregation. The model considers cellular aggregation under no-flow conditions as a two-step process. Individual cells and cell aggregates 1) move on the tissue culture surface and 2) collide with other cells (or aggregates). These collisions lead to the formation of intercellular bonds. The aggregation kinetics are described by a system of coupled, nonlinear ordinary differential equations, and the collision frequency kernel is derived by extending Smoluchowski's colloidal flocculation theory to cell migration and aggregation on a two-dimensional surface. Our results indicate that aggregation rates strongly depend upon the motility of cells and cell aggregates, the frequency of cell-cell collisions, and the strength of intercellular bonds. Model predictions agree well with data from homotypic lymphocyte aggregation experiments using Jurkat cells activated by 33B6, an antibody to the beta 1 integrin. Since cell migration speeds and all the other model parameters can be independently measured, the aggregation model provides a quantitative methodology by which we can accurately evaluate the adhesivity and aggregation behavior of cells.

  19. Aggregation in environmental systems: seasonal tracer cycles quantify young water fractions, but not mean transit times, in spatially heterogeneous catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, J. W.

    2015-03-01

    Environmental heterogeneity is ubiquitous, but environmental systems are often analyzed as if they were homogeneous instead, resulting in aggregation errors that are rarely explored and almost never quantified. Here I use simple benchmark tests to explore this general problem in one specific context: the use of seasonal cycles in chemical or isotopic tracers (such as Cl-, δ18O, or δ2H) to estimate timescales of storage in catchments. Timescales of catchment storage are typically quantified by the mean transit time, meaning the average time that elapses between parcels of water entering as precipitation and leaving again as streamflow. Longer mean transit times imply greater damping of seasonal tracer cycles. Thus, the amplitudes of tracer cycles in precipitation and streamflow are commonly used to calculate catchment mean transit times. Here I show that these calculations will typically be wrong by several hundred percent, when applied to catchments with realistic degrees of spatial heterogeneity. This aggregation bias arises from the strong nonlinearity in the relationship between tracer cycle amplitude and mean travel time. I propose an alternative storage metric, the young water fraction in streamflow, defined as the fraction of runoff with transit times of less than roughly 0.2 years. I show that this young water fraction (not to be confused with event-based "new water" in hydrograph separations) is accurately predicted by seasonal tracer cycles within a precision of a few percent, across the entire range of mean transit times from almost zero to almost infinity. Importantly, this relationship is also virtually free from aggregation error. That is, seasonal tracer cycles also accurately predict the young water fraction in runoff from highly heterogeneous mixtures of subcatchments with strongly contrasting transit time distributions. Thus, although tracer cycle amplitudes yield biased and unreliable estimates of catchment mean travel times in heterogeneous

  20. Development of Scalable Culture Systems for Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Azarin, Samira M.; Palecek, Sean P.

    2009-01-01

    The use of human pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, in therapeutic applications will require the development of robust, scalable culture technologies for undifferentiated cells. Advances made in large-scale cultures of other mammalian cells will facilitate expansion of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but challenges specific to hESCs will also have to be addressed, including development of defined, humanized culture media and substrates, monitoring spontaneous differentiation and heterogeneity in the cultures, and maintaining karyotypic integrity in the cells. This review will describe our current understanding of environmental factors that regulate hESC self-renewal and efforts to provide these cues in various scalable bioreactor culture systems. PMID:20161686

  1. IEEE 802.15.4 Frame Aggregation Enhancement to Provide High Performance in Life-Critical Patient Monitoring Systems.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Muhammad Sajjad; Yu, Hongnian; Cang, Shuang

    2017-01-28

    In wireless body area sensor networks (WBASNs), Quality of Service (QoS) provision for patient monitoring systems in terms of time-critical deadlines, high throughput and energy efficiency is a challenging task. The periodic data from these systems generates a large number of small packets in a short time period which needs an efficient channel access mechanism. The IEEE 802.15.4 standard is recommended for low power devices and widely used for many wireless sensor networks applications. It provides a hybrid channel access mechanism at the Media Access Control (MAC) layer which plays a key role in overall successful transmission in WBASNs. There are many WBASN's MAC protocols that use this hybrid channel access mechanism in variety of sensor applications. However, these protocols are less efficient for patient monitoring systems where life critical data requires limited delay, high throughput and energy efficient communication simultaneously. To address these issues, this paper proposes a frame aggregation scheme by using the aggregated-MAC protocol data unit (A-MPDU) which works with the IEEE 802.15.4 MAC layer. To implement the scheme accurately, we develop a traffic patterns analysis mechanism to understand the requirements of the sensor nodes in patient monitoring systems, then model the channel access to find the performance gap on the basis of obtained requirements, finally propose the design based on the needs of patient monitoring systems. The mechanism is initially verified using numerical modelling and then simulation is conducted using NS2.29, Castalia 3.2 and OMNeT++. The proposed scheme provides the optimal performance considering the required QoS.

  2. IEEE 802.15.4 Frame Aggregation Enhancement to Provide High Performance in Life-Critical Patient Monitoring Systems

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Muhammad Sajjad; Yu, Hongnian; Cang, Shuang

    2017-01-01

    In wireless body area sensor networks (WBASNs), Quality of Service (QoS) provision for patient monitoring systems in terms of time-critical deadlines, high throughput and energy efficiency is a challenging task. The periodic data from these systems generates a large number of small packets in a short time period which needs an efficient channel access mechanism. The IEEE 802.15.4 standard is recommended for low power devices and widely used for many wireless sensor networks applications. It provides a hybrid channel access mechanism at the Media Access Control (MAC) layer which plays a key role in overall successful transmission in WBASNs. There are many WBASN’s MAC protocols that use this hybrid channel access mechanism in variety of sensor applications. However, these protocols are less efficient for patient monitoring systems where life critical data requires limited delay, high throughput and energy efficient communication simultaneously. To address these issues, this paper proposes a frame aggregation scheme by using the aggregated-MAC protocol data unit (A-MPDU) which works with the IEEE 802.15.4 MAC layer. To implement the scheme accurately, we develop a traffic patterns analysis mechanism to understand the requirements of the sensor nodes in patient monitoring systems, then model the channel access to find the performance gap on the basis of obtained requirements, finally propose the design based on the needs of patient monitoring systems. The mechanism is initially verified using numerical modelling and then simulation is conducted using NS2.29, Castalia 3.2 and OMNeT++. The proposed scheme provides the optimal performance considering the required QoS. PMID:28134853

  3. Strengths and limitations of the neurosphere culture system.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Josephine B; Parmar, Malin

    2006-12-01

    After the initial reports of free-floating cultures of neural stem cells termed neurospheres (1,2), a wide array of studies using this promising culture system emerged. In theory, this was a near-perfect system for large-scale production of neural cells for use in cell replacement therapies and to assay for and characterize neural stem cells. More than a decade later, after rigorous scrutiny and ample experimental testing of the neurosphere culture system, it has become apparent that the culture system suffers from several disadvantages, and its usefulness is limited for several applications. Nevertheless, the bulk of high-quality research produced over the last decade has also shown that under the right circumstances and for the appropriate purposes, neurospheres hold up to their initial promise. This article discusses the pros and cons of the neurosphere culture system regarding its three major applications: as an assay for neural stem cells, as a model system for neurogenesis and neural development, and for expansion of neural stem cells for transplantation purposes.

  4. Submillimetre-sized dust aggregate collision and growth properties. Experimental study of a multi-particle system on a suborbital rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisset, J.; Heißelmann, D.; Kothe, S.; Weidling, R.; Blum, J.

    2016-08-01

    Context. In the very first steps of the formation of a new planetary system, dust agglomerates grow inside the protoplanetary disk that rotates around the newly formed star. In this disk, collisions between the dust particles, induced by interactions with the surrounding gas, lead to sticking. Aggregates start growing until their sizes and relative velocities are high enough for collisions to result in bouncing or fragmentation. With the aim of investigating the transitions between sticking and bouncing regimes for colliding dust aggregates and the formation of clusters from multiple aggregates, the Suborbital Particle and Aggregation Experiment (SPACE) was flown on the REXUS 12 suborbital rocket. Aims: The collisional and sticking properties of sub-mm-sized aggregates composed of protoplanetary dust analogue material are measured, including the statistical threshold velocity between sticking and bouncing, their surface energy and tensile strength within aggregate clusters. Methods: We performed an experiment on the REXUS 12 suborbital rocket. The protoplanetary dust analogue materials were micrometre-sized monodisperse and polydisperse SiO2 particles prepared into aggregates with sizes around 120 μm and 330 μm, respectively and volume filling factors around 0.37. During the experimental run of 150 s under reduced gravity conditions, the sticking of aggregates and the formation and fragmentation of clusters of up to a few millimetres in size was observed. Results: The sticking probability of the sub-mm-sized dust aggregates could be derived for velocities decreasing from ~22 to 3 cm s-1. The transition from bouncing to sticking collisions happened at 12.7+2.1-1.4 cm s-1 for the smaller aggregates composed of monodisperse particles and at 11.5+1.9-1.3 and 11.7+1.9-1.3 cm s-1 for the larger aggregates composed of mono- and polydisperse dust particles, respectively. Using the pull-off force of sub-mm-sized dust aggregates from the clusters, the surface energy of the

  5. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, T.I.; Bolen, W.P.

    2007-01-01

    Construction aggregates, primarily stone, sand and gravel, are recovered from widespread naturally occurring mineral deposits and processed for use primarily in the construction industry. They are mined, crushed, sorted by size and sold loose or combined with portland cement or asphaltic cement to make concrete products to build roads, houses, buildings, and other structures. Much smaller quantities are used in agriculture, cement manufacture, chemical and metallurgical processes, glass production and many other products.

  6. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Part of the Annual Commodities Review 1995. Production of construction aggregates such as crushed stone and construction sand and gravel showed a marginal increase in 1995. Most of the 1995 increases were due to funding for highway construction work. The major areas of concern to the industry included issues relating to wetlands classification and the classification of crystalline silica as a probable human carcinogen. Despite this, an increase in demand is anticipated for 1996.

  7. Multiwell cell culture plate format with integrated microfluidic perfusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domansky, Karel; Inman, Walker; Serdy, Jim; Griffith, Linda G.

    2006-01-01

    A new cell culture analog has been developed. It is based on the standard multiwell cell culture plate format but it provides perfused three-dimensional cell culture capability. The new capability is achieved by integrating microfluidic valves and pumps into the plate. The system provides a means to conduct high throughput assays for target validation and predictive toxicology in the drug discovery and development process. It can be also used for evaluation of long-term exposure to drugs or environmental agents or as a model to study viral hepatitis, cancer metastasis, and other diseases and pathological conditions.

  8. Particle size analysis of dispersed oil and oil-mineral aggregates with an automated ultraviolet epi-fluorescence microscopy system.

    PubMed

    Ma, X; Cogswell, A; Li, Z; Lee, K

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes recent advances in microscopic analysis for quantitative measurement of oil droplets. Integration of a microscope with bright-field and ultraviolet epi-fluorescence illumination (excitation wavelengths 340-380 nm; emission wavelengths 400-430 nm) fitted with a computer-controlled motorized stage, a high resolution digital camera, and new image-analysis software, enables automatic acquisition of multiple images and facilitates efficient counting and sizing of oil droplets. Laboratory experiments were conducted with this system to investigate the size distribution of chemically dispersed oil droplets and oil-mineral aggregates in baffled flasks that have been developed for testing chemical dispersant effectiveness. Image acquisition and data processing methods were developed to illustrate the size distribution of chemically dispersed oil droplets, as a function of energy dissipation rate in the baffled flasks, and the time-dependent change of the morphology and size distribution of oil-mineral aggregates. As a quantitative analytical tool, epifluorescence microscopy shows promise for application in research on oil spill response technologies, such as evaluating the effectiveness of chemical dispersant and characterizing the natural interaction between oil and mineral fines and other suspended particulate matters.

  9. Cultural selection drives the evolution of human communication systems.

    PubMed

    Tamariz, Monica; Ellison, T Mark; Barr, Dale J; Fay, Nicolas

    2014-08-07

    Human communication systems evolve culturally, but the evolutionary mechanisms that drive this evolution are not well understood. Against a baseline that communication variants spread in a population following neutral evolutionary dynamics (also known as drift models), we tested the role of two cultural selection models: coordination- and content-biased. We constructed a parametrized mixed probabilistic model of the spread of communicative variants in four 8-person laboratory micro-societies engaged in a simple communication game. We found that selectionist models, working in combination, explain the majority of the empirical data. The best-fitting parameter setting includes an egocentric bias and a content bias, suggesting that participants retained their own previously used communicative variants unless they encountered a superior (content-biased) variant, in which case it was adopted. This novel pattern of results suggests that (i) a theory of the cultural evolution of human communication systems must integrate selectionist models and (ii) human communication systems are functionally adaptive complex systems.

  10. Therapeutically important proteins from in vitro plant tissue culture systems.

    PubMed

    Doran, Pauline M

    2013-01-01

    Plant cells cultured in liquid medium in bioreactors are now being used commercially to produce biopharmaceutical proteins. The emergence of in vitro plant cell culture as a production vehicle reflects the importance of key biosafety and biocontainment concerns affecting the competitiveness of alternative systems such as mammalian cell culture and agriculture. Food plant species are particularly attractive as hosts for in vitro protein production: the risk of transgene escape and food chain contamination is eliminated using containment facilities, while regulatory approval for oral delivery of drugs may be easier than if non-edible species were used. As in whole plants, proteolysis in cultured plant cells can lead to significant degradation of foreign proteins after synthesis; however, substantial progress has been made to counter the destructive effects of proteases in plant systems. Although protein secretion into the culture medium is advantageous for product recovery and purification, measures are often required to minimise extracellular protease activity and product losses due to irreversible surface adsorption. Disposable plastic bioreactors, which are being used increasingly in mammalian cell bioprocessing, are also being adopted for plant cell culture to allow rapid scale-up and generation of saleable product. This review examines a range of technical and regulatory issues affecting the choice of industrial production platform for foreign proteins, and assesses progress in the development of in vitro plant systems for biopharmaceutical production.

  11. A Situated Cultural Festival Learning System Based on Motion Sensing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yi-Hsing; Lin, Yu-Kai; Fang, Rong-Jyue; Lu, You-Te

    2017-01-01

    A situated Chinese cultural festival learning system based on motion sensing is developed in this study. The primary design principle is to create a highly interactive learning environment, allowing learners to interact with Kinect through natural gestures in the designed learning situation to achieve efficient learning. The system has the…

  12. Method and system of culturing an algal mat

    DOEpatents

    Das, Keshav C; Cannon, Benjamin R; Bhatnagar, Ashish; Chinnasamy, Senthil

    2014-05-13

    A system and method for culturing algae are presented. The system and method utilize a fog of growth medium that is delivered to an algal mat generator along with a stream of CO.sub.2 to promote growth of algal cells contained in the generator.

  13. Culture temperature affects human chondrocyte messenger RNA expression in monolayer and pellet culture systems.

    PubMed

    Ito, Akira; Nagai, Momoko; Tajino, Junichi; Yamaguchi, Shoki; Iijima, Hirotaka; Zhang, Xiangkai; Aoyama, Tomoki; Kuroki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapy has been explored for articular cartilage regeneration. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is a promising cell-based technique for repairing articular cartilage defects. However, there are several issues such as chondrocyte de-differentiation. While numerous studies have been designed to overcome some of these issues, only a few have focused on the thermal environment that can affect chondrocyte metabolism and phenotype. In this study, the effects of different culture temperatures on human chondrocyte metabolism- and phenotype-related gene expression were investigated in 2D and 3D environments. Human chondrocytes were cultured in a monolayer or in a pellet culture system at three different culture temperatures (32°C, 37°C, and 41°C) for 3 days. The results showed that the total RNA level, normalized to the threshold cycle value of internal reference genes, was higher at lower temperatures in both culture systems. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and citrate synthase (CS), which are involved in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle, respectively, were expressed at similar levels at 32°C and 37°C in pellet cultures, but the levels were significantly lower at 41°C. Expression of the chondrogenic markers, collagen type IIA1 (COL2A1) and aggrecan (ACAN), was higher at 37°C than at 32°C and 41°C in both culture systems. However, this phenomenon did not coincide with SRY (sex-determining region Y)-box 9 (SOX9), which is a fundamental transcription factor for chondrogenesis, indicating that a SOX9-independent pathway might be involved in this phenomenon. In conclusion, the expression of chondrocyte metabolism-related genes at 32°C was maintained or enhanced compared to that at 37°C. However, chondrogenesis-related genes were further induced at 37°C in both culture systems. Therefore, manipulating the culture temperature may be an advantageous approach for regulating human chondrocyte metabolic activity and chondrogenesis.

  14. Acetylcholine receptors and concanavalin A-binding sites on cultured Xenopus muscle cells: electrophoresis, diffusion, and aggregation [corrected and republished article originally printed in J Cell Biol 1988 May;106(5):1723-34

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Using digitally analyzed fluorescence videomicroscopy, we have examined the behavior of acetylcholine receptors and concanavalin A binding sites in response to externally applied electric fields. The distributions of these molecules on cultured Xenopus myoballs were used to test a simple model which assumes that electrophoresis and diffusion are the only important processes involved. The model describes the distribution of concanavalin A sites quite well over a fourfold range of electric field strengths; the results suggest an average diffusion constant of approximately 2.3 X 10(-9) cm2/s. At higher electric field strengths, the asymmetry seen is substantially less than that predicted by the model. Acetylcholine receptors subjected to electric fields show distributions substantially different from those predicted on the basis of simple electrophoresis and diffusion, and evidence a marked tendency to aggregate. Our results suggest that this aggregation is due to lateral migration of surface acetylcholine receptors, and is dependent on surface interactions, rather than the rearrangement of microfilaments or microtubules. The data are consistent with a diffusion-trap mechanism of receptor aggregation, and suggest that the event triggering receptor localization is a local increase in the concentration of acetylcholine receptors, or the electrophoretic concentration of some other molecular species. These observations suggest that, whatever mechanism(s) trigger initial clustering events in vivo, the accumulation of acetylcholine receptors can be substantially enhanced by passive, diffusion-mediated aggregation. PMID:3170634

  15. Horizontally rotated cell culture system with a coaxial tubular oxygenator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Schwarz, Ray P. (Inventor); Trinh, Tinh T. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention relates to a horizontally rotating bioreactor useful for carrying out cell and tissue culture. For processing of mammalian cells, the system is sterilized and fresh fluid medium, microcarrier beads, and cells are admitted to completely fill the cell culture vessel. An oxygen containing gas is admitted to the interior of the permeable membrane which prevents air bubbles from being introduced into the medium. The cylinder is rotated at a low speed within an incubator so that the circular motion of the fluid medium uniformly suspends the microbeads throughout the cylinder during the cell growth period. The unique design of this cell and tissue culture device was initially driven by two requirements imposed by its intended use for feasibility studies for three dimensional culture of living cells and tissues in space by JSC. They were compatible with microgravity and simulation of microgravity in one G. The vessels are designed to approximate the extremely quiescent low shear environment obtainable in space.

  16. A Hybrid Robotic Control System Using Neuroblastoma Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrández, J. M.; Lorente, V.; Cuadra, J. M.; Delapaz, F.; Álvarez-Sánchez, José Ramón; Fernández, E.

    The main objective of this work is to analyze the computing capabilities of human neuroblastoma cultured cells and to define connection schemes for controlling a robot behavior. Multielectrode Array (MEA) setups have been designed for direct culturing neural cells over silicon or glass substrates, providing the capability to stimulate and record simultaneously populations of neural cells. This paper describes the process of growing human neuroblastoma cells over MEA substrates and tries to modulate the natural physiologic responses of these cells by tetanic stimulation of the culture. We show that the large neuroblastoma networks developed in cultured MEAs are capable of learning: establishing numerous and dynamic connections, with modifiability induced by external stimuli and we propose an hybrid system for controlling a robot to avoid obstacles.

  17. Culture and systems of oppression in abused women's lives.

    PubMed

    Phillips, D S

    1998-01-01

    Women's experiences of abuse are shaped by the social and cultural contexts in which they live. Recognition of the complex ways in which culture and systems of oppression interact, creating qualitatively different abuse experiences, is important nursing knowledge. Of particular concern are the ways in which women are constrained in their efforts to combat abuse as they experience the harsh and alienating effects of racism, sexism, classism, and other forms of social injustice. An understanding of the ways in which race and ethnicity, class, language and citizenship, religion, and culture intersect and shape women's experiences of abuse is critical to the provision of culturally competent nursing care. This understanding is the springboard from which more effective assessment and intervention strategies with vulnerable abused women of diverse backgrounds can emerge.

  18. The effect of three culture methods on intensive culture system of pacific white shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhen; Wan, Rong; Song, Xiefa; Gao, Lei

    2013-09-01

    Different culture methods may affect the intensive culture system of Pacific white shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei) regarding water quality and growth and economic performance. This study evaluated the potential effects of three culture methods through cultivation of juvenile shrimps under consistent tank management conditions for 84 d. The three methods involved shrimp cultivation in different tanks, i.e., outdoor tanks with cement bottom (mode-C), greenhouse tanks with cement bottom (mode-G) and outdoor tanks with mud-substrate (mode-M). Results showed that water temperature was significantly higher in mode-G than that in mode-C ( P < 0.05). In contrast to the other two treatments, mode-M had stable pH after 50 d cultivation of shrimps. In the mid-late period, the average concentrations of TAN, NO2-N, DIP and COD were significantly lower in mode-M and mode-G compared with those in mode-C ( P < 0.05). Despite lack of differences in the final shrimp weight among different treatments ( P > 0.05), mode-M had significantly higher shrimp yield, survival rate and feed conversion rate ( P < 0.05) than other modes. There were significant differences in revenue and net return among different treatments ( P < 0.05). These demonstrated that the treatments of mode-G and mode-M were conductive to the intensive culture system of L. vannamei.

  19. Moving towards culturally competent health systems: organizational and market factors.

    PubMed

    Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Elliott, Marc N; Pradhan, Rohit; Schiller, Cameron; Dreachslin, Janice; Hays, Ron D

    2012-09-01

    Cultural competency has been proposed as an organizational strategy to address racial/ethnic disparities in the healthcare system; disparities are a long-standing policy challenge whose relevance is only increasing with the increasing population diversity of the US and across the world. Using an integrative conceptual framework based on the resource dependency and institutional theories, we examine the relationship between organizational and market factors and hospitals' degree of cultural competency. Our sample consists of 119 hospitals located in the state of California (US) and is constructed using the following datasets for the year 2006: Cultural Competency Assessment Tool of Hospitals (CCATH) Survey, California's Office of Statewide Health Planning & Development's Hospital Inpatient Discharges and Annual Hospital Financial Data, American Hospital Association's Annual Survey, and the Area Resource File. The dependent variable consists of the degree of hospital cultural competency, as assessed by the CCATH overall score. Organizational variables include ownership status, teaching hospital, payer mix, size, system membership, financial performance, and the proportion of inpatient racial/ethnic minorities. Market characteristics included hospital competition, the proportion of racial/ethnic minorities in the area, metropolitan area, and per capita income. Regression analyses were conducted to assess the relationship between the CCATH overall score and organizational and market variables. Our results show that hospitals which are not-for-profit, serve a more diverse inpatient population, and are located in more competitive and affluent markets exhibit a higher degree of cultural competency. Our results underscore the importance of both institutional and competitive market pressures in guiding hospital behavior. For instance, while not-for-profit may adopt innovative/progressive policies like cultural competency simply as a function of their organizational goals

  20. World Culture in the Capitalist World-System in Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Tom G.; Arnove, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    World culture theory (WCT) offers an explanatory framework for macro-level comparative analyses of systems of mass education, including their structures, accompanying policies and their curricular and pedagogical practices. WCT has contributed to broader efforts to overcome methodological nationalism in comparative research. In this paper, we…

  1. Culturally Responsive Evaluation Meets Systems-Oriented Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Veronica G.; Parsons, Beverly A.

    2017-01-01

    The authors of this article each bring a different theoretical background to their evaluation practice. The first author has a background of attention to culturally responsive evaluation (CRE), while the second author has a background of attention to systems theories and their application to evaluation. Both have had their own evolution of…

  2. Cultural Influences on Number Preferences: Christmas and Grading Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stieger, Stefan; Krizan, Zlatan

    2013-01-01

    People consistently prefer numbers associated with themselves (e.g., birth dates) over other numbers. We argue that such number preferences are also shaped by cultural influences, such as customs regarding the day on which Christmas is celebrated and customs regarding ranking of numerals used in national school's grading system. Across 6 different…

  3. Voice knowledge acquisition system for the management of cultural heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Château, Stefan; Boulanger, Danielle; Mercier-Laurent, Eunika

    This document presents our work on a definition and experimentation of a voice interface for cultural heritage inventory. This hybrid system includes signal processing, natural language techniques and knowledge modeling for future retrieval. We discuss the first results and give some points on future work.

  4. Pedagogical System of Future Teachers' Professional Thinking Culture Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abildina, Saltanat K.; Sarsekeyeva, Zhanar Y.; Aidarbekova, Kulzhan A.; Asetova, Zhannur B.; Adanov, Kuanysbek B.

    2016-01-01

    Research objective is to theoretically justify and to develop a pedagogical system of development of future teachers' professional thinking culture. In the research there are used a set of theoretical methods: systematic analysis of the philosophical, psychological and pedagogical literature on the researched topic; compilation and classification…

  5. Parents' Cultural Belief Systems: Their Origins, Expressions, and Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harkness, Sara, Ed.; Super, Charles M., Ed.

    This volume presents observations and thinking of scholars from a variety of disciplines about parental cultural belief systems. The chapters are concerned with the sources and consequences of parental ethnotheories in a number of societies. The following chapters are included: (1) "Introduction" (Sara Harkness and Charles M. Super); (2)…

  6. Barriers to Excellence: The Culture of Silence in School Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusch, Edith A.

    Little is known about how restructuring networks actually affect the cultures of school systems. This report examines the creation of an "island" of reform in a school district in northwest Ohio. The research emanated from the discovery of a new "island" in northwest Ohio called the Pathfinder Network. The group formed through…

  7. A nanoscale bio-inspired light-harvesting system developed from self-assembled alkyl-functionalized metallochlorin nano-aggregates.

    PubMed

    Ocakoglu, Kasim; Joya, Khurram S; Harputlu, Ersan; Tarnowska, Anna; Gryko, Daniel T

    2014-08-21

    Self-assembled supramolecular organization of nano-structured biomimetic light-harvesting modules inside solid-state nano-templates can be exploited to develop excellent light-harvesting materials for artificial photosynthetic devices. We present here a hybrid light-harvesting system mimicking the chlorosomal structures of the natural photosynthetic system using synthetic zinc chlorin units (ZnChl-C6, ZnChl-C12 and ZnChl-C18) that are self-aggregated inside the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nano-channel membranes. AAO nano-templates were modified with a TiO2 matrix and functionalized with long hydrophobic chains to facilitate the formation of supramolecular Zn-chlorin aggregates. The transparent Zn-chlorin nano-aggregates inside the alkyl-TiO2 modified AAO nano-channels have a diameter of ∼120 nm in a 60 μm length channel. UV-Vis studies and fluorescence emission spectra further confirm the formation of the supramolecular ZnChl aggregates from monomer molecules inside the alkyl-functionalized nano-channels. Our results prove that the novel and unique method can be used to produce efficient and stable light-harvesting assemblies for effective solar energy capture through transparent and stable nano-channel ceramic materials modified with bio-mimetic molecular self-assembled nano-aggregates.

  8. An immune-inspired swarm aggregation algorithm for self-healing swarm robotic systems.

    PubMed

    Timmis, J; Ismail, A R; Bjerknes, J D; Winfield, A F T

    2016-08-01

    Swarm robotics is concerned with the decentralised coordination of multiple robots having only limited communication and interaction abilities. Although fault tolerance and robustness to individual robot failures have often been used to justify the use of swarm robotic systems, recent studies have shown that swarm robotic systems are susceptible to certain types of failure. In this paper we propose an approach to self-healing swarm robotic systems and take inspiration from the process of granuloma formation, a process of containment and repair found in the immune system. We use a case study of a swarm performing team work where previous works have demonstrated that partially failed robots have the most detrimental effect on overall swarm behaviour. We have developed an immune inspired approach that permits the recovery from certain failure modes during operation of the swarm, overcoming issues that effect swarm behaviour associated with partially failed robots.

  9. Multilineage differentiation of rhesus monkey embryonic stem cells in three-dimensional culture systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Silvia S.; Revoltella, Roberto P.; Papini, Sandra; Michelini, Monica; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Margolis, Leonid

    2003-01-01

    In the course of normal embryogenesis, embryonic stem (ES) cells differentiate along different lineages in the context of complex three-dimensional (3D) tissue structures. In order to study this phenomenon in vitro under controlled conditions, 3D culture systems are necessary. Here, we studied in vitro differentiation of rhesus monkey ES cells in 3D collagen matrixes (collagen gels and porous collagen sponges). Differentiation of ES cells in these 3D systems was different from that in monolayers. ES cells differentiated in collagen matrixes into neural, epithelial, and endothelial lineages. The abilities of ES cells to form various structures in two chemically similar but topologically different matrixes were different. In particular, in collagen gels ES cells formed gland-like circular structures, whereas in collagen sponges ES cells were scattered through the matrix or formed aggregates. Soluble factors produced by feeder cells or added to the culture medium facilitated ES cell differentiation into particular lineages. Coculture with fibroblasts in collagen gel facilitated ES cell differentiation into cells of a neural lineage expressing nestin, neural cell adhesion molecule, and class III beta-tubulin. In collagen sponges, keratinocytes facilitated ES cell differentiation into cells of an endothelial lineage expressing factor VIII. Exogenous granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor further enhanced endothelial differentiation. Thus, both soluble factors and the type of extracellular matrix seem to be critical in directing differentiation of ES cells and the formation of tissue-like structures. Three-dimensional culture systems are a valuable tool for studying the mechanisms of these phenomena.

  10. Establishment of plant regeneration and cryopreservation system from zygotic embryo-derived embryogenic cell suspension cultures of Ranunculus kazusensis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suk Weon; Oh, Myung Jin

    2009-01-01

    This chapter describes culture conditions for high-frequency plant regeneration via somatic embryogenesis and cryopreservation from cell suspension cultures of Ranunculus kazusensis. Zygotic embryos form white nodular structures and pale-yellow calli at a frequency of 84.9% on half-strength Schenk and Hildebrandt (SH) medium supplemented with 0.1 mg/L 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4- D). However, the frequency of white nodular structure and off-white callus formation decreases to 25% with an increasing concentration of 2,4- D up to 10 mg/L cell suspension cultures are established from zygotic embryo-derived pale-yellow calli using half-strength SH medium supplemented with 0.1 mg/L 2,4- D. Upon plating onto half-strength SH basal medium, over 90% cell aggregates give rise to numerous somatic embryos and develop into plantlets. Regenerated plantlets are transplanted to pots filled with soil and grown to maturity at 90% survival rate in a growth chamber. Furthermore, we have developed the cryopreservation system using embryogenic cell suspension cultures of Ranunculus kazusensis. The re-growth rate of cryopreserved cells in 20% glycerol and 10% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) is 10% and 28.3%, respectively. These results show that DMSO is more effective cryoprotectant than glycerol in long-term preservation of embryogenic cell suspension cultures. The plant regeneration and cryopreservation system established in this study could be applied for mass propagation and ex situ conservation of this plant species.

  11. Investigation of work parameters of SI engine dedicated to energetics aggregates with pneumatic injection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marek, W.; Śliwiński, K.

    2016-09-01

    The article presents the possibilities of alternative fuel combustion in the engine four- stroke spark ignition engines. Power of the motor was carried out pneumatic fuel injection system using a hot gas developed by Prof. Stanislaw Jarnuszkiewicz. Presented made the position of the measuring system with the power and results. The engine experimental at the time of the study was powered by a blend of alcohol and gasoline. The main aim of the study was the question of control fuel dosage, taking into account the energy needs of forcing the engine load. During the tests carried load characteristics control the motor using the power control quality. Another issue was the elimination of penetration of fuel to the engine lubrication system, a problem occurred in the initial study on the issue of the pneumatic fuel injection using the hot exhaust gases. In summary we present the findings of this phase of the study.

  12. INTEGRATED SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM SAFETY CULTURE IMPROVEMENT INITIATIVE

    SciTech Connect

    MCDONALD JA JR

    2009-01-16

    In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) identified safety culture as one of their top Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) related priorities. A team was formed to address this issue. The team identified a consensus set of safety culture principles, along with implementation practices that could be used by DOE, NNSA, and their contractors. Documented improvement tools were identified and communicated to contractors participating in a year long pilot project. After a year, lessons learned will be collected and a path forward determined. The goal of this effort was to achieve improved safety and mission performance through ISMS continuous improvement. The focus of ISMS improvement was safety culture improvement building on operating experience from similar industries such as the domestic and international commercial nuclear and chemical industry.

  13. Slice Culture Modeling of Central Nervous System (CNS) Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dionne, Kalen R.; Tyler, Kenneth L.

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of the central nervous system (CNS) is not recapitulated in cell culture models. Thin slicing and subsequent culture of CNS tissue has become a valued means to study neuronal and glial biology within the context of the physiologically relevant tissue milieu. Modern membrane-interface slice culturing methodology allows straightforward access to both CNS tissue and feeding medium, enabling experimental manipulations and analyses that would otherwise be impossible in vivo. CNS slices can be successfully maintained in culture for up to several weeks for investigation of evolving pathology and long-term intervention in models of chronic neurologic disease. Herein, membrane-interface slice culture models for studying viral encephalitis and myelitis are detailed, with emphasis on the use of these models for investigation of pathogenesis and evaluation of novel treatment strategies. We describe techniques to (1) generate brain and spinal cord slices from rodent donors, (2) virally infect slices, (3) monitor viral replication, (4) assess virally induced injury/apoptosis, (5) characterize “CNS-specific” cytokine production, and (6) treat slices with cytokines/pharmaceuticals. Although our focus is on CNS viral infection, we anticipate that the described methods can be adapted to address a wide range of investigations within the fields of neuropathology, neuroimmunology, and neuropharmacology. PMID:23975824

  14. Information Management Platform for Data Analytics and Aggregation (IMPALA) System Design Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnell, Andrew; Akinyelu, Akinyele

    2016-01-01

    The System Design document tracks the design activities that are performed to guide the integration, installation, verification, and acceptance testing of the IMPALA Platform. The inputs to the design document are derived from the activities recorded in Tasks 1 through 6 of the Statement of Work (SOW), with the proposed technical solution being the completion of Phase 1-A. With the documentation of the architecture of the IMPALA Platform and the installation steps taken, the SDD will be a living document, capturing the details about capability enhancements and system improvements to the IMPALA Platform to provide users in development of accurate and precise analytical models. The IMPALA Platform infrastructure team, data architecture team, system integration team, security management team, project manager, NASA data scientists and users are the intended audience of this document. The IMPALA Platform is an assembly of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) products installed on an Apache-Hadoop platform. User interface details for the COTS products will be sourced from the COTS tools vendor documentation. The SDD is a focused explanation of the inputs, design steps, and projected outcomes of every design activity for the IMPALA Platform through installation and validation.

  15. Gender and cultural issues in psychiatric nosological classification systems.

    PubMed

    van de Water, Tanya; Suliman, Sharain; Seedat, Soraya

    2016-08-01

    Much has changed since the two dominant mental health nosological systems, the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), were first published in 1900 and 1952, respectively. Despite numerous modifications to stay up to date with scientific and cultural changes (eg, exclusion of homosexuality as a disorder) and to improve the cultural sensitivity of psychiatric diagnoses, the ICD and DSM have only recently renewed attempts at harmonization. Previous nosological iterations demonstrate the oscillation in the importance placed on the biological focus, highlighting the tension between a gender- and culture-free nosology (solely biological) and a contextually relevant understanding of mental illness. In light of the release of the DSM 5, future nosological systems, such as the ICD 11, scheduled for release in 2017, and the Research Development Criteria (RDoC), can learn from history and apply critiques. This article aims to critically consider gender and culture in previous editions of the ICD and DSM to inform forthcoming classifications.

  16. Controlled clinical comparison of three commercial blood culture systems.

    PubMed

    Frank, U; Malkotsis, D; Mlangeni, D; Daschner, F D

    1999-04-01

    In a controlled clinical comparison, three commercial blood culture systems--the standard aerobic BacT/Alert bottle (STD), the aerobic BacT/Alert FAN bottle (FAN) and the Isolator system (ISO; Wampole Laboratories, USA) were compared for their ability to detect aerobic and facultatively anaerobic microorganisms. A total of 945 BacT/Alert (STD and FAN) blood culture sets were compared. Of these, 110 blood culture sets (11.6%) yielded growth of 116 clinically significant bacterial and fungal isolates. Microorganisms were recovered from 10.7% (101/945) of the FAN bottles compared to 8.9% (84/945) of the STD bottles. Of the significant isolates, 78 (67.2%) were recovered by both bottles, 29 (25%) by the FAN bottle only and nine (7.8%) by the STD bottle only (P<0.01). Along with 56.1% (530/945) of BacT/Alert blood culture sets, a concomitant ISO tube was obtained. Of the triple (STD + FAN + ISO) blood culture sets, 54 (10.2%) yielded growth of 59 clinically relevant isolates. Microorganisms were detected in 9.1% (48/530) of the FAN bottles, 8.3% (44/530) of the STD bottles and 4% (21/530) of the ISO tubes (P<0.001). Overall, the BacT/Alert system detected more clinically significant microorganisms than the ISO tube; the STD and the FAN bottle each recovered significantly more staphylococci (P<0.01 and P<0.001, respectively) and gram-negative rods (P<0.01, both). In conclusion, the BacT/Alert FAN bottle performed better than the BacT/Alert STD bottle; both BacT/Alert bottles, however, were superior to the ISO tube in terms of recovery of clinically significant microorganisms, including gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

  17. Embryo Aggregation in Pig Improves Cloning Efficiency and Embryo Quality

    PubMed Central

    Buemo, Carla Paola; Gambini, Andrés; Moro, Lucia Natalia; Hiriart, María Inés; Fernández-Martín, Rafael; Collas, Philippe; Salamone, Daniel Felipe

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the effects of the cloned embryo aggregation on in vitro embryo development and embryo quality by measuring blastocyst diameter and cell number, DNA fragmentation levels and the expression of genes associated with pluripotency, apoptosis, trophoblast and DNA methylation in the porcine. Zona-free reconstructed cloned embryos were cultured in the well of the well system, placing one (1x non aggregated group) or three (3x group) embryos per microwell. Our results showed that aggregation of three embryos increased blastocyst formation rate and blastocyst diameter of cloned pig embryos. DNA fragmentation levels in 3x aggregated cloned blastocysts were significantly decreased compared to 1x blastocysts. Levels of Oct4, Klf4, Igf2, Bax and Dnmt 1 transcripts were significantly higher in aggregated embryos, whereas Nanog levels were not affected. Transcripts of Cdx2 and Bcl-xl were essentially non-detectable. Our study suggests that embryo aggregation in the porcine may be beneficial for cloned embryo development and embryo quality, through a reduction in apoptotic levels and an improvement in cell reprogramming. PMID:26894831

  18. Embryo Aggregation in Pig Improves Cloning Efficiency and Embryo Quality.

    PubMed

    Buemo, Carla Paola; Gambini, Andrés; Moro, Lucia Natalia; Hiriart, María Inés; Fernández-Martín, Rafael; Collas, Philippe; Salamone, Daniel Felipe

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the effects of the cloned embryo aggregation on in vitro embryo development and embryo quality by measuring blastocyst diameter and cell number, DNA fragmentation levels and the expression of genes associated with pluripotency, apoptosis, trophoblast and DNA methylation in the porcine. Zona-free reconstructed cloned embryos were cultured in the well of the well system, placing one (1x non aggregated group) or three (3x group) embryos per microwell. Our results showed that aggregation of three embryos increased blastocyst formation rate and blastocyst diameter of cloned pig embryos. DNA fragmentation levels in 3x aggregated cloned blastocysts were significantly decreased compared to 1x blastocysts. Levels of Oct4, Klf4, Igf2, Bax and Dnmt 1 transcripts were significantly higher in aggregated embryos, whereas Nanog levels were not affected. Transcripts of Cdx2 and Bcl-xl were essentially non-detectable. Our study suggests that embryo aggregation in the porcine may be beneficial for cloned embryo development and embryo quality, through a reduction in apoptotic levels and an improvement in cell reprogramming.

  19. An expert system for culture-based infection control surveillance.

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, M. G.; Steib, S. A.; Fraser, V. J.; Dunagan, W. C.

    1993-01-01

    Hospital-acquired infections represent a significant cause of prolonged inpatient days and additional hospital charges. We describe an expert system, called GERMWATCHER, which applies the Centers for Disease Control's National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance culture-based criteria for detecting nosocomial infections. GERMWATCHER has been deployed at Barnes Hospital, a large tertiary-care teaching hospital, since February 1993. We describe the Barnes Hospital infection control environment, the expert system design, and a predeployment performance evaluation. We then compare our system to other efforts in computer-based infection control. PMID:8130456

  20. Information support systems for cultural heritage protection against flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedvedova, K.; Pergl, R.

    2015-08-01

    The goal of this paper is to present use of different kind of software applications to create complex support system for protection of cultural heritage against flooding. The project is very complex and it tries to cover the whole area of the problem from prevention to liquidation of aftermath effects. We used GIS for mapping the risk areas, ontology systems for vulnerability assessment application and the BORM method (Business Object Relation Modelling) for flood protection system planning guide. Those modern technologies helped us to gather a lot of information in one place and provide the knowledge to the broad audience.

  1. Cultural selection drives the evolution of human communication systems

    PubMed Central

    Tamariz, Monica; Ellison, T. Mark; Barr, Dale J.; Fay, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Human communication systems evolve culturally, but the evolutionary mechanisms that drive this evolution are not well understood. Against a baseline that communication variants spread in a population following neutral evolutionary dynamics (also known as drift models), we tested the role of two cultural selection models: coordination- and content-biased. We constructed a parametrized mixed probabilistic model of the spread of communicative variants in four 8-person laboratory micro-societies engaged in a simple communication game. We found that selectionist models, working in combination, explain the majority of the empirical data. The best-fitting parameter setting includes an egocentric bias and a content bias, suggesting that participants retained their own previously used communicative variants unless they encountered a superior (content-biased) variant, in which case it was adopted. This novel pattern of results suggests that (i) a theory of the cultural evolution of human communication systems must integrate selectionist models and (ii) human communication systems are functionally adaptive complex systems. PMID:24966310

  2. Shear Bond Strength of Calcium Enriched Mixture Cement and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate to Composite Resin with Two Different Adhesive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Bahari, Mahmoud; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Motahhari, Paria; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Asgary, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Immediate restoration after vital pulp therapy is essential in order to create and maintain effective coronal seal. Purpose of Study: The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of recently used pulp capping materials: white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and calcium enriched mixture cement (CEM) to composite resin with the use of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems and compare them with the bond strength of commonly used resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) cement. Materials and Methods: Forty specimens from each test material were fabricated, measuring 4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in depth. The specimens of each material were divided into 2 groups of 20 specimens according to the adhesive system (Single Bond vs. Clearfil SE Bond) used for bonding of resin composite. The shear bond strength values were measured at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min and fractured surfaces were examined. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey’s test (P<0.05). Results: Analysis of data showed a significantly higher bond strength for RMGI compared to MTA and CEM (P<0.001); however, no significant differences were observed in the bond strength values of MTA and CEM (P=0.9). Furthermore, there were no significant differences in relation to the type of the adhesive system irrespective of the type of the material used (P=0.95) All the failures were of cohesive type in RMGI, MTA and CEM. Conclusion: Bond strength of RMGI cement to composite resin was higher than that of MTA or CEM cement irrespective of the type of the adhesive system. PMID:25628696

  3. Mixed aggregate formation in gemini surfactant/1,2-dialkyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine systems.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Javed; Tavakoli, Naser; Marangoni, D Gerrard; Wettig, Shawn D

    2012-07-01

    An evaluation of the physical interactions between gemini surfactants, DNA, and 1,2-dialkyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine helper lipid is presented in this work. Complexation between gemini surfactants and DNA was first investigated using surface tensiometry where the surface tension profiles obtained were found to be consistent with those typically observed for mixed surfactant-polymer systems; that is, there is a synergistic lowering of the surface tension, followed by a first (CAC) and second (CMC) break point in the plot. The surfactant alkyl tail length was observed to exhibit a significant effect on the CAC, thus demonstrating the importance of hydrophobic interactions during complexation between gemini surfactants and DNA. The second study presented is an investigation of the mixing interactions between gemini surfactants and DOPE using Clint's, Rubingh's, and Motomura's theories for mixed micellar formation. The mixing interactions between the 16-3-16/16-7-16/16-12-16/16-7NH-16 gemini surfactants and DOPE were observed to be antagonistic, where the strength of antagonism was found to be dependent upon the gemini surfactant spacer group and the solution composition.

  4. Multiplying steady-state culture in multi-reactor system.

    PubMed

    Erm, Sten; Adamberg, Kaarel; Vilu, Raivo

    2014-11-01

    Cultivation of microorganisms in batch experiments is fast and economical but the conditions therein change constantly, rendering quantitative data interpretation difficult. By using chemostat with controlled environmental conditions the physiological state of microorganisms is fixed; however, the unavoidable stabilization phase makes continuous methods resource consuming. Material can be spared by using micro scale devices, which however have limited analysis and process control capabilities. Described herein are a method and a system combining the high throughput of batch with the controlled environment of continuous cultivations. Microorganisms were prepared in one bioreactor followed by culture distribution into a network of bioreactors and continuation of independent steady state experiments therein. Accelerostat cultivation with statistical analysis of growth parameters demonstrated non-compromised physiological state following distribution, thus the method effectively multiplied steady state culture of microorganisms. The theoretical efficiency of the system was evaluated in inhibitory compound analysis using repeated chemostat to chemostat transfers.

  5. Beneficiation of natural aggregates by polymer impregnation

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, R.P.; Fontana, J.J.

    1980-09-01

    The use of polymer impregnation as a means of upgrading natural aggregates has been investigated. The effect of polymer impregnation on the physical and mechanical properties was evaluated in a series of tests performed using four aggregates of varying quality. The strength of concrete cast with polymer impregnated coarse aggregate was also tested. Two monomer systems were used in the investigation; a methyl methacrylate-based system and a styrene-based system. In general, significant improvements in the physical and mechanical properties of each of the four aggregates resulted from polymer impregnation. The strength of concrete cast with impregnated aggregates varied, being increased in some cases and decreased in others.

  6. An ex vivo culture system to study thyroid development.

    PubMed

    Delmarcelle, Anne-Sophie; Villacorte, Mylah; Hick, Anne-Christine; Pierreux, Christophe E

    2014-06-06

    The thyroid is a bilobated endocrine gland localized at the base of the neck, producing the thyroid hormones T3, T4, and calcitonin. T3 and T4 are produced by differentiated thyrocytes, organized in closed spheres called follicles, while calcitonin is synthesized by C-cells, interspersed in between the follicles and a dense network of blood capillaries. Although adult thyroid architecture and functions have been extensively described and studied, the formation of the "angio-follicular" units, the distribution of C-cells in the parenchyma and the paracrine communications between epithelial and endothelial cells is far from being understood. This method describes the sequential steps of mouse embryonic thyroid anlagen dissection and its culture on semiporous filters or on microscopy plastic slides. Within a period of four days, this culture system faithfully recapitulates in vivo thyroid development. Indeed, (i) bilobation of the organ occurs (for e12.5 explants), (ii) thyrocytes precursors organize into follicles and polarize, (iii) thyrocytes and C-cells differentiate, and (iv) endothelial cells present in the microdissected tissue proliferate, migrate into the thyroid lobes, and closely associate with the epithelial cells, as they do in vivo. Thyroid tissues can be obtained from wild type, knockout or fluorescent transgenic embryos. Moreover, explants culture can be manipulated by addition of inhibitors, blocking antibodies, growth factors, or even cells or conditioned medium. Ex vivo development can be analyzed in real-time, or at any time of the culture by immunostaining and RT-qPCR. In conclusion, thyroid explant culture combined with downstream whole-mount or on sections imaging and gene expression profiling provides a powerful system for manipulating and studying morphogenetic and differentiation events of thyroid organogenesis.

  7. Tourmaline nodules from Capo Bianco aplite (Elba Island, Italy): an example of diffusion limited aggregation growth in a magmatic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perugini, Diego; Poli, Giampiero

    2007-05-01

    The morphology of tourmaline nodules occurring in the Capo Bianco aplite (Elba Island, Italy) is studied. Outcrop features indicate that tourmaline nodules are the product of magmatic crystallization, as they are aligned along flow fields developed within the magmatic hosting mass. Mesoscopic observations indicate that nodule morphologies are very variable, from rounded to dendritic. Morphometric analyses show that tourmaline nodules are fractals and that fractal dimension quantifies their degree of irregularity. Numerical simulations of nodule growth are performed by using a Diffusion-Limited Aggregation process. The presence in natural samples of nodules with different morphologies is explained by considering a chaotic magmatic system characterized by a complex interplay between growth rate in different dynamical regions, latent heat of crystallization, and local convection dynamics. It is suggested that higher growth rates correspond to growth of tourmaline nodules in dynamical regions where the transfer of nutrients is very efficient. In such conditions, the latent heat released by the growing nodule is high, inducing strong local convection dynamics, destabilizing the nodule interface, and promoting the formation of dendritic morphologies. On the contrary, the growth of nodules in dynamical regions characterized by weak transfer of nutrients is inhibited leading to weak local convection dynamics and, consequently, to the formation of rounded morphologies.

  8. Aggregation of Full-length Immunoglobulin Light Chains from Systemic Light Chain Amyloidosis (AL) Patients Is Remodeled by Epigallocatechin-3-gallate.

    PubMed

    Andrich, Kathrin; Hegenbart, Ute; Kimmich, Christoph; Kedia, Niraja; Bergen, H Robert; Schönland, Stefan; Wanker, Erich; Bieschke, Jan

    2017-02-10

    Intervention into amyloid deposition with anti-amyloid agents like the polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is emerging as an experimental secondary treatment strategy in systemic light chain amyloidosis (AL). In both AL and multiple myeloma (MM), soluble immunoglobulin light chains (LC) are produced by clonal plasma cells, but only in AL do they form amyloid deposits in vivo We investigated the amyloid formation of patient-derived LC and their susceptibility to EGCG in vitro to probe commonalities and systematic differences in their assembly mechanisms. We isolated nine LC from the urine of AL and MM patients. We quantified their thermodynamic stabilities and monitored their aggregation under physiological conditions by thioflavin T fluorescence, light scattering, SDS stability, and atomic force microscopy. LC from all patients formed amyloid-like aggregates, albeit with individually different kinetics. LC existed as dimers, ∼50% of which were linked by disulfide bridges. Our results suggest that cleavage into LC monomers is required for efficient amyloid formation. The kinetics of AL LC displayed a transition point in concentration dependence, which MM LC lacked. The lack of concentration dependence of MM LC aggregation kinetics suggests that conformational change of the light chain is rate-limiting for these proteins. Aggregation kinetics displayed two distinct phases, which corresponded to the formation of oligomers and amyloid fibrils, respectively. EGCG specifically inhibited the second aggregation phase and induced the formation of SDS-stable, non-amyloid LC aggregates. Our data suggest that EGCG intervention does not depend on the individual LC sequence and is similar to the mechanism observed for amyloid-β and α-synuclein.

  9. A mobile system for a comprehensive online-characterization of nanoparticle aggregates based on wide-angle light scattering and laser-induced incandescence.

    PubMed

    Huber, Franz J T; Altenhoff, Michael; Will, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    A mobile demonstrator for the comprehensive online-characterization of gas-borne nanoparticle aggregates is presented. Two optical measurement techniques are combined, both utilizing a pulsed Nd:YAG laser as light source. Aggregate size and fractal dimension are measured by Wide-Angle Light Scattering (WALS). An ellipsoidal mirror images elastically scattered light from scattering angles between 10° and 165° onto a CCD-camera chip resulting in an almost complete scattering diagram with high angular resolution. Primary particle size and volume fraction are measured by time-resolved Laser-Induced Incandescence (TiRe-LII). Here, particles are heated up to about 3000 K by the short laser pulse, the enhanced thermal radiation signal is detected with gated photomultiplier tubes. Analysis of the signal decay time and maximum LII-signal allows for the determination of primary particle diameter and volume fraction. The performance of the system is demonstrated by combined measurements on soot nanoparticle aggregates from a soot aerosol generator. Particle and aggregate sizes are varied by using different equivalence ratios of the combustion in the generator. Soot volume fraction can be adjusted by different levels of dilution with air. Online-measurements were carried out demonstrating the favorable performance of the system and the potential for industrial applications such as process control and product development. The particle properties obtained are confirmed through transmission electron microscopy analysis on representative samples.

  10. A mobile system for a comprehensive online-characterization of nanoparticle aggregates based on wide-angle light scattering and laser-induced incandescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Franz J. T.; Altenhoff, Michael; Will, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    A mobile demonstrator for the comprehensive online-characterization of gas-borne nanoparticle aggregates is presented. Two optical measurement techniques are combined, both utilizing a pulsed Nd:YAG laser as light source. Aggregate size and fractal dimension are measured by Wide-Angle Light Scattering (WALS). An ellipsoidal mirror images elastically scattered light from scattering angles between 10° and 165° onto a CCD-camera chip resulting in an almost complete scattering diagram with high angular resolution. Primary particle size and volume fraction are measured by time-resolved Laser-Induced Incandescence (TiRe-LII). Here, particles are heated up to about 3000 K by the short laser pulse, the enhanced thermal radiation signal is detected with gated photomultiplier tubes. Analysis of the signal decay time and maximum LII-signal allows for the determination of primary particle diameter and volume fraction. The performance of the system is demonstrated by combined measurements on soot nanoparticle aggregates from a soot aerosol generator. Particle and aggregate sizes are varied by using different equivalence ratios of the combustion in the generator. Soot volume fraction can be adjusted by different levels of dilution with air. Online-measurements were carried out demonstrating the favorable performance of the system and the potential for industrial applications such as process control and product development. The particle properties obtained are confirmed through transmission electron microscopy analysis on representative samples.

  11. Zooplankton Aggregations Near Sills

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-30

    frequency echo-sounder system. This data were supplemented with multi-net (BIONESS) trawls, bongo nets, and otter trawls (operated by D. Mackas and group...side. The general composition of the zooplankton aggregations can be deduced from the relative levels of the three echo-sounder frequencies; krill ...Nov. 20th, 2002. Krill layer is evident at 66 – 90 m, coincident with BIONESS trawl through the region. 3 Figure 2 shows a comparison between

  12. Advanced imaging systems for diagnostic investigations applied to Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peccenini, E.; Albertin, F.; Bettuzzi, M.; Brancaccio, R.; Casali, F.; Morigi, M. P.; Petrucci, F.

    2014-12-01

    The diagnostic investigations are an important resource in the studies on Cultural Heritage to enhance the knowledge on execution techniques, materials and conservation status of a work of art. In this field, due to the great historical and artistic value of the objects, preservation is the main concern; for this reason, new technological equipment has been designed and developed in the Physics Departments of the Universities of Ferrara and Bologna to enhance the non-invasive approach to the study of pictorial artworks and other objects of cultural interest. Infrared (IR) reflectography, X-ray radiography and computed tomography (CT), applied to works of art, are joined by the same goal: to get hidden information on execution techniques and inner structure pursuing the non-invasiveness of the methods, although using different setup and physical principles. In this work transportable imaging systems to investigate large objects in museums and galleries are presented. In particular, 2D scanning devices for IR reflectography and X-ray radiography, CT systems and some applications to the Cultural Heritage are described.

  13. An Air-Liquid Interface Culture System for 3D Organoid Culture of Diverse Primary Gastrointestinal Tissues.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingnan; Ootani, Akifumi; Kuo, Calvin

    2016-01-01

    Conventional in vitro analysis of gastrointestinal epithelium usually relies on two-dimensional (2D) culture of epithelial cell lines as monolayer on impermeable surfaces. However, the lack of context of differentiation and tissue architecture in 2D culture can hinder the faithful recapitulation of the phenotypic and morphological characteristics of native epithelium. Here, we describe a robust long-term three-dimensional (3D) culture methodology for gastrointestinal culture, which incorporates both epithelial and mesenchymal/stromal components into a collagen-based air-liquid interface 3D culture system. This system allows vigorously expansion of primary gastrointestinal epithelium for over 60 days as organoids with both proliferation and multilineage differentiation, indicating successful long-term intestinal culture within a microenvironment accurately recapitulating the stem cell niche.

  14. Allogenic forcing of autogenic processes: inferences from an aggregated process-based model of fluvio-deltaic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamitopoulos, P.; Weltje, G.; Dalman, R.

    2011-12-01

    Spatial and temporal variability of sediment storage in fluvio-deltaic sedimentary systems is controlled by the interplay of allogenic and autogenic processes. In order to investigate the effects of this interplay on the resulting stratigraphy at varying spatio-temporal scales, we carried out a series of numerical experiments using an aggregated process-based model of fluvio-deltaic systems (SIMCLAST), which combines diffusive and advective transport with sub-grid channel stability algorithms in the fluvial domain. New distributary channels occur by avulsions under conditions of local superelevation or through bifurcations due to mouth bar deposition. A series of numerical experiments were performed under forcing by glacio-eustatic sealevel cycles in the order of 100 kyr. Initial conditions of all experiments are represented by classic continental-margin topography with a shelf break. In this scenario, erosional features (canyons) are developed when sea level falls below the shelf break. Sediment supply and liquid discharge remain constant throughout the experiments. In order to characterize the topographic variability during the experiments, we used a difference measure obtained by summation of local changes in net sediment accumulation rates across the entire model domain. Long-term average variability (10 kyr resolution) correlates strongly with the allogenic sea-level signal. The long-term variability reaches a maximum around the time interval corresponding to isochronous maximum flooding surfaces, when retrogradation gives way to a new episode of progradation. Long-term mean variability is lowest during periods of sea-level fall, when incision restricts sediment dispersal. Increasing the time resolution of our difference measure allows recognition of numerous small peaks which correspond to local changes in sediment accumulation rates induced by autogenic processes (avulsions and bifurcations). The amplitudes of these peaks are related to the rate of change of

  15. Aggregation of Minnesota water-use data and transfer of data to the National Water-Use Data System; Procedures and programs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trotta, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    The Minnesota Water-Use Data System stores data on the quantity of withdrawals and discharge in Minnesota. To transfer these data into the U.S. Geological Survey 's National Water-Use Data System properly, certain procedures must be followed. Uniform data categorization and entry allows comparison of water use from State to State. The data in the National Water-Use Data System are aggregated by county and by watershed (hydrologic unit). This report documents the data aggregation and transfer process as developed by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, the Minnesota State Planning Agency/Planning Information Center, and the U.S. Geological Survey as part of the National Water-Use Information Program.

  16. A nanoscale bio-inspired light-harvesting system developed from self-assembled alkyl-functionalized metallochlorin nano-aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocakoglu, Kasim; Joya, Khurram S.; Harputlu, Ersan; Tarnowska, Anna; Gryko, Daniel T.

    2014-07-01

    Self-assembled supramolecular organization of nano-structured biomimetic light-harvesting modules inside solid-state nano-templates can be exploited to develop excellent light-harvesting materials for artificial photosynthetic devices. We present here a hybrid light-harvesting system mimicking the chlorosomal structures of the natural photosynthetic system using synthetic zinc chlorin units (ZnChl-C6, ZnChl-C12 and ZnChl-C18) that are self-aggregated inside the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nano-channel membranes. AAO nano-templates were modified with a TiO2 matrix and functionalized with long hydrophobic chains to facilitate the formation of supramolecular Zn-chlorin aggregates. The transparent Zn-chlorin nano-aggregates inside the alkyl-TiO2 modified AAO nano-channels have a diameter of ~120 nm in a 60 μm length channel. UV-Vis studies and fluorescence emission spectra further confirm the formation of the supramolecular ZnChl aggregates from monomer molecules inside the alkyl-functionalized nano-channels. Our results prove that the novel and unique method can be used to produce efficient and stable light-harvesting assemblies for effective solar energy capture through transparent and stable nano-channel ceramic materials modified with bio-mimetic molecular self-assembled nano-aggregates.Self-assembled supramolecular organization of nano-structured biomimetic light-harvesting modules inside solid-state nano-templates can be exploited to develop excellent light-harvesting materials for artificial photosynthetic devices. We present here a hybrid light-harvesting system mimicking the chlorosomal structures of the natural photosynthetic system using synthetic zinc chlorin units (ZnChl-C6, ZnChl-C12 and ZnChl-C18) that are self-aggregated inside the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nano-channel membranes. AAO nano-templates were modified with a TiO2 matrix and functionalized with long hydrophobic chains to facilitate the formation of supramolecular Zn-chlorin aggregates. The

  17. Role of streams in myxobacteria aggregate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiskowski, Maria A.; Jiang, Yi; Alber, Mark S.

    2004-10-01

    Cell contact, movement and directionality are important factors in biological development (morphogenesis), and myxobacteria are a model system for studying cell-cell interaction and cell organization preceding differentiation. When starved, thousands of myxobacteria cells align, stream and form aggregates which later develop into round, non-motile spores. Canonically, cell aggregation has been attributed to attractive chemotaxis, a long range interaction, but there is growing evidence that myxobacteria organization depends on contact-mediated cell-cell communication. We present a discrete stochastic model based on contact-mediated signaling that suggests an explanation for the initialization of early aggregates, aggregation dynamics and final aggregate distribution. Our model qualitatively reproduces the unique structures of myxobacteria aggregates and detailed stages which occur during myxobacteria aggregation: first, aggregates initialize in random positions and cells join aggregates by random walk; second, cells redistribute by moving within transient streams connecting aggregates. Streams play a critical role in final aggregate size distribution by redistributing cells among fewer, larger aggregates. The mechanism by which streams redistribute cells depends on aggregate sizes and is enhanced by noise. Our model predicts that with increased internal noise, more streams would form and streams would last longer. Simulation results suggest a series of new experiments.

  18. An Information System for European culture collections: the way forward.

    PubMed

    Casaregola, Serge; Vasilenko, Alexander; Romano, Paolo; Robert, Vincent; Ozerskaya, Svetlana; Kopf, Anna; Glöckner, Frank O; Smith, David

    2016-01-01

    Culture collections contain indispensable information about the microorganisms preserved in their repositories, such as taxonomical descriptions, origins, physiological and biochemical characteristics, bibliographic references, etc. However, information currently accessible in databases rarely adheres to common standard protocols. The resultant heterogeneity between culture collections, in terms of both content and format, notably hampers microorganism-based research and development (R&D). The optimized exploitation of these resources thus requires standardized, and simplified, access to the associated information. To this end, and in the interest of supporting R&D in the fields of agriculture, health and biotechnology, a pan-European distributed research infrastructure, MIRRI, including over 40 public culture collections and research institutes from 19 European countries, was established. A prime objective of MIRRI is to unite and provide universal access to the fragmented, and untapped, resources, information and expertise available in European public collections of microorganisms; a key component of which is to develop a dynamic Information System. For the first time, both culture collection curators as well as their users have been consulted and their feedback, concerning the needs and requirements for collection databases and data accessibility, utilised. Users primarily noted that databases were not interoperable, thus rendering a global search of multiple databases impossible. Unreliable or out-of-date and, in particular, non-homogenous, taxonomic information was also considered to be a major obstacle to searching microbial data efficiently. Moreover, complex searches are rarely possible in online databases thus limiting the extent of search queries. Curators also consider that overall harmonization-including Standard Operating Procedures, data structure, and software tools-is necessary to facilitate their work and to make high-quality data easily accessible

  19. Studies on the formation of hierarchical zeolite T aggregates with well-defined morphology in different template systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiaoyan; Chu, Naibo; Lu, Xuewei; Li, Zhongfang; Guo, Hong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the disk-like and pumpkin-like hierarchical zeolite T aggregates consisted of primary nano-grains have been hydrothermally synthesized with and without the aid of the second template. The first template is used with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAOH) and the second template is used with triethanolamine (TEA) or polyving akohol (PVA). A combination of characterization techniques, including XRD, SEM, TEM and N2 adsorption-desorption to examine the crystal crystallinity, morphology and surface properties of hierarchical zeolite T aggregates. In the single-template preparation process, the two-step varying-temperature treatment has been used to improve the meso-porosity of zeolite T aggregates. In the double-template preparation process, the amounts of PVA or TEA on the crystallinity, morphology and meso-porosity of zeolite T aggregates have been studied. It has been proved that the interstitial voids between the primary grains of aggregates are the origin of additional mesopores of samples. The micro- and meso-porosities of samples prepared with and without the second template have been contrasted in detail at last. In particular, the sample synthesized with the addition of PVA presents a hierarchical pore structure with the highest Sext value of 122 m2/g and Vmeso value of 0.255 cm3/g.

  20. Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    Twelve conference papers on cultural aspects of second language instruction include: "Towards True Multiculturalism: Ideas for Teachers" (Brian McVeigh); Comparing Cultures Through Critical Thinking: Development and Interpretations of Meaningful Observations" (Laurel D. Kamada); "Authority and Individualism in Japan and the…

  1. Development of bovine embryos cultured in CR1aa and IVD101 media using different oxygen tensions and culture systems.

    PubMed

    Somfai, Tamás; Inaba, Yasushi; Aikawa, Yoshio; Ohtake, Masaki; Kobayashi, Shuji; Konishi, Kazuyuki; Nagai, Takashi; Imai, Kei

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to optimise the culture conditions for the in vitro production of bovine embryos. The development of in vitro fertilised bovine oocytes in CR1aa supplemented with 5% calf serum and IVD101 culture media were compared using traditional microdrops and Well of the Well (WOW) culture systems either under 5% or 20% oxygen tension. After 7 days of culture, a significantly higher blastocyst formation rate was obtained for embryos cultured in CR1aa medium compared to those cultured in IVD101, irrespective of O2 tensions and culture systems. The blastocyst formation in IVD101 was suppressed under 20% O2 compared to 5% O2 . Despite their similar total cell numbers, higher rates of inner cell mass (ICM) cells were observed in blastocysts developed in IVD101 medium than in those developed in CR1aa, irrespective of O2 tensions. There was no significant difference in blastocyst formation, total, ICM and trophectoderm (TE) cell numbers between embryos obtained by microdrop and WOW culture systems irrespective of the culture media and O2 tensions used. In conclusion, CR1aa resulted in higher blastocyst formation rates irrespective of O2 tension, whereas IVD101 supported blastocyst formation only under low O2 levels but enhanced the proliferation of ICM cells.

  2. Three-dimensional printed polymeric system to encapsulate human mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into islet-like insulin-producing aggregates for diabetes treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sabek, Omaima M; Farina, Marco; Fraga, Daniel W; Afshar, Solmaz; Ballerini, Andrea; Filgueira, Carly S; Thekkedath, Usha R; Grattoni, Alessandro; Gaber, A Osama

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is one of the most prevalent, costly, and debilitating diseases in the world. Pancreas and islet transplants have shown success in re-establishing glucose control and reversing diabetic complications. However, both are limited by donor availability, need for continuous immunosuppression, loss of transplanted tissue due to dispersion, and lack of vascularization. To overcome the limitations of poor islet availability, here, we investigate the potential of bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into islet-like insulin-producing aggregates. Islet-like insulin-producing aggregates, characterized by gene expression, are shown to be similar to pancreatic islets and display positive immunostaining for insulin and glucagon. To address the limits of current encapsulation systems, we developed a novel three-dimensional printed, scalable, and potentially refillable polymeric construct (nanogland) to support islet-like insulin-producing aggregates’ survival and function in the host body. In vitro studies showed that encapsulated islet-like insulin-producing aggregates maintained viability and function, producing steady levels of insulin for at least 4 weeks. Nanogland—islet-like insulin-producing aggregate technology here investigated as a proof of concept holds potential as an effective and innovative approach for diabetes cell therapy. PMID:27152147

  3. Tracking protein aggregate interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, Jason C; Nilsson, K Peter R

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils share a structural motif consisting of highly ordered β-sheets aligned perpendicular to the fibril axis.1, 2 At each fibril end, β-sheets provide a template for recruiting and converting monomers.3 Different amyloid fibrils often co-occur in the same individual, yet whether a protein aggregate aids or inhibits the assembly of a heterologous protein is unclear. In prion disease, diverse prion aggregate structures, known as strains, are thought to be the basis of disparate disease phenotypes in the same species expressing identical prion protein sequences.4–7 Here we explore the interactions reported to occur when two distinct prion strains occur together in the central nervous system. PMID:21597336

  4. The Membrane Protein LeuT in Micellar Systems: Aggregation Dynamics and Detergent Binding to the S2 Site

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Structural and functional properties of integral membrane proteins are often studied in detergent micellar environments (proteomicelles), but how such proteomicelles form and organize is not well understood. This makes it difficult to evaluate the relationship between the properties of the proteins measured in such a detergent-solubilized form and under native conditions. To obtain mechanistic information about this relationship for the leucine transporter (LeuT), a prokaryotic homologue of the mammalian neurotransmitter/sodium symporters (NSSs), we studied the properties of proteomicelles formed by n-dodecyl-β,d-maltopyranoside (DDM) detergent. Extensive atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of different protein/detergent/water number ratios revealed the formation of a proteomicelle characterized by a constant-sized shell of detergents surrounding LeuT protecting its transmembrane segments from unfavorable hydrophobic/hydrophilic exposure. Regardless of the DDM content in the simulated system, this shell consisted of a constant number of DDM molecules (∼120 measured at a 4 Å cutoff distance from LeuT). In contrast, the overall number of DDMs in the proteomicelle (aggregation number) was found to depend on the detergent concentration, reaching a saturation value of 226±17 DDMs in the highest concentration regime simulated. Remarkably, we found that at high detergent-to-protein ratios we observed two independent ways of DDM penetration into LeuT, both leading to a positioning of the DDM molecule in the second substrate (S2) binding site of LeuT. Consonant with several recent experimental studies demonstrating changes in functional properties of membrane proteins due to detergent, our findings highlight how the environment in which the membrane proteins are examined may affect the outcome and interpretation of their mechanistic features. PMID:23980525

  5. The membrane protein LeuT in micellar systems: aggregation dynamics and detergent binding to the S2 site.

    PubMed

    Khelashvili, George; LeVine, Michael V; Shi, Lei; Quick, Matthias; Javitch, Jonathan A; Weinstein, Harel

    2013-09-25

    Structural and functional properties of integral membrane proteins are often studied in detergent micellar environments (proteomicelles), but how such proteomicelles form and organize is not well understood. This makes it difficult to evaluate the relationship between the properties of the proteins measured in such a detergent-solubilized form and under native conditions. To obtain mechanistic information about this relationship for the leucine transporter (LeuT), a prokaryotic homologue of the mammalian neurotransmitter/sodium symporters (NSSs), we studied the properties of proteomicelles formed by n-dodecyl-β,D-maltopyranoside (DDM) detergent. Extensive atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of different protein/detergent/water number ratios revealed the formation of a proteomicelle characterized by a constant-sized shell of detergents surrounding LeuT protecting its transmembrane segments from unfavorable hydrophobic/hydrophilic exposure. Regardless of the DDM content in the simulated system, this shell consisted of a constant number of DDM molecules (∼120 measured at a 4 Å cutoff distance from LeuT). In contrast, the overall number of DDMs in the proteomicelle (aggregation number) was found to depend on the detergent concentration, reaching a saturation value of 226±17 DDMs in the highest concentration regime simulated. Remarkably, we found that at high detergent-to-protein ratios we observed two independent ways of DDM penetration into LeuT, both leading to a positioning of the DDM molecule in the second substrate (S2) binding site of LeuT. Consonant with several recent experimental studies demonstrating changes in functional properties of membrane proteins due to detergent, our findings highlight how the environment in which the membrane proteins are examined may affect the outcome and interpretation of their mechanistic features.

  6. Eigenmodes of coupled plasmons-excitons in a system of adjoining spherical metallic-J-aggregate nanoshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manassah, Jamal T.

    2013-08-01

    Using the spherical modes of the full-Maxwell equations, I compute the eigenfrequencies of the complex consisting of concentric passive inner core, a metallic nanoshell, molecular J-aggregate adsorped to the surface of the metal, immersed in a passive solution. The coupling of the plasmons of the metal to the excitons of the J-aggregate is incorporated in the formalism through the continuity conditions for the tangential components of the electric field and magnetic flux density at the materials interfaces. Comparison with results obtained using the electrostatic approximation shows deviations in both the values of the resonance frequencies and their decay-rates.

  7. Cooperation and its evolution in growing systems with cultural reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Portillo, Ignacio

    2012-12-01

    We explore the evolution of cooperation in the framework of the evolutionary game theory using the prisoner's dilemma as metaphor of the problem. We present a minimal model taking into account the growing process of the systems and individuals with imitation capacity. We consider the topological structure and the evolution of strategies decoupled instead of a coevolutionary dynamic. We show conditions to build up a cooperative system with real topological structures for any natural selection intensity. When the system starts to grow, cooperation is unstable but becomes stable as soon as the system reaches a small core of cooperators whose size increases when the intensity of natural selection decreases. Thus, we reduce the evolution of cooperative systems with cultural reproduction to justify a small initial cooperative structure that we call cooperative seed. Otherwise, given that the system grows principally as cooperator whose cooperators inhabit the most linked parts of the system, the benefit-cost ratio required for cooperation evolve is drastically reduced compared to the found in static networks. In this way, we show that in systems whose individuals have imitation capacity the growing process is essential for the evolution of cooperation.

  8. Community, culture and sustainability in multilevel dynamic systems intervention science.

    PubMed

    Schensul, Jean J

    2009-06-01

    This paper addresses intertwined issues in the conceptualization, implementation and evaluation of multilevel dynamic systems intervention science (MDSIS). Interventions are systematically planned, conducted and evaluated social science-based cultural products intercepting the lives of people and institutions in the context of multiple additional events and processes (which also may be referred to as interventions) that may speed, slow or reduce change towards a desired outcome. Multilevel interventions address change efforts at multiple social levels in the hope that effects at each level will forge synergistic links, facilitating movement toward desired change. This paper utilizes an ecological framework that identifies macro (policy and regulatory institutions), meso (organizations and agencies with resources, and power) and micro (individuals, families and friends living in communities) interacting directly and indirectly. An MDSIS approach hypothesizes that change toward a goal will occur faster and more effectively when synchronized and supported across levels in a social system. MDSIS approaches by definition involve "whole" communities and cannot be implemented without the establishments of working community partnerships This paper takes a dynamic systems approach to science as conducted in communities, and discusses four concepts that are central to MDSIS--science, community, culture, and sustainability. These concepts are important in community based participatory research and to the targeting, refinement, and adaptation of enduring interventions. Consistency in their meaning and use can promote forward movement in the field of MDSIS, and in community-based prevention science.

  9. Workshop Report: Systems Biology for Organotypic Cell Cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Grego, Sonia; Dougherty, Edward R.; Alexander, Francis Joseph; Auerbach, Scott S.; Berridge, Brian R.; Bittner, Michael L.; Casey, Warren; Cooley, Philip C.; Dash, Ajit; Ferguson, Stephen F.; Fennell, Timothy R.; Hawkins, Brian T.; Hickey, Anthony J.; Kleensang, Andre; Liebman, Michael; Martin, Florian; Maull, Elizabeth A.; Paragas, Jason; Qiao, Guilin; Ramaiahgari, Sreenivasa; Sumner, Susan J.; Yoon, Miyoung

    2016-11-14

    Translating in vitro biological data into actionable information related to human health holds the potential to improve disease treatment and risk assessment of chemical exposures. While genomics has identified regulatory pathways at the cellular level, translation to the organism level requires a multiscale approach accounting for intra-cellular regulation, inter-cellular interaction, and tissue/organ-level effects. Tissue-level effects can now be probed in vitro thanks to recently developed systems of three-dimensional (3D), multicellular, “organotypic” cell cultures, which mimic functional responses of living tissue. However, there remains a knowledge gap regarding interactions across different biological scales, complicating accurate prediction of health outcomes from molecular/genomic data and tissue responses. Systems biology aims at mathematical modeling of complex, non-linear biological systems. We propose to apply a systems biology approach to achieve a computational representation of tissue-level physiological responses by integrating empirical data derived from organotypic culture systems with computational models of intracellular pathways to better predict human responses. Successful implementation of this integrated approach will provide a powerful tool for faster, more accurate and cost-effective screening of potential toxicants and therapeutics. On September 11, 2015, an interdisciplinary group of scientists, engineers, and clinicians gathered for a workshop in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, to discuss this ambitious goal. Participants represented laboratory-based and computational modeling approaches to pharmacology and toxicology, as well as the pharmaceutical industry, government, non-profits, and academia. Discussions focused on identifying critical system perturbations to model, the computational tools required, and the experimental approaches best suited to generating key data.

  10. Workshop Report: Systems Biology for Organotypic Cell Cultures

    DOE PAGES

    Grego, Sonia; Dougherty, Edward R.; Alexander, Francis Joseph; ...

    2016-11-14

    Translating in vitro biological data into actionable information related to human health holds the potential to improve disease treatment and risk assessment of chemical exposures. While genomics has identified regulatory pathways at the cellular level, translation to the organism level requires a multiscale approach accounting for intra-cellular regulation, inter-cellular interaction, and tissue/organ-level effects. Tissue-level effects can now be probed in vitro thanks to recently developed systems of three-dimensional (3D), multicellular, “organotypic” cell cultures, which mimic functional responses of living tissue. However, there remains a knowledge gap regarding interactions across different biological scales, complicating accurate prediction of health outcomes from molecular/genomicmore » data and tissue responses. Systems biology aims at mathematical modeling of complex, non-linear biological systems. We propose to apply a systems biology approach to achieve a computational representation of tissue-level physiological responses by integrating empirical data derived from organotypic culture systems with computational models of intracellular pathways to better predict human responses. Successful implementation of this integrated approach will provide a powerful tool for faster, more accurate and cost-effective screening of potential toxicants and therapeutics. On September 11, 2015, an interdisciplinary group of scientists, engineers, and clinicians gathered for a workshop in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, to discuss this ambitious goal. Participants represented laboratory-based and computational modeling approaches to pharmacology and toxicology, as well as the pharmaceutical industry, government, non-profits, and academia. Discussions focused on identifying critical system perturbations to model, the computational tools required, and the experimental approaches best suited to generating key data.« less

  11. The Cultural Erosion Metaphor and the Transcultural Impact of Media Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varan, Duane

    1998-01-01

    Contributes to scholarship on the transcultural impact of media systems (and draws on media effects, political economy, and cultural studies research) by applying the soil erosion metaphor to transcultural impact of television. Discusses four processes associated with this model: cultural abrasion, cultural deflation, cultural deposition, and…

  12. Production of monozygotic twin calves using the blastomere separation technique and Well of the Well culture system.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, M; Matoba, S; Narita, M; Saito, N; Nagai, T; Imai, K

    2008-03-15

    The present study was conducted to establish a simple and efficient method of producing monozygotic twin calves using the blastomere separation technique. To produce monozygotic twin embryos from zona-free two- and eight-cell embryos, blastomeres were separated mechanically by pipetting to form two demi-embryos; each single blastomere from the two-cell embryo and tetra-blastomeres from the eight-cell embryo were cultured in vitro using the Well of the Well culture system (WOW). This culture system supported the successful arrangement of blastomeres, resulting in their subsequent aggregation to form a demi-embryo developing to the blastocyst stage without a zona pellucida. There was no significant difference in the development to the blastocyst stage between blastomeres separated from eight-cell (72.0%) and two-cell (62.0%) embryos. The production rates of the monozygotic pair blastocysts and transferable paired blastocysts for demi-embryos obtained from eight-cell embryos (64.0 and 45.0%, respectively) were higher than those for demi-embryos obtained from two-cell embryos (49.0 and 31.0%, P<0.05). The separated demi-embryos obtained from eight-cell embryos produced by IVM/IVF of oocytes collected by ovum pick-up (OPU) from elite cows and cultured in wells tended to have a higher pregnancy rate (78.9% vs. 57.1%) and similar monozygotic twinning rate (40.0% vs. 33.3%) compared with monozygotic twin blastocysts obtained by the conventional bisection of in vivo derived blastocysts. In conclusion, producing twins by separation of blastomeres in OPU-IVF embryos, followed by the WOW culture system, yielded viable monozygotic demi-embryos, resulting in high rates of pregnancy and twinning rates after embryo transfer.

  13. The Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia and Thrombosis Syndrome: Treatment with Intraarterial Urokinase and Systemic Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Kenneth D.; McCrohan, Gerard; DeMarta, Deborah A.; Shirodkar, Nitin B.; Kwon, Oun J.; Chopra, Paramjit S.

    1996-03-15

    We report a case of the heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and thrombosis syndrome presenting with acute ischemia of a lower limb. The patient was successfully treated by withdrawal of heparin products, intraarterial urokinase, and platelet anti-aggregation therapy consisting of Dextran and aspirin.

  14. A Novel Component Carrier Configuration and Switching Scheme for Real-Time Traffic in a Cognitive-Radio-Based Spectrum Aggregation System

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yunhai; Ma, Lin; Xu, Yubin

    2015-01-01

    In spectrum aggregation (SA), two or more component carriers (CCs) of different bandwidths in different bands can be aggregated to support a wider transmission bandwidth. The scheduling delay is the most important design constraint for the broadband wireless trunking (BWT) system, especially in the cognitive radio (CR) condition. The current resource scheduling schemes for spectrum aggregation become questionable and are not suitable for meeting the challenge of the delay requirement. Consequently, the authors propose a novel component carrier configuration and switching scheme for real-time traffic (RT-CCCS) to satisfy the delay requirement in the CR-based SA system. In this work, the authors consider a sensor-network-assisted CR network. The authors first introduce a resource scheduling structure for SA in the CR condition. Then the proposed scheme is analyzed in detail. Finally, simulations are carried out to verify the analysis on the proposed scheme. Simulation results prove that our proposed scheme can satisfy the delay requirement in the CR-based SA system. PMID:26393594

  15. Lean management systems: creating a culture of continuous quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Clark, David M; Silvester, Kate; Knowles, Simon

    2013-08-01

    This is the first in a series of articles describing the application of Lean management systems to Laboratory Medicine. Lean is the term used to describe a principle-based continuous quality improvement (CQI) management system based on the Toyota production system (TPS) that has been evolving for over 70 years. Its origins go back much further and are heavily influenced by the work of W Edwards Deming and the scientific method that forms the basis of most quality management systems. Lean has two fundamental elements--a systematic approach to process improvement by removing waste in order to maximise value for the end-user of the service and a commitment to respect, challenge and develop the people who work within the service to create a culture of continuous improvement. Lean principles have been applied to a growing number of Healthcare systems throughout the world to improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of services for patients and a number of laboratories from all the pathology disciplines have used Lean to shorten turnaround times, improve quality (reduce errors) and improve productivity. Increasingly, models used to plan and implement large scale change in healthcare systems, including the National Health Service (NHS) change model, have evidence-based improvement methodologies (such as Lean CQI) as a core component. Consequently, a working knowledge of improvement methodology will be a core skill for Pathologists involved in leadership and management.

  16. Collaborative reputation systems in a cultural heritage scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuomo, Salvatore; De Michele, Pasquale; Galletti, Ardelio; Ponti, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    In the last decade, algorithms for reputation systems are been widely developed in order to achieve correct ratings for products, services, companies, digital contents and people. We start from a comprehensive mathematical model for Collaborative Reputation Systems (CRSes), present in the literature and formally defined as a recurrence relation that generates a sequence of trust matrices, from which the reputation of the items and the raters can be derived. Even though this model can be applied to several scenarios, the focus of this work is related to its application in a real case, that is a cultural event scenario. More in detail, in cultural heritage environment, the data collected in an event represent the basic knowledge to be inferred. The main idea is to correctly use the available technology and data to give a reliable rate (reputation) for both visitors and artworks. These rates will be very useful to classify the visiting style of the visitors and to fix the artworks that have most attracted visitors.

  17. Development of a bovine luteal cell in vitro culture system suitable for co-culture with early embryos.

    PubMed

    Batista, M; Torres, A; Diniz, P; Mateus, L; Lopes-da-Costa, L

    2012-10-01

    The cross talk between the corpus luteum (CL) and the early embryo, potentially relevant to pregnancy establishment, is difficult to evaluate in the in vivo bovine model. In vitro co-culture of bovine luteal cells and early embryos (days 2-8 post in vitro fertilization) may allow the deciphering of this poorly understood cross talk. However, early embryos and somatic cells require different in vitro culture conditions. The objective of this study was to develop a bovine luteal cell in vitro culture system suitable for co-culture with early embryos in order to evaluate their putative steroidogenic and prostanoid interactions. The corpora lutea of the different stages of the estrous cycle (early, mid, and late) were recovered postmortem and enriched luteal cell populations were obtained. In experiments 1 and 2, the effects of CL stage, culture medium (TCM, DMEM-F12, or SOF), serum concentration (5 or 10%), atmosphere oxygen tension (5 or 20%), and refreshment of the medium on the ability of luteal cells to produce progesterone (P(4)) were evaluated. The production of P(4) was significantly increased in early CL cultures, and luteal cells adapted well to simple media (SOF), low serum concentrations (5%), and oxygen tensions (5%). In experiment 3, previous luteal cell cryopreservation did not affect the production of P(4), PGF(2α), and PGE(2) compared to fresh cell cultures. This enables the use of pools of frozen-thawed cells to decrease the variation in cell function associated with primary cell cultures. In experiment 4, mineral oil overlaying culture wells resulted in a 50-fold decrease of the P(4) quantified in the medium, but had no effect on PGF(2α) and PGE(2) quantification. In conclusion, a luteal cell in vitro culture system suitable for the 5-d-long co-culture with early embryos was developed.

  18. The SAWO (Small And Well Organized) avatar teaches the importance of the aggregates on the soil system and how to determine their stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Cerdà, Artemi; Jordán, Antonio; Úbeda, Xavier; Pereira, Paulo

    2015-04-01

    Soil structure is the key factor that determine the soil quality as control the organic matter turnnover, soil biology and soil erodibility (Cerdà, 1996; 1998; Wick et al., 2014; Gelaw, 2015). There is a need to understand better the factors and the processes that act on the soil aggregation and the dynamics of the soil aggregation, which will make easier to understand the soil system functioning (Jordán et al., 2011; Jordán et al., 2012; Pulido Moncada et al., 2013). Fire, mines, grazing and agricultura (Cerdà, 2000; Mataix Solera et al., 2011; Cerdà et al., 2012; Hallett et al., 2014; Lozano et al., 2013) determines how the soil structure is highly affected by the humankind. And this determines the sustainability of the land managements (García Orenes et al., 2012; K¨ropfl et al., 2013; Mekuria and Aynekulu, 2013; Taguas et al., 2013; Zhao et al., 2013). Aggregates are Small And Well Organized (SAWO) structures that allow the water to flow, the air fill the porous and the life to be diverse and abundant in the soil. The SAWO avatar will teach the importance of the functions and the services of the aggregates to students and other scientists, but also to any audience. This means that the experiments and the vocabulary to be used by SAWO will be very wide and rich. The Avatar SAWO will use different strategies and skills to teach the soil aggregation properties and characteristics. And also, how to measure. Easy to carry out experiments will be shown by SAWO to measure the aggregate stability in the field and in the laboratory, and the soil sampling in the field. The SAWO avatar will play a special attention to the impact of forest fires on aggregate stability changes and how to measure. The SAWO avatar will teach how to take samples in the field, how to transport and manage in the laboratory, and finally which measurements and test can be done to determine the aggregate stability. Acknowledgements To the "Ministerio de Economía and Competitividad" of

  19. Cadmium and the reticuloendothelial system (RES). A specific defect in blood clearance of soluble aggregates of IgG by the liver in mice given cadmium.

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, D W; Vredevoe, D L; Aoki, K R; Hays, E J; Levy, L

    1980-01-01

    The ability of the reticuloendothelial system (RES) to bind and catabolize soluble stable heat aggregates of 125I-IgG (A-IgG) was studied in mice given oral cadmium. Cadmium caused a delay in the circulation clearance of A-IgG in intact animals. The defect was due to impaired liver uptake of A-IgG and correlated with increased liver cadmium. Subsequent catabolism of bound A-IgG by liver slices was not affected. The defect was specific in that clearance of aggregated human serum albumin and colloidal carbon was normal in cadmium mice; this suggests that cadmium may affect either Fc or complement receptors of Kupffer cells in liver. PMID:7419241

  20. The Relationship between National Culture and the Usability of an E-Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downey, Steve; Wentling, Rose Mary; Wentling, Tim; Wadsworth, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    This study sought to measure the relationship between national culture and the usability of an e-Learning system by using Hofstede's cultural dimensions and Nielson's usability attributes. The study revealed that high uncertainty avoidance cultures found the system more frustrating to use. The study also revealed that individuals from cultures…

  1. Co-culture systems for vascularization--learning from nature.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, C James; Fuchs, Sabine; Unger, Ronald E

    2011-04-30

    The endothelial cell (EC) is practically ubiquitous in the human body and forms the inner cellular lining of the entire cardiovascular system. Following tissue injury, the microcirculation becomes the stage for both the inflammatory response and the subsequent healing reaction to restore physiological function to the damaged tissue. The advent of the multidisciplinary field of Regenerative Medicine (RegMed), of which Tissue Engineering (TE) and drug delivery using modern stimuli-responsive or interactive biomaterials are important components, has opened up new approaches to the acceleration of the healing response. A central and rate-limiting role in the latter is played by the process of vascularization or neovascularization, so that it is not surprising that in RegMed concepts have been developed for the drug- and gene-delivery of potent stimuli such as vascular-endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to promote neovessel development. However, not all of these novel materials can be tested in vivo, and in vitro co-culture model systems using human primary cells are being developed to pre-evaluate and determine which of the RegMed concepts exhibit the most promising potential for success after implantation. This review describes some of the growing number of in vitro co-cultures model systems that are being used to study cell-cell and cell-material interactions at the cellular and molecular levels to determine which materials are best suited to integrate into the host, promote a rapid vascularization and fit into the regenerative process without disturbing or slowing the normal healing steps.

  2. Simulation of J-aggregate microcavity photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michetti, Paolo; La Rocca, Giuseppe C.

    2008-05-01

    We have developed a model in order to account for the photoexcitation dynamics of J-aggregate films and strongly coupled J-aggregate microcavities. The J aggregates are described as a disordered Frenkel exciton system in which relaxation occurs due to the presence of a thermal bath of molecular vibrations. The correspondence between the photophysics in J-aggregate films and that in J-aggregate microcavities is obtained by introducing a model polariton wave function mixing cavity photon modes and J-aggregate super-radiant excitons. With the same description of the material properties, we have calculated both absorption and luminescence spectra for the J-aggregate film and the photoluminescence of strongly coupled organic microcavities. The model is able to account for the fast relaxation dynamics in organic microcavities following nonresonant pumping and explains the temperature dependence of the ratio between the upper polariton and the lower polariton luminescence.

  3. Integrated Information Support System (IISS). Volume 5. Common Data Model Subsystem. Part 29. Data Aggregators Product Specification.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-01

    Role Boeing Military Aircraft Reviewer. Company (EMAC) D. Appleton Company Responsible for IDEF support, (DACOM) state-of-the-art literature search...SRTCDR SORTING THE COMMON DATA RECORD TRMSRT TERMINATE THE SORTING 3-12 Milt X - PS 620141320 1 November 1985 DATA AGGREGATORS Module List Module Name...OF THE RECORD "INPUT-FILE". REVISED 15 APR 1985 MODIFIED 2 MAY 1985 MODIFIED 9 MAY 1985 ARGUMENTS: INPUT-FILE - RECRD TEMP-FILE-NAME - DSPLY [ X (30

  4. Development and use of culture systems to modulate specific cell responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Yves

    Culture surfaces that induce specific localized cell responses are required to achieve tissue-like cell growth in three-dimensional (3D) environments, as well as to develop more efficient cell-based diagnostic techniques, noticeably when working with fragile cells such as stem cells or platelets. As such, Chapter 1 of this thesis work is devoted to the review of 3D cell-material interactions in vitro and the corresponding existing culture systems available to achieve in vivo-like cell responses. More adequate 3D culture systems will need to be developed to mimic several characteristics of in vivo environments, including lowered non-specific cell-material interactions and localized biochemical signaling. The experimental work in this thesis is based on the hypothesis that well-studied and optimized surface treatments will be able to lower non-specific cell-material interactions and allow local chemical modification in order to achieve specific localized cell-material interactions for different applications. As such, in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 of this thesis, surface treatments were developed using plasma polymerization and covalent immobilization of a low-fouling polymer (i.e., poly(ethylene glycol)) and characterized and optimized using a large number of techniques including atomic force microscopy, quartz crystal microbalance, surface plasmon resonance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and fluorescence-based techniques. The main plasma polymerization parameter important for surface chemical content, specifically nitrogen to carbon content, was identified as being glow discharge power, while reaction time and power determined plasma film thickness. Moreover, plasma films were shown to be stable in aqueous environments. Covalently-bound poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) layers physicochemical and mechanical properties are dependent on fabrication methods. Polymer concentration in solution is an important indicator of final layer properties, and use of a theta solvent

  5. Fish Growth in Marine Culture Systems: A Challenge for Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Lyndon

    1999-07-01

    : Aquaculture production is constrained largely by the growth efficiency of the species being produced. Nutritional approaches have played an important part in improving this situation, but, it is argued, the room for further improvement using such established techniques is limited. Alternative ways of improving fish production by utilizing recent biotechnological advances are explored and assessed as to their potential for commercialization in the near future. Transgenic technologies promise a revolution in aquaculture, but it is considered that consumer resistance may delay the use of transgenic fish for food production. An alternative approach could be the breeding of transgenic fodder plants without the amino acid deficiencies of existing alternatives to fish meal in aquaculture diets. The use of probiotics could reduce antibiotic use on fish farms while they might also provide the basis for "smart" diets, tailored to specific purposes by the inclusion of microorganisms. The selection and genetic engineering of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria could also pave the way for fully enclosed, recirculating marine culture systems, which would allow control of the environmental variables that currently restrain marine fish culture.

  6. Microfluidic cell culture systems with integrated sensors for drug screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grist, Samantha; Yu, Linfen; Chrostowski, Lukas; Cheung, Karen C.

    2012-03-01

    Cell-based testing is a key step in drug screening for cancer treatments. A microfluidic platform can permit more precise control of the cell culture microenvironment, such as gradients in soluble factors. These small-scale devices also permit tracking of low cell numbers. As a new screening paradigm, a microscale system for integrated cell culture and drug screening promises to provide a simple, scalable tool to apply standardized protocols used in cellular response assays. With the ability to dynamically control the microenvironment, we can create temporally varying drug profiles to mimic physiologically measured profiles. In addition, low levels of oxygen in cancerous tumors have been linked with drug resistance and decreased likelihood of successful treatment and patient survival. Our work also integrates a thin-film oxygen sensor with a microfluidic oxygen gradient generator which will in future allow us to create spatial oxygen gradients and study effects of hypoxia on cell response to drug treatment. In future, this technology promises to improve cell-based validation in the drug discovery process, decreasing the cost and increasing the speed in screening large numbers of compounds.

  7. Biochemical Study of Mixed Culture Prototype in a Closed Ecological System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischer, R. G.

    1960-01-01

    Since June 1, 1960, the date of initiation of this research project, efforts have been directed toward studying cultural and fermentation patterns and the methodology of pure culture isolation of prototype microorganisms to be employed in closed ecological systems.

  8. Arsenoriboside degradation in marine systems: the use of bacteria culture incubation experiments as model systems.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Elliott G; Maher, William A; Foster, Simon D; Mikac, Katarina M; Krikowa, Frank; Florance, Anthea

    2014-01-01

    Arsenoribosides (as glycerol; phosphate; sulfate and sulfonate) persisted in all bacteria-inoculated cultures irrespective of the source of bacteria (seawater, macro-algae surface) or the culture media used (DIFCO Marine Broth 2216 or novel blended Hormosira banksii tissue-based). This is unlike observations from traditional macro-algae tissue decomposition studies or in nature. In addition known arsenoriboside degradation products such as dimethylarsenoethanol (DMAE), dimethylarsenate (DMA), methylarsenate (MA) and arsenate - As(V) were not detected in any cultures. Consequently, the use of bacterial culture incubation experiments to explain the fate of arsenoribosides in marine systems appears limited as the processes governing arsenoriboside degradation in these experiments appear to be different to those in macro-algae tissue decomposition studies or in nature.

  9. Competition of Invertebrates Mixed Culture in the Closed Aquatic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisman, Tamara

    The study considers the experimental model of interactions between invertebrates (the cilates Paramecium caudatum, Paramecium bursaria and the rotifers Brachionis plicatilis) in the closed aquatic system. The infusoria P.caudatum can feed on yeast, bacteria and chlorella; in this experiment growth and reproduction were maintained by bacteria only. The P.bursaria - zoochlorella endosymbiosis is a natural model of a simple biotic cycle. P.bursaria consumes glucose and oxygen released by zoochlorella in the process of biosynthesis and releases nitrogenous compounds and carbon dioxide necessary for algal photosynthesis. The rotifers Br. plicatilis can consume algae, bacteria and detritus. Thus in experiment with the mixed culture of invertebrates they can use different food sources. However with any initial percentage of the invertebrates the end portion of P.bursaria reaches 90-99

  10. Optimized soluble expression and purification of an aggregation-prone protein by fusion tag systems and on-column cleavage in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Gao, Mingming; Liu, Wenchao; Kong, Yuelin; Tian, Hong; Yao, Wenbing; Gao, Xiangdong

    2012-12-01

    Previously we constructed a fusion protein based on GLP-1 and globular adiponectin but unfortunately its yield was low because it was mainly expressed as inclusion bodies. Herein to optimize the soluble expression of this fusion protein we tried several fusion tag systems. Fusion tags, including GST-, Trx- and MBP-tag, greatly improved the soluble expression of the fusion protein. However, these tag-fusion proteins were aggregation-prone as judged by Native PAGE and gel filtration chromatography, and this aggregation reduced the specificity of enterokinase-mediated enzyme cleavage which was essential to remove the fusion tags. To improve the specificity of protein cleavage, we employed on-column cleavage for downstream purification. Finally using optimized expression followed by on-column cleavage, we obtained the product fusion protein with a yield of 1.2 mg per g wet bacterial cells which was 8-fold higher than before. This method improved the yield and simplified the process, and as a convenient method it can also be used for the preparation of other aggregation-prone proteins.

  11. Effect of cysteine on lowering protein aggregation and subsequent hardening of whey protein isolate (WPI) protein bars in WPI/buffer model systems.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dan; Labuza, Theodore P

    2010-07-14

    Whey protein isolate (WPI) bar hardening without and with cysteine (Cys) or N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) was investigated in model systems (WPI/buffer = 6:4, by weight, pH 6.8, a(w) approximately 0.97) in an accelerated shelf-life test (ASLT) at 45 degrees C over a period of up to 35 days. The formation of insoluble aggregates as determined by solubility and the structural rearrangement of WPI protein aggregates as observed by SEM were responsible for the WPI bars' hardening. As corroborated by electrophoresis analysis, both beta-lactoglobulin (beta-lg) and alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-la) were involved in the formation of aggregates via the thiol-disulfide interchange reaction and/or noncovalent interactions. The former force dominated the bar hardening at an earlier stage, whereas the latter force played a role for the long-term hardening. In comparison with the control bar without Cys, the thiol-disulfide interchange reaction was significantly reduced by Cys (WPI/Cys = 0.05), increased by Cys (WPI/Cys = 0.25), and inhibited by NEM (WPI/NEM = 2). Therefore, bar hardening was significantly delayed by Cys (WPI/Cys = 0.05) and NEM but accelerated by Cys (WPI/Cys = 0.25).

  12. Biogrid--a microfluidic device for large-scale enzyme-free dissociation of stem cell aggregates.

    PubMed

    Wallman, Lars; Åkesson, Elisabet; Ceric, Dario; Andersson, Per Henrik; Day, Kelly; Hovatta, Outi; Falci, Scott; Laurell, Thomas; Sundström, Erik

    2011-10-07

    Culturing stem cells as free-floating aggregates in suspension facilitates large-scale production of cells in closed systems, for clinical use. To comply with GMP standards, the use of substances such as proteolytic enzymes should be avoided. Instead of enzymatic dissociation, the growing cell aggregates may be mechanically cut at passage, but available methods are not compatible with large-scale cell production and hence translation into the clinic becomes a severe bottle-neck. We have developed the Biogrid device, which consists of an array of micrometerscale knife edges, micro-fabricated in silicon, and a manifold in which the microgrid is placed across the central fluid channel. By connecting one side of the Biogrid to a syringe or a pump and the other side to the cell culture, the culture medium with suspended cell aggregates can be aspirated, forcing the aggregates through the microgrid, and ejected back to the cell culture container. Large aggregates are thereby dissociated into smaller fragments while small aggregates pass through the microgrid unaffected. As proof-of-concept, we demonstrate that the Biogrid device can be successfully used for repeated passage of human neural stem/progenitor cells cultured as so-called neurospheres, as well as for passage of suspension cultures of human embryonic stem cells. We also show that human neural stem/progenitor cells tolerate transient pressure changes far exceeding those that will occur in a fluidic system incorporating the Biogrid microgrids. Thus, by using the Biogrid device it is possible to mechanically passage large quantities of cells in suspension cultures in closed fluidic systems, without the use of proteolytic enzymes.

  13. A novel physiological culture system that mimics luteal angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, R S; Hammond, A J; Mann, G E; Hunter, M G

    2008-03-01

    Luteal inadequacy is a major cause of poor embryo development and infertility. Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels, is an essential process underpinning corpus luteum (CL) development and progesterone production. Thus, understanding the factors that regulate angiogenesis during this critical time is essential for the development of novel strategies to alleviate luteal inadequacy and infertility. This study demonstrates the development of a physiologically relevant primary culture system that mimics luteal angiogenesis. This system incorporates all luteal cell types (e.g. endothelial, steroidogenic cells, fibroblasts and pericytes). Using this approach, endothelial cells, identified by the specific marker von Willebrand factor (VWF), start to form clusters on day 2, which then proliferate and develop thread-like structures. After 9 days in culture, these tubule-like structures lengthen, thicken and form highly organized intricate networks resembling a capillary bed. Development of the vasculature was promoted by coating wells with fibronectin, as determined by image analysis (P<0.001). Progesterone production increased with time and was stimulated by LH re-enforcing the physiological relevance of the model in mimicking in vivo luteal function. LH also increased the area stained positively for VWF by twofold (P<0.05). Development of this endothelial cell network was stimulated by fibroblast growth factor 2 and vascular endothelial growth factor A, which increased total area of VWF positive staining on day 9, both independently (three- to fourfold; P<0.01) and in combination (tenfold; P<0.001). In conclusion, the successful development of endothelial cell networks in vitro provides a new opportunity to elucidate the physiological control of the angiogenic process in the developing CL.

  14. The effect of a prostaglandin DP-receptor partial agonist (192C86) on platelet aggregation and the cardiovascular system in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Gray, S J; Giles, H; Posner, J

    1992-10-01

    1. PGD2 (DP)-receptors mediate inhibition of platelet aggregation and vasodilatation. If receptor reserve were greater on platelets it might be possible to separate these effects. To determine whether such a difference in receptor reserve exists, we have examined the effects of a highly selective DP-receptor partial agonist 192C86 on platelet aggregation and the cardiovascular system in healthy volunteers. 2. Using an open, dose-escalating study design, four male volunteers received constant rate intravenous infusions of 192C86 for up to 60 min. Ex vivo platelet aggregation to ADP and collagen in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and whole blood (WB) was studied at baseline, after 15, 30 and 60 min of each infusion and at 180 min post-infusion. Heart rate (HR), systolic and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure were measured at frequent intervals. Adverse experiences were monitored by checklist. Facial flushing was assessed by the volunteer using a visual analogue scale, by an observer using a numerical scale and by full-face colour photographs. Blood was taken for assay of plasma 192C86 concentrations by radio-immunoassay (r.i.a.). 3. 192C86 (0.007-0.058 micrograms kg-1 min-1) inhibited platelet aggregation to ADP and collagen both in PRP and WB in a dose-dependent manner. However, this was always accompanied by a decrease in DBP, increase in HR and facial flushing. Plasma concentrations of 192C86 were at or below the limits of sensitivity of the r.i.a. (0.5 ng ml-1). 4. The highest infusion rate was stopped after 20 min due to symptomatic hypotension on standing.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Thrombolytic therapy reduces red blood cell aggregation in plasma without affecting intrinsic aggregability.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ami, R; Sheinman, G; Yedgar, S; Eldor, A; Roth, A; Berliner, A S; Barshtein, G

    2002-03-15

    Red blood cell (RBC) aggregation may contribute to occlusion of the coronary microcirculation during myocardial infarction. We studied the effect of thrombolytic therapy on RBC aggregation in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Compared with patients with myocardial infarction who did not receive thrombolytic therapy, those treated with systemic thrombolysis exhibited significantly reduced RBC aggregation, reduced plasma fibrinogen levels and increased plasma D-dimer levels. Using measurement of RBC aggregation in a standardized dextran-500 solution, reduction in RBC aggregation after thrombolysis was shown to be plasma dependent. Thrombolytic therapy had no direct effect on intrinsic RBC aggregability in patients with AMI. We conclude that thrombolytic therapy has rheologic consequences that may contribute to its overall efficacy. Inhibition of RBC aggregation by thrombolytic therapy may result from the degradation of fibrinogen, a key factor in the formation of RBC aggregates, and from the generation of fibrinogen degradation products capable of disaggregating RBCs.

  16. A cell-based assay for aggregation inhibitors as therapeutics of polyglutamine-repeat disease and validation in Drosophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, Barbara L.; Kazantsev, Alexsey; Raffioni, Simona; Illes, Katalin; Pallos, Judit; Bodai, Laszlo; Slepko, Natalia; Bear, James E.; Gertler, Frank B.; Hersch, Steven; Housman, David E.; Marsh, J. Lawrence; Michels Thompson, Leslie

    2003-05-01

    The formation of polyglutamine-containing aggregates and inclusions are hallmarks of pathogenesis in Huntington's disease that can be recapitulated in model systems. Although the contribution of inclusions to pathogenesis is unclear, cell-based assays can be used to screen for chemical compounds that affect aggregation and may provide therapeutic benefit. We have developed inducible PC12 cell-culture models to screen for loss of visible aggregates. To test the validity of this approach, compounds that inhibit aggregation in the PC12 cell-based screen were tested in a Drosophila model of polyglutamine-repeat disease. The disruption of aggregation in PC12 cells strongly correlates with suppression of neuronal degeneration in Drosophila. Thus, the engineered PC12 cells coupled with the Drosophila model provide a rapid and effective method to screen and validate compounds.

  17. 47 CFR 10.300 - Alert aggregator. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alert aggregator. 10.300 Section 10.300 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL MOBILE ALERT SYSTEM System Architecture § 10.300 Alert aggregator....

  18. 47 CFR 10.300 - Alert aggregator. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Alert aggregator. 10.300 Section 10.300 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL MOBILE ALERT SYSTEM System Architecture § 10.300 Alert aggregator....

  19. 47 CFR 10.300 - Alert aggregator. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Alert aggregator. 10.300 Section 10.300 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL MOBILE ALERT SYSTEM System Architecture § 10.300 Alert aggregator....

  20. Social aggregation as a cooperative game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilone, Daniele; Guazzini, Andrea

    2011-07-01

    A new approach for the description of phenomena of social aggregation is suggested. On the basis of psychological concepts (as for instance social norms and cultural coordinates), we deduce a general mechanism for social aggregation in which different clusters of individuals can merge according to cooperation among the agents. In their turn, the agents can cooperate or defect according to the clusters' distribution inside the system. The fitness of an individual increases with the size of its cluster, but decreases with the work the individual had to do in order to join it. In order to test the reliability of such a new approach, we introduce a couple of simple toy models with the features illustrated above. We see, from this preliminary study, how cooperation is the most convenient strategy only in the presence of very large clusters, while on the other hand it is not necessary to have one hundred percent of cooperators for reaching a totally ordered configuration with only one megacluster filling the whole system.

  1. Organizational Culture and Performance. ASHE 1987 Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krakower, Jack

    The nature and strength of college culture were studied, along with how culture is related to perceptions of organizational performance. Data were obtained from a study conducted by the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS). Questions of method, especially the validity of aggregating perceptual data to the organizational…

  2. Equilibrium structure of ferrofluid aggregates.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mina; Tománek, David

    2010-11-17

    We study the equilibrium structure of large but finite aggregates of magnetic dipoles, representing a colloidal suspension of magnetite particles in a ferrofluid. With increasing system size, the structural motif evolves from chains and rings to multi-chain and multi-ring assemblies. Very large systems form single- and multi-wall coils, tubes and scrolls. These structural changes result from a competition between various energy terms, which can be approximated analytically within a continuum model. We also study the effect of external parameters such as magnetic field on the relative stability of these structures. Our results may give insight into experimental data obtained during solidification of ferrofluid aggregates at temperatures where thermal fluctuations become negligible in comparison to inter-particle interactions. These data may also help to experimentally control the aggregation of magnetic particles.

  3. Equilibrium structure of ferrofluid aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Mina; Tomanek, David

    2010-01-01

    We study the equilibrium structure of large but finite aggregates of magnetic dipoles, representing a colloidal suspension of magnetite particles in a ferrofluid. With increasing system size, the structural motif evolves from chains and rings to multi-chain and multi-ring assemblies. Very large systems form single- and multi-wall coils, tubes and scrolls. These structural changes result from a competition between various energy terms, which can be approximated analytically within a continuum model. We also study the effect of external parameters such as magnetic field on the relative stability of these structures. Our results may give insight into experimental data obtained during solidification of ferrofluid aggregates at temperatures where thermal fluctuations become negligible in comparison to inter-particle interactions. These data may also help to experimentally control the aggregation of magnetic particles.

  4. A palmtop-sized microfluidic cell culture system driven by a miniaturized infusion pump.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Naoki; Shinjo, Mika; Hirakawa, Satoshi; Nishinaka, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yo; Mawatari, Kazuma; Kitamori, Takehiko; Sato, Kae

    2012-07-01

    A palmtop-sized microfluidic cell culture system is presented. The system consists of a microfluidic device and a miniaturized infusion pump that possesses a reservoir of culture medium, an electrical control circuit, and an internal battery. The footprint of the system was downsized to 87 × 57 mm, which is, to the best of our knowledge, the smallest integrated cell culture system. Immortalized human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were cultured in the system. HMEC-1 in the system proliferated at the same speed as cells in a microchannel perfused by a syringe pump and cells in a culture flask. HUVEC in the system oriented along the direction of the fluid flow. Claudin-5, a tight junction protein, was localized along the peripheries of the HUVEC. We expect that the present system is applicable to various cell types as a stand-alone and easy-to-use system for microfluidic bioanalysis.

  5. On mean type aggregation.

    PubMed

    Yager, R R

    1996-01-01

    We introduce and define the concept of mean aggregation of a collection of n numbers. We point out that the lack of associativity of this operation compounds the problem of the extending mean of n numbers to n+1 numbers. The closely related concepts of self identity and the centering property are introduced as one imperative for extending mean aggregation operators. The problem of weighted mean aggregation is studied. A new concept of prioritized mean aggregation is then introduced. We next show that the technique of selecting an element based upon the performance of a random experiment can be considered as a mean aggregation operation.

  6. Fully-automated roller bottle handling system for large scale culture of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kunitake, R; Suzuki, A; Ichihashi, H; Matsuda, S; Hirai, O; Morimoto, K

    1997-01-20

    A fully automatic and continuous cell culture system based on roller bottles is described in this paper. The system includes a culture rack storage station for storing a large number of roller bottles filled with culture medium and inoculated with mammalian cells, mass-handling facility for extracting completed cultures from the roller bottles, and replacing the culture medium. The various component units of the system were controlled either by a general-purpose programmable logic controller or a dedicated controller. The system provided four subsequent operation modes: cell inoculation, medium change, harvesting, and medium change. The operator could easily select and change the appropriate mode from outside of the aseptic area. The development of the system made large-scale production of mammalian cells, and manufacturing and stabilization of high quality products such as erythropoietin possible under total aseptic control, and opened up the door for industrial production of physiologically active substances as pharmaceutical drugs by mammalian cell culture.

  7. Cellular strategies for regulating functional and nonfunctional protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Gsponer, Jörg; Babu, M Madan

    2012-11-29

    Growing evidence suggests that aggregation-prone proteins are both harmful and functional for a cell. How do cellular systems balance the detrimental and beneficial effect of protein aggregation? We reveal that aggregation-prone proteins are subject to differential transcriptional, translational, and degradation control compared to nonaggregation-prone proteins, which leads to their decreased synthesis, low abundance, and high turnover. Genetic modulators that enhance the aggregation phenotype are enriched in genes that influence expression homeostasis. Moreover, genes encoding aggregation-prone proteins are more likely to be harmful when overexpressed. The trends are evolutionarily conserved and suggest a strategy whereby cellular mechanisms specifically modulate the availability of aggregation-prone proteins to (1) keep concentrations below the critical ones required for aggregation and (2) shift the equilibrium between the monomeric and oligomeric/aggregate form, as explained by Le Chatelier's principle. This strategy may prevent formation of undesirable aggregates and keep functional assemblies/aggregates under control.

  8. Culturing Human Pluripotent and Neural Stem Cells in an Enclosed Cell Culture System for Basic and Preclinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Stover, Alexander E.; Herculian, Siranush; Banuelos, Maria G.; Navarro, Samantha L.; Jenkins, Michael P.; Schwartz, Philip H.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes how to use a custom manufactured, commercially available enclosed cell culture system for basic and preclinical research. Biosafety cabinets (BSCs) and incubators have long been the standard for culturing and expanding cell lines for basic and preclinical research. However, as the focus of many stem cell laboratories shifts from basic research to clinical translation, additional requirements are needed of the cell culturing system. All processes must be well documented and have exceptional requirements for sterility and reproducibility. In traditional incubators, gas concentrations and temperatures widely fluctuate anytime the cells are removed for feeding, passaging, or other manipulations. Such interruptions contribute to an environment that is not the standard for cGMP and GLP guidelines. These interruptions must be minimized especially when cells are utilized for therapeutic purposes. The motivation to move from the standard BSC and incubator system to a closed system is that such interruptions can be made negligible. Closed systems provide a work space to feed and manipulate cell cultures and maintain them in a controlled environment where temperature and gas concentrations are consistent. This way, pluripotent and multipotent stem cells can be maintained at optimum health from the moment of their derivation all the way to their eventual use in therapy. PMID:27341536

  9. Culturing Human Pluripotent and Neural Stem Cells in an Enclosed Cell Culture System for Basic and Preclinical Research.

    PubMed

    Stover, Alexander E; Herculian, Siranush; Banuelos, Maria G; Navarro, Samantha L; Jenkins, Michael P; Schwartz, Philip H

    2016-06-10

    This paper describes how to use a custom manufactured, commercially available enclosed cell culture system for basic and preclinical research. Biosafety cabinets (BSCs) and incubators have long been the standard for culturing and expanding cell lines for basic and preclinical research. However, as the focus of many stem cell laboratories shifts from basic research to clinical translation, additional requirements are needed of the cell culturing system. All processes must be well documented and have exceptional requirements for sterility and reproducibility. In traditional incubators, gas concentrations and temperatures widely fluctuate anytime the cells are removed for feeding, passaging, or other manipulations. Such interruptions contribute to an environment that is not the standard for cGMP and GLP guidelines. These interruptions must be minimized especially when cells are utilized for therapeutic purposes. The motivation to move from the standard BSC and incubator system to a closed system is that such interruptions can be made negligible. Closed systems provide a work space to feed and manipulate cell cultures and maintain them in a controlled environment where temperature and gas concentrations are consistent. This way, pluripotent and multipotent stem cells can be maintained at optimum health from the moment of their derivation all the way to their eventual use in therapy.

  10. A novel feeder-free culture system for expansion of mouse spermatogonial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Na Young; Park, Yo Seph; Ryu, Jae-Sung; Lee, Hye Jeong; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Ko, Kisung; Han, Dong Wook; Schöler, Hans R; Ko, Kinarm

    2014-06-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs, also called germline stem cells) are self-renewing unipotent stem cells that produce differentiating germ cells in the testis. SSCs can be isolated from the testis and cultured in vitro for long-term periods in the presence of feeder cells (often mouse embryonic fibroblasts). However, the maintenance of SSC feeder culture systems is tedious because preparation of feeder cells is needed at each subculture. In this study, we developed a Matrigel-based feeder-free culture system for long-term propagation of SSCs. Although several in vitro SSC culture systems without feeder cells have been previously described, our Matrigel-based feeder-free culture system is time- and cost- effective, and preserves self-renewability of SSCs. In addition, the growth rate of SSCs cultured using our newly developed system is equivalent to that in feeder cultures. We confirmed that the feeder-free cultured SSCs expressed germ cell markers both at the mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, the functionality of feeder-free cultured SSCs was confirmed by their transplantation into germ cell-depleted mice. These results suggest that our newly developed feeder-free culture system provides a simple approach to maintaining SSCs in vitro and studying the basic biology of SSCs, including determination of their fate.

  11. Aggregation server for grid-integrated vehicles

    DOEpatents

    Kempton, Willett

    2015-05-26

    Methods, systems, and apparatus for aggregating electric power flow between an electric grid and electric vehicles are disclosed. An apparatus for aggregating power flow may include a memory and a processor coupled to the memory to receive electric vehicle equipment (EVE) attributes from a plurality of EVEs, aggregate EVE attributes, predict total available capacity based on the EVE attributes, and dispatch at least a portion of the total available capacity to the grid. Power flow may be aggregated by receiving EVE operational parameters from each EVE, aggregating the received EVE operational parameters, predicting total available capacity based on the aggregated EVE operational parameters, and dispatching at least a portion of the total available capacity to the grid.

  12. Neuronal aggregates: formation, clearance and spreading

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Junghyun; Yue, Zhenyu

    2015-01-01

    Summary Proteostasis is maintained by multiple cellular pathways, including protein synthesis, quality control and degradation. An imbalance of neuronal proteostasis, associated with protein misfolding and aggregation, leads to proteinopathies or neurodegeneration. While genetic variations and protein modifications contribute to aggregate formation, components of the proteostasis network dictate the fate of protein aggregates. Here we provide an overview of proteostasis pathways and their interplay (particularly autophagy) with the metabolism of disease-related proteins. We review recent studies on neuronal activity-mediated regulation of proteostasis and transcellular propagation of protein aggregates in the nervous system. Targeting proteostasis pathways therapeutically remains an attractive but challenging task. PMID:25710535

  13. Does the concept of safety culture help or hinder systems thinking in safety?

    PubMed

    Reiman, Teemu; Rollenhagen, Carl

    2014-07-01

    The concept of safety culture has become established in safety management applications in all major safety-critical domains. The idea that safety culture somehow represents a "systemic view" on safety is seldom explicitly spoken out, but nevertheless seem to linger behind many safety culture discourses. However, in this paper we argue that the "new" contribution to safety management from safety culture never really became integrated with classical engineering principles and concepts. This integration would have been necessary for the development of a more genuine systems-oriented view on safety; e.g. a conception of safety in which human, technological, organisational and cultural factors are understood as mutually interacting elements. Without of this integration, researchers and the users of the various tools and methods associated with safety culture have sometimes fostered a belief that "safety culture" in fact represents such a systemic view about safety. This belief is, however, not backed up by theoretical or empirical evidence. It is true that safety culture, at least in some sense, represents a holistic term-a totality of factors that include human, organisational and technological aspects. However, the departure for such safety culture models is still human and organisational factors rather than technology (or safety) itself. The aim of this paper is to critically review the various uses of the concept of safety culture as representing a systemic view on safety. The article will take a look at the concepts of culture and safety culture based on previous studies, and outlines in more detail the theoretical challenges in safety culture as a systems concept. The paper also presents recommendations on how to make safety culture more systemic.

  14. A three-dimensional culture system using alginate hydrogel prolongs hatched cattle embryo development in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuan; Liu, Zhen-Xing; Gao, Hui; Wu, Yi; Fang, Yuan; Wu, Shuai-Shuai; Li, Ming-Jie; Bai, Jia-Hua; Liu, Yan; Evans, Alexander; Zeng, Shen-Ming

    2015-07-15

    No successful method exists to maintain the three-dimensional architecture of hatched embryos in vitro. Alginate, a linear polysaccharide derived from brown algae, has characteristics that make it an ideal material as a three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix for in vitro cell, tissue, or embryo culture. In this study, alginate hydrogel was used for IVC of posthatched bovine embryos to observe their development under the 3D system. In vitro-fertilized and parthenogenetically activated posthatched bovine blastocysts were cultured in an alginate encapsulation culture system (AECS), an alginate overlay culture system (AOCS), or control culture system. After 18 days of culture, the survival rate of embryos cultured in AECS was higher than that in the control group (P < 0.05), and the embryos were expanded and elongated in AECS with the maximal length of 1.125 mm. When the AECS shrinking embryos were taken out of the alginate beads on Day 18 and cultured in the normal culture system, 9.09% of them attached to the bottoms of the plastic wells and grew rapidly, with the largest area of an attached embryo being 66.00 mm(2) on Day 32. The embryos cultured in AOCS developed monovesicular or multivesicular morphologies. Total cell number of the embryos cultured in AECS on Day 19 was significantly higher than that of embryos on Day 8. Additionally, AECS and AOCS supported differentiation of the embryonic cells. Binuclear cells were visible in Day-26 adherent embryos, and the messenger RNA expression patterns of Cdx2 and Oct4 in AOCS-cultured embryos were similar to those in vivo embryos, whereas IFNT and ISG15 messenger RNA were still expressed in Day-26 and Day-32 prolong-cultured embryos. In conclusion, AECS and AOCS did support cell proliferation, elongation, and differentiation of hatched bovine embryos during prolonged IVC. The culture system will be useful to further investigate the molecular mechanisms controlling ruminant embryo elongation and implantation.

  15. Novel insights into amylin aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Pillay, Karen; Govender, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Amylin is a peptide that aggregates into species that are toxic to pancreatic beta cells, leading to type II diabetes. This study has for the first time quantified amylin association and dissociation kinetics (association constant (ka) = 28.7 ± 5.1 L mol−1 s−1 and dissociation constant (kd) = 2.8 ± 0.6 ×10−4 s−1) using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Thus far, techniques used for the sizing of amylin aggregates do not cater for the real-time monitoring of unconstrained amylin in solution. In this regard we evaluated recently innovated nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA). In addition, both SPR and NTA were used to study the effect of previously synthesized amylin derivatives on amylin aggregation and to evaluate their potential as a cell-free system for screening potential inhibitors of amylin-mediated cytotoxicity. Results obtained from NTA highlighted a predominance of 100–300 nm amylin aggregates and correlation to previously published cytotoxicity results suggests the toxic species of amylin to be 200–300 nm in size. The results seem to indicate that NTA has potential as a new technique to monitor the aggregation potential of amyloid peptides in solution and also to screen potential inhibitors of amylin-mediated cytotoxicity. PMID:26019498

  16. Aggregated Recommendation through Random Forests

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aggregated recommendation refers to the process of suggesting one kind of items to a group of users. Compared to user-oriented or item-oriented approaches, it is more general and, therefore, more appropriate for cold-start recommendation. In this paper, we propose a random forest approach to create aggregated recommender systems. The approach is used to predict the rating of a group of users to a kind of items. In the preprocessing stage, we merge user, item, and rating information to construct an aggregated decision table, where rating information serves as the decision attribute. We also model the data conversion process corresponding to the new user, new item, and both new problems. In the training stage, a forest is built for the aggregated training set, where each leaf is assigned a distribution of discrete rating. In the testing stage, we present four predicting approaches to compute evaluation values based on the distribution of each tree. Experiments results on the well-known MovieLens dataset show that the aggregated approach maintains an acceptable level of accuracy. PMID:25180204

  17. Propagation of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells in an indirect co-culture system

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Sheena; Sheridan, Steven D.; Laurent, Louise C.; Albert, Kelsey; Stubban, Christopher; Ulitsky, Igor; Miller, Bradley; Loring, Jeanne F.; Rao, Raj R.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed and validated a microporous poly(ethylene terephthalate) membrane-based indirect co-culture system for human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) propagation, which allows real-time conditioning of the culture medium with human fibroblasts while maintaining the complete separation of the two cell types. The propagation and pluripotent characteristics of a human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line and a human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) line were studied in prolonged culture in this system. We report that hPSCs cultured on membranes by indirect co-culture with fibroblasts were indistinguishable by multiple criteria from hPSCs cultured directly on a fibroblast feeder layer. Thus this co-culture system is a significant advance in hPSC culture methods, providing a facile stem cell expansion system with continuous medium conditioning while preventing mixing of hPSCs and feeder cells. This membrane culture method will enable testing of novel feeder cells and differentiation studies using co-culture with other cell types, and will simplify stepwise changes in culture conditions for staged differentiation protocols. PMID:20117095

  18. Cultural adaptation of visual attention: calibration of the oculomotor control system in accordance with cultural scenes.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Yoshiyuki; Komiya, Asuka

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have found that Westerners are more likely than East Asians to attend to central objects (i.e., analytic attention), whereas East Asians are more likely than Westerners to focus on background objects or context (i.e., holistic attention). Recently, it has been proposed that the physical environment of a given culture influences the cultural form of scene cognition, although the underlying mechanism is yet unclear. This study examined whether the physical environment influences oculomotor control. Participants saw culturally neutral stimuli (e.g., a dog in a park) as a baseline, followed by Japanese or United States scenes, and finally culturally neutral stimuli again. The results showed that participants primed with Japanese scenes were more likely to move their eyes within a broader area and they were less likely to fixate on central objects compared with the baseline, whereas there were no significant differences in the eye movements of participants primed with American scenes. These results suggest that culturally specific patterns in eye movements are partly caused by the physical environment.

  19. Effects of Conservation Tillage on Topsoil Microbial Metabolic Characteristics and Organic Carbon within Aggregates under a Rice (Oryza sativa L.)-Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Cropping System in Central China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li-Jin; Lin, Shan; Liu, Tian-Qi; Cao, Cou-Gui; Li, Cheng-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Investigating microbial metabolic characteristics and soil organic carbon (SOC) within aggregates and their relationships under conservation tillage may be useful in revealing the mechanism of SOC sequestration in conservation tillage systems. However, limited studies have been conducted to investigate the relationship between SOC and microbial metabolic characteristics within aggregate fractions under conservation tillage. We hypothesized that close relationships can exist between SOC and microbial metabolic characteristics within aggregates under conservation tillage. In this study, a field experiment was conducted from June 2011 to June 2013 following a split-plot design of a randomized complete block with tillage practices [conventional intensive tillage (CT) and no tillage (NT)] as main plots and straw returning methods [preceding crop residue returning (S, 2100-2500 kg C ha-1) and removal (NS, 0 kg C ha(-1))] as subplots with three replications. The objective of this study was to reveal the effects of tillage practices and residue-returning methods on topsoil microbial metabolic characteristics and organic carbon (SOC) fractions within aggregates and their relationships under a rice-wheat cropping system in central China. Microbial metabolic characteristics investigated using the Biolog system was examined within two aggregate fractions (>0.25 and <0.25 mm). NT treatments significantly increased SOC concentration of bulk soil, >0.25 aggregate, and <0.25 mm aggregate in the 0-5 cm soil layer by 5.8%, 6.8% and 7.9% relative to CT treatments, respectively. S treatments had higher SOC concentration of bulk soil (12.9%), >0.25 mm aggregate (11.3%), and <0.25 mm aggregate (14.1%) than NS treatments. Compared with CT treatments, NT treatments increased MBC by 11.2%, 11.5%, and 20%, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration by 15.5%, 29.5%, and 14.1% of bulk soil, >0.25 mm aggregate, and <0.25 mm aggregate in the 0-5 cm soil layer, respectively. Compared with

  20. Effects of Conservation Tillage on Topsoil Microbial Metabolic Characteristics and Organic Carbon within Aggregates under a Rice (Oryza sativa L.) –Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Cropping System in Central China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tian-Qi; Cao, Cou-Gui; Li, Cheng-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Investigating microbial metabolic characteristics and soil organic carbon (SOC) within aggregates and their relationships under conservation tillage may be useful in revealing the mechanism of SOC sequestration in conservation tillage systems. However, limited studies have been conducted to investigate the relationship between SOC and microbial metabolic characteristics within aggregate fractions under conservation tillage. We hypothesized that close relationships can exist between SOC and microbial metabolic characteristics within aggregates under conservation tillage. In this study, a field experiment was conducted from June 2011 to June 2013 following a split-plot design of a randomized complete block with tillage practices [conventional intensive tillage (CT) and no tillage (NT)] as main plots and straw returning methods [preceding crop residue returning (S, 2100−2500 kg C ha−1) and removal (NS, 0 kg C ha-1)] as subplots with three replications. The objective of this study was to reveal the effects of tillage practices and residue-returning methods on topsoil microbial metabolic characteristics and organic carbon (SOC) fractions within aggregates and their relationships under a rice–wheat cropping system in central China. Microbial metabolic characteristics investigated using the Biolog system was examined within two aggregate fractions (>0.25 and <0.25 mm). NT treatments significantly increased SOC concentration of bulk soil, >0.25 aggregate, and <0.25 mm aggregate in the 0−5 cm soil layer by 5.8%, 6.8% and 7.9% relative to CT treatments, respectively. S treatments had higher SOC concentration of bulk soil (12.9%), >0.25 mm aggregate (11.3%), and <0.25 mm aggregate (14.1%) than NS treatments. Compared with CT treatments, NT treatments increased MBC by 11.2%, 11.5%, and 20%, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration by 15.5%, 29.5%, and 14.1% of bulk soil, >0.25 mm aggregate, and <0.25 mm aggregate in the 0−5 cm soil layer, respectively

  1. Application of cell co-culture system to study fat and muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Pandurangan, Muthuraman; Hwang, Inho

    2014-09-01

    Animal cell culture is a highly complex process, in which cells are grown under specific conditions. The growth and development of these cells is a highly unnatural process in vitro condition. Cells are removed from animal tissues and artificially cultured in various culture vessels. Vitamins, minerals, and serum growth factors are supplied to maintain cell viability. Obtaining result homogeneity of in vitro and in vivo experiments is rare, because their structure and function are different. Living tissues have highly ordered complex architecture and are three-dimensional (3D) in structure. The interaction between adjacent cell types is quite distinct from the in vitro cell culture, which is usually two-dimensional (2D). Co-culture systems are studied to analyze the interactions between the two different cell types. The muscle and fat co-culture system is useful in addressing several questions related to muscle modeling, muscle degeneration, apoptosis, and muscle regeneration. Co-culture of C2C12 and 3T3-L1 cells could be a useful diagnostic tool to understand the muscle and fat formation in animals. Even though, co-culture systems have certain limitations, they provide a more realistic 3D view and information than the individual cell culture system. It is suggested that co-culture systems are useful in evaluating the intercellular communication and composition of two different cell types.

  2. Self-sustaining populations, population sinks or aggregates of strays: chum (Oncorhynchus keta) and Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Wood River system, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jocelyn E; Hilborn, Ray; Quinn, Thomas P; Hauser, Lorenz

    2011-12-01

    Small populations can provide insights into ecological and evolutionary aspects of species distributions over space and time. In the Wood River system in Alaska, USA, small aggregates of Chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and chum salmon (O. keta) spawn in an area dominated by sockeye salmon (O. nerka). Our objective was to determine whether these Chinook and chum salmon are reproductively isolated, self-sustaining populations, population sinks that produce returning adults but receive immigration, or strays from other systems that do not produce returning adults. DNA samples collected from adult chum salmon from 16 streams and Chinook salmon from four streams in the Wood River system over 3 years were compared to samples from large populations in the nearby Nushagak River system, a likely source of strays. For both species, microsatellite markers indicated no significant genetic differentiation between the two systems. Simulations of microsatellite data in a large source and a smaller sink population suggested that considerable immigration would be required to counteract the diverging effects of genetic drift and produce genetic distances as small as those observed, considering the small census sizes of the two species in the Wood River system. Thus, the Wood River system likely receives substantial immigration from neighbouring watersheds, such as the Nushagak River system, which supports highly productive runs. Although no data on population productivity in the Wood River system exist, our results suggest source-sink dynamics for the two species, a finding relevant to other systems where salmonid population sizes are limited by habitat factors.

  3. Aggregation in environmental systems - Part 1: Seasonal tracer cycles quantify young water fractions, but not mean transit times, in spatially heterogeneous catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental heterogeneity is ubiquitous, but environmental systems are often analyzed as if they were homogeneous instead, resulting in aggregation errors that are rarely explored and almost never quantified. Here I use simple benchmark tests to explore this general problem in one specific context: the use of seasonal cycles in chemical or isotopic tracers (such as Cl-, δ18O, or δ2H) to estimate timescales of storage in catchments. Timescales of catchment storage are typically quantified by the mean transit time, meaning the average time that elapses between parcels of water entering as precipitation and leaving again as streamflow. Longer mean transit times imply greater damping of seasonal tracer cycles. Thus, the amplitudes of tracer cycles in precipitation and streamflow are commonly used to calculate catchment mean transit times. Here I show that these calculations will typically be wrong by several hundred percent, when applied to catchments with realistic degrees of spatial heterogeneity. This aggregation bias arises from the strong nonlinearity in the relationship between tracer cycle amplitude and mean travel time. I propose an alternative storage metric, the young water fraction in streamflow, defined as the fraction of runoff with transit times of less than roughly 0.2 years. I show that this young water fraction (not to be confused with event-based "new water" in hydrograph separations) is accurately predicted by seasonal tracer cycles within a precision of a few percent, across the entire range of mean transit times from almost zero to almost infinity. Importantly, this relationship is also virtually free from aggregation error. That is, seasonal tracer cycles also accurately predict the young water fraction in runoff from highly heterogeneous mixtures of subcatchments with strongly contrasting transit-time distributions. Thus, although tracer cycle amplitudes yield biased and unreliable estimates of catchment mean travel times in heterogeneous

  4. Perfusion enhanced polydimethylsiloxane based scaffold cell culturing system for multi-well drug screening platform.

    PubMed

    Tania, Marshella; Hsu, Myat Noe; Png, Si Ning; Leo, Hwa Liang; Toh, Guoyang William; Birgersson, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Conventional two-dimensional cultures in monolayer and sandwich configuration have been used as a model for in vitro drug testing. However, these culture configurations do not present the actual in vivo liver cytoarchitecture for the hepatocytes cultures and thus they may compromise the cells liver-specific functions and their cuboidal morphology over longer term culture. In this study, we present a three-dimensional polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) scaffold with interconnected spherical macropores for the culturing of rat liver cells (hepatocytes). The scaffolds were integrated into our perfusion enhanced bioreactor to improve the nutrients and gas supply for cell cultures. The liver-specific functions of the cell culture were assessed by their albumin and urea production, and the changes in the cell morphology were tracked by immunofluorescence staining over 9 days of culture period. N-Acetyl-Para-Amino-Phenol (acetaminophen) was used as drug model to investigate the response of cells to drug in our scaffold-bioreactor system. Our experimental results revealed that the perfusion enhanced PDMS-based scaffold system provides a more conducive microenvironment with better cell-to-cell contacts among the hepatocytes that maintains the culture specific enzymatic functions and their cuboidal morphology during the culturing period. The numerical simulation results further showed improved oxygen distribution within the culturing chamber with the scaffold providing an additional function of shielding the cell cultures from the potentially detrimental fluid induced shear stresses. In conclusion, this study could serve a crucial role as a platform for future preclinical hepatotoxicity testing.

  5. Rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis by identification of Antigen 85 in mycobacterial culture system.

    PubMed

    Phunpae, Ponrut; Chanwong, Sakarin; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai; Apiratmateekul, Napaporn; Makeudom, Anupong; Kasinrerk, Watchara

    2014-03-01

    The standard culture for identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis takes a long time to perform. We introduce here a method for fast identification of M. tuberculosis in mycobacterial culture system. Antibodies to Antigen (Ag) 85 of M. tuberculosis were produced and subsequently used to develop enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detecting Ag85 in the culture filtrate. By this detection, rapid tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis was achieved in comparison to the standard culture system with 89.6% sensitivity and 94% specificity. We thus suggest a new TB diagnosis strategy in which clinical samples are cultured in mycobacteria liquid culture medium. The culture filtrates are taken for detection of the Ag85 by ELISA. Using this strategy, 25%, 50%, 80%, and 90% of TB patients will be detected within day 3, week 1, 2, and 4, respectively. The established assay will enable a faster diagnosis of TB, leading to more efficient treatment of TB patients and control of disease transmission.

  6. A rapid method for simultaneous evaluation of free light chain content and aggregate content in culture media of Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing monoclonal antibodies for cell line screening.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Yoichi; Tsukahara, Masayoshi; Wakamatsu, Kaori

    2016-04-01

    The goal of developing a monoclonal antibody (mAb) production process is high productivity and high quality. Because the productivity and quality of mAbs depend on cell line properties, the selection of cell lines suitable for large-scale production is an important stage in process development for mAb production. The light chain (LC) is important for antibody folding and assembly in the endoplasmic reticulum; cell lines that secrete a large amount of LCs in the medium secrete high-quality antibodies with high productivity. LC contents in culture media have been estimated by western blotting, reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. However, these analyses require fine tuning of experimental conditions for each antibody analyzed. Here we report a rapid and simple high-sensitivity size-exclusion chromatography (HS-SEC) method to evaluate the contents of low-molecular weight species (LMWS, mainly consisting of LC monomers and dimers) and high-molecular weight species (HMWS, aggregates) in the media for cell line screening. Because LMWS and HMWS are important indicators of productivity and quality, respectively, for cell line screening, HS-SEC will be useful in the first step of cell line selection needed for large-scale production.

  7. Induction of carcinoembryonic antigen expression in a three-dimensional culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jessup, J. M.; Brown, D.; Fitzgerald, W.; Ford, R. D.; Nachman, A.; Goodwin, T. J.; Spaulding, G.

    1994-01-01

    MIP-101 is a poorly differentiated human colon carcinoma cell line established from ascites that produces minimal amounts of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a 180 kDa glycoprotein tumor marker, and nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA), a related protein that has 50 and 90 kDa isoforms, in vitro in monolayer culture. MIP-101 produces CEA when implanted into the peritoneum of nude mice but not when implanted into subcutaneous tissue. We tested whether MIP-101 cells may be induced to express CEA when cultured on microcarrier beads in three-dimensional cultures, either in static cultures as non-adherent aggregates or under dynamic conditions in a NASA-designed low shear stress bioreactor. MIP- 101 cells proliferated well under all three conditions and increased CEA and NCA production 3 - 4 fold when grown in three-dimensional cultures compared to MIP-101 cells growing logarithmically in monolayers. These results suggest that three-dimensional growth in vitro simulates tumor function in vivo and that three-dimensional growth by itself may enhance production of molecules that are associated with the metastatic process.

  8. Growth hormone aggregates in the rat adenohypophysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrington, M.; Hymer, W. C.

    1990-01-01

    Although it has been known for some time that GH aggregates are contained within the rat anterior pituitary gland, the role that they might play in pituitary function is unknown. The present study examines this issue using the technique of Western blotting, which permitted visualization of 11 GH variants with apparent mol wt ranging from 14-88K. Electroelution of the higher mol wt variants from gels followed by their chemical reduction with beta-mercaptoethanol increased GH immunoassayability by about 5-fold. With the blot procedure we found 1) that GH aggregates greater than 44K were associated with a 40,000 x g sedimentable fraction; 2) that GH aggregates were not present in glands from thyroidectomized rats, but were in glands from the thyroidectomized rats injected with T4; 3) that GH aggregates were uniquely associated with a heavily granulated somatotroph subpopulation isolated by density gradient centrifugation; and 4) that high mol wt GH forms were released from the dense somatotrophs in culture, since treatment of the culture medium with beta-mercaptoethanol increased GH immunoassayability by about 5-fold. Taken together, the results show that high mol wt GH aggregates are contained in secretory granules of certain somatotrophs and are also released in aggregate form from these cells in vitro.

  9. The Best System: Black Academic and Cultural Retention (Save the Children).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Pansye S.; Hord, Frederick L.

    Assumptions concerning the American education system and its social structure and implications for blacks are discussed, and a Frostburg State College program that addresses academic and cultural retention issues for black students is described. This program, the Best System, includes features such as: offering black cultural history; using…

  10. Exercises in a Resilient System of Care, Cultural Competency, and the Wraparound Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina, Vera O.; VanDenBerg, John

    1999-01-01

    Explores a socially resilient system of care and two key elements of the wraparound process: cultural competence and discovering family strengths, preferences, voice, and choice. Demonstrates the basic elements of an organized, resilient system of care and community strengths and includes exercises in social resilience, cultural competence, and…

  11. Revisiting the Role of Cultural Capital in East Asian Educational Systems: The Case of South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byun, Soo-yong; Schofer, Evan; Kim, Kyung-keun

    2012-01-01

    The concept of cultural capital has proved invaluable in understanding educational systems in Western countries, and recent work seeks to extend those insights to the diverse educational systems of other geographic regions. Using data from the 2000 Programme for International Student Assessment, the authors explored cultural capital in South Korea…

  12. Adult Educators and Cultural Competence within Health Care Systems: Change at the Individual and Structural Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegahn, Linda; Ton, Hendry

    2011-01-01

    Goals of cultural competence are commonly described as creation of a health care system and workforce capable of delivering high-quality care to all patients regardless of race, ethnicity, culture, or language. While this "system" is made up of individuals, it also has a life of its own, as with all institutions. In this chapter, the…

  13. A model for culturally adapting a learning system.

    PubMed

    Del Rosario, M L

    1975-12-01

    The Cross-Cultural Adaption Model (XCAM) is designed to help identify cultural values contained in the text, narration, or visual components of a learning instrument and enables the adapter to evaluate his adapted model so that he can modify or revise it, and allows him to assess the modified version by actually measuring the amount of cultural conflict still present in it. Such a model would permit world-wide adaption of learning materials in population regulation. A random sample of the target group is selected. The adapter develops a measurin g instrument, the cross-cultural adaption scale (XCA), a number of statements about the cultural affinity of the object evaluated. The pretest portion of the sample tests the clarity and understandability of the rating scale to be used for evaluating the instructional materials; the pilot group analyzes the original version of the instructional mater ials, determines the criteria for change, and analyzes the adapted version in terms of these criteria; the control group is administered the original version of the learning materials; and the experimental group is administered the adapted version. Finally, the responses obtained from the XRA rating scale and discussions of both the experimental and control groups are studied and group differences are ev aluated according to cultural conflicts met with each version. With this data, the preferred combination of elements is constructed.

  14. 47 CFR 10.300 - Alert aggregator. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Alert aggregator. 10.300 Section 10.300 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL WIRELESS EMERGENCY ALERTS System Architecture § 10.300 Alert aggregator....

  15. 47 CFR 10.300 - Alert aggregator. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Alert aggregator. 10.300 Section 10.300 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL WIRELESS EMERGENCY ALERTS System Architecture § 10.300 Alert aggregator....

  16. Developing management systems with cross-cultural fit: assessing international differences in operational systems.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Nancy; Roelofs, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Experiences in the Yunnan Maternal and Child Health Project, a 6-year CAN 6 million dollars bilateral initiative implemented in 10 counties (population 2.4 million) in Yunnan, China, are used to illustrate management approaches that successfully bridge cross-cultural differences in operational systems between donor and recipient countries. Donor institutions, local implementing agencies, and partner executing organizations each operate within specific assumptions about how governance structures, financial and administrative systems, human resource infrastructure, communications systems, and monitoring and reporting mechanisms function. These 'system domains' vary across cultures and countries, and become more evident as projects deal with capacity constraints, concerns about accountability, and rapid socioeconomic and political change during implementation. Management teams must be able to identify areas of poor fit among operational systems and respond appropriately. An assessment tool is offered, which management partners can use, as a basis for joint reflections on potential risks, identification of mitigation strategies, and establishing operational systems that are a fit for the funder as well as for partner agencies responsible for executing the project.

  17. C[sub 60] in model biological systems. A visible-UV absorption study of solvent-dependent parameters and solute aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Bensasson, R.V.; Dellinger, M. ); Bienvenue, E.; Seta, P. ); Leach, S. Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, Meudon )

    1994-03-31

    A study was made of the solubilization of C[sub 60] in various solvents and systems of biological interest, i.e., octanols, micelles, and liposomes, using visible-UV absorption spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool. The state of incorporation of C[sub 60] molecules in micellar and colloidal liposome solutions was monitored using a number of spectroscopic criteria of solute-solvent and solute-solute interactions based on comparison with spectra obtained in alkane and octanol solvents and from thin films of C[sub 60]. Spectral red shifts and intensity modifications of C[sub 60] absorption and C[sub 60] aggregation are discussed in terms of environment-dependent physical parameters. The results indicate that C[sub 60] can be dispersed in micellar solutions of Triton X-100 and Triton X-100 R-S, the fullerene molecules being localized in the inner hydrophobic part of the micelles. C[sub 60] was shown to be incorporated, mainly as aggregates, into phosphatidylcholine liposome colloidal solutions. It is concluded that micellar and liposome solutions can be prepared which could be used to transfer individual C[sub 60] molecules, or groups of molecules, to biological cells. 38 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Miktoarm star copolymers from D-(-)-salicin core aggregated into dandelion-like structures as anticancer drug delivery systems: synthesis, self-assembly and drug release.

    PubMed

    Mielańczyk, Anna; Odrobińska, Justyna; Grządka, Sebastian; Mielańczyk, Łukasz; Neugebauer, Dorota

    2016-12-30

    The β-glucoside-based heterofunctional initiator was used in the synthesis of well-defined eight-armed miktopolymers by sequential ring opening polymerization (ROP) of ε-caprolactone (CL) and atom transfer radical (co)polymerization (ATRP) of methyl methacrylate (MMA) and/or tert-butyl methacrylate (tBMA). Consequently, methacrylic acid (MAA) repeating units were introduced via selective cleavage of pendant tert-butyl protecting groups. Both the amphiphilic copolymers and miktoarm copolymers were self-assembled at 37°C and pH 7.4. The aggregates of miktoarm polymers were larger than that formed by polymethacrylate homoarm stars (≥250nm vs ≤200nm). The critical aggregation concentrations (CAC) of (mikto)stars were relatively low (0.006-0.411mg/mL) and decreased with the increase in MAA fraction content. Both MAA-based mikto- and homoarmed (co)polymers with shorter arms exhibited lower doxorubicin (DOX) loading capacity, whereas camptothecin (CPT) was encapsulated preferably by miktostars. The kinetic profiles of drug release showed that the rate of release was higher at acidic environment (pH 5.0) than in neutral pH. In the most cases the studied miktopolymer systems demonstrated the well-controlled delivery of the model anticancer drugs, which can be adjusted by structural parameters of polymeric carriers.

  19. An analysis of the productivity of a CELSS continuous algal culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radmer, R.; Behrens, P.; Fernandez, E.; Arnett, K.

    1986-01-01

    One of the most attractive aspects of using algal cultures as plant components for a Closed Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) is the efficiency with which they can be grown. Although algae are not necessarily intrinsically more efficient than higher plants, the ease which they can be handled and manipulated (more like chemical reagents than plants), and the culturing techniques available, result in much higher growth rates than are usually attainable with higher plants. Furthermore, preliminary experiments have demonstrated that algal growth and physiology is not detectable altered in a microgravity environment, (1) whereas the response of higher plants to zero gravity is unknown. In order to rationally design and operate culture systems, it is necessary to understand how the macroparameters of a culture system, e.g., productivity, are related to the physiological aspects of the algal culture. A first principles analysis of culture system is discussed, and a mathematical model that describes the relationship of culture productivity to the cell concentration of light-limited culture is derived. The predicted productivity vs cell concentration curve agrees well with the experimental data obtained to test this model, indicating that this model permits an accurate prediction of culture productivity given the growth parameters of the system.

  20. Characterization of Ovine Dermal Papilla Cell Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Sari, Agnes Rosarina Prita; Rufaut, Nicholas Wolfgang; Jones, Leslie Norman; Sinclair, Rodney Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Context: The dermal papilla (DP) is a condensation of mesenchymal cells at the proximal end of the hair follicle, which determines hair shaft size and regulates matrix cell proliferation and differentiation. DP cells have the ability to regenerate new hair follicles. These cells tend to aggregate both in vitro and in vivo. This tendency is associated with the ability of papilla cells to induce hair growth. However, human papilla cells lose their hair-inducing activity in later passage number. Ovine DP cells are different from human DP cells since they do not lose their aggregative behavior or hair-inducing activity in culture. Nonetheless, our understanding of ovine DP cells is still limited. Aim: The aim of this study was to observe the expression of established DP markers in ovine cells and their association with aggregation. Subjects and Methods: Ovine DP cells from three different sheep were compared. Histochemistry, immunoflourescence, and polymerase chain reaction experiments were done to analyze the DP markers. Results: We found that ovine DP aggregates expressed all the 16 markers evaluated, including alkaline phosphatase and versican. Expression of the versican V0 and V3 isoforms, neural cell adhesion molecule, and corin was increased significantly with aggregation, while hey-1 expression was significantly decreased. Conclusions: Overall, the stable expression of numerous markers suggests that aggregating ovine DP cells have a similar phenotype to papillae in vivo. The stability of their molecular phenotype is consistent with their robust aggregative behavior and retained follicle-inducing activity after prolonged culture. Their phenotypic stability in culture contrasts with DP cells from other species, and suggests that a better understanding of ovine DP cells might provide opportunities to improve the hair-inducing activity and therapeutic potential of human cells. PMID:27625564

  1. Fimbriae and lipopolysaccharides are necessary for co-aggregation between Lactobacilli and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kouhei; Furukawa, Soichi; Usui, Yumi; Ishiba, Madoka; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    Cells of Lactobacilli co-aggregated with Escherichia coli K-12 cells to form co-aggregates under mixed-culture conditions at 37 °C for 24 h. Co-aggregation was inhibited by sodium dodecyl sulfate but not by protease. E. coli deletion mutants of fimbriae formation and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) formation did not co-aggregate with Lactobacilli. These results showed that fimbriae and LPS are necessary for co-aggregation between Lactobacilli and E. coli.

  2. A dual-color luciferase assay system reveals circadian resetting of cultured fibroblasts by co-cultured adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Takako; Ikeda, Masaaki; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Nakajima, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, circadian rhythms of various organs and tissues are synchronized by pacemaker neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Glucocorticoids released from the adrenal glands can synchronize circadian rhythms in other tissues. Many hormones show circadian rhythms in their plasma concentrations; however, whether organs outside the SCN can serve as master synchronizers to entrain circadian rhythms in target tissues is not well understood. To further delineate the function of the adrenal glands and the interactions of circadian rhythms in putative master synchronizing organs and their target tissues, here we report a simple co-culture system using a dual-color luciferase assay to monitor circadian rhythms separately in various explanted tissues and fibroblasts. In this system, circadian rhythms of organs and target cells were simultaneously tracked by the green-emitting beetle luciferase from Pyrearinus termitilluminans (ELuc) and the red-emitting beetle luciferase from Phrixothrix hirtus (SLR), respectively. We obtained tissues from the adrenal glands, thyroid glands, and lungs of transgenic mice that expressed ELuc under control of the promoter from a canonical clock gene, mBmal1. The tissues were co-cultured with Rat-1 fibroblasts as representative target cells expressing SLR under control of the mBmal1 promoter. Amplitudes of the circadian rhythms of Rat-1 fibroblasts were potentiated when the fibroblasts were co-cultured with adrenal gland tissue, but not when co-cultured with thyroid gland or lung tissue. The phases of Rat-1 fibroblasts were reset by application of adrenal gland tissue, whereas the phases of adrenal gland tissue were not influenced by Rat-1 fibroblasts. Furthermore, the effect of the adrenal gland tissue on the fibroblasts was blocked by application of a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist. These results demonstrate that glucocorticoids are strong circadian synchronizers for fibroblasts and that this co-culture

  3. Aggregation of colloidal particles modeled as a dynamical process.

    PubMed Central

    Bentz, J; Nir, S

    1981-01-01

    Aggregation kinetics of sonicated phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) vesicles in NaCl indicate that the process is fully reversible and dynamical, involving the rapid formation and dispersal of aggregates. Accordingly, the general mass action kinetic equations are analyzed with respect to the equilibrium state and the formation of higher order aggregates. For a general class of systems, the values for the mass average aggregate size at equilibrium are obtained from simple closed-form expressions. It is shown that an analysis of the aggregation equilibrium will yield estimates for the potential energy well that holds the aggregates together. A fit to the experimental data for kinetics of Na+-induced aggregation of the vesicles has been achieved by employing mass action kinetic equations that include the dissociation reactions. The threshold of NaCl concentration required for aggregation involves the clear distinction between the rate and extent of aggregation. PMID:6940176

  4. Aggregations in Flatworms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liffen, C. L.; Hunter, M.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a school project to investigate aggregations in flatworms which may be influenced by light intensity, temperature, and some form of chemical stimulus released by already aggregating flatworms. Such investigations could be adopted to suit many educational levels of science laboratory activities. (DS)

  5. Unbonded Aggregate Surface Roads

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    are sufficiently angular and rough in texture, thus ensuring mixture stability. A popular asphalt mixture design method called Superpave Level 1...would not pass either of the Superpave aggregate requirements. Table 18 Additional Characteristics for the Fine Fraction Abbreviated Common Name...CBR values when compacted wet of optimum. This is likely attributable to their relatively high permeabilities . For soaked CBR tests, the aggregates

  6. Erosion of dust aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seizinger, A.; Krijt, S.; Kley, W.

    2013-12-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to gain a deeper insight into how much different aggregate types are affected by erosion. Especially, it is important to study the influence of the velocity of the impacting projectiles. We also want to provide models for dust growth in protoplanetary disks with simple recipes to account for erosion effects. Methods: To study the erosion of dust aggregates we employed a molecular dynamics approach that features a detailed micro-physical model of the interaction of spherical grains. For the first time, the model has been extended by introducing a new visco-elastic damping force, which requires a proper calibration. Afterwards, different sample generation methods were used to cover a wide range of aggregate types. Results: The visco-elastic damping force introduced in this work turns out to be crucial to reproduce results obtained from laboratory experiments. After proper calibration, we find that erosion occurs for impact velocities of 5 ms-1 and above. Though fractal aggregates as formed during the first growth phase are most susceptible to erosion, we observe erosion of aggregates with rather compact surfaces as well. Conclusions: We find that bombarding a larger target aggregate with small projectiles results in erosion for impact velocities as low as a few ms-1. More compact aggregates suffer less from erosion. With increasing projectile size the transition from accretion to erosion is shifted to higher velocities. This allows larger bodies to grow through high velocity collisions with smaller aggregates.

  7. Long-term maintenance of human induced pluripotent stem cells by automated cell culture system

    PubMed Central

    Konagaya, Shuhei; Ando, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Toshiaki; Suemori, Hirofumi; Iwata, Hiroo

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, are regarded as new sources for cell replacement therapy. These cells can unlimitedly expand under undifferentiated conditions and be differentiated into multiple cell types. Automated culture systems enable the large-scale production of cells. In addition to reducing the time and effort of researchers, an automated culture system improves the reproducibility of cell cultures. In the present study, we newly designed a fully automated cell culture system for human iPS maintenance. Using an automated culture system, hiPS cells maintained their undifferentiated state for 60 days. Automatically prepared hiPS cells had a potency of differentiation into three germ layer cells including dopaminergic neurons and pancreatic cells. PMID:26573336

  8. Flow Partitioning in Fully Saturated Soil Aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaofan; Richmond, Marshall C.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Perkins, William A.; Resat, Haluk

    2014-03-30

    Microbes play an important role in facilitating organic matter decomposition in soils, which is a major component of the global carbon cycle. Microbial dynamics are intimately coupled to environmental transport processes, which control access to labile organic matter and other nutrients that are needed for the growth and maintenance of microorganisms. Transport of soluble nutrients in the soil system is arguably most strongly impacted by preferential flow pathways in the soil. Since the physical structure of soils can be characterized as being formed from constituent micro aggregates which contain internal porosity, one pressing question is the partitioning of the flow among the “inter-aggregate” and “intra-aggregate” pores and how this may impact overall solute transport within heterogeneous soil structures. The answer to this question is particularly important in evaluating assumptions to be used in developing upscaled simulations based on highly-resolved mechanistic models. We constructed a number of diverse multi-aggregate structures with different packing ratios by stacking micro-aggregates containing internal pores and varying the size and shape of inter-aggregate pore spacing between them. We then performed pore-scale flow simulations using computational fluid dynamics methods to determine the flow patterns in these aggregate-of-aggregates structures and computed the partitioning of the flow through intra- and inter-aggregate pores as a function of the spacing between the aggregates. The results of these numerical experiments demonstrate that soluble nutrients are largely transported via flows through inter-aggregate pores. Although this result is consistent with intuition, we have also been able to quantify the relative flow capacity of the two domains under various conditions. For example, in our simulations, the flow capacity through the aggregates (intra-aggregate flow) was less than 2% of the total flow when the spacing between the aggregates

  9. Biomaterials in co-culture systems: towards optimizing tissue integration and cell signaling within scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Battiston, Kyle G; Cheung, Jane W C; Jain, Devika; Santerre, J Paul

    2014-05-01

    Most natural tissues consist of multi-cellular systems made up of two or more cell types. However, some of these tissues may not regenerate themselves following tissue injury or disease without some form of intervention, such as from the use of tissue engineered constructs. Recent studies have increasingly used co-cultures in tissue engineering applications as these systems better model the natural tissues, both physically and biologically. This review aims to identify the challenges of using co-culture systems and to highlight different approaches with respect to the use of biomaterials in the use of such systems. The application of co-culture systems to stimulate a desired biological response and examples of studies within particular tissue engineering disciplines are summarized. A description of different analytical co-culture systems is also discussed and the role of biomaterials in the future of co-culture research are elaborated on. Understanding the complex cell-cell and cell-biomaterial interactions involved in co-culture systems will ultimately lead the field towards biomaterial concepts and designs with specific biochemical, electrical, and mechanical characteristics that are tailored towards the needs of distinct co-culture systems.

  10. A single-cell and feeder-free culture system for monkey embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ono, Takashi; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kato, Yosuke; Fujita, Risako; Araki, Toshihiro; Yamashita, Tomoko; Kato, Hidemasa; Torii, Ryuzo; Sato, Naoya

    2014-01-01

    Primate pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), including embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), hold great potential for research and application in regenerative medicine and drug discovery. To maximize primate PSC potential, a practical system is required for generating desired functional cells and reproducible differentiation techniques. Much progress regarding their culture systems has been reported to date; however, better methods would still be required for their practical use, particularly in industrial and clinical fields. Here we report a new single-cell and feeder-free culture system for primate PSCs, the key feature of which is an originally formulated serum-free medium containing FGF and activin. In this culture system, cynomolgus monkey ESCs can be passaged many times by single-cell dissociation with traditional trypsin treatment and can be propagated with a high proliferation rate as a monolayer without any feeder cells; further, typical PSC properties and genomic stability can be retained. In addition, it has been demonstrated that monkey ESCs maintained in the culture system can be used for various experiments such as in vitro differentiation and gene manipulation. Thus, compared with the conventional culture system, monkey ESCs grown in the aforementioned culture system can serve as a cell source with the following practical advantages: simple, stable, and easy cell maintenance; gene manipulation; cryopreservation; and desired differentiation. We propose that this culture system can serve as a reliable platform to prepare primate PSCs useful for future research and application.

  11. Algal culture studies related to a Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radmer, R.; Behrens, P.; Fernandez, E.; Ollinger, O.; Howell, C.; Venables, A.; Huggins, D.; Gladue, R.

    1984-01-01

    In many respects, algae would be the ideal plant component for a biologically based controlled life support system, since they are eminently suited to the closely coupled functions of atmosphere regeneration and food production. Scenedesmus obliquus and Spirulina platensis were grown in three continuous culture apparatuses. Culture vessels their operation and relative merits are described. Both light and nitrogen utilization efficiency are examined. Long term culture issues are detailed and a discussion of a plasmid search in Spirulina is included.

  12. Educational Policy vs. Culturally Sensitive Programs in Turkish Educational System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arslan, Hasan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the perceptions of elementary school teachers about the sensitiveness of principals, teachers, and curriculum on multicultural education. Education provides the transmission and the advancement of its culture while it is developing and enhancing the common values, the integrity and the progress of…

  13. Modular plant culture systems for life support functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The current state of knowledge with regard to culture of higher plants in the zero-G environment is assessed; and concepts for the empirical development of small plant growth chambers for the production of salad type vegetables on space shuttle or space station are evaluated. American and Soviet space flight experiences in gravitational biology are summarized.

  14. Isolation and Characterization of Poliovirus in Cell Culture Systems.

    PubMed

    Thorley, Bruce R; Roberts, Jason A

    2016-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of enteroviruses by cell culture was accepted as the "gold standard" by clinical virology laboratories. Methods for the direct detection of all enteroviruses by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, targeting a conserved region of the genome, have largely supplanted cell culture as the principal diagnostic procedure. However, the World Health Organization's Global Polio Eradication Initiative continues to rely upon cell culture to isolate poliovirus due to the lack of a reliable sensitive genetic test for direct typing of enteroviruses from clinical specimens. Poliovirus is able to infect a wide range of mammalian cell lines, with CD155 identified as the primary human receptor for all three seroytpes, and virus replication leads to an observable cytopathic effect. Inoculation of cell lines with extracts of clinical specimens and subsequent passaging of the cells leads to an increased virus titre. Cultured isolates of poliovirus are suitable for testing by a variety of methods and remain viable for years when stored at low temperature.This chapter describes general procedures for establishing a cell bank and routine passaging of cell lines. While the sections on specimen preparation and virus isolation focus on poliovirus, the protocols are suitable for other enteroviruses.

  15. A Systemic Approach to Culturally Responsive Assessment Practices and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slee, June

    2010-01-01

    In an earlier paper, Slee and Keenan demonstrated that it was possible for tertiary education institutions to design culturally responsive assessment procedures that complied with standardised assessment policy. The authors' paper described "Growing Our Own," an initiative between Charles Darwin University and Northern Territory Catholic…

  16. Bridging the Two Cultures: Disciplinary Divides and Educational Reward Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiferl, E. I.

    2007-01-01

    In 1959 C.P. Snow believed that communication and education could span the cultural gap between the sciences and the humanities. In the twenty-first century, language, research models, and academic structures hinder intellectual communication between art history, cognitive neuroscience and perceptual psychology--three disciplines dedicated to…

  17. Design and Evaluation of a Cross-Cultural Training System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santarelli, Thomas; Stagl, Kevin C.

    2011-01-01

    Cross-cultural competency, and the underlying communication and affective skills required to develop such expertise, is becoming increasingly important for a wide variety of domains. To address this need, we developed a blended learning platform which combines virtual role-play with tutorials, assessment and feedback. A Middle-Eastern Curriculum (MEC) exemplar for cross-cultural training U.S. military personnel was developed to guide the refinement of an existing game-based training platform. To complement this curriculum, we developed scenario authoring tools to enable end-users to define training objectives, link performance measures and feedback/remediation to these objectives, and deploy experiential scenarios within a game-based virtual environment (VE). Lessons learned from the design and development of this exemplar cross-cultural competency curriculum, as well as formative evaluation results, are discussed. Initial findings suggest that the underlying training technology promotes deep levels of semantic processing of the key information of relevant cultural and communication skills.

  18. Fabrication of a Novel Cell Culture System Using DNA-Grafted Substrates and DNase.

    PubMed

    Mitomo, Hideyuki; Eguchi, Asumi; Suzuki, Yasunobu; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Niikura, Kenichi; Nakazawa, Kohji; Ijiro, Kuniharu

    2016-02-01

    In conventional cell culture systems, trypsin is generally used for cell harvesting. However, trypsin damages the cells due to the nonselective degradation of proteins on the cell surface. This is a critical issue for cell culture systems. Therefore, an alternative cell culture system with the lowest possible impact on cells is desired. In this paper, we have focused on DNA as a sacrificial layer and DNase as an alternate enzyme instead of trypsin. DNase ought not to result in damage to or stress on cells as it only hydrolyzes DNAs while the plasma membrane and extracellular matrices are basically composed of lipids, proteins, and glycosides. Therefore, we fabricated DNA-grafted substrates as cell culture dishes and evaluated this novel cell culture system. As a result, we were able to culture several types of mammalian cells on the DNA-grafted substrates, with the cells harvested using DNase with only little damage to the cells. This cell culture system could provide a breakthrough in cell culturing technology.

  19. Selectivity of aggregation-determining interactions.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Ashok; Debulpaep, Maja; Wilkinson, Hannah; Van Durme, Joost; De Baets, Greet; Jonckheere, Wim; Ramakers, Meine; Ivarsson, Ylva; Zimmermann, Pascale; Van Eldere, Johan; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic

    2015-01-30

    Protein aggregation is sequence specific, favoring self-assembly over cross-seeding with non-homologous sequences. Still, as the majority of proteins in a proteome are aggregation prone, the high level of homogeneity of protein inclusions in vivo both during recombinant overexpression and in disease remains surprising. To investigate the selectivity of protein aggregation in a proteomic context, we here compared the selectivity of aggregation-determined interactions with antibody binding. To that purpose, we synthesized biotin-labeled peptides, corresponding to aggregation-determining sequences of the bacterial protein β-galactosidase and two human disease biomarkers: C-reactive protein and prostate-specific antigen. We analyzed the selectivity of their interactions in Escherichia coli lysate, human serum and human seminal plasma, respectively, using a Western blot-like approach in which the aggregating peptides replace the conventional antibody. We observed specific peptide accumulation in the same bands detected by antibody staining. Combined spectroscopic and mutagenic studies confirmed accumulation resulted from binding of the peptide on the identical sequence of the immobilized target protein. Further, we analyzed the sequence redundancy of aggregating sequences and found that about 90% of them are unique within their proteome. As a result, the combined specificity and low sequence redundancy of aggregating sequences therefore contribute to the observed homogeneity of protein aggregation in vivo. This suggests that these intrinsic proteomic properties naturally compartmentalize aggregation events in sequence space. In the event of physiological stress, this might benefit the ability of cells to respond to proteostatic stress by allowing chaperones to focus on specific aggregation events rather than having to face systemic proteostatic failure.

  20. Inbreeding in stochastic subdivided mating systems: the genetic consequences of host spatial structure, aggregated transmission dynamics and life history characteristics in parasite populations.

    PubMed

    Dharmarajan, Guha

    2015-03-01

    Inbreeding in parasite populations can have important epidemiological and evolutionary implications. However, theoretical models have predominantly focussed on the evolution of parasite populations under strong selection or in epidemic situations, and our understanding of neutral gene dynamics in parasite populations at equilibrium has been limited to verbal arguments or conceptual models. This study focusses on how host-parasite population dynamics affects observed levels of inbreeding in a random sample of parasites from an infinite population of hosts by bridging traditional genetic and parasitological processes utilizing a backward-forward branching Markov process embedded within a flexible statistical framework, the logarithmic-poisson mixture model. My results indicate that levels of inbreeding in parasites are impacted by demographic and/or transmission dynamics (subdivided mating, aggregated transmission dynamics and host spatial structure), and that this inbreeding is poorly estimated by 'equilibrium' levels of inbreeding calculated assuming regular systems of mating. Specifically, the model reveals that at low levels of inbreeding (F ≤ 0.1), equilibrium levels of inbreeding are lower than those observed, while at high levels of inbreeding the opposite pattern occurs. The model also indicates that inbreeding could have important epidemiological implications (e.g., the spread of recessive drug resistance genes) by directly impacting the observed frequency of rare homozygotes in parasite populations. My results indicate that frequencies of rare homozygotes are affected by aggregated transmission dynamics and host spatial structure, and also that an increase in the frequency of rare homozygotes can be caused by a decrease in effective population size solely due to the presence of a subdivided breeding system.

  1. Progressive aggregation of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus coat protein in systemically infected tomato plants, susceptible and resistant to the virus.

    PubMed

    Gorovits, Rena; Moshe, Adi; Kolot, Mikhail; Sobol, Iris; Czosnek, Henryk

    2013-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) coat protein (CP) accumulated in tomato leaves during infection. The CP was immuno-detected in the phloem associated cells. At the early stages of infection, punctate signals were detected in the cytoplasm, while in the later stages aggregates of increasing size were localized in cytoplasm and nuclei. Sedimentation of protein extracts through sucrose gradients confirmed that progress of infection was accompanied by the formation of CP aggregates of increasing size. Genomic ssDNA was found in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus, while the dsDNA replicative form was exclusively associated with the nucleus. CP-DNA complexes were detected by immuno-capture PCR in nuclear and cytoplasmic large aggregates. Nuclear aggregates contained infectious particles transmissible to test plants by whiteflies. In contrast to susceptible tomatoes, the formation of large CP aggregates in resistant plants was delayed. By experimentally changing the level of resistance/susceptibility of plants, we showed that maintenance of midsized CP aggregates was associated with resistance, while large aggregates where characteristic of susceptibility. We propose that sequestering of virus CP into midsized aggregates and retarding the formation of large insoluble aggregates containing infectious particles is part of the response of resistant plants to TYLCV.

  2. Multiple Embedded Inequalities and Cultural Diversity in Educational Systems: A Theoretical and Empirical Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhoeven, Marie

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the social construction of cultural diversity in education, with a view to social justice. It examines how educational systems organize ethno-cultural difference and how this process contributes to inequalities. Theoretical resources are drawn from social philosophy as well as from recent developments in social organisation…

  3. MOSAICA: A Web-2.0 Based System for the Preservation and Presentation of Cultural Heritage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barak, Miri; Herscoviz, Orit; Kaberman, Zvia; Dori, Yehudit J.

    2009-01-01

    The question of how to present cultural heritage resources in a way that attracts potential users is becoming important in our ever-changing world. This paper describes MOSAICA system--a web 2.0-based toolbox, dedicated for the preservation and presentation of cultural heritage. This paper also describes an evaluation study that examined MOSAICA…

  4. Algal culture studies related to a Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radmer, R. O.; Ollinger, O.; Venables, A.; Fernandez, E.

    1982-01-01

    Studies with algal cultures which relate to closed ecological life support systems (CELSS) are discussed. A description of a constant cell density apparatus for continuous culture of algae is included. Excretion of algal by-products, and nitrogen utilization and excretion are discussed.

  5. The Relationship between National Culture and the Usability of an E-Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adeoye, Blessing; Wentling, Rose Mary

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate possible relationships between national culture and the usability of an e-learning system. The theoretical frameworks that were used to guide this study were Hofstede's (1980) cultural dimensions, and Nielson's (1993) usability attributes. The sample for this study was composed of 24 international…

  6. Application of polydimethylsiloxane-based optical system for measuring optical density of microbial culture.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yurika

    2016-12-01

    The performance of recently developed polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based optical system was tested for measuring optical density of microbial culture. The data showed that PDMS-based spectrometer is superior to "one drop" spectrometers in the accuracy, and has an advantage over conventional spectrometers in measuring dense culture without dilution.

  7. Autoimmune Responses to Soluble Aggregates of Amyloidogenic Proteins Involved in Neurodegenerative Diseases: Overlapping Aggregation Prone and Autoimmunogenic regions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Thangakani, A Mary; Nagarajan, R; Singh, Satish K; Velmurugan, D; Gromiha, M Michael

    2016-02-29

    Why do patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases generate autoantibodies that selectively bind soluble aggregates of amyloidogenic proteins? Presently, molecular basis of interactions between the soluble aggregates and human immune system is unknown. By analyzing sequences of experimentally validated T-cell autoimmune epitopes, aggregating peptides, amyloidogenic proteins and randomly generated peptides, here we report overlapping regions that likely drive aggregation as well as generate autoantibodies against the aggregates. Sequence features, that make short peptides susceptible to aggregation, increase their incidence in human T-cell autoimmune epitopes by 4-6 times. Many epitopes are predicted to be significantly aggregation prone (aggregation propensities ≥10%) and the ones containing experimentally validated aggregating regions are enriched in hydrophobicity by 10-20%. Aggregate morphologies also influence Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)--types recognized by the aggregating regions containing epitopes. Most (88%) epitopes that contain amyloid fibril forming regions bind HLA-DR, while majority (63%) of those containing amorphous β-aggregating regions bind HLA-DQ. More than two-thirds (70%) of human amyloidogenic proteins contain overlapping regions that are simultaneously aggregation prone and auto-immunogenic. Such regions help clear soluble aggregates by generating selective autoantibodies against them. This can be harnessed for early diagnosis of proteinopathies and for drug/vaccine design against them.

  8. Dual Monitoring of Secretion and ATP Levels during Chondrogenesis Using Perfusion Culture-Combined Bioluminescence Monitoring System.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyuck Joon; Han, Youngbae

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal pattern formation in limb development depends on prechondrogenic condensation which prefigures the cartilage template. However, although morphogens such as TGF-βs and BMPs have been known to play essential roles in skeletal patterning, how the morphogens induce prechondrogenic cells to aggregate and determine patterns of cartilage elements has remained unclear. Our previous study reported that ATP oscillations are induced during chondrogenesis. This result suggests the possibility that ATP oscillations lead to the oscillatory secretion of morphogens, due to the fact that secretion process requires ATP. To examine the correlation between ATP oscillations and secretion levels of morphogens, we have developed perfusion culture-combined bioluminescence monitoring system to simultaneously monitor intracellular ATP levels and secretion levels. Using this system, we found that secretory activity oscillates in phase with ATP oscillations and that secretion levels of TGF-β1 and BMP2 oscillate during chondrogenesis. The oscillatory secretion of the morphogens would contribute to amplifying the fluctuation of the morphogens, underlie the spatial patterning of morphogens, and consequently lead to skeletal pattern formation.

  9. Aggregate and the environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, William H.; Drew, Lawrence J.; Sachs, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    This book is designed to help you understand our aggregate resources-their importance, where they come from, how they are processed for our use, the environmental concerns related to their mining and processing, how those concerns are addressed, and the policies and regulations designed to safeguard workers, neighbors, and the environment from the negative impacts of aggregate mining. We hope this understanding will help prepare you to be involved in decisions that need to be made-individually and as a society-to be good stewards of our aggregate resources and our living planet.

  10. Effect of cultural system and essential oil treatment on antioxidant capacity in raspberries.

    PubMed

    Jin, Peng; Wang, Shiow Y; Gao, Haiyan; Chen, Hangjun; Zheng, Yonghua; Wang, Chien Y

    2012-05-01

    The effects of cultural system and essential oil treatment on antioxidant capacities in raspberries were evaluated. Raspberries were hand-harvested from organic and conventional farms in Maryland, USA, and were treated with essential oil including carvacrol, anethole, cinnamic acid, perillaldehyde, cinnamaldehyde, and linalool. Results from this study showed that raspberries grown from organic culture exhibited higher value of antioxidant capacities and individual flavonoids contents. Moreover, the organic culture also enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes. In addition, essential oil treatments promoted the antioxidant enzymes activities and antioxidant capacities of raspberries, and the most effective compound was perillaldehyde. In conclusion, raspberries produced from organic culture contained significantly higher antioxidant capacities than those produce from conventional culture. Postharvest essential oil treatments have positive effect on enhancing antioxidant capacities in raspberries from both organic and conventional cultures.

  11. Marine aggregate dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The direction and scope of the Office of Naval Research's Marine Aggregate Dynamics Accelerated Research Initiative will be the topic of an open-house style meeting February 14, 7:30-10:00 P.M. in Ballroom D of the Hyatt Regency New Orleans at the Louisiana Superdome. This meeting is scheduled during the AGU/American Society of Limnology and Oceanography Ocean Sciences Meeting February 12-16 in New Orleans.The critical focus of the ARI is the measurement and modeling of the dynamics of the biological, physical, chemical and molecular processes that drive aggregation and produce aggregates. This new ARI will provide funding in Fiscal Years 1991-1995 to identify and quantify mechanisms that determine the distribution, abundance and size spectrum of aggregated particulate matter in the ocean.

  12. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  13. Aggregation and Averaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Irving H.

    The arithmetic processes of aggregation and averaging are basic to quantitative investigations of employment, unemployment, and related concepts. In explaining these concepts, this report stresses need for accuracy and consistency in measurements, and describes tools for analyzing alternative measures. (BH)

  14. SCRMS: An RFID and Sensor Web-Enabled Smart Cultural Relics Management System.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Changjiang; Chen, Nengcheng; Li, Dandan; Lv, You; Gong, Jianya

    2016-12-30

    Cultural relics represent national or even global resources of inestimable value. How to efficiently manage and preserve these cultural relics is a vitally important issue. To achieve this goal, this study proposed, designed, and implemented an RFID and Sensor Web-enabled smart cultural relics management system (SCRMS). In this system, active photovoltaic subtle energy-powered Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is used for long-range contactless identification and lifecycle management of cultural relics during their storage and circulation. In addition, different types of ambient sensors are integrated with the RFID tags and deployed around cultural relics to monitor their environmental parameters, helping to ensure that they remain in good condition. An Android-based smart mobile application, as middleware, is used in collaboration with RFID readers to collect information and provide convenient management for the circulation of cultural relics. Moreover, multiple sensing techniques are taken advantage of simultaneously for preservation of cultural relics. The proposed system was successfully applied to a museum in the Yongding District, Fujian Province, China, demonstrating its feasibility and advantages for smart and efficient management and preservation of cultural relics.

  15. SCRMS: An RFID and Sensor Web-Enabled Smart Cultural Relics Management System

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Changjiang; Chen, Nengcheng; Li, Dandan; Lv, You; Gong, Jianya

    2016-01-01

    Cultural relics represent national or even global resources of inestimable value. How to efficiently manage and preserve these cultural relics is a vitally important issue. To achieve this goal, this study proposed, designed, and implemented an RFID and Sensor Web–enabled smart cultural relics management system (SCRMS). In this system, active photovoltaic subtle energy-powered Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is used for long-range contactless identification and lifecycle management of cultural relics during their storage and circulation. In addition, different types of ambient sensors are integrated with the RFID tags and deployed around cultural relics to monitor their environmental parameters, helping to ensure that they remain in good condition. An Android-based smart mobile application, as middleware, is used in collaboration with RFID readers to collect information and provide convenient management for the circulation of cultural relics. Moreover, multiple sensing techniques are taken advantage of simultaneously for preservation of cultural relics. The proposed system was successfully applied to a museum in the Yongding District, Fujian Province, China, demonstrating its feasibility and advantages for smart and efficient management and preservation of cultural relics. PMID:28042820

  16. Soil aggregation and aggregating agents as affected by long term contrasting management of an Anthrosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shulan; Wang, Renjie; Yang, Xueyun; Sun, Benhua; Li, Qinghui

    2016-12-01

    Soil aggregation was studied in a 21-year experiment conducted on an Anthrosol. The soil management regimes consisted of cropland abandonment, bare fallow without vegetation and cropping system. The cropping system was combined with the following nutrient management treatments: control (CONTROL, no nutrient input); nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK); straw plus NPK (SNPK); and manure (M) plus NPK (MNPK). Compared with the CONTROL treatment, the abandonment treatment significantly increased the formation of large soil macroaggregates (>2 mm) and consequently improved the stability of aggregates in the surface soil layer due to enhancement of hyphal length and of soil organic matter content. However, in response to long-term bare fallow treatment aggregate stability was low, as were the levels of aggregating agents. Long term fertilization significantly redistributed macroaggregates; this could be mainly ascribed to soil organic matter contributing to the formation of 0.5–2 mm classes of aggregates and a decrease in the formation of the >2 mm class of aggregates, especially in the MNPK treatment. Overall, hyphae represented a major aggregating agent in both of the systems tested, while soil organic compounds played significantly different roles in stabilizing aggregates in Anthrosol when the cropping system and the soil management regimes were compared.

  17. Soil aggregation and aggregating agents as affected by long term contrasting management of an Anthrosol

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shulan; Wang, Renjie; Yang, Xueyun; Sun, Benhua; Li, Qinghui

    2016-01-01

    Soil aggregation was studied in a 21-year experiment conducted on an Anthrosol. The soil management regimes consisted of cropland abandonment, bare fallow without vegetation and cropping system. The cropping system was combined with the following nutrient management treatments: control (CONTROL, no nutrient input); nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK); straw plus NPK (SNPK); and manure (M) plus NPK (MNPK). Compared with the CONTROL treatment, the abandonment treatment significantly increased the formation of large soil macroaggregates (>2 mm) and consequently improved the stability of aggregates in the surface soil layer due to enhancement of hyphal length and of soil organic matter content. However, in response to long-term bare fallow treatment aggregate stability was low, as were the levels of aggregating agents. Long term fertilization significantly redistributed macroaggregates; this could be mainly ascribed to soil organic matter contributing to the formation of 0.5–2 mm classes of aggregates and a decrease in the formation of the >2 mm class of aggregates, especially in the MNPK treatment. Overall, hyphae represented a major aggregating agent in both of the systems tested, while soil organic compounds played significantly different roles in stabilizing aggregates in Anthrosol when the cropping system and the soil management regimes were compared. PMID:27958366

  18. Parainfluenza virus isolation enhancement utilizing a portable cell culture system in the field.

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, A J; Muchmore, H G; Scott, L V; Miles, J A

    1980-01-01

    Using a portable minaturized cell culture system, enhanced recoveries of parainfluenza virus types 1 and 3 were made in the field from symptomatic human adult subjects working at remote Antarctic stations. PMID:6247369

  19. Target detect system in 3D using vision apply on plant reproduction by tissue culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez Rueda, Martin G.; Hahn, Federico

    2001-03-01

    This paper presents the preliminary results for a system in tree dimension that use a system vision to manipulate plants in a tissue culture process. The system is able to estimate the position of the plant in the work area, first calculate the position and send information to the mechanical system, and recalculate the position again, and if it is necessary, repositioning the mechanical system, using an neural system to improve the location of the plant. The system use only the system vision to sense the position and control loop using a neural system to detect the target and positioning the mechanical system, the results are compared with an open loop system.

  20. Classification and Characterization of Therapeutic Antibody Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Joubert, Marisa K.; Luo, Quanzhou; Nashed-Samuel, Yasser; Wypych, Jette; Narhi, Linda O.

    2011-01-01

    A host of diverse stress techniques was applied to a monoclonal antibody (IgG2) to yield protein particles with varying attributes and morphologies. Aggregated solutions were evaluated for percent aggregation, particle counts, size distribution, morphology, changes in secondary and tertiary structure, surface hydrophobicity, metal content, and reversibility. Chemical modifications were also identified in a separate report (Luo, Q., Joubert, M. K., Stevenson, R., Narhi, L. O., and Wypych, J. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 25134–25144). Aggregates were categorized into seven discrete classes, based on the traits described. Several additional molecules (from the IgG1 and IgG2 subtypes as well as intravenous IgG) were stressed and found to be defined with the same classification system. The mechanism of protein aggregation and the type of aggregate formed depends on the nature of the stress applied. Different IgG molecules appear to aggregate by a similar mechanism under the same applied stress. Aggregates created by harsh mechanical stress showed the largest number of subvisible particles, and the class generated by thermal stress displayed the largest number of visible particles. Most classes showed a disruption of the higher order structure, with the degree of disorder depending on the stress process. Particles in all classes (except thermal stress) were at least partially reversible upon dilution in pH 5 buffer. High copper content was detected in isolated metal-catalyzed aggregates, a stress previously shown to produce immunogenic aggregates. In conclusion, protein aggregates can be a very heterogeneous population, whose qualities are the result of the type of stress that was experienced. PMID:21454532

  1. Microfluidics and cancer analysis: cell separation, cell/tissue culture, cell mechanics, and integrated analysis systems.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Dimitri

    2016-01-21

    Among the growing number of tools available for cancer studies, microfluidic systems have emerged as a promising analytical tool to elucidate cancer cell and tumor function. Microfluidic methods to culture cells have created approaches to provide a range of environments from single-cell analysis to complex three-dimensional devices. In this review we discuss recent advances in tumor cell culture, cancer cell analysis, and advanced studies enabled by microfluidic systems.

  2. A real-time multi-channel monitoring system for stem cell culture process.

    PubMed

    Xicai Yue; Drakakis, E M; Lim, M; Radomska, A; Hua Ye; Mantalaris, A; Panoskaltsis, N; Cass, A

    2008-06-01

    A novel, up to 128 channels, multi-parametric physiological measurement system suitable for monitoring hematopoietic stem cell culture processes and cell cultures in general is presented in this paper. The system aims to measure in real-time the most important physical and chemical culture parameters of hematopoietic stem cells, including physicochemical parameters, nutrients, and metabolites, in a long-term culture process. The overarching scope of this research effort is to control and optimize the whole bioprocess by means of the acquisition of real-time quantitative physiological information from the culture. The system is designed in a modular manner. Each hardware module can operate as an independent gain programmable, level shift adjustable, 16 channel data acquisition system specific to a sensor type. Up to eight such data acquisition modules can be combined and connected to the host PC to realize the whole system hardware. The control of data acquisition and the subsequent management of data is performed by the system's software which is coded in LabVIEW. Preliminary experimental results presented here show that the system not only has the ability to interface to various types of sensors allowing the monitoring of different types of culture parameters. Moreover, it can capture dynamic variations of culture parameters by means of real-time multi-channel measurements thus providing additional information on both temporal and spatial profiles of these parameters within a bioreactor. The system is by no means constrained in the hematopoietic stem cell culture field only. It is suitable for cell growth monitoring applications in general.

  3. The Role of State Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems in Promoting Cultural Competence and Effective Cross-Cultural Communication. Building State Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Series, Number 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sareen, Harvinder; Visencio, Diane; Russ, Shirley; Halfon, Neal

    2005-01-01

    If early childhood systems are to be effective at the population level then they must be able to provide family-centered care to all the racial, ethnic and cultural groups that they serve. Despite major policy driven and technological advances in healthcare, health disparities across different races and ethnicities persist. For example, the infant…

  4. A microfluidic co-culture system to monitor tumor-stromal interactions on a chip

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Nishanth V.; Cao, Bin; Lim, Mayasari; Kang, Yuejun

    2014-01-01

    The living cells are arranged in a complex natural environment wherein they interact with extracellular matrix and other neighboring cells. Cell-cell interactions, especially those between distinct phenotypes, have attracted particular interest due to the significant physiological relevance they can reveal for both fundamental and applied biomedical research. To study cell-cell interactions, it is necessary to develop co-culture systems, where different cell types can be cultured within the same confined space. Although the current advancement in lab-on-a-chip technology has allowed the creation of in vitro models to mimic the complexity of in vivo environment, it is still rather challenging to create such co-culture systems for easy control of different colonies of cells. In this paper, we have demonstrated a straightforward method for the development of an on-chip co-culture system. It involves a series of steps to selectively change the surface property for discriminative cell seeding and to induce cellular interaction in a co-culture region. Bone marrow stromal cells (HS5) and a liver tumor cell line (HuH7) have been used to demonstrate this co-culture model. The cell migration and cellular interaction have been analyzed using microscopy and biochemical assays. This co-culture system could be used as a disease model to obtain biological insight of pathological progression, as well as a tool to evaluate the efficacy of different drugs for pharmaceutical studies. PMID:25553194

  5. [Effects of different culture system of isolating and passage of sheep embryonic stem-like cells].

    PubMed

    Bai, Changming; Liu, Chousheng; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Xinzhuang

    2008-07-01

    In this research, we use mouse embryonic fibroblasts as feeder layers. To eliminate the influence of serum and mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) conditioned medium (ESCCM) on self-renewal of sheep embryonic stem-like cells, knockout serum replacement (KSR) was used to replace serum, then supplanted with ESCCM for the isolation and cloning of sheep embryonic stem-like cells. We found when inner cell masses (ICMs) cultured in the control group with medium supplanted with fetal bovine serum (FBS), sheep ES-like cells could not survive for more than 3 passages. However, sheep embryonic stem-like cells could remain undifferentiated for 5 passages when cultured in the medium that FBS was substituted by KSR. The result indicates that KSR culture system was more suitable for the isolation and cloning of sheep embryonic stem-like cells compared to FBS culture system. Finally we applied medium with 15% KSR as basic medium supplanted with 40% ESCCM as a new culture system to isolate sheep embryonic stem-like cells, we found one embryonic stem-like cell line still maintained undifferentiating for 8 passages, which characterized with a normal and stable karyotype and high expression of alkaline phosphatase. These results suggest that it is suitable to culture sheep ICM in the new culture system with 15% KSR as basic medium and supplanted with 40% ESCCM, which indicated that mouse ES cells might secrete factors playing important roles in promoting sheep ES-like cells' self-renewal.

  6. The Changeable Nervous System: Studies On Neuroplasticity In Cerebellar Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Seil, Fredrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Circuit reorganization after injury was studied in a cerebellar culture model. When cerebellar cultures derived from newborn mice were exposed at explantation to a preparation of cytosine arabinoside that destroyed granule cells and oligodendrocytes and compromised astrocytes, Purkinje cells surviving in greater than usual numbers were unensheathed by astrocytic processes and received twice the control number of inhibitory axosomatic synapses. Purkinje cell axon collaterals sprouted and many of their terminals formed heterotypical synapses with other Purkinje cell dendritic spines. The resulting circuit reorganization preserved inhibition in the cerebellar cortex. Following this reorganization, replacement of the missing granule cells and glia was followed by a restitution of the normal circuitry. Most of these developmental and reconstructive changes were not dependent on neuronal activity, the major exception being inhibitory synaptogenesis. The full complement of inhibitory synapses did not develop in the absence of neuronal activity, which could be mitigated by application of exogenous TrkB receptor ligands. Inhibitory synaptogenesis could also be promoted by activity-induced release of endogenous TrkB receptor ligands or by antibody activation of the TrkB receptor. PMID:24933693

  7. Lysine hydroxylation of collagen in a fibroblast cell culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uzawa, Katsuhiro; Yeowell, Heather N.; Yamamoto, Kazushi; Mochida, Yoshiyuki; Tanzawa, Hideki; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2003-01-01

    The lysine (Lys) hydroxylation pattern of type I collagen produced by human fibroblasts in culture was analyzed and compared. Fibroblasts were cultured from normal human skin (NSF), keloid (KDF), fetal skin (FDF), and skin tissues of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VIA and VIB patients (EDS-VIA and -VIB). The type I collagen alpha chains with or without non-helical telopeptides were purified from the insoluble matrix and analyzed. In comparison with NSFs, KDF and FDF showed significantly higher Lys hydroxylation, particularly in the telopeptide domains of both alpha chains. Both EDS-VIA and -VIB showed markedly lower Lys hydroxylation in the helical domains of both alpha chains whereas that in the telopeptides was comparable with those of NSFs. A similar profile was observed in the tissue sample of the EDS-VIB patient. These results demonstrate that the Lys hydroxylation pattern is domain-specific within the collagen molecule and that this method is useful to characterize the cell phenotypes in normal/pathological connective tissues.

  8. Control of galactosylated glycoforms distribution in cell culture system.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Neil A; Kowle, Ronald; Ouyang, Anli

    2014-01-01

    Cell culture process conditions including media components and bioreactor operation conditions have a profound impact on recombinant protein quality attributes. Considerable changes in the distribution of galactosylated glycoforms (G0F, G1F, and G2F) were observed across multiple CHO derived recombinant proteins in development at Eli Lilly and Company when switching to a new chemically defined (CD) media platform condition. In the new CD platform, significantly lower G0F percentages and higher G1F and G2F were observed. These changes were of interest as glycosylation heterogeneity can impact the effectiveness of a protein. A systematic investigation was done to understand the root cause of the change and control strategy for galactosylated glycoforms distribution. It was found that changes in asparagine concentration could result in a corresponding change in G0F, G1F, and G2F distribution. A follow-up study examined a wider range of asparagine concentration and it was found that G0F, G1F, and G2F percentage could be titrated by adjusting asparagine concentration. The observed changes in heterogeneity from changing asparagine concentration are due to resulting changes in ammonium metabolism. Further study ascertained that different integrated ammonium level during the cell culture process could control G0F, G1F, and G2F percentage distribution. A mechanism hypothesis is proposed that integrated ammonium level impacts intracellular pH, which further regulates β-1, 4 galactosyltransferase activity.

  9. On the Embedded Complementarity of Agent-Based and Aggregate Reasoning in Students' Developing Understanding of Dynamic Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stroup, Walter M.; Wilensky, Uri

    2014-01-01

    Placed in the larger context of broadening the engagement with systems dynamics and complexity theory in school-aged learning and teaching, this paper is intended to introduce, situate, and illustrate--with results from the use of network supported participatory simulations in classrooms--a stance we call "embedded complementarity" as an…

  10. Aggregation kinetics of human mesenchymal stem cells under wave motion.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ang-Chen; Liu, Yijun; Yuan, Xuegang; Chella, Ravindran; Ma, Teng

    2016-12-20

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are primary candidates in cell therapy and regenerative medicine but preserving their therapeutic potency following culture expansion is a significant challenge. hMSCs can spontaneously assemble into three-dimensional (3D) aggregates that enhance their regenerative properties. The present study investigated the impact of hydrodynamics conditions on hMSC aggregation kinetics under controlled rocking motion. While various laboratory methods have been developed for hMSC aggregate production, the rocking platform provides gentle mixing and can be scaled up using large bags as in wave motion bioreactors. The results show that the hMSC aggregation is mediated by cell adhesion molecules and that aggregate size distribution is influenced by seeding density, culture time, and hydrodynamic conditions. The analysis of fluid shear stress by COMSOL indicated that aggregate size distribution is inversely correlated with shear stress and that the rocking angle had a more pronounced effect on aggregate size distribution than the rocking speed due to its impact on shear stress. hMSC aggregates obtained from the bioreactor exhibit increased stemness, migratory properties, and expression of angiogenic factors. The results demonstrate the potential of the rocking platform to produce hMSC aggregates with controlled size distribution for therapeutic application.

  11. Three-dimensional chemotaxis-driven aggregation of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Puliafito, Alberto; De Simone, Alessandro; Seano, Giorgio; Gagliardi, Paolo Armando; Di Blasio, Laura; Chianale, Federica; Gamba, Andrea; Primo, Luca; Celani, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important steps in tumor progression involves the transformation from a differentiated epithelial phenotype to an aggressive, highly motile phenotype, where tumor cells invade neighboring tissues. Invasion can occur either by isolated mesenchymal cells or by aggregates that migrate collectively and do not lose completely the epithelial phenotype. Here, we show that, in a three-dimensional cancer cell culture, collective migration of cells eventually leads to aggregation in large clusters. We present quantitative measurements of cluster velocity, coalescence rates, and proliferation rates. These results cannot be explained in terms of random aggregation. Instead, a model of chemotaxis-driven aggregation – mediated by a diffusible attractant – is able to capture several quantitative aspects of our results. Experimental assays of chemotaxis towards culture conditioned media confirm this hypothesis. Theoretical and numerical results further suggest an important role for chemotactic-driven aggregation in spreading and survival of tumor cells. PMID:26471876

  12. Impact of Implementation of an Automated Liquid Culture System on Diagnosis of Tuberculous Pleurisy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Hee; Yoon, Seong Hoon; Yeo, Hye Ju; Kim, Dong Wan; Lee, Seung Eun; Cho, Woo Hyun; Lee, Su Jin; Kim, Yun Seong; Jeon, Doosoo

    2015-07-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the impact of implementation of an automated liquid culture system on the diagnosis of tuberculous pleurisy in an HIV-uninfected patient population. We retrospectively compared the culture yield, time to positivity, and contamination rate of pleural effusion samples in the BACTEC Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube 960 (MGIT) and Ogawa media among patients with tuberculous pleurisy. Out of 104 effusion samples, 43 (41.3%) were culture positive on either the MGIT or the Ogawa media. The culture yield of MGIT was higher (40.4%, 42/104) than that of Ogawa media (18.3%, 19/104) (P<0.001). One of the samples was positive only on the Ogawa medium. The median time to positivity was faster in the MGIT (18 days, range 8-32 days) than in the Ogawa media (37 days, range 20-59 days) (P<0.001). No contamination or growth of nontuberculous mycobacterium was observed on either of the culture media. In conclusion, the automated liquid culture system could provide approximately twice as high yields and fast results in effusion culture, compared to solid media. Supplemental solid media may have a limited impact on maximizing sensitivity in effusion culture; however, further studies are required.

  13. Dynamics of proteins aggregation. I. Universal scaling in unbounded media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Size; Javidpour, Leili; Shing, Katherine S.; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    It is well understood that in some cases proteins do not fold correctly and, depending on their environment, even properly-folded proteins change their conformation spontaneously, taking on a misfolded state that leads to protein aggregation and formation of large aggregates. An important factor that contributes to the aggregation is the interactions between the misfolded proteins. Depending on the aggregation environment, the aggregates may take on various shapes forming larger structures, such as protein plaques that are often toxic. Their deposition in tissues is a major contributing factor to many neuro-degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and prion. This paper represents the first part in a series devoted to molecular simulation of protein aggregation. We use the PRIME, a meso-scale model of proteins, together with extensive discontinuous molecular dynamics simulation to study the aggregation process in an unbounded fluid system, as the first step toward MD simulation of the same phenomenon in crowded cellular environments. Various properties of the aggregates have been computed, including dynamic evolution of aggregate-size distribution, mean aggregate size, number of peptides that contribute to the formation of β sheets, number of various types of hydrogen bonds formed in the system, radius of gyration of the aggregates, and the aggregates' diffusivity. We show that many of such quantities follow dynamic scaling, similar to those for aggregation of colloidal clusters. In particular, at long times the mean aggregate size S(t) grows with time as, S(t) ˜ tz, where z is the dynamic exponent. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the qualitative similarity between aggregation of proteins and colloidal aggregates has been pointed out.

  14. Pathway Aggregation in the Risk Assessment of Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR&PP) of Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Aldemir, Tunc; Denning, Richard; Catalyurek, Umit; Yilmaz, Alper; Yue, Meng; Cheng, Lap-Yan

    2015-01-23

    The framework for Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR & PP) evaluation is to define a set of challenges, to obtain the system responses, and to assess the outcomes. The assessment of outcomes heavily relies on pathways, defined as sequences of events or actions that could potentially be followed by a State or a group of individuals in order to achieve a proliferation objective, with the defined threats as initiating events. There may be large number of segments connecting pathway stages (e.g. acquisition, processing, and fabrication for PR) which can lead to even larger number of pathways or scenarios through possible different combinations of segment connections, each with associated probabilities contributing to the overall risk. Clustering of these scenarios in specified stage attribute intervals is important for their tractable analysis and outcome assessment. A software tool for scenario generation and clustering (OSUPR) is developed that utilizes the PRCALC code developed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory for scenario generation and the K- means, mean shift and adaptive mean shift algorithms as possible clustering schemes. The results of the study using the Example Sodium Fast Breeder as an example system show that clustering facilitates the probabilistic or deterministic analysis of scenarios to identify system vulnerabilities and communication of the major risk contributors to stakeholders. The results of the study also show that the mean shift algorithm has the most potential for assisting the analysis of the scenarios generated by PRCALC.

  15. Kinetic studies on the aggregation of Aspergillus niger conidia.

    PubMed

    Grimm, L H; Kelly, S; Hengstler, J; Göbel, A; Krull, R; Hempel, D C

    2004-07-20

    Morphology has a crucial effect on productivity and the supply of substrate for cultures of filamentous fungi. However, cultivation parameters leading to the desired morphology are often chosen empirically as the mechanisms governing the processes involved are usually unknown. For coagulating microorganisms like Aspergillus niger the morphological development is considered to start with the aggregation of conidia right after inoculation. To elucidate the mechanism of this process, kinetic studies were carried out using an in-line particle size analyzer. Based on the data obtained from these experiments a model for conidial aggregation is proposed in this article. It consists of two separate aggregation steps. The first one takes place immediately after inoculation, but only leads to a small decrease of total particle concentration. Most suspended conidia aggregate after a second aggregation step triggered by germination and hyphal growth. Aggregation velocity of this second phase is linearly dependent on the particle growth rate.

  16. A novel method for toxicology: in vitro culture system of a rat preantral follicle.

    PubMed

    Wan Xuying; Zhu Jiangbo; Zhu Yuping; Xili, Ma; Liu Zhen; Wang Fei; Xu Guifeng; Zhang Tianbao

    2011-08-01

    Preantral follicle in vitro culture systems have been successfully or nearly successfully established for sheep, pig and mouse, and applied on follicle development and regulation research on reproductive biology and physiology. However, there have been few studies concerning rat preantral follicle in vitro development. The objective is to establish an in vitro culture system for rat preantral follicles which can be used for reproductive biology and toxicology research. Rat preantral follicles are mechanically separated, cultured in vitro in single follicle mode for continuous 12 days using 96-well plates, and then administrated ovulation induction. The observation on follicle development, hormone level, and ovum formation are recorded and assessed. Taking in vivo growth and in vitro maturation of oocytes group as control group, in vitro growth and maturation of oocytes group is assessed to see whether this in vitro culture method is successful. The conditions for rat follicle culture are determined based on the mouse pre-antral follicle culture. The in vitro culture system for rat preantral follicles established in this study is feasible and successful, and can serve as model for reproductive biology and toxicology research.

  17. Spatially monitoring oxygen level in 3D microfabricated cell culture systems using optical oxygen sensing beads.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Acosta, Miguel A; Leach, Jennie B; Carrier, Rebecca L

    2013-04-21

    Capability of measuring and monitoring local oxygen concentration at the single cell level (tens of microns scale) is often desirable but difficult to achieve in cell culture. In this study, biocompatible oxygen sensing beads were prepared and tested for their potential for real-time monitoring and mapping of local oxygen concentration in 3D micro-patterned cell culture systems. Each oxygen sensing bead is composed of a silica core loaded with both an oxygen sensitive Ru(Ph2phen3)Cl2 dye and oxygen insensitive Nile blue reference dye, and a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) shell rendering biocompatibility. Human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells were cultivated on a series of PDMS and type I collagen based substrates patterned with micro-well arrays for 3 or 7 days, and then brought into contact with oxygen sensing beads. Using an image analysis algorithm to convert florescence intensity of beads to partial oxygen pressure in the culture system, tens of microns-size oxygen sensing beads enabled the spatial measurement of local oxygen concentration in the microfabricated system. Results generally indicated lower oxygen level inside wells than on top of wells, and local oxygen level dependence on structural features of cell culture surfaces. Interestingly, chemical composition of cell culture substrates also appeared to affect oxygen level, with type-I collagen based cell culture systems having lower oxygen concentration compared to PDMS based cell culture systems. In general, results suggest that oxygen sensing beads can be utilized to achieve real-time and local monitoring of micro-environment oxygen level in 3D microfabricated cell culture systems.

  18. Aggregation of organic matter by pelagic tunicates

    SciTech Connect

    Pomeroy, L.R.; Deibel, D.

    1980-07-01

    Three genera of pelagic tunicates were fed concentrates of natural seston and an axenic diatom culture. Fresh and up to 4-day-old feces resemble flocculent organic aggregates containing populations of microorganisms, as described from highly productive parts of the ocean, and older feces resemble the nearly sterile flocculent aggregates which are ubiquitous in surface waters. Fresh feces consist of partially digested phytoplankton and other inclusions in an amorphous gelatinous matrix. After 18 to 36 h, a population of large bacteria develops in the matrix and in some of the remains of phytoplankton contained in the feces. From 48 to 96 h, protozoan populations arise which consume the bacteria and sometimes the remains of the phytoplankton in the feces. Thereafter only a sparse population of microorganisms remains, and the particles begin to fragment. Water samples taken in or below dense populations of salps and doliolids contained greater numbers of flocculent aggregates than did samples from adjacent stations.

  19. F-actin aggregates in transformed cells

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Polymerized actin has been found aggregated into distinctive patches inside transformed cells in culture. The F-actin-specific fluorescent probe, nitrobenzoxadiazole-phallacidin, labels these F-actin aggregates near the ventral cell surface of cells transformed by RNA or DNA tumor viruses, or by chemical mutagens, or spontaneously. Their appearance in all eight transformed cell types studied suggests their ubiquity and involvement in transformation morphology. Actin patches developed in normal rat kidney (NRK) cells transformed by a temperature-sensitive mutant of Rous sarcoma virus (LA23-NRK) within 30 min after a shift from the nonpermissive (39 degrees C) to the permissive temperature (32 degrees C). Patch appearance paralleling viral src gene expression tends to implicate pp60src kinase activity in destabilizing the cytoskeleton. However, appearance of the actin aggregates in cells not transformed by retrovirus calls for alternative mechanisms, perhaps involving an endogenous kinase, for this apparently common trait. PMID:6270163

  20. Protein aggregation in a membrane environment.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Galyna; Trusova, Valeriya

    2011-01-01

    Biological membranes are featured by a remarkable ability to modulate a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. Of these, protein aggregation is currently receiving the greatest attention, as one type of the ordered protein aggregates, amyloid fibrils, proved to be involved in molecular etiology of a number of fatal diseases. It has been hypothesized that nucleation of amyloid fibrils and toxic action of their precursors is mediated by lipid-protein interactions. Lipid bilayer provides a variety of environments in which aggregated state of polypeptide chain appears to be more thermodynamically favorable than its monomeric form. The major factors responsible for the enhanced self-association propensity of membrane-bound proteins include (i) structural transition of polypeptide chain into aggregation-prone conformation; (ii) protein crowding in a lipid phase; (iii) particular aggregation-favoring orientation and bilayer embedment of the protein molecules. All these factors are considered in the present review with an emphasis being put on the role of electrostatic, hydrophobic, and hydrogen-bonding phenomena in initiating and modulating the protein aggregation on a membrane template. Likewise, we survey the advanced experimental techniques employed for detection and structural characterization of the aggregated species in membrane systems.

  1. Liver tissue engineering based on aggregate assembly: efficient formation of endothelialized rat hepatocyte aggregates and their immobilization with biodegradable fibres.

    PubMed

    Pang, Y; Montagne, K; Shinohara, M; Komori, K; Sakai, Y

    2012-12-01

    To realize long-term in vitro culture of hepatocytes at a high density while maintaining a high hepatic function for aggregate-based liver tissue engineering, we report here a novel culture method whereby endothelialized rat hepatocyte aggregates were formed using a PDMS microwell device and cultured in a perfusion bioreactor by introducing spacers between aggregates to improve oxygen and nutrient supply. Primary rat hepatocyte aggregates around 100 µm in diameter coated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells were spontaneously and quickly formed after 12 h of incubation, thanks to the continuous supply of oxygen by diffusion through the PDMS honeycomb microwell device. Then, the recovered endothelialized rat hepatocyte aggregates were mixed with biodegradable poly-l-lactic acid fibres in suspension and packed into a PDMS-based bioreactor. Perfusion culture of 7 days was successfully achieved with more than 73.8% cells retained in the bioreactor. As expected, the fibres acted as spacers between aggregates, which was evidenced from the enhanced albumin production and more spherical morphology compared with fibre-free packing. In summary, this study shows the advantages of using PDMS-based microwells to form heterotypic aggregates and also demonstrates the feasibility of spacing tissue elements for improving oxygen and nutrient supply to tissue engineering based on modular assembly.

  2. Investigating Educational Systems, Leadership, and School Culture: A Holistic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Jill Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Most populous school districts operate using a bureaucratic hierarchical organizational structure developed primarily for industry, a system structure that has remained intact for a century despite evolving from a manufacturing to a knowledge-based economy. Although strong for efficiency, this system structure is resistant to change and promotes…

  3. Tissue culture system using a PANDA ring resonator and wavelength router for hydroponic plant.

    PubMed

    Kamoldilok, Surachart; Suwanpayak, Nathaporn; Suttirak, Saisudawan; Yupapin, Preecha P

    2012-06-01

    A novel system of nanofluidics trapping and delivery, which is known as a tissue culture system is proposed. By using the intense optical pulse(i.e., a soliton pulse) and a system constructed by a liquid core waveguide, the optical vortices (gradient optical fields/wells) can be generated, where the trapping tools in the same way as the optical tweezers in the PANDA ring resonator can be formed. By controlling the suitable parameters, the intense optical vortices can be generated within the PANDA ring resonator, in which the nanofluidics can be trapped and moved (transported) dynamically within the Tissue culture system(a wavelength router), which can be used for tissue culture and delivery in the hydroponic plant system.

  4. Acid-switched Eu(III) coordination inside reverse aggregates: Insights into a synergistic liquid-liquid extraction system

    DOE PAGES

    Ellis, Ross J.

    2016-08-09

    Determining the structure of complex solutions bearing metal ions is challenging, but crucial for developing important technologies such as liquid-liquid extraction for metal refining and separation purposes. Herein, the structure of an organic Eu(III) solution consisting a binary mixture of lipophilic ligands di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid (HDEHP) and tetraoctyl diglycolamide (TODGA) in dodecane is studied using synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). This system is of technological importance in f-element separation for nuclear fuel cycle applications, where extraction is controlled by varying nitric acid concentration. Extraction is promoted at low and high concentration, butmore » is retarded at intermediate concentration, leading to a U-shaped function; the structural origins of which we investigate. At the nanoscale, the solution is apparently comprised of reverse micelles with polar cores of approximately 1 nm in size, and these remain virtually unchanged as acid concentration is varied. Inside the polar cores, the coordination environment of Eu(III) switches from a 9-coordinate [Eu(TODGA)3]3+ motif at high acid, to a 6-coordinate HDEHP-dominated complex resembling Eu(HDEHP·DEHP)3 at low acid. The results show that extraction is controlled within the coordination sphere, where it is promoted under conditions that favor coordination of either one of the two organic ligands, but is retarded under conditions that encourage mixed complexes. Lastly, our results link solution structure with ion transport properties in a technologically-important liquid-liquid ion extraction system.« less

  5. Acid-switched Eu(III) coordination inside reverse aggregates: Insights into a synergistic liquid-liquid extraction system

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Ross J.

    2016-08-09

    Determining the structure of complex solutions bearing metal ions is challenging, but crucial for developing important technologies such as liquid-liquid extraction for metal refining and separation purposes. Herein, the structure of an organic Eu(III) solution consisting a binary mixture of lipophilic ligands di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid (HDEHP) and tetraoctyl diglycolamide (TODGA) in dodecane is studied using synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). This system is of technological importance in f-element separation for nuclear fuel cycle applications, where extraction is controlled by varying nitric acid concentration. Extraction is promoted at low and high concentration, but is retarded at intermediate concentration, leading to a U-shaped function; the structural origins of which we investigate. At the nanoscale, the solution is apparently comprised of reverse micelles with polar cores of approximately 1 nm in size, and these remain virtually unchanged as acid concentration is varied. Inside the polar cores, the coordination environment of Eu(III) switches from a 9-coordinate [Eu(TODGA)3]3+ motif at high acid, to a 6-coordinate HDEHP-dominated complex resembling Eu(HDEHP·DEHP)3 at low acid. The results show that extraction is controlled within the coordination sphere, where it is promoted under conditions that favor coordination of either one of the two organic ligands, but is retarded under conditions that encourage mixed complexes. Lastly, our results link solution structure with ion transport properties in a technologically-important liquid-liquid ion extraction system.

  6. Design and Implementation of an Automated Illuminating, Culturing, and Sampling System for Microbial Optogenetic Applications.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Cameron J; McClean, Megan N

    2017-02-19

    Optogenetic systems utilize genetically-encoded proteins that change conformation in response to specific wavelengths of light to alter cellular processes. There is a need for culturing and measuring systems that incorporate programmed illumination and stimulation of optogenetic systems. We present a protocol for building and using a continuous culturing apparatus to illuminate microbial cells with programmed doses of light, and automatically acquire and analyze images of cells in the effluent. The operation of this apparatus as a chemostat allows the growth rate and the cellular environment to be tightly controlled. The effluent of the continuous cell culture is regularly sampled and the cells are imaged by multi-channel microscopy. The culturing, sampling, imaging, and image analysis are fully automated so that dynamic responses in the fluorescence intensity and cellular morphology of cells sampled from the culture effluent are measured over multiple days without user input. We demonstrate the utility of this culturing apparatus by dynamically inducing protein production in a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered with an optogenetic system that activates transcription.

  7. Evaluation of a hybrid artificial liver module based on a spheroid culture system of embryonic stem cell-derived hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Mizumoto, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Shunsuke; Matsumoto, Kinya; Ikeda, Kaoru; Kusumi, Tomoaki; Inamori, Masakazu; Nakazawa, Kohji; Ijima, Hiroyuki; Funatsu, Kazumori; Kajiwara, Toshihisa

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid artificial liver (HAL) is an extracorporeal circulation system comprised of a bioreactor containing immobilized functional liver cells. It is expected to not only serve as a temporary liver function support system, but also to accelerate liver regeneration in recovery from hepatic failure. One of the most difficult problems in developing a hybrid artificial liver is obtaining an adequate cell source. In this study, we attempt to differentiate embryonic stem (ES) cells by hepatic lineage using a polyurethane foam (PUF)/spheroid culture in which the cultured cells spontaneously form spherical multicellular aggregates (spheroids) in the pores of the PUF. We also demonstrate the feasibility of the PUF-HAL system by comparing ES cells to primary hepatocytes in in vitro and ex vivo experiments. Mouse ES cells formed multicellular spheroids in the pores of PUF. ES cells expressed liver-specific functions (ammonia removal and albumin secretion) after treatment with the differentiation-promoting agent, sodium butyrate (SB). We designed a PUF-HAL module comprised of a cylindrical PUF block with many medium-flow capillaries for hepatic differentiation of ES cells. The PUF-HAL module cells expressed ammonia removal and albumin secretion functions after 2 weeks of SB culture. Because of high proliferative activity of ES cells and high cell density, the maximum expression level of albumin secretion function per unit volume of module was comparable to that seen in primary mouse hepatocyte culture. In the animal experiments with rats, the PUF-HAL differentiating ES cells appeared to partially contribute to recovery from liver failure. This outcome indicates that the PUF module containing differentiating ES cells may be a useful biocomponent of a hybrid artificial liver support system.

  8. Mixed culture polyhydroxyalkanoates production from sugar molasses: the use of a 2-stage CSTR system for culture selection.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, M G E; Concas, S; Bengtsson, S; Reis, M A M

    2010-09-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are promising biodegradable polymers. The use of mixed microbial cultures (MMC) and low cost feedstocks have a positive impact on the cost-effectiveness of the process. It has typically been carried out in Sequencing Batch Reactors (SBR). In this study, a 2-stage CSTR system (under Feast and Famine conditions) was used to effectively select for PHA-storing organisms using fermented molasses as feedstock. The effect of influent substrate concentration (60-120 Cmmol VFA/L) and HRT ratio between the reactors (0.2-0.5h/h) on the system's selection efficiency was assessed. It was shown that Feast reactor residual substrate concentration impacted on the selective pressure for PHA storage (due to substrate-dependent kinetic limitation). Moreover, a residual substrate concentration coming from the Feast to the Famine reactor did not jeopardize the physiological adaptation required for enhanced PHA storage. The culture reached a maximum PHA content of 61%. This success opens new perspectives to the use of wastewater treatment infrastructure for PHA production, thus valorizing either excess sludge or wastewaters.

  9. Development of 3-D Hydrogel Culture Systems With On-Demand Cell Separation

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Sharon K.; Bloodworth, Nathaniel C.; Massad, Christopher S.; Hammoudi, Taymour M.; Suri, Shalu; Yang, Peter J.; Lu, Hang; Temenoff, Johnna S.

    2013-01-01

    Recently there has been an increased interest in the effects of paracrine signaling between groups of cells, particularly in the context of better understanding how stem cells contribute to tissue repair. Most current 3-D co-culture methods lack the ability to effectively separate 2 cell populations after the culture period, which is important for simultaneously analyzing the reciprocal effects of each cell type on the other. Here, we detail the development of a 3-D hydrogel co-culture system that allows us to culture different cell types for up to 7 days and subsequently separate and isolate the different cell populations using enzyme-sensitive glues. Separable 3-D co-culture laminates were prepared by laminating PEG-based hydrogels with enzyme-degradable hydrogel adhesives. Encapsulated cell populations exhibited good segregation with well-defined interfaces. Furthermore, constructs can be separated on-demand upon addition of the appropriate enzyme and cell viability remains high throughout the culture period, even after laminate separation. This platform offers great potential for a variety of basic cell signaling studies as the incorporation of an enzyme-sensitive adhesive interface allows the on-demand separation of individual cell populations for immediate analysis or further culture to examine persistence of co-culture effects and paracrine signaling on cell populations. PMID:23447378

  10. Glycoprotein secretion in a tracheal organ culture system

    SciTech Connect

    Warunek, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    Glycoprotein secretion in the rat trachea was studied in vitro, utilizing a modified, matrix embed/perfusion chamber. Baseline parameters of the culture environment were determined by enzymatic and biochemical procedures. The effect of pilocarpine on the release of labelled glycoproteins from the tracheal epithelium was assessed. After a single stimulation with the drug, there was a significant increase in the release of /sup 14/C-glucosamine and /sup 3/H-fucose-labelled glycoprotein. The response was dose-dependent. Similar results were obtained after a second exposure to pilocarpine. However, no dose response was observed. Morphological analyses of the tracheal epithelial secretory cells by Alcian Blue/Periodic Acid Schiff staining showed a significant decrease in the total number of Alcian Blue staining cells and an increase in the mixed cell population after a single exposure to pilocarpine. Second stimulation with the drug showed that the trachea was able to respond again, this time with a further decrease in the number of Alcian Blue staining cells and a decrease in the PAS staining cells as well. Carbohydrate analyses after the first simulation with pilocarpine showed increased levels of N-acetyl neuraminic acid and the neutral carbohydrates, fucose and galactose, in the precipitated glycoproteins.

  11. Seasonal variability of soil aggregate stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohoskova, M.; Kodesova, R.; Jirku, V.; Zigova, A.; Kozak, J.

    2009-04-01

    Seasonal variability of soil properties measured in surface horizons of three soil types (Haplic Luvisol, Greyic Phaeozem, Haplic Cambisol) was studied in years 2007 and 2008. Undisturbed and disturbed soil samples were taken every month to evaluate field water content, bulk density, porosity, ration of gravitational and capillary pores, pHKCl and pHH2O, organic matter content and its quality, aggregate stability using WSA index. In addition, micromorphological features of soil aggregates were studied in thin soil sections that were made from undisturbed large soil aggregates. Results showed that soil aggregate stability depended on stage of the root zone development, soil management and climatic conditions. Larger aggregate stabilities and also larger ranges of measure values were obtained in the year 2007 then those measured in 2008. This was probably caused by lower precipitations and consequently lower soil water contents observed in 2007 than those measured in 2008. The highest aggregate stability was measured at the end of April in the years 2007 and 2008 in Haplic Luvisol and Greyic Phaeozem, and at the end of June in the year 2007 and at the beginning of June in 2008 in Haplic Cambisol. In all cases aggregate stability increased during the root growth and then gradually decreased due to summer rainfall events. Aggregate stability reflected aggregate structure and soil pore system development, which was documented on micromorphological images and evaluated using the ration of gravitational and capillary pores measured on the undisturbed sol samples. Acknowledgement: Authors acknowledge the financial support of the Grant Agency of the Czech Republic grant No. 526/08/0434, and the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports grant No. MSM 6046070901.

  12. In Vivo Bone Regeneration Using Tubular Perfusion System Bioreactor Cultured Nanofibrous Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Yeatts, Andrew B.; Both, Sanne K.; Yang, Wanxun; Alghamdi, Hamdan S.; Yang, Fang; Jansen, John A.

    2014-01-01

    The use of bioreactors for the in vitro culture of constructs for bone tissue engineering has become prevalent as these systems may improve the growth and differentiation of a cultured cell population. Here we utilize a tubular perfusion system (TPS) bioreactor for the in vitro culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and implant the cultured constructs into rat femoral condyle defects. Using nanofibrous electrospun poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/poly(ɛ-caprolactone) scaffolds, hMSCs were cultured for 10 days in vitro in the TPS bioreactor with cellular and acellular scaffolds cultured statically for 10 days as a control. After 3 and 6 weeks of in vivo culture, explants were removed and subjected to histomorphometric analysis. Results indicated more rapid bone regeneration in defects implanted with bioreactor cultured scaffolds with a new bone area of 1.23±0.35 mm2 at 21 days compared to 0.99±0.43 mm2 and 0.50±0.29 mm2 in defects implanted with statically cultured scaffolds and acellular scaffolds, respectively. At the 21 day timepoint, statistical differences (p<0.05) were only observed between defects implanted with cell containing scaffolds and the acellular control. After 42 days, however, defects implanted with TPS cultured scaffolds had the greatest new bone area with 1.72±0.40 mm2. Defects implanted with statically cultured and acellular scaffolds had a new bone area of 1.26±0.43 mm2 and 1.19±0.33 mm2, respectively. The increase in bone growth observed in defects implanted with TPS cultured scaffolds was statistically significant (p<0.05) when compared to both the static and acellular groups at this timepoint. This study demonstrates the efficacy of the TPS bioreactor to improve bone tissue regeneration and highlights the benefits of utilizing perfusion bioreactor systems to culture MSCs for bone tissue engineering. PMID:23865551

  13. System for measuring oxygen consumption rates of mammalian cells in static culture under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Yuki; Miyahara, Hirotaka; Ota, Yuri; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Estimating the oxygen consumption rates (OCRs) of mammalian cells in hypoxic environments is essential for designing and developing a three-dimensional (3-D) cell culture system. However, OCR measurements under hypoxic conditions are infrequently reported in the literature. Here, we developed a system for measuring OCRs at low oxygen levels. The system injects nitrogen gas into the environment and measures the oxygen concentration by an optical oxygen microsensor that consumes no oxygen. The developed system was applied to HepG2 cells in static culture. Specifically, we measured the spatial profiles of the local dissolved oxygen concentration in the medium, then estimated the OCRs of the cells. The OCRs, and also the pericellular oxygen concentrations, decreased nonlinearly as the oxygen partial pressure in the environment decreased from 19% to 1%. The OCRs also depended on the culture period and the matrix used for coating the dish surface. Using this system, we can precisely estimate the OCRs of various cell types under environments that mimic 3-D culture conditions, contributing crucial data for an efficient 3-D culture system design.

  14. Living between two worlds: two-phase culture systems for producing plant secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Malik, Sonia; Hossein Mirjalili, Mohammad; Fett-Neto, Arthur Germano; Mazzafera, Paulo; Bonfill, Mercedes

    2013-03-01

    The two-phase culture system is an important in vitro strategy to increase the production of secondary metabolites (SMs) by providing an enhanced release of these compounds from plant cells. Whereas the first phase supports cell growth, the second phase provides an additional site or acts as a metabolic sink for the accumulation of SMs and also reduces feedback inhibition. This review is focused on several aspects of the two-phase culture system and aims to show the diverse possibilities of employing this technique for the in vitro production of SMs from plant cells. Depending on the material used in the secondary phase, two-phase culture systems can be broadly categorised as liquid-liquid or liquid-solid. The choice of material for the second phase depends on the type of compound to be recovered and the compatibility with the other phase. Different factors affecting the efficiency of two-phase culture systems include the choice of material for the secondary phase, its concentration, volume, and time of addition. Factors such as cell elicitation, immobilization, and permeabilization, have been suggested as important strategies to make the two-phase culture system practically reliable on a commercial scale. Since there are many possibilities for designing a two-phase system, more detailed studies are needed to broaden the range of secondary phases compatible with the various plant species producing SMs with potential applications, mainly in the food and pharmacology industries.

  15. Systems analysis of the culture physiology in acetone-butanol fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Yerushaimi, L.; Volesky, B.; Votruba, J.

    1986-09-01

    The pronounced differences in performance of a strain of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 were analyzed by the method of systems analysis. The mechanism for cellular transport of substrate (glucose), solvents, and acids was studied and mathematically formulated. The systems analysis approach in the treatment of data from culture experiments pointed out the cell membrane malfunction indicated by its altered permeability and reflected in the altered number of active sugar transport sites. Experimental results obtained from the study of the cell uptake of 3-0-methyl glucose (0.7 mM) by the normal culture and the retarded culture confirmed the theoretical predictions regarding a slower transport in the retarded culture. The initial uptake rate and the accumulation coefficient of the sugar in the normal culture were 15.0 and 4.1 times higher, respectively, than those for the retarded culture. Adjustment of the culture pH resulted in further increases in these parameters by factors of 3.0 and 3.5, respectively.

  16. Dynamic cell culture system: a new cell cultivation instrument for biological experiments in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gmunder, F. K.; Nordau, C. G.; Tschopp, A.; Huber, B.; Cogoli, A.

    1988-01-01

    The prototype of a miniaturized cell cultivation instrument for animal cell culture experiments aboard Spacelab is presented (Dynamic cell culture system: DCCS). The cell chamber is completely filled and has a working volume of 200 microliters. Medium exchange is achieved with a self-powered osmotic pump (flowrate 1 microliter h-1). The reservoir volume of culture medium is 230 microliters. The system is neither mechanically stirred nor equipped with sensors. Hamster kidney (Hak) cells growing on Cytodex 3 microcarriers were used to test the biological performance of the DCCS. Growth characteristics in the DCCS, as judged by maximal cell density, glucose consumption, lactic acid secretion and pH, were similar to those in cell culture tubes.

  17. Organ Culture as a Model System for Studies on Enterotoxin Interactions with the Intestinal Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, Ulver Spangsberg; Hansen, Gert H; Danielsen, E Michael

    2016-01-01

    Studies on bacterial enterotoxin-epithelium interactions require model systems capable of mimicking the events occurring at the molecular and cellular levels during intoxication. In this chapter, we describe organ culture as an often neglected alternative to whole-animal experiments or enterocyte-like cell lines. Like cell culture, organ culture is versatile and suitable for studying rapidly occurring events, such as enterotoxin binding and uptake. In addition, it is advantageous in offering an epithelium with more authentic permeability/barrier properties than any cell line, as well as a subepithelial lamina propria, harboring the immune cells of the gut mucosa.

  18. Technology meets aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.; Swan, C.

    2007-07-01

    New technology carried out at Tufts University and the University of Massachusetts on synthetic lightweight aggregate has created material from various qualities of fly ash from coal-fired power plants for use in different engineered applications. In pilot scale manufacturing tests an 'SLA' containing 80% fly ash and 20% mixed plastic waste from packaging was produced by 'dry blending' mixed plastic with high carbon fly ash. A trial run was completed to produce concrete masonry unit (CMU) blocks at a full-scale facility. It has been shown that SLA can be used as a partial substitution of a traditional stone aggregate in hot asphalt mix. 1 fig., 2 photos.

  19. Structure and Dynamics of Anaerobic Bacterial Aggregates in a Gas-Lift Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Beeftink, H. H.; Staugaard, P.

    1986-01-01

    Anaerobic mixed-culture aggregates, which converted glucose to acetic, propionic, butyric, and valeric acids, were formed under controlled conditions of substrate feed (carbon limitation) and hydraulic regimen. The continuous-flow system used (anaerobic gas-lift reactor) was designed to retain bacterial aggregates in a well-mixed reactor. Carrier availability (i.e., liquid-suspended sand grains) proved necessary for bacterial aggregate formation from individual cells during reactor start-up. Electron microscopic examination revealed that incipient colonization of sand grains by bacteria from the bulk liquid occurred in surface irregularities, conceivably reflecting local quiescence. Subsequent confluent biofilm formation on sand grains proved to be unstable, however. Substrate depletion in the bulk liquid is assumed to weaken deeper parts of the biofilm due to cellular lysis, after which production of gas bubbles and liquid shearing forces cause sloughing. The resulting fragments, although sand free, were nevertheless large enough to be retained in the reactor and gradually grew larger through bacterial growth and by clumping together with other fragments. In the final steady state, high cell densities were maintained in the form of aggregates, while sand had virtually disappeared due to sampling losses and wash-out. Numerical cell densities within aggregates ranged from 1012/ml at the periphery to very low values in the center. The cells were enmeshed in a polymer matrix containing polysaccharides; nevertheless, carbon sufficiency was not a prerequisite to sustain high hold-up ratios. Images PMID:16347213

  20. Condensation versus diffusion. A spatial-scale-independent theory of aggregate structures in edible oils: applications to model systems and commercial shortenings studied via rheology and USAXS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pink, David A.; Peyronel, Fernanda; Quinn, Bonnie; Singh, Pratham; Marangoni, Alejandro G.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding how solid fats structures come about in edible oils and quantifying their structures is of fundamental importance in developing edible oils with pre-selected characteristics. We considered the great range of fractal dimensions, from 1.91 to 2.90, reported from rheological measurements. We point out that, if the structures arise via DLA/RLA or DLCA/RLCA, as has been established using ultra small angle x-ray scattering (USAXS), we would expect fractal dimensions in the range ~1.7 to 2.1, and ~2.5 or ~3.0. We present new data for commercial fats and show that the fractal dimensions deduced lie outside these values. We have developed a model in which competition between two processes can lead to the range of fractal dimensions observed. The two processes are (i) the rate at which the solid fat particles are created as the temperature is decreased, and (ii) the rate at which these particles diffuse, thereby meeting and forming aggregates. We assumed that aggregation can take place essentially isotropically and we identified two characteristic times: a time characterizing the rate of creation of solid fats, {τ\\text{create}}(T)\\equiv 1/{{R}S}(T) , where {{R}S}(T) is the rate of solid condensation (cm3 s-1), and the diffusion time of solid fats, {τ\\text{diff}}≤ft(T,{{c}S}\\right)=< {{r}2}> /6{D}≤ft(T,{{c}S}\\right) , where {D}≤ft(T,{{c}S}\\right) is their diffusion coefficient and < {{r}2}> is the typical average distance that fats must move in order to aggregate. The intent of this model is to show that a simple process can lead to a wide range of fractal dimensions. We showed that in the limit of very fast solid creation, {τ\\text{create}}\\ll {τ\\text{diff}} the fractal dimension is predicted to be that of DLCA, ~1.7, relaxing to that of RLCA, 2.0-2.1, and that in the limit of very slow solid creation, {τ\\text{create}}\\gg {τ\\text{diff}} , the fractal dimension is predicted to be that obtained via DLA, ~2.5, relaxing to that of RLA, 3

  1. Evaluation of two formulations containing mineral trioxide aggregate on delayed tooth replantation: relevance of RANKL/RANK/OPG system.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Beatriz Farias; Souza, Carlos Eduardo Chrzanowski Pereira; Silva, Daniela Nascimento; Etges, Adriana; Campos, Maria Martha

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of White MTA (WMTA) and MTA Fillapex(®) on root resorption, when used for root canal filling, in a rat model of delayed tooth replantation, with special focus on the RANKL/RANK/OPG system. Maxillary right central incisors of male rats were extracted (total N = 48), and exposed to dry environment for 30 min. The animals were allocated into four groups: (1) WMTA; (2) MTA Fillapex; (3) Calcium hydroxide; (4) Negative control. After periodontal ligament removal, root canals were filled with the corresponding material and replanted. After 10 and 60 days, qualitative and semi-quantitative histological and immunohistochemical analyses were carried out. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Tukey's post hoc adjustment was used, at 10 and 60 days, to compare the experimental groups in terms of the inflammatory scores and in terms of the changes in OPG, RANK and RANKL. Both WMTA and MTA Fillapex groups displayed inflammatory and replacement resorption, with the presence of dento-alveolar ankylosis, similarly to that observed for calcium hydroxide, in either 10 or 60 days. Notably, a slight increase of the inflammatory process was observed in both MTA groups. Quantitatively, inflammation score analysis showed a significant difference between the calcium hydroxide and the control group at 10 days. On 60 days, dento-alveolar ankylosis was found significantly increased in the MTA Fillapex, in comparison to the control group (p < 0.05). For immunohistochemical analysis, the expression of both RANK and RANKL was reduced in calcium hydroxide and WMTA groups, from 10 to 60 days of evaluation, an effect that was accompanied by increased OPG immunolabelling. Otherwise, the MTA Fillapex group presented a general increase of RANKL immunopositivity, similarly to that observed in the negative control group. Our data showed that none of tested materials was able to fully prevent the root resorption, although the white MTA cement presented an outcome

  2. Gibberellic acid production by free and immobilized cells in different culture systems.

    PubMed

    Durán-Páramo, Enrique; Molina-Jiménez, Héctor; Brito-Arias, Marco A; Robles-Martínez, Fabián

    2004-01-01

    Gibberellic acid production was studied in different fermentation systems. Free and immobilized cells of Gibberella fujikuroi cultures in shake-flask, stirred and fixed-bed reactors were evaluated for the production of gibberellic acid (GA3). Gibberellic acid production with free cells cultured in a stirred reactor reached 0.206 g/L and a yield of 0.078 g of GA3/g biomass.

  3. Aggregation of Sea Urchin Phagocytes Is Augmented In Vitro by Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Majeske, Audrey J.; Bayne, Christopher J.; Smith, L. Courtney

    2013-01-01

    Development of protocols and media for culturing immune cells from marine invertebrates has not kept pace with advancements in mammalian immune cell culture, the latter having been driven by the need to understand the causes of and develop therapies for human and animal diseases. However, expansion of the aquaculture industry and the diseases that threaten these systems creates the need to develop cell and tissue culture methods for marine invertebrates. Such methods will enable us to better understand the causes of disease outbreaks and to develop means to avoid and remedy epidemics. We report a method for the short-term culture of phagocytes from the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, by modifying an approach previously used to culture cells from another sea urchin species. The viability of cultured phagocytes from the purple sea urchin decreases from 91.6% to 57% over six days and phagocyte morphology changes from single cells to aggregates leading to the formation of syncytia-like structures. This process is accelerated in the presence of lipopolysaccharide suggesting that phagocytes are capable of detecting this molecular pattern in culture conditions. Sea urchin immune response proteins, called Sp185/333, are expressed on the surface of a subset of phagocytes and have been associated with syncytia-like structures. We evaluated their expression in cultured phagocytes to determine their possible role in cell aggregation and in the formation of syncytia-like structures. Between 0 and 3 hr, syncytia-like structures were observed in cultures when only ∼10% of the cells were positive for Sp185/333 proteins. At 24 hr, ∼90% of the nuclei were Sp185/333-positive when all of the phagocytes had aggregated into syncytia-like structures. Consequently, we conclude that the Sp185/333 proteins do not have a major role in initiating the aggregation of cultured phagocytes, however the Sp185/333 proteins are associated with the clustered nuclei within the

  4. Aggregated Gas Molecules: Toxic to Protein?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng; Zuo, Guanghong; Chen, Jixiu; Gao, Yi; Fang, Haiping

    2013-01-01

    The biological toxicity of high levels of breathing gases has been known for centuries, but the mechanism remains elusive. Earlier work mainly focused on the influences of dispersed gas molecules dissolved in water on biomolecules. However, recent studies confirmed the existence of aggregated gas molecules at the water-solid interface. In this paper, we have investigated the binding preference of aggregated gas molecules on proteins with molecular dynamics simulations, using nitrogen (N2) gas and the Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain as the model system. Aggregated N2 molecules were strongly bound by the active sites of the SH3 domain, which could impair the activity of the protein. In contrast, dispersed N2 molecules did not specifically interact with the SH3 domain. These observations extend our understanding of the possible toxicity of aggregates of gas molecules in the function of proteins. PMID:23588597

  5. Bioengineered 3D Glial Cell Culture Systems and Applications for Neurodegeneration and Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Watson, P Marc D; Kavanagh, Edel; Allenby, Gary; Vassey, Matthew

    2017-02-01

    Neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation are key features in a range of chronic central nervous system (CNS) diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, as well as acute conditions like stroke and traumatic brain injury, for which there remains significant unmet clinical need. It is now well recognized that current cell culture methodologies are limited in their ability to recapitulate the cellular environment that is present in vivo, and there is a growing body of evidence to show that three-dimensional (3D) culture systems represent a more physiologically accurate model than traditional two-dimensional (2D) cultures. Given the complexity of the environment from which cells originate, and their various cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, it is important to develop models that can be controlled and reproducible for drug discovery. 3D cell models have now been developed for almost all CNS cell types, including neurons, astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocyte cells. This review will highlight a number of current and emerging techniques for the culture of astrocytes and microglia, glial cell types with a critical role in neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory conditions. We describe recent advances in glial cell culture using electrospun polymers and hydrogel macromolecules, and highlight how these novel culture environments influence astrocyte and microglial phenotypes in vitro, as compared to traditional 2D systems. These models will be explored to illuminate current trends in the techniques used to create 3D environments for application in research and drug discovery focused on astrocytes and microglial cells.

  6. A Novel Method to Quantify Soil Aggregate Stability by Measuring Aggregate Bond Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efrat, Rachel; Rawlins, Barry G.; Quinton, John N.; Watts, Chris W.; Whitmore, Andy P.

    2016-04-01

    Soil aggregate stability is a key indicator of soil quality because it controls physical, biological and chemical functions important in cultivated soils. Micro-aggregates are responsible for the long term sequestration of carbon in soil, therefore determine soils role in the carbon cycle. It is thus vital that techniques to measure aggregate stability are accurate, consistent and reliable, in order to appropriately manage and monitor soil quality, and to develop our understanding and estimates of soil as a carbon store to appropriately incorporate in carbon cycle models. Practices used to assess the stability of aggregates vary in sample preparation, operational technique and unit of results. They use proxies and lack quantification. Conflicting results are therefore drawn between projects that do not provide methodological or resultant comparability. Typical modern stability tests suspend aggregates in water and monitor fragmentation upon exposure to an un-quantified amount of ultrasonic energy, utilising a laser granulometer to measure the change in mean weight diameter. In this project a novel approach has been developed based on that of Zhu et al., (2009), to accurately quantify the stability of aggregates by specifically measuring their bond energies. The bond energies are measured operating a combination of calorimetry and a high powered ultrasonic probe, with computable output function. Temperature change during sonication is monitored by an array of probes which enables calculation of the energy spent heating the system (Ph). Our novel technique suspends aggregates in heavy liquid lithium heteropolytungstate, as opposed to water, to avoid exposing aggregates to an immeasurable disruptive energy source, due to cavitation, collisions and clay swelling. Mean weight diameter is measured by a laser granulometer to monitor aggregate breakdown after successive periods of calculated ultrasonic energy input (Pi), until complete dispersion is achieved and bond

  7. Submicromolar Aβ42 reduces hippocampal glutamate receptors and presynaptic markers in an aggregation-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, Meagan L.; Hwang, Jeannie; Bahr, Ben A.

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic pathology in Alzheimer's disease brains is thought to involve soluble Aβ42 peptide. Here, sterile incubation in PBS caused small Aβ42 oligomer formation as well as heterogeneous, 6E10-immunopositive aggregates of 80-100 kDa. High molecular weight aggregates (H-agg) formed in a time-dependent manner over an extended 30-day period. Interestingly, an inverse relationship between dimeric and H-agg formation was more evident when incubations were performed at 37°C as compared to 23°C, thus providing an experimental strategy with which to address synaptic compromise produced by the different Aβ aggregates. H-agg species formed faster and to higher levels at 37°C compared to 23°C, and the two aggregate preparations were evaluated in hippocampal slice cultures, a sensitive system for monitoring synaptic integrity. Applied daily at 80-600 nM for 7 days, the Aβ42 preparations caused dose-dependent and aggregation-dependent declines in α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits as well as in presynaptic components. Unlike the synaptic effects, Aβ42 induced only trace cellular degeneration that was CA1 specific. The 37°C preparation was less effective at decreasing synaptic markers, corresponding with its reduced levels of Aβ42 monomers and dimers. Aβ42 dimers decayed significantly faster at 37°C than 23°C, and more rapidly than monomers at either temperature. These findings indicate that Aβ42 can self-aggregate into potent synaptotoxic oligomers as well as into larger aggregates that may serve to neutralize the toxic formations. These results will add to the growing debate concerning whether high molecular weight Aβ complexes that form amyloid plaques are protective through the sequestration of oligomeric species. PMID:21978994

  8. Aggregation kinetics of coalescing polymer colloids.

    PubMed

    Gauer, Cornelius; Jia, Zichen; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2009-09-01

    The aggregation behavior of a soft, rubbery colloidal system with a relatively low glass transition temperature, T(g) approximately -20 degrees C, has been investigated. It is found that the average gyration and hydrodynamic radii, R(g) and R(h), measured by light scattering techniques, evolve in time in parallel, without exhibiting the crossover typical of rigid particle aggregation. Cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) images reveal sphere-like clusters, indicating that complete coalescence between particles occurs during aggregation. Since coalescence leads to a reduction in the total colloidal surface area, the surfactant adsorption equilibrium, and thus the colloidal stability, change in the course of aggregation. It is found that to simulate the observed kinetic behavior based on the population balance equations, it is necessary to assume that all the clusters are spherical and to account for variations in the colloidal stability of each aggregating particle pair with time. This indicates that, for the given system, the coalescence is very fast, i.e., its time scale is much smaller than that of the aggregation.

  9. The Transformation of Ergonomic Affordances into Cultural Affordances: The Case of the Alnuset System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiappini, Giampaolo

    2012-01-01

    Is it possible to study the ergonomic affordances offered by a system designed for educational aims and their transformation into cultural affordances? To this purpose, what references can we adopt? This work describes the theoretical framework used to realise this study referring to AlNuSet, a system realised within the EC ReMath project to…

  10. Summary of the Culture, History and Educational System of Viet Nam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Chinh B., Comp.

    This booklet gives information on the culture, history and educational system of Vietnam as it relates to Vietnamese students in the American educational system. It is intended for use by teachers who have Vietnamese students in their classes. It consists of the following chapters: (1) Vietnamese Geography and History; (2) Vietnamese Family…

  11. Culture, Indigenous Knowledge Systems and Sustainable Development: A Critical View of Education in an African Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breidlid, Anders

    2009-01-01

    The article's focus is the relationship between culture, indigenous knowledge systems (IKS), sustainable development and education in Africa. It analyzes the concept of sustainability with particular reference to education and indigenous knowledge systems. In particular the article analyzes the documents from the World Summit in Johannesburg in…

  12. Revisiting Bourdieu: Alternative Educational Systems in the Light of the Theory of Social and Cultural Reproduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azaola, Marta Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The paper reflects upon the principles and practice of an alternative educational system operating in rural Mexico in the light of Bourdieu's theory of cultural and social reproduction. Bourdieu's theory seeks to explain processes of reproduction of power relations within schools and society; whereas alternative educational systems seek to expand…

  13. Inactivation of bacteria using ultraviolet irradiation in a recirculating salmonid culture system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to determine the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation dosages required to inactivate bacteria in a commercial-scale recirculating salmonid culture system. Research was conducted in the commercial-scale recirculating system used for Arctic char growout at the Conservation ...

  14. Efficient expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells in a disposable fixed bed culture system.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Amanda; Orellana, Maristela D; Caruso, Sâmia R; de Lima Prata, Karen; Covas, Dimas T; Swiech, Kamilla

    2013-01-01

    The need for efficient and reliable technologies for clinical-scale expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) has led to the use of disposable bioreactors and culture systems. Here, we evaluate the expansion of cord blood-derived MSC in a disposable fixed bed culture system. Starting from an initial cell density of 6.0 × 10(7) cells, after 7 days of culture, it was possible to produce of 4.2(±0.8) × 10(8) cells, which represents a fold increase of 7.0 (±1.4). After enzymatic retrieval from Fibra-Cell disks, the cells were able to maintain their potential for differentiation into adipocytes and osteocytes and were positive for many markers common to MSC (CD73, CD90, and CD105). The results obtained in this study demonstrate that MSC can be efficiently expanded in the culture system. This novel approach presents several advantages over the current expansion systems, based on culture flasks or microcarrier-based spinner flasks and represents a key element for MSC cellular therapy according to GMP compliant clinical-scale production system.

  15. Cometabolism of Monochloramine by Distribution System Relevant Mixed Culture Nitrifiers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monochloramine (NH2Cl) is increasingly used as a residual disinfectant. A major problem related to NH2Cl is nitrification in distribution systems, leading to rapid NH2Cl residual loss. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), which oxidize ammonia (NH3) to nitrite, can cometabolize chem...

  16. Implementation of culturally targeted patient navigation system for screening colonoscopy in a direct referral system.

    PubMed

    Jandorf, Lina; Cooperman, Julia L; Stossel, Lauren M; Itzkowitz, Steven; Thompson, Hayley S; Villagra, Cristina; Thélémaque, Linda D; McGinn, Thomas; Winkel, Gary; Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis; Shelton, Rachel C; Redd, William

    2013-10-01

    Low-income minorities often face system-based and personal barriers to screening colonoscopy (SC). Culturally targeted patient navigation (CTPN) programs employing professional navigators (Pro-PNs) or community-based peer navigators (Peer-PNs) can help overcome barriers but are not widely implemented. In East Harlem, NY, USA, where approximately half the residents participate in SC, 315 African American patients referred for SC at a primary care clinic with a Direct Endoscopic Referral System were recruited between May 2008 and May 2010. After medical clearance, 240 were randomized to receive CTPN delivered by a Pro-PN (n = 106) or Peer-PN (n = 134). Successful navigation was measured by SC adherence rate, patient satisfaction and navigator trust. Study enrollment was 91.4% with no significant differences in SC adherence rates between Pro-PN (80.0%) and Peer-PN (71.3%) (P = 0.178). Participants in both groups reported high levels of satisfaction and trust. These findings suggest that CTPN Pro-PN and Peer-PN programs are effective in this urban primary care setting. We detail how we recruited and trained navigators, how CTPN was implemented and provide a preliminary answer to our questions of the study aims: can peer navigators be as effective as professionals and what is the potential impact of patient navigation on screening adherence?

  17. The rat whole embryo culture assay using the Dysmorphology Score system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cindy; Panzica-Kelly, Julie; Augustine-Rauch, Karen

    2013-01-01

    The rat whole embryo culture (WEC) system has been used extensively for characterizing teratogenic properties of test chemicals. In this chapter, we describe the methodology for culturing rat embryos as well as a new morphological score system, the Dysmorphology Score (DMS) system for assessing morphology of mid gestation (gestational day 11) rat embryos. In contrast to the developmental stage focused scoring associated with the Brown and Fabro score system, this new score system assesses the respective degree of severity of dysmorphology, which delineates normal from abnormal morphology of specific embryonic structures and organ systems. This score system generates an approach that allows rapid identification and quantification of adverse developmental findings, making it conducive for characterization of compounds for teratogenic properties and screening activities.

  18. Aggregates, broccoli and cauliflower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grey, Francois; Kjems, Jørgen K.

    1989-09-01

    Naturally grown structures with fractal characters like broccoli and cauliflower are discussed and compared with DLA-type aggregates. It is suggested that the branching density can be used to characterize the growth process and an experimental method to determine this parameter is proposed.

  19. Cross-cultural effect on the brain revisited: universal structures plus writing system variation.

    PubMed

    Bolger, Donald J; Perfetti, Charles A; Schneider, Walter

    2005-05-01

    Recognizing printed words requires the mapping of graphic forms, which vary with writing systems, to linguistic forms, which vary with languages. Using a newly developed meta-analytic approach, aggregated Gaussian-estimated sources (AGES; Chein et al. [2002]: Psychol Behav 77:635-639), we examined the neuroimaging results for word reading within and across writing systems and languages. To find commonalities, we compiled 25 studies in English and other Western European languages that use an alphabetic writing system, 9 studies of native Chinese reading, 5 studies of Japanese Kana (syllabic) reading, and 4 studies of Kanji (morpho-syllabic) reading. Using the AGES approach, we created meta-images within each writing system, isolated reliable foci of activation, and compared findings across writing systems and languages. The results suggest that these writing systems utilize a common network of regions in word processing. Writing systems engage largely the same systems in terms of gross cortical regions, but localization within those regions suggests differences across writing systems. In particular, the region known as the visual word form area (VWFA) shows strikingly consistent localization across tasks and across writing systems. This region in the left mid-fusiform gyrus is critical to word recognition across writing systems and languages.

  20. Influence of polysaccharides on wine protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Jaeckels, Nadine; Meier, Miriam; Dietrich, Helmut; Will, Frank; Decker, Heinz; Fronk, Petra

    2016-06-01

    Polysaccharides are the major high-molecular weight components of wines. In contrast, proteins occur only in small amounts in wine, but contribute to haze formation. The detailed mechanism of aggregation of these proteins, especially in combination with other wine components, remains unclear. This study demonstrates the different aggregation behavior between a buffer and a model wine system by dynamic light scattering. Arabinogalactan-protein, for example, shows an increased aggregation in the model wine system, while in the buffer system a reducing effect is observed. Thus, we could show the importance to examine the behavior of wine additives under conditions close to reality, instead of simpler buffer systems. Additional experiments on melting points of wine proteins reveal that only some isoforms of thaumatin-like proteins and chitinases are involved in haze formation. We can confirm interactions between polysaccharides and proteins, but none of these polysaccharides is able to prevent haze in wine.

  1. Three cyanobacteriochromes work together to form a light color-sensitive input system for c-di-GMP signaling of cell aggregation.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Gen; Ni-Ni-Win; Narikawa, Rei; Ikeuchi, Masahiko

    2015-06-30

    Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) are cyanobacterial photoreceptors that have diverse spectral properties and domain compositions. Although large numbers of CBCR genes exist in cyanobacterial genomes, no studies have assessed whether multiple CBCRs work together. We recently showed that the diguanylate cyclase (DGC) activity of the CBCR SesA from Thermosynechococcus elongatus is activated by blue-light irradiation and that, when irradiated, SesA, via its product cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP), induces aggregation of Thermosynechococcus vulcanus cells at a temperature that is suboptimum for single-cell viability. For this report, we first characterize the photobiochemical properties of two additional CBCRs, SesB and SesC. Blue/teal light-responsive SesB has only c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity, which is up-regulated by teal light and GTP. Blue/green light-responsive SesC has DGC and PDE activities. Its DGC activity is enhanced by blue light, whereas its PDE activity is enhanced by green light. A ΔsesB mutant cannot suppress cell aggregation under teal-green light. A ΔsesC mutant shows a less sensitive cell-aggregation response to ambient light. ΔsesA/ΔsesB/ΔsesC shows partial cell aggregation, which is accompanied by the loss of color dependency, implying that a nonphotoresponsive DGC(s) producing c-di-GMP can also induce the aggregation. The results suggest that SesB enhances the light color dependency of cell aggregation by degrading c-di-GMP, is particularly effective under teal light, and, therefore, seems to counteract the induction of cell aggregation by SesA. In addition, SesC seems to improve signaling specificity as an auxiliary backup to SesA/SesB activities. The coordinated action of these three CBCRs highlights why so many different CBCRs exist.

  2. Biotypes of Candida albicans isolated from cardiovascular system and skin surveillance cultures of hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Vazić-Babić, Verica; Mlinarić-Missoni, Emilija; Kalenić, Smilja

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to biotype 59 isolates of Candida (C.) albicans from cardiovascular system samples (blood and intravenous catheter) and 123 isolates of the same species from skin surveillance cultures (swabs of the armpit, groins and intravenous catheter insertion sites) of hospitalized patients using the Odds and Abbott biotyping method. Biotyping of 59 isolates of C. albicans taken from the cardiovascular system samples revealed the presence of 16 biotypes. Biotype 355 was the most common biotype, accounting for 35.6% of all biotype isolates from this system. Biotyping of 123 C. albicans isolates from skin surveillance cultures detected 21 biotypes. Biotype 355 was most common, accounting for 17.9% of all biotype isolates from these samples. The two systems had 10 biotypes in common: 355, 155, 257, 305, 105, 315, 300, 015, 157, and 345. These biotypes accounted for 88.3% and 81.4% of all C. albicans biotypes isolated from the cardiovascular system and skin surveillance cultures, respectively. Biotypes 355, 155, and 257 were the biotypes most frequently shared in isolates from the two systems. These biotypes accounted for 57.7% and 43.1% of all C. albicans biotypes isolated from the cardiovascular system and skin surveillance cultures, respectively.

  3. Cells of Escherichia coli are protected against severe chemical stress by co-habiting cell aggregates formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Jagmann, Nina; Henke, Sebastian Franz; Philipp, Bodo

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial cells within biofilms and cell aggregates show increased resistance against chemical stress compared with suspended cells. It is not known whether bacteria that co-habit biofilms formed by other bacteria also acquire such resistance. This scenario was investigated in a proof-of-principle experiment with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1 as cell aggregate-forming bacterium and Escherichia coli strain MG1655 as potential co-habiting bacterium equipped with an inducible bioluminescence system. Cell aggregation of strain PAO1 can be induced by the toxic detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). In single cultures of strain MG1655, bioluminescence was inhibited by the protonophor carbonylcyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) but the cells were still viable. By applying CCCP and SDS together, cells of strain MG1655 lost their bioluminescence and viability indicating the importance of energy-dependent resistance mechanisms against SDS. In co-suspensions with strain PAO1, bioluminescence of strain MG1655 was sustained in the presence of SDS and CCCP. Image analysis showed that bioluminescent cells were located in cell aggregates formed by strain PAO1. Thus, cells of strain MG1655 that co-habited cell aggregates formed by strain PAO1 were protected against a severe chemical stress that was lethal to them in single cultures. Co-habiting could lead to increased survival of pathogens in clinical settings and could be employed in biotechnological applications involving toxic milieus.

  4. Preimplantation embryo metabolism and culture systems: experience from domestic animals and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Absalón-Medina, V A; Butler, W R; Gilbert, R O

    2014-04-01

    Despite advantages of in vitro embryo production in many species, widespread use of this technology is limited by generally lower developmental competence of in vitro derived embryos compared to in vivo counterparts. Regardless, in vivo or in vitro gametes and embryos face and must adjust to multiple microenvironments especially at preimplantation stages. Moreover, the embryo has to be able to further adapt to environmental cues in utero to result in the birth of live and healthy offspring. Enormous strides have been made in understanding and meeting stage-specific requirements of preimplantation embryos, but interpretation of the data is made difficult due to the complexity of the wide array of culture systems and the remarkable plasticity of developing embryos that seem able to develop under a variety of conditions. Nevertheless, a primary objective remains meeting, as closely as possible, the preimplantation embryo requirements as provided in vivo. In general, oocytes and embryos develop more satisfactorily when cultured in groups. However, optimization of individual culture of oocytes and embryos is an important goal and area of intensive current research for both animal and human clinical application. Successful culture of individual embryos is of primary importance in order to avoid ovarian superstimulation and the associated physiological and psychological disadvantages for patients. This review emphasizes stage specific shifts in embryo metabolism and requirements and research to optimize in vitro embryo culture conditions and supplementation, with a view to optimizing embryo culture in general, and culture of single embryos in particular.

  5. Laser light scattering as a probe of fractal colloid aggregates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, David A.; Lin, M. Y.

    1989-01-01

    The extensive use of laser light scattering is reviewed, both static and dynamic, in the study of colloid aggregation. Static light scattering enables the study of the fractal structure of the aggregates, while dynamic light scattering enables the study of aggregation kinetics. In addition, both techniques can be combined to demonstrate the universality of the aggregation process. Colloidal aggregates are now well understood and therefore represent an excellent experimental system to use in the study of the physical properties of fractal objects. However, the ultimate size of fractal aggregates is fundamentally limited by gravitational acceleration which will destroy the fractal structure as the size of the aggregates increases. This represents a great opportunity for spaceborne experimentation, where the reduced g will enable the growth of fractal structures of sufficient size for many interesting studies of their physical properties.

  6. Automatic analysis of microscopic images of red blood cell aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menichini, Pablo A.; Larese, Mónica G.; Riquelme, Bibiana D.

    2015-06-01

    Red blood cell aggregation is one of the most important factors in blood viscosity at stasis or at very low rates of flow. The basic structure of aggregates is a linear array of cell commonly termed as rouleaux. Enhanced or abnormal aggregation is seen in clinical conditions, such as diabetes and hypertension, producing alterations in the microcirculation, some of which can be analyzed through the characterization of aggregated cells. Frequently, image processing and analysis for the characterization of RBC aggregation were done manually or semi-automatically using interactive tools. We propose a system that processes images of RBC aggregation and automatically obtains the characterization and quantification of the different types of RBC aggregates. Present technique could be interesting to perform the adaptation as a routine used in hemorheological and Clinical Biochemistry Laboratories because this automatic method is rapid, efficient and economical, and at the same time independent of the user performing the analysis (repeatability of the analysis).

  7. Garlic exerts allelopathic effects on pepper physiology in a hydroponic co-culture system

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Haiyan; Liu, Menglong; Hayat, Sikandar; Feng, Han

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A hydroponic co-culture system was adopted to determine the allelopathic potential of garlic on the growth of pepper plants. Different numbers of garlic plants (0, 2, 4, 8 and 12) were hydroponically co-cultured with two pepper plants to investigate allelopathic effects on the growth attributes and antioxidative defense system of the test pepper plants. The responses of the pepper plants depended on the number of garlic plants included in the co-culture system, indicating an association of pepper growth with the garlic root exudate concentration. When grown at a pepper/garlic ratio of 1:1 or 1:2, the pepper plant height, chlorophyll content, and peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT) and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activities were significantly increased after 30 days of co-culture; in contrast, reduction in methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) content was observed. However, when the pepper/garlic ratio was 1:4 or higher, these morphological indices and protective enzyme activities were significantly inhibited, whereas MDA levels in the pepper leaves were significantly increased due to severe membrane lipid peroxidation. The results indicate that although low concentrations of garlic root exudates appear to induce protective enzyme systems and promote pepper growth, high concentrations have deleterious effects. These findings suggest that further investigations should optimize the co-culture pepper/garlic ratio to reduce continuous cropping obstacles in pepper production. PMID:27095440

  8. Interferon Response in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection: Lessons from Cell Culture Systems of HCV Infection.

    PubMed

    Sung, Pil Soo; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2015-10-07

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive-stranded RNA virus that infects approximately 130-170 million people worldwide. In 2005, the first HCV infection system in cell culture was established using clone JFH-1, which was isolated from a Japanese patient with fulminant HCV infection. JFH-1 replicates efficiently in hepatoma cells and infectious virion particles are released into the culture supernatant. The development of cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc) systems has allowed us to understand how hosts respond to HCV infection and how HCV evades host responses. Although the mechanisms underlying the different outcomes of HCV infection are not fully understood, innate immune responses seem to have a critical impact on the outcome of HCV infection, as demonstrated by the prognostic value of IFN-λ gene polymorphisms among patients with chronic HCV infection. Herein, we review recent research on interferon response in HCV infection, particularly studies using HCVcc infection systems.

  9. Aggregation of Montmorillonite and Organic Matter in Aqueous Media Containing Artificial Seawater

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-23

    laboratory kaolinite and montmorillonite aggregation in which the dispersion-aggregation properties of pure clay suspensions were found to be primarily...Article 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Aggregation of montmorillonite and organic matter in aqueous media containing...properties of suspended colloids and aggregates) were determined for systems containing suspended montmorillonite , humic acid, and/or chitin at the

  10. Automating indicator data reporting from health facility EMR to a national aggregate data system in Kenya: An Interoperability field-test using OpenMRS and DHIS2

    PubMed Central

    Kariuki, James M.; Manders, Eric-Jan; Richards, Janise; Oluoch, Tom; Kimanga, Davies; Wanyee, Steve; Kwach, James O.; Santas, Xenophon

    2016-01-01

    Introduction:Developing countries are increasingly strengthening national health information systems (HIS) for evidence-based decision-making. However, the inability to report indicator data automatically from electronic medical record systems (EMR) hinders this process. Data are often printed and manually re-entered into aggregate reporting systems. This affects data completeness, accuracy, reporting timeliness, and burdens staff who support routine indicator reporting from patient-level data. Method: After conducting a feasibility test to exchange indicator data from Open Medical Records System (OpenMRS) to District Health Information System version 2 (DHIS2), we conducted a field test at a health facility in Kenya. We configured a field-test DHIS2 instance, similar to the Kenya Ministry of Health (MOH) DHIS2, to receive HIV care and treatment indicator data and the KenyaEMR, a customized version of OpenMRS, to generate and transmit the data from a health facility. After training facility staff how to send data using DHIS2 reporting module, we compared completeness, accuracy and timeliness of automated indicator reporting with facility monthly reports manually entered into MOH DHIS2. Results: All 45 data values in the automated reporting process were 100% complete and accurate while in manual entry process, data completeness ranged from 66.7% to 100% and accuracy ranged from 33.3% to 95.6% for seven months (July 2013-January 2014). Manual tally and entry process required at least one person to perform each of the five reporting activities, generating data from EMR and manual entry required at least one person to perform each of the three reporting activities, while automated reporting process had one activity performed by one person. Manual tally and entry observed in October 2013 took 375 minutes. Average time to generate data and manually enter into DHIS2 was over half an hour (M=32.35 mins, SD=0.29) compared to less than a minute for automated submission (M=0

  11. Hand-made cloned buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) embryos: comparison of different media and culture systems.

    PubMed

    Shah, Riaz A; George, Aman; Singh, Manoj K; Kumar, Dharmendra; Chauhan, Manmohan S; Manik, Radhaysham; Palta, Prabhat; Singla, Suresh K

    2008-12-01

    Hand-made cloning (HMC) has proved to be an efficient alternative to the conventional micromanipulator-based technique in some domestic animal species. This study reports the development of an effective culture system for in vitro culture of zona-free cloned buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) embryos reconstructed using adult skin fibroblast cells as nucleus donor. Cleavage and blastocyst rates observed were 52 and 0% in modified Charles Rosenkrans 2 (mCR2), 61 and 4.6% in modified Synthetic Oviductal Fluid (mSOF), and 82 and 40.3% in Research Vitro Cleave (RVCL; Cook, Australia) medium, respectively. Similarly, higher blastocyst rates (24.5 +/- 4.1%) were observed when zona-free parthenotes were cultured in RVCL medium. Culturing zona-free cloned buffalo embryos on flat surfaces (FS) yielded significantly higher (p < 0.05) blastocyst rates than Well of the Wells (WOW) or microdrops (MD). Furthermore, development in WOW was found to be significantly better than MD culture. The quality of HMC blastocysts was examined using differential staining. This study establishes the application of zona-free nuclear transfer procedures for the production of hand-made cloned buffalo embryos and the development of efficient culture system and appropriate media requirements for enhancing their preimplantation development.

  12. An integrated system for synchronous culture of animal cells under controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Pérez, Elena; Hernández, Vanessa; Palomares, Laura A; Serrato, José A

    2016-01-01

    The cell cycle has fundamental effects on cell cultures and their products. Tools to synchronize cultured cells allow the study of cellular physiology and metabolism at particular cell cycle phases. However, cells are most often arrested by methods that alter their homeostasis and are then cultivated in poorly controlled environments. Cell behavior could then be affected by the synchronization method and culture conditions used, and not just by the particular cell cycle phase under study. Moreover, only a few viable cells are recovered. Here, we designed an integrated system where a large number of cells from a controlled bioreactor culture is separated by centrifugal elutriation at high viabilities. In contrast to current elutriation methods, cells are injected directly from a bioreactor into an injection loop, allowing the introduction of a large number of cells into the separation chamber without stressful centrifugation. A low pulsation peristaltic pump increases the stability of the elutriation chamber. Using this approach, a large number of healthy cells at each cell cycle phase were obtained, allowing their direct inoculation into fully instrumented bioreactors. Hybridoma cells synchronized and cultured in this system behaved as expected for a synchronous culture.

  13. Culturing thick brain slices: an interstitial 3D microperfusion system for enhanced viability.

    PubMed

    Rambani, Komal; Vukasinovic, Jelena; Glezer, Ari; Potter, Steve M

    2009-06-15

    Brain slice preparations are well-established models for a wide spectrum of in vitro investigations in the neuroscience discipline. However, these investigations are limited to acute preparations or thin organotypic culture preparations due to the lack of a successful method that allows culturing of thick organotypic brain slices. Thick brain slice cultures suffer necrosis due to ischemia deep in the tissue resulting from a destroyed circulatory system and subsequent diffusion-limited supply of nutrients and oxygen. Although thin organotypic brain slice cultures can be successfully cultured using a well-established roller-tube method (a monolayer organotypic culture) (Gahwiler B H. Organotypic monolayer cultures of nervous tissue. J Neurosci Methods. 1981; 4: 329-342) or a membrane-insert method (up to 1-4 cell layers, <150 microm) (Stoppini L, Buchs PA, Muller D. A simple method for organotypic cultures of neural tissue. J Neurosci Methods 1991; 37: 173-182), these methods fail to support thick tissue preparations. A few perfusion methods (using submerged or interface/microfluidic chambers) have been reported to enhance the longevity (up to few hours) of acute slice preparations (up to 600 microm thick) (Hass HL, Schaerer B, Vosmansky M. A simple perfusion chamber for study of nervous tissue slices in vitro. J Neurosci Methods 1979; 1: 323-325; Nicoll RA, Alger BE. A simple chamber for recording from submerged brain slices. J Neurosci Methods 1981; 4: 153-156; Passeraub PA, Almeida AC, Thakor NV. Design, microfabrication and characterization of a microfluidic chamber for the perfusion of brain tissue slices. J Biomed Dev 2003; 5: 147-155). Here, we report a unique interstitial microfluidic perfusion technique to culture thick (700 microm) organotypic brain slices. The design of the custom-made microperfusion chamber facilitates laminar, interstitial perfusion of oxygenated nutrient medium throughout the tissue thickness with concomitant removal of depleted medium

  14. The response of mineralizing culture systems to microtextured and polished titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hacking, S Adam; Harvey, Edward; Roughley, Peter; Tanzer, Michael; Bobyn, John

    2008-10-01

    The surface texture of titanium has a predictable effect on peri-implant tissue formation in vivo. When implanted in an osseous environment, smooth surfaces (R(a) < 0.5 mm) are generally apposed by fibrous tissue and textured surfaces (R(a) > 1.0 mm) are generally apposed by osseous tissue. Thus in vitro study assessed the mineralization and proliferation response of TF274, MC3T3-E1, murine femoral stromal cells and canine stromal cells to tissue culture plastic (R(a) = 0.001 mm), polished (R(a) = 0.01 mm) and irregularly textured (R(a) = 3.26 mm) titanium surfaces. Amongst all culture systems, proliferation was significantly decreased on textured vs. smooth surfaces. Midway through the culture of the canine marrow cells, the cell layer detached from the tissue culture plastic and polished titanium surfaces. The TF274, MC3T3-E1, murine femoral stromal cell systems formed a mineralized matrix on the tissue culture plastic and polished titanium surfaces which was not observed with the canine stromal cell system. Compared to the tissue culture plastic and polished titanium surfaces, matrix mineralization was significantly reduced on the textured titanium surfaces for the TF274, MC3T3-E1, murine femoral stromal systems, a result which was differed significantly in comparison to the canine stromal system. These results were surprising given the large number of reports concerning the in vivo response to titanium in clinical and pre-clinical studies. Further work is required to determine if the TF274, MC3T3-E1 and murine femoral stromal systems are suitable for the in vitro investigation of the effects of titanium surface texture on osteoblast activity.

  15. Socio-cultural and global health perspectives for the development of future psychiatric diagnostic systems.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sing

    2002-01-01

    Psychiatric diagnosis and classification reflect the social and political context of an era and are embedded in it. In the last few decades, culture-bound syndromes reported in non-Western societies constituted the major focus of contention over the validity and universality of psychiatric diagnosis. In contemporary times, social, economic, and political factors, such as the hegemony of the DSM discourse, the managed care culture, pharmaceutical forces, and the global burden of disease study, have virtually made culture-bound syndromes 'disappear'. Once widely believed to be rare outside of the developed West, depression has rapidly become the master narrative of mental health worldwide. In the context of global mental health, the field of psychiatric classification must go beyond routine debates over categories. In order to address the growing discrepancy between needs and services, international cultural psychiatry must engage key social forces, such as psychiatric epidemiology, primary care psychiatry, integration of diagnostic systems, stigma, and advocacy.

  16. The response of aggregated Pseudomonas putida CP1 cells to UV-C and UV-A/B disinfection.

    PubMed

    Maganha de Almeida, Ana C; Quilty, Bríd

    2016-11-01

    UV radiation is a spread method used worldwide for the disinfection of water. However, much of the research on the disinfection of bacterial cells by UV has focused on planktonic cells. Many bacterial cells in nature are present in clumps or aggregates, and these aggregates, which are more resistant to disinfection than their planktonic counterparts, can be problematic in engineered water systems. The current research used Pseudomonas putida (P. putida) CP1, an environmental and non-pathogenic microorganism which autoaggregates when grown under certain conditions, as a model organism to simulate aggregated cells. The study investigated the response of both the planktonic and the aggregated forms of the bacterium to UV-C (λ = 253.7 nm) and UV-A/B (λ > 300 nm) disinfection at laboratory scale in a minimal medium. The planktonic cells of P. putida CP1 were inactivated within 60 s by UV-C and in 60 min by UV-A/B; however, the aggregated cells required 120 min of UV-C treatment and 240 min of UV-A/B radiation to become inactive. The size of the aggregate was reduced following UV treatment. Although all the cells had lost culturability, viability as measured by the LIVE/DEAD(®) stain and epifluorescence microscopy was not completely lost and the cells all demonstrated regrowth after overnight incubation in the dark.

  17. Modelling and pathway identification involving the transport mechanism of a complex metabolic system in batch culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jinlong; Zhang, Xu; Zhu, Xi; Feng, Enmin; Yin, Hongchao; Xiu, Zhilong

    2014-06-01

    The bio-dissimilation of glycerol to 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD) by Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) can be characterized by a complex metabolic system of interactions among biochemical fluxes, metabolic compounds, key enzymes and genetic regulation. In this paper, in consideration of the fact that the transport ways of 1,3-PD and glycerol with different weights across cell membrane are still unclear in batch culture, we consider 121 possible metabolic pathways and establish a novel mathematical model which is represented by a complex metabolic system. Taking into account the difficulty in accurately measuring the concentration of intracellular substances and the absence of equilibrium point for the metabolic system of batch culture, the novel approach used here is to define quantitatively biological robustness of the intracellular substance concentrations for the overall process of batch culture. To determine the most possible metabolic pathway, we take the defined biological robustness as cost function and establish an identification model, in which 1452 system parameters and 484 pathway parameters are involved. Simultaneously, the identification model is subject to the metabolic system, continuous state constraints and parameter constraints. As such, solving the identification model by a serial program is a very complicated task. We propose a parallel migration particle swarm optimization algorithm (MPSO) capable of solving the identification model in conjunction with the constraint transcription and smoothing approximation techniques. Numerical results show that the most possible metabolic pathway and the corresponding metabolic system can reasonably describe the process of batch culture.

  18. The Impact of National Cultural Differences on Nurses' Acceptance of Hospital Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsien-Cheng

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to explore the influence of national cultural differences on nurses' perceptions of their acceptance of hospital information systems. This study uses the perspective of Technology Acceptance Model; national cultural differences in terms of masculinity/femininity, individualism/collectivism, power distance, and uncertainty avoidance are incorporated into the Technology Acceptance Model as moderators, whereas time orientation is a control variable on hospital information system acceptance. A quantitative research design was used in this study; 261 participants, US and Taiwan RNs, all had hospital information system experience. Data were collected from November 2013 to February 2014 and analyzed using a t test to compare the coefficients for each moderator. The results show that individualism/collectivism, power distance, and uncertainty avoidance all exhibit significant difference on hospital information system acceptance; however, both masculinity/femininity and time orientation factors did not show significance. This study verifies that national cultural differences have significant influence on nurses' behavioral intention to use hospital information systems. Therefore, hospital information system providers should emphasize the way in which to integrate different technological functions to meet the needs of nurses from various cultural backgrounds.

  19. Aggregation of theta-polymers in spherical confinement.

    PubMed

    Zierenberg, Johannes; Mueller, Marco; Schierz, Philipp; Marenz, Martin; Janke, Wolfhard

    2014-09-21

    We investigate the aggregation transition of theta polymers in spherical confinement with multicanonical simulations. This allows for a systematic study of the effect of density on the aggregation transition temperature for up to 24 monodisperse polymers. Our results for solutions in the dilute regime show that polymers can be considered isolated for all temperatures larger than the aggregation temperature, which is shown to be a function of the density. The resulting competition between single-polymer collapse and aggregation yields the lower temperature bound of the isolated chain approximation. We provide entropic and energetic arguments to describe the density dependence and finite-size effects of the aggregation transition for monodisperse solutions in finite systems. This allows us to estimate the aggregation transition temperature of dilute systems in a spherical cavity, using a few simulations of small, sufficiently dilute polymer systems.

  20. Nencki Affective Picture System: Cross-Cultural Study in Europe and Iran

    PubMed Central

    Riegel, Monika; Moslehi, Abnoos; Michałowski, Jarosław M.; Żurawski, Łukasz; Horvat, Marko; Wypych, Marek; Jednoróg, Katarzyna; Marchewka, Artur

    2017-01-01

    Although emotions have been assumed conventionally to be universal, recent studies have suggested that various aspects of emotions may be mediated by cultural background. The purpose of our research was to test these contradictory views, in the case of the subjective evaluation of visual affective stimuli. We also sought to validate the recently introduced Nencki Affective Picture System (NAPS) database on a different cultural group. Since there has been, to date, no attempt to compare the emotions of a culturally distinct sample of Iranians with those of Europeans, subjective ratings were collected from 40 Iranians and 39 Europeans. Each cultural group was asked separately to provide normative affective ratings and classify pictures according to discrete emotions. The results were analyzed to identify cultural differences in the ratings of individual images. One hundred and seventy NAPS pictures were rated with regard to the intensity of the basic emotions (happiness, sadness, fear, surprise, anger, and disgust) they elicited, as well as in terms of affective dimensions (valence and arousal). Contrary to previous studies using the International Affective Picture System, our results for Europeans and Iranians show that neither the ratings for affective dimensions nor for basic emotions differed across cultural groups. In both cultural groups, the relationship between valence and arousal ratings could be best described by a classical boomerang-shaped function. However, the content of the pictures (animals, faces, landscapes, objects, or people) had a significant effect on the ratings for valence and arousal. These findings indicate that further studies in cross-cultural affective research should control for the content of stimuli. PMID:28316576

  1. Nencki Affective Picture System: Cross-Cultural Study in Europe and Iran.

    PubMed

    Riegel, Monika; Moslehi, Abnoos; Michałowski, Jarosław M; Żurawski, Łukasz; Horvat, Marko; Wypych, Marek; Jednoróg, Katarzyna; Marchewka, Artur

    2017-01-01

    Although emotions have been assumed conventionally to be universal, recent studies have suggested that various aspects of emotions may be mediated by cultural background. The purpose of our research was to test these contradictory views, in the case of the subjective evaluation of visual affective stimuli. We also sought to validate the recently introduced Nencki Affective Picture System (NAPS) database on a different cultural group. Since there has been, to date, no attempt to compare the emotions of a culturally distinct sample of Iranians with those of Europeans, subjective ratings were collected from 40 Iranians and 39 Europeans. Each cultural group was asked separately to provide normative affective ratings and classify pictures according to discrete emotions. The results were analyzed to identify cultural differences in the ratings of individual images. One hundred and seventy NAPS pictures were rated with regard to the intensity of the basic emotions (happiness, sadness, fear, surprise, anger, and disgust) they elicited, as well as in terms of affective dimensions (valence and arousal). Contrary to previous studies using the International Affective Picture System, our results for Europeans and Iranians show that neither the ratings for affective dimensions nor for basic emotions differed across cultural groups. In both cultural groups, the relationship between valence and arousal ratings could be best described by a classical boomerang-shaped function. However, the content of the pictures (animals, faces, landscapes, objects, or people) had a significant effect on the ratings for valence and arousal. These findings indicate that further studies in cross-cultural affective research should control for the content of stimuli.

  2. Simulations of kinetically irreversible protein aggregate structure.

    PubMed Central

    Patro, S Y; Przybycien, T M

    1994-01-01

    We have simulated the structure of kinetically irreversible protein aggregates in two-dimensional space using a lattice-based Monte-Carlo routine. Our model specifically accounts for the intermolecular interactions between hydrophobic and hydrophilic protein surfaces and a polar solvent. The simulations provide information about the aggregate density, the types of inter-monomer contacts and solvent content within the aggregates, the type and extent of solvent exposed perimeter, and the short- and long-range order all as a function of (i) the extent of monomer hydrophobic surface area and its distribution on the model protein surface and (ii) the magnitude of the hydrophobic-hydrophobic contact energy. An increase in the extent of monomer hydrophobic surface area resulted in increased aggregate densities with concomitant decreased system free energies. These effects are accompanied by increases in the number of hydrophobic-hydrophobic contacts and decreases in the solvent-exposed hydrophobic surface area of the aggregates. Grouping monomer hydrophobic surfaces in a single contiguous stretch resulted in lower aggregate densities and lower short range order. More favorable hydrophobic-hydrophobic contact energies produced structures with higher densities but the number of unfavorable protein-protein contacts was also observed to increase; greater configurational entropy produced the opposite effect. Properties predicted by our model are in good qualitative agreement with available experimental observations. Images FIGURE 6 FIGURE 13 PMID:8061184

  3. An energy landscape approach to protein aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buell, Alexander; Knowles, Tuomas

    2012-02-01

    Protein aggregation into ordered fibrillar structures is the hallmark of a class of diseases, the most prominent examples of which are Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Recent results (e.g. Baldwin et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2011) suggest that the aggregated state of a protein is in many cases thermodynamically more stable than the soluble state. Therefore the solubility of proteins in a cellular context appears to be to a large extent under kinetic control. Here, we first present a conceptual framework for the description of protein aggregation ( see AK Buell et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 2010) that is an extension to the generally accepted energy landscape model for protein folding. Then we apply this model to analyse and interpret a large set of experimental data on the kinetics of protein aggregation, acquired mainly with a novel biosensing approach (see TPJK Knowles et al, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sc. 2007). We show how for example the effect of sequence modifications on the kinetics and thermodynamics of human lysozyme aggregation can be understood and quantified (see AK Buell et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2011). These results have important implications for therapeutic strategies against protein aggregation disorders, in this case lysozyme systemic amyloidosis.

  4. Multi-scale interactions in Dictyostelium discoideum aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, James A.; Kelty-Stephen, Damian G.

    2012-12-01

    Cellular aggregation is essential for a wide range of phenomena in developmental biology, and a crucial event in the life-cycle of Dictyostelium discoideum. The current manuscript presents an analysis of multi-scale interactions involved in D. discoideum aggregation and non-aggregation events. The multi-scale fractal dimensions of a sequence of microscope images were used to estimate changing structure at different spatial scales. Three regions showing aggregation and three showing non-aggregation were considered. The results showed that both aggregation and non-aggregation regions were strongly multi-fractal. Analyses of the over-time relationships among nine scales of the generalized dimension, D(q), were conducted using vector autoregression and vector error-correction models. Both types of regions showed evidence that across-scale interactions serve to maintain the equilibrium of the system. Aggregation and non-aggregation regions also showed different patterns of effects of individual scales on other scales. Specifically, aggregation regions showed greater effects of both the smallest and largest scales on the smaller scale structures. The results suggest that multi-scale interactions are responsible for maintaining and altering the cellular structures during aggregation.

  5. Modeling transport and aggregation of volcanic ash particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Antonio; Folch, Arnau; Macedonio, Giovanni; Durant, Adam

    2010-05-01

    A complete description of ash aggregation processes in volcanic clouds is an very arduous task and the full coupling of ash transport and ash aggregation models is still computationally prohibitive. A large fraction of fine ash injected in the atmosphere during explosive eruptions aggregate because of complex interactions of surface liquid layers, electrostatic forces, and differences in settling velocities. The formation of aggregates of size and density different from those of the primary particles dramatically changes the sedimentation dynamics and results in lower atmospheric residence times of ash particles and in the formation of secondary maxima of tephra deposit. Volcanic ash transport models should include a full aggregation model accounting for all particle class interaction. However this approach would require prohibitive computational times. Here we present a simplified model for wet aggregation that accounts for both atmospheric and volcanic water transport. The aggregation model assumes a fractal relationship for the number of primary particles in aggregates, average efficiencies factors, and collision frequency functions accounting for Brownian motion, laminar and turbulent fluid shear, and differential settling velocity. We implemented the aggregation model in the WRF+FALL3D coupled modelling system and applied it to different eruptions where aggregation has been recognized to play an important role, such as the August and September 1992 Crater Peak eruptions and the 1980 Mt St Helens eruption. Moreover, understanding aggregation processes in volcanic clouds will contribute to mitigate the risks related with volcanic ash transport and sedimentation.

  6. Three-dimensional cell culturing by magnetic levitation.

    PubMed

    Haisler, William L; Timm, David M; Gage, Jacob A; Tseng, Hubert; Killian, T C; Souza, Glauco R

    2013-10-01

    Recently, biomedical research has moved toward cell culture in three dimensions to better recapitulate native cellular environments. This protocol describes one method for 3D culture, the magnetic levitation method (MLM), in which cells bind with a magnetic nanoparticle assembly overnight to render them magnetic. When resuspended in medium, an external magnetic field levitates and concentrates cells at the air-liquid interface, where they aggregate to form larger 3D cultures. The resulting cultures are dense, can synthesize extracellular matrix (ECM) and can be analyzed similarly to the other culture systems using techniques such as immunohistochemical analysis (IHC), western blotting and other biochemical assays. This protocol details the MLM and other associated techniques (cell culture, imaging and IHC) adapted for the MLM. The MLM requires 45 min of working time over 2 d to create 3D cultures that can be cultured in the long term (>7 d).

  7. A 3D modeling and measurement system for cultural heritage preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Guoguang; Zhou, Mingquan; Ren, Pu; Shui, Wuyang; Zhou, Pengbo; Wu, Zhongke

    2015-07-01

    Cultural Heritage reflects the human production, life style and environmental conditions of various historical periods. It exists as one of the major national carriers of national history and culture. In order to do better protection and utilization for these cultural heritages, a system of three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and statistical measurement is proposed in this paper. The system solves the problems of cultural heritage's data storage, measurement and analysis. Firstly, for the high precision modeling and measurement problems, range data registration and integration algorithm used to achieve high precision 3D reconstruction. Secondly, multi-view stereo reconstruction method is used to solve the problem of rapid reconstruction by procedures such as the original image data pre-processing, camera calibration, point cloud modeling. At last, the artifacts' measure underlying database is established by calculating the measurements of the 3D model's surface. These measurements contain Euclidean distance between the points on the surface, geodesic distance between the points, normal and curvature in each point, superficial area of a region, volume of model's part and some other measurements. These measurements provide a basis for carrying out information mining of cultural heritage. The system has been applied to the applications of 3D modeling, data measurement of the Terracotta Warriors relics, Tibetan architecture and some other relics.

  8. [Progress in microalgae culture system for biodiesel combined with reducing carbon dioxide emission].

    PubMed

    Su, Hongyang; Zhou, Xuefei; Xia, Xuefen; Sun, Zhen; Zhang, Yalei

    2011-09-01

    Wastewater resources, CO2 emission reduction and microalgae biodiesel are considered as current frontier fields of energy and environmental researches. In this paper, we reviewed the progress in system of microalgae culture for biodiesel production by wastewater and stack gas. Multiple factors including microalgal species, nutrition, culture methods and photobioreactor, which were crucial to the cultivation of microalgae for biodiesel production, were discussed in detail. A valuable culture system of microalgae for biodiesel production or other high value products combined with the treatment of wastewater by microalgae was put forward through the optimizations of algal species and culture technology. The culture system coupled with the treatment of wastewater, the reduction of CO2 emission with the cultivation of microalgae for biodiesel production will reduce the production cost of microalgal biofuel production and the treatment cost of wastewater simultaneously. Therefore, it would be a promising technology with important environmental value, social value and economic value to combine the treatment of wastewater with the cultivation of microalgae for biodiesel production.

  9. Evaluation of mono or mixed cultures of lactic acid bacteria in type II sourdough system.

    PubMed

    Ekinci, Raci; Şimşek, Ömer; Küçükçuban, Ayca; Nas, Sebahattin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of mono and mixed lactic acid bacteria (LAB) cultures to determine suitable LAB combinations for a type II sourdough system. In this context, previously isolated sourdough LAB strains with antimicrobial activity, which included Lactobacillus plantarum PFC22, Lactobacillus brevis PFC31, Pediococcus acidilactici PFC38, and Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis PFC80, were used as mono or mixed culture combinations in a fermentation system to produce type II sourdough, and subsequently in bread dough production. Compared to the monoculture fermentation of dough, the use of mixed cultures shortened the adaptation period by half. In addition, the use of mixed cultures ensured higher microbial viability, and enhanced the fruity flavor during bread dough production. It was determined that the combination of L. plantarum PFC22 + P. acidilactici PFC38 + L. sanfranciscensis PFC80 is a promising culture mixture that can be used in the production of type II sourdough systems, and that may also contribute to an increase in metabolic activity during bread production process.

  10. Developmental potential of bovine hand-made clone embryos reconstructed by aggregation or fusion with distinct cytoplasmic volumes.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Eduardo de Souza; Gerger, Renato Pereira da Costa; Ohlweiler, Lain Uriel; Ortigari, Ivens; Mezzalira, Joana Cláudia; Forell, Fabiana; Bertolini, Luciana Relly; Rodrigues, José Luiz; Ambrósio, Carlos Eduardo; Miglino, Maria Angélica; Mezzalira, Alceu; Bertolini, Marcelo

    2009-09-01

    Animal cloning has been associated with developmental abnormalities, with the level of heteroplasmy caused by the procedure being one of its potential limiting factors. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the fusion of hemicytoplasts or aggregation of hemiembryos, varying the final cytoplasmic volume, on development and cell density of embryos produced by hand-made cloning (HMC), parthenogenesis or by in vitro fertilization (IVF). One or two enucleated hemicytoplasts were paired and fused with one skin somatic cell. Activated clone and zona-free parthenote embryos and hemiembryos were in vitro cultured in the well-of-the-well (WOW) system, being allocated to one of six experimental groups, on a per WOW basis: single clone or parthenote hemiembryos (1 x 50%); aggregation of two (2 x 50%), three (3 x 50%), or four (4 x 50%) clone or parthenote hemiembryos; single clone or parthenote embryos (1 x 100%); or aggregation of two clone or parthenote embryos (2 x 100%). Control zona-intact parthenote or IVF embryos were in vitro cultured in four-well dishes. Results indicated that the increase in the number of aggregated structures within each WOW was followed by a linear increase in cleavage, blastocyst rate, and cell density. The increase in cytoplasmic volume, either by fusion or by aggregation, had a positive effect on embryo development, supporting the establishment of pregnancies and the birth of a viable clone calf after transfer to recipients. However, embryo aggregation did not improve development on a hemicytoplast basis, except for the aggregation of two clone embryos.

  11. Pathophysiology of protein aggregation and extended phenotyping in filaminopathy

    PubMed Central

    Serdaroglu-Oflazer, Piraye; Leber, Yvonne; Odgerel, Zagaa; van der Ven, Peter F. M.; Olivé, Montse; Ferrer, Isidro; Onipe, Adekunle; Mihaylov, Mariya; Bilbao, Juan M.; Lee, Hee S.; Höhfeld, Jörg; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Kong, Kester; Tegenthoff, Martin; Peters, Sören A.; Stenzel, Werner; Vorgerd, Matthias; Goldfarb, Lev G.; Fürst, Dieter O.

    2012-01-01

    , there is a noticeably diminished efficiency of both the ubiquitin–proteasome system and autophagy that impairs the muscle capacity to prevent the formation or mediate the degradation of aggregates. Transfection studies of cultured muscle cells imitate events observed in the patient’s affected muscle and therefore provide a helpful model for testing future therapeutic strategies. PMID:22961544

  12. The Importance of Treating Culture as a System: Lessons on Counter-Insurgency Strategy from the British Iraqi Mandate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    However, culture consists of far more than customs and courtesies.[1] In this respect, the best working definition of culture uses Franz Boas as a...starting point ( Boas was an early 20th century German cultural anthropologist): “The system of shared beliefs, values, customs, behaviours, and

  13. Ectogenesis: what could be learned from novel in-vitro culture systems?

    PubMed

    Jedrusik, Agnieszka

    2013-06-01

    Early mammalian development consists of two distinct phases separated by the event of implantation. Whereas much has been discovered about developmental mechanisms prior to implantation, the inability to culture and follow in real time cell behaviour over the period of implantation means that the second phase has not been explored in as much detail. Recently, a novel in-vitro culture system was described that permits continuous culture and time-lapse observations through the peri- and early post-implantation stages. This system has already delivered detailed information on the cellular processes accompanying early morphogenesis and allowed direct connections to be established between events occurring at the two developmental phases. This review discusses the potential of this novel technology and its possible applications that could have not only impact on basic science but also practical implications for human medicine.

  14. Using a 3D Culture System to Differentiate Visceral Adipocytes In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Emont, Margo P; Yu, Hui; Jun, Heejin; Hong, Xiaowei; Maganti, Nenita; Stegemann, Jan P; Wu, Jun

    2015-12-01

    It has long been recognized that body fat distribution and regional adiposity play a major role in the control of metabolic homeostasis. However, the ability to study and compare the cell autonomous regulation and response of adipocytes from different fat depots has been hampered by the difficulty of inducing preadipocytes isolated from the visceral depot to differentiate into mature adipocytes in culture. Here, we present an easily created 3-dimensional (3D) culture system that can be used to differentiate preadipocytes from the visceral depot as robustly as those from the sc depot. The cells differentiated in these 3D collagen gels are mature adipocytes that retain depot-specific characteristics, as determined by imaging, gene expression, and functional assays. This 3D culture system therefore allows for study of the development and function of adipocytes from both depots in vitro and may ultimately lead to a greater understanding of site-specific functional differences of adipose tissues to metabolic dysregulation.

  15. A pneumatic pressure-driven multi-throughput microfluidic circulation culture system.

    PubMed

    Satoh, T; Narazaki, G; Sugita, R; Kobayashi, H; Sugiura, S; Kanamori, T

    2016-06-21

    Here, we report a pneumatic pressure-driven microfluidic device capable of multi-throughput medium circulation culture. The circulation culture system has the following advantages for application in drug discovery: (i) simultaneous operation of multiple circulation units, (ii) use of a small amount of circulating medium (3.5 mL), (iii) pipette-friendly liquid handling, and (iv) a detachable interface with pneumatic pressure lines via sterile air-vent filters. The microfluidic device contains three independent circulation culture units, in which human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured under physiological shear stress induced by circulation of the medium. Circulation of the medium in the three culture units was generated by programmed sequentially applied pressure from two pressure-control lines. HUVECs cultured in the microfluidic device were aligned under a one-way circulating flow with a shear stress of 10 dyn cm(-2); they exhibited a randomly ordered alignment under no shear stress and under reciprocating flow with a shear stress of 10 dyn cm(-2). We also observed 2.8- to 4.9-fold increases in expression of the mRNAs of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and thrombomodulin under one-way circulating flow with a shear stress of 10 dyn cm(-2) compared with conditions of no shear stress or reciprocating flow.

  16. Numerical calculations for diffusion effects in the well-of-the-well culture system for mammalian embryos.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Koji

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies suggest that the microenvironment and embryo density used during embryo culture considerably affect development to the blastocyst stage. High embryo density allows for autocrine secretions to diffuse to neighbouring embryos during group culture, with a positive effect on further development. A variation of group culture is the well-of-the-well (WOW) culture system, allowing for individual identification of embryos cultured in small holes in a microdroplet. Bovine blastocyst development is higher in the WOW culture system than in conventional group culture. To compare the concentration of chemical factors between conventional and WOW culture, a model was constructed to calculate the concentration of secreted factors based on Fick's second law of diffusion using spreadsheet software. Furthermore, model was used to determine the concentration of growth factors and waste materials adjacent to the embryo periphery. The results of these calculations suggest that the highest difference in the concentration of secreted small molecules and macromolecules was at the most two- to threefold, with the concentrations reduced more and diffusion kinetics facilitated to a greater extent in the WOW culture system. The average ratio of the concentration of secreted macromolecules (10nm diameter) around the embryos was also compared between systems with well widths of 0.1 and 0.3mm. The concentration of secreted materials surrounding embryos increased in a narrow tapered well. The findings suggest that the WOW culture system is better than conventional group culture because of the increased final concentration of autocrine factors and higher diffusion kinetics of waste materials.

  17. The potential use of constructed wetlands in a recirculating aquaculture system for shrimp culture.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying-Feng; Jing, Shuh-Ren; Lee, Der-Yuan

    2003-01-01

    A pilot-scale constructed wetland unit, consisting of free water surface (FWS) and subsurface flow (SF) constructed wetlands arranged in series, was integrated into an outdoor recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) for culturing Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei). This study evaluated the performance of the wetland unit in treating the recirculating wastewater and examined the effect of improvement in water quality of the culture tank on the growth and survival of shrimp postlarvae. During an 80-day culture period, the wetland unit operated at a mean hydraulic loading rate of 0.3 m/day and effectively reduced the influent concentrations of 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5, 24%), suspended solids (SS, 71%), chlorophyll a (chl-a, 88%), total ammonium (TAN, 57%), nitrite nitrogen (NO2-N, 90%) and nitrate nitrogen (NO3-N, 68%). Phosphate (PO4-P) reduction was the least efficient (5.4%). The concentrations of SS, Chl-a, turbidity and NO3-N in the culture tank water in RAS were significantly (Psystem (CAS) that simulated static pond culture without wetland treatment. However, no significant difference (Psystems. At the end of the study, the harvest results showed that shrimp weight and survival rate in the RAS (3.8 +/-1.8 g/shrimp and 90%) significantly (Pculture environment, consequently increasing the shrimp growth and survival without water exchange, in a recirculating system.

  18. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Three-dimensional hydrogel cell culture systems for modeling neural tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, John

    Two-dimensional (2-D) neural cell culture systems have served as physiological models for understanding the cellular and molecular events that underlie responses to physical and chemical stimuli, control sensory and motor function, and lead to the development of neurological diseases. However, the development of three-dimensional (3-D) cell culture systems will be essential for the advancement of experimental research in a variety of fields including tissue engineering, chemical transport and delivery, cell growth, and cell-cell communication. In 3-D cell culture, cells are provided with an environment similar to tissue, in which they are surrounded on all sides by other cells, structural molecules and adhesion ligands. Cells grown in 3-D culture systems display morphologies and functions more similar to those observed in vivo, and can be cultured in such a way as to recapitulate the structural organization and biological properties of tissue. This thesis describes a hydrogel-based culture system, capable of supporting the growth and function of several neural cell types in 3-D. Alginate hydrogels were characterized in terms of their biomechanical and biochemical properties and were functionalized by covalent attachment of whole proteins and peptide epitopes. Methods were developed for rapid cross-linking of alginate hydrogels, thus permitting the incorporation of cells into 3-D scaffolds without adversely affecting cell viability or function. A variety of neural cell types were tested including astrocytes, microglia, and neurons. Cells remained viable and functional for longer than two weeks in culture and displayed process outgrowth in 3-D. Cell constructs were created that varied in cell density, type and organization, providing experimental flexibility for studying cell interactions and behavior. In one set of experiments, 3-D glial-endothelial cell co-cultures were used to model blood-brain barrier (BBB) structure and function. This co-culture system was

  20. Co-culture systems and technologies: taking synthetic biology to the next level

    PubMed Central

    Goers, Lisa; Freemont, Paul; Polizzi, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    Co-culture techniques find myriad applications in biology for studying natural or synthetic interactions between cell populations. Such techniques are of great importance in synthetic biology, as multi-species cell consortia and other natural or synthetic ecology systems are widely seen to hold enormous potential for foundational research as well as novel industrial, medical and environmental applications with many proof-of-principle studies in recent years. What is needed for co-cultures to fulfil their potential? Cell–cell interactions in co-cultures are strongly influenced by the extracellular environment, which is determined by the experimental set-up, which therefore needs to be given careful consideration. An overview of existing experimental and theoretical co-culture set-ups in synthetic biology and adjacent fields is given here, and challenges and opportunities involved in such experiments are discussed. Greater focus on foundational technology developments for co-cultures is needed for many synthetic biology systems to realize their potential in both applications and answering biological questions. PMID:24829281

  1. Co-culture systems and technologies: taking synthetic biology to the next level.

    PubMed

    Goers, Lisa; Freemont, Paul; Polizzi, Karen M

    2014-07-06

    Co-culture techniques find myriad applications in biology for studying natural or synthetic interactions between cell populations. Such techniques are of great importance in synthetic biology, as multi-species cell consortia and other natural or synthetic ecology systems are widely seen to hold enormous potential for foundational research as well as novel industrial, medical and environmental applications with many proof-of-principle studies in recent years. What is needed for co-cultures to fulfil their potential? Cell-cell interactions in co-cultures are strongly influenced by the extracellular environment, which is determined by the experimental set-up, which therefore needs to be given careful consideration. An overview of existing experimental and theoretical co-culture set-ups in synthetic biology and adjacent fields is given here, and challenges and opportunities involved in such experiments are discussed. Greater focus on foundational technology developments for co-cultures is needed for many synthetic biology systems to realize their potential in both applications and answering biological questions.

  2. Secretome analysis using a hollow fiber culture system for cancer biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Kuo-Hsun; Chang, Ying-Hua; Liao, Pao-Chi

    2013-11-01

    Secreted proteins, collectively referred to as the secretome, were suggested as valuable biomarkers in disease diagnosis and prognosis. However, some secreted proteins from cell cultures are difficult to detect because of their intrinsically low abundance; they are frequently masked by the released proteins from lysed cells and the substantial amounts of serum proteins used in culture medium. The hollow fiber culture (HFC) system is a commercially available system composed of small fibers sealed in a cartridge shell; cells grow on the outside of the fiber. Recently, because this system can help cells grow at a high density, it has been developed and applied in a novel analytical platform for cell secretome collection in cancer biomarker discovery. This article focuses on the advantages of the HFC system, including the effectiveness of the system for collection of secretomes, and reviews the process of cell secretome collection by the HFC system and proteomic approaches to discover cancer biomarkers. The HFC system not only provides a high-density three-dimensional (3D) cell culture system to mimic tumor growth conditions in vivo but can also accommodate numerous cells in a small volume, allowing secreted proteins to be accumulated and concentrated. In addition, cell lysis rates can be greatly reduced, decreasing the amount of contamination by abundant cytosolic proteins from lysed cells. Therefore, the HFC system is useful for preparing a wide range of proteins from cell secretomes and provides an effective method for collecting higher amounts of secreted proteins from cancer cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: An Updated Secretome.

  3. From the World-Systems Perspective to Institutional World History: Culture and Economy in Global Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benton, Lauren

    1996-01-01

    Summarizes critical attacks on Immanuel Wallerstein's World Systems approach to history and offers new critical evaluations. Wallerstein argued that an emerging capitalist world economy dominated politics and history from the 16th century to the present. Defines two new approaches, institutional analysis and post colonial cultural theory, that…

  4. Cultural Influences and Corporate Decision Making: The Humanities/Information Systems Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skovira, Robert J.

    Robert Morris College received a national Endowment for the Humanities grant to create a faculty study project to internationalize the humanities curriculum. The Humanities can play a role in building the cultural contexts and contributing to a deeper understanding of information-based corporate decision making in Information Systems courses,…

  5. Raising Cultural Self-Efficacy among Faculty and Staff of a Private Native Hawaiian School System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Randie Kamuela

    2012-01-01

    The Hawaiian cultural revitalization movement in Hawai`i is an important driver for many Hawaiian organizations as well as educational institutions that serve Native Hawaiians. One such organization is Kamehameha Schools, a private school system founded and endowed by Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop in 1887 to educate Native Hawaiian children. From…

  6. Development of Quality Assurance System in Culture and Nation Character Education in Primary Education in Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Susilana, Rudi; Asra

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of national education is to develop skills and build dignified national character and civilization in educating nation life (Act No. 20, 2003). The paper describes a system of quality assurance in culture and character education in primary education. This study employs the six sigma model which consists of the formula DMAIC (Define,…

  7. The Learning Transfer System Inventory (LTSI) in Ukraine: The Cross-Cultural Validation of the Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamkovenko, Bogdan V.; Holton, Elwood, III; Bates, R. A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to expand cross-cultural research and validate the Learning Transfer System Inventory in Ukraine. The researchers seek to translate the LTSI into Ukrainian and investigate the internal structure of this translated version of the questionnaire. Design/methodology/approach: The LTSI is translated into…

  8. Cross-Cultural Research with the Career Decision-Making System (CDM).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Thomas F.

    The increased diversity of clients is a fact for most counselors. The Career Decision-Making System (CDM) reliably measured six interest inventory scales in the following countries and cultures: Asian, European, Pacific Basin, Canadian English- and French-speaking, and United States English- and Spanish-speaking. The six scales are: Crafts;…

  9. Spearmint plantlet culture system as a means to study secondary metabolism in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The production of phytochemicals in vitro has been obtained from a variety of tissue types and organs. A plantlet culture system offers a means to study whole plant growth and development in a miniature scale and their corresponding phytochemical production. Plantlets resemble their in vivo counte...

  10. Enforced Cultural Change in Academe. A Practical Case Study: Implementing Management Systems in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer-Matthews, Sarah

    2001-01-01

    An action research project sought to implement a quality management system in an academic department in an Australian higher education institution. The case study revealed that technical change was attained, but adoption of a quality culture achieved only token acceptance. (EV)

  11. [Establishment of a cell suspension culture system of endangered Aquilaria sinensis (Lour.) Gilg].

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Han, Xiao-Min; Liang, Liang; Liu, Qing-Chang; Xu, Yan-Hong; Yang, Cheng-Min; Zhang, Zheng; Sun, Jing; Wei, Jian-He

    2014-08-01

    Aquilaria sinensis callus induced by stem tips were used to establish the suspension cell system. The results showed that the most suitable medium for callus induction and subculture is MS + 2.0 mg x L(-1) NAA + 1.0 mg x L(-1) 6-BA. After 12 times of subculture, the energetic and loose callus, which were appropriate for cell suspension culture, were cultured and shook in liquid medium MS + 2.0 mg x L(-1) NAA + 1.0 mg x L(-1) 6-BA + 500.0 mg x L(-1) casein hydrolysate (CH) to establish the suspension cell system. The growth curve of suspension cells showed a "S" type. At the beginning of the culture, cell density increased slowly; during 4 to 6 days, suspension cells reached logarithmic growth period; during 7 to 12 days, suspension cells were in the platform period; but after 12 days, cell density and activity went down obviously. Agarwood sesquiterpenes were not detected in the suspension cells during the growth period, however, they could be detected in MeJA treated suspension cells. In this study, a stable and active growing suspension cell system was established, which was a proper system to study the mechanism of agarwood sesquiterpene formation, and additionally provided a potential way to generate agarwood sesquiterpenes through application of cell culture.

  12. National Contexts Influencing Principals' Time Use and Allocation: Economic Development, Societal Culture, and Educational System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Moosung; Hallinger, Philip

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the impact of macro-context factors on the behavior of school principals. More specifically, the article illuminates how a nation's level of economic development, societal culture, and educational system influence the amount of time principals devote to their job role and shape their allocation of time to instructional…

  13. Hybrid System for the Inventory of the Cultural Heritage Using Voice Interface for Knowledge acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Château, Stefan Du; Boulanger, Danielle; Mercier-Laurent, Eunika

    This document presents our work on a definition and experimentation of a voice interface for cultural heritage inventory. This hybrid system includes signal processing, natural language techniques and knowledge modeling for future retrieval. We discuss the first results and present some challenges for our future work.

  14. In vitro systems and cultured cells as specimens for X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Roomans, G M; Hongpaisan, J; Jin, Z; Mörk, A C; Zhang, A

    1996-01-01

    In vitro systems and cultured cells are recognized as useful systems in many areas of biomedical research, including X-ray microanalysis. To be reliable, in an vitro system should have an elemental composition close to that of the tissue in situ, react in the same way to stimuli, and retain the in situ regulation of ion transport. In the present paper, four of the most commonly used in vitro systems will be reviewed: incubated tissue slices (liver and pancreas), isolated glands (submandibular gland acini, sweat glands), primary cell cultures (sweat glands, endometrium), and cell lines (the colon cancer cell line T84, immortalized sweat gland cells). Incubation of tissue slices of liver in Krebs-Ringers buffer caused a significant increase in Na and Cl and a decrease in K. Initially, these changes were also observed in the pancreas, but here the values gradually returned to normal. Isolated submandibular gland acini, and isolated sweat gland ducts and coils react in a similar way to stimulation as their in situ counterparts. In primary cultures of coil cells, however, part of the cell population acquires different ion transport characteristics. Technically simplest is the use of cell lines originating from cancer cells (e.g., the T84 cell line) and immortalized cell lines. X-ray microanalysis not only confirms data on ion transport obtained with other techniques, but adds the possibility to investigate the presence of subpopulations within a culture.

  15. Effect of cultural system and essential oil treatment on antioxidant capacity in raspberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of cultural system and essential oil treatment on antioxidant enzyme activities, antioxidant capacities and flavonoid contents in raspberries were evaluated. Raspberries were hand-harvested from organic and conventional farms in Maryland, USA, and were treated with essential oils includi...

  16. Improving Achievement for Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Learners through an Inquiry-Based Earth Systems Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Julie; Ariza, Eileen N. Whelan

    2008-01-01

    This report describes an inquiry-based Earth systems curriculum and strategies for teaching diverse students, which were embedded in the curriculum. The curriculum was implemented with 5th-grade students with varied linguistic, cultural, and socioeconomic backgrounds in five schools in a large, southeastern U.S., urban school district. At the end…

  17. Improving Hospital Quality and Patient Safety an Examination of Organizational Culture and Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, John Wallace

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the effects of safety culture, including operational climate and practices, as well as the adoption and use of information systems for delivering high quality healthcare and improved patient experience. Chapter 2 studies the influence of both general and outcome-specific hospital climate and quality practices on process…

  18. Organizing the Baby Boomer Construct: An Exploration of Marketing, Social Systems, and Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipschultz, Jeremy H.; Hilt, Michael L.; Reilly, Hugh J.

    2007-01-01

    Baby boomer trends are applied in the development of a conceptual framework that offers a social systems and cultural model for future studies. While there has been considerable recent attention paid to baby boomers, the studies lack a coherent theoretical base that would allow for more advanced and continuing research. Aging baby boomers heading…

  19. Ultrahigh-throughput Generation and Characterization of Cellular Aggregates in Laser-ablated Microwells of Poly(dimethylsiloxane)

    PubMed Central

    Albritton, Jacob L.; Roybal, Jonathon D.; Paulsen, Samantha J.; Calafat, Nick; Flores-Zaher, Jose A.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Gibbons, Don L.; Miller, Jordan S.

    2016-01-01

    Aggregates of cells, also known as multicellular aggregates (MCAs), have been used as microscale tissues in the fields of cancer biology, regenerative medicine, and developmental biology for many decades. However, small MCAs (fewer than 100 cells per aggregate) have remained challenging to manufacture in large quantities at high uniformity. Forced aggregation into microwells offers a promising solution for forming consistent aggregates, but commercial sources of microwells are expensive, complicated to manufacture, or lack the surface packing densities that would significantly improve MCA production. To address these concerns, we custom-modified a commercial laser cutter to provide complete control over laser ablation and directly generate microwells in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) substrate. We achieved ultra rapid microwell production speeds (>50,000 microwells/hr) at high areal packing densities (1,800 microwells/cm2) and over large surface areas for cell culture (60 cm2). Variation of the PDMS substrate distance from the laser focal plane during ablation allowed for the generation of microwells with a variety of sizes, contours, and aspect ratios. Casting of high-fidelity microneedle masters in polyurethane allowed for non-ablative microwell reproduction through replica molding. MCAs of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), murine 344SQ metastatic adenocarcinoma cells, and human C4-2 prostate cancer cells were generated in our system with high uniformity within 24 hours, and computer vision software aided in the ultra-high-throughput analysis of harvested aggregates. Moreover, MCAs maintained invasive capabilities in 3D migration assays. In particular, 344SQ MCAs demonstrated epithelial lumen formation on Matrigel, and underwent EMT and invasion in the presence of TGF-β. We expect this technique to find broad utility in the generation and cultivation of cancer cell aggregates, primary cell aggregates, and embryoid bodies. PMID:26998251

  20. Influence of tillage practices and straw incorporation on soil aggregates, organic carbon, and crop yields in a rice-wheat rotation system

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ke; Yang, Jianjun; Xue, Yong; Lv, Weiguang; Zheng, Xianqing; Pan, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a fixed-site field experiment was conducted to study the influence of different combinations of tillage and straw incorporation management on carbon storage in different-sized soil aggregates and on crop yield after three years of rice-wheat rotation. Compared to conventional tillage, the percentages of >2 mm macroaggregates and water-stable macroaggregates in rice-wheat double-conservation tillage (zero-tillage and straw incorporation) were increased 17.22% and 36.38% in the 0–15 cm soil layer and 28.93% and 66.34% in the 15–30 cm soil layer, respectively. Zero tillage and straw incorporation also increased the mean weight diameter and stability of the soil aggregates. In surface soil (0–15 cm), the maximum proportion of total aggregated carbon was retained with 0.25–0.106 mm aggregates, and rice-wheat double-conservation tillage had the greatest ability to hold the organic carbon (33.64 g kg−1). However, different forms occurred at higher levels in the 15–30 cm soil layer under the conventional tillage. In terms of crop yield, the rice grown under conventional tillage and the wheat under zero tillage showed improved equivalent rice yields of 8.77% and 6.17% compared to rice-wheat double-cropping under zero tillage or conventional tillage, respectively. PMID:27812038

  1. Influence of tillage practices and straw incorporation on soil aggregates, organic carbon, and crop yields in a rice-wheat rotation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ke; Yang, Jianjun; Xue, Yong; Lv, Weiguang; Zheng, Xianqing; Pan, Jianjun

    2016-11-01

    In this study, a fixed-site field experiment was conducted to study the influence of different combinations of tillage and straw incorporation management on carbon storage in different-sized soil aggregates and on crop yield after three years of rice-wheat rotation. Compared to conventional tillage, the percentages of >2 mm macroaggregates and water-stable macroaggregates in rice-wheat double-conservation tillage (zero-tillage and straw incorporation) were increased 17.22% and 36.38% in the 0–15 cm soil layer and 28.93% and 66.34% in the 15–30 cm soil layer, respectively. Zero tillage and straw incorporation also increased the mean weight diameter and stability of the soil aggregates. In surface soil (0–15 cm), the maximum proportion of total aggregated carbon was retained with 0.25–0.106 mm aggregates, and rice-wheat double-conservation tillage had the greatest ability to hold the organic carbon (33.64 g kg‑1). However, different forms occurred at higher levels in the 15–30 cm soil layer under the conventional tillage. In terms of crop yield, the rice grown under conventional tillage and the wheat under zero tillage showed improved equivalent rice yields of 8.77% and 6.17% compared to rice-wheat double-cropping under zero tillage or conventional tillage, respectively.

  2. Influence of tillage practices and straw incorporation on soil aggregates, organic carbon, and crop yields in a rice-wheat rotation system.

    PubMed

    Song, Ke; Yang, Jianjun; Xue, Yong; Lv, Weiguang; Zheng, Xianqing; Pan, Jianjun

    2016-11-04

    In this study, a fixed-site field experiment was conducted to study the influence of different combinations of tillage and straw incorporation management on carbon storage in different-sized soil aggregates and on crop yield after three years of rice-wheat rotation. Compared to conventional tillage, the percentages of >2 mm macroaggregates and water-stable macroaggregates in rice-wheat double-conservation tillage (zero-tillage and straw incorporation) were increased 17.22% and 36.38% in the 0-15 cm soil layer and 28.93% and 66.34% in the 15-30 cm soil layer, respectively. Zero tillage and straw incorporation also increased the mean weight diameter and stability of the soil aggregates. In surface soil (0-15 cm), the maximum proportion of total aggregated carbon was retained with 0.25-0.106 mm aggregates, and rice-wheat double-conservation tillage had the greatest ability to hold the organic carbon (33.64 g kg(-1)). However, different forms occurred at higher levels in the 15-30 cm soil layer under the conventional tillage. In terms of crop yield, the rice grown under conventional tillage and the wheat under zero tillage showed improved equivalent rice yields of 8.77% and 6.17% compared to rice-wheat double-cropping under zero tillage or conventional tillage, respectively.

  3. Culturing thick brain slices: An interstitial 3D microperfusion system for enhanced viability

    PubMed Central

    Rambani, Komal; Vukasinovic, Jelena; Glezer, Ari; Potter, Steve M.

    2009-01-01

    Brain slice preparations are well-established models for a wide spectrum of in vitro investigations in the neuroscience discipline. However, these investigations are limited to acute preparations or thin organotypic culture preparations due to the lack of a successful method that allows culturing of thick organotypic brain slices. Thick brain slice cultures suffer necrosis due to ischemia deep in the tissue resulting from a destroyed circulatory system and subsequent diffusion-limited supply of nutrients and oxygen. Although thin organotypic brain slice cultures can be successfully cultured using a well established roller tube method (a monolayer organotypic culture) (Gahwiler B H, 1981) or a membrane insert method (up to 1–4 cell layers, <150μm)(Stoppini L et al., 1991), these methods fail to support thick tissue preparations. A few perfusion methods (using submerged or interface/microfluidic chambers) have been reported to enhance the longevity (up to few hours) of acute slice preparations (up to 600μm thick) (Hass H L et al., 1979; Nicoll R A and Alger B E, 1981; Passeraub P A et al., 2003). Here, we report a unique interstitial microfluidic perfusion technique to culture thick (700μm) organotypic brain slices. The design of the custom-made micro-perfusion chamber facilitates laminar, interstitial perfusion of oxygenated nutrient medium throughout the tissue thickness with concomitant removal of depleted medium and catabolites. We examined the utility of this perfusion method to enhance the viability of the thick organotypic brain slice cultures after 2 days and 5 days in vitro (DIV). We investigated the range of amenable flow rates that enhance the viability of 700μm thick organotypic brain slices compared to the unperfused control cultures. Our perfusion method allows up to 84.6% viability (P<0.01) and up to 700μm thickness, even after 5 DIV. Our results also confirm that these cultures are functionally active and have their in vivo cytoarchitecture

  4. Culture characteristics of the atmospheric and room temperature plasma-mutated Spirulina platensis mutants in CO2 aeration culture system for biomass production.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yinyee; Fang, Mingyue; Jin, Lihua; Zhang, Chong; Li, He-Ping; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2015-10-01

    For biomass production of Spirulina platensis as feedstock of fermentation, the culture characteristics of three typical mutants of 3-A10, 3-B2 and 4-B3 generated by atmospheric and room temperature plasmas (ARTP) mutagenesis were systematically studied by using CO2 aeration culture system and compared with the wild strain. The specific growth rate of wild strain in the pure air aeration culture system exhibited a 76.2% increase compared with static culture, while the specific growth rates of the 3-A10, 3-B2 and 4-B3 in pure air aeration culture system were increased by 114.4%, 95.9% and 88.2% compared with their static cultures. Compared with static culture, the carbohydrate contents of wild strain, 3-A10, 3-B2 and 4-B3 in pure air aeration culture system dropped plainly by 51.0%, 79.3%, 85.5% and 26.1%. Increase of CO2 concentration enhanced carbohydrate content and productivity. Based on the carbohydrate productivity, the optimal inlet of CO2 concentration in aeration culture was determined to be 12% (v/v). Under this condition, 3-B2 exhibited the highest carbohydrate content (30.7%), CO2 fixation rate (0.120gCO2·g(-1)·d(-1)) and higher growth rate (0.093 g L(-1)·d(-1)), while 3-A10 showed the highest growth rate (0.118 g L(-1)·d(-1)) and higher CO2 fixation rate (0.117gCO2·g(-1)·d(-1)) but low carbohydrate content (24.5%), and 4-B3 showed the highest chlorophyll (Chl) content (3.82 mg·g(-1)). The most outstanding mutant by static culture in terms of growth rate and carbohydrate productivity (3-B2), was also demonstrated by CO2 aeration culture system. This study revealed that the ARTP mutagenesis could generate the S. platensis mutants suitable for CO2 aeration culture aiming at biomass production.

  5. Measurement of aggregate cohesion by tissue surface tensiometry.

    PubMed

    Butler, Christine M; Foty, Ramsey A

    2011-04-08

    Rigorous measurement of intercellular binding energy can only be made using methods grounded in thermodynamic principles in systems at equilibrium. We have developed tissue surface tensiometry (TST) specifically to measure the surface free energy of interaction between cells. The biophysical concepts underlying TST have been previously described in detail. The method is based on the observation that mutually cohesive cells, if maintained in shaking culture, will spontaneously assemble into clusters. Over time, these clusters will round up to form spheres. This rounding-up behavior mimics the behavior characteristic of liquid systems. Intercellular binding energy is measured by compressing spherical aggregates between parallel plates in a custom-designed tissue surface tensiometer. The same mathematical equation used to measure the surface tension of a liquid droplet is used to measure surface tension of 3D tissue-like spherical aggregates. The cellular equivalent of liquid surface tension is intercellular binding energy, or more generally, tissue cohesivity. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that tissue surface tension (1) predicts how two groups of embryonic cells will interact with one another, (2) can strongly influence the ability of tissues to interact with biomaterials, (3) can be altered not only through direct manipulation of cadherin-based intercellular cohesion, but also by manipulation of key ECM molecules such as FN and 4) correlates with invasive potential of lung cancer, fibrosarcoma, brain tumor and prostate tumor cell lines. In this article we will describe the apparatus, detail the steps required to generate spheroids, to load the spheroids into the tensiometer chamber, to initiate aggregate compression, and to analyze and validate the tissue surface tension measurements generated.

  6. Comparison of different procedures to stabilize biogas formation after process failure in a thermophilic waste digestion system: Influence of aggregate formation on process stability

    SciTech Connect

    Kleyboecker, A.; Liebrich, M.; Kasina, M.; Kraume, M.; Wittmaier, M.; Wuerdemann, H.

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanism of process recovery with calcium oxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of insoluble calcium salts with long chain fatty acids and phosphate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption of VFAs by the precipitates resulting in the formation of aggregates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acid uptake and phosphate release by the phosphate-accumulating organisms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microbial degradation of volatile fatty acids in the aggregates. - Abstract: Following a process failure in a full-scale biogas reactor, different counter measures were undertaken to stabilize the process of biogas formation, including the reduction of the organic loading rate, the addition of sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and the introduction of calcium oxide (CaO). Corresponding to the results of the process recovery in the full-scale digester, laboratory experiments showed that CaO was more capable of stabilizing the process than NaOH. While both additives were able to raise the pH to a neutral milieu (pH > 7.0), the formation of aggregates was observed particularly when CaO was used as the additive. Scanning electron microscopy investigations revealed calcium phosphate compounds in the core of the aggregates. Phosphate seemed to be released by phosphorus-accumulating organisms, when volatile fatty acids accumulated. The calcium, which was charged by the CaO addition, formed insoluble salts with long chain fatty acids, and caused the precipitation of calcium phosphate compounds. These aggregates were surrounded by a white layer of carbon rich organic matter, probably consisting of volatile fatty acids. Thus, during the process recovery with CaO, the decrease in the amount of accumulated acids in the liquid phase was likely enabled by (1) the formation of insoluble calcium salts with long chain fatty acids, (2) the adsorption of volatile fatty acids by the precipitates, (3) the acid uptake by phosphorus-accumulating organisms and (4

  7. Multi-stage continuous high cell density culture systems: a review.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ho Nam; Jung, Kwonsu; Choi, Jin-Dal-Rae; Lee, Joon Chul; Woo, Hee-Chul

    2014-01-01

    A multi-stage continuous high cell density culture (MSC-HCDC) system makes it possible to achieve high productivity together with high product titer of many bioproducts. For long-term continuous operation of MSC-HCDC systems, the cell retention time and hydraulic retention time must be decoupled and strains (bacteria, yeast, plant, and animal cells) must be stable. MSC-HCDC systems are suitable for low-value high-volume extracellular products such as fuel ethanol, lactic acid or volatile fatty acids, and high-value products such as monoclonal antibodies as well as intracellular products such as polyhydroxybutyric acid (PHB), microbial lipids or a number of therapeutics. Better understanding of the fermentation kinetics of a specific product and reliable high-density culture methods for the product-generating microorganisms will facilitate timely industrialization of MSC-HCDC systems for products that are currently obtained in fed-batch bioreactors.

  8. Recurrent amoebic gill infestation in rainbow trout cultured in a semiclosed water recirculation system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, A.C.; Herman, R.L.; Noga, E.J.; Bullock, G.L.

    1997-01-01

    Five lots of commercially purchased juvenile rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (17-44 g) stocked in a continuous-production water recirculation system became infested with gilt amoebae. The amoebae were introduced into the recirculation system, as evidenced by their presence on gills of fish held in quarantine tanks. Based on their morphology, as seen in histological sections and by electron microscopy, the amoebae appeared to be more closely related to the family Cochliopodiidae than to other taxa of free living amoebae. Attempts to culture the amoebae in different media, at different temperatures of incubation, and in fish cell culture were not successful. Initial treatment of the recirculation system with formalin at 167 parts per million (ppm) for 1 h eliminated amoebae from the gills. Subsequent treatments of the entire system with formalin at 50-167 ppm reduced the intensity of further infestations.

  9. Comparison of different procedures to stabilize biogas formation after process failure in a thermophilic waste digestion system: influence of aggregate formation on process stability.

    PubMed

    Kleyböcker, A; Liebrich, M; Kasina, M; Kraume, M; Wittmaier, M; Würdemann, H

    2012-06-01

    Following a process failure in a full-scale biogas reactor, different counter measures were undertaken to stabilize the process of biogas formation, including the reduction of the organic loading rate, the addition of sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and the introduction of calcium oxide (CaO). Corresponding to the results of the process recovery in the full-scale digester, laboratory experiments showed that CaO was more capable of stabilizing the process than NaOH. While both additives were able to raise the pH to a neutral milieu (pH>7.0), the formation of aggregates was observed particularly when CaO was used as the additive. Scanning electron microscopy investigations revealed calcium phosphate compounds in the core of the aggregates. Phosphate seemed to be released by phosphorus-accumulating organisms, when volatile fatty acids accumulated. The calcium, which was charged by the CaO addition, formed insoluble salts with long chain fatty acids, and caused the precipitation of calcium phosphate compounds. These aggregates were surrounded by a white layer of carbon rich organic matter, probably consisting of volatile fatty acids. Thus, during the process recovery with CaO, the decrease in the amount of accumulated acids in the liquid phase was likely enabled by (1) the formation of insoluble calcium salts with long chain fatty acids, (2) the adsorption of volatile fatty acids by the precipitates, (3) the acid uptake by phosphorus-accumulating organisms and (4) the degradation of volatile fatty acids in the aggregates. Furthermore, this mechanism enabled a stable process performance after re-activation of biogas production. In contrast, during the counter measure with NaOH aggregate formation was only minor resulting in a rapid process failure subsequent the increase of the organic loading rate.

  10. A 3D cell culture system: separation distance between INS-1 cell and endothelial cell monolayers co-cultured in fibrin influences INS-1 cells insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Sabra, Georges; Vermette, Patrick

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an in vitro cell culture system allowing studying the effect of separation distance between monolayers of rat insulinoma cells (INS-1) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) co-cultured in fibrin over INS-1 cell insulin secretion. For this purpose, a three-dimensional (3D) cell culture chamber was designed, built using micro-fabrication techniques and validated. The co-culture was successfully carried out and the effect on INS-1 cell insulin secretion was investigated. After 48 and 72 h, INS-1 cells co-cultured with HUVEC separated by a distance of 100 µm revealed enhanced insulin secretion compared to INS-1 cells cultured alone or co-cultured with HUVEC monolayers separated by a distance of 200 µm. These results illustrate the importance of the separation distance between two cell niches for cell culture design and the possibility to further enhance the endocrine function of beta cells when this factor is considered.

  11. The culture of Chlorella vulgaris with human urine in multibiological life support system experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Liu, Hong; Tong, Ling; Fu, Yuming; He, Wenting; Hu, Enzhu; Hu, Dawei

    The Integrative Experimental System (IES) was established as a tool to evaluate the rela-tionship of the subsystems in Bioregenerative Life Support System, and Multibiological Life Support System Experiments (MLSSE) have been conducted in the IES. The IES consists of a higher plant chamber, an animal chamber and a plate photo bioreactor (PPB) which cultivated lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), silkworm (Bombyx Mori L.) and microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris), respectively. In MLSSE, four volunteers took turns breathing the system air through a tube connected with the animal chamber periodically. According to the CO2 concentration in the IES, the automotive control system of the PPB changed the light intensity regulating the photosynthesis of Chlorella vulgaris to make CO2 /O2 in the system maintain at stable levels. Chlorella vulgaris grew with human urine by carrying certain amount of alga liquid out of the bioreactor every day with synthetic urine replenished into the system, and O2 was regenerated, at the same time human urine was purified. Results showed that this IES worked stably and Chlorella vulgaris grew well; The culture of Chlorella vulgaris could be used to keep the balance of CO2 and O2 , and the change of light intensity could control the gas composition in the IES; Microalgae culture could be used in emergency in the system, the culture of Chlorella vulgaris could recover to original state in 5 days; 15.6 ml of condensation water was obtained every day by the culture of Chlorella vulgaris; The removal efficiencies of N, P in human urine could reach to 98.2% and 99.5%.

  12. An aeroponic culture system for the study of root herbivory on Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Plant defense against herbivory has been studied primarily in aerial tissues. However, complex defense mechanisms have evolved in all parts of the plant to combat herbivore attack and these mechanisms are likely to differ in the aerial and subterranean environment. Research investigating defense responses belowground has been hindered by experimental difficulties associated with the accessibility and quality of root tissue and the lack of bioassays using model plants with altered defense profiles. Results We have developed an aeroponic culture system based on a calcined clay substrate that allows insect herbivores to feed on plant roots while providing easy recovery of the root tissue. The culture method was validated by a root-herbivore system developed for Arabidopsis thaliana and the herbivore Bradysia spp. (fungus gnat). Arabidopsis root mass obtained from aeroponically grown plants was comparable to that from other culture systems, and the plants were morphologically normal. Bradysia larvae caused considerable root damage resulting in reduced root biomass and water absorption. After feeding on the aeroponically grown root tissue, the larvae pupated and emerged as adults. Root damage of mature plants cultivated in aeroponic substrate was compared to that of Arabidopsis seedlings grown in potting mix. Seedlings were notably more susceptible to Bradysia feeding than mature plants and showed decreased overall growth and survival rates. Conclusions A root-herbivore system consisting of Arabidopsis thaliana and larvae of the opportunistic herbivore Bradysia spp. has been established that mimics herbivory in the rhizosphere. Bradysia infestation of Arabidopsis grown in this culture system significantly affects plant performance. The culture method will allow simple profiling and in vivo functional analysis of root defenses such as chemical defense metabolites that are released in response to belowground insect attack. PMID:21392399

  13. Enhanced Geothermal System Development of the AmeriCulture Leasehold in the Animas Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Duchane, David V; Seawright, Gary L; Sewright, Damon E; Brown, Don; Witcher, James c.; Nichols, Kenneth E.

    2001-03-02

    Working under the grant with AmeriCulture, Inc., and its team of geothermal experts, assembled a plan to apply enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) techniques to increase both the temperature and flow rate of the geothermal waters on its leasehold. AmeriCulture operates a commercial aquaculture facility that will benefit from the larger quantities of thermal energy and low cost electric power that EGS technology can provide. The project brought together a team of specialists that, as a group, provided the full range of expertise required to successfully develop and implement the project.

  14. Health system factors affecting communication with pediatricians: gendered work culture in primary care.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Sean

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the roles that practice setting, education level, and gender may play in social workers' communication satisfaction with pediatricians. Taking an ethnographic approach, the researcher interviewed social workers and pediatricians who worked together to provide mental health services in primary care. The results suggested that gender at the health system level may be an issue and that gendered work culture in primary care was a factor in communication. In particular, reimbursement, an aspect of the gendered work culture, was a substantial communication barrier, and the implications for Medicaid billing are discussed.

  15. One health from a social-ecological systems perspective: enriching social and cultural dimensions.