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Sample records for aggregate elastic moduli

  1. Elastic moduli of pyrope rich garnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B. K.; Pandey, A. K.; Singh, C. K.

    2013-06-01

    The elastic properties of minerals depend on its composition, crystal structure, temperature and level of defects. The elastic parameters are important for the interpretation of the structure and composition of the garnet rich family. In present work we have calculated the elastic moduli such as isothermal bulk modulus, Young's modulus and Shear modulus over a wide range of temperature from 300 K to 1000 K by using Birch EOS and Poirrier Tarantola equation of state. The obtained results are compared with the experimental results obtained by measuring the elastic moduli of single crystal. The calculated results show that the logarithmic isothermal EOS does not cooperate well with experimental results.

  2. Polycrystalline gamma plutonium's elastic moduli versus temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, Albert; Betts, J; Trugman, A; Mielke, C H; Mitchell, J N; Ramos, M; Stroe, I

    2009-01-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy was used to measure the elastic properties of pure polycrystalline {sup 239}Pu in the {gamma} phase. Shear and longitudinal elastic moduli were measured simultaneously and the bulk modulus was computed from them. A smooth, linear, and large decrease of all elastic moduli with increasing temperature was observed. They calculated the Poisson ratio and found that it increases from 0.242 at 519 K to 0.252 at 571 K. These measurements on extremely well characterized pure Pu are in agreement with other reported results where overlap occurs.

  3. Resonant Acoustic Determination of Complex Elastic Moduli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, David A.; Garrett, Steven L.

    1991-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive, yet accurate method for measuring the dynamic complex modulus of elasticity is described. Using a 'free-free' bar selectively excited in three independent vibrational modes, the shear modulus is obtained by measuring the frequency of the torsional resonant mode and the Young's modulus is determined from measurement of either the longitudinal or flexural mode. The damping properties are obtained by measuring the quality factor (Q) for each mode. The Q is inversely proportional to the loss tangent. The viscoelastic behavior of the sample can be obtained by tracking a particular resonant mode (and thus a particular modulus) using a phase locked loop (PLL) and by changing the temperature of the sample. The change in the damping properties is obtained by measuring the in-phase amplitude of the PLL which is proportional to the Q of the material. The real and imaginary parts or the complex modulus can be obtained continuously as a function of parameters such as temperature, pressure, or humidity. For homogeneous and isotropic samples only two independent moduli are needed in order to characterize the complete set of elastic constants, thus, values can be obtained for the dynamic Poisson's ratio, bulk modulus, Lame constants, etc.

  4. Elastic shear moduli of brittle matrix composites with interfacial debonding

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, F.G.; Pagano, N.J.

    1994-12-31

    Elastic shear moduli of brittle matrix composites with interfacial debonding are studied. Compatibility displacement boundary conditions between representative volume elements are imposed through finite element analyses. Comparisons of the moduli between the full RVE model and quarter cell model are made. Parametric studies assessing the effect of the debonding, the shear moduli ratios in the constituents and the fiber volume fractions on the composite shear moduli are also presented. Results show that the commonly used quarter cell model overestimate the moduli. The disparity increases as the rigidity of the fibers or fiber volume fraction increases.

  5. Theoretical elastic moduli for disordered packings of interconnected spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaccone, Alessio; Lattuada, Marco; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2007-11-01

    A theoretical model has been developed which provides analytical expressions for the elastic moduli of disordered isotropic ensembles of spheres interconnected by physical bonds. Young's and shear moduli have been derived assuming an ideal random isotropic network and the radial distribution function for disordered packings of spheres. The interparticle interactions are accounted for in terms of surface forces for the two distinct cases of perfectly rigid spheres and spheres deformable at contact. A theoretical expression is also derived in a similar way for the bulk or compressibility modulus. In this case, an atomistic approach has been followed based on the analogy with noble gas solids and colloidal crystals. Also in this case, disordered spatial distribution of the spheres is described statistically. For the case of colloidal aggregates, a total two-body mean-field interaction potential is used which includes the Born repulsion energy. This latter contribution plays an essential role in determining the compression behavior of systems of particles aggregated in the primary minimum of the potential well and, therefore, must not be neglected. Both the expression of the Young's modulus and that of the compressibility modulus derived in this work are found to be consistent with two distinct sets of experimental data which recently appeared in the literature.

  6. Spatial Distributions of Local Elastic Moduli Near the Jamming Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Hideyuki; Silbert, Leonardo E.; Sperl, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Recent progress on studies of the nanoscale mechanical responses in disordered systems has highlighted a strong degree of heterogeneity in the elastic moduli. In this contribution, using computer simulations, we study the elastic heterogeneities in athermal amorphous solids—composed of isotropic static sphere packings—near the jamming transition. We employ techniques based on linear response methods that are amenable to experimentation. We find that the local elastic moduli are randomly distributed in space and are described by Gaussian probability distributions, thereby lacking any significant spatial correlations, that persist all the way down to the transition point. However, the shear modulus fluctuations grow as the jamming threshold is approached, which is characterized by a new power-law scaling. Through this diverging behavior we are able to identify a characteristic length scale, associated with shear modulus heterogeneities, that distinguishes between bulk and local elastic responses.

  7. Spatial Distributions of Local Elastic Moduli Near the Jamming Transition.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hideyuki; Silbert, Leonardo E; Sperl, Matthias

    2016-02-12

    Recent progress on studies of the nanoscale mechanical responses in disordered systems has highlighted a strong degree of heterogeneity in the elastic moduli. In this contribution, using computer simulations, we study the elastic heterogeneities in athermal amorphous solids--composed of isotropic static sphere packings--near the jamming transition. We employ techniques based on linear response methods that are amenable to experimentation. We find that the local elastic moduli are randomly distributed in space and are described by Gaussian probability distributions, thereby lacking any significant spatial correlations, that persist all the way down to the transition point. However, the shear modulus fluctuations grow as the jamming threshold is approached, which is characterized by a new power-law scaling. Through this diverging behavior we are able to identify a characteristic length scale, associated with shear modulus heterogeneities, that distinguishes between bulk and local elastic responses. PMID:26919018

  8. Structures and Elastic Moduli of Polymer Nanocomposite Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hongyi; Karim, Alamgir; University of Akron Team

    2014-03-01

    Polymeric thin films generally possess unique mechanical and thermal properties due to confinement. In this study we investigated structures and elastic moduli of polymer nanocomposite thin films, which can potentially find wide applications in diverse areas such as in coating, permeation and separation. Conventional thermoplastics (PS, PMMA) and biopolymers (PLA, PCL) were chosen as polymer matrices. Various types of nanoparticles were used including nanoclay, fullerene and functionalized inorganic particles. Samples were prepared by solvent-mixing followed by spin-coating or flow-coating. Film structures were characterized using X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Elastic moduli were measured by strain-induced elastic buckling instability for mechanical measurements (SIEBIMM), and a strengthening effect was found in certain systems due to strong interaction between polymers and nanoparticles. The effects of polymer structure, nanoparticle addition and film thickness on elastic modulus will be discussed and compared with bulk materials.

  9. Computation of graphene elastic moduli at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zubko, I. Yu. Kochurov, V. I.

    2015-10-27

    Finding the values of parameters for the simplest Mie’s family potentials is performed in order to estimate elastic moduli of graphene monolayers using lattice statics approach. The coincidence criterion of the experimentally determined Poisson’s ratio with the estimated value is taken in order to select dimensionless power parameters of the Mie-type potential. It allowed obtaining more precise estimation of elastic properties in comparison with variety of other potentials for carbon atoms in graphene monolayer.

  10. Dynamics and elasticity of fire ant aggregations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto; Tennenbaum, Michael; Liu, Zhongyang; Hu, David

    2015-03-01

    Fire ants, Solenopsis invicta, form aggregations that are able to drip and spread like simple liquids, but that can also store energy and maintain a shape like elastic solids. They are an active material where the constituent particles constantly transform chemical energy into work. We find that fire ant aggregations shear thin and exhibit a stress cutoff below which they are able to oppose the applied stress. In the linear regime, the dynamics is fractal-like with both storage and shear moduli that overlap for over three orders of magnitude and that are power law with frequency. This dynamic behavior, characteristic of polymer gels and the gelation point, gives way to a predominantly elastic regime at higher ant densities. In comparison, dead ants are always solid-like.

  11. Variation of elastic moduli of clays with humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuila, U.; Prasad, M.

    2012-12-01

    The elastic moduli of clays are highly variable. The reported values of elastic moduli of clays in the literature provide a large range: ranging from 0.15 GPa to 400 GPa. One of the many probable reasons for this variation is different external experimental environments leading to varied amounts of cations and bound water in the interlayers. The clay structure is affected by the kind of water associated with it: free water and bound water, the water in the interlayer. Smectite and mixed-layered illite-smectite (I-S) are capable of retaining significant electrostatic bound water in excess of 200C and can rapidly adsorb moisture from the air depending upon the humidity conditions. These can lead to the variation in their elastic properties. Prior experimental studies of acoustic velocity measurement in compacted clay pellets showed comparable trends (Figure 1) but different velocities for same reported porosity. This can be attributed to the humidity difference in the lab ambient conditions where the measurements were made. Molecular simulation studies on montmorillonite clays shows similar dependence of Young's Modulus on the hydration state of the clays (Pal Bathija 2009). In this paper, we studied the effect of humidity on the elastic properties of compacted pellets of Na-montmorillonite. This can be achieved by placing the Na-montmorillonite pellets in bell jars containing different saturated salt solutions. These salt solutions are used as a standard for relative humidity measurements. Figure 2 shows an experimental set-up used to the experiment. We will present the results of the variation of elastic properties of clays with varying humidity conditions. Preliminary results suggest that acoustic velocities through the compacted Na-montmorillonite pellet depend on the humidity conditions. The varying amount of interlayer clay-bound water and capillary condensation of water in small micropores in clays with varying humidity conditions resulted in the change in the

  12. Dynamic elastic moduli during isotropic densification of initially granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Jérémie; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Lavallée, Yan; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-03-01

    The elastic properties of homogeneous, isotropic materials are well constrained. However, in heterogeneous and evolving materials, these essential properties are less well-explored. During sintering of volcanic ash particles by viscous processes as well as during compaction and cementation of sediments, microstructure and porosity undergo changes that affect bulk dynamic elastic properties. Here using a model system of glass particles as an analogue for initially granular rock-forming materials, we have determined porosity and P-wave velocity during densification. Using these results, we test models for the kinetics of densification and the resultant evolution of the elastic properties to derive a quantitative description of the coupling between the kinetics of isotropic densification and the evolving dynamic elastic moduli. We demonstrate the power of the resultant model on a wide range of data for non-coherent sediments as well as sedimentary and volcanic rocks. We propose that such constraints be viewed as an essential ingredient of time-dependent models for the deformation of evolving materials in volcanoes and sedimentary basins.

  13. Elastic moduli of nanocrystalline binary Al alloys with Fe, Co, Ti, Mg and Pb alloying elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babicheva, Rita I.; Bachurin, Dmitry V.; Dmitriev, Sergey V.; Zhang, Ying; Kok, Shaw Wei; Bai, Lichun; Zhou, Kun

    2016-05-01

    The paper studies the elastic moduli of nanocrystalline (NC) Al and NC binary Al-X alloys (X is Fe, Co, Ti, Mg or Pb) by using molecular dynamics simulations. X atoms in the alloys are either segregated to grain boundaries (GBs) or distributed randomly as in disordered solid solution. At 0 K, the rigidity of the alloys increases with decrease in atomic radii of the alloying elements. An addition of Fe, Co or Ti to the NC Al leads to increase in the Young's E and shear μ moduli, while an alloying with Pb decreases them. The elastic moduli of the alloys depend on a distribution of the alloying elements. The alloys with the random distribution of Fe or Ti demonstrate larger E and μ than those for the corresponding alloys with GB segregations, while the rigidity of the Al-Co alloy is higher for the case of the GB segregations. The moduli E and μ for polycrystalline aggregates of Al and Al-X alloys with randomly distributed X atoms are estimated based on the elastic constants of corresponding single-crystals according to the Voigt-Reuss-Hill approximation, which neglects the contribution of GBs to the rigidity. The results show that GBs in NC materials noticeably reduce their rigidity. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of μ for the NC Al-X alloys is analyzed. Only the Al-Co alloy with GB segregations shows the decrease in μ to the lowest extent in the temperature range of 0-600 K in comparison with the NC pure Al.

  14. An ultrasonic method for studying elastic moduli as a function of temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, R. G.

    1969-01-01

    Ultrasonic method is used to determine the elastic moduli of materials used in components of high-temperature nuclear reactors. An ultrasonic, pulse-echo technique determines the velocity of sound waves propogating in a heated region of rod-shaped specimens. From these velocities, the elastic moduli are calculated.

  15. Predicting the Elastic Moduli of Perovskites in the Earth's Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, R. J.; Ross, N. L.; Zhao, J.; Vanpeteghem, C.

    2006-05-01

    Understanding the relationship between the elasticity of a mineral and its composition and structure is essential for building predictive models of mantle flow. Recent advances in laboratory-based single-crystal X- ray diffraction techniques for measuring the intensities of diffraction from crystals held in situ at high pressures in the diamond-anvil cell have been used to determine the role of polyhedral compression in the response of oxide perovskites to high pressure [1]. These new data clearly demonstrate that, contrary to previous belief that perovskites octahedra are essentially incompressible, the compression of the octahedral sites is significant and that the evolution of the perovskite structure with pressure is controlled by a new principle; that of equipartition of bond-valence strain between the A and B cation sites within the structure [2]. The structural response to pressure is thus determined by the compressibility ratio of the A and B cation sites within the structure which can be predicted as inverse of the ratio of the site parameters MA/MB [2] which are completely determined by the room-pressure structure. Further, we find that the bulk elastic properties of perovskites are strongly linearly correlated with this site parameter ratio, thus providing a way to predict the elastic moduli of lower-mantle perovskites from the composition alone. References [1] e.g. Zhao, Ross & Angel (2004) Phys Chem Miner. 31: 299; Ross, Zhao,. & Angel (2004). J. Solid State Chemistry 177:1276, Vanpeteghem CB, Zhao J, Angel RJ, Ross NL, Bolfan-Casanova N (2006) Geophysical Research Letters 33: L03306. [2] Zhao, Ross, & Angel (2004). Acta Cryst. B60:263

  16. Elastic moduli and vibrational modes in jammed particulate packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Hideyuki; Saitoh, Kuniyasu; Silbert, Leonardo E.

    2016-06-01

    When we elastically impose a homogeneous, affine deformation on amorphous solids, they also undergo an inhomogeneous, nonaffine deformation, which can have a crucial impact on the overall elastic response. To correctly understand the elastic modulus M , it is therefore necessary to take into account not only the affine modulus MA, but also the nonaffine modulus MN that arises from the nonaffine deformation. In the present work, we study the bulk (M =K ) and shear (M =G ) moduli in static jammed particulate packings over a range of packing fractions φ . The affine MA is determined essentially by the static structural arrangement of particles, whereas the nonaffine MN is related to the vibrational eigenmodes. We elucidate the contribution of each vibrational mode to the nonaffine MN through a modal decomposition of the displacement and force fields. In the vicinity of the (un)jamming transition φc, the vibrational density of states g (ω ) shows a plateau in the intermediate-frequency regime above a characteristic frequency ω*. We illustrate that this unusual feature apparent in g (ω ) is reflected in the behavior of MN: As φ →φc , where ω*→0 , those modes for ω <ω* contribute less and less, while contributions from those for ω >ω* approach a constant value which results in MN to approach a critical value MN c, as MN-MN c˜ω* . At φc itself, the bulk modulus attains a finite value Kc=KA c-KN c>0 , such that KN c has a value that remains below KA c. In contrast, for the critical shear modulus Gc, GN c and GA c approach the same value so that the total value becomes exactly zero, Gc=GA c-GN c=0 . We explore what features of the configurational and vibrational properties cause such a distinction between K and G , allowing us to validate analytical expressions for their critical values.

  17. Determination of third-order elastic moduli via parameters of bulk strain solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbuzov, F. E.; Samsonov, A. M.; Semenov, A. A.; Shvartz, A. G.

    2016-02-01

    A method is proposed aimed for determination of the third-order elastic moduli (Murnaghan moduli) based on the estimation of measured parameters of bulk strain solitons in the three main waveguide configurations, a rod, a plate, and a shell. Formulas connecting the third-order moduli of the waveguide material and the parameters of a solitary strain wave (amplitude, velocity, full width at half-maximum) are derived. If the soliton parameters measured in three waveguide types manufactured from the same material are available, determination of the third-order elastic moduli is reduced to the solution of a system of three algebraic equations with a nondegenerate matrix.

  18. Clarification of the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds on the effective elastic moduli of polycrystals with hexagonal, trigonal, and tetragonal symmetries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watt, J.P.; Peselnick, L.

    1980-01-01

    Bounds on the effective elastic moduli of randomly oriented aggregates of hexagonal, trigonal, and tetragonal crystals are derived using the variational principles of Hashin and Shtrikman. The bounds are considerably narrower than the widely used Voigt and Reuss bounds. The Voigt-Reuss-Hill average lies within the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds in nearly all cases. Previous bounds of Peselnick and Meister are shown to be special cases of the present results.

  19. Theoretical elastic moduli of ferromagnetic bcc Fe alloys.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hualei; Punkkinen, Marko P J; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente

    2010-07-14

    The polycrystalline elastic parameters of ferromagnetic Fe(1-x)M(x) (M = Al, Si, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Rh; 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.1) random alloys in the body centered cubic (bcc) crystallographic phase have been calculated using first-principles alloy theory in combination with statistical averaging methods. With a few exceptions, the agreement between the calculated and the available experimental data for the polycrystalline aggregates is satisfactory. All additions considered here decrease the bulk modulus (B) and Poisson's ratio (ν) of bcc Fe. The complex composition dependence of the C(44) single-crystal elastic constant is reflected in the polycrystalline shear modulus (G), Young's modulus (E), and Debye temperature (Θ). The polycrystalline anisotropy of bcc Fe is increased by all additions, and Al, Si, Ni, and Rh yield the largest alloying effects. PMID:21399255

  20. Direct micromechanics derivation and DEM confirmation of the elastic moduli of isotropic particulate materials: Part I No particle rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischmann, J. A.; Drugan, W. J.; Plesha, M. E.

    2013-07-01

    We derive the macroscopic elastic moduli of a statistically isotropic particulate aggregate material via the homogenization methods of Voigt (1928) (kinematic hypothesis), Reuss (1929) (static hypothesis), and Hershey (1954) and Kröner (1958) (self-consistent hypothesis), originally developed to treat crystalline materials, from the directionally averaged elastic moduli of three regular cubic packings of uniform spheres. We determine analytical expressions for these macroscopic elastic moduli in terms of the (linearized) elastic inter-particle contact stiffnesses on the microscale under the three homogenization assumptions for the three cubic packings (simple, body-centered, and face-centered), assuming no particle rotation. To test these results and those in the literature, we perform numerical simulations using the discrete element method (DEM) to measure the overall elastic moduli of large samples of randomly packed uniform spheres with constant normal and tangential contact stiffnesses (linear spring model). The beauty of DEM is that simulations can be run with particle rotation either prohibited or unrestrained. In this first part of our two-part series of papers, we perform DEM simulations with particle rotation prohibited, and we compare these results with our theoretical results that assumed no particle rotation. We show that the self-consistent homogenization assumption applied to the locally body-centered cubic (BCC) packing most accurately predicts the measured values of the overall elastic moduli obtained from the DEM simulations, in particular Poisson's ratio. Our new analytical self-consistent results lead to significantly better predictions of Poisson's ratio than all prior published theoretical results. Moreover, our results are based on a direct micromechanics analysis of specific geometrical packings of uniform spheres, in contrast to all prior theoretical analyses, which were based on difficult-to-verify hypotheses involving overall inter

  1. Universal behavior of changes in elastic moduli of hot compressed oxide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenson, Mouritz N.; Guerette, Michael; Huang, Liping; Lönnroth, Nadja; Mauro, John C.; Rzoska, Sylwester J.; Bockowski, Michal; Smedskjaer, Morten M.

    2016-05-01

    The elastic moduli of glasses are important for numerous applications, but predicting them based on their chemical composition and forming history remains a great challenge. In this study, we investigate the relationship between densification and changes in elastic moduli as a result of isostatic compression up to 1 GPa of various oxide compositions at elevated temperature (so-called hot compression). An approximately linear relationship is observed between the relative changes in density and elastic moduli across a variety of glass families, although these glasses exhibit a diverse range of structural responses during compression owing to their dramatically different chemistries.

  2. Elastic moduli and vibrational modes in jammed particulate packings.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hideyuki; Saitoh, Kuniyasu; Silbert, Leonardo E

    2016-06-01

    When we elastically impose a homogeneous, affine deformation on amorphous solids, they also undergo an inhomogeneous, nonaffine deformation, which can have a crucial impact on the overall elastic response. To correctly understand the elastic modulus M, it is therefore necessary to take into account not only the affine modulus M_{A}, but also the nonaffine modulus M_{N} that arises from the nonaffine deformation. In the present work, we study the bulk (M=K) and shear (M=G) moduli in static jammed particulate packings over a range of packing fractions φ. The affine M_{A} is determined essentially by the static structural arrangement of particles, whereas the nonaffine M_{N} is related to the vibrational eigenmodes. We elucidate the contribution of each vibrational mode to the nonaffine M_{N} through a modal decomposition of the displacement and force fields. In the vicinity of the (un)jamming transition φ_{c}, the vibrational density of states g(ω) shows a plateau in the intermediate-frequency regime above a characteristic frequency ω^{*}. We illustrate that this unusual feature apparent in g(ω) is reflected in the behavior of M_{N}: As φ→φ_{c}, where ω^{*}→0, those modes for ω<ω^{*} contribute less and less, while contributions from those for ω>ω^{*} approach a constant value which results in M_{N} to approach a critical value M_{Nc}, as M_{N}-M_{Nc}∼ω^{*}. At φ_{c} itself, the bulk modulus attains a finite value K_{c}=K_{Ac}-K_{Nc}>0, such that K_{Nc} has a value that remains below K_{Ac}. In contrast, for the critical shear modulus G_{c}, G_{Nc} and G_{Ac} approach the same value so that the total value becomes exactly zero, G_{c}=G_{Ac}-G_{Nc}=0. We explore what features of the configurational and vibrational properties cause such a distinction between K and G, allowing us to validate analytical expressions for their critical values. PMID:27415345

  3. Elastic moduli across the superconducting and pseudogap phase boundaries in four cuprate compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramshaw, Brad; Shekhter, Arkady; Betts, Jon; Migliori, Albert

    2013-03-01

    A detailed understanding of the physics of the cuprate superconductors relies on an experimental determination of the thermodynamic phase diagram. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) is a unique thermodynamic probe, capable of measuring part per million changes in elastic moduli, and has access to symmetry information. Here we present a symmetry analysis of changes in the elastic moduli across the superconducting and psedogap phase boundaries in several classes of cuprates: YBCO, LSCO, Hg-1201, and Tl-2201.

  4. Composite model for the anisotropic elastic moduli of lean oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Rundle, J.B.; Schuler, K.W.

    1981-02-01

    A model to predict the anisotropic elastic moduli of lean oil shale is formulated. Deformation of a homogeneous ellipsoidal inclusion in a host matrix is used as the basis for computing the deformation of the composite. Both inclusions and the host rock are presumed to be separately isotropic. Anisotropy of the composite arises from the nonspherical shape of the kerogen inclusions. Six parameters are needed to quantify the model fully: 2 elastic moduli for the host rock, 2 for the inclusions, the kerogen content, and the inclusion aspect ratio. The model is compared to a set of statically measured elastic moduli. Good agreement with lean oil shale data was found. However, some systematic differences appear in comparison with moduli measured ultrasonically. 20 references.

  5. Density-functional theory of elastic moduli: Hard-sphere and Lennard-Jones crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarić, Marko V.; Mohanty, Udayan

    1988-03-01

    We propose a density-functional method for calculating elastic moduli of crystalline solids. The method is based on the second-order Ramakrishnan-Yussouff (RY) expansion of the variational grand-canonical potential around a uniform liquid state. The densities of the strained and unstrained crystal are represented as sums of narrow Gaussians. We express the crystal moduli in terms of the liquid structure factor its first and second derivatives evaluated at the reciprocal-lattice points of the crystal. We evaluate the elastic moduli for fcc hard-sphere and Lennard-Jones crystals using the Percus-Yevick and computer-simulation liquid structure factors, respectively. An indirect comparison with available experimental and theoretical values shows that although our calculated moduli are accurate to an order of magnitude, higher-order terms in the RY expansion might be significant. We find important contributions from density equilibration within the strained unit cell.

  6. Equivalent orthotropic elastic moduli identification method for laminated electrical steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Akira; Nishikawa, Yasunari; Yamasaki, Shintaro; Fujita, Kikuo; Kawamoto, Atsushi; Kuroishi, Masakatsu; Nakai, Hideo

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a combined numerical-experimental methodology for the identification of elastic moduli of orthotropic media is presented. Special attention is given to the laminated electrical steel sheets, which are modeled as orthotropic media with nine independent engineering elastic moduli. The elastic moduli are determined specifically for use with finite element vibration analyses. We propose a three-step methodology based on a conventional nonlinear least squares fit between measured and computed natural frequencies. The methodology consists of: (1) successive augmentations of the objective function by increasing the number of modes, (2) initial condition updates, and (3) appropriate selection of the natural frequencies based on their sensitivities on the elastic moduli. Using the results of numerical experiments, it is shown that the proposed method achieves more accurate converged solution than a conventional approach. Finally, the proposed method is applied to measured natural frequencies and mode shapes of the laminated electrical steel sheets. It is shown that the method can successfully identify the orthotropic elastic moduli that can reproduce the measured natural frequencies and frequency response functions by using finite element analyses with a reasonable accuracy.

  7. Probing asthenospheric density, temperature, and elastic moduli below the western United States.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takeo; Simons, Mark

    2011-05-20

    Periodic ocean tides continually provide a cyclic load on Earth's surface, the response to which can be exploited to provide new insights into Earth's interior structure. We used geodetic observations of surface displacements induced by ocean tidal loads to constrain a depth-dependent model for the crust and uppermost mantle that provides independent estimates of density and elastic moduli below the western United States and nearby offshore regions. Our observations require strong gradients in both density and elastic shear moduli at the top and bottom of the asthenosphere but no discrete structural discontinuity at a depth of 220 kilometers. The model indicates that the asthenosphere has a low-density anomaly of ~50 kilograms per cubic meter; a temperature anomaly of ~300°C can simultaneously explain this density anomaly and inferred colocated minima in elastic moduli. PMID:21493821

  8. The permeability and elastic moduli of tuff from Campi Flegrei, Italy: implications for ground deformation modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, M. J.; Baud, P.; Meredith, P. G.; Vinciguerra, S.; Reuschlé, T.

    2014-01-01

    The accuracy of ground deformation modelling at active volcanoes is a principal requirement in volcanic hazard mitigation. However, the reliability of such models relies on the accuracy of the rock physical property (permeability and elastic moduli) input parameters. Unfortunately, laboratory-derived values on representative rocks are usually rare. To this end we have performed a systematic laboratory study on the influence of pressure and temperature on the permeability and elastic moduli of samples from the two most widespread lithified pyroclastic deposits at the Campi Flegrei volcanic district, Italy. Our data show that the water permeability of Neapolitan Yellow Tuff and a tuff from the Campanian Ignimbrite differ by about 1.5 orders of magnitude. As pressure (depth) increases beyond the critical point for inelastic pore collapse (at an effective pressure of 10-15 MPa, or a depth of about 750 m), permeability and porosity decrease significantly, and ultrasonic wave velocities and dynamic elastic moduli increase significantly. Increasing the thermal stressing temperature increases the permeability and decreases the ultrasonic wave velocities and dynamic elastic moduli of the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff; whereas the tuff from the Campanian Ignimbrite remains unaffected. This difference is due to the presence of thermally unstable zeolites within the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff. For both rocks we also find, under the same pressure conditions, that the dynamic (calculated from ultrasonic wave velocities) and static (calculated from triaxial stress-strain data) elastic moduli differ significantly. The choice of elastic moduli in ground deformation modelling is therefore an important consideration. While we urge that these new laboratory data should be considered in routine ground deformation modelling, we highlight the challenges for ground deformation modelling based on the heterogeneous nature (vertically and laterally) of the rocks that comprise the caldera at Campi

  9. Real time studies of Elastic Moduli Pu Aging using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorov, Boris

    Elastic moduli are fundamental thermodynamic susceptibilities that connect directly to thermodynamics, electronic structure and give important information about mechanical properties. To determine the time evolution of the elastic properties in 239Pu and it Ga alloys, is imperative to study its phase stability and self-irradiation damage process. The most-likely sources of these changes include a) ingrowth of radioactive decay products like He and U, b) the introduction of radiation damage, c) δ-phase instabilities towards α-Pu or to Pu3Ga. The measurement of mechanical resonance frequencies can be made with extreme precision and used to compute the elastic moduli without corrections giving important insight in this problem. Using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy, we measured the time dependence of the mechanical resonance frequencies of fine-grained polycrystalline δ-phase 239Pu, from 300K up to 480K. At room temperature, the shear modulus shows an increase in time (stiffening), but the bulk modulus decreases (softening). These are the first real-time measurements of room temperature aging of the elastic moduli, and the changes are consistent with elastic moduli measurements performed on 44 year old δ-Pu. As the temperature is increased, the rate of change increases exponentially, with both moduli becoming stiffer with time. For T>420K an abrupt change in the time dependence is observed indicating that the bulk and shear moduli have opposite rates of change. Our measurements provide a basis for ruling out the decomposition of δ-Pu towards α-Pu or Pu3Ga, and indicate a complex defect-related scenario from which we are gathering important clues.

  10. The elastic moduli and diametrical compressive fracture stress of ? - ? ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, K. S.; Hing, P.; Ramalingam, P.

    1997-03-01

    Young's moduli of green and sintered unstabilized 0022-3727/30/6/017/img8 - 0022-3727/30/6/017/img9 ceramics have been determined by measuring compression and shear velocities through the material and, from separate measurements, the associated bulk density. Young's modulus and sintered density of 0022-3727/30/6/017/img8 - 0022-3727/30/6/017/img9 ceramics can be enhanced by increasing the compacting pressure when forming the green ceramics and with the addition of <5 wt% of unstabilized 0022-3727/30/6/017/img9. For a particular green compacting pressure, the trend in the diametrical compressive fracture stress is similar to that of Young's modulus. The fracture stress also increases with a higher green compacting pressure at a constant wt% 0022-3727/30/6/017/img9.

  11. Elasticity theory equations and fracture condition for materials of varying moduli

    SciTech Connect

    Oleinikov, A.I.

    1986-11-01

    Many massive rocks and composite materials belong to the class of materials of varying moduli with definite distinct deformation and strength properties under tension and compression. The results of experiments indicate that the difference between the properties of materials of different moduli is not limited to tension and compression cases but can also appear clearly for any change in the form of the state of stress. Elasticity theory equations are constructed here to describe the strain of materials of varying moduli as well as the dependence of the strength properties on the form of the state of strain. Tests were done on coal, limestone, diabase and cement and results are shown. Using the dependencies obtained, Poisson's ratio and the elastic modulus can be calculated for these rocks. The equations and conditions of fracture proposed, are written in a simple invariant form.

  12. Dispersion of elastic moduli in a porous-cracked rock: Theoretical predictions for squirt-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelinet, M.; Fortin, J.; Guéguen, Y.

    2011-04-01

    Crustal rocks contain variable amount of both cracks and equant pores depending on tectonic and thermal stresses but also on their geological origin. Crack damage and porosity change result in effects on elastic waves velocities. When rocks are fluid saturated, dispersion of the P- and S-waves should be taken into account. This paper deals with frequency dispersion of elastic moduli in a fluid saturated porous and cracked rock with the assumption that squirt-flow is the dominant process. We develop a theoretical approach to calculate both high (HF) and low (LF) frequency bulk and shear moduli. The HF moduli are derived from a new effective medium model, called CPEM, with an isotropic distribution of pores or cracks with idealized geometry, respectively spheres and ellipsoids. LF moduli are obtained by taking HF dry moduli from the CPEM and substituting into Gassmann's equations. In the case of a porosity only supported by equant pores, the calculated dispersion in elastic moduli is equal to zero. In the case of a crack porosity, no bulk dispersion is predicted but a shear dispersion appears. Finally in the general case of a mixed porosity (pores and cracks), dispersion in bulk and in shear is predicted. Our results show that the maximum dispersion is predicted for a mixture of pores and spheroidal cracks with a very small aspect ratio (≤ 10 - 3 ). Our theoretical predictions are compared to experimental data obtained during hydrostatic experiment performed on a basaltic rock and a good agreement is observed. We also used our theoretical model to predict elastic waves velocities and Vp/Vs ratio dispersion. We show that the P-waves dispersion can reach almost 20% and the Vp/Vs dispersion a maximum value of 9% for a crack porosity of about 1%. Since laboratory data are ultrasonic measurements and field data are obtained at much lower frequencies, these results are useful for geophysicists to interpret seismic data in terms of fluid and rock interactions.

  13. Temperature Dependent Elastic moduli of Lead-Telluride based Thermoelectric Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Fei; Case, Eldon D; Ni, Jennifer E.; Timm, Edward J; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Trejo, Rosa M; Lin, Chia-Her

    2009-01-01

    In the open literature, reports of mechanical properties are limited for semiconducting thermoelectric materials, including the temperature dependence of the elastic moduli. In this study, for both cast ingots and hot pressed billets of Ag-, Sb-, Sn-, and S- doped PbTe thermoelectric materials, Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) was utilized to determine the temperature dependence of elastic moduli including Young's modulus, shear modulus, and Poisson's ratio. This study is the first to determine the temperature-dependent elastic moduli for these PbTe based thermoelectrics and among the few determinations of elasticity of any thermoelectric material for temperatures above 300 K. The Young s modulus and Poisson s ratio measured from room temperature to 773 K during heating and cooling agreed well. Also, the observed Young s modulus, E, versus temperature, T, relationship E(T) = E0(1 bT) is consistent with predictions for materials in the range well above the Debye temperature. A nanoindentation study of Young s modulus on the specimen faces showed that both the cast and hot pressed specimens were approximately elastically isotropic.

  14. Determination of Elastic Moduli of Fiber-Resin Composites Using an Impulse Excitation Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viens, Michael J.; Johnson, Jeffrey J.

    1996-01-01

    The elastic moduli of graphite/epoxy and graphite/cyanate ester composite specimens with various laminate lay-ups was determined using an impulse excitation/acoustic resonance technique and compared to those determined using traditional strain gauge and extensometer techniques. The stiffness results were also compared to those predicted from laminate theory using uniaxial properties. The specimen stiffnesses interrogated ranged from 12 to 30 Msi. The impulse excitation technique was found to be a relatively quick and accurate method for determining elastic moduli with minimal specimen preparation and no requirement for mechanical loading frames. The results of this investigation showed good correlation between the elastic modulus determined using the impulse excitation technique, strain gauge and extensometer techniques, and modulus predicted from laminate theory. The flexural stiffness determined using the impulse excitation was in good agreement with that predicted from laminate theory. The impulse excitation/acoustic resonance interrogation technique has potential as a quality control test.

  15. A modified direct method for the calculation of elastic moduli of composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.A.; Lubliner, J.; Monteiro, P.J.M.

    1996-02-01

    The modified direct method is a scheme for the estimation of elastic moduli of composite materials and is based on micromechanical theory and classical elasticity. Using the statistical homogeneous assumption and the two-phase composite approach, one takes the average field of the composite. Due to the complexity of composite materials, the modeling parameters for the exact analytical theory are not always available and then the effective bounds are usually too wide for practical application. For engineering purposes a more practical and general model is desired. The modified direct method was developed to approach the above requirements. In this work the modified direct method is compared with different available experiment data and methods, for example, Kuster-Toksoez, Christensen-Lo. The comparison results show that the modified direct method provides a very good estimation of the elastic moduli in different kinds of problems, such as the soft and hard inclusion cases, porous materials, at various concentrations and/or various porosities.

  16. Transversely isotropic elastic moduli of a composite with partial particle debonding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.H.; Weng, G.J.

    1995-12-31

    A theoretical principle is developed to determine the transversely isotropic effective moduli of a composite containing homogeneously dispersed, elastic spherical inclusions which, under the action of external tension, experience debonding on the top and bottom of the interface. The theory is developed on the assumption that the inclusions can no longer carry stress in the loading direction after debonding, but are still capable of doing so in the transverse direction. The effective moduli are then calculated as a function of volume concentrations of still perfectly bonded particles and already debonded particles, in addition to the properties of the inclusions and matrix. Comparison is provided between this newly developed theory and those of Mochida, Taya and Obata for partial debonding of rigid inclusions, and of Tohgo and Weng for complete debonding of elastic inclusions. It is found that the longitudinal Young`s modulus with partially debonded elastic particles always lies between these two.

  17. Molecular Modeling of the Axial and Circumferential Elastic Moduli of Tubulin

    PubMed Central

    Zeiger, A. S.; Layton, B. E.

    2008-01-01

    Microtubules play a number of important mechanical roles in almost all cell types in nearly all major phylogenetic trees. We have used a molecular mechanics approach to perform tensile tests on individual tubulin monomers and determined values for the axial and circumferential moduli for all currently known complete sequences. The axial elastic moduli, in vacuo, were found to be 1.25 GPa and 1.34 GPa for α- and β-bovine tubulin monomers. In the circumferential direction, these moduli were 378 MPa for α- and 460 MPa for β-structures. Using bovine tubulin as a template, 269 homologous tubulin structures were also subjected to simulated tensile loads yielding an average axial elastic modulus of 1.10 ± 0.14 GPa for α-tubulin structures and 1.39 ± 0.68 GPa for β-tubulin. Circumferentially the α- and β-moduli were 936 ± 216 MPa and 658 ± 134 MPa, respectively. Our primary finding is that that the axial elastic modulus of tubulin diminishes as the length of the monomer increases. However, in the circumferential direction, no correlation exists. These predicted anisotropies and scale dependencies may assist in interpreting the macroscale behavior of microtubules during mitosis or cell growth. Additionally, an intergenomic approach to investigating the mechanical properties of proteins may provide a way to elucidate the evolutionary mechanical constraints imposed by nature upon individual subcellular components. PMID:18621829

  18. Pressure derivatives of elastic moduli of fused quartz to 10 kb

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peselnick, L.; Meister, R.; Wilson, W.H.

    1967-01-01

    Measurements of the longitudinal and shear moduli were made on fused quartz to 10 kb at 24??5??C. The anomalous behavior of the bulk modulus K at low pressure, ???K ???P 0, at higher pressures. The pressure derivative of the rigidity modulus ???G ???P remains constant and negative for the pressure range covered. A 15-kb hydrostatic pressure vessel is described for use with ultrasonic pulse instrumentation for precise measurements of elastic moduli and density changes with pressure. The placing of the transducer outside the pressure medium, and the use of C-ring pressure seals result in ease of operation and simplicity of design. ?? 1967.

  19. Elastic Moduli Inheritance and Weakest Link in Bulk Metallic Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Stoica, Alexandru Dan; Wang, Xun-Li; Lu, Z.P.; Clausen, Bjorn; Brown, Donald

    2012-01-01

    We show that a variety of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) inherit their Young s modulus and shear modulus from the solvent components. This is attributed to preferential straining of locally solvent-rich configurations among tightly bonded atomic clusters, which constitute the weakest link in an amorphous structure. This aspect of inhomogeneous deformation, also revealed by our in-situ neutron diffraction studies of an elastically deformed BMG, suggests a scenario of rubber-like viscoelasticity owing to a hierarchy of atomic bonds in BMGs.

  20. Application of a modified method of ultrasonic measurements for determination of elastic moduli of rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Zel, I. Yu.; Ivankina, T. I.; Levin, D. M.; Lokajicek, T.

    2015-07-15

    The velocities of elastic waves with quasi-longitudinal and quasi-transverse polarizations in a spherical rock sample have been measured. The experimental values of velocities are used to calculate 21 elastic moduli of the sample. For comparison, the effective elastic properties of the sample are simulated based on the data on the crystallographic textures of rock-forming minerals obtained by neutron diffraction. It is shown that the largest discrepancy between the model predictions and experimental velocity values is observed for transversely polarized waves.

  1. Changes in the elastic moduli of C-S-H due to presence of interlaminar cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia, Shirley; Hoyos, Bibian

    2016-03-01

    A set of models of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) with alkali cations in the interlaminar layer, various calcium/silicon ratios, and each with a density of 2.4 g cm-3 is presented. Using molecular simulation techniques, the objective was to study how the Young’s, bulk, and shear modulus, as well as the Poisson’s ratio changed due to the presence of monovalent ions. The effect of density on the elastic moduli was neglected, thus the NVT ensemble was used. Comparing the different simulation cells, it was found that models with sodium and potassium ions in the structure and an alkali/silicon ratio of 0.18 showed negative effects on the elastic moduli of C-S-H. This could be mainly ascribed to the shielding effect of the alkali on the interlaminar interactions that contribute to the cohesion between the layers of C-S-H.

  2. Elastic Moduli and Damping of Vibrational Modes of Aluminum/Silicon Carbide Composite Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leidecker, Henning

    1996-01-01

    Elastic and shear moduli were determined for two aluminum matrix composites containing 20 and 40 volume percent discontinuous silicon carbide, respectively, using transverse, longitudinal, and torsional vibrational modes of specimens prepared as thin beams. These moduli are consistent with those determined from stress-strain measurements. The damping factors for these modes were also determined. Thermal properties are used to show that part of the damping of transverse modes is caused by the transverse thermal currents discussed by C. Zener (thermo-elastic damping); this damping is frequency-dependent with a maximum damping factor of approximately 0.002. The remaining damping is frequency-independent, and has roughly similar values in transverse, longitudinal, and torsional modes: approximately 0.0001.

  3. Elastic Moduli of Single-Crystal Orthoenstatite From Room Temperature to 1450 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, M. G.; Isaak, D. G.; Gwanmesia, G. D.

    2007-12-01

    Orthopyroxene [(Mg,Fe)2Si2O6] is commonly considered to be one of the four major minerals in Earth's upper mantle. Thus, data on the elastic properties of orthopyroxene over wide ranges of temperature and pressure are necessary to develop reliable models of the composition and structure of the upper mantle. New elasticity data are provided on the nine independent adiabatic elastic moduli of orthoenstatite (Mg end-member orthopyroxene) from room temperature to 1450 K at ambient pressure. These data were obtained using the resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) with a natural single-crystal specimen; they extend by 380 kelvin the temperature range for which the elastic moduli of single-crystal orthoenstatite have previously been reported. Broad agreement in the temperature dependences of the nine Cij's is found when comparing our results with those from a Brillouin spectroscopy study of orthoenstatite up to 1073 K (Jackson et al., PEPI, 161, 1- 12, 2007). An earlier report (Jackson et al., Am. Mineral., 89, 239-245, 2004) identified marked non-linear temperature effects in the C33 and C55 moduli and correlated this nonlinearity to high-temperature mode softening in orthoenstatite at high temperature. Similar non-linear effects in the C33 and C55 are seen in the current RUS experiments and are carefully documented up to 1450 K in intervals of 25 kelvin. The current RUS study also reveals conspicuous non-linear trends in the temperature dependences of two of the three off-diagonal moduli, C13 and C23, above 1000 K. These results are interpreted in terms of the high-temperature isotropic properties of orthoenstatite, and their impact on our understanding of the properties of Earth's upper mantle is discussed.

  4. Experimentally-based multiscale model of the elastic moduli of bovine trabecular bone and its constituents.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Elham; Novitskaya, Ekaterina; Li, Jun; Jasiuk, Iwona; McKittrick, Joanna

    2015-09-01

    The elastic moduli of trabecular bone were modeled using an analytical multiscale approach. Trabecular bone was represented as a porous nanocomposite material with a hierarchical structure spanning from the collagen-mineral level to the trabecular architecture level. In parallel, compression testing was done on bovine femoral trabecular bone samples in two anatomical directions, parallel to the femoral neck axis and perpendicular to it, and the measured elastic moduli were compared with the corresponding theoretical results. To gain insights on the interaction of collagen and minerals at the nanoscale, bone samples were deproteinized or demineralized. After such processing, the treated samples remained as self-standing structures and were tested in compression. Micro-computed tomography was used to characterize the hierarchical structure of these three bone types and to quantify the amount of bone porosity. The obtained experimental data served as inputs to the multiscale model and guided us to represent bone as an interpenetrating composite material. Good agreement was found between the theory and experiments for the elastic moduli of the untreated, deproteinized, and demineralized trabecular bone. PMID:26046284

  5. Simultaneous moduli measurement of elastic materials at elevated temperatures using an ultrasonic waveguide method.

    PubMed

    Periyannan, Suresh; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2015-11-01

    A novel technique for simultaneously measuring the moduli of elastic isotropic material, as a function of temperature, using two ultrasonic guided wave modes that are co-generated using a single probe is presented here. This technique can be used for simultaneously measuring Young's modulus (E) and shear modulus (G) of different materials over a wide range of temperatures (35 °C-1200 °C). The specimens used in the experiments have special embodiments (for instance, a bend) at one end of the waveguide and an ultrasonic guided wave generator/detector (transducer) at the other end for obtaining reflected signals in a pulse-echo mode. The orientation of the transducer can be used for simultaneously generating/receiving the L(0,1) and/or T(0,1) using a single transducer in a waveguide on one end. The far end of the waveguides with the embodiment is kept inside a heating device such as a temperature-controlled furnace. The time of flight difference, as a function of uniform temperature distribution region (horizontal portion) of bend waveguides was measured and used to determine the material properties. Several materials were tested and the comparison between values reported in the literature and measured values were found to be in agreement, for both elastic moduli (E and G) measurements, as a function of temperature. This technique provides significant reduction in time and effort over conventional means of measurement of temperature dependence of elastic moduli. PMID:26628161

  6. Soft-materials elastic and shear moduli measurement using piezoelectric cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markidou, Anna; Shih, Wan Y.; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2005-06-01

    We have developed a soft-material elastic modulus and shear modulus sensor using piezoelectric cantilevers. A piezoelectric cantilever is consisted of a highly piezoelectric layer, e.g., lead-zirconate-titanate bonded to a nonpiezoelectric layer, e.g., stainless steel. Applying an electric field in the thickness direction causes a piezoelectric cantilever to bend, generating an axial displacement or force. When a piezoelectric cantilever is in contact with an object, this electric field-generated axial displacement is reduced due to the resistance by the object. With a proper design of the piezoelectric cantilever's geometry, its axial displacements with and without contacting the object could be accurately measured. From these measurements the elastic modulus of the object can be deduced. In this study, we tailored the piezoelectric cantilevers for measuring the elastic and shear moduli of tissue-like soft materials with forces in the submilli Newton to milliNewton range. Elastic moduli and shear moduli of soft materials were measured using piezoelectric cantilevers with a straight tip and an L-shaped tip, respectively. Using gelatin and commercial rubber material as model soft tissues, we showed that a piezoelectric cantilever 1.5-2cm long could measure the elastic modulus and the shear modulus of a small soft material sample (1-3mm wide) in the small strain range (<1%). For samples 5mm high, the resultant compressive (shear) strains were less than 0.5% (1%). The measurements were validated by (1) comparing the measured Young's modulus of the commercial rubber sample with its known value and (2) by measuring both the Young's modulus and shear modulus on the samples and confirming the thus deduced Poisson's ratios with the separately measured Poisson's ratios.

  7. Measurements of elastic moduli of silicone gel substrates with a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Edgar; Groisman, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Thin layers of gels with mechanical properties mimicking animal tissues are widely used to study the rigidity sensing of adherent animal cells and to measure forces applied by cells to their substrate with traction force microscopy. The gels are usually based on polyacrylamide and their elastic modulus is measured with an atomic force microscope (AFM). Here we present a simple microfluidic device that generates high shear stresses in a laminar flow above a gel-coated substrate and apply the device to gels with elastic moduli in a range from 0.4 to 300 kPa that are all prepared by mixing two components of a transparent commercial silicone Sylgard 184. The elastic modulus is measured by tracking beads on the gel surface under a wide-field fluorescence microscope without any other specialized equipment. The measurements have small and simple to estimate errors and their results are confirmed by conventional tensile tests. A master curve is obtained relating the mixing ratios of the two components of Sylgard 184 with the resulting elastic moduli of the gels. The rigidity of the silicone gels is less susceptible to effects from drying, swelling, and aging than polyacrylamide gels and can be easily coated with fluorescent tracer particles and with molecules promoting cellular adhesion. This work can lead to broader use of silicone gels in the cell biology laboratory and to improved repeatability and accuracy of cell traction force microscopy and rigidity sensing experiments. PMID:21980487

  8. Measurements of Elastic Moduli of Silicone Gel Substrates with a Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Edgar; Groisman, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Thin layers of gels with mechanical properties mimicking animal tissues are widely used to study the rigidity sensing of adherent animal cells and to measure forces applied by cells to their substrate with traction force microscopy. The gels are usually based on polyacrylamide and their elastic modulus is measured with an atomic force microscope (AFM). Here we present a simple microfluidic device that generates high shear stresses in a laminar flow above a gel-coated substrate and apply the device to gels with elastic moduli in a range from 0.4 to 300 kPa that are all prepared by mixing two components of a transparent commercial silicone Sylgard 184. The elastic modulus is measured by tracking beads on the gel surface under a wide-field fluorescence microscope without any other specialized equipment. The measurements have small and simple to estimate errors and their results are confirmed by conventional tensile tests. A master curve is obtained relating the mixing ratios of the two components of Sylgard 184 with the resulting elastic moduli of the gels. The rigidity of the silicone gels is less susceptible to effects from drying, swelling, and aging than polyacrylamide gels and can be easily coated with fluorescent tracer particles and with molecules promoting cellular adhesion. This work can lead to broader use of silicone gels in the cell biology laboratory and to improved repeatability and accuracy of cell traction force microscopy and rigidity sensing experiments. PMID:21980487

  9. Inhomogeneous elastic moduli of the Weeks-Chandler-Andersen fluids close to a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zongli; Zhang, Lihong; Song, Jianmin; Kang, Yanmei

    2014-07-01

    Based on the classical elastic theory, expressions for the shear and bulk moduli of the inhomogeneous fluids are derived. Both moduli are expressed as functionals of the density function of the particles. The theoretical derivations are firstly applied to the homogeneous Weeks-Chandler-Andersen fluids. Agreement between our results and those from the molecular-dynamics simulations is observed. In their application to the inhomogeneous fluids close to a large sphere, influences of the volume fraction, temperature and the external potential on their values are calculated and analyzed. The satisfactory performance achieved in this work suggests that our results may be applicative and effective in even wider areas of fluid of the micro- or nano-scale, including the mechanical behavior and hydrodynamical properties.

  10. High-temperature elastic moduli of bulk nanostructured n - and p -type silicon germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladden, J. R.; Li, G.; Adebisi, R.; Firdosy, S.; Caillat, T.; Ravi, V.

    2010-07-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) has been used to measure the elastic moduli of n - and p -type doped polycrystalline bulk nanostructured silicon germanium alloys at elevated temperatures. A direct contact RUS transducer system with a working temperature range up to 900 K was successfully constructed for these measurements. For higher temperatures (up to 1300 K), we employed a traditional buffer rod RUS system. Experimental results show the Young’s and shear moduli of p -type SiGe alloys monotonically decrease with increasing temperatures in the 300-1200 K range. The n -type samples show a marked stiffening beginning at 675 K which does not repeat upon cooling or subsequent reheating. We attribute the stiffening of the n -type samples to the thermally activated precipitation of the phosphorous dopant. Electrical resistivity and Seebeck coefficient data are also presented for both types of SiGe which support this conclusion.

  11. A first-principles study of cementite (Fe3C) and its alloyed counterparts: Elastic constants, elastic anisotropies, and isotropic elastic moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, G.

    2015-08-01

    A comprehensive computational study of elastic properties of cementite (Fe3C) and its alloyed counterparts (M3C (M = Al, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hf, Mn, Mo, Nb, Ni, Si, Ta, Ti, V, W, Zr, Cr2FeC and CrFe2C) having the crystal structure of Fe3C is carried out employing electronic density-functional theory (DFT), all-electron PAW pseudopotentials and the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation energy (GGA). Specifically, as a part of our systematic study of cohesive properties of solids and in the spirit of materials genome, following properties are calculated: (i) single-crystal elastic constants, Cij, of above M3Cs; (ii) anisotropies of bulk, Young's and shear moduli, and Poisson's ratio based on calculated Cijs, demonstrating their extreme anisotropies; (iii) isotropic (polycrystalline) elastic moduli (bulk, shear, Young's moduli and Poisson's ratio) of M3Cs by homogenization of calculated Cijs; and (iv) acoustic Debye temperature, θD, of M3Cs based on calculated Cijs. We provide a critical appraisal of available data of polycrystalline elastic properties of alloyed cementite. Calculated single crystal properties may be incorporated in anisotropic constitutive models to develop and test microstructure-processing-property-performance links in multi-phase materials where cementite is a constituent phase.

  12. Elastic Moduli of Polymeric Thin Films of Nanocomposites and Blends via Buckling on Elastomeric Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hongyi; Marszalek-Kempke, Jolanta; Verma, Prateek; Karim, Alamgir

    2012-02-01

    Mechanical properties are important for the long term durability of polymeric thin films. Unfortunately, there are very few methods for mechanical characterization of sub-micron thin films with high accuracy and repeatability. The technique of Strain-Induced Elastic Buckling Instability for Mechanical Measurements (SIEBIMM) was employed to determine the elastic moduli of nanocomposite and blend films, which were calculated from the buckling patterns generated by applying compressive stresses. In this study, polylactic acid (PLA) / Cloisite 30B nanocomposite thin films and polycaprolactone (PCL) / PLA blend thin films were prepared via spin-coating and then transferred to crosslinked polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) flexible substrates. Results showed the strengthening effect of Cloisite 30B on PLA systems. The effect of nanoparticle concentrations and the influences of crystallinity and phase separation of blends will be presented.

  13. Variability of Fiber Elastic Moduli in Composite Random Fiber Networks Makes the Network Softer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Ehsan; Picu, Catalin

    2015-03-01

    Athermal fiber networks are assemblies of beams or trusses. They have been used to model mechanics of fibrous materials such as biopolymer gels and synthetic nonwovens. Elasticity of these networks has been studied in terms of various microstructural parameters such as the stiffness of their constituent fibers. In this work we investigate the elasticity of composite fiber networks made from fibers with moduli sampled from a distribution function. We use finite elements simulations to study networks made by 3D Voronoi and Delaunay tessellations. The resulting data collapse to power laws showing that variability in fiber stiffness makes fiber networks softer. We also support the findings by analytical arguments. Finally, we apply these results to a network with curved fibers to explain the dependence of the network's modulus on the variation of its structural parameters.

  14. Elastic moduli of precompressed pyrophyllite used in ultrahigh pressure research. [propagation of ultrasonic pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, W.; Ruoff, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    The propagation of ultrasonic pulses in pyrophyllite specimens was studied to determine the effect of specimen precompression on the measured elastic moduli. Measurements were made at room pressure and, for the precompressed specimens, to pressures of 3 kbar. Pyrophyllite was found to be elastically anisotropic, apparently the result of the fabric present in our material. The room pressure adiabatic bulk modulus as measured on specimens made of isostatically compacted powered pyrophyllite was determined to be 96.1 kbar. The wave speeds of ultrasonic pulses in pyrophyllite were found to decrease with increasing specimen precompression. A limiting value of precompression was found, above which no further decrease in wave speed was observed. For the shear wave speeds this occurs at 10 kbar while for the longitudinal wave at 25 kbar. In the limit, the shear waves propagate 20% slower than in the unprecompressed samples; for the longitudinal wave the difference is 30%.

  15. Effect of TeO 2 on the elastic moduli of sodium borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saddeek, Yasser B.; Latif, Lamia. Abd El

    2004-05-01

    Sodium borate glass containing tellurite as Te xNa 2-2 xB 4-4 xO 7-5 x with x=0, 0.05, 0.15, 0.25 and 0.35 have been prepared by rapid quenching. Ultrasonic velocity (both longitudinal and shear) measurements have been made using a transducer operated at the fundamental frequency of 4 MHz at room temperature. The density was measured by the conventional Archimedes method. The elastic moduli, the Debye temperature, Poisson's ratio, and the parameters derived from the Makishima-Mackenzie model and the bond compression model have been obtained as a function of TeO 2 content. The monotonic decrease in the velocities and the elastic moduli, and the increase in the ring diameter and the ratio Kbc/ Ke as a function of TeO 2 modifier content reveals the loose packing structure, which is attributed to the increase in the molar volume and the reduction in the vibrations of the borate lattice. The observed results confirm that the addition of TeO 2 changes the rigid character of Na 2B 4O 7 to a matrix of ionic behaviour bonds (NBOs). This is due to the creation of more and more discontinuities and defects in the glasses, thus breaking down the borax structure.

  16. Electrostatic and electrokinetic contributions to the elastic moduli of a driven membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoste, D.; Menon, G. I.; Bazant, M. Z.; Joanny, J. F.

    2009-03-01

    We discuss the electrostatic contribution to the elastic moduli of a cell or artificial membrane placed in an electrolyte and driven by a DC electric field. The field drives ion currents across the membrane, through specific channels, pumps or natural pores. In steady state, charges accumulate in the Debye layers close to the membrane, modifying the membrane elastic moduli. We first study a model of a membrane of zero thickness, later generalizing this treatment to allow for a finite thickness and finite dielectric constant. Our results clarify and extend the results presented by D. Lacoste, M. Cosentino Lagomarsino, and J.F. Joanny (EPL 77, 18006 (2007)), by providing a physical explanation for a destabilizing term proportional to k ⊥ 3 in the fluctuation spectrum, which we relate to a nonlinear (E2) electrokinetic effect called induced-charge electro-osmosis (ICEO). Recent studies of ICEO have focused on electrodes and polarizable particles, where an applied bulk field is perturbed by capacitive charging of the double layer and drives the flow along the field axis toward surface protrusions; in contrast, we predict “reverse” ICEO flows around driven membranes, due to curvature-induced tangential fields within a nonequilibrium double layer, which hydrodynamically enhance protrusions. We also consider the effect of incorporating the dynamics of a spatially dependent concentration field for the ion channels.

  17. Estimating elastic moduli of rocks from thin sections: Digital rock study of 3D properties from 2D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Nishank; Mavko, Gary

    2016-03-01

    Estimation of elastic rock moduli using 2D plane strain computations from thin sections has several numerical and analytical advantages over using 3D rock images, including faster computation, smaller memory requirements, and the availability of cheap thin sections. These advantages, however, must be weighed against the estimation accuracy of 3D rock properties from thin sections. We present a new method for predicting elastic properties of natural rocks using thin sections. Our method is based on a simple power-law transform that correlates computed 2D thin section moduli and the corresponding 3D rock moduli. The validity of this transform is established using a dataset comprised of FEM-computed elastic moduli of rock samples from various geologic formations, including Fontainebleau sandstone, Berea sandstone, Bituminous sand, and Grossmont carbonate. We note that using the power-law transform with a power-law coefficient between 0.4-0.6 contains 2D moduli to 3D moduli transformations for all rocks that are considered in this study. We also find that reliable estimates of P-wave (Vp) and S-wave velocity (Vs) trends can be obtained using 2D thin sections.

  18. Measurement of Elastic Moduli of the Arterial Wall at Multiple Frequencies by Remote Actuation for Assessment of Viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2004-05-01

    To characterize tissues in atherosclerotic plaques, we have developed a method, the phased tracking method, for measuring the strain (change in wall thickness) and elasticity of the arterial wall. However, some types of tissue, such as lipids and blood clots, cannot be discriminated from each other based only on elasticity due to the small difference in their elasticity. For more precise tissue characterization, we have measured the regional viscoelasticity. To obtain the viscoelasticity, in this study, elastic moduli at multiple frequencies were measured with ultrasound by generating the change in internal pressure due to remote cyclic actuation. Furthermore, the viscoelasticity of the arterial wall was estimated from the measured elastic moduli at multiple actuation frequencies.

  19. Compositional dependence of elastic moduli for transition-metal oxide spinels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichmann, H. J.; Jacobsen, S. D.; Boffa Ballaran, T.

    2012-12-01

    Spinel phases (AB2O4) are common non-silicate oxides in the Earth's crust and upper mantle. A characteristic of this mineral group is the ability to host a wide range of transition metals. Here we summarize the influence of transition metals (Fe, Zn, and Mn) on the pressure dependence of elastic moduli of related spinels (magnetite, gahnite, and franklinite) using GHz-ultrasonic interferometry. Measurements were carried out up to 10 GPa in diamond-anvil cells using hydrostatic pressure media. Transition metals with unfilled 3d orbitals strongly influence the elastic properties of spinels. Franklinite (Zn,Mn)Fe2O4 and magnetite Fe3O4 with transition metals on both A and B cation sites exhibit pressure-induced mode softening of C44, whereas C44 of gahnite(ZnAl2O4) and spinel (MgAl2O4) exhibit positive pressure derivatives of the shear moduli. Spinels with two transition elements tend to undergo phase changes at a lower pressure than those with none or only one transition metal. Along the Mn-Zn solid solution, the variation of moduli with composition is non-linear, and a mid-range franklinite composition studied here shows a minimum in C44 compared with either end-member: MnFe2O 4 or ZnFe2O4. In general, the linear variation of sound velocity with density (Birch's Law) is followed by spinels, however spinels containing only one or no transition metals follow a distinct slope from those containing transition metals on both A and B sites. The Cauchy relation, 0.5(C12 - C44) = P is fulfilled by spinels with only one or no transition metals, suggesting that that Coulomb interactions dominate. Spinels with two transition metals fail to meet the Cauchy relation, indicating strong directional dependence and covalent character of bonding. The bonding character of transition metals is crucial to understanding the elastic behavior of natural and synthetic spinel solid solutions containing transition metals.

  20. Aggregation-structure-elasticity relationship of gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hang-Shing

    Aerogel is a mesoporous, low-density material which is desirable for applications like thermal insulation and low-k interlayer dielectric. However, its lack of mechanical integrity hinders its development. Experiments have shown that aerogels exhibit a scaling relationship E ∝ rho m between modulus E and density rho, with the exponent m usually between 3 and 4. The objective of the dissertation is to use computer modeling to understand how the random aggregation process accounts for the fractal structure and the compliant nature of aerogels. Model gels were created by the diffusion-limited cluster-cluster aggregation (DLCA), which simulates random aggregation leading to the sol-gel transition. Then each resulting structure was modeled as an elastic beam network and numerically compressed using the finite element method (FEM). Analyses showed that the DLCA gels reproduced the scaling relationship after trimming the non-contributive dangling branches from the mechanically efficient looped networks. The dangling bond deflection (DEF) model was therefore developed to model the random rotational movement of the dangling branches and the subsequent loop structure formation. Model gels with extensive loops and negligible dangling branches were simulated by combining the DLCA and DEF models. Representation of the aerogel networks by the DLCADEF models was validated for the resemblance of the fractal geometry and elastic behavior. The lack of mechanical integrity in aerogels is a natural consequence of the random aggregation and the resulting fractal structure. Fractal clusters are created in the early stage of aggregation, each of which is characterized by a dense core and sparse perimeter. These clusters grow in size until they percolate at the gel point by knitting together at the perimeters. The gel structure possesses a "blob-and-link" architecture, with the blobs representing the rigid cores of the fractal clusters, and the links corresponding to the tenuous chains

  1. Role of cytoskeleton and elastic moduli in cellular response to nanosecond pulsed electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Gary L.; Roth, Caleb; Tolstykh, Gleb; Kuipers, Marjorie; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2013-02-01

    Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) are known to increase cell membrane permeability to small molecules in accordance with dosages. As previous work has focused on nsPEF exposures in whole cells, electrodeformation may contribute to this induced-permeabilization in addition to other biological mechanisms. Here, we hypothesize that cellular elasticity, based upon the cytoskeleton, affects nsPEF-induced decrease in cellular viability. Young's moduli of various types of cells have been calculated from atomic force microscopy (AFM) force curve data, showing that CHO cells are stiffer than non-adherent U937 and Jurkat cells, which are more susceptible to nsPEF exposure. To distinguish any cytoskeletal foundation for these observations, various cytoskeletal reagents were applied. Inhibiting actin polymerization significantly decreased membrane integrity, as determined by relative propidium uptake and phosphatidylserine externalization, upon exposure at 150 kV/cm with 100 pulses of 10 ns pulse width. Exposure in the presence of other drugs resulted in insignificant changes in membrane integrity and 24-hour viability. However, Jurkat cells showed greater lethality than latrunculin-treated CHO cells of comparable elasticity. From these results, it is postulated that cellular elasticity rooted in actin-membrane interaction is only a minor contributor to the differing responses of adherent and non-adherent cells to nsPEF insults.

  2. Uncoupling shear and uniaxial elastic moduli of semiflexible biopolymer networks: compression-softening and stretch-stiffening

    PubMed Central

    van Oosten, Anne S. G.; Vahabi, Mahsa; Licup, Albert J.; Sharma, Abhinav; Galie, Peter A.; MacKintosh, Fred C.; Janmey, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Gels formed by semiflexible filaments such as most biopolymers exhibit non-linear behavior in their response to shear deformation, e.g., with a pronounced strain stiffening and negative normal stress. These negative normal stresses suggest that networks would collapse axially when subject to shear stress. This coupling of axial and shear deformations can have particularly important consequences for extracellular matrices and collagenous tissues. Although measurements of uniaxial moduli have been made on biopolymer gels, these have not directly been related to the shear response. Here, we report measurements and simulations of axial and shear stresses exerted by a range of hydrogels subjected to simultaneous uniaxial and shear strains. These studies show that, in contrast to volume-conserving linearly elastic hydrogels, the Young’s moduli of networks formed by the biopolymers are not proportional to their shear moduli and both shear and uniaxial moduli are strongly affected by even modest degrees of uniaxial strain. PMID:26758452

  3. Uncoupling shear and uniaxial elastic moduli of semiflexible biopolymer networks: compression-softening and stretch-stiffening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oosten, Anne S. G.; Vahabi, Mahsa; Licup, Albert J.; Sharma, Abhinav; Galie, Peter A.; Mackintosh, Fred C.; Janmey, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Gels formed by semiflexible filaments such as most biopolymers exhibit non-linear behavior in their response to shear deformation, e.g., with a pronounced strain stiffening and negative normal stress. These negative normal stresses suggest that networks would collapse axially when subject to shear stress. This coupling of axial and shear deformations can have particularly important consequences for extracellular matrices and collagenous tissues. Although measurements of uniaxial moduli have been made on biopolymer gels, these have not directly been related to the shear response. Here, we report measurements and simulations of axial and shear stresses exerted by a range of hydrogels subjected to simultaneous uniaxial and shear strains. These studies show that, in contrast to volume-conserving linearly elastic hydrogels, the Young’s moduli of networks formed by the biopolymers are not proportional to their shear moduli and both shear and uniaxial moduli are strongly affected by even modest degrees of uniaxial strain.

  4. Differential effective medium modeling of rock elastic moduli with critical porosity constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Mukerji, T.; Mavko, G.; Berryman, J.; Berge, P.

    1995-03-01

    Rocks generally have a percolation porosity at which they lose rigidity and fall apart. Percolation behaviour is a purely geometrical property, independent of any physical properties, and is a powerful constraint on any valid velocity-porosity relation. The authors show how the conventional Differential Effective Medium (DEM) theory can be modified to incorporate percolation of elastic moduli in rocks by taking the material at the critical porosity as one of the constituents of a two-phase composite. Any desired percolation porosity can be specified as an input. In contrast, the conventional DEM model always predicts percolation at a porosity of either 0 or 100 percent. Most sedimentary rocks however have intermediate percolation porosities and are therefore not well represented by the conventional theory. The modified DEM model incorporates percolation behavior, and at the same time is always consistent with the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds. The predictions compare favorably with laboratory sandstone data. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Application of Monte Carlo simulations to the prediction of the effective elastic moduli of hydrated Nafion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, Lisa Mauck; Lada, Emily K.; Smith, Ralph C.; Leo, Donald J.

    2005-05-01

    Application of Rotational Isomeric State (RIS) theory to the prediction of Young's modulus of a solvated ionomer is considered. RIS theory directly addresses polymer chain conformation as it relates to mechanical response trends. Successful adaptation of this methodology to the prediction of elastic moduli would thus provide a powerful tool for guiding ionomer fabrication. The Mark-Curro Monte Carlo methodology is applied to generate a statistically valid number of end-to-end chain lengths via RIS theory for a solvated Nafion case. The distribution of chain lengths is then fitted to a Probability Density Function by the Johnson Bounded distribution method. The fitting parameters, as they relate to the model predictions and physical structure of the polymer, are studied so that a means to extend RIS theory to the reliable prediction of ionomer stiffness may be identified.

  6. High Temperature Elastic Moduli Measurements and Phase Transition Studies of Novel Thermoelectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guangyan; Adebisi, Resheed; Gladden, Josh

    2009-03-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) materials can be used to convert heat including waste heat to electrical power. They are one component to energy savings and independence. Silicon germanium (SiGe) and Zintl phase compounds are excellent candidates for high temperature applications. The mechanical properties of these materials need to be known before their actual applications in high temperature (1000C) environments. The temperature dependent elastic moduli of five different SiGe alloys were successfully measured using a high temperature resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) technique. A linear trend is generally observed up to 600C, a downward curvature especially in two n-type samples is noticeable at higher temperatures. Hysteresis is only observed in one of the n-type SiGe samples. Phase transitions, indicated by shifts in the natural frequencies of a Zintl sample, were observed near 792, 892, 931C. The nature of these transitions will be discussed.

  7. A first-principles study of cementite (Fe{sub 3}C) and its alloyed counterparts: Elastic constants, elastic anisotropies, and isotropic elastic moduli

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, G.

    2015-08-15

    A comprehensive computational study of elastic properties of cementite (Fe{sub 3}C) and its alloyed counterparts (M{sub 3}C (M = Al, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hf, Mn, Mo, Nb, Ni, Si, Ta, Ti, V, W, Zr, Cr{sub 2}FeC and CrFe{sub 2}C) having the crystal structure of Fe{sub 3}C is carried out employing electronic density-functional theory (DFT), all-electron PAW pseudopotentials and the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation energy (GGA). Specifically, as a part of our systematic study of cohesive properties of solids and in the spirit of materials genome, following properties are calculated: (i) single-crystal elastic constants, C{sub ij}, of above M{sub 3}Cs; (ii) anisotropies of bulk, Young’s and shear moduli, and Poisson’s ratio based on calculated C{sub ij}s, demonstrating their extreme anisotropies; (iii) isotropic (polycrystalline) elastic moduli (bulk, shear, Young’s moduli and Poisson’s ratio) of M{sub 3}Cs by homogenization of calculated C{sub ij}s; and (iv) acoustic Debye temperature, θ{sub D}, of M{sub 3}Cs based on calculated C{sub ij}s. We provide a critical appraisal of available data of polycrystalline elastic properties of alloyed cementite. Calculated single crystal properties may be incorporated in anisotropic constitutive models to develop and test microstructure-processing-property-performance links in multi-phase materials where cementite is a constituent phase.

  8. Computing elastic moduli on 3-D X-ray computed tomography image stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garboczi, E. J.; Kushch, V. I.

    2015-03-01

    A numerical task of current interest is to compute the effective elastic properties of a random composite material by operating on a 3D digital image of its microstructure obtained via X-ray computed tomography (CT). The 3-D image is usually sub-sampled since an X-ray CT image is typically of order 10003 voxels or larger, which is considered to be a very large finite element problem. Two main questions for the validity of any such study are then: can the sub-sample size be made sufficiently large to capture enough of the important details of the random microstructure so that the computed moduli can be thought of as accurate, and what boundary conditions should be chosen for these sub-samples? This paper contributes to the answer of both questions by studying a simulated X-ray CT cylindrical microstructure with three phases, cut from a random model system with known elastic properties. A new hybrid numerical method is introduced, which makes use of finite element solutions coupled with exact solutions for elastic moduli of square arrays of parallel cylindrical fibers. The new method allows, in principle, all of the microstructural data to be used when the X-ray CT image is in the form of a cylinder, which is often the case. Appendix A describes a similar algorithm for spherical sub-samples, which may be of use when examining the mechanical properties of particles. Cubic sub-samples are also taken from this simulated X-ray CT structure to investigate the effect of two different kinds of boundary conditions: forced periodic and fixed displacements. It is found that using forced periodic displacements on the non-geometrically periodic cubic sub-samples always gave more accurate results than using fixed displacements, although with about the same precision. The larger the cubic sub-sample, the more accurate and precise was the elastic computation, and using the complete cylindrical sample with the new method gave still more accurate and precise results. Fortran 90

  9. Temperature- and thickness-dependent elastic moduli of polymer thin films.

    PubMed

    Ao, Zhimin; Li, Sean

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical properties of polymer ultrathin films are usually different from those of their counterparts in bulk. Understanding the effect of thickness on the mechanical properties of these films is crucial for their applications. However, it is a great challenge to measure their elastic modulus experimentally with in situ heating. In this study, a thermodynamic model for temperature- (T) and thickness (h)-dependent elastic moduli of polymer thin films Ef(T,h) is developed with verification by the reported experimental data on polystyrene (PS) thin films. For the PS thin films on a passivated substrate, Ef(T,h) decreases with the decreasing film thickness, when h is less than 60 nm at ambient temperature. However, the onset thickness (h*), at which thickness Ef(T,h) deviates from the bulk value, can be modulated by T. h* becomes larger at higher T because of the depression of the quenching depth, which determines the thickness of the surface layer δ. PMID:21711747

  10. Effective elastic moduli of a composite containing rigid spheres at nondilute concentrations: A multiple scattering approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondescu, Radu P.; Muthukumar, M.

    1999-01-01

    Based on the multiple scattering technique [K. F. Freed and M. Muthukumar, J. Chem. Phys. 69, 2657 (1978); 68, 2088 (1978); M. Muthukumar and K. H. Freed, J. Chem. Phys. 70, 5875 (1979)] previously applied to the study of suspensions of spheres and polymers, we propose an approach to the computation of the effective elastic properties of a composite material containing rigid, mono-sized, randomly dispersed, spherical particles. Our method incorporates the many-body, long-range elastic interactions among inclusions. The effective medium equations are constructed and numerically solved self-consistently. We have calculated the effective shear μ' and Young E' moduli, as well as the effective Poisson ratio σ', as functions of the particle volume fraction Φ and of the Poisson ratio σ of the continuous phase. Comparisons with two sets of experimental data—glass beads in a polymer matrix and tungsten carbide particles in a cobalt matrix (Wc/Co)—and to a previous theoretical solution, are also presented. Our model can predict the effective Poisson ratio of the Wc/Co system for Φ⩽1 and for the glass/polymer system for Φ⩽0.5. In particular, the present work describes accurately composites with a high volume fraction of inclusions, where a percolation transition occurs. Very good agreement with the experimental data are obtained for E' and μ' when Φ⩽0.4, for both systems.

  11. Temperature- and thickness-dependent elastic moduli of polymer thin films

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical properties of polymer ultrathin films are usually different from those of their counterparts in bulk. Understanding the effect of thickness on the mechanical properties of these films is crucial for their applications. However, it is a great challenge to measure their elastic modulus experimentally with in situ heating. In this study, a thermodynamic model for temperature- (T) and thickness (h)-dependent elastic moduli of polymer thin films Ef(T,h) is developed with verification by the reported experimental data on polystyrene (PS) thin films. For the PS thin films on a passivated substrate, Ef(T,h) decreases with the decreasing film thickness, when h is less than 60 nm at ambient temperature. However, the onset thickness (h*), at which thickness Ef(T,h) deviates from the bulk value, can be modulated by T. h* becomes larger at higher T because of the depression of the quenching depth, which determines the thickness of the surface layer δ. PMID:21711747

  12. Determination of elastic moduli of thin layers of soft material using the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriadis, Emilios K; Horkay, Ferenc; Maresca, Julia; Kachar, Bechara; Chadwick, Richard S

    2002-01-01

    We address three problems that limit the use of the atomic force microscope when measuring elastic moduli of soft materials at microscopic scales. The first concerns the use of sharp cantilever tips, which typically induce local strains that far exceed the linear material regime. We show that this problem can be alleviated by using microspheres as probes, and we establish the criteria for their use. The second relates to the common use of the Hertz contact mechanics model, which leads to significant errors when applied to thin samples. We develop novel, simple to use corrections to apply for such cases. Samples that are either bonded or not bonded to a rigid substrate are considered. The third problem concerns the difficulty in establishing when contact occurs on a soft material. We obtain error estimates for the elastic modulus resulting from such uncertainty and discuss the sensitivity of the estimation methods to error in contact point. The theoretical and experimental results are compared to macroscopic measurements on poly(vinyl-alcohol) gels. PMID:11964265

  13. Preparation and elastic moduli of germanate glass containing lead and bismuth.

    PubMed

    Sidek, Hj A A; Bahari, Hamid R; Halimah, Mohamed K; Yunus, Wan M M

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the rapid melt quenching technique preparation for the new family of bismuth-lead germanate glass (BPG) systems in the form of (GeO(2))(60)-(PbO)(40-) (x)-(½Bi(2)O(3))(x) where x = 0 to 40 mol%. Their densities with respect of Bi(2)O(3) concentration were determined using Archimedes' method with acetone as a floatation medium. The current experimental data are compared with those of bismuth lead borate (B(2)O(3))(20)-(PbO)(80-) (x)-(Bi(2)O(3))(x). The elastic properties of BPG were studied using the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique where both longitudinal and transverse sound wave velocities have been measured in each glass samples at a frequency of 15 MHz and at room temperature. Experimental data shows that all the physical parameters of BPG including density and molar volume, both longitudinal and transverse velocities increase linearly with increasing of Bi(2)O(3) content in the germanate glass network. Their elastic moduli such as longitudinal, shear and Young's also increase linearly with addition of Bi(2)O(3) but the bulk modulus did not. The Poisson's ratio and fractal dimensionality are also found to vary linearly with the Bi(2)O(3) concentration. PMID:22606000

  14. Elastic moduli of rock glasses under pressure to 8 kilobars and geophysical implications.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meister, R.; Robertson, E.C.; Werke, R.W.; Raspet, R.

    1980-01-01

    Shear and longitudinal velocities were measured by the ultrasonic phase comparison method as a function of pressure to 8 kbar on synthetic glasses of basalt, andesite, rhyolite, and quartz composition and on natural obsidian. Velocities of most of the glasses decrease anomalously with pressure, but increasingly more-normal behavior occurs with decrease in SiO2 content. The pressure derivatives of rigidity and bulk modulus increase linearly, from -3.39 to -0.26 and from -5.91 to +2.09, respectively, with decrease in SiO2 content from 100 to 49%. The change from negative to positive in the pressure derivatives of both moduli and observed at Poisson's ratio of about 0.25 is consitent with the Smyth model for the anomalous elastic behavior of glass. If the temperature in the upper mantle is about 1500oC, tholeiitic basalt would be molten in accordance with the partial melt explanation for the low-velocity zone; at 1300oC and below, basalt would be in the glassy state, especially if more felsic than tholeiite. -Authors

  15. Laser ultrasonic assessment of the effects of porosity and microcracking on the elastic moduli of nuclear graphites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicer, James B.; Olasov, Lauren R.; Zeng, Fan W.; Han, Karen; Gallego, Nidia C.; Contescu, Cristian I.

    2016-04-01

    Laser ultrasonic methods have been used to measure the elastic moduli of various nuclear graphites. Measurements were made to assess wavespeeds for longitudinal and shear waves in different propagation directions and these were used along with density measurements to compute the longitudinal and shear moduli as well as Young's modulus. All moduli decreased with increasing graphite porosity and these variations could be interpreted using models describing the effect of porosity on material stiffness. Extrapolations for these models to zero porosity were used to infer the moduli for theoretically dense graphite; the results were far below predicted values reported in the literature for fully dense, polycrystalline, isotropic graphite. Differences can be attributed to microcracking in the graphite microstructure. Using models for the effects of microcracking on modulus, estimates for microcrack populations indicate that the number of cracks per unit volume must be much greater than the number of pores per unit volume. Experimental results reported in the literature for irradiated graphites as well as for the stress dependence of graphite modulus are consistent with the influence of microcracking on elastic behavior and could be interpreted using concepts developed here. Results in this work for graphite structure-property relationships should allow for more sophisticated characterization of nuclear graphites using ultrasonic methods.

  16. Direct micromechanics derivation and DEM confirmation of the elastic moduli of isotropic particulate materials:. Part II Particle rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischmann, J. A.; Drugan, W. J.; Plesha, M. E.

    2013-07-01

    In Part I, Fleischmann et al. (2013), we performed theoretical analyses of three cubic packings of uniform spheres (simple, body-centered, and face-centered) assuming no particle rotation, employed these results to derive the effective elastic moduli for a statistically isotropic particulate material, and assessed these results by performing numerical discrete element method (DEM) simulations with particle rotations prohibited. In this second part, we explore the effect that particle rotation has on the overall elastic moduli of a statistically isotropic particulate material. We do this both theoretically, by re-analyzing the elementary cells of the three cubic packings with particle rotation allowed, which leads to the introduction of an internal parameter to measure zero-energy rotations at the local level, and numerically via DEM simulations in which particle rotation is unrestrained. We find that the effects of particle rotation cannot be neglected. For unrestrained particle rotation, we find that the self-consistent homogenization assumption applied to the locally body-centered cubic packing incorporating particle rotation effects most accurately predicts the measured values of the overall elastic moduli obtained from the DEM simulations, in particular Poisson's ratio. Our new self-consistent results and theoretical modeling of particle rotation effects together lead to significantly better theoretical predictions of Poisson's ratio than all prior published results. Moreover, our results are based on a direct micromechanics analysis of specific geometrical packings of uniform spheres, in contrast to prior theoretical analyses based on hypotheses involving overall inter-particle contact distributions. Thus, our results permit a direct assessment of the reasons for the theory-experiment discrepancies noted in the literature with regard to previous theoretical derivations of the macroscopic elastic moduli for particulate materials, and our new theoretical results

  17. A new calibration of seismic velocities, anisotropy, fabrics, and elastic moduli of amphibole-rich rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Shaocheng; Shao, Tongbin; Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi; Long, Changxing; Wang, Qian; Kondo, Yosuke; Zhao, Weihua; Wang, Hongcai; Salisbury, Matthew H.

    2013-09-01

    large portion of the middle to lower crust beneath the continents and oceanic island arcs consists of amphibolites dominated by hornblende and plagioclase. We have measured P and S wave velocities (Vp and Vs) and anisotropy of 17 amphibole-rich rock samples containing 34-80 vol % amphibole at hydrostatic pressures (P) up to 650 MPa. Combined petrophysical and geochemical analyses provide a new calibration for mean density, average major element contents, mean Vp-P and Vs-P coefficients, intrinsic Vp and Vs anisotropy, Poisson's ratios, the logarithmic ratio Rs/p, and elastic moduli of amphibole-rich rocks. The Vp values decrease with increasing SiO2 and Na2O + K2O contents but increase with increasing MgO and CaO contents. The maximum (≤0.38-0.40 km/s) and minimum S wave birefringence values occur generally in the propagation direction parallel to Y and normal to foliation, respectively. Amphibole plays a critical role in the formation of seismic anisotropy, whereas the presence of plagioclase, quartz, pyroxene, and garnet diminishes the anisotropy induced by amphibole crystallographic preferred orientations (CPOs). The CPO variations cause different anisotropy patterns illustrated in the Flinn diagram of Vp(X)/Vp(Y)-Vp(Y)/Vp(Z) plots. The results make it possible to distinguish, in terms of seismic properties, the amphibolites from other categories of lithology such as granite-granodiorite, diorite, gabbro-diabase, felsic gneiss, mafic gneiss, eclogite, and peridotite within the Earth's crust. Hence, amphibole, aligned by dislocation creep, anisotropic growth, or rigid-body rotation, is the most important contributor to the seismic anisotropy of the deep crust beneath the continents and oceanic island arcs, which contains rather little phyllosilicates such as mica or chlorite.

  18. Many-atom interactions in the theory of higher order elastic moduli: A general theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipenko, I. A.; Kukin, O. V.; Gufan, A. Yu.; Gufan, Yu. M.

    2013-12-01

    The total potential energy of a crystal U({ r ik }) as a function of the vectors r ik connecting centers of equilibrium positions of the ith and kth atoms is assumed to be represented as a sum of irreducible interaction energies in clusters containing pairs, triples, and quadruples of atoms located in sites of the crystal lattice A2: U({ r ik }) ≡ Σ{/N=1 4} E N ({ r ik }). The curly brackets denote the "entire set." A complete set of invariants { I j ({ r ik })} N , which determine the energy of each individual cluster as a function of the vectors connecting centers of equilibrium positions of atoms in the cluster E N ({ r ik }) ≡ E N ({ I j ({ r ik })} N ), is obtained from symmetry considerations. The vectors r ik are represented in the form of an expansion in the basis of the Bravais lattice. This makes it possible to represent the invariants { I j ({ r ik })} N in the form of polynomials of integers multiplied by τ{2/ m }. Here, τ2 is one-half of the edge of the unit cell in the A2 structure and m is a constant determined by the model of interaction energy in pairs, triples, and quadruples of atoms. The model interaction potential between atoms in the form of a sum of the Lennard-Jones interaction potential and similarly constructed interaction potentials of triples and quadruples of atoms is considered as an example. Within this model, analytical expressions for second-order and third-order elastic moduli of crystals with the A2 structure are obtained.

  19. Influence of C concentration on elastic moduli of α‧-Fe1-xCx alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janßen, Jan; Gunkelmann, Nina; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2016-05-01

    The elastic constants of tetragonally distorted ?-? crystallites are calculated for several available interatomic interaction potentials. Besides embedded-atom-method-type potentials also a simple pair potential, modified embedded-atom-method and bond-order potentials are investigated. Care is taken to minimise the crystal structure properly in the presence of the C interstitials; we verify that the influence of statistics, i.e. the randomness of the C positions in the lattice, affects the elastic properties only little, as long as C is not allowed to cluster. We find that both sign and order of magnitude of the tetragonal elastic constants vary strongly between the predictions of the available potentials. Recent experimental data are available for the orientation-averaged elastic moduli; in contrast to the tetragonal constants, they feature only a mild dependence on C content. The experimental data are well reproduced by several of the potentials studied here. Existing deviations between experiment and predictions are discussed.

  20. Determination of the dynamic elastic constants of recycled aggregate concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoumani, A. A.; Barkoula, N.-M.; Matikas, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    Nowadays, construction and demolition waste constitutes a major portion of the total solid waste production in the world. Due to both environmental and economical reasons, an increasing interest concerning the use of recycled aggregate to replace aggregate from natural sources is generated. This paper presents an investigation on the properties of recycled aggregate concrete. Concrete mixes are prepared using recycled aggregates at a substitution level between 0 and 100% of the total coarse aggregate. The influence of this replacement on strengthened concrete's properties is being investigated. The properties estimated are: density and dynamic modulus of elasticity at the age of both 7 and 28 days. Also, flexural strength of 28 days specimens is estimated. The determination of the dynamic elastic modulus was made using the ultrasonic pulse velocity method. The results reveal that the existence of recycled aggregates affects the properties of concrete negatively; however, in low levels of substitution the influence of using recycled aggregates is almost negligible. Concluding, the controlled use of recycled aggregates in concrete production may help solve a vital environmental issue apart from being a solution to the problem of inadequate concrete aggregates.

  1. Nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of sedimentary rocks. Part 2: Hysteresis effects and influence of type of fluid on elastic moduli

    SciTech Connect

    Tutuncu, A.N.; Podio, A.L.; Sharma, M.M.

    1998-01-01

    Uniaxial stress cycling experiments were conducted on dry, brine saturated and hexadecane saturated Berea sandstone samples to observe in detail the hysteresis in stress-strain diagrams and to understand the influence of different fluids on the strain amplitude dependence of elastic moduli and attenuation. Cycling experiments were also conducted with sandstone samples saturated with CTAB, a cationic surfactant that renders the mineral surfaces hydrophobic. Hexadecane and CTAB were selected so as to investigate the relative contributions of adhesion hysteresis and stick-slip sliding on attenuation in sedimentary granular rocks. Young`s moduli and Poisson`s ratios obtained from the cycling tests show a significant dependence on strain amplitude on dry as well as water and hexadecane saturated samples. Bow-tie-shaped diagrams are obtained when loading and unloading tangent moduli are plotted against strain. The type of fluid in the pore space and at the grain contacts has a large influence on the hysteresis observed in the stress-strain diagrams.

  2. An ultrasonic method for determination of elastic moduli, density, attenuation and thickness of a polymer coating on a stiff plate.

    PubMed

    Lavrentyev, A I; Rokhlin, S I

    2001-04-01

    An ultrasonic method proposed by us for determination of the complete set of acoustical and geometrical properties of a thin isotropic layer between semispaces (J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102 (1997) 3467) is extended to determination of the properties of a coating on a thin plate. The method allows simultaneous determination of the coating thickness, density, elastic moduli and attenuation (longitudinal and shear) from normal and oblique incidence reflection (transmission) frequency spectra. Reflection (transmission) from the coated plate is represented as a function of six nondimensional parameters of the coating which are determined from two experimentally measured spectra: one at normal and one at oblique incidence. The introduction of the set of nondimensional parameters allows one to transform the reconstruction process from one search in a six-dimensional space to two searches in three-dimensional spaces (one search for normal incidence and one for oblique). Thickness, density, and longitudinal and shear elastic moduli of the coating are calculated from the nondimensional parameters determined. The sensitivity of the method to individual properties and its stability against experimental noise are studied and the inversion algorithm is accordingly optimized. An example of the method and experimental measurement for comparison is given for a polypropylene coating on a steel foil. PMID:11350002

  3. Elastic moduli of TiB{sub 2} and C layers in a fiber reinforced glass ceramic composite

    SciTech Connect

    Berriche, R.; Dutton, R.

    1995-09-01

    Depth sensing indentation (DSI) tests have been performed at the interfacial region between sic fibers and their borosilicate matrix to determine primarily the elastic moduli of the TiB{sub 2} and C layers found at this interface. Some tests were also performed on the SiC fibers and the borosilicate matrix, which gave E values that were in excellent agreement with published E values determined for these two materials using conventional methods. This establishes that the DSI method using the Nanomechanical Probe (NMP) is an accurate method for measuring elastic properties of materials. The average elastic modulus values obtained for the TiB{sub 2} and the C layers are 143{+-}7 and 91{+-}6 GPa, respectively. The calculated value for TiB{sub 2} is much lower than the published one due to the layer having a different microstructure and/or due to proximity to other layers. The E value for the C layer, on the other hand, is comparable to the published value.

  4. Impulsive correction to the elastic moduli obtained using the stress-fluctuation formalism in systems with truncated pair potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Wittmer, J. P.; Polińska, P.; Baschnagel, J.

    2012-10-01

    The truncation of a pair potential at a distance rc is well known to imply, in general, an impulsive correction to the pressure and other moments of the first derivatives of the potential. That, depending on rc, the truncation may also be of relevance to higher derivatives is shown theoretically for the Born contributions to the elastic moduli obtained using the stress-fluctuation formalism in d dimensions. Focusing on isotropic liquids for which the shear modulus G must vanish by construction, the predicted corrections are tested numerically for binary mixtures and polydisperse Lennard-Jones beads in, respectively, d=3 and 2 dimensions. Both models being glass formers, we comment briefly on the temperature (T) dependence of the (corrected) shear modulus G(T) around the glass transition temperature Tg.

  5. Non-invasive determination of the complete elastic moduli of spider silks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koski, Kristie J.; Akhenblit, Paul; McKiernan, Keri; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2013-03-01

    Spider silks possess nature’s most exceptional mechanical properties, with unrivalled extensibility and high tensile strength. Unfortunately, our understanding of silks is limited because the complete elastic response has never been measured—leaving a stark lack of essential fundamental information. Using non-invasive, non-destructive Brillouin light scattering, we obtain the entire stiffness tensors (revealing negative Poisson’s ratios), refractive indices, and longitudinal and transverse sound velocities for major and minor ampullate spider silks: Argiope aurantia, Latrodectus hesperus, Nephila clavipes, Peucetia viridans. These results completely quantify the linear elastic response for all possible deformation modes, information unobtainable with traditional stress-strain tests. For completeness, we apply the principles of Brillouin imaging to spatially map the elastic stiffnesses on a spider web without deforming or disrupting the web in a non-invasive, non-contact measurement, finding variation among discrete fibres, junctions and glue spots. Finally, we provide the stiffness changes that occur with supercontraction.

  6. Non-invasive determination of the complete elastic moduli of spider silks.

    PubMed

    Koski, Kristie J; Akhenblit, Paul; McKiernan, Keri; Yarger, Jeffery L

    2013-03-01

    Spider silks possess nature's most exceptional mechanical properties, with unrivalled extensibility and high tensile strength. Unfortunately, our understanding of silks is limited because the complete elastic response has never been measured-leaving a stark lack of essential fundamental information. Using non-invasive, non-destructive Brillouin light scattering, we obtain the entire stiffness tensors (revealing negative Poisson's ratios), refractive indices, and longitudinal and transverse sound velocities for major and minor ampullate spider silks: Argiope aurantia, Latrodectus hesperus, Nephila clavipes, Peucetia viridans. These results completely quantify the linear elastic response for all possible deformation modes, information unobtainable with traditional stress-strain tests. For completeness, we apply the principles of Brillouin imaging to spatially map the elastic stiffnesses on a spider web without deforming or disrupting the web in a non-invasive, non-contact measurement, finding variation among discrete fibres, junctions and glue spots. Finally, we provide the stiffness changes that occur with supercontraction. PMID:23353627

  7. Strength and elastic moduli of TiN from radial x-ray diffraction under nonhydrostatic compression up to 45 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Haihua; Peng, Fang; Mao, Ho-kwang; Shen, Guoyin; Liermann, Hanns-Peter; Li, Zuo; Shu, Jinfu

    2010-07-23

    The high pressure behavior of titanium nitride (TiN) was investigated using synchrotron radial x-ray diffraction (RXRD) under nonhydrostatic compression up to 45.4 GPa in a diamond-anvil cell. We obtained the hydrostatic compression equation of state of TiN. Fitting to the third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state, the bulk modulus derived from nonhydrostatic compression data varies from 232 to 353 GPa, depending on angle {Psi}, the orientation of the diffraction planes with respect to the loading axis. The RXRD data obtained at {Psi} = 54.7{sup o} yield a bulk modulus K{sub 0} = 282 {+-} 9 GPa with pressure derivative K{prime}{sub 0} fixed at 4. We have analyzed the deformation mechanisms by analyzing the (111), (200), (220), (311), and (222) peaks in the x-ray diffraction under pressures. The ratio of uniaxial stress component to shear modulus t/G ranges from 0.007-0.027 at the pressure of 6.4-45.4 GPa. It was found that the TiN sample could support a maximum uniaxial stress component t of 8.6 GPa, when it started to yield at 45.4 GPa under uniaxial compression. And the aggregate elastic moduli of TiN at high pressure were determined from the synchrotron RXRD measurements.

  8. Determination and validation of the elastic moduli of small and complex biological samples: bone and keratin in bird beaks.

    PubMed

    Soons, Joris; Herrel, Anthony; Aerts, Peter; Dirckx, Joris

    2012-06-01

    In recent years, there has been a surge in the development of finite-element (FE) models aimed at testing biological hypotheses. For example, recent modelling efforts suggested that the beak in Darwin's finches probably evolved in response to fracture avoidance. However, knowledge of the material properties of the structures involved is crucial for any model. For many biological structures, these data are not available and may be difficult to obtain experimentally given the complex nature of biological structures. Beaks are interesting as they appear to be highly optimized in some cases. In order to understand the biomechanics of this small and complex structure, we have been developing FE models that take into account the bilayered structure of the beak consisting of bone and keratin. Here, we present the results of efforts related to the determination and validation of the elastic modulus of bone and keratin in bird beaks. The elastic moduli of fresh and dried samples were obtained using a novel double-indentation technique and through an inverse analysis. A bending experiment is used for the inverse analysis and the validation of the measurements. The out-of-plane displacements during loading are measured using digital speckle pattern interferometry. PMID:22090286

  9. Determination and validation of the elastic moduli of small and complex biological samples: bone and keratin in bird beaks

    PubMed Central

    Soons, Joris; Herrel, Anthony; Aerts, Peter; Dirckx, Joris

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a surge in the development of finite-element (FE) models aimed at testing biological hypotheses. For example, recent modelling efforts suggested that the beak in Darwin's finches probably evolved in response to fracture avoidance. However, knowledge of the material properties of the structures involved is crucial for any model. For many biological structures, these data are not available and may be difficult to obtain experimentally given the complex nature of biological structures. Beaks are interesting as they appear to be highly optimized in some cases. In order to understand the biomechanics of this small and complex structure, we have been developing FE models that take into account the bilayered structure of the beak consisting of bone and keratin. Here, we present the results of efforts related to the determination and validation of the elastic modulus of bone and keratin in bird beaks. The elastic moduli of fresh and dried samples were obtained using a novel double-indentation technique and through an inverse analysis. A bending experiment is used for the inverse analysis and the validation of the measurements. The out-of-plane displacements during loading are measured using digital speckle pattern interferometry. PMID:22090286

  10. An in situ estimation of anisotropic elastic moduli for a submarine shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Douglas E.; Leaney, Scott; Borland, William H.

    1994-11-01

    Direct arrival times and slownesses from wide-aperture walkaway vertical seismic profile data acquired in a layered anisotropic medium can be processed to give direct estimate of the phase slowness surface associated with the medium at the depth of the receivers. This slowness surface can, in turn, be fit by an estimated transversely isotropic medium with a vertical symmetry axis (a 'TIV' medium). While the method requires that the medium between the receivers and the surface be horizontally stratified, no further measurement or knowledge of that medium is required. When applied to data acquired in a compacting shale sequence (here termed the 'Petronas shale') encountered by a well in the South China Sea, the method yields an estimated TIV medium that fits the data extremely well over 180 deg of propagation angles sampled by 201 source positions. The medium is strongly anisotropic. The anisotropy is significantly anelliptic and implies that the quasi-shear mode should be triplicated for off-axis propagation. Estimated density-normalized moduli (in units of sq km/sq s) for the Petronas shale are A(sub 11) = 6.99 +/- 0.21, A(sub 33) = 5.53 +/- 0.17, A(sub 55) = 0.91 +/- 0.05, and A(sub 13) = 2.64 +/- 0.26. Densities in the logged zone just below the survey lie in the range between 2200 and 2400 kg/cu m with an average value close to 2300 kg/cu m.

  11. Elastometry of deflated capsules: elastic moduli from shape and wrinkle analysis.

    PubMed

    Knoche, Sebastian; Vella, Dominic; Aumaitre, Elodie; Degen, Patrick; Rehage, Heinz; Cicuta, Pietro; Kierfeld, Jan

    2013-10-01

    Elastic capsules, prepared from droplets or bubbles attached to a capillary (as in a pendant drop tensiometer), can be deflated by suction through the capillary. We study this deflation and show that a combined analysis of the shape and wrinkling characteristics enables us to determine the elastic properties in situ. Shape contours are analyzed and fitted using shape equations derived from nonlinear membrane-shell theory to give the elastic modulus, Poisson ratio and stress distribution of the membrane. We include wrinkles, which generically form upon deflation, within the shape analysis. Measuring the wavelength of wrinkles and using the calculated stress distribution gives the bending stiffness of the membrane. We compare this method with previous approaches using the Laplace-Young equation and illustrate the method on two very different capsule materials: polymerized octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) capsules and hydrophobin (HFBII) coated bubbles. Our results are in agreement with the available rheological data. For hydrophobin coated bubbles, the method reveals an interesting nonlinear behavior consistent with the hydrophobin molecules having a rigid core surrounded by a softer shell. PMID:24015876

  12. Elastic Moduli of detwinned orthorhombic optimally doped LSCO (La2-0.16 Sr 0.16 CuO4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanelli, Victor; Betts, Jonathan; Migliori, Albert; Suzuki, Yoko; Yan, Jiaqiang

    2010-03-01

    Accurate elastic modulus characterization of the superconducting phase transition (SC) in La2-0.16 Sr 0.16 CuO4 is difficult because the discontinuities in moduli are much smaller than fluctuations from twin boundary motion. Thus detwinning is required for a useful measurement and was achieved using mechanical stress along the tetragonal [110] direction (or equivalently, along the orthorhombic [100] direction) below the orthorhombic phase transition that is well below ambient temperature. Using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) on the detwinned monocrystal, the discontinuities and moduli around the SC transition were measured.

  13. Polycrystalline elastic moduli of a high-entropy alloy at cryogenic temperatures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Haglund, A.; Koehler, M.; Catoor, D.; George, E. P.; Keppens, V.

    2014-12-05

    A FCC high-entropy alloy (HEA) that exhibits strong temperature dependence of strength at low homologous temperatures in sharp contrast to pure FCC metals like Ni that show weak temperature dependence is CrMnCoFeNi. In order to understand this behavior, elastic constants were determined as a function of temperature. From 300 K down to 55 K, the shear modulus (G) of the HEA changes by only 8%, increasing from 80 to 86 GPa. Moreover, this temperature dependence is weaker than that of FCC Ni, whose G increases by 12% (81–91 GPa). Therefore, the uncharacteristic temperature-dependence of the strength of the HEA ismore » not due to the temperature dependence of its shear modulus.« less

  14. Polycrystalline elastic moduli of a high-entropy alloy at cryogenic temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Haglund, A.; Koehler, M.; Catoor, D.; George, E. P.; Keppens, V.

    2014-12-05

    A FCC high-entropy alloy (HEA) that exhibits strong temperature dependence of strength at low homologous temperatures in sharp contrast to pure FCC metals like Ni that show weak temperature dependence is CrMnCoFeNi. In order to understand this behavior, elastic constants were determined as a function of temperature. From 300 K down to 55 K, the shear modulus (G) of the HEA changes by only 8%, increasing from 80 to 86 GPa. Moreover, this temperature dependence is weaker than that of FCC Ni, whose G increases by 12% (81–91 GPa). Therefore, the uncharacteristic temperature-dependence of the strength of the HEA is not due to the temperature dependence of its shear modulus.

  15. Optoelectronic Properties, Elastic Moduli and Thermoelectricity of SrAlGa: An Ab Initio Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshan, Ali; Murtaza, G.; Takagiwa, Y.; Khenata, R.; Haleem, Uddin; Ullah, H.; A. Khan, S.

    2014-04-01

    Half-Heusler compounds are an impressive class of materials with a huge potential for different applications such as in future energy, especially in the fields of thermoelectrics and solar cells. We present ab initio total energy calculations within the modified Becke—Johnson generalized gradient approximation (mBJ-GGA) to obtain the physical properties of SrAlGa compounds. The structural, elastic, acoustic, electronic, chemical bonding, optical, and thermoelectric properties are calculated and compared with the available calculation data. The SrAlGa is found to be a small-band-gap (0.125-0.175 eV) material, suitable for thermoelectric applications with a relatively high Seebeck coefficient. Also, SrAlGa has the potential in the optoelectronic applications due to high optical conductivity and reflectivity in the infrared and visible region of electromagnetic spectra.

  16. Elastic Moduli of Pyrolytic Boron Nitride Measured Using 3-Point Bending and Ultrasonic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaforey, M. L.; Deeb, C. W.; Matthiesen, D. H.; Roth, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    Three-point bending and ultrasonic testing were performed on a flat plate of PBN. In the bending experiment, the deformation mechanism was believed to be shear between the pyrolytic layers, which yielded a shear modulus, c (sub 44), of 2.60 plus or minus .31 GPa. Calculations based on the longitudinal and shear wave velocity measurements yielded values of 0.341 plus or minus 0.006 for Poisson's ratio, 10.34 plus or minus .30 GPa for the elastic modulus (c (sub 33)), and 3.85 plus or minus 0.02 GPa for the shear modulus (c (sub 44)). Since free basal dislocations have been reported to affect the value of c (sub 44) found using ultrasonic methods, the value from the bending experiment was assumed to be the more accurate value.

  17. Goddard rattler-jamming mechanism for quantifying pressure dependence of elastic moduli of grain packs

    SciTech Connect

    Pride, Steven R.; Berryman, James G.

    2009-01-05

    An analysis is presented to show how it is possible for unconsolidated granular packings to obey overall non-Hertzian pressure dependence due to the imperfect and random spatial arrangements of the grains in these packs. With imperfect arrangement, some gaps that remain between grains can be closed by strains applied to the grain packing. As these gaps are closed, former rattler grains become jammed and new stress-bearing contacts are created that increase the elastic stiffness of the packing. By allowing for such a mechanism, detailed analytical expressions are obtained for increases in bulk modulus of a random packing of grains with increasing stress and strain. Only isotropic stress and strain are considered in this analysis. The model is shown to give a favorable fit to laboratory data on variations in bulk modulus due to variations in applied pressure for bead packs.

  18. Cell model and elastic moduli of disordered solids - Low temperature limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, S. T. J.; Landel, R. F.; Moacanin, J.; Simha, Robert; Papazoglou, Elisabeth

    1987-01-01

    The cell theory has been previously employed to compute the equation of state of a disordered condensed system. It is now generalized to include anisotropic stresses. The condition of affine deformation is adopted, transforming an orginally spherical into an ellipsoidal cell. With a Lennard-Jones n-m potential between nonbonded centers, the formal expression for the deformational free energy is derived. It is to be evaluated in the limit of the linear elastic range. Since the bulk modulus in this limit is already known, it is convenient to consider a uniaxial deformation. To begin with, restrictions are made to the low-temperature limit in the absence of entropy contributions. Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio then follow.

  19. Fiber/collagen composites for ligament tissue engineering: influence of elastic moduli of sparse aligned fibers on mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Thayer, Patrick S; Verbridge, Scott S; Dahlgren, Linda A; Kakar, Sanjeev; Guelcher, Scott A; Goldstein, Aaron S

    2016-08-01

    Electrospun microfibers are attractive for the engineering of oriented tissues because they present instructive topographic and mechanical cues to cells. However, high-density microfiber networks are too cell-impermeable for most tissue applications. Alternatively, the distribution of sparse microfibers within a three-dimensional hydrogel could present instructive cues to guide cell organization while not inhibiting cell behavior. In this study, thin (∼5 fibers thick) layers of aligned microfibers (0.7 μm) were embedded within collagen hydrogels containing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), cultured for up to 14 days, and assayed for expression of ligament markers and imaged for cell organization. These microfibers were generated through the electrospinning of polycaprolactone (PCL), poly(ester-urethane) (PEUR), or a 75/25 PEUR/PCL blend to produce microfiber networks with elastic moduli of 31, 15, and 5.6 MPa, respectively. MSCs in composites containing 5.6 MPa fibers exhibited increased expression of the ligament marker scleraxis and the contractile phenotype marker α-smooth muscle actin versus the stiffer fiber composites. Additionally, cells within the 5.6 MPa microfiber composites were more oriented compared to cells within the 15 and 31 MPa microfiber composites. Together, these data indicate that the mechanical properties of microfiber/collagen composites can be tuned for the engineering of ligament and other target tissues. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1894-1901, 2016. PMID:27037972

  20. Temperature dependencies of the elastic moduli and thermal expansion coefficient of an equiatomic, single-phase CoCrFeMnNi high-entropy alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Laplanche, G.; Gadaud, P.; Horst, O.; Otto, F.; Eggeler, G.; George, E.

    2014-11-15

    The equiatomic CoCrFeMnNi alloy is now regarded as a model face-centered cubic single-phase high-entropy alloy. Consequently, determination of its intrinsic properties such as the temperature dependencies of elastic moduli and thermal expansion coefficient are important to improve understanding of this new class of material. Lastly, these temperature dependencies were measured over a large temperature range (200–1270 K) in this study.

  1. Temperature dependence of the elastic moduli and damping for polycrystalline LiF-22 pct CaF2 eutectic salt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfenden, A.; Lastrapes, G.; Duggan, M. B.; Raj, S. V.

    1991-01-01

    Young's and shear moduli and damping were measured for as-cast polycrystalline LiF-(22 mol pct)CaF2 eutectic specimens as a function of temperature using the piezoelectric ultrasonic composite oscillator technique. The shear modulus decreased with increasing temperature from about 40 GPa at 295 K to about 30 GPa at 1000 K, while the Young modulus decreased from about 115 GPa at 295 K to about 35 GPa at 900 K. These values are compared with those derived from the rule of mixtures using elastic moduli data for LiF and CaF2 single crystals. It is shown that, while the shear modulus data agree reasonably well with the predicted trend, there is a large discrepancy between the theoretical calculations and the Young modulus values, where this disagreement increases with increasing temperature.

  2. High Elastic Moduli of a 54Al2O3-46Ta2O5 Glass Fabricated via Containerless Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales-Sosa, Gustavo A.; Masuno, Atsunobu; Higo, Yuji; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Yanaba, Yutaka; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu; Umada, Takumi; Okamura, Kohei; Kato, Katsuyoshi; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2015-10-01

    Glasses with high elastic moduli have been in demand for many years because the thickness of such glasses can be reduced while maintaining its strength. Moreover, thinner and lighter glasses are desired for the fabrication of windows in buildings and cars, cover glasses for smart-phones and substrates in Thin-Film Transistor (TFT) displays. In this work, we report a 54Al2O3-46Ta2O5 glass fabricated by aerodynamic levitation which possesses one of the highest elastic moduli and hardness for oxide glasses also displaying excellent optical properties. The glass was colorless and transparent in the visible region, and its refractive index nd was as high as 1.94. The measured Young’s modulus and Vickers hardness were 158.3 GPa and 9.1 GPa, respectively, which are comparable to the previously reported highest values for oxide glasses. Analysis made using 27Al Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy revealed the presence of a significantly large fraction of high-coordinated Al in addition to four-coordinated Al in the glass. The high elastic modulus and hardness are attributed to both the large cationic field strength of Ta5+ ions and the large dissociation energies per unit volume of Al2O3 and Ta2O5.

  3. High Elastic Moduli of a 54Al2O3-46Ta2O5 Glass Fabricated via Containerless Processing.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Sosa, Gustavo A; Masuno, Atsunobu; Higo, Yuji; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Yanaba, Yutaka; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu; Umada, Takumi; Okamura, Kohei; Kato, Katsuyoshi; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Glasses with high elastic moduli have been in demand for many years because the thickness of such glasses can be reduced while maintaining its strength. Moreover, thinner and lighter glasses are desired for the fabrication of windows in buildings and cars, cover glasses for smart-phones and substrates in Thin-Film Transistor (TFT) displays. In this work, we report a 54Al2O3-46Ta2O5 glass fabricated by aerodynamic levitation which possesses one of the highest elastic moduli and hardness for oxide glasses also displaying excellent optical properties. The glass was colorless and transparent in the visible region, and its refractive index nd was as high as 1.94. The measured Young's modulus and Vickers hardness were 158.3 GPa and 9.1 GPa, respectively, which are comparable to the previously reported highest values for oxide glasses. Analysis made using (27)Al Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy revealed the presence of a significantly large fraction of high-coordinated Al in addition to four-coordinated Al in the glass. The high elastic modulus and hardness are attributed to both the large cationic field strength of Ta(5+) ions and the large dissociation energies per unit volume of Al2O3 and Ta2O5. PMID:26468639

  4. High Elastic Moduli of a 54Al2O3-46Ta2O5 Glass Fabricated via Containerless Processing

    PubMed Central

    Rosales-Sosa, Gustavo A.; Masuno, Atsunobu; Higo, Yuji; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Yanaba, Yutaka; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu; Umada, Takumi; Okamura, Kohei; Kato, Katsuyoshi; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Glasses with high elastic moduli have been in demand for many years because the thickness of such glasses can be reduced while maintaining its strength. Moreover, thinner and lighter glasses are desired for the fabrication of windows in buildings and cars, cover glasses for smart-phones and substrates in Thin-Film Transistor (TFT) displays. In this work, we report a 54Al2O3-46Ta2O5 glass fabricated by aerodynamic levitation which possesses one of the highest elastic moduli and hardness for oxide glasses also displaying excellent optical properties. The glass was colorless and transparent in the visible region, and its refractive index nd was as high as 1.94. The measured Young’s modulus and Vickers hardness were 158.3 GPa and 9.1 GPa, respectively, which are comparable to the previously reported highest values for oxide glasses. Analysis made using 27Al Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy revealed the presence of a significantly large fraction of high-coordinated Al in addition to four-coordinated Al in the glass. The high elastic modulus and hardness are attributed to both the large cationic field strength of Ta5+ ions and the large dissociation energies per unit volume of Al2O3 and Ta2O5. PMID:26468639

  5. Fracture mode, microstructure and temperature-dependent elastic moduli for thermoelectric composites of PbTe-PbS with SiC nanoparticle additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Jennifer E.; Case, Eldon D.; Schmidt, Robert D.; Wu, Chun-I.; Hogan, Timothy P.; Trejo, Rosa M.; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2013-12-01

    Twenty-six (Pb0.95Sn0.05Te)0.92(PbS)0.08-0.055% PbI2-SiC nanoparticle (SiCnp) composite thermoelectric specimens were either hot pressed or pulsed electric current sintered (PECS). Bloating (a thermally induced increase in porosity, P, for as-densified specimens) was observed during annealing at temperatures >603 K for hot-pressed specimens and PECS-processed specimens from wet milled powders, but in contrast seven out of seven specimens densified by PECS from dry milled powders showed no observable bloating following annealing at temperatures up to 936 K. In this study, bloating in the specimens was accessed via thermal annealing induced changes in (i) porosity measured by scanning electron microscopy on fractured specimen surfaces, (ii) specimen volume and (iii) elastic moduli. The moduli were measured by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. SiCnp additions (1-3.5 vol.%) changed the fracture mode from intergranular to transgranular, inhibited grain growth, and limited bloating in the wet milled PECS specimens. Inhibition of bloating likely occurs due to cleaning of contamination from powder particle surfaces via PECS processing which has been reported previously in the literature.

  6. Fracture mode, microstructure and temperature-dependent elastic moduli for thermoelectric composites of PbTe PbS with SiC nanoparticle additions

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Jennifer E; Case, Eldon D; Hogan, Timophy P.; Trejo, Rosa M; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-six (Pb0.95Sn0.05Te)0.92(PbS)0.08 0.055% PbI2 SiC nanoparticle (SiCnp) composite thermoelectric specimens were either hot pressed or pulsed electric current sintered (PECS). Bloating (a thermally induced increase in porosity, P, for as-densified specimens) was observed during annealing at temperatures >603 K for hot-pressed specimens and PECS-processed specimens from wet milled powders, but in contrast seven out of seven specimens densified by PECS from dry milled powders showed no observable bloating following annealing at temperatures up to 936 K. In this study, bloating in the specimens was accessed via thermal annealing induced changes in (i) porosity measured by scanning electron microscopy on fractured specimen surfaces, (ii) specimen volume and (iii) elastic moduli. The moduli were measured by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. SiCnp additions (1 3.5 vol.%) changed the fracture mode from intergranular to transgranular, inhibited grain growth, and limited bloating in the wet milled PECS specimens. Inhibition of bloating likely occurs due to cleaning of contamination from powder particle surfaces via PECS processing which has been reported previously in the literature.

  7. Effect of pore pressure on the elastic moduli, porosity and permeability of Berea sandstone and Leuders limestone

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, T.W.; Kelkar, S.M.; Gray, K.E.

    1983-02-01

    The behavior of Berea sandstone and Leuders limestone under atmospheric and elevated pore pressures is reported. The porosity and the permeability changes, along with the static and dynamic moduli for these rocks have been determined under various conditions. The existing theoretical background pertinent to the study is reviewed along with the previous experimental work. The detailed descriptions and the discussions on the experimental procedure involved and the equipment utilized are presented. A discussion on the sources of experimental errors is included. It also includes the error propagation equations and relevant discussions on the data acquisition and analysis. The findings are summarized together with a discussion of the results. The conclusions drawn from these results are included. The bulk of the data acquired and the results computed from it are presented.

  8. Absorption and elastic scattering of light by particle aggregates.

    PubMed

    Quinten, M; Kreibig, U

    1993-10-20

    Light scattering and absorption by spherical particles is extended to aggregates of spheres with arbitrary shape and size. We applied the theory of G6rardy and Ausloos [Phys. Rev. B 25, 4204-4229 (1082)] to compute the total extinction loss spectra of several aggregates of nanometer-sized silver spheres from the near IR to the near UV. Silver was best suited to provide quantitative comparison with experiments concerning the scattering and absorption in the visible spectral region. Additional resonant extinction was obtained besides the resonant extinction of the single silver sphere. The spectra were discussed in detail to give general results that are independent of the particle material. PMID:20856447

  9. Determination of the full elastic moduli of single crystals using shear-wave velocities by Brillouin spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, D.; Mao, Z.; Lin, J.; Yang, J.

    2013-12-01

    Brillouin light scattering (BLS) is the inelastic scattering of monochromatic laser light by phonons in the GHz frequency range [1]. BLS spectroscopy can be used to measure sound velocities traveling along certain directions of a single crystal through the frequency shifts of the scattered light from the acoustic phonons [1]. Over the past few decades, BLS spectroscopy has been widely used to measure the velocities of acoustic waves for a wide range of Earth's materials, in which the full elastic constants were derived from the measured compressional (VP) and shear wave (VS) velocities. However, the VP velocities of minerals normally overlap with the shear-wave velocities of diamonds in Brillouin measurements approximately above 25 GPa [2-5] such that only VS of minerals can be measured experimentally. Theoretical models have showed that the shear-wave velocities of minerals also carry necessary information to invert the full elastic tensors [2], although previous studies at high pressures have focused on measuring velocities within the principle planes of the crystals. This leads to a strong trade-off among individual Cij, preventing the derivation of the full elastic tensors from the VS velocities alone [3-5]. In this study, we have come up with an elastic model to overcome this problem by finding a suitable crystallographic plane that has optimized VS-VP interactions in the elastic tensors. Using MgO, spinel and zoisite as test samples, we have used measured VP/VS or VS velocities of these crystals using BLS spectroscopy to derive their full elastic tensors. This new approach sheds lights on future high-pressure elasticity studies relevant to materials the Earth's deep interior. 1. Sinogeikin, S.V., Bass, J.D., Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 120, 43 (2000). 2. Every, A. G., Phys. Rev. B., 22, 1746, (1980) 3. Marquardt, H., Speziale, S., Reichmann, H.J., Frost, D.J., and Schilling, F.R., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 287, 345 (2009). 4. Marquardt, H., Speziale, S

  10. Elastic wave speeds and moduli in polycrystalline ice Ih, si methane hydrate, and sll methane-ethane hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helgerud, M.B.; Waite, W.F.; Kirby, S.H.; Nur, A.

    2009-01-01

    We used ultrasonic pulse transmission to measure compressional, P, and shear, S, wave speeds in laboratory-formed polycrystalline ice Ih, si methane hydrate, and sll methane-ethane hydrate. From the wave speed's linear dependence on temperature and pressure and from the sample's calculated density, we derived expressions for bulk, shear, and compressional wave moduli and Poisson's ratio from -20 to 15??C and 22.4 to 32.8 MPa for ice Ih, -20 to 15??C and 30.5 to 97.7 MPa for si methane hydrate, and -20 to 10??C and 30.5 to 91.6 MPa for sll methane-ethane hydrate. All three materials had comparable P and S wave speeds and decreasing shear wave speeds with increasing applied pressure. Each material also showed evidence of rapid intergranular bonding, with a corresponding increase in wave speed, in response to pauses in sample deformation. There were also key differences. Resistance to uniaxial compaction, indicated by the pressure required to compact initially porous samples, was significantly lower for ice Ih than for either hydrate. The ice Ih shear modulus decreased with increasing pressure, in contrast to the increase measured in both hydrates ?? 2009.

  11. A Note on Aggregate Price-Level Elasticity and Supply-Side Shocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findlay, David W.

    1995-01-01

    Investigates factors that influence the short-run and long-run effects of supply-side shocks on aggregate income and tax revenues. Concludes that the long-run relationship between tax revenues and the tax rate is completely independent of price-level elasticity. (CFR)

  12. Complete elastic characterization of viscoelastic materials by dynamic measurements of the complex bulk and Young's moduli as a function of temperature and hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, François M.; Trivett, D. H.

    2011-07-01

    Two independent systems to measure the dynamic complex Young's and bulk moduli of viscoelastic materials as a function of temperature and hydrostatic pressure are described. In the Young's modulus system, a bar-shaped sample is adhered to a piezoelectric shaker and mounted vertically inside an air-filled pressure vessel. Data are obtained using both the traditional resonant approach and a wave-speed technique. In the bulk modulus system, the compressibility of a sample of arbitrary shape immersed in Castor oil and placed inside a pressure chamber is measured. Data can be obtained at frequencies typically ranging from 50 Hz to 5 kHz, at temperatures comprised between -2 and 50 °C and under hydrostatic pressures ranging from 0 to 2 MPa (Young's), or 6.5 MPa (bulk). Typical data obtained with both systems are presented, and it is shown how these data can be combined to completely characterize the elasticity of the material under investigation. In particular, they can be used to obtain experimental values of the complex Poisson's ratio, whose accurate measurement is otherwise quite challenging to perform directly. As an example, the magnitude and loss tangent of Poisson's ratio are presented for a nearly incompressible rubber.

  13. pH-induced metal-ligand cross-links inspired by mussel yield self-healing polymer networks with near-covalent elastic moduli.

    PubMed

    Holten-Andersen, Niels; Harrington, Matthew J; Birkedal, Henrik; Lee, Bruce P; Messersmith, Phillip B; Lee, Ka Yee C; Waite, J Herbert

    2011-02-15

    Growing evidence supports a critical role of metal-ligand coordination in many attributes of biological materials including adhesion, self-assembly, toughness, and hardness without mineralization [Rubin DJ, Miserez A, Waite JH (2010) Advances in Insect Physiology: Insect Integument and Color, eds Jérôme C, Stephen JS (Academic Press, London), pp 75-133]. Coordination between Fe and catechol ligands has recently been correlated to the hardness and high extensibility of the cuticle of mussel byssal threads and proposed to endow self-healing properties [Harrington MJ, Masic A, Holten-Andersen N, Waite JH, Fratzl P (2010) Science 328:216-220]. Inspired by the pH jump experienced by proteins during maturation of a mussel byssus secretion, we have developed a simple method to control catechol-Fe(3+) interpolymer cross-linking via pH. The resonance Raman signature of catechol-Fe(3+) cross-linked polymer gels at high pH was similar to that from native mussel thread cuticle and the gels displayed elastic moduli (G') that approach covalently cross-linked gels as well as self-healing properties. PMID:21278337

  14. Estimation of elastic moduli in a compressible Gibson half-space by inverting Rayleigh-wave phase velocity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Miller, R.D.; Chen, C.

    2006-01-01

    A Gibson half-space model (a non-layered Earth model) has the shear modulus varying linearly with depth in an inhomogeneous elastic half-space. In a half-space of sedimentary granular soil under a geostatic state of initial stress, the density and the Poisson's ratio do not vary considerably with depth. In such an Earth body, the dynamic shear modulus is the parameter that mainly affects the dispersion of propagating waves. We have estimated shear-wave velocities in the compressible Gibson half-space by inverting Rayleigh-wave phase velocities. An analytical dispersion law of Rayleigh-type waves in a compressible Gibson half-space is given in an algebraic form, which makes our inversion process extremely simple and fast. The convergence of the weighted damping solution is guaranteed through selection of the damping factor using the Levenberg-Marquardt method. Calculation efficiency is achieved by reconstructing a weighted damping solution using singular value decomposition techniques. The main advantage of this algorithm is that only three parameters define the compressible Gibson half-space model. Theoretically, to determine the model by the inversion, only three Rayleigh-wave phase velocities at different frequencies are required. This is useful in practice where Rayleigh-wave energy is only developed in a limited frequency range or at certain frequencies as data acquired at manmade structures such as dams and levees. Two real examples are presented and verified by borehole S-wave velocity measurements. The results of these real examples are also compared with the results of the layered-Earth model. ?? Springer 2006.

  15. Interaction of angiogenically stimulated intermediate CD163+ monocytes/macrophages with soft hydrophobic poly(n-butyl acrylate) networks with elastic moduli matched to that of human arteries.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Anke; Kratz, Karl; Hiebl, Bernhard; Lendlein, Andreas; Jung, Friedrich

    2012-03-01

    mRNA expression profile of the aMO2 was not influenced by the substrate elasticity. In the supernatant of aMO2 on cPnBA0250, significantly less VEGF-A(165) product was found than expected based on the mRNA level measured (P < 0.01). Tests with recombinant VEGF-A(165) then demonstrated that significantly more VEGF-A(165) was adhered on cPnBA0250 than on cPnBA1100 (P < 0.01). Seeded on cPnBA, aMO2-unaffected by the elastic moduli of both substrates-seemed to remain in their subset status and secreted VEGF-A(165) without release of proinflammatory cytokines. These in vitro results might indicate that this MO subset can be used as cellular delivery system for proangiogenic and noninflammatory mediators to support the endothelialization of cPnBA. PMID:22360779

  16. Monetary Policy Rules, Supply Shocks, and the Price-Level Elasticity of Aggregate Demand: A Graphical Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyer, Ben L.; Maggs, Gary E.

    1995-01-01

    Utilizes two-dimensional price and output graphs to demonstrate the way that the price-level elasticity of aggregate demand affects alternative monetary policy rules designed to cope with random aggregate supply shocks. Includes graphs illustrating price-level, real Gross Domestic Product (GDP), nominal GDP, and nominal money supply targeting.…

  17. Elastic moduli, thermal expansion, and inferred permeability of Climax quartz monzonite and Sudbury gabbro to 500/sup 0/C and 55 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Page, L.; Heard, H.C.

    1981-03-17

    Young's modulus (E), bulk modulus (K), and the coefficient of thermal linear expansion (..cap alpha..) have been determined for Climax quartz monzonite to 500/sup 0/C and pressures (P) to 55 MPa and for Sudbury gabbro to 300/sup 0/C and 55 MPa. For each rock, both E and K decreased with T and increased with P in a nonlinear manner. In the monzonite, E and K decreased by up to 60% as P decreased from 55.2 to 6.9 MPa isothermally, while the gabbro indicated a decrease up to 70% over the same pressure range. As T increased isobarically, E and K for the monzonite decreased by up to a factor of approx. 80% from 19 to 500/sup 0/C. The moduli of the gabbro decreased by as much as 70% from 19 to 300/sup 0/C. ..cap alpha.. for the monzonite increased with T and decreased with P in a nonmonotonic fashion, with most measured values for ..cap alpha.. greater than values calculated for the crack-free aggregate. Depending on P, ..cap alpha.. in the monzonite increased from 8 to 11.10/sup -6/ /sup 0/C/sup -1/ at 40/sup 0/C to 22 to 25.10/sup -6/C/sup -1/ at 475/sup 0/C. For the gabbro, ..cap alpha.. also generally decreased with increasing P. Values ranged from 6 to 11.10/sup -6/ /sup 0/C/sup -1/, showing a nonlinear trend and very little net increas over the T range from 19 to 300/sup 0/C. Calculated permeability of these rocks based on the ..cap alpha.. determinations indicated that permeabilities may increase by up to a factor of 3 over the temperature interval 19 to 300/sup 0/C, and the permeability of the monzonite is inferred to increase by up to a factor of 8 by 500/sup 0/C. In both rocks, most measurements are consistent with microcracks controlling the thermoelastic response by opening with T and closing with sigma and P.

  18. Mechanics of fire ant aggregations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennenbaum, Michael; Liu, Zhongyang; Hu, David; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Fire ants link their bodies to form aggregations; these can adopt a variety of structures, they can drip and spread, or withstand applied loads. Here, by using oscillatory rheology, we show that fire ant aggregations are viscoelastic. We find that, at the lowest ant densities probed and in the linear regime, the elastic and viscous moduli are essentially identical over the spanned frequency range, which highlights the absence of a dominant mode of structural relaxation. As ant density increases, the elastic modulus rises, which we interpret by alluding to ant crowding and subsequent jamming. When deformed beyond the linear regime, the aggregation flows, exhibiting shear-thinning behaviour with a stress load that is comparable to the maximum load the aggregation can withstand before individual ants are torn apart. Our findings illustrate the rich, collective mechanical behaviour that can arise in aggregations of active, interacting building blocks.

  19. Mechanics of fire ant aggregations.

    PubMed

    Tennenbaum, Michael; Liu, Zhongyang; Hu, David; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Fire ants link their bodies to form aggregations; these can adopt a variety of structures, they can drip and spread, or withstand applied loads. Here, by using oscillatory rheology, we show that fire ant aggregations are viscoelastic. We find that, at the lowest ant densities probed and in the linear regime, the elastic and viscous moduli are essentially identical over the spanned frequency range, which highlights the absence of a dominant mode of structural relaxation. As ant density increases, the elastic modulus rises, which we interpret by alluding to ant crowding and subsequent jamming. When deformed beyond the linear regime, the aggregation flows, exhibiting shear-thinning behaviour with a stress load that is comparable to the maximum load the aggregation can withstand before individual ants are torn apart. Our findings illustrate the rich, collective mechanical behaviour that can arise in aggregations of active, interacting building blocks. PMID:26501413

  20. Variational method of determining effective moduli of polycrystals: (A) hexagonal symmetry, (B) trigonal symmetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peselnick, L.; Meister, R.

    1965-01-01

    Variational principles of anisotropic elasticity have been applied to aggregates of randomly oriented pure-phase polycrystals having hexagonal symmetry and trigonal symmetry. The bounds of the effective elastic moduli obtained in this way show a considerable improvement over the bounds obtained by means of the Voigt and Reuss assumptions. The Hill average is found to be in most cases a good approximation when compared to the bounds found from the variational method. The new bounds reduce in their limits to the Voigt and Reuss values. ?? 1965 The American Institute of Physics.

  1. Elastic moduli of hard c-Zr3N4 and η-Ta2N3, a tough self-healing material, via laser ultrasonics and nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerr, Andreas; Chigarev, Nikolay; Bourguille, Judith; Tetard, Florent; Brinza, Ovidiu; Nikitin, Sergey; Lomonosov, Alexey; Gusev, Vitalyi

    2013-06-01

    Bulk and shear moduli (B0 and G0) of the dense polycrystalline oxygen bearing c-Zr3N4 and η-Ta2N3 were determined from the laser ultrasonic (LU) measurements on highly porous samples having the volume fraction porosity of 0.23 and 0.18, respectively. Dense samples of these high-pressure (HP) materials are today not available due to their very high hardness and absence of a densification procedure. Combining the LU data with a numerical analysis of the sample porosity, the ``true'' isotropic moduli were determined to be B0 = 217(20) GPa and G0 = 163(9) GPa, for c-Zr3N4, and B0 = 281(15) GPa and G0 = 123(2) GPa, for η-Ta2N3. For both HP-nitrides the B0 values agree with those obtained earlier via the HP compression measurements in a diamond anvil cell. Also, the self-healing behavior of η-Ta2N3 by mechanical polishing was confirmed by two independent methods. Finally, the results obtained for η-Ta2N3 via the LU method were compared with our nanoindentation measurements. The high G0 value of c-Zr3N4 suggests that this material could vie with γ-Si3N4 for the rank of the third hardest material after diamond and c-BN. Supported by the Agence Nationale de la Recherche (France).

  2. Moduli Decays and Gravitinos

    SciTech Connect

    Dine, Michael; Kitano, Ryuichiro; Morisse, Alexander; Shirman, Yuri

    2006-04-21

    One proposed solution of the moduli problem of string cosmology requires that the moduli are quite heavy, their decays reheating the universe to temperatures above the scale of nucleosynthesis. In many of these scenarios, the moduli are approximately supersymmetric; it is then crucial that the decays to gravitinos are helicity suppressed. In this paper, we discuss situations where these decays are, and are not, suppressed. We also comment on a possible gravitino problem from inaton decay.

  3. Variational method of determining effective moduli of polycrystals with tetragonal symmetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meister, R.; Peselnick, L.

    1966-01-01

    Variational principles have been applied to aggregates of randomly oriented pure-phase polycrystals having tetragonal symmetry. The bounds of the effective elastic moduli obtained in this way show a substantial improvement over the bounds obtained by means of the Voigt and Reuss assumptions. The Hill average is found to be a good approximation in most cases when compared to the bounds found from the variational method. The new bounds reduce in their limits to the Voigt and Reuss values. ?? 1966 The American Institute of Physics.

  4. Ultransonic velocity measurements in sheared granular layers: Implications for the evolution of dynamic elastic moduli of compositionally-diverse cataclastic fault gouges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, Matthew William

    The objective of this project was to investigate the mechanical and elastic evolution of laboratory fault gouge analogs during active shear. To do this, I designed, constructed, and implemented a new technique for measuring changes in the elastic properties of granular layers subjected to shear deformation. Granular layers serve as an experimental analog to gouge layers forming in cataclastic faults. The technique combines a double-direct shear configuration with a method of determining ultrasonic elastic compressional and shear wavespeed. Experimental results are divided into chapters based on application to fundamental mechanics or to field cases. The first set of experiments allowed us to develop the technique and apply it to a range of end- member materials including quartz sands, montmorillonite clays, and mixtures of sand and clay. Emphasis is placed on normal stress unload-reload cycles and the resulting behavior as clay content is varied within the layer. We observe consistent decrease in wavespeed with shear for sand, and nonlinear but increasing wavespeed for clay and the sand/clay mixture. The second set of experiments involves the application of this technique to measurements conducted under fluid saturation and controlled pressure conditions, examining the behavior of materials from the Nankai Trough Accretionary Prism under shear. I introduce the effects of variable displacement rate and hold time, with implications for fault stability and rate-and-state frictional sliding. The experiments demonstrate a consistent inverse relationship between sliding velocity and wavespeed, and an increase in wavespeed associated with holds. The third set of experiments deals with velocity through stick-slipping glass beads, which has implications for fundamental granular mechanics questions involving velocity-weakening materials. I find that wavespeed decreases in the time between events and increases at "slips", suggesting a strong control related to changes in

  5. Elastic properties of hedenbergite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandelin, John; Weidner, Donald J.

    1988-02-01

    The single-crystal elastic moduli of hedenbergite (CaFeSi2O6) hare been measured at 20°C and 1 bar using Brillouin spectroscopy. The moduli are (in gigapascals): C11 = 222, C22 = 176, C23 = 249, C44 = 55, C55 = 63, C66 = 60, C12 = 69, C13 = 79, C33, = 86, C15 = 12, C25 = 13, C35 = 26, C46 = -10. The comparison of elastic properties among Mg-Fe-Ca bearing pyroxenes, known as quadrilateral pyroxenes, reveals only weak variations with changes in composition. Of the four quadrilateral pyroxenes, orthoferrosilite has elastic properties distinctive from the others. The principal differences among these pyroxenes are due to subtle structural differences. In particular, the mechanical linkage between the M2 polyhedral chains in clinopyroxenes enhances the importance of the cation in this site. In contrast to the orthopyroxenes, the aggregate shear modulus μ of the calcium-bearing clinopyroxenes (diopside and hedenbergite) exhibits no dependence on the amount of iron (Fe2+) present in the structure, while the ratio K/μ does. As a result, the compressional and shear acoustic velocities of the calcium-bearing clinopyroxenes show a smaller dependency on iron content than do the orthopyroxenes.

  6. Life on moduli space?

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Stephen D. H.

    2009-10-15

    While the number of metastable landscape vacua in string theory is vast, the number of supermoduli vacua which lead to distinct low-energy physics is even larger, perhaps infinitely so. From the anthropic perspective it is therefore important to understand whether complex life is possible on moduli space - i.e., in low-energy effective theories with (1) exact supersymmetry and (2) some massless multiplets (moduli). Unless life is essentially impossible on moduli space as a consequence of these characteristics, anthropic reasoning in string theory suggests that the overwhelming majority of sentient beings would observe 1-2. We investigate whether 1 and 2 are by themselves automatically inimical to life and conclude, tentatively, that they are not. In particular, we describe moduli scenarios in which complex life seems possible.

  7. Effect of Hydrodynamic Forces on meso-(4-Sulfonatophenyl)-Substituted Porphyrin J-Aggregate Nanoparticles: Elasticity, Plasticity and Breaking.

    PubMed

    El-Hachemi, Zoubir; Balaban, Teodor Silviu; Campos, J Lourdes; Cespedes, Sergio; Crusats, Joaquim; Escudero, Carlos; Kamma-Lorger, Christina S; Llorens, Joan; Malfois, Marc; Mitchell, Geoffrey R; Tojeira, Ana P; Ribó, Josep M

    2016-07-01

    The J aggregates of 4-sulfonatophenyl meso-substituted porphyrins are non-covalent polymers obtained by self-assembly that form nanoparticles of different morphologies. In the case of high aspect-ratio nanoparticles (bilayered ribbons and monolayered nanotubes), shear hydrodynamic forces may modify their shape and size, as observed by peak force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy of frozen solutions, small-angle X-ray scattering measurements in a disk-plate rotational cell, and cone-plate rotational viscometry. These nanoparticles either show elastic or plastic behaviour: there is plasticity in the ribbons obtained upon nanotube collapse on solid/air interfaces and in viscous concentrated nanotube solutions, whereas elasticity occurs in the case of dilute nanotube solutions. Sonication and strong shear hydrodynamic forces lead to the breaking of the monolayered nanotubes into small particles, which then associate into large colloidal particles. PMID:27238461

  8. Numerical predictions of viscoelastic properties and dynamic moduli of innovative pothole patching materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, K. Y.; Yuan, W.; Ju, J. W.; Yang, J. M.; Kao, W.; Carlson, L.

    2013-04-01

    As asphalt pavements age and deteriorate, recurring pothole repair failures and propagating alligator cracks in the asphalt pavements have become a serious issue to our daily life and resulted in high repairing costs for pavement and vehicles. To solve this urgent issue, pothole repair materials with superior durability and long service life are needed. In the present work, revolutionary pothole patching materials with high toughness, high fatigue resistance that are reinforced with nano-molecular resins have been developed to enhance their resistance to traffic loads and service life of repaired potholes. In particular, DCPD resin (dicyclopentadiene, C10H12) with a Rhuthinium-based catalyst is employed to develop controlled properties that are compatible with aggregates and asphalt binders. In this paper, a multi-level numerical micromechanics-based model is developed to predict the viscoelastic properties and dynamic moduli of these innovative nano-molecular resin reinforced pothole patching materials. Irregular coarse aggregates in the finite element analysis are modeled as randomly-dispersed multi-layers coated particles. The effective properties of asphalt mastic, which consists of fine aggregates, tar, cured DCPD and air voids are theoretically estimated by the homogenization technique of micromechanics in conjunction with the elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle. Numerical predictions of homogenized viscoelastic properties and dynamic moduli are demonstrated.

  9. Self-consistent modeling of visco-elastic polycrystals: Application to irradiation creep and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, P. A.; Tomé, C. N.

    1993-07-01

    w EPRESENT a model that permits the simulation of the transient response of polycrystalline aggregates to externally imposed loads and temperature gradients. The mechanical response of the constitutive grains includes elastic, Newtonian (linearly viscous), thermal and growth terms. The formulation explicitly accounts for the anisotropy in the elastic, creep, thermal and growth properties of both grains and polycrystals, and describes the time evolution of the overall visco-elastic moduli and of the internal stresses. It also provides, as limit cases, the correct overall elastic, thermal, creep and growth moduli of the polycrystal. The model is applied to analyse the characteristics of irradiation creep and growth in reactor tubes subjected to hydrostatic pressure. The influence of texture, grain anisotropy, grain shape and thermal stresses over the predicted polycrystal response, and expecially over the transient regime, is analysed in detail.

  10. Digitally Marking RSA Moduli

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, A.M.

    2000-10-09

    The moduli used in RSA (see [5]) can be generated by many different sources. The generator of that modulus (assuming a single entity generates the modulus) knows its factorization. They would have the ability to forge signatures or break any system based on this moduli. If a moduli and the RSA parameters associated with it were generated by a reputable source, the system would have higher value than if the parameters were generated by an unknown entity. So for tracking, security, confidence and financial reasons it would be beneficial to know who the generator of the RSA modulus was. This is where digital marking comes in. An RSA modulus ia digitally marked, or digitally trade marked, if the generator and other identifying features of the modulus (such as its intended user, the version number, etc.) can be identified and possibly verified by the modulus itself. The basic concept of digitally marking an RSA modulus would be to fix the upper bits of the modulus to this tag. Thus anyone who sees the public modulus can tell who generated the modulus and who the generator believes the intended user/owner of the modulus is.

  11. Static and Dynamic Moduli of Malm Carbonate: A Poroelastic Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadegan, Alireza; Guérizec, Romain; Reinsch, Thomas; Blöcher, Guido; Zimmermann, Günter; Milsch, Harald

    2016-06-01

    The static and poroelastic moduli of a porous rock, e.g., the drained bulk modulus, can be derived from stress-strain curves in rock mechanical tests, and the dynamic moduli, e.g., dynamic Poisson's ratio, can be determined by acoustic velocity and bulk density measurements. As static and dynamic elastic moduli are different, a correlation is often required to populate geomechanical models. A novel poroelastic approach is introduced to correlate static and dynamic bulk moduli of outcrop analogues samples, representative of Upper-Malm reservoir rock in the Molasse basin, southwestern Germany. Drained and unjacketed poroelastic experiments were performed at two different temperature levels (30 and 60°). For correlating the static and dynamic elastic moduli, a drained acoustic velocity ratio is introduced, corresponding to the drained Poisson's ratio in poroelasticity. The strength of poroelastic coupling, i.e., the product of Biot and Skempton coefficients here, was the key parameter. The value of this parameter decreased with increasing effective pressure by about 56 ~% from 0.51 at 3 MPa to 0.22 at 73 MPa. In contrast, the maximum change in P- and S-wave velocities was only 3 % in this pressure range. This correlation approach can be used in characterizing underground reservoirs, and can be employed to relate seismicity and geomechanics (seismo-mechanics).

  12. Static and Dynamic Moduli of Malm Carbonate: A Poroelastic Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadegan, Alireza; Guérizec, Romain; Reinsch, Thomas; Blöcher, Guido; Zimmermann, Günter; Milsch, Harald

    2016-08-01

    The static and poroelastic moduli of a porous rock, e.g., the drained bulk modulus, can be derived from stress-strain curves in rock mechanical tests, and the dynamic moduli, e.g., dynamic Poisson's ratio, can be determined by acoustic velocity and bulk density measurements. As static and dynamic elastic moduli are different, a correlation is often required to populate geomechanical models. A novel poroelastic approach is introduced to correlate static and dynamic bulk moduli of outcrop analogues samples, representative of Upper-Malm reservoir rock in the Molasse basin, southwestern Germany. Drained and unjacketed poroelastic experiments were performed at two different temperature levels (30 and 60°C). For correlating the static and dynamic elastic moduli, a drained acoustic velocity ratio is introduced, corresponding to the drained Poisson's ratio in poroelasticity. The strength of poroelastic coupling, i.e., the product of Biot and Skempton coefficients here, was the key parameter. The value of this parameter decreased with increasing effective pressure by about 56 ~% from 0.51 at 3 MPa to 0.22 at 73 MPa. In contrast, the maximum change in P- and S-wave velocities was only 3 % in this pressure range. This correlation approach can be used in characterizing underground reservoirs, and can be employed to relate seismicity and geomechanics (seismo-mechanics).

  13. Improved Indentation Test for Measuring Nonlinear Elasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2004-01-01

    A cylindrical-punch indentation technique has been developed as a means of measuring the nonlinear elastic responses of materials -- more specifically, for measuring the moduli of elasticity of materials in cases in which these moduli vary with applied loads. This technique offers no advantage for characterizing materials that exhibit purely linear elastic responses (constant moduli of elasticity, independent of applied loads). However, the technique offers a significant advantage for characterizing such important materials as plasma-sprayed thermal-barrier coatings, which, in cyclic loading, exhibit nonlinear elasticity with hysteresis related to compaction and sliding within their microstructures.

  14. Macroscopic elastic properties of textured ZrN-AlN polycrystalline aggregates: From ab initio calculations to grain-scale interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holec, D.; Tasnádi, F.; Wagner, P.; Friák, M.; Neugebauer, J.; Mayrhofer, P. H.; Keckes, J.

    2014-11-01

    Despite the fast development of computational material modeling, the theoretical description of macroscopic elastic properties of textured polycrystalline aggregates starting from basic principles remains a challenging task. In this study we use a supercell-based approach to obtain the elastic properties of a random solid solution cubic Zr1 -xAlxN system as a function of the metallic sublattice composition and texture descriptors. The employed special quasirandom structures are optimized not only with respect to short-range-order parameters, but also to make the three cubic directions [1 0 0 ] , [0 1 0 ] , and [0 0 1 ] as similar as possible. In this way, only a small spread of elastic constant tensor components is achieved and an optimum trade-off between modeling of chemical disorder and computational limits regarding the supercell size and calculational time is proposed. The single-crystal elastic constants are shown to vary smoothly with composition, yielding x ≈0.5 an alloy constitution with an almost isotropic response. Consequently, polycrystals with this composition are suggested to have Young's modulus independent of the actual microstructure. This is indeed confirmed by explicit calculations of polycrystal elastic properties, both within the isotropic aggregate limit and with fiber textures with various orientations and sharpness. It turns out that for low AlN mole fractions, the spread of the possible Young's modulus data caused by the texture variation can be larger than 100 GPa. Consequently, our discussion of Young's modulus data of cubic Zr1 -xAlxN contains also the evaluation of the texture typical for thin films.

  15. The heterotic superpotential and moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Ossa, Xenia; Hardy, Edward; Svanes, Eirik Eik

    2016-01-01

    We study the four-dimensional effective theory arising from ten-dimensional heterotic supergravity compactified on manifolds with torsion. In particular, given the heterotic superpotential appropriately corrected at O(α') to account for the Green-Schwarz anomaly cancellation mechanism, we investigate properties of four-dimensional Minkowski vacua of this theory. Considering the restrictions arising from F-terms and D-terms we identify the infinitesimal massless moduli space of the theory. We show that it agrees with the results that have recently been obtained from a ten-dimensional perspective where super-symmetric Minkowski solutions including the Bianchi identity correspond to an integrable holomorphic structure, with infinitesimal moduli calculated by its first cohomology. As has recently been noted, interplay of complex structure and bundle deformations through holomorphic and anomaly constraints can lead to fewer moduli than may have been expected. We derive a relation between the number of complex structure and bundle moduli removed from the low energy theory in this way, and give conditions for there to be no complex structure moduli or bundle moduli remaining in the low energy theory. The link between Yukawa couplings and obstruction theory is also briefly discussed.

  16. Coupling hybrid inflation to moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brax, Philippe; van de Bruck, Carsten; Davis, Anne-Christine; Davis, Stephen C.

    2006-09-01

    Hybrid inflation can be realized in low energy effective string theory, as described using supergravity. We find that the coupling of moduli to F-term hybrid inflation in supergravity leads to a slope and a curvature for the inflaton potential. The epsi and η parameters receive contributions at tree and one loop level which are not compatible with slow roll inflation. Furthermore the coupling to the moduli sector can even prevent inflation from ending at all. We show that introducing shift symmetries in the inflationary sector and taking the moduli sector to be no-scale removes most of these problems. If the moduli fields are fixed during inflation, as is usually assumed, it appears that viable slow roll inflation can then be obtained with just one fine-tuning of the moduli sector parameters. However, we show this is not a reasonable assumption, and that the small variation of the moduli fields during inflation gives a significant contribution to the effective inflaton potential. This typically implies that ηap-6, although it may be possible to obtain smaller values with heavy fine-tuning.

  17. Development of an improved data analysis approach for combined laser extinction and two-angle elastic light scattering diagnostics of soot aggregates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tongfeng; Thomson, Murray J

    2016-02-01

    An improved data analysis approach has been developed for the combined laser extinction and two-angle elastic light scattering diagnostics to relate the various measured optical cross sections to soot aggregate properties. The performance of the proposed approach is assessed using the comprehensive dataset of Santoro ethylene-air co-flow diffusion flame. Compared to previously reported studies, the proposed approach can be applied to a wider range of soot sources by removing the assumption made to the scattering regime or moment ratio of aggregate size distribution. The proposed approach also considers the contribution of scattering to extinction in determining the soot volume fraction, and this contribution is shown to increase as soot aggregate size becomes larger. The sensitivity of the calculation to the assumed parameters of the approach is examined and discussed. The mean radius of gyration of soot aggregates and the ratio of scattering intensities at the two measurement angles are shown to be independent of soot refractive index and are therefore recommended for soot model validation purposes. PMID:26836101

  18. Moduli mediation without moduli-induced gravitino problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akita, Kensuke; Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Oikawa, Akane; Otsuka, Hajime

    2016-05-01

    We study the moduli-induced gravitino problem within the framework of the phenomenologically attractive mirage mediations. The huge amount of gravitino generated by the moduli decay can be successfully diluted by introducing an extra light modulus field which does not induce the supersymmetry breaking. Since the lifetime of extra modulus field becomes longer than usually considered modulus field, our proposed mechanism is applied to both the low- and high-scale supersymmetry breaking scenarios. We also point out that such an extra modulus field appears in the flux compactification of type II string theory.

  19. Stabilization of moduli by fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Behrndt, Klaus

    2004-12-10

    In order to fix the moduli, non-trivial fluxes might the essential input. We summarize different aspects of compactifications in the presence of fluxes, as there is the relation to generalized Scherk-Schwarz reductions and gauged supergravity but also the description of flux-deformed geometries in terms of G-structures and intrinsic torsion.

  20. Simple torsion test for shear moduli determination of orthotropic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumsion, H. T.; Rajapakse, Y. D. S.

    1978-01-01

    By means of torsion tests performed on test specimens of the same material having a minimum of two different cross sections (flat sheet of different widths), the effective in-plane (G13) and out-of-plane (G23) shear moduli were determined for two composite materials of uniaxial and angleply fiber orientations. Test specimens were 16 plies (nominal 2 mm) thick, 100 mm in length, and in widths of 6.3, 9.5, 12.5, and 15.8 mm. Torsion tests were run under controlled deflection (constant angle of twist) using an electrohydraulic servocontrolled test system. In-plane and out-of-plane shear moduli were calculated from an equation derived in the theory of elasticity which relates applied torque, the torsional angle of twist, the specimen width/thickness ratio, and the ratio of the two shear moduli G13/G23. Results demonstrate that torsional shear moduli, G23 as well as G13, can be determined by simple torsion tests of flat specimens of rectangular cross section. Neither the uniaxial nor angleply composite material were transversely isotropic.

  1. Readily fiberizable glasses having a high modulus of elasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.

    1970-01-01

    New glass compositions yield composites having higher moduli of elasticity and specific moduli of elasticity than commercially available glasses. Over a reasonable temperature range the glasses have a viscosity of about 20,000 poises. They consist of silica, alumina, magnesia, and beryllia, plus at least one uncommon oxide.

  2. Elastic module of superhard rhenium diboride

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, Michael R.; Keppens, Veerle; Sales, Brian C; Jin, Rongying; Mandrus, David

    2009-01-01

    The elastic moduli of polycrystalline rhenium diboride are measured as a function of temperature between 5 and 325 K. The room temperature results show that ReB{sub 2} has very high values for both the bulk and shear modulus, confirming the incompressible and superhard nature of this material. With decreasing temperature, the moduli increase, with a hint of softening below 50 K.

  3. Elastin peptides prepared from piscine and mammalian elastic tissues inhibit collagen-induced platelet aggregation and stimulate migration and proliferation of human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Shiratsuchi, Eri; Ura, Megumi; Nakaba, Misako; Maeda, Iori; Okamoto, Kouji

    2010-11-01

    We obtained pure elastin peptides from bovine ligamentum nuchae, porcine aorta, and bonito bulbus arteriosus. The inhibitory activity of these elastin peptides on platelet aggregation induced by collagen and the migratory and proliferative responsivenesses of human skin fibroblasts to these elastin peptides were examined. All of bonito, bovine, and porcine elastin peptides found to inhibit platelet aggregation, but bonito elastin peptides showed a higher inhibitory activity than bovine and porcine elastin peptides did. All elastin peptides enhanced the proliferation of fibroblasts 3.5- to 4.5-fold at a concentration of 10 µg/ml. Bovine and porcine elastin peptides stimulated the migration of fibroblasts, with the optimal response occurring at 10(-1) µg/ml, while maximal response was at 10(2) µg/ml for bonito elastin peptides. Furthermore, pretreatment of fibroblasts by lactose depressed their ability to migrate in response to all elastin peptides, suggesting the involvement of elastin receptor in cell response. These results suggest that both mammalian and piscine elastin peptides can be applied as useful biomaterials in which elasticity, antithrombotic property, and the enhancement of cell migration and proliferation are required. PMID:20853312

  4. Identification of microstructural characteristics in lightweight aggregate concretes by micromechanical modelling including the interfacial transition zone (ITZ)

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Y.; Ortola, S.; Beaucour, A.L.; Dumontet, H.

    2010-11-15

    An approach which combines both experimental techniques and micromechanical modelling is developed in order to characterise the elastic behaviour of lightweight aggregate concretes (LWAC). More than three hundred LWAC specimens with various lightweight aggregate types (5) of several volume ratios and three different mortar matrices (normal, HP, VHP) are tested. The modelling is based on iterative homogenisation process and includes the ITZ specificities experimentally observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In agreement with experimental measurements, the effects of mix design parameters as well as of the interfacial transition zone (ITZ) on concrete mechanical performances are quantitatively analysed. Confrontations with experimental results allow identifying the elastic moduli of LWA which are difficult to determine experimentally. Whereas the traditional empirical formulas are not sufficiently precise, predictions of LWAC elastic behaviours computed with the micromechanical models appear in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  5. Age-related changes in dynamic moduli of ovine vitreous.

    PubMed

    Colter, Jourdan; Williams, Alex; Moran, Patrick; Coats, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Multiple rheological studies have characterized the dynamic material properties of adult vitreous, but no studies have investigated vitreous properties in the immature eye. In this study, premature, infant and adult ovine vitreous specimens were tested in shear to identify differences in dynamic moduli with age. Significant inertial artifact and rapid degradation of the vitreous ex vivo hindered the ability to accurately collect dynamic data through standard oscillation protocols. Therefore, dynamic moduli were calculated by converting relaxation spectrum data to the retardation spectrum, resulting in the calculation of the storage (G') and loss (G") moduli from the first few milliseconds of creep testing when tissue degradation and inertia is minimal. The technique was validated against two synthetic materials that span the viscoelastic spectrum. G' and G" of the primarily viscous synthetic material (polystyrene, tanδ=0.61) and G' of the primarily elastic material (agar, tanδ=0.06) were not significantly different than those calculated from dynamic oscillatory testing (p<0.05). G" of agar was overestimated (4-39%) with the interconversion technique due to creep ringing. Ovine vitreous was primarily viscous (tanδ=1.31), so this technique was used to evaluate changes in dynamic moduli with age. G' and G" for adult vitreous was 2-4 times and 1.5-2 times lower, respectively, than infant vitreous, corresponding to the structural breakdown of the vitreous with age. The dynamic moduli of premature vitreous was lower than infant and adult, likely due to premature development of the vitreal structure. These data suggest that significant differences exist between the viscoelastic response of infant and adult vitreous, and computational models of the pediatric eye will require appropriate age and rate material properties of vitreous. PMID:25266808

  6. Development of a Single-Crystal Mineral Elasticity Database and Applications to Crustal and Upper Mantle Mineralogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    The single-crystal elastic stiffness tensor fully characterizes the anisotropic elastic response of minerals. An understanding of how such elastic properties vary with pressure, temperature, structure, and composition are needed to interpret seismic data for the Earth. Additionally, elastic moduli are important for understanding many solid-state phenomena including mechanical stability, interatomic interactions, material strength, compressibility, and phase transition mechanisms. A database of single-crystal elastic properties of minerals and related phases is being assembled. This dataset currently incorporates over 400 sets of elastic constant measurements on more than 270 separate phases. In addition to compiling the individual elastic stiffnesses, the database also allows calculation of a variety of additional properties including anisotropy factors, bulk and linear compressibilities, and stability criteria, as well as evaluation of aggregate properties including bounds and averages of bulk, shear, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio and elastic wave speeds. Extensions of the database to include high pressure and high temperature data as well as theoretical calculations are being planned. Examples of application of this database to geophysical problems will be highlighted. Specific applications to be discussed include: 1) variation of elastic anisotropy with pressure for mantle and crustal minerals; 2) evaluation of elasticity data for pyroxenes revealing major structural and chemical controls on elasticity as well as remaining ambiguities and uncertainties.

  7. Anisotropic elastic and vibrational properties of Ru2B3 and Os2B3: a first-principles investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozisik, Haci; Deligoz, Engin; Surucu, Gokhan; Bogaz Ozisik, Havva

    2016-07-01

    The structural, mechanical and lattice dynamical properties of Ru2B3 and Os2B3 have been investigated by using a first-principles method based on the density functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation. The single crystal elastic constants are numerically estimated using strain–stress approach. The polycrystalline aggregate elastic parameters are calculated from the single elastic constants via the Voigt–Reuss–Hill approximations. Subsequently, the ductility and brittleness are characterized with the estimation from Pugh’s rule (B/G) and Cauchy pressure. Additionally, the Debye temperature is calculated from the average elastic wave velocity obtained from bulk and shear moduli. The calculated parameters are consistent with the previous experimental and theoretical data. These borides are both mechanically and dynamically stable in the considered structure.

  8. Elasticity of stishovite at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baosheng; Rigden, Sally M.; Liebermann, Robert C.

    1996-08-01

    The elastic-wave velocities of stishovite, the rutile-structured polymorph of SiO 2, were measured to 3 GPa at room temperature in a piston cylinder apparatus using ultrasonic interferometry on polycrystalline samples. These polycrystalline samples (2-3 mm in length and diameter) were hot-pressed at 14 GPa and 1050°C in a 2000 ton uniaxial split-sphere apparatus (USSA-2000) using fused silica rods as starting material. They were characterized as low porosity (less than 1%), single phase, fine grained, free of cracks and preferred orientation, and acoustically isotropic by using density measurement, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and bench-top velocity measurements. On the basis of subsequent in situ X-ray diffraction study at high P and T on peak broadening on similar specimens, it is evident that the single crystal grains within these polycrystalline aggregates are well equilibrated and that these specimens are free of residual strain. P- and S-wave velocities measured at 1 atm are within 1.5% of the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds calculated from single-crystal elastic moduli. Measured pressure derivatives of the bulk and shear moduli, K' 0 = 5.3 ± 0.1 and G' 0 = 1.8 ± 0.1, are not unusual compared with values measured for other transition zone phases such as silicate spinel and majorite garnet. Isothermal compression curves calculated with the measured values of K0 and K' 0 agree well with experimental P-V data to 16 GPa. The experimental value of dG /dP is in excellent agreement with predictions based on elasticity systematics. Theoretical models are not yet able to replicate the measured values of K' 0 and G' 0.

  9. The moduli and gravitino (non)-problems in models with strongly stabilized moduli

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Jason L.; Olive, Keith A.; Garcia, Marcos A.G. E-mail: garciagarcia@physics.umn.edu

    2014-03-01

    In gravity mediated models and in particular in models with strongly stabilized moduli, there is a natural hierarchy between gaugino masses, the gravitino mass and moduli masses: m{sub 1/2} << m{sub 3/2} << m{sub φ}. Given this hierarchy, we show that 1) moduli problems associated with excess entropy production from moduli decay and 2) problems associated with moduli/gravitino decays to neutralinos are non-existent. Placed in an inflationary context, we show that the amplitude of moduli oscillations are severely limited by strong stabilization. Moduli oscillations may then never come to dominate the energy density of the Universe. As a consequence, moduli decay to gravitinos and their subsequent decay to neutralinos need not overpopulate the cold dark matter density.

  10. Young's Moduli of Cold and Vacuum Plasma Sprayed Metallic Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Pawlik, R.; Loewenthal, W.

    2009-01-01

    Monolithic metallic copper alloy and NiCrAlY coatings were fabricated by either the cold spray (CS) or the vacuum plasma spray (VPS) deposition processes. Dynamic elastic modulus property measurements were conducted on these monolithic coating specimens between 300 K and 1273 K using the impulse excitation technique. The Young's moduli decreased almost linearly with increasing temperature at all temperatures except in the case of the CS Cu-23%Cr-5%Al and VPS NiCrAlY, where deviations from linearity were observed above a critical temperature. It was observed that the Young's moduli for VPS Cu-8%Cr were larger than literature data compiled for Cu. The addition of 1%Al to Cu- 8%Cr significantly increased its Young's modulus by 12 to 17% presumably due to a solid solution effect. Comparisons of the Young s moduli data between two different measurements on the same CS Cu- 23%Cr-5%Al specimen revealed that the values measured in the first run were about 10% higher than those in the second run. It is suggested that this observation is due to annealing of the initial cold work microstructure resulting form the cold spray deposition process.

  11. Elastic constant versus temperature behavior of three hardened maraging steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledbetter, H. M.; Austin, M. W.

    1985-01-01

    Elastic constants of three maraging steels were determined by measuring ultrasonic velocities. Annealed steels show slightly lower bulk moduli and considerably lower shear moduli than hardened steels. All the elastic constants (Young's modulus, shear modulus, bulk modulus and Poisson's ratio) show regular temperature behavior between 76 and 400 K. Young's modulus and the shear modulus increase with increasing yield strength, but the bulk modulus and Poisson's ratio are relatively unchanged. Elastic anisotropy is quite small.

  12. Roaming moduli space using dynamical triangulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambjørn, J.; Barkley, J.; Budd, T. G.

    2012-05-01

    In critical as well as in non-critical string theory the partition function reduces to an integral over moduli space after integration over matter fields. For non-critical string theory this moduli integrand is known for genus one surfaces. The formalism of dynamical triangulations provides us with a regularization of non-critical string theory. We show how to assign in a simple and geometrical way a moduli parameter to each triangulation. After integrating over possible matter fields we can thus construct the moduli integrand. We show numerically for c=0 and c=-2 non-critical strings that the moduli integrand converges to the known continuum expression when the number of triangles goes to infinity.

  13. On the anisotropic elastic properties of hydroxyapatite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J. L.; Ukraincik, K.

    1971-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the isotropic elastic moduli on polycrystalline specimens of hydroxyapatite and fluorapatite are compared with elastic constants measured directly from single crystals of fluorapatite in order to derive a set of pseudo single crystal elastic constants for hydroxyapatite. The stiffness coefficients thus derived are given. The anisotropic and isotropic elastic properties are then computed and compared with similar properties derived from experimental observations of the anisotropic behavior of bone.

  14. Hard tissue as a composite material. I - Bounds on the elastic behavior.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J. L.

    1971-01-01

    Recent determination of the elastic moduli of hydroxyapatite by ultrasonic methods permits a re-examination of the Voigt or parallel model of the elastic behavior of bone, as a two phase composite material. It is shown that such a model alone cannot be used to describe the behavior of bone. Correlative data on the elastic moduli of dentin, enamel and various bone samples indicate the existence of a nonlinear dependence of elastic moduli on composition of hard tissue. Several composite models are used to calculate the bounds on the elastic behavior of these tissues. The limitations of these models are described, and experiments to obtain additional critical data are discussed.

  15. Moduli stabilization in stringy ISS models

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Yu; Nakayama, Yu; Yamazaki, Masahito; Yanagida, T.T.

    2007-09-28

    We present a stringy realization of the ISS metastable SUSY breaking model with moduli stabilization. The mass moduli of the ISS model is stabilized by gauging of a U(1) symmetry and its D-term potential. The SUSY is broken both by F-terms and D-terms. It is possible to obtain de Sitter vacua with a vanishingly small cosmological constant by an appropriate fine-tuning of flux parameters.

  16. Micromechanical Prediction of the Effective Behavior of Fully Coupled Electro-Magneto-Thermo-Elastic Multiphase Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aboudi, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    The micromechanical generalized method of cells model is employed for the prediction of the effective moduli of electro-magneto-thermo-elastic composites. These include the effective elastic, piezoelectric, piezomagnetic, dielectric, magnetic permeability, electromagnetic coupling moduli, as well as the effective thermal expansion coefficients and the associated pyroelectric and pyromagnetic constants. Results are given for fibrous and periodically bilaminated composites.

  17. Elastic compliances and stiffnesses of the fcc Lennard-Jones solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesnel, D. J.; Rimai, D. S.; Demejo, L. P.

    1993-09-01

    The isothermal elastic compliances, stiffnesses, and bulk moduli of a Lennard-Jones solid organized into an fcc crystal structure (256 atoms in 43 unit cells) have been calculated as a function of testing temperature (expressed as the mean kinetic energy per atom). Tests conducted in pure shear were used to determine S44 and C44=G100, where 100 refers to crystallographic directions. Tests imposing axial elongation with fixed lateral dimensions established C11 and C12. Axial deformation with zero lateral pressure (a tension test) was used to determine S11, S12, E100 and ν100. This provided an independent set of results for comparison with the dilatational stiffnesses C11 and C12. The bulk modulus K was obtained by independent triaxial tension testing. The stiffnesses, compliances, and moduli were determined by regression analysis and digital filtering applied to combinations of the stress-tensor and strain-tensor data stored at each iteration during the constant-rate deformation experiments. While the cubic fcc Lennard-Jones solid expectedly obeys the Cauchy relations for central-force potentials, it is not isotropic, allowing ν to take on values other than 1/4 as originally proposed by Poisson. The present calculations show ν100=0.347 for the fcc Lennard-Jones solid with a Young's modulus of E100=61.1ɛ/σ3, an initial (as indicated by superscript 0) shear modulus of G0100=57.2ɛ/σ3, and an initial bulk modulus of K0=71.2ɛ/σ3 at zero temperature. The moduli all decreased with increasing temperature. Reuss, Voigt, and Hashin and Shtrikman [J. Mech. Phys. Solids 10, 335 (1962)] bounds on the isotropic elastic properties of polycrystalline aggregates of Lennard-Jones material were also determined. Computed values of the moduli are in reasonable agreement with experimental results for solid argon and crystalline polyethylene.

  18. First-principles study of structural, elastic, electronic and vibrational properties of BiCoO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koroglu, Ulas; Cabuk, Suleyman; Deligoz, Engin

    2014-08-01

    We used density functional theory (DFT) to study the structural, elastic, electronic, and lattice dynamical properties of tetragonal BiCoO3 applying the “norm-conserving” pseudopotentials within the local spin density approximation (LSDA). The calculated equilibrium lattice parameters and atomic displacements are in agreement with the available experimental and theoretical results. Moreover, the structural stability of tetragonal BiCoO3 were confirmed by the calculated elastic constants. In addition, the elastic properties of polycrystalline aggregates including bulk, shear and Young's moduli, and Poisson's ratio are also determined. The electronic band structure, total and partial density of states (DOS and PDOS) with ferromagnetic spin configuration are obtained. The results show that tetragonal BiCoO3 has an indirect band gap with both up- and down-spin configurations and its bonding behavior is of covalent nature. We compute Born effective charge (BEC) which is found to be quite anisotropic of Bi, Co and O atoms. The infrared and Raman active phonon mode frequencies at the Г point are found. The phonon dispersion curves exhibit imaginary frequencies which lead from the high-symmetry tetragonal phase to low-symmetry rhombohedral phase in BiCoO3. The six independent elastic constants, including bulk, shear and Young's moduli, and Poisson's ratio, complete BEC tensor and phonon dispersion relations in tetragonal BiCoO3 are predicted for the first time. Results of the calculations are compared with the existing experimental and theoretical data.

  19. Elastic wave velocities of peridotite KLB-1 at mantle pressures and implications for mantle velocity modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting; Zou, Yongtao; Liebermann, Robert C.; Li, Baosheng

    2015-05-01

    Compressional (VP) and shear (VS) wave velocities of a synthetic KLB-1 peridotite were measured for the first time up to 10 GPa using ultrasonic interferometry. Analysis of the P and S wave velocities yielded K0 = 123(1) GPa, K0' = 5.1(2), G0 = 75(1) GPa, and G0'= 1.3(1) for the bulk and shear moduli and their pressure derivatives. Comparison with Voigt-Reuss-Hill (VRH) calculations based on literature elasticity data for its constituent minerals indicates that the experimentally measured P and S wave velocities, densities, bulk sound velocities, and VP/VS ratios fall close to the lower limit of VRH averages associated with the uncertainties of the mineral elasticity data. A comparison with previous modeling of mantle compositions implies that the velocities for an aggregate with the pyrolitic composition of KLB-1 are in close agreement with seismic data at the depths of the Earth's upper mantle.

  20. Elasticity of plagioclase feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. Michael; Angel, Ross J.; Ross, Nancy L.

    2016-02-01

    Elastic properties are reported for eight plagioclase feldspars that span compositions from albite (NaSi3AlO8) to anorthite (CaSi2Al2O8). Surface acoustic wave velocities measured using Impulsive Stimulated Light Scattering and compliance sums from high-pressure X-ray compression studies accurately determine all 21 components of the elasticity tensor for these triclinic minerals. The overall pattern of elasticity and the changes in individual elastic components with composition can be rationalized on the basis of the evolution of crystal structures and chemistry across this solid-solution join. All plagioclase feldspars have high elastic anisotropy; a* (the direction perpendicular to the b and c axes) is the softest direction by a factor of 3 in albite. From albite to anorthite the stiffness of this direction undergoes the greatest change, increasing twofold. Small discontinuities in the elastic components, inferred to occur between the three plagioclase phases with distinct symmetry (C1>¯, I1>¯, and P1>¯), appear consistent with the nature of the underlying conformation of the framework-linked tetrahedra and the associated structural changes. Measured body wave velocities of plagioclase-rich rocks, reported over the last five decades, are consistent with calculated Hill-averaged velocities using the current moduli. This confirms long-standing speculation that previously reported elastic moduli for plagioclase feldspars are systematically in error. The current results provide greater assurance that the seismic structure of the middle and lower crusts can be accurately estimated on the basis of specified mineral modes, chemistry, and fabric.

  1. Flux-line tilt moduli in anisotropic superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Sudbo, A.; Brandt, E.H. )

    1991-04-01

    A general expression for the elastic energy of the flux-line lattice (FLL) in anisotropic superconductors is given. From this we derive three tilt moduli {ital c}{sub 44}({bold k}) for the FLL in uniaxial superconductors with induction {ital B}{parallel} and {perpendicular} to the basal plane. The discreteness of the FLL leads to a logarithmically dispersive isolated-vortex term, which at {ital B}{much lt}{ital B}{sub {ital c}2} in a large part of the Brillouin-zone area exceeds the usual Lorentzian-dispersive {ital c}{sub 44}({bold k}) originating from the overlapping vortex fields. The difference between vortex self-energy, line tension, and tilt modulus in an anisotropic superconductor is discussed.

  2. Prediction of the overall moduli of a cylindrical short-fiber reinforced composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanyi, Du; Linzhi, Wu

    1993-02-01

    With respect to obtaining the effective elastic moduli of the composite, the present theory differs from both Eshelby's equivalent inclusion method and Hill's self-consistent one, both of which only consider the mechanical properties of the matrix and inclusions (fibers). In fact, the inclusion-inclusion interaction is more pronounced when the volume fraction of inclusions of the composite increases. Hence, in this paper the effective elastic moduli of the composite are derived by taking into account the shapes, sizes and distribution of inclusions, and the interactions between inclusions. In addition, it is more convincing to assume short-fibers as cylindrical inclusions as in the present paper than as ellipsoidal ones as in others[7,8]. Finally, numerical results are given.

  3. Pre-Stressed Viscoelastic Composites: Effective Incremental Moduli and Band-Gap Tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Parnell, William J.

    2010-09-30

    We study viscoelastic wave propagation along pre-stressed nonlinear elastic composite bars. In the pre-stressed state we derive explicit forms for the effective incremental storage and loss moduli with dependence on the pre-stress. We also derive a dispersion relation for the effective wavenumber in the case of arbitrary frequency, hence permitting a study of viscoelastic band-gap tuning via pre-stress.

  4. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy for elastic constant measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, R.D.; Migliori, A.; Roe, L.H.

    1993-12-31

    All objects exhibit vibrational resonances when mechanically excited. These resonant frequencies are determined by density, geometry, and elastic moduli. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) takes advantage of the known relationship between the parameters. In particular, for a freely suspended object, with three of the four parameters (vibrational spectra, density, geometry, or elastic moduli) known the remaining one can be calculated. From a materials characterization standpoint it is straight-forward to measure density and geometry but less so to measure all the elastic moduli. It has recently become possible to quickly and accurately measure vibrational spectra, and using code written at Los Alamos, calculate all the elastic moduli simultaneously. This is done to an accuracy of better than one percent for compression and 0.1 percent for shear. RUS provides rapid acquisition of materials information here-to-fore obtainable only with difficulty. It will greatly facilitate the use of real materials properties in models and thus make possible more realistic modeling results. The technique is sensitive to phase changes and microstructure. This offers a change to input real data into microstructure and phase change models. It will also enable measurement of moduli at locations in and about a weld thus providing information for a validating coupled thermomechanical calculations.

  5. Accidental Kähler moduli inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Maharana, Anshuman; Rummel, Markus; Sumitomo, Yoske

    2015-09-14

    We study a model of accidental inflation in type IIB string theory where inflation occurs near the inflection point of a small Kähler modulus. A racetrack structure helps to alleviate the known concern that string-loop corrections may spoil Kähler Moduli Inflation unless having a significant suppression via the string coupling or a special brane setup. Also, the hierarchy of gauge group ranks required for the separation between moduli stabilization and inflationary dynamics is relaxed. The relaxation becomes more significant when we use the recently proposed D-term generated racetrack model.

  6. An Approach to Calculate Mineralś Bulk Moduli KS from Chemical Composition and Density ρ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, S.; Schilling, F. R.; Mueller, B.; Drüppel, K.

    2015-12-01

    The elastic properties of minerals are fundamental parameters for technical and geotechnical applications and an important research topic towards a better understanding of the Eart&hacute;s interior. Published elastic properties, chemical composition, and density data of 86 minerals (total of 258 data including properties of minerals at various p, T conditions) were collected into a database. It was used to test different hypotheses about relationships between these properties (e.g. water content in minerals and their Poisson's ratio). Furthermore, a scheme to model the average elastic properties, i.e. the bulk modulus KS, based on mineral density and composition was developed. Birc&hacute;s law, a linearity between density ρ and wave velocity (e.g. vp.), is frequently used in seismic and seismology to derive density of the Eart&hacute;s interior from seismic velocities. Applying the compiled mineral data contradicts the use of a simple velocity-density relation (e.g. Gardneŕs relation, 1974). The presented model-approach to estimate the mineralś bulk moduli Ks (as Voigt-Reuss-Hill average) is based on the idea of pressure-temperature (p-T) dependent ionś bulk moduli. Using a multi-exponential regression to ascertain the ionś bulk moduli and by applying an exponential scaling with density ρ, their bulk moduli could be modelled. As a result, > 88 % of the 258 bulk moduli data are predicted with an uncertainty of < 20 % compared to published values. Compared to other models (e.g. Anderson et al. 1970 and Anderson & Nafe 1965), the here presented approach to model the bulk moduli only requires the density ρ and chemical composition of the mineral and is not limited to a specific group of minerals, composition, or structure. In addition to this, by using the pressure and temperature dependent density ρ(p, T), it is possible to predict bulk moduli for varying p-T conditions. References:Gardner, G.H.F, Gardner, L.W. and Gregory, A.R. (1974). Geophysics, 39, No. 6

  7. An Approach to Calculate Mineralś Bulk Moduli KS from Chemical Composition and Density ρ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, S.; Schilling, F. R.; Mueller, B.; Drüppel, K.

    2015-12-01

    The elastic properties of minerals are fundamental parameters for technical and geotechnical applications and an important research topic towards a better understanding of the Earth's interior. Published elastic properties, chemical composition, and density data of 86 minerals (total of 258 data including properties of minerals at various p, T conditions) were collected into a database. It was used to test different hypotheses about relationships between these properties (e.g. water content in minerals and their Poisson's ratio). Furthermore, a scheme to model the average elastic properties, i.e. the bulk modulus KS, based on mineral density and composition was developed. Birch's law, a linearity between density ρ and wave velocity (e.g. vp.), is frequently used in seismic and seismology to derive density of the Earth's interior from seismic velocities. Applying the compiled mineral data contradicts the use of a simple velocity-density relation (e.g. Gardneŕs relation, 1974). The presented model-approach to estimate the mineralś bulk moduli Ks (as Voigt-Reuss-Hill average) is based on the idea of pressure-temperature (p-T) dependent ionś bulk moduli. Using a multi-exponential regression to ascertain the ionś bulk moduli and by applying an exponential scaling with density ρ, their bulk moduli could be modelled. As a result, > 88 % of the 258 bulk moduli data are predicted with an uncertainty of < 20 % compared to published values. Compared to other models (e.g. Anderson et al. 1970 and Anderson & Nafe 1965), the here presented approach to model the bulk moduli only requires the density ρ and chemical composition of the mineral and is not limited to a specific group of minerals, composition, or structure. In addition to this, by using the pressure and temperature dependent density ρ(p, T), it is possible to predict bulk moduli for varying p-T conditions. References:Gardner, G.H.F, Gardner, L.W. and Gregory, A.R. (1974). Geophysics, 39, No. 6, 770

  8. Elastic properties of granular materials under uniaxial compaction cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, N.; Anderson, O. L.

    1973-01-01

    Data on andesitic and basaltic sands are presented showing compressional sound velocity, density, and creep as functions of uniaxial loading through several compaction cycles. Maximum pressures over which acoustic measurements were made were in the range from 600 to 700 bars. The dynamic elastic modulus varies with pressure in a manner analogous to that of a static elastic modulus defined by small pressure perturbations on a typical compaction cycle. After several compaction cycles, two compressional elastic moduli apparently exist at low pressure (thus two modes of compressional wave propagation through the samples are indicated). The elastic moduli observations are briefly discussed in terms of a general expression for compressibility.

  9. Geometry of Calabi-Yau Moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Changyong

    In this thesis, we study the geometry of the moduli space and the Teichmuller space of Calabi-Yau manifolds, which mainly involves the following two aspects: the (locally, globally) Hermitian symmetric property of the Teichmuller space and the first Chern form of the moduli space with the Weil-Petersson and Hodge metrics. In the first part, we define the notation of quantum correction for the Teichmuller space T of Calabi-Yau manifolds. Under the assumption of vanishing of weak quantum correction, we prove that the Teichmuller space, with the Weil-Petersson metric, is a locally symmetric space. For Calabi-Yau threefolds, we show that the vanishing of strong quantum correction is equivalent to that the image of the Teichmuller space under the period map is an open submanifold of a globally Hermitian symmetric space W of the same dimension as T. Finally, for Hyperkahler manifolds of dimension 2n ≥ 4, we find globally defined families of (2, 0) and (2n, 0)-classes over the Teichmuller space of polarized Hyperkahler manifolds. In the second part, we prove that the first Chern form of the moduli space of polarized Calabi-Yau manifolds, with the Hodge metric or the Weil-Petersson metric, represents the first Chern class of the canonical extensions of the tangent bundle to the compactification of the moduli space with normal crossing divisors.

  10. Single-crystal Elasticity of Wadsleyite With 1.7 wt % H 2 O to 11 GPa by Brillouin Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, L.; Mao, Z.; Jacobsen, S. D.; Jiang, F.; Smyth, J. R.; Holl, C. M.; Duffy, T. S.

    2008-12-01

    Polymorphs of olivine have the greatest water storage capacity among all the nominally anhydrous mantle minerals (e.g. Bolfan-Casanova et al., 2000). Wadsleyite (β-Mg 2SiO 4) is able to contain up to 3.3 wt% H2O (Smyth et al., 1987). This phase is considered as the dominate mineral in the mantle from 410 km to 520 km depth. A previous study showed that water decreases the elasticity of wadsleyite strongly at ambient conditions (Mao et al., 2008), but has no detectable effect on the pressure derivatives of the bulk and shear moduli of wadsleyite containing 0.84 wt% H2O (Mao et al., in press). The effect of H 2O content on high-pressure elasticity has not been investigated for samples with larger water contents. In this study, we performed high-pressure Brillouin measurements on a single crystal of wadsleyite with 1.7 wt% H2O to obtain the elastic tensor, hence the aggregate elastic moduli and their pressure derivatives. Two crystals were cut and polished into 30~40μm-thick platelets. Single- crystal x-ray diffraction was conducted at x17C of Brookhaven National Laboratory to determine the orientations of the two platelets. The samples were measured at 7 pressures steps up to 11 GPa. For each platelet, 19 spectra were collected at 10° intervals at each pressure step in order to cover a range of 180° degrees. Preliminary result shows that the elastic constants, Cij, have the similar trends as anhydrous and 0.84 wt%-H2O wadsleyite while increasing pressure. Pressure derivatives of bulk and shear moduli are 4.1 (2) and 1.3 (1) for 1.7 wt%-H2O wadsleyite, which are not different within uncertainty from those of anhydrous and 0.84 wt%-H2O wadsleyite. (Zha et al., 1997; Mao et al., in press). This suggests that the pressure derivatives of elastic moduli do not change with water content at least up to 1.7 wt% H2O. It further confirms the previous inference that at least 1 wt% H2O in wadsleyite at 410 km is required for a pyrolite composition (60 vol% olivine) to match

  11. Elasticity and structure of mantle pyroxenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, J. D.; Zhang, J. S.; Sang, L.; Reynard, B.; Montagnac, G.; Dera, P. K.

    2012-12-01

    The elastic properties of both natural orthoenstatite and natural diopside have been determined at high pressures to over 14 GPa at room temperature by Brillouin spectroscopy. Single crystals of Fe-bearing orthoenstatite from San Carlos, AZ were used in one part of the study. The sound velocity data display a pronounced change in elastic character upon cold compression to above 12 GPa. There is an abrupt change in velocity anisotropy above that pressure. Single-crystal X-ray structure refinements, performed at the GSECARS beamline, Sector 13 of the APS, demonstrate that orthoenstatite transforms to a new high-pressure phase with space group P21/c (HPCEN2), with the transition pressure bracketed to be between about 10-14 GPa (JS Zhang et al., 2012). No evidence of a structure with C2/c space group was observed. Raman spectroscopy was used to explore the compositional dependence of the transition pressure and structure of the high-pressure phase. Single crystals of nearly pure Mg end-member OPX, a high-alumina sample, and an Fe-rich sample were examined. We find that Al and Fe both effect the transition pressure, but that the high-pressure phase is still P21/c HPCEN2 in all cases. The single-crystal elasticity diopside was measured to transition zone pressures using Brillouin spectroscopy. A very dense high-quality velocity data set was obtained, from which the single-crystal elastic moduli as a function of pressure were obtained. Results for the aggregate bulk elastic properties are in very good agreement with polycrystalline acoustic measurements of Li and Neuville. This is a case where the results of single-crystal Brillouin and polycrystalline acoustic measurements give highly consistent results. Li, B.S., and Neuville, D.R. (2010) Elasticity of diopside to 8 GPa and 1073 K and implications for the upper mantle. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, 183(3-4), 398-403. Zhang, JS, P Dera, and JD Bass (2012) A new high-pressure phase transition in natural Fe

  12. D-branes, moduli, and supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramanian, V.; Leigh, R.G.

    1997-05-01

    We study toroidal compactifications of type II string theory with D-branes and nontrivial antisymmetric tensor moduli and show that turning on these fields modifies the supersymmetry projections imposed by D-branes. These modifications are seen to be necessary for the consistency of T duality. We also show the existence of unusual BPS configurations of branes at angles that are supersymmetric because of conspiracies between moduli fields. Analysis of the problem from the point of view of the effective field theory of massless modes shows that the presence of a two-form background must modify the realization of supersymmetry on the brane. In particular, the appropriate supersymmetry variation of the physical gaugino vanishes in any constant field strength background. These considerations are relevant for the E{sub 7(7)}-symmetric counting of states of four-dimensional black holes in type II string theory compactified on T{sup 6}. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Kähler moduli double inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Koichi E-mail: miyamone@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2011-02-01

    We show that double inflation is naturally realized in Kähler moduli inflation, which is caused by moduli associated with string compactification. We find that there is a small coupling between the two inflatons which leads to amplification of perturbations through parametric resonance in the intermediate stage of double inflation. This results in the appearance of a peak in the power spectrum of the primordial curvature perturbation. We numerically calculate the power spectrum and show that the power spectrum can have a peak on observationally interesing scales. We also compute the TT-spectrum of CMB based on the power spectrum with a peak and see that it better fits WMAP 7-years data.

  14. Moduli of Vortices and Grassmann Manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Indranil; Romão, Nuno M.

    2013-05-01

    We use the framework of Quot schemes to give a novel description of the moduli spaces of stable n-pairs, also interpreted as gauged vortices on a closed Riemann surface Σ with target {Mat_{r × n}({C})}, where n ≥ r. We then show that these moduli spaces embed canonically into certain Grassmann manifolds, and thus obtain natural Kähler metrics of Fubini-Study type. These spaces are smooth at least in the local case r = n. For abelian local vortices we prove that, if a certain "quantization" condition is satisfied, the embedding can be chosen in such a way that the induced Fubini-Study structure realizes the Kähler class of the usual L 2 metric of gauged vortices.

  15. Moduli stabilization and inflation using wrapped branes

    SciTech Connect

    Easson, Damien A.; Trodden, Mark

    2005-07-15

    We demonstrate that a gas of wrapped branes in the early Universe can help resolve the cosmological Dine-Seiberg/Brustein-Steinhardt overshoot problem in the context of moduli stabilization with steep potentials in string theory. Starting from this mechanism, we propose a cosmological model with a natural setting in the context of an early phase dominated by brane and string gases. The Universe inflates at early times due to the presence of a wrapped two brane (domain wall) gas and all moduli are stabilized. A natural graceful exit from the inflationary regime is achieved. However, the basic model suffers from a generalized domain wall/reheating problem and cannot generate a scale invariant spectrum of fluctuations without additional physics. Several suggestions are presented to address these issues.

  16. BCFT moduli space in level truncation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudrna, Matěj; Maccaferri, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    We propose a new non-perturbative method to search for marginal deformations in level truncated open string field theory. Instead of studying the flatness of the effective potential for the marginal field (which is not expected to give a one-to-one parametrization of the BCFT moduli space), we identify a new non-universal branch of the tachyon potential which, from known analytic examples, is expected to parametrize the marginal flow in a much larger region of the BCFT moduli space. By a level 18 computation in Siegel gauge we find an increasingly flat effective potential in the non-universal sector, connected to the perturbative vacuum and we confirm that the coefficient of the marginal field ( λ SFT) has a maximum compatible with the value where the solutions stop existing in the standard Sen-Zwiebach approach. At the maximal reachable level the effective potential still deviates from flatness for large values of the tachyon, but the Ellwood invariants stay close to the correct BCFT values on the whole branch and the full periodic moduli space of the cosine deformation is covered.

  17. Elastic anomalies in Fe-Cr alloys.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hualei; Wang, Guisheng; Punkkinen, Marko P J; Hertzman, Staffan; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente

    2013-05-15

    Using ab initio alloy theory, we determine the elastic parameters of ferromagnetic and paramagnetic Fe(1-c)Cr(c) (0 ≤ c ≤ 1) alloys in the body centered cubic crystallographic phase. Comparison with the experimental data demonstrates that the employed theoretical approach accurately describes the observed composition dependence of the polycrystalline elastic moduli. The predicted single-crystal elastic constants follow complex anomalous trends, which are shown to originate from the interplay between magnetic and chemical effects. The nonmonotonic composition dependence of the elastic parameters has marked implications on the micro-mechanical properties of ferrite stainless steels. PMID:23604218

  18. Elastic properties of gamma-Pu by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, Albert; Betts, J; Trugman, A; Mielke, C H; Mitchell, J N; Ramos, M; Stroe, I

    2009-01-01

    Despite intense experimental and theoretical work on Pu, there is still little understanding of the strange properties of this metal. We used resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method to investigate the elastic properties of pure polycrystalline Pu at high temperatures. Shear and longitudinal elastic moduli of the {gamma}-phase of Pu were determined simultaneously and the bulk modulus was computed from them. A smooth linear and large decrease of all elastic moduli with increasing temperature was observed. We calculated the Poisson ratio and found that it increases from 0.242 at 519K to 0.252 at 571K.

  19. Elastic-wave velocity in marine sediments with gas hydrates: Effective medium modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helgerud, M.B.; Dvorkin, J.; Nur, A.; Sakai, A.; Collett, T.

    1999-01-01

    We offer a first-principle-based effective medium model for elastic-wave velocity in unconsolidated, high porosity, ocean bottom sediments containing gas hydrate. The dry sediment frame elastic constants depend on porosity, elastic moduli of the solid phase, and effective pressure. Elastic moduli of saturated sediment are calculated from those of the dry frame using Gassmann's equation. To model the effect of gas hydrate on sediment elastic moduli we use two separate assumptions: (a) hydrate modifies the pore fluid elastic properties without affecting the frame; (b) hydrate becomes a component of the solid phase, modifying the elasticity of the frame. The goal of the modeling is to predict the amount of hydrate in sediments from sonic or seismic velocity data. We apply the model to sonic and VSP data from ODP Hole 995 and obtain hydrate concentration estimates from assumption (b) consistent with estimates obtained from resistivity, chlorinity and evolved gas data. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Characterization of the Nonlinear Elastic Properties of Graphite/Epoxy Composites Using Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.; Green, Robert E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The normalized change in ultrasonic "natural" velocity as a function of stress and temperature was measured in a unidirectional laminate of T300/5208 graphite/epoxy composite using a pulsed phase locked loop ultrasonic interferometer. These measurements were used together with the linear (second order) elastic moduli to calculate some of the nonlinear (third order) moduli of this material.

  1. Permutation combinatorics of worldsheet moduli space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidel, Laurent; Garner, David; Ramgoolam, Sanjaye

    2015-06-01

    Light-cone string diagrams have been used to reproduce the orbifold Euler characteristic of moduli spaces of punctured Riemann surfaces at low genus and with few punctures. Nakamura studied the meromorphic differential introduced by Giddings and Wolpert to characterize light-cone diagrams and introduced a class of graphs related to this differential. These Nakamura graphs were used to parametrize the cells in a light-cone cell decomposition of moduli space. We develop links between Nakamura graphs and realizations of the worldsheet as branched covers. This leads to a development of the combinatorics of Nakamura graphs in terms of permutation tuples. For certain classes of cells, including those of the top dimension, there is a simple relation to Belyi maps, which allows us to use results from Hermitian and complex matrix models to give analytic formulas for the counting of cells at an arbitrarily high genus. For the most general cells, we develop a new equivalence relation on Hurwitz classes which organizes the cells and allows efficient enumeration of Nakamura graphs using the group theory software gap.

  2. Moduli stabilization and the pattern of sparticle spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kiwoon

    2008-11-23

    We discuss the pattern of low energy sparticle spectra which appears in some class of moduli stabilization scenario. In case that light moduli are stabilized by non-perturbative effects encoded in the superpotential and a phenomenologically viable de Sitter vacuum is obtained by a sequestered supersymmetry breaking sector, the anomaly-mediated soft terms become comparable to the moduli-mediated ones, leading to a quite distinctive pattern of low energy spacticle masses dubbed the mirage mediation pattern. We also discuss low energy sparticle masses in more general mixed-mediation scenario which includes a comparable size of gauge mediation in addition to the moduli and anomaly mediations.

  3. Failure of classical elasticity in auxetic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, J. H.; Giller, C. B.; Mott, P. H.; Roland, C. M.

    2013-04-01

    Poisson's ratio, ν, was measured for four materials, a rubbery polymer, a conventional soft foam, and two auxetic foams. We find that for the first two materials, having ν ≥ 0.2, the experimental determinations of Poisson's ratio are in good agreement with values calculated from the shear and tensile moduli using the equations of classical elasticity. However, for the two auxetic materials (ν < 0), the equations of classical elasticity give values significantly different from the measured ν. We offer an interpretation of these results based on a recently published analysis of the bounds on Poisson's ratio for classical elasticity to be applicable.

  4. Correlation between longitudinal, circumferential, and radial moduli in cortical bone: effect of mineral content.

    PubMed

    Macione, J; Depaula, C A; Guzelsu, N; Kotha, S P

    2010-07-01

    Previous studies indicate that changes in the longitudinal elastic properties of bone due to changes in mineral content are related to the longitudinal strength of bone tissue. Changes in mineral content are expected to affect bone tissue mechanical properties along all directions, albeit to different extents. However, changes in tissue mechanical properties along the different directions are expected to be correlated to one another. In this study, we investigate if radial, circumferential, and longitudinal moduli are related in bone tissue with varying mineral content. Plexiform bovine femoral bone samples were treated in fluoride ion solutions for a period of 3 and 12 days to obtain bones with 20% and 32% lower effective mineral contents. Transmission ultrasound velocities were obtained in the radial, circumferential, and longitudinal axes of bone and combined with measured densities to obtain corresponding tensorial moduli. Results indicate that moduli decreased with fluoride ion treatments and were significantly correlated to one another (r(2) radial vs. longitudinal = 0.80, r(2) circumferential vs. longitudinal = 0.90, r(2) radial vs. circumferential = 0.85). Densities calculated from using ultrasound parameters, acoustic impedance and transmission velocities, were moderately correlated to those measured by the Archimedes principle (r(2)=0.54, p<0.01). These results suggest that radial and circumferential ultrasound measurements could be used to determine the longitudinal properties of bone and that ultrasound may not be able to predict in vitro densities of bones containing unbonded mineral. PMID:20416555

  5. Single-crystal elasticity of the deep-mantle magnesite at high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jing; Mao, Zhu; Lin, Jung-Fu; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2014-04-01

    Magnesite (MgCO3) is considered to be a major candidate carbon host in the Earth's mantle, and has been found to exist as an accessory mineral in carbonated peridotite and eclogite. Studying the thermal elastic properties of magnesite under relevant pressure-temperature conditions of the upper mantle is thus important for our understanding of the deep-carbon storage in the Earth's interior. Here we have measured the single-crystal elasticity of a natural magnesite using in situ Brillouin spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell up to 14 GPa at room temperature and up to 750 K at ambient pressure, respectively. Using the third-order Eulerian finite-strain equations to model the elasticity data, we have derived the aggregate adiabatic bulk, KS0, and shear moduli, G0, at ambient conditions: KS0=114.7 (±1.3) GPa and G0=69.9 (±0.6) GPa. The pressure derivatives of the bulk and shear moduli at 300 K are (∂KS/∂P)T=4.82 (±0.10) and (∂G/∂P)T=1.75 (±0.10), respectively, while their temperature derivatives at ambient pressure are (∂Ks/∂T)P=-24.0 (±0.2) MPa/K and (∂G/∂T)P=-14.8 (±0.7) MPa/K. Based on the thermal elastic modeling of the measured elastic constants along an expected normal upper-mantle geotherm and a cold subducting slab, magnesite exhibits compressional wave (VP) anisotropy of approximately 46-49% and shear wave (VS) splitting of 37-41% that are much larger than those of major constituent minerals in the Earth's upper mantle including olivine, pyroxene, and garnet. The modeled aggregate VP and VS velocity in moderately carbonated peridotite and eclogite containing approximately 10 wt.% magnesite (approximately 5 wt.% CO2) show minimal effects of magnesite on the seismic profiles of these rock assemblages at upper mantle conditions, suggesting that the presence of magnesite is likely difficult to be detected seismically. However, due to its unusually high VP and VS anisotropies, magnesite with strong preferred orientations

  6. Nonlinear and heterogeneous elasticity of multiply-crosslinked biopolymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amuasi, H. E.; Heussinger, C.; Vink, R. L. C.; Zippelius, A.

    2015-08-01

    We simulate randomly crosslinked networks of biopolymers, characterizing linear and nonlinear elasticity under different loading conditions (uniaxial extension, simple shear, and pure shear). Under uniaxial extension, and upon entering the nonlinear regime, the network switches from a dilatant to contractile response. Analogously, under isochoric conditions (pure shear), the normal stresses change their sign. Both effects are readily explained with a generic weakly nonlinear elasticity theory. The elastic moduli display an intermediate super-stiffening regime, where moduli increase much stronger with applied stress σ than predicted by the force-extension relation of a single wormlike-chain ({G}{wlc}∼ {σ }3/2). We interpret this super-stiffening regime in terms of the reorientation of filaments with the maximum tensile direction of the deformation field. A simple model for the reorientation response gives an exponential stiffening, G∼ {{{e}}}σ , in qualitative agreement with our data. The heterogeneous, anisotropic structure of the network is reflected in correspondingly heterogeneous and anisotropic elastic properties. We provide a coarse-graining scheme to quantify the local anisotropy, the fluctuations of the elastic moduli, and the local stresses as a function of coarse-graining length. Heterogeneities of the elastic moduli are strongly correlated with the local density and increase with applied strain.

  7. Nonperturbative moduli superpotential with positive exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Higaki, Tetsutaro; Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Seto, Osamu

    2008-07-01

    We study nonperturbative moduli superpotentials with positive exponents, i.e. the form like AeaT with a positive constant a and the modulus T. These effects can be generated, e.g., by D-branes which have negative Ramond-Ramond charge of the lower-dimensional D-brane. The scalar potentials including such terms have quite a rich structure. There are several local minima with different potential energies and a high barrier, whose height is of O(Mp4). We discuss their implications from the viewpoints of cosmology and particle phenomenology, e.g. the realization of inflation models, avoiding the overshooting problem. This type of potential would be useful to realize the inflation and low-energy supersymmetry breaking.

  8. Elasticity of the Rod-Shaped Gram-Negative Eubacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulbitch, A.; Quinn, B.; Pink, D.

    2000-12-01

    We report a theoretical calculation of the elasticity of the peptidoglycan network, the only stress-bearing part of rod-shaped Gram-negative eubacteria. The peptidoglycan network consists of elastic peptides and inextensible glycan strands, and it has been proposed that the latter form zigzag filaments along the circumference of the cylindrical bacterial shell. The zigzag geometry of the glycan strands gives rise to nonlinear elastic behavior. The four elastic moduli of the peptidoglycan network depend on its stressed state. For a bacterium under physiological conditions the elasticity is proportional to the bacterial turgor pressure. Our results are in good agreement with recent measurements.

  9. Approximate method for controlling solid elastic waves by transformation media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jin; Chang, Zheng; Hu, Gengkai

    2011-11-01

    By idealizing a general mapping as a series of local affine ones, we derive approximately transformed material parameters necessary to control solid elastic waves within classical elasticity theory. The transformed elastic moduli are symmetric, and can be used with Navier's equation to manipulate elastic waves. It is shown numerically that the method can provide a powerful tool to control elastic waves in solids in case of high frequency or small material gradient. Potential applications can be anticipated in nondestructive testing, structure impact protection, petroleum exploration, and seismology.

  10. Beauty is Attractive: Moduli Trapping at Enhanced Symmetry Points

    SciTech Connect

    Kofman, L

    2004-02-27

    We study quantum effects on moduli dynamics arising from the production of particles which are light at points of enhanced symmetry in moduli space. The resulting forces trap the moduli at these points. Moduli trapping occurs in time-dependent quantum field theory, as well as in systems of moving D-branes, where it leads the branes to combine into stacks. Trapping also occurs in the presence of gravity, though the range over which the moduli can roll is limited by Hubble friction. We observe that a scalar field trapped on a steep potential can induce a stage of acceleration of the universe, which we call trapped inflation. Moduli trapping ameliorates the cosmological moduli problem and may affect vacuum selection. In particular, rolling moduli are most powerfully attracted to the points of greatest symmetry. Given suitable assumptions about the dynamics of the very early universe, this effect might help to explain why among the plethora of possible vacuum states of string theory, we appear to live in one with a large number of (spontaneously broken) symmetries.

  11. Elastic Properties of Mantle Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, T. S.; Stan, C. V.

    2012-12-01

    The most direct information about the interior structure of the Earth comes from seismic wave velocities. Interpretation of seismic data requires an understanding of how sound velocities and elastic properties of minerals vary with pressure, temperature, crystal structure, and composition as well as the role of anelasticity, melts, etc. More generally, elastic moduli are important for understanding many solid-state phenomena including mechanical stability, interatomic interactions, material strength, compressibility, and phase transition mechanisms. The database of mineral elasticity measurements has been growing rapidly in recent years. In this work, we report initial results of an ongoing survey of our current knowledge of mineral elasticity at both ambient conditions and high pressures and temperatures. The analysis is selective, emphasizing single crystal measurements but also incorporating polycrystalline measurements and volume compression data as appropriate. The goal is to synthesize our current understanding of mineral elasticity in terms of structure and composition, and to identify the major remaining needs for experimental and theoretical work. Clinopyroxenes (Cpx) provide an example of our approach. A wide range of clinopyroxene compositions are found geologically and Mg-, Ca-, and Na-rich clinopyroxenes are expected to be important components in the upper mantle. The single-crystal elastic properties of a number of endmember Cpx compositions have been measured and these exhibit a range of ~25% in shear velocity. Those with monovalent cations (spodumene, jadeite) in the M2 site exhibit the highest velocities while Fe-rich (hendenbergit, acmite) compositions have the lowest velocities. The effects on velocity due to a wide range of chemical substitutions can be defined, but there are important discrepancies and omissions in the database. New measurements of omphacites, intermediate diopside-hedenbergite compositions, aegerine/acmite, augite, etc. are

  12. Metastable SUSY breaking, de Sitter moduli stabilisation and Kähler moduli inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krippendorf, Sven; Quevedo, Fernando

    2009-11-01

    We study the influence of anomalous U(1) symmetries and their associated D-terms on the vacuum structure of global field theories once they are coupled to Script N = 1 supergravity and in the context of string compactifications with moduli stabilisation. In particular, we focus on a IIB string motivated construction of the ISS scenario and examine the influence of one additional U(1) symmetry on the vacuum structure. We point out that in the simplest one-Kähler modulus compactification, the original ISS vacuum gets generically destabilised by a runaway behaviour of the potential in the modulus direction. In more general compactifications with several Kähler moduli, we find a novel realisation of the LARGE volume scenario with D-term uplifting to de Sitter space and both D-term and F-term supersymmetry breaking. The structure of soft supersymmetry breaking terms is determined in the preferred scenario where the standard model cycle is not stabilised non-perturbatively and found to be flavour universal. Our scenario also provides a purely supersymmetric realisation of Kähler moduli (blow-up and fibre) inflation, with similar observational properties as the original proposals but without the need to include an extra (non-SUSY) uplifting term.

  13. A new approach to the cosmological moduli problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dienes, Keith R.; Kost, Jeff; Thomas, Brooks

    2016-06-01

    A generic byproduct of many theories beyond the Standard Model is the appearance of light scalar fields known as moduli. These moduli should be copiously produced in the early universe but have dangerously long lifetimes, leading to their excessive domination of the late-time energy density - an issue known as the "cosmological moduli problem". In this talk, we discuss a number of new effects which have direct relevance for the cosmological moduli problem and which, depending on circumstances, can either unexpectedly amerliorate it or worsen it, often by many orders of magnitude. As described more fully in Ref. [1], these effects arise in theories containing multiple moduli which mix amongst themselves in the presence of a mass-generating phase transition.

  14. Cosmological constraints on strongly coupled moduli from cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Sabancilar, Eray

    2010-06-15

    Cosmic (super)string loops emit moduli as they oscillate under the effect of their tension. Abundance of such moduli is constrained by diffuse gamma ray background, dark matter, and primordial element abundances if their lifetime is of the order of the relevant cosmic time. It is shown that the constraints on string tension G{mu} and modulus mass m are significantly relaxed for moduli coupling to matter stronger than gravitational strength which appears to be quite generic in large volume and warped compactification scenarios in string theory. It is also shown that thermal production of strongly coupled moduli is not efficient, hence free from constraints. In particular, the strongly coupled moduli in warped and large volume compactification scenarios and the radial modulus in the Randall-Sundrum model are found to be free from the constraints when their coupling constant is sufficiently large.

  15. Single-crystal elasticity of diopside to 14 GPa by Brillouin scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Liqin; Bass, Jay D.

    2014-03-01

    The single-crystal elastic moduli (Cij) of diopside have been measured up to 14 GPa using Brillouin spectroscopy, from which the aggregate compressional and shear velocities, adiabatic bulk modulus, shear modulus, and their pressure derivatives were obtained. A least-squares fit of the velocity-pressure data to third-order finite strain equation yields KS‧ = 4.8(2), G‧ = 1.7(1) with ρ0 = 3.264(6) g/cm3, Ks = 114.6(7) GPa and G = 72.7(4) GPa. The current study provides the first high-pressure experimental values for the individual Cij’s of diopside and extends the range of direct measurements on the shear modulus to higher pressure. From the single-crystal moduli, the acoustic anisotropy of diopside is calculated and found to be higher than that of other major mantle minerals such as olivine, orthopyroxene, or garnet. The high anisotropy of diopsidic pyroxene is solely responsible for the observed acoustic anisotropy of eclogitic rocks. In mantle rocks containing both olivine and clinopyroxene, such as lherzolites, the diopside component could either enhance or diminish the bulk acoustic anisotropy, depending on the relationship of preferred orientation of these phases.

  16. AFM Investigation of Liquid-Filled Polymer Microcapsules Elasticity.

    PubMed

    Sarrazin, Baptiste; Tsapis, Nicolas; Mousnier, Ludivine; Taulier, Nicolas; Urbach, Wladimir; Guenoun, Patrick

    2016-05-10

    Elasticity of polymer microcapsules (MCs) filled with a liquid fluorinated core is studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Accurately characterized spherical tips are employed to obtain the Young's moduli of MCs having four different shell thicknesses. We show that those moduli are effective ones because the samples are composites. The strong decrease of the effective MC elasticity (from 3.0 to 0.1 GPa) as the shell thickness decreases (from 200 to 10 nm) is analyzed using a novel numerical approach. This model describes the evolution of the elasticity of a coated half-space according to the contact radius, the thickness of the film, and the elastic moduli of bulk materials. This numerical model is consistent with the experimental data and allows simulating the elastic behavior of MCs at high frequencies (5 MHz). While the quasi-static elasticity of the MCs is found to be very dependent on the shell thickness, the high frequency (5 MHz) elastic behavior of the core leads to a stable behavior of the MCs (from 2.5 to 3 GPa according to the shell thickness). Finally, the effect of thermal annealing on the MCs elasticity is investigated. The Young's modulus is found to decrease because of the reduction of the shell thickness due to the loss of the polymer. PMID:27058449

  17. Chirality dependent elastic properties of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes under uniaxial and torsional loading

    SciTech Connect

    Anoop Krishnan, N. M. Ghosh, Debraj

    2014-02-14

    The elastic behavior of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes is studied under axial and torsional loading. Molecular dynamics simulation is carried out with a tersoff potential for modeling the interatomic interactions. Different chiral configurations with similar diameter are considered to study the effect of chirality on the elastic and shear moduli. Furthermore, the effects of tube length on elastic modulus are also studied by considering different aspects ratios. It is observed that both elastic and shear moduli depend upon the chirality of a nanotube. For aspect ratios less than 15, the elastic modulus reduces monotonically with an increase in the chiral angle. For chiral nanotubes, the torsional response shows a dependence on the direction of loading. The difference between the shear moduli against and along the chiral twist directions is maximum for chiral angle of 15°, and zero for zigzag (0°) and armchair (30°) configurations.

  18. High-pressure single-crystal elasticity study of CO2 across phase I-III transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin S.; Shieh, Sean R.; Bass, Jay D.; Dera, Przemyslaw; Prakapenka, Vitali

    2014-04-01

    Sound velocities and elastic moduli of solid single-crystal CO2 were measured at pressures up to 11.7(3) GPa by Brillouin spectroscopy. The aggregate adiabatic bulk modulus (KS), shear modulus (G), and their pressure derivatives for CO2 Phase I are KS0 = 3.4(6) GPa, G0 = 1.8(2) GPa, (dKS/dP)0 = 7.8(3), (dG/dP)0 = 2.5(1), (d2KS/dP2)0 = -0.23(3) GPa-1, and (d2G/dP2)0 = -0.10(1) GPa-1. A small increase of elastic properties was observed between 9.8(1) and 10.5(3) GPa, in agreement with the CO2 I-III transition pressure determined from previous x-ray diffraction experiments. Above the transition pressure PT, we observed a mixture dominated by CO2-I, with minor CO2-III. The CO2-I + III mixture shows slightly increased sound velocities compared to pure CO2-I. Elastic anisotropy calculated from the single-crystal elasticity tensor exhibits a decrease with pressure beginning at 7.9(1) GPa, which is lower than PT. Our results coincide with recent X-ray Raman observations, suggesting that a pressure-induced electronic transition is related to local structural and optical changes.

  19. Computation of elastic properties of 3D digital cores from the Longmaxi shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Hui; Fu, Li-Yun; Zhang, Yan; Jin, Wei-Jun

    2016-06-01

    The dependence of elastic moduli of shales on the mineralogy and microstructure of shales is important for the prediction of sweet spots and shale gas production. Based on 3D digital images of the microstructure of Longmaxi black shale samples using X-ray CT, we built detailed 3D digital images of cores with porosity properties and mineral contents. Next, we used finite-element (FE) methods to derive the elastic properties of the samples. The FE method can accurately model the shale mineralogy. Particular attention is paid to the derived elastic properties and their dependence on porosity and kerogen. The elastic moduli generally decrease with increasing porosity and kerogen, and there is a critical porosity (0.75) and kerogen content (ca. ≤3%) over which the elastic moduli decrease rapidly and slowly, respectively. The derived elastic moduli of gas- and oil-saturated digital cores differ little probably because of the low porosity (4.5%) of the Longmaxi black shale. Clearly, the numerical experiments demonstrated the feasibility of combining microstructure images of shale samples with elastic moduli calculations to predict shale properties.

  20. Transversely isotropic elastic properties of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Lianxi; Li, Jackie

    2005-01-01

    Five independent effective elastic moduli of a transversely isotropic multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) are studied by analyzing its deformations under four loading conditions, i.e., axial tension, torsional moment, in-plane biaxial tension, and in-plane tension-compression stress. Two distributions of the tension loading on the outermost tube and on all tubes are considered, which correspond to the tensile and compressive Young’s moduli. The general relations between the interwall stresses and strains are linearized due to the small strain condition, where the interwall stresses correspond to the variation of the interwall van der Waals forces. Three interwall elastic constants are used to characterize the linear relations associated with three basic interwall deformation modes, i.e., normal deformation in radial direction and two shear deformations in axial and circumferential directions. By taking each tube as a single-walled carbon nanotube, the analytical expressions for the interwall shear stress under the tensile loading on the outermost tube and five elastic moduli of a double-walled carbon nanotube are first obtained. Then, a replacement method is proposed to derive the corresponding expressions for the cases of more walls than two. These analytical expressions are plotted for the case of MWNT’s composed of armchair tubes, where the interwall elastic constants are approximated as the corresponding ones of the graphite. The effect of the wall number, diameter, chirality, and length of the MWNT on the shear stress and five elastic moduli are displayed and discussed.

  1. Stretch Moduli of Ribonucleotide Embedded Short DNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Koh, Kyung Duk; Riedo, Elisa; Storici, Francesca

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the mechanical properties of DNA is essential to comprehending the dynamics of many cellular functions. DNA deformations are involved in many mechanisms when genetic information needs to be stored and used. In addition, recent studies have found that Ribonucleotides (rNMPs) are among the most common non-standard nucleotides present in DNA. The presences of rNMPs in DNA might cause mutation, fragility or genotoxicity of chromosome but how they influence the structure and mechanical properties of DNA remains unclear. By means of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based single molecule spectroscopy, we measure the stretch moduli of double stranded DNAs (dsDNA) with 30 base pairs and 5 equally embedded rNMPs. The dsDNAs are anchored on gold substrate via thiol chemistry, while the AFM tip is used to pick up and stretch the dsDNA from its free end through biotin-streptavidin bonding. Our preliminary results indicate that the inclusion of rNMPs in dsDNA might significantly change its stretch modulus, which might be important in some biological processes.

  2. Explicitly broken supersymmetry with exactly massless moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xi; Freedman, Daniel Z.; Zhao, Yue

    2016-06-01

    The AdS/CFT correspondence is applied to an analogue of the little hierarchy problem in three-dimensional supersymmetric theories. The bulk is governed by a super-gravity theory in which a U(1) × U(1) R-symmetry is gauged by Chern-Simons fields. The bulk theory is deformed by a boundary term quadratic in the gauge fields. It breaks SUSY completely and sources an exactly marginal operator in the dual CFT. SUSY breaking is communicated by gauge interactions to bulk scalar fields and their spinor superpartners. The bulk-to-boundary propagator of the Chern-Simons fields is a total derivative with respect to the bulk coordinates. Integration by parts and the Ward identity permit evaluation of SUSY breaking effects to all orders in the strength of the deformation. The R-charges of scalars and spinors differ so large SUSY breaking mass shifts are generated. Masses of R-neutral particles such as scalar moduli are not shifted to any order in the deformation strength, despite the fact that they may couple to R-charged fields running in loops. We also obtain a universal deformation formula for correlation functions under an exactly marginal deformation by a product of holomorphic and anti-holomorphic U(1) currents.

  3. Elastic Properties of Clay Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanorio, T.; Prasad, M.; Nur, A.

    2001-12-01

    We present ultrasonic P- and S-waves velocity measurements on pure clay samples using three different experiment setups. These experiments provided petrophysical and acoustic properties of clay minerals as a function both of mineralogy and compaction. In the first experiment, acoustic measurements were performed on cold-pressed clay aggregates at ambient and at hydrostatic pressure conditions. Porosity and grain density values of the different clay mineralogy aggregates ranged from 4 to 43% and 2.13 to 2.83 g cm-3, respectively. In the second experiment, we measured P-wave velocity and attenuation in a kaolinite-water suspension in which clay concentration was increased up to 60%. In the third experiment, P- and S- wave velocities were measured during uniaxial stress compaction of clay powders. Results from all three experiments revealed low bulk (K) and shear (μ ) moduli for kaolinite, montmorillonite, and smectite; the values range between 6-12 GPa for K and 4-6 GPa for μ , respectively. Using these clay moduli values in effective medium and granular porous media models, velocity is predicted in saturated pure kaolinite samples, kaolinite suspension and shaly sandstones fairly well. Experimental results also showed that water interlayers play an important role in the compaction and strength of clay aggregates. Clay minerals carrying on water interlayers in their structure showed high compaction and strength. This study is relevant for a more reliable assessment of the seismic response in reservoirs and/or basins characterized by clay-bearing formations.

  4. Moduli inflation in five-dimensional supergravity models

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Otsuka, Hajime E-mail: hajime.13.gologo@akane.waseda.jp

    2014-11-01

    We propose a simple but effective mechanism to realize an inflationary early universe consistent with the observed WMAP, Planck and/or BICEP2 data, which would be incorporated in various supersymmetric models of elementary particles constructed in the (effective) five-dimensional spacetime. In our scenario, the inflaton field is identified with one of the moduli appearing when the fifth direction is compactified, and a successful cosmological inflation without the so-called η problem can be achieved by a very simple moduli stabilization potential. We also discuss the related particle cosmology during and (just) after the inflation, such as the (no) cosmological moduli problem.

  5. Elasticity and Strength of Biomacromolecular Crystals: Lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, A. M.; Witherow, W. K.; Chen, L. Q.; Chernov, A. A.

    2003-01-01

    The static Young modulus, E = 0.1 to 0.5 GPa, the crystal critical strength (sigma(sub c)) and its ratio to E,sigma(sub c)/E is approximately 10(exp 3), were measured for the first time for non cross-linked lysozyme crystals in solution. By using a triple point bending apparatus, we also demonstrated that the crystals were purely elastic. Softness of protein crystals built of hard macromolecules (26 GPa for lysozyme) is explained by the large size of the macromolecules as compared to the range of intermolecular forces and by the weakness of intermolecular bonds as compared to the peptide bond strength. The relatively large reported dynamic elastic moduli (approximately 8 GPa) from resonance light scattering should come from averaging over the moduli of intracrystalline water and intra- and intermolecular bonding.

  6. Moduli stabilization and flavor structure in 5D SUGRA with multi moduli

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Sakamura, Yutaka

    2008-11-23

    We investigate 5-dimensional supergravity on S{sup 1}/Z{sub 2} with a physical Z{sub 2}-odd vector multiplet, which yields an additional modulus other than the radion. We find additional terms in the 4-dimensional effective theory that are peculiar to the multi moduli case. Such terms can make the soft masses are non-tachyonic and almost flavor-universal at tree-level, in contrast to the single modulus case. This provides a new possibility to solve the SUSY flavor problem.

  7. Stabilized fiber-reinforced pavement base course with recycled aggregate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobhan, Khaled

    This study evaluates the benefits to be gained by using a composite highway base course material consisting of recycled crushed concrete aggregate, portland cement, fly ash, and a modest amount of reinforcing fibers. The primary objectives of this research were to (a) quantify the improvement that is obtained by adding fibers to a lean concrete composite (made from recycled aggregate and low quantities of Portland cement and/or fly ash), (b) evaluate the mechanical behavior of such a composite base course material under both static and repeated loads, and (c) utilize the laboratory-determined properties with a mechanistic design method to assess the potential advantages. The split tensile strength of a stabilized recycled aggregate base course material was found to be exponentially related to the compacted dry density of the mix. A lean mix containing 4% cement and 4% fly ash (by weight) develops sufficient unconfined compressive, split tensile, and flexural strengths to be used as a high quality stabilized base course. The addition of 4% (by weight) of hooked-end steel fibers significantly enhances the post-peak load-deformation response of the composite in both indirect tension and static flexure. The flexural fatigue behavior of the 4% cement-4% fly ash mix is comparable to all commonly used stabilized materials, including regular concrete; the inclusion of 4% hooked-end fibers to this mix significantly improves its resistance to fatigue failure. The resilient moduli of stabilized recycled aggregate in flexure are comparable to the values obtained for traditional soil-cement mixes. In general, the fibers are effective in retarding the rate of fatigue damage accumulation, which is quantified in terms of a damage index defined by an energy-based approach. The thickness design curves for a stabilized recycled aggregate base course, as developed by using an elastic layer approach, is shown to be in close agreement with a theoretical model (based on Westergaard

  8. Local structure controls the nonaffine shear and bulk moduli of disordered solids.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, M; Brujic, J; Terentjev, E M; Zaccone, A

    2016-01-01

    Paradigmatic model systems, which are used to study the mechanical response of matter, are random networks of point-atoms, random sphere packings, or simple crystal lattices; all of these models assume central-force interactions between particles/atoms. Each of these models differs in the spatial arrangement and the correlations among particles. In turn, this is reflected in the widely different behaviours of the shear (G) and compression (K) elastic moduli. The relation between the macroscopic elasticity as encoded in G, K and their ratio, and the microscopic lattice structure/order, is not understood. We provide a quantitative analytical connection between the local orientational order and the elasticity in model amorphous solids with different internal microstructure, focusing on the two opposite limits of packings (strong excluded-volume) and networks (no excluded-volume). The theory predicts that, in packings, the local orientational order due to excluded-volume causes less nonaffinity (less softness or larger stiffness) under compression than under shear. This leads to lower values of G/K, a well-documented phenomenon which was lacking a microscopic explanation. The theory also provides an excellent one-parameter description of the elasticity of compressed emulsions in comparison with experimental data over a broad range of packing fractions. PMID:26732406

  9. Local structure controls the nonaffine shear and bulk moduli of disordered solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, M.; Brujic, J.; Terentjev, E. M.; Zaccone, A.

    2016-01-01

    Paradigmatic model systems, which are used to study the mechanical response of matter, are random networks of point-atoms, random sphere packings, or simple crystal lattices; all of these models assume central-force interactions between particles/atoms. Each of these models differs in the spatial arrangement and the correlations among particles. In turn, this is reflected in the widely different behaviours of the shear (G) and compression (K) elastic moduli. The relation between the macroscopic elasticity as encoded in G, K and their ratio, and the microscopic lattice structure/order, is not understood. We provide a quantitative analytical connection between the local orientational order and the elasticity in model amorphous solids with different internal microstructure, focusing on the two opposite limits of packings (strong excluded-volume) and networks (no excluded-volume). The theory predicts that, in packings, the local orientational order due to excluded-volume causes less nonaffinity (less softness or larger stiffness) under compression than under shear. This leads to lower values of G/K, a well-documented phenomenon which was lacking a microscopic explanation. The theory also provides an excellent one-parameter description of the elasticity of compressed emulsions in comparison with experimental data over a broad range of packing fractions.

  10. Bounds on scalar masses in theories of moduli stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Bobby Samir; Kane, Gordon; Kuflik, Eric

    2014-04-01

    In recent years it has been realized that pre-BBN decays of moduli can be a significant source of dark matter production, giving a "nonthermal WIMP miracle" and substantially reduced fine-tuning in cosmological axion physics. We study moduli masses and sharpen the claim that moduli dominated the pre-BBN universe. We conjecture that in any string theory with stabilized moduli there will be at least one modulus field whose mass is of order (or less than) the gravitino mass. Cosmology then generically requires the gravitino mass not be less than about 30 TeV and the cosmological history of the universe is nonthermal prior to BBN. Stable LSP's produced in these decays can account for the observed dark matter if they are "wino-like." We briefly consider implications for the LHC, rare decays, and dark matter direct detection and point out that these results could prove challenging for models attempting to realize gauge mediation in string theory.

  11. Introduction to physical properties and elasticity models: Chapter 20

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dvorkin, Jack; Helgerud, Michael B.; Waite, William F.; Kirby, Stephen H.; Nur, Amos

    2003-01-01

    Estimating the in situ methane hydrate volume from seismic surveys requires knowledge of the rock physics relations between wave speeds and elastic moduli in hydrate/sediment mixtures. The elastic moduli of hydrate/sediment mixtures depend on the elastic properties of the individual sedimentary particles and the manner in which they are arranged. In this chapter, we present some rock physics data currently available from literature. The unreferenced values in Table I were not measured directly, but were derived from other values in Tables I and II using standard relationships between elastic properties for homogeneous, isotropic material. These derivations allow us to extend the list of physical property estimates, but at the expense of introducing uncertainties due to combining property values measured under different physical conditions. This is most apparent in the case of structure II (sII) hydrate for which very few physical properties have been measured under identical conditions.

  12. Stabilizing all geometric moduli in heterotic Calabi-Yau vacua

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Lara B.; Gray, James; Lukas, Andre; Ovrut, Burt

    2011-05-27

    We propose a scenario to stabilize all geometric moduli - that is, the complex structure, Kähler moduli and the dilaton - in smooth heterotic Calabi-Yau compactifications without Neveu-Schwarz three-form flux. This is accomplished using the gauge bundle required in any heterotic compactification, whose perturbative effects on the moduli are combined with non-perturbative corrections. We argue that, for appropriate gauge bundles, all complex structure and a large number of other moduli can be perturbatively stabilized - in the most restrictive case, leaving only one combination of Kähler moduli and the dilaton as a flat direction. At this stage, the remaining moduli space consists of Minkowski vacua. That is, the perturbative superpotential vanishes in the vacuum without the necessity to fine-tune flux. Finally, we incorporate non-perturbative effects such as gaugino condensation and/or instantons. These are strongly constrained by the anomalous U(1) symmetries which arise from the required bundle constructions. We present a specific example, with a consistent choice of non-perturbative effects, where all remaining flat directions are stabilized in an AdS vacuum.

  13. Living bacteria rheology: Population growth, aggregation patterns, and collective behavior under different shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrício, P.; Almeida, P. L.; Portela, R.; Sobral, R. G.; Grilo, I. R.; Cidade, T.; Leal, C. R.

    2014-08-01

    The activity of growing living bacteria was investigated using real-time and in situ rheology—in stationary and oscillatory shear. Two different strains of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus—strain COL and its isogenic cell wall autolysis mutant, RUSAL9—were considered in this work. For low bacteria density, strain COL forms small clusters, while the mutant, presenting deficient cell separation, forms irregular larger aggregates. In the early stages of growth, when subjected to a stationary shear, the viscosity of the cultures of both strains increases with the population of cells. As the bacteria reach the exponential phase of growth, the viscosity of the cultures of the two strains follows different and rich behaviors, with no counterpart in the optical density or in the population's colony-forming units measurements. While the viscosity of strain COL culture keeps increasing during the exponential phase and returns close to its initial value for the late phase of growth, where the population stabilizes, the viscosity of the mutant strain culture decreases steeply, still in the exponential phase, remains constant for some time, and increases again, reaching a constant plateau at a maximum value for the late phase of growth. These complex viscoelastic behaviors, which were observed to be shear-stress-dependent, are a consequence of two coupled effects: the cell density continuous increase and its changing interacting properties. The viscous and elastic moduli of strain COL culture, obtained with oscillatory shear, exhibit power-law behaviors whose exponents are dependent on the bacteria growth stage. The viscous and elastic moduli of the mutant culture have complex behaviors, emerging from the different relaxation times that are associated with the large molecules of the medium and the self-organized structures of bacteria. Nevertheless, these behaviors reflect the bacteria growth stage.

  14. Price and Income Elasticities of Iranian Exports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atrkar Roshan, Sedigheh

    This study investigates the export demand elasticities at the aggregate and disaggregated levels over the period 1977 to 2001 for Iran. By utilizing an export demand model and using time series techniques that account for the nonstationarity in the data, the price and income elasticities of demand are estimated by commodity class. As the elasticities of demand for various categories of exports are different, while they are crucial for policy determination. Based upon the estimated results, price and income elasticities are almost similar to those obtained in earlier studies in the case of developing countries. The main findings of this paper demonstrate that, price elasticities are smaller than -1 for all exports categories, whereas the income elasticities are found to be greater than one. The results also suggested, the income elasticities of industrial goods are higher compared to other export categories, while the lower elasticities are found in primary exports. The price and income elasticity estimates have also good statistical properties.

  15. Sound velocities and elastic properties of Fe-bearing wadsleyite and ringwoodite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinogeikin, S. V.; Katsura, T.; Bass, J. D.

    1998-09-01

    The sound velocities and single-crystal elastic moduli of β phase (wadsleyite) and γ phase (ringwoodite) of (Mg,Fe)2SiO4 with Fe/(Fe+Mg) ratios of ˜0.075 and ˜0.09, respectively, have been determined at ambient conditions by Brillouin spectroscopy. Both compressional and shear wave aggregate velocities decrease with increasing Fe content in both phases, but the magnitude of this decrease is different for the two phases. The adiabatic bulk modulus, Ks, of Fe;-bearing β-Mg2SiO4 (Ks = 170±2 GPa) is indistinguishable from that of the Mg end-member within experimental uncertainty, whereas Ks of γ-(Mg,Fe)2SiO4 increases rapidly with increasing iron content. The shear moduli of both phases decrease with increasing Fe content. Our measurements indicate that the velocity and impedance contrasts between olivine and β-(Mg,Fe)2SiO4 are independent of Fe content for Mg-rich compositions, but the contrast for the β → γ-(Mg,Fe)2SiO4 transition increases significantly with increasing Fe content. The new data support a previous estimate of 40±10% for the olivine content of the upper mantle and suggest that less than 50% (Mg,Fe)2SiO4 is sufficient to account for the observed impedance contrasts at depths of both 410 km and 520 km. Unless the effect of Fe on elastic properties is accounted for, it is difficult to account for both the 410 and 520 km discontinuities with a single olivine content.

  16. Study of radial compression elasticity of single xanthan molecules by vibrating scanning polarization force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huabin; Zhou, Xingfei; An, Hongjie; Sun, Jielin; Zhang, Yi; Hu, Jun

    2008-08-01

    Individual xanthan molecules were prepared on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface with a modified spin-casting technique. Then the radial compression elasticity of single xanthan molecules was investigated by vibrating scanning polarization force microscopy. The effective elastic moduli of xanthan molecules are estimated to be approximately 20-100 MPa under loads below 0.4 nN. PMID:19049142

  17. Closed-form analysis for elastic deformations of multilayered strands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K.; Cochran, J. E., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Closed-form solutions are developed for elastic deformation characteristics of multilayered strands under tensile and torsional loads. These analytical results are successfully applied to obtain expressions for the effective extensional and torsional moduli of rigidity for the strands. Finally, a simple design criterion is established for 'nonrotating' cables.

  18. Identification of couple-stress moduli of vertebral trabecular bone based on the 3D internal architectures.

    PubMed

    Goda, Ibrahim; Ganghoffer, Jean-François

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a homogeneous, orthotropic couple-stress continuum model as a substitute of the 3D periodic heterogeneous cellular solid model of vertebral trabecular bone. Vertebral trabecular bone is modeled as a porous material with an idealized periodic structure made of 3D open cubic cells, which is effectively orthotropic. The chosen architecture is based on studies of samples taken from the central part of vertebral bodies. The effective properties are obtained based on the response of the representative volume element under prescribed boundary conditions. Mixed boundary conditions comprising both traction and displacement boundary conditions are applied on the structure boundaries. In this contribution, the effective mechanical constants of the effective couple-stress continuum are deduced by an equivalent strain energy method. The characteristic lengths for bending and torsion are identified from the resulting homogenized orthotropic moduli. We conduct this study computationally using a finite element approach. Vertebral trabecular bone is modeled either as a cellular solid or as a two-phase material consisting of bone tissue (stiff phase) forming a trabecular network, and a surrounding soft tissue referring to the bone marrow present in the pores. Both the bone tissue forming the network and the pores are assumed to be homogeneous linear elastic, and isotropic media. The scale effects on the predicted couple stress moduli of these networks are investigated by varying the size of the bone specimens over which the boundary conditions are applied. The analysis using mixed boundary conditions gives results that are independent of unit cell size when computing the first couple stress tensor, while it is dependent on the cell size as to the second couple stress tensor moduli. This study provides overall guidance on how the size of the trabecular specimen influence couple stresses elastic moduli of cellular materials, with focus on bones

  19. Elastic deformations of bolalipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Galimzyanov, Timur R; Kuzmin, Peter I; Pohl, Peter; Akimov, Sergey A

    2016-02-17

    Archaeal membranes have unique mechanical properties that enable these organisms to survive under extremely aggressive environmental conditions. The so-called bolalipids contribute to this exceptional stability. They have two polar heads joined by two hydrocarbon chains. The two headgroups can face different sides of the membrane (O-shape conformation) or the same side (U-shape conformation). We have developed an elasticity theory for bolalipid membranes and show that the energetic contributions of (i) tilt deformations, (ii) area compression/stretching deformations, (iii) as well as those of Gaussian splay from the two membrane surfaces are additive, while splay deformations yield a cross-term. The presence of a small fraction of U-shaped molecules resulted in spontaneous membrane curvature. We estimated the tilt modulus to be approximately equal to that of membranes in eukaryotic cells. In contrast to conventional lipids, the bolalipid membrane possesses two splay moduli, one of which is estimated to be an order of magnitude larger than that of conventional lipids. The projected values of elastic moduli act to hamper pore formation and to decelerate membrane fusion and fission. PMID:26791255

  20. Frequency and fluid effects on elastic properties of basalt: Experimental investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelinet, M.; Fortin, J.; Guéguen, Y.; Schubnel, A.; Geoffroy, L.

    2010-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of fluid and frequency on the elastic properties, we performed hydrostatic experiments on an Icelandic basalt specimen under both dry and saturated conditions. This basalt is characterized by a bimodal porosity, i.e., cracks and equant pores. The elastic properties -bulk moduli in our case- were investigated under high pressure through two experimental methods: (1) a classical one using ultrasonic P- and S-waves velocities (frequency 106 Hz), (2) and a new one, using oscillation tests (frequency 10-2 Hz). In dry condition, experimental data show no significant difference between high (HF) and low (LF) frequency bulk moduli. However, in saturated conditions, two effects are highlighted: a physico-chemical effect emphasized by a difference between drained and dry moduli, and a squirt-flow effect evidenced by a difference between HF and LF undrained moduli.

  1. Effects of Director Angle Anchoring Conditions on the Dynamic Moduli of Heterogeneous Nematic Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choate, Eric P.; Forest, M. Gregory; Cui, Zhenlu; Ju, Lili

    2008-07-01

    We examine the linear viscoelastic response of heterogeneous nematic polymers to small amplitude oscillatory shear flow, paying special attention to the macroscopic influence of strong plate anchoring conditions. To predict the dynamic moduli, we model the system with Stokes hydrodynamic equations with viscous and nematic stresses coupled with orientational dynamics driven by the flow, an excluded volume potential, and an elasticity potential. First, we show that for special cases of normal and tangential anchoring, we recover explicitly solvable Leslie-Ericksen-Frank behavior. In this case we observe significant differences between the moduli for normal and tangential anchoring, including a two-to-three order of magnitude enhancement of the storage modulus for normal over tangential anchoring. Then, we turn to a numerical study of oblique anchoring conditions, which are more complicated due to the appearance of order parameter gradients at leading order. When the anchoring angle is near 45 degrees, we observe significantly different scaling behavior in the storage modulus for high frequencies compared to the behavior for normal or tangential anchoring. Furthermore, we find that for low frequencies, normal anchoring gives the largest storage modulus and tangential the smallest; however, we see a brief window of higher frequencies where the maximum storage modulus occurs at an oblique anchoring angle.

  2. Linear elastic behavior of dry soap foams

    SciTech Connect

    Kraynik, A.M.; Reinelt, D.A.

    1996-08-10

    Linear elastic constants are computed for three dry foams that have crystal symmetry, bubbles with equal volume V, and films with uniform surface tension T. The Kelvin, Williams, and Weaire-Phelan foams contain one, two, and eight bubbles in the unit cell, respectively. All three foams have 14-sided bubbles, but these tetrakaidecahedra have different topology; the Weaire-Phelan foam also contains pentagonal dodecahedra. In addition to the bulk modulus for volume compression, the authors calculate two shear moduli for the Kelvin and Weaire-Phelan foams, which have cubic symmetry, and four shear moduli for the Williams foam, which has tetragonal symmetry. The Williams foam has five elastic constants, not six, because the stress remains isotropic for uniform expansion; this is not guaranteed by symmetry alone. The two shear moduli for the Weaire-Phelan foam differ by less than 5%. The other two foams exhibit much greater elastic anisotropy; their shear moduli differ by a factor of 2. An effective isotropic shear modulus {bar G}, which represents the response averaged over all orientations, is evaluated for each foam. Scaled by T/V{sup 1/3}, {bar G} is 0.8070, 0.7955, and 0.8684 for the Kelvin, Williams, and Weaire-Phelan foams, respectively. When extrapolated to the dry limit, the shear modulus data of Princen and Kiss (for concentrated oil-in-water emulsions with polydisperse drop-size distributions) fall within the range of the calculations. The Surface Evolver program, developed by Brakke, was used to compute minimal surfaces for the dry foams. Also reported for each undeformed foam are various geometric constants relating to interfacial energy density, cell edge length, and bubble pressure.

  3. Stabilizing all geometric moduli in heterotic Calabi-Yau vacua

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anderson, Lara B.; Gray, James; Lukas, Andre; Ovrut, Burt

    2011-05-27

    We propose a scenario to stabilize all geometric moduli - that is, the complex structure, Kähler moduli and the dilaton - in smooth heterotic Calabi-Yau compactifications without Neveu-Schwarz three-form flux. This is accomplished using the gauge bundle required in any heterotic compactification, whose perturbative effects on the moduli are combined with non-perturbative corrections. We argue that, for appropriate gauge bundles, all complex structure and a large number of other moduli can be perturbatively stabilized - in the most restrictive case, leaving only one combination of Kähler moduli and the dilaton as a flat direction. At this stage, the remaining modulimore » space consists of Minkowski vacua. That is, the perturbative superpotential vanishes in the vacuum without the necessity to fine-tune flux. Finally, we incorporate non-perturbative effects such as gaugino condensation and/or instantons. These are strongly constrained by the anomalous U(1) symmetries which arise from the required bundle constructions. We present a specific example, with a consistent choice of non-perturbative effects, where all remaining flat directions are stabilized in an AdS vacuum.« less

  4. Moduli vacuum misalignment and precise predictions in string inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicoli, Michele; Dutta, Koushik; Maharana, Anshuman; Quevedo, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    The predictions for all the cosmological observables of any inflationary model depend on the number of e-foldings which is sensitive to the post-inflationary history of the universe. In string models the generic presence of light moduli leads to a late-time period of matter domination which lowers the required number of e-foldings and, in turn, modifies the exact predictions of any inflationary model. In this paper we compute exactly the shift of the number of e-foldings in Kähler moduli inflation which is determined by the magnitude of the moduli initial displacement caused by vacuum misalignment and the moduli decay rates. We find that the preferred number of e-foldings gets reduced from 50 to 45, causing a modification of the spectral index at the percent level. Our results illustrate the importance of understanding the full post-inflationary evolution of the universe in order to derive precise predictions in string inflation. To perform this task it is crucial to work in a setting where there is good control over moduli stabilisation.

  5. The effect of fracture density and stress state on the static and dynamic bulk moduli of Westerly granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, O. O.; Faulkner, D. R.

    2016-04-01

    Elastic properties are key parameters during the deformation of rocks. They can be measured statically or dynamically, but the two measurements are often different. In this study, the static and dynamic bulk moduli (Kstatic and Kdynamic) were measured at varying effective stress for dry and fluid-saturated Westerly granite with controlled fracture densities under isotropic and differential stress states. Isotropic fracturing of different densities was induced in samples by thermal treatment to 250, 450, 650, and 850°C. Results show that fluid saturation does not greatly affect static moduli but increases dynamic moduli. Under isotropic loading, high fracture density and/or low effective pressure results in a low Kstatic/Kdynamic ratio. For dry conditions Kstatic/Kdynamic approaches 1 at low fracture densities when the effective pressure is high, consistent with previous studies. Stress-induced anisotropy exists under differential stress state that greatly affects Kstatic compared to Kdynamic. As a result, the Kstatic/Kdynamic ratio is higher than that for the isotropic stress state and approaches 1 with increasing axial loading. The effect of stress-induced anisotropy increases with increasing fracture density. A key omission in previous studies comparing static and dynamic properties is that anisotropy has not been considered. The standard methods for measuring static elastic properties, such as Poisson's ratio, Young's and shear modulus, involve subjecting the sample to a differential stress state that promotes anisotropy. Our results show that stress-induced anisotropy resulting from differential stress state is a major contributor to the difference between static and dynamic elasticity and is dominant with high fracture density.

  6. Influence of Young's moduli in 3D fluid-structure coupled models of the human cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhnke, Frank; Semmelbauer, Sebastian; Marquardt, Torsten

    2015-12-01

    The acoustic wave propagation in the human cochlea was studied using a tapered box-model with linear assumptions respective to all mechanical parameters. The discretisation and evaluation is conducted by a commercial finite element package (ANSYS). The main difference to former models of the cochlea was the representation of the basilar membrane by a 3D elastic solid. The Young's moduli of this solid were modified to study their influence on the travelling wave. The lymph in the scala vestibuli and scala tympani was represented by a viscous and nearly incompressible fluid finite element approach. Our results show the maximum displacement for f = 2kHz at half of the length of the cochlea in accordance with former experiments. For low frequencies f <200 Hz nearly zero phase shifts were found, whereas for f =1 kHz it reaches values up to -12 cycles depending on the degree of orthotropy.

  7. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    Part of the 1994 Industrial Minerals Review. The production, consumption, and applications of construction aggregates are reviewed. In 1994, the production of construction aggregates, which includes crushed stone and construction sand and gravel combined, increased 7.7 percent to 2.14 Gt compared with the previous year. These record production levels are mostly a result of funding for highway construction work provided by the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991. Demand is expected to increase for construction aggregates in 1995.

  8. Ultrasonic measurement of the elastic properties of ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washer, Glenn; Fuchs, Paul; Rezai, Ali; Ghasemi, Hamid

    2005-05-01

    This paper discusses research to develop ultrasonic methods for materials characterization of an innovative new material known as Reactive Powder Concrete (RPC). Also known as Ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC), this relatively new material has been proposed for the construction of civil structures. UHPC mix designs typically include no aggregates larger than sand, and include steel fibers 0.2 mm in diameter and 12 mm in length. These steel fibers increase the strength and toughness of the UHPC significantly relative to more traditional concretes. Compressive strengths of 200 to 800 MPa have been achieved with UHPC, compared with maximum compressive strength of 50 to 100 MPa for more traditional concrete materials. Young"s modulus of 50 to 60 GPa are common for UHPC. However, the curing methods employed have a significant influence on the strength and modulus of UHPC. This paper reports on the development of ultrasonic methods for monitoring the elastic properties of UHPC under a series of curing scenarios. Ultrasonic velocity measurements are used to estimate the bulk elastic modulus of UHPC and results are compared with traditional, destructive methods. Measurements of shear moduli and Poisson's ratio based on ultrasonic velocity are also reported. The potential for the development of quality control techniques for the future implementation of UHPC is discussed.

  9. Early-time dynamics of actomyosin polarization in cells of confined shape in elastic matrices.

    PubMed

    Nisenholz, Noam; Botton, Mordechai; Zemel, Assaf

    2014-04-14

    The cell shape and the rigidity of the extracellular matrix have been shown to play an important role in the regulation of cytoskeleton structure and force generation. Elastic stresses that develop by actomyosin contraction feedback on myosin activity and govern the anisotropic polarization of stress fibers in the cell. We theoretically study the consequences that the cell shape and matrix rigidity may have on the dynamics and steady state polarization of actomyosin forces in the cell. Actomyosin forces are assumed to polarize in accordance with the stresses that develop in the cytoskeleton. The theory examines this self-polarization process as a relaxation response determined by two distinct susceptibility factors and two characteristic times. These reveal two canonical polarization responses to local variations in the elastic stress: an isotropic response, in which actomyosin dipolar stress isotropically changes in magnitude, and an orientational response, in which actomyosin forces orient with no net change in magnitude. Actual polarization may show up as a superimposition of the two mechanisms yielding different phases in the polarization response as observed experimentally. The cell shape and elastic moduli of the surroundings are shown to govern both the dynamics of the process as well as the steady-state. We predict that in the steady-state, beyond a critical matrix rigidity, spherical cells exert maximal force, and below that rigidity, elongated or flattened cells exert more force. Similar behaviors are reflected in the rate of the polarization process. The theory is also applicable to study the elastic response of whole cell aggregates in a gel. PMID:24623163

  10. CP violation and moduli stabilization in heterotic models

    SciTech Connect

    Giedt, Joel

    2002-04-01

    The role of moduli stabilization in predictions for CP violation is examined in the context of four-dimensional effective supergravity models obtained from the weakly coupled heterotic string. They point out that while stabilization of compactification moduli has been studied extensively, the determination of background values for other scalar by dynamical means has not been subjected to the same degree of scrutiny. These other complex scalars are important potential sources of CP violation and they show in a simple model how their background values (including complex phases) may be determined from the minimization of the supergravity scalar potential, subject to the constraint of vanishing cosmological constant.

  11. Mesoscale elastic properties of marine sponge spicules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaqi; Reed, Bryan W; Chung, Frank R; Koski, Kristie J

    2016-01-01

    Marine sponge spicules are silicate fibers with an unusual combination of fracture toughness and optical light propagation properties due to their micro- and nano-scale hierarchical structure. We present optical measurements of the elastic properties of Tethya aurantia and Euplectella aspergillum marine sponge spicules using non-invasive Brillouin and Raman laser light scattering, thus probing the hierarchical structure on two very different scales. On the scale of single bonds, as probed by Raman scattering, the spicules resemble a combination of pure silica and mixed organic content. On the mesoscopic scale probed by Brillouin scattering, we show that while some properties (Young's moduli, shear moduli, one of the anisotropic Poisson ratios and refractive index) are nearly the same as those of artificial optical fiber, other properties (uniaxial moduli, bulk modulus and a distinctive anisotropic Poisson ratio) are significantly smaller. Thus this natural composite of largely isotropic materials yields anisotropic elastic properties on the mesoscale. We show that the spicules' optical waveguide properties lead to pronounced spontaneous Brillouin backscattering, a process related to the stimulated Brillouin backscattering process well known in artificial glass fibers. These measurements provide a clearer picture of the interplay of flexibility, strength, and material microstructure for future functional biomimicry. PMID:26672719

  12. Weighted aggregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiveson, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The use of a weighted aggregation technique to improve the precision of the overall LACIE estimate is considered. The manner in which a weighted aggregation technique is implemented given a set of weights is described. The problem of variance estimation is discussed and the question of how to obtain the weights in an operational environment is addressed.

  13. Elastic Behavior of pr Substituted Y-123 Superconducting Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dole, B. N.; Purushotham, Y.; Reddy, P. Venugopal; Shah, S. S.

    The longitudinal (Vl) and shear (Vs) wave velocities of Praseodymium substituted YB2Cu3O7-δ high temperature superconductors were determined at room temperature by the pulse transmission technique. The values of Young's (E), rigidity (n) and bulk (k) moduli have been corrected to zero porosity. The zero porous corrected values of the elastic moduli are found to increase with increasing Praseodymium concentration. A linear relationship between the Debye temperature (θD) and average sound velocity (Vm) has also been observed and the behavior is explained qualitatively.

  14. Measurement of the nonlinear elasticity of red blood cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yongkeun; Best, Catherine A.; Kuriabova, Tatiana; Henle, Mark L.; Feld, Michael S.; Levine, Alex J.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2011-05-01

    The membranes of human red blood cells (RBCs) are a composite of a fluid lipid bilayer and a triangular network of semiflexible filaments (spectrin). We perform cellular microrheology using the dynamic membrane fluctuations of the RBCs to extract the elastic moduli of this composite membrane. By applying known osmotic stresses, we measure the changes in the elastic constants under imposed strain and thereby determine the nonlinear elastic properties of the membrane. We find that the elastic nonlinearities of the shear modulus in tensed RBC membranes can be well understood in terms of a simple wormlike chain model. Our results show that the elasticity of the spectrin network can mostly account for the area compression modulus at physiological osmolality, suggesting that the lipid bilayer has significant excess area. As the cell swells, the elastic contribution from the now tensed lipid membrane becomes dominant.

  15. Elastic Properties of Clay Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanorio, T.; Prasad, M.; Nur, A.

    We present ultrasonic P- and S-waves velocity measurements on pure clay samples us- ing three different experiment setups. These experiments provided petrophysical and acoustic properties of clay minerals as a function both of mineralogy and compaction. In the first experiment, acoustic measurements were performed on cold-pressed clay aggregates at ambient and at hydrostatic pressure conditions. Porosity and grain den- sity values of the different clay mineralogy aggregates ranged from 4 to 43% and 2.13 to 2.83 g cm-3, respectively. In the second experiment, we measured P-wave velocity and attenuation in a kaolinite-water suspension in which clay concentration was in- creased up to 60%. In the third experiment, P- and S- wave velocities were measured during uniaxial stress compaction of clay powders. Results from all three experiments revealed low bulk (K) and shear (µ) moduli for kaolinite, montmorillonite, and smec- tite; the values range between 6-12 GPa for K and 4-6 GPa for µ, respectively. Using these clay moduli values in effective medium and granular porous media (theories) models, velocity is predicted in saturated pure kaolinite samples, kaolinite suspension and shaly sandstone fairly well. Experimental results also showed that water interlay- ers play an important role in the compaction and strength of clay aggregates. Clay minerals carrying on water interlayers in their structure showed high compaction and strength. This study is relevant for a more reliable assessment of the seismic response in reservoirs and/or basins characterized by clay-bearing formations.

  16. On the possibility of large axion moduli spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rudelius, Tom

    2015-04-28

    We study the diameters of axion moduli spaces, focusing primarily on type IIB compactifications on Calabi-Yau three-folds. In this case, we derive a stringent bound on the diameter in the large volume region of parameter space for Calabi-Yaus with simplicial Kähler cone. This bound can be violated by Calabi-Yaus with non-simplicial Kähler cones, but additional contributions are introduced to the effective action which can restrict the field range accessible to the axions. We perform a statistical analysis of simulated moduli spaces, finding in all cases that these additional contributions restrict the diameter so that these moduli spaces are no more likely to yield successful inflation than those with simplicial Kähler cone or with far fewer axions. Further heuristic arguments for axions in other corners of the duality web suggest that the difficulty observed in http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1475-7516/2003/06/001 of finding an axion decay constant parametrically larger than M{sub p} applies not only to individual axions, but to the diagonals of axion moduli space as well. This observation is shown to follow from the weak gravity conjecture of http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1126-6708/2007/06/060, so it likely applies not only to axions in string theory, but also to axions in any consistent theory of quantum gravity.

  17. Supersymmetry breaking due to moduli stabilization in string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linde, Andrei; Mambrini, Yann; Olive, Keith A.

    2012-03-01

    We consider the phenomenological consequences of fixing compactification moduli. In the simplest Kachru-Kallosh-Linde-Trivedi constructions, stabilization of internal dimensions is rather soft: weak scale masses for moduli are generated, and are of order mσ˜m3/2. As a consequence one obtains a pattern of soft supersymmetry breaking masses found in gravity and/or anomaly mediated supersymmetry breaking (AMSB) models. These models may lead to destabilization of internal dimensions in the early universe, unless the Hubble constant during inflation is very small. Fortunately, strong stabilization of compactified dimensions can be achieved by a proper choice of the superpotential (e.g., in the Kallosh-Linde model with a racetrack superpotential). This allows for a solution of the cosmological moduli problem and for a successful implementation of inflation in supergravity. We show that strong moduli stabilization leads to a very distinct pattern of soft supersymmetry breaking masses. In general, we find that soft scalar masses remain of order the gravitino mass, while gaugino masses nearly vanish at the tree level; i.e., they are of order m3/22/mσ. Radiative corrections generate contributions to gaugino masses reminiscent of AMSB models and a decoupled spectrum of scalars reminiscent of split supersymmetry. This requires a relatively large gravitino mass [˜O(100)TeV], resolving the cosmological gravitino problem and problems with tachyonic staus in AMSB models.

  18. BPS Monopoles in Moduli Space under SU(2) Gauge Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, S. C.

    2009-09-01

    Solving Dirac equation for a BPS monopole moving in the field of another BPS monopole in moduli space, it has been shown that spin momentum of the interacting monopole behaves as an extra energy source. The possibilities of splitting of the energy levels of the system have been explored.

  19. Cosmological moduli problem, supersymmetry breaking, and stability in postinflationary cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, T.; Berkooz, M.; Steinhardt, P.J.

    1995-07-15

    We review scenarios that have been proposed to solve the cosmological problem caused by moduli in string theory, the postmodern Polonyi problem (PPP). In particular, we discuss the difficulties encountered by the apparently ``trivial`` solution of this problem, in which moduli masses are assumed to arise from nonperturbative, SUSY-preserving, dynamics at a scale higher than that of SUSY breaking. This suggests a powerful {ital cosmological} {ital vacuum} {ital selection} {ital principle} in superstring theory. However, we argue that if one eschews the possibility of cancellations between different exponentials of the inverse string coupling, the mechanism described above cannot stabilize the dilaton. Thus, even if supersymmetric dynamics gives mass to the other moduli in string theory, the dilaton mass must be generated by SUSY breaking, and dilaton domination of the energy density of the Universe cannot be avoided. We conclude that the only proposal for solving the PPP that works is the intermediate scale inflation scenario of Randall and Thomas. However, we point out that all extant models have ignored unavoidably large inhomogeneities in the cosmological moduli density at very early times, and speculate that the effects associated with nonlinear gravitational collapse of these inhomogeneities may serve as an efficient mechanism for converting moduli into ordinary matter. As an important by-product of this investigation we show that in a postinflationary universe minima of the effective potential with a negative cosmological constant are not stationary points of the classical equations of scalar field cosmology. Instead, such points lead to catastrophic gravitational collapse of that part of the Universe which is attracted to them. Thus postinflationary cosmology dynamically chooses non-negative values of the cosmological constant. This implies that supersymmetry {ital must} be broken in any sensible inflationary cosmology. (Abstract Truncated)

  20. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, W.H.; Tepordei, V.V.; Bolen, W.P.

    2000-01-01

    Construction aggregates consist primarily of crushed stone and construction sand and gravel. Total estimated production of construction aggregates increased in 1999 by about 2% to 2.39 Gt (2.64 billion st) compared with 1998. This record production level continued an expansion that began in 1992. By commodities, crushed stone production increased 3.3%, while sand and gravel production increased by about 0.5%.

  1. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    Part of a special section on industrial minerals in 1993. The 1993 production of construction aggregates increased 6.3 percent over the 1992 figure, to reach 2.01 Gt. This represents the highest estimated annual production of combined crushed stone and construction sand and gravel ever recorded in the U.S. The outlook for construction aggregates and the issues facing the industry are discussed.

  2. Estimation of the engineering elastic constants of a directionally solidified superalloy for finite element structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    1991-01-01

    The temperature-dependent engineering elastic constants of a directionally solidified nickel-base superalloy were estimated from the single-crystal elastic constants of nickel and MAR-MOO2 superalloy by using Wells' method. In this method, the directionally solidified (columnar-grained) nickel-base superalloy was modeled as a transversely isotropic material, and the five independent elastic constants of the transversely isotropic material were determined from the three independent elastic constants of a cubic single crystal. Solidification for both the single crystals and the directionally solidified superalloy was assumed to be along the (001) direction. Temperature-dependent Young's moduli in longitudinal and transverse directions, shear moduli, and Poisson's ratios were tabulated for the directionally solidified nickel-base superalloy. These engineering elastic constants could be used as input for performing finite element structural analysis of directionally solidified turbine engine components.

  3. Estimation of elastic moduli of graphene monolayer in lattice statics approach at nonzero temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zubko, I. Yu. Kochurov, V. I.

    2015-10-27

    For the aim of the crystal temperature control the computational-statistical approach to studying thermo-mechanical properties for finite sized crystals is presented. The approach is based on the combination of the high-performance computational techniques and statistical analysis of the crystal response on external thermo-mechanical actions for specimens with the statistically small amount of atoms (for instance, nanoparticles). The heat motion of atoms is imitated in the statics approach by including the independent degrees of freedom for atoms connected with their oscillations. We obtained that under heating, graphene material response is nonsymmetric.

  4. Frequency dispersion of the dynamic moduli of elasticity of electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odinaev, S.; Akdodov, D. M.; Sharifov, N.

    2016-02-01

    The frequency dispersion range of the dynamic bulk relaxation modulus K(ω) and shear relaxation modulus µ(ω) of electrolyte solutions has been determined in relation to the nature of stress tensor damping in the momentum and configuration spaces. Numerical calculations have been carried out for an aqueous NaCl solution in wide frequency, temperature, and density ranges using analytical expressions obtained for K(ω) and µ(ω) for the exponential-law damping of the fluxes at a certain molecular interaction potential Φ (| {vec r} | ) and radial distribution function g( | {vec r} | ). It has been demonstrated that the frequency dispersion range of K r (v) and µ(v) for the exponential-law damping of the corresponding fluxes is narrow (˜102 Hz).

  5. Elastic properties of alkali-feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waeselmann, N.; Brown, J.; Angel, R. J.; Ross, N.; Kaminsky, W.

    2013-12-01

    New measurements of single crystal elastic moduli for a suite of the alkali feldspars are reported. In order to interpret Earth's seismic structure, knowledge of the elastic properties of constituent minerals is essential. The elasticity of feldspar minerals, despite being the most abundant phase in Earth's crust (estimated to be more than 60%), were previously poorly characterized. All prior seismic and petrologic studies have utilized 50-year-old results, of questionable quality, based on 1-bar measurements on pseudo-single crystals. Alkali-feldspars present a large experimental challenge associated with their structural complexity. In the K-end member (KAlSi3O8) the symmetry is governed by Al/Si ordering, in the Na-end member (NaAlSi3O8) the symmetry is governed by whether or not there is a displacive collapse of the framework independent of the Al/Si ordering. K-feldspars exhibit monoclinic (C2/m) symmetry (necessitating determination of 13 elastic moduli) if disordered and triclinic (C-1) symmetry (21 elastic moduli) if ordered. Exsolution of Na-rich and K-rich phases is ubiquitous in natural samples, making it difficult to find suitable single phase and untwinned samples for study. The small single domain samples selected for this study were previously characterized by x-ray diffraction and microprobe analysis to ensure adequate sample quality. Surface wave velocities were measured on oriented surfaces of natural and synthetic single crystals using impulsively stimulated light scattering. A surface corrugation with a spacing of about 2 microns was impulsively created by the overlap of 100 ps infrared light pulses. The time evolution of the stimulated standing elastic waves was detected by measuring the intensity of diffraction from the surface corrugation of a variably delayed probe pulse. This method allows accurate (better than 0.2%) determination of velocities on samples smaller than 100 microns. The combination of measured surface wave velocities and

  6. Wave anisotropy of shear viscosity and elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, O. V.; Sarvazyan, A. P.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents the theory of shear wave propagation in a "soft solid" material possessing anisotropy of elastic and dissipative properties. The theory is developed mainly for understanding the nature of the low-frequency acoustic characteristics of skeletal muscles, which carry important diagnostic information on the functional state of muscles and their pathologies. It is shown that the shear elasticity of muscles is determined by two independent moduli. The dissipative properties are determined by the fourth-rank viscosity tensor, which also has two independent components. The propagation velocity and attenuation of shear waves in muscle depend on the relative orientation of three vectors: the wave vector, the polarization vector, and the direction of muscle fiber. For one of the many experiments where attention was distinctly focused on the vector character of the wave process, it was possible to make a comparison with the theory, estimate the elasticity moduli, and obtain agreement with the angular dependence of the wave propagation velocity predicted by the theory.

  7. Elasticity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraru, Gheorghe; Mursa, Condrat

    2006-12-01

    In this book we present the basic concepts of the theory of elasticity: stress and deformation states (plane and three-dimensional) and generalized Hooke's law. We present a number of problems which have applications in strength analysis. The book includes a synthesis of the theory of elasticity and modern methods of applied mathematics. This book is designed for students, post graduate students and specialists in strength analysis. the book contains a number of appendixes which includes: elements of matrix-calculation, concepts of tensorial calculation, the Fourier transform, the notion of improper integrals,singular and hypersingular integrals, generalized functions, the Dirac Delta function

  8. No-scale D-term inflation with stabilized moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchmüller, Wilfried; Domcke, Valerie; Wieck, Clemens

    2014-03-01

    We study the consistency of hybrid inflation and moduli stabilization, using the Kallosh-Linde model as an example for the latter. We find that F-term hybrid inflation is not viable since inflationary trajectories are destabilized by tachyonic modes. On the other hand, D-term hybrid inflation is naturally compatible with moduli stabilization due to the absence of a large superpotential term during the inflationary phase. Our model turns out to be equivalent to superconformal D-term inflation and it therefore successfully accounts for the CMB data in the large-field regime. Supersymmetry breaking can be incorporated via an O'Raifeartaigh model. For GUT-scale inflation one obtains stringent bounds on the gravitino mass. A rough estimate yields 105 GeV≲m≲1010 GeV, contrary to naive expectation.

  9. TASI/PiTP/ISS Lectures on Moduli and Microphysics

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, E

    2004-05-10

    I review basic forces on moduli that lead to their stabilization, for example in the supercritical and KKLT models of de Sitter space in string theory, as well as an AdS{sub 4} x S{sup 3} x S{sup 3} model I include which is not published elsewhere. These forces come from the classical dilaton tadpole in generic dimensionality, internal curvature, fluxes, and branes and orientifolds as well as non-perturbative effects. The resulting (A)dS solutions of string theory make detailed predictions for microphysical entropy, whose leading behavior we exhibit on the Coulomb branch of the system. Finally, I briefly review recent developments concerning the role of velocity-dependent effects in the dynamics of moduli. These lecture notes are based on material presented at various stages in the 1999 TASI, 2002 PiTP, 2003 TASI, and 2003 ISS schools.

  10. Cosmological moduli problem in large volume scenario and thermal inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kiwoon; Park, Wan-Il; Shin, Chang Sub E-mail: wipark@kias.re.kr

    2013-03-01

    We show that in a large volume scenario of type IIB string or F-theory compactifications, single thermal inflation provides only a partial solution to the cosmological problem of the light volume modulus. We then clarify the conditions for double thermal inflation, being a simple extension of the usual single thermal inflation scenario, to solve the cosmological moduli problem in the case of relatively light moduli masses. Using a specific example, we demonstrate that double thermal inflation can be realized in large volume scenario in a natural manner, and the problem of the light volume modulus can be solved for the whole relevant mass range. We also find that right amount of baryon asymmetry and dark matter can be obtained via a late-time Affleck-Dine mechanism and the decays of the visible sector NLSP to flatino LSP.

  11. The moduli space of superconformal instantons in sigma models

    SciTech Connect

    Monastyrsky, M.I. ); Natanzon, S.M. )

    1991-06-21

    In this paper, an approach to instantons in supersymmetrical 2-dimensional sigma models is discussed. In this approach superinstantons are characterized as the superconformal maps of a physical space into the isotopic (target) space. The authors consider a special case of the supersphere with punctures. New topological invariants as the number of the so-called fermionic points appear in this case. The authors also analyze the structure of the moduli space of superinstantons within this framework.

  12. On natural inflation and moduli stabilisation in string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palti, Eran

    2015-10-01

    Natural inflation relies on the existence of an axion decay constant which is super-Planckian. In string theory only sub-Planckian axion decay constants have been found in any controlled regime. However in field theory it is possible to generate an enhanced super-Planckian decay constant by an appropriate aligned mixing between axions with individual sub-Planckian decay constants. We study the possibility of such a mechanism in string theory. In particular we construct a new realisation of an alignment scenario in type IIA string theory compactifications on a Calabi-Yau where the alignment is induced through fluxes. Within field theory the original decay constants are taken to be independent of the parameters which induce the alignment. In string theory however they are moduli dependent quantities and so interact gravitationally with the physics responsible for the mixing. We show that this gravitational effect of the fluxes on the moduli can precisely cancel any enhancement of the effective decay constant. This censorship of an effective super-Planckian decay constant depends on detailed properties of Calabi-Yau moduli spaces and occurs for all the examples and classes that we study. We expand these results to a general superpotential assuming only that the axion superpartners are fixed supersymmetrically and are able to show for a large class of Calabi-Yau manifolds, but not all, that the cancellation effect occurs and is independent of the superpotential. We also study simple models where the moduli are fixed non-supersymmetrically and find that similar cancellation behaviour can emerge. Finally we make some comments on a possible generalisation to axion monodromy inflation models.

  13. Bohr-Sommerfeld Lagrangians of moduli spaces of Higgs bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Indranil; Gammelgaard, Niels Leth; Logares, Marina

    2015-08-01

    Let X be a compact connected Riemann surface of genus at least two. Let MH(r, d) denote the moduli space of semistable Higgs bundles on X of rank r and degree d. We prove that the compact complex Bohr-Sommerfeld Lagrangians of MH(r, d) are precisely the irreducible components of the nilpotent cone in MH(r, d) . This generalizes to Higgs G-bundles and also to the parabolic Higgs bundles.

  14. High-pressure single-crystal elasticity study of CO{sub 2} across phase I-III transition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jin S. Bass, Jay D.; Shieh, Sean R.; Dera, Przemyslaw; Prakapenka, Vitali

    2014-04-07

    Sound velocities and elastic moduli of solid single-crystal CO{sub 2} were measured at pressures up to 11.7(3) GPa by Brillouin spectroscopy. The aggregate adiabatic bulk modulus (K{sub S}), shear modulus (G), and their pressure derivatives for CO{sub 2} Phase I are K{sub S0} = 3.4(6) GPa, G{sub 0} = 1.8(2) GPa, (dK{sub S}/dP){sub 0} = 7.8(3), (dG/dP){sub 0} = 2.5(1), (d{sup 2}K{sub S}/dP{sup 2}){sub 0} = −0.23(3) GPa{sup −1}, and (d{sup 2}G/dP{sup 2}){sub 0} = −0.10(1) GPa{sup −1}. A small increase of elastic properties was observed between 9.8(1) and 10.5(3) GPa, in agreement with the CO{sub 2} I-III transition pressure determined from previous x-ray diffraction experiments. Above the transition pressure P{sub T}, we observed a mixture dominated by CO{sub 2}-I, with minor CO{sub 2}-III. The CO{sub 2}-I + III mixture shows slightly increased sound velocities compared to pure CO{sub 2}-I. Elastic anisotropy calculated from the single-crystal elasticity tensor exhibits a decrease with pressure beginning at 7.9(1) GPa, which is lower than P{sub T}. Our results coincide with recent X-ray Raman observations, suggesting that a pressure-induced electronic transition is related to local structural and optical changes.

  15. Elastic Wave Velocity Measurements for Clinohumite and Phase A to 11 GPa: Seismic and Petrologic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, P.; Phan, H. T.; Reusser, E.; Burlini, L.

    2009-12-01

    Ultrasonic wave propagation velocities of polycrystalline aggregates of the dense hydrous magnesium silicate phases (DHMS) clinohumite (Mg9Si4O16(OH)2)and phase A (Mg7Si2O8(OH)6) have been measured at 1 to 11 GPa and room temperature condition. Starting materials were prepared by a sol-gel technique and synthesis experiments were conducted with a rocking piston cylinder and multi-anvil apparatus to produce homogenous fine-grained polycrystalline aggregates. Measurements were carried out in a multi-anvil device employing ultrasonic wave propagation techniques. Simultaneous compression (P) and shear (S) waves were created by Li-Niobate dual transducers with a resonant frequency in the range of 10-40 MHz. Using the third-order finite-strain equation of state elastic moduli and their derivatives were derived for clinohumite: KSo= 119(2) GPa, K’S= 4.8(1), G= 77(1) GPa and G’=1.9(2); and phase A: KSo=100(1) GPa, K’S=6.3(1), G=61(1) GPa, and G’=2.2(1). Elastic data of the principal anhydrous and hydrous phases stable at post-serpentine conditions derived from this study and literature values combined with petrologic phase assembly constraints were utilized to compute the seismic velocities of hydrous peridotite compositions with different degrees of hydration at subduction zone condition, where clinohumite and phase A are stable and form the principal H2O repositories. These calculations reveal some noteworthy and not necessarily expected results: Calculated Vp and Vs at a constant temperature of 1073K (800 °C) and pressures varying from 5 to 11 GPa indicate that the hydrous phases clinohumite and phase A exhibit a similar or stronger, positive pressure dependence than the anhydrous phases considered (olivine, garnets, high- and low-Ca pyroxenes) resulting in increasing isothermal seismic velocities with in increasing pressure. Computed, aggregate (rock) seismic velocities of hydrated peridotite are higher than anhydrous, olivine-dominated peridotite due to the

  16. Cell elasticity with altered cytoskeletal architectures across multiple cell types.

    PubMed

    Grady, Martha E; Composto, Russell J; Eckmann, David M

    2016-08-01

    The cytoskeleton is primarily responsible for providing structural support, localization and transport of organelles, and intracellular trafficking. The structural support is supplied by actin filaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments, which contribute to overall cell elasticity to varying degrees. We evaluate cell elasticity in five different cell types with drug-induced cytoskeletal derangements to probe how actin filaments and microtubules contribute to cell elasticity and whether it is conserved across cell type. Specifically, we measure elastic stiffness in primary chondrocytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells (HUVEC), hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HUH-7), and fibrosarcoma cells (HT 1080) subjected to two cytoskeletal destabilizers: cytochalasin D and nocodazole, which disrupt actin and microtubule polymerization, respectively. Elastic stiffness is measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the disruption of the cytoskeleton is confirmed using fluorescence microscopy. The two cancer cell lines showed significantly reduced elastic moduli values (~0.5kPa) when compared to the three healthy cell lines (~2kPa). Non-cancer cells whose actin filaments were disrupted using cytochalasin D showed a decrease of 60-80% in moduli values compared to untreated cells of the same origin, whereas the nocodazole-treated cells showed no change in elasticity. Overall, we demonstrate actin filaments contribute more to elastic stiffness than microtubules but this result is cell type dependent. Cancer cells behaved differently, exhibiting increased stiffness as well as stiffness variability when subjected to nocodazole. We show that disruption of microtubule dynamics affects cancer cell elasticity, suggesting therapeutic drugs targeting microtubules be monitored for significant elastic changes. PMID:26874250

  17. Structural stability and elastic properties of prototypical covalent organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei; Wu, Hui; Yildirim, Taner

    2010-10-01

    We report the first investigation of the structural stabilities and elastic properties of covalent organic frameworks (COFs), a new class of porous crystalline materials. Representative 2D COFs were found to prefer shifted AA stacking, somewhat similar to graphite. The shear moduli of 2D COFs are exceedingly small, suggesting that the layer-layer coupling in 2D COFs is rather weak, and stacking faults may widely exist. Representative 3D COFs were found to exhibit relatively low elastic stiffness overall. In particular, COF-108, the least dense crystal known, exhibits rather low bulk and shear moduli. Our findings provide important structural and physical details to be considered in the further development of COF materials.

  18. 511 keV line and diffuse gamma rays from moduli

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuya, Shinta; Kawasaki, Masahiro

    2006-03-15

    We obtain the spectrum of gamma-ray emissions from the moduli whose decay into e{sup +}e{sup -} accounts for the 511 keV line observed by SPI/INTERGRAL. The moduli emit gamma rays through internal bremsstrahlung, and also decay directly into two gammas via tree and/or one-loop diagrams. We show that the internal bremsstahlung constrains the mass of the moduli below {approx}40 MeV model-independently. On the other hand, the flux of two gammas directly decayed from the moduli through one-loop diagrams will exceed the observed galactic diffuse gamma-ray background if the moduli mass exceeds {approx}20 MeV in the typical situation. Moreover, forthcoming analysis of SPI data in the range of 1-8 MeV may detect the line emisson with the energy half the moduli mass in the near future, which confirms the decaying moduli scenario.

  19. The Single-Crystal Elasticity of Yttria (Y2O3) to High Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriven, Waltraud M.; Palko, James W.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Bass, Jay D.; Sayir, Ali; Levine, Stanley R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The single-crystal elastic moduli of yttria have been measured by Brillouin spectroscopy up to 1200 C. The room temperature values obtained are C11 = 223.6 +/- 0.6 GPa, C44 = 74.6 +/- 0.5 GPa, and C12 = 112.4 +/- 1.0 GPa. The resulting bulk and (Voigt-Reuss-Hill) shear moduli are K = 149.5 +/- 1.0 GPa and G(sub VRH) = 66.3 +/- 0.8 GPa, respectively. These agree much more closely with experimental values reported for polycrystalline samples than do previous single-crystal measurements. Linear least squares regressions to the variation of bulk and shear moduli with temperature result in derivatives of dK/dT = -17 +/- 2 MPa/degC and dG(sub VRH)/dT = -8 +/- 2 MPa/degC. Elastic anisotropy was found to remain essentially constant over the temperature range studied.

  20. Calibration Method in Elasticity Evaluation of Regenerating Cartilage Based on Ultrasonic Particle Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Naotaka; Hyodo, Koji; Misawa, Masaki; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Shirasaki, Yoshio; Homma, Kazuhiro; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2013-07-01

    It is important in regenerative medicine to evaluate the maturity of regenerating tissue. In the maturity evaluation of regenerating cartilage, it is useful to measure the temporal change in elasticity because the maturity of regenerating tissue is closely related to its elasticity. In this study, a quantitative elasticity evaluation of extracted regenerating cartilage samples, which is based on the laser Doppler measurement of ultrasonic particle velocity and calibration, was experimentally investigated using agar-based phantoms with different Young's moduli and regenerating cartilage samples extracted from beagles in animal experiments. The experimental results verified the feasibility of the proposed method for the elasticity evaluation of regenerating cartilage samples.

  1. Elasticity of hcp cobalt at high pressure and temperature: a quasi-harmonic case

    SciTech Connect

    Antonangeli, D; Krisch, M; Farber, D L; Ruddle, D G; Fiquet, G

    2007-11-30

    We performed high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering measurements on a single crystal of hcp cobalt at simultaneous high pressure and high temperature, deriving 4 of the 5 independent elements of the elastic tensor. Our experiments indicate that the elasticity of hcp-Co is well described within the frame of a quasi-harmonic approximation and that anharmonic high-temperature effects on the elastic moduli, sound velocities and elastic anisotropy are minimal at constant density. These results support the validity of the Birch's law and represent an important benchmark for ab initio thermal lattice dynamics and molecular-dynamics simulations.

  2. Elastic Properties of Rolled Uranium -- 10 wt.% Molybdenum Nuclear Fuel Foils

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Brown; D. J. Alexander; K. D. Clarke; B. Clausen; M. A. Okuniewski; T. A. Sisneros

    2013-11-01

    In situ neutron diffraction data was collected during elastic loading of rolled foils of uranium-10 wt.% molybdenum bonded to a thin layer of zirconium. Lattice parameters were ascertained from the diffraction patterns to determine the elastic strain and, subsequently, the elastic moduli and Poisson’s ratio in the rolling and transverse directions. The foil was found to be elastically isotropic in the rolling plane with an effective modulus of 86 + / - 3 GPa and a Poisson’s ratio 0.39 + / - 0.04.

  3. Comparative studies between theoretical and experimental of elastic properties and irradiation effects of soda lime glasses doped with neodymium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bootjomchai, C.

    2015-05-01

    A comparative studies on the theoretical and experimental values of elastic moduli of (90 - x) RWG -(10)Na2O -(x)Nd2O3 glass system, where RWG is recycled window glass and x is 0.001, 0.01, 0.1 and 1 mol%, was investigated. The radiation effects on structural properties and elastic moduli were evaluated by measuring the ultrasonic velocities. In addition, the FTIR spectra were measured to investigate the effects of irradiation on the structure of the glass. Moreover, the theoretical bond compression model was used to confirm the obtained results from the experiments. The results show that evidently changes in the structure of the glass depend on the concentration of the neodymium oxide and gamma irradiation. Furthermore, the experimental elastic moduli are in good agreement with the theoretical values.

  4. Single-Crystal Elastic Constants of Yttria (Y2O3) Measured to High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayir, Ali; Palko, James W.; Kriven, Waltraud M.; Sinogeikin, Sergey V.; Bass, Jay D.

    2001-01-01

    Yttria, or yttrium sesquioxide (Y2O3), has been considered for use in nuclear applications and has gained interest relatively recently for use in infrared optics. Single crystals of yttria have been grown successfully at the NASA Glenn Research Center using a laser-heated float zone technique in a fiber and rod. Such samples allow measurement of the single-crystal elastic properties, and these measurements provide useful property data for the design of components using single crystals. They also yield information as to what degree the elastic properties of yttria ceramics are a result of the intrinsic properties of the yttria crystal in comparison to characteristics that may depend on processing, such as microstructure and intergranular phases, which are common in sintered yttria. The single-crystal elastic moduli are valuable for designing such optical components. In particular, the temperature derivatives of elastic moduli allow the dimensional changes due to heating under physical constraints, as well as acoustic excitation, to be determined. The single-crystal elastic moduli of yttria were measured by Brillouin spectroscopy up to 1200 C. The room-temperature values obtained were C(sub 11) = 223.6 + 0.6 GPa, C(sub 44) = 74.6 + 0.5 GPa, and C(sub 12) = 112.4 + 1.0 GPa. The resulting bulk and (Voigt-Reuss-Hill) shear moduli were K = 149.5 + 1.0 GPa and G(sub VRH) = 66.3 + 0.8 GPa, respectively. Linear least-squares regressions to the variation of bulk and shear moduli with temperature resulted in derivatives of dK/dT = -17 + 2 MPa/C and dG(sub VRH)/dT = -8 + 2 MPa/ C. Elastic anisotropy was found to remain essentially constant over the temperature range studied.

  5. Evaporation effects in elastocapillary aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vella, Dominic; Hadjittofis, Andreas; Singh, Kiran; Lister, John

    2015-11-01

    We consider the effect of evaporation on the aggregation of a number of elastic objects due to a liquid's surface tension. In particular, we consider an array of spring-block elements in which the gaps between blocks are filled by thin liquid films that evaporate during the course of an experiment. Using lubrication theory to account for the fluid flow within the gaps, we study the dynamics of aggregation. We find that a non-zero evaporation rate causes the elements to aggregate more quickly and, indeed, to contact within finite time. However, we also show that the number of elements within each cluster decreases as the evaporation rate increases. We explain these results quantitatively by comparison with the corresponding two-body problem and discuss their relevance for controlling pattern formation in carbon nanotube forests.

  6. An Inverse Problem Approach for Elasticity Imaging through Vibroacoustics

    PubMed Central

    Aguilo, Miguel A.; Brigham, J. C.; Aquino, W.; Fatemi, M.

    2011-01-01

    A new methodology for estimating the spatial distribution of elastic moduli using the steady-state dynamic response of solids immersed in fluids is presented. The technique relies on the ensuing acoustic pressure field from a remotely excited solid to inversely estimate the spatial distribution of Young’s modulus. This work proposes the use of Gaussian radial basis functions (GRBF) to represent the spatial variation of elastic moduli. GRBF are shown to possess the advantage of representing smooth functions with quasi-compact support, and can efficiently represent elastic moduli distributions such as those that occur in soft biological tissue in the presence of tumors. The direct problem consists of a coupled acoustic-structure interaction boundary value problem solved in the frequency domain using the finite element method. The inverse problem is cast as an optimization problem in which the objective function is defined as a measure of discrepancy between an experimentally measured response and a finite element representation of the system. Non-gradient based optimization algorithms in combination with a divide and conquer strategy are used to solve the resulting optimization problem. The feasibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated through a series of numerical and a physical experiment. For comparison purposes, the surface velocity response was also used for the inverse characterization as the measured response in place of the acoustic pressure. PMID:20335092

  7. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    Part of a special section on the market performance of industrial minerals in 1992. Production of construction aggregates increased by 4.6 percent in 1992. This increase was due, in part, to the increased funding for transportation and infrastructure projects. The U.S. produced about 1.05 Gt of crushed stone and an estimated 734 Mt of construction sand and gravel in 1992. Demand is expected to increase by about 5 percent in 1993.

  8. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Part of the Annual Commodities Review 1995. Production of construction aggregates such as crushed stone and construction sand and gravel showed a marginal increase in 1995. Most of the 1995 increases were due to funding for highway construction work. The major areas of concern to the industry included issues relating to wetlands classification and the classification of crystalline silica as a probable human carcinogen. Despite this, an increase in demand is anticipated for 1996.

  9. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, T.I.; Bolen, W.P.

    2007-01-01

    Construction aggregates, primarily stone, sand and gravel, are recovered from widespread naturally occurring mineral deposits and processed for use primarily in the construction industry. They are mined, crushed, sorted by size and sold loose or combined with portland cement or asphaltic cement to make concrete products to build roads, houses, buildings, and other structures. Much smaller quantities are used in agriculture, cement manufacture, chemical and metallurgical processes, glass production and many other products.

  10. Nonlinear elasticity, fluctuations and heterogeneity of nematic elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Xing Xiangjun Radzihovsky, Leo

    2008-01-15

    Liquid crystal elastomers realize a fascinating new form of soft matter that is a composite of a conventional crosslinked polymer gel (rubber) and a liquid crystal. These solid liquid crystal amalgams, quite similarly to their (conventional, fluid) liquid crystal counterparts, can spontaneously partially break translational and/or orientational symmetries, accompanied by novel soft Goldstone modes. As a consequence, these materials can exhibit unconventional elasticity characterized by symmetry-enforced vanishing of some elastic moduli. Thus, a proper description of such solids requires an essential modification of the classical elasticity theory. In this work, we develop a rotationally invariant, nonlinear theory of elasticity for the nematic phase of ideal liquid crystal elastomers. We show that it is characterized by soft modes, corresponding to a combination of long wavelength shear deformations of the solid network and rotations of the nematic director field. We study thermal fluctuations of these soft modes in the presence of network heterogeneities and show that they lead to a large variety of anomalous elastic properties, such as singular length-scale dependent shear elastic moduli, a divergent elastic constant for splay distortion of the nematic director, long-scale incompressibility, universal Poisson ratios and a nonlinear stress-strain relation for arbitrary small strains. These long-scale elastic properties are universal, controlled by a nontrivial zero-temperature fixed point and constitute a qualitative breakdown of the classical elasticity theory in nematic elastomers. Thus, nematic elastomers realize a stable 'critical phase', characterized by universal power-law correlations, akin to a critical point of a continuous phase transition, but extending over an entire phase.

  11. Elastic Anisotropy of Trabecular Bone in the Elderly Human Vertebra.

    PubMed

    Unnikrishnan, Ginu U; Gallagher, John A; Hussein, Amira I; Barest, Glenn D; Morgan, Elise F

    2015-11-01

    Knowledge of the nature of the elastic symmetry of trabecular bone is fundamental to the study of bone adaptation and failure. Previous studies have classified human vertebral trabecular bone as orthotropic or transversely isotropic but have typically obtained samples from only selected regions of the centrum. In this study, the elastic symmetry of human vertebral trabecular bone was characterized using microfinite element (μFE) analyses performed on 1019 cubic regions of side length equal to 5 mm, obtained via thorough sampling of the centrums of 18 human L1 vertebrae (age = 81.17 ± 7.7 yr; eight males and ten females). An optimization procedure was used to find the closest orthotropic representation of the resulting stiffness tensor for each cube. The orthotropic elastic constants and orientation of the principal elastic axes were then recorded for each cube and were compared to the constants predicted from Cowin's fabric-based constitutive model (Cowin, 1985, "The Relationship Between the Elasticity Tensor and the Fabric Tensor," Mech. Mater., 4(2), pp. 137-147.) and the orientation of the principal axes of the fabric tensor, respectively. Deviations from orthotropy were quantified by the "orthotropic error" (van Rietbergen et al., 1996, "Direct Mechanics Assessment of Elastic Symmetries and Properties of Trabecular Bone Architecture," J. Biomech., 29(12), pp. 1653-1657), and deviations from transverse isotropy were determined by statistical comparison of the secondary and tertiary elastic moduli. The orthotropic error was greater than 50% for nearly half of the cubes, and the secondary and tertiary moduli differed from one another (p < 0.0001). Both the orthotropic error and the difference between secondary and tertiary moduli decreased with increasing bone volume fraction (BV/TV; p ≤ 0.007). Considering only the cubes with an orthotropic error less than 50%, only moderate correlations were observed between the fabric-based and the

  12. Precisely predicting and designing the elasticity of metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. Q.; Wang, R. F.; Qu, R. T.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2014-05-01

    We reveal that the elastic moduli of metallic glasses (MGs) invariably vary in a much steeper manner than that predicted by the conventional "rule of mixtures" in individual alloy systems. Such deviations are proved to originate fundamentally from their disordered atomic structures and intrinsic local heterogeneities. By treating the MGs as atomic-level dual phase hybrids, we further propose universal relations to be capable of precisely predicting and designing the elastic constants of MGs. This may contribute to the development of MGs with intended properties and behaviors, and allow new understandings on the structures and properties as well as their relationships in MGs.

  13. Cosserat elasticity of negative Poisson’s ratio foam: experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueger, Zach; Lakes, Roderic S.

    2016-05-01

    Negative Poisson’s ratio polymer foams derived from reticulated open cell foams exhibit large size effects in torsion and bending. Effective moduli increase as diameter decreases in contrast to the prediction of classical elasticity. Size effects of this sort are predicted by Cosserat (micropolar) elasticity in which points can rotate as well as translate and distributed moments are incorporated. The Cosserat coupling number N was about twice as large as that of as-received foam, leading to strong effects. The torsion characteristic length {{\\ell }}{{t}} was similar. Cosserat effects are known to enhance toughness and immunity from stress concentration.

  14. Anisotropic linear elastic properties of fractal-like composites.

    PubMed

    Carpinteri, Alberto; Cornetti, Pietro; Pugno, Nicola; Sapora, Alberto

    2010-11-01

    In this work, the anisotropic linear elastic properties of two-phase composite materials, made up of square inclusions embedded in a matrix, are investigated. The inclusions present a fractal hierarchical distribution and are supposed to have the same Poisson's ratio as the matrix but a different Young's modulus. The effective elastic moduli of the medium are computed at each fractal iteration by coupling a position-space renormalization-group technique with a finite element analysis. The study allows to obtain and generalize some fundamental properties of fractal composite materials. PMID:21230552

  15. Magnetodeformation and elastic properties of ferrogels and ferroelastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubarev, A. Yu.; Elkady, Ashraf S.

    2014-11-01

    The work deals with a theoretical study of magnetoelastic properties of soft composite materials, consisting of a polymer matrix filled with micron-sized magnetizable particles (ferrogels and ferroelastomers). The systems with a homogeneous gas-like spatial distribution of particles in the matrix are considered. The impact of the particles magnetic interaction on the macroscopic elastic characteristics of the composites is studied. Analysis shows that this interaction increases elastic moduli of the materials. This effect must be especially significant for the composites with soft gel matrix.

  16. A Preponderance of Elastic Properties of Alpha Plutonium Measured Via Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Saleh, Tarik A.; Farrow, Adam M.; Freibert, Franz J.

    2012-06-06

    Samples of {alpha} plutonium were fabricated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Plutonium Facility. Cylindrical samples were machined from cast pucks. Precision immersion density and resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) measurements were completed on 27 new samples, yielding elastic moduli measurements. Mechanical tests were performed in compression yielding stress-strain curves as a function of rate, temperature and phase.

  17. A mineralogical model for density and elasticity of the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazzoni, A. S.; Steinle-Neumann, G.; Bunge, H.-P.; Dolejš, D.

    2007-11-01

    We present a thermodynamic model of high-pressure mineralogy that allows the evaluation of phase stability and physical properties for the Earth's mantle. The thermodynamic model is built from previous assessments and experiments in the five-component CFMAS system (CaO-FeO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2), including mineral phases that occur close to typical chemical models of the mantle and reasonable mantle temperatures. In this system we have performed a system Gibbs free energy minimization, including pure end-member phases and a nonideal formulation for solid solutions. Solid solutions were subdivided into discrete pseudocompounds and treated as stoichiometric phases during computation of chemical equilibrium by the simplex method. We have complemented the thermodynamic model with a model of shear wave properties to obtain a full description of aggregate elastic properties (density, bulk, and shear moduli) that provide a useful basis for the consideration of seismic and geodynamic models of the Earth's mantle. The thermodynamic model described here is made available for research and training purposes through a Web interface (http://www.earthmodel.org). We examine its validity in light of experiments from mineral physics and briefly discuss inferences for mantle structure.

  18. Consequences of Moduli Stabilization in the Einstein-Maxwell Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asensio, César; Seguí, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    A toy landscape sector is introduced as a compactification of the Einstein-Maxwell model on a product of two spheres. Features of the model include moduli stabilization, a distribution of the effective cosmological constant of the dimensionally reduced 1+1 spacetime, which is different from the analogous distribution of the Bousso-Polchinski landscape, and the absence of the so-called α* problem. This problem arises when the Kachru-Kallosh-Linde-Trivedi stabilization mechanism is naively applied to the states of the Bousso-Polchinski landscape. The model also contains anthropic states, which can be readily constructed without needing any fine-tuning.

  19. New results of intersection numbers on moduli spaces of curves.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kefeng; Xu, Hao

    2007-08-28

    We present a series of results we obtained recently about the intersection numbers of tautological classes on moduli spaces of curves, including a simple formula of the n-point functions for Witten's tau classes, an effective recursion formula to compute higher Weil-Petersson volumes, several new recursion formulae of intersection numbers and our proof of a conjecture of Itzykson and Zuber concerning denominators of intersection numbers. We also present Virasoro and KdV properties of generating functions of general mixed kappa and psi intersections. PMID:17702863

  20. Dynamic Young's moduli of space materials at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L. Z.; Tu, Z. H.; Zhang, P. Q.

    Using vibration analysis methods, the dynamic mechanical properties of space materials at low temperatures (from 4.2 to 300 K) are studied in this paper. System identification techniques in the time domain are used to identify the dynamic parameters of the space materials Ti-5Al-2.5Sn extra-low-interstitial (ELI) alloy and Al-2.5Li-1.3Cu-0.9Mg-0.13Zr (Al-Li) alloy. The dynamic Young's moduli of these materials are calculated using the basic natural frequencies at different temperatures.

  1. Development in the elastic analysis of laminated plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, A. J. M.

    1989-05-01

    Some developments in three dimensional analyses of stress and deformation in laminated plates are described. They are based on work by Michell published in 1900. For isotropic and homogeneous plates, Michell obtained a number of classes of exact solutions of the three dimensional elasticity equations which satisfy zero traction conditions on the lateral surfaces of a moderately thick plate. Firstly, for laminates in which the laminae are different isotropic materials, generalizations of Michell's solutions are outlined. Then a more general problem of extending Michell's solutions to materials in which the elastic moduli vary through the plate thickness is considered. The results are then recovered in a direct and simple manner by specializing to the case in which the elastic moduli are piecewise constant through the thickness. For advanced composite materials applications, the main interest is in laminates whose laminae are anisotropic. Michell's solutions cannot be generalized, in closed form, to anisotropic elastic plates. However, the concept of using solutions of the two dimensional thin plate equations to generate relevant solutions of the three dimensional elasticity equations remains valid, although the three dimensional solutions can no longer be presented in closed form. Recent developments along these lines are outlined.

  2. Oxides and oxide superconductors: Elastic and related properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, M.; Ledbetter, H.

    1991-08-01

    Using both measurements and modeling, the elastic and related properties of some oxides and oxide superconductors were studied. The polycrystal elastic constants were measured using a MHz-frequency pulse-echo method between 295 and 4 K and corrected to the void-free state by using a model for a composite material containing spherical particles. The elastic moduli of the high-T(c) superconductor Y1Ba2Cu3O7 (YBCO) were compared with that of oxides, especially the perovskites BaTiO3 and SrTiO3, which are crystal-structure building blocks for the YBCO superconductor. The bulk moduli were also calculated using a Born ionic model with two energy terms: electrostatic (Madelung) and ion-core-repulsion. The calculated bulk modulus of YBCO, 98 GPa, agrees well with measurement, 101 GPa. Based on monocrystal measurements combined with analysis-theory, elastic stiffnesses C(ij) for orthorhombic YBCO were estimated. The bulk modulus obtained from the estimated C(ij) by the Voigt-Reuss-Hill averaging method agrees with the monocrystal measurement. From the measured polycrystalline elastic constants, the Debye characteristic temperatures were calculated.

  3. Elastic Properties of Lithium Germanate Glasses Studied by Brillouin Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneda, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Yu; Kojima, Seiji

    2010-07-01

    To investigate the correlation between structural changes and physical properties, the elastic properties of lithium germanate glasses, xLi2O·(100-x)GeO2 represented as a function of Li2O mole fraction, have been studied in the composition range 6≤x≤36 mol % by Brillouin scattering spectroscopy. Raman spectra have also been measured to clarify the composition variation of structural changes. Several elastic properties, such as sound velocity and elastic modulus, have been determined from the Brillouin shift. The longitudinal and transverse sound velocities increase up to about x=20 mol %, and above x=20 mol %, they become nearly constant. Elastic moduli, such as longitudinal modulus (L) and shear modulus (G), increase gradually up to x=22 mol % and then decrease with a further increase in Li2O content. It is considered that such behaviors are due to the change in the coordination number of germanium atoms and the formation of nonbridging oxygen. Differently from other elastic moduli, Poisson's ratio (σ) shows a similar behavior to sound velocity.

  4. Soap Bubble Elasticity: Analysis and Correlation with Foam Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakashev, S. I.; Tsekov, R.; Manev, E. D.; Nguyen, A. V.

    2010-05-01

    A correlation between the elastic modulus of soap bubble and the foam stability was found. A model system was chosen: a soap bubble stabilized by simple nonionic surfactant tetraethylene glycol octyl ether (C8E4) and 10^-5 M NaCl. The Elastic moduli were determined by periodical expansion and shrinking of foam bubbles with frequency of 0.1 Hz and volumetric amplitude of 2 mm 3. The film tension was monitored via commercial profile analysis tensiometer (Sinterface Technologies, GmbH). The elastic moduli of foam bubbles versus surfactant concentration in the range of 2x10^-3 - 10^-2 M were obtained. In addition, the theory of Lucassen and van den Tempel for the elastic modulus of single liquid/air interface at given frequency was exploited as well. The bulk diffusion coefficient of the surfactant molecules is unknown parameter through the adsorption frequency in this theory. Hence, a fitting procedure (with one free parameter) was conducted matching experimental and theoretical data. The value of the bulk diffusion coefficient of C8E4 obtained was 5.1x10^-11 m^2/s, which is an order of magnitude lower value than what is expected for. The foam was generated by shaking method and left to decay. A correlation between the elastic modulus and foam life time upon surfactant concentration was found.

  5. The elastic constants and related properties of the epsilon polymorph of the energetic material CL-20 determined by Brillouin scattering.

    PubMed

    Haycraft, James J

    2009-12-01

    The acoustic phonons of the epsilon polymorph of 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazatetracyclo [5.5.0.0(5,9).0(3,11)] dodecane (epsilon-CL-20) have been studied using Brillouin scattering spectroscopy. Analysis of the acoustic phonon velocities allowed determination of the complete stiffness tensor for this energetic material. The results are compared to a theoretical determination of the epsilon-CL-20 elastic constants, bulk moduli, and shear moduli. The observed ordering of elastic constants, C(22)>C(33)>C(11), is noted to be different from other nitramine energetic materials. Finally, the elasticity of epsilon-CL-20 is compared to recently published reports on cyclotrimethylene trinitramine's (RDX) elasticity and the beta polymorph of cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine's (beta-HMX) elasticity. PMID:19968345

  6. Impact of Hydration Media on Ex Vivo Corneal Elasticity Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Janice; Ziebarth, Noël M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine the effect of hydration media on ex vivo corneal elasticity. Methods Experiments were conducted on forty porcine eyes retrieved from an abattoir (10 eyes each for PBS, BSS, Optisol, 15% Dextran). The epithelium was removed and the cornea was excised with an intact scleral rim and placed in 20% Dextran overnight to restore its physiological thickness. For each hydration media, corneas were evenly divided into two groups: one with an intact scleral rim and the other without. Corneas were mounted onto a custom chamber and immersed in a hydration medium for elasticity testing. While in each medium, corneal elasticity measurements were performed for 2 hours: at 5-minute intervals for the first 30 minutes and then 15-minute intervals for the remaining 90 minutes. Elasticity testing was performed using nanoindentation with spherical indenters and Young’s modulus was calculated using the Hertz model. Thickness measurements were taken before and after elasticity testing. Results The percentage change in corneal thickness and elasticity was calculated for each hydration media group. BSS, PBS, and Optisol showed an increase in thickness and Young’s moduli for corneas with and without an intact scleral rim. 15% Dextran exhibited a dehydrating effect on corneal thickness and provided stable maintenance of corneal elasticity for both groups. Conclusions Hydration media affects the stability of corneal thickness and elasticity measurements over time. 15% Dextran was most effective in maintaining corneal hydration and elasticity, followed by Optisol. PMID:25603443

  7. Single-Crystal Elasticity of Earth Materials: An Appraisal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, T. S.

    2015-12-01

    The elastic properties of minerals are of central importance for interpreting seismic data for the Earth's crust, mantle, and core. Mineral elasticity data also have more general applications towards understanding equations of state, phase equilibria, interatomic forces, material strength, and phase transitions. The singe-crystal elastic properties are the most generally useful as they provide complete information on the anisotropy of elastic moduli (e.g. Poisson's ratio, Young's modulus), sound velocities, and compressibility. Measurement of the full set of single-crystal elastic properties remains challenging especially for lower symmetry crystals. In this talk, I present an overview of our current understanding of single-crystal elasticity based on a newly constructed database of single-crystal elastic properties. At ambient conditions the full elastic tensor of about 150 minerals have now been measured, along with about another 60 related compounds that are not formally minerals. About two-thirds of the measured minerals are oxides or silicates. A limitation of the existing database is that only about 10% of the measurements are on crystals of monoclinic or triclinic symmetry, while these two systems account for about 40% of known minerals. Additionally, only a smaller subset of minerals have been examined at high pressure or temperature conditions. Several applications of the database will be presented emphasizing trends in elastic anisotropy. The pyroxenes will be used as an illustrative example.

  8. A novel method to determine the elastic modulus of extremely soft materials.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Tamás; Zrínyi, Miklós

    2015-06-01

    Determination of the elastic moduli of extremely soft materials that may deform under their own weight is a rather difficult experimental task. A new method has been elaborated by means of which the elastic modulus of such materials can be determined. This method is generally applicable to all soft materials with purely neo-Hookean elastic deformation behaviour with elastic moduli lower than 1 kPa. Our novel method utilises the self-deformation of pendent gel cylinders under gravity. When suspended, the material at the very top bears the weight of the entire gel cylinder, but that at the bottom carries no load at all. Due to the non-uniform stress distribution along the gel sample both the stress and the resulting strain show position dependence. The cross-sectional area of the material is lowest at the top of the sample and gradually increases towards its bottom. The equilibrium geometry of the pendant gel is used to evaluate the elastic modulus. Experimental data obtained by the proposed new method were compared to the results obtained from underwater measurements. The parameters affecting the measurement uncertainty were studied by a Pareto analysis of a series of adaptive Monte Carlo simulations. It has been shown that our method provides an easily achievable method to provide an accurate determination of the elastic modulus of extremely soft matter typically applicable for moduli below 1 kPa. PMID:25873419

  9. Area Expansivity Moduli of Regenerating Plant Protoplast Cell Walls Exposed to Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimura, Yuu; Iino, Masaaki; Watanabe, Ugai

    2005-05-01

    To control the elasticity of the plant cell wall, protoplasts isolated from cultured Catharanthus roseus cells were regenerated in shear flows of 115 s-1 (high shear) and 19.2 s-1 (low shear, as a control). The surface area expansivity modulus and the surface breaking strength of these regenerating protoplasts were measured by a micropipette aspiration technique. Cell wall synthesis was also measured using a cell wall-specific fluorescent dye. High shear exposure for 3 h doubled both the surface area modulus and breaking strength observed under low shear, significantly decreased cell wall synthesis, and roughly quadrupled the moduli of the cell wall. Based on the cell wall synthesis data, we estimated the three-dimensional modulus of the cell wall to be 4.1± 1.2 GPa for the high shear, and 0.35± 0.2 GPa for the low shear condition, using the surface area expansivity modulus divided by the cell wall thickness, which is identical with the Young’s modulus divided by 2(1-σ), where σ is Poisson's ratio. We concluded that high shear exposure considerably strengthens the newly synthesized cell wall.

  10. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bolen, W.P.; Tepordei, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    The estimated production during 2000 of construction aggregates, crushed stone, and construction sand and gravel increased by about 2.6% to 2.7 Gt (3 billion st), compared with 1999. The expansion that started in 1992 continued with record production levels for the ninth consecutive year. By commodity, construction sand and gravel production increased by 4.5% to 1.16 Gt (1.28 billion st), while crushed stone production increased by 1.3% to 1.56 Gt (1.72 billion st).

  11. Moduli stabilisation with nilpotent goldstino: vacuum structure and SUSY breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, Luis; Quevedo, Fernando; Valandro, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    We study the effective field theory of KKLT and LVS moduli stabilisation scenarios coupled to an anti-D3-brane at the tip of a warped throat. We describe the presence of the anti-brane in terms of a nilpotent goldstino superfield in a supersymmetric effective field theory. The introduction of this superfield produces a term that can lead to a de Sitter minimum. We fix the Kähler moduli dependence of the nilpotent field couplings by matching this term with the anti-D3-brane uplifting contribution. The main result of this paper is the computation, within this EFT, of the soft supersymmetry breaking terms in both KKLT and LVS for matter living on D3-brane (leaving the D7-brane analysis to an appendix). A handful of distinct phenomenological scenarios emerge that could have low energy implications, most of them having a split spectrum of soft masses. Some cosmological and phenomenological properties of these models are discussed. We also check that the attraction between the D3-brane and the anti-D3-brane does not affect the leading contribution to the soft masses and does not destabilise the system.

  12. Simple torsion test for shear moduli determination of orthotropic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumsion, H. T.; Rajapakse, Y. D. S.

    1978-01-01

    The shear moduli G13 and G23 for two different composites (AS/3501 and T300/5209) of uniaxial and cross-ply fiber orientations were determined by torsion testing of flat specimens of rectangular cross section. Torsion tests were run under controlled angle of twist in an electro-hydraulic servo-controlled test system. Both laser and potentiometer methods of measuring the angle of twist were used. The in-plane shear modulus was calculated with a formula for transversally isotropic materials and a formula for orthotropic materials, while the out-of-plane shear modulus was calculated from the orthotropic material formula. Neither the uniaxial nor the angle-ply composite materials studied were transversely isotropic. The degree of anisotropy for the angle-ply materials was several times greater than that of the uniaxial composites. For specimens of uniaxial fiber orientation, the in-plane shear moduli could be calculated to a good approximation by using the isotropic formula and test machine deflection data.

  13. Non-Gaussian Error Distributions of LMC Distance Moduli Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crandall, Sara; Ratra, Bharat

    2015-12-01

    We construct error distributions for a compilation of 232 Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) distance moduli values from de Grijs et al. that give an LMC distance modulus of (m - M)0 = 18.49 ± 0.13 mag (median and 1σ symmetrized error). Central estimates found from weighted mean and median statistics are used to construct the error distributions. The weighted mean error distribution is non-Gaussian—flatter and broader than Gaussian—with more (less) probability in the tails (center) than is predicted by a Gaussian distribution; this could be the consequence of unaccounted-for systematic uncertainties. The median statistics error distribution, which does not make use of the individual measurement errors, is also non-Gaussian—more peaked than Gaussian—with less (more) probability in the tails (center) than is predicted by a Gaussian distribution; this could be the consequence of publication bias and/or the non-independence of the measurements. We also construct the error distributions of 247 SMC distance moduli values from de Grijs & Bono. We find a central estimate of {(m-M)}0=18.94+/- 0.14 mag (median and 1σ symmetrized error), and similar probabilities for the error distributions.

  14. Quiver theories for moduli spaces of classical group nilpotent orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanany, Amihay; Kalveks, Rudolph

    2016-06-01

    We approach the topic of Classical group nilpotent orbits from the perspective of the moduli spaces of quivers, described in terms of Hilbert series and generating functions. We review the established Higgs and Coulomb branch quiver theory constructions for A series nilpotent orbits. We present systematic constructions for BCD series nilpotent orbits on the Higgs branches of quiver theories defined by canonical partitions; this paper collects earlier work into a systematic framework, filling in gaps and providing a complete treatment. We find new Coulomb branch constructions for above minimal nilpotent orbits, including some based upon twisted affine Dynkin diagrams. We also discuss aspects of 3 d mirror symmetry between these Higgs and Coulomb branch constructions and explore dualities and other relationships, such as HyperKähler quotients, between quivers. We analyse all Classical group nilpotent orbit moduli spaces up to rank 4 by giving their unrefined Hilbert series and the Highest Weight Generating functions for their decompositions into characters of irreducible representations and/or Hall Littlewood polynomials.

  15. Dynamic bulk and shear moduli due to grain-scale local fluid flow in fluid-saturated cracked poroelastic rocks: Theoretical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yongjia; Hu, Hengshan; Rudnicki, John W.

    2016-07-01

    Grain-scale local fluid flow is an important loss mechanism for attenuating waves in cracked fluid-saturated poroelastic rocks. In this study, a dynamic elastic modulus model is developed to quantify local flow effect on wave attenuation and velocity dispersion in porous isotropic rocks. The Eshelby transform technique, inclusion-based effective medium model (the Mori-Tanaka scheme), fluid dynamics and mass conservation principle are combined to analyze pore-fluid pressure relaxation and its influences on overall elastic properties. The derivation gives fully analytic, frequency-dependent effective bulk and shear moduli of a fluid-saturated porous rock. It is shown that the derived bulk and shear moduli rigorously satisfy the Biot-Gassmann relationship of poroelasticity in the low-frequency limit, while they are consistent with isolated-pore effective medium theory in the high-frequency limit. In particular, a simplified model is proposed to quantify the squirt-flow dispersion for frequencies lower than stiff-pore relaxation frequency. The main advantage of the proposed model over previous models is its ability to predict the dispersion due to squirt flow between pores and cracks with distributed aspect ratio instead of flow in a simply conceptual double-porosity structure. Independent input parameters include pore aspect ratio distribution, fluid bulk modulus and viscosity, and bulk and shear moduli of the solid grain. Physical assumptions made in this model include (1) pores are inter-connected and (2) crack thickness is smaller than the viscous skin depth. This study is restricted to linear elastic, well-consolidated granular rocks.

  16. Aggregate breakdown of nanoparticulate titania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, Navin

    Six nanosized titanium dioxide powders synthesized from a sulfate process were investigated. The targeted end-use of this powder was for a de-NOx catalyst honeycomb monolith. Alteration of synthesis parameters had resulted principally in differences in soluble ion level and specific surface area of the powders. The goal of this investigation was to understand the role of synthesis parameters in the aggregation behavior of these powders. Investigation via scanning electron microscopy of the powders revealed three different aggregation iterations at specific length scales. Secondary and higher order aggregate strength was investigated via oscillatory stress rheometry as a means of simulating shear conditions encountered during extrusion. G' and G'' were measured as a function of the applied oscillatory stress. Oscillatory rheometry indicated a strong variation as a function of the sulfate level of the particles in the viscoelastic yield strengths. Powder yield stresses ranged from 3.0 Pa to 24.0 Pa of oscillatory stress. Compaction curves to 750 MPa found strong similarities in extrapolated yield point of stage I and II compaction for each of the powders (at approximately 500 MPa) suggesting that the variation in sulfate was greatest above the primary aggregate level. Scanning electron microscopy of samples at different states of shear in oscillatory rheometry confirmed the variation in the linear elastic region and the viscous flow regime. A technique of this investigation was to approach aggregation via a novel perspective: aggregates are distinguished as being loose open structures that are highly disordered and stochastic in nature. The methodology used was to investigate the shear stresses required to rupture the various aggregation stages encountered and investigate the attempt to realign the now free-flowing constituents comprising the aggregate into a denser configuration. Mercury porosimetry was utilized to measure the pore size of the compact resulting from

  17. On a new compactification of moduli of vector bundles on a surface. III: Functorial approach

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeeva, Nadezhda V

    2011-03-31

    A new compactification for the scheme of moduli for Gieseker-stable vector bundles with prescribed Hilbert polynomial on the smooth projective polarized surface (S,L) is constructed. We work over the field k=k-bar of characteristic zero. Families of locally free sheaves on the surface S are completed with locally free sheaves on schemes which are modifications of S. The Gieseker-Maruyama moduli space has a birational morphism onto the new moduli space. We propose the functor for families of pairs 'polarized scheme-vector bundle' with moduli space of such type. Bibliography: 16 titles.

  18. Aggregate of nanoparticles: rheological and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Wu, Xiaojun; Yang, Wei; Zhai, Yuanming; Xie, Banghu; Yang, Mingbo

    2011-12-01

    The understanding of the rheological and mechanical properties of nanoparticle aggregates is important for the application of nanofillers in nanocompoistes. In this work, we report a rheological study on the rheological and mechanical properties of nano-silica agglomerates in the form of gel network mainly constructed by hydrogen bonds. The elastic model for rubber is modified to analyze the elastic behavior of the agglomerates. By this modified elastic model, the size of the network mesh can be estimated by the elastic modulus of the network which can be easily obtained by rheology. The stress to destroy the aggregates, i.e., the yield stress ( σ y ), and the elastic modulus ( G') of the network are found to be depended on the concentration of nano-silica ( ϕ, wt.%) with the power of 4.02 and 3.83, respectively. Via this concentration dependent behavior, we can extrapolate two important mechanical parameters for the agglomerates in a dense packing state ( ϕ = 1): the shear modulus and the yield stress. Under large deformation (continuous shear flow), the network structure of the aggregates will experience destruction and reconstruction, which gives rise to fluctuations in the viscosity and a shear-thinning behavior.

  19. Exact moduli space metrics for hyperbolic vortex polygons

    SciTech Connect

    Krusch, S.; Speight, J. M.

    2010-02-15

    Exact metrics on some totally geodesic submanifolds of the moduli space of static hyperbolic N-vortices are derived. These submanifolds, denoted as {sigma}{sub n,m}, are spaces of C{sub n}-invariant vortex configurations with n single vortices at the vertices of a regular polygon and m=N-n coincident vortices at the polygon's center. The geometric properties of {sigma}{sub n,m} are investigated, and it is found that {sigma}{sub n,n-1} is isometric to the hyperbolic plane of curvature -(3{pi}n){sup -1}. The geodesic flow on {sigma}{sub n,m} and a geometrically natural variant of geodesic flow recently proposed by Collie and Tong ['The dynamics of Chern-Simons vortices', Phys. Rev. D Part. Fields Gravit. Cosmol. 78, 065013 (2008);e-print arXiv:hep-th/0805.0602] are analyzed in detail.

  20. Heavy tails in Calabi-Yau moduli spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Cody; McAllister, Liam; McGuirk, Paul

    2014-10-01

    We study the statistics of the metric on Kähler moduli space in compactifications of string theory on Calabi-Yau hypersurfaces in toric varieties. We find striking hierarchies in the eigenvalues of the metric and of the Riemann curvature contribution to the Hessian matrix: both spectra display heavy tails. The curvature contribution to the Hessian is non-positive, suggesting a reduced probability of metastability compared to cases in which the derivatives of the Kähler potential are uncorrelated. To facilitate our analysis, we have developed a novel triangulation algorithm that allows efficient study of hypersurfaces with h 1,1 as large as 25, which is difficult using algorithms internal to pack-ages such as Sage. Our results serve as input for statistical studies of the vacuum structure in flux compactifications, and of the distribution of axion decay constants in string theory.

  1. The Moduli Space of Asymptotically Cylindrical Calabi-Yau Manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conlon, Ronan J.; Mazzeo, Rafe; Rochon, Frédéric

    2015-09-01

    We prove that the deformation theory of compactifiable asymptotically cylindrical Calabi-Yau manifolds is unobstructed. This relies on a detailed study of the Dolbeault-Hodge theory and its description in terms of the cohomology of the compactification. We also show that these Calabi-Yau metrics admit a polyhomogeneous expansion at infinity, a result that we extend to asymptotically conical Calabi-Yau metrics as well. We then study the moduli space of Calabi-Yau deformations that fix the complex structure at infinity. There is a Weil-Petersson metric on this space, which we show is Kähler. By proving a local families L 2-index theorem, we exhibit its Kähler form as a multiple of the curvature of a certain determinant line bundle.

  2. Nonlocal elastic properties of flux-line lattices in anisotropic superconductors in an arbitrarily oriented field

    SciTech Connect

    Sudbo, A.; Brandt, E.H. )

    1991-05-01

    The real-space anisotropic interaction between arbitrarily curved London vortices is calculated for a uniaxially anisotropic superconductor. From this we derive the elastic energy of a distorted flux-line lattice (FLL) in a uniaxially anisotropic superconductor for inductions {ital B}{much lt}{ital B}{sub {ital c}2} and arbitrary field direction. Avoiding the continuum description of the FLL, we obtain the exact elastic matrix, which is periodic in Fourier space and from which all elastic moduli of the FLL may be extracted. In the continuum limit, we give explicit expressions for the various nonlocal tilt and bulk moduli for the two cases {bold B}{perpendicular}{bold {cflx c}} and {bold B}-{bold {cflx c}}; here {bold {cflx c}} is the symmetry axis of the uniaxial crystal perpendicular to the basal plane. These results complement previous local theories and extend previous nonlocal treatments.

  3. Radial elasticity of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Michael W. Smith, Cheol Park, Meng Zheng, Changhong Ke ,In-Tae Bae, Kevin Jordan

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the radial mechanical properties of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes (MW-BNNTs) using atomic force microscopy. The employed MW-BNNTs were synthesized using pressurized vapor/condenser (PVC) methods and were dispersed in aqueous solution using ultrasonication methods with the aid of ionic surfactants. Our nanomechanical measurements reveal the elastic deformational behaviors of individual BNNTs with two to four tube walls in their transverse directions. Their effective radial elastic moduli were obtained through interpreting their measured radial deformation profiles using Hertzian contact mechanics models. Our results capture the dependences of the effective radial moduli of MW-BNNTs on both the tube outer diameter and the number of tube layers. The effective radial moduli of double-walled BNNTs are found to be several-fold higher than those of single-walled BNNTs within the same diameter range. Our work contributes directly to a complete understanding of the fundamental structural and mechanical properties of BNNTs and the pursuits of their novel structural and electronics applications.

  4. Finite elastic-plastic deformation of polycrystalline metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwakuma, T.; Nemat-Nasser, S.

    1984-01-01

    Applying Hill's self-consistent method to finite elastic-plastic deformations, the overall moduli of polycrystalline solids are estimated. The model predicts a Bauschinger effect, hardening, and formation of vertex or corner on the yield surface for both microscopically non-hardening and hardening crystals. The changes in the instantaneous moduli with deformation are examined, and their asymptotic behavior, especially in relation to possible localization of deformations, is discussed. An interesting conclusion is that small second-order quantities, such as shape changes of grains and residual stresses (measured relative to the crystal elastic moduli), have a first-order effect on the overall response, as they lead to a loss of the overall stability by localized deformation. The predicted incipience of localization for a uniaxial deformation in two dimensions depends on the initial yield strain, but the orientation of localization is slightly less than 45 deg with respect to the tensile direction, although the numerical instability makes it very difficult to estimate this direction accurately.

  5. Oxides and oxide superconductors: Elastic and related properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ming Lei.

    1991-01-01

    Using both measurements and modeling, the elastic and related properties of some oxides and oxide superconductors were studied. The polycrystal elastic constants were measured using a MHz-frequency pulse-echo method between 295 and 4 K and corrected to the void-free state by using a model for a composite material containing spherical particles. The elastic moduli of the high-{Tc} superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (YBCO) were compared with that of oxides, especially the perovskites BaTiO{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3}, which are crystal-structure building blocks for the YBCO superconductor. The bulk moduli were also calculated using a Born ionic model with two energy terms: electrostatic (Madelung) and ion-core-repulsion. The calculated bulk modulus of YBCO, 98 GPa, agrees well with measurement, 101 GPa. Based on monocrystal measurements combined with analysis-theory, elastic stiffnesses C{sub ij} for orthorhombic YBCO were estimated. The bulk modulus obtained from the estimated C{sub ij} by the Voigt-Reuss-Hill averaging method agrees with the monocrystal measurement.

  6. Kähler classes on universal moduli spaces and volumina of Quot spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okonek, Christian; Teleman, Andrei

    2015-10-01

    We study canonical Kähler metrics on moduli spaces of stable oriented pairs in a very general framework, and we prove a universal formula expressing the Kähler class of such a moduli space in terms of characteristic classes of the universal bundle. We use these results to compute the volumina of certain Quot spaces.

  7. Fundamentals of elasticity of (Mg1-x, Fex)2SiO4 olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez-Valdez, M.; Umemoto, K.; Wentzcovitch, R. M.

    2010-07-01

    We study the influence of iron on the elasticity of (Mg1-x, Fex)2SiO4 olivine (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.125), a major constituent of the Earth's upper mantle. We calculate static elastic properties by first principles for this solid solution and investigate the effect of atomic arrangement, an artifact of supercell calculations, on all single crystal and poly-crystalline elastic moduli. From calculated wave propagation velocities we find the heterogeneity ratios of shear to compressional wave velocity, and bulk sound to shear wave velocity. Their values are, though limited to composition considerations, marginally consistent with seismic tomography.

  8. Elastic constants of a Laves phase compound: C15 NbCr{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Ormeci, A. |; Chu, F.; Wills, J.M.; Chen, S.P.; Albers, R.C.; Thoma, D.J.; Mitchell, T.E.

    1997-04-01

    The single-crystal elastic constants of C15 NbCr{sub 2} have been computed by using a first-principles, self-consistent, full-potential total energy method. From these single-crystal elastic constants the isotropic elastic moduli are calculated using the Voigt and Reuss averages. The calculated values are in fair agreement with the experimental values. The implications of the results are discussed with regards to Poisson`s ratio and the direction dependence of Young`s modulus.

  9. New effective moduli of isotropic viscoelastic composites. Part I. Theoretical justification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetashkov, A. A.; Vakurov, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    According to the approach based on the commonality of problems of determining effective moduli of composites and viscoelastic solids, which properties are time-inhomogeneous, it is assumed that a viscoelastic solid is a two-component composite. One component displays temporal properties defined by a pair of Castiglianian-type effective moduli, and the other is defined by a pair of Lagrangian-type effective moduli. The Voigt and Reuss averaging is performed for the obtained two-composite solid with the introduction of a time function of volume fraction. In order to determine closer estimates, a method of iterative transformation of time effective moduli is applied to the viscoelastic Voigt-Reuss model. The physical justification of the method is provided. As a result, new time effective moduli of the viscoelastic solid are obtained which give a closer estimate of temporal properties as compared to the known models.

  10. Nonuniform elastic properties of macromolecules and effect of prestrain on their continuum nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Ankush; May, Eric R.; Brooks, Charles L.; Klug, William S.

    2016-01-01

    Many experimental and theoretical methods have been developed to calculate the coarse-grained continuum elastic properties of macromolecules. However, all of those methods assume uniform elastic properties. Following the continuum mechanics framework, we present a systematic way of calculating the nonuniform effective elastic properties from atomic thermal fluctuations obtained from molecular dynamics simulation at any coarse-grained scale using a potential of the mean-force approach. We present the results for a mutant of Sesbania mosaic virus capsid, where we calculate the elastic moduli at different scales and observe an apparent problem with the chosen reference configuration in some cases. We present a possible explanation using an elastic network model, where inducing random prestrain results in a similar behavior. This phenomenon provides a novel insight into the continuum nature of macromolecules and defines the limits on details that the elasticity theory can capture. Further investigation into prestrains could elucidate important aspects of conformational dynamics of macromolecules.

  11. Elasticity Evaluation of Regenerating Cartilage Sample Based on Laser Doppler Measurement of Ultrasonic Particle Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Naotaka; Misawa, Masaki; Homma, Kazuhiro; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2012-07-01

    It is important for regenerative medicine to evaluate the maturity of regenerating tissue. In the maturity evaluation of regenerating cartilage, it is useful to measure the temporal change of elasticity because the maturity of regenerating tissue is closely related to its elasticity. In this study, an elasticity evaluation method for the extracted regenerating cartilage sample, which is based on the laser Doppler measurement of ultrasonic particle velocity, was experimentally investigated using agar-based phantoms with different elastic moduli and the regenerating cartilage samples extracted from beagles in animal experiments. In addition, the experimentally-obtained elasticity was compared with the result of a static compression test. These results verified the feasibility of the proposed method in the elasticity evaluation of regenerating cartilage samples.

  12. Nonuniform elastic properties of macromolecules and effect of prestrain on their continuum nature.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Ankush; May, Eric R; Brooks, Charles L; Klug, William S

    2016-01-01

    Many experimental and theoretical methods have been developed to calculate the coarse-grained continuum elastic properties of macromolecules. However, all of those methods assume uniform elastic properties. Following the continuum mechanics framework, we present a systematic way of calculating the nonuniform effective elastic properties from atomic thermal fluctuations obtained from molecular dynamics simulation at any coarse-grained scale using a potential of the mean-force approach. We present the results for a mutant of Sesbania mosaic virus capsid, where we calculate the elastic moduli at different scales and observe an apparent problem with the chosen reference configuration in some cases. We present a possible explanation using an elastic network model, where inducing random prestrain results in a similar behavior. This phenomenon provides a novel insight into the continuum nature of macromolecules and defines the limits on details that the elasticity theory can capture. Further investigation into prestrains could elucidate important aspects of conformational dynamics of macromolecules. PMID:26871111

  13. WE-E-9A-01: Ultrasound Elasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Emelianov, S; Hall, T; Bouchard, R

    2014-06-15

    Principles and techniques of ultrasound-based elasticity imaging will be presented, including quasistatic strain imaging, shear wave elasticity imaging, and their implementations in available systems. Deeper exploration of quasistatic methods, including elastic relaxation, and their applications, advantages, artifacts and limitations will be discussed. Transient elastography based on progressive and standing shear waves will be explained in more depth, along with applications, advantages, artifacts and limitations, as will measurement of complex elastic moduli. Comparisons will be made between ultrasound radiation force techniques, MR elastography, and the simple A mode plus mechanical plunger technique. Progress in efforts, such as that by the Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance, to reduce the differences in the elastic modulus reported by different commercial systems will be explained. Dr. Hall is on an Advisory Board for Siemens Ultrasound and has a research collaboration with them, including joint funding by R01CA140271 for nonlinear elasticity imaging. Learning Objectives: Be reminded of the long history of palpation of tissue elasticity for critical medical diagnosis and the relatively recent advances to be able to image tissue strain in response to an applied force. Understand the differences between shear wave speed elasticity measurement and imaging and understand the factors affecting measurement and image frame repletion rates. Understand shear wave propagation effects that can affect measurements, such as essentially lack of propagation in fluids and boundary effects, so important in thin layers. Know characteristics of available elasticity imaging phantoms, their uses and limitations. Understand thermal and cavitational limitations affecting radiation force-based shear wave imaging. Have learning and references adequate to for you to use in teaching elasticity imaging to residents and technologists. Be able to explain how elasticity measurement

  14. Elasticity of single-crystal wüstite at ambient and elevated temperature from resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaak, Donald; Moser, Steven

    2013-06-01

    Results are presented from resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) measurements of adiabatic elastic moduli for single-crystal Fe0.943O at ambient and elevated temperature. Room temperature results are comparable to those obtained in four other Fe1-xO studies that used dynamic techniques with single-crystals. These five studies together result in small ranges for the bulk (KS) and two shear (C44 and CS) moduli of (GPa) 153-156, 45.1-46.1, and 47.7-48.0, respectively, at ambient P,T conditions. These ranges contrast with those from two other single-crystal studies with higher values for each of these elastic moduli. Our review of data from precise dynamic methods on single-crystals does not provide evidence of systematic compositional effects on KS for Fe1-xO with x around 0.05. Our measurements from 297-500 K are the first single-crystal elasticity determinations reported for Fe1-xO above room temperature and provide tight constraints on the temperature dependences of the shear moduli over this range. The positive value of (∂C44/∂T)P due to the softening of C44 at the Néel temperature, TN˜195 K, persists to at least 500 K with extrapolations indicating it may continue to about 750 K. Magnetoelastic interactions affect the elastic state of Fe1-xO to temperatures several hundreds of kelvin above TN.

  15. Quantitative microstructure characterization and elastic properties upscaling of carbonate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vialle, Stephanie; Lebedev, Maxim

    2016-04-01

    Most Rock Physics models commonly used to predict elastic properties rely on a very simplified representation of the pore and grains geometry. Initially developed for siliclastic rocks, they do not apply easily and/or with as much success, to rocks with more complicated microstructure such as carbonates, which exhibit complex relationships between geophysical attributes and rock properties, such as P-wave velocity versus porosity. Furthermore, until recently, most microstructure imaging techniques such as optical microscopy, SEM, X-ray micro-CT, etc., only give a qualitative description of the pore and grain arrangement. Nano-indentation technique is a method that gives quantitative information by mean of local (micrometer size) measurements of elastic moduli. We used this technique to obtain 300 μm * 300 μm maps of Young's moduli (around 1000 data points) of two microporous carbonates of same mineralogy but of two different microstructures. As the size of the indenter tip is much smaller than the characteristic length of the heterogeneities in microstructure, the distribution of the Young's moduli can be deconvolved into its component parts (i.e. phases). SEM imaging of the same areas than the ones mapped by nano-indentation shows correlations between type of micrite and phases of different mean Young's modulus: tight micrites exhibiting a higher Young's modulus (up to 64 GPa) than microporous micrites (as low as 9 GPa). We then investigate different ways to upscale the measurements in order to get the effective bulk and shear moduli, from simply using volume fractions of the different phases, classical Hashin-Shrikman bounds, and Hill average; to using micro-CT imaging and analysis combined with rock physics models. Though more work is still needed to render nano-indentation technique a robust method for rock physics, both on the theory behind and on the upscaling of the measurements, these results that use nano-indentation method in a statistical way are very

  16. Elastic properties of Li+ doped lead zinc borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaramakrishna, R.; Lakshmikantha, R.; Anavekar, R. V.

    2014-04-01

    Glasses in the system 0.25PbO-(0.25-x) ZnO-0.5B2O3-xLi2O have been prepared by the melt quenching technique. Elastic properties, DSC studies have been employed to study the role of Li2O in the present glass system. Elastic properties and Debye temperature have been determined using pulsed echo ultrasonic interferometer operating at 10MHz. Sound velocities Vl, Vt and elastic moduli decrease up to 5 mol% and then gradually increase with increase in Li2O concentration. Debye temperature and the glass transition temperature decreases with increase in Li2O. Densities remains almost constant up to 15 mol% Li2O concentration and increases monotonically while the molar volume decreases with the increase of Li2O concentration. The results are discussed in view of the borate structural network and dual role of Zn and Pb in these glasses.

  17. Elasticity of developing cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majkut, Stephanie; Swift, Joe; Krieger, Christine; Discher, Dennis

    2011-03-01

    Proper development and function of the heart from the tissue to cellular scale depends on a compliant ECM. Here we study the maturation of embryonic cardiac tissue mechanics in parallel with the effects of extracellular mechanics on individual cardiomyocyte function throughout early development. We used micropipette aspiration to measure local and bulk elastic moduli (E) of embryonic avian heart tissue from days 2-12. We observe stiffening of the early heart tube from E = 1 kPa at day 1 to E = 2 kPa at day 4, reaching neonatal values by day 12. Treating heart tubes with blebbistatin led to 30% decrease in E, indicating a significant but partial actomyosin contribution to mechanics at these stages. We performed a proteomic analysis of intact and decellularized 2-4 day heart tubes by mass spectrometry to quantify the ECM present at these stages. Isolated cardiomyocytes from 2-4 day chick embryos were cultured on collagen-coated PA gels of various stiffnesses. Beating magnitude was modulated by substrates with E = 1-2 kPa, similar to physiological E at those stages.

  18. Measurement of Elastic Modulus of Collagen Type I Single Fiber.

    PubMed

    Dutov, Pavel; Antipova, Olga; Varma, Sameer; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Schieber, Jay D

    2016-01-01

    Collagen fibers are the main components of the extra cellular matrix and the primary contributors to the mechanical properties of tissues. Here we report a novel approach to measure the longitudinal component of the elastic moduli of biological fibers under conditions close to those found in vivo and apply it to type I collagen from rat tail tendon. This approach combines optical tweezers, atomic force microscopy, and exploits Euler-Bernoulli elasticity theory for data analysis. This approach also avoids drying for measurements or visualization, since samples are freshly extracted. Importantly, strains are kept below 0.5%, which appear consistent with the linear elastic regime. We find, surprisingly, that the longitudinal elastic modulus of type I collagen cannot be represented by a single quantity but rather is a distribution that is broader than the uncertainty of our experimental technique. The longitudinal component of the single-fiber elastic modulus is between 100 MPa and 360 MPa for samples extracted from different rats and/or different parts of a single tail. Variations are also observed in the fibril-bundle/fibril diameter with an average of 325±40 nm. Since bending forces depend on the diameter to the fourth power, this variation in diameter is important for estimating the range of elastic moduli. The remaining variations in the modulus may be due to differences in composition of the fibril-bundles, or the extent of the proteoglycans constituting fibril-bundles, or that some single fibrils may be of fibril-bundle size. PMID:26800120

  19. Determination of the elastic modulus of snow via acoustic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerling, Bastian; van Herwijnen, Alec; Löwe, Henning

    2016-04-01

    The elastic modulus of snow is a key quantity from the viewpoint of avalanche research and forecasting, snow engineering or materials science in general. Since it is a fundamental property, many measurements have been reported in the literature. Due to differences in measurement methods, there is a lot of variation in the reported values. Especially values derived via computer tomography (CT) based numerical calculations using finite element methods are not corresponding to the results of other methods. The central issue is that CT based moduli are purely elastic whereas other methods may include viscoelastic deformation. In order to avoid this discrepancy we derived the elastic modulus of snow via wave propagation measurements and compared our results with CT based calculations. We measured the arrival times of acoustic pulses propagating through the snow samples to determine the P-wave velocity and in turn derive the elastic modulus along the direction of wave propagation. We performed a series of laboratory experiments to derive the P-wave modulus of snow in relation to density. The P-wave modulus ranged from 10 to 280 MPa for a snow density between 150 and 370 kg/m³. The moduli derived from the acoustic measurements correlated well with the CT-based values and both exhibited a power law trend over the entire density range. Encouraged by these results we used the acoustic method to investigate the temporal evolution of the elastic modulus. The rate of increase was very close to values mentioned in literature on the sintering rate of snow. Overall, our results are a first but important step towards a new measurement method to attain the elastic properties of snow.

  20. Measurement of Elastic Modulus of Collagen Type I Single Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Dutov, Pavel; Antipova, Olga; Varma, Sameer; Orgel, Joseph P. R. O.; Schieber, Jay D.

    2016-01-01

    Collagen fibers are the main components of the extra cellular matrix and the primary contributors to the mechanical properties of tissues. Here we report a novel approach to measure the longitudinal component of the elastic moduli of biological fibers under conditions close to those found in vivo and apply it to type I collagen from rat tail tendon. This approach combines optical tweezers, atomic force microscopy, and exploits Euler-Bernoulli elasticity theory for data analysis. This approach also avoids drying for measurements or visualization, since samples are freshly extracted. Importantly, strains are kept below 0.5%, which appear consistent with the linear elastic regime. We find, surprisingly, that the longitudinal elastic modulus of type I collagen cannot be represented by a single quantity but rather is a distribution that is broader than the uncertainty of our experimental technique. The longitudinal component of the single-fiber elastic modulus is between 100 MPa and 360 MPa for samples extracted from different rats and/or different parts of a single tail. Variations are also observed in the fibril-bundle / fibril diameter with an average of 325±40 nm. Since bending forces depend on the diameter to the fourth power, this variation in diameter is important for estimating the range of elastic moduli. The remaining variations in the modulus may be due to differences in composition of the fibril-bundles, or the extent of the proteoglycans constituting fibril-bundles, or that some single fibrils may be of fibril-bundle size. PMID:26800120

  1. Moduli vacuum bubbles produced by evaporating black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J. R.

    2007-10-15

    We consider a model with a toroidally compactified extra dimension giving rise to a temperature-dependent 4D effective potential with one-loop contributions due to the Casimir effect, along with a 5D cosmological constant. The forms of the effective potential at low and high temperatures indicate a possibility for the formation of a domain wall bubble, formed by the modulus scalar field, surrounding an evaporating black hole. This is viewed as an example of a recently proposed black hole vacuum bubble arising from matter-sourced moduli fields in the vicinity of an evaporating black hole [D. Green, E. Silverstein, and D. Starr, Phys. Rev. D 74, 024004 (2006)]. The black hole bubble can be highly opaque to lower-energy particles and photons, and thereby entrap them within. For high-temperature black holes, there may also be a symmetry-breaking black hole bubble of false vacuum of the type previously conjectured by Moss [I. G. Moss, Phys. Rev. D 32, 1333 (1985)], tending to reflect low-energy particles from its wall. A double bubble composed of these two different types of bubble may form around the black hole, altering the hole's emission spectrum that reaches outside observers. Smaller mass black holes that have already evaporated away could have left vacuum bubbles behind that contribute to the dark matter.

  2. Perturbations and moduli space dynamics of tachyon kinks

    SciTech Connect

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Li Huiquan

    2008-03-15

    The dynamic process of unstable D-branes decaying into stable ones with one dimension lower can be described by a tachyon field with a Dirac-Born-Infeld effective action. In this paper we investigate the fluctuation modes of the tachyon field around a two-parameter family of static solutions representing an array of brane-antibrane pairs. Besides a pair of zero modes associated with the parameters of the solution, and instabilities associated with annihilation of the brane-antibrane pairs, we find states corresponding to excitations of the tachyon field around the brane and in the bulk. In the limit that the brane thickness tends to zero, the support of the eigenmodes is limited to the brane, consistent with the idea that propagating tachyon modes drop out of the spectrum as the tachyon field approaches its ground state. The zero modes, and other low-lying excited states, show a fourfold degeneracy in this limit, which can be identified with some of the massless superstring modes in the brane-antibrane system. Finally, we also discuss the slow motion of the solution corresponding to the decay process in the moduli space, finding a trajectory which oscillates periodically between the unstable D-brane and the brane-antibrane pairs of one dimension lower.

  3. Explaining the electroweak scale and stabilizing moduli in M theory

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, Bobby S.; Bobkov, Konstantin; Kane, Gordon L.; Kumar, Piyush; Shao Jing

    2007-12-15

    In a recent paper [B. Acharya, K. Bobkov, G. Kane, P. Kumar, and D. Vaman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 191601 (2006).] it was shown that in fluxless M theory vacua with at least two hidden sectors undergoing strong gauge dynamics and a particular form of the Kaehler potential, all moduli are stabilized by the effective potential and a stable hierarchy is generated, consistent with standard gauge unification. This paper explains the results of [B. Acharya, K. Bobkov, G. Kane, P. Kumar, and D. Vaman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 191601 (2006).] in more detail and generalizes them, finding an essentially unique de Sitter vacuum under reasonable conditions. One of the main phenomenological consequences is a prediction which emerges from this entire class of vacua: namely, gaugino masses are significantly suppressed relative to the gravitino mass. We also present evidence that, for those vacua in which the vacuum energy is small, the gravitino mass, which sets all the superpartner masses, is automatically in the TeV-100 TeV range.

  4. Ab initio study of thermodynamic, electronic, magnetic, structural, and elastic properties of Ni4N allotropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemzalová, P.; Friák, M.; Šob, M.; Ma, D.; Udyansky, A.; Raabe, D.; Neugebauer, J.

    2013-11-01

    We have employed parameter-free density functional theory calculations to study the thermodynamic stability and structural parameters as well as elastic and electronic properties of Ni4N in eight selected crystallographic phases. In agreement with the experimental findings, the cubic structure with Pearson symbol cP5, space group Pm3¯m (221) is found to be the most stable and it is also the only thermodynamically stable structure at T=0 K with respect to decomposition to the elemental Ni crystal and N2 gas phase. We determine structural parameters, bulk moduli, and their pressure derivatives for all eight allotropes. The thermodynamic stability and bulk modulus is shown to be anticorrelated. Comparing ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic states, we find common features between the magnetism of elemental Ni and studied ferromagnetic Ni4N structures. For the ground-state Ni4N structure and other two Ni4N cubic allotropes, we predict a complete set of single-crystalline elastic constants (in the equilibrium and under hydrostatic pressure), the Young and area moduli, as well as homogenized polycrystalline elastic moduli obtained by different homogenization methods. We demonstrate that the elastic anisotropy of the ground-state Ni4N is qualitatively opposite to that in the elemental Ni, i.e., these materials have hard and soft crystallographic directions interchanged. Moreover, one of the studied metastable cubic phases is found auxetic, i.e., exhibiting negative Poisson ratio.

  5. Elastic properties of glasses: a multiscale approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouxel, Tanguy

    2006-12-01

    Very different materials are named 'Glass', with Young's modulus E and Poisson's ratio ν extending from 5 to 180 GPa and from 0.1 to 0.4, respectively, in the case of bulk inorganic glasses. Glasses have in common the lack of long range order in the atomic organization. Beside the essential role of elastic properties for materials selection in mechanical design, we show in this analysis that macroscopical elastic characteristics ( E,ν) provide an interesting way to get insight into the short- and medium-range orders existing in glasses. In particular, ν, the packing density ( C) and the glass network dimensionality appear to be strongly correlated. Networks consisting primarily of chains and layers units (chalcogenides, low Si-content silicate glasses) correspond to ν>0.25 and C>0.56, with maximum values observed for metallic glasses ( ν˜0.4 and C>0.7). On the contrary, ν<0.25 is associated to a highly cross-linked network with a tri-dimensional organization resulting in a low packing density. Moreover, the temperature dependence of the elastic moduli brings a new light on the 'fragility' of glasses (as introduced by Angell) and on the level of cooperativity of atomic movements at the source of the deformation process. To cite this article: T. Rouxel, C. R. Mecanique 334 (2006).

  6. Nonlinear elasticity of disordered fiber networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jingchen; Levine, Herbert; Mao, Xiaoming; Sander, Leonard M.

    One of the most striking mechanical properties in disordered biopolymer gels is strong nonlinearities. In the case of athermal gels (such as collagen- I) the nonlinearity has long been associated with a crossover from a bending dominated to a stretching dominated regime of elasticity. The physics of this crossover is related to the existence of a central-force isostatic point and to the small bending modulus for most gels. This crossover induces scaling behavior for the elastic moduli. In particular, for linear elasticity such a scaling law has been demonstrated by Broedersz et al. We generalize the scaling to the nonlinear regime with a two-parameter scaling law involving three critical exponents. We do numerical testing of the scaling law for two disordered lattice models, and find a good scaling collapse for the shear modulus in both the linear and nonlinear regimes. We compute all the critical exponents for the two lattice models and discuss the applicability of our results to real systems.

  7. Restructuring of Dust Aggregates in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominik, C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the results of a recent effort to analyze the mechanical stability of dust aggregates with a detailed model of the physical properties of a contact between grains. This model contains both elastic repulsion forces and attractive van der Waals/dipole/metallic forces along with a description of the energy dissipation due to rolling, sliding, and breaking of contacts. We find that (1) aggregates formed from single sized grains via Particle-Cluster-Aggregation remain fluffy, (2) collisions with other aggregates and with large grains may lead to compaction (3) the velocities of small grains and aggregates in the early solar nebula are too small to produce marked compaction as long as the aggregates are small, and (4) internal restructuring of aggregates is a potentially large sink of energy which could enable the sticking of large bodies even at collision velocities of the order of several hundred cm/s.

  8. In-situ Young's moduli of the constitutive layers in a solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Amit; Shyam, Amit; Liu, Zhien; Goettler, Richard

    2015-01-01

    In-situ Young's moduli of thin constituent layers of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) are needed to estimate the mechanical reliability of the fuel cell unit. Because a robust technique to measure the same is not available, an improved methodology is proposed to determine the in-situ Young's moduli of thin ceramic layers of a substrate-supported SOFC. The measured Young's moduli of the constituent layers were found to be close to those of corresponding bulk materials using the resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) technique but were different from the values obtained using nanoindentation.

  9. Global Aspects of (0,2) Moduli Space: Toric Varieties and Tangent Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donagi, Ron; Lu, Zhentao; Melnikov, Ilarion V.

    2015-09-01

    We study the moduli space of A/2 half-twisted gauged linear sigma models for NEF Fano toric varieties. Focusing on toric deformations of the tangent bundle, we describe the vacuum structure of many (0,2) theories, in particular identifying loci in parameter space with spontaneous supersymmetry breaking or divergent ground ring correlators. We find that the parameter space of such an A/2 theory and its ground ring is in general a moduli stack, and we show in examples that with suitable stability conditions it is possible to obtain a simple compactification of the moduli space of smooth A/2 theories.

  10. Bubbles attenuate elastic waves at seismic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisato, Nicola; Quintal, Beatriz; Chapman, Samuel; Podladchikov, Yury; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The vertical migration of multiphase fluids in the crust can cause hazardous events such as eruptions, explosions, pollution and earthquakes. Although seismic tomography could potentially provide a detailed image of such fluid-saturated regions, the interpretation of the tomographic signals is often controversial and fails in providing a conclusive map of the subsurface saturation. Seismic tomography should be improved considering seismic wave attenuation (1/Q) and the dispersive elastic moduli which allow accounting for the energy lost by the propagating elastic wave. In particular, in saturated media a significant portion of the energy carried by the propagating wave is dissipated by the wave-induced-fluid-flow and the wave-induced-gas-exsolution-dissolution (WIGED) mechanisms. The WIGED mechanism describes how a propagating wave modifies the thermodynamic equillibrium between different fluid phases causing the exsolution and the dissolution of the gas in the liquid, which in turn causes a significant frequency dependent 1/Q and moduli dispersion. The WIGED theory was initially postulated for bubbly magmas but only recently was extended to bubbly water and experimentally demonstrated. Here we report these theory and laboratory experiments. Specifically, we present i) attenuation measurements performed by means of the Broad Band Attenuation Vessel on porous media saturated with water and different gases, and ii) numerical experiments validating the laboratory observations. Finally, we will extend the theory to fluids and to pressure-temperature conditions which are typical of phreatomagmatic and hydrocarbon domains and we will compare the propagation of seismic waves in bubble-free and bubble-bearing subsurface domains. With the present contribution we extend the knowledge about attenuation in rocks which are saturated with multiphase fluid demonstrating that the WIGED mechanism could be extremely important to image subsurface gas plumes.

  11. An effective medium theory for three-dimensional elastic heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Thomas H.

    2015-11-01

    A second-order Born approximation is used to formulate a self-consistent theory for the effective elastic parameters of stochastic media with ellipsoidal distributions of small-scale heterogeneity. The covariance of the stiffness tensor is represented as the product of a one-point tensor variance and a two-point scalar correlation function with ellipsoidal symmetry, which separates the statistical properties of the local anisotropy from those of the geometric anisotropy. The spatial variations can then be rescaled to an isotropic distribution by a simple metric transformation; the spherical average of the strain Green's function in the transformed space reduces to a constant Kneer tensor, and the second-order corrections to the effective elastic parameters are given by the contraction of the rescaled Kneer tensor against the single-point variance of the stiffness tensor. Explicit results are derived for stochastic models in which the heterogeneity is transversely isotropic and its second moments are characterized by a horizontal-to-vertical aspect ratio η. If medium is locally isotropic, the expressions for the anisotropic effective moduli reduce in the limit η → ∞ to Backus's second-order expressions for a 1-D stochastic laminate. Comparisons with the exact Backus theory show that the second-order approximation predicts the effective anisotropy for non-Gaussian media fairly well for relative rms fluctuations in the moduli smaller than about 30 per cent. A locally anisotropic model is formulated in which the local elastic properties have hexagonal symmetry, guided by a Gaussian random vector field that is transversely isotropic and specified by a horizontal-to-vertical orientation ratio ξ. The self-consistent theory provides closed-form expressions for the dependence of the effective moduli on 0 < ξ < ∞ and 0 < η < ∞. The effective-medium parametrizations described here appear to be suitable for incorporation into tomographic modelling.

  12. A-thermal elastic behavior of silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabia, Mohammed Kamel; Degioanni, Simon; Martinet, Christine; Le Brusq, Jacques; Champagnon, Bernard; Vouagner, Dominique

    2016-02-01

    Depending on the composition of silicate glasses, their elastic moduli can increase or decrease as function of the temperature. Studying the Brillouin frequency shift of these glasses versus temperature allows the a-thermal composition corresponding to an intermediate glass to be determined. In an intermediate glass, the elastic moduli are independent of the temperature over a large temperature range. For sodium alumino-silicate glasses, the a-thermal composition is close to the albite glass (NaAlSi3O8). The structural origin of this property is studied by in situ high temperature Raman scattering. The structure of the intermediate albite glass and of silica are compared at different temperatures between room temperature and 600 °C. When the temperature increases, it is shown that the high frequency shift of the main band at 440 cm-1 in silica is a consequence of the cristobalite-like alpha-beta transformation of 6-membered rings. This effect is stronger in silica than bond elongation (anharmonic effects). As a consequence, the elastic moduli of silica increase as the temperature increases. In the albite glass, the substitution of 25% of Si4+ ions by Al3+ and Na+ ions decreases the proportion of SiO2 6-membered rings responsible for the silica anomaly. The effects of the silica anomaly balance the anharmonicity in albite glass and give rise to an intermediate a-thermal glass. Different networks, formers or modifiers, can be added to produce different a-thermal glasses with useful mechanical or chemical properties.

  13. A-thermal elastic behavior of silicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Rabia, Mohammed Kamel; Degioanni, Simon; Martinet, Christine; Le Brusq, Jacques; Champagnon, Bernard; Vouagner, Dominique

    2016-02-24

    Depending on the composition of silicate glasses, their elastic moduli can increase or decrease as function of the temperature. Studying the Brillouin frequency shift of these glasses versus temperature allows the a-thermal composition corresponding to an intermediate glass to be determined. In an intermediate glass, the elastic moduli are independent of the temperature over a large temperature range. For sodium alumino-silicate glasses, the a-thermal composition is close to the albite glass (NaAlSi3O8). The structural origin of this property is studied by in situ high temperature Raman scattering. The structure of the intermediate albite glass and of silica are compared at different temperatures between room temperature and 600 °C. When the temperature increases, it is shown that the high frequency shift of the main band at 440 cm(-1) in silica is a consequence of the cristobalite-like alpha-beta transformation of 6-membered rings. This effect is stronger in silica than bond elongation (anharmonic effects). As a consequence, the elastic moduli of silica increase as the temperature increases. In the albite glass, the substitution of 25% of Si(4+) ions by Al(3+) and Na(+) ions decreases the proportion of SiO2 6-membered rings responsible for the silica anomaly. The effects of the silica anomaly balance the anharmonicity in albite glass and give rise to an intermediate a-thermal glass. Different networks, formers or modifiers, can be added to produce different a-thermal glasses with useful mechanical or chemical properties. PMID:26815634

  14. Elastic laboratory measurements and modeling of saturated basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Ludmila; Otheim, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the elastic behavior of basalt is important to seismically monitor volcanoes, subsea basalts, and carbon sequestration in basalt. We estimate the elastic properties of basalt samples from the Snake River Plain, Idaho, at ultrasonic (0.8 MHz) and seismic (2-300 Hz) frequencies. To test the sensitivity of seismic waves to the fluid content in the pore structure, measurements are performed at three saturation conditions: saturated with liquid CO2, water, and dry. When CO2 replaces water, the P-wave velocity drops, on average, by 10%. Vesicles and cracks, observed in the rock microstructure, control the relaxation of pore-fluid pressures in the rock as a wave propagates. The bulk and shear moduli of basalts saturated with liquid CO2 are not frequency dependent, suggesting that fluid pore pressures are in equilibrium between 2 Hz and 0.8 MHz. However, when samples are water saturated, the bulk modulus of the rock is frequency dependent. Modeling with Gassmann's equations predicts the measured saturated rock bulk modulus for all fluids for frequencies below 20 Hz but underpredicts the water-saturated basalt bulk modulus for frequencies greater than 20 Hz. The most likely reason is that the pore-fluid pressures are unrelaxed. Instead, the ultrasonic frequency rock moduli are modeled with high-frequency elastic theories of squirt flow and Kuster-Toksöz (KT). Although KT's model is based on idealized pore shapes, a combination of spheres (vesicles) and penny-shaped cracks (fractures) interpreted and quantified from petrographical data predicts the ultrasonic dry and saturated rock moduli for the measured basalts.

  15. Evaluation of Fracture in Concrete with Recycled Aggregate by Acoustic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishibata, Sayaka; Watanabe, Takeshi; Hashimoro, Chikanori; Kohno, Kiyoshi

    This research revealed fracture behavior of concrete in using recycled aggregates by Acoustic Emission as one of the Non-destructive Inspection. The phenomenon of acoustic emission (AE) is the propagation of elastic waves generated from a source, known as a micro-crack in an elastic material. There were taken to use low-treated recycled aggregate, crushed returned ready mixed concrete for aggregate and normal aggregate. Examination measured AE under the uniaxial compression test. The condition of load is repeated loading. As a result, fracture behavior due to low treated recycled aggregate was detected by AE. It is clarified that AE of concrete with low treated recycled aggregate appeared in low stress level. It has been understood that difference of aggregates becomes clear from Kaiser effect in repeated loading. In relation between RA value and average frequency, it has been understood the adhesion properties of the cement paste in recycled aggregate are appreciable.

  16. Analytical methods to determine the effective mesoscopic and macroscopic elastic properties of cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Parnell, William J; Vu, M B; Grimal, Q; Naili, S

    2012-07-01

    We compare theoretical predictions of the effective elastic moduli of cortical bone at both the meso- and macroscales. We consider the efficacy of three alternative approaches: the method of asymptotic homogenization, the Mori-Tanaka scheme and the Hashin-Rosen bounds. The methods concur for specific engineering moduli such as the axial Young's modulus but can vary for others. In a past study, the effect of porosity alone on mesoscopic properties of cortical bone was considered, taking the matrix to be isotropic. Here, we consider the additional influence of the transverse isotropy of the matrix. We make the point that micromechanical approaches can be used in two alternative ways to predict either the macroscopic (size of cortical bone sample) or mesoscopic (in between micro- and macroscales) effective moduli, depending upon the choice of representative volume element size. It is widely accepted that the mesoscale behaviour is an important aspect of the mechanical behaviour of bone but models incorporating its effect have started to appear only relatively recently. Before this only macroscopic behaviour was addressed. Comparisons are drawn with experimental data and simulations from the literature for macroscale predictions with particularly good agreement in the case of dry bone. Finally, we show how predictions of the effective mesoscopic elastic moduli can be made which retain dependence on the well-known porosity gradient across the thickness of cortical bone. PMID:22109098

  17. Dispersion morphology and correlation to moduli using buckling metrology in clay-biopolymer nanocomposite thin films.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hongyi; Singh, Gurpreet; Raghavan, Dharmaraj; Al-Enizi, Abdullah M; Elzatahry, Ahmed; Karim, Alamgir

    2014-08-27

    Structure-interaction-mechanical property correlation in bionanocomposite thin films is an area of growing interest for research and application areas from barrier to molecular transport to UV blocking layers for polymer solar cells to dielectric properties modification. Here we study flow coated ultrathin to thin films (70-150 nm) of clay bionanocomposites to understand the nanoparticle dispersion and its effect on nanomechanical properties. Binary and ternary thin film systems of polylactide (PLA), polycaprolactone (PCL), and Cloisite 30B (C30B) clay platelets were investigated. While C30B was only partially intercalated by PLA, it was almost completely intercalated by PCL due to strong hydrogen bonding. In addition, the dispersion of C30B improved continuously and linearly with increasing PCL content in homogeneously cast blended PLA:PCL. GIWAXS confirmed that the intercalated clay platelets in PLA and PCL were dominantly oriented parallel to the substrate. The method of strain induced elastic buckling instability for mechanical measurements (SIEBIMM) showed that pure PLA and PCL had in-plane modulus unchanged from bulk values for this range of ultrathin-thin films. In PLA/C30B nanocomposite thin films, the in-plane elastic modulus rapidly increased by up to 26% with 2 wt % C30B, but saturated thereafter up to 10 wt % C30B forming C30B aggregates. On the other hand, the in-plane elastic modulus of PCL/C30B thin films increased linearly by up to 43% with 10 wt % C30B due to the higher interaction driven dispersion, results that were shown to fit well with the Halpin-Tsai model. We conclude that the different strengthening behavior came from different interaction driven dispersion states of C30B in polymer matrices, governed by their molecular structures. PMID:25062299

  18. Elasticity of interfacial rafts of hard particles with soft shells.

    PubMed

    Knoche, Sebastian; Kierfeld, Jan

    2015-05-19

    We study an elasticity model for compressed protein monolayers or particle rafts at a liquid interface. Based on the microscopic view of hard-core particles with soft shells, a bead-spring model is formulated and analyzed in terms of continuum elasticity theory. The theory can be applied, for example, to hydrophobin-coated air-water interfaces or, more generally, to liquid interfaces coated with an adsorbed monolayer of interacting hard-core particles. We derive constitutive relations for such particle rafts and describe the buckling of compressed planar liquid interfaces as well as their apparent Poisson ratio. We also use the constitutive relations to obtain shape equations for pendant or buoyant capsules attached to a capillary, and to compute deflated shapes of such capsules. A comparison with capsules obeying the usual Hookean elasticity (without hard cores) reveals that the hard cores trigger capsule wrinkling. Furthermore, it is shown that a shape analysis of deflated capsules with hard-core/soft-shell elasticity gives apparent elastic moduli which can be much higher than the original values if Hookean elasticity is assumed. PMID:25901364

  19. Numerical Weil-Petersson metrics on moduli spaces of Calabi-Yau manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Julien; Lukic, Sergio

    2015-06-01

    We introduce a simple and very fast algorithm to compute Weil-Petersson metrics on moduli spaces of Calabi-Yau varieties. Additionally, we introduce a second algorithm to approximate the same metric using Donaldson's quantization link between infinite and finite dimensional Geometric Invariant Theoretical (GIT) quotients that describe moduli spaces of varieties. Although this second algorithm is slower and more sophisticated, it can also be used to compute similar metrics on other moduli spaces (e.g. moduli spaces of vector bundles on Calabi-Yau varieties). We study the convergence properties of both algorithms and provide explicit computer implementations using a family of Calabi-Yau quintic hypersurfaces in P4. Also, we include discussions on: the existing methods that are used to compute this class of metrics, the background material that we use to build our algorithms, and how to extend the second algorithm to the vector bundle case.

  20. Compositional dependence of Young's moduli for amorphous FeCo-SiO{sub 2} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.; Xie, J. L.; Deng, L. J.; Guo, Q.; Zhu, Z. W.; Bi, L.

    2011-04-01

    Systematic force-deflection measurements with microcantilevers and a combinatorial-deposition method have been used to investigate the Young's moduli of amorphous composite FeCo-SiO{sub 2} thin films as a function of film composition, with high compositional resolution. It is found that the modulus decreases monotonically with increasing FeCo content. Such a trend can be explained in terms of the metalloid atoms having a significant effect on the Young's moduli of metal-metalloid composites, which is associated with the strong chemical interaction between the metalloid and themetallic atoms rather than that between the metallic components themselves. This work provides an efficient and effective method to study the moduli of magnetic thin films over a largecomposition coverage, and to compare the relative magnitudes of moduli for differentcompositions at high compositional resolution.

  1. Change and anisotropy of elastic modulus in sheet metals due to plastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishitsuka, Yuki; Arikawa, Shuichi; Yoneyama, Satoru

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the effect of the plastic deformation on the microscopic structure and the anisotropy of the elastic modulus in the cold-rolled steel sheet (SPCC) is investigated. Various uniaxial plastic strains (0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, and 10%) are applied to the annealed SPCC plates, then, the specimens for the tensile tests are cut out from them. The elastic moduli in the longitudinal direction and the transverse direction to the direction that are pre-strained are measured by the tensile tests. Cyclic tests are performed to investigate the effects of the internal friction caused by the movable dislocations in the elastic deformation. Also, the movable dislocations are quantified by the boundary tracking for TEM micrographs. In addition, the behaviors of the change of the elastic modulus in the solutionized and thermal aged aluminum alloy (A5052) are measured to investigate the effect on the movable dislocations with the amount of the depositions. As a result in SPCC, the elastic moduli of the 0° and 90° directions decrease more than 10% as 10% prestrain applied. On the other hand, the elastic modulus shows the recovery behavior after the strain aging and the annealing. The movable dislocation and the internal friction show a tendency to increase as the plastic strain increases. The marked anisotropy is not observed in the elastic modulus and the internal friction. The elastic modulus in A5052 with many and few depositions decreases similarly by the plastic deformation. From the above, the movable dislocations affect the elastic modulus strongly without depending on the deposition amount. Moreover, the elastic modulus recovers after the plastic deformation by reducing the effects of them with the strain aging and the heat treatment.

  2. First-principles elastic stiffness of LaPO4 monazite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingyang; Zhou, Yanchun; Lin, Zhijun

    2005-08-01

    In this letter, the full set of elastic coefficients of LaPO4 monazite is presented based on the first-principles plane-wave pseudopotential total energy method. Mechanical parameters (bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's moduli, and Poisson's ratio) are also presented and compared with experimental results for polycrystalline monazite. The responses of electronic structure and chemical bonds to a series of {010}⟨001⟩ shear strains are examined in order to study the mechanism of low shear strain resistance. The results show that small shear moduli originate from the inhomogeneous strengths of atomic bonds. For example, the weak La-O bonds accommodate the shear strain locally, while the PO4 tetrahedra are almost rigid. The theoretical elastic stiffness may be useful to understand the deformation mechanisms of LaPO4 monazite.

  3. On the links between elastic constants and effective elastic behavior of pharmaceutical compacts: importance of poisson's ratio and use of bulk modulus.

    PubMed

    Mazel, Vincent; Busignies, Virginie; Diarra, Harona; Tchoreloff, Pierre

    2013-11-01

    The elastic properties of pharmaceutical powders and compacts are of great interest to understand the complex phenomena that occur during and after the tableting process. The elastic recovery after compression is known to be linked with adverse phenomena such as capping or delamination of tablets. Classically, the elastic behavior is modeled using linear elasticity and is characterized using only Young's modulus (E), often by using a value extrapolated at zero porosity. In this work, four pharmaceutical products were studied. The elastic behavior of compacts obtained using a large range of applied pressure was characterized. First, it was found more suitable to use apparent elastic moduli than extrapolations at zero porosity. Then, the results indicate that there was not always a good correlation between the values of Young's modulus and the actual elastic recovery of the compacts. Poisson's ratio (v), which differs from one product to another and is porosity-dependent, must be taken into account. Finally, the bulk modulus (K), which combines E and v, was shown to be well correlated with the elastic recovery of the compacts and can be considered as a relevant parameter to characterize the elastic behavior of pharmaceutical compacts. PMID:23963744

  4. Ab initio study of electronic structure, elastic and optical properties of anti-perovskite type alkali metal oxyhalides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanna, J.; Yedukondalu, N.; Ramesh Babu, K.; Vaitheeswaran, G.

    2013-06-01

    We report the structural, elastic, electronic, and optical properties of antiperovskite alkali metal oxyhalides Na3OCl, Na3OBr, and K3OBr using two different density functional methods within generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Plane wave pseudo potential (PW-PP) method has been used to calculate the ground state structural and elastic properties while the electronic structure and optical properties are calculated explicitly using full potential-linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method. The calculated ground state properties of the investigated compounds agree quite well with the available experimental data. The predicted elastic constants using both PW-PP and FP-LAPW methods are in good accord with each other and show that the materials are mechanically stable. The low values of the elastic moduli indicate that these materials are soft in nature. The bulk properties such as shear moduli, Young's moduli, and Poisson's ratio are derived from the calculated elastic constants. Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson (TB-mBJ) potential improves the band gaps over GGA and Engel-Vosko GGA. The computed TB-mBJ electronic band structure reveals that these materials are direct band gap insulators. The complex dielectric function of the metal oxyhalide compounds have been calculated and the observed prominent peaks are analyzed through the TB-mBJ electronic structures. By using the knowledge of complex dielectric function other important optical properties including absorption, reflectivity, refractive index and loss function have been obtained as a function of energy.

  5. In vitro comparison of flexural strength and elastic modulus of three provisional crown materials used in fixed prosthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Poonacha, Seema; Salagundi, Basavaraj; Rupesh, P L.; Raghavan, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate and compare the flexural strength and the elastic moduli of three provisional crown materials (methyl methacrylate based autopolymerized resin, bis acryl composite based autopolymerized resin and urethane dimethacrylate based light polymerized resin) after storing in artificial saliva and testing at intervals of 24 hours and 7 days. Study design: A metal master mould with four slots of dimensions 25x2x2 mm was fabricated to obtain samples of standard dimensions. A total of 135 specimens were thus obtained with 45 each of three provisional materials. Further 15 samples of each group were tested after storing for one hour at room temperature and again at intervals of 24 hours and 7 days after storing in artificial saliva. Three point flexural tests were carried out in the universal testing machine to calculate the flexural strength and the elastic modulus. The changes were calculated and data was analyzed with Fisher’s test and ANOVA. Results: The flexural strength of the methyl methacrylate resin reduced significantly while bis-acrylic composite resin showed a significant increase in its flexural strength after storing in artificial saliva for 24 hours and the values of both remained constant thereafter. Contrary to these findings, light polymerized resin showed a significant decrease in flexural strength after storing in artificial saliva for 24 hours and then significantly increased in flexural strength after 7 days. However the changes in the values for elastic modulus of respective materials were statistically insignificant. Conclusion: Methacrylate based autopolymerizing resin showed the highest flexural strength and elastic moduli after fabrication and after storing in artificial saliva and for 24 hours and 7 days. Bis-acrylic composite resin showed the least flexural strength and elastic moduli. Key words:Provisional restorations, interim restorations, Methyl Methacrylate, composite restoration, flexural strength, elastic moduli

  6. Theoretical prediction of structural and elastic behavior of AlRu under pressure: A FP-LAPW study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Ekta; Pagare, Gitanjali; Devi, Hansa; Sanyal, S. P.

    2015-06-01

    Using full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method, the structural and elastic properties of AlRu intermetallic compound have been determined within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). The exchange correlation potential is used for generalized gradient approximations in the scheme of Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (GGA-PBE), Wu-Cohen (GGA-WC) and Perdew et. al. (GGA-PBEsol). Furthermore we have analyzed the trend of elastic constants (C11, C12 and C44) and elastic moduli (B, G and E) under variable pressure.

  7. Theoretical calculations of structural, electronic, and elastic properties of CdSe1‑x Te x : A first principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, Shakil; Muhammad, Zafar; Shabbir, Ahmed; Muhammad Raza-ur-rehman, Hashmi; M, A. Choudhary; T, Iqbal

    2016-07-01

    The plane wave pseudo-potential method was used to investigate the structural, electronic, and elastic properties of CdSe1‑x Te x in the zinc blende phase. It is observed that the electronic properties are improved considerably by using LDA+U as compared to the LDA approach. The calculated lattice constants and bulk moduli are also comparable to the experimental results. The cohesive energies for pure CdSe and CdTe binary and their mixed alloys are calculated. The second-order elastic constants are also calculated by the Lagrangian theory of elasticity. The elastic properties show that the studied material has a ductile nature.

  8. Aggregation of commercial heparin samples in storage.

    PubMed

    Racey, T J; Rochon, P; Awang, D V; Neville, G A

    1987-04-01

    The size distribution of heparin aggregates in commercial heparin preparations was examined with the technique of quasi-elastic light scattering. The size distributions were initially examined to determine if any relationship existed between the physical state of the heparin preparation, its age, and its biological activity. It was found that commercial heparin samples change their aggregation state in storage. The amount of aggregation appears to be related to the amount of time in storage and to the storage history. Storage of the samples under conditions of refrigeration and handling represents the storage history that most noticeably increases the aggregation state of the heparin preparations. These aggregates, once formed, appear to be stable. The biological activity of the heparin samples (as measured by the official test) was found to still fall within the accepted limits, independent of the aggregation state of the samples. It is not known what effect, if any, a change in the physical state of the commercial preparation should have on its biological activity. PMID:3598891

  9. Elastic Properties of Double-Layered Manganite La1.2Sr1.8-xBaxMn2O7 (x=0.0-0.4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Y. S.; Prashanth Kumar, V.; Ramesh, S.; Venkanna, S.; Ramana Reddy, M. V.; Kistaiah, P.; Vishnuvardhan Reddy, C.

    2008-06-01

    The elastic behavior of the sol-gel prepared double-layered manganite system La1.2Sr1.8-xBaxMn2O7 (x = 0.0-0.4) was investigated at 300 K, employing ultrasonic pulse transmission technique at 1 MHz. The values of elastic moduli and acoustic Debye temperature (θD) were computed from longitudinal and shear velocities. The measured values were corrected to zero porosity using Hasselman and Fulrath's formula. The elastic constants of the samples, estimated using Modi's heterogeneous metal-mixture rule, were also reported. The variation of elastic moduli with Ba concentration was interpreted in terms of strength of interatomic bonding.

  10. Platelet aggregation test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003669.htm Platelet aggregation test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The platelet aggregation blood test checks how well platelets , a ...

  11. Thermodynamics of Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Kenneth L.; Barz, Bogdan; Bachmann, Michael; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloid protein aggregation characterizes many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Creutz- feldt-Jakob disease. Evidence suggests that amyloid aggregates may share similar aggregation pathways, implying simulation of full-length amyloid proteins is not necessary for understanding amyloid formation. In this study we simulate GNNQQNY, the N-terminal prion-determining domain of the yeast protein Sup35 to investigate the thermodynamics of structural transitions during aggregation. We use a coarse-grained model with replica-exchange molecular dynamics to investigate the association of 3-, 6-, and 12-chain GNNQQNY systems and we determine the aggregation pathway by studying aggregation states of GN- NQQNY. We find that the aggregation of the hydrophilic GNNQQNY sequence is mainly driven by H-bond formation, leading to the formation of /3-sheets from the very beginning of the assembly process. Condensation (aggregation) and ordering take place simultaneously, which is underpinned by the occurrence of a single heat capacity peak only.

  12. Platelet aggregation test

    MedlinePlus

    The platelet aggregation blood test checks how well platelets , a part of blood, clump together and cause blood to clot. ... Decreased platelet aggregation may be due to: Autoimmune ... Fibrin degradation products Inherited platelet function defects ...

  13. Colloidal aggregation and dynamics in anisotropic fluids

    PubMed Central

    Mondiot, Frédéric; Botet, Robert; Snabre, Patrick; Mondain-Monval, Olivier; Loudet, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    We present experiments and numerical simulations to investigate the collective behavior of submicrometer-sized particles immersed in a nematic micellar solution. We use latex spheres with diameters ranging from 190 to 780 nm and study their aggregation properties due to the interplay of the various colloidal forces at work in the system. We found that the morphology of aggregates strongly depends on the particle size, with evidence for two distinct regimes: the biggest inclusions clump together within minutes into either compact clusters or V-like structures that are completely consistent with attractive elastic interactions. On the contrary, the smallest particles form chains elongated along the nematic axis, within comparable timescales. In this regime, Monte Carlo simulations, based on a modified diffusion-limited cluster aggregation model, strongly suggest that the anisotropic rotational Brownian motion of the clusters combined with short-range depletion interactions dominate the system coarsening; elastic interactions no longer prevail. The simulations reproduce the sharp transition between the two regimes on increasing the particle size. We provide reasonable estimates to interpret our data and propose a likely scenario for colloidal aggregation. These results emphasize the growing importance of the diffusion of species at suboptical-wavelength scales and raise a number of fundamental issues. PMID:24715727

  14. High-Temperature Elasticity, Cation Disorder and Magnetic Transition in Magnesioferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Antao,S.; Jackson, I.; Li, B.; Kung, J.; Chen, J.; Hassan, I.; Liebermann, R.; Parise, J.

    2007-01-01

    The elastic moduli of magnesioferrite spinel, MgFe2O4, and their temperature dependence have been determined for the first time by ultrasonic measurements on a polycrystalline specimen. The measurements were carried out at 300 MPa and to 700 C in a gas-medium high-pressure apparatus. On heating, both the elastic bulk (K S) and shear (G) moduli decrease linearly to 350 C. By combining with extant thermal-expansion data, the values for the room-temperature K S and G, and their temperature derivatives are as follows: K 0 = 176.3(7) GPa, G 0 = 80.1(2) GPa, ({partial_derivative}K S/{partial_derivative}T) P = -0.032(3) GPa K-1 and ({partial_derivative}G/{partial_derivative}T) P = -0.012(1) GPa K-1. Between 350 and 400 C, there are abrupt increases of 1.4% in both of the elastic moduli; these closely coincide with the magnetic Curie transition that was observed by thermal analyses at about 360 C.

  15. First-principles calculations for development of low elastic modulus Ti alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikehata, Hideaki; Nagasako, Naoyuki; Furuta, Tadahiko; Fukumoto, Atsuo; Miwa, Kazutoshi; Saito, Takashi

    2004-11-01

    The elastic constants of the Ti1-xXx ( X=V , Nb, Ta, Mo, and W) and Zr1-xXx ( X=Nb and Mo) binary alloys were calculated for x=0.0 , 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 by the ultrasoft pseudopotential method within the generalized gradient approximation to density functional theory to clarify the mechanisms by which the low elastic moduli of the Ti binary alloys are realized. The Young’s moduli of the polycrystals for these Ti or Zr binary alloys were calculated from the calculated elastic constants of the single crystal by using the Voigt-Reuss-Hill averaging scheme. The results show that the Young’s moduli of the Ti-X or Zr-X binary alloys have the minimum values in the vicinity of x=0.25 . From the calculation results, we have found that C11-C12 is correlated with the valence electron number per atom and the value of C11-C12 becomes nearly zero with the valence electron number of around 4.20-4.24. C11-C12 also represents the stability of the bcc structure in these alloys and we thus emphasize that controlling the valence electron number at around 4.20-4.24 is important to realize a low-Young’s-modulus material in the Ti or Zr binary alloys having bcc structure.

  16. Shear elastic modulus estimation from indentation and SDUV on gelatin phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Carolina; Urban, Matthew W.; Chen, Shigao; Chen, Qingshan; An, Kai-Nan; Greenleaf, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue mechanical properties such as elasticity are linked to tissue pathology state. Several groups have proposed shear wave propagation speed to quantify tissue mechanical properties. It is well known that biological tissues are viscoelastic materials; therefore velocity dispersion resulting from material viscoelasticity is expected. A method called Shearwave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (SDUV) can be used to quantify tissue viscoelasticity by measuring dispersion of shear wave propagation speed. However, there is not a gold standard method for validation. In this study we present an independent validation method of shear elastic modulus estimation by SDUV in 3 gelatin phantoms of differing stiffness. In addition, the indentation measurements are compared to estimates of elasticity derived from shear wave group velocities. The shear elastic moduli from indentation were 1.16, 3.40 and 5.6 kPa for a 7, 10 and 15% gelatin phantom respectively. SDUV measurements were 1.61, 3.57 and 5.37 kPa for the gelatin phantoms respectively. Shear elastic moduli derived from shear wave group velocities were 1.78, 5.2 and 7.18 kPa for the gelatin phantoms respectively. The shear elastic modulus estimated from the SDUV, matched the elastic modulus measured by indentation. On the other hand, shear elastic modulus estimated by group velocity did not agree with indentation test estimations. These results suggest that shear elastic modulus estimation by group velocity will be bias when the medium being investigated is dispersive. Therefore a rheological model should be used in order to estimate mechanical properties of viscoelastic materials. PMID:21317078

  17. Acoustic, elastic, and anharmonic properties of Sm1- x R x S solid solutions with trivalent impurities (R = Y, Lа, Tm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belomestnykh, V. N.; Tesleva, E. P.

    2012-10-01

    Based on the known experimental data on the rigidity constants c ij ( x) of single crystals of samarium monosulfide solid solutions (alloys) with yttrium, lanthanum, and thulium impurities, their anisotropic and isotropic acoustic (sound velocities), elastic (elasticity moduli and Poisson's ratios), and anharmonic (Grüneisen parameters) properties are investigated. Anomalous behavior of these characteristics at isostructural electron phase transitions in the examined mixed systems in the intermediate valence state is discussed.

  18. Prediction of Elastic Behavior of Sintered Metal Powder from the Ultrasonic Velocities of Green Compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phani, K. K.; Sanyal, Dipayan

    2008-04-01

    A novel procedure for the estimation of the elastic properties of the sintered and compacted metal powders from the ultrasonic velocities of the green compact alone has been proposed in this article. The methodology has been validated for sintered iron powder and copper powder compacts as well as for consolidated silver powder compacts of various processing histories, powder sizes, and pore morphology. The predicted elastic moduli, including the derived modulus (Poisson’s ratio), are found to be in reasonably good agreement with the measured data reported in the literature. The proposed method can be developed as a potent tool for the quantitative nondestructive evaluation (QNDE) of powder metallurgy products.

  19. Structural mechanics and helical geometry of thin elastic composites.

    PubMed

    Wada, Hirofumi

    2016-09-21

    Helices are ubiquitous in nature, and helical shape transition is often observed in residually stressed bodies, such as composites, wherein materials with different mechanical properties are glued firmly together to form a whole body. Inspired by a variety of biological examples, the basic physical mechanism responsible for the emergence of twisting and bending in such thin composite structures has been extensively studied. Here, we propose a simplified analytical model wherein a slender membrane tube undergoes a helical transition driven by the contraction of an elastic ribbon bound to the membrane surface. We analytically predict the curvature and twist of an emergent helix as functions of differential strains and elastic moduli, which are confirmed by our numerical simulations. Our results may help understand shapes observed in different biological systems, such as spiral bacteria, and could be applied to novel designs of soft machines and robots. PMID:27510457

  20. Stabilizing electrodeposition in elastic solid electrolytes containing immobilized anions

    PubMed Central

    Tikekar, Mukul D.; Archer, Lynden A.; Koch, Donald L.

    2016-01-01

    Ion transport–driven instabilities in electrodeposition of metals that lead to morphological instabilities and dendrites are receiving renewed attention because mitigation strategies are needed for improving rechargeability and safety of lithium batteries. The growth rate of these morphological instabilities can be slowed by immobilizing a fraction of anions within the electrolyte to reduce the electric field at the metal electrode. We analyze the role of elastic deformation of the solid electrolyte with immobilized anions and present theory combining the roles of separator elasticity and modified transport to evaluate the factors affecting the stability of planar deposition over a wide range of current densities. We find that stable electrodeposition can be easily achieved even at relatively high current densities in electrolytes/separators with moderate polymer-like mechanical moduli, provided a small fraction of anions are immobilized in the separator. PMID:27453943

  1. Stabilizing electrodeposition in elastic solid electrolytes containing immobilized anions.

    PubMed

    Tikekar, Mukul D; Archer, Lynden A; Koch, Donald L

    2016-07-01

    Ion transport-driven instabilities in electrodeposition of metals that lead to morphological instabilities and dendrites are receiving renewed attention because mitigation strategies are needed for improving rechargeability and safety of lithium batteries. The growth rate of these morphological instabilities can be slowed by immobilizing a fraction of anions within the electrolyte to reduce the electric field at the metal electrode. We analyze the role of elastic deformation of the solid electrolyte with immobilized anions and present theory combining the roles of separator elasticity and modified transport to evaluate the factors affecting the stability of planar deposition over a wide range of current densities. We find that stable electrodeposition can be easily achieved even at relatively high current densities in electrolytes/separators with moderate polymer-like mechanical moduli, provided a small fraction of anions are immobilized in the separator. PMID:27453943

  2. Elastic properties of silver borate glasses doped with praseodymium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Gowda, G. V. Jagadeesha; Eraiah, B.

    2014-04-24

    A series of glasses xPr{sub 6}O{sub 11−}(35−x) Ag{sub 2}O−65B{sub 2}O{sub 3} with x=0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 mol % were synthesized by melt quenching technique. Longitudinal and shear ultrasonic velocity were measured at 5 MHz frequency and at room temperature. Elastic moduli, Poisson's ratio and Debye temperature have been calculated from the measured density and ultrasonic velocity at room temperature. The experimental results indicate that the elastic constants depend upon the composition of the glasses. The role of the Pr{sub 6}O{sub 11} inside the glass network was discussed.

  3. Elasticity of polymeric nanocolloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riest, Jonas; Athanasopoulou, Labrini; Egorov, Sergei A.; Likos, Christos N.; Ziherl, Primož

    2015-11-01

    Softness is an essential mechanical feature of macromolecular particles such as polymer-grafted nanocolloids, polyelectrolyte networks, cross-linked microgels as well as block copolymer and dendrimer micelles. Elasticity of individual particles directly controls their swelling, wetting, and adsorption behaviour, their aggregation and self-assembly as well as structural and rheological properties of suspensions. Here we use numerical simulations and self-consistent field theory to study the deformation behaviour of a single spherical polymer brush upon diametral compression. We observe a universal response, which is rationalised using scaling arguments and interpreted in terms of two coarse-grained models. At small and intermediate compressions the deformation can be accurately reproduced by modelling the brush as a liquid drop, whereas at large compressions the brush behaves as a soft ball. Applicable far beyond the pairwise-additive small-strain regime, the models may be used to describe microelasticity of nanocolloids in severe confinement including dense disordered and crystalline phases.

  4. Laboratory measurements of a complete set of poroelastic moduli for Berea sandstone and Indiana limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, David J.; Wang, Herbert F.

    1995-09-01

    Measurements have been completed for eight different poroelastic moduli of water-saturated Berea sandstone and Indiana limestone as a function of confining pressure and pore pressure. The poroelastic moduli for Indiana limestone are generally consistent to ±10%, which was verified by a formal inversion procedure for independent moduli from the eight measurements. For Indiana limestone, best fit values were drained bulk modulus, 21.2 GPa; the undrained bulk modulus, 31.7 GPa; drained Poisson's ratio, 0.26; undrained Poisson's ratio, 0.33; and pore pressure buildup coefficient, 0.47 at 20-35 MPa effective stress. The poroelastic moduli for Berea sandstone are generally consistent to ±20%. The greater inconsistency is most likely caused by the nonlinear variation of the moduli at different strains. For Berea sandstone, best fit values were drained bulk modulus, 6.6 GPa; undrained bulk modulus, 15.8 GPa; drained Poisson's ratio, 0.17; undrained Poisson's ratio, 0.34; and pore pressure buildup coefficient, 0.75 at 10 MPa effective stress.

  5. Moduli Dark Matter and the Search for Its Decay Line using Suzaku X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusenko, Alexander; Loewenstein, Michael; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2013-01-01

    Light scalar fields called moduli arise from a variety of different models involving supersymmetry and/or string theory; thus their existence is a generic prediction of leading theories for physics beyond the standard model. They also present a formidable, long-standing problem for cosmology. We argue that an anthropic solution to the moduli problem exists in the case of small moduli masses and that it automatically leads to dark matter in the form of moduli. The recent discovery of the 125 GeV Higgs boson implies a lower bound on the moduli mass of about a keV. This form of dark matter is consistent with the observed properties of structure formation, and it is amenable to detection with the help of x-ray telescopes. We present the results of a search for such dark matter particles using spectra extracted from the first deep x-ray observations of the Draco and Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxies, which are darkmatter- dominated systems with extreme mass-to-light ratios and low intrinsic backgrounds. No emission line is positively detected, and we set new constraints on the relevant new physics.

  6. Effect of Indenter Elastic Modulus on Hertzian Ring Crack Initiation in Silicon Carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Daloz, William L; Strong, Kevin T; Jadaan, Osama M.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of spherical indenter stiffness on Hertzian-contact-induced fracture initiation was examined in hot-pressed silicon carbides (SiCs). Hertzian ring crack initiation forces were measured using zirconia, steel, silicon nitride, alumina, or tungsten carbide spherical indenters (elastic moduli ranging between 213 and 630 GPa). The two (flat target) SiCs were fully dense, and had equivalent elastic moduli (~450 GPa) and fracture toughnesses; however, about 20% of the grains in one SiC were larger than the largest grains in the other. Decreasing the indenter elastic modulus consistently resulted in lower ring crack initiation forces and those differences were statistically significant. Such a decrease in Hertzian ring crack initiation force with decreased indenter elastic modulus indicates the presence of a non-zero friction coefficient. Additionally, independent of the indenter material, ring crack initiation occurred at lower Hertzian indentation forces in the SiC containing larger grains suggesting that the grains in that tail of the grain-size-distribution acted as Griffith-type flaws. Lastly, selecting a spherical indenter material that has the same or similar elastic modulus as the target material provides simpler interpretation, and estimates of ring crack initiation stresses with greater usefulness and fidelity. Such a "matched" condition serves to circumvent the complexities that a ubiquitously unknown coefficient of friction introduces in the estimation of Hertzian ring crack initiation stress.

  7. Elastic properties of swollen polyelectrolyte gels in aqueous salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Shigeo

    2006-03-01

    The elastic relaxation responding to a uniaxially stretched poly(acrylic acid) rodlike gel in the aqueous NaCl solution was investigated. The relaxation elucidated the shear (mu) and bulk (K) moduli and the frictional coefficients (sigma) of the fully ionized gel at pH above 9 as functions of the degree of swelling, which was controlled by the NaCl concentration (C(S)) of the solution. Two gels, cross-linked chains of which consist of 500 (GelA500) and 50 (GelA50) monomeric units, were examined to investigate the effect of the chain length on the elastic behavior. The moduli of GelA500 increased with swelling at C(S) below 100 mM and decreased at C(S) above it. The mu values of both gels can be characterized by the power function of gel diameter, d as mu proportional, variantd(beta). The beta values being -1 at C(S) above 100 mM transitionally changed to 1.2 at C(S) about 100 mM. That is, the dimensionality of space for the chains to distribute, n(dim) [= (beta+5)/(beta+2) according to the conventional theory [Sasaki et al., J. Chem. Phys. 102, 5694 (1995)

  8. Bulk elastic properties of chicken embryos during somitogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We present measurements of the bulk Young's moduli of early chick embryos at Hamburger-Hamilton stage 10. Using a micropipette probe with a force constant k ~0.025 N/m, we applied a known force in the plane of the embryo in the anterior-posterior direction and imaged the resulting tissue displacements. We used a two-dimensional finite-element simulation method to model the embryo as four concentric elliptical elastic regions with dimensions matching the embryo's morphology. By correlating the measured tissue displacements to the displacements calculated from the in-plane force and the model, we obtained the approximate short time linear-elastic Young's moduli: 2.4 ± 0.1 kPa for the midline structures (notocord, neural tube, and somites), 1.3 ± 0.1 kPa for the intermediate nearly acellular region between the somites and area pellucida, 2.1 ± 0.1 kPa for the area pellucida, and 11.9 ± 0.8 kPa for the area opaca. PMID:20353597

  9. Metaconcrete: Engineered aggregates for enhanced dynamic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Stephanie J.

    This work presents the development and investigation of a new type of concrete for the attenuation of waves induced by dynamic excitation. Recent progress in the field of metamaterials science has led to a range of novel composites which display unusual properties when interacting with electromagnetic, acoustic, and elastic waves. A new structural metamaterial with enhanced properties for dynamic loading applications is presented, which is named metaconcrete. In this new composite material the standard stone and gravel aggregates of regular concrete are replaced with spherical engineered inclusions. Each metaconcrete aggregate has a layered structure, consisting of a heavy core and a thin compliant outer coating. This structure allows for resonance at or near the eigenfrequencies of the inclusions, and the aggregates can be tuned so that resonant oscillations will be activated by particular frequencies of an applied dynamic loading. The activation of resonance within the aggregates causes the overall system to exhibit negative effective mass, which leads to attenuation of the applied wave motion. To investigate the behavior of metaconcrete slabs under a variety of different loading conditions a finite element slab model containing a periodic array of aggregates is utilized. The frequency dependent nature of metaconcrete is investigated by considering the transmission of wave energy through a slab, which indicates the presence of large attenuation bands near the resonant frequencies of the aggregates. Applying a blast wave loading to both an elastic slab and a slab model that incorporates the fracture characteristics of the mortar matrix reveals that a significant portion of the supplied energy can be absorbed by aggregates which are activated by the chosen blast wave profile. The transfer of energy from the mortar matrix to the metaconcrete aggregates leads to a significant reduction in the maximum longitudinal stress, greatly improving the ability of the material

  10. Theoretical Predictions for High-Pressure Elastic, Mechanical, and Phonon Properties of SiGe Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güler, M.; Güler, E.

    2016-04-01

    Elastic, mechanical, and phonon properties of zinc blende (ZB)-type SiGe ordered alloy were theoretically investigated in detail under pressures up to 12 GPa. Unlike earlier theoretical calculations of literature, a Stillinger-Weber-type interatomic potential was applied to this work for the first time with geometry optimization calculations. Pressure dependence of typical cubic elastic constants, bulk, shear and Young moduli, elastic wave velocities, Kleinman parameter, elastic anisotropy factor, phonon dispersion, as well as density of states of SiGe alloy were calculated and compared with other results when available. In general, our results for the above considered quantities of SiGe alloy are satisfactory and compare well the former theoretical data of alloy.

  11. Elastic anisotropy and shear-induced atomistic deformation of tetragonal silicon carbon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Haiyan; Zhang, Meiguang; Zhao, Yaru; Zhou, Xinchun; Wei, Qun

    2014-07-14

    First-principles calculations are employed to provide a fundamental understanding of the structural features, elastic anisotropy, shear-induced atomistic deformation behaviors, and its electronic origin of the recently proposed superhard t-SiCN. According to the dependences of the elastic modulus on different crystal directions, the t-SiCN exhibits a well-pronounced elastic anisotropy which may impose certain limitations and restrictions on its applications. The further mechanical calculations demonstrated that t-SiCN shows lower elastic moduli and ideal shear strength than those of typical hard substances of TiN and TiC, suggesting that it cannot be intrinsically superhard as claimed in the recent works. We find that the failure modes of t-SiCN at the atomic level during shear deformation can be attributed to the breaking of C-C bonds through the bonding evolution and electronic localization analyses.

  12. Virtual Structure Constants as Intersection Numbers of Moduli Space of Polynomial Maps with Two Marked Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinzenji, Masao

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we derive the virtual structure constants used in the mirror computation of the degree k hypersurface in CP N-1, by using a localization computation applied to moduli space of polynomial maps from CP 1 to CP N-1 with two marked points. This moduli space corresponds to the GIT quotient of the standard moduli space of instantons of Gauged Linear Sigma Model by the standard torus action. We also apply this technique to the non-nef local geometry {{\\cal O}(1)oplus {\\cal O}(-3)rightarrow CP1} and realize the mirror computation without using Birkhoff factorization. Especially, we obtain a geometrical construction of the expansion coefficients of the mirror maps of these models.

  13. Moduli spaces of stable bundles on Calabi-Yau varieties and Donaldson-Thomas invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, L.

    2011-11-01

    Let Y be a smooth Calabi-Yau hypersurface of P1×P where P stands for a Pd-bundle over P1. We will prove that for many ample line bundles L and certain Chern characters c, the moduli space M(c) (resp. ML(c)) of L-Gieseker semistable (resp. L-stable ) rank two torsion free sheaves (resp. vector bundles) on Y with Chern character c are smooth and irreducible and we will compute its dimension. Moreover, we will prove that both moduli spaces coincide. As a byproduct of the geometrical description of these moduli spaces, we will compute the Donaldson-Thomas invariants of some Calabi-Yau 3-folds.

  14. Strain rate, temperature, and humidity on strength and moduli of a graphite/epoxy composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lifshitz, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    Results of an experimental study of the influence of strain rate, temperature and humidity on the mechanical behavior of a graphite/epoxy fiber composite are presented. Three principal strengths (longitudinal, transverse and shear) and four basic moduli (E1, E2, G12 and U12) of a unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite were followed as a function of strain rate, temperature and humidity. Each test was performed at a constant tensile strain rate in an environmental chamber providing simultaneous temperature and humidity control. Prior to testing, specimens were given a moisture preconditioning treatment at 60 C. Values for the matrix dominated moduli and strength were significantly influenced by both environmental and rate parameters, whereas the fiber dominated moduli were not. However, the longitudinal strength was significantly influenced by temperature and moisture content. A qualitative explanation for these observations is presented.

  15. The effect of iron on the elastic properties of ringwoodite at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higo, Yuji; Inoue, Toru; Li, Baosheng; Irifune, Tetsuo; Liebermann, Robert C.

    2006-12-01

    Elastic wave velocities of ringwoodite with compositions of Mg 2SiO 4, (Mg 0.8Fe 0.2) 2SiO 4 and (Mg 0.5Fe 0.5) 2SiO 4 have been measured to address the effect of iron on the elastic properties of silicate spinel under high pressure. Ultrasonic measurements on specimens produced by hot-pressing at about 19 GPa and at 1200 °C were conducted at pressures up to 14 GPa at room temperature in a multianvil apparatus. Pressure was estimated from a relationship between the travel time in an Al 2O 3 buffer rod and the pressure estimated from in situ X-ray diffraction measurements. Thus, measured bulk modulus ( K) of ringwoodite slightly increases with increasing iron content, while the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus remains virtually the same ( K' = 4.4 for XFe = Fe/(Fe + Mg) = 0-0.5). In contrast, the shear modulus ( G) decreases significantly with increasing iron content, while the pressure derivative of the shear modulus slightly decreases or remains almost unchanged ( G' = 1.4-1.0 for XFe = 0-0.5). The effects of iron content on the elastic moduli are somewhat different from those of an earlier study using Brillion scattering method, but are consistent with the elastic moduli of the Fe 2SiO 4 end-member measured in a piston-cylinder apparatus using ultrasonic interferometry. The effects of iron on the elastic moduli of ringwoodite are described as K = 184(1) + 16(1) XFe (GPa) and G = 124(2) - 45(3) XFe (GPa), by combining the present and earlier results based on the ultrasonic interferometry at high pressure. The present result suggests that the temperature anomalies, rather than the variations of iron content in ringwoodite, are more likely causes for the observed variations in seismic velocities in the mantle transition region.

  16. The Effect of Iron on the Elastic Properties of Ringwoodite at High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Higo,Y.; Inoue, T.; Li, B.; Irifune, T.; Liebermann, R.

    2006-01-01

    Elastic wave velocities of ringwoodite with compositions of Mg2SiO4, (Mg0.8Fe0.2)2SiO4 and (Mg0.5Fe0.5)2SiO4 have been measured to address the effect of iron on the elastic properties of silicate spinel under high pressure. Ultrasonic measurements on specimens produced by hot-pressing at about 19 GPa and at 1200 C were conducted at pressures up to 14 GPa at room temperature in a multianvil apparatus. Pressure was estimated from a relationship between the travel time in an Al2O3 buffer rod and the pressure estimated from in situ X-ray diffraction measurements. Thus, measured bulk modulus (K) of ringwoodite slightly increases with increasing iron content, while the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus remains virtually the same (K' = 4.4 for XFe = Fe/(Fe + Mg) = 0-0.5). In contrast, the shear modulus (G) decreases significantly with increasing iron content, while the pressure derivative of the shear modulus slightly decreases or remains almost unchanged (G' = 1.4-1.0 for XFe = 0-0.5). The effects of iron content on the elastic moduli are somewhat different from those of an earlier study using Brillion scattering method, but are consistent with the elastic moduli of the Fe2SiO4 end-member measured in a piston-cylinder apparatus using ultrasonic interferometry. The effects of iron on the elastic moduli of ringwoodite are described as K = 184(1) + 16(1)XFe (GPa) and G = 124(2) - 45(3)XFe (GPa), by combining the present and earlier results based on the ultrasonic interferometry at high pressure. The present result suggests that the temperature anomalies, rather than the variations of iron content in ringwoodite, are more likely causes for the observed variations in seismic velocities in the mantle transition region.

  17. Elastically Decoupling Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuflik, Eric; Perelstein, Maxim; Lorier, Nicolas Rey-Le; Tsai, Yu-Dai

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel dark matter candidate, an elastically decoupling relic, which is a cold thermal relic whose present abundance is determined by the cross section of its elastic scattering on standard model particles. The dark matter candidate is predicted to have a mass ranging from a few to a few hundred MeV, and an elastic scattering cross section with electrons, photons and/or neutrinos in the 10-3- 1 fb range.

  18. Elastically Decoupling Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Kuflik, Eric; Perelstein, Maxim; Lorier, Nicolas Rey-Le; Tsai, Yu-Dai

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel dark matter candidate, an elastically decoupling relic, which is a cold thermal relic whose present abundance is determined by the cross section of its elastic scattering on standard model particles. The dark matter candidate is predicted to have a mass ranging from a few to a few hundred MeV, and an elastic scattering cross section with electrons, photons and/or neutrinos in the 10^{-3}-1  fb range. PMID:27314712

  19. Determining the frequency dependence of elastic properties of fractured rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrens, Benedikt; Renner, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    In the brittle crust, rocks often contain joints or faults on various length scales that have a profound effect on fluid flow and heat transport, as well as on the elastic properties of rocks. Improving the understanding of the effect of fractures and the role of stress state and heterogeneity along the fractures on elastic properties of rocks is potentially important for the characterization of deep geothermal reservoirs. Seismic surveys, typically covering a frequency range of about 1 to 1000 Hz, are a valuable tool to investigate fractured rocks but the extraction of fracture properties remains difficult. The elementary frequency-dependent interaction between fractured rock matrix and viscous pore fluids and the resulting effects on wave propagation require well-founded dispersion analyses of heterogeneous rocks. In this laboratory study, we investigate the stress dependence of the effective elastic properties of fractured reservoir rocks over a broad frequency range. To assess the effect of faults on the effective elastic properties, we performed cyclic axial loading tests on intact and fractured samples of Solnhofen limestone and Padang granodiorite. The samples contained an idealized fault, which was created by stacking two sample discs on top of each other that experienced various surface treatments to vary their roughness. The dynamic loading tests were conducted with frequencies up to 10 Hz and amplitudes reaching 10% of the statically applied stress. Simultaneously, P- and S-wave measurements were performed in the ultrasonic frequency range (above 100 kHz) with a total of 16 sensors, whose positioning above and below the samples guarantees a wide range of transmission and reflection angles. Preliminary results of static and dynamic elastic properties of intact Padang granodiorite show a pronounced increase in Young's moduli and Poisson's ratio with increasing axial stress. Stress relaxation is accompanied by a decrease of the modulus and the Poisson

  20. The information metric on the moduli space of instantons with global symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, Emanuel; Murugan, Jeff; Shock, Jonathan P.

    2016-02-01

    In this note we revisit Hitchin's prescription [1] of the Fisher metric as a natural measure on the moduli space of instantons that encodes the space-time symmetries of a classical field theory. Motivated by the idea of the moduli space of supersymmetric instantons as an emergent space in the sense of the gauge/gravity duality, we extend the prescription to encode also global symmetries of the underlying theory. We exemplify our construction with the instanton solution of the CPN sigma model on R2.

  1. Gravitational particle production in massive chaotic inflation and the moduli problem.

    PubMed

    de Haro, Jaume; Elizalde, Emilio

    2012-02-10

    Particle production from vacuum fluctuations during inflation is briefly revisited. The moduli problem occurring with light particles produced at the end of inflation is addressed, namely, the fact that some results are in disagreement with nucleosynthesis constrains. A universal solution to this problem is found which leads to reasonable reheating temperatures in all cases. It invokes the assumption that, immediately after inflation, the moduli evolve like nonrelativistic matter. The assumption is justified in the context of massive chaotic inflation where, at the end of inflation, the Universe evolves as if it were matter dominated. PMID:22401053

  2. The geometry of the light-cone cell decomposition of moduli space

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, David Ramgoolam, Sanjaye

    2015-11-15

    The moduli space of Riemann surfaces with at least two punctures can be decomposed into a cell complex by using a particular family of ribbon graphs called Nakamura graphs. We distinguish the moduli space with all punctures labelled from that with a single labelled puncture. In both cases, we describe a cell decomposition where the cells are parametrised by graphs or equivalence classes of finite sequences (tuples) of permutations. Each cell is a convex polytope defined by a system of linear equations and inequalities relating light-cone string parameters, quotiented by the automorphism group of the graph. We give explicit examples of the cell decomposition at low genus with few punctures.

  3. Elastic internal flywheel gimbal

    SciTech Connect

    Rabenhorst, D.W.

    1981-01-13

    An elastic joint mounting and rotatably coupling a rotary inertial energy storage device or flywheel, to a shaft, the present gimbal structure reduces vibration and shock while allowing precession of the flywheel without the need for external gimbal mounts. The present elastic joint usually takes the form of an annular elastic member either integrally formed into the flywheel as a centermost segment thereof or attached to the flywheel or flywheel hub member at the center thereof, the rotary shaft then being mounted centrally to the elastic member.

  4. Reports of the measurement of elastic properties of 51XX series steels for the heat treatment distortion project

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, T.; Migliori, A.; Armstrong, P.E.; Vaidya, R.; Scherer, C.; Lowe, T.

    1997-09-01

    We have measured the temperature dependence of the elastic constants of the 51XX series steels [gear steels] for a range of phases. At RT the normalized steel (pearlite) has the highest value of the moduli, the bainite phase the next highest, and martensite the lowest. Extrapolation of the austenite suggests that at RT austenite has lower moduli than martensite. For all the grades and phases of steels examined, the behavior of the elastic constants is similar: a curve could be drawn for each of the moduli from all the phases and all the grades would not deviate by more than {+-}4%. The normalized phase (100% pearlite in 5180) is stable up to 900 C. Bainite is stable up to 500 C. Martensite starts to change above 150 C as it tempers or strain relieves; once this is complete, the martensite moduli increase to similar values to bainite. Extrapolations are discussed. Behavior in lower carbon steels (5140, 5120) should conform to above; there is no explanation for the anomalous behavior of the quenched 5120 steel.

  5. Atomic pattern formation at the onset of stress-induced elastic instability: Fracture versus phase change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milstein, Frederick; Zhao, Jianhua; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2004-11-01

    A systematic theoretical study is presented of the stress-induced structural response of initially cubic single crystals to uniaxial [100] loading based on elastic stability analysis and isostress molecular-dynamics simulations through a classical description of interatomic interactions in model metallic crystals. Special emphasis is placed on the study of the atomic pattern formation characteristics in the crystal’s structural response to loading at and beyond the onset of elastic instability. The instability is reached at a rigorously defined critical stress level that occurs in association with the vanishing of a shear modulus, i.e., when C22/C23-1=0 , where Crs are stress-dependent elastic moduli. Although the atomic mechanism for the onset of instability is invariant, two divergent atomic processes are found to occur beyond the onset of instability, depending on subtle differences in the elastic properties of the crystals. Our analyses and simulations of a crystal model with the relatively small initial value of C22/C23-1=0.41 (based on the elastic moduli of copper) reveal an inhomogeneous structural transformation mechanism, through the creation of individual rotating domains that lead to formation of a new hexagonal single crystal without loss of strength. This theoretical result is consistent with what is known experimentally for metals with relatively small values of (C22/C23-1) , e.g., certain copper alloys and the alkali metals, which can undergo various cubic-to-hexagonal structural transformations. However, a crystal model based on the elastic moduli of nickel, with the larger initial value of C22/C23-1=0.73 , fails to exhibit domain rotation beyond the onset of elastic instability and, as a result, the initial destabilization of the crystal structure then leads to fracture.

  6. Effects of frequency- and direction-dependent elastic materials on linearly elastic MRE image reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Perreard, I M; Pattison, A J; Doyley, M; McGarry, M D J; Barani, Z; Van Houten, E E; Weaver, J B; Paulsen, K D

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical model commonly used in magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is linear elasticity. However, soft tissue may exhibit frequency-and direction-dependent (FDD) shear moduli in response to an induced excitation causing a purely linear elastic model to provide an inaccurate image reconstruction of its mechanical properties. The goal of this study was to characterize the effects of reconstructing FDD data using a linear elastic inversion (LEI) algorithm. Linear and FDD phantoms were manufactured and LEI images were obtained from time-harmonic MRE acquisitions with variations in frequency and driving signal amplitude. LEI responses to artificially imposed uniform phase shifts in the displacement data from both purely linear elastic and FDD phantoms were also evaluated. Of the variety of FDD phantoms considered, LEI appeared to tolerate viscoelastic data-model mismatch better than deviations caused by poroelastic and anisotropic mechanical properties in terms of visual image contrast. However, the estimated shear modulus values were substantially incorrect relative to independent mechanical measurements even in the successful viscoelastic cases and the variations in mean values with changes in experimental conditions associated with uniform phase shifts, driving signal frequency and amplitude were unpredictable. Overall, use of LEI to reconstruct data acquired in phantoms with FDD material properties provided biased results under the best conditions and significant artifacts in the worst cases. These findings suggest that the success with which LEI is applied to MRE data in tissue will depend on the underlying mechanical characteristics of the tissues and/or organs systems of clinical interest. PMID:21030746

  7. High pressure elastic properties of minerals from ab initio simulations: the case of pyrope, grossular and andradite silicate garnets.

    PubMed

    Erba, A; Mahmoud, A; Belmonte, D; Dovesi, R

    2014-03-28

    A computational strategy is devised for the accurate ab initio simulation of elastic properties of crystalline materials under pressure. The proposed scheme, based on the evaluation of the analytical stress tensor and on the automated computation of pressure-dependent elastic stiffness constants, is implemented in the CRYSTAL solid state quantum-chemical program. Elastic constants and related properties (bulk, shear and Young moduli, directional seismic wave velocities, elastic anisotropy index, Poisson's ratio, etc.) can be computed for crystals of any space group of symmetry. We apply such a technique to the study of high-pressure elastic properties of three silicate garnet end-members (namely, pyrope, grossular, and andradite) which are of great geophysical interest, being among the most important rock-forming minerals. The reliability of this theoretical approach is proved by comparing with available experimental measurements. The description of high-pressure properties provided by several equations of state is also critically discussed. PMID:24697466

  8. Systematic study on the anisotropic elastic properties of tetragonal XYSb (X = Ti, Zr, Hf; Y = Si, Ge) compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozyar, U. F.; Deligoz, E.; Colakoglu, K.

    2015-02-01

    The anisotropic elastic properties of XYSb (X = Ti, Zr, Hf; Y = Si, Ge) compounds have been investigated by using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. The calculated lattice parameters are in excellent agreement with the available experimental data. The computed elastic constants indicate that all compounds are mechanically stable according to the elastic stability criteria under pressure. We have calculated the bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, Debye temperature, and anisotropy value from the obtained elastic constants according to the Voigt-Reuss-Hill approximation. Additionally, the ductility and brittleness are characterized with the estimation from Pugh's rule (B/G) and Poisson's ratio. Furthermore, the elastic anisotropy have been visualized in detail by plotting the directional dependence of compressibility, Young's and shear moduli.

  9. High pressure elastic properties of minerals from ab initio simulations: The case of pyrope, grossular and andradite silicate garnets

    SciTech Connect

    Erba, A. Mahmoud, A.; Dovesi, R.; Belmonte, D.

    2014-03-28

    A computational strategy is devised for the accurate ab initio simulation of elastic properties of crystalline materials under pressure. The proposed scheme, based on the evaluation of the analytical stress tensor and on the automated computation of pressure-dependent elastic stiffness constants, is implemented in the CRYSTAL solid state quantum-chemical program. Elastic constants and related properties (bulk, shear and Young moduli, directional seismic wave velocities, elastic anisotropy index, Poisson's ratio, etc.) can be computed for crystals of any space group of symmetry. We apply such a technique to the study of high-pressure elastic properties of three silicate garnet end-members (namely, pyrope, grossular, and andradite) which are of great geophysical interest, being among the most important rock-forming minerals. The reliability of this theoretical approach is proved by comparing with available experimental measurements. The description of high-pressure properties provided by several equations of state is also critically discussed.

  10. Single-crystal elasticity of pyrope and MgO to 20 GPa by Brillouin scattering in the diamond cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Bass, Jay D.

    2000-06-01

    The single-crystal elastic properties of synthetic pyrope (Mg 3Al 2Si 3O 12) and periclase (MgO) have been measured by Brillouin scattering in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) up to 20 GPa. A 16:3:1 mixture of methanol-ethanol-water was used as a pressure-transmitting medium. Above the freezing pressure of this medium (˜14 GPa), heat treatment and accompanying stress relaxation produces quasi-hydrostatic conditions. An analysis of geometric errors associated with the DAC indicates that the DAC introduces an additional uncertainty in velocity of ≤0.5% (as compared to measurements in air), if there is no vignetting of the incident and scattered beams. The nonhydrostaticity caused by freezing of the pressure-transmitting medium results in lower velocities and elastic moduli than are obtained under hydrostatic conditions, and this leads to an overestimation of the second pressure derivatives of the elastic moduli. Fitting our hydrostatic data to finite-strain equations of state yields the following adiabatic bulk ( KS) and shear ( μ) moduli and their pressure derivatives: KS=163.2(10), K'=3.96(10), Kʺ=-0.044(20), μ=130.2(10), μ'=2.35(10), μʺ=-0.040(20) for MgO and KS=171.2(20), K'=4.1(3), μ=93.7 (20), μ'=1.3(2) for pyrope, where primes indicate pressure derivatives of moduli. Our results for MgO are in excellent agreement with previous ultrasonic measurements performed at lower pressures, and in particular the values of K' agree to within a few percent. Our data are in good agreement with recent compression measurements on pyrope to pressures exceeding 20 GPa, suggesting that Brillouin scattering is an accurate method for high-pressure density and elastic moduli measurements. Pyrope is nearly elastically isotropic at ambient conditions and remains isotropic over the pressure range studied here. In contrast, the elastic anisotropy of MgO is observed to decrease dramatically with increasing pressure, becoming elastically isotropic at ˜21.5 GPa.

  11. Gutenberg-Richter relation originates from Coulomb stress fluctuations caused by elastic rock heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenbruch, C.; Shapiro, S. A.

    2014-02-01

    Based on measurements along boreholes, a characterization of the Earth's crust elastic heterogeneity is presented. We investigate its impact on Coulomb stress distribution and earthquake magnitude scaling. The analysis of elastic modulus distribution at various borehole locations in different regions reveals universal fractal nature of elastic heterogeneity. By applying a homogeneous far-field stress to a representative model of elastic rock heterogeneity, we show that it causes strong Coulomb stress fluctuations. In situ fluctuations of Coulomb stress are mainly controlled by in situ elastic moduli. Fluctuations caused by surrounding heterogeneities are only of minor importance. Hence, the fractal nature of elastic heterogeneity results in Coulomb stress fluctuations with power law size distribution. As a consequence, fault sizes and magnitudes of earthquakes scale according to the Gutenberg-Richter relation. Due to the universal fractal nature of elastic heterogeneity, the b value should be universal. Deviation from its universal value of b≈1 occurs due to characteristic scales of seismogenic processes, which cause limitations or changes of fractal scaling. Scale limitations are also the reason for observed stress dependency of the b value. Our analysis suggests that the Gutenberg-Richter relation originates from Coulomb stress fluctuations caused by elastic rock heterogeneity.

  12. COMPARISON OF ELASTIC OF POROUS CORDIERITE BY FLEXURE AND DYNAMIC TEST METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, Randall; Golovin, K. B.; Dickinson, A.; Watkins, Thomas R; Shyam, Amit; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2012-01-01

    Previous work showed differences in apparent elastic modulus between mechanical flexure testing and resonance methods. Flexure tests have been conducted using non-contact optical systems to directly measure deflection for calculation of elastic modulus. Dynamic test methods for elastic modulus measurement were conducted on the same material for comparison. The results show significant difference in the apparent elastic modulus for static flexure versus dynamic methods. The significance of the difference in apparent elastic modulus on thermal stress and the hypotheses for these differences will be discussed. Dynamic measurement (resonance) and static measurement (mechanical) produce different values for elastic modulus of porous cordierite ceramic. The elastic modulus from resonance is a measure of the material response at very low strain which is different from the material response in a mechanical test with relatively large strain. The apparent elastic moduli for dynamic versus static test methods in this study are different by a factor of two. This result has significant impact on calculated stress and life in an aftertreatment component.

  13. Indentation Measurements to Validate Dynamic Elasticity Imaging Methods.

    PubMed

    Altahhan, Khaldoon N; Wang, Yue; Sobh, Nahil; Insana, Michael F

    2016-09-01

    We describe macro-indentation techniques for estimating the elastic modulus of soft hydrogels. Our study describes (a) conditions under which quasi-static indentation can validate dynamic shear-wave imaging estimates and (b) how each of these techniques uniquely biases modulus estimates as they couple to the sample geometry. Harmonic shear waves between 25 and 400 Hz were imaged using ultrasonic Doppler and optical coherence tomography methods to estimate shear dispersion. From the shear-wave speed of sound, average elastic moduli of homogeneous samples were estimated. These results are compared directly with macroscopic indentation measurements measured two ways. One set of measurements applied Hertzian theory to the loading phase of the force-displacement curves using samples treated to minimize surface adhesion forces. A second set of measurements applied Johnson-Kendall-Roberts theory to the unloading phase of the force-displacement curve when surface adhesions were significant. All measurements were made using gelatin hydrogel samples of different sizes and concentrations. Agreement within 5% among elastic modulus estimates was achieved for a range of experimental conditions. Consequently, a simple quasi-static indentation measurement using a common gel can provide elastic modulus measurements that help validate dynamic shear-wave imaging estimates. PMID:26376923

  14. Elastic properties of minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, K.S.; Prodaivoda, G.T.

    1993-09-01

    Investigations of the elastic properties of the main rock-forming minerals were begun by T.V. Ryzhova and K.S. Aleksandrov over 30 years ago on the initiative of B.P. Belikov. At the time, information on the elasticity of single crystals in general, and especially of minerals, was very scanty. In the surveys of that time there was information on the elasticity of 20 or 30 minerals. These, as a rule, did not include the main rock-forming minerals; silicates were represented only by garnets, quartz, topaz, tourmaline, zircon, beryl, and staurolite, which are often found in nature in the form of large and fairly high-quality crystals. Then and even much later it was still necessary to prove a supposition which now seems obvious: The elastic properties of rocks, and hence the velocities of elastic (seismic) waves in the earth`s crust, are primarily determined by the elastic characteristics of the minerals composing these rocks. Proof of this assertion, with rare exceptions of mono-mineralic rocks (marble, quartzite, etc.) cannot be obtained without information on the elasticities of a sufficiently large number of minerals, primarily framework, layer, and chain silicates which constitute the basis of most rocks. This also served as the starting point and main problem of the undertakings of Aleksandrov, Ryzhova, and Belikov - systematic investigations of the elastic properties of minerals and then of various rocks. 108 refs., 7 tabs.

  15. Postinstability models in elasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1984-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the instability caused by the failure of hyperbolicity in elasticity and associated with the problem of unpredictability in classical mechanics expresses the incompleteness of the original model of an elastic medium. The instability as well as the ill-posedness of the Cauchy problem are eliminated by reformulating the original model.

  16. Elastic limit of silicane.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qing; De, Suvranu

    2014-10-21

    Silicane is a fully hydrogenated silicene-a counterpart of graphene-having promising applications in hydrogen storage with capacities larger than 6 wt%. Knowledge of its elastic limit is critical in its applications as well as tailoring its electronic properties by strain. Here we investigate the mechanical response of silicane to various strains using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. We illustrate that non-linear elastic behavior is prominent in two-dimensional nanomaterials as opposed to bulk materials. The elastic limits defined by ultimate tensile strains are 0.22, 0.28, and 0.25 along armchair, zigzag, and biaxial directions, respectively, an increase of 29%, 33%, and 24% respectively in reference to silicene. The in-plane stiffness and Poisson ratio are reduced by a factor of 16% and 26%, respectively. However, hydrogenation/dehydrogenation has little effect on its ultimate tensile strengths. We obtained high order elastic constants for a rigorous continuum description of the nonlinear elastic response. The limitation of second, third, fourth, and fifth order elastic constants are in the strain range of 0.02, 0.08, and 0.13, and 0.21, respectively. The pressure effect on the second order elastic constants and Poisson's ratio were predicted from the third order elastic constants. Our results could provide a safe guide for promising applications and strain-engineering the functions and properties of silicane monolayers. PMID:25190587

  17. AB INITIO STUDY OF PHONON DISPERSION AND ELASTIC PROPERTIES OF L12 INTERMETALLICS Ti3Al AND Y3Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikan, N.; Ersen, M.; Ocak, H. Y.; Iyigör, A.; Candan, A.; UǦUR, Ş.; UǦUR, G.; Khenata, R.; Varshney, D.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, the structural, elastic and phonon properties of Ti3Al and Y3Al in L12(Cu3Al) phase are studied by performing first-principles calculations within the generalized gradient approximation. The calculated lattice constants, static bulk moduli, first-order pressure derivative of bulk moduli and elastic constants for both compounds are reported. The phonon dispersion curves along several high-symmetry lines at the Brillouin zone, together with the corresponding phonon density of states, are determined using the first-principles linear-response approach of the density functional perturbation theory. Temperature variations of specific heat in the range of 0-500 K are obtained using the quasi-harmonic model.

  18. Dependence of Yukawa couplings on the axionic background moduli of ZN orbifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erler, J.; Jungnickel, D.; Lauer, J.

    1992-05-01

    The metrical and axionic background moduli which determine a general symmetric ZN orbifold model are chosen in such a way that the rotational twist leaves the underlying σ model action invariant. A thorough analysis of this condition is given. We notice that it plays a key role in the evaluation of the four-point correlation functions of ground states which belong to the lowest twisted sectors. Having fixed the normalization of these functions we factorize them with respect to the twisted intermediate channel. This method yields the moduli-dependent part of the twisted sector Yukawa couplings of an orbifoldized heterotic string model. We then perform various discrete mappings (axionic shifts, duality) on the space of background moduli and recognize that the induced linear transformations of the Yukawa couplings are essentially independent of the choice of a specific background. If compensating unitary redefinitions of the twist fields are applied then orbifold models whose backgrounds are related by one of the above mappings cannot be distinguished. For many twist orders we arrive at an explicit form of the phase factors needed to redefine twist fields in order that a general discrete axionic shift can be undone. The requirement of duality invariance is sufficient to determine the moduli dependence of the Yukawa couplings. Hence one may even bypass the evaluation of instanton actions.

  19. A new mechanism of Kähler moduli stabilization in type IIB theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García del Moral, María Pilar

    2006-04-01

    We study the scalar potential in supersymmetric (orientifolded) Calabi Yau flux compactifications of Type IIB theory. We present a new mechanism to stabilize all closed string moduli at leading order in α' by consistently introducing fluxes. As usual we consider the dilaton and the complex structure moduli stabilized by turning on three-form fluxes that couple to the F-part of the scalar potential. The Kahler moduli get fixed by the combined action of the flux-induced scalar masses with the magnetic fields of the open string sector, and Fayet-Illiopoulos terms. For supersymmetric three-form fluxes the model is N = 1, otherwise the mass terms are the scalar soft breaking terms of the MSSM fields. For the case of imaginary self dual three-form fluxes (ISD), the mass terms are positive and the minimum of the potential is at exactly zero energy. We argue that, under generic assumptions, this is a general mechanism for the full stabilization of closed string moduli. The vacua depend explicitly on the fluxes introduced in the manifold. A concrete realization of this mechanism for type IIB on a (T6/Z2 × Z2) orientifold is provided.

  20. A stringy mechanism for a small cosmological constant — multi-moduli cases

    SciTech Connect

    Sumitomo, Yoske; Tye, S.-H. Henry E-mail: iastye@ust.hk

    2013-02-01

    Based on the properties of probability distributions of functions of random variables, we proposed earlier a simple stringy mechanism that prefers the meta-stable vacua with a small cosmological constant Λ. As an illustration of this approach, we study in this paper particularly simple but non-trivial models of the Kähler uplift in the large volume flux compactification scenario in Type IIB string theory, where all parameters introduced in the model are treated either as fixed constants motivated by physics, or as random variables with some given uniform probability distributions. We determine the value w{sub 0} of the superpotential W{sub 0} at the supersymmetric minima, and find that the resulting probability distribution P(w{sub 0}) peaks at w{sub 0} = 0; furthermore, this peaking behavior strengthens as the number of complex structure moduli increases. The resulting probability distribution P(Λ) for meta-stable vacua also peaks as Λ → 0, for both positive and negative Λ. This peaking/divergent behavior of P(Λ) strengthens as the number of moduli increases. In some scenarios for Λ > 0, the likely value of Λ decreases exponentially as the number of moduli increases. The light cosmological moduli issue accompanying a very small Λ is also mentioned.

  1. A stringy mechanism for a small cosmological constant — multi-moduli cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumitomo, Yoske; Tye, S.-H. Henry

    2013-02-01

    Based on the properties of probability distributions of functions of random variables, we proposed earlier a simple stringy mechanism that prefers the meta-stable vacua with a small cosmological constant Λ. As an illustration of this approach, we study in this paper particularly simple but non-trivial models of the Kähler uplift in the large volume flux compactification scenario in Type IIB string theory, where all parameters introduced in the model are treated either as fixed constants motivated by physics, or as random variables with some given uniform probability distributions. We determine the value w0 of the superpotential W0 at the supersymmetric minima, and find that the resulting probability distribution P(w0) peaks at w0 = 0; furthermore, this peaking behavior strengthens as the number of complex structure moduli increases. The resulting probability distribution P(Λ) for meta-stable vacua also peaks as Λ → 0, for both positive and negative Λ. This peaking/divergent behavior of P(Λ) strengthens as the number of moduli increases. In some scenarios for Λ > 0, the likely value of Λ decreases exponentially as the number of moduli increases. The light cosmological moduli issue accompanying a very small Λ is also mentioned.

  2. Hardrock Elastic Physical Properties: Birch's Seismic Parameter Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, M.; Milkereit, B.

    2014-12-01

    Identifying rock composition and properties is imperative in a variety of fields including geotechnical engineering, mining, and petroleum exploration, in order to accurately make any petrophysical calculations. Density is, in particular, an important parameter that allows us to differentiate between lithologies and estimate or calculate other petrophysical properties. It is well established that compressional and shear wave velocities of common crystalline rocks increase with increasing densities (i.e. the Birch and Nafe-Drake relationships). Conventional empirical relations do not take into account S-wave velocity. Physical properties of Fe-oxides and massive sulfides, however, differ significantly from the empirical velocity-density relationships. Currently, acquiring in-situ density data is challenging and problematic, and therefore, developing an approximation for density based on seismic wave velocity and elastic moduli would be beneficial. With the goal of finding other possible or better relationships between density and the elastic moduli, a database of density, P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, and Poisson's ratio was compiled based on a multitude of lab samples. The database is comprised of isotropic, non-porous metamorphic rock. Multi-parameter cross plots of the various elastic parameters have been analyzed in order to find a suitable parameter combination that reduces high density outliers. As expected, the P-wave velocity to S-wave velocity ratios show no correlation with density. However, Birch's seismic parameter, along with the bulk modulus, shows promise in providing a link between observed compressional and shear wave velocities and rock densities, including massive sulfides and Fe-oxides.

  3. Lattice instability and elastic response of metastable Mo1-xSix thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillon, A.; Jaouen, C.; Michel, A.; Abadias, G.; Tromas, C.; Belliard, L.; Perrin, B.; Djemia, Ph.

    2013-11-01

    We present a detailed experimental study on Mo1-xSix thin films, an archetypal alloy system combining metallic and semiconductor materials. The correlations between structure and elastic response are comprehensively investigated. We focus on assessing trends for understanding the evolution of elastic properties upon Si alloying in relation to the structural state (crystalline vs amorphous), bonding character (metallic vs covalent), and local atomic environment. By combining picosecond ultrasonics and Brillouin light scattering techniques, a complete set of effective elastic constants and mechanical moduli (B, G, E) is provided in the whole compositional range, covering bcc solid solutions (x < 0.20) and the amorphous phase (0.20 < x < 1.0). A softening of the shear and Young moduli and a concomitant decrease of the Debye temperature is revealed for crystalline alloys, with a significant drop being observed at x ˜ 0.2 corresponding to the limit of crystal lattice stability. Amorphous alloys exhibit a more complex elastic response, related to variations in coordination number, atomic volume, and bonding state, depending on Si content. Finally, distinct evolutions of the G/B ratio as a function of Cauchy pressure are reported for crystalline and amorphous alloys, enabling us to identify signatures of ductility vs brittleness in the features of the local atomic environment. This work paves the way to design materials with improved mechanical properties by appropriate chemical substitution or impurity incorporation during thin-film growth.

  4. Cross-type optical separation of elastic oblate capsules in a uniform flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Cheong Bong; Sung, Hyung Jin; Huang, Wei-Xi

    2015-01-21

    The dynamic behavior of an elastic capsule with an initially oblate spheroidal shape during cross-type optical separation was numerically investigated. The penalty immersed boundary method was adopted for the fluid-membrane interaction, and the optical force calculation was conducted by using the ray optics method including the ray-surface intersection algorithm. The oblate elastic capsule of b/a = 0.5 with different surface Young's moduli and different initial inclination angles was considered. The oblate capsule with higher surface Young's moduli was less deformed, and was more migrated for each initial inclination angle. Unlike the oblate rigid particle, the initially inclined capsules with moderate inclination angles were similarly migrated since the oblate elastic capsule was deformed during rotation near the laser beam axis. The oblate capsules can be separated according to the surface Young's modulus, except for nearly non-inclined capsules. As the fluid velocity decreased, the migration distance increased. The maximum deformation parameter was insensitive to the fluid velocity. Furthermore, a new dimensionless number (S{sub ec}) was introduced to predict the migration distance of the oblate elastic capsule.

  5. Aggregations in Flatworms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liffen, C. L.; Hunter, M.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a school project to investigate aggregations in flatworms which may be influenced by light intensity, temperature, and some form of chemical stimulus released by already aggregating flatworms. Such investigations could be adopted to suit many educational levels of science laboratory activities. (DS)

  6. New Measurements on the Temperature Dependence of Elasticity of Polycrystalline Fe- Wadsleyite and Other Mantle Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaak, D. G.; Gwanmesia, G. D.; Triplett, R. S.; Davis, M. G.; Donahue, L. K.; Stafford, A. M.; Stafford, S. C.

    2007-12-01

    Understanding the composition and structure of Earth's mantle requires accurate and precise information about the elastic properties of candidate minerals and how these elastic properties are affected by temperature, pressure, and chemical variations. New elasticity data from room temperature to 640 K at ambient pressure for hot-pressed polycrystalline iron-bearing wadsleyite (Fe:Mg ~ 1:9) will be presented. These data were obtained using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) on a Fe-wadsleyite shaped into a right-rectangular parallelepiped with dimensions of 1.965 mm x 1.667 mm x 1.416 mm. From analysis of 42 modal frequencies, the room temperature adiabatic bulk (KS) and shear (G) moduli were found to be 171.3(0.7) GPa and 108.9(0.2) GPa, respectively, with numbers in parentheses indicating uncertainty. These results agree with room temperature values of KS = 170(3) GPa and G = 108(2) GPa found in an earlier study on single-crystal Fe- wadsleyite using Brillouin spectroscopy, and they provide a better anchor point for investigating the temperature dependence of the elasticity of polycrystalline wadsleyite than values of KS = 165.72(0.06) GPa and G = 105.43(0.02) GPa used by previous investigators. We carried out several temperature cycles from room temperature to 500 K (twice) and to 640 K (thrice) in order to determine the elastic properties at elevated temperature and to test reproducibility of the data. The temperature dependence of elastic moduli for Fe-bearing wadsleyite obtained from these experiments will be presented. We will also show recent results of high- temperature elasticity for other polycrystalline mantle minerals (forsterite, garnet).

  7. Proton Nucleus Elastic Scattering Data.

    1993-08-18

    Version 00 The Proton Nucleus Elastic Scattering Data file PNESD contains the numerical data and the related bibliography for the differential elastic cross sections, polarization and integral nonelastic cross sections for elastic proton-nucleus scattering.

  8. The effect of extreme temperatures on the elastic properties and fracture behavior of graphite/polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. H.; Simonds, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of elevated and cryogenic temperatures on the elastic moduli and fracture strengths of several C6000/PMR-15 and C6000/NR-15082 laminates was measured. Tests were conducted at -157 C, 24 C, and 316 C (-250 F, 75 F, and 600 F). Both notched and unnotched laminates were tested. The average stress failure criterion was used to predict the fracture strength of quasi-isotropic notched laminates.

  9. Effect of Hydration on the Single-crystal Elasticity of Fe-bearing Wadsleyite to 12 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Z Mao; S Jacobsen; D Frost; C McCammon; E Hauri; T Duffy

    2011-12-31

    The single-crystal elastic properties of Fe-bearing wadsleyite with 1.93 wt% H{sub 2}O (Mg{sub 1.634}Fe{sub 0.202}H{sub 0.305}SiO{sub 4}) have been determined by Brillouin scattering. At ambient conditions, the aggregate bulk and shear moduli (K{sub S0}, G{sub 0}) of this wadsleyite are 156.2(5) and 98.0(3) GPa, respectively. Compared to the corresponding anhydrous wadsleyite, 1.93 wt% H{sub 2}O lowers K{sub S0} and G{sub 0} by 8.1% and 9.3%, respectively. High-pressure measurements up to 12 GPa show that the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus, K'{sub S0} = 4.8(1), is similar to that of the anhydrous Fe-wadsleyite with reported values of 4.6-4.74, but the addition of H{sub 2}O increases the pressure derivative of the shear modulus, G{sub 0}' from 1.5(1) to 1.9(1). This contrasts with the G{sub 0}' of Fe-free wadsleyite, which is the same within uncertainty for the hydrous and anhydrous phases. As a result, both the compressional- and shear-wave velocities (v{sub P}, v{sub S}) of hydrous Fe-bearing wadsleyite are about 200({+-}24) m/s slower than anhydrous Fe-bearing wadsleyite at transition zone pressures.

  10. On granular elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qicheng; Jin, Feng; Wang, Guangqian; Song, Shixiong; Zhang, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Mesoscopic structures form in dense granular materials due to the self-organisation of the constituent particles. These structures have internal structural degrees of freedom in addition to the translational degree of freedom. The resultant granular elasticity, which exhibits intrinsic variations and inevitable relaxation, is a key quantity that accounts for macroscopic solid- or fluid-like properties and the transitions between them. In this work, we propose a potential energy landscape (PEL) with local stable basins and low elastic energy barriers to analyse the nature of granular elasticity. A function for the elastic energy density is proposed for stable states and is further calibrated with ultrasonic measurements. Fluctuations in the elastic energy due to the evolution of internal structures are proposed to describe a so-called configuration temperature Tc as a counterpart of the classical kinetic granular temperature Tk that is attributed to the translational degrees of freedom. The two granular temperatures are chosen as the state variables, and a fundamental equation is established to develop non-equilibrium thermodynamics for granular materials. Due to the relatively low elastic energy barrier in the PEL, granular elasticity relaxes more under common mechanical loadings, and a simple model based on mean-field theory is developed to account for this behaviour. PMID:25951049

  11. Elastic membranes in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, Joshua; Miksis, Michael; Davis, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    An elastic membrane stretched between two walls takes a shape defined by its length and the volume of fluid it encloses. Many biological structures, such as cells, mitochondria and DNA, have finer internal structure in which a membrane (or elastic member) is geometrically ``confined'' by another object. We study the shape stability of elastic membranes in a ``confining'' box and introduce repulsive van der Waals forces to prevent the membrane from intersecting the wall. We aim to define the parameter space associated with mitochondria-like deformations. We compare the confined to `unconfined' solutions and show how the structure and stability of the membrane shapes changes with the system parameters.

  12. Metaconcrete: designed aggregates to enhance dynamic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Stephanie J.; Pandolfi, Anna; Ortiz, Michael

    2014-04-01

    We propose a new type of concrete for the attenuation of elastic waves induced by dynamic excitation. In this metamaterial, which we call metaconcrete, the stone, sand, and gravel aggregates of standard concrete are replaced with spherical inclusions consisting of a heavy metal core coated with a soft outer layer. These engineered aggregates can be tuned so that particular frequencies of a propagating blast wave will activate resonant oscillations of the heavy mass within the inclusions. The resonant behavior causes the system to exhibit negative effective mass, and this interaction between the wave motion and the resonant aggregates results in the attenuation of the applied dynamic loading. We introduce the concept of negative mass by deriving the effective momentum mass for the system and we define the geometrical and material parameters for the design of resonant aggregates. We develop finite element models for the analysis of metaconcrete behavior, defining a section of slab containing a periodic arrangement of inclusions. By computing the energy histories for the system when subject to a blast load, we show that there is a transfer of energy between the inclusions and the surrounding mortar. The inclusions are able to absorb a significant portion of the applied energy, resulting in a reduction in the amount of stress carried by the mortar phase and greatly improving the ability of the material to resist damage under explosive dynamic loading.

  13. Charged Dust Aggregate Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    A proper understanding of the behavior of dust particle aggregates immersed in a complex plasma first requires a knowledge of the basic properties of the system. Among the most important of these are the net electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments on the dust aggregate as well as the manner in which the aggregate interacts with the local electrostatic fields. The formation of elongated, fractal-like aggregates levitating in the sheath electric field of a weakly ionized RF generated plasma discharge has recently been observed experimentally. The resulting data has shown that as aggregates approach one another, they can both accelerate and rotate. At equilibrium, aggregates are observed to levitate with regular spacing, rotating about their long axis aligned parallel to the sheath electric field. Since gas drag tends to slow any such rotation, energy must be constantly fed into the system in order to sustain it. A numerical model designed to analyze this motion provides both the electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments of the aggregate while including the forces due to thermophoresis, neutral gas drag, and the ion wakefield. This model will be used to investigate the ambient conditions leading to the observed interactions. This research is funded by NSF Grant 1414523.

  14. Polynomial approximations of a class of stochastic multiscale elasticity problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Viet Ha; Nguyen, Thanh Chung; Xia, Bingxing

    2016-06-01

    We consider a class of elasticity equations in {mathbb{R}^d} whose elastic moduli depend on n separated microscopic scales. The moduli are random and expressed as a linear expansion of a countable sequence of random variables which are independently and identically uniformly distributed in a compact interval. The multiscale Hellinger-Reissner mixed problem that allows for computing the stress directly and the multiscale mixed problem with a penalty term for nearly incompressible isotropic materials are considered. The stochastic problems are studied via deterministic problems that depend on a countable number of real parameters which represent the probabilistic law of the stochastic equations. We study the multiscale homogenized problems that contain all the macroscopic and microscopic information. The solutions of these multiscale homogenized problems are written as generalized polynomial chaos (gpc) expansions. We approximate these solutions by semidiscrete Galerkin approximating problems that project into the spaces of functions with only a finite number of N gpc modes. Assuming summability properties for the coefficients of the elastic moduli's expansion, we deduce bounds and summability properties for the solutions' gpc expansion coefficients. These bounds imply explicit rates of convergence in terms of N when the gpc modes used for the Galerkin approximation are chosen to correspond to the best N terms in the gpc expansion. For the mixed problem with a penalty term for nearly incompressible materials, we show that the rate of convergence for the best N term approximation is independent of the Lamé constants' ratio when it goes to {infty}. Correctors for the homogenization problem are deduced. From these we establish correctors for the solutions of the parametric multiscale problems in terms of the semidiscrete Galerkin approximations. For two-scale problems, an explicit homogenization error which is uniform with respect to the parameters is deduced. Together

  15. Aggregate and the environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, William H.; Drew, Lawrence J.; Sachs, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    This book is designed to help you understand our aggregate resources-their importance, where they come from, how they are processed for our use, the environmental concerns related to their mining and processing, how those concerns are addressed, and the policies and regulations designed to safeguard workers, neighbors, and the environment from the negative impacts of aggregate mining. We hope this understanding will help prepare you to be involved in decisions that need to be made-individually and as a society-to be good stewards of our aggregate resources and our living planet.

  16. Mechanism of Resilin Elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Guokui; Hu, Xiao; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Resilin is critical in the flight and jumping systems of insects as a polymeric rubber-like protein with outstanding elasticity. However, insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for resilin elasticity remains undefined. Here we report the structure and function of resilin from Drosophila CG15920. A reversible beta-turn transition was identified in the peptide encoded by exon III and for full length resilin during energy input and release, features that correlate to the rapid deformation of resilin during functions in vivo. Micellar structures and nano-porous patterns formed after beta-turn structures were present via changes in either the thermal or mechanical inputs. A model is proposed to explain the super elasticity and energy conversion mechanisms of resilin, providing important insight into structure-function relationships for this protein. Further, this model offers a view of elastomeric proteins in general where beta-turn related structures serve as fundamental units of the structure and elasticity. PMID:22893127

  17. Anisotropic elastic properties of thermal spray coatings determined via resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Yang; Shyam, Amit; Choi, Wanhuk Brian; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Sampath, Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    The determination of elastic properties of plasma-sprayed ceramic and metallic coatings is difficult due to their complex microstructure, which involves a myriad array of pores, interfaces and other defects. Furthermore, the splat-based build-up of the coating results in transverse anisotropy in the elastic properties. In this paper, we report on the anisotropic elastic properties of these coatings determined by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS). This approach along with the analysis presented enables, for the first time, the determination of elastic properties as a function of direction and temperature for these complex systems with concomitant implications for design. The coating systems investigated included plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and nickel. An additional nickel coating deposited by high-velocity oxygen-fuel process was investigated and its elastic properties were compared to those of plasma-sprayed nickel. Average Young s moduli of the coatings were independently measured by using the instrumented indentation method. The elastic properties determined from the RUS and indentation methodologies allowed description of the microstructure elastic property relationships in the coatings.

  18. Elastic properties of sand-peat moss mixtures from ultrasonic measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Trombino, C N

    1998-09-02

    Effective remediation of an environmental site requires extensive knowledge of the geologic setting, as well as the amount and distribution of contaminants. Seismic investigations provide a means to examine the subsurface with minimum disturbance, Laboratory measurements are needed to interpret field data. In this experiment, laboratory tests were performed to characterize manufactured soil samples in terms of their elastic properties. The soil samples consisted of small (mass) percentages (1 to 20 percent) of peat moss mixed with pure quartz sand. Sand was chosen as the major component because its elastic properties are well known except at the lowest pressures. The ultrasonic pulse transmission technique was used to collect elastic wave velocity data. These data were analyzed and mathematically processed to calculate the other elastic properties such as the modulus of elasticity. This experiment demonstrates that seismic data are affected by the amount~of peat moss added to pure sand samples. Elastic wave velocities, velocity gradients, and elastic moduli vary with pressure and peat moss amounts. In particular, ultrasonic response changes dramatically when pore space fills with peat. With some further investigation, the information gathered in this experiment could be applied to seismic field research.

  19. Determination of elastic stiffness coefficients of lead zirconate single crystals in the cubic phase by Brillouin light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, J. H.; Roleder, K.; Bussmann-Holder, A.

    2014-03-01

    The temperature dependence of the three independent elastic constants of antiferroelectric lead zirconate single crystals was determined in the cubic, paraelectric phase by Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy. Two longitudinal elastic moduli of C11 and (C11 + C12+2 C44)/2 showed softening upon cooling toward the phase transition temperature, indicating the coupling of the acoustic waves to the polarization fluctuations of the precursor polar clusters. Among the two transverse acoustic modes, C44 was almost constant while (C11-C12)/2 showed a noticeable softening in the paraelectric phase. This was attributed to the acoustic instability of lead zirconate toward the orthorhombic ground state.

  20. Deflation of elastic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quilliet, Catherine; Quemeneur, François; Marmottant, Philippe; Imhof, Arnout; Pépin-Donat, Brigitte; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2010-03-01

    The deflation of elastic spherical surfaces has been numerically investigated, and show very different types of deformations according the range of elastic parameters, some of them being quantitatively explained through simple calculations. This allows to retrieve various shapes observed on hollow shells (from colloidal to centimeter scale), on lipid vesicles, or on some biological objects. The extension of this process to other geometries allows to modelize vegetal objects such as the ultrafast trap of carnivorous plants.

  1. From Process Modeling to Elastic Property Prediction for Long-Fiber Injection-Molded Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kunc, Vlastimil; Frame, Barbara J.; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Holbery, James D.; Smith, Mark T.

    2007-09-13

    This paper presents an experimental-modeling approach to predict the elastic properties of long-fiber injection-molded thermoplastics (LFTs). The approach accounts for fiber length and orientation distributions in LFTs. LFT samples were injection-molded for the study, and fiber length and orientation distributions were measured at different locations for use in the computation of the composite properties. The current fiber orientation model was assessed to determine its capability to predict fiber orientation in LFTs. Predicted fiber orientations for the studied LFT samples were also used in the calculation of the elastic properties of these samples, and the predicted overall moduli were then compared with the experimental results. The elastic property prediction was based on the Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka method combined with the orientation averaging technique. The predictions reasonably agree with the experimental LFT data

  2. Investigation of the Elasticity of Polymer Nanoparticle by Vibrating Scanning Polarization Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li-Juan; Wang, Hua-Bin

    2006-08-01

    The elasticity of an individual polymer nanoparticle may be greatly different from that of the bulk one. Understanding the properties of individual particles such as elasticity and deformation under external forces is of great importance in controlling the final structures and functions of bulk materials. We study the compression properties of single polyethylenimine (PEI) particles using vibrating scanning polarization force microscopy. By controllably imaging PEI particles at different vibration amplitude set-point values, it is demonstrated that we can compress the single PEI nanoparticle with an atomic force microscopy tip in different loads. Based on the force-height and force-strain curves obtained, Young's moduli of PEI (5-160 MPa) in three force regions are estimated according to the Hertz model. The results indicate that PEI has excellent elasticity, which may contribute to its high efficiency as vectors in gene transfection.

  3. Measurement of elastic constants of monoclinic nickel-titanium and validation of first principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Stebner, A. P.; Brown, D. W.; Brinson, L. C.

    2013-05-27

    Polycrystalline, monoclinic nickel-titanium specimens were subjected to tensile and compressive deformations while neutron diffraction spectra were recorded in situ. Using these data, orientation-specific and macroscopic Young's moduli are determined from analysis of linear-elastic deformation exhibited by 13 unique orientations of monoclinic lattices and their relationships to each macroscopic stress and strain. Five of 13 elastic compliance constants are also identified: s{sub 11} = 1.15, s{sub 15} = -1.10, s{sub 22} = 1.34, s{sub 33} = 1.06, s{sub 35} = -1.54, all Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} GPa{sup -1}. Through these results, recent atomistic calculations of monoclinic nickel-titanium elastic constants are validated.

  4. Squeezing Superfluid from a Stone: Coupling Superfluidity and Elasticity in a Supersolid

    SciTech Connect

    Dorsey, Alan T.; Goldbart, Paul M.; Toner, John

    2006-02-10

    Starting from the assumption that the normal solid to supersolid (NS-SS) phase transition is continuous, we develop a phenomenological Landau theory of the transition in which superfluidity is coupled to the elasticity of the crystalline {sup 4}He lattice. We find that the elasticity does not affect the universal properties of the superfluid transition, so that in an unstressed crystal the well-known {lambda} anomaly in the heat capacity of the superfluid transition should also appear at the NS-SS transition. We also find that the onset of supersolidity leads to anomalies in the elastic moduli and thermal expansion coefficients near the transition and, conversely, that inhomogeneous lattice strains can induce local variations of the superfluid transition temperature, leading to a broadened transition.

  5. An inclusion in one of two joined isotropic elastic half-spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walpole, L. J.

    1997-10-01

    Two dissimilar, homogeneous and istropic, elastic half-spaces are bonded together over thier infinite plane of contract. An arbitrarily shaped finite part of one of them (an inclusion) tends spontaneously to undergo a unifrom infinitesimal strain, but, as it remains attached to and restrained by the surrounding material, an equilibrated state of stress and strain is established everywhere instead. By adopting a convenient expression for the fundamental field of a point force, we transformed inclusion. For a general shape of the inclussion and for particular spherical and finite cylindrical shapes in detail, we consider the evaluation of the elastic strain energy, especially of the interaction term which depends on the location of the inclusion and both pairs of elastic moduli, and which is of great significance in physical applications.

  6. Finite-element formulations for problems of large elastic-plastic deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmeeking, R. M.; Rice, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    An Eulerian finite element formulation is presented for problems of large elastic-plastic flow. The method is based on Hill's variational principle for incremental deformations, and is ideally suited to isotropically hardening Prandtl-Reuss materials. Further, the formulation is given in a manner which allows any conventional finite element program, for 'small strain' elastic-plastic analysis, to be simply and rigorously adapted to problems involving arbitrary amounts of deformation and arbitrary levels of stress in comparison to plastic deformation moduli. The method is applied to a necking bifurcation analysis of a bar in plane-strain tension. The paper closes with a unified general formulation of finite element equations, both Lagrangian and Eulerian, for large deformations, with arbitrary choice of the conjugate stress and strain measures. Further, a discussion is given of other proposed formulations for elastic-plastic finite element analysis at large strain, and the inadequacies of some of these are commented upon.

  7. Determination of the elasticity parameters of brain tissue with combined simulation and registration.

    PubMed

    Soza, G; Grosso, R; Nimsky, C; Hastreiter, P; Fahlbusch, R; Greiner, G

    2005-09-01

    Reliable elasticity parameters describing the behavior of a given material are an important issue in the context of physically-based simulation. In this paper we introduce a method for the determination of the mechanical properties of brain tissue. Elasticity parameters Young's modulus E and Poisson's ratio nu are estimated in an iterative framework coupling a finite element simulation with image registration. Within this framework, the outcome of the simulation is parameterized with both elasticity moduli that are automatically varied until optimal image correspondence between the simulated and the intraoperative data is achieved. We calculated optimal mechanical properties of brain tissue in six cases. The statistical analysis of the obtained values showed a good correlation of the results, thus proving the value of the method. An approach combining simulation and registration for the determination of the mechanical brain tissue properties is presented. This contributes to performing reliable physically-based simulation of soft tissue movement. PMID:17518395

  8. Ab initio investigations of the elastic properties of chlorates and perchlorates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korabel'nikov, D. V.; Zhuravlev, Yu. N.

    2016-06-01

    Elastic properties of NaClO3, KClO3, LiClO4, NaClO4, and KClO4 have been investigated from first principles by the method of linear combination of atomic orbitals in the gradient approximation of the density functional theory using CRYSTAL software. The elastic constants and moduli, hardness, Poisson's ratio, and the anisotropy parameters have been calculated. The velocities of sound, the Debye temperature, the thermal conductivity, and the Grüneisen parameter have been estimated. It has been found that these compounds are mechanically stable, anisotropic, and ductile materials. The dependences of their elastic parameters on the atomic number of the cation have been calculated. The obtained results are in good agreement with the available experimental data.

  9. Bonds, bands and elasticity of smithsonite rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouibes, A.; Zaoui, A.; Tunega, D.

    2013-07-01

    The objective here is to spread out in detail the various fundamental state properties of smithsonite rock (ZnCO3) for which the most intrinsic quantities remain still unknown. First-principles electronic structure calculations based on the density functional theory with the pseudopotential method were performed using diverse functionals. A number of mechanical quantities were evaluated such as bulk modulus, elastic constants, Young's and shear moduli, and transversal and longitudinal sound velocities (VS and VP). Fitting the compression data of smithsonite to the third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state gives a bulk modulus of 124.17 GPa, which reflects an important rigidity compared to the other carbonates. The analysis of the band structure reveals a band-gap energy of 3.36 eV that is close enough to some semiconductors rather than insulators. Finally the chemical bonding was analyzed through the electronic charge density of the total contributions of the valence bands. A pronounced charge transfer was observed towards the carbonate ion, indicating thereby the ionic character of ZnCO3.

  10. Elastic Collisions and Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Steven

    2009-04-01

    Elastic collisions are fascinating demonstrations of conservation principles. The mediating force must be conservative in an elastic collision. Truly elastic collisions take place only when the objects in collision do not touch, e.g. magnetic bumpers on low friction carts. This requires that we define a collision as a momentum transfer. Elastic collisions in 1-D can be solved in general and the implications are quite remarkable. For example, a heavy object moving initially towards a light object followed by an elastic collision results in a final velocity of the light object greater than either initial velocity. This is easily demonstrated with low friction carts. Gravitational elastic collisions involving a light spacecraft and an extremely massive body like a moon or planet can be approximated as 1-D collisions, such as the ``free return'' trajectory of Apollo 13 around the moon. The most fascinating gravitational collisions involve the gravitational slingshot effect used to boost spacecraft velocities. The maximum gravitational slingshot effect occurs when approaching a nearly 1-D collision, revealing that the spacecraft can be boosted to greater than twice the planet velocity, enabling the spacecraft to travel much further away from the Sun.

  11. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  12. Oxides and Oxide Superconductors: Elastic and Related Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Ming

    Using both measurements and modeling, the elastic and related properties of some oxides and oxide superconductors were studied. The polycrystal elastic constants were measured using a MHz-frequency pulse-echo method between 295 and 4 K and corrected to the void-free state by using a model for a composite material containing spherical particles. The elastic moduli of the high-T_{rm c} superconductor rm Y_1Ba _2Cu_3O_7 (YBCO) were compared with that of oxides, especially the perovskites BaTiO _3 and SrTiO_3, which are crystal-structure building blocks for the YBCO superconductor. The bulk moduli were also calculated using a Born ionic model with two energy terms: electrostatic (Madelung) and ion -core-repulsion. The calculated bulk modulus of YBCO, 98 GPa, agrees well with measurement, 101 GPa. Based on monocrystal measurements combined with analysis-theory, elastic stiffnesses C_{ij} for orthorhombic YBCO were estimated. The bulk modulus obtained from the estimated C_{ij} by the Voigt-Reuss-Hill averaging method agrees with the monocrystal measurement. From the measured polycrystalline elastic constants, the Debye characteristic temperatures, Theta_ D, were calculated. For YBCO, Theta_sp{D}{rm O} = 437 K. The electron-phonon parameters, lambda, were estimated from T _{c} and Theta_sp {D}{rm O} using Kresin's model, which is valid for all values of lambda . For YBCO, lambda = 2.24. By calculating the Madelung energy, two further features were studied: the valence of copper and the electron hole distribution. The results show that the hole prefers the CuO_2 plane at the oxygen sites. All the results are consistent with the assumption that all copper ions have valences near +2. Using a relationship between T _ c and Delta V_ A, the difference in Madelung site potentials for a hole at the apical and planar oxygens, the pressure derivative and stress and stain derivatives of T_ c were calculated. The results show that T _ c increases with decreasing a-axis, increasing b

  13. Virtual design of electrospun-like gelatin scaffolds: the effect of three-dimensional fibre orientation on elasticity behaviour.

    PubMed

    Guessasma, S; Oyen, M

    2016-01-14

    Remarkable mechanical performance of biological tissues is explained by a hierarchical fibrous structure. Designing materials that have similar properties is challenging because of the need to assess complex deformation mechanisms. In order to shed more light on architectural possibilities of biopolymer fibrous networks, we propose a numerical study that relates the fibre arrangement to the elastic modulus of a gelatin scaffold obtained using electrospinning. The adopted approach is based on the virtual designing of scaffolds using all possible combinations of Euler angles that define fibre orientations including preferable alignment. The generated networks are converted into a finite element model and the predicted elastic behaviour is examined. Predictions show that the fibre alignment achieved experimentally in biopolymer fibrous networks is for most of the fibres exhibiting an orthotropic behaviour. Some particular combinations of Euler angles allow transverse isotropic architectures while only limited cases are isotropic. A large sensitivity of Young's moduli to Euler angles is achieved describing multiple scenarios of independent anisotropic behaviours. An anisotropy ratio of the elastic behaviour is suggested based on a suitable combination of elastic moduli. Such a ratio exhibits a wide variation depending on individual and coupled effects of Euler angles. The finite element model predicts 2D, 3D and 4D maps representing all possible configurations of fibre alignment and their consequences on elastic behaviour. The predicted fibre orientation representing the observed anisotropic behaviour of electrospun gelatin networks demonstrates unbalanced contributions of in-plane and out-of plane fibres for a large range of processing conditions. PMID:26508563

  14. Elastic properties of polycrystals—influence of texture and stereology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunge, H. J.; Kiewel, R.; Reinert, Th; Fritsche, L.

    2000-01-01

    The macroscopic elastic properties of polycrystalline materials depend on the elastic properties of the crystallites and the way how these are 'arranged' in the polycrystalline aggregate. This comprises the volume fraction of crystal orientations (texture) as well as their arrangement in space (stereology). It is estimated that the stereological aggregate parameters may contribute up to 25% of the maximum texture influence. Model calculations of the effective macroscopic elastic properties were carried out using a grain cluster model which is a finite discretization of the aggregate function g( x) describing the complete 'orientation-stereology' of the polycrystalline material. The most important stereological parameters influencing the effective elastic constants are grain shape expressed by two axis ratios, grain packing expressed by the space filling factor of the lattice of grain centres and orientation pair correlation of neighbouring grains expressed by the misorientation distribution function. By rotating the orientation of only one grain it can be shown that grain interaction strains decrease rapidly and may be neglected beyond the second order neighbours.

  15. Effect of a hypergravity environment on cortical bone elasticity in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohles, S. S.; Bowers, J. R.; Vailas, A. C.; Vanderby, R. Jr

    1996-01-01

    There is considerable interest in determining whether hypergravity can be used as a countermeasure for microgravity-induced bone loss. This study was conducted on 20 immature male rats in order to investigate possible elastic adaptations of cortical bone in rapidly growing rats exposed to chronic hypergravity. Ten rats were continuously centrifuged for 14 days at twice gravitational acceleration (2G) on a 12.75 foot radius centrifuge and 10 rats concurrently acted as stationary controls. The effect of hypergravity on the elastic characteristics of cortical bone was quantified via ultrasonic wave propagation. Propagation velocities of longitudinal and shear waves were measured through cubic cortical specimens from the posterior femoral diaphyses. Density was measured with an Archimedes' technique. The orthotropic elastic properties were calculated and used to compare the difference between groups. Results showed an average increase in both the Young's moduli (Eii, + 2.2%) and shear moduli (Gij, + 4.3%) with a statistically significant increase only in G12 (+15.7%, P = 0.046). The ratio of transverse to axial strain (Poisson's ratio, nuij) demonstrated statistically significant changes in nu12, nu21, nu13, and nu31 (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that although slight elastic changes were incurred via a hypergravity environment, the treatment level or duration in this study do not dramatically perturb the normal elastic behavior of cortical bone and that dramatic biomechanical differences noted in previous studies were due more to structural changes than material elasticity changes. Hypergravity applied post facto to a microgravity environment would offer further illucidation of this method as treatment for a degenerative spaceflight experience.

  16. Correlation of fragility with mechanical moduli in double-well potential for glass-forming liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wan Qiang

    2012-02-01

    The shoving model and the Vogel-Fulcher relation are employed to derive correlation of the fragility with the mechanical moduli for glass-forming simple liquids. The result shows that a liquid with smaller fragility will have larger ratio of K∞/G∞ in dilute liquid system. Based on radial distribution function with the Lennard-Jones potential modified by the Gaussian potential with a second minimum, fragility of the supercooled simple liquid is derived from the correlation between viscosity and shear modulus via configurational entropy. The results demonstrate that the fragility is determined by two parts: thermodynamic components and mechanical moduli. For a weak Gaussian potential liquid, the fragility is proportional to the Tg, while for a strong one, the fragility is inversely proportional to the Tg, and the Gaussian potential will increase fragility.

  17. An experimental investigation on the tensile moduli and strengths of graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeow, Y. T.; Brinson, H. F.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a series of tensile tests on some graphite/epoxy laminates, at rates varying from 0.002 to 2 in./min are examined. The loads were applied at various angles to the fiber directions in each case. The rate-dependent behavior of the stress-strain response is assessed. Evidence is presented to indicate that failure first occurs on inner plies, and that, in some cases, moduli increase with increasing stress (or strain) level. Lamination theory is used to predict the moduli, and comparisons with experiment are given. This theory is also used in conjunction with three failure theories to predict ultimate strengths (with varying degrees of success). Further, two approaches to ply unloading after first-ply failure are used and discussed. One is a standard method found in the literature while the other is a proposed 'strength-of-materials' type of technique which is computationally much simpler.

  18. A new computational method for homogenized tangent moduli of a soft magnetoelastic composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, Alireza; Gordaninejad, Faramarz

    2015-07-01

    A finite element methods based homogenization approach is presented to simulate the nonlinear behavior of magnetoactive composites under a macroscopic deformation and an external magnetic field. The coupled magnetoelastic constitutive law and governing equations are developed in micro-scale for large deformations. Micro-scale formulation is employed on a characteristic volume element, taking into account periodic boundary conditions. A periodic homogenization method is utilized to compute macroscopic properties of the magnetoelastic composite at different mechanical and magnetic loading paths. A new and cost effective numerical scheme is used to develop the magnetoelastic tangent moduli tensors. A sensitivity analysis is proposed to compute the overall tangent moduli tensors of the composite through the finite difference method. The presented approach is useful in the characterization of magnetoactive and electroactive composites and FE2 methods. Results are presented for typical equilibrium states.

  19. Fixing All Moduli for M-Theory on K3xK3

    SciTech Connect

    Aspinwall, Paul S.; Kallosh, Renata; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2005-06-15

    We analyze M-theory compactified on K3 x K3 with fluxes preserving half the supersymmetry and its F-theory limit, which is dual to an orientifold of the type IIB string on K3 x (T{sup 2}/Z{sub 2}). The geometry of attractive K3 surfaces plays a significant role in the analysis. We prove that the number of choices for the K3 surfaces is finite and we show how they can be completely classified. We list the possibilities in one case. We then study the instanton effects and see that they will generically fix all of the moduli. We also discuss situations where the instanton effects might not fix all the moduli.

  20. Cosmological moduli and the post-inflationary universe: A critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Gordon; Sinha, Kuver; Watson, Scott

    2015-06-01

    We critically review the role of cosmological moduli in determining the post-inflationary history of the universe. Moduli are ubiquitous in string and M-theory constructions of beyond the Standard Model physics, where they parametrize the geometry of the compactification manifold. For those with masses determined by supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking this leads to their eventual decay slightly before Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) (without spoiling its predictions). This results in a matter dominated phase shortly after inflation ends, which can influence baryon and dark matter genesis, as well as observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the growth of large-scale structure. Given progress within fundamental theory, and guidance from dark matter and collider experiments, nonthermal histories have emerged as a robust and theoretically well-motivated alternative to a strictly thermal one. We review this approach to the early universe and discuss both the theoretical challenges and the observational implications.

  1. Elastic Softening in HoFe2Al10 due to the Quadrupole Interaction under an Orthorhombic Crystal Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamikawa, Shuhei; Ishii, Isao; Noguchi, Yoshihito; Goto, Hiroki; Fujita, Takahiro K.; Nakagawa, Fumiya; Tanida, Hiroshi; Sera, Masafumi; Suzuki, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    To investigate 4f electronic states in HoFe2Al10 under an orthorhombic crystal electric field (CEF), we measured the specific heat, magnetic susceptibility, magnetization, and elastic modulus of single-crystalline samples. We found elastic softening of the transverse elastic moduli C55 and C66 below 20 and 130 K, respectively. With further decreasing temperature, C66 shows further elastic softening below 5 K. We observed two Schottky peaks in the specific heat at 2.2 and 20 K and small anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility and magnetization in the paramagnetic region. By analyzing these experimental data, we obtained the CEF parameters of HoFe2Al10. From the analysis, we clarified that the softening of C55 and C66 originates from indirect quadrupole interactions of Ozx and Oxy, and propose that the overall CEF splitting is about 85 K.

  2. Numerical Approximation of Tangent Moduli for Finite Element Implementations of Nonlinear Hyperelastic Material Models

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Chaikof, Elliot L.; Levenston, Marc E.

    2009-01-01

    Finite element (FE) implementations of nearly incompressible material models often employ decoupled numerical treatments of the dilatational and deviatoric parts of the deformation gradient. This treatment allows the dilatational stiffness to be handled separately to alleviate ill conditioning of the tangent stiffness matrix. However, this can lead to complex formulations of the material tangent moduli that can be difficult to implement or may require custom FE codes, thus limiting their general use. Here we present an approach, based on work by Miehe (Miehe, 1996, “Numerical Computation of Algorithmic (Consistent) Tangent Moduli in Large Strain Computational Inelasticity,” Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Eng., 134, pp. 223–240), for an efficient numerical approximation of the tangent moduli that can be easily implemented within commercial FE codes. By perturbing the deformation gradient, the material tangent moduli from the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress are accurately approximated by a forward difference of the associated Kirchhoff stresses. The merit of this approach is that it produces a concise mathematical formulation that is not dependent on any particular material model. Consequently, once the approximation method is coded in a subroutine, it can be used for other hyperelastic material models with no modification. The implementation and accuracy of this approach is first demonstrated with a simple neo-Hookean material. Subsequently, a fiber-reinforced structural model is applied to analyze the pressure-diameter curve during blood vessel inflation. Implementation of this approach will facilitate the incorporation of novel hyperelastic material models for a soft tissue behavior into commercial FE software. PMID:19045532

  3. Gauge theory dynamics and Kähler potential for Calabi-Yau complex moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroud, Nima; Gomis, Jaume

    2013-12-01

    We compute the exact two-sphere partition function and matrix of two-point functions of operators in the chiral ring with their complex conjugates in two-dimensional supersymmetric gauge theories. For gauge theories that flow in the infrared to a CalabiYau nonlinear sigma model, these renormalization group invariant observables determine the exact Kähler potential and associated Zamolodchikov metric in the complex structure moduli space of the Calabi-Yau manifold.

  4. Critical behaviour in the nonlinear elastic response of hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Dennison, M; Jaspers, M; Kouwer, P H J; Storm, C; Rowan, A E; MacKintosh, F C

    2016-08-17

    In this paper we study the elastic response of synthetic hydrogels to an applied shear stress. The hydrogels studied here have previously been shown to mimic the behaviour of biopolymer networks when they are sufficiently far above the gel point. We show that near the gel point they exhibit an elastic response that is consistent with the predicted critical behaviour of networks near or below the isostatic point of marginal stability. This point separates rigid and floppy states, distinguished by the presence or absence of finite linear elastic moduli. Recent theoretical work has also focused on the response of such networks to finite or large deformations, both near and below the isostatic point. Despite this interest, experimental evidence for the existence of criticality in such networks has been lacking. Using computer simulations, we identify critical signatures in the mechanical response of sub-isostatic networks as a function of applied shear stress. We also present experimental evidence consistent with these predictions. Furthermore, our results show the existence of two distinct critical regimes, one of which arises from the nonlinear stretch response of semi-flexible polymers. PMID:27464595

  5. Elastic constants of beryllium: a first-principles investigation.

    PubMed

    Dal Corso, Andrea

    2016-02-24

    We apply several recently introduced projector-augmented wave, ultrasoft, and norm-conserving pseudopotentials (PPs) to the calculation of the elastic constants of beryllium and compare the results with previous theory and experiments. We discuss how the elastic constants depend on the Brillouin zone integration, the PP type, and the exchange and correlation functional. We find that although in percentage terms the elastic constants of beryllium depend on the PPs more than the crystal parameters or the bulk moduli, the differences between the local density approximation (LDA) and the Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhof (PBE) generalized-gradient approximation are larger than the PP differences. The LDA overestimates compared to experiments, while the PBE values are higher than those of experiments but show a much better agreement. The PBEsol functional gives values that are slightly higher than those from PBE, with differences comparable to the PP uncertainty. We propose a simple formula to rationalize the internal relaxations in hexagonal close-packed crystals and show that Be relaxations are in reasonable agreement with this formula. The effects of internal relaxations on the values of C11 and C12 amount to a few per cent of C11, but up to 50% of C12. PMID:26809146

  6. Elastic constants of beryllium: a first-principles investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Corso, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    We apply several recently introduced projector-augmented wave, ultrasoft, and norm-conserving pseudopotentials (PPs) to the calculation of the elastic constants of beryllium and compare the results with previous theory and experiments. We discuss how the elastic constants depend on the Brillouin zone integration, the PP type, and the exchange and correlation functional. We find that although in percentage terms the elastic constants of beryllium depend on the PPs more than the crystal parameters or the bulk moduli, the differences between the local density approximation (LDA) and the Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhof (PBE) generalized-gradient approximation are larger than the PP differences. The LDA overestimates compared to experiments, while the PBE values are higher than those of experiments but show a much better agreement. The PBEsol functional gives values that are slightly higher than those from PBE, with differences comparable to the PP uncertainty. We propose a simple formula to rationalize the internal relaxations in hexagonal close-packed crystals and show that Be relaxations are in reasonable agreement with this formula. The effects of internal relaxations on the values of C 11 and C 12 amount to a few per cent of C 11, but up to 50% of C 12.

  7. Constraints on moduli cosmology from the production of dark matter and baryon isocurvature fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoine, Martin; Martin, Jerome; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2009-12-15

    We set constraints on moduli cosmology from the production of dark matter - radiation and baryon -radiation isocurvature fluctuations through modulus decay, assuming the modulus remains light during inflation. We find that the moduli problem becomes worse at the perturbative level as a significant part of the parameter space m{sub {sigma}} (modulus mass) - {sigma}{sub inf} (modulus vacuum expectation value at the end of inflation) is constrained by the nonobservation of significant isocurvature fluctuations. We discuss in detail the evolution of the modulus vacuum expectation value and perturbations, in particular, the consequences of Hubble scale corrections to the modulus potential, and the stochastic motion of the modulus during inflation. We show, in particular, that a high modulus mass scale m{sub {sigma}} > or approx. 100 TeV, which allows the modulus to evade big bang nucleosynthesis constraints is strongly constrained at the perturbative level. We find that generically, solving the moduli problem requires the inflationary scale to be much smaller than 10{sup 13} GeV.

  8. Aspects of the moduli space of instantons on C P2 and its orbifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pini, Alessandro; Rodriguez-Gomez, Diego

    2016-01-01

    We study the moduli space of (framed) self-dual instantons on C P2 . These are described by an Atiyah-Drinfeld-Hitchin-Manin (ADHM)-like construction which allows us to compute the Hilbert series of the moduli space. The latter has been found to be blind to certain compact directions. In this paper, we probe these, finding them to correspond to a Grassmanian, upon considering appropriate ungaugings. Moreover, the ADHM-like construction can be embedded into a 3 d gauge theory with a known gravity dual. Using this, we realize in AdS4/CFT3 (part of), the instanton moduli space providing at the same time further evidence supporting the AdS4/CFT3 duality. Moreover, upon orbifolding, we provide the ADHM-like construction of instantons on C P2/Zn as well as compute its Hilbert series. As in the unorbifolded case, these turn out to coincide with those for instantons on C2/Zn .

  9. Scattering and sequestering of blow-up moduli in local string models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conlon, Joseph P.; Witkowski, Lukas T.

    2011-12-01

    We study the scattering and sequestering of blow-up fields - either local to or distant from a visible matter sector - through a CFT computation of the dependence of physical Yukawa couplings on the blow-up moduli. For a visible sector of D3-branes on orbifold singularities we compute the disk correlator left< {tau_s^{{(1)}}tau_s^{{(2)}}...tau_s^{{(n)}}ψ ψ φ } rightrangle between orbifold blow-up moduli and matter Yukawa couplings. For n = 1 we determine the full quantum and classical correlator. This result has the correct factorisation onto lower 3-point functions and also passes numerous other consistency checks. For n > 1 we show that the structure of picture-changing applied to the twist operators establishes the sequestering of distant blow-up moduli at disk level to all orders in α'. We explain how these results are relevant to suppressing soft terms to scales parametrically below the gravitino mass. By giving vevs to the blow-up fields we can move into the smooth limit and thereby derive CFT results for the smooth Swiss-cheese Calabi-Yaus that appear in the Large Volume Scenario.

  10. Models of discretized moduli spaces, cohomological field theories, and Gaussian means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard; Chekhov, Leonid O.; Norbury, Paul; Penner, Robert C.

    2015-12-01

    We prove combinatorially the explicit relation between genus filtrated s-loop means of the Gaussian matrix model and terms of the genus expansion of the Kontsevich-Penner matrix model (KPMM). The latter is the generating function for volumes of discretized (open) moduli spaces Mg,sdisc given by Ng,s(P1, …, Ps) for (P1, …, Ps) ∈ Z+s. This generating function therefore enjoys the topological recursion, and we prove that it is simultaneously the generating function for ancestor invariants of a cohomological field theory thus enjoying the Givental decomposition. We use another Givental-type decomposition obtained for this model by the second authors in 1995 in terms of special times related to the discretization of moduli spaces thus representing its asymptotic expansion terms (and therefore those of the Gaussian means) as finite sums over graphs weighted by lower-order monomials in times thus giving another proof of (quasi)polynomiality of the discrete volumes. As an application, we find the coefficients in the first subleading order for Mg,1 in two ways: by using the refined Harer-Zagier recursion and by exploiting the above Givental-type transformation. We put forward the conjecture that the above graph expansions can be used for probing the reduction structure of the Deligne-Mumford compactification M bar g, s of moduli spaces of punctured Riemann surfaces.

  11. D-branes at del Pezzo singularities: global embedding and moduli stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicoli, Michele; Krippendorf, Sven; Mayrhofer, Christoph; Quevedo, Fernando; Valandro, Roberto

    2012-09-01

    In the context of type IIB string theory we combine moduli stabilisation and model building on branes at del Pezzo singularities in a fully consistent global compactification. By means of toric geometry, we classify all the Calabi-Yau manifolds with 3 < h 1,1 < 6 which admit two identical del Pezzo singularities mapped into each other under the orientifold involution. This effective singularity hosts the visible sector containing the Standard Model while the Kähler moduli are stabilised via a combination of D-terms, perturbative and non-perturbative effects supported on hidden sectors. We present concrete models where the visible sector, containing the Standard Model, gauge and matter content, is built via fractional D3-branes at del Pezzo singularities and all the Kähler moduli are fixed providing an explicit realisation of both KKLT and LARGE volume scenarios, the latter with D-term uplifting to de Sitter minima. We perform the consistency checks for global embedding such as tadpole, K-theory charges and Freed-Witten anomaly cancellation. We briefly discuss phenomenological and cosmological implications of our models.

  12. Constraints on moduli cosmology from the production of dark matter and baryon isocurvature fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, Martin; Martin, Jérôme; Yokoyama, Jun'Ichi

    2009-12-01

    We set constraints on moduli cosmology from the production of dark matter—radiation and baryon—radiation isocurvature fluctuations through modulus decay, assuming the modulus remains light during inflation. We find that the moduli problem becomes worse at the perturbative level as a significant part of the parameter space mσ (modulus mass)—σinf (modulus vacuum expectation value at the end of inflation) is constrained by the nonobservation of significant isocurvature fluctuations. We discuss in detail the evolution of the modulus vacuum expectation value and perturbations, in particular, the consequences of Hubble scale corrections to the modulus potential, and the stochastic motion of the modulus during inflation. We show, in particular, that a high modulus mass scale mσ≳100TeV, which allows the modulus to evade big bang nucleosynthesis constraints is strongly constrained at the perturbative level. We find that generically, solving the moduli problem requires the inflationary scale to be much smaller than 1013GeV.

  13. Torsional elasticity and energetics of F1-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Czub, Jacek; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2011-05-01

    F(o)F(1)-ATPase is a rotary motor protein synthesizing ATP from ADP driven by a cross-membrane proton gradient. The proton flow through the membrane-embedded F(o) generates the rotary torque that drives the rotation of the asymmetric shaft of F(1). Mechanical energy of the rotating shaft is used by the F(1) catalytic subunit to synthesize ATP. It was suggested that elastic power transmission with transient storage of energy in some compliant part of the shaft is required for the observed high turnover rate. We used atomistic simulations to study the spatial distribution and structural determinants of the F(1) torsional elasticity at the molecular level and to comprehensively characterize the elastic properties of F(1)-ATPase. Our fluctuation analysis revealed an unexpected heterogeneity of the F(1) shaft elasticity. Further, we found that the measured overall torsional moduli of the shaft arise from two distinct contributions, the intrinsic elasticity and the effective potential imposed on the shaft by the catalytic subunit. Separation of these two contributions provided a quantitative description of the coupling between the rotor and the catalytic subunit. This description enabled us to propose a minimal quantitative model of the F(1) energetics along the rotary degrees of freedom near the resting state observed in the crystal structures. As opposed to the usually employed models where the motor mechanical progression is described by a single angular variable, our multidimensional treatment incorporates the spatially inhomogeneous nature of the shaft and its interactions with the stator and offers new insight into the mechanoenzymatics of F(1)-ATPase. PMID:21502534

  14. Torsional elasticity and energetics of F1-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Czub, Jacek; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    FoF1-ATPase is a rotary motor protein synthesizing ATP from ADP driven by a cross-membrane proton gradient. The proton flow through the membrane-embedded Fo generates the rotary torque that drives the rotation of the asymmetric shaft of F1. Mechanical energy of the rotating shaft is used by the F1 catalytic subunit to synthesize ATP. It was suggested that elastic power transmission with transient storage of energy in some compliant part of the shaft is required for the observed high turnover rate. We used atomistic simulations to study the spatial distribution and structural determinants of the F1 torsional elasticity at the molecular level and to comprehensively characterize the elastic properties of F1-ATPase. Our fluctuation analysis revealed an unexpected heterogeneity of the F1 shaft elasticity. Further, we found that the measured overall torsional moduli of the shaft arise from two distinct contributions, the intrinsic elasticity and the effective potential imposed on the shaft by the catalytic subunit. Separation of these two contributions provided a quantitative description of the coupling between the rotor and the catalytic subunit. This description enabled us to propose a minimal quantitative model of the F1 energetics along the rotary degrees of freedom near the resting state observed in the crystal structures. As opposed to the usually employed models where the motor mechanical progression is described by a single angular variable, our multidimensional treatment incorporates the spatially inhomogeneous nature of the shaft and its interactions with the stator and offers new insight into the mechanoenzymatics of F1-ATPase. PMID:21502534

  15. Elasticity of polymeric nanocolloidal particles

    PubMed Central

    Riest, Jonas; Athanasopoulou, Labrini; Egorov, Sergei A.; Likos, Christos N.; Ziherl, Primož

    2015-01-01

    Softness is an essential mechanical feature of macromolecular particles such as polymer-grafted nanocolloids, polyelectrolyte networks, cross-linked microgels as well as block copolymer and dendrimer micelles. Elasticity of individual particles directly controls their swelling, wetting, and adsorption behaviour, their aggregation and self-assembly as well as structural and rheological properties of suspensions. Here we use numerical simulations and self-consistent field theory to study the deformation behaviour of a single spherical polymer brush upon diametral compression. We observe a universal response, which is rationalised using scaling arguments and interpreted in terms of two coarse-grained models. At small and intermediate compressions the deformation can be accurately reproduced by modelling the brush as a liquid drop, whereas at large compressions the brush behaves as a soft ball. Applicable far beyond the pairwise-additive small-strain regime, the models may be used to describe microelasticity of nanocolloids in severe confinement including dense disordered and crystalline phases. PMID:26522242

  16. Colloidal Particles that Rapidly Change Shape via Elastic Instabilities.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Eric; Yoon, Jaewon; Madhukar, Amit; Hsia, K Jimmy; Braun, Paul V

    2015-12-01

    The fabrication and properties of pH-responsive colloidal particles are reported, which change shape rapidly (less than 200 ms), nearly independent of the diffusion of the pH altering species that trigger their actuation, and far more rapid than their Brownian motion. These particles are mechanically bistable, as revealed by their hysteretic shape response. Finite element analysis (FEA) shows that mechanical hysteresis and bistability derives from the colloids' spherical curvature. Mechanical characterization of the bilayered polymers comprising the colloidal particles shows that viscoelastic relaxation plays a non-negligible role in limiting the shape switching rate; however, energy landscapes obtained from FEA simulations suggest that by tuning the elastic moduli and thicknesses of the constituent polymer layers, microparticles of the size shown here may be fabricated to actuate on timescales as fast as 1 μs. PMID:26449185

  17. Elastic Properties of the Solid Electrolyte Li7La3Zr2O12 (LLZO)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu, Seungho; Schmidt, Robert D.; Garcia-mendez, Regina; Herbert, Erik G.; Dudney, Nancy J.; Wolfenstine, Jeff; Sakamoto, Jeff; Seigel, Donald

    2015-12-16

    The oxide known as LLZO, with nominal composition Li7La3Zr2O12, is a promising solid electrolyte for Li-based batteries due to its high Li-ion conductivity and chemical stability with respect to lithium. Solid electrolytes may also enable the use of metallic Li anodes by serving as a physical barrier that suppresses dendrite initiation and propagation during cycling. Prior linear elasticity models of the Li electrode/solid electrolyte interface suggest that the stability of this interface is highly dependent on the elastic properties of the solid separator. For example, dendritic suppression is predicted to be enhanced as the electrolyte s shear modulus increases. Inmore » the present study a combination of first-principles calculations, acoustic impulse excitation measurements, and nanoindentation experiments are used to determine the elastic constants and moduli for highconductivity LLZO compositions based on Al and Ta doping. The calculated and measured isotropic shear moduli are in good agreement and fall within the range of 56-61 GPa. These values are an order of magnitude larger than that for Li metal and far exceed the minimum value ( 8.5 GPa) believed to be necessary to suppress dendrite initiation. These data suggest that LLZO exhibits sufficient stiffness to warrant additional development as a solid electrolyte for Li batteries.« less

  18. Higher-order elasticity of cubic metals in the embedded-atom method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantasiriwan, Somchart; Milstein, Frederick

    1996-06-01

    The higher-order elasticity of cubic metals in the framework of the embedded-atom method (EAM) is investigated. Proper groupings of the second- and third-order elastic moduli are shown to yield expressions that depend solely on either the electron density function or the pair potential and which therefore facilitate the construction of EAM models. This formulation also makes evident some important restrictions on the EAM functions and lattice summations. In order for the EAM to model the anharmonic properties accurately, (a) at least the third-nearest-neighbor interactions must be included in the expressions for the cohesive energies of both the body-centered-cubic and face-centered-cubic metals and (b) an electron density function of an inverse power form, as has been employed previously, generally is not valid. Specific EAM models are constructed for a diverse selection of metals (i.e., aluminum, copper, sodium, and molybdenum). These models identically reproduce the respective second- and third-order elastic moduli, as well as the binding energy, atomic volume, unrelaxed vacancy formation energy, and Rose's universal equation of state. They also provide reasonable phonon frequency spectra and structural energy differences

  19. Elastic Properties of the Solid Electrolyte Li7La3Zr2O12 (LLZO)

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Seungho; Schmidt, Robert D.; Garcia-mendez, Regina; Herbert, Erik G.; Dudney, Nancy J.; Wolfenstine, Jeff; Sakamoto, Jeff; Seigel, Donald

    2015-12-16

    The oxide known as LLZO, with nominal composition Li7La3Zr2O12, is a promising solid electrolyte for Li-based batteries due to its high Li-ion conductivity and chemical stability with respect to lithium. Solid electrolytes may also enable the use of metallic Li anodes by serving as a physical barrier that suppresses dendrite initiation and propagation during cycling. Prior linear elasticity models of the Li electrode/solid electrolyte interface suggest that the stability of this interface is highly dependent on the elastic properties of the solid separator. For example, dendritic suppression is predicted to be enhanced as the electrolyte s shear modulus increases. In the present study a combination of first-principles calculations, acoustic impulse excitation measurements, and nanoindentation experiments are used to determine the elastic constants and moduli for highconductivity LLZO compositions based on Al and Ta doping. The calculated and measured isotropic shear moduli are in good agreement and fall within the range of 56-61 GPa. These values are an order of magnitude larger than that for Li metal and far exceed the minimum value ( 8.5 GPa) believed to be necessary to suppress dendrite initiation. These data suggest that LLZO exhibits sufficient stiffness to warrant additional development as a solid electrolyte for Li batteries.

  20. Density and elasticity of superconducting niobium nitride under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Y.; Li, B.; Wang, X.; Chen, T.

    2013-12-01

    Hard superconducting materials are of considerable interest for specific electronic applications. Transition-metal (TM) nitrides have increasingly attracted attention because of their outstanding mechanical, optoelectronic, thermal, magnetic and/or superconducting properties and potential usage in a variety of technological areas, such as NbN exploited in superconducting and high hardness coatings. Previous hardness measurements on NbN by Vickers indentation method reported a Vickers hardness about 20 GPa and its bulk modulus was found close to that of cubic boron nitride. In addition, experimental studies and first-principles calculations have investigated the equation-of-state (EOS) for B1 structured NbN and provided important insights into the origin of its outstanding mechanical properties. In spite of its importance, to date, the high-pressure behavior and elastic properties of NbN are not well studied experimentally, in particular for the shear properties under pressure. In this study, we hot-pressed high quality (well-sintered, free of cracks, small grain size and homogeneous) polycrystalline NbN specimens and performed simultaneous measurements of compressional and shear wave travel times using ultrasonic interferometry techniques up to ~12 GPa at room temperature in a large-volume high-pressure apparatus. By fitting these experimental data to finite strain equations, the compressional and shear wave velocities, density, and the bulk and shear moduli as a function of pressure are all obtained. These new data not only allow us to compare with previous EOS data on NbN and those of other transition metal nitrides, but also enable us to further explore the constitutive relations between elastic moduli and hardness in these nitrides.

  1. Quantum Critical Elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, Mario; Paul, Indranil; Garst, Markus

    2015-07-01

    We discuss elastic instabilities of the atomic crystal lattice at zero temperature. Because of long-range shear forces of the solid, at such transitions the phonon velocities vanish, if at all, only along certain crystallographic directions, and, consequently, the critical phonon fluctuations are suppressed to a lower dimensional manifold and governed by a Gaussian fixed point. In the case of symmetry-breaking elastic transitions, a characteristic critical phonon thermodynamics arises that is found, e.g., to violate Debye's T3 law for the specific heat. We point out that quantum critical elasticity is triggered whenever a critical soft mode couples linearly to the strain tensor. In particular, this is relevant for the electronic Ising-nematic quantum phase transition in a tetragonal crystal as discussed in the context of certain cuprates, ruthenates, and iron-based superconductors.

  2. Mechanics of elastic networks

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Andrew N.

    2014-01-01

    We consider a periodic lattice structure in d=2 or 3 dimensions with unit cell comprising Z thin elastic members emanating from a similarly situated central node. A general theoretical approach provides an algebraic formula for the effective elasticity of such frameworks. The method yields the effective cubic elastic constants for three-dimensional space-filling lattices with Z=4, 6, 8, 12 and 14, the last being the ‘stiffest’ lattice proposed by Gurtner & Durand (Gurtner & Durand 2014 Proc. R. Soc. A 470, 20130611. (doi:10.1098/rspa.2013.0611)). The analytical expressions provide explicit formulae for the effective properties of pentamode materials, both isotropic and anisotropic, obtained from the general formulation in the stretch-dominated limit for Z=d+1. PMID:25484608

  3. Elastic properties of HMX.

    SciTech Connect

    Sewell, T. D.; Bedrov, D.; Menikoff, Ralph; Smith, G. D.

    2001-01-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations have been used to calculate isothermal elastic properties for {beta}-, {alpha}-, and {delta}-HMX. The complete elastic tensor for each polymorph was determined at room temperature and pressure via analysis of microscopic strain fluctuations using formalism due to Rahman and Parrinello [J. Chem. Phys. 76,2662 (1982)]. Additionally, the isothermal compression curve was computed for {beta}-HMX for 0 {le} p {le} 10.6 GPa; the bulk modulus K and its pressure derivative K{prime} were obtained from two fitting forms employed previously in experimental studies of the {beta}-HMX equation of state. Overall, the results indicate good agreement between the bulk modulus predicted from the measured and calculated compression curves. The bulk modulus determined directly from the elastic tensor of {beta}-HMX is in significant disagreement with the compression curve-based results. The explanation for this discrepancy is an area of current research.

  4. An elastic second skin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Betty; Kang, Soo-Young; Akthakul, Ariya; Ramadurai, Nithin; Pilkenton, Morgan; Patel, Alpesh; Nashat, Amir; Anderson, Daniel G; Sakamoto, Fernanda H; Gilchrest, Barbara A; Anderson, R Rox; Langer, Robert

    2016-08-01

    We report the synthesis and application of an elastic, wearable crosslinked polymer layer (XPL) that mimics the properties of normal, youthful skin. XPL is made of a tunable polysiloxane-based material that can be engineered with specific elasticity, contractility, adhesion, tensile strength and occlusivity. XPL can be topically applied, rapidly curing at the skin interface without the need for heat- or light-mediated activation. In a pilot human study, we examined the performance of a prototype XPL that has a tensile modulus matching normal skin responses at low strain (<40%), and that withstands elongations exceeding 250%, elastically recoiling with minimal strain-energy loss on repeated deformation. The application of XPL to the herniated lower eyelid fat pads of 12 subjects resulted in an average 2-grade decrease in herniation appearance in a 5-point severity scale. The XPL platform may offer advanced solutions to compromised skin barrier function, pharmaceutical delivery and wound dressings. PMID:27159017

  5. Elastic membranes in confinement.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, J B; Miksis, M J; Davis, S H

    2016-07-01

    An elastic membrane stretched between two walls takes a shape defined by its length and the volume of fluid it encloses. Many biological structures, such as cells, mitochondria and coiled DNA, have fine internal structure in which a membrane (or elastic member) is geometrically 'confined' by another object. Here, the two-dimensional shape of an elastic membrane in a 'confining' box is studied by introducing a repulsive confinement pressure that prevents the membrane from intersecting the wall. The stage is set by contrasting confined and unconfined solutions. Continuation methods are then used to compute response diagrams, from which we identify the particular membrane mechanics that generate mitochondria-like shapes. Large confinement pressures yield complex response diagrams with secondary bifurcations and multiple turning points where modal identities may change. Regions in parameter space where such behaviour occurs are then mapped. PMID:27440257

  6. Elastic constants of calcite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peselnick, L.; Robie, R.A.

    1962-01-01

    The recent measurements of the elastic constants of calcite by Reddy and Subrahmanyam (1960) disagree with the values obtained independently by Voigt (1910) and Bhimasenachar (1945). The present authors, using an ultrasonic pulse technique at 3 Mc and 25??C, determined the elastic constants of calcite using the exact equations governing the wave velocities in the single crystal. The results are C11=13.7, C33=8.11, C44=3.50, C12=4.82, C13=5.68, and C14=-2.00, in units of 1011 dyncm2. Independent checks of several of the elastic constants were made employing other directions and polarizations of the wave velocities. With the exception of C13, these values substantially agree with the data of Voigt and Bhimasenachar. ?? 1962 The American Institute of Physics.

  7. Quantum Critical Elasticity.

    PubMed

    Zacharias, Mario; Paul, Indranil; Garst, Markus

    2015-07-10

    We discuss elastic instabilities of the atomic crystal lattice at zero temperature. Because of long-range shear forces of the solid, at such transitions the phonon velocities vanish, if at all, only along certain crystallographic directions, and, consequently, the critical phonon fluctuations are suppressed to a lower dimensional manifold and governed by a Gaussian fixed point. In the case of symmetry-breaking elastic transitions, a characteristic critical phonon thermodynamics arises that is found, e.g., to violate Debye's T(3) law for the specific heat. We point out that quantum critical elasticity is triggered whenever a critical soft mode couples linearly to the strain tensor. In particular, this is relevant for the electronic Ising-nematic quantum phase transition in a tetragonal crystal as discussed in the context of certain cuprates, ruthenates, and iron-based superconductors. PMID:26207483

  8. An elastic second skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Betty; Kang, Soo-Young; Akthakul, Ariya; Ramadurai, Nithin; Pilkenton, Morgan; Patel, Alpesh; Nashat, Amir; Anderson, Daniel G.; Sakamoto, Fernanda H.; Gilchrest, Barbara A.; Anderson, R. Rox; Langer, Robert

    2016-08-01

    We report the synthesis and application of an elastic, wearable crosslinked polymer layer (XPL) that mimics the properties of normal, youthful skin. XPL is made of a tunable polysiloxane-based material that can be engineered with specific elasticity, contractility, adhesion, tensile strength and occlusivity. XPL can be topically applied, rapidly curing at the skin interface without the need for heat- or light-mediated activation. In a pilot human study, we examined the performance of a prototype XPL that has a tensile modulus matching normal skin responses at low strain (<40%), and that withstands elongations exceeding 250%, elastically recoiling with minimal strain-energy loss on repeated deformation. The application of XPL to the herniated lower eyelid fat pads of 12 subjects resulted in an average 2-grade decrease in herniation appearance in a 5-point severity scale. The XPL platform may offer advanced solutions to compromised skin barrier function, pharmaceutical delivery and wound dressings.

  9. Coiling of Elastic Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, M.; Ribe, N. M.; Bonn, Daniel

    2007-10-01

    A rope falling onto a solid surface typically forms a series of regular coils. Here, we study this phenomenon using laboratory experiments (with cotton threads and softened spaghetti) and an asymptotic “slender-rope” numerical model. The excellent agreement between the two with no adjustable parameters allows us to determine a complete phase diagram for elastic coiling comprising three basic regimes involving different force balances (elastic, gravitational, and inertial) together with resonant “whirling string” and “whirling shaft” eigenmodes in the inertial regime.

  10. Thermo-elastic behavior of deformed woven fabric composites at elevated temperatures: Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Vu-Khanh, T.; Liu, B.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents the results of a study on the effects of temperature on the thermo-elastic properties of woven fabric composites. The thermo-mechanical behavior of woven fabric composites is characterized by a laminate composed of four fictional unidirectional plies, called the sub-plies model. The model allows determination of the thermo-elastic properties of deformed fabric composites (non-orthogonal structure) and direct use of layered shell elements in finite element codes. A special procedure is also proposed to measure the fiber undulation effect and to predict the on-axis thermo-elastic coefficients of the equivalent constituent plies. The thermo-elastic behavior at elevated temperature was investigated on graphite/epoxy fabric composites. Experimental measurements were carried out from 23 C to 177 C. The results revealed that the equivalent thermal expansion coefficients of the sub-plies remain almost constant over a wide range of temperature. However, the equivalent elastic moduli and Poison`s ratio of the sub-plies vary nonlinearly with temperature. Semiempirical equations based on the experimental data were also developed to predict the equivalent on-axis thermo-elastic properties of the fictional constituent plies in the sub-plies model as a function of temperature.

  11. Technology meets aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.; Swan, C.

    2007-07-01

    New technology carried out at Tufts University and the University of Massachusetts on synthetic lightweight aggregate has created material from various qualities of fly ash from coal-fired power plants for use in different engineered applications. In pilot scale manufacturing tests an 'SLA' containing 80% fly ash and 20% mixed plastic waste from packaging was produced by 'dry blending' mixed plastic with high carbon fly ash. A trial run was completed to produce concrete masonry unit (CMU) blocks at a full-scale facility. It has been shown that SLA can be used as a partial substitution of a traditional stone aggregate in hot asphalt mix. 1 fig., 2 photos.

  12. On the measurement of human osteosarcoma cell elastic modulus using shear assay experiments.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yifang; Bly, Randy; Moore, Will; Gao, Zhan; Cuitino, Alberto M; Soboyejo, Wole

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a method for determining the elastic modulus of human osteosarcoma (HOS) cells. The method involves a combination of shear assay experiments and finite element analysis. Following in-situ observations of cell deformation during shear assay experiments, a digital image correlation (DIC) technique was used to determine the local displacement and strain fields. Finite element analysis was then used to determine the Young's moduli of HOS cells. This involved a match of the maximum shear stresses estimated from the experimental shear assay measurements and those calculated from finite element simulations. PMID:17200819

  13. A first principle study of the pressure dependent elastic properties of monazite LaPO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Kawsar; Arya, A.; Ghosh, P. S.; Dey, G. K.

    2016-05-01

    DFT based ab-initio simulations have been performed to study the effect of pressure on the elastic properties of monazite LaPO4 which is a promising host material for immobilization of high level nuclear waste. The phase is found to be stable up to 30 GPa. The calculated polycrystalline bulk, shear and Young moduli show an increasing trend as a function of pressure. The ductility and anisotropy in shear modulus of the material have been found to increase with pressure; whilethe bulk modulus anisotropy decreases with pressure.

  14. Elastic properties of the bcc structure of bismuth at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Gonzalo; Menéndez-Proupin, Eduardo; Singh, Anil K.

    2006-05-01

    First-principles calculations of the single-crystal elastic constants of the body-centered cubic phase of bismuth are carried out in the pressure range of 31-191 GPa. The calculations are performed in the framework of density functional theory with generalized gradient approximation using a plane wave basis set and pseudopotential scheme. These results confirm the conclusions drawn in a recent study based on the x-ray diffraction data under nonhydrostatic compression. The calculated unit cell volumes and the bulk moduli as a function of pressure agree well with the experimentally measured values.

  15. Elastic modulus measurements of LDEF glasses and glass-ceramics using a speckle technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedlocher, D. E.; Kinser, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    Elastic moduli of five glass types and the glass-ceramic Zerodur, exposed to a near-earth orbit environment on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), were compared to that of unexposed samples. A double exposure speckle photography technique utilizing 633 nm laser light was used in the production of the speckle pattern. Subsequent illumination of a double exposed negative using the same wavelength radiation produces Young's fringes from which the in-plane displacements are measured. Stresses imposed by compressive loading produced measurable strains in the glasses and glass-ceramic.

  16. A study of elastic behaviour and internal friction of aluminium substituted magnesium-copper ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, P. Venugopal; Mulay, V. N.; Reddy, K. Bhupal; Ramana, Y. V.

    1988-07-01

    The compressional ( Vl) and shear velocities ( Vs) of polycrystalline Al-substituted MgCu mixed ferrites having seven different compositions have been measured at room temperature by ultrasonic pulse transmission technique. The Young's modulus ( E0), rigidity modulus ( n0) and bulk modulus ( k0), corrected to zero porosity are found to decrease continuously with increasing Al-content. The variation of elastic moduli with composition has been explained in terms of binding forces between the ions. Internal friction (Q -1) for all the specimens has also been determined at room temperature by the pulse-echo technique.

  17. Measuring the elastic properties of living cells with atomic force microscopy indentation.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Joanna L; Kumar, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful and versatile tool for probing the mechanical properties of biological samples. This chapter describes the procedures for using AFM indentation to measure the elastic moduli of living cells. We include step-by-step instructions for cantilever calibration and data acquisition using a combined AFM/optical microscope system, as well as a detailed protocol for data analysis. Our protocol is written specifically for the BioScope™ Catalyst™ AFM system (Bruker AXS Inc.); however, most of the general concepts can be readily translated to other commercial systems. PMID:23027009

  18. Rheology of pig skin gelatine: Defining the elastic domain and its thermal and mechanical properties for geological analogue experiment applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Otterloo, Jozua; Cruden, Alexander R.

    2016-06-01

    Gelatine is a viscoelastic polymer that has been employed widely in geological analogue experiments to study processes related to the elastic behaviour of rocks such as tensile fracturing, seismicity and magma intrusion. However, the elastic domain of this material has not yet been clearly defined by rheological tests. Here we describe the rheology and define the elastic domain of 250 bloom/20 mesh pigskin gelatine at concentrations ≤ 10 wt.% and temperatures of 5-25 °C; however, these results are strongly comparable with gelatine of 245-260 bloom. New equations are given for the shear and elastic moduli in relationship to temperature and gelatine concentration. It is found that at concentrations ≤ 3 wt.% the tested gelatine is best described by a rheological model composed of a combination of Kelvin-Voight and Maxwell elements and, therefore, is not suitable to model elastic behaviour in geological analogue experiments. At higher concentrations it is best described by a simpler viscoelastic model comprising a single Maxwell element. In order to ensure that geological analogue experiments remain within the elastic domain where the elastic component is far greater than the viscous component, strain rates should range between 0.1 and 10 s- 1 and temperature values should be < 15 °C. With a Poisson's ratio of ~ 0.45 for concentrations > 3 wt.% analogue experiments using gelatine approximate the elastic behaviour of natural rocks more closely than previously assumed.

  19. Development of construction materials using nano-silica and aggregates recycled from construction and demolition waste.

    PubMed

    Mukharjee, Bibhuti Bhusan; Barai, Sudhirkumar V

    2015-06-01

    The present work addresses the development of novel construction materials utilising commercial grade nano-silica and recycled aggregates retrieved from construction and demolition waste. For this, experimental work has been carried out to examine the influence of nano-silica and recycled aggregates on compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, water absorption, density and volume of voids of concrete. Fully natural and recycled aggregate concrete mixes are designed by replacing cement with three levels (0.75%, 1.5% and 3%) of nano-silica. The results of the present investigation depict that improvement in early days compressive strength is achieved with the incorporation of nano-silica in addition to the restoration of reduction in compressive strength of recycled aggregate concrete mixes caused owing to the replacement of natural aggregates by recycled aggregates. Moreover, the increase in water absorption and volume of voids with a reduction of bulk density was detected with the incorporation of recycled aggregates in place of natural aggregates. However, enhancement in density and reduction in water absorption and volume of voids of recycled aggregate concrete resulted from the addition of nano-silica. In addition, the results of the study reveal that nano-silica has no significant effect on elastic modulus of concrete. PMID:25986048

  20. Elastic and Inelastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul

    2010-01-01

    There have been two articles in this journal that described a pair of collision carts used to demonstrate vividly the difference between elastic and inelastic collisions. One cart had a series of washers that were mounted rigidly on a rigid wooden framework, the other had washers mounted on rubber bands stretched across a framework. The rigidly…

  1. The Calculus of Elasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Warren B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the elasticity of demand, and shows that geometrically, it may be interpreted as the ratio of two simple distances along the tangent line: the distance from the point on the curve to the x-intercept to the distance from the point on the curve to the y-intercept. It also shows that total revenue is maximized at the transition…

  2. The Law of Elasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cocco, Alberto; Masin, Sergio Cesare

    2010-01-01

    Participants estimated the imagined elongation of a spring while they were imagining that a load was stretching the spring. This elongation turned out to be a multiplicative function of spring length and load weight--a cognitive law analogous to Hooke's law of elasticity. Participants also estimated the total imagined elongation of springs joined…

  3. Elastically tailored composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Elastically tailored composite structures using out-of-autoclave processes. Several unsymetric autoclave-cured and electron-beam-cured composite laminates are compared. Cantilevered beam (unbalanced/asymetric laminate) used to demonstrate bend-twist coupling effects. Photographed in building 1145, photographic studio.

  4. Hydrodynamic Elastic Magneto Plastic

    1985-02-01

    The HEMP code solves the conservation equations of two-dimensional elastic-plastic flow, in plane x-y coordinates or in cylindrical symmetry around the x-axis. Provisions for calculation of fixed boundaries, free surfaces, pistons, and boundary slide planes have been included, along with other special conditions.

  5. Spreading and spontaneous motility of multicellular aggregates on soft substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochard-Wyart, Françoise

    2013-03-01

    We first describe the biomechanics of multicellular aggregates, a model system for tissues and tumors. We first characterize the tissue mechanical properties (surface tension, elasticity, viscosity) by a new pipette aspiration technique. The aggregate exhibits a viscoelastic response but, unlike an inert fluid, we observe aggregate reinforcement with pressure, which for a narrow range of pressures results in pulsed contractions or shivering. We interpret this reinforcement as a mechanosensitive active response of the acto-myosin cortex. Such an active behavior has previously been found to cause tissue pulsation during dorsal closure of Drosophila embryo. We then describe the spreading of aggregates on rigid glass substrates, varying both intercellular and substrate adhesion. We find both partial and complete wetting regimes. For the dynamics, we find a universal spreading law at short time, analogous to that of a viscoelastic drop. At long time, we observe, for strong substrate adhesion, a precursor film spreading around the aggregate. Depending on aggregate cohesion, this precursor film can be a dense cellular monolayer (liquid state) or consist of individual cells escaping from the aggregate body (gas state). The transition from liquid to gas state appears also to be present in the progression of a tumor from noninvasive to metastatic, known as the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Finally, we describe the effect of the substrate rigidity on the phase diagram of wetting. On soft gels decorated with fibronectin and strongly cohesive aggregates, we have observed a wetting transition induced by the substrate rigidity: on ultra soft gels, below an elastic modulus Ec the aggregates do not spread, whereas above Ec we observe a precursor film expending with a diffusive law. The diffusion coefficient D(E) present a maximum for E =Em. A maximum of mobility versus the substrate rigidity had also been observed for single cells. Near Em, we observe a new phenomenon: a cell

  6. Renormalization of curvature elastic constants for elastic and fluid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ami, S.; Kleinert, H.

    1987-02-01

    We study the fluctuations of membranes with area and curvature elasticity and calculate the renormalization of the curvature elastic constants due to thermal fluctuations. For the mean curvature elastic constant the result is the same as obtained previously for “ideal membranes” which resist only to curvature deformations. The renormalization of the gaussian curvature, on the other hand, depends on the elastic contants. In an incompressible membrane, it is five times weaker than in an ideal membrane.

  7. Aggregates, broccoli and cauliflower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grey, Francois; Kjems, Jørgen K.

    1989-09-01

    Naturally grown structures with fractal characters like broccoli and cauliflower are discussed and compared with DLA-type aggregates. It is suggested that the branching density can be used to characterize the growth process and an experimental method to determine this parameter is proposed.

  8. Frequency dependent elastic impedance inversion for interstratified dispersive elastic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Zhaoyun; Yin, Xingyao; Wu, Guochen

    2016-08-01

    The elastic impedance equation is extended to frequency dependent elastic impedance equation by taking partial derivative to frequency. With this equation as the forward solver, a practical frequency dependent elastic impedance inversion approach is presented to implement the estimation of the interstratified dispersive elastic parameters which makes full use of the frequency information of elastic impedances. Three main steps are included in this approach. Firstly, the elastic Bayesian inversion is implemented for the estimation of elastic impedances from different incident angle. Secondly, with those estimated elastic impedances, their variations are used to estimate P-wave velocity and S-wave velocity. Finally, with the prior elastic impedance and P-wave and S-wave velocity information, the frequency dependent elastic variation with incident angle inversion is presented for the estimation of the interstratified elastic parameters. With this approach, the interstratified elastic parameters rather than the interface information can be estimated, making easier the interpretation of frequency dependent seismic attributes. The model examples illustrate the feasibility and stability of the proposed method in P-wave velocity dispersion and S-wave velocity dispersion estimation. The field data example validates the possibility and efficiency in hydrocarbon indication of the estimated P-wave velocity dispersion and S-wave velocity dispersion.

  9. Elastic properties of iron-bearing wadsleyite to 17.7 GPa: Implications for mantle mineral models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingyun; Bass, Jay D.; Kastura, Tomoo

    2014-03-01

    The sound velocities and single-crystal elastic moduli of iron-bearing wadsleyite with [Fe]/[Fe + Mg] molar ratio of 0.075 have been measured by Brillouin scattering experiments at high pressures up to 17.7 GPa. Pressure derivatives for the adiabatic bulk modulus (KS0) and shear modulus (μ0) are 4.1(1) and 1.45(4), respectively. A comparison of our results with previous Brillouin scattering results on the Mg end-member wadsleyite shows that incorporating 7.5 mol% iron in wadsleyite at high-pressure conditions decreases the shear moduli by ∼4-5%, but does not have a discernable effect on the bulk modulus. The effects of iron on the elastic moduli of wadsleyite at ambient pressure persist to high-pressure conditions at a relatively constant level. Using our results on iron-bearing wadsleyite at high pressure, we conclude that less olivine than in the pyrolite model of mantle composition provides a satisfactory explanation for 410 km seismic discontinuity at the top of the transition zone.

  10. Correlation between relaxations and plastic deformation, and elastic model of flow in metallic glasses and glass-forming liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Weihua

    2011-09-01

    We study the similarity and correlations between relaxations and plastic deformation in metallic glasses (MGs) and MG-forming liquids. It is shown that the microscope plastic events, the initiation and formation of shear bands, and the mechanical yield in MGs where the atomic sites are topologically unstable induced by applied stress, can be treated as the glass to supercooled liquid state transition induced by external shear stress. On the other hand, the glass transition, the primary and secondary relaxations, plastic deformation and yield can be attributed to the free volume increase induced flow, and the flow can be modeled as the activated hopping between the inherent states in the potential energy landscape. We then propose an extended elastic model to describe the flow based on the energy landscape theory. That is, the flow activation energy density is linear proportional to the instantaneous elastic moduli, and the activation energy density {rho}{sub E} is determined to be a simple expression of {rho}{sub E}=(10/11)G+(1/11)K. The model indicates that both shear and bulk moduli are critical parameters accounting for both the homogeneous and inhomogeneous flows in MGs and MG-forming liquids. The elastic model is experimentally certified. We show that the elastic perspectives offers a simple scenario for the flow in MGs and MG-forming liquids and are suggestive for understanding the glass transition, plastic deformation, and nature and characteristics of MGs.

  11. Correlation between relaxations and plastic deformation, and elastic model of flow in metallic glasses and glass-forming liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei Hua

    2011-09-01

    We study the similarity and correlations between relaxations and plastic deformation in metallic glasses (MGs) and MG-forming liquids. It is shown that the microscope plastic events, the initiation and formation of shear bands, and the mechanical yield in MGs where the atomic sites are topologically unstable induced by applied stress, can be treated as the glass to supercooled liquid state transition induced by external shear stress. On the other hand, the glass transition, the primary and secondary relaxations, plastic deformation and yield can be attributed to the free volume increase induced flow, and the flow can be modeled as the activated hopping between the inherent states in the potential energy landscape. We then propose an extended elastic model to describe the flow based on the energy landscape theory. That is, the flow activation energy density is linear proportional to the instantaneous elastic moduli, and the activation energy density ρE is determined to be a simple expression of ρE=10/11G +1/11K. The model indicates that both shear and bulk moduli are critical parameters accounting for both the homogeneous and inhomogeneous flows in MGs and MG-forming liquids. The elastic model is experimentally certified. We show that the elastic perspectives offers a simple scenario for the flow in MGs and MG-forming liquids and are suggestive for understanding the glass transition, plastic deformation, and nature and characteristics of MGs

  12. Influence of point defects on the elastic properties of mantle minerals and superhard materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yun-Yuan

    Perfect crystals do not exist in nature. Defects in crystals modify their physical and chemical properties. Elastic properties relate stress to reversible strain and reflect the strength of interatomic bonding forces, which may be influenced by defects. This thesis advances our understanding of how defects influence the elastic properties of mantle minerals and superhard materials. In this study, I focused on defects associated with ferric iron (Fe 3+) and hydrogen (H) substitution in mantle minerals with application to interpreting the water content of the mantle from observed seismic wave speeds. High-pressure, single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiments were carried out to determine the comparative compressibility of hydrous and anhydrous Fo90 wadsleyite, the dominant phase in Earth's mantle transition zone (410-660 km depth). The results show that hydration of wadsleyite with 1 wt.% H2O reduces its bulk modulus by 4.7%, but has no influence on its pressure derivative. Therefore, the reduction in bulk sound velocity of wadsleyite associated with H defects should persist to mantle pressures. In another study, the equation of state and electronic spin state of ferric iron (Fe3+) in Fe-Al-phase D were determined, pertaining to dense hydrous magnesium silicates that could potentially transport water into the lower mantle. The results show that Fe3+ undergoes a gradual spin transition between 40 and 65 GPa, causing pronounced bulk-elastic softening of Fe-Al phase D within the spin transition pressure interval. Results provide an alternative interpretation for small-scale seismic heterogeneities beneath the Pacific rim. In addition to mantle silicates, I have determined the influence of nitrogen defects on the elastic properties of natural and synthetic diamond. The measurements of elastic moduli of synthetic nano-polycrystalline diamond (NPD) and natural type Ia diamond feature a newly developed optical contact micrometer for ultrasonic sample thickness measurements

  13. Moduli stabilization with F-term uplifting in heterotic string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Kwang Sik

    2008-11-23

    In this work, we examine the role of F-term uplifting in stabilizing moduli within the framework of heterotic string theory. In turns out that the uplifting sector plays an important role in stabilizing both the dilaton and the volume modulus. To fix the volume modulus at a self-dual point of modular invariant potential, the modular weight of uplifting field is required to satisfy certain conditions. Generalizing to the case with an anomalous U(1) gauge symmetry, we also study its implications for supersymmetry breaking. It is found that the U(1) sector gives contributions to soft terms which are generically comparable to the dilaton mediated contributions.

  14. Moduli stabilization, F-term uplifting, and soft supersymmetry breaking terms

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Higaki, Tetsutaro; Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Omura, Yuji

    2007-01-15

    We study moduli stabilization with F-term uplifting. As a source of uplifting F-term, we consider spontaneous supersymmetry breaking models, e.g. the Polonyi model and the Intriligator-Seiberg-Shih model. We analyze potential minima by requiring almost vanishing vacuum energy and evaluate the size of modulus F-term. We also study soft SUSY-breaking terms. In our scenario, the mirage mediation is dominant in gaugino masses. Scalar masses can be comparable with gaugino masses or much heavier, depending on couplings with spontaneous supersymmetry breaking sector.

  15. Feeding strategies as revealed by the section moduli of the humerus bones in bipedal theropod dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Scott; Richards, Zachary

    2015-03-01

    The section modulus of a bone is a measure of its ability to resist bending torques. Carnivorous dinosaurs presumably had strong arm bones to hold struggling prey during hunting. Some theropods are believed to have become herbivorous and such animals would not have needed such strong arms. In this work, the section moduli of the humerus bones of bipedal theropod dinosaurs (from Microvenator celer to Tyrannosaurus rex) are studied to determine the maximum bending loads their arms could withstand. The results show that bending strength is not of uniform importance to these magnificent animals. The predatory theropods had strong arms for use in hunting. In contrast, the herbivorous dinosaurs had weaker arms.

  16. Phenomenology of stabilizing moduli in a framework of gx meson compactification of M-theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Jing

    This thesis explores an interesting class of fluxless G 2 compactifications of M-theory, where all the moduli are stabilized and a TeV scale is generated with the Planck scale as the only dimensionful input. A well-motivated phenomenological model---the G 2-MSSM, can be naturally defined within this framework. In this thesis, important phenomenological aspects of the G2-MSSM are carefully studied. First, the soft supersymmetry breaking parameters and the superpartner mass spectrum are computed. The spectrum is found to contain light gauginos and heavy scalars with a wino LSP when the vacuum energy is tuned to be small. The prospects for discovery at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are promising. The model predicts a spectacular four-top signature, which can be easily identified at the LHC. In addition, the charginos are meta-stable and could be detected directly at the LHC providing additional information about the nature of the LSP. Second, in the G 2-MSSM CP-violating phases occur in the quark and lepton Yukawas but are not generated from the supersymmetry breaking. However, in such models additional CP violation can be generated because the soft trilinear matrices are not proportional to the Yukawa matrices. The estimated upper bounds for the electric dipole moments of the electron, neutron and mercury are all within the current experimental limits and could be probed in the near future. Finally, the cosmological moduli/gravitino problems and the issue of too little thermal but excessive non-thermal dark matter from the decays of moduli are studied. It is shown that the late decaying moduli not only satisfy the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints but also avoid the gravitino problem. The non-thermal production of wino LSPs gives a right amount of relic density. The phenomenological results obtained in this thesis can be tested by coming experiments, particularly the LHC experiments, and therefore provide a means to connect the experimental data to a high scale

  17. Measuring the complex moduli of materials by using the double pendulum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casimir, J. B.; Vinh, T.

    2012-03-01

    A interesting double pendulum system permits evaluating complex moduli (Young and shear) without independent excitation and transducers. This instrument was described at France in 1934 by Le Rolland and Sorin in Etude d' une méthode utilisant le couplage entre deux systèmes oscillants pour la détermination de la résistance mécanique des constructions et la mesure des modules d' élasticité, scientific and technical publications of the Air Force Ministry, no. 47, 1934. This device is revisited and improved in order to make it applicable to measurements of viscoelastic materials.

  18. Moduli stabilization in type II Calabi-Yau compactifications at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lihui; Partouche, Hervé

    2012-11-01

    We consider the type II superstring compactified on Calabi-Yau threefolds, at finite temperature. The latter is implemented at the string level by a free action on the Euclidean time circle. We show that all Kähler and complex structure moduli involved in the gauge theories geometrically engineered in the vicinity of singular loci are lifted by the stringy thermal effective potential. The analysis is based on the effective gauged super-gravity at low energy, without integrating out the non-perturbative BPS states becoming massless at the singular loci. The universal form of the action in the weak coupling regime and at low enough temperature is determined in two cases. Namely, the conifold locus, as well as a locus where the internal space develops a genus- g curve of A N -1 singularities, thus realizing an SU( N ) gauge theory coupled to g hypermultiplets in the adjoint. In general, we argue that the favored points of stabilization sit at the intersection of several such loci. As a result, the entire vector multiplet moduli space is expected to be lifted, together with hypermultiplet moduli. The scalars are dynamically stabilized during the cosmological evolution induced by the back-reaction of the thermal effective potential on the originally static background. When the universe expands and the temperature T drops, the scalars converge to minima, with damped oscillations. Moreover, they store an energy density that scales as T 4, which never dominates over radiation. The reason for this is that the mass they acquire at one-loop is of order the temperature scale, which is time-dependent rather than constant. As an example, we analyze the type IIA compactification on a hy-persurface {P}_{{( {1,1,2,2,6} )}}^4 [12], with Hodge numbers h 11 = 2 and h 12 = 128. In this case, both Kähler moduli are stabilized at a point, where the internal space develops a node and an enhanced SU(2) gauge theory coupled to 2 adjoint hypermultiplets. This shows that in the dual thermal

  19. Physics of cell elasticity, shape and adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safran, S. A.; Gov, N.; Nicolas, A.; Schwarz, U. S.; Tlusty, T.

    2005-07-01

    We review recent theoretical work that analyzes experimental measurements of the shape, fluctuations and adhesion properties of biological cells. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of the cytoskeleton and cell elasticity and we contrast the shape and adhesion of elastic cells with fluid-filled vesicles. In red blood cells (RBC), the cytoskeleton consists of a two-dimensional network of spectrin proteins. Our analysis of the wavevector and frequency dependence of the fluctuation spectrum of RBC indicates that the spectrin network acts as a confining potential that reduces the fluctuations of the lipid bilayer membrane. However, since the cytoskeleton is only sparsely connected to the bilayer, one cannot regard the composite cytoskeleton-membrane as a polymerized object with a shear modulus. The sensitivity of RBC fluctuations and shapes to ATP concentration may reflect topological defects induced in the cytoskeleton network by ATP. The shapes of cells that adhere to a substrate are strongly determined by the cytoskeletal elasticity that can be varied experimentally by drugs that depolymerize the cytoskeleton. This leads to a tension-driven retraction of the cell body and a pearling instability of the resulting ray-like protrusions. Recent experiments have shown that adhering cells exert polarized forces on substrates. The interactions of such “force dipoles” in either bulk gels or on surfaces can be used to predict the nature of self-assembly of cell aggregates and may be important in the formation of artificial tissues. Finally, we note that cell adhesion strongly depends on the forces exerted on the adhesion sites by the tension of the cytoskeleton. The size and shape of the adhesion regions are strongly modified as the tension is varied and we present an elastic model that relates this tension to deformations that induce the recruitment of new molecules to the adhesion region. In all these examples, cell shape and adhesion differ from vesicle shape and

  20. Time-dependent behaviour of high performance concrete: influence of coarse aggregate characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makani, A.; Vidal, T.; Pons, G.; Escadeillas, G.

    2010-06-01

    This paper examines the influence of coarse aggregate characteristics on the time-dependent deformations of High Performances Concretes (HPC). Four concretes made using the same cement paste but incorporating different types of aggregate (rolled siliceous gravel, crushed granite, crushed limestone and crushed siliceous gravels) were studied in order to investigate the effect of aggregate properties on the compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, shrinkage and creep. The results indicate that the aggregate type has a significant effect on creep and shrinkage deformations of HPC. An influence of the shape of aggregate on time-dependent deformations has also been observed. On the basis of these results, long-term behaviour seems to be correlated to the characteristics of the Interfacial Transition Zone (ITZ) strongly depending on the mineralogical nature and properties of aggregates. The experimental results are compared with the values calculated using the current Eurocode 2 model in order to assess the accuracy of the predictions.