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Sample records for aggregate elastic moduli

  1. Measuring Moduli Of Elasticity At High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfenden, Alan

    1993-01-01

    Shorter, squatter specimens and higher frequencies used in ultrasonic measurement technique. Improved version of piezo-electric ultrasonic composite oscillator technique used to measure moduli of elasticity of solid materials at high temperatures.

  2. Elastic moduli of pyrope rich garnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B. K.; Pandey, A. K.; Singh, C. K.

    2013-06-01

    The elastic properties of minerals depend on its composition, crystal structure, temperature and level of defects. The elastic parameters are important for the interpretation of the structure and composition of the garnet rich family. In present work we have calculated the elastic moduli such as isothermal bulk modulus, Young's modulus and Shear modulus over a wide range of temperature from 300 K to 1000 K by using Birch EOS and Poirrier Tarantola equation of state. The obtained results are compared with the experimental results obtained by measuring the elastic moduli of single crystal. The calculated results show that the logarithmic isothermal EOS does not cooperate well with experimental results.

  3. Polycrystalline gamma plutonium's elastic moduli versus temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, Albert; Betts, J; Trugman, A; Mielke, C H; Mitchell, J N; Ramos, M; Stroe, I

    2009-01-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy was used to measure the elastic properties of pure polycrystalline {sup 239}Pu in the {gamma} phase. Shear and longitudinal elastic moduli were measured simultaneously and the bulk modulus was computed from them. A smooth, linear, and large decrease of all elastic moduli with increasing temperature was observed. They calculated the Poisson ratio and found that it increases from 0.242 at 519 K to 0.252 at 571 K. These measurements on extremely well characterized pure Pu are in agreement with other reported results where overlap occurs.

  4. Elastic Moduli of Lungs. Revision,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    dodecahedron . The analysis is based on a variational statement of non-linear structural mechanics, and the results show how the moduli depend on the... dodecahedron . In this analysis, each face of the dodecahedron will be subjected to a traction consistent with the prescribed uniform stress but, at the same...Lbility Codes nA or . . .4 . .. . . . . . . -4- the average mean curvature of each face vanishes.* By virtue of its symmetry, the isolated dodecahedron

  5. Elastic moduli and instability in molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpakov, V. P.; Tse, J. S.; Belosludov, V. R.; Belosludov, R. V.

    1997-07-01

    The phenomenon of instability in pressurized molecular crystals is studied using the lattice-dynamics approach. General expressions for the elastic moduli are obtained taking into account both short-range and long-range (electrostatic) interactions within the framework of the quasi-harmonic approximation. The behaviour of a system under changing pressure and temperature conditions and the Born stability criteria are investigated. Two types of instabilities, dynamical and thermodynamical, associated with the elastic moduli are presented. The dynamical instability occurs when the instability of acoustic modes of the phonon Hamiltonian occurs in the q = 0 region. The nature of thermodynamical stability implies that the equilibrium state of the crystal becomes thermodynamically unstable with respect to a small homogeneous deformation of the crystal lattice when the Born stability criteria are violated for isothermal or adiabatic moduli. These types of instabilities are illustrated in a series of calculations for ice Ic using the SPC potential for water's interactions. The results show that one of the stability conditions for the isothermal (adiabatic) moduli 0953-8984/9/27/015/img7 is violated at 0953-8984/9/27/015/img8 kbar and, as a consequence, thermodynamical instability occurs. In contrast, the dynamical instability of the phonon spectrum occurs at a significantly higher pressure, about 20 kbar.

  6. Resonant Acoustic Determination of Complex Elastic Moduli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, David A.; Garrett, Steven L.

    1991-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive, yet accurate method for measuring the dynamic complex modulus of elasticity is described. Using a 'free-free' bar selectively excited in three independent vibrational modes, the shear modulus is obtained by measuring the frequency of the torsional resonant mode and the Young's modulus is determined from measurement of either the longitudinal or flexural mode. The damping properties are obtained by measuring the quality factor (Q) for each mode. The Q is inversely proportional to the loss tangent. The viscoelastic behavior of the sample can be obtained by tracking a particular resonant mode (and thus a particular modulus) using a phase locked loop (PLL) and by changing the temperature of the sample. The change in the damping properties is obtained by measuring the in-phase amplitude of the PLL which is proportional to the Q of the material. The real and imaginary parts or the complex modulus can be obtained continuously as a function of parameters such as temperature, pressure, or humidity. For homogeneous and isotropic samples only two independent moduli are needed in order to characterize the complete set of elastic constants, thus, values can be obtained for the dynamic Poisson's ratio, bulk modulus, Lame constants, etc.

  7. Micromechanics Solution for the Elastic Moduli of Fiber-Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Yu Jia; Yang, Liu; Jin, Yu; Guang, Jia Lian; Ming, Liu

    2014-09-01

    The overall elastic moduli of fiber-reinforced concrete composite materials are investigated by employing the theory of micromechanics. A method based on the Mori-Tanaka theory and triple inhomogeneities is found to provide a sufficiently accurate evaluation of the average elastic properties of fiber-reinforced concrete composite materials. The inhomogeneities of the materials are divided into three groups: a fine aggregate, a coarse aggregate, and fibers (steel or polymer). The elastic moduli of fiber-reinforced concrete composite materials are determined as functions of the physical properties and volume fraction of sand, gravel, fibers (steel or polymer), and cement paste as a matrix. The theoretical results obtained are compared with published experimental data. The parameters affecting the elastic moduli of fiber-reinforced concrete are discussed in detail.

  8. Acoustic oscillations and elastic moduli of single gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Zijlstra, Peter; Tchebotareva, Anna L; Chon, James W M; Gu, Min; Orrit, Michel

    2008-10-01

    We present the first acoustic vibration measurements of single gold nanorods with well-characterized dimensions and crystal structure. The nanorods have an average size of 90 nm x 30 nm and display two vibration modes, the breathing mode and the extensional mode. Correlation between the dimensions obtained from electron microscope images and the vibrational frequencies of the same particle allows us to determine the elastic moduli for each individual nanorod. Contrary to previous reports on ensembles of gold nanorods, we find that the single particle elastic moduli agree well with bulk values.

  9. Computation of graphene elastic moduli at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zubko, I. Yu. Kochurov, V. I.

    2015-10-27

    Finding the values of parameters for the simplest Mie’s family potentials is performed in order to estimate elastic moduli of graphene monolayers using lattice statics approach. The coincidence criterion of the experimentally determined Poisson’s ratio with the estimated value is taken in order to select dimensionless power parameters of the Mie-type potential. It allowed obtaining more precise estimation of elastic properties in comparison with variety of other potentials for carbon atoms in graphene monolayer.

  10. The Development of Fibrous Glasses Having High Elastic Moduli

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1955-11-01

    MACHLAN OWENS - CORNING FIBERGLAS CORPORATION NEWARK, OHIO D-TICEl EUTE n NOVEMBER15 LIP4Ry 1rP9 .~n 4MAY 311956 ITWAs document bas boon approved for...ELASTIC MODULI GEORGE R. MACHLAN OWENS - CORNING FIBERGLAS CORPORATION NEWARIM OHIO Accesion For NTIS CRA&I " - DTIC TAB U-iann~ou -cd :" Justification...Laboratories, Owens - Corning Fiberglas Corporation, Newark, Ohio under USAF Contract No. AF 33(616)-2422. This contract was initiated under Project No

  11. Elastic moduli of MoSi sub 2 -based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, S.R.; Schwarz, R.B. )

    1992-07-01

    We prepared MoSi{sub 2}, two-phase MoSi{sub 2}/Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, and (Mo,W)Si{sub 2} solid-solution alloy powders by mechanically alloying mixtures of elemental molybdenum, silicon, and tungsten. These powders were consolidated by hot-pressing them at 1500 {degree}C in graphite dies. We measured the elastic moduli of these alloys by a recently developed technique for non-contact ultrasonic spectroscopy. Second-phase Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} additions to MoSi{sub 2} result in decreased values for {ital G} and {ital E}, whereas alloying MoSi{sub 2} with WSi{sub 2} results in increased values for {ital G} and {ital E}. An analysis of these Young's moduli and of data from the literature for various intermetallic alloys suggests that for any given alloy system, the Young's moduli for its various intermetallics as a function of density fall on a straight line. Further, the lines for the different alloy systems are approximately parallel.

  12. Thermodynamics and elastic moduli of fluids with steeply repulsive potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyes, D. M.

    1997-08-01

    Analytic expressions for the thermodynamic properties and elastic moduli of molecular fluids interacting with steeply repulsive potentials are derived using Rowlinson's hard-sphere perturbation treatment which employs a softness parameter, λ specifying the deviation from the hard-sphere potential. Generic potentials of this form might be used to represent the interactions between near-hard-sphere stabilized colloids. Analytic expressions for the equivalent hard-sphere diameter of inverse power [ɛ(σ/r)n where ɛ sets the energy scale and σ the distance scale] exponential and logarithmic potential forms are derived using the Barker-Henderson formula. The internal energies in the hard-sphere limit are predicted essentially exactly by the perturbation approach when compared against molecular dynamics simulation data using the same potentials. The elastic moduli are similarly accurately predicted in the hard-sphere limit, as they are trivially related to the internal energy. The compressibility factors from the perturbation expansion do not compare as favorably with simulation data, and in this case the Carnahan-Starling equation of state prediction using the analytic effective hard-sphere diameter would appear to be a preferable route for this thermodynamic property. A more refined state point dependent definition for the effective hard-sphere diameter is probably required for this property.

  13. Elastic moduli of nanocrystalline binary Al alloys with Fe, Co, Ti, Mg and Pb alloying elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babicheva, Rita I.; Bachurin, Dmitry V.; Dmitriev, Sergey V.; Zhang, Ying; Kok, Shaw Wei; Bai, Lichun; Zhou, Kun

    2016-05-01

    The paper studies the elastic moduli of nanocrystalline (NC) Al and NC binary Al-X alloys (X is Fe, Co, Ti, Mg or Pb) by using molecular dynamics simulations. X atoms in the alloys are either segregated to grain boundaries (GBs) or distributed randomly as in disordered solid solution. At 0 K, the rigidity of the alloys increases with decrease in atomic radii of the alloying elements. An addition of Fe, Co or Ti to the NC Al leads to increase in the Young's E and shear μ moduli, while an alloying with Pb decreases them. The elastic moduli of the alloys depend on a distribution of the alloying elements. The alloys with the random distribution of Fe or Ti demonstrate larger E and μ than those for the corresponding alloys with GB segregations, while the rigidity of the Al-Co alloy is higher for the case of the GB segregations. The moduli E and μ for polycrystalline aggregates of Al and Al-X alloys with randomly distributed X atoms are estimated based on the elastic constants of corresponding single-crystals according to the Voigt-Reuss-Hill approximation, which neglects the contribution of GBs to the rigidity. The results show that GBs in NC materials noticeably reduce their rigidity. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of μ for the NC Al-X alloys is analyzed. Only the Al-Co alloy with GB segregations shows the decrease in μ to the lowest extent in the temperature range of 0-600 K in comparison with the NC pure Al.

  14. On the isotropic moduli of 2D strain-gradient elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auffray, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, the simplest model of strain-gradient elasticity will be considered, that is, the isotropy in a bidimensional space. Paralleling the definition of the classic elastic moduli, our aim is to introduce second-order isotropic moduli having a mechanical interpretation. A general construction process of these moduli will be proposed. As a result, it appears that many sets can be defined, each of them constituted of 4 moduli: 3 associated with 2 distinct mechanisms and the last one coupling these mechanisms. We hope that these moduli (and the construction process) might be useful for forthcoming investigations on generalized continuum mechanics.

  15. An ultrasonic method for studying elastic moduli as a function of temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, R. G.

    1969-01-01

    Ultrasonic method is used to determine the elastic moduli of materials used in components of high-temperature nuclear reactors. An ultrasonic, pulse-echo technique determines the velocity of sound waves propogating in a heated region of rod-shaped specimens. From these velocities, the elastic moduli are calculated.

  16. Elastic moduli and vibrational modes in jammed particulate packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Hideyuki; Saitoh, Kuniyasu; Silbert, Leonardo E.

    2016-06-01

    When we elastically impose a homogeneous, affine deformation on amorphous solids, they also undergo an inhomogeneous, nonaffine deformation, which can have a crucial impact on the overall elastic response. To correctly understand the elastic modulus M , it is therefore necessary to take into account not only the affine modulus MA, but also the nonaffine modulus MN that arises from the nonaffine deformation. In the present work, we study the bulk (M =K ) and shear (M =G ) moduli in static jammed particulate packings over a range of packing fractions φ . The affine MA is determined essentially by the static structural arrangement of particles, whereas the nonaffine MN is related to the vibrational eigenmodes. We elucidate the contribution of each vibrational mode to the nonaffine MN through a modal decomposition of the displacement and force fields. In the vicinity of the (un)jamming transition φc, the vibrational density of states g (ω ) shows a plateau in the intermediate-frequency regime above a characteristic frequency ω*. We illustrate that this unusual feature apparent in g (ω ) is reflected in the behavior of MN: As φ →φc , where ω*→0 , those modes for ω <ω* contribute less and less, while contributions from those for ω >ω* approach a constant value which results in MN to approach a critical value MN c, as MN-MN c˜ω* . At φc itself, the bulk modulus attains a finite value Kc=KA c-KN c>0 , such that KN c has a value that remains below KA c. In contrast, for the critical shear modulus Gc, GN c and GA c approach the same value so that the total value becomes exactly zero, Gc=GA c-GN c=0 . We explore what features of the configurational and vibrational properties cause such a distinction between K and G , allowing us to validate analytical expressions for their critical values.

  17. Study of the elastic behavior of synthetic lightweight aggregates (SLAs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Na

    Synthetic lightweight aggregates (SLAs), composed of coal fly ash and recycled plastics, represent a resilient construction material that could be a key aspect to future sustainable development. This research focuses on a prediction of the elastic modulus of SLA, assumed as a homogenous and isotropic composite of particulates of high carbon fly ash (HCFA) and a matrix of plastics (HDPE, LDPE, PS and mixture of plastics), with the emphasis on SLAs made of HCFA and PS. The elastic moduli of SLA with variable fly ash volume fractions are predicted based on finite element analyses (FEA) performed using the computer programs ABAQUS and PLAXIS. The effect of interface friction (roughness) between phases and other computation parameters; e.g., loading strain, stiffness of component, element type and boundary conditions, are included in these analyses. Analytical models and laboratory tests provide a baseline for comparison. Overall, results indicate ABAQUS generates elastic moduli closer to those predicted by well-established analytical models than moduli predicted from PLAXIS, especially for SLAs with lower fly ash content. In addition, an increase in roughness, loading strain indicated increase of SLAs stiffness, especially as fly ash content increases. The elastic moduli obtained from unconfined compression generally showed less elastic moduli than those obtained from analytical and ABAQUS 3D predictions. This may be caused by possible existence of pre-failure surface in specimen and the directly interaction between HCFA particles. Recommendations for the future work include laboratory measurements of SLAs moduli and FEM modeling that considers various sizes and random distribution of HCFA particles in SLAs.

  18. Clarification of the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds on the effective elastic moduli of polycrystals with hexagonal, trigonal, and tetragonal symmetries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watt, J.P.; Peselnick, L.

    1980-01-01

    Bounds on the effective elastic moduli of randomly oriented aggregates of hexagonal, trigonal, and tetragonal crystals are derived using the variational principles of Hashin and Shtrikman. The bounds are considerably narrower than the widely used Voigt and Reuss bounds. The Voigt-Reuss-Hill average lies within the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds in nearly all cases. Previous bounds of Peselnick and Meister are shown to be special cases of the present results.

  19. Theoretical elastic moduli of ferromagnetic bcc Fe alloys.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hualei; Punkkinen, Marko P J; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente

    2010-07-14

    The polycrystalline elastic parameters of ferromagnetic Fe(1-x)M(x) (M = Al, Si, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Rh; 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.1) random alloys in the body centered cubic (bcc) crystallographic phase have been calculated using first-principles alloy theory in combination with statistical averaging methods. With a few exceptions, the agreement between the calculated and the available experimental data for the polycrystalline aggregates is satisfactory. All additions considered here decrease the bulk modulus (B) and Poisson's ratio (ν) of bcc Fe. The complex composition dependence of the C(44) single-crystal elastic constant is reflected in the polycrystalline shear modulus (G), Young's modulus (E), and Debye temperature (Θ). The polycrystalline anisotropy of bcc Fe is increased by all additions, and Al, Si, Ni, and Rh yield the largest alloying effects.

  20. Universal behavior of changes in elastic moduli of hot compressed oxide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenson, Mouritz N.; Guerette, Michael; Huang, Liping; Lönnroth, Nadja; Mauro, John C.; Rzoska, Sylwester J.; Bockowski, Michal; Smedskjaer, Morten M.

    2016-05-01

    The elastic moduli of glasses are important for numerous applications, but predicting them based on their chemical composition and forming history remains a great challenge. In this study, we investigate the relationship between densification and changes in elastic moduli as a result of isostatic compression up to 1 GPa of various oxide compositions at elevated temperature (so-called hot compression). An approximately linear relationship is observed between the relative changes in density and elastic moduli across a variety of glass families, although these glasses exhibit a diverse range of structural responses during compression owing to their dramatically different chemistries.

  1. Elastic moduli and vibrational modes in jammed particulate packings.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hideyuki; Saitoh, Kuniyasu; Silbert, Leonardo E

    2016-06-01

    When we elastically impose a homogeneous, affine deformation on amorphous solids, they also undergo an inhomogeneous, nonaffine deformation, which can have a crucial impact on the overall elastic response. To correctly understand the elastic modulus M, it is therefore necessary to take into account not only the affine modulus M_{A}, but also the nonaffine modulus M_{N} that arises from the nonaffine deformation. In the present work, we study the bulk (M=K) and shear (M=G) moduli in static jammed particulate packings over a range of packing fractions φ. The affine M_{A} is determined essentially by the static structural arrangement of particles, whereas the nonaffine M_{N} is related to the vibrational eigenmodes. We elucidate the contribution of each vibrational mode to the nonaffine M_{N} through a modal decomposition of the displacement and force fields. In the vicinity of the (un)jamming transition φ_{c}, the vibrational density of states g(ω) shows a plateau in the intermediate-frequency regime above a characteristic frequency ω^{*}. We illustrate that this unusual feature apparent in g(ω) is reflected in the behavior of M_{N}: As φ→φ_{c}, where ω^{*}→0, those modes for ω<ω^{*} contribute less and less, while contributions from those for ω>ω^{*} approach a constant value which results in M_{N} to approach a critical value M_{Nc}, as M_{N}-M_{Nc}∼ω^{*}. At φ_{c} itself, the bulk modulus attains a finite value K_{c}=K_{Ac}-K_{Nc}>0, such that K_{Nc} has a value that remains below K_{Ac}. In contrast, for the critical shear modulus G_{c}, G_{Nc} and G_{Ac} approach the same value so that the total value becomes exactly zero, G_{c}=G_{Ac}-G_{Nc}=0. We explore what features of the configurational and vibrational properties cause such a distinction between K and G, allowing us to validate analytical expressions for their critical values.

  2. Aggregate and Single-Crystalline Elasticity of hcp Cobalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonangeli, D.; Krisch, M.; Fiquet, G.; Badro, J.; Farber, D. L.

    2005-12-01

    The capability to produce detailed models of the internal structure of the Earth and other planets critically hinges on our knowledge of the pressure dependence of sound velocities and elastic moduli. Here we present data on the complete elastic tensor of hcp cobalt under hydrostatic compression to 39 GPa, derived by Inelastic X-Ray Scattering (IXS). These results are complemented by an IXS study on polycrystalline cobalt throughout the stability range of the hcp phase, to 99 GPa. Interestingly, the single crystal elastic anisotropy is only very weakly reflected in the effective anisotropy of the aggregate. A Voigt-Reuss-Hill average of the single crystal moduli reproduces the results on powder within 3%, up to 75 GPa. Above this pressure, we observe an anomalous softening in the density evolution of the aggregate velocities. This type of comparative analysis between single crystal and polycrystal is essential for characterizing the bulk properties of textured samples and provides a basis for the rigorous testing of the orientational averaging schemes currently employed to link the single crystal elastic moduli with the aggregate sound velocities. We note that only through the combined approach of experiment and theory (ab initio calculations) we can progress in both refining first principle methods and in getting more insights into the physics of the investigated system. In the specific case of Co, we inferred a magnetic transition to be the physical origin for the high pressure elastic anomaly. Finally, our study points out the importance of coupling between the electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom to elastic properties at high pressure. We suggest that these effects likely play an important role in elasticity of deep planetary interiors.

  3. Strongly anisotropic elastic moduli of nematic elastomers: analytical expressions and nonlinear temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Z; Jin, L; Huo, Y

    2010-05-01

    Exact formulae for the elastic moduli of the nematic elastomers are obtained by the implicit function method based on somewhat general energy functions. The formulae indicate that both the moduli parallel and perpendicular to the director of the nematic elastomers are smaller than the modulus of the classical elastomers because of the mechanical-nematic coupling. Moreover, the moduli are generally anisotropic due to the biaxiality induced by stretching the nematic elastomers perpendicular to the director. Then we get the explicit analytical expressions of the parallel and perpendicular moduli by making use of the Landau-de Gennes free energy and the neo-classical elastic energy. Very different from the classical elastomers, they are both strongly nonlinear functions of the temperature in the nematic phase. Furthermore, their ratio, the degree of anisotropy, changes with the temperature as well. The results agree qualitatively with some experiments. Better quantitative agreement is obtained by some modifications of the constitutive relation of the elastic energy.

  4. Real time studies of Elastic Moduli Pu Aging using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorov, Boris

    Elastic moduli are fundamental thermodynamic susceptibilities that connect directly to thermodynamics, electronic structure and give important information about mechanical properties. To determine the time evolution of the elastic properties in 239Pu and it Ga alloys, is imperative to study its phase stability and self-irradiation damage process. The most-likely sources of these changes include a) ingrowth of radioactive decay products like He and U, b) the introduction of radiation damage, c) δ-phase instabilities towards α-Pu or to Pu3Ga. The measurement of mechanical resonance frequencies can be made with extreme precision and used to compute the elastic moduli without corrections giving important insight in this problem. Using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy, we measured the time dependence of the mechanical resonance frequencies of fine-grained polycrystalline δ-phase 239Pu, from 300K up to 480K. At room temperature, the shear modulus shows an increase in time (stiffening), but the bulk modulus decreases (softening). These are the first real-time measurements of room temperature aging of the elastic moduli, and the changes are consistent with elastic moduli measurements performed on 44 year old δ-Pu. As the temperature is increased, the rate of change increases exponentially, with both moduli becoming stiffer with time. For T>420K an abrupt change in the time dependence is observed indicating that the bulk and shear moduli have opposite rates of change. Our measurements provide a basis for ruling out the decomposition of δ-Pu towards α-Pu or Pu3Ga, and indicate a complex defect-related scenario from which we are gathering important clues.

  5. Elasticity theory equations and fracture condition for materials of varying moduli

    SciTech Connect

    Oleinikov, A.I.

    1986-11-01

    Many massive rocks and composite materials belong to the class of materials of varying moduli with definite distinct deformation and strength properties under tension and compression. The results of experiments indicate that the difference between the properties of materials of different moduli is not limited to tension and compression cases but can also appear clearly for any change in the form of the state of stress. Elasticity theory equations are constructed here to describe the strain of materials of varying moduli as well as the dependence of the strength properties on the form of the state of strain. Tests were done on coal, limestone, diabase and cement and results are shown. Using the dependencies obtained, Poisson's ratio and the elastic modulus can be calculated for these rocks. The equations and conditions of fracture proposed, are written in a simple invariant form.

  6. Imperfection sensitivity due to the elastic moduli in the Roorda-Koiter frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elishakoff, Isaac; Starnes, J. H., Jr.; Li, Y. W.

    1998-01-01

    In this study, it is demonstrated through a simple example of the Roorda-Koiter frame that the unavoidable dissimilarity in the distribution of elastic moduli may further reduce the load-carrying capacity in addition to the well-recognized effect of initial geometric imperfections.

  7. A modified direct method for the calculation of elastic moduli of composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.A.; Lubliner, J.; Monteiro, P.J.M.

    1996-02-01

    The modified direct method is a scheme for the estimation of elastic moduli of composite materials and is based on micromechanical theory and classical elasticity. Using the statistical homogeneous assumption and the two-phase composite approach, one takes the average field of the composite. Due to the complexity of composite materials, the modeling parameters for the exact analytical theory are not always available and then the effective bounds are usually too wide for practical application. For engineering purposes a more practical and general model is desired. The modified direct method was developed to approach the above requirements. In this work the modified direct method is compared with different available experiment data and methods, for example, Kuster-Toksoez, Christensen-Lo. The comparison results show that the modified direct method provides a very good estimation of the elastic moduli in different kinds of problems, such as the soft and hard inclusion cases, porous materials, at various concentrations and/or various porosities.

  8. Determination of Elastic Moduli of Fiber-Resin Composites Using an Impulse Excitation Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viens, Michael J.; Johnson, Jeffrey J.

    1996-01-01

    The elastic moduli of graphite/epoxy and graphite/cyanate ester composite specimens with various laminate lay-ups was determined using an impulse excitation/acoustic resonance technique and compared to those determined using traditional strain gauge and extensometer techniques. The stiffness results were also compared to those predicted from laminate theory using uniaxial properties. The specimen stiffnesses interrogated ranged from 12 to 30 Msi. The impulse excitation technique was found to be a relatively quick and accurate method for determining elastic moduli with minimal specimen preparation and no requirement for mechanical loading frames. The results of this investigation showed good correlation between the elastic modulus determined using the impulse excitation technique, strain gauge and extensometer techniques, and modulus predicted from laminate theory. The flexural stiffness determined using the impulse excitation was in good agreement with that predicted from laminate theory. The impulse excitation/acoustic resonance interrogation technique has potential as a quality control test.

  9. Molecular Modeling of the Axial and Circumferential Elastic Moduli of Tubulin

    PubMed Central

    Zeiger, A. S.; Layton, B. E.

    2008-01-01

    Microtubules play a number of important mechanical roles in almost all cell types in nearly all major phylogenetic trees. We have used a molecular mechanics approach to perform tensile tests on individual tubulin monomers and determined values for the axial and circumferential moduli for all currently known complete sequences. The axial elastic moduli, in vacuo, were found to be 1.25 GPa and 1.34 GPa for α- and β-bovine tubulin monomers. In the circumferential direction, these moduli were 378 MPa for α- and 460 MPa for β-structures. Using bovine tubulin as a template, 269 homologous tubulin structures were also subjected to simulated tensile loads yielding an average axial elastic modulus of 1.10 ± 0.14 GPa for α-tubulin structures and 1.39 ± 0.68 GPa for β-tubulin. Circumferentially the α- and β-moduli were 936 ± 216 MPa and 658 ± 134 MPa, respectively. Our primary finding is that that the axial elastic modulus of tubulin diminishes as the length of the monomer increases. However, in the circumferential direction, no correlation exists. These predicted anisotropies and scale dependencies may assist in interpreting the macroscale behavior of microtubules during mitosis or cell growth. Additionally, an intergenomic approach to investigating the mechanical properties of proteins may provide a way to elucidate the evolutionary mechanical constraints imposed by nature upon individual subcellular components. PMID:18621829

  10. Pressure derivatives of elastic moduli of fused quartz to 10 kb

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peselnick, L.; Meister, R.; Wilson, W.H.

    1967-01-01

    Measurements of the longitudinal and shear moduli were made on fused quartz to 10 kb at 24??5??C. The anomalous behavior of the bulk modulus K at low pressure, ???K ???P 0, at higher pressures. The pressure derivative of the rigidity modulus ???G ???P remains constant and negative for the pressure range covered. A 15-kb hydrostatic pressure vessel is described for use with ultrasonic pulse instrumentation for precise measurements of elastic moduli and density changes with pressure. The placing of the transducer outside the pressure medium, and the use of C-ring pressure seals result in ease of operation and simplicity of design. ?? 1967.

  11. Multi-scale modelling of elastic moduli of trabecular bone

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, Elham; Jasiuk, Iwona; Yoo, Andrew; Lee, YikHan; Liszka, Tadeusz

    2012-01-01

    We model trabecular bone as a nanocomposite material with hierarchical structure and predict its elastic properties at different structural scales. The analysis involves a bottom-up multi-scale approach, starting with nanoscale (mineralized collagen fibril) and moving up the scales to sub-microscale (single lamella), microscale (single trabecula) and mesoscale (trabecular bone) levels. Continuum micromechanics methods, composite materials laminate theory and finite-element methods are used in the analysis. Good agreement is found between theoretical and experimental results. PMID:22279160

  12. Application of a modified method of ultrasonic measurements for determination of elastic moduli of rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Zel, I. Yu.; Ivankina, T. I.; Levin, D. M.; Lokajicek, T.

    2015-07-15

    The velocities of elastic waves with quasi-longitudinal and quasi-transverse polarizations in a spherical rock sample have been measured. The experimental values of velocities are used to calculate 21 elastic moduli of the sample. For comparison, the effective elastic properties of the sample are simulated based on the data on the crystallographic textures of rock-forming minerals obtained by neutron diffraction. It is shown that the largest discrepancy between the model predictions and experimental velocity values is observed for transversely polarized waves.

  13. Proposed moduli of dry rock and their application to predicting elastic velocities of sandstones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2005-01-01

    Velocities of water-saturated isotropic sandstones under low frequency can be modeled using the Biot-Gassmann theory if the moduli of dry rocks are known. On the basis of effective medium theory by Kuster and Toksoz, bulk and shear moduli of dry sandstone are proposed. These moduli are related to each other through a consolidation parameter and provide a new way to calculate elastic velocities. Because this parameter depends on differential pressure and the degree of consolidation, the proposed moduli can be used to calculate elastic velocities of sedimentary rocks under different in-place conditions by varying the consolidation parameter. This theory predicts that the ratio of P-wave to S-wave velocity (Vp/Vs) of a dry rock decreases as differential pressure increases and porosity decreases. This pattern of behavior is similar to that of water-saturated sedimentary rocks. If microcracks are present in sandstones, the velocity ratio usually increases as differential pressure increases. This implies that this theory is optimal for sandstones having intergranular porosities. Even though the accurate behavior of the consolidation parameter with respect to differential pressure or the degree of consolidation is not known, this theory presents a new way to predict S-wave velocity from P-wave velocity and porosity and to calculate elastic velocities of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments. For given properties of sandstones such as bulk and shear moduli of matrix, only the consolidation parameter affects velocities, and this parameter can be estimated directly from the measurements; thus, the prediction of S-wave velocity is accurate, reflecting in-place conditions.

  14. Elastic Moduli and Damping of Vibrational Modes of Aluminum/Silicon Carbide Composite Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leidecker, Henning

    1996-01-01

    Elastic and shear moduli were determined for two aluminum matrix composites containing 20 and 40 volume percent discontinuous silicon carbide, respectively, using transverse, longitudinal, and torsional vibrational modes of specimens prepared as thin beams. These moduli are consistent with those determined from stress-strain measurements. The damping factors for these modes were also determined. Thermal properties are used to show that part of the damping of transverse modes is caused by the transverse thermal currents discussed by C. Zener (thermo-elastic damping); this damping is frequency-dependent with a maximum damping factor of approximately 0.002. The remaining damping is frequency-independent, and has roughly similar values in transverse, longitudinal, and torsional modes: approximately 0.0001.

  15. Simultaneous moduli measurement of elastic materials at elevated temperatures using an ultrasonic waveguide method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periyannan, Suresh; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2015-11-01

    A novel technique for simultaneously measuring the moduli of elastic isotropic material, as a function of temperature, using two ultrasonic guided wave modes that are co-generated using a single probe is presented here. This technique can be used for simultaneously measuring Young's modulus (E) and shear modulus (G) of different materials over a wide range of temperatures (35 °C-1200 °C). The specimens used in the experiments have special embodiments (for instance, a bend) at one end of the waveguide and an ultrasonic guided wave generator/detector (transducer) at the other end for obtaining reflected signals in a pulse-echo mode. The orientation of the transducer can be used for simultaneously generating/receiving the L(0,1) and/or T(0,1) using a single transducer in a waveguide on one end. The far end of the waveguides with the embodiment is kept inside a heating device such as a temperature-controlled furnace. The time of flight difference, as a function of uniform temperature distribution region (horizontal portion) of bend waveguides was measured and used to determine the material properties. Several materials were tested and the comparison between values reported in the literature and measured values were found to be in agreement, for both elastic moduli (E and G) measurements, as a function of temperature. This technique provides significant reduction in time and effort over conventional means of measurement of temperature dependence of elastic moduli.

  16. Experimentally-based multiscale model of the elastic moduli of bovine trabecular bone and its constituents.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Elham; Novitskaya, Ekaterina; Li, Jun; Jasiuk, Iwona; McKittrick, Joanna

    2015-09-01

    The elastic moduli of trabecular bone were modeled using an analytical multiscale approach. Trabecular bone was represented as a porous nanocomposite material with a hierarchical structure spanning from the collagen-mineral level to the trabecular architecture level. In parallel, compression testing was done on bovine femoral trabecular bone samples in two anatomical directions, parallel to the femoral neck axis and perpendicular to it, and the measured elastic moduli were compared with the corresponding theoretical results. To gain insights on the interaction of collagen and minerals at the nanoscale, bone samples were deproteinized or demineralized. After such processing, the treated samples remained as self-standing structures and were tested in compression. Micro-computed tomography was used to characterize the hierarchical structure of these three bone types and to quantify the amount of bone porosity. The obtained experimental data served as inputs to the multiscale model and guided us to represent bone as an interpenetrating composite material. Good agreement was found between the theory and experiments for the elastic moduli of the untreated, deproteinized, and demineralized trabecular bone.

  17. Dynamic elastic moduli in magnetic gels: Normal modes and linear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessot, Giorgio; Löwen, Hartmut; Menzel, Andreas M.

    2016-09-01

    In the perspective of developing smart hybrid materials with customized features, ferrogels and magnetorheological elastomers allow a synergy of elasticity and magnetism. The interplay between elastic and magnetic properties gives rise to a unique reversible control of the material behavior by applying an external magnetic field. Albeit few works have been performed on the time-dependent properties so far, understanding the dynamic behavior is the key to model many practical situations, e.g., applications as vibration absorbers. Here we present a way to calculate the frequency-dependent elastic moduli based on the decomposition of the linear response to an external stress in normal modes. We use a minimal three-dimensional dipole-spring model to theoretically describe the magnetic and elastic interactions on the mesoscopic level. Specifically, the magnetic particles carry permanent magnetic dipole moments and are spatially arranged in a prescribed way, before they are linked by elastic springs. An external magnetic field aligns the magnetic moments. On the one hand, we study regular lattice-like particle arrangements to compare with previous results in the literature. On the other hand, we calculate the dynamic elastic moduli for irregular, more realistic particle distributions. Our approach measures the tunability of the linear dynamic response as a function of the particle arrangement, the system orientation with respect to the external magnetic field, as well as the magnitude of the magnetic interaction between the particles. The strength of the present approach is that it explicitly connects the relaxational modes of the system with the rheological properties as well as with the internal rearrangement of the particles in the sample, providing new insight into the dynamics of these remarkable materials.

  18. A first-principles study of cementite (Fe3C) and its alloyed counterparts: Elastic constants, elastic anisotropies, and isotropic elastic moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, G.

    2015-08-01

    A comprehensive computational study of elastic properties of cementite (Fe3C) and its alloyed counterparts (M3C (M = Al, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hf, Mn, Mo, Nb, Ni, Si, Ta, Ti, V, W, Zr, Cr2FeC and CrFe2C) having the crystal structure of Fe3C is carried out employing electronic density-functional theory (DFT), all-electron PAW pseudopotentials and the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation energy (GGA). Specifically, as a part of our systematic study of cohesive properties of solids and in the spirit of materials genome, following properties are calculated: (i) single-crystal elastic constants, Cij, of above M3Cs; (ii) anisotropies of bulk, Young's and shear moduli, and Poisson's ratio based on calculated Cijs, demonstrating their extreme anisotropies; (iii) isotropic (polycrystalline) elastic moduli (bulk, shear, Young's moduli and Poisson's ratio) of M3Cs by homogenization of calculated Cijs; and (iv) acoustic Debye temperature, θD, of M3Cs based on calculated Cijs. We provide a critical appraisal of available data of polycrystalline elastic properties of alloyed cementite. Calculated single crystal properties may be incorporated in anisotropic constitutive models to develop and test microstructure-processing-property-performance links in multi-phase materials where cementite is a constituent phase.

  19. Elastic moduli of precompressed pyrophyllite used in ultrahigh pressure research. [propagation of ultrasonic pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, W.; Ruoff, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    The propagation of ultrasonic pulses in pyrophyllite specimens was studied to determine the effect of specimen precompression on the measured elastic moduli. Measurements were made at room pressure and, for the precompressed specimens, to pressures of 3 kbar. Pyrophyllite was found to be elastically anisotropic, apparently the result of the fabric present in our material. The room pressure adiabatic bulk modulus as measured on specimens made of isostatically compacted powered pyrophyllite was determined to be 96.1 kbar. The wave speeds of ultrasonic pulses in pyrophyllite were found to decrease with increasing specimen precompression. A limiting value of precompression was found, above which no further decrease in wave speed was observed. For the shear wave speeds this occurs at 10 kbar while for the longitudinal wave at 25 kbar. In the limit, the shear waves propagate 20% slower than in the unprecompressed samples; for the longitudinal wave the difference is 30%.

  20. Electrostatic and electrokinetic contributions to the elastic moduli of a driven membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoste, D.; Menon, G. I.; Bazant, M. Z.; Joanny, J. F.

    2009-03-01

    We discuss the electrostatic contribution to the elastic moduli of a cell or artificial membrane placed in an electrolyte and driven by a DC electric field. The field drives ion currents across the membrane, through specific channels, pumps or natural pores. In steady state, charges accumulate in the Debye layers close to the membrane, modifying the membrane elastic moduli. We first study a model of a membrane of zero thickness, later generalizing this treatment to allow for a finite thickness and finite dielectric constant. Our results clarify and extend the results presented by D. Lacoste, M. Cosentino Lagomarsino, and J.F. Joanny (EPL 77, 18006 (2007)), by providing a physical explanation for a destabilizing term proportional to k ⊥ 3 in the fluctuation spectrum, which we relate to a nonlinear (E2) electrokinetic effect called induced-charge electro-osmosis (ICEO). Recent studies of ICEO have focused on electrodes and polarizable particles, where an applied bulk field is perturbed by capacitive charging of the double layer and drives the flow along the field axis toward surface protrusions; in contrast, we predict “reverse” ICEO flows around driven membranes, due to curvature-induced tangential fields within a nonequilibrium double layer, which hydrodynamically enhance protrusions. We also consider the effect of incorporating the dynamics of a spatially dependent concentration field for the ion channels.

  1. Effect of TeO 2 on the elastic moduli of sodium borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saddeek, Yasser B.; Latif, Lamia. Abd El

    2004-05-01

    Sodium borate glass containing tellurite as Te xNa 2-2 xB 4-4 xO 7-5 x with x=0, 0.05, 0.15, 0.25 and 0.35 have been prepared by rapid quenching. Ultrasonic velocity (both longitudinal and shear) measurements have been made using a transducer operated at the fundamental frequency of 4 MHz at room temperature. The density was measured by the conventional Archimedes method. The elastic moduli, the Debye temperature, Poisson's ratio, and the parameters derived from the Makishima-Mackenzie model and the bond compression model have been obtained as a function of TeO 2 content. The monotonic decrease in the velocities and the elastic moduli, and the increase in the ring diameter and the ratio Kbc/ Ke as a function of TeO 2 modifier content reveals the loose packing structure, which is attributed to the increase in the molar volume and the reduction in the vibrations of the borate lattice. The observed results confirm that the addition of TeO 2 changes the rigid character of Na 2B 4O 7 to a matrix of ionic behaviour bonds (NBOs). This is due to the creation of more and more discontinuities and defects in the glasses, thus breaking down the borax structure.

  2. [Compliance of brain--Part 2 Approach from the local elastic and viscous moduli (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, N; Masuzawa, H; Sano, K; Kihira, M; Kobayashi, S

    1982-05-01

    It is important to have information about physical property of the brain in order to elucidate both the physical changes of the morbid brain and the physical mechanism of the traumatic brain injury. Under the hypothesis that reaction of the active brain to the dynamic load can be compared to the Maxwell-Voigt three dimensional model, elastic property of the brain was obtained as the Young's modulus (E: 10(-2) Kgf/cm2) of which error was less than 10%, and viscous property of the brain as the Viscous modulus (eta: 10(-2) Kgf.sec/cm2). And it was confirmed that the reactive pressure of the brain to dynamic load came from the surface to about 15 mm depth of the brain. In this report, experiments were done on the alive normal brains, the edematous ones nd necrotic ones which were produced by the cold injury (dry ice-aceton) in dogs (9.0--16.0 Kg). In the normal brain, E = 3.24 +/- 0.25, eta = 1.10 +/- 0.37 and these moduli were also stable when the physical conditions of the brain were stable. Under the dehydration by 20% mannitol, E increased in its value (p less than 0.01). But under the hydration by 5% glucose, E did not change at all. In the edematous brain, E = 3.28 +/- 0.44, eta = 1.74 +/- 0.06 and E of the edematous brain was almost same as that of normal ones, but under the dehydration, E of the edematous brain decreased (p less than 0.10), on the other hand it increased in its value under the hydration (p less than 0.05). In the necrotic brain, E = 1.60 +/- 0.14, eta = 0.82 +/- 0.28. Both moduli were of lower values and moreover they did not change its values at all under dehydration and hydration. As Young's modulus is the elastic index of the brain, the converse (1/E) should be compliance of the brain, that is to say, buffer effect of the brain. As for the compliance, the necrotic brain has maximum buffer effect and the over-hydrated edematous brain and the dehydrated normal ones have minimum buffer effect. From analysing the changes of the viscous moduli

  3. Elastic moduli of δ-Pu 239 reveal aging in real time

    DOE PAGES

    Maiorov, Boris; Betts, Jonathan B.; Söderlind, Per; ...

    2017-03-28

    We study the time evolution (aging) of the elastic moduli of an eight-year-old polycrystalline δ- Pu 2.0 at % Ga alloy (δ-Pu:Ga ) from 295K to nearly 500K in real time using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS). After 8 years of aging at 295K, the bulk and shear moduli increase at a normalized rate of 0.2%/year and 0.6%/year respectively. As the temperature is raised, two time dependences are observed, an exponential one of about a week, followed by a linear one (constant rate). The linear rate is thermally activated with an activation energy of 0.33+0.06 eV. Above 420K a qualitative changemore » in the time evolution is observed; the bulk modulus decreases with time while the shear modulus continues to stiffen. No change is observed as the α-β transition temperature is crossed as would be expected if a decomposition of δ-Pu:Ga to α-Pu and Pu3Ga occurred over the temperature range studied. Our results indicate that the main mechanism of aging is creation of defects that are partially annealed starting at T = 420 K.« less

  4. Role of cytoskeleton and elastic moduli in cellular response to nanosecond pulsed electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Gary L.; Roth, Caleb; Tolstykh, Gleb; Kuipers, Marjorie; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2013-02-01

    Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) are known to increase cell membrane permeability to small molecules in accordance with dosages. As previous work has focused on nsPEF exposures in whole cells, electrodeformation may contribute to this induced-permeabilization in addition to other biological mechanisms. Here, we hypothesize that cellular elasticity, based upon the cytoskeleton, affects nsPEF-induced decrease in cellular viability. Young's moduli of various types of cells have been calculated from atomic force microscopy (AFM) force curve data, showing that CHO cells are stiffer than non-adherent U937 and Jurkat cells, which are more susceptible to nsPEF exposure. To distinguish any cytoskeletal foundation for these observations, various cytoskeletal reagents were applied. Inhibiting actin polymerization significantly decreased membrane integrity, as determined by relative propidium uptake and phosphatidylserine externalization, upon exposure at 150 kV/cm with 100 pulses of 10 ns pulse width. Exposure in the presence of other drugs resulted in insignificant changes in membrane integrity and 24-hour viability. However, Jurkat cells showed greater lethality than latrunculin-treated CHO cells of comparable elasticity. From these results, it is postulated that cellular elasticity rooted in actin-membrane interaction is only a minor contributor to the differing responses of adherent and non-adherent cells to nsPEF insults.

  5. Linearity, resolution, and covariance in GRT inversions for anisotropic elastic moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Carl; de Hoop, Maarten V.; Burridge, Robert

    1995-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the linearized inversion of elastic wave data using the Generalized Radon Transformation to give anisotropic medium parameters. Assumptions of linearity are examined by comparing linearized reflection coefficients calculated using the Born approximation with full plane-wave reflection coefficients. In typical sand/shale models we have found that the linearity assumption is valid only to approximately 60 degrees from the normal. Linear dependencies between the scattering patterns produced by individual moduli result in an ill-posed inverse problem. Utilizing P-wave data, we find that for the Transversely Isotropic case similarities in the C55 and C13 scattering directivity mean that they cannot be distinguished. C11 is best observed at wide-angle and hence estimates made using limited aperture data are subject to large error. Quasi-Monte Carlo techniques are adapted to carry out the 4D inversion integral.

  6. Frequency moments and elastic moduli of liquid rubidium at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, A. B.; Bhatt, N. K.; Thakore, B. Y.; Jani, A. R.

    2013-06-01

    To shed light on structural and vibrational dynamics of liquid rubidium (Rb) at different temperatures; a treatment of pseudopotential theory has been performed. The temperature dependence of structure factor and pair correlation functions has been determined using Percus-Yevick approximation consistent to the model potential used. In the present study, a modified empty core potential is employed to explain an electron-ion interaction. It consists of the full electron-ion interaction and a delta function which represents the orthogonalisation effect due to the s-core states in such sp-bonded metals. The temperature dependence of pair potential is achieved by using the damping factor exp(-αkBTr/2kF) in the pair potential. Expressions for phonon dispersions are derived using different frequency moments. Results for longitudinal phonon frequencies and various elastic moduli are obtained.

  7. Mapping elasticity moduli of atherosclerotic plaque in situ via atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tracqui, Philippe; Broisat, Alexis; Toczek, Jackub; Mesnier, Nicolas; Ohayon, Jacques; Riou, Laurent

    2011-04-01

    Several studies have suggested that evolving mechanical stresses and strains drive atherosclerotic plaque development and vulnerability. Especially, stress distribution in the plaque fibrous capsule is an important determinant for the risk of vulnerable plaque rupture. Knowledge of the stiffness of atherosclerotic plaque components is therefore of critical importance. In this work, force mapping experiments using atomic force microscopy (AFM) were conducted in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mouse, which represents the most widely used experimental model for studying mechanisms underlying the development of atherosclerotic lesions. To obtain the elastic material properties of fibrous caps and lipidic cores of atherosclerotic plaques, serial cross-sections of aortic arch lesions were probed at different sites. Atherosclerotic plaque sub-structures were subdivided into cellular fibrotic, hypocellular fibrotic and lipidic rich areas according to histological staining. Hertz's contact mechanics were used to determine elasticity (Young's) moduli that were related to the underlying histological plaque structure. Cellular fibrotic regions exhibit a mean Young modulus of 10.4±5.7kPa. Hypocellular fibrous caps were almost six-times stiffer, with average modulus value of 59.4±47.4kPa, locally rising up to ∼250kPa. Lipid rich areas exhibit a rather large range of Young's moduli, with average value of 5.5±3.5kPa. Such precise quantification of plaque stiffness heterogeneity will allow investigators to have prospectively a better monitoring of atherosclerotic disease evolution, including arterial wall remodeling and plaque rupture, in response to mechanical constraints imposed by vascular shear stress and blood pressure.

  8. Computing elastic moduli on 3-D X-ray computed tomography image stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garboczi, E. J.; Kushch, V. I.

    2015-03-01

    A numerical task of current interest is to compute the effective elastic properties of a random composite material by operating on a 3D digital image of its microstructure obtained via X-ray computed tomography (CT). The 3-D image is usually sub-sampled since an X-ray CT image is typically of order 10003 voxels or larger, which is considered to be a very large finite element problem. Two main questions for the validity of any such study are then: can the sub-sample size be made sufficiently large to capture enough of the important details of the random microstructure so that the computed moduli can be thought of as accurate, and what boundary conditions should be chosen for these sub-samples? This paper contributes to the answer of both questions by studying a simulated X-ray CT cylindrical microstructure with three phases, cut from a random model system with known elastic properties. A new hybrid numerical method is introduced, which makes use of finite element solutions coupled with exact solutions for elastic moduli of square arrays of parallel cylindrical fibers. The new method allows, in principle, all of the microstructural data to be used when the X-ray CT image is in the form of a cylinder, which is often the case. Appendix A describes a similar algorithm for spherical sub-samples, which may be of use when examining the mechanical properties of particles. Cubic sub-samples are also taken from this simulated X-ray CT structure to investigate the effect of two different kinds of boundary conditions: forced periodic and fixed displacements. It is found that using forced periodic displacements on the non-geometrically periodic cubic sub-samples always gave more accurate results than using fixed displacements, although with about the same precision. The larger the cubic sub-sample, the more accurate and precise was the elastic computation, and using the complete cylindrical sample with the new method gave still more accurate and precise results. Fortran 90

  9. A first-principles study of cementite (Fe{sub 3}C) and its alloyed counterparts: Elastic constants, elastic anisotropies, and isotropic elastic moduli

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, G.

    2015-08-15

    A comprehensive computational study of elastic properties of cementite (Fe{sub 3}C) and its alloyed counterparts (M{sub 3}C (M = Al, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hf, Mn, Mo, Nb, Ni, Si, Ta, Ti, V, W, Zr, Cr{sub 2}FeC and CrFe{sub 2}C) having the crystal structure of Fe{sub 3}C is carried out employing electronic density-functional theory (DFT), all-electron PAW pseudopotentials and the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation energy (GGA). Specifically, as a part of our systematic study of cohesive properties of solids and in the spirit of materials genome, following properties are calculated: (i) single-crystal elastic constants, C{sub ij}, of above M{sub 3}Cs; (ii) anisotropies of bulk, Young’s and shear moduli, and Poisson’s ratio based on calculated C{sub ij}s, demonstrating their extreme anisotropies; (iii) isotropic (polycrystalline) elastic moduli (bulk, shear, Young’s moduli and Poisson’s ratio) of M{sub 3}Cs by homogenization of calculated C{sub ij}s; and (iv) acoustic Debye temperature, θ{sub D}, of M{sub 3}Cs based on calculated C{sub ij}s. We provide a critical appraisal of available data of polycrystalline elastic properties of alloyed cementite. Calculated single crystal properties may be incorporated in anisotropic constitutive models to develop and test microstructure-processing-property-performance links in multi-phase materials where cementite is a constituent phase.

  10. Preparation and Elastic Moduli of Germanate Glass Containing Lead and Bismuth

    PubMed Central

    Sidek, Hj A. A.; Bahari, Hamid R.; Halimah, Mohamed K.; Yunus, Wan M. M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the rapid melt quenching technique preparation for the new family of bismuth-lead germanate glass (BPG) systems in the form of (GeO2)60–(PbO)40−x–(½Bi2O3)x where x = 0 to 40 mol%. Their densities with respect of Bi2O3 concentration were determined using Archimedes’ method with acetone as a floatation medium. The current experimental data are compared with those of bismuth lead borate (B2O3)20–(PbO)80−x–(Bi2O3)x. The elastic properties of BPG were studied using the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique where both longitudinal and transverse sound wave velocities have been measured in each glass samples at a frequency of 15 MHz and at room temperature. Experimental data shows that all the physical parameters of BPG including density and molar volume, both longitudinal and transverse velocities increase linearly with increasing of Bi2O3 content in the germanate glass network. Their elastic moduli such as longitudinal, shear and Young’s also increase linearly with addition of Bi2O3 but the bulk modulus did not. The Poisson’s ratio and fractal dimensionality are also found to vary linearly with the Bi2O3 concentration. PMID:22606000

  11. Temperature- and thickness-dependent elastic moduli of polymer thin films

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical properties of polymer ultrathin films are usually different from those of their counterparts in bulk. Understanding the effect of thickness on the mechanical properties of these films is crucial for their applications. However, it is a great challenge to measure their elastic modulus experimentally with in situ heating. In this study, a thermodynamic model for temperature- (T) and thickness (h)-dependent elastic moduli of polymer thin films Ef(T,h) is developed with verification by the reported experimental data on polystyrene (PS) thin films. For the PS thin films on a passivated substrate, Ef(T,h) decreases with the decreasing film thickness, when h is less than 60 nm at ambient temperature. However, the onset thickness (h*), at which thickness Ef(T,h) deviates from the bulk value, can be modulated by T. h* becomes larger at higher T because of the depression of the quenching depth, which determines the thickness of the surface layer δ. PMID:21711747

  12. Preparation and elastic moduli of germanate glass containing lead and bismuth.

    PubMed

    Sidek, Hj A A; Bahari, Hamid R; Halimah, Mohamed K; Yunus, Wan M M

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the rapid melt quenching technique preparation for the new family of bismuth-lead germanate glass (BPG) systems in the form of (GeO(2))(60)-(PbO)(40-) (x)-(½Bi(2)O(3))(x) where x = 0 to 40 mol%. Their densities with respect of Bi(2)O(3) concentration were determined using Archimedes' method with acetone as a floatation medium. The current experimental data are compared with those of bismuth lead borate (B(2)O(3))(20)-(PbO)(80-) (x)-(Bi(2)O(3))(x). The elastic properties of BPG were studied using the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique where both longitudinal and transverse sound wave velocities have been measured in each glass samples at a frequency of 15 MHz and at room temperature. Experimental data shows that all the physical parameters of BPG including density and molar volume, both longitudinal and transverse velocities increase linearly with increasing of Bi(2)O(3) content in the germanate glass network. Their elastic moduli such as longitudinal, shear and Young's also increase linearly with addition of Bi(2)O(3) but the bulk modulus did not. The Poisson's ratio and fractal dimensionality are also found to vary linearly with the Bi(2)O(3) concentration.

  13. Determination of the elastic moduli of a machinable ceramic over the range from room temperature to 800/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, H.; Nagai, S.; Imai, H.

    1987-07-01

    The ultrasonic velocities of a machinable ceramic were measured using the pulse echo overlap technique. The machinable ceramic consists of 5- to 10-..mu..m crystallite blocks of mica in a boroaluminosilicate glass matrix. The elastic moduli are deduced from the sound velocities over the temperature range from room temperature to 800/sup 0/C. Their temperature change is well described by a fourth-degree polynomial. Although the moduli decrease with increasing temperature, a plateau region appears at about 450/sup 0/C. This anomalous behavior is explained by applying the simple rule of mixtures to cnstitutent materials, the mica crystallites, and the glass matrix.

  14. On the origins of anomalous elastic moduli and failure strains of GaP nanowires.

    PubMed

    Yashinski, M S; Gutiérrez, H R; Muhlstein, C L

    2017-02-10

    Previous reports suggest that Raman peaks in uniaxially loaded nanowires with diamond cubic and zinc blende crystal structures shift at rates that are significantly different from bulk specimens. We have investigated the first order Raman scattering from individual, free-standing, [111] oriented GaP nanowires ranging from 75 to 180 nm in diameter at uniaxial tensile stresses up to 5 GPa. All of the phonon modes were shifted to frequencies lower than previously reported for bulk GaP, and significant splitting of the degenerate transverse optical mode was observed. A general analysis method using single and double Lorentzian fits of the Raman peaks is presented and used to report more accurate values of the phonon deformation potentials (PDPs) that relate uniaxial strains to Raman peak shifts in GaP. A new set of PDPs determined from the nanowires revealed that the they have elastic moduli and failure strains that are consistent with bulk GaP. The analysis method eliminated the anomalous, inconsistent deformation behavior commonly reported in Raman-based strain measurements of nanowires, and can be extended to other materials systems with degenerate phonons.

  15. On the origins of anomalous elastic moduli and failure strains of GaP nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashinski, M. S.; Gutiérrez, H. R.; Muhlstein, C. L.

    2017-02-01

    Previous reports suggest that Raman peaks in uniaxially loaded nanowires with diamond cubic and zinc blende crystal structures shift at rates that are significantly different from bulk specimens. We have investigated the first order Raman scattering from individual, free-standing, [111] oriented GaP nanowires ranging from 75 to 180 nm in diameter at uniaxial tensile stresses up to 5 GPa. All of the phonon modes were shifted to frequencies lower than previously reported for bulk GaP, and significant splitting of the degenerate transverse optical mode was observed. A general analysis method using single and double Lorentzian fits of the Raman peaks is presented and used to report more accurate values of the phonon deformation potentials (PDPs) that relate uniaxial strains to Raman peak shifts in GaP. A new set of PDPs determined from the nanowires revealed that the they have elastic moduli and failure strains that are consistent with bulk GaP. The analysis method eliminated the anomalous, inconsistent deformation behavior commonly reported in Raman-based strain measurements of nanowires, and can be extended to other materials systems with degenerate phonons.

  16. Elastic moduli of rock glasses under pressure to 8 kilobars and geophysical implications.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meister, R.; Robertson, E.C.; Werke, R.W.; Raspet, R.

    1980-01-01

    Shear and longitudinal velocities were measured by the ultrasonic phase comparison method as a function of pressure to 8 kbar on synthetic glasses of basalt, andesite, rhyolite, and quartz composition and on natural obsidian. Velocities of most of the glasses decrease anomalously with pressure, but increasingly more-normal behavior occurs with decrease in SiO2 content. The pressure derivatives of rigidity and bulk modulus increase linearly, from -3.39 to -0.26 and from -5.91 to +2.09, respectively, with decrease in SiO2 content from 100 to 49%. The change from negative to positive in the pressure derivatives of both moduli and observed at Poisson's ratio of about 0.25 is consitent with the Smyth model for the anomalous elastic behavior of glass. If the temperature in the upper mantle is about 1500oC, tholeiitic basalt would be molten in accordance with the partial melt explanation for the low-velocity zone; at 1300oC and below, basalt would be in the glassy state, especially if more felsic than tholeiite. -Authors

  17. Laser ultrasonic assessment of the effects of porosity and microcracking on the elastic moduli of nuclear graphites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicer, James B.; Olasov, Lauren R.; Zeng, Fan W.; Han, Karen; Gallego, Nidia C.; Contescu, Cristian I.

    2016-04-01

    Laser ultrasonic methods have been used to measure the elastic moduli of various nuclear graphites. Measurements were made to assess wavespeeds for longitudinal and shear waves in different propagation directions and these were used along with density measurements to compute the longitudinal and shear moduli as well as Young's modulus. All moduli decreased with increasing graphite porosity and these variations could be interpreted using models describing the effect of porosity on material stiffness. Extrapolations for these models to zero porosity were used to infer the moduli for theoretically dense graphite; the results were far below predicted values reported in the literature for fully dense, polycrystalline, isotropic graphite. Differences can be attributed to microcracking in the graphite microstructure. Using models for the effects of microcracking on modulus, estimates for microcrack populations indicate that the number of cracks per unit volume must be much greater than the number of pores per unit volume. Experimental results reported in the literature for irradiated graphites as well as for the stress dependence of graphite modulus are consistent with the influence of microcracking on elastic behavior and could be interpreted using concepts developed here. Results in this work for graphite structure-property relationships should allow for more sophisticated characterization of nuclear graphites using ultrasonic methods.

  18. Silicate perovskite analogue ScAlO 3: temperature dependence of elastic moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Jennifer; Rigden, Sally M.; Jackson, Ian

    2000-08-01

    The elastic moduli of ScAlO 3 perovskite, a very close structural analogue for MgSiO 3 perovskite, have been measured between 300 and 600 K using high precision ultrasonic interferometry in an internally heated gas-charged pressure vessel. This new capability for high temperature measurement of elastic wave speeds has been demonstrated on polycrystalline alumina. The temperature derivatives of elastic moduli of Al 2O 3 measured in this study agree within 15% with expectations based on published single-crystal data. For ScAlO 3 perovskite, the value of (∂ KS/∂ T) P is -0.033 GPa K -1 and (∂ G/∂ T) P is -0.015 GPa K -1. The relative magnitudes of these derivatives agree with the observation in Duffy and Anderson [Duffy, T.S., Anderson, D.L., 1989. Seismic velocities in mantle minerals and the mineralogy of the upper mantle. J. Geophys. Res. 94, 1895-1912.] that |(∂ KS/∂ T) P| is typically about twice |(∂ G/∂ T) P|. The value of (∂ KS/∂ T) P for ScAlO 3 is intermediate between those inferred less directly from V( P, T) studies of Fe-free and Fe- and Al-bearing MgSiO 3 perovskites [Wang, Y., Weidner, D.J., Liebermann, R.C., Zhao, Y., 1994. P- V- T equation of state of (Mg,Fe)SiO 3 perovskite: constraints on composition of the lower mantle. Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. 83, 13-40; Mao, H.K., Hemley, R.J., Shu, J., Chen, L., Jephcoat, A.P., Wu, Y., Bassett, W.A., 1991. Effect of pressure, temperature and composition on the lattice parameters and density of (Mg,Fe) SiO 3 perovskite to 30 GPa. J. Geophys. Res. 91, 8069-8079; Zhang, Weidner, D., 1999. Thermal equation of state of aluminum-enriched silicate perovskite. Science 284, 782-784]. The value of |(∂ G/∂ T)| P for ScAlO 3 is similar to those of most other mantle silicate phases but lower than the recent determination for MgSiO 3 perovskite [Sinelnikov, Y., Chen, G., Neuville, D.R., Vaughan, M.T., Liebermann, R.C., 1998. Ultrasonic shear wave velocities of MgSiO 3 perovskite at 8 GPa and 800K and

  19. Direct micromechanics derivation and DEM confirmation of the elastic moduli of isotropic particulate materials:. Part II Particle rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischmann, J. A.; Drugan, W. J.; Plesha, M. E.

    2013-07-01

    In Part I, Fleischmann et al. (2013), we performed theoretical analyses of three cubic packings of uniform spheres (simple, body-centered, and face-centered) assuming no particle rotation, employed these results to derive the effective elastic moduli for a statistically isotropic particulate material, and assessed these results by performing numerical discrete element method (DEM) simulations with particle rotations prohibited. In this second part, we explore the effect that particle rotation has on the overall elastic moduli of a statistically isotropic particulate material. We do this both theoretically, by re-analyzing the elementary cells of the three cubic packings with particle rotation allowed, which leads to the introduction of an internal parameter to measure zero-energy rotations at the local level, and numerically via DEM simulations in which particle rotation is unrestrained. We find that the effects of particle rotation cannot be neglected. For unrestrained particle rotation, we find that the self-consistent homogenization assumption applied to the locally body-centered cubic packing incorporating particle rotation effects most accurately predicts the measured values of the overall elastic moduli obtained from the DEM simulations, in particular Poisson's ratio. Our new self-consistent results and theoretical modeling of particle rotation effects together lead to significantly better theoretical predictions of Poisson's ratio than all prior published results. Moreover, our results are based on a direct micromechanics analysis of specific geometrical packings of uniform spheres, in contrast to prior theoretical analyses based on hypotheses involving overall inter-particle contact distributions. Thus, our results permit a direct assessment of the reasons for the theory-experiment discrepancies noted in the literature with regard to previous theoretical derivations of the macroscopic elastic moduli for particulate materials, and our new theoretical results

  20. A Statistical Learning Framework for Materials Science: Application to Elastic Moduli of k-nary Inorganic Polycrystalline Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Maarten; Chen, Wei; Notestine, Randy; Persson, Kristin; Ceder, Gerbrand; Jain, Anubhav; Asta, Mark; Gamst, Anthony

    2016-10-01

    Materials scientists increasingly employ machine or statistical learning (SL) techniques to accelerate materials discovery and design. Such pursuits benefit from pooling training data across, and thus being able to generalize predictions over, k-nary compounds of diverse chemistries and structures. This work presents a SL framework that addresses challenges in materials science applications, where datasets are diverse but of modest size, and extreme values are often of interest. Our advances include the application of power or Hölder means to construct descriptors that generalize over chemistry and crystal structure, and the incorporation of multivariate local regression within a gradient boosting framework. The approach is demonstrated by developing SL models to predict bulk and shear moduli (K and G, respectively) for polycrystalline inorganic compounds, using 1,940 compounds from a growing database of calculated elastic moduli for metals, semiconductors and insulators. The usefulness of the models is illustrated by screening for superhard materials.

  1. A Statistical Learning Framework for Materials Science: Application to Elastic Moduli of k-nary Inorganic Polycrystalline Compounds

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Maarten; Chen, Wei; Notestine, Randy; Persson, Kristin; Ceder, Gerbrand; Jain, Anubhav; Asta, Mark; Gamst, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Materials scientists increasingly employ machine or statistical learning (SL) techniques to accelerate materials discovery and design. Such pursuits benefit from pooling training data across, and thus being able to generalize predictions over, k-nary compounds of diverse chemistries and structures. This work presents a SL framework that addresses challenges in materials science applications, where datasets are diverse but of modest size, and extreme values are often of interest. Our advances include the application of power or Hölder means to construct descriptors that generalize over chemistry and crystal structure, and the incorporation of multivariate local regression within a gradient boosting framework. The approach is demonstrated by developing SL models to predict bulk and shear moduli (K and G, respectively) for polycrystalline inorganic compounds, using 1,940 compounds from a growing database of calculated elastic moduli for metals, semiconductors and insulators. The usefulness of the models is illustrated by screening for superhard materials. PMID:27694824

  2. In Vivo Determination of the Complex Elastic Moduli of Cetacean Head Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    determining the complex moduli is an application of a new medical imaging technology called elastography . The methods described by Greenleaf (Chen et al, 2002...Vibration, Acoustics, Stress, and Reliability in Design, 109, 55-59. (1987) Fink M, et al, “Transient Elastography and Supersonic Shear Imaging

  3. Determination of the dynamic elastic constants of recycled aggregate concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoumani, A. A.; Barkoula, N.-M.; Matikas, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    Nowadays, construction and demolition waste constitutes a major portion of the total solid waste production in the world. Due to both environmental and economical reasons, an increasing interest concerning the use of recycled aggregate to replace aggregate from natural sources is generated. This paper presents an investigation on the properties of recycled aggregate concrete. Concrete mixes are prepared using recycled aggregates at a substitution level between 0 and 100% of the total coarse aggregate. The influence of this replacement on strengthened concrete's properties is being investigated. The properties estimated are: density and dynamic modulus of elasticity at the age of both 7 and 28 days. Also, flexural strength of 28 days specimens is estimated. The determination of the dynamic elastic modulus was made using the ultrasonic pulse velocity method. The results reveal that the existence of recycled aggregates affects the properties of concrete negatively; however, in low levels of substitution the influence of using recycled aggregates is almost negligible. Concluding, the controlled use of recycled aggregates in concrete production may help solve a vital environmental issue apart from being a solution to the problem of inadequate concrete aggregates.

  4. Semiempirical formulae for elastic moduli and brittleness of diamondlike and zinc-blende covalent crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kamran, Sami; Chen, Liang; Chen, Kuiying

    2008-03-01

    In the present work, semiempirical formulae for both bulk B and shear G moduli of diamondlike and zinc-blende covalent crystals are elaborated in terms of bond length and ionicity fraction of the bonding. The resulting expressions can be applied to a broad selection of covalent materials and their modulus predictions are in good agreement with the experimental data and those from ab initio calculations. Furthermore, the correlation between the ratio G/B and the aforementioned bonding parameters was investigated. The analysis of this relationship demonstrates that compared to the ionicity fraction, the bond length is the predominant parameter responsible for the brittle features of covalent materials.

  5. Measurements of elastic moduli of pharmaceutical compacts: a new methodology using double compaction on a compaction simulator.

    PubMed

    Mazel, Vincent; Busignies, Virginie; Diarra, Harona; Tchoreloff, Pierre

    2012-06-01

    The elastic properties of pharmaceutical powders play an important role during the compaction process. The elastic behavior can be represented by Young's modulus (E) and Poisson's ratio (v). However, during the compaction, the density of the powder bed changes and the moduli must be determined as a function of the porosity. This study proposes a new methodology to determine E and v as a function of the porosity using double compaction in an instrumented compaction simulator. Precompression is used to form the compact, and the elastic properties are measured during the beginning of the main compaction. By measuring the axial and radial pressure and the powder bed thickness, E and v can be determined as a function of the porosity. Two excipients were studied, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) and anhydrous calcium phosphate (aCP). The values of E measured are comparable to those obtained using the classical three-point bending test. Poisson's ratio was found to be close to 0.24 for aCP with only small variations with the porosity, and to increase with a decreasing porosity for MCC (0.23-0.38). The classical approximation of a value of 0.3 for ν of pharmaceutical powders should therefore be taken with caution.

  6. Improved rigorous bounds on the effective elastic moduli of a composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantor, Y.; Bergman, D. J.

    A NEW METHOD for deriving rigorous bounds on the effective elastic constants of a composite material is presented and used to derive a number of known as well as some new bounds. The new approach is based on a presentation of those constants as a sum of simple poles. The locations and strengths of the poles are treated as variational parameters, while different kinds of available information are translated into constraints on these parameters. Our new results include an extension of the range of validity of the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds to the case of composites made of isotropic materials but with an arbitrary microgeometry. We also use information on the effective elastic constants of one composite in order to obtain improved bounds on the effective elastic constants of another composite with the same or a similar microgeometry.

  7. Non-invasive determination of the complete elastic moduli of spider silks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koski, Kristie J.; Akhenblit, Paul; McKiernan, Keri; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2013-03-01

    Spider silks possess nature’s most exceptional mechanical properties, with unrivalled extensibility and high tensile strength. Unfortunately, our understanding of silks is limited because the complete elastic response has never been measured—leaving a stark lack of essential fundamental information. Using non-invasive, non-destructive Brillouin light scattering, we obtain the entire stiffness tensors (revealing negative Poisson’s ratios), refractive indices, and longitudinal and transverse sound velocities for major and minor ampullate spider silks: Argiope aurantia, Latrodectus hesperus, Nephila clavipes, Peucetia viridans. These results completely quantify the linear elastic response for all possible deformation modes, information unobtainable with traditional stress-strain tests. For completeness, we apply the principles of Brillouin imaging to spatially map the elastic stiffnesses on a spider web without deforming or disrupting the web in a non-invasive, non-contact measurement, finding variation among discrete fibres, junctions and glue spots. Finally, we provide the stiffness changes that occur with supercontraction.

  8. An in situ estimation of anisotropic elastic moduli for a submarine shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Douglas E.; Leaney, Scott; Borland, William H.

    1994-11-01

    Direct arrival times and slownesses from wide-aperture walkaway vertical seismic profile data acquired in a layered anisotropic medium can be processed to give direct estimate of the phase slowness surface associated with the medium at the depth of the receivers. This slowness surface can, in turn, be fit by an estimated transversely isotropic medium with a vertical symmetry axis (a 'TIV' medium). While the method requires that the medium between the receivers and the surface be horizontally stratified, no further measurement or knowledge of that medium is required. When applied to data acquired in a compacting shale sequence (here termed the 'Petronas shale') encountered by a well in the South China Sea, the method yields an estimated TIV medium that fits the data extremely well over 180 deg of propagation angles sampled by 201 source positions. The medium is strongly anisotropic. The anisotropy is significantly anelliptic and implies that the quasi-shear mode should be triplicated for off-axis propagation. Estimated density-normalized moduli (in units of sq km/sq s) for the Petronas shale are A(sub 11) = 6.99 +/- 0.21, A(sub 33) = 5.53 +/- 0.17, A(sub 55) = 0.91 +/- 0.05, and A(sub 13) = 2.64 +/- 0.26. Densities in the logged zone just below the survey lie in the range between 2200 and 2400 kg/cu m with an average value close to 2300 kg/cu m.

  9. Determination of the Complex Elastic Moduli of Materials Using A Free- Free Bar Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    Lifshitz, E. M., Theory of Elasticity, Pergamon, )Tew York, 1970. 16. Strutt , J. W. (Lord Rayleigh ), Tho Theory of Sound, Vol I, 2" ed., Dover, New...MASTER CURVES: PRTATION OF DATA AS A FUNCTION OF REDUCED FREQUENCY . 28 1. Introduction ...... ...... . . 28 2. Williams -Landel-Ferry Equation...the temperature and frequency into one variable. The shift factor is a monotonically decreasing function of temperature. [Ref. 8] 2. Williams -Landel

  10. Elastic moduli inheritance and the weakest link in bulk metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Ma, D; Stoica, A D; Wang, X-L; Lu, Z P; Clausen, B; Brown, D W

    2012-02-24

    We show that a variety of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) inherit their Young's modulus and shear modulus from the solvent components. This is attributed to preferential straining of locally solvent-rich configurations among tightly bonded atomic clusters, which constitute the weakest link in an amorphous structure. This aspect of inhomogeneous deformation, also revealed by our in situ neutron diffraction studies of an elastically deformed BMG, suggests a rubberlike viscoelastic behavior due to a hierarchy of atomic bonds in BMGs.

  11. On the determination of elastic moduli of cells by AFM based indentation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yue; Xu, Guang-Kui; Wang, Gang-Feng

    2017-01-01

    The atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been widely used to measure the mechanical properties of biological cells through indentations. In most of existing studies, the cell is supposed to be linear elastic within the small strain regime when analyzing the AFM indentation data. However, in experimental situations, the roles of large deformation and surface tension of cells should be taken into consideration. Here, we use the neo-Hookean model to describe the hyperelastic behavior of cells and investigate the influence of surface tension through finite element simulations. At large deformation, a correction factor, depending on the geometric ratio of indenter radius to cell radius, is introduced to modify the force-indent depth relation of classical Hertzian model. Moreover, when the indent depth is comparable with an intrinsic length defined as the ratio of surface tension to elastic modulus, the surface tension evidently affects the indentation response, indicating an overestimation of elastic modulus by the Hertzian model. The dimensionless-analysis-based theoretical predictions, which include both large deformation and surface tension, are in good agreement with our finite element simulation data. This study provides a novel method to more accurately measure the mechanical properties of biological cells and soft materials in AFM indentation experiments. PMID:28368053

  12. On the determination of elastic moduli of cells by AFM based indentation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yue; Xu, Guang-Kui; Wang, Gang-Feng

    2017-04-03

    The atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been widely used to measure the mechanical properties of biological cells through indentations. In most of existing studies, the cell is supposed to be linear elastic within the small strain regime when analyzing the AFM indentation data. However, in experimental situations, the roles of large deformation and surface tension of cells should be taken into consideration. Here, we use the neo-Hookean model to describe the hyperelastic behavior of cells and investigate the influence of surface tension through finite element simulations. At large deformation, a correction factor, depending on the geometric ratio of indenter radius to cell radius, is introduced to modify the force-indent depth relation of classical Hertzian model. Moreover, when the indent depth is comparable with an intrinsic length defined as the ratio of surface tension to elastic modulus, the surface tension evidently affects the indentation response, indicating an overestimation of elastic modulus by the Hertzian model. The dimensionless-analysis-based theoretical predictions, which include both large deformation and surface tension, are in good agreement with our finite element simulation data. This study provides a novel method to more accurately measure the mechanical properties of biological cells and soft materials in AFM indentation experiments.

  13. Landslide characterization using P- and S-wave seismic refraction tomography - The importance of elastic moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlemann, S.; Hagedorn, S.; Dashwood, B.; Maurer, H.; Gunn, D.; Dijkstra, T.; Chambers, J.

    2016-11-01

    In the broad spectrum of natural hazards, landslides in particular are capable of changing the landscape and causing significant human and economic losses. Detailed site investigations form an important component in the landslide risk mitigation and disaster risk reduction process. These investigations usually rely on surface observations, discrete sampling of the subsurface, and laboratory testing to examine properties that are deemed representative of entire slopes. Often this requires extensive interpolations and results in large uncertainties. To compliment and extend these approaches, we present a study from an active landslide in a Lias Group clay slope, North Yorkshire, UK, examining combined P- and S-wave seismic refraction tomography (SRT) as a means of providing subsurface volumetric imaging of geotechnical proxies. The distributions of seismic wave velocities determined from SRT at the study site indicated zones with higher porosity and fissure density that are interpreted to represent the extent and depth of mass movements and weathered bedrock zones. Distinguishing the lithological units was facilitated by deriving the Poisson's ratio from the SRT data as saturated clay and partially saturated sandy silts showed distinctively different Poisson's ratios. Shear and Young's moduli derived from the SRT data revealed the weak nature of the materials in active parts of the landslide (i.e. 25 kPa and 100 kPa respectively). The SRT results are consistent with intrusive (i.e. cone penetration tests), laboratory, and additional geoelectrical data from this site. This study shows that SRT forms a cost-effective method that can significantly reduce uncertainties in the conceptual ground model of geotechnical and hydrological conditions that govern landslide dynamics.

  14. Elastic moduli of collagen gels can be predicted from two-dimensional confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Li; Leone, Lindsay M; Kaufman, Laura J

    2009-10-07

    We quantitatively compare data obtained from imaging two-dimensional slices of three-dimensional unlabeled and fluorescently labeled collagen gels with confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM) and/or confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM). Different network structures are obtained by assembling the gels over a range of concentrations at various temperatures. Comparison between CRM and CFM shows that the techniques are not equally sensitive to details of network structure, with CFM displaying higher fidelity in imaging fibers parallel to the optical axis. Comparison of CRM of plain and labeled collagen gels shows that labeling itself induces changes in gel structure, chiefly through inhibition of fibril bundling. Despite these differences, image analyses carried out on two-dimensional CFM and CRM slices of collagen gels reveal identical trends in structural parameters as a function of collagen concentration and gelation temperature. Fibril diameter approximated from either CRM or CFM is in good accord with that determined via electron microscopy. Two-dimensional CRM images are used to show that semiflexible polymer theory can relate network structural properties to elastic modulus successfully. For networks containing bundled fibrils, it is shown that average structural diameter, rather than fibril diameter, is the length scale that sets the magnitude of the gel elastic modulus.

  15. Elastic Moduli of Pyrolytic Boron Nitride Measured Using 3-Point Bending and Ultrasonic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaforey, M. L.; Deeb, C. W.; Matthiesen, D. H.; Roth, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    Three-point bending and ultrasonic testing were performed on a flat plate of PBN. In the bending experiment, the deformation mechanism was believed to be shear between the pyrolytic layers, which yielded a shear modulus, c (sub 44), of 2.60 plus or minus .31 GPa. Calculations based on the longitudinal and shear wave velocity measurements yielded values of 0.341 plus or minus 0.006 for Poisson's ratio, 10.34 plus or minus .30 GPa for the elastic modulus (c (sub 33)), and 3.85 plus or minus 0.02 GPa for the shear modulus (c (sub 44)). Since free basal dislocations have been reported to affect the value of c (sub 44) found using ultrasonic methods, the value from the bending experiment was assumed to be the more accurate value.

  16. Cell model and elastic moduli of disordered solids - Low temperature limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, S. T. J.; Landel, R. F.; Moacanin, J.; Simha, Robert; Papazoglou, Elisabeth

    1987-01-01

    The cell theory has been previously employed to compute the equation of state of a disordered condensed system. It is now generalized to include anisotropic stresses. The condition of affine deformation is adopted, transforming an orginally spherical into an ellipsoidal cell. With a Lennard-Jones n-m potential between nonbonded centers, the formal expression for the deformational free energy is derived. It is to be evaluated in the limit of the linear elastic range. Since the bulk modulus in this limit is already known, it is convenient to consider a uniaxial deformation. To begin with, restrictions are made to the low-temperature limit in the absence of entropy contributions. Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio then follow.

  17. Polycrystalline elastic moduli of a high-entropy alloy at cryogenic temperatures

    DOE PAGES

    Haglund, A.; Koehler, M.; Catoor, D.; ...

    2014-12-05

    A FCC high-entropy alloy (HEA) that exhibits strong temperature dependence of strength at low homologous temperatures in sharp contrast to pure FCC metals like Ni that show weak temperature dependence is CrMnCoFeNi. In order to understand this behavior, elastic constants were determined as a function of temperature. From 300 K down to 55 K, the shear modulus (G) of the HEA changes by only 8%, increasing from 80 to 86 GPa. Moreover, this temperature dependence is weaker than that of FCC Ni, whose G increases by 12% (81–91 GPa). Therefore, the uncharacteristic temperature-dependence of the strength of the HEA ismore » not due to the temperature dependence of its shear modulus.« less

  18. Polycrystalline elastic moduli of a high-entropy alloy at cryogenic temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Haglund, A.; Koehler, M.; Catoor, D.; George, E. P.; Keppens, V.

    2014-12-05

    A FCC high-entropy alloy (HEA) that exhibits strong temperature dependence of strength at low homologous temperatures in sharp contrast to pure FCC metals like Ni that show weak temperature dependence is CrMnCoFeNi. In order to understand this behavior, elastic constants were determined as a function of temperature. From 300 K down to 55 K, the shear modulus (G) of the HEA changes by only 8%, increasing from 80 to 86 GPa. Moreover, this temperature dependence is weaker than that of FCC Ni, whose G increases by 12% (81–91 GPa). Therefore, the uncharacteristic temperature-dependence of the strength of the HEA is not due to the temperature dependence of its shear modulus.

  19. Temperature dependencies of the elastic moduli and thermal expansion coefficient of an equiatomic, single-phase CoCrFeMnNi high-entropy alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Laplanche, G.; Gadaud, P.; Horst, O.; ...

    2014-11-15

    The equiatomic CoCrFeMnNi alloy is now regarded as a model face-centered cubic single-phase high-entropy alloy. Consequently, determination of its intrinsic properties such as the temperature dependencies of elastic moduli and thermal expansion coefficient are important to improve understanding of this new class of material. Lastly, these temperature dependencies were measured over a large temperature range (200–1270 K) in this study.

  20. Temperature dependence of the elastic moduli and damping for polycrystalline LiF-22 pct CaF2 eutectic salt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfenden, A.; Lastrapes, G.; Duggan, M. B.; Raj, S. V.

    1991-01-01

    Young's and shear moduli and damping were measured for as-cast polycrystalline LiF-(22 mol pct)CaF2 eutectic specimens as a function of temperature using the piezoelectric ultrasonic composite oscillator technique. The shear modulus decreased with increasing temperature from about 40 GPa at 295 K to about 30 GPa at 1000 K, while the Young modulus decreased from about 115 GPa at 295 K to about 35 GPa at 900 K. These values are compared with those derived from the rule of mixtures using elastic moduli data for LiF and CaF2 single crystals. It is shown that, while the shear modulus data agree reasonably well with the predicted trend, there is a large discrepancy between the theoretical calculations and the Young modulus values, where this disagreement increases with increasing temperature.

  1. High Elastic Moduli of a 54Al2O3-46Ta2O5 Glass Fabricated via Containerless Processing.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Sosa, Gustavo A; Masuno, Atsunobu; Higo, Yuji; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Yanaba, Yutaka; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu; Umada, Takumi; Okamura, Kohei; Kato, Katsuyoshi; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2015-10-15

    Glasses with high elastic moduli have been in demand for many years because the thickness of such glasses can be reduced while maintaining its strength. Moreover, thinner and lighter glasses are desired for the fabrication of windows in buildings and cars, cover glasses for smart-phones and substrates in Thin-Film Transistor (TFT) displays. In this work, we report a 54Al2O3-46Ta2O5 glass fabricated by aerodynamic levitation which possesses one of the highest elastic moduli and hardness for oxide glasses also displaying excellent optical properties. The glass was colorless and transparent in the visible region, and its refractive index nd was as high as 1.94. The measured Young's modulus and Vickers hardness were 158.3 GPa and 9.1 GPa, respectively, which are comparable to the previously reported highest values for oxide glasses. Analysis made using (27)Al Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy revealed the presence of a significantly large fraction of high-coordinated Al in addition to four-coordinated Al in the glass. The high elastic modulus and hardness are attributed to both the large cationic field strength of Ta(5+) ions and the large dissociation energies per unit volume of Al2O3 and Ta2O5.

  2. High Elastic Moduli of a 54Al2O3-46Ta2O5 Glass Fabricated via Containerless Processing

    PubMed Central

    Rosales-Sosa, Gustavo A.; Masuno, Atsunobu; Higo, Yuji; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Yanaba, Yutaka; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu; Umada, Takumi; Okamura, Kohei; Kato, Katsuyoshi; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Glasses with high elastic moduli have been in demand for many years because the thickness of such glasses can be reduced while maintaining its strength. Moreover, thinner and lighter glasses are desired for the fabrication of windows in buildings and cars, cover glasses for smart-phones and substrates in Thin-Film Transistor (TFT) displays. In this work, we report a 54Al2O3-46Ta2O5 glass fabricated by aerodynamic levitation which possesses one of the highest elastic moduli and hardness for oxide glasses also displaying excellent optical properties. The glass was colorless and transparent in the visible region, and its refractive index nd was as high as 1.94. The measured Young’s modulus and Vickers hardness were 158.3 GPa and 9.1 GPa, respectively, which are comparable to the previously reported highest values for oxide glasses. Analysis made using 27Al Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy revealed the presence of a significantly large fraction of high-coordinated Al in addition to four-coordinated Al in the glass. The high elastic modulus and hardness are attributed to both the large cationic field strength of Ta5+ ions and the large dissociation energies per unit volume of Al2O3 and Ta2O5. PMID:26468639

  3. High Elastic Moduli of a 54Al2O3-46Ta2O5 Glass Fabricated via Containerless Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales-Sosa, Gustavo A.; Masuno, Atsunobu; Higo, Yuji; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Yanaba, Yutaka; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu; Umada, Takumi; Okamura, Kohei; Kato, Katsuyoshi; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2015-10-01

    Glasses with high elastic moduli have been in demand for many years because the thickness of such glasses can be reduced while maintaining its strength. Moreover, thinner and lighter glasses are desired for the fabrication of windows in buildings and cars, cover glasses for smart-phones and substrates in Thin-Film Transistor (TFT) displays. In this work, we report a 54Al2O3-46Ta2O5 glass fabricated by aerodynamic levitation which possesses one of the highest elastic moduli and hardness for oxide glasses also displaying excellent optical properties. The glass was colorless and transparent in the visible region, and its refractive index nd was as high as 1.94. The measured Young’s modulus and Vickers hardness were 158.3 GPa and 9.1 GPa, respectively, which are comparable to the previously reported highest values for oxide glasses. Analysis made using 27Al Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy revealed the presence of a significantly large fraction of high-coordinated Al in addition to four-coordinated Al in the glass. The high elastic modulus and hardness are attributed to both the large cationic field strength of Ta5+ ions and the large dissociation energies per unit volume of Al2O3 and Ta2O5.

  4. Origin of the multiple configurations that drive the response of δ-plutonium’s elastic moduli to temperature

    PubMed Central

    Migliori, Albert; Söderlind, Per; Landa, Alexander; Freibert, Franz J.; Maiorov, Boris; Ramshaw, B. J.; Betts, Jon B.

    2016-01-01

    The electronic and thermodynamic complexity of plutonium has resisted a fundamental understanding for this important elemental metal. A critical test of any theory is the unusual softening of the bulk modulus with increasing temperature, a result that is counterintuitive because no or very little change in the atomic volume is observed upon heating. This unexpected behavior has in the past been attributed to competing but never-observed electronic states with different bonding properties similar to the scenario with magnetic states in Invar alloys. Using the recent observation of plutonium dynamic magnetism, we construct a theory for plutonium that agrees with relevant measurements by using density-functional-theory (DFT) calculations with no free parameters to compute the effect of longitudinal spin fluctuations on the temperature dependence of the bulk moduli in δ-Pu. We show that the softening with temperature can be understood in terms of a continuous distribution of thermally activated spin fluctuations. PMID:27647904

  5. Origin of the multiple configurations that drive the response of δ-plutonium's elastic moduli to temperature.

    PubMed

    Migliori, Albert; Söderlind, Per; Landa, Alexander; Freibert, Franz J; Maiorov, Boris; Ramshaw, B J; Betts, Jon B

    2016-10-04

    The electronic and thermodynamic complexity of plutonium has resisted a fundamental understanding for this important elemental metal. A critical test of any theory is the unusual softening of the bulk modulus with increasing temperature, a result that is counterintuitive because no or very little change in the atomic volume is observed upon heating. This unexpected behavior has in the past been attributed to competing but never-observed electronic states with different bonding properties similar to the scenario with magnetic states in Invar alloys. Using the recent observation of plutonium dynamic magnetism, we construct a theory for plutonium that agrees with relevant measurements by using density-functional-theory (DFT) calculations with no free parameters to compute the effect of longitudinal spin fluctuations on the temperature dependence of the bulk moduli in δ-Pu. We show that the softening with temperature can be understood in terms of a continuous distribution of thermally activated spin fluctuations.

  6. Origin of the multiple configurations that drive the response of δ-plutonium's elastic moduli to temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliori, Albert; Söderlind, Per; Landa, Alexander; Freibert, Franz J.; Maiorov, Boris; Ramshaw, B. J.; Betts, Jon B.

    2016-10-01

    The electronic and thermodynamic complexity of plutonium has resisted a fundamental understanding for this important elemental metal. A critical test of any theory is the unusual softening of the bulk modulus with increasing temperature, a result that is counterintuitive because no or very little change in the atomic volume is observed upon heating. This unexpected behavior has in the past been attributed to competing but never-observed electronic states with different bonding properties similar to the scenario with magnetic states in Invar alloys. Using the recent observation of plutonium dynamic magnetism, we construct a theory for plutonium that agrees with relevant measurements by using density-functional-theory (DFT) calculations with no free parameters to compute the effect of longitudinal spin fluctuations on the temperature dependence of the bulk moduli in δ-Pu. We show that the softening with temperature can be understood in terms of a continuous distribution of thermally activated spin fluctuations.

  7. Elastic Moduli of Wadsleyite (and#64258;-Mg2SiO4) 7 GPa and 873 Kelvin

    SciTech Connect

    Li,B.; Liebermann, R.; Weidner, D.

    1998-01-01

    Simultaneous sound velocity measurements and x-ray diffraction studies were made on wadsleyite ({beta}-Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) to 7 gigapascals and 873 kelvin. The calculated adiabatic bulk (K) and shear (G) moduli yield K (at room conditions) = 172(2) gigapascals, dK/dP = 4.2(1), and dK/dT = 0.012(1) gigapascals per kelvin, and G (at room conditions) = 113(1) gigapascals, dG/dP = 1.5(1), and dG/dT = 0.017(1) gigapascals per kelvin, respectively. The data imply that the P and S wave velocity contrasts between olivine and wadsleyite require an olivine amount of 38 to 39 percent in the upper mantle to satisfy the observed 410-kilometer discontinuity, but 55 to 60 percent to account for the velocity increase through the transition zone.

  8. Origin of the multiple configurations that drive the response of δ-plutonium’s elastic moduli to temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, Albert; Soderlind, Per; Landa, Alexander; Freibert, Franz Joseph; Maiorov, Boris Alfredo; Ramshaw, Brad J.; Betts, Jon Bobby

    2016-09-19

    The electronic and thermodynamic complexity of plutonium has resisted a fundamental understanding for this important elemental metal. A critical test of any theory is the unusual softening of the bulk modulus with increasing temperature, a result that is counterintuitive because no or very little change in the atomic volume is observed upon heating. This unexpected behavior has in the past been attributed to competing but never-observed electronic states with different bonding properties similar to the scenario with magnetic states in Invar alloys. Using the recent observation of plutonium dynamic magnetism, we construct a theory for plutonium that agrees with relevant measurements by using density-functional-theory (DFT) calculations with no free parameters to compute the effect of longitudinal spin fluctuations on the temperature dependence of the bulk moduli in δ-Pu. Lastly, we show that the softening with temperature can be understood in terms of a continuous distribution of thermally activated spin fluctuations.

  9. Determination of the full elastic moduli of single crystals using shear-wave velocities by Brillouin spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, D.; Mao, Z.; Lin, J.; Yang, J.

    2013-12-01

    Brillouin light scattering (BLS) is the inelastic scattering of monochromatic laser light by phonons in the GHz frequency range [1]. BLS spectroscopy can be used to measure sound velocities traveling along certain directions of a single crystal through the frequency shifts of the scattered light from the acoustic phonons [1]. Over the past few decades, BLS spectroscopy has been widely used to measure the velocities of acoustic waves for a wide range of Earth's materials, in which the full elastic constants were derived from the measured compressional (VP) and shear wave (VS) velocities. However, the VP velocities of minerals normally overlap with the shear-wave velocities of diamonds in Brillouin measurements approximately above 25 GPa [2-5] such that only VS of minerals can be measured experimentally. Theoretical models have showed that the shear-wave velocities of minerals also carry necessary information to invert the full elastic tensors [2], although previous studies at high pressures have focused on measuring velocities within the principle planes of the crystals. This leads to a strong trade-off among individual Cij, preventing the derivation of the full elastic tensors from the VS velocities alone [3-5]. In this study, we have come up with an elastic model to overcome this problem by finding a suitable crystallographic plane that has optimized VS-VP interactions in the elastic tensors. Using MgO, spinel and zoisite as test samples, we have used measured VP/VS or VS velocities of these crystals using BLS spectroscopy to derive their full elastic tensors. This new approach sheds lights on future high-pressure elasticity studies relevant to materials the Earth's deep interior. 1. Sinogeikin, S.V., Bass, J.D., Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 120, 43 (2000). 2. Every, A. G., Phys. Rev. B., 22, 1746, (1980) 3. Marquardt, H., Speziale, S., Reichmann, H.J., Frost, D.J., and Schilling, F.R., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 287, 345 (2009). 4. Marquardt, H., Speziale, S

  10. Crystallization kinetic of Sb-V2O5-TeO2 glasses investigated by DSC and their elastic moduli and Poisson's ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souri, Dariush

    2015-01-01

    Ternary tellurate glasses of the form xSb-(60-x)V2O5-40TeO2 (0≤x≤15 in mol%) were prepared by using the usual melt quenching method. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) at different heating rates (φ) was used to thermal analyze and to gain more insight in to the thermal stability, glass forming tendency and so calorimetric behavior of the present glasses. The glass transition temperature (Tg), the temperature corresponding to the onset of crystallization (Tx) and also the crystallization temperature (TCr) were obtained at different heating rates, to estimate the key kinetic parameter of activation energy of crystallization (ΔE) by using different empirical formulas. Also some other thermal parameters such as thermal stability and glass forming tendency were determined. It was found that Tg, Tx and TCr increase with increase in Sb content and also with increase in heating rate. Moreover, Makishima-Makenzie's theory was employed to evaluate the Poisson's ratio and elastic moduli, indicating a strong relation between elastic properties and the structure of glass. From the mechanical and thermal data and also the values of oxygen molar volume ( V O *), it was founded that the glass systems can be divided in to "two compositional regions"; so, results indicate that glasses with 10≤x≤15 (especially for x=12) are more thermal stable and strong glasses, which make them as more useful and promising materials in technological advantages and device manufacturing.

  11. Origin of the multiple configurations that drive the response of δ-plutonium’s elastic moduli to temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Migliori, Albert; Soderlind, Per; Landa, Alexander; ...

    2016-09-19

    The electronic and thermodynamic complexity of plutonium has resisted a fundamental understanding for this important elemental metal. A critical test of any theory is the unusual softening of the bulk modulus with increasing temperature, a result that is counterintuitive because no or very little change in the atomic volume is observed upon heating. This unexpected behavior has in the past been attributed to competing but never-observed electronic states with different bonding properties similar to the scenario with magnetic states in Invar alloys. Using the recent observation of plutonium dynamic magnetism, we construct a theory for plutonium that agrees with relevantmore » measurements by using density-functional-theory (DFT) calculations with no free parameters to compute the effect of longitudinal spin fluctuations on the temperature dependence of the bulk moduli in δ-Pu. Lastly, we show that the softening with temperature can be understood in terms of a continuous distribution of thermally activated spin fluctuations.« less

  12. Elastic wave speeds and moduli in polycrystalline ice Ih, si methane hydrate, and sll methane-ethane hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helgerud, M.B.; Waite, W.F.; Kirby, S.H.; Nur, A.

    2009-01-01

    We used ultrasonic pulse transmission to measure compressional, P, and shear, S, wave speeds in laboratory-formed polycrystalline ice Ih, si methane hydrate, and sll methane-ethane hydrate. From the wave speed's linear dependence on temperature and pressure and from the sample's calculated density, we derived expressions for bulk, shear, and compressional wave moduli and Poisson's ratio from -20 to 15??C and 22.4 to 32.8 MPa for ice Ih, -20 to 15??C and 30.5 to 97.7 MPa for si methane hydrate, and -20 to 10??C and 30.5 to 91.6 MPa for sll methane-ethane hydrate. All three materials had comparable P and S wave speeds and decreasing shear wave speeds with increasing applied pressure. Each material also showed evidence of rapid intergranular bonding, with a corresponding increase in wave speed, in response to pauses in sample deformation. There were also key differences. Resistance to uniaxial compaction, indicated by the pressure required to compact initially porous samples, was significantly lower for ice Ih than for either hydrate. The ice Ih shear modulus decreased with increasing pressure, in contrast to the increase measured in both hydrates ?? 2009.

  13. On the measurement of shear elastic moduli and viscosities of erythrocyte plasma membranes by transient deformation in high frequency electric fields.

    PubMed Central

    Engelhardt, H; Sackmann, E

    1988-01-01

    We present a new method to measure the shear elastic moduli and viscosities of erythrocyte membranes which is based on the fixation and transient deformation of cells in a high-frequency electric field. A frequency domain of constant force (arising by Maxwell Wagner polarization) is selected to minimize dissipative effects. The electric force is thus calculated by electrostatic principles by considering the cell as a conducting body in a dielectric fluid and neglecting membrane polarization effects. The elongation A of the cells perpendicular to their rotational axis exhibits a linear regime (A proportional to Maxwell tension or to square of the electric field E2) at small, and a nonlinear regime (A proportional to square root of Maxwell tension or to the electric field E) at large extensions with a cross-over at A approximately 0.5 micron. The nonlinearity leads to amplitude-dependent response times and to differences of the viscoelastic response and relaxation functions. The cells exhibit pronounced yet completely reversible tip formations at large extensions. Absolute values of the shear elastic modulus, mu, and membrane viscosity, eta, are determined by assuming that field-induced stretching of the biconcave cell may be approximately described in terms of a sphere to ellipsoid deformation. The (nonlinear) elongation-vs.-force relationship calculated by the elastic theory of shells agress well with the experimentally observed curves and the values of mu = 6.1 x 10(-6) N/m and eta = 3.4 x 10(-7) Ns/m are in good agreement with the micropipette results of Evans and co-workers. The effect of physical, biochemical, and disease-induced structural changes on the viscoelastic parameters is studied. The variability of mu and eta of a cell population of a healthy donor is +/- 45%, which is mainly due to differences in the cell age. The average mu value of cells of different healthy donors scatters by +/- 18%. Osmotic deflation of the cells leads to a fivefold increase of

  14. Complete elastic characterization of viscoelastic materials by dynamic measurements of the complex bulk and Young's moduli as a function of temperature and hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, François M.; Trivett, D. H.

    2011-07-01

    Two independent systems to measure the dynamic complex Young's and bulk moduli of viscoelastic materials as a function of temperature and hydrostatic pressure are described. In the Young's modulus system, a bar-shaped sample is adhered to a piezoelectric shaker and mounted vertically inside an air-filled pressure vessel. Data are obtained using both the traditional resonant approach and a wave-speed technique. In the bulk modulus system, the compressibility of a sample of arbitrary shape immersed in Castor oil and placed inside a pressure chamber is measured. Data can be obtained at frequencies typically ranging from 50 Hz to 5 kHz, at temperatures comprised between -2 and 50 °C and under hydrostatic pressures ranging from 0 to 2 MPa (Young's), or 6.5 MPa (bulk). Typical data obtained with both systems are presented, and it is shown how these data can be combined to completely characterize the elasticity of the material under investigation. In particular, they can be used to obtain experimental values of the complex Poisson's ratio, whose accurate measurement is otherwise quite challenging to perform directly. As an example, the magnitude and loss tangent of Poisson's ratio are presented for a nearly incompressible rubber.

  15. A Note on Aggregate Price-Level Elasticity and Supply-Side Shocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findlay, David W.

    1995-01-01

    Investigates factors that influence the short-run and long-run effects of supply-side shocks on aggregate income and tax revenues. Concludes that the long-run relationship between tax revenues and the tax rate is completely independent of price-level elasticity. (CFR)

  16. Bulk elastic moduli and solute potentials in leaves of freshwater, coastal and marine hydrophytes. Are marine plants more rigid?

    PubMed Central

    Touchette, Brant W.; Marcus, Sarah E.; Adams, Emily C.

    2014-01-01

    Bulk modulus of elasticity (ɛ), depicting the flexibility of plant tissues, is recognized as an important component in maintaining internal water balance. Elevated ɛ and comparatively low osmotic potential (Ψπ) may work in concert to effectively maintain vital cellular water content. This concept, termed the ‘cell water conservation hypothesis’, may foster tolerance for lower soil-water potentials in plants while minimizing cell dehydration and shrinkage. Therefore, the accumulation of solutes in marine plants, causing decreases in Ψπ, play an important role in plant–water relations and likely works with higher ɛ to achieve favourable cell volumes. While it is generally held that plants residing in marine systems have higher leaf tissue ɛ, to our knowledge no study has specifically addressed this notion in aquatic and wetland plants residing in marine and freshwater systems. Therefore, we compared ɛ and Ψπ in leaf tissues of 38 freshwater, coastal and marine plant species using data collected in our laboratory, with additional values from the literature. Overall, 8 of the 10 highest ɛ values were observed in marine plants, and 20 of the lowest 25 ɛ values were recorded in freshwater plants. As expected, marine plants often had lower Ψπ, wherein the majority of marine plants were below −1.0 MPa and the majority of freshwater plants were above −1.0 MPa. While there were no differences among habitat type and symplastic water content (θsym), we did observe higher θsym in shrubs when compared with graminoids, and believe that the comparatively low θsym observed in aquatic grasses may be attributed to their tendency to develop aerenchyma that hold apoplastic water. These results, with few exceptions, support the premise that leaf tissues of plants acclimated to marine environments tend to have higher ɛ and lower Ψπ, and agree with the general tenets of the cell water conservation hypothesis. PMID:24876296

  17. Bulk elastic moduli and solute potentials in leaves of freshwater, coastal and marine hydrophytes. Are marine plants more rigid?

    PubMed

    Touchette, Brant W; Marcus, Sarah E; Adams, Emily C

    2014-03-28

    Bulk modulus of elasticity (ɛ), depicting the flexibility of plant tissues, is recognized as an important component in maintaining internal water balance. Elevated ɛ and comparatively low osmotic potential (Ψπ) may work in concert to effectively maintain vital cellular water content. This concept, termed the 'cell water conservation hypothesis', may foster tolerance for lower soil-water potentials in plants while minimizing cell dehydration and shrinkage. Therefore, the accumulation of solutes in marine plants, causing decreases in Ψπ, play an important role in plant-water relations and likely works with higher ɛ to achieve favourable cell volumes. While it is generally held that plants residing in marine systems have higher leaf tissue ɛ, to our knowledge no study has specifically addressed this notion in aquatic and wetland plants residing in marine and freshwater systems. Therefore, we compared ɛ and Ψπ in leaf tissues of 38 freshwater, coastal and marine plant species using data collected in our laboratory, with additional values from the literature. Overall, 8 of the 10 highest ɛ values were observed in marine plants, and 20 of the lowest 25 ɛ values were recorded in freshwater plants. As expected, marine plants often had lower Ψπ, wherein the majority of marine plants were below -1.0 MPa and the majority of freshwater plants were above -1.0 MPa. While there were no differences among habitat type and symplastic water content (θsym), we did observe higher θsym in shrubs when compared with graminoids, and believe that the comparatively low θsym observed in aquatic grasses may be attributed to their tendency to develop aerenchyma that hold apoplastic water. These results, with few exceptions, support the premise that leaf tissues of plants acclimated to marine environments tend to have higher ɛ and lower Ψπ, and agree with the general tenets of the cell water conservation hypothesis.

  18. Estimation of elastic moduli in a compressible Gibson half-space by inverting Rayleigh-wave phase velocity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Miller, R.D.; Chen, C.

    2006-01-01

    A Gibson half-space model (a non-layered Earth model) has the shear modulus varying linearly with depth in an inhomogeneous elastic half-space. In a half-space of sedimentary granular soil under a geostatic state of initial stress, the density and the Poisson's ratio do not vary considerably with depth. In such an Earth body, the dynamic shear modulus is the parameter that mainly affects the dispersion of propagating waves. We have estimated shear-wave velocities in the compressible Gibson half-space by inverting Rayleigh-wave phase velocities. An analytical dispersion law of Rayleigh-type waves in a compressible Gibson half-space is given in an algebraic form, which makes our inversion process extremely simple and fast. The convergence of the weighted damping solution is guaranteed through selection of the damping factor using the Levenberg-Marquardt method. Calculation efficiency is achieved by reconstructing a weighted damping solution using singular value decomposition techniques. The main advantage of this algorithm is that only three parameters define the compressible Gibson half-space model. Theoretically, to determine the model by the inversion, only three Rayleigh-wave phase velocities at different frequencies are required. This is useful in practice where Rayleigh-wave energy is only developed in a limited frequency range or at certain frequencies as data acquired at manmade structures such as dams and levees. Two real examples are presented and verified by borehole S-wave velocity measurements. The results of these real examples are also compared with the results of the layered-Earth model. ?? Springer 2006.

  19. Interaction of angiogenically stimulated intermediate CD163+ monocytes/macrophages with soft hydrophobic poly(n-butyl acrylate) networks with elastic moduli matched to that of human arteries.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Anke; Kratz, Karl; Hiebl, Bernhard; Lendlein, Andreas; Jung, Friedrich

    2012-03-01

    mRNA expression profile of the aMO2 was not influenced by the substrate elasticity. In the supernatant of aMO2 on cPnBA0250, significantly less VEGF-A(165) product was found than expected based on the mRNA level measured (P < 0.01). Tests with recombinant VEGF-A(165) then demonstrated that significantly more VEGF-A(165) was adhered on cPnBA0250 than on cPnBA1100 (P < 0.01). Seeded on cPnBA, aMO2-unaffected by the elastic moduli of both substrates-seemed to remain in their subset status and secreted VEGF-A(165) without release of proinflammatory cytokines. These in vitro results might indicate that this MO subset can be used as cellular delivery system for proangiogenic and noninflammatory mediators to support the endothelialization of cPnBA.

  20. Elastic moduli, thermal expansion, and inferred permeability of Climax quartz monzonite and Sudbury gabbro to 500/sup 0/C and 55 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Page, L.; Heard, H.C.

    1981-03-17

    Young's modulus (E), bulk modulus (K), and the coefficient of thermal linear expansion (..cap alpha..) have been determined for Climax quartz monzonite to 500/sup 0/C and pressures (P) to 55 MPa and for Sudbury gabbro to 300/sup 0/C and 55 MPa. For each rock, both E and K decreased with T and increased with P in a nonlinear manner. In the monzonite, E and K decreased by up to 60% as P decreased from 55.2 to 6.9 MPa isothermally, while the gabbro indicated a decrease up to 70% over the same pressure range. As T increased isobarically, E and K for the monzonite decreased by up to a factor of approx. 80% from 19 to 500/sup 0/C. The moduli of the gabbro decreased by as much as 70% from 19 to 300/sup 0/C. ..cap alpha.. for the monzonite increased with T and decreased with P in a nonmonotonic fashion, with most measured values for ..cap alpha.. greater than values calculated for the crack-free aggregate. Depending on P, ..cap alpha.. in the monzonite increased from 8 to 11.10/sup -6/ /sup 0/C/sup -1/ at 40/sup 0/C to 22 to 25.10/sup -6/C/sup -1/ at 475/sup 0/C. For the gabbro, ..cap alpha.. also generally decreased with increasing P. Values ranged from 6 to 11.10/sup -6/ /sup 0/C/sup -1/, showing a nonlinear trend and very little net increas over the T range from 19 to 300/sup 0/C. Calculated permeability of these rocks based on the ..cap alpha.. determinations indicated that permeabilities may increase by up to a factor of 3 over the temperature interval 19 to 300/sup 0/C, and the permeability of the monzonite is inferred to increase by up to a factor of 8 by 500/sup 0/C. In both rocks, most measurements are consistent with microcracks controlling the thermoelastic response by opening with T and closing with sigma and P.

  1. Monetary Policy Rules, Supply Shocks, and the Price-Level Elasticity of Aggregate Demand: A Graphical Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyer, Ben L.; Maggs, Gary E.

    1995-01-01

    Utilizes two-dimensional price and output graphs to demonstrate the way that the price-level elasticity of aggregate demand affects alternative monetary policy rules designed to cope with random aggregate supply shocks. Includes graphs illustrating price-level, real Gross Domestic Product (GDP), nominal GDP, and nominal money supply targeting.…

  2. Variational method of determining effective moduli of polycrystals: (A) hexagonal symmetry, (B) trigonal symmetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peselnick, L.; Meister, R.

    1965-01-01

    Variational principles of anisotropic elasticity have been applied to aggregates of randomly oriented pure-phase polycrystals having hexagonal symmetry and trigonal symmetry. The bounds of the effective elastic moduli obtained in this way show a considerable improvement over the bounds obtained by means of the Voigt and Reuss assumptions. The Hill average is found to be in most cases a good approximation when compared to the bounds found from the variational method. The new bounds reduce in their limits to the Voigt and Reuss values. ?? 1965 The American Institute of Physics.

  3. Dynamic and static moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C. H.; Johnston, David H.

    1981-01-01

    Static and dynamic bulk moduli (Ks and Kd) are measured as continuous functions of pressure from zero to 2-3 kilobars for two sandstones, a tuff, limestone, granite, and oil shale. Results for the sandstones and granite are in good agreement with previously reported data with Ks/Kd varying from about 0.5 at atmospheric pressure to close to unity at pressures 2 kilobars and above. For rocks behaving elastically under static loading, the Ks/Kd ratio is inversely related to the microcrack density. For the limestone, time dependent deformation associated with pore collapse results in Ks/Kd ratios approaching 0.1 at high pressure. Upon unloading, while initially high ( ˜ 1.0) at high pressures, Ks/Kd becomes lower than values obtained during loading at low pressures ( < 1 kilobar) due to opening of microcracks generated during pore collapse. For the oil shale, in which few microcracks exist, Ks/Kd remains relatively constant with pressure at a value of about 0.7.

  4. Relations between drained and undrained moduli in anisotropic poroelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loret, Benjamin; Rizzi, Egidio; Zerfa, Zohra

    2001-11-01

    Although the knowledge of the drained moduli is often assumed to define the material coefficients of elastic fluid-saturated porous media, it is not sufficient. Resorting to the properties of the constituents is possible but may not be satisfactory due to lack of accuracy. On the other hand, the mechanical information contained in the undrained moduli is complementary to that provided by the drained moduli but is also overabundant. The compatibility relations between these two types of moduli are examined for several classes of anisotropic solid skeletons and the information required from the undrained moduli is exactly defined through a spectral analysis of the dyadic difference in tensor compliances. A switch of the results is possible if the undrained moduli are given instead of the drained moduli. An incomplete data set of material coefficients for a transverse isotropic shale is treated as an example. Considerable simplifications arise for a particular form of anisotropy defined by a second order fabric tensor.

  5. Evaluation of polydimethylsiloxane scaffolds with physiologically-relevant elastic moduli: interplay of substrate mechanics and surface chemistry effects on vascular smooth muscle cell response.

    PubMed

    Brown, Xin Q; Ookawa, Keiko; Wong, Joyce Y

    2005-06-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is used extensively to study cell-substrate interactions because its mechanical properties are easily tuned in physiologically relevant ranges. However, changes in mechanical properties also modulate surface chemistry and cell response. Here, we correlate the mechanical and surface properties of PDMS to vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) behavior. We find that a 5-fold increase in base:crosslinker ratio leads to approximately 40-fold decrease in elastic modulus but no significant differences in surface wettability. However, when polyelectrolyte multilayers are adsorbed to promote cell adhesion, wettability varies inversely with substrate stiffness. Despite these differences in hydrophobicity, the amount of adsorbed protein remains the same. In the absence of serum, there is a 39% decrease in cell attachment and a 42% decrease in spreading as the elastic modulus decreases from 1.79 to 0.05 MPa. In the presence of serum or adsorbed fibronectin, the differences in attachment and spreading are diminished. This is not the case for the rate of serum-stimulated cell proliferation, which remains inversely dependent on crosslinker concentration. We conclude that for the range of crosslinker concentrations investigated, the surface properties dominate the initial cell attachment and spreading, whereas the mechanical properties influence the long-term cell growth.

  6. Ultransonic velocity measurements in sheared granular layers: Implications for the evolution of dynamic elastic moduli of compositionally-diverse cataclastic fault gouges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, Matthew William

    The objective of this project was to investigate the mechanical and elastic evolution of laboratory fault gouge analogs during active shear. To do this, I designed, constructed, and implemented a new technique for measuring changes in the elastic properties of granular layers subjected to shear deformation. Granular layers serve as an experimental analog to gouge layers forming in cataclastic faults. The technique combines a double-direct shear configuration with a method of determining ultrasonic elastic compressional and shear wavespeed. Experimental results are divided into chapters based on application to fundamental mechanics or to field cases. The first set of experiments allowed us to develop the technique and apply it to a range of end- member materials including quartz sands, montmorillonite clays, and mixtures of sand and clay. Emphasis is placed on normal stress unload-reload cycles and the resulting behavior as clay content is varied within the layer. We observe consistent decrease in wavespeed with shear for sand, and nonlinear but increasing wavespeed for clay and the sand/clay mixture. The second set of experiments involves the application of this technique to measurements conducted under fluid saturation and controlled pressure conditions, examining the behavior of materials from the Nankai Trough Accretionary Prism under shear. I introduce the effects of variable displacement rate and hold time, with implications for fault stability and rate-and-state frictional sliding. The experiments demonstrate a consistent inverse relationship between sliding velocity and wavespeed, and an increase in wavespeed associated with holds. The third set of experiments deals with velocity through stick-slipping glass beads, which has implications for fundamental granular mechanics questions involving velocity-weakening materials. I find that wavespeed decreases in the time between events and increases at "slips", suggesting a strong control related to changes in

  7. Variational method of determining effective moduli of polycrystals with tetragonal symmetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meister, R.; Peselnick, L.

    1966-01-01

    Variational principles have been applied to aggregates of randomly oriented pure-phase polycrystals having tetragonal symmetry. The bounds of the effective elastic moduli obtained in this way show a substantial improvement over the bounds obtained by means of the Voigt and Reuss assumptions. The Hill average is found to be a good approximation in most cases when compared to the bounds found from the variational method. The new bounds reduce in their limits to the Voigt and Reuss values. ?? 1966 The American Institute of Physics.

  8. Life on moduli space?

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Stephen D. H.

    2009-10-15

    While the number of metastable landscape vacua in string theory is vast, the number of supermoduli vacua which lead to distinct low-energy physics is even larger, perhaps infinitely so. From the anthropic perspective it is therefore important to understand whether complex life is possible on moduli space - i.e., in low-energy effective theories with (1) exact supersymmetry and (2) some massless multiplets (moduli). Unless life is essentially impossible on moduli space as a consequence of these characteristics, anthropic reasoning in string theory suggests that the overwhelming majority of sentient beings would observe 1-2. We investigate whether 1 and 2 are by themselves automatically inimical to life and conclude, tentatively, that they are not. In particular, we describe moduli scenarios in which complex life seems possible.

  9. Resonant Acoustic Determination of Complex Elastic Moduli

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    F ( 79 "C) 1 Complete Cure - days @ 77"F (25" C) 2 - 4 Complete Cure -L hrs. @ 175 F ( 79 °C) 2 - 3 Color Amber or Black Ratio (By Weight): Part A 100...Classification Authority 3 Distribution Availability of Report 2b Declassification/Downgrading Schedule Approved for public release; distribution is...Mechanical Model ..................................................... 7 3 . Complex Modulus, Loss Tangent and Quality Factor .................... 10 4

  10. Numerical predictions of viscoelastic properties and dynamic moduli of innovative pothole patching materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, K. Y.; Yuan, W.; Ju, J. W.; Yang, J. M.; Kao, W.; Carlson, L.

    2013-04-01

    As asphalt pavements age and deteriorate, recurring pothole repair failures and propagating alligator cracks in the asphalt pavements have become a serious issue to our daily life and resulted in high repairing costs for pavement and vehicles. To solve this urgent issue, pothole repair materials with superior durability and long service life are needed. In the present work, revolutionary pothole patching materials with high toughness, high fatigue resistance that are reinforced with nano-molecular resins have been developed to enhance their resistance to traffic loads and service life of repaired potholes. In particular, DCPD resin (dicyclopentadiene, C10H12) with a Rhuthinium-based catalyst is employed to develop controlled properties that are compatible with aggregates and asphalt binders. In this paper, a multi-level numerical micromechanics-based model is developed to predict the viscoelastic properties and dynamic moduli of these innovative nano-molecular resin reinforced pothole patching materials. Irregular coarse aggregates in the finite element analysis are modeled as randomly-dispersed multi-layers coated particles. The effective properties of asphalt mastic, which consists of fine aggregates, tar, cured DCPD and air voids are theoretically estimated by the homogenization technique of micromechanics in conjunction with the elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle. Numerical predictions of homogenized viscoelastic properties and dynamic moduli are demonstrated.

  11. Elastic properties of plagioclase aggregates and seismic velocities in the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H.; Todd, T.; Richter, D.; Simmons, G.

    1973-01-01

    The compressional velocities of Apollo 16 gabbroic anorthosites in which the cracks have been closed match the seismic velocity of 7 km/sec in the 25 to 65 km depth region of the moon beneath the Imbrium Basin. The intrinsic velocities of plagioclase aggregates indicate that a velocity of 7 km/sec in a highly calcic gabbroic anorthosite is consistent only with a very small pyroxene component. Because mare basalts and gabbroic-anorthosites both have intrinsic velocities of 7 km/sec, the laboratory velocity data do not require a compositional change from basalt to anorthosite at the 25 km discontinuity. The laboratory velocity data only imply that the 25 km seismic discontinuity is one of microcrack density. The physical rather than the chemical or mineralogical state is constrained.

  12. Kahler moduli inflation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Buck, Duncan; Copeland, Edmund J.; Gomez-Reino, Marta; Nunes, Nelson J.

    2010-01-01

    We perform a detailed numerical analysis of inflationary solutions in Kahler moduli of type IIB flux compactifications. We show that there are inflationary solutions even when all the fields play an important role in the overall shape of the scalar potential. Moreover, there exists a direction of attraction for the inflationary trajectories that correspond to the constant volume direction. This basin of attraction enables the system to have an island of stability in the set of initial conditions. We provide explicit examples of these trajectories, compute the corresponding tilt of the density perturbations power spectrum and show that they provide a robust prediction of n s ≈ 0.96 for 60 e-folds of inflation.

  13. Inflationary predictions and moduli masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Kumar; Dutta, Koushik; Maharana, Anshuman

    2015-12-01

    A generic feature of inflationary models in supergravity/string constructions is vacuum misalignment for the moduli fields. The associated production of moduli particles leads to an epoch in the post-inflationary history in which the energy density is dominated by cold moduli particles. This modification of the post-inflationary history implies that the preferred range for the number of e-foldings between horizon exit of the modes relevant for CMB observations and the end of inflation (Nk) depends on moduli masses. This in turn implies that the precision CMB observables ns and r are sensitive to moduli masses. We analyse this sensitivity for some representative models of inflation and find the effect to be highly relevant for confronting inflationary models with observations.

  14. Effective moduli of particulate solids: Lubrication approximation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, F.; Phan-Thien, N.; X. J. Fan

    To efficiently calculate the effective properties of a composite, which consists of rigid spherical inclusions not necessarily of the same sizes in a homogeneous isotropic elastic matrix, a method based on the lubrication forces between neighbouring particles has been developed. The method is used to evaluate the effective Lamé moduli and the Poisson's ratio of the composite, for the particles in random configurations and in cubic lattices. A good agreement with experimental results given by Smith (1975) for particles in random configurations is observed, and also the numerical results on the effective moduli agree well with the results given by Nunan & Keller (1984) for particles in cubic lattices.

  15. Improved Indentation Test for Measuring Nonlinear Elasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2004-01-01

    A cylindrical-punch indentation technique has been developed as a means of measuring the nonlinear elastic responses of materials -- more specifically, for measuring the moduli of elasticity of materials in cases in which these moduli vary with applied loads. This technique offers no advantage for characterizing materials that exhibit purely linear elastic responses (constant moduli of elasticity, independent of applied loads). However, the technique offers a significant advantage for characterizing such important materials as plasma-sprayed thermal-barrier coatings, which, in cyclic loading, exhibit nonlinear elasticity with hysteresis related to compaction and sliding within their microstructures.

  16. On the consistency of complex moduli for transversely-isotropic viscoelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesieutre, George A.

    The ability of advanced composite materials and structures to damp vibration is important in many applications. Use of the complex modulus approach to represent the dissipative properties of transversely-isotropic materials, such as unidirectional fiber-reinforced composites, requires the definition of a set of 5 (imaginary) loss moduli in addition to the 5 (real) storage moduli needed to describe the elastic behavior. In practice, designers of composite materials rarely have experimental data for all 5 loss moduli, and must assume values for the remaining moduli in their analyses. If values for these unknown loss moduli are specified arbitrarily, physically unreasonable behavior can result. This paper develops the conditions necessary for physical consistency of the complex moduli of transversely isotropic materials.

  17. The heterotic superpotential and moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Ossa, Xenia; Hardy, Edward; Svanes, Eirik Eik

    2016-01-01

    We study the four-dimensional effective theory arising from ten-dimensional heterotic supergravity compactified on manifolds with torsion. In particular, given the heterotic superpotential appropriately corrected at O(α') to account for the Green-Schwarz anomaly cancellation mechanism, we investigate properties of four-dimensional Minkowski vacua of this theory. Considering the restrictions arising from F-terms and D-terms we identify the infinitesimal massless moduli space of the theory. We show that it agrees with the results that have recently been obtained from a ten-dimensional perspective where super-symmetric Minkowski solutions including the Bianchi identity correspond to an integrable holomorphic structure, with infinitesimal moduli calculated by its first cohomology. As has recently been noted, interplay of complex structure and bundle deformations through holomorphic and anomaly constraints can lead to fewer moduli than may have been expected. We derive a relation between the number of complex structure and bundle moduli removed from the low energy theory in this way, and give conditions for there to be no complex structure moduli or bundle moduli remaining in the low energy theory. The link between Yukawa couplings and obstruction theory is also briefly discussed.

  18. On a new compactification of moduli of vector bundles on a surface. IV: Nonreduced moduli

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeeva, Nadezda V

    2013-01-31

    The construction of a nonreduced projective moduli scheme of semistable admissible pairs is performed. We establish the connection of this moduli scheme with the reduced moduli scheme constructed in the previous article and prove that the nonreduced moduli scheme contains an open subscheme which is isomorphic to a moduli scheme of semistable vector bundles. Bibliography: 10 titles.

  19. Moduli mediation without moduli-induced gravitino problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akita, Kensuke; Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Oikawa, Akane; Otsuka, Hajime

    2016-05-01

    We study the moduli-induced gravitino problem within the framework of the phenomenologically attractive mirage mediations. The huge amount of gravitino generated by the moduli decay can be successfully diluted by introducing an extra light modulus field which does not induce the supersymmetry breaking. Since the lifetime of extra modulus field becomes longer than usually considered modulus field, our proposed mechanism is applied to both the low- and high-scale supersymmetry breaking scenarios. We also point out that such an extra modulus field appears in the flux compactification of type II string theory.

  20. High-pressure elastic properties of cubic Ir2P from ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao-Wei; Bioud, Nadhira; Fu, Zhi-Jian; Wei, Xiao-Ping; Song, Ting; Li, Zheng-Wei

    2016-10-01

    A study of the high-pressure elastic properties of new synthetic Ir2P in the anti-fluorite structure is conducted using ab initio calculations based on density functional theory. The elastic constants C11, C12 and C44 for the cubic Ir2P are obtained by the stress-strain method and the elastic stability calculations under pressure indicate that it is stable at least 100 GPa. Additionally, the electronic density of states, the aggregate elastic moduli, that is bulk modulus, shear modulus, and Young's modulus along with the Debye temperature, Poisson's ratio, and elastic anisotropy factor are all successfully obtained. Moreover, the pressure dependence of the longitudinal and shear wave velocities in three different directions [100], [110], and [111] for Ir2P are also predicted for the first time.

  1. Moduli backreaction on inflationary attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roest, Diederik; Scalisi, Marco; Werkman, Pelle

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the interplay between moduli dynamics and inflation, focusing on the Kachru-Kallosh-Linde-Trivedi scenario and cosmological α -attractors. General couplings between these sectors can induce a significant backreaction and potentially destroy the inflationary regime; however, we demonstrate that this generically does not happen for α -attractors. Depending on the details of the superpotential, the volume modulus can either be stable during the entire inflationary trajectory or become tachyonic at some point and act as a waterfall field, resulting in a sudden end of inflation. In the latter case there is a universal supersymmetric minimum where the scalars end up, preventing the decompactification scenario. The gravitino mass is independent from the inflationary scale with no fine-tuning of the parameters. The observational predictions conform to the universal value of attractors, fully compatible with the Planck data, with possibly a capped number of e -folds due to the interplay with moduli.

  2. Porous grain model and equivalent elastic medium approach for predicting effective elastic properties of sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Franklin J.

    accurately match empirical relations in competent sand, shale, and quartz/calcite mixtures. The porous grain model treats marine sediment as pack of porous elastic grains. The effective elastic moduli of the porous grains are calculated using the differential effective-medium model (DEM), where the intragranular ellipsoidal inclusions have a fixed aspect ratio and are filled with seawater. Then the elastic moduli of a pack of these spherical grains are calculated using different granular medium models and a modified (scaled to the critical porosity) upper Hashin-Shtrikman bound above the critical porosity, and modified lower and upper Hashin-Shtrikman bounds below the critical porosity. In this study, the modified lower and upper bounds were found to be appropriate for carbonate marine sediment and diatomaceous sediment, respectively. The porous-grain model is also applied to estimate the effective elastic properties of three basic porous grain-aggregate scenarios, depending on the effective fluid connectivity of the intragranular porosity and in the grains. To determine the effective elastic properties of the saturated porous-grain material in the three different porous-grain-aggregate scenarios, we use two models: the differential effective medium approximation (DEM) and the combination DEM-Gassmann, depending on whether we wish to obtain the high frequency or the low frequency effective elastic moduli, respectively. In this approach, low and high frequency refer to fluid-related effects; but the wavelengths are still much longer than any scale of grains or intergranular pores. A similar staged approach is used to determine the elastic moduli of a cemented porous grain aggregate at low cement concentration. This is achieved by introducing the porous grain concept into the cementation theory. Then, the combination of the cementation theory for porous grain material with a self-consistent approximation, specifically, the coherent potential approximation (CPA), allows us to

  3. Readily fiberizable glasses having a high modulus of elasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.

    1970-01-01

    New glass compositions yield composites having higher moduli of elasticity and specific moduli of elasticity than commercially available glasses. Over a reasonable temperature range the glasses have a viscosity of about 20,000 poises. They consist of silica, alumina, magnesia, and beryllia, plus at least one uncommon oxide.

  4. Age-related changes in dynamic moduli of ovine vitreous.

    PubMed

    Colter, Jourdan; Williams, Alex; Moran, Patrick; Coats, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Multiple rheological studies have characterized the dynamic material properties of adult vitreous, but no studies have investigated vitreous properties in the immature eye. In this study, premature, infant and adult ovine vitreous specimens were tested in shear to identify differences in dynamic moduli with age. Significant inertial artifact and rapid degradation of the vitreous ex vivo hindered the ability to accurately collect dynamic data through standard oscillation protocols. Therefore, dynamic moduli were calculated by converting relaxation spectrum data to the retardation spectrum, resulting in the calculation of the storage (G') and loss (G") moduli from the first few milliseconds of creep testing when tissue degradation and inertia is minimal. The technique was validated against two synthetic materials that span the viscoelastic spectrum. G' and G" of the primarily viscous synthetic material (polystyrene, tanδ=0.61) and G' of the primarily elastic material (agar, tanδ=0.06) were not significantly different than those calculated from dynamic oscillatory testing (p<0.05). G" of agar was overestimated (4-39%) with the interconversion technique due to creep ringing. Ovine vitreous was primarily viscous (tanδ=1.31), so this technique was used to evaluate changes in dynamic moduli with age. G' and G" for adult vitreous was 2-4 times and 1.5-2 times lower, respectively, than infant vitreous, corresponding to the structural breakdown of the vitreous with age. The dynamic moduli of premature vitreous was lower than infant and adult, likely due to premature development of the vitreal structure. These data suggest that significant differences exist between the viscoelastic response of infant and adult vitreous, and computational models of the pediatric eye will require appropriate age and rate material properties of vitreous.

  5. Elastic module of superhard rhenium diboride

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, Michael R.; Keppens, Veerle; Sales, Brian C; Jin, Rongying; Mandrus, David

    2009-01-01

    The elastic moduli of polycrystalline rhenium diboride are measured as a function of temperature between 5 and 325 K. The room temperature results show that ReB{sub 2} has very high values for both the bulk and shear modulus, confirming the incompressible and superhard nature of this material. With decreasing temperature, the moduli increase, with a hint of softening below 50 K.

  6. Identification of microstructural characteristics in lightweight aggregate concretes by micromechanical modelling including the interfacial transition zone (ITZ)

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Y.; Ortola, S.; Beaucour, A.L.; Dumontet, H.

    2010-11-15

    An approach which combines both experimental techniques and micromechanical modelling is developed in order to characterise the elastic behaviour of lightweight aggregate concretes (LWAC). More than three hundred LWAC specimens with various lightweight aggregate types (5) of several volume ratios and three different mortar matrices (normal, HP, VHP) are tested. The modelling is based on iterative homogenisation process and includes the ITZ specificities experimentally observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In agreement with experimental measurements, the effects of mix design parameters as well as of the interfacial transition zone (ITZ) on concrete mechanical performances are quantitatively analysed. Confrontations with experimental results allow identifying the elastic moduli of LWA which are difficult to determine experimentally. Whereas the traditional empirical formulas are not sufficiently precise, predictions of LWAC elastic behaviours computed with the micromechanical models appear in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  7. Development of a Single-Crystal Mineral Elasticity Database and Applications to Crustal and Upper Mantle Mineralogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    The single-crystal elastic stiffness tensor fully characterizes the anisotropic elastic response of minerals. An understanding of how such elastic properties vary with pressure, temperature, structure, and composition are needed to interpret seismic data for the Earth. Additionally, elastic moduli are important for understanding many solid-state phenomena including mechanical stability, interatomic interactions, material strength, compressibility, and phase transition mechanisms. A database of single-crystal elastic properties of minerals and related phases is being assembled. This dataset currently incorporates over 400 sets of elastic constant measurements on more than 270 separate phases. In addition to compiling the individual elastic stiffnesses, the database also allows calculation of a variety of additional properties including anisotropy factors, bulk and linear compressibilities, and stability criteria, as well as evaluation of aggregate properties including bounds and averages of bulk, shear, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio and elastic wave speeds. Extensions of the database to include high pressure and high temperature data as well as theoretical calculations are being planned. Examples of application of this database to geophysical problems will be highlighted. Specific applications to be discussed include: 1) variation of elastic anisotropy with pressure for mantle and crustal minerals; 2) evaluation of elasticity data for pyroxenes revealing major structural and chemical controls on elasticity as well as remaining ambiguities and uncertainties.

  8. Elastic properties of pyrope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Bridget; Bass, Jay D.; Rossman, George R.; Geiger, Charles A.; Langer, Klaus

    1991-03-01

    Brillouin spectroscopy was used to measure the single crystal elastic properties of a pure synthetic pyrope and a natural garnet containing 89.9 mol% of the pyrope end member (Mg3Al2Si3O12). The elastic moduli, c ij , of the two samples are entirely consistent and agree with previous estimates of the elastic properties of pyrope based upon the moduli of solid solutions. Our results indicate that the elastic moduli of pyrope end-member are c 11=296.2±0.5, c 12=111.1±0.6, c 44=91.6±0.3, Ks=172.8±0.3, μ=92.0±0.2, all in units of GPa. These results differ by several percent from those reported previously for synthetic pyrope, but are based upon a much larger data set. Although the hydrous components of the two samples from the present study are substantially different, representing both ‘dry’ and ‘saturated’ samples, we find no discernable effect of structurally bound water on the elastic properties. This is due to the small absolute solubility of water in pyrope, as compared with other garnets such as grossular.

  9. Using Ultrasonic Lamb Waves To Measure Moduli Of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1995-01-01

    Measurements of broad-band ultrasonic Lamb waves in plate specimens of ceramic-matrix/fiber and metal-matrix/fiber composite materials used to determine moduli of elasticity of materials. In one class of potential applications of concept, Lamb-wave responses of specimens measured and analyzed at various stages of thermal and/or mechanical processing to determine effects of processing, without having to dissect specimens. In another class, structural components having shapes supporting propagation of Lamb waves monitored ultrasonically to identify signs of deterioration and impending failure.

  10. The moduli and gravitino (non)-problems in models with strongly stabilized moduli

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Jason L.; Olive, Keith A.; Garcia, Marcos A.G. E-mail: garciagarcia@physics.umn.edu

    2014-03-01

    In gravity mediated models and in particular in models with strongly stabilized moduli, there is a natural hierarchy between gaugino masses, the gravitino mass and moduli masses: m{sub 1/2} << m{sub 3/2} << m{sub φ}. Given this hierarchy, we show that 1) moduli problems associated with excess entropy production from moduli decay and 2) problems associated with moduli/gravitino decays to neutralinos are non-existent. Placed in an inflationary context, we show that the amplitude of moduli oscillations are severely limited by strong stabilization. Moduli oscillations may then never come to dominate the energy density of the Universe. As a consequence, moduli decay to gravitinos and their subsequent decay to neutralinos need not overpopulate the cold dark matter density.

  11. Young's Moduli of Cold and Vacuum Plasma Sprayed Metallic Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Pawlik, R.; Loewenthal, W.

    2009-01-01

    Monolithic metallic copper alloy and NiCrAlY coatings were fabricated by either the cold spray (CS) or the vacuum plasma spray (VPS) deposition processes. Dynamic elastic modulus property measurements were conducted on these monolithic coating specimens between 300 K and 1273 K using the impulse excitation technique. The Young's moduli decreased almost linearly with increasing temperature at all temperatures except in the case of the CS Cu-23%Cr-5%Al and VPS NiCrAlY, where deviations from linearity were observed above a critical temperature. It was observed that the Young's moduli for VPS Cu-8%Cr were larger than literature data compiled for Cu. The addition of 1%Al to Cu- 8%Cr significantly increased its Young's modulus by 12 to 17% presumably due to a solid solution effect. Comparisons of the Young s moduli data between two different measurements on the same CS Cu- 23%Cr-5%Al specimen revealed that the values measured in the first run were about 10% higher than those in the second run. It is suggested that this observation is due to annealing of the initial cold work microstructure resulting form the cold spray deposition process.

  12. String moduli stabilization at the conifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenhagen, Ralph; Herschmann, Daniela; Wolf, Florian

    2016-08-01

    We study moduli stabilization for type IIB orientifolds compactified on Calabi-Yau threefolds in the region close to conifold singularities in the complex structure moduli space. The form of the periods implies new phenomena like exponential mass hierarchies even in the regime of negligible warping. Integrating out the heavy conic complex structure modulus leads to an effective flux induced potential for the axio-dilaton and the remaining complex structure moduli containing exponentially suppressed terms that imitate non-perturbative effects. It is shown that this scenario can be naturally combined with the large volume scenario so that all moduli are dynamically stabilized in the dilute flux regime. As an application of this moduli stabilization scheme, a string inspired model of aligned inflation is designed that features a parametrically controlled hierarchy of mass scales.

  13. Elastic constant versus temperature behavior of three hardened maraging steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledbetter, H. M.; Austin, M. W.

    1985-01-01

    Elastic constants of three maraging steels were determined by measuring ultrasonic velocities. Annealed steels show slightly lower bulk moduli and considerably lower shear moduli than hardened steels. All the elastic constants (Young's modulus, shear modulus, bulk modulus and Poisson's ratio) show regular temperature behavior between 76 and 400 K. Young's modulus and the shear modulus increase with increasing yield strength, but the bulk modulus and Poisson's ratio are relatively unchanged. Elastic anisotropy is quite small.

  14. Measurements of Young's and shear moduli of rail steel at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yuanye; Zhang, Haifeng; Ahmadi, Mehdi; Karim, Md Afzalul; Felix Wu, H

    2014-03-01

    The design and modelling of the buckling effect of Continuous Welded Rail (CWR) requires accurate material constants, especially at elevated temperatures. However, such material constants have rarely been found in literature. In this article, the Young's moduli and shear moduli of rail steel at elevated temperatures are determined by a new sonic resonance method developed in our group. A network analyser is used to excite a sample hanged inside a furnace through a simple tweeter type speaker. The vibration signal is picked up by a Polytec OFV-5000 Laser Vibrometer and then transferred back to the network analyser. Resonance frequencies in both the flexural and torsional modes are measured, and the Young's moduli and shear moduli are determined through the measured resonant frequencies. To validate the measured elastic constants, the measurements have been repeated by using the classic sonic resonance method. The comparisons of obtained moduli from the two methods show an excellent consistency of the results. In addition, the material elastic constants measured are validated by an ultrasound test based on a pulse-echo method and compared with previous published results at room temperature. The measured material data provides an invaluable reference for the design of CWR to avoid detrimental buckling failure.

  15. On the anisotropic elastic properties of hydroxyapatite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J. L.; Ukraincik, K.

    1971-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the isotropic elastic moduli on polycrystalline specimens of hydroxyapatite and fluorapatite are compared with elastic constants measured directly from single crystals of fluorapatite in order to derive a set of pseudo single crystal elastic constants for hydroxyapatite. The stiffness coefficients thus derived are given. The anisotropic and isotropic elastic properties are then computed and compared with similar properties derived from experimental observations of the anisotropic behavior of bone.

  16. Effective dynamic moduli and density of fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caleap, Mihai; Drinkwater, Bruce W.; Wilcox, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    A multiple scattering theory is developed to predict the effective dynamic material properties of elastic composites in two dimensions. The system consists of circular fibers distributed randomly in an elastic solid. The coherent wave propagation in the elastic composite is analyzed under the quasi-crystalline approximation. The effective medium equivalent to the original composite material is a medium with space and time dispersion, and hence, its parameters are functions of frequency of the incident field. Although the effective medium is homogeneous and isotropic, its effective dynamic moduli and density depend on the type of propagating wave, e.g., they are different for longitudinal and transverse incident waves. However, they coincide in the long-wave region as expected on physical grounds. Furthermore, the effective material properties are found to be complexvalued, in addition to their dynamic nature. For in-plane waves and in the long-wave limit the effective bulk modulus, mass density and shear modulus are independently determined by a set of monopolar, dipolar and quadrupolar scattering coefficients of the embedded fibers alone, respectively. Likewise, for anti-plane waves, the effective mass density and the shear modulus are specified, respectively, in terms of the monopolar and dipolar scattering coefficients of the corresponding fiberscattering problem. The emerging possibility of designing composite materials to form elastic metamaterials is discussed.

  17. Universal moduli spaces of Riemann surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Lizhen; Jost, Jürgen

    2017-04-01

    We construct a moduli space for Riemann surfaces that is universal in the sense that it represents compact Riemann surfaces of any finite genus. This moduli space is a connected complex subspace of an infinite dimensional complex space, and is stratified according to genus such that each stratum has a compact closure, and it carries a metric and a measure that induce a Riemannian metric and a finite volume measure on each stratum. Applications to the Plateau-Douglas problem for minimal surfaces of varying genus and to the partition function of Bosonic string theory are outlined. The construction starts with a universal moduli space of Abelian varieties. This space carries a structure of an infinite dimensional locally symmetric space which is of interest in its own right. The key to our construction of the universal moduli space then is the Torelli map that assigns to every Riemann surface its Jacobian and its extension to the Satake-Baily-Borel compactifications.

  18. Moduli stabilization in stringy ISS models

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Yu; Nakayama, Yu; Yamazaki, Masahito; Yanagida, T.T.

    2007-09-28

    We present a stringy realization of the ISS metastable SUSY breaking model with moduli stabilization. The mass moduli of the ISS model is stabilized by gauging of a U(1) symmetry and its D-term potential. The SUSY is broken both by F-terms and D-terms. It is possible to obtain de Sitter vacua with a vanishingly small cosmological constant by an appropriate fine-tuning of flux parameters.

  19. Moduli Stabilization Using Open String Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Alok

    2007-04-01

    In this talk we discuss how by turning on gauge fluxes which couple to the end-points of open strings one can obtain stabilization of closed string moduli. This is done by analyzing supersymmetry constraints and RR tadpole conditions. Stabilization of complex and Kahler moduli is studied in a T6/Z2 orientifold. .

  20. Hard tissue as a composite material. I - Bounds on the elastic behavior.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J. L.

    1971-01-01

    Recent determination of the elastic moduli of hydroxyapatite by ultrasonic methods permits a re-examination of the Voigt or parallel model of the elastic behavior of bone, as a two phase composite material. It is shown that such a model alone cannot be used to describe the behavior of bone. Correlative data on the elastic moduli of dentin, enamel and various bone samples indicate the existence of a nonlinear dependence of elastic moduli on composition of hard tissue. Several composite models are used to calculate the bounds on the elastic behavior of these tissues. The limitations of these models are described, and experiments to obtain additional critical data are discussed.

  1. Elastic properties of NaXH4 (X = B, Al)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Jiang, Zhen-Yi; Hou, Yu-Qing; Li, Li-Sha

    2009-07-01

    Elastic properties of NaXH4 (X = B, Al) have been studied by first-principles calculations using a projected augmented plane-wave approach. The calculated elastic constants compare favorably with experimental values. Our calculations show that the theoretically calculated elastic constants and bulk moduli have small values compared with those of typical metals and intermetallic compounds, which indicates that NaXH4 (X = B, Al) are highly compressible. Comparison of bulk moduli B of different complex hydrides shows a correlation between B and the decomposition temperatures. Also, we calculated the elastic anisotropies and the Debye temperatures from the elastic constants.

  2. Micromechanical Prediction of the Effective Behavior of Fully Coupled Electro-Magneto-Thermo-Elastic Multiphase Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aboudi, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    The micromechanical generalized method of cells model is employed for the prediction of the effective moduli of electro-magneto-thermo-elastic composites. These include the effective elastic, piezoelectric, piezomagnetic, dielectric, magnetic permeability, electromagnetic coupling moduli, as well as the effective thermal expansion coefficients and the associated pyroelectric and pyromagnetic constants. Results are given for fibrous and periodically bilaminated composites.

  3. Determination of tensile and compressive moduli of laminae in unidirectionally reinforced laminate by flexural tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuklinski, Mariusz

    2017-03-01

    The Euler-Bernoulli beam theory is widely used in engineering despite of various simplifications. One of which, that do matters in this article, is neglecting the difference between tensile and compressive moduli. Experimental tests reveal that for fibre reinforced composites tensile moduli are generally greater than compressive ones. This paper presents the results of testing the laminate composed of four unidirectionally glass reinforced laminae separated by layers of glass mat. The specimens were subjected to flexural, tensile and compressive loading in order to calculate corresponding moduli of elasticity. The results were compared using equations of Classical Beam Theory. Knowing the tensile and compressive moduli of glass mat reinforced laminae and performing flexural tests of laminate it is possible to calculate the tensile and compressive moduli of unidirectionally glass reinforced laminae. The experimental data taken into calculations correspond to linear normal strains of 0.0005 and 0.0025. The experimental data are consistent with results of calculations within acceptable margin of tolerance.

  4. Calculated elastic and thermal properties of MGO at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaak, Donald G.; Cohen, Ronald E.; Mehl, Michael J.

    1990-05-01

    Using the potential-induced breathing model, we calculate the pressure and temperature dependence of the thermoelastic properties of MgO. These calculations represent the first attempt to obtain a consistent set of thermodynamic elastic moduli for an oxide from an ab initio model over a wide range of pressure and temperature. By assuming the quasi-harmonic approximation for the free energies, we find excellent agreement between the temperature dependence of calculated elastic moduli and those obtained from experiments. Comparison of the calculated athermal and isothermal elastic moduli shows approximations using athermal values to be unreliable at high temperature. The elastic moduli for MgO are presented for pressures and temperatures appropriate for the lower mantle, a regime in which elastic moduli cannot be obtained by direct measurement.

  5. Higgs-otic inflation and moduli stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielleman, Sjoerd; Ibáñez, Luis E.; Pedro, Francisco G.; Valenzuela, Irene; Wieck, Clemens

    2017-02-01

    We study closed-string moduli stabilization in Higgs-otic inflation in Type IIB orientifold backgrounds with fluxes. In this setup large-field inflation is driven by the vacuum energy of mobile D7-branes. Imaginary selfdual (ISD) three-form fluxes in the background source a μ-term and the necessary monodromy for large field excursions while imaginary anti-selfdual (IASD) three-form fluxes are sourced by non-perturbative contri-butions to the superpotential necessary for moduli stabilization. We analyze Kähler moduli stabilization and backreaction on the inflaton potential in detail. Confirming results in the recent literature, we find that integrating out heavy Kähler moduli leads to a controlled flattening of the inflaton potential. We quantify the flux tuning necessary for stability even during large-field inflation. Moreover, we study the backreaction of supersymmetrically stabilized complex structure moduli and the axio-dilaton in the Kähler metric of the inflaton. Contrary to previous findings, this backreaction can be pushed far out in field space if a similar flux tuning as in the Kähler sector is possible. This allows for a trans-Planckian field range large enough to support inflation.

  6. Two-field Kaehler moduli inflation in large volume moduli stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Huan-Xiong; Ma, Hong-Liang E-mail: hlma@mail.ustc.edu.cn

    2008-08-15

    In this paper we present a two-field inflation model, which is distinctive in having a non-canonical kinetic Lagrangian and comes from the large volume approach to the moduli stabilization in flux compactification of type IIB superstring on a Calabi-Yau orientifold with h{sup (1,2)}>h{sup (1,1)}{>=}4. The Kaehler moduli are classified as the volume modulus, heavy moduli and two light moduli. The axion-dilaton, complex structure moduli and all heavy Kaehler moduli including the volume modulus are frozen by a non-perturbatively corrected flux superpotential and the {alpha}{sup '}-corrected Kaehler potential in the large volume limit. The minimum of the scalar potential at which the heavy moduli are stabilized provides the dominant potential energy for the surviving light Kaehler moduli. We consider a simplified case where the axionic components in the light Kaehler moduli are further stabilized at the potential minimum and only the geometrical components are taken as scalar fields to drive an assisted-like inflation. For a certain range of moduli stabilization parameters and inflation initial conditions, we obtain a nearly flat power spectrum of the curvature perturbation, with n{sub s} Almost-Equal-To 0.96 at Hubble exit, and an inflationary energy scale of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} GeV. In our model, there is significant correlation between the curvature and isocurvature perturbations on super-Hubble scales, so at the end of inflation a great deal of the curvature power spectrum originates from this correlation.

  7. Accidental Kähler moduli inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Maharana, Anshuman; Rummel, Markus; Sumitomo, Yoske E-mail: markus.rummel@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2015-09-01

    We study a model of accidental inflation in type IIB string theory where inflation occurs near the inflection point of a small Kähler modulus. A racetrack structure helps to alleviate the known concern that string-loop corrections may spoil Kähler Moduli Inflation unless having a significant suppression via the string coupling or a special brane setup. Also, the hierarchy of gauge group ranks required for the separation between moduli stabilization and inflationary dynamics is relaxed. The relaxation becomes more significant when we use the recently proposed D-term generated racetrack model.

  8. Accidental Kähler moduli inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Maharana, Anshuman; Rummel, Markus; Sumitomo, Yoske

    2015-09-14

    We study a model of accidental inflation in type IIB string theory where inflation occurs near the inflection point of a small Kähler modulus. A racetrack structure helps to alleviate the known concern that string-loop corrections may spoil Kähler Moduli Inflation unless having a significant suppression via the string coupling or a special brane setup. Also, the hierarchy of gauge group ranks required for the separation between moduli stabilization and inflationary dynamics is relaxed. The relaxation becomes more significant when we use the recently proposed D-term generated racetrack model.

  9. Pre-Stressed Viscoelastic Composites: Effective Incremental Moduli and Band-Gap Tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Parnell, William J.

    2010-09-30

    We study viscoelastic wave propagation along pre-stressed nonlinear elastic composite bars. In the pre-stressed state we derive explicit forms for the effective incremental storage and loss moduli with dependence on the pre-stress. We also derive a dispersion relation for the effective wavenumber in the case of arbitrary frequency, hence permitting a study of viscoelastic band-gap tuning via pre-stress.

  10. Elasticity of plagioclase feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. Michael; Angel, Ross J.; Ross, Nancy L.

    2016-02-01

    Elastic properties are reported for eight plagioclase feldspars that span compositions from albite (NaSi3AlO8) to anorthite (CaSi2Al2O8). Surface acoustic wave velocities measured using Impulsive Stimulated Light Scattering and compliance sums from high-pressure X-ray compression studies accurately determine all 21 components of the elasticity tensor for these triclinic minerals. The overall pattern of elasticity and the changes in individual elastic components with composition can be rationalized on the basis of the evolution of crystal structures and chemistry across this solid-solution join. All plagioclase feldspars have high elastic anisotropy; a* (the direction perpendicular to the b and c axes) is the softest direction by a factor of 3 in albite. From albite to anorthite the stiffness of this direction undergoes the greatest change, increasing twofold. Small discontinuities in the elastic components, inferred to occur between the three plagioclase phases with distinct symmetry (C1>¯, I1>¯, and P1>¯), appear consistent with the nature of the underlying conformation of the framework-linked tetrahedra and the associated structural changes. Measured body wave velocities of plagioclase-rich rocks, reported over the last five decades, are consistent with calculated Hill-averaged velocities using the current moduli. This confirms long-standing speculation that previously reported elastic moduli for plagioclase feldspars are systematically in error. The current results provide greater assurance that the seismic structure of the middle and lower crusts can be accurately estimated on the basis of specified mineral modes, chemistry, and fabric.

  11. An Approach to Calculate Mineralś Bulk Moduli KS from Chemical Composition and Density ρ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, S.; Schilling, F. R.; Mueller, B.; Drüppel, K.

    2015-12-01

    The elastic properties of minerals are fundamental parameters for technical and geotechnical applications and an important research topic towards a better understanding of the Earth's interior. Published elastic properties, chemical composition, and density data of 86 minerals (total of 258 data including properties of minerals at various p, T conditions) were collected into a database. It was used to test different hypotheses about relationships between these properties (e.g. water content in minerals and their Poisson's ratio). Furthermore, a scheme to model the average elastic properties, i.e. the bulk modulus KS, based on mineral density and composition was developed. Birch's law, a linearity between density ρ and wave velocity (e.g. vp.), is frequently used in seismic and seismology to derive density of the Earth's interior from seismic velocities. Applying the compiled mineral data contradicts the use of a simple velocity-density relation (e.g. Gardneŕs relation, 1974). The presented model-approach to estimate the mineralś bulk moduli Ks (as Voigt-Reuss-Hill average) is based on the idea of pressure-temperature (p-T) dependent ionś bulk moduli. Using a multi-exponential regression to ascertain the ionś bulk moduli and by applying an exponential scaling with density ρ, their bulk moduli could be modelled. As a result, > 88 % of the 258 bulk moduli data are predicted with an uncertainty of < 20 % compared to published values. Compared to other models (e.g. Anderson et al. 1970 and Anderson & Nafe 1965), the here presented approach to model the bulk moduli only requires the density ρ and chemical composition of the mineral and is not limited to a specific group of minerals, composition, or structure. In addition to this, by using the pressure and temperature dependent density ρ(p, T), it is possible to predict bulk moduli for varying p-T conditions. References:Gardner, G.H.F, Gardner, L.W. and Gregory, A.R. (1974). Geophysics, 39, No. 6, 770

  12. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy for elastic constant measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, R.D.; Migliori, A.; Roe, L.H.

    1993-12-31

    All objects exhibit vibrational resonances when mechanically excited. These resonant frequencies are determined by density, geometry, and elastic moduli. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) takes advantage of the known relationship between the parameters. In particular, for a freely suspended object, with three of the four parameters (vibrational spectra, density, geometry, or elastic moduli) known the remaining one can be calculated. From a materials characterization standpoint it is straight-forward to measure density and geometry but less so to measure all the elastic moduli. It has recently become possible to quickly and accurately measure vibrational spectra, and using code written at Los Alamos, calculate all the elastic moduli simultaneously. This is done to an accuracy of better than one percent for compression and 0.1 percent for shear. RUS provides rapid acquisition of materials information here-to-fore obtainable only with difficulty. It will greatly facilitate the use of real materials properties in models and thus make possible more realistic modeling results. The technique is sensitive to phase changes and microstructure. This offers a change to input real data into microstructure and phase change models. It will also enable measurement of moduli at locations in and about a weld thus providing information for a validating coupled thermomechanical calculations.

  13. Elastic properties of granular materials under uniaxial compaction cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, N.; Anderson, O. L.

    1973-01-01

    Data on andesitic and basaltic sands are presented showing compressional sound velocity, density, and creep as functions of uniaxial loading through several compaction cycles. Maximum pressures over which acoustic measurements were made were in the range from 600 to 700 bars. The dynamic elastic modulus varies with pressure in a manner analogous to that of a static elastic modulus defined by small pressure perturbations on a typical compaction cycle. After several compaction cycles, two compressional elastic moduli apparently exist at low pressure (thus two modes of compressional wave propagation through the samples are indicated). The elastic moduli observations are briefly discussed in terms of a general expression for compressibility.

  14. Prediction of elastic properties for polymer-particle nanocomposites exhibiting an interphase.

    PubMed

    Deng, Fei; Van Vliet, Krystyn J

    2011-04-22

    Particle-polymer nanocomposites often exhibit mechanical properties described poorly by micromechanical models that include only the particle and matrix phases. Existence of an interfacial region between the particle and matrix, or interphase, has been posited and indirectly demonstrated to account for this effect. Here, we present a straightforward analytical approach to estimate effective elastic properties of composites comprising particles encapsulated by an interphase of finite thickness and distinct elastic properties. This explicit solution can treat nanocomposites that comprise either physically isolated nanoparticles or agglomerates of such nanoparticles; the same framework can also treat physically isolated nanoparticle aggregates or agglomerates of such aggregates. We find that the predicted elastic moduli agree with experiments for three types of particle-polymer nanocomposites, and that the predicted interphase thickness and stiffness of carbon black-rubber nanocomposites are consistent with measured values. Finally, we discuss the relative influence of the particle-polymer interphase thickness and stiffness to identify maximum possible changes in the macroscale elastic properties of such materials.

  15. Dimensional reduction for D3-brane moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cownden, Brad; Frey, Andrew R.; Marsh, M. C. David; Underwood, Bret

    2016-12-01

    Warped string compactifications are central to many attempts to stabilize moduli and connect string theory with cosmology and particle phenomenology. We present a first-principles derivation of the low-energy 4D effective theory from dimensional reduction of a D3-brane in a warped Calabi-Yau compactification of type IIB string theory with imaginary self-dual 3-form flux, including effects of D3-brane motion beyond the probe approximation, and find the metric on the moduli space of brane positions, the universal volume modulus, and axions descending from the 4-form potential. As D3-branes may be considered as carrying either electric or magnetic charges for the self-dual 5-form field strength, we present calculations in both duality frames. Our results are consistent with, but extend significantly, earlier results on the low-energy effective theory arising from D3-branes in string compactifications.

  16. Braneworld gravity: influence of the moduli fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barceló, Carlos; Visser, Matt

    2000-10-01

    We consider the case of a generic braneworld geometry in the presence of one or more moduli fields (e.g. the dilaton) that vary throughout the bulk spacetime. Working in an arbitrary conformal frame, using the generalized junction conditions of gr-qc/0008008 and the Gauss-Codazzi equations, we derive the effective ``induced'' on-brane gravitational equations. As usual in braneworld scenarios, these equations do not form a closed system in that the bulk can exchange both information and stress-energy with the braneworld. We work with an arbitrary number of moduli fields described by an arbitrary sigma model, with arbitrary curvature couplings, arbitrary self interactions, and arbitrary dimension for the bulk. (The braneworld is always codimension one.) Among the novelties we encounter are modifications of the on-brane stress-energy conservation law, anomalous couplings between on-brane gravity and the trace of the on-brane stress-energy tensor, and additional possibilities for modifying the on-brane effective cosmological constant. After obtaining the general stress-energy ``conservation'' law and the ``induced Einstein equations'' we particularize the discussion to two particularly attractive cases: for a (n-2)-brane in ([n-1] + 1) dimensions we discuss both the effect of (1) generic variable moduli fields in the Einstein frame, and (2) the effect of a varying dilaton in the string frame.

  17. BCFT moduli space in level truncation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudrna, Matěj; Maccaferri, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    We propose a new non-perturbative method to search for marginal deformations in level truncated open string field theory. Instead of studying the flatness of the effective potential for the marginal field (which is not expected to give a one-to-one parametrization of the BCFT moduli space), we identify a new non-universal branch of the tachyon potential which, from known analytic examples, is expected to parametrize the marginal flow in a much larger region of the BCFT moduli space. By a level 18 computation in Siegel gauge we find an increasingly flat effective potential in the non-universal sector, connected to the perturbative vacuum and we confirm that the coefficient of the marginal field ( λ SFT) has a maximum compatible with the value where the solutions stop existing in the standard Sen-Zwiebach approach. At the maximal reachable level the effective potential still deviates from flatness for large values of the tachyon, but the Ellwood invariants stay close to the correct BCFT values on the whole branch and the full periodic moduli space of the cosine deformation is covered.

  18. Elasticity and structure of mantle pyroxenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, J. D.; Zhang, J. S.; Sang, L.; Reynard, B.; Montagnac, G.; Dera, P. K.

    2012-12-01

    The elastic properties of both natural orthoenstatite and natural diopside have been determined at high pressures to over 14 GPa at room temperature by Brillouin spectroscopy. Single crystals of Fe-bearing orthoenstatite from San Carlos, AZ were used in one part of the study. The sound velocity data display a pronounced change in elastic character upon cold compression to above 12 GPa. There is an abrupt change in velocity anisotropy above that pressure. Single-crystal X-ray structure refinements, performed at the GSECARS beamline, Sector 13 of the APS, demonstrate that orthoenstatite transforms to a new high-pressure phase with space group P21/c (HPCEN2), with the transition pressure bracketed to be between about 10-14 GPa (JS Zhang et al., 2012). No evidence of a structure with C2/c space group was observed. Raman spectroscopy was used to explore the compositional dependence of the transition pressure and structure of the high-pressure phase. Single crystals of nearly pure Mg end-member OPX, a high-alumina sample, and an Fe-rich sample were examined. We find that Al and Fe both effect the transition pressure, but that the high-pressure phase is still P21/c HPCEN2 in all cases. The single-crystal elasticity diopside was measured to transition zone pressures using Brillouin spectroscopy. A very dense high-quality velocity data set was obtained, from which the single-crystal elastic moduli as a function of pressure were obtained. Results for the aggregate bulk elastic properties are in very good agreement with polycrystalline acoustic measurements of Li and Neuville. This is a case where the results of single-crystal Brillouin and polycrystalline acoustic measurements give highly consistent results. Li, B.S., and Neuville, D.R. (2010) Elasticity of diopside to 8 GPa and 1073 K and implications for the upper mantle. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, 183(3-4), 398-403. Zhang, JS, P Dera, and JD Bass (2012) A new high-pressure phase transition in natural Fe

  19. Elastic properties of gamma-Pu by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, Albert; Betts, J; Trugman, A; Mielke, C H; Mitchell, J N; Ramos, M; Stroe, I

    2009-01-01

    Despite intense experimental and theoretical work on Pu, there is still little understanding of the strange properties of this metal. We used resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method to investigate the elastic properties of pure polycrystalline Pu at high temperatures. Shear and longitudinal elastic moduli of the {gamma}-phase of Pu were determined simultaneously and the bulk modulus was computed from them. A smooth linear and large decrease of all elastic moduli with increasing temperature was observed. We calculated the Poisson ratio and found that it increases from 0.242 at 519K to 0.252 at 571K.

  20. Elastic-wave velocity in marine sediments with gas hydrates: Effective medium modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helgerud, M.B.; Dvorkin, J.; Nur, A.; Sakai, A.; Collett, T.

    1999-01-01

    We offer a first-principle-based effective medium model for elastic-wave velocity in unconsolidated, high porosity, ocean bottom sediments containing gas hydrate. The dry sediment frame elastic constants depend on porosity, elastic moduli of the solid phase, and effective pressure. Elastic moduli of saturated sediment are calculated from those of the dry frame using Gassmann's equation. To model the effect of gas hydrate on sediment elastic moduli we use two separate assumptions: (a) hydrate modifies the pore fluid elastic properties without affecting the frame; (b) hydrate becomes a component of the solid phase, modifying the elasticity of the frame. The goal of the modeling is to predict the amount of hydrate in sediments from sonic or seismic velocity data. We apply the model to sonic and VSP data from ODP Hole 995 and obtain hydrate concentration estimates from assumption (b) consistent with estimates obtained from resistivity, chlorinity and evolved gas data. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Elastic modulus of cetacean auditory ossicles.

    PubMed

    Tubelli, Andrew A; Zosuls, Aleks; Ketten, Darlene R; Mountain, David C

    2014-05-01

    In order to model the hearing capabilities of marine mammals (cetaceans), it is necessary to understand the mechanical properties, such as elastic modulus, of the middle ear bones in these species. Biologically realistic models can be used to investigate the biomechanics of hearing in cetaceans, much of which is currently unknown. In the present study, the elastic moduli of the auditory ossicles (malleus, incus, and stapes) of eight species of cetacean, two baleen whales (mysticete) and six toothed whales (odontocete), were measured using nanoindentation. The two groups of mysticete ossicles overall had lower average elastic moduli (35.2 ± 13.3 GPa and 31.6 ± 6.5 GPa) than the groups of odontocete ossicles (53.3 ± 7.2 GPa to 62.3 ± 4.7 GPa). Interior bone generally had a higher modulus than cortical bone by up to 36%. The effects of freezing and formalin-fixation on elastic modulus were also investigated, although samples were few and no clear trend could be discerned. The high elastic modulus of the ossicles and the differences in the elastic moduli between mysticetes and odontocetes are likely specializations in the bone for underwater hearing.

  2. Characterization of the Nonlinear Elastic Properties of Graphite/Epoxy Composites Using Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.; Green, Robert E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The normalized change in ultrasonic "natural" velocity as a function of stress and temperature was measured in a unidirectional laminate of T300/5208 graphite/epoxy composite using a pulsed phase locked loop ultrasonic interferometer. These measurements were used together with the linear (second order) elastic moduli to calculate some of the nonlinear (third order) moduli of this material.

  3. Erosion of dust aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seizinger, A.; Krijt, S.; Kley, W.

    2013-12-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to gain a deeper insight into how much different aggregate types are affected by erosion. Especially, it is important to study the influence of the velocity of the impacting projectiles. We also want to provide models for dust growth in protoplanetary disks with simple recipes to account for erosion effects. Methods: To study the erosion of dust aggregates we employed a molecular dynamics approach that features a detailed micro-physical model of the interaction of spherical grains. For the first time, the model has been extended by introducing a new visco-elastic damping force, which requires a proper calibration. Afterwards, different sample generation methods were used to cover a wide range of aggregate types. Results: The visco-elastic damping force introduced in this work turns out to be crucial to reproduce results obtained from laboratory experiments. After proper calibration, we find that erosion occurs for impact velocities of 5 ms-1 and above. Though fractal aggregates as formed during the first growth phase are most susceptible to erosion, we observe erosion of aggregates with rather compact surfaces as well. Conclusions: We find that bombarding a larger target aggregate with small projectiles results in erosion for impact velocities as low as a few ms-1. More compact aggregates suffer less from erosion. With increasing projectile size the transition from accretion to erosion is shifted to higher velocities. This allows larger bodies to grow through high velocity collisions with smaller aggregates.

  4. Moduli stabilization and the pattern of sparticle spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kiwoon

    2008-11-23

    We discuss the pattern of low energy sparticle spectra which appears in some class of moduli stabilization scenario. In case that light moduli are stabilized by non-perturbative effects encoded in the superpotential and a phenomenologically viable de Sitter vacuum is obtained by a sequestered supersymmetry breaking sector, the anomaly-mediated soft terms become comparable to the moduli-mediated ones, leading to a quite distinctive pattern of low energy spacticle masses dubbed the mirage mediation pattern. We also discuss low energy sparticle masses in more general mixed-mediation scenario which includes a comparable size of gauge mediation in addition to the moduli and anomaly mediations.

  5. Imaging Elastic Properties of Soft Materials Immersed in Water Using Force Modulation Mode in Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haga, Hisashi; Sasaki, Shigeo; Morimoto, Mayumi; Kawabata, Kazushige; Ito, Etsuro; Abe, Kazuhiro; Sambongi, Takashi

    1998-06-01

    Using the force modulation mode in atomic force microscopy (AFM), we have succeeded in imaging elastic properties of agar gels immersed in water.The elastic images of agar have been captured simultaneously with the topographic images.Stiffer grains of agar whose size is about 200 nm can be clearly seen in the elastic image of 3.0% agar, while they are not so visible in the case of 1.5% agar.These grains probably correspond to aggregation of agar which cannot be observed in the topographic images.We also measured force-versus-distance curves using AFM to confirm that the absolute values of elastic modulus (Young's modulus) of agar coincide with the bulk values measured using the conventional stress-strain method.The estimated values of the elastic moduli with the AFM were 40 and 90 kPa for 1.5% and 3.0% agar gels, respectively.These are in good agreement with the respective bulk values of 30 and 80 kPa obtained using the conventional method.

  6. Single-crystal elasticity of hydrous wadsleyite by Brillouin scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Z.; Jiang, F.; Jacobsen, S. D.; Smyth, J. R.; Holl, C.; Duffy, T. S.; Frost, D. J.

    2006-12-01

    Wadsleyite (β-Mg2SiO4) is the high-pressure polymorph of olivine that is expected to be a dominant mineral in the transition zone from 410 km to 520 km depth in the mantle. The elasticity of wadsleyite is crucial to constrain the mineralogy of the transition zone. Previous studies show wadsleyite can incorporate variable amounts of water up to 3.3 wt% of water (Kohlstedt et al. 1996; Inoue et al. 1995; Smyth et al. 1987, 1994). The effect of water on the bulk modulus of wadsleyite was studied by x-ray diffraction (Yusa and Inoue, 1997; Smyth et al. 2005) but no constraints on the shear modulus exist. We have measured the single-crystal elastic constants of hydrous wadsleyite with varying water content using Brillouin spectroscopy at ambient conditions. We carried out measurements for samples containing 0.3 wt%, 0.6 wt% and 1.6 wt% water using at least 2 crystal planes for each sample. By computing the aggregate elastic properties, we find that the bulk (K0S) and shear modulus (G0) of hydrous wadsleyite decrease linearly with water content according to the following relations: K0S=169.0-11.8X_W; G0=115.1-12.5X_W; where X_W is the water H2O weight percent. Compared with anhydrous wadsleyite, 1 wt% of water will lead to 7.0% decrease in bulk modulus, 10.9% decrease in shear modulus. Water has a greater effect on the elastic moduli of wadsleyite than that of olivine or ringwoodite. The olivine to wadsleyite phase transition is believed to be the origin of the seismic discontinuity near 410 km. Using these new results, the possible effect of water content on the velocity contrast across the 410-km discontinuity will be examined.

  7. Nonperturbative moduli superpotential with positive exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Higaki, Tetsutaro; Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Seto, Osamu

    2008-07-01

    We study nonperturbative moduli superpotentials with positive exponents, i.e. the form like AeaT with a positive constant a and the modulus T. These effects can be generated, e.g., by D-branes which have negative Ramond-Ramond charge of the lower-dimensional D-brane. The scalar potentials including such terms have quite a rich structure. There are several local minima with different potential energies and a high barrier, whose height is of O(Mp4). We discuss their implications from the viewpoints of cosmology and particle phenomenology, e.g. the realization of inflation models, avoiding the overshooting problem. This type of potential would be useful to realize the inflation and low-energy supersymmetry breaking.

  8. Failure of classical elasticity in auxetic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, J. H.; Giller, C. B.; Mott, P. H.; Roland, C. M.

    2013-04-01

    Poisson's ratio, ν, was measured for four materials, a rubbery polymer, a conventional soft foam, and two auxetic foams. We find that for the first two materials, having ν ≥ 0.2, the experimental determinations of Poisson's ratio are in good agreement with values calculated from the shear and tensile moduli using the equations of classical elasticity. However, for the two auxetic materials (ν < 0), the equations of classical elasticity give values significantly different from the measured ν. We offer an interpretation of these results based on a recently published analysis of the bounds on Poisson's ratio for classical elasticity to be applicable.

  9. Complete bundle moduli reduction in heterotic string compactifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curio, Gottfried

    2012-05-01

    A major problem in discussing heterotic string models is the stabilisation of the many vector bundle moduli via the superpotential generated by world-sheet instantons. In arXiv:1110.6315 we have discussed the method to make a discrete twist in a large and much discussed class of vector bundles such that the generation number gets new contributions (which can be tuned suitably) and at the same time the space of bundle moduli of the new, twisted bundle is a proper subspace (where the 'new', non-generic twist class exists) of the original bundle moduli space; one thus gets a model, closely related to the original model one started with, but with enhanced flexibility in the generation number and where on the other hand the number of bundle moduli is somewhat reduced. Whereas in the previous paper the emphasis was on examples for the new flexibility in the generation number we here classify and describe explicitly the twists and give the precise reduction formula (for the number of moduli) for SU(5) bundles leading to an SU(5) GUT group in four dimensions. Finally we give various examples where the bundle moduli space is reduced completely: the superpotential for such rigid bundles becomes a function of the complex structure moduli alone (besides the exponential Kahler moduli contribution).

  10. Moduli restriction and chiral matter in heterotic string compactifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curio, Gottfried

    2012-01-01

    Supersymmetric heterotic string models, built from a stable holomorphic vector bundle V on a Calabi-Yau threefold X , usually come with many vector bundle moduli whose stabilisation is a difficult and complex task. It is therefore of interest to look for bundle constructions which, from the outset, have as few as possible bundle moduli. One way to reach such a set-up is to start from a generic construction and to make discrete mod- ifications of it which are available only over a subset of the bundle moduli space. Turning on such discrete `twists' constrains the moduli to the corresponding subset of their moduli space: the twisted bundle has less parametric freedom. We give an example of a set-up where this idea can be considered concretely. Such non-generic twists lead also to new contributions of chiral matter (which greatly enhances the flexibility in model building); their computation constitutes the main issue of this note.

  11. Elasticity of the Rod-Shaped Gram-Negative Eubacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulbitch, A.; Quinn, B.; Pink, D.

    2000-12-01

    We report a theoretical calculation of the elasticity of the peptidoglycan network, the only stress-bearing part of rod-shaped Gram-negative eubacteria. The peptidoglycan network consists of elastic peptides and inextensible glycan strands, and it has been proposed that the latter form zigzag filaments along the circumference of the cylindrical bacterial shell. The zigzag geometry of the glycan strands gives rise to nonlinear elastic behavior. The four elastic moduli of the peptidoglycan network depend on its stressed state. For a bacterium under physiological conditions the elasticity is proportional to the bacterial turgor pressure. Our results are in good agreement with recent measurements.

  12. Elastic Properties of Mantle Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, T. S.; Stan, C. V.

    2012-12-01

    The most direct information about the interior structure of the Earth comes from seismic wave velocities. Interpretation of seismic data requires an understanding of how sound velocities and elastic properties of minerals vary with pressure, temperature, crystal structure, and composition as well as the role of anelasticity, melts, etc. More generally, elastic moduli are important for understanding many solid-state phenomena including mechanical stability, interatomic interactions, material strength, compressibility, and phase transition mechanisms. The database of mineral elasticity measurements has been growing rapidly in recent years. In this work, we report initial results of an ongoing survey of our current knowledge of mineral elasticity at both ambient conditions and high pressures and temperatures. The analysis is selective, emphasizing single crystal measurements but also incorporating polycrystalline measurements and volume compression data as appropriate. The goal is to synthesize our current understanding of mineral elasticity in terms of structure and composition, and to identify the major remaining needs for experimental and theoretical work. Clinopyroxenes (Cpx) provide an example of our approach. A wide range of clinopyroxene compositions are found geologically and Mg-, Ca-, and Na-rich clinopyroxenes are expected to be important components in the upper mantle. The single-crystal elastic properties of a number of endmember Cpx compositions have been measured and these exhibit a range of ~25% in shear velocity. Those with monovalent cations (spodumene, jadeite) in the M2 site exhibit the highest velocities while Fe-rich (hendenbergit, acmite) compositions have the lowest velocities. The effects on velocity due to a wide range of chemical substitutions can be defined, but there are important discrepancies and omissions in the database. New measurements of omphacites, intermediate diopside-hedenbergite compositions, aegerine/acmite, augite, etc. are

  13. Stretch Moduli of Ribonucleotide Embedded Short DNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Koh, Kyung Duk; Riedo, Elisa; Storici, Francesca

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the mechanical properties of DNA is essential to comprehending the dynamics of many cellular functions. DNA deformations are involved in many mechanisms when genetic information needs to be stored and used. In addition, recent studies have found that Ribonucleotides (rNMPs) are among the most common non-standard nucleotides present in DNA. The presences of rNMPs in DNA might cause mutation, fragility or genotoxicity of chromosome but how they influence the structure and mechanical properties of DNA remains unclear. By means of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based single molecule spectroscopy, we measure the stretch moduli of double stranded DNAs (dsDNA) with 30 base pairs and 5 equally embedded rNMPs. The dsDNAs are anchored on gold substrate via thiol chemistry, while the AFM tip is used to pick up and stretch the dsDNA from its free end through biotin-streptavidin bonding. Our preliminary results indicate that the inclusion of rNMPs in dsDNA might significantly change its stretch modulus, which might be important in some biological processes.

  14. Chirality dependent elastic properties of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes under uniaxial and torsional loading

    SciTech Connect

    Anoop Krishnan, N. M. Ghosh, Debraj

    2014-02-14

    The elastic behavior of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes is studied under axial and torsional loading. Molecular dynamics simulation is carried out with a tersoff potential for modeling the interatomic interactions. Different chiral configurations with similar diameter are considered to study the effect of chirality on the elastic and shear moduli. Furthermore, the effects of tube length on elastic modulus are also studied by considering different aspects ratios. It is observed that both elastic and shear moduli depend upon the chirality of a nanotube. For aspect ratios less than 15, the elastic modulus reduces monotonically with an increase in the chiral angle. For chiral nanotubes, the torsional response shows a dependence on the direction of loading. The difference between the shear moduli against and along the chiral twist directions is maximum for chiral angle of 15°, and zero for zigzag (0°) and armchair (30°) configurations.

  15. Computation of elastic properties of 3D digital cores from the Longmaxi shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Hui; Fu, Li-Yun; Zhang, Yan; Jin, Wei-Jun

    2016-06-01

    The dependence of elastic moduli of shales on the mineralogy and microstructure of shales is important for the prediction of sweet spots and shale gas production. Based on 3D digital images of the microstructure of Longmaxi black shale samples using X-ray CT, we built detailed 3D digital images of cores with porosity properties and mineral contents. Next, we used finite-element (FE) methods to derive the elastic properties of the samples. The FE method can accurately model the shale mineralogy. Particular attention is paid to the derived elastic properties and their dependence on porosity and kerogen. The elastic moduli generally decrease with increasing porosity and kerogen, and there is a critical porosity (0.75) and kerogen content (ca. ≤3%) over which the elastic moduli decrease rapidly and slowly, respectively. The derived elastic moduli of gas- and oil-saturated digital cores differ little probably because of the low porosity (4.5%) of the Longmaxi black shale. Clearly, the numerical experiments demonstrated the feasibility of combining microstructure images of shale samples with elastic moduli calculations to predict shale properties.

  16. First-principles calculations of typical anisotropic cubic and hexagonal structures and homogenized moduli estimation based on the Y-parameter: Application to CaO, MgO, CH and Calcite CaCO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jia; Bernard, Fabrice; Kamali-Bernard, Siham

    2017-02-01

    X-ray method to test the material properties and to obtain elastic constants is commonly based on the Reuss model and Kroner model. Y parameter has been turned out to be an effective method to estimate elastic properties of polycrystalline material. Since Y-parameters of cubic polycrystalline material based on the certain uniform stress (Reuss model) has not been given, our work aims to complete this part of the theoretical analysis, which can effectively compare elastic constants measured by the X-ray diffraction method. The structural and the elastic properties of cubic structures (CaO and MgO) and hexagonal structures (CH and Calcite CaCO3) are investigated by the density functional theory method. And then the credibility of Y parameters for determing elastic moduli of cubic structures is proved and elastic properties in typical crystallographic planes of [100], [110] and [111] are also calculated. Meanwhile, Young's moduli of CH and Calcite structure are 58.08 GPa and 84.549 GPa, which are all close to references. Elastic properties of cubic and hexagonal structures under various pressures are calculated and the surface constructions of elastic moduli are drawn, showing the anisotropy at various directions. The crystal structure investigated in this work are typical of some primary or secondary components of Hardened Cements Pastes and their homogenized elastic properties are needed in a hierarchical multi-scale modeling, such as the one developed by some of the authors of this paper.

  17. Breakdown of elasticity in amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biroli, Giulio; Urbani, Pierfrancesco

    2016-12-01

    What characterizes a solid is the way that it responds to external stresses. Ordered solids, such as crystals, exhibit an elastic regime followed by a plastic regime, both understood microscopically in terms of lattice distortion and dislocations. For amorphous solids the situation is instead less clear, and the microscopic understanding of the response to deformation and stress is a very active research topic. Several studies have revealed that even in the elastic regime the response is very jerky at low temperature, resembling very much the response of disordered magnetic materials. Here we show that in a very large class of amorphous solids this behaviour emerges upon decreasing temperature, as a phase transition, where standard elastic behaviour breaks down. At the transition all nonlinear elastic moduli diverge and standard elasticity theory no longer holds. Below the transition, the response to deformation becomes history- and time-dependent.

  18. Nonlocal elasticity tensors in dislocation and disclination cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taupin, V.; Gbemou, K.; Fressengeas, C.; Capolungo, L.

    2017-03-01

    Nonlocal elastic constitutive laws are introduced for crystals containing defects such as dislocations and disclinations. In addition to pointwise elastic moduli tensors adequately reflecting the elastic response of defect-free regions by relating stresses to strains and couple-stresses to curvatures, elastic cross-moduli tensors relating strains to couple-stresses and curvatures to stresses within convolution integrals are derived from a nonlocal analysis of strains and curvatures in the defects cores. Sufficient conditions are derived for positive-definiteness of the resulting free energy, and stability of elastic solutions is ensured. The elastic stress/couple stress fields associated with prescribed dislocation/disclination density distributions and solving the momentum and moment of momentum balance equations in periodic media are determined by using a Fast Fourier Transform spectral method. The convoluted cross-moduli bring the following results: (i) Nonlocal stresses and couple stresses oppose their local counterparts in the defects core regions, playing the role of restoring forces and possibly ensuring spatio-temporal stability of the simulated defects, (ii) The couple stress fields are strongly affected by nonlocality. Such effects favor the stability of the simulated grain boundaries and allow investigating their elastic interactions with extrinsic defects, (iii) Driving forces inducing grain growth or refinement derive from the self-stress and couple stress fields of grain boundaries in nanocrystalline configurations.

  19. Nonlocal elasticity tensors in dislocation and disclination cores

    DOE PAGES

    Taupin, V.; Gbemou, K.; Fressengeas, C.; ...

    2017-01-07

    We introduced nonlocal elastic constitutive laws for crystals containing defects such as dislocations and disclinations. Additionally, the pointwise elastic moduli tensors adequately reflect the elastic response of defect-free regions by relating stresses to strains and couple-stresses to curvatures, elastic cross-moduli tensors relating strains to couple-stresses and curvatures to stresses within convolution integrals are derived from a nonlocal analysis of strains and curvatures in the defects cores. Sufficient conditions are derived for positive-definiteness of the resulting free energy, and stability of elastic solutions is ensured. The elastic stress/couple stress fields associated with prescribed dislocation/disclination density distributions and solving the momentum andmore » moment of momentum balance equations in periodic media are determined by using a Fast Fourier Transform spectral method. Here, the convoluted cross-moduli bring the following results: (i) Nonlocal stresses and couple stresses oppose their local counterparts in the defects core regions, playing the role of restoring forces and possibly ensuring spatio-temporal stability of the simulated defects, (ii) The couple stress fields are strongly affected by nonlocality. Such effects favor the stability of the simulated grain boundaries and allow investigating their elastic interactions with extrinsic defects, (iii) Driving forces inducing grain growth or refinement derive from the self-stress and couple stress fields of grain boundaries in nanocrystalline configurations.« less

  20. Elasticity and Strength of Biomacromolecular Crystals: Lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, A. M.; Witherow, W. K.; Chen, L. Q.; Chernov, A. A.

    2003-01-01

    The static Young modulus, E = 0.1 to 0.5 GPa, the crystal critical strength (sigma(sub c)) and its ratio to E,sigma(sub c)/E is approximately 10(exp 3), were measured for the first time for non cross-linked lysozyme crystals in solution. By using a triple point bending apparatus, we also demonstrated that the crystals were purely elastic. Softness of protein crystals built of hard macromolecules (26 GPa for lysozyme) is explained by the large size of the macromolecules as compared to the range of intermolecular forces and by the weakness of intermolecular bonds as compared to the peptide bond strength. The relatively large reported dynamic elastic moduli (approximately 8 GPa) from resonance light scattering should come from averaging over the moduli of intracrystalline water and intra- and intermolecular bonding.

  1. Stabilizing all geometric moduli in heterotic Calabi-Yau vacua

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Lara B.; Gray, James; Lukas, Andre; Ovrut, Burt

    2011-05-27

    We propose a scenario to stabilize all geometric moduli - that is, the complex structure, Kähler moduli and the dilaton - in smooth heterotic Calabi-Yau compactifications without Neveu-Schwarz three-form flux. This is accomplished using the gauge bundle required in any heterotic compactification, whose perturbative effects on the moduli are combined with non-perturbative corrections. We argue that, for appropriate gauge bundles, all complex structure and a large number of other moduli can be perturbatively stabilized - in the most restrictive case, leaving only one combination of Kähler moduli and the dilaton as a flat direction. At this stage, the remaining moduli space consists of Minkowski vacua. That is, the perturbative superpotential vanishes in the vacuum without the necessity to fine-tune flux. Finally, we incorporate non-perturbative effects such as gaugino condensation and/or instantons. These are strongly constrained by the anomalous U(1) symmetries which arise from the required bundle constructions. We present a specific example, with a consistent choice of non-perturbative effects, where all remaining flat directions are stabilized in an AdS vacuum.

  2. Chemomechanical evolution of pore space in carbonate microstructures upon dissolution: Linking pore geometry to bulk elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arson, C.; Vanorio, T.

    2015-10-01

    One of the challenges faced today in a variety of geophysical applications is the need to understand the changes of elastic properties due to time-variant chemomechanical processes. The objective of this work is to model carbonate rock elastic properties as functions of pore geometry changes that occur when the solid matrix is dissolved by carbon dioxide. We compared two carbonate microstructures: porous micrite ("mudstone") and grain-supported carbonate ("packstone"). We formulated a mathematical model that distinguishes the effects of microporosity and macroporosity on stiffness changes. We used measures of mechanical and chemical porosity changes recorded during injection tests to compute elastic moduli and compare them to moduli obtained from wave velocity measurements. In mudstones, both experimental and numerical results indicate that bulk moduli change by less than 5%. The evolution of elastic moduli is controlled by macropore enlargement. In packstones, model predictions underestimate changes of elastic moduli with total porosity by 10% to 80%. The total porosity variation is 60% to 75% smaller than the chemical porosity variation, which indicates that pore expansion due to dissolution is counterbalanced by pore shrinkage due to compaction. Packstone elastic properties are controlled by grain sliding. The methodology presented in this paper can be generalized to other chemomechanical processes studied in rocks, such as dislocations, glide, diffusive mass transfer, recrystallization, and precipitation.

  3. Introduction to physical properties and elasticity models: Chapter 20

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dvorkin, Jack; Helgerud, Michael B.; Waite, William F.; Kirby, Stephen H.; Nur, Amos

    2003-01-01

    Estimating the in situ methane hydrate volume from seismic surveys requires knowledge of the rock physics relations between wave speeds and elastic moduli in hydrate/sediment mixtures. The elastic moduli of hydrate/sediment mixtures depend on the elastic properties of the individual sedimentary particles and the manner in which they are arranged. In this chapter, we present some rock physics data currently available from literature. The unreferenced values in Table I were not measured directly, but were derived from other values in Tables I and II using standard relationships between elastic properties for homogeneous, isotropic material. These derivations allow us to extend the list of physical property estimates, but at the expense of introducing uncertainties due to combining property values measured under different physical conditions. This is most apparent in the case of structure II (sII) hydrate for which very few physical properties have been measured under identical conditions.

  4. Stabilized fiber-reinforced pavement base course with recycled aggregate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobhan, Khaled

    This study evaluates the benefits to be gained by using a composite highway base course material consisting of recycled crushed concrete aggregate, portland cement, fly ash, and a modest amount of reinforcing fibers. The primary objectives of this research were to (a) quantify the improvement that is obtained by adding fibers to a lean concrete composite (made from recycled aggregate and low quantities of Portland cement and/or fly ash), (b) evaluate the mechanical behavior of such a composite base course material under both static and repeated loads, and (c) utilize the laboratory-determined properties with a mechanistic design method to assess the potential advantages. The split tensile strength of a stabilized recycled aggregate base course material was found to be exponentially related to the compacted dry density of the mix. A lean mix containing 4% cement and 4% fly ash (by weight) develops sufficient unconfined compressive, split tensile, and flexural strengths to be used as a high quality stabilized base course. The addition of 4% (by weight) of hooked-end steel fibers significantly enhances the post-peak load-deformation response of the composite in both indirect tension and static flexure. The flexural fatigue behavior of the 4% cement-4% fly ash mix is comparable to all commonly used stabilized materials, including regular concrete; the inclusion of 4% hooked-end fibers to this mix significantly improves its resistance to fatigue failure. The resilient moduli of stabilized recycled aggregate in flexure are comparable to the values obtained for traditional soil-cement mixes. In general, the fibers are effective in retarding the rate of fatigue damage accumulation, which is quantified in terms of a damage index defined by an energy-based approach. The thickness design curves for a stabilized recycled aggregate base course, as developed by using an elastic layer approach, is shown to be in close agreement with a theoretical model (based on Westergaard

  5. The atomistic representation of first strain-gradient elastic tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Admal, Nikhil Chandra; Marian, Jaime; Po, Giacomo

    2017-02-01

    We derive the atomistic representations of the elastic tensors appearing in the linearized theory of first strain-gradient elasticity for an arbitrary multi-lattice. In addition to the classical second-Piola) stress and elastic moduli tensors, these include the rank-three double-stress tensor, the rank-five tensor of mixed elastic moduli, and the rank-six tensor of strain-gradient elastic moduli. The atomistic representations are closed-form analytical expressions in terms of the first and second derivatives of the interatomic potential with respect to interatomic distances, and dyadic products of relative atomic positions. Moreover, all expressions are local, in the sense that they depend only on the atomic neighborhood of a lattice site. Our results emanate from the condition of energetic equivalence between continuum and atomistic representations of a crystal, when the kinematics of the latter is governed by the Cauchy-Born rule. Using the derived expressions, we prove that the odd-order tensors vanish if the lattice basis admits central-symmetry. The analytical expressions are implemented as a KIM compliant algorithm to compute the strain gradient elastic tensors for various materials. Numerical results are presented to compare representative interatomic potentials used in the literature for cubic crystals, including simple lattices (fcc Al and Cu and bcc Fe and W) and multi-lattices (diamond-cubic Si). We observe that central potentials exhibit generalized Cauchy relations for the rank-six tensor of strain-gradient elastic moduli. In addition, this tensor is found to be indefinite for many potentials. We discuss the relationship between indefiniteness and material stability. Finally, the atomistic representations are specialized to central potentials in simple lattices. These expressions are used with analytical potentials to study the sensitivity of the elastic tensors to the choice of the cutoff radius.

  6. Room temperature elastic properties of V-5Cr-5Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, W.A.

    1994-09-01

    Elastic moduli were measured for a specimen of the alloy V-5Cr-5Ti in the annealed condition using pulse-echo techniques. The value of Young`s modulus was determined to be 125.6 GPa, the shear modulus was determined to be 45.9 GPa, and the Poisson`s ratio to be 0.367.

  7. Living bacteria rheology: population growth, aggregation patterns, and collective behavior under different shear flows.

    PubMed

    Patrício, P; Almeida, P L; Portela, R; Sobral, R G; Grilo, I R; Cidade, T; Leal, C R

    2014-08-01

    The activity of growing living bacteria was investigated using real-time and in situ rheology-in stationary and oscillatory shear. Two different strains of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus-strain COL and its isogenic cell wall autolysis mutant, RUSAL9-were considered in this work. For low bacteria density, strain COL forms small clusters, while the mutant, presenting deficient cell separation, forms irregular larger aggregates. In the early stages of growth, when subjected to a stationary shear, the viscosity of the cultures of both strains increases with the population of cells. As the bacteria reach the exponential phase of growth, the viscosity of the cultures of the two strains follows different and rich behaviors, with no counterpart in the optical density or in the population's colony-forming units measurements. While the viscosity of strain COL culture keeps increasing during the exponential phase and returns close to its initial value for the late phase of growth, where the population stabilizes, the viscosity of the mutant strain culture decreases steeply, still in the exponential phase, remains constant for some time, and increases again, reaching a constant plateau at a maximum value for the late phase of growth. These complex viscoelastic behaviors, which were observed to be shear-stress-dependent, are a consequence of two coupled effects: the cell density continuous increase and its changing interacting properties. The viscous and elastic moduli of strain COL culture, obtained with oscillatory shear, exhibit power-law behaviors whose exponents are dependent on the bacteria growth stage. The viscous and elastic moduli of the mutant culture have complex behaviors, emerging from the different relaxation times that are associated with the large molecules of the medium and the self-organized structures of bacteria. Nevertheless, these behaviors reflect the bacteria growth stage.

  8. Elastic Properties of Chimpanzee Craniofacial Cortical Bone.

    PubMed

    Gharpure, Poorva; Kontogiorgos, Elias D; Opperman, Lynne A; Ross, Callum F; Strait, David S; Smith, Amanda; Pryor, Leslie C; Wang, Qian; Dechow, Paul C

    2016-12-01

    Relatively few assessments of cranial biomechanics formally take into account variation in the material properties of cranial cortical bone. Our aim was to characterize the elastic properties of chimpanzee craniofacial cortical bone and compare these to the elastic properties of dentate human craniofacial cortical bone. From seven cranial regions, 27 cylindrical samples were harvested from each of five chimpanzee crania. Assuming orthotropy, axes of maximum stiffness in the plane of the cortical plate were derived using modified equations of Hooke's law in a Mathcad program. Consistent orientations among individuals were observed in the zygomatic arch and alveolus. The density of cortical bone showed significant regional variation (P < 0.001). The elastic moduli demonstrated significant differences between sites, and a distinct pattern where E3  > E2  > E1 . Shear moduli were significantly different among regions (P < 0.001). The pattern by which chimpanzee cranial cortical bone varies in elastic properties resembled that seen in humans, perhaps suggesting that the elastic properties of craniofacial bone in fossil hominins can be estimated with at least some degree of confidence. Anat Rec, 299:1718-1733, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Measurement of elastic nonlinearity of soft solid with transient elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catheline, S.; Gennisson, J.-L.; Fink, M.

    2003-12-01

    Transient elastography is a powerful tool to measure the speed of low-frequency shear waves in soft tissues and thus to determine the second-order elastic modulus μ (or the Young's modulus E). In this paper, it is shown how transient elastography can also achieve the measurement of the nonlinear third-order elastic moduli of an Agar-gelatin-based phantom. This method requires speed measurements of polarized elastic waves measured in a statically stressed isotropic medium. A static uniaxial stress induces a hexagonal anisotropy (transverse isotropy) in solids. In the special case of uniaxially stressed isotropic media, the anisotropy is not caused by linear elastic coefficients but by the third-order nonlinear elastic constants, and the medium recovers its isotropic properties as soon as the uniaxial stress disappears. It has already been shown how transient elastography can measure the elastic (second-order) moduli in a media with transverse isotropy such as muscles. Consequently this method, based on the measurement of the speed variations of a low-frequency (50-Hz) polarized shear strain waves as a function of the applied stress, allows one to measure the Landau moduli A, B, C that completely describe the third-order nonlinearity. The several orders of magnitude found among these three constants can be justified from the theoretical expression of the internal energy.

  10. Stabilizing all geometric moduli in heterotic Calabi-Yau vacua

    DOE PAGES

    Anderson, Lara B.; Gray, James; Lukas, Andre; ...

    2011-05-27

    We propose a scenario to stabilize all geometric moduli - that is, the complex structure, Kähler moduli and the dilaton - in smooth heterotic Calabi-Yau compactifications without Neveu-Schwarz three-form flux. This is accomplished using the gauge bundle required in any heterotic compactification, whose perturbative effects on the moduli are combined with non-perturbative corrections. We argue that, for appropriate gauge bundles, all complex structure and a large number of other moduli can be perturbatively stabilized - in the most restrictive case, leaving only one combination of Kähler moduli and the dilaton as a flat direction. At this stage, the remaining modulimore » space consists of Minkowski vacua. That is, the perturbative superpotential vanishes in the vacuum without the necessity to fine-tune flux. Finally, we incorporate non-perturbative effects such as gaugino condensation and/or instantons. These are strongly constrained by the anomalous U(1) symmetries which arise from the required bundle constructions. We present a specific example, with a consistent choice of non-perturbative effects, where all remaining flat directions are stabilized in an AdS vacuum.« less

  11. Moduli vacuum misalignment and precise predictions in string inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Cicoli, Michele; Dutta, Koushik; Quevedo, Fernando

    2016-08-03

    The predictions for all the cosmological observables of any inflationary model depend on the number of e-foldings which is sensitive to the post-inflationary history of the universe. In string models the generic presence of light moduli leads to a late-time period of matter domination which lowers the required number of e-foldings and, in turn, modifies the exact predictions of any inflationary model. In this paper we compute exactly the shift of the number of e-foldings in Kähler moduli inflation which is determined by the magnitude of the moduli initial displacement caused by vacuum misalignment and the moduli decay rates. We find that the preferred number of e-foldings gets reduced from 50 to 45, causing a modification of the spectral index at the percent level. Our results illustrate the importance of understanding the full post-inflationary evolution of the universe in order to derive precise predictions in string inflation. To perform this task it is crucial to work in a setting where there is good control over moduli stabilisation.

  12. Moduli vacuum misalignment and precise predictions in string inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicoli, Michele; Dutta, Koushik; Maharana, Anshuman; Quevedo, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    The predictions for all the cosmological observables of any inflationary model depend on the number of e-foldings which is sensitive to the post-inflationary history of the universe. In string models the generic presence of light moduli leads to a late-time period of matter domination which lowers the required number of e-foldings and, in turn, modifies the exact predictions of any inflationary model. In this paper we compute exactly the shift of the number of e-foldings in Kähler moduli inflation which is determined by the magnitude of the moduli initial displacement caused by vacuum misalignment and the moduli decay rates. We find that the preferred number of e-foldings gets reduced from 50 to 45, causing a modification of the spectral index at the percent level. Our results illustrate the importance of understanding the full post-inflationary evolution of the universe in order to derive precise predictions in string inflation. To perform this task it is crucial to work in a setting where there is good control over moduli stabilisation.

  13. Influence of Young's moduli in 3D fluid-structure coupled models of the human cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhnke, Frank; Semmelbauer, Sebastian; Marquardt, Torsten

    2015-12-01

    The acoustic wave propagation in the human cochlea was studied using a tapered box-model with linear assumptions respective to all mechanical parameters. The discretisation and evaluation is conducted by a commercial finite element package (ANSYS). The main difference to former models of the cochlea was the representation of the basilar membrane by a 3D elastic solid. The Young's moduli of this solid were modified to study their influence on the travelling wave. The lymph in the scala vestibuli and scala tympani was represented by a viscous and nearly incompressible fluid finite element approach. Our results show the maximum displacement for f = 2kHz at half of the length of the cochlea in accordance with former experiments. For low frequencies f <200 Hz nearly zero phase shifts were found, whereas for f =1 kHz it reaches values up to -12 cycles depending on the degree of orthotropy.

  14. Determination of layer moduli from falling weight deflectometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruotoistenmaeki, A.

    Back calculation programs are used for evaluation of pavement layer moduli from falling weight deflectometer (FWD) measurements. A comparison of two programs with different calculation methods, Modulus and Elmod, is made using deflection data derived from 43 SHRP-LTPP (Strategic Highway Research Program, Long-Term Pavement Performance) test sections. Critical strains were calculated using the linear program (BISAR) with layer moduli from the Modulus program as input and with the Elmod program. It was found that calculated strains from the two programs agree very well, even though the calculated moduli are quite different. Calculated strains from FWD loading were compared with measured strains under moving wheel load at Virttaa test site. The differences between the two are most likely due to differences in the loading conditions and in the method of analysis.

  15. Linear elastic behavior of dry soap foams

    SciTech Connect

    Kraynik, A.M.; Reinelt, D.A.

    1996-08-10

    Linear elastic constants are computed for three dry foams that have crystal symmetry, bubbles with equal volume V, and films with uniform surface tension T. The Kelvin, Williams, and Weaire-Phelan foams contain one, two, and eight bubbles in the unit cell, respectively. All three foams have 14-sided bubbles, but these tetrakaidecahedra have different topology; the Weaire-Phelan foam also contains pentagonal dodecahedra. In addition to the bulk modulus for volume compression, the authors calculate two shear moduli for the Kelvin and Weaire-Phelan foams, which have cubic symmetry, and four shear moduli for the Williams foam, which has tetragonal symmetry. The Williams foam has five elastic constants, not six, because the stress remains isotropic for uniform expansion; this is not guaranteed by symmetry alone. The two shear moduli for the Weaire-Phelan foam differ by less than 5%. The other two foams exhibit much greater elastic anisotropy; their shear moduli differ by a factor of 2. An effective isotropic shear modulus {bar G}, which represents the response averaged over all orientations, is evaluated for each foam. Scaled by T/V{sup 1/3}, {bar G} is 0.8070, 0.7955, and 0.8684 for the Kelvin, Williams, and Weaire-Phelan foams, respectively. When extrapolated to the dry limit, the shear modulus data of Princen and Kiss (for concentrated oil-in-water emulsions with polydisperse drop-size distributions) fall within the range of the calculations. The Surface Evolver program, developed by Brakke, was used to compute minimal surfaces for the dry foams. Also reported for each undeformed foam are various geometric constants relating to interfacial energy density, cell edge length, and bubble pressure.

  16. Elasticity of calcium and calcium-sodium amphiboles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. Michael; Abramson, Evan H.

    2016-12-01

    Measurements of single-crystal elastic moduli under ambient conditions are reported for nine calcium to calcium-sodium amphiboles that lie in the composition range of common crustal constituents. Velocities of body and surface acoustic waves measured by Impulsive Stimulated Light Scattering (ISLS) were inverted to determine the 13 moduli characterizing these monoclinic samples. Moduli show a consistent pattern: C33 > C22 > C11 and C23 > C12 > C13 and C44 > C55 ∼ C66 and for the uniquely monoclinic moduli, |C35| ≫ C46 ∼ |C25| > |C15| ∼ 0. Most of the compositionally-induced variance of moduli is associated with aluminum and iron content. Seven moduli (C11C12C13C22C44C55C66) increase with increasing aluminum while all diagonal moduli decrease with increasing iron. Three moduli (C11, C13 and C44) increase with increasing sodium and potassium occupancy in A-sites. The uniquely monoclinic moduli (C15C25 and C35) have no significant compositional dependence. Moduli associated with the a∗ direction (C11C12C13C55 and C66) are substantially smaller than values associated with structurally and chemically related clinopyroxenes. Other moduli are more similar for both inosilicates. The isotropically averaged adiabatic bulk modulus does not vary with iron content but increases with aluminum content from 85 GPa for tremolite to 99 GPa for pargasite. Increasing iron reduces while increasing aluminum increases the isotropic shear modulus which ranges from 47 GPa for ferro-actinolite to 64 GPa for pargasite. These results exhibit far greater anisotropy and higher velocities than apparent in earlier work. Quasi-longitudinal velocities are as fast as ∼9 km/s and (intermediate between the a∗- and c-axes) are as slow as ∼6 km/s. Voigt-Reuss-Hill averaging based on prior single crystal moduli resulted in calculated rock velocities lower than laboratory measurements, leading to adoption of the (higher velocity) Voigt bound. Thus, former uses of the upper Voigt bound can

  17. On consistent micromechanical estimation of macroscopic elastic energy, coherence energy and phase transformation strains for SMA materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziółkowski, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    An apparatus of micromechanics is used to isolate the key ingredients entering macroscopic Gibbs free energy function of a shape memory alloy (SMA) material. A new self-equilibrated eigenstrains influence moduli (SEIM) method is developed for consistent estimation of effective (macroscopic) thermostatic properties of solid materials, which in microscale can be regarded as amalgams of n-phase linear thermoelastic component materials with eigenstrains. The SEIM satisfy the self-consistency conditions, following from elastic reciprocity (Betti) theorem. The method allowed expressing macroscopic coherency energy and elastic complementary energy terms present in the general form of macroscopic Gibbs free energy of SMA materials in the form of semilinear and semiquadratic functions of the phase composition. Consistent SEIM estimates of elastic complementary energy, coherency energy and phase transformation strains corresponding to classical Reuss and Voigt conjectures are explicitly specified. The Voigt explicit relations served as inspiration for working out an original engineering practice-oriented semiexperimental SEIM estimates. They are especially conveniently applicable for an isotropic aggregate (composite) composed of a mixture of n isotropic phases. Using experimental data for NiTi alloy and adopting conjecture that it can be treated as an isotropic aggregate of two isotropic phases, it is shown that the NiTi coherency energy and macroscopic phase strain are practically not influenced by the difference in values of austenite and martensite elastic constants. It is shown that existence of nonzero fluctuating part of phase microeigenstrains field is responsible for building up of so-called stored energy of coherency, which is accumulated in pure martensitic phase after full completion of phase transition. Experimental data for NiTi alloy show that the stored coherency energy cannot be neglected as it considerably influences the characteristic phase transition

  18. Dynamics of photo-induced changes in the elastic characteristics of lithium niobate crystals doped with Jahn-Teller Fe2+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golenishchev-Kutuzov, A. V.; Golenishchev-Kutuzov, V. A.; Kalimullin, R. I.; Semennikov, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of admixture Jahn-Teller Fe2+ ions on the elastic characteristics of lithium niobate was studied. The appearance of photostrains and a change in elastic moduli under the influence of laser radiation was established, thus enabling the creation of device elements with optically controlled elastic characteristics.

  19. First-principles study of the structural, elastic, vibrational, thermodynamic and electronic properties of the Mo2B intermetallic under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escamilla, R.; Carvajal, E.; Cruz-Irisson, M.; Romero, M.; Gómez, R.; Marquina, V.; Galván, D. H.; Durán, A.

    2016-12-01

    The structural, elastic, vibrational, thermodynamic and electronic properties of the Mo2B intermetallic under pressure are assessed using first-principles calculations based on the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) proposed by Perdew-Wang (PW91). Our results show that the calculated structural parameters at a pressure of zero GPa are in good agreement with the available experimental data. The effect of high pressures on the lattice constants shows that the compression along the c-axis and along the a-axis are similar. The elastic constants were calculated using the static finite strain technique, and the bulk shear moduli are derived from the ideal polycrystalline aggregate. We find that the elastic constants, elastic modulus and hardness monotonically increase as a function of pressure; consequently, the structure is dynamically stable and tends from brittle to ductile behavior under pressure. The Debye temperature θD increases and the so-called Gru¨ neisen constant γ decreases due to stiffening of the crystal structure. The phonon dispersion curves were obtained using the direct method. Additionally, the internal energy (ΔE), the Helmholtz free energy (ΔF), the entropy (S) and the lattice contribution to the heat capacity Cv were calculated and analyzed with the help of the phonon dispersion curves. The N(EF) and the electron transfer between the B and Mo atoms increase as a function of pressure.

  20. Mesoscale elastic properties of marine sponge spicules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaqi; Reed, Bryan W; Chung, Frank R; Koski, Kristie J

    2016-01-01

    Marine sponge spicules are silicate fibers with an unusual combination of fracture toughness and optical light propagation properties due to their micro- and nano-scale hierarchical structure. We present optical measurements of the elastic properties of Tethya aurantia and Euplectella aspergillum marine sponge spicules using non-invasive Brillouin and Raman laser light scattering, thus probing the hierarchical structure on two very different scales. On the scale of single bonds, as probed by Raman scattering, the spicules resemble a combination of pure silica and mixed organic content. On the mesoscopic scale probed by Brillouin scattering, we show that while some properties (Young's moduli, shear moduli, one of the anisotropic Poisson ratios and refractive index) are nearly the same as those of artificial optical fiber, other properties (uniaxial moduli, bulk modulus and a distinctive anisotropic Poisson ratio) are significantly smaller. Thus this natural composite of largely isotropic materials yields anisotropic elastic properties on the mesoscale. We show that the spicules' optical waveguide properties lead to pronounced spontaneous Brillouin backscattering, a process related to the stimulated Brillouin backscattering process well known in artificial glass fibers. These measurements provide a clearer picture of the interplay of flexibility, strength, and material microstructure for future functional biomimicry.

  1. Elastic and osmotic properties of articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, David; Dimitriadis, Emilios; Horkayne-Szakaly, Iren; Horkay, Ferenc

    2006-03-01

    The pathophysiology of osteoarthritis involves cellular and biochemical processes linked to mechanical stress. A better understanding of the mechanism of these processes and how they cause changes in the composition, macro- and micro-structure, and mechanical properties of cartilage is necessary for developing effective preventative and treatment strategies. In this study, elastic and osmotic swelling properties of tissue-engineered cartilage were explored using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a tissue osmometer. AFM was also used to image the surface of the specimens while chemical composition was determined by biochemical analysis. Estimation of the Young's moduli of the tissue from AFM force-indentation data was performed using an optimization approach to fit appropriate models to the data. Force-indentation data were acquired both with sharp, pyramidal and with microspherical probes. The procedure has been validated by making measurements on model gel systems of known elastic properties. This approach is presented as a robust method of optimally extracting Young's moduli of soft, crosslinked materials from AFM data. Gross inhomogeneities at different scales in the cartilage tissue are manifested in the high degree of variance in local Young's moduli values obtained from both AFM and osmotic swelling data. These findings suggest that the mechanical properties of cartilage are affected by the local macromolecular composition.

  2. Discrete and Continuum Elastic Properties of Interfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alber, Elliott Solomon

    The microstructure of defects in solids, e.g. interfaces, is heterogeneous and, consequently, so are the elastic properties. The complete anisotropic fourth-order tensors of both the discrete and the effective elastic moduli are defined in the interfacial region. To examine the meaning of discrete elastic constants, (i) a piecewise-continuous medium is considered where individual phases occupy the Voronoi polyhedra and have the elastic moduli associated with individual atoms, and (ii) the relationship between natural vibrations of the discrete systems and continuum waves is explored. Questions of local energy changes and stability are addressed in terms of continuum properties of the moduli, particularly positive definiteness and strong ellipticity. Comparisons between the atomistic results (exact effective moduli) and those for the continuum analog (bounds) establish the validity of the definition of elastic properties for heterogeneous structures at atomic scales and lead to criteria to assess the stability of a given microstructure. Homogenization of interfacial properties gives heterogeneous transition zone (or interphase) model. Interface phenomena in macrosystems (composites) and microsystems (grain boundaries) is explained by inner layer conditions between homogeneous bulk regions. Dynamical membrane and spring models of the imperfect interfaces are shown to be limiting models (similar to Reuss and Voigt bounding approximations in multiphase composite mechanics) for asymptotic expansions of stress and strain fields, respectively. Asymptotic expansion of both fields (in terms of small parameter h -thickness of the layer) produces mixed-type, exact approximation of the first order in h. Derived models of imperfect interface are used for investigation of interface waves in anisotropic bicrystals and for comparison with corresponding acoustical modes in phonon spectra. Localized interface waves are explained as general inhomogeneous plane waves in subsonic

  3. Discrete and continuum elastic properties of interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alber, Elliott Solomon

    1993-06-01

    The microstructure of defects in solids, e.g. interfaces, is heterogeneous and, consequently, so are the elastic properties. The complete anisotropic fourth-order tensors of both the discrete and the effective elastic moduli are defined in the interfacial region. To examine the meaning of discrete elastic constants, (1) a piecewise-continuous medium is considered where individual phases occupy the Voronoi polyhedra and have the elastic moduli associated with individual atoms, and (2) the relationship between natural vibrations of the discrete systems and continuum waves is explored. Questions of local energy changes and stability are addressed in terms of continuum properties of the moduli, particularly positive definiteness and strong ellipticity. Comparisons between the atomistic results (exact effective moduli) and those for the continuum analog (bounds) establish the validity of the definition of elastic properties for heterogeneous structures at atomic scales and lead to criteria to assess the stability of a given microstructure. Homogenization of interfacial properties gives heterogeneous transition zone (or interphase) model. Interface phenomena in macrosystems (composites) and microsystems (grain boundaries) is explained by inner layer conditions between homogeneous bulk regions. Dynamical membrane and spring models of the imperfect interfaces are shown to be limiting models (similar to Reuss and Voigt bounding approximations in multiphase composite mechanics) for asymptotic expansions of stress and strain fields, respectively. Asymptotic expansion of both fields (in terms of small parameter h-thickness of the layer) produces mixed-type, exact approximation of the first order in h. Derived models of imperfect interface are used for investigation of interface waves in anisotropic bicrystals and for comparison with corresponding acoustical modes in phonon spectra. Localized interface waves are explained as general inhomogeneous plane waves in subsonic

  4. On the possibility of large axion moduli spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rudelius, Tom

    2015-04-01

    We study the diameters of axion moduli spaces, focusing primarily on type IIB compactifications on Calabi-Yau three-folds. In this case, we derive a stringent bound on the diameter in the large volume region of parameter space for Calabi-Yaus with simplicial Kähler cone. This bound can be violated by Calabi-Yaus with non-simplicial Kähler cones, but additional contributions are introduced to the effective action which can restrict the field range accessible to the axions. We perform a statistical analysis of simulated moduli spaces, finding in all cases that these additional contributions restrict the diameter so that these moduli spaces are no more likely to yield successful inflation than those with simplicial Kähler cone or with far fewer axions. Further heuristic arguments for axions in other corners of the duality web suggest that the difficulty observed in [1] of finding an axion decay constant parametrically larger than M{sub p} applies not only to individual axions, but to the diagonals of axion moduli space as well. This observation is shown to follow from the weak gravity conjecture of [2], so it likely applies not only to axions in string theory, but also to axions in any consistent theory of quantum gravity.

  5. On the possibility of large axion moduli spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rudelius, Tom

    2015-04-28

    We study the diameters of axion moduli spaces, focusing primarily on type IIB compactifications on Calabi-Yau three-folds. In this case, we derive a stringent bound on the diameter in the large volume region of parameter space for Calabi-Yaus with simplicial Kähler cone. This bound can be violated by Calabi-Yaus with non-simplicial Kähler cones, but additional contributions are introduced to the effective action which can restrict the field range accessible to the axions. We perform a statistical analysis of simulated moduli spaces, finding in all cases that these additional contributions restrict the diameter so that these moduli spaces are no more likely to yield successful inflation than those with simplicial Kähler cone or with far fewer axions. Further heuristic arguments for axions in other corners of the duality web suggest that the difficulty observed in http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1475-7516/2003/06/001 of finding an axion decay constant parametrically larger than M{sub p} applies not only to individual axions, but to the diagonals of axion moduli space as well. This observation is shown to follow from the weak gravity conjecture of http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1126-6708/2007/06/060, so it likely applies not only to axions in string theory, but also to axions in any consistent theory of quantum gravity.

  6. Generalized Kähler Geometry of Instanton Moduli Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bursztyn, Henrique; Cavalcanti, Gil R.; Gualtieri, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We prove that Hitchin's generalized Kähler structure on the moduli space of instantons over a compact, even generalized Kähler four-manifold may be obtained by generalized Kähler reduction, in analogy with the usual Kähler case. The underlying reduction of Courant algebroids is a realization of Donaldson's μ-map in degree three.

  7. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    Part of the 1994 Industrial Minerals Review. The production, consumption, and applications of construction aggregates are reviewed. In 1994, the production of construction aggregates, which includes crushed stone and construction sand and gravel combined, increased 7.7 percent to 2.14 Gt compared with the previous year. These record production levels are mostly a result of funding for highway construction work provided by the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991. Demand is expected to increase for construction aggregates in 1995.

  8. Elastic properties of hybrid composites by the effective field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaun, S. K.; Jeulin, D.

    2001-10-01

    The work is dedicated to the calculation of the overall elastic properties of matrix composite materials containing two different populations of inclusions (three phase hybrid composites). The application of the well known Mori-Tanaka method or self-consistent effective medium method to the solution of this problem gives overall elastic moduli tensors of such composites that do not have the necessary symmetry (the symmetry with respect to the first and second pairs of indices). In this work, a new version of the effective field method that takes into account specific features of the microstructure of three phase composites is developed. In this version, the field that acts on every inclusion in the composite is assumed to be different for inclusions of different populations. It is shown that the modified effective field method gives a correct symmetry of the overall elastic moduli tensors of three phase composites. The method allows us to describe the influence of the peculiarities in spatial distributions of inclusions on the overall elastic constants. The cases of media containing infinite cylindrical fibers and thin ellipsoidal disks or spherical pores are considered. Various boolean type probabilistic models of random sets of such inclusions are proposed and the elastic moduli tensors of the corresponding three phase composites are obtained and analyzed. It turns out that these tensors strongly depend on statistical properties of the random fields of inclusions. It is shown that for two phase composites, the Mori-Tanaka method is a particular case of the effective field method. In the case of three phase composites, the formulas of the Mori-Tanaka method follow from the equations of the effective field method if a general property of the symmetry of cross-correlation functions of different populations of inclusions is violated. As a result, the overall elastic moduli tensors obtained by Mori-Tanaka method lose their natural symmetry.

  9. Infinitesimal moduli of G2 holonomy manifolds with instanton bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Ossa, Xenia; Larfors, Magdalena; Svanes, Eirik E.

    2016-11-01

    We describe the infinitesimal moduli space of pairs ( Y, V) where Y is a manifold with G 2 holonomy, and V is a vector bundle on Y with an instanton connection. These structures arise in connection to the moduli space of heterotic string compactifications on compact and non-compact seven dimensional spaces, e.g. domain walls. Employing the canonical G 2 cohomology developed by Reyes-Carrión and Fernández and Ugarte, we show that the moduli space decomposes into the sum of the bundle moduli {H}_{{overset{ěe }{d}}_A}^1(Y,End(V)) plus the moduli of the G 2 structure preserving the instanton condition. The latter piece is contained in {H}_{overset{ěe }{d}θ}^1(Y,TY) , and is given by the kernel of a map overset{ěe }{F} which generalises the concept of the Atiyah map for holomorphic bundles on complex manifolds to the case at hand. In fact, the map overset{ěe }{F} is given in terms of the curvature of the bundle and maps {H}_{overset{ěe }{d}θ}^1(Y,TY) into {H}_{{overset{ěe }{d}}_A}^2(Y,End(V)) , and moreover can be used to define a cohomology on an extension bundle of TY by End( V). We comment further on the resemblance with the holomorphic Atiyah algebroid and connect the story to physics, in particular to heterotic compactifications on ( Y, V) when α' = 0.

  10. Blind inversion method using Lamb waves for the complete elastic property characterization of anisotropic plates.

    PubMed

    Vishnuvardhan, J; Krishnamurthy, C V; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2009-02-01

    A novel blind inversion method using Lamb wave S(0) and A(0) mode velocities is proposed for the complete determination of elastic moduli, material symmetries, as well as principal plane orientations of anisotropic plates. The approach takes advantage of genetic algorithm, introduces the notion of "statistically significant" elastic moduli, and utilizes their sensitivities to velocity data to reconstruct the elastic moduli. The unknown material symmetry and the principal planes are then evaluated using the method proposed by Cowin and Mehrabadi [Q. J. Mech. Appl. Math. 40, 451-476 (1987)]. The blind inversion procedure was verified using simulated ultrasonic velocity data sets on materials with transversely isotropic, orthotropic, and monoclinic symmetries. A modified double ring configuration of the single transmitter and multiple receiver compact array was developed to experimentally validate the blind inversion approach on a quasi-isotropic graphite-epoxy composite plate. This technique finds application in the area of material characterization and structural health monitoring of anisotropic platelike structures.

  11. Single-crystal elastic properties of (Cs,Na)AlSi2O6.H2O pollucite: A zeolite with potential use for long-term storage of Cs radioisotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Valle, Carmen; Chio, Chi-Hong; Gatta, G. Diego

    2010-11-01

    The single-crystal and aggregate elastic properties of the zeolite pollucite (Cs,Na)AlSi2O6ṡH2O, a potential host for Cs radionucleides in geological repositories, have been determined by Brillouin scattering spectroscopy at ambient conditions. The three nonzero individual elastic constants of cubic pollucite are: C11=105.0(1.3) GPa, C44=27.0(3) GPa, and C12=25.7(6) GPa. The Voigt-Reuss-Hill average of the aggregate bulk, shear modulus, Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio are KS=52.2(1.0) GPa, G=31.5(7) GPa, E=78.6(1.0) GPa, and ν =0.248(4), respectively. The bulk modulus of pollucite is 12.7% lower than that of the all-Na isotypic mineral analcime NaAlSi2O6ṡH2O whereas the shear moduli G are identical within mutual uncertainties. The higher compressibility of pollucite results from the weaker Cs-O bonds compared to Na-O bonds, suggesting strong control of the nature and configuration of the extraframework content on the behavior of the structure. The elastic properties of pollucite reported here will help in the prediction of its behavior as a geological barrier and in the modeling of the short-term and long-term safety of the Cs-repositories.

  12. Dynamic considerations in pavement layers moduli evaluation using falling weight deflectometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoukry, Samir N.; Martinelli, David R.; Selezneva, Olga I.

    1996-11-01

    Falling weight deflectometer (FWD) test is employed by many state highway agencies for the nondestructive evaluation of pavement layers moduli. The accuracy of test results changes significantly for different pavement systems and may results in misleading conclusions. In this study, explicit finite element analysis was used to investigate the behavior of pavement layers under the action of an impact load. The time dependent dynamic responses of origin and flexible pavements were compared and significant differences in behavior were observed. Analysis of the time-histories of vertical deformations propagating through the pavement depth reveals that the displacements measured on the surface layer at standard FWD sensors' positions may not be indicative of the displacements of underlying layers. Computer results are provided for the extreme cases of fully bonded and unbonded pavement layers' interfaces. The results of the analysis reveal that the dynamic displacement patterns are much more complicated than the static ones. Animation of the model results indicates that near-surface pavement layers may behave as a set of composite plates resting on an elastic foundation in absence of bonds between the layers interfaces. If there are strong bonds, the near surface layers behave as a single composite solid resting on elastic foundation.

  13. Elastic and magnetostrictive properties of Tb6Fe1-xCioBi2 (0 < x < 0.375)

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, Michael R.; Jia, Lin; McCarthy, David; McGuire, Michael A; Keppens, Veerle

    2011-01-01

    Elastic moduli and magnetostriction data are reported for polycrystalline Tb{sub 6}Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}Bi{sub 2} (0 {le} x {le} 0.375). The elastic moduli c{sub 11} and c{sub 44} have been measured as a function of temperature (5-300 K) and magnetic field (0-5 T), and reflect the ferromagnetic transition observed in these materials around 250 K. A remarkable elastic softening, which is partially suppressed upon application of a magnetic field, is observed at low temperatures and is believed to be linked to a structural transition that takes place in the Co-doped samples. The soft elastic moduli lead to large magnetostriction below 50 K, reaching a value of 700 ppm at 20 kOe for Tb{sub 6}Fe{sub 0.75}Co{sub 0.25}Bi{sub 2}.

  14. In Vivo Determination of the Complex Elastic Moduli of Cetacean Head Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    and compared with directly measured and tabulated material values. The noninvasive technique will be repeated for tissue phantoms enclosed in a...peak negative pressure, time averaged intensity) will be consistent with limits established as safe for humans, and ultrasound frequencies will be...3-D ultrasonic intensity distributions in tissue-like materials . The model was used to compare and refine candidate designs for the new radiation

  15. A Laboratory Study of the Effect of Stress State on the Elastic Moduli of Sand

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Aouad, Mohammed Kayal and James Lee. I would like to express my appreciation to the U.S. Air Force and the Air Force Institute of Technology whose...devices constructed for pulse testing are either right circular cylinder or cubic in nature. Cubic devices have the advantage to vary the three orthogonal...testing in cubic devices has the advantage of measuring dilatational and shear body waves under triaxial stress conditions with relative ease. Through

  16. In Vivo Determination of the Complex Elastic Moduli of Cetacean Head Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    pathologies. APPROACH This work builds upon the principles of ultrasonic elastographyi, wherein ultrasound is used to both generate and observe low ...an ensemble of forcing pulses , the low frequency drive spectrum has a low pass filtered comb spectrum consisting of 64 Hz harmonics, as shown in the...objective of this project is to develop an ultrasound -based system for non-invasive determination of in vivo shear and bulk properties of cetacean soft

  17. Estimation of elastic moduli of graphene monolayer in lattice statics approach at nonzero temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zubko, I. Yu. Kochurov, V. I.

    2015-10-27

    For the aim of the crystal temperature control the computational-statistical approach to studying thermo-mechanical properties for finite sized crystals is presented. The approach is based on the combination of the high-performance computational techniques and statistical analysis of the crystal response on external thermo-mechanical actions for specimens with the statistically small amount of atoms (for instance, nanoparticles). The heat motion of atoms is imitated in the statics approach by including the independent degrees of freedom for atoms connected with their oscillations. We obtained that under heating, graphene material response is nonsymmetric.

  18. In Vivo Determination of the Complex Elastic Moduli of Cetacean Head Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    scatterer such as bone. The second technique involved a pulsed ultrasonic carrier signal from which the motion of a reflecting surface was...extracted by repeated correlation of the echoed pulses with those that were transmitted. This technique permitted different scatterers to be simultaneously...combine the measurement resolution of pure­ tone vibrometry with the spatial resolution of pulse -echo vibrometry. The new technique requires that the

  19. In Vivo Determination of the Complex Elastic Moduli of Cetacean Head Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    and data collection hardware. 3. Hemorrhage and edema detection study The feasibility study addressing the use of the prototype elastography ...universally optimal, should not impose a limit on the attainable performance of the overall prototype elastography system. 3. Hemorrhage and

  20. In Vivo Determination of the Complex Elastic Moduli of Cetacean Head Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT A confocal ultrasonic elastography system was designed, developed, and tested with discrete...technology called elastography . The methods described by Greenleaf (Chen et al, 2002) and Sarvazyan (Sarvazyan et al, 1998) provide the basis for shear... elastography system was designed, developed, and tested with discrete scatterers and tissue phantoms. The former experiments demonstrated the ability to

  1. In Vivo Determination of the Complex Elastic Moduli of Cetacean Head Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    as a precursor to elastography measurements. 2 4. Hemorrhage and Edema Simulation A finite element model-based simulation effort was initiated...profiles, as are 3 commonly used in ultrasound elastography , and ring-shaped force profiles. The critical findings from the simulation effort are

  2. In Vivo Determination of the Complex Elastic Moduli of Cetacean Head Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    and with harvested tissue samples. In vivo testing will be conducted on Navy dolphins . Ultrasound parameters (peak negative pressure, time averaged...A synthetic material was developed which mimicks the ultrasonic properties of living bottlenose dolphin soft tissues. RESULTS 1. System...NIVMS) and with a laser doppler vibrometer (Polytec PDV-100). A variety of pulse drive levels, durations, and bandwidths for both ultrasound

  3. Room Temperature Elastic Moduli and Vickers Hardness of Hot-Pressed LLZO Cubic Garnet

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    was examined on uncoated fracture surfaces by SEM with an accelerating voltage of 1 and 3 kV. Phase purity was evaluated from X-ray diffraction data... hydroxyapatite [14], langatates [20], La0.5Sr0.5Fe1-xCoxO3-d perovskites [22], SmScO3 [23], and NdScO3 [23], a number of ternary and quaternary carbides...Microstructure and lattice parameter of LLZO specimens In this study, the LLZO microstructure was observed on a (i) fracture surface of LLZO-01 (Fig. 1a) and

  4. In Vivo Determination of the Complex Elastic Moduli of Cetacean Head Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    formed by the ultrasonic source. As the ring radius is changed through a change in the ultrasonic carrier frequency, a fixed receiver measures the...of an ultrasonic Doppler vibration measurement system called NVMS developed at Georgia Tech iii. Algorithms have been developed to enable the...magnitude and phase of vibration to be determined as a function of range (tissue depth) along the ultrasonic beam. By measuring the differential phase of

  5. Estimation of the engineering elastic constants of a directionally solidified superalloy for finite element structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    1991-01-01

    The temperature-dependent engineering elastic constants of a directionally solidified nickel-base superalloy were estimated from the single-crystal elastic constants of nickel and MAR-MOO2 superalloy by using Wells' method. In this method, the directionally solidified (columnar-grained) nickel-base superalloy was modeled as a transversely isotropic material, and the five independent elastic constants of the transversely isotropic material were determined from the three independent elastic constants of a cubic single crystal. Solidification for both the single crystals and the directionally solidified superalloy was assumed to be along the (001) direction. Temperature-dependent Young's moduli in longitudinal and transverse directions, shear moduli, and Poisson's ratios were tabulated for the directionally solidified nickel-base superalloy. These engineering elastic constants could be used as input for performing finite element structural analysis of directionally solidified turbine engine components.

  6. An Estimation Method of Pore Structure and Mineral Moduli Based on Kuster-Toksöz (KT) Model and Biot's Coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Da; Yin, Cheng; Zhao, Hu; Liu, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Pore structure and mineral matrix elastic moduli are indispensable in rock physics models. We propose an estimation method of pore structure and mineral moduli based on Kuster-Toksöz model and Biot's coefficient. In this technique, pore aspect ratios of five different scales from 100 to 10-4 are considered, Biot's coefficient is used to determine bounds of mineral moduli, and an estimation procedure combined with simulated annealing (SA) algorithm to handle real logs or laboratory measurements is developed. The proposed method is applied to parameter estimations on 28 sandstone samples, the properties of which have been measured in lab. The water saturated data are used for estimating pore structure and mineral moduli, and the oil saturated data are used for testing these estimated parameters through fluid substitution in Kuster-Toksöz model. We then compare fluid substitution results with lab measurements and find that relative errors of P-wave and S-wave velocities are all less than 5%, which indicates that the estimation results are accurate.

  7. Moduli evolution in the presence of thermal corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Barreiro, Tiago; Carlos, Beatriz de; Copeland, Edmund J.; Nunes, Nelson J.

    2008-09-15

    We study the effect of thermal corrections on the evolution of moduli in effective supergravity models. This is motivated by previous results in the literature suggesting that these corrections could alter and even erase the presence of a minimum in the zero temperature potential, something that would have disastrous consequences in these particular models. We show that, in a representative sample of flux compactification constructions, this need not be the case, although we find that the inclusion of thermal corrections can dramatically decrease the region of initial conditions for which the moduli are stabilized. Moreover, the bounds on the reheating temperature coming from demanding that the full, finite temperature potential, has a minimum can be considerably relaxed given the slow pace at which the evolution proceeds.

  8. Moduli spaces of vortex knots for an exact fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoyavlenskij, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    The moduli spaces S ( D ) of non-isotopic vortex knots are introduced for the ideal fluid flows in invariant domains D . The analogous moduli spaces of the magnetic fields B knots are defined. We derive and investigate new exact fluid flows (and analogous plasma equilibria) satisfying the Beltrami equation which have nested invariant balls Bk 3 with radii Rk ≈ (k + 1) π, k⟶∞. The first flow is z-axisymmetric; the other ones do not possess any rotational symmetries. The axisymmetric flow has an invariant plane z = 0. Due to an involutive symmetry of the flow, its vortex knots in the invariant half-spaces z > 0 and z < 0 are equivalent. It is demonstrated that the moduli space 𝒮(ℝ3) for the derived fluid flow in ℝ3 is naturally isomorphic to the set of all rational numbers p/q in the interval J 1 : 0 . 25 < q < M ˜ 1 ≈ 0 . 5847 , where q is the safety factor. For the fluid flow in the first invariant ball B1 3 , it is shown that all values of the safety factor q belong to a small interval of length ℓ ≈ 0.1261. It is established that only torus knots Kp,q with 0.25 < p/q < 0.5847 are realized as vortex knots for the constructed flow in ℝ3. Each torus knot Kp,q with 0.25 < p/q < 0.5 is realized on countably many invariant tori Tk 2 located between the invariant spheres Sk 2 and Sk + 1 2 , while torus knots with 0 . 5 < p / q < M ˜ 1 are realized only on finitely many invariant tori. The moduli spaces S m ( Ba 3 ) ( m = 1 , 2 , … ) of vortex knots are constructed for some axisymmetric steady fluid flows that are solutions to the boundary eigenvalue problem for the curl operator on a ball Ba 3 .

  9. Pressuremeter Moduli for Airport Pavement Design and Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    Dissertation, Department of Civil Engineering , Uni- versity of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Briaud, J.-L. & Garland, E., 1985, "Loading Rate Method for Pile...Response in Clay," Jour. of Geotechnical Engineering , ASCE, Vol. 111, No. 3, pp. 319-335. Briand, J.-L., Lytton, R.L. & Hung, J.T., 1982, "Using a...DOT/FAA/PM-87/10 Pressuremeter Moduli for Program Engineering Airport Pavement Design and Maintenance Service Washington, D.C. 20591 and Evaluation

  10. The moduli space of superconformal instantons in sigma models

    SciTech Connect

    Monastyrsky, M.I. ); Natanzon, S.M. )

    1991-06-21

    In this paper, an approach to instantons in supersymmetrical 2-dimensional sigma models is discussed. In this approach superinstantons are characterized as the superconformal maps of a physical space into the isotopic (target) space. The authors consider a special case of the supersphere with punctures. New topological invariants as the number of the so-called fermionic points appear in this case. The authors also analyze the structure of the moduli space of superinstantons within this framework.

  11. Geometry of moduli stacks of (k , l) -stable vector bundles over algebraic curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata-Gutiérrez, O.; Neumann, Frank

    2017-01-01

    We study the geometry of the moduli stack of vector bundles of fixed rank and degree over an algebraic curve by introducing a filtration made of open substacks build from (k , l) -stable vector bundles. The concept of (k , l) -stability was introduced by Narasimhan and Ramanan to study the geometry of the coarse moduli space of stable bundles. We will exhibit the stacky picture and analyse the geometric and cohomological properties of the moduli stacks of (k , l) -stable vector bundles. For particular pairs (k , l) of integers we also show that these moduli stacks admit coarse moduli spaces and we discuss their interplay.

  12. Measurement of Elastic Modulus of Collagen Type I Single Fiber.

    PubMed

    Dutov, Pavel; Antipova, Olga; Varma, Sameer; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Schieber, Jay D

    2016-01-01

    Collagen fibers are the main components of the extra cellular matrix and the primary contributors to the mechanical properties of tissues. Here we report a novel approach to measure the longitudinal component of the elastic moduli of biological fibers under conditions close to those found in vivo and apply it to type I collagen from rat tail tendon. This approach combines optical tweezers, atomic force microscopy, and exploits Euler-Bernoulli elasticity theory for data analysis. This approach also avoids drying for measurements or visualization, since samples are freshly extracted. Importantly, strains are kept below 0.5%, which appear consistent with the linear elastic regime. We find, surprisingly, that the longitudinal elastic modulus of type I collagen cannot be represented by a single quantity but rather is a distribution that is broader than the uncertainty of our experimental technique. The longitudinal component of the single-fiber elastic modulus is between 100 MPa and 360 MPa for samples extracted from different rats and/or different parts of a single tail. Variations are also observed in the fibril-bundle/fibril diameter with an average of 325±40 nm. Since bending forces depend on the diameter to the fourth power, this variation in diameter is important for estimating the range of elastic moduli. The remaining variations in the modulus may be due to differences in composition of the fibril-bundles, or the extent of the proteoglycans constituting fibril-bundles, or that some single fibrils may be of fibril-bundle size.

  13. High-pressure single-crystal elasticity study of CO{sub 2} across phase I-III transition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jin S. Bass, Jay D.; Shieh, Sean R.; Dera, Przemyslaw; Prakapenka, Vitali

    2014-04-07

    Sound velocities and elastic moduli of solid single-crystal CO{sub 2} were measured at pressures up to 11.7(3) GPa by Brillouin spectroscopy. The aggregate adiabatic bulk modulus (K{sub S}), shear modulus (G), and their pressure derivatives for CO{sub 2} Phase I are K{sub S0} = 3.4(6) GPa, G{sub 0} = 1.8(2) GPa, (dK{sub S}/dP){sub 0} = 7.8(3), (dG/dP){sub 0} = 2.5(1), (d{sup 2}K{sub S}/dP{sup 2}){sub 0} = −0.23(3) GPa{sup −1}, and (d{sup 2}G/dP{sup 2}){sub 0} = −0.10(1) GPa{sup −1}. A small increase of elastic properties was observed between 9.8(1) and 10.5(3) GPa, in agreement with the CO{sub 2} I-III transition pressure determined from previous x-ray diffraction experiments. Above the transition pressure P{sub T}, we observed a mixture dominated by CO{sub 2}-I, with minor CO{sub 2}-III. The CO{sub 2}-I + III mixture shows slightly increased sound velocities compared to pure CO{sub 2}-I. Elastic anisotropy calculated from the single-crystal elasticity tensor exhibits a decrease with pressure beginning at 7.9(1) GPa, which is lower than P{sub T}. Our results coincide with recent X-ray Raman observations, suggesting that a pressure-induced electronic transition is related to local structural and optical changes.

  14. Surface tension and the dodecahedron model for lung elasticity.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, E; Budiansky, B

    1990-05-01

    Macroscopic elastic moduli governing the incremental deformations of lung parenchyma are calculated on the basis of a model for an individual lung element in the shape of a regular dodecahedron. Elastic stiffness within the element is provided by pin-jointed tension members along the edges of the dodecahedron, surface tension is incorporated into its pentagonal faces, and the influence of transpulmonary pressure is simulated by an externally applied hydrostatic tension. The analysis is based on a variational statement of nonlinear structural mechanics, and the results show how the moduli depend on the effective inflation pressure, the constitutive behavior of the idealized truss members, and the surface-area dependent surface tension. The theory is discussed in the light of available experimental information. A more general analysis is needed to account for the effects of structural as well as surface-tension hysteresis.

  15. Connection between elastic and electrical properties of cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Gao, X; Sevostianov, I

    2016-03-21

    The paper focuses on the connection between elastic and electrical properties of cortical bone. Both these properties are governed by microstructure that consists of several pore systems filled with mechanically soft and electrically conductive tissue. Microstructural changes induced by aging, various diseases, microgravity conditions etc. lead to variation in both properties. The paper address the problem of evaluation of the changes in mechanical performance (decrease in Young׳s moduli) via monitoring electrical conductivity. The theoretical results are verified experimentally.

  16. Elasticity of hcp cobalt at high pressure and temperature: a quasi-harmonic case

    SciTech Connect

    Antonangeli, D; Krisch, M; Farber, D L; Ruddle, D G; Fiquet, G

    2007-11-30

    We performed high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering measurements on a single crystal of hcp cobalt at simultaneous high pressure and high temperature, deriving 4 of the 5 independent elements of the elastic tensor. Our experiments indicate that the elasticity of hcp-Co is well described within the frame of a quasi-harmonic approximation and that anharmonic high-temperature effects on the elastic moduli, sound velocities and elastic anisotropy are minimal at constant density. These results support the validity of the Birch's law and represent an important benchmark for ab initio thermal lattice dynamics and molecular-dynamics simulations.

  17. Elastic Properties of Rolled Uranium -- 10 wt.% Molybdenum Nuclear Fuel Foils

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Brown; D. J. Alexander; K. D. Clarke; B. Clausen; M. A. Okuniewski; T. A. Sisneros

    2013-11-01

    In situ neutron diffraction data was collected during elastic loading of rolled foils of uranium-10 wt.% molybdenum bonded to a thin layer of zirconium. Lattice parameters were ascertained from the diffraction patterns to determine the elastic strain and, subsequently, the elastic moduli and Poisson’s ratio in the rolling and transverse directions. The foil was found to be elastically isotropic in the rolling plane with an effective modulus of 86 + / - 3 GPa and a Poisson’s ratio 0.39 + / - 0.04.

  18. The Single-Crystal Elasticity of Yttria (Y2O3) to High Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriven, Waltraud M.; Palko, James W.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Bass, Jay D.; Sayir, Ali; Levine, Stanley R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The single-crystal elastic moduli of yttria have been measured by Brillouin spectroscopy up to 1200 C. The room temperature values obtained are C11 = 223.6 +/- 0.6 GPa, C44 = 74.6 +/- 0.5 GPa, and C12 = 112.4 +/- 1.0 GPa. The resulting bulk and (Voigt-Reuss-Hill) shear moduli are K = 149.5 +/- 1.0 GPa and G(sub VRH) = 66.3 +/- 0.8 GPa, respectively. These agree much more closely with experimental values reported for polycrystalline samples than do previous single-crystal measurements. Linear least squares regressions to the variation of bulk and shear moduli with temperature result in derivatives of dK/dT = -17 +/- 2 MPa/degC and dG(sub VRH)/dT = -8 +/- 2 MPa/degC. Elastic anisotropy was found to remain essentially constant over the temperature range studied.

  19. Single-Crystal Elastic Constants of Yttria (Y2O3) Measured to High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayir, Ali; Palko, James W.; Kriven, Waltraud M.; Sinogeikin, Sergey V.; Bass, Jay D.

    2001-01-01

    Yttria, or yttrium sesquioxide (Y2O3), has been considered for use in nuclear applications and has gained interest relatively recently for use in infrared optics. Single crystals of yttria have been grown successfully at the NASA Glenn Research Center using a laser-heated float zone technique in a fiber and rod. Such samples allow measurement of the single-crystal elastic properties, and these measurements provide useful property data for the design of components using single crystals. They also yield information as to what degree the elastic properties of yttria ceramics are a result of the intrinsic properties of the yttria crystal in comparison to characteristics that may depend on processing, such as microstructure and intergranular phases, which are common in sintered yttria. The single-crystal elastic moduli are valuable for designing such optical components. In particular, the temperature derivatives of elastic moduli allow the dimensional changes due to heating under physical constraints, as well as acoustic excitation, to be determined. The single-crystal elastic moduli of yttria were measured by Brillouin spectroscopy up to 1200 C. The room-temperature values obtained were C(sub 11) = 223.6 + 0.6 GPa, C(sub 44) = 74.6 + 0.5 GPa, and C(sub 12) = 112.4 + 1.0 GPa. The resulting bulk and (Voigt-Reuss-Hill) shear moduli were K = 149.5 + 1.0 GPa and G(sub VRH) = 66.3 + 0.8 GPa, respectively. Linear least-squares regressions to the variation of bulk and shear moduli with temperature resulted in derivatives of dK/dT = -17 + 2 MPa/C and dG(sub VRH)/dT = -8 + 2 MPa/ C. Elastic anisotropy was found to remain essentially constant over the temperature range studied.

  20. More on the Abrikosov strings with non-Abelian moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shifman, M.; Tallarita, Gianni; Yung, Alexei

    2014-04-01

    We continue explorations of deformed Abrikosov-Nielsen-Olesen (ANO) strings, with non-Abelian moduli on the worldsheet. In a simple model with an extra field, we find classically stable ANO and non-Abelian strings. The tension of the latter is a few percent lower than the tension of the ANO string. Then, we calculate the interpolating field configuration. Once the kink mass Mk and the difference of tensions ΔT are found, we calculate the decay rate of the ANO string with a higher tension ("false vacuum") into the non-Abelian string with the lower tension ("genuine vacuum") through the "bubble" formation in the quasiclassical approximation.

  1. Dynamic Young's moduli of space materials at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L. Z.; Tu, Z. H.; Zhang, P. Q.

    Using vibration analysis methods, the dynamic mechanical properties of space materials at low temperatures (from 4.2 to 300 K) are studied in this paper. System identification techniques in the time domain are used to identify the dynamic parameters of the space materials Ti-5Al-2.5Sn extra-low-interstitial (ELI) alloy and Al-2.5Li-1.3Cu-0.9Mg-0.13Zr (Al-Li) alloy. The dynamic Young's moduli of these materials are calculated using the basic natural frequencies at different temperatures.

  2. Determination of Biomembrane Bending Moduli in Fully Atomistic Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The bilayer bending modulus (Kc) is one of the most important physical constants characterizing lipid membranes, but precisely measuring it is a challenge, both experimentally and computationally. Experimental measurements on chemically identical bilayers often differ depending upon the techniques employed, and robust simulation results have previously been limited to coarse-grained models (at varying levels of resolution). This Communication demonstrates the extraction of Kc from fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations for three different single-component lipid bilayers (DPPC, DOPC, and DOPE). The results agree quantitatively with experiments that measure thermal shape fluctuations in giant unilamellar vesicles. Lipid tilt, twist, and compression moduli are also reported. PMID:25202918

  3. An inverse problem approach for elasticity imaging through vibroacoustics.

    PubMed

    Aguiló, Miguel A; Aquino, Wilkins; Brigham, John C; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2010-04-01

    A methodology for estimating the spatial distribution of elastic moduli using the steady-state dynamic response of solids immersed in fluids is presented. The technique relies on the ensuing acoustic field from a remotely excited solid to inversely estimate the spatial distribution of Young's modulus of biological structures (e.g., breast tissue). This work proposes the use of Gaussian radial basis functions (GRBF) to represent the spatial variation of elastic moduli. GRBF are shown to possess the advantage of representing smooth functions with quasi-compact support and can efficiently represent elastic moduli distributions such as those that occur in soft biological tissue in the presence of unhealthy tissue (e.g., tumors and calcifications). The direct problem consists of a coupled acoustic-structure interaction boundary-value problem solved in the frequency domain using the finite element method. The inverse problem is cast as an optimization problem in which the error functional is defined as a measure of discrepancy between an experimentally measured response and a finite element representation of the system. Nongradient based optimization algorithms are used to solve the resulting optimization problem. The feasibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated through a series of simulations and an experiment. For comparison purposes, the surface velocity response was also used for the inverse characterization as the measured response in place of the acoustic pressure.

  4. Elastic-Plastic Finite-Difference Analysis of Unidirectional Composites Subjected to Thermomechanical Cyclic Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    1Nb matrix was attained using a bilinear elastic -plastic model with temperature dependent elastic and plastic moduli , yield stress and coefficient of...J., "Investigation of the Thermomechanical Response of a Titanium - Aluminide /Silicon-Carbide Composite using a Unified State Variable Model and the...Analysis of MMC Subjected to Thermomechanical Fatigue", Titanium Aluminide Composites, WL-TR-91- 4020, Wright Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio

  5. A diffraction correction for storage and loss moduli imaging using radiation force based elastography.

    PubMed

    Budelli, Eliana; Brum, Javier; Bernal, Miguel; Deffieux, Thomas; Tanter, Mickaël; Lema, Patricia; Negreira, Carlos; Gennisson, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-07

    Noninvasive evaluation of the rheological behavior of soft tissues may provide an important diagnosis tool. Nowadays, available commercial ultrasound systems only provide shear elasticity estimation by shear wave speed assessment under the hypothesis of a purely elastic model. However, to fully characterize the rheological behavior of tissues, given by its storage (G') and loss (G″) moduli, it is necessary to estimate both: shear wave speed and shear wave attenuation. Most elastography techniques use the acoustic radiation force to generate shear waves. For this type of source the shear waves are not plane and a diffraction correction is needed to properly estimate the shear wave attenuation. The use of a cylindrical wave approximation to evaluate diffraction has been proposed by other authors before. Here the validity of such approximation is numerically and experimentally revisited. Then, it is used to generate images of G' and G″ in heterogeneous viscoelastic mediums. A simulation algorithm based on the anisotropic and viscoelastic Green's function was used to establish the validity of the cylindrical approximation. Moreover, two experiments were carried out: a transient elastography experiment where plane shear waves were generated using a vibrating plate and a SSI experiment that uses the acoustic radiation force to generate shear waves. For both experiments the shear wave propagation was followed with an ultrafast ultrasound scanner. Then, the shear wave velocity and shear wave attenuation were recovered from the phase and amplitude decay versus distance respectively. In the SSI experiment the cylindrical approximation was applied to correct attenuation due to diffraction effects. The numerical and experimental results validate the use of a cylindrical correction to assess shear wave attenuation. Finally, by applying the cylindrical correction G' and G″ images were generated in heterogeneous phantoms and a preliminary in vivo feasibility study was

  6. A diffraction correction for storage and loss moduli imaging using radiation force based elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budelli, Eliana; Brum, Javier; Bernal, Miguel; Deffieux, Thomas; Tanter, Mickaël; Lema, Patricia; Negreira, Carlos; Gennisson, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-01

    Noninvasive evaluation of the rheological behavior of soft tissues may provide an important diagnosis tool. Nowadays, available commercial ultrasound systems only provide shear elasticity estimation by shear wave speed assessment under the hypothesis of a purely elastic model. However, to fully characterize the rheological behavior of tissues, given by its storage (G‧) and loss (G″) moduli, it is necessary to estimate both: shear wave speed and shear wave attenuation. Most elastography techniques use the acoustic radiation force to generate shear waves. For this type of source the shear waves are not plane and a diffraction correction is needed to properly estimate the shear wave attenuation. The use of a cylindrical wave approximation to evaluate diffraction has been proposed by other authors before. Here the validity of such approximation is numerically and experimentally revisited. Then, it is used to generate images of G‧ and G″ in heterogeneous viscoelastic mediums. A simulation algorithm based on the anisotropic and viscoelastic Green’s function was used to establish the validity of the cylindrical approximation. Moreover, two experiments were carried out: a transient elastography experiment where plane shear waves were generated using a vibrating plate and a SSI experiment that uses the acoustic radiation force to generate shear waves. For both experiments the shear wave propagation was followed with an ultrafast ultrasound scanner. Then, the shear wave velocity and shear wave attenuation were recovered from the phase and amplitude decay versus distance respectively. In the SSI experiment the cylindrical approximation was applied to correct attenuation due to diffraction effects. The numerical and experimental results validate the use of a cylindrical correction to assess shear wave attenuation. Finally, by applying the cylindrical correction G‧ and G″ images were generated in heterogeneous phantoms and a preliminary in vivo feasibility study

  7. Elastic Anisotropy of Trabecular Bone in the Elderly Human Vertebra

    PubMed Central

    Unnikrishnan, Ginu U.; Gallagher, John A.; Hussein, Amira I.; Barest, Glenn D.; Morgan, Elise F.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the nature of the elastic symmetry of trabecular bone is fundamental to the study of bone adaptation and failure. Previous studies have classified human vertebral trabecular bone as orthotropic or transversely isotropic but have typically obtained samples from only selected regions of the centrum. In this study, the elastic symmetry of human vertebral trabecular bone was characterized using microfinite element (μFE) analyses performed on 1019 cubic regions of side length equal to 5 mm, obtained via thorough sampling of the centrums of 18 human L1 vertebrae (age = 81.17 ± 7.7 yr; eight males and ten females). An optimization procedure was used to find the closest orthotropic representation of the resulting stiffness tensor for each cube. The orthotropic elastic constants and orientation of the principal elastic axes were then recorded for each cube and were compared to the constants predicted from Cowin's fabric-based constitutive model (Cowin, 1985, “The Relationship Between the Elasticity Tensor and the Fabric Tensor,” Mech. Mater., 4(2), pp. 137–147.) and the orientation of the principal axes of the fabric tensor, respectively. Deviations from orthotropy were quantified by the “orthotropic error” (van Rietbergen et al., 1996, “Direct Mechanics Assessment of Elastic Symmetries and Properties of Trabecular Bone Architecture,” J. Biomech., 29(12), pp. 1653–1657), and deviations from transverse isotropy were determined by statistical comparison of the secondary and tertiary elastic moduli. The orthotropic error was greater than 50% for nearly half of the cubes, and the secondary and tertiary moduli differed from one another (p < 0.0001). Both the orthotropic error and the difference between secondary and tertiary moduli decreased with increasing bone volume fraction (BV/TV; p ≤ 0.007). Considering only the cubes with an orthotropic error less than 50%, only moderate correlations were observed between the fabric

  8. Elastic loss and dispersion in ceramic-matrix piezocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybyanets, A. N.; Naumenko, A. A.; Konstantinov, G. M.; Shvetsova, N. A.; Lugovaya, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    Ceramic-matrix composites of different types have been comprehensively studied using three-dimensional numerical simulation, resonance analysis of impedance spectra, and pulse-echo ultrasonic measurements. The results of finite-difference simulation of longitudinal ultrasonic wave propagation in different viscoelastic ceramic-matrix composites (porous ceramics and ceramics/crystal) have been presented. The experimental studies have revealed regions of elastic dispersion characterized by anomalies of the frequency dependences of the imaginary and real parts of the elastic moduli. The simulation results have been compared with experimental data.

  9. Elastic properties of silver borate glasses doped with praseodymium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowda, G. V. Jagadeesha; Eraiah, B.

    2014-04-01

    A series of glasses xPr6O11-(35-x) Ag2O-65B2O3 with x=0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 mol % were synthesized by melt quenching technique. Longitudinal and shear ultrasonic velocity were measured at 5 MHz frequency and at room temperature. Elastic moduli, Poisson's ratio and Debye temperature have been calculated from the measured density and ultrasonic velocity at room temperature. The experimental results indicate that the elastic constants depend upon the composition of the glasses. The role of the Pr6O11 inside the glass network was discussed.

  10. Precisely predicting and designing the elasticity of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z. Q. E-mail: zhfzhang@imr.ac.cn; Wang, R. F.; Qu, R. T.; Zhang, Z. F. E-mail: zhfzhang@imr.ac.cn

    2014-05-28

    We reveal that the elastic moduli of metallic glasses (MGs) invariably vary in a much steeper manner than that predicted by the conventional “rule of mixtures” in individual alloy systems. Such deviations are proved to originate fundamentally from their disordered atomic structures and intrinsic local heterogeneities. By treating the MGs as atomic-level dual phase hybrids, we further propose universal relations to be capable of precisely predicting and designing the elastic constants of MGs. This may contribute to the development of MGs with intended properties and behaviors, and allow new understandings on the structures and properties as well as their relationships in MGs.

  11. A Preponderance of Elastic Properties of Alpha Plutonium Measured Via Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Saleh, Tarik A.; Farrow, Adam M.; Freibert, Franz J.

    2012-06-06

    Samples of {alpha} plutonium were fabricated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Plutonium Facility. Cylindrical samples were machined from cast pucks. Precision immersion density and resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) measurements were completed on 27 new samples, yielding elastic moduli measurements. Mechanical tests were performed in compression yielding stress-strain curves as a function of rate, temperature and phase.

  12. Thermal and elastic properties of oxy-fluoro zinc tellurite glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmmad, Shaik Kareem; Samee, M. A.; Taqiullah, S. M.; Rahman, Syed

    2014-04-01

    A glass system based on ZnF2-ZnO-As2O3-TeO2 was prepared. A number of properties such as glass transition temperature, glass stability, Elastic moduli, Debye temperature, poisons ratio studies. The results indicated that most of the properties are observed to be dependent on ZnF2 content.

  13. Elastic and magnetostrictive properties of Tb{sub 6}Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}Bi{sub 2} (0 {<=} x {<=} 0.375)

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, Michael R.; Jia Lin; McCarthy, David; Keppens, Veerle; McGuire, Michael A.

    2011-04-01

    Elastic moduli and magnetostriction data are reported for polycrystalline Tb{sub 6}Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}Bi{sub 2} (0 {<=} x {<=} 0.375). The elastic moduli c{sub 11} and c{sub 44} have been measured as a function of temperature (5-300 K) and magnetic field (0-5 T), and reflect the ferromagnetic transition observed in these materials around 250 K. A remarkable elastic softening, which is partially suppressed upon application of a magnetic field, is observed at low temperatures and is believed to be linked to a structural transition that takes place in the Co-doped samples. The soft elastic moduli lead to large magnetostriction below 50 K, reaching a value of 700 ppm at 20 kOe for Tb{sub 6}Fe{sub 0.75}Co{sub 0.25}Bi{sub 2}.

  14. Non-affine elasticity in jammed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, Craig

    2006-03-01

    Symmetry dictates that perfect crystals should deform homogeneously, or affinely, under external load, and computing the elastic moduli from the underlying interaction potential is then straightforward. For disordered materials no such simple procedure exists, and recent numerical works have demonstrated that non-affine corrections can dramatically reduce the naive expectation for the shear modulus in a broad class of disordered systems and may control rigidity loss in the zero pressure limit in purely repulsive systems, i.e. the unjamming transition (c.f. [O'Hern et. al. PRE 68, 011306 (2003)]). We present numerical results and an analytical framework for the study of these non-affine corrections to the elastic response of disordered packings.

  15. Non-Gaussian Error Distributions of LMC Distance Moduli Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crandall, Sara; Ratra, Bharat

    2015-12-01

    We construct error distributions for a compilation of 232 Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) distance moduli values from de Grijs et al. that give an LMC distance modulus of (m - M)0 = 18.49 ± 0.13 mag (median and 1σ symmetrized error). Central estimates found from weighted mean and median statistics are used to construct the error distributions. The weighted mean error distribution is non-Gaussian—flatter and broader than Gaussian—with more (less) probability in the tails (center) than is predicted by a Gaussian distribution; this could be the consequence of unaccounted-for systematic uncertainties. The median statistics error distribution, which does not make use of the individual measurement errors, is also non-Gaussian—more peaked than Gaussian—with less (more) probability in the tails (center) than is predicted by a Gaussian distribution; this could be the consequence of publication bias and/or the non-independence of the measurements. We also construct the error distributions of 247 SMC distance moduli values from de Grijs & Bono. We find a central estimate of {(m-M)}0=18.94+/- 0.14 mag (median and 1σ symmetrized error), and similar probabilities for the error distributions.

  16. Quiver theories for moduli spaces of classical group nilpotent orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanany, Amihay; Kalveks, Rudolph

    2016-06-01

    We approach the topic of Classical group nilpotent orbits from the perspective of the moduli spaces of quivers, described in terms of Hilbert series and generating functions. We review the established Higgs and Coulomb branch quiver theory constructions for A series nilpotent orbits. We present systematic constructions for BCD series nilpotent orbits on the Higgs branches of quiver theories defined by canonical partitions; this paper collects earlier work into a systematic framework, filling in gaps and providing a complete treatment. We find new Coulomb branch constructions for above minimal nilpotent orbits, including some based upon twisted affine Dynkin diagrams. We also discuss aspects of 3 d mirror symmetry between these Higgs and Coulomb branch constructions and explore dualities and other relationships, such as HyperKähler quotients, between quivers. We analyse all Classical group nilpotent orbit moduli spaces up to rank 4 by giving their unrefined Hilbert series and the Highest Weight Generating functions for their decompositions into characters of irreducible representations and/or Hall Littlewood polynomials.

  17. Flow-induced aggregation of colloidal particles in viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Donglin; Qiao, Greg G.; Dunstan, Dave E.

    2016-08-01

    The flow-induced aggregation of dilute colloidal polystyrene nanoparticles suspended in Newtonian and viscoelastic solutions is reported. A rheo-optical method has been used to detect real-time aggregation processes via measuring optical absorption or scattering in a quartz Couette cell. The observed absorbance decreases over time are attributed to the flow-induced coagulation. Numerical simulations show that the aggregation processes still follow the Smoluchowski coagulation equation in a revised version. Suspensions in a series of media are studied to evaluate the effect of the media rheological properties on the particle aggregation. The data shows that elasticity reduces the aggregation while the solution viscosity enhances the aggregation processes.

  18. Soap Bubble Elasticity: Analysis and Correlation with Foam Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakashev, S. I.; Tsekov, R.; Manev, E. D.; Nguyen, A. V.

    2010-05-01

    A correlation between the elastic modulus of soap bubble and the foam stability was found. A model system was chosen: a soap bubble stabilized by simple nonionic surfactant tetraethylene glycol octyl ether (C8E4) and 10^-5 M NaCl. The Elastic moduli were determined by periodical expansion and shrinking of foam bubbles with frequency of 0.1 Hz and volumetric amplitude of 2 mm 3. The film tension was monitored via commercial profile analysis tensiometer (Sinterface Technologies, GmbH). The elastic moduli of foam bubbles versus surfactant concentration in the range of 2x10^-3 - 10^-2 M were obtained. In addition, the theory of Lucassen and van den Tempel for the elastic modulus of single liquid/air interface at given frequency was exploited as well. The bulk diffusion coefficient of the surfactant molecules is unknown parameter through the adsorption frequency in this theory. Hence, a fitting procedure (with one free parameter) was conducted matching experimental and theoretical data. The value of the bulk diffusion coefficient of C8E4 obtained was 5.1x10^-11 m^2/s, which is an order of magnitude lower value than what is expected for. The foam was generated by shaking method and left to decay. A correlation between the elastic modulus and foam life time upon surfactant concentration was found.

  19. Impact of Hydration Media on Ex Vivo Corneal Elasticity Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Janice; Ziebarth, Noël M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine the effect of hydration media on ex vivo corneal elasticity. Methods Experiments were conducted on forty porcine eyes retrieved from an abattoir (10 eyes each for PBS, BSS, Optisol, 15% Dextran). The epithelium was removed and the cornea was excised with an intact scleral rim and placed in 20% Dextran overnight to restore its physiological thickness. For each hydration media, corneas were evenly divided into two groups: one with an intact scleral rim and the other without. Corneas were mounted onto a custom chamber and immersed in a hydration medium for elasticity testing. While in each medium, corneal elasticity measurements were performed for 2 hours: at 5-minute intervals for the first 30 minutes and then 15-minute intervals for the remaining 90 minutes. Elasticity testing was performed using nanoindentation with spherical indenters and Young’s modulus was calculated using the Hertz model. Thickness measurements were taken before and after elasticity testing. Results The percentage change in corneal thickness and elasticity was calculated for each hydration media group. BSS, PBS, and Optisol showed an increase in thickness and Young’s moduli for corneas with and without an intact scleral rim. 15% Dextran exhibited a dehydrating effect on corneal thickness and provided stable maintenance of corneal elasticity for both groups. Conclusions Hydration media affects the stability of corneal thickness and elasticity measurements over time. 15% Dextran was most effective in maintaining corneal hydration and elasticity, followed by Optisol. PMID:25603443

  20. Single-Crystal Elasticity of Earth Materials: An Appraisal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, T. S.

    2015-12-01

    The elastic properties of minerals are of central importance for interpreting seismic data for the Earth's crust, mantle, and core. Mineral elasticity data also have more general applications towards understanding equations of state, phase equilibria, interatomic forces, material strength, and phase transitions. The singe-crystal elastic properties are the most generally useful as they provide complete information on the anisotropy of elastic moduli (e.g. Poisson's ratio, Young's modulus), sound velocities, and compressibility. Measurement of the full set of single-crystal elastic properties remains challenging especially for lower symmetry crystals. In this talk, I present an overview of our current understanding of single-crystal elasticity based on a newly constructed database of single-crystal elastic properties. At ambient conditions the full elastic tensor of about 150 minerals have now been measured, along with about another 60 related compounds that are not formally minerals. About two-thirds of the measured minerals are oxides or silicates. A limitation of the existing database is that only about 10% of the measurements are on crystals of monoclinic or triclinic symmetry, while these two systems account for about 40% of known minerals. Additionally, only a smaller subset of minerals have been examined at high pressure or temperature conditions. Several applications of the database will be presented emphasizing trends in elastic anisotropy. The pyroxenes will be used as an illustrative example.

  1. A novel method to determine the elastic modulus of extremely soft materials.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Tamás; Zrínyi, Miklós

    2015-06-07

    Determination of the elastic moduli of extremely soft materials that may deform under their own weight is a rather difficult experimental task. A new method has been elaborated by means of which the elastic modulus of such materials can be determined. This method is generally applicable to all soft materials with purely neo-Hookean elastic deformation behaviour with elastic moduli lower than 1 kPa. Our novel method utilises the self-deformation of pendent gel cylinders under gravity. When suspended, the material at the very top bears the weight of the entire gel cylinder, but that at the bottom carries no load at all. Due to the non-uniform stress distribution along the gel sample both the stress and the resulting strain show position dependence. The cross-sectional area of the material is lowest at the top of the sample and gradually increases towards its bottom. The equilibrium geometry of the pendant gel is used to evaluate the elastic modulus. Experimental data obtained by the proposed new method were compared to the results obtained from underwater measurements. The parameters affecting the measurement uncertainty were studied by a Pareto analysis of a series of adaptive Monte Carlo simulations. It has been shown that our method provides an easily achievable method to provide an accurate determination of the elastic modulus of extremely soft matter typically applicable for moduli below 1 kPa.

  2. Dynamic bulk and shear moduli due to grain-scale local fluid flow in fluid-saturated cracked poroelastic rocks: Theoretical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yongjia; Hu, Hengshan; Rudnicki, John W.

    2016-07-01

    Grain-scale local fluid flow is an important loss mechanism for attenuating waves in cracked fluid-saturated poroelastic rocks. In this study, a dynamic elastic modulus model is developed to quantify local flow effect on wave attenuation and velocity dispersion in porous isotropic rocks. The Eshelby transform technique, inclusion-based effective medium model (the Mori-Tanaka scheme), fluid dynamics and mass conservation principle are combined to analyze pore-fluid pressure relaxation and its influences on overall elastic properties. The derivation gives fully analytic, frequency-dependent effective bulk and shear moduli of a fluid-saturated porous rock. It is shown that the derived bulk and shear moduli rigorously satisfy the Biot-Gassmann relationship of poroelasticity in the low-frequency limit, while they are consistent with isolated-pore effective medium theory in the high-frequency limit. In particular, a simplified model is proposed to quantify the squirt-flow dispersion for frequencies lower than stiff-pore relaxation frequency. The main advantage of the proposed model over previous models is its ability to predict the dispersion due to squirt flow between pores and cracks with distributed aspect ratio instead of flow in a simply conceptual double-porosity structure. Independent input parameters include pore aspect ratio distribution, fluid bulk modulus and viscosity, and bulk and shear moduli of the solid grain. Physical assumptions made in this model include (1) pores are inter-connected and (2) crack thickness is smaller than the viscous skin depth. This study is restricted to linear elastic, well-consolidated granular rocks.

  3. Elastic response of thermal spray deposits under indentation tests

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, S.H.; Lin, C.K.; Berndt, C.C.

    1997-08-01

    The elastic response behavior of thermal spray deposits at Knoop indentations has been investigated using indentation techniques. The ration of hardness to elastic modulus, which is an important prerequisite for the evaluation of indentation fracture toughness, is determined by measuring the elastic recovery of the in-surface dimensions of Knoop indentations. The elastic moduli of thermal spray deposits are in the range of 12%--78% of the comparable bulk materials and reveal the anisotropic behavior of thermal spray deposits. A variety of thermal spray deposits has been examined, including Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, yttria-stabilized ZrO{sub 2} (YSZ), and NiAl. Statistical tools have been used to evaluate the error estimates of the data.

  4. Structure and elastic properties of smectic liquid crystalline elastomer films.

    PubMed

    Stannarius, R; Köhler, R; Dietrich, U; Lösche, M; Tolksdorf, C; Zentel, R

    2002-04-01

    Mechanical measurements, x-ray investigations, and optical microscopy are employed to characterize the interplay of chemical composition, network topology, and elastic response of smectic liquid crystalline elastomers (LCEs) in various mesophases. Macroscopically ordered elastomer films of submicrometer thicknesses were prepared by cross linking freely suspended smectic polymer films. The cross-linked material preserves the mesomorphism and phase transitions of the precursor polymer. The elastic response of the smectic LCE is entropic, and the corresponding elastic moduli are of the order of MPa. In the tilted ferroelectric smectic-C* phase, the network structure plays an important role. Due to the coupling of elastic network deformations to the orientation of the mesogenic groups in interlayer cross-linked materials (mesogenic cross-linker units), the stress-strain characteristics is found to differ qualitatively from that in the other phases.

  5. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, T.I.; Bolen, W.P.

    2007-01-01

    Construction aggregates, primarily stone, sand and gravel, are recovered from widespread naturally occurring mineral deposits and processed for use primarily in the construction industry. They are mined, crushed, sorted by size and sold loose or combined with portland cement or asphaltic cement to make concrete products to build roads, houses, buildings, and other structures. Much smaller quantities are used in agriculture, cement manufacture, chemical and metallurgical processes, glass production and many other products.

  6. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Part of the Annual Commodities Review 1995. Production of construction aggregates such as crushed stone and construction sand and gravel showed a marginal increase in 1995. Most of the 1995 increases were due to funding for highway construction work. The major areas of concern to the industry included issues relating to wetlands classification and the classification of crystalline silica as a probable human carcinogen. Despite this, an increase in demand is anticipated for 1996.

  7. ElaStic: A tool for calculating second-order elastic constants from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golesorkhtabar, Rostam; Pavone, Pasquale; Spitaler, Jürgen; Puschnig, Peter; Draxl, Claudia

    2013-08-01

    Elastic properties play a key role in materials science and technology. The elastic tensors at any order are defined by the Taylor expansion of the elastic energy or stress in terms of the applied strain. In this paper, we present ElaStic, a tool that is able to calculate the full second-order elastic stiffness tensor for any crystal structure from ab initio total-energy and/or stress calculations. This tool also provides the elastic compliances tensor and applies the Voigt and Reuss averaging procedure in order to obtain an evaluation of the bulk, shear, and Young moduli as well as the Poisson ratio of poly-crystalline samples. In a first step, the space-group is determined. Then, a set of deformation matrices is selected, and the corresponding structure files are produced. In a next step, total-energy or stress calculations for each deformed structure are performed by a chosen density-functional theory code. The computed energies/stresses are fitted as polynomial functions of the applied strain in order to get derivatives at zero strain. The knowledge of these derivatives allows for the determination of all independent components of the elastic tensor. In this context, the accuracy of the elastic constants critically depends on the polynomial fit. Therefore, we carefully study how the order of the polynomial fit and the deformation range influence the numerical derivatives, and we propose a new approach to obtain the most reliable results. We have applied ElaStic to representative materials for each crystal system, using total energies and stresses calculated with the full-potential all-electron codes exciting and WIEN2k as well as the pseudo-potential code Quantum ESPRESSO.

  8. Exact moduli space metrics for hyperbolic vortex polygons

    SciTech Connect

    Krusch, S.; Speight, J. M.

    2010-02-15

    Exact metrics on some totally geodesic submanifolds of the moduli space of static hyperbolic N-vortices are derived. These submanifolds, denoted as {sigma}{sub n,m}, are spaces of C{sub n}-invariant vortex configurations with n single vortices at the vertices of a regular polygon and m=N-n coincident vortices at the polygon's center. The geometric properties of {sigma}{sub n,m} are investigated, and it is found that {sigma}{sub n,n-1} is isometric to the hyperbolic plane of curvature -(3{pi}n){sup -1}. The geodesic flow on {sigma}{sub n,m} and a geometrically natural variant of geodesic flow recently proposed by Collie and Tong ['The dynamics of Chern-Simons vortices', Phys. Rev. D Part. Fields Gravit. Cosmol. 78, 065013 (2008);e-print arXiv:hep-th/0805.0602] are analyzed in detail.

  9. Instanton transition in thermal and moduli deformed de Sitter cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kounnas, Costas; Partouche, Hervé

    2008-04-01

    We consider the de Sitter cosmology deformed by the presence of a thermal bath of radiation and/or time-dependent moduli fields. Depending on the parameters, either a first or second-order phase transition can occur. In the first case, an instanton allows a double analytic continuation. It induces a probability to enter the inflationary evolution by tunnel effect from another cosmological solution. The latter starts with a big bang and, in the case the transition does not occur, ends with a big crunch. A temperature duality exchanges the two cosmological branches. In the limit where the pure de Sitter universe is recovered, the tunnel effect reduces to a “creation from nothing”, due to the vanishing of the big bang branch. However, the latter may be viable in some range of the deformation parameter. In the second case, there is a smooth evolution from a big bang to the inflationary phase.

  10. Second virial coefficient and mechanical moduli of metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wan Qiang

    2013-10-01

    The relationship between the bulk, shear moduli and second virial coefficient of amorphous materials is derived according to their dependences with the radial distribution function. Lennard-Jones-Gaussian potential is used to investigate the relationship between second virial coefficient and temperature, where Lennard-Jones potential represents interactions with the nearest neighbor atoms, and Gaussian potential is responsible for the multi-atom interactions including the next nearest neighbor atoms and heterogeneous structures for a metallic glass. The results show that deep potential well formed by Gaussian potential causes a large second virial coefficient at low temperatures, which is very obvious for the larger fragility glasses. The quadratic form relationship of shear modulus and compositions is proposed, and confirmed by the experimental results of PdxNi100-x-20P20 alloy.

  11. Nonaffine rubber elasticity for stiff polymer networks.

    PubMed

    Heussinger, Claus; Schaefer, Boris; Frey, Erwin

    2007-09-01

    We present a theory for the elasticity of cross-linked stiff polymer networks. Stiff polymers, unlike their flexible counterparts, are highly anisotropic elastic objects. Similar to mechanical beams, stiff polymers easily deform in bending, while they are much stiffer with respect to tensile forces ("stretching"). Unlike in previous approaches, where network elasticity is derived from the stretching mode, our theory properly accounts for the soft bending response. A self-consistent effective medium approach is used to calculate the macroscopic elastic moduli starting from a microscopic characterization of the deformation field in terms of "floppy modes"-low-energy bending excitations that retain a high degree of nonaffinity. The length scale characterizing the emergent nonaffinity is given by the "fiber length" lf, defined as the scale over which the polymers remain straight. The calculated scaling properties for the shear modulus are in excellent agreement with the results of recent simulations obtained in two-dimensional model networks. Furthermore, our theory can be applied to rationalize bulk rheological data in reconstituted actin networks.

  12. Aggregate breakdown of nanoparticulate titania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, Navin

    Six nanosized titanium dioxide powders synthesized from a sulfate process were investigated. The targeted end-use of this powder was for a de-NOx catalyst honeycomb monolith. Alteration of synthesis parameters had resulted principally in differences in soluble ion level and specific surface area of the powders. The goal of this investigation was to understand the role of synthesis parameters in the aggregation behavior of these powders. Investigation via scanning electron microscopy of the powders revealed three different aggregation iterations at specific length scales. Secondary and higher order aggregate strength was investigated via oscillatory stress rheometry as a means of simulating shear conditions encountered during extrusion. G' and G'' were measured as a function of the applied oscillatory stress. Oscillatory rheometry indicated a strong variation as a function of the sulfate level of the particles in the viscoelastic yield strengths. Powder yield stresses ranged from 3.0 Pa to 24.0 Pa of oscillatory stress. Compaction curves to 750 MPa found strong similarities in extrapolated yield point of stage I and II compaction for each of the powders (at approximately 500 MPa) suggesting that the variation in sulfate was greatest above the primary aggregate level. Scanning electron microscopy of samples at different states of shear in oscillatory rheometry confirmed the variation in the linear elastic region and the viscous flow regime. A technique of this investigation was to approach aggregation via a novel perspective: aggregates are distinguished as being loose open structures that are highly disordered and stochastic in nature. The methodology used was to investigate the shear stresses required to rupture the various aggregation stages encountered and investigate the attempt to realign the now free-flowing constituents comprising the aggregate into a denser configuration. Mercury porosimetry was utilized to measure the pore size of the compact resulting from

  13. New effective moduli of isotropic viscoelastic composites. Part I. Theoretical justification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetashkov, A. A.; Vakurov, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    According to the approach based on the commonality of problems of determining effective moduli of composites and viscoelastic solids, which properties are time-inhomogeneous, it is assumed that a viscoelastic solid is a two-component composite. One component displays temporal properties defined by a pair of Castiglianian-type effective moduli, and the other is defined by a pair of Lagrangian-type effective moduli. The Voigt and Reuss averaging is performed for the obtained two-composite solid with the introduction of a time function of volume fraction. In order to determine closer estimates, a method of iterative transformation of time effective moduli is applied to the viscoelastic Voigt-Reuss model. The physical justification of the method is provided. As a result, new time effective moduli of the viscoelastic solid are obtained which give a closer estimate of temporal properties as compared to the known models.

  14. Finite elastic-plastic deformation of polycrystalline metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwakuma, T.; Nemat-Nasser, S.

    1984-01-01

    Applying Hill's self-consistent method to finite elastic-plastic deformations, the overall moduli of polycrystalline solids are estimated. The model predicts a Bauschinger effect, hardening, and formation of vertex or corner on the yield surface for both microscopically non-hardening and hardening crystals. The changes in the instantaneous moduli with deformation are examined, and their asymptotic behavior, especially in relation to possible localization of deformations, is discussed. An interesting conclusion is that small second-order quantities, such as shape changes of grains and residual stresses (measured relative to the crystal elastic moduli), have a first-order effect on the overall response, as they lead to a loss of the overall stability by localized deformation. The predicted incipience of localization for a uniaxial deformation in two dimensions depends on the initial yield strain, but the orientation of localization is slightly less than 45 deg with respect to the tensile direction, although the numerical instability makes it very difficult to estimate this direction accurately.

  15. Radial elasticity of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Michael W. Smith, Cheol Park, Meng Zheng, Changhong Ke ,In-Tae Bae, Kevin Jordan

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the radial mechanical properties of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes (MW-BNNTs) using atomic force microscopy. The employed MW-BNNTs were synthesized using pressurized vapor/condenser (PVC) methods and were dispersed in aqueous solution using ultrasonication methods with the aid of ionic surfactants. Our nanomechanical measurements reveal the elastic deformational behaviors of individual BNNTs with two to four tube walls in their transverse directions. Their effective radial elastic moduli were obtained through interpreting their measured radial deformation profiles using Hertzian contact mechanics models. Our results capture the dependences of the effective radial moduli of MW-BNNTs on both the tube outer diameter and the number of tube layers. The effective radial moduli of double-walled BNNTs are found to be several-fold higher than those of single-walled BNNTs within the same diameter range. Our work contributes directly to a complete understanding of the fundamental structural and mechanical properties of BNNTs and the pursuits of their novel structural and electronics applications.

  16. Radial elasticity of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Meng; Ke, Changhong; Bae, In-Tae; Park, Cheol; Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin

    2012-03-09

    We investigated the radial mechanical properties of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes (MW-BNNTs) using atomic force microscopy. The employed MW-BNNTs were synthesized using pressurized vapor/condenser (PVC) methods and were dispersed in aqueous solution using ultrasonication methods with the aid of ionic surfactants. Our nanomechanical measurements reveal the elastic deformational behaviors of individual BNNTs with two to four tube walls in their transverse directions. Their effective radial elastic moduli were obtained through interpreting their measured radial deformation profiles using Hertzian contact mechanics models. Our results capture the dependences of the effective radial moduli of MW-BNNTs on both the tube outer diameter and the number of tube layers. The effective radial moduli of double-walled BNNTs are found to be several-fold higher than those of single-walled BNNTs within the same diameter range. Our work contributes directly to a complete understanding of the fundamental structural and mechanical properties of BNNTs and the pursuits of their novel structural and electronics applications.

  17. Radial elasticity of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Meng; Ke, Changhong; Bae, In-Tae; Park, Cheol; Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin

    2012-03-01

    We investigated the radial mechanical properties of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes (MW-BNNTs) using atomic force microscopy. The employed MW-BNNTs were synthesized using pressurized vapor/condenser (PVC) methods and were dispersed in aqueous solution using ultrasonication methods with the aid of ionic surfactants. Our nanomechanical measurements reveal the elastic deformational behaviors of individual BNNTs with two to four tube walls in their transverse directions. Their effective radial elastic moduli were obtained through interpreting their measured radial deformation profiles using Hertzian contact mechanics models. Our results capture the dependences of the effective radial moduli of MW-BNNTs on both the tube outer diameter and the number of tube layers. The effective radial moduli of double-walled BNNTs are found to be several-fold higher than those of single-walled BNNTs within the same diameter range. Our work contributes directly to a complete understanding of the fundamental structural and mechanical properties of BNNTs and the pursuits of their novel structural and electronics applications.

  18. Breakdown of nonlinear elasticity in stress-controlled thermal amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dailidonis, Vladimir; Ilyin, Valery; Procaccia, Itamar; Shor, Carmel A. B. Z.

    2017-03-01

    In recent work it was clarified that amorphous solids under strain control do not possess nonlinear elastic theory in the sense that the shear modulus exists but nonlinear moduli exhibit sample-to-sample fluctuations that grow without bound with the system size. More relevant, however, for experiments are the conditions of stress control. In the present Rapid Communication we show that also under stress control the shear modulus exists, but higher-order moduli show unbounded sample-to-sample fluctuation. The unavoidable consequence is that the characterization of stress-strain curves in experiments should be done with a stress-dependent shear modulus rather than with nonlinear expansions.

  19. Multi-scale imaging and elastic simulation of carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, Titly Farhana; Awedalkarim, Ahmed; Jouini, Mohamed Soufiane; Jouiad, Mustapha; Chevalier, Sylvie; Sassi, Mohamed

    2016-05-01

    Digital Rock Physics (DRP) is an emerging technology that can be used to generate high quality, fast and cost effective special core analysis (SCAL) properties compared to conventional experimental techniques and modeling techniques. The primary workflow of DRP conssits of three elements: 1) image the rock sample using high resolution 3D scanning techniques (e.g. micro CT, FIB/SEM), 2) process and digitize the images by segmenting the pore and matrix phases 3) simulate the desired physical properties of the rocks such as elastic moduli and velocities of wave propagation. A Finite Element Method based algorithm, that discretizes the basic Hooke's Law equation of linear elasticity and solves it numerically using a fast conjugate gradient solver, developed by Garboczi and Day [1] is used for mechanical and elastic property simulations. This elastic algorithm works directly on the digital images by treating each pixel as an element. The images are assumed to have periodic constant-strain boundary condition. The bulk and shear moduli of the different phases are required inputs. For standard 1.5" diameter cores however the Micro-CT scanning reoslution (around 40 μm) does not reveal smaller micro- and nano- pores beyond the resolution. This results in an unresolved "microporous" phase, the moduli of which is uncertain. Knackstedt et al. [2] assigned effective elastic moduli to the microporous phase based on self-consistent theory (which gives good estimation of velocities for well cemented granular media). Jouini et al. [3] segmented the core plug CT scan image into three phases and assumed that micro porous phase is represented by a sub-extracted micro plug (which too was scanned using Micro-CT). Currently the elastic numerical simulations based on CT-images alone largely overpredict the bulk, shear and Young's modulus when compared to laboratory acoustic tests of the same rocks. For greater accuracy of numerical simulation prediction, better estimates of moduli inputs

  20. Nonuniform elastic properties of macromolecules and effect of prestrain on their continuum nature.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Ankush; May, Eric R; Brooks, Charles L; Klug, William S

    2016-01-01

    Many experimental and theoretical methods have been developed to calculate the coarse-grained continuum elastic properties of macromolecules. However, all of those methods assume uniform elastic properties. Following the continuum mechanics framework, we present a systematic way of calculating the nonuniform effective elastic properties from atomic thermal fluctuations obtained from molecular dynamics simulation at any coarse-grained scale using a potential of the mean-force approach. We present the results for a mutant of Sesbania mosaic virus capsid, where we calculate the elastic moduli at different scales and observe an apparent problem with the chosen reference configuration in some cases. We present a possible explanation using an elastic network model, where inducing random prestrain results in a similar behavior. This phenomenon provides a novel insight into the continuum nature of macromolecules and defines the limits on details that the elasticity theory can capture. Further investigation into prestrains could elucidate important aspects of conformational dynamics of macromolecules.

  1. Elastic constants of a Laves phase compound: C15 NbCr{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Ormeci, A. |; Chu, F.; Wills, J.M.; Chen, S.P.; Albers, R.C.; Thoma, D.J.; Mitchell, T.E.

    1997-04-01

    The single-crystal elastic constants of C15 NbCr{sub 2} have been computed by using a first-principles, self-consistent, full-potential total energy method. From these single-crystal elastic constants the isotropic elastic moduli are calculated using the Voigt and Reuss averages. The calculated values are in fair agreement with the experimental values. The implications of the results are discussed with regards to Poisson`s ratio and the direction dependence of Young`s modulus.

  2. Computer Simulation of the Elastic Properties of Titanium Alloys for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estevez, Elsa Paz; Burganova, R. M.; Lysogorskii, Yu. V.

    2016-09-01

    Results of a computer simulation of the elastic properties of α+β- and β-titanium alloys, used for medical purposes, within the framework of the molecular-dynamics method are presented. It is shown that β-titanium alloys are best suited for the use as bone implants because of their small moduli of elasticity. The advisability of the use of the molecular-dynamics method for the study of the elastic properties of titanium alloys, serving as bone implants, is demonstrated.

  3. Elastic properties of compressed rare-gas crystals in a model of deformable atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbenko, Ie. Ie.; Troitskaya, E. P.; Pilipenko, E. A.

    2017-01-01

    The elastic properties of compressed Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe rare-gas crystals were studied in a model of deformable and polarizable atoms. The second-order Fuchs elasticity moduli, their pressure derivatives, and the Zener elastic anisotropy ratio were calculated with allowance for three-body interaction and quadrupole deformation in electron shells within a wide pressure range. Comparison with the experiment and results of other authors was performed. In xenon at a compression of 0.6, the shear modulus B 44 was observed to become zero, thus corresponding to the FCC-HCP transition at 75 GPa.

  4. Theoretical calculations of structural, electronic, and elastic properties of CdSe1-x Te x : A first principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, Shakil; Muhammad, Zafar; Shabbir, Ahmed; Muhammad Raza-ur-rehman, Hashmi; M, A. Choudhary; T, Iqbal

    2016-07-01

    The plane wave pseudo-potential method was used to investigate the structural, electronic, and elastic properties of CdSe1-x Te x in the zinc blende phase. It is observed that the electronic properties are improved considerably by using LDA+U as compared to the LDA approach. The calculated lattice constants and bulk moduli are also comparable to the experimental results. The cohesive energies for pure CdSe and CdTe binary and their mixed alloys are calculated. The second-order elastic constants are also calculated by the Lagrangian theory of elasticity. The elastic properties show that the studied material has a ductile nature.

  5. Elastic properties of C40 transition metal disilicides

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, F.; Maloy, S.A.; Petrovic, J.J.; Mitchell, T.E.; Lei, M.

    1996-08-01

    Room-temperature and low temperature elastic properties of hexagonal C40 transition metal disilicides, NbSi{sub 2} and TaSi{sub 2}, have been studied using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS). All five independent elastic stiffness constants c{sub ij} for NbSi{sub 2} and TaSi{sub 2} single crystals have been obtained. The temperature dependence of the c{sub ij} is normal but not large. The orientation dependence of the Young`s and shear moduli was examined in comparison with other transition metal disilicides. The room temperature shear moduli in the {l_brace}0001{r_brace} plane, with values of 145.3 and 143.7 GPa for NbSi{sub 2} and TaSi{sub 2} respectively, are low relative to those in the equivalent pseudo hexagonal {l_brace}220{r_brace} close-packed plane for tetragonal C11{sub b} MoSi{sub 2} and WSi{sub 2}. The isotropic elastic constants for polycrystalline materials were also calculated. The results show that the various moduli are all much higher than those of the constituent elements. The room temperature Poisson`s ratios of NbSi{sub 2} and TaSi{sub 2} are 0.18 and 0.19, respectively, which are smaller than those of the constituent elements and smaller than most materials. The Debye temperatures, {theta}{sub D}, were estimated to be 688 K for NbSi{sub 2} and 552 K for TaSi{sub 2}. The elastic properties of C40 VSi{sub 2}, NbSi{sub 2}, TaSi{sub 2}, and CrSi{sub 2} and C11{sub b} MoSi{sub 2} and WSi{sub 2} are compared and the possible influence on mechanical behavior discussed.

  6. WE-E-9A-01: Ultrasound Elasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Emelianov, S; Hall, T; Bouchard, R

    2014-06-15

    Principles and techniques of ultrasound-based elasticity imaging will be presented, including quasistatic strain imaging, shear wave elasticity imaging, and their implementations in available systems. Deeper exploration of quasistatic methods, including elastic relaxation, and their applications, advantages, artifacts and limitations will be discussed. Transient elastography based on progressive and standing shear waves will be explained in more depth, along with applications, advantages, artifacts and limitations, as will measurement of complex elastic moduli. Comparisons will be made between ultrasound radiation force techniques, MR elastography, and the simple A mode plus mechanical plunger technique. Progress in efforts, such as that by the Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance, to reduce the differences in the elastic modulus reported by different commercial systems will be explained. Dr. Hall is on an Advisory Board for Siemens Ultrasound and has a research collaboration with them, including joint funding by R01CA140271 for nonlinear elasticity imaging. Learning Objectives: Be reminded of the long history of palpation of tissue elasticity for critical medical diagnosis and the relatively recent advances to be able to image tissue strain in response to an applied force. Understand the differences between shear wave speed elasticity measurement and imaging and understand the factors affecting measurement and image frame repletion rates. Understand shear wave propagation effects that can affect measurements, such as essentially lack of propagation in fluids and boundary effects, so important in thin layers. Know characteristics of available elasticity imaging phantoms, their uses and limitations. Understand thermal and cavitational limitations affecting radiation force-based shear wave imaging. Have learning and references adequate to for you to use in teaching elasticity imaging to residents and technologists. Be able to explain how elasticity measurement

  7. Magnetic charge lattices, moduli spaces and fusion rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampmeijer, L.; Slingerland, J. K.; Schroers, B. J.; Bais, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the labelling and fusion properties of magnetic charge sectors consisting of smooth BPS monopoles in Yang-Mills-Higgs theory with arbitrary gauge group G spontaneously broken to a subgroup H. The magnetic charges are restricted by a generalized Dirac quantization condition and by an inequality due to Murray. Geometrically, the set of allowed charges is a solid cone in the coroot lattice of G, which we call the Murray cone. We argue that magnetic charge sectors correspond to points in this cone divided by the Weyl group of H so that magnetic charge sectors are labelled by dominant integral weights of the dual group H. We define generators of the Murray cone modulo Weyl group, and interpret the monopoles in the associated magnetic charge sectors as basic; monopoles in sectors with decomposable charges are interpreted as composite configurations. This interpretation is supported by the dimensionality of the moduli spaces associated to the magnetic charges and by classical fusion properties for smooth monopoles in particular cases. Throughout the paper we compare our findings with corresponding results for singular monopoles recently obtained by Kapustin and Witten.

  8. Explaining the electroweak scale and stabilizing moduli in M theory

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, Bobby S.; Bobkov, Konstantin; Kane, Gordon L.; Kumar, Piyush; Shao Jing

    2007-12-15

    In a recent paper [B. Acharya, K. Bobkov, G. Kane, P. Kumar, and D. Vaman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 191601 (2006).] it was shown that in fluxless M theory vacua with at least two hidden sectors undergoing strong gauge dynamics and a particular form of the Kaehler potential, all moduli are stabilized by the effective potential and a stable hierarchy is generated, consistent with standard gauge unification. This paper explains the results of [B. Acharya, K. Bobkov, G. Kane, P. Kumar, and D. Vaman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 191601 (2006).] in more detail and generalizes them, finding an essentially unique de Sitter vacuum under reasonable conditions. One of the main phenomenological consequences is a prediction which emerges from this entire class of vacua: namely, gaugino masses are significantly suppressed relative to the gravitino mass. We also present evidence that, for those vacua in which the vacuum energy is small, the gravitino mass, which sets all the superpartner masses, is automatically in the TeV-100 TeV range.

  9. Perturbations and moduli space dynamics of tachyon kinks

    SciTech Connect

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Li Huiquan

    2008-03-15

    The dynamic process of unstable D-branes decaying into stable ones with one dimension lower can be described by a tachyon field with a Dirac-Born-Infeld effective action. In this paper we investigate the fluctuation modes of the tachyon field around a two-parameter family of static solutions representing an array of brane-antibrane pairs. Besides a pair of zero modes associated with the parameters of the solution, and instabilities associated with annihilation of the brane-antibrane pairs, we find states corresponding to excitations of the tachyon field around the brane and in the bulk. In the limit that the brane thickness tends to zero, the support of the eigenmodes is limited to the brane, consistent with the idea that propagating tachyon modes drop out of the spectrum as the tachyon field approaches its ground state. The zero modes, and other low-lying excited states, show a fourfold degeneracy in this limit, which can be identified with some of the massless superstring modes in the brane-antibrane system. Finally, we also discuss the slow motion of the solution corresponding to the decay process in the moduli space, finding a trajectory which oscillates periodically between the unstable D-brane and the brane-antibrane pairs of one dimension lower.

  10. In-situ Young's moduli of the constitutive layers in a solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Amit; Shyam, Amit; Liu, Zhien; Goettler, Richard

    2015-01-01

    In-situ Young's moduli of thin constituent layers of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) are needed to estimate the mechanical reliability of the fuel cell unit. Because a robust technique to measure the same is not available, an improved methodology is proposed to determine the in-situ Young's moduli of thin ceramic layers of a substrate-supported SOFC. The measured Young's moduli of the constituent layers were found to be close to those of corresponding bulk materials using the resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) technique but were different from the values obtained using nanoindentation.

  11. Shear moduli in bcc-fcc structure transition of colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongwei; Xu, Shenghua; Sun, Zhiwei; Zhu, Ruzeng

    2015-10-14

    Shear moduli variation in the metastable-stable structure transition of charged colloidal crystals was investigated by the combination techniques of torsional resonance spectroscopy and reflection spectrometer. Modulus of the system increases with the proceeding of the transition process and it finally reaches the maximum value at the end of the transition. For colloidal crystals in stable state, the experimental moduli show good consistence with theoretical expectations. However, in the transition process, the moduli are much smaller than theoretical ones and this can be chalked up to crystalline imperfection in the transition state.

  12. Shear moduli in bcc-fcc structure transition of colloidal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongwei; Xu, Shenghua; Sun, Zhiwei; Zhu, Ruzeng

    2015-10-01

    Shear moduli variation in the metastable-stable structure transition of charged colloidal crystals was investigated by the combination techniques of torsional resonance spectroscopy and reflection spectrometer. Modulus of the system increases with the proceeding of the transition process and it finally reaches the maximum value at the end of the transition. For colloidal crystals in stable state, the experimental moduli show good consistence with theoretical expectations. However, in the transition process, the moduli are much smaller than theoretical ones and this can be chalked up to crystalline imperfection in the transition state.

  13. Structure, stability and elasticity of DNA nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Himanshu; Dwaraknath, Anjan; Maiti, Prabal K

    2015-01-14

    DNA nanotubes are tubular structures composed of DNA crossover molecules. We present a bottom up approach for the construction and characterization of these structures. Various possible topologies of nanotubes are constructed such as 6-helix, 8-helix and tri-tubes with different sequences and lengths. We have used fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to study the structure, stability and elasticity of these structures. Several nanosecond long MD simulations give the microscopic details about DNA nanotubes. Based on the structural analysis of simulation data, we show that 6-helix nanotubes are stable and maintain their tubular structure; while 8-helix nanotubes are flattened to stabilize themselves. We also comment on the sequence dependence and the effect of overhangs. These structures are approximately four times more rigid having a stretch modulus of ∼4000 pN compared to the stretch modulus of 1000 pN of a DNA double helix molecule of the same length and sequence. The stretch moduli of these nanotubes are also three times larger than those of PX/JX crossover DNA molecules which have stretch moduli in the range of 1500-2000 pN. The calculated persistence length is in the range of a few microns which is close to the reported experimental results on certain classes of DNA nanotubes.

  14. Ab initio study of thermodynamic, electronic, magnetic, structural, and elastic properties of Ni4N allotropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemzalová, P.; Friák, M.; Šob, M.; Ma, D.; Udyansky, A.; Raabe, D.; Neugebauer, J.

    2013-11-01

    We have employed parameter-free density functional theory calculations to study the thermodynamic stability and structural parameters as well as elastic and electronic properties of Ni4N in eight selected crystallographic phases. In agreement with the experimental findings, the cubic structure with Pearson symbol cP5, space group Pm3¯m (221) is found to be the most stable and it is also the only thermodynamically stable structure at T=0 K with respect to decomposition to the elemental Ni crystal and N2 gas phase. We determine structural parameters, bulk moduli, and their pressure derivatives for all eight allotropes. The thermodynamic stability and bulk modulus is shown to be anticorrelated. Comparing ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic states, we find common features between the magnetism of elemental Ni and studied ferromagnetic Ni4N structures. For the ground-state Ni4N structure and other two Ni4N cubic allotropes, we predict a complete set of single-crystalline elastic constants (in the equilibrium and under hydrostatic pressure), the Young and area moduli, as well as homogenized polycrystalline elastic moduli obtained by different homogenization methods. We demonstrate that the elastic anisotropy of the ground-state Ni4N is qualitatively opposite to that in the elemental Ni, i.e., these materials have hard and soft crystallographic directions interchanged. Moreover, one of the studied metastable cubic phases is found auxetic, i.e., exhibiting negative Poisson ratio.

  15. Elastic Rock Heterogeneity Controls Brittle Rock Failure during Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenbruch, C.; Shapiro, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    For interpretation and inversion of microseismic data it is important to understand, which properties of the reservoir rock control the occurrence probability of brittle rock failure and associated seismicity during hydraulic stimulation. This is especially important, when inverting for key properties like permeability and fracture conductivity. Although it became accepted that seismic events are triggered by fluid flow and the resulting perturbation of the stress field in the reservoir rock, the magnitude of stress perturbations, capable of triggering failure in rocks, can be highly variable. The controlling physical mechanism of this variability is still under discussion. We compare the occurrence of microseismic events at the Cotton Valley gas field to elastic rock heterogeneity, obtained from measurements along the treatment wells. The heterogeneity is characterized by scale invariant fluctuations of elastic properties. We observe that the elastic heterogeneity of the rock formation controls the occurrence of brittle failure. In particular, we find that the density of events is increasing with the Brittleness Index (BI) of the rock, which is defined as a combination of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio. We evaluate the physical meaning of the BI. By applying geomechanical investigations we characterize the influence of fluctuating elastic properties in rocks on the probability of brittle rock failure. Our analysis is based on the computation of stress fluctuations caused by elastic heterogeneity of rocks. We find that elastic rock heterogeneity causes stress fluctuations of significant magnitude. Moreover, the stress changes necessary to open and reactivate fractures in rocks are strongly related to fluctuations of elastic moduli. Our analysis gives a physical explanation to the observed relation between elastic heterogeneity of the rock formation and the occurrence of brittle failure during hydraulic reservoir stimulations. A crucial factor for understanding

  16. Numerical Weil-Petersson metrics on moduli spaces of Calabi-Yau manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Julien; Lukic, Sergio

    2015-06-01

    We introduce a simple and very fast algorithm to compute Weil-Petersson metrics on moduli spaces of Calabi-Yau varieties. Additionally, we introduce a second algorithm to approximate the same metric using Donaldson's quantization link between infinite and finite dimensional Geometric Invariant Theoretical (GIT) quotients that describe moduli spaces of varieties. Although this second algorithm is slower and more sophisticated, it can also be used to compute similar metrics on other moduli spaces (e.g. moduli spaces of vector bundles on Calabi-Yau varieties). We study the convergence properties of both algorithms and provide explicit computer implementations using a family of Calabi-Yau quintic hypersurfaces in P4. Also, we include discussions on: the existing methods that are used to compute this class of metrics, the background material that we use to build our algorithms, and how to extend the second algorithm to the vector bundle case.

  17. Bubbles attenuate elastic waves at seismic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisato, Nicola; Quintal, Beatriz; Chapman, Samuel; Podladchikov, Yury; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The vertical migration of multiphase fluids in the crust can cause hazardous events such as eruptions, explosions, pollution and earthquakes. Although seismic tomography could potentially provide a detailed image of such fluid-saturated regions, the interpretation of the tomographic signals is often controversial and fails in providing a conclusive map of the subsurface saturation. Seismic tomography should be improved considering seismic wave attenuation (1/Q) and the dispersive elastic moduli which allow accounting for the energy lost by the propagating elastic wave. In particular, in saturated media a significant portion of the energy carried by the propagating wave is dissipated by the wave-induced-fluid-flow and the wave-induced-gas-exsolution-dissolution (WIGED) mechanisms. The WIGED mechanism describes how a propagating wave modifies the thermodynamic equillibrium between different fluid phases causing the exsolution and the dissolution of the gas in the liquid, which in turn causes a significant frequency dependent 1/Q and moduli dispersion. The WIGED theory was initially postulated for bubbly magmas but only recently was extended to bubbly water and experimentally demonstrated. Here we report these theory and laboratory experiments. Specifically, we present i) attenuation measurements performed by means of the Broad Band Attenuation Vessel on porous media saturated with water and different gases, and ii) numerical experiments validating the laboratory observations. Finally, we will extend the theory to fluids and to pressure-temperature conditions which are typical of phreatomagmatic and hydrocarbon domains and we will compare the propagation of seismic waves in bubble-free and bubble-bearing subsurface domains. With the present contribution we extend the knowledge about attenuation in rocks which are saturated with multiphase fluid demonstrating that the WIGED mechanism could be extremely important to image subsurface gas plumes.

  18. An effective medium theory for three-dimensional elastic heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Thomas H.

    2015-11-01

    A second-order Born approximation is used to formulate a self-consistent theory for the effective elastic parameters of stochastic media with ellipsoidal distributions of small-scale heterogeneity. The covariance of the stiffness tensor is represented as the product of a one-point tensor variance and a two-point scalar correlation function with ellipsoidal symmetry, which separates the statistical properties of the local anisotropy from those of the geometric anisotropy. The spatial variations can then be rescaled to an isotropic distribution by a simple metric transformation; the spherical average of the strain Green's function in the transformed space reduces to a constant Kneer tensor, and the second-order corrections to the effective elastic parameters are given by the contraction of the rescaled Kneer tensor against the single-point variance of the stiffness tensor. Explicit results are derived for stochastic models in which the heterogeneity is transversely isotropic and its second moments are characterized by a horizontal-to-vertical aspect ratio η. If medium is locally isotropic, the expressions for the anisotropic effective moduli reduce in the limit η → ∞ to Backus's second-order expressions for a 1-D stochastic laminate. Comparisons with the exact Backus theory show that the second-order approximation predicts the effective anisotropy for non-Gaussian media fairly well for relative rms fluctuations in the moduli smaller than about 30 per cent. A locally anisotropic model is formulated in which the local elastic properties have hexagonal symmetry, guided by a Gaussian random vector field that is transversely isotropic and specified by a horizontal-to-vertical orientation ratio ξ. The self-consistent theory provides closed-form expressions for the dependence of the effective moduli on 0 < ξ < ∞ and 0 < η < ∞. The effective-medium parametrizations described here appear to be suitable for incorporation into tomographic modelling.

  19. Elastic laboratory measurements and modeling of saturated basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Ludmila; Otheim, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the elastic behavior of basalt is important to seismically monitor volcanoes, subsea basalts, and carbon sequestration in basalt. We estimate the elastic properties of basalt samples from the Snake River Plain, Idaho, at ultrasonic (0.8 MHz) and seismic (2-300 Hz) frequencies. To test the sensitivity of seismic waves to the fluid content in the pore structure, measurements are performed at three saturation conditions: saturated with liquid CO2, water, and dry. When CO2 replaces water, the P-wave velocity drops, on average, by 10%. Vesicles and cracks, observed in the rock microstructure, control the relaxation of pore-fluid pressures in the rock as a wave propagates. The bulk and shear moduli of basalts saturated with liquid CO2 are not frequency dependent, suggesting that fluid pore pressures are in equilibrium between 2 Hz and 0.8 MHz. However, when samples are water saturated, the bulk modulus of the rock is frequency dependent. Modeling with Gassmann's equations predicts the measured saturated rock bulk modulus for all fluids for frequencies below 20 Hz but underpredicts the water-saturated basalt bulk modulus for frequencies greater than 20 Hz. The most likely reason is that the pore-fluid pressures are unrelaxed. Instead, the ultrasonic frequency rock moduli are modeled with high-frequency elastic theories of squirt flow and Kuster-Toksöz (KT). Although KT's model is based on idealized pore shapes, a combination of spheres (vesicles) and penny-shaped cracks (fractures) interpreted and quantified from petrographical data predicts the ultrasonic dry and saturated rock moduli for the measured basalts.

  20. A-thermal elastic behavior of silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabia, Mohammed Kamel; Degioanni, Simon; Martinet, Christine; Le Brusq, Jacques; Champagnon, Bernard; Vouagner, Dominique

    2016-02-01

    Depending on the composition of silicate glasses, their elastic moduli can increase or decrease as function of the temperature. Studying the Brillouin frequency shift of these glasses versus temperature allows the a-thermal composition corresponding to an intermediate glass to be determined. In an intermediate glass, the elastic moduli are independent of the temperature over a large temperature range. For sodium alumino-silicate glasses, the a-thermal composition is close to the albite glass (NaAlSi3O8). The structural origin of this property is studied by in situ high temperature Raman scattering. The structure of the intermediate albite glass and of silica are compared at different temperatures between room temperature and 600 °C. When the temperature increases, it is shown that the high frequency shift of the main band at 440 cm-1 in silica is a consequence of the cristobalite-like alpha-beta transformation of 6-membered rings. This effect is stronger in silica than bond elongation (anharmonic effects). As a consequence, the elastic moduli of silica increase as the temperature increases. In the albite glass, the substitution of 25% of Si4+ ions by Al3+ and Na+ ions decreases the proportion of SiO2 6-membered rings responsible for the silica anomaly. The effects of the silica anomaly balance the anharmonicity in albite glass and give rise to an intermediate a-thermal glass. Different networks, formers or modifiers, can be added to produce different a-thermal glasses with useful mechanical or chemical properties.

  1. Bagger-Witten line bundles on moduli spaces of elliptic curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Wei; Sharpe, Eric

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we discuss Bagger-Witten line bundles over moduli spaces of SCFTs. We review how in general they are “fractional” line bundles, not honest line bundles, twisted on triple overlaps. We discuss the special case of moduli spaces of elliptic curves in detail. There, the Bagger-Witten line bundle does not exist as an ordinary line bundle, but rather is necessarily fractional. As a fractional line bundle, it is nontrivial (though torsion) over the uncompactified moduli stack, and its restriction to the interior, excising corners with enhanced stabilizers, is also fractional. It becomes an honest line bundle on a moduli stack defined by a quotient of the upper half plane by a metaplectic group, rather than SL(2, ℤ). We review and compare to results of recent work arguing that well-definedness of the worldsheet metric implies that the Bagger-Witten line bundle admits a flat connection (which includes torsion bundles as special cases), and gives general arguments on the existence of universal structures on moduli spaces of SCFTs, in which superconformal deformation parameters are promoted to nondynamical fields ranging over the SCFT moduli space.

  2. The size-dependent elastic properties of nanofilms with surface effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jian-Gang; Zhao, Ya-Pu

    2005-10-01

    Size-dependent elastic constants are investigated theoretically with reference to a nanoscale single-crystal thin film. A three-dimensional (3D) model is presented with the relaxation on the surface of the nanofilm taken into consideration. The constitutive relation of the 3D model is derived by using the energy approach, and analytical expressions for the four nonzero elastic constants of the nanofilm are obtained. The size effects of the four elastic constants are then discussed, and the dependence of these elastic constants on the surface relaxation and the ambiguity in the definition of the thickness of the nanofilm are also analyzed. In addition, the elastic moduli of the nanofilm in two kinds of plane problem are obtained and discussed in the case of a special boundary condition.

  3. Determination of elastic modulus of the components at dentin-resin interface using the ultrasonic device.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tamayo; Miyazaki, Masashi; Inage, Hirohiko; Kurokawa, Hiroyasu

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the elastic moduli of the components at resin-dentin interface with the use of an ultrasonic device. Dentin plates were obtained from freshly extracted bovine incisors with a shape in rectangular form. Resin composites and bonding agents were polymerized and trimmed in the same shape as the dentin specimens. The ultrasonic equipment employed in this study was comprised of a Pulser-Receiver, transducers, and an oscilloscope. Each elastic modulus was determined by measuring the longitudinal and shear wave sound velocities. The mean elastic modulus of mineralized dentin was 17.4 GPa, while that of demineralized dentin was 1.4 GPa. When the demineralized dentin was immersed in bonding agents, the elastic modulus changed to 3.7-4.7 GPa, and these values were significantly higher than those of demineralized dentin. A gradient in elastic modulus was detected as the analysis shifted from the dentin side to the resin composite.

  4. Elastic properties computation and fluid substitution simulation from X-ray CT scan images in Middle East carbonates samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouini, M. S.; Vega, D. S.

    2010-12-01

    One of the most common problems in rock physics is the prediction of the elastic rock properties. Although about half hydrocarbons reserves in the world are in carbonate reservoir rocks, little has been published concerning their elastic properties. Fluid substitution experiments in laboratory are time consuming and can affect the original carbonate elastic rock properties, due to chemical interaction with fluids and re-crystallization. Nowadays, computational methods make possible to conduct complex, fast and realistic simulations of elasticity equations directly on digitized models. Carbonate digital structures can be obtained by a nondestructive technique using X-ray computed tomography scanner providing a 3-D structure representing rock density for each voxel. The main advantages of such a technique are to provide a data representative of core plug scale and to allow repeating indefinitely simulations without any impact in the original rock frame. In this paper, an image processing technique is used to segment automatically into rock matrix and pore space the digitalized structure of a high porosity carbonate reservoir samples in the Middle East. However due to the medium resolution of our data (20µm), we added a pre-processing step to enhance the contrast of the digitalized structure in order to improve the segmentation result (Fig). The rock elastic properties are then computed by simulating a static deformation experiment after assigning for each voxel its specific elastic moduli. The finite elements method is used to estimate local and average strains providing an estimation of bulk and shear moduli. Finally, we assume that linear elasticity laws are valid within the sample which allows converting elastic moduli into elastic-wave velocities. In order to validate these results, we compared our simulated elastic moduli with laboratory measurements in the carbonates samples under different saturation conditions: dried, oil saturated and brine saturated

  5. The asymptotic homogenization elasticity tensor properties for composites with material discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penta, Raimondo; Gerisch, Alf

    2017-01-01

    The classical asymptotic homogenization approach for linear elastic composites with discontinuous material properties is considered as a starting point. The sharp length scale separation between the fine periodic structure and the whole material formally leads to anisotropic elastic-type balance equations on the coarse scale, where the arising fourth rank operator is to be computed solving single periodic cell problems on the fine scale. After revisiting the derivation of the problem, which here explicitly points out how the discontinuity in the individual constituents' elastic coefficients translates into stress jump interface conditions for the cell problems, we prove that the gradient of the cell problem solution is minor symmetric and that its cell average is zero. This property holds for perfect interfaces only (i.e., when the elastic displacement is continuous across the composite's interface) and can be used to assess the accuracy of the computed numerical solutions. These facts are further exploited, together with the individual constituents' elastic coefficients and the specific form of the cell problems, to prove a theorem that characterizes the fourth rank operator appearing in the coarse-scale elastic-type balance equations as a composite material effective elasticity tensor. We both recover known facts, such as minor and major symmetries and positive definiteness, and establish new facts concerning the Voigt and Reuss bounds. The latter are shown for the first time without assuming any equivalence between coarse and fine-scale energies ( Hill's condition), which, in contrast to the case of representative volume elements, does not identically hold in the context of asymptotic homogenization. We conclude with instructive three-dimensional numerical simulations of a soft elastic matrix with an embedded cubic stiffer inclusion to show the profile of the physically relevant elastic moduli (Young's and shear moduli) and Poisson's ratio at increasing (up to

  6. The Elastic Properties of Natural Portlandite Ca(OH)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speziale, S.; Reichmann, H. J.; Schilling, F.; Wenk, H. R.; Monteiro, P. J.

    2007-12-01

    Portlandite, Ca(OH) 2, is a simple hydroxide with brucite structure (space group P~{3}m1). It is built up of layers of CaO6 octahedra stacked along the c-axis. Portlandite is of basic interest for the cement and concrete research and industries, because it is a major primary solid phase in hydrated portland cement. It is therefore of particular importance to determine the elastic properties of portlandite. So far a computational (Laugesen, 2005) and an experimental (Holuj et al., 1985) study reported the single crystal elastic moduli Cij. However, these results differ significantly in some off-diagonal moduli. We performed Brillouin spectroscopy measurements on natural single crystal portlandite at ambient conditions. Our measurements have been performed in a new Brillouin laboratory set up at the Geoforschungszentrum, Potsdam. The new system features an Eulerian cradle with an inner diameter of 400 mm, and it has been designed to accommodate an internally heated diamond anvil cell to perform Brillouin measurements at high P and T conditions. We have obtained the following values for the elastic moduli (expressed in GPa followed by 1σ uncertainty in parentheses): C11 = 102.0 (2.0), C12 = 32.1 (1.0), C13 = 8.4 (0.4), C14 = 4.5 (0.2), C33 = 33.6 (0.7), C44 = 12.0 (0.3), C66 = (C11-C12)/2 = 35.0 (1.5). With our new measurements we put a better constraint on the value of C13 which is more than 2.5 times larger than reported by Holuj and coworkers, and is closer to the value calculated by Laugesen. A remarkable feature of the elastic behavior is the high elastic anisotropy of portlandite due to its highly anisotropic layered structure. The zero pressure Voigt and Reuss bounds to the adiabatic bulk modulus of portlandite are: K0SV = 37.3 (0.4) GPa and K0SR = 26.0 (0.3) GPa, with a 43% difference between the two bounds. The Voigt and Reuss bounds to the shear modulus are G0V = 24.4 (0.4) GPa and G0R = 17.5 (0.3) GPa, with a 40% difference between the two bounds. The

  7. Using capillary forces to determine the elastic properties of mesoporous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolley, E.; Garroum, N.; Grosman, A.

    2017-02-01

    The capillary forces in mesoporous materials, when imbibed with liquid, are large enough to induce mechanical deformations. Using anisotropic porous silicon, we show that systematic measurements of strain as a function of the pore pressure can yield most of the elastic constants characterizing the porous matrix. The results of this poroelastic approach are in agreement with independent standard stress-strain measurements. The porosity dependence of Young's moduli as well as the values of Poisson's ratios are qualitatively consistent with porous silicon having a honeycomb structure. For a quantitative comparison, we performed finite element modeling of realistic pore geometries. The calculated elastic moduli are found to be much smaller than the measured ones. This is presumably due to both (i) finite-size effects, the Young's modulus of the 5-nm thick walls of the honeycomb could be notably smaller than the Young's modulus of bulk Si, and (ii) defects of the honeycomb structure along the pore axis.

  8. Effective-medium theory of elastic waves in random networks of rods.

    PubMed

    Katz, J I; Hoffman, J J; Conradi, M S; Miller, J G

    2012-06-01

    We formulate an effective medium (mean field) theory of a material consisting of randomly distributed nodes connected by straight slender rods, hinged at the nodes. Defining wavelength-dependent effective elastic moduli, we calculate both the static moduli and the dispersion relations of ultrasonic longitudinal and transverse elastic waves. At finite wave vector k the waves are dispersive, with phase and group velocities decreasing with increasing wave vector. These results are directly applicable to networks with empty pore space. They also describe the solid matrix in two-component (Biot) theories of fluid-filled porous media. We suggest the possibility of low density materials with higher ratios of stiffness and strength to density than those of foams, aerogels, or trabecular bone.

  9. High-precision study of time- and temperature-dependence of the elastic properties of 239Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorov, B.; Ramshaw, B. J.; Shekhter, A.; Betts, J. B.; Freibert, F.; Migliori, A.

    2015-03-01

    It is important to determine the origin of changes in elastic properties in 239Pu as a function of time. The measurement of mechanical resonance frequencies can be made with extreme precision and used to compute the elastic moduli without corrections giving important insight in this problem. The precision of these measurements enabled observation of changes in elastic properties of 1 part in 107 for measurements lasting hours up to several days. The most-likely source of these changes include a) ingrowth of radioactive decay products such as He and U, b) the introduction of radiation damage, c) phase instabilities associated with transformations to the delta phase or to Pu3Ga. Using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy, measurements were made of the mechanical resonance frequencies of 300mg cylinders of fine-grained polycrystalline alpha-phase 239Pu with about 600PPM Ga. We present the surprising result that at temperatures below 60K, there is a strong dependence on temperature of the rate of change of elastic moduli with time. Older results showed that the sign of this rate of change reverses at higher temperature. Such studies of nascent state are key to exploring damage evolution and its impact on specific volume and elastic moduli. Future studies will continue these measurements to above ambient temperatures.

  10. Ab initio study of electronic structure, elastic and optical properties of anti-perovskite type alkali metal oxyhalides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanna, J.; Yedukondalu, N.; Ramesh Babu, K.; Vaitheeswaran, G.

    2013-06-01

    We report the structural, elastic, electronic, and optical properties of antiperovskite alkali metal oxyhalides Na3OCl, Na3OBr, and K3OBr using two different density functional methods within generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Plane wave pseudo potential (PW-PP) method has been used to calculate the ground state structural and elastic properties while the electronic structure and optical properties are calculated explicitly using full potential-linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method. The calculated ground state properties of the investigated compounds agree quite well with the available experimental data. The predicted elastic constants using both PW-PP and FP-LAPW methods are in good accord with each other and show that the materials are mechanically stable. The low values of the elastic moduli indicate that these materials are soft in nature. The bulk properties such as shear moduli, Young's moduli, and Poisson's ratio are derived from the calculated elastic constants. Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson (TB-mBJ) potential improves the band gaps over GGA and Engel-Vosko GGA. The computed TB-mBJ electronic band structure reveals that these materials are direct band gap insulators. The complex dielectric function of the metal oxyhalide compounds have been calculated and the observed prominent peaks are analyzed through the TB-mBJ electronic structures. By using the knowledge of complex dielectric function other important optical properties including absorption, reflectivity, refractive index and loss function have been obtained as a function of energy.

  11. Evaluation of Fracture in Concrete with Recycled Aggregate by Acoustic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishibata, Sayaka; Watanabe, Takeshi; Hashimoro, Chikanori; Kohno, Kiyoshi

    This research revealed fracture behavior of concrete in using recycled aggregates by Acoustic Emission as one of the Non-destructive Inspection. The phenomenon of acoustic emission (AE) is the propagation of elastic waves generated from a source, known as a micro-crack in an elastic material. There were taken to use low-treated recycled aggregate, crushed returned ready mixed concrete for aggregate and normal aggregate. Examination measured AE under the uniaxial compression test. The condition of load is repeated loading. As a result, fracture behavior due to low treated recycled aggregate was detected by AE. It is clarified that AE of concrete with low treated recycled aggregate appeared in low stress level. It has been understood that difference of aggregates becomes clear from Kaiser effect in repeated loading. In relation between RA value and average frequency, it has been understood the adhesion properties of the cement paste in recycled aggregate are appreciable.

  12. In vitro comparison of flexural strength and elastic modulus of three provisional crown materials used in fixed prosthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Poonacha, Seema; Salagundi, Basavaraj; Rupesh, P L.; Raghavan, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate and compare the flexural strength and the elastic moduli of three provisional crown materials (methyl methacrylate based autopolymerized resin, bis acryl composite based autopolymerized resin and urethane dimethacrylate based light polymerized resin) after storing in artificial saliva and testing at intervals of 24 hours and 7 days. Study design: A metal master mould with four slots of dimensions 25x2x2 mm was fabricated to obtain samples of standard dimensions. A total of 135 specimens were thus obtained with 45 each of three provisional materials. Further 15 samples of each group were tested after storing for one hour at room temperature and again at intervals of 24 hours and 7 days after storing in artificial saliva. Three point flexural tests were carried out in the universal testing machine to calculate the flexural strength and the elastic modulus. The changes were calculated and data was analyzed with Fisher’s test and ANOVA. Results: The flexural strength of the methyl methacrylate resin reduced significantly while bis-acrylic composite resin showed a significant increase in its flexural strength after storing in artificial saliva for 24 hours and the values of both remained constant thereafter. Contrary to these findings, light polymerized resin showed a significant decrease in flexural strength after storing in artificial saliva for 24 hours and then significantly increased in flexural strength after 7 days. However the changes in the values for elastic modulus of respective materials were statistically insignificant. Conclusion: Methacrylate based autopolymerizing resin showed the highest flexural strength and elastic moduli after fabrication and after storing in artificial saliva and for 24 hours and 7 days. Bis-acrylic composite resin showed the least flexural strength and elastic moduli. Key words:Provisional restorations, interim restorations, Methyl Methacrylate, composite restoration, flexural strength, elastic moduli

  13. Elastic Instability in Growing Yeast Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Baochi; Upadhyaya, Arpita; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Brenner, Michael P.

    2004-01-01

    The differential adhesion between cells is believed to be the major driving force behind the formation of tissues. The idea is that an aggregate of cells minimizes the overall adhesive energy between cell surfaces. We demonstrate in a model experimental system that there exist conditions where a slowly growing tissue does not minimize this adhesive energy. A mathematical model demonstrates that the instability of a spherical shape is caused by the competition between elastic and surface energies. PMID:15111392

  14. The Effects of Elastic Fiber Protein Insufficiency and Treatment on the Modulus of Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gabriela Espinosa, M.; Gardner, William S.; Bennett, Lisa; Sather, Bradley A.; Yanagisawa, Hiromi; Wagenseil, Jessica E.

    2014-01-01

    Elastic fibers are critical for the mechanical function of the large arteries. Mechanical effects of elastic fiber protein deficiency have been investigated in whole arteries, but not in isolated smooth muscle cells (SMCs). The elastic moduli of SMCs from elastin (Eln-/-) and fibulin-4 (Fbln4-/-) knockout mice were measured using atomic force microscopy. Compared to control SMCs, the modulus of Eln-/- SMCs is reduced by 40%, but is unchanged in Fbln4-/- SMCs. The Eln-/- SMC modulus is rescued by soluble or α elastin treatment. Altered gene expression, specifically of calponin, suggests that SMC phenotypic modulation may be responsible for the modulus changes. PMID:24322348

  15. High-Temperature Elasticity, Cation Disorder and Magnetic Transition in Magnesioferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Antao,S.; Jackson, I.; Li, B.; Kung, J.; Chen, J.; Hassan, I.; Liebermann, R.; Parise, J.

    2007-01-01

    The elastic moduli of magnesioferrite spinel, MgFe2O4, and their temperature dependence have been determined for the first time by ultrasonic measurements on a polycrystalline specimen. The measurements were carried out at 300 MPa and to 700 C in a gas-medium high-pressure apparatus. On heating, both the elastic bulk (K S) and shear (G) moduli decrease linearly to 350 C. By combining with extant thermal-expansion data, the values for the room-temperature K S and G, and their temperature derivatives are as follows: K 0 = 176.3(7) GPa, G 0 = 80.1(2) GPa, ({partial_derivative}K S/{partial_derivative}T) P = -0.032(3) GPa K-1 and ({partial_derivative}G/{partial_derivative}T) P = -0.012(1) GPa K-1. Between 350 and 400 C, there are abrupt increases of 1.4% in both of the elastic moduli; these closely coincide with the magnetic Curie transition that was observed by thermal analyses at about 360 C.

  16. Moduli Dark Matter and the Search for Its Decay Line using Suzaku X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusenko, Alexander; Loewenstein, Michael; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2013-01-01

    Light scalar fields called moduli arise from a variety of different models involving supersymmetry and/or string theory; thus their existence is a generic prediction of leading theories for physics beyond the standard model. They also present a formidable, long-standing problem for cosmology. We argue that an anthropic solution to the moduli problem exists in the case of small moduli masses and that it automatically leads to dark matter in the form of moduli. The recent discovery of the 125 GeV Higgs boson implies a lower bound on the moduli mass of about a keV. This form of dark matter is consistent with the observed properties of structure formation, and it is amenable to detection with the help of x-ray telescopes. We present the results of a search for such dark matter particles using spectra extracted from the first deep x-ray observations of the Draco and Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxies, which are darkmatter- dominated systems with extreme mass-to-light ratios and low intrinsic backgrounds. No emission line is positively detected, and we set new constraints on the relevant new physics.

  17. Shear elastic modulus estimation from indentation and SDUV on gelatin phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Carolina; Urban, Matthew W.; Chen, Shigao; Chen, Qingshan; An, Kai-Nan; Greenleaf, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue mechanical properties such as elasticity are linked to tissue pathology state. Several groups have proposed shear wave propagation speed to quantify tissue mechanical properties. It is well known that biological tissues are viscoelastic materials; therefore velocity dispersion resulting from material viscoelasticity is expected. A method called Shearwave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (SDUV) can be used to quantify tissue viscoelasticity by measuring dispersion of shear wave propagation speed. However, there is not a gold standard method for validation. In this study we present an independent validation method of shear elastic modulus estimation by SDUV in 3 gelatin phantoms of differing stiffness. In addition, the indentation measurements are compared to estimates of elasticity derived from shear wave group velocities. The shear elastic moduli from indentation were 1.16, 3.40 and 5.6 kPa for a 7, 10 and 15% gelatin phantom respectively. SDUV measurements were 1.61, 3.57 and 5.37 kPa for the gelatin phantoms respectively. Shear elastic moduli derived from shear wave group velocities were 1.78, 5.2 and 7.18 kPa for the gelatin phantoms respectively. The shear elastic modulus estimated from the SDUV, matched the elastic modulus measured by indentation. On the other hand, shear elastic modulus estimated by group velocity did not agree with indentation test estimations. These results suggest that shear elastic modulus estimation by group velocity will be bias when the medium being investigated is dispersive. Therefore a rheological model should be used in order to estimate mechanical properties of viscoelastic materials. PMID:21317078

  18. Elastic Moduli and Seismic Wave Attenuation in Dry and Saturated Rock. Volume 2. Modulus Dispersion and Attenuation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-31

    similar densities and viscosities but had very different chemical, electrochemical, and dielectric properties. He concluded that electrochemical...duplicated for a low loss standard aluminum cot’t with the same dimensions to calibrate the hyste-esis of the experimental apparatus. The experimental...specimen using fluids with different electrical properties and electrolytes but with similar densities and viscosities . Frequency dependence in

  19. Acoustic, elastic, and anharmonic properties of Sm1- x R x S solid solutions with trivalent impurities (R = Y, Lа, Tm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belomestnykh, V. N.; Tesleva, E. P.

    2012-10-01

    Based on the known experimental data on the rigidity constants c ij ( x) of single crystals of samarium monosulfide solid solutions (alloys) with yttrium, lanthanum, and thulium impurities, their anisotropic and isotropic acoustic (sound velocities), elastic (elasticity moduli and Poisson's ratios), and anharmonic (Grüneisen parameters) properties are investigated. Anomalous behavior of these characteristics at isostructural electron phase transitions in the examined mixed systems in the intermediate valence state is discussed.

  20. Elastic behavior of amorphous-crystalline silicon nanocomposite: An atomistic view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Suvankar; Dutta, Amlan

    2017-01-01

    In the context of mechanical properties, nanocomposites with homogeneous chemical composition throughout the matrix and the dispersed phase are of particular interest. In this study, the elastic moduli of amorphous-crystalline silicon nanocomposite have been estimated using atomistic simulations. A comparison with the theoretical model reveals that the elastic behavior is significantly influenced by the crystal-amorphous interphase. On observing the effect of volume-fraction of the crystalline phase, an anomalous trend for the bulk modulus is obtained. This phenomenon is attributed to the relaxation displacements of the amorphous atoms.

  1. Elastic properties of silver borate glasses doped with praseodymium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Gowda, G. V. Jagadeesha; Eraiah, B.

    2014-04-24

    A series of glasses xPr{sub 6}O{sub 11−}(35−x) Ag{sub 2}O−65B{sub 2}O{sub 3} with x=0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 mol % were synthesized by melt quenching technique. Longitudinal and shear ultrasonic velocity were measured at 5 MHz frequency and at room temperature. Elastic moduli, Poisson's ratio and Debye temperature have been calculated from the measured density and ultrasonic velocity at room temperature. The experimental results indicate that the elastic constants depend upon the composition of the glasses. The role of the Pr{sub 6}O{sub 11} inside the glass network was discussed.

  2. Stabilizing electrodeposition in elastic solid electrolytes containing immobilized anions

    PubMed Central

    Tikekar, Mukul D.; Archer, Lynden A.; Koch, Donald L.

    2016-01-01

    Ion transport–driven instabilities in electrodeposition of metals that lead to morphological instabilities and dendrites are receiving renewed attention because mitigation strategies are needed for improving rechargeability and safety of lithium batteries. The growth rate of these morphological instabilities can be slowed by immobilizing a fraction of anions within the electrolyte to reduce the electric field at the metal electrode. We analyze the role of elastic deformation of the solid electrolyte with immobilized anions and present theory combining the roles of separator elasticity and modified transport to evaluate the factors affecting the stability of planar deposition over a wide range of current densities. We find that stable electrodeposition can be easily achieved even at relatively high current densities in electrolytes/separators with moderate polymer-like mechanical moduli, provided a small fraction of anions are immobilized in the separator. PMID:27453943

  3. Abnormal Elasticity of Single-Crystal Magnesiosiderite across the Spin Transition in Earth's Lower Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Suyu; Yang, Jing; Lin, Jung-Fu

    2017-01-01

    Brillouin light scattering and impulsive stimulated light scattering have been used to determine the full elastic constants of magnesiosiderite [(Mg0.35Fe0.65)CO3 ] up to 70 GPa at room temperature in a diamond-anvil cell. Drastic softening in C11 , C33 , C12 , and C13 elastic moduli associated with the compressive stress component and stiffening in C44 and C14 moduli associated with the shear stress component are observed to occur within the spin transition between ˜42.4 and ˜46.5 GPa . Negative values of C12 and C13 are also observed within the spin transition region. The Born criteria constants for the crystal remain positive within the spin transition, indicating that the mixed-spin state remains mechanically stable. Significant auxeticity can be related to the electronic spin transition-induced elastic anomalies based on the analysis of Poisson's ratio. These elastic anomalies are explained using a thermoelastic model for the rhombohedral system. Finally, we conclude that mixed-spin state ferromagnesite, which is potentially a major deep-carbon carrier, is expected to exhibit abnormal elasticity, including a negative Poisson's ratio of -0.6 and drastically reduced VP by 10%, in Earth's midlower mantle.

  4. Strain rate, temperature, and humidity on strength and moduli of a graphite/epoxy composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lifshitz, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    Results of an experimental study of the influence of strain rate, temperature and humidity on the mechanical behavior of a graphite/epoxy fiber composite are presented. Three principal strengths (longitudinal, transverse and shear) and four basic moduli (E1, E2, G12 and U12) of a unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite were followed as a function of strain rate, temperature and humidity. Each test was performed at a constant tensile strain rate in an environmental chamber providing simultaneous temperature and humidity control. Prior to testing, specimens were given a moisture preconditioning treatment at 60 C. Values for the matrix dominated moduli and strength were significantly influenced by both environmental and rate parameters, whereas the fiber dominated moduli were not. However, the longitudinal strength was significantly influenced by temperature and moisture content. A qualitative explanation for these observations is presented.

  5. Colloidal aggregation and dynamics in anisotropic fluids

    PubMed Central

    Mondiot, Frédéric; Botet, Robert; Snabre, Patrick; Mondain-Monval, Olivier; Loudet, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    We present experiments and numerical simulations to investigate the collective behavior of submicrometer-sized particles immersed in a nematic micellar solution. We use latex spheres with diameters ranging from 190 to 780 nm and study their aggregation properties due to the interplay of the various colloidal forces at work in the system. We found that the morphology of aggregates strongly depends on the particle size, with evidence for two distinct regimes: the biggest inclusions clump together within minutes into either compact clusters or V-like structures that are completely consistent with attractive elastic interactions. On the contrary, the smallest particles form chains elongated along the nematic axis, within comparable timescales. In this regime, Monte Carlo simulations, based on a modified diffusion-limited cluster aggregation model, strongly suggest that the anisotropic rotational Brownian motion of the clusters combined with short-range depletion interactions dominate the system coarsening; elastic interactions no longer prevail. The simulations reproduce the sharp transition between the two regimes on increasing the particle size. We provide reasonable estimates to interpret our data and propose a likely scenario for colloidal aggregation. These results emphasize the growing importance of the diffusion of species at suboptical-wavelength scales and raise a number of fundamental issues. PMID:24715727

  6. Thermodynamics of Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Kenneth L.; Barz, Bogdan; Bachmann, Michael; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloid protein aggregation characterizes many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Creutz- feldt-Jakob disease. Evidence suggests that amyloid aggregates may share similar aggregation pathways, implying simulation of full-length amyloid proteins is not necessary for understanding amyloid formation. In this study we simulate GNNQQNY, the N-terminal prion-determining domain of the yeast protein Sup35 to investigate the thermodynamics of structural transitions during aggregation. We use a coarse-grained model with replica-exchange molecular dynamics to investigate the association of 3-, 6-, and 12-chain GNNQQNY systems and we determine the aggregation pathway by studying aggregation states of GN- NQQNY. We find that the aggregation of the hydrophilic GNNQQNY sequence is mainly driven by H-bond formation, leading to the formation of /3-sheets from the very beginning of the assembly process. Condensation (aggregation) and ordering take place simultaneously, which is underpinned by the occurrence of a single heat capacity peak only.

  7. Elasticity of polymeric nanocolloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riest, Jonas; Athanasopoulou, Labrini; Egorov, Sergei A.; Likos, Christos N.; Ziherl, Primož

    2015-11-01

    Softness is an essential mechanical feature of macromolecular particles such as polymer-grafted nanocolloids, polyelectrolyte networks, cross-linked microgels as well as block copolymer and dendrimer micelles. Elasticity of individual particles directly controls their swelling, wetting, and adsorption behaviour, their aggregation and self-assembly as well as structural and rheological properties of suspensions. Here we use numerical simulations and self-consistent field theory to study the deformation behaviour of a single spherical polymer brush upon diametral compression. We observe a universal response, which is rationalised using scaling arguments and interpreted in terms of two coarse-grained models. At small and intermediate compressions the deformation can be accurately reproduced by modelling the brush as a liquid drop, whereas at large compressions the brush behaves as a soft ball. Applicable far beyond the pairwise-additive small-strain regime, the models may be used to describe microelasticity of nanocolloids in severe confinement including dense disordered and crystalline phases.

  8. Elastic modulus of single cellulose microfibrils from tunicate measured by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Shinichiro; Kai, Weihua; Isogai, Akira; Iwata, Tadahisa

    2009-09-14

    The elastic modulus of single microfibrils from tunicate ( Halocynthia papillosa ) cellulose was measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Microfibrils with cross-sectional dimensions 8 x 20 nm and several micrometers in length were obtained by oxidation of cellulose with 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (TEMPO) as a catalyst and subsequent mechanical disintegration in water and by sulfuric acid hydrolysis. The nanocellulosic materials were deposited on a specially designed silicon wafer with grooves 227 nm in width, and a three-point bending test was applied to determine the elastic modulus using an AFM cantilever. The elastic moduli of single microfibrils prepared by TEMPO-oxidation and acid hydrolysis were 145.2 +/- 31.3 and 150.7 +/- 28.8 GPa, respectively. The result showed that the experimentally determined modulus of the highly crystalline tunicate microfibrils was in agreement with the elastic modulus of native cellulose crystals.

  9. Elastic anisotropy and shear-induced atomistic deformation of tetragonal silicon carbon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Haiyan; Zhang, Meiguang; Zhao, Yaru; Zhou, Xinchun; Wei, Qun

    2014-07-14

    First-principles calculations are employed to provide a fundamental understanding of the structural features, elastic anisotropy, shear-induced atomistic deformation behaviors, and its electronic origin of the recently proposed superhard t-SiCN. According to the dependences of the elastic modulus on different crystal directions, the t-SiCN exhibits a well-pronounced elastic anisotropy which may impose certain limitations and restrictions on its applications. The further mechanical calculations demonstrated that t-SiCN shows lower elastic moduli and ideal shear strength than those of typical hard substances of TiN and TiC, suggesting that it cannot be intrinsically superhard as claimed in the recent works. We find that the failure modes of t-SiCN at the atomic level during shear deformation can be attributed to the breaking of C-C bonds through the bonding evolution and electronic localization analyses.

  10. The geometry of the light-cone cell decomposition of moduli space

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, David Ramgoolam, Sanjaye

    2015-11-15

    The moduli space of Riemann surfaces with at least two punctures can be decomposed into a cell complex by using a particular family of ribbon graphs called Nakamura graphs. We distinguish the moduli space with all punctures labelled from that with a single labelled puncture. In both cases, we describe a cell decomposition where the cells are parametrised by graphs or equivalence classes of finite sequences (tuples) of permutations. Each cell is a convex polytope defined by a system of linear equations and inequalities relating light-cone string parameters, quotiented by the automorphism group of the graph. We give explicit examples of the cell decomposition at low genus with few punctures.

  11. Gravitational particle production in massive chaotic inflation and the moduli problem.

    PubMed

    de Haro, Jaume; Elizalde, Emilio

    2012-02-10

    Particle production from vacuum fluctuations during inflation is briefly revisited. The moduli problem occurring with light particles produced at the end of inflation is addressed, namely, the fact that some results are in disagreement with nucleosynthesis constrains. A universal solution to this problem is found which leads to reasonable reheating temperatures in all cases. It invokes the assumption that, immediately after inflation, the moduli evolve like nonrelativistic matter. The assumption is justified in the context of massive chaotic inflation where, at the end of inflation, the Universe evolves as if it were matter dominated.

  12. The information metric on the moduli space of instantons with global symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, Emanuel; Murugan, Jeff; Shock, Jonathan P.

    2016-02-01

    In this note we revisit Hitchin's prescription [1] of the Fisher metric as a natural measure on the moduli space of instantons that encodes the space-time symmetries of a classical field theory. Motivated by the idea of the moduli space of supersymmetric instantons as an emergent space in the sense of the gauge/gravity duality, we extend the prescription to encode also global symmetries of the underlying theory. We exemplify our construction with the instanton solution of the CPN sigma model on R2.

  13. Effect of PbO on the elastic behavior of ZnO-P2O5 glass systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidek, H. A. A.; El-Mallawany, R.; Matori, K. A.; Halimah, M. K.

    A series of ternary phosphate glasses in the form of 40(P2O5)-(60 - x)ZnO-xPbO and 50(P2O5)-(50 - x)ZnO-xPbO where x = 0-60 mol%, have been successfully prepared by conventional melt quenching technique. Both longitudinal and shear ultrasonic velocities were measured in different compositions of PbO using the MBS8000 ultrasonic data acquisition system at 10 MHz frequency and at room temperature. The ultrasonic velocity data, the density and the calculated elastic moduli are found to be composition dependent and discussed in terms of PbO modifiers. The correlation of elastic moduli with the atomic packing density of these glasses was discussed. To predict the compositional dependence of elastic moduli of this glass system, the interpretation of the variation in the experimental elastic behavior observed has been studied based on various of the bond compression and the Makishima-Mackenzie models.

  14. The Effect of Iron on the Elastic Properties of Ringwoodite at High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Higo,Y.; Inoue, T.; Li, B.; Irifune, T.; Liebermann, R.

    2006-01-01

    Elastic wave velocities of ringwoodite with compositions of Mg2SiO4, (Mg0.8Fe0.2)2SiO4 and (Mg0.5Fe0.5)2SiO4 have been measured to address the effect of iron on the elastic properties of silicate spinel under high pressure. Ultrasonic measurements on specimens produced by hot-pressing at about 19 GPa and at 1200 C were conducted at pressures up to 14 GPa at room temperature in a multianvil apparatus. Pressure was estimated from a relationship between the travel time in an Al2O3 buffer rod and the pressure estimated from in situ X-ray diffraction measurements. Thus, measured bulk modulus (K) of ringwoodite slightly increases with increasing iron content, while the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus remains virtually the same (K' = 4.4 for XFe = Fe/(Fe + Mg) = 0-0.5). In contrast, the shear modulus (G) decreases significantly with increasing iron content, while the pressure derivative of the shear modulus slightly decreases or remains almost unchanged (G' = 1.4-1.0 for XFe = 0-0.5). The effects of iron content on the elastic moduli are somewhat different from those of an earlier study using Brillion scattering method, but are consistent with the elastic moduli of the Fe2SiO4 end-member measured in a piston-cylinder apparatus using ultrasonic interferometry. The effects of iron on the elastic moduli of ringwoodite are described as K = 184(1) + 16(1)XFe (GPa) and G = 124(2) - 45(3)XFe (GPa), by combining the present and earlier results based on the ultrasonic interferometry at high pressure. The present result suggests that the temperature anomalies, rather than the variations of iron content in ringwoodite, are more likely causes for the observed variations in seismic velocities in the mantle transition region.

  15. On mean type aggregation.

    PubMed

    Yager, R R

    1996-01-01

    We introduce and define the concept of mean aggregation of a collection of n numbers. We point out that the lack of associativity of this operation compounds the problem of the extending mean of n numbers to n+1 numbers. The closely related concepts of self identity and the centering property are introduced as one imperative for extending mean aggregation operators. The problem of weighted mean aggregation is studied. A new concept of prioritized mean aggregation is then introduced. We next show that the technique of selecting an element based upon the performance of a random experiment can be considered as a mean aggregation operation.

  16. Elasticity of single-crystal SmAlO 3, GdAlO 3 and ScAlO 3 perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Jay D.

    1984-12-01

    The adiabatic single-crystal elastic moduli of SmAlO 3, GdAlO 3 and ScAlO 3, all with the orthorhombic perovskite structure, have been measured by Brillouin spectroscopy under ambient conditions. These 3 compounds display various degrees of crystallographic distortion from the ideal cubic perovskite structure. We find that longitudinal moduli in directions parallel to the axes of a pseudocubic subcell are nearly equal and insensitive to distortions of the crystal structure from cubic symmetry, whereas, the moduli C 11 and C 22, parallel to the orthorhombic axes, display pronounced anisotropy with the exception of ScAlO 3. The shear moduli also correlate with distortion from cubic symmetry, as measured by rotation, or tilt angles, of the AlO 6 octahedra. Our data support the observations of Liebermann et al. that perovskite-structure compounds define consistent elasticity trends relating bulk modulus and molar volume, and sound speed and mean atomic weight. These relationships have been used to estimate bulk and shear moduli for the high-pressure polymorphs of CaSiO 3 and MgSiO 3 with the perovskite structure.

  17. Elastically Decoupling Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Kuflik, Eric; Perelstein, Maxim; Lorier, Nicolas Rey-Le; Tsai, Yu-Dai

    2016-06-03

    We present a novel dark matter candidate, an elastically decoupling relic, which is a cold thermal relic whose present abundance is determined by the cross section of its elastic scattering on standard model particles. The dark matter candidate is predicted to have a mass ranging from a few to a few hundred MeV, and an elastic scattering cross section with electrons, photons and/or neutrinos in the 10^{-3}-1  fb range.

  18. Metaconcrete: Engineered aggregates for enhanced dynamic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Stephanie J.

    This work presents the development and investigation of a new type of concrete for the attenuation of waves induced by dynamic excitation. Recent progress in the field of metamaterials science has led to a range of novel composites which display unusual properties when interacting with electromagnetic, acoustic, and elastic waves. A new structural metamaterial with enhanced properties for dynamic loading applications is presented, which is named metaconcrete. In this new composite material the standard stone and gravel aggregates of regular concrete are replaced with spherical engineered inclusions. Each metaconcrete aggregate has a layered structure, consisting of a heavy core and a thin compliant outer coating. This structure allows for resonance at or near the eigenfrequencies of the inclusions, and the aggregates can be tuned so that resonant oscillations will be activated by particular frequencies of an applied dynamic loading. The activation of resonance within the aggregates causes the overall system to exhibit negative effective mass, which leads to attenuation of the applied wave motion. To investigate the behavior of metaconcrete slabs under a variety of different loading conditions a finite element slab model containing a periodic array of aggregates is utilized. The frequency dependent nature of metaconcrete is investigated by considering the transmission of wave energy through a slab, which indicates the presence of large attenuation bands near the resonant frequencies of the aggregates. Applying a blast wave loading to both an elastic slab and a slab model that incorporates the fracture characteristics of the mortar matrix reveals that a significant portion of the supplied energy can be absorbed by aggregates which are activated by the chosen blast wave profile. The transfer of energy from the mortar matrix to the metaconcrete aggregates leads to a significant reduction in the maximum longitudinal stress, greatly improving the ability of the material

  19. High pressure elastic properties of minerals from ab initio simulations: The case of pyrope, grossular and andradite silicate garnets

    SciTech Connect

    Erba, A. Mahmoud, A.; Dovesi, R.; Belmonte, D.

    2014-03-28

    A computational strategy is devised for the accurate ab initio simulation of elastic properties of crystalline materials under pressure. The proposed scheme, based on the evaluation of the analytical stress tensor and on the automated computation of pressure-dependent elastic stiffness constants, is implemented in the CRYSTAL solid state quantum-chemical program. Elastic constants and related properties (bulk, shear and Young moduli, directional seismic wave velocities, elastic anisotropy index, Poisson's ratio, etc.) can be computed for crystals of any space group of symmetry. We apply such a technique to the study of high-pressure elastic properties of three silicate garnet end-members (namely, pyrope, grossular, and andradite) which are of great geophysical interest, being among the most important rock-forming minerals. The reliability of this theoretical approach is proved by comparing with available experimental measurements. The description of high-pressure properties provided by several equations of state is also critically discussed.

  20. High pressure elastic properties of minerals from ab initio simulations: the case of pyrope, grossular and andradite silicate garnets.

    PubMed

    Erba, A; Mahmoud, A; Belmonte, D; Dovesi, R

    2014-03-28

    A computational strategy is devised for the accurate ab initio simulation of elastic properties of crystalline materials under pressure. The proposed scheme, based on the evaluation of the analytical stress tensor and on the automated computation of pressure-dependent elastic stiffness constants, is implemented in the CRYSTAL solid state quantum-chemical program. Elastic constants and related properties (bulk, shear and Young moduli, directional seismic wave velocities, elastic anisotropy index, Poisson's ratio, etc.) can be computed for crystals of any space group of symmetry. We apply such a technique to the study of high-pressure elastic properties of three silicate garnet end-members (namely, pyrope, grossular, and andradite) which are of great geophysical interest, being among the most important rock-forming minerals. The reliability of this theoretical approach is proved by comparing with available experimental measurements. The description of high-pressure properties provided by several equations of state is also critically discussed.

  1. A stringy mechanism for a small cosmological constant — multi-moduli cases

    SciTech Connect

    Sumitomo, Yoske; Tye, S.-H. Henry E-mail: iastye@ust.hk

    2013-02-01

    Based on the properties of probability distributions of functions of random variables, we proposed earlier a simple stringy mechanism that prefers the meta-stable vacua with a small cosmological constant Λ. As an illustration of this approach, we study in this paper particularly simple but non-trivial models of the Kähler uplift in the large volume flux compactification scenario in Type IIB string theory, where all parameters introduced in the model are treated either as fixed constants motivated by physics, or as random variables with some given uniform probability distributions. We determine the value w{sub 0} of the superpotential W{sub 0} at the supersymmetric minima, and find that the resulting probability distribution P(w{sub 0}) peaks at w{sub 0} = 0; furthermore, this peaking behavior strengthens as the number of complex structure moduli increases. The resulting probability distribution P(Λ) for meta-stable vacua also peaks as Λ → 0, for both positive and negative Λ. This peaking/divergent behavior of P(Λ) strengthens as the number of moduli increases. In some scenarios for Λ > 0, the likely value of Λ decreases exponentially as the number of moduli increases. The light cosmological moduli issue accompanying a very small Λ is also mentioned.

  2. On metric geometry of conformal moduli spaces of four-dimensional superconformal theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asnin, Vadim

    2010-09-01

    Conformal moduli spaces of four-dimensional superconformal theories obtained by deformations of a superpotential are considered. These spaces possess a natural metric (a Zamolodchikov metric). This metric is shown to be Kahler. The proof is based on superconformal Ward identities.

  3. Fernique-type inequalities and moduli of continuity for anisotropic Gaussian random fields

    PubMed Central

    Meerschaert, Mark M.; Wang, Wensheng; Xiao, Yimin

    2013-01-01

    This paper is concerned with sample path properties of anisotropic Gaussian random fields. We establish Fernique-type inequalities and utilize them to study the global and local moduli of continuity for anisotropic Gaussian random fields. Applications to fractional Brownian sheets and to the solutions of stochastic partial differential equations are investigated. PMID:24825922

  4. Baker-Akhiezer Spinor Kernel and Tau-functions on Moduli Spaces of Meromorphic Differentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalla, C.; Korotkin, D.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we study the Baker-Akhiezer spinor kernel on moduli spaces of meromorphic differentials on Riemann surfaces. We introduce the Baker-Akhiezer tau-function which is related to both the Bergman tau-function (which was studied before in the context of Hurwitz spaces and spaces of holomorphic Abelian and quadratic differentials) and the KP tau-function on such spaces. In particular, we derive variational formulas of Rauch-Ahlfors type on moduli spaces of meromorphic differentials with prescribed singularities: we use the system of homological coordinates, consisting of absolute and relative periods of the meromorphic differential, and show how to vary the fundamental objects associated to a Riemann surface (the matrix of b-periods, normalized Abelian differentials, the Bergman bidifferential, the Szegö kernel and the Baker-Akhiezer spinor kernel) with respect to these coordinates. The variational formulas encode dependence both on the moduli of the Riemann surface and on the choice of meromorphic differential (variation of the meromorphic differential while keeping the Riemann surface fixed corresponds to flows of KP type). Analyzing the global properties of the Bergman and Baker-Akhiezer tau-functions, we establish relationships between various divisor classes on the moduli spaces.

  5. Numerical approximation of tangent moduli for finite element implementations of nonlinear hyperelastic material models.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Chaikof, Elliot L; Levenston, Marc E

    2008-12-01

    Finite element (FE) implementations of nearly incompressible material models often employ decoupled numerical treatments of the dilatational and deviatoric parts of the deformation gradient. This treatment allows the dilatational stiffness to be handled separately to alleviate ill conditioning of the tangent stiffness matrix. However, this can lead to complex formulations of the material tangent moduli that can be difficult to implement or may require custom FE codes, thus limiting their general use. Here we present an approach, based on work by Miehe (Miehe, 1996, "Numerical Computation of Algorithmic (Consistent) Tangent Moduli in Large Strain Computational Inelasticity," Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Eng., 134, pp. 223-240), for an efficient numerical approximation of the tangent moduli that can be easily implemented within commercial FE codes. By perturbing the deformation gradient, the material tangent moduli from the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress are accurately approximated by a forward difference of the associated Kirchhoff stresses. The merit of this approach is that it produces a concise mathematical formulation that is not dependent on any particular material model. Consequently, once the approximation method is coded in a subroutine, it can be used for other hyperelastic material models with no modification. The implementation and accuracy of this approach is first demonstrated with a simple neo-Hookean material. Subsequently, a fiber-reinforced structural model is applied to analyze the pressure-diameter curve during blood vessel inflation. Implementation of this approach will facilitate the incorporation of novel hyperelastic material models for a soft tissue behavior into commercial FE software.

  6. Elastic properties of minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, K.S.; Prodaivoda, G.T.

    1993-09-01

    Investigations of the elastic properties of the main rock-forming minerals were begun by T.V. Ryzhova and K.S. Aleksandrov over 30 years ago on the initiative of B.P. Belikov. At the time, information on the elasticity of single crystals in general, and especially of minerals, was very scanty. In the surveys of that time there was information on the elasticity of 20 or 30 minerals. These, as a rule, did not include the main rock-forming minerals; silicates were represented only by garnets, quartz, topaz, tourmaline, zircon, beryl, and staurolite, which are often found in nature in the form of large and fairly high-quality crystals. Then and even much later it was still necessary to prove a supposition which now seems obvious: The elastic properties of rocks, and hence the velocities of elastic (seismic) waves in the earth`s crust, are primarily determined by the elastic characteristics of the minerals composing these rocks. Proof of this assertion, with rare exceptions of mono-mineralic rocks (marble, quartzite, etc.) cannot be obtained without information on the elasticities of a sufficiently large number of minerals, primarily framework, layer, and chain silicates which constitute the basis of most rocks. This also served as the starting point and main problem of the undertakings of Aleksandrov, Ryzhova, and Belikov - systematic investigations of the elastic properties of minerals and then of various rocks. 108 refs., 7 tabs.

  7. AB INITIO STUDY OF PHONON DISPERSION AND ELASTIC PROPERTIES OF L12 INTERMETALLICS Ti3Al AND Y3Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikan, N.; Ersen, M.; Ocak, H. Y.; Iyigör, A.; Candan, A.; UǦUR, Ş.; UǦUR, G.; Khenata, R.; Varshney, D.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, the structural, elastic and phonon properties of Ti3Al and Y3Al in L12(Cu3Al) phase are studied by performing first-principles calculations within the generalized gradient approximation. The calculated lattice constants, static bulk moduli, first-order pressure derivative of bulk moduli and elastic constants for both compounds are reported. The phonon dispersion curves along several high-symmetry lines at the Brillouin zone, together with the corresponding phonon density of states, are determined using the first-principles linear-response approach of the density functional perturbation theory. Temperature variations of specific heat in the range of 0-500 K are obtained using the quasi-harmonic model.

  8. Observation of Low-Temperature Softening of Transverse Elastic Modulus Due to Cobalt Impurities in Mercury Selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhevstovskikh, Irina V.; Okulov, Vsevolod I.; Gudkov, Vladimir V.; Sarychev, Maksim N.; Medvedev, Kirill A.; Andriichuk, Myroslav D.; Paranchich, Lidiya D.

    2016-12-01

    Influence on elastic moduli of donor electron d-states of cobalt impurities has been investigated in mercury selenide crystals. Experiments have been carried out at the frequency of 53 MHz in the temperature interval of 1.3-100 K. Softening of the (C_{11} - C_{12})/2 modulus below 10 K has been observed in the impurity crystals in contrast with the (C_{11} + C_{12} + 2C_{44})/2 and C_{44} moduli those have exhibited hardening at cooling typical for dielectric and semiconductor crystals. The softening of the elastic modulus has been interpreted as manifestation of hybridization of the impurity d-states in the conduction band of the crystal. Comparison of theoretical calculations with experimental data has been proved to be in good agreement and has made it possible to determine the parameters characterizing the hybridized electron states.

  9. Effect of the elastic modulus of the matrix on magnetostrictive strain in composites

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Snyder, J.E.; Schwichtenberg, C.R.; Dennis, K.W.; Falzgraf, D.K.; McCallum, R.W.; Jiles, D.C.

    1999-02-01

    The effect of the matrix material on the magnetostriction of composites containing highly magnetostrictive particles has been studied. Experimental results showed that the elastic modulus of the matrix is an important factor determining the bulk magnetostriction of the composite. For a series of composites with the same volume fraction of magnetostrictive particles but different matrix materials, the bulk magnetostriction was found to increase systematically with decreasing elastic modulus of the matrix. A model theory for the magnetostriction of such composites has been developed, based on two limiting assumptions: uniform strain or uniform stress inside the composite. The theory was then used to predict the magnetostriction of the entire material from the volume fractions of the components, their elastic moduli and magnetostrictions. These predictions were in agreement with the experimental results. It is concluded that to obtain a high magnetostriction and adequate mechanical properties of a composite, the elastic moduli of the magnetostrictive phase and the matrix should be as close as possible in value. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Lattice instability and elastic response of metastable Mo1-xSix thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillon, A.; Jaouen, C.; Michel, A.; Abadias, G.; Tromas, C.; Belliard, L.; Perrin, B.; Djemia, Ph.

    2013-11-01

    We present a detailed experimental study on Mo1-xSix thin films, an archetypal alloy system combining metallic and semiconductor materials. The correlations between structure and elastic response are comprehensively investigated. We focus on assessing trends for understanding the evolution of elastic properties upon Si alloying in relation to the structural state (crystalline vs amorphous), bonding character (metallic vs covalent), and local atomic environment. By combining picosecond ultrasonics and Brillouin light scattering techniques, a complete set of effective elastic constants and mechanical moduli (B, G, E) is provided in the whole compositional range, covering bcc solid solutions (x < 0.20) and the amorphous phase (0.20 < x < 1.0). A softening of the shear and Young moduli and a concomitant decrease of the Debye temperature is revealed for crystalline alloys, with a significant drop being observed at x ˜ 0.2 corresponding to the limit of crystal lattice stability. Amorphous alloys exhibit a more complex elastic response, related to variations in coordination number, atomic volume, and bonding state, depending on Si content. Finally, distinct evolutions of the G/B ratio as a function of Cauchy pressure are reported for crystalline and amorphous alloys, enabling us to identify signatures of ductility vs brittleness in the features of the local atomic environment. This work paves the way to design materials with improved mechanical properties by appropriate chemical substitution or impurity incorporation during thin-film growth.

  11. Elasticity of Single Crystal MgO to 8 Gigapascals and 1600 Kelvin

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,G.; Liebermann, R.; Weidner, D.

    1998-01-01

    The cross pressure (P) and temperature (T) dependence of the elastic moduli (C{sub ij}) of single-crystal samples of periclase (MgO) from acoustic wave travel times was measured with ultrasonic interferometry: {partial_derivative}{sup 2}C{sub 11}/{partial_derivative}P{partial_derivative}T = (-1.3 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -3} per kelvin; {partial_derivative}{sup 2}C{sub 110}/{partial_derivative}P{partial_derivative}T = (1.7 {+-} 0.7) x 10{sup -3} per kelvin; and {partial_derivative}{sup 2}C{sub 44}/{partial_derivative}P{partial_derivative}T = (-0.2 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -3} per kelvin. The elastic anisotropy of MgO decreases with increasing pressure at ambient temperature, but then increases as temperature is increased at high pressure. An assumption of zero cross pressure and temperature derivatives for the elastic moduli underestimates the elastic anisotropy and overestimates the acoustic velocities of MgO at the extrapolated high-pressure and high-temperature conditions of Earth's mantle.

  12. Cross-type optical separation of elastic oblate capsules in a uniform flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Cheong Bong; Sung, Hyung Jin; Huang, Wei-Xi

    2015-01-21

    The dynamic behavior of an elastic capsule with an initially oblate spheroidal shape during cross-type optical separation was numerically investigated. The penalty immersed boundary method was adopted for the fluid-membrane interaction, and the optical force calculation was conducted by using the ray optics method including the ray-surface intersection algorithm. The oblate elastic capsule of b/a = 0.5 with different surface Young's moduli and different initial inclination angles was considered. The oblate capsule with higher surface Young's moduli was less deformed, and was more migrated for each initial inclination angle. Unlike the oblate rigid particle, the initially inclined capsules with moderate inclination angles were similarly migrated since the oblate elastic capsule was deformed during rotation near the laser beam axis. The oblate capsules can be separated according to the surface Young's modulus, except for nearly non-inclined capsules. As the fluid velocity decreased, the migration distance increased. The maximum deformation parameter was insensitive to the fluid velocity. Furthermore, a new dimensionless number (S{sub ec}) was introduced to predict the migration distance of the oblate elastic capsule.

  13. The effect of extreme temperatures on the elastic properties and fracture behavior of graphite/polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. H.; Simonds, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of elevated and cryogenic temperatures on the elastic moduli and fracture strengths of several C6000/PMR-15 and C6000/NR-15082 laminates was measured. Tests were conducted at -157 C, 24 C, and 316 C (-250 F, 75 F, and 600 F). Both notched and unnotched laminates were tested. The average stress failure criterion was used to predict the fracture strength of quasi-isotropic notched laminates.

  14. The effect of extreme temperatures on the elastic properties and fracture behavior of graphite/polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. H.; Simonds, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of elevated and cryogenic temperatures on the elastic moduli and fracture strengths of several C6000/PMR-15 and C6000/NR-15082 laminates was measured. Tests were conducted at -157 C, 24 C, and 316 C (-250 F, 75 F, and 600 F). Both notched and unnotched laminates were tested. The average stress failure criterion was used to predict the fracture strength of quasi-isotropic notched laminates.

  15. A Coupled Local Mode Investigation of Elastic Anisotropy in Shallow Water Environments: A Study of Antisotropy Beyond VTI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-28

    currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 12. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From...The summary, conclusions and discussion of results are contained in section 5. A variety of useful relations, such as theory , and concepts concerning...moduli. Although the elastic symmetry has been limited to transverse isotropy for this work, the theory and some portions of the code can incorporate

  16. On granular elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qicheng; Jin, Feng; Wang, Guangqian; Song, Shixiong; Zhang, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Mesoscopic structures form in dense granular materials due to the self-organisation of the constituent particles. These structures have internal structural degrees of freedom in addition to the translational degree of freedom. The resultant granular elasticity, which exhibits intrinsic variations and inevitable relaxation, is a key quantity that accounts for macroscopic solid- or fluid-like properties and the transitions between them. In this work, we propose a potential energy landscape (PEL) with local stable basins and low elastic energy barriers to analyse the nature of granular elasticity. A function for the elastic energy density is proposed for stable states and is further calibrated with ultrasonic measurements. Fluctuations in the elastic energy due to the evolution of internal structures are proposed to describe a so-called configuration temperature Tc as a counterpart of the classical kinetic granular temperature Tk that is attributed to the translational degrees of freedom. The two granular temperatures are chosen as the state variables, and a fundamental equation is established to develop non-equilibrium thermodynamics for granular materials. Due to the relatively low elastic energy barrier in the PEL, granular elasticity relaxes more under common mechanical loadings, and a simple model based on mean-field theory is developed to account for this behaviour. PMID:25951049

  17. Effect of Hydration on the Single-crystal Elasticity of Fe-bearing Wadsleyite to 12 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Z Mao; S Jacobsen; D Frost; C McCammon; E Hauri; T Duffy

    2011-12-31

    The single-crystal elastic properties of Fe-bearing wadsleyite with 1.93 wt% H{sub 2}O (Mg{sub 1.634}Fe{sub 0.202}H{sub 0.305}SiO{sub 4}) have been determined by Brillouin scattering. At ambient conditions, the aggregate bulk and shear moduli (K{sub S0}, G{sub 0}) of this wadsleyite are 156.2(5) and 98.0(3) GPa, respectively. Compared to the corresponding anhydrous wadsleyite, 1.93 wt% H{sub 2}O lowers K{sub S0} and G{sub 0} by 8.1% and 9.3%, respectively. High-pressure measurements up to 12 GPa show that the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus, K'{sub S0} = 4.8(1), is similar to that of the anhydrous Fe-wadsleyite with reported values of 4.6-4.74, but the addition of H{sub 2}O increases the pressure derivative of the shear modulus, G{sub 0}' from 1.5(1) to 1.9(1). This contrasts with the G{sub 0}' of Fe-free wadsleyite, which is the same within uncertainty for the hydrous and anhydrous phases. As a result, both the compressional- and shear-wave velocities (v{sub P}, v{sub S}) of hydrous Fe-bearing wadsleyite are about 200({+-}24) m/s slower than anhydrous Fe-bearing wadsleyite at transition zone pressures.

  18. Elastic membranes in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, Joshua; Miksis, Michael; Davis, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    An elastic membrane stretched between two walls takes a shape defined by its length and the volume of fluid it encloses. Many biological structures, such as cells, mitochondria and DNA, have finer internal structure in which a membrane (or elastic member) is geometrically ``confined'' by another object. We study the shape stability of elastic membranes in a ``confining'' box and introduce repulsive van der Waals forces to prevent the membrane from intersecting the wall. We aim to define the parameter space associated with mitochondria-like deformations. We compare the confined to `unconfined' solutions and show how the structure and stability of the membrane shapes changes with the system parameters.

  19. Polynomial approximations of a class of stochastic multiscale elasticity problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Viet Ha; Nguyen, Thanh Chung; Xia, Bingxing

    2016-06-01

    We consider a class of elasticity equations in {mathbb{R}^d} whose elastic moduli depend on n separated microscopic scales. The moduli are random and expressed as a linear expansion of a countable sequence of random variables which are independently and identically uniformly distributed in a compact interval. The multiscale Hellinger-Reissner mixed problem that allows for computing the stress directly and the multiscale mixed problem with a penalty term for nearly incompressible isotropic materials are considered. The stochastic problems are studied via deterministic problems that depend on a countable number of real parameters which represent the probabilistic law of the stochastic equations. We study the multiscale homogenized problems that contain all the macroscopic and microscopic information. The solutions of these multiscale homogenized problems are written as generalized polynomial chaos (gpc) expansions. We approximate these solutions by semidiscrete Galerkin approximating problems that project into the spaces of functions with only a finite number of N gpc modes. Assuming summability properties for the coefficients of the elastic moduli's expansion, we deduce bounds and summability properties for the solutions' gpc expansion coefficients. These bounds imply explicit rates of convergence in terms of N when the gpc modes used for the Galerkin approximation are chosen to correspond to the best N terms in the gpc expansion. For the mixed problem with a penalty term for nearly incompressible materials, we show that the rate of convergence for the best N term approximation is independent of the Lamé constants' ratio when it goes to {infty}. Correctors for the homogenization problem are deduced. From these we establish correctors for the solutions of the parametric multiscale problems in terms of the semidiscrete Galerkin approximations. For two-scale problems, an explicit homogenization error which is uniform with respect to the parameters is deduced. Together

  20. Aggregations in Flatworms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liffen, C. L.; Hunter, M.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a school project to investigate aggregations in flatworms which may be influenced by light intensity, temperature, and some form of chemical stimulus released by already aggregating flatworms. Such investigations could be adopted to suit many educational levels of science laboratory activities. (DS)

  1. Unbonded Aggregate Surface Roads

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    are sufficiently angular and rough in texture, thus ensuring mixture stability. A popular asphalt mixture design method called Superpave Level 1...would not pass either of the Superpave aggregate requirements. Table 18 Additional Characteristics for the Fine Fraction Abbreviated Common Name...CBR values when compacted wet of optimum. This is likely attributable to their relatively high permeabilities . For soaked CBR tests, the aggregates

  2. Mechanical Properties and Elastic Constants Due to Damage Accumulation and Amorphization in SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2004-06-28

    Damage accumulation due to cascade overlap, which was simulated previously, has been used to study the changes of elastic constants, bulk and elastic moduli as a function of dose. These mechanical properties generally decrease with increasing dose, and the rapid decrease at low-dose level indicates that point defects and small clusters play an important role in the changes of elastic constants rather than topological disorder. The internal strain relaxation has no effect on the elastic constants, C11 and C12, in perfect SiC, but it has a significant influence on all elastic constants calculated in damaged SiC. The elastic constants in the cascade-amorphized (CA) SiC decrease about 19%, 29% and 46% for C11, C12 and C44, respectively. The bulk modulus decrease 23% and the elastic modulus decreases 29%, which is consistent with experimental measurements. The stability of both the perfect SiC and CA-SiC under hydrostatic tension has been also investigated. All mechanical properties in the CA-SiC exhibit behavior similar to that in perfect SiC, but the critical stress at which the CA-SiC becomes structurally unstable is one order of magnitude smaller than that for perfect SiC.

  3. Elastic properties of sand-peat moss mixtures from ultrasonic measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Trombino, C N

    1998-09-02

    Effective remediation of an environmental site requires extensive knowledge of the geologic setting, as well as the amount and distribution of contaminants. Seismic investigations provide a means to examine the subsurface with minimum disturbance, Laboratory measurements are needed to interpret field data. In this experiment, laboratory tests were performed to characterize manufactured soil samples in terms of their elastic properties. The soil samples consisted of small (mass) percentages (1 to 20 percent) of peat moss mixed with pure quartz sand. Sand was chosen as the major component because its elastic properties are well known except at the lowest pressures. The ultrasonic pulse transmission technique was used to collect elastic wave velocity data. These data were analyzed and mathematically processed to calculate the other elastic properties such as the modulus of elasticity. This experiment demonstrates that seismic data are affected by the amount~of peat moss added to pure sand samples. Elastic wave velocities, velocity gradients, and elastic moduli vary with pressure and peat moss amounts. In particular, ultrasonic response changes dramatically when pore space fills with peat. With some further investigation, the information gathered in this experiment could be applied to seismic field research.

  4. Fixing All Moduli for M-Theory on K3xK3

    SciTech Connect

    Aspinwall, Paul S.; Kallosh, Renata; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2005-06-15

    We analyze M-theory compactified on K3 x K3 with fluxes preserving half the supersymmetry and its F-theory limit, which is dual to an orientifold of the type IIB string on K3 x (T{sup 2}/Z{sub 2}). The geometry of attractive K3 surfaces plays a significant role in the analysis. We prove that the number of choices for the K3 surfaces is finite and we show how they can be completely classified. We list the possibilities in one case. We then study the instanton effects and see that they will generically fix all of the moduli. We also discuss situations where the instanton effects might not fix all the moduli.

  5. Presence or absence of light moduli: The controlling feature for supersymmetry phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Milton; Dine, Michael; Draper, Patrick

    2013-07-01

    Supersymmetry and string theory suggest the existence of light moduli. Their presence, or absence, controls the realization of supersymmetry at low energies. If there are no such fields, or if all such fields are fixed in a supersymmetric fashion, the conventional thermal production of lightest supersymmetric particle dark matter is possible, as is an anomaly-mediated (“mini-split”) spectrum. On the other hand, the axion solution to the strong CP problem is not operative, and slow roll inflation appears difficult to implement. If there are light moduli, a mini-split spectrum is less generic, weakly interacting dark matter appears atypical, and the supersymmetry scale is likely tens of TeV or higher.

  6. Single-crystal elastic constants of disordered and ordered FePd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichitsubo, Tetsu; Tanaka, Katsushi

    2004-12-01

    Single-crystal elastic constants of A1 (fcc disordered) and single-variant L10-ordered FePd alloy are presented. The ordered phase consisting of single-variant domains was formed using the compression method proposed by our previous paper [T. Ichitsubo, M. Nakamoto, K. Tanaka, and M. Koiwa, Mater. Trans. JIM 39, 24 (1998)]. A complete set of elastic constants has been determined with the resonance ultrasound spectroscopy technique. The disordered alloy exhibits common features of usual fcc metals, and the ordered alloy clearly shows a tetragonal elastic anisotropy, c11moduli has also been investigated using a quenched disordered sample. The anisotropy factor 2c44/(c11-c12) is fairly large (about 3.0) at any temperatures, which may be related with the tweed pattern formation observed experimentally in the early stage of ordering.

  7. Finite-element formulations for problems of large elastic-plastic deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmeeking, R. M.; Rice, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    An Eulerian finite element formulation is presented for problems of large elastic-plastic flow. The method is based on Hill's variational principle for incremental deformations, and is ideally suited to isotropically hardening Prandtl-Reuss materials. Further, the formulation is given in a manner which allows any conventional finite element program, for 'small strain' elastic-plastic analysis, to be simply and rigorously adapted to problems involving arbitrary amounts of deformation and arbitrary levels of stress in comparison to plastic deformation moduli. The method is applied to a necking bifurcation analysis of a bar in plane-strain tension. The paper closes with a unified general formulation of finite element equations, both Lagrangian and Eulerian, for large deformations, with arbitrary choice of the conjugate stress and strain measures. Further, a discussion is given of other proposed formulations for elastic-plastic finite element analysis at large strain, and the inadequacies of some of these are commented upon.

  8. An inclusion in one of two joined isotropic elastic half-spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walpole, L. J.

    1997-10-01

    Two dissimilar, homogeneous and istropic, elastic half-spaces are bonded together over thier infinite plane of contract. An arbitrarily shaped finite part of one of them (an inclusion) tends spontaneously to undergo a unifrom infinitesimal strain, but, as it remains attached to and restrained by the surrounding material, an equilibrated state of stress and strain is established everywhere instead. By adopting a convenient expression for the fundamental field of a point force, we transformed inclusion. For a general shape of the inclussion and for particular spherical and finite cylindrical shapes in detail, we consider the evaluation of the elastic strain energy, especially of the interaction term which depends on the location of the inclusion and both pairs of elastic moduli, and which is of great significance in physical applications.

  9. The role of water in the elastic properties of aluminosilicate zeolites: DFT investigation.

    PubMed

    Bryukhanov, Ilya A; Rybakov, Andrey A; Larin, Alexander V; Trubnikov, Dmitry N; Vercauteren, Daniel P

    2017-03-01

    The bulk and Young moduli and heats of hydration have been calculated at the DFT level for fully optimized models of all-siliceous and cationic zeolites with and without water, and then compared to the corresponding experimental data. Upon the addition of water, the monovalent alkali ion and divalent alkaline earth ion exchanged zeolites presented opposite trends in the elastic modulus. The main contribution to the decrease in the elastic modulus of the alkali ion exchanged zeolites appeared to be a shift of cations from the framework oxygen atoms upon water addition, with the coordination number often remaining the same. The contrasting increase in elastic modulus observed for the divalent (alkaline earth) ion exchanged zeolites was explained by cation stabilization resulting from increased coordination, which cannot be achieved within a rigid zeolite framework without water.

  10. Pressure-induced structural phase transition and elastic properties of rare earth Pr chalcogenides and pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Dinesh; Shriya, Swarna; Varshney, Meenu; Khenata, R.

    2015-01-01

    Pressure-induced structural aspects and elastic properties of NaCl-type (B1) to CsCl-type (B2) structure in praseodymium chalcogenides and pnictides are presented. Ground-state properties are numerically computed by considering long-range Coulomb interactions, Hafemeister and Flygare type short-range overlap repulsion, and van der Waals interaction in the interionic potential. From the elastic constants, Poisson's ratio ν, the ratio RG/B of G (shear modulus) over B (bulk modulus), anisotropy parameter, shear and Young's moduli, Lamé's constant, Kleinman parameter, elastic wave velocity and thermodynamical property such as Debye temperature are calculated. Poisson's ratio ν and the ratio RG/B indicate that PrX and PrY are brittle in B1 phase and ductile in B2 phase. To our knowledge, this is the first quantitative theoretical prediction of the ductile (brittle) nature of praseodymium chalcogenides and pnictides and still awaits experimental confirmation.

  11. Thermodynamics of viscous flow and elasticity of glass forming liquids in the glass transition range.

    PubMed

    Rouxel, T

    2011-11-14

    The elastic moduli of glasses from different chemical systems, including oxide, chalcogenide, oxynitride, and metallic, were investigated through the glass transition (T(g)), typically from 0.4 to 1.3 T(g). These data were used to interpret the temperature sensitivity of the shear viscosity coefficient obtained on the same materials. The relevant Gibbs free activation energy was estimated from the apparent heat of flow by means of the temperature dependence of the shear elastic modulus. The activation entropy associated with the viscous flow was also derived and was found to correlate with the fragile versus strong character of the glass forming liquids. Finally, the physicochemistry of the flow process was described on the basis of the glass network de-structuration which shows up through the temperature dependence of Poisson's ratio, and an expression for the shear viscosity coefficient is proposed which is chiefly based on the high temperature elastic behavior.

  12. Elastic Relaxation of Fluid-Driven Cracks and the Resulting Backflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Ching-Yao; Zheng, Zhong; Dressaire, Emilie; Ramon, Guy Z.; Huppert, Herbert E.; Stone, Howard A.

    2016-12-01

    Cracks filled with fluid propagation when the pressurized fluid is injected into the crack. Subsequently, when the fluid inlet is exposed to a lower pressure, the fluid flows backwards (backflow) and the crack closes due to the elastic relaxation of the solid. Here we study the dynamics of the crack closure during the backflow. We find that the crack radius remains constant and the fluid volume in the crack decreases with time in a power-law manner at late times. The balance between the viscous stresses in the fluid and elastic stresses in the fluid and the elastic stresses in the solid yields a scaling law that agrees with the experimental results for different fluid viscosities, Young's moduli of the solid, and initial radii of the cracks. Furthermore, we visualize the time-dependent crack shapes, and the convergence to a universal dimensionless shape demonstrates the self-similarity of the crack shapes during the backflow process.

  13. Thermodynamics of viscous flow and elasticity of glass forming liquids in the glass transition range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouxel, T.

    2011-11-01

    The elastic moduli of glasses from different chemical systems, including oxide, chalcogenide, oxynitride, and metallic, were investigated through the glass transition (Tg), typically from 0.4 to 1.3 Tg. These data were used to interpret the temperature sensitivity of the shear viscosity coefficient obtained on the same materials. The relevant Gibbs free activation energy was estimated from the apparent heat of flow by means of the temperature dependence of the shear elastic modulus. The activation entropy associated with the viscous flow was also derived and was found to correlate with the fragile versus strong character of the glass forming liquids. Finally, the physicochemistry of the flow process was described on the basis of the glass network de-structuration which shows up through the temperature dependence of Poisson's ratio, and an expression for the shear viscosity coefficient is proposed which is chiefly based on the high temperature elastic behavior.

  14. Measurement of elastic constants of monoclinic nickel-titanium and validation of first principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Stebner, A. P.; Brown, D. W.; Brinson, L. C.

    2013-05-27

    Polycrystalline, monoclinic nickel-titanium specimens were subjected to tensile and compressive deformations while neutron diffraction spectra were recorded in situ. Using these data, orientation-specific and macroscopic Young's moduli are determined from analysis of linear-elastic deformation exhibited by 13 unique orientations of monoclinic lattices and their relationships to each macroscopic stress and strain. Five of 13 elastic compliance constants are also identified: s{sub 11} = 1.15, s{sub 15} = -1.10, s{sub 22} = 1.34, s{sub 33} = 1.06, s{sub 35} = -1.54, all Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} GPa{sup -1}. Through these results, recent atomistic calculations of monoclinic nickel-titanium elastic constants are validated.

  15. Squeezing Superfluid from a Stone: Coupling Superfluidity and Elasticity in a Supersolid

    SciTech Connect

    Dorsey, Alan T.; Goldbart, Paul M.; Toner, John

    2006-02-10

    Starting from the assumption that the normal solid to supersolid (NS-SS) phase transition is continuous, we develop a phenomenological Landau theory of the transition in which superfluidity is coupled to the elasticity of the crystalline {sup 4}He lattice. We find that the elasticity does not affect the universal properties of the superfluid transition, so that in an unstressed crystal the well-known {lambda} anomaly in the heat capacity of the superfluid transition should also appear at the NS-SS transition. We also find that the onset of supersolidity leads to anomalies in the elastic moduli and thermal expansion coefficients near the transition and, conversely, that inhomogeneous lattice strains can induce local variations of the superfluid transition temperature, leading to a broadened transition.

  16. Solution of the Eshelby problem in gradient elasticity for multilayer spherical inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov-Bogorodskii, D. B.; Lurie, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    We consider gradient models of elasticity which permit taking into account the characteristic scale parameters of the material. We prove the Papkovich-Neuber theorems, which determine the general form of the gradient solution and the structure of scale effects. We derive the Eshelby integral formula for the gradient moduli of elasticity, which plays the role of the closing equation in the self-consistent three-phase method. In the gradient theory of deformations, we consider the fundamental Eshelby-Christensen problem of determining the effective elastic properties of dispersed composites with spherical inclusions; the exact solution of this problem for classical models was obtained in 1976. This paper is the first to present the exact analytical solution of the Eshelby-Christensen problem for the gradient theory, which permits estimating the influence of scale effects on the stress state and the effective properties of the dispersed composites under study.We also analyze the influence of scale factors.

  17. Influence of elasticity on gap formation in a lining technique with flowable composite.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eitetsu; Chikawa, Hirokazu; Kishikawa, Ryuzo; Inai, Norimichi; Otsuki, Masayuki; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of flowable composites as liners for direct composite restorations, with key focus on the elastic moduli of flowable and condensable composites. After treating the composite mold cavity surface with an adhesive system, one of the flowable composites was placed as a 1 mm-thick layer on the cavity floor and irradiated for 20 seconds. The rest of cavity was subsequently filled with a condensable composite and irradiated for 40 seconds. Gap formation at both interfaces--between the cavity floor and flowable composite, and between the flowable and condensable composites--was examined. No gaps were detected at the interface between the cavity floor and flowable composite. Gap percentage at the interface between the flowable and condensable composites was dependent on the difference in elastic modulus. It was concluded that flowable composite with high elastic modulus could inhibit gap formation between flowable and condensable composites.

  18. Mechanism of Resilin Elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Guokui; Hu, Xiao; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Resilin is critical in the flight and jumping systems of insects as a polymeric rubber-like protein with outstanding elasticity. However, insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for resilin elasticity remains undefined. Here we report the structure and function of resilin from Drosophila CG15920. A reversible beta-turn transition was identified in the peptide encoded by exon III and for full length resilin during energy input and release, features that correlate to the rapid deformation of resilin during functions in vivo. Micellar structures and nano-porous patterns formed after beta-turn structures were present via changes in either the thermal or mechanical inputs. A model is proposed to explain the super elasticity and energy conversion mechanisms of resilin, providing important insight into structure-function relationships for this protein. Further, this model offers a view of elastomeric proteins in general where beta-turn related structures serve as fundamental units of the structure and elasticity. PMID:22893127

  19. On the Young's moduli of Ti-6Al-4V alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Zhongyun . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    In this paper, the authors will present an iterative approach to Young's modulus of multi-phase composites developed by Fan et al. The iterative approach will then be applied to Ti-6Al-4V alloys to predict their effective Young's moduli. It is hoped that the theoretical predictions will offer a quantitative explanation to the peculiar shape of the E[sup c][minus]f[sub [beta

  20. Deflation of elastic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quilliet, Catherine; Quemeneur, François; Marmottant, Philippe; Imhof, Arnout; Pépin-Donat, Brigitte; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2010-03-01

    The deflation of elastic spherical surfaces has been numerically investigated, and show very different types of deformations according the range of elastic parameters, some of them being quantitatively explained through simple calculations. This allows to retrieve various shapes observed on hollow shells (from colloidal to centimeter scale), on lipid vesicles, or on some biological objects. The extension of this process to other geometries allows to modelize vegetal objects such as the ultrafast trap of carnivorous plants.

  1. Constraints on moduli cosmology from the production of dark matter and baryon isocurvature fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoine, Martin; Martin, Jerome; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2009-12-15

    We set constraints on moduli cosmology from the production of dark matter - radiation and baryon -radiation isocurvature fluctuations through modulus decay, assuming the modulus remains light during inflation. We find that the moduli problem becomes worse at the perturbative level as a significant part of the parameter space m{sub {sigma}} (modulus mass) - {sigma}{sub inf} (modulus vacuum expectation value at the end of inflation) is constrained by the nonobservation of significant isocurvature fluctuations. We discuss in detail the evolution of the modulus vacuum expectation value and perturbations, in particular, the consequences of Hubble scale corrections to the modulus potential, and the stochastic motion of the modulus during inflation. We show, in particular, that a high modulus mass scale m{sub {sigma}} > or approx. 100 TeV, which allows the modulus to evade big bang nucleosynthesis constraints is strongly constrained at the perturbative level. We find that generically, solving the moduli problem requires the inflationary scale to be much smaller than 10{sup 13} GeV.

  2. Quasi-residual strain and moduli measurements in materials using embedded acoustic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrold, Ronald T.; Sanjana, Zal N.; Raju, Basavaraju B.

    1996-11-01

    Following the processing and manufacture of resin and composite parts and during their lifetime, the distribution of internal residual strain and any variations in moduli are generally unknown. Real-time information on these parameters would be valuable for improving material performance and reliability. It is believed that measurements related to material residual stresses or strain and moduli can be obtained by measuring the longitudinal wave velocities within acoustic waveguides (AWG) embedded within a material. The concept is that the wave velocities within embedded AWG are related to the material bulk modulus, density and Poisson's Ratio which are all in some degree related to the material state of cure, and finally the internal residual stresses. Based on this concept it is shown that the AWG of different diameters embedded within the same resin part of uniform internal stress distribution, the AWG wave velocities should vary in relation to the square root of the AWG diameter. Experimental results using AWG of 5, 10, 16, 20, 40 and 62 mil diameter Nichrome embedded within Shell 815 clear resin with optically measured uniform strain, demonstrate a direct relationship between AWG velocities and the square root of the AWG diameter. Consequently, it is reasoned that for a part with several embedded AWG, each of the same diameter, then differences in the AWG velocities would yield information on differences in the residual strain and moduli within the part.

  3. Aspects of the moduli space of instantons on C P2 and its orbifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pini, Alessandro; Rodriguez-Gomez, Diego

    2016-01-01

    We study the moduli space of (framed) self-dual instantons on C P2 . These are described by an Atiyah-Drinfeld-Hitchin-Manin (ADHM)-like construction which allows us to compute the Hilbert series of the moduli space. The latter has been found to be blind to certain compact directions. In this paper, we probe these, finding them to correspond to a Grassmanian, upon considering appropriate ungaugings. Moreover, the ADHM-like construction can be embedded into a 3 d gauge theory with a known gravity dual. Using this, we realize in AdS4/CFT3 (part of), the instanton moduli space providing at the same time further evidence supporting the AdS4/CFT3 duality. Moreover, upon orbifolding, we provide the ADHM-like construction of instantons on C P2/Zn as well as compute its Hilbert series. As in the unorbifolded case, these turn out to coincide with those for instantons on C2/Zn .

  4. Effect of a hypergravity environment on cortical bone elasticity in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohles, S. S.; Bowers, J. R.; Vailas, A. C.; Vanderby, R. Jr

    1996-01-01

    There is considerable interest in determining whether hypergravity can be used as a countermeasure for microgravity-induced bone loss. This study was conducted on 20 immature male rats in order to investigate possible elastic adaptations of cortical bone in rapidly growing rats exposed to chronic hypergravity. Ten rats were continuously centrifuged for 14 days at twice gravitational acceleration (2G) on a 12.75 foot radius centrifuge and 10 rats concurrently acted as stationary controls. The effect of hypergravity on the elastic characteristics of cortical bone was quantified via ultrasonic wave propagation. Propagation velocities of longitudinal and shear waves were measured through cubic cortical specimens from the posterior femoral diaphyses. Density was measured with an Archimedes' technique. The orthotropic elastic properties were calculated and used to compare the difference between groups. Results showed an average increase in both the Young's moduli (Eii, + 2.2%) and shear moduli (Gij, + 4.3%) with a statistically significant increase only in G12 (+15.7%, P = 0.046). The ratio of transverse to axial strain (Poisson's ratio, nuij) demonstrated statistically significant changes in nu12, nu21, nu13, and nu31 (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that although slight elastic changes were incurred via a hypergravity environment, the treatment level or duration in this study do not dramatically perturb the normal elastic behavior of cortical bone and that dramatic biomechanical differences noted in previous studies were due more to structural changes than material elasticity changes. Hypergravity applied post facto to a microgravity environment would offer further illucidation of this method as treatment for a degenerative spaceflight experience.

  5. Charged Dust Aggregate Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    A proper understanding of the behavior of dust particle aggregates immersed in a complex plasma first requires a knowledge of the basic properties of the system. Among the most important of these are the net electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments on the dust aggregate as well as the manner in which the aggregate interacts with the local electrostatic fields. The formation of elongated, fractal-like aggregates levitating in the sheath electric field of a weakly ionized RF generated plasma discharge has recently been observed experimentally. The resulting data has shown that as aggregates approach one another, they can both accelerate and rotate. At equilibrium, aggregates are observed to levitate with regular spacing, rotating about their long axis aligned parallel to the sheath electric field. Since gas drag tends to slow any such rotation, energy must be constantly fed into the system in order to sustain it. A numerical model designed to analyze this motion provides both the electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments of the aggregate while including the forces due to thermophoresis, neutral gas drag, and the ion wakefield. This model will be used to investigate the ambient conditions leading to the observed interactions. This research is funded by NSF Grant 1414523.

  6. Shear, Bulk, and Young's Moduli of Clay/Polymer Nanocomposites Containing the Stacks of Intercalated Layers as Pseudoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, Yasser

    2016-10-01

    The pseudoparticles include the stacks of intercalated layers in the case of incomplete clay exfoliation in clay/polymer nanocomposites. In this article, the effects of pseudoparticle properties on the shear, bulk, and Young's moduli of nanocomposites are studied using the Norris model. The properties of pseudoparticles are determined in some samples by the experimental data of Young's modulus and the roles of pseudoparticles in the shear, bulk, and Young's moduli of nanocomposites are discussed. The calculations show a good agreement with the experimental data when the pseudoparticles are taken into account in the samples. A low number of clay layers in the pseudoparticles present high moduli in nanocomposites. Moreover, the Poisson ratio and Young's modulus of polymer matrix play different roles in the shear, bulk, and Young's moduli of nanocomposites.

  7. Aggregate and the environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, William H.; Drew, Lawrence J.; Sachs, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    This book is designed to help you understand our aggregate resources-their importance, where they come from, how they are processed for our use, the environmental concerns related to their mining and processing, how those concerns are addressed, and the policies and regulations designed to safeguard workers, neighbors, and the environment from the negative impacts of aggregate mining. We hope this understanding will help prepare you to be involved in decisions that need to be made-individually and as a society-to be good stewards of our aggregate resources and our living planet.

  8. A particle dynamic model of red blood cell aggregation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Fenech, Marianne; Garcia, Damien; Meiselman, Herbert J; Cloutier, Guy

    2009-11-01

    To elucidate the relationship between microscopic red blood cell (RBC) interactions and macroscopic rheological behavior, we propose a two-dimensional particle model capable of mimicking the main characteristics of RBC aggregation kinetics. The mechanical model of RBCs sheared in Couette flow is based on Newton law. We assumed a hydrodynamic force to move particles, a force to describe aggregation and an elasticity force. The role of molecular mass and concentration of neutral polymers on aggregation [Neu, B., and H. J. Meiselman. Biophys. J. 83:2482-2490, 2002] could be mimicked. Specifically, it was shown that for any shear rate (SR), the mean aggregate size (MAS) grew with time until it reached a constant value, which is consistent with in vitro experiments. It was also demonstrated that we could mimic the modal relationship between MAS and SR and the occurrence of maximum aggregation at about 0.1 s(-1). As anticipated, simulations indicated that an increase in aggregation force augmented MAS. Further, augmentation of the depletion layer thickness influenced MAS only for SR close to zero, which is a new finding. To conclude, our contribution reveals that the aggregation force intensity and SR influence the steady state MAS, and that the depletion and layer thickness affect the aggregation speed.

  9. Second strain gradient elasticity of nano-objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero, Nicolas M.; Forest, Samuel; Busso, Esteban P.

    2016-12-01

    Mindlin's second strain gradient continuum theory for isotropic linear elastic materials is used to model two different kinds of size-dependent surface effects observed in the mechanical behaviour of nano-objects. First, the existence of an initial higher order stress represented by Mindlin's cohesion parameter, b0, makes it possible to account for the relaxation behaviour of traction-free surfaces. Second, the higher order elastic moduli, ci, coupling the strain tensor and its second gradient are shown to significantly affect the apparent elastic properties of nano-beams and nano-films under uni-axial loading. These two effects are independent from each other and allow for separated identification of the corresponding material parameters. Analytical results are provided for the size-dependent apparent shear modulus of a nano-thin strip under shear. Finite element simulations are then performed to derive the dependence of the apparent Young modulus and Poisson ratio of nano-films with respect to their thickness, and to illustrate hole free surface relaxation in a periodic nano-porous material.

  10. Torsional elasticity and energetics of F1-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Czub, Jacek; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2011-05-03

    F(o)F(1)-ATPase is a rotary motor protein synthesizing ATP from ADP driven by a cross-membrane proton gradient. The proton flow through the membrane-embedded F(o) generates the rotary torque that drives the rotation of the asymmetric shaft of F(1). Mechanical energy of the rotating shaft is used by the F(1) catalytic subunit to synthesize ATP. It was suggested that elastic power transmission with transient storage of energy in some compliant part of the shaft is required for the observed high turnover rate. We used atomistic simulations to study the spatial distribution and structural determinants of the F(1) torsional elasticity at the molecular level and to comprehensively characterize the elastic properties of F(1)-ATPase. Our fluctuation analysis revealed an unexpected heterogeneity of the F(1) shaft elasticity. Further, we found that the measured overall torsional moduli of the shaft arise from two distinct contributions, the intrinsic elasticity and the effective potential imposed on the shaft by the catalytic subunit. Separation of these two contributions provided a quantitative description of the coupling between the rotor and the catalytic subunit. This description enabled us to propose a minimal quantitative model of the F(1) energetics along the rotary degrees of freedom near the resting state observed in the crystal structures. As opposed to the usually employed models where the motor mechanical progression is described by a single angular variable, our multidimensional treatment incorporates the spatially inhomogeneous nature of the shaft and its interactions with the stator and offers new insight into the mechanoenzymatics of F(1)-ATPase.

  11. Marine aggregate dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The direction and scope of the Office of Naval Research's Marine Aggregate Dynamics Accelerated Research Initiative will be the topic of an open-house style meeting February 14, 7:30-10:00 P.M. in Ballroom D of the Hyatt Regency New Orleans at the Louisiana Superdome. This meeting is scheduled during the AGU/American Society of Limnology and Oceanography Ocean Sciences Meeting February 12-16 in New Orleans.The critical focus of the ARI is the measurement and modeling of the dynamics of the biological, physical, chemical and molecular processes that drive aggregation and produce aggregates. This new ARI will provide funding in Fiscal Years 1991-1995 to identify and quantify mechanisms that determine the distribution, abundance and size spectrum of aggregated particulate matter in the ocean.

  12. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  13. Aggregation and Averaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Irving H.

    The arithmetic processes of aggregation and averaging are basic to quantitative investigations of employment, unemployment, and related concepts. In explaining these concepts, this report stresses need for accuracy and consistency in measurements, and describes tools for analyzing alternative measures. (BH)

  14. Elastic Properties of the Solid Electrolyte Li7La3Zr2O12 (LLZO)

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Seungho; Schmidt, Robert D.; Garcia-mendez, Regina; Herbert, Erik G.; Dudney, Nancy J.; Wolfenstine, Jeff; Sakamoto, Jeff; Seigel, Donald

    2015-12-16

    The oxide known as LLZO, with nominal composition Li7La3Zr2O12, is a promising solid electrolyte for Li-based batteries due to its high Li-ion conductivity and chemical stability with respect to lithium. Solid electrolytes may also enable the use of metallic Li anodes by serving as a physical barrier that suppresses dendrite initiation and propagation during cycling. Prior linear elasticity models of the Li electrode/solid electrolyte interface suggest that the stability of this interface is highly dependent on the elastic properties of the solid separator. For example, dendritic suppression is predicted to be enhanced as the electrolyte s shear modulus increases. In the present study a combination of first-principles calculations, acoustic impulse excitation measurements, and nanoindentation experiments are used to determine the elastic constants and moduli for highconductivity LLZO compositions based on Al and Ta doping. The calculated and measured isotropic shear moduli are in good agreement and fall within the range of 56-61 GPa. These values are an order of magnitude larger than that for Li metal and far exceed the minimum value ( 8.5 GPa) believed to be necessary to suppress dendrite initiation. These data suggest that LLZO exhibits sufficient stiffness to warrant additional development as a solid electrolyte for Li batteries.

  15. Elastic Properties of the Solid Electrolyte Li7La3Zr2O12 (LLZO)

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Seungho; Schmidt, Robert D.; Garcia-mendez, Regina; ...

    2015-12-16

    The oxide known as LLZO, with nominal composition Li7La3Zr2O12, is a promising solid electrolyte for Li-based batteries due to its high Li-ion conductivity and chemical stability with respect to lithium. Solid electrolytes may also enable the use of metallic Li anodes by serving as a physical barrier that suppresses dendrite initiation and propagation during cycling. Prior linear elasticity models of the Li electrode/solid electrolyte interface suggest that the stability of this interface is highly dependent on the elastic properties of the solid separator. For example, dendritic suppression is predicted to be enhanced as the electrolyte s shear modulus increases. Inmore » the present study a combination of first-principles calculations, acoustic impulse excitation measurements, and nanoindentation experiments are used to determine the elastic constants and moduli for highconductivity LLZO compositions based on Al and Ta doping. The calculated and measured isotropic shear moduli are in good agreement and fall within the range of 56-61 GPa. These values are an order of magnitude larger than that for Li metal and far exceed the minimum value ( 8.5 GPa) believed to be necessary to suppress dendrite initiation. These data suggest that LLZO exhibits sufficient stiffness to warrant additional development as a solid electrolyte for Li batteries.« less

  16. Temperature-dependent elastic properties of brain tissues measured with the shear wave elastography method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Lin; Li, Guo-Yang; He, Ping; Mao, Ze-Qi; Cao, Yanping

    2017-01-01

    Determining the mechanical properties of brain tissues is essential in such cases as the surgery planning and surgical training using virtual reality based simulators, trauma research and the diagnosis of some diseases that alter the elastic properties of brain tissues. Here, we suggest a protocol to measure the temperature-dependent elastic properties of brain tissues in physiological saline using the shear wave elastography method. Experiments have been conducted on six porcine brains. Our results show that the shear moduli of brain tissues decrease approximately linearly with a slope of -0.041±0.006kPa/°C when the temperature T increases from room temperature (~23°C) to body temperature (~37°C). A case study has been further conducted which shows that the shear moduli are insensitive to the temperature variation when T is in the range of 37 to 43°C and will increase when T is higher than 43°C. With the present experimental setup, temperature-dependent elastic properties of brain tissues can be measured in a simulated physiological environment and a non-destructive manner. Thus the method suggested here offers a unique tool for the mechanical characterization of brain tissues with potential applications in brain biomechanics research.

  17. Explaining the mechanical mechanisms of zeolitic metal-organic frameworks: revealing auxeticity and anomalous elasticity.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Matthew R; Tan, Jin-Chong

    2016-03-14

    The comprehensive elastic properties of Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks (ZIF-1 to ZIF-4) have been computed using density functional theory (DFT). We employed the periodic CRYSTAL14 code to calculate the single-crystal elastic coefficients (Cij) at the B3LYP level of theory. While the chemical compositions of ZIFs-1 to -4 are the same, each structure features a distinct network topology, crystal symmetry and porosity configuration, which translate into differential structure-function mechanical correlations. We elucidate the anisotropic mechanical response with respect to the directionally dependent Young's and shear moduli properties. Our theoretical results suggest that ZIF-3 adopting a dft topology has an extremely low shear resistance (Gmin = 0.1 GPa), which is also underpinning the flexible mechanism responsible for its negative Poisson's ratio (auxetic νmin = -0.43). Interestingly, we identified that ZIF-1, ZIF-2, and ZIF-4 could exhibit a nearly zero Poisson's ratio for certain crystal orientations, which is reminescent of a rare "cork-like" phenomenon where there is practically no lateral deformation corresponding to an applied axial strain. Furthermore, we determined the bulk moduli and linear compressibilities, alongside the averaged elastic properties of the ZIF polycrystals.

  18. Elasticity of polymeric nanocolloidal particles

    PubMed Central

    Riest, Jonas; Athanasopoulou, Labrini; Egorov, Sergei A.; Likos, Christos N.; Ziherl, Primož

    2015-01-01

    Softness is an essential mechanical feature of macromolecular particles such as polymer-grafted nanocolloids, polyelectrolyte networks, cross-linked microgels as well as block copolymer and dendrimer micelles. Elasticity of individual particles directly controls their swelling, wetting, and adsorption behaviour, their aggregation and self-assembly as well as structural and rheological properties of suspensions. Here we use numerical simulations and self-consistent field theory to study the deformation behaviour of a single spherical polymer brush upon diametral compression. We observe a universal response, which is rationalised using scaling arguments and interpreted in terms of two coarse-grained models. At small and intermediate compressions the deformation can be accurately reproduced by modelling the brush as a liquid drop, whereas at large compressions the brush behaves as a soft ball. Applicable far beyond the pairwise-additive small-strain regime, the models may be used to describe microelasticity of nanocolloids in severe confinement including dense disordered and crystalline phases. PMID:26522242

  19. Effect of chain length and unsaturation on elasticity of lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Rawicz, W; Olbrich, K C; McIntosh, T; Needham, D; Evans, E

    2000-01-01

    Micropipette pressurization of giant bilayer vesicles was used to measure both elastic bending k(c) and area stretch K(A) moduli of fluid-phase phosphatidylcholine (PC) membranes. Twelve diacyl PCs were chosen: eight with two 18 carbon chains and degrees of unsaturation from one double bond (C18:1/0, C18:0/1) to six double bonds per lipid (diC18:3), two with short saturated carbon chains (diC13:0, diC14:0), and two with long unsaturated carbon chains (diC20:4, diC22:1). Bending moduli were derived from measurements of apparent expansion in vesicle surface area under very low tensions (0.001-0.5 mN/m), which is dominated by smoothing of thermal bending undulations. Area stretch moduli were obtained from measurements of vesicle surface expansion under high tensions (>0.5 mN/m), which involve an increase in area per molecule and a small-but important-contribution from smoothing of residual thermal undulations. The direct stretch moduli varied little (< +/-10%) with either chain unsaturation or length about a mean of 243 mN/m. On the other hand, the bending moduli of saturated/monounsaturated chain PCs increased progressively with chain length from 0.56 x 10(-19) J for diC13:0 to 1.2 x 10(-19) J for diC22:1. However, quite unexpectedly for longer chains, the bending moduli dropped precipitously to approximately 0.4 x 10(-19) J when two or more cis double bonds were present in a chain (C18:0/2, diC18:2, diC18:3, diC20:4). Given nearly constant area stretch moduli, the variations in bending rigidity with chain length and polyunsaturation implied significant variations in thickness. To test this hypothesis, peak-to-peak headgroup thicknesses h(pp) of bilayers were obtained from x-ray diffraction of multibilayer arrays at controlled relative humidities. For saturated/monounsaturated chain bilayers, the distances h(pp) increased smoothly from diC13:0 to diC22:1 as expected. Moreover, the distances and elastic properties correlated well with a polymer brush model of the

  20. An elastic second skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Betty; Kang, Soo-Young; Akthakul, Ariya; Ramadurai, Nithin; Pilkenton, Morgan; Patel, Alpesh; Nashat, Amir; Anderson, Daniel G.; Sakamoto, Fernanda H.; Gilchrest, Barbara A.; Anderson, R. Rox; Langer, Robert

    2016-08-01

    We report the synthesis and application of an elastic, wearable crosslinked polymer layer (XPL) that mimics the properties of normal, youthful skin. XPL is made of a tunable polysiloxane-based material that can be engineered with specific elasticity, contractility, adhesion, tensile strength and occlusivity. XPL can be topically applied, rapidly curing at the skin interface without the need for heat- or light-mediated activation. In a pilot human study, we examined the performance of a prototype XPL that has a tensile modulus matching normal skin responses at low strain (<40%), and that withstands elongations exceeding 250%, elastically recoiling with minimal strain-energy loss on repeated deformation. The application of XPL to the herniated lower eyelid fat pads of 12 subjects resulted in an average 2-grade decrease in herniation appearance in a 5-point severity scale. The XPL platform may offer advanced solutions to compromised skin barrier function, pharmaceutical delivery and wound dressings.

  1. Elastic constants of calcite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peselnick, L.; Robie, R.A.

    1962-01-01

    The recent measurements of the elastic constants of calcite by Reddy and Subrahmanyam (1960) disagree with the values obtained independently by Voigt (1910) and Bhimasenachar (1945). The present authors, using an ultrasonic pulse technique at 3 Mc and 25??C, determined the elastic constants of calcite using the exact equations governing the wave velocities in the single crystal. The results are C11=13.7, C33=8.11, C44=3.50, C12=4.82, C13=5.68, and C14=-2.00, in units of 1011 dyncm2. Independent checks of several of the elastic constants were made employing other directions and polarizations of the wave velocities. With the exception of C13, these values substantially agree with the data of Voigt and Bhimasenachar. ?? 1962 The American Institute of Physics.

  2. Thermo-elastic behavior of deformed woven fabric composites at elevated temperatures: Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Vu-Khanh, T.; Liu, B.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents the results of a study on the effects of temperature on the thermo-elastic properties of woven fabric composites. The thermo-mechanical behavior of woven fabric composites is characterized by a laminate composed of four fictional unidirectional plies, called the sub-plies model. The model allows determination of the thermo-elastic properties of deformed fabric composites (non-orthogonal structure) and direct use of layered shell elements in finite element codes. A special procedure is also proposed to measure the fiber undulation effect and to predict the on-axis thermo-elastic coefficients of the equivalent constituent plies. The thermo-elastic behavior at elevated temperature was investigated on graphite/epoxy fabric composites. Experimental measurements were carried out from 23 C to 177 C. The results revealed that the equivalent thermal expansion coefficients of the sub-plies remain almost constant over a wide range of temperature. However, the equivalent elastic moduli and Poison`s ratio of the sub-plies vary nonlinearly with temperature. Semiempirical equations based on the experimental data were also developed to predict the equivalent on-axis thermo-elastic properties of the fictional constituent plies in the sub-plies model as a function of temperature.

  3. Elastic model of supercoiling.

    PubMed Central

    Benham, C J

    1977-01-01

    An elastic model for the supercoiling of duplex DNA is developed. The simplest assumptions regarding the elastic properties of double-helical DNA (homogeneous, isotropic, of circular cross section, and remaining straight when unstressed) will generate two orders of superhelicity when stressed. Recent experimental results [Brady, G.W., Fein, D.B. & Brumberger, H. (1976) Nature 264, 231-234] suggest that in supercoiled DNA molecules there are regions where two distinct orders of supercoiling arise, as predicted by this model. PMID:267934

  4. Low Activation Joining of SiC/SiC Composites for Fusion Applications: Modeling Miniature Torsion Tests with Elastic and Elastic-Plastic Models

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kurtz, Richard J.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Borlaug, Brennan A.; Ferraris, Monica; Ventrella, Andrea; Katoh, Yutai

    2015-03-01

    The use of SiC and SiC-composites in fission or fusion environments requires joining methods for assembling systems. The international fusion community designed miniature torsion specimens for joint testing and irradiation in test reactors with limited irradiation volumes. These torsion specimens fail out-of-plane when joints are strong and when elastic moduli are within a certain range compared to SiC, which causes difficulties in determining shear strengths for joints or for comparing unirradiated and irradiated joints. A finite element damage model was developed that indicates fracture is likely to occur within the joined pieces to cause out-of-plane failures for miniature torsion specimens when a certain modulus and strength ratio between the joint material and the joined material exists. The model was extended to treat elastic-plastic joints such as SiC/epoxy and steel/epoxy joints tested as validation of the specimen design.

  5. Elastic modulus measurements of LDEF glasses and glass-ceramics using a speckle technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedlocher, D. E.; Kinser, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    Elastic moduli of five glass types and the glass-ceramic Zerodur, exposed to a near-earth orbit environment on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), were compared to that of unexposed samples. A double exposure speckle photography technique utilizing 633 nm laser light was used in the production of the speckle pattern. Subsequent illumination of a double exposed negative using the same wavelength radiation produces Young's fringes from which the in-plane displacements are measured. Stresses imposed by compressive loading produced measurable strains in the glasses and glass-ceramic.

  6. Structural, elastic, and electronic properties of new superhard isotropic cubic crystals of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enyashin, A. N.; Ivanovskii, A. L.

    2008-05-01

    The models of new isotropic cubic crystals of single-layered carbon nanotubes are proposed. The structural, elastic, and electronic properties and the energies of formation of these crystals were calculated using the density functional-based tight binding (DFTB) method. The crystals proposed were found to exhibit extreme compression moduli (550-650 GPa) and a minimum compressibility (0.0018-0.0015 GPa-1); in this case, the type of conduction of the parent nanotubes was retained. For this reason, the above crystals are of interest for the development of new superhard materials with controllable electrophysical properties.

  7. Measuring the elastic properties of living cells with atomic force microscopy indentation.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Joanna L; Kumar, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful and versatile tool for probing the mechanical properties of biological samples. This chapter describes the procedures for using AFM indentation to measure the elastic moduli of living cells. We include step-by-step instructions for cantilever calibration and data acquisition using a combined AFM/optical microscope system, as well as a detailed protocol for data analysis. Our protocol is written specifically for the BioScope™ Catalyst™ AFM system (Bruker AXS Inc.); however, most of the general concepts can be readily translated to other commercial systems.

  8. Rheology of pig skin gelatine: Defining the elastic domain and its thermal and mechanical properties for geological analogue experiment applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Otterloo, Jozua; Cruden, Alexander R.

    2016-06-01

    Gelatine is a viscoelastic polymer that has been employed widely in geological analogue experiments to study processes related to the elastic behaviour of rocks such as tensile fracturing, seismicity and magma intrusion. However, the elastic domain of this material has not yet been clearly defined by rheological tests. Here we describe the rheology and define the elastic domain of 250 bloom/20 mesh pigskin gelatine at concentrations ≤ 10 wt.% and temperatures of 5-25 °C; however, these results are strongly comparable with gelatine of 245-260 bloom. New equations are given for the shear and elastic moduli in relationship to temperature and gelatine concentration. It is found that at concentrations ≤ 3 wt.% the tested gelatine is best described by a rheological model composed of a combination of Kelvin-Voight and Maxwell elements and, therefore, is not suitable to model elastic behaviour in geological analogue experiments. At higher concentrations it is best described by a simpler viscoelastic model comprising a single Maxwell element. In order to ensure that geological analogue experiments remain within the elastic domain where the elastic component is far greater than the viscous component, strain rates should range between 0.1 and 10 s- 1 and temperature values should be < 15 °C. With a Poisson's ratio of 0.45 for concentrations > 3 wt.% analogue experiments using gelatine approximate the elastic behaviour of natural rocks more closely than previously assumed.

  9. Fibronectin Aggregation and Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Tomoo; Erickson, Harold P.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of fibronectin (FN) assembly and the self-association sites are still unclear and contradictory, although the N-terminal 70-kDa region (I1–9) is commonly accepted as one of the assembly sites. We previously found that I1–9 binds to superfibronectin, which is an artificial FN aggregate induced by anastellin. In the present study, we found that I1–9 bound to the aggregate formed by anastellin and a small FN fragment, III1–2. An engineered disulfide bond in III2, which stabilizes folding, inhibited aggregation, but a disulfide bond in III1 did not. A gelatin precipitation assay showed that I1–9 did not interact with anastellin, III1, III2, III1–2, or several III1–2 mutants including III1–2KADA. (In contrast to previous studies, we found that the III1–2KADA mutant was identical in conformation to wild-type III1–2.) Because I1–9 only bound to the aggregate and the unfolding of III2 played a role in aggregation, we generated a III2 domain that was destabilized by deletion of the G strand. This mutant bound I1–9 as shown by the gelatin precipitation assay and fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis, and it inhibited FN matrix assembly when added to cell culture. Next, we introduced disulfide mutations into full-length FN. Three disulfide locks in III2, III3, and III11 were required to dramatically reduce anastellin-induced aggregation. When we tested the disulfide mutants in cell culture, only the disulfide bond in III2 reduced the FN matrix. These results suggest that the unfolding of III2 is one of the key factors for FN aggregation and assembly. PMID:21949131

  10. Feeding strategies as revealed by the section moduli of the humerus bones in bipedal theropod dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Scott; Richards, Zachary

    2015-03-01

    The section modulus of a bone is a measure of its ability to resist bending torques. Carnivorous dinosaurs presumably had strong arm bones to hold struggling prey during hunting. Some theropods are believed to have become herbivorous and such animals would not have needed such strong arms. In this work, the section moduli of the humerus bones of bipedal theropod dinosaurs (from Microvenator celer to Tyrannosaurus rex) are studied to determine the maximum bending loads their arms could withstand. The results show that bending strength is not of uniform importance to these magnificent animals. The predatory theropods had strong arms for use in hunting. In contrast, the herbivorous dinosaurs had weaker arms.

  11. Moduli stabilization, F-term uplifting, and soft supersymmetry breaking terms

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Higaki, Tetsutaro; Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Omura, Yuji

    2007-01-15

    We study moduli stabilization with F-term uplifting. As a source of uplifting F-term, we consider spontaneous supersymmetry breaking models, e.g. the Polonyi model and the Intriligator-Seiberg-Shih model. We analyze potential minima by requiring almost vanishing vacuum energy and evaluate the size of modulus F-term. We also study soft SUSY-breaking terms. In our scenario, the mirage mediation is dominant in gaugino masses. Scalar masses can be comparable with gaugino masses or much heavier, depending on couplings with spontaneous supersymmetry breaking sector.

  12. Sugar does not affect the bending and tilt moduli of simple lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Nagle, John F; Jablin, Michael S; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie

    2016-03-01

    The diffuse X-ray scattering method has been applied to samples composed of SOPC, DOPC, DMPC, and POPC with added sugar, either sucrose, glucose, fructose, maltose, or trehalose. Several sugar concentrations in the range 200-500 mM were investigated for each of the lipid/sugar samples. We observed no systematic change in the bending modulus KC or in the tilt modulus Kθ with increasing sugar concentration. The average values of both these moduli were the same as those of the respective pure lipid controls within statistical uncertainty of 2%. These results are inconsistent with previous reports of sugar concentration dependent values of KC.

  13. Mssm-Like AdS Flux Vacua with Frozen Open-String Moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ching-Ming; Li, Tianjun; Mayes, Van Eric; Nanopoulos, D. V.

    We construct supersymmetric Pati-Salam flux vacua in AdS from intersecting D6-branes on T6/(ℤ2 × ℤ‧2). The models constructed have three generations of MSSM matter plus right-handed neutrinos. Because the cycles wrapped by the D-branes are rigid there are no extra massless fields in the adjoint representation, arising as open-string moduli. However, we find that it is problematic to break the Pati-Salam gauge symmetry to the Standard Model (SM) while keeping the SM hypercharge massless.

  14. The Law of Elasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cocco, Alberto; Masin, Sergio Cesare

    2010-01-01

    Participants estimated the imagined elongation of a spring while they were imagining that a load was stretching the spring. This elongation turned out to be a multiplicative function of spring length and load weight--a cognitive law analogous to Hooke's law of elasticity. Participants also estimated the total imagined elongation of springs joined…

  15. Elastic swimming I: Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric; Yu, Tony; Hosoi, Anette

    2006-03-01

    We consider the problem of swimming at low Reynolds number by oscillating an elastic filament in a viscous liquid, as investigated by Wiggins and Goldstein (1998, Phys Rev Lett). In this first part of the study, we characterize the optimal forcing conditions of the swimming strategy and its optimal geometrical characteristics.

  16. Elastic swimming II: Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tony; Lauga, Eric; Hosoi, Anette

    2006-03-01

    We consider the problem of swimming at low Reynolds number by oscillating an elastic filament in a viscous liquid, as investigated by Wiggins and Goldstein (1998, Phys Rev Lett). In this second part of the study, we present results of a series of experiments characterizing the performance of the propulsive mechanism.

  17. Hydrodynamic Elastic Magneto Plastic

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, M. L.; Levatin, J. A.

    1985-02-01

    The HEMP code solves the conservation equations of two-dimensional elastic-plastic flow, in plane x-y coordinates or in cylindrical symmetry around the x-axis. Provisions for calculation of fixed boundaries, free surfaces, pistons, and boundary slide planes have been included, along with other special conditions.

  18. Elastic and Inelastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul

    2010-01-01

    There have been two articles in this journal that described a pair of collision carts used to demonstrate vividly the difference between elastic and inelastic collisions. One cart had a series of washers that were mounted rigidly on a rigid wooden framework, the other had washers mounted on rubber bands stretched across a framework. The rigidly…

  19. Elastic Granular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Charles

    2006-03-01

    There is no fundamental understanding of the mechanics of granular solids. Partially this is because granular flows have historically been divided into two very distinct flow regimes, (1) the slow, quasistatic regime, in which the bulk friction coefficient is taken to be a material constant, and (2) the fast, rapid-flow regime, where the particles interact collisionally. But slow hopper flow simulations indicate that the bulk friction coefficient is not a constant. Rapidly moving large scale landslide simulations never entered the collisional regime and operate in a separate intermediate flow regime. In other words, most realistic granular flows are not described by either the quasistatic or rapid flow models and it is high time that the field look beyond those early models. This talk will discuss computer simulation studies that draw out the entire flowmap of shearing granular materials, spanning the quasistatic, rapid and the intermediate regimes. The key was to include the elastic properties of the solid material in the set of rheological parameters; in effect, this puts solid properties back into the rheology of granular solids. The solid properties were previously unnecessary in the plasticity and kinetic theory formalisms that respectively form the foundations of the quasistatic and rapid-flow theories. Granular flows can now be divided into two broad categories, the Elastic Regimes, in which the particles are locked in force chains and interact elastically over long duration contact with their neighbors and the Inertial regimes, where the particles have broken free of the force chains. The Elastic regimes can be further subdivided into the Elastic-Quasistatic regime (the old quasistatic regime) and the Elastic-Inertial regime. The Elastic-Inertial regime is the ``new'' regime observed in the landslide simulations, in which the inertially induced stresses are significant compared to the elastically induced stresses. The Inertial regime can also be sub

  20. Elastic properties of chemical-vapor-deposited monolayer MoS2, WS2, and their bilayer heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Yan, Qimin; Chen, Michelle; Fan, Wen; Sun, Yinghui; Suh, Joonki; Fu, Deyi; Lee, Sangwook; Zhou, Jian; Tongay, Sefaattin; Ji, Jie; Neaton, Jeffrey B; Wu, Junqiao

    2014-09-10

    Elastic properties of materials are an important factor in their integration in applications. Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) monolayer semiconductors are proposed as key components in industrial-scale flexible devices and building blocks of two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals heterostructures. However, their mechanical and elastic properties have not been fully characterized. Here we report high 2D elastic moduli of CVD monolayer MoS2 and WS2 (∼170 N/m), which is very close to the value of exfoliated MoS2 monolayers and almost half the value of the strongest material, graphene. The 2D moduli of their bilayer heterostructures are lower than the sum of 2D modulus of each layer but comparable to the corresponding bilayer homostructure, implying similar interactions between the hetero monolayers as between homo monolayers. These results not only provide deep insight into understanding interlayer interactions in 2D van der Waals structures but also potentially allow engineering of their elastic properties as desired.

  1. Correlation between relaxations and plastic deformation, and elastic model of flow in metallic glasses and glass-forming liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Weihua

    2011-09-01

    We study the similarity and correlations between relaxations and plastic deformation in metallic glasses (MGs) and MG-forming liquids. It is shown that the microscope plastic events, the initiation and formation of shear bands, and the mechanical yield in MGs where the atomic sites are topologically unstable induced by applied stress, can be treated as the glass to supercooled liquid state transition induced by external shear stress. On the other hand, the glass transition, the primary and secondary relaxations, plastic deformation and yield can be attributed to the free volume increase induced flow, and the flow can be modeled as the activated hopping between the inherent states in the potential energy landscape. We then propose an extended elastic model to describe the flow based on the energy landscape theory. That is, the flow activation energy density is linear proportional to the instantaneous elastic moduli, and the activation energy density {rho}{sub E} is determined to be a simple expression of {rho}{sub E}=(10/11)G+(1/11)K. The model indicates that both shear and bulk moduli are critical parameters accounting for both the homogeneous and inhomogeneous flows in MGs and MG-forming liquids. The elastic model is experimentally certified. We show that the elastic perspectives offers a simple scenario for the flow in MGs and MG-forming liquids and are suggestive for understanding the glass transition, plastic deformation, and nature and characteristics of MGs.

  2. Technology meets aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.; Swan, C.

    2007-07-01

    New technology carried out at Tufts University and the University of Massachusetts on synthetic lightweight aggregate has created material from various qualities of fly ash from coal-fired power plants for use in different engineered applications. In pilot scale manufacturing tests an 'SLA' containing 80% fly ash and 20% mixed plastic waste from packaging was produced by 'dry blending' mixed plastic with high carbon fly ash. A trial run was completed to produce concrete masonry unit (CMU) blocks at a full-scale facility. It has been shown that SLA can be used as a partial substitution of a traditional stone aggregate in hot asphalt mix. 1 fig., 2 photos.

  3. Development of construction materials using nano-silica and aggregates recycled from construction and demolition waste.

    PubMed

    Mukharjee, Bibhuti Bhusan; Barai, Sudhirkumar V

    2015-06-01

    The present work addresses the development of novel construction materials utilising commercial grade nano-silica and recycled aggregates retrieved from construction and demolition waste. For this, experimental work has been carried out to examine the influence of nano-silica and recycled aggregates on compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, water absorption, density and volume of voids of concrete. Fully natural and recycled aggregate concrete mixes are designed by replacing cement with three levels (0.75%, 1.5% and 3%) of nano-silica. The results of the present investigation depict that improvement in early days compressive strength is achieved with the incorporation of nano-silica in addition to the restoration of reduction in compressive strength of recycled aggregate concrete mixes caused owing to the replacement of natural aggregates by recycled aggregates. Moreover, the increase in water absorption and volume of voids with a reduction of bulk density was detected with the incorporation of recycled aggregates in place of natural aggregates. However, enhancement in density and reduction in water absorption and volume of voids of recycled aggregate concrete resulted from the addition of nano-silica. In addition, the results of the study reveal that nano-silica has no significant effect on elastic modulus of concrete.

  4. Moduli of curve families and (quasi-)conformality of power-law entropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalogeropoulos, Nikos

    2016-03-01

    We present aspects of the moduli of curve families on a metric measure space which may prove useful in calculating, or in providing bounds to, non-additive entropies having a power-law functional form. We use as paradigmatic cases the calculations of the moduli of curve families for a cylinder and for an annulus in ℝn. The underlying motivation for these studies is that the definitions and some properties of the modulus of a curve family resembles those of the Tsallis entropy, when the latter is seen from a micro-canonical viewpoint. We comment on the origin of the conjectured invariance of the Tsallis entropy under Möbius transformations of the non-extensive (entropic) parameter. Needing techniques applicable to both locally Euclidean and fractal classes of spaces, we examine the behavior of the Tsallis functional, via the modulus, under quasi-conformal maps. We comment on properties of such maps and their possible significance for the dynamical foundations of power-law entropies.

  5. Surface dilational moduli of poly (ethylene oxide), poly (methyl methacrylate), and their blend films.

    PubMed

    Kato, Satoaki; Kawaguchi, Masami

    2012-10-15

    Surface dilational moduli of poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO), poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), and compatible PEO/PMMA blend films spread at the air-water interface were investigated as a function of surface concentration. The surface dilational modulus of an expanded PEO film increased as the surface concentration increased to 0.4 mg/m(2), which corresponds to the limiting surface area of PEO. After peaking at this value, the surface dilational modulus decreased with an increase in the PEO concentration. Lissajous orbits of PEO films exhibited positive hysteresis loops for all surface concentration ranges. On the other hand, the surface dilational modulus of a condensed PMMA film steeply increased as the surface concentration increased. Lissajous orbits of PMMA films changed from positive hysteresis loops to negative loops at the surface concentration at which the surface pressure reached in the plateau region. The magnitude of the surface dilational modulus of PMMA was larger than that of PEO at a fixed surface concentration. The surface dilational moduli of the PEO/PMMA blend films increased with the total surface concentration and their magnitudes were less than those of the individual PMMA films and larger than those of the individual PEO films at fixed surface concentrations. Lissajous orbits of the PEO/PMMA blend films also changed from positive hysteresis loops to negative loops beyond the surface concentration at which the plateau surface pressure of PEO was attained.

  6. Spreading and spontaneous motility of multicellular aggregates on soft substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochard-Wyart, Françoise

    2013-03-01

    We first describe the biomechanics of multicellular aggregates, a model system for tissues and tumors. We first characterize the tissue mechanical properties (surface tension, elasticity, viscosity) by a new pipette aspiration technique. The aggregate exhibits a viscoelastic response but, unlike an inert fluid, we observe aggregate reinforcement with pressure, which for a narrow range of pressures results in pulsed contractions or shivering. We interpret this reinforcement as a mechanosensitive active response of the acto-myosin cortex. Such an active behavior has previously been found to cause tissue pulsation during dorsal closure of Drosophila embryo. We then describe the spreading of aggregates on rigid glass substrates, varying both intercellular and substrate adhesion. We find both partial and complete wetting regimes. For the dynamics, we find a universal spreading law at short time, analogous to that of a viscoelastic drop. At long time, we observe, for strong substrate adhesion, a precursor film spreading around the aggregate. Depending on aggregate cohesion, this precursor film can be a dense cellular monolayer (liquid state) or consist of individual cells escaping from the aggregate body (gas state). The transition from liquid to gas state appears also to be present in the progression of a tumor from noninvasive to metastatic, known as the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Finally, we describe the effect of the substrate rigidity on the phase diagram of wetting. On soft gels decorated with fibronectin and strongly cohesive aggregates, we have observed a wetting transition induced by the substrate rigidity: on ultra soft gels, below an elastic modulus Ec the aggregates do not spread, whereas above Ec we observe a precursor film expending with a diffusive law. The diffusion coefficient D(E) present a maximum for E =Em. A maximum of mobility versus the substrate rigidity had also been observed for single cells. Near Em, we observe a new phenomenon: a cell

  7. Pressure and Temperature Dependence of the Elasticity of Pyrope-Majorite [Py60Mj40 and Py50Mj50] Garnets Solid Solution Measured by Ultrasonic Interferometry Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Gwanmesia, G.; Wang, L; Tripletta, R; Liebermann, R

    2009-01-01

    Compressional (P) and shear (S) wave velocities have been measured for two synthetic polycrystalline specimens of pyrope-majorite garnets [Py60Mj40 and Py50Mj50] by ultrasonic interferometry to 8 GPa and 1000 K, in a DIA-type cubic anvil high pressure apparatus (SAM-85) interfaced with synchrotron X-radiation and X-ray imaging. Elastic bulk (KS) and shear (G) moduli data obtained at the end of the cooling cycles were fitted to functions of Eulerian strain to third order yielding pressure derivatives of the elastic moduli (?KS/?P)T = 4.3 (3); (?G/?P)T = 1.5 (1) for Py60Mj40 garnet and (?KS/?P)T = 4.4 (1); (?G/?P)T = 1.3 (1) for Py50Mj40 garnet. Both (?KS/?P)T and (?G/?P)T are identical for the two garnet compositions and are also consistent with Brillouin scattering data for polycrystalline Py50Mj50. Moreover, the new pressure derivatives of the elastic moduli are equal within experimental uncertainties to those of end-member pyrope garnet from ultrasonic studies.

  8. Aggregates, broccoli and cauliflower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grey, Francois; Kjems, Jørgen K.

    1989-09-01

    Naturally grown structures with fractal characters like broccoli and cauliflower are discussed and compared with DLA-type aggregates. It is suggested that the branching density can be used to characterize the growth process and an experimental method to determine this parameter is proposed.

  9. Thermal expansion and elastic anisotropy in single crystal Al2O3 and SiC reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Li, Zhuang; Bradt, Richard C.

    1994-01-01

    In single crystal form, SiC and Al2O3 are attractive reinforcing components for high temperature composites. In this study, the axial coefficients of thermal expansion and single crystal elastic constants of SiC and Al2O3 were used to determine their coefficients of thermal expansion and Young's moduli as a function of crystallographic orientation and temperature. SiC and Al2O3 exhibit a strong variation of Young's modulus with orientation; however, their moduli and anisotropies are weak functions of temperature below 1000 C. The coefficients of thermal expansion exhibit significant temperature dependence, and that of the non-cubic Al2O3 is also a function of crystallographic orientation.

  10. Linear Elastic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revenough, Justin

    Elastic waves propagating in simple media manifest a surprisingly rich collection of phenomena. Although some can't withstand the complexities of Earth's structure, the majority only grow more interesting and more important as remote sensing probes for seismologists studying the planet's interior. To fully mine the information carried to the surface by seismic waves, seismologists must produce accurate models of the waves. Great strides have been made in this regard. Problems that were entirely intractable a decade ago are now routinely solved on inexpensive workstations. The mathematical representations of waves coded into algorithms have grown vastly more sophisticated and are troubled by many fewer approximations, enforced symmetries, and limitations. They are far from straightforward, and seismologists using them need a firm grasp on wave propagation in simple media. Linear Elastic Waves, by applied mathematician John G. Harris, responds to this need.

  11. Series elastic actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Matthew M.

    1995-01-01

    This thesis presents the design, construction, control and evaluation of a novel for controlled actuator. Traditional force controlled actuators are designed from the premise that 'Stiffer is better'. This approach gives a high bandwidth system, prone to problems of contact instability, noise, and low power density. The actuator presented in this thesis is designed from the premise that 'Stiffness isn't everything'. The actuator, which incorporates a series elastic element, trades off achievable bandwidth for gains in stable, low noise force control, and protection against shock loads. This thesis reviews related work in robot force control, presents theoretical descriptions of the control and expected performance from a series elastic actuator, and describes the design of a test actuator constructed to gather performance data. Finally the performance of the system is evaluated by comparing the performance data to theoretical predictions.

  12. Elastic Properties of Molecular Glass Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Jessica

    2011-12-01

    This dissertation provides a fundamental understanding of the impact of bulk polymer properties on the nanometer length scale modulus. The elastic modulus of amorphous organic thin films is examined using a surface wrinkling technique. Potential correlations between thin film behavior and intrinsic properties such as flexibility and chain length are explored. Thermal properties, glass transition temperature (Tg) and the coefficient of thermal expansion, are examined along with the moduli of these thin films. It is found that the nanometer length scale behavior of flexible polymers correlates to its bulk Tg and not the polymers intrinsic size. It is also found that decreases in the modulus of ultrathin flexible films is not correlated with the observed Tg decrease in films of the same thickness. Techniques to circumvent reductions from bulk modulus were also demonstrated. However, as chain flexibility is reduced the modulus becomes thickness independent down to 10 nm. Similarly for this series minor reductions in T g were obtained. To further understand the impact of the intrinsic size and processing conditions; this wrinkling instability was also utilized to determine the modulus of small organic electronic materials at various deposition conditions. Lastly, this wrinkling instability is exploited for development of poly furfuryl alcohol wrinkles. A two-step wrinkling process is developed via an acid catalyzed polymerization of a drop cast solution of furfuryl alcohol and photo acid generator. The ability to control the surface topology and tune the wrinkle wavelength with processing parameters such as substrate temperature and photo acid generator concentration is also demonstrated. Well-ordered linear, circular, and curvilinear patterns are also obtained by selective ultraviolet exposure and polymerization of the furfuryl alcohol film. As a carbon precursor a thorough understanding of this wrinkling instability can have applications in a wide variety of

  13. Elastic plate spallation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oline, L.; Medaglia, J.

    1972-01-01

    The dynamic finite element method was used to investigate elastic stress waves in a plate. Strain displacement and stress strain relations are discussed along with the stiffness and mass matrix. The results of studying point load, and distributed load over small, intermediate, and large radii are reported. The derivation of finite element matrices, and the derivation of lumped and consistent matrices for one dimensional problems with Laplace transfer solutions are included. The computer program JMMSPALL is also included.

  14. First-principles study of structural and elastic properties of monoclinic and orthorhombic BiMnO3.

    PubMed

    Mei, Zhi-Gang; Shang, Shun-Li; Wang, Yi; Liu, Zi-Kui

    2010-07-28

    The structural and elastic properties of BiMnO(3) with monoclinic (C 2/c) and orthorhombic (Pnma) ferromagnetic (FM) structures have been studied by first-principles calculations within LDA + U and GGA + U approaches. The equilibrium volumes and bulk moduli of BiMnO(3) phases are evaluated by equation of state (EOS) fittings, and the bulk properties predicted by LDA + U calculations are in better agreement with experiment. The orthorhombic phase is found to be more stable than the monoclinic phase at ambient pressure. A monoclinic to monoclinic phase transition is predicted to occur at a pressure of about 10 GPa, which is ascribed to magnetism versus volume instability of monoclinic BiMnO(3). The single-crystal elastic stiffness constants c(ij)s of the monoclinic and orthorhombic phases are investigated using the stress-strain method. The c(46) of the monoclinic phase is predicted to be negative. In addition, the polycrystalline elastic properties including bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, bulk modulus-shear modulus ratio, Poisson's ratio, and elastic anisotropy ratio are determined based on the calculated elastic constants. The presently predicted phase transition and elastic properties open new directions for investigation of the phase transitions in BiMnO(3), and provide helpful guidance for the future elastic constant measurements.

  15. Proxy model materials to simulate the elastic properties of digested municipal sludge.

    PubMed

    Eshtiaghi, Nicky; Markis, Flora; Baudez, Jean-Christophe; Slatter, Paul

    2013-10-01

    The elastic rheological properties of sludge are complex and evolve with time as a result of ageing and microbial activity. Due to the peculiar nature of sludge, this makes the measurement of physical parameters difficul. The challenge is to identify a reference material that can be used as a proxy for industrial process design or optimization. In this study, respectively the mixtures of 0.5%, 0.7% and 1% glass beads suspension in water have been added to 0.5%, 0.7% and 1% carbopol dissolved in water and neutralized with NaOH to prepare gel, at different ratios. Elastic and loss moduli have been determined for different glass bead suspension ratios in the range of 0%-80%. The results showed that there is a critical glass bead suspension/carbopol ratio at which the elastic properties of the mixture changes dramatically. The elastic properties of these model mixtures of different glass bead/carbopol ratio suspensions are compared with the elastic property of municipal sludge sampled from a Melbourne Waste Water Treatment Plant, and similarity established.

  16. Elastic modulus and viscoelastic properties of full thickness skin characterised at micro scales.

    PubMed

    Crichton, Michael L; Chen, Xianfeng; Huang, Han; Kendall, Mark A F

    2013-03-01

    The recent emergence of micro-devices for vaccine delivery into upper layers of the skin holds potential for increased immune responses using physical means to target abundant immune cell populations. A challenge in doing this has been a limited understanding of the skin elastic properties at the micro scale (i.e. on the order of a cell diameter; ~10 μm). Here, we quantify skin's elastic properties at a micro-scale by fabricating customised probes of scales from sub- to super-cellular (0.5 μm-20 μm radius). We then probe full thickness skin; first with force-relaxation experiments and subsequently by elastic indentations. We find that skin's viscoelastic response is scale-independent: consistently a ~40% decrease in normalised force over the first second, followed by further 10% reduction over 10 s. Using Prony series and Hertzian contact analyses, we determined the strain-rate independent elastic moduli of the skin. A high scale dependency was found: the smallest probe encountered the highest elastic modulus (~30 MPa), whereas the 20 μm radius probe was lowest (below 1 MPa). We propose that this may be a result of the load distribution in skin facilitated by the hard corneocytes in the outermost skin layers, and softer living cell layers below.

  17. Elastic modulus affects the growth and differentiation of neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xian-feng; Yang, Kai; Yang, Xiao-qing; Liu, Ying-fu; Cheng, Yuan-chi; Chen, Xu-yi; Tu, Yue

    2015-01-01

    It remains poorly understood if carrier hardness, elastic modulus, and contact area affect neural stem cell growth and differentiation. Tensile tests show that the elastic moduli of Tiansu and SMI silicone membranes are lower than that of an ordinary dish, while the elastic modulus of SMI silicone membrane is lower than that of Tiansu silicone membrane. Neural stem cells from the cerebral cortex of embryonic day 16 Sprague-Dawley rats were seeded onto ordinary dishes as well as Tiansu silicone membrane and SMI silicone membrane. Light microscopy showed that neural stem cells on all three carriers show improved adherence. After 7 days of differentiation, neuron specific enolase, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and myelin basic protein expression was detected by immunofluorescence. Moreover, flow cytometry revealed a higher rate of neural stem cell differentiation into astrocytes on Tiansu and SMI silicone membranes than on the ordinary dish, which was also higher on the SMI than the Tiansu silicone membrane. These findings confirm that all three cell carrier types have good biocompatibility, while SMI and Tiansu silicone membranes exhibit good mechanical homogenization. Thus, elastic modulus affects neural stem cell differentiation into various nerve cells. Within a certain range, a smaller elastic modulus results in a more obvious trend of cell differentiation into astrocytes. PMID:26604916

  18. Elasticity of nanoparticles influences their blood circulation, phagocytosis, endocytosis, and targeting.

    PubMed

    Anselmo, Aaron C; Zhang, Mengwen; Kumar, Sunny; Vogus, Douglas R; Menegatti, Stefano; Helgeson, Matthew E; Mitragotri, Samir

    2015-03-24

    The impact of physical and chemical modifications of nanoparticles on their biological function has been systemically investigated and exploited to improve their circulation and targeting. However, the impact of nanoparticles' flexibility (i.e., elastic modulus) on their function has been explored to a far lesser extent, and the potential benefits of tuning nanoparticle elasticity are not clear. Here, we describe a method to synthesize polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based hydrogel nanoparticles of uniform size (200 nm) with elastic moduli ranging from 0.255 to 3000 kPa. These particles are used to investigate the role of particle elasticity on key functions including blood circulation time, biodistribution, antibody-mediated targeting, endocytosis, and phagocytosis. Our results demonstrate that softer nanoparticles (10 kPa) offer enhanced circulation and subsequently enhanced targeting compared to harder nanoparticles (3000 kPa) in vivo. Furthermore, in vitro experiments show that softer nanoparticles exhibit significantly reduced cellular uptake in immune cells (J774 macrophages), endothelial cells (bEnd.3), and cancer cells (4T1). Tuning nanoparticle elasticity potentially offers a method to improve the biological fate of nanoparticles by offering enhanced circulation, reduced immune system uptake, and improved targeting.

  19. Study of in vitro RBCs membrane elasticity with AOD scanning optical tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Song, Huadong; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Bin; Tian, Kangzhen; Zhu, Panpan; Lu, Hao; Tang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    The elasticity of red cell membrane is a critical physiological index for the activity of RBC. Study of the inherent mechanism for RBCs membrane elasticity transformation is attention-getting all along. This paper proposes an optimized measurement method of erythrocytes membrane shear modulus incorporating acousto-optic deflector (AOD) scanning optical tweezers system. By use of this method, both membrane shear moduli and sizes of RBCs with different in vitro times were determined. The experimental results reveal that the RBCs membrane elasticity and size decline with in vitro time extension. In addition, semi quantitative measurements of S-nitrosothiol content in blood using fluorescent spectrometry during in vitro storage show that RBCs membrane elasticity change is positively associated with the S-nitrosylation level of blood. The analysis considered that the diminished activity of the nitric oxide synthase makes the S-nitrosylation of in vitro blood weaker gradually. The main reason for worse elasticity of the in vitro RBCs is that S-nitrosylation effect of spectrin fades. These results will provide a guideline for further study of in vitro cells activity and other clinical applications. PMID:28101425

  20. Elastic stability and electronic structure of pyrite type PtN2: Ahard semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Rong; Zhan, Qian; Zhang, Xiao-Feng

    2006-08-29

    The elastic properties and electronic structure of PtN2 withthe pyrite structure (PtN2(C2)) were studied with first-principlescalculations. The crystal structure is demonstrated to be elasticallystable with a lower energy than the metastable fluorite structureproposed before. The calculated shear modulus of 214 GPa suggests thatPtN2(C2) is harder than some well known hard materials such as TiN andSiC. The high elastic moduli are attributed to a stacking ofcorner-shared PtN6 octahedra bonded by strong N-N covalent bonding. Incontrast to the metallic fluorite-type phase, PtN2(C2) is semiconductingwith an indirect band gap.

  1. Finite element formulations for problems of large elastic-plastic deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmeeking, R. M.; Rice, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    An Eulerian finite element formulation is presented for problems of large elastic-plastic flow. The method is based on Hill's variational principle for incremental deformations, and is suited to isotropically hardening Prandtl-Reuss materials. The formulation is given in a manner which allows any conventional finite element program, for "small strain" elasticplastic analysis, to be simply and rigorously adapted to problems involving arbitrary amounts of deformation and arbitrary levels of stress in comparison to plastic deformation moduli. The method is applied to a necking bifurcation analysis of a bar in plane-strain tension. A unified general formulation of finite element equations, both Lagrangian and Eulerian, for large deformations, with arbitrary choice of the conjugate stress and strain measures, and a discussion is given of other proposed formulations for elastic-plastic finite element analysis at large strain.

  2. Two-vortex interactions and elastic constants in type II superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Miesenboeck, H.M.

    1984-07-01

    The elastic energy of a distorted flux-line lattice is calculated on the basis of a two-vortex interaction. Such a description is completely sufficient throughout the whole induction range between the upper and lower critical fields H/sub c//sub 1/ and H/sub c//sub 2/. Therefore it is possible to calculate all elastic moduli from a common potential consisting of two parts, one of a combined ''electromagnetic London type,'' the other based on the core overlap of the flux lines. The results are highly nonlocal and are in agreement with previous calculations of Brandt, but are modified near H/sub c//sub 1/ for small k (the ratio between the penetration depth and the coherence length).

  3. The effect of dopant incorporation on the elastic properties of Ti metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, N. C.; McGregor, K.; Gibson, M. A.; Russo, S. P.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of dopant atoms on the structural and elastic properties of α titanium is examined through the use of density functional theory. The effect of 66 dopant atoms, from H through the third row transition metal elements, were considered in this study. In all cases the dopant concentration was approximately 3 at%, with substitutional incorporation investigated for all atoms considered and interstitial incorporation investigated for a smaller subset of elements. Interstitial incorporation was calculated to be more energetically favourable for the elements H, B to F, S and Cl with these dopants coordinating octahedrally with the surrounding Ti atoms, while substitutional incorporation was found to be more stable for the other elements. The five independent single crystal elastic constants are calculated, along with the bulk and shear moduli. The energetics and mechanically stability associated with the alloying of various dopants is also discussed.

  4. ELEMENTARY APPROACH TO SELF-ASSEMBLY AND ELASTIC PROPERTIES OF RANDOM COPOLYMERS

    SciTech Connect

    S. M. CHITANVIS

    2000-10-01

    The authors have mapped the physics of a system of random copolymers onto a time-dependent density functional-type field theory using techniques of functional integration. Time in the theory is merely a label for the location of a given monomer along the extent of a flexible chain. We derive heuristically within this approach a non-local constraint which prevents segments on chains in the system from straying too far from each other, and leads to self-assembly. The structure factor is then computed in a straightforward fashion. The long wave-length limit of the structure factor is used to obtain the elastic modulus of the network. It is shown that there is a surprising competition between the degree of micro-phase separation and the elastic moduli of the system.

  5. Elastic properties of compressed crystalline Ne in the model of deformable atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, E. P.; Chabanenko, V. V.; Zhikharev, I. V.; Gorbenko, Ie. Ie.; Pilipenko, E. A.

    2013-02-01

    An ab initio version of the model with deformable atoms has been constructed to investigate the elastic properties of compressed crystalline neon. Approximations for the calculating parameters of quadrupole deformation of atomic electron shells have been discussed. It has been shown that the pressure dependence of the deviation from the Cauchy relation δ is the result of two competitive interactions, namely, the many-body and electron-phonon interactions, which manifests itself in the deformation of atomic electron shells during the shift of nuclei. In the case of Ne, contributions of these interactions are compensated to a large degree, which provides a weakly pressure-dependent positive value for δ. The agreement of calculated elastic moduli and deviations from the Cauchy relation for Ne with the experiment is good.

  6. Nonlinear postbuckling of imperfect doubly curved thin shallow FGM shells resting on elastic foundations and subjected to mechanical loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Nguyen Dinh; Quan, Tran Quoc

    2013-11-01

    The nonlinear response of buckling and posbuckling of imperfect thin functionally graded doubly curved thin shallow shells resting on elastic foundations and subjected to some mechanical loads is investigated analytically. The elastic moduli of materials, Young's modulus, and Poisson ratio are all graded in the shell thickness direction according to a simple power-law in terms of volume fractions of constituents. All formulations are based on the classical theory of shells with account of geometrical nonlinearity, an initial geometrical imperfection, and a Pasternak-type elastic foundation. By employing the Galerkin method, explicit relations for the load-deflection curves of simply supported doubly curved shallow FGM shells are determined. The effects of material and geometrical properties, foundation stiffness, and imperfection of shells on the buckling and postbuckling loadcarrying capacity of spherical and cylindrical shallow FGM shells are analyzed and discussed.

  7. Structural, electronic and elastic properties of the cubic CaTiO{sub 3} under pressure: A DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Tariq, Saad Ahmed, Afaq; Tariq, Samar; Saad, Saher

    2015-07-15

    Using highly accurate FP-LAPW method with GGA approximation structural, electronic and elastic properties of cubic CaTiO{sub 3} have been calculated from 0-120 GPa range of pressure. It is observed that lattice constant, bond length and anisotropy factor decrease with increase in pressure. Also the brittle nature and indirect band-gap of the compound become ductile and direct band-gap respectively at 120 GPa. Moduli of elasticity, density of the material, Debye temperature and wave elastic wave velocities increase with increase in pressure. Spin dependent DOS’s plots show invariant anti-ferromagnetic nature of the compound under pressure. Our calculated results are in good agreement with available theoretical and experimental results.

  8. A Theoretical Investigation of the Effect of Pressure on the Structural, Elastic and Mechanical Properties of ZnS Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güler, E.; Güler, M.

    2015-06-01

    Structural, elastic, and mechanical properties of blende-type zinc sulfide ( bt-ZnS) were investigated under pressures up to 20 GPa. Unlike previous theoretical calculations, an existing mixed-type interatomic potential was applied with geometry optimization calculations. B3 → B1 phase transition pressure was obtained as 17 GPa under zero pressure and temperature. Pressure dependence of typical cubic elastic constants, bulk, shear and Young moduli, elastic wave velocities, Kleinman parameter, static and high-frequency dielectric constants of bt-ZnS were also obtained. Overall, our results for the considered parameters of bt-ZnS are in good agreement with experiments and better than those of several available theoretical data.

  9. Helfrich model of membrane bending: from Gibbs theory of liquid interfaces to membranes as thick anisotropic elastic layers.

    PubMed

    Campelo, Felix; Arnarez, Clement; Marrink, Siewert J; Kozlov, Michael M

    2014-06-01

    Helfrich model of membrane bending elasticity has been most influential in establishment and development of Soft-Matter Physics of lipid bilayers and biological membranes. Recently, Helfrich theory has been extensively used in Cell Biology to understand the phenomena of shaping, fusion and fission of cellular membranes. The general background of Helfrich theory on the one hand, and the ways of specifying the model parameters on the other, are important for quantitative treatment of particular biologically relevant membrane phenomena. Here we present the origin of Helfrich model within the context of the general Gibbs theory of capillary interfaces, and review the strategies of computing the membrane elastic moduli based on considering a lipid monolayer as a three-dimensional thick layer characterized by trans-monolayer profiles of elastic parameters. We present the results of original computations of these profiles by a state-of-the-art numerical approach.

  10. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: First-Principles Calculations of Elastic and Thermal Properties of Molybdenum Disilicide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zun-Lue; Fu, Hong-Zhi; Sun, Jin-Feng; Liu, Yu-Fang; Shi, De-Heng; Xu, Guo-Liang

    2009-08-01

    The first-principles plane-wave pseudopotential method using the generalized gradient approximation within the framework of density functional theory is applied to anaylse the equilibrium lattice parameters, six independent elastic constants, bulk moduli, thermal expansions and heat capacities of MoSi2. The quasi-harmonic Debye model, using a set of total energy versus cell volume obtained with the plane-wave pseudopotential method, is applied to the study of the elastic properties, thermodynamic properties and vibrational effects. The calculated zero pressure elastic constants are in overall good agreement with the experimental data. The calculated heat capacities and the thermal expansions agree well with the observed values under ambient conditions and those calculated by others. The results show that the temperature has hardly any effect under high pressure.

  11. Model for the dynamics of a spherical bubble undergoing small shape oscillations between parallel soft elastic layers

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Todd A.; Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2013-01-01

    A model is developed for a pulsating and translating gas bubble immersed in liquid in a channel formed by two soft, thin elastic parallel layers having densities equal to that of the surrounding liquid and small, but finite, shear moduli. The bubble is nominally spherical but free to undergo small shape deformations. Shear strain in the elastic layers is estimated in a way which is valid for short, transient excitations of the system. Coupled nonlinear second-order differential equations are obtained for the shape and position of the bubble, and numerical integration of an expression for the liquid velocity at the layer interfaces yields an estimate of the elastic layer displacement. Numerical integration of the dynamical equations reveals behavior consistent with laboratory observations of acoustically excited bubbles in ex vivo vessels reported by Chen et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 034301 (2011) and Ultrasound Med. Biol. 37, 2139–2148 (2011)]. PMID:23927185

  12. In-situ neutron diffraction of LaCoO{sub 3} perovskite under uniaxial compression. II. Elastic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lugovy, Mykola; Aman, Amjad; Orlovskaya, Nina; Chen, Yan; Kuebler, Jakob; Graule, Thomas; Reece, Michael J.; Ma, Dong; Stoica, Alexandru D.; An, Ke

    2014-07-07

    Calculations of elastic constants and development of elastic anisotropy under uniaxial compression in originally isotropic polycrystalline LaCoO{sub 3} perovskite are reported. The lattice strains in individual (hkl) planes as well as average lattice strain were determined both for planes oriented perpendicular and parallel to the loading direction using in-situ neutron diffraction. Utilizing average lattice strains as well as lattice strains along the a and c crystallographic directions, an attempt was made to determine Poisson's ratio of LaCoO{sub 3}, which was then compared with that measured using an impulse excitation technique. The elastic constants were calculated and Young's moduli of LaCoO{sub 3} single crystal in different crystallographic directions were estimated.

  13. First-principles study of the elastic and thermodynamic properties of CaSiO(3) perovskite.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z J; Sun, X W; Chen, Q F; Cai, L C; Wu, H Y; Ge, S H

    2007-06-20

    The thermodynamic and elastic properties of CaSiO(3) perovskite are investigated at high pressures and temperatures using the plane wave pseudopotential method within the local density approximation. The athermal elastic moduli of CaSiO(3) perovskite are calculated as a function of pressure up to 200 GPa. The calculated results are in excellent agreement with available experimental data at high pressure, and compare favourably with other pseudopotential predictions over the pressure regime studied. It is also found that the elastic anisotropy drops rapidly with the increase of pressure initially, and then decreases more slowly at higher pressures. The thermodynamic properties of CaSiO(3) perovskite are predicted using the quasi-harmonic Debye model for the first time; the heat capacity and the thermal expansion coefficient agree with the observed values at ambient conditions and the other calculations at high pressures and temperatures.

  14. The transmission or scattering of elastic waves by an inhomogeneity of simple geometry: A comparison of theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheu, Y. C.; Fu, L. S.

    1982-01-01

    The extended method of equivalent inclusion developed is applied to study the specific wave problems of the transmission of elastic waves in an infinite medium containing a layer of inhomogeneity, and of the scattering of elastic waves in an infinite medium containing a perfect spherical inhomogeneity. The eigenstrains are expanded as a geometric series and the method of integration for the inhomogeneous Helmholtz operator given by Fu and Mura is adopted. The results obtained by using a limited number of terms in the eigenstrain expansion are compared with exact solutions for the layer problem and for a perfect sphere. Two parameters are singled out for this comparison: the ratio of elastic moduli, and the ratio of the mass densities. General trends for three different situations are shown.

  15. Elastic velocities of partially gas-saturated unconsolidated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.

    2004-01-01

    Fluid in sediments significantly affects elastic properties of sediments and gas in the pore space can be identified by a marked reduction of P-wave velocity or a decrease of Poisson's ratio. The elastic properties of gas-saturated sediments can be predicted by the classical Biot-Gassmann theory (BGT). However, parameters for the BGT such as the Biot coefficient or moduli of dry frame of unconsolidated and high porosity sediments are not readily available. Dependence of velocities on differential pressure or porosity for partially gas-saturated sediments is formulated using properties derived from velocities of water-saturated sediments. Laboratory samples for unconsolidated and consolidated sediments and well log data acquired for unconsolidated marine sediments agree well with the predictions. However, because the P-wave velocity depends highly on how the gas is saturated in the pore space such as uniform or patch, the amounts of gas estimated from the P-wave velocity contains high uncertainty. The modeled Vp/Vs ratio of partially gas-saturated sediment using the patch distribution is usually greater than 1.6, whereas the ratio modeled assuming a uniform distribution is about 1.6. Thus, Poisson's ratio or Vp/Vs ratio may be used to differentiate patch from uniform saturation, but differences between various models of patch saturation cannot be easily identified. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Elasticity of Wadsleyite at 12 GPa1073K

    SciTech Connect

    W Liu; J Kung; B Li; N Nishiyama; Y Wang

    2011-12-31

    Elasticity of (Mg{sub 0.87}Fe{sub 0.13}){sub 2}SiO{sub 4} wadsleyite has been measured at simultaneous high pressure and high temperature to 12 GPa and 1073 K using ultrasonic interferometry in conjunction with synchrotron X-radiation. The elastic moduli and their pressure and temperature derivatives are precisely determined using pressure-standard-free third-order and fourth-order finite strain equations. Combined with previous thermoelastic data on olivine, the density, velocity and acoustic impedance contrasts between {alpha}- and {beta}-(Mg{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1}){sub 2}SiO{sub 4} at 410-km depth are calculated along a 1673 K adiabatic geotherm. Both the third- and fourth-order finite strain equation fitting results give estimation of {approx}33-58% olivine content in the upper mantle to account for a seismic discontinuity of {approx}5% velocity jumps, and 8.5% (P wave) and 11.1% (S wave) impedance jumps at 410 km depth.

  17. Characterization of nuclear graphite elastic properties using laser ultrasonic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Fan W.; Han, Karen; Olasov, Lauren R.; Gallego, Nidia C.; Contescu, Cristian I.; Spicer, James B.

    2015-05-01

    Laser ultrasonic methods have been used to characterize the elastic behaviors of commercially-available and legacy nuclear graphites. Since ultrasonic techniques are sensitive to various aspects of graphite microstructure including preferred grain orientation, microcrack orientation and porosity, laser ultrasonics is a candidate technique for monitoring graphite degradation and structural integrity in environments expected in high-temperature, gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Aspects of materials texture can be assessed by studying ultrasonic wavespeeds as a function of propagation direction and polarization. Shear wave birefringence measurements, in particular, can be used to evaluate elastic anisotropy. In this work, laser ultrasonic measurements of graphite moduli have been made to provide insight into the relationship between the microstructures and the macroscopic stiffnesses of these materials. In particular, laser ultrasonic measurements have been made using laser line sources to produce shear waves with specific polarizations. By varying the line orientation relative to the sample, shear wave birefringence measurements have been recorded. Results from shear wave birefringence measurements show that an isostatically molded graphite, such as PCIB, behaves isotropically, while an extruded graphite, such as H-451, displays significant ultrasonic texture. Graphites have complicated microstructures that depend on the manufacturing processes used, and ultrasonic texture in these materials could originate from grain orientation and preferred microcrack alignment. Effects on material isotropy due to service related microstructural changes are possible and the ultimate aim of this work is to determine the degree to which these changes can be assessed nondestructively using laser ultrasonics measurements.

  18. Elasticity dominated surface segregation of small molecules in polymer mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croce, Salvatore; Krawczyk, Jaroslaw; McLeish, Tom; Chakrabarti, Buddhapriya

    When a binary polymer mixture with mobile components is left to equilibrate, the low molecular weight component migrates to the free surface. A balance between loss of translational entropy and gain in surface energy dictates the equilibrium partitioning ratio and the migrant fraction. Despite its ubiquity and several theoretical and experimental investigations, the phenomenon is not fully understood. Further, methods by which migration can be controlled are in its nascent stage of development. We propose a new phenomenological free energy functional that incorporates the elasticity of bulk polymer mixtures (reticulated networks and gels) and show (using mean field and self-consistent field theories) that the migrant fraction decreases with increasing the bulk modulus of the system. Further, a wetting transition observed otherwise for large values of miscibility parameter and polymerization index can be avoided by increasing the elastic modulus of the system. Estimated values of moduli (for the effect to be observable) are akin to those of rubbery polymers. Our work paves the way for controlling surface migration in complex industrial formulations with polymeric ingredients where this effect leads to decreased product stability and performance.

  19. Effective elastic mechanical properties of single layer graphene sheets.

    PubMed

    Scarpa, F; Adhikari, S; Srikantha Phani, A

    2009-02-11

    The elastic moduli of single layer graphene sheet (SLGS) have been a subject of intensive research in recent years. Calculations of these effective properties range from molecular dynamic simulations to use of structural mechanical models. On the basis of mathematical models and calculation methods, several different results have been obtained and these are available in the literature. Existing mechanical models employ Euler-Bernoulli beams rigidly jointed to the lattice atoms. In this paper we propose truss-type analytical models and an approach based on cellular material mechanics theory to describe the in-plane linear elastic properties of the single layer graphene sheets. In the cellular material model, the C-C bonds are represented by equivalent mechanical beams having full stretching, hinging, bending and deep shear beam deformation mechanisms. Closed form expressions for Young's modulus, the shear modulus and Poisson's ratio for the graphene sheets are derived in terms of the equivalent mechanical C-C bond properties. The models presented provide not only quantitative information about the mechanical properties of SLGS, but also insight into the equivalent mechanical deformation mechanisms when the SLGS undergoes small strain uniaxial and pure shear loading. The analytical and numerical results from finite element simulations show good agreement with existing numerical values in the open literature. A peculiar marked auxetic behaviour for the C-C bonds is identified for single graphene sheets under pure shear loading.

  20. Modular elastic patches – mechanical and biological effects

    PubMed Central

    Serban, Monica A.; Kluge, Jonathan A.; Laha, Michael M.; Kaplan, David L.

    2010-01-01

    A modular approach to engineering crosslinked elastic biomaterials is presented for fine tuning of material mechanical and biological properties. The three components, soluble elastin, hyaluronic acid and silk fibroin, contribute with different features to the overall properties of the final material system. The elastic biomaterial is chemically crosslinked via interaction between primary amine groups naturally present on the two proteins, silk and elastin, or chemically introduced on hyaluronan and N-succinimide functionalities of the crosslinker. The materials obtained by crosslinking the three components in different ratios have Young’s moduli ranging from ~700 kPa to 100 kPa, strain to failure between ~ 65-15 % and ultimate tensile strengths of ~ 50 to 20 kPa. The biological effects and enzymatic degradation rates of the different composites are also different based on material composition. These findings further underline the strength of modular, multi-component systems in creating a range of biomaterials, targeted tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications, with application-tailored mechanical and biological properties. PMID:20712340

  1. Characterization of nuclear graphite elastic properties using laser ultrasonic methods

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Fan W; Han, Karen; Olasov, Lauren R; Gallego, Nidia C; Contescu, Cristian I; Spicer, James B

    2015-01-01

    Laser ultrasonic methods have been used to characterize the elastic behaviors of commercially-available and legacy nuclear graphites. Since ultrasonic techniques are sensitive to various aspects of graphite microstructure including preferred grain orientation, microcrack orientation and porosity, laser ultrasonics is a candidate technique for monitoring graphite degradation and structural integrity in environments expected in high-temperature, gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Aspects of materials texture can be assessed by studying ultrasonic wavespeeds as a function of propagation direction and polarization. Shear wave birefringence measurements, in particular, can be used to evaluate elastic anisotropy. In this work, laser ultrasonic measurements of graphite moduli have been made to provide insight into the relationship between the microstructures and the macroscopic stiffnesses of these materials. In particular, laser ultrasonic measurements have been made using laser line sources to produce shear waves with specific polarizations. By varying the line orientation relative to the sample, shear wave birefringence measurements have been recorded. Results from shear wave birefringence measurements show that an isostatically molded graphite, such as PCIB, behaves isotropically, while an extruded graphite, such as H-451, displays significant ultrasonic texture. Graphites have complicated microstructures that depend on the manufacturing processes used, and ultrasonic texture in these materials could originate from grain orientation and preferred microcrack alignment. Effects on material isotropy due to service related microstructural changes are possible and the ultimate aim of this work is to determine the degree to which these changes can be assessed nondestructively using laser ultrasonics measurements

  2. Asymptotic analysis of mathematical models for elastic composite media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkov, S. K.

    The main subject of the thesis is the asymptotic analysis of models in mechanics of composite materials. It is based on the extension of the theory of the Polya-Szego tensors to the problems of homogenization and fracture. Such a technique allows one to obtain an asymptotic solution to a problem where most of numerical algorithms fail due to the presence of a singular perturbation. As a result of this work, a number of interesting effects have been found in optimization of composites and inverse problems of crack-inclusion interaction. Chapter 1 is an introductory chapter that contains the main definitions and bibliographical remarks. In Chapter 2 the Polya-Szego dipole tensors are employed for analysis of plane elasticity problems in non-homogeneous media. Classes of equivalence for defects (cavities and rigid inclusions) are specified for the Laplace and Navier operators: composite materials with defects of the same class have the same effective elastic moduli. Explicit asymptotic formulae for the effective compliance matrices of dilute composites are obtained. The problem of the optimal cavity shape is analyzed in Chapter 3. The analysis uses the Polya-Szego tensors calculated in Chapter 2. A new type of structure which is optimal for shear loading has been found. Properties of the optimal cavity are described. The crack-inclusion interaction problem considered in Chapter 4 has been solved by the asymptotic methods. An analysis of crack trajectories is performed in Chapter 5 for different types of defects and interface conditions. The algorithm employs the Polya-Szego tensors as integral characteristics describing the defect. Comparison with experimental data (Ceramic Centre, Bologna) is presented. In Chapter 6 we use the method of compound asymptotic expansions to treat the homogenization problem for thin-walled composites. The technique of boundary layer fields is employed to derive the junction condition in the region connecting thin walls. The asymptotic

  3. Low Activation Joining of SiC/SiC Composites for Fusion Applications: Modeling Miniature Torsion Tests with Elastic and Elastic-Plastic Models

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kurtz, Richard J.; Ferraris, Monica; Katoh, Yutai

    2015-06-30

    The international fusion community designed miniature torsion specimens for joint testing and irradiation in test reactors with limited irradiation volumes since SiC and SiC-composites used in fission or fusion environments require joining methods for assembling systems. Torsion specimens fail out-of-plane when joints are strong and when elastic moduli are comparable to SiC, which causes difficulties in determining shear strengths for many joints or for comparing unirradiated and irradiated joints. A finite element damage model was developed to treat elastic joints such as SiC/Ti3SiC2+SiC and elastic-plastic joints such as SiC/epoxy and steel/epoxy. The model uses constitutive shear data and is validated using epoxy joint data. The elastic model indicates fracture is likely to occur within the joined pieces to cause out-of-plane failures for miniature torsion specimens when a certain modulus and strength ratio between the joint material and the joined material exists. Lower modulus epoxy joints always fail in plane and provide good model validation.

  4. Phase stability, elastic anisotropy and electronic structure of cubic MAl2 (M = Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) Laves phases from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Yuanyuan; Duan, Yonghua; Ma, Lishi; Li, Runyue

    2016-10-01

    By performing first-principles calculations within the generalized gradient approximation, the phase stability, elastic constant and anisotropy, and density of states of cubic C15-type MAl2 (M = Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) Laves phases have been investigated. Optimized equilibrium lattice parameters and formation enthalpies agree well with the available experimental data. Elastic constants C ij have been evaluated, and these C15-type MAl2 Laves phases are mechanically stable due to the meeting of C ij to the mechanical stability criteria. Polycrystalline elastic moduli have been deduced from elastic constants by Voigt-Reuss-Hill approximation. Plastic properties were characterized via values of B/G, Poisson’s ratio ν and Cauchy pressure (C 12-C 44). The elastic anisotropy has been considered by several anisotropy indexes (A U , A Z , A shear and A comp), anisotropy of shear modulus, and 3D surface constructions of bulk and Young’s moduli. Additionally, the sound velocity anisotropy and Debye temperature were predicted. Finally, electronic structures were carried out to reveal the underlying phase stability mechanism of these Laves phases.

  5. Converting strain maps into elasticity maps for materials with small contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellis, Cédric

    2017-01-01

    This study addresses the question of the quantitative reconstruction of heterogeneous distributions of isotropic elastic moduli from full strain field data. This parameter identification problem exposes the need for a local reconstruction procedure that is investigated here in the case of materials with small contrast. To begin with the integral formulation framework for the periodic linear elasticity problem, first- and second-order asymptotics are retained for the strain field solution and the effective elasticity tensor. Properties of the featured Green's tensor are investigated to characterize its decomposition into an isotropic term and an orthogonal part. The former is then shown to define a local contribution to the volume integral equations considered. Based on this property, then the combination of multiple strain field solutions corresponding to well-chosen applied macroscopic strains is shown to lead to a set of local and uncoupled identities relating, respectively, the bulk and shear moduli to the spherical and deviatoric components of the strain fields. Valid at the first-order in the weak contrast limit, such relations permit point-wise conversions of strain maps into elasticity maps. Furthermore, it is also shown that for macroscopically isotropic material configurations a single strain field solution is actually sufficient to reconstruct either the bulk or the shear modulus distribution. Those results are then revisited in the case of bounded media. Finally, some sets of analytical and numerical examples are provided for comparison and to illustrate the relevance of the obtained strain-modulus local equations for a parameter identification method based on full-field data.

  6. Noninvasive vascular displacement estimation for relative elastic modulus reconstruction in transversal imaging planes.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Hendrik H G; Richards, Michael S; Doyley, Marvin M; de Korte, Chris L

    2013-03-11

    Atherosclerotic plaque rupture can initiate stroke or myocardial infarction. Lipid-rich plaques with thin fibrous caps have a higher risk to rupture than fibrotic plaques. Elastic moduli differ for lipid-rich and fibrous tissue and can be reconstructed using tissue displacements estimated from intravascular ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data acquisitions. This study investigated if modulus reconstruction is possible for noninvasive RF acquisitions of vessels in transverse imaging planes using an iterative 2D cross-correlation based displacement estimation algorithm. Furthermore, since it is known that displacements can be improved by compounding of displacements estimated at various beam steering angles, we compared the performance of the modulus reconstruction with and without compounding. For the comparison, simulated and experimental RF data were generated of various vessel-mimicking phantoms. Reconstruction errors were less than 10%, which seems adequate for distinguishing lipid-rich from fibrous tissue. Compounding outperformed single-angle reconstruction: the interquartile range of the reconstructed moduli for the various homogeneous phantom layers was approximately two times smaller. Additionally, the estimated lateral displacements were a factor of 2-3 better matched to the displacements corresponding to the reconstructed modulus distribution. Thus, noninvasive elastic modulus reconstruction is possible for transverse vessel cross sections using this cross-correlation method and is more accurate with compounding.

  7. The stabilities, electronic structures and elastic properties of Rb—As systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havva Bogaz, Ozisik; Kemal, Colakoglu; Engin, Deligoz; Haci, Ozisik

    2012-04-01

    The structural, electronic and elastic properties of Rb—As systems (RbAs in NaP, LiAs and AuCu structures, RbAs2 in the MgCu2 structure, Rb3As in Na3As, Cu3P and Li3Bi structures, and Rb5As4 in the A5B4 structure) are investigated with the generalized gradient approximation in the frame of density functional theory. The lattice parameters, cohesive energies, formation energies, bulk moduli and the first derivatives of the bulk moduli (to fit Murnaghan's equation of state) of the considered structures are calculated and reasonable agreement is obtained. In addition, the phase transition pressures are also predicted. The electronic band structures, the partial densities of states corresponding to the band structures and the charge density distributions are presented and analysed. The second-order elastic constants based on the stress-strain method and other related quantities such as Young's modulus, the shear modulus, Poisson's ratio, sound velocities, the Debye temperature and shear anisotropy factors are also estimated.

  8. Structural stabilities, elastic and electronic properties of chromium tetraboride from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Li, Q.; Liu, C. M.; Duan, M. Y.; Wang, H. K.

    2016-05-01

    First-principles calculations are employed to investigate the structural and elastic properties, formation enthalpies and chemical bonding features as well as hardness values of chromium tetraboride (CrB4) with different structures. The lattice parameters, Poisson’s ratio and B/G ratio are also derived. Our calculations indicate that the orthorhombic structure with Pnnm symmetry is the most energetically stable one for CrB4. Except for WB4P63/mmc structure with imaginary frequencies, another six new structures are investigated through the full phonon dispersion calculations. Their mechanical and thermodynamic stabilities are also studied by calculating the elastic constants and formation enthalpies. Our calculations show that the thermodynamic stabilities of all these CrB4 phases can be enhanced under high pressure. The large shear moduli, Young’s moduli and hardness values indicate that these CrB4 phases are potential hard materials. Analyses of the densities of states (DOSs) and electron localization functions (ELFs) provide further understandings of the chemical and physical properties of these CrB4 phases. It is observed that the large occupations and high strengths of the B-B covalent bonds are important for the stabilities, incompressibility and hardnesses of these CrB4 phases.

  9. Comparison of the Modified Biot-Gassmann Theory and the Kuster-Toksoz Theory in Predicting Elastic Velocities of Sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2008-01-01

    Elastic velocities of water-saturated sandstones depend primarily on porosity, effective pressure, and the degree of consolidation. If the dry-frame moduli are known, from either measurements or theoretical calculations, the effect of pore water on velocities can be modeled using the Gassmann theory. Kuster and Toksoz developed a theory based on wave-scattering theory for a variety of inclusion shapes, which provides a means for calculating dry- or wet-frame moduli. In the Kuster-Toksoz theory, elastic wave velocities through different sediments can be predicted by using different aspect ratios of the sediment's pore space. Elastic velocities increase as the pore aspect ratio increases (larger pore aspect ratio describes a more spherical pore). On the basis of the velocity ratio, which is assumed to be a function of (1-0)n, and the Biot-Gassmann theory, Lee developed a semi-empirical equation for predicting elastic velocities, which is referred to as the modified Biot-Gassmann theory of Lee. In this formulation, the exponent n, which depends on the effective pressure and the degree of consolidation, controls elastic velocities; as n increases, elastic velocities decrease. Computationally, the role of exponent n in the modified Biot-Gassmann theory by Lee is similar to the role of pore aspect ratios in the Kuster-Toksoz theory. For consolidated sediments, either theory predicts accurate velocities. However, for unconsolidated sediments, the modified Biot-Gassmann theory by Lee performs better than the Kuster-Toksoz theory, particularly in predicting S-wave velocities.

  10. Tracking protein aggregate interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, Jason C; Nilsson, K Peter R

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils share a structural motif consisting of highly ordered β-sheets aligned perpendicular to the fibril axis.1, 2 At each fibril end, β-sheets provide a template for recruiting and converting monomers.3 Different amyloid fibrils often co-occur in the same individual, yet whether a protein aggregate aids or inhibits the assembly of a heterologous protein is unclear. In prion disease, diverse prion aggregate structures, known as strains, are thought to be the basis of disparate disease phenotypes in the same species expressing identical prion protein sequences.4–7 Here we explore the interactions reported to occur when two distinct prion strains occur together in the central nervous system. PMID:21597336

  11. Cultural Heritage Content Re-Use: An Aggregators's Point of View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilis, D.; Ioannides, M.; Theofanous, E.

    2015-08-01

    This paper introduces a use case of re-using aggregated and enriched metadata for the tourism creative industry. The MORe aggregation and enrichment framework is presented along with an example for enriching cultural heritage objects harvested from a number of Omeka repositories. The enriched content is then published both to the EU Digital Library Europeana (http://www.europeana.eu) and to an Elastic Search component that feeds a portal aimed at providing tourists with interesting information.

  12. Zooplankton Aggregations Near Sills

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-30

    frequency echo-sounder system. This data were supplemented with multi-net (BIONESS) trawls, bongo nets, and otter trawls (operated by D. Mackas and group...side. The general composition of the zooplankton aggregations can be deduced from the relative levels of the three echo-sounder frequencies; krill ...Nov. 20th, 2002. Krill layer is evident at 66 – 90 m, coincident with BIONESS trawl through the region. 3 Figure 2 shows a comparison between

  13. Superhigh moduli and tension-induced phase transition of monolayer gamma-boron at finite temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Junhua; Yang, Zhaoyao; Wei, Ning; Kou, Liangzhi

    2016-01-01

    Two dimensional (2D) gamma-boron (γ-B28) thin films have been firstly reported by the experiments of the chemical vapor deposition in the latest study. However, their mechanical properties are still not clear. Here we predict the superhigh moduli (785 ± 42 GPa at 300 K) and the tension-induced phase transition of monolayer γ-B28 along a zigzag direction for large deformations at finite temperatures using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The new phase can be kept stable after unloading process at these temperatures. The predicted mechanical properties are reasonable when compared with our results from density functional theory. This study provides physical insights into the origins of the new phase transition of monolayer γ-B28 at finite temperatures. PMID:26979283

  14. A compactification of the moduli space of principal Higgs bundles over singular curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Giudice, Alessio; Pustetto, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    A principal Higgs bundle (P , ϕ) over a singular curve X is a pair consisting of a principal bundle P and a morphism ϕ : X →Ad P ⊗ ΩX1. We construct the moduli space of principal Higgs G-bundles over an irreducible singular curve X using the theory of decorated vector bundles. More precisely, given a faithful representation ρ : G → Sl(V) of G, we consider principal Higgs bundles as triples (E , q , φ) , where E is a vector bundle with rk(E) = dim V over the normalization X ˜ of X, q is a parabolic structure on E and φ :Ea,b → L is a morphism of bundles, L being a line bundle and Ea,b ≑(E⊗a) ⊕ b a vector bundle depending on the Higgs field ϕ and on the principal bundle structure.

  15. Moduli stabilization with F-term uplifting in heterotic string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Kwang Sik; Shin, Seodong

    2009-02-15

    We discuss the role of F-term uplifting in stabilizing moduli within the framework of heterotic string theory. It turns out that the uplifting sector plays an important role in fixing the volume modulus at one of the self-dual points of a modular invariant potential. For the volume modulus stabilized at a self-dual point, the F-term uplifting leads to the dilation stabilization which can naturally yield the mirage mediation pattern of soft supersymmetry breaking terms. Generalizing to the case with anomalous U(1) gauge symmetry, we also find that the U(1) sector generically gives a contribution to sfermion masses comparable to the dilaton-mediated one while maintaining the mirage mediation pattern.

  16. Special Issue on "Instanton Counting: Moduli Spaces, Representation Theory, and Integrable Systems"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzzo, Ugo; Sala, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Geometry and Physics collects some papers that were presented during the workshop "Instanton Counting: Moduli Spaces, Representation Theory, and Integrable Systems" that took place at the Lorentz Center in Leiden, The Netherlands, from 16 to 20 June 2014. The workshop was supported by the Lorentz Center, the "Geometry and Quantum Theory" Cluster, Centre Européen pour les Mathématiques, la Physique et leurs Interactions (Lille, France), Laboratoire Angevin de Recherche en Mathématiques (Angers, France), SISSA (Trieste, Italy), and Foundation Compositio (Amsterdam, the Netherlands). We deeply thank all these institutions for making the workshop possible. We also thank the other organizers of the workshop, Professors Dimitri Markushevich, Vladimir Rubtsov and Sergey Shadrin, for their efforts and great collaboration.

  17. Probabilistic elastography: estimating lung elasticity.

    PubMed

    Risholm, Petter; Ross, James; Washko, George R; Wells, William M

    2011-01-01

    We formulate registration-based elastography in a probabilistic framework and apply it to study lung elasticity in the presence of emphysematous and fibrotic tissue. The elasticity calculations are based on a Finite Element discretization of a linear elastic biomechanical model. We marginalize over the boundary conditions (deformation) of the biomechanical model to determine the posterior distribution over elasticity parameters. Image similarity is included in the likelihood, an elastic prior is included to constrain the boundary conditions, while a Markov model is used to spatially smooth the inhomogeneous elasticity. We use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique to characterize the posterior distribution over elasticity from which we extract the most probable elasticity as well as the uncertainty of this estimate. Even though registration-based lung elastography with inhomogeneous elasticity is challenging due the problem's highly underdetermined nature and the sparse image information available in lung CT, we show promising preliminary results on estimating lung elasticity contrast in the presence of emphysematous and fibrotic tissue.

  18. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Low velocity layer (LVL) in subduction zones: elasticity of lawsonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantel, J.; Mookherjee, M.; Frost, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    As the oceanic plates subduct, they undergoes a series of phase transformations. The hydrated oceanic crust undergoes dehydrations and eventually transforms to eclogite. However, in cold subduction zones such transformations are kinetically hindered. Eclogite is dense, and its elastic properties are similar to the normal peridotitic mantle. On the other hand, the seismic wave speeds in basalts are 10-15% slower than harzburgite. In certain subduction zones, including southern Japan, a 5-10 km think low velocity layer (LVL) has been observed. The LVL is around 5-7% slower than the surrounding mantle and cannot be readily explained by the presence of meta-stable basalts. Instead, a metamorphic rock such as lawsonite-blueschist is a likely candidate for explaining the observed LVL. We have conducted high-pressure ultrasonic interferometric measurements to gain insight into the elastic properties of lawsonite [CaAl2(Si2O7)(OH)2.H2O]. In addition, we have also computed the full elastic constant tensor at elevated pressures, using electronic structure calculations. The bulk and shear modulus obtained from theory and experiments are in good agreement with an adiabatic bulk (K) and shear (G) moduli of 126.2 ± 0.3 GPa and 52.7 ± 0.2 GPa respectively. The pressure derivaitive of bulk modulus (K’) and shear modulus (G’) are 3.5 and 1.1 respectively. Indeed, lawsonite has unusually low shear modulus and might be a suitable candidate phase to explain the observed LVL in subduction zones.

  20. Elasticity of foam bubbles measured by profile analysis tensiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakashev, S. I.; Tsekov, R.; Manev, E. D.; Nguyen, A. V.

    2010-10-01

    Elastic modulus of foam bubbles, stabilized with tetraethylene glycol octyl ether (C8E4) and 1 × 10-5 M NaCl, was determined by cyclic expansion and shrinking of foam bubbles with frequency of 0.1 Hz and volumetric amplitude of 2 mm3. The film tension was monitored by a commercial profile analysis tensiometer (Sinterface Technologies, GmbH). The elastic moduli of foam bubbles were obtained as a function of surfactant concentration in the range of 2 × 10-3-1 × 10-2 M. The theory of Lucassen and van den Tempel [1] for the elastic modulus of a single liquid/air interface at a given frequency was employed. In the theoretical analysis the bulk diffusion coefficient of surfactant molecules was considered as a unknown model parameter which was obtained by matching the theory with the experimental data. Hence, the dependence of the bulk diffusion coefficient of C8E4 molecules upon the C8E4 concentration was obtained. The diffusion coefficient reached a maximum at 5 × 10-3 M C8E4 (D = 8.5 × 10-11 m2/s). In the experimental surfactant concentration range (2 × 10-3-1 × 10-2 M, CMC = 7.5 × 10-3 M) the foam bubbles were relatively dry, with visible interferometric fringes corresponding to thin films stabilized by repulsion of the electrostatic disjoining pressure. Hence, the overall dynamics of periodical expansion and shrinking of the foam bubbles occurred within the thin film state.

  1. Design guidance for elastic followup

    SciTech Connect

    Naugle, F.V.

    1983-01-01

    The basic mechanism of elastic followup is discussed in relation to piping design. It is shown how mechanistic insight gained from solutions for a two-bar problem can be used to identify dominant design parameters and to determine appropriate modifications where elastic followup is a potential problem. It is generally recognized that quantitative criteria are needed for elastic followup in the creep range where badly unbalanced lines can pose potential problems. Approaches for criteria development are discussed.

  2. Theory of epithelial elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajnc, Matej; Ziherl, Primož

    2015-11-01

    We propose an elastic theory of epithelial monolayers based on a two-dimensional discrete model of dropletlike cells characterized by differential surface tensions of their apical, basal, and lateral sides. We show that the effective tissue bending modulus depends on the apicobasal differential tension and changes sign at the transition from the flat to the fold morphology. We discuss three mechanisms that stabilize the finite-wavelength fold structures: Physical constraint on cell geometry, hard-core interaction between non-neighboring cells, and bending elasticity of the basement membrane. We show that the thickness of the monolayer changes along the waveform and thus needs to be considered as a variable rather than a parameter. Next we show that the coupling between the curvature and the thickness is governed by the apicobasal polarity and that the amplitude of thickness modulation along the waveform is proportional to the apicobasal differential tension. This suggests that intracellular stresses can be measured indirectly by observing easily measurable morphometric parameters. We also study the mechanics of three-dimensional structures with cylindrical symmetry.

  3. Elastic emission polishing

    SciTech Connect

    Loewenthal, M.; Loseke, K.; Dow, T.A.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Elastic emission polishing, also called elastic emission machining (EEM), is a process where a stream of abrasive slurry is used to remove material from a substrate and produce damage free surfaces with controlled surface form. It is a noncontacting method utilizing a thick elasto-hydrodynamic film formed between a soft rotating ball and the workpiece to control the flow of the abrasive. An apparatus was built in the Center, which consists of a stationary spindle, a two-axis table for the workpiece, and a pump to circulate the working fluid. The process is controlled by a programmable computer numerical controller (CNC), which presently can operate the spindle speed and movement of the workpiece in one axis only. This apparatus has been used to determine material removal rates on different material samples as a function of time, utilizing zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) particles suspended in distilled water as the working fluid. By continuing a study of removal rates the process should become predictable, and thus create a new, effective, yet simple tool for ultra-precision mechanical machining of surfaces.

  4. Dynamic elastic properties from micro-CT images: modeling and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, M.; Pervukhina, M.; de Paula, O.; Clennell, B.; Gurevich, B.

    2009-04-01

    Knowledge of the elastic properties of rocks is a key factor in seismic interpretation. Elastic properties of rock are determined by its microstructure and their prediction relies on the availability of accurate microstructural models. X-ray computer tomography (CT) as a unique non-destructive technique is becoming a powerful tool in geophysics research which reveals detailed 3D microstructure of rock with special resolution of 1 micron. Recent breakthrough in computational capabilities allows simulation of elastic properties directly using the micro-CT images. In this study we simulate acoustic velocities of sandstones, based on high resolution 3D images and compare simulation results with ultrasonic measurements. Synchrotron images of two sandstones are segmented to separate grain from pore space. The porosity obtained as a result of the segmentation process is compared with the measured porosity for the segmentation quality control. Parallel 3D finite difference (FD) code is used to simulate elastic wave propagation through the digitized two phase media where the total solid phase is supposed to have elastic properties of intact quartz and the pore space is either dry or saturated with water. Attenuation and dispersion of acoustic velocities are obtained at a range of frequencies. The numerical results noticeably overestimate velocities obtained at laboratory experiments at ultrasonic frequencies. The discrepancy can be explained with the fact that grain contacts have strong effect on elastic moduli and are the most speculative part of the simulations. To validate our FD code and calibrate the properties of grain contacts, we simulated elastic wave propagation in aluminum foam with porosity of 40%. All grain contacts in the foam are "solid" and its microstructure is similar to that of moldic carbonates. Preliminary results of FD modeling and comparison with experiment of carbonates are presented as well.

  5. Influence of recycled aggregate quality and proportioning criteria on recycled concrete properties.

    PubMed

    López-Gayarre, F; Serna, P; Domingo-Cabo, A; Serrano-López, M A; López-Colina, C

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental research using concrete produced by substituting part of the natural coarse aggregates with recycled aggregates from concrete demolition. The influence of the quality of the recycled aggregate (amount of declassified and source of aggregate), the percentage of replacement on the targeted quality of the concrete to be produced (strength and workability) has been evaluated. The granular structure of concrete and replacement criteria were analyzed in this study, factors which have not been analyzed in other studies. The following properties of recycled concretes were analyzed: density, absorption, compressive strength, elastic modulus, amount of occluded air, penetration of water under pressure and splitting tensile strength. A simplified test program was designed to control the costs of the testing while still producing sufficient data to develop reliable conclusions in order to make the number of tests viable whilst guaranteeing the reliability of the conclusions. Several factors were analyzed including the type of aggregate, the percentage of replacement, the type of sieve curve, the declassified content, the strength of concrete and workability of concrete and the replacement criteria. The type of aggregate and the percentage of replacement were the only factors that showed a clear influence on most of the properties. Compressive strength is clearly affected by the quality of recycled aggregates. If the water-cement ratio is kept constant and the loss of workability due to the effect of using recycled aggregate is compensated for with additives, the percentage of replacement of the recycled aggregate will not affect the compressive strength. The elastic modulus is affected by the percentage of replacement. If the percentage of replacement does not exceed 50%, the elastic modulus will only change slightly.

  6. Elastic and viscoelastic mechanical properties of brain tissues on the implanting trajectory of sub-thalamic nucleus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Deng, Jianxin; Zhou, Jun; Li, Xueen

    2016-11-01

    Corresponding to pre-puncture and post-puncture insertion, elastic and viscoelastic mechanical properties of brain tissues on the implanting trajectory of sub-thalamic nucleus stimulation are investigated, respectively. Elastic mechanical properties in pre-puncture are investigated through pre-puncture needle insertion experiments using whole porcine brains. A linear polynomial and a second order polynomial are fitted to the average insertion force in pre-puncture. The Young's modulus in pre-puncture is calculated from the slope of the two fittings. Viscoelastic mechanical properties of brain tissues in post-puncture insertion are investigated through indentation stress relaxation tests for six interested regions along a planned trajectory. A linear viscoelastic model with a Prony series approximation is fitted to the average load trace of each region using Boltzmann hereditary integral. Shear relaxation moduli of each region are calculated using the parameters of the Prony series approximation. The results show that, in pre-puncture insertion, needle force almost increases linearly with needle displacement. Both fitting lines can perfectly fit the average insertion force. The Young's moduli calculated from the slope of the two fittings are worthy of trust to model linearly or nonlinearly instantaneous elastic responses of brain tissues, respectively. In post-puncture insertion, both region and time significantly affect the viscoelastic behaviors. Six tested regions can be classified into three categories in stiffness. Shear relaxation moduli decay dramatically in short time scales but equilibrium is never truly achieved. The regional and temporal viscoelastic mechanical properties in post-puncture insertion are valuable for guiding probe insertion into each region on the implanting trajectory.

  7. Elasticity of ferropericlase at lower mantle conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z.; Justo, J. F.; Wentzcovitch, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Clarification of the effect of the iron spin change on properties of Fp is important to address the relative abundance of Fp in the lower mantle. However, recent reports to this question show completely different conclusions. The calculated density of a pyrolite aggregate with spin crossover-related change in iron partitioning up to 45 GPa compared well with the density in PREM [1]. On the other hand, Murakami et al's analysis of VS in aggregates with variable amounts of Fp concluded the opposite - the lower mantle is more perovskitic than pyrolitic [2]. We investigated thermoelasticity of Fp with first principles DFT+U calculations. The calculated thermoelasticity are in good consitence with the available experimental data on samples with various iron concentrations. The results can well explain discrepancy on softening of the shear modulus of Fp among different experiments[3,4]. We predict velocities of Fp at lower mantle conditions and suggest that pyrolite is a reasonable compositional model for the lower mantle. Our results show the importance of constraining the elastic properties of minerals without extrapolations for analyses of the thermochemical state of this region[5]. [1] Irifune et al., Science 327, 193 (2010). [2] Murakami et al., Nature 485, 90 (2012). [3] Crowhurst et al., Science 319, 451 (2008). [4] Marquardt et al., Science 324, 224 (2009). [5]Wu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110. 228501 (2013)

  8. The influence of erythrocyte aggregation on induced platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Ott, C; Lardi, E; Schulzki, T; Reinhart, W H

    2010-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) affect platelet aggregation in flowing blood (primary hemostasis). We tested the hypothesis that RBC aggregation could influence platelet aggregation. RBC aggregation was altered in vitro by: (i) changing plasma aggregatory properties with 3.7 g% dextran 40 (D40), 3.0 g% dextran 70 (D70) or 1.55 g% dextran 500 (D500); (ii) changing RBC aggregatory properties by incubating RBCs in 50 mU/ml neuraminidase for 60 min (reduction of the surface sialic acid content, thus reducing electrostatic repulsion) and subsequent RBC resuspension in platelet rich plasma (PRP) containing 1 g% dextran 70. RBC aggregation was assessed with the sedimentation rate (ESR). Platelet aggregation was measured: (i) in flowing whole blood with a platelet function analyzer PFA-100(R), which simulates in vivo conditions with RBCs flowing in the center and platelets along the wall, where they adhere to collagen and aggregate; and (ii) in a Chrono-log 700 Aggregometer, which measures changes of impedance by platelet aggregation in whole blood or changes in light transmission in PRP. We found that RBC aggregation increased with increasing molecular weight of dextran (ESR: 4 +/- 3 mm/h, 34 +/- 14 mm/h and 89 +/- 23 mm/hfor D40, D70 and D500, respectively, p < 0.0001) and with neuraminidase-treated RBCs (76 +/- 27 mm/h vs 27 +/- 8 mm/h, respectively, p < 0.0001). Platelet aggregation measured in whole blood under flow conditions (PFA-100) and without flow (Chronolog Aggregometer) was not affected by RBC aggregation. Our data suggest that RBC aggregation does not affect platelet aggregation in vitro and plays no role in primary hemostasis.

  9. Single-crystal elasticity of wadsleyites, β-Mg 2SiO 4, containing 0.37-1.66 wt.% H 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Z.; Jacobsen, S. D.; Jiang, F.; Smyth, J. R.; Holl, C. M.; Frost, D. J.; Duffy, T. S.

    2008-02-01

    The presence of hydrogen can affect elastic properties and seismic velocities of minerals in the Earth's upper mantle. In this study, the second-order elastic constants of hydrous wadsleyites containing 0.37, 0.84, and 1.66 wt.% H 2O were determined by Brillouin scattering at ambient conditions. Measurements were performed on at least three independent crystal planes for each composition. The aggregate bulk modulus, K S0, and shear modulus, G0, were calculated using VRH (Voigt-Reuss-Hill) averages. The results are: K S0 = 165.4(9) GPa, G0 = 108.6(6) GPa for wadsleyite with 0.37 wt.% H 2O; K S0 = 160.3(7) GPa, G0 = 105.3(6) GPa for 0.84 wt.% H 2O; K S0 = 149.2(6) GPa, G0 = 98.6(4) GPa for 1.66 wt.% H 2O. We find that the bulk and shear moduli of hydrous wadsleyites decrease linearly with water content according to the following relations (in GPa): K S0 = 170.9(9)-13.0(8) CH2O, G0 = 111.7(6)-7.8(4) CH2O, where CH2O is the H 2O weight percentage. Compared with anhydrous wadsleyite, addition of 1 wt.% H 2O will lead to a 7.6% decrease in the bulk modulus, and a 7.0% decrease in the shear modulus. Using these results, we examine the velocity contrast between hydrous olivine and wadsleyite at ambient conditions for an Fe-free system assuming an H 2O partition coefficient between wadsleyite and olivine of 3. The velocity contrast in compressional and shear velocity between wadsleyite and olivine ranges from 12 to 13% for an H 2O-free system to 7-8% for wadsleyite containing 1.5 wt.% H 2O. Thus, the magnitude of the seismic velocity change at 410-km depth can be expected to be sensitive to the presence of H 2O in olivine polymorphs.

  10. Single-crystal elasticity of wadsleyites, β -Mg 2SiO 4, containing 0.37-1.66 wt.% H 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Z.; Jacobsen, S. D.; Jiang, F. M.; Smyth, J. R.; Holl, C. M.; Frost, D. J.; Duffy, T. S.

    2008-04-01

    The presence of hydrogen can affect elastic properties and seismic velocities of minerals in the Earth's upper mantle. In this study, the second-order elastic constants of hydrous wadsleyites containing 0.37, 0.84, and 1.66 wt.% H 2O were determined by Brillouin scattering at ambient conditions. Measurements were performed on at least three independent crystal planes for each composition. The aggregate bulk modulus, KS0, and shear modulus, G0, were calculated using VRH (Voigt-Reuss-Hill) averages. The results are: KS0 = 165.4(9) GPa, G0 = 108.6(6) GPa for wadsleyite with 0.37 wt.% H 2O; KS0 = 160.3(7) GPa, G0 = 105.3(6) GPa for 0.84 wt.% H 2O; KS0 = 149.2(6) GPa, G0 = 98.6(4) GPa for 1.66 wt.% H 2O. We find that the bulk and shear moduli of hydrous wadsleyites decrease linearly with water content according to the following relations (in GPa): KS0 = 170.9(9) - 13.0(8) C H 2O , G0 = 111.7(6) - 7.8(4) C H 2O , where C H 2O is the H 2O weight percentage. Compared with anhydrous wadsleyite, addition of 1 wt.% H 2O will lead to a 7.6% decrease in the bulk modulus, and a 7.0% decrease in the shear modulus. Using these results, we examine the velocity contrast between hydrous olivine and wadsleyite at ambient conditions for an Fe-free system assuming an H 2O partition coefficient between wadsleyite and olivine of 3. The velocity contrast in compressional and shear velocity between wadsleyite and olivine ranges from 12-13% for an H 2O-free system to 7-8% for wadsleyite containing 1.5 wt.% H 2O. Thus, the magnitude of the seismic velocity change at 410-km depth can be expected to be sensitive to the presence of H 2O in olivine polymorphs.

  11. Structure of Viral Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Stephen; Luijten, Erik

    2010-03-01

    The aggregation of virus particles is a particular form of colloidal self-assembly, since viruses of a give type are monodisperse and have identical, anisotropic surface charge distributions. In small-angle X-ray scattering experiments, the Qbeta virus was found to organize in different crystal structures in the presence of divalent salt and non-adsorbing polymer. Since a simple isotropic potential cannot explain the occurrence of all observed phases, we employ computer simulations to investigate how the surface charge distribution affects the virus interactions. Using a detailed model of the virus particle, we find an asymmetric ion distribution around the virus which gives rise to the different phases observed.

  12. A Theoretical Study of some Rheological Properties of the Aggregation of the Molecules Deoxy- Hemoglobin S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensah, Francis; Grant, Julius; Thorpe, Arthur

    2010-02-01

    Sickle cell disease is a serious public health problem that affects many people worldwide. In this paper, the Langevin equation is used for hemoglobin's aggregation in sickle cell anemia. Several parameters are explored such as the time-dependent deformation of the aggregates whose plot gives a sigmoid, the time-dependent expressions obtained for the coefficient of viscosity and the elastic modulus which characterize the aggregation of the sickle hemoglobin. Other properties such as the viscoelastic and the elasto-thixotropic properties of the sickle hemoglobin polymer are also described. An attempt is made to approach the polymerization process in terms of a dynamical system. )

  13. Effects of alloying elements and temperature on the elastic properties of dilute Ni-base superalloys from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, S. L.; Kim, D. E.; Zacherl, C. L.; Wang, Y.; Du, Y.; Liu, Z. K.

    2012-09-01

    The variation of elastic properties, e.g., elastic constants, bulk modulus, and shear modulus of dilute Ni-base superalloys due to alloying elements (X's) and temperature, has been studied via first-principles calculations. Here, 26 alloying elements are considered: Al, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hf, Ir, Mn, Mo, Nb, Os, Pd, Pt, Re, Rh, Ru, Sc, Si, Ta, Tc, Ti, V, W, Y, Zn, and Zr. It is found that (i) both the bulk and shear moduli of Ni-X decrease approximately linearly with increasing equilibrium volume, especially within each group of 3d, 4d, or 5d transition-metal alloying elements; (ii) all alloying elements considered herein increase the ratio of bulk to shear modulus (i.e., the ductility) and the elastic anisotropy of the Ni-X alloys; and (iii) the largest decrease of elastic properties of Ni is caused by alloying element Y. It is observed that the change of elastic properties of Ni due to various alloying elements is traceable from the distribution of (magnetization) charge density, for instance the spherical distribution of charge density facilitates shear deformation, resulting in a lower shear-related property. Using a proposed quasistatic approach based on the predicted elasticity-volume-temperature relationship, the isothermal and the isentropic elastic properties are predicted for the dilute Ni-X alloys at finite temperatures, displaying a decreasing trend with respect to temperature for each Ni-X system. Computed elastic properties are in favorable accord with available experimental data.

  14. Full elastic characterization of absorptive rubber using laser excited guided ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraeten, Bert; Xu, Xiadong; Martinez, Loïc; Glorieux, Christ

    2012-05-01

    Because of the highly damping nature of rubber, it is difficult to characterize its dynamic elastic properties using classical methods. In this paper, an experimental approach employing laser excited guided acoustic waves is proposed to accurately determine the real and imaginary part of the longitudinal and shear elastic modulus of a rubber layer. From the spatiotemporal evolution of a propagating laser excited Lamb wave measured by a laser Doppler vibrometer, which is scanning along a line perpendicular to a line of excitation, the phase velocity dispersion curves in the wave number - frequency domain are obtained. The results are interpreted in the framework of a detailed semianalytical study, analyzing the influence of elastic damping on the Lamb dispersion curves. This analysis is exploited to adequately fit the experimental dispersion curves and thus extract information about the elastic moduli and absorption coefficients of the rubber plate. The results are validated by a pulse-echo measurement, and by guided wave propagation results with the rubber layer connected in a bi-layer plate configuration to non-damping plates.

  15. Robust Scaling of Strength and Elastic Constants and Universal Cooperativity in Disordered Colloidal Micropillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianola, Daniel; Strickland, Daniel; Huang, Yun-Ru; Derlet, Peter; Lee, Daeyeon

    2015-03-01

    We study the uniaxial compressive behavior of disordered colloidal free-standing micropillars composed of a mixture of 3 and 6 μm polystyrene particles. Mechanical annealing enables variation of the packing fraction across the phase space of colloidal glasses. The measured strengths and elastic moduli of the micropillars span almost three orders-of-magnitude despite similar plastic morphology governed by shear banding. We measure a robust correlation between strengths and elastic constants that is invariant to humidity, implying a critical strain of ~0.01 that is strikingly similar to that observed in metallic glasses and suggestive of a universal mode of cooperative plastic deformation. We estimate the characteristic strain of the underlying cooperative plastic event by considering the energy necessary to create an Eshelby-like ellipsoidal inclusion in an elastic matrix. We find that the characteristic strain is similar to that found in experiments and simulations of other disordered solids with distinct bonding and particle sizes, suggesting a universal criterion for the elastic to plastic transition in glassy materials with the capacity for finite plastic flow. In addition, we measure the statistics of load-drops for specimens at three packing fractions. At higher packing fractions, the load-drops scale as a power-law with an exponent close to mean field theory (MFT) predictions. However, the scaling at the lowest packing fraction deviates from MFT.

  16. Effect of a growth hormone treatment on bone orthotropic elasticity in dwarf rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohles, S. S.; Martinez, D. A.; Bowers, J. R.; Vailas, A. C.; Vanderby, R. Jr

    1997-01-01

    A refinement of the current ultrasonic elasticity technique was used to measure the orthotropic elastic properties of rat cortical bone as well as to quantify changes in elastic properties, density, and porosity of the dwarf rat cortex after a treatment with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH). The ultrasonic elasticity technique was refined via optimized signal management of high-frequency wave propagation through cubic cortical specimens. Twenty dwarf rats (37 days old) were randomly assigned to two groups (10 rats each). The dwarf rat model (5-10% of normal GH) was given subcutaneous injections of either rhGH or saline over a 14-day treatment period. Density was measured using Archimedes technique. Porosity and other microstructural characteristics were also explored via scanning electron microscopy and image analysis. Statistical tests verified significant decreases in cortical orthotropic Young's (-26.7%) and shear (-16.7%) moduli and density (-2.42%) concomitant with an increase in porosity (+125%) after rhGH treatments to the dwarf model (p < 0.05). A change in material symmetry from orthotropy toward planar isotropy within the radial-circumferential plane after GH treatments was also noted. These results demonstrate some alteration in bone properties at this time interval. Structural implications of these changes throughout physiological loading regimens should be explored.

  17. Robust scaling of strength and elastic constants and universal cooperativity in disordered colloidal micropillars

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Daniel J.; Huang, Yun-Ru; Lee, Daeyeon

    2014-01-01

    We study the uniaxial compressive behavior of disordered colloidal free-standing micropillars composed of a bidisperse mixture of 3- and 6-μm polystyrene particles. Mechanical annealing of confined pillars enables variation of the packing fraction across the phase space of colloidal glasses. The measured normalized strengths and elastic moduli of the annealed freestanding micropillars span almost three orders of magnitude despite similar plastic morphology governed by shear banding. We measure a robust correlation between ultimate strengths and elastic constants that is invariant to relative humidity, implying a critical strain of ∼0.01 that is strikingly similar to that observed in metallic glasses (MGs) [Johnson WL, Samwer K (2005) Phys Rev Lett 95:195501] and suggestive of a universal mode of cooperative plastic deformation. We estimate the characteristic strain of the underlying cooperative plastic event by considering the energy necessary to create an Eshelby-like ellipsoidal inclusion in an elastic matrix. We find that the characteristic strain is similar to that found in experiments and simulations of other disordered solids with distinct bonding and particle sizes, suggesting a universal criterion for the elastic to plastic transition in glassy materials with the capacity for finite plastic flow. PMID:25489098

  18. Cascading elastic perturbation in Japan due to the 2012 Mw 8.6 Indian Ocean Earthquake

    DOE PAGES

    Delorey, A. A.; Johnson, P. A.; Chao, K.; ...

    2015-10-02

    Since the discovery of extensive earthquake triggering occurring in response to the 1992 Mw 7.3 Landers earthquake, it is now well established that seismic waves from earthquakes can trigger other earthquakes, tremor, slow slip, and pore pressure changes. Our contention is that earthquake triggering is one manifestation of a more widespread elastic disturbance that reveals information about Earth’s stress state. Earth’s stress state is central to our understanding of both natural and anthropogenic-induced crustal processes. Here we present that seismic waves from distant earthquakes may perturb stresses and frictional properties on faults and elastic moduli of the crust in cascadingmore » fashion. Transient dynamic stresses place crustal material into a metastable state during which material recovers through a process termed slow dynamics. This observation of widespread, dynamically induced elastic perturbation, including systematic migration of offshore seismicity, strain transients, and velocity transients, presents a new characterization of Earth’s elastic system that will advance our understanding of plate tectonics, seismicity, and seismic hazards.« less

  19. Cascading elastic perturbation in Japan due to the 2012 Mw 8.6 Indian Ocean earthquake

    PubMed Central

    Delorey, Andrew A.; Chao, Kevin; Obara, Kazushige; Johnson, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of extensive earthquake triggering occurring in response to the 1992 Mw (moment magnitude) 7.3 Landers earthquake, it is now well established that seismic waves from earthquakes can trigger other earthquakes, tremor, slow slip, and pore pressure changes. Our contention is that earthquake triggering is one manifestation of a more widespread elastic disturbance that reveals information about Earth’s stress state. Earth’s stress state is central to our understanding of both natural and anthropogenic-induced crustal processes. We show that seismic waves from distant earthquakes may perturb stresses and frictional properties on faults and elastic moduli of the crust in cascading fashion. Transient dynamic stresses place crustal material into a metastable state during which the material recovers through a process termed slow dynamics. This observation of widespread, dynamically induced elastic perturbation, including systematic migration of offshore seismicity, strain transients, and velocity transients, presents a new characterization of Earth’s elastic system that will advance our understanding of plate tectonics, seismicity, and seismic hazards. PMID:26601289

  20. Controlling mechanisms in directional growth of aggregated archaeal cells.

    PubMed

    Milkevych, Viktor; Batstone, Damien J

    2014-12-28

    Members of the family Methanosarcinaceae are important archaeal representatives due to their broad functionality, ubiquitous presence, and functionality in harsh environments. A key characteristic is their multicellular (packet) morphology represented by aggregates of spatially confined cells. This morphology is driven by directed growth of cells in confinement with sequential variation in growth direction. To further understand why spatially confined Methanosarcina cells (and in general, confined prokaryotes) change their direction of growth during consecutive growth-division stages, and how a particular cell senses its wall topology and responds to changes on it a theoretical model for stress dependent growth of aggregated archaeal cells was developed. The model utilizes a confined elastic shell representation of aggregated archaeal cell and is derived based on a work-energy principle. The growth law takes into account the fine structure of archaeal cell wall, polymeric nature of methanochondroitin layer, molecular-biochemical processes and is based on thermodynamic laws. The developed model has been applied to three typical configurations of aggregated cell in 3D. The developed model predicted a geometry response with delayed growth of aggregated archaeal cells explained from mechanistic principles, as well as continuous changes in direction of growth during the consecutive growth-division stages. This means that cell wall topology sensing and growth anisotropy can be predicted using simple cellular mechanisms without the need for dedicated cellular machinery.