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Sample records for aggregated gold nanoparticles

  1. Spherical aggregates composed of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chi-Chang; Kuo, Ping-Lin; Cheng, Yu-Chen

    2009-02-01

    Alkylated triethylenetetramine (C12E3) was synthesized and used as both a reductant in the preparation of gold nanoparticles by the reduction of HAuCl4 and a stabilizer in the subsequent self-assembly of the gold nanoparticles. In acidic aqueous solution, spherical aggregates (with a diameter of about 202 ± 22 nm) of gold nanoparticles (with the mean diameter of ~18.7 nm) were formed. The anion-induced ammonium adsorption of the alkylated amines on the gold nanoparticles was considered to provide the electrostatic repulsion and steric hindrance between the gold nanoparticles, which constituted the barrier that prevented the individual particles from coagulating. However, as the amino groups became deprotonated with increasing pH, the ammonium adsorption was weakened, and the amino groups were desorbed from the gold surface, resulting in discrete gold particles. The results indicate that the morphology of the reduced gold nanoparticles is controllable through pH-'tunable' aggregation under the mediation of the amino groups of alkylated amine to create spherical microstructures.

  2. Construction of simple gold nanoparticle aggregates with controlled plasmon plasmon interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westcott, Sarah L.; Oldenburg, Steven J.; Lee, T. Randall; Halas, Naomi J.

    1999-02-01

    We have developed a colloidal assembly for the study of plasmon-plasmon interactions between gold nanoparticles. Colloidal aggregates of controlled size and interparticle spacing were synthesized on silica nanoparticle substrates. Following the immobilization of isolated gold nanoparticles onto silica nanoparticles, the surfaces of the adsorbed gold nanoparticles were functionalized with 4-aminobenzenethiol. This molecular linker attached additional gold nanoparticles to the `parent' gold nanoparticle, forming small nanoparticle aggregates. The optical absorption spectrum of these clusters differed from that of gold colloid in a manner consistent with plasmon-plasmon interactions between the gold nanoparticles.

  3. Preparation of controlled gold nanoparticle aggregates using a dendronization strategy.

    PubMed

    Paez, Julieta I; Coronado, Eduardo A; Strumia, Miriam C

    2012-10-15

    In this work, a dendronization strategy was used to control interparticle spacing and the optical properties of gold nanoparticle (NP) aggregates in aqueous media. To achieve this goal, two dendritic disulfides bearing different functionalities on their periphery were synthesized and used as ligands to dendronize gold NPs. The dendronized NPs then undergo aggregation; this process was followed by UV-vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) measurements and correlated with Generalized Mie Theory electrodynamics calculations. For comparison, NP functionalization was also studied using a nondendritic ligand. It was found that the use of dendritic disulfides allows for the preparation of controlled NP aggregates. This study demonstrates how different dendronization parameters, such as disulfide concentration, temperature, time and nature of the ligand (dendritic vs nondendritic), determine the control exerted over the size and stability of the NP aggregates.

  4. Unique Gold Nanoparticle Aggregates as a Highly Active SERS Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartzberg, A M; Grant, C D; Wolcott, A; Talley, C E; Huser, T R; Bogomolni, R; Zhang, J Z

    2004-04-06

    A unique gold nanoparticle aggregate (GNA) system has been shown to be an excellent substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) applications. Rhodamine 6G (R6G), a common molecule used for testing SERS activity on silver, but generally difficult to detect on gold substrates, has been found to readily bind to the GNA and exhibit strong SERS activity due to the unique surface chemistry afforded by sulfur species on the surface. This GNA system has yielded a large SERS enhancement of 10{sup 7}-10{sup 9} in bulk solution for R6G, on par with or greater than any previously reported gold SERS substrate. SERS activity has also been successfully demonstrated for several biological molecules including adenine, L-cysteine, L-lysine, and L-histidine for the first time on a gold SERS substrate, showing the potential of this GNA as a convenient and powerful SERS substrate for biomolecular detection. In addition, SERS spectrum of R6G on single aggregates has been measured. We have shown that the special surface properties of the GNA, in conjunction with strong near IR absorption, make it useful for SERS analysis of a wide variety of molecules.

  5. Electromagnetic heating effect of aggregated gold nanoparticle colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Chen, Hui-jiuan; Chen, Xiaodong; Alfadhl, Yasir; Yu, Junsheng; Wen, Dongsheng

    2014-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been recently investigated intensively for potential hyperthermia treatment of malignant cancer cells in combination with radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic (EM) fields/waves. However, many controversial results have been reported on whether GNPs can be heated by EM fields. It has been suggested that aggregated GNPs may be heated significantly by a RF field, which however has not been examined experimentally. This work proposes a novel electric treatment of mono-dispersed particles to create aggregated GNPs, and conducts an investigation of their bulk heating behavior under a 655 nm laser and a 13.56 MHz RF electric field. It is revealed that the heating rates of aggregated colloids are significantly higher than those of mono-dispersed GNPs for the 655 nm laser, whereas at 13.56 MHz, the heating effects are barely noticeable for both aggregated and mono-dispersed colloids. Various possible reasons are discussed and the negligible electric field enhancement is believed to be responsible at 13.56 MHz.

  6. Small molecule- and amino acid-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Hesham M; Shah, Akash; Konieczny, Michael; Hoffmann, Joan A; Nijdam, A Jasper; Reeves, M E

    2013-06-25

    To understand which organic molecules are capable of binding to gold nanoparticles and/or inducing nanoparticle aggregation, we investigate the interaction of gold nanoparticles with small molecules and amino acids at variable pH. Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectra were measured on mixtures of colloidal gold with small molecules to track the progression of the aggregation of gold nanoparticles. We introduce the 522 to 435 nm UV-vis absorbance ratio as a sensitive method for the detection of colloidal gold aggregation, whereby we delineate the ability of thiol, amine, and carboxylic acid functional groups to bind to the surfaces of gold nanoparticles and investigate how combinations of these functional groups affect colloidal stability. We present models for mechanisms of aggregation of colloidal gold, including surface charge reduction and bridging linkers. For all molecules whose addition leads to the aggregation of gold nanoparticles, the aggregation kinetics were accelerated at acidic pH values. Colloidal gold is maintained only in the presence of anionic carboxyl groups, which are neutralized by protonation at lower pH. The overall reduced charge on the stabilizing carboxyl groups accounts for the accelerated aggregation at lower pH values. PMID:23718319

  7. Glutathione-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles: electromagnetic interactions in a closely packed assembly.

    PubMed

    Basu, Soumen; Pal, Tarasankar

    2007-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles of variable sizes have been prepared by reducing HAuCl4 with trisodium citrate by Frens' method. The synthesized gold particles show intense surface plasmon band in the visible region. The optical resonances in the visible are due to the surface plasmon oscillation, which is a function of geometry of the particles. The work reported here describes the interaction between nanoscale gold particles and a biomolecule, glutathione at low pH. Glutathione, which is a major cellular antioxidant and consists of amino acids glutamic acid, cysteine, and glycine, has been used as a molecular linker between the gold nanoparticles. In glutathione, the reactivity of the a-amines (adjacent to -COOH) is found to be pH-dependent. Linking via the a-amines are activated at low pH but suppressed at high pH due to electrostatic repulsive forces between the gold surfaces and the charged carboxylate groups. In colloidal solutions, the colour of gold nanoparticles may range from red to purple to blue, depending on the degree of aggregation as well as orientation of the individual particles within the aggregates. The citrate-functionalized gold nanoparticles with glutathione in variable acidic pH condition produce different but well-ordered aggregates. It is observed that a new peak appearing at a longer wavelength intensifies and shifts further to the red from the original peak position depending on the particle size, concentration of glutathione, and pH of the solution. The aggregates have been characterized by UV/Vis, FTIR, XRD, and TEM. On the basis of the first appearance of a clearly defined new peak at longer wavelength, a higher sensitivity of glutathione detection has been achieved with gold nanoparticles of larger dimension.

  8. Silica shell/gold core nanoparticles: correlating shell thickness with the plasmonic red shift upon aggregation.

    PubMed

    Vanderkooy, Alan; Chen, Yang; Gonzaga, Ferdinand; Brook, Michael A

    2011-10-01

    Differences in the wavelengths of the surface plasmon band of gold nanoparticles (AuNP)--before and after particle aggregation--are widely used in bioanalytical assays. However, the gold surfaces in such bioassays can suffer from exchange and desorption of noncovalently bound ligands and from nonspecific adsorption of biomolecules. Silica shells on the surfaces of the gold can extend the available surface chemistries for bioconjugation and potentially avoid these issues. Therefore, silica was grown on gold surfaces using either hydrolysis/condensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate 1 under basic conditions or diglyceroxysilane 2 at neutral pH. The former precursor permitted slow, controlled growth of shells from about 1.7 to 4.3 nm thickness. By contrast, 3-4 nm thick silica shells formed within an hour using diglyceroxysilane; thinner or thicker shells were not readily available. Within the range of shell thicknesses synthesized, the presence of a silica shell on the gold nanoparticle did not significantly affect the absorbance maximum (~5 nm) of unaggregated particles. However, the change in absorbance wavelength upon aggregation of the particles was highly dependent on the thickness of the shell. With silica shells coating the AuNP, there was a significant decrease in the absorbance maximum of the aggregated particles, from ~578 to ~536 nm, as the shell thicknesses increased from ~1.7 to ~4.3 nm, because of increased distance between adjacent gold cores. These studies provide guidance for the development of colorimetric assays using silica-coated AuNP.

  9. Amyloid-β aggregation with gold nanoparticles on brain lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyojin; Kim, Yuna; Park, Anna; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2014-05-14

    Understanding and manipulating amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation provide key knowledge and means for the diagnosis and cure of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and the applications of Aβ-based aggregation systems. Here, we studied the formation of various Aβ aggregate structures with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and brain total lipid extract-based supported lipid bilayer (brain SLB). The roles of AuNPs and brain SLB in forming Aβ aggregates were studied in real time, and the structural details of Aβ aggregates were monitored and analyzed with the dark-field imaging of plasmonic AuNPs that allows for long-term in situ imaging of Aβ aggregates with great structural details without further labeling. It was shown that the fluid brain SLB platform provides the binding sites for Aβ and drives the fast and efficient formation of Aβ aggregate structures and, importantly, large Aβ plaque structures (>15 μm in diameter), a hallmark for AD, were formed without going through fibril structures when Aβ peptides were co-incubated with AuNPs on the brain SLB. The dark-field scattering and circular dichroism-correlation data suggest that AuNPs were heavily involved with Aβ aggregation on the brain SLB and less α-helix, less β-sheet and more random coil structures were found in large plaque-like Aβ aggregates.

  10. Salt-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles for photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mengmeng; Liu, Fei; Zhu, Yukun; Wang, Wansheng; Hu, Jin; Liu, Jing; Dai, Zhifei; Wang, Kun; Wei, Yen; Bai, Jing; Gao, Weiping

    2016-02-01

    The challenge in photothermal therapy (PTT) is to develop biocompatible photothermal transducers that can absorb and convert near-infrared (NIR) light into heat with high efficiency. Herein, we report salt-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in biological media to form highly efficient and biocompatible NIR photothermal transducers for PTT and photothermal/photoacoustic (PT/PA) imaging of cancer. The GNP depots in situ formed by salt-induced aggregation of GNPs show strong NIR absorption induced by plasmonic coupling between adjacent GNPs and very high photothermal conversion efficiency (52%), enabling photothermal destruction of tumor cells. More interestingly, GNPs in situ aggregate in tumors to form GNP depots, enabling simultaneous PT/PA imaging and PTT of the tumors. These findings may provide a simple and effective way to develop a new class of intelligent and biocompatible NIR photothermal transducers with high efficiency for PT/PA imaging and PTT.The challenge in photothermal therapy (PTT) is to develop biocompatible photothermal transducers that can absorb and convert near-infrared (NIR) light into heat with high efficiency. Herein, we report salt-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in biological media to form highly efficient and biocompatible NIR photothermal transducers for PTT and photothermal/photoacoustic (PT/PA) imaging of cancer. The GNP depots in situ formed by salt-induced aggregation of GNPs show strong NIR absorption induced by plasmonic coupling between adjacent GNPs and very high photothermal conversion efficiency (52%), enabling photothermal destruction of tumor cells. More interestingly, GNPs in situ aggregate in tumors to form GNP depots, enabling simultaneous PT/PA imaging and PTT of the tumors. These findings may provide a simple and effective way to develop a new class of intelligent and biocompatible NIR photothermal transducers with high efficiency for PT/PA imaging and PTT. Electronic supplementary

  11. Two-dimensional self-organization of gold nanoparticles on supramolecular aggregates.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Sudeshna; Datta, Alokmay

    2006-06-01

    Alkanethiol-capped gold (Au) nanoparticles, dispersed in toluene and spin-coated on atactic polystyrene films that are themselves spin-coated on fused quartz plates, self-assemble into a characteristic two-dimensional pattern-a network of the Au-thiol nano-composite separating polystyrene 'islands' of dimensions around 200 nm. This pattern changes on varying the concentration of the nanoparticles in the coating solution, evolving into the network from isolated nanoparticle clusters, and then going over to a distribution of 'pinholes' on a surface covered by the nano-composite, resembling a partially wetted surface with near-full coverage. Study of the pristine polystyrene surface reveals a pattern of low-cohesion regions separating 'islands' of polystyrene, where the latter are known to be supramolecular aggregates. It is suggested that these regions play the role of low-resistance channels to the flow of the nano-composite during spin coating.

  12. Surfactant induced aggregation behavior of Merocyanine-540 adsorbed on polymer coated positively charged gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, K.; Uppal, A.; Saini, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Surfactant induced aggregation behavior of Merocyanine 540 adsorbed on polymer (PDD) coated gold nanoparticles (AuNP) is reported. The absorption band of the dye shifts to higher energy in the presence of free polymer and polymer coated AuNP implying aggregation. Addition of a negatively charged surfactant (SDS) induces multiple bands in the extinction spectrum of the dye adsorbed on nanoparticle surface. The highest (460 nm) and lowest (564 nm) energy bands of the dye become prominent at 10 and >50 μM SDS concentrations respectively (dye: 10 μM; AuNP: 100-200 pM). Based on earlier results the high energy band is likely to originate from dye aggregates and the low energy band is likely to originate from dye monomers. This is attributed to the interplay between polymer-surfactant and polymer-dye interactions at the AuNP surface. The extinction spectra of dye adsorbed at AuNP surface remain unaffected in the presence of a positively charged (CTAB) or a neutral surfactant (Tx-100), at low surfactant concentrations. However at higher surfactant concentrations (>60 μM) dye aggregation takes place which is attributed to dye-surfactant interactions. The fluorescence intensity of the dye quenched significantly but its lifetime increased in the presence of polymer coated AuNP. This is attributed to aggregation and reduction in the photoisomerization rate of the dye adsorbed on AuNP surface.

  13. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Aggregate and Deliver Gold Nanoparticles to Tumors for Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seokyung; Bhang, Suk Ho; Hwang, Sekyu; Yoon, Jeong-Kee; Song, Jaejung; Jang, Hyeon-Ki; Kim, Sungjee; Kim, Byung-Soo

    2015-10-27

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been extensively studied for photothermal cancer therapy because AuNPs can generate heat upon near-infrared irradiation. However, improving their tumor-targeting efficiency and optimizing the nanoparticle size for maximizing the photothermal effect remain challenging. We demonstrate that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can aggregate pH-sensitive gold nanoparticles (PSAuNPs) in mildly acidic endosomes, target tumors, and be used for photothermal therapy. These aggregated structures had a higher cellular retention in comparison to pH-insensitive, control AuNPs (cAuNPs), which is important for the cell-based delivery process. PSAuNP-laden MSCs (MSC-PSAuNPs) injected intravenously to tumor-bearing mice show a 37-fold higher tumor-targeting efficiency (5.6% of the injected dose) and 8.3 °C higher heat generation compared to injections of cAuNPs after irradiation, which results in a significantly enhanced anticancer effect.

  14. Amino acid induced fractal aggregation of gold nanoparticles: Why and how.

    PubMed

    Doyen, Matthieu; Goole, Jonathan; Bartik, Kristin; Bruylants, Gilles

    2016-02-15

    Gold colloids are the object of many studies as they are reported to have potential biological sensing, imaging and drug delivery applications. In the presence of certain amino acids the aggregation of the gold nanoparticles into linear structures is observed, as highlighted by the appearance of a second plasmon band in the UV-Vis spectra of the colloid. The mechanism behind this phenomenon is still under debate. In order to help elucidate this issue, the interaction between gold colloids and different amino acids, modified amino acids and molecules mimicking their side-chain was monitored by UV-Vis absorption, DLS and TEM. The results show that phenomenon can be rationalized in terms of the Diffusion Limited Colloid Aggregation (DLCA) model which gives rise to the fractal aggregation colloids. The global charge of the compound, which influences the ionic strength of the solution, and the ease with which the compound can interact with the GNPs and affect their surface potential, are, the two parameters which control the DLCA regime. Calculations based on the Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey and Overbeek (DLVO) theory confirm all the experimental observations. PMID:26613335

  15. Amino acid induced fractal aggregation of gold nanoparticles: Why and how.

    PubMed

    Doyen, Matthieu; Goole, Jonathan; Bartik, Kristin; Bruylants, Gilles

    2016-02-15

    Gold colloids are the object of many studies as they are reported to have potential biological sensing, imaging and drug delivery applications. In the presence of certain amino acids the aggregation of the gold nanoparticles into linear structures is observed, as highlighted by the appearance of a second plasmon band in the UV-Vis spectra of the colloid. The mechanism behind this phenomenon is still under debate. In order to help elucidate this issue, the interaction between gold colloids and different amino acids, modified amino acids and molecules mimicking their side-chain was monitored by UV-Vis absorption, DLS and TEM. The results show that phenomenon can be rationalized in terms of the Diffusion Limited Colloid Aggregation (DLCA) model which gives rise to the fractal aggregation colloids. The global charge of the compound, which influences the ionic strength of the solution, and the ease with which the compound can interact with the GNPs and affect their surface potential, are, the two parameters which control the DLCA regime. Calculations based on the Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey and Overbeek (DLVO) theory confirm all the experimental observations.

  16. Thioglucose-stabilized gold nanoparticles as a novel platform for colorimetric bioassay based on nanoparticle aggregation.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shigeru; Yoshida, Kazuma; Shinkawa, Keitarou; Kumagawa, Daisuke; Seguchi, Hideki

    2010-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles stabilized with thioglucose (TGlu-AuNPs), which have carboxyl groups on the particle surface as anchoring sites for covalent immobilization of biomolecules, were prepared by the chemical reduction of HAuCl4 using 1-thio-β-D-glucose as a reducing and stabilizing agent, and their application to colorimetric bioassay was demonstrated using the carbohydrate-lectin system. p-Aminophenyl α-D-mannose (Man-NH2) was covalently attached by a conventional method to the activated carboxyl groups on the TGlu-AuNPs. On addition of Con A to the Man-AuNPs, multiple binding events occurred between Con A and the mannoses immobilized on the particle surface. This Con A-induced aggregation resulted in a significant red shift in local surface plasmon resonance. The binding isotherm showed a sigmoidal curve, indicating cooperativity in the binding of Con A and the Man-AuNPs. In addition, Hill plots showed two nonequivalent binding modes, with the Kd values for high- and low-affinity binding of 11.3 and 66.5 pM, respectively, which was significantly lower than that for methyl-α-D-mannose binding to Con A. The enhanced binding affinity between Man-AuNPs and Con A involves the cluster effect of the carbohydrate groups on the AuNPs. A linear correlation curve was obtained in the range 10-100 nM (R2=0.983). The limit of detection (LOD) for Con A was 9.0 nM in aqueous buffer, which is comparable to that of other conventional methods such as ELISA. PMID:20801619

  17. Detection of Gold Nanoparticles Aggregation Growth Induced by Nucleic Acid through Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gary, Ramla; Carbone, Giovani; Petriashvili, Gia; De Santo, Maria Penelope; Barberi, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    The gold nanoparticle (GNP) aggregation growth induced by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is studied by laser scanning confocal and environmental scanning electron microscopies. As in the investigated case the direct light scattering analysis is not suitable, we observe the behavior of the fluorescence produced by a dye and we detect the aggregation by the shift and the broadening of the fluorescence peak. Results of laser scanning confocal microscopy images and the fluorescence emission spectra from lambda scan mode suggest, in fact, that the intruding of the hydrophobic moiety of the probe within the cationic surfactants bilayer film coating GNPs results in a Förster resonance energy transfer. The environmental scanning electron microscopy images show that DNA molecules act as template to assemble GNPs into three-dimensional structures which are reminiscent of the DNA helix. This study is useful to design better nanobiotechnological devices using GNPs and DNA. PMID:26907286

  18. Detection of Gold Nanoparticles Aggregation Growth Induced by Nucleic Acid through Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gary, Ramla; Carbone, Giovani; Petriashvili, Gia; De Santo, Maria Penelope; Barberi, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    The gold nanoparticle (GNP) aggregation growth induced by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is studied by laser scanning confocal and environmental scanning electron microscopies. As in the investigated case the direct light scattering analysis is not suitable, we observe the behavior of the fluorescence produced by a dye and we detect the aggregation by the shift and the broadening of the fluorescence peak. Results of laser scanning confocal microscopy images and the fluorescence emission spectra from lambda scan mode suggest, in fact, that the intruding of the hydrophobic moiety of the probe within the cationic surfactants bilayer film coating GNPs results in a Förster resonance energy transfer. The environmental scanning electron microscopy images show that DNA molecules act as template to assemble GNPs into three-dimensional structures which are reminiscent of the DNA helix. This study is useful to design better nanobiotechnological devices using GNPs and DNA. PMID:26907286

  19. Gold nanoparticle aggregation for quantification of oligonucleotides: optimization and increased dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Cordray, Michael S; Amdahl, Matthew; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca R

    2012-12-15

    A variety of assays have been proposed to detect small quantities of nucleic acids at the point of care. One approach relies on target-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles functionalized with oligonucleotide sequences complementary to adjacent regions on the targeted sequence. In the presence of the target sequence, the gold nanoparticles aggregate, producing an easily detectable shift in the optical scattering properties of the solution. The major limitations of this assay are that it requires heating and that long incubation times are needed to produce a result. This study aimed to optimize the assay conditions and optical readout, with the goals of eliminating the need for heating and reducing the time to result without sacrificing sensitivity or dynamic range. By optimizing assay conditions and measuring the spectrum of scattered light at the end point of incubation, we found that the assay is capable of producing quantifiable results at room temperature in 30min with a linear dynamic range spanning 150amol to 15fmol of target. If changes in light scattering are measured dynamically during the incubation process, the linear range can be expanded 2-fold, spanning 50amol to 500fmol, while decreasing the time to result to 10min.

  20. Generic phosphatase activity detection using zinc mediated aggregation modulation of polypeptide-modified gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selegård, Robert; Enander, Karin; Aili, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    A challenge in the design of plasmonic nanoparticle-based colorimetric assays is that the change in colloidal stability, which generates the colorimetric response, is often directly linked to the biomolecular recognition event. New assay strategies are hence required for every type of substrate and enzyme of interest. Here, a generic strategy for monitoring of phosphatase activity is presented where substrate recognition is completely decoupled from the nanoparticle stability modulation mechanism, which enables detection of a wide range of enzymes using different natural substrates with a single simple detection scheme. Phosphatase activity generates inorganic phosphate that forms an insoluble complex with Zn2+. In a sample containing a preset concentration of Zn2+, phosphatase activity will markedly reduce the concentration of dissolved Zn2+ from the original value, which in turn affects the aggregation of gold nanoparticles functionalized with a designed Zn2+ responsive polypeptide. The change in nanoparticle stability thus provides a rapid and sensitive readout of the phosphatase activity. The assay is not limited to a particular enzyme or enzyme substrate, which is demonstrated using three completely different phosphatases and five different substrates, and thus constitutes a highly interesting system for drug screening and diagnostics.A challenge in the design of plasmonic nanoparticle-based colorimetric assays is that the change in colloidal stability, which generates the colorimetric response, is often directly linked to the biomolecular recognition event. New assay strategies are hence required for every type of substrate and enzyme of interest. Here, a generic strategy for monitoring of phosphatase activity is presented where substrate recognition is completely decoupled from the nanoparticle stability modulation mechanism, which enables detection of a wide range of enzymes using different natural substrates with a single simple detection scheme

  1. Enhanced effect of aggregated gold nanoparticles on luminol chemiluminescence system and its analytical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yingying; Li, Baoxin

    2013-07-01

    Some organic compounds containing groups of OH, NH2, or SH, which could induce the aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), were observed to enhance effectively the luminol-H2O2-2.6 nm AuNPs CL system. It was found that the aggregation of AuNPs was an important effect factor for the catalytic activity of AuNPs on luminol CL system. The aggregated AuNPs could effectively enhance luminol CL signal compared with the dispersed one. The enhanced effect was closely related to the sizes of AuNPs. Among the studied AuNPs with seven sizes, 2.6 nm AuNPs had the greatest enhancement effect on luminol CL system after its aggregation. The CL enhancement mechanism was investigated, and the marked enhancement of aggregated 2.6 nm AuNPs for luminol CL system was supposed to originate from the decrease of AuNPs' surface negative charge density compared to its dispersed state. For the luminol-H2O2-2.6 nm AuNPs CL system in the presence of organic compounds containing groups of OH, NH2, or SH, more than one factor played the role in influencing the CL intensity. It was found that the enhanced effect of aggregated 2.6 nm AuNPs induced by such organic compounds was much more significant than the inhibition effect of reducing groups of OH, NH2, or SH, which made it applicable for the determination of this kind of compounds.

  2. Assessing the Role of Capping Molecules in Controlling Aggregative Growth of Gold Nanoparticles in Heated Solution.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Han-Wen; Schadt, Mark J; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2016-01-01

    This report describes findings of an investigation of the role of capping molecules in the size growth in the aggregative growth of pre-formed small-sized gold nanoparticles capped with alkanethiolate monolayers toward monodispersed larger sizes. The size controllability depends on the thiolate chain length and concentration in the thermal solution. The size evolution in solution at different concentrations of alkanethiols is analyzed in relation to adsorption isotherms and cohesive energy. The size dependence on thiolate chain length is also analyzed by considering the cohesive energy of the capping molecules, revealing the importance of cohesive energy in the capping structure. Theoretical and experimental comparisons of the surface plasmonic resonance optical properties have also provided new insights into the mechanism, thus enabling the exploitation of size-dependent nanoscale properties.

  3. Ultrasensitive detection of target analyte-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles using laser-induced nanoparticle Rayleigh scattering.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jia-Hui; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2015-01-01

    Detection of salt- and analyte-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) mostly relies on costly and bulky analytical instruments. To response this drawback, a portable, miniaturized, sensitive, and cost-effective detection technique is urgently required for rapid field detection and monitoring of target analyte via the use of AuNP-based sensor. This study combined a miniaturized spectrometer with a 532-nm laser to develop a laser-induced Rayleigh scattering technique, allowing the sensitive and selective detection of Rayleigh scattering from the aggregated AuNPs. Three AuNP-based sensing systems, including salt-, thiol- and metal ion-induced aggregation of the AuNPs, were performed to examine the sensitivity of laser-induced Rayleigh scattering technique. Salt-, thiol-, and metal ion-promoted NP aggregation were exemplified by the use of aptamer-adsorbed, fluorosurfactant-stabilized, and gallic acid-capped AuNPs for probing K(+), S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase-induced hydrolysis of S-adenosylhomocysteine, and Pb(2+), in sequence. Compared to the reported methods for monitoring the aggregated AuNPs, the proposed system provided distinct advantages of sensitivity. Laser-induced Rayleigh scattering technique was improved to be convenient, cheap, and portable by replacing a diode laser and a miniaturized spectrometer with a laser pointer and a smart-phone. Using this smart-phone-based detection platform, we can determine whether or not the Pb(2+) concentration exceed the maximum allowable level of Pb(2+) in drinking water.

  4. High spatial resolution mapping of surface plasmon resonance modes in single and aggregated gold nanoparticles assembled on DNA strands

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We present the mapping of the full plasmonic mode spectrum for single and aggregated gold nanoparticles linked through DNA strands to a silicon nitride substrate. A comprehensive analysis of the electron energy loss spectroscopy images maps was performed on nanoparticles standing alone, dimers, and clusters of nanoparticles. The experimental results were confirmed by numerical calculations using the Mie theory and Gans-Mie theory for solving Maxwell's equations. Both bright and dark surface plasmon modes have been unveiled. PACS 78.67.Bf; 61.46.Df; 87.64.Ee PMID:23890222

  5. Evaluating aggregation of gold nanoparticles and humic substances using fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pallem, Vasanta L; Stretz, Holly A; Wells, Martha J M

    2009-10-01

    The fate and transport of diagnostic gold nanoparticles in surface waters would significantly depend on their interactions with humic substances, which are ubiquitously found in natural aquatic systems. The current study employs UV-visible absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate the interactions of commercial humic acid (HA) with gold nanoparticles having a core size of 5 nm and coated with two different stabilizers, beta-D-glucose and citrate. Humic substances (HS) are fluorescent in nature, providing a unique probe of nanometer-scale morphological changes for interactions between these natural polyelectrolytes and water-soluble gold nanoparticles. Quenching of fluorescence intensity was observed with beta-D-glucose-coated gold nanoparticles, whereas an enhancement effect was noticed with the citrate-coated particles when mixed with HA having concentrations of 2 and 8 ppm (surface waters typically may contain approximately 10 ppm HS). Examining the quenching and enhancement of fluorescence provides insight into the structural changes taking place at the coated gold nanoparticle-HA interface. The quenching behavior suggested ligand exchange due to nanometer-scale contact between the HA and beta-D-glucose-coated gold nanoparticles, whereas the enhancement effect with citrate particles would indicate overcoating, leading to increased transfer distances for fluorescence resonance energy transfer. PMID:19848172

  6. DNA base-stacking assay utilizing catalytic hairpin assembly-induced gold nanoparticle aggregation for colorimetric protein sensing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Chen; Chen, Chie-Pein; Chen, Chen-Yu; Lin, Chii-Wann

    2016-03-18

    A label-free and enzyme-free colorimetric sensing platform for the amplified detection of fibronectin was developed based on an ingenious combination of catalytic hairpin assembly and a base stacking hybridization-based gold nanoparticle aggregation strategy. The detection limit of 2.3 pM is at least one order of magnitude lower than that of established fibronectin biosensors. PMID:26906691

  7. Colorimetric recognition of pazufloxacin mesilate based on the aggregation of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Sumei; Liao, Ming; Gu, Yu; Li, Nan; Wu, Pinping; Zhang, Tingting; He, Hua

    2016-03-01

    A novel colorimetric nanomaterial-assisted optical sensor for pazufloxacin mesilate was proposed for the first time. Pazufloxacin mesilate could induce the aggregation of glucose-reduced gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) through hydrogen-bonding interaction and electrostatic attraction, leading to the changes in color and absorption spectra of AuNPs. The effect of different factors such as pH, the amount of AuNPs, reaction time and reaction temperature was inspected. Under the optimum condition, UV-vis spectra showed that the absorption ratio (A670/A532) was linear with the concentration of pazufloxacin mesilate in the range from 9 × 10- 8 mol L- 1 to 7 × 10- 7 mol L- 1 with a linear coefficient of 0.9951. This method can be applied to detecting pazufloxacin mesilate with an ultralow detection limit of 7.92 × 10- 9 mol L- 1 without any complicated instruments. Through inspecting other analytes and ions, the anti-interference performance of AuNP detection system for pazufloxacin mesilate was excellent. For its high efficiency, rapid response rate as well as wide linear range, it had been successfully used to the analysis of pazufloxacin mesilate in human urine quantificationally.

  8. Gold nanoparticle aggregation-based colorimetric assay for β-casein detection in bovine milk samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Y S; Zhou, Y; Meng, X Y; Zhang, Y Y; Song, F; Lu, S Y; Ren, H L; Hu, P; Liu, Z S; Zhang, J H

    2014-11-01

    Traditional Kjeldahl method, used for quality evaluation of bovine milk, has intrinsic defects of time-consuming sample preparation and two analyses to determine the difference between non-protein nitrogen content and total protein nitrogen content. Herein, based upon antibody functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), we described a colorimetric method for β-casein (β-CN) detection in bovine milk samples. The linear dynamic range and the LOD were 0.08-250 μg mL(-1), and 0.03 μg mL(-1) respectively. In addition, the real content of β-CN in bovine milk was measured by using the developed assay. The results are closely correlated with those from Kjeldahl method. The advantages of β-CN triggered AuNP aggregation-based colorimetric assay are simple signal generation, the high sensitivity and specificity as well as no need of complicated sample preparation, which make it for on-site detection of β-CN in bovine milk samples.

  9. Colorimetric recognition of pazufloxacin mesilate based on the aggregation of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kong, Sumei; Liao, Ming; Gu, Yu; Li, Nan; Wu, Pinping; Zhang, Tingting; He, Hua

    2016-03-15

    A novel colorimetric nanomaterial-assisted optical sensor for pazufloxacin mesilate was proposed for the first time. Pazufloxacin mesilate could induce the aggregation of glucose-reduced gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) through hydrogen-bonding interaction and electrostatic attraction, leading to the changes in color and absorption spectra of AuNPs. The effect of different factors such as pH, the amount of AuNPs, reaction time and reaction temperature was inspected. Under the optimum condition, UV-vis spectra showed that the absorption ratio (A670/A532) was linear with the concentration of pazufloxacin mesilate in the range from 9×10(-8) mol L(-1) to 7×10(-7) mol L(-1) with a linear coefficient of 0.9951. This method can be applied to detecting pazufloxacin mesilate with an ultralow detection limit of 7.92×10(-9) mol L(-1) without any complicated instruments. Through inspecting other analytes and ions, the anti-interference performance of AuNP detection system for pazufloxacin mesilate was excellent. For its high efficiency, rapid response rate as well as wide linear range, it had been successfully used to the analysis of pazufloxacin mesilate in human urine quantificationally. PMID:26774816

  10. Relating surface-enhanced Raman scattering signals of cells to gold nanoparticle aggregation as determined by LA-ICP-MS micromapping.

    PubMed

    Büchner, Tina; Drescher, Daniela; Traub, Heike; Schrade, Petra; Bachmann, Sebastian; Jakubowski, Norbert; Kneipp, Janina

    2014-11-01

    The cellular response to nanoparticle exposure is essential in various contexts, especially in nanotoxicity and nanomedicine. Here, 14-nm gold nanoparticles in 3T3 fibroblast cells are investigated in a series of pulse-chase experiments with a 30-min incubation pulse and chase times ranging from 15 min to 48 h. The gold nanoparticles and their aggregates are quantified inside the cellular ultrastructure by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry micromapping and evaluated regarding the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals. In this way, both information about their localization at the micrometre scale and their molecular nanoenvironment, respectively, is obtained and can be related. Thus, the nanoparticle pathway from endocytotic uptake, intracellular processing, to cell division can be followed. It is shown that the ability of the intracellular nanoparticles and their accumulations and aggregates to support high SERS signals is neither directly related to nanoparticle amount nor to high local nanoparticle densities. The SERS data indicate that aggregate geometry and interparticle distances in the cell must change in the course of endosomal maturation and play a critical role for a specific gold nanoparticle type in order to act as efficient SERS nanoprobe. This finding is supported by TEM images, showing only a minor portion of aggregates that present small interparticle spacing. The SERS spectra obtained after different chase times show a changing composition and/or structure of the biomolecule corona of the gold nanoparticles as a consequence of endosomal processing. PMID:25120183

  11. Intercalation of aggregation-free and well-dispersed gold nanoparticles into the walls of mesoporous silica as a robust "green" catalyst for n-alkane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lifang; Hu, Juncheng; Richards, Ryan

    2009-01-28

    Aggregate-free and well-dispersed gold nanoparticles were intercalated into the walls of mesoporous silica forming a nanoreactor demonstrating high catalytic activity for "green" alkane oxidation. The material is robust and can be recycled. The method may be developed to intercalate other metal or alloy nanoparticles into the walls of mesoporous silica.

  12. Recyclable Photo-Thermal Nano-Aggregates of Magnetic Nanoparticle Conjugated Gold Nanorods for Effective Pathogenic Bacteria Lysis.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, Mohankandhasamy; Kim, Sanghyo; Lee, Su Seong; Yi, Dong Kee

    2016-01-01

    We describe the nucleophilic hybridization technique for fabricating magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) around gold nanorod (AuNR) for desired photo-thermal lysis on pathogenic bacteria. From the electromagnetic energy conversion into heat to the surrounding medium, a significant and quicker temperature rise was noted after light absorption on nanohybrids, at a controlled laser light output and optimum nanoparticle concentration. We observed a similar photo-thermal pattern for more than three times for the same material up on repeated magnetic separation. Regardless of the cell wall nature, superior pathogenic cell lysis has been observed for the bacteria suspensions of individual and mixed samples of Salmonella typhi (S.typhi) and Bacillus subtilis (B.subtilis) by the photo-heated nanoparticles. The synthesis of short gold nanorod, conjugation with magnetic nanoparticle and its subsequent laser exposure provides a rapid and reiterated photo-thermal effect with enhanced magnetic separation for efficient bactericidal application in water samples. Resultant novel properties of the nano-aggregates makes them a candidate to be used for a rapid, effective, and re-iterated photo-thermal agent against a wide variety of pathogens to attain microbe free water. PMID:27398487

  13. Recyclable Photo-Thermal Nano-Aggregates of Magnetic Nanoparticle Conjugated Gold Nanorods for Effective Pathogenic Bacteria Lysis.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, Mohankandhasamy; Kim, Sanghyo; Lee, Su Seong; Yi, Dong Kee

    2016-01-01

    We describe the nucleophilic hybridization technique for fabricating magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) around gold nanorod (AuNR) for desired photo-thermal lysis on pathogenic bacteria. From the electromagnetic energy conversion into heat to the surrounding medium, a significant and quicker temperature rise was noted after light absorption on nanohybrids, at a controlled laser light output and optimum nanoparticle concentration. We observed a similar photo-thermal pattern for more than three times for the same material up on repeated magnetic separation. Regardless of the cell wall nature, superior pathogenic cell lysis has been observed for the bacteria suspensions of individual and mixed samples of Salmonella typhi (S.typhi) and Bacillus subtilis (B.subtilis) by the photo-heated nanoparticles. The synthesis of short gold nanorod, conjugation with magnetic nanoparticle and its subsequent laser exposure provides a rapid and reiterated photo-thermal effect with enhanced magnetic separation for efficient bactericidal application in water samples. Resultant novel properties of the nano-aggregates makes them a candidate to be used for a rapid, effective, and re-iterated photo-thermal agent against a wide variety of pathogens to attain microbe free water.

  14. A sensitive and selective colorimetric method for detection of copper ions based on anti-aggregation of unmodified gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hormozi-Nezhad, M Reza; Abbasi-Moayed, Samira

    2014-11-01

    A highly sensitive and selective colorimetric method for detection of copper ions, based on anti-aggregation of D-penicillamine (D-PC) induced aggregated gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was developed. Copper ions can hinder the aggregation of AuNPs induced by D-PC, through formation of mixed-valence complex with D-PC that is a selective copper chelator. In the presence of a fixed amount of D-PC, the aggregation of AuNPs decreases with increasing concentrations of Cu(2+) along with a color change from blue to red in AuNPs solution and an increase in the absorption ratio (A520/A650). Under the optimum experimental conditions (pH 7, [AuNPs] =3.0 nmol L(-1) and [NaCl]=25 mmol L(-1)), a linear calibration curve for Cu(2+) was obtained within the range of 0.05-1.85 µmol L(-1) with a limit of detection (3Sb) of 30 nmol L(-1). Excellent selectivity toward Cu(2+) was observed among various metal ions due to a specific complex formation between Cu(2+) and D-PC. The proposed method has been successfully applied for the detection of Cu(2+) in various real samples.

  15. Chemiluminescence determination of trimetazidine via inducing the aggregation of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiao; Quan, Jie; Du, Jianxiu; Liu, Mei

    2013-10-01

    A simple, rapid and sensitive chemiluminescence (CL) method combined with flow injection analysis was developed for the determination of trimetazidine. Trimetazidine was found to significantly increase the CL signal arising from N-bromosuccinimide-luminol reaction in the presence of gold nanoparticles. The enhanced CL intensity was proportional to trimetazidine concentration in the range of 0.01-5.0 μg/mL, with a limit of detection (3sb) of 6.7 ng/mL. The relative standard deviation was 2.8% for 11 repetitive measurements of 0.1 μg/mL trimetazidine solution. The practicality of the method was evaluated by determining trimetazidine in pharmaceutical formulations and in spiked human serum samples. Moreover, the possible CL reaction mechanism was also discussed.

  16. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy reveals strong fluorescence quenching of FITC adducts on PEGylated gold nanoparticles in water and the presence of fluorescent aggregates of desorbed thiolate ligands.

    PubMed

    Loumaigne, Matthieu; Praho, Raïssa; Nutarelli, Daniele; Werts, Martinus H V; Débarre, Anne

    2010-09-28

    Colloidal gold particles functionalised with oligoethylene-glycolated disulfide ligands and fluorescent moieties derived from fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) have been prepared and studied in aqueous suspension using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). FCS probes the dynamics of the particles at the single object level, and reveals the desorption of fluorescent ligands which subsequently aggregate into larger (slower diffusing) objects. Cross-correlation spectroscopy of the FITC fluorescence and the Rayleigh-Mie scattering (RM-FCCS) of the gold cores shows that the only detectable fluorescent objects are free ligands and aggregates not associated with a gold particle. The fluorescence of bound fluorophores is quenched making their fluorescence too weak to be detected. FCS and RM-FCCS are useful tools for characterising functionalised noble metal particles in solution, under conditions similar to those used in optical bio-imaging. Desorption of thiolates from gold nanoparticles needs to be taken into account when working with these materials at low concentration.

  17. In vivo tumor-targeted dual-modal fluorescence/CT imaging using a nanoprobe co-loaded with an aggregation-induced emission dye and gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jimei; Li, Chan; Zhang, Xu; Huo, Shuaidong; Jin, Shubin; An, Fei-Fei; Wang, Xiaodan; Xue, Xiangdong; Okeke, C I; Duan, Guiyun; Guo, Fengguang; Zhang, Xiaohong; Hao, Jifu; Wang, Paul C; Zhang, Jinchao; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2015-02-01

    As an intensely studied computed tomography (CT) contrast agent, gold nanoparticle has been suggested to be combined with fluorescence imaging modality to offset the low sensitivity of CT. However, the strong quenching of gold nanoparticle on fluorescent dyes requires complicated design and shielding to overcome. Herein, we report a unique nanoprobe (M-NPAPF-Au) co-loading an aggregation-induced emission (AIE) red dye and gold nanoparticles into DSPE-PEG(2000) micelles for dual-modal fluorescence/CT imaging. The nanoprobe was prepared based on a facile method of "one-pot ultrasonic emulsification". Surprisingly, in the micelles system, fluorescence dye (NPAPF) efficiently overcame the strong fluorescence quenching of shielding-free gold nanoparticles and retained the crucial AIE feature. In vivo studies demonstrated the nanoprobe had superior tumor-targeting ability, excellent fluorescence and CT imaging effects. The totality of present studies clearly indicates the significant potential application of M-NPAPF-Au as a dual-modal non-invasive fluorescence/X-ray CT nanoprobe for in vivo tumor-targeted imaging and diagnosis.

  18. The Importance of Excess Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) for the Aggregation of Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-Coated Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Thermoresponsive materials are generating significant interest on account of the sharp and tunable temperature deswelling transition of the polymer chain. Such materials have shown promise in drug delivery devices, sensing systems, and self-assembly. Incorporation of nanoparticles (NPs), typically through covalent attachment of the polymer chains to the NP surface, can add additional functionality and tunability to such hybrid materials. The versatility of these thermoresponsive polymer/nanoparticle materials has been shown previously; however, significant and important differences exist in the published literature between virtually identical materials. Here we use poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm)-AuNPs as a model system to understand the aggregation behavior of thermoresponsive polymer-coated nanoparticles in pure water, made by either grafting-to or grafting-from methods. We show that, contrary to popular belief, the aggregation of PNIPAm-coated AuNPs, and likely other such materials, relies on the size and concentration of unbound “free” PNIPAm in solution. It is this unbound polymer that also leads to an increase in solution turbidity, a characteristic that is typically used to prove nanoparticle aggregation. The size of PNIPAm used to coat the AuNPs, as well as the concentration of the resultant polymer–AuNP composites, is shown to have little effect on aggregation. Without free PNIPAm, contraction of the polymer corona in response to increasing temperature is observed, instead of nanoparticle aggregation, and is accompanied by no change in solution turbidity or color. We develop an alternative method for removing all traces of excess free polymer and develop an approach for analyzing the aggregation behavior of such materials, which truly allows for heat-triggered aggregation to be studied. PMID:26788966

  19. The Importance of Excess Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) for the Aggregation of Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-Coated Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jones, Samuel T; Walsh-Korb, Zarah; Barrow, Steven J; Henderson, Sarah L; del Barrio, Jesús; Scherman, Oren A

    2016-03-22

    Thermoresponsive materials are generating significant interest on account of the sharp and tunable temperature deswelling transition of the polymer chain. Such materials have shown promise in drug delivery devices, sensing systems, and self-assembly. Incorporation of nanoparticles (NPs), typically through covalent attachment of the polymer chains to the NP surface, can add additional functionality and tunability to such hybrid materials. The versatility of these thermoresponsive polymer/nanoparticle materials has been shown previously; however, significant and important differences exist in the published literature between virtually identical materials. Here we use poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm)-AuNPs as a model system to understand the aggregation behavior of thermoresponsive polymer-coated nanoparticles in pure water, made by either grafting-to or grafting-from methods. We show that, contrary to popular belief, the aggregation of PNIPAm-coated AuNPs, and likely other such materials, relies on the size and concentration of unbound "free" PNIPAm in solution. It is this unbound polymer that also leads to an increase in solution turbidity, a characteristic that is typically used to prove nanoparticle aggregation. The size of PNIPAm used to coat the AuNPs, as well as the concentration of the resultant polymer-AuNP composites, is shown to have little effect on aggregation. Without free PNIPAm, contraction of the polymer corona in response to increasing temperature is observed, instead of nanoparticle aggregation, and is accompanied by no change in solution turbidity or color. We develop an alternative method for removing all traces of excess free polymer and develop an approach for analyzing the aggregation behavior of such materials, which truly allows for heat-triggered aggregation to be studied. PMID:26788966

  20. Fluorescence spectroscopy in probing spontaneous and induced aggregation amongst size-selective gold nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Dewan S.; Ghosh, Sujit Kumar

    2014-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been synthesized by borohydride reduction using poly(N-vinyl 2-pyrrolidone) as the stabilizing agent in aqueous medium in the size regime of 1-5 nm. Aggregation amongst these polymer-stabilized gold nanoparticles has been accomplished by the controlled addition of hydrazine or aggregation may occur spontaneously (devoid of any chemicals) that is ubiquitous to nanoparticulate systems. Now, fluorescencein isothiocyanate (FITC), a prototype molecular probe has been employed in understanding the physical principles of aggregation phenomenon of the size-selective gold nanoparticles undergoing spontaneous and induced-aggregation under stipulated conditions. It is seen that there is enhancement of fluorescence intensity of FITC in the presence of both spontaneously and induced-aggregated gold nanoclusters as compared to free FITC. Interestingly, it is observed that the fluorescence sensitivity is able to distinguish seven different sizes of the gold nanoparticles in the aggregates and maximum enhancement of intensity arises at higher concentration with increase in size of gold particles within the aggregates. With increase in concentration of gold nanoparticle aggregates, the intensity increases, initially, reaches a maximum at a threshold concentration and then, gradually decreases in the presence of both spontaneously and induced-aggregated gold particles. However, the salient feature of physical significance is that the maximum enhancement of intensity with time has remained almost same for induced-aggregated gold while decreases exponentially with spontaneously aggregated gold particles.

  1. Chemistry for oncotheranostic gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Trouiller, Anne Juliette; Hebié, Seydou; El Bahhaj, Fatima; Napporn, Teko W; Bertrand, Philippe

    2015-06-24

    This review presents in a comprehensive ways the chemical methods used to functionalize gold nanoparticles with focus on anti-cancer applications. The review covers the parameters required for the synthesis gold nanoparticles with defined shapes and sizes, method for targeted delivery in tumours, and selected examples of anti-cancers compounds delivered with gold nanoparticles. A short survey of bioassays for oncology based on gold nanoparticles is also presented.

  2. Gold Nanoparticles Cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironava, Tatsiana

    Over the last two decades gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been used for many scientific applications and have attracted attention due to the specific chemical, electronic and optical size dependent properties that make them very promising agents in many fields such as medicine, imagine techniques and electronics. More specifically, biocompatible gold nanoparticles have a huge potential for use as the contrast augmentation agent in X-ray Computed Tomography and Photo Acoustic Tomography for early tumor diagnostic as well these nanoparticles are extensively researched for enhancing the targeted cancer treatment effectiveness such as photo-thermal and radiotherapy. In most biomedical applications biocompatible gold nanoparticles are labeled with specific tumor or other pathology targeting antibodies and used for site specific drug delivery. However, even though gold nanoparticles poses very high level of anti cancer properties, the question of their cytotoxicity ones they are released in normal tissue has to be researched. Moreover, the huge amount of industrially produced gold nanoparticles raises the question of these particles being a health hazard, since the penetration is fairly easy for the "nano" size substances. This study focuses on the effect of AuNPs on a human skin tissue, since it is fall in both categories -- the side effects for biomedical applications and industrial workers and users' exposure during production and handling. Therefore, in the present project, gold nanoparticles stabilized with the biocompatible agent citric acid were generated and characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The cytotoxic effect of AuNPs release to healthy skin tissue was modeled on 3 different cell types: human keratinocytes, human dermal fibroblasts, and human adipose derived stromal (ADS) cells. The AuNPs localization inside the cell was found to be cell type dependent. Overall cytotoxicity was found to be dependent

  3. A visual assay and spectrophotometric determination of LLM-105 explosive using detection of gold nanoparticle aggregation at two pH values.

    PubMed

    He, Yi; Cheng, Yang

    2016-08-01

    We report a simple, rapid, and sensitive assay for visual and spectrophotometric detection of the 2,6-diamino-3,5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide (LLM-105) explosive. The assay is based on different interactions between LLM-105 and gold nanoparticle (AuNP) dispersions at two pH values, leading to the formation of dispersed or aggregated AuNPs. Two AuNP dispersions at two pH values were applied to recognize and detect LLM-105 instead of traditional AuNP dispersion under an aptotic pH to improve the anti-interference ability. The developed assay showed excellent sensitivity with a detection limit of 3 ng/mL, and the presence of as low as 0.2 μg/mL LLM-105 can be directly detected with the bare eye. This sensitivity is about six orders of magnitude higher than that of the reported traditional assays. Additionally, the assay exhibited good selectivity toward LLM-105 over other explosives, sulfur-containing compounds, and amines. Graphical abstract A simple, sensitive, and selective assay for LLM-105 was developed based on the pH-dependent interaction between the LLM-105 explosive and gold nanoparticle dispersion.

  4. Techniques for Accurate Sizing of Gold Nanoparticles Using Dynamic Light Scattering with Particular Application to Chemical and Biological Sensing Based on Aggregate Formation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Tianyu; Bott, Steven; Huo, Qun

    2016-08-24

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have found broad applications in chemical and biological sensing, catalysis, biomolecular imaging, in vitro diagnostics, cancer therapy, and many other areas. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is an analytical tool used routinely for nanoparticle size measurement and analysis. Due to its relatively low cost and ease of operation in comparison to other more sophisticated techniques, DLS is the primary choice of instrumentation for analyzing the size and size distribution of nanoparticle suspensions. However, many DLS users are unfamiliar with the principles behind the DLS measurement and are unware of some of the intrinsic limitations as well as the unique capabilities of this technique. The lack of sufficient understanding of DLS often leads to inappropriate experimental design and misinterpretation of the data. In this study, we performed DLS analyses on a series of citrate-stabilized AuNPs with diameters ranging from 10 to 100 nm. Our study shows that the measured hydrodynamic diameters of the AuNPs can vary significantly with concentration and incident laser power. The scattered light intensity of the AuNPs has a nearly sixth order power law increase with diameter, and the enormous scattered light intensity of AuNPs with diameters around or exceeding 80 nm causes a substantial multiple scattering effect in conventional DLS instruments. The effect leads to significant errors in the reported average hydrodynamic diameter of the AuNPs when the measurements are analyzed in the conventional way, without accounting for the multiple scattering. We present here some useful methods to obtain the accurate hydrodynamic size of the AuNPs using DLS. We also demonstrate and explain an extremely powerful aspect of DLS-its exceptional sensitivity in detecting gold nanoparticle aggregate formation, and the use of this unique capability for chemical and biological sensing applications. PMID:27472008

  5. In vitro monitoring of oxidative processes with self-aggregating gold nanoparticles using all-optical photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yasmin, Zannatul; Khachatryan, Edward; Lee, Yuan-Hao; Maswadi, Saher; Glickman, Randolph; Nash, Kelly L

    2015-02-15

    In this work, the assembly of gold nanoparticles of (AuNPs) is used to detect the presence of the biomolecule glutathione (GSH) using a novel technique called "all-optical photoacoustic spectroscopy" (AOPAS). The AOPAS technique coupled with AuNPs forms the basis of a biosensing technique capable of probing the dynamic evolution of nano-bio interfaces within a microscopic volume. Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectra were measured to describe the kinetics governing the interparticle interactions by monitoring the AuNPs assembly and evolution of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band. A comparison of the same dynamic evolution of AuNPs assembly was performed using the AOPAS technique to confirm the validity of this method. The fundamental study is complemented by a demonstration of the performance of this biosensing technique in the presence of cell culture medium containing fetal bovine serum (FBS), which forms a protein corona on the surface of the AuNPs. This work demonstrates that the in vitro monitoring capabilities of the AOPAS provides sensitive measurement at the microscopic level and low nanoparticle concentrations without the artifacts limiting the use of conventional biosensing methods, such as fluorescent indicators. The AOPAS technique not only provides a facile approach for in vitro biosensing, but also shed a light on the real-time detection of thiol containing oxidative stress biomarkers in live systems using AuNPs. PMID:25441418

  6. Dopamine assay based on an aggregation-induced reversed inner filter effect of gold nanoparticles on the fluorescence of graphene quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng-E; Gui, Chuang; Wen, Wei; Bao, Ting; Zhang, Xiuhua; Wang, Shengfu

    2016-09-01

    We describe a fluorescent dopamine assay that is based on the inner filter effect (IFE) of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the fluorescence of graphene quantum dots (GQDs). The green fluorescence of GQDs is remarkably inhibited in the presence of citrate-stabilized AuNPs via IFE. Upon the addition of dopamine (DA), aggregation of the AuNPs occurs which is associated with a color change from red to blue. The IFE can no longer occur and the fluorescence of GQDs is recovered. Under the optimum conditions, a linear correlation exists between fluorescence intensity and the concentration of DA in the range from 20nM to 200nM with a detection limit of 15nM (at 3σ/s). The assay is rapid, inexpensive and highly sensitive. PMID:27343608

  7. Unusual sequence length-dependent gold nanoparticles aggregation of the ssDNA sticky end and its application for enzyme-free and signal amplified colorimetric DNA detection

    PubMed Central

    He, Hongfei; Dai, Jianyuan; Duan, Zhijuan; Zheng, Baozhan; Meng, Yan; Guo, Yong; Dan Xiao

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the adsorption of short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) on unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is much faster than that for long ssDNA, and thus leads to length-dependent AuNPs aggregation after addition of salt, the color of the solutions sequentially changed from red to blue in accordance with the increase of ssDNA length. However, we found herein that the ssDNA sticky end of hairpin DNA exhibited a completely different adsorption behavior compared to ssDNA, an inverse blue-to-red color variation was observed in the colloid solution with the increase of sticky end length when the length is within a certain range. This unusual sequence length-dependent AuNPs aggregation might be ascribed to the effect of the stem of hairpin DNA. On the basis of this unique phenomenon and catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) based signal amplification, a novel AuNPs-based colorimetric DNA assay with picomolar sensitivity and specificity was developed. This unusual sequence length-dependent AuNPs aggregation of the ssDNA sticky end introduces a new direction for the AuNPs-based colorimetric assays. PMID:27477392

  8. Unusual sequence length-dependent gold nanoparticles aggregation of the ssDNA sticky end and its application for enzyme-free and signal amplified colorimetric DNA detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hongfei; Dai, Jianyuan; Duan, Zhijuan; Zheng, Baozhan; Meng, Yan; Guo, Yong; Dan Xiao

    2016-08-01

    It is known that the adsorption of short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) on unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is much faster than that for long ssDNA, and thus leads to length-dependent AuNPs aggregation after addition of salt, the color of the solutions sequentially changed from red to blue in accordance with the increase of ssDNA length. However, we found herein that the ssDNA sticky end of hairpin DNA exhibited a completely different adsorption behavior compared to ssDNA, an inverse blue-to-red color variation was observed in the colloid solution with the increase of sticky end length when the length is within a certain range. This unusual sequence length-dependent AuNPs aggregation might be ascribed to the effect of the stem of hairpin DNA. On the basis of this unique phenomenon and catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) based signal amplification, a novel AuNPs-based colorimetric DNA assay with picomolar sensitivity and specificity was developed. This unusual sequence length-dependent AuNPs aggregation of the ssDNA sticky end introduces a new direction for the AuNPs-based colorimetric assays.

  9. 1,4-Benzenediboronic-Acid-Induced Aggregation of Gold Nanoparticles: Application to Hydrogen Peroxide Detection and Biotin-Avidin-Mediated Immunoassay with Naked-Eye Detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Chun; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2016-05-17

    Hydrogen-peroxide (H2O2)-induced growth of small-sized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is often implemented for H2O2 sensing and plasmonic immunoassay. In contrast, there is little-to-no information in the literature regarding the application of H2O2-inhibited aggregation of citrate-capped AuNPs. This study discloses that benzene-1,4-diboronic acid (BDBA) was effective in driving the aggregation of citrate-capped AuNPs through an interaction between α-hydroxycarboxylate of citrate and boronic acids of BDBA. The H2O2-mediated oxidation of BDBA resulted in the conversion of boronic acid groups to phenol groups. The oxidized BDBA was incapable of triggering the aggregation of citrate-capped AuNPs. Thus, the presence of H2O2 prohibited BDBA-induced aggregation of citrate-capped AuNPs. The BDBA-induced aggregation of citrate-capped AuNPs can be paired with the glucose oxidase (GOx)-glucose system to design a colorimetric probe for glucose. Moreover, a H2O2·BDBA·AuNP probe was integrated with sandwich immunoassay, biotinylated antibody, and avidin-conjugated GOx for the selective naked-eye detection of rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) and human-prostate-specific antigen (PSA). The lowest detectable concentrations of rabbit IgG and human PSA by the naked eye were down to 0.1 and 4 ng/mL, respectively. More importantly, the proposed plasmonic immunoassay allowed the naked-eye quantification of 0-10 ng/mL PSA at an interval of 2 ng/mL in plasma samples.

  10. 1,4-Benzenediboronic-Acid-Induced Aggregation of Gold Nanoparticles: Application to Hydrogen Peroxide Detection and Biotin-Avidin-Mediated Immunoassay with Naked-Eye Detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Chun; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2016-05-17

    Hydrogen-peroxide (H2O2)-induced growth of small-sized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is often implemented for H2O2 sensing and plasmonic immunoassay. In contrast, there is little-to-no information in the literature regarding the application of H2O2-inhibited aggregation of citrate-capped AuNPs. This study discloses that benzene-1,4-diboronic acid (BDBA) was effective in driving the aggregation of citrate-capped AuNPs through an interaction between α-hydroxycarboxylate of citrate and boronic acids of BDBA. The H2O2-mediated oxidation of BDBA resulted in the conversion of boronic acid groups to phenol groups. The oxidized BDBA was incapable of triggering the aggregation of citrate-capped AuNPs. Thus, the presence of H2O2 prohibited BDBA-induced aggregation of citrate-capped AuNPs. The BDBA-induced aggregation of citrate-capped AuNPs can be paired with the glucose oxidase (GOx)-glucose system to design a colorimetric probe for glucose. Moreover, a H2O2·BDBA·AuNP probe was integrated with sandwich immunoassay, biotinylated antibody, and avidin-conjugated GOx for the selective naked-eye detection of rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) and human-prostate-specific antigen (PSA). The lowest detectable concentrations of rabbit IgG and human PSA by the naked eye were down to 0.1 and 4 ng/mL, respectively. More importantly, the proposed plasmonic immunoassay allowed the naked-eye quantification of 0-10 ng/mL PSA at an interval of 2 ng/mL in plasma samples. PMID:27091002

  11. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles using various amino acids.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Tatsuo; Fujimoto, Yuhei; Maekawa, Tetsuya

    2015-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles (4-7nm) were synthesized from tetraauric acid using various amino acids as reducing and capping agents. The gold nanoparticles were produced from the incubation of a AuCl4(-) solution with an amino acid at 80°C for 20min. Among the twenty amino acids tested, several amino acids produced gold nanoparticles. The color of the nanoparticle solutions varied with the amino acids used for the reduction. We adopted l-histidine as a reducing agent and investigated the effects of the synthesis conditions on the gold nanoparticles. The His and AuCl4(-) concentrations affected the size of the gold nanoparticles and their aggregates. The pH of the reaction solution also affected the reaction yields and the shape of the gold nanoparticles.

  12. Visual scanometric detection of DNA through silver enhancement regulated by gold-nanoparticle aggregation with a molecular beacon as the trigger.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hanxu; Dong, Haifeng; Yan, Feng; Lei, Jianping; Ding, Ling; Gao, Wenchao; Ju, Huangxian

    2011-09-26

    A convenient and label-free scanometric approach for DNA assay was designed by integrating a metal-ion-mediated conformational molecular beacon (MB) and silver-signal amplification regulated by gold-nanoparticle (AuNP) aggregation. The strategy was based on displacing the interaction between the target DNA sequence and a competitor Hg(2+) ion with a link DNA sequence. In the absence of the target DNA sequence, a link DNA sequence interacted with the Hg(2+) ions, thus forming an inactive cyclic conformation of the MB. This result led to the poor aggregation of polyadenosine-functionalized AuNPs (A-AuNP). In the presence of a target DNA sequence with a stronger affinity than that of the competitor, hybridization between the link DNA and target DNA sequences turned on the trigger. The polythymidine end of the resulting linear duplex structure could react with A-AuNP, thus leading to a cross-linking aggregation. This aggregation weakened AuNP-catalyzed silver enhancement on a spot substrate. Further, by using scanometric detection, the concentration of the target DNA sequence could be conveniently read out within a linear range from 1.0 to 30 nM. Interestingly, in the same amount of Hg(2+) ions, one-base mismatched DNA showed only 22% of the relative gray-scale intensity for the target DNA sequence at the same concentration, thus indicating good specificity. The designed approach, with the help of the ion-mediated conformational MB, was simple, cost effective, adaptable, and convenient and provided significant potential applications in clinical analysis.

  13. A label-free colorimetric aptasensor for simple, sensitive and selective detection of Pt (II) based on platinum (II)-oligonucleotide coordination induced gold nanoparticles aggregation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Daoqing; Zhai, Qingfeng; Zhou, Weijun; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Erkang; Dong, Shaojun

    2016-11-15

    Herein, a gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) based label-free colorimetric aptasensor for simple, sensitive and selective detection of Pt (II) was constructed for the first time. Four bases (G-G mismatch) mismatched streptavidin aptamer (MSAA) was used to protect AuNPs from salt-induced aggregation and recognize Pt (II) specifically. Only in the presence of Pt (II), coordination occurs between G-G bases and Pt (II), leading to the activation of streptavidin aptamer. Streptavidin coated magnetic beads (MBs) were used as separation agent to separate Pt (II)-coordinated MSAA. The residual less amount of MSAA could not efficiently protect AuNPs anymore and aggregation of AuNPs will produce a colorimetric product. With the addition of Pt (II), a pale purple-to-blue color variation could be observed by the naked eye. A detection limit of 150nM and a linear range from 0.6μM to 12.5μM for Pt (II) could be achieved without any amplification. PMID:27281107

  14. A new strategy for the controlled deposition of gold nanoparticle aggregates on two-dimensional polystyrene arrays and its application in glucose oxidase immobilization.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yuetong; Li, Jinru; Jiang, Long

    2012-07-01

    Nano/microstructures play an important role in nanoparticle applications. This paper describes an innovative strategy to fabricate a variety of gold nanoparticle aggregates (AuNPs) on large-scale arrays of up to ∼1 cm(2) made from polystyrene (PS). A dendritic surfactant, C18N3, has multi-amine head groups that can control the thickness of a double layer adsorbed on the PS sphere surface in a pH-dependent manner. Controlling the pH and immersion time in the C18N3 solution allows the morphology of AuNPs deposited on the PS spheres (PS@AuNP) to be regulated. The influence of nano/microstructures on the activity enhancement of glucose oxidase (GOD) was investigated. The results indicated that well-ordered PS@AuNP arrays performed much better in the specific activity enhancement of GOD compared with free GOD and GOD immobilized on PS arrays. Furthermore, it was observed that the immobilized GOD on 2D PS@AuNP arrays maintained a highly improved operational stability compared to free GOD. The mechanism behind this effect is discussed. For practical applications, prepared PS@AuNP arrays can be used as an effective chip for GOD immobilization and application. PMID:22498366

  15. Nanoparticle aggregation: principles and modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    The high surface area to volume ratio of nanoparticles usually results in highly reactive and colloidal instability compared to their bulk counterparts. Aggregation as well as many other transformations (e.g., dissolution) in the environment may alter the physiochemical properties, reactivity, fate, transport, and biological interactions (e.g., bioavailability and uptake) of nanoparticles. The unique properties pertinent to nanoparticles, such as shape, size, surface characteristics, composition, and electronic structures, greatly challenge the ability of colloid science to understand nanoparticle aggregation and its environmental impacts. This review briefly introduces fundamentals about aggregation, fractal dimensions, classic and extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeak (DLVO) theories, aggregation kinetic modeling, experimental measurements, followed by detailed discussions on the major factors on aggregation and subsequent effects on nanomaterial transport and reactivity.

  16. The adjuvanticity of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykman, Lev A.; Bogatyrev, Vladimir A.; Staroverov, Sergey A.; Pristensky, Dmitry V.; Shchyogolev, Sergey Yu.; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G.

    2006-06-01

    A new variant of a technique for in vivo production of antibodies to various antigens with colloidal-gold nanoparticles as carrier is discussed. With this technique we obtained highly specific and relatively high-titre antibodies to different antigens. The antibodies were tested by an immunodot assay with gold nanoparticle markers. Our results provide the first demonstration that immunization of animals with colloidal gold complexed with either haptens or complete antigens gives rise to highly specific antibodies even without the use of complete Freund's adjuvant. These findings may attest to the adjuvanticity of gold nanoparticles itself. We provide also experimental results and discussion aimed at elucidation of possible mechanisms of the discovered colloidal-gold-adjuvanticity effect.

  17. Iodide-induced organothiol desorption and photochemical reaction, gold nanoparticle (AuNP) fusion, and SERS signal reduction in organothiol-containing AuNP aggregates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been used extensively as surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic (SERS) substrates for their large SERS enhancements and widely believed chemical stability. Presented is the finding that iodide can rapidly reduce the SERS intensity of the ligands, including organothiols ...

  18. Concentration-controlled formation of myoglobin/gold nanosphere aggregates.

    PubMed

    Sevilla, Paz; Sánchez-Cortés, Santiago; García-Ramos, José V; Feis, Alessandro

    2014-05-15

    Gold nanoparticles are being increasingly proposed as biotechnological tools for medical diagnosis and therapy purposes. Their safety for human beings and the environment is therefore becoming an emerging issue, which calls for basic research on the interactions between nanostructured gold particles and biological materials, including physicochemical studies of model systems. In this Article, we focus on the "reaction products" of a widely known nanoparticle type, citrate-capped 30 nm gold nanospheres, with a model protein, horse myoglobin. Protein adsorption and partial denaturation were accompanied by the formation of nanoparticle aggregates with strongly distinct optical spectroscopy properties and shapes, as observed by transmission electron microscopy. We singled out the concentration of myoglobin as the determinant of these differences, and verified on this basis that surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra can only be obtained by aggregates with strong interparticle optical coupling, which are obtained at low protein concentration. The results can be useful both in improving the spectroscopy of biomolecules and in understanding the formation of the protein corona in biomedical applications.

  19. Selection of a DNA aptamer for cadmium detection based on cationic polymer mediated aggregation of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuangen; Zhan, Shenshan; Wang, Lumei; Zhou, Pei

    2014-03-21

    The demand for selection of aptamers against various small chemical molecules has substantially increased in recent years. To incubate and separate target-specific aptamers, the conventional SELEX procedures generally need to immobilize target molecules on a matrix, which may be impotent to screen aptamers toward small molecules without enough sites for immobilization. Herein we chose Cd(II) as a model of a small molecule with less sites, and proposed a novel SELEX strategy of immobilizing ssDNA libraries rather than target molecules on a matrix, for selection of aptamers with high affinity to Cd(II). After eleven rounds of positive and negative selection, twelve T and G-rich of nonrepeating ssDNA sequences were identified, of which the Cd-4 aptamer displayed the highest binding affinity to Cd(II). The secondary structures of these sequences revealed that a stem-loop structure folded by the domain of their 30-random sequence is critical for aptamers to bind targets. Then the interaction between the selected Cd-4 aptamer and Cd(II) was confirmed by CD analysis, and the binding specificity toward other competitive metal ions was also investigated. The dissociation constant (Kd) of Cd-4 aptamer was determined as 34.5 nM for Cd(II). Moreover, the Cd-4 aptamer was considered a recognition element for the colorimetric detection of Cd(II) based on the aggregation of AuNPs by cationic polymer. Through spectroscopic quantitative analysis, Cd(II) in aqueous solution can be detected as low as 4.6 nM. The selected Cd-4 aptamer will offer a new substitute for the detection of Cd(II) or other applications like recovery of cadmium from polluted samples.

  20. Nanomanufacturing of gold nanoparticle superstructures from the "bottom-up"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Tingling

    48 nm, the corresponding number of PEO chains on each particle was estimated to increase proportionally from 6 to 140. Consequently, the structure of the final products could be manipulated from gold dimer to raspberry-like structures. The third part of my work demonstrated the fabrication of 2-dimensional (2-D) gold nanoparticle arrays using peptide-derivatized block copolymer thin film templates. A triblock polystyrene-b-poly(methyl methacrylate)-b-A3 peptide (PS-b-PMMA-A3) was synthesized and processed into thin film with highly-ordered surface patterns via cold zone annealing (CZA). Gold nanoparticles were selectively immobilized onto PMMA domains due to the binding affinity of A3 peptide located at the PMMA chain end. Gold nanoparticle structures such as hexagonally-packed gold nanoparticle clusters and parallel gold nanoparticle wires have been achieved using this method. GISAXS results indicate that the hexagonal gold-hierarchical structure is constituted of two different structures: a primary structure induced by nanofeatures on the thin film template and a secondary structure formed through gold nanoparticle packing within each cluster domain. Selectivity of the thin film template to gold nanoparticles and the nanoparticle aggregation are two competing phenomena that affect resolution of the hierarchical structures.

  1. Gold nanoparticles for photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wanwan; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a biomedical imaging modality that provides functional information regarding the cellular and molecular signatures of tissue by using endogenous and exogenous contrast agents. There has been tremendous effort devoted to the development of PA imaging agents, and gold nanoparticles as exogenous contrast agents have great potential for PA imaging due to their inherent and geometrically induced optical properties. The gold-based nanoparticles that are most commonly employed for PA imaging include spheres, rods, shells, prisms, cages, stars and vesicles. This article provides an overview of the current state of research in utilizing these gold nanomaterials for PA imaging of cancer, atherosclerotic plaques, brain function and image-guided therapy. PMID:25600972

  2. Biologically inspired stealth peptide-capped gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, Ann K; White, Andrew D; Keefe, Andrew J; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2014-02-25

    Introduction into the human body makes most nanoparticle systems susceptible to aggregation via nonspecific protein binding. Here, we developed a peptide-capped gold nanoparticle platform that withstands aggregation in undiluted human serum at 37 °C for 24 h. This biocompatible and natural system is based on mimicking human proteins which are enriched in negatively charged glutamic acid and positively charged lysine residues on their surface. The multifunctional EKEKEKE-PPPPC-Am peptide sequence consists of a stealth glutamic acid/lysine portion combined with a surface anchoring linker containing four prolines and a cysteine. Particle stability was measured via optical spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering in single protein, high salt, and undiluted human serum solutions. In vitro cell experiments demonstrate EKEKEKE-PPPPC-Am capped gold nanoparticles effectively minimize nonspecific cell uptake by nonphagocytic bovine aortic endothelial cells and phagocytic murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. Cytotoxicity studies show that peptide-capped gold nanoparticles do not affect cell viability. Finally, the peptide EKEKEKE-PPPPC-Am was extended with cyclic RGD to demonstrate specific cell targeting and stealth without using poly(ethylene glycol). Adding the functional peptide via peptide sequence extension avoids complex conjugation chemistries that are used for connection to synthetic materials. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy results indicate high aortic bovine endothelial cell uptake of c[RGDfE(SGG-KEKEKE-PPPPC-Am)] capped gold nanoparticles and low uptake of the control scrambled sequence c[RDGfE(SGG-KEKEKE-PPPPC-Am)] capped gold nanoparticles.

  3. Microwave extinction characteristics of nanoparticle aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y. P.; Cheng, J. X.; Liu, X. X.; Wang, H. X.; Zhao, F. T.; Wen, W. W.

    2016-07-01

    Structure of nanoparticle aggregates plays an important role in microwave extinction capacity. The diffusion-limited aggregation model (DLA) for fractal growth is utilized to explore the possible structures of nanoparticle aggregates by computer simulation. Based on the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) method, the microwave extinction performance by different nano-carborundum aggregates is numerically analyzed. The effects of the particle quantity, original diameter, fractal structure, as well as orientation on microwave extinction are investigated, and also the extinction characteristics of aggregates are compared with the spherical nanoparticle in the same volume. Numerical results give out that proper aggregation of nanoparticle is beneficial to microwave extinction capacity, and the microwave extinction cross section by aggregated granules is better than that of the spherical solid one in the same volume.

  4. The size distribution of 'gold standard' nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bienert, Ralf; Emmerling, Franziska; Thünemann, Andreas F

    2009-11-01

    The spherical gold nanoparticle reference materials RM 8011, RM 8012, and RM 8013, with a nominal radius of 5, 15, and 30 nm, respectively, have been available since 2008 from NIST. These materials are recommended as standards for nanoparticle size measurements and for the study of the biological effects of nanoparticles, e.g., in pre-clinical biomedical research. We report on determination of the size distributions of these gold nanoparticles using different small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) instruments. Measurements with a classical Kratky type SAXS instrument are compared with a synchrotron SAXS technique. Samples were investigated in situ, positioned in capillaries and in levitated droplets. The number-weighted size distributions were determined applying model scattering functions based on (a) Gaussian, (b) log-normal, and (c) Schulz distributions. The mean radii are 4.36 +/- 0.04 nm (RM 8011), 12.20 +/- 0.03 nm (RM 8012), and 25.74 +/- 0.27 nm (RM 8013). Low polydispersities, defined as relative width of the distributions, were detected with values of 0.067 +/- 0.006 (RM 8011), 0.103 +/- 0.003, (RM 8012), and 0.10 +/- 0.01 (RM 8013). The results are in agreement with integral values determined from classical evaluation procedures, such as the radius of gyration (Guinier) and particle volume (Kratky). No indications of particle aggregation and particle interactions--repulsive or attractive--were found. We recommend SAXS as a standard method for a fast and precise determination of size distributions of nanoparticles.

  5. Does Shining Light on Gold Colloids Influence Aggregation?

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Susmita; Narasimha, Suda; Roy, Anushree; Banerjee, Soumitro

    2014-01-01

    In this article we revisit the much-studied behavior of self-assembled aggregates of gold colloidal particles. In the literature, the electrostatic interactions, van der Waals interactions, and the change in free energy due to ligand-ligand or ligand-solvent interactions are mainly considered to be the dominating factors in determining the characteristics of the gold aggregates. However, our light scattering and imaging experiments clearly indicate a distinct effect of light in the growth structure of the gold colloidal particles. We attribute this to the effect of a non-uniform distribution of the electric field in aggregated gold colloids under the influence of light. PMID:24909824

  6. Aggregation kinetics and colloidal stability of functionalized nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gambinossi, Filippo; Mylon, Steven E; Ferri, James K

    2015-08-01

    The functionalization of nanoparticles has primarily been used as a means to impart stability in nanoparticle suspensions. In most cases even the most advanced nanomaterials lose their function should suspensions aggregate and settle, but with the capping agents designed for specific solution chemistries, functionalized nanomaterials generally remain monodisperse in order to maintain their function. The importance of this cannot be underestimated in light of the growing use of functionalized nanomaterials for wide range of applications. Advanced functionalization schemes seek to exert fine control over suspension stability with small adjustments to a single, controllable variable. This review is specific to functionalized nanoparticles and highlights the synthesis and attachment of novel functionalization schemes whose design is meant to affect controllable aggregation. Some examples of these materials include stimulus responsive polymers for functionalization which rely on a bulk solution physicochemical threshold (temperature or pH) to transition from a stable (monodisperse) to aggregated state. Also discussed herein are the primary methods for measuring the kinetics of particle aggregation and theoretical descriptions of conventional and novel models which have demonstrated the most promise for the appropriate reduction of experimental data. Also highlighted are the additional factors that control nanoparticle stability such as the core composition, surface chemistry and solution condition. For completeness, a case study of gold nanoparticles functionalized using homologous block copolymers is discussed to demonstrate fine control over the aggregation state of this type of material. PMID:25150615

  7. Dendritic functionalization of monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, Erin C.; Lundin, Erik; Garabato, B. Davis; Choi, Daeock; Shon, Young-Seok . E-mail: young.shon@wku.edu

    2007-06-05

    This paper describes the facile synthesis of nanoparticle-cored dendrimers (NCDs) and nanoparticle megamers from monolayer-protected gold clusters using either single or multi-step reactions. First, 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid/hexanethiolate-protected gold clusters were synthesized using the Schiffrin reaction followed by the ligand place-exchange reaction. A convergent approach for the synthesis of nanoparticle-cored dendrimers uses a single step reaction that is an ester coupling reaction of hydroxy-functionalized dendrons with carboxylic acid-functionalized gold clusters. A divergent approach, which is based on multi-step reactions, employs the repetition of an amide coupling reaction and a Michael addition reaction to build polyamidoamine dendritic architectures around a nanoparticle core. Nanoparticle megamers, which are large dendrimer-induced nanoparticle aggregates with an average diameter of more than 300 nm, were prepared by the amide coupling reaction between polyamiodoamine [G-2] dendrimers and carboxylic acid-functionalized gold clusters. {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used for the characterization of these hybrid nanoparticles.

  8. Gold nanoparticles for nucleic acid delivery.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ya; Jiang, Ziwen; Saha, Krishnendu; Kim, Chang Soo; Kim, Sung Tae; Landis, Ryan F; Rotello, Vincent M

    2014-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles provide an attractive and applicable scaffold for delivery of nucleic acids. In this review, we focus on the use of covalent and noncovalent gold nanoparticle conjugates for applications in gene delivery and RNA-interference technologies. We also discuss challenges in nucleic acid delivery, including endosomal entrapment/escape and active delivery/presentation of nucleic acids in the cell. PMID:24599278

  9. Gold nanoparticle photosensitized radical photopolymerization.

    PubMed

    Anyaogu, Kelechi C; Cai, Xichen; Neckers, Douglas C

    2008-12-01

    We report the photopolymerization of an acrylic monomer using thiol-stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and [4-[(octyloxy)phenyl] phenyl] iodonium hexafluoroantimonate (OPPI) as photoinitiator and coinitiator, respectively. Polymerization occurred only when the AuNPs, in the presence of the iodonium salt, were irradiated at the particle plasmonic absorption region (lambda>450 nm). The AuNPs activate the coinitiator by intermolecular electron transfer since OPPI has no absorption in the visible region. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to monitor polymerization. UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy measurements were used to characterize the NPs. PMID:19037499

  10. [Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by Azospirillum brasilense].

    PubMed

    Kupriashina, M A; Vetchinkina, E P; Burov, A M; Ponomareva, E G; Nikitina, V E

    2014-01-01

    Plant-associated nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria Azospirillum brasilense were shown to reduce the gold of chloroauric acid to elemental gold, resulting in formation of gold nanoparicles. Extracellular phenoloxidizing enzymes (laccases and Mn peroxidases) were shown to participate in reduction of Au+3 (HAuCl4) to Au(0). Transmission electron microscopy revealed accumulation of colloidal gold nanoparticles of diverse shape in the culture liquid of A. brasilense strains Sp245 and Sp7. The size of the electron-dense nanospheres was 5 to 50 nm, and the size of nanoprisms varied from 5 to 300 nm. The tentative mechanism responsible for formation of gold nanoparticles is discussed.

  11. Gold Nanoparticle Aggregation as a Probe of Antifreeze (Glyco) Protein-Inspired Ice Recrystallization Inhibition and Identification of New IRI Active Macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Daniel E.; Congdon, Thomas; Rodger, Alison; Gibson, Matthew I.

    2015-01-01

    Antifreeze (glyco)proteins are found in polar fish species and act to slow the rate of growth of ice crystals; a property known as ice recrystallization inhibition. The ability to slow ice growth is of huge technological importance especially in the cryopreservation of donor cells and tissue, but native antifreeze proteins are often not suitable, nor easily available. Therefore, the search for new materials that mimic this function is important, but currently limited by the low-throughout assays associated with the antifreeze properties. Here 30 nm gold nanoparticles are demonstrated to be useful colorimetric probes for ice recrystallization inhibition, giving a visible optical response and is compatible with 96 well plates for high-throughout studies. This method is faster, requires less infrastructure, and has easier interpretation than the currently used ‘splat’ methods. Using this method, a series of serum proteins were identified to have weak, but specific ice recrystallization inhibition activity, which was removed upon denaturation. It is hoped that high-throughput tools such as this will accelerate the discovery of new antifreeze mimics. PMID:26499135

  12. Gold Nanoparticle Aggregation as a Probe of Antifreeze (Glyco) Protein-Inspired Ice Recrystallization Inhibition and Identification of New IRI Active Macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Daniel E; Congdon, Thomas; Rodger, Alison; Gibson, Matthew I

    2015-10-26

    Antifreeze (glyco)proteins are found in polar fish species and act to slow the rate of growth of ice crystals; a property known as ice recrystallization inhibition. The ability to slow ice growth is of huge technological importance especially in the cryopreservation of donor cells and tissue, but native antifreeze proteins are often not suitable, nor easily available. Therefore, the search for new materials that mimic this function is important, but currently limited by the low-throughout assays associated with the antifreeze properties. Here 30 nm gold nanoparticles are demonstrated to be useful colorimetric probes for ice recrystallization inhibition, giving a visible optical response and is compatible with 96 well plates for high-throughout studies. This method is faster, requires less infrastructure, and has easier interpretation than the currently used 'splat' methods. Using this method, a series of serum proteins were identified to have weak, but specific ice recrystallization inhibition activity, which was removed upon denaturation. It is hoped that high-throughput tools such as this will accelerate the discovery of new antifreeze mimics.

  13. Direct colorimetric biosensing of mercury(II) ion based on aggregation of poly-(γ-glutamic acid)-functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Guan, Huanan; Liu, Xiaofei; Wang, Wei; Liang, Jinzhong

    2014-01-01

    A simple and sensitive method for colorimetric detection of mercury ion (Hg(2+)) has been developed by using a poly (γ-glutamic acid) functionalized gold nanoparticles (PGA-AuNPs) system. Electrostatic self-assembly technique was used to assemble negatively charged PGA on the surface of positively charged CTAB-capped AuNPs. With the increase of Hg(2+) concentration, the color of the solution would progress from light red to purple blue. The results showed that the absorbance ratio (A750/A580) was linear with the Hg(2+) concentration in the range of 0.01-10 μM and from 50 to 300 μM, with the correlation coefficients of 0.998 and 0.991, respectively. The reported probe is suitable for real-time detection of Hg(2+) in water with the limit of detection (LOD) of 1.9 nM obtained by UV-vis spectrum, and exhibits selectivity toward one order of magnitude over other metal ions. This approach was applied successfully to the determination of Hg(2+) in tap water and mineral water, and the recoveries were from 90% to 103% and from 103.53% to 113%, respectively. The proposed method is rapid, low-cost and free of complex equipment, making it possible to analyze Hg(2+) in various water samples. PMID:24291429

  14. Induced growth of dendrite gold nanostructure by controlling self-assembly aggregation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, M H; Abdelrasoul, G N; Scarpellini, A; Marras, S; Diaspro, A

    2015-11-15

    Self-assembly of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is an important growth mode for fabricating functional materials. In this work we report a dendrite structure formed by slowing down the aggregation dynamics of AuNPs self-assembly. The obtained results show that the aggregation dynamics is dominated by the Reaction Limited Aggregation Model (RLA) more than the Diffusion Limited Aggregation Model (DLA). In which the repulsion due to electrostatic forces is dominant by the Van Der Walls attraction forces, and low sticking probability of nanoparticles. The aggregation dynamics of AuNPs can be slowed down if the water evaporation of the drop casted colloidal AuNPs on a quartz substrate is slowed. Slowing down the evaporation allows electrostatic repulsion forces to decrease gradually. At certain point, the attraction forces become higher than the electrostatic repulsion and hence cluster aggregation take place slowly. The slow aggregation dynamics allows the nanoparticles to sample all possible orientation in the sticking site, searching for the lowest energy configuration. The size distribution of the nanoparticles in liquid is confirmed using dynamic light scattering based on Stokes-Einstein equation for diffusion coefficient in water. X-ray and photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the sample after aggregation showed a shift which is related to the aggregation compared with non-aggregated colloidal nanoparticles in the solution. The study shows that dendrite self similar structure can be formed by slowing down the aggregation dynamics of nanoparticles as a result of minimizing the Helmholtz free surface energy of the system. PMID:26233557

  15. DNA-templated gold nanoparticles formation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lanlan; Song, Yonghai; Wang, Li; Sun, Yujing; Guo, Cunlan; Liu, Zhelin; Li, Zhuang

    2008-09-01

    The interaction between HAuCl4 and DNA has enabled creation of DNA-templated gold nanoparticles without formation of large nanoparticles. It was found that spheral DNA-HAuCl4 hybrid of 8.7 nm in diameter, flower-like DNA-HAuCl4 hybrid, nanoparticles chains and nanoparticles network of DNA-HAuCl4 hybrid could be obtained by varying the reaction conditions, including DNA concentration and reaction temperature. The intermediate product was investigated by shortening the reaction time of DNA and HAuCl4, and the obtained nanoparticles preserved a small DNA segment, which indicated that the reaction between DNA and HAuCl4 had a process. The addition of reduction reagent resulted in DNA-templated gold nanoparticles and nanoflowers, respectively. UV-vis absorption spectra were used to characterize the DNA-HAuCl4 hybrid and the gold nanostructures templated on DNA, and XPS spectra were used to compare the composition of DNA-Au(III) complex and gold nanoparticles. AFM and TEM results revealed that the spheral gold nanoparticles of about 11 nm in size and flower-like gold nanoparticles were formed after the addition of NaBH4.

  16. Impact of Particle Aggregation on Nanoparticle Reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassby, David

    2011-12-01

    The prevalence of nanoparticles in the environment is expected to grow in the coming years due to their increasing pervasiveness in consumer and industrial applications. Once released into the environment, nanoparticles encounter conditions of pH, salinity, UV light, and other solution conditions that may alter their surface characteristics and lead to aggregation. The unique properties that make nanoparticles desirable are a direct consequence of their size and increased surface area. Therefore, it is critical to recognize how aggregation alters the reactive properties of nanomaterials, if we wish to understand how these properties are going to behave once released into the environment. The size and structure of nanoparticle aggregates depend on surrounding conditions, including hydrodynamic ones. Depending on these conditions, aggregates can be large or small, tightly packed or loosely bound. Characterizing and measuring these changes to aggregate morphology is important to understanding the impact of aggregation on nanoparticle reactive properties. Examples of decreased reactivity due to aggregation include the case where tightly packed aggregates have fewer available surface sites compared to loosely packed ones; also, photocatalytic particles embedded in the center of large aggregates will experience less light when compared to particles embedded in small aggregates. However, aggregation also results in an increase in solid-solid interfaces between nanoparticles. This can result in increased energy transfer between neighboring particles, surface passivation, and altered surface tension. These phenomena can lead to an increase in reactivity. The goal of this thesis is to examine the impacts of aggregation on the reactivity of a select group of nanomaterials. Additionally, we examined how aggregation impacts the removal efficiency of fullerene nanoparticles using membrane filtration. The materials we selected to study include ZnS---a metal chalcogenide

  17. Functionalization of gold nanoparticles as antidiabetic nanomaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatachalam, M.; Govindaraju, K.; Mohamed Sadiq, A.; Tamilselvan, S.; Ganesh Kumar, V.; Singaravelu, G.

    2013-12-01

    In the present investigation, functionalization of gold nanoparticles synthesized using propanoic acid 2-(3-acetoxy-4,4,14-trimethylandrost-8-en-17-yl) (PAT) an active biocomponent isolated from Cassia auriculata is studied in detail. On reaction of PAT with aqueous HAuCl4, rapid formation of stable gold nanoparticles was achieved. Formation of gold nanoparticles was confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy, XRD, GC-MS, FTIR, TEM and SEM with EDAX. Gold nanoparticles mostly were monodisperse, spherical in shape and ranged in size 12-41 nm. Gold nanoparticles synthesised using PAT was administered to alloxan (150 mg/kg body weight) induced diabetic male albino rats at different doses (0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 mg/kg body weight) for 28 days. Plasma glucose level, cholesterol and triglyceride were significantly (p < 0.001) reduced in experimental animals treated with gold nanoparticles at dosage of 0.5 mg/kg body weight and plasma insulin increased significantly. The newly genre green gold nanoparticles exhibit remarkable protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitory activity.

  18. PST-Gold nanoparticle as an effective anticancer agent with immunomodulatory properties.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Manu M; Aravind, S R; Varghese, Sheeja; Mini, S; Sreelekha, T T

    2013-04-01

    Polysaccharide PST001, which is isolated from the seed kernels of Tamarindus indica (Ti), is an antitumor and immunomodulatory compound. Gold nanoparticles have been used for various applications in cancer. In the present report, a novel strategy for the synthesis and stabilization of gold nanoparticles using anticancer polysaccharide PST001 was employed and the nanoparticles' antitumor activity was evaluated. PST-Gold nanoparticles were prepared such that PST001 acted both as a reducing agent and as a capping agent. PST-Gold nanoparticles showed high stability, no obvious aggregation for months and a wide range of pH tolerance. PST-Gold nanoparticles not only retained the antitumor effect of PST001 but also showed an enhanced effect even at a low concentration. It was also found that the nanoparticles exerted their antitumor effects through the induction of apoptosis. In vivo assays on BALB/c mice revealed that PST-Gold nanoparticles exhibited immunomodulatory effects. Evaluation of biochemical, hematological and histopathological features of mice revealed that PST-Gold nanoparticles could be administered safely without toxicity. Using the polysaccharide PST001 for the reduction and stabilization of gold nanoparticles does not introduce any environmental toxicity or biological hazards, and these particles are more effective than the parent polysaccharide. Further studies should be employed to exploit these particles as anticancer agents with imaging properties.

  19. PST-Gold nanoparticle as an effective anticancer agent with immunomodulatory properties.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Manu M; Aravind, S R; Varghese, Sheeja; Mini, S; Sreelekha, T T

    2013-04-01

    Polysaccharide PST001, which is isolated from the seed kernels of Tamarindus indica (Ti), is an antitumor and immunomodulatory compound. Gold nanoparticles have been used for various applications in cancer. In the present report, a novel strategy for the synthesis and stabilization of gold nanoparticles using anticancer polysaccharide PST001 was employed and the nanoparticles' antitumor activity was evaluated. PST-Gold nanoparticles were prepared such that PST001 acted both as a reducing agent and as a capping agent. PST-Gold nanoparticles showed high stability, no obvious aggregation for months and a wide range of pH tolerance. PST-Gold nanoparticles not only retained the antitumor effect of PST001 but also showed an enhanced effect even at a low concentration. It was also found that the nanoparticles exerted their antitumor effects through the induction of apoptosis. In vivo assays on BALB/c mice revealed that PST-Gold nanoparticles exhibited immunomodulatory effects. Evaluation of biochemical, hematological and histopathological features of mice revealed that PST-Gold nanoparticles could be administered safely without toxicity. Using the polysaccharide PST001 for the reduction and stabilization of gold nanoparticles does not introduce any environmental toxicity or biological hazards, and these particles are more effective than the parent polysaccharide. Further studies should be employed to exploit these particles as anticancer agents with imaging properties. PMID:23298585

  20. Therapeutic gold, silver, and platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Miko; Foote, Matthew; Prow, Tarl W

    2015-01-01

    There are an abundance of nanoparticle technologies being developed for use as part of therapeutic strategies. This review focuses on a narrow class of metal nanoparticles that have therapeutic potential that is a consequence of elemental composition and size. The most widely known of these are gold nanoshells that have been developed over the last two decades for photothermal ablation in superficial cancers. The therapeutic effect is the outcome of the thickness and diameter of the gold shell that enables fine tuning of the plasmon resonance. When these metal nanoparticles are exposed to the relevant wavelength of light, their temperature rapidly increases. This in turn induces a localized photothermal ablation that kills the surrounding tumor tissue. Similarly, gold nanoparticles have been developed to enhance radiotherapy. The high-Z nature of gold dramatically increases the photoelectric cross-section. Thus, the photoelectric effects are significantly increased. The outcome of these interactions is enhanced tumor killing with lower doses of radiation, all while sparing tissue without gold nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles have been used for their wound healing properties in addition to enhancing the tumor-killing effects of anticancer drugs. Finally, platinum nanoparticles are thought to serve as a reservoir for platinum ions that can induce DNA damage in cancer cells. The future is bright with the path to clinical trials is largely cleared for some of the less complex therapeutic metal nanoparticle systems.

  1. Gold Nanoparticle Labels Amplify Ellipsometric Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatasubbarao, Srivatsa

    2008-01-01

    The ellipsometric method reported in the immediately preceding article was developed in conjunction with a method of using gold nanoparticles as labels on biomolecules that one seeks to detect. The purpose of the labeling is to exploit the optical properties of the gold nanoparticles in order to amplify the measurable ellipsometric effects and thereby to enable ultrasensitive detection of the labeled biomolecules without need to develop more-complex ellipsometric instrumentation. The colorimetric, polarization, light-scattering, and other optical properties of nanoparticles depend on their sizes and shapes. In the present method, these size-and-shape-dependent properties are used to magnify the polarization of scattered light and the diattenuation and retardance of signals derived from ellipsometry. The size-and-shape-dependent optical properties of the nanoparticles make it possible to interrogate the nanoparticles by use of light of various wavelengths, as appropriate, to optimally detect particles of a specific type at high sensitivity. Hence, by incorporating gold nanoparticles bound to biomolecules as primary or secondary labels, the performance of ellipsometry as a means of detecting the biomolecules can be improved. The use of gold nanoparticles as labels in ellipsometry has been found to afford sensitivity that equals or exceeds the sensitivity achieved by use of fluorescence-based methods. Potential applications for ellipsometric detection of gold nanoparticle-labeled biomolecules include monitoring molecules of interest in biological samples, in-vitro diagnostics, process monitoring, general environmental monitoring, and detection of biohazards.

  2. Therapeutic gold, silver, and platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Miko; Foote, Matthew; Prow, Tarl W

    2015-01-01

    There are an abundance of nanoparticle technologies being developed for use as part of therapeutic strategies. This review focuses on a narrow class of metal nanoparticles that have therapeutic potential that is a consequence of elemental composition and size. The most widely known of these are gold nanoshells that have been developed over the last two decades for photothermal ablation in superficial cancers. The therapeutic effect is the outcome of the thickness and diameter of the gold shell that enables fine tuning of the plasmon resonance. When these metal nanoparticles are exposed to the relevant wavelength of light, their temperature rapidly increases. This in turn induces a localized photothermal ablation that kills the surrounding tumor tissue. Similarly, gold nanoparticles have been developed to enhance radiotherapy. The high-Z nature of gold dramatically increases the photoelectric cross-section. Thus, the photoelectric effects are significantly increased. The outcome of these interactions is enhanced tumor killing with lower doses of radiation, all while sparing tissue without gold nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles have been used for their wound healing properties in addition to enhancing the tumor-killing effects of anticancer drugs. Finally, platinum nanoparticles are thought to serve as a reservoir for platinum ions that can induce DNA damage in cancer cells. The future is bright with the path to clinical trials is largely cleared for some of the less complex therapeutic metal nanoparticle systems. PMID:25521618

  3. Folding induced assembly of polypeptide decorated gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Aili, Daniel; Enander, Karin; Rydberg, Johan; Nesterenko, Irina; Björefors, Fredrik; Baltzer, Lars; Liedberg, Bo

    2008-04-30

    Reversible assembly of gold nanoparticles controlled by the homodimerization and folding of an immobilized de novo designed synthetic polypeptide is described. In solution at neutral pH, the polypeptide folds into a helix-loop-helix four-helix bundle in the presence of zinc ions. When immobilized on gold nanoparticles, the addition of zinc ions induces dimerization and folding between peptide monomers located on separate particles, resulting in rapid particle aggregation. The particles can be completely redispersed by removal of the zinc ions from the peptide upon addition of EDTA. Calcium ions, which do not induce folding in solution, have no effect on the stability of the peptide decorated particles. The contribution from folding on particle assembly was further determined utilizing a reference peptide with the same primary sequence but containing both D and L amino acids. Particles functionalized with the reference peptide do not aggregate, as the peptides are unable to fold. The two peptides, linked to the nanoparticle surface via a cysteine residue located in the loop region, form submonolayers on planar gold with comparable properties regarding surface density, orientation, and ability to interact with zinc ions. These results demonstrate that nanoparticle assembly can be induced, controlled, and to some extent tuned, by exploiting specific molecular interactions involved in polypeptide folding. PMID:18380430

  4. Gold Nanoparticles and Microwave Irradiation Inhibit Beta-Amyloid Amyloidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Peptide-Gold nanoparticles selectively attached to β-amyloid protein (Aβ) amyloidogenic aggregates were irradiated with microwave. This treatment produces dramatic effects on the Aβ aggregates, inhibiting both the amyloidogenesis and the restoration of the amyloidogenic potential. This novel approach offers a new strategy to inhibit, locally and remotely, the amyloidogenic process, which could have application in Alzheimer’s disease therapy. We have studied the irradiation effect on the amyloidogenic process in the presence of conjugates peptide-nanoparticle by transmission electronic microscopy observations and by Thioflavine T assays to quantify the amount of fibrils in suspension. The amyloidogenic aggregates rather than the amyloid fibrils seem to be better targets for the treatment of the disease. Our results could contribute to the development of a new therapeutic strategy to inhibit the amyloidogenic process in Alzheimer’s disease.

  5. Gold Nanoparticles and Microwave Irradiation Inhibit Beta-Amyloid Amyloidogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, Eyleen; Olmedo, Ivonne; Bastus, Neus G.; Guerrero, Simón; Puntes, Víctor F.; Giralt, Ernest; Kogan, Marcelo J.

    2008-11-01

    Peptide-Gold nanoparticles selectively attached to β-amyloid protein (Aβ) amyloidogenic aggregates were irradiated with microwave. This treatment produces dramatic effects on the Aβ aggregates, inhibiting both the amyloidogenesis and the restoration of the amyloidogenic potential. This novel approach offers a new strategy to inhibit, locally and remotely, the amyloidogenic process, which could have application in Alzheimer’s disease therapy. We have studied the irradiation effect on the amyloidogenic process in the presence of conjugates peptide-nanoparticle by transmission electronic microscopy observations and by Thioflavine T assays to quantify the amount of fibrils in suspension. The amyloidogenic aggregates rather than the amyloid fibrils seem to be better targets for the treatment of the disease. Our results could contribute to the development of a new therapeutic strategy to inhibit the amyloidogenic process in Alzheimer’s disease.

  6. Metal enhanced fluorescence with gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattingly, Shaina LaRissa Strating

    A novel hybrid nanocomposite of Au nanoparticle-modified silicon nanowire was developed for surface enhanced fluorescence applications. The designed nanocomposite contained a silicon nanowire, gold nanoparticles and a silica layer doped with dye molecules. The hybrid nanomaterial was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), fluorescence measurements, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The results showed that the gold nanoparticles were uniformly adhered on the silicon nanowires and covered by a thin silica layer. The nanostructure exhibited strong capacity for surface enhanced fluorescence. Different enhancement factors were obtained by changing synthetic conditions. The second goal of the project was to determine if the shape of gold nanoparticles affects the extent of its fluorescence enhancement under constant external factors. Two shapes of gold nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized by SEM, STEM, zeta potential and absorbance measurements. Then they were coated with fluorescent dye-doped silica and the fluorescence intensity was measured and compared to the pure fluorescent dye. Gold nanorods enhanced fluorescence more than gold nanostars and that the fluorescent dye Alexafluor 700 showed a greater fluorescence intensity change in the presence of nanoparticles than methylene blue.

  7. Label-free gold nanoparticles for the determination of neomycin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apyari, Vladimir V.; Dmitrienko, Stanislava G.; Arkhipova, Viktoriya V.; Atnagulov, Aydar G.; Gorbunova, Mariya V.; Zolotov, Yury A.

    2013-11-01

    A new spectrophotometric method for the determination of neomycin has been developed. The method is based on aggregation of label-free gold nanoparticles leading to change in absorption spectra and color of the solution. Influence of different factors (the concentration of ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), pH, the concentrations of neomycin and the nanoparticles) on the aggregation and analytical performance of the method was investigated. EDTA plays an important role not only as a masking agent to eliminate interferences of metal cations but strongly affects the sensitivity of the nanoparticles relative to neomycin. The method allows to determine neomycin with detection limit of 28 ng mL-1. It was applied to analysis of eye- and ear-drops. The sample pretreatment is simply done by diluting the formulation with water.

  8. Label-free gold nanoparticles for the determination of neomycin.

    PubMed

    Apyari, Vladimir V; Dmitrienko, Stanislava G; Arkhipova, Viktoriya V; Atnagulov, Aydar G; Gorbunova, Mariya V; Zolotov, Yury A

    2013-11-01

    A new spectrophotometric method for the determination of neomycin has been developed. The method is based on aggregation of label-free gold nanoparticles leading to change in absorption spectra and color of the solution. Influence of different factors (the concentration of ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), pH, the concentrations of neomycin and the nanoparticles) on the aggregation and analytical performance of the method was investigated. EDTA plays an important role not only as a masking agent to eliminate interferences of metal cations but strongly affects the sensitivity of the nanoparticles relative to neomycin. The method allows to determine neomycin with detection limit of 28ngmL(-1). It was applied to analysis of eye- and ear-drops. The sample pretreatment is simply done by diluting the formulation with water.

  9. Radiofrequency Heating Pathways for Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Collins, C. B.; McCoy, R. S.; Ackerson, B. J.; Collins, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    This feature article reviews the thermal dissipation of nanoscopic gold under radiofrequency (RF) irradiation. It also presents previously unpublished data addressing obscure aspects of this phenomenon. While applications in biology motivated initial investigation of RF heating of gold nanoparticles, recent controversy concerning whether thermal effects can be attributed to nanoscopic gold highlight the need to understand the involved mechanism or mechanisms of heating. Both the nature of the particle and the nature of the RF field influence heating. Aspects of nanoparticle chemistry and physics, including the hydrodynamic diameter of the particle, the oxidation state and related magnetism of the core, and the chemical nature of the ligand shell may all strongly influence to what extent a nanoparticle heats in an RF field. Aspects of RF include: power, frequency and antenna designs that emphasize relative strength of magnetic or electric fields, and also influence the extent to which a gold nanoparticle heats in RF. These nanoparticle and RF properties are analysed in the context of three heating mechanisms proposed to explain gold nanoparticle heating in an RF field. This article also makes a critical analysis of the existing literature in the context of the nanoparticle preparations, RF structure, and suggested mechanisms in previously reported experiments. PMID:24962620

  10. Protein-mediated autoreduction of gold salts to gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Basu, Nivedita; Bhattacharya, Resham; Mukherjee, Priyabrata

    2008-09-01

    Here we report for the first time that proteins can function as unique reducing agents to produce gold nanoparticles from gold salts. We demonstrate that three different proteins, namely, bovine serum albumin (BSA), Rituximab (RIT--an anti-CD20 antibody) and Cetuximab (C225--anti-EGFR antibody), reduce gold salts to gold nanoparticles (GNP). Interestingly, among all the three proteins tested, only BSA can reduce gold salts to gold nanotriangles (GNT). BSA-induced formation of GNT can be controlled by carefully selecting the reaction condition. Heating or using excess of ascorbic acid (AA) as additional reducing agent shifts the reaction towards the formation of GNP with flower-like morphology, whereas slowing down the reaction either by cooling or by adding small amount of AA directs the synthesis towards GNT formation. GNT is formed only at pH 3; higher pHs (pH 7 and pH 10) did not produce any nanoparticles, suggesting the involvement of specific protein conformation in GNT formation. The nanomaterials formed by this method were characterized using UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This is an important finding that will have uses in various nanotechnological applications, particularly in the green synthesis of novel nanomaterials based on protein structure.

  11. Gold nanoparticles for tumour detection and treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartsuiker, L.; Petersen, W.; Jose, J.; van Es, P.; Lenferink, A.; Poot, A. A.; Terstappen, L. W. M. M.; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Manohar, S.; Otto, C.

    2011-07-01

    The use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications is emerging rapidly. Recent developments have led to numerous studies of noble metal nanoparticles, down to the level of single molecule detection in living cells. The application of noble metal nanoparticles in diagnostics and treatment of early stage carcinomas is the subject of many present studies. Gold nanoparticles are particularly interesting for optical biomedical applications due to their biocompatibility and moreover, their enhanced absorption cross-sections. The latter is a result of surface plasmon resonance, which can be tuned by altering the shape of the nanoparticles enabling usage of the near infrared tissue transparent optical window. This paper presents a brief overview of the variety of shapes, size and surface chemistries of the gold nanoparticles used for cancer detection and treatment, as well as their effects in different tumour models that have recently been investigated, both in vitro and in vivo.

  12. Engineered Gold Nanoparticles and Plant Adaptation Potential.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Khwaja Salahuddin; Husen, Azamal

    2016-12-01

    Use of metal nanoparticles in biological system has recently been recognised although little is known about their possible effects on plant growth and development. Nanoparticles accumulation, translocation, growth response and stress modulation in plant system is not well understood. Plants exposed to gold and gold nanoparticles have been demonstrated to exhibit both positive and negative effects. Their growth and yield vary from species to species. Cytoxicity of engineered gold nanoparticles depends on the concentration, particle size and shape. They exhibit increase in vegetative growth and yield of fruit/seed at lower concentration and decrease them at higher concentration. Studies have shown that the gold nanoparticles exposure has improved free radical scavenging potential and antioxidant enzymatic activities and alter micro RNAs expression that regulate different morphological, physiological and metabolic processes in plants. These modulations lead to improved plant growth and yields. Prior to the use of gold nanoparticles, it has been suggested that its cost may be calculated to see if it is economically feasible. PMID:27637892

  13. Engineered Gold Nanoparticles and Plant Adaptation Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqi, Khwaja Salahuddin; Husen, Azamal

    2016-09-01

    Use of metal nanoparticles in biological system has recently been recognised although little is known about their possible effects on plant growth and development. Nanoparticles accumulation, translocation, growth response and stress modulation in plant system is not well understood. Plants exposed to gold and gold nanoparticles have been demonstrated to exhibit both positive and negative effects. Their growth and yield vary from species to species. Cytoxicity of engineered gold nanoparticles depends on the concentration, particle size and shape. They exhibit increase in vegetative growth and yield of fruit/seed at lower concentration and decrease them at higher concentration. Studies have shown that the gold nanoparticles exposure has improved free radical scavenging potential and antioxidant enzymatic activities and alter micro RNAs expression that regulate different morphological, physiological and metabolic processes in plants. These modulations lead to improved plant growth and yields. Prior to the use of gold nanoparticles, it has been suggested that its cost may be calculated to see if it is economically feasible.

  14. Accumulation of Gold Nanoparticles in Brassic Juncea

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, A.T.; Haverkamp, R.G.; Davies, C.E.; Parsons, J.G.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.; Agterveld, D.van

    2009-06-03

    Enzymatic digestion is proposed as a method for concentrating gold nanoparticles produced in plants. The mild conditions of digestion are used in order to avoid an increase in the gold particle size, which would occur with a high-temperature process, so that material suitable for catalysis may be produced. Gold nanoparticles of a 5-50-nm diameter, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), at concentrations 760 and 1120 ppm Au, were produced within Brassica juncea grown on soil with 22-48 mg Au kg{sup -1}. X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) reveals that the plant contained approximately equal quantities of Au in the metallic (Au{sup 0}) and oxidized (Au{sup +1}) states. Enzymatic digestion dissolved 55-60 wt% of the plant matter. Due to the loss of the soluble gold fraction, no significant increase in the total concentration of gold in the samples was observed. However, it is likely that the concentration of the gold nanoparticles increased by a factor of two. To obtain a gold concentration suitable for catalytic reactions, around 95 wt% of the starting dry biomass would need to be solubilized or removed, which has not yet been achieved.

  15. Luminescent gold nanoparticles for bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen

    Inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) with tunable and diverse material properties hold great potential as contrast agents for better disease management. Over the past decades, luminescent gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with intrinsic emissions ranging from the visible to the near infrared have been synthesized and emerge as a new class of fluorophores for bioimaging. This dissertation aims to fundamentally understand the structure-property relationships in luminescent AuNPs and apply them as contrast agents to address some critical challenges in bioimaging at both the in vitro and in vivo level. In Chapter 2, we described the synthesized ~20 nm polycrystalline AuNPs (pAuNPs), which successfully integrated and enhanced plasmonic and fluorescence properties into a single AuNP through the grain size effect. The combination of these properties in one NP enabled AuNPs to serve as a multimodal contrast agent for in vitro optical microscopic imaging, making it possible to develop correlative microscopic imaging techniques. In Chapters 3-5, we proposed a feasible approach to optimize the in vivo kinetics and clearance profile of nanoprobes for multimodality in vivo bioimaging applications by using straightforward surface chemistry with luminescent AuNPs as a model. Luminescent glutathione-coated AuNPs of ~2 nm were synthesized. Investigation of the biodistribution showed that these glutathione-coated AuNPs (GS-AuNPs) exhibit stealthiness to the reticuloendothelial system (RES) organs and efficient renal clearance, with only 3.7+/-1.9% and 0.3+/-0.1% accumulating in the liver and spleen, and over 65% of the injection dose cleared out via the urine within the first 72 hours. In addition, ~2.5 nm NIR-emitting radioactive glutathione-coated [198Au]AuNPs (GS-[198Au]AuNPs) were synthesized for further evaluation of the pharmacokinetic profile of GS-AuNPs and potential multimodal imaging. The results showed that the GS-[198Au]AuNPs behave like small-molecule contrast agents in

  16. Green synthesis of size controllable gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan Kumar, Kesarla; Mandal, Badal Kumar; Kiran Kumar, Hoskote A.; Maddinedi, Sireesh Babu

    2013-12-01

    A facile rapid green eco-friendly method to synthesize gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) of tunable size using aqueous Terminalia arjuna fruit extracts has been demonstrated herein. Formation of Au NPs was confirmed by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) study at 528 nm using UV-visible spectrophotometer. The time of reduction, size and morphological variations of Au NPs were studied with varying quantities of T. arjuna fruit aqueous extracts. Synthesized Au NPs were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX). Polyphenols responsible for reduction of Au3+ to Au0 were identified using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) as ascorbic acid, gallic acid and pyrogallol. The oxidized forms of polyphenols formed coordination with surface of Au NPs which protected their further growth and aggregation. We also propose a plausible mechanism how to tune size and shape of Au NPs by varying the quantity of extracts. Thus obtained Au NPs were stable for more than four months.

  17. Rapid Non-Crosslinking Aggregation of DNA-Functionalized Gold Nanorods and Nanotriangles for Colorimetric Single-Nucleotide Discrimination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoqing; Akiyama, Yoshitsugu; Takarada, Tohru; Maeda, Mizuo

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles modified with DNA duplexes are rapidly and spontaneously aggregated at high ionic strength. In contrast, this aggregation is greatly suppressed when the DNA duplex has a single-base mismatch or a single-nucleotide overhang located at the outermost surface of the particle. These colloidal features emerge irrespective of the size and composition of the particle core; however, the effects of the shape remain unexplored. Using gold nanorods and nanotriangles (nanoplatelets), we show herein that both remarkable rapidity in colloidal aggregation and extreme susceptibility to DNA structural perturbations are preserved, regardless of the shape and aspect ratio of the core. It is also demonstrated that the DNA-modified gold nanorods and nanotriangles are applicable to naked-eye detection of a single-base difference in a gene model. The current study corroborates the generality of the unique colloidal properties of DNA-functionalized nanoparticles, and thus enhances the feasibility of their practical use.

  18. Synthesis, purification and assembly of gold and iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Penghe

    , 6 & 7), nanoparticles were assembled into three different hierachical structures through both template-assisted and template-free approaches. In the template-assisted assembly, gold nanorods were aligned into ordered 1D linear pattern by using soft biological filamentous, namely bacteria flagella, as templates. Two different ways of assembling nanorods onto flagella were investigated. In another study, a highly commercialized polymer, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), was discovered for the first time to be able to self-assemble into branched hollow fibers. Based on this discovery, two approaches (one through direct deposition of silica onto the PVP aggregate and the other through co-assembly of PVP covered gold nanoparticles with free PVP molecules) by which the self-assembly behavior of PVP could be exploited to template the formation of branched hollow inorganic fibers were demonstrated. In the template-free assembly, a general method for assembling nanoparticle into clusters (NPCs) in an oil-in-water emulsion system was investigated. Detailed studies on the mechanism of formation of NPCs structure, optimized conditions, scalable production and surface chemistry manipulation were carried out. Besides, comparison of the properties of individual and clustered iron oxide nanoparticles was conducted. It was discovered that due to their collective properties, NPCs are more responsive to an external magnetic field and can potentially serve as better contrast enhancement agents than individually dispersed magnetic NPs in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI).

  19. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles: A green approach.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shakeel; Annu; Ikram, Saiqa; Yudha S, Salprima

    2016-08-01

    Nanotechnology is an immensely developing field due to its extensive range of applications in different areas of technology and science. Different types of methods are employed for synthesis of nanoparticles due to their wide applications. The conventional chemical methods have certain limitations with them either in the form of chemical contaminations during their syntheses procedures or in later applications and use of higher energy. During the last decade research have been focussed on developing simple, clean, non-toxic, cost effective and eco-friendly protocols for synthesis of nanoparticles. In order to get this objective, biosynthesis methods have been developed in order to fill this gap. The biosynthesis of nanoparticles is simple, single step, eco-friendly and a green approach. The biochemical processes in biological agents reduce the dissolved metal ions into nano metals. The various biological agents like plant tissues, fungi, bacteria, etc. are used for biosynthesis for metal nanoparticles. In this review article, we summarised recent literature on biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles which have revolutionised technique of synthesis for their applications in different fields. Due to biocompatibility of gold nanoparticles, it has find its applications in biomedical applications. The protocol and mechanism of biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles along with various applications have also been discussed. PMID:27236049

  20. Titration of gold nanoparticles in phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Han-Wen; Schadt, Mark J; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2015-12-01

    In the organic-aqueous phase transfer process of gold nanoparticles, there are two types of distinctive interfaces involving hydrophilic and hydrophobic ligands, the understanding of which is important for the design of functional nanomaterials for analytical/bioanalytical applications and the control over the nanoparticles' nanoactivity and nanotoxicity in different phases. This report describes new findings of an investigation of the quantitative aspect of ligand ion pairing at the capping monolayer structure that drives the phase extraction of gold nanoparticles. Alkanethiolate-capped gold nanoparticles of 8 nm diameter with high size monodispersity (RSD ∼ 5%) were first derivatized by a ligand place exchange reaction with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid to form a mixed monolayer shell consisting of both hydrophobic (-CH3) and hydrophilic (-COOH) groups. It was followed by quantitative titration of the resulting nanoparticles with a cationic species (-NR4(+)) in a toluene phase, yielding ion pairing of -NR4(+) and -COO(-) on part of the capping monolayer. Analysis of the phase extraction allowed a quantitative determination of the percentage of ion pairing and structural changes in the capping monolayer on the nanoparticles. The results, along with morphological characterization, are discussed in terms of the interfacial structural changes and their implications on the rational design of surface-functionalized nanoparticles and fine tuning of the interfacial reactivity. PMID:26523548

  1. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles: A green approach.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shakeel; Annu; Ikram, Saiqa; Yudha S, Salprima

    2016-08-01

    Nanotechnology is an immensely developing field due to its extensive range of applications in different areas of technology and science. Different types of methods are employed for synthesis of nanoparticles due to their wide applications. The conventional chemical methods have certain limitations with them either in the form of chemical contaminations during their syntheses procedures or in later applications and use of higher energy. During the last decade research have been focussed on developing simple, clean, non-toxic, cost effective and eco-friendly protocols for synthesis of nanoparticles. In order to get this objective, biosynthesis methods have been developed in order to fill this gap. The biosynthesis of nanoparticles is simple, single step, eco-friendly and a green approach. The biochemical processes in biological agents reduce the dissolved metal ions into nano metals. The various biological agents like plant tissues, fungi, bacteria, etc. are used for biosynthesis for metal nanoparticles. In this review article, we summarised recent literature on biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles which have revolutionised technique of synthesis for their applications in different fields. Due to biocompatibility of gold nanoparticles, it has find its applications in biomedical applications. The protocol and mechanism of biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles along with various applications have also been discussed.

  2. Gold Nanoparticle Quantitation by Whole Cell Tomography.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Aric W; Jeerage, Kavita M; Schwartz, Cindi L; Curtin, Alexandra E; Chiaramonti, Ann N

    2015-12-22

    Many proposed biomedical applications for engineered gold nanoparticles require their incorporation by mammalian cells in specific numbers and locations. Here, the number of gold nanoparticles inside of individual mammalian stem cells was characterized using fast focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy based tomography. Enhanced optical microscopy was used to provide a multiscale map of the in vitro sample, which allows cells of interest to be identified within their local environment. Cells were then serially sectioned using a gallium ion beam and imaged using a scanning electron beam. To confirm the accuracy of single cross sections, nanoparticles in similar cross sections were imaged using transmission electron microscopy and scanning helium ion microscopy. Complete tomographic series were then used to count the nanoparticles inside of each cell and measure their spatial distribution. We investigated the influence of slice thickness on counting single particles and clusters as well as nanoparticle packing within clusters. For 60 nm citrate stabilized particles, the nanoparticle cluster packing volume is 2.15 ± 0.20 times the volume of the bare gold nanoparticles.

  3. Titration of gold nanoparticles in phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Han-Wen; Schadt, Mark J; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2015-12-01

    In the organic-aqueous phase transfer process of gold nanoparticles, there are two types of distinctive interfaces involving hydrophilic and hydrophobic ligands, the understanding of which is important for the design of functional nanomaterials for analytical/bioanalytical applications and the control over the nanoparticles' nanoactivity and nanotoxicity in different phases. This report describes new findings of an investigation of the quantitative aspect of ligand ion pairing at the capping monolayer structure that drives the phase extraction of gold nanoparticles. Alkanethiolate-capped gold nanoparticles of 8 nm diameter with high size monodispersity (RSD ∼ 5%) were first derivatized by a ligand place exchange reaction with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid to form a mixed monolayer shell consisting of both hydrophobic (-CH3) and hydrophilic (-COOH) groups. It was followed by quantitative titration of the resulting nanoparticles with a cationic species (-NR4(+)) in a toluene phase, yielding ion pairing of -NR4(+) and -COO(-) on part of the capping monolayer. Analysis of the phase extraction allowed a quantitative determination of the percentage of ion pairing and structural changes in the capping monolayer on the nanoparticles. The results, along with morphological characterization, are discussed in terms of the interfacial structural changes and their implications on the rational design of surface-functionalized nanoparticles and fine tuning of the interfacial reactivity.

  4. The peptide route to multifunctional gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenxin; Lévy, Raphaël; Fernig, David G; Brust, Mathias

    2005-01-01

    Extremely stable, peptide-capped gold nanoparticles with two different biomolecular recognition motifs expressed on their surface have been prepared, and their specific and selective binding to artificial, DNA-modified target particles and to DNA and protein microarrays has been demonstrated. Stabilization and biofunctionalization has been achieved in a single preparative step starting with citrate-stabilized gold hydrosols and a derivatization cocktail of peptide-capping ligands, which carry the functionalities of choice.

  5. Gold-coated nanoparticles for use in biotechnology applications

    DOEpatents

    Berning, Douglas E.; Kraus, Jr., Robert H.; Atcher, Robert W.; Schmidt, Jurgen G.

    2007-06-05

    A process of preparing gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles is disclosed and includes forming a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles within a suitable liquid, adding an amount of a reducible gold compound and a reducing agent to the suspension, and, maintaining the suspension for time sufficient to form gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

  6. Gold-coated nanoparticles for use in biotechnology applications

    DOEpatents

    Berning, Douglas E.; Kraus, Jr., Robert H.; Atcher, Robert W.; Schmidt, Jurgen G.

    2009-07-07

    A process of preparing gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles is disclosed and includes forming a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles within a suitable liquid, adding an amount of a reducible gold compound and a reducing agent to the suspension, and, maintaining the suspension for time sufficient to form gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

  7. The gold standard: gold nanoparticle libraries to understand the nano-bio interface.

    PubMed

    Alkilany, Alaaldin M; Lohse, Samuel E; Murphy, Catherine J

    2013-03-19

    Since the late 1980s, researchers have prepared inorganic nanoparticles of many types--including elemental metals, metal oxides, metal sulfides, metal selenides, and metal tellurides--with excellent control over size and shape. Originally many researchers were primarily interested in exploring the quantum size effects predicted for such materials. Applications of inorganic nanomaterials initially centered on physics, optics, and engineering but have expanded to include biology. Many current nanomaterials can serve as biochemical sensors, contrast agents in cellular or tissue imaging, drug delivery vehicles, or even as therapeutics. In this Account we emphasize that the understanding of how nanomaterials will function in a biological system relies on the knowledge of the interface between biological systems and nanomaterials, the nano-bio interface. Gold nanoparticles can serve as excellent standards to understand more general features of the nano-bio interface because of its many advantages over other inorganic materials. The bulk material is chemically inert, and well-established synthetic methods allow researchers to control its size, shape, and surface chemistry. Gold's background concentration in biological systems is low, which makes it relatively easy to measure it at the part-per-billion level or lower in water. In addition, the large electron density of gold enables relatively simple electron microscopic experiments to localize it within thin sections of cells or tissue. Finally, gold's brilliant optical properties at the nanoscale are tunable with size, shape, and aggregation state and enable many of the promising chemical sensing, imaging, and therapeutic applications. Basic experiments with gold nanoparticles and cells include measuring the toxicity of the particles to cells in in vitro experiments. The species other than gold in the nanoparticle solution can be responsible for the apparent toxicity at a particular dose. Once the identity of the toxic

  8. Radiofrequency heating pathways for gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Collins, C B; McCoy, R S; Ackerson, B J; Collins, G J; Ackerson, C J

    2014-08-01

    This feature article reviews the thermal dissipation of nanoscopic gold under radiofrequency (RF) irradiation. It also presents previously unpublished data addressing obscure aspects of this phenomenon. While applications in biology motivated initial investigation of RF heating of gold nanoparticles, recent controversy concerning whether thermal effects can be attributed to nanoscopic gold highlight the need to understand the involved mechanism or mechanisms of heating. Both the nature of the particle and the nature of the RF field influence heating. Aspects of nanoparticle chemistry which may affect thermal dissipation include the hydrodynamic diameter of the particle, the oxidation state and related magnetism of the core, and the chemical nature of the ligand shell. Aspects of RF which may affect thermal dissipation include power, frequency and antenna designs that emphasize relative strength of magnetic or electric fields. These nanoparticle and RF properties are analysed in the context of three heating mechanisms proposed to explain gold nanoparticle heating in an RF field. This article also makes a critical analysis of the existing literature in the context of the nanoparticle preparations, RF structure, and suggested mechanisms in previously reported experiments.

  9. Applications of gold nanoparticles in cancer nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weibo; Gao, Ting; Hong, Hao; Sun, Jiangtao

    2013-01-01

    It has been almost 4 decades since the “war on cancer” was declared. It is now generally believed that personalized medicine is the future for cancer patient management. Possessing unprecedented potential for early detection, accurate diagnosis, and personalized treatment of cancer, nanoparticles have been extensively studied over the last decade. In this review, we will summarize the current state-of-the-art of gold nanoparticles in biomedical applications targeting cancer. Gold nanospheres, nanorods, nanoshells, nanocages, and surface enhanced Raman scattering nanoparticles will be discussed in detail regarding their uses in in vitro assays, ex vivo and in vivo imaging, cancer therapy, and drug delivery. Multifunctionality is the key feature of nanoparticle-based agents. Targeting ligands, imaging labels, therapeutic drugs, and other functionalities can all be integrated to allow for targeted molecular imaging and molecular therapy of cancer. Big strides have been made and many proof-of-principle studies have been successfully performed. The future looks brighter than ever yet many hurdles remain to be conquered. A multifunctional platform based on gold nanoparticles, with multiple receptor targeting, multimodality imaging, and multiple therapeutic entities, holds the promise for a “magic gold bullet” against cancer. PMID:24163578

  10. Applications of gold nanoparticles in cancer nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weibo; Gao, Ting; Hong, Hao; Sun, Jiangtao

    2008-01-01

    It has been almost 4 decades since the “war on cancer” was declared. It is now generally believed that personalized medicine is the future for cancer patient management. Possessing unprecedented potential for early detection, accurate diagnosis, and personalized treatment of cancer, nanoparticles have been extensively studied over the last decade. In this review, we will summarize the current state-of-the-art of gold nanoparticles in biomedical applications targeting cancer. Gold nanospheres, nanorods, nanoshells, nanocages, and surface enhanced Raman scattering nanoparticles will be discussed in detail regarding their uses in in vitro assays, ex vivo and in vivo imaging, cancer therapy, and drug delivery. Multifunctionality is the key feature of nanoparticle-based agents. Targeting ligands, imaging labels, therapeutic drugs, and other functionalities can all be integrated to allow for targeted molecular imaging and molecular therapy of cancer. Big strides have been made and many proof-of-principle studies have been successfully performed. The future looks brighter than ever yet many hurdles remain to be conquered. A multifunctional platform based on gold nanoparticles, with multiple receptor targeting, multimodality imaging, and multiple therapeutic entities, holds the promise for a “magic gold bullet” against cancer. PMID:24198458

  11. Radiofrequency heating pathways for gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Collins, C B; McCoy, R S; Ackerson, B J; Collins, G J; Ackerson, C J

    2014-08-01

    This feature article reviews the thermal dissipation of nanoscopic gold under radiofrequency (RF) irradiation. It also presents previously unpublished data addressing obscure aspects of this phenomenon. While applications in biology motivated initial investigation of RF heating of gold nanoparticles, recent controversy concerning whether thermal effects can be attributed to nanoscopic gold highlight the need to understand the involved mechanism or mechanisms of heating. Both the nature of the particle and the nature of the RF field influence heating. Aspects of nanoparticle chemistry which may affect thermal dissipation include the hydrodynamic diameter of the particle, the oxidation state and related magnetism of the core, and the chemical nature of the ligand shell. Aspects of RF which may affect thermal dissipation include power, frequency and antenna designs that emphasize relative strength of magnetic or electric fields. These nanoparticle and RF properties are analysed in the context of three heating mechanisms proposed to explain gold nanoparticle heating in an RF field. This article also makes a critical analysis of the existing literature in the context of the nanoparticle preparations, RF structure, and suggested mechanisms in previously reported experiments. PMID:24962620

  12. Incorporation of the fluoride induced Si-O bond cleavage and functionalized gold nanoparticle aggregation into one colorimetric probe for highly specific and sensitive detection of fluoride.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie-Fang; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Zhong-Mian; Liu, Jing-Fu

    2014-04-11

    A highly selective and sensitive probe was developed for the field test of F(-) in environmental waters. The probe was fabricated by anchoring 4-mercaptopyridine (MPD) on AuNPs via Au-S interaction to form MPD-AuNPs, and further assembling 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) on the surface of MPD-AuNPs. The hydrolysis and cross-link of APTMS resulted in a thin monolayer of Si-O-Si protecting layer to encapsulated MPD-AuNPs. In the assay, F(-) reacted with Si-O bond and thus destroyed the outer protecting layer of the probe, and further triggered the aggregation of internal MPD-AuNPs by forming N-H-F hydrogen bond. The F(-) induced aggregation of functionalized AuNPs gave rise to significant solution color switch from red to blue, which facilitated visual assay of F(-) in the range of 1.0-7.0 μg mL(-1) by naked eyes. The probe is able to discriminate F(-) from a wide range of environmentally dominant ions, thus it can be applied to detect F(-) in drinkable water with satisfactory results that is agreed well with that of using ion chromatography.

  13. Colloidal stability of zwitterionic polymer-grafted gold nanoparticles in water.

    PubMed

    Durand-Gasselin, Céline; Koerin, Régis; Rieger, Jutta; Lequeux, Nicolas; Sanson, Nicolas

    2014-11-15

    We investigate the colloidal stability of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) coated with zwitterionic sulfobetaine polymers in aqueous solution. Zwitterionic polymers with different molar masses, synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of N,N'-dimethyl(methacrylamido propyl)ammonium propanesulfonate (SPP) exhibit a well known Upper Critical Solution Temperature (UCST) in water, i.e., phase separate at low temperature. The colloidal stability of gold nanoparticles grafted with PSPP was studied as a function of the temperature. The effects of the molar mass of the grafted polymers, the salt concentration, and the presence of free polymer chains in solution were investigated. UV-vis spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering measurements show that whatever the molar mass of the grafted polymer, the nanoparticles never aggregate at low temperature in pure water. However, a reversible thermal-driven aggregation process of the gold nanoparticles is observed in presence of free polymer chains in solution and explained by a depletion process.

  14. Gold nanoparticles-based chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer for ultrasensitive detection of melamine.

    PubMed

    Du, Jianxiu; Wang, Yadi; Zhang, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    A turn-on chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer method was fabricated for the determination of melamine by using bis(2,4,6-trichlorophenyl)oxalate-hydrogen peroxide-fluorescein chemiluminescence reaction as a donor and dispersed gold nanoparticles as an acceptor. The chemiluminescence signal of bis(2,4,6-trichlorophenyl)oxalate-hydrogen peroxide-fluorescein reaction decreased significantly in the presence of dispersed gold nanoparticles because the absorption band of dispersed gold nanoparticles perfectly overlapped with the chemiluminescence spectrum. Melamine could induce the aggregation of gold nanoparticles, leading to a dramatic red-shift of the absorption band of dispersed gold nanoparticles. The absorption band of the aggregated gold nanoparticles does not overlap with the chemiluminescence spectrum of the reaction. In such a case, chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer could not happen and the chemiluminescence signal was restored. The procedure allowed the measurement of 3.2×10(-12)-3.2×10(-7) mol/L melamine with a limit of detection of 3×10(-13) mol/L. The method was applied to the determination of melamine in spiked milk samples; with recoveries within the range 94.1-104.2%.

  15. Cholesteric liquid crystal devices with nanoparticle aggregation.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Shie-Chang; Hwang, Shug-June; Hung, Yu-Hsiang; Chen, Sheng-Chieh

    2010-10-11

    A broadband cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) device with a multi-domain structure is demonstrated by using an aggregation of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) nanoparticles in the CLC layer. The aggregation pattern of the self-assembled POSS nanoparticles depends on the concentration of POSS doped in the mixture of POSS/CLC and the cooling rate of the mixture from a temperature higher than the clear point. POSS-induced changes in the bulk and surface properties of the cholesteric cells, such as a promotion of homeotropic alignment, help to form a cholesteric structure with a broadband reflection of light; the latter can be used for improvement of bistable CLC devices. A higher POSS concentration and a higher cooling rate both improve the appearance of the black-white CLC device. PMID:20941154

  16. Toward efficient modification of large gold nanoparticles with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, R.; Göeken, K.; Subramaniam, V.

    2014-03-01

    DNA-coated gold nanoparticles are one of the most researched nano-bio hybrid systems. Traditionally their synthesis has been a long and tedious process, involving slow salt addition and long incubation steps. This stems from the fact that both DNA and gold particles are negatively charged, therefore efficient interaction is possible only at high salt concentration. However, unmodified particles are susceptible to aggregation at high salt concentrations. Most of the recent modification methods involve the use of surfactants or other small molecules to stabilize the nanoparticles against aggregation, enabling faster modification. Here we present our result on an alternative route to reach fast modification in low salt conditions, namely, reduction of the charge of DNA. We will discuss both the use of natural DNA under acidic pH conditions, and the use of DNA with a cationic, spermine-based "tail" which is commercially available under the name ZNA. Additionally we introduce a characterization method based on ensemble localized surface plasmon resonance measurement (LSPR) which enabled us to extract the kinetics of DNA absorbance without the need for fluorescent tags. Lastly we show that the same ZNA-based modification protocol can be effectively used for silver nanoparticle modification.

  17. Plasmonic biocompatible silver-gold alloyed nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sotiriou, Georgios A; Etterlin, Gion Diego; Spyrogianni, Anastasia; Krumeich, Frank; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2014-11-14

    The addition of Au during scalable synthesis of nanosilver drastically minimizes its surface oxidation and leaching of toxic Ag(+) ions. These biocompatible and inexpensive silver-gold nanoalloyed particles exhibit superior plasmonic performance than commonly used pure Au nanoparticles, and as such these nanoalloys have great potential in theranostic applications.

  18. Enhancement of DNA immobilization and hybridization on gold electrode modified by nanogold aggregates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Feng; Li, Yong-Fang; Li, Jin-Ru; Jiang, Long

    2005-11-15

    Gold electrodes modified by nanogold aggregates (nanogold electrode) were obtained by the electrodeposition of gold nanoparticles onto planar gold electrode. The Electrochemical response of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probe immobilization and hybridization with target DNA was measured by cyclic voltammograms (CV) using methylene blue (MB) as an electroactive indicator. An improving method using long sequence target DNA, which greatly enhanced the response signal during hybridization, was studied. Nanogold electrodes could largely increase the immobilization amount of ssDNA probe. The hybridization amount of target DNA could be increased several times for the manifold nanogold electrodes. The detection limit of nanogold electrode for the complementary 16-mer oligonucleotide (target DNA1) and long sequence 55-mer oligonucleotide (target DNA2) could reach the concentration of 10(-9) mol/L and 10(-11) mol/L, respectively, which are far more sensitive than that of the planar electrode.

  19. DNA binding and aggregation by carbon nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    An, Hongjie; Liu, Qingdai; Ji, Qiaoli; Jin, Bo

    2010-03-19

    Significant environmental and health risks due to the increasing applications of engineered nanoparticles in medical and industrial activities have been concerned by many communities. The interactions between nanomaterials and genomes have been poorly studied so far. This study examined interactions of DNA with carbon nanoparticles (CNP) using atomic force microscopy (AFM). We experimentally assessed how CNP affect DNA molecule and bacterial growth of Escherichia coli. We found that CNP were bound to the DNA molecules during the DNA replication in vivo. The results revealed that the interaction of DNA with CNP resulted in DNA molecule binding and aggregation both in vivo and in vitro in a dose-dependent manner, and consequently inhabiting the E. coli growth. While this was a preliminary study, our results showed that this nanoparticle may have a significant impact on genomic activities.

  20. Tryptophan-functionalized gold nanoparticles for deep UV imaging of microbial cells.

    PubMed

    Pajović, Jelena D; Dojčilović, Radovan; Božanić, Dušan K; Kaščáková, Slavka; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Dimitrijević-Branković, Suzana; Vodnik, Vesna V; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R; Piscopiello, Emanuela; Luyt, Adriaan S; Djoković, Vladimir

    2015-11-01

    Biocompatible fluorescent nanostructures were prepared by a functionalization of gold nanoparticles with the amino acid tryptophan. The gold-tryptophan bioconjugates were investigated by TEM and HRTEM and various spectroscopy methods (XPS, FTIR, UV-vis and photoluminescence). It was found that the gold nanoparticles, initially 8 nm in diameter, aggregate in the presence of the amino acid. From the XPS and FTIR spectroscopy results, it was concluded that the tryptophan gold interactions mainly take place via indole and carboxyl groups. Although the indole group is involved in the interaction with the gold surfaces, the tryptophan-gold hybrids showed strong fluorescence due to the presence of multilayers of tryptophan. Deep ultra violet (DUV) imaging performed at the SOLEIL synchrotron showed that it is possible to detect these hybrid nanostructures within Escherichia coli cells.

  1. Antifungal activity of gold nanoparticles prepared by solvothermal method

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Tokeer; Wani, Irshad A.; Lone, Irfan H.; Ganguly, Aparna; Manzoor, Nikhat; Ahmad, Aijaz; Ahmed, Jahangeer; Al-Shihri, Ayed S.

    2013-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Gold nanoparticles (7 and 15 nm) of very high surface area (329 and 269 m{sup 2}/g) have been successfully synthesized through solvothermal method by using tin chloride and sodium borohydride as reducing agents. As-prepared gold nanoparticles shows very excellent antifungal activity against Candida isolates and activity increases with decrease in the particle size. Display Omitted Highlights: ► Effect of reducing agents on the morphology of gold nanoparticles. ► Highly uniform and monodisperse gold nanoparticles (7 nm). ► Highest surface area of gold nanoparticles (329 m{sup 2/}g). ► Excellent antifungal activity of gold nanoparticles against Candida strains. -- Abstract: Gold nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by solvothermal method using SnCl{sub 2} and NaBH{sub 4} as reducing agents. X-ray diffraction studies show highly crystalline and monophasic nature of the gold nanoparticles with face centred cubic structure. The transmission electron microscopic studies show the formation of nearly spherical gold nanoparticles of average size of 15 nm using SnCl{sub 2}, however, NaBH{sub 4} produced highly uniform, monodispersed and spherical gold nanoparticles of average grain size of 7 nm. A high surface area of 329 m{sup 2}/g for 7 nm and 269 m{sup 2}/g for 15 nm gold nanoparticles was observed. UV–vis studies assert the excitations over the visible region due to transverse and longitudinal surface plasmon modes. The gold nanoparticles exhibit excellent size dependant antifungal activity and greater biocidal action against Candida isolates for 7 nm sized gold nanoparticles restricting the transmembrane H{sup +} efflux of the Candida species than 15 nm sized gold nanoparticles.

  2. Growth of gold nanoparticles at gelatin-silica bio-interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensaid, Imen; Masse, Sylvie; Selmane, Mohamed; Fessi, Shemseddine; Coradin, Thibaud

    2016-01-01

    The growth of gold nanoparticles via chemical reduction of HAuCl4 dispersed in gelatin-silicate mixtures was studied. Gelatin leads to densely packed nanoparticles whereas open colloidal aggregates with tight boundaries are formed within silica. Within the bio-hybrid systems, gold species are located within the gelatin-silicate particles and/or within the gelatin phase, depending on the preparation conditions. These various localizations and their impact on the final nanoparticle structure are discussed considering attractive and repulsive electrostatic interactions existing between the three components. These data suggest that bio-hybrid systems are interesting and versatile interfaces to study crystallization processes in confined environments.

  3. Different active biomolecules involved in biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by three fungus species.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaorong; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Yang, Xiaohai

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, the intracellular gold nanoparticles were biosynthesized using three fungi including Aureobasidium pullulans (A. pullulans), Fusarium sp. and Fusarium oxysporum (F. oxysporum) after immersion the fungal cells in AuCl4- ions solution. UV-vis and FTIR spectrum, and biochemical compositions analysis of Au nano-fungal cells suggested that active biomolecules of reducing sugar of A. pullulans, and proteins in Fusarium sp. and F. oxysporum were tested positive of providing the function of the reduction of AuCI4- ions and the formation of the gold crystals. SDS-PAGE analysis of purified protein from gold nanoparticles synthesized by three fungi showed that three proteins with molecular weight (WM) about 100 kDa, 25 kDa and 19 kDa were in the gold nanoparticles by Fusarium sp. and two proteins with WM about 25 kDa and 19 kDa were in gold nanoparticles of F oxysporum. Further, three purified fungal proteins with WM about 100 kDa, 25 kDa and 19 kDa from gold nanoparticles by Fusarium sp. identified by LC-MS/MS, named plasma membrane ATPase, 3-glucan binding protein and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, respectively. The Au nano-fungal cells ultrathin sections of Fusarium sp. and F. oxysporum showed that the gold nanoparticles mainly produced in intracellular vacuoles of fungal cells. The growth of gold nanoparticles in three fungal cells indicated the reducing sugar led to the gold nanoparticles in spherical morphology and proteins benefited to the gold aggregates.

  4. Gold nanoparticle (AuNPs) and gold nanopore (AuNPore) catalysts in organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Takale, Balaram S; Bao, Ming; Yamamoto, Yoshinori

    2014-04-01

    Organic synthesis using gold has gained tremendous attention in last few years, especially heterogeneous gold catalysis based on gold nanoparticles has made its place in almost all organic reactions, because of the robust and green nature of gold catalysts. In this context, gold nanopore (AuNPore) with a 3D metal framework is giving a new dimension to heterogeneous gold catalysts. Interestingly, AuNPore chemistry is proving better than gold nanoparticles based chemistry. In this review, along with recent advances, major discoveries in heterogeneous gold catalysis are discussed.

  5. Structural Motifs of Gold Nanoparticles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, C. L.; Luedtke, W. D.; Landman, Uzi

    1996-03-01

    Through an extensive search, involving energy minimization using embedded atom potentials, we found(R.L. Whetten et al./), submitted to Nature (1995). that the energetically optimal sequence for AuN clusters (30 <= N <= 3000 atoms) consists of fcc crystallites, with a truncated-octahedral (TO) morphological motif, and variants thereof. These predictions for bare gold particles, and for particles coated by sef-assembled thiol monolayers, are discussed in light of recent experiments on the preparation and characterization (including mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction) of nanocrystalline gold molecules (see Ref. 2).

  6. Strong plasmon-exciton coupling in a hybrid system of gold nanostars and J-aggregates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid materials formed by plasmonic nanostructures and J-aggregates provide a unique combination of highly localized and enhanced electromagnetic field in metal constituent with large oscillator strength and extremely narrow exciton band of the organic component. The coherent coupling of localized plasmons of the multispiked gold nanoparticles (nanostars) and excitons of JC1 dye J-aggregates results in a Rabi splitting reaching 260 meV. Importantly, broad absorption features of nanostars extending over a visible and near-infrared spectral range allowed us to demonstrate double Rabi splitting resulting from the simultaneous coherent coupling between plasmons of the nanostars and excitons of J-aggregates of two different cyanine dyes. PMID:23522305

  7. Single Chain Fragment Variable Recombinant Antibody Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles for a Highly Sensitive Colorimetric Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Yi; Raymond, Raymond L.; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2009-01-01

    In this report, the peptide linker connecting scFv VH and VL domains were genetically modified to contain different amino acids (i.e. cysteine (scFv-cys) or histidines ( scFv-his)) to enable the scFv to adsorb or self-assemble onto the gold nanoparticles (NPs). The scFv-cys stabilized gold NPs were used to develop a highly sensitive colorimetric immunosensor. The scFv-cys stabilized gold NPs were characterized by UV-vis spectra, transmission electron microscope (TEM) and FT-IR. After adding the antigen rabbit IgG, the solution of scFv-cys stabilized gold NPs shows obvious visible color change from deep red to light purple due to the aggregation of the gold nanoparticles. Based on the colorimetric aggregation of scFv-cys stabilized gold NPs, the immunosensor exhibits high sensitivity with detection limit of 1.7 nM and good specificity. The good properties of the colorimetric aggregation immunosensor would be attributed to the small size of scFv and the covalent link between the scFv and gold NPs that improve the better orientation and enhance the probe density. With the advantages of speed, simplicity and specificity, the colorimetric immunoassay based on the functionalized scFv stabilized gold NPs represents a promising approach for protein analysis and clinical diagnostics. PMID:19327975

  8. X-ray optics of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Letfullin, Renat R; Rice, Colin E W; George, Thomas F

    2014-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been investigated as contrast agents for traditional x-ray medical procedures, utilizing the strong absorption characteristics of the nanoparticles to enhance the contrast of the detected x-ray image. Here we use the Kramers-Kronig relation for complex atomic scattering factors to find the real and imaginary parts of the index of refraction for the medium composed of single-element materials or compounds in the x-ray range of the spectrum. These complex index of refraction values are then plugged into a Lorenz-Mie theory to calculate the absorption efficiency of various size gold nanoparticles for photon energies in the 1-100 keV range. Since the output from most medical diagnostic x-ray devices follows a wide and filtered spectrum of photon energies, we introduce and compute the effective intensity-absorption-efficiency values for gold nanoparticles of radii varying from 5 to 50 nm, where we use the TASMIP model to integrate over all spectral energies generated by typical tungsten anode x-ray tubes with kilovolt potentials ranging from 50 to 150 kVp.

  9. Turkevich method for gold nanoparticle synthesis revisited.

    PubMed

    Kimling, J; Maier, M; Okenve, B; Kotaidis, V; Ballot, H; Plech, A

    2006-08-17

    The growth of gold nanoparticles by reduction by citrate and ascorbic acid has been examined in detail to explore the parameter space of reaction conditions. It is found that gold particles can be produced in a wide range of sizes, from 9 to 120 nm, with defined size distribution, following the earlier work of Turkevich and Frens. The reaction is initiated thermally or in comparison by UV irradiation, which results in similar final products. The kinetics of the extinction spectra show the multiple steps of primary and secondary clustering leading to polycrystallites.

  10. Terminalia chebula mediated green and rapid synthesis of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan Kumar, Kesarla; Mandal, Badal Kumar; Sinha, Madhulika; Krishnakumar, Varadhan

    2012-02-01

    Biologically inspired experimental process in synthesising nanoparticles is of great interest in present scenario. Biosynthesis of nanoparticles is considered to be one of the best green techniques in synthesising metal nanoparticles. Here, an in situ green biogenic synthesis of gold nanoparticles using aqueous extracts of Terminalia chebula as reducing and stabilizing agent is reported. Gold nanoparticles were confirmed by surface plasmon resonance in the range of 535 nm using UV-visible spectrometry. TEM analysis revealed that the morphology of the particles thus formed contains anisotropic gold nanoparticles with size ranging from 6 to 60 nm. Hydrolysable tannins present in the extract of T. chebula are responsible for reductions and stabilization of gold nanoparticles. Antimicrobial activity of gold nanoparticles showed better activity towards gram positive S. aureus compared to gram negative E. coli using standard well diffusion method.

  11. Novel monolayer and bilayer shell aggregate gold nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelidou, Myria; Pitris, Costas

    2011-03-01

    Various gold nanostructures are being investigated for medical and biological uses. For many medical applications, it would be beneficial to use near infrared (NIR) excitation as well as small gold nanospheres which can easily reach the cytoplasm and cell nucleus. For that purpose, we propose a novel nanostructure, the "shell aggregate," which consists of small nanospheres aggregated around a core such as an intracellular organelle. The extinction efficiency of such monolayfer and bilayer shell aggregates is thoroughly investigated with appropriate simulations using the Descrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) method. This technique can deal with any arbitrary size, shape, synthesis and external environment. The effect of parameters such as the overall radius of the nanostructure, the small nanosphere radius, and the distance between the nanospheres, on the extinction efficiency factor of the nanostructures was examined. The results indicate that the extinction spectra appear to depend heavily on the distance between the small nanospheres. Finally, the monolayer shell aggregate could be a suitable candidate for use in various biological, intracellular, applications since it provides a reasonably tunable plasmon resonance wavelength while the small size of its components can be exploited for intracellular distribution.

  12. Immobilization of gold nanoparticles on cell culture surfaces for safe and enhanced gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection.

    PubMed

    Kalies, Stefan; Heinemann, Dag; Schomaker, Markus; Gentemann, Lara; Meyer, Heiko; Ripken, Tammo

    2014-01-01

    In comparison to standard transfection methods, gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection has proven to be a versatile alternative. This is based on its minor influence on cell viability and its high efficiency, especially for the delivery of small molecules like small interfering RNA. However, in order to transfer it to routine usage, a safety aspect is of major concern: The avoidance of nanoparticle uptake by the cells is desired. The immobilization of the gold nanoparticles on cell culture surfaces can address this issue. In this study, we achieved this by silanization of the appropriate surfaces and the binding of gold nanoparticles to them. Comparable perforation efficiencies to the previous approaches of gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection with free gold nanoparticles are demonstrated. The uptake of the immobilized particles by the cells is unlikely. Consequently, these investigations offer the possibility of bringing gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection closer to routine usage.

  13. Protein Cages as Containers for Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aijie; Verwegen, Martijn; de Ruiter, Mark V; Maassen, Stan J; Traulsen, Christoph H-H; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M

    2016-07-01

    Abundant and highly diverse, viruses offer new scaffolds in nanotechnology for the encapsulation, organization, or even synthesis of novel materials. In this work the coat protein of the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) is used to encapsulate gold nanoparticles with different sizes and stabilizing ligands yielding stable particles in buffered solutions at neutral pH. The sizes of the virus-like particles correspond to T = 1, 2, and 3 Caspar-Klug icosahedral triangulation numbers. We developed a simple one-step process enabling the encapsulation of commercially available gold nanoparticles without prior modification with up to 97% efficiency. The encapsulation efficiency is further increased using bis-p-(sufonatophenyl)phenyl phosphine surfactants up to 99%. Our work provides a simplified procedure for the preparation of metallic particles stabilized in CCMV protein cages. The presented results are expected to enable the preparation of a variety of similar virus-based colloids for current focus areas. PMID:27135176

  14. Thiolate–Protected Gold Nanoparticles Via Physical Approach: Unusual Structural and Photophysical Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Yohei; Akita, Ikumi; Sumi, Taiki; Matsubara, Masaki; Yonezawa, Tetsu

    2016-01-01

    Here we report a novel physical approach for thiolate–protected fluorescent gold nanoparticles with a controlled size of the order of a few nanometers. This approach is based on a sputtering of gold into a liquid matrix containing thiolate ligand as a stabilizer at various concentrations, thus no reductant was used. The size of the gold nanoparticles was successfully controlled to range from 1.6 to 7.4 nm by adjusting the thiol concentrations. Surface plasmon absorption was observed in larger nanoparticles, but it was not observed in smaller ones. Such smaller nanoparticles fluoresced at around 670 nm with a small spectral shift according to their size, however, the diameter (1.6–2.7 nm) was very strange to show such red emission compared with photophysical characteristics of reported gold cluster or nanoparticles synthesized by chemical method. By detailed investigations using TEM, HAADF-STEM, XPS, and TGA, and size fractionation by size exclusion chromatography, we finally arrived at the plausible mechanism for the origin of unusual fluorescence property; the obtained gold nanoparticles are not single-crystal and are composed of aggregates of very small components such as multinuclear gold clusters or complexes. PMID:27427446

  15. Thiolate–Protected Gold Nanoparticles Via Physical Approach: Unusual Structural and Photophysical Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Yohei; Akita, Ikumi; Sumi, Taiki; Matsubara, Masaki; Yonezawa, Tetsu

    2016-07-01

    Here we report a novel physical approach for thiolate–protected fluorescent gold nanoparticles with a controlled size of the order of a few nanometers. This approach is based on a sputtering of gold into a liquid matrix containing thiolate ligand as a stabilizer at various concentrations, thus no reductant was used. The size of the gold nanoparticles was successfully controlled to range from 1.6 to 7.4 nm by adjusting the thiol concentrations. Surface plasmon absorption was observed in larger nanoparticles, but it was not observed in smaller ones. Such smaller nanoparticles fluoresced at around 670 nm with a small spectral shift according to their size, however, the diameter (1.6–2.7 nm) was very strange to show such red emission compared with photophysical characteristics of reported gold cluster or nanoparticles synthesized by chemical method. By detailed investigations using TEM, HAADF-STEM, XPS, and TGA, and size fractionation by size exclusion chromatography, we finally arrived at the plausible mechanism for the origin of unusual fluorescence property; the obtained gold nanoparticles are not single-crystal and are composed of aggregates of very small components such as multinuclear gold clusters or complexes.

  16. Thiolate-Protected Gold Nanoparticles Via Physical Approach: Unusual Structural and Photophysical Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yohei; Akita, Ikumi; Sumi, Taiki; Matsubara, Masaki; Yonezawa, Tetsu

    2016-01-01

    Here we report a novel physical approach for thiolate-protected fluorescent gold nanoparticles with a controlled size of the order of a few nanometers. This approach is based on a sputtering of gold into a liquid matrix containing thiolate ligand as a stabilizer at various concentrations, thus no reductant was used. The size of the gold nanoparticles was successfully controlled to range from 1.6 to 7.4 nm by adjusting the thiol concentrations. Surface plasmon absorption was observed in larger nanoparticles, but it was not observed in smaller ones. Such smaller nanoparticles fluoresced at around 670 nm with a small spectral shift according to their size, however, the diameter (1.6-2.7 nm) was very strange to show such red emission compared with photophysical characteristics of reported gold cluster or nanoparticles synthesized by chemical method. By detailed investigations using TEM, HAADF-STEM, XPS, and TGA, and size fractionation by size exclusion chromatography, we finally arrived at the plausible mechanism for the origin of unusual fluorescence property; the obtained gold nanoparticles are not single-crystal and are composed of aggregates of very small components such as multinuclear gold clusters or complexes. PMID:27427446

  17. Detection of squamous carcinoma cells using gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Wei-Yun; Lee, Sze-tsen; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2015-03-01

    The goal of this study is to use gold nanoparticle as a diagnostic agent to detect human squamous carcinoma cells. Gold nanoparticles were synthesized and the gold nanoparticle size was 34.3 ± 6.2 nm. Based on the over-expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) biomarkers in squamous carcinoma cells, we hypothesized that EGFR could be a feasible biomarker with a target moiety for detection. We further modified polyclonal antibodies of EGFR on the surface of gold nanoparticles. We found selected squamous carcinoma cells can be selectively detected using EGFR antibody-modified gold nanoparticles via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Cell death was also examined to determine the survival status of squamous carcinoma cells with respect to gold nanoparticle treatment and EGFR polyclonal antibody modification.

  18. Digitizing Gold Nanoparticle-Based Colorimetric Assay by Imaging and Counting Single Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Liang; Wang, Xian; Fang, Yimin; Liu, Chenbin; Jiang, Dan; Wo, Xiang; Wang, Wei; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2016-02-16

    Gold colloid changes its color when the internanoparticle distance changes. On the basis of analyte-induced aggregation or disaggregation behavior of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), versatile colorimetric assays have been developed for measuring various kinds of analytes including proteins, DNA, small molecules, and ions. Traditional read-out signals, which are usually measured by a spectrometer or naked eyes, are based on the averaged extinction properties of a bulk solution containing billions of nanoparticles. Averaged extinction property of a large amount of nanoparticles diminished the contribution from rare events when the analyte concentration was low, thus resulting in limited detection sensitivity. Instead of measuring the averaged optical property from bulk colloid, in the present work, we proposed a digital counterpart of the colorimetric assay by imaging and counting individual AuNPs. This method quantified the analyte concentration with the number percentage of large-sized AuNPs aggregates, which were digitally counted with surface plasmon resonance microscopy (SPRM), a plasmonic imaging technique recently developed by us and other groups. SPRM was able to identify rare AuNPs aggregates despite their small population and greatly improved the detection sensitivity as demonstrated by two model systems based on analyte-induced aggregation and disaggregation, respectively. Furthermore, besides plasmonic AuNPs, SPRM is also suitable for imaging and counting nonplasmonic nanomaterials such as silica and metal oxide with poor extinction properties. It is thus anticipated that the present digitized assay holds a great potential for expanding the colorimetric assay to broad categories of nonplasmonic nanoparticles.

  19. Enhancing Therapeutic Efficacy through Designed Aggregation of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Sadhukha, Tanmoy; Wiedmann, Timothy Scott; Panyama, Jayanth

    2015-01-01

    Particle size is a key determinant of biological performance of sub-micron size delivery systems. Previous studies investigating the effect of particle size have primarily focused on well-dispersed nanoparticles. However, inorganic nanoparticles are prone to aggregation in biological environments. In our studies, we examined the consequence of aggregation on superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticle-induced magnetic hyperthermia. Here we show that the extent and mechanism of hyperthermia-induced cell kill is highly dependent on the aggregation state of SPIO nanoparticles. Well-dispersed nanoparticles induced apoptosis, similar to that observed with conventional hyperthermia. Sub-micron size aggregates, on the other hand, induced temperature-dependent autophagy through generation of oxidative stress. Micron size aggregates caused rapid membrane damage, resulting in acute cell kill. Overall, this work highlights the potential for developing highly effective anticancer therapeutics through designed aggregation of nano delivery systems. PMID:24947232

  20. Enhancing therapeutic efficacy through designed aggregation of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sadhukha, Tanmoy; Wiedmann, Timothy S; Panyam, Jayanth

    2014-09-01

    Particle size is a key determinant of biological performance of sub-micron size delivery systems. Previous studies investigating the effect of particle size have primarily focused on well-dispersed nanoparticles. However, inorganic nanoparticles are prone to aggregation in biological environments. In our studies, we examined the consequence of aggregation on superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticle-induced magnetic hyperthermia. Here we show that the extent and mechanism of hyperthermia-induced cell kill is highly dependent on the aggregation state of SPIO nanoparticles. Well-dispersed nanoparticles induced apoptosis, similar to that observed with conventional hyperthermia. Sub-micron size aggregates, on the other hand, induced temperature-dependent autophagy through generation of oxidative stress. Micron size aggregates caused rapid membrane damage, resulting in acute cell kill. Overall, this work highlights the potential for developing highly effective anticancer therapeutics through designed aggregation of nano delivery systems.

  1. Gold nanoparticles as novel agents for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jain, S; Hirst, D G; O'Sullivan, J M

    2012-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are emerging as promising agents for cancer therapy and are being investigated as drug carriers, photothermal agents, contrast agents and radiosensitisers. This review introduces the field of nanotechnology with a focus on recent gold nanoparticle research which has led to early-phase clinical trials. In particular, the pre-clinical evidence for gold nanoparticles as sensitisers with ionising radiation in vitro and in vivo at kilovoltage and megavoltage energies is discussed. PMID:22010024

  2. EXAFS studies on gold nanoparticles over novel catalytic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akolekar, Deepak B.; Bhargava, Suresh K.; Foran, Garry

    2006-11-01

    Novel nanogold catalytic systems made up of gold nanoparticles (˜2-6 nm) supported on niobium, ytterbium, lanthanum and cerium oxide materials were synthesized. XAS is uniquely suited for studying catalytic systems with low metal and high metal dispersion. Au L 3 edge X-ray absorption spectroscopic measurements were carried out over a series of supported gold nanoparticles. The interesting results obtained from EXAFS and XANES confirms the typical characteristics and structure of gold nanoparticles in these materials.

  3. Thermally controlled photocatalytic coalescence of functionalized gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Moshik; Zalevsky, Zeev; Pocoví-Martínez, Salvador; Shahmoon, Asaf; Pérez-Prieto, Julia

    2014-05-01

    The selective synthesis of gold nanoparticles of any desired size is of great interest. Benzophenone in THF has proved to act as an efficient photocatalyst for the growth of thiolate-capped nanoparticles in the presence and in the absence of gold salts. Consequently, we explored the effect of applying thermal energy to control these processes. These studies have provided key information for the effective growth of gold nanoparticles tailored to specific applications.

  4. Membrane-mediated aggregation of anisotropically curved nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Olinger, Alexander D; Spangler, Eric J; Kumar, P B Sunil; Laradji, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Using systematic numerical simulations, we study the self-assembly of elongated curved nanoparticles on lipid vesicles. Our simulations are based on molecular dynamics of a coarse-grained implicit-solvent model of self-assembled lipid membranes with a Langevin thermostat. Here we consider only the case wherein the nanoparticle-nanoparticle interaction is repulsive, only the concave surface of the nanoparticle interacts attractively with the lipid head groups and only the outer surface of the vesicle is exposed to the nanoparticles. Upon their adhesion on the vesicle, the curved nanoparticles generate local curvature on the membrane. The resulting nanoparticle-generated membrane curvature leads in turn to nanoparticle self-assembly into two main types of aggregates corresponding to chain aggregates at low adhesion strengths and aster aggregates at high adhesion strength. The chain-like aggregates are due to the fact that at low values of adhesion strength, the nanoparticles prefer to lie parallel to each other. As the adhesion strength is increased, a splay angle between the nanoparticles is induced with a magnitude that increases with increasing adhesion strength. The origin of the splay angles between the nanoparticles is shown to be saddle-like membrane deformations induced by a tilt of the lipids around the nanoparticles. This phenomenon of membrane mediated self-assembly of anisotropically curved nanoparticles is explored for systems with varying nanoparticle number densities, adhesion strength, and nanoparticle intrinsic curvature.

  5. SERS-active nanoparticle aggregate technology for tags and seals

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Leif O; Montoya, Velma M; Havrilla, George J; Doorn, Stephen K

    2010-06-03

    In this paper, we describe our efforts to create a modern tagging and sealing technology for international safeguards application. Our passive tagging methods are based on SANAs (SERS-Active Nanoparticle Aggregates; SERS: Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering). These SANAs offer robust spectral barcoding capability in an inexpensive tag/seal, with the possibility of rapid in-field verification that requires no human input. At INMM 2009, we introduced SANAs, and showed approaches to integrating our technology with tags under development at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Here, we will focus on recent LANL development work, as well as adding additional dimensionality to the barcoding technique. The field of international safeguards employs a broad array of tags, seals, and tamper-indicating devices to assist with identification, tracking, and verification of components and materials. These devices each have unique strengths suited to specific applications, and span a range of technologies from passive metal cup seals and adhesive seals to active, remotely monitored fiber optic seals. Regardless of the technology employed, essential characteristics center around security, environmental and temporal stability, ease of use, and the ability to provide confidence to all parties. Here, we present a new inexpensive tagging technology that will deliver these attributes, while forming the basis of either a new seal, or as a secure layer added to many existing devices. Our approach uses the Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) response from SANAs (SERS-Active Nanoparticle Aggregates, Figure 1) to provide a unique identifier or signature for tagging applications. SANAs are formed from gold or silver nanoparticles in the 40-80 nm size range. A chemical dye is installed on the nanoparticle surface, and the nanoparticles are then aggregated into ensembles of {approx}100 to 500 nm diameter, prior to being coated with silica. The silica shell protects the finished SANA from

  6. Site-directed delivery of ferritin-encapsulated gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, B.; Yamashita, I.; Uenuma, M.; Iwahori, K.; Kobayashi, M.; Uraoka, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Newly designed porter proteins, which catch gold nanoparticles and deliver the nanoparticles selectively to a silicon dioxide (SiO2) surface under the specific conditions were reported. Recombinant apoferritin subunits, each of which has gold-binding peptide and titanium-binding peptide at the C- and N-terminus, respectively, can efficiently encapsulate a gold nanoparticle. The bio-conjugate, a nanogold and surrounding mutant protein subunits, had a property which can deliver itself to the SiO2 surface through the interaction. In theory, our genetically manipulated apoferritin subunits can encapsulate gold nanoparticles of various sizes, which is a promising property for applications involving surface plasmon resonance.

  7. Photoacoustic excitation profiles of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Feis, Alessandro; Gellini, Cristina; Salvi, Pier Remigio; Becucci, Maurizio

    2014-03-01

    The wavelength dependence of the laser-induced photoacoustic signal amplitude has been measured for water dispersions of 10, 61, and 93 nm diameter gold nanospheres. The whole region of the localized surface plasmon resonance has been covered. This "photoacoustic excitation profile" can be overlayed with the extinction spectrum between 450 nm and 600 nm in the case of the smallest nanoparticles. At variance, the larger-sized nanoparticles display a progressive deviation from the extinction spectrum at longer wavelength, where the photoacoustic signal becomes relatively smaller. Considering that photoacoustics is intrinsically insensitive to light scattering, at least for optically thin samples, the results are in agreement with previous theoretical work predicting (i) an increasing contribution of scattering to extinction when the nanoparticle size increases and (ii) a larger scattering component at longer wavelengths. Therefore, the method has a general validity and can be applied to selectively determine light absorption by plasmonic systems.

  8. Sargassum myriocystum mediated biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalin Dhas, T.; Ganesh Kumar, V.; Stanley Abraham, L.; Karthick, V.; Govindaraju, K.

    2012-12-01

    Functionalized metal nanoparticles are unique in nature and are being developed for its specificity in drug targeting. In the present study, aqueous extract of Sargassum myriocystum is used for the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by the reduction of chloroauric acid. The formation of nanoparticles reaction was complete within 15 min at 76 °C. The size, shape and elemental analysis of AuNPs were carried out using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, FT-IR, TEM, SEM-EDAX, and XRD analysis. The newly formed AuNPs are stable, well-defined, polydispersed (triangular and spherical) and crystalline with an average size of 15 nm. The biomolecule involved in stabilizing AuNPs was identified using GC-MS.

  9. X-Ray Spectroscopy of Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.; Montenegro, M.; Pradhan, A. K.; Pitzer, R.

    2009-06-01

    Inner shell transitions, such as 1s-2p, in heavy elements can absorb or produce hard X-rays, and hence are widely used in nanoparticles. Bio-medical research for cancer treatment has been using heavy element nanoparticles, embeded in malignant tumor, for efficient absorption of irradiated X-rays and leading emission of hard X-rays and energetic electrons to kill the surrounding cells. Ejection of a 1s electron during ionization of the element by absorption of a X-ray photon initiates the Auger cascades of emission of photons and electrons. We have investigated gold nanoparticles for the optimal energy range, below the K-edge (1s) ionization threshold, that corresponds to resonant absorption of X-rays with large attenuation coefficients, orders of magnitude higher over the background as well as to that at K-edge threshold. We applied these attenuation coefficients in Monte Carlo simulation to study the intensities of emission of photons and electrons by Auger cascades. The numerical experiments were carried out in a phantom of water cube with a thin layer, 0.1mm/g, of gold nanoparticles 10 cm inside from the surface using the well-known code Geant4. We will present results on photon and electron emission spectra from passing monochromatic X-ray beams at 67 keV, which is the resonant energy for resonant K_{α} lines, at 82 keV, the K-shell ionization threshold, and at 2 MeV where the resonant effect is non-existent. Our findings show a high peak in the gold nanoparticle absorption curve indicating complete absorption of radiation within the gold layer. The photon and electron emission spectra show resonant features. Acknowledgement: Partially supported by a Large Interdisciplinary Grant award of the Ohio State University and NASA APRA program (SNN). The computational work was carried out on the Cray X1 and Itanium 4 cluster at the Ohio Supercomputer Center, Columbus Ohio. "Resonant X-ray Irradiation of High-Z Nanoparticles For Cancer Theranostics" (refereed

  10. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles and silver nanoparticles via green technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Zulfiqaar; Balu, S. S.

    2012-11-01

    The proposed work describes the comparison of various methods of green synthesis for preparation of Gold and Silver nanoparticles. Pure extracts of Lemon (Citrus limon) and Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) were mixed with aqueous solution of auric tetrachloride and silver nitrate. The resultant solutions were treated with four common techniques to assist in the reduction namely photo catalytic, thermal, microwave assisted reduction and solvo - thermal reduction. UV - Visible Spectroscopy results and STM images of the final solutions confirmed the formation of stable metallic nanoparticles. A preliminary account of the green synthesis work is presented here.

  11. The combination of gold nanorods and nanoparticles with DNA nanodevices for logic gates construction.

    PubMed

    Yao, Dongbao; Song, Tingjie; Zheng, Bin; Xiao, Shiyan; Huang, Fujian; Liang, Haojun

    2015-10-23

    In this work, two DNA nanodevices were constructed utilizing a DNA strand displacement reaction. With the assistance of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and gold nanorods (AuNRs), the autonomous reactions can be reflected from the aggregation states of nanoparticles. By sequence design and the two non-overlapping double hump-like UV-vis spectral peaks of AuNPs and AuNRs, two logic gates with multiple inputs and outputs were successfully run with expected outcomes. This method not only shows how to achieve computing with multiple logic calculations but also has great potential for multiple targets detection.

  12. Biological response of hydrogels embedding gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Marsich, Eleonora; Travan, Andrea; Donati, Ivan; Di Luca, Andrea; Benincasa, Monica; Crosera, Matteo; Paoletti, Sergio

    2011-04-01

    A nanocomposite hydrogel based on natural polysaccharides and gold nanoparticles (ACnAu) has been prepared and its biological effects were tested in vitro with both bacteria and eukaryotic cells. Antimicrobial tests showed that AC-nAu gels are effective in killing both gram+ (Staphylococcus aureus) and gram- (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria. LDH assays pointed at a toxic effect towards eukaryotic cell-lines (HepG2 and MG63), in contrast with the case of silver-based hydrogels; cytofluorimetry studies demonstrated an apoptosis-related mechanism induced by increase of ROS intracellular level which leads to cell death after 24 h of direct contact with AC-nAu gels. In vivo biocompatibility has been evaluated in a rat model, investigating the peri-implant soft tissue reaction after 1 month of implantation. The results show that silver-containing samples induced a fibrotic capsule of the same average thickness of the control sample (devoid of nanoparticles) (∼50 μm), while in the case of gold containing materials the fibrotic capsule was thicker (∼100 μm), confirming a higher biocompatibility for silver-based samples than for gold-based ones.

  13. Discrimination of Proteins Using an Array of Surfactant-Stabilized Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rogowski, Jacob L; Verma, Mohit S; Gu, Frank X

    2016-08-01

    Protein analysis is a fundamental aspect of biochemical research. Gold nanoparticles are an emerging platform for various biological applications given their high surface area, biocompatibility, and unique optical properties. The colorimetric properties of gold nanoparticles make them ideal for point-of-care diagnostics. Different aspects of gold nanoparticle-protein interactions have been investigated to predict the effect of protein adsorption on colloidal stability, but the role of surfactants is often overlooked, despite their potential to alter both protein and nanoparticle properties. Herein we present a method by which gold nanoparticles can be prepared in various surfactants and used for array-based quantification and identification of proteins. The exchange of surfactant not only changed the zeta potential of those gold nanoparticles but also drastically altered their aggregation response to five different proteins (bovine serum albumin, human serum albumin, immunoglobulin G, lysozyme, and hemoglobin) in a concentration-dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrate that varying surfactant concentration can be used to control assay sensitivity. PMID:27399345

  14. Gold nanoparticles: Opportunities and Challenges in Nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Arvizo, Rochelle; Bhattacharya, Resham; Mukherjee, Priyabrata

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Site-specific drug delivery is an important area of research that is anticipated to increase the efficacy of the drug and reduce potential side effects. Due to this, substantial work has been done developing non-invasive and targeted tumor treatment with nano-scale metallic particles. Areas covered in this review This review focuses on the work done in the last several years developing gold nanoparticles as cancer therapeutics and diagnostic agents. However, there are challenges in using gold nanoparticles as drug delivery systems such as biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and possible toxicity. Approaches to limit these issues are proposed. What the reader will gain Different approaches from several different disciplines are discussed. Potential clinical applications of these engineered nanoparticles is also presented. Take home message Because of their unique size-dependent physico-chemical and optical properties, adaptability, sub-cellular size, and bio-compatibility, these nanosized carriers offer an apt means of transporting small molecules as well as biomacromoleculs to diseased cells/ tissues. PMID:20408736

  15. A DNA-gold nanoparticle-based colorimetric competition assay for the detection of cysteine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Seung; Ulmann, Pirmin A; Han, Min Su; Mirkin, Chad A

    2008-02-01

    We report the development of a highly sensitive and selective colorimetric detection method for cysteine based upon oligonucleotide-functionalized gold nanoparticle probes that contain strategically placed thymidine-thymidine (T-T) mismatches complexed with Hg2+. This assay relies upon the distance-dependent optical properties of gold nanoparticles, the sharp melting transition of oligonucleotide-linked nanoparticle aggregates, and the very selective coordination of Hg2+ with cysteine. The concentration of cysteine can be determined by monitoring with the naked eye or a UV-vis spectrometer the temperature at which the purple-to-red color change associated with aggregate dissociation takes place. This assay does not utilize organic cosolvents, enzymatic reactions, light-sensitive dye molecules, lengthy protocols, or sophisticated instrumentation thereby overcoming some of the limitations of more conventional methods.

  16. Advances in cancer research using gold nanoparticles mediated photothermal ablation

    PubMed Central

    MOCAN, LUCIAN; MATEA, CRISTIAN T.; BARTOS, DANA; MOSTEANU, OFELIA; POP, TEODORA; MOCAN, TEODORA; IANCU, CORNEL

    2016-01-01

    Recent research suggests that nanotechnologies may lead to the development of novel cancer treatment. Gold nanoparticles with their unique physical and chemical properties hold great hopes for the development of thermal-based therapies against human malignancies. This review will focus on various strategies that have been developed to use gold nanoparticles as photothermal agents against human cancers. PMID:27152068

  17. Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment Modules for Probing Gold Nanoparticle Interfacial Phenomena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karunanayake, Akila G.; Gunatilake, Sameera R.; Ameer, Fathima S.; Gadogbe, Manuel; Smith, Laura; Mlsna, Deb; Zhang, Dongmao

    2015-01-01

    Three gold-nanoparticle (AuNP) undergraduate experiment modules that are focused on nanoparticles interfacial phenomena have been developed. Modules 1 and 2 explore the synthesis and characterization of AuNPs of different sizes but with the same total gold mass. These experiments enable students to determine how particle size affects the AuNP…

  18. Impedimetric investigation of gold nanoparticles - guanine modified electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vulcu, A.; Pruneanu, S.; Berghian-Grosan, C.; Olenic, L.; Muresan, L. M.; Barbu-Tudoran, L.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we report the preparation of a modified electrode with gold nanoparticles and guanine. The colloidal suspension of gold nanoparticles was obtained by Turkevich method and was next analyzed by UV-Vis spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The gold electrode was modified by self-assembling the gold nanoparticles with guanine, the organic molecule playing also the role of linker. The electrochemical characteristics of the bare and modified electrode were investigated by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). A theoretical model was developed based on an electrical equivalent circuit which contain solution resistance (Rs), charge transfer resistance (Rct), Warburg impedance (ZW) and double layer capacitance (Cdl).

  19. Green Chemistry Techniques for Gold Nanoparticles Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannavino, Sarah A.; King, Christy A.; Ferrara, Davon W.

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are often utilized in many technological and research applications ranging from the detection of tumors, molecular and biological sensors, and as nanoantennas to probe physical processes. As these applications move from the research laboratory to industrial settings, there is a need to develop efficient and sustainable synthesis techniques. Recent research has shown that several food products and beverages containing polyphenols, a common antioxidant, can be used as reducing agents in the synthesis of AuNPs in solution. In this study, we explore a variety of products to determine which allow for the most reproducible solution of nanoparticles based on the size and shapes of particles present. We analyzed the AuNPs solutions using extinction spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. We also develop a laboratory activity to introduce introductory chemistry and physics students to AuNP synthesis techniques and analysis.

  20. Synthesis of chitosan-stabilized gold nanoparticles by atmospheric plasma.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yong; Li, Zepeng; Hu, Lijuan; Shi, Xiaowen; Guan, Weimin; Du, Yumin

    2013-01-01

    We report a facile method to prepare gold nanoparticles by atmospheric plasma. Chitosan, was used as a stabilizing agent and gold precursor. In chitosan solution was reduced by atmospheric plasma at room temperature. We find the plasma treatment is effective for reducing the gold precursor and the process only takes minutes. The obtained gold nanoparticles were characterized with UV-vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The results indicated that the morphology and size distribution of gold nanoparticles prepared varied with treatment time and the ratio of chitosan to precursor metal salts. Additionally, a preliminary study on air component analysis indicated that the moisture in air plays an important role in producing the active ingredient for the production of gold nanoparticles.

  1. Silver and gold nanoparticles for sensor and antibacterial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindhu, M. R.; Umadevi, M.

    2014-07-01

    Green biogenic method for the synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles using Solanum lycopersicums extract as reducing agent was studied. The biomolecules present in the extract was responsible for reduction of Au3+ and Ag+ ions from HAuCl4 and AgNO3 respectively. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) technique to identify the size, shape of nanoparticles and biomolecules act as reducing agents. UV-visible spectra show the surface plasmon resonance peak at 546 nm and 445 nm corresponding to gold and silver nanoparticles respectively. Crystalline nature of the nanoparticles was evident from TEM images and XRD analysis. TEM images showed average size of 14 nm and 12 nm for prepared gold and silver nanoparticles respectively. FTIR analysis provides the presence of biomolecules responsible for the reduction and stability of the prepared silver and gold nanoparticles. XRD analysis of the silver and gold nanoparticles confirmed the formation of metallic silver and gold. The prepared gold and silver nanoparticles show good sensing and antimicrobial activity.

  2. Silver and gold nanoparticles for sensor and antibacterial applications.

    PubMed

    Bindhu, M R; Umadevi, M

    2014-07-15

    Green biogenic method for the synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles using Solanum lycopersicums extract as reducing agent was studied. The biomolecules present in the extract was responsible for reduction of Au(3+) and Ag(+) ions from HAuCl4 and AgNO3 respectively. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) technique to identify the size, shape of nanoparticles and biomolecules act as reducing agents. UV-visible spectra show the surface plasmon resonance peak at 546 nm and 445 nm corresponding to gold and silver nanoparticles respectively. Crystalline nature of the nanoparticles was evident from TEM images and XRD analysis. TEM images showed average size of 14 nm and 12 nm for prepared gold and silver nanoparticles respectively. FTIR analysis provides the presence of biomolecules responsible for the reduction and stability of the prepared silver and gold nanoparticles. XRD analysis of the silver and gold nanoparticles confirmed the formation of metallic silver and gold. The prepared gold and silver nanoparticles show good sensing and antimicrobial activity. PMID:24657466

  3. Synthesis and optical properties of colloidal gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Nguyen Ngoc; Van Vu, Le; Kiem, Chu Dinh; Cong Doanh, Sai; Thi Nguyet, Cao; Thi Hang, Pham; Duy Thien, Nguyen; Quynh, Luu Manh

    2009-09-01

    Colloidal gold nanoparticles (spheres) have been prepared from HAuCl4 containing aqueous solution by using X-ray irradiation and by chemical reduction method. Gold nanorods were synthesized according to the seed-mediated growth method. The colloidal gold nanoparticles were characterized by using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy. It was found that the concentration of the precursors affects the size of the nanoparticles. In the chemical reduction approach the size of nanoparticles can be controlled by varying amount of trisodium citrate, but in the photochemical method the size of nanoparticles can been controlled by varying the ratio of HAuCl4 to TX-100 and X-ray irradiation duration. Gold nanorods have been synthesized according to the seed-mediated growth method with two steps. The effect of silver acetate and CTAB on formation of gold nanorods has been studied.

  4. Facile Decoration of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes with Hetero-oligophenylene Stabilized-Gold Nanoparticles: Visible Light Photocatalytic Degradation of Rhodamine B Dye.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sharanjeet; Bhalla, Vandana; Kumar, Manoj

    2015-08-01

    A hetero-oligophenylene derivative 3 has been designed and synthesized which forms fluorescent spherical aggregates in mixed aqueous media due to its aggregation-induced emission enhancement characteristics. These fluorescent aggregates act as a ratiometric probe for the detection of gold ions in aqueous media and serve as reactors and stabilizers for the preparation of gold nanoparticles. The in situ generated gold nanoparticles have been decorated on multiwalled carbon nanotubes to form AuNPs@MWCNTs nanohybrid materials, which serve as recyclable photocatalysts for carrying out degradation of rhodamine dye in aqueous media.

  5. Kinetics of aggregation in liquids with dispersed nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jeżewski, Wojciech

    2015-04-14

    The process of attaching molecules of liquid media by dispersed nanoparticles is modeled and numerically studied. The growth rate of the resulting nanoparticle-induced aggregates is determined by assuming the preferential attachment rule according to which the effectiveness of the connection of a new molecular unit to aggregates is determined by their size. It is shown that, depending on a specific functional form of the growth rate, the size distribution of aggregates can display very different shapes, including various multimodal structures. This can explain experimentally obtained complex size distributions of inhomogeneous aggregates appearing as a consequence of the adsorption of molecules by nanoparticles or as a consequence of the self-assembling of active dispersants on surfaces of nanoparticles. The time evolution and the stationarity of the size distribution are also analyzed, gaining an insight into the long-time behavior of systems with dispersed nanoparticles. PMID:25745674

  6. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using Cinnamomum zeylanicum leaf broth.

    PubMed

    Smitha, S L; Philip, Daizy; Gopchandran, K G

    2009-10-15

    Development of biologically inspired experimental processes for the synthesis of nanoparticles is an important branch of nanotechnology. The synthesis of gold nanoparticles using Cinnamomum zeylanicum leaf broth as the reducing agent is reported. The morphology of the particles formed consists of a mixture of gold nanoprisms and spheres with fcc (111) structure of gold. At lower concentrations of the extract, formation of prism shaped Au particles dominates, while at higher concentrations almost spherical particles alone are observed. Good crystallinity of the nanoparticles with fcc phase is evident from XRD patterns, clear lattice fringes in the high resolution TEM image and bright circular rings in the SAED pattern. Au nanoparticles grown are observed to be photoluminescent and the intensity of photoemission is found to increase with increase in leaf broth concentration. The ability to modulate the shape of nanoparticles as observed in this study for gold nanoparticles opens up the exciting possibility of developing further synthetic routes employing ecofriendly sources.

  7. Simple colorimetric detection of doxycycline and oxytetracycline using unmodified gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Fan, Shumin; Li, Zhigang; Xie, Yuanzhe; Wang, Rui; Ge, Baoyu; Wu, Jing; Wang, Ruiyong

    2014-08-01

    The interaction between tetracycline antibiotics and gold nanoparticles was studied. With citrate-coated gold nanoparticles as colorimetric probe, a simple and rapid detection method for doxycycline and oxytetracycline has been developed. This method relies on the distance-dependent optical properties of gold nanoparticles. In weakly acidic buffer medium, doxycycline and oxytetracycline could rapidly induce the aggregation of gold nanoparticles, resulting in red-to-blue (or purple) colour change. The experimental parameters were optimized with regard to pH, the concentration of the gold nanoparticles and the reaction time. Under optimal experimental conditions, the linear range of the colorimetric sensor for doxycycline/oxytetracycline was 0.06-0.66 and 0.59-8.85 μg mL-1, respectively. The corresponding limit of detection for doxycycline and oxytetracycline was 0.0086 and 0.0838 μg mL-1, respectively. This assay was sensitive, selective, simple and readily used to detect tetracycline antibiotics in food products.

  8. Formation of gold nanoparticles by glycolipids of Lactobacillus casei

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Fumiya; Kato, Yugo; Furihata, Kazuo; Kogure, Toshihiro; Imura, Yuki; Yoshimura, Etsuro; Suzuki, Michio

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have particular properties distinct from those of bulk gold crystals, and such nanoparticles are used in various applications in optics, catalysis, and drug delivery. Many reports on microbial synthesis of gold nanoparticles have appeared. However, the molecular details (reduction and dispersion) of such synthesis remain unclear. In the present study, we studied gold nanoparticle synthesis by Lactobacillus casei. A comparison of L. casei components before and after addition of an auric acid solution showed that the level of unsaturated lipids decreased significantly after addition. NMR and mass spectrum analysis showed that the levels of diglycosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG) and triglycosyldiacylglycerol (TGDG) bearing unsaturated fatty acids were much reduced after formation of gold nanoparticles. DGDG purified from L. casei induced the synthesis of gold nanoparticles in vitro. These results suggested that glycolipids, such as DGDG, play important roles in reducing Au(III) to Au(0) and in ensuring that the nanoparticles synthesized remain small in size. Our work will lead to the development of novel, efficient methods by which gold nanoparticles may be produced by, and accumulated within, microorganisms. PMID:27725710

  9. Quantitative gold nanoparticle analysis methods: A review.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Andriola, Angelo

    2010-08-15

    Research and development in the area of gold nanoparticles' (AuNPs) preparation, characterization, and applications are burgeoning in recent years. Many of the techniques and protocols are very mature, but two major concerns are with the mass domestic production and the consumption of AuNP based products. First, how many AuNPs exist in a dispersion? Second, where are the AuNPs after digestion by the environment and how many are there? To answer these two questions, reliable and reproducible methods are needed to analyze the existence and the population of AuNP in samples. This review summarized the most recent chemical and particle quantitative analysis methods that have been used to characterize the concentration (in number of moles of gold per liter) or population (in number of particles per mL) of AuNPs. The methods summarized in this review include, mass spectroscopy, electroanalytical methods, spectroscopic methods, and particle counting methods. These methods may count the number of AuNP directly or analyze the total concentration of element gold in an AuNP dispersion.

  10. Photoswitchable NIR-Emitting Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bonacchi, Sara; Cantelli, Andrea; Battistelli, Giulia; Guidetti, Gloria; Calvaresi, Matteo; Manzi, Jeannette; Gabrielli, Luca; Ramadori, Federico; Gambarin, Alessandro; Mancin, Fabrizio; Montalti, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Photo-switching of the NIR emission of gold nanoparticles (GNP) upon photo-isomerization of azobenzene ligands, bound to the surface, is demonstrated. Photophysical results confirm the occurrence of an excitation energy transfer process from the ligands to the GNP that produces sensitized NIR emission. Because of this process, the excitation efficiency of the gold core, upon excitation of the ligands, is much higher for the trans form than for the cis one, and t→c photo-isomerization causes a relevant decrease of the GNP NIR emission. As a consequence, photo-isomerization can be monitored by ratiometric detection of the NIR emission upon dual excitation. The photo-isomerization process was followed in real-time through the simultaneous detection of absorbance and luminescence changes using a dedicated setup. Surprisingly, the photo-isomerization rate of the ligands, bound to the GNP surface, was the same as measured for the chromophores in solution. This outcome demonstrated that excitation energy transfer to gold assists photo-isomerization, rather than competing with it. These results pave the road to the development of new, NIR-emitting, stimuli-responsive nanomaterials for theranostics. PMID:27513299

  11. Adsorption of a Protein Monolayer via Hydrophobic Interactions Prevents Nanoparticle Aggregation under Harsh Environmental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez-Medina, Sergio; Blankenburg, Jan; Olson, Jana; Landes, Christy F.; Link, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    We find that citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles aggregate and precipitate in saline solutions below the NaCl concentration of many bodily fluids and blood plasma. Our experiments indicate that this is due to complexation of the citrate anions with Na+ cations in solution. A dramatically enhanced colloidal stability is achieved when bovine serum albumin is adsorbed to the gold nanoparticle surface, completely preventing nanoparticle aggregation under harsh environmental conditions where the NaCl concentration is well beyond the isotonic point. Furthermore, we explore the mechanism of the formation of this albumin ‘corona’ and find that monolayer protein adsorption is most likely ruled by hydrophobic interactions. As for many nanotechnology-based biomedical and environmental applications, particle aggregation and sedimentation are undesirable and could substantially increase the risk of toxicological side-effects, the formation of the BSA corona presented here provides a low-cost bio-compatible strategy for nanoparticle stabilization and transport in highly ionic environments. PMID:23914342

  12. Aggregation in charged nanoparticles solutions induced by different interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, S.; Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2016-05-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the aggregation of anionic silica nanoparticles as induced through different interactions. The nanoparticle aggregation is induced by addition of salt (NaCl), cationic protein (lysozyme) and non-ionic surfactant (C12E10) employing different kind of interactions. The results show that the interaction in presence of salt can be explained using DLVO theory whereas non-DLVO forces play important role for interaction of nanoparticles with protein and surfactant. The presence of salt screens the repulsion between charged nanoparticles giving rise to a net attraction in the DLVO potential. On the other hand, strong electrostatic attraction between nanoparticle and oppositely charged protein leads to protein-mediated nanoparticle aggregation. In case of non-ionic surfactant, the relatively long-range attractive depletion interaction is found to be responsible for the particle aggregation. Interestingly, the completely different interactions lead to similar kind of aggregate morphology. The nanoparticle aggregates formed are found to have mass fractal nature having a fractal dimension (~2.5) consistent with diffusion limited type of fractal morphology in all three cases.

  13. Reprotoxicity of gold, silver, and gold-silver alloy nanoparticles on mammalian gametes.

    PubMed

    Tiedemann, Daniela; Taylor, Ulrike; Rehbock, Christoph; Jakobi, Jurij; Klein, Sabine; Kues, Wilfried A; Barcikowski, Stephan; Rath, Detlef

    2014-03-01

    Metal and alloy nanoparticles are increasingly developed for biomedical applications, while a firm understanding of their biocompatibility is still missing. Various properties have been reported to influence the toxic potential of nanoparticles. This study aimed to assess the impact of nanoparticle size, surface ligands and chemical composition of gold, silver or gold-silver alloy nanoparticles on mammalian gametes. An in vitro assay for porcine gametes was developed, since these are delicate primary cells, for which well-established culture systems exist and functional parameters are defined. During coincubation with oocytes for 46 h neither any of the tested gold nanoparticles nor the gold-silver alloy particles with a silver molar fraction of up to 50% showed any impact on oocyte maturation. Alloy nanoparticles with 80% silver molar fraction and pure silver nanoparticles inhibited cumulus-oocyte maturation. Confocal microscopy revealed a selective uptake of gold nanoparticles by oocytes, while silver and alloy particles mainly accumulated in the cumulus cell layer surrounding the oocyte. Interestingly sperm vitality parameters (motility, membrane integrity and morphology) were not affected by any of the tested nanoparticles. Only sporadic association of nanoparticles with the sperm plasma membrane was found by transmission electron microscopy. In conclusion, mammalian oocytes were sensitive to silver containing nanoparticles. Likely, the delicate process of completing meiosis in maternal gametes features high vulnerability towards nanomaterial derived toxicity. The results imply that released Ag(+)-ions are responsible for the observed toxicity, but the compounding into an alloy seemed to alleviate the toxic effects to a certain extent.

  14. Toxicity of silver and gold nanoparticles on marine microalgae.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Garrido, Ignacio; Pérez, Sara; Blasco, Julián

    2015-10-01

    The increased use of nanomaterials in several novel industrial applications during the last decade has led to a rise in concerns about the potential toxic effects of released engineered nanoparticles (NPs) into the environment, as their potential toxicity to aquatic organisms is just beginning to be recognised. Toxicity of metallic nanoparticles to aquatic organisms, including microalgae, seems to be related to their physical and chemical properties, as well as their behaviour in the aquatic media where processes of dissolution, aggregation and agglomeration can occur. Although the production of these particles has increased considerably in recent years, data on their toxicity on microalgae, especially those belonging to marine or estuarine environments remain scarce and scattered. The literature shows a wide variation of results on toxicity, mainly due to the different methodology used in bioassays involving microalgae. These can range for up to EC50 data, in the case of AgNPs, representing five orders of magnitude. The importance of initial cellular density is also addressed in the text, as well as the need for keeping test conditions as close as possible to environmental conditions, in order to increase their environmental relevance. This review focuses on the fate and toxicity of silver, gold, and gold-silver alloy nanoparticles on microalgae, as key organisms in aquatic ecosystems. It is prompted by their increased production and use, and taking into account that oceans and estuaries are the final sink for those NPs. The design of bioassays and further research in the field of microalgae nanoecotoxicology is discussed, with a brief survey on newly developed technology of green (algae mediated) production of Ag, Au and Ag-Au bimetallic NPs, as well as some final considerations about future research on this field.

  15. Laser-targeted photofabrication of gold nanoparticles inside cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Nicholas I; Mochizuki, Kentaro; Niioka, Hirohiko; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Pavillon, Nicolas; Hobro, Alison J; Ando, Jun; Fujita, Katsumasa; Kumagai, Yutaro

    2014-10-09

    Nanoparticle manipulation is of increasing interest, since they can report single molecule-level measurements of the cellular environment. Until now, however, intracellular nanoparticle locations have been essentially uncontrollable. Here we show that by infusing a gold ion solution, focused laser light-induced photoreduction allows in situ fabrication of gold nanoparticles at precise locations. The resulting particles are pure gold nanocrystals, distributed throughout the laser focus at sizes ranging from 2 to 20 nm, and remain in place even after removing the gold solution. We demonstrate the spatial control by scanning a laser beam to write characters in gold inside a cell. Plasmonically enhanced molecular signals could be detected from nanoparticles, allowing their use as nano-chemical probes at targeted locations inside the cell, with intracellular molecular feedback. Such light-based control of the intracellular particle generation reaction also offers avenues for in situ plasmonic device creation in organic targets, and may eventually link optical and electron microscopy.

  16. GOLD NANOPARTICLES: A REVIVAL IN PRECIOUS METAL ADMINISTRATION TO PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Thakor, AS; Jokerst, J; Zaveleta, C; Massoud, TF; Gambhir, SS

    2011-01-01

    Gold has been used as a therapeutic agent to treat a wide variety of rheumatic diseases including psoriatic arthritis, juvenile arthritis and discoid lupus erythematosus. Although the use of gold has been largely superseded by newer drugs, gold nanoparticles are being used effectively in laboratory based clinical diagnostic methods whilst concurrently showing great promise in vivo either as a diagnostic imaging agent or a therapeutic agent. For these reasons, gold nanoparticles are therefore well placed to enter mainstream clinical practice in the near future. Hence, the present review summarizes the chemistry, pharmacokinetics, bio-distribution, metabolism and toxicity of bulk gold in humans based on decades of clinical observation and experiments in which gold was used to treat patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The beneficial attributes of gold nanoparticles, such as their ease of synthesis, functionalization and shape control are also highlighted demonstrating why gold nanoparticles are an attractive target for further development and optimization. The importance of controlling the size and shape of gold nanoparticles to minimize any potential toxic side effects is also discussed. PMID:21846107

  17. Multifunctional gold nanoparticles for diagnosis and therapy of disease

    PubMed Central

    Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have a number of physical properties that make them appealing for medical applications. For example, the attenuation of X-rays by gold nanoparticles has led to their use in computed tomography imaging and as adjuvants for radiotherapy. AuNPs have numerous other applications in imaging, therapy and diagnostic systems. The advanced state of synthetic chemistry of gold nanoparticles offers precise control over physicochemical and optical properties. Furthermore gold cores are inert and are considered to be biocompatible and non-toxic. The surface of gold nanoparticles can easily be modified for a specific application and ligands for targeting, drugs or biocompatible coatings can be introduced. AuNPs can be incorporated into larger structures such as polymeric nanoparticles or liposomes that deliver large payloads for enhanced diagnostic applications, efficiently encapsulate drugs for concurrent therapy or add additional imaging labels. This array of features has led to the afore-mentioned applications in biomedical fields, but more recently in approaches where multifunctional gold nanoparticles are used for multiple methods, such as concurrent diagnosis and therapy, so called theranostics. The following review covers basic principles and recent findings in gold nanoparticle applications for imaging, therapy and diagnostics, with a focus on reports of multifunctional AuNPs. PMID:23360440

  18. Gold nanoparticles in the engineering of antibacterial and anticoagulant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ehmann, Heike M A; Breitwieser, Doris; Winter, Sascha; Gspan, Christian; Koraimann, Günther; Maver, Uros; Sega, Marija; Köstler, Stefan; Stana-Kleinschek, Karin; Spirk, Stefan; Ribitsch, Volker

    2015-03-01

    Simultaneous antibacterial and anticoagulant surfaces have been prepared by immobilization of engineered gold nanoparticles onto different kinds of surfaces. The gold nanoparticle core is surrounded by a hemocompatible, anticoagulant polysaccharide, 6-O chitosan sulfate, which serves as reduction and stabilizing agent for the generation of gold nanoparticles in a microwave mediated reaction. The particle suspension shows anticoagulant activity, which is investigated by aPTT and PT testing on citrated blood samples of three patients suffering from congenital or acquired bleeding disorders. The amount of nanoparticles deposited on the surfaces is quantified by a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation unit. All gold containing surfaces exhibit excellent antimicrobial properties against the chosen model organism, Escherichia coli MG 1655 [R1-16]. Moreover, blood plasma coagulation times of the surfaces are increased after deposition of the engineered nanoparticles as demonstrated by QCM-D.

  19. Oligonucleotide-Functionalized Anisotropic Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Matthew Robert

    In this thesis, we describe the properties of oligonucleotide-functionalized gold colloids under the unique set of conditions where the particles are geometrically anisotropic and have nanometer-scale dimensions. While nearly two decades of previous work elucidated numerous unexpected and emergent phenomena arising from the combination of inorganic nanoparticles with surface-bound DNA strands, virtually nothing was known about how these properties are altered when the shape of the nanoparticle core is chosen to be non-spherical. In particular, we are interested in understanding, and ultimately controlling, the ways in which these DNA-conjugated anisotropic nanostructures interact when their attraction is governed by programmable DNA hybridization events. Chapter 1 introduces the field of DNA-based materials assembly by discussing how nanoscale building blocks which present rigid, directional interactions can be thought of as possessing artificial versions of the familiar chemical principles of "bonds" and "valency". In chapter 2 we explore the fundamental interparticle binding thermodynamics of DNA-functionalized spherical and anisotropic nanoparticles, which reveals enormous preferences for collective ligand interactions occurring between flat surfaces over those that occur between curved surfaces. Using these insights, chapter 3 demonstrates that when syntheses produce mixtures of different nanoparticle shapes, the tailorable nature of DNA-mediated interparticle association can be used to selectively crystallize and purify the desired anisotropic nanostructure products, leaving spherical impurity particles behind. Chapter 4 leverages the principle that the flat facets of anisotropic particles generate directional DNA-based hybridization interactions to assemble a variety of tailorable nanoparticle superlattices whose symmetry and dimensionality are a direct consequence of the shape of the nanoparticle building block used in their construction. Chapter 5 explores

  20. Multifunctional gold nanoparticles for photodynamic therapy of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaing Oo, Maung Kyaw

    As an important and growing branch of photomedicine, photodynamic therapy (PDT) is being increasingly employed in clinical applications particularly for the treatment of skin cancer. This dissertation focuses on the synthesis, characterization and deployment of gold nanoparticles for enhanced PDT of fibrosarcoma cancer cells. We have developed robust strategies and methods in fabrication of gold nanoparticles with positively- and negatively-tethered surface charges by photo-reduction of gold chloride salt using branched polyethyleneimine and sodium citrate respectively. An optimal concentration window of gold salt has been established to yield the most stable and monodispersed gold nanoparticles. 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA), a photosensitizing precursor, has been successfully conjugated on to positively charged gold nanoparticles through electrostatic interactions. The 5-ALA/gold nanoparticle conjugates are biocompatible and have shown to be preferably taken up by cancer cells. Subsequent light irradiation results in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cancer cells, leading to their destruction without adverse effects on normal fibroblasts. We have demonstrated for the first time that gold nanoparticles can enhance PDT efficacy by 50% compared to the treatment with 5-ALA alone. Collected evidence has strongly suggested that this enhancement stems from the elevated formation of ROS via the strongly localized electric field of gold nanoparticles. Through single cell imaging using surface-enhanced Raman scattering enabled by the very same gold nanoparticles, we have shown that multifunctionality of gold nanoparticles can be harvested concurrently for biomedical applications in general and for PDT in specific. In other words, gold nanoparticles can be used not only for targeted drug delivery and field-enhanced ROS formation, but also for monitoring cell destructions during PDT. Finally, our COMSOL Multiphysics simulation of the size-dependent electric

  1. Tetrahedron DNA dendrimers and their encapsulation of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tao; Wang, Yijie; Dong, Yuanchen; Chen, Chun; Liu, Dongsheng; Yang, Zhongqiang

    2014-08-15

    DNA dendrimers have achieved increasing attention recently. Previously reported DNA dendrimers used Y-DNA as monomers. Tetrahedron DNA is a rigid tetrahedral cage made of DNA. Herein, we use tetrahedron DNA as monomers to prepare tetrahedron DNA dendrimers. The prepared tetrahedron DNA dendrimers have larger size compared with those made of Y-DNA. In addition, thanks to the central cavity of tetrahedron DNA monomers, some nanoscale structures (e.g., gold nanoparticles) can be encapsulated within tetrahedron DNA monomers. Tetrahedron DNA encapsulated with gold nanoparticles can be further assembled into dendrimers, guiding gold nanoparticles into clusters.

  2. Gold mining for PDT: Great expectations from tiny nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gamaleia, Nikolai F; Shton, Irina O

    2015-06-01

    Among many and various products, born by the modern nanotechnology, gold nanoparticles roused a special interest of biomedical researchers. Unique features of the nanoparticles allow to use them not only as effective transporters for therapeutic agents but also as basic components of nanocomposite preparations intended for targeted photodynamic and photothermal therapy of tumours. In the review, physical, chemical and biological properties of gold nanoparticles which can promote PDT efficiency of a designed nanocomposite, are briefly characterized, and promising trends in creation of gold-containing composite photosensitizers are analysed.

  3. Effects of Soy Protein Nanoparticle Aggregate Size on the Viscoelastic Properties of Styrene-Butadiene Composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soy protein nanoparticle aggregates were prepared by alkaline hydrolysis of soy protein isolate (SPI). Light scattering measurements indicated a narrow size distribution of SPI aggregates. Nanocomposites were formed by mixing hydrolyzed SPI (HSPI) nanoparticle aggregates with styrene-butadiene (SB...

  4. Heparin assisted photochemical synthesis of gold nanoparticles and their performance as SERS substrates.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Torres, Maria del Pilar; Díaz-Torres, Luis Armando; Romero-Servin, Sergio

    2014-10-23

    Reactive and pharmaceutical-grade heparins were used as biologically compatible reducing and stabilizing agents to photochemically synthesize colloidal gold nanoparticles. Aggregates and anisotropic shapes were obtained photochemically under UV black-light lamp irradiation (λ = 366 nm). Heparin-functionalized gold nanoparticles were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The negatively charged colloids were used for the Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) analysis of differently charged analytes (dyes). Measurements of pH were taken to inspect how the acidity of the medium affects the colloid-analyte interaction. SERS spectra were taken by mixing the dyes and the colloidal solutions without further functionalization or addition of any aggregating agent.

  5. Heparin Assisted Photochemical Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles and Their Performance as SERS Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Torres, Maria del Pilar; Díaz-Torres, Luis Armando; Romero-Servin, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Reactive and pharmaceutical-grade heparins were used as biologically compatible reducing and stabilizing agents to photochemically synthesize colloidal gold nanoparticles. Aggregates and anisotropic shapes were obtained photochemically under UV black-light lamp irradiation (λ = 366 nm). Heparin-functionalized gold nanoparticles were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The negatively charged colloids were used for the Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) analysis of differently charged analytes (dyes). Measurements of pH were taken to inspect how the acidity of the medium affects the colloid-analyte interaction. SERS spectra were taken by mixing the dyes and the colloidal solutions without further functionalization or addition of any aggregating agent. PMID:25342319

  6. Gold Nanoparticle Conjugation Enhances the Antiacanthamoebic Effects of Chlorhexidine.

    PubMed

    Aqeel, Yousuf; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Anwar, Ayaz; Shah, Muhammad Raza; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2016-03-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is a serious infection with blinding consequences and often associated with contact lens wear. Early diagnosis, followed by aggressive topical application of drugs, is a prerequisite in successful treatment, but even then prognosis remains poor. Several drugs have shown promise, including chlorhexidine gluconate; however, host cell toxicity at physiologically relevant concentrations remains a challenge. Nanoparticles, subcolloidal structures ranging in size from 10 to 100 nm, are effective drug carriers for enhancing drug potency. The overall aim of the present study was to determine whether conjugation with gold nanoparticles enhances the antiacanthamoebic potential of chlorhexidine. Gold-conjugated chlorhexidine nanoparticles were synthesized. Briefly, gold solution was mixed with chlorhexidine and reduced by adding sodium borohydride, resulting in an intense deep red color, indicative of colloidal gold-conjugated chlorhexidine nanoparticles. The synthesis was confirmed using UV-visible spectrophotometry that shows a plasmon resonance peak of 500 to 550 nm, indicative of gold nanoparticles. Further characterization using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry showed a gold-conjugated chlorhexidine complex at m/z 699 ranging in size from 20 to 100 nm, as determined using atomic force microscopy. To determine the amoebicidal and amoebistatic effects, amoebae were incubated with gold-conjugated chlorhexidine nanoparticles. For controls, amoebae also were incubated with gold and silver nanoparticles alone, chlorhexidine alone, neomycin-conjugated nanoparticles, and neomycin alone. The findings showed that gold-conjugated chlorhexidine nanoparticles exhibited significant amoebicidal and amoebistatic effects at 5 μM. Amoebicidal effects were observed by parasite viability testing using a Trypan blue exclusion assay and flow-cytometric analysis using propidium iodide, while amoebistatic effects were observed using growth

  7. Gold Nanoparticle Conjugation Enhances the Antiacanthamoebic Effects of Chlorhexidine

    PubMed Central

    Aqeel, Yousuf; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Anwar, Ayaz; Shah, Muhammad Raza

    2015-01-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is a serious infection with blinding consequences and often associated with contact lens wear. Early diagnosis, followed by aggressive topical application of drugs, is a prerequisite in successful treatment, but even then prognosis remains poor. Several drugs have shown promise, including chlorhexidine gluconate; however, host cell toxicity at physiologically relevant concentrations remains a challenge. Nanoparticles, subcolloidal structures ranging in size from 10 to 100 nm, are effective drug carriers for enhancing drug potency. The overall aim of the present study was to determine whether conjugation with gold nanoparticles enhances the antiacanthamoebic potential of chlorhexidine. Gold-conjugated chlorhexidine nanoparticles were synthesized. Briefly, gold solution was mixed with chlorhexidine and reduced by adding sodium borohydride, resulting in an intense deep red color, indicative of colloidal gold-conjugated chlorhexidine nanoparticles. The synthesis was confirmed using UV-visible spectrophotometry that shows a plasmon resonance peak of 500 to 550 nm, indicative of gold nanoparticles. Further characterization using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry showed a gold-conjugated chlorhexidine complex at m/z 699 ranging in size from 20 to 100 nm, as determined using atomic force microscopy. To determine the amoebicidal and amoebistatic effects, amoebae were incubated with gold-conjugated chlorhexidine nanoparticles. For controls, amoebae also were incubated with gold and silver nanoparticles alone, chlorhexidine alone, neomycin-conjugated nanoparticles, and neomycin alone. The findings showed that gold-conjugated chlorhexidine nanoparticles exhibited significant amoebicidal and amoebistatic effects at 5 μM. Amoebicidal effects were observed by parasite viability testing using a Trypan blue exclusion assay and flow-cytometric analysis using propidium iodide, while amoebistatic effects were observed using growth

  8. Functionalization and Characterization of Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Techane, Sirnegeda D.

    2011-12-01

    Surface characterization of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is necessary to obtain a thorough understanding of the AuNP properties and ultimately realize their full potential in applications. The work described in this dissertation strives to the structure and composition of AuNPs using highly surface sensitive techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) in addition to the more widely used characterization techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and UV-VIS spectroscopy. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiols were used to modify AuNPs surfaces to create positively and negatively charged surfaces. Functionalization with carboxylic acid terminated alkanethiol SAMs (COON-SAMs) was first optimized to produce clean and stable negatively charged AuNPs. Using 14nm and 40nm diameter AuNPs in combination with C11 and C16 chain length COOH-SAMs, it was found that addition of NH4OH during functionalization coupled with dialysis purification produced AuNPs that did not aggregate and did not have unbound thiols. Effects of AuNP size and COOH-SAM chain lengths were studied using 14, 25 and 40nm average diameter AuNPs functionalized with C6, C8, C11 and C16 COOH-SAMs. Flat Au surfaces were also functionalized with the COOH-SAMs for comparison. It was shown that the 14nm AuNPs with C16 COOH-SAMs were the most stable and had crystalline-like, well-ordered SAM structures. The SAMs on the 40nm AuNPs had similar surface chemistry as the SAMs on the flat Au surfaces. The effective photoelectron take-off angle of the C16 COOH-SAM decreased when the size of the AuNP increased. It was also shown that when using Kratos AxisUltra DLD XPS instrument in the hybrid mode, it was important to consider effects of both the hybrid mode and the AuNPs curvature when calculating overlayer thickness of the SAMs on AuNPs. Using the Kratos in the electrostatic

  9. Gold nanoparticles: From nanomedicine to nanosensing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Po C; Mwakwari, Sandra C; Oyelere, Adegboyega K

    2008-01-01

    Because of their photo-optical distinctiveness and biocompatibility, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have proven to be powerful tools in various nanomedicinal and nanomedical applications. In this review article, we discuss recent advances in the application of AuNPs in diagnostic imaging, biosensing and binary cancer therapeutic techniques. We also provide an eclectic collection of AuNPs delivery strategies, including assorted classes of delivery vehicles, which are showing great promise in specific targeting of AuNPs to diseased tissues. However, successful clinical implementations of the promised applications of AuNPs are still hampered by many barriers. In particular, more still needs to be done regarding our understanding of the pharmacokinetics and toxicological profiles of AuNPs and AuNPs-conjugates. PMID:24198460

  10. Two-Dimensional Self-Assembly and Chemical Synthesis of Charged Gold Nanoparticles in Non-Polar Solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Matthew Nichols

    Gold nanoparticles between 1 and 10 nm in diameter exhibit size-dependent electronic and optical properties that cannot be explained by molecular science and which deviate significantly from their bulk counterparts. For example, the melting temperature of gold nanoparticles less than 5 nm in diameter is around 300 °C [1], whereas bulk gold melts at over 1000 °C [2]. Gold nanoparticles require precise control over particle diameter in order to exploit and tailor their unique properties; however, tuning the size reproducibly and predictably has proved to be a challenge. One of the most difficult obstacles to overcome is nanoparticle aggregation, since nanoparticles flocculate at room temperature quite readily. In 1994, Brust et al. solved the aggregation problem by introducing monolayer protection coatings on gold nanoparticles, in which organic ligand molecules are attached to the nanoparticle surface and create a physical barrier between the gold core and solvent. This was a definitive solution to size stability, since nanoparticles never aggregate, however the synthesis method does not generate monodisperse nanoparticles and has poor size-tuning capabilities. We developed a synthesis method for gold nanoparticles that improves greatly upon the Brust method. Starting from scratch, we discovered a "sweet zone" for aqueous gold nanoparticles, revealing how to make "naked" (stabilizer-free) gold nanoparticles which are continuously and precisely controlled between 3.2 and 5.2 nm in diameter, both reproducibly and predictably. Naked nanoparticles are then coated with organic 1-dodecanethiol ligand molecules, and transferred to hexane. Since all reaction byproducts remain in the water-phase, no postsynthesis cleaning or size-filtering is necessary, reducing the total synthesis time from ~24 hours in the Brust method, to less than 10 minutes. Surprisingly, our nanoparticles are highly negatively charged in nonpolar solvents. This unexpectedly caused nanoparticles to be

  11. Extracellular mycosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using Fusarium solani

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, K.; Arumugam, A.

    2014-08-01

    The development of eco-friendly methods for the synthesis of nanomaterial shape and size is an important area of research in the field of nanotechnology. The present investigation deals with the extracellular rapid biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using Fusarium solani culture filtrate. The UV-vis spectra of the fungal culture filtrate medium containing gold ion showed peak at 527 nm corresponding to the plasmon absorbance of gold nanoparticles. FTIR spectra provide an evidence for the presence of heterocyclic compound in the culture filtrate, which increases the stability of the synthesized gold nanoparticles. The X-ray analysis respects the Bragg's law and confirmed the crystalline nature of the gold nanoparticles. AFM analysis showed the results of particle sizes (41 nm). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the gold nanoparticles are spherical in shape with the size range from 20 to 50 nm. The use of F. solani will offer several advantages since it is considered as a non-human pathogenic organism. The fungus F. solani has a fast growth rate, rapid capacity of metallic ions reduction, NPs stabilization and facile and economical biomass handling. Extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles could be highly advantageous from the point of view of synthesis in large quantities, time consumption, eco-friendly, non-toxic and easy downstream processing.

  12. Optics of metal nanoparticle aggregates with light induced motion.

    PubMed

    Drachev, Vladimir P; Perminov, Sergey V; Rautian, Sergey G

    2007-07-01

    Light-induced forces between metal nanoparticles change the geometry of the aggregates and affect their optical properties. Light absorption, scattering and scattering of a probe beam are numerically studied with Newton's equations and the coupled dipole equations for penta-particle aggregates. The relative changes in optical responses are large compared with the linear, low-intensity limit and relatively fast with nanosecond characteristic times. Time and intensity dependencies are shown to be sensitive to the initial potential of the aggregation forces.

  13. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of gold nanoparticle conjugates with cefotaxime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titanova, Elena O.; Burygin, Gennady L.

    2016-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have attracted significant interest as a novel platform for various applications to nanobiotechnology and biomedicine. The conjugates of GNPs with antibiotics and antibodies were also used for selective photothermal killing of protozoa and bacteria. Also the conjugates of some antibiotics with GNPs decreased the number of bacterial growing cells. In this work was made the procedure optimization for conjugation of cefotaxime (a third-generation cephalosporin antibiotic) with GNPs (15 nm) and we examined the antimicrobial properties of this conjugate to bacteria culture of E. coli K-12. Addition of cefotaxime solution to colloidal gold does not change their color and extinction spectrum. For physiologically active concentration of cefotaxime (3 μg/mL), it was shown that the optimum pH for the conjugation was more than 9.5. A partial aggregation of the GNPs in saline medium was observed at pH 6.5-7.5. The optimum concentration of K2CO3 for conjugation cefotaxime with GNPs-15 was 5 mM. The optimum concentration of cefotaxime was at 0.36 μg/mL. We found the inhibition of the growth of E. coli K12 upon application cefotaxime-GNP conjugates.

  14. Ionic liquid-based stable nanofluids containing gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baogang; Wang, Xiaobo; Lou, Wenjing; Hao, Jingcheng

    2011-10-01

    A one-phase and/or two-phase method were used to prepare the stable ionic liquid-based nanofluids containing same volume fraction but different sizes or surface states of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and their thermal conductivities were investigated in more detail. Five significant experiment parameters, i.e. temperature, dispersion condition, particle size and surface state, and viscosity of base liquid, were evaluated to supply experimental explanations for heat transport mechanisms. The conspicuously temperature-dependent and greatly enhanced thermal conductivity under high temperatures verify that Brownian motion should be one key effect factor in the heat transport processes of ionic liquid-based gold nanofluids. While the positive influences of proper aggregation and the optimized particle size on their thermal conductivity enhancements under some specific conditions demonstrate that clustering may be another critical effect factor in heat transport processes. Moreover, the remarkable difference of the thermal conductivity enhancements of the nanofluids containing Au NPs with different surface states could be attributed to the surface state which has a strong correlation with not only Brownian motion but also clustering. Whilst the close relationship between their thermal conductivity enhancements and the viscosity of base liquid further indicate Brownian motion must occupy the leading position among various influencing factors. Finally, a promisingly synergistic effect of Brownian motion and clustering based on experimental clues and theoretical analyses was first proposed, justifying different mechanisms are sure related. The results may shed lights on comprehensive understanding of heat transport mechanisms in nanofluids.

  15. Silver, Gold, Palladium Nanoparticles: Ligand Design, Synthesis and Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Muhammad

    least stable, although dialkyl dithiophosphates bind as bi-dentate ligands and are most stable towards cyanide etching. In contrast, dialkyl dithiophosphinates show mixed mono- and bi-dentate binding that generates loosely packed monolayers of low degree of crystallinity. Another part of this thesis (Chapter 4 and 5) employs AuNPs and silver particles as fillers to improve the electrical and thermal conductivities of polyurethane composites. High anisotropic electrical conductivity of thin composite films are obtained after curing at unprecedentedly low gold contents, which is reasoned with the coagulation of AuNPs to conductive gold networks in domains of high concentration of AuNPs. Silver particles and flakes of sizes between 20 nm and 1.5 micron were dispersed in polyurethane to investigate the effect of their size, morphology, aggregation, and dispersion on the thermal conductivity of the composites. Unexpectedly, composites filled with micron sized silver particles outperformed those filled with silver nanoparticles in thermal conductivity and stability. Finally, PdNPs were synthesized in the presence of thiolate ligands of different conical bulk (single phase surfactant free approach) to study the influence of the different ligands on their size (Chapter 6). No systematic effect was observed in contrast to a similar study on AuNPs, which is reasoned with a weaker binding of ligands to the Pd surface.

  16. A Renewable Electrochemical Magnetic Immunosensor Based on Gold Nanoparticle Labels

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2005-05-24

    A particle-based renewable electrochemical magnetic immunosensor was developed by using magnetic beads and a gold nanoparticle label. Anti-IgG antibody-modified magnetic beads were attached to a renewable carbon paste transducer surface by magnets that were fixed inside the sensor. A gold nanoparticle label was capsulated to the surface of magnetic beads by sandwich immunoassay. Highly sensitive electrochemical stripping analysis offers a simple and fast method to quantify the capatured gold nanoparticle tracer and avoid the use of an enzyme label and substrate. The stripping signal of gold nanoparticle is related to the concentration of target IgG in the sample solution. A transmission electron microscopy image shows that the gold nanoparticles were successfully capsulated to the surface of magnetic beads through sandwich immunoreaction events. The parameters of immunoassay, including the loading of magnetic beads, the amount of gold nanoparticle conjugate, and the immunoreaction time, were optimized. The detection limit of 0.02 μg ml-1of IgG was obtained under optimum experimental conditions. Such particle-based electrochemical magnetic immunosensors could be readily used for simultaneous parallel detection of multiple proteins by using multiple inorganic metal nanoparticle tracers and are expected to open new opportunities for disease diagnostics and biosecurity.

  17. Modelling encapsulation of gold and silver nanoparticles inside lipid nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baowan, Duangkamon; Thamwattana, Ngamta

    2014-02-01

    Lipid nanotubes are of particular interest for use as a template to create various one-dimensional nanostructures and as a carrier for drug and gene delivery. Understanding the encapsulation process is therefore crucial for such development. This paper models the interactions between lipid nanotubes and spheres of gold and silver nanoparticles and determines the critical dimension of lipid nanotubes that maximises the interaction with the nanoparticles. Our results confirm the acceptance of gold and silver nanoparticles inside lipid nanotubes. Further, we find that the lipid nanotube of radius approximately 10.23 nm is most favourable to encapsulate both types of nanoparticles.

  18. Exploitation of marine bacteria for production of gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have found wide range of applications in electronics, biomedical engineering, and chemistry owing to their exceptional opto-electrical properties. Biological synthesis of gold nanoparticles by using plant extracts and microbes have received profound interest in recent times owing to their potential to produce nanoparticles with varied shape, size and morphology. Marine microorganisms are unique to tolerate high salt concentration and can evade toxicity of different metal ions. However, these marine microbes are not sufficiently explored for their capability of metal nanoparticle synthesis. Although, marine water is one of the richest sources of gold in the nature, however, there is no significant publication regarding utilization of marine micro-organisms to produce gold nanoparticles. Therefore, there might be a possibility of exploring marine bacteria as nanofactories for AuNP biosynthesis. Results In the present study, marine bacteria are exploited towards their capability of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) production. Stable, monodisperse AuNP formation with around 10 nm dimension occur upon exposure of HAuCl4 solution to whole cells of a novel strain of Marinobacter pelagius, as characterized by polyphasic taxonomy. Nanoparticles synthesized are characterized by Transmission electron microscopy, Dynamic light scattering and UV-visible spectroscopy. Conclusion The potential of marine organisms in biosynthesis of AuNPs are still relatively unexplored. Although, there are few reports of gold nanoparticles production using marine sponges and sea weeds however, there is no report on the production of gold nanoparticles using marine bacteria. The present work highlighted the possibility of using the marine bacterial strain of Marinobacter pelagius to achieve a fast rate of nanoparticles synthesis which may be of high interest for future process development of AuNPs. This is the first report of AuNP synthesis by marine bacteria

  19. Impact of multivalent charge presentation on peptide–nanoparticle aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Schöne, Daniel; Schade, Boris; Böttcher, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Summary Strategies to achieve controlled nanoparticle aggregation have gained much interest, due to the versatility of such systems and their applications in materials science and medicine. In this article we demonstrate that coiled-coil peptide-induced aggregation based on electrostatic interactions is highly sensitive to the length of the peptide as well as the number of presented charges. The quaternary structure of the peptide was found to play an important role in aggregation kinetics. Furthermore, we show that the presence of peptide fibers leads to well-defined nanoparticle assembly on the surface of these macrostructures. PMID:26124881

  20. Synthesis, capping and binding of colloidal gold nanoparticles to proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nghiem, Thi Ha Lien; Huyen La, Thi; Hoa Vu, Xuan; Chu, Viet Ha; Hai Nguyen, Thanh; Huan Le, Quang; Fort, Emmanuel; Hoa Do, Quang; Nhung Tran, Hong

    2010-06-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as a stabilizing agent and biofunctionalized layer for water-dispersed gold nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized from metal precursor HAuCl4. The BSA binding to gold NPs was characterized qualitatively and quantitatively by transmission electron microscopy, UV-VIS and FTIR spectrophotometers. HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) specific phage antibodies were attached to BSA stabilized gold NPs to form a gold-antibody complex. An ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) test was done to confirm the bioactivity of antibodies attached to gold NPs.

  1. Highly sensitive homogenous chemiluminescence immunoassay using gold nanoparticles as label

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jing; Cui, Xiang; Liu, Wei; Li, Baoxin

    2014-10-01

    Homogeneous immunoassay is becoming more and more attractive for modern medical diagnosis because it is superior to heterogeneous immunoassay in sample and reagent consumption, analysis time, portability and disposability. Herein, a universal platform for homogeneous immunoassay, using human immunoglobulin G (IgG) as a model analyte, has been developed. This assay relies upon the catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on luminol-AgNO3 chemiluminescence (CL) reaction. The immunoreaction of antigen and antibody can induce the aggregation of antibody-functionalized AuNPs, and after aggregation the catalytic activity of AuNPs on luminol-AgNO3 CL reaction is greatly enhanced. Without any separation steps, a CL signal is generated upon addition of a trigger solution, and the CL intensity is directly correlated to the quantity of IgG. The detection limit of IgG was estimated to be as low as 3 pg/mL, and the sensitivity was better than that of the reported AuNPs-based CL immunoassay for IgG.

  2. Theranostic potential of gold nanoparticle-protein agglomerates.

    PubMed

    Sanpui, Pallab; Paul, Anumita; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2015-11-28

    Owing to the ever-increasing applications, glittered with astonishing success of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) in biomedical research as diagnostic and therapeutic agents, the study of Au NP-protein interaction seems critical for maximizing their theranostic efficiency, and thus demands comprehensive understanding. The mutual interaction of Au NPs and proteins at physiological conditions may result in the aggregation of protein, which can ultimately lead to the formation of Au NP-protein agglomerates. In the present article, we try to appreciate the plausible steps involved in the Au NP-induced aggregation of proteins and also the importance of the proteins' three-dimensional structures in the process. The Au NP-protein agglomerates can potentially be exploited for efficient loading and subsequent release of various therapeutically important molecules, including anticancer drugs, with the unique opportunity of incorporating hydrophilic as well as hydrophobic drugs in the same nanocarrier system. Moreover, the Au NP-protein agglomerates can act as 'self-diagnostic' systems, allowing investigation of the conformational state of the associated protein(s) as well as the protein-protein or protein-Au NP interaction within the agglomerates. Furthermore, the potential of these Au NP-protein agglomerates as a novel platform for multifunctional theranostic application along with exciting future-possibilities is highlighted here. PMID:26508277

  3. Gold nanoparticles assembled with dithiocarbamate-anchored molecular wires.

    PubMed

    Reeler, Nini E A; Lerstrup, Knud A; Somerville, Walter; Speder, Jozsef; Petersen, Søren V; Laursen, Bo W; Arenz, Matthias; Qiu, Xiaohui; Vosch, Tom; Nørgaard, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    A protocol for the bottom-up self-assembly of nanogaps is developed through molecular linking of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Two π-conjugated oligo(phenylene ethynylene) molecules (OPE) with dithiocarbamate anchoring groups are used as ligands for the AuNPs. OPE-4S with a dithiocarbamate in each end of the molecule and a reference molecule OPE-2S with only a single dithiocarbamate end group. The linking mechanism of OPE-4S is investigated by using a combination of TEM, UV-Vis absorption and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as well as studying the effect of varying the OPE-4S to AuNP concentration ratio. UV-Vis absorption confirms the formation of AuNP aggregates by the appearance of an extended plasmon band (EPB) for which the red shift and intensity depend on the OPE-4S:AuNP ratio. SERS confirms the presence of OPE-4S and shows a gradual increase of the signal intensity with increasing OPE-4S:AuNP ratios up to a ratio of about 4000, after which the SERS intensity does not increase significantly. For OPE-2S, no linking is observed below full coverage of the AuNPs indicating that the observed aggregate formation at high OPE-2S:AuNP ratios, above full AuNP coverage, is most likely of a physical nature (van der Waals forces or π-π interactions). PMID:26471461

  4. Gold nanoparticles assembled with dithiocarbamate-anchored molecular wires

    PubMed Central

    Reeler, Nini E. A.; Lerstrup, Knud A.; Somerville, Walter; Speder, Jozsef; Petersen, Søren V.; Laursen, Bo W.; Arenz, Matthias; Qiu, Xiaohui; Vosch, Tom; Nørgaard, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    A protocol for the bottom-up self-assembly of nanogaps is developed through molecular linking of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Two π-conjugated oligo(phenylene ethynylene) molecules (OPE) with dithiocarbamate anchoring groups are used as ligands for the AuNPs. OPE-4S with a dithiocarbamate in each end of the molecule and a reference molecule OPE-2S with only a single dithiocarbamate end group. The linking mechanism of OPE-4S is investigated by using a combination of TEM, UV-Vis absorption and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as well as studying the effect of varying the OPE-4S to AuNP concentration ratio. UV-Vis absorption confirms the formation of AuNP aggregates by the appearance of an extended plasmon band (EPB) for which the red shift and intensity depend on the OPE-4S:AuNP ratio. SERS confirms the presence of OPE-4S and shows a gradual increase of the signal intensity with increasing OPE-4S:AuNP ratios up to a ratio of about 4000, after which the SERS intensity does not increase significantly. For OPE-2S, no linking is observed below full coverage of the AuNPs indicating that the observed aggregate formation at high OPE-2S:AuNP ratios, above full AuNP coverage, is most likely of a physical nature (van der Waals forces or π-π interactions). PMID:26471461

  5. Theranostic potential of gold nanoparticle-protein agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanpui, Pallab; Paul, Anumita; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2015-11-01

    Owing to the ever-increasing applications, glittered with astonishing success of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) in biomedical research as diagnostic and therapeutic agents, the study of Au NP-protein interaction seems critical for maximizing their theranostic efficiency, and thus demands comprehensive understanding. The mutual interaction of Au NPs and proteins at physiological conditions may result in the aggregation of protein, which can ultimately lead to the formation of Au NP-protein agglomerates. In the present article, we try to appreciate the plausible steps involved in the Au NP-induced aggregation of proteins and also the importance of the proteins' three-dimensional structures in the process. The Au NP-protein agglomerates can potentially be exploited for efficient loading and subsequent release of various therapeutically important molecules, including anticancer drugs, with the unique opportunity of incorporating hydrophilic as well as hydrophobic drugs in the same nanocarrier system. Moreover, the Au NP-protein agglomerates can act as `self-diagnostic' systems, allowing investigation of the conformational state of the associated protein(s) as well as the protein-protein or protein-Au NP interaction within the agglomerates. Furthermore, the potential of these Au NP-protein agglomerates as a novel platform for multifunctional theranostic application along with exciting future-possibilities is highlighted here.

  6. Colloidal stability of zwitterionic polymer-grafted gold nanoparticles in water.

    PubMed

    Durand-Gasselin, Céline; Koerin, Régis; Rieger, Jutta; Lequeux, Nicolas; Sanson, Nicolas

    2014-11-15

    We investigate the colloidal stability of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) coated with zwitterionic sulfobetaine polymers in aqueous solution. Zwitterionic polymers with different molar masses, synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of N,N'-dimethyl(methacrylamido propyl)ammonium propanesulfonate (SPP) exhibit a well known Upper Critical Solution Temperature (UCST) in water, i.e., phase separate at low temperature. The colloidal stability of gold nanoparticles grafted with PSPP was studied as a function of the temperature. The effects of the molar mass of the grafted polymers, the salt concentration, and the presence of free polymer chains in solution were investigated. UV-vis spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering measurements show that whatever the molar mass of the grafted polymer, the nanoparticles never aggregate at low temperature in pure water. However, a reversible thermal-driven aggregation process of the gold nanoparticles is observed in presence of free polymer chains in solution and explained by a depletion process. PMID:25203910

  7. Glutathione-facilitated design and fabrication of gold nanoparticle-based logic gates and keypad lock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhenzhen; Wang, Haonan; Yang, Wensheng

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we describe how we developed a simple design and fabrication method for logic gates and a device by using a commercially available tripeptide, namely glutathione (GSH), together with metal ions and disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) to control the dispersion and aggregation of gold nanoparticles (NPs). With the fast adsorption of GSH on gold NPs and the strong coordination of GSH with metal ions, the addition of GSH and Pb2+ ions immediately resulted in the aggregation of gold NPs, giving rise to an AND function. Either Pb2+ or Ba2+ ions induced the aggregation of gold NPs in the presence of GSH, supporting an OR gate. Based on the fact that EDTA has a strong capacity to bind metal ions, thus preventing the aggregation of gold NPs, an INHIBIT gate was also fabricated. More interestingly, we found that the addition sequence of GSH and Hg2+ ions influenced the aggregation of gold NPs in a controlled manner, which was used to design a sequential logic gate and a three-input keypad lock for potential use in information security. The GSH strategy addresses concerns of low cost, simple fabrication, versatile design and easy operation, and offers a promising platform for the development of functional logic systems.In this paper, we describe how we developed a simple design and fabrication method for logic gates and a device by using a commercially available tripeptide, namely glutathione (GSH), together with metal ions and disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) to control the dispersion and aggregation of gold nanoparticles (NPs). With the fast adsorption of GSH on gold NPs and the strong coordination of GSH with metal ions, the addition of GSH and Pb2+ ions immediately resulted in the aggregation of gold NPs, giving rise to an AND function. Either Pb2+ or Ba2+ ions induced the aggregation of gold NPs in the presence of GSH, supporting an OR gate. Based on the fact that EDTA has a strong capacity to bind metal ions, thus preventing the

  8. Self assembled nanoparticle aggregates from line focused femtosecond laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Zuhlke, Craig A; Alexander, Dennis R; Bruce, John C; Ianno, Natale J; Kamler, Chad A; Yang, Weiqing

    2010-03-01

    In this paper we present the use of a line focused femtosecond laser beam that is rastered across a 2024 T3 aluminum surface to produce nanoparticles that self assemble into 5-60 micron diameter domed and in some cases sphere-shaped aggregate structures. Each time the laser is rastered over initial aggregates their diameter increases as new layers of nanoparticles self assemble on the surface. The aggregates are thus composed of layers of particles forming discrete layered shells inside of them. When micron size aggregates are removed, using an ultrasonic bath, rings are revealed that have been permanently formed in the sample surface. These rings appear underneath, and extend beyond the physical boundary of the aggregates. The surface is blackened by the formation of these structures and exhibits high light absorption. PMID:20389444

  9. Single-point mutation detection in RNA extracts using gold nanoparticles modified with hydrophobic molecular beacon-like structures.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Alfonso; Posch, Christian; Garcimartín, Yolanda; Ortiz-Urda, Susana; Somoza, Álvaro

    2014-03-21

    Gold nanoparticles functionalized with oligonucleotides that bear a cholesterol group are used as gene sensors. The hydrophobic molecule is buried inside the nanostructure but when the complementary RNA sequence is present the structure unfolds exposing the cholesterol group to the water molecules. This rearrangement leads to the aggregation of the nanostructures.

  10. Chemically functionalized gold nanoparticles: Synthesis, characterization, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Weston Lewis

    This thesis focuses on the development and application of gold nanoparticle based detection systems and biomimetic structures. Each class of modified nanoparticle has properties that are defined by its chemical moieties that interface with solution and the gold nanoparticle core. In Chapter 2, a comparison of the biomolecular composition and binding properties of various preparations of antibody oligonucleotide gold nanoparticle conjugates is presented. These constructs differed significantly in terms of their structure and binding properties. Chapter 3 reports the use of electroless gold deposition as a light scattering signal enhancer in a multiplexed, microarray-based scanometric immunoassay using the gold nanoparticle probes evaluated in Chapter 2. The use of gold development results in greater signal enhancement than the typical silver development, and multiple rounds of metal development were found to increase the resulting signal compared to one development. Chapter 4 describes an amplified scanometric detection method for human telomerase activity. Gold nanoparticles functionalized with specific oligonucleotide sequences can efficiently capture telomerase enzymes and subsequently be elongated. Both the elongated and unmodified oligonucleotide sequences are simultaneously measured. At low telomerase concentrations, elongated strands cannot be detected, but the unmodified sequences, which come from the same probe particles, can be detected because their concentration is higher, providing a novel form of amplification. Chapter 5 reports the development of a novel colorimetric nitrite and nitrate ion assay based upon gold nanoparticle probes functionalized with Griess reaction reagents. This assay takes advantage of the distance-dependent plasmonic properties of the gold nanoparticles and the ability of nitrite ion to facilitate the cross coupling of novel nanoparticle probes. The assay works on the concept of a kinetic end point and can be triggered at the EPA

  11. Controlling the Shape and Crystallinity of Gold and Silver Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Personick, Michelle Louise

    The strong dependence of the optical, electronic, and catalytic properties of noble metal nanoparticles on their shape has necessitated the high-yield synthesis of gold and silver nanostructures with precisely defined morphologies. This directed synthesis requires a detailed mechanistic understanding of the chemical and physical factors which control nanoparticle shape; however, these mechanistic explanations are still incomplete. To this end, the work of this dissertation seeks to enhance the understanding of nanoparticle growth on a mechanistic level, while also developing synthetic methods for producing novel nanoparticle shapes. Chapter 1 describes the state of the art in shape-controlled noble metal nanoparticle synthesis prior to the work conducted in this dissertation. In Chapter 2, a method is reported for synthesizing {110}-faceted bipyramids and rhombic dodecahedra, in which the combination of a chloride-containing surfactant and a low concentration of silver ions leads to the stabilization of the {110} facets. Chapter 3 explores in mechanistic detail the use of silver underpotential deposition to control particle growth in the synthesis of four gold nanoparticle shapes: octahedra, rhombic dodecahedra, truncated ditetragonal prisms, and concave cubes. This mechanistic understanding is expanded in Chapter 4, where the independent and synergistic roles of silver ions and halide ions in the seed-mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles are systematically probed, culminating in a set of design considerations for controlling the shape of gold nanoparticles. Chapter 5 investigates the role of excitation wavelength in controlling the rate of silver ion reduction in the plasmon-mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles and describes the synthesis of silver cubes with an unusual twinning structure. Finally, Chapter 6 combines the mechanistic insights gained in Chapters 2-5 to address a standing challenge in shape-controlled gold nanoparticle synthesis: the direct

  12. Linking gold nanoparticles with conductive 1,4-phenylene diisocyanide-gold oligomers.

    PubMed

    Kestell, John; Abuflaha, Rasha; Boscoboinik, J Anibal; Bai, Yun; Bennett, Dennis W; Tysoe, Wilfred T

    2013-02-18

    It is demonstrated that 1,4-phenylene diisocyanide (PDI)-gold oligomers can spontaneously bridge between gold nanoparticles on mica, thereby providing a strategy for electrically interconnecting nanoelectrodes. The barrier height of the bridging oligomer is 0.10 ± 0.02 eV, within the range of previous single-molecule measurements of PDI.

  13. Multiple morphologies of gold-magnetite heterostructure nanoparticles are effectively functionalized with protein for cell targeting.

    PubMed

    Krystofiak, Evan S; Mattson, Eric C; Voyles, Paul M; Hirschmugl, Carol J; Albrecht, Ralph M; Gajdardziska-Josifovska, Marija; Oliver, Julie A

    2013-08-01

    Nanoparticles composed of a magnetic iron oxide core surrounded by a metal shell have utility in a broad range of biomedical applications. However, the presence of surface energy differences between the two components makes wetting of oxide with metal unfavorable, precluding a "core-shell" structure of an oxide core completely surrounded by a thin metal shell. Three-dimensional island growth followed by island coalescence into thick shells is favored over the two-dimensional layer-by-layer growth of a thin, continuous metal coating of a true core-shell. Aqueous synthesis of gold-coated magnetite nanoparticles with analysis by infrared, energy-dispersive X-ray, and electron energy loss spectroscopies; high-resolution transmission electron microscopy; selected area electron diffraction; and high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy showed two distinct morphologies that are inconsistent with an idealized core-shell. The majority were isolated ~16-22-nm-diameter nanoparticles consisting of ~7-nm-diameter magnetite and a thick deposition of gold, most often discontinuous, with some potentially "sandwiched" morphologies. A minority were aggregates of agglomerated magnetite decorated with gold but displaying significant bare magnetite. Both populations were successfully conjugated to fibrinogen and targeted to surface-activated platelets, demonstrating that iron oxide-gold nanoparticles produced by aqueous synthesis do not require an ideal core-shell structure for biological activity in cell labeling and targeting applications.

  14. Gold nanoparticle based label-free SERS probe for ultrasensitive and selective detection of trinitrotoluene.

    PubMed

    Dasary, Samuel S R; Singh, Anant Kumar; Senapati, Dulal; Yu, Hongtao; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2009-09-30

    TNT is one of the most commonly used nitro aromatic explosives used for landmine and military purpose. Due to the significant detrimental effects, contamination of soil and groundwater with TNT is the major concern. Driven by the need to detect trace amounts of TNT from environmental samples, this article demonstrates for the first time a highly selective and ultra sensitive, cysteine modified gold nanoparticle based label-free surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) probe, for TNT recognition in 2 pico molar (pM) level in aqueous solution. Due to the formation of Meisenheimer complex between TNT and cysteine, gold nanoparticles undergo aggregation in the presence of TNT via electrostatic interaction between Meisenheimer complex bound gold nanoparticle and cysteine modified gold nanoparticle. As a result, it formed several hot spots and provided a significant enhancement of the Raman signal intensity by 9 orders of magnitude through electromagnetic field enhancements. A detailed mechanism for termendous SERS intensity change has been discussed. Our experimental results show that TNT can be detected quickly and accurately without any dye tagging in lower pM level with excellent discrimination against other nitro compounds and heavy metals.

  15. Aggregation kinetics and dissolution of coated silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Lenhart, John J; Walker, Harold W

    2012-01-17

    Determining the fate of manufactured nanomaterials in the environment is contingent upon understanding how stabilizing agents influence the stability of nanoparticles in aqueous systems. In this study, the aggregation and dissolution tendencies of uncoated silver nanoparticles and the same particles coated with three common coating agents, trisodium citrate, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and Tween 80 (Tween), were evaluated. Early stage aggregation kinetics of the uncoated and coated silver nanoparticles were assessed by dynamic light scattering over a range of electrolyte types (NaCl, NaNO(3), and CaCl(2)) and concentrations that span those observed in natural waters. Although particle dissolution was observed, aggregation of all particle types was still consistent with classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. The aggregation of citrate-coated particles and SDS-coated particles were very similar to that for the uncoated particles, as the critical coagulation concentrations (CCC) of the particles in different electrolytes were all approximately the same (40 mM NaCl, 30 mM NaNO(3), and 2 mM CaCl(2)). The Tween-stabilized particles were significantly more stable than the other particles, however, and in NaNO(3) aggregation was not observed up to an electrolyte concentration of 1 M. Differences in the rate of aggregation under diffusion-limited aggregation conditions at high electrolyte concentrations for the SDS and Tween-coated particles, in combination with the moderation of their electrophoretic mobilities, suggest SDS and Tween imparted steric interactions to the particles. The dissolution of the silver nanoparticles was inhibited by the SDS and Tween coatings, but not by the citrate coating, and in chloride-containing electrolytes a secondary precipitate of AgCl was observed bridging the individual particles. These results indicate that coating agents could significant influence the fate of silver nanoparticles in aquatic systems, and in some

  16. Tea-bag-like polymer nanoreactors filled with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mitschang, Fabian; Schmalz, Holger; Agarwal, Seema; Greiner, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Gold-containing polymer nanotubes, which showed both catalytic activity and resistance to leaching, were prepared by the "tubes by fiber templates" (TUFT) process. For this purpose, electrospun polymer nonwovens with incorporated poly(L-lactide)-stabilized gold nanoparticles were coated with poly(p-xylylene) by the chemical vapor deposition process, and then the inner fiber templates were removed. The resulting polymer tubes carried encapsulated gold nanoparticles which were shown to be immobilized and featured pronounced catalytic activity towards the hydrolytic oxidation of dimethylphenylsilane and the alcoholysis of dimethylphenylsilane with n-butanol. The macroscopic nonwovens could be used as tea-bag-like catalyst systems and showed excellent reusability.

  17. Using femtosecond lasers to modify sizes of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Cordeiro, Thiago; Almeida de Matos, Ricardo; Silva, Flávia Rodrigues de Oliveira; Vieira, Nilson D.; Courrol, Lilia C.; Samad, Ricardo E.

    2016-04-01

    Metallic nanoparticles are important on several scientific, medical and industrial areas. The control of nanoparticles characteristics has fundamental importance to increase the efficiency on the processes and applications in which they are employed. The metallic nanoparticles present specific surface plasmon resonances (SPR). These resonances are related with the collective oscillations of the electrons presents on the metallic nanoparticle. The SPR is determined by the potential defined by the nanoparticle size and geometry. There are several methods of producing gold nanoparticles, including the use of toxic chemical polymers. We already reported the use of natural polymers, as for example, the agar-agar, to produce metallic nanoparticles under xenon lamp irradiation. This technique is characterized as a "green" synthesis because the natural polymers are inoffensive to the environment. We report a technique to produce metallic nanoparticles and change its geometrical and dimensional characteristics using a femtosecond laser. The 1 ml initial solution was irradiate using a laser beam with 380 mW, 1 kHz and 40 nm of bandwidth centered at 800 nm. The setup uses an Acousto-optic modulator, Dazzler, to change the pulses spectral profiles by introduction of several orders of phase, resulting in different temporal energy distributions. The use of Dazzler has the objective of change the gold nanoparticles average size by the changing of temporal energy distributions of the laser pulses incident in the sample. After the laser irradiation, the gold nanoparticles average diameter were less than 15 nm.

  18. How Do the Size, Charge and Shape of Nanoparticles Affect Amyloid β Aggregation on Brain Lipid Bilayer?

    PubMed

    Kim, Yuna; Park, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Hyojin; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the effect of the size, shape, and surface charge of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) on amyloid beta (Aβ) aggregation on a total brain lipid-based supported lipid bilayer (brain SLB), a fluid platform that facilitates Aβ-AuNP aggregation process. We found that larger AuNPs induce large and amorphous aggregates on the brain SLB, whereas smaller AuNPs induce protofibrillar Aβ structures. Positively charged AuNPs were more strongly attracted to Aβ than negatively charged AuNPs, and the stronger interactions between AuNPs and Aβ resulted in fewer β-sheets and more random coil structures. We also compared spherical AuNPs, gold nanorods (AuNRs), and gold nanocubes (AuNCs) to study the effect of nanoparticle shape on Aβ aggregation on the brain SLB. Aβ was preferentially bound to the long axis of AuNRs and fewer fibrils were formed whereas all the facets of AuNCs interacted with Aβ to produce the fibril networks. Finally, it was revealed that different nanostructures induce different cytotoxicity on neuroblastoma cells, and, overall, smaller Aβ aggregates induce higher cytotoxicity. The results offer insight into the roles of NPs and brain SLB in Aβ aggregation on the cell membrane and can facilitate the understanding of Aβ-nanostructure co-aggregation mechanism and tuning Aβ aggregate structures. PMID:26782664

  19. How Do the Size, Charge and Shape of Nanoparticles Affect Amyloid β Aggregation on Brain Lipid Bilayer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yuna; Park, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Hyojin; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the effect of the size, shape, and surface charge of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) on amyloid beta (Aβ) aggregation on a total brain lipid-based supported lipid bilayer (brain SLB), a fluid platform that facilitates Aβ-AuNP aggregation process. We found that larger AuNPs induce large and amorphous aggregates on the brain SLB, whereas smaller AuNPs induce protofibrillar Aβ structures. Positively charged AuNPs were more strongly attracted to Aβ than negatively charged AuNPs, and the stronger interactions between AuNPs and Aβ resulted in fewer β-sheets and more random coil structures. We also compared spherical AuNPs, gold nanorods (AuNRs), and gold nanocubes (AuNCs) to study the effect of nanoparticle shape on Aβ aggregation on the brain SLB. Aβ was preferentially bound to the long axis of AuNRs and fewer fibrils were formed whereas all the facets of AuNCs interacted with Aβ to produce the fibril networks. Finally, it was revealed that different nanostructures induce different cytotoxicity on neuroblastoma cells, and, overall, smaller Aβ aggregates induce higher cytotoxicity. The results offer insight into the roles of NPs and brain SLB in Aβ aggregation on the cell membrane and can facilitate the understanding of Aβ-nanostructure co-aggregation mechanism and tuning Aβ aggregate structures.

  20. Biodegradable hollow silica nanospheres containing gold nanoparticle arrays.

    PubMed

    Cassano, Domenico; Rota Martir, Diego; Signore, Giovanni; Piazza, Vincenzo; Voliani, Valerio

    2015-06-21

    We introduce biodegradable hollow silica nanocapsules embedding arrays of 3 nm gold nanoparticles. The silica shell degrades in full serum in a few hours, potentially allowing the clearance of the capsules and their contents by the efficient renal pathway, and thereby overcoming accumulation issues typical of metal nanoparticles.

  1. Local density variation of gold nanoparticles in aquatic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinzadeh, F.; Shirazian, F.; Shahsavari, R.; Khoei, A. R.

    2016-10-01

    Gold (Au) nanoparticles are widely used in diagnosing cancer, imaging, and identification of therapeutic methods due to their particular quantum characteristics. This research presents different types of aqueous models and potentials used in TIP3P, to study the effect of the particle size and density of Au clusters in aquatic environments; so it can be useful to facilitate future investigation of the interaction of proteins with Au nanoparticles. The EAM potential is used to model the structure of gold clusters. It is observed that in the systems with identical gold/water density and different cluster radii, gold particles are distributed in aqueous environment almost identically. Thus, Au particles have identical local densities, and the root mean square displacement (RMSD) increases with a constant slope. However in systems with constant cluster radii and different gold/water densities, Au particle dispersion increases with density; as a result, the local density decreases and the RMSD increases with a larger slope. In such systems, the larger densities result in more blunted second peaks in gold-gold radial distribution functions, owing to more intermixing of the clusters and less FCC crystalline features at longer range, a mechanism that is mediated by the competing effects of gold-water and gold-gold interactions.

  2. Induced nanoparticle aggregation for short nucleic acid quantification by depletion isotachophoresis.

    PubMed

    Marczak, Steven; Senapati, Satyajyoti; Slouka, Zdenek; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2016-12-15

    A rapid (<20min) gel-membrane biochip platform for the detection and quantification of short nucleic acids is presented based on a sandwich assay with probe-functionalized gold nanoparticles and their separation into concentrated bands by depletion-generated gel isotachophoresis. The platform sequentially exploits the enrichment and depletion phenomena of an ion-selective cation-exchange membrane created under an applied electric field. Enrichment is used to concentrate the nanoparticles and targets at a localized position at the gel-membrane interface for rapid hybridization. The depletion generates an isotachophoretic zone without the need for different conductivity buffers, and is used to separate linked nanoparticles from isolated ones in the gel medium and then by field-enhanced aggregation of only the linked particles at the depletion front. The selective field-induced aggregation of the linked nanoparticles during the subsequent depletion step produces two lateral-flow like bands within 1cm for easy visualization and quantification as the aggregates have negligible electrophoretic mobility in the gel and the isolated nanoparticles are isotachophoretically packed against the migrating depletion front. The detection limit for 69-base single-stranded DNA targets is 10 pM (about 10 million copies for our sample volume) with high selectivity against nontargets and a three decade linear range for quantification. The selectivity and signal intensity are maintained in heterogeneous mixtures where the nontargets outnumber the targets 10,000 to 1. The selective field-induced aggregation of DNA-linked nanoparticles at the ion depletion front is attributed to their trailing position at the isotachophoretic front with a large field gradient. PMID:27494807

  3. Toxic effects of gold nanoparticles on Salmonella typhimurium bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuguang; Lawson, Rasheeda; Ray, Paresh C; Yu, Hongtao

    2013-01-01

    Nanometer-sized gold, due to its beautiful and bountiful color and unique optical properties, is a versatile material for many industrial and societal applications. We have studied the effect of gold nanoparticles on Salmonella typhimurium strain TA 102. The gold nanoparticles in solution prepared using the citrate reduction method is found not to be toxic or mutagenic but photomutagenic to the bacteria; however, careful control experiments indicate that the photomutagenicity is due to the co-existing citrate and Au3+ ions, not due to the gold nanoparticle itself. Au3+ is also found to be photomutagenic to the bacteria at concentrations lower than 1 µM, but toxic at higher concentrations. The toxicity of Au3+ is enhanced by light irradiation. The photomutagenicity of both citrate and Au3+ is likely due to the formation of free radicals, as a result of light-induced citrate decarboxylation or Au3+ oxidation of co-existing molecules. Both processes can generate free radicals that may cause DNA damage and mutation. Studies of the interaction of gold nanoparticles with the bacteria indicate that gold nanoparticles can be absorbed onto the bacteria surface but not able to penetrate the bacteria wall to enter the bacteria. PMID:21415096

  4. Preparation of concentrated colloids of gold core-silica shell nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Park, Yeon-Su

    2012-01-01

    Encapsulation of gold nanoparticles within a silica shell is highly beneficial to the preparation of highly concentrated gold nanoparticles that can strongly absorb X-ray and hence be used as an X-ray contrast agent. This chapter describes a method for preparing highly concentrated colloidal gold nanoparticles suitable for an X-ray contrast agent application. It describes specific details of procedures for preparing spherical gold nanoparticles, forming thin silica shell on each gold nanoparticle, and enriching the silica-encapsulated gold nanoparticles.

  5. Impedimetric investigation of gold nanoparticles - guanine modified electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Vulcu, A.; Pruneanu, S.; Berghian-Grosan, C.; Olenic, L.; Muresan, L. M.; Barbu-Tudoran, L.

    2013-11-13

    In this paper we report the preparation of a modified electrode with gold nanoparticles and guanine. The colloidal suspension of gold nanoparticles was obtained by Turkevich method and was next analyzed by UV-Vis spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The gold electrode was modified by self-assembling the gold nanoparticles with guanine, the organic molecule playing also the role of linker. The electrochemical characteristics of the bare and modified electrode were investigated by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). A theoretical model was developed based on an electrical equivalent circuit which contain solution resistance (R{sub s}), charge transfer resistance (R{sub ct}), Warburg impedance (Z{sub W}) and double layer capacitance (C{sub dl})

  6. Shaping and patterning gold nanoparticles via micelle templated photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Kundrat, F; Baffou, G; Polleux, J

    2015-10-14

    Shaping and positioning noble metal nanostructures are essential processes that still require laborious and sophisticated techniques to fabricate functional plasmonic interfaces. The present study reports a simple photochemical approach compatible with micellar nanolithography and photolithography that enables the growth, arrangement and shaping of gold nanoparticles with tuneable plasmonic resonances on glass substrates. Ultraviolet illumination of surfaces coated with gold-loaded micelles leads to the formation of gold nanoparticles with micro/nanometric spatial resolution without requiring any photosensitizers or photoresists. Depending on the extra-micellar chemical environment and the illumination wavelength, block copolymer micelles act as reactive and light-responsive templates, which enable to grow gold deformed nanoparticles (potatoids) and nanorings. Optical characterization reveals that arrays of individual potatoids and rings feature a localized plasmon resonance around 600 and 800 nm, respectively, enhanced photothermal properties and high temperature sustainability, making them ideal platforms for future developments in nanochemistry and biomolecular manipulation controlled by near-infrared-induced heat.

  7. Optical manipulation of gold nanoparticles using an optical nanofiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Hu, Yan-Jun

    2013-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles are gaining increasing attention due to their biological and medical applications. In this letter, we experimentally demonstrate the optical manipulation of 250-nm-diameter gold nanoparticles along an optical nanofiber (550 nm in diameter) injected by an 808-nm laser light. The nanoparticles situated in the evanescent optical field are trapped by optical gradient force and move along the direction of light propagation due to optical scattering force. The velocities reach as high as 132 μm/s at an optical power of 80 mW.

  8. Vibrational properties of gold nanoparticles obtained by green synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Ramón A. B.; Cortez-Valadez, M.; Bueno, L. Oscar Neira; Britto Hurtado, R.; Rocha-Rocha, O.; Delgado-Beleño, Y.; Martinez-Nuñez, C. E.; Serrano-Corrales, Luis Ivan; Arizpe-Chávez, H.; Flores-Acosta, M.

    2016-10-01

    This study reports the synthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles through an ecological method to obtain nanostructures from the extract of the plant Opuntia ficus-indica. Colloidal nanoparticles show sizes that vary between 10-20 nm, and present various geometric morphologies. The samples were characterized through optical absorption, Raman Spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Additionally, low energy metallic clusters of Aun (n=2-20 atoms) were modeled by computational quantum chemistry. The theoretical results were obtained with Density Functional Theory (DFT). The predicted results of Au clusters show a tendency and are correlated with the experimental results concerning the optical absorption bands and Raman spectroscopy in gold nanoparticles.

  9. Gold, palladium, and gold-palladium alloy nanoshells on silica nanoparticle cores.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Hyun; Bryan, William W; Chung, Hae-Won; Park, Chan Young; Jacobson, Allan J; Lee, T Randall

    2009-05-01

    The synthesis of gold, palladium, and gold-palladium alloy nanoshells (approximately 15-20 nm thickness) was accomplished by the reduction of gold and palladium ions onto dielectric silica core particles (approximately 100 nm in diameter) seeded with small gold nanoparticles (approximately 2-3 nm in diameter). The size, morphology, elemental composition, and optical properties of the nanoshells were characterized using field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. The results demonstrate the successful growth of gold, palladium, and gold-palladium alloy nanoshells, where the optical properties systematically vary with the relative content of gold and palladium. The alloy nanoshells are being prepared for use in applications that stand to benefit from photoenhanced catalysis. PMID:20355892

  10. Amoxicillin functionalized gold nanoparticles reverts MRSA resistance.

    PubMed

    Kalita, Sanjeeb; Kandimalla, Raghuram; Sharma, Kaustav Kalyan; Kataki, Amal Chandra; Deka, Manab; Kotoky, Jibon

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we have described the biosynthesis of biocompatible gold nanoparticles (GNPs) from aqueous extract of the aerial parts of a pteridophyte, "Adiantum philippense" by microwave irradiation and its surface functionalization with broad spectrum beta lactam antibiotic, amoxicillin (Amox). The functionalization of amoxicillin on GNPs (GNP-Amox) was carried out via electrostatic interaction of protonated amino group and thioether moiety mediated attractive forces. The synthesized GNPs and GNP-Amox were physicochemically characterized. UV-Vis spectroscopy, Zeta potential, XRD, FTIR and SERS (surface enhanced raman spectra) results confirmed the loading of Amox into GNPs. Loading of Amox to GNPs reduce amoxicillin cytotoxicity, whereas GNPs were found to be nontoxic to mouse fibroblast cell line (L929) as evident from MTT and acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EtBr) live/dead cell assays. The GNP-Amox conjugates demonstrated enhanced broad-spectrum bactericidal activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Furthermore, in-vitro and in-vivo assays of GNP-Amox revealed potent anti-MRSA activity and improved the survival rate. This indicates the subversion of antibiotic resistance mechanism by overcoming the effect of high levels of β-lactamase produced by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Taken together, this study demonstrates the positive attributes from GNP-Amox conjugates as a promising antibacterial therapeutic agent against MRSA as well as other pathogens.

  11. Comparison of amino acids interaction with gold nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Fatemeh; Amanlou, Massoud; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem

    2014-04-01

    The study of nanomaterial/biomolecule interface is an important emerging field in bionanoscience, and additionally in many biological processes such as hard-tissue growth and cell-surface adhesion. To have a deeper understanding of the amino acids/gold nanoparticle assemblies, the adsorption of these amino acids on the gold nanoparticles (GNPs) has been investigated via molecular dynamics simulation. In these simulations, all the constituent atoms of the nanoparticles were considered to be dynamic. The geometries of amino acids, when adsorbed on the nanoparticle, were studied and their flexibilities were compared with one another. The interaction of each of 20 amino acids was considered with 3 and 8 nm gold GNPs.

  12. Ultrafast electronic energy redistribution in hollow gold nanoparticles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappenberger, Kenneth; Schwartzberg, Adam

    2009-03-01

    Nanostructured materials offer great potential for novel ways to generate, utilize, store and transport energy. These unique opportunities arise because nanoclusters often portray strikingly different chemical and physical properties than their bulk counterparts, and, perhaps more intriguingly, these vary widely with cluster size and shape. Here we report on the redistribution of electronic energy to thermal phonons in a series of hollow gold nanoparticles using femtosecond transient absorption. Qualitatively, the relaxation processes are similar to those of solid nanoparticles, however distinct differences are observed, likely owing to the unique properties of the hollow structures. In particular, a larger excitation power density is required to observe coherent vibrational oscillations in hollow gold nanoparticles than is needed for solid particles following electronic excitation. This effect is systematically studied over a range of hollow and solid particles, including multiple diameters and wall thicknesses. Models will be presented to account for the different relaxation mechanism observed for hollow and solid gold nanoparticles.

  13. Gold Nanoparticles for Imaging and Drug Transport to the CNS.

    PubMed

    Male, D; Gromnicova, R; McQuaid, C

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles with a core size of 2nm covalently coated with glycans to maintain solubility, targeting molecules for brain endothelium, and cargo molecules hold great potential for delivery of therapies into the CNS. They have low toxicity, pass through brain endothelium in vitro and in vivo, and move rapidly through the brain parenchyma. Within minutes of infusion the nanoparticles can be detected in neurons and glia. These nanoparticles are relatively easy to synthesize in association with their surface ligands. They can be detected by electron microscopy, ICP-mass spectrometry, and spectroscopy. However, modification of the basic gold nanoparticle is required for in vivo imaging by MR or radioactive methods. Depending on their surface coat, the nanoparticles cross the brain endothelium by the plasma membrane/cytosolic route (passive transport) or by vesicular transcytosis (active transport). A primary aim of current research is to improve the biodistribution of the nanoparticles for CNS drug delivery. Smaller gold nanoparticles are removed rapidly via the kidney, while larger nanoparticles are taken up by mononuclear phagocytes in various tissues. Receptors selectively located on brain endothelium can act as targets for the nanoparticles, to increase their delivery to the brain. PMID:27678177

  14. Adsorption and Unfolding of a Single Protein Triggers Nanoparticle Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The response of living systems to nanoparticles is thought to depend on the protein corona, which forms shortly after exposure to physiological fluids and which is linked to a wide array of pathophysiologies. A mechanistic understanding of the dynamic interaction between proteins and nanoparticles and thus the biological fate of nanoparticles and associated proteins is, however, often missing mainly due to the inadequacies in current ensemble experimental approaches. Through the application of a variety of single molecule and single particle spectroscopic techniques in combination with ensemble level characterization tools, we identified different interaction pathways between gold nanorods and bovine serum albumin depending on the protein concentration. Overall, we found that local changes in protein concentration influence everything from cancer cell uptake to nanoparticle stability and even protein secondary structure. We envision that our findings and methods will lead to strategies to control the associated pathophysiology of nanoparticle exposure in vivo. PMID:26751094

  15. Facile solvothermal preparation of monodisperse gold nanoparticles and their engineered assembly of ferritin-gold nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jonghoon; Park, Sungwook; Stojanović, Zoran; Han, Hyung-Seop; Lee, Jongwook; Seok, Hyun Kwang; Uskoković, Dragan; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2013-12-17

    Herein, we report a quick and simple synthesis of water-soluble gold nanoparticles using a HAuCl4 and oleylamine mixture. Oleylamine serves as a reduction agent as well as a stabilizer for nanoparticle surfaces. The particle sizes can be adjusted by modulating reaction temperature and time. Solvothermal reduction of HAuCl4 with oleylamine can be confirmed by measuring the product in Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The plasmon band shifting from yellow to red confirms a nanosized particle formation. Amide bonds on the surface of the nanoparticles formed hydrogen bonds with one another, resulting in a hydrophobic monolayer. Particles dispersed well in nonpolar organic solvents, such as in hexane or toluene, by brief sonication. Next, we demonstrated the transfer of gold nanoparticles into water by lipid capsulation using 1-myristoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (MHPC), 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-(methoxy polyethylene glycol)-2000 (DPPE-PEG2k), and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-N-{5-amino-1-carboxypentyl}iminodiacetic acid succinyl nickel salt [DGS-NTA(Ni)]. The particle concentration can be obtained using an absorbance in ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectra (at 420 nm). Instrumental analyses using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and FTIR confirmed successful production of gold nanoparticles and fair solubility in water. Prepared gold particles were selectively clustered via engineered ferritin nanocages that provide multiple conjugation moieties. A total of 5-6 gold nanoparticles were clustered on a single ferritin nanocage confirmed in TEM. Reported solvothermal synthesis and preparation of gold nanoclusters may serve as an efficient, alternate way of preparing water-soluble gold nanoparticles, which can be used in a wide variety of biomedical applications. PMID:24283573

  16. Shape control technology during electrochemical synthesis of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiu-yu; Cui, Cong-ying; Cheng, Ying-wen; Ma, Hou-yi; Liu, Duo

    2013-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles with different shapes and sizes were prepared by adding gold precursor (HAuCl4) to an electrolyzed aqueous solution of poly( N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) and KNO3, which indicates the good reducing capacity of the PVP-containing solution after being treated by electrolysis. Using a catholyte and an anolyte as the reducing agents for HAuCl4, respectively, most gold nanoparticles were spherical particles in the former case but plate-like particles in the latter case. The change in the pH value of electrolytes caused by the electrolysis of water would be the origin of the differences in shape and morphology of gold nanoparticles. A hypothesis of the H+ or OH- catalyzed PVP degradation mechanism was proposed to interpret why the pH value played a key role in determining the shape or morphology of gold nanoparticles. These experiments open up a new method for effectively controlling the shape and morphology of metal nanoparticles by using electrochemical methods.

  17. Ultrasensitive aptamer biosensor for malathion detection based on cationic polymer and gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bala, Rajni; Kumar, Munish; Bansal, Kavita; Sharma, Rohit K; Wangoo, Nishima

    2016-11-15

    In this work, we have demonstrated a novel sensing strategy for an organophosphorus pesticide namely, malathion, employing unmodified gold nanoparticles, aptamer and a positively charged, water-soluble polyelectrolyte Polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDDA). The PDDA when associated with the aptamer prevents the aggregation of the gold-nanoparticles while no such inhibition is observed when the aptamer specific pesticide is added to the solution, thereby changing the color of the solution from red to blue. This type of biosensor is quite simple and straightforward and can be completed in a few minutes without the need of any expensive equipment or trained personnel. The proposed method was linear in the concentration range of 0.5-1000pM with 0.06pM as the limit of detection. Moreover, the proposed assay selectively recognized malathion in the presence of other interfering substances and thus, can be applied to real samples for the rapid screening of malathion. PMID:27208476

  18. Biomimetic glycopolymers tethered gold nanoparticles: preparation, self-assembly and lectin recognition properties.

    PubMed

    Pei, Danfeng; Li, Yanchun; Huang, Qingrong; Ren, Qu; Li, Fan; Shi, Tongfei

    2015-02-01

    Biomimetic glycopolymers poly(gluconamidoethylmethacrylate)-b-poly(ɛ-caprolactone)-b-poly(gluconamidoethylmethacrylate) with degradable disulfide groups in the backbone (PGAMA-PCL-SS-PCL-PGAMA) were synthesized by the combination of ring opening polymerization (ROP) and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The internal disulfide bonds were cleaved by reduction with dl-dithiothreitol to yield the corresponding thiol terminated glycopolymers. The thiol terminated glycopolymers were effectively anchored on the surface of gold nanoparticles to prepare the biomimetic glycopolymers modified gold nanoparticles (Gly@Au NPs). Moreover, the properties of the Gly@Au NPs in aqueous solution were investigated. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis revealed that the self-assembly morphology of the Gly@Au NPs can be fine-tuned, from irregular clusters to spherical aggregates, by changing the weight fraction of the hydrophobic PCL block. Furthermore, the Gly@Au NPs had specific recognition with Concanavalin A (Con A). PMID:25533190

  19. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis of gold nanoparticles in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ng, Cheng Teng; Tang, Florence Mei Ai; Li, Jasmine Jia'en; Ong, Cynthia; Yung, Lanry Lin Yue; Bay, Boon Huat

    2015-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have potential biomedical and scientific applications. In this study, we evaluated the uptake and internalization of FBS-coated 20 nm AuNPs into lung fibroblasts and liver cells by different microscopy techniques. AuNP aggregates were observed inside MRC5 lung fibroblasts and Chang liver cells under light microscopy, especially after enhancement with automegallography. Clusters of AuNPs were observed to be adsorbed on the cell surface by scanning electron microscopy. Ultrathin sections showed that AuNPs were mainly enclosed within cytoplasmic vesicles when viewed under transmission electron microscopy. We also investigated the mechanism of uptake for AuNPs, using endocytosis inhibitors and quantification of Au with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Cells treated with concanavalin A and chlorpromazine showed significant decrease of Au uptake in MRC5 lung fibroblasts and Chang liver cells, respectively, implying that the uptake of AuNPs was facilitated by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. It would therefore appear that uptake of 20 nm AuNPs in both cell types with different tissues of origin, was dependent upon clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

  20. Gold nanoparticles based colorimetric nanodiagnostics for cancer and infectious diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, Paola; Persano, Stefano; Cecere, Paola; Sabella, Stefania; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2014-03-01

    Traditional in vitro diagnostics requires specialized laboratories and costly instrumentation, both for the amplification of nucleic acid targets (usually achieved by PCR) and for the assay readout, often based on fluorescence. We are developing hybrid nanomaterials-based sensors for the rapid and low-cost diagnosis of various disease biomarkers, for applications in portable platforms for diagnostics at the point-of-care. To this aim, we exploited the size and distancedependent optical properties of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to achieve colorimetric detection. Moreover, in order to avoid the complexity of thermal cycles associated to traditional PCR, the design of our systems includes signal amplification schemes, achieved by the use of enzymes (nucleases, helicase) or DNAzymes. Focused on instrument-free and sensitive detection, we carefully combined the intrinsic sensitivity by multivalency of functionalized AuNPs with isothermal and non-stringent enzyme-aided reaction conditions, controlled AuNPs aggregates, universal reporters and magnetic microparticles, the latter used both as a substrate and as a means for the colorimetric detection. We obtained simple and robust assays for the sensitive (pM range or better) naked-eye detection of cancer or infectious diseases (HPV, HCV) biomarkers, requiring no instrumentation except for a simple heating plate. Finally, we are also developing non-medical applications of these bio-nanosensors, such as in the development of on-field rapid tests for the detection of pollutants and other food and water contaminants.

  1. Utilizing Gold Nanoparticle Probes to Visually Detect DNA Methylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kui; Zhang, Mingyi; Chang, Ya-Nan; Xia, Lin; Gu, Weihong; Qin, Yanxia; Li, Juan; Cui, Suxia; Xing, Gengmei

    2016-06-01

    The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect endows gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with the ability to visualize biomolecules. In the present study, we designed and constructed a GNP probe to allow the semi-quantitative analysis of methylated tumor suppressor genes in cultured cells. To construct the probe, the GNP surfaces were coated with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) by forming Au-S bonds. The ssDNA contains a thiolated 5'-end, a regulatory domain of 12 adenine nucleotides, and a functional domain with absolute pairing with methylated p16 sequence (Met- p16). The probe, paired with Met- p16, clearly changed the color of aggregating GNPs probe in 5 mol/L NaCl solution. Utilizing the probe, p16 gene methylation in HCT116 cells was semi-quantified. Further, the methylation of E-cadherin, p15, and p16 gene in Caco2, HepG2, and HCT116 cell lines were detected by the corresponding probes, constructed with three domains. This simple and cost-effective method was useful for the diagnosis of DNA methylation-related diseases.

  2. Shape separation of gold nanoparticles using a pH-responsive amphiphilic dendrimer according to their shape anisotropy distinction.

    PubMed

    Hao, Minjia; Liu, Cheng; Peng, Ling; Li, Jinru; Lu, Wensheng; Jiang, Long

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel method for shape-selective separation of nanoparticles in aqueous media utilizing an amphiphilic cationic dendrimer (C18N5) through regulation of the pH of the dispersion medium. This amphiphilic dendrimer (C18N5) bears a poly(amidoamine) dendron with four terminal amine groups and one hydrophobic long alkyl chain, and it can strongly adsorb to the surface of gold nanoparticles at low pH and promote their aggregation at high pH. During aggregation, isotropic NPs with smaller inter-particle contact area have much better solution stability than anisotropic NPs. Therefore, isotropic NPs remain stable in the supernatant, while anisotropic NPs are subject to aggregation and subsequent precipitation. As a result of this simple separation strategy, gold nanoplates with a purity level of 97% (in number density) can be rapidly and conveniently achieved.

  3. Tumor necrosis factor interaction with gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, De-Hao; Elzey, Sherrie; Delrio, Frank W.; Keene, Athena M.; Tyner, Katherine M.; Clogston, Jeffrey D.; Maccuspie, Robert I.; Guha, Suvajyoti; Zachariah, Michael R.; Hackley, Vincent A.

    2012-05-01

    We report on a systematic investigation of molecular conjugation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) protein onto gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and the subsequent binding behavior to its antibody (anti-TNF). We employ a combination of physical and spectroscopic characterization methods, including electrospray-differential mobility analysis, dynamic light scattering, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence assay, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The native TNF used in this study exists in the active homotrimer configuration prior to conjugation. After binding to AuNPs, the maximum surface density of TNF is (0.09 +/- 0.02) nm-2 with a binding constant of 3 × 106 (mol L-1)-1. Dodecyl sulfate ions induce desorption of monomeric TNF from the AuNP surface, indicating a relatively weak intermolecular binding within the AuNP-bound TNF trimers. Anti-TNF binds to both TNF-conjugated and citrate-stabilized AuNPs, showing that non-specific binding is significant. Based on the number of anti-TNF molecules adsorbed, a substantially higher binding affinity was observed for the TNF-conjugated surface. The inclusion of thiolated polyethylene glycol (SH-PEG) on the AuNPs inhibits the binding of anti-TNF, and the amount of inhibition is related to the number ratio of surface bound SH-PEG to TNF and the way in which the ligands are introduced. This study highlights the challenges in quantitatively characterizing complex hybrid nanoscale conjugates, and provides insight on TNF-AuNP formation and activity.We report on a systematic investigation of molecular conjugation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) protein onto gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and the subsequent binding behavior to its antibody (anti-TNF). We employ a combination of physical and spectroscopic characterization methods, including electrospray-differential mobility analysis, dynamic light scattering, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

  4. Microbial mediated preparation, characterization and optimization of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Barabadi, Hamed; Honary, Soheila; Ebrahimi, Pouneh; Mohammadi, Milad Ali; Alizadeh, Ahad; Naghibi, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    The need for eco-friendly and cost effective methods for nanoparticles synthesis is developing interest in biological approaches which are free from the use of toxic chemicals as byproducts. This study aimed to biosynthesize and optimize the size of gold nanoparticles which produced by biotechnological method using Penicillium crustosum isolated from soil. Initially, Penicillium crustosum was grown in fluid czapek dox broth on shaker at 28 °C and 200 rpm for ten days and then the supernatant was separated from the mycelia to convert AuCl₄ solution into gold nanoparticles. The synthesized nanoparticles in the optimum conditions were formed with fairly well-defined dimensions and good monodispersity. The characterizations were done by using different methods (UV-Visible Spectroscopy, Fluorescence, FT-IR, AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) and DLS (Dynamic Light Scattering). The bioconversion was optimized by Box-Behnken experimental design. The results show that the effective factors in this process were concentration of AuCl₄, pH of medium and temperature of shaker incubator. The R(2) value was calculated to be 0.9999 indicating the accuracy and ability of the polynomial model. It can be concluded that the use of multivariate analysis facilitated to find out the optimum conditions for the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles induced by Penicillium crustosum in a time and cost effective process. The current approach suggested that rapid synthesis of gold nanoparticles would be suitable for developing a biological process for mass scale production of formulations.

  5. Coassembly of gold nanoparticles and cellulose nanocrystals in composite films.

    PubMed

    Lukach, Ariella; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Querejeta-Fernández, Ana; Pitch, Natalie; Chauve, Grégory; Méthot, Myriam; Bouchard, Jean; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2015-05-12

    Coassembly of nanoparticles with different size-, shape-, and composition-dependent properties is a promising approach to the design and fabrication of functional materials and devices. This paper reports the results of a detailed investigation of the formation and properties of free-stranding composite films formed by the coassembly of cellulose nanocrystals and shape-isotropic plasmonic gold nanoparticles. The effect of gold nanoparticle size, surface charge, and concentration on the structural and optical properties of the composite films has been studied. The composite films retained photonic crystal and chiroptical activity properties. The size and surface charge of gold nanoparticles had a minor effect on the structure and properties of the composite films, while the concentration of gold nanoparticles in the composite material played a more significant role and can be used to fine-tune the optical properties of materials derived from cellulose nanocrystals. These findings significantly broaden the range of nanoparticles that can be used for producing nanocomposite materials based on cellulose nanocrystals. The simplicity of film preparation, the abundance of cellulose nanocrystals, and the robust, free-standing nature of the composite films offer highly advantageous features and pave the way for the generation of functional materials with coupled optical properties.

  6. Colorimetric detection of mercury species based on functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Li, Jinhua; Chen, Lingxin

    2014-09-24

    The speciation analysis of heavy metal pollutants is very important because different species induce different toxicological effects. Nanomaterial-assisted optical sensors have achieved rapid developments, displaying wide applications to heavy metal ions but few to metal speciation analysis. In this work, a novel colorimetric nanosensor strategy for mercury speciation was proposed for the first time, based on the analyte-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) with the assistance of a thiol-containing ligand of diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC). Upon the addition of mercury species, because Hg-DDTC was more stable than Cu-DDTC, a place-displacement between Hg species and Cu(2+) would occur, and thereby the functionalized Au NPs would aggregate, resulting in a color change. Moreover, by virtue of the masking effect of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), the nanosensor could readily discriminate organic mercury and inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)), and it is thus anticipated to shed some light on the colorimetric sensing of organic mercury. So, a direct, simple colorimetric assay for selective determination of Hg species was obtained, presenting high detectability, such as up to 10 nM for Hg(2+) and 15 nM for methylmercury. Meanwhile, the strategy offered excellent selectivity toward mercury species against other metal ions. The simple, rapid, and sensitive label-free colorimetric sensor for the determination of Hg species provided an attractive alternative to conventional methods, which usually involve sophisticated instruments, complicated processes, and long periods of time. More importantly, by using mercury as a model, an excellent nanomaterial-based optical sensing platform can be developed for speciation analysis of trace heavy metals, which can lead to nanomaterials stability change through smart functionalization and reasonable interactions.

  7. Spectroscopic studies of nucleic acid additions during seed-mediated growth of gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tapp, Maeling; Sullivan, Rick; Dennis, Patrick; Naik, Rajesh R.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of adding nucleic acids to gold seeds during the growth stage of either nanospheres or nanorods was investigated using UV-Vis spectroscopy to reveal any oligonucleotide base or structure-specific effects on nanoparticle growth kinetics or plasmonic signatures. Spectral data indicate that the presence of DNA duplexes during seed ageing drastically accelerated nanosphere growth while the addition of single-stranded polyadenine at any point during seed ageing induces nanosphere aggregation. For seeds added to a gold nanorod growth solution, single-stranded polythymine induces a modest blue-shift in the longitudinal peak wavelength. Moreover, a particular sequence comprised of 50% thymine bases was found to induce a faster, more dramatic blue-shift in the longitudinal peak wavelength compared to any of the homopolymer incubation cases. Monomeric forms of the nucleic acids, however, do not yield discernable spectral differences in any of the gold suspensions studied. PMID:25960601

  8. Chemiluminescent Reactions Catalyzed by Nanoparticles of Gold, Silver, and Gold/Silver Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abideen, Saqib Ul

    Chemiluminescence (CL) reactions are catalyzed by metals nanoparticles, which display unique catalytic properties due to an increased surface area. The present study describes the catalytic effects of nanoparticles (NP) of silver, gold, and alloys of Au/Ag nanoparticles on the chemiluminescent reaction taking place between luminol and potassium ferricyanide. It was found that silver nanoparticles and alloy nanoparticles enhance the CL process when their sizes remained in the range of 30 nm to 50 nm. The data show that the intensity and rate of chemiluminescence were influenced by the mole fraction of gold and silver in the alloy. Data to this chemiluminescence reaction are modeled by a double exponential curve, which indicates that two competing processes are occurring.

  9. Application of gold nanoparticles in biomedical and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Daraee, Hadis; Eatemadi, Ali; Abbasi, Elham; Fekri Aval, Sedigheh; Kouhi, Mohammad; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles are the simplest form of structures with sizes in the nanometer (nm) range. In principle any collection of atoms bonded together with a structural radius of < 100 nm can be considered nano particles. Nanotechnology offers unique approaches to probe and control a variety of biological and medical processes that occur at nanometer scales, and is expected to have a revolutionary impact on biology and medicine. Among the approaches for exploiting nanotechnology in medicine, nanoparticles offer some unique advantages as sensing, image enhancement, and delivery agents. Several varieties of nanoparticles with biomedical relevance are available including, polymeric nanoparticles, metal nanoparticles, liposomes, micelles, quantum dots, dendrimers, and nanoassemblies. To further the application of nanoparticles in disease diagnosis and therapy, it is important that the systems are biocompatible and capable of being functionalized for recognition of specific target sites in the body after systemic administration. In this review, we have explained some important applications of gold nanoparticles. PMID:25229833

  10. Solvent-mediated plasmon-tuning in a gold nanoparticle-poly(ionic liquid) composite.

    SciTech Connect

    Batra, D.; Seifert, S.; Varela, L.; Firestone, M. A.

    2007-05-01

    The design, synthesis, and characterization of a hierarchically ordered composite whose structure and optical properties can be reversibly switched by adjustment of solvent conditions are described. Solvent-induced swelling and de-swelling is shown to provide control over the internal packing arrangement and hence, optical properties of in situ synthesized metal nanoparticles. Specifically, a gold-nanoparticle-containing ionic-liquid-derived polymer is synthesized in a single step by UV irradiation of a metal-ion-precursor-doped, self-assembled ionic liquid gel, 1-decyl-3-vinylimidazolium chloride. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies indicate that in the de-swollen state, the freestanding polymer adopts a perforated lamellar structure. Optical spectroscopy of the dried composite reveals plasmon resonances positioned in the near-IR. Strong particle-particle interactions arise from matrix-promoted formation of aggregated 1D clusters or chains of gold nanoparticles. Upon swelling in alcohol, the composite undergoes a structural conversion to a disordered structure, which is accompanied by a color change from purple to pale pink and a shift in the surface plasmon resonance to 527 nm, consistent with isolated, non-interacting particles. These results demonstrate the far-field tuning of the plasmonic spectrum of gold nanoparticles by solvent-mediated changes in its encapsulating matrix, offering a straightforward, low-cost strategy for the fabrication of nanophotonic materials.

  11. Femtosecond laser generated gold nanoparticles and their plasmonic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Rupali; Navas M., P.; Soni, R. K.

    2016-05-01

    The pulsed laser ablation in liquid medium is now commonly used to generate stable colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) in absence of any chemical additives or stabilizer with diverse applications. In this paper, we report generation of gold NPs (Au NPs) by ultra-short laser pulses. Femtosecond (fs) laser radiation (λ = 800 nm) has been used to ablate a gold target in pure de-ionized water to produce gold colloids with smallsize distribution. The average size of the particles can be further controlled by subjecting to laser-induced post-irradiation providing a versatile physical method of size-selected gold nanoparticles. The optical extinction and morphological dimensions were investigated with UV-Vis spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy measurements, respectively. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is employed to calculate localized surface plasmon (LSPR) wavelength and the near-field generated by Au NPs and their hybrids.

  12. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles: an ecofriendly approach using Hansenula anomala.

    PubMed

    K, Sathish Kumar; R, Amutha; Arumugam, Palaniappan; Berchmans, Sheela

    2011-05-01

    This work describes a bioassisted approach for the preparation of metal nanoparticles using yeast species Hansenula anomala. Gold nanoparticles were prepared using gold salt as the precursor, amine-terminated polyamidoamine dendrimer as the stabilizer, and the extracellular material from H. anomala as the bioreductant. It could also be demonstrated that, using our approach, small molecules such as cysteine can act as stabilizers as well. This synthetic approach offers a greener alternative route to the preparation of gold sols that are devoid of cellular and toxic chemical components. The ability of as-synthesized gold sol to function as biological ink for producing patterns for the analysis of fingerprints and to act as an antimicrobial reagent is evaluated. The generality of this toxin-free synthetic approach to other metals was assessed using palladium and silver. PMID:21517037

  13. Laser-induced modifications of gold nanoparticles and their cytotoxic effect.

    PubMed

    Abdelhamid, Shimaa; Saleh, Hazem; Abdelhamid, Mahmoud; Gohar, Adel; Youssef, Tareq

    2012-06-01

    As nanotechnology continues to develop, an assessment of nanoparticles' toxicity becomes very crucial for biomedical applications. The current study examines the deleterious effects of pre-irradiated gold nanoparticles (GNPs) solutions on primary rat kidney cells (PRKCs). Spectroscopic and transmission electron microscopic studies demonstrated that exposure of 15 nm GNPs in size to pulsed laser caused a reduction both in optical density and mean particle diameter. GNPs showed an aggregation when added to the cell culture medium (DMEM). This aggregation was markedly decreased upon adding serum to the medium. Under our experimental conditions, trypan blue and MTT assays revealed no significant changes in cell viability when PRKCs were incubated with non-irradiated GNPs over a period of 72 h and up to 4 nM GNPs concentration. On the contrary, when cells were incubated with irradiated GNPs a significant reduction in PRKCs viability was revealed.

  14. Gold Nanoparticles in Biology and Medicine: Recent Advances and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Dykman, L.A.; Khlebtsov, N.G.

    2011-01-01

    Functionalized gold nanoparticles with controlled geometrical and optical properties are the subject of intensive studies and biomedical applications, including genomics, biosensorics, immunoassays, clinical chemistry, laser phototherapy of cancer cells and tumors, the targeted delivery of drugs, DNA and antigens, optical bioimaging and the monitoring of cells and tissues with the use of state-of-the-art detection systems. This work will provide an overview of the recent advances and current challenges facing the biomedical application of gold nanoparticles of various sizes, shapes, and structures. The review is focused on the application of gold nanoparticle conjugates in biomedical diagnostics and analytics, photothermal and photodynamic therapies, as a carrier for delivering target molecules, and on the immunological and toxicological properties. Keeping in mind the huge volume and high speed of the data update rate, 2/3 of our reference list (certainly restricted to 250 Refs.) includes publications encompassing the past 5 years. PMID:22649683

  15. Gold nanoparticles in biology and medicine: recent advances and prospects.

    PubMed

    Dykman, L A; Khlebtsov, N G

    2011-04-01

    Functionalized gold nanoparticles with controlled geometrical and optical properties are the subject of intensive studies and biomedical applications, including genomics, biosensorics, immunoassays, clinical chemistry, laser phototherapy of cancer cells and tumors, the targeted delivery of drugs, DNA and antigens, optical bioimaging and the monitoring of cells and tissues with the use of state-of-the-art detection systems. This work will provide an overview of the recent advances and current challenges facing the biomedical application of gold nanoparticles of various sizes, shapes, and structures. The review is focused on the application of gold nanoparticle conjugates in biomedical diagnostics and analytics, photothermal and photodynamic therapies, as a carrier for delivering target molecules, and on the immunological and toxicological properties. Keeping in mind the huge volume and high speed of the data update rate, 2/3 of our reference list (certainly restricted to 250 Refs.) includes publications encompassing the past 5 years.

  16. Aggregation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles: role of a fulvic acid.

    PubMed

    Domingos, Rute F; Tufenkji, Nathalie; Wilkinson, Kevin I

    2009-03-01

    The increasing use of nanomaterials in consumer products has led to increased concerns abouttheir potential environmental and health impacts. To better understand the transport, fate, and behavior of nanoparticles in aquatic systems, it is essential to understand their interactions with different components of natural waters including natural organic matter over a broad range of physicochemical conditions. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy was used to determine the diffusion coefficients of TiO2 nanoparticles having a nominal size of 5 nm. The effects of a various concentrations of the Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA) and the roles of pH and ionic strength were evaluated. Aggregation of the bare TiO2 nanoparticles increased for pH values near the zero point of charge. At any given pH, an increase in ionic strength generally resulted in increased aggregation. Furthermore, conditions which favored adsorption of the SRFA resulted in less aggregation of the TiO2 nanoparticles, presumably due to increased steric repulsion. Under the conditions studied here, nanoparticle dispersions were often stable for environmentally relevant conditions of SRFA, pH, and ionic strength, suggesting that in the natural environment, TiO2 dispersion might occur to a greater extent than expected. PMID:19350891

  17. Long-term exposure to gold nanoparticles accelerates larval metamorphosis without affecting mass in wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) at environmentally relevant concentrations.

    PubMed

    Fong, Peter P; Thompson, Lucas B; Carfagno, Gerardo L F; Sitton, Andrea J

    2016-09-01

    Nanoparticles are environmental contaminants of emerging concern. Exposure to engineered nanoparticles has been shown to have detrimental effects on aquatic organisms. The authors synthesized gold nanoparticles (18.1 ± 3.5 nm) and tested their effects on time to and weight at metamorphosis in wood frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) tadpoles, a species known to be sensitive to environmental stressors. Continuous exposure to all concentrations of gold nanoparticles (0.05 pM, 0.5 pM, and 5 pM in particles) for up to 55 d significantly reduced time to metamorphosis by as much as an average of 3 d (p < 0.05). However, exposure to gold nanoparticles had no effect on tadpole mass at metamorphosis. The approximately 18-nm gold nanoparticles used were metastable in dechlorinated tap water, resulting in a change in surface charge and aggregation over time, leading to negatively charged aggregates that were on the order of 60 nm to 110 nm. Nanoparticle aggregation could exacerbate the effect on time to metamorphosis. To the authors' knowledge, the present study is the first report on the effect of engineered nanoparticles of any kind on life-history variables in an amphibian, a taxonomic group that has been declining globally for at least 25 yr. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2304-2310. © 2016 SETAC. PMID:26873819

  18. Aspheric Solute Ions Modulate Gold Nanoparticle Interactions in an Aqueous Solution: An Optimal Way To Reversibly Concentrate Functionalized Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Oscar D; Chen, Liao Y; Whetten, Robert L; Demeler, Borries

    2015-12-17

    Nanometer-sized gold particles (AuNPs) are of peculiar interest because their behaviors in an aqueous solution are sensitive to changes in environmental factors including the size and shape of the solute ions. In order to determine these important characteristics, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations on the icosahedral Au144 nanoparticles each coated with a homogeneous set of 60 thiolates (4-mercaptobenzoate, pMBA) in eight aqueous solutions having ions of varying sizes and shapes (Na(+), K(+), tetramethylamonium cation TMA(+), tris-ammonium cation TRS(+), Cl(-), and OH(-)). For each solution, we computed the reversible work (potential of mean of force) to bring two nanoparticles together as a function of their separation distance. We found that the behavior of pMBA protected Au144 nanoparticles can be readily modulated by tuning their aqueous environmental factors (pH and solute ion combinations). We examined the atomistic details on how the sizes and shapes of solute ions quantitatively factor in the definitive characteristics of nanoparticle-environment and nanoparticle-nanoparticle interactions. We predict that tuning the concentrations of nonspherical composite ions such as TRS(+) in an aqueous solution of AuNPs be an effective means to modulate the aggregation propensity desired in biomedical and other applications of small charged nanoparticles.

  19. Gold and Gallium Nanoparticle Growth on Silicon (100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Rees; Brown, Hunter L.; Ames, Sadie; Rasmussen, J. Leland; Tobler, Samuel

    2014-03-01

    Nanoparticles are used for various applications in today's research. Some researcher's interests involve using the nanoparticles to grow silicon nanowires on a silicon substrate. Before growing nanowires can be accomplished a study must be made of the formation of nanoparticles. Most often the metal used to make the nanoparticles is gold. In this study both gold and gallium were used to make the nanoparticles, by thermal evaporation. The gold and gallium nanoparticles were grown on silicon (100). Between one to three monolayers of material was added to the substrate, with the particle sizes ranging from 0.5 microns to 3 microns in diameter. Densities of nanoparticles varied based on the time of growth and on the intensity of the source. The variable sizes were seen with sample temperatures between 700 C and 900 C measured using a disappearing filament optical pyrometer. The growth process occurred at pressures below 3e-7 Torr. This presentation will summarize the growth process and show the similarities and differences between the two metals.

  20. Sub-chronic toxicity of gold nanoparticles in male mice

    PubMed Central

    Ajdary, Marziyeh; Ghahnavieh, Marziyeh Ziaee; Naghsh, Nooshin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gold nanoparticles have many industrial applications; moreover, they are photothermic agents for clinical treatment of cancer. This study was provided to investigate the effects associated with different doses of applied gold nanoparticles by injection and contact procedures on the alterations of the serum levels and certain factors in male mice. Materials and Methods: 72 male mice were randomly assigned into two protocols in terms of touching and injection. The injection protocol was included of five groups: Sham, control, 25, 50, and 100 ppm. They received gold nanoparticles at 25, 50, and 100 ppm concentrations administered in form of 0.3 ml/day for the period of 14 days and that of touching protocol were received 0.2 ml/day gold nanoparticles. Blood sample of which was taken to measure the serum level of creatine kinase phosphate, fasting blood, creatinine, albumin, blood urea nitrogen and eventually, the kidney was dissected for the intent of pathological analysis. Results: The serum level of creatine kinase phosphate and fasting blood sugar at middle dose was significantly different (P ≤ 0.05) in touching protocol. In both protocols, the serum level of creatinine in high and medium doses showed a significant difference (P < 0.05) associated with the treated group. In the touching method, in high and medium doses administered to the treated group, the alteration was significant (P ≤ 0.05). In the both protocols, the serum level of albumin in high and medium doses of the treated group showed significant difference (P < 0.05). Thus, the gold nanoparticles could result in undesirable effects upon kidney tissue. Conclusion: The result of this study indicated that the administration of gold nanoparticles by touching method was more effective on the serum levels of these factors than that of injection method. PMID:25878992

  1. Light induced cytosolic drug delivery from liposomes with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lajunen, Tatu; Viitala, Lauri; Kontturi, Leena-Stiina; Laaksonen, Timo; Liang, Huamin; Vuorimaa-Laukkanen, Elina; Viitala, Tapani; Le Guével, Xavier; Yliperttula, Marjo; Murtomäki, Lasse; Urtti, Arto

    2015-04-10

    Externally triggered drug release at defined targets allows site- and time-controlled drug treatment regimens. We have developed liposomal drug carriers with encapsulated gold nanoparticles for triggered drug release. Light energy is converted to heat in the gold nanoparticles and released to the lipid bilayers. Localized temperature increase renders liposomal bilayers to be leaky and triggers drug release. The aim of this study was to develop a drug releasing system capable of releasing its cargo to cell cytosol upon triggering with visible and near infrared light signals. The liposomes were formulated using either heat-sensitive or heat- and pH-sensitive lipid compositions with star or rod shaped gold nanoparticles. Encapsulated fluorescent probe, calcein, was released from the liposomes after exposure to the light. In addition, the pH-sensitive formulations showed a faster drug release in acidic conditions than in neutral conditions. The liposomes were internalized into human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and did not show any cellular toxicity. The light induced cytosolic delivery of calcein from the gold nanoparticle containing liposomes was shown, whereas no cytosolic release was seen without light induction or without gold nanoparticles in the liposomes. The light activated liposome formulations showed a controlled content release to the cellular cytosol at a specific location and time. Triggering with visual and near infrared light allows good tissue penetration and safety, and the pH-sensitive liposomes may enable selective drug release in the intracellular acidic compartments (endosomes, lysosomes). Thus, light activated liposomes with gold nanoparticles are an attractive option for time- and site-specific drug delivery into the target cells.

  2. Natural organic matter concentration and hydrochemistry influence aggregation kinetics of functionalized engineered nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junfeng; Legros, Samuel; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the colloidal stability of functionalized engineered nanoparticles (FENPs) in aquatic environments is of paramount importance in order to assess the risk related to FENPs. In this study, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) of 68 and 43 nm diameter, coated with citrate and 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) respectively, were used as models of FENPs. Time-resolved dynamic light scattering was employed to investigate the aggregation kinetics of two types of GNPs. The results show that without Suwannee river natural organic matter (SRNOM), MUA coating resulted in greater stability than citrate coating for GNPs. Cations have a destabilizing effect on both GNPs following the order Ca(2+) ≈ Mg(2+) > Na(+); different anions (Cl(-) and SO4(2-)) showed no difference in effects. In the fast aggregation regime, adding SRNOM enhanced the stability of MUA-coated GNPs in both Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) solutions. However citrate-coated GNPs were only stabilized in Mg(2+) solution but enhanced aggregation occurred in high Ca(2+) concentration due to interparticle bridging. For the investigated GNPs and in the presence of SRNOM, Ca(2+) does not always act as a strong coagulant. This indicates that for the new materials emerging from the application of nanotechnology the well-described aggregation mechanisms of colloids in the environment require a detailed re-examination.

  3. Protein--nanoparticle interaction: identification of the ubiquitin--gold nanoparticle interaction site.

    PubMed

    Calzolai, Luigi; Franchini, Fabio; Gilliland, Douglas; Rossi, François

    2010-08-11

    We demonstrate that it is possible to identify the protein--nanoparticle interaction site at amino acid scale in solution. Using NMR, chemical shift perturbation analysis, and dynamic light scattering we have identified a specific domain of human ubiquitin that interacts with gold nanoparticles. This method allows a detailed structural analysis of proteins absorbed onto surfaces of nanoparticles in physiological conditions and it will provide much needed experimental data for better modeling and prediction of protein--nanoparticle interactions. PMID:20698623

  4. In situgrowth of gold nanoparticles on latent fingerprints--from forensic applications to inkjet printed nanoparticle patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Irshad; Hussain, Syed Zajif; Habib-Ur-Rehman, Affa; Ihsan, Ayesha; Rehman, Asma; Khalid, Zafar M.; Brust, Mathias; Cooper, Andrew I.

    2010-12-01

    Latent fingerprints are made visible in a single step by in situgrowth of gold nanoparticles on ridge patterns. The chemicals, among the essential components of human sweat, found responsible for the formation and assembly of gold nanoparticles are screened and used as ink to write invisible patterns, using common ball pen and inkjet printer, which are then developed by selectively growing gold nanoparticles by soaking them in gold salt solution.Latent fingerprints are made visible in a single step by in situgrowth of gold nanoparticles on ridge patterns. The chemicals, among the essential components of human sweat, found responsible for the formation and assembly of gold nanoparticles are screened and used as ink to write invisible patterns, using common ball pen and inkjet printer, which are then developed by selectively growing gold nanoparticles by soaking them in gold salt solution. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed experimental procedure and some supporting images. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00593b

  5. Reduced aggregation and cytotoxicity of amyloid peptides by graphene oxide/gold nanocomposites prepared by pulsed laser ablation in water.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingying; Han, Qiusen; Wang, Xinhuan; Yu, Ning; Yang, Lin; Yang, Rong; Wang, Chen

    2014-11-12

    A novel and convenient method to synthesize the nanocomposites combining graphene oxides (GO) with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is reported and their applications to modulate amyloid peptide aggregation are demonstrated. The nanocomposites produced by pulsed laser ablation (PLA) in water show good biocompatibility and solubility. The reduced aggregation of amyloid peptides by the nanocomposites is confirmed by Thioflavin T fluorescence and atomic force microscopy. The cell viability experiments reveals that the presence of the nanocomposites can significantly reduce the cytotoxicity of the amyloid peptides. Furthermore, the depolymerization of peptide fibrils and inhibition of their cellular cytotoxicity by GO/AuNPs is also observed. These observations suggest that the nanocomposites combining GO and AuNPs have a great potential for designing new therapeutic agents and are promising for future treatment of amyloid-related diseases.

  6. Characterization of Nanoparticle Aggregation in Biologically Relevant Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEnnis, Kathleen; Lahann, Joerg

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are often studied as drug delivery vehicles, but little is known about their behavior in blood once injected into animal models. If the NPs aggregate in blood, they will be shunted to the liver or spleen instead of reaching the intended target. The use of animals for these experiments is costly and raises ethical questions. Typically dynamic light scattering (DLS) is used to analyze aggregation behavior, but DLS cannot be used because the components of blood also scatter light. As an alternative, a method of analyzing NPs in biologically relevant fluids such as blood plasma has been developed using nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) with fluorescent filters. In this work, NTA was used to analyze the aggregation behavior of fluorescent polystyrene NPs with different surface modifications in blood plasma. It was expected that different surface chemistries on the particles will change the aggregation behavior. The effect of the surface modifications was investigated by quantifying the percentage of NPs in aggregates after addition to blood plasma. The use of this characterization method will allow for better understanding of particle behavior in the body, and potential problems, specifically aggregation, can be addressed before investing in in vivo studies.

  7. Bio-mediated synthesis, characterization and cytotoxicity of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Klekotko, Magdalena; Matczyszyn, Katarzyna; Siednienko, Jakub; Olesiak-Banska, Joanna; Pawlik, Krzysztof; Samoc, Marek

    2015-11-21

    We report here a "green" approach for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in which the Mentha piperita extract was applied for the bioreduction of chloroauric acid and the stabilization of the formed nanostructures. The obtained GNPs were characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The reduction of gold ions with the plant extract leads to the production of nanoparticles with various shapes (spherical, triangular and hexagonal) and sizes (from 10 to 300 nm). The kinetics of the reaction was monitored and various conditions of the synthesis were investigated. As a result, we established protocols optimized towards the synthesis of nanospheres and nanoprisms of gold. The cytotoxic effect of the obtained gold nanoparticles was studied by performing MTT assay, which showed lower cytotoxicity of the biosynthesized GNPs compared to gold nanorods synthesized using the usual seed-mediated growth. The results suggest that the synthesis using plant extracts may be a useful method to produce gold nanostructures for various biological and medical applications. PMID:26456245

  8. Bio-mediated synthesis, characterization and cytotoxicity of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Klekotko, Magdalena; Matczyszyn, Katarzyna; Siednienko, Jakub; Olesiak-Banska, Joanna; Pawlik, Krzysztof; Samoc, Marek

    2015-11-21

    We report here a "green" approach for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in which the Mentha piperita extract was applied for the bioreduction of chloroauric acid and the stabilization of the formed nanostructures. The obtained GNPs were characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The reduction of gold ions with the plant extract leads to the production of nanoparticles with various shapes (spherical, triangular and hexagonal) and sizes (from 10 to 300 nm). The kinetics of the reaction was monitored and various conditions of the synthesis were investigated. As a result, we established protocols optimized towards the synthesis of nanospheres and nanoprisms of gold. The cytotoxic effect of the obtained gold nanoparticles was studied by performing MTT assay, which showed lower cytotoxicity of the biosynthesized GNPs compared to gold nanorods synthesized using the usual seed-mediated growth. The results suggest that the synthesis using plant extracts may be a useful method to produce gold nanostructures for various biological and medical applications.

  9. Silica nanoparticles separation from water: aggregation by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB).

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Tourbin, M; Lachaize, S; Guiraud, P

    2013-07-01

    Nanoparticles will inevitably be found in industrial and domestic wastes in the near future and as a consequence soon in water resources. Due to their ultra-small size, nanoparticles may not only have new hazards for environment and human health, but also cause low separation efficiency by classical water treatments processes. Thus, it would be an important challenge to develop a specific treatment with suitable additives for recovery of nanoparticles from waters. For this propose, this paper presents aggregation of silica nanoparticles (Klebosol 30R50 (75nm) and 30R25 (30nm)) by cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Different mechanisms such as charge neutralization, "depletion flocculation" or "volume-restriction", and "hydrophobic effect" between hydrocarbon tails of CTAB have been proposed to explicate aggregation results. One important finding is that for different volume concentrations between 0.05% and 0.51% of 30R50 suspensions, the same critical coagulation concentration was observed at CTAB=0.1mM, suggesting the optimized quantity of CTAB during the separation process for nanoparticles of about 75nm. Furthermore, very small quantities of CTAB (0.01mM) can make 30R25 nanosilica aggregated due to the "hydrophobic effect". It is then possible to minimize the sludge and allow the separation process as "greener" as possible by studying this case. It has also shown that aggregation mechanisms can be different for very small particles so that a special attention has to be paid to the treatment of nanoparticles contained in water and wastewaters.

  10. Properties of TiO2 films with gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, S. A.; Nikolaev, N. E.; Trofimov, N. S.; Chekhlova, T. K.

    2016-08-01

    The physicochemical and optical properties of titanium dioxide films, made by gel technology and doped with gold nanoparticles, were investigated. The structures of the titanium dioxide films synthesized by different techniques have been compared. Using methods of high-resolution microscopy and the results of X-ray diffraction analysis it was shown, that the developed gel technology allows getting almost 100% nanostructured anatase phase. Titanium dioxide was modified by nanoparticles of gold with different concentration and transmittance spectra of the samples were studied.

  11. Melting transition of directly linked gold nanoparticle DNA assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Harris, N. C.; Kiang, C.-H.

    2005-05-01

    DNA melting and hybridization is a fundamental biological process as well as a crucial step in many modern biotechnology applications. DNA confined on surfaces exhibits a behavior different from that in free solutions. The system of DNA-capped gold nanoparticles exhibits unique phase transitions and represents a new class of complex fluids. Depending on the sequence of the DNA, particles can be linked to each other through direct complementary DNA sequences or via a ‘linker’ DNA, whose sequence is complementary to the sequence attached to the gold nanoparticles. We observed different melting transitions for these two distinct systems.

  12. Contrasting effects of nanoparticle-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Radic, Slaven; Davis, Thomas P; Ke, Pu Chun; Ding, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been experimentally found to either promote or inhibit amyloid aggregation of proteins, but the molecular mechanisms for such complex behaviors remain unknown. Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the effects of varying the strength of nonspecific NP-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation of a model protein, the amyloid-beta peptide implicated in Alzheimer's disease. Specifically, with increasing NP-peptide attraction, amyloid aggregation on the NP surface was initially promoted due to increased local protein concentration on the surface and destabilization of the folded state. However, further increase of NP-peptide attraction decreased the stability of amyloid fibrils and reduced their lateral diffusion on the NP surface necessary for peptide conformational changes and self-association, thus prohibiting amyloid aggregation. Moreover, we found that the relative concentration between protein and NPs also played an important role in amyloid aggregation. With a high NP/protein ratio, NPs that intrinsically promote protein aggregation may display an inhibitive effect by depleting the proteins in solution while having a low concentration of the proteins on each NP's surface. Our coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation study offers a molecular mechanism for delineating the contrasting and seemingly conflicting effects of NP-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation and highlights the potential of tailoring anti-aggregation nanomedicine against amyloid diseases. PMID:26989481

  13. Biointeractions of ultrasmall glutathione-coated gold nanoparticles: effect of small size variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Alioscka A.; Hassan, Sergio A.; Knittel, Luiza L.; Balbo, Andrea; Aronova, Maria A.; Brown, Patrick H.; Schuck, Peter; Leapman, Richard D.

    2016-03-01

    Recent in vivo studies have established ultrasmall (<3 nm) gold nanoparticles coated with glutathione (AuGSH) as a promising platform for applications in nanomedicine. However, systematic in vitro investigations to gain a more fundamental understanding of the particles' biointeractions are still lacking. Herein we examined the behavior of ultrasmall AuGSH in vitro, focusing on their ability to resist aggregation and adsorption from serum proteins. Despite having net negative charge, AuGSH particles were colloidally stable in biological media and able to resist binding from serum proteins, in agreement with the favorable bioresponses reported for AuGSH in vivo. However, our results revealed disparate behaviors depending on nanoparticle size: particles between 2 and 3 nm in core diameter were found to readily aggregate in biological media, whereas those strictly under 2 nm were exceptionally stable. Molecular dynamics simulations provided microscopic insight into interparticle interactions leading to aggregation and their sensitivity to the solution composition and particle size. These results have important implications, in that seemingly small variations in size can impact the biointeractions of ultrasmall AuGSH, and potentially of other ultrasmall nanoparticles as well.Recent in vivo studies have established ultrasmall (<3 nm) gold nanoparticles coated with glutathione (AuGSH) as a promising platform for applications in nanomedicine. However, systematic in vitro investigations to gain a more fundamental understanding of the particles' biointeractions are still lacking. Herein we examined the behavior of ultrasmall AuGSH in vitro, focusing on their ability to resist aggregation and adsorption from serum proteins. Despite having net negative charge, AuGSH particles were colloidally stable in biological media and able to resist binding from serum proteins, in agreement with the favorable bioresponses reported for AuGSH in vivo. However, our results revealed disparate

  14. Peptide-induced patterning of gold nanoparticle thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borteh, Hassan M.; Ferrell, Nicholas J.; Butler, Randall T.; Olesik, Susan V.; Hansford, Derek J.

    2011-10-01

    In this work, the use of patterned proteins and peptides for the deposition of gold nanoparticles on several substrates with different surface chemistries is presented. The patterned biomolecule on the surface acts as a catalyst to precipitate gold nanoparticles from a precursor solution of HAuCl 4 onto the substrate. The peptide patterning on the surfaces was accomplished by physical adsorption or covalent attachment. It was shown that by using covalent attachment with a linker molecule, the influence of the surface properties from the different substrates on the biomolecule adsorption and subsequent nanoparticle deposition could be avoided. By adjusting the reaction conditions such as pH or HAuCl 4 concentration, the sizes and morphologies of deposited gold nanoparticle agglomerates could be controlled. Two biomolecules were used for this experiment, 3XFLAG peptide and bovine serum albumin (BSA). A micro-transfer molding technique was used to pattern the peptides on the substrates, in which a pre-patterned poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) mold was used to deposit a lift-off pattern of polypropylmethacrylate (PPMA) on the various substrates. The proteins were either physically adsorbed or covalently attached to the substrates, and an aqueous HAuCl 4 solution was applied on the substrates with the protein micropatterns, causing the precipitation of gold nanoparticles onto the patterns. SEM, AFM, and Electron Beam Induced Current (EBIC) were used for characterization.

  15. Near-field heat transfer between gold nanoparticle arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Phan, Anh D.; Phan, The-Long; Woods, Lilia M.

    2013-12-07

    The radiative heat transfer between gold nanoparticle layers is presented using the coupled dipole method. Gold nanoparticles are modelled as effective electric and magnetic dipoles interacting via electromagnetic fluctuations. The effect of higher-order multipoles is implemented in the expression of electric polarizability to calculate the interactions at short distances. Our findings show that the near-field radiation reduces as the radius of the nanoparticles is increased. Also, the magnetic dipole contribution to the heat exchange becomes more important for larger particles. When one layer is displayed in parallel with respect to the other layer, the near-field heat transfer exhibits oscillatory-like features due to the influence of the individual nanostructures. Further details about the effect of the nanoparticles size are also discussed.

  16. Gold nanoparticle localization at the core surface by using thermosensitive core-shell particles as a template.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Kawaguchi, Haruma

    2005-12-01

    We report novel thermosensitive hybrid core-shell particles via in situ gold nanoparticle formation using thermosensitive core-shell particles as a template. This method for the in situ synthesis of gold nanoparticles with microgel interiors offers the advantage of eliminating or significantly reducing particle aggregation. In addition, by using thermosensitive microgel structures in which the shell has thermosensitive and gel properties in water--whereas the core itself is a water-insoluble polymer--we were able to synthesize the gold nanoparticles only at the surface of the core, which had reactive sites to bind metal ions. After the gold nanoparticles were synthesized, electroless gold plating was carried out to control the thickness of the gold nanoshells. The dispersions of the obtained hybrid particles were characterized by dynamic light scattering and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, and the dried particles were also observed by electron microscopy. Adaptation of the technique shown here will create a number of applications as optical, electronic, and biomedical functional materials. PMID:16316147

  17. Gold nanoparticles deposited on glass: physicochemical characterization and cytocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznickova, Alena; Novotna, Zdenka; Kasalkova, Nikola Slepickova; Svorcik, Vaclav

    2013-05-01

    Properties of gold films sputtered under different conditions onto borosilicate glass substrate were studied. Mean thickness of sputtered gold film was measured by gravimetry, and film contact angle was determined by goniometry. Surface morphology was examined by atomic force microscopy, and electrical sheet resistance was determined by two-point technique. The samples were seeded with rat vascular smooth muscle cells, and their adhesion and proliferation were studied. Gold depositions lead to dramatical changes in the surface morphology and roughness in comparison to pristine substrate. For sputtered gold structures, the rapid decline of the sheet resistance appears on structures deposited for the times above 100 s. The thickness of deposited gold nanoparticles/layer is an increasing function of sputtering time and current. AFM images prove the creation of separated gold islands in the initial deposition phase and a continuous gold coverage for longer deposition times. Gold deposition has a positive effect on the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Largest number of cells was observed on sample sputtered with gold for 20 s and at the discharge current of 40 mA. This sample exhibits lowest contact angle, low relative roughness, and only mild increase of electrical conductivity.

  18. Encapsulation of Gold Nanoparticles in a DNA Origami Cage

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhao; Jacovetty, Erica L.; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2011-01-21

    A critical challenge in nanoparticle (NP) surface functionalization is to label the NP surface with a single copy of a functional group or to display multiple, unique molecules on the NP surface with control of the orientation and intermolecular distance. This challenge was addressed with the construction of a spatially addressable, self-assembling DNA origami nanocage that encapsulates gold nanoparticles and interrupts its surface symmetry

  19. Gold nanoparticle capture within protein crystal scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Ann E; Huber, Thaddaus R; Ni, Thomas W; Hartje, Luke F; Appel, Karina L; Yost, Jarad W; Ackerson, Christopher J; Snow, Christopher D

    2016-07-01

    DNA assemblies have been used to organize inorganic nanoparticles into 3D arrays, with emergent properties arising as a result of nanoparticle spacing and geometry. We report here the use of engineered protein crystals as an alternative approach to biologically mediated assembly of inorganic nanoparticles. The protein crystal's 13 nm diameter pores result in an 80% solvent content and display hexahistidine sequences on their interior. The hexahistidine sequence captures Au25(glutathione)∼17 (nitrilotriacetic acid)∼1 nanoclusters throughout a chemically crosslinked crystal via the coordination of Ni(ii) to both the cluster and the protein. Nanoparticle loading was validated by confocal microscopy and elemental analysis. The nanoparticles may be released from the crystal by exposure to EDTA, which chelates the Ni(ii) and breaks the specific protein/nanoparticle interaction. The integrity of the protein crystals after crosslinking and nanoparticle capture was confirmed by single crystal X-ray crystallography. PMID:27264210

  20. Quantitative detection of liver-relevant biomarkers by SERS-immunolabeled gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, William Mark

    Lab-on-a-chip technology has the potential to rapidly change the way experiments are conducted in a variety of fields ranging from medicine to environmental science. Specifically, sensors, detectors, and monitoring devices are increasingly being miniaturized to perform many experiments or measurements on a single chip. In this research, we develop an immunolabeled gold nanoparticle complex capable of detecting liver organoid biomarkers intended for use in a microfluidic device. Human Serum Albumin (HSA) and alpha-Glutathione S-Transferase (alpha-GST) are liver biomarkers that indicate liver health and damage respectively. Herein we demonstrate detection of the liver organoid biomarkers at nanomolar concentrations. Through plasmonic coupling induced by aggregation in the presence of analyte, the SERS signal obtained from the nanoparticles is dramatically increased. Furthermore, detection is demonstrated in a simple fluidic device to show the feasibility of implementing an optimized SERS-immunolabeled nanoparticle for translational application.

  1. Gold nanoparticle capture within protein crystal scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Ann E.; Huber, Thaddaus R.; Ni, Thomas W.; Hartje, Luke F.; Appel, Karina L.; Yost, Jarad W.; Ackerson, Christopher J.; Snow, Christopher D.

    2016-06-01

    DNA assemblies have been used to organize inorganic nanoparticles into 3D arrays, with emergent properties arising as a result of nanoparticle spacing and geometry. We report here the use of engineered protein crystals as an alternative approach to biologically mediated assembly of inorganic nanoparticles. The protein crystal's 13 nm diameter pores result in an 80% solvent content and display hexahistidine sequences on their interior. The hexahistidine sequence captures Au25(glutathione)~17 (nitrilotriacetic acid)~1 nanoclusters throughout a chemically crosslinked crystal via the coordination of Ni(ii) to both the cluster and the protein. Nanoparticle loading was validated by confocal microscopy and elemental analysis. The nanoparticles may be released from the crystal by exposure to EDTA, which chelates the Ni(ii) and breaks the specific protein/nanoparticle interaction. The integrity of the protein crystals after crosslinking and nanoparticle capture was confirmed by single crystal X-ray crystallography.DNA assemblies have been used to organize inorganic nanoparticles into 3D arrays, with emergent properties arising as a result of nanoparticle spacing and geometry. We report here the use of engineered protein crystals as an alternative approach to biologically mediated assembly of inorganic nanoparticles. The protein crystal's 13 nm diameter pores result in an 80% solvent content and display hexahistidine sequences on their interior. The hexahistidine sequence captures Au25(glutathione)~17 (nitrilotriacetic acid)~1 nanoclusters throughout a chemically crosslinked crystal via the coordination of Ni(ii) to both the cluster and the protein. Nanoparticle loading was validated by confocal microscopy and elemental analysis. The nanoparticles may be released from the crystal by exposure to EDTA, which chelates the Ni(ii) and breaks the specific protein/nanoparticle interaction. The integrity of the protein crystals after crosslinking and nanoparticle capture was

  2. An investigation of the impedance properties of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callaghan, Martina F.; Lund, Torben; Hashemzadeh, Parham; Roitt, Ivan M.; Bayford, Richard H.

    2010-04-01

    Over recent years there has been rapid growth in the research being carried out on nanoparticles. In the field of medical imaging, this interest has focussed primarily on the potential for drug delivery and using nanoparticles as a contrast agent, e.g. super-paramagnetic iron-oxide (SPIO) particles in MRI. More recently gold nanoparticles have been used in radiotherapy treatment of tumours to provide dose enhancement by increasing the efficacy of the radiation absorption. Nanoparticles coated with molecules such as glucose or cancer-specific antibodies can be directed towards specific cancer cells in vivo. Such targeting combined with the properties of nanoparticles shows great promise for localised therapy of tumours while leaving neighbouring healthy tissue unaffected. However, on the nanoparticle scale of sub-100nm the weighting of various factors and inter-atomic interactions which determine the bulk properties of a material changes. Many properties of the bulk material no longer hold. As such, each aspect of nanoparticle behaviour must be investigated afresh to explore the full extent of their potential. The property of nanoparticles we wish to explore and characterise is impedance. Bulk gold is well known to be highly conductive. If this were to remain the case on the nanoscale, it could be highly effective as a contrast agent for electrical impedance tomography, particularly when combined with tumour targeting.

  3. Vascular targeting of a gold nanoparticle to breast cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Peiris, Pubudu M.; Deb, Partha; Doolittle, Elizabeth; Doron, Gilad; Goldberg, Amy; Govender, Priya; Shah, Shruti; Rao, Swetha; Carbone, Sarah; Cotey, Thomas; Sylvestre, Meilyn; Singh, Sohaj; Schiemann, William P.; Lee, Zhenghong; Karathanasis, Efstathios

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of breast cancer deaths are due to metastatic disease. While deep tissue targeting of nanoparticles is suitable for some primary tumors, vascular targeting may be a more attractive strategy for micrometastasis. This study combined a vascular targeting strategy with the enhanced targeting capabilities of a nanoparticle to evaluate the ability of a gold nanoparticle to specifically target the early spread of metastatic disease. As a ligand for the vascular targeting strategy, we utilized a peptide targeting alpha(v) beta(3) integrin, which is functionally linked to the development of micrometastases at a distal site. By employing a straightforward radiolabeling method to incorporate Technetium-99m into the gold nanoparticles, we used the high sensitivity of radionuclide imaging to monitor the longitudinal accumulation of the nanoparticles in metastatic sites. Animal and histological studies showed that vascular targeting of the nanoparticle facilitated highly accurate targeting of micrometastasis in the 4T1 mouse model of breast cancer metastasis using radionuclide imaging and a low dose of the nanoparticle. Due to the efficient targeting scheme, 14% of the injected AuNP deposited at metastatic sites in the lungs within 60 min after injection, indicating that the vascular bed of metastasis is a viable target site for nanoparticles. PMID:26036431

  4. Effect of gold ion concentration on size and properties of gold nanoparticles in TritonX-100 based inverse microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Tokeer; Wani, Irshad A.; Ahmed, Jahangeer; Al-Hartomy, Omar A.

    2014-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been prepared successfully using TritonX-100 inverse microemulsion at different concentrations of HAuCl4 (0.1, 0.05, 0.04, 0.03, 0.02 and 0.01 M). We have studied the effect of gold ion concentration on the particle size, morphology, surface area and optical properties of the gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, UV-Visible spectroscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analysis. X-ray diffraction studies show the monophasic nature of the gold nanoparticles. TritonX-100 stabilized gold nanoparticles were appeared to be agglomerated at higher concentrations (0.1 and 0.05 M) of Au3+ with an average grain size of 60 and 50 nm, respectively. Monodisperse and uniform gold nanoparticles with well-defined morphologies of an average grain size of 15 and 25 nm were obtained at lower concentrations (0.01 and 0.02 M). UV-Visible spectroscopy shows the characteristic surface plasmon resonance peak ~540 nm along with the peaks at shorter and longer wavelengths may be due to the higher order plasmon resonance of the gold nanoparticles. The surface areas of the gold nanoparticles were found to be in the range of 5.8-107 m2/g which were well in agreement with the electron microscopic studies.

  5. Effect of gold ion concentration on size and properties of gold nanoparticles in TritonX-100 based inverse microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Tokeer; Wani, Irshad A.; Ahmed, Jahangeer; Al-Hartomy, Omar A.

    2013-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been prepared successfully using TritonX-100 inverse microemulsion at different concentrations of HAuCl4 (0.1, 0.05, 0.04, 0.03, 0.02 and 0.01 M). We have studied the effect of gold ion concentration on the particle size, morphology, surface area and optical properties of the gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, UV-Visible spectroscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analysis. X-ray diffraction studies show the monophasic nature of the gold nanoparticles. TritonX-100 stabilized gold nanoparticles were appeared to be agglomerated at higher concentrations (0.1 and 0.05 M) of Au3+ with an average grain size of 60 and 50 nm, respectively. Monodisperse and uniform gold nanoparticles with well-defined morphologies of an average grain size of 15 and 25 nm were obtained at lower concentrations (0.01 and 0.02 M). UV-Visible spectroscopy shows the characteristic surface plasmon resonance peak ~540 nm along with the peaks at shorter and longer wavelengths may be due to the higher order plasmon resonance of the gold nanoparticles. The surface areas of the gold nanoparticles were found to be in the range of 5.8-107 m2/g which were well in agreement with the electron microscopic studies.

  6. Gold nanoparticles-graphene hybrids as active catalysts for Suzuki reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yang; Fan, Xiaobin; Qi, Junjie; Ji, Junyi; Wang, Shulan; Zhang, Guoliang; Zhang, Fengbao

    2010-10-15

    Graphene was successfully modified with gold nanoparticles in a facile route by reducing chloroauric acid in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate, which is used as both a surfactant and reducing agent. The gold nanoparticles-graphene hybrids were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and energy X-ray spectroscopy. We demonstrate for the first time that the gold nanoparticles-graphene hybrids can act as efficient catalysts for the Suzuki reaction in water under aerobic conditions. The catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles-graphene hybrids was influenced by the size of the gold nanoparticles.

  7. Electrochemical assembling of methionine-gold nanoparticles and catalysis on the surface of glassy carbon electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y. Z.; Wang, J. H.; Zhang, X. M.; Cao, W.; Ge, A.; Zhou, L.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper cyclic voltammetry was used for the synthesis of linear array spherical gold nanoparticles on the surface of glassy carbon electrode using methionine as a stable reagent. The methionine-gold nanoparticles on the surface of glassy electrode were obtained. The methionine-gold nanoparticles were characterized by cyclic voltammetry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry and powder X-ray diffraction. Electrochemical behavior of methionine at methionine-gold nanoparticle modified electrode was investigated. It was demonstrated that the methionine-gold nanoparticles can catalyze electrochemical transformations of methionine.

  8. Rapid and selective lead (II) colorimetric sensor based on azacrown ether-functionalized gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, A.; Khodaei, M. M.; Karami, Ch; Workentin, M. S.; Shamsipur, M.; Sadeghi, M.

    2010-08-01

    A gold nanoparticle (AuNPs)-based simple and fast colorimetric sensor for selective detecting of Pb(II) in aqueous solution has been developed. Monodisperse AuNPs (approx. 2.0 nm diameter) has been prepared facilely and further modified with an alkanethiol-bearing monoazacrown ether terminus. These AuNPs are shown to selectively sense Pb2 + through color change, which is visually discernible by an appearance of the surface plasmon band (SPB) at 520 nm. The recognition mechanism is attributed to the unique structure of the monoazacrown ether attached to AuNPs and metal sandwich coordination between two azacrown ether moieties that are attached to separate nanoparticles. This inter-particle cross-linking results in an aggregation and apparent color change from brown to purple. Additionally, TEM experiments support the optical absorption data proving the aggregation between azacrown ether-capped gold nanoparticles. This AuNP-based colorimetric assay is a facile and robust method and allows fast detection of Pb2 + at ambient temperatures. More importantly, the developed technique does not utilize enzymatic reactions, light-sensitive dye molecules, lengthy protocols or sophisticated instrumentation.

  9. Aggregation and deposition behavior of boron nanoparticles in porous media.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuyang; Wazne, Mahmoud; Christodoulatos, Christos; Jasinkiewicz, Kristin L

    2009-02-01

    New kinds of solid fuels and propellants comprised of nanomaterials are making their way into civilian and military applications yet the impact of their release on the environment remains largely unknown. One such material is nano boron, a promising solid fuel and propellant. The fate and transport of nano boron under various aquatic systems was investigated in aggregation and deposition experiments. Column experiments were performed to examine the effects of electrolyte concentration and flow velocity on the transport of boron nanoparticles under saturated conditions, whereas aggregation tests were conducted to assess the effects of electrolytes on the aggregation of the boron nanoparticles. Aggregation tests indicated the presence of different reaction-controlled and diffusion-controlled regimes and yielded critical coagulation concentrations (CCC) of 200 mM, 0.7 mM and 1.5 mM for NaCl, CaCl(2), and MgCl(2), respectively. Aggregation and deposition experimental data corresponded with the classic Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) model and the constant attachment efficiency filtration model, respectively. Theoretical calculations indicated that both the primary and secondary energy minima play important roles in the deposition of nano boron in sand columns.

  10. Fungus-mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles: a novel biological approach to nanoparticle synthesis.

    PubMed

    Honary, Soheyla; Gharaei-Fathabad, Eshrat; Barabadi, Hamed; Naghibi, Farzaneh

    2013-02-01

    The biological effects of nanoparticles and their uses as molecular probes are research areas of growing interest. The present study demonstrates an eco-friendly biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles. The pure colonies of penicillium aurantiogriseum, penicillium citrinum, and penicillium waksmanii were cultured in fluid czapek dox broth. Then, their supernatants were examined for the ability to produce gold nanoparticles. In this step, 1 mM solution of AuCl added to the reaction matrixes separately. The reactions were performed in a dark environment at 28 degrees C. After 24 hours, it was observed that the color of the solutions turned to dark purple from light yellow. Synthesized gold nanoparticles were characterized by using UV-Visible Spectroscopy, Nano Zeta Sizer, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. The results showed that the gold nanoparticles were formed fairly uniform with spherical shape with the Z-average diameter of 153.3 nm, 172 nm and 160.1 nm for penicillium aurantiogriseum, penicillium citrinum, and penicillium waksmanii, respectively. The Fourier transformed infrared spectra revealed the presence of different functional groups to gold nanoparticles which were present in the fungal extract. The current approach suggests that the rapid synthesis of nanoparticles would be proper for developing a biological process for mass scale production.

  11. Molecular photoacoustic imaging using gold nanoparticles as a contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulhong; Cho, Eun Chul; Chen, Jingyi; Song, Kwang Hyun; Au, Leslie; Favazza, Christopher P.; Zhang, Qiang; Cobley, Claire M.; Xia, Younan; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles have received much attention due to their potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Gold nanoparticles are attractive in many biomedical applications because of their biocompatibility, easily modifiable surfaces for targeting, lack of heavy metal toxicity, wide range of sizes (35-100 nm), tunable plasmonic resonance peak, encapsulated site-specific drug delivery, and strong optical absorption in the near-infrared regime. Specifically, due to their strong optical absorption, gold nanoparticles have been used as a contrast agent for molecular photoacoustic (PA) imaging of tumor. The plasmonic resonance peak of the gold nanocages (AuNCs) was tuned to the near-infrared region, and the ratio of the absorption cross-section to the extinction cross-section was approximately ~70%, as measured by PA sensing. We used PEGylated gold nanocages (PEG-AuNCs) as a passive targeting contrast agent on melanomas. After 6-h intravenous injection of PEG-AuNCs, PA amplitude was increased by ~14 %. These results strongly suggest PA imaging paired with AuNCs is a promising diagnostic tool for early cancer detection.

  12. Anodic Stripping Voltammetry of Silver Nanoparticles: Aggregation Leads to Incomplete Stripping

    PubMed Central

    Cloake, Samantha J; Toh, Her Shuang; Lee, Patricia T; Salter, Chris; Johnston, Colin; Compton, Richard G

    2015-01-01

    The influence of nanoparticle aggregation on anodic stripping voltammetry is reported. Dopamine-capped silver nanoparticles were chosen as a model system, and melamine was used to induce aggregation in the nanoparticles. Through the anodic stripping of the silver nanoparticles that were aggregated to different extents, it was found that the peak area of the oxidative signal corresponding to the stripping of silver to silver(I) ions decreases with increasing aggregation. Aggregation causes incomplete stripping of the silver nanoparticles. Two possible mechanisms of ‘partial oxidation’ and ‘inactivation’ of the nanoparticles are proposed to account for this finding. Aggregation effects must be considered when anodic stripping voltammetry is used for nanoparticle detection and quantification. Hence, drop casting, which is known to lead to aggregation, is not encouraged for preparing electrodes for analytical purposes. PMID:25861566

  13. Ligand adsorption and exchange on pegylated gold nanoparticles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous researchers proposed that thiolated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-SH) adopts a “mushroom-like” conformation on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in water. However, information regarding the size and permeability of the PEG-SH mushroom caps and surface area passivated by the PEG-SH mushroom stems are ...

  14. Multiple strategies to activate gold nanoparticles as antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuyun; Jiang, Xingyu

    2013-09-21

    Widespread antibiotic resistance calls for new strategies. Nanotechnology provides a chance to overcome antibiotic resistance by multiple antibiotic mechanisms. This paper reviews the progress in activating gold nanoparticles with nonantibiotic or antibiotic molecules to combat bacterial resistance, analyzes the gap between experimental achievements and real clinical application, and suggests some potential directions in developing antibacterial nanodrugs.

  15. Multiple strategies to activate gold nanoparticles as antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuyun; Jiang, Xingyu

    2013-08-01

    Widespread antibiotic resistance calls for new strategies. Nanotechnology provides a chance to overcome antibiotic resistance by multiple antibiotic mechanisms. This paper reviews the progress in activating gold nanoparticles with nonantibiotic or antibiotic molecules to combat bacterial resistance, analyzes the gap between experimental achievements and real clinical application, and suggests some potential directions in developing antibacterial nanodrugs.

  16. Gold Nanoparticles: Recent Advances in the Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoying

    2015-07-01

    Among the multiple branches of nanotechnology applications in the area of medicine and biology, Nanoparticle technology is the fastest growing and shows significant future promise. Nanoscale structures, with size similar to many biological molecules, show different physical and chemical properties compared to either small molecules or bulk materials, find many applications in the fields of biomedical imaging and therapy. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are relatively inert in biological environment, and have a number of physical properties that are suitable for several biomedical applications. For example, AuNPs have been successfully employed in inducing localized hyperthermia for the destruction of tumors or radiotherapy for cancer, photodynamic therapy, computed tomography imaging, as drug carriers to tumors, bio-labeling through single particle detection by electron microscopy and in photothermal microscopy. Recent advances in synthetic chemistry makes it possible to make gold nanoparticles with precise control over physicochemical and optical properties that are desired for specific clinical or biological applications. Because of the availability of several methods for easy modification of the surface of gold nanoparticles for attaching a ligand, drug or other targeting molecules, AuNPs are useful in a wide variety of applications. Even though gold is biologically inert and thus shows much less toxicity, the relatively low rate of clearance from circulation and tissues can lead to health problems and therefore, specific targeting of diseased cells and tissues must be achieved before AuNPs find their application for routine human use.

  17. Resistive pressure sensors based on freestanding membranes of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlicke, Hendrik; Rebber, Matthias; Kunze, Svenja; Vossmeyer, Tobias

    2015-12-01

    In this communication the application of gold nanoparticle membranes as ambient pressure sensors with electromechanical signal transduction is demonstrated. The devices were fabricated by sealing microstructured cavities with membranes of 1,6-hexanedithiol cross-linked gold nanoparticles, which were electrically contacted by metal electrodes deposited on both sides of the cavities. Variations of the external pressure resulted in a deflection of the membranes and, thus, increased the average interparticle distances. Therefore, the pressure change could easily be detected by simply monitoring the resistance of the membranes.In this communication the application of gold nanoparticle membranes as ambient pressure sensors with electromechanical signal transduction is demonstrated. The devices were fabricated by sealing microstructured cavities with membranes of 1,6-hexanedithiol cross-linked gold nanoparticles, which were electrically contacted by metal electrodes deposited on both sides of the cavities. Variations of the external pressure resulted in a deflection of the membranes and, thus, increased the average interparticle distances. Therefore, the pressure change could easily be detected by simply monitoring the resistance of the membranes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06937h

  18. Aquatic Fern (Azolla Sp.) Assisted Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Anal K.; Prasad, K.

    2016-02-01

    Aquatic pteridophyte (Azolla sp.) was taken to assess its potential to synthesize the metal (Au) nanoparticles. The synthesized particles were characterized using X-ray, UV-visible, scanning and transmission electron microscopy analyses. Nanoparticles almost spherical in shape having the sizes of 5-17nm are found. UV-visible study revealed the surface plasmon resonance at 538nm. Responsible phytochemicals for the transformation were principally phenolics, tannins, anthraquinone glycosides and sugars present abundantly in the plant thereby bestowing it adaptive prodigality. Also, the use of Azolla sp. for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles offers the benefit of eco-friendliness.

  19. Plant Extract (Bupleurum falcatum) as a Green Factory for Biofabrication of Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, You Jeong; Cha, Song-Hyun; Lee, Kyoung Jin; Kim, Yeong Shik; Cho, Seonho; Park, Youmie

    2015-09-01

    This work describes a biofabrication process for gold nanoparticles in which the plant extract (Bupleurum falcatum) is used as a reducing agent to convert gold ions to gold nanoparticles. Biofabricated gold nanoparticles with spherical shapes were observed with an average diameter of 10.5 ± 2.3 nm. The color of the gold nanoparticles was purple, with a surface plasmon resonance peak at 542 nm. The face-centered cubic structure of crystalline gold was confirmed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction patterns. The biofabricated gold nanoparticles demonstrated excellent catalytic activity towards the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction. The current report suggests that plant extracts are valuable natural sources for the biofabrication of gold nanoparticles with excellent catalytic activities.

  20. Gold-Nanoparticle-Based Colorimetric Sensor Array for Discrimination of Organophosphate Pesticides.

    PubMed

    Fahimi-Kashani, Nafiseh; Hormozi-Nezhad, M Reza

    2016-08-16

    There is a growing interest in developing high-performance sensors monitoring organophosphate pesticides, primarily due to their broad usage and harmful effects on mammals. In the present study, a colorimetric sensor array consisting of citrate-capped 13 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has been proposed for the detection and discrimination of several organophosphate pesticides (OPs). The aggregation-induced spectral changes of AuNPs upon OP addition has been analyzed with pattern recognition techniques, including hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). In addition, the proposed sensor array has the capability to identify individual OPs or mixtures of them in real samples. PMID:27412472

  1. “Smart” Diblock Copolymers as Templates for Magnetic-Core Gold-Shell Nanoparticle Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Michael A.; Lai, James J.; Hoffman, Allan S.; Yager, Paul; Stayton, Partick S.

    2010-01-13

    We report a new strategy for synthesizing temperature-responsive γ-Fe2O3-core/Au-shell nanoparticles (Au-mNPs) from diblock copolymer micelles. The amphiphilic diblock copolymer chains were synthesized using reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) with a thermally responsive “smart” poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAAm) block and an amine-containing poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethylacrylamide) (DMAEAm) block that acted as a reducing agent during gold shell formation. The Au-mNPs reversibly aggregated upon heating the solution above the transition temperature of pNIPAAm, resulting in a red-shifted localized surface plasmon resonance.

  2. Highly Sensitive Colorimetric Detection of Ochratoxin A by a Label-Free Aptamer and Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Yunxia; Chen, Jiayi; Li, Cheng; Xie, Gang; Fu, Hailong; Ma, Zhihong; Lu, Anxiang

    2015-01-01

    A label-free aptamer-based assay for the highly sensitive and specific detection of Ochratoxin A (OTA) was developed using a cationic polymer and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The OTA aptamer was used as a recognition element for the colorimetric detection of OTA based on the aggregation of AuNPs by the cationic polymer. By spectroscopic quantitative analysis, the colorimetric assay could detect OTA down to 0.009 ng/mL with high selectivity in the presence of other interfering toxins. This study offers a new alternative in visual detection methods that is rapid and sensitive for OTA detection. PMID:26690477

  3. Nanoparticles in relation to peptide and protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Masihuz; Ahmad, Ejaz; Qadeer, Atiyatul; Rabbani, Gulam; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been considerable research interest in the use of nanoparticles in the study of protein and peptide aggregation, and of amyloid-related diseases. The influence of nanoparticles on amyloid formation yields great interest due to its small size and high surface area-to-volume ratio. Targeting nucleation kinetics by nanoparticles is one of the most searched for ways to control or induce this phenomenon. The observed effect of nanoparticles on the nucleation phase is determined by particle composition, as well as the amount and nature of the particle’s surface. Various thermodynamic parameters influence the interaction of proteins and nanoparticles in the solution, and regulate the protein assembly into fibrils, as well as the disaggregation of preformed fibrils. Metals, organic particles, inorganic particles, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and so on are more suitable candidates for nanoparticle formulation. In the present review, we attempt to explore the effects of nanoparticles on protein and peptide fibrillation processes from both perspectives (ie, as inducers and inhibitors on nucleation kinetics and in the disaggregation of preformed fibrils). Their formulation and characterization by different techniques have been also addressed, along with their toxicological effects, both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:24611007

  4. Shaping and patterning gold nanoparticles via micelle templated photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundrat, F.; Baffou, G.; Polleux, J.

    2015-09-01

    Shaping and positioning noble metal nanostructures are essential processes that still require laborious and sophisticated techniques to fabricate functional plasmonic interfaces. The present study reports a simple photochemical approach compatible with micellar nanolithography and photolithography that enables the growth, arrangement and shaping of gold nanoparticles with tuneable plasmonic resonances on glass substrates. Ultraviolet illumination of surfaces coated with gold-loaded micelles leads to the formation of gold nanoparticles with micro/nanometric spatial resolution without requiring any photosensitizers or photoresists. Depending on the extra-micellar chemical environment and the illumination wavelength, block copolymer micelles act as reactive and light-responsive templates, which enable to grow gold deformed nanoparticles (potatoids) and nanorings. Optical characterization reveals that arrays of individual potatoids and rings feature a localized plasmon resonance around 600 and 800 nm, respectively, enhanced photothermal properties and high temperature sustainability, making them ideal platforms for future developments in nanochemistry and biomolecular manipulation controlled by near-infrared-induced heat.Shaping and positioning noble metal nanostructures are essential processes that still require laborious and sophisticated techniques to fabricate functional plasmonic interfaces. The present study reports a simple photochemical approach compatible with micellar nanolithography and photolithography that enables the growth, arrangement and shaping of gold nanoparticles with tuneable plasmonic resonances on glass substrates. Ultraviolet illumination of surfaces coated with gold-loaded micelles leads to the formation of gold nanoparticles with micro/nanometric spatial resolution without requiring any photosensitizers or photoresists. Depending on the extra-micellar chemical environment and the illumination wavelength, block copolymer micelles act as

  5. A Facile pH Controlled Citrate-Based Reduction Method for Gold Nanoparticle Synthesis at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Himanshu; Kushwaha, Ajay; Kumar, Anshuman; Aslam, Mohammed

    2016-12-01

    The synthesis of gold nanoparticles using citrate reduction process has been revisited. A simplified room temperature approach to standard Turkevich synthesis is employed to obtain fairly monodisperse gold nanoparticles. The role of initial pH alongside the concentration ratio of reactants is explored for the size control of Au nanoparticles. The particle size distribution has been investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscope (TEM). At optimal pH of 5, gold nanoparticles obtained are highly monodisperse and spherical in shape and have narrower size distribution (sharp surface plasmon at 520 nm). For other pH conditions, particles are non-uniform and polydisperse, showing a red-shift in plasmon peak due to aggregation and large particle size distribution. The room temperature approach results in highly stable "colloidal" suspension of gold nanoparticles. The stability test through absorption spectroscopy indicates no sign of aggregation for a month. The rate of reduction of auric ionic species by citrate ions is determined via UV absorbance studies. The size of nanoparticles under various conditions is thus predicted using a theoretical model that incorporates nucleation, growth, and aggregation processes. The faster rate of reduction yields better size distribution for optimized pH and reactant concentrations. The model involves solving population balance equation for continuously evolving particle size distribution by discretization techniques. The particle sizes estimated from the simulations (13 to 25 nm) are close to the experimental ones (10 to 32 nm) and corroborate the similarity of reaction processes at 300 and 373 K (classical Turkevich reaction). Thus, substitution of experimentally measured rate of disappearance of auric ionic species into theoretical model enables us to capture the unusual experimental observations. PMID:27526178

  6. A Facile pH Controlled Citrate-Based Reduction Method for Gold Nanoparticle Synthesis at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Himanshu; Kushwaha, Ajay; Kumar, Anshuman; Aslam, Mohammed

    2016-12-01

    The synthesis of gold nanoparticles using citrate reduction process has been revisited. A simplified room temperature approach to standard Turkevich synthesis is employed to obtain fairly monodisperse gold nanoparticles. The role of initial pH alongside the concentration ratio of reactants is explored for the size control of Au nanoparticles. The particle size distribution has been investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscope (TEM). At optimal pH of 5, gold nanoparticles obtained are highly monodisperse and spherical in shape and have narrower size distribution (sharp surface plasmon at 520 nm). For other pH conditions, particles are non-uniform and polydisperse, showing a red-shift in plasmon peak due to aggregation and large particle size distribution. The room temperature approach results in highly stable "colloidal" suspension of gold nanoparticles. The stability test through absorption spectroscopy indicates no sign of aggregation for a month. The rate of reduction of auric ionic species by citrate ions is determined via UV absorbance studies. The size of nanoparticles under various conditions is thus predicted using a theoretical model that incorporates nucleation, growth, and aggregation processes. The faster rate of reduction yields better size distribution for optimized pH and reactant concentrations. The model involves solving population balance equation for continuously evolving particle size distribution by discretization techniques. The particle sizes estimated from the simulations (13 to 25 nm) are close to the experimental ones (10 to 32 nm) and corroborate the similarity of reaction processes at 300 and 373 K (classical Turkevich reaction). Thus, substitution of experimentally measured rate of disappearance of auric ionic species into theoretical model enables us to capture the unusual experimental observations.

  7. A Facile pH Controlled Citrate-Based Reduction Method for Gold Nanoparticle Synthesis at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Himanshu; Kushwaha, Ajay; Kumar, Anshuman; Aslam, Mohammed

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis of gold nanoparticles using citrate reduction process has been revisited. A simplified room temperature approach to standard Turkevich synthesis is employed to obtain fairly monodisperse gold nanoparticles. The role of initial pH alongside the concentration ratio of reactants is explored for the size control of Au nanoparticles. The particle size distribution has been investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscope (TEM). At optimal pH of 5, gold nanoparticles obtained are highly monodisperse and spherical in shape and have narrower size distribution (sharp surface plasmon at 520 nm). For other pH conditions, particles are non-uniform and polydisperse, showing a red-shift in plasmon peak due to aggregation and large particle size distribution. The room temperature approach results in highly stable "colloidal" suspension of gold nanoparticles. The stability test through absorption spectroscopy indicates no sign of aggregation for a month. The rate of reduction of auric ionic species by citrate ions is determined via UV absorbance studies. The size of nanoparticles under various conditions is thus predicted using a theoretical model that incorporates nucleation, growth, and aggregation processes. The faster rate of reduction yields better size distribution for optimized pH and reactant concentrations. The model involves solving population balance equation for continuously evolving particle size distribution by discretization techniques. The particle sizes estimated from the simulations (13 to 25 nm) are close to the experimental ones (10 to 32 nm) and corroborate the similarity of reaction processes at 300 and 373 K (classical Turkevich reaction). Thus, substitution of experimentally measured rate of disappearance of auric ionic species into theoretical model enables us to capture the unusual experimental observations.

  8. Synthesis of new liquid crystals embedded gold nanoparticles for photoswitching properties.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Lutfor; Biswas, Tapan Kumar; Sarkar, Shaheen M; Yusoff, Mashitah Mohd; Yuvaraj, A R; Kumar, Sandeep

    2016-09-15

    A new series of liquid crystals decorated gold nanoparticles is synthesized whose molecular architecture has azobenzenes moieties as the peripheral units connected to gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) via alkyl groups. The morphology and mesomorphic properties were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscope, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and polarizing optical microscopy. The thiolated ligand molecules (3a-c) showed enantiotropic smectic A phase, whereas gold nanoparticles (5a-c) exhibit nematic and smectic A phase with monotropic nature. HR-TEM measurement showed that the functionalized Au NPs are of the average size of 2nm and they are well dispersed without any aggregation. The trans-form of azo compounds showed a strong band in the UV region at ∼378nm for the π-π(∗) transition, and a weak band in the visible region at ∼472nm due to the n-π(∗) transition. These molecules exhibit attractive photoisomerization behaviour in which trans-cis transition takes about 15s whereas the cis-trans transition requires about 45min for compound 5c. The extent of reversible isomerization did not decay after 10 cycles, which proved that the photo-responsive properties of 5c were stable and repeatable. Therefore, these materials may be suitably exploited in the field of molecular switches and the optical storage devices. PMID:27341036

  9. Synthesis of new liquid crystals embedded gold nanoparticles for photoswitching properties.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Lutfor; Biswas, Tapan Kumar; Sarkar, Shaheen M; Yusoff, Mashitah Mohd; Yuvaraj, A R; Kumar, Sandeep

    2016-09-15

    A new series of liquid crystals decorated gold nanoparticles is synthesized whose molecular architecture has azobenzenes moieties as the peripheral units connected to gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) via alkyl groups. The morphology and mesomorphic properties were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscope, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and polarizing optical microscopy. The thiolated ligand molecules (3a-c) showed enantiotropic smectic A phase, whereas gold nanoparticles (5a-c) exhibit nematic and smectic A phase with monotropic nature. HR-TEM measurement showed that the functionalized Au NPs are of the average size of 2nm and they are well dispersed without any aggregation. The trans-form of azo compounds showed a strong band in the UV region at ∼378nm for the π-π(∗) transition, and a weak band in the visible region at ∼472nm due to the n-π(∗) transition. These molecules exhibit attractive photoisomerization behaviour in which trans-cis transition takes about 15s whereas the cis-trans transition requires about 45min for compound 5c. The extent of reversible isomerization did not decay after 10 cycles, which proved that the photo-responsive properties of 5c were stable and repeatable. Therefore, these materials may be suitably exploited in the field of molecular switches and the optical storage devices.

  10. Gold nanoparticles - the theranostic challenge for PPPM: nanocardiology application

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The article overviews the potential biomedical applications of nanoscale gold particles for predictive, preventive and personalised nanomedicine in cardiology. The review demonstrates the wide opportunities for gold nanoparticles due to their unique biological properties. The use of gold nanoparticles in cardiology is promising to develop fundamentally new methods of diagnosis and treatment. The nanotheranostics in cardiovascular diseases allows the non-invasive imaging associated with simultaneous therapeutic intervention and predicting treatment outcomes. Imaging may reflect the effectiveness of treatment and has become a fundamental optimisation setting for therapeutic protocol. Combining the application of biomolecular and cellular therapies with nanotechnologies foresees the development of complex integrated nanodevices. Nanocardiology may challenge existing healthcare system and economic benefits as cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality at present. PMID:23800174

  11. Synthesis, Structure, Stability and Redispersion of Gold-based Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiruvalam, Ram Chandra

    Nanoscale gold has been shown to possess an intriguing combination of unexpected optical, photochemical and catalytic properties. The ability to control the size, shape, morphology, composition and dispersion of gold-based nanostructures is key to optimizing their performance for nanotechnology applications. The advanced electron microscopy studies described in this thesis analyze three important aspects of gold and gold-palladium alloy nanoparticles: namely, (i) the ability to synthesize gold nanoparticles of controlled size and shape in an aqueous medium; (ii) the colloidal preparation of designer gold-palladium alloys for selective oxidation catalysis; and (iii) the ability to disperse gold as finely and homogeneously as possible on a metal oxide or carbon support. The ability to exploit the nanoscale properties of gold for various engineering applications often depends on our ability to control size and shape of the nanoscale entity by careful manipulation of the synthesis parameters. We have explored an aqueous based synthesis route, using oleylamine as both a reductant and surfactant, for preparing gold nanostructures. By systematically varying synthesis parameters such as oleylamine concentration, reaction temperature, and aging time it is possible to identify processing regimens that generate Au nanostructures having either pseudo-spherical, faceted polyhedral, nanostar or wire shaped morphologies. Furthermore, by quenching the reaction partway through it is possible to create a class of metastable Au-containing structures such as nanocubes, nanoboxes and nanowires. Possible formation mechanisms for these gold based nano-objects are discussed. There is a growing interest in using supported bimetallic AuPd alloy nanoparticles for selective oxidation reactions. In this study, a systematic series of size controlled AuPd bimetallic particles have been prepared by colloidal synthesis methods. Particles having random alloy structures, as well as `designer

  12. Can small hydrophobic gold nanoparticles inhibit β2-microglobulin fibrillation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brancolini, Giorgia; Toroz, Dimitrios; Corni, Stefano

    2014-06-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles stabilized by a shell of organic ligands can enhance or suppress the natural propensity of proteins to form fibrils. Functionalization facilitates targeted delivery of the nanoparticles to various cell types, bioimaging, drug delivery and other therapeutic and diagnostic applications. In this study, we provide a computational model of the effect of a prototypical thiol-protected gold nanoparticle, Au25L18- (L = S(CH2)2Ph) on the β2-microglobulin natural fibrillation propensity. To reveal the molecular basis of the protein-nanoparticle association process, we performed various simulations at multiple levels (Classical Molecular Dynamics and Brownian Dynamics) that cover multiple length- and timescales. The results provide a model of the ensemble of structures constituting the protein-gold nanoparticle complexes, and insights into the driving forces for the binding of β2-microglobulin to hydrophobic small size gold nanoparticles. We have found that the small nanoparticles can bind the protein to form persistent complexes. This binding of nanoparticles is able to block the active sites of domains from binding to another protein, thus leading to potential inhibition of the fibrillation activity. A comparison with the binding patches identified for the interaction of the protein with a known inhibitor of fibrillation, supports our conclusion.Inorganic nanoparticles stabilized by a shell of organic ligands can enhance or suppress the natural propensity of proteins to form fibrils. Functionalization facilitates targeted delivery of the nanoparticles to various cell types, bioimaging, drug delivery and other therapeutic and diagnostic applications. In this study, we provide a computational model of the effect of a prototypical thiol-protected gold nanoparticle, Au25L18- (L = S(CH2)2Ph) on the β2-microglobulin natural fibrillation propensity. To reveal the molecular basis of the protein-nanoparticle association process, we performed various

  13. Preparation of DPPE-Stabilized Gold Nanoparticles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dungey, Keenan E.; Muller, David P.; Gunter, Tammy

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is presented that introduces students to nanotechnology through the preparation of nanoparticles and their visualization using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experiment familiarizes the students with nonaqueous solvents, biphasic reactions, phase-transfer agents, ligands to stabilize growing nanoparticles, and bidentate…

  14. Interaction of gold nanoparticles mediated by captopril and S-nitrosocaptopril: the effect of manganese ions in mild acid medium.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Emilia; Prado-Gotor, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    We report herein results regarding reactivity and assembly of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) mediated by captopril (cap) and S-nitrosocaptopril (NOcap), two angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and antihypertensive agents. The results were compared with that of cysteine (Cys), a thiol-containing amino acid found in plasma. The interparticle interactions were characterized by monitoring the evolution of the surface plasmon resonance band using the spectrophotometric method. The original gold nanoparticles were efficiently modified by small amounts of Mn(+2) ions, which are adsorbed onto the surface of 15.4 nm citrate-capped gold nanoparticles, giving rise to manganese-gold nanoparticles (Mn-AuNPs) that, in mild acid medium, have proved to be highly sensitive and a rapid colorimetric detection method for thiols. Depending on the concentration of the Mn(+2) ions the aggregation of AuNPs can be rapidly induced. The kinetics of the assembly process has been studied. Good first-order kinetics has been observed, with the exception of captopril-mediated nanoparticle aggregation at low concentration of either cap or acid. The rate of Cys-mediated assembly of gold nanoparticles in aqueous 10 mM acetic acid is more than 20-times faster than pure AuNPs and concentrations of Cys as low as 34 nM can be detected in less than 40 min under conditions of stable Mn-AuNPs. Similar effects were observed with cap or NOcap. The assembly-disassembly reversibility is shown with cap and NOcap and depends highly on pH.

  15. Structure and nanotribology of thermally deposited gold nanoparticles on graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cihan, Ebru; Özoğul, Alper; Baykara, Mehmet Z.

    2015-11-01

    We present experiments involving the structural and frictional characterization of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) thermally deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The effect of thermal deposition amount, as well as post-deposition annealing on the morphology and distribution of gold on HOPG is studied via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements, while transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is utilized to confirm the crystalline character of the nanoparticles. Lateral force measurements conducted via atomic force microscopy (AFM) under ambient conditions are employed to investigate the nanotribological properties of the gold nanoparticles as a function of normal load. Finally, the increase in lateral force experienced at the edges of the nanoparticles is studied as a function of normal load, as well as nanoparticle height. As a whole, our results constitute a comprehensive structural and frictional characterization of the AuNP/HOPG material system, forming the basis for nanotribology experiments involving the lateral manipulation of thermally deposited AuNPs on HOPG via AFM under ambient conditions.

  16. Cascade synthesis of a gold nanoparticle-network polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubjesic, Simonida; Ringstrand, Bryan S.; Jungjohann, Katherine L.; Brombosz, Scott M.; Seifert, Sönke; Firestone, Millicent A.

    2016-01-01

    The multi-step, cascade synthesis of a self-supporting, hierarchically-structured gold nanoparticle hydrogel composite is described. The composite is spontaneously prepared from a non-covalent, lamellar lyotropic mesophase composed of amphiphiles that support the reactive constituents, a mixture of hydroxyl- and acrylate-end-derivatized PEO117-PPO47-PEO117 and [AuCl4]-. The reaction sequence begins with the auto-reduction of aqueous [AuCl4]- by PEO117-PPO47-PEO117 which leads to both the production of Au NPs and the free radical initiated polymerization and crosslinking of the acrylate end-derivatized PEO117-PPO47-PEO117 to yield a network polymer. Optical spectroscopy and TEM monitored the reduction of [AuCl4]-, formation of large aggregated Au NPs and oxidative etching into a final state of dispersed, spherical Au NPs. ATR/FT-IR spectroscopy and thermal analysis confirms acrylate crosslinking to yield the polymer network. X-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS) monitored the evolution of the multi-lamellar structured mesophase and revealed the presence of semi-crystalline PEO confined within the water layers. The hydrogel could be reversibly swollen without loss of the well-entrained Au NPs with full recovery of composite structure. Optical spectroscopy shows a notable red shift (Δλ ~ 45 nm) in the surface plasmon resonance between swollen and contracted states, demonstrating solvent-mediated modulation of the internal NP packing arrangement.The multi-step, cascade synthesis of a self-supporting, hierarchically-structured gold nanoparticle hydrogel composite is described. The composite is spontaneously prepared from a non-covalent, lamellar lyotropic mesophase composed of amphiphiles that support the reactive constituents, a mixture of hydroxyl- and acrylate-end-derivatized PEO117-PPO47-PEO117 and [AuCl4]-. The reaction sequence begins with the auto-reduction of aqueous [AuCl4]- by PEO117-PPO47-PEO117 which leads to both the production of Au NPs and the free radical

  17. Optimization and stabilization of gold nanoparticles by using herbal plant extract with microwave heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasmin, Akbar; Ramesh, Kumaraswamy; Rajeshkumar, Shanmugam

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we have synthesized the gold nanoparticles by using Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, a medicinal plant. The gold nanoparticles were synthesized rapidly by the involvement of microwave heating. By changing of plant extract concentration, gold solution concentration, microwave heating time and power of microwave heating the optimized condition was identified. The surface Plasmon resonance found at 520 nm confirmed the gold nanoparticles synthesis. The spherical sized nanoparticles in the size range of 16-30 nm were confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). The stability of the nanoparticles is very well proved in the invitro stability tests. The biochemical like alkaloids and flavonoids play a vital role in the nanoparticles synthesis was identified using the Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Combining the phytochemical and microwave heating, the rapid synthesis of gold nanoparticles is the novel process for the medically applicable gold nanoparticles production.

  18. Shape-Dependent Nonlinear Optical Properties of Anisotropic Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hua, Yi; Chandra, Kavita; Dam, Duncan Hieu M; Wiederrecht, Gary P; Odom, Teri W

    2015-12-17

    This Letter reports the shape-dependent third-order nonlinear optical properties of anisotropic gold nanoparticles. We characterized the nonlinear absorption coefficients of nanorods, nanostars, and nanoshells using femtosecond Z-scan measurements. By comparing nanoparticle solutions with a similar linear extinction at the laser excitation wavelength, we separated shape effects from that of the localized surface plasmon wavelength. We found that the nonlinear response depended on particle shape. Using pump-probe spectroscopy, we measured the ultrafast transient response of nanoparticles, which supported the strong saturable absorption observed in nanorods and weak nonlinear response in nanoshells. We found that the magnitude of saturable absorption as well as the ultrafast spectral responses of nanoparticles were affected by the linear absorption of the nanoparticles. PMID:26595327

  19. Surface plasma resonant effect of gold nanoparticles on the photoelectrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meen, Teen-Hang; Tsai, Jenn-Kai; Chao, Shi-Mian; Lin, Yu-Chien; Wu, Tien-Chuan; Chang, Tang-Yun; Ji, Liang-Wen; Water, Walter; Chen, Wen-Ray; Tang, I.-Tseng; Huang, Chien-Jung

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we prepared different shapes of gold nanoparticles by seed-mediated growth method and applied them on the photoelectrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) to study the surface plasma resonant (SPR) effect of gold nanoparticles on the photoelectrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells. The analyses of field emission scanning electron microscopy show that the average diameter of the spherical gold nanoparticles is 45 nm, the average length and width of the short gold nanorods were 55 and 22 nm, respectively, and the average length and width of the long gold nanorods were 55 and 14 nm, respectively. The aspect ratio of the short and long gold nanorods was about 2.5 and 4, respectively. The results of ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra show that the absorption wavelength is about 540 nm for spherical gold nanoparticles, and the absorption of the gold nanorods reveals two peaks. One is about 510 to 520 nm, and the other is about 670 and 710 nm for the short and long gold nanorods, respectively. The best conversion efficiency of the dye-sensitized solar cells with spherical gold nanoparticles and short and long gold nanorods added in is 6.77%, 7.08%, and 7.29%, respectively, and is higher than that of the cells without gold nanoparticles, which is 6.21%. This result indicates that the effect of gold nanoparticles on the photoelectrodes can increase the conductivity and reduce the recombination of charges in the photoelectrodes, resulting in the increase of conversion efficiency for DSSCs. In addition, the long gold nanorods have stronger SPR effect than the spherical gold nanoparticles and short gold nanorods at long wavelength. This may be the reason for the higher conversion efficiency of DSSCs with long gold nanorods than those of the cells with spherical gold nanoparticles and short gold nanorods.

  20. Optical absorption properties of dispersed gold and silver alloy nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wilcoxon, Jess

    2009-03-01

    The oldest topic in nanoscience is the size-dependent optical properties of gold and silver colloids or nanoparticles, first investigated scientifically by Michael Faraday in 1857. In the modern era, advances in both synthesis and characterization have resulted in new insights into the size-dependent absorbance of Au and Ag nanoparticles with sizes below the classical limit for Mie theory. In this paper we discuss the synthesis and properties of core/shell and nanoalloy particles of Au and Ag, compare them to particles of pure gold and silver, and discuss how alloying affects nanoparticle chemical stability. We show that composition, size, and nanostructure (e.g., core/shell vs quasi-random nanoalloy) can all be employed to adjust the optical absorbance properties. The type of nanostructure--core/shell vs alloy--is reflected in their optical absorbance features. PMID:19708105

  1. Optical absorption properties of dispersed gold and silver alloy nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wilcoxon, Jess

    2009-03-01

    The oldest topic in nanoscience is the size-dependent optical properties of gold and silver colloids or nanoparticles, first investigated scientifically by Michael Faraday in 1857. In the modern era, advances in both synthesis and characterization have resulted in new insights into the size-dependent absorbance of Au and Ag nanoparticles with sizes below the classical limit for Mie theory. In this paper we discuss the synthesis and properties of core/shell and nanoalloy particles of Au and Ag, compare them to particles of pure gold and silver, and discuss how alloying affects nanoparticle chemical stability. We show that composition, size, and nanostructure (e.g., core/shell vs quasi-random nanoalloy) can all be employed to adjust the optical absorbance properties. The type of nanostructure--core/shell vs alloy--is reflected in their optical absorbance features.

  2. Gold nanoparticles in model biological membranes: A computational perspective.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Giulia; Monticelli, Luca

    2016-10-01

    The electronic, optical, catalytic, and magnetic properties of metal nanoparticles (NPs) make them extremely interesting for biomedical applications. In this rapidly moving field, monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles emerge both as a reference system and as promising candidates for drug and gene delivery, photothermal treatment, and imaging applications. Despite the technological relevance, there is still poor understanding of the molecular processes driving the interactions of metal nanoparticles with cells, and with cell membranes in particular. In this paper we review molecular-level computational studies of the interaction between monolayer-protected gold NPs and model lipid membranes. Our review comprises a brief description of the most relevant experimental results in this field and of the questions they raised, followed by a description of the computational achievements reported so far. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of interfacial interactions between small nanoparticles during diffusion-limited aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jing; Liu, Dongmei; Yang, Xiaonan; Zhao, Ying; Liu, Haixing; Tang, Huan; Cui, Fuyi

    2015-12-01

    Due to the limitations of experimental methods at the atomic level, research on the aggregation of small nanoparticles (D < 5 nm) in aqueous solutions is quite rare. The aggregation of small nanoparticles in aqueous solutions is very different than that of normal sized nanoparticles. The interfacial interactions play a dominant role in the aggregation of small nanoparticles. In this paper, molecular dynamics simulations, which can explore the microscopic behavior of nanoparticles during the diffusion-limited aggregation at an atomic level, were employed to reveal the aggregation mechanism of small nanoparticles in aqueous solutions. First, the aggregation processes and aggregate structure were depicted. Second, the particle-particle interaction and surface diffusion of nanoparticles during aggregation were investigated. Third, the water-mediated interactions during aggregation were ascertained. The results indicate that the aggregation of nanoparticle in aqueous solutions is affected by particle size. The strong particle-particle interaction and high surface diffusion result in the formation of particle-particle bonds of 2 nm TiO2 nanoparticles, and the water-mediated interaction plays an important role in the aggregation process of 3 and 4 nm TiO2 nanoparticles.

  4. Colorimetric aptasensor using unmodified gold nanoparticles for homogeneous multiplex detection.

    PubMed

    Niu, Shucao; Lv, Zhenzhen; Liu, Jinchuan; Bai, Wenhui; Yang, Shuming; Chen, Ailiang

    2014-01-01

    Colorimetric aptasensors using unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have attracted much attention because of their low cost, simplicity, and practicality, and they have been developed for various targets in the past several years. However, previous research has focused on developing single-target assays. Here, we report the development of a homogeneous multiplex aptasensor by using more than one class of aptamers to stabilize AuNPs. Using sulfadimethoxine (SDM), kanamycin (KAN) and adenosine (ADE) as example targets, a KAN aptamer (750 nM), an SDM aptamer (250 nM) and an ADE aptamer (500 nM) were mixed at a 1∶1∶1 volume ratio and adsorbed directly onto the surface of unmodified AuNPs by electrostatic interaction. Upon the addition of any of the three targets, the conformation of the corresponding aptamer changed from a random coil structure to a rigid folded structure, which could not adsorb and stabilize AuNPs. The AuNPs aggregated in a specific reaction buffer (20 mM Tris-HCl containing 20 mM NaCl and 5 mM KCl), which led to a color change from red to purple/blue. These results demonstrate that the multiplex colorimetric aptasensor detected three targets simultaneously while maintaining the same sensitivity as a single-target aptasensor for each individual target. The multiplex aptasensor could be extended to other aptamers for various molecular detection events. Due to its simple design, easy operation, fast response, cost effectiveness and lack of need for sophisticated instrumentation, the proposed strategy provides a powerful tool to examine large numbers of samples to screen for a small number of potentially positive samples containing more than one analyte, which can be further validated using sophisticated instruments. PMID:25279730

  5. Targeting Cell Membrane Lipid Rafts by Stoichiometric Functionalization of Gold Nanoparticles With a Sphingolipid-Binding Domain Peptide.

    PubMed

    Paramelle, David; Nieves, Daniel; Brun, Benjamin; Kraut, Rachel S; Fernig, David G

    2015-04-22

    A non-membrane protein-based nanoparticle agent for the tracking of lipid rafts on live cells is produced by stoichiometric functionalization of gold nanoparticles with a previously characterized sphingolipid- and cell membrane microdomain-binding domain peptide (SBD). The SBD peptide is inserted in a self-assembled monolayer of peptidol and alkane thiol ethylene glycol, on gold nanoparticles surface. The stoichiometric functionalization of nanoparticles with the SBD peptide, essential for single molecule tracking, is achieved by means of non-affinity nanoparticle purification. The SBD-nanoparticles have remarkable long-term resistance to electrolyte-induced aggregation and ligand-exchange and have no detectable non-specific binding to live cells. Binding and diffusion of SBD-nanoparticles bound to the membrane of live cells is measured by real-time photothermal microscopy and shows the dynamics of sphingolipid-enriched microdomains on cells membrane, with evidence for clustering, splitting, and diffusion over time of the SBD-nanoparticle labeled membrane domains. The monofunctionalized SBD-nanoparticle is a promising targeting agent for the tracking of lipid rafts independently of their protein composition and the labelling requires no prior modification of the cells. This approach has potential for further functionalization of the particles to manipulate the organization of, or targeting to microdomains that control signaling events and thereby lead to novel diagnostics and therapeutics.

  6. Characterization of Conventional One-Step Sodium Thiosulfate Facilitated Gold Nanoparticle Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saverot, Scott-Eugene; Reese, Laura M.; Cimini, Daniela; Vikesland, Peter J.; Bickford, Lissett Ramirez

    2015-05-01

    Gold-gold sulfide nanoparticles are of interest for drug delivery, biomedical imaging, and photothermal therapy applications due to a facile synthesis method resulting in small particles with high near-infrared (NIR) absorption efficiency. Previous studies suggest that the NIR sensitivity of these nanoparticles was due to hexagonally shaped metal-coated dielectric nanoparticles that consist of a gold sulfide core and gold shell. Here, we illustrate that the conventional synthesis procedure results in the formation of polydisperse samples of icosahedral gold particles, gold nanoplates, and small gold spheres. Importantly, through compositional analysis, via UV/vis absorption spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), we show that all of the nanoparticles exhibit identical face center cubic (FCC) gold crystalline structures, thus suggesting that sulfide is not present in the final fabricated nanoparticles. We show that icosahedrally shaped nanoparticles result in a blue-shifted absorbance, with a peak in the visible range. Alternatively, the nanoplate nanoparticles result in the characteristic NIR absorbance peak. Thus, we report that the NIR-contributing species in conventional gold-gold sulfide formulations are nanoplates that are comprised entirely of gold. Furthermore, polydisperse gold nanoparticle samples produced by the traditional one-step reduction of HAuCl4 by sodium thiosulfate show increased in vitro toxicity, compared to isolated and more homogeneous constituent samples. This result exemplifies the importance of developing monodisperse nanoparticle formulations that are well characterized in order to expedite the development of clinically beneficial nanomaterials.

  7. Sonosynthesis of gold nanoparticles from a geranium leaf extract.

    PubMed

    Franco-Romano, M; Gil, M L A; Palacios-Santander, J M; Delgado-Jaén, J J; Naranjo-Rodríguez, I; Hidalgo-Hidalgo de Cisneros, J L; Cubillana-Aguilera, L M

    2014-07-01

    A rapid in situ biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is proposed in which a geranium (Pelargonium zonale) leaf extract was used as a non-toxic reducing and stabilizing agent in a sonocatalysis process based on high-power ultrasound. The synthesis process took only 3.5 min in aqueous solution under ambient conditions. The stability of the nanoparticles was studied by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy with reference to the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band. AuNPs have an average lifetime of about 8 weeks at 4 °C in the absence of light. The morphology and crystalline phase of the gold nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The composition of the nanoparticles was evaluated by electron diffraction and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). A total of 80% of the gold nanoparticles obtained in this way have a diameter in the range 8-20 nm, with an average size of 12±3 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicated the presence of biomolecules that could be responsible for reducing and capping the biosynthesized gold nanoparticles. A hypothesis concerning the type of organic molecules involved in this process is also given. Experimental design linked to the simplex method was used to optimize the experimental conditions for this green synthesis route. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a high-power ultrasound-based sonocatalytic process and experimental design coupled to a simplex optimization process has been used in the biosynthesis of AuNPs. PMID:24530142

  8. Unprecedented inhibition of tubulin polymerization directed by gold nanoparticles inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Diptiman; Xavier, Paulrajpillai Lourdu; Chaudhari, Kamalesh; John, Robin; Dasgupta, Anjan Kumar; Pradeep, Thalappil; Chakrabarti, Gopal

    2013-05-01

    The effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the polymerization of tubulin has not been examined till now. We report that interaction of weakly protected AuNPs with microtubules (MTs) could cause inhibition of polymerization and aggregation in the cell free system. We estimate that single citrate capped AuNPs could cause aggregation of ~105 tubulin heterodimers. Investigation of the nature of inhibition of polymerization and aggregation by Raman and Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopies indicated partial conformational changes of tubulin and microtubules, thus revealing that AuNP-induced conformational change is the driving force behind the observed phenomenon. Cell culture experiments were carried out to check whether this can happen inside a cell. Dark field microscopy (DFM) combined with hyperspectral imaging (HSI) along with flow cytometric (FC) and confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) analyses suggested that AuNPs entered the cell, caused aggregation of the MTs of A549 cells, leading to cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase and concomitant apoptosis. Further, Western blot analysis indicated the upregulation of mitochondrial apoptosis proteins such as Bax and p53, down regulation of Bcl-2 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) confirming mitochondrial apoptosis. Western blot run after cold-depolymerization revealed an increase in the aggregated insoluble intracellular tubulin while the control and actin did not aggregate, suggesting microtubule damage induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The observed polymerization inhibition and cytotoxic effects were dependent on the size and concentration of the AuNPs used and also on the incubation time. As microtubules are important cellular structures and target for anti-cancer drugs, this first observation of nanoparticles-induced protein's conformational change-based aggregation of the tubulin-MT system is of high importance, and would be useful in the understanding of cancer therapeutics

  9. Evaluation of Nanoparticle Tracking for Characterization of Fibrillar Protein Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dennis T.; Lu, Xiaomeng; Fan, Yamin; Murphy, Regina M.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloidogenesis is the process of formation of protein aggregates with fibrillar morphology. Because amyloidogenesis is linked to neurodegenerative disease, there is interest in understanding the mechanism of fibril growth. Kinetic models of amyloidogenesis require data on the number concentration and size distribution of aggregates, but this information is difficult to obtain using conventional methods. Nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) is a relatively new technique that may be uniquely suited for obtaining these data. In NTA, the two-dimensional (2-D) trajectory of individual particles is tracked, from which the diffusion coefficient, and, hence, hydrodynamic radius is obtained. Here we examine the validity of NTA in tracking number concentration and size of DNA, as a model of a fibrillar macromolecule. We use NTA to examine three amyloidogenic materials: beta-amyloid, transthyretin, and polyglutamine-containing peptides. Our results are instructive in demonstrating the advantages and some limitations of single-particle diffusion measurements for investigating aggregation in protein systems. PMID:25843955

  10. Biointeractions of ultrasmall glutathione-coated gold nanoparticles: effect of small size variations.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Alioscka A; Hassan, Sergio A; Knittel, Luiza L; Balbo, Andrea; Aronova, Maria A; Brown, Patrick H; Schuck, Peter; Leapman, Richard D

    2016-03-28

    Recent in vivo studies have established ultrasmall (<3 nm) gold nanoparticles coated with glutathione (AuGSH) as a promising platform for applications in nanomedicine. However, systematic in vitro investigations to gain a more fundamental understanding of the particles' biointeractions are still lacking. Herein we examined the behavior of ultrasmall AuGSH in vitro, focusing on their ability to resist aggregation and adsorption from serum proteins. Despite having net negative charge, AuGSH particles were colloidally stable in biological media and able to resist binding from serum proteins, in agreement with the favorable bioresponses reported for AuGSH in vivo. However, our results revealed disparate behaviors depending on nanoparticle size: particles between 2 and 3 nm in core diameter were found to readily aggregate in biological media, whereas those strictly under 2 nm were exceptionally stable. Molecular dynamics simulations provided microscopic insight into interparticle interactions leading to aggregation and their sensitivity to the solution composition and particle size. These results have important implications, in that seemingly small variations in size can impact the biointeractions of ultrasmall AuGSH, and potentially of other ultrasmall nanoparticles as well. PMID:26934984

  11. Femtomolar oligonucleotide detection by a one-step gold nanoparticle-based assay.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Prayanka; Kaufmann, Silvan; Vörös, János; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy; Demkó, László

    2015-11-01

    A sequence-specific oligonucleotide detection method based on the tail-to-tail aggregation of functionalized gold nanoparticles in the presence of target analytes is presented together with its optimization and capabilities for detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In this single-step method, capture probes are freely accessible for hybridization, resulting in an improved assay performance compared to substrate-based assays. The analytes bring the nanoparticles close to each other via hybridization, causing a red shift of the nanoparticle plasmon peak detected by a spectrophotometer or CCD camera coupled to a darkfield imaging system. Optimal conditions for the assay were found to be (i) use of capture probes complementary to the target without any gap, (ii) maximum possible probe density on the gold nanoparticles, and (iii) 1M ionic strength buffer. The optimized assay has a 1 fM limit of detection and fM to 10 pM dynamic range, with detection of perfect match sequences being three orders of magnitude more sensitive than targets with single nucleotide mismatches.

  12. A novel class of potential prion drugs: preliminary in vitro and in vivo data for multilayer coated gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai Tran, Hoang Ngoc; Sousa, Fernanda; Moda, Fabio; Mandal, Subhra; Chanana, Munish; Vimercati, Chiara; Morbin, Michela; Krol, Silke; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Legname, Giuseppe

    2010-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles coated with oppositely charged polyelectrolytes, such as polyallylamine hydrochloride and polystyrenesulfonate, were examined for potential inhibition of prion protein aggregation and prion (PrPSc) conversion and replication. Different coatings, finishing with a positive or negative layer, were tested, and different numbers of layers were investigated for their ability to interact and reduce the accumulation of PrPSc in scrapie prion infected ScGT1 and ScN2a cells. The particles efficiently hampered the accumulation of PrPSc in ScN2a cells and showed curing effects on ScGT1 cells with a nanoparticle concentration in the picomolar range. Finally, incubation periods of prion-infected mice treated with nanomolar concentrations of gold nanoparticles were significantly longer compared to untreated controls.Gold nanoparticles coated with oppositely charged polyelectrolytes, such as polyallylamine hydrochloride and polystyrenesulfonate, were examined for potential inhibition of prion protein aggregation and prion (PrPSc) conversion and replication. Different coatings, finishing with a positive or negative layer, were tested, and different numbers of layers were investigated for their ability to interact and reduce the accumulation of PrPSc in scrapie prion infected ScGT1 and ScN2a cells. The particles efficiently hampered the accumulation of PrPSc in ScN2a cells and showed curing effects on ScGT1 cells with a nanoparticle concentration in the picomolar range. Finally, incubation periods of prion-infected mice treated with nanomolar concentrations of gold nanoparticles were significantly longer compared to untreated controls. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: HRTEM image of a 2A coated nanogold particle; Western blot of cell lysate from ScGT1 cells treated with nanoparticles (a) 2A, (b) 2A-46 nm, (c) 5S, and (d) 5S-46 nm. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00551g

  13. Enhancing nanoparticle electrodynamics with gold nanoplate mirrors.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zijie; Bao, Ying; Manna, Uttam; Shah, Raman A; Scherer, Norbert F

    2014-05-14

    Mirrors and optical cavities can modify and enhance matter-radiation interactions. Here we report that chemically synthesized Au nanoplates can serve as micrometer-size mirrors that enhance electrodynamic interactions. Because of their plasmonic properties, the Au nanoplates enhance the brightness of scattered light from Ag nanoparticles near the nanoplate surface in dark-field microscopy. More importantly, enhanced optical trapping and optical binding of Ag nanoparticles are demonstrated in interferometric optical traps created from a single laser beam and its reflection from individual Au nanoplates. The enhancement of the interparticle force constant is ≈20-fold more than expected from the increased intensity due to standing wave interference. We show that the additional stability for optical binding arises from the restricted axial thermal motion of the nanoparticles that couples to and reduces the fluctuations in the lateral plane. This new mechanism greatly advances the photonic synthesis of ultrastable nanoparticle arrays and investigation of their properties.

  14. Gold and silver nanoparticles from Trianthema decandra: synthesis, characterization, and antimicrobial properties

    PubMed Central

    Geethalakshmi, R; Sarada, DVL

    2012-01-01

    Background There is an increasing commercial demand for nanoparticles due to their wide applicability in various markets, including medicine, catalysis, electronics, chemistry, and energy. In this report, a simple and ecofriendly chemical reaction for the synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles from Trianthema decandra (Aizoaceae) has been developed. Methods and results On treatment of aqueous solutions containing chloroauric acid or silver nitrate with root extract of T. decandra, stable gold or silver nanoparticles were rapidly formed. The kinetics of reduction of gold and silver ions during the reaction was analyzed by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. Field emission-scanning electron microscopy showed formation of gold nanoparticles in various shapes, including spherical, cubical, triangular, and hexagonal, while silver nanoparticles were spherical. The size of the gold nanoparticles was 33–65 nm and that of the silver nanoparticles was 36–74 nm. Energy dispersive x-ray and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the presence of metallic gold and metallic silver in the respective nanoparticles. The antimicrobial properties of the synthesized nanoparticles were analyzed using the Kirby-Bauer method. The results show varied susceptibility of microorganisms to the gold and silver nanoparticles. Conclusion It is believed that phytochemicals present in T. decandra extract reduce the silver and gold ions into metallic nanoparticles. This strategy reduces the cost of production and the environmental impact. The silver and gold nanoparticles formed showed strong activity against all microorganisms tested. PMID:23091381

  15. Microwave Heating of Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-Conjugated Gold Nanoparticles for Temperature-Controlled Display of Concanavalin A.

    PubMed

    Vasani, Roshan B; Janardanan, Nayana; Prieto-Simón, Beatriz; Cifuentes-Rius, Anna; Bradley, Siobhan J; Moore, Eli; Kraus, Tobias; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-12-23

    We demonstrate microwave-induced heating of gold nanoparticles and nanorods. An appreciably higher and concentration-dependent microwave-induced heating rate was observed with aqueous dispersions of the nanomaterials as opposed to pure water and other controls. Grafted with the thermoresponsive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), these gold nanomaterials react to microwave-induced heating with a conformational change in the polymer shell, leading to particle aggregation. We subsequently covalently immobilize concanavalin A (Con A) on the thermoresponsive gold nanoparticles. Con A is a bioreceptor commonly used in bacterial sensors because of its affinity for carbohydrates on bacterial cell surfaces. The microwave-induced thermal transitions of the polymer reversibly switch on and off the display of Con A on the particle surface and hence the interactions of the nanomaterials with carbohydrate-functionalized surfaces. This effect was determined using linear sweep voltammetry on a methyl-α-d-mannopyranoside-functionalized electrode.

  16. The optical nonlinearity of gold nanoparticles prepared by bioreduction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balbuena Ortega, A.; Arroyo Carrasco, M. L.; Gayou, V. L.; Orduña Díaz, A.; Delgado Macuil, R.; Rojas López, Marlon

    2013-11-01

    Nonlinear optical and electronic properties of nanosized metal particles have drawn considerable attention because of their strong and size-dependent plasmon resonance absorption. In a metal nanoparticle system such as gold dispersed in a transparent matrix, an absorption peak due to surface plasmon resonance is usually observed in the visible spectral region. Metal nanoparticles are of special interest as nonlinear materials for optical switching and computing because of their relatively large third-order nonlinearity (χ3) and ultrafast response time. The purpose of this study was to analyze the nonlinear optical properties of biosynthesized gold nanoparticles. The samples were prepared by biosynthesis method using yeast extract as reducing agent and the nonlinear optical properties of the nanoparticles were investigated using a single beam Z-scan technique with a beam power of 20 mW and operated at wavelength of 514 nm. The reaction between metal ions and yeast extracts were monitored by UV-visible spectra of Au nanoparticles in aqueous solution with different pH (3-6). The surface plasmon peak position was shifted from 528 nm to 573 nm, according to of pH variation 4 to 6. The average particle size was calculated by the absorption peak position using the Fernig method, from 42 to 103 nm. The z-scan curves showed a negative nonlocal nonlinear refractive index with a magnitude dependent on the nanoparticle size.

  17. Quantification of laser local hyperthermia induced by gold plasmonic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yakunin, Alexander N; Avetisyan, Yuri A; Tuchin, Valery V

    2015-05-01

    This paper discusses one of the key problems of laser-induced tissue/cell hyperthermia mediated by gold nanoparticles, namely, quantifying and precise prediction of the light exposure to provide a controllable local heating impact on living organisms. The distributions of such parameters as an efficiency factor of absorption, differential and integral absorbing power of a nanoparticle, temperature increment, and Arrhenius damage integral were used to quantify nanoparticle effectiveness in the two-dimensional coordinate space “laser wavelength (λ) × radius of gold nanoparticles (R).” It was found that the fulfillment of required spatial and temporal characteristics of temperature fields in the vicinity of nanoparticle determines the optimal λ and R. As a result, the area in the space (λ × R) with a minimal criticality to alterations of the local hyperthermia may be significantly displaced from the position of the plasmonic resonance. The aspects of generalization of the proposed methodology for the analysis of local hyperthermia using nanoparticles of different shapes (nanoshells, nanorods, nanostars) and short pulse laser radiation are discussed.

  18. Dynamic gold nanoparticle, polymer-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, Millicent; Junghans, Ann; Hayden, Steven; Majeski, Jaroslaw; CINT, Lujan Team

    2014-03-01

    Artificial polymer-based biomembranes may serve as a foundational architecture for the integration and spatial organization of metal nanoparticles forming functional nanocomposites. Nonionic triblock copolymer (PEO-PPO-PEO), lipid-based gels, containing Au nanoparticles (NPs) can be prepared by either external doping of the preformed nanoparticles or by in-situ reduction of Au 3+. Neutron reflectivity on quartz supported thin films of the Au NP -doped polymer-based biomembranes was used to determine the location of the Au. The nanoparticles were found to preferentially reside within the ethylene oxide chains located at the interface of the bulk water channels and the amphiphile bilayers. The embedded Au nanoparticles can act as localized heat sinks, inducing changes in the polymer conformation. The collective, thermally-triggered expansion and contraction of the EO chains modulate the mesophase structure of the gels. Synchrotron X-ray scattering (SAXS) was used to monitor mesophase structure as a function of both temperature and photo-irradiation. These studies represent a first step towards designingexternally-responsive polymer-nanoparticle composites.

  19. Gold and silver nanoparticles for biomolecule immobilization and enzymatic catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, Galina A.; Záruba, Кamil; Žvátora, Pavel; Král, Vladimír

    2012-06-01

    In this work, a simple method for alcohol synthesis with high enantiomeric purity was proposed. For this, colloidal gold and silver surface modifications with 3-mercaptopropanoic acid and cysteamine were used to generate carboxyl and amine functionalized gold and silver nanoparticles of 15 and 45 nm, respectively. Alcohol dehydrogenase from Thermoanaerobium brockii (TbADH) and its cofactor (NADPH) were physical and covalent (through direct adsorption and using cross-linker) immobilized on nanoparticles' surface. In contrast to the physical and covalent immobilizations that led to a loss of 90% of the initial enzyme activity and 98% immobilization, the use of a cross-linker in immobilization process promoted a loss to 30% of the initial enzyme activity and >92% immobilization. The yield of NADPH immobilization was about 80%. The best results in terms of activity were obtained with Ag-citr nanoparticle functionalized with carboxyl groups (Ag-COOH), Au-COOH(CTAB), and Au-citr functionalized with amine groups and stabilized with CTAB (Au-NH2(CTAB)) nanoparticles treated with 0.7% and 1.0% glutaraldehyde. Enzyme conformation upon immobilization was studied using fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopies. Shift in ellipticity at 222 nm with about 4 to 7 nm and significant decreasing in fluorescence emission for all bioconjugates were observed by binding of TbADH to silver/gold nanoparticles. Emission redshifting of 5 nm only for Ag-COOH-TbADH bioconjugate demonstrated change in the microenvironment of TbADH. Enzyme immobilization on glutaraldehyde-treated Au-NH2(CTAB) nanoparticles promotes an additional stabilization preserving about 50% of enzyme activity after 15 days storage. Nanoparticles attached-TbADH-NADPH systems were used for enantioselective ( ee > 99%) synthesis of ( S)-7-hydroxy-2-tetralol.

  20. Synthesis and agglomeration of gold nanoparticles in reverse micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Adriana P.; Resto, Oscar; Briano, Julio G.; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2005-07-01

    Reverse micelles prepared in the system water, sodium bis-(2-ethylhexyl) sulfoccinate (AOT), and isooctane were investigated as a templating system for the production of gold nanoparticles from Au(III) and the reducing agent sulfite. A core-shell Mie model was used to describe the optical properties of gold nanoparticles in the reverse micelles. Dynamic light scattering of gold colloids in aqueous media and in reverse micelle solution indicated agglomeration of micelles containing particles. This was verified theoretically with an analysis of the total interaction energy between pairs of particles as a function of particle size. The analysis indicated that particles larger than about 8 nm in diameter should reversibly flocculate. Transmission electron microscopy measurements of gold nanoparticles produced in our reverse micelles showed diameters of 8-10 nm. Evidence of cluster formation was also observed. Time-correlated UV-vis absorption measurements showed a red shift for the peak wavelength. This was interpreted as the result of multiple scattering and plasmon interaction between particles due to agglomeration of micelles with particles larger than 8 nm.

  1. Time-dependent Protein-directed Growth of Gold Nanoparticles within a Single Crystal of Lysozyme

    SciTech Connect

    H Wei; Z Wang; J Zhang; S House; Y Gao; L Yang; H Robinson; L Tan; H Xing; C Hou

    2011-12-31

    Gold nanoparticles are useful in biomedical applications due to their distinct optical properties and high chemical stability. Reports of the biogenic formation of gold colloids from gold complexes has also led to an increased level of interest in the biomineralization of gold. However, the mechanism responsible for biomolecule-directed gold nanoparticle formation remains unclear due to the lack of structural information about biological systems and the fast kinetics of biomimetic chemical systems in solution. Here we show that intact single crystals of lysozyme can be used to study the time-dependent, protein-directed growth of gold nanoparticles. The protein crystals slow down the growth of the gold nanoparticles, allowing detailed kinetic studies to be carried out, and permit a three-dimensional structural characterization that would be difficult to achieve in solution. Furthermore, we show that additional chemical species can be used to fine-tune the growth rate of the gold nanoparticles.

  2. Alterations in nanoparticle protein corona by biological surfactants: impact of bile salts on β-lactoglobulin-coated gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Winuprasith, Thunnalin; Chantarak, Sirinya; Suphantharika, Manop; He, Lili; McClements, David Julian

    2014-07-15

    The impact of biological surfactants (bile salts) on the protein (β-lactoglobulin) corona surrounding gold nanoparticles (200 nm) was studied using a variety of analytical techniques at pH 7: dynamic light scattering (DLS); particle electrophoresis (ζ-potential); UV-visible (UV) spectroscopy; transmission electron microscopy (TEM); and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The bile salts adsorbed to the protein-coated nanoparticle surfaces and altered their interfacial composition, charge, and structure. SERS spectra of protein-coated nanoparticles after bile salt addition contained bands from both protein and bile salts, indicating that the protein was not fully displaced by the bile salts. UV, DLS and TEM techniques also indicated that the protein coating was not fully displaced from the nanoparticle surfaces. The impact of bile salts could be described by an orogenic mechanism: mixed interfaces were formed that consisted of islands of aggregated proteins surrounded by a sea of bile salts. This knowledge is useful for understanding the interactions of bile salts with protein-coated colloidal particles, which may be important for controlling the fate of colloidal delivery systems in the human gastrointestinal tract, or the gastrointestinal fate of ingested inorganic nanoparticles.

  3. Spectroscopic and microscopic investigations of phthalocyanine aggregates on Gold(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Krista Rachel Akiko

    Self-assembled organic pi systems are of interest because of their potential applications in light harvesting and electron transfer. Phthalocyanines (Pc) demonstrate desirable photonic and electronic properties, thus making them excellent candidates for functional nanostructures. The specific focus of this research has been the nanoscale aggregation of a metal-free organic dye, tetrasulfonic acid phthalocyanine (TSPc) and includes the use of UV-visible Spectroscopy, Resonance Light Scattering Spectroscopy (RLS), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and ambient and ultra-high-vacuum Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy (STS). The UV-visible absorption studies show that TSPc aggregates upon dissolution in water and obeys Beer's Law within the concentration range of 10 -7M to 10-4M, indicating that TSPc concentration has no further effect on aggregation in aqueous solution. In addition, both ionic strength in NaCl and pH changes in the presence of NaOH, HCl or acetic acid (HAc) do affect aggregation. The RSL studies confirm these effects of pH only in the presence of HAc. The XPS studies show that the ratio of non-protonated to protonated nitrogens does not change with decreasing solution pH. STM images of TSPc deposited from pH<1 solutions reveal ordered branched web-like assemblies hundreds of nanometers in length, generally 2 nm tall and having variable widths. STM imaging shows TSPc aggregates decrease in order as pH increases. STM images of TSPc deposited from solutions with pH>10 show monolayer coverage of TSPc in salt form. High-resolution UHV-STM images of TSPc aggregates deposited from pH 0 solution on Au(111) reveal detailed coherent columnar architecture with the phthalocyanine macrocycles orientated parallel to the substrate surface. OMTS was used to identify the HOMO and LUMO of the TSPc aggregates and the results are contrasted with the same molecular states in unsubstituted metallated

  4. Covalent assembly of gold nanoparticles for nonvolatile memory applications.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Raju Kumar; Kusuma, Damar Yoga; Lee, P S; Srinivasan, M P

    2011-12-01

    This work reports a versatile approach for enhancing the stability of nonvolatile memory devices through covalent assembly of functionalized gold nanoparticles. 11-mercapto-1-undecanol functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with a narrow size distribution and particle size of about 5 nm were synthesized. Then, the AuNPs were immobilized on a SiO(2) substrate using a functionalized polymer as a surface modifier. Microscopic and spectroscopic techniques were used to characterize the AuNPs and their morphology before and after immobilization. Finally, a metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) type memory device with such covalently anchored AuNPs as a charge trapping layer was fabricated. The MIS structure showed well-defined counterclockwise C-V hysteresis curves indicating a good memory effect. The flat band voltage shift was 1.64 V at a swapping voltage between ±7 V. Furthermore, the MIS structure showed a good retention characteristic up to 20,000 s. The present synthetic route to covalently immobilize gold nanoparticles system will be a step towards realization for the nanoparticle-based electronic devices and related applications.

  5. Silver and Gold Nanoparticles Alter Cathepsin Activity In vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speshock, Janice L.; Braydich-Stolle, Laura K.; Szymanski, Eric R.; Hussain, Saber M.

    2011-12-01

    Nanomaterials are being incorporated into many biological applications for use as therapeutics, sensors, or labels. Silver nanomaterials are being utilized for biological implants and wound dressings as an antiviral material, whereas gold nanomaterials are being used as biological labels or sensors due to their surface properties and biocompatibility. Cytotoxicity data of these materials are becoming more prevalent; however, little research has been performed to understand how the introduction of these materials into cells affects cellular processes. Here, we demonstrate the impact that silver and gold nanoparticles have on cathepsin activity in vitro. Cathepsins are important cellular proteases that are imperative for proper immune system function. We have selected to examine gold and silver nanoparticles due to the increased use of these materials in biological applications. This manuscript depicts how both of these types of nanomaterials affect cathepsin activity, which could impact the host's immune system and its ability to respond to pathogens. Cathepsin B activity decreases in a dose-dependent manner with all nanoparticles tested. Alternatively, the impact of nanoparticles on cathepsin L activity depends greatly on the type and size of the material.

  6. Surface Coating by Gold Nanoparticles on Functional Polymers: On-Demand Portable Catalysts for Suzuki Reactions.

    PubMed

    García-Calvo, José; García-Calvo, Víctor; Vallejos, Saúl; García, Félix C; Avella, Manuel; García, José-Miguel; Torroba, Tomás

    2016-09-28

    We have developed new functionalized polymers capable of being easily coated by gold nanoparticles, uniformly distributed on the surface of the polymers, by simply adding a gold(III) solution in water to the polymers. The polymer-supported gold nanoparticle material was used as an efficient portable and reusable catalyst for Suzuki reactions in mixed organic-aqueous solvents. PMID:27617785

  7. Phase Transition and Optical Properties of DNA-Gold Nanoparticle Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Young; Harris, Nolan C; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2007-08-01

    We review recent work on DNA-linked gold nanoparticle assemblies. The synthesis, properties, and phase behavior of such DNA-gold nanoparticle assemblies are described. These nanoparticle assemblies have strong optical extinction in the ultraviolet and visible light regions; hence, the technique is used to study the kinetics and phase transitions of DNA-gold nanoparticle assemblies. The melting transition of DNA-gold nanoparticle assemblies shows unusual trends compared to those of free DNA. The phase transitions are influenced by many parameters, such as nanoparticle size, DNA sequence, DNA grafting density, DNA linker length, interparticle distance, base pairing defects, and disorders. The physics of the DNA-gold nanoparticle assemblies can be understood in terms of the phase behavior of complex fluids, with the colloidal gold interaction potential dominated by DNA hybridization energies.

  8. Field effect on digestive ripening of thiol-capped gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Meng-Lin; Peng, J. S.; Lee, Sanboh; Yang, Fuqian

    2014-02-07

    We studied the digestive ripening of thiol-capped gold nanoparticles under simultaneous action of electric field and reflux heating in a silicone oil bath at 130 °C, using transmission electron microscopy. Observation revealed that a polydispersed gold nanoparticle system reached the state of nearly monodispersity under the action of an electric field and the thiol-capped gold nanoparticles carried negative charges. The electric field caused the increase of the particle size for the nearly monodispersed gold nanoparticle system. The self-assembly of the nearly monodisperse gold nanoparticles under the action of an electric field of a high field intensity was observed. The gold nanoparticles tended to form self-assembled nanostructures of six-fold symmetry. This study provides a new route for system engineering to control the particle size of metallic nanoparticles by electric field and digestive ripening.

  9. Synthesis of netlike gold nanoparticles using ampicillin as a stabilizing reagent and its application

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Y.Z.; Zhou, J.F.; Song, Y.; Cheng, Z.P.; Xu, J.

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Electrochemical deposition of netlike gold nanoparticles (GNPs) on the surface of glassy carbon electrode and preparation of netlike GNPs in aqueous solution using ampicillin as a stabilizing reagent were proposed. The catalytic properties of netlike gold nanoparticles on the glassy carbon electrode for dopamine were demonstrated. The results indicate that the netlike gold nanoparticle modified electrode has an excellent repeatability and reproducibility. Display Omitted Highlights: ► Synthesis of netlike gold nanoparticles using ampicillin as a stabilizing reagent. ► Excellent repeatability and reproducibility of netlike gold nanoparticle modified glassy carbon electrode. ► The catalytic properties of netlike gold nanoparticle for dopamine. -- Abstract: Electrochemical deposition of netlike gold nanoparticles on the surface of glassy carbon electrode and preparation of netlike GNPs in aqueous solution using ampicillin as a stabilizing reagent were proposed. The netlike gold nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, infrared spectrometer, UV spectrophotometer, powder X-ray diffractometer and electrochemical analyzer. The catalysis of the netlike gold nanoparticles on the glassy carbon electrode for dopamine was demonstrated. The results indicate that the gold nanoparticle modified electrode has an excellent repeatability and reproducibility.

  10. Gold nanoparticles embedded silicon channel biosensor for improved sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, H. Y.; Arshad, M. K. Md.; M. Nuzaihan M., N.; Fathil, M. F. M.; Hashim, U.

    2016-07-01

    This project discusses the fabrication steps of a biosensor device on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer. Conventional photolithography technique is used to fabricate the device. The gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are then used to enhance the sensitivity of the device. By incorporating the GNPs, it is expected to get higher current compared with the device without GNPs due to better conductivity of gold and higher volume-to-ratio. Hence, with the addition of GNPs, it may boost up the signal and enhance the sensitivity of the device.

  11. The biodistribution of gold nanoparticles designed for renal clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alric, Christophe; Miladi, Imen; Kryza, David; Taleb, Jacqueline; Lux, François; Bazzi, Rana; Billotey, Claire; Janier, Marc; Perriat, Pascal; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier

    2013-06-01

    Owing to their tunable optical properties and their high absorption cross-section of X- and γ-ray, gold nanostructures appear as promising agents for remotely controlled therapy. Since the efficiency of cancer therapy is not limited to the eradication of the tumour but rests also on the sparing of healthy tissue, a biodistribution study is required in order to determine whether the behaviour of the nanoparticles after intravenous injection is safe (no accumulation in healthy tissue, no uptake by phagocytic cell-rich organs (liver, spleen) and renal clearance). The biodistribution of Au@DTDTPA nanoparticles which are composed of a gold core and a DTDTPA (dithiolated polyaminocarboxylate) shell can be established by X-ray imaging (owing to the X-ray absorption of the gold core) and by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) since the DTDTPA shell was designed for the immobilization of paramagnetic gadolinium ions. However scintigraphy appears better suited for a biodistribution study owing to a great sensitivity. The successful immobilization of radioelements (99mTc, 111In) in the DTDTPA shell, instead of gadolinium ions, renders possible the follow up of Au@DTDTPA by scintigraphy which showed that Au@DTDTPA nanoparticles exhibit a safe behaviour after intravenous injection to healthy rats.Owing to their tunable optical properties and their high absorption cross-section of X- and γ-ray, gold nanostructures appear as promising agents for remotely controlled therapy. Since the efficiency of cancer therapy is not limited to the eradication of the tumour but rests also on the sparing of healthy tissue, a biodistribution study is required in order to determine whether the behaviour of the nanoparticles after intravenous injection is safe (no accumulation in healthy tissue, no uptake by phagocytic cell-rich organs (liver, spleen) and renal clearance). The biodistribution of Au@DTDTPA nanoparticles which are composed of a gold core and a DTDTPA (dithiolated polyaminocarboxylate

  12. Processes in resonant domains of metal nanoparticle aggregates and optical nonlinearity of aggregates in pulsed laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilyuk, A. P.; Karpov, S. V.

    2009-09-01

    Optical nonlinearities in aggregates of nanoparticles formed in silver hydrosols (SHs) are studied under pico- and nanosecond pulsed laser excitation. The dependence of the nonlinear refractive index n 2 on the degree of hydrosol aggregation is studied experimentally at the wavelength λ=1.064 μm. It is found that n 2 changes sign when the degree of hydrosol aggregation is increased. Various physical effects occurring in resonant domains of the aggregates are analyzed using a simple physical model of two bound silver nanoparticles. The theory takes into account thermal, elastic, electrostatic, and light-induced effects. Experimental results are discussed in the context of this theory.

  13. Modeling the atomistic growth behavior of gold nanoparticles in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, C. Heath; Lei, Yu; Bao, Yuping

    2016-04-01

    The properties of gold nanoparticles strongly depend on their three-dimensional atomic structure, leading to an increased emphasis on controlling and predicting nanoparticle structural evolution during the synthesis process. In order to provide this atomistic-level insight and establish a link to the experimentally-observed growth behavior, a kinetic Monte Carlo simulation (KMC) approach is developed for capturing Au nanoparticle growth characteristics. The advantage of this approach is that, compared to traditional molecular dynamics simulations, the atomistic nanoparticle structural evolution can be tracked on time scales that approach the actual experiments. This has enabled several different comparisons against experimental benchmarks, and it has helped transition the KMC simulations from a hypothetical toy model into a more experimentally-relevant test-bed. The model is initially parameterized by performing a series of automated comparisons of Au nanoparticle growth curves versus the experimental observations, and then the refined model allows for detailed structural analysis of the nanoparticle growth behavior. Although the Au nanoparticles are roughly spherical, the maximum/minimum dimensions deviate from the average by approximately 12.5%, which is consistent with the corresponding experiments. Also, a surface texture analysis highlights the changes in the surface structure as a function of time. While the nanoparticles show similar surface structures throughout the growth process, there can be some significant differences during the initial growth at different synthesis conditions.

  14. Modeling the atomistic growth behavior of gold nanoparticles in solution.

    PubMed

    Turner, C Heath; Lei, Yu; Bao, Yuping

    2016-04-28

    The properties of gold nanoparticles strongly depend on their three-dimensional atomic structure, leading to an increased emphasis on controlling and predicting nanoparticle structural evolution during the synthesis process. In order to provide this atomistic-level insight and establish a link to the experimentally-observed growth behavior, a kinetic Monte Carlo simulation (KMC) approach is developed for capturing Au nanoparticle growth characteristics. The advantage of this approach is that, compared to traditional molecular dynamics simulations, the atomistic nanoparticle structural evolution can be tracked on time scales that approach the actual experiments. This has enabled several different comparisons against experimental benchmarks, and it has helped transition the KMC simulations from a hypothetical toy model into a more experimentally-relevant test-bed. The model is initially parameterized by performing a series of automated comparisons of Au nanoparticle growth curves versus the experimental observations, and then the refined model allows for detailed structural analysis of the nanoparticle growth behavior. Although the Au nanoparticles are roughly spherical, the maximum/minimum dimensions deviate from the average by approximately 12.5%, which is consistent with the corresponding experiments. Also, a surface texture analysis highlights the changes in the surface structure as a function of time. While the nanoparticles show similar surface structures throughout the growth process, there can be some significant differences during the initial growth at different synthesis conditions. PMID:27091290

  15. A novel class of potential prion drugs: preliminary in vitro and in vivo data for multilayer coated gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ai Tran, Hoang Ngoc; Sousa, Fernanda; Moda, Fabio; Mandal, Subhra; Chanana, Munish; Vimercati, Chiara; Morbin, Michela; Krol, Silke; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Legname, Giuseppe

    2010-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles coated with oppositely charged polyelectrolytes, such as polyallylamine hydrochloride and polystyrenesulfonate, were examined for potential inhibition of prion protein aggregation and prion (PrPSc) conversion and replication. Different coatings, finishing with a positive or negative layer, were tested, and different numbers of layers were investigated for their ability to interact and reduce the accumulation of PrPSc in scrapie prion infected ScGT1 and ScN2a cells. The particles efficiently hampered the accumulation of PrPSc in ScN2a cells and showed curing effects on ScGT1 cells with a nanoparticle concentration in the picomolar range. Finally, incubation periods of prion-infected mice treated with nanomolar concentrations of gold nanoparticles were significantly longer compared to untreated controls.

  16. Singlet Oxygen Generation by Laser Irradiation of Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The formation of singlet oxygen by irradiation of gold nanoparticles in their plasmon resonance band with continuous or pulsed laser light has been investigated. Citrate-stabilized nanoparticles were found to facilitate the photogeneration of singlet oxygen, albeit with low quantum yield. The reaction caused by pulsed laser irradiation makes use of the equilibrated hot electrons that can reach temperatures of several thousand degrees during the laser pulse. Although less efficient, continuous irradiation, which acts via the short-lived directly excited primary “hot” electrons only, can produce enough singlet oxygen for photodynamic cancer therapy and has significant advantages for practical applications. However, careful design of the nanoparticles is needed, since even a moderately thick capping layer can completely inhibit singlet oxygen formation. Moreover, the efficiency of the process also depends on the nanoparticle size. PMID:27239247

  17. Delivery of gold nanoparticles to the brain by conjugation with a peptide that recognizes the transferrin receptor.

    PubMed

    Prades, Roger; Guerrero, Simón; Araya, Eyleen; Molina, Claudia; Salas, Edison; Zurita, Esther; Selva, Javier; Egea, Gustavo; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Teixidó, Meritxell; Kogan, Marcelo J; Giralt, Ernest

    2012-10-01

    The treatment of Alzheimer's disease and many other brain-related disorders is limited because of the presence of the blood-brain barrier, which highly regulate the crossing of drugs. Metal nanoparticles have unique features that could contribute to the development of new therapies for these diseases. Nanoparticles have the capacity to carry several molecules of a drug; furthermore, their unique physico-chemical properties allow, for example, photothermal therapy to produce molecular surgery to destroy tumor cells and toxic structures. Recently, we demonstrated that gold nanoparticles conjugated to the peptide CLPFFD are useful to destroy the toxic aggregates of β-amyloid, similar to the ones found in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease. However, nanoparticles, like many other compounds, have null or very low capacity to cross the blood-brain barrier. In order to devise a strategy to improve drug delivery to the brain, here we introduced the peptide sequence THRPPMWSPVWP into the gold nanoparticle-CLPFFD conjugate. This peptide sequence interacts with the transferrin receptor present in the microvascular endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier, thus causing an increase in the permeability of the conjugate in brain, as shown by experiments in vitro and in vivo. Our results are highly relevant for the therapeutic applications of gold nanoparticles for molecular surgery in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Colorimetric Detection of Cadmium Ions Using DL-Mercaptosuccinic Acid-Modified Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Na; Chen, Jun; Yang, Jing-Hua; Bai, Lian-Yang; Zhang, Yu-Ping

    2016-01-01

    A colorimetric assay has been developed for detection of Cd²⁺ utilizing DL-mercaptosuccinic acid-modified gold nanoparticles (MSA-AuNPs). The method showed good selectivity for Cd²⁺ over other metal ions. As a result, the linear relationships (r > 0.9606) between concentration 0.07 mM and 0.20 mM for cadmium ion were obtained. The detection limit was as low as 0.07 mM by the naked eye. The effect of pH on the aggregation was optimized. The MSA-AuNPs probe could be used to detect Cd²⁺ in an aqueous solution based on the aggregation-induced color change of MSA-AuNPs. PMID:27398533

  19. Detection of urinary creatinine using gold nanoparticles after solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Sittiwong, Jarinya; Unob, Fuangfa

    2015-03-01

    Label-free gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were utilized in the detection of creatinine in human urine after a sample preparation by extraction of creatinine on sulfonic acid functionalized silica gel. With the proposed sample preparation method, the interfering effects of the urine matrix on creatinine detection by AuNPs were eliminated. Parameters affecting creatinine extraction were investigated. The aggregation of AuNPs induced by creatinine resulted in a change in the surface plasmon resonance signal with a concomitant color change that could be observed by the naked eye and quantified spectrometrically. The effect of AuNP concentration and reaction time on AuNP aggregation was investigated. The method described herein provides a determination of creatinine in a range of 15-40mgL(-1) with a detection limit of 13.7mgL(-1) and it was successfully used in the detection of creatinine in human urine samples.

  20. Shape and surface effects on the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles: Gold nanospheres versus gold nanostars.

    PubMed

    Favi, Pelagie Marlene; Gao, Ming; Johana Sepúlveda Arango, Liuda; Ospina, Sandra Patricia; Morales, Mariana; Pavon, Juan Jose; Webster, Thomas Jay

    2015-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles are materials with unique optical properties that have made them very attractive for numerous biomedical applications. With the increasing discovery of techniques to synthesize novel nanoparticles such as star-shaped gold nanoparticles for biomedical applications, the safety and performance of these new nanomaterials must be systematically assessed before use. In this study, gold nanostars (AuNSTs) with multibranched surface structures were synthesized, and their influence on the cytotoxicity of human skin fibroblasts and rat fat pad endothelial cells (RFPECs) were assessed and compared with that of gold nanospheres (AuNSPs) with unbranched surfaces. Results showed that the AuNSPs with diameters of approximately 61.46 nm showed greater toxicity with fibroblast cells and RFPECs compared with the synthesized AuNSTs with diameters of approximately 33.69 nm. The AuNSPs were lethal at concentrations of 40 μg/mL for both cell lines, whereas the AuNSTs were less toxic at higher concentrations (400 μg/mL). The calculated IC50 (50% inhibitory concentration) values of the AuNSPs exposed to fibroblast cells were greater at 1 and 4 days of culture (26.4 and 27.7 μg/mL, respectively) compared with the RFPECs (13.6 and 13.8 μg/mL, respectively), indicating that the AuNSPs have a greater toxicity to endothelial cells. It was proposed that possible factors that could be promoting the reduced toxicity effects of the AuNSTs to fibroblast cells and RFPECs, compared with the AuNSPs may be size, surface chemistry, and shape of the gold nanoparticles. The reduced cell toxicity observed with the AuNSTs suggests that AuNSTs may be a promising material for use in biomedical applications. PMID:25904210

  1. Shape and surface effects on the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles: Gold nanospheres versus gold nanostars.

    PubMed

    Favi, Pelagie Marlene; Gao, Ming; Johana Sepúlveda Arango, Liuda; Ospina, Sandra Patricia; Morales, Mariana; Pavon, Juan Jose; Webster, Thomas Jay

    2015-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles are materials with unique optical properties that have made them very attractive for numerous biomedical applications. With the increasing discovery of techniques to synthesize novel nanoparticles such as star-shaped gold nanoparticles for biomedical applications, the safety and performance of these new nanomaterials must be systematically assessed before use. In this study, gold nanostars (AuNSTs) with multibranched surface structures were synthesized, and their influence on the cytotoxicity of human skin fibroblasts and rat fat pad endothelial cells (RFPECs) were assessed and compared with that of gold nanospheres (AuNSPs) with unbranched surfaces. Results showed that the AuNSPs with diameters of approximately 61.46 nm showed greater toxicity with fibroblast cells and RFPECs compared with the synthesized AuNSTs with diameters of approximately 33.69 nm. The AuNSPs were lethal at concentrations of 40 μg/mL for both cell lines, whereas the AuNSTs were less toxic at higher concentrations (400 μg/mL). The calculated IC50 (50% inhibitory concentration) values of the AuNSPs exposed to fibroblast cells were greater at 1 and 4 days of culture (26.4 and 27.7 μg/mL, respectively) compared with the RFPECs (13.6 and 13.8 μg/mL, respectively), indicating that the AuNSPs have a greater toxicity to endothelial cells. It was proposed that possible factors that could be promoting the reduced toxicity effects of the AuNSTs to fibroblast cells and RFPECs, compared with the AuNSPs may be size, surface chemistry, and shape of the gold nanoparticles. The reduced cell toxicity observed with the AuNSTs suggests that AuNSTs may be a promising material for use in biomedical applications.

  2. Heat induced aggregation of gold nanorods for rapid visual detection of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Tohidi Moghadam, Tahereh; Ranjbar, Bijan

    2015-11-01

    Gold nanorods have been nominated as propitious candidates for nanobiodiagnostic applications. Herein, a technique has been introduced for rapid visual detection of lysozyme, as its high level of excretion in biological fluids is a characteristic sign of leukemia and kidney disorders. Gold nanorods were biofunctionalized with lysozyme aptamer and characterized with UV-Visible and FTIR spectroscopy, zeta potential analyzer and transmission electron microscopy. Exposure of the nanoprobe to nano molar levels of lysozyme (20 nmol l(-1)) lead to dictated aggregation of the nanostructures at ambient temperature; which was significantly improved by heat induced morphological perturbations and rapid detection by the naked eye (down to pico molar level). Qualitative analysis of Acute myeloid leukemia, Acute lymphocytic leukemia and Lymphoma blood serums showed sensitivity and specificity of the fabricated aptasensor under both temperature conditions. This report encourages utilization of heat-induced aggregation of gold nanorods as a promising nanodiagnostic technique for the emerging nanotechnologies.

  3. Gold-nanoparticle-based multifunctional amyloid-β inhibitor against Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Gao, Nan; Sun, Hanjun; Dong, Kai; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    Targeting amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced complex neurotoxicity has received considerable attention in the therapeutic and preventive treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The complex pathogenesis of AD suggests that it requires comprehensive treatment, and drugs with multiple functions against AD are more desirable. Herein, AuNPs@POMD-pep (AuNPs: gold nanoparticles, POMD: polyoxometalate with Wells-Dawson structure, pep: peptide) were designed as a novel multifunctional Aβ inhibitor. AuNPs@POMD-pep shows synergistic effects in inhibiting Aβ aggregation, dissociating Aβ fibrils and decreasing Aβ-mediated peroxidase activity and Aβ-induced cytotoxicity. By taking advantage of AuNPs as vehicles that can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), AuNPs@POMD-pep can cross the BBB and thus overcome the drawbacks of small-molecule anti-AD drugs. Thus, this work provides new insights into the design and synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles as multifunctional therapeutic agents for treatment of AD. PMID:25376633

  4. Novel method to detect DNA methylation using gold nanoparticles coupled with enzyme-linkage reactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Dongmei; Li, Genxi

    2010-01-01

    DNA methylation, catalyzed by methylases, plays a critical role in many biological processes, and methylases have been regarded as promising targets for antimicrobial drugs. In this paper, we propose a simple and sensitive colorimetric assay method to detect the activity of methylases so as to monitor DNA methylation using DNA-modified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) coupled with enzyme-linkage reactions. The duplex DNA molecules modified on the surface of AuNPs are first methylated by DNA adenine methylation (Dam) methyltransferase (MTase) and then cut by methylation-sensitive restriction endonuclease Dpn I. Removal of duplex from the AuNP surfaces by the methylation/cleavage process will destabilize the nanoparticles, resulting in aggregation of AuNPs and a red-to-blue color change. Consequently, the enzyme activity of Dam MTase can be assayed and DNA methylation can be detected. Furthermore, this study may provide a sensitive platform to screen inhibitors for Dam MTase.

  5. Gold-nanoparticle-based multifunctional amyloid-β inhibitor against Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Gao, Nan; Sun, Hanjun; Dong, Kai; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    Targeting amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced complex neurotoxicity has received considerable attention in the therapeutic and preventive treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The complex pathogenesis of AD suggests that it requires comprehensive treatment, and drugs with multiple functions against AD are more desirable. Herein, AuNPs@POMD-pep (AuNPs: gold nanoparticles, POMD: polyoxometalate with Wells-Dawson structure, pep: peptide) were designed as a novel multifunctional Aβ inhibitor. AuNPs@POMD-pep shows synergistic effects in inhibiting Aβ aggregation, dissociating Aβ fibrils and decreasing Aβ-mediated peroxidase activity and Aβ-induced cytotoxicity. By taking advantage of AuNPs as vehicles that can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), AuNPs@POMD-pep can cross the BBB and thus overcome the drawbacks of small-molecule anti-AD drugs. Thus, this work provides new insights into the design and synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles as multifunctional therapeutic agents for treatment of AD.

  6. Mixed stimuli-responsive magnetic and gold nanoparticle system for rapid purification, enrichment, and detection of biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Nash, Michael A; Yager, Paul; Hoffman, Allan S; Stayton, Patrick S

    2010-12-15

    A new diagnostic system for the enrichment and detection of protein biomarkers from human plasma is presented. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were surface-modified with a diblock copolymer synthesized using reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The diblock copolymer contained a thermally responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAAm) block, a cationic amine-containing block, and a semi-telechelic PEG₂-biotin end group. When a mixed suspension of 23 nm pNIPAAm-modified AuNPs was heated with pNIPAAm-coated 10 nm iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) in human plasma, the thermally responsive pNIPAAm directed the formation of mixed AuNP/mNP aggregates that could be separated efficiently with a magnet. Model studies showed that this mixed nanoparticle system could efficiently purify and strongly enrich the model biomarker protein streptavidin in spiked human plasma. A 10 ng/mL streptavidin sample was mixed with the biotinylated pNIPAAm-modified AuNPs and magnetically separated in the mixed nanoparticle system with pNIPAAm mNPs. The aggregates were concentrated into a 50-fold smaller fluid volume at room temperature where the gold nanoparticle reagent redissolved with the streptavidin target still bound. The concentrated gold-labeled streptavidin could be subsequently analyzed directly using lateral flow immunochromatography. This rapid capture and enrichment module thus utilizes the mixed stimuli-responsive nanoparticle system to achieve concentration of a gold-labeled biomarker that can be directly analyzed using lateral flow or other rapid diagnostic strategies. PMID:21070026

  7. A Mixed Stimuli-Responsive Magnetic and Gold Nanoparticle System for Rapid Purification, Enrichment, and Detection of Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Michael A.; Yager, Paul; Hoffman, Allan S.; Stayton, Patrick S.

    2010-01-01

    A new diagnostic system for the enrichment and detection of protein biomarkers from human plasma is presented. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were surface-modified with a diblock copolymer synthesized using reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The diblock copolymer contained a thermally-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAAm) block, a cationic amine-containing block, and a semi-telechelic PEG2-biotin end group. When a mixed suspension of 23 nm pNIPAAm-modified AuNPs was heated with pNIPAAm-coated 10 nm iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) in human plasma, the thermally-responsive pNIPAAm directed the formation of mixed AuNP/mNP aggregates that could be separated efficiently with a magnet. Model studies showed that this mixed nanoparticle system could efficiently purify and strongly enrich the model biomarker protein streptavidin in spiked human plasma. A 10 ng/mL streptavidin sample was mixed with the biotinylated and pNIPAAm modified AuNP and magnetically separated in the mixed nanoparticle system with pNIPAAm mNPs. The aggregates were concentrated into a 50-fold smaller fluid volume at room temperature where the gold nanoparticle reagent redissolved with the streptavidin target still bound. The concentrated gold-labeled streptavidin could be subsequently analyzed directly using lateral flow immunochromatography. This rapid capture and enrichment module thus utilizes the mixed stimuli-responsive nanoparticle system to achieve direct concentration of a gold-labeled biomarker that can be directly analyzed using lateral flow or other rapid diagnostic strategies. PMID:21070026

  8. Enhanced chemiluminescence-based detection on gold substrate after electrografting of diazonium precursor-coated gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Houmed Adabo, Ali; Zeggari, Rabah; Mohamed Saïd, Nasser; Bazzi, Rana; Elie-Caille, Céline; Marquette, Christophe; Martini, Matteo; Tillement, Olivier; Perriat, Pascal; Chaix, Carole; Boireau, Wilfrid; Roux, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    Since it was demonstrated that nanostructured surfaces are more efficient for the detection based on the specific capture of analytes, there is a real need to develop strategies for grafting nanoparticles onto flat surfaces. Among the different routes for the functionalization of a surface, the reduction of diazonium salts appears very attractive for the covalent immobilization of nanoparticles because this method does not require a pre-treatment of the surface. For achieving this goal, gold nanoparticles coated by precursor of diazonium salts were synthesized by reduction of gold salt in presence of mercaptoaniline. These mercaptoaniline-coated gold nanoparticles (Au@MA) were successfully immobilized onto various conducting substrates (indium tin oxide (ITO), glassy carbon (GC) and gold electrodes with flat terraces) after addition of sodium nitrite at fixed potential. When applied onto the gold electrodes, such a grafting strategy led to an obvious enhancement of the luminescence of luminol used for the biodetection. PMID:26803605

  9. In vivo integrity of polymer-coated gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kreyling, Wolfgang G; Abdelmonem, Abuelmagd M; Ali, Zulqurnain; Alves, Frauke; Geiser, Marianne; Haberl, Nadine; Hartmann, Raimo; Hirn, Stephanie; de Aberasturi, Dorleta Jimenez; Kantner, Karsten; Khadem-Saba, Gülnaz; Montenegro, Jose-Maria; Rejman, Joanna; Rojo, Teofilo; de Larramendi, Idoia Ruiz; Ufartes, Roser; Wenk, Alexander; Parak, Wolfgang J

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles are frequently engineered with an organic surface coating to improve their physicochemical properties, and it is well known that their colloidal properties may change upon internalization by cells. While the stability of such nanoparticles is typically assayed in simple in vitro tests, their stability in a mammalian organism remains unknown. Here, we show that firmly grafted polymer shells around gold nanoparticles may degrade when injected into rats. We synthesized monodisperse radioactively labelled gold nanoparticles ((198)Au) and engineered an (111)In-labelled polymer shell around them. Upon intravenous injection into rats, quantitative biodistribution analyses performed independently for (198)Au and (111)In showed partial removal of the polymer shell in vivo. While (198)Au accumulates mostly in the liver, part of the (111)In shows a non-particulate biodistribution similar to intravenous injection of chelated (111)In. Further in vitro studies suggest that degradation of the polymer shell is caused by proteolytic enzymes in the liver. Our results show that even nanoparticles with high colloidal stability can change their physicochemical properties in vivo.

  10. In vivo integrity of polymer-coated gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Abdelmonem, Abuelmagd M.; Ali, Zulqurnain; Alves, Frauke; Geiser, Marianne; Haberl, Nadine; Hartmann, Raimo; Hirn, Stephanie; de Aberasturi, Dorleta Jimenez; Kantner, Karsten; Khadem-Saba, Gülnaz; Montenegro, Jose-Maria; Rejman, Joanna; Rojo, Teofilo; de Larramendi, Idoia Ruiz; Ufartes, Roser; Wenk, Alexander; Parak, Wolfgang J.

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles are frequently engineered with an organic surface coating to improve their physicochemical properties, and it is well known that their colloidal properties may change upon internalization by cells. While the stability of such nanoparticles is typically assayed in simple in vitro tests, their stability in a mammalian organism remains unknown. Here, we show that firmly grafted polymer shells around gold nanoparticles may degrade when injected into rats. We synthesized monodisperse radioactively labelled gold nanoparticles (198Au) and engineered an 111In-labelled polymer shell around them. Upon intravenous injection into rats, quantitative biodistribution analyses performed independently for 198Au and 111In showed partial removal of the polymer shell in vivo. While 198Au accumulates mostly in the liver, part of the 111In shows a non-particulate biodistribution similar to intravenous injection of chelated 111In. Further in vitro studies suggest that degradation of the polymer shell is caused by proteolytic enzymes in the liver. Our results show that even nanoparticles with high colloidal stability can change their physicochemical properties in vivo.

  11. Synthesis of hafnium oxide-gold core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Naween; Chikan, Viktor

    2012-01-01

    Developing cheap composite nanoparticle systems that combines a high dielectric constant with good conductivity is important for the future of the electronic industry. In this study, two different sizes, 7.3 ± 2.2 and 5.6 ± 1.9 nm, of HfO(2)@Au core-shell nanoparticles are prepared by using a high-temperature reduction method. The core-shell nanoparticles are characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. HfO(2) exhibits no absorption in the visible region, but the HfO(2)@Au core-shell nanoparticles show a plasmon absorption band at 555 nm that is 25 nm red-shifted as compared to pure gold nanoparticles. According to transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis, the HfO(2) particles are coated with approximately three atomic layers of gold.

  12. Dielectrophoresis of gold nanoparticles conjugated to DNA origami structures

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Matthew; Lakatos, Mathias; Heerwig, Andreas; Ostermaier, Frieder; Haufe, Nora

    2016-01-01

    Summary DNA nanostructures are promising construction materials to bridge the gap between self-assembly of functional molecules and conventional top-down fabrication methods in nanotechnology. Their positioning onto specific locations of a microstructured substrate is an important task towards this aim. Here we study manipulation and positioning of pristine and of gold nanoparticle-conjugated tubular DNA origami structures using ac dielectrophoresis. The dielectrophoretic behavior was investigated employing fluorescence microscopy. For the pristine origami, a significant dielectrophoretic response was found to take place in the megahertz range, whereas, due to the higher polarizability of the metallic nanoparticles, the nanoparticle/DNA hybrid structures required a lower electrical field strength and frequency for a comparable trapping at the edges of the electrode structure. The nanoparticle conjugation additionally resulted in a remarkable alteration of the DNA structure arrangement. The growth of linear, chain-like structures in between electrodes at applied frequencies in the megahertz range was observed. The long-range chain formation is caused by a local, gold nanoparticle-induced field concentration along the DNA nanostructures, which in turn, creates dielectrophoretic forces that enable the observed self-alignment of the hybrid structures. PMID:27547612

  13. In vivo integrity of polymer-coated gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kreyling, Wolfgang G; Abdelmonem, Abuelmagd M; Ali, Zulqurnain; Alves, Frauke; Geiser, Marianne; Haberl, Nadine; Hartmann, Raimo; Hirn, Stephanie; de Aberasturi, Dorleta Jimenez; Kantner, Karsten; Khadem-Saba, Gülnaz; Montenegro, Jose-Maria; Rejman, Joanna; Rojo, Teofilo; de Larramendi, Idoia Ruiz; Ufartes, Roser; Wenk, Alexander; Parak, Wolfgang J

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles are frequently engineered with an organic surface coating to improve their physicochemical properties, and it is well known that their colloidal properties may change upon internalization by cells. While the stability of such nanoparticles is typically assayed in simple in vitro tests, their stability in a mammalian organism remains unknown. Here, we show that firmly grafted polymer shells around gold nanoparticles may degrade when injected into rats. We synthesized monodisperse radioactively labelled gold nanoparticles ((198)Au) and engineered an (111)In-labelled polymer shell around them. Upon intravenous injection into rats, quantitative biodistribution analyses performed independently for (198)Au and (111)In showed partial removal of the polymer shell in vivo. While (198)Au accumulates mostly in the liver, part of the (111)In shows a non-particulate biodistribution similar to intravenous injection of chelated (111)In. Further in vitro studies suggest that degradation of the polymer shell is caused by proteolytic enzymes in the liver. Our results show that even nanoparticles with high colloidal stability can change their physicochemical properties in vivo. PMID:26076469

  14. Dielectrophoresis of gold nanoparticles conjugated to DNA origami structures.

    PubMed

    Henning-Knechtel, Anja; Wiens, Matthew; Lakatos, Mathias; Heerwig, Andreas; Ostermaier, Frieder; Haufe, Nora; Mertig, Michael

    2016-01-01

    DNA nanostructures are promising construction materials to bridge the gap between self-assembly of functional molecules and conventional top-down fabrication methods in nanotechnology. Their positioning onto specific locations of a microstructured substrate is an important task towards this aim. Here we study manipulation and positioning of pristine and of gold nanoparticle-conjugated tubular DNA origami structures using ac dielectrophoresis. The dielectrophoretic behavior was investigated employing fluorescence microscopy. For the pristine origami, a significant dielectrophoretic response was found to take place in the megahertz range, whereas, due to the higher polarizability of the metallic nanoparticles, the nanoparticle/DNA hybrid structures required a lower electrical field strength and frequency for a comparable trapping at the edges of the electrode structure. The nanoparticle conjugation additionally resulted in a remarkable alteration of the DNA structure arrangement. The growth of linear, chain-like structures in between electrodes at applied frequencies in the megahertz range was observed. The long-range chain formation is caused by a local, gold nanoparticle-induced field concentration along the DNA nanostructures, which in turn, creates dielectrophoretic forces that enable the observed self-alignment of the hybrid structures.

  15. Label-free detection of ApoE4-mediated β-amyloid aggregation on single nanoparticle uncovering Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min Kyung; Lee, Jeewon; Nguyen, Anh H; Sim, Sang Jun

    2015-10-15

    Beta amyloid (Aβ) deposition is a pathological milestone of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This is facilitated by an isoform of Apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4), which is a dominant risk factor for AD. However, current in vitro Aβ aggregation assays were performed in extreme conditions not linked to physiological conditions, to understand the mechanism of Aβ induced neurotoxicity. Here, we present a simple method for the ApoE4-mediated Aβ aggregation at physiological conditions using single gold nanoparticle based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). It can be directly observed by dark-field microscope or even by the naked eye. Following LSPR principles, we used ApoE4 inducing Aβ42 self-assemblies on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) surface via their surface charge interaction. Using physiologically mimic cerebrospinal fluid, we determined a detection limit of 1.5 pM for Aβ42 corresponding to the ~2.9 nm LSPR-peak shift under ApoE4. Interestingly, the result also shows that ApoE4 induces the aggregation of Aβ42 more specifically and rapidly than that of Aβ40. This is the first biomimetic platform for real-time detection of Aβ aggregation, mimicking biological conditions, which can be used to investigate AD directly.

  16. Gold-Coated Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles for Single Methyl Discrimination in DNA Aptamers.

    PubMed

    Tintoré, Maria; Mazzini, Stefania; Polito, Laura; Marelli, Marcello; Latorre, Alfonso; Somoza, Álvaro; Aviñó, Anna; Fàbrega, Carme; Eritja, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Au- and iron-based magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are promising NPs for biomedical applications due to their unique properties. The combination of a gold coating over a magnetic core puts together the benefits from adding the magnetic properties to the robust chemistry provided by the thiol functionalization of gold. Here, the use of Au-coated magnetic NPs for molecular detection of a single methylation in DNA aptamer is described. Binding of α-thrombin to two aptamers conjugated to these NPs causes aggregation, a phenomenon that can be observed by UV, DLS and MRI. These techniques discriminate a single methylation in one of the aptamers, preventing aggregation due to the inability of α-thrombin to recognize it. A parallel study with gold and ferromagnetic NPs is detailed, concluding that the Au coating of FexOy NP does not affect their performance and that they are suitable as complex biosensors. These results prove the high detection potency of Au-coated SPIONs for biomedical applications especially for DNA repair detection.

  17. Gold-Coated Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles for Single Methyl Discrimination in DNA Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Tintoré, Maria; Mazzini, Stefania; Polito, Laura; Marelli, Marcello; Latorre, Alfonso; Somoza, Álvaro; Aviñó, Anna; Fàbrega, Carme; Eritja, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Au- and iron-based magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are promising NPs for biomedical applications due to their unique properties. The combination of a gold coating over a magnetic core puts together the benefits from adding the magnetic properties to the robust chemistry provided by the thiol functionalization of gold. Here, the use of Au-coated magnetic NPs for molecular detection of a single methylation in DNA aptamer is described. Binding of α-thrombin to two aptamers conjugated to these NPs causes aggregation, a phenomenon that can be observed by UV, DLS and MRI. These techniques discriminate a single methylation in one of the aptamers, preventing aggregation due to the inability of α-thrombin to recognize it. A parallel study with gold and ferromagnetic NPs is detailed, concluding that the Au coating of FexOy NP does not affect their performance and that they are suitable as complex biosensors. These results prove the high detection potency of Au-coated SPIONs for biomedical applications especially for DNA repair detection. PMID:26593913

  18. Paper-based tuberculosis diagnostic devices with colorimetric gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Shen, Shu-Wei; Cheng, Chao-Min; Chen, Chien-Fu

    2013-08-01

    A colorimetric sensing strategy employing gold nanoparticles and a paper assay platform has been developed for tuberculosis diagnosis. Unmodified gold nanoparticles and single-stranded detection oligonucleotides are used to achieve rapid diagnosis without complicated and time-consuming thiolated or other surface-modified probe preparation processes. To eliminate the use of sophisticated equipment for data analysis, the color variance for multiple detection results was simultaneously collected and concentrated on cellulose paper with the data readout transmitted for cloud computing via a smartphone. The results show that the 2.6 nM tuberculosis mycobacterium target sequences extracted from patients can easily be detected, and the turnaround time after the human DNA is extracted from clinical samples was approximately 1 h.

  19. The Formation and Binding of Gold Nanoparticles onto Wool Fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, James H.; Burridge, Kerstin A.; Kelly, Fern M.

    2009-07-23

    This paper presents the novel use of nanosize gold with different plasmon resonance colours, as stable colourfast colourants on wool fibres for use in high quality fabrics and textiles. The gold nanoparticles are synthesised by the controlled reduction of Au{sup 3+} in the AuCl{sub 4}{sup -} complex to Au{sup 0} onto the surface of the wool where they attach to the S in the cystine amino acids in wool keratin proteins. Scanning electronmicroscopy shows the nanoparticles are present on the cuticles of the fibre surface and are concentrated at the edges of these cuticles. EDS analysis shows a strong correlation of Au with S and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy suggests Au-S bond formation. Hence the nanogold colourants are chemically bound to the wool fibre surface and do not fade as traditional organic dyes do. A range of coloured fibres have been produced.

  20. Towards Effective Photothermal/Photodynamic Treatment Using Plasmonic Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bucharskaya, Alla; Maslyakova, Galina; Terentyuk, Georgy; Yakunin, Alexander; Avetisyan, Yuri; Bibikova, Olga; Tuchina, Elena; Khlebtsov, Boris; Khlebtsov, Nikolai; Tuchin, Valery

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of different size and shape are widely used as photosensitizers for cancer diagnostics and plasmonic photothermal (PPT)/photodynamic (PDT) therapy, as nanocarriers for drug delivery and laser-mediated pathogen killing, even the underlying mechanisms of treatment effects remain poorly understood. There is a need in analyzing and improving the ways to increase accumulation of AuNP in tumors and other crucial steps in interaction of AuNPs with laser light and tissues. In this review, we summarize our recent theoretical, experimental, and pre-clinical results on light activated interaction of AuNPs with tissues and cells. Specifically, we discuss a combined PPT/PDT treatment of tumors and killing of pathogen bacteria with gold-based nanocomposites and atomic clusters, cell optoporation, and theoretical simulations of nanoparticle-mediated laser heating of tissues and cells. PMID:27517913

  1. Fountain-pen-based laser microstructuring with gold nanoparticle inks

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Tae Y.; Poulikakos, Dimos; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.

    2004-07-05

    Employing the fountain-pen principle, a micropipette is used to write an Au nanoparticle ink on glass substrates. A continuous-wave laser (488-515 nm) is subsequently used as a controlled, localized energy source to evaporate the carrier liquid (toluene) in the ink and sinter the nanoparticles together thus fabricating continuous gold stripes 5 {mu}m in width and a few hundred nanometers in height. The scanning speed, the laser intensity, and the degree of defocusing are identified as important parameters to the successful manufacturing of the gold microstructures. The electrical resistivity of the stripes, within the parametric domain of the present work, is measured to be the order of 10{sup -6} {omega} m.

  2. Fountain-pen-based laser microstructuring with gold nanoparticle inks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Tae Y.; Poulikakos, Dimos; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.

    2004-07-01

    Employing the fountain-pen principle, a micropipette is used to write an Au nanoparticle ink on glass substrates. A continuous-wave laser (488-515nm) is subsequently used as a controlled, localized energy source to evaporate the carrier liquid (toluene) in the ink and sinter the nanoparticles together thus fabricating continuous gold stripes 5μm in width and a few hundred nanometers in height. The scanning speed, the laser intensity, and the degree of defocusing are identified as important parameters to the successful manufacturing of the gold microstructures. The electrical resistivity of the stripes, within the parametric domain of the present work, is measured to be the order of 10-6Ωm.

  3. Dendronized Anionic Gold Nanoparticles: Synthesis, Characterization, and Antiviral Activity.

    PubMed

    Peña-González, Cornelia E; García-Broncano, Pilar; Ottaviani, M Francesca; Cangiotti, Michela; Fattori, Alberto; Hierro-Oliva, Margarita; González-Martín, M Luisa; Pérez-Serrano, Jorge; Gómez, Rafael; Muñoz-Fernández, M Ángeles; Sánchez-Nieves, Javier; de la Mata, F Javier

    2016-02-24

    Anionic carbosilane dendrons decorated with sulfonate functions and one thiol moiety at the focal point have been used to synthesize water-soluble gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) through the direct reaction of dendrons, gold precursor, and reducing agent in water, and also through a place-exchange reaction. These nanoparticles have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy, TEM, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV/Vis spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and zeta-potential measurements. The interacting ability of the anionic sulfonate functions was investigated by EPR spectroscopy with copper(II) as a probe. Different structures and conformations of the AuNPs modulate the availability of sulfonate and thiol groups for complexation by copper(II). Toxicity assays of AuNPs showed that those produced through direct reaction were less toxic than those obtained by ligand exchange. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection was higher in the case of dendronized AuNPs than in dendrons. PMID:26875938

  4. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of gold nanoparticles on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    DeJarnette, Drew; Roper, D. Keith

    2014-08-07

    Plasmon excitation decay by absorption, scattering, and hot electron transfer has been distinguished from effects induced by incident photons for gold nanoparticles on graphene monolayer using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Gold nano-ellipses were evaporated onto lithographed graphene, which was transferred onto a silicon nitride transmission electron microscopy grid. Plasmon decay from lithographed nanoparticles measured with EELS was compared in the absence and presence of the graphene monolayer. Measured decay values compared favorably with estimated radiative and non-radiative contributions to decay in the absence of graphene. Graphene significantly enhanced low-energy plasmon decay, increasing mode width 38%, but did not affect higher energy plasmon or dark mode decay. This decay beyond expected radiative and non-radiative mechanisms was attributed to hot electron transfer, and had quantum efficiency of 20%, consistent with previous reports.

  5. The Formation and Binding of Gold Nanoparticles onto Wool Fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, James H.; Burridge, Kerstin A.; Kelly, Fern M.

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents the novel use of nanosize gold with different plasmon resonance colours, as stable colourfast colourants on wool fibres for use in high quality fabrics and textiles. The gold nanoparticles are synthesised by the controlled reduction of Au3+ in the AuCl4- complex to Au0 onto the surface of the wool where they attach to the S in the cystine amino acids in wool keratin proteins. Scanning electronmicroscopy shows the nanoparticles are present on the cuticles of the fibre surface and are concentrated at the edges of these cuticles. EDS analysis shows a strong correlation of Au with S and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy suggests Au-S bond formation. Hence the nanogold colourants are chemically bound to the wool fibre surface and do not fade as traditional organic dyes do. A range of coloured fibres have been produced.

  6. Fabrication of Gold Nanoparticles for targeted therapy in pancreatic cancer**

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Bhattacharya, Resham; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Mukherjee, Priyabrata

    2009-01-01

    The targeted delivery of a drug should result in enhanced therapeutic efficacy with low to minimal side effects. This is a widely accepted concept, but limited in application due to lack of available technologies and process of validation. Biomedical nanotechnology can play an important role in this respect. Biomedical nanotechnology is a burgeoning field with myriads of opportunities and possibilities for advancing medical science and disease treatment. Cancer nanotechnology (1–100 nm size range) is expected to change the very foundations of cancer treatment, diagnosis and detection. Nanomaterials, especially gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have unique physicochemical properties, such as ultra small size, large surface area to mass ratio, and high surface reactivity, presence of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands, biocompatibility and ease of surface functionalization. In this review, we will discuss how the unique physico-chemical properties of gold nanoparticles may be utilized for targeted drug delivery in pancreatic cancer leading to increased efficacy of traditional chemotherapeutics. PMID:19914317

  7. Dendronized Anionic Gold Nanoparticles: Synthesis, Characterization, and Antiviral Activity.

    PubMed

    Peña-González, Cornelia E; García-Broncano, Pilar; Ottaviani, M Francesca; Cangiotti, Michela; Fattori, Alberto; Hierro-Oliva, Margarita; González-Martín, M Luisa; Pérez-Serrano, Jorge; Gómez, Rafael; Muñoz-Fernández, M Ángeles; Sánchez-Nieves, Javier; de la Mata, F Javier

    2016-02-24

    Anionic carbosilane dendrons decorated with sulfonate functions and one thiol moiety at the focal point have been used to synthesize water-soluble gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) through the direct reaction of dendrons, gold precursor, and reducing agent in water, and also through a place-exchange reaction. These nanoparticles have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy, TEM, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV/Vis spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and zeta-potential measurements. The interacting ability of the anionic sulfonate functions was investigated by EPR spectroscopy with copper(II) as a probe. Different structures and conformations of the AuNPs modulate the availability of sulfonate and thiol groups for complexation by copper(II). Toxicity assays of AuNPs showed that those produced through direct reaction were less toxic than those obtained by ligand exchange. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection was higher in the case of dendronized AuNPs than in dendrons.

  8. Towards Effective Photothermal/Photodynamic Treatment Using Plasmonic Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bucharskaya, Alla; Maslyakova, Galina; Terentyuk, Georgy; Yakunin, Alexander; Avetisyan, Yuri; Bibikova, Olga; Tuchina, Elena; Khlebtsov, Boris; Khlebtsov, Nikolai; Tuchin, Valery

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of different size and shape are widely used as photosensitizers for cancer diagnostics and plasmonic photothermal (PPT)/photodynamic (PDT) therapy, as nanocarriers for drug delivery and laser-mediated pathogen killing, even the underlying mechanisms of treatment effects remain poorly understood. There is a need in analyzing and improving the ways to increase accumulation of AuNP in tumors and other crucial steps in interaction of AuNPs with laser light and tissues. In this review, we summarize our recent theoretical, experimental, and pre-clinical results on light activated interaction of AuNPs with tissues and cells. Specifically, we discuss a combined PPT/PDT treatment of tumors and killing of pathogen bacteria with gold-based nanocomposites and atomic clusters, cell optoporation, and theoretical simulations of nanoparticle-mediated laser heating of tissues and cells. PMID:27517913

  9. Towards thiol functionalization of vanadium pentoxide nanotubes using gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Lavayen, V.; O'Dwyer, C. . E-mail: codwyer@tyndall.ie; Cardenas, G.; Gonzalez, G.; Sotomayor Torres, C.M.

    2007-04-12

    Template-directed synthesis is a promising route to realize vanadate-based 1-D nanostructures, an example of which is the formation of vanadium pentoxide nanotubes and associated nanostructures. In this work, we report the interchange of long-chained alkyl amines with alkyl thiols. This reaction was followed using gold nanoparticles prepared by the Chemical Liquid Deposition (CLD) method with an average diameter of {approx}0.9nm and a stability of {approx}85 days. V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanotubes (VOx-NTs) with lengths of {approx}2{mu}m and internal hollow diameters of 20-100nm were synthesized and functionalized in a Au-acetone colloid with a nominal concentration of {approx}4x10{sup -3}mol dm{sup -3}. The interchange reaction with dodecylamine is found only to occur in polar solvents and incorporation of the gold nanoparticles is not observed in the presence of n-decane.

  10. Click Chemistry Immobilization of Antibodies on Polymer Coated Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Finetti, Chiara; Sola, Laura; Pezzullo, Margherita; Prosperi, Davide; Colombo, Miriam; Riva, Benedetta; Avvakumova, Svetlana; Morasso, Carlo; Picciolini, Silvia; Chiari, Marcella

    2016-07-26

    The goal of this work is to develop an innovative approach for the coating of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with a synthetic functional copolymer. This stable coating with a thickness of few nanometers provides, at the same time, stabilization and functionalization of the particles. The polymeric coating consists of a backbone of polydimethylacrylamide (DMA) functionalized with an alkyne monomer that allows the binding of azido modified molecules by Cu(I)-catalyzed azide/alkyne 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (CuAAC, click chemistry). The thin polymer layer on the surface stabilizes the colloidal suspension whereas the alkyne functions pending from the backbone are available for the reaction with azido-modified proteins. The reactivity of the coating is demonstrated by immobilizing an azido modified anti-mouse IgG antibody on the particle surface. This approach for the covalent binding of antibody to a gold-NPs is applied to the development of gold labels in biosensing techniques.

  11. Iron oxide and gold nanoparticles in cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotman, Irena; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S.; Gutmanas, Elazar Y.

    2016-08-01

    Continuous research activities in the field of nanomedicine in the past decade have, to a great extent, been focused on nanoparticle technologies for cancer therapy. Gold and iron oxide nanoparticles (NP) are two of the most studied inorganic nanomaterials due to their unique optical and magnetic properties. Both types of NPs are emerging as promising systems for anti-tumor drug delivery and for nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapy of cancer. In thermal therapy, localized heating inside tumors or in proximity of tumor cells can be induced, for example, with Au NPs by radiofrequency ablation heating or conversion of photon energy (photothermal therapy) and in iron oxide magnetic NPs by heat generation through relaxation in an alternating magnetic field (magnetic hyperthermia). Furthermore, the superparamagnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles have led to their use as potent MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) contrast agents. Surface modification/coating can produce NPs with tailored and desired properties, such as enhanced blood circulation time, stability, biocompatibility and water solubility. To target nanoparticles to specific tumor cells, NPs should be conjugated with targeting moieties on the surface which bind to receptors or other molecular structures on the cell surface. The article presents several approaches to enhancing the specificity of Au and iron oxide nanoparticles for tumor tissue by appropriate surface modification/functionalization, as well as the effect of these treatments on the saturation magnetization value of iron oxide NPs. The use of other nanoparticles and nanostructures in cancer treatment is also briefly reviewed.

  12. Bottom-up fabrication of nanohole arrays loaded with gold nanoparticles: extraordinary plasmonic sensors.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Markus; Quint, Stefan B; Klenk, Simon; Pacholski, Claudia

    2014-12-18

    A chemical route to periodic hole arrays in gold films whose holes are loaded with single gold nanoparticles is presented, paving the road to mass production of highly sensitive plasmonic sensors on large areas.

  13. Bottom-up fabrication of nanohole arrays loaded with gold nanoparticles: extraordinary plasmonic sensors.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Markus; Quint, Stefan B; Klenk, Simon; Pacholski, Claudia

    2014-12-18

    A chemical route to periodic hole arrays in gold films whose holes are loaded with single gold nanoparticles is presented, paving the road to mass production of highly sensitive plasmonic sensors on large areas. PMID:25350760

  14. Gold nanoparticles supported on magnesium oxide for CO oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Au was loaded (1 wt%) on a commercial MgO support by three different methods: double impregnation, liquid-phase reductive deposition and ultrasonication. Samples were characterised by adsorption of N2 at -96°C, temperature-programmed reduction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Upon loading with Au, MgO changed into Mg(OH)2 (the hydroxide was most likely formed by reaction with water, in which the gold precursor was dissolved). The size range for gold nanoparticles was 2-12 nm for the DIM method and 3-15 nm for LPRD and US. The average size of gold particles was 5.4 nm for DIM and larger than 6.5 for the other methods. CO oxidation was used as a test reaction to compare the catalytic activity. The best results were obtained with the DIM method, followed by LPRD and US. This can be explained in terms of the nanoparticle size, well known to determine the catalytic activity of gold catalysts. PMID:21711499

  15. On the thermal conductivity of gold nanoparticle colloids.

    PubMed

    Shalkevich, Natallia; Escher, Werner; Bürgi, Thomas; Michel, Bruno; Si-Ahmed, Lynda; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2010-01-19

    Nanofluids (colloidal suspensions of nanoparticles) have been reported to display significantly enhanced thermal conductivities relative to those of conventional heat transfer fluids, also at low concentrations well below 1% per volume (Putnam, S. A., et at. J. Appl. Phys. 2006, 99, 084308; Liu, M.-S. L., et al. Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer. 2006, 49; Patel, H. E., et al. Appl. Phys. Lett. 2003, 83, 2931-2933). The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effect of the particle size, concentration, stabilization method and particle clustering on the thermal conductivity of gold nanofluids. We synthesized spherical gold nanoparticles of different size (from 2 to 45 nm) and prepared stable gold colloids in the range of volume fraction of 0.00025-1%. The colloids were inspected by UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscope (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The thermal conductivity has been measured by the transient hot-wire method (THW) and the steady state parallel plate method (GAP method). Despite a significant search in parameter space no significant anomalous enhancement of thermal conductivity was observed. The highest enhancement in thermal conductivity is 1.4% for 40 nm sized gold particles stabilized by EGMUDE (triethyleneglycolmono-11-mercaptoundecylether) and suspended in water with a particle-concentration of 0.11 vol%.

  16. Cellular network formation of hydrophobic alkanethiol capped gold nanoparticles on mica surface mediated by water islands.

    PubMed

    John, Neena S; Raina, Gargi; Sharma, Ashutosh; Kulkarni, Giridhar U

    2010-09-01

    Dendritic and cellular networks of nanoparticles are known to form commonly either by random diffusion-limited aggregation or by solvent evaporation dynamics. Using alkanethiol capped gold nanoparticles deposited on mica imaged under ambient and controlled water vapor conditions by atomic force microscope and in situ scanning electron microscope, respectively, we show a third mechanism in action. The cellular network consisting of open and closed polygons is formed by the nucleation and lateral growth of adsorbed water islands, the contact lines of which push the randomly distributed hydrophobic nanoparticles along the growth directions, eventually leading to the polygonal structure formation as the boundaries of the growing islands meet. Such nanoparticle displacement has been possible due to the weakly adhering nature of the hydrophilic substrate, mica. These results demonstrate an important but hitherto neglected effect of adsorbed water in the structure formation on hydrophilic substrates and provide a facile tool for the fabrication of nanoparticle networks without specific particle or substrate modifications and without a tight control on particle deposition conditions during the solvent evaporation. PMID:20831330

  17. Imaging and radiation effects of gold nanoparticles in tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    McQuaid, Harold N.; Muir, Mark F.; Taggart, Laura E.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Coulter, Jonathan A.; Hyland, Wendy B.; Jain, Suneil; Butterworth, Karl T.; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M.; Hirst, David G.; Botchway, Stanley W.; Currell, Fred J.

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle radiosensitization represents a novel technique in enhancement of ionising radiation dose and its effect on biological systems. Variation between theoretical predictions and experimental measurement is significant enough that the mechanism leading to an increase in cell killing and DNA damage is still not clear. We present the first experimental results that take into account both the measured biodistribution of gold nanoparticles at the cellular level and the range of the product electrons responsible for energy deposition. Combining synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays, intracellular gold particle imaging and DNA damage assays, has enabled a DNA damage model to be generated that includes the production of intermediate electrons. We can therefore show for the first time good agreement between the prediction of biological outcomes from both the Local Effect Model and a DNA damage model with experimentally observed cell killing and DNA damage induction via the combination of X-rays and GNPs. However, the requirement of two distinct models as indicated by this mechanistic study, one for short-term DNA damage and another for cell survival, indicates that, at least for nanoparticle enhancement, it is not safe to equate the lethal lesions invoked in the local effect model with DNA damage events. PMID:26787230

  18. Dual plasmonic gold nanoparticles for multispectral photoacoustic imaging application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, Vijay; Subhash, Hrebesh; Breathnach, Aedán.; Leahy, Martin; Dockery, Peter; Olivo, Malini

    2014-03-01

    Nanoparticle contrast agents for molecular targeted imaging have widespread interest in diagnostic applications with cellular resolution, specificity and selectivity for visualization and assessment of various disease processes. Of particular interest is gold nanoparticle owing to its tunability of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and its relative inertness. Here we present the synthesis of anisotropic multi-branched star shaped gold nanoparticles exhibiting dual-band plasmon absorption peaks and its application as a contrast agent for multispectral photoacoustic imaging. The transverse plasmon absorption peak of the synthesised dual plasmonic gold nanostar (DPGNS) was around 700 nm and that of longitudinal plasmon absorption in the longer wavelength region around 1050-1150 nm. Unlike most reported PA contrast agent with surface plasmon absorption in the range of 700 to 800 nm showing moderate tissue penetration, 1050-1200 nm range lies in the farther region of the optical window of biological tissue where scattering and the intrinsic optical extinction of endogenous chromophores is at its minimum. We also present a proof of principle demonstration of DPGNS as contrast agent for multispectral photoacoustic animal imaging. Our results show that DPGNS are promising for PA imaging with extended-depth imaging applications.

  19. Multiplex Electrochemical Immunoassay Using Gold Nanoparticle Probes and Immunochromatographic Strips

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Xun; Baloda, Meenu; Gurung, Anant; Lin, Yuehe; Liu, Guodong

    2008-10-20

    We describe a multiplex electrochemical immunoassay based on the use of gold nanoparticle (Au-NP) probes and immunochromatographic strips (ISs). The approach takes advantage of the speed and low cost of the conventional IS tests and the high sensitivities of the nanoparticle-based electrochemical immunoassays. Rabbit IgG(R-IgG) and human IgM (H-IgM) were used as model targets for the demonstration of the proof of concept. The Au-NPs based sandwich immunoreactions were performed on the IS, and the captured gold nanoparticle labels on the test zones were determined by highly-sensitive stripping voltammetric measurement of the dissolved gold ions (III) with a carbon paste electrode. The detection limits are 1.0 and 1.5 ng/mL with the linear ranges of 2.5-250 ng/mL for quantitative detection of R-IgG and H-IgM, respectively. The total assay time is around 25 minutes. Such multiplex electrochemical immunoassay could be readily highly multiplexed to allow simultaneous parallel detection of numerous proteins and is expected to open new opportunities for protein diagnostics and biosecurity.

  20. Imaging and radiation effects of gold nanoparticles in tumour cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuaid, Harold N.; Muir, Mark F.; Taggart, Laura E.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Coulter, Jonathan A.; Hyland, Wendy B.; Jain, Suneil; Butterworth, Karl T.; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M.; Hirst, David G.; Botchway, Stanley W.; Currell, Fred J.

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle radiosensitization represents a novel technique in enhancement of ionising radiation dose and its effect on biological systems. Variation between theoretical predictions and experimental measurement is significant enough that the mechanism leading to an increase in cell killing and DNA damage is still not clear. We present the first experimental results that take into account both the measured biodistribution of gold nanoparticles at the cellular level and the range of the product electrons responsible for energy deposition. Combining synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays, intracellular gold particle imaging and DNA damage assays, has enabled a DNA damage model to be generated that includes the production of intermediate electrons. We can therefore show for the first time good agreement between the prediction of biological outcomes from both the Local Effect Model and a DNA damage model with experimentally observed cell killing and DNA damage induction via the combination of X-rays and GNPs. However, the requirement of two distinct models as indicated by this mechanistic study, one for short-term DNA damage and another for cell survival, indicates that, at least for nanoparticle enhancement, it is not safe to equate the lethal lesions invoked in the local effect model with DNA damage events.

  1. Peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles stabilized by hyperbranched polyglycidol derivatives over a wide pH range.

    PubMed

    Drozd, Marcin; Pietrzak, Mariusz; Parzuchowski, Paweł; Mazurkiewicz-Pawlicka, Marta; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2015-12-11

    The aim of this work was to carry out comparative studies on the peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) stabilized with low molecular weight hyperbranched polyglycidol (HBPG-OH) and its derivative modified with maleic acid residues (HBPG-COOH). The influence of the stabilizer to gold precursor ratio on the size and morphology of nanoparticles obtained was checked, and prepared nanoparticles were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The results indicated the divergent effect of increasing the concentration of stabilizers (HBPG-OH or HBPG-COOH) on the size of the nanostructures obtained. The gold nanoparticles obtained were characterized as having intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and the mechanism of catalysis in acidic and alkaline mediums was consistent with the standard Michaelis-Menten kinetics, revealing a strong affinity of AuNPs with 2, 2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB), and significantly lower affinity towards phenol. By comparing the kinetic parameters, a negligible effect of polymeric ligand charge on activity against various types of substrates (anionic or cationic) was indicated. The superiority of steric stabilization via the application of tested low-weight hyperbranched polymers over typical stabilizers in preventing salt-induced aggregation and maintaining high catalytic activity in time was proved. The applied hyperbranched stabilizers provide a good tool for manufacturing gold-based nanozymes, which are highly stable and active over a wide pH range.

  2. Peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles stabilized by hyperbranched polyglycidol derivatives over a wide pH range.

    PubMed

    Drozd, Marcin; Pietrzak, Mariusz; Parzuchowski, Paweł; Mazurkiewicz-Pawlicka, Marta; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2015-12-11

    The aim of this work was to carry out comparative studies on the peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) stabilized with low molecular weight hyperbranched polyglycidol (HBPG-OH) and its derivative modified with maleic acid residues (HBPG-COOH). The influence of the stabilizer to gold precursor ratio on the size and morphology of nanoparticles obtained was checked, and prepared nanoparticles were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The results indicated the divergent effect of increasing the concentration of stabilizers (HBPG-OH or HBPG-COOH) on the size of the nanostructures obtained. The gold nanoparticles obtained were characterized as having intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and the mechanism of catalysis in acidic and alkaline mediums was consistent with the standard Michaelis-Menten kinetics, revealing a strong affinity of AuNPs with 2, 2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB), and significantly lower affinity towards phenol. By comparing the kinetic parameters, a negligible effect of polymeric ligand charge on activity against various types of substrates (anionic or cationic) was indicated. The superiority of steric stabilization via the application of tested low-weight hyperbranched polymers over typical stabilizers in preventing salt-induced aggregation and maintaining high catalytic activity in time was proved. The applied hyperbranched stabilizers provide a good tool for manufacturing gold-based nanozymes, which are highly stable and active over a wide pH range. PMID:26567596

  3. Single-step co-deposition of nanostructured tungsten oxide supported gold nanoparticles using a gold-phosphine cluster complex as the gold precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molkenova, Anara; Sarip, Rozie; Sathasivam, Sanjay; Umek, Polona; Vallejos, Stella; Blackman, Chris; Hogarth, Graeme; Sankar, Gopinathan

    2014-12-01

    The use of a molecular gold organometallic cluster in chemical vapour deposition is reported, and it is utilized, together with a tungsten oxide precursor, for the single-step co-deposition of (nanostructured) tungsten oxide supported gold nanoparticles (NPs). The deposited gold-NP and tungsten oxide supported gold-NP are highly active catalysts for benzyl alcohol oxidation; both show higher activity than SiO2 supported gold-NP synthesized via a solution-phase method, and tungsten oxide supported gold-NP show excellent selectivity for conversion to benzaldehyde.

  4. Biofabrication of discrete spherical gold nanoparticles using the metal-reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Suresh, Anil K; Pelletier, Dale A; Wang, Wei; Broich, Michael L; Moon, Ji Won; Gu, Baohua; Allison, David P; Joy, David Charles; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2011-01-01

    Nanocrystallites have garnered substantial interest due to their varying applications including catalysis. Consequently important aspects related to control of shape/size and syntheses through economical and non-hazardous means are desirable. Highly efficient bioreduction based natural fabrication approaches that utilize microbes and or -plant extracts are poised to meet these needs. Here we show that the gamma- proteobacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, can reduce tetrachloro aurate (III) ions, producing discrete extracellular spherical gold nanocrystallites. The particles were homogeneous with multiple size distributions and produced under ambient conditions at high yield, 88% of theoretical maximum. Further characterization revealed that the particles consist of spheres in the size range of 2-50 nm, with an average of 12 5 nm. The nanoparticles were hydrophilic, biocompatible, and resisted aggregation even after several months. The particles are likely capped by a detachable protein/peptide coat. UV-vis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectra and transmission electron microscopy measurements confirmed the formation as well the crystalline nature of the nanoparticles. The antibacterial activity of these gold nanoparticles was assessed using Gram-negative (E. coli and S. oneidensis) and Gram-positive (B. subtilis) bacteria. Toxicity assessments divulged that the particles were neither toxic nor inhibitory to any of these bacteria.

  5. Size sorting of citrate reduced gold nanoparticles by sedimentation field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Contado, Catia; Argazzi, Roberto

    2009-12-25

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been synthesized through the citrate reduction method; the citrate/gold(III) ratio was changed from 1:1 up to 10:1 and the size of the resulting nanoparticles was measured by sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF). Experimental data showed that the GNPs size decreases in the ratio range 1:1-3:1 and then increases from 5:1 to 10:1 passing through a plateau region in between, and is almost independent of the precursor solution concentrations. In the zone of minimum diameters the synthetic process does not produce monodispersed GNPs but often multiple distributions, very close in size, are observed as evidenced by the particle size distributions (PSDs) derived from the SdFFF fractograms. UV-vis spectrophotometry, being the most common technique employed in the optical characterization of nanoparticles suspensions, was used throughout this work. A confirmation of the nucleation-aggregation-fragmentation mechanism was inferred from the cross-correlation between UV-vis and SdFFF results.

  6. Interfacial activity of polymer-coated gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Borrell, Marcos; Leal, L Gary

    2007-12-01

    A systematic study of the interfacial activity of polymer-coated gold nanoparticles was performed with the use of a computer-controlled four-roll mill. The nanoparticle locality within the polymeric domains (bulk or interface) was controlled by means of a mixture of polymeric ligands grafted to the gold nanoparticle core. The bulk polymers were polybutadiene (PBd) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Monoterminated PDMS and PBd ligands were synthesized on the basis of the esterification of reactive groups (such as hydroxyl or amino groups) with lipoic acid anhydride. The formation of polymer-coated nanoparticles using these lipoic acid-functionalized polymers was confirmed via transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and their interfacial activity was manifested as a reduction of the interfacial tension and in the enhanced stability of thin films (as seen via the inhibition of coalescence). The nanoparticles showed an equal, if not superior, ability to reduce the interfacial tension when compared to previous studies on the effect of insoluble surfactants; however, these particles proved not to be as effective at inhibiting coalescence as their surfactant counterpart. We suggest that this effect may be caused by an increase in the attractive van der Waals forces created by the presence of metal-core nanoparticles. Experimental measurements using the four-roll mill allow us to explore the relationship between nanoparticle concentration at the interface and interfacial tension. In particular, we have found evidence that the interface concentration can be increased relative to the equilibrium value achieved by diffusion alone, and thus the interfacial tension can be systematically reduced if the interfacial area is increased temporarily via drop deformation or breakup followed by recoalescence. PMID:17973410

  7. First identification of primary nanoparticles in the aggregation of HMF.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mu; Yang, Hong; Liu, Yinong; Sun, Xudong; Zhang, Dongke; Xue, Dongfeng

    2012-01-01

    5-Hydroxymethylfurfural [HMF] is an important intermediate compound for fine chemicals. It is often obtained via hydrothermal treatment of biomass-derived carbohydrates, such as fructose, glucose and sucrose. This study investigates the formation of carbonaceous spheres from HMF created by dehydration of fructose under hydrothermal conditions. The carbonaceous spheres, ranging between 0.4 and 10 μm in diameter, have granulated morphologies both on the surface and in the interior. The residual solution is found to contain a massive number of primary nanoparticles. The chemical structure of the carbonaceous spheres was characterised by means of FTIR and NMR spectroscopies. Based on these observations, a mechanism involving the formation and aggregation of the nanoparticles is proposed. This mechanism differs considerably from the conventional understanding in the open literature. PMID:22221552

  8. First identification of primary nanoparticles in the aggregation of HMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mu; Yang, Hong; Liu, Yinong; Sun, Xudong; Zhang, Dongke; Xue, Dongfeng

    2012-01-01

    5-Hydroxymethylfurfural [HMF] is an important intermediate compound for fine chemicals. It is often obtained via hydrothermal treatment of biomass-derived carbohydrates, such as fructose, glucose and sucrose. This study investigates the formation of carbonaceous spheres from HMF created by dehydration of fructose under hydrothermal conditions. The carbonaceous spheres, ranging between 0.4 and 10 μm in diameter, have granulated morphologies both on the surface and in the interior. The residual solution is found to contain a massive number of primary nanoparticles. The chemical structure of the carbonaceous spheres was characterised by means of FTIR and NMR spectroscopies. Based on these observations, a mechanism involving the formation and aggregation of the nanoparticles is proposed. This mechanism differs considerably from the conventional understanding in the open literature.

  9. Non-specific internalization of laser ablated pure gold nanoparticles in pancreatic tumor cell.

    PubMed

    Sobhan, M A; Sreenivasan, V K A; Withford, M J; Goldys, E M

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the intracellular uptake of 7.3 nm, 21.2 nm and 31.3 nm average size pure colloidal gold nanoparticles synthesized using femtosecond laser ablation technique in pure water. Dark-field imaging, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to assess the uptake of these pure gold nanoparticles in the pancreatic tumor cell line. We show that these ligand-free gold nanoparticles are non-toxic to these cells. The nanoparticles and cell images indicated that unmodified gold nanoparticles interacted with the cells, despite negative surface charge on both the cells and the nanoparticles. We also demonstrate that the uptake of the gold nanoparticles is size-dependent.

  10. Simple and Rapid High-Yield Synthesis and Size Sorting of Multibranched Hollow Gold Nanoparticles with Highly Tunable NIR Plasmon Resonances.

    PubMed

    Blanch, Adam J; Döblinger, Markus; Rodríguez-Fernández, Jessica

    2015-09-16

    Branched gold nanoparticles with sharp tips are considered excellent candidates for sensing and field enhancement applications. Here, a rapid and simple synthesis strategy is presented that generates highly branched gold nanoparticles with hollow cores and a ca.100% yield through a simple one-pot seedless reaction at room temperature in the presence of Triton X-100. It is shown that multibranched hollow gold nanoparticles of tunable dimensions, branch density and branch length can be obtained by adjusting the concentrations of the reactants. Insights into the formation mechanism point toward an aggregative type of growth involving hollow core formation first, and branching thereafter. The pronounced near-infrared (NIR) plasmon band of the nanoparticles is due to the combined contribution from hollowness and branching, and can be tuned over a wide range (≈700-2000 nm). It is also demonstrated that the high environmental sensitivity of colloidal dispersions based on multibranched hollow gold nanoparticles can be boosted even further by separating the nanoparticles into fractions of given sizes and improved monodispersity by means of a glycerol density gradient. The possibility to obtain highly monodisperse multibranched hollow gold nanoparticles with predictable dimensions (50-300 nm) and branching and, therefore, tailored NIR plasmonic properties, highlights their potential for theranostic applications.

  11. Phase transitions and kinetic properties of gold nanoparticles confined between two-layer graphene nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Wu, Nanhua; Chen, Jionghua; Wang, Jinjian; Shao, Jingling; Zhu, Xiaolei; Lu, Xiaohua; Guo, Lucun

    2016-11-01

    The thermodynamic and kinetic behaviors of gold nanoparticles confined between two-layer graphene nanosheets (two-layer-GNSs) are examined and investigated during heating and cooling processes via molecular dynamics (MD) simulation technique. An EAM potential is applied to represent the gold-gold interactions while a Lennard-Jones (L-J) potential is used to describe the gold-GNS interactions. The MD melting temperature of 1345 K for bulk gold is close to the experimental value (1337 K), confirming that the EAM potential used to describe gold-gold interactions is reliable. On the other hand, the melting temperatures of gold clusters supported on graphite bilayer are corrected to the corresponding experimental values by adjusting the εAu-C value. Therefore, the subsequent results from current work are reliable. The gold nanoparticles confined within two-layer GNSs exhibit face center cubic structures, which is similar to those of free gold clusters and bulk gold. The melting points, heats of fusion, and heat capacities of the confined gold nanoparticles are predicted based on the plots of total energies against temperature. The density distribution perpendicular to GNS suggests that the freezing of confined gold nanoparticles starts from outermost layers. The confined gold clusters exhibit layering phenomenon even in liquid state. The transition of order-disorder in each layer is an essential characteristic in structure for the freezing phase transition of the confined gold clusters. Additionally, some vital kinetic data are obtained in terms of classical nucleation theory.

  12. Toxicological risk assessment of elemental gold following oral exposure to sheets and nanoparticles - A review.

    PubMed

    Hadrup, Niels; Sharma, Anoop K; Poulsen, Morten; Nielsen, Elsa

    2015-07-01

    Elemental gold is used as a food coloring agent and in dental fillings. In addition, gold nanoparticles are gaining increasing attention due to their potential use as inert carriers for medical purposes. Although elemental gold is considered to be inert, there is evidence to suggest the release of gold ions from its surface. Elemental gold, or the released ions, is, to some extent, absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract. Gold is distributed to organs such as the liver, heart, kidneys and lungs. The main excretion route of absorbed gold is through urine. Data on the oral toxicity of elemental gold is limited. The acute toxicity of elemental gold seems to be low, as rats were unaffected by a single dose of 2000mg nanoparticles/kg of body weight. Information on repeated dose toxicity is very limited. Skin rashes have been reported in humans following the ingestion of liquors containing gold. In addition, gold released from dental restorations has been reported to increase the risk of developing gold hypersensitivity. Regarding genotoxicity, in vitro studies indicate that gold nanoparticles induce DNA damage in mammalian cells. In vivo, gold nanoparticles induce genotoxic effects in Drosophila melanogaster; however, genotoxicity studies in mammals are lacking. Overall, based on the literature and taking low human exposure into account, elemental gold via the oral route is not considered to pose a health concern to humans in general.

  13. Synthesis and photophysical studies of phthalocyanine-gold nanoparticle conjugates.

    PubMed

    Nombona, Nolwazi; Antunes, Edith; Litwinski, Christian; Nyokong, Tebello

    2011-11-28

    This work reports on the synthesis, characterization and photophysical studies of phthalocyanine-gold nanoparticle conjugates. The phthalocyanine complexes are: tris-(5-trifluoromethyl-2-mercaptopyridine)-2-(carboxy)phthalocyanine (3), 2,9,17,23-tetrakis-[(1, 6-hexanedithiol) phthalocyaninato]zinc(II) (8) and [8,15,22-tris-(naptho)-2(amidoethanethiol) phthalocyanato] zinc(II)(10). The gold nanoparticles were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy where the size was confirmed to be ∼5 nm. The phthalocyanine Au nanoparticle conjugates showed lower fluorescence quantum yield values with similar fluorescence lifetimes compared to the free phthalocyanines. The Au nanoparticle conjugates of 3 and 10 also showed higher triplet quantum yields of 0.69 to 0.71, respectively. A lower triplet quantum yield was obtained for the conjugate compared to free phthalocyanine for complex 8. The triplet lifetimes ranged from 70 to 92 μs for the conjugates and from 110 to 304 μs for unbound Pc complexes.

  14. Oxidation of bioethanol using zeolite-encapsulated gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mielby, Jerrik; Abildstrøm, Jacob Oskar; Wang, Feng; Kasama, Takeshi; Weidenthaler, Claudia; Kegnaes, Søren

    2014-11-10

    With the ongoing developments in biomass conversion, the oxidation of bioethanol to acetaldehyde may become a favorable and green alternative to the preparation from ethylene. Here, a simple and effective method to encapsulate gold nanoparticles in zeolite silicalite-1 is reported and their high activity and selectivity for the catalytic gas-phase oxidation of ethanol are demonstrated. The zeolites are modified by a recrystallization process, which creates intraparticle voids and mesopores that facilitate the formation of small and disperse nanoparticles upon simple impregnation. The individual zeolite crystals comprise a broad range of mesopores and contain up to several hundred gold nanoparticles with a diameter of 2-3 nm that are distributed inside the zeolites rather than on the outer surface. The encapsulated nanoparticles have good stability and result in 50 % conversion of ethanol with 98 % selectivity toward acetaldehyde at 200 °C, which (under the given reaction conditions) corresponds to 606 mol acetaldehyde/mol Au hour(-1) . PMID:25196739

  15. Oxidation of bioethanol using zeolite-encapsulated gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mielby, Jerrik; Abildstrøm, Jacob Oskar; Wang, Feng; Kasama, Takeshi; Weidenthaler, Claudia; Kegnaes, Søren

    2014-11-10

    With the ongoing developments in biomass conversion, the oxidation of bioethanol to acetaldehyde may become a favorable and green alternative to the preparation from ethylene. Here, a simple and effective method to encapsulate gold nanoparticles in zeolite silicalite-1 is reported and their high activity and selectivity for the catalytic gas-phase oxidation of ethanol are demonstrated. The zeolites are modified by a recrystallization process, which creates intraparticle voids and mesopores that facilitate the formation of small and disperse nanoparticles upon simple impregnation. The individual zeolite crystals comprise a broad range of mesopores and contain up to several hundred gold nanoparticles with a diameter of 2-3 nm that are distributed inside the zeolites rather than on the outer surface. The encapsulated nanoparticles have good stability and result in 50 % conversion of ethanol with 98 % selectivity toward acetaldehyde at 200 °C, which (under the given reaction conditions) corresponds to 606 mol acetaldehyde/mol Au hour(-1) .

  16. pH induced protein-scaffold biosynthesis of tunable shape gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaorong; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Ren, Fang; Qin, Zhihe

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, a pH-inductive protein-scaffold biosynthesis of shape-tunable crystalline gold nanoparticles at room temperature has been developed. By simple manipulation of the reaction solution's pH, anisotropic gold nanoparticles including spheres, triangles and cubes could be produced by incubating an aqueous solution of sodium tetrachloroaurate with Dolichomitriopsis diversiformis biomasses after immersion in ultrapure Millipore water overnight. A moss protein with molecular weight of about 71 kDa and pI of 4.9 was the primary biomolecule involved in the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles. The secondary configuration of the proteins by CD spectrum implied that the moss protein could display different secondary configurations including random coil, α-helix and intermediate conformations between random coil and α-helix for the experimental pH solution. The growth process of gold nanoparticles further showed that the moss protein with different configurations provided the template scaffold for the shape-controlled biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles. The constrained shape of the gold nanoparticles, however, disappeared in boiled moss extract. The gold nanoparticles with designed morphology were successfully reconstructed using the moss protein purified from the gold nanoparticles. Structural characterizations by SEM, TEM and SAED showed that the triangular and cubic gold nanoparticles were single crystalline.

  17. Luminescence quantum yields of gold nanoparticles varying with excitation wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuqing; Lu, Guowei; He, Yingbo; Shen, Hongming; Zhao, Jingyi; Xia, Keyu; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-01-28

    Luminescence quantum yields (QYs) of gold nanoparticles including nanorods, nanobipyramids and nanospheres are measured elaborately at a single nanoparticle level with different excitation wavelengths. It is found that the QYs of the nanostructures are essentially dependent on the excitation wavelength. The QY is higher when the excitation wavelength is blue-detuned and close to the nanoparticles' surface plasmon resonance peak. A phenomenological model based on the plasmonic resonator concept is proposed to understand the experimental findings. The excitation wavelength dependent QY is attributed to the wavelength dependent coupling efficiency between the free electron oscillation and the intrinsic plasmon resonant radiative mode. These studies should contribute to the understanding of one-photon luminescence from metallic nanostructures and plasmonic surface enhanced spectroscopy. PMID:26731570

  18. Luminescence quantum yields of gold nanoparticles varying with excitation wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuqing; Lu, Guowei; He, Yingbo; Shen, Hongming; Zhao, Jingyi; Xia, Keyu; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-01-01

    Luminescence quantum yields (QYs) of gold nanoparticles including nanorods, nanobipyramids and nanospheres are measured elaborately at a single nanoparticle level with different excitation wavelengths. It is found that the QYs of the nanostructures are essentially dependent on the excitation wavelength. The QY is higher when the excitation wavelength is blue-detuned and close to the nanoparticles' surface plasmon resonance peak. A phenomenological model based on the plasmonic resonator concept is proposed to understand the experimental findings. The excitation wavelength dependent QY is attributed to the wavelength dependent coupling efficiency between the free electron oscillation and the intrinsic plasmon resonant radiative mode. These studies should contribute to the understanding of one-photon luminescence from metallic nanostructures and plasmonic surface enhanced spectroscopy.

  19. Gold Coated Lanthanide Phosphate Nanoparticles for Targeted Alpha Generator Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, Mark F; Woodward, Jonathan; Boll, Rose Ann; Wall, Jonathan; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Kennel, Steve J; Mirzadeh, Saed; Robertson, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Targeted radiotherapies maximize cytotoxicty to cancer cells. In vivo generators such as 225Ac, which emits four particles in its decay chain, can significantly amplify the radiation dose delivered to the target site. However, renal dose from unbound 213Bi escaping during the decay process limits the dose of 225Ac that can be administered. Traditional chelating moieties are unable to sequester the radioactive daughters because of the high recoil energy from alpha particle emission. To counter this, we demonstrate that an engineered multilayered nanoparticle-antibody conjugate can both deliver radiation and contain the decay daughters of the in vivo -generator 225Ac while targeting biologically relevant receptors. These multi-shell nanoparticles combine the radiation resistance of crystalline lanthanide phosphate to encapsulate and contain 225Ac and its radioactive decay daughters, the magnetic properties of gadolinium phosphate for easy separation, and established surface chemistry of gold for attachment of nanoparticles to targeting antibodies.

  20. Poly(amino acid) functionalized maghemite and gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perego, Davide; Masciocchi, Norberto; Guagliardi, Antonietta; Domínguez-Vera, José Manuel; Gálvez, Natividad

    2013-02-01

    Bimodal MRI/OI imaging probes are of great interest in nanomedicine. Although many organic polymers have been studied thoroughly for in vivo applications, reports on the use of poly(amino acid)s as coating polymers are scarce. In this paper, poly-(d-glutamic acid, d-lysine) (PGL) has been used for coating maghemite and gold nanoparticles. An advantage of this flexible and biocompatible polymer is that, once anchored to the nanoparticle surface, dangling lysine amino groups are available for the incorporation of new functionalities. As an example, Alexa Fluor derivatives have been attached to PGL-coated maghemite nanoparticles to obtain magnetic/fluorescent materials. These dual-property materials could be used as bimodal MRI/OI probes for in vivo imaging.

  1. Nanoparticle-Induced Ellipse-to-Vesicle Morphology Transition of Rod-Coil-Rod Triblock Copolymer Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chaoying; Li, Qing; Cai, Chunhua; Lin, Jiaping

    2016-07-12

    Cooperative self-assembly behavior of rod-coil-rod poly(γ-benzyl-l-glutamate)-block-poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(γ-benzyl-l-glutamate) (PBLG-b-PEG-b-PBLG) amphiphilic triblock copolymers and hydrophobic gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was investigated by both experiments and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. It was discovered that pure PBLG-b-PEG-b-PBLG copolymers self-assemble into ellipse-like aggregates, and the morphology transforms into vesicles as AuNPs are introduced. When the hydrophobicity of AuNPs is close to that of the copolymers, AuNPs are homogeneously distributed in the vesicle wall. While for the AuNPs with higher hydrophobicity, they are embedded in the vesicle wall as clusters. In addition to the experimental observations, DPD simulations were performed on the self-assembly behavior of triblock copolymer/nanoparticle mixtures. Simulations well reproduced the morphology transition observed in the experiments and provided additional information such as chain packing mode in aggregates. It is deduced that the main reason for the ellipse-to-vesicle transition of the aggregates is attributed to the breakage of ordered and dense packing of PBLG rods in the aggregate core by encapsulating AuNPs. This study deepens our understanding of the self-assembly behavior of rod-coil copolymer/nanoparticle mixtures and provides strategy for designing hybrid polypeptide nanostructures. PMID:27314970

  2. Investigating the Toxicity, Uptake, Nanoparticle Formation and Genetic Response of Plants to Gold

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Andrew F.; Rylott, Elizabeth L.; Anderson, Christopher W. N.; Bruce, Neil C.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the physiological and genetic responses of Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Arabidopsis) to gold. The root lengths of Arabidopsis seedlings grown on nutrient agar plates containing 100 mg/L gold were reduced by 75%. Oxidized gold was subsequently found in roots and shoots of these plants, but gold nanoparticles (reduced gold) were only observed in the root tissues. We used a microarray-based study to monitor the expression of candidate genes involved in metal uptake and transport in Arabidopsis upon gold exposure. There was up-regulation of genes involved in plant stress response such as glutathione transferases, cytochromes P450, glucosyl transferases and peroxidases. In parallel, our data show the significant down-regulation of a discreet number of genes encoding proteins involved in the transport of copper, cadmium, iron and nickel ions, along with aquaporins, which bind to gold. We used Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) to study nanoparticle uptake from hydroponic culture using ionic gold as a non-nanoparticle control and concluded that nanoparticles between 5 and 100 nm in diameter are not directly accumulated by plants. Gold nanoparticles were only observed in plants exposed to ionic gold in solution. Together, we believe our results imply that gold is taken up by the plant predominantly as an ionic form, and that plants respond to gold exposure by up-regulating genes for plant stress and down-regulating specific metal transporters to reduce gold uptake. PMID:24736522

  3. Investigating the toxicity, uptake, nanoparticle formation and genetic response of plants to gold.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Andrew F; Rylott, Elizabeth L; Anderson, Christopher W N; Bruce, Neil C

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the physiological and genetic responses of Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Arabidopsis) to gold. The root lengths of Arabidopsis seedlings grown on nutrient agar plates containing 100 mg/L gold were reduced by 75%. Oxidized gold was subsequently found in roots and shoots of these plants, but gold nanoparticles (reduced gold) were only observed in the root tissues. We used a microarray-based study to monitor the expression of candidate genes involved in metal uptake and transport in Arabidopsis upon gold exposure. There was up-regulation of genes involved in plant stress response such as glutathione transferases, cytochromes P450, glucosyl transferases and peroxidases. In parallel, our data show the significant down-regulation of a discreet number of genes encoding proteins involved in the transport of copper, cadmium, iron and nickel ions, along with aquaporins, which bind to gold. We used Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) to study nanoparticle uptake from hydroponic culture using ionic gold as a non-nanoparticle control and concluded that nanoparticles between 5 and 100 nm in diameter are not directly accumulated by plants. Gold nanoparticles were only observed in plants exposed to ionic gold in solution. Together, we believe our results imply that gold is taken up by the plant predominantly as an ionic form, and that plants respond to gold exposure by up-regulating genes for plant stress and down-regulating specific metal transporters to reduce gold uptake. PMID:24736522

  4. Production of antibody labeled gold nanoparticles for influenza virus H5N1 diagnosis kit development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Van Dong; Hoang, Ha; Hoang Phan, Trong; Conrad, Udo; Chu, Hoang Ha

    2012-12-01

    Preparation of colloidal gold conjugated antibodies specific for influenza A/H5N1 and its use in developing a virus A/H5N1 rapid diagnostic kit is presented. Colloidal gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were prepared through citrate reduction. Single chain antibodies specific to H5N1 (scFv7 and scFv24) were produced using pTI2 + vector and E. coli strain HB2151. These antibodies were purified by affinity chromatography technique employing HiTrap Chelating HP columns pre-charged with Ni2 + . The method for preparation of antibody-colloidal gold conjugate was based on electrostatic force binding antibody with colloidal gold. The effect of factors such as pH and concentration of antibody has been quantitatively analyzed using spectroscopic methods after adding 1 wt% NaCl which induced AuNP aggregation. The morphological study by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the average size of the spherical AuNPs was 23 nm with uniform sizes. The spectroscopic properties of colloidal AuNPs showed the typical surface plasmon resonance band at 523 nm in UV-visible spectrum. The optimal pH of conjugated colloidal gold was found between 8.0 and 10.0. The activity of synthesized antibody labeled AuNPs for detection of H5N1 flu virus was checked by dot blot immunological method. The results confirmed the ability in detection of the A/H5N1 virus of the prepared antibody labeled gold particles and opened up the possibility of using them in manufacturing rapid detection kit for this virus.

  5. Production of antibody labeled gold nanoparticles for influenza virus H5N1 diagnosis kit development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Van Dong; Hoang, Ha; Hoang Phan, Trong; Conrad, Udo; Chu, Hoang Ha

    2012-12-01

    Preparation of colloidal gold conjugated antibodies specific for influenza A/H5N1 and its use in developing a virus A/H5N1 rapid diagnostic kit is presented. Colloidal gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were prepared through citrate reduction. Single chain antibodies specific to H5N1 (scFv7 and scFv24) were produced using pTI2 + vector and E. coli strain HB2151. These antibodies were purified by affinity chromatography technique employing HiTrap Chelating HP columns pre-charged with Ni2 + . The method for preparation of antibody–colloidal gold conjugate was based on electrostatic force binding antibody with colloidal gold. The effect of factors such as pH and concentration of antibody has been quantitatively analyzed using spectroscopic methods after adding 1 wt% NaCl which induced AuNP aggregation. The morphological study by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the average size of the spherical AuNPs was 23 nm with uniform sizes. The spectroscopic properties of colloidal AuNPs showed the typical surface plasmon resonance band at 523 nm in UV-visible spectrum. The optimal pH of conjugated colloidal gold was found between 8.0 and 10.0. The activity of synthesized antibody labeled AuNPs for detection of H5N1 flu virus was checked by dot blot immunological method. The results confirmed the ability in detection of the A/H5N1 virus of the prepared antibody labeled gold particles and opened up the possibility of using them in manufacturing rapid detection kit for this virus.

  6. Scaling of transverse nuclear magnetic relaxation due to magnetic nanoparticle aggregation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Keith A; Vassiliou, Christophoros C; Issadore, David; Berezovsky, Jesse; Cima, Michael J; Westervelt, R M

    2010-10-01

    The aggregation of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles decreases the transverse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time T2CP of adjacent water molecules measured by a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse-echo sequence. This effect is commonly used to measure the concentrations of a variety of small molecules. We perform extensive Monte Carlo simulations of water diffusing around SPIO nanoparticle aggregates to determine the relationship between T2CP and details of the aggregate. We find that in the motional averaging regime T2CP scales as a power law with the number N of nanoparticles in an aggregate. The specific scaling is dependent on the fractal dimension d of the aggregates. We find T2CP∝N-0.44 for aggregates with d = 2.2, a value typical of diffusion limited aggregation. We also find that in two-nanoparticle systems, T2CP is strongly dependent on the orientation of the two nanoparticles relative to the external magnetic field, which implies that it may be possible to sense the orientation of a two-nanoparticle aggregate. To optimize the sensitivity of SPIO nanoparticle sensors, we propose that it is best to have aggregates with few nanoparticles, close together, measured with long pulse-echo times. PMID:20689678

  7. Serum proteins prevent aggregation of Fe2O3 and ZnO nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Mark A.; Abid, Aamir; Kennedy, Ian M.; Barakat, Abdul I.

    2014-01-01

    Aggregation of metal oxide nanoparticles in aqueous media complicates interpretation of in vitro studies of nanoparticle–cell interactions. We used dynamic light scattering to investigate the aggregation dynamics of iron oxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles. Our results show that iron oxide particles aggregate more readily than zinc oxide particles. Pretreatment with serum stabilises iron oxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles against aggregation. Serum-treated iron oxide is stable only in pure water, while zinc oxide is stable in water or cell culture media. These findings, combined with zeta potential measurements and quantification of proteins adsorbed on particle surface, suggest that serum stabilisation of iron oxide particles occurs primarily through protein adsorption and resulting net surface charge. Zinc oxide stabilisation, however, also involves steric hindrance of particle aggregation. Fluid shear at levels used in flow experiments breaks up iron oxide particle aggregates. These results enhance our understanding of nanoparticle aggregation and its consequences for research on the biological effects of nanomaterials. PMID:22149273

  8. Size dependent fractal aggregation mediated through surfactant in silica nanoparticle solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2012-06-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study aggregation of anionic silica nanoparticles in presence of cationic surfactant (DTAB) in aqueous solution. The measurements were carried out for different sizes of nanoparticles (8.2, 16.4 and 26.4 nm) at fixed (1 wt%) nanoparticles and surfactant concentration. It is found that the adsorption of surfactant micelles on the silica nanoparticles leads to the aggregation of nanoparticles, which is characterized by a fractal structure. The number of adsorbed micelles on nanoparticle increases from 7 to 152 with the increase in the size of the nanoparticle from 8.2 to 26.4 nm, whereas interestingly the fractal dimension remains same. The aggregate morphology in these systems is expected to be governed by the diffusion limited aggregation.

  9. Antibody modified gold nanoparticles for fast and selective, colorimetric T7 bacteriophage detection.

    PubMed

    Lesniewski, Adam; Los, Marcin; Jonsson-Niedziółka, Martin; Krajewska, Anna; Szot, Katarzyna; Los, Joanna M; Niedziolka-Jonsson, Joanna

    2014-04-16

    Herein, we report a colorimetric immunosensor for T7 bacteriophage based on gold nanoparticles modified with covalently bonded anti-T7 antibodies. The new immunosensor allows for a fast, simple, and selective detection of T7 virus. T7 virions form immunological complexes with the antibody modified gold nanoparticles which causes them to aggregate. The aggregation can be observed with the naked eye as a color change from red to purple, as well as with a UV-vis spectrophotometer. The aggregate formation was confirmed with SEM imaging. Sensor selectivity against the M13 bacteriophage was demonstrated. The limit of detection (LOD) is 1.08 × 10(10) PFU/mL (18 pM) T7. The new method was compared with a traditional plaque test. In contrast to biological tests the colorimetric method allows for detection of all T7 phages, not only those biologically active. This includes phage ghosts and fragments of virions. T7 virus has been chosen as a model organism for adenoviruses. The described method has several advantages over the traditional ones. It is much faster than a standard plaque test. It is more robust since no bacteria-virus interactions are utilized in the detection process. Since antibodies are available for a large variety of pathogenic viruses, the described concept is very flexible and can be adapted to detect many different viruses, not only bacteriophages. Contrary to the classical immunoassays, it is a one-step detection method, and no additional amplification, e.g., enzymatic, is needed to read the result.

  10. Do particle size and surface functionality affect uptake and depuration of gold nanoparticles by aquatic invertebrates?

    PubMed

    Park, Sujung; Woodhall, James; Ma, Guibin; Veinot, Jonathan G C; Boxall, Alistair B A

    2015-04-01

    Because of the widespread use of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in consumer and industrial products, it is inevitable that these materials will enter the environment. It is often stated that the uptake of ENPs into organisms in the environment is related to the particle size and surface functionality. To test this assumption, the present study investigated the uptake and depuration of gold nanoparticle (Au NPs) coated with either citrate (Au-citrate NPs), mercaptoundecanoic acid (Au-MUDA NPs), amino polyethylene glycol (PEG) thiol (Au-NH2 NPs), or PEG (Au-PEG NP) by the aquatic invertebrate Gammarus pulex. The studies were performed using a range of standard ecotoxicity media and natural waters, resulting in varying degrees of aggregation of the different NPs. Uptake of gold by G. pulex varied depending on the surface coatings, with Au-MUDA and Au-citrate NPs being taken up to a greater extent than Au-NH2 and Au-PEG NPs in all test media and natural waters. In all test media evaluated, higher amounts of amino and PEG-coated ENPs were eliminated compared with MUDA- and citrate-coated ENPs. No obvious relationships were seen between the aggregation state of the different Au NPs in treatment and uptake, suggesting that the widely accepted assumption that Au NP uptake is related to particle size does not hold for the range of aggregation states studied (67.1-178.8 nm). Positive correlations between particle number concentration in the media and uptake were observed, indicating that this factor might partly explain the differences in uptake of a particle from different media types.

  11. SERS immunoassay based on the capture and concentration of antigen-assembled gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Arielle; Lovato, Francis; Oh, Soon Hwan; Lai, Yen H; Filbrun, Seth; Driskell, Elizabeth A; Driskell, Jeremy D

    2016-01-01

    A simple, rapid, and sensitive immunoassay has been developed based on antigen-mediated aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Central to this platform is the extrinsic Raman label (ERL), which consists of a gold nanoparticle modified with a mixed monolayer of a Raman active molecule and an antibody. ERLs are mixed with sample, and antigen induces the aggregation of the ERLs. A membrane filter is then used to isolate and concentrate the ERL aggregates for SERS analysis. Preliminary work to establish proof-of-principle of the platform technology utilized mouse IgG as a model antigen. The effects of membrane pore diameter and AuNP size on the analytical performance of the assay were systematically investigated, and it was determined that a pore diameter of 200 nm and AuNP diameter of 80 nm provide maximum sensitivity while minimizing signal from blank samples. Optimization of the assay provided a detection limit of 1.9 ng/mL, 20-fold better than the detection limit achieved by an ELISA employing the same antibody-antigen system. Furthermore, this assay required only 60 min compared to 24h for the ELISA. To validate this assay, mouse serum was directly analyzed to accurately quantify IgG. Collectively, these results demonstrate the potential advantages of this technology over current diagnostic tests for protein biomarkers with respect to time, simplicity, and detection limits. Thus, this approach provides a framework for prospective development of new and more powerful tools that can be designed for point-of-care diagnostic or point-of-need detection. PMID:26695280

  12. Comparison of Gold Nanoparticle Conjugated Secondary Antibody with Non-Gold Secondary Antibody in an ELISA Kit Model.

    PubMed

    Emami, Tara; Madani, Rasool; Golchinfar, Fariba; Shoushtary, Abdolhamid; Amini, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-10-01

    In this study, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were used as carriers of the signaling anti-chicken antibody peroxidase in comparison with anti-chicken antibody peroxidase without gold nanoparticle in a commercial avian influenza kit. AuNPs enhanced the absorbance and shortened the assay time. AuNPs act as a carrier of many enzymes and multiply the effect of enzyme when reacting with substrate. They amplify optical signal, while keeping low background signals.

  13. Facile green synthesis of variable metallic gold nanoparticle using Padina gymnospora, a brown marine macroalga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M.; Kalaivani, R.; Manikandan, S.; Sangeetha, N.; Kumaraguru, A. K.

    2013-04-01

    The process of development of reliable and eco-friendly metallic nanoparticles is an important step in the field of nanotechnology. To achieve this, use of natural sources like biological systems becomes essential. In the present work, extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using Padina gymnospora has been attempted and achieved rapid formation of gold nanoparticles in a short duration. The UV-vis spectrum of the aqueous medium containing gold ion showed peak at 527 nm corresponding to the plasmon absorbance of gold nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy showed the formation of well-dispersed gold nanoparticles. FTIR spectra of brown alga confirmed that hydroxyl groups present in the algal polysaccharides were involved in the gold bioreduction. AFM analysis showed the results of particle sizes (53-67 nm) and average height of the particle roughness (60.0 nm). X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrum of the gold nanoparticles exhibited Bragg reflections corresponding to gold nanoparticles. This environment-friendly method of biological gold nanoparticle synthesis can be applied potentially in various products that directly come in contact with the human body, such as cosmetics, and foods and consumer goods, besides medical applications.

  14. The effect of visible light on gold nanoparticles and some bioeffects on environmental fungi.

    PubMed

    Andries, Maria; Pricop, Daniela; Oprica, Lacramioara; Creanga, Dorina-Emilia; Iacomi, Felicia

    2016-05-30

    The oxidative stress induced by light exposed gold nanoparticles in some microorganism cells was investigated. Gold nanoparticles are currently used in biomedical and pharmaceutical research. For this study citrate-gold nanoparticles were synthesized in alkaline conditions at constant temperature of 85°C under magnetic stirring. Equal volumes of such prepared colloidal solution, were exposed to visible light at different wavelengths for 90min at room temperature. The spectra in the visible and ultraviolet range have revealed an increase in the intensity of the absorption band for gold nanoparticles exposed to light, due to the effect of surface plasmon resonance. Versatility of gold nanoparticles photocatalytic action was shown by means of manipulating wavelengths of incident light, which evidenced differences in the bioeffects induced in cellulolytic fungi - known for their environmental role but also for other applications such as in cosmetics industry. The comparative analysis of fungal response to gold nanoparticle stressors has revealed different enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation when fungi were supplied with gold nanoparticles exposed to different wavelength lights. The activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase were remarkably increased for green light exposure of gold nanoparticles suggesting fungi adaption to increased oxidative stress induced by irradiated particles; increased level of lipid peroxidation was showed by high concentration of malondialdehyde for white light exposed gold particles since antioxidant enzymes were less active. PMID:27063667

  15. Biosynthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles using extracts of tamarindus indica L leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, S. N.; Naranjo, A. M.; Herrera, A. P.

    2016-02-01

    This study reports the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using an extract of Tamarindus indica L. leaves. Phenols, ketones and carboxyls were present in the leaves of T. indica. These organic compounds that allowed the synthesis of nanoparticles were identified by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and High Pressure Liquid Chromatographic (HPLC). Synthesis of gold nanoparticles was performed with the extract of T. indica leaves and an Au+3 aqueous solutions (HAuCl4) at room temperature with one hour of reaction time. Characterization of gold nanoparticles was performed by UV visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and EDX. The results indicated the formation of gold nanoparticles with a wavelength of 576nm and an average size of 52±5nm. The EDX technique confirmed the presence of gold nanoparticles with 12.88% in solution.

  16. The use of quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) for studying nanoparticle-induced platelet aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Martinez, Maria Jose; Inkielewicz-Stepniak, Iwona; Medina, Carlos; Rahme, Kamil; D’Arcy, Deirdre M; Fox, Daniel; Holmes, Justin D; Zhang, Hongzhou; Radomski, Marek Witold

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between blood platelets and nanoparticles have both pharmacological and toxicological significance and may lead to platelet activation and aggregation. Platelet aggregation is usually studied using light aggregometer that neither mimics the conditions found in human microvasculature nor detects microaggregates. A new method for the measurement of platelet microaggregation under flow conditions using a commercially available quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) has recently been developed. The aim of the current study was to investigate if QCM-D could be used for the measurement of nanoparticle-platelet interactions. Silica, polystyrene, and gold nanoparticles were tested. The interactions were also studied using light aggregometry and flow cytometry, which measured surface abundance of platelet receptors. Platelet activation was imaged using phase contrast and scanning helium ion microscopy. QCM-D was able to measure nanoparticle-induced platelet microaggregation for all nanoparticles tested at concentrations that were undetectable by light aggregometry and flow cytometry. Microaggregates were measured by changes in frequency and dissipation, and the presence of platelets on the sensor surface was confirmed and imaged by phase contrast and scanning helium ion microscopy. PMID:22275839

  17. Urease immobilized fluorescent gold nanoparticles for urea sensing.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Upendra Kumar; Nirala, Narsingh R; Upadhyay, Chandan; Saxena, P S; Srivastava, Anchal

    2015-05-01

    We report a surfactant-free synthesis of monodispersed gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with average size of 15 nm. An approach for visual and fluorescent sensing of urea in aqueous solution based on shift in surface plasmon band (SPB) maxima as well as quench in fluorescence intensity. To enable the urea detection, we functionalized the thiol-capped gold nanoparticles with urease, the enzyme specific to urea using carbodiimide chemistry. The visible color changed of the gold colloidal solution from red to blue (or purple); this was evident from quenching in absorbance and fluorescence intensity, is the principle applied here for the sensing of urea. The solution turns blue when the urea concentration exceeds 8 mg/dL which reveals visual lower detection limit. The lower detection limits governed by the fluorescence quenching were found 5 mg/dL (R(2) = 0.99) which is highly sensitive and selective compared to shift in SPB maxima. The approach depicted here seems to be important in clinical diagnosis.

  18. Gold-Speckled Multimodal Nanoparticles for Noninvasive Bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    In this report the synthesis, characterization, and functional evaluation of a multimodal nanoparticulate contrast agent for noninvasive imaging through both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is presented. The nanoparticles described herein enable high resolution and highly sensitive three-dimensional diagnostic imaging through the synergistic coupling of MRI and PAT capabilities. Gadolinium (Gd)-doped gold-speckled silica (GSS) nanoparticles, ranging from 50 to 200 nm, have been prepared in a simple one-pot synthesis using nonionic microemulsions. The photoacoustic signal is generated from a nonuniform, discontinuous gold nanodomains speckled across the silica surface, whereas the MR contrast is provided through Gd incorporated in the silica matrix. The presence of a discontinuous speckled surface, as opposed to a continuous gold shell, allows sufficient bulk water exchange with the Gd ions to generate a strong MR contrast. The dual imaging capabilities of the particles have been demonstrated through in silicio and in vitro methods. The described particles also have the capacity for therapeutic applications including the thermal ablation of tumors through the absorption of irradiated light. PMID:19466201

  19. Electrical Detection of Protein Using Gold Nanoparticles and Nanogap Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chien-Ying; Chang, Tien-Li; Uppala, Ramesh; Chen, Chun-Chi; Ko, Fu-Hsiang; Chen, Ping-Hei

    2005-07-01

    A method of electrically detecting of protein described is developed using self-assembled multilayer gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on a SiO2/Si substrate between gold electrodes. Electrical measurements are performed at room temperature using a probe station. A monoclonal antibody is immobilized on the top surface of the first layer of AuNPs (14 nm). The second layer of AuNPs is formed through specific binding among a target antigen [hepatitis C virus, (HCV)], the monoclonal antibody, and the conjugate of a AuNP-polyclonal antibody. Once the specific binding among the monoclonal antibody, target antigen, and polyclonal antibody occurs, a significant electric current is detected through multilayer self-assembled gold nanoparticles between nanogap electrodes. No significant current (<1 pA) can be measured through a monolayer of AuNPs. A significant difference between the IV curves of the monolayer and the multilayer of AuNPs is used to identify whether the target antigen exists in the tested sample.

  20. Converging hazard assessment of gold nanoparticles to aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    García-Cambero, Jesús Pablo; Núñez García, Mercedes; López, Gema Díaz; Herranz, Ana López; Cuevas, Laureano; Pérez-Pastrana, Esperanza; Cuadal, Judith Sendra; Castelltort, Marc Ramis; Calvo, Argelia Castaño

    2013-10-01

    The gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) are being increasingly used because of their huge diversity of applications, and consequently, elevated levels in the environment are expected. However, due to their physico-chemical properties and functionalization a high variety of Au-NPs can be found, and complete toxicological information for each type of Au-NPs still lacks, and even, the toxicological information for the same species is sometimes contradictory. Therefore, hazard assessment should be done case by case. Hence, the objective of this study was to obtain ecotoxicological information of the same Au-NPs in aquatic organisms and to find a rationale for Au-NPs toxicity. For such a purpose, bare and hyaluronic acid capped Au-NPs (12.5 nm) along with Au-NPs bulk material were tested on freshwater algae, Daphnia and zebrafish. Results showed that while gold nanoparticles were found to be harmless to the tested organisms, the soluble gold showed to be toxic to algae and Daphnia, with an LC50 between 1 and 2 mg L(-1). Comparing our results with those gathered in the literature, it appears that a common hazard assessment of Au-NPs on the studied organisms can be elucidated.

  1. Highly stable noble metal nanoparticles dispersible in biocompatible solvents: synthesis of cationic phosphonium gold nanoparticles in water and DMSO.

    PubMed

    Ju-Nam, Yon; Abdussalam-Mohammed, Wanisa; Ojeda, Jesus J

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report the synthesis of novel cationic phosphonium gold nanoparticles dispersible in water and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for their potential use in biomedical applications. All the cationic-functionalising ligands currently reported in the literature are ammonium-based species. Here, the synthesis and characterisation of an alternative system, based on phosphonioalkylthiosulfate zwitterions and phosphonioalkylthioacetate were carried out. We have also demonstrated that our phosphonioalkylthiosulfate zwitterions readily disproportionate into phosphonioalkylthiolates in situ during the synthesis of gold nanoparticles produced by the borohydride reduction of gold(III) salts. The synthesis of the cationic gold nanoparticles using these phosphonium ligands was carried out in water and DMSO. UV-visible spectroscopic and TEM studies have shown that the phosphonioalkylthiolates bind to the surface of gold nanoparticles which are typically around 10 nm in diameter. The resulting cationic-functionalised gold nanoparticles are dispersible in aqueous media and in DMSO, which is the only organic solvent approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for drug carrier tests. This indicates their potential future use in biological applications. This work shows the synthesis of a new family of phosphonium-based ligands, which behave as cationic masked thiolate ligands in the functionalisation of gold nanoparticles. These highly stable colloidal cationic phosphonium gold nanoparticles dispersed in water and DMSO can offer a great opportunity for the design of novel biorecognition and drug delivery systems.

  2. Approach and Coalescence of Gold Nanoparticles Driven by Surface Thermodynamic Fluctuations and Atomic Interaction Forces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiadao; Chen, Shuai; Cui, Kai; Li, Dangguo; Chen, Darong

    2016-02-23

    The approach and coalescence behavior of gold nanoparticles on a silicon surface were investigated by experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. By analyzing the behavior of the atoms in the nanoparticles in the simulations, it was found that the atoms in a single isolated nanoparticle randomly fluctuated and that the surface atoms showed greater fluctuation. The fluctuation increased as the temperature increased. When there were two or more neighboring nanoparticles, the fluctuating surface atoms of the nanoparticles "flowed" toward the neighboring nanoparticle because of atomic interaction forces between the nanoparticles. With the surface atoms "flowing", the gold nanoparticles approached and finally coalesced. The simulation results were in good agreement with the experimental results. It can be concluded that surface thermodynamic fluctuations and atomic interaction forces are the causes of the approach and coalescence behavior of the gold nanoparticles. PMID:26756675

  3. Gold nanoparticles delivery in mammalian live cells: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Lévy, Raphaël; Shaheen, Umbreen; Cesbron, Yann; Sée, Violaine

    2010-01-01

    Functional nanomaterials have recently attracted strong interest from the biology community, not only as potential drug delivery vehicles or diagnostic tools, but also as optical nanomaterials. This is illustrated by the explosion of publications in the field with more than 2,000 publications in the last 2 years (4,000 papers since 2000; from ISI Web of Knowledge, ‘nanoparticle and cell’ hit). Such a publication boom in this novel interdisciplinary field has resulted in papers of unequal standard, partly because it is challenging to assemble the required expertise in chemistry, physics, and biology in a single team. As an extreme example, several papers published in physical chemistry journals claim intracellular delivery of nanoparticles, but show pictures of cells that are, to the expert biologist, evidently dead (and therefore permeable). To attain proper cellular applications using nanomaterials, it is critical not only to achieve efficient delivery in healthy cells, but also to control the intracellular availability and the fate of the nanomaterial. This is still an open challenge that will only be met by innovative delivery methods combined with rigorous and quantitative characterization of the uptake and the fate of the nanoparticles. This review mainly focuses on gold nanoparticles and discusses the various approaches to nanoparticle delivery, including surface chemical modifications and several methods used to facilitate cellular uptake and endosomal escape. We will also review the main detection methods and how their optimum use can inform about intracellular localization, efficiency of delivery, and integrity of the surface capping. PMID:22110850

  4. Influence of structure of iron nanoparticles in aggregates on their magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosická, Dana; Šembera, Jan

    2011-09-01

    Zero-valent iron nanoparticles rapidly aggregate. One of the reasons is magnetic forces among the nanoparticles. Magnetic field around particles is caused by composition of the particles. Their core is formed from zero-valent iron, and shell is a layer of magnetite. The magnetic forces contribute to attractive forces among the nanoparticles and that leads to increasing of aggregation of the nanoparticles. This effect is undesirable for decreasing of remediation properties of iron particles and limited transport possibilities. The aggregation of iron nanoparticles was established for consequent processes: Brownian motion, sedimentation, velocity gradient of fluid around particles and electrostatic forces. In our previous work, an introduction of influence of magnetic forces among particles on the aggregation was presented. These forces have significant impact on the rate of aggregation. In this article, a numerical computation of magnetic forces between an aggregate and a nanoparticle and between two aggregates is shown. It is done for random position of nanoparticles in an aggregate and random or arranged directions of magnetic polarizations and for structured aggregates with arranged vectors of polarizations. Statistical computation by Monte Carlo is done, and range of dominant area of magnetic forces around particles is assessed.

  5. Colorimetric detection of sulfide based on target-induced shielding against the peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hao-Hua; Weng, Shao-Huang; Huang, Shuang-Lu; Zhang, Ling-Na; Liu, Ai-Lin; Lin, Xin-Hua; Chen, Wei

    2014-12-10

    Colorimetric recognition and sensing of sulfide with high sensitivity was proposed based on target-induced shielding against the peroxidase-like activity of bare gold nanoparticles. Significant features of the new assay system are its simplicity and cost-effectiveness. The recognition of sulfide by bare gold nanoparticles can be fulfilled in a few seconds and the assay can be accomplished in about 10 min. Furthermore, the new assay system does not require surface modification of GNPs to obtain the specificity for sulfide, and a salt-induced aggregation step is not needed. The detection limit of this method for sulfide was 80 nM. These features make this sensor a potentially powerful tool for the quantitative determination of sulfide in water samples. PMID:25441901

  6. Barium titanate core – gold shell nanoparticles for hyperthermia treatments

    PubMed Central

    FarrokhTakin, Elmira; Ciofani, Gianni; Puleo, Gian Luigi; de Vito, Giuseppe; Filippeschi, Carlo; Mazzolai, Barbara; Piazza, Vincenzo; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2013-01-01

    The development of new tools and devices to aid in treating cancer is a hot topic in biomedical research. The practice of using heat (hyperthermia) to treat cancerous lesions has a long history dating back to ancient Greece. With deeper knowledge of the factors that cause cancer and the transmissive window of cells and tissues in the near-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum, hyperthermia applications have been able to incorporate the use of lasers. Photothermal therapy has been introduced as a selective and noninvasive treatment for cancer, in which exogenous photothermal agents are exploited to achieve the selective destruction of cancer cells. In this manuscript, we propose applications of barium titanate core–gold shell nanoparticles for hyperthermia treatment against cancer cells. We explored the effect of increasing concentrations of these nanoshells (0–100 μg/mL) on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, testing the internalization and intrinsic toxicity and validating the hyperthermic functionality of the particles through near infrared (NIR) laser-induced thermoablation experiments. No significant changes were observed in cell viability up to nanoparticle concentrations of 50 μg/mL. Experiments upon stimulation with an NIR laser revealed the ability of the nanoshells to destroy human neuroblastoma cells. On the basis of these findings, barium titanate core–gold shell nanoparticles resulted in being suitable for hyperthermia treatment, and our results represent a promising first step for subsequent investigations on their applicability in clinical practice. PMID:23847415

  7. Fluctuation-driven anisotropy in effective pair interactions between nanoparticles: Thiolated gold nanoparticles in ethane

    SciTech Connect

    Jabes, B. Shadrack; Yadav, Hari O. S.; Chakravarty, Charusita; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2014-10-21

    Fluctuations within the ligand shell of a nanoparticle give rise to a significant degree of anisotropy in effective pair interactions for low grafting densities [B. Bozorgui, D. Meng, S. K. Kumar, C. Chakravarty, and A. Cacciuto, Nano Lett. 13, 2732 (2013)]. Here, we examine the corresponding fluctuation-driven anisotropy for gold nanocrystals densely passivated with short ligands. In particular, we consider gold nanocrystals capped by alkylthiols, both in vacuum and in ethane solvent at high density. As in the preceding study, we show that the anisotropy in the nanoparticle pair potential can be quantified by an angle-dependent correction term to the isotropic potential of mean force (PMF). We find that the anisotropy of the ligand shells is distance dependent, and strongly influenced by ligand interdigitation effects as well as expulsion of ligand chains from the interparticle region at short distances. Such fluctuation-driven anisotropy can be significant for alkylthiol-coated gold nanoparticles, specially for longer chain lengths, under good solvent conditions. The consequences of such anisotropy for self-assembly, specially as a function of grafting density, solvent quality and at interfaces, should provide some interesting insights in future work. Our results clearly show that an isotropic two-body PMF cannot adequately describe the thermodynamics and assembly behavior of nanoparticles in this dense grafting regime and inclusion of anisotropic effects, as well as possibly many-body interactions, is necessary. Extensions of this approach to other passivated nanoparticle systems and implications for self-assembly are considered.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of the straining of nanoparticle chain aggregates: the case of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalis, Adamos; Friedlander, Sheldon K.

    2005-07-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that individual nanoparticle chain aggregates (NCAs) exhibit unusual mechanical behaviour when under strain inside the transmission electron microscope. NCAs made of various materials (e.g. carbon, metal oxides and metals) were strained by as much as 100% under tension. The nanoparticles that compose the chains were 5-10 nm in diameter and the chains of the order of 1 µm in length. Such aggregates are of technological importance in the manufacture of nanocomposite materials (e.g. rubber), aggregate break-up (e.g. sampling diesel emissions) and chemical-mechanical planarization. The goal of this study was to simulate the mechanical behaviour of chain aggregates with morphological properties similar to those of technological interest. Molecular dynamics (MD) and energy minimization computer simulations are employed to investigate, at the atomic scale, the behaviour of short nanoparticle aggregates under strain and to obtain quantitative information on the forces involved in aggregate straining and fracturing. The interaction potential used is that of copper obtained with the embedded atom method (EAM). Two seven-nanoparticle aggregates are studied, one linear and the other kinked. The seven nanoparticles in both aggregates are single crystals and about 2.5 nm in diameter each. The aggregates are strained along their longest dimension, to the breaking point, at strain rates spanning from 2.5 × 107 to 8.0 × 108 s-1 (MD simulations). The linear aggregate yield strain is about 0.1. The kinked aggregate elastic limit is also about 0.1, but only one-third of the stress develops along the straining direction compared to the linear aggregate. The kinked aggregate breaks at a strain of about 0.5, five times higher than the breaking strain of the linear aggregate. The ability of the kinked aggregate to straighten through combined nanoparticle interface sliding and rotation accounts for the extra strain accommodation. Simulation

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of the straining of nanoparticle chain aggregates: the case of copper.

    PubMed

    Dalis, Adamos; Friedlander, Sheldon K

    2005-07-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that individual nanoparticle chain aggregates (NCAs) exhibit unusual mechanical behaviour when under strain inside the transmission electron microscope. NCAs made of various materials (e.g. carbon, metal oxides and metals) were strained by as much as 100% under tension. The nanoparticles that compose the chains were 5-10 nm in diameter and the chains of the order of 1 µm in length. Such aggregates are of technological importance in the manufacture of nanocomposite materials (e.g. rubber), aggregate break-up (e.g. sampling diesel emissions) and chemical-mechanical planarization. The goal of this study was to simulate the mechanical behaviour of chain aggregates with morphological properties similar to those of technological interest. Molecular dynamics (MD) and energy minimization computer simulations are employed to investigate, at the atomic scale, the behaviour of short nanoparticle aggregates under strain and to obtain quantitative information on the forces involved in aggregate straining and fracturing. The interaction potential used is that of copper obtained with the embedded atom method (EAM). Two seven-nanoparticle aggregates are studied, one linear and the other kinked. The seven nanoparticles in both aggregates are single crystals and about 2.5 nm in diameter each. The aggregates are strained along their longest dimension, to the breaking point, at strain rates spanning from 2.5 × 10(7) to 8.0 × 10(8) s(-1) (MD simulations). The linear aggregate yield strain is about 0.1. The kinked aggregate elastic limit is also about 0.1, but only one-third of the stress develops along the straining direction compared to the linear aggregate. The kinked aggregate breaks at a strain of about 0.5, five times higher than the breaking strain of the linear aggregate. The ability of the kinked aggregate to straighten through combined nanoparticle interface sliding and rotation accounts for the extra strain accommodation

  10. Gold Nanoparticles and Radiofrequency in Experimental Models for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Raoof, Mustafa; Corr, Stuart J.; Zhu, Cihui; Cisneros, Brandon T.; Kaluarachchi, Warna D; Phounsavath, Sophia; Wilson, Lon J.; Curley, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most lethal and chemo-refractory cancers, clearly, alternative treatment strategies are needed. We utilized 10nm gold nanoparticles as a scaffold to synthesize nanoconjugates bearing a targeting antibody (cetuximab, C225) and gemcitabine. Loading efficiency of gemcitabine on the gold nanoconjugates was 30%. Targeted gold nanoconjugates in combination with RF were selectively cytotoxic to EGFR expressing Hep3B and SNU449 cells when compared to isotype particles with/without RF (p<0.05). In animal experiments, targeted gold nanoconjugates halted the growth of subcutaneous Hep3B xenografts in combination with RF exposure (p<0.05). These xenografts also demonstrated increased apoptosis, necrosis and decreased proliferation compared to controls. Normal tissues were unharmed. We have demonstrated that non-invasive RF-induced hyperthermia when combined with targeted delivery of gemcitabine is more effective and safe at dosages ~275-fold lower than the current clinically-delivered systemic dose of gemcitabine. PMID:24650884

  11. Anticancer studies of the synthesized gold nanoparticles against MCF 7 breast cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamala Priya, M. R.; Iyer, Priya R.

    2015-04-01

    It has been previously stated that gold nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized using various green extracts of plants. The synthesized gold nanoparticles were characterized under scanning electron microscopy and EDX to identify the size of the nanoparticles. It was found that the nanoparticles were around 30 nm in size, which is a commendable nano dimension achieved through a plant mediated synthesis. The nanoparticles were further studied for their various applications. In the current study, we have made attempts to exploit the anticancer ability of the gold nano particles. The nanoparticles were studied against MCF 7 breast cancer cell lines. The results obtained from the studies of anticancer activity showed that gold nanoparticles gave an equivalent good results, in par with the standard drugs against cancer. The AuNP's proved to be efficient even from the minimum concentrations of 2 μg/ml, and as the concentration increased the anticancer efficacy as well increased.

  12. Anticancer studies of the synthesized gold nanoparticles against MCF 7 breast cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamala Priya, M. R.; Iyer, Priya R.

    2014-09-01

    It has been previously stated that gold nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized using various green extracts of plants. The synthesized gold nanoparticles were characterized under scanning electron microscopy and EDX to identify the size of the nanoparticles. It was found that the nanoparticles were around 30 nm in size, which is a commendable nano dimension achieved through a plant mediated synthesis. The nanoparticles were further studied for their various applications. In the current study, we have made attempts to exploit the anticancer ability of the gold nano particles. The nanoparticles were studied against MCF 7 breast cancer cell lines. The results obtained from the studies of anticancer activity showed that gold nanoparticles gave an equivalent good results, in par with the standard drugs against cancer. The AuNP's proved to be efficient even from the minimum concentrations of 2 μg/ml, and as the concentration increased the anticancer efficacy as well increased.

  13. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by Pseudomonas veronii AS41G inhabiting Annona squamosa L.

    PubMed

    Baker, Syed; Satish, Sreedharamurthy

    2015-11-01

    Biogenic principles to nanotechnology have generated tremendous attention in recent past owing eco friendly benign process for synthesis of nanoparticles. Present investigation reports extracellular synthesis of gold nanoparticles using cell free supernatant of Pseudomonas veronii AS 41G, a novel endophyte isolated from Annona squamosa L. Gold nanoparticles formation was confirmed with UV-Visible spectrophotometer. FTIR analysis predicted various functional groups responsible for reduction of metal salts and stabilization of gold nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were crystalline in nature as shown in XRD pattern. TEM analysis revealed morphological characteristics of nanoparticles with different size. Thus the present study attributes for facile process for synthesis of gold nanoparticles as an alternative for conventional methods. The study also highlights the new role of novel bacterium Pseudomonas veronii AS41G which will be very valuable as a record for the researchers working on it.

  14. One at a time: counting single-nanoparticle/electrode collisions for accurate particle sizing by overcoming the instability of gold nanoparticles under electrolytic conditions.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Danfeng; Wang, Song; Zheng, Yuanqin; Deng, Zhaoxiang

    2013-12-20

    In response to an increasing demand for understanding electrochemical processes on the nanometer scale, it now becomes possible to monitor electron transfer reactions at the single-nanoparticle level, namely particle collision electrochemistry. This technique has great potential in the development of research tools towards single-particle electrocatalysis and selective and multiplexed particle sizing. However, one existing problem that may discourage these applications is the relatively weak colloidal stability of nanoparticles in an electrolytic solution. Here we report on a facile but efficient way to achieve a good stability of gold nanoparticles in an acidic media so that 'zero-aggregation' collisions can be achieved at a carbon ultramicroelectrode. This allows us to obtain anodic dissolution currents from individual nanoparticles in a 'one particle at a time' manner, based on which accurate particle sizing with a resolution of 1-2 nm can be achieved. Our work strongly suggests that to maintain a well dispersed nanoparticle solution during a particle impact electrochemical experiment is critically important for accurate particle sizing, as well as other applications that require information to be extracted from individual nanoparticles (not their aggregates).

  15. Antibody tagged gold nanoparticles as scattering probes for the pico molar detection of the proteins in blood serum using nanoparticle tracking analyzer.

    PubMed

    Kashid, Sahebrao Balaso; Tak, Rajesh D; Raut, Rajesh Warluji

    2015-09-01

    We report a rapid one-step immunoassay to detect protein using antibody conjugated gold nanoparticles (AbGNPs) where the targeted protein concentration was determined by analyzing the gold nanoparticle aggregation caused by antibody-antigen interactions using nanoparticles tracking analysis (NTA) technique. The sandwich structure constituting the binding of the targeted human IgG to the gold nanoparticle conjugates with goat anti human monoclonal IgG (AbGNPs) was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The binding of human IgG (antigen, mentioned hence forth as AT) induce AbGNPs to form dimers or trimers through a typical antibody-antigen-antibody sandwich structure that can be analyzed for the sensitive determination on the basis of change in hydrodynamic diameter of AbGNPs. By this method the minimum detectable concentration of AT is found to be below 2pg/ml. We expect that a significant change in the hydrodynamic diameter of AbGNP could form the basis for the rapid one-step immunoassay development.

  16. Analytical and Theranostic Applications of Gold Nanoparticles and Multifunctional Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Khlebtsov, Nikolai; Bogatyrev, Vladimir; Dykman, Lev; Khlebtsov, Boris; Staroverov, Sergey; Shirokov, Alexander; Matora, Larisa; Khanadeev, Vitaly; Pylaev, Timofey; Tsyganova, Natalia; Terentyuk, Georgy

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and GNP-based multifunctional nanocomposites are the subject of intensive studies and biomedical applications. This minireview summarizes our recent efforts in analytical and theranostic applications of engineered GNPs and nanocomposites by using plasmonic properties of GNPs and various optical techniques. Specifically, we consider analytical biosensing; visualization and bioimaging of bacterial, mammalian, and plant cells; photodynamic treatment of pathogenic bacteria; and photothermal therapy of xenografted tumors. In addition to recently published reports, we discuss new data on dot immunoassay diagnostics of mycobacteria, multiplexed immunoelectron microscopy analysis of Azospirillum brasilense, materno-embryonic transfer of GNPs in pregnant rats, and combined photodynamic and photothermal treatment of rat xenografted tumors with gold nanorods covered by a mesoporous silica shell doped with hematoporphyrin. PMID:23471188

  17. Polymer coated gold nanoparticles for tracing the mobility of engineered nanoparticles in the subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uthuppu, Basil; Sidelmann Fjordbøge, Annika; Caspersen, Eva; Broholm, Mette Martina; Havsteen Jakobsen, Mogens

    2014-05-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are manufactured for their specific properties providing possibilities for new and improved products and applications. The use of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) has therefore brought significant innovation and advances to society, including benefits for human health and the environment. At the same time, little is known about the potential risk associated with the inevitable release of these new materials to the environment, and their new properties are poorly understood . Suspensions of ENPs are not very stable, as they tend to aggregate thereby losing their properties as single particles. Coatings, including a large variety of natural and synthetic polymers, are used to enhance the colloid stability in high concentrations . However, increasing the stability of these materials may lead to unintended effects, such as enhancing their mobility in surface water and groundwater leading to inadvertent impacts on aquatic ecosystems and human health. Detection of ENPs in natural water systems, however, has proved very challenging. Hence, there is a need for tracing of ENP behaviour in the environment. We suggest a possibility of introducing inert gold NPs with the same mobility as the reactive NPs, as tracer particles. Colloidal gold has been of great interest for centuries due to its vibrant colors produced by the interaction with visible light. The unusual optical-electronic properties, high chemical stability and relatively low toxicity have made them the model system of choice in this context. Also, the natural occurrence of these particles in the proposed environment is very rare. Laboratory based experiments conducted in sand columns show that stable aqueous suspensions of gold NPs coated with amphiphilic block co polymers (PVP-VA and PVA-COOH) are extremely mobile (retardation factors of 1.0-1.2) with high recovery values (50-95 %). The specific retardation and recovery depends on the coating type, concentration and grafting method. The NPs

  18. The fabrication of nanochain structure of gold nanoparticles and its application in ractopamine sensing.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jiahua; He, Dawei; Wang, Wenshuo; Liu, Yongchuan; Wu, Hongpeng; Wang, Yongsheng; Fu, Ming; Li, Shulei

    2013-10-15

    The illegal food additives including ractopamine and melamine throw a serious threat to human health. In this paper, the ractopamine and melamine were first used to form the nanochain structure of citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with a convenient and inexpensive method. The fabricated nanochain structure consisting of several AuNPs was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy. A new longitudinal surface plasma resonance, which could be adjusted from visible to near infrared range, was observed in absorption spectra due to the aggregation of AuNPs. This could be well explained by Finite Different Time Domain algorithm theoretically. As confirmed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, the complex formed by hydrogen-bonding interaction between melamine and ractopamine could effectively promote the aggregation of AuNPs that was useful to develop the sensitivity and selectivity for the detection of ractopamine. Hence, the plasmonic coupling phenomenon of gold nanochain could be applied in bio-assay for ractopamine through the change of solution's color and optical absorption band with naked eye or absorption spectra. The linear range was broadened to (1.23 × 10(-7)M, 1.11 × 10(-6)M) and the limit of detection was extended to 4.10 × 10(-8)M (S/N=3). More importantly, this time-saving method will be promising in rapid and selective detection of β-agonist for clinical applications. PMID:24054693

  19. Microwave-induced synthesis of highly dispersed gold nanoparticles within the pore channels of mesoporous silica

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Jinlou; Fan Wei; Shimojima, Atsushi; Okubo, Tatsuya

    2008-04-15

    Highly dispersed gold nanoparticles have been incorporated into the pore channels of SBA-15 mesoporous silica through a newly developed strategy assisted by microwave radiation (MR). The sizes of gold are effectively controlled attributed to the rapid and homogeneous nucleation, simultaneous propagation and termination of gold precursor by MR. Diol moieties with high dielectric and dielectric loss constants, and hence a high microwave activation, were firstly introduced to the pore channels of SBA-15 by a simple addition reaction between amino group and glycidiol and subsequently served as the reduction centers for gold nanoparticles. Extraction of the entrapped gold from the nanocomposite resulted in milligram quantities of gold nanoparticles with low dispersity. The successful assembly process of diol groups and formation of gold nanoparticles were monitored and tracked by solid-state NMR and UV-vis measurements. Characterization by small angle X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated that the incorporation of gold nanoparticles would not breakup the structural integrity and long-range periodicity of SBA-15. The gold nanoparticles had a narrow size distribution with diameters in the size range of 5-10 nm through TEM observation. The average particles size is 7.9 nm via calculation by the Scherrer formula and TEM measurements. Nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms gave further evidence that the employed method was efficient and gold nanoparticles were successfully incorporated into the pore channels of SBA-15. - Graphical abstract: A facile and novel strategy has been developed to incorporate gold nanoparticles into the pore channels of mesoporous SBA-15 assisted by microwave radiation (MR) with mild reaction condition and rapid reaction speed. Due to the rapid and homogeneous nucleation, simultaneous propagation and termination by MR, the size of gold nanoparticles are effectively controlled.

  20. Multiplexed Enrichment and Detection of Malarial Biomarkers Using a Stimuli-Responsive Iron Oxide and Gold Nanoparticle Reagent System

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Michael A.; Waitumbi, John N.; Hoffman, Allan S.; Yager, Paul; Stayton, Patrick S.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for simple yet robust biomarker and antigen purification and enrichment strategies that are compatible with current rapid diagnostic modalities. Here, a stimuli-responsive nanoparticle system is presented for multiplexed magneto-enrichment and non-instrumented lateral flow strip detection of model antigens from spiked pooled plasma. The integrated reagent system allows purification and enrichment of the gold-labeled biomarker half-sandwich that can be applied directly to lateral flow test strips. A linear diblock copolymer with a thermally-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAm) segment and a gold-binding block composed of NIPAm-co-N,N-dimethylaminoethylacrylamide (DMAEAm) was prepared by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The diblock copolymer was used to functionalize gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), with subsequent bioconjugation to yield thermally-responsive pNIPAm-AuNPs that were co-decorated with streptavidin. These AuNPs efficiently complexed biotinylated capture antibody reagents that were bound to picomolar quantities of pan-aldolase and Plasmodium Falciparum histidine rich protein 2 (PfHRP2) in spiked pooled plasma samples. The gold-labeled biomarker half-sandwich was then purified and enriched using 10 nm thermally-responsive magnetic nanoparticles that were similarly decorated with pNIPAm. When a thermal stimulus was applied in conjunction with a magnetic field, co-aggregation of the AuNP-half-sandwiches with the pNIPAm-coated iron oxide nanoparticles created large aggregates that were efficiently magnetophoresed and separated from bulk serum. The purified biomarkers from a spiked pooled plasma sample could be concentrated 50-fold into a small volume and applied directly to a commercial multiplexed lateral flow strip to dramatically improve the signal-to-noise ratio and test sensitivity. PMID:22804625

  1. Miscibility and alignment effects of mixed monolayer cyanobiphenyl liquid-crystal-capped gold nanoparticles in nematic cyanobiphenyl liquid crystal hosts.

    PubMed

    Qi, Hao; Kinkead, Brandy; Marx, Vanessa M; Zhang, Huai R; Hegmann, Torsten

    2009-06-01

    Against the rule: Liquid crystal hosts (5CB and 8CB) are doped with different thiol decorated gold nanoparticles (see figure). The "simple" hexanethiol and dodecanethiol capped nanoparticles (Au1 and Au2) are more compatible to the nematic cyanobiphenyl liquid crystals than nanoparticles capped simultaneously with alkylthiols and a nematic cyanobiphenyl thiol (Au3 and Au4).This study focuses on the miscibility of liquid crystal (LC) decorated gold nanoparticles (NPs) in nematic LCs. To explore if LC functional groups on the gold NP corona improve the compatibility (miscibility) with structurally related LC hosts, we examined mixtures of two LC hosts, 5CB and 8CB, doped at 5 wt % with different types of gold NPs. Four alkanethiol-capped NPs were synthesized; two homogeneously coated with alkanethiols (Au1 with C(6)H(13)SH and Au2 with C(12)H(25)SH), and two that were additionally capped at a different ratio with a mesogenic cyanobiphenyl end-functionalized alkanethiol HS10OCB (C(6)H(13)SH + HS10OCB for Au3 and C(12)H(25)SH + HS10OCB for Au4). Investigating these mixtures in the bulk for settling of the NPs, and in thin films using polarized optical microscopy (POM) between untreated glass slides as well as POM studies and electro-optic tests in planar ITO/polyimide test cells, reveal that the alkanethiol capped NPs Au1 and Au2 are more compatible with the two polar cyanobiphenyl hosts in comparison to the NPs decorated with the cyanobiphenyl moieties. All NPs induce homeotropic alignment in 5CB and 8CB between untreated glass slides, with Au1 and Au2 showing characteristic birefringent stripes, and Au3 and A4 exhibiting clear signs of aggregation. In rubbed polyimide cells, however, Au3 and Au4 fail to induce homeotropic alignment and show clear signs of macroscopic aggregation. PMID:19334026

  2. Investigation of thiol derivatized gold nanoparticle sensors for gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Jared S.

    Analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air and exhaled breath by sensor array is a very useful testing technique. It can provide non-invasive, fast, inexpensive testing for many diseases. Breath analysis has been very successful in identifying cancer and other diseases by using a chemiresistor sensor or array with gold nanoparticles to detect biomarkers. Acetone is a biomarker for diabetes and having a portable testing device could help to monitor diabetic and therapeutic progress. An advantage to this testing method is it is conducted at room temperature instead of 200 degrees Celsius. 3. The objective of this research is to determine the effect of thiol derivatized gold nanoparticles based on sensor(s) detection of VOCs. The VOCs to be tested are acetone, ethanol, and a mixture of acetone and ethanol. Each chip is tested under all three VOCs and three concentration levels (0.1, 1, and 5.0 ppm). VOC samples are used to test the sensors' ability to detect and differentiate VOCs. Sensors (also referred to as a chip) are prepared using several types of thiol derivatized gold nanoparticles. The factors are: thiol compound and molar volume loading of the thiol in synthesis. The average resistance results are used to determine the VOC selectivity of the sensors tested. The results show a trend of increasing resistance as VOC concentration is increased relative to dry air; which is used as baseline for VOCs. Several sensors show a high selectivity to one or more VOCs. Overall the 57 micromoles of 4-methoxy-toluenethiol sensor shows the strongest selectivity for VOCs tested. 3. Gerfen, Kurt. 2012. Detection of Acetone in Air Using Silver Ion Exchanged ZSM-5 and Zinc Oxide Sensing Films. Master of Science thesis, University of Louisville.

  3. Gold Nanoparticles and Their Alternatives for Radiation Therapy Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Daniel; Bekah, Devesh; Nadeau, Jay

    2014-10-01

    Radiation therapy is one of the most commonly used treatments for cancer. The dose of delivered ionizing radiation can be amplified by the presence of high-Z materials via an enhancement of the photoelectric effect; the most widely studied material is gold (atomic number 79). However, a large amount is needed to obtain a significant dose enhancement, presenting a challenge for delivery. In order to make this technique of broader applicability, the gold must be targeted, or alternative formulations developed that do not rely solely on the photoelectric effect. One possible approach is to excite scintillating nanoparticles with ionizing radiation, and then exploit energy transfer between these particles and attached dyes in a manner analogous to photodynamic therapy. Doped rare-earth halides and semiconductor quantum dots have been investigated for this purpose. However, although the spectrum of emitted light after radiation excitation is usually similar to that seen with light excitation, the yield is not. Measurement of scintillation yields is challenging, and in many cases has been done only for bulk materials, with little understanding of how the principles translate to the nanoscale. Another alternative is to use local heating using gold or iron, followed by application of ionizing radiation. Hyperthermia pre-sensitizes the tumors, leading to an improved response. Another approach is to use chemotherapeutic drugs that can radiosensitize tumors. Drugs may be attached to high-Z nanoparticles or encapsulated. This article discusses each of these techniques, giving an overview of the current state of nanoparticle-assisted radiation therapy and future directions.

  4. Gold nanoparticles and their alternatives for radiation therapy enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Daniel R.; Bekah, Devesh; Nadeau, Jay L.

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy is one of the most commonly used treatments for cancer. The dose of delivered ionizing radiation can be amplified by the presence of high-Z materials via an enhancement of the photoelectric effect; the most widely studied material is gold (atomic number 79). However, a large amount is needed to obtain a significant dose enhancement, presenting a challenge for delivery. In order to make this technique of broader applicability, the gold must be targeted, or alternative formulations developed that do not rely solely on the photoelectric effect. One possible approach is to excite scintillating nanoparticles with ionizing radiation, and then exploit energy transfer between these particles and attached dyes in a manner analogous to photodynamic therapy (PDT). Doped rare-earth halides and semiconductor quantum dots have been investigated for this purpose. However, although the spectrum of emitted light after radiation excitation is usually similar to that seen with light excitation, the yield is not. Measurement of scintillation yields is challenging, and in many cases has been done only for bulk materials, with little understanding of how the principles translate to the nanoscale. Another alternative is to use local heating using gold or iron, followed by application of ionizing radiation. Hyperthermia pre-sensitizes the tumors, leading to an improved response. Another approach is to use chemotherapeutic drugs that can radiosensitize tumors. Drugs may be attached to high-Z nanoparticles or encapsulated. This article discusses each of these techniques, giving an overview of the current state of nanoparticle-assisted radiation therapy and future directions. PMID:25353018

  5. Analytical performance of molecular beacons on surface immobilized gold nanoparticles of varying size and density.

    PubMed

    Uddayasankar, Uvaraj; Krull, Ulrich J

    2013-11-25

    The high quenching efficiency of metal nanoparticles has facilitated its use as quenchers in molecular beacons. To optimize this system, a good understanding of the many factors that influence molecular beacon performance is required. In this study, molecular beacon performance was evaluated as a function of gold nanoparticle size and its immobilization characteristics. Gold nanoparticles of 4 nm, 15 nm and 87 nm diameter, were immobilized onto glass slides. Each size regime offered distinctive optical properties for fluorescence quenching of molecular dyes that were conjugated to oligonucleotides that were immobilized to the gold nanoparticles. Rigid double stranded DNA was used as a model to place fluorophores at different distances from the gold nanoparticles. The effect of particle size and also the immobilization density of nanoparticles was evaluated. The 4 nm and 87 nm gold nanoparticles offered the highest sensitivity in terms of the change in fluorescence intensity as a function of distance (3-fold improvement for Cy5). The optical properties of the molecular fluorophore was of significance, with Cy5 offering higher contrast ratios than Cy3 due to the red-shifted emission spectrum relative to the plasmon peak. A high density of gold nanoparticles reduced contrast ratios, indicating preference for a monolayer of immobilized nanoparticles when considering analytical performance. Molecular beacon probes were then used in place of the double stranded oligonucleotides. There was a strong dependence of molecular beacon performance on the length of a linker used for attachment to the nanoparticle surface. The optimal optical performance was obtained with 4 nm gold nanoparticles that were immobilized as monolayers of low density (5.7×10(11)particles cm(-2)) on glass surfaces. These nanoparticle surfaces offered a 2-fold improvement in analytical performance of the molecular beacons when compared to other nanoparticle sizes investigated. The principles developed

  6. Plasmon resonances of novel monolayer and bilayer shell aggregate gold nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelidou, Myria; Pitris, Costas

    2011-07-01

    Various gold nanostructures have being investigated for medical and biological uses, such as surface enhanced-Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and photoacoustic imaging (PAI), each having its advantages and limitations depending on the specific application. For many imaging and spectroscopic applications, it would be beneficial to use near infrared (NIR) excitation as well as small gold nanospheres which can easily reach the cytoplasm and cell nucleus. For that purpose, we propose a novel nanostructure, the "shell aggregate," which consists of small nanospheres aggregated (mono/bi-layer) around a core such as an intracellular organelle. The extinction efficiency of such monolayer and bilayer shell aggregates is thoroughly investigated with appropriate simulations using the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) method. The effect of parameters such as the overall radius of the nanostructure, the small nanosphere radius, and the distance between the nanospheres, on the extinction efficiency factor of the nanostructures was examined. The results indicate that the extinction spectra appear to depend heavily on the distance between the small nanospheres. Two distinct absorption peak wavelengths are observed for a specific nanostructure. The monolayer shell aggregate provides a reasonably tunable plasmon resonance wavelength while the small size of its components can be exploited for intracellular distribution.

  7. In vivo optical detection of intranuclear cancer biomarkers using gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sonia; Sokolov, Konstantin; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2006-02-01

    Specific genotypes of human papillomavirus (HPV) are well correlated with cervical oncogenesis. The major transforming and immortalizing protein in high risk HPVs, namely HPV16, is E7 protein. E7 protein functions by deregulating the cell cycle and promoting S-phase reentry in differentiated keratinocytes. Currently, clinical diagnosis of cervical cancer is based on phenotypic changes observed in a screening Papanicolaou smear. Although screening has been effective in reducing the occurrence of cervical cancer, the low specificity of the Pap smear results in resources wasted on the evaluation of low-grade lesions not likely to progress to cervical cancer. Molecular characterization of active HPV infections using molecular specific contrast agents are combined with in-vivo optical imaging is proposed to be a cost-effective, non-invasive technique for the detection of cervical pre-cancers. Contrast is achieved by exploiting the peak absorbance and scattering shift in aggregated gold nanoparticles over isolated ones and molecular specificity is achieved via recognition moieties with high affinities for E7. Conjugates of gold nanoparticles and HPV16 anti-E7 antibodies are delivered into the nucleus of living cells and imaged with reflectance confocal microscopy. These contrast agents have been used to successfully enhance contrast in HPV16+ cervical cancer cells over HPV- cells by a factor of 2.5. Further characterization and development of these contrast agents will provide a robust, low cost screening tool for the detection of cervical pre-cancers.

  8. A molecular ruler based on plasmon coupling of single gold andsilver nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnichsen, Carsten; Reinhard, Bjorn M.; Liphardt, Jan; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2005-05-22

    Molecular rulers based on Foerster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) that report conformational changes and intramolecular distances of single biomolecules have helped to understand important biological processes. However, these rulers suffer from low and fluctuating signal intensities from single dyes and limited observation time due to photobleaching. The plasmon resonance in noble metal particles has been suggested as an alternative probe to overcome the limitations of organic fluorophores and the coupling of plasmons in nearby particles has been exploited to detect particle aggregation by a distinct color change in bulk experiments. Here we demonstrate that plasmon coupling can be used to monitor distances between single pairs of gold and silver nanoparticles. We use this effect to follow the directed assembly of gold and silver nanoparticle dimers in real time and to study the time dynamics of single DNA hybridization events. These ''plasmon rulers'' allowed us to continuously monitor separations of up to 70 nm for more than 3000 seconds. Single molecule in vitro studies of biological processes previously inaccessible with fluorescence based molecular rulers are enabled with plasmon rulers with extended time and distance range.

  9. Magnetic controlling of migration of DNA and proteins using one-step modified gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu; Feng, Lei; Dong, Shuli; Hao, Jingcheng

    2015-06-01

    A protocol was developed for preparing magnetic gold nanoparticles via one-step modification with a paramagnetic cationic surfactant. These magnetic gold nanoparticles can bind to and manipulate a low strength magnetic field-based delivery of DNA and proteins powerfully and non-invasively. PMID:25847127

  10. Physically-synthesized gold nanoparticles containing multiple nanopores for enhanced photothermal conversion and photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Jisoo; Kang, Heesung; Kim, Young Heon; Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Tae Geol; Wi, Jung-Sub

    2016-08-25

    Physically-synthesized gold nanoparticles having a narrow size distribution and containing multiple nanopores have been utilized as photothermal converters and imaging contrast agents. Nanopores within the gold nanoparticles make it possible to increase the light-absorption cross-section and consequently exhibit distinct improvements in photothermal conversion and photoacoustic imaging efficiencies.

  11. Quantitative surface acoustic wave detection based on colloidal gold nanoparticles and their bioconjugates.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chi-Shun; Gwo, Shangjr

    2008-05-01

    The immobilization scheme of monodispersed gold nanoparticles (10-nm diameter) on piezoelectric substrate surfaces using organosilane molecules as cross-linkers has been developed for lithium niobate (LiNbO3) and silicon oxide (SiO2)/gold-covered lithium tantalate (LiTaO3) of Rayleigh and guided shear horizontal- (guided SH) surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors. In this study, comparative measurements of gold nanoparticle adsorption kinetics using high-resolution field-emission scanning electron microscopy and SAW sensors allow the frequency responses of SAW sensors to be quantitatively correlated with surface densities of adsorbed nanoparticles. Using this approach, gold nanoparticles are used as the "nanosized mass standards" to scale the mass loading in a wide dynamical range. Rayleigh-SAW and guided SH-SAW sensors are employed here to monitor the surface mass changes on the device surfaces in gas and liquid phases, respectively. The mass sensitivity ( approximately 20 Hz.cm2/ng) of Rayleigh-SAW device (fundamental oscillation frequency of 113.3 MHz in air) is more than 2 orders of magnitude higher than that of conventional 9-MHz quartz crystal microbalance sensors. Furthermore, in situ (aqueous solutions), real-time measurements of adsorption kinetics for both citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles and DNA-gold nanoparticle conjugates are also demonstrated by guided SH-SAW (fundamental oscillation frequency of 121.3 MHz). By comparing frequency shifts between the adsorption cases of gold nanoparticles and DNA-gold nanoparticle conjugates, the average number of bound oligonucleotides per gold nanoparticle can also be determined. The high mass sensitivity ( approximately 6 Hz.cm2/ng) of guided SH-SAW sensors and successful detection of DNA-gold nanoparticle conjugates paves the way for real-time biosensing in liquids using nanoparticle-enhanced SAW devices. PMID:18363384

  12. Memecylon edule leaf extract mediated green synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Elavazhagan, Tamizhamudu; Arunachalam, Kantha D

    2011-01-01

    We used an aqueous leaf extract of Memecylon edule (Melastomataceae) to synthesize silver and gold nanoparticles. To our knowledge, this is the first report where M. edule leaf broth was found to be a suitable plant source for the green synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles. On treatment of aqueous solutions of silver nitrate and chloroauric acid with M. edule leaf extract, stable silver and gold nanoparticles were rapidly formed. The gold nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). The kinetics of reduction of aqueous silver and gold ions during reaction with the M. edule leaf broth were easily analyzed by UV-visible spectroscopy. SEM analysis showed that aqueous gold ions, when exposed to M. edule leaf broth, were reduced and resulted in the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles in the size range 20-50 nm. TEM analysis of gold nanoparticles showed formation of triangular, circular, and hexagonal shapes in the size range 10-45 nm. The resulting silver nanoparticles were predominantly square with uniform size range 50-90 nm. EDAX results confirmed the presence of triangular nanoparticles in the adsorption peak of 2.30 keV. Further FTIR analysis was also done to identify the functional groups in silver and gold nanoparticles. The characterized nanoparticles of M. edule have potential for various medical and industrial applications. Saponin presence in aqueous extract of M. edule is responsible for the mass production of silver and gold nanoparticles.

  13. Gold nanoparticle-decellularized matrix hybrids for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Shevach, Michal; Fleischer, Sharon; Shapira, Assaf; Dvir, Tal

    2014-10-01

    Decellularized matrices are valuable scaffolds for engineering functional cardiac patches for treating myocardial infarction. However, the lack of quick and efficient electrical coupling between adjacent cells may jeopardize the success of the treatment. To address this issue, we have deposited gold nanoparticles on fibrous decellularized omental matrices and investigated their morphology, conductivity, and degradation. We have shown that cardiac cells engineered within the hybrid scaffolds exhibited elongated and aligned morphology, massive striation, and organized connexin 43 electrical coupling proteins. Finally, we have shown that the hybrid patches demonstrated superior function as compared to pristine patches, including a stronger contraction force, lower excitation threshold, and faster calcium transients.

  14. Optical injection of gold nanoparticles into living cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Miao; Lohmüller, Theobald; Feldmann, Jochen

    2015-01-14

    The controlled injection of nanoscopic objects into living cells with light offers promising prospects for the development of novel molecular delivery strategies or intracellular biosensor applications. Here, we show that single gold nanoparticles from solution can be patterned on the surface of living cells with a continuous wave laser beam. In a second step, we demonstrate how the same particles can then be injected into the cells through a combination of plasmonic heating and optical force. We find that short exposure times are sufficient to perforate the cell membrane and inject the particles into cells with a survival rate of >70%.

  15. Gold nanorods-silica Janus nanoparticles for theranostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying-Shuai; Shao, Dan; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Xu-Lin; Li, Jing; Feng, Jing; Xia, Hong; Huo, Qi-Sheng; Dong, Wen-Fei; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2015-04-01

    A multi-functional gold nanorods-mesoporous silica Janus nanoparticles (NPs) were fabricated by a facile and mild strategy. These Janus NPs not only exhibit small shift of the local surface plasmon resonance wavelength but also have high potential for drug loading and low cytotoxicity. More importantly, the Janus nano-composites could efficiently deliver the imaging agents or drugs into liver cancer cells, at the same time the Janus NPs have good effect on photothermal, which indicate that the unique Janus NPs could be a promising candidate of theranostic system for combined photothermo-/chemo-cancer therapy.

  16. Fractal dimensions of soy protein nanoparticle aggregates determined by dynamic mechanical method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fractal dimension of the protein aggregates can be estimated by dynamic mechanical methods when the particle aggregates are imbedded in a polymer matrix. Nanocomposites were formed by mixing hydrolyzed soy protein isolate (HSPI) nanoparticle aggregates with styrene-butadiene (SB) latex, followe...

  17. Gold nanoparticles in columnar matrix of discotic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supreet, Kumar, Rishi; Pratibha, R.; Kumar, Sandeep; Raina, K. K.

    2013-06-01

    Hexanethiolate-stabilized gold nanoparticles (GNP) were synthesized by the method adopted by Song et al.[2]. Average size of GNPs was determined by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). This method yielded nanoparticles with average particle size of 1.5 nm. In the present work, we have incorporated GNPs in columnar matrix of discotic liquid crystal. The thermo-physical properties of these mixtures were investigated using polarizing optical micrography (POM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dielectric spectroscopy. Results show GNPs does not affect the hexagonal arrangement of columns of DLC. However, there is decrease in mesophase to crystallization temperature as confirmed by DSC. This approach of crossing of the field of nanotechnology with DLC may lead to novel materials with interesting properties that are useful for many device applications.

  18. Dielectric Anisotropy of Gold Nanoparticle Colloids in Nematic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visco, Angelo; Foust, Jon; Mahmood, Rizwan

    We present electrical and optical studies of hexanethiol-treated gold nanoparticle (GNPs) colloids in 4-cyano-4 '-pentyl-biphenyl (5CB) liquid crystals. Preliminary data analysis suggests an unusual behavior of sudden drop and then rise in the dielectric anisotropy at a critical concentration of 0.0862% by wt. GNPs and a sudden rise and then drop in the nematic to isotropic transition temperature. Above the critical concentration the data level off to within the uncertainty of the experimental errors. This colloidal system will help us to understand the interaction and the effects of nanoparticles on the self-assembly of LC molecules and the manner in which these particles organize in LC. This study is important for further developments in nanotechnology, sharp and fast display panels, and within the medical field.

  19. Evaluation of Methods to Predict Reactivity of Gold Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, Thomas C.; Tong, Yu ye J.

    2011-06-20

    Several methods have appeared in the literature for predicting reactivity on metallic surfaces and on the surface of metallic nanoparticles. All of these methods have some relationship to the concept of frontier molecular orbital theory. The d-band theory of Hammer and Nørskov is perhaps the most widely used predictor of reactivity on metallic surfaces, and it has been successfully applied in many cases. Use of the Fukui function and the condensed Fukui function is well established in organic chemistry, but has not been so widely applied in predicting the reactivity of metallic nanoclusters. In this article, we will evaluate the usefulness of the condensed Fukui function in predicting the reactivity of a family of cubo-octahedral gold nanoparticles and make comparison with the d-band method.

  20. Biosynthesis of anisotropic gold nanoparticles using Maduca longifolia extract and their potential in infrared absorption.

    PubMed

    Fayaz, A Mohammed; Girilal, M; Venkatesan, R; Kalaichelvan, P T

    2011-11-01

    Metal nanoparticles, in general, and gold nanoparticles, in particular, are very attractive because of their size- and shape-dependent properties. Biosynthesis of anisotropic gold nanoparticles using aqueous extract of Madhuca longifolia and their potential as IR blockers has been demonstrated. The tyrosine residue was identified as the active functional group for gold ion reduction. These gold nanoparticles were characterized by of UV-Vis spectrophotometer, FTIR, TEM and HrTEM. The presence of proteins was identified by FTIR, SDS-PAGE, UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The micrograph revealed the formation of anisotropic gold nanoaprticles. The biologically synthesized gold nanotriangles can be easily coated in the glass windows which are highly efficient in absorbing IR radiations.

  1. Use of Soybean Lecithin in Shape Controlled Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Benjamin Robert

    The work presented in this dissertation is a composite of experiments in the growth of gold nanoparticles with specific optical properties of interest. The goal is to synthesize these gold nanoparticles using soybean extract for not only shape control, but for propensity as a biocompatible delivery system. The optical properties of these nanoparticles has found great application in coloring glass during the Roman empire and, over the centuries, has grown into its own research field in applications of nanoparticulate materials. Many of the current functions include use in biological systems as biosensors and therapeutic applications, thus making biocompatibility a necessity. Current use of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide leads to rod-shaped gold nanoparticles, however, the stability of these gold nanoparticles does not endure for extended periods of time in aqueous media. In my research, two important components were found to be necessary for stable, anisotropic growth of gold nanoparticles. In the first experiments, it was found that bromide played a key role in shape control. Bromide exchange on the gold atoms led to specific packing of the growing crystals, allowing for two-dimensional growth of gold nanoparticles. It was also discerned that soybean lecithin contained ligands that blocked specific gold facets leading to prismatic gold nanoparticle growth. These gold nanoprisms give a near infrared plasmon absorption similar to that of rod-shaped gold nanoparticles. These gold nanoprisms are discovered to be extremely stable in aqueous media and remain soluble for extended periods of time, far longer than that of gold nanoparticles grown using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. Since soy lecithin has a plethora of compounds present, it became necessary to discover which compound was responsible for the shape control of the gold nanoprisms in order to optimize the synthesis and allow for a maximum yield of the gold nanoprisms. Many of these components were identified

  2. Ellipsometry study on gold-nanoparticle-coated gold thin film for biosensing application

    PubMed Central

    Moirangthem, Rakesh Singh; Chang, Yia-Chung; Wei, Pei-Kuen

    2011-01-01

    The amplified plasmonic response from various distributions of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) coated on top of gold thin film was studied via ellipsometry under total internal reflection mode. The surface plasmon resonance dip can be tuned from the visible to near infrared by simply varying the AuNP concentration. Theoretical modeling based on effective medium theory with a multi-slice model has been employed to fit the experimental results. Additionally, this experimental tool has been further extended to study bio-molecular interactions with metal surfaces as well as in studying protein-protein interaction without any labeling. Hence, this technique could provide a non-destructive way of designing tunable label-free optical biosensors with very high sensitivity. PMID:21991549

  3. Isolation and identification of gold nanoparticles synthesizing fungi from Indian Kolar Gold Field mine soil.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, V Jhansi; Kannan, K P

    2016-07-01

    An indigenous fungal strain was isolated from Indian Kolar Gold Field mine soil. The isolate was heterothallic, branched septate, deeply floccose, fast-growing, dull green with white background conidial columnar mycelium from Aspergillus section Fumigati. Diverse metabolic patterns of the isolate exhibit high metal, thermal resistance which grews well from 28 ± 1 degrees C to 37 degrees C and pH concentration was significant on the growth of isolate. Phylogenetic analysis of 16srRNA β-Tubulin gene sequence established relationship among isolate and other taxa. Molecular identification and morphological features of fungal isolate were consistent with those of Neosartorya udagawae. Heterothallic N. udagawae FJ830683 strain was closely related to homothallic N. aureola EF661890. Fungal isolate extract synthesized narrow sized stable Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). PMID:27498502

  4. Functionalized self-assembly of gold nanoparticles functionalized with amino acids and aleurone globular protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomoaia-Cotisel, Maria; Mocanu, Aurora; Horovitz, Ossi; Indrea, Emil; Tomoaia, Gheorghe; Bratu, Ioan

    2009-01-01

    Gold colloidal aqueous solutions were synthesized and characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy and TEM. Gold films were prepared on silanized glass slides at room temperature and with thermal treatment. The interaction of gold nanoparticles with biomolecules (amino acids, protein) was studied using UV-Vis spectroscopy, AFM, TEM and X-ray diffraction.

  5. Preparation of gold nanoparticles-agarose gel composite and its application in SERS detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoyuan; Xia, Yu; Ni, Lili; Song, Liangjing; Wang, Zhouping

    2014-03-01

    Agarose gel/gold nanoparticles hybrid was prepared by adding gold nanoparticles to preformed agarose gel. Nanocomposite structures and properties were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and UV-Vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy. Based on the swelling-contraction characteristics of agarose gel and the adjustable localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of the gold nanoparticles, the nanocomposites were used as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate to detect the Raman signal molecules (NBA, MBA, 1NAT). Results revealed that the porous structure of the agarose gel provided a good carrier for the enrichment of the gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles dynamic hot-spot effect arising from the agarose gel contraction loss of water in the air greatly enhanced the Raman signal. Furthermore, the gel could be cleaned with washing solution and recycling could be achieved for Raman detection.

  6. Characterizing Optical Properties of Self-Assembled Gold Nanoparticles for Surface Plasmon Resonance Device Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsuen-Li; Cheng, Hsu-Chun; Ko, Tsung-Shine; Chuang, Shang-Yu; Chu, Tien-Chi

    2006-09-01

    In this study, the optical constants of gold nanoparticles are evaluated for surface plasmon-based sensor applications. Using an effective medium approximation (EMA) and ellipsometry, approaches to monitor the self-assembly of gold nanoparticles are also demonstrated. Spectroscopic ellipsometric parameters measured (\\tan\\Psi, \\cosΔ) before and after adding gold nanoparticles to a substrate are used to calculate the optical constants of gold nanoparticles. The film thickness is measured by grazing incidence X-ray reflectivity (XRR). The optical constants (refractive index, extinction coefficient) of gold nanoparticles can be obtained from the measured ellipsometric parameters and thickness. We also show that particles density can be well predicted and detected nondestructively by this method.

  7. Assessment of the In Vivo Toxicity of Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Shiun; Hung, Yao-Ching; Liau, Ian; Huang, G. Steve

    2009-08-01

    The environmental impact of nanoparticles is evident; however, their toxicity due to their nanosize is rarely discussed. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) may serve as a promising model to address the size-dependent biological response to nanoparticles because they show good biocompatibility and their size can be controlled with great precision during their chemical synthesis. Naked GNPs ranging from 3 to 100 nm were injected intraperitoneally into BALB/C mice at a dose of 8 mg/kg/week. GNPs of 3, 5, 50, and 100 nm did not show harmful effects; however, GNPs ranging from 8 to 37 nm induced severe sickness in mice. Mice injected with GNPs in this range showed fatigue, loss of appetite, change of fur color, and weight loss. Starting from day 14, mice in this group exhibited a camel-like back and crooked spine. The majority of mice in these groups died within 21 days. Injection of 5 and 3 nm GNPs, however, did not induce sickness or lethality in mice. Pathological examination of the major organs of the mice in the diseased groups indicated an increase of Kupffer cells in the liver, loss of structural integrity in the lungs, and diffusion of white pulp in the spleen. The pathological abnormality was associated with the presence of gold particles at the diseased sites, which were verified by ex vivo Coherent anti-Stoke Raman scattering microscopy. Modifying the surface of the GNPs by incorporating immunogenic peptides ameliorated their toxicity. This reduction in the toxicity is associated with an increase in the ability to induce antibody response. The toxicity of GNPs may be a fundamental determinant of the environmental toxicity of nanoparticles.

  8. Photocatalytic and antibacterial response of biosynthesized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Khan, Arif Ullah; Yuan, Qipeng; Wei, Yun; Khan, Gul Majid; Khan, Zia Ul Haq; Khan, Shafiullah; Ali, Farman; Tahir, Kamran; Ahmad, Aftab; Khan, Faheem Ullah

    2016-09-01

    Increase in the bacterial resistance to available antibiotics and water contamination by different toxic organic dyes are both severe problems throughout the world. To overcome these concerns, new methodologies including synthesis of nontoxic, human friendly and efficient nanoparticles is required. These nanoparticles not even inhibit the growth of microorganisms but are also effective in the degradation of toxic organics in waste water thus providing a clean and human friendly environment. The use of plants extracts to synthesize and stabilize noble metal nanoparticles have been considered as safe, cost-effective, eco-benign and green approach nowadays. In the present study, Longan fruit juice proficiently reduced ionic gold (Au(+3)) to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as well as mediated the stabilization of AuNPs. The antibacterial activity of AuNPs was carried out against both gram positive and gram negative bacteria using agar well diffusion method, followed by the determination of Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values. AuNPs were found to have significant antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli with MIC values of 75μg/ml while outstanding MIC values of 50μg/ml against Staphylococcus areous and Basilus subtilus. AuNPs revealed significant photocatalytic degradation (76%) of methylene blue in time period of 55min, indicating the effective photocatalytic property of biosynthesized AuNPs (K=0.29/min, r(2)=0.95). The considerable antibacterial and photocatalytic activities of the photosynthesized AuNPs can be attributed towards their small size, spherical morphology and uniform dispersion. Our finding suggests the possible therapeutic potential of biogenic AuNPs in the development of new antibacterial agents as well as in the development of effective photocatalysts. PMID:27394010

  9. One-step assay for detecting influenza virus using dynamic light scattering and gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Driskell, Jeremy D; Jones, Cheryl A; Tompkins, S Mark; Tripp, Ralph A

    2011-08-01

    Herein we detail the development of a simple, rapid, and sensitive method for quantitative detection of influenza A virus using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and gold nanoparticle (AuNP) labels. Influenza-specific antibodies are conjugated to AuNPs, and aggregation of the AuNP probes is induced upon addition of the target virus. DLS is used to measure the extent of aggregation and the mean hydrodynamic diameter is correlated to virus concentration. The effects of nanoparticle concentration and size on the analytical performance of the assay were systematically investigated. It was determined that decreasing the AuNP probe concentration improves the detection limit while the effect of changing the AuNP size is minimal. Optimization of the assay provided a detection limit of <100 TCID(50)/mL which is 1-2 orders of magnitude improved over commercial diagnostic kits without increasing the assay time or complexity. Additionally, this assay was demonstrated to perform equivalently for influenza virus prepared in different biological matrices.

  10. Characterization and catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles synthesized using ayurvedic arishtams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (