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Sample records for aggregated immunoglobulin e-receptor

  1. Human and rat mast cell high-affinity immunoglobulin E receptors: Characterization of putative. alpha. -chain gene products

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Akira; Benfey, P.N.; Leder, P. ); Tepler, I. Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA ); Berenstein, E.H.; Siraganian, R.P. )

    1988-03-01

    The authors have cloned and determined the entire nucleotide sequence of cDNAs corresponding to the putative {alpha} subunits of the human and rat mast cell high-affinity IgE receptors. Both human and rat cDNAs encode an NH{sub 2}-terminal signal peptide, two immunoglobulin-like extracellular domains (encoded by discrete exons), a hydrophobic transmembrane region, and a positively charged cytoplasmic tail. The human and rat {alpha} subunits share an overall homology with one another and the immunoglobulin gene family, suggesting that they arose from a common ancestral gene and continue to share structural homology with their ligands. In addition, the rat gene is transcribed into at least three distinct forms, each of which yields a somewhat different coding sequence.

  2. Ethanol Inhibits High-Affinity Immunoglobulin E Receptor (FcεRI) Signaling in Mast Cells by Suppressing the Function of FcεRI-Cholesterol Signalosome.

    PubMed

    Draberova, Lubica; Paulenda, Tomas; Halova, Ivana; Potuckova, Lucie; Bugajev, Viktor; Bambouskova, Monika; Tumova, Magda; Draber, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol has multiple effects on biochemical events in a variety of cell types, including the high-affinity immunoglobulin E receptor (FcεRI) signaling in antigen-activated mast cells. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown. To get better understanding of the effect of ethanol on FcεRI-mediated signaling we examined the effect of short-term treatment with non-toxic concentrations of ethanol on FcεRI signaling events in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells. We found that 15 min exposure to ethanol inhibited antigen-induced degranulation, calcium mobilization, expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and interleukin-13), and formation of reactive oxygen species in a dose-dependent manner. Removal of cellular cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin had a similar effect and potentiated some of the inhibitory effects of ethanol. In contrast, exposure of the cells to cholesterol-saturated methyl-β-cyclodextrin abolished in part the inhibitory effect of ethanol on calcium response and production of reactive oxygen species, supporting lipid-centric theories of ethanol action on the earliest stages of mast cell signaling. Further studies showed that exposure to ethanol and/or removal of cholesterol inhibited early FcεRI activation events, including tyrosine phosphorylation of the FcεRI β and γ subunits, SYK kinases, LAT adaptor protein, phospholipase Cγ, STAT5, and AKT and internalization of aggregated FcεRI. Interestingly, ethanol alone, and particularly in combination with methyl-β-cyclodextrin, enhanced phosphorylation of negative regulatory tyrosine 507 of LYN kinase. Finally, we found that ethanol reduced passive cutaneous anaphylactic reaction in mice, suggesting that ethanol also inhibits FcεRI signaling under in vivo conditions. The combined data indicate that ethanol interferes with early antigen-induced signaling events in mast cells by suppressing the function of Fc

  3. Effects of tau domain-specific antibodies and intravenous immunoglobulin on tau aggregation and aggregate degradation.

    PubMed

    Esteves-Villanueva, Jose O; Trzeciakiewicz, Hanna; Loeffler, David A; Martić, Sanela

    2015-01-20

    Tau pathology, including neurofibrillary tangles, develops in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aggregation and hyperphosphorylation of tau are potential therapeutic targets for AD. Administration of anti-tau antibodies reduces tau pathology in transgenic "tauopathy" mice; however, the optimal tau epitopes and conformations to target are unclear. Also unknown is whether intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) products, currently being evaluated in AD trials, exert effects on pathological tau. This study examined the effects of anti-tau antibodies targeting different tau epitopes and the IVIG Gammagard on tau aggregation and preformed tau aggregates. Tau aggregation was assessed by transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy, and the binding affinity of the anti-tau antibodies for tau was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Antibodies used were anti-tau 1-150 ("D-8"), anti-tau 259-266 ("Paired-262"), anti-tau 341-360 ("A-10"), and anti-tau 404-441 ("Tau-46"), which bind to tau's N-terminus, microtubule binding domain (MBD) repeat sequences R1 and R4, and the C-terminus, respectively. The antibodies Paired-262 and A-10, but not D-8 and Tau-46, reduced tau fibrillization and degraded preformed tau aggregates, whereas the IVIG reduced tau aggregation but did not alter preformed aggregates. The binding affinities of the antibodies for the epitope for which they were specific did not appear to be related to their effects on tau aggregation. These results confirm that antibody binding to tau's MBD repeat sequences may inhibit tau aggregation and indicate that such antibodies may also degrade preformed tau aggregates. In the presence of anti-tau antibodies, the resulting tau morphologies were antigen-dependent. The results also suggested the possibility of different pathways regulating antibody-mediated inhibition of tau aggregation and antibody-mediated degradation of preformed tau aggregates. PMID:25545358

  4. A time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay suitable for high-throughput screening for inhibitors of immunoglobulin E-receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beomkyu; Tarchevskaya, Svetlana S; Eggel, Alexander; Vogel, Monique; Jardetzky, Theodore S

    2012-12-15

    The interaction of immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies with the high-affinity receptor, FcεRI, plays a central role in initiating most allergic reactions. The IgE-receptor interaction has been targeted for treatment of allergic diseases, and many high-affinity macromolecular inhibitors have been identified. Small molecule inhibitors would offer significant advantages over current anti-IgE treatment, but no candidate compounds have been identified and fully validated. Here, we report the development of a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assay for monitoring the IgE-receptor interaction. The TR-FRET assay measures an increase in fluorescence intensity as a donor lanthanide fluorophore is recruited into complexes of site-specific Alexa Fluor 488-labeled IgE-Fc and His-tagged FcεRIα proteins. The assay can readily monitor classic competitive inhibitors that bind either IgE-Fc or FcεRIα in equilibrium competition binding experiments. Furthermore, the TR-FRET assay can also be used to follow the kinetics of IgE-Fc-FcεRIα dissociation and identify inhibitory ligands that accelerate the dissociation of preformed complexes, as demonstrated for an engineered DARPin (designed ankyrin repeat protein) inhibitor. The TR-FRET assay is suitable for high-throughput screening (HTS), as shown by performing a pilot screen of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Collection Library in a 384-well plate format.

  5. Distribution and dynamics of rat basophilic leukemia immunoglobulin E receptors (FcepsilonRI) on planar ligand-presenting surfaces.

    PubMed

    Spendier, Kathrin; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Lidke, Keith A; Wilson, Bridget S; Timlin, Jerilyn A; Thomas, James L

    2010-07-21

    There is considerable interest in the signaling mechanisms of immunoreceptors, especially when triggered with membrane-bound ligands. We have quantified the spatiotemporal dynamics of the redistribution of immunoglobulin E-loaded receptors (IgE-FcepsilonRI) on rat basophilic leukemia-2H3 mast cells in contact with fluid and gel-phase membranes displaying ligands for immunoglobulin E, using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. To clearly separate the kinetics of receptor redistribution from cell spreading, and to precisely define the initial contact time (+/-50 ms), micropipette cell manipulation was used to bring individual cells into contact with surfaces. On ligand-free surfaces, there are micron-scale heterogeneities in fluorescence that likely reflect regions of the cell that are more closely apposed to the substrate. When ligands are present, receptor clusters form with this same size scale. The initial rate of accumulation of receptors into the clusters is consistent with diffusion-limited trapping with D approximately 10(-1) microm2/s. These results support the hypothesis that clusters form by diffusion to cell-surface contact regions. Over longer timescales (>10 s), individual clusters moved with both diffusive and directed motion components. The dynamics of the cluster motion is similar to the dynamics of membrane fluctuations of cells on ligand-free fluid membranes. Thus, the same cellular machinery may be responsible for both processes.

  6. Distribution and Dynamics of Rat Basophilic Leukemia Immunoglobulin E Receptors (FcɛRI) on Planar Ligand-Presenting Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Spendier, Kathrin; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Lidke, Keith A.; Wilson, Bridget S.; Timlin, Jerilyn A.; Thomas, James L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract There is considerable interest in the signaling mechanisms of immunoreceptors, especially when triggered with membrane-bound ligands. We have quantified the spatiotemporal dynamics of the redistribution of immunoglobulin E-loaded receptors (IgE-FcɛRI) on rat basophilic leukemia-2H3 mast cells in contact with fluid and gel-phase membranes displaying ligands for immunoglobulin E, using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. To clearly separate the kinetics of receptor redistribution from cell spreading, and to precisely define the initial contact time (±50 ms), micropipette cell manipulation was used to bring individual cells into contact with surfaces. On ligand-free surfaces, there are micron-scale heterogeneities in fluorescence that likely reflect regions of the cell that are more closely apposed to the substrate. When ligands are present, receptor clusters form with this same size scale. The initial rate of accumulation of receptors into the clusters is consistent with diffusion-limited trapping with D ∼10−1μm2/s. These results support the hypothesis that clusters form by diffusion to cell-surface contact regions. Over longer timescales (>10 s), individual clusters moved with both diffusive and directed motion components. The dynamics of the cluster motion is similar to the dynamics of membrane fluctuations of cells on ligand-free fluid membranes. Thus, the same cellular machinery may be responsible for both processes. PMID:20643056

  7. Single-particle tracking of immunoglobulin E receptors (FcεRI) in micron-sized clusters and receptor patches.

    PubMed

    Spendier, Kathrin; Lidke, Keith A; Lidke, Diane S; Thomas, James L

    2012-02-17

    When mast cells contact a monovalent antigen-bearing fluid lipid bilayer, IgE-loaded FcεRI receptors aggregate at contact points and trigger degranulation and the release of immune activators. We used two-color total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and single-particle tracking to show that most fluorescently labeled receptor complexes diffuse freely within these micron-size clusters, with a diffusion coefficient comparable to free receptors in resting cells. At later times, when the small clusters coalesce to form larger patches, receptors diffuse even more rapidly. In all cases, Monte Carlo diffusion simulations ensured that the tracking results were free of bias, and distinguished biological from statistical variation. These results show the diversity in receptor mobility in mast cells, demonstrating at least three distinct states of receptor diffusivity.

  8. Intermolecular disulfide bond formation promotes immunoglobulin aggregation: investigation by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nag, Moupriya; Bera, Kallol; Basak, Soumen

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation generally results from association between hydrophobic regions of individual monomers. However, additional mechanisms arising from specific interactions, such as intermolecular disulfide bond formation, may also contribute to the process. The latter is proposed to be the initiating pathway for aggregation of immunoglobulin (IgG), which is essential for triggering its immune response. To test the veracity of this hypothesis, we have employed fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to measure the kinetics of aggregation of IgG in separate experiments either allowing or inhibiting disulfide formation. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements yielded a diffusion time (τ(D)) of ∼200 µsec for Rhodamine-labeled IgG, corresponding to a hydrodynamic radius (R(H)) of 56 Å for the IgG monomer. The aggregation kinetics of the protein was followed by monitoring the time evolution of τ(D) under conditions in which its cysteine residues were either free or blocked. In both cases, the progress curves confirmed that aggregation proceeded via the nucleation-dependent polymerization pathway. However, for aggregation in the presence of free cysteines, the lag times were shorter, and the aggregate sizes bigger, than their respective counterparts for aggregation in the presence of blocked cysteines. This result clearly demonstrates that formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds represents a preferred pathway in the aggregation process of IgG. Fluorescence spectroscopy showed that aggregates formed in experiments where disulfide formation was prevented denatured at lower concentration of guanidine hydrochloride than those obtained in experiments where the disulfides were free to form, indicating that intermolecular disulfide bridging is a valid pathway for IgG aggregation. PMID:25371040

  9. Effect of Excipients on Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation and Aggregation in Dual Variable Domain Immunoglobulin Protein Solutions.

    PubMed

    Raut, Ashlesha S; Kalonia, Devendra S

    2016-03-01

    Liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) and aggregation can reduce the physical stability of therapeutic protein formulations. On undergoing LLPS, the protein-rich phase can promote aggregation during storage due to high concentration of the protein. Effect of different excipients on aggregation in protein solution is well documented; however data on the effect of excipients on LLPS is scarce in the literature. In this study, the effect of four excipients (PEG 400, Tween 80, sucrose, and hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrin (HPβCD)) on liquid-liquid phase separation and aggregation in a dual variable domain immunoglobulin protein solution was investigated. Sucrose suppressed both LLPS and aggregation, Tween 80 had no effect on either, and PEG 400 increased LLPS and aggregation. Attractive protein-protein interactions and liquid-liquid phase separation decreased with increasing concentration of HPβCD, indicating its specific binding to the protein. However, HPβCD had no effect on the formation of soluble aggregates and fragments in this study. LLPS and aggregation are highly temperature dependent; at low temperature protein exhibits LLPS, at high temperature protein exhibits aggregation, and at an intermediate temperature both phenomena occur simultaneously depending on the solution conditions.

  10. Stimulation of human neutrophils by soluble and insoluble immunoglobulin aggregates. Secretion of granule constituents and increased oxidation of glucose.

    PubMed Central

    Henson, P M; Oades, Z G

    1975-01-01

    Reaction of human neutrophils with aggregated immunoglobulin on nonphagocytosable surfaces results in secretion of granule enzymes (exocytosis of granules) and stimulation of glucose oxidation by the nexose monophosphate pathway (HMP). The role of HMP stimulation in the enzyme secretion and some requirements for the two neutrophil activities have been examined. It was found that (a) HMP stimulation could be selectively inhibited under conditions where release of granule enzymes remained unchanged or was enhanced, for example, by reduced glucose concentration or by 2-deoxyglucose. (b) Removal of Ca++ and addition of agents which increased the intracellular levels of cyclic AMP (cAMP), however, prevented both activities, while colchicine had greater inhibitory activity on HMP stimulation than upon secretion. (c) Neutrophils incubated in suspension with particulate aggregated gamma-globulin phagocytosed the particles and exhibited a stimulated HMP and released granule enzymes. In contrast, incubation in suspension with soluble aggregated gamma-globulin resulted in the stimulated HMP only. Granule evzymes were not liberated. 300-fold less soluble aggregates bound to a surface, however readily induced exocytosis of granules from adherent neutrophils. This demonstrates the importance of surface effects in the induction of secretion from neutrophils. Aggregated immunoglobulin reacting with neutrophil Fc receptors thus induces both degranulation (exocytosis) and increased HMP activity. The pathways leading to these events are separable although apparently sharing some common steps, including the initiating events. Images PMID:51031

  11. Specific-ion effects on the aggregation mechanisms and protein-protein interactions for anti-streptavidin immunoglobulin gamma-1.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Gregory V; Razinkov, Vladimir I; Kerwin, Bruce A; Laue, Thomas M; Woodka, Andrea H; Butler, Paul D; Perevozchikova, Tatiana; Roberts, Christopher J

    2015-05-01

    Non-native protein aggregation is common in the biopharmaceutical industry and potentially jeopardizes product shelf life, therapeutic efficacy, and patient safety. The present article focuses on the relationship(s) among protein-protein interactions, aggregate growth mechanisms, aggregate morphologies, and specific-ion effects for an anti-streptavidin (AS) immunoglobulin gamma 1 (IgG1). Aggregation mechanisms of AS-IgG1 were determined as a function of pH and NaCl concentration with sodium acetate buffer and compared to previous work with sodium citrate. Aggregate size and shape were determined using a combination of laser light scattering and small-angle neutron or X-ray scattering. Protein-protein interactions were quantified in terms of the protein-protein Kirkwood-Buff integral (G22) determined from static light scattering and in terms of the protein effective charge (Zeff) measured using electrophoretic light scattering. Changing from citrate to acetate resulted in significantly different protein-protein interactions as a function of pH for low NaCl concentrations when the protein displayed positive Zeff. Overall, the results suggest that electrostatic repulsions between proteins were lessened because of preferential accumulation of citrate anions, compared to acetate anions, at the protein surface. The predominant aggregation mechanisms correlated well with G22, indicating that ion-specific effects beyond traditional mean-field descriptions of electrostatic protein-protein interactions are important for predicting qualitative shifts in protein aggregation state diagrams. Interestingly, while solution conditions dictated which mechanisms predominated, aggregate average molecular weight and size displayed a common scaling behavior across both citrate- and acetate-based systems. PMID:25885209

  12. Structural Characterization of the Partially Folded Intermediates of An Immunoglobulin Light Chain Leading to Amyloid Fibrillation And Amorphous Aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Z.; Hu, D.; Zhu, M.; Fink, A.L.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2007-07-12

    Immunoglobulin light chain deposition diseases involve various types of extracellular deposition of light chain variable domains, including amyloid fibrils and amorphous deposits. The decreased thermodynamic stability of the light chain is believed to be the major factor leading to fibrillation. However, the differences in the nature of the deposits among the light chain deposition diseases raise the question of whether the mechanisms leading to fibrillar or amorphous aggregation is different. In this study, we generated two partially folded intermediates of the light chain variable domain SMA in the presence of guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) and characterized their conformations. The more unfolded intermediate formed fibrils most rapidly, while the more native-like intermediate predominantly led to amorphous deposits. The results also show that the monomeric, rather than the dimeric state, was critical for fibrillation. The data also indicate that fibril elongation involves addition of a partially unfolded intermediate, rather than the native state. We postulate that a more highly unfolded intermediate is more suited to undergo the topological rearrangements necessary to form amyloid fibrils than a more structured one and that this also correlates with increased destabilization. In the case of light chain aggregation, it appears that more native-like intermediate conformations are more prone to form amorphous deposits.

  13. Aggregates, Crystals, Gels, and Amyloids: Intracellular and Extracellular Phenotypes at the Crossroads of Immunoglobulin Physicochemical Property and Cell Physiology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant immunoglobulins comprise an important class of human therapeutics. Although specific immunoglobulins can be purposefully raised against desired antigen targets by various methods, identifying an immunoglobulin clone that simultaneously possesses potent therapeutic activities and desirable manufacturing-related attributes often turns out to be challenging. The variable domains of individual immunoglobulins primarily define the unique antigen specificities and binding affinities inherent to each clone. The primary sequence of the variable domains also specifies the unique physicochemical properties that modulate various aspects of individual immunoglobulin life cycle, starting from the biosynthetic steps in the endoplasmic reticulum, secretory pathway trafficking, secretion, and the fate in the extracellular space and in the endosome-lysosome system. Because of the diverse repertoire of immunoglobulin physicochemical properties, some immunoglobulin clones' intrinsic properties may manifest as intriguing cellular phenotypes, unusual solution behaviors, and serious pathologic outcomes that are of scientific and clinical importance. To gain renewed insights into identifying manufacturable therapeutic antibodies, this paper catalogs important intracellular and extracellular phenotypes induced by various subsets of immunoglobulin clones occupying different niches of diverse physicochemical repertoire space. Both intrinsic and extrinsic factors that make certain immunoglobulin clones desirable or undesirable for large-scale manufacturing and therapeutic use are summarized. PMID:23533417

  14. Large-scale co-aggregation of fluorescent lipid probes with cell surface proteins

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Large scale aggregation of fluorescein-labeled immunoglobulin E (IgE) receptor complexes on the surface of RBL cells results in the co- aggregation of a large fraction of the lipophilic fluorescent probe 3,3'-dihexadecylindocarbocyanine (diI) that labels the plasma membranes much more uniformly in the absence of receptor aggregation. Most of the diI molecules that are localized in patches of aggregated receptors have lost their lateral mobility as determined by fluorescence photobleaching recovery. The diI outside of patches is mobile, and its mobility is similar to that in control cells without receptor aggregates. It is unlikely that the co-aggregation of diI with IgE receptors is due to specific interactions between these components, as two other lipophilic probes of different structures are also observed to redistribute with aggregated IgE receptors, and aggregation of two other cell surface antigens also results in the coredistribution of diI at the RBL cell surface. Quantitative analysis of CCD images of labeled cells reveals some differences in the spatial distributions of co- aggregated diI and IgE receptors. The results indicate that cross- linking of specific cell surface antigens causes a substantial change in the organization of the plasma membrane by redistributing pre- existing membrane domains or causing their formation. PMID:8188747

  15. Formation of C3-IgG complexes in serum by aggregated IgG and by non-immunoglobulin activators of complement.

    PubMed

    van Dam, A P; Hack, C E

    1987-06-01

    We studied the generation of C3-IgG complexes during the activation of C3 in serum by aggregated human IgG (AHG), zymosan or cobra venom factor (CVF). C3-IgG complexes were detected by specific radioimmunoassays: samples to be tested were incubated with anti-IgG Sepharose, and complexes that had bound to the Sepharose were detected by incubation with either 125I-anti-C3c or 125I-anti-C3d, g. Incubation of serum with as little as 6 micrograms AHG per ml, for 30 min at 37 degrees, resulted in the generation of C3-IgG complexes. When serum was incubated with zymosan or CVF, C3-IgG complexes were also generated. AHG appeared to be more effective in the generation of C3-IgG complexes than CVF. We calculated that AHG (2 mg/ml) caused about 36% of the C3 to be fixed to IgG, CVF (400 micrograms/ml) about 14%. Finally, the presence of C3 fixed to IgG in serum incubated with CVF was demonstrated by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), followed by immunoblotting. This study indicates that the formation of C3-IgG complexes in serum is not only induced by immune complexes but also by non-immunoglobulin activators. Therefore, C3-IgG complexes might be considered as complement activation products, and their detection in patients' samples should not be considered as conclusive evidence for the presence of immune complexes.

  16. Impact of short range hydrophobic interactions and long range electrostatic forces on the aggregation kinetics of a monoclonal antibody and a dual-variable domain immunoglobulin at low and high concentrations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vineet; Dixit, Nitin; Zhou, Liqiang Lisa; Fraunhofer, Wolfgang

    2011-12-12

    The purpose of this work was to determine the nature of long and short-range forces governing protein aggregation kinetics at low and high concentrations for a monoclonal antibody (IgG1) and a dual-variable-domain immunoglobulin (DVD-Ig). Protein-protein interactions (PPI) were studied under dilute conditions by utilizing the methods of static (B(22)) and dynamic light scattering (k(D)). PPI in solutions containing minimal ionic strengths were characterized to get detailed insights into the impact of ionic strength on aggregation. Microcalorimetry and susceptibility to denature at air-liquid interface were used to assess the tertiary structure and quiescent stability studies were conducted to study aggregation characteristics. Results for IgG1 showed that electrostatic interactions governed protein aggregation kinetics both under dilute and concentrated conditions (i.e., 5 mg/mL and 150 mg/mL). For DVD-Ig molecules, on the other hand, although electrostatic interactions governed protein aggregation under dilute conditions, hydrophobic forces clearly determined the kinetics at high concentrations. This manuscript shows for the first time that short-range hydrophobic interactions can outweigh electrostatic forces and play an important role in determining protein aggregation at high concentrations. Additionally, results show that although higher-order virial coefficients become significant under low ionic strength conditions, removal of added charges may be used to enhance the aggregation stability of dilute protein formulations.

  17. Elucidation of Acid-induced Unfolding and Aggregation of Human Immunoglobulin IgG1 and IgG2 Fc

    PubMed Central

    Latypov, Ramil F.; Hogan, Sabine; Lau, Hollis; Gadgil, Himanshu; Liu, Dingjiang

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the underlying mechanisms of Fc aggregation is an important prerequisite for developing stable and efficacious antibody-based therapeutics. In our study, high resolution two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was employed to probe structural changes in the IgG1 Fc. A series of 1H-15N heteronuclear single-quantum correlation NMR spectra were collected between pH 2.5 and 4.7 to assess whether unfolding of CH2 domains precedes that of CH3 domains. The same pH range was subsequently screened in Fc aggregation experiments that utilized molecules of IgG1 and IgG2 subclasses with varying levels of CH2 glycosylation. In addition, differential scanning calorimetry data were collected over a pH range of 3–7 to assess changes in CH2 and CH3 thermostability. As a result, compelling evidence was gathered that emphasizes the importance of CH2 stability in determining the rate and extent of Fc aggregation. In particular, we found that Fc domains of the IgG1 subclass have a lower propensity to aggregate compared with those of the IgG2 subclass. Our data for glycosylated, partially deglycosylated, and fully deglycosylated molecules further revealed the criticality of CH2 glycans in modulating Fc aggregation. These findings provide important insights into the stability of Fc-based therapeutics and promote better understanding of their acid-induced aggregation process. PMID:22084250

  18. Preferential Signaling and Induction of Allergy-promoting Lymphokines Upon Weak Stimulation of the High Affinity IgE Receptor on Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Espinosa, Claudia; Odom, Sandra; Olivera, Ana; Hobson, J. Peyton; Martinez, Maria Eugenia Cid; Oliveira-dos-Santos, Antonio; Barra, Lillian; Spiegel, Sarah; Penninger, Josef M.; Rivera, Juan

    2003-01-01

    Mast cell degranulation and de novo cytokine production is a consequence of antigen-aggregation of the immunoglobulin E (IgE)-occupied high affinity receptor for IgE (FcɛRI). Herein, we report that lymphokines that promote allergic inflammation, like MCP-1, were potently induced at low antigen (Ag) concentrations or at low receptor occupancy with IgE whereas some that down-regulate this response, like interleukin (IL)-10, required high receptor occupancy. Weak stimulation of mast cells caused minimal degranulation whereas a half-maximal secretory response was observed for chemokines and, with the exception of TNF-α, a weaker cytokine secretory response was observed. The medium from weakly stimulated mast cells elicited a monocyte/macrophage chemotactic response similar to that observed at high receptor occupancy. Weak stimulation also favored the phosphorylation of Gab2 and p38MAPK, while LAT and ERK2 phosphorylation was induced by a stronger stimulus. Gab2-deficient mast cells were severely impaired in chemokine mRNA induction whereas LAT-deficient mast cells showed a more pronounced defect in cytokines. These findings demonstrate that perturbation of small numbers of IgE receptors on mast cells favors certain signals that contribute to a lymphokine response that can mediate allergic inflammation. PMID:12782712

  19. Immunoglobulin E in histoplasmosis.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, R A; Arnold, D R

    1980-01-01

    Immunoglobulin M, G, A, and E serum levels were quantitated in 20 patients with active histoplasmosis (group I), 24 healthy subjects who were skin test positive to histoplasmin (group II), and 47 healthy persons who were skin test negative to histoplasmin (group III). The results established that patients with this disease have increased immunoglobulin G (P less than 0.05), immunoglobulin A (P less than 0.001), and immunoglobulin E (P less than 0.01) serum levels when compared with the 71 healthy subjects in groups II and III. PMID:7399706

  20. Immunoglobulins and immunoglobulin genes of the horse.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    Antibodies of the horse were studied intensively by many notable immunologists throughout the past century until the early 1970's. After a large gap of interest in horse immunology, additional basic studies on horse immunoglobulin genes performed during the past 10 years have resulted in new insights into the equine humoral immune system. These include the characterization of the immunoglobulin lambda and kappa light chain genes, the immunoglobulin heavy chain constant (IGHC) gene regions, and initial studies regarding the heavy chain variable genes. Horses express predominately lambda light chains and seem to have a relatively restricted germline repertoire of both lambda and kappa chain variable genes. The IGHC region contains eleven constant heavy chain genes, seven of which are gamma heavy chain genes. It is suggested that all seven genes encoding IgG isotypes are expressed and have distinct functions in equine immune responses.

  1. Equine immunoglobulins and organization of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Walther, Stefanie; Rusitzka, Tamara V; Diesterbeck, Ulrike S; Czerny, Claus-Peter

    2015-12-01

    Our understanding of how equine immunoglobulin genes are organized has increased significantly in recent years. For equine heavy chains, 52 IGHV, 40 IGHD, 8 IGHJ and 11 IGHC are present. Seven of these IGHCs are gamma chain genes. Sequence diversity is increasing between fetal, neonatal, foal and adult age. The kappa light chain contains 60 IGKV, 5 IGKJ and 1 IGKC, whereas there are 144 IGLV, 7 IGLJ, and 7 IGLC for the lambda light chain, which is expressed predominantly in horses. Significant transcriptional differences for IGLV and IGLC are identified in different breeds. Allotypic and allelic variants are observed for IGLC1, IGLC5, and IGLC6/7, and two IGLV pseudogenes are also transcribed. During age development, a decrease in IGLVs is noted, although nucleotide diversity and significant differences in gene usage increased. The following paper suggests a standardization of the existing nomenclature of immunoglobulin genes.

  2. Organization of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Tonegawa, S; Brack, C; Hozumi, N; Pirrotta, V

    1978-01-01

    The nucleotide-sequence determination of a cloned, embryonic Vlambda gene directly demonstrated that V genes are separate from a corresponding C gene in embryonic cells. Analysis by restriction enzymes of total cellular DNA from various sources strongly suggested that the two separate immunoglobulin genes become continuous during differentiation of B lymphocytes. There seems to be a strict correlation between the joining event and activation of the joined genes. Cloning of more immunoglobulin genes from embryo and plasma cells will not only provide direct demonstration of such a gene-joining event but also help in the elucidation of a possible relationship of the event to gene activation mechanisms.

  3. Apolipoprotein E receptors: linking brain development and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Herz, J; Beffert, U

    2000-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder that afflicts an increasing part of our ageing population. An isoform of apolipoprotein E, a protein that mediates the transport of lipids and cholesterol in the circulatory system, predisposes carriers of this allele to the common late-onset form of the disease. How this protein is related to a neurodegenerative disorder is an enigma. Mounting evidence indicates that apolipoprotein E receptors, which are abundantly expressed in most neurons in the central nervous system, also fulfill critical functions during brain development and may profoundly influence the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Release of leukotrienes C4 and B4 (LTC4, LTB4) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) from human monocytes (M phi) induced with aggregated immunoglobulins (Ig) of different classes

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreri, N.R.; Howland, W.C.; Spiegelberg, H.L.

    1986-03-01

    Purified human peripheral blood monocytes were stimulated with aggregated human myeloma proteins or the calcium ionophore A23187. Release of LTC4, LTB4 and PGE2 into the supernate was determined by radioimmunoassay and high performance liquid chromatography. The ionophore induced release of 10 +/- 5 ng LTC4 and 25 +/- 8 ng LTB4/10/sup 6/ M phi. Aggregated IgG, IgA and IgE but not IgM or monomeric Ig induced release of LTC4 and LTB4 that was approximately 10-20% of that induced by ionophore. Similarly, IgG, IgA and IgE but not IgM induced release of PGE2 (range 0.015-0.22 ng/10/sup 6/ M phi). Absence of calcium or preincubation with nordihydroguaiaretic acid (10/sup -6/ M) inhibited Ig-induced LTC4 and LTB4 release and indomethacin (10/sup -6/ M) inhibited PGE2 release. Phagocytosis of the Ig aggregates was not required since release was not inhibited by cytochalasin B. Release of PGE2 and LTC4/LTB4 induced by all classes except IgM correlated with the presence or absence of M phi Fc receptors (FcR) for each class as determined by rosette assay. The data indicate that IgG, IgA and IgE immune complexes can induce M phi arachidonic acid metabolism via interaction with FcR despite inhibition of phagocytosis. Such a mechanism may contribute to inflammatory reactions characterized by mononuclear cell infiltrates.

  5. [Avidity of polyreactive immunoglobulins].

    PubMed

    Bobrovnik, S A

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of the mechanism of interaction between polyreactive immunoglobulins (PRIG) and antigen was conducted and it was shown that most of the traditional methods of antibody affinity evaluation are not applicable for PRIG affinity. The comparative assessment of the mouse and human PRIG avidity against ovalbumin and horse myoglobin and the avidity of specific monoclonal antibodies against ovalbumin have shown that the avidity of PRIG not only is much less than the avidity of monoclonal antibodies but even exceeds it.

  6. Immunoglobulin genes of the turtles.

    PubMed

    Magadán-Mompó, Susana; Sánchez-Espinel, Christian; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2013-03-01

    The availability of reptile genomes for the use of the scientific community is an exceptional opportunity to study the evolution of immunoglobulin genes. The genome of Chrysemys picta bellii and Pelodiscus sinensis is the first one that has been reported for turtles. The scanning for immunoglobulin genes resulted in the presence of a complex locus for the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH). This IGH locus in both turtles contains genes for 13 isotypes in C. picta bellii and 17 in P. sinensis. These correspond with one immunoglobulin M, one immunoglobulin D, several immunoglobulins Y (six in C. picta bellii and eight in P. sinensis), and several immunoglobulins that are similar to immunoglobulin D2 (five in C. picta belli and seven in P. sinensis) that was previously described in Eublepharis macularius. It is worthy to note that IGHD2 are placed in an inverted transcriptional orientation and present sequences for two immunoglobulin domains that are similar to bird IgA domains. Furthermore, its phylogenetic analysis allows us to consider about the presence of IGHA gene in a primitive reptile, so we would be dealing with the memory of the gene that originated from the bird IGHA. In summary, we provide a clear picture of the immunoglobulins present in a turtle, whose analysis supports the idea that turtles emerged from the evolutionary line from the differentiation of birds and the presence of the IGHA gene present in a common ancestor.

  7. Biology of Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Berlot, Giorgio; Rossini, Perla; Turchet, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous Immunoglobulins (IvIg) are often administered to critically ill patients more as an act of faith than on the basis of relevant clinical studies. This particularly applies to the treatment of sepsis in adult patients, in whom the current guidelines even recommend against their use, despite that many studies demonstrated either their beneficial effects in different subsets of patients and that some preparations of IvIg are more effective than other. The biology of Ig are reviewed, aiming to a more in-depth understanding of their properties in order to clarify their possible indications in different clinical settings. PMID:25674545

  8. Measurement of anticomplementary activity in therapeutic intravenous immunoglobulin preparations.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, I; Tran, E; Farrugia, A

    1997-03-01

    Anticomplementary activity (ACA) of aggregates in intravenous immunoglobulin preparations (IVIG) was investigated using the modified Kabat and Meyer classical complement consumption method recommended by the European Pharmacopoeia and a C1q-coated microtitre enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The physical characteristics of aggregates were found to affect complement binding. Aggregates formed by heating IVIG preparations at acid pH bound complement poorly, while aggregates formed by heating IVIG at neutral pH showed high ACA. This suggests that analysis of complement binding capacity provides a level of aggregate characterization of aggregates which is additional to quantitation by High-performance liquid chromatography ((HPLC). The correlation (r = 0.98) between the two tests was good when aggregates formed at neutral pH were compared, but decreased (r = 0.57) when aggregates formed at acid pH were included. A comparison of the results showed that there were no significant differences in the classification of aggregates with acceptable/unacceptable (i.e. pass/fail outcome) values of ACA. Between assay variation (CV = 7.6%) was lower in the ELISA test compared with the complement consumption assay (where percentage binding varied from 78.9% to 100%). Both assays are justified for the evaluation of ACA in therapeutic IVIG. The ELISA had the advantage in being more precise, less dependent on reagent source and requiring less technical expertise.

  9. Immunoglobulin profile in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, M S; Dhar, N K; Agrawal, P; Khurana, S K; Neena, B; Malik, S C

    1992-08-01

    The present study was conducted on 40 new consecutive schizophrenic patients admitted in the psychiatry ward. The diagnosis of schizophrenia was done by Research Diagnosis Criteria (RDC). Serum immunoglobulins were were estimated in schizophrenic patients and were age and sex matched with 40 healthy individuals, comprising the control group. The IgG and IgA mean levels of schizophrenic patients were found to be significantly higher (p < 0.01) than the normal healthy individuals. There were however no significant differences between the schizophrenic patients and control group regarding total proteins, albumin and globulin levels. In subtypes of schinophrenia based on phenomenology only, paranoid group scored significantly higher (p < 0.01) IgG and IgA mean values than other types of Schizophrenia (catatonic, disorganised and undifferentiated).

  10. Immunoglobulin Resistance in Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hartas, Georgios A.; Hashmi, Syed Shahrukh; Pham-Peyton, Chi; Tsounias, Emmanouil; Bricker, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for immunoglobulin resistance, including clinical symptoms such as arthritis and the pH of intravenous immunoglobulin. Methods: The data of children with Kawasaki disease who had received immunoglobulin were evaluated. Data regarding the brand of immunoglobulin administered were abstracted from the pharmacy records. Results: Eighty consecutive children with Kawasaki disease were evaluated (Mdnage=28 months, 66% male). The prevalence of immunoglobulin resistance was 30%. Arthritis was a presenting symptom in the acute phase of Kawasaki disease in 8% (6/80, all male) and was seen in significant association with immunoglobulin resistance in comparison to those without arthritis (16.7% vs. 0.2%, p=0.008). Next, the immunoglobulin brand types were divided into two groups: the relatively high pH group (n=16), including Carimune (pH 6.6±0.2), and the low pH group (n=63), including Gamunex (pH 4–4.5) or Privigen (pH 4.6–5). Overall, no significant difference in immunoglobulin responsiveness was found between the low pH and the high pH groups (73% vs. 56%, p=0.193), although the low pH group showed a trend toward a larger decrease in erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p=0.048), lower steroid use (p=0.054), and lower coronary involvement (p=0.08) than those in the high pH group. Conclusions: Children presenting with arthritis in the acute phase of Kawasaki disease may be at risk for immunoglobulin resistance. PMID:25852966

  11. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    Part of the 1994 Industrial Minerals Review. The production, consumption, and applications of construction aggregates are reviewed. In 1994, the production of construction aggregates, which includes crushed stone and construction sand and gravel combined, increased 7.7 percent to 2.14 Gt compared with the previous year. These record production levels are mostly a result of funding for highway construction work provided by the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991. Demand is expected to increase for construction aggregates in 1995.

  12. Pepsinogen--an immunoglobulin binding artefact in 'collagen' preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, A P; O'Hara, B P; Mageed, R A; McMahon, M S; McCarthy, D; Menashi, S; Archer, J R; Currey, H L

    1986-01-01

    It has previously been shown that extracts of human articular cartilage, many many of which contain type II collagen, react with heat-aggregated immunoglobulin and artificially prepared immune complexes. Sera from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis, but not from patients with inflammatory bowel disease, react with these extracts. There are two distinct patterns of binding, either as low molecular weight immune complexes or as free antibody directed against collagen. Aggregate-binding activity identified in extracts of human articular cartilage following pepsin digestion was found to be distinct from collagen in its salt solubility. Further purification of this aggregate-binding factor by SDS gel electrophoresis has shown it to be an artefact resulting from the binding of small immune complexes to pepsinogen present in the pepsin preparation used to digest the cartilage. Images Fig. 4 PMID:3780048

  13. Soluble IgE receptors – elements of the IgE network

    PubMed Central

    Platzer, Barbara; Ruiter, Floortje; van der Mee, John; Fiebiger, Edda

    2011-01-01

    Soluble isoforms of three human IgE Fc receptors, namely FcεRI, FcεRII and galectin-3, can be found in serum. These soluble IgE receptors are a diverse family of proteins unified by the characteristic of interacting with IgE in the extracellular matrix. A truncated form of the alpha-chain of FcεRI, the high affinity IgE receptor, has recently been described as a soluble isoform (sFcεRI). Multiple soluble isoforms of CD23 (sCD23), the low affinity IgE receptor also known as FcεRII, are generated via different mechanisms of extracellular and intracellular proteolysis. The second low affinity IgE receptor, galectin-3, only exists as a secretory protein. We here discuss the physiological roles of these three soluble IgE receptors as elements of the human IgE network. Additionally, we review the potential and current use of sFcεRI, sCD23 and galectin-3 as biomarkers in human disease. PMID:21920387

  14. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, W.H.; Tepordei, V.V.; Bolen, W.P.

    2000-01-01

    Construction aggregates consist primarily of crushed stone and construction sand and gravel. Total estimated production of construction aggregates increased in 1999 by about 2% to 2.39 Gt (2.64 billion st) compared with 1998. This record production level continued an expansion that began in 1992. By commodities, crushed stone production increased 3.3%, while sand and gravel production increased by about 0.5%.

  15. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    Part of a special section on industrial minerals in 1993. The 1993 production of construction aggregates increased 6.3 percent over the 1992 figure, to reach 2.01 Gt. This represents the highest estimated annual production of combined crushed stone and construction sand and gravel ever recorded in the U.S. The outlook for construction aggregates and the issues facing the industry are discussed.

  16. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, T.I.; Bolen, W.P.

    2007-01-01

    Construction aggregates, primarily stone, sand and gravel, are recovered from widespread naturally occurring mineral deposits and processed for use primarily in the construction industry. They are mined, crushed, sorted by size and sold loose or combined with portland cement or asphaltic cement to make concrete products to build roads, houses, buildings, and other structures. Much smaller quantities are used in agriculture, cement manufacture, chemical and metallurgical processes, glass production and many other products.

  17. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Part of the Annual Commodities Review 1995. Production of construction aggregates such as crushed stone and construction sand and gravel showed a marginal increase in 1995. Most of the 1995 increases were due to funding for highway construction work. The major areas of concern to the industry included issues relating to wetlands classification and the classification of crystalline silica as a probable human carcinogen. Despite this, an increase in demand is anticipated for 1996.

  18. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    Part of a special section on the market performance of industrial minerals in 1992. Production of construction aggregates increased by 4.6 percent in 1992. This increase was due, in part, to the increased funding for transportation and infrastructure projects. The U.S. produced about 1.05 Gt of crushed stone and an estimated 734 Mt of construction sand and gravel in 1992. Demand is expected to increase by about 5 percent in 1993.

  19. Studies of heat precipitable immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, R.; Roberts, Mary; Pruzansky, J. J.

    1970-01-01

    The nature of the heat precipitation of 3 mononoclonal heat labile immunoglobulins was studied. These included 2 γG pyroglobulins and one γM pyroglobulin. Thermoprecipitable activity of both γG pyroglobulins could be localized to their heavy chains and to the Fab fragments of one of them. Heat precipitability of the γM paraprotein required the presence of the intact γM molecule since 7S subunits did not precipitate. The thermal precipitates appeared to result from intramolecular or intermolecular reactions with the formation of strong covalent bonds rather than weak non-covalent bonds. The importance of disulphide bonding was excluded in the precipitation of both γG but not in the γM pyroglobulins. Heat precipitation of the monoclonal γM resulted in coprecipitation of other proteins, particularly γG globulin, which suggested a specific type of reaction with this immunoglobulin. The interaction of the γM pyroglobulin, normal γG and heat produced an irreversible precipitate. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:4099668

  20. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bolen, W.P.; Tepordei, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    The estimated production during 2000 of construction aggregates, crushed stone, and construction sand and gravel increased by about 2.6% to 2.7 Gt (3 billion st), compared with 1999. The expansion that started in 1992 continued with record production levels for the ninth consecutive year. By commodity, construction sand and gravel production increased by 4.5% to 1.16 Gt (1.28 billion st), while crushed stone production increased by 1.3% to 1.56 Gt (1.72 billion st).

  1. Atypical immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xia; Feng, Jun; Cao, Xinxin; Zhang, Lu; Zhou, Daobin; Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Primary immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis (AL amyloidosis) is a plasma cell disorder which mainly affects heart, kidneys, liver, and peripheral nervous system. Cases of atypical AL amyloidosis presented as spontaneous vertebral compression fractures have been rarely reported, and data about the management and clinical outcomes of the patients are scarce. Methods: Herein, we present 3 new cases of AL amyloidosis with spontaneous vertebral compression fracture and review 13 cases retrieved from the literature. Results: Moreover, we observed overrepresentations of liver involvement and bone marrow involvement in AL amyloidosis with spontaneous vertebral compression fracture. Conclusion: We believe that better awareness of the rare clinical presentation as spontaneous vertebral compression fracture of AL amyloidosis can facilitate earlier diagnosis and earlier treatment. PMID:27603350

  2. Perspectives on Immunoglobulins in Colostrum and Milk

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Walter L.; Theil, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    Immunoglobulins form an important component of the immunological activity found in milk and colostrum. They are central to the immunological link that occurs when the mother transfers passive immunity to the offspring. The mechanism of transfer varies among mammalian species. Cattle provide a readily available immune rich colostrum and milk in large quantities, making those secretions important potential sources of immune products that may benefit humans. Immune milk is a term used to describe a range of products of the bovine mammary gland that have been tested against several human diseases. The use of colostrum or milk as a source of immunoglobulins, whether intended for the neonate of the species producing the secretion or for a different species, can be viewed in the context of the types of immunoglobulins in the secretion, the mechanisms by which the immunoglobulins are secreted, and the mechanisms by which the neonate or adult consuming the milk then gains immunological benefit. The stability of immunoglobulins as they undergo processing in the milk, or undergo digestion in the intestine, is an additional consideration for evaluating the value of milk immunoglobulins. This review summarizes the fundamental knowledge of immunoglobulins found in colostrum, milk, and immune milk. PMID:22254105

  3. PHYLOGENY OF IMMUNOGLOBULIN STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Clem, L. W.; Small, P. A.

    1967-01-01

    Lemon sharks immunized with bovine serum albumin produced two molecular forms of antibodies detectable by passive hemagglutination of antigen-coated, tanned sheep erythrocytes. Throughout the course of immunization 2-ME-sensitive antibody was associated with a 19S immunoglobulin fraction (4–5 mg/ml serum) while late in the course of immunization antibody was found also associated with a 7S immunoglobulin fraction (7–8 mg/ml serum). No evidence for any anamnestic response was found in these animals. Naturally occurring hemagglutinins for sheep erythrocytes were found to be 2-ME-sensitive and present in the 19S immunoglobulin fraction. These immunoglobulin fractions were readily purified by DEAE-cellulose chromatography and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration. Both immunoglobulin molecules yielded equimolar amounts of H and L polypeptide chains when subjected to extensive reduction and alkylation followed by gel filtration in 5 M guanidine-HCl. Antigenically reactive H and L chains were obtained by partial reduction and alkylation followed by gel filtration in 1 M propionic acid. The 7S and 19S immunoglobulin H chains were indistinguishable by fingerprints of tryptic digests, disc electrophoretic patterns, antigenic properties, and mass (molecular weight ∼70,000), thus suggesting these two molecules to belong to the same immunoglobulin class. The shark 19S and 7S immunoglobulin L chains were indistinguishable from each other by similar criteria and were different from the H chains. These L chains exhibited the electrophoretic heterogeneity of their mammalian counterparts. The 7S (shark immunoglobulin) molecule was shown to have a molecular weight of ∼160,000 and to consist of 2H and 2L polypeptide chains (total mass ≅180,000). The 19S molecule was shown to have a molecular weight of 800,000–900,000; therefore, there were probably five 7S subunits per 19S molecule, comparable to mammalian γM. Other reasons for considering the 7S and the 19S lemon shark

  4. Cytomegalovirus Immunoglobulin After Thoracic Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, Paolo; Mohacsi, Paul; Szabolcs, Zoltán; Potena, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a highly complex pathogen which, despite modern prophylactic regimens, continues to affect a high proportion of thoracic organ transplant recipients. The symptomatic manifestations of CMV infection are compounded by adverse indirect effects induced by the multiple immunomodulatory actions of CMV. These include a higher risk of acute rejection, cardiac allograft vasculopathy after heart transplantation, and potentially bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in lung transplant recipients, with a greater propensity for opportunistic secondary infections. Prophylaxis for CMV using antiviral agents (typically oral valganciclovir or intravenous ganciclovir) is now almost universal, at least in high-risk transplants (D+/R−). Even with extended prophylactic regimens, however, challenges remain. The CMV events can still occur despite antiviral prophylaxis, including late-onset infection or recurrent disease, and patients with ganciclovir-resistant CMV infection or who are intolerant to antiviral therapy require alternative strategies. The CMV immunoglobulin (CMVIG) and antiviral agents have complementary modes of action. High-titer CMVIG preparations provide passive CMV-specific immunity but also exert complex immunomodulatory properties which augment the antiviral effect of antiviral agents and offer the potential to suppress the indirect effects of CMV infection. This supplement discusses the available data concerning the immunological and clinical effects of CMVIG after heart or lung transplantation. PMID:26900989

  5. Immunoglobulin gene diversification in cattle.

    PubMed

    Meyer, A; Parng, C L; Hansal, S A; Osborne, B A; Goldsby, R A

    1997-01-01

    Research in several species has revealed that different types of mammals have evolved divergent molecular and cellular strategies for generating immunoglobulin diversity. Other chapters in this text have highlighted the specific characteristics unique to chicken, rabbit, mouse, human and sheep B lymphocyte development; namely indicating differences in the mechanisms of diversity and the site of primary B cell development. Studies of the bovine system have indicated that like the sheep system, the ileal Peyer's patch (IPP) is a likely chicken bursal equivalent, and is a site of primary B lymphocyte development. Substantial investigation in sheep has indicated that Ig diversity is created by untemplated somatic mutation and intense selective pressure (Reynaud et al., 1991). The frequency of alteration in the sheep Ig light chain gene locus also is characteristic of the bovine system, however, recent evidence from sequencing of bovine lambda light chain genes indicates that one mechanism that contributes to diversity is gene conversion, utilizing several pseudogenes located in the Ig locus (Parng et al., 1996). The mechanism by which this hyperalteration of Ig genes occurs in both sheep and cattle is poorly understood and is thus the focus of considerable investigation. The study of events in the IPP may also have informative ramifications for secondary diversification of the Ig repertoire by somatic hyperalteration in germinal centers.

  6. Frondoside A inhibits breast cancer metastasis and antagonizes prostaglandin E receptors EP4 and EP2

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xinrong; Kundu, Namita; Collin, Peter D; Goloubeva, Olga; Fulton, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Frondoside A, derived from the sea cucumber Cucumaria frondosa has demonstrable anticancer activity in several models, however, the ability of Frondoside A to affect tumor metastasis has not been reported. Using a syngeneic murine model of metastatic breast cancer, we now show that Frondoside A has potent antimetastatic activity. Frondoside A given i.p. to mice bearing mammary gland implanted mammary tumors, inhibits spontaneous tumor metastasis to the lungs. The elevated Cyclooxygenase -2 activity in many malignancies promotes tumor growth and metastasis by producing high levels of PGE2 which acts on the prostaglandin E receptors, chiefly EP4 and EP2. We examined the ability of Frondoside A to modulate the functions of these EP receptors. We now show that Frondoside A antagonizes the prostaglandin E receptors EP2 and EP4. 3H-PGE2 binding to recombinant EP2 or EP4-expressing cells was inhibited by Frondoside A at low μM concentrations. Likewise, EP4 or EP2-linked activation of intracellular cAMP as well as EP4-mediated ERK1/2 activation were also inhibited by Frondoside A. Consistent with the antimetastatic activity observed in vivo, migration of tumor cells in vitro in response to EP4 or EP2 agonists was also inhibited by Frondoside A. These studies identify a new function for an agent with known antitumor activity, and show that the antimetastatic activity may be due in part to a novel mechanism of action. These studies add to the growing body of evidence that Frondoside A may be a promising new agent with potential to treat cancer and may also represent a potential new modality to antagonize EP4. PMID:21761157

  7. Immunoglobulin isotypes in childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Najam, F I; Giasuddin, A S; Shembesh, A H

    1999-01-01

    Immunoglobulin isotypes (IgG, IgA, IgM, IgD, IgE) in serum were investigated in 64 Libyan children with mild to moderately severe asthma (age: 1-12 years; sex: 39 males, 25 females) (Group A) and in 57 healthy Libyan children (age: 1-12 years; sex: 30 males, 27 females (Group B). The patients were classified according to age into three groups (A1: 1-3 years; A2: > 3-5 years; A3: > 5-12 years); according to disease activity into two groups (AA: active disease; NA: inactive disease); and according to age plus disease activity into six groups (AA1, NA1; AA2, NA2; AA3, NA3). The healthy children were also divided according to age into three groups (B1: 1-3 years; B2: > 3-5 years; B3: > 5-12 years). IgG, IgA, IgM and IgD were measured by radial immunodiffusion method and IgE was estimated by enzyme immunoassay technique utilizing immunokits from bioMerieux, France. Serum levels of IgG, IgD and IgE were elevated significantly in patients compared to controls (A vs B: p < 0.05) while IgA and IgM levels were normal (p > 0.05). IgG and IgD levels were raised in A3 (p < 0.05), while IgD levels were raised in both A2 and A3 (p < 0.05) and IgE was elevated in all age groups (p < 0.05). However, IgG was elevated significantly in AA only, while IgD and IgE levels were high in both AA and NA (p < 0.05) and IgE was even considerably higher in AA compared to NA (p < 0.02). Further elevated levels were observed for IgG in AA3 only (p < 0.05), for IgD in NA2 (p < 0.01), AA3 (p < 0.01) and NA3 (p < 0.05) and IgE was much higher in patients with active disease than with inactive disease in all age groups (p < 0.05). The fact that asthmatic attack in majority of our patients can be explained as mediated through IgE and the possibilities that IgG and IgD may play roles as aetiopathogenetic or protective regulatory factors in childhood asthma are discussed.

  8. Switch Transcripts in Immunoglobulin Class Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Matthias; Jung, Steffen; Radbruch, Andreas

    1995-03-01

    B cells can exchange gene segments for the constant region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain, altering the class and effector function of the antibodies that they produce. Class switching is directed to distinct classes by cytokines, which induce transcription of the targeted DNA sequences. These transcripts are processed, resulting in spliced "switch" transcripts. Switch recombination can be directed to immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) by the heterologous human metallothionein II_A promoter in mutant mice. Induction of the structurally conserved, spliced switch transcripts is sufficient to target switch recombination to IgG1, whereas transcription alone is not.

  9. Rapid separation of immunoglobulin M from immunoglobulin G antibodies for reliable diagnosis of recent rubella infections.

    PubMed Central

    Frisch-Niggemeyer, W

    1975-01-01

    Chromatography on controlled pore glass was adapted for the separation of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) rubella antibodies from 0.3-ml samples of human serum. An extremely sharp separation of IgM from IgG antibodies could be obtained within 40 min. Nonspecific inhibitors were removed before chromatography by precipitation with high-molecular-weight dextran sulfate, and the titer of rubella antibodies in the different classes of immunoglobulins were assayed with a modified hemagglutination inhibition technique. The combination of these methods is recommended for routine tests. It permits an accurate diagnosis of recent rubella infection within a few hours. PMID:1194404

  10. Phylogen of immunoglobulin structure and function. 3. Immunoglobulins of the chicken.

    PubMed

    Leslie, G A; Clem, L W

    1969-12-01

    Chicken 7.1S immunoglobulin was purified from whole chicken serum by DEAE-cellulose chromatography and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration. The macroglobulin was purified by a combination of salt precipitation and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration. Both immunoglobulin molecules yielded 75% heavy (H) chains and 25% light (L) chains when subjected to extensive reduction and alkylation followed by gel filtration in 5 M guanidine-HCl. Antigenically reactive H and L chains were obtained by partial reduction and alkylation followed by gel filtration in 5 M guanidine-HCl. The 7.1S and 16.7S immunoglobulin H chains were antigenically unrelated to each other, whereas the L chains were antigenically indistinguishable from one another. The 16.7S H chains were found to have a mass of approximately 70,000, and the 7.1S H chains had a mass of 67,500. The mass of the L chains was approximately 22,000. Sedimentation equilibrium studies of the 7.1S immunoglobulin molecule gave a mol wt of approximately 170,000 which is in good agreement with the 179,000 predicted on the basis of 2 H and 2 L polypeptide chains. The 16.7S molecule was shown to have a mol wt of approximately 890,000. A reductive subunit that has a mol wt of approximately 174,000 has been isolated from the 16.7S molecule. These values are consistent with the chicken macroglobulin having five subunits, each of which has 2 H and 2 L chains. The hexose contents of the chicken 7.1S and 16.7S immunoglobulins are 2.2% and 2.6%, respectively. The extinction coefficients of the 7.1S and 16.7S immunoglobulins were 13.18 +/- 0.04 and 12.72 +/- 0.77, respectively, when measured in 0.3 M KCl. Based upon physical-chemical and antigenic characteristics, the 16.7S immunoglobulin most closely resembles IgM of mammals. The 7.1S immunoglobulin definitely belongs to a different class than the 16,7S immunoglobulin, but it does not align itself very well with any of the mammalian immunoglobulins. We propose that this molecule be designated as Ig

  11. Molecular characterization of prostaglandin F receptor (FP) and E receptor subtype 1 (EP₁) in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Amy H Y; Wang, Yajun; Leung, Frederick C

    2012-09-01

    Prostaglandins E (PGE) and F (PGF) mediate diverse physiological functions via their cell surface receptors - prostaglandin E receptor (EP) subtypes 1, 2, 3 and 4 (EP(1); EP(2); EP(3); EP(4)) and F receptor (FP). In teleost fishes, PGE was implicated in gill epithelium ion transport, while both PGE and PGF were involved in oocyte maturation, follicular rupture and coordination of reproductive behaviors. However, little is known about the mechanisms behind their actions. In present study, we first identified the full-length ORF cDNA clones of three zebrafish prostaglandin E receptor subtype 1 (zEP(1)) isoforms - zEP(1a), zEP(1b) and zEP(1c) - and FP (zFP) from adult ovary. RT-PCR showed that zEP(1a), zEP(1b) and zFP are widely expressed in adult tissues, while zEP(1c) mRNA expression is mainly confined in brain and kidney. Using a pGL3-NFAT-RE luciferase reporter system, both zEP(1a) and zEP(1b) expressed in DF-1 cells were shown to be activated by PGE(2) potently while zEP(1c) and zFP were activated by PGF(2a) effectively, suggesting that the four receptors are functionally coupled to intracellular Ca(2+)-signaling pathway. Furthermore, EP1a and EP1b, but not EP1c were suggested to couple to cAMP-PKA signaling pathway using a pGL3-CRE luciferase reporter assay. Although zEP(1c) might originate as a paralog to zEP(1a) and zEP(1b), its functional coupling to PGF(2α) instead of PGE(2) suggested that zEP(1) isoforms might have sub-functionalized in their ligand binding and G protein coupling specificity, in addition to differential tissue distribution. Characterization of these receptors undoubtedly furthered our understanding on the diverse yet highly target-specific responses of prostaglandins in teleosts. PMID:22617193

  12. Eastern Equine Encephalitis Treated With Intravenous Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Mukerji, Shibani S.; Lam, Alice D.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 68-year-old man from southeastern Massachusetts presenting with encephalitis due to eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus. Despite the high morbidity and mortality rate of EEE, the patient made a near complete recovery in the setting of receiving early intravenous immunoglobulins. PMID:26740855

  13. Identifying protein aggregation mechanisms and quantifying aggregation rates from combined monomer depletion and continuous scattering.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Gregory V; Drenski, Michael; Razinkov, Vladimir; Reed, Wayne F; Roberts, Christopher J

    2016-10-15

    Parallel temperature initial rates (PTIR) from chromatographic separation of aggregating protein solutions are combined with continuous simultaneous multiple sample light scattering (SMSLS) to make quantitative deductions about protein aggregation kinetics and mechanisms. PTIR determines the rates at which initially monomeric proteins are converted to aggregates over a range of temperatures, under initial-rate conditions. Using SMSLS for the same set of conditions provides time courses of the absolute Rayleigh scattering ratio, IR(t), from which a potentially different measure of aggregation rates can be quantified. The present report compares these measures of aggregation rates across a range of solution conditions that result in different aggregation mechanisms for anti-streptavidin (AS) immunoglobulin gamma-1 (IgG1). The results illustrate how the two methods provide complementary information when deducing aggregation mechanisms, as well as cases where they provide new mechanistic details that were not possible to deduce in previous work. Criteria are presented for when the two techniques are expected to give equivalent results for quantitative rates, the potential limitations when solution non-idealities are large, as well as a comparison of the temperature dependence of AS-IgG1 aggregation rates with published data for other antibodies. PMID:27510552

  14. The Low Affinity IgE Receptor (CD23) Is Cleaved by the Metalloproteinase ADAM10*

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux, George A.; Blumenkron, Fernando; Yeung, Nolan; Zhou, Pei; Williams, Jason; Grammer, Amrie C.; Petrovich, Robert; Lipsky, Peter E.; Moss, Marcia L.; Werb, Zena

    2008-01-01

    The low affinity IgE receptor, Fc∊RII (CD23), is both a positive and negative regulator of IgE synthesis. The proteinase activity that converts the membrane-bound form of CD23 into a soluble species (sCD23) is an important regulator of the function of CD23 and may be an important therapeutic target for the control of allergy and inflammation. We have characterized the catalytic activity of ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) 10 toward human CD23. We found that ADAM10 efficiently catalyzes the cleavage of peptides derived from two distinct cleavage sites in the CD23 backbone. Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases and a specific prodomain-based inhibitor of ADAM10 perturb the release of endogenously produced CD23 from human leukemia cell lines as well as primary cultures of human B-cells. Expression of a mutant metalloproteinase-deficient construct of ADAM10 partially inhibited the production of sCD23. Similarly, small inhibitory RNA knockdown of ADAM10 partially inhibited CD23 release and resulted in the accumulation of the membrane-bound form of CD23 on the cells. ADAM10 contributes to CD23 shedding and thus could be considered a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of allergic disease. PMID:17389606

  15. The low affinity IgE receptor (CD23) is cleaved by the metalloproteinase ADAM10.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, George A; Blumenkron, Fernando; Yeung, Nolan; Zhou, Pei; Williams, Jason; Grammer, Amrie C; Petrovich, Robert; Lipsky, Peter E; Moss, Marcia L; Werb, Zena

    2007-05-18

    The low affinity IgE receptor, FcepsilonRII (CD23), is both a positive and negative regulator of IgE synthesis. The proteinase activity that converts the membrane-bound form of CD23 into a soluble species (sCD23) is an important regulator of the function of CD23 and may be an important therapeutic target for the control of allergy and inflammation. We have characterized the catalytic activity of ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) 10 toward human CD23. We found that ADAM10 efficiently catalyzes the cleavage of peptides derived from two distinct cleavage sites in the CD23 backbone. Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases and a specific prodomain-based inhibitor of ADAM10 perturb the release of endogenously produced CD23 from human leukemia cell lines as well as primary cultures of human B-cells. Expression of a mutant metalloproteinase-deficient construct of ADAM10 partially inhibited the production of sCD23. Similarly, small inhibitory RNA knockdown of ADAM10 partially inhibited CD23 release and resulted in the accumulation of the membrane-bound form of CD23 on the cells. ADAM10 contributes to CD23 shedding and thus could be considered a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of allergic disease.

  16. Thermodynamics of Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Kenneth L.; Barz, Bogdan; Bachmann, Michael; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloid protein aggregation characterizes many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Creutz- feldt-Jakob disease. Evidence suggests that amyloid aggregates may share similar aggregation pathways, implying simulation of full-length amyloid proteins is not necessary for understanding amyloid formation. In this study we simulate GNNQQNY, the N-terminal prion-determining domain of the yeast protein Sup35 to investigate the thermodynamics of structural transitions during aggregation. We use a coarse-grained model with replica-exchange molecular dynamics to investigate the association of 3-, 6-, and 12-chain GNNQQNY systems and we determine the aggregation pathway by studying aggregation states of GN- NQQNY. We find that the aggregation of the hydrophilic GNNQQNY sequence is mainly driven by H-bond formation, leading to the formation of /3-sheets from the very beginning of the assembly process. Condensation (aggregation) and ordering take place simultaneously, which is underpinned by the occurrence of a single heat capacity peak only.

  17. Fc receptors for immunoglobulins and their appearance during vertebrate evolution.

    PubMed

    Akula, Srinivas; Mohammadamin, Sayran; Hellman, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Receptors interacting with the constant domain of immunoglobulins (Igs) have a number of important functions in vertebrates. They facilitate phagocytosis by opsonization, are key components in antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity as well as activating cells to release granules. In mammals, four major types of classical Fc receptors (FcRs) for IgG have been identified, one high-affinity receptor for IgE, one for both IgM and IgA, one for IgM and one for IgA. All of these receptors are related in structure and all of them, except the IgA receptor, are found in primates on chromosome 1, indicating that they originate from a common ancestor by successive gene duplications. The number of Ig isotypes has increased gradually during vertebrate evolution and this increase has likely been accompanied by a similar increase in isotype-specific receptors. To test this hypothesis we have performed a detailed bioinformatics analysis of a panel of vertebrate genomes. The first components to appear are the poly-Ig receptors (PIGRs), receptors similar to the classic FcRs in mammals, so called FcRL receptors, and the FcR γ chain. These molecules are not found in cartilagous fish and may first appear within bony fishes, indicating a major step in Fc receptor evolution at the appearance of bony fish. In contrast, the receptor for IgA is only found in placental mammals, indicating a relatively late appearance. The IgM and IgA/M receptors are first observed in the monotremes, exemplified by the platypus, indicating an appearance during early mammalian evolution. Clearly identifiable classical receptors for IgG and IgE are found only in marsupials and placental mammals, but closely related receptors are found in the platypus, indicating a second major step in Fc receptor evolution during early mammalian evolution, involving the appearance of classical IgG and IgE receptors from FcRL molecules and IgM and IgA/M receptors from PIGR. PMID:24816777

  18. Chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenia treated with immunoglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Mori, P G; Mancuso, G; del Principe, D; Duse, M; Miniero, R; Tovo, R; Bardare, M; Carnelli, V; de Mattia, D

    1983-01-01

    Twenty five children with chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura followed from 6-96 months in 7 Italian paediatric departments were treated with high dose immunoglobulin according to a multicentre protocol. Positive responses were observed in 20 of 25 patients (80%) and negative responses in 5 of 25 (20%). On previous steroid treatment 7 of 10 positive responders were steroid resistant and 13 of 15 were steroid dependent. Within four weeks of beginning treatment 16 of 20 patients (80%) relapsed, while 4 of 20 (20%) maintained normal platelet values after 4-12 months' follow up. Statistical analysis of the platelet count on day five of treatment enabled us to divide positive responders into three groups: good, intermediate, and poor. The possible mode of action and clinical application of high dose immunoglobulin are discussed. PMID:6685997

  19. Role of immunoglobulins in neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, L; Borrelli, AC; Cerullo, J; Pisanti, R; Figliuolo, C; Izzo, F; Paccone, M; Ferrara, T; Lama, S; Raimondi, F

    2015-01-01

    Neonates, especially VLBW, are at high risk for sepsis related morbidity and mortality for immaturity of their immune system and invasive NICU practices. The paucity of immunoglobulins in preterm neonates consequently to the immaturity of immune system contributes to their high risk for systemic infection. The use of intravenous IgM enriched immunoglobulins, with higher antimicrobial activity than standard IgG, has been demonstrated in a retrospective study to reduce short term mortality in VLBW infant with proven sepsis. Larger, randomized prospective trials given the enormous burden of morbidity and mortality imposed by neonatal sepsis should urgently be addressed not only to validate this results but also to tailor the optimal scheme of treatment. PMID:25674546

  20. Artificial Affinity Proteins as Ligands of Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Mouratou, Barbara; Béhar, Ghislaine; Pecorari, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    A number of natural proteins are known to have affinity and specificity for immunoglobulins. Some of them are widely used as reagents for detection or capture applications, such as Protein G and Protein A. However, these natural proteins have a defined spectrum of recognition that may not fit specific needs. With the development of combinatorial protein engineering and selection techniques, it has become possible to design artificial affinity proteins with the desired properties. These proteins, termed alternative scaffold proteins, are most often chosen for their stability, ease of engineering and cost-efficient recombinant production in bacteria. In this review, we focus on alternative scaffold proteins for which immunoglobulin binders have been identified and characterized. PMID:25647098

  1. [BIOLOGICAL AND IMMUNOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF POLYREACTIVE IMMUNOGLOBULINS].

    PubMed

    Bobrovnik, S A; Demchenko, M A; Komisarenko, S V

    2015-01-01

    A previously unknown phenomenon of acquired polyreactivity for serum immunoglobulins, which were subjected either to solutions of KSCN (3.0-5.0 M), low/high pH (pH 2.2-3.0), or heating to 58-60 degrees C, was described by us in 1990 year. Much later, eleven years after that, similar data were published by others, which completely confirmed our results concerning the influence of either chaotropic ions or the drastic shift of pH on immunoglobulins polyreactive properties. Our further investigations of polyreactive serum immunoglobulins (PRIG) properties have shown that the mechanism of non-specific interaction between PRIG and antigens much differs from the mechanism of interaction between specific antibodies and corresponding antigens. Later we have shown that the increasing of PRIG reactivity could be induced in vivo, and PRIG are one of serum components for human or animal sera. Then, it could be suggested that PRIG can perform certain biological functions. Studying of PRIG's effect on the phagocytosis of microbes by peritoneal cells or the tumor growth have shown that PRIG can play a certain role in protecting the body from infections and probably can influence on the development of various pathological processes. Recently we have also found that PRIG IgG contents significantly increases in aged people. These data demonstrate that further investigations of PRIG's immunochemical properties and studying of their biological role in organism protection from various diseases is very intriguing and important.

  2. [BIOLOGICAL AND IMMUNOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF POLYREACTIVE IMMUNOGLOBULINS].

    PubMed

    Bobrovnik, S A; Demchenko, M A; Komisarenko, S V

    2015-01-01

    A previously unknown phenomenon of acquired polyreactivity for serum immunoglobulins, which were subjected either to solutions of KSCN (3.0-5.0 M), low/high pH (pH 2.2-3.0), or heating to 58-60 degrees C, was described by us in 1990 year. Much later, eleven years after that, similar data were published by others, which completely confirmed our results concerning the influence of either chaotropic ions or the drastic shift of pH on immunoglobulins polyreactive properties. Our further investigations of polyreactive serum immunoglobulins (PRIG) properties have shown that the mechanism of non-specific interaction between PRIG and antigens much differs from the mechanism of interaction between specific antibodies and corresponding antigens. Later we have shown that the increasing of PRIG reactivity could be induced in vivo, and PRIG are one of serum components for human or animal sera. Then, it could be suggested that PRIG can perform certain biological functions. Studying of PRIG's effect on the phagocytosis of microbes by peritoneal cells or the tumor growth have shown that PRIG can play a certain role in protecting the body from infections and probably can influence on the development of various pathological processes. Recently we have also found that PRIG IgG contents significantly increases in aged people. These data demonstrate that further investigations of PRIG's immunochemical properties and studying of their biological role in organism protection from various diseases is very intriguing and important. PMID:26502695

  3. Interaction of immunoglobulin glycopeptides with concanavalin A.

    PubMed

    Kornfeld, R; Ferris, C

    1975-04-10

    A number of intact and partially degraded immunoglobulin glycopeptides have been tested for their ability to interact with concanavalin A. The degraded glycopeptides were prepared by using purified glycosidases to remove sugar residues from the nonreducing ends of the oligosaccharide chains of intact glycopeptides. A quantitative and sensitive assay was devised to measure the potency of the glycopeptides as haptene inhibitors of 125I-concanavalin A binding to guinea pig erythrocytes. The most potent haptene, derived from an immunoglobulin G glycopeptide, had a branched chain oligosaccharide with two GlcNAc (see article) Man (see article) nonreducing termini linked to a mannose residue in the core. The other very potent glycopeptide was an immunoglobulin E high mannose glycopeptide which contained 3 terminal alpha-mannose residues and 1 internal 2-O-mannose residue. Removal of terminal beta-N-acetylglucosamine residues or alpha-mannose residues reduced the activity of these and other glycopeptides as inhibitors of 125I-concanavalin A binding. It was concluded that the ability of these glycopeptides to interact with concanavalin A is dependent on their content of terminal beta-N-acetylglucosamine residues, terminal alpha-mannose residues, and also internal mannose residues substituted on the C-2 hydroxyl group, and that the saccharide combining site of concanavalin A must be able to bind several sugar residues.

  4. Molecular characterization of prostaglandin F receptor (FP) and E receptor subtype 3 (EP3) in chickens.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Amy H Y; Wang, Yajun; Leung, Frederick C

    2012-10-01

    Prostaglandin E and F regulate diverse physiological functions including gastrointestinal motility, fever induction and reproduction. This multitude of biological effects is mediated via their four E receptor subtypes (EP(1), EP(2), EP(3) and EP(4)) and F receptor (FP), respectively. Majority of these studies was performed in mammalian species, while investigations on their roles were impeded by inadequate information on their receptors in avian species. In present study, full-length cDNAs of chicken EP(3) (cEP(3)) and two isoforms of FP - cFPa and cFPb - were cloned from adult hen ovary. The putative cEP(3) and cFPa share high amino acid sequence identity with their respective orthologs, while the predicted cFPb is a novel middle-truncated splice variant which lacks 107 amino acids between transmembrane domains 4 and 6. RT-PCR showed that cEP(3), cFPa and cFPb are widely expressed in adult tissues examined, including ovary and oviduct. Using a pGL3-CRE luciferase reporter system, cEP(3)-expressing DF1 cells inhibited forskolin-induced luciferase activity (EC(50): <1.9 pM) upon PGE(2) treatment, suggesting that cEP(3) may functionally couple to Gi protein. Upon PGF(2α) addition, cFPa was shown to potentially couple to intracellular Ca(2+)-signaling pathway by pGL3-NFAT-RE reporter assay (EC(50): 2.9 nM), while cFPb showed no response. Using a pGL4-SRE reporter system, both cEP(3) and cFPa exhibited potential MAPK activation by PGE(2) and PGF(2α) at EC(50) 0.34 and 13 nM, respectively. Molecular characterization of these receptors paved the road to the better understanding of PGE(2) and PGF(2α) roles in avian physiology and comparative endocrinology studies. PMID:22885557

  5. Long-term immunoglobulin therapy for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rajabally, Yusuf A

    2015-05-01

    Immunoglobulins are an effective but expensive treatment for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Although the goal is to improve function, use of functional scales to monitor therapy is not widespread. Limited recent evidence suggests that doses lower than those used traditionally may be as effective. There are no proven correlations of effective dose with weight, disease severity, or duration. The clinical course of CIDP is heterogeneous and includes monophasic forms and complete remissions. Careful monitoring of immunoglobulin use is necessary to avoid overtreatment. Definitive evidence for immunoglobulin superiority over steroids is lacking. Although latest trial evidence favors immunoglobulins over steroids, the latter may result in higher remission rates and longer remission periods. This article addresses the appropriateness of first-line, high-dose immunoglobulin treatment for CIDP and reviews important clinical questions regarding the need for long-term therapy protocols, adequate monitoring, treatment withdrawal, and consideration of corticosteroids as an alternative to immunoglobulin therapy.

  6. Regulation of rat basophilic leukemia-2H3 mast cell secretion by a constitutive Lyn kinase interaction with the high affinity IgE receptor (Fc epsilon RI).

    PubMed

    Vonakis, Becky M; Gibbons, Scott P; Rotté, Masashi J; Brothers, Elizabeth A; Kim, Seok C; Chichester, Kristin; MacDonald, Susan M

    2005-10-01

    Signaling through the high affinity IgE receptor is initiated by noncovalently associated Lyn kinase, resulting in the secretion of inflammatory mediators from mast cells. A fraction of the total cellular Lyn is associated via its N-terminal unique domain with the cytoplasmic domain of the Fc epsilonRI beta subunit before receptor aggregation. In the current study, we stably transfected the unique domain of Lyn into rat basophilic leukemia-2H3 mast cells and examined the consequences on Fc epsilonRI-induced signal transduction and mediator secretion to further define the role of the unique domain of Lyn in mast cell secretion. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Fc epsilonRI beta and gamma subunits was partially inhibited in the Lyn unique domain transfectants after Ag stimulation. Ag stimulation of Lyn unique domain transfectants was accompanied by enhanced phosphorylation of MEK and ERK-2, which are required for leukotriene C4 (LTC4) release, and production of LTC4 was increased 3- to 5-fold, compared with cells transfected with vector alone. Conversely, tyrosine phosphorylation of the adaptor protein Gab2, which is essential for mast cell degranulation, was inhibited after Ag stimulation of Lyn unique domain transfectants, and Ag-induced release of histamine was inhibited up to 48%. In rat basophilic leukemia-2H3 cells, Lyn thus plays a dual role by positively regulating Fc epsilonRI phosphorylation and degranulation while negatively regulating LTC4 production. This study provides further evidence that the constitutive interaction between the unique domain of Lyn and the Fc epsilonRI beta subunit is a crucial step in the initiation of Fc epsilonRI signaling and that Lyn is limiting for Fc epsilonRI-induced secretion of inflammatory mediators.

  7. Characterization of the immunoglobulin A protease of Ureaplasma urealyticum.

    PubMed Central

    Spooner, R K; Russell, W C; Thirkell, D

    1992-01-01

    Ureaplasma urealyticum strains of all serotypes express a specific human immunoglobulin A1 protease that cleaves immunoglobulin A1 to produce intact Fab and Fc fragments. The use of a variety of inhibitors suggests that the enzyme is a serine protease. N-terminal sequencing of the Fc digestion product showed that the enzyme cleaves between the proline and threonine residues 235 and 236 in the hinge region of the heavy chain of immunoglobulin A1. Images PMID:1587621

  8. An in vivo platform for identifying inhibitors of protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Mahood, Rachel A.; Jackson, Matthew P.; Revill, Charlotte H.; Foster, Richard J.; Smith, D. Alastair; Ashcroft, Alison E.; Brockwell, David J.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation underlies an array of human diseases, yet only one small molecule therapeutic has been successfully developed to date. Here, we introduce an in vivo system, based on a β-lactamase tripartite fusion construct, capable of identifying aggregation-prone sequences in the periplasm of Escherichia coli and inhibitors that prevent their aberrant self-assembly. We demonstrate the power of the system using a range of proteins, from small unstructured peptides (islet amyloid polypeptide and amyloid β) to larger, folded immunoglobulin domains. Configured in a 48-well format, the split β-lactamase sensor readily differentiates between aggregation-prone and soluble sequences. Performing the assay in the presence of 109 compounds enabled a rank ordering of inhibition and revealed a new inhibitor of IAPP aggregation. This platform can be applied to both amyloidogenic and other aggregation-prone systems, independent of sequence or size, and can identify small molecules or other factors able to ameliorate or inhibit protein aggregation. PMID:26656088

  9. An in vivo platform for identifying inhibitors of protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Janet C; Young, Lydia M; Mahood, Rachel A; Jackson, Matthew P; Revill, Charlotte H; Foster, Richard J; Smith, D Alastair; Ashcroft, Alison E; Brockwell, David J; Radford, Sheena E

    2016-02-01

    Protein aggregation underlies an array of human diseases, yet only one small-molecule therapeutic targeting this process has been successfully developed to date. Here, we introduce an in vivo system, based on a β-lactamase tripartite fusion construct, that is capable of identifying aggregation-prone sequences in the periplasm of Escherichia coli and inhibitors that prevent their aberrant self-assembly. We demonstrate the power of the system using a range of proteins, from small unstructured peptides (islet amyloid polypeptide and amyloid β) to larger, folded immunoglobulin domains. Configured in a 48-well format, the split β-lactamase sensor readily differentiates between aggregation-prone and soluble sequences. Performing the assay in the presence of 109 compounds enabled a rank ordering of inhibition and revealed a new inhibitor of islet amyloid polypeptide aggregation. This platform can be applied to both amyloidogenic and other aggregation-prone systems, independent of sequence or size, and can identify small molecules or other factors able to ameliorate or inhibit protein aggregation. PMID:26656088

  10. Fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia and maternal intravenous immunoglobulin infusion

    PubMed Central

    Giers, Günther; Wenzel, Folker; Stockschläder, Markus; Riethmacher, Regina; Lorenz, Horst; Tutschek, Boris

    2010-01-01

    Background Different therapeutic approaches have been used in fetal-neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, but many centers administer immunoglobulin G infusions to the pregnant woman. We studied the effect of maternal antenatal immunoglobulin infusions on fetal platelet counts in pregnancies with fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia. Design and Methods We retrospectively analyzed the clinical courses of fetuses with fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia whose mothers were treated with immunoglobulin G infusions in a single center between 1999 and 2005. In a center-specific protocol, weekly maternal immunoglobulin G infusions were given to 25 pregnant women with previously affected neonates and four women with strong platelet antibodies, but no previous history of fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia; before each infusion diagnostic fetal blood sampling was performed to determine fetal platelet counts and immunoglobulin G levels. Results There were 30 fetuses with fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, confirmed by initial fetal blood sampling showing fetal platelet counts between 4×109/L and 130×109/L and antibody-coated fetal platelets using a glycoprotein specific assay. Despite weekly antenatal maternal immunoglobulin G infusions fetal platelet counts did not change significantly. Maternal and fetal immunoglobulin G levels, measured before every infusion, increased significantly with the number of maternal immunoglobulin G infusions. Conclusions In this group of fetuses with fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia no consistent increase of fetal platelets was achieved as a result of regular maternal immunoglobulin G infusions. PMID:20534698

  11. Hydrometer test for estimation of immunoglobulin concentration in bovine colostrum.

    PubMed

    Fleenor, W A; Stott, G H

    1980-06-01

    A practical field method for measuring immunoglobulin concentration in bovine colostrum has been developed from the linear relationship between colostral specific gravity and immunoglobulin concentration. Fourteen colostrums were collected within 24 h postpartum from nursed and unnursed cows and were assayed for specific gravity and major colostral constituents. Additionally, 15 colostrums were collected immediately postpartum prior to suckling and assayed for specific gravity and immunoglobulin concentration. Regression analysis provided an equation to estimate colostral immunoglobulin concentration from the specific gravity of fresh whole colostrum. From this, a colostrometer was developed for practical field use.

  12. Secondary hypogammaglobulinemia in Waldmann's disease treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Patuzzo, G; Tinazzi, E; Micheletti, M; Puccetti, A; Lunardi, C

    2016-03-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is rare disorder characterized by congenital malformation or obstruction of intestinal lymphatic drainage; it is responsible for protein losing enteropathy leading to lymphopenia, hypoalbuminemia and hypogammaglobulinemia. A low-fat diet associated with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation is the cornerstone of PIL management. The administration of intravenous immunoglobulins does not always lead to satisfactory plasma levels and therefore the replacement therapy with immunoglobulins is controversial. We describe here the case of a patient with PIL and severe hypogammaglobulinemia treated with immunoglobulins. The striking aspect of this case is the clinical and serological benefit obtained with the subcutaneous compared to the intravenous immunoglobulins administration. PMID:26934740

  13. Hydrometer test for estimation of immunoglobulin concentration in bovine colostrum.

    PubMed

    Fleenor, W A; Stott, G H

    1980-06-01

    A practical field method for measuring immunoglobulin concentration in bovine colostrum has been developed from the linear relationship between colostral specific gravity and immunoglobulin concentration. Fourteen colostrums were collected within 24 h postpartum from nursed and unnursed cows and were assayed for specific gravity and major colostral constituents. Additionally, 15 colostrums were collected immediately postpartum prior to suckling and assayed for specific gravity and immunoglobulin concentration. Regression analysis provided an equation to estimate colostral immunoglobulin concentration from the specific gravity of fresh whole colostrum. From this, a colostrometer was developed for practical field use. PMID:7400425

  14. Reduced Subvisible Particle Formation in Lyophilized Intravenous Immunoglobulin Formulations Containing Polysorbate 20.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chen; Qi, Wei; Lewis, E Neil; Randolph, Theodore W; Carpenter, John F

    2016-08-01

    The first goal of this study was to determine the effects of the surface fraction of protein in lyophilized formulations of intravenous immunoglobulin on protein stability during long-term storage. We attempted to modulate surface fraction by either including polysorbate 20 (PS20) in the formulation or performing pre-drying annealing during lyophilization, but neither approach reduced surface fraction. Our second goal was to study the effects of formulation and processing conditions on protein aggregation and subvisible particle formation. If formulations were reconstituted immediately after lyophilization, protein aggregation detected by size exclusion chromatography was insignificant. However, with the higher resolution of damage afforded by subvisible particle analysis, it was found that high levels of particles were produced in the formulation containing trehalose and that the presence of PS20 greatly reduced particle concentrations. Size exclusion chromatography analysis showed that in formulations without trehalose during storage for 16 weeks at 50°C, there was loss of monomer and a concomitant increase in aggregates. In formulations containing trehalose there were no significant increases in aggregation or subvisible particle levels. Finally, we observed that inclusion of PS20 in the water used to reconstitute lyophilized formulations without PS20 reduced the formation of protein particles; documenting that protection by the surfactant occurred during reconstitution as well as during lyophilization. PMID:27290624

  15. Immunoglobulin Fc gamma receptor promotes immunoglobulin uptake, immunoglobulin-mediated calcium increase, and neurotransmitter release in motor neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohamed, Habib A.; Mosier, Dennis R.; Zou, Ling L.; Siklos, Laszlo; Alexianu, Maria E.; Engelhardt, Jozsef I.; Beers, David R.; Le, Wei-dong; Appel, Stanley H.

    2002-01-01

    Receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (IgG; FcgammaRs) facilitate IgG uptake by effector cells as well as cellular responses initiated by IgG binding. In earlier studies, we demonstrated that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patient IgG can be taken up by motor neuron terminals and transported retrogradely to the cell body and can alter the function of neuromuscular synapses, such as increasing intracellular calcium and spontaneous transmitter release from motor axon terminals after passive transfer. In the present study, we examined whether FcgammaR-mediated processes can contribute to these effects of ALS patient immunoglobulins. F(ab')(2) fragments (which lack the Fc portion) of ALS patient IgG were not taken up by motor axon terminals and were not retrogradely transported. Furthermore, in a genetically modified mouse lacking the gamma subunit of the FcR, the uptake of whole ALS IgG and its ability to enhance intracellular calcium and acetylcholine release were markedly attenuated. These data suggest that FcgammaRs appear to participate in IgG uptake into motor neurons as well as IgG-mediated increases in intracellular calcium and acetylcholine release from motor axon terminals. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Aggregations in Flatworms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liffen, C. L.; Hunter, M.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a school project to investigate aggregations in flatworms which may be influenced by light intensity, temperature, and some form of chemical stimulus released by already aggregating flatworms. Such investigations could be adopted to suit many educational levels of science laboratory activities. (DS)

  17. [Dermatomyositis and Panniculitis: the function of immunoglobulins].

    PubMed

    Abdelhafidh, Nadia Ben; Toujeni, Sana; Kefi, Asma; Bousetta, Najeh; Sayhi, Sameh; Gharsallah, Imen; Othmani, Salah

    2016-01-01

    Panniculitis is an inflammatory disease of subcutaneous adipose tissue which is rarely associated with dermatomyositis. It can occur before, after or simultaneously with muscle damage. In most cases, the evolution of panniculitis and of other dermatomyositis affections is favorable with corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressants. We report the case of a 48 year-old patient who developed panniculitis lesions 2 months before having muscular signs. Skin involvement was resistant to corticosteroid treatment associated with immunosuppressants drugs. This led to the use of polyvalent immunoglobulin treatment improving both skin and muscle damage. PMID:27516827

  18. 21 CFR 866.5530 - Immunoglobulin G (Fc fragment specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... immunoglobulin G (resulting from breakdown of immunoglobulin G antibodies) in urine, serum, and other body fluids. Measurement of immunoglobulin G Fc fragments aids in the diagnosis of plasma cell...

  19. The immunoglobulins of cold-blooded vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Pettinello, Rita; Dooley, Helen

    2014-11-24

    Although lymphocyte-like cells secreting somatically-recombining receptors have been identified in the jawless fishes (hagfish and lamprey), the cartilaginous fishes (sharks, skates, rays and chimaera) are the most phylogenetically distant group relative to mammals in which bona fide immunoglobulins (Igs) have been found. Studies of the antibodies and humoral immune responses of cartilaginous fishes and other cold-blooded vertebrates (bony fishes, amphibians and reptiles) are not only revealing information about the emergence and roles of the different Ig heavy and light chain isotypes, but also the evolution of specialised adaptive features such as isotype switching, somatic hypermutation and affinity maturation. It is becoming increasingly apparent that while the adaptive immune response in these vertebrate lineages arose a long time ago, it is most definitely not primitive and has evolved to become complex and sophisticated. This review will summarise what is currently known about the immunoglobulins of cold-blooded vertebrates and highlight the differences, and commonalities, between these and more "conventional" mammalian species.

  20. Autoantibodies and immunoglobulins among atomic bomb survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Saeko; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Kodama, Kazunori; Shimaoka, Katsutaro; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Carter, R.L.; Yamakido, Michio

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if exposure to atomic bomb radiation affects immune responsiveness, such as the occurrence of autoantibodies and levels of immunoglobulins. Rheumatoid factor, antinuclear antibody, antithyroglobulin antibody, anti-thyroid-microsomal antibody and immunoglobulin levels (IgG, IgM, IgA and IgE) were measured among 2,061 individuals exposed to atomic bomb radiation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki whose estimated doses ranged from 0 to 5.6 Gy. The prevalence and titers of rheumatoid factor were found to be increased in the individuals exposed to higher radiation doses. The IgA level in females and the IgM level in both sexes increased as radiation dose increased, although the effects of radiation exposure were not large. No effect of radiation was found on the prevalence of antinuclear antibody, antithyroglobulin antibody and anti-thyroid-microsomal antibody or on the levels of IgG and IgE. 32 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. The immunoglobulins of cold-blooded vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Pettinello, Rita; Dooley, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Although lymphocyte-like cells secreting somatically-recombining receptors have been identified in the jawless fishes (hagfish and lamprey), the cartilaginous fishes (sharks, skates, rays and chimaera) are the most phylogenetically distant group relative to mammals in which bona fide immunoglobulins (Igs) have been found. Studies of the antibodies and humoral immune responses of cartilaginous fishes and other cold-blooded vertebrates (bony fishes, amphibians and reptiles) are not only revealing information about the emergence and roles of the different Ig heavy and light chain isotypes, but also the evolution of specialised adaptive features such as isotype switching, somatic hypermutation and affinity maturation. It is becoming increasingly apparent that while the adaptive immune response in these vertebrate lineages arose a long time ago, it is most definitely not primitive and has evolved to become complex and sophisticated. This review will summarise what is currently known about the immunoglobulins of cold-blooded vertebrates and highlight the differences, and commonalities, between these and more "conventional" mammalian species. PMID:25427250

  2. Immunoglobulin synthesis in primary and myeloma amyloidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Preud'homme, J L; Ganeval, D; Grünfeld, J P; Striker, L; Brouet, J C

    1988-01-01

    Bone marrow cells from 14 patients with primary amyloidosis and two patients with myeloma amyloidosis were studied by immunofluorescence and biosynthesis experiments after incorporation of radioactive amino acids. Cells from four patients affected with non-myeloma secondary amyloidosis were also studied as controls. In primary amyloidosis, monoclonal plasma cell populations were demonstrated by immunofluorescence in virtually every case, even in patients without serum and urine monoclonal immunoglobulin and with a normal percentage of bone marrow plasma cells. Biosynthesis experiments showed the secretion of large amounts of free light chains, most often of the lambda type, in every primary or myeloma amyloidosis case and the presence of light chain fragments in almost all cases. Special features in certain patients were the synthesis of short gamma chains (two cases), assembly block at the HL half molecule level of a monoclonal IgA (one case) and secretion of decameric abnormally large kappa chains (one case). This is in contrast with non-myelomatous secondary amyloidosis where the distribution of bone marrow plasma cells was normal by immunofluorescence and where normal sized immunoglobulins were synthesized, without free light chain secretion and fragments. These data confirm that primary amyloidosis belongs to plasma cell dyscrasias and emphasize the role of free light chains and light chain fragments in the pathogenesis of amyloid deposition. PMID:3145161

  3. The Immunoglobulins of Cold-Blooded Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Pettinello, Rita; Dooley, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Although lymphocyte-like cells secreting somatically-recombining receptors have been identified in the jawless fishes (hagfish and lamprey), the cartilaginous fishes (sharks, skates, rays and chimaera) are the most phylogenetically distant group relative to mammals in which bona fide immunoglobulins (Igs) have been found. Studies of the antibodies and humoral immune responses of cartilaginous fishes and other cold-blooded vertebrates (bony fishes, amphibians and reptiles) are not only revealing information about the emergence and roles of the different Ig heavy and light chain isotypes, but also the evolution of specialised adaptive features such as isotype switching, somatic hypermutation and affinity maturation. It is becoming increasingly apparent that while the adaptive immune response in these vertebrate lineages arose a long time ago, it is most definitely not primitive and has evolved to become complex and sophisticated. This review will summarise what is currently known about the immunoglobulins of cold-blooded vertebrates and highlight the differences, and commonalities, between these and more “conventional” mammalian species. PMID:25427250

  4. [Carbohydrate component of immunoglobulin G in cattle suffering from leukosis].

    PubMed

    Meged', E F; Korotkoruchko, V P; Radionov, N T

    1982-01-01

    No essential differences are found in the composition and total amount of carbohydrates in the studied preparations of the immunoglobulin G subfraction in cattle suffering from leucosis and of the immunoglobulin G subfraction, identical in evolution, in healthy animals. It is shown that the main mass of carbohydrates is connected with Fc-fragment and heavy chains of the protein under study. PMID:7135515

  5. Development of immunoglobulin and antibody-synthesizing cells after immunization with different doses of antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Antoine, J C; Petit, C; Avrameas, S

    1976-01-01

    The kinetics of development of antibody-synthesizing cells and of cells synthesizing immunoglobulins without detectable antibody function were studied in rats immunized with different doses (0-1, 1, 10, 100 mg) of horse radish peroxidase, bovine serum albumin, human serum albumin, hen ovalbumin, or human IgG, which had been deaggregated or heat-aggregated. Each antigen was injected once or twice as a solution in saline. Antibody and immunoglobulin-producing cells were detected in draining lymph nodes by immunohistochemical staining. In the primary response a few antibody-synthesizing cells were found whatever the dose injected. No increase or some increase was found with the amount of antigen injected, according to the protein used, but with all doses of antigen injected, the population of cells remained small, except with human IgG where a relatively high number of positive cells was detected even after injection of 1 mg of antigen. In the secondary response a few antibody-forming cells were also detected with the lower doses of antigen, but this population increased after boosting with 100 mg of antigen. With human IgG a greater number of positive cells was induced withall the doses tested. A correlation between the number of cells synthesizing immunoglobulins without antibody function and the amount of antigen injected was observed in the primary and secondary responses. The relative size of these two populations varied with the stage of immunity of the animals. In the primary response, the population of cells synthesizing immunoglobulins without antibody function was larger than the population of antibody-forming cells. The same was true in the secondary response, but if after a booster injection the level of antibody-synthesizing cells exceeded that reached in the primary response, the increase of cells synthesizing Ig without antibody function was smaller than the increase in antibody-forming cells. In general the more immunogenic an antigen was, the smaller

  6. Aggregate and the environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, William H.; Drew, Lawrence J.; Sachs, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    This book is designed to help you understand our aggregate resources-their importance, where they come from, how they are processed for our use, the environmental concerns related to their mining and processing, how those concerns are addressed, and the policies and regulations designed to safeguard workers, neighbors, and the environment from the negative impacts of aggregate mining. We hope this understanding will help prepare you to be involved in decisions that need to be made-individually and as a society-to be good stewards of our aggregate resources and our living planet.

  7. New Regulatory Roles of Galectin-3 in High-Affinity IgE Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bambouskova, Monika; Polakovicova, Iva; Halova, Ivana; Goel, Gautam; Draberova, Lubica; Bugajev, Viktor; Doan, Aivi; Utekal, Pavol; Gardet, Agnes; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2016-01-01

    Aggregation of the high-affinity receptor for IgE (FcεRI) in mast cells initiates activation events that lead to degranulation and release of inflammatory mediators. To better understand the signaling pathways and genes involved in mast cell activation, we developed a high-throughput mast cell degranulation assay suitable for RNA interference experiments using lentivirus-based short hairpin RNA (shRNA) delivery. We tested 432 shRNAs specific for 144 selected genes for effects on FcεRI-mediated mast cell degranulation and identified 15 potential regulators. In further studies, we focused on galectin-3 (Gal3), identified in this study as a negative regulator of mast cell degranulation. FcεRI-activated cells with Gal3 knockdown exhibited upregulated tyrosine phosphorylation of spleen tyrosine kinase and several other signal transduction molecules and enhanced calcium response. We show that Gal3 promotes internalization of IgE-FcεRI complexes; this may be related to our finding that Gal3 is a positive regulator of FcεRI ubiquitination. Furthermore, we found that Gal3 facilitates mast cell adhesion and motility on fibronectin but negatively regulates antigen-induced chemotaxis. The combined data indicate that Gal3 is involved in both positive and negative regulation of FcεRI-mediated signaling events in mast cells. PMID:26929198

  8. Neurodegeneration in mice resulting from loss of functional selenoprotein P or its receptor apolipoprotein E receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Valentine, William M; Abel, Ty W; Hill, Kristina E; Austin, Lori M; Burk, Raymond F

    2008-01-01

    Selenoprotein P (Sepp1) is involved in selenium homeostasis. Mice with a deletion of Sepp1, replacement of it by the shortened form Sepp1(Delta240-361), or deletion of its receptor apolipoprotein E receptor 2 develop severe neurologic dysfunction when fed low-selenium diet. Because the brainstems of Sepp1(-/-) mice had been observed to contain degenerated axons, a study of these 3 strains was made under selenium-deficient and high-selenium (control) conditions. Selenium-deficient wild-type mice were additional controls. Serial sections of the brain were evaluated with amino cupric silver degeneration and anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein stains. All 3 strains with altered Sepp1 metabolism developed severe axonal injury when fed selenium deficient diet. This injury was mitigated by high-selenium diet and was absent from selenium-deficient wild-type mice. Injury was most severe in Sepp1(-/-) mice, with staining in at least 6 brain regions. Injury in Sepp1(Delta240-361) and apolipoprotein E receptor 2 mice was less severe and occurred only in areas injured in Sepp1(-/-) mice, suggesting a common selenium-related etiology. Affected brain regions were primarily associated with auditory and motor functions, consistent with the clinical signs. Those areas have high metabolic rates. We conclude that interference with Sepp1 function damages auditory and motor areas, at least in part by restricting selenium supply to the brain regions. PMID:18172410

  9. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  10. Cell aggregation and sedimentation.

    PubMed

    Davis, R H

    1995-01-01

    The aggregation of cells into clumps or flocs has been exploited for decades in such applications as biological wastewater treatment, beer brewing, antibiotic fermentation, and enhanced sedimentation to aid in cell recovery or retention. More recent research has included the use of cell aggregation and sedimentation to selectively separate subpopulations of cells. Potential biotechnological applications include overcoming contamination, maintaining plasmid-bearing cells in continuous fermentors, and selectively removing nonviable hybridoma cells from perfusion cultures.

  11. The Biology of Intestinal Immunoglobulin A Responses

    PubMed Central

    Cerutti, Andrea; Rescigno, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The gut mucosa is exposed to a large community of commensal bacteria that are required for the processing of nutrients and the education of the local immune system. Conversely, the gut immune system generates innate and adaptive responses that shape the composition of the local microbiota. One striking feature of intestinal adaptive immunity is its ability to generate massive amounts of noninflammatory immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies through multiple follicular and extrafollicular pathways that operate in the presence or absence of cognate T-B cell interactions. Here we discuss the role of intestinal IgA in host-commensal mutualism, immune protection, and tolerance and summarize recent advances on the role of innate immune cells in intestinal IgA production. PMID:18549797

  12. Immunoglobulin Responses at the Mucosal Interface

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kang; Chorny, Alejo

    2011-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces are colonized by large communities of commensal bacteria and represent the primary site of entry for pathogenic agents. To prevent microbial intrusion, mucosal B cells release large amounts of immunoglobulin (Ig) molecules through multiple follicular and extrafollicular pathways. IgA is the most abundant antibody isotype in mucosal secretions and owes its success in frontline immunity to its ability to undergo transcytosis across epithelial cells. In addition to translocating IgA onto the mucosal surface, epithelial cells educate the mucosal immune system as to the composition of the local microbiota and instruct B cells to initiate IgA responses that generate immune protection while preserving immune homeostasis. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the cellular interactions and signaling pathways governing IgA production at mucosal surfaces and discuss new findings on the regulation and function of mucosal IgD, the most enigmatic isotype of our mucosal antibody repertoire. PMID:21219173

  13. Rheumatoid factors, B cells and immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Jefferis, R

    1995-04-01

    The paradigm of self, non-self discrimination in the immune system is under review as autoreactive B or T cells are increasingly delineated within normal individuals. The products of autoreactive B cells are, mostly, polyspecific IgM antibodies of low affinity. These 'natural' antibodies include rheumatoid factors (RF) encoded by unmutated germline immunoglobulin genes. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the RF may be of the IgM, IgG or IgA isotype, show evidence of somatic mutation and have increased affinity; consistent with maturation of an antigen driven immune response. This response could be initiated or driven by an auto-immunogenic form of IgG or an exogenous cross-reactive antigen. Changes in galactosylation of IgG have been reported to be a valuable diagnostic and prognostic indicator in RA. Speculation that these changes may precipitate some of the disease processes is critically reviewed.

  14. Immunoglobulin allotypes in Ecuadorian Cayapa Indians.

    PubMed

    Kron, M A; Gately, L; Pandey, J P; Jurado, M H; Rumbea Guzman, J

    1994-05-01

    Indigenous Indian groups comprise approximately 20% of Ecuador's population, the third largest percentage in all of Central or South America, yet immunogenetic data on these groups are lacking in the literature. In the course of population migration studies, sera collected from 65 Ecuadorians living in the northern province of Esmeraldas were typed for six GM and two KM markers. The study population consisted of 47 Cayapa Indians and 18 blacks of African origin, descendants of slaves imported into the area during the seventeenth century. The Cayapa demonstrated three GM phenotypes, two of which are common to other South American Indian tribes. The frequency of KM1 positive Cayapa Indians (63%) is similar to other South American Indian tribes, but is significantly greater than the Huaorani of eastern Ecuador (2%), the only other Ecuadorian Indian group for whom limited immunoglobulin allotype data are available (chi 2 = 35.8, P < 0.0001). PMID:8168827

  15. Immunoglobulin double-isotype expression by trans-mRNA in a human immunoglobulin transgenic mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, A; Nussenzweig, M C; Mizuta, T R; Leder, P; Honjo, T

    1989-01-01

    We have studied immunoglobulin double-isotype expression in a transgenic mouse (TG.SA) in which expression of the endogenous immunoglobulin heavy chain locus is almost completely excluded by a nonallelic rearranged human mu transgene. By flow-cytometric analyses, we have shown that a small, but significant, portion (about 4%) of transgenic spleen cells expresses human mu (transgene) and mouse gamma (endogenous) chains when cultured in vitro with bacterial lipopolysaccharide and interleukin 4. By using amplification of cDNA by the polymerase chain reaction, followed by cloning and sequencing of the amplified cDNA fragment, we have demonstrated expression of trans-mRNA consisting of the transgenic variable and endogenous constant (gamma 1) region sequences. Such trans-mRNA could be produced by either switch recombination or trans-splicing between the transgene and endogenous sterile gamma 1-gene transcripts. These results indicate that trans-splicing might be a possible mechanism for the immunoglobulin double-isotype expression in normal B lymphocytes that have not rearranged the second expressed constant region gene. Images PMID:2510157

  16. Gene conversion in human rearranged immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Darlow, John M; Stott, David I

    2006-07-01

    Over the past 20 years, many DNA sequences have been published suggesting that all or part of the V(H) segment of a rearranged immunoglobulin gene may be replaced in vivo. Two different mechanisms appear to be operating. One of these is very similar to primary V(D)J recombination, involving the RAG proteins acting upon recombination signal sequences, and this has recently been proven to occur. Other sequences, many of which show partial V(H) replacements with no addition of untemplated nucleotides at the V(H)-V(H) joint, have been proposed to occur by an unusual RAG-mediated recombination with the formation of hybrid (coding-to-signal) joints. These appear to occur in cells already undergoing somatic hypermutation in which, some authors are convinced, RAG genes are silenced. We recently proposed that the latter type of V(H) replacement might occur by homologous recombination initiated by the activity of AID (activation-induced cytidine deaminase), which is essential for somatic hypermutation and gene conversion. The latter has been observed in other species, but not in human Ig genes, so far. In this paper, we present a new analysis of sequences published as examples of the second type of rearrangement. This not only shows that AID recognition motifs occur in recombination regions but also that some sequences show replacement of central sections by a sequence from another gene, similar to gene conversion in the immunoglobulin genes of other species. These observations support the proposal that this type of rearrangement is likely to be AID-mediated rather than RAG-mediated and is consistent with gene conversion.

  17. Fibronectin Aggregation and Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Tomoo; Erickson, Harold P.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of fibronectin (FN) assembly and the self-association sites are still unclear and contradictory, although the N-terminal 70-kDa region (I1–9) is commonly accepted as one of the assembly sites. We previously found that I1–9 binds to superfibronectin, which is an artificial FN aggregate induced by anastellin. In the present study, we found that I1–9 bound to the aggregate formed by anastellin and a small FN fragment, III1–2. An engineered disulfide bond in III2, which stabilizes folding, inhibited aggregation, but a disulfide bond in III1 did not. A gelatin precipitation assay showed that I1–9 did not interact with anastellin, III1, III2, III1–2, or several III1–2 mutants including III1–2KADA. (In contrast to previous studies, we found that the III1–2KADA mutant was identical in conformation to wild-type III1–2.) Because I1–9 only bound to the aggregate and the unfolding of III2 played a role in aggregation, we generated a III2 domain that was destabilized by deletion of the G strand. This mutant bound I1–9 as shown by the gelatin precipitation assay and fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis, and it inhibited FN matrix assembly when added to cell culture. Next, we introduced disulfide mutations into full-length FN. Three disulfide locks in III2, III3, and III11 were required to dramatically reduce anastellin-induced aggregation. When we tested the disulfide mutants in cell culture, only the disulfide bond in III2 reduced the FN matrix. These results suggest that the unfolding of III2 is one of the key factors for FN aggregation and assembly. PMID:21949131

  18. Effect of zinc supplementation on mycospecific immunoglobulins in tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Dipak Kumar; Maity, Chitta Ranjan; Nag, Debabrata

    2010-02-01

    The effect of zinc supplementation on the serum level of IgA, IgG, IgM mycospecific immunoglobulins in tuberculosis patients alongwith normal control and disease control subjects were studied. It was observed that with antituberculous drugs for one month (without zinc supplementation), the serum level of immunoglobulins in tuberculosis subjects although decreased significantly, but with zinc supplementation along with antituberculous drugs for one month the decrease in the level of immunoglobulins in serum was more significant. This may be attributed to the effect of zinc supplementation favouring the normal compartmentalisation state of iron and also to the immunomodulatory effect of zinc.

  19. Association of CD2 with fibrinogen in human plasma: depletion of the soluble E-receptor in blood clotting.

    PubMed

    Smorodin, Eugeniy P; Kurtenkov, O A; Shevchuk, I N

    2007-01-01

    The soluble E-receptor (SER) of lymphocytes that is related to CD2 was detected in human plasma and serum using immunoelectrophoresis with sheep antiserum. All plasma samples (n=18) demonstrated reactivity with antiserum, whereas the reactivity of the corresponding sera remained low or undetectable. The depletion of SER in clotting is associated with fibrinogen, as shown by crossed-affinity immunoelectrophoresis with antisera to plasma proteins. The SER-associated fibrinogen was purified and analysed by the SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. A band close to 66 kDa was detected with monoclonal antibodies to CD2. The association of CD2 and other soluble receptors with fibrinogen via domains is suggested. It is recommended that the fresh plasma, not serum, should be used to study circulating receptors because coagulation may appreciably diminish their physiological level in blood samples.

  20. Technology meets aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.; Swan, C.

    2007-07-01

    New technology carried out at Tufts University and the University of Massachusetts on synthetic lightweight aggregate has created material from various qualities of fly ash from coal-fired power plants for use in different engineered applications. In pilot scale manufacturing tests an 'SLA' containing 80% fly ash and 20% mixed plastic waste from packaging was produced by 'dry blending' mixed plastic with high carbon fly ash. A trial run was completed to produce concrete masonry unit (CMU) blocks at a full-scale facility. It has been shown that SLA can be used as a partial substitution of a traditional stone aggregate in hot asphalt mix. 1 fig., 2 photos.

  1. Rabbit anti-rabies immunoglobulins production and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinjian; Liu, Qiongqiong; Feng, Xiaomin; Tang, Qi; Wang, Zhongcan; Li, Suqing; Feng, Zhenqing; Zhu, Jin; Guan, Xiaohong

    2011-04-01

    Due to the disadvantages of human and equine rabies immunoglobulin, it is necessary to develop a substitute for HRIG and ERIG, especially for those people living in the developing countries. Because of higher affinity and lower immunogenicity of rabbit's immunoglobulins, anti-rabies immunoglobulins specific to rabies virus were produced in rabbits as a bioreactor, and had been characterized by ELISA, affinity assay, immunofluorescence assay (IFA), immunocytochemistry, rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). ELISA, affinity assay and IFA showed that rabbit RIG (RRIG) bound specifically to rabies virions. RFFIT result showed that RRIG has neutralization activity. This result was confirmed in vivo in a Kunming mouse challenge model and the protection rate of the treatment with RRIG was higher (25%) than that offered by HRIG when mice were challenged with a lethal RV dose. Our results demonstrate that RRIG is safe and efficacious as a candidate drug to replace rabies immunoglobulin in post-exposure prophylaxis.

  2. The molecular basis of somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Storb, U

    1996-04-01

    Somatic hypermutation amplifies the variable region repertoire of immunoglobulin genes. Recent experimental evidence has thrown light on various molecular models of somatic hypermutation. A link between somatic hypermutation and transcription coupled DNA repair is shaping up.

  3. Shared epitopes of avian immunoglobulin light chains.

    PubMed

    Benčina, Mateja; Cizelj, Ivanka; Berčič, Rebeka Lucijana; Narat, Mojca; Benčina, Dušan; Dovč, Peter

    2014-04-15

    Like all jawed vertebrates, birds (Aves) also produce antibodies i.e. immunoglobulins (Igs) as a defence mechanism against pathogens. Their Igs are composed of two identical heavy (H) and light (L) chains which are of lambda isotype. The L chain consists of variable (VL), joining (JL) and constant (CL) region. Using enzyme immunoassays (EIA) and two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) (3C10 and CH31) to chicken L chain, we analysed their cross-reactivity with sera from 33 avian species belonging to nine different orders. Among Galliformes tested, mAbs 3C10 and CH31 reacted with L chains of chicken, turkey, four genera of pheasants, tragopan and peafowl, but not with sera of grey partridge, quail and Japanese quail. Immunoglobulins of guinea-fowl reacted only with mAb 3C10. Both mAbs reacted also with the L chain of Eurasian griffon (order Falconiformes) and domestic sparrow (order Passeriformes). Sera from six other orders of Aves did not react with either of the two mAbs. EIA using mAbs 3C10 and CH31 enabled detection of antibodies to major avian pathogens in sera of chickens, turkeys, pheasants, peafowl, Eurasian griffon and guinea-fowl (only with mAb 3C10). The N-terminal amino acid sequence of pheasant L chain (19 residues) was identical to that of chicken. Sequences of genes encoding the L chain constant regions of pheasants, turkey and partridge were determined and deposited in the public database (GenBank accession numbers: FJ 649651, FJ 649652 and FJ 649653, respectively). Among them, amino acid sequence of pheasants is the most similar to that of chicken (97% similarity), whereas those of turkey and partridge have greater similarity to each other (89%) than to any other avian L chain sequence. The characteristic deletion of two amino acids which is present in the L chain constant region in Galliformes has been most likely introduced to their L chain after their divergence from Anseriformes.

  4. Shared epitopes of avian immunoglobulin light chains.

    PubMed

    Benčina, Mateja; Cizelj, Ivanka; Berčič, Rebeka Lucijana; Narat, Mojca; Benčina, Dušan; Dovč, Peter

    2014-04-15

    Like all jawed vertebrates, birds (Aves) also produce antibodies i.e. immunoglobulins (Igs) as a defence mechanism against pathogens. Their Igs are composed of two identical heavy (H) and light (L) chains which are of lambda isotype. The L chain consists of variable (VL), joining (JL) and constant (CL) region. Using enzyme immunoassays (EIA) and two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) (3C10 and CH31) to chicken L chain, we analysed their cross-reactivity with sera from 33 avian species belonging to nine different orders. Among Galliformes tested, mAbs 3C10 and CH31 reacted with L chains of chicken, turkey, four genera of pheasants, tragopan and peafowl, but not with sera of grey partridge, quail and Japanese quail. Immunoglobulins of guinea-fowl reacted only with mAb 3C10. Both mAbs reacted also with the L chain of Eurasian griffon (order Falconiformes) and domestic sparrow (order Passeriformes). Sera from six other orders of Aves did not react with either of the two mAbs. EIA using mAbs 3C10 and CH31 enabled detection of antibodies to major avian pathogens in sera of chickens, turkeys, pheasants, peafowl, Eurasian griffon and guinea-fowl (only with mAb 3C10). The N-terminal amino acid sequence of pheasant L chain (19 residues) was identical to that of chicken. Sequences of genes encoding the L chain constant regions of pheasants, turkey and partridge were determined and deposited in the public database (GenBank accession numbers: FJ 649651, FJ 649652 and FJ 649653, respectively). Among them, amino acid sequence of pheasants is the most similar to that of chicken (97% similarity), whereas those of turkey and partridge have greater similarity to each other (89%) than to any other avian L chain sequence. The characteristic deletion of two amino acids which is present in the L chain constant region in Galliformes has been most likely introduced to their L chain after their divergence from Anseriformes. PMID:24603015

  5. Efficacy and tolerability of 16% subcutaneous immunoglobulin compared with 20% subcutaneous immunoglobulin in primary antibody deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Niebur, H B; Duff, C M; Shear, G F; Nguyen, D; Alberdi, T K; Dorsey, M J; Sleasman, J W

    2015-01-01

    Multiple subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) products are available to treat primary antibody deficiency (PAD). The efficacy and tolerability of 16% SCIG (Vivaglobin®) was compared with 20% SCIG (Hizentra®) in PAD subjects. The study was a prospective, single-centre, open-label study of PAD subjects transitioning Vivaglobin to equivalent Hizentra doses, rounded to the nearest vial size. Comparisons included immunoglobulin (Ig)G levels; tetanus, varicella and Streptococcus pneumoniae titres; adverse events (AEs), annual infection rate and quality of life during 8 weeks of Vivaglobin and 24 weeks of Hizentra. Thirty-two subjects (aged 2–75 years) participated. Rounding to the nearest Hizentra vial size resulted in a 12·8% (± 2·9%) increase in SCIG dose. Median immunoglobulin (Ig)G level following 8 weeks of Vivaglobin was similar to 24 weeks of Hizentra (1050 versus 1035 mg/dl, respectively; P = 0·77). Both products had similar protective titres to tetanus, varicella and serotypes of S. pneumoniae, which were variable but well above protective levels. After 12 weeks of Hizentra, subjects reported fewer local site reactions compared with Vivaglobin. Switching products resulted in increased systemic AEs in some subjects but, overall, not significantly higher than during Vivaglobin treatment. Average infusion time decreased from 104·7 min (3·3 sites) with Vivaglobin to 70·7 min (2·2 sites) with Hizentra (P = 0·0005). Acute serious bacterial infections were similar. Treatment satisfaction was superior with Hizentra. Hizentra and Vivaglobin have similar pharmacokinetics and efficacy. Although transition to a different SCIG product initially increased AEs, Hizentra is well tolerated and can be infused more rapidly and with fewer sites compared to Vivaglobin. PMID:25761372

  6. Efficacy and tolerability of 16% subcutaneous immunoglobulin compared with 20% subcutaneous immunoglobulin in primary antibody deficiency.

    PubMed

    Niebur, H B; Duff, C M; Shear, G F; Nguyen, D; Alberdi, T K; Dorsey, M J; Sleasman, J W

    2015-09-01

    Multiple subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) products are available to treat primary antibody deficiency (PAD). The efficacy and tolerability of 16% SCIG (Vivaglobin(®) ) was compared with 20% SCIG (Hizentra(®) ) in PAD subjects. The study was a prospective, single-centre, open-label study of PAD subjects transitioning Vivaglobin to equivalent Hizentra doses, rounded to the nearest vial size. Comparisons included immunoglobulin (Ig)G levels; tetanus, varicella and Streptococcus pneumoniae titres; adverse events (AEs), annual infection rate and quality of life during 8 weeks of Vivaglobin and 24 weeks of Hizentra. Thirty-two subjects (aged 2-75 years) participated. Rounding to the nearest Hizentra vial size resulted in a 12·8% (± 2·9%) increase in SCIG dose. Median immunoglobulin (Ig)G level following 8 weeks of Vivaglobin was similar to 24 weeks of Hizentra (1050 versus 1035 mg/dl, respectively; P = 0·77). Both products had similar protective titres to tetanus, varicella and serotypes of S. pneumoniae, which were variable but well above protective levels. After 12 weeks of Hizentra, subjects reported fewer local site reactions compared with Vivaglobin. Switching products resulted in increased systemic AEs in some subjects but, overall, not significantly higher than during Vivaglobin treatment. Average infusion time decreased from 104·7 min (3·3 sites) with Vivaglobin to 70·7 min (2·2 sites) with Hizentra (P = 0·0005). Acute serious bacterial infections were similar. Treatment satisfaction was superior with Hizentra. Hizentra and Vivaglobin have similar pharmacokinetics and efficacy. Although transition to a different SCIG product initially increased AEs, Hizentra is well tolerated and can be infused more rapidly and with fewer sites compared to Vivaglobin.

  7. Aggregates, broccoli and cauliflower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grey, Francois; Kjems, Jørgen K.

    1989-09-01

    Naturally grown structures with fractal characters like broccoli and cauliflower are discussed and compared with DLA-type aggregates. It is suggested that the branching density can be used to characterize the growth process and an experimental method to determine this parameter is proposed.

  8. Immunoglobulin light chains, glycosaminoglycans and amyloid.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F. J.; Kisilevsky, R.; Biosciences Division; Queen's Univ.

    2000-03-01

    Immunoglobulin light chains are the precursor proteins for fibrils that are formed during primary amyloidosis and in amyloidosis associated with multiple myeloma. As found for the approximately 20 currently described forms of focal, localized, or systemic amyloidoses, light chain-related fibrils extracted from physiological deposits are invariably associated with glycosaminoglycans, predominantly heparan sulfate. Other amyloid-related proteins are either structurally normal, such as g2-microglobulin and islet amyloid polypeptide, fragments of normal proteins such as serum amyloid A protein or the precursor protein of the g peptide involved in Alzheimer's disease, or are inherited forms of single amino acid variants of a normal protein such as found in the familial forms of amyloid associated with transthyretin. In contrast, the primary structures of light chains involved in fibril formation exhibit extensive mutational diversity rendering some proteins highly amyloidogenic and others non-pathological. The interactions between light chains and glycosaminoglycans are also affected by amino acid variation and may influence the clinical course of disease by enhancing fibril stability and contributing to resistance to protease degradation. Relatively little is currently known about the mechanisms by which glycosaminoglycans interact with light chains and light-chain fibrils. It is probable that future studies of this uniquely diverse family of proteins will continue o shed light on the processes of amyloidosis, and contribute as well to a greater understanding of the normal physiological roles of glycosaminoglycans.

  9. Ulcerative Colitis and Immunoglobulin G4

    PubMed Central

    Kuwata, Go; Koizumi, Koichi; Tabata, Taku; Hara, Seiichi; Kuruma, Sawako; Fujiwara, Takashi; Chiba, Kazuro; Egashira, Hideto; Fujiwara, Junko; Arakawa, Takeo; Momma, Kumiko; Horiguchi, Shinichiro

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Ulcerative colitis (UC) is sometimes associated with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). Infiltration of immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-positive plasma cells is sometimes detected in the colonic mucosa of AIP or UC patients. This study aimed to clarify the relation between UC and IgG4. Methods Associations with UC were reviewed in 85 AIP patients. IgG4 immunostaining was performed on biopsy specimens from the colonic mucosa of 14 AIP and 32 UC patients. Results UC was confirmed in two cases (type 1 AIP, n=1; suspected type 2 AIP, n=1). Abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells in the colonic mucosa was detected in the case of suspected type 2 AIP with UC and two cases of type 1 AIP without colitis. Abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells was detected in 10 UC cases (IgG4-present, 31%). Although 72% of IgG4-absent UC patients showed mild disease activity, 70% of IgG4-present patients showed moderate to severe disease activity (p<0.05). Conclusions UC is sometimes associated with AIP, but it seems that UC is not a manifestation of IgG4-related disease. Infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells is sometimes detectable in the colonic mucosa of UC patients and is associated with disease activity. PMID:24516698

  10. Dermatomyosite et panniculite: place des immunoglobulines

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhafidh, Nadia Ben; Toujeni, Sana; Kefi, Asma; Bousetta, Najeh; Sayhi, Sameh; Gharsallah, Imen; Othmani, Salah

    2016-01-01

    La panniculite est une maladie inflammatoire du tissu adipeux sous-cutané rarement associée à la dermatomyosite. Elle peut survenir avant, après ou en même temps que l'atteinte musculaire. Dans la plupart des cas, l’évolution de la panniculite et des autres atteintes de la dermatomyosite est favorable sous traitement corticoïde et/ou immunosuppresseur. Nous rapportons le cas d'une patiente âgée de 48 ans ayant présenté des lésions de panniculite précédant de 2 mois les signes musculaires. L'atteinte cutanée était résistante au traitement corticoïde associés aux immunosuppresseurs ce qui a nécessité le recours au traitement par Immunoglobulines polyvalentes permettant ainsi une amélioration à la fois de l'atteinte cutanée et musculaire. PMID:27516827

  11. Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Durandy, Anne; Kracker, Sven

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiencies (Ig-CSR-Ds) are rare primary immunodeficiencies characterized by defective switched isotype (IgG/IgA/IgE) production. Depending on the molecular defect in question, the Ig-CSR-D may be combined with an impairment in somatic hypermutation (SHM). Some of the mechanisms underlying Ig-CSR and SHM have been described by studying natural mutants in humans. This approach has revealed that T cell-B cell interaction (resulting in CD40-mediated signaling), intrinsic B-cell mechanisms (activation-induced cytidine deaminase-induced DNA damage), and complex DNA repair machineries (including uracil-N-glycosylase and mismatch repair pathways) are all involved in class-switch recombination and SHM. However, several of the mechanisms required for full antibody maturation have yet to be defined. Elucidation of the molecular defects underlying the diverse set of Ig-CSR-Ds is essential for understanding Ig diversification and has prompted better definition of the clinical spectrum of diseases and the development of increasingly accurate diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:22894609

  12. Immunoglobulin: production, mechanisms of action and formulations

    PubMed Central

    Novaretti, Marcia Cristina Zago; Dinardo, Carla Luana

    2011-01-01

    Human immunoglobulin (Ig) began to be applied in the clinical practice with the treatment of primary immunodeficiencies. Quickly, applications of Ig increased, as its anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory functions were elucidated. Currently, Ig is the most commonly used blood product. Ig is obtained by processing plasma; methods, in particular, techniques to reduce plasma viral loads have been evolving over the years and include: pasteurization, solvent/ detergent treatment, caprylic acid treatment and nanofiltration. These methods contribute to increased safety and quality of blood products. The mechanisms of action of Ig not only involve the blockade of Fc receptors of phagocytes, but also control complement pathways, idiotype-anti-idiotype dimer formation, blockage of superantigen binding to T cells, inhibition of dendritic cells and stimulation of regulatory T cells (Tregs). There are several formulations of Ig available, each one with its own peculiar characteristics. In Brazil, there is stringent legislation regulating the quality of Ig. Only Ig products that completely fulfill the quality control criteria are released for use. These standards involve different tests from visual inspection to determination of anti-complementary activity. This paper will further review the history and current status of Ig, including its production and mechanisms of action. The formulations available in Brazil and also the criteria of quality control currently applied will be presented. PMID:23049343

  13. Immunoglobulin isotypes in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar.

    PubMed

    Hordvik, Ivar

    2015-02-27

    There are three major immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes in salmonid fish: IgM, IgD and IgT, defined by the heavy chains μ, δ and τ, respectively. As a result of whole genome duplication in the ancestor of the salmonid fish family, Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) possess two highly similar Ig heavy chain gene complexes (A and B), comprising two μ genes, two δ genes, three intact τ genes and five τ pseudogenes. The μA and μB genes correspond to two distinct sub-populations of serum IgM. The IgM-B sub-variant has a characteristic extra cysteine near the C-terminal part of the heavy chain and exhibits a higher degree of polymer disulfide cross-linking compared to IgM-A. The IgM-B:IgM-A ratio in serum is typically 60:40, but skewed ratios are also observed. The IgT isotype appears to be specialized to mucosal immune responses in salmonid fish. The concentration of IgT in serum is 100 to 1000 times lower than IgM. Secreted forms of IgD have been detected in rainbow trout, but not yet in Atlantic salmon.

  14. Cytomegalovirus Immunoglobulin After Thoracic Transplantation: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Grossi, Paolo; Mohacsi, Paul; Szabolcs, Zoltán; Potena, Luciano

    2016-03-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a highly complex pathogen which, despite modern prophylactic regimens, continues to affect a high proportion of thoracic organ transplant recipients. The symptomatic manifestations of CMV infection are compounded by adverse indirect effects induced by the multiple immunomodulatory actions of CMV. These include a higher risk of acute rejection, cardiac allograft vasculopathy after heart transplantation, and potentially bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in lung transplant recipients, with a greater propensity for opportunistic secondary infections. Prophylaxis for CMV using antiviral agents (typically oral valganciclovir or intravenous ganciclovir) is now almost universal, at least in high-risk transplants (D+/R-). Even with extended prophylactic regimens, however, challenges remain. The CMV events can still occur despite antiviral prophylaxis, including late-onset infection or recurrent disease, and patients with ganciclovir-resistant CMV infection or who are intolerant to antiviral therapy require alternative strategies. The CMV immunoglobulin (CMVIG) and antiviral agents have complementary modes of action. High-titer CMVIG preparations provide passive CMV-specific immunity but also exert complex immunomodulatory properties which augment the antiviral effect of antiviral agents and offer the potential to suppress the indirect effects of CMV infection. This supplement discusses the available data concerning the immunological and clinical effects of CMVIG after heart or lung transplantation.

  15. Clinical applications of intravenous immunoglobulins in neurology

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, R A C; Dalakas, M C; Cornblath, D R; Latov, N; Weksler, M E; Relkin, N

    2009-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is used increasingly in the management of patients with neurological conditions. The efficacy and safety of IVIg treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) have been established clearly in randomized controlled trials and summarized in Cochrane systematic reviews. However, questions remain regarding the dose, timing and duration of IVIg treatment in both disorders. Reports about successful IVIg treatment in other neurological conditions exist, but its use remains investigational. IVIg has been shown to be efficacious as second-line therapy in patients with dermatomyositis and suggested to be of benefit in some patients with polymyositis. In patients with inclusion body myositis, IVIg was not shown to be effective. IVIg is also a treatment option in exacerbations of myasthenia gravis. Studies with IVIg in patients with Alzheimer's disease have reported increased plasma anti-Aβ antibody titres associated with decreased Aβ peptide levels in the cerebrospinal fluid following IVIg treatment. These changes at the molecular level were accompanied by improved cognitive function, and large-scale randomized trials are under way. PMID:19883422

  16. Efficacy of Intravenous Immunoglobulin in Neurological Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lünemann, Jan D; Quast, Isaak; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2016-01-01

    Owing to its anti-inflammatory efficacy in various autoimmune disease conditions, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG)-pooled IgG obtained from the plasma of several thousands individuals-has been used for nearly three decades and is proving to be efficient in a growing number of neurological diseases. IVIG therapy has been firmly established for the treatment of Guillain-Barré syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and multifocal motor neuropathy, either as first-line therapy or adjunctive treatment. IVIG is also recommended as rescue therapy in patients with worsening myasthenia gravis and is beneficial as a second-line therapy for dermatomyositis and stiff-person syndrome. Subcutaneous rather than intravenous administration of IgG is gaining momentum because of its effectiveness in patients with primary immunodeficiency and the ease with which it can be administered independently from hospital-based infusions. The demand for IVIG therapy is growing, resulting in rising costs and supply shortages. Strategies to replace IVIG with recombinant products have been developed based on proposed mechanisms that confer the anti-inflammatory activity of IVIG, but their efficacy has not been tested in clinical trials. This review covers new developments in the immunobiology and clinical applications of IVIG in neurological diseases.

  17. Basketball exercise and secretory immunoglobulin A.

    PubMed

    Tharp, G D

    1991-01-01

    This study examined saliva levels of immunoglobulin A (IgA) before and after three games and three practice sessions during the basketball season. Saliva was collected from 27 prepubescent boys (10-12 years) in a small Fry league and 23 postpubescent boys (16-18 years) on a high school varsity team. Saliva samples were frozen for later assay using a standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique. IgA levels were significantly increased after games 1 and 3 in both age groups and after practice 3 in the high school athletes. Over the 2 months of saliva collections the pre-exercise IgA increased significantly with games 2 and 3 higher than game 1, and practice 3 higher than practices 1 and 2, in both age groups. These results indicate that basketball exercise can increase saliva IgA levels and that chronic exercise over the basketball season may increase the resting levels of IgA. These changes may give athletes more protection against respiratory infections both after exercise and in the resting state later in the season.

  18. Use of subcutaneous immunoglobulin in primary immune deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Aydıner, Elif Karakoç; Kıykım, Ayça; Barış, Safa; Özen, Ahmet; Barlan, Işıl

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Immunoglobulin replacement therapy is required to reduce the frequency and severity of infections in patients with primary antibody deficiencies. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) can be administered intramuscularly, intravenously or subcutaneously. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy, dose adjustment and adverse events in subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy by retrospectively presenting the records of 16 patients who received subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy. Material and Methods: The demographic findings, clinical and laboratory findings, subcutaneous immunoglobulin dosage and dose frequency, infusion time, area and methods, adverse events and frequency of infections were obtained from patient files and recorded. Results: Sixteen patients (seven female, nine male) aged between 0–33 years who were diagnosed with primary immune deficiency and treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulin were enrolled. All patients had been receiving intravenous imunoglobulin (5–10%) at a dose of 0.33–1.25 gr/kg/dose with two-four week intervals before subcutaneous immunoglobulin. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin (10%) was administered at a dose of 0.03–0.43 gr/kg/dose with one-two week intervals. No significant difference was found between serum through IgG levels before administration of intravenous imunoglobulin and steady state IgG levels during subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy. When five patients whose serum through IgG levels were below 600 mg/dL were evaluated, however, a significant increase was found in steady state IgG levels with subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy (p=0.043). In a ten-month follow-up period, seven infections were observed in four patients (three upper respiratory infectons, two lower respiratory tract infections and three acute gastroenteritis). No acute severe bacterial infection was observed. Local advers reaction was reported in only 10 of 180 infusions (6%). No serious adverse events were reported. All 16 patients were willing to continue IgG replacement

  19. Immunoglobulin-Mediated Agglutination of and Biofilm Formation by Escherichia coli K-12 Require the Type 1 Pilus Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Orndorff, Paul E.; Devapali, Aditya; Palestrant, Sarah; Wyse, Aaron; Everett, Mary Lou; Bollinger, R. Randal; Parker, William

    2004-01-01

    The binding of human secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA), the primary immunoglobulin in the gut, to Escherichia coli is thought to be dependent on type 1 pili. Type 1 pili are filamentous bacterial surface attachment organelles comprised principally of a single protein, the product of the fimA gene. A minor component of the pilus fiber (the product of the fimH gene, termed the adhesin) mediates attachment to a variety of host cell molecules in a mannose inhibitable interaction that has been extensively described. We found that the aggregation of E. coli K-12 by human secretory IgA (SIgA) was dependent on the presence of the pilus fiber, even in the absence of the mannose specific adhesin or in the presence of 25 mM α-CH3Man. The presence of pilus without adhesin also facilitated SIgA-mediated biofilm formation on polystyrene, although biofilm formation was stronger in the presence of the adhesin. IgM also mediated aggregation and biofilm formation in a manner dependent on pili with or without adhesin. These findings indicate that the pilus fiber, even in the absence of the adhesin, may play a role in biologically important processes. Under conditions in which E. coli was agglutinated by SIgA, the binding of SIgA to E. coli was not increased by the presence of the pili, with or without adhesin. This observation suggests that the pili, with or without adhesin, affect factors such as cell surface rigidity or electrostatic repulsion, which can affect agglutination but which do not necessarily determine the level of bound immunoglobulin. PMID:15039312

  20. Applications of intravenous immunoglobulin in haematology.

    PubMed

    Todd, A A; Yap, P L

    1992-06-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIgG) has many potential applications in haematology both as antibody replacement therapy and as an immune-modulater in autoimmune disorders. Antibody replacement appears to be of value in the prophylaxis of infection in low-grade B-cell malignancies, in bone marrow transplant recipients and in children with AIDS, although optimal treatment strategies have not been assessed and determining which patients are likely to derive greatest benefit has been problematic. IVIgG appears to be effective in the prevention or amelioration of CMV-related pathology if given frequently and has also dramatically improved the survival of patients with established interstitial pneumonia when used in combination with ganciclovir. Intriguingly, IVIgG appears to moderate the severity of GVHD in adult transplant recipients. IVIgG has short term efficacy in most patients with ITP but, as long term remissions are uncommon, it has become necessary to be more selective in the use of IVIgG in this disorder. The response to IVIgG in other immune-mediated cytopenias is similar with generally transient improvement but also with occasional spectacular cures. The treatment of the acquired haemophilias with IVIgG has yielded in vivo and vitro evidence to support the idiotype-antiidiotype theory of IVIgG immune-modulation and has also demonstrated significant differences in the sensitivity of coagulation factor autoantibodies and alloantibodies to IVIgG therapy. IVIgG has several roles in pregnancy related disorders, including the management of both mother and fetus in ITP during pregnancy, the antenatal and postnatal management of platelet alloimmunisation and also in the management of severe rhesus isoimmunisation. IVIgG is safe and well tolerated. The expense of this therapy should be balanced against the likely gains and the overall costs of alternative approaches.

  1. 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Danieli, M G; Shoenfeld, Y

    2014-12-01

    Immunomodulation uses synthetic, natural and recombinant preparations to modify the immune response to a desired level, typically to treat specific autoimmune diseases, as will be discussed in this section. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common systemic autoimmune disease, affecting 1% of the population worldwide. Currently, a first-line disease-modifying therapy for RA is methotrexate; however, more than 40 monoclonal antibodies are in use or under investigation for the treatment of RA. This panoply of biological disease-modifying agents means that clinicians can make use of drugs with different mechanisms of action should one type become ineffective. In autoimmune pemphigus conditions, identification of pathogenic autoantibodies against intercellular cadherin desmoglein 1 and/or 3 antigens is one of the criteria for appropriate diagnosis. In pemphigoid conditions, autoantibodies are directed against bullous pemphigoid antigens BP230 and BP180, and in both types of immunobullous disease intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), as adjuvant therapy in combination with a cytotoxic drug, is effective in reducing autoantibody levels, disease severity and background steroid use. Further studies are required to establish the role of monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of autoimmune bullous disease. IVIg may also be effective in another at-risk population with autoimmune disease, namely secondary recurrent miscarriage (RM). However, the mechanism of action of IVIg in secondary RM is largely unknown, although levels of natural killer cell biomarkers, particularly CD56(+) , have been shown to decline after IVIg treatment. Data from meta-analyses of heterogeneous placebo-controlled trials indicate that IVIg may be effective in secondary RM, but most trials to date have used immunomodulatory doses lower than those considered to be efficient in autoimmune disease. The results of a recently completed study may help to address this question.

  2. Immunoglobulin genes implicated in glioma risk.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Janardan P; Kaur, Navtej; Costa, Sandra; Amorim, Julia; Nabico, Rui; Linhares, Paulo; Vaz, Rui; Viana-Pereira, Marta; Reis, Rui M

    2014-01-01

    Both genetic and environmental factors are thought to be causal in gliomagenesis. Several genes have been implicated in glioma development, but the putative role of a major immunity-related gene complex member, immunoglobulin heavy chain γ (IGHG) has not been evaluated. Prior observations that IGHG-encoded γ marker (GM) allotypes exhibit differential sensitivity to an immunoevasion strategy of cytomegalovirus, a pathogen implicated as a promoter of gliomagenesis, has lead us to hypothesize that these determinants are risk factors for glioma. To test this hypothesis, we genotyped the IGHG locus comprising the GM alleles, specifically GM alleles 3 and 17, of 120 glioma patients and 133 controls via TaqMan® genotyping assay. To assess the associations between GM genotypes and the risk of glioma, we applied an unconditional multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for potential confounding variables. In comparison to subjects who were homozygous for the GM 17 allele, the GM 3 homozygotes were over twice as likely, and the GM 3/17 heterozygotes were over three times as likely, to develop glioma. Similar results were achieved when analyzed by combining the data corresponding to alleles GM 3 and GM 3/17 in a dominant model. The GM 3/17 genotype and the combination of GM 3 and GM 3/17 were found to be further associated with over 3 times increased risk for high-grade astrocytoma (grades III-IV). Allele frequency analyses also showed an increased risk for gliomas and high-grade astrocytoma in association with GM 3. Our findings support the premise that the GM 3 allele may present risk for the development of glioma, possibly by modulating immunity to cytomegalovirus.

  3. Serum Immunoglobulin G4 and Immunoglobulin G1 for Distinguishing Immunoglobulin G4-Associated Cholangitis From Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Boonstra, Kirsten; Culver, Emma L; de Buy Wenniger, Lucas Maillette; van Heerde, Marianne J; van Erpecum, Karel J; Poen, Alexander C; van Nieuwkerk, Karin MJ; Spanier, BW Marcel; Witteman, Ben JM; Tuynman, Hans ARE; van Geloven, Nan; van Buuren, Henk; Chapman, Roger W; Barnes, Eleanor; Beuers, Ulrich; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y

    2014-01-01

    The recent addition of immunoglobulin (Ig)G4-associated cholangitis (IAC), also called IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis (IRSC), to the spectrum of chronic cholangiopathies has created the clinical need for reliable methods to discriminate between IAC and the more common cholestatic entities, primary (PSC) and secondary sclerosing cholangitis. The current American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases practice guidelines for PSC advise on the measurement of specific Ig (sIg)G4 in PSC patients, but interpretation of elevated sIgG4 levels remains unclear. We aimed to provide an algorithm to distinguish IAC from PSC using sIgG analyses. We measured total IgG and IgG subclasses in serum samples of IAC (n = 73) and PSC (n = 310) patients, as well as in serum samples of disease controls (primary biliary cirrhosis; n = 22). sIgG4 levels were elevated above the upper limit of normal (ULN = >1.4 g/L) in 45 PSC patients (15%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 11-19). The highest specificity and positive predictive value (PPV; 100%) for IAC were reached when applying the 4× ULN (sIgG4 > 5.6 g/L) cutoff with a sensitivity of 42% (95% CI: 31-55). However, in patients with a sIgG4 between 1× and 2× ULN (n = 38/45), the PPV of sIgG4 for IAC was only 28%. In this subgroup, the sIgG4/sIgG1 ratio cutoff of 0.24 yielded a sensitivity of 80% (95% CI: 51-95), a specificity of 74% (95% CI: 57-86), a PPV of 55% (95% CI: 33-75), and a negative predictive value of 90% (95% CI: 73-97). Conclusion: Elevated sIgG4 (>1.4 g/L) occurred in 15% of patients with PSC. In patients with a sIgG4 >1.4 and <2.8 g/L, incorporating the IgG4/IgG1 ratio with a cutoff at 0.24 in the diagnostic algorithm significantly improved PPV and specificity. We propose a new diagnostic algorithm based on IgG4/IgG1 ratio that may be used in clinical practice to distinguish PSC from IAC. (Hepatology 2014;59:1954–1963) PMID:24375491

  4. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Covalent cross-links in oxygen free radical altered human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Kleinveld, H A; Hack, C E; Swaak, A J; van Noort, W L; van Eijk, H G; Koster, J F

    1988-01-01

    The damaging effect of an oxygen free radical generating system, i.e. ultraviolet irradiation, on human immunoglobulin G (IgG) was studied. The free radical altered IgG was analysed by a high performance liquid chromatograph equipped with a TSK G 3000 SW-column. Gel filtration of 120 min UV-irradiated IgG resulted in three clearly distinguished peaks corresponding to polymer IgG (MW greater than 500 kD), dimer IgG (MW 300 kD) and monomer IgG (MW 150 kD). Analysis of oxygen free radical altered and aggregated IgG by SDS-PAGE and subsequent silver-staining revealed inter- and intra-molecular reduction (by beta-mercaptoethanol)-resistant cross-links between IgG-molecules were formed. Comparison of amino acid analyses of native IgG with oxygen free radical aggregated polymer IgG showed significant reductions in tyrosine- (7.0%) and histidine- (6.5%) content. These findings suggest that tyrosine and histidine are involved in covalent cross-linking between IgG-molecules caused by oxygen free radicals. These alterations on IgG induced by free radical-activity might render it antigenic, and could initiate the production of rheumatoid factors (RF).

  6. Antibody Fc functional activity of intravenous immunoglobulin preparations treated with solvent-detergent for virus inactivation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y H; Ngo, C; Yeh, I N; Uemura, Y

    1994-01-01

    We report here results of in vitro comparisons of the Fc functional activity of a second-generation intravenous immunoglobulin (IGIV) preparation (Venoglobulin-I) and a third-generation IGIV product that includes a deliberate virus-inactivation step (Venoglobulin-S). Both formulations showed equivalent Fc-mediated function against viral antigens (rubella, influenza A, and influenza B) by single-radial hemolysis test, and against group B Streptococcus, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by opsonophagocytosis assay. In addition, we showed by three different immunochemical reactions and by HPLC analysis that both preparations consisted of mostly monomeric IgG and contained very low levels of complement-fixing IgG aggregates. However, IgG aggregation induced by heating at 63 degrees C markedly enhanced fixation of Clq and C3 and binding to Raji cells, indicating that the IgG molecules retained their complement-fixing capacity. Thus, the incorporation of a virus inactivation step in the manufacture of our third-generation IGIV did not alter the Fc functional activities of the IgG, as measured by these in vitro assay systems.

  7. High-affinity immunoglobulin E receptor (Fc epsilon RI)-bearing eosinophils, mast cells, macrophages and Langerhans' cells in allergen-induced late-phase cutaneous reactions in atopic subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Ying, S; Barata, L T; Meng, Q; Grant, J A; Barkans, J; Durham, S R; Kay, A B

    1998-01-01

    We have used in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) to investigate the kinetics of the expression for Fc epsilon RI mRNA (alpha-, beta- and gamma-chains), the alpha-chain protein product, as well as the phenotype of the mRNA- or protein-positive cells in allergen-induced late-phase skin reactions in atopic subjects. Compared with diluent controls, there were significant increases in the total number of mRNA+ cells for the alpha-, beta- and gamma-chains for Fc epsilon RI at all time-points (6, 24 and 48 hr) after allergen challenge (P < 0.01). By double IHC/ISH significant increases in alpha-, beta- and gamma-chain mRNA+ macrophages, eosinophils, mast cells and CD1a+ cells were also observed after allergen challenge (P < 0.05). The distribution of Fc epsilon RI subunit (alpha-, beta-, or gamma-chain) mRNA+ co-localization was CD68+ macrophages (42-47%), EG2+ eosinophils (33-39%), tryptase+ mast cells (5-11%) and CD1a+ Langerhans' cells (2-4%). Using single IHC, significant increases in the total number of Fc epsilon RI protein+ cells (P < 0.01) were observed 24 and 48 hr after allergen challenge. Double IHC showed that the distribution of Fc epsilon RI+ cells was tryptase+ mast cells (33%), CD68+ macrophages (36%), EG2+ eosinophils (20%), CD1a+ Langerhans' cells (4%) and unidentified cells (7%), at the 24-hr allergen-challenged sites. These observations suggest that the cutaneous late-phase reaction in man is associated with up-regulation of Fc epsilon RI on eosinophils, macrophages, mast cells and Langerhans' cells. Images Figure 6 PMID:9616380

  8. Prostaglandin E Receptor Subtype 4 Signaling in the Heart: Role in Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury and Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yin; Tang, Eva Hoi Ching; Ma, Haichun

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is an endogenous lipid mediator, produced from the metabolism of arachidonic acids, upon the sequential actions of phospholipase A2, cyclooxygenases, and prostaglandin E synthases. The various biological functions governed by PGE2 are mediated through its four distinct prostaglandin E receptors (EPs), designated as EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4, among which the EP4 receptor is the one most widely distributed in the heart. The availability of global or cardiac-specific EP4 knockout mice and the development of selective EP4 agonists/antagonists have provided substantial evidence to support the role of EP4 receptor in the heart. However, like any good drama, activation of PGE2-EP4 signaling exerts both protective and detrimental effects in the ischemic heart disease. Thus, the primary object of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current progress of the PGE2-EP4 signaling in ischemic heart diseases, including cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. A better understanding of PGE2-EP4 signaling should promote the development of more effective therapeutic approaches to treat the ischemic heart diseases without triggering unwanted side effects. PMID:27190998

  9. Prostaglandin E2-prostaglandin E receptor subtype 4 (EP4) signaling mediates UV irradiation-induced systemic immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Soontrapa, Kitipong; Honda, Tetsuya; Sakata, Daiji; Yao, Chengcan; Hirata, Takako; Hori, Shohei; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Kita, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Takao; Kabashima, Kenji; Narumiya, Shuh

    2011-04-19

    UV radiation induces systemic immunosuppression. Because nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs suppress UV-induced immunosuppression, prostanoids have been suspected as a crucial mediator of this UV effect. However, the identity of the prostanoid involved and its mechanism of action remain unclear. Here, we addressed this issue by subjecting mice deficient in each prostanoid receptor individually or mice treated with a subtype-specific antagonist to UV irradiation. Mice treated with an antagonist for prostaglandin E receptor subtype 4 (EP4), but not those deficient in other prostanoid receptors, show impaired UV-induced immunosuppression, whereas administration of an EP4 agonist rescues the impairment of the UV-induced immunosuppression in indomethacin-treated mice. The EP4 antagonist treatment suppresses an increase in the number of CD4(+)/forkhead box P3-positive (Foxp3(+)) regulatory T cells (Treg cells) in the peripheral lymph nodes (LNs) and dendritic cells expressing DEC205 in the LNs and the skin after UV irradiation. Furthermore, the EP4 antagonist treatment down-regulates UV-induced expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) in skin keratinocytes. Finally, administration of anti-RANKL antibody abolishes the restoration of UV-induced immunosuppression by EP4 agonism in indomethacin-treated mice. Thus, prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2))-EP4 signaling mediates UV-induced immunosuppression by elevating the number of Treg cells through regulation of RANKL expression in the epidermis.

  10. Reconstitution of interactions between tyrosine kinases and the high affinity IgE receptor which are controlled by receptor clustering.

    PubMed Central

    Scharenberg, A M; Lin, S; Cuenod, B; Yamamura, H; Kinet, J P

    1995-01-01

    High affinity IgE receptor (Fc epsilon RI) signaling after contact with antigen occurs in response to receptor clustering. This paper describes methodology, based on vaccinia virus driven protein expression, for probing signaling pathways and its application to Fc epsilon RI interactions with the lyn and syk tyrosine kinases. Reconstitution of the complete tetrameric Fc epsilon RI receptor, lyn and syk in a non-hematopoietic 'null' cell line is sufficient to reconstruct clustering-controlled receptor tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of syk, without apparent requirement for hematopoietic specific phosphatases. The src family kinase lyn phosphorylates Fc epsilon RI in response to receptor clustering, resulting in syk binding to the phosphorylated Fc epsilon RI. Lyn also participates in the tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of syk in a manner which is dependent on phosphorylated Fc epsilon RI. Using overexpression of active and dominant negative syk proteins in a mast cell line which naturally expresses Fc epsilon RI, we corroborate syk's role downstream of receptor phosphorylation, and demonstrate that syk SH2 domains protect receptor ITAMs from ongoing dephosphorylation. Based on these results, we propose that receptor clustering controls lyn-mediated Fc epsilon RI tyrosine phosphorylation by shifting a balance between phosphorylation and dephosphorylation towards accumulation of tyrosine phosphorylated Fc epsilon RI. Fc epsilon RI tyrosine phosphorylation functions to bring syk into a microenvironment where it becomes tyrosine phosphorylated and activated, thereby allowing clustering to indirectly control syk activity. Images PMID:7628439

  11. Prostaglandin E receptor 4 (PTGER4) involved in host protection against immune challenge in oyster, Crassostrea hongkongensis.

    PubMed

    Qu, Fufa; Xiang, Zhiming; Wang, Fuxuan; Qi, Lin; Xu, Fengjiao; Xiao, Shu; Yu, Ziniu

    2015-02-01

    Prostaglandin E receptor 4 (PTGER4) is an essential receptor that can detect various physiological and pathological stimuli and has been implicated in a wide variety of biological processes, including the regulation of immune responses, cytokine production, and apoptosis. In this report, the first mollusk PTGER4, referred to as ChPTGER4, was cloned and characterized from the Hong Kong oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis. Its full-length cDNA is 1734 bp in length, including 5'- and 3'-untranslated region (UTRs) of 354 bp and 306 bp, respectively, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 1074 bp. ChPTGER4 comprises 357 amino acids and shares significant homology with its vertebrate homologs. The results of phylogenetic analysis revealed that ChPTGER4 clusters with PTGER4 from the Pacific oyster. In addition, quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that ChPTGER4 was constitutively expressed in all tissues examined and that its expression was significantly up-regulated in hemocytes and gills following challenge by pathogens (Vibrio alginolyticus, Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs: lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and peptidoglycan (PGN). Moreover, fluorescence microscopy analysis revealed that ChPTGER4 localized to the membrane, and its overexpression significantly enhanced NF-κB reporter gene activation in the HEK293T cell line. In summary, this study provides the first experimental evidence of a functional PTGER4 in mollusks, which suggests its involvement in the innate immune response in oyster.

  12. The Production Processes and Biological Effects of Intravenous Immunoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Barahona Afonso, Ana Filipa; João, Cristina Maria Pires

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin is a highly diverse autologous molecule able to influence immunity in different physiological and diseased situations. Its effect may be visible both in terms of development and function of B and T lymphocytes. Polyclonal immunoglobulin may be used as therapy in many diseases in different circumstances such as primary and secondary hypogammaglobulinemia, recurrent infections, polyneuropathies, cancer, after allogeneic transplantation in the presence of infections and/or GVHD. However, recent studies have broadened the possible uses of polyclonal immunoglobulin showing that it can stimulate certain sub-populations of T cells with effects on T cell proliferation, survival and function in situations of lymphopenia. These results present a novel and considerable impact of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) treatment in situations of severe lymphopenia, a situation that can occur in cancer patients after chemo and radiotherapy treatments. In this review paper the established and experimental role of polyclonal immunoglobulin will be presented and discussed as well as the manufacturing processes involved in their production. PMID:27005671

  13. Effects of Protein Conformation, Apparent Solubility, and Protein-Protein Interactions on the Rates and Mechanisms of Aggregation for an IgG1Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Kalonia, Cavan; Toprani, Vishal; Toth, Ronald; Wahome, Newton; Gabel, Ian; Middaugh, C Russell; Volkin, David B

    2016-07-28

    Non-native protein aggregation is a key degradation pathway of immunoglobulins. In this work, the aggregation kinetics of an immunoglobulin gamma-1 monoclonal antibody (IgG1 mAb) in different solution environments was monitored over a range of incubation temperatures for up to seven months using size exclusion chromatography. Histidine and citrate buffers with/without sodium chloride were employed to modulate the mAb's conformational stability, solubility (in the presence of polyethylene glycol, PEG), and protein-protein interactions as measured by differential scanning calorimetry, PEG precipitation, and static light scattering, respectively. The effect of these parameters on the mechanism(s) of mAb aggregation during storage at different temperatures was determined using kinetic models, which were used to fit aggregation data to determine rate constants for aggregate nucleation and growth processes. This approach was used to investigate the effects of colloidal protein-protein interactions and solubility values (in PEG solutions) on the mechanisms and rates of IgG1 mAb aggregation as a function of temperature-induced structural perturbations. Aggregate nucleation and growth pathways for this IgG1 mAb were sensitive to temperature and overall conformational stability. Aggregate growth, on the other hand, was also sensitive to conditions affecting the solubility of the mAb, particularly at elevated temperatures. PMID:27380437

  14. Dynamics of fire ant aggregations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennenbaum, Michael; Hu, David; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    Fire ant aggregations are an inherently active system. Each ant harvests its own energy and can convert it into motion. The motion of individual ants contributes non-trivially to the bulk material properties of the aggregation. We have measured some of these properties using plate-plate rheology, where the response to an applied external force or deformation is measured. In this talk, we will present data pertaining to the aggregation behavior in the absence of any external force. We quantify the aggregation dynamics by monitoring the rotation of the top plate and by measuring the normal force. We then compare the results with visualizations of 2D aggregations.

  15. The Immunobiology of Immunoglobulin G4.

    PubMed

    Lighaam, Laura C; Rispens, Theo

    2016-08-01

    Human immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) antibodies are in many ways unusual. In this review, an overview is given of the structural and functional aspects of IgG4 antibodies, the consequences of IgG4 antibody formation in various disease settings, and the factors involved in the regulation of IgG4 responses. Unlike most IgG antibodies, IgG4 antibodies exist in a dynamic equilibrium with other IgG4 antibodies, continuously exchanging half-molecules resulting in effectively monovalent antibodies that cannot cross-link. Together with the low affinities to C1q and most Fc receptors, and a generally high affinity for antigen, IgG4 antibodies appear to be nature's way of producing "blocking antibodies." On the one hand, IgG4 may contribute to tolerance to allergens, presumably via competition with IgE. Also, IgG4 immune responses to filarial parasites might prevent excessive immune reactions during such infections. On the other hand, IgG4 autoantibodies may be pathogenic, simply because they inhibit the function of their target molecules. Furthermore, IgG4 antibodies to biologicals may result in secondary loss of response. In addition, IgG4 has been implicated to impair humoral immunity to tumors. The role of high IgG4 serum levels in IgG4-related disease has not yet been established. Regulation of IgG4 responses is most likely a multifactorial process, which in vivo requires prolonged or repeated challenge with antigen, and is associated with regulatory T cells, T helper 2 cells, interleukin- (IL-) 4, and IL-10. In vitro, cytokines like IL-4, IL-13, IL-10, and IL-21 have been shown to differentially influence IgG4 production. The properties of IgG4 B cells have now started to be elucidated, and may provide additional clues to explain the unusual dynamics of IgG4-antibody responses. PMID:27466791

  16. Stress modulates intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Godínez-Victoria, Marycarmen; Abarca-Rojano, Edgar; Pacheco-Yépez, Judith; Reyna-Garfias, Humberto; Barbosa-Cabrera, Reyna Elizabeth; Drago-Serrano, Maria Elisa

    2013-01-01

    Stress is a response of the central nervous system to environmental stimuli perceived as a threat to homeostasis. The stress response triggers the generation of neurotransmitters and hormones from the hypothalamus pituitary adrenal axis, sympathetic axis and brain gut axis, and in this way modulates the intestinal immune system. The effects of psychological stress on intestinal immunity have been investigated mostly with the restraint/immobilization rodent model, resulting in an up or down modulation of SIgA levels depending on the intensity and time of exposure to stress. SIgA is a protein complex formed by dimeric (dIgA) or polymeric IgA (pIgA) and the secretory component (SC), a peptide derived from the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR). The latter receptor is a transmembrane protein expressed on the basolateral side of gut epithelial cells, where it uptakes dIgA or pIgA released by plasma cells in the lamina propria. As a result, the IgA-pIgR complex is formed and transported by vesicles to the apical side of epithelial cells. pIgR is then cleaved to release SIgA into the luminal secretions of gut. Down modulation of SIgA associated with stress can have negative repercussions on intestinal function and integrity. This can take the form of increased adhesion of pathogenic agents to the intestinal epithelium and/or an altered balance of inflammation leading to greater intestinal permeability. Most studies on the molecular and biochemical mechanisms involved in the stress response have focused on systemic immunity. The present review analyzes the impact of stress (mostly by restraint/immobilization, but also with mention of other models) on the generation of SIgA, pIgR and other humoral and cellular components involved in the intestinal immune response. Insights into these mechanisms could lead to better therapies for protecting against pathogenic agents and avoiding epithelial tissue damage by modulating intestinal inflammation. PMID:24348350

  17. Properties and mechanisms of immunoglobulins for congenital cytomegalovirus disease.

    PubMed

    Parruti, Giustino; Polilli, Ennio; Ursini, Tamara; Tontodonati, Monica

    2013-12-01

    Immunoglobulins are one major component of adaptive immunity to external and resident microorganisms, evolving very early in phylogenesis. They help eukaryotes in controlling infections, mainly through their neutralizing activity, which quenches both the cytopathic and inflammatory potential of invading microorganisms. Cytomegalovirus (CMV)-related disease is generally blunted in seropositive subjects with conserved specific humoral responses. CMV-seropositive pregnant women, in accordance with such evidence, suffer little or no fetal damage when reexposed to CMV. Several seminal experiences and early experimental models confirmed that repeated infusions of immunoglobulins, either with hyperimmune or standard preparations, may help to reduce maternal-fetal CMV transmission, as well as to quench fetal disease upon transmission. This review focused on experimental evidence supporting the potential role of immunoglobulins as a tool to control fetal CMV-related disease in pregnant women.

  18. FUNDAMENTAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN NATURAL ANTIBODIES AND POLYREACTIVE IMMUNOGLOBULINS.

    PubMed

    Bobrovnik, S A; Demchenko, M A; Komisarenko, S V

    2015-01-01

    A problem of similarity and differences between so-called polyreactive immunoglobulins (PRIGs) and natural antibodies (NAbs), capable of cross-reacting with some structurally dissimilar antigens, has been considered. The analysis of mechanisms of an unspecific interaction between PRIGs or NAbs and antigens evidences for the fact that essential differences exist between these substances. These differences permit classifying the abovementioned substances as different types of immunoglobulin molecules. The major difference between PRIGs and NAbs may include both the mechanisms of the above mentioned immunoglobulin molecules binding to antigens and their interaction affinity, as well as an absolutely different influence of some low-molecular substances on the efficiency of the interaction with antigens. Relying on the obtained data it can be assumed that, since PRIGs and NAbs have fundamental differences, they may perform not only similar but also different functions of the immune system.

  19. Non-immune immunoglobulins shield Schistosoma japonicum from host immunorecognition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chuang; Hou, Nan; Piao, Xianyu; Liu, Shuai; Cai, Pengfei; Xiao, Yan; Chen, Qijun

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a major human parasitic disease with a global impact. Schistosoma japonicum, the most difficult to control, can survive within host veins for decades. Mechanisms of immune evasion by the parasite, including antigenic variation and surface masking, have been implicated but not well defined. In this study, we defined the immunoglobulin-binding proteomes of S. japonicum using human IgG, IgM, and IgE as the molecular bait for affinity purification, followed by protein identification by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Several proteins situated at the tegument of S. japonicum were able to nonselectively bind to the Fc domain of host immunoglobulins, indicating a mechanism for the avoidance of host immune attachment and recognition. The profile of the immunoglobulin-binding proteomes provides further clues for immune evasion mechanisms adopted by S. japonicum. PMID:26299686

  20. Targeting of AID-mediated sequence diversification to immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Kothapalli, Naga Rama; Fugmann, Sebastian D

    2011-04-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is a key enzyme for antibody-mediated immune responses. Antibodies are encoded by the immunoglobulin genes and AID acts as a transcription-dependent DNA mutator on these genes to improve antibody affinity and effector functions. An emerging theme in field is that many transcribed genes are potential targets of AID, presenting an obvious danger to genomic integrity. Thus there are mechanisms in place to ensure that mutagenic outcomes of AID activity are specifically restricted to the immunoglobulin loci. Cis-regulatory targeting elements mediate this effect and their mode of action is probably a combination of immunoglobulin gene specific activation of AID and a perversion of faithful DNA repair towards error-prone outcomes.

  1. Isolation and analysis of complement activating aggregates from synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis using monoclonal anti-C3d antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Bedwell, A E; Elson, C J; Carter, S D; Dieppe, P A; Hutton, C W; Czudek, R

    1987-01-01

    The complement activating aggregates in synovial fluids of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have been isolated using monoclonal IgM anti-C3d antibodies attached to solid phases, and the content of the material bound has been analysed. High levels of aggregated IgG bearing C3d were found in RA synovial fluids, and IgG was the major immunoglobulin bound from such synovial fluids by anti-C3d Sepharose. A strong correlation was shown between levels of aggregated IgG bearing C3d and complement activation, as judged by C3d levels. Significant (but less strong) relationships were also observed between C3d levels and both complement consuming and C1q binding activity. C3d levels and levels of aggregated IgG bearing C3d were both significantly associated with the numbers of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) found in RA synovial fluids. From these results it is concluded that the aggregated immunoglobulins bearing C3d (particularly IgG) isolated from RA synovial fluids are responsible for activating complement and attracting PMNs into the joint space. Radioimmunoassay showed no correlation, however, between levels of aggregated IgG (or IgM) bearing C3d and rheumatoid factor (RF) activity bound by anti-C3d. In addition, the material bound by anti-C3d Sepharose from most synovial fluid polyethylene glycol precipitates did not contain either IgM or IgG RF. Thus both techniques show that the majority of complexes bearing C3d do not contain RF. As the complement fixing aggregates apparently contain only immunoglobulin and complement components the results raise the problem of how the aggregates are formed. It is suggested that RA IgG may remain aggregated after either antigen or antibody (RF) has dissociated from the complex. Images PMID:3492971

  2. Kinetics of protein aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Tuomas

    2015-03-01

    Aggregation into linear nanostructures, notably amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils, is a common form of behaviour exhibited by a range of peptides and proteins. This process was initially discovered in the context of the aetiology of a range of neurodegenerative diseases, but has recently been recognised to of general significance and has been found at the origin of a number of beneficial functional roles in nature, including as catalytic scaffolds and functional components in biofilms. This talk discusses our ongoing efforts to study the kinetics of linear protein self-assembly by using master equation approaches combined with global analysis of experimental data.

  3. Structure of Viral Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Stephen; Luijten, Erik

    2010-03-01

    The aggregation of virus particles is a particular form of colloidal self-assembly, since viruses of a give type are monodisperse and have identical, anisotropic surface charge distributions. In small-angle X-ray scattering experiments, the Qbeta virus was found to organize in different crystal structures in the presence of divalent salt and non-adsorbing polymer. Since a simple isotropic potential cannot explain the occurrence of all observed phases, we employ computer simulations to investigate how the surface charge distribution affects the virus interactions. Using a detailed model of the virus particle, we find an asymmetric ion distribution around the virus which gives rise to the different phases observed.

  4. Human lymphocyte surface immunoglobulin capping. Normal characteristics and anomalous behavior of chronic lymphocytic leukemic lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, H J

    1975-01-01

    The phenomenon of redistribution of surface membrane immunoglobulin (Ig) components (capping) has been well described in mouse lymphoid cells. The characteristics of this process in human lymphocytes are less clear. This study characterizes the phenomenon of surface membrane Ig redistribution of normal and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) lymphocytes with the use of fluoroscein-labeled anti-Ig sera. Normal lymphocytes underwent rapid cap formation after incubation with anti-Ig serum in the cold and subsequent rewarming. The morphology was characteristic with aggregation over the pole of the cell opposite the nucleus and over the uropod when present. The process was energy dependent but independent of protein synthesis, and could be inhibited by vincristine, vinblastine, and colchicine but not by cytochalasin B. CLL cells, on the other hand, though showing fluorescent complex aggregation on the surface, rarely demonstrated unidirectional movement of these aggregates to form a cap. Cap formation in these cells could not be stimulated by supplementing the energy source or protein concentration of the medium nor by adding glutamic acid which could partially reverse the vincristine and vinblastine inhibition of normal capping. The failure of agents which inhibit motility to inhibit capping of the normal lymphocytes suggests that active locomotion is not a direct prerequisite for capping. The results also suggest the involvement of microtubules in normal capping and the possibility that abnormal membrane structure or microtubular function could explain the failure of CLL cells to behave normally in this regard. The role of this cellular defect in the immune deficiencies exhibited by many patients with CLL, however, is not established. Images PMID:1088910

  5. Beswitched. The looping out model for immunoglobulin class switching.

    PubMed

    von Schwedler, U; Jäck, H M; Wabl, M

    1990-08-01

    During the switch in expression of an immunoglobulin class, the gene segment encoding the constant region of the heavy chain is replaced in a way that leads to a deletion. Three different models of how this deletion is generated have been proposed: recombination between homologs, unequal sister chromatid exchange, and looping out and deletion. While none of the predicted recombination products of the first two models have been found, the products of the looping out--inversions and circular DNA--have been isolated. Thus looping out and deletion appears to be the appropriate model to explain the genetic events leading to the immunoglobulin heavy chain class switch. PMID:2282364

  6. Fate of Multimeric Oligomers, Submicron, and Micron Size Aggregates of Monoclonal Antibodies Upon Subcutaneous Injection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kijanka, Grzegorz; Bee, Jared S; Bishop, Steven M; Que, Ivo; Löwik, Clemens; Jiskoot, Wim

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the fate of differently sized protein aggregates upon subcutaneous injection in mice. A murine and a human monoclonal immunoglobulin G 1 (IgG1) antibody were labeled with a fluorescent dye and subjected to stress conditions to create aggregates. Aggregates fractionated by centrifugation or gel permeation chromatography were administered subcutaneously into SKH1 mice. The biodistribution was measured by in vivo fluorescence imaging for up to 1 week post injection. At several time points, mice were sacrificed and selected organs and tissues were collected for ex vivo analysis. Part of injected aggregated IgGs persisted much longer at the injection site than unstressed controls. Aggregate fractions containing submicron (0.1-1 μm) or micron (1-100 μm) particles were retained to a similar extent. Highly fluorescent "hot-spots" were detected 24 h post injection in spleens of mice injected with submicron aggregates of murine IgG. Submicron aggregates of human IgG showed higher accumulation in draining lymph nodes 1 h post injection than unstressed controls or micron size aggregates. For both tested proteins, aggregated fractions seemed to be eliminated from circulation more rapidly than monomeric fractions. The biodistribution of monomers isolated from solutions subjected to stress conditions was similar to that of unstressed control. PMID:27044942

  7. 21 CFR 866.5540 - Immunoglobulin G (Fd fragment specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... fragment) of the heavy chain (a subunit) of the immunoglobulin antibody molecule in serum. Measurement of immunoglobulin G Fd fragments aids in the diagnosis of plasma antibody-forming cell abnormalities....

  8. Prostaglandin E receptor EP4 is a therapeutic target in breast cancer cells with stem-like properties.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Namita; Ma, Xinrong; Kochel, Tyler; Goloubeva, Olga; Staats, Paul; Thompson, Keyata; Martin, Stuart; Reader, Jocelyn; Take, Yukinori; Collin, Peter; Fulton, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The cyclooxygenase pathway is strongly implicated in breast cancer progression but the role of this pathway in the biology of breast cancer stem/progenitor cells has not been defined. Recent attention has focused on targeting the cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) pathway downstream of the COX-2 enzyme by blocking the activities of individual prostaglandin E (EP) receptors. Prostaglandin E receptor 4 (EP4) is widely expressed in primary invasive ductal carcinomas of the breast and antagonizing this receptor with small molecule inhibitors or shRNA directed to EP4 inhibits metastatic potential in both syngeneic and xenograft models. Breast cancer stem/progenitor cells are defined as a subpopulation of cells that drive tumor growth, metastasis, treatment resistance, and relapse. Mammosphere-forming breast cancer cells of human (MDA-MB-231, SKBR3) or murine (66.1, 410.4) origin of basal-type, Her-2 phenotype and/or with heightened metastatic capacity upregulate expression of both EP4 and COX-2 and are more tumorigenic compared to the bulk population. In contrast, luminal-type or non-metastatic counterparts (MCF7, 410, 67) do not increase COX-2 and EP4 expression in mammosphere culture. Treatment of mammosphere-forming cells with EP4 inhibitors (RQ-15986, AH23848, Frondoside A) or EP4 gene silencing, but not with a COX inhibitor (Indomethacin) reduces both mammosphere-forming capacity and the expression of phenotypic markers (CD44(hi)/CD24(low), aldehyde dehydrogenase) of breast cancer stem cells. Finally, an orally delivered EP4 antagonist (RQ-08) reduces the tumor-initiating capacity and markedly inhibits both the size of tumors arising from transplantation of mammosphere-forming cells and phenotypic markers of stem cells in vivo. These studies support the continued investigation of EP4 as a potential therapeutic target and provide new insight regarding the role of EP4 in supporting a breast cancer stem cell/tumor-initiating phenotype.

  9. Intraplantar PGE2 causes nociceptive behaviour and mechanical allodynia: the role of prostanoid E receptors and protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Kassuya, C A L; Ferreira, J; Claudino, R F; Calixto, J B

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Receptor subtypes involved in PGE2-induced nociception are still controversial. The present study investigated the prostanoid E receptor (EP) subtypes and the protein kinase (PK) pathways involved in the nociception induced by PGE2 injection in the mouse paw. Experimental approach: Paw-licking and mechanical allodynia were measured in vivo and protein kinase activation ex vivo by Western blots of extracts of paw skin. Key results: Intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of PGE2 into the mouse paw caused nociceptive behaviour of short duration with mean ED50 of 1.43 nmol. PGE2 produced a longer-lasting mechanical allodynia, with an ED50 of 0.05 nmol. Intraplantar injection of antagonists at EP3 or EP4, but not at EP1 or EP2 receptors inhibited PGE2-induced paw-licking. Paw-licking caused by PGE2 was blocked by an inhibitor of PKA but only partially decreased by inhibition of the extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK). Selective inhibitors of PKC, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) or p38, all failed to affect PGE2-induced paw-licking. An EP3 antagonist inhibited PGE2-induced mechanical allodynia. However, inhibitors of PKA, PKC or ERK, but not p38 or JNK, also partially inhibited PGE2-induced mechanical allodynia. Western blot analyses confirmed that i.pl. injection of PGE2 activated PKA, PKCα, and mitogen activated kinases (MAPKs) in the paw. Co-treatment with EP3 or EP4 receptor antagonists reduced PGE2-induced PKA and ERK, but not PKCα activation. Conclusions and Implications: The present results indicate that the nociceptive behaviour and mechanical allodynia caused by i.pl. PGE2 are mediated through activation of distinct EP receptors and PK-dependent mechanisms. PMID:17310141

  10. Taurine and platelet aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Nauss-Karol, C.; VanderWende, C.; Gaut, Z.N.

    1986-03-01

    Taurine is a putative neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. The endogenous taurine concentration in human platelets, determined by amino acid analysis, is 15 ..mu..M/g. In spite of this high level, taurine is actively accumulated. Uptake is saturable, Na/sup +/ and temperature dependent, and suppressed by metabolic inhibitors, structural analogues, and several classes of centrally active substances. High, medium and low affinity transport processes have been characterized, and the platelet may represent a model system for taurine transport in the CNS. When platelets were incubated with /sup 14/C-taurine for 30 minutes, then resuspended in fresh medium and reincubated for one hour, essentially all of the taurine was retained within the cells. Taurine, at concentrations ranging from 10-1000 ..mu..M, had no effect on platelet aggregation induced by ADP or epinephrine. However, taurine may have a role in platelet aggregation since 35-39% of the taurine taken up by human platelets appears to be secreted during the release reaction induced by low concentrations of either epinephrine or ADP, respectively. This release phenomenon would imply that part of the taurine taken up is stored directly in the dense bodies of the platelet.

  11. Interaction between glycosaminoglycans and immunoglobulin light chains.

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Myatt, E.; Lykos, P.; Stevens, F. J.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Illinois Inst. of Tech.

    1997-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a pathological process in which normally soluble proteins polymerize to form insoluble fibrils (amyloid). Amyloid formation is found in a number of diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, adult-onset diabetes, and light-chain-associated amyloidosis. No pharmaceutical methods currently exist to prevent this process or to remove the fibrils from tissue. The search for treatment and prevention methods is hampered by a limited understanding of the biophysical basis of amyloid formation. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are long, unbranched heteropolysaccharides composed of repeating disaccharide subunits and are known to associate with amyloid fibrils. The interaction of amyloid-associated free light chains with GAGs was tested by both size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis experiments. The results indicated that heparin 16 000 and chondroitin sulfate B and C precipitated both human intact light chains and recombinant light chain variable domains. Although all light chains interacted with heparin, the strongest interactions were obtained with proteins that had formed amyloid. Molecular modeling indicated the possibility of interaction between heparin and the conserved saddle like surface of the light chain dimer opposite the complementarity-determining segments that form part of the antigen-binding site of a functional antibody. This suggestion might offer a new path to block the aggregation of amyloid-associated light chain proteins, by design of antagonists based on properties of GAG binding. A hexasaccharide was modeled as the basis for a possible antagonist.

  12. Holographic characterization of protein aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen; Zhong, Xiao; Ruffner, David; Stutt, Alexandra; Philips, Laura; Ward, Michael; Grier, David

    Holographic characterization directly measures the size distribution of subvisible protein aggregates in suspension and offers insights into their morphology. Based on holographic video microscopy, this analytical technique records and interprets holograms of individual aggregates in protein solutions as they flow down a microfluidic channel, without requiring labeling or other exceptional sample preparation. The hologram of an individual protein aggregate is analyzed in real time with the Lorenz-Mie theory of light scattering to measure that aggregate's size and optical properties. Detecting, counting and characterizing subvisible aggregates proceeds fast enough for time-resolved studies, and lends itself to tracking trends in protein aggregation arising from changing environmental factors. No other analytical technique provides such a wealth of particle-resolved characterization data in situ. Holographic characterization promises accelerated development of therapeutic protein formulations, improved process control during manufacturing, and streamlined quality assurance during storage and at the point of use. Mrsec and MRI program of the NSF, Spheryx Inc.

  13. 21 CFR 866.5520 - Immunoglobulin G (Fab fragment specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Immunoglobulin G (Fab fragment specific... Test Systems § 866.5520 Immunoglobulin G (Fab fragment specific) immunological test system. (a) Identification. An immunoglobulin G (Fab fragment specific) immunological test system is a device that...

  14. Studies on the quantitation of immunoglobulin in human intestinal secretions

    PubMed Central

    Samson, R. R.; McClelland, D. B. L.; Shearman, D. J. C.

    1973-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for the importance of the secretory immune system in the gut. In studies of local antibody production it is important to have satisfactory methods for measuring immunoglobulin concentrations and to be aware of the errors which may occur. Studies on immunoglobulin measurement in intestinal secretion by the radial immunodiffusion method are reported, showing the effects of proteolytic digestion, IgA molecular size, and sampling and storage conditions. Because of the presence of monomeric IgA in addition to secretory IgA, there is no satisfactory standard for IgA in gastrointestinal secretions, and only semi-quantitative results can be given. With radial immunodiffusion, IgG and IgM when subjected to tryptic digestion, and IgA when subjected to peptic digestion, may be overestimated because of the presence of fragments of immunoglobulins. In addition, pepsin rapidly destroys IgM and IgG. Both IgM and IgG are unstable in storage. The findings suggest that immunoglobulin concentration measurements in small intestinal aspirates should be interpreted with caution. These problems are also relevant to the detection of specific antibodies in gastrointestinal secretions. ImagesFig 3Fig 5Fig 7Fig 8Fig 9Fig 11 PMID:4582728

  15. Intravenous Immunoglobulin in the Treatment of Severe Clostridium Difficile Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nihar; Shaaban, Hamid; Spira, Robert; Slim, Jihad; Boghossian, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has been utilized in patients with recurrent and refractory Clostridium difficile colitis. It is increasingly being used in patients with initial clinical presentation of severe colitis. Herein, we report a case of severe C. Difficile colitis successfully treated with IVIG with a review of the medical literature to identify the optimal timing and clinical characteristics for this treatment strategy. PMID:24926170

  16. Adult Fanconi syndrome with monoclonal abnormality of immunoglobulin light chain

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, J. F.; Blainey, J. D.

    1967-01-01

    Two adult cases of the Fanconi syndrome are described, in each of which there was abnormal urinary excretion of immunoglobulin κ-chain. The significance of this finding is discussed in relation to the recognized association between multiple myeloma and the Fanconi syndrome. Images PMID:6016886

  17. Immunoglobulin genes: generating diversity with AID and UNG.

    PubMed

    Storb, Ursula; Stavnezer, Janet

    2002-10-29

    Somatic hypermutation and switch recombination of immunoglobulin genes require the activity of the activation-induced deaminase, AID. Recent studies of mice deficient for the uracil-DNA glycosylase UNG, which removes U from DNA, suggest that AID catalyses the deamination of dC to dU during antibody diversification.

  18. Molecular analysis of the immunoglobulin genes in goose.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tian; Wu, Kun; Yuan, Xiaoli; Shao, Shuai; Wang, WenYuan; Wei, Si; Cao, Gengsheng

    2016-07-01

    Immunoglobulins play an important role in adaptive immune system as defense molecules against pathogens. However, our knowledge on avian immunoglobulin genes has been limited to a few species. In this study, we analyzed goose (Anser cygnoides orientalis) immunoglobulin genes. Three IgH classes including IgM, IgA, IgY and λ light chain were identified. The IgM and IgA heavy chain constant regions are characteristically similar to their counterparts described in other vertebrates. In addition to the classic Ig isotypes, we also detected a transcript that encoded a truncated form of IgY (IgY(ΔFc)) in goose. Similar to duck, the IgY(ΔFc) in goose was generated by using different transcriptional termination signal of the same υ gene. Limited variability and only one leader peptide were observed in VH and VL domains, which suggested that gene conversion was the primary mechanism involved in goose antibody diversity. Our study provides more insights into the immunoglobulin genes in goose that had not been fully explored before.

  19. [Clinical significance of analysis of immunoglobulin A levels in saliva].

    PubMed

    Bokor-Bratić, M

    2000-01-01

    SALIVA COLLECTION: Whole saliva is a product of secretion of 3 major glands (parotid, submandibular, sublingual) and many minor glands (labial, buccal, palatal). Unstimulated saliva is usually obtained as the patient spits out every 60 sec. or by forward bended head the patient allows saliva to drip off the lower lip into a cylinder. By collection of saliva in the tube the flow rate per unit time can be measured. When volume measurement is not required the saliva can be collected on cotton rolls, gauze or filter paper. For evaluating salivary gland function or when large volumes of saliva are required for analytic purposes, stimulated whole saliva is used. Method of collection is the same as for unstimulated saliva. The usual masticatory stimuli are paraffin wax or a washed rubber band. A standard gustatory stimulus is obtained by 2% citric acid applied directly to the tongue every 15 to 60 sec. Parotid saliva can be collected by aspiration from the duct opening with a micropipette. Parotid saliva is best collected with Lashley's vacuum chamber. Submandibular and sublingual saliva can be collected by cannulation of the duct with micropipette, but in practice this is both uncomfortable for the patients and technically difficult since the duct orifice is mobile and has a strong sphincter. Because of that, alginate and silicone impression material is used for retention of the collecting tube. As alternative and simple technique is to block off secretion from the parotid glands with absorbent swabs and collect mixed submandibular and sublingual saliva by pipette from the floor of the mouth. Saliva from labial and palatal glands can be collected by filter paper disc or disc of other synthetic materials. SALIVARY IMMUNOGLOBULIN A: The most significant characteristics of the salivary immunoglobulin system are quantitative domination of immunoglobulin A, local synthesis and specific structure. Immunofluorescence studies have shown that immunoglobulin A is produced by

  20. Hsp70 and antifibrillogenic peptides promote degradation and inhibit intracellular aggregation of amyloidogenic light chains.

    SciTech Connect

    Dul, J. L.; Davis, D. P.; Williamson, E. K.; Stevens, F. J.; Argon, Y.; Univ. of Chicago

    2001-02-19

    In light chain (LC) amyloidosis an immunoglobulin LC assembles into fibrils that are deposited in various tissues. Little is known about how these fibrils form in vivo. We previously showed that a known amyloidogenic LC, SMA, can give rise to amyloid fibrils in vitro when a segment of one of its {beta} sheets undergoes a conformational change, exposing an Hsp70 binding site. To examine SMA aggregation in vivo, we expressed it and its wild-type counterpart, LEN, in COS cells. While LEN is rapidly oxidized and subsequently secreted, newly synthesized SMA remains in the reduced state. Most SMA molecules are dislocated out of the ER into the cytosol, where they are ubiquitinylated and degraded by proteasomes. A parallel pathway for molecules that are not degraded is condensation into perinuclear aggresomes that are surrounded by vimentin-containing intermediate filaments and are dependent upon intact microtubules. Inhibition of proteasome activity shifts the balance toward aggresome formation. Intracellular aggregation is decreased and targeting to proteasomes improved by overexpression of the cytosolic chaperone Hsp70. Importantly, transduction into the cell of an Hsp70 target peptide, derived from the LC sequence, also reduces aggresome formation and increases SMA degradation. These results demonstrate that an amyloidogenic LC can aggregate intracellularly despite the common presentation of extracellular aggregates, and that a similar molecular surface mediates both in vitro fibril formation and in vivo aggregation. Furthermore, rationally designed peptides can be used to suppress this aggregation and may provide a feasible therapeutic approach.

  1. Mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of Teleost fish

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Irene; Zhang, Yong-An; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2012-01-01

    As physical barriers that separate teleost fish from the external environment, mucosae are also active immunological sites that protect them against exposure to microbes and stressors. In mammals, the sites where antigens are sampled from mucosal surfaces and where stimulation of naive T and B lymphocytes occurs are known as inductive sites and are constituted by mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). According to anatomical location, the MALT in teleost fish is subdivided into gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), and gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT). All MALT contain a variety of leukocytes, including, but not limited to, T cells, B cells, plasma cells, macrophages and granulocytes. Secretory immunoglobulins are produced mainly by plasmablasts and plasma cells, and play key roles in the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis. Until recently, teleost fish B cells were thought to express only two classes of immunoglobulins, IgM and IgD, in which IgM was thought to be the only one responding to pathogens both in systemic and mucosal compartments. However, a third teleost immunoglobulin class, IgT/IgZ, was discovered in 2005, and it has recently been shown to behave as the prevalent immunoglobulin in gut mucosal immune responses. The purpose of this review is to summarise the current knowledge of mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of fish MALT. Moreover, we attempt to integrate the existing knowledge on both basic and applied research findings on fish mucosal immune responses, with the goal to provide new directions that may facilitate the development of novel vaccination strategies that stimulate not only systemic, but also mucosal immunity. PMID:22133710

  2. Treatment with hyperimmune equine immunoglobulin or immunoglobulin fragments completely protects rodents from Ebola virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xuexing; Wong, Gary; Zhao, Yongkun; Wang, Hualei; He, Shihua; Bi, Yuhai; Chen, Weijin; Jin, Hongli; Gai, Weiwei; Chu, Di; Cao, Zengguo; Wang, Chong; Fan, Quanshui; Chi, Hang; Gao, Yuwei; Wang, Tiecheng; Feng, Na; Yan, Feihu; Huang, Geng; Zheng, Ying; Li, Nan; Li, Yuetao; Qian, Jun; Zou, Yong; Kobinger, Gary; Gao, George Fu; Qiu, Xiangguo; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-01-01

    Recent successes with monoclonal antibody cocktails ZMappTM and MIL77 against Ebola virus (EBOV) infections have reignited interest in antibody-based therapeutics. Since the production process for monoclonal antibodies can be prolonged and costly, alternative treatments should be investigated. We produced purified equine antisera from horses hyperimmunized with EBOV virus-like particles, and tested the post-exposure efficacy of the antisera in a mouse model of infection. BALB/c mice were given up to 2 mg of purified equine antisera per animal, at 30 minutes, 1 or 2 days post-infection (dpi), in which all animals survived. To decrease the possibility of serum sickness, the equine antisera was digested with pepsin to generate F(ab′)2 fragments, with in vitro neutralizing activity comparable to whole immunoglobulin. Full protection was achieved with when treatment was initiated at 1 dpi, but the suboptimal protection observed with the 30 minute and 2 dpi groups demonstrate that in addition to virus neutralization, other Fc-dependent antibody mechanisms may also contribute to survival. Guinea pigs given 20 mg of antisera or F(ab′)2 at or starting at 1 or 2 dpi were also fully protected from EBOV infection. These results justify future efficacy studies for purified equine products in NHPs. PMID:27067649

  3. Treatment with hyperimmune equine immunoglobulin or immunoglobulin fragments completely protects rodents from Ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xuexing; Wong, Gary; Zhao, Yongkun; Wang, Hualei; He, Shihua; Bi, Yuhai; Chen, Weijin; Jin, Hongli; Gai, Weiwei; Chu, Di; Cao, Zengguo; Wang, Chong; Fan, Quanshui; Chi, Hang; Gao, Yuwei; Wang, Tiecheng; Feng, Na; Yan, Feihu; Huang, Geng; Zheng, Ying; Li, Nan; Li, Yuetao; Qian, Jun; Zou, Yong; Kobinger, Gary; Gao, George Fu; Qiu, Xiangguo; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-01-01

    Recent successes with monoclonal antibody cocktails ZMapp(TM) and MIL77 against Ebola virus (EBOV) infections have reignited interest in antibody-based therapeutics. Since the production process for monoclonal antibodies can be prolonged and costly, alternative treatments should be investigated. We produced purified equine antisera from horses hyperimmunized with EBOV virus-like particles, and tested the post-exposure efficacy of the antisera in a mouse model of infection. BALB/c mice were given up to 2 mg of purified equine antisera per animal, at 30 minutes, 1 or 2 days post-infection (dpi), in which all animals survived. To decrease the possibility of serum sickness, the equine antisera was digested with pepsin to generate F(ab')2 fragments, with in vitro neutralizing activity comparable to whole immunoglobulin. Full protection was achieved with when treatment was initiated at 1 dpi, but the suboptimal protection observed with the 30 minute and 2 dpi groups demonstrate that in addition to virus neutralization, other Fc-dependent antibody mechanisms may also contribute to survival. Guinea pigs given 20 mg of antisera or F(ab')2 at or starting at 1 or 2 dpi were also fully protected from EBOV infection. These results justify future efficacy studies for purified equine products in NHPs.

  4. ApoE Receptor 2 mediates trophoblast dysfunction and pregnancy complications induced by antiphospholipid antibodies in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Victoria; Gelber, Shari E.; Vukelic, Milena; Sacharidou, Anastasia; Herz, Joachim; Urbanus, Rolf T.; de Groot, Philip G.; Natale, David R.; Harihara, Anirudha; Redecha, Patricia; Abrahams, Vikki M.; Shaul, Philip W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pregnancies in women with the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are frequently complicated by fetal loss and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). How circulating antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) cause pregnancy complications in APS is poorly understood. We sought to determine if the LDL receptor family member apoE receptor 2 (apoER2) mediates trophoblast dysfunction and pregnancy complications induced by aPL. Methods Placental and trophoblast apoER2 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Normal human IgG (NHIgG) and aPL were purified from healthy individuals and APS patients, respectively. The role of apoER2 in aPL-induced changes in trophoblast proliferation, migration and kinase activation was assessed using RNA interference in HTR-8/SVneo cells. The participation of apoER2 in aPL-induced pregnancy loss and IUGR was evaluated in pregnant apoER2+/+ and apoER2−/− mice injected with aPL or NHIgG. Results We found that apoER2 is abundant in human and mouse placental trophoblasts, and in multiple trophoblast-derived cell lines including HTR-8/SVneo cells. ApoER2 and its interaction with the cell surface protein β2-glycoprotein I were required for aPL-induced inhibition of cultured trophoblast proliferation and migration. In parallel, aPL antagonism of Akt kinase activation by EGF in trophoblasts was mediated by apoER2. Furthermore, in a murine passive transfer model of pregnancy complications of APS, apoER2−/− mice were protected from both aPL-induced fetal loss and aPL-induced IUGR. Conclusion ApoER2 plays a major role in the attenuation of trophoblast function by aPL, and the receptor mediates aPL-induced pregnancy complications in vivo in mice. ApoER2-directed interventions can now potentially be developed to combat the pregnancy complications associated with APS. PMID:26474194

  5. Human Eosinophils Express the High Affinity IgE Receptor, FcεRI, in Bullous Pemphigoid

    PubMed Central

    Messingham, Kelly N.; Holahan, Heather M.; Frydman, Alexandra S.; Fullenkamp, Colleen; Srikantha, Rupasree; Fairley, Janet A.

    2014-01-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune blistering disease mediated by autoantibodies targeting BP180 (type XVII collagen). Patient sera and tissues typically have IgG and IgE autoantibodies and elevated eosinophil numbers. Although the pathogenicity of the IgE autoantibodies is established in BP, their contribution to the disease process is not well understood. Our aims were two-fold: 1) To establish the clinical relationships between total and BP180-specific IgE, eosinophilia and other markers of disease activity; and 2) To determine if eosinophils from BP patients express the high affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI, as a potential mechanism of action for IgE in BP. Our analysis of 48 untreated BP patients revealed a correlation between BP180 IgG and both BP180 IgE and peripheral eosinophil count. Additionally, we established a correlation between total IgE concentration and both BP180 IgE levels and eosinophil count. When only sera from patients (n = 16) with total IgE≥400 IU/ml were analyzed, BP180 IgG levels correlated with disease severity, BP230 IgG, total circulating IgE and BP180 IgE. Finally, peripheral eosinophil count correlated more strongly with levels of BP180 IgE then with BP180 IgG. Next, eosinophil FcεRI expression was investigated in the blood and skin using several methods. Peripheral eosinophils from BP patients expressed mRNA for all three chains (α, β and γ) of the FcεRI. Surface expression of the FcεRIα was confirmed on both peripheral and tissue eosinophils from most BP patients by immunostaining. Furthermore, using a proximity ligation assay, interaction of the α- and β-chains of the FcεRI was observed in some biopsy specimens, suggesting tissue expression of the trimeric receptor form in some patients. These studies provide clinical support for the relevance of IgE in BP disease and provide one mechanism of action of these antibodies, via binding to the FcεRI on eosinophils. PMID:25255430

  6. Human eosinophils express the high affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI, in bullous pemphigoid.

    PubMed

    Messingham, Kelly N; Holahan, Heather M; Frydman, Alexandra S; Fullenkamp, Colleen; Srikantha, Rupasree; Fairley, Janet A

    2014-01-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune blistering disease mediated by autoantibodies targeting BP180 (type XVII collagen). Patient sera and tissues typically have IgG and IgE autoantibodies and elevated eosinophil numbers. Although the pathogenicity of the IgE autoantibodies is established in BP, their contribution to the disease process is not well understood. Our aims were two-fold: 1) To establish the clinical relationships between total and BP180-specific IgE, eosinophilia and other markers of disease activity; and 2) To determine if eosinophils from BP patients express the high affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI, as a potential mechanism of action for IgE in BP. Our analysis of 48 untreated BP patients revealed a correlation between BP180 IgG and both BP180 IgE and peripheral eosinophil count. Additionally, we established a correlation between total IgE concentration and both BP180 IgE levels and eosinophil count. When only sera from patients (n = 16) with total IgE ≥ 400 IU/ml were analyzed, BP180 IgG levels correlated with disease severity, BP230 IgG, total circulating IgE and BP180 IgE. Finally, peripheral eosinophil count correlated more strongly with levels of BP180 IgE then with BP180 IgG. Next, eosinophil FcεRI expression was investigated in the blood and skin using several methods. Peripheral eosinophils from BP patients expressed mRNA for all three chains (α, β and γ) of the FcεRI. Surface expression of the FcεRIα was confirmed on both peripheral and tissue eosinophils from most BP patients by immunostaining. Furthermore, using a proximity ligation assay, interaction of the α- and β-chains of the FcεRI was observed in some biopsy specimens, suggesting tissue expression of the trimeric receptor form in some patients. These studies provide clinical support for the relevance of IgE in BP disease and provide one mechanism of action of these antibodies, via binding to the FcεRI on eosinophils. PMID:25255430

  7. Peptide aggregation in neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Regina M

    2002-01-01

    In the not-so-distant past, insoluble aggregated protein was considered as uninteresting and bothersome as yesterday's trash. More recently, protein aggregates have enjoyed considerable scientific interest, as it has become clear that these aggregates play key roles in many diseases. In this review, we focus attention on three polypeptides: beta-amyloid, prion, and huntingtin, which are linked to three feared neurodegenerative diseases: Alzheimer's, "mad cow," and Huntington's disease, respectively. These proteins lack any significant primary sequence homology, yet their aggregates possess very similar features, specifically, high beta-sheet content, fibrillar morphology, relative insolubility, and protease resistance. Because the aggregates are noncrystalline, secrets of their structure at nanometer resolution are only slowly yielding to X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR, and other techniques. Besides structure, the aggregates may possess similar pathways of assembly. Two alternative assembly pathways have been proposed: the nucleation-elongation and the template-assisted mode. These two modes may be complementary, not mutually exclusive. Strategies for interfering with aggregation, which may provide novel therapeutic approaches, are under development. The structural similarities between protein aggregates of dissimilar origin suggest that therapeutic strategies successful against one disease may have broad utility in others. PMID:12117755

  8. Topics in Probabilistic Judgment Aggregation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Guanchun

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation is a compilation of several studies that are united by their relevance to probabilistic judgment aggregation. In the face of complex and uncertain events, panels of judges are frequently consulted to provide probabilistic forecasts, and aggregation of such estimates in groups often yield better results than could have been made…

  9. Mineral of the month: aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, Valentin V.

    2005-01-01

    Natural aggregates, consisting of crushed stone, and sand and gravel, are a major contributor to economic health, and have an amazing variety of uses. Aggregates are among the most abundant mineral resources and are major basic raw materials used by construction, agriculture and other industries that employ complex chemical and metallurgical processes.

  10. Comparison of techniques of detecting immunoglobulin-binding protein reactivity to immunoglobulin produced by different avian and mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Justiz-Vaillant, A A; Akpaka, P E; McFarlane-Anderson, N; Smikle, M F

    2013-01-01

    The rationale of this study was to use several immunological assays to investigate the reactivity of immunoglobulin binding protein (IBP) to immunoglobulins from various avian and mammalian species. The IBP studied were Staphylococcal protein A (SpA), Streptococcal protein G (SpG), Peptostreptococcal protein L (SpL) and recombinant protein LA (SpLA). The various immunological techniques used were double immunodiffusion (Ouchterlony technique) that tested positive high protein reactivities, direct and competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) that tested moderate and low positive protein binding capacities, respectively. In addition to sandwich ELISAs, immunoblot analyses and Ig-purification by SpA-affinity chromatography, which were sensitive tests and helpful in the screening and confirmatory tests were also used. The Ouchterlony technique showed that compared to the other proteins, SpLA had the highest range of reactivity with animal sera and purified immunoglobulins while SpL was least reactive. With the direct ELISA, SpL reacted with the raccoon sera, rabbit IgG and with IgY from bantam hens and pigeons. While with the direct ELISA, SpA reacted with sera from skunk, coyote, raccoon, mule, donkey and human. The sandwich ELISA revealed high reactivity of both SpG and SpLA with mammalian sera titres ranging from 1:32 (raccoon serum) to 1:1024 (mule and donkey sera). These results suggest that IBP can be used for the detection of immunoglobulin using various immunological assays and this is important for the diagnosis of infectious diseases in animal and bird populations studied and in the purification of immunoglobulins. PMID:24171322

  11. Molecular aggregation of humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) form molecular aggregates in solution and on mineral surfaces. Elucidation of the mechanism of formation of these aggregates is important for an understanding of the interactions of HS in soils arid natural waters. The HS are formed mainly by enzymatic depolymerization and oxidation of plant biopolymers. These reactions transform the aromatic and lipid plant components into amphiphilic molecules, that is, molecules that consist of separate hydrophobic (nonpolar) and hydrophilic (polar) parts. The nonpolar parts of the molecules are composed of relatively unaltered segments of plant polymers and the polar parts of carboxylic acid groups. These amphiphiles form membrane-like aggregates on mineral surfaces and micelle-like aggregates in solution. The exterior surfaces of these aggregates are hydrophilic, and the interiors constitute separate hydrophobic liquid-like phases.

  12. Nanoparticle aggregation: principles and modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    The high surface area to volume ratio of nanoparticles usually results in highly reactive and colloidal instability compared to their bulk counterparts. Aggregation as well as many other transformations (e.g., dissolution) in the environment may alter the physiochemical properties, reactivity, fate, transport, and biological interactions (e.g., bioavailability and uptake) of nanoparticles. The unique properties pertinent to nanoparticles, such as shape, size, surface characteristics, composition, and electronic structures, greatly challenge the ability of colloid science to understand nanoparticle aggregation and its environmental impacts. This review briefly introduces fundamentals about aggregation, fractal dimensions, classic and extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeak (DLVO) theories, aggregation kinetic modeling, experimental measurements, followed by detailed discussions on the major factors on aggregation and subsequent effects on nanomaterial transport and reactivity.

  13. Immunogenicity of Therapeutic Protein Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Ehab M; Panchal, Jainik P; Moorthy, Balakrishnan S; Blum, Janice S; Joubert, Marisa K; Narhi, Linda O; Topp, Elizabeth M

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic proteins have a propensity for aggregation during manufacturing, shipping, and storage. The presence of aggregates in protein drug products can induce adverse immune responses in patients that may affect safety and efficacy, and so it is of concern to both manufacturers and regulatory agencies. In this vein, there is a lack of understanding of the physicochemical determinants of immunological responses and a lack of standardized analytical methods to survey the molecular properties of aggregates associated with immune activation. In this review, we provide an overview of the basic immune mechanisms in the context of interactions with protein aggregates. We then critically examine the literature with emphasis on the underlying immune mechanisms as they relate to aggregate properties. Finally, we highlight the gaps in our current understanding of this issue and offer recommendations for future research. PMID:26869409

  14. Mechanics of fire ant aggregations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennenbaum, Michael; Liu, Zhongyang; Hu, David; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Fire ants link their bodies to form aggregations; these can adopt a variety of structures, they can drip and spread, or withstand applied loads. Here, by using oscillatory rheology, we show that fire ant aggregations are viscoelastic. We find that, at the lowest ant densities probed and in the linear regime, the elastic and viscous moduli are essentially identical over the spanned frequency range, which highlights the absence of a dominant mode of structural relaxation. As ant density increases, the elastic modulus rises, which we interpret by alluding to ant crowding and subsequent jamming. When deformed beyond the linear regime, the aggregation flows, exhibiting shear-thinning behaviour with a stress load that is comparable to the maximum load the aggregation can withstand before individual ants are torn apart. Our findings illustrate the rich, collective mechanical behaviour that can arise in aggregations of active, interacting building blocks.

  15. Mechanics of fire ant aggregations.

    PubMed

    Tennenbaum, Michael; Liu, Zhongyang; Hu, David; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Fire ants link their bodies to form aggregations; these can adopt a variety of structures, they can drip and spread, or withstand applied loads. Here, by using oscillatory rheology, we show that fire ant aggregations are viscoelastic. We find that, at the lowest ant densities probed and in the linear regime, the elastic and viscous moduli are essentially identical over the spanned frequency range, which highlights the absence of a dominant mode of structural relaxation. As ant density increases, the elastic modulus rises, which we interpret by alluding to ant crowding and subsequent jamming. When deformed beyond the linear regime, the aggregation flows, exhibiting shear-thinning behaviour with a stress load that is comparable to the maximum load the aggregation can withstand before individual ants are torn apart. Our findings illustrate the rich, collective mechanical behaviour that can arise in aggregations of active, interacting building blocks. PMID:26501413

  16. Adsorption-induced colloidal aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, B. M.; Petit, J.-M.; Beysens, D.

    1998-03-01

    Reversible colloidal aggregation in binary liquid mixtures has been studied for a number of years. As the phase separation temperature of the liquid mixture is approached the thickness of an adsorption layer around the colloidal particles increases. Beysens and coworkers have demonstrated experimentally that this adsorption layer is intimately connected with the aggregation of the colloidal particles, however, no definitive theory has been available which can explain all of the experimental observations. In this contribution we describe an extension of the Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek theory of colloidal aggregation which takes into account the presence of the adsorption layer and which more realistically models the attractive dispersion interactions. This modified theory can quantitatively account for many of the observed experimental features such as the characteristics of the aggregated state, the general shape of the aggregation line, and the temperature dependence of the second virial coefficient for a lutidine-water mixture containing a small volume fraction of silica colloidal particles.

  17. [Immunoglobulins or plasma exchange? Guillain-Barré syndrome: indications for plasma exchange and immunoglobulins].

    PubMed

    Raphaël, J C; Chevret, S; Jars-Guincestre, M C; Chastang, C; Gajdos, P

    1993-01-01

    The effect of plasma exchange (PE) in the Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) has been evaluated in 4 randomized clinical trials. A positive effect could be excluded in only one study conducted in Great Britain which included 29 patients. The more powerful studies conducted in Sweden (39 patients), in North America (245 patients) and in France (220 patients) demonstrated that early use of four PEs in patients with a GBS severe enough to require assistance in walking was followed by decreased duration and severity of the acute phase. These conclusions were ratified at a North American consensus conference. More recently, PE has been demonstrated to increase the number of patients who recover normal muscular power after a 1-year follow-up. The French trial also demonstrated that diluted albumin should be preferred over fresh frozen plasma. The number of plasma exchanges and the role of PE in initially benign forms is of great importance and is now under study by a cooperative group in France. The effect of immunoglobulins (IgG) was recently investigated in a randomized trial including 150 patients. In this study, high doses (0.4 g/kg/day for 5 days) were compared with 5 PE administered between days 7 and 14 in children and adults who, at inclusion, were unable to walk. The main result was that the outcome at one month was good with IgG as with PE. Treatment is easier with IgG, and morbidity is lower. Direct costs are similar. If IgG are shown to be as effective as PE, IgG should be given for GBS.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Complement and immunoglobulins stimulate superoxide production by human leukocytes independently of phagocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, I M; Roos, D; Kaplan, H B; Weissmann, G

    1975-01-01

    Human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes, when exposed to appropriate stimuli, generate significant amounts of superoxide anion (O-.2), a highly reactive molecule which is possibly involved in bacterial killing. Since the subcellular localization and mechanism of activation of O-.2 generating systems are unknown, we have investigated superoxide dismutase-inhibitable cytochrome c reduction (attributable to O-.2) by, and lysosomal enzyme release from, normal polymorphonuclear leukocytes and cells rendered incapable of ingesting particles by treatment with cytochalasin B. Neither phagocytosis nor lysosomal degranulation were prerequisites for enhanced O-.2 generation. Cytochalasin B-treated cells exposed to (a) serum-treated zymosan, a C3b receptor stimulus; (b) heat aggregated human IgG, an Fc receptor stimulus; and (c) the complement component, C5a, generated enhanced amounts of O-.2 in a time and concentration-dependent fashion. These cells also responded by releasing lysosomal enzymes, but there was no correlation between the ability of any immune reactant to provoke enzyme release and its ability to stimulate O-.2 generation. The three stimuli also enhanced O-.2 generation by normal (untreated) polymorphonuclear leukocytes, but only serum-treated zymosan and aggregated IgG were capable of provoking lysosomal enzyme release from normal cells. Untreated zymosan and native IgG neither stimulated O-.2 production nor provoked lysomal enzyme release. Since enhanced O-.2 production was stimulated by immune reactants in the absence of phagocytosis, the O-.2 generating system is very likely associated with the external plasma membrane of the polymorphonuclear leukocyte. Leukocyte membrane receptors for complement and immunoglobulins may therefore not only serve in particle recognition but also may initiate biochemical events which accompany phagocytosis and killing. PMID:171281

  19. New principle for the simultaneous detection of total and immunoglobulin M antibodies applied to the measurement of antibody to hepatitis B core antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Angarano, G; Monno, L; Santantonio, T A; Pastore, G

    1984-01-01

    A new test principle for the simultaneous detection of total approximate titers and immunoglobulin M antibodies has been developed and applied to the detection of antibody to hepatitis B core antigen. The method is based on the combination of a competition radioimmunoassay, for the determination of total antibody titer, with an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the determination of single class antibodies. The interference of the rheumatoid factor was avoided by including heat-aggregated immunoglobulin G in the dilution buffer. The specificity, sensitivity, and clinical application of the test are discussed. The results presented suggest that the simultaneous detection of total and immunoglobulin M antibody to hepatitis B core antigen might be helpful in the differentiation between previous and recent or ongoing hepatitis B infection, as well as in the differential diagnosis of acute hepatitis, in monitoring viral activity in chronic infections, and in helping to differentiate acute from chronic infections. The test principle appears applicable in the accurate diagnosis of other infectious diseases by a single test on only one serum sample. PMID:6381530

  20. [The role of immunoglobulin preparations in treatment of allergic diseases].

    PubMed

    Boznański, Andrzej; Widerska, Alicja

    2002-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has been used for many years to treat patients with primary immunodeficiencies. More recently, IVIG has been shown to have antiinflammatory activity when used at substantially higher concentrations. A number of studies have examined the efficacy of IVIG in allergic diseases. For patients with severe refractory asthma, sinusitis, atopic dermatitis, and urticaria, IVIG offers an alternative therapy with relatively few side effects. Although the mechanism by which IVIG may attenuate the allergic response is still undetermined, clinical studies have shown that immunoglobulin therapy can decrease serum IgE levels and increase glucocorticoid binding affinity, while in vitro studies have shown that IVIG can decrease T-cell secretion of TH2 cytokines.

  1. Comparative analyses of immunoglobulin genes: surprises and portents.

    PubMed

    Flajnik, Martin F

    2002-09-01

    The study of immunoglobulin genes in non-mouse and non-human models has shown that different vertebrate groups have evolved distinct methods of generating antibody diversity. By contrast, the development of T cells in the thymus is quite similar in all of the species that have been examined. The three mechanisms by which B cells uniquely modify their immunoglobulin genes -- somatic hypermutation, gene conversion and class switching -- are increasingly believed to share some fundamental mechanisms, which studies in different vertebrate groups have helped (and will continue to help) to resolve. When these mechanisms are better understood, we should be able to look to the constitutive pathways from which they have evolved and perhaps determine whether the rearrangement of variable, diversity and joining antibody gene segments -- V(D)J recombination -- was superimposed on an existing adaptive immune system.

  2. Somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes is linked to transcription initiation.

    PubMed

    Peters, A; Storb, U

    1996-01-01

    To identify DNA sequences that target the somatic hypermutation process, the immunoglobulin gene promoter located upstream of the variable (V) region was duplicated upstream of the constant (C) region of a kappa transgene. Normally, kappa genes are somatically mutated only in the VJ region, but not in the C region. In B cell hybridomas from mice with this kappa transgene (P5'C), both the VJ region and the C region, but not the region between them, were mutated at similar frequencies, suggesting that the mutation mechanism is related to transcription. The downstream promoter was not occluded by transcripts from the upstream promoter. In fact, the levels of transcripts originating from the two promoters were similar, supporting a mutation model based on initiation of transcripts. Several "hot-spots" of somatic mutation were noted, further demonstrating that this transgene has the hallmarks of somatic mutation of endogenous immunoglobulin genes. A model linking somatic mutation to transcription-coupled DNA repair is proposed.

  3. Dual immunoglobulin light chain B cells: Trojan horses of autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Pelanda, Roberta

    2014-04-01

    Receptor editing, a major mechanism of B cell tolerance, can also lead to allelic inclusion at the immunoglobulin light chain loci and the development of B cells that coexpress two different immunoglobulin light chains and, therefore, two antibody specificities. Most allelically included B cells express two κ chains, although rare dual-λ cells are also observed. Moreover, these cells typically coexpress an autoreactive and a nonautoreactive antibody. Thus, allelically included B cells could operate like 'Trojan horses': expression and function of the nonautoreactive antigen receptors might promote their maturation, activation, and terminal differentiation into effector cells that also express and secrete autoantibodies. Indeed, dual-κ B cells are greatly expanded into effector B cell subsets in some autoimmune mice, thus indicating they might play an important role in disease.

  4. Intravenous Immunoglobulin in the Management of Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Wenderfer, Scott E.; Thacker, Trisha

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of nephritis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The pathogenesis of lupus nephritis is complex, involving innate and adaptive cellular and humoral immune responses. Autoantibodies in particular have been shown to be critical in the initiation and progression of renal injury, via interactions with both Fc-receptors and complement. One approach in the management of patients with lupus nephritis has been the use of intravenous immunoglobulin. This therapy has shown benefit in the setting of many forms of autoantibody-mediated injury; however, the mechanisms of efficacy are not fully understood. In this paper, the data supporting the use of immunoglobulin therapy in lupus nephritis will be evaluated. In addition, the potential mechanisms of action will be discussed with respect to the known involvement of complement and Fc-receptors in the kidney parenchyma. Results are provocative and warrant additional clinical trials. PMID:23056926

  5. A multipurpose capacitive biosensor for assay and quality control of human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Labib, Mahmoud; Hedström, Martin; Amin, Magdy; Mattiasson, Bo

    2009-10-01

    We report a flow-injection biosensor system with a capacitive transducer for assay and quality control of human immunoglobulin G (hIgG). The sensing platform is based on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of carboxylic acid terminated alkyl-thiols with covalently attached concanavalin A. The electrochemical characteristics of the sensor surface were assessed by cyclic voltammetry using a permeable redox couple (potassium ferricyanide). The developed biosensor proved capable of performing a sensitive label-free assay of hIgG with a detection limit of 1.0 microg mL(-1). The capacitance response depended linearly on hIgG concentration over the range from 5.0 to 100 microg mL(-1), in a logarithmic plot. Typical measurements were performed in 15 min and up to 18 successive assays were achieved without significant loss of sensitivity using a single electrode. In addition, the biosensor can detect hIgG aggregates with concentrations as low as 0.01% of the total hIgG content (5.0 microg mL(-1)). Hence, it represents a potential post-size-exclusion chromatography-UV (post-SEC-UV) binding assay for in-process quality control of hIgG, which cannot be detected by SEC-UV singly at concentrations below 0.3% of the total hIgG content.

  6. Phase separation of the receptor for immunoglobulin E and its subunits in Triton X-114.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz, G; Kinet, J P; Kumar, N; Wank, S A; Metzger, H

    1984-12-10

    Above its critical micelle concentration, Triton X-114 in solution forms two phases at room temperature: a lower phase containing supramicellar aggregates and an upper phase largely depleted of detergent. This property of the detergent is potentially useful for separating under mild conditions proteins that bind detergent from those that do not (Bordier, C. (1981) J. Biol. Chem. 256, 1604-1607). We studied the distribution of the receptor for immunoglobulin E (IgE) and its subunits in the two phases. IgE and IgE complexed either with intact receptors or with the alpha chains of the receptor alone are principally partitioned into the upper phase, whereas the unliganded receptor as well as the isolated alpha, and especially the beta and gamma chains of the receptor, preferentially partition into the lower detergent phase. Chromatography of IgE and of the subunits of the receptor on a hydrophobic support showed that the beta and gamma chains have a considerably greater hydrophobic surface than the alpha chains or IgE. These results indicate that the distribution of a protein in the two phases of phase-separated Triton X-114 is not an all-or-none effect based upon whether it binds detergent or not. Rather, it reflects the overall balance between the hydrophobic and hydrophilic properties of the protein's surface.

  7. Preparation of F(ab')2 fragments of immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Killion, J J; Holtgrewe, E M

    1983-11-01

    We describe a simple protocol for the preparation of F(ab')2 fragments of immunoglobulin G, based upon the known Fc- binding properties of protein A-Sepharose. The fragment preparations of xenogeneic and allogeneic anti-IgG were noncytotoxic to intact target cells, and were able to block the cytotoxicity of intact antibody. This method should therefore be useful for functional studies not requiring biochemical homogeneity.

  8. CD147 Immunoglobulin Superfamily Receptor Function and Role in Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Iacono, Kathryn T.; Brown, Amy L.; Greene, Mark I.; Saouaf, Sandra J.

    2008-01-01

    The immunoglobulin superfamily member CD147 plays an important role in fetal, neuronal, lymphocyte and extracellular matrix development. Here we review the current understanding of CD147 expression and protein interactions with regard to CD147 function and its role in pathologic conditions including heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease, stroke and cancer. A model linking hypoxic conditions found within the tumor microenvironment to up-regulation of CD147 expression and tumor progression is introduced. PMID:17945211

  9. CD147 immunoglobulin superfamily receptor function and role in pathology.

    PubMed

    Iacono, Kathryn T; Brown, Amy L; Greene, Mark I; Saouaf, Sandra J

    2007-12-01

    The immunoglobulin superfamily member CD147 plays an important role in fetal, neuronal, lymphocyte and extracellular matrix development. Here we review the current understanding of CD147 expression and protein interactions with regard to CD147 function and its role in pathologic conditions including heart disease, Alzheimer's disease, stroke and cancer. A model linking hypoxic conditions found within the tumor microenvironment to upregulation of CD147 expression and tumor progression is introduced. PMID:17945211

  10. Ocular manifestations of monoclonal copper-binding immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sejal; Espana, Edgar M; Margo, Curtis E

    2014-01-01

    The dense accumulation of copper in Descemet membrane and lens capsule is the characteristic manifestation of a circulating monoclonal antibody with strong affinity for copper. The overproduction of this monoclonal immunoglobulin may be associated with either multiple myeloma or a benign monoclonal gammopathy. Despite prolonged exposure to elevated serum copper, no other tissues in the body are adversely affected by this redox metal. We describe the clinical and pathological findings in a 46-year-old woman with this disorder.

  11. Immunoglobulin G4-related disease: autoimmune pancreatitis and extrapancreatic manifestations*

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Daniel Alvarenga; Kido, Ricardo Yoshio Zanetti; Barros, Ricardo Hoelz de Oliveira; Martins, Daniel Lahan; Penachim, Thiago José; Caserta, Nelson Marcio Gomes

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related disease with pancreatic and extrapancreatic involvement, including the biliary and renal systems. Given the importance of imaging methods for the diagnosis of IgG4-related disease and its differentiation from pancreatic adenocarcinoma, we emphasize important abdominal computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings related to this recently recognized systemic autoimmune disease. PMID:27141136

  12. Intracellular Neutralization of Virus by Immunoglobulin A Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazanec, Mary B.; Kaetzel, Charlotte S.; Lamm, Michael E.; Fletcher, David; Nedrud, John G.

    1992-08-01

    IgA is thought to neutralize viruses at the epithelial surface of mucous membranes by preventing their attachment. Since IgA, a polymeric immunoglobulin, is transported through the lining of epithelial cells by the polymeric-immunoglobulin receptor and since viruses are obligate intracellular parasites, we hypothesized that IgA antibodies may also interfere with viral replication by binding to newly synthesized viral proteins within infected cells. Polarized monolayers of Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells expressing the polymeric-immunoglobulin receptor were infected on the apical surface with Sendai virus. Anti-Sendai virus IgA monoclonal antibody delivered from the basolateral surface colocalized with viral protein within the cell, as documented by immunofluorescence. More importantly, anti-viral IgA reduced virus titers >1000-fold (P < 0.0001) in apical supernatants and >10-fold (P < 0.0001) in cell lysates from monolayers treated with anti-viral IgA compared with those treated with either anti-viral IgG or an irrelevant IgA monoclonal antibody. We believe that the differences in viral titers between cell layers treated with specific IgA, which enters the epithelial cell by binding to the polymeric-immunoglobulin receptor, and those treated with specific IgG, which does not enter the cells, or irrelevant IgA indicate that specific intracellular IgA antibodies can inhibit viral replication. Thus, in addition to the classical role of humoral antibodies in extracellular defense, IgA antibody may be able to neutralize microbial pathogens intracellularly, giving IgA a role in host defense that has traditionally been reserved for cell-mediated immunity.

  13. Immunoglobulin determinants on the lymphocytes of normal rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, B.; Janeway, C. A.; Coombs, R. R. A.; Catty, D.; Gell, P. G. H.; Kelus, A. S.

    1971-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to see if `allelic exclusion' holds with regard to allotypic immunoglobulin determinants on circulating lymphocytes of the rabbit. The b locus allotypes As4 and As6 were investigated and these were measured by the mixed antiglobulin reaction. To investigate whether both allotypic determinants can be expressed on the membrane of any one lymphocyte, a lymphocyte suspension was treated with antibody reagents to both determinants. Adsorption of each antibody was shown by mixed agglutination with indicator red cells carrying either As4 or As6 immunoglobulin; one of the red cell suspensions was labelled with fluorescein isothiocyanate. When lymphocytes of adult heterozygous rabbits were tested, separate As4 and As6 lymphocytes were shown, but often more than 50 per cent of the lymphocytes exhibited both determinants on the same cell. Tests on an artificial mixture of homozygous As44 lymphocytes and homozygous As66 lymphocytes produced only distinct separate rosettes of the two types. Tests were performed on the lymphocytes of baby rabbits resulting from matings of As/46 does × homozygous As/44 bucks. At 2–3 weeks, when maternal As/46 immunoglobulin was present in easily detectable amounts in the sera of all baby rabbits, genetically As/44 animals could be clearly differentiated from genetically As/46 animals; correspondingly in matings with homozygous As/66 bucks. In litters of matings As/44 does × As/66 bucks, As6 determinants could be detected on the lymphocytes before the As6 immunoglobulin could be shown in the serum. In the very young (2–3 weeks) baby heterozygous As/46 rabbits, the majority of lymphocytes reacted as either As4 or As6 with a very much smaller percentage of mixed As46 cells. By the 12th week, the number of cells exhibiting both determinants had increased but not to so high a figure as found in the adults. PMID:4104284

  14. Fractal aggregates in Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabane, M.; Rannou, P.; Chassefiere, E.; Israel, G.

    1993-04-01

    The cluster structure of Titan's atmosphere was modeled by using an Eulerian microphysical model with the specific formulation of microphysical laws applying to fractal particles. The growth of aggregates in the settling phase was treated by introducing the fractal dimension as a parameter of the model. The model was used to obtain a vertical distribution of size and number density of the aggregates for different production altitudes. Results confirm previous estimates of the formation altitude of photochemical aerosols. The vertical profile of the effective radius of aggregates was calculated as a function of the visible optical depth.

  15. Minipool Caprylic Acid Fractionation of Plasma Using Disposable Equipment: A Practical Method to Enhance Immunoglobulin Supply in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    El-Ekiaby, Magdy; Vargas, Mariángela; Sayed, Makram; Gorgy, George; Goubran, Hadi; Radosevic, Mirjana; Burnouf, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Background Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is an essential plasma-derived medicine that is lacking in developing countries. IgG shortages leave immunodeficient patients without treatment, exposing them to devastating recurrent infections from local pathogens. A simple and practical method for producing IgG from normal or convalescent plasma collected in developing countries is needed to provide better, faster access to IgG for patients in need. Methodology/Principal Findings IgG was purified from 10 consecutive minipools of 20 plasma donations collected in Egypt using single-use equipment. Plasma donations in their collection bags were subjected to 5%-pH5.5 caprylic acid treatment for 90 min at 31°C, and centrifuged to remove the precipitate. Supernatants were pooled, then dialyzed and concentrated using a commercial disposable hemodialyzer. The final preparation was filtered online by gravity, aseptically dispensed into storage transfusion bags, and frozen at <-20°C. The resulting preparation had a mean protein content of 60.5 g/L, 90.2% immunoglobulins, including 83.2% IgG, 12.4% IgA, and 4.4% IgM, and residual albumin. There was fourfold to sixfold enrichment of anti-hepatitis B and anti-rubella antibodies. Analyses of aggregates (<3%), prekallicrein (5-7 IU/mL), plasmin (26.3 mU/mL), thrombin (2.5 mU/mL), thrombin-like activity (0.011 U/g), thrombin generation capacity (< 223 nM), and Factor XI (<0.01 U/mL) activity, Factor XI/XIa antigen (2.4 ng/g) endotoxin (<0.5 EU/mL), and general safety test in rats showed the in vitro safety profile. Viral validation revealed >5 logs reduction of HIV, BVDV, and PRV infectivity in less than 15 min of caprylic acid treatment. Conclusions/Significance 90% pure, virally-inactivated immunoglobulins can be prepared from plasma minipools using simple disposable equipment and bag systems. This easy-to-implement process could be used to produce immunoglobulins from local plasma in developing countries to treat immunodeficient patients

  16. Comprehensive N-Glycan Profiling of Avian Immunoglobulin Y.

    PubMed

    Gilgunn, Sarah; Millán Martín, Silvia; Wormald, Mark R; Zapatero-Rodríguez, Julia; Conroy, Paul J; O'Kennedy, Richard J; Rudd, Pauline M; Saldova, Radka

    2016-01-01

    Recent exploitation of the avian immune system has highlighted its suitability for the generation of high-quality, high-affinity antibodies to a wide range of antigens for a number of therapeutic and biotechnological applications. The glycosylation profile of potential immunoglobulin therapeutics is species specific and is heavily influenced by the cell-line/culture conditions used for production. Hence, knowledge of the carbohydrate moieties present on immunoglobulins is essential as certain glycan structures can adversely impact their physicochemical and biological properties. This study describes the detailed N-glycan profile of IgY polyclonal antibodies from the serum of leghorn chickens using a fully quantitative high-throughput N-glycan analysis approach, based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) separation of released glycans. Structural assignments revealed serum IgY to contain complex bi-, tri- and tetra-antennary glycans with or without core fucose and bisects, hybrid and high mannose glycans. High sialic acid content was also observed, with the presence of rare sialic acid structures, likely polysialic acids. It is concluded that IgY is heavily decorated with complex glycans; however, no known non-human or immunogenic glycans were identified. Thus, IgY is a potentially promising candidate for immunoglobulin-based therapies for the treatment of various infectious diseases.

  17. Unusual intracytoplasmic immunoglobulin inclusions in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Guglielmi, P; Preud'Homme, J L; Gourdin, M F; Reyes, F; Daniel, M T

    1982-01-01

    Unusual intracytoplasmic immunoglobulin inclusions were found by immunofluorescence in three patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. The inclusions contained the same immunoglobulin chains as those detected on the plasma membrane, except for delta chains which were expressed on the cell surface and not in the cytoplasmic inclusions. The cytoplasmic staining persisted throughout culture for 8 or more days. An initial study of patients 1's cells showed that the inclusions contained only mu chains, and kappa chains gradually became apparent after in vitro culture. In a second study, the fresh lymphocytes contained both mu and and kappa chains. Initially, biosynthetic experiments showed production of mu chains which polymerized in the cytoplasm and were not secreted. Subsequently there was synthesis of heavy and light chains which assembled into monomeric subunits that were retained and secretion of free light chains. The apparent molecular weight of these immunoglobulin chains was larger than that of their secretory counterparts. Immunoelectronmicroscopy revealed cytoplasmic mu chains in strands of endoplasmic reticulum. In the two other patients, immunofluorescence displayed unusual staining patterns of bright networks in perinuclear areas. PMID:6275878

  18. Comprehensive N-Glycan Profiling of Avian Immunoglobulin Y

    PubMed Central

    Millán Martín, Silvia; Wormald, Mark R.; Zapatero-Rodríguez, Julia; Conroy, Paul J.; O’Kennedy, Richard J.; Rudd, Pauline M.; Saldova, Radka

    2016-01-01

    Recent exploitation of the avian immune system has highlighted its suitability for the generation of high-quality, high-affinity antibodies to a wide range of antigens for a number of therapeutic and biotechnological applications. The glycosylation profile of potential immunoglobulin therapeutics is species specific and is heavily influenced by the cell-line/culture conditions used for production. Hence, knowledge of the carbohydrate moieties present on immunoglobulins is essential as certain glycan structures can adversely impact their physicochemical and biological properties. This study describes the detailed N-glycan profile of IgY polyclonal antibodies from the serum of leghorn chickens using a fully quantitative high-throughput N-glycan analysis approach, based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) separation of released glycans. Structural assignments revealed serum IgY to contain complex bi-, tri- and tetra-antennary glycans with or without core fucose and bisects, hybrid and high mannose glycans. High sialic acid content was also observed, with the presence of rare sialic acid structures, likely polysialic acids. It is concluded that IgY is heavily decorated with complex glycans; however, no known non-human or immunogenic glycans were identified. Thus, IgY is a potentially promising candidate for immunoglobulin-based therapies for the treatment of various infectious diseases. PMID:27459092

  19. Comprehensive N-Glycan Profiling of Avian Immunoglobulin Y.

    PubMed

    Gilgunn, Sarah; Millán Martín, Silvia; Wormald, Mark R; Zapatero-Rodríguez, Julia; Conroy, Paul J; O'Kennedy, Richard J; Rudd, Pauline M; Saldova, Radka

    2016-01-01

    Recent exploitation of the avian immune system has highlighted its suitability for the generation of high-quality, high-affinity antibodies to a wide range of antigens for a number of therapeutic and biotechnological applications. The glycosylation profile of potential immunoglobulin therapeutics is species specific and is heavily influenced by the cell-line/culture conditions used for production. Hence, knowledge of the carbohydrate moieties present on immunoglobulins is essential as certain glycan structures can adversely impact their physicochemical and biological properties. This study describes the detailed N-glycan profile of IgY polyclonal antibodies from the serum of leghorn chickens using a fully quantitative high-throughput N-glycan analysis approach, based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) separation of released glycans. Structural assignments revealed serum IgY to contain complex bi-, tri- and tetra-antennary glycans with or without core fucose and bisects, hybrid and high mannose glycans. High sialic acid content was also observed, with the presence of rare sialic acid structures, likely polysialic acids. It is concluded that IgY is heavily decorated with complex glycans; however, no known non-human or immunogenic glycans were identified. Thus, IgY is a potentially promising candidate for immunoglobulin-based therapies for the treatment of various infectious diseases. PMID:27459092

  20. Organization and expression of immunoglobulin genes in fetal liver hybridomas.

    PubMed

    Perry, R P; Kelley, D E; Coleclough, C; Kearney, J F

    1981-01-01

    The organization and expression of immunoglobulin genes were studied in a series of six hybridomas derived from the fusion of a nonproducing myeloma cell with cells from mouse fetal liver. These hybridomas, which exhibit several phenotypic characteristics of immature B lymphocytes, all have productively rearranged mu heavy chain genes and produce both the membrane and secreted forms of mu mRNA in a ratio of about 1:10. Significantly, none of the hybridomas has an unrearranged (germ line) allelic mu gene. Examination of the kappa light chain genes revealed that all six of the hybridomas contain unrearranged kappa loci and produce 8.4-kilobase transcripts containing kappa constant region sequences. None of the five hybridomas that exhibit a mu-only phenotype contains a rearranged kappa gene other than that derived from the myeloma parent. One hybridoma, which actively secretes kappa immunoglobulin, contains a rearranged kappa gene of fetal liver origin and synthesizes a distinctive kappa mRNA precursor in addition to the 8.4-kilobase transcript. These results demonstrate that rearrangement of heavy chain immunoglobulin genes normally occurs prior to that of light chain genes and further indicate that the transcriptional competence of the kappa constant region locus is established prior to the time of its rearrangement.

  1. Subclasses of immunoglobulins and autoantibodies in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Outschoorn, I; Rowley, M J; Cook, A D; Mackay, I R

    1993-01-01

    The differing capacity of subclasses of IgG to bind to protein A and protein G was used in a sequential affinity purification procedure to examine immunoglobulin isotypes and subclasses in autoimmune disease. The utility of the procedure is that affinity-purified fractions containing particular isotypes and subclasses of immunoglobulin can be analyzed for their content of autoantibodies using standard techniques. For each of four autoimmune diseases studied, chronic active hepatitis, Sjogren's syndrome, primary biliary cirrhosis, and rheumatoid arthritis, there were characteristic protein elution profiles and the various disease-specific autoantibodies showed preferential distributions among the isotypes and subclasses. Moreover there was not an absolute correlation between an increased level of a particular subclass and the occurrence of antibodies of that subclass. The occurrence of highly disease-specific immunoglobulin subclass profiles suggests that the hypergammaglobulinemia associated with autoimmunity cannot be attributed entirely to polyclonal B-cell activation. Rather, there are disease-specific alterations in isotype subclass switching which may reflect different cytokine-dependent influences on autoimmune B cells and their products.

  2. Surface fractals in liposome aggregation.

    PubMed

    Roldán-Vargas, Sándalo; Barnadas-Rodríguez, Ramon; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel; Estelrich, Joan; Callejas-Fernández, José

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the aggregation of charged liposomes induced by magnesium is investigated. Static and dynamic light scattering, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and cryotransmission electron microscopy are used as experimental techniques. In particular, multiple intracluster scattering is reduced to a negligible amount using a cross-correlation light scattering scheme. The analysis of the cluster structure, probed by means of static light scattering, reveals an evolution from surface fractals to mass fractals with increasing magnesium concentration. Cryotransmission electron microscopy micrographs of the aggregates are consistent with this interpretation. In addition, a comparative analysis of these results with those previously reported in the presence of calcium suggests that the different hydration energy between lipid vesicles when these divalent cations are present plays a fundamental role in the cluster morphology. This suggestion is also supported by infrared spectroscopy data. The kinetics of the aggregation processes is also analyzed through the time evolution of the mean diffusion coefficient of the aggregates. PMID:19257067

  3. Surface fractals in liposome aggregation.

    PubMed

    Roldán-Vargas, Sándalo; Barnadas-Rodríguez, Ramon; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel; Estelrich, Joan; Callejas-Fernández, José

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the aggregation of charged liposomes induced by magnesium is investigated. Static and dynamic light scattering, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and cryotransmission electron microscopy are used as experimental techniques. In particular, multiple intracluster scattering is reduced to a negligible amount using a cross-correlation light scattering scheme. The analysis of the cluster structure, probed by means of static light scattering, reveals an evolution from surface fractals to mass fractals with increasing magnesium concentration. Cryotransmission electron microscopy micrographs of the aggregates are consistent with this interpretation. In addition, a comparative analysis of these results with those previously reported in the presence of calcium suggests that the different hydration energy between lipid vesicles when these divalent cations are present plays a fundamental role in the cluster morphology. This suggestion is also supported by infrared spectroscopy data. The kinetics of the aggregation processes is also analyzed through the time evolution of the mean diffusion coefficient of the aggregates.

  4. Platelet thrombopathy in asthmatic patients with elevated immunoglobulin e.

    PubMed

    Maccia, C A; Gallagher, J S; Ataman, G; Glueck, H I; Brooks, S M; Bernstein, I L

    1977-02-01

    Abnormalities of second-wave platelet aggregation were demonstrated in 17 of 33 asthmatic patients in whom drug and diet intake were controlled in the hospital. Mean abnormal responses were significantly greater after epinephrine- (p less than 0.001), adenosine diphosphate-(less than 0.001), collagen- (p = 0.01), and thrombin- (p less than 0.001) induced platelet aggregation in patients with immunologically mediated asthma and serum IgE levels greater than 250 U/ml as compared to patients without immunologic factors and/or normal controls. Mean pollen-specific radioallergosorbent (RAST) binding was also significantly higher in patients with abnormal aggregation as compared to normal platelet responders (p = 0.02). Release of serotonin generally reflected abnormal aggregation patterns in asthmatic patients. Platelet factor 4 release was significantly decreased in the same groups of patients. These results suggest that the allergic state may affect platelet membrane responsiveness to multiple aggregating agents.

  5. Electromagnetic charges in aggregation phenomena.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rioux, Claude; Slobodrian, R. J.

    Introduction The mechanism of fine particles aggregation is of great importance in many areas of research, in particular environment sciences where the state of aggregation defines the removal speed of dust from the atmosphere. The study of this mechanism is also important to understand the first stage of planet formation from the solar nebula. The aggregates formed are generally fractals and, as mentioned in the literature [1], the fractal dimensions and the site growth probability measures of the resulting fractal structures strongly depend on the properties of the forces that cause the aggregation. Theory and experimental apparatus We began this study by the aggregation between two charged particles and we are now consid-ering the aggregation between two magnetized particles. The aggregations are produced in a gas at a pressure between 10 and 1000 mbar and by using the applicable simplifications; we find that the distance (r) between the particles as a function of time (t) is given by the following equations: r=Ce(tf -t)1/3 for the electrical attraction r=Cm(tf -t)1/5 for the magnetic dipoles aligned in an external magnetic field. The apparatus built for these measurements consists of an experimental cell from which two perpendicular views are combined via an optical system in one image recorded by a video camera. From the video, we can then measure the distance between the particles as a function of time and reconstruct the trajectories in 3-D. The horizontal and vertical resolutions are respectively 0.86 and 0.92 microns per pixel. With a depth of field of 250 microns, the usable volume for 3-D observation in then 250 microns x 250 microns x 443 microns. Results and discussion A first version of the apparatus was tested on an electrical force aggregation and the results [2] show that the corresponding equation is a good representation of the phenomenon. Preliminary results, from an experiment using iron particles, show that the magnetic force can be seen in

  6. Aggregate breakdown of nanoparticulate titania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, Navin

    Six nanosized titanium dioxide powders synthesized from a sulfate process were investigated. The targeted end-use of this powder was for a de-NOx catalyst honeycomb monolith. Alteration of synthesis parameters had resulted principally in differences in soluble ion level and specific surface area of the powders. The goal of this investigation was to understand the role of synthesis parameters in the aggregation behavior of these powders. Investigation via scanning electron microscopy of the powders revealed three different aggregation iterations at specific length scales. Secondary and higher order aggregate strength was investigated via oscillatory stress rheometry as a means of simulating shear conditions encountered during extrusion. G' and G'' were measured as a function of the applied oscillatory stress. Oscillatory rheometry indicated a strong variation as a function of the sulfate level of the particles in the viscoelastic yield strengths. Powder yield stresses ranged from 3.0 Pa to 24.0 Pa of oscillatory stress. Compaction curves to 750 MPa found strong similarities in extrapolated yield point of stage I and II compaction for each of the powders (at approximately 500 MPa) suggesting that the variation in sulfate was greatest above the primary aggregate level. Scanning electron microscopy of samples at different states of shear in oscillatory rheometry confirmed the variation in the linear elastic region and the viscous flow regime. A technique of this investigation was to approach aggregation via a novel perspective: aggregates are distinguished as being loose open structures that are highly disordered and stochastic in nature. The methodology used was to investigate the shear stresses required to rupture the various aggregation stages encountered and investigate the attempt to realign the now free-flowing constituents comprising the aggregate into a denser configuration. Mercury porosimetry was utilized to measure the pore size of the compact resulting from

  7. Glycation precedes lens crystallin aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Swamy, M.S.; Perry, R.E.; Abraham, E.C.

    1987-05-01

    Non-enzymatic glycosylation (glycation) seems to have the potential to alter the structure of crystallins and make them susceptible to thiol oxidation leading to disulfide-linked high molecular weight (HMW) aggregate formation. They used streptozotocin diabetic rats during precataract and cataract stages and long-term cell-free glycation of bovine lens crystallins to study the relationship between glycation and lens crystallin aggregation. HMW aggregates and other protein components of the water-soluble (WS) and urea-soluble (US) fractions were separated by molecular sieve high performance liquid chromatography. Glycation was estimated by both (/sup 3/H)NaBH/sub 4/ reduction and phenylboronate agarose affinity chromatography. Levels of total glycated protein (GP) in the US fractions were about 2-fold higher than in the WS fractions and there was a linear increase in GP in both WS and US fractions. This increase was parallelled by a corresponding increase in HMW aggregates. Total GP extracted by the affinity method from the US fraction showed a predominance of HMW aggregates and vice versa. Cell-free glycation studies with bovine crystallins confirmed the results of the animals studies. Increasing glycation caused a corresponding increase in protein insolubilization and the insoluble fraction thus formed also contained more glycated protein. It appears that lens protein glycation, HMW aggregate formation, and protein insolubilization are interrelated.

  8. Ash Aggregates in Proximal Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, L. A.; Russell, K.

    2012-12-01

    Ash aggregates are thought to have formed within and been deposited by the eruption column and plume and dilute density currents and their associated ash clouds. Moist, turbulent ash clouds are considered critical to ash aggregate formation by facilitating both collision and adhesion of particles. Consequently, they are most commonly found in distal deposits. Proximal deposits containing ash aggregates are less commonly observed but do occur. Here we describe two occurrences of vent proximal ash aggregate-rich deposits; the first within a kimberlite pipe where coated ash pellets and accretionary lapilli are found within the intra-vent sequence; and the second in a glaciovolcanic setting where cored pellets (armoured lapilli) occur within <1 km of the vent. The deposits within the A418 pipe, Diavik Diamond Mine, Canada, are the residual deposits within the conduit and vent of the volcano and are characterised by an abundance of ash aggregates. Coated ash pellets are dominant but are followed in abundance by ash pellets, accretionary lapilli and rare cored pellets. The coated ash pellets typically range from 1 - 5 mm in diameter and have core to rim ratios of approximately 10:1. The formation and preservation of these aggregates elucidates the style and nature of the explosive phase of kimberlite eruption at A418 (and other pipes?). First, these pyroclasts dictate the intensity of the kimberlite eruption; it must be energetic enough to cause intense fragmentation of the kimberlite to produce a substantial volume of very fine ash (<62 μm). Secondly, the ash aggregates indicate the involvement of moisture coupled with the presence of dilute expanded eruption clouds. The structure and distribution of these deposits throughout the kimberlite conduit demand that aggregation and deposition operate entirely within the confines of the vent; this indicates that aggregation is a rapid process. Ash aggregates within glaciovolcanic sequences are also rarely documented. The

  9. Genetic control of basal serum immunoglobulin E level and its effect on specific reaginic sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Marsh, D G; Bias, W B; Ishizaka, K

    1974-09-01

    Studies of the distribution of total serum immunoglobulin E levels in nonallergic and allergic populations defined a cut-off point between low and high immunoglobulin E at 95 U/ml, based on Mendelian recessive inheritance of high immunoglobulin E level. Subsequent investigations of the distribution of total serum immunoglobulin E levels in 28 allergic families confirmed the recessive hypothesis. The results of quantitative skin tests in eight families, performed with between five and eight highly purified grass and ragweed pollen allergens per family, demonstrate that the immunoglobulin E-regulating gene exerts a profound effect on specific immunoglobulin E-mediated sensitivity, often masking the effect of HL-A associated immune response genes.

  10. Crystal aggregation in kidney stones; a polymer aggregation problem?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, J.; Beshensky, A.; Viswanathan, P.; Zachowicz, W.; Kleinman, J.

    2008-03-01

    Kidney stones most frequently form as aggregates of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals with organic layers between them, and the organic layers contain principally proteins. The pathway leading to the formation of these crystal aggregates in affected people has not been identified, but stone forming patients are thought to have a defect in the structure or distribution of urinary proteins, which normally protect against stone formation. We have developed two polyelectrolyte models that will induce COM crystal aggregation in vitro, and both are consistent with possible urinary protein compositions. The first model was based on mixing polyanionic and polycationic proteins, in portions such that the combined protein charge is near zero. The second model was based on reducing the charge density on partially charged polyanionic proteins, specifically Tamm-Horsfall protein, the second most abundant protein in urine. Both models demonstrated polymer phase separation at solution conditions where COM crystal aggregation was observed. Correlation with data from other bulk crystallization measurements suggest that the anionic side chains form critical binding interactions with COM surfaces that are necessary along with the phase separation process to induce COM crystal aggregation.

  11. Identification of cellular immunoglobulins in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia by immunoperoxidase staining.

    PubMed Central

    Markey, G M; McConnell, R E; Alexander, H D; Morris, T C; Robertson, J H

    1983-01-01

    An indirect immunoperoxidase technique has been used for visualisation of cellular immunoglobulins in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Baker's formol calcium was used as fixative. Monoclonal light and heavy chain patterns were demonstrated in 24 out of 27 cases. Only one case did not have any demonstrable immunoglobulins. The presence of alpha or gamma heavy chain immunoglobulin isotypes in leukaemic lymphocytes was found to be related to low mouse rosetting capacity (p less than 0.05). Images PMID:6418770

  12. Existence of B/E and E receptors on Hep-G2 cells: a study using colloidal gold- and /sup 125/I-labeled lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Hesz, A.; Ingolic, E.; Krempler, F.; Kostner, G.M.

    1987-06-01

    The presence of specific receptors for apolipoprotein B (low-density lipoproteins) and apolipoprotein E (HDL-E) on Hep-G2 cells and human skin fibroblasts was studied by chemical methods and by electron microscopy using a differential gold labeling technique. Fibroblasts bound both types of lipoproteins to one and the same receptor (B/E receptor) as deduced from competition experiments with HDL-E and LDL. Labeled HDL-E, on the other hand, was only partially displaced by cold LDL but was completely displaced by unlabeled HDL-E. Scatchard analysis of lipoprotein binding to Hep-G2 cells revealed an approx 10 times higher binding affinity of apoE-containing lipoproteins as compared to apoB-containing ones. No differences between apoE- or apoB-containing lipoproteins with respect to the morphology of cell binding and intracellular processing were observed. The results are compatible with the concept that Hep-G2 cells possess two kinds of receptors, one specific for apoB- and apoE-containing lipoproteins (B/E receptor) and another specific for apoE only. From these studies we conclude that Hep-G2 cells may serve as a suitable model for studying the lipoprotein metabolism in the liver.

  13. Improved purification of immunoglobulin G from plasma by mixed-mode chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chai, Dong-Sheng; Sun, Yan; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Shi, Qing-Hong

    2014-12-01

    Efficient loading of immunoglobulin G in mixed-mode chromatography is often a serious bottleneck in the chromatographic purification of immunoglobulin G. In this work, a mixed-mode ligand, 4-(1H-imidazol-1-yl) aniline, was coupled to Sepharose Fast Flow to fabricate AN SepFF adsorbents with ligand densities of 15-64 mmol/L, and the chromatographic performances of these adsorbents were thoroughly investigated to identify a feasible approach to improve immunoglobulin G purification. The results indicate that a critical ligand density exists for immunoglobulin G on the AN SepFF adsorbents. Above the critical ligand density, the adsorbents showed superior selectivity to immunoglobulin G at high salt concentrations, and also exhibited much higher dynamic binding capacities. For immunoglobulin G purification, both the yield and binding capacity increased with adsorbent ligand density along with a decrease in purity. It is difficult to improve the binding capacity, purity, and yield of immunoglobulin G simultaneously in AN SepFF chromatography. By using tandem AN SepFF chromatography, a threefold increase in binding capacity as well as high purity and yield of immunoglobulin G were achieved. Therefore, the tandem chromatography demonstrates that AN SepFF adsorbent is a practical and feasible alternative to MEP HyperCel adsorbents for immunoglobulin G purification.

  14. 21 CFR 866.5520 - Immunoglobulin G (Fab fragment specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... multiple myeloma (tumor of bone marrow cells), Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (increased immunoglobulin production by the spleen and bone marrow cells), and lymphoma (tumor of the lymphoid tissues)....

  15. 21 CFR 866.5510 - Immunoglobulins A, G, M, D, and E immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... antibodies) in serum. Measurement of these immunoglobulins aids in the diagnosis of abnormal protein metabolism and the body's lack of ability to resist infectious agents. (b) Classification. Class...

  16. 21 CFR 866.5510 - Immunoglobulins A, G, M, D, and E immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... antibodies) in serum. Measurement of these immunoglobulins aids in the diagnosis of abnormal protein metabolism and the body's lack of ability to resist infectious agents. (b) Classification. Class...

  17. 21 CFR 866.5510 - Immunoglobulins A, G, M, D, and E immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... antibodies) in serum. Measurement of these immunoglobulins aids in the diagnosis of abnormal protein metabolism and the body's lack of ability to resist infectious agents. (b) Classification. Class...

  18. Microbially cleaved immunoglobulins are sensed by the innate immune receptor LILRA2.

    PubMed

    Hirayasu, Kouyuki; Saito, Fumiji; Suenaga, Tadahiro; Shida, Kyoko; Arase, Noriko; Oikawa, Keita; Yamaoka, Toshifumi; Murota, Hiroyuki; Chibana, Hiroji; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Kubori, Tomoko; Nagai, Hiroki; Nakamaru, Yuji; Katayama, Ichiro; Colonna, Marco; Arase, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Microbial proteases degrade a variety of host proteins(1-3). However, it has remained largely unknown why microorganisms have evolved to acquire such proteases and how the host responds to microbially degraded products. Here, we have found that immunoglobulins disrupted by microbial pathogens are specifically detected by leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor A2 (LILRA2), an orphan activating receptor expressed on human myeloid cells. Proteases from Mycoplasma hyorhinis, Legionella pneumophila, Streptococcus pneumonia and Candida albicans cleaved the N-terminus of immunoglobulins. Identification of the immunoglobulin-cleaving protease from L. pneumophila revealed that the protease is conserved across some bacteria including Vibrio spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These microbially cleaved immunoglobulins but not normal immunoglobulins stimulated human neutrophils via LILRA2. In addition, stimulation of primary monocytes via LILRA2 inhibited the growth of L. pneumophila. When mice were infected with L. pneumophila, immunoglobulins were cleaved and recognized by LILRA2. More importantly, cleaved immunoglobulins were detected in patients with bacterial infections and stimulated LILRA2-expressing cells. Our findings demonstrate that LILRA2 is a type of innate immune receptor in the host immune system that detects immunoglobulin abnormalities caused by microbial pathogens. PMID:27572839

  19. Immunoglobulin production induced in vitro by glucocorticoid hormones: T cell-dependent stimulation of immunoglobulin production without B cell proliferation in cultures of human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Grayson, J.; Dooley, N.J.; Koski, I.R.; Blaese, R.M.

    1981-12-01

    The direct effects of steroid hormones on the production of immunoglobulins and DNA synthesis by human T and B lymphocytes was evaluated in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. As detected by a reverse hemolytic plaque assay, the addition of 0.1 mM to 10 nM hydrocortisone to lymphocytes in culture in the absence of other stimulants or mitogens, resulted in the dramatic induction of immunoglobulin production with responses comparable to those seen in similar cultures stimulated with pokeweed mitogen. Steroid-stimulated immunoglobulin production was first seen after 48 h and peaked at 8-10 d of culture. The production of IgG, IgA, and IgM was induced following incubation with steroid. Glucocorticoids, but not estrogens or androgens, were capable of mediating this effect, and only compounds with affinity for the glucocorticoid receptor were active. The induction of immunoglobulin production was dependent on both T cells and monocytes; cultures depleted of either cell type did not produce immunoglobulin when stimulated with glucocorticoid hormones. Proliferation of B cells or T cells could not be detected by (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation or total cell recovery from steroid-stimulated cultures, even though such cultures demonstrated marked increases in immunoglobulin production. The mechanism responsible for this functional maturation of B cells to become high rate immunoglobulin producing cells is as yet undefined, although it appears to involve more than merely steroid mediated inactivation of suppressor T cells.

  20. Modeling of Virion Collisions in Cervicovaginal Mucus Reveals Limits on Agglutination as the Protective Mechanism of Secretory Immunoglobulin A

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alex; McKinley, Scott A.; Shi, Feng; Wang, Simi; Mucha, Peter J.; Harit, Dimple; Forest, M. Gregory; Lai, Samuel K.

    2015-01-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA), a dimeric antibody found in high quantities in the gastrointestinal mucosa, is broadly associated with mucosal immune protection. A distinguishing feature of sIgA is its ability to crosslink pathogens, thereby creating pathogen/sIgA aggregates that are too large to traverse the dense matrix of mucin fibers in mucus layers overlying epithelial cells and consequently reducing infectivity. Here, we use modeling to investigate this mechanism of “immune exclusion” based on sIgA-mediated agglutination, in particular the potential use of sIgA to agglutinate HIV in cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) and prevent HIV transmission. Utilizing reported data on HIV diffusion in CVM and semen, we simulate HIV collision kinetics in physiologically-thick mucus layers–a necessary first step for sIgA-induced aggregation. We find that even at the median HIV load in semen of acutely infected individuals possessing high viral titers, over 99% of HIV virions will penetrate CVM and reach the vaginal epithelium without colliding with another virion. These findings imply that agglutination is unlikely to be the dominant mechanism of sIgA-mediated protection against HIV or other sexually transmitted pathogens. Rather, we surmise that agglutination is most effective against pathogens either present at exceedingly high concentrations or that possess motility mechanisms other than Brownian diffusion that significantly enhance encounter rates. PMID:26132216

  1. Fractal Aggregates in Tennis Ball Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabin, J.; Bandin, M.; Prieto, G.; Sarmiento, F.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new practical exercise to explain the mechanisms of aggregation of some colloids which are otherwise not easy to understand. We have used tennis balls to simulate, in a visual way, the aggregation of colloids under reaction-limited colloid aggregation (RLCA) and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation (DLCA) regimes. We have used the…

  2. Aggregated Recommendation through Random Forests

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aggregated recommendation refers to the process of suggesting one kind of items to a group of users. Compared to user-oriented or item-oriented approaches, it is more general and, therefore, more appropriate for cold-start recommendation. In this paper, we propose a random forest approach to create aggregated recommender systems. The approach is used to predict the rating of a group of users to a kind of items. In the preprocessing stage, we merge user, item, and rating information to construct an aggregated decision table, where rating information serves as the decision attribute. We also model the data conversion process corresponding to the new user, new item, and both new problems. In the training stage, a forest is built for the aggregated training set, where each leaf is assigned a distribution of discrete rating. In the testing stage, we present four predicting approaches to compute evaluation values based on the distribution of each tree. Experiments results on the well-known MovieLens dataset show that the aggregated approach maintains an acceptable level of accuracy. PMID:25180204

  3. Novel insights into amylin aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Pillay, Karen; Govender, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Amylin is a peptide that aggregates into species that are toxic to pancreatic beta cells, leading to type II diabetes. This study has for the first time quantified amylin association and dissociation kinetics (association constant (ka) = 28.7 ± 5.1 L mol−1 s−1 and dissociation constant (kd) = 2.8 ± 0.6 ×10−4 s−1) using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Thus far, techniques used for the sizing of amylin aggregates do not cater for the real-time monitoring of unconstrained amylin in solution. In this regard we evaluated recently innovated nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA). In addition, both SPR and NTA were used to study the effect of previously synthesized amylin derivatives on amylin aggregation and to evaluate their potential as a cell-free system for screening potential inhibitors of amylin-mediated cytotoxicity. Results obtained from NTA highlighted a predominance of 100–300 nm amylin aggregates and correlation to previously published cytotoxicity results suggests the toxic species of amylin to be 200–300 nm in size. The results seem to indicate that NTA has potential as a new technique to monitor the aggregation potential of amyloid peptides in solution and also to screen potential inhibitors of amylin-mediated cytotoxicity. PMID:26019498

  4. Bovine immunoglobulin protein isolates for the nutritional management of enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Petschow, Bryon W; Blikslager, Anthony T; Weaver, Eric M; Campbell, Joy M; Polo, Javier; Shaw, Audrey L; Burnett, Bruce P; Klein, Gerald L; Rhoads, J Marc

    2014-09-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is responsible for a multitude of digestive and immune functions which depend upon the balanced interaction of the intestinal microbiota, diet, gut barrier function, and mucosal immune response. Disruptions in one or more of these factors can lead to intestinal disorders or enteropathies which are characterized by intestinal inflammation, increased gut permeability, and reduced capacity to absorb nutrients. Enteropathy is frequently associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune enteropathy, radiation enteritis, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), where pathologic changes in the intestinal tract lead to abdominal discomfort, bloating, abnormal bowel function (e.g., diarrhea, urgency, constipation and malabsorption). Unfortunately, effective therapies for the management of enteropathy and restoring intestinal health are still not available. An accumulating body of preclinical studies has demonstrated that oral administration of plasma- or serum-derived protein concentrates containing high levels of immunoglobulins can improve weight, normalize gut barrier function, and reduce the severity of enteropathy in animal models. Recent studies in humans, using serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate, demonstrate that such protein preparations are safe and improve symptoms, nutritional status, and various biomarkers associated with enteropathy. Benefits have been shown in patients with HIV infection or diarrhea-predominant IBS. This review summarizes preclinical and clinical studies with plasma/serum protein concentrates and describes the effects on host nutrition, intestinal function, and markers of intestinal inflammation. It supports the concept that immunoglobulin-containing protein preparations may offer a new strategy for restoring functional homeostasis in the intestinal tract of patients with enteropathy.

  5. Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor gene association with cryptorchidism.

    PubMed

    Niepiekło-Miniewska, Wanda; Kuśnierczyk, Piotr; Havrylyuk, Anna; Kamieniczna, Marzena; Nakonechnyy, Andrij; Chopyak, Valentyna; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    Cryptorchidism is a condition where a testis persists in the abdominal cavity. Thus, due to elevated temperature we may expect induction of aberrant immune reactions depending on genetic constitution of individual. This may be reflected by development of anti-sperm antibodies (ASA) in cryptorchid males. Also, natural killer (NK) cells which belong to innate immunity may control adaptive immunity. Therefore, the gene system encoding polymorphic NK cell immunoglobulin receptors (KIRs) has been studied. 109 prepubertal boys with cryptorchidism and 136 ethnically matched young male donors were selected to study NK cell KIRs. DNA was isolated using automatic Maxwell(®) system from the peripheral venous blood drawn onto anticoagulant. Olerup SSP KIR Genotyping kit including Taq polymerase was used for detection of KIR genes. Human leukocyte antigen-C (HLA-C) groups, C1 and C2 were established using a Olerup SSP KIR HLA Ligand kit. KIR2DL2 (killer immunoglobulin-like receptor two-domain long 2) and KIR2DS2 (killer immunoglobulin-like receptor two-domain short 2) genes were less frequent in patients than in control individuals (corrected p values: 0.0110 and 0.0383, respectively). However, no significant differences were observed between ASA-positive and ASA-negative patients, or between bilateral or unilateral cryptorchidism. No association between KIR ligands C1 and C2, alone or together with KIR2DL2, was found. However, the results suggest that KIR2DL2+/KIR2DS2+ genotype may be, to some extent, protective against cryptorchidism.

  6. Rearrangements of immunoglobulin genes during differentiation and evolution.

    PubMed

    Honjo, T; Nakai, S; Nishida, Y; Kataoka, T; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Takahashi, N; Obata, M; Shimizu, A; Yaoita, Y; Nikaido, T; Ishida, N

    1981-01-01

    Immunoglobulin genes are shown to undergo dynamic rearrangements during differentiation as well as evolution. We have demonstrated that a complete immunoglobulin heavy chain gene is formed by at least two types of DNA rearrangement during B cell differentiation. The first type of rearrangement is V-D-J recombination to complete a variable region sequence and the second type is S-S recombination to switch a constant region sequence. Both types of recombination are accompanied by deletion of the intervening DNA segment. Structure and organization of CH genes are elucidated by molecular cloning and nucleotide sequence determination. Organization of H chain genes is summarized as VH-(unknown distance)-JH-(6.5 kb)-C mu-(4.5 kb)-C delta-(unknown distance)-C gamma 3-(34 kb)-C gamma 1-(21 kb)-C gamma 2b-(15 kb)-C gamma 2a-(14.5 kb)-C epsilon-(12.5 kb)-C alpha. The S-S recombination takes place at the S region which is located at the 5' side of each CH gene. Nucleotide sequence of the S region comprises tandem repetition of closely related sequences. The S-S recombination seems to be mediated by short common sequences shared among S regions. A sister chromatid exchange model was proposed as a mechanism for S-S recombination. Comparison of nucleotide sequences of CH genes indicates that immunoglobulin genes have scrambled by intervening sequence-mediated domain transfer during their evolution.

  7. Bovine immunoglobulin protein isolates for the nutritional management of enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Petschow, Bryon W; Blikslager, Anthony T; Weaver, Eric M; Campbell, Joy M; Polo, Javier; Shaw, Audrey L; Burnett, Bruce P; Klein, Gerald L; Rhoads, J Marc

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is responsible for a multitude of digestive and immune functions which depend upon the balanced interaction of the intestinal microbiota, diet, gut barrier function, and mucosal immune response. Disruptions in one or more of these factors can lead to intestinal disorders or enteropathies which are characterized by intestinal inflammation, increased gut permeability, and reduced capacity to absorb nutrients. Enteropathy is frequently associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune enteropathy, radiation enteritis, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), where pathologic changes in the intestinal tract lead to abdominal discomfort, bloating, abnormal bowel function (e.g., diarrhea, urgency, constipation and malabsorption). Unfortunately, effective therapies for the management of enteropathy and restoring intestinal health are still not available. An accumulating body of preclinical studies has demonstrated that oral administration of plasma- or serum-derived protein concentrates containing high levels of immunoglobulins can improve weight, normalize gut barrier function, and reduce the severity of enteropathy in animal models. Recent studies in humans, using serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate, demonstrate that such protein preparations are safe and improve symptoms, nutritional status, and various biomarkers associated with enteropathy. Benefits have been shown in patients with HIV infection or diarrhea-predominant IBS. This review summarizes preclinical and clinical studies with plasma/serum protein concentrates and describes the effects on host nutrition, intestinal function, and markers of intestinal inflammation. It supports the concept that immunoglobulin-containing protein preparations may offer a new strategy for restoring functional homeostasis in the intestinal tract of patients with enteropathy. PMID:25206275

  8. Estimation of major immunoglobulins in smokers and gutkha chewers

    PubMed Central

    Prajapati, Ketankumar Jayantilal; Chawda, Jyoti G

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To estimate the level of IgG and IgA major immunoglobulins in patients having the habit of smoking, gutkha chewing and in patients without any tobacco habit as control. Materials and Methods: Estimation of major immunoglobulins IgG and IgA was carried out by automated Nephelometry method in ten patients (control group), forty patients who had habit of smoking either bidi or cigarette and forty patients who had the habit of gutkha chewing. Among forty patients who smoked, twenty patients were without any lesion while twenty patients had homogenous leukoplakia. Among the forty patients who had habit of gutkha chewing, twenty patients were without any lesion while twenty patients had oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF). The obtained data were analyzed using independent sample t-test. Results: IgG and IgA levels were higher in smokers and gutkha chewers as compared to control group and were higher in gutkha chewers as compared to smokers. IgG and IgA levels of non- lesional smokers and gutkha chewers showed no change as compared to the controls while it was increased in patients with homogenous leukoplakia and patients with OSMF as compared to control group. IgG and IgA levels were also significantly higher in patients with OSMF as compared to that of homogenous leukoplakia. IgG and IgA levels were higher in all the grades of OSMF as compared to the controls and both IgG and IgA levels were directly correlated with the grades of OSMF. Conclusion: Higher major immunoglobulins levels in present study among the study groups indicate the use of immunoprofile estimation in etiology and pathogenesis and would prove a great asset in the proper assessment of the lesions. PMID:27601812

  9. Facilitated subcutaneous immunoglobulin (fSCIg) therapy--practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Ponsford, M; Carne, E; Kingdon, C; Joyce, C; Price, C; Williams, C; El-Shanawany, T; Williams, P; Jolles, S

    2015-12-01

    There is an increasing range of therapeutic options for primary antibody-deficient patients who require replacement immunoglobulin. These include intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIg), rapid push SCIg and most recently recombinant human hyaluronidase-facilitated SCIg (fSCIg). Advantages of fSCIg include fewer needle punctures, longer infusion intervals and an improved adverse effect profile relative to IVIg. Limited real-life experience exists concerning the practical aspects of switching or starting patients on fSCIg. We describe the first 14 patients who have been treated with fSCIg at the Immunodeficiency Centre for Wales (ICW), representing more than 6 patient-years of experience. The regimen was well tolerated, with high levels of satisfaction and no increase in training requirement, including for a treatment-naive patient. Two patients discontinued fSCIg due to pain and swelling at the infusion site, and one paused therapy following post-infusion migraines. Ultrasound imaging of paired conventional and facilitated SCIg demonstrated clear differences in subcutaneous space distribution associated with a 10-fold increase in rate and volume delivery with fSCIg. Patient profiles for those choosing fSCIg fell into two main categories: those experiencing clinical problems with their current treatment and those seeking greater convenience and flexibility. When introducing fSCIg, consideration of the type and programming of infusion pump, needle gauge and length, infusion site, up-dosing schedule, home training and patient information are important, as these may differ from conventional SCIg. This paper provides guidance on practical aspects of the administration, training and outcomes to help inform decision-making for this new treatment modality. PMID:26288095

  10. A Case of Immunoglobulin E Mediated Anaphylaxis to Levodropropizine

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung Hee; Yun, Il Seon; Choi, Soo-Young; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Hong, Chein-Soo

    2013-01-01

    We experienced a case of immunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated anaphylaxis to levodropropizine. The patient was an 18-year old Korean woman. After taking the common cold medication including acetaminophen, domperidone, and levodropropizine, skin rash, angioedema and anaphylaxis were developed immediately. As she was tolerable to acetaminophen alone, we thought the culprit agent was maybe a levodropropizine tablet. To confirm the culprit, she underwent skin prick test and oral drug provocation test with the suspected one. Finally we detected levodropropizine specific IgE and confirmed the specificity by inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). PMID:23225830

  11. [Immunoglobulins in the cerebrospinal fluid and blood in acute neuroinfections].

    PubMed

    Dekonenko, E P; Poliakova, T G; Ivanova, L A; Umanskiĭ, K G; Demidova, S A

    1988-01-01

    The authors have examined 42 patients with viral encephalitides and other central nervous system lesions using a complex of clinical and viroimmunological methods of examination. The main emphasis has been laid on measuring immunoglobulins A, M, and G in the blood serum and cerebrospinal fluid. The results have shown marked changes in humoral immunity. The degree of these changes is directly correlated with severity of encephalitis. Investigation into humoral immunity in patients with neuroinfections and other nervous system diseases contributes to the development of differential diagnostic criteria and better understanding of the relationship between severity and outcome of diseases.

  12. Immunoglobulin Concentration in Tears of Contact Lens Wearers

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Rajendra P.; Bhushan, Prashant; Singh, Virendra P.; Singh, Mahendra K.; Kumar, Prakash; Bhatia, Ravindra P.S.; Singh, Usha

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate changes in the concentration of tear immunoglobulins in contact lens wearers. Methods: A total of 45 cases including 23 contact lens wearers (43 eyes) and 22 age and sex matched healthy controls having no ocular pathology were studied for immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM) in their tears by single radial immunodiffusion method. Results: Most of the cases used soft (56.6%) and semi-soft gas permeable (30.4%) contact lenses. Tear IgM was detected in only 17.4% and tear IgG in 43.6% of contact lens wearers, while in controls IgG was detected in 9.1% but none of the controls had IgM. There was a significant rise in total tear IgA (13.17 ± 4.44 mg/dl) in contact lens wearer as compared to controls (8.93 ± 3.79 mg/dl). Rise of tear IgA was more in symptomatic patients (15.38 ± 5.28 mg/dl) and in those wearing hard (19.73 ± 5.43 mg/dl) and semi-soft contact lenses (13.31 ± 5.43 mg/dl). A significant increase in tear IgA was noticed in subjects wearing lenses for >3 years (15.69 ± 5.39 mg/dl). About 43.4% of lens wearers were symptomatic and 80% of their lenses showed deposits and/or haziness. All cases with IgM in tear were symptomatic. Conclusion: The relation of immunoglobulin concentration with increasing duration of wear and material of contact lens shows that tear immunoglobulin rise accrues due to mechanical stimulation, hence contact lenses should not be used for a long period and lenses of hard nature should be discouraged. The maintenance, cleaning and deproteinization of the lenses are of high importance to avoid immunostimulation. PMID:25667732

  13. Equilibrium structure of ferrofluid aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Mina; Tomanek, David

    2010-01-01

    We study the equilibrium structure of large but finite aggregates of magnetic dipoles, representing a colloidal suspension of magnetite particles in a ferrofluid. With increasing system size, the structural motif evolves from chains and rings to multi-chain and multi-ring assemblies. Very large systems form single- and multi-wall coils, tubes and scrolls. These structural changes result from a competition between various energy terms, which can be approximated analytically within a continuum model. We also study the effect of external parameters such as magnetic field on the relative stability of these structures. Our results may give insight into experimental data obtained during solidification of ferrofluid aggregates at temperatures where thermal fluctuations become negligible in comparison to inter-particle interactions. These data may also help to experimentally control the aggregation of magnetic particles.

  14. Customer Aggregation: An Opportunity for Green Power?

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, E.; Bird, L.

    2001-02-26

    We undertook research into the experience of aggregation groups to determine whether customer aggregation offers an opportunity to bring green power choices to more customers. The objectives of this report, therefore, are to (1) identify the different types of aggregation that are occurring today, (2) learn whether aggregation offers an opportunity to advance sales of green power, and (3) share these concepts and approaches with potential aggregators and green power advocates.

  15. Fractal aggregates in tennis ball systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabin, J.; Bandín, M.; Prieto, G.; Sarmiento, F.

    2009-09-01

    We present a new practical exercise to explain the mechanisms of aggregation of some colloids which are otherwise not easy to understand. We have used tennis balls to simulate, in a visual way, the aggregation of colloids under reaction-limited colloid aggregation (RLCA) and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation (DLCA) regimes. We have used the images of the cluster of balls, following Forrest and Witten's pioneering studies on the aggregation of smoke particles, to estimate their fractal dimension.

  16. Environmentalism and natural aggregate mining

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drew, L.J.; Langer, W.H.; Sachs, J.S.

    2002-01-01

    Sustaining a developed economy and expanding a developing one require the use of large volumes of natural aggregate. Almost all human activity (commercial, recreational, or leisure) is transacted in or on facilities constructed from natural aggregate. In our urban and suburban worlds, we are almost totally dependent on supplies of water collected behind dams and transported through aqueducts made from concrete. Natural aggregate is essential to the facilities that produce energy-hydroelectric dams and coal-fired powerplants. Ironically, the utility created for mankind by the use of natural aggregate is rarely compared favorably with the environmental impacts of mining it. Instead, the empty quarries and pits are seen as large negative environmental consequences. At the root of this disassociation is the philosophy of environmentalism, which flavors our perceptions of the excavation, processing, and distribution of natural aggregate. The two end-member ideas in this philosophy are ecocentrism and anthropocentrism. Ecocentrism takes the position that the natural world is a organism whose arteries are the rivers-their flow must not be altered. The soil is another vital organ and must not be covered with concrete and asphalt. The motto of the ecocentrist is "man must live more lightly on the land." The anthropocentrist wants clean water and air and an uncluttered landscape for human use. Mining is allowed and even encouraged, but dust and noise from quarry and pit operations must be minimized. The large volume of truck traffic is viewed as a real menace to human life and should be regulated and isolated. The environmental problems that the producers of natural aggregate (crushed stone and sand and gravel) face today are mostly difficult social and political concerns associated with the large holes dug in the ground and the large volume of heavy truck traffic associated with quarry and pit operations. These concerns have increased in recent years as society's demand for

  17. Immunoglobulin allotypes and immunoglobulin G subclass responses to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis in early-onset periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Choi, J I; Ha, M H; Kim, J H; Kim, S J

    1996-01-01

    The present study was performed to estimate the observed frequencies of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain (Gm) and light-chain (Km) allotypes among patients with early-onset periodontitis (EOP) and their effect on the IgG2 subclass responses against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 and Porphyromonas gingivalis 381, respectively. Sixty-nine EOP patients, including 11 with localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP), 19 who had LJP, 15 with LJP-rapidly progressing periodontitis (RPP), and 24 with RPP, were examined for the Gm and Km allotypes by a hemagglutination inhibition test. Levels of immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) antibodies against the two organisms were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Fifty race- and age-matched, periodontally healthy subjects were also included as a control group. The observed frequencies of the Gm haplotype afnb and Km(1) were significantly higher in the RPP and LJP groups, respectively. The G2m(n)+ group of those with RPP and the Km(1)+ group of those with LJP had significantly higher levels of IgG2 antibodies to A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis, respectively. The results indicate that linkage disequilibrium of the G2m(n) locus in RPP patients or the Km(1) locus in LJP patients may be associated with high IgG2 antibody responses to the respective bacteria. It was reasoned that the IgG2 antibody responses are associated with the immunoglobulin allotypes. The function of IgG2 antibodies in their reaction to different bacterial antigens may be interpreted as either protective or nonprotective in the two different types of EOP (i.e., LJP and RPP). PMID:8926092

  18. Cross-linking of Thy-1 glycoproteins or high-affinity IgE receptors induces mast cell activation via different mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Dráberová, L; Dráber, P

    1993-01-01

    Rat peritoneal and pleural mast cells and rat basophilic leukemia cells, RBL-2H3, have been previously shown to be activated by Thy-1-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb). In the present study we investigated the mechanism of Thy-1-mediated activation and compared it with activation induced by cross-linking of the high-affinity IgE receptor. Binding of an IgG Thy-1 x 1-specific mAb, MRCOX7 (OX7), to RBL-2H3 cells and mast cells, and activation of RBL-2H3 by the OX7 were abrogated by pretreatment of the cells with phosphatidyl inositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). The F(ab')2 fragment of OX7, in contrast to the Fab' fragment, induced cell activation as well as intact OX7 mAb. Cells sensitized with IgE exhibited an increased responsiveness to anti-Thy-1 antibodies suggesting formation of functional complexes of IgE receptor/IgE/Thy-1/anti-Thy-1. Pretreatment of RBL-2H3 cells with cholera toxin potentiated activation induced by IgE+antigen (Ag) and IgE+OX7, but had no effect on activation induced by OX7 antibody alone. Similarly, dexamethasone had no effect on OX7-induced activation but inhibited IgE+Ag- and IgE+OX7-induced activation. Analysis of phosphotyrosine-containing proteins in RBL-2H3 cell lysates revealed that IgE+Ag and IgE+OX7 induced a marked increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins that were not tyrosine phosphorylated in cells exposed to OX7 mAb alone. Similar results were obtained when RBL-2H3-derived cells, expressing transfected mouse Thy-1.2, were activated with Thy-1.2-specific IgM antibody. The combined data suggest that Thy-1-specific antibodies activate cells by a mechanism that is different from activation induced by cross-linking of high-affinity IgE receptor. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7902332

  19. CEACAM1 mediates B cell aggregation in central nervous system autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Rovituso, Damiano M; Scheffler, Laura; Wunsch, Marie; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Dörck, Sebastian; Ulzheimer, Jochen; Bayas, Antonios; Steinman, Lawrence; Ergün, Süleyman; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    B cell aggregates in the central nervous system (CNS) have been associated with rapid disease progression in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Here we demonstrate a key role of carcinoembryogenic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule1 (CEACAM1) in B cell aggregate formation in MS patients and a B cell-dependent mouse model of MS. CEACAM1 expression was increased on peripheral blood B cells and CEACAM1(+) B cells were present in brain infiltrates of MS patients. Administration of the anti-CEACAM1 antibody T84.1 was efficient in blocking aggregation of B cells derived from MS patients. Along these lines, application of the monoclonal anti-CEACAM1 antibody mCC1 was able to inhibit CNS B cell aggregate formation and significantly attenuated established MS-like disease in mice in the absence of any adverse effects. CEACAM1 was co-expressed with the regulator molecule T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain -3 (TIM-3) on B cells, a novel molecule that has recently been described to induce anergy in T cells. Interestingly, elevated coexpression on B cells coincided with an autoreactive T helper cell phenotype in MS patients. Overall, these data identify CEACAM1 as a clinically highly interesting target in MS pathogenesis and open new therapeutic avenues for the treatment of the disease. PMID:27435215

  20. CEACAM1 mediates B cell aggregation in central nervous system autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rovituso, Damiano M.; Scheffler, Laura; Wunsch, Marie; Dörck, Sebastian; Ulzheimer, Jochen; Bayas, Antonios; Steinman, Lawrence; Ergün, Süleyman; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    B cell aggregates in the central nervous system (CNS) have been associated with rapid disease progression in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Here we demonstrate a key role of carcinoembryogenic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule1 (CEACAM1) in B cell aggregate formation in MS patients and a B cell-dependent mouse model of MS. CEACAM1 expression was increased on peripheral blood B cells and CEACAM1+ B cells were present in brain infiltrates of MS patients. Administration of the anti-CEACAM1 antibody T84.1 was efficient in blocking aggregation of B cells derived from MS patients. Along these lines, application of the monoclonal anti-CEACAM1 antibody mCC1 was able to inhibit CNS B cell aggregate formation and significantly attenuated established MS-like disease in mice in the absence of any adverse effects. CEACAM1 was co-expressed with the regulator molecule T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain −3 (TIM-3) on B cells, a novel molecule that has recently been described to induce anergy in T cells. Interestingly, elevated coexpression on B cells coincided with an autoreactive T helper cell phenotype in MS patients. Overall, these data identify CEACAM1 as a clinically highly interesting target in MS pathogenesis and open new therapeutic avenues for the treatment of the disease. PMID:27435215

  1. Characterization of antibodies against ferret immunoglobulins, cytokines and CD markers.

    PubMed

    Martel, Cyril Jean-Marie; Aasted, Bent

    2009-12-15

    Ferret IgG and IgM were purified from normal serum, while ferret IgA was purified from bile. The estimated molecular weights of the immunoglobulin gamma, alpha and mu heavy chains were found to be 54kDa, 69kDa and 83kDa, respectively. For immunological (ELISA) quantification of ferret immunoglobulins, we identified and characterized polyclonal antibodies towards ferret IgG, IgM and IgA. We also identified 22 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised mostly against human CD markers which cross-reacted with ferret leukocytes. These antibodies were originally specific against human CD8, CD9, CD14, CD18, CD25, CD29, CD32, CD44, CD61, CD71, CD79b, CD88, CD104, CD172a and mink CD3. Finally, we identified 4 cross-reacting mAbs with specificities against ferret interferon-gamma, TNF-alpha, interleukin-4 and interleukin-8.

  2. The protective role of immunoglobulins in fungal infections and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Elluru, Sri Ramulu; Kaveri, Srini V; Bayry, Jagadeesh

    2015-03-01

    Increased incidence of fungal infections in the immunocompromised individuals and fungi-mediated allergy and inflammatory conditions in immunocompetent individuals is a cause of concern. Consequently, there is a need for efficient therapeutic alternatives to treat fungal infections and inflammation. Several studies have demonstrated that antibodies or immunoglobulins have a role in restricting the fungal burden and their clearance. However, based on the data from monoclonal antibodies, it is now evident that the efficacy of antibodies in fungal infections is dependent on epitope specificity, abundance of protective antibodies, and their isotype. Antibodies confer protection against fungal infections by multiple mechanisms that include direct neutralization of fungi and their antigens, inhibition of growth of fungi, modification of gene expression, signaling and lipid metabolism, causing iron starvation, inhibition of polysaccharide release, and biofilm formation. Antibodies promote opsonization of fungi and their phagocytosis, complement activation, and antibody-dependent cell toxicity. Passive administration of specific protective monoclonal antibodies could also prove to be beneficial in drug resistance cases, to reduce the dosage and associated toxic symptoms of anti-fungal drugs. The longer half-life of the antibodies and flexibilities to modify their structure/forms are additional advantages. The clinical data obtained with two monoclonal antibodies should incite interests in translating pre-clinical success into the clinics. The anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory role of antibodies in fungal inflammation could be exploited by intravenous immunoglobulin or IVIg.

  3. Evaluation of serum immunoglobulin E levels in bronchial asthma

    PubMed Central

    Sandeep, Thirunavukkarasu; Roopakala, Mysore Subrahmanyam; Silvia, Chickballapur Rayappa Wilma Delphine; Chandrashekara, Srikantaiah; Rao, Mohan

    2010-01-01

    Background: Immunoglobulin E and associated cellular responses are responsible for allergic airway diseases. A hypersensitivity reaction initiated by immunologic mechanisms, mediated by IgE antibodies occurs in allergic asthma Aim: To estimate and compare serum IgE levels in mild, moderate, and severe asthmatics and in normal subjects and to obtain a mathematical model describing the relationship between serum IgE levels and severity of asthma. Materials and Methods: A stratified sample of 60 patients within age group of 18-60 years and 31 male and 29 female asthmatic patients and 13 healthy controls within 18-60 years were included in this study and classified according to GINA classification. Serum IgE levels were estimated by using ELISA kit. Results: Mean IgE levels ranged from 151.95 IU/ml in normal subjects to 1045.32 IU/ml in severe asthmatics. The model developed was 27% efficient. Conclusion: Serum Immunoglobulin E levels were high in asthmatics as compared to normal subjects. On an average, the levels increased as the severity of asthma increased. However, there was no statistically significant correlation since the variability in each level of asthma was very large PMID:20931031

  4. Immunoglobulin G Expression in Human Sperm and Possible Functional Significance

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Meiling; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Pu, Qinxue; Huang, Tao; Xie, Qingdong; Wang, Yan; Li, Jing; Wang, Yun; Gu, Huan; Huang, Tianhua; Li, Zhiling; Gu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG), the major molecule of the immune system, which was traditionally thought to be produced by differentiated B-lymphocytes, had recently been found in non-immune cells including spermatozoa of rabbit testis. To study if human sperms could produce IgG that might play a role in fertilization, we employed immunofluorescent staining, Western blot, in situ hybridization, RT-PCR (reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction) and immunoelectron microscope and found that human sperms were capable of synthesizing IgG. IgG protein and mRNA were detected in the cytoplasm, mainly the neck region of the sperm and IgG immunoreactivity was found to cover the entire sperm cell. The essential enzymes necessary for IgG synthesis and class switching, RAG1 (recombination activating gene 1), RAG2 (recombination activating gene 2) and AID (activation-induced cytidine deaminase), were also detected in the sperm cells. Furthermore, we found that anti-IgG antibody could inhibit sperm from penetrating Zona-free hamster egg with statistical significance. These discoveries suggested that immunoglobulin G could be produced by human sperms and it might play a role during fertilization. PMID:26833114

  5. Serum immunoglobulin levels and humoral immune competence in coalworkers

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, M.D.; Boyd, J.E.; Collins, H.P.; Davis, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Serum immunoglobulin (Ig) levels were measured in 788 coalworkers and 121 nonmining controls for comparison with the radiological category of pneumoconiosis after taking into account age and smoking habit. In addition a simple assessment of humoral immune competence was made by estimating the titre of serum antibody against the common gut commensal Escherichia coli. Smoking was found to depress serum IgA and IgM while levels of IgG and IgA increased slightly with age. Men with radiological signs of coalworkers pneumoconiosis (CWP) had significantly raised levels of IgA and IgG with increasing pneumoconiosis category. Even coalworkers with less than category 1 simple pneumoconiosis had raised levels of IgA, suggesting that increased production of this immunoglobulin occurs before radiologically identifiable pathological changes have occurred in the lung tissue. No association between reduced humoral immune competence and radiological category of pneumoconiosis was found. Whether high Ig levels in men exposed to coal dust are merely a passive response to dusted lung tissue or whether they indicate that an immunological process is important in the development of pneumoconiotic lesions remains uncertain.

  6. Risk factors for venous thromboembolism in immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Bever, Katherine M.; Masha, Luke I.; Sun, Fangui; Stern, Lauren; Havasi, Andrea; Berk, John L.; Sanchorawala, Vaishali; Seldin, David C.; Sloan, J. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Patients with immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis are at risk for both thrombotic and bleeding complications. While the hemostatic defects have been extensively studied, less is known about thrombotic complications in this disease. This retrospective study examined the frequency of venous thromboembolism in 929 patients with immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis presenting to a single referral center, correlated risk of venous thromboembolism with clinical and laboratory factors, and examined complications of anticoagulation in this population. Sixty-five patients (7%) were documented as having at least one venous thromboembolic event. Eighty percent of these patients had events within one year prior to or following diagnosis. Lower serum albumin was associated with increased risk of VTE, with a hazard ratio of 4.30 (CI 1.60–11.55; P=0.0038) for serum albumin less than 3 g/dL compared to serum albumin greater than 4 g/dL. Severe bleeding complications were observed in 5 out of 57 patients with venous thromboembolism undergoing treatment with anticoagulation. Prospective investigation should be undertaken to better risk stratify these patients and to determine the optimal strategies for prophylaxis against and management of venous thromboembolism. PMID:26452981

  7. Update on immunoglobulin A nephropathy, Part I: Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, Maurizio; Rosso, Giuseppina

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy is one of the most common glomerulonephritis and its frequency is probably underestimated because in most patients the disease has an indolent course and the kidney biopsy is essential for the diagnosis. In the last years its pathogenesis has been better identified even if still now several questions remain to be answered. The genetic wide association studies have allowed to identifying the relevance of genetics and several putative genes have been identified. The genetics has also allowed explaining why some ancestral groups are affected with higher frequency. To date is clear that IgA nephropathy is related to auto antibodies against immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) with poor O-glycosylation. The role of mucosal infections is confirmed, but which are the pathogens involved and which is the role of Toll-like receptor polymorphism is less clear. Similarly to date whether the disease is due to the circulating immunocomplexes deposition on the mesangium or whether the antigen is already present on the mesangial cell as a “lanthanic” deposition remains to be clarified. Finally also the link between the mesangial and the podocyte injury and the tubulointerstitial scarring, as well as the mechanisms involved need to be better clarified. PMID:26380197

  8. Separation of specific immunoglobulin. 1. Desalination using a membrane system.

    PubMed

    Tishchenko, G; Bleha, M; Skvor, J; Bures, L

    1995-02-01

    Separation of the ammonium sulfate precipitated protein fraction of mouse ascitic fluid, containing the specific immunoglobulin (pI 6.7-6.8; molecular weight 180000), from ammonium sulfate was investigated by means of non-traditional dialysis, based on the difference in diffusion rates of small and large molecules through porous membranes. The experiments were carried out in spiral membrane modules equipped with a Neosepta (AM-2 or ACS-SB) anion exchange membrane and a microfiltration membrane (Synpore or Sartorius). To enhance the driving force for penetration of ammonium sulfate and low-molecular-weight components from solution of ascitic protein fraction into water, a counterpressure was imposed on the side of microfiltration membrane. The flow rate, counterpressure and the pore sizes of microfiltration membranes had a significant effect on the separation process, as expected. The type of the anion exchange membrane had only a small effect. This process makes it possible to desalt the immunoglobulin fraction with high purity and yield in a few hours instead of 5 days.

  9. The immunoglobulin light chain locus of the turkey, Meleagris gallopavo.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yonghua; Wu, Sun; Zang, Yunlong; Wang, Hui; Song, Xiangfeng; Xu, Chunyang; Xie, Bohong; Guo, Yongchen

    2012-06-15

    To date, most jawed vertebrate species encode more than one immunoglobulin light (IgL) chain isotypes. It has been shown that several bird species (chickens, white Pekin or domestic duck, and zebra finches) exclusively express lambda isotype. We analyze here the genomic organization of another bird species turkey IgL genes based on the recently released genome data. The turkey IgL locus located on chromosome 17 spans approximately 75.2kb and contains a single functional V(λ) gene, twenty V(λ) pseudogenes, and a single functional J(λ)-C(λ) block. These data suggest that the genomic organization of bird IgL chain genes seems to be conserved. Ten cDNA clones from turkey Igλ chain containing almost full-length V(λ), J(λ) and C(λ) segments were acquired. The comparison of V(λ) cDNA sequences to all the germline V(λ) segments suggests that turkey species may be generating IgL chain diversity by gene conversion and somatic hypermutation like the chicken. This study provides insights into the immunoglobulin light chain genes in another bird species.

  10. 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Interlaken Leadership Awards

    PubMed Central

    Dalakas, M C; Löscher, W N

    2014-01-01

    The Interlaken Leadership Awards (ILAs), established in 2010, are monetary grants pledged annually by CSL Behring to fund research into the use of immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy, especially into its use in neurological disorders. Five recipients of the 2011/2012 Awards were invited to present their research at the 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference. Dr Honnorat reports on paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS). His multi-centre Phase II trial, currently under way, will assess the efficacy of IVIg therapy in treating PNS in the first 3 months of treatment. Dr Geis shows improved disease scores after IVIg treatment in a mouse model of neuromyelitis optica (NMO). It is hoped that these promising results will translate well into human NMO. Dr Schmidt studied IVIg therapy in an mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). He reports that motor function improved and myopathic changes in skeletal muscles and creatine kinase release were decreased. Dr Gamez presents the design and rationale for a Phase II clinical trial investigating the preoperative use of IVIg therapy in myasthenia gravis patients to prevent post-operative myasthenic crisis. Dr Goebel reports results from studies elucidating the immune-mediated pathogenesis of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), the successful IVIg therapy in a proportion of CRPS patients, and the development of a model for predicting which patients are more likely to respond to Ig therapy. PMID:25546789

  11. 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Interlaken Leadership Awards.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, M C; Löscher, W N

    2014-12-01

    The Interlaken Leadership Awards (ILAs), established in 2010, are monetary grants pledged annually by CSL Behring to fund research into the use of immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy, especially into its use in neurological disorders. Five recipients of the 2011/2012 Awards were invited to present their research at the 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference. Dr Honnorat reports on paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS). His multi-centre Phase II trial, currently under way, will assess the efficacy of IVIg therapy in treating PNS in the first 3 months of treatment. Dr Geis shows improved disease scores after IVIg treatment in a mouse model of neuromyelitis optica (NMO). It is hoped that these promising results will translate well into human NMO. Dr Schmidt studied IVIg therapy in an mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). He reports that motor function improved and myopathic changes in skeletal muscles and creatine kinase release were decreased. Dr Gamez presents the design and rationale for a Phase II clinical trial investigating the preoperative use of IVIg therapy in myasthenia gravis patients to prevent post-operative myasthenic crisis. Dr Goebel reports results from studies elucidating the immune-mediated pathogenesis of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), the successful IVIg therapy in a proportion of CRPS patients, and the development of a model for predicting which patients are more likely to respond to Ig therapy.

  12. [Immunoglobulin genes in lymphoid cells and regulation of their transcription].

    PubMed

    Stepchenko, A G; Urakov, D N; Luchina, N N; Deev, S M; Polianovskiĭ, O L

    1990-01-01

    The hybridoma genomes contain polyploid sets of immunoglobulin genes. We have shown, that the hybridoma PTF-02 genome contains three genes of heavy chains and two genes of light chains. The genes responsible for antibody synthesis were cloned and their structure were determined. Investigation of the kappa gene transcription and its fragments which contain regulatory sequences revealed a nuclear factor. The latter interacts with the octanucleotide localized at the promoter region of the kappa gene. The purified factor activates the transcription of the kappa gene in a heterologous cell-free system. Together with the tissue-specific factor there is also an universal factor interacting with the octanucleotide sequence. We have shown an additional factor in lymphoid cells interact with the protein which binds to the octanucleotide sequence. We have shown an additional factor in lymphoid cells interacting with the protein which binds to the octanucleotide sequence. As a result, there is a family of factors which interact with ATTTGCAT sequence. One major factor (m.w. 60 +/- 2 kDa) is an obligatory component for the initiation of immunoglobulin genes transcription.

  13. The effect of immunoglobulins and somatic cells on the gravity separation of fat, bacteria, and spores in pasteurized whole milk.

    PubMed

    Geer, S R; Barbano, D M

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to determine the role that immunoglobulins and somatic cells (SC) play in the gravity separation of milk. The experiment comprised 9 treatments: (1) low-temperature pasteurized (LTP; 72°C for 17.31s) whole milk; (2) LTP (72°C for 17.31s) whole milk with added bacteria and spores; (3) recombined LTP (72°C for 17.31s) whole milk with added bacteria and spores; (4) high-temperature pasteurized (HTP; 76°C for 7min) whole milk with added bacteria and spores; (5) HTP (76°C for 7min) whole milk with added bacteria and spores and added colostrum; (6) HTP (76°C for 7min) centrifugally separated, gravity-separated (CS GS) skim milk with HTP (76°C for 7min) low-SC cream with added bacteria and spores; (7) HTP (76°C for 7min) CS GS skim milk with HTP (76°C for 7min) high-SC cream with added bacteria and spores; (8) HTP (76°C for 7min) CS GS skim milk with HTP (76°C for 7min) low-SC cream with added bacteria and spores and added colostrum; and (9) HTP (76°C for 7min) CS GS skim milk with HTP (76°C for 7min) high-SC cream with added bacteria and spores and added colostrum. The milks in the 9 treatments were gravity separated at 4°C for 23h in glass columns. Five fractions were collected by weight from each of the column treatments, starting from the bottom of the glass column: 0 to 5%, 5 to 90%, 90 to 96%, 96 to 98%, and 98 to 100%. The SC, fat, bacteria, and spores were measured in each of the fractions. The experiment was replicated 3 times in different weeks using a different batch of milk and different colostrum. Portions of the same batch of the frozen bacteria and spore solutions were used for all 3 replicates. The presence of both SC and immunoglobulins were necessary for normal gravity separation (i.e., rising to the top) of fat, bacteria, and spores in whole milk. The presence of immunoglobulins alone without SC was not sufficient to cause bacteria, fat, and spores to rise to the top. The interaction between SC and immunoglobulins was

  14. Oral Human Immunoglobulin for Children with Autism and Gastrointestinal Dysfunction: A Prospective, Open-Label Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Cindy K.; Melmed, Raun D.; Barstow, Leon E.; Enriquez, F. Javier; Ranger-Moore, James; Ostrem, James A.

    2006-01-01

    Immunoglobulin secretion onto mucosal surfaces is a major component of the mucosal immune system. We hypothesized that chronic gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances associated with autistic disorder (AD) may be due to an underlying deficiency in mucosal immunity, and that orally administered immunoglobulin would be effective in alleviating chronic GI…

  15. Immunoglobulin K light chain deficiency: A rare, but probably underestimated, humoral immune defect.

    PubMed

    Sala, Pierguido; Colatutto, Antonio; Fabbro, Dora; Mariuzzi, Laura; Marzinotto, Stefania; Toffoletto, Barbara; Perosa, Anna R; Damante, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Human immunoglobulin molecules are generated by a pair of identical heavy chains, which identify the immunoglobulin class, and a pair of identical light chains, Kappa or Lambda alternatively, which characterize the immunoglobulin type. In normal conditions, Kappa light chains represent approximately 2/3 of the light chains of total immunoglobulins, both circulating and lymphocyte surface bound. Very few cases of immunoglobulin Kappa or Lambda light chain defects have been reported. Furthermore, the genetic basis of this defect has been extensively explored only in a single case. We report a case of a patient suffering of serious recurrent bacterial infections, which was caused by a very rare form of immunoglobulin disorder, consisting of a pure defect of Kappa light chain. We evaluated major serum immunoglobulin concentrations, as well as total and free Kappa and Lambda light chain concentrations. Lymphocyte phenotyping was also performed and finally we tested the Kappa chain VJ rearrangement as well as the constant Kappa region sequence. Studies performed on VJ rearrangement showed a polyclonal genetic arrangement, whereas the gene sequencing for the constant region of Kappa chain showed a homozygous T to G substitution at the position 1288 (rs200765148). This mutation causes a substitution from Cys to Gly in the protein sequence and, therefore, determines the abnormal folding of the constant region of Kappa chain. We suggest that this defect could lead to an effective reduction of the variability of total antibody repertoire and a consequent defect of an apparently normal immunoglobulin response to common antigens.

  16. Anti-Clostridium difficile bovine immunoglobulin concentrate inhibits cytotoxicity and enterotoxicity of C. difficile toxins.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, C P; Pothoulakis, C; Vavva, F; Castagliuolo, I; Bostwick, E F; O'Keane, J C; Keates, S; LaMont, J T

    1996-01-01

    Clostridium difficile diarrhea and colitis result from the actions of bacterial exotoxins on the colonic mucosa. This study examined the ability of hyperimmune bovine colostral antibodies to neutralize the biological effects of these toxins. Anti-C. difficile bovine immunoglobulin concentrate was prepared from the colostral milk of Holstein cows previously immunized with C. difficile toxoids. The anti-C. difficile bovine immunoglobulin concentrate contained high levels of bovine immunoglobulin G specific for C. difficile toxins A and B, as evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Anti-C. difficile bovine immunoglobulin concentrate neutralized the cytotoxic effects of purified toxin A and toxin B on cultured human fibroblasts, whereas control bovine immunoglobulin concentrate had little toxin-neutralizing activity. Anti-C. difficile bovine immunoglobulin concentrate also blocked the binding of toxin A to its enterocyte receptor and inhibited the enterotoxic effects of C. difficile toxins on the rat ileum, as measured by an increased rat ileal loop weight/length ratio (63% inhibition; P < 0.01), increased mannitol permeability (92% inhibition; P < 0.01), and histologic grading of enteritis (P < 0.01 versus nonimmune bovine immunoglobulin concentrate). Thus, anti-C. difficile bovine immunoglobulin concentrate neutralizes the cytotoxic effects of C. difficile toxins in vitro and inhibits their enterotoxic effects in vivo. This agent may be clinically useful in the prevention and treatment of C. difficile diarrhea and colitis. PMID:8834883

  17. 21 CFR 866.5520 - Immunoglobulin G (Fab fragment specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... resulting from breakdown of immunoglobulin G antibodies in urine, serum, and other body fluids. Measurement... multiple myeloma (tumor of bone marrow cells), Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (increased immunoglobulin production by the spleen and bone marrow cells), and lymphoma (tumor of the lymphoid tissues)....

  18. Construction of chimeric antibodies: cloning of immunoglobulin genes including their promoter regions by PCR.

    PubMed

    Mocikat, R; Kütemeier, G; Harloff, C

    1992-03-01

    In the production of recombinant antibodies, it is necessary to have an immunoglobulin gene promoter for driving the expression of the antibody genes. Here we describe a simple PCR method that allows cloning of the immunoglobulin genes together with their own promoters despite the fact that the sequence of the upstream part of the gene is unknown.

  19. Hepatocyte handling of immunoglobulin A in the rat: the role of microtubules

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, I.S.; Jones, A.L.; Hradek, G.T.; Huling, S.

    1983-07-01

    Plasma-derived dimeric immunoglobulin A is transported through liver parenchymal cells into bile, in association with its glycoprotein receptor secretory component, by a vesicular transport system. This study was designed to determine the effects of colchicine, a microtubule-disrupting agent, and thus the role of microtubules on the uptake, intracellular transport, and subsequent biliary secretion of dimeric immunoglobulin A. In vivo studies in rats showed that colchicine treatment reduced the amount of intraportally injected /sup 125/I-dimeric immunoglobulin A that appeared in the bile. It was also found that although the livers in colchicine-treated animals could sequester and internalize immunoglobulin A, it was not readily secreted into bile. In vitro studies using peroxidase-labeled antisecretory component and /sup 125/I-dimeric immunoglobulin A autoradiography were both used to determine the site of this block in immunoglobulin A secretion. These studies demonstrate that colchicine disruption of microtubules (a) has little initial effect on the binding and internalization of dimeric immunoglobulin A; (b) has a major effect on the translocation of immunoglobulin A-containing vesicles within the hepatocyte, and (c) most likely prevents the translocation of newly synthesized secretory component to the plasma membrane.

  20. 21 CFR 866.5550 - Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system. 866.5550 Section 866.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Test Systems § 866.5550 Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system....

  1. 21 CFR 866.5550 - Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system. 866.5550 Section 866.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Test Systems § 866.5550 Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system....

  2. 21 CFR 866.5550 - Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system. 866.5550 Section 866.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Test Systems § 866.5550 Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system....

  3. 21 CFR 866.5550 - Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system. 866.5550 Section 866.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Test Systems § 866.5550 Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system....

  4. 21 CFR 866.5540 - Immunoglobulin G (Fd fragment specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Immunoglobulin G (Fd fragment specific) immunological test system. 866.5540 Section 866.5540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... fragment) of the heavy chain (a subunit) of the immunoglobulin antibody molecule in serum. Measurement...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5540 - Immunoglobulin G (Fd fragment specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Immunoglobulin G (Fd fragment specific) immunological test system. 866.5540 Section 866.5540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... fragment) of the heavy chain (a subunit) of the immunoglobulin antibody molecule in serum. Measurement...

  6. 21 CFR 866.5540 - Immunoglobulin G (Fd fragment specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Immunoglobulin G (Fd fragment specific) immunological test system. 866.5540 Section 866.5540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... fragment) of the heavy chain (a subunit) of the immunoglobulin antibody molecule in serum. Measurement...

  7. 21 CFR 866.5540 - Immunoglobulin G (Fd fragment specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Immunoglobulin G (Fd fragment specific) immunological test system. 866.5540 Section 866.5540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... fragment) of the heavy chain (a subunit) of the immunoglobulin antibody molecule in serum. Measurement...

  8. 21 CFR 866.5550 - Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system. 866.5550 Section 866.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Test Systems § 866.5550 Immunoglobulin (light chain specific) immunological test system....

  9. Studies on recycled aggregates-based concrete.

    PubMed

    Rakshvir, Major; Barai, Sudhirkumar V

    2006-06-01

    Reduced extraction of raw materials, reduced transportation cost, improved profits, reduced environmental impact and fast-depleting reserves of conventional natural aggregates has necessitated the use of recycling, in order to be able to conserve conventional natural aggregate. In this study various physical and mechanical properties of recycled concrete aggregates were examined. Recycled concrete aggregates are different from natural aggregates and concrete made from them has specific properties. The percentages of recycled concrete aggregates were varied and it was observed that properties such as compressive strength showed a decrease of up to 10% as the percentage of recycled concrete aggregates increased. Water absorption of recycled aggregates was found to be greater than natural aggregates, and this needs to be compensated during mix design.

  10. RAGG - R EPISODIC AGGREGATION PACKAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The RAGG package is an R implementation of the CMAQ episodic model aggregation method developed by Constella Group and the Environmental Protection Agency. RAGG is a tool to provide climatological seasonal and annual deposition of sulphur and nitrogen for multimedia management. ...

  11. Cyclosporine A enhances platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Grace, A A; Barradas, M A; Mikhailidis, D P; Jeremy, J Y; Moorhead, J F; Sweny, P; Dandona, P

    1987-12-01

    In view of the reported increase in thromboembolic episodes following cyclosporine A (CyA) therapy, the effect of this drug on platelet aggregation and thromboxane A2 release was investigated. The addition of CyA, at therapeutic concentrations to platelet rich plasma from normal subjects in vitro was found to increase aggregation in response to adrenaline, collagen and ADP. Ingestion of CyA by healthy volunteers was also associated with enhanced platelet aggregation. The CyA-mediated enhancement of aggregation was further enhanced by the addition in vitro of therapeutic concentrations of heparin. Platelets from renal allograft recipients treated with CyA also showed hyperaggregability and increased thromboxane A2 release, which were most marked at "peak" plasma CyA concentration and less so at "trough" concentrations. Platelet hyperaggregability in renal allograft patients on long-term CyA therapy tended to revert towards normal following the replacement of CyA with azathioprine. Hypertensive patients with renal allografts on nifedipine therapy had normal platelet function and thromboxane release in spite of CyA therapy. These observations suggest that CyA-mediated platelet activation may contribute to the pathogenesis of the thromboembolic phenomena associated with the use of this drug. The increased release of thromboxane A2 (a vasoconstrictor) may also play a role in mediating CyA-related nephrotoxicity.

  12. Sequence-dependent Internalization of Aggregating Peptides*

    PubMed Central

    Couceiro, José R.; Gallardo, Rodrigo; De Smet, Frederik; De Baets, Greet; Baatsen, Pieter; Annaert, Wim; Roose, Kenny; Saelens, Xavier; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a number of aggregation disease polypeptides have been shown to spread from cell to cell, thereby displaying prionoid behavior. Studying aggregate internalization, however, is often hampered by the complex kinetics of the aggregation process, resulting in the concomitant uptake of aggregates of different sizes by competing mechanisms, which makes it difficult to isolate pathway-specific responses to aggregates. We designed synthetic aggregating peptides bearing different aggregation propensities with the aim of producing modes of uptake that are sufficiently distinct to differentially analyze the cellular response to internalization. We found that small acidic aggregates (≤500 nm in diameter) were taken up by nonspecific endocytosis as part of the fluid phase and traveled through the endosomal compartment to lysosomes. By contrast, bigger basic aggregates (>1 μm) were taken up through a mechanism dependent on cytoskeletal reorganization and membrane remodeling with the morphological hallmarks of phagocytosis. Importantly, the properties of these aggregates determined not only the mechanism of internalization but also the involvement of the proteostatic machinery (the assembly of interconnected networks that control the biogenesis, folding, trafficking, and degradation of proteins) in the process; whereas the internalization of small acidic aggregates is HSF1-independent, the uptake of larger basic aggregates was HSF1-dependent, requiring Hsp70. Our results show that the biophysical properties of aggregates determine both their mechanism of internalization and proteostatic response. It remains to be seen whether these differences in cellular response contribute to the particular role of specific aggregated proteins in disease. PMID:25391649

  13. Effect of whole and fractionated intravenous immunoglobulin on complement in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mollnes, T E; Andreassen, I H; Høgåsen, K; Hack, C E; Harboe, M

    1997-07-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) are increasingly used for treatment of inflammatory diseases, and the modulation of complement may contribute to some of its beneficial effects. IVIG may bind C1q and activated C3 and C4, and enhance inactivation of C3b. We have previously shown that IVIG inhibited complement-mediated lysis solely via its Fc part through interaction with the classical pathway. In the present study we have investigated whole IVIG (Octagam, and Sandoglobulin) and the monomer, dimer and multimer fractions of Octagam with respect to complement activation in serum and inhibition of complement lysis of red cells. The isolated fractions were found to be stable, homogeneous (monomer, dimer or multimer) and pure (virtually only IgG). Both whole IVIG and its fractions significantly activated complement in serum and inhibited hemolysis compared with human albumin. These effects were most pronounced in the monomer, less in the multimer and least in the dimer fraction. The complement activation was shown to be mediated through the classical pathway since formation of C1rs-C1inh complexes and C4bc were increased, in contrast to Bb. Surprisingly, heat aggregation of Octagam was not followed by a corresponding increase in complement activation, as would be expected, unless it was dialysed before heating, suggesting that it is stabilized to avoid excess activation. In conclusion, the results support the hypothesis that IVIG causes a mild activation of complement in vitro. We suggest that this effect may contribute to the complement inhibitory properties of IVIG by diverting complement deposition from the target to the fluid phase.

  14. Sensing the neuronal glycocalyx by glial sialic acid binding immunoglobulin-like lectins.

    PubMed

    Linnartz-Gerlach, B; Mathews, M; Neumann, H

    2014-09-01

    Sialic acid binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs) are cell surface receptors of microglia and oligodendrocytes that recognize the sialic acid cap of healthy neurons and neighboring glial cells. Upon ligand binding, Siglecs typically signal through an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM) to keep the cell in a homeostatic status and support healthy neighboring cells. Siglecs can be divided into two groups; the first, being conserved among different species. The conserved Siglec-4/myelin-associated glycoprotein is expressed on oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells. Siglec-4 protects neurons from acute toxicity via interaction with sialic acids bound to neuronal gangliosides. The second group of Siglecs, named CD33-related Siglecs, is almost exclusively expressed on immune cells and is highly variable among different species. Microglial expression of Siglec-11 is human lineage-specific and prevents neurotoxicity via interaction with α2.8-linked sialic acid oligomers exposed on the neuronal glycocalyx. Microglial Siglec-E is a mouse CD33-related Siglec member that prevents microglial phagocytosis and the associated oxidative burst. Mouse Siglec-E of microglia binds to α2.8- and α2.3-linked sialic acid residues of the healthy glycocalyx of neuronal and glial cells. Recently, polymorphisms of the human Siglec-3/CD33 were linked to late onset Alzheimer's disease by genome-wide association studies. Human Siglec-3 is expressed on microglia and produces inhibitory signaling that decreases uptake of particular molecules such as amyloid-β aggregates. Thus, glial ITIM-signaling Siglecs recognize the intact glycocalyx of neurons and are involved in the modulation of neuron-glia interaction in healthy and diseased brain.

  15. An Aggregation Advisor for Ligand Discovery.

    PubMed

    Irwin, John J; Duan, Da; Torosyan, Hayarpi; Doak, Allison K; Ziebart, Kristin T; Sterling, Teague; Tumanian, Gurgen; Shoichet, Brian K

    2015-09-10

    Colloidal aggregation of organic molecules is the dominant mechanism for artifactual inhibition of proteins, and controls against it are widely deployed. Notwithstanding an increasingly detailed understanding of this phenomenon, a method to reliably predict aggregation has remained elusive. Correspondingly, active molecules that act via aggregation continue to be found in early discovery campaigns and remain common in the literature. Over the past decade, over 12 thousand aggregating organic molecules have been identified, potentially enabling a precedent-based approach to match known aggregators with new molecules that may be expected to aggregate and lead to artifacts. We investigate an approach that uses lipophilicity, affinity, and similarity to known aggregators to advise on the likelihood that a candidate compound is an aggregator. In prospective experimental testing, five of seven new molecules with Tanimoto coefficients (Tc's) between 0.95 and 0.99 to known aggregators aggregated at relevant concentrations. Ten of 19 with Tc's between 0.94 and 0.90 and three of seven with Tc's between 0.89 and 0.85 also aggregated. Another three of the predicted compounds aggregated at higher concentrations. This method finds that 61 827 or 5.1% of the ligands acting in the 0.1 to 10 μM range in the medicinal chemistry literature are at least 85% similar to a known aggregator with these physical properties and may aggregate at relevant concentrations. Intriguingly, only 0.73% of all drug-like commercially available compounds resemble the known aggregators, suggesting that colloidal aggregators are enriched in the literature. As a percentage of the literature, aggregator-like compounds have increased 9-fold since 1995, partly reflecting the advent of high-throughput and virtual screens against molecular targets. Emerging from this study is an aggregator advisor database and tool ( http://advisor.bkslab.org ), free to the community, that may help distinguish between

  16. Mucosal immunoglobulins at respiratory surfaces mark an ancient association that predates the emergence of tetrapods.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Takizawa, Fumio; Parra, David; Gómez, Daniela; von Gersdorff Jørgensen, Louise; LaPatra, Scott E; Sunyer, J Oriol

    2016-01-01

    Gas-exchange structures are critical for acquiring oxygen, but they also represent portals for pathogen entry. Local mucosal immunoglobulin responses against pathogens in specialized respiratory organs have only been described in tetrapods. Since fish gills are considered a mucosal surface, we hypothesized that a dedicated mucosal immunoglobulin response would be generated within its mucosa on microbial exposure. Supporting this hypothesis, here we demonstrate that following pathogen exposure, IgT(+) B cells proliferate and generate pathogen-specific IgT within the gills of fish, thus providing the first example of locally induced immunoglobulin in the mucosa of a cold-blooded species. Moreover, we demonstrate that gill microbiota is predominantly coated with IgT, thus providing previously unappreciated evidence that the microbiota present at a respiratory surface of a vertebrate is recognized by a mucosal immunoglobulin. Our findings indicate that respiratory surfaces and mucosal immunoglobulins are part of an ancient association that predates the emergence of tetrapods. PMID:26869478

  17. Mucosal immunoglobulins at respiratory surfaces mark an ancient association that predates the emergence of tetrapods

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhen; Takizawa, Fumio; Parra, David; Gómez, Daniela; von Gersdorff Jørgensen, Louise; LaPatra, Scott E.; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2016-01-01

    Gas-exchange structures are critical for acquiring oxygen, but they also represent portals for pathogen entry. Local mucosal immunoglobulin responses against pathogens in specialized respiratory organs have only been described in tetrapods. Since fish gills are considered a mucosal surface, we hypothesized that a dedicated mucosal immunoglobulin response would be generated within its mucosa on microbial exposure. Supporting this hypothesis, here we demonstrate that following pathogen exposure, IgT+ B cells proliferate and generate pathogen-specific IgT within the gills of fish, thus providing the first example of locally induced immunoglobulin in the mucosa of a cold-blooded species. Moreover, we demonstrate that gill microbiota is predominantly coated with IgT, thus providing previously unappreciated evidence that the microbiota present at a respiratory surface of a vertebrate is recognized by a mucosal immunoglobulin. Our findings indicate that respiratory surfaces and mucosal immunoglobulins are part of an ancient association that predates the emergence of tetrapods. PMID:26869478

  18. Nebular history of amoeboid olivine aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, N.; Petaev, M. I.; Kimura, M.; Miyazaki, A.; Hiyagon, H.

    2009-05-01

    Minor element (Ca, Cr, and Mn) concentrations in amoeboid olivine aggregates (AOAs) from primitive chondrites were measured and compared with those predicted by equilibrium condensation in the solar nebula. CaO concentrations in forsterite are low, particularly in porous aggregates. A plausible explanation appears that an equilibrium Ca activity was not maintained during the olivine condensation. CaO and MnO in forsterite are negatively correlated, with CaO being higher in compact aggregates. This suggests that the compact aggregates formed either by a prolonged reheating of the porous aggregates or by condensation and aggregation of forsterite during a very slow cooling in the nebula.

  19. Detection of antirotavirus immunoglobulins A, G, and M in swine colostrum, milk, and feces by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Corthier, G; Franz, J

    1981-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed to allow direct detection of class-specific antirotavirus antibodies. In colostrum and in milk, antirotavirus antibodies were found in the three immunoglobulin classes. Antirotavirus immunoglobulins G and M were predominant in colostrum, whereas antirotavirus immunoglobulin A was predominant in milk and feces. PMID:6260678

  20. Role of streams in myxobacteria aggregate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiskowski, Maria A.; Jiang, Yi; Alber, Mark S.

    2004-10-01

    Cell contact, movement and directionality are important factors in biological development (morphogenesis), and myxobacteria are a model system for studying cell-cell interaction and cell organization preceding differentiation. When starved, thousands of myxobacteria cells align, stream and form aggregates which later develop into round, non-motile spores. Canonically, cell aggregation has been attributed to attractive chemotaxis, a long range interaction, but there is growing evidence that myxobacteria organization depends on contact-mediated cell-cell communication. We present a discrete stochastic model based on contact-mediated signaling that suggests an explanation for the initialization of early aggregates, aggregation dynamics and final aggregate distribution. Our model qualitatively reproduces the unique structures of myxobacteria aggregates and detailed stages which occur during myxobacteria aggregation: first, aggregates initialize in random positions and cells join aggregates by random walk; second, cells redistribute by moving within transient streams connecting aggregates. Streams play a critical role in final aggregate size distribution by redistributing cells among fewer, larger aggregates. The mechanism by which streams redistribute cells depends on aggregate sizes and is enhanced by noise. Our model predicts that with increased internal noise, more streams would form and streams would last longer. Simulation results suggest a series of new experiments.

  1. Molecular analysis of immunoglobulin genes in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Kosmas, C; Stamatopoulos, K; Stavroyianni, N; Belessi, C; Viniou, N; Yataganas, X

    1999-04-01

    The study of immunoglobulin genes in multiple myeloma over the last five years has provided important information regarding biology, ontogenetic location, disease evolution, pathogenic consequences and tumor-specific therapeutic intervention with idiotypic vaccination. Detailed analysis of V(H) genes has revealed clonal relationship between switch variants expressed by the bone marrow plasma cell and myeloma progenitors in the marrow and peripheral blood. V(H) gene usage is biased against V4-34 (encoding antibodies with cold agglutinin specificity; anti-l/i) explaining the absence of autoimmune phenomena in myeloma compared to other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. V(H) genes accumulate somatic hypermutations following a distribution compatible with antigen selection, but with no intraclonal heterogeneity. V(L) genes indicate a bias in usage of VkappaI family members and somatic hypermutation, in line with antigen selection, of the expressed Vkappa genes is higher than any other B-cell lymphoid disorder. A complementary imprint of antigen selection as evidenced by somatic hypermutation of either the V(H) or V(L) clonogenic genes has been observed. The absence of ongoing somatic mutations in either V(H) or V(L) genes gives rise to the notion that the cell of origin in myeloma is a post-germinal center memory B-cell. Clinical application of sensitive PCR methods in order to detect clonal immunoglobulin gene rearrangements has made relevant the monitoring and follow-up of minimal residual disease in stem cell autografts and after myeloablative therapy. The fact that surface immunoglobulin V(H) and V(L) sequences constitute unique tumor-specific antigenic determinants has stimulated investigators to devise strategies aiming to generate active specific immunity against the idiotype of malignant B-cells in myeloma by constructing vaccines based on expressed single-chain Fv fragments, DNA plasmids carrying V(H)+V(L) clonogenic genes for naked DNA vaccination, or

  2. Management of hypersensitivity reactions to anti-D immunoglobulin preparations.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, K; Nasser, S M

    2014-11-01

    RhD immunoglobulin G (anti-D) administered to pregnant Rh(-) women prevents Rh isoimmunization. Its use has significantly reduced the incidence of haemolytic disease of the foetus and newborn previously responsible for one death in every 2200 births. In pregnancy, acute drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylaxis can have serious deleterious effects on the mother and foetus/neonate. Women can be erroneously labelled as drug allergic as the investigation of hypersensitivity reactions in pregnancy is complex and drug challenges are usually contraindicated. We present three cases of suspected anti-D hypersensitivity clinically presenting as anaphylaxis and delayed transfusion-related reaction. We also propose a new algorithm for the investigations of such reaction. It relies on detailed history, cautious interpretation of skin tests, foetal Rh genotyping from maternal blood and, in some cases, anti-D challenges. This is not to deprive women of anti-D which might put their future pregnancies at risk. PMID:25066207

  3. Intravenous immunoglobulins in peripheral neuropathy associated with vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Y; Uziel, Y; Zandman, G; Amital, H; Sherer, Y; Langevitz, P; Goldman, B; Shoenfeld, Y

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To present patients who exhibited various inflammatory diseases accompanied with vasculitic peripheral neuropathies for which intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) was used for treatment. Methods: Six patients with Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), vaccination induced vasculitis, Churg-Strauss vasculitis, mixed cryoglobulinaemia associated with hepatitis C infection, or sarcoidosis were included. All developed vasculitic peripheral neuropathy, and were treated with high dose IVIg (2 g/kg body weight). The patients were followed up for 1–5 years after this treatment. Results: In four patients (Sjögren's syndrome, Churg-Strauss vasculitis, SLE, and vaccination induced vasculitis) the neuropathy resolved after IVIg treatment. Conclusion: IVIg may be beneficial in cases of resistant vasculitic peripheral neuropathy. IVIg should probably be considered as a sole or adjuvant treatment for patients with contraindications to conventional treatment, or alternatively, for patients in whom conventional treatment has failed. PMID:14644864

  4. Immunoglobulins in defense, pathogenesis, and therapy of fungal diseases.

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Arturo; Pirofski, Liise-Anne

    2012-05-17

    Only two decades ago antibodies to fungi were thought to have little or no role in protection against fungal diseases. However, subsequent research has provided convincing evidence that certain antibodies can modify the course of fungal infection to the benefit or detriment of the host. Hybridoma technology was the breakthrough that enabled the characterization of antibodies to fungi, illuminating some of the requirements for antibody efficacy. As discussed in this review, fungal-specific antibodies mediate protection through direct actions on fungal cells and through classical mechanisms such as phagocytosis and complement activation. Although mechanisms of antibody-mediated protection are often species-specific, numerous fungal antigens can be targeted to generate vaccines and therapeutic immunoglobulins. Furthermore, the study of antibody function against medically important fungi has provided fresh immunological insights into the complexity of humoral immunity that are likely to apply to other pathogens.

  5. Role of immunoglobulin G antibodies in diagnosis of food allergy

    PubMed Central

    Bartuzi, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents current views on the role of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies in the reactions with food antigens in the digestive tract and their role in the diagnosis of food allergy based on the assays of specific IgG class antibodies, with a special focus on contemporary practice guidelines. In the light of current scientific knowledge, the IgG-specific antibody-mediated reactions are a body's natural and normal defensive reactions to infiltrating food antigens, which are considered as pathogens. On the other hand, specific IgG antibodies against food allergens play a crucial role in the induction and maintaining of immunological tolerance to food antigens. The statements of many scientific societies stress that sIgG are of no significant importance in the diagnosis of food allergy since their presence is associated with a normal immune response to food allergens and attests to a protracted exposure to food antigens.

  6. Intravenous human immunoglobulin for treatment of folliculitis decalvans.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Nuriah; Ralph, Nicola; Murphy, Gillian

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of folliculitis decalvans (FD) successfully treated with intravenous human immunoglobulin (HIG). Many conventional treatments with topical agents and oral antibiotics had failed to achieve disease remission, treatment with HIG at a dose of 2 g/kg for the first month, reduced to 1 g/kg for second to fourth months was therefore started, which resulted in rapid improvement and ultimately complete resolution of FD. Clinical improvement was noted after the first infusion of HIG and remission of inflammation was achieved after the fourth infusion. Disease remission was sustained for six months following the last HIG infusion. The exact mechanism of action of HIG is poorly understood. However, it is thought to act as an immunomodulatory agent by altering different components of immune functions. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in the literature of FD successfully treated with intravenous HIG.

  7. Explanatory style and Immunoglobulin A (IgA).

    PubMed

    Brennan, F X; Charnetski, C J

    2000-01-01

    The construct of explanatory style has been related to numerous aspects of human psychology, including health. Our research has focused on the effects of various psychological variables on the immune system, in particular Immunoglobulin A (IgA). We had participants fill out the Attributional Style Questionnaire (ASQ), the predominant measure of explanatory style, and assayed saliva samples for secretory IgA. No relationship was observed between overall ASQ score and IgA, or composite optimism score and IgA. However, we observed significant negative correlations between both the composite pessimism score and IgA, as well as the hopelessness score and IgA. Pessimistic explanatory style may therefore be related to immune system deficits and poor health. PMID:11330488

  8. Immunoglobulin M myeloma: evaluation of molecular features and cytokine expression.

    PubMed

    Konduri, Kartik; Sahota, Surinder S; Babbage, Gavin; Tong, Alex W; Kumar, Padmasini; Newman, Joseph T; Stone, Marvin J

    2005-03-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) M myeloma is a distinct entity with features of multiple myeloma (MM) and Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM). The malignant cells in IgM myeloma have a distinctive chromosomal translocation that differentiates them from WM. These cells are postgerminal-center in origin with isotype-switch transcripts. They appear to be arrested at a point of maturation between that of WM and MM. Preliminary data indicate that a pattern of osteoclast-activating factor and osteoprotegerin expression similar to that observed in classic MM is present in IgM myeloma. Additional studies on patients with this rare tumor may provide further insight into the pathogenesis of bone disease in plasma cell dyscrasias.

  9. Anaphylactic shock due to hepatitis B immunoglobulin in a newborn.

    PubMed

    Bulbul, Ali; Karadag, Ahmet; Köklü, Esad; Pamuk, Utku; Sarici, Serdar Umit

    2010-10-01

    Hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) is administered for the passive immunisation of all infants born to HBsAg-positive mothers within 12 h of birth. Adverse effects of HBIG are very rare. In this study, we report a newborn (a female, 33 weeks' gestation and 2030 g birth weight) developing anaphylaxis after HBIG administration. The mother was a Hepatitis B virus (HBV) carrier. Hypotension and erythematous rash developed 7 min after HBIG administration. Reporting the first anaphylaxis case in newborns due to HBIG in literature, we suggest the condition be taken into account, and requisite precautions should be taken against this probable complication in the newborn. PMID:20210693

  10. Intravenous immunoglobulin in neurological disease: a specialist review

    PubMed Central

    Wiles, C; Brown, P; Chapel, H; Guerrini, R; Hughes, R; Martin, T; McCrone, P; Newsom-Davis, J; Palace, J; Rees, J; Rose, M; Scolding, N; Webster, A

    2002-01-01

    Treatment of neurological disorders with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is an increasing feature of our practice for an expanding range of indications. For some there is evidence of benefit from randomised controlled trials, whereas for others evidence is anecdotal. The relative rarity of some of the disorders means that good randomised control trials will be difficult to deliver. Meanwhile, the treatment is costly and pressure to "do something" in often distressing disorders considerable. This review follows a 1 day meeting of the authors in November 2000 and examines current evidence for the use of IVIg in neurological conditions and comments on mechanisms of action, delivery, safety and tolerability, and health economic issues. Evidence of efficacy has been classified into levels for healthcare interventions (tables 1 and 2). PMID:11909900

  11. Characterization of a lymphoblastoid line deleted for lambda immunoglobulin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hough, C.A., White, B.N., Holden, J.A.

    1995-04-01

    While characterizing the cat eye syndrome (CES) supernumerary chromosome for the presence of {lambda} immunoglobulin gene region sequences, a lymphoblastoid cell line from one CES patient was identified in which there was selection of cells deleted from some IGLC and IGLV genes. Two distinct deletions, one on each chromosome 22, were identified, presumably arising from independent somatic recombination events occurring during B-lymphocyte differentiation. The extent of the deleted regions was determined using probes from the various IGLV subgroups and they each covered at least 82 kilobases. The precise definition of the deletions was not possible because of conservation of some restriction sites in the IGLV region. The cell line was used to map putative IGLV genes within the recombinant phage {lambda}V{lambda}135 to the distal part of the IGLV gene region. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Chronic myopathy due to immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Manoli, Irini; Kwan, Justin Y.; Wang, Qian; Rushing, Elisabeth J.; Tsokos, Maria; Arai, Andrew E.; Burch, Warner M.; Dispenzieri, Angela; McPherron, Alexandra C.; Gahl, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid myopathy associated with a plasma cell dyscrasia is a rare cause of muscle hypertrophy. It can be a challenging diagnosis, since pathological findings are often elusive. In addition, the mechanism by which immunoglobulin light-chain deposition stimulates muscle overgrowth remains poorly understood. We present a 53–year old female with a 10-year history of progressive generalized muscle overgrowth. Congo-red staining and immunohistochemistry revealed perivascular lambda light chain amyloid deposits, apparent only in a second muscle biopsy. The numbers of central nuclei and satellite cells were increased, suggesting enhanced muscle progenitor cell formation. Despite the chronicity of the light chain disease, the patient showed complete resolution of hematologic findings and significant improvement of her muscle symptoms following autologous bone marrow transplantation. This case highlights the importance of early diagnosis and therapy for this treatable cause of a chronic myopathy with muscle hypertrophy. PMID:23465863

  13. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment in a patient with adrenomyeloneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) is one of several phenotypes of the adrenoleukodystrophy spectrum caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene on the X chromosome. An inflammatory component is part of the disease complex ranging from severe childhood CNS demyelination to spinal cord and peripheral nerve degeneration. Case presentation We present a patient with clinical progressive AMN and severe lower limb pain. Longitudinal brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed a constant slightly elevated myoinositol/total creatine ratio during the five year treatment period, probably reflecting demyelination, microglial activation and gliosis, indicating an inflammatory response. The pain was refractory to conventional therapy but intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treatment was highly efficient. Conclusion IVIG may be considered as a last resort for treatment of refractory pain in AMN patients with indications of an inflammatory component. PMID:23009600

  14. Role of immunoglobulin G antibodies in diagnosis of food allergy

    PubMed Central

    Bartuzi, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents current views on the role of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies in the reactions with food antigens in the digestive tract and their role in the diagnosis of food allergy based on the assays of specific IgG class antibodies, with a special focus on contemporary practice guidelines. In the light of current scientific knowledge, the IgG-specific antibody-mediated reactions are a body's natural and normal defensive reactions to infiltrating food antigens, which are considered as pathogens. On the other hand, specific IgG antibodies against food allergens play a crucial role in the induction and maintaining of immunological tolerance to food antigens. The statements of many scientific societies stress that sIgG are of no significant importance in the diagnosis of food allergy since their presence is associated with a normal immune response to food allergens and attests to a protracted exposure to food antigens. PMID:27605894

  15. Role of immunoglobulin G antibodies in diagnosis of food allergy.

    PubMed

    Gocki, Jacek; Bartuzi, Zbigniew

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents current views on the role of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies in the reactions with food antigens in the digestive tract and their role in the diagnosis of food allergy based on the assays of specific IgG class antibodies, with a special focus on contemporary practice guidelines. In the light of current scientific knowledge, the IgG-specific antibody-mediated reactions are a body's natural and normal defensive reactions to infiltrating food antigens, which are considered as pathogens. On the other hand, specific IgG antibodies against food allergens play a crucial role in the induction and maintaining of immunological tolerance to food antigens. The statements of many scientific societies stress that sIgG are of no significant importance in the diagnosis of food allergy since their presence is associated with a normal immune response to food allergens and attests to a protracted exposure to food antigens. PMID:27605894

  16. Primary immunoglobulin repertoire development: time and space matter.

    PubMed

    Granato, Alessandra; Chen, Yuezhou; Wesemann, Duane R

    2015-04-01

    The primary immunoglobulin repertoire develops via opposing forces of expanding diversification balanced by contracting selection mechanisms. The resulting shape is essential for host health and immune fitness. While the molecular mechanisms of Ig diversification have largely been defined, selection forces shaping emerging Ig repertoires are poorly understood. During lifetime, human and mouse early B cell development occurs at distinct locations-beginning in fetal liver before transferring to bone marrow and spleen by the end of gestation. During an early life window of time, the murine gut lamina propria harbors developing immature B cells in proximity to intestinal contents such as commensal microbes and dietary antigens. Location and timing of early B cell development may thus endow neighboring antigens with primary repertoire-shaping capabilities.

  17. Childhood Pemphigus Foliaceus with Exclusive Immunoglobulin G Autoantibodies to Desmocollins.

    PubMed

    Geller, Shamir; Gat, Andrea; Harel, Avikam; Mashiah, Jacob; Zeeli, Tal; Eming, Rüdiger; Ishii, Norito; Hertl, Michael; Hashimoto, Takashi; Sprecher, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Pemphigus refers to a group of potentially fatal blistering skin diseases that are often due to the deleterious effects of autoantibodies directed against desmosomal antigens. Although desmogleins have been mainly implicated as autoantigens in pemphigus, a steadily growing body of evidence suggests that other desmosomal proteins may be causally involved as well. Antibodies directed against desmocollin-3 have been shown to play a direct role in the pathogenesis of several types of pemphigus. Here we describe the case of a child with localized pemphigus foliaceus and immunoglobulin G (IgG) reactivity exclusively directed to desmocollins. The present report suggests that autoantibodies against nondesmoglein antigens may play a role in the pathogenesis of superficial pemphigus, in addition to pemphigus vulgaris, paraneoplastic pemphigus, and IgA pemphigus. PMID:26758100

  18. Impedimetric immunoglobulin G immunosensor based on chemically modified graphenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loo, Adeline Huiling; Bonanni, Alessandra; Ambrosi, Adriano; Poh, Hwee Ling; Pumera, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Immunosensors which display high sensitivity and selectivity are of utmost importance to the biomedical field. Graphene is a material which has immense potential for the fabrication of immunosensors. For the first time, we evaluate the immunosensing capabilities of various graphene surfaces in this work. We propose a simple and label-free electrochemical impedimetric immunosensor for immunoglobulin G (IgG) based on chemically modified graphene (CMG) surfaces such as graphite oxide, graphene oxide, thermally reduced graphene oxide and electrochemically reduced graphene oxide. Disposable electrochemical printed electrodes were first modified with CMG materials before anti-immunoglobulin G (anti-IgG), which is specific to IgG, was immobilized. The principle of detection lies in the changes in impedance spectra of the redox probe after the attachment of IgG to the immobilized anti-IgG. It was found that thermally reduced graphene oxide has the best performance when compared to the other CMG materials. In addition, the optimal concentration of anti-IgG to be deposited onto the modified electrode surface is 10 μg ml-1 and the linear range of detection of the immunosensor is from 0.3 μg ml-1 to 7 μg ml-1. Finally, the fabricated immunosensor also displays selectivity for IgG.Immunosensors which display high sensitivity and selectivity are of utmost importance to the biomedical field. Graphene is a material which has immense potential for the fabrication of immunosensors. For the first time, we evaluate the immunosensing capabilities of various graphene surfaces in this work. We propose a simple and label-free electrochemical impedimetric immunosensor for immunoglobulin G (IgG) based on chemically modified graphene (CMG) surfaces such as graphite oxide, graphene oxide, thermally reduced graphene oxide and electrochemically reduced graphene oxide. Disposable electrochemical printed electrodes were first modified with CMG materials before anti-immunoglobulin G (anti

  19. 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Interlaken Leadership Awards

    PubMed Central

    Dalakas, M C; Löscher, W N

    2014-01-01

    The research presented in this section explores novel applications of immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy in neurological disorders. The results from the upcoming and ongoing trials of Drs Honnorat and Gamez are expected to provide meaningful insights into the treatment of two serious and disabling diseases. The results already being reported from the work of Drs Schmidt and Geis in animal models seem promising, but further proof-of-concept research is warranted to translate their significance to human diseases. Dr Goebel's work in developing animal models of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) may provide new insights into predicting which CRPS patients could respond to Ig therapy or other immunotherapies. The work being made possible by a number of the Interlaken Leadership Awards may provide fundamental insights in understanding neurological disorders and improving quality of life for the patients who suffer from them. PMID:25546795

  20. 7th International Immunoglobulin Conference: Interlaken Leadership Awards.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, M C; Löscher, W N

    2014-12-01

    The research presented in this section explores novel applications of immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy in neurological disorders. The results from the upcoming and ongoing trials of Drs Honnorat and Gamez are expected to provide meaningful insights into the treatment of two serious and disabling diseases. The results already being reported from the work of Drs Schmidt and Geis in animal models seem promising, but further proof-of-concept research is warranted to translate their significance to human diseases. Dr Goebel's work in developing animal models of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) may provide new insights into predicting which CRPS patients could respond to Ig therapy or other immunotherapies. The work being made possible by a number of the Interlaken Leadership Awards may provide fundamental insights in understanding neurological disorders and improving quality of life for the patients who suffer from them.

  1. Allelic exclusion of immunoglobulin genes: models and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Vettermann, Christian; Schlissel, Mark S

    2010-09-01

    The allelic exclusion of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes is one of the most evolutionarily conserved features of the adaptive immune system and underlies the monospecificity of B cells. While much has been learned about how Ig allelic exclusion is established during B-cell development, the relevance of monospecificity to B-cell function remains enigmatic. Here, we review the theoretical models that have been proposed to explain the establishment of Ig allelic exclusion and focus on the molecular mechanisms utilized by developing B cells to ensure the monoallelic expression of Ig kappa and Ig lambda light chain genes. We also discuss the physiological consequences of Ig allelic exclusion and speculate on the importance of monospecificity of B cells for immune recognition.

  2. Not only immunoglobulins, C-reactive protein too.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Alok

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this letter is to expand a discussion, published recently in Molecular Immunology, on the post-secretion gain of function by immunoglobulins. It was reported that some circulating IgG molecules in all healthy individuals acquire novel antigen-binding specificity after exposure to conditions that change protein conformation, such as acidic pH. Another protein, C-reactive protein, also acquires novel ligand-binding specificity post-secretion after a switch from its native pentameric conformation to non-native pentameric conformation. Thus, that the functions of a protein depend upon its alternate structural states, and therefore on the surrounding milieu, is a more general phenomenon for some ancient molecules of the immune system than previously thought.

  3. Immunoglobulin A in Bovine Milk: A Potential Functional Food?

    PubMed

    Cakebread, Julie A; Humphrey, Rex; Hodgkinson, Alison J

    2015-08-26

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is an anti-inflammatory antibody that plays a critical role in mucosal immunity. It is found in large quantities in human milk, but there are lower amounts in bovine milk. In humans, IgA plays a significant role in providing protection from environmental pathogens at mucosal surfaces and is a key component for the establishment and maintenance of intestinal homeostasis via innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. To date, many of the dairy-based functional foods are derived from bovine colostrum, targeting the benefits of IgG. IgA has a higher pathogenic binding capacity and greater stability against proteolytic degradation when ingested compared with IgG. This provides IgA-based products greater potential in the functional food market that has yet to be realized.

  4. Protein aggregation in salt solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kastelic, Miha; Kalyuzhnyi, Yurij V.; Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Dill, Ken A.; Vlachy, Vojko

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation is broadly important in diseases and in formulations of biological drugs. Here, we develop a theoretical model for reversible protein–protein aggregation in salt solutions. We treat proteins as hard spheres having square-well-energy binding sites, using Wertheim’s thermodynamic perturbation theory. The necessary condition required for such modeling to be realistic is that proteins in solution during the experiment remain in their compact form. Within this limitation our model gives accurate liquid–liquid coexistence curves for lysozyme and γ IIIa-crystallin solutions in respective buffers. It provides good fits to the cloud-point curves of lysozyme in buffer–salt mixtures as a function of the type and concentration of salt. It than predicts full coexistence curves, osmotic compressibilities, and second virial coefficients under such conditions. This treatment may also be relevant to protein crystallization. PMID:25964322

  5. Protein aggregation in salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Kastelic, Miha; Kalyuzhnyi, Yurij V; Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Dill, Ken A; Vlachy, Vojko

    2015-05-26

    Protein aggregation is broadly important in diseases and in formulations of biological drugs. Here, we develop a theoretical model for reversible protein-protein aggregation in salt solutions. We treat proteins as hard spheres having square-well-energy binding sites, using Wertheim's thermodynamic perturbation theory. The necessary condition required for such modeling to be realistic is that proteins in solution during the experiment remain in their compact form. Within this limitation our model gives accurate liquid-liquid coexistence curves for lysozyme and γ IIIa-crystallin solutions in respective buffers. It provides good fits to the cloud-point curves of lysozyme in buffer-salt mixtures as a function of the type and concentration of salt. It than predicts full coexistence curves, osmotic compressibilities, and second virial coefficients under such conditions. This treatment may also be relevant to protein crystallization.

  6. Functional Properties of Human Cytomegalovirus Hyperimmunoglobulin and Standard Immunoglobulin Preparations.

    PubMed

    Germer, Matthias; Herbener, Peter; Schüttrumpf, Jörg

    2016-09-06

    BACKGROUND Cytomegalovirus hyperimmunoglobulin (CMV-HIG) preparations reduce mortality after solid organ transplantation. Polyspecific intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) products are also used prophylactically by some centers. Since direct comparative characterizations of the preparations are scarce, it is challenging to compare different clinical studies. MATERIAL AND METHODS The functionality of 2 CMV-HIG preparations (Cytotect® CP, Cytogam®) and 2 IVIg preparations (Ig Vena®, Flebogamma®) were compared in terms of: (i) CMV-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody levels determined by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA), (ii) avidity index using a CMV IgG avidity enzyme immunoassay, (iii) immunoblot assay against CMV-specific antigens, and (iv) anti-CMV microneutralization assay. RESULTS Median CMV-specific IgG antibody concentration was similar in the 2 CMV-HIG preparations (Cytotect® CP 101.8 PEIU/ml, Cytogam® 112.5 PEIU/ml) but markedly lower in the IVIg preparations (13.5 PEIU/ml and 21.3 PEIU/ml). CMV binding avidity was virtually identical for both CMV-HIG products (~90%). Immunoblot assay showed consistently high binding of both CMV-HIG preparations against all antigenic CMV glycoproteins tested. Recognition of some CMV-specific antigens (IE1, CM2, and p65) was weaker for the 2 IVIg products. Median CMV neutralizing antibody titers were identical for both CMV-HIG preparations (1:256), and 4-fold lower (1:64) for the IVIg products. CMV IgG antibody concentration correlated with the CMV neutralization titer. CONCLUSIONS Compared to the polyspecific IVIg products tested here, CMV-HIG preparations showed higher CMV binding activity and wider recognition of tested CMV-specific glycoprotein antigens, with markedly higher neutralizing activity. There do not appear to be any relevant distinctions between the Cytotect® CP and Cytogam® CMV-HIG products in terms of functional activity.

  7. Expression of immunoglobulin kappa and lambda chains in mink.

    PubMed

    Bovkun, L A; Peremislov, V V; Nayakshin, A M; Belousov, E S; Mechetina, L V; Aasted, B; Taranin, A V

    1993-08-01

    The ratio of kappa and lambda chains of immunoglobulins varies significantly from one species to another. It has previously been thought that lambda was only type expressed in mink. We tested mink immunoglobulin light chains using two monoclonal antibodies G80 and G88. It has been shown that G80 and G88 specifically recognize two antigenically different subpopulations of the light chains. Immunochemical analysis of these subpopulations separated by affinity chromatography suggested that they represent lambda and kappa types of light chains, respectively. Screening of a mink cDNA library with monoclonal antibody G88 resulted in the isolation of clone pIGK-1 containing kappa chain-encoding sequence. The cDNA insert of pIGK-1 included most of the V segment, as well as the J, C and 3' untranslated sequences. Mink V kappa sequence shown the highest homology with the human V kappa II subgroup genes (76-79%). Mink C kappa sequence was 53-63% homologous to C kappa of other species. The striking feature of mink C kappa chain is the presence of glutamine in the C-terminal position. Southern blot analysis suggested that mink haploid genome has one C kappa gene and multiple V kappa genes. The kappa:lambda chain ratio in the 12 minks studied was, on the average, 46:54. The same ratio was observed for the kappa- and lambda-producing cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes. The five previously identified mink light chain allotypes were assigned to the lambda chains, thereby confirming that lambda chains in this species are additionally subdivided into several subtypes.

  8. Functional Properties of Human Cytomegalovirus Hyperimmunoglobulin and Standard Immunoglobulin Preparations.

    PubMed

    Germer, Matthias; Herbener, Peter; Schüttrumpf, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cytomegalovirus hyperimmunoglobulin (CMV-HIG) preparations reduce mortality after solid organ transplantation. Polyspecific intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) products are also used prophylactically by some centers. Since direct comparative characterizations of the preparations are scarce, it is challenging to compare different clinical studies. MATERIAL AND METHODS The functionality of 2 CMV-HIG preparations (Cytotect® CP, Cytogam®) and 2 IVIg preparations (Ig Vena®, Flebogamma®) were compared in terms of: (i) CMV-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody levels determined by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA), (ii) avidity index using a CMV IgG avidity enzyme immunoassay, (iii) immunoblot assay against CMV-specific antigens, and (iv) anti-CMV microneutralization assay. RESULTS Median CMV-specific IgG antibody concentration was similar in the 2 CMV-HIG preparations (Cytotect® CP 101.8 PEIU/ml, Cytogam® 112.5 PEIU/ml) but markedly lower in the IVIg preparations (13.5 PEIU/ml and 21.3 PEIU/ml). CMV binding avidity was virtually identical for both CMV-HIG products (~90%). Immunoblot assay showed consistently high binding of both CMV-HIG preparations against all antigenic CMV glycoproteins tested. Recognition of some CMV-specific antigens (IE1, CM2, and p65) was weaker for the 2 IVIg products. Median CMV neutralizing antibody titers were identical for both CMV-HIG preparations (1:256), and 4-fold lower (1:64) for the IVIg products. CMV IgG antibody concentration correlated with the CMV neutralization titer. CONCLUSIONS Compared to the polyspecific IVIg products tested here, CMV-HIG preparations showed higher CMV binding activity and wider recognition of tested CMV-specific glycoprotein antigens, with markedly higher neutralizing activity. There do not appear to be any relevant distinctions between the Cytotect® CP and Cytogam® CMV-HIG products in terms of functional activity. PMID:27595792

  9. Scope of action of the immunoglobulin mutator system.

    PubMed

    Wabl, M R; Jäck, H M; von Borstel, R C; Steinberg, C M

    1989-01-01

    The authors have developed a method to measure the rate of spontaneous mutations taking place in IgH, the gene encoding the immunoglobulin heavy chain. When an amber chain-termination codon mutates to a sense codon, translation of the polypeptide chain will be completed, and mutant cells producing the heavy chain can be detected with a fluorescent labelled antibody. The protocol used is the compartmentalization test which minimizes any effect of selection. In subclones of the pre-B lymphocyte line 18-81, the spontaneous mutation rate in the part of IgH encoding the variable region is somewhat greater than 10(-5) mutations per base pair per generation. This supports the hypothesis that hypermutation is not dependent on cell stimulation by an antigen. In a hybrid between a cell of this line and a myeloma (which represents the terminal stage of the B-cell lineage), the mutation rate was too low to be determined by this test, less than 10(-9). When the same loss to gain procedure system was used with an opal chain-terminating codon in the part of IgH encoding the constant region (C mu), a high rate of reversion by deletion was found. Long (more than one exon) and short (less than one exon) deletions occurred at rates of 1.7 x 10(-5) and 1.4 x 10(-7) per generation, respectively. It is thought that the high rate of deletion is not related to somatic hypermutation but rather to DNA rearrangement during the heavy-chain class switch, which is occurring in these pre-B cell lines. The point mutation rate was too low to be detected above the background of deletion mutants, less than 5 x 10(-8). The immunoglobulin mutator system works weakly, if at all, on two other, nonimmunoglobulin, genes tested: B2m (beta 2 microglobulin) and the gene for ouabain resistance. PMID:2512197

  10. Immunoglobulin G concentration in canine colostrum: Evaluation and variability.

    PubMed

    Mila, Hanna; Feugier, Alexandre; Grellet, Aurélien; Anne, Jennifer; Gonnier, Milène; Martin, Maelys; Rossig, Lisa; Chastant-Maillard, Sylvie

    2015-11-01

    Canine neonates are born hypogammaglobulinemic, and colostrum is their main source of immunoglobulins. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immune quality of canine colostrum and its variability both among bitches and among mammary glands. The immune quality was estimated from immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentration (ELISA test). The correlation of IgG concentration with refractometry was evaluated. From a total of 44 bitches from 13 different breeds from a single breeding kennel, samples of colostrum and blood were collected one day after the parturition onset. Colostrum was collected separately from each pair of mammary glands (180 pairs). The mean colostrum IgG concentration in our population was 20.8 ± 8.1g/L (ranging from 8.0 to 41.7 g/L) with no influence of breed size, litter size, age of dam or serum IgG concentration. Colostrum IgG concentration varied widely among pairs of mammary glands within one bitch (variation coefficient: 42 ± 32.1%). Nevertheless, no single pair of mammary glands was found to produce regularly a secretion of higher quality. No difference in IgG concentration was recorded between anterior and posterior pairs either. The BRIX index and the refractive index were significantly, but moderately correlated with colostrum IgG concentration (r=0.53 and 0.42, respectively). This study demonstrates a great variability in immune quality of colostrum among bitches and among mammary glands within one bitch. Further studies on the suckling behavior of puppies and on determination of the minimal immune quality of colostrum are required to evaluate their impact of this high variability on neonatal mortality in dogs. PMID:26186389

  11. Aggregation of Heterogeneously Charged Colloids.

    PubMed

    Dempster, Joshua M; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2016-06-28

    Patchy colloids are attractive as programmable building blocks for metamaterials. Inverse patchy colloids, in which a charged surface is decorated with patches of the opposite charge, are additionally noteworthy as models for heterogeneously charged biological materials such as proteins. We study the phases and aggregation behavior of a single charged patch in an oppositely charged colloid with a single-site model. This single-patch inverse patchy colloid model shows a large number of phases when varying patch size. For large patch sizes we find ferroelectric crystals, while small patch sizes produce cross-linked gels. Intermediate values produce monodisperse clusters and unusual worm structures that preserve finite ratios of area to volume. The polarization observed at large patch sizes is robust under extreme disorder in patch size and shape. We examine phase-temperature dependence and coexistence curves and find that large patch sizes produce polarized liquids, in contrast to mean-field predictions. Finally, we introduce small numbers of unpatched charged colloids. These can either suppress or encourage aggregation depending on their concentration and the size of the patches on the patched colloids. These effects can be exploited to control aggregation and to measure effective patch size.

  12. Tau Phosphorylation, Aggregation, and Cell Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Avila, J.; Santa-María, I.; Pérez, M.; Hernández, F.; Moreno, F.

    2006-01-01

    Protein aggregation takes place in many neurodegenerative disorders. However, there is a controversy about the possible toxicity of these protein aggregates. In this review, this controversy is discussed, focussing on the tau aggregation that takes place in those disorders known as tauopathies. PMID:17047313

  13. Mineral resource of the month: aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willett, Jason C.

    2012-01-01

    Crushed stone and construction sand and gravel, the two major types of natural aggregates, are among the most abundant and accessible natural resources on the planet. The earliest civilizations used aggregates for various purposes, mainly construction. Today aggregates provide the basic raw materials for the foundation of modern society.

  14. ANTIBODY AND IMMUNOGLOBULIN PRODUCTION AT THE CELLULAR LEVEL IN BURSECTOMIZED-IRRADIATED CHICKENS

    PubMed Central

    Alm, Gunnar V.; Peterson, Raymond D. A.

    1969-01-01

    The effect of bursectomy combined with sublethal X-irradiation in the newly hatched chicken on the immunoglobulin and antibody producing capacity in later life was investigated. The previous findings of a significant incidence of hypogammaglobulinemia in such animals were confirmed. Spleen cells from severely hypogammaglobulinemic animals synthesized and secreted little or no immunoglobulin. Such spleen lymphoid cells contained fewer immunoglobulin antigenic determinants than spleen cells from irradiated control animals as evidenced by their relative inability to respond by an increased DNA synthesis after in vitro culture with rabbit antiserum to chicken immunoglobulin. Therefore, the deficiency in the immunoglobulin synthesis extends not only to actively secreting cells such as plasma cells, but to the entire lymphoid cell population. As expected, most irradiated-bursectomized chickens, irrespective of plasma immunoglobulin levels failed to produce detectable amount of circulating antibodies to Brucella abortus antigen in the primary immune response. Severely hypogammaglobulinemic animals were completely unable to elaborate any plaque forming cells (PFC) in the primary response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC). The results of this investigation support the contention that in the severely hypogammaglobulinemic bursectomized-irradiated chicken the entire antibody producing and immunoglobulin producing cell line is absent. The possibility remains that precursor or stem cells are present but are not appropriately directed to antibody synthesis by other cell types. PMID:4181832

  15. Inhibitory potential of Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) colostrum immunoglobulin G on Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    L S, Mamatha Bhanu; Nishimura, S-I; H S, Aparna

    2016-07-01

    The unique components of colostrum like free oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates are known to offer resistance to enzymatic digestion in the gastrointestinal tract and have the ability to inhibit the localized adherence of enteropathogens to the digestive tract of the neonates. In this context, we have evaluated the in vitro effect of buffalo colostrum immunoglobulin G on human pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae, a predominant multidrug resistant pathogen associated with nasocomial infections. The investigation revealed growth inhibitory potential of immunoglobulin G in a dose dependent manner supported by scanning electron microscopic studies. The N-glycan enriched fraction of immunoglobulin G after PNGase treatment was found more effective, comparable to ampicillin than native immunoglobulin G supporting the fact that colostrum derived oligosaccharides is crucial and act as ideal substrates for undesirable and pathogenic bacteria. The MALDI TOF/TOF analysis confirmed the glycostructures of abundant N-glycans of immunoglobulin G exerting antibacterial activity. The proteomic analysis revealed variations between control and treated cells and expression of chemotaxis-CheY protein (14kDa) was evidenced in response to immunoglobulin G treatment. Hence, it would be interesting to investigate the mode of inhibition of multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae by buffalo colostrum immunoglobulin G with the identification of a newly expressed signalling protein.

  16. The ubiquitous octamer-binding protein(s) is sufficient for transcription of immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D G; Carayannopoulos, L; Capra, J D; Tucker, P W; Hanke, J H

    1990-03-01

    All immunoglobulin genes contain a conserved octanucleotide promoter element, ATGCAAAT, which has been shown to be required for their normal B-cell-specific transcription. Proteins that bind this octamer have been purified, and cDNAs encoding octamer-binding proteins have been cloned. Some of these proteins (referred to as OTF-2) are lymphoid specific, whereas at least one other, and possibly more (referred to as OTF-1), is found ubiquitously in all cell types. The exact role of these different proteins in directing the tissue-specific expression of immunoglobulin genes is unclear. We have identified two human pre-B-cell lines that contain extremely low levels of OTF-2 yet still express high levels of steady-state immunoglobulin heavy-chain mRNA in vivo and efficiently transcribe an immunoglobulin gene in vitro. Addition of a highly enriched preparation of OTF-1 made from one of these pre-B cells or from HeLa cells specifically stimulated in vitro transcription of an immunoglobulin gene. Furthermore, OFT-1 appeared to have approximately the same transactivation ability as OTF-2 when normalized for binding activity. These results suggest that OTF-1, without OTF-2, is sufficient for transcription of immunoglobulin genes and that OTF-2 alone is not responsible for the B-cell-specific regulation of immunoglobulin gene expression.

  17. The Application of Magnetic Bead Selection to Investigate Interactions between the Oral Microbiota and Salivary Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Madhwani, Tejal

    2016-01-01

    The effect of humoral immunity on the composition of the oral microbiota is less intensively investigated than hygiene and diet, in part due to a lack of simple and robust systems for investigating interactions between salivary immunoglobulins and oral bacteria. Here we report the application of an ex situ method to investigate the specificity of salivary immunoglobulins for salivary bacteria. Saliva collected from six volunteers was separated into immunoglobulin and microbial fractions, and the microbial fractions were then directly exposed to salivary immunoglobulins of “self” and “non-self” origin. Antibody-selected bacteria were separated from their congeners using a magnetic bead system, selective for IgA or IgG isotypes. The positively selected fractions were then characterized using gel-based eubacterial-specific DNA profiling. The eubacterial profiles of positively selected fractions diverged significantly from profiles of whole salivary consortia based on volunteer (P≤ 0.001%) and immunoglobulin origin (P≤ 0.001%), but not immunoglobulin isotype (P = 0.2). DNA profiles of separated microbial fractions were significantly (p≤ 0.05) less diverse than whole salivary consortia and included oral and environmental bacteria. Consortia selected using self immunoglobulins were generally less diverse than those selected with immunoglobulins of non-self origin. Magnetic bead separation facilitated the testing of interactions between salivary antibodies and oral bacteria, showing that these interactions are specific and may reflect differences in recognition by self and non-self immunoglobulins. Further development of this system could improve understanding of the relationship between the oral microbiota and the host immune system and of mechanisms underlying the compositional stability of the oral microbiota. PMID:27483159

  18. The Application of Magnetic Bead Selection to Investigate Interactions between the Oral Microbiota and Salivary Immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Madhwani, Tejal; McBain, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    The effect of humoral immunity on the composition of the oral microbiota is less intensively investigated than hygiene and diet, in part due to a lack of simple and robust systems for investigating interactions between salivary immunoglobulins and oral bacteria. Here we report the application of an ex situ method to investigate the specificity of salivary immunoglobulins for salivary bacteria. Saliva collected from six volunteers was separated into immunoglobulin and microbial fractions, and the microbial fractions were then directly exposed to salivary immunoglobulins of "self" and "non-self" origin. Antibody-selected bacteria were separated from their congeners using a magnetic bead system, selective for IgA or IgG isotypes. The positively selected fractions were then characterized using gel-based eubacterial-specific DNA profiling. The eubacterial profiles of positively selected fractions diverged significantly from profiles of whole salivary consortia based on volunteer (P≤ 0.001%) and immunoglobulin origin (P≤ 0.001%), but not immunoglobulin isotype (P = 0.2). DNA profiles of separated microbial fractions were significantly (p≤ 0.05) less diverse than whole salivary consortia and included oral and environmental bacteria. Consortia selected using self immunoglobulins were generally less diverse than those selected with immunoglobulins of non-self origin. Magnetic bead separation facilitated the testing of interactions between salivary antibodies and oral bacteria, showing that these interactions are specific and may reflect differences in recognition by self and non-self immunoglobulins. Further development of this system could improve understanding of the relationship between the oral microbiota and the host immune system and of mechanisms underlying the compositional stability of the oral microbiota. PMID:27483159

  19. Comparison of anti-D immunoglobulin, methylprednisolone, or intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in newly diagnosed pediatric immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Celik, Muhittin; Bulbul, Ali; Aydogan, Gönül; Tugcu, Deniz; Can, Emrah; Uslu, Sinan; Dursun, Mesut

    2013-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy, cost, and effects of anti-D immunoglobulin (anti-D Ig), methylprednisolone, or intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy on the development of chronic disease in children who are Rh-positive with diagnosed immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Children with newly diagnosed ITP and platelet count <20,000/mm(3) were prospectively randomized to treatment with anti-D Ig (50 μg/kg), methylprednisolone (2 mg/kg/day), or IVIG (0.4 g/kg/day, 5 days). Sixty children with a mean age of 6.7 years were divided into three equal groups. No difference was observed between platelet counts before treatment and on day 3 of treatment. However, platelet counts at day 7 were lower in the methylprednisolone group than in the IVIG group (P = 0.03). In the anti-D Ig group, hemoglobin and hematocrit levels were significantly lower at the end of treatment (P < 0.05). Chronic ITP developed in 30% of the anti-D Ig group, 35% of the methylprednisolone group, and 25% of the IVIG group, but no significant difference was noted among the groups. The cost analysis revealed that the mean cost of IVIG was 7.4 times higher than anti-D Ig and 10.9 times higher than methylprednisolone. In the treatment of ITP in childhood, one 50 μg/kg dose of anti-D Ig has similar effects to IVIG and methylprednisolone. Among patients who were treated with anti-D Ig, serious anemia was not observed, and the cost of treatment was less than that of IVIG treatment.

  20. Protein kinase R is a novel mediator of CD40 signaling and plays a critical role in modulating immunoglobulin expression during respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Sheetal A; Zalinger, Zachary B; Johnson, Teresa R; Imani, Farhad

    2011-12-01

    Effective immunoglobulin responses play a vital role in protection against most pathogens. However, the molecular mediators and mechanisms responsible for signaling and selective expression of immunoglobulin types remain to be elucidated. Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that protein kinase R (PKR) plays a crucial role in IgE responses to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in vitro. In this study, we show that PKR plays a critical role in IgG expression both in vivo and in vitro. PKR(-/-) mice show significantly altered serum IgG levels during respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. IgG2a expression is particularly sensitive to a lack of PKR and is below the detection level in mock- or RSV-infected PKR(-/-) mice. Interestingly, we show that upon activation by anti-CD40 and gamma interferon (IFN-γ), B cells from PKR(-/-) mice show diminished major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II), CD80, and CD86 levels on the cell surface compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Our data also show that PKR is necessary for optimal expression of adhesion molecules, such as CD11a and ICAM-1, that are necessary for homotypic aggregation of B cells. Furthermore, in this report we demonstrate for the first time that upon CD40 ligation, PKR is rapidly phosphorylated and activated, indicating that PKR is an early and novel downstream mediator of CD40 signaling pathways.

  1. Microwave extinction characteristics of nanoparticle aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y. P.; Cheng, J. X.; Liu, X. X.; Wang, H. X.; Zhao, F. T.; Wen, W. W.

    2016-07-01

    Structure of nanoparticle aggregates plays an important role in microwave extinction capacity. The diffusion-limited aggregation model (DLA) for fractal growth is utilized to explore the possible structures of nanoparticle aggregates by computer simulation. Based on the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) method, the microwave extinction performance by different nano-carborundum aggregates is numerically analyzed. The effects of the particle quantity, original diameter, fractal structure, as well as orientation on microwave extinction are investigated, and also the extinction characteristics of aggregates are compared with the spherical nanoparticle in the same volume. Numerical results give out that proper aggregation of nanoparticle is beneficial to microwave extinction capacity, and the microwave extinction cross section by aggregated granules is better than that of the spherical solid one in the same volume.

  2. What favors convective aggregation and why?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Caroline; Bony, Sandrine

    2015-07-01

    The organization of convection is ubiquitous, but its physical understanding remains limited. One particular type of organization is the spatial self-aggregation of convection, taking the form of cloud clusters, or tropical cyclones in the presence of rotation. We show that several physical processes can give rise to self-aggregation and highlight the key features responsible for it, using idealized simulations. Longwave radiative feedbacks yield a "radiative aggregation." In that case, sufficient spatial variability of radiative cooling rates yields a low-level circulation, which induces the upgradient energy transport and radiative-convective instability. Not only do vertically integrated radiative budgets matter but the vertical profile of cooling is also crucial. Convective aggregation is facilitated when downdrafts below clouds are weak ("moisture-memory aggregation"), and this is sufficient to trigger aggregation in the absence of longwave radiative feedbacks. These results shed some light on the sensitivity of self-aggregation to various parameters, including resolution or domain size.

  3. Simulation of J-aggregate microcavity photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michetti, Paolo; La Rocca, Giuseppe C.

    2008-05-01

    We have developed a model in order to account for the photoexcitation dynamics of J-aggregate films and strongly coupled J-aggregate microcavities. The J aggregates are described as a disordered Frenkel exciton system in which relaxation occurs due to the presence of a thermal bath of molecular vibrations. The correspondence between the photophysics in J-aggregate films and that in J-aggregate microcavities is obtained by introducing a model polariton wave function mixing cavity photon modes and J-aggregate super-radiant excitons. With the same description of the material properties, we have calculated both absorption and luminescence spectra for the J-aggregate film and the photoluminescence of strongly coupled organic microcavities. The model is able to account for the fast relaxation dynamics in organic microcavities following nonresonant pumping and explains the temperature dependence of the ratio between the upper polariton and the lower polariton luminescence.

  4. Changes in fractal dimension during aggregation.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, Rajat K; Gardner, Kevin H; Atkinson, Joseph F; Van Benschoten, John E

    2003-02-01

    Experiments were performed to evaluate temporal changes in the fractal dimension of aggregates formed during flocculation of an initially monodisperse suspension of latex microspheres. Particle size distributions and aggregate geometrical information at different mixing times were obtained using a non-intrusive optical sampling and digital image analysis technique, under variable conditions of mixing speed, coagulant (alum) dose and particle concentration. Pixel resolution required to determine aggregate size and geometric measures including the fractal dimension is discussed and a quantitative measure of accuracy is developed. The two-dimensional fractal dimension was found to range from 1.94 to 1.48, corresponding to aggregates that are either relatively compact or loosely structured, respectively. Changes in fractal dimension are explained using a conceptual model, which describes changes in fractal dimension associated with aggregate growth and changes in aggregate structure. For aggregation of an initially monodisperse suspension, the fractal dimension was found to decrease over time in the initial stages of floc formation.

  5. Fibrin formation by staphylothrombin facilitates Staphylococcus aureus-induced platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Vanassche, Thomas; Kauskot, Alexandre; Verhaegen, Jan; Peetermans, Willy E; van Ryn, Joanne; Schneewind, Olaf; Hoylaerts, Marc F; Verhamme, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Interactions of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and platelets play an important role in the pathogenesis of intravascular infections such as infective endocarditis (IE). A typical feature of S. aureus is the ability to generate thrombin activity through the secretion of two prothrombin activating molecules, staphylocoagulase and von Willebrand factor-binding protein (vWbp), which bind to human prothrombin to form the enzymatically active staphylothrombin complex. The role of staphylothrombin in the interaction between S. aureus and platelets has not yet been studied. We found that in contrast with thrombin, staphylothrombin did not directly activate human platelets. However, the staphylothrombin-mediated conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin initiated platelet aggregation and secondary activation and facilitated S. aureus-platelet interactions. Both the genetic absence of staphylocoagulase and vWbp and pharmacological inhibition of staphylothrombin increased the lag time to aggregation, and reduced platelet trapping by S. aureus in high shear stress conditions. The combined inhibition of staphylothrombin and immunoglobulin binding to platelets completely abolished the ability of S. aureus to aggregate platelets in vitro. In conclusion, although staphylothrombin did not directly activate platelets, the formation of a fibrin scaffold facilitated bacteria-platelet interaction, and the inhibition of staphylothrombin resulted in a reduced activation of platelets by S. aureus. PMID:22437005

  6. Inhomogeneous diffusion-limited aggregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selinger, Robin Blumberg; Nittmann, Johann; Stanley, H. E.

    1989-01-01

    It is demonstrated here that inhomogeneous diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model can be used to simulate viscous fingering in a medium with inhomogeneous permeability and homogeneous porosity. The medium consists of a pipe-pore square-lattice network in which all pores have equal volume and the pipes have negligible volume. It is shown that fluctuations in a DLA-based growth process may be tuned by noise reduction, and that fluctuations in the velocity of the moving interface are multiplicative in form.

  7. Familial Aggregation of Absolute Pitch

    PubMed Central

    Baharloo, Siamak; Service, Susan K.; Risch, Neil; Gitschier, Jane; Freimer, Nelson B.

    2000-01-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is a behavioral trait that is defined as the ability to identify the pitch of tones in the absence of a reference pitch. AP is an ideal phenotype for investigation of gene and environment interactions in the development of complex human behaviors. Individuals who score exceptionally well on formalized auditory tests of pitch perception are designated as “AP-1.” As described in this report, auditory testing of siblings of AP-1 probands and of a control sample indicates that AP-1 aggregates in families. The implications of this finding for the mapping of loci for AP-1 predisposition are discussed. PMID:10924408

  8. Polymerization of actin in RBL-2H3 cells can be triggered through either the IgE receptor or the adenosine receptor but different signaling pathways are used.

    PubMed Central

    Apgar, J R

    1994-01-01

    Crosslinking of the IgE receptor on rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells using the multivalent antigen DNP-BSA leads to a rapid and sustained increase in the filamentous actin content of the cells. Stimulation of RBL cells through the adenosine receptor also induces a very rapid polymerization of actin, which peaks in 45-60 s and is equivalent in magnitude to the F-actin response elicited through stimulation of the IgE receptor. However, in contrast to the IgE mediated response, which remains elevated for over 30 min, the F-actin increase induced by the adenosine analogue 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamido)-adenosine (NECA) is relatively transient and returns to baseline values within 5-10 min. While previous work has shown that the polymerization of actin in RBL cells stimulated through the IgE receptor is mediated by protein kinase C (PKC), protein kinase inhibitors have no effect on the F-actin response activated through the adenosine receptor. In contrast, pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin completely inhibits the F-actin response to NECA but has relatively little effect on the response induced through the IgE receptor. Stimulation of RBL cells through either receptor causes increased production of phosphatidylinositol mono-phosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositol bis-phosphate (PIP2), which correlates with the F-actin response. Production of PIP and PIP2 may be important downstream signals since these polyphosphoinositides are able to regulate the interaction of gelsolin and profilin with actin. Thus the polymerization of actin can be triggered through either the adenosine receptor or the IgE receptor, but different upstream signaling pathways are being used. The IgE mediated response requires the activation of PKC while stimulation through the adenosine receptor is PKC independent but involves a G protein. PMID:8049523

  9. Cloning of a cDNA encoding a putative human very low density lipoprotein/Apolipoprotein E receptor and assignment of the gene to chromosome 9pter-p23[sup 6

    SciTech Connect

    Gafvels, M.E.; Strauss, J.F. III ); Caird, M.; Patterson, D. ); Britt, D.; Jackson, C.L. )

    1993-11-01

    The authors report the cloning of a 3656-bp cDNA encoding a putative human very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)/apolipoprotein E (ApoE) receptor. The gene encoding this protein was mapped to chromosome 9pter-p23. Northern analysis of human RNA identified cognate mRNAs of 6.0 and 3.8 kb with most abundant expression in heart and skeletal muscle, followed by kidney, placenta, pancreas, and brain. The pattern of expression generally paralleled that of lipoprotein lipase mRNA but differed from that of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/[alpha][sub 2]-macroglobulin receptor (LRP), which are members of the same gene family. VLDL/ApoE receptor message was not detected in liver, whereas mRNAs for both LDL receptor and LRP were found in hepatic tissue. In mouse 3T3-L1 cells, VLDL/ApoE receptor mRNA was induced during the transformation of the cells into adipocytes. Expression was also detected in human choriocarcinoma cells, suggesting that at least part of the expression observed in placenta may be in trophoblasts, cells which would be exposed to maternal blood. Expression in brain may be related to high levels of ApoE expression in that organ, an observation of potential relevance to the recently hypothesized role for ApoE in late onset Alzheimer disease. The results suggest that the putative VLDL/ApoE receptor could play a role in the uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles by specific organs including striated and cardiac muscle and adipose tissue and in the transport of maternal lipids across the placenta. The findings presented here, together with recent observations from other laboratories, bring up the possibility that a single gene, the VLDL/ApoE receptor, may play a role in the pathogenesis of certain forms of atherosclerosis, Alzheimer disease, and obesity.

  10. Expression of the inhibitory Ly49E receptor is not critically involved in the immune response against cutaneous, pulmonary or liver tumours

    PubMed Central

    Filtjens, Jessica; Keirsse, Jiri; Van Ammel, Els; Taveirne, Sylvie; Van Acker, Aline; Kerre, Tessa; Taghon, Tom; Vandekerckhove, Bart; Plum, Jean; Van Ginderachter, Jo A.; Leclercq, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) lymphocytes are part of the innate immune system and are important in immune protection against tumourigenesis. NK cells display a broad repertoire of activating and inhibitory cell surface receptors that regulate NK cell activity. The Ly49 family of NK receptors is composed of several members that recognize major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) or MHC-I-related molecules. Ly49E is a unique inhibitory member, being triggered by the non-MHC-I-related protein urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) in contrast to the known MHC-I-triggering of the other inhibitory Ly49 receptors. Ly49E also has an uncommon expression pattern on NK cells, including high expression on liver DX5− NK cells. Furthermore, Ly49E is the only Ly49 member expressed by epidermal γδ T cells. As γδ T cells and/or NK cells have been shown to be involved in the regulation of cutaneous, pulmonary and liver malignancies, and as uPA is involved in tumourigenesis, we investigated the role of the inhibitory Ly49E receptor in the anti-tumour immune response. We demonstrate that, although Ly49E is highly expressed on epidermal γδ T cells and liver NK cells, this receptor does not play a major role in the control of skin tumour formation or in lung and liver tumour development. PMID:27469529

  11. Deletion of apolipoprotein E receptor-2 in mice lowers brain selenium and causes severe neurological dysfunction and death when a low-selenium diet is fed.

    PubMed

    Burk, Raymond F; Hill, Kristina E; Olson, Gary E; Weeber, Edwin J; Motley, Amy K; Winfrey, Virginia P; Austin, Lori M

    2007-06-01

    Selenoprotein P (Sepp1) is a plasma and extracellular protein that is rich in selenium. Deletion of Sepp1 results in sharp decreases of selenium levels in the brain and testis with dysfunction of those organs. Deletion of Sepp1 also causes increased urinary selenium excretion, leading to moderate depletion of whole-body selenium. The lipoprotein receptor apolipoprotein E receptor-2 (apoER2) binds Sepp1 and facilitates its uptake by Sertoli cells, thus providing selenium for spermatogenesis. Experiments were performed to assess the effect of apoER2 on the concentration and function of selenium in the brain and on whole-body selenium. ApoER2-/- and apoER2+/+ male mice were fed a semipurified diet with selenite added as the source of selenium. ApoER2-/- mice had depressed brain and testis selenium, but normal levels in liver, kidney, muscle, and the whole body. Feeding a selenium-deficient diet to apoER2-/- mice led to neurological dysfunction and death, with some of the characteristics exhibited by Sepp1-/- mice fed the same diet. Thus, although it does not affect whole-body selenium, apoER2 is necessary for maintenance of brain selenium and for prevention of neurological dysfunction and death under conditions of selenium deficiency, suggesting an interaction of apoER2 with Sepp1 in the brain.

  12. Establishment of a novel high-affinity IgE receptor-positive canine mast cell line with wild-type c-kit receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Amagai, Yosuke; Tanaka, Akane; Ohmori, Keitaro; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2008-02-15

    Much is known regarding participations of mast cells with innate and acquired immunity by secreting various cytokines and chemical mediators. However, details of mast cell biology still remain unclear. In this study, we successfully established a novel growth factor-independent mast cell line (MPT-1) derived from canine mast cell tumor. MPT-1 cells manifested factor-independent proliferation as floating cells containing a large amount of histamine, as well as chymase-like dog mast cell protease 3, in cytosolic granules. Particularly, MPT-1 cells expressed high-affinity IgE receptors (Fc{epsilon}RI) and wild-type c-kit receptors. Degranulation of MPT-1 cells was induced not only by stimulation with calcium ionophore but also by cross-linkage of the surface IgE. Given that MPT-1 is the first mast cell line with Fc{epsilon}RI which has no c-kit mutations, MPT-1 cells may provide great contribution for investigation of IgE-mediated activation mechanisms of mast cells, leading to development of effective treatment for allergic disorders.

  13. Expression of the inhibitory Ly49E receptor is not critically involved in the immune response against cutaneous, pulmonary or liver tumours.

    PubMed

    Filtjens, Jessica; Keirsse, Jiri; Van Ammel, Els; Taveirne, Sylvie; Van Acker, Aline; Kerre, Tessa; Taghon, Tom; Vandekerckhove, Bart; Plum, Jean; Van Ginderachter, Jo A; Leclercq, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) lymphocytes are part of the innate immune system and are important in immune protection against tumourigenesis. NK cells display a broad repertoire of activating and inhibitory cell surface receptors that regulate NK cell activity. The Ly49 family of NK receptors is composed of several members that recognize major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) or MHC-I-related molecules. Ly49E is a unique inhibitory member, being triggered by the non-MHC-I-related protein urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) in contrast to the known MHC-I-triggering of the other inhibitory Ly49 receptors. Ly49E also has an uncommon expression pattern on NK cells, including high expression on liver DX5(-) NK cells. Furthermore, Ly49E is the only Ly49 member expressed by epidermal γδ T cells. As γδ T cells and/or NK cells have been shown to be involved in the regulation of cutaneous, pulmonary and liver malignancies, and as uPA is involved in tumourigenesis, we investigated the role of the inhibitory Ly49E receptor in the anti-tumour immune response. We demonstrate that, although Ly49E is highly expressed on epidermal γδ T cells and liver NK cells, this receptor does not play a major role in the control of skin tumour formation or in lung and liver tumour development. PMID:27469529

  14. Rare problems with RhD immunoglobulin for postnatal prophylaxis after large fetomaternal haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Biscoe, Amber; Kidson-Gerber, Giselle

    2015-12-01

    We report a case of unusually large fetomaternal haemorrhage in a RhD- patient; of symptomatic non-sustained haemolysis of fetal red cells in the maternal circulation with infusion of intravenous high-dose RhD immunoglobulin; and of a failure to prevent RhD alloimmunisation. The haemolytic reaction is not previously reported in this patient group and we suggest would be limited to patients where the number of fetal red cells in the circulation is high. We advocate caution in treatment and spaced dosing of RhD immunoglobulin where the required dose is high, and refer readers to the WinRhoSDF™ RhD immunoglobulin product information for their updated dosing recommendations. There is a need for better understanding of pathophysiology and RhD immunoglobulin effects, to further reduce alloimmunisation rates, and we support the reporting of prophylaxis failures to haemovigilance programmes as is in place in the United Kingdom. PMID:27512480

  15. Elevated vitreous concentration of monoclonal immunoglobulin manifesting as schlieren in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis-associated uveitis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Q D; Humphrey, R L; Dunn, J P; Humayun, M S

    2001-02-01

    We report the clinical findings and analysis of the immunoglobulin (Ig) composition of the vitreous of a 10-year-old girl with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis-associated uveitis. The vitreous had a schlieren appearance at the time of pars plana lensectomy and vitrectomy. Analysis of the vitreous fluid revealed marked elevation of IgG, IgM, IgA, and albumin levels relative to vitreous fluids from control patients without uveitis. The immunoglobulin coefficients were also elevated for the IgG and IgM classes of immunoglobulins. Immunofixation electrophoresis of the vitreous fluid revealed 2 distinct bands of restricted electrophoretic mobility. These studies suggest that there may be local (intraocular) production of immunoglobulins as an immunologic response in ocular inflammatory diseases such as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis-associated uveitis and that this immunologic response may be monoclonal (possibly biclonal or oligoclonal) in nature.

  16. Assay of immunoglobulins in supernatants of lymphoid cell lines by conventional laser nephelometry.

    PubMed

    Virella, G; Muñoz, J; Robinson, J E; Goust, J M

    1979-03-01

    An adaptation of the nephelometric assay for serum immunoglobulins has been developed for detection and quantitation of extracellular immunoglobulins in cultures of lymphoblastoid cell lines. This assay employs the standard equipment for laser nephelometry and commercial reagents for immunoglobulin quantitation. By adjusting dilutions of controls and sample volumes of culture supernatants, amounts of IgG and IgM below 1 microgram/ml can be detected in culture supernatants. At concentrations between 1 and 4 microgram/ml, day-to-day and within-run variations for IgM assays were 16 and 11% respectively. The possibility of measuring immunoglobulins secreted by cell lines by conventional laser nephelometry opens several areas of application in the study of the functional activity of B cells and of cell-cell interactions. PMID:313634

  17. [Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in Morvan syndrome secondary to recurrent thymic carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Horta Baas, Gabriel

    2015-11-25

    Morvan's syndrome is a rare autoimmune channelopathy. A case of Morvan's syndrome is presented as a paraneoplastic syndrome associated to the recurrence of a well-differentiated thymic carcinoma, which showed a good clinical response to treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin.

  18. The ultrastructural localization of immunoglobulins in human b cells of immunoproliferative diseases.

    PubMed

    Gourdin, M F; Farcet, J P; Reyes, F

    1982-06-01

    The cellular distribution of immunoglobulins in human malignant and normal B cells was investigated by immunoelectron microscopy by direct incubation of fixed cells with electron microscopy by direct incubation of fixed cells with peroxidase-coupled antibody. These conjugates penetrated into the cell, resulting in the simultaneous detection of surface and cytoplasmic immunoglobulins. The latter were seen as specific intracisternal staining of the perinuclear space and endoplasmic reticulum and occasionally of the Golgi complex. Plasma cells were frequently characterized by a heterogeneity of reactivity of the endoplasmic reticulum. Minute amounts of cytoplasmic immunoglobulin were demonstrated in cells without developed secretory organelles, such as lymphoma cells and lymphocytes from chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The method allowed us to define several subsets of cells according to the expression of surface and cytoplasmic immunoglobulins and thus to determine the stage of maturation of cells involved in monoclonal proliferation. PMID:7044445

  19. Immunoperoxidase staining of surface and intracellular immunoglobulin in human neoplastic lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Mason, D Y; Leonard, R C; Laurent, G; Gourdin, M F

    1980-07-01

    An immunoperoxidase technique for the optical microscopic detection of cellular immunoglobulin has been used to stain fixed smears of human neoplastic B lymphoid cells. Only four out of 28 cases of chronic lymphatic leukaemia (CLL) showed membrane labelling by this technique. In contrast, when 14 samples from other types of B lymphoproliferative disorder (including hairy cell leukaemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and prolymphocytic leukaemia) were studied, all samples showed membrane immunoglobulin labelling (confirmed by capping experiments). This discrepancy was attributed to the greater density of surface immunoglobulin present on neoplastic cells in the latter group of disorders compared to CLL. This immunoperoxidase technique is therefore less sensitive than immunofluorescent staining of cells in suspension for the demonstration of neoplastic cell surface immunoglobulin. However, it offers a number of advantages (eg, excellent visualisation of cell morphology, permanence of stained preparations, and applicability to stored samples) which recommend it as the method of choice in certain clinical haematological contexts. PMID:7000833

  20. Serum immunoglobulin E and hyaluronate levels in children living along major roads

    SciTech Connect

    Shima, Masayuki; Adachi, Motoaki

    1996-11-01

    To assess the effects of automobile exhaust on human health, we determined serum concentrations of total immunoglobulin E and hyaluronate in 185 schoolchildren who lived in a district that contained major roads. Serum immunoglobulin E levels were elevated in children who had asthma or wheezing, but levels did no t differ with respect to distance of their homes from the major roads. Serum hyaluronate levels were higher in children who lived less than 50 m from the roadside, compared with children who resided a greater distance from roads. The difference, however, was significant only in a subgroup of children in whom immunoglobulin E levels exceeded 250 IU/ml. Our results suggest that serum hyaluronate levels in children reflect the effects of traffic-related air pollution. Children with high immunoglobulin E levels appeared to be particularly susceptible to the effects of automobile exhaust. 34 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Interaction between immunoglobulin allotypes and NK receptor genes in diabetes post-hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Granados-Montiel, Julio; Zúñiga, Joaquin; Azocar, Jose; Feris, Edmond J; Terreros, Daniel; Larsen, Charles E; Clavijo, Olga P; Cruz-Lagunas, Alfredo; Middleton, Derek; Alper, Chester A; Pandey, Janardan P; Yunis, Edmond J

    2011-06-01

    Genetic interactions between natural killer (NK) cells immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes and immunoglobulin allotypes have been previously reported in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. Puerto Rican Americans with a history of intravenous drug use who developed DM following HCV infection (n=32) were compared to individuals infected with HCV without diabetes (n=121) and to DM non-infected individuals (n=95). Subjects were genotyped for KIRs and immunoglobulin allotypes. We found interactions of immunoglobulin allotypes KM3/KM3 with NK inhibitory receptors 2DL3/2DL3, 2DL1 in the absence of 2DS4 associated with susceptibility to DM in HCV infected individuals. These data suggest the possibility that a subset of patients with HCV could have an immune-mediated component contributing to the development of DM.

  2. Ectopic recombination within homologous immunoglobulin mu gene constant regions in a mouse hybridoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, M D; Read, L R

    1992-01-01

    We have transferred a pSV2neo vector containing the wild-type constant region of the immunoglobulin mu gene (C mu) into the mutant hybridoma igm482, which bears a 2-bp deletion in the third constant-region exon of its haploid chromosomal mu gene (C mu 3). Independent igm482 transformants contain the wild-type immunoglobulin C mu region stably integrated in ectopic chromosomal positions. We report here that the wild-type immunoglobulin C mu region can function as the donor sequence in a gene conversion event which corrects the 2-bp deletion in the mutant igm482 chromosomal C mu 3 exon. The homologous recombination event restores normal immunoglobulin M production in the mutant cell. Images PMID:1406631

  3. Self-administered hyaluronidase-facilitated subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy in complicated primary antibody deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Danieli, Maria Giovanna; Pulvirenti, Federica; Rocchi, Valeria; Morariu, Ramona; Quinti, Isabella

    2016-09-01

    Hyaluronidase-facilitated subcutaneous immunoglobulin (fSCIg) is a new immunoglobulin product for replacement therapy in patients with primary antibody deficiencies (PAD). The pre-administration of recombinant human hyaluronidase associated with 10% immunoglobulin allowed the infusion of larger (up to 600 ml) amounts of immunoglobulin at a single infusion site, enabling patients to receive the necessary treatment in a single monthly dose. Here, we report the effectiveness and the tolerability of fSCIg in patients with severe PAD-related comorbidities: refractory autoimmune thrombocytopenia; systemic granulomatous disease; severe enteropathy, and Type I diabetes. We conclude that fSCIg could be a feasible option to improve the adherence to replacement therapy also by patients with severe PAD. PMID:27485073

  4. Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with selective immunoglobulin E deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Magen, Eli; Schlesinger, Menachem; Ben-Zion, Itzhak; Vardy, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence and clinical characteristics of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-infected dyspeptic patients with selective immunoglobulin E deficiency (IgEd). METHODS: All individuals who underwent serum total immunoglobulin E (IgE) measurement at the Leumit Healthcare Services (Israel) in 2012 were identified in an electronic database search (n = 18487). From these, selected case group subjects were ≥ 12 years of age and had serum total IgE < 2 kIU/L (n = 158). The control group was selected from a random sampling of the remaining subjects ≥ 12 years of age to obtain a case-control ratio of 1:20 (n = 3160). Dyspeptic diseases, diagnosed no more than 5 years before serum total IgE testing, were identified and retrieved from the electronic database using specific International Classification of Diseases diagnostic codes. Results of C13-urea breath tests were used to identify subjects infected with H. pylori. Categorical variables between case and control subjects were analyzed using Fisher’s exact tests, whereas continuous variables were analyzed using χ2 tests. RESULTS: Dyspepsia was present in 27.2% (43/158) of case subjects and 22.7% (718/3160) of controls. Of these, significantly more case subjects (32/43, 74.4%) than controls (223/718, 31.1%) were positive for H. pylori (P < 0.01). Esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed in 19 case and 94 control subjects, revealing that gastritis was more prevalent in IgEd case subjects than in controls (57.9% vs 29.8%, P < 0.05). Furthermore, a significantly greater proportion of case subjects presented with peptic duodenal ulcers (63.2% vs 15.9%, P < 0.01). Histopathologic examination showed marked chronic inflammation, lymphoid follicle formation and prominent germinal centers, with polymorphonuclear cell infiltration of gastric glands, that was similar in case and control biopsy tissues. Finally, IgEd case subjects that underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy were more likely to exhibit treatment

  5. Characterization of the binding of shikonin to human immunoglobulin using scanning electron microscope, molecular modeling and multi-spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    He, Wenying; Ye, Xinyu; Yao, Xiaojun; Wu, Xiuli; Lin, Qiang; Huang, Guolei; Hua, Yingjie; Hui, Yang

    2015-11-01

    Shikonin, one of the active components isolated from the root of Arnebia euchroma (Royle) Johnst, have anti-tumor, anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory activities and has been used clinically in phlebitis and vascular purpura. In the present work, the interaction of human immunoglobulin (HIg) with shikonin has been investigated by using scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, fluorescence polarization, synchronous and 3D fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with molecular modeling techniques under physiological conditions with drug concentrations of 3.33-36.67 μM. The results of SEM exhibited visually the special effect on aggregation behavior of the complex formed between HIg and shikonin. The fluorescence polarization values indicated that shikonin molecules were found in a motionally unrestricted environment introduced by HIg. Molecular docking showed the shikonin moiety bound to the hydrophobic cavity of HIg, and there are four hydrogen-bonding interactions between shikonin and the residues of protein. The synchronous and 3D fluorescence spectra confirmed that shikonin could quench the intrinsic fluorescence of HIg and has an effect on the microenvironment around HIg in aqueous solution. The changes in the secondary structure of HIg were estimated by qualitative and quantitative FT-IR spectroscopic analysis. The binding constants and thermodynamic parameters for shikonin-HIg systems were obtained under different temperatures (300 K, 310 K and 320 K). The above results revealed the binding mechanism of shikonin and HIg at the ultrastructure and molecular level.

  6. Surface bound or cytoplasmic immunoglobulins: interpretation of the immunofluorescence observed in cytocentrifuge slides of human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Schuit, H R; Hijmans, W; Jansen, J

    1984-01-01

    Results of immunofluorescence observations in the study of normal and malignant blood lymphocytes are described. Data which support the proposition that most membrane bound immunoglobulin molecules are stable enough to remain intact during cytocentrifuge slide preparation are presented. Therefore not all positive cells in a fixed cytocentrifuge slide should be considered as containing cytoplasmic immunoglobulins. A correct interpretation is essential because of its bearing on our concepts of B lymphocyte differentiation. Images Fig. 3 PMID:6378456

  7. Effects of intravenous immunoglobulins on T-cell mediated, concanavalin A-induced hepatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Shirin, H; Bruck, R; Aeed, H; Hershkoviz, R; Lider, O; Kenet, G; Avni, Y; Halpern, Z

    1997-12-01

    Concanavalin A (ConA) activates T lymphocytes and causes T-cell mediated hepatic injury in mice. The intravenous administration of human immunoglobulins has beneficial effects in T-cell mediated diseases such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and adjuvant arthritis. In the present study, we examined the effects of intravenous immunoglobulins in a mouse model of T-cell mediated, acute liver injury induced by concanavalin A. Balb/c mice were inoculated with 12 mg/kg concanavalin A with or without intravenous immunoglobulins at doses of 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 g/kg body wt. The serum levels of liver enzymes, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interferon-gamma and interleukin-6 were assayed 2, 6 and 24 h after concanavalin A administration. Intravenous immunoglobulins did not prevent concanavalin A-induced hepatitis, as manifested by elevation of serum aminotransferases and histopathological evaluation. The serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in mice pretreated with immunoglobulins, measured 2 h after ConA treatment were reduced, while interferon-gamma levels measured 6 h after ConA inoculation were 5-fold higher than control levels. There was no effect of intravenous immunoglobulins on the release of interleukin 6. In conclusion, these results indicate that intravenous immunoglobulin is not effective in preventing T-cell mediated concanavalin A-induced hepatitis. The increased secretion of interferon-gamma and the incomplete suppression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha release may explain the lack of efficacy of intravenous immunoglobulin in this experimental model. PMID:9455732

  8. Introduction of human gamma 1 immunoglobulin genes into fertilized mouse eggs.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, K; Kikutani, H; Takahashi, N; Taga, T; Akira, S; Kawai, K; Fukuchi, K; Kumahara, Y; Honjo, T; Kishimoto, T

    1984-08-01

    A rearranged human gamma 1 immunoglobulin gene was introduced into fertilized mouse eggs. The phage Ch4A-VCE-gamma 1 was constructed by ligating an EcoRI and BglII fragment of pBR322-CESSV(CE-1) containing the VDJ region with an EcoRI and BamHI fragment of Ch4A-HIg gamma 1-10 containing the gamma 1 constant region. About 200 copies of Ch4A-VCE-gamma 1 genes were introduced into fertilized mouse eggs. Of 489 eggs injected with these genes, 319 survived and were transferred to oviducts of foster mothers. Thirtyeight mice were born and were screened for the presence of human gamma 1 immunoglobulin genes by Southern blot hybridization. Five of these 38 mice had integrated human gamma 1 immunoglobulin genes. None of the human gamma 1 copies in each mouse had undergone deletions or rearrangements as judged by the Southern blotting patterns for several restriction enzymes. Human gamma 1 gene was present in several different tissues. All the mice tested so far transmit the human gamma 1 gene to a fraction of their offspring in an autosomal dominant manner. Spleen cells from transgenic mice were analyzed for immunoglobulin production by reverse plaque assay or immunofluorescence staining of cytoplasmic immunoglobulin, but synthesis and secretion of human gamma 1 chains could not be detected. No human gamma 1 immunoglobulin mRNA was detected in the liver and spleen of a transgenic mouse. The presence of the human gamma 1 immunoglobulin gene appeared to have no effect on the expression of endogenous mouse immunoglobulin genes.

  9. Guidelines for the use of human immunoglobulin therapy in patients with primary immunodeficiencies in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Condino-Neto, A; Costa-Carvalho, B T; Grumach, A S; King, A; Bezrodnik, L; Oleastro, M; Leiva, L; Porras, O; Espinosa-Rosales, F J; Franco, J L; Sorensen, R U

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies are an essential component of the adaptative immune response and hold long-term memory of the immunological experiences throughout life. Antibody defects represent approximately half of the well-known primary immunodeficiencies requiring immunoglobulin replacement therapy. In this article, the authors review the current indications and therapeutic protocols in the Latin American environment. Immunoglobulin replacement therapy has been a safe procedure that induces dramatic positive changes in the clinical outcome of patients who carry antibody defects. PMID:23333411

  10. Detergent-mediated protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Neale, Chris; Ghanei, Hamed; Holyoake, John; Bishop, Russell E; Privé, Gilbert G; Pomès, Régis

    2013-04-01

    Because detergents are commonly used to solvate membrane proteins for structural evaluation, much attention has been devoted to assessing the conformational bias imparted by detergent micelles in comparison to the native environment of the lipid bilayer. Here, we conduct six 500-ns simulations of a system with >600,000 atoms to investigate the spontaneous self assembly of dodecylphosphocholine detergent around multiple molecules of the integral membrane protein PagP. This detergent formed equatorial micelles in which acyl chains surround the protein's hydrophobic belt, confirming existing models of the detergent solvation of membrane proteins. In addition, unexpectedly, the extracellular and periplasmic apical surfaces of PagP interacted with the headgroups of detergents in other micelles 85 and 60% of the time, respectively, forming complexes that were stable for hundreds of nanoseconds. In some cases, an apical surface of one molecule of PagP interacted with an equatorial micelle surrounding another molecule of PagP. In other cases, the apical surfaces of two molecules of PagP simultaneously bound a neat detergent micelle. In these ways, detergents mediated the non-specific aggregation of folded PagP. These simulation results are consistent with dynamic light scattering experiments, which show that, at detergent concentrations ≥600 mM, PagP induces the formation of large scattering species that are likely to contain many copies of the PagP protein. Together, these simulation and experimental results point to a potentially generic mechanism of detergent-mediated protein aggregation.

  11. Attracted diffusion-limited aggregation.

    PubMed

    Rahbari, S H Ebrahimnazhad; Saberi, A A

    2012-07-01

    In this paper we present results of extensive Monte Carlo simulations of diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) with a seed placed on an attractive plane as a simple model in connection with the electrical double layers. We compute the fractal dimension of the aggregated patterns as a function of the attraction strength α. For the patterns grown in both two and three dimensions, the fractal dimension shows a significant dependence on the attraction strength for small values of α and approaches that of the ordinary two-dimensional (2D) DLA in the limit of large α. For the nonattracting case with α = 1, our results in three dimensions reproduce the patterns of 3D ordinary DLA, while in two dimensions our model leads to the formation of a compact cluster with dimension 2. For intermediate α, the 3D clusters have a quasi-2D structure with a fractal dimension very close to that of the ordinary 2D DLA. This allows one to control the morphology of a growing cluster by tuning a single external parameter α. PMID:23005417

  12. Attracted diffusion-limited aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahbari, S. H. Ebrahimnazhad; Saberi, A. A.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper we present results of extensive Monte Carlo simulations of diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) with a seed placed on an attractive plane as a simple model in connection with the electrical double layers. We compute the fractal dimension of the aggregated patterns as a function of the attraction strength α. For the patterns grown in both two and three dimensions, the fractal dimension shows a significant dependence on the attraction strength for small values of α and approaches that of the ordinary two-dimensional (2D) DLA in the limit of large α. For the nonattracting case with α=1, our results in three dimensions reproduce the patterns of 3D ordinary DLA, while in two dimensions our model leads to the formation of a compact cluster with dimension 2. For intermediate α, the 3D clusters have a quasi-2D structure with a fractal dimension very close to that of the ordinary 2D DLA. This allows one to control the morphology of a growing cluster by tuning a single external parameter α.

  13. Sectoral shifts and aggregate unemployment

    SciTech Connect

    Loungani, P.

    1986-01-01

    Some recent research has taken the view that sectoral or industry-specific shocks significantly affect aggregate unemployment by increasing the amount of inter-industry labor reallocation required. The empirical evidence for this view rests on the finding that during the 1950s - and again during the 1970s - there was a positive correlation between aggregate unemployment and the dispersion of employment growth rates. This thesis demonstrates that this correlation arises largely because oil price shocks affect both unemployment and the dispersion of employment growth. Once the dispersion due to oil shocks is accounted for, the residual dispersion in employment has very low explanatory power for unemployment. Since the dispersion index does not measure pure sectoral shifts, an alternate measure of dispersion is developed that serves as a better proxy for the amount of inter-industry labor reallocation required each period. Estimates using this measure suggest that, during the 1950s, temporary increases in the relative price of oil were responsible for generating the observed correlation. On the other hand, sectoral shifts were important during the 1970s; in particular, the 1973 oil price increase has had significant reallocative effects on the economy. This contention is subjected to further tests by looking at the time-series behavior of employment in durable-goods industries and also by following the inter-industry movements of workers over time through the use of panel data.

  14. A review of volcanic ash aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. J.; Bonadonna, C.; Durant, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Most volcanic ash particles with diameters <63 μm settle from eruption clouds as particle aggregates that cumulatively have larger sizes, lower densities, and higher terminal fall velocities than individual constituent particles. Particle aggregation reduces the atmospheric residence time of fine ash, which results in a proportional increase in fine ash fallout within 10-100 s km from the volcano and a reduction in airborne fine ash mass concentrations 1000 s km from the volcano. Aggregate characteristics vary with distance from the volcano: proximal aggregates are typically larger (up to cm size) with concentric structures, while distal aggregates are typically smaller (sub-millimetre size). Particles comprising ash aggregates are bound through hydro-bonds (liquid and ice water) and electrostatic forces, and the rate of particle aggregation correlates with cloud liquid water availability. Eruption source parameters (including initial particle size distribution, erupted mass, eruption column height, cloud water content and temperature) and the eruption plume temperature lapse rate, coupled with the environmental parameters, determines the type and spatiotemporal distribution of aggregates. Field studies, lab experiments and modelling investigations have already provided important insights on the process of particle aggregation. However, new integrated observations that combine remote sensing studies of ash clouds with field measurement and sampling, and lab experiments are required to fill current gaps in knowledge surrounding the theory of ash aggregate formation.

  15. Applications of aggregation theory to sustainability assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Pollesch, N.; Dale, V. H.

    2015-04-01

    In order to aid in transition towards operations that promote sustainability goals, researchers and stakeholders use sustainability assessments. Although assessments take various forms, many utilize diverse sets of indicators that can number anywhere from two to over 2000. Indices, composite indicators, or aggregate values are used to simplify high dimensional and complex data sets and to clarify assessment results. Although the choice of aggregation function is a key component in the development of the assessment, there are few examples to be found in literature to guide appropriate aggregation function selection. This paper develops a connection between the mathematical study of aggregation functions and sustainability assessment in order to aid in providing criteria for aggregation function selection. Relevant mathematical properties of aggregation functions are presented and interpreted. Lastly, we provide cases of these properties and their relation to previous sustainability assessment research. Examples show that mathematical aggregation properties can be used to address the topics of compensatory behavior and weak versus strong sustainability, aggregation of data under varying units of measurements, multiple site multiple indicator aggregation, and the determination of error bounds in aggregate output for normalized and non-normalized indicator measures.

  16. Applications of aggregation theory to sustainability assessment

    DOE PAGES

    Pollesch, N.; Dale, V. H.

    2015-04-01

    In order to aid in transition towards operations that promote sustainability goals, researchers and stakeholders use sustainability assessments. Although assessments take various forms, many utilize diverse sets of indicators that can number anywhere from two to over 2000. Indices, composite indicators, or aggregate values are used to simplify high dimensional and complex data sets and to clarify assessment results. Although the choice of aggregation function is a key component in the development of the assessment, there are few examples to be found in literature to guide appropriate aggregation function selection. This paper develops a connection between the mathematical study ofmore » aggregation functions and sustainability assessment in order to aid in providing criteria for aggregation function selection. Relevant mathematical properties of aggregation functions are presented and interpreted. Lastly, we provide cases of these properties and their relation to previous sustainability assessment research. Examples show that mathematical aggregation properties can be used to address the topics of compensatory behavior and weak versus strong sustainability, aggregation of data under varying units of measurements, multiple site multiple indicator aggregation, and the determination of error bounds in aggregate output for normalized and non-normalized indicator measures.« less

  17. Role of Multicellular Aggregates in Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kragh, Kasper N.; Hutchison, Jaime B.; Melaugh, Gavin; Rodesney, Chris; Roberts, Aled E. L.; Irie, Yasuhiko; Jensen, Peter Ø.; Diggle, Stephen P.; Allen, Rosalind J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In traditional models of in vitro biofilm development, individual bacterial cells seed a surface, multiply, and mature into multicellular, three-dimensional structures. Much research has been devoted to elucidating the mechanisms governing the initial attachment of single cells to surfaces. However, in natural environments and during infection, bacterial cells tend to clump as multicellular aggregates, and biofilms can also slough off aggregates as a part of the dispersal process. This makes it likely that biofilms are often seeded by aggregates and single cells, yet how these aggregates impact biofilm initiation and development is not known. Here we use a combination of experimental and computational approaches to determine the relative fitness of single cells and preformed aggregates during early development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We find that the relative fitness of aggregates depends markedly on the density of surrounding single cells, i.e., the level of competition for growth resources. When competition between aggregates and single cells is low, an aggregate has a growth disadvantage because the aggregate interior has poor access to growth resources. However, if competition is high, aggregates exhibit higher fitness, because extending vertically above the surface gives cells at the top of aggregates better access to growth resources. Other advantages of seeding by aggregates, such as earlier switching to a biofilm-like phenotype and enhanced resilience toward antibiotics and immune response, may add to this ecological benefit. Our findings suggest that current models of biofilm formation should be reconsidered to incorporate the role of aggregates in biofilm initiation. PMID:27006463

  18. Asphaltene Aggregation and Fouling Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derakhshesh, Marzie

    This thesis explored the properties of asphaltene nano-aggregates in crude oil and toluene based solutions and fouling at process furnace temperatures, and the links between these two phenomena. The link between stability of asphaltenes at ambient conditions and fouling at the conditions of a delayed coker furnace, at over 450 °C, was examined by blending crude oil with an aliphatic diluent in different ratios. The stability of the blends were measured using a S-value analyzer, then fouling rates were measured on electrically heated stainless steel 316 wires in an autoclave reactor. The less stable the blend, the greater the rate and extent of fouling. The most severe fouling occurred with the unstable asphaltenes. SEM imaging of the foulant illustrates very different textures, with the structure becoming more porous with lower stability. Under cross-polarized light, the coke shows the presence of mesophase in the foulant layer. These data suggest a correlation between the fouling rate at high temperature furnace conditions and the stability index of the crude oil. Three organic polysulfides were introduced to the crude oil to examine their effect on fouling. The polysulfides are able to reduce coking and carbon monoxide generation in steam crackers. The fouling results demonstrated that polysulfide with more sulfur content increased the amount of corrosion-fouling of the wire. Various additives, solvents, ultrasound, and heat were employed to attempt to completely disaggregate the asphaltene nano-aggregates in solution at room temperature. The primary analytical technique used to monitor the nano-aggregation state of the asphaltenes in solution was the UV-visible spectroscopy. The results indicate that stronger solvents, such as pyridine and quinoline, combined with ionic liquids yield a slight reduction in the apparent absorbance at longer wavelengths, indicative of a decrease in the nano-aggregate size although the magnitude of the decrease is not significant

  19. Renal AH Amyloidosis Associated With a Truncated Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Undetectable by Immunostaining.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Shun; Hatano, Michiyasu; Yazaki, Masahide; Nitta, Kosaku; Nagata, Michio

    2015-12-01

    AH amyloidosis is a rare type of amyloidosis caused by deposition of monoclonal immunoglobulin heavy chain. The key diagnostic feature is positive immunostaining for a single class of immunoglobulin heavy chain. We report a case of AH amyloidosis with immunoglobulin G (IgG) λ monoclonal gammopathy that was diagnosed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) after immunostaining of renal tissue for immunoglobulin heavy chain gave negative results. The molecular weight of the purified renal amyloid protein was ∼11kDa, which was determined by LC-MS/MS analysis to correspond to an amino acid sequence comprising the variable region and a truncated portion of the constant region of IgG heavy chain. The exact same truncated heavy chain was detected by LC-MS/MS of a protein isolated from the patient's serum, suggesting that the truncated serum protein was the precursor of the amyloid protein. Because antibodies to immunoglobulin heavy chain recognize the Fc portion, the large deletion in the constant region could explain the negative results upon immunostaining. Direct protein detection by LC-MS/MS is a powerful aid to diagnose renal AH amyloidosis, particularly when the findings of immunoglobulin staining are inconsistent with the background monoclonal gammopathy.

  20. Computational study on the interactions and orientation of monoclonal human immunoglobulin G on a polystyrene surface

    PubMed Central

    Javkhlantugs, Namsrai; Bayar, Hexig; Ganzorig, Chimed; Ueda, Kazuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Having a theoretical understanding of the orientation of immunoglobulin on an immobilized solid surface is important in biomedical pathogen-detecting systems and cellular analysis. Despite the stable adsorption of immunoglobulin on a polystyrene (PS) surface that has been applied in many kinds of immunoassays, there are many uncertainties in antibody-based clinical and biological experimental methods. To understand the binding mechanism and physicochemical interactions between immunoglobulin and the PS surface at the atomic level, we investigated the binding behavior and interactions of the monoclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) on the PS surface using the computational method. In our docking simulation with the different arrangement of translational and rotational orientation of IgG onto the PS surface, three typical orientation patterns of the immunoglobulin G on the PS surface were found. We precisely analyzed these orientation patterns and clarified how the immunoglobulin G interacts with the PS surface at atomic scale in the beginning of the adsorption process. Major driving forces for the adsorption of IgG onto the PS surface come from serine (Ser), aspartic acid (Asp), and glutamic acid (Glu) residues. PMID:23874096

  1. Somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes is independent of the Bloom's syndrome DNA helicase.

    PubMed

    Sack, S Z; Liu, Y; German, J; Green, N S

    1998-05-01

    Immunoglobulin gene somatic mutation leads to antibody affinity maturation through the introduction of multiple point mutations in the antigen binding site. No genes have as yet been identified that participate in this process. Bloom's syndrome (BS) is a chromosomal breakage disorder with a mutator phenotype. Most affected individuals exhibit an immunodeficiency of undetermined aetiology. The gene for this disorder, BLM, has recently been identified as a DNA helicase. If this gene were to play a role in immunoglobulin mutation, then people with BS may lack normally mutated antibodies. Since germ-line, non-mutated immunoglobulin genes generally produce low affinity antibodies, impaired helicase activity might be manifested as the immunodeficiency found in BS. Therefore, we asked whether BLM is specifically involved in immunoglobulin hypermutation. Sequences of immunoglobulin variable (V) regions were analysed from small unsorted blood samples obtained from BS individuals and compared with germ-line sequences. BS V regions displayed the normal distribution of mutations, indicating that the defect in BS is not related to the mechanism of somatic mutation. These data strongly argue against BLM being involved in this process. The genetic approach to identifying the genes involved in immunoglobulin mutation will require further studies of DNA repair- and immunodeficient individuals.

  2. Immunoglobulin treatment reduces atherosclerosis in apo E knockout mice.

    PubMed Central

    Nicoletti, A; Kaveri, S; Caligiuri, G; Bariéty, J; Hansson, G K

    1998-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is associated with immune activation. T cells and macrophages infiltrate atherosclerotic plaques and disease progression is associated with formation of autoantibodies to oxidized lipoproteins. In the apo E knockout mouse, a genetic model of cholesterol-induced atherosclerosis, congenital deficiency of macrophages, lymphocytes, or interferon-gamma receptors result in reduced lesion formation. We have now evaluated whether immune modulation in the adult animal affects disease development. Injections of 7-wk-old male apo E knockout mice with polyclonal immunoglobulin preparations (ivIg) during a 5-d period reduced fatty streak formation over a 2-mo period on cholesterol diet by 35%. Fibrofatty lesions induced by diet treatment for 4 mo were reduced by 50% in mice receiving ivIg after 2 mo on the diet. ivIg treatment also reduced IgM antibodies to oxidized LDL and led to inactivation of spleen and lymph node T cells. These data indicate that ivIg inhibits atherosclerosis, that it is effective both during the fatty streak and plaque phases, and that it may act by modulating T cell activity and/or antibody production. Therefore, immunomodulation may be an effective way to prevent and/or treat atherosclerosis. PMID:9727059

  3. Targeted disruption of the porcine immunoglobulin kappa light chain locus.

    PubMed

    Ramsoondar, J; Mendicino, M; Phelps, C; Vaught, T; Ball, S; Monahan, J; Chen, S; Dandro, A; Boone, J; Jobst, P; Vance, A; Wertz, N; Polejaeva, I; Butler, J; Dai, Y; Ayares, D; Wells, K

    2011-06-01

    Inactivation of the endogenous pig immunoglobulin (Ig) loci, and replacement with their human counterparts, would produce animals that could alleviate both the supply and specificity issues of therapeutic human polyclonal antibodies (PAbs). Platform genetics are being developed in pigs that have all endogenous Ig loci inactivated and replaced by human counterparts, in order to address this unmet clinical need. This report describes the deletion of the porcine kappa (κ) light chain constant (Cκ) region in pig primary fetal fibroblasts (PPFFs) using gene targeting technology, and the generation of live animals from these cells via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning. There are only two other targeted loci previously published in swine, and this is the first report of a targeted disruption of an Ig light chain locus in a livestock species. Pigs with one targeted Cκ allele (heterozygous knockout or ±) were bred together to generate Cκ homozygous knockout (-/-) animals. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) from Cκ -/- pigs were devoid of κ-containing Igs. Furthermore, there was an increase in lambda (λ) light chain expression when compared to that of wild-type littermates (Cκ +/+). Targeted inactivation of the Ig heavy chain locus has also been achieved and work is underway to inactivate the pig lambda light chain locus.

  4. Tc-99m polyclonal human immunoglobulin scintigraphy in brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Kadanali, A; Varoglu, E; Kerek, M; Tasyaran, M A

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of Tc-99m polyclonal human immunoglobulin (HIG) scintigraphy for the diagnosis of brucellosis, and to compare its effectiveness in the diagnosis of osteoarticular involvement in comparison with bone scanning. Of 30 patients with brucellosis, Tc-99m HIG detected osteoarticular involvement in 18 (60%) patients, in whom the sacroiliac joints were affected most commonly (n = 13; 72.2%), with statistically predominant bilateral involvement (p < 0.05). By bone scanning, the rate of osteoarticular involvement was 70% (21 of 30 patients), and the joints affected most commonly were sacroiliac (15 of 21 patients; 71.4%). Although bilateral involvement was observed mostly by bone scanning, there was no significant difference between the rate of bilateral and unilateral involvement. The anatomical distribution of osteoarticular complications, as detected by Tc-99m HIG and bone scintigraphy, did not differ significantly. With Tc-99m HIG, orchitis was detected in two patients and paravertebral abscess in one patient. Since bone scanning did not detect these soft tissue complications, Tc-99m HIG scintigraphy might be useful for the detection of both osteoarticular and soft tissue complications resulting from brucellosis.

  5. Clonal deletion of specific thymocytes by an immunoglobulin idiotype.

    PubMed Central

    Bogen, B; Dembic, Z; Weiss, S

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated whether immunoglobulin can induce clonal deletion of thymocytes by employing two strains of transgenic mice. One strain is transgenic for an alpha/beta T cell receptor (TCR) which recognizes a processed idiotypic peptide of the lambda 2(315) light chain variable region, bound to the I-Ed class II major histocompatibility complex molecule. The other mouse strain is transgenic for the lambda 2(315) gene. Double transgenic offspring from a TCR-transgenic female mated with a lambda 2(315) transgenic male exhibit a pronounced clonal deletion of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes. Analysis of neonates from the reciprocal (lambda 2(315)-transgenic female x TCR-transgenic male) cross suggests that the deletion in double transgenic offspring most likely is caused by lambda 2(315) produced within the thymus rather than by maternally derived IgG, lambda 2(315). Nevertheless, IgG, lambda 2(315) can cause deletion of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes when injected in large amounts intraperitoneally into either adult or neonatal TCR-transgenic mice. Deletion is evident 48 and 72 h after injection, but by day 7 the thymus has already regained its normal appearance. A serum concentration of several hundred microgram/ml is required for deletion to be observed. Therefore, the heterogeneous idiotypes of serum Ig are probably each of too low concentration to cause thymocyte deletion in normal animals. Images PMID:8428591

  6. Specific dimerization of the light chains of human immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, G T; Straus, D

    1968-07-01

    1. The light chains of human immunoglobulin were allowed to dimerize in vitro on removal of the dispersing agents acetic acid or urea. 2. On electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel at pH8.8 the dimers yielded up to nine regularly spaced bands. This approximates to the number of electrophoretic components known to occur among the monomers. 3. Single electrophoretic components of the dimers were isolated from the gel, dissociated into monomers, and subjected as such to electrophoresis in urea-containing gels. Each gave two adjacent bands. 4. Similarly, after all the light chains as monomers had been subjected to electrophoresis in urea-containing gels, single electrophoretic components were isolated and allowed to dimerize. When examined now as dimers in the absence of urea, each component gave two adjacent bands. 5. These findings are explicable on the following basis. (a) The dimerization of the light chains is specific, at least inasmuch as it occurs between monomers of the same electrophoretic mobilities. (b) With the buffer constant, different light chains undergo different changes in net charge on being transferred from urea-containing to urea-free solution; in this way two different chains of the same initial charge can acquire a charge difference of 1. 6. Experiments with Bence-Jones proteins and other homogeneous light chains gave results substantiating the conclusions (a) and (b). PMID:4174431

  7. Cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) immunoglobulin heavy chain locus description.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guo-Yun; Mate, Suzanne; Garcia, Karla; Ward, Michael D; Brueggemann, Ernst; Hall, Matthew; Kenny, Tara; Sanchez-Lockhart, Mariano; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Palacios, Gustavo

    2016-07-01

    Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) have become an important animal model for biomedical research. In particular, it is the animal model of choice for the development of vaccine candidates associated with emerging dangerous pathogens. Despite their increasing importance as animal models, the cynomolgus macaque genome is not fully characterized, hindering molecular studies for this model. More importantly, the lack of knowledge about the immunoglobulin (IG) locus organization directly impacts the analysis of the humoral response in cynomolgus macaques. Recent advances in next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to analyze IG repertoires open the opportunity to deeply characterize the humoral immune response. However, the IG locus organization for the animal is required to completely dissect IG repertoires. Here, we describe the localization and organization of the rearranging IG heavy (IGH) genes on chromosome 7 of the cynomolgus macaque draft genome. Our annotation comprises 108 functional genes which include 63 variable (IGHV), 38 diversity (IGHD), and 7 joining (IGHJ) genes. For validation, we provide RNA transcript data for most of the IGHV genes and all of the annotated IGHJ genes, as well as proteomic data to validate IGH constant genes. The description and annotation of the rearranging IGH genes for the cynomolgus macaques will significantly facilitate scientific research. This is particularly relevant to dissect the immune response during vaccination or infection with dangerous pathogens such as Ebola, Marburg and other emerging pathogens where non-human primate models play a significant role for countermeasure development.

  8. New Insights into the Enigma of Immunoglobulin D

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kang; Cerutti, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Summary Immunoglobulin D (IgD) has remained a mysterious antibody class for almost half a century. IgD was initially thought to be a recently evolved Ig isotype expressed only by some mammalian species, but recent discoveries in fishes and amphibians demonstrate that IgD was present in the ancestor of all jawed vertebrates and has important immunological functions. The structure of IgD has been very dynamic throughout evolution. Mammals can express IgD through alternative splicing and class switch recombination (CSR). Active cell-dependent and T-cell-independent IgM-to-IgD class switching takes place in a unique subset of human B cells from the upper aerodigestive mucosa, which provides a layer of mucosal protection by interacting with many pathogens and their virulence factors. Circulating IgD can bind to myeloid cells such as basophils and induce antimicrobial, inflammatory, and B-cell-stimulating factors upon cross-linking, which contributes to immune surveillance but also inflammation and tissue damage when this pathway is overactivated under pathological conditions. Recent research shows that IgD is an important immunomodulator that orchestrates an ancestral surveillance system at the interface between immunity and inflammation. PMID:20727035

  9. IV immunoglobulin confounds JC virus antibody serostatus determination

    PubMed Central

    Kuesters, Geoffrey; Chamot, Eric; Omari, Mirza; Dontas, Kim; Yarussi, Mary; Subramanyam, Meena; Herbert, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the impact of therapeutic infusion of IV immunoglobulin (IVIg) on John Cunningham virus antibody (JCV Ab) serostatus and level in serum. Methods: We carried out a retrospective analysis of serum levels of JCV Ab among STRATIFY-2 trial enrollees from 2 multiple sclerosis centers who were exposed to IVIg during the trial. For the subset of eligible patients, we estimated mean linear trends while on IVIg and after stopping IVIg with a linear mixed-effects model. Results: The JCV Ab seropositivity rate in the group of patients that was recently exposed to IVIg was 100%, which is significantly higher than in the IVIg-naive population (58%, p < 0.001). The seropositivity rate in the patient group with remote IVIg exposure was similar to that in the IVIg-naive population (67%, p = 0.68, Fisher exact test). The slope of the linear trend line after stopping IVIg decreased significantly by −0.310 units per 100 days (95% confidence interval, −0.611 to −0.008; p = 0.04). Conclusions: Recent IVIg exposure is invariably associated with JCV Ab seropositivity. After stopping IVIg, JCV Ab levels tend to decrease with time, and seroreversion to innately Ab-negative status can occur. PMID:25340081

  10. Evaluation of immunoglobulins in bovine colostrum using laser induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Salam, Z; Abdel Ghany, Sh; Harith, M A

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to exploit laser induced fluorescence (LIF) as a spectrochemical analytical technique for evaluation of immunoglobulin (IgG) in bovine colostrum. Colostrum samples were collected from different American Holstein cows at different times after calving. Four samples were gathered from each cow; the first three samples were obtained from the first three milkings (colostrum) and the fourth sample (milk) was obtained a week after calving. It has been demonstrated that LIF can be used as a simple, fast, sensitive and less costly spectrochemical analytical technique for qualitative estimation of IgG in colostrum. LIF results have been confirmed via the quantitative evaluation of IgG in the same samples adopting the single radial immunodiffusion conventional technique and a very good agreement has been obtained. Through LIF it was possible to evaluate bovine colostrum after different milking times and to differentiate qualitatively between colostrum from different animals which may reflect their general health status. A fluorescence linear calibration curve for IgG concentrations from 0 up to 120 g L(-1) has been obtained. In addition, it is feasible to adopt this technique for in situ measurements, i.e. in dairy cattle farms as a simple and fast method for evaluation of IgG in bovine colostrum instead of using lengthy and complicated conventional techniques in laboratories. PMID:25127559

  11. Dynamics of immunoglobulin sequence diversity in HIV-1 infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Hoehn, Kenneth B.; Gall, Astrid; Bashford-Rogers, Rachael; Fidler, S. J.; Kaye, S.; Weber, J. N.; McClure, M. O.; Kellam, Paul; Pybus, Oliver G.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in immunoglobulin (Ig) sequencing technology are leading to new perspectives on immune system dynamics. Much research in this nascent field has focused on resolving immune responses to viral infection. However, the dynamics of B-cell diversity in early HIV infection, and in response to anti-retroviral therapy, are still poorly understood. Here, we investigate these dynamics through bulk Ig sequencing of samples collected over 2 years from a group of eight HIV-1 infected patients, five of whom received anti-retroviral therapy during the first half of the study period. We applied previously published methods for visualizing and quantifying B-cell sequence diversity, including the Gini index, and compared their efficacy to alternative measures. While we found significantly greater clonal structure in HIV-infected patients versus healthy controls, within HIV patients, we observed no significant relationships between statistics of B-cell clonal expansion and clinical variables such as viral load and CD4+ count. Although there are many potential explanations for this, we suggest that important factors include poor sampling resolution and complex B-cell dynamics that are difficult to summarize using simple summary statistics. Importantly, we find a significant association between observed Gini indices and sequencing read depth, and we conclude that more robust analytical methods and a closer integration of experimental and theoretical work is needed to further our understanding of B-cell repertoire diversity during viral infection. PMID:26194755

  12. Extracellular idiotypic immunoglobulin arising from human leukemic B lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The peripheral blood lymphocytes of nine out of nine patients with typical surface Ig-positive chronic lymphocytic leukemia but no paraprotein visible on serum electrophoresis have been shown by radioimmunoassay to export small amounts of pentameric IgM during culture (in the range of 2.4-7.2 ng/10(7) cells per h); three out of nine also exported monomeric IgD (0.7-1.4 ng/10(7) cells per h). Immunoglobulin turned over on the cell surface did not appear to contribute to material in the culture fluid, except possibly as vesicle- bound Ig. In three cases, which included two of the IgD producers, anti- idiotypic antibody raised against the cell surface Fab mu was used to demonstrate the idiotypic nature of the exported Ig. Anti-idiotypic antibody was also used to measure levels of idiotypic Ig in the sera of these three patients as a proportion of the total Ig. Total serum IgM was depressed in all three patients, and the idiotypic IgM represented 43%, 65%, and 96% of the IgM. The findings suggest that in typical chronic lymphocytic leukemia involving B lymphocytes, the export of a small amount of idiotypic Ig by the neoplastic cells in a common or even usual occurrence. PMID:6969771

  13. Immunoglobulin genomics in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster).

    PubMed

    Qin, Tong; Zhao, Huijing; Zhu, Huabin; Wang, Dong; Du, Weihua; Hao, Haisheng

    2015-08-01

    In science, the prairie voles are ideal models for studying the regulatory mechanisms of social behavior in humans. The utility of the prairie vole as a biology model can be further enhanced by characterization of the genes encoding components of the immune system. Here, we report the genomic organization of the prairie vole immunoglobulin heavy and light chain genes. The prairie vole IgH locus on chromosome 1 spans over 1600kb, and consists of at least 79 VH segments (28 potentially functional genes, 2 ORFs and 49 pseudogenes), 7 DH segments, 4 JH segments, four constant region genes (μ, γ, ɛ, and α), and two transmembrane regions of δ gene. The Igκ locus, found on three scaffolds (JH996430, JH996605 and JH996566), contains a totle of 124 Vκ segments (47 potentially functional genes, 1 ORF and 76 pseudogenes), 5 Jκ segments and a single Cκ gene. Two different transcriptional orientations were determined for these Vκ gene segments. In contrast, the Igλ locus on scaffold JH996473 and JH996489 includes 21 Vλ gene segments (14 potentially functional genes, 1 ORF and 6 pseudogenes), all with the same transcriptional polarity as the downstream Jλ-Cλ cluster. Phylogenetic analysis and sequence alignments suggested the prairie vole's large germline VH, Vκ and Vλ gene segments appear to form limited gene families. Therefore, this species may generate antibody diversity via a gene conversion-like mechanism associated with its pseudogene reserves.

  14. Esophageal Involvement of Immunoglobulin G4-Related Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ji Hyun; Lee, Tae Hee; Kim, Hyo Shik; Jung, Chan Sung; Lee, Joon Seong; Hong, Su Jin; Jin, So-Young

    2015-01-01

    Abstarct Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related disease is characterized by the typical histopathological features of a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate rich in IgG4-positive plasma cells, a high ratio of IgG4- to IgG-positive cells, storiform fibrosis (cellular fibrosis organized in an irregular whorled pattern), obliterative phlebitis, and variable presence of eosinophils. The disease exhibits systemic involvement but very rarely involves the esophagus. A 33-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for evaluation of a 1-year history of progressive dysphagia. Neck imaging revealed a 3.9-cm mass in the cervical esophagus and multifocal calcified lymph nodes in the lower neck and mediastinum. Two previous tertiary hospitals failed to diagnose the patient's condition despite the use of ultrasound-guided needle biopsy of the neck tumor. We performed neck imaging studies, a flexible endoscopic swallowing study, high-resolution manometry, upper endoscopy, and a review of the previous pathologic slides. The patient was finally diagnosed with IgG4-related esophagitis and showed a good response to corticosteroid therapy. We herein report a rare case of dysphagia associated with IgG4-related disease and present a review of the literature. PMID:26683918

  15. Pioneer oral streptococci produce immunoglobulin A1 protease.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, M F; Evans, M; Fitzsimmons, S; Johnson, J; Pearce, C; Sheridan, M J; Wientzen, R; Bowden, G

    1994-01-01

    As part of a longitudinal study of the relationship between bacterial colonization and the secretory immune response, 367 isolates of pioneer viridans streptococci collected from 40 breast- and bottle-fed neonates within the first month postpartum were tested for the production of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) protease and glycosidases. Fifty percent of the streptococci isolated produced IgA1 protease, including all isolates of Streptococcus oralis and S. sanguis, 60.7% of S. mitis biovar 1 isolates, and some isolates that could not be identified. Three cleavage patterns of alpha 1 heavy chains were observed. Six isolates of S. mitis biovar 1 that did not produce IgA1 protease attacked the alpha 1 chain. Incubation of IgA1 protease-negative S. mitis biovar 1 isolates with IgA1, either prior to or together with S. sanguis, rendered the IgA1 paraprotein resistant to cleavage by the IgA1 protease of S. sanguis. The ability of some pioneer streptococci in the human oral cavity to produce IgA1 protease and of others to modify the susceptibility of IgA1 to cleavage by IgA1 protease perhaps enhances their ability to survive in this habitat. Images PMID:8188337

  16. Suppression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by intravenously administered polyclonal immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Achiron, A; Mor, F; Margalit, R; Cohen, I R; Lider, O; Miron, S

    2000-11-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in Lewis rats either by active immunization with myelin basic protein (MBP) or by adoptive transfer using anti-MBP specific CD4(+)T cells. Treatment with human polyclonal immunoglobulins (IgG) effectively suppressed active EAE. Time-dependent experiments demonstrated that the effect of IgG was manifested only when treatment was given immediately after immunization; administration from day 7 after disease induction did not suppress the disease. In the adoptive transfer model of EAE, IgG had no effect in vivo. However, pretreatment in vitro of the antigen-specific T-cells with IgG inhibited their ability to mediate adoptive EAE, as it did in active EAE. Similarly, in vitro IgG pretreatment of the antigen-specific T-cells suppressed the proliferative response to MBP. Fluorescent Activated Cell Sorter (FACS) analysis demonstrated the binding of IgG to activated T-cell lines that was inhibited by soluble Fc molecules. The differential effects of IgG on active EAE and on the adoptive transfer of EAE suggest that IgG in vivo can suppress disease by acting during the early phase of the immune response which involves naive T cells. The inhibition of T-cell proliferation and adoptive transfer of EAE by incubation of T cells in vitro appears to require higher concentrations of IgG than those obtained in vivo. PMID:11040073

  17. Effects of pseudopregnancy on immunoglobulin-secreting cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Sulila, P; Lundkvist, U; Mattsson, R

    1988-07-01

    Pregnant mice characteristically show elevated numbers of immunoglobulin-secreting cells in their enlarged spleen and para-aortic lymph nodes. A comparative study of pseudopregnancy and syngeneic pregnancy in CBA/Ca mice was made to evaluate the role of maternal hormones in the induction of these changes. To induce pseudopregnancy, CBA/Ca female mice were mated with vasectomized males, the duration of pseudopregnancy induced in this way is 8-10 days. Serum progesterone levels were monitored periodically throughout pseudopregnancy using RIA technique. Changes were recorded in weight of the thymus, spleen and para-aortic lymph nodes, levels of serum IgG and IgM (ELISA-technique), and content of splenic IgG- and IgM-secreting cells (protein A plaque assay). Thymus involution was observed in pregnant and pseudopregnant mice. Patterns of change in the weight of the spleen and the para-aortic lymph nodes (PALN) were similar in pregnant and pseudopregnant mice until day 8. Ig-secretion in the spleen increased slightly day 5-8 in both pregnant and pseudopregnant mice, but to a lesser extent in the latter. No differences were observed in serum Ig levels between the two groups until day 8. A marked decrease in serum IgG levels and, to some extent, IgM levels between days 8 and 12 was observed in pregnant animals.

  18. Local Immunoglobulin E in the Nasal Mucosa: Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    De Schryver, Els; Devuyst, Lien; Derycke, Lara; Dullaers, Melissa; Van Zele, Thibaut; Bachert, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin E (IgE) can be highly elevated in the airway mucosa independently of IgE serum levels and atopic status. Mostly, systemic markers are assessed to investigate inflammation in airway disease for research or clinical practice. A more accurate but more cumbersome approach to determine inflammation at the target organ would be to evaluate markers locally. We review evidence for local production of IgE in allergic rhinitis (AR) and chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP). Diagnostic and therapeutic consequences in clinical practice are discussed. We describe that the airway mucosa has the intrinsic capability to produce IgE. Moreover, not only do IgE-positive B cells reside within the mucosa, but all tools are present locally for affinity maturation by somatic hypermutation (SHM), clonal expansion, and class switch recombination to IgE. Recognizing local IgE in the absence of systemic IgE has diagnostic and therapeutic consequences. Therefore, we emphasize the importance of local IgE in patients with a history of AR or CRSwNP. PMID:25749769

  19. Mechanism of immunoglobulin G adsorption on polystyrene microspheres.

    PubMed

    Sofińska, Kamila; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Barbasz, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption of polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) on negatively charged polystyrene microparticle suspension (latex) was studied by using the Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) measurements. Using this technique, the dependence of the electrophoretic mobility of particles on the IgG concentration in the suspension was measured for various ionic strengths and pH 3.5. The increase in the electrophoretic mobility was quantitatively interpreted in terms of the 3D electrokinetic model. On the other hand, the maximum coverage of IgG on latex was determined using the depletion method based on AFM imaging. It was shown that IgG adsorption was irreversible and that its maximum coverage on the microspheres increased from 1.4mgm(-2) for 0.001M NaCl to 2.0mgm(-2) for 0.15M NaCl. This was interpreted in terms of reduced electrostatic repulsion among adsorbed molecules. The stability of IgG monolayers on the particles was confirmed in separate experiments where changes in its electrophoretic mobility were monitored over prolonged time periods. Additionally, the acid-base properties of the IgG monolayers on latex were determined in pH cycling experiments. The isoelectric point of the IgG monolayers on the microspheres was 4.8. The results obtained in this work indicate that basic physicochemical characteristics of IgG can be acquired via electrophoretic mobility measurements using microgram quantities of the protein.

  20. Cytomegalovirus Hyper Immunoglobulin for CMV Prophylaxis in Thoracic Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rea, Federico; Potena, Luciano; Yonan, Nizar; Wagner, Florian; Calabrese, Fiorella

    2016-03-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection negatively influences both short- and long-term outcomes after cardiothoracic transplantation. In heart transplantation, registry analyses have shown that CMV immunoglobulin (CMVIG) with or without virostatic prophylaxis is associated with a significant reduction in mortality and graft loss versus no prophylaxis, particularly in high-risk donor (D)+/recipient (R)- transplants. Randomized comparative trials are lacking but retrospective data suggest that addition of CMVIG to antiviral prophylaxis may reduce rates of CMV-related events after heart transplantation, including the incidence of acute rejection or chronic allograft vasculopathy. However, available data consistently indicate that when CMVIG is used, it should be administered with concomitant antiviral therapy, and that evidence concerning preemptive management with CMVIG is limited, but promising. In lung transplantation, CMVIG should again only be used with concomitant antiviral therapy. Retrospective studies have shown convincing evidence that addition of CMVIG to antiviral prophylaxis lowers CMV endpoints and mortality. The current balance of evidence suggests that CMVIG prophylaxis reduces the risk of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome, but a controlled trial is awaited. Overall, the relatively limited current data set suggests that prophylaxis with CMVIG in combination with antiviral therapy appears effective in D+/R- heart transplant patients, whereas in lung transplantation, addition of CMVIG in recipients of a CMV-positive graft may offer an advantage in terms of CMV infection and disease.

  1. Immunoglobulin A nephropathy: current progress and future directions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunlei; Zeng, Xuehui; Li, Zhongxin; Wang, Zhe; Li, Shunmin

    2015-08-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy is the most prevalent form of primary glomerulonephritis that often leads to end-stage kidney failure, thereby representing a major health challenge worldwide. Tremendous effort has been dedicated to the diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment of the disease, and the past several years have witnessed exciting advances that have enriched our understanding of the biology, etiology, and pathology of IgA nephropathy. The disease is characterized by predominant deposition of IgA immune complexes that progressively causes activation of mesangial cells, glomerular inflammation, and ultimately renal injury. Multiple recent independent high-throughput studies in cohorts have identified key susceptibility alleles, such as the major histocompatibility complex loci that are significantly associated with the risk of disease occurrence. Notably, a fraction of these risk loci encode proteins that participate in immune defense against mucosal pathogens, particularly intestinal nematodes, indicating a linkage between IgA-mediated antihelminth immunity and the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy. The emerging "omics" technology also allows for systemic analysis of urinary and serum samples as a noninvasive procedure for diagnosis and prognosis, as demonstrated by several studies implicating the proteomic signature and microRNA profile as promising diagnostic and prognostic parameters. In the clinic, the current treatment protocol relies on suppression of the renin-angiotensin system to control blood pressure and proteinuria. This review scrutinizes and summarizes recent relevant findings that aim to translate researchers' benchside knowledge of disease initiation and development into patients' bedside diagnosis and therapy. PMID:25797891

  2. Immunoglobulin determinants on the lymphocytes of normal rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Coombs, R. R. A.; Gurner, B. W.; Janeway, C. A.; Wilson, Anne B.; Gell, P. G. H.; Kelus, A. S.

    1970-01-01

    Immunoglobulin determinants can be shown on the membrane of circulating lymphocytes of the rabbit by the mixed antiglobulin reaction. An enumeration was made of lymphocytes reacting specifically with anti-γ, anti-μ, anti-Fab and anti-L chain sera. The L chain allotypic determinants As4 and As6 were also shown and reacting cells enumerated. There was a marked dose-dependence between the concentration of the antiglobulin reagent used to treat the lymphocyte suspension and the number of lymphocytes reacting to form rosettes. The experiments reported at this stage bear no direct evidence on the question as to whether the μ- and γ-determinants, or more than one L chain allotypic determinant can exist on the one cell. Of three rabbits with 26, 47, and 61 per cent IgG-reacting lymphocytes in the circulation, only one had 1 per cent reacting cells in the thymus while the other two had less than 1 per cent. No μ-reacting cells were detectable in the thymuses of the two rabbits tested. ImagesFIG. 2 PMID:4192262

  3. Immunoglobulin G response in patients with Campylobacter concisus diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Hans Linde; Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Mitchell, Hazel M; Nielsen, Henrik

    2016-02-01

    Limited information is available on the systemic immunoglobulin response in patients infected with the emerging pathogen Campylobacter concisus. The aim of the present study was to detect anti-C. concisus antibodies in serum of 88 patients with C. concisus gastroenteritis. Specific IgG antibodies to C. concisus were measured in serum using an in-house enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and pooled donor serum was used as a control. The mean optical density was 0.135 (SEM: 0.020) for the 88 adult patients and 0.100 (SEM: 0.011) in controls. When using an optical density value equal to the mean +3 SEM for the control serum, 22 (25%) C. concisus-positive patients had increased IgG antibodies. Patients with high IgG levels more often reported headache, and they had a trend toward more mucus in stools, whereas IgG levels were unrelated to age, duration of diarrhea, number of stools per day, and weight loss.

  4. Immunoglobulin genes and their transcriptional control in teleosts.

    PubMed

    Hikima, Jun-ichi; Jung, Tae-Sung; Aoki, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig), which exists only in jawed vertebrates, is one of the most important molecules in adaptive immunity. In the last two decades, many teleost Ig genes have been identified by in silico data mining from the enormous gene and EST databases of many fish species. In this review, the organization of Ig gene segments, the expressed Ig isotypes and their transcriptional controls are discussed. The Ig heavy chain (IgH) locus in teleosts encodes the variable (V), the diversity (D), the joining (J) segments and three different isotypic constant (C) regions including Cμ, Cδ, and Cζ/τ genes, and is organized as a "translocon" type like the IgH loci of higher vertebrates. In contrast, the Ig light (L) chain locus is arranged in a "multicluster" or repeating set of VL, JL, and CL segments. The IgL chains have four isotypes; two κ L1/G and L3/F), σ (L2) and λ. The transcription of IgH genes in teleosts is regulated by a VH promoter and the Eμ3' enhancer, which both function in a B cell-specific manner. The location of the IgH locus, structure and transcriptional function of the Eμ3' enhancer are important to our understanding of the evolutional changes that have occurred in the IgH gene locus.

  5. Comparison of somatic mutation frequency among immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Motoyama, N; Miwa, T; Suzuki, Y; Okada, H; Azuma, T

    1994-02-01

    We analyzed the frequency of somatic mutation in immunoglobulin genes from hybridomas that secrete anti-(4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl)acetyl (NP) monoclonal antibodies. A high frequency of mutation (3.3-4.4%) was observed in both the rearranged VH186.2 and V lambda 1 genes, indicating that somatic mutation occurs with similar frequency in these genes in spite of the absence of an intron enhancer in lambda 1 chain genes. In contrast to the high frequency in J-C introns, only two nucleotide substitutions occurred at positions -462 and -555 in the 5' noncoding region in one of the lambda 1-chain genes and in none of the other three so far studied. Since a similar low frequency of somatic mutation was observed in the 5' noncoding region of inactive lambda 2-chain genes rendered inactive because of incorrect rearrangement, this region may not be a target or alternatively, may be protected from the mutator system. We observed a low frequency of nucleotide substitution in unrearranged V lambda 1 genes (approximately 1/15 that of rearranged genes). Together with previous results (Azuma T., N. Motoyama, L. Fields, and D. Loh, 1993. Int. Immunol. 5:121), these findings suggest that the 5' noncoding region, which contains the promoter element, provides a signal for the somatic mutator system and that rearrangement, which brings the promoter into close proximity to the enhancer element, should increase mutation efficiency.

  6. Somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes in human neonates.

    PubMed

    Ridings, J; Nicholson, I C; Goldsworthy, W; Haslam, R; Roberton, D M; Zola, H

    1997-05-01

    The antibody response in the young infant is limited in several ways; in particular, responses generally are of low affinity and restricted to IgM. This raises the question whether the affinity maturation process, consisting of somatic mutation of immunoglobulin genes coupled with selection of high-affinity variants, is operative in the neonate. Re-arranged V(H)6 genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from cord blood and from peripheral blood of infants. Heteroduplex analysis detected mutation in only 2/18 cord blood samples, while mutations were seen from about 10 days of age onwards. Cloning and sequencing of mutated neonatal V(H)6 genes showed that mutated sequences contained relatively few mutations (one to three mutations per sequence) compared with published values of about 10 in adult IgM sequences. Selection was not evident in the majority of neonatal samples. Thus mutation can occur in the human neonate, but is minimal and generally not accompanied by selection. The age at which affinity maturation develops effectively is yet to be defined.

  7. The immunoglobulin genes: structure and specificity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Gerard

    2007-06-01

    The rearrangement of the immunoglobulin genes (IG) provides a large diversity of B-cell receptors conformations and allows the immune system to respond differently to foreign antigens. In chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), there are a restricted number of stereotyped B-cell receptors rearranged by the tumor B-cells between CLL patients. These subsets with stereotyped receptors appear to have clinical implications, for example cases that rearrange the IGHV3-21 gene display poor clinical prognosis. The number of subsets with stereotyped receptors has been reported at a frequency of over 20% of CLL cases; however, the specificities of these receptors are still not clearly defined. Reactivity to epitopes from bacterial antigen, cytoskeleton components such as vimentin, and antigens on viable and apoptotic T-cell have been proposed. The role of antigen in CLL development is currently being more clearly defined with identification of stereotyped receptors, and their antigen specificity and the continued role antigen stimulation plays in CLL disease will be an important question in the future.

  8. Tailoring immobilization of immunoglobulin by excimer laser for biosensor applications.

    PubMed

    Sima, Felix; Axente, Emanuel; Ristoscu, Carmen; Mihailescu, Ion N; Kononenko, Taras V; Nagovitsin, Ilya A; Chudinova, Galina; Konov, Vitaly I; Socol, Marcela; Enculescu, Ionut; Sima, Livia E; Petrescu, Stefana M

    2011-02-01

    The sheltered transfer and immobilization of rabbit anti-human antiserum immunoglobulin G (IgG) by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) are reported. The iced targets submitted to laser irradiation consisted of 0.2-2 mg/mL IgG blended or not with lipid (L-α-phosphatidylcholine dipalmitoyl) dissolved in distilled water-based saline buffer. Thin IgG coatings were obtained at room temperature onto glass, fused silica, or silicon substrates. Ten thousand subsequent laser pulses of 0.33, 0.5, or 0.67 J/cm(2) fluence were applied for the synthesis of each sample. Morphology and composition of the thin films were studied by optical, scanning, and atomic force microscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectrometry. Optical labeling methods such as spectrofluorimetry and fluorescence microscopy were selected to verify the biosensor transduction principle because of their high sensitivity for detecting low amounts of antigen (IgG). Protein immobilization to the substrate surface was demonstrated for all obtained structures after immersion in the donkey anti-rabbit secondary antibody solution. The IgG transfer and immobilization onto substrates were improved by addition of lipid to MAPLE solutions.

  9. Immunoglobulin G4-related disease of the hard palate.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Nicholas; Kearney, Daniel; Sladden, Nicole; Goss, Alastair; Selva, Dinesh

    2014-04-01

    A 71-year-old woman presented with erythematous, nontender, bilateral hard palate nodules of 6-month duration. Biopsy showed collagenous sclerosis and a follicular lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate among the minor salivary glands. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgG4 staining showed 280 IgG4(+) cells per high-power field and a ratio of IgG4(+) to IgG(+) cells of 0.8. The patient subsequently developed bilateral lacrimal gland and parotid gland enlargement associated with an increased serum IgG4 level of 3,031 mg/dL (≤ 135 mg/dL). Left lacrimal gland biopsy confirmed IgG4-related dacryoadenitis. The patient declined corticosteroid treatment for IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) and remained stable at 15 months after the first presentation. Spontaneous, partial resolution of the palatal lesion was observed during follow-up. IgG4-RD should be considered in the differential diagnosis of lymphoplasmacytic lesions of the hard palate.

  10. Immunoglobulin genomics in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster).

    PubMed

    Qin, Tong; Zhao, Huijing; Zhu, Huabin; Wang, Dong; Du, Weihua; Hao, Haisheng

    2015-08-01

    In science, the prairie voles are ideal models for studying the regulatory mechanisms of social behavior in humans. The utility of the prairie vole as a biology model can be further enhanced by characterization of the genes encoding components of the immune system. Here, we report the genomic organization of the prairie vole immunoglobulin heavy and light chain genes. The prairie vole IgH locus on chromosome 1 spans over 1600kb, and consists of at least 79 VH segments (28 potentially functional genes, 2 ORFs and 49 pseudogenes), 7 DH segments, 4 JH segments, four constant region genes (μ, γ, ɛ, and α), and two transmembrane regions of δ gene. The Igκ locus, found on three scaffolds (JH996430, JH996605 and JH996566), contains a totle of 124 Vκ segments (47 potentially functional genes, 1 ORF and 76 pseudogenes), 5 Jκ segments and a single Cκ gene. Two different transcriptional orientations were determined for these Vκ gene segments. In contrast, the Igλ locus on scaffold JH996473 and JH996489 includes 21 Vλ gene segments (14 potentially functional genes, 1 ORF and 6 pseudogenes), all with the same transcriptional polarity as the downstream Jλ-Cλ cluster. Phylogenetic analysis and sequence alignments suggested the prairie vole's large germline VH, Vκ and Vλ gene segments appear to form limited gene families. Therefore, this species may generate antibody diversity via a gene conversion-like mechanism associated with its pseudogene reserves. PMID:26073565

  11. Immunoglobulin λ Gene Rearrangement Can Precede κ Gene Rearrangement

    DOE PAGES

    Berg, Jörg; Mcdowell, Mindy; Jäck, Hans-Martin; Wabl, Matthias

    1990-01-01

    Imore » mmunoglobulin genes are generated during differentiation of B lymphocytes by joining gene segments. A mouse pre-B cell contains a functional immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene, but no light-chain gene. Although there is only one heavy-chain locus, there are two lightchain loci: κ and λ .It has been reported that κ loci in the germ-line configuration are never (in man) or very rarely (in the mouse) present in cells with functionally rearranged λ -chain genes. Two explanations have been proposed to explain this: (a) the ordered rearrangement theory, which postulates that light-chain gene rearrangement in the pre-B cell is first attempted at the κ locus, and that only upon failure to produce a functional κ chain is there an attempt to rearrange the λ locus; and (b) the stochastic theory, which postulates that rearrangement at the λ locus proceeds at a rate that is intrinsically much slower than that at the κ locus. We show here that λ -chain genes are generated whether or not the κ locus has lost its germ-line arrangement, a result that is compatible only with the stochastic theory.« less

  12. Immunoglobulins: 25 Years of Immunoinformatics and IMGT-ONTOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Lefranc, Marie-Paule

    2014-01-01

    IMGT®, the international ImMunoGeneTics information system® (CNRS and Montpellier University) is the global reference in immunogenetics and immunoinformatics. By its creation in 1989, IMGT® marked the advent of immunoinformatics, which emerged at the interface between immunogenetics and bioinformatics. IMGT® is specialized in the immunoglobulins (IG) or antibodies, T cell receptors (TR), major histocompatibility (MH), and IgSF and MhSF superfamilies. IMGT® has been built on the IMGT-ONTOLOGY axioms and concepts, which bridged the gap between genes, sequences and three-dimensional (3D) structures. The concepts include the IMGT® standardized keywords (identification), IMGT® standardized labels (description), IMGT® standardized nomenclature (classification), IMGT unique numbering and IMGT Colliers de Perles (numerotation). IMGT® comprises seven databases, 15,000 pages of web resources and 17 tools. IMGT® tools and databases provide a high-quality analysis of the IG from fish to humans, for basic, veterinary and medical research, and for antibody engineering and humanization. They include, as examples: IMGT/V-QUEST and IMGT/JunctionAnalysis for nucleotide sequence analysis and their high-throughput version IMGT/HighV-QUEST for next generation sequencing, IMGT/DomainGapAlign for amino acid sequence analysis of IG domains, IMGT/3Dstructure-DB for 3D structures, contact analysis and paratope/epitope interactions of IG/antigen complexes, and the IMGT/mAb-DB interface for therapeutic antibodies and fusion proteins for immunological applications (FPIA). PMID:25521638

  13. Application of Oxford classification, and overexpression of transforming growth factor-β1 and immunoglobulins in immunoglobulin A nephropathy: correlation with World Health Organization classification of immunoglobulin A nephropathy in a Chinese patient cohort.

    PubMed

    Meng, Hongxue; Zhang, Lei; E, Xiaoqiang; Ye, Fei; Li, Huining; Han, Changsong; Yamakawa, Mitsunori; Jin, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) is characterized by the qualitative abnormality of immunoglobulin A (IgA) in circulation and deposits of IgA in the renal mesangium. Transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) plays a key role in fibrogenesis and the progression of renal damage. This study aimed to investigate the clinicopathologic data on IgAN in northeastern China and the presence of TGF-β1, total IgA, and secretory IgA in the glomeruli and sera, as well as changes in galactose-deficient IgA1 in the serum. We investigated the clinicopathologic data of 1050 cases of IgAN diagnosed in a single center over 13 years. We then assessed the concentrations of TGF-β1 and immunoglobulins in the serum of 100 patients with IgAN and 56 healthy control subjects by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and investigated their presence in the glomeruli by immunofluorescence and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. From our data, 76.17% of the IgAN cases belonged to classes I and II according to the World Health Organization classification, representing the early stage. Compared with other studies, we found significantly lower frequencies of segmental glomerulosclerosis (27.71%) but higher frequencies of endocapillary proliferation (50.67%), and a similar proportion of mesangial hypercellularity (68.48%) and tubular atrophy/interstitial fibrosis (moderate, 17.81%; severe, 1.52%) in the northeastern Chinese cohort. There was an increased presence of TGF-β1 and immunoglobulins in the serum and glomeruli of IgAN, which correlates with the progression of pathologic classification. The pathologic variables of the Oxford classification correlated significantly with the WHO classifications. TGF-β1 and immunoglobulins could be used as biomarkers of IgAN pathogenic mechanisms, acting as important adjuncts to the original Oxford Classification.

  14. Natural aggregates of the conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, William H.

    1988-01-01

    Crushed stone and sand and gravel are the two main sources of natural aggregates. These materials are commonly used construction materials and frequently can be interchanged with one another. They are widely used throughout the United States, with every State except two producing crushed stone. Together they amount to about half the mining volume in the United States. Approximately 96 percent of sand and gravel and 77 percent of the crushed stone produced in the United States are used in the construction industry. Natural aggregates are widely distributed throughout the United States in a variety of geologic environments. Sand and gravel deposits commonly are the results of the weathering of bedrock and subsequent transportation and deposition of the material by water or ice (glaciers). As such, they commonly occur as river or stream deposits or in glaciated areas as glaciofluvial and other deposits. Crushed stone aggregates are derived from a wide variety of parent bedrock materials. Limestone and other carbonates account for approximately three quarters of the rocks used for crushed stone, with granite and other igneous rocks making up the bulk of the remainder. Limestone deposits are widespread throughout the Central and Eastern United States and are scattered in the West. Granites are widely distributed in the Eastern and Western United States, with few exposures in the Midwest. Igneous rocks (excluding granites) are largely concentrated in the Western United States and in a few isolated localities in the East. Even though natural aggregates are widely distributed throughout the United States, they are not universally available for consumptive use. Some areas are devoid of sand and gravel, and potential sources of crushed stone may be covered with sufficient unconsolidated material to make surface mining impractical. In some areas many aggregates do not meet the physical property requirements for certain uses, or they may contain mineral constituents that react

  15. Influence of calf genotype on colostral immunoglobulins in Bos taurus and Bos indicus cows and serum immunoglobulins in their calves.

    PubMed

    Vann, R C; Holloway, J W; Carstens, G E; Boyd, M E; Randel, R D

    1995-10-01

    Purebred Bos indicus calves are documented to have lower survival rates than Bos taurus calves. Thus, this study was designed to investigate the possibility that this decreased survival rate may be attributed to dam colostral immunoglobulin (Ig) concentrations and subsequent calf serum Ig concentrations. The specific objective was to determine the effect of breed type of calf on colostrum production, immunoglobulin concentrations in colostrum and calf serum, and availability and absorption efficiency of Ig. Brahman (B) and Angus (A) cattle were reciprocally mated to produce calves of the following types: A x A (n = 8), A x B (n = 9), B x B (n = 11), and B x A (n = 11). At birth, calves were separated from their dams and a blood sample was collected before feeding pooled colostrum (30 mL/kg birth weight) at 1 and 6 h of age. From 6 to 12 h of age, each calf was placed in a box that allowed interaction with the dam but prevented suckling. At 12 h of age, each calf was fed its dam's colostrum and placed with the dam. Additional blood samples were collected at 12, 24, and 48 h after birth. Serum and colostrum samples were analyzed for IgG, IgG1, IgG2, IgM, and IgA using single radial immunodiffusion (RID) assay techniques. The cows were hand-milked after induction of milk letdown with oxytocin at 1 and 12 h after calving. Colostrum volume was recorded, and samples were collected. Brahman cows produced more (P < .001) colostrum at 1 and 12 h than A cows. Total Ig concentrations were obtained by summing IgG, IgG1, IgG2, IgM, and IgA concentrations. Total Ig (P < .02), IgG (P < .005), and IgA (P < .01) concentrations in colostrum were greater in cows producing crossbred calves. Total Ig (P < .006), IgG (P < .02), IgG1 (P < .004), and IgG2 (P < .02) available in colostrum were affected by B x B and A x B breed types of calf. Brahman cows had more Ig available at 1 and 12 h than A cows due to increased production of colostrum. Breed type influenced colostral Ig in cattle

  16. Waves and aggregation patterns in myxobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igoshin, Oleg A.; Welch, Roy; Kaiser, Dale; Oster, George

    2004-03-01

    Under starvation conditions, a population of myxobacteria aggregates to build a fruiting body whose shape is species-specific and within which the cells sporulate. Early in this process, cells often pass through a "ripple phase" characterized by traveling linear, concentric, and spiral waves. These waves are different from the waves observed during slime mold aggregation that depend on diffusible morphogens, because myxobacteria communicate by direct contact. The difference is most dramatic when waves collide: rather than annihilating one another, myxobacterial waves appear to pass through one another unchanged. Under certain conditions, the spacing and location of the nascent fruiting bodies is determined by the wavelength and pattern of the waves. Later in fruiting body development, waves are replaced by streams of cells that circulate around small initial aggregates enlarging and rounding them. Still later, pairs of motile aggregates coalesce to form larger aggregates that develop into fruiting bodies. Here we present a mathematical model that quantitatively explains these wave and aggregation phenomena.

  17. Aggregation server for grid-integrated vehicles

    DOEpatents

    Kempton, Willett

    2015-05-26

    Methods, systems, and apparatus for aggregating electric power flow between an electric grid and electric vehicles are disclosed. An apparatus for aggregating power flow may include a memory and a processor coupled to the memory to receive electric vehicle equipment (EVE) attributes from a plurality of EVEs, aggregate EVE attributes, predict total available capacity based on the EVE attributes, and dispatch at least a portion of the total available capacity to the grid. Power flow may be aggregated by receiving EVE operational parameters from each EVE, aggregating the received EVE operational parameters, predicting total available capacity based on the aggregated EVE operational parameters, and dispatching at least a portion of the total available capacity to the grid.

  18. Tubular aggregates: their association with myalgia.

    PubMed Central

    Niakan, E; Harati, Y; Danon, M J

    1985-01-01

    Three thousand consecutive muscle biopsies were reviewed for the presence of tubular aggregates and their association with clinical symptomatology. Tubular aggregates were detected in 19 patients (0.6%). Twelve of these nineteen patients had severe myalgia, and the most abundant tubular aggregates were found in biopsies of patients with myalgia. Seven patients had only myalgia as their clinical symptomatology with normal physical examination. An additional five patients with tubular aggregates and myalgia had concomitant amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (2) or neuropathy (3). The high incidence of myalgia associated with tubular aggregates in our patients and the fact that tubular aggregates originate from sarcoplasmic reticulum suggest a role played by this structure in the pathogenesis of myalgia. Images PMID:2995591

  19. Multiscale simulation of red blood cell aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, P.; Popel, A. S.

    2004-11-01

    In humans and other mammals, aggregation of red blood cells (RBC) is a major determinant to blood viscosity in microcirculation under physiological and pathological conditions. Elevated levels of aggregation are often related to cardiovascular diseases, bacterial infection, diabetes, and obesity. Aggregation is a multiscale phenomenon that is governed by the molecular bond formation between adjacent cells, morphological and rheological properties of the cells, and the motion of the extra-cellular fluid in which the cells circulate. We have developed a simulation technique using front tracking methods for multiple fluids that includes the multiscale characteristics of aggregation. We will report the first-ever direct computer simulation of aggregation of deformable cells in shear flows. We will present results on the effect of shear rate, strength of the cross-bridging bonds, and the cell rheological properties on the rolling motion, deformation and subsequent breakage of an aggregate.

  20. Association of asialo-galactosyl beta 1-3N-acetylgalactosamine on the hinge with a conformational instability of Jacalin-reactive immunoglobulin A1 in immunoglobulin A nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Hiki, Y; Iwase, H; Kokubo, T; Horii, A; Tanaka, A; Nishikido, J; Hotta, K; Kobayashi, Y

    1996-06-01

    The O-glycans in Jacalin-binding immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) were released by gas-phase hydrazinolysis and were fractionated by gel filtration and reversed-phase HPLC. Four peaks (P1 to P4) were obtained. There was a significant shift from Peak 2 (monosialylated Gal beta 1-3GalNAc) to Peak 4 (asialo-Gal beta 1-3GalNAc) in the IgA-nephropathy group compared with the negative control group (P < 0.05). One of the functions of the carbohydrate side chains is to stabilize the three-dimensional structure of the glycopeptides. In order to evaluate the stability of the Jacalin-binding IgA1 molecule, the increase in turbidity as a consequence of the increase of the aggregated IgA1 level under the condition of high temperature (63 degrees C) was observed. The increase in the turbidity was significantly higher in the IgA nephropathy group compared with the negative control group (21.7 vs. 5.9% at 150 min, P < 0.02). From a sample of IgA1 solution that had originated from a pooled normal serum, heat-tolerant (nonaggregated) and intolerant (aggregated) IgA1 molecules were separated by gel filtration. The heat-intolerant IgA1 had lower amounts of sialic acid (27.4 micrograms/mg IgA1) than the tolerant IgA1 (37.6 micrograms/mg IgA1). Further, the analysis of the O-glycans released from another IgA1 sample by the hydrazinolysis revealed that the ratio of the asialo-Gal beta 1-3GalNAc/total Gal beta 1-3GalNAc in the heat-in-tolerant IgA1 (27.2%) was increased compared with that in the heat-tolerant IgA1 (18.2%). From these results, it was suggested that unusual glycosylation on the hinge region of Jacalin-binding IgA1 induced an insufficient conformational stiffness to the hinge peptide, resulting in the aggregation of the IgA1 molecule in IgA nephropathy.

  1. Diffusion Limited Aggregation: Algorithm optimization revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, F. L.; Ribeiro, M. S.

    2011-08-01

    The Diffusion Limited Aggregation (DLA) model developed by Witten and Sander in 1978 is useful in modeling a large class of growth phenomena with local dependence. Besides its simplicity this aggregation model has a complex behavior that can be observed at the patterns generated. We propose on this work a brief review of some important proprieties of this model and present an algorithm to simulate a DLA aggregates that simpler and efficient compared to others found in the literature.

  2. Microbial aggregates in anaerobic wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Kosaric, N; Blaszczyk, R

    1990-01-01

    The phenomenon aggregation of anaerobic bacteria gives an opportunity to speed up the digestion rate during methanogenesis. The aggregates are mainly composed of methanogenic bacteria which convert acetate and H2/CO2 into methane. Other bacteria are also included in the aggregates but their concentration is rather small. The aggregates may also be formed during acetogenesis or even hydrolysis but such aggregates are not stable and disrupt quickly when not fed. A two stage process seems to be suitable when high concentrated solid waste must be treated. Special conditions are necessary to promote aggregate formation from methanogenic bacteria but aggregates once formed are stable without feeding even for a few years. The structure, texture and activity of bacterial aggregates depend on several parameters: (1)--temperature and pH, (2)--wastewater composition and (3)--hydrodynamic conditions within the reactor. The common influence of all these parameters is still rather unknown but some recommendations may be given. Temperature and pH should be maintained in the range which is optimal for methanogenic bacteria e.g. a temperature between 32 and 50 degrees C and a value pH between 6.5 and 7.5. Wastewaters should contain soluble wastes and the specific loading rate should be around one kgCOD(kgVSS)-1 d-1. The concentration of the elements influences aggregate composition and probably structure and texture. At high calcium concentration a change in the colour of the granules has been observed. Research is necessary to investigate the influence of other elements and organic toxicants on maintenance of the aggregates. Hydrodynamic conditions seem to influence the stability of the granules over long time periods. At low liquid stream rates, aggregates may starve and lysis within the aggregates is possible which results in hollowing of aggregates and their floating. At high liquid stream rates the aggregates may be disrupted and washed out of the reactor as a flocculent

  3. Neuronal aggregates: formation, clearance and spreading

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Junghyun; Yue, Zhenyu

    2015-01-01

    Summary Proteostasis is maintained by multiple cellular pathways, including protein synthesis, quality control and degradation. An imbalance of neuronal proteostasis, associated with protein misfolding and aggregation, leads to proteinopathies or neurodegeneration. While genetic variations and protein modifications contribute to aggregate formation, components of the proteostasis network dictate the fate of protein aggregates. Here we provide an overview of proteostasis pathways and their interplay (particularly autophagy) with the metabolism of disease-related proteins. We review recent studies on neuronal activity-mediated regulation of proteostasis and transcellular propagation of protein aggregates in the nervous system. Targeting proteostasis pathways therapeutically remains an attractive but challenging task. PMID:25710535

  4. Immunogenicity of therapeutic proteins: influence of aggregation.

    PubMed

    Ratanji, Kirsty D; Derrick, Jeremy P; Dearman, Rebecca J; Kimber, Ian

    2014-01-01

    The elicitation of anti-drug antibodies (ADA) against biotherapeutics can have detrimental effects on drug safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics. The immunogenicity of biotherapeutics is, therefore, an important issue. There is evidence that protein aggregation can result in enhanced immunogenicity; however, the precise immunological and biochemical mechanisms responsible are poorly defined. In the context of biotherapeutic drug development and safety assessment, understanding the mechanisms underlying aggregate immunogenicity is of considerable interest. This review provides an overview of the phenomenon of protein aggregation, the production of unwanted aggregates during bioprocessing, and how the immune response to aggregated protein differs from that provoked by non-aggregated protein. Of particular interest is the nature of the interaction of aggregates with the immune system and how subsequent ADA responses are induced. Pathways considered here include 'classical' activation of the immune system involving antigen presenting cells and, alternatively, the breakdown of B-cell tolerance. Additionally, methods available to screen for aggregation and immunogenicity will be described. With an increased understanding of aggregation-enhanced immune responses, it may be possible to develop improved manufacturing and screening processes to avoid, or at least reduce, the problems associated with ADA.

  5. Bouncing behavior of microscopic dust aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seizinger, A.; Kley, W.

    2013-03-01

    Context. Bouncing collisions of dust aggregates within the protoplanetary disk may have a significant impact on the growth process of planetesimals. Yet, the conditions that result in bouncing are not very well understood. Existing simulations studying the bouncing behavior used aggregates with an artificial, very regular internal structure. Aims: Here, we study the bouncing behavior of sub-mm dust aggregates that are constructed applying different sample preparation methods. We analyze how the internal structure of the aggregate alters the collisional outcome and we determine the influence of aggregate size, porosity, collision velocity, and impact parameter. Methods: We use molecular dynamics simulations where the individual aggregates are treated as spheres that are made up of several hundred thousand individual monomers. The simulations are run on graphic cards (GPUs). Results: Statistical bulk properties and thus bouncing behavior of sub-mm dust aggregates depend heavily on the preparation method. In particular, there is no unique relation between the average volume filling factor and the coordination number of the aggregate. Realistic aggregates bounce only if their volume filling factor exceeds 0.5 and collision velocities are below 0.1 ms-1. Conclusions: For dust particles in the protoplanetary nebula we suggest that the bouncing barrier may not be such a strong handicap in the growth phase of dust agglomerates, at least in the size range of ≈100 μm.

  6. Aggregate Remote Memory Copy Interface

    2006-02-23

    The purpose of the Aggregate Remote Memory Copy (ARMCI) library is to provide a general- purpose, efficient, and Widely portable remote memory access (RMA) operations (one-sided communication) optimized for Contiguous and noncontiguous (strided, scatter/gather, I/O vector) data transfers. In addition, ARMCI includes a set of atomic and mutual exclusion operations. The development ARMCI is driven by the need to support the global-addres space communication model in context of distributed regular or irregular distributed data structures,more » communication libraries, and compilers. ARMCI is a standalone system that could be used to support user-level libraries and applications that use MPI or PVM.« less

  7. Swarms: Optimum aggregations of spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, H. L.

    1980-01-01

    Swarms are aggregations of spacecraft or elements of a space system which are cooperative in function, but physically isolated or only loosely connected. For some missions the swarm configuration may be optimum compared to a group of completely independent spacecraft or a complex rigidly integrated spacecraft or space platform. General features of swarms are induced by considering an ensemble of 26 swarms, examples ranging from Earth centered swarms for commercial application to swarms for exploring minor planets. A concept for a low altitude swarm as a substitute for a space platform is proposed and a preliminary design studied. The salient design feature is the web of tethers holding the 30 km swarm in a rigid two dimensional array in the orbital plane. A mathematical discussion and tutorial in tether technology and in some aspects of the distribution of services (mass, energy, and information to swarm elements) are included.

  8. Morphological classification of nanoceramic aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosta, Giovanni F.; Kang, Bongwoo; Ospina, Carolina; Sung, Changmo

    2005-01-01

    Aluminum silicate nanoaggregates grown at near-room temperature on an organic template under a variety of experimental conditions have been imaged by transmission electron microscopy. Images have been automatically classified by an algorithm based on "spectrum enhancement", multivariate statistics and supervised optimization. Spectrum enhancement consists of subtracting, in the log scale, a known function of wavenumber from the angle averaged power spectral density of the image. Enhanced spectra of each image, after polynomial interpolation, have been regarded as morphological descriptors and as such submitted to principal components analysis nested with a multiobjective parameter optimization algorithm. The latter has maximized pairwise discrimination between classes of materials. The role of the organic template and of a reaction parameter on aggregate morphology has been assessed at two magnification scales. Classification results have also been related to crystal structure data derived from selected area electron diffraction patterns.

  9. Collisional Aggregation Due to Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumir, Alain; Wilkinson, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Collisions between particles suspended in a fluid play an important role in many physical processes. As an example, collisions of microscopic water droplets in clouds are a necessary step in the production of macroscopic raindrops. Collisions of dust grains are also conjectured to be important for planet formation in the gas surrounding young stars and to play a role in the dynamics of sand storms. In these processes, collisions are favored by fast turbulent motions. Here we review recent advances in the understanding of collisional aggregation due to turbulence. We discuss the role of fractal clustering of particles and caustic singularities of their velocities. We also discuss limitations of the Smoluchowski equation for modeling such processes. These advances lead to a semiquantitative understanding on the influence of turbulence on collision rates and point to deficiencies in the current understanding of rainfall and planet formation.

  10. Emerin expression in tubular aggregates.

    PubMed

    Manta, Panagiota; Terzis, Gerasimos; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Kontou, Chrysanthi; Vassilopoulos, Demetris

    2004-06-01

    Emerin is an inner nuclear membrane protein that is mutated or not expressed in patients with X-linked Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (X-EDMD/EMD). Cytoplasmic localization of emerin in cultured cells or tissues has been reported, although this remains a controversial issue. Tubular aggregates (TAs) are pathological structures seen in the sarcoplasm of human skeletal muscle fibers in various disorders. The TAs derive from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and represent, probably, an adaptive response of the SR to various insults to the muscle fibers. In the present study, we present immunohistochemical evidence of emerin expression in TAs. Muscle biopsies with tubular aggregates from four male, unrelated patients were studied. The percentage of muscle fibers containing TAs varied between 5 and 20%. Routine histochemistry revealed intense reaction of TAs with NADH-TR, AMPDA, and NSE, but not with COX, SDH, myosin ATPase (pH 9.4, 4.3, 4.6), PAS, and Oil red O staining. Immunohistochemical study revealed strong immunostaining of TAs with antibodies against emerin and 7 SERCA2-ATPase. Immunostaining of TAs was also seen with antibodies against heat shock protein and dysferlin, but not with antibodies to lamin A, dystrophin, adhalin, beta, gamma, delta sarcoglycans, and merosin. These results suggest that emerin, an inner nuclear membrane protein, is present at the TAs. The interpretation and significance of this finding is discussed in relation to experimental data suggesting that normal emerin localization at the inner nuclear membrane depends on lamin A and mutations in the N-terminal domain of emerin cause mislocalization of the protein to the sarcoplasmic membranes.

  11. Detergent-mediated protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Neale, Chris; Ghanei, Hamed; Holyoake, John; Bishop, Russell E.; Privé, Gilbert G.; Pomès, Régis

    2016-01-01

    Because detergents are commonly used to solvate membrane proteins for structural evaluation, much attention has been devoted to assessing the conformational bias imparted by detergent micelles in comparison to the native environment of the lipid bilayer. Here, we conduct six 500-ns simulations of a system with >600,000 atoms to investigate the spontaneous self assembly of dodecylphosphocholine detergent around multiple molecules of the integral membrane protein PagP. This detergent formed equatorial micelles in which acyl chains surround the protein’s hydrophobic belt, confirming existing models of the detergent solvation of membrane proteins. In addition, unexpectedly, the extracellular and periplasmic apical surfaces of PagP interacted with the headgroups of detergents in other micelles 85 and 60% of the time, respectively, forming complexes that were stable for hundreds of nanoseconds. In some cases, an apical surface of one molecule of PagP interacted with an equatorial micelle surrounding another molecule of PagP. In other cases, the apical surfaces of two molecules of PagP simultaneously bound a neat detergent micelle. In these ways, detergents mediated the non-specific aggregation of folded PagP. These simulation results are consistent with dynamic light scattering experiments, which show that, at detergent concentrations ≥600 mM, PagP induces the formation of large scattering species that are likely to contain many copies of the PagP protein. Together, these simulation and experimental results point to a potentially generic mechanism of detergent-mediated protein aggregation. PMID:23466535

  12. Monoclonal antibodies to snakehead, Channa striata immunoglobulins: detection and quantification of immunoglobulin-positive cells in blood and lymphoid organs.

    PubMed

    Sood, Neeraj; Chaudhary, Dharmendra K; Rathore, Gaurav; Singh, Akhilesh; Lakra, W S

    2011-02-01

    Snakehead Channa striata is an important freshwater food fish in many Southeast Asian countries. Three monoclonal antibodies (C9, C10 and D10) were developed against purified serum immunoglobulins of Channa striata (Cs-Ig) and characterized. C9 and D10 MAbs were specific to heavy chain, while C10 MAb detected only unreduced Cs-Ig in western blotting. In competitive ELISA, C9 and C10 MAbs were specific to C. striata Ig and showed no cross reactivity with serum Ig of other fish species i.e. Channa punctatus, Channa marulius, Clarias batrachus and Labeo rohita. D10 MAb showed reactivity to serum Ig of C. striata and C. marulius. In FACS analysis of gated lymphocytes, the percentage of Ig+ cells detected by C9 MAb was 18.2%, 27.7% and 10.3% in blood, spleen and kidney, respectively (n=3, body weight 500-600 g). However, only a few cells (0.5%) were found to be Ig+ in thymus (n=5). C9 MAb was also successfully employed to demonstrate Ig+ cells in blood smears and formalin fixed sections of spleen and kidney. These findings suggest that the spleen plays an important role in humoral immunity as compared to head kidney. Further, these MAbs can be useful immunological tool in monitoring health status of cultured C. striata.

  13. Persistence of immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M antibodies after postnatal rubella infection determined by solid-phase radioimmunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    Meurman, O H

    1978-01-01

    The appearance and persistence of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antibodies in postnatal rubella infections were studied by employing a solid-phase radioimmunoassay test. Altogether, 222 serial serum specimens from 51 patients with acute rubella infection were tested. Both IgG and IgM antibodies developed rapidly and appeared in all patients within 4 days after the onset of rash. In some patients, the IgM antibodies clearly preceded the IgG antibodies; however, the reverse situation was also noticed in a few cases. The IgG antibodies showed only minor changes after 8 to 10 days from the onset of rash. The IgM titers also reached a maximum level at approximately 8 to 10 days after the onset of rash, after which time a rapid decrease was normally seen. The mean half-life of IgM antibodies after 15 days from the onset of rash was 4.5 days, giving for IgM antibodies persistence times from 43 to approximately 80 days. Two patients with a prolonged IgM antibody response were detected. One of these patients had bilateral arthritis of the knee as a complication, whereas in the other patient no complication caused by rubella virus was detected. The IgM antibody response and its value in diagnosis are discussed. PMID:624770

  14. Intra-uterine infection and cord immunoglobulin M II. Clinical analysis of infants with elevated cord serum immunoglobulin M *

    PubMed Central

    Finkel, Annette; Dent, P. B.; Emrich, W. H.; Gent, M.; Rahim, M. A.

    1974-01-01

    Cord blood immunoglobulin M was measured in 3474 consecutive newborn infants. A group of 147 infants with elevated IgM values (≥19.0 mg./100 ml.) were compared with 92 unselected newborn infants with normal IgM values. One infant with clinically unsuspected congenital rubella was detected in the study group while no cases of intra-uterine infection were found among the controls. A greater proportion of mothers in the study group had a history of viral infection. The study group also contained a larger number of mothers who might be considered to be at greater risk of infection with agents known to cause intra-uterine disease. Follow-up studies at 6 months of age revealed no differences between the two groups aside from an increased incidence of minor motor abnormalities in the study group. While it is recognized that infants with cord blood IgM levels truly in excess of 30 mg./100 ml. may represent a high-risk group with respect to proved or subclinical intra-uterine infection, it is concluded that routine cord blood screening for elevated IgM values is not a high-yield procedure for the detection of intra-uterine infection in our population. PMID:4203457

  15. Binding analysis of carbon nanoparticles to human immunoglobulin G: Elucidation of the cytotoxicity of CNPs and perturbation of immunoglobulin conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengrui; Yang, Haitao; Ji, Xiaohui; Wang, Qin

    2016-02-01

    The chemical compositions, sizes and fluorescent properties of synthesized carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) were characterized. Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells were used as a model to study the cytotoxicity of CNPs, and the results of the cellular uptake of CNPs yielded excellent results: the CNPs demonstrated good biocompatibility and were non-toxic to the growth of the E. coli cells. Moreover, to assess the potential toxicity of CNPs to human health, the binding behavior of CNPs with human immunoglobulin G (HIgG) was examined by fluorescence quenching spectroscopy, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy under physiological conditions. The fluorescence quenching constants and parameters for the interaction at different temperatures had been calculated according to Scatchard. The thermodynamic parameters, such as enthalpy change (ΔH), entropy change (ΔS) and free energy change (ΔG), were calculated, and the results indicated strong static quenching and showed that van der Waals forces, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions were the predominant intermolecular forces stabilizing the CNP-HIgG complex. Synchronous fluorescence and circular dichroism spectra provided information regarding the conformational alteration of HIgG in the presence of CNPs. These findings help to characterize the interactions between CNPs and HIgG, which may clarify the potential risks and undesirable health effects of CNPs, as well as the related cellular trafficking and systemic translocation.

  16. Monoclonal antibodies to snakehead, Channa striata immunoglobulins: detection and quantification of immunoglobulin-positive cells in blood and lymphoid organs.

    PubMed

    Sood, Neeraj; Chaudhary, Dharmendra K; Rathore, Gaurav; Singh, Akhilesh; Lakra, W S

    2011-02-01

    Snakehead Channa striata is an important freshwater food fish in many Southeast Asian countries. Three monoclonal antibodies (C9, C10 and D10) were developed against purified serum immunoglobulins of Channa striata (Cs-Ig) and characterized. C9 and D10 MAbs were specific to heavy chain, while C10 MAb detected only unreduced Cs-Ig in western blotting. In competitive ELISA, C9 and C10 MAbs were specific to C. striata Ig and showed no cross reactivity with serum Ig of other fish species i.e. Channa punctatus, Channa marulius, Clarias batrachus and Labeo rohita. D10 MAb showed reactivity to serum Ig of C. striata and C. marulius. In FACS analysis of gated lymphocytes, the percentage of Ig+ cells detected by C9 MAb was 18.2%, 27.7% and 10.3% in blood, spleen and kidney, respectively (n=3, body weight 500-600 g). However, only a few cells (0.5%) were found to be Ig+ in thymus (n=5). C9 MAb was also successfully employed to demonstrate Ig+ cells in blood smears and formalin fixed sections of spleen and kidney. These findings suggest that the spleen plays an important role in humoral immunity as compared to head kidney. Further, these MAbs can be useful immunological tool in monitoring health status of cultured C. striata. PMID:21167285

  17. Immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G responses in BALB/c mice to conjugated outer membrane extracts of four Salmonella serotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Kudrna, D A; Teresa, G W; Arnzen, J M; Beard, K S

    1985-01-01

    Outer membranes (OMs) of Salmonella enteritidis, S. anatum, S. typhimurium, and S. infantis were extracted and cross-linked with glutaraldehyde to form a large macromolecular antigen. The antigen consisted of OM proteins and lipopolysaccharide and was designated 4-OMP-LPS. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of extracted OMs from each serotype revealed differences in protein profiles. S. enteritidis and S. infantis possessed a greater variety of proteins than did S. anatum and S. typhimurium. Immunizations with 4-OMP-LPS in phosphate-buffered saline (4-OMP-LPS-C) and 4-OMP-LPS emulsified with muramyl dipeptide in the oil phase of a hexadecane-water emulsion (4-OMP-LPS-MDP) revealed that BALB/c mice were capable of eliciting specific primary and secondary immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG responses. Both antigen preparations were capable of eliciting IgM and IgG specific for the cell surfaces of each live Salmonella serotype. Also, 4-OMP-LPS-MDP and 4-OMP-LPS-C were capable of evoking a substantial anamnestic response. Adsorption studies revealed that the combined serotypes had the antigenic capacity to adsorb up to 94% of the antibodies, but 4-OMP-LPS-MDP antibodies were more effectively adsorbed than were 4-OMP-LPS-C antibodies. Adsorption of pooled antiserum with heterologous bacteria yielded a variety of adsorption profiles. PMID:4030094

  18. Il-1β and prostaglandin E2 attenuate the hypercapnic as well as the hypoxic respiratory response via prostaglandin E receptor type 3 in neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Siljehav, Veronica; Shvarev, Yuri; Herlenius, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) serves as a critical mediator of hypoxia, infection, and apnea in term and preterm babies. We hypothesized that the prostaglandin E receptor type 3 (EP3R) is the receptor responsible for PGE2-induced apneas. Plethysmographic recordings revealed that IL-1β (ip) attenuated the hypercapnic response in C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) but not in neonatal (P9) EP3R(-/-) mice (P < 0.05). The hypercapnic responses in brain stem spinal cord en bloc preparations also differed depending on EP3R expression whereby the response was attenuated in EP3R(-/-) preparations (P < 0.05). After severe hypoxic exposure in vivo, IL-1β prolonged time to autoresuscitation in WT but not in EP3R(-/-) mice. Moreover, during severe hypoxic stress EP3R(-/-) mice had an increased gasping duration (P < 0.01) as well as number of gasps (P < 0.01), irrespective of intraperitoneal treatment, compared with WT mice. Furthermore, EP3R(-/-) mice exhibited longer hyperpneic breathing efforts when exposed to severe hypoxia (P < 0.01). This was then followed by a longer period of secondary apnea before autoresuscitation occurred in EP3R(-/-) mice (P < 0.05). In vitro, EP3R(-/-) brain stem spinal cord preparations had a prolonged respiratory burst activity during severe hypoxia accompanied by a prolonged neuronal arrest during recovery in oxygenated medium (P < 0.05). In conclusion, PGE2 exerts its effects on respiration via EP3R activation that attenuates the respiratory response to hypercapnia as well as severe hypoxia. Modulation of the EP3R may serve as a potential therapeutic target for treatment of inflammatory and hypoxic-induced detrimental apneas and respiratory disorders in neonates.

  19. Variability of total and free IgE levels and IgE receptor expression in allergic subjects in and out of pollen season.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, M; Thorell, L; Sjölander, A; Larsson-Faria, S

    2015-04-01

    The inter- and intra-individual variability and seasonal variation of IgE, and high (FcεRI)- and low-affinity (CD23) IgE receptor expression in blood of seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR) subjects, is not well studied. Thirty-two otherwise healthy subjects with a history of SAR to birch pollen and a positive skin prick test to birch pollen were sampled three times out of the pollen season and three times during the pollen season. FcεRI and CD23 expressions were analysed using flow cytometry. Total IgE was analysed using ImmunoCAP(®) and free IgE was analysed with a novel customised research assay using an IgG-FcεRI-chimera protein coupled to ImmunoCAP as capture reagent, ImmunoCAP-specific IgE conjugate and ImmunoCAP IgE calibrators. The performance of the free IgE assay was compared well with the reference ImmunoCAP total IgE assay. The working range of the assay was 0.35-200 kU/l IgE. FcεRI expression on basophils and CD23 expression on B cells showed low intrasubject variability both in and out of the pollen season (<10% CV). There was a small seasonal difference with lower total IgE levels (120 versus 128 kU/l; P = 0.004) and FcεRI expression (283 versus 325 mean fluorescence intensity (MFI); P < 0.001) during the pollen season. IgE, FcεRI expression and CD23 expression fulfilled biomarker and assay requirements of variability, and allergen exposure affected the biomarkers only to a minor degree. The free IgE assay may be used for measurement of free IgE levels in patients after anti-IgE antibody treatment. PMID:25620574

  20. Expression of the very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDL-r), an apolipoprotein-E receptor, in the central nervous system and in Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, R.H.; Chung, Haeyong; Rebeck, G.W.; Hyman, B.T.

    1996-04-01

    The very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDL-r) is a cell-surface molecule specialized for the internalization of multiple diverse ligands, including apolipoprotein E (apoE)-containing lipoprotein particles, via clathrin-coated pits. Its structure is similar to the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-r), although the two have substantially different systemic distributions and regulatory pathways. The present work examines the distribution of VLDL-r in the central nervous system (CNS) and in relation to senile plaques in Alzheimer disease (AD). VLDL-r is present on resting and activated microglia, particularly those associated with senile plaques (SPs). VLDL-r immunoreactivity is also found in cortical neurons. Two exons of VLDL-r mRNA are differentially spliced in the mature receptor mRNA. One set of splice forms gives rise to receptors containing (or lacking) an extracellular O-linked glycosylation domain near the transmembrane portion of the molecule. The other set of splice forms appears to be brain-specific, and is responsible for the presence or absence of one of the cysteine-rich repeat regions in the binding region of the molecule. Ratios of the receptor variants generated from these splice forms do not differ substantially across different cortical areas or in AD. We hypothesize that VLDL-r might contribute to metabolism of apoE and apoE/A{beta} complexes in the brain. Further characterization of apoE receptors in Alzheimer brain may help lay the groundwork for understanding the role of apoE in the CNS and in the pathophysiology of AD. 43 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Siderophore-mediated iron uptake in Alcaligenes eutrophus CH34 and identification of aleB encoding the ferric iron-alcaligin E receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Gilis, A; Khan, M A; Cornelis, P; Meyer, J M; Mergeay, M; van der Lelie, D

    1996-01-01

    Siderophore production in response to iron limitation was observed in Alcaligenes eutrophus CH34, and the corresponding siderophore was named alcaligin E. Alcaligin E was characterized as a phenolate-type siderophore containing neither catecholate nor hydroxamate groups. Alcaligin E promoted the growth of siderophore-deficient A. eutrophus mutants under iron-restricted conditions and promoted 59Fe uptake by iron-limited cells. However, the growth of the Sid- mutant AE1152, which was obtained from CH34 by Tn5-Tc mutagenesis, was completely inhibited by the addition of alcaligin E. AE1152 also showed strongly reduced 59Fe uptake in the presence of alcaligin E. This indicates that a gene, designated aleB, which is involved in transport of ferric iron-alcaligin E across the membrane is inactivated. The aleB gene was cloned, and its putative amino acid sequence showed strong similarity to those of ferric iron-siderophore receptor proteins. Both wild-type strain CH34 and aleB mutant AE1152 were able to use the same heterologous siderophores, indicating that AleB is involved only in ferric iron-alcaligin E uptake. Interestingly, no utilization of pyochelin, which is also a phenolate-type siderophore, was observed for A. eutrophus CH34. Genetic studies of different Sid- mutants, obtained after transposon mutagenesis, showed that the genes involved in alcaligin E and ferric iron-alcaligin E receptor biosynthesis are clustered in a 20-kb region on the A. eutrophus CH34 chromosome in the proximity of the cys-232 locus. PMID:8808942

  2. The N-terminal strand modulates immunoglobulin light chain fibrillogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pozo-Yauner, Luis del; Wall, Jonathan S.; González Andrade, Martín; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Rodríguez-Ambriz, Sandra L.; Pérez Carreón, Julio I.; and others

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •We evaluated the impact of mutations in the N-terminal strand of 6aJL2 protein. •Mutations destabilized the protein in a position-dependent manner. •Destabilizing mutations accelerated the fibrillogenesis by shortening the lag time. •The effect on the kinetic of fibril elongation by seeding was of different nature. •The N-terminal strand is buried in the fibrillar state of 6aJL2 protein. -- Abstract: It has been suggested that the N-terminal strand of the light chain variable domain (V{sub L}) protects the molecule from aggregation by hindering spurious intermolecular contacts. We evaluated the impact of mutations in the N-terminal strand on the thermodynamic stability and kinetic of fibrillogenesis of the V{sub L} protein 6aJL2. Mutations in this strand destabilized the protein in a position-dependent manner, accelerating the fibrillogenesis by shortening the lag time; an effect that correlated with the extent of destabilization. In contrast, the effect on the kinetics of fibril elongation, as assessed in seeding experiments was of different nature, as it was not directly dependant on the degree of destabilization. This finding suggests different factors drive the nucleation-dependent and elongation phases of light chain fibrillogenesis. Finally, taking advantage of the dependence of the Trp fluorescence upon environment, four single Trp substitutions were made in the N-terminal strand, and changes in solvent exposure during aggregation were evaluated by acrylamide-quenching. The results suggest that the N-terminal strand is buried in the fibrillar state of 6aJL2 protein. This finding suggest a possible explanation for the modulating effect exerted by the mutations in this strand on the aggregation behavior of 6aJL2 protein.

  3. The mechanisms of action of intravenous immunoglobulin and polyclonal anti-d immunoglobulin in the amelioration of immune thrombocytopenic purpura: what do we really know?

    PubMed

    Crow, Andrew R; Lazarus, Alan H

    2008-04-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) has been used for more than 25 years to treat an ever-increasing number of autoimmune diseases including immune thrombocytopenic purpura. Although the exact mechanism of action of IVIg has remained elusive, many theories have been postulated, including mononuclear phagocytic system blockade/inhibition, autoantibody neutralization by anti-idiotype antibodies, pathogenic autoantibody clearance due to competitive inhibition of the neonatal immunoglobulin Fc receptor, cytokine modulation, complement neutralization, and immune complex formation leading to dendritic cell priming. Polyclonal anti-D immunoglobulin is a polyclonal IVIg product enriched for antibodies directed to the RhD antigen on red blood cells and that has also been successfully used to treat immune thrombocytopenia in RhD(+) patients. The primary theory to explain polyclonal anti-D immunoglobulin function has classically been mononuclear phagocytic system blockade, although modulation of Fcgamma receptor expression and/or immunomodulation may also play a role. Work using a murine model of immune thrombocytopenic purpura to further our understanding of the mechanism of action of these 2 therapeutic agents is a focus of this article.

  4. Immunogenic and antigenic epitopes of immunoglobulins I. Cross-reactivity of murine monoclonal antibodies to human IgG with the immunoglobulins of certain animal species.

    PubMed Central

    Jefferis, R; Lowe, J; Ling, N R; Porter, P; Senior, S

    1982-01-01

    Antibody-producing hybridoma clones have been isolated following immunization of mice with human IgG. Twenty-five monoclonal antibodies (nine anti-C gamma 3, fourteen anti-C gamma 2, one anit-kappa and one anti-lambda) were selected for study of their cross-reactivity with the IgG of fifteen mammalian species and chicken immunoglobulin. Each antibody exhibited a unique reaction profile suggesting that human IgG expresses a very large repertoire of immunogenic epitopes. Whilst some antibodies showed a very restricted cross-reactivity profile for others a very wide reactivity profile was observed-including two clones producing autoantibodies. Antibodies demonstrating cross-reactivity between human Fc gamma and 7S chicken immunoglobulin allow its definitive assignment as a homologue of human IgG. Four clones demonstrated specificity for bovine IgG subclass gamma 1 and gamma 2 and the degree of reactivity allows their application to qualitative and quantitative assay systems. These studies suggest new perspectives for the characterization of immunoglobulins and the standardization of anti-immunoglobulin reagents. PMID:6173313

  5. Weak protein interactions and pH- and temperature-dependent aggregation of human Fc1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haixia; Truncali, Kristopher; Ritchie, Julie; Kroe-Barrett, Rachel; Singh, Sanjaya; Robinson, Anne S; Roberts, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    The Fc (fragment crystallizable) is a common structural region in immunoglobulin gamma (IgG) proteins, IgG-based multi-specific platforms, and Fc-fusion platform technologies. Changes in conformational stability, protein-protein interactions, and aggregation of NS0-produced human Fc1 were quantified experimentally as a function of pH (4 to 6) and temperature (30 to 77°C), using a combination of differential scanning calorimetry, laser light scattering, size-exclusion chromatography, and capillary electrophoresis. The Fc1 was O-glycosylated at position 3 (threonine), and confirmed to correspond to the intact IgG1 by comparison with Fc1 produced by cleavage of the parent IgG1. Changing the pH caused large effects for thermal unfolding transitions, but it caused surprisingly smaller effects for electrostatic protein-protein interactions. The aggregation behavior was qualitatively similar across different solution conditions, with soluble dimers and larger oligomers formed in most cases. Aggregation rates spanned approximately 5 orders of magnitude and could be divided into 2 regimes: (i) Arrhenius, unfolding-limited aggregation at temperatures near or above the midpoint-unfolding temperature of the CH2 domain; (ii) a non-Arrhenius regime at lower temperatures, presumably as a result of the temperature dependence of the unfolding enthalpy for the CH2 domain. The non-Arrhenius regime was most pronounced for lower temperatures. Together with the weak protein-protein repulsions, these highlight challenges that are expected for maintaining long-term stability of biotechnology products that are based on human Fc constructs. PMID:26267255

  6. Flow Partitioning in Fully Saturated Soil Aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaofan; Richmond, Marshall C.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Perkins, William A.; Resat, Haluk

    2014-03-30

    Microbes play an important role in facilitating organic matter decomposition in soils, which is a major component of the global carbon cycle. Microbial dynamics are intimately coupled to environmental transport processes, which control access to labile organic matter and other nutrients that are needed for the growth and maintenance of microorganisms. Transport of soluble nutrients in the soil system is arguably most strongly impacted by preferential flow pathways in the soil. Since the physical structure of soils can be characterized as being formed from constituent micro aggregates which contain internal porosity, one pressing question is the partitioning of the flow among the “inter-aggregate” and “intra-aggregate” pores and how this may impact overall solute transport within heterogeneous soil structures. The answer to this question is particularly important in evaluating assumptions to be used in developing upscaled simulations based on highly-resolved mechanistic models. We constructed a number of diverse multi-aggregate structures with different packing ratios by stacking micro-aggregates containing internal pores and varying the size and shape of inter-aggregate pore spacing between them. We then performed pore-scale flow simulations using computational fluid dynamics methods to determine the flow patterns in these aggregate-of-aggregates structures and computed the partitioning of the flow through intra- and inter-aggregate pores as a function of the spacing between the aggregates. The results of these numerical experiments demonstrate that soluble nutrients are largely transported via flows through inter-aggregate pores. Although this result is consistent with intuition, we have also been able to quantify the relative flow capacity of the two domains under various conditions. For example, in our simulations, the flow capacity through the aggregates (intra-aggregate flow) was less than 2% of the total flow when the spacing between the aggregates

  7. Acetal phosphatidic acids: novel platelet aggregating agents.

    PubMed

    Brammer, J P; Maguire, M H; Walaszek, E J; Wiley, R A

    1983-05-01

    1 Palmitaldehyde, olealdehyde and linolealdehyde acetal phosphatidic acids induced rapid shape change and dose-dependent biphasic aggregation of human platelets in platelet-rich plasma; aggregation was reversible at low doses and irreversible at high doses of the acetal phosphatidic acids. The palmitaldehyde congener elicited monophasic dose-dependent aggregation of sheep platelets in platelet-rich plasma.2 The threshold concentration for palmitaldehyde acetal phosphatidic acid (PGAP)-induced platelet aggregation was 2.5-5 muM for human platelets and 0.25-0.5 muM for sheep platelets. PGAP was 4-5 times as potent versus human platelets as the olealdehyde and linolealdehyde acetal phosphatidic acids, which were equipotent.3 PGAP-induced irreversible aggregation of [(14)C]-5-hydroxytryptamine ([(14)C]-5-HT)-labelled human platelets in platelet-rich plasma was accompanied by release of 44.0+/-2.4% (s.e.) of the platelet [(14)C]-5-HT; reversible aggregation was not associated with release. In contrast, PGAP-induced release of [(14)C]-5-HT-labelled sheep platelets was dose-dependent.4 The adenosine diphosphate (ADP) antagonist, 2-methylthio-AMP, and the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, aspirin, abolished PGAP-induced second phase aggregation and release in human platelets but did not affect the first, reversible, phase of aggregation. Both the first and second phases of PGAP-induced aggregation were abolished by chlorpromazine, by the phospholipase A(2) inhibitor, mepacrine, and by nmolar concentrations of prostaglandin E(1) (PGE(1)); these agents abolished the second, but not the first phase of ADP-induced aggregation.5 The related phospholipids, lecithin, lysolecithin and phosphatidic acid, at <100 muM, neither induced aggregation of human platelets in platelet-rich plasma, nor modified PGAP-induced aggregation; 1-palmityl lysophosphatidic acid elicited aggregation of human platelets at a threshold concentration of 100 muM.6 It is concluded that the acetal phosphatidic acids

  8. Succession of Protists on Estuarine Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Wörner; Zimmerman-Timm; Kausch

    2000-08-01

    Colonization by and succession of bacteria and bacterivorous protists on laboratory-made aggregates were determined over a period of 14 days during winter and spring in 1997. Aggregates were generated from natural water from the limnetic zone of the Elbe Estuary using a tilting tube roller system. Within 1 h after the beginning of the experiments, macroaggregates started to form. Aggregates reached a maximum size of 1 mm with a tendency toward large sizes at the end of the experiment after the 10th day. On the first day, high bacterial densities of more than 10(9) cells ml(-1) were detected within the aggregates. The abundances of flagellates and ciliates within aggregates were also two or three orders of magnitude higher than in the surrounding water. Densities of aggregate associated organisms are comparable to those occuring in sediments. The first protistan colonizers on the aggregates were small heterotrophic flagellates, such as choanoflagellates and small euglenids. Later, beginning on the 4th day, small sarcodines and ciliates became abundant. The most abundant ciliates associated with aggregates were small species of the Hypotrichia, Cyrtophorida, and Hymenostomata. After 9 days, large omnivorous and carnivorous ciliates, such as large members of the Hypotrichia and the Pleurostomatida, occurred. In spring, large heterotrophic flagellates and amebae also appeared at this time. These findings indicated the existence of a succession of protists on newly formed aggregates and a microbial food net within the aggregates based on bacterial production. Additionally, most of the species observed during this study were adapted for living on surfaces. In natural environments they are more common in benthic than in pelagic environments. For them, aggregates are havens in the water column comparable to sediment communities.

  9. Preformed Seeds Modulate Native Insulin Aggregation Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Colina; Yang, Mu; Long, Fei; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2015-12-10

    Insulin aggregates under storage conditions via disulfide interchange reaction. It is also known to form aggregates at the site of repeated injections in diabetes patients, leading to injection amyloidosis. This has fueled research in pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry as well as in academia to understand factors that modulate insulin stability and aggregation. The main aim of this study is to understand the factors that modulate aggregation propensity of insulin under conditions close to physiological and measure effect of "seeds" on aggregation kinetics. We explored the aggregation kinetics of insulin at pH 7.2 and 37 °C in the presence of disulfide-reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT), using spectroscopy (UV-visible, fluorescence, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) and microscopy (scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy) techniques. We prepared insulin "seeds" by incubating disulfide-reduced insulin at pH 7.2 and 37 °C for varying lengths of time (10 min to 12 h). These seeds were added to the native protein and nucleation-dependent aggregation kinetics was measured. Aggregation kinetics was fastest in the presence of 10 min seeds suggesting they were nascent. Interestingly, intermediate seeds (30 min to 4 h incubation) resulted in formation of transient fibrils in 4 h that converted to amorphous aggregates upon longer incubation of 24 h. Overall, the results show that insulin under disulfide reducing conditions at pH and temperature close to physiological favors amorphous aggregate formation and seed "maturity" plays an important role in nucleation dependent aggregation kinetics.

  10. Optimisation of the detection of bacterial proteases using adsorbed immunoglobulins as universal substrates.

    PubMed

    Abuknesha, Ram A; Jeganathan, Fiona; Wildeboer, Dirk; Price, Robert G

    2010-06-15

    Bacterial proteases, Type XXIV from Bacillus licheniformens and Type XIV from Streptomyces griseus, were used to investigate the utility and optimisation of a solid phase assay for proteases, using immunoglobulin proteins as substrates. Immunoglobulins IgA and IgG were adsorbed on to surfaces of ELISA plates and exposed to various levels of the bacterial proteases which led to digestion and desorption of proportional amounts of the immunoglobulins. The assay signal was developed by measuring the remaining proteins on the polystyrene surface with appropriate enzyme-labelled anti-immunoglobulin reagents. The assay was fully optimised in terms of substrate levels employing ELISA techniques to titrate levels of adsorbed substrates and protease analytes. The critical factor which influences assay sensitivity was found to be the substrate concentration, the levels of adsorbed immunoglobulins. The estimated detection limits for protease XXIV and XIV were 10micro units/test and 9micro units/test using IgA as a substrate. EC(50) values were calculated as 213 and 48micro units/test for each protease respectively. Using IgG as a substrate, the estimated detection limits were 104micro units/test for protease XXIV and 9micro units/test for protease XIV. EC(50) values were calculated at 529micro units/test and 28micro units/test for protease XXIV and XIV respectively. The solid phase protease assay required no modification of the substrates and the adsorption step is merely simple addition of immunoglobulins to ELISA plates. Adsorption of the immunoglobulins to polystyrene enabled straightforward separation of reaction mixtures prior to development of assay signal. The assay exploits the advantages of the technical facilities of ELISA technology and commercially available reagents enabling the detection and measurement of a wide range of proteases. However, the key issue was found to be that in order to achieve the potential performance of the simple assay, optimisation of the

  11. Biotherapies in inflammatory ocular disorders: Interferons, immunoglobulins, monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Saadoun, D; Bodaghi, B; Bienvenu, B; Wechsler, B; Sene, D; Trad, S; Abad, S; Cacoub, P; Kodjikian, L; Sève, P

    2013-05-01

    Biotherapies used in clinical practice for the treatment of ophthalmologic manifestations of systemic diseases include interferons (IFN), intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) and monoclonal antibodies (anti-TNF, anakinra, tocilizumab and rituximab). Several open prospective studies have shown the effectiveness of IFN-α (78 to 98% complete remission) for the treatment of severe uveitis in Behcet's disease. IFN is capable of inducing prolonged remission and continued after his arrest, in 20-40% of patients. Side effects (flu-like, psychological effects) limit its use in practice. Anti-TNFα (infliximab and adalimumab) represents an attractive alternative therapeutic in severe uveitis refractory to immunosuppressants, especially in Behcet's disease. They are almost always (>90% of cases) and rapidly effective but their action is often suspensive. Anti-TNFα requires an extended prescription or takes over from another immunosuppressant once ocular inflammation has been controlled. IVIG are used for the treatment of Kawasaki disease and Birdshot disease. Several open or retrospective studies showed their effectiveness for the treatment of severe and refractory cicatricial pemphigoid. Tolerance of IVIG is good but their efficacy is transient. Rituximab showed an efficacy in few observations of various inflammatory eye diseases (uveitis, scleritis and idiopathic inflammatory pseudo-tumors or associated with granulomatosis with polyangiitis) and cicatricial pemphigoid. The risk of infection associated with this biotherapy limits its use in refractory diseases to conventional therapy. Anakinra (a soluble antagonist of IL-1R) showed interesting results in terms of efficiency in one small open study in Behcet's disease. Its safety profile is good and with a quick action that could be interesting for the treatment of severe uveitis.

  12. Immunoglobulin D Multiple Myeloma With Rapidly Progressing Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Modi, Jwalant; Kamal, Jeanne; Eter, Ahmad; El-Sayegh, Suzanne; El-Charabaty, Elie

    2015-08-01

    Immunoglobulin D (IgD) multiple myeloma (MM) is a very rare form of myeloma affecting less than 2% of all myeloma patients. It has a multiorgan involvement with renal failure being the key feature. We present here a case of IgD MM in a 62-year-old white male, smoker with past medical history of hypertension, who presented to emergency department with complaints of lower abdominal pain, constipation and decreased urination. Physical exam was unremarkable. Laboratory investigation showed S.Cr 5.99 mg/dL, hemoglobin 8.7 g/dL and corrected S.Ca 10.6 mg/dL. Urine dipstick showed 100 protein and TP/Cr ratio was 23. Serology was positive for serum free lambda chain level of 8,947.6 mg/L as well with free κ/λ ratio < 0.01. The results of serum and urine electrophoresis and immunofixation were also supportive of diagnosis of IgD MM. IgD level was remarkably elevated (27,300 mg/L) too. CT scan of abdomen/pelvis was negative for obstructive uropathy. Skeletal survey showed a solitary lytic lesion in the iliac crest. His kidney function deteriorated next day requiring hemodialysis. The bone marrow biopsy was positive for plasma cell hypercellularity (70-80%) and flow cytometry showed 8% monoclonal IgD lambda plasma cells. The patient was started on bortezomib and dexamethasone and he underwent bone marrow transplant 6 months later. He is doing well hematologically now but he remains dialysis-dependent. IgD MM is a very rare disease affecting younger population with poor prognosis; patients often end up on hemodialysis despite better control of the hematological component. PMID:26124916

  13. Glycosylation of Immunoglobulin G: Role of Genetic and Epigenetic Influences

    PubMed Central

    Mangino, Massimo; Bell, Jordana T.; Erte, Idil; Akmačić, Irena; Vučković, Frano; Pučić Baković, Maja; Gornik, Olga; McCarthy, Mark I.; Zoldoš, Vlatka; Spector, Tim D.; Lauc, Gordan; Valdes, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the extent to which genetic and epigenetic factors contribute to variations in glycosylation of immunoglobulin G (IgG) in humans. Methods 76  N-glycan traits in circulating IgG were analyzed by UPLC in 220 monozygotic and 310 dizygotic twin pairs from TwinsUK. A classical twin study design was used to derive the additive genetic, common and unique environmental components defining the variance in these traits. Epigenome-wide association analysis was performed using the Illumina 27k chip. Results 51 of the 76 glycan traits studied have an additive genetic component (heritability, h2)≥  0.5. In contrast, 12 glycan traits had a low genetic contribution (h2<0.35). We then tested for association between methylation levels and glycan levels (P<2 x10-6). Among glycan traits with low heritability probe cg08392591 maps to a CpG island 5’ from the ANKRD11 gene, a p53 activator on chromosome 16. Probe cg26991199 maps to the SRSF10 gene involved in regulation of RNA splicing and particularly in regulation of splicing of mRNA precursors upon heat shock. Among those with high heritability we found cg13782134 (mapping to the NRN1L gene) and cg16029957 mapping near the QPCT gene to be array-wide significant. The proportion of array-wide epigenetic associations was significantly larger (P<0.005) among glycans with low heritability (42%) than in those with high heritability (6.2%). Conclusions Glycome analyses might provide a useful integration of genetic and non-genetic factors to further our understanding of the role of glycosylation in both normal physiology and disease. PMID:24324808

  14. Rapid cloning of any rearranged mouse immunoglobulin variable genes

    SciTech Connect

    Dattamajumdar, A.K.; Jacobson, D.P.; Hood, L.E.; Osman, G.E.

    1996-12-31

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) have been the focus of extensive study for several decades and have become an important research area for immunologists and molecular biologists. The use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology has accelerated the cloning, sequencing, and characterization of genes of the immune system. However, cloning and sequencing the Ig variable (V) genes using the PCR technology has been a challenging task, primarily due to the very diverse nature of Ig V region genes. We have developed a simple, rapid, and reproducible PCR-based technique to clone any rearranged mouse Ig heavy or light chain genes. A close examination of all Ig heavy and light chain V gene families has resulted in the design of 5{prime} and 3{prime} universal primers from regions that are highly conserved across all heavy or light chain V gene families, and the joining or constant regions, respectively. We present our strategy for designing universal primers for Ig V gene families. These primers were able to rapidly amplify the rearranged Ig V genes, belonging to diverse Ig V gene families from very different cell lines, i.e., J558, MOPC-21, 36-60, and a chicken ovalbumin specific B-cell hybridoma. In addition, the present study provides the complete alignment of nucleotide sequences of all heavy and light chain variable gene families. This powerful method of cloning Ig V genes, therefore, allows rapid and precise analysis of B-cell hybridomas, B-cell repertoire, and B-cell ontogeny. 55 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Complement and immunoglobulin levels in athletes and sedentary controls.

    PubMed

    Nieman, D C; Tan, S A; Lee, J W; Berk, L S

    1989-04-01

    Eleven marathon runners (42.7 +/- 2.1 yrs, 54.2 +/- 1.8 ml.kg-1.min-1) and nine sedentary controls (44.2 +/- 1.2 yrs, 33.3 +/- 1.1 ml.kg-1.min-1) were studied during 30 min of rest, a graded maximal treadmill test using the Balke protocol, and 45 min of recovery to determine the effects of training and acute exercise on complement and immunoglobulin levels. Three baseline and five recovery blood samples were obtained in addition to repeated 5-min samples during exercise. Data for the exercise period were analyzed using a multiple regression approach to repeated measures ANOVA to allow comparison between groups on a percent VO2max basis. Groups did not differ during any of the three phases for IgG, IgA, or IgM. Resting levels of complement C3 (0.89 +/- 0.05 vs 1.27 +/- 0.10 g/L, P less than 0.001) and C4 (0.19 +/- 0.02 vs 0.29 +/- 0.03 g/L, P less than 0.001) were significantly lower in athletes than in controls. Exercise complement C3 [F(1,18) = 14.1, P = 0.001] and C4 [F(1,18) = 7.6, P = 0.013], and recovery complement [F(1,18) = 19.4, P less than 0.001] and C4 [F(1,18) = 13.5, P = 0.002] were also lower in the athletes than in sedentary controls. Acute increases during exercise were not associated with changes in catecholamines or cortisol. These data suggest that blood concentrations of C3 and C4, but not IgG, IgA, or IgM, are decreased during rest, graded maximal exercise, and recovery in marathon runners in comparison with sedentary controls.

  16. Oral Microbial Ecology and the Role of Salivary Immunoglobulin A

    PubMed Central

    Marcotte, Harold; Lavoie, Marc C.

    1998-01-01

    In the oral cavity, indigenous bacteria are often associated with two major oral diseases, caries and periodontal diseases. These diseases seem to appear following an inbalance in the oral resident microbiota, leading to the emergence of potentially pathogenic bacteria. To define the process involved in caries and periodontal diseases, it is necessary to understand the ecology of the oral cavity and to identify the factors responsible for the transition of the oral microbiota from a commensal to a pathogenic relationship with the host. The regulatory forces influencing the oral ecosystem can be divided into three major categories: host related, microbe related, and external factors. Among host factors, secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) constitutes the main specific immune defense mechanism in saliva and may play an important role in the homeostasis of the oral microbiota. Naturally occurring SIgA antibodies that are reactive against a variety of indigenous bacteria are detectable in saliva. These antibodies may control the oral microbiota by reducing the adherence of bacteria to the oral mucosa and teeth. It is thought that protection against bacterial etiologic agents of caries and periodontal diseases could be conferred by the induction of SIgA antibodies via the stimulation of the mucosal immune system. However, elucidation of the role of the SIgA immune system in controlling the oral indigenous microbiota is a prerequisite for the development of effective vaccines against these diseases. The role of SIgA antibodies in the acquisition and the regulation of the indigenous microbiota is still controversial. Our review discusses the importance of SIgA among the multiple factors that control the oral microbiota. It describes the oral ecosystems, the principal factors that may control the oral microbiota, a basic knowledge of the secretory immune system, the biological functions of SIgA, and, finally, experiments related to the role of SIgA in oral microbial ecology

  17. Epitope-specific tolerance induction with an engineered immunoglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Zambidis, E T; Scott, D W

    1996-01-01

    Isologous and heterologous immunoglobulins have been shown to be extremely effective as tolerogenic carriers for nearly 30 years. The efficacy of these proteins is due in part to their long half-life in vivo, as well as their ability to crosslink surface IgM with Fc receptors. The concept of using IgG as a carrier molecule to induce unresponsiveness in the adult immune system has been exploited for simple haptens, such as nucleosides, as well as for peptides. To further evaluate the in vivo potential of these molecules for inducing tolerance to a defined epitope, we have engineered a fusion protein of mouse IgG1 with the immunodominant epitope 12-26 from bacteriophage lambda cI repressor protein. This 15-mer, which contains both a B-cell and T-cell epitope, has been fused in-frame to the N terminus of a mouse heavy chain IgG1 construct, thus creating a "genetic hapten-carrier" system. We describe a novel in vitro and in vivo experimental system for studying the feasibility of engineered tolerogens, consisting of a recombinant flagellin challenge antigen and a murine IgG1 tolerogen, both expressing the lambda repressor epitope 12-26. Herein, we show that peptide-grafted IgG molecules injected i.v., or expressed by transfected, autologous B cells, can efficiently modulate the cellular and humoral immune responses to immunodominant epitopes. This model displays the feasibility of "tailor-designing" immune responses to whole antigens by selecting epitopes for either tolerance or immunity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 PMID:8643522

  18. Analysis of the immunoglobulin A protease gene of Streptococcus sanguis.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, J V; Plaut, A G; Wright, A

    1991-01-01

    The amino acid sequence T-P-P-T-P-S-P-S is tandemly duplicated in the heavy chain of human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1), the major antibody in secretions. The bacterial pathogen Streptococcus sanguis, a precursor to dental caries and a cause of bacterial endocarditis, yields IgA protease that cleaves only the Pro-Thr peptide bond in the left duplication, while the type 2 IgA proteases of the genital pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae and the respiratory pathogen Haemophilus influenzae cleave only the P-T bond in the right half. We have sequenced the entire S. sanguis iga gene cloned into Escherichia coli. A segment consisting of 20 amino acids tandemly repeated 10 times, of unknown function, occurs near the amino-terminal end of the enzyme encoded in E. coli. Identification of a predicted zinc-binding region in the S. sanguis enzyme and the demonstration that mutations in this region result in production of a catalytically inactive protein support the idea that the enzyme is a metalloprotease. The N. gonorrhoeae and H. influenzae enzymes were earlier shown to be serine-type proteases, while the Bacteroides melaninogenicus IgA protease was shown to be a cysteine-type enzyme. The streptococcal IgA protease amino acid sequence has no significant homology with either of the two previously determined IgA protease sequences, that of type 2 N. gonorrhoeae and type 1 H. influenzae. The differences in both structure and mechanism among these functionally analogous enzymes underscore their role in the infectious process and offer some prospect of therapeutic intervention. Images PMID:1987065

  19. Detection of Immunoglobulin Isotypes from Dried Blood Spots

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Nancy J; Mondal, Tapan Kumar; Preissler, Mark T.; Freed, Brian M.; Stockinger, Sabine; Bell, Erin; Druschel, Charlotte; Buck Louis, Germaine M.; Lawrence, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The study was designed to determine the sensitivity and reproducibility of recovering immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes (IgG subclasses, IgA, IgE and IgM classes) from dried blood spots (DBS), a methodologic subcomponent of the Upstate KIDS Study. A multiplexed Luminex assay was used for IgG1/2/3/4, IgA and IgM analysis; an ELISA was used for IgE. Plasma samples from de-identified patients were used to compare the Luminex assay with nephelometry, which is routinely used to quantify IgA, IgG and IgM in clinical samples. The IgE ELISA was compared to an immunofluorescence assay. Prior to evaluation of punches from newborn dried blood spots (NDBSs), recoveries of Ig from punches of cord blood DBSs (CBDBSs) vs. plasma from the same cord bloods were compared. Although the recoveries of Ig from plasma and DBSs were not comparable, which could be due to cell lysates in the DBS samples, the analyses were reproducible. Additionally, the levels of IgA, IgG2, IgG4, and IgM recovered from CBDBSs positively correlated with those in plasma. The DBS data is a relative value since it is not equivalent to the plasma concentration. The majority of Ig concentrations recovered from 108 newborns of the Upstate KIDs Study were within the range of newborn plasma Ig levels with the exception of IgG3. The IgG4 values displayed the greatest variance with a wide range (0.01–319 mg/dl), whereas, IgG1 values had the narrowest range (85.2–960.4 mg/dl). PMID:24333851

  20. Biosynthesis of immunoglobulin A (IgA) and immunoglobulin M (IgM). Requirement for J chain and a disulphide-exchanging enzyme for polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Corte, E. Della; Parkhouse, R. M. E.

    1973-01-01

    Mouse myeloma cells secreting 19S IgM (immunoglobulin M) (MOPC 104E and TEPC 183) or monomer and polymer IgA (immunoglobulin A) (MOPC 315) were incubated with radioactive leucine and the intracellular and secreted immunoglobulins and immunoglobulin subunits were prepared by preparative sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation. Samples were reduced in the presence or absence of isolated J chain, passed over Sephadex G-25 and then incubated at 37°C for 30min with or without a source of disulphide-interchange enzyme. The extent of reassembly of reduced subunits was then evaluated by electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels. Provided that J chain and the disulphide-interchange enzyme were supplied, both IgM and IgA could be assembled from their respective subunits, obtained by reductive cleavage of polymeric forms. Under similar conditions, assembly of polymeric forms from intracellular or secreted 7S monomer subunits also occurred. Under these conditions polymerization was total, there being no residue of the monomeric form. Reassembly did not occur in the absence of either J chain or the enzyme. All of the J chain released from IgM by reductive cleavage was incorporated back into the reassembled polymer. The J chain is therefore likely to be an essential structural requirement for polymeric immunoglobulins. A variety of controls ruled out non-specific interactions, and further suggested that the amino acid sequence of polypeptide chains determines the specificity of polymerization. The fact that intracellular IgA and IgM monomer subunits known to be deficient in galactose and fucose can be completely polymerized suggests that the addition of carbohydrate does not control polymerization. ImagesFig. 7. PMID:4205352

  1. Impact of Particle Aggregation on Nanoparticle Reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassby, David

    2011-12-01

    The prevalence of nanoparticles in the environment is expected to grow in the coming years due to their increasing pervasiveness in consumer and industrial applications. Once released into the environment, nanoparticles encounter conditions of pH, salinity, UV light, and other solution conditions that may alter their surface characteristics and lead to aggregation. The unique properties that make nanoparticles desirable are a direct consequence of their size and increased surface area. Therefore, it is critical to recognize how aggregation alters the reactive properties of nanomaterials, if we wish to understand how these properties are going to behave once released into the environment. The size and structure of nanoparticle aggregates depend on surrounding conditions, including hydrodynamic ones. Depending on these conditions, aggregates can be large or small, tightly packed or loosely bound. Characterizing and measuring these changes to aggregate morphology is important to understanding the impact of aggregation on nanoparticle reactive properties. Examples of decreased reactivity due to aggregation include the case where tightly packed aggregates have fewer available surface sites compared to loosely packed ones; also, photocatalytic particles embedded in the center of large aggregates will experience less light when compared to particles embedded in small aggregates. However, aggregation also results in an increase in solid-solid interfaces between nanoparticles. This can result in increased energy transfer between neighboring particles, surface passivation, and altered surface tension. These phenomena can lead to an increase in reactivity. The goal of this thesis is to examine the impacts of aggregation on the reactivity of a select group of nanomaterials. Additionally, we examined how aggregation impacts the removal efficiency of fullerene nanoparticles using membrane filtration. The materials we selected to study include ZnS---a metal chalcogenide

  2. 24 CFR 58.32 - Project aggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... other activities and actions. (See 40 CFR 1508.25(a)). (2) Consider reasonable alternative courses of... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Project aggregation. 58.32 Section... Environmental Review Process: Documentation, Range of Activities, Project Aggregation and Classification §...

  3. 24 CFR 58.32 - Project aggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... other activities and actions. (See 40 CFR 1508.25(a)). (2) Consider reasonable alternative courses of... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Project aggregation. 58.32 Section... Environmental Review Process: Documentation, Range of Activities, Project Aggregation and Classification §...

  4. 48 CFR 514.270 - Aggregate awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aggregate awards. 514.270 Section 514.270 Federal Acquisition Regulations System GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES SEALED BIDDING Solicitation of Bids 514.270 Aggregate awards....

  5. Streaming instability of aggregating slime mold amoebae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Herbert; Reynolds, William

    1991-05-01

    We propose a new model of aggregation in the cellular slime mold D. Discoideum. Our approach couples the excitable signaling system to amoeba chemotaxis; the resultant system of equations is tractable to analytical and numerical approaches. Using our model, we derive the existence of a streaming instability for the concentric target aggregation pattern.

  6. 24 CFR 58.32 - Project aggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Environmental Review Process: Documentation, Range of Activities, Project Aggregation and Classification § 58.32... the total project must be listed and described by the responsible entity in the environmental review... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Project aggregation. 58.32...

  7. 24 CFR 58.32 - Project aggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Environmental Review Process: Documentation, Range of Activities, Project Aggregation and Classification § 58.32... the total project must be listed and described by the responsible entity in the environmental review... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Project aggregation. 58.32...

  8. Choosing Aggregation Rules for Composite Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munda, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    From a formal point of view, a composite indicator is an aggregate of all dimensions, objectives, individual indicators and variables used for its construction. This implies that what defines a composite indicator is the set of properties underlying its mathematical aggregation convention. In this article, I try to revise the theoretical debate on…

  9. Teaching Aggregate Demand and Supply Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Graeme

    2010-01-01

    The author analyzes the inflation-targeting model that underlies recent textbook expositions of the aggregate demand-aggregate supply approach used in introductory courses in macroeconomics. He shows how numerical simulations of a model with inflation inertia can be used as a tool to help students understand adjustments in response to demand and…

  10. 7 CFR 1.6 - Aggregating requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aggregating requests. 1.6 Section 1.6 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Official Records § 1.6 Aggregating requests. When an agency reasonably believes that a requester, or a group of requesters acting in...

  11. 42 CFR 411.106 - Aggregation rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aggregation rules. 411.106 Section 411.106 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM... Under Group Health Plans: General Provisions § 411.106 Aggregation rules. The following rules apply...

  12. 7 CFR 1.6 - Aggregating requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aggregating requests. 1.6 Section 1.6 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Official Records § 1.6 Aggregating requests. When an agency reasonably believes that a requester, or a group of requesters acting in...

  13. Biomass round bales infield aggregation logistic scenarios

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biomass bales often need to be aggregated (collected into groups and transported) to a field-edge stack for temporary storage for feedlots or processing facilities. Aggregating the bales with the least total distance involved is a goal of producers and bale handlers. Several logistics scenarios for ...

  14. Aggregate size distribution of the soil loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, Judit Alexandra; Jakab, Gergely; Szabó, Boglárka; Józsa, Sándor; Szalai, Zoltán; Centeri, Csaba

    2016-04-01

    In agricultural areas the soil erosion and soil loss estimation is vital information in long-term planning. During the initial period of the erosion a part of the soil particles and aggregates get transportable and nutrients and organic matter could be transported due to the effect of water or wind. This preliminary phase was studied with laboratory-scale rainfall simulator. Developed surface crust and aggregate size composition of the runoff was examined in six different slope-roughness-moisture content combination of a Cambisol and a Regosol. The ratio of micro- and macro aggregates in the runoff indicate the stability of the aggregates and determine the transport capacity of the runoff. Both soil samples were taken from field where the water erosion is a potential hazard. During the experiment the whole amount of runoff and sediment was collected through sieve series to a bucket to separate the micro- and macro aggregates. In case of both samples the micro aggregates dominate in the runoff and the runoff rates are similar. Although the runoff of the Regosol - with dominant >1000μm macro aggregate content - contained almost nothing but <50μm sized micro aggregates. Meanwhile the runoff of the Cambisol - with more balanced micro and macro aggregate content - contained dominantly 50-250μm sized micro aggregates and in some case remarkable ratio 250-1000μm sized macro aggregates. This difference occurred because the samples are resistant against drop erosion differently. In case of both sample the selectivity of the erosion and substance matrix redistribution manifested in mineral crusts in the surface where the quartz deposited in place while the lighter organic matter transported with the sediment. The detachment of the aggregates and the redistribution of the particles highly effect on the aggregate composition of the runoff which is connected with the quality of the soil loss. So while the estimation of soil loss quantity is more or less is easy, measuring

  15. Therapeutic Protein Aggregation: Mechanisms, Design, and Control

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    While it is well known that proteins are only marginally stable in their folded states, it is often less well appreciated that most proteins are inherently aggregation-prone in their unfolded or partially unfolded states, and the resulting aggregates can be extremely stable and long-lived. For therapeutic proteins, aggregates are a significant risk factor for deleterious immune responses in patients, and can form via a variety of mechanisms. Controlling aggregation using a mechanistic approach may allow improved design of therapeutic protein stability, as a complement to existing design strategies that target desired protein structures and function. Recent results highlight the importance of balancing protein environment with the inherent aggregation propensities of polypeptide chains. PMID:24908382

  16. CHARGING OF AGGREGATE GRAINS IN ASTROPHYSICAL ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Qianyu; Matthews, Lorin S.; Hyde, Truell W.; Land, Victor

    2013-02-15

    The charging of dust grains in astrophysical environments has been investigated with the assumption that these grains are homogeneous spheres. However, there is evidence which suggests that many grains in astrophysical environments are irregularly shaped aggregates. Recent studies have shown that aggregates acquire higher charge-to-mass ratios due to their complex structures, which in turn may alter their subsequent dynamics and evolution. In this paper, the charging of aggregates is examined including secondary electron emission and photoemission in addition to primary plasma currents. The results show that the equilibrium charge on aggregates can differ markedly from spherical grains with the same mass, but that the charge can be estimated for a given environment based on structural characteristics of the grain. The 'small particle effect' due to secondary electron emission is also important for de terming the charge of micron-sized aggregates consisting of nano-sized particles.

  17. Competitive aggregation dynamics using phase wave signals.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Maeyama, Satomi

    2014-10-21

    Coupled equations of the phase equation and the equation of cell concentration n are proposed for competitive aggregation dynamics of slime mold in two dimensions. Phase waves are used as tactic signals of aggregation in this model. Several aggregation clusters are formed initially, and target patterns appear around the localized aggregation clusters. Owing to the competition among target patterns, the number of the localized aggregation clusters decreases, and finally one dominant localized pattern survives. If the phase equation is replaced with the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation, several spiral patterns appear, and n is localized near the center of the spiral patterns. After the competition among spiral patterns, one dominant spiral survives. PMID:24956327

  18. Formation of Tethers from Spreading Cellular Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Beaune, Grégory; Winnik, Françoise M; Brochard-Wyart, Françoise

    2015-12-01

    Membrane tubes are commonly extruded from cells and vesicles when a point-like force is applied on the membrane. We report here the unexpected formation of membrane tubes from lymph node cancer prostate (LNCaP) cell aggregates in the absence of external applied forces. The spreading of LNCaP aggregates deposited on adhesive glass substrates coated with fibronectin is very limited because cell-cell adhesion is stronger than cell-substrate adhesion. Some cells on the aggregate periphery are very motile and try to escape from the aggregate, leading to the formation of membrane tubes. Tethered networks and exchange of cargos between cells were observed as well. Growth of the tubes is followed by either tube retraction or tube rupture. Hence, even very cohesive cells are successful in escaping aggregates, which may lead to epithelial mesenchymal transition and tumor metastasis. We interpret the dynamics of formation and retraction of tubes in the framework of membrane mechanics. PMID:26509898

  19. Imbibition kinetics of spherical colloidal aggregates.

    PubMed

    Debacker, A; Makarchuk, S; Lootens, D; Hébraud, P

    2014-07-11

    The imbibition kinetics of a millimeter-sized aggregate of 300 nm diameter colloidal particles by a wetting pure solvent is studied. Three successive regimes are observed. First, the imbibition proceeds by compressing the air inside the aggregate. Next, the solvent stops when the pressure of the compressed air is equal to the excess of capillary pressure at the meniscus of the wetting solvent in the porous aggregate. The interface is pinned and the aggregate slowly degases up to the point where the pressure of the entrapped air stops decreasing and is controlled by the capillary pressure. Finally, the imbibition starts again at a constant excess of pressure, smaller than the capillary pressure but larger than the one of the atmosphere. This last stage leads to the complete infiltration of the aggregate. PMID:25062241

  20. Therapeutic efficacy of intravenous immunoglobulin preparations depends on the immunoglobulin G dimers: studies in experimental immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Teeling, J L; Jansen-Hendriks, T; Kuijpers, T W; de Haas, M; van de Winkel, J G; Hack, C E; Bleeker, W K

    2001-08-15

    The clinical benefit of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) preparations in the treatment of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is supposed to be mediated by blockade of Fc gamma receptor--bearing phagocytes. In 2 experimental models for ITP, it is shown that the therapeutic efficacy of IVIG preparations is related to the IgG dimer content present in these preparations. A rat monoclonal antibody (mAb; MWReg30) directed to the murine platelet-specific integrin alpha(IIb)beta(3) (gpIIb/IIIa) was administered intraperitoneally either as bolus injection or continuous infusion. With bolus injection, the circulating platelet count dropped to almost zero within 3 hours. Pretreatment with cobra venom factor did not affect platelet depletion, whereas pretreatment with anti-Fc gamma RII/III mAb 2.4G2 or IVIG greatly reduced platelet clearance. With continuous infusion, platelet numbers reached a steady state after 4 days, at approximately 25% of control. This reduction in platelets was, however, not observed in mice deficient for the FcR gamma-chain, lacking Fc gamma RI, Fc gamma RIII, and Fc gamma RIII(-/-) mice. Infusion of a single dose of IVIG with a high IgG dimer content on the 4th day--ie, mimicking therapeutic administration--resulted in a platelet increase for several days. IVIG predominantly consisting of monomeric IgG had no effect on platelet numbers. In conclusion, continuous infusion of MWReg30 induces thrombocytopenia in mice by enhancing Fc gamma receptor--mediated clearance of platelets. In this model, it is shown that IgG dimers present in IVIG preparations are responsible for the increase in platelet counts. (Blood. 2001;98:1095-1099)

  1. Jacalin interaction with human immunoglobulin A1 and bovine immunoglobulin G1: affinity constant determined by piezoelectric biosensoring.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, Mariele M; Pesquero, Naira C; Thomaz, Sandra M O; Roque-Barreira, Maria C; Faria, Ronaldo C; Bueno, Paulo R

    2012-03-01

    The affinity of the D-galactose-binding lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus lectin, known as jacalin, with immonuglobulins (Igs) was determined by biofunctionalization of a piezoelectric transducer. This piezoelectric biofunctionalized transducer was used as a mass-sensitive analytical tool, allowing the real-time binding analysis of jacalin-human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA(1)) and jacalin-bovine IgG(1) interactions from which the apparent affinity constant was calculated. The strategy was centered in immobilizing jacalin on the gold electrode's surface of the piezoelectric crystal resonator using appropriate procedures based on self-assembling of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid and 2-mercaptoethanol thiol's mixture, a particular immobilization strategy by which it was possible to avoid cross-interaction between the proteins over electrode's surface. The apparent affinity constants obtained between jacalin-human IgA(1) and jacalin-bovine IgG(1) differed by 1 order of magnitude [(8.0 ± 0.9) 10(5) vs (8.3 ± 0.1) 10(6) L mol(-1)]. On the other hand, the difference found between human IgA(1) and human IgA(2) interaction with jacalin, eight times higher for IgA(1), was attributed to the presence of O-linked glycans in the IgA(1) hinge region, which is absent in IgA(2). Specific interaction of jacalin with O-glycans, proved to be present in the human IgA(1) and hypothetically present in bovine IgG(1) structures, is discussed as responsible for the obtained affinity values.

  2. Recombinant Immunoglobulin A Specific for Influenza A Virus Hemagglutinin: Production, Functional Analysis, and Formation of Secretory Immunoglobulin A

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Kentaro; Takahashi, Tadanobu; Kurohane, Kohta; Iwata, Koki; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Tsuruta, Shogo; Sugino, Takatomo; Miyake, Masaki; Suzuki, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Secretory immunoglobulin (Ig) A (SIgA), comprised of dimeric IgA and secretory component (SC), is believed to provide a defense mechanism on the mucosal surface. Influenza A virus (IAV) hemagglutinin (HA)-specific SIgA is thought to play an important role in the prevention of IAV infection. However, the topical application of preformed IAV-specific SIgA has not been shown to prevent IAV infection. This is due to the difficulty in the production of antigen-specific IgA monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and monoclonal SIgA. Here, a recombinant hybrid IgA (HIgA) was established that utilizes variable regions of an HA-specific mouse IgG mAb and the heavy chain constant region of a mouse IgA mAb. We expressed the dimeric HIgA in Chinese hamster ovary-K1 (CHO-K1) cells. When in vitro IAV infection of Madin–Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells was tested, 10 times lower concentrations of HIgA were able to inhibit it as compared with an HA-specific IgG with the same variable regions. A functional hybrid secretory IgA (HSIgA) was also produced through incubation of the dimeric HIgA with recombinant mouse SC in vitro. It was demonstrated that HSIgA could be separated from the dimeric HIgA on size exclusion chromatography. This study provides a basic strategy for investigating the role of SIgA upon IAV infection on the mucosal surface. PMID:25658886

  3. Irreversible aggregation of the Fc fragment derived from polymeric but not monomeric serum IgA1--implications in IgA-mediated disease.

    PubMed

    Almogren, Adel; Kerr, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    IgA is by far the most abundant immunoglobulin in humans. It is found in serum and in secretions (SIgA). Unlike any other class of immunoglobulin, each form of IgA occurs naturally in different polymerisation states. In serum, the predominant form of IgA is IgA1 of which around 90% is monomeric and 10% is dimeric or polymeric. The proportion of dimeric/polymeric IgA increases in a number of important diseases, such as IgA nephropathy and in chronic liver disease. In both, there is evidence that further aggregation of dimeric/polymeric IgA is the cause of the characteristic tissue deposition. To investigate the effect of role of IgA polymerisation on the structure and function of IgA, we purified different molecular forms of IgA1 from myeloma serum (monomer, dimer and trimer) and SIgA1 from colostrum. Structural features of these different IgA1 forms were examined following proteolysis using Neisseria gonorrhoeae IgA1 type 2 protease and Streptococcus pneumoniae IgA1 protease. These IgA1 proteases cleave IgA1 at the hinge region and produce Fcalpha and Fab fragments. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the Fcalpha fragments of serum dimeric and trimeric but not monomeric IgA1 aggregated to form multimers resistant to disruption in SDS-PAGE under non-reducing conditions. Size exclusion chromatography under native conditions of cleaved serum dimeric IgA1 demonstrated that aggregation occurs because of structural changes in the IgA per se and was not an effect of the SDS-PAGE system. In the same assay, SIgA1 (dimeric) did not aggregate after digestion. The results suggest an important, previously unrecognised, property of dimeric/polymeric serum IgA1, which might explain its propensity to aggregate and deposit in tissues.

  4. Amphibians have immunoglobulins similar to ancestral IgD and IgA from Amniotes.

    PubMed

    Estevez, Olivia; Garet, Elina; Olivieri, David; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    We studied the immunoglobulin genes from either the genomes or RNAs of amphibians. In particular, we obtained data from one frog genome (Nanorana parkeri) and three transcriptomes of the Caudata order (Andrias davidianus, Notophthalmus viridescens and Cynops pyrrhogaster). Apart from the immunoglobulins IgM and IgY previously described, we identified several IgD related immunoglobulins. The species N. parkeri, N. viridescens and C. pyrrhogaster have two IgD genes, while Andrias davidianus has three such genes. The three Caudata species have long IgD immunoglobulins similar to IgD of reptiles, and could be an ancient relic from the common ancestor of IgD of all mammals and reptiles. We also found two IgA isotypes. The results suggest that one of the IgA may be the ancestor of IgA in crocodiles and birds, while the other could be the ancestor IgA found in mammals. These results provide information that could help understand the evolution of immunoglobulins in terrestrial vertebrates.

  5. Scintigraphic detection of bone and joint infections with indium-111-labeled nonspecific polyclonal human immunoglobulin G

    SciTech Connect

    Oyen, W.J.; Claessens, R.A.; van Horn, J.R.; van der Meer, J.W.; Corstens, F.H. )

    1990-04-01

    The utility of indium-111-({sup 111}In) labeled immunoglobulin G (IgG) to detect infection of bone and adjacent tissues was investigated. Proof of infection was obtained by cultures taken at surgery. All 32 patients showed focally increased uptake on the technetium-99m- (99mTc) methylene diphosphonate (MDP) skeletal scintigraphies. Labeled immunoglobulin correctly identified presence, location, extent and soft-tissue involvement of the suspected inflammatory site. In these patients, focally increasing accumulation was noted over 48 hr. Discrimination between infection and sterile inflammatory lesions was not possible. Two fractures, 6-mo-old, and an aseptic loosening of a total-hip prosthesis were not visualized. Side effects after the immunoglobulin administration were not observed. Radiolabeled immunoglobulin is a new and safe radiopharmaceutical for the investigation of infectious bone and joint disease. The sensitivity of this agent appears at least as high as that of labeled leukocytes. However, labeled immunoglobulin can easily be prepared in every nuclear medicine department.

  6. Immunoglobulin A nephropathy in horseshoe kidney: case reports and literature review.

    PubMed

    Hu, Panpan; Jin, Meiling; Xie, Yuansheng; Chen, Pu; Zhang, Xueguang; Yin, Zhong; Cai, Guangyan; Chen, Xiangmei

    2014-10-01

    Horseshoe kidney is the most common congenital renal fusion anomaly. Immunoglobulin A nephropathy is a common glomerulonephritis worldwide. However, the co-occurrence of these diseases had not been reported in the literature. We report the first two cases with the occurrence of immunoglobulin A nephropathy in horseshoe kidney. The first case was a 26-year-old male with hypertension and proteinuria (1.4 g/24 h), his pathological finding was primary immunoglobulin A nephropathy. The second case was a 15-year-old female who presented with recurrent peliosis on bilateral lower extremities, haematuria and proteinuria (1.7 g/24 h). Her renal biopsy finding was Henoch-Schonlein purpura nephritis (secondary immunoglobulin A nephropathy). In both cases, renal biopsy was performed by experienced doctors under ultrasonic guidance at the renal upper pole and no postoperative complications were observed. After they were treated based on the renal pathological findings for 6 months, urine protein excretion decreased significantly and blood pressure and serum creatinine stabilized. It is possible that immunoglobulin A nephropathy occurs in a horseshoe kidney patient. Renal biopsy may be valuable and viable for horseshoe kidney patients with heavy proteinuria to identify pathologic type of glomerulopathy and to guide treatment, if renal biopsy is performed by experienced doctors at the renal upper pole under renal ultrasonic guidance.

  7. A preliminary analysis of the immunoglobulin genes in the African elephant (Loxodonta africana).

    PubMed

    Guo, Yongchen; Bao, Yonghua; Wang, Hui; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Zhao, Zhihui; Li, Ning; Zhao, Yaofeng

    2011-02-25

    The genomic organization of the IgH (Immunoglobulin heavy chain), Igκ (Immunoglobulin kappa chain), and Igλ (Immunoglobulin lambda chain) loci in the African elephant (Loxodonta africana) was annotated using available genome data. The elephant IgH locus on scaffold 57 spans over 2,974 kb, and consists of at least 112 V(H) gene segments, 87 D(H) gene segments (the largest number in mammals examined so far), six J(H) gene segments, a single μ, a δ remnant, and eight γ genes (α and ε genes are missing, most likely due to sequence gaps). The Igκ locus, found on three scaffolds (202, 50 and 86), contains a total of 153 V(κ) gene segments, three J(κ) segments, and a single C(κ) gene. Two different transcriptional orientations were determined for these V(κ) gene segments. In contrast, the Igλ locus on scaffold 68 includes 15 V(λ) gene segments, all with the same transcriptional polarity as the downstream J(λ)-C(λ) cluster. These data suggest that the elephant immunoglobulin gene repertoire is highly diverse and complex. Our results provide insights into the immunoglobulin genes in a placental mammal that is evolutionarily distant from humans, mice, and domestic animals.

  8. Transient hypogammaglobulinemia and severe atopic dermatitis: Open-label treatment with immunoglobulin in a case series

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Joanna H.; Roberts, Robert; Lim, Kellie J.; Stiehm, E. Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background: We reported on six infants between 5 and 11 months old, with transient hypogammaglobulinemia of infancy and severe refractory atopic dermatitis, who were treated with open-label immunoglobulin (Ig) after conventional therapy failed. All six infants had an IgG level of <225 mg/dL, elevated eosinophil and IgE levels, and no urine or stool protein losses, but they did exhibit hypoalbuminemia. Objective: To evaluate the utility of open-label immunoglobulin in infants with severe atopic dermatitis for whom conventional therapy failed. We reviewed the clinical utility of intravenous immunoglobulin in the treatment of severe atopic dermatitis, the most recent research in the field, and suggested mechanisms for its benefit. Methods: The six infants were identified from a retrospective chart review at the University of California Los Angeles Allergy and Immunology outpatient pediatric clinic. Results: All six patients were treated with 400 mg/kg/month of intravenous immunoglobulin and had normalization of their IgG and albumin levels, and all but one had clinically improved atopic dermatitis. Conclusion: Infants with severe atopic dermatitis who did not respond to conventional therapy avoidance may benefit from intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. PMID:27470901

  9. Reconsidering the mechanism of polyglutamine peptide aggregation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christine C; Walters, Robert H; Murphy, Regina M

    2007-11-01

    There are at least nine neurodegenerative diseases associated with proteins that contain an unusually expanded polyglutamine domain, the best known of which is Huntington's disease. In all of these diseases, the mutant protein aggregates into neuronal inclusions; it is generally, although not universally, believed that protein aggregation is an underlying cause of the observed neuronal degeneration. In an effort to examine the role of polyglutamine in facilitating protein aggregation, investigators have used synthetic polyglutamine peptides as model systems. Analysis of kinetic data led to the conclusions that aggregation follows a simple nucleation-elongation mechanism characterized by a significant lag time, during which the peptide is monomeric, and that the nucleus is a monomer in a thermodynamically unfavorable conformation [Chen, S. M., et al. (2002) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 11884-11889]. We re-examined this hypothesis by measuring the aggregation kinetics of the polyglutamine peptide K2Q23K2, using sedimentation, static and dynamic light scattering, and size exclusion chromatography. Our data show that during the lag time in sedimentation kinetics, there is substantial organization of the peptide into soluble linear aggregates. These aggregates have no regular secondary structure as measured by circular dichroism but have particle dimensions and morphologies similar to those of mature insoluble aggregates. The soluble aggregates constitute approximately 30% of the total peptide mass, form rapidly, and continue to grow over a period of hours to days, eventually precipitating. Once insoluble aggregates form, loss of monomer from the solution phase continues. Our data support an assembly mechanism for polyglutamine peptide more complex than that previously proposed.

  10. Classification and Characterization of Therapeutic Antibody Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Joubert, Marisa K.; Luo, Quanzhou; Nashed-Samuel, Yasser; Wypych, Jette; Narhi, Linda O.

    2011-01-01

    A host of diverse stress techniques was applied to a monoclonal antibody (IgG2) to yield protein particles with varying attributes and morphologies. Aggregated solutions were evaluated for percent aggregation, particle counts, size distribution, morphology, changes in secondary and tertiary structure, surface hydrophobicity, metal content, and reversibility. Chemical modifications were also identified in a separate report (Luo, Q., Joubert, M. K., Stevenson, R., Narhi, L. O., and Wypych, J. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 25134–25144). Aggregates were categorized into seven discrete classes, based on the traits described. Several additional molecules (from the IgG1 and IgG2 subtypes as well as intravenous IgG) were stressed and found to be defined with the same classification system. The mechanism of protein aggregation and the type of aggregate formed depends on the nature of the stress applied. Different IgG molecules appear to aggregate by a similar mechanism under the same applied stress. Aggregates created by harsh mechanical stress showed the largest number of subvisible particles, and the class generated by thermal stress displayed the largest number of visible particles. Most classes showed a disruption of the higher order structure, with the degree of disorder depending on the stress process. Particles in all classes (except thermal stress) were at least partially reversible upon dilution in pH 5 buffer. High copper content was detected in isolated metal-catalyzed aggregates, a stress previously shown to produce immunogenic aggregates. In conclusion, protein aggregates can be a very heterogeneous population, whose qualities are the result of the type of stress that was experienced. PMID:21454532

  11. Sans study of asphaltene aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Overfield, R.E.; Sheu, E.Y.; Sinha, S.K.; Liang, K.S. )

    1988-06-01

    The colloidal properties of asphaltenes have long been recognized from peculiarities in their solubility and colligative properties. A layered micellar model or asphaltenes was proposed by others in which a highly condensed alkyl aromatic formed the central part, and molecules of decreasingly aromatic character (resins) clustered around them. Numerous studies, based on a variety of techniques such as ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy indicated a particulate nature for asphaltenes with size 20-40 A diameter. Others have proposed a refined model based on x-ray diffraction and small angle scattering. In this model, interactions between flat sheets of condensed aromatic rings form the central ''crystallite'' part of a spherical particle with the outer part being comprised of the aliphatic positions of the same molecules. These particles are bunched together with some degree of entanglement into ''micelles''. Concentration and solvent dependent radii of gyration, ranging from 30-50 A were reported. The aggregation creates a good deal of uncertainty as to the true molecular size or weight of asphaltenes. Neutron scattering offers novel contrast relative to light scattering (refractive index) and x-ray scattering (electron density). This is because the scattering length of proton is negative, whereas that from deuterium and other nuclei such as C, S, O, and N are positive. Thus by replacing hydrogen with deuterium in either the solvent or the scatterer the contrast can be varied, and different parts of the molecule can be highlighted.

  12. Anisotropic diffusion-limited aggregation.

    PubMed

    Popescu, M N; Hentschel, H G E; Family, F

    2004-06-01

    Using stochastic conformal mappings, we study the effects of anisotropic perturbations on diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) in two dimensions. The harmonic measure of the growth probability for DLA can be conformally mapped onto a constant measure on a unit circle. Here we map m preferred directions for growth to a distribution on the unit circle, which is a periodic function with m peaks in [-pi,pi) such that the angular width sigma of the peak defines the "strength" of anisotropy kappa= sigma(-1) along any of the m chosen directions. The two parameters (m,kappa) map out a parameter space of perturbations that allows a continuous transition from DLA (for small enough kappa ) to m needlelike fingers as kappa--> infinity. We show that at fixed m the effective fractal dimension of the clusters D(m,kappa) obtained from mass-radius scaling decreases with increasing kappa from D(DLA) approximately 1.71 to a value bounded from below by D(min) = 3 / 2. Scaling arguments suggest a specific form for the dependence of the fractal dimension D(m,kappa) on kappa for large kappa which compares favorably with numerical results. PMID:15244564

  13. A Regulatable Switch Mediates Self Association in an Immunoglobulin Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese,M.; Eakin, C.; Wang, J.; Miranker, A.

    2008-01-01

    beta-2 microglobulin (beta2m) is a globular protein that self-associates into fibrillar amyloid deposits in patients undergoing hemodialysis therapy. Formation of these beta-sheet-rich assemblies is a fundamental property of polypeptides that can be triggered by diverse conditions. For beta2m, oligomerization into pre-amyloidogenic states occurs in specific response to coordination by Cu2+. Here we report the basis for this self-association at atomic resolution. Metal is not a direct participant in the molecular interface. Rather, binding results in distal alterations enabling the formation of two new surfaces. These interact to form a closed hexameric species. The origins of this include isomerization of a buried and conserved cis-proline previously implicated in the beta2m aggregation pathway. The consequences of this isomerization are evident and reveal a molecular basis for the conversion of this robust monomeric protein into an amyloid-competent state.

  14. [Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) as treatment for recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL)].

    PubMed

    Sapir, Tal; Carp, Howard; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2005-06-01

    Miscarriages are the most common complication in human pregnancies. Recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) could occur for several reasons, such as: immunological abnormalities of the pregnant women and chromosomal abnormalities of the embryo. There are several autoimmune characteristics for RPL, such as autoantibodies, and sometimes RPL are a symptom of an autoimmune disease. It is unclear whether the autoantibodies are the cause, the consequence or an artifact of the RPL. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is a preparation made of purified plasma of thousands of healthy donors. Currently, IVIG is provided as a treatment for several autoimmune diseases. There are reports on a beneficial effect of IVIG for women with RPL of unknown reason. Some reports indicate a beneficial effect of IVIG independent of aspirin, as well as in artificial fertilization. Nevertheless, the efficacy of IVIG has yet to be established. Perhaps a certain sub-group should be defined of women who suffer from RPL and have greater odds for successful IVIG treatment. A sub-group analysis showed that, in secondary RPL, IVIG is more successful when provided after embryo implantation, whereas, in primary RPL, IVIG is better when provided prior to conceiving. Apart from the miscarriage type (secondary or primary) other factors that might influence the IVIG-treatment success were found: the number of previous miscarriages, the age of the pregnant women and the way IVIG is administrated. The mechanisms of action of IVIG in RPL are multiple, complex and not fully understood. IVIG therapy regulates the immune system in several mechanisms, in a way that might increase the survival rate of the embryo in the uterus and might decrease the odds of a miscarriage. For example, one of the main mechanisms of IVIG in RPL is down-regulation of natural killer cells (NK cells) activity and expression. This finding is of great importance because it has been reported that women who have never given birth and have high levels

  15. Comparison and Characterization of Immunoglobulin G Subclasses among Primate Species

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Michael H.; Dark, Robyn D.; Chodosh, James; Kennedy, Ronald C.

    1999-01-01

    Little information is available on the immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclasses expressed in the sera of nonhuman primate species. To address this issue, we compared the IgG subclasses found in humans (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4) to those of nonhuman primates, such as baboons and macaques. Cross-reactive antihuman IgG subtype-specific reagents were identified and used to analyze purified IgG from sera by solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Protein A-purified human IgG obtained from sera was composed of IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4, whereas baboon and macaque IgG was composed of IgG1, IgG2, and IgG4. Protein G-purified human IgG was composed of IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4, whereas baboon and macaque IgG was composed of IgG1, IgG2, and IgG4. To test the possibility that baboon and macaque IgG3 is actually present, but is outcompeted for binding to proteins A and G by the other more abundant IgG subclasses, we repurified the IgG from sera that did not bind either protein A or protein G. We found a baboon IgG3 population in the sera that did not bind protein A, but bound protein G. No IgG3 subtype was detectable in macaque sera. These data suggest that baboon sera, like human sera, contain four IgG subtypes, whereas macaque sera exhibit only three of the human subclass analogs. In addition, the IgG subtype-specific reagents were shown to be useful in determining the IgG subclass distribution following vaccination of baboons with hepatitis B surface antigen. PMID:10548592

  16. A second immunoglobulin light chain isotype in the rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Partula, S; Schwager, J; Timmusk, S; Pilström, L; Charlemagne, J

    1996-01-01

    A novel immunoglobulin (Ig) light chain isotype, termed IgL2, has been isolated from trout lymphoid tissues both by reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and screening of cDNA libraries. The CL domain of the new isotype shares only 29% residues with a recently cloned trout IgL isotype, termed IgL1, which has some similarities to Ckappa and Clambda isotype domains of several vertebrate species. Using anchored PCR, a VL element rearranged to CL2 was isolated. It is a member of a new VL family (VL2) of which four members were sequenced. These differ in the sequence of CDR1 and CDR2 but are remarkably similar in CDR3, i. e., at the junction between VL and JL segments. VL elements are rearranged to novel JL elements which differ from those described for VL1-CL1 rearrangements. Two cDNA clones contained JL-CL2 segments but no VL segments. The JL segments were preceded by typical rearrangements signal sequences [RSS, nonamer-23 base pair (bp) spacer-heptamer]. Further upstream of RSS were located two to three near identical 53 bp repeats, each of which included a 16 bp sequence similar to KI and KII sequences located at similar places in human and mouse Jk1 genes. These sequences are believed to act as binding sites for the protein KLP, which could be a transcriptional factor involved in the synthesis of germline Jk transcripts. Their phylogenic conservation in vertebrates suggests that they have an important role in B-cell differentiation. Remarkably, an RNA species of about 0.7 kilobase is the predominant IgL mRNA in trout spleen and coincides in size with JLCL2 transcripts. Genomic DNA blot analysis indicates that the trout L2 locus has a cluster-like organization similar to the trout L1 locus and the IgL locus of several teleost fish. A phylogenic analysis of VL2 and CL2 corroborates their low similarity to other vertebrate IgL chains and suggests an ancient diversification of the IgL locus. PMID:8881036

  17. [Immunoglobulin genes encoding antibodies directed to oncodevelopmental carbohydrate antigens].

    PubMed

    Zenita, K; Yago, K; Fujimoto, E; Kannagi, R

    1990-07-01

    We investigated the immunoglobulin genes which encode the variable region of the monoclonal antibodies directed to the onco-developmental carbohydrate antigens such SSEA-1, fucosyl SSEA-1, SSEA-3 and SSEA-4. The VH region of these antibodies was preferentially encoded by the gene members of the X24, VH7183 and Q52 families, the families which are known to be located at the 3'-end region of the murine germ line VH gene. This result is interesting particularly when considering that the members of the 3'-end VH families are known to be preferentially expressed in embryonic B lymphocytes by an intrinsic genetic program. The comparative study of the nucleic acid sequences of mRNAs encoding these antibodies and the sequences of the corresponding germ line VH genes disclosed that the sequences encoding the antibodies contain no mutation from the germ line VH genes, or contain only a few somatic mutations, which are thought to be insignificant for the reactivity of the antibodies to the nominal antigens. These results imply that some of the embryonic B lymphocytes that express the unmutated germ line VH genes of the 3'-end families can be reactive with embryonic carbohydrate antigens, albeit rearranged with appropriate D-JH gene segments, and coupled with proper light chains. The VH region of the syngenic monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies directed to these anti-carbohydrate antibodies were also encoded preferentially by the members of the 3'-end VH families. We propose here that a part of the virgin embryonic B lymphocytes, which express the antibody encoded by the gene members of the 3'-end VH families at the cell surface, will be stimulated by the embryonic carbohydrate antigens which are abundantly present in the internal milieu of the embryo. The clonally expanded B lymphocytes, in turn, will facilitate the proliferation of other populations of embryonic B lymphocytes expressing the corresponding anti-idiotypic antibodies, which are also encoded by the gene members

  18. Can intra-aggregate pore structures affect the aggregate's effectiveness in protecting carbon?

    SciTech Connect

    Ananyeva, K; Wang, W; Smucker, A J.M.; Rivers, M L; Kravchenko, A N

    2012-11-15

    Aggregates are known to provide physical protection to soil organic matter shielding it from rapid decomposition. Spatial arrangement and size distribution of intra-aggregate pores play an important role in this process. This study examined relationships between intra-aggregate pores measured using X-ray computed micro-tomography images and concentrations of total C in 4–6 mm macro-aggregates from two contrasting land use and management practices, namely, conventionally tilled and managed row crop agricultural system (CT) and native succession vegetation converted from tilled agricultural land in 1989 (NS). Previous analyses of these aggregates indicated that small (<15 μm) and large (>100 μm) pores prevail in NS aggregates while medium (30–90 μm) pores are more abundant in CT aggregates (Kravchenko et al., 2011; Wang et al., 2012). We hypothesized that these differences in pore size distributions affect the ability of macro-aggregates to protect C. The results of this study supported this hypothesis. Consistent with greater heterogeneity of pore distributions within NS aggregates we observed higher total C and greater intra-aggregate C variability in NS as compared with CT aggregates. Total C concentrations and intra-aggregate C standard deviations were negatively correlated with fractions of medium sized pores, indicating that presence of such pores was associated with lower but more homogeneously distributed total C. While total C was positively correlated with presence of small and large pores. The results suggest that because of their pore structure NS macro-aggregates provide more effective physical protection to C than CT aggregates.

  19. Clinical usefulness of oral immunoglobulins in lung transplant recipients with norovirus gastroenteritis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Gairard-Dory, A-C; Dégot, T; Hirschi, S; Schuller, A; Leclercq, A; Renaud-Picard, B; Gourieux, B; Kessler, R

    2014-12-01

    Viral gastroenteritis causing diarrhea is a common complication observed in lung transplant recipients. Differently from the mild and typically self-limited disease seen in immunocompetent subjects, immunocompromised patients frequently have a more severe course. Norovirus and rotavirus are among the leading causes of severe gastroenteritis in transplant recipients. Specific treatment is unavailable, although good supportive treatment can significantly reduce morbidity. Previous studies have suggested that oral immunoglobulins may be used for the treatment of acute viral gastroenteritis after solid-organ transplantation. Herein, we conducted a retrospective chart review of 12 lung transplant recipients with norovirus-induced gastroenteritis who were treated with oral immunoglobulins for 2 days. Eleven patients were successfully treated, whereas 1 subject was only mildly improved. Four patients had at least 1 recurrence. No significant adverse effects were observed. We conclude that oral immunoglobulins may be clinically useful for lung transplant recipients with norovirus-induced gastroenteritis.

  20. Segmental myofiber necrosis in myotonic dystrophy - An immunoperoxidase study of immunoglobulins in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Silver, M. M.; Banerjee, D.; Hudson, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Because serum immunoglobulin G levels are low in patients with myotonic dystrophy, it was hypothesized that it might be catabolized within abnormal muscle fibers. Accordingly, immunohistochemical stains for immunoglobulins were performed on muscle sections derived at biopsy or autopsy from patients with myotonic dystrophy, other forms of muscular dystrophy, nondystrophic muscle disease, or normal muscle. Positive staining for immunoglobulins was found only in necrotic segments of myofibers (in 7 of 19 dystrophic and 6 of 27 nondystrophic subjects), and it is believed that the staining was due to nonspecific diffusion. However, staining reactions distinguished between incipient necrosis and artifactual contraction bands and allowed us to study segmental myofiber necrosis, comparing its frequency in the various muscle diseases. Segmental myofiber necrosis was present in 4 of 16 cases of myotonic dystrophy. The relevance of this finding to the clinical and morphologic features of myotonic dystrophy is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:6351629

  1. The use of immunoglobulin light chain assays in the diagnosis of paraprotein-related kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Punit; Leung, Nelson; Sanders, Paul W.; Cockwell, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Kidney involvement is common in paraprotein-related diseases. A diversity of clinical presentations and histopathological features can occur secondary to tissue injury caused by precipitation or deposition of a clonal immunoglobulin, usually an immunoglobulin light chain. The paraprotein is either produced by multiple myeloma or by a clone of B-cell lineage that does not fulfill diagnostic criteria for multiple myeloma. The recent introduction of serum immunoglobulin free light chain assays, which accurately quantify both light chain isotypes to produce a ratio that indicates the presence or absence of a light chain paraprotein, is a major clinical development. However, as the interpretation of the assay can be challenging, the aim of this review is to clarify the role of serum and urinary light chain assays in the screening and diagnosis of paraprotein-related kidney disease. PMID:25296094

  2. Effect of radiation and age on immunoglobulin levels in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, W. H.; Saphire, D. G.; Hackleman, S. M.; Braun, A. M.; Pennington, P.; Scheffler, J.; Wigle, J. C.; Cox, A. B.

    1994-01-01

    We report the results of a study on the immunoglobulin levels of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) in a colony consisting of the survivors of monkeys that received a single whole-body exposure to protons, electrons or X rays between 1964 and 1969. This colony has been maintained to assess the long-term effects of ionizing radiation on astronauts and high-flying pilots. Of the original 358 monkeys that were retained for lifetime studies, 129 (97 irradiated and 32 controls) were available for our study. We found no significant difference between the irradiated and control monkeys in mean levels of IgA, IgG and IgM, irrespective of the radiation treatment. The availability of these aged monkeys provided a unique opportunity to compare their immunoglobulin levels to those of other monkeys of various ages, and thus assess the effect of age on immunoglobulin levels. We found that only the IgA levels increase with age.

  3. Proteomic analysis of sera from common variable immunodeficiency patients undergoing replacement intravenous immunoglobulin therapy.

    PubMed

    Spadaro, Giuseppe; D'Orio, Concetta; Genovese, Arturo; Galeotafiore, Antonella; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Di Giovanni, Stefano; Vitale, Monica; Capasso, Mario; Lamberti, Vincenzo; Scaloni, Andrea; Marone, Gianni; Zambrano, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency is the most common form of symptomatic primary antibody failure in adults and children. Replacement immunoglobulin is the standard treatment of these patients. By using a differential proteomic approach based on 2D-DIGE, we examined serum samples from normal donors and from matched, naive, and immunoglobulin-treated patients. The results highlighted regulated expression of serum proteins in naive patients. Among the identified proteins, clusterin/ApoJ serum levels were lower in naive patients, compared to normal subjects. This finding was validated in a wider collection of samples from newly enrolled patients. The establishment of a cellular system, based on a human hepatocyte cell line HuH7, allowed to ascertain a potential role in the regulation of CLU gene expression by immunoglobulins.

  4. [Is intravenous immunoglobulin effective in toxic epidermal necrolysis and Stevens-Johnson syndrome?].

    PubMed

    Navajas, Lucas; Rada, Gabriel

    2014-10-17

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis and Stevens-Johnson syndrome are severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions. Intravenous immunoglobulin is described as a therapeutic option, however its use is still controversial. Using Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening over 20 databases, we identified six systematic reviews, including 39 primary studies. We combined the evidence using tables for summary of findings, following the GRADE approach, and concluded there is uncertainty about the effects of intravenous immunoglobulin because the certainty of the evidence is very low; it probably leads to important adverse effects; and has high cost. Intravenous immunoglobulin should not be used outside the context of a clinical trial, or only in cases where other treatments have failed and there are no resource constraints.

  5. Methylation patterns of immunoglobulin genes in lymphoid cells: correlation of expression and differentiation with undermethylation.

    PubMed

    Storb, U; Arp, B

    1983-11-01

    Different states of eukaryotic gene expression are often correlated with different levels of methylation of DNA sequences containing structural genes and their flanking regions. To assess the potential role of DNA methylation in the expression of immunoglobulin genes, which require complex rearrangements prior to expression, methylation patterns were examined in cell lines representing different stages of lymphocyte maturation. Methylation of the second cytosine in the sequence 5' C-C-G-G 3' was determined by using Hpa II/Msp I endonuclease digestion. Four CH genes (C mu, C delta, C gamma 2b, and C alpha), C kappa, V kappa, C lambda, and V lambda genes were analyzed. The results lead to the following conclusions: (i) transcribed immunoglobulin genes are undermethylated; (ii) the C gene allelic to an expressed C gene is always also undermethylated; and (iii) all immunoglobulin loci tend to become increasingly undermethylated as B cells mature.

  6. Somatic hypermutations in the immunoglobulin genes of two new human lymphoma lines of lymphatic follicle origin.

    PubMed

    Wu, H Y; Tuomikoski, T; Eray, M; Mattila, P; Knuutila, S; Kaartinen, M

    1994-03-01

    Variable immunoglobulin heavy-chain regions (VDJ) of two newly established human lymphoma cell lines (HF-1 and HF-4) were sequenced. The most homologous germline VH gene found for both the HF-1 and HF-4 sequences was VH26 of the VH3a (V gene) family (82% and 91% homologies, respectively). The JH region of the HF-4 heavy-chain sequence contained two nucleotide differences compared to the published germline JH3 gene. The DHJH region of the HF-1 gene had a record high number (20%) of somatic mutations. The numerous hypermutations found in the HF-1 cell line support the hypothesis that in some human follicular lymphomas, mutations continue to accumulate in immunoglobulin genes during the malignant growth. Follicular lymphoma cell lines, which have an active mutational machinery, in future may help to solve the molecular events behind the somatic hypermutations modifying immunoglobulin genes of B lymphocytes.

  7. Collision simulation of sintered dust aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirono, Sin-iti; Ueno, Haruta

    Collisional evolution of dust aggregates is the initial process of the planet formation. Sticking velocity, below which collisional sticking of an aggregate happens, is a crucial quantity in the collisional evolution. In the standard model of protoplanetary nebula, the maximum collisional velocity is around 50m/s. Therefore, if a planetesimal is formed through direct collisional sticking, the sticking velocity should be higher than 50m/s. Even if a planetesimal is formed by other mechanism such as anticyclonic vortices, substantial growth of an aggregate is required because the motion of an aggregate should be decoupled from that of gas. Collisional simulation of icy dust aggregates (Wada et al. 2009, ApJ 702, 1490) showed that the sticking velocity was larger than 50m/s and planetesimal formation by collisional sticking was possible. However, sintering of ice proceeds in a wide area of a protoplanetary nebula (Sirono 2011, ApJ 765, 50). Sintering enlarges a neck, connection between adjacent dust grains, and changes the mechanical properties of a dust aggregate. Here we performed collisional simulations between sintered dust aggregates taking account of sintering. We found that the sticking velocity was decreased substantially down to 20m/s. This result suggests that a planetesimal is not formed by direct collisional sticking and that the planetesimal formation proceeded in particular regions in a protoplanetary nebula.

  8. Efficient clustering aggregation based on data fragments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ou; Hu, Weiming; Maybank, Stephen J; Zhu, Mingliang; Li, Bing

    2012-06-01

    Clustering aggregation, known as clustering ensembles, has emerged as a powerful technique for combining different clustering results to obtain a single better clustering. Existing clustering aggregation algorithms are applied directly to data points, in what is referred to as the point-based approach. The algorithms are inefficient if the number of data points is large. We define an efficient approach for clustering aggregation based on data fragments. In this fragment-based approach, a data fragment is any subset of the data that is not split by any of the clustering results. To establish the theoretical bases of the proposed approach, we prove that clustering aggregation can be performed directly on data fragments under two widely used goodness measures for clustering aggregation taken from the literature. Three new clustering aggregation algorithms are described. The experimental results obtained using several public data sets show that the new algorithms have lower computational complexity than three well-known existing point-based clustering aggregation algorithms (Agglomerative, Furthest, and LocalSearch); nevertheless, the new algorithms do not sacrifice the accuracy. PMID:22334025

  9. Seasonal variability of soil aggregate stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohoskova, M.; Kodesova, R.; Jirku, V.; Zigova, A.; Kozak, J.

    2009-04-01

    Seasonal variability of soil properties measured in surface horizons of three soil types (Haplic Luvisol, Greyic Phaeozem, Haplic Cambisol) was studied in years 2007 and 2008. Undisturbed and disturbed soil samples were taken every month to evaluate field water content, bulk density, porosity, ration of gravitational and capillary pores, pHKCl and pHH2O, organic matter content and its quality, aggregate stability using WSA index. In addition, micromorphological features of soil aggregates were studied in thin soil sections that were made from undisturbed large soil aggregates. Results showed that soil aggregate stability depended on stage of the root zone development, soil management and climatic conditions. Larger aggregate stabilities and also larger ranges of measure values were obtained in the year 2007 then those measured in 2008. This was probably caused by lower precipitations and consequently lower soil water contents observed in 2007 than those measured in 2008. The highest aggregate stability was measured at the end of April in the years 2007 and 2008 in Haplic Luvisol and Greyic Phaeozem, and at the end of June in the year 2007 and at the beginning of June in 2008 in Haplic Cambisol. In all cases aggregate stability increased during the root growth and then gradually decreased due to summer rainfall events. Aggregate stability reflected aggregate structure and soil pore system development, which was documented on micromorphological images and evaluated using the ration of gravitational and capillary pores measured on the undisturbed sol samples. Acknowledgement: Authors acknowledge the financial support of the Grant Agency of the Czech Republic grant No. 526/08/0434, and the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports grant No. MSM 6046070901.

  10. Quarter variation and correlations of colostrum albumin, immunoglobulin G1 and G2 in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Samarütel, Jaak; Baumrucker, Craig R; Gross, Josef J; Dechow, Chad D; Bruckmaier, Rupert M

    2016-05-01

    A high variation in immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) concentration in first milked quarter colostrum has been reported, but BSA quarter colostrum variation is not known. The occurrence of serum albumin in milk has been attributed to increased blood-milk barrier penetration. Reports of serum albumin binding to the Fc Receptor of the neonate, the receptor thought to be responsible for IgG1 transcytosis, suggested that a correlation with the appearance of IgG1 in colostrum of dairy cows was likely. The objective of the study was to establish the quarter colostrum concentration and mass of immunoglobulins and serum albumin. First colostrum was quarter collected within 4 h of parturition from healthy udders of 31 multiparous dairy cows. Individual quarter colostrum weight was determined and a sample of each was frozen for subsequent analysis. Concentrations of immunoglobulin G1, G2, and BSA were measured by ELISA and total mass of components was calculated. In addition, colostrum was also analysed for L-lactate dehydrogenase activity. Analysis of concentration and mass of BSA, immunoglobulin G1, G2 established that the quarter variations were different by cow, quarter and quarter within cow. Partial correlations corrected for colostrum weight indicated that BSA and IgG2 concentration and mass are closely correlated while that of BSA and IgG1 concentration and mass exhibited no correlation suggesting that BSA and IgG1 may have different transport mechanisms. Interestingly, immunoglobulin G1 and G2 concentration and mass exhibited strong correlations suggesting that also some unknown mechanism of immunoglobulin G2 appearance in colostrum is occurring. Finally, no measured protein exhibited any correlation with the activity of lactate dehydrogenase in colostrum.

  11. Directional sensing and streaming in Dictyostelium aggregation.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Sofia; Dilão, Rui

    2016-05-01

    We merge the Kessler-Levine simple discrete model for Dictyostelium cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production and diffusion with the Dilão-Hauser directional sensing aggregation mechanism. The resulting compound model describes all the known transient patterns that emerge during Dictyostelium aggregation, which include the spontaneous formation of cAMP self-sustained target and spiral waves and streaming. We show that the streaming patterns depend on the speed of the amoebae, on the relaxation time for the production of cAMP, on the cAMP degradation rate, and on directional sensing. Moreover, we show that different signaling centers emerge during Dictyostelium aggregation. PMID:27300919

  12. Directional sensing and streaming in Dictyostelium aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Sofia; Dilão, Rui

    2016-05-01

    We merge the Kessler-Levine simple discrete model for Dictyostelium cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production and diffusion with the Dilão-Hauser directional sensing aggregation mechanism. The resulting compound model describes all the known transient patterns that emerge during Dictyostelium aggregation, which include the spontaneous formation of cAMP self-sustained target and spiral waves and streaming. We show that the streaming patterns depend on the speed of the amoebae, on the relaxation time for the production of cAMP, on the cAMP degradation rate, and on directional sensing. Moreover, we show that different signaling centers emerge during Dictyostelium aggregation.

  13. A look at construction aggregates production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willett, Jason Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Construction aggregates are defined as the combination of crushed stone and construction sand and gravel. Aggregates are one of the most accessible natural resources on Earth and one of the fundamental building blocks of our society. They have been used from the earliest times of our civilization for a variety of applications that have increased in number and complexity with time and technological progress. Despite the relatively low but increasing unit value of its basic products, the construction aggregates industry is a major contributor to and an indicator of the economic well-being of the nation.

  14. Reusing recycled aggregates in structural concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Shicong

    The utilization of recycled aggregates in concrete can minimize environmental impact and reduce the consumption of natural resources in concrete applications. The aim of this thesis is to provide a scientific basis for the possible use of recycled aggregates in structure concrete by conducting a comprehensive programme of laboratory study to gain a better understanding of the mechanical, microstructure and durability properties of concrete produced with recycled aggregates. The study also explored possible techniques to of improve the properties of recycled aggregate concrete that is produced with high percentages (≧ 50%) of recycled aggregates. These techniques included: (a) using lower water-to-cement ratios in the concrete mix design; (b) using fly ash as a cement replacement or as an additional mineral admixture in the concrete mixes, and (c) precasting recycled aggregate concrete with steam curing regimes. The characteristics of the recycled aggregates produced both from laboratory and a commercially operated pilot construction and demolition (C&D) waste recycling plant were first studied. A mix proportioning procedure was then established to produce six series of concrete mixtures using different percentages of recycled coarse aggregates with and without the use of fly ash. The water-to-cement (binder) ratios of 0.55, 0.50, 0.45 and 0.40 were used. The fresh properties (including slump and bleeding) of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) were then quantified. The effects of fly ash on the fresh and hardened properties of RAC were then studied and compared with those RAC prepared with no fly ash addition. Furthermore, the effects of steam curing on the hardened properties of RAC were investigated. For micro-structural properties, the interfacial transition zones of the aggregates and the mortar/cement paste were analyzed by SEM and EDX-mapping. Moreover, a detailed set of results on the fracture properties for RAC were obtained. Based on the experimental

  15. Exciton dynamics in perturbed vibronic molecular aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Brüning, C.; Wehner, J.; Hausner, J.; Wenzel, M.; Engel, V.

    2015-01-01

    A site specific perturbation of a photo-excited molecular aggregate can lead to a localization of excitonic energy. We investigate this localization dynamics for laser-prepared excited states. Changing the parameters of the electric field significantly influences the exciton localization which offers the possibility for a selective control of this process. This is demonstrated for aggregates possessing a single vibrational degree of freedom per monomer unit. It is shown that the effects identified for the molecular dimer can be generalized to larger aggregates with a high density of vibronic states. PMID:26798840

  16. Blood viscosity: influence of erythrocyte aggregation.

    PubMed

    Chien, S; Usami, S; Dellenback, R J; Gregersen, M I; Nanninga, L B; Guest, M M

    1967-08-18

    The addition of purified canine or bovine fibrinogen to suspensions of canine erythocytes in Ringer solution caused an increase in viscosity and the formation of aggregates of erythocytes. Both of these effects became increasingly pronounced as the fibrinogen concentration was raised, and they approached plateaus with 1 gram of fibrinogen per 100 milliliters. An increase in shear rate (or shear stress) reduced both the effect on viscosity and the aggregate size. The data suggest that fibrinogen causes an increase in blood viscosity and a departure from Newtonian behavior by interacting with erythrocytes to form cell aggregates which can be dispersed by shear stress. PMID:17842794

  17. Directional sensing and streaming in Dictyostelium aggregation.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Sofia; Dilão, Rui

    2016-05-01

    We merge the Kessler-Levine simple discrete model for Dictyostelium cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production and diffusion with the Dilão-Hauser directional sensing aggregation mechanism. The resulting compound model describes all the known transient patterns that emerge during Dictyostelium aggregation, which include the spontaneous formation of cAMP self-sustained target and spiral waves and streaming. We show that the streaming patterns depend on the speed of the amoebae, on the relaxation time for the production of cAMP, on the cAMP degradation rate, and on directional sensing. Moreover, we show that different signaling centers emerge during Dictyostelium aggregation.

  18. Aggregation of ice crystals in cirrus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kajikawa, Masahiro; Heymsfield, Andrew J.

    1989-01-01

    Results are given from analysis of the aggregation of thick plate, columnar, and bullet rosette ice crystals in cirrus. Data were obtained from PMS 2D-C images, oil coated slides, and aircraft meteorological measurements. Crystal size ranged from 100 to 900 microns in temperatures from -30 to -45 C. The results indicate that the ratio of the sizes of aggregating crystals and the difference of their terminal velocities are important in aggregation. The collection efficiency was calculated for the thick plate crystals from the same data.

  19. [The effect of blood serum polyreactive immunoglobulins on serum antibody affinity determination].

    PubMed

    Bobrovnik, S A; Demchenko, M A; Komisarenko, S V

    2010-01-01

    The presence of polyreactive immunoglobulins in sera may substantially influence on the accuracy of antibody affinity determination. In order to obtain precise values of antibody affinity one should apply one of two following ways. First, one should block polyreactive immunoglobulins with high concentration of Twin 20 and high concentration of any antigen which does not interact with studying antibody. After this antibody affinity may be determined by traditional methods. Another way is the application of the method suggested by us earlier, which allow determining affinity of two antibodies in a mixture and the relation of their concentrations.

  20. Mapping of Heavy Chain Genes for Mouse Immunoglobulins M and D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chih-Ping; Tucker, Philip W.; Mushinski, J. Frederic; Blattner, Frederick R.

    1980-09-01

    A single DNA fragment containing both μ and δ immunoglobulin heavy chain genes has been cloned from normal BALB/c mouse liver DNA with a new λ phage vector Charon 28. The physical distance between the membrane terminal exon of μ and the first domain of δ is 2466 base pairs, with δ on the 3' side of μ . A single transcript could contain a variable region and both μ and δ constant regions. The dual expression of immunoglobulins M and D on spleen B cells may be due to alternate splicing of this transcript.