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Sample records for aggregated suspension cultures

  1. A population balance equation model of aggregation dynamics in Taxus suspension cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Kolewe, Martin E; Roberts, Susan C; Henson, Michael A

    2012-02-01

    The nature of plant cells to grow as multicellular aggregates in suspension culture has profound effects on bioprocess performance. Recent advances in the measurement of plant cell aggregate size allow for routine process monitoring of this property. We have exploited this capability to develop a conceptual model to describe changes in the aggregate size distribution that are observed over the course of a Taxus cell suspension batch culture. We utilized the population balance equation framework to describe plant cell aggregates as a particulate system, accounting for the relevant phenomenological processes underlying aggregation, such as growth and breakage. We compared model predictions to experimental data to select appropriate kernel functions, and found that larger aggregates had a higher breakage rate, biomass was partitioned asymmetrically following a breakage event, and aggregates grew exponentially. Our model was then validated against several datasets with different initial aggregate size distributions and was able to quantitatively predict changes in total biomass and mean aggregate size, as well as actual size distributions. We proposed a breakage mechanism where a fraction of biomass was lost upon each breakage event, and demonstrated that even though smaller aggregates have been shown to produce more paclitaxel, an optimum breakage rate was predicted for maximum paclitaxel accumulation. We believe this is the first model to use a segregated, corpuscular approach to describe changes in the size distribution of plant cell aggregates, and represents an important first step in the design of rational strategies to control aggregation and optimize process performance.

  2. Aggregate formation and suspension culture of human pluripotent stem cells and differentiated progeny.

    PubMed

    Hookway, Tracy A; Butts, Jessica C; Lee, Emily; Tang, Hengli; McDevitt, Todd C

    2016-05-15

    Culture of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) as in vitro multicellular aggregates has been increasingly used as a method to model early embryonic development. Three-dimensional assemblies of hPSCs facilitate interactions between cells and their microenvironment to promote morphogenesis, analogous to the multicellular organization that accompanies embryogenesis. In this paper, we describe a method for reproducibly generating and maintaining populations of homogeneous three-dimensional hPSC aggregates using forced aggregation and rotary orbital suspension culture. We propose solutions to several challenges associated with the consistent formation and extended culture of cell spheroids generated from hPSCs and their differentiated progeny. Further, we provide examples to demonstrate how aggregation can be used as a tool to select specific subpopulations of cells to create homotypic spheroids, or as a means to introduce multiple cell types to create heterotypic tissue constructs. Finally, we demonstrate that the aggregation and rotary suspension method can be used to support culture and maintenance of hPSC-derived cell populations representing each of the three germ layers, underscoring the utility of this platform for culturing many different cell types. PMID:26658353

  3. Inverse problem analysis of pluripotent stem cell aggregation dynamics in stirred-suspension cultures

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Mahboubeh Rahmati; Wu, Jincheng; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S.

    2015-01-01

    The cultivation of stem cells as aggregates in scalable bioreactor cultures is an appealing modality for the large-scale manufacturing of stem cell products. Aggregation phenomena are central to such bioprocesses affecting the viability, proliferation and differentiation trajectory of stem cells but a quantitative framework is currently lacking. A population balance equation (PBE) model was used to describe the temporal evolution of the embryonic stem cell (ESC) cluster size distribution by considering collision-induced aggregation and cell proliferation in a stirred-suspension vessel. For ESC cultures at different agitation rates, the aggregation kernel representing the aggregation dynamics was successfully recovered as a solution of the inverse problem. The rate of change of the average aggregate size was greater at the intermediate rate tested suggesting a trade-off between increased collisions and agitation-induced shear. Results from forward simulation with obtained aggregation kernels were in agreement with transient aggregate size data from experiments. We conclude that the framework presented here can complement mechanistic studies offering insights into relevant stem cell clustering processes. More importantly from a process development standpoint, this strategy can be employed in the design and control of bioreactors for the generation of stem cell derivatives for drug screening, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:26036699

  4. Inverse problem analysis of pluripotent stem cell aggregation dynamics in stirred-suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Mahboubeh Rahmati; Wu, Jincheng; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S

    2015-08-20

    The cultivation of stem cells as aggregates in scalable bioreactor cultures is an appealing modality for the large-scale manufacturing of stem cell products. Aggregation phenomena are central to such bioprocesses affecting the viability, proliferation and differentiation trajectory of stem cells but a quantitative framework is currently lacking. A population balance equation (PBE) model was used to describe the temporal evolution of the embryonic stem cell (ESC) cluster size distribution by considering collision-induced aggregation and cell proliferation in a stirred-suspension vessel. For ESC cultures at different agitation rates, the aggregation kernel representing the aggregation dynamics was successfully recovered as a solution of the inverse problem. The rate of change of the average aggregate size was greater at the intermediate rate tested suggesting a trade-off between increased collisions and agitation-induced shear. Results from forward simulation with obtained aggregation kernels were in agreement with transient aggregate size data from experiments. We conclude that the framework presented here can complement mechanistic studies offering insights into relevant stem cell clustering processes. More importantly from a process development standpoint, this strategy can be employed in the design and control of bioreactors for the generation of stem cell derivatives for drug screening, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  5. Oxygen Transport and Stem Cell Aggregation in Stirred-Suspension Bioreactor Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jincheng; Rostami, Mahboubeh Rahmati; Cadavid Olaya, Diana P.; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S.

    2014-01-01

    Stirred-suspension bioreactors are a promising modality for large-scale culture of 3D aggregates of pluripotent stem cells and their progeny. Yet, cells within these clusters experience limitations in the transfer of factors and particularly O2 which is characterized by low solubility in aqueous media. Cultured stem cells under different O2 levels may exhibit significantly different proliferation, viability and differentiation potential. Here, a transient diffusion-reaction model was built encompassing the size distribution and ultrastructural characteristics of embryonic stem cell (ESC) aggregates. The model was coupled to experimental data from bioreactor and static cultures for extracting the effective diffusivity and kinetics of consumption of O2 within mouse (mESC) and human ESC (hESC) clusters. Under agitation, mESC aggregates exhibited a higher maximum consumption rate than hESC aggregates. Moreover, the reaction-diffusion model was integrated with a population balance equation (PBE) for the temporal distribution of ESC clusters changing due to aggregation and cell proliferation. Hypoxia was found to be negligible for ESCs with a smaller radius than 100 µm but became appreciable for aggregates larger than 300 µm. The integrated model not only captured the O2 profile both in the bioreactor bulk and inside ESC aggregates but also led to the calculation of the duration that fractions of cells experience a certain range of O2 concentrations. The approach described in this study can be employed for gaining a deeper understanding of the effects of O2 on the physiology of stem cells organized in 3D structures. Such frameworks can be extended to encompass the spatial and temporal availability of nutrients and differentiation factors and facilitate the design and control of relevant bioprocesses for the production of stem cell therapeutics. PMID:25032842

  6. Oxygen transport and stem cell aggregation in stirred-suspension bioreactor cultures.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jincheng; Rostami, Mahboubeh Rahmati; Cadavid Olaya, Diana P; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S

    2014-01-01

    Stirred-suspension bioreactors are a promising modality for large-scale culture of 3D aggregates of pluripotent stem cells and their progeny. Yet, cells within these clusters experience limitations in the transfer of factors and particularly O2 which is characterized by low solubility in aqueous media. Cultured stem cells under different O2 levels may exhibit significantly different proliferation, viability and differentiation potential. Here, a transient diffusion-reaction model was built encompassing the size distribution and ultrastructural characteristics of embryonic stem cell (ESC) aggregates. The model was coupled to experimental data from bioreactor and static cultures for extracting the effective diffusivity and kinetics of consumption of O2 within mouse (mESC) and human ESC (hESC) clusters. Under agitation, mESC aggregates exhibited a higher maximum consumption rate than hESC aggregates. Moreover, the reaction-diffusion model was integrated with a population balance equation (PBE) for the temporal distribution of ESC clusters changing due to aggregation and cell proliferation. Hypoxia was found to be negligible for ESCs with a smaller radius than 100 µm but became appreciable for aggregates larger than 300 µm. The integrated model not only captured the O2 profile both in the bioreactor bulk and inside ESC aggregates but also led to the calculation of the duration that fractions of cells experience a certain range of O2 concentrations. The approach described in this study can be employed for gaining a deeper understanding of the effects of O2 on the physiology of stem cells organized in 3D structures. Such frameworks can be extended to encompass the spatial and temporal availability of nutrients and differentiation factors and facilitate the design and control of relevant bioprocesses for the production of stem cell therapeutics.

  7. Factorial experimental design for the culture of human embryonic stem cells as aggregates in stirred suspension bioreactors reveals the potential for interaction effects between bioprocess parameters.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Megan M; Meng, Guoliang; Rancourt, Derrick E; Gates, Ian D; Kallos, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    Traditional optimization of culture parameters for the large-scale culture of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) as aggregates is carried out in a stepwise manner whereby the effect of varying each culture parameter is investigated individually. However, as evidenced by the wide range of published protocols and culture performance indicators (growth rates, pluripotency marker expression, etc.), there is a lack of systematic investigation into the true effect of varying culture parameters especially with respect to potential interactions between culture variables. Here we describe the design and execution of a two-parameter, three-level (3(2)) factorial experiment resulting in nine conditions that were run in duplicate 125-mL stirred suspension bioreactors. The two parameters investigated here were inoculation density and agitation rate, which are easily controlled, but currently, poorly characterized. Cell readouts analyzed included fold expansion, maximum density, and exponential growth rate. Our results reveal that the choice of best case culture parameters was dependent on which cell property was chosen as the primary output variable. Subsequent statistical analyses via two-way analysis of variance indicated significant interaction effects between inoculation density and agitation rate specifically in the case of exponential growth rates. Results indicate that stepwise optimization has the potential to miss out on the true optimal case. In addition, choosing an optimum condition for a culture output of interest from the factorial design yielded similar results when repeated with the same cell line indicating reproducibility. We finally validated that human ESCs remain pluripotent in suspension culture as aggregates under our optimal conditions and maintain their differentiation capabilities as well as a stable karyotype and strong expression levels of specific human ESC markers over several passages in suspension bioreactors.

  8. Effective Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor treatment to dissociate human iPS cells for suspension culture to form embryoid body-like cell aggregates.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Ayumi; Yazaki, Koyuki; Aoyagi, Mami; Ohnuki, Yoshitsugu; Kurosawa, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Treatment conditions using Y-27632 in the preparation of cell suspension of dissociated human pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) were investigated in the context of embryoid body (EB)-like cell aggregates. The effectiveness of a pretreatment with Y-27632 before cell dissociation and that of a Y-27632 treatment during cell dissociation were investigated from the viewpoint of simplicity and robustness. The duration of Y-27632 treatment in the preparation process affected the circularity and agglomeration of dissociated hiPSCs. A single application of pretreatment failed to prevent the onset of blebbing. However, a pretreatment promoted the agglomeration of dissociated hiPSCs when combined with the addition of Y-27632 to cell suspension. Our results indicate that pretreatment enhances the agglomeration potential of dissociated hiPSCs. When cell dissociation was performed in the presence of Y-27632, dissociated hiPSCs possessed the highest circularity and significant agglomerating property. It was shown that treatment with Y-27632 during cell dissociation is a simple and robust method to prepare dissociated hiPSCs for suspension culture to form EB-like cell aggregates.

  9. Suspension culture of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Birch, J R; Arathoon, R

    1990-01-01

    Mammalian cell suspension culture systems are being used increasingly in the biotechnology industry. This is due to their many advantages including simplicity and homogeneity of culture. Suspension systems are very adaptable (e.g., for microcarrier, microencapsulation, or other methods of culture). Their engineering is thoroughly understood and standardized at large scale, and automation and cleaning procedures are well established. Suspension systems offer the possibility of quick implementation of production protocols due to their ability to be scaled easily once the basic culture parameters are understood. The only main disadvantage of the suspension culture systems to date is their inapplicability for the production of human vaccines from either primary cell lines or from normal human diploid cell lines (Hayflick et al., 1987 and references therein). One of the great advantages of suspension culture is the opportunity it provides to study interactions of metabolic and production phenomena in chemostat or turbidostat steady-state systems. Furthermore, in suspension culture systems from which cell number and cell mass measurements are easy to obtain, rigorous and quantitative estimations of the effects of growth conditions or perturbations of metabolic homeostasis can be made. Such studies can speed up the development of optimal processes. With our increasing understanding of factors influencing expression in mammalian cells (Cohen and Levinson, 1988; Santoro et al., 1988) and the direct application of new methods in suspension culture (Rhodes and Birch, 1988), its usefulness and importance is likely to increase in the future. In this chapter, we have described some of the potential uses of the various suspension culture systems and have covered most of the established technology and literature. Due to the rapid developments and needs in the biotechnology industry and the versatility of suspension culture systems, it is probable that many more variations on this

  10. Aggregation kinetics in a model colloidal suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Bastea, S

    2005-08-08

    The authors present molecular dynamics simulations of aggregation kinetics in a colloidal suspension modeled as a highly asymmetric binary mixture. Starting from a configuration with largely uncorrelated colloidal particles the system relaxes by coagulation-fragmentation dynamics to a structured state of low-dimensionality clusters with an exponential size distribution. The results show that short range repulsive interactions alone can give rise to so-called cluster phases. For the present model and probably other, more common colloids, the observed clusters appear to be equilibrium phase fluctuations induced by the entropic inter-colloidal attractions.

  11. Optimized suspension culture: the rotating-wall vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, T. G.; Hammond, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    Suspension culture remains a popular modality, which manipulates mechanical culture conditions to maintain the specialized features of cultured cells. The rotating-wall vessel is a suspension culture vessel optimized to produce laminar flow and minimize the mechanical stresses on cell aggregates in culture. This review summarizes the engineering principles, which allow optimal suspension culture conditions to be established, and the boundary conditions, which limit this process. We suggest that to minimize mechanical damage and optimize differentiation of cultured cells, suspension culture should be performed in a solid-body rotation Couette-flow, zero-headspace culture vessel such as the rotating-wall vessel. This provides fluid dynamic operating principles characterized by 1) solid body rotation about a horizontal axis, characterized by colocalization of cells and aggregates of different sedimentation rates, optimally reduced fluid shear and turbulence, and three-dimensional spatial freedom; and 2) oxygenation by diffusion. Optimization of suspension culture is achieved by applying three tradeoffs. First, terminal velocity should be minimized by choosing microcarrier beads and culture media as close in density as possible. Next, rotation in the rotating-wall vessel induces both Coriolis and centrifugal forces, directly dependent on terminal velocity and minimized as terminal velocity is minimized. Last, mass transport of nutrients to a cell in suspension culture depends on both terminal velocity and diffusion of nutrients. In the transduction of mechanical culture conditions into cellular effects, several lines of evidence support a role for multiple molecular mechanisms. These include effects of shear stress, changes in cell cycle and cell death pathways, and upstream regulation of secondary messengers such as protein kinase C. The discipline of suspension culture needs a systematic analysis of the relationship between mechanical culture conditions and

  12. Aggregation kinetics and shear rheology of aqueous silica suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metin, Cigdem O.; Bonnecaze, Roger T.; Lake, Larry W.; Miranda, Caetano R.; Nguyen, Quoc P.

    2012-12-01

    The kinetics of aggregation of silica nanoparticle solutions as a function of NaCl and silica concentrations is studied experimentally and theoretically. Silica nanoparticles form fractal aggregates due to the collapse of the electrical double layer at high salt concentrations and resulting reduction in stabilizing repulsive force. We propose a convenient model to describe the aggregation of silica nanoparticles and the growth of their aggregate size that depends on particle size and concentration and salt concentration. The model agrees well with experimental data. The aggregation of silica nanoparticles also affects the rheology of the suspension. We propose an equilibrium approach for sediment volume fraction to determine the maximum effective packing fraction. The results for the relative viscosity of silica aggregates agree well with the proposed viscosity model, which also collapses onto a single master curve.

  13. Stress distributions in flowing aggregated colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Silbert, L.E.; Farr, R.S.; Melrose, J.R.; Ball, R.C.

    1999-09-01

    Simulations of the flow of concentrated aggregated colloidal systems, at the particulate level, are used to investigate the distribution of stresses in the shear-thinning regime. It is found that the distribution of shear stress carried by interparticle bonds decays approximately exponentially at large stresses, but with a double-exponential distribution for values of positive stress. The microstructural mechanisms associated with large stresses are manifested in clusters which dominate the positive contribution to the stress in the system. Towards the end of shear thinning the highest forces occur along bonds defining rods of particles aligned approximately along the flow-compression direction. We propose that the rheology of such systems is determined by a rupture{endash}reformation process of these clusters of stress concentration during the flow. The aggregation forces play the role of enhancing such stress concentration by stabilizing clusters against buckling. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Beyond diffusion-limited aggregation kinetics in microparticle suspensions.

    PubMed

    Erb, Randall M; Krebs, Melissa D; Alsberg, Eben; Samanta, Bappaditya; Rotello, Vincent M; Yellen, Benjamin B

    2009-11-01

    Aggregation in nondiffusion limited colloidal particle suspensions follows a temporal power-law dependence that is consistent with classical diffusion limited cluster aggregation models; however, the dynamic scaling exponents observed in these systems are not adequately described by diffusion limited cluster aggregation models, which expect these scaling exponents to be constant over all experimental conditions. We show here that the dynamic scaling exponents for 10 microm particles increase with the particle concentration and the particle-particle free energy of interaction. We provide a semiquantitative explanation for the scaling behavior in terms of the long-ranged particle-particle interaction potential. PMID:20364980

  15. Origin of Aggregate Formation in Antibody Crystal Suspensions Containing PEG.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Christian; Mathaes, Roman; Saedler, Rainer; Winter, Gerhard

    2016-03-01

    The crystalline state of proteins is deemed as a promising formulation platform for biopharmaceuticals. However, a stabilizing effect of protein crystal suspensions is controversially discussed. In fact, antibodies can display an increased aggregation and particle formation profile after the crystallization process compared with liquid or solid amorphous formulations. Nevertheless, studies regarding aggregate formation and its origin remain meager in literature. It was the aim of this study to investigate these aspects for a model IgG antibody (mAb1), which shows an increased aggregate formation after crystallization with polyethylene glycol. The presence of a dynamic equilibrium, a steady exchange of protein between the crystals and the supernatant, was demonstrated by replacing the supernatant with an identical but fluorescence-labeled protein solution and followed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Aggregate formation was monitored by size exclusion high-pressure chromatography and flow cytometry. Constantly increasing aggregate levels were found for the crystal fraction and for the supernatant. For the later, markedly higher particle counts were detected. The labeled supernatant and the unlabeled protein crystals allowed a precise identification of the origin of the aggregates. The rising aggregate fractions of the crystals displayed high mean fluorescence intensities that elucidated their origin in the supernatant. PMID:26886344

  16. Aggregation and colloidal stability of fine-particle coal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, P.R.; Rubin, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    The aggregation and colloidal stability of colloidal coal suspensions in the presence of varying concentrations of hydrogen ions, neutral salts, and aluminum sulfate were investigated. Critical concentration and critical pH values for coagulation and stabilization were determined from turbidity changes during settling following aggregation. Two colloidal suspensions of a bituminous coal representing stability extremes due to oxidation were compared. In the absence of other coagulants, vigorous oxidation lowered the isoelectric point of the coal sol from pH 5.1 to pH 1.1 and the pH for stabilization from 7.5 to 2.6. The coagulation of the suspensions followed the Schulze-Hardy rule as hydrophobic sols although the oxidized coal sol was slightly less sensitive to neutral salts. The entire log aluminum sulfate concentration-pH stability limit diagram for the oxidized coal sol was established. The boundaries of settling of the coal in the presence of aluminum sulfate were similar to other hydrophobic sols except for small differences in alkaline solution. Regions of ionic coagulation, rapid coagulation due to enmeshment in aluminum hydroxide precipitate, and restabilization were also observed and delineated.

  17. Elastic properties of dry clay mineral aggregates, suspensions and sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanorio, Tiziana; Prasad, Manika; Nur, Amos

    2003-10-01

    The presence of clay minerals can alter the elastic behaviour of rocks significantly. Although clay minerals are common in sedimentary formations and seismic measurements are our main tools for studying subsurface lithologies, measurements of elastic properties of clay minerals have proven difficult. Theoretical values for the bulk modulus of clay are reported between 20 and 50 GPa. The only published experimental measurement of Young's modulus in a clay mineral using atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) gave a much lower value of 6.2 GPa. This study has concentrated on using independent experimental methods to measure the elastic moduli of clay minerals as functions of pressure and saturation. First, ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities were measured as functions of hydrostatic pressure in cold-pressed clay aggregates with porosity and grain density ranging from 4 to 43 per cent and 2.13 to 2.83 g cm-3, respectively. In the second experiment, P- and S-wave velocities in clay powders were measured under uniaxial stresses compaction. In the third experiment, P-wave velocity and attenuation in a kaolinite-water suspension with clay concentrations between 0 and 60 per cent were measured at ambient conditions. Our elastic moduli measurements of kaolinite, montmorillonite and smectite are consistent for all experiments and with reported AFAM measurements on a nanometre scale. The bulk modulus values of the solid clay phase (Ks) lie between 6 and 12 GPa and shear (μs) modulus values vary between 4 and 6 GPa. A comparison is made between the accuracy of velocity prediction in shaley sandstones and clay-water and clay-sand mixtures using the values measured in this study and those from theoretical models. Using Ks= 12 GPa and μs= 6 GPa from this study, the models give a much better prediction both of experimental velocity reduction due to increase in clay content in sandstones and velocity measurements in a kaolinite-water suspension.

  18. Dialysis buffer with different ionic strength affects the antigenicity of cultured nervous necrosis virus (NNV) suspensions.

    PubMed

    Gye, Hyun Jung; Nishizawa, Toyohiko

    2016-09-01

    Nervous necrosis virus (NNV) belongs to the genus Betanodavirus (Nodaviridae). It is highly pathogenic to various marine fishes. Here, we investigated the antigenicity changes of cultured NNV suspensions during 14days of dialyses using a dialysis tube at 1.4×10(4) molecular weight cut off (MWCO) in three different buffers (Dulbecco's phosphate buffered saline (D-PBS), 15mM Tris-HCl (pH 8.0), and deionized water (DIW)). Total NNV antigen titers of cultured NNV suspension varied depending on different dialysis buffers. For example, total NNV antigen titer during D-PBS dialysis was increased once but then decreased. During Tris-HCl dialysis, it was relatively stable. During dialysis in DIW, total NNV antigen titer was increased gradually. These antigenicity changes in NNV suspension might be due to changes in the aggregation state of NNV particles and/or coat proteins (CPs). ELISA values of NNV suspension changed due to changing aggregates state of NNV antigens. NNV particles in suspension were aggregated at a certain level. These aggregates were progressive after D-PBS dialysis, but regressive after Tris-HCl dialysis. The purified NNV particles self-aggregated after dialysis in D-PBS or in Tris-HCl containing 600mM NaCl, but not after dialysis in Tris-HCl or DIW. Quantitative analysis is merited to determine NNV antigens in the highly purified NNV particles suspended in buffer at low salt condition. PMID:27381060

  19. Development of a scalable suspension culture for cardiac differentiation from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Vincent C; Ye, Jingjing; Shukla, Praveen; Hua, Giau; Chen, Danlin; Lin, Ziguang; Liu, Jian-chang; Chai, Jing; Gold, Joseph; Wu, Joseph; Hsu, David; Couture, Larry A

    2015-09-01

    To meet the need of a large quantity of hPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (CM) for pre-clinical and clinical studies, a robust and scalable differentiation system for CM production is essential. With a human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) aggregate suspension culture system we established previously, we developed a matrix-free, scalable, and GMP-compliant process for directing hPSC differentiation to CM in suspension culture by modulating Wnt pathways with small molecules. By optimizing critical process parameters including: cell aggregate size, small molecule concentrations, induction timing, and agitation rate, we were able to consistently differentiate hPSCs to >90% CM purity with an average yield of 1.5 to 2×10(9) CM/L at scales up to 1L spinner flasks. CM generated from the suspension culture displayed typical genetic, morphological, and electrophysiological cardiac cell characteristics. This suspension culture system allows seamless transition from hPSC expansion to CM differentiation in a continuous suspension culture. It not only provides a cost and labor effective scalable process for large scale CM production, but also provides a bioreactor prototype for automation of cell manufacturing, which will accelerate the advance of hPSC research towards therapeutic applications.

  20. Somatic embryogenesis in Picea suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Stasolla, Claudio

    2006-01-01

    Generation of somatic embryos in spruce is achieved through the execution of five steps designated as: (1) induction of embryogenic tissue, (2) maintenance of embryogenic tissue, (3) embryo development, (4) embryo maturation, and (5) conversion into plants. Depending on species and genotypes within the same species, each step must be optimized for obtaining maximum results. In general, embryogenic tissue is generated from immature and mature zygotic embryos and maintained in either liquid or solid conditions in the presence of plant growth regulators auxin and cytokinin. Initiation of embryo development in suspension cultured is induced by removal of plant growth regulators, whereas continuation of development and completion of maturation require applications of abscisic acid and imposition of a desiccation period. Both treatments are needed for conferring morphological and physiological maturation to the embryos. Mature somatic embryos are germinated in the absence of plant regulators and embryo conversion (i.e., formation of a functional shoot and root, occurs after a few weeks in culture). PMID:16673908

  1. Structure and flow of dense suspensions of protein fractal aggregates in comparison with microgels.

    PubMed

    Inthavong, Walailuk; Kharlamova, Anna; Chassenieux, Christophe; Nicolai, Taco

    2016-03-14

    Solutions of the globular whey protein β-lactoglobulin (β-lg) were heated at different protein concentrations leading to the formation of polydisperse fractal aggregates with different average sizes. The structure of the solutions was analyzed with light scattering as a function of the protein concentration. The osmotic compressibility and the dynamic correlation length decreased with increasing concentration and became independent of the aggregate size in dense suspensions. The results obtained for different aggregate sizes could be superimposed after normalizing the concentration with the overlap concentration. Dense suspensions of fractal protein aggregates are strongly interpenetrated and can be visualized as an ensemble of fractal 'blobs'. The viscosity of the heated β-lg solutions increased extremely sharply above 80 g L(-1) and diverged at 98 g L(-1), mainly due to the sharply increasing aggregate size. At a fixed aggregate size, the viscosity increased initially exponentially with increasing concentration and then diverged. The increase was stronger when the aggregates were larger, but the dependence of the viscosity on the aggregate size was weaker than that of the osmotic compressibility and the dynamic correlation length. The concentration dependence of the viscosity of solutions of fractal β-lg aggregates is much stronger than that of homogeneous β-lg microgels. The behavior of fractal aggregates formed by whey protein isolates was similar. PMID:26864954

  2. The effect of surfactant and solid phase concentration on drug aggregates in model aerosol propellent suspensions.

    PubMed

    Bower, C; Washington, C; Purewal, T S

    1996-04-01

    The effect of increasing solid phase concentration on the morphology and flocculation rate of model aerosol suspensions has been investigated. Suspensions of micronized salbutamol sulphate and lactose in trichlorotrifluoroethane (P113) were studied under conditions of increasing shear stress. By use of image analysis techniques, measurement of aggregate size, fractal dimension and rate of aggregation was performed. The effect of the surfactant sorbitan monooleate on morphology and flocculation rate was also studied. Increased solid phase concentration caused an increase in the rate of aggregation and average aggregate size at a given value of shear stress. Surfactant addition retarded the aggregation rate, and caused a shift from a diffusion-limited cluster aggregation to a reaction-limited cluster aggregation mechanism. The aggregate profiles showed a corresponding change from rugged and crenellated without surfactant, to increasingly smooth and Euclidian with increasing surfactant concentration. The morphological changes were characterized by a decrease in the average boundary fractal dimension which also correlated well with the corresponding reduction in aggregation rate.

  3. Large-scale production of monoclonal antibodies in suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Backer, M P; Metzger, L S; Slaber, P L; Nevitt, K L; Boder, G B

    1988-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are being manufactured for clinical trials in suspension culture at the 1300-L scale. Suspension culture offers some advantages relative to high-density mammalian cell culture methods; in particular, the ability to closely monitor the behavior of cells in a homogeneous environment. Computer control and on-line mass spectrography of exit gases provide instantaneous information about the culture metabolic activity. Air sparging and agitation by marine impeller provide aeration sufficient to maintain a constant dissolved oxygen tension at cell concentrations up to 5.0 x 10(6) cells/mL without causing apparent cell damage.

  4. Sensing aggregation in highly turbid plasmonic and non-plasmonic colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducay, Rey Nann Mark; Philip, Nathan; Boivin, Jordan; Judge, Patrick; Berberich, Jason; Scaffidi, Jonathan; Bali, Lalit; Bali, Samir

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate a method for sensing the presence of aggregation in highly turbid aqueous suspensions of polystyrene and gold nanospheres. Aggregation is induced either by changing the pH or the ionic strength, by adding small, controlled amounts of an acid or base solution. The particle concentrations used are at least two orders of magnitude higher than previously reported. To the best of our knowledge, this is a first observation of aggregation in highly dense colloidal suspensions without any sample dilution or special sample preparation. We gratefully acknowledge support from the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund and Miami University's Interdisciplinary Roundtable Fund. We also gratefully acknowledge experimental help from the Miami University Instrumentation Laboratory.

  5. Rheological characteristics of cell suspension and cell culture of Perilla frutescens.

    PubMed

    Zhong, J J; Seki, T; Kinoshita, S; Yoshida, T

    1992-12-01

    Physical properties such as viscosity, fluid dynamic behavior of cell suspension, and size distribution of cell aggregates of a plant, Perilla frustescens, cultured in a liquid medium were studied. As a result of investigations using cells harvester after 12 days of cultivation in a flask, it was found that the apparent viscosity of the cell suspension did not change with any variation of cell concentration below 5 g dry cell/L but markedly increased when the cell concentration increased over 12.8 g dry cell/L. The cell suspension exhibited the characteristics of a Bingham plastic fluid with a small yield stress. The size of cell aggregates in the range 74 to 500 mum did not influence the rheological characteristics of the cell suspension. The rheological characteristics of cultivation mixtures of P. frutescens cultivated in a flask and in a bioreactor were also investigated. The results showed that the flow characteristics of the cell culture could be described by a Bingham plastic model. At the later stage of cultivation, the apparent viscosity increased steadily, even though the biomass concentration (by dry weight) decreased, due to the increase of individual cell size.

  6. Callus and suspension culture induction, maintenance, and characterization.

    PubMed

    Robledo-Paz, Alejandrina; Vázquez-Sánchez, María Nélida; Adame-Alvarez, Rosa María; Jofre-Garfias, Alba Estela

    2006-01-01

    Callus and cell suspension can be used for long-term cell cultures maintenance. This chapter describes procedures for the induction of somatic embryos of garlic, keeping a regeneration capacity for more than 5 yr, as well as the maintenance of a tobacco suspension culture (NT-1 cells), for more than 10 yr. Methods for plant regeneration and growth kinetics of garlic cultures are described, as well as for cell viability of NT-1 cells stained with 2,3,5 triphenyltetrazolium chloride. The packed cell volume determination as a parameter of growth is detailed. PMID:16673905

  7. Characterization of rhamnogalacturonan I from cotton suspension culture cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Progress has been made on the project of determining the structure of pectins. From recent progress, a covalent crosslink between rhamnogalacturonan I (RGI) and xyloglucan was hypothesized and a structure for RGI was proposed. The development of a method to determine the distribution of methyl esterification with pectins also progressed. The degree of methyl esterification of cotton cotyledon cell walls was compared to that of cotton suspension cultures. Cotyledon wall were found to have {approximately}55% of the galacturonic acid esterified whereas suspension culture wall were only about 14% methyl esterified. 10 refs. (SM)

  8. Interfacial aggregation of a nonionic surfactant: Effect on the stability of silica suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Giordano-Palmino, F.; Denoyel, R.; Rouquerol, J. . Centre de thermodynamique et Microcalorimetrie)

    1994-06-01

    Nonionic surfactants are in widespread use in technological applications such as flotation, detergency, suspension stabilization (paints, ceramic preparation, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics), and enhanced oil recovery. The adsorption of the nonionic surfactant TX 100 in two silica suspensions (Ludox HS40 and Syton W30) has been studied with the aim of relating the structure of the adsorbed layer to the stability of the suspension. First, a thermodynamic study based on the determination of adsorption isotherms and displacement enthalpies as a function of pH and solid/liquid ratio was carried out and lead to the conclusion that such a surfactant forms micelle-like aggregates on the silica surface. Then, a stability study based on visual observation, turbidimetry, and particle size determination (by photon correlation spectroscopy) was performed in order to determine the TX 100 concentration range in which flocculation occurs. Considering that the surface is covered with micelle-like aggregates in the flocculation range and that the [zeta]-potential (determined by microelectrophoresis) has varied only slightly at the onset of flocculation, it is concluded that the flocculation mechanism is a bridging of particles by surface micelles. This bridging of particles by aggregates similar in size and shape could be an explanation of the presence, in such systems, of optimum flocculation at half surface coverage.

  9. SUSPENSION CULTURE AND PLANT REGENERATION OF TYPHA LATIFOLIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study is the first reported attempt to generate a growth curve from Typha latifolia L. (broadleaf cattail) callus cells in suspension culture. Several media and hormone combinations were tested for their capacity to induce callus cell formation from T. latifolia leaf section...

  10. Effects of chilling on protein synthesis in tomato suspension cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Matadial, B.; Pauls, K.P. )

    1989-04-01

    The effect of chilling on cell growth, cell viability, protein content and protein composition in suspension cultures of L. esculentum and L. hirsutum was investigated. Cell growth for both species was arrested at 2{degrees}C but when cultures were transferred to 25{degree}C cell growth resumed. There was no difference in viability between control and chilled cultures of L. esculentum, however, L. hirsutum control cultures exhibited larger amounts of Fluorescein Diacetate induced fluorescence than chilled cultures. {sup 35}S-methionine incorporation into proteins was 2.5-2 times higher in L. hirsutum than in L. esculentum. Quantitative and qualitative differences, in {sup 35}S-methionine labelled proteins, between chilled and control cultures were observed by SDS-PAGE and fluorography. Protein content in chilled cultures decreased over time but then increased when cultures were transferred to 25{degrees}C.

  11. Scalable Stirred-Suspension Bioreactor Culture of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kehoe, Daniel E.; Jing, Donghui; Lock, Lye T.

    2010-01-01

    Advances in stem cell biology have afforded promising results for the generation of various cell types for therapies against devastating diseases. However, a prerequisite for realizing the therapeutic potential of stem cells is the development of bioprocesses for the production of stem cell progeny in quantities that satisfy clinical demands. Recent reports on the expansion and directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in scalable stirred-suspension bioreactors (SSBs) demonstrated that large-scale production of therapeutically useful hESC progeny is feasible with current state-of-the-art culture technologies. Stem cells have been cultured in SSBs as aggregates, in microcarrier suspension and after encapsulation. The various modes in which SSBs can be employed for the cultivation of hESCs and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are described. To that end, this is the first account of hiPSC cultivation in a microcarrier stirred-suspension system. Given that cultured stem cells and their differentiated progeny are the actual products used in tissue engineering and cell therapies, the impact of bioreactor's operating conditions on stem cell self-renewal and commitment should be considered. The effects of variables specific to SSB operation on stem cell physiology are discussed. Finally, major challenges are presented which remain to be addressed before the mainstream use of SSBs for the large-scale culture of hESCs and hiPSCs. PMID:19739936

  12. Scalable stirred-suspension bioreactor culture of human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kehoe, Daniel E; Jing, Donghui; Lock, Lye T; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S

    2010-02-01

    Advances in stem cell biology have afforded promising results for the generation of various cell types for therapies against devastating diseases. However, a prerequisite for realizing the therapeutic potential of stem cells is the development of bioprocesses for the production of stem cell progeny in quantities that satisfy clinical demands. Recent reports on the expansion and directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in scalable stirred-suspension bioreactors (SSBs) demonstrated that large-scale production of therapeutically useful hESC progeny is feasible with current state-of-the-art culture technologies. Stem cells have been cultured in SSBs as aggregates, in microcarrier suspension and after encapsulation. The various modes in which SSBs can be employed for the cultivation of hESCs and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are described. To that end, this is the first account of hiPSC cultivation in a microcarrier stirred-suspension system. Given that cultured stem cells and their differentiated progeny are the actual products used in tissue engineering and cell therapies, the impact of bioreactor's operating conditions on stem cell self-renewal and commitment should be considered. The effects of variables specific to SSB operation on stem cell physiology are discussed. Finally, major challenges are presented which remain to be addressed before the mainstream use of SSBs for the large-scale culture of hESCs and hiPSCs.

  13. Enzymatically degradable poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels for the 3D culture and release of human embryonic stem cell derived pancreatic precursor cell aggregates.

    PubMed

    Amer, Luke D; Holtzinger, Audrey; Keller, Gordon; Mahoney, Melissa J; Bryant, Stephanie J

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to develop a three dimensional culture platform for aggregates of human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived pancreatic progenitors that enables long-term culture, maintains aggregate size and morphology, does not adversely affect differentiation and provides a means for aggregate recovery. A platform was developed with poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels containing collagen type I, for cell-matrix interactions, and peptide crosslinkers, for facile recovery of aggregates. The platform was first demonstrated with RIN-m5F cells, showing encapsulation and subsequent release of single cells and aggregates without adversely affecting viability. Aggregates of hESC-derived pancreatic progenitors with an effective diameter of 82 (15)μm were either encapsulated in hydrogels or cultured in suspension for 28 days. At day 14, aggregate viability was maintained in the hydrogels, but significantly reduced (88%) in suspension culture. However by day 28, viability was reduced under both culture conditions. Aggregate size was maintained in the hydrogels, but in suspension was significantly higher (∼ 2-fold) by day 28. The ability to release aggregates followed by a second enzyme treatment to achieve single cells enabled assessment by flow cytometry. Prior to encapsulation, there were 39% Pdx1(+)/Nkx6.1(+) cells, key endocrine markers required for β-cell maturation. The fraction of doubly positive cells was not affected in hydrogels but was slightly and significantly lower in suspension culture by 28 days. In conclusion, we demonstrate that a MMP-sensitive PEG hydrogel containing collagen type I is a promising platform for hESC-derived pancreatic progenitors that maintains viable aggregates, aggregate size, and progenitor state and offers facile recovery of aggregates.

  14. Enzymatically degradable poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels for the 3D culture and release of human embryonic stem cell derived pancreatic precursor cell aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Amer, Luke D.; Holtzinger, Audrey; Keller, Gordon; Mahoney, Melissa J.; Bryant, Stephanie J.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a three dimensional culture platform for aggregates of human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived pancreatic progenitors that enables long-term culture, maintains aggregate size and morphology, does not adversely affect differentiation and provides a means for aggregate recovery. A platform was developed with poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels containing collagen type I, for cell-matrix interactions, and peptide crosslinkers, for facile recovery of aggregates. The platform was first demonstrated with RIN-m5F cells, showing encapsulation and subsequent release of single cells and aggregates without adversely affecting viability. Aggregates of hESC-derived pancreatic progenitors with an effective diameter of 82 (15) μm were either encapsulated in hydrogels or cultured in suspension for 28 days. At day 14, aggregate viability was maintained in the hydrogels, but significantly reduced (88%) in suspension culture. However by day 28, viability was reduced in both culture conditions. Aggregate size was maintained in the hydrogels, but in suspension was significantly higher (~2-fold) by day 28. The ability to release aggregates followed by a second enzyme treatment to achieve single cells enabled assessment by flow cytometry. Prior to encapsulation, there were 39% Pdx1+/Nkx6.1+ cells, key endocrine markers required for β-cell maturation. The fraction of doubly positive cells was not affected in hydrogels but was slightly and significantly lower in suspension culture by 28 days. In conclusion, we demonstrate that a MMP-sensitive PEG hydrogel containing collagen type I is a promising platform for hESC-derived pancreatic progenitors that maintains viable aggregates, aggregate size, and progenitor state and offers facile recovery of aggregates. PMID:25913222

  15. Suspension culture titration: A simple method for measuring baculovirus titers.

    PubMed

    Matindoost, Leila; Chan, Leslie C L; Qi, Ying Mei; Nielsen, Lars K; Reid, Steven

    2012-08-01

    The baculovirus-insect cell expression system is an important technology for the production of recombinant proteins and baculovirus-based biopesticides. Budded virus titration is critical when scaling up baculovirus production processes in suspension cultures, to ensure reproducible infections, especially when a low multiplicity of infection (MOI) is applied. In this study, a simple suspension culture titration (SCT) assay was developed that involves accurate measurements of the initial cell densities (ICDs) and peak cell densities (PCDs) of an infected culture, from which the MOI and hence the virus inoculum infectious titer can be estimated, using the established Power-Nielsen baculovirus infection model. The SCT assay was assessed in parallel with two adherent culture-based assays (MTT and AlamarBlue) for the Heliothine baculovirus HaSNPV, and was shown to be more objective, time-efficient and reproducible. The model predicted a linear correlation between log(PCD/ICD) and log(MOI), hence an alternative model-independent SCT assay was also developed, which relies on a well-replicated standard curve relating suspension culture-derived PCD/ICD ratios with plaque or endpoint assay-derived MOIs. Standard curves with excellent linearity were generated for HaSNPV and the industrially significant rAcMNPV, demonstrating the feasibility of this simple titration approach, especially in terms of its applicability to a wide range of virus infection kinetics.

  16. Peroxidases from cell suspension cultures of Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Agostini, E; de Forchetti, S M; Tigier, H A

    2000-08-01

    Cell suspension cultures of Brassica napus were obtained under different hormonal conditions, using 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and kinetin as growth regulators. They were analyzed as a culture system for peroxidase production in vitro to avoid many of the problems that affect the production from field-grown roots. Total peroxidase specific activities reached a maximum at the end of exponential growth phase of the cultures. Cultures obtained with 4 mg/l of 2,4-D an without kinetin or with 1 mg/l of 2,4-D and the same amount of kinetin produced twice the total activity of root extracts and, in addition, they released peroxidases to the culture medium, which would be advantageous for the commercial production of the enzyme. Peroxidase patterns, obtained by isoelectric focusing of cell extracts and of culture medium of cell suspension cultures, differed from those of root crude extracts from field-grown plants with additional bands of higher isoelectric points. These cultures showed interesting properties and could be considered an alternative source of peroxidases for commercial production and/or to be applied as a model for physiological research. PMID:10979611

  17. Tunable Aggregation and Gelation of Thermoresponsive Suspensions of Polymer-Grafted Cellulose Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Azzam, Firas; Siqueira, Eder; Fort, Sébastien; Hassaini, Roumaïssa; Pignon, Frédéric; Travelet, Christophe; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Jean, Bruno

    2016-06-13

    The colloidal stability together with the tunable aggregation and viscoelastic properties of thermoresponsive polymer-grafted cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) were investigated. TEMPO oxidation of CNCs followed by peptidic coupling in water were used to covalently graft thermosensitive Jeffamine polyetheramine M2005 chains onto the surface of CNCs. The resulting polymer-decorated particles (M2005-g-CNCs) exhibited new colloidal properties, by their ability to perfectly redisperse in water and organic solvents such as toluene, dichloromethane or DMF after freeze-drying. In addition, they presented an enhanced thermal stability when compared to that of sulfated or TEMPO-oxidized CNCs. Dynamic light scattering experiments were used to demonstrate that the thermally induced aggregation of M2005-g-CNCs was fully reversible and reproducible over many temperature cycles and that, most interestingly, the aggregation number could be tuned by varying the ionic strength and/or the pH of the medium, making the suspension multiresponsive. This property arises from the variations of the sign (attractive or repulsive) and the range of the different types (entropic, electrostatic, hydrophobic) of interaction forces between the thermosensitive polymer-decorated nanoparticles. The variation of the viscoelastic properties of M2005-g-CNCs suspensions as a function of temperature, probed by oscillatory rheology measurements of more concentrated suspensions, revealed a reversible temperature-triggered liquid-to-gel transition. Such enhanced functionalities pave the way to the design of advanced CNC-based materials benefiting both from the intrinsic characteristics of these biosourced particles and the new properties imparted by the stimuli-sensitive grafted chains. PMID:27116589

  18. Inositol-Containing Lipids in Suspension-Cultured Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Drøbak, Bjørn K.; Ferguson, Ian B.; Dawson, Alan P.; Irvine, Robin F.

    1988-01-01

    Polar lipids were extracted from suspension-cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cells and analyzed by thin layer chromatography. Four major inositol-containing compounds were found, and incorporation of [32P]orthosphosphate, [2-3H]glycerol, and myo-[2-3H]inositol was studied. Results showed that phosphatidylinositol-monophosphate is the phospholipid in these cells displaying the most rapid incorporation of [32P]orthophosphate. We suggest that the tracer is incorporated primarily into the phosphomonoester group. Two inositol-containing lipids showed chromatographic behavior similar to phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate when using standard thin layer chromatography techniques. The labeling pattern of these compounds, however, reveals that it is unlikely that either of these is identical to phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate. Should phosphatidylinositol-bisphosphate be present in suspension cultured plant cells, our data indicate chemical abundancies substantially lower than previously reported. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16666106

  19. Putting the Spotlight Back on Plant Suspension Cultures.

    PubMed

    Santos, Rita B; Abranches, Rita; Fischer, Rainer; Sack, Markus; Holland, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell suspension cultures have several advantages that make them suitable for the production of recombinant proteins. They can be cultivated under aseptic conditions using classical fermentation technology, they are easy to scale-up for manufacturing, and the regulatory requirements are similar to those established for well-characterized production systems based on microbial and mammalian cells. It is therefore no surprise that taliglucerase alfa (Elelyso®)-the first licensed recombinant pharmaceutical protein derived from plants-is produced in plant cell suspension cultures. But despite this breakthrough, plant cells are still largely neglected compared to transgenic plants and the more recent plant-based transient expression systems. Here, we revisit plant cell suspension cultures and highlight recent developments in the field that show how the rise of plant cells parallels that of Chinese hamster ovary cells, currently the most widespread and successful manufacturing platform for biologics. These developments include medium optimization, process engineering, statistical experimental designs, scale-up/scale-down models, and process analytical technologies. Significant yield increases for diverse target proteins will encourage a gold rush to adopt plant cells as a platform technology, and the first indications of this breakthrough are already on the horizon. PMID:27014320

  20. Putting the Spotlight Back on Plant Suspension Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Rita B.; Abranches, Rita; Fischer, Rainer; Sack, Markus; Holland, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell suspension cultures have several advantages that make them suitable for the production of recombinant proteins. They can be cultivated under aseptic conditions using classical fermentation technology, they are easy to scale-up for manufacturing, and the regulatory requirements are similar to those established for well-characterized production systems based on microbial and mammalian cells. It is therefore no surprise that taliglucerase alfa (Elelyso®)—the first licensed recombinant pharmaceutical protein derived from plants—is produced in plant cell suspension cultures. But despite this breakthrough, plant cells are still largely neglected compared to transgenic plants and the more recent plant-based transient expression systems. Here, we revisit plant cell suspension cultures and highlight recent developments in the field that show how the rise of plant cells parallels that of Chinese hamster ovary cells, currently the most widespread and successful manufacturing platform for biologics. These developments include medium optimization, process engineering, statistical experimental designs, scale-up/scale-down models, and process analytical technologies. Significant yield increases for diverse target proteins will encourage a gold rush to adopt plant cells as a platform technology, and the first indications of this breakthrough are already on the horizon. PMID:27014320

  1. Simple suspension culture system of human iPS cells maintaining their pluripotency for cardiac cell sheet engineering.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Yuji; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a simple three-dimensional (3D) suspension culture method for the expansion and cardiac differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) is reported. The culture methods were easily adapted from two-dimensional (2D) to 3D culture without any additional manipulations. When hiPSCs were directly applied to 3D culture from 2D in a single-cell suspension, only a few aggregated cells were observed. However, after 3 days, culture of the small hiPSC aggregates in a spinner flask at the optimal agitation rate created aggregates which were capable of cell passages from the single-cell suspension. Cell numbers increased to approximately 10-fold after 12 days of culture. The undifferentiated state of expanded hiPSCs was confirmed by flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR, and the hiPSCs differentiated into three germ layers. When the hiPSCs were subsequently cultured in a flask using cardiac differentiation medium, expression of cardiac cell-specific genes and beating cardiomyocytes were observed. Furthermore, the culture of hiPSCs on Matrigel-coated dishes with serum-free medium containing activin A, BMP4 and FGF-2 enabled it to generate robust spontaneous beating cardiomyocytes and these cells expressed several cardiac cell-related genes, including HCN4, MLC-2a and MLC-2v. This suggests that the expanded hiPSCs might maintain the potential to differentiate into several types of cardiomyocytes, including pacemakers. Moreover, when cardiac cell sheets were fabricated using differentiated cardiomyocytes, they beat spontaneously and synchronously, indicating electrically communicative tissue. This simple culture system might enable the generation of sufficient amounts of beating cardiomyocytes for use in cardiac regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  2. Differentiation of human embryonic stem cells to dopaminergic neurons in serum-free suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Thomas C; Noggle, Scott A; Palmarini, Gail M; Weiler, Deb A; Lyons, Ian G; Pensa, Kate A; Meedeniya, Adrian C B; Davidson, Bruce P; Lambert, Nevin A; Condie, Brian G

    2004-01-01

    The use of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) as a source of dopaminergic neurons for Parkinson's disease cell therapy will require the development of simple and reliable cell differentiation protocols. The use of cell cocultures, added extracellular signaling factors, or transgenic approaches to drive hESC differentiation could lead to additional regulatory as well as cell production delays for these therapies. Because the neuronal cell lineage seems to require limited or no signaling for its formation, we tested the ability of hESCs to differentiate to form dopamine-producing neurons in a simple serum-free suspension culture system. BG01 and BG03 hESCs were differentiated as suspension aggregates, and neural progenitors and neurons were detectable after 2-4 weeks. Plated neurons responded appropriately to electrophysiological cues. This differentiation was inhibited by early exposure to bone morphogenic protein (BMP)-4, but a pulse of BMP-4 from days 5 to 9 caused induction of peripheral neuronal differentiation. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and whole-mount immunocytochemistry demonstrated the expression of multiple markers of the midbrain dopaminergic phenotype in serum-free differentiations. Neurons expressing tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) were killed by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), a neurotoxic catecholamine. Upon plating, these cells released dopamine and other catecholamines in response to K+ depolarization. Surviving TH+ neurons, derived from the cells differentiated in serum-free suspension cultures, were detected 8 weeks after transplantation into 6-OHDA-lesioned rat brains. This work suggests that hESCs can differentiate in simple serum-free suspension cultures to produce the large number of cells required for transplantation studies. PMID:15579641

  3. A Versatile Bioreactor for Dynamic Suspension Cell Culture. Application to the Culture of Cancer Cell Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Madeddu, Denise; Cerino, Giulia; Falco, Angela; Frati, Caterina; Gallo, Diego; Deriu, Marco A.; Falvo D’Urso Labate, Giuseppe; Quaini, Federico; Audenino, Alberto; Morbiducci, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    A versatile bioreactor suitable for dynamic suspension cell culture under tunable shear stress conditions has been developed and preliminarily tested culturing cancer cell spheroids. By adopting simple technological solutions and avoiding rotating components, the bioreactor exploits the laminar hydrodynamics establishing within the culture chamber enabling dynamic cell suspension in an environment favourable to mass transport, under a wide range of tunable shear stress conditions. The design phase of the device has been supported by multiphysics modelling and has provided a comprehensive analysis of the operating principles of the bioreactor. Moreover, an explanatory example is herein presented with multiphysics simulations used to set the proper bioreactor operating conditions for preliminary in vitro biological tests on a human lung carcinoma cell line. The biological results demonstrate that the ultralow shear dynamic suspension provided by the device is beneficial for culturing cancer cell spheroids. In comparison to the static suspension control, dynamic cell suspension preserves morphological features, promotes intercellular connection, increases spheroid size (2.4-fold increase) and number of cycling cells (1.58-fold increase), and reduces double strand DNA damage (1.5-fold reduction). It is envisioned that the versatility of this bioreactor could allow investigation and expansion of different cell types in the future. PMID:27144306

  4. Serum-free spheroid suspension culture maintains high proliferation and differentiation potentials of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Alimperti, Stella; Wen, Yuan; Lei, Pedro; Tian, Jun; Campbell, Andrew; Andreadis, Stelios T.

    2016-01-01

    There have been many clinical trials recently using ex vivo-expanded human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to treat several indications such as graft-versus-host disease, acute myocardial infarction, Crohn’s disease, and multiple sclerosis. However, the conventional 2-dimensional (2D) culture of MSCs is laborious and limited in scale potential. The large dosage requirement for many of the indications further exacerbates this manufacturing challenge. In contrast, spheroid MSC culture does not require a cell attachment surface and is amenable to large-scale suspension cell culture techniques, such as stirred-tank bioreactors. In this present study, we developed and optimized serum free media for culturing MSC spheroids. We used Design of Experiment (DoE)-based strategies to systematically evaluate media mixtures and a panel of different components. The optimization yielded two prototype media that could allow MSCs to form aggregates and proliferate in both static cultures and dynamic cultures. The expanded MSCs expressed the expected surface markers for mesenchymal cells (CD73, CD90 and CD105). In addition, the expanded cells demonstrated multipotency and differentiated to the osteocyte, chondrocyte and adipocyte lineages, which showed similar or enhanced differentiation levels compared with serum-containing adherent cultures. PMID:24616445

  5. Aggregation by depletion attraction in cultures of bacteria producing exopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Dorken, Gary; Ferguson, Gail P.; French, Chris E.; Poon, Wilson C. K.

    2012-01-01

    In bacteria, the production of exopolysaccharides—polysaccharides secreted by the cells into their growth medium—is integral to the formation of aggregates and biofilms. These exopolysaccharides often form part of a matrix that holds the cells together. Investigating the bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti, we found that a mutant that overproduces the exopolysaccharide succinoglycan showed enhanced aggregation, resulting in phase separation of the cultures. However, the aggregates did not appear to be covered in polysaccharides. Succinoglycan purified from cultures was applied to different concentrations of cells, and observation of the phase behaviour showed that the limiting polymer concentration for aggregation and phase separation to occur decreased with increasing cell concentration, suggesting a ‘crowding mechanism’ was occurring. We suggest that, as found in colloidal dispersions, the presence of a non-adsorbing polymer in the form of the exopolysaccharide succinoglycan drives aggregation of S. meliloti by depletion attraction. This force leads to self-organization of the bacteria into small clusters of laterally aligned cells, and, furthermore, leads to aggregates clustering into biofilm-like structures on a surface. PMID:22896568

  6. Removal of excess polymer from a suspension containing hybrids of thermoresponsive polymer and carbon nanotubes using aggregation phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Katsuki; Kumashiro, Yoshikazu; Oura, Shusuke; Okano, Teruo; Umemura, Kazuo

    2016-09-01

    Hybrids of organic molecules and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are attractive candidates for nanobiodevices. The removal of organic molecules after dispersing the SWNTs in organic media is a significant step in the preparation of these hybrid suspensions. We investigated the aggregation phenomenon in hybrids of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) and SWNTs. Our results indicate that the hybrids efficiently precipitated when a buffer or salt solution was added to the suspension at 25 °C. 4 mM tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane hydrochloride (Tris–HCl) buffer was sufficient to precipitate the hybrids. Then, by repeated centrifugations and replacements of solvents, excess PNIPAAm molecules were efficiently removed from the suspension. Results of UV–vis spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) suggest that the PNIPAAm–SWNT hybrids retained their hybridized structures even after the treatment process. However, the aggregation phenomenon was not observed at 4 °C.

  7. Removal of excess polymer from a suspension containing hybrids of thermoresponsive polymer and carbon nanotubes using aggregation phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Katsuki; Kumashiro, Yoshikazu; Oura, Shusuke; Okano, Teruo; Umemura, Kazuo

    2016-09-01

    Hybrids of organic molecules and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are attractive candidates for nanobiodevices. The removal of organic molecules after dispersing the SWNTs in organic media is a significant step in the preparation of these hybrid suspensions. We investigated the aggregation phenomenon in hybrids of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) and SWNTs. Our results indicate that the hybrids efficiently precipitated when a buffer or salt solution was added to the suspension at 25 °C. 4 mM tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane hydrochloride (Tris-HCl) buffer was sufficient to precipitate the hybrids. Then, by repeated centrifugations and replacements of solvents, excess PNIPAAm molecules were efficiently removed from the suspension. Results of UV-vis spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) suggest that the PNIPAAm-SWNT hybrids retained their hybridized structures even after the treatment process. However, the aggregation phenomenon was not observed at 4 °C.

  8. Recellularization of Decellularized Lung Scaffolds Is Enhanced by Dynamic Suspension Culture

    PubMed Central

    Crabbé, Aurélie; Liu, Yulong; Sarker, Shameema F.; Bonenfant, Nicholas R.; Barrila, Jennifer; Borg, Zachary D.; Lee, James J.; Weiss, Daniel J.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2015-01-01

    Strategies are needed to improve repopulation of decellularized lung scaffolds with stromal and functional epithelial cells. We demonstrate that decellularized mouse lungs recellularized in a dynamic low fluid shear suspension bioreactor, termed the rotating wall vessel (RWV), contained more cells with decreased apoptosis, increased proliferation and enhanced levels of total RNA compared to static recellularization conditions. These results were observed with two relevant mouse cell types: bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells (MSCs) and alveolar type II cells (C10). In addition, MSCs cultured in decellularized lungs under static but not bioreactor conditions formed multilayered aggregates. Gene expression and immunohistochemical analyses suggested differentiation of MSCs into collagen I-producing fibroblast-like cells in the bioreactor, indicating enhanced potential for remodeling of the decellularized scaffold matrix. In conclusion, dynamic suspension culture is promising for enhancing repopulation of decellularized lungs, and could contribute to remodeling the extracellular matrix of the scaffolds with subsequent effects on differentiation and functionality of inoculated cells. PMID:25962111

  9. Auxin requirements of sycamore cells in suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Moloney, M M; Hall, J F; Robinson, G M; Elliott, M C

    1983-04-01

    Sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cell suspension cultures (strain OS) require 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in their culture medium for normal growth. If the 2,4-D is omitted, rates of cell division are dramatically reduced and cell lysis may occur. Despite this ;auxin requirement,' it has been shown by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry that the cells synthesize indol-3yl-acetic acid (IAA). Changes in free 2,4-D and IAA in the cells during a culture passage have been monitored.There is a rapid uptake of 2,4-D by the cells during the lag phase leading to a maximum concentration per cell (125 nanograms per 10(6) cells) on day 2 followed by a decline to 45 nanograms per 10(6) cells by day 9 (middle of linear phase). The initial concentration of IAA (0.08 nanograms per 10(6) cells) rises slowly to a peak of 1.4 nanograms per 10(6) cells by day 9 then decreases rapidly to 0.2 nanograms per 10(6) cells by day 15 (early declining phase) and 0.08 nanograms per 10(6) cells by day 23 (early stationary phase).

  10. Cultural Consensus Theory: Aggregating Continuous Responses in a Finite Interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelder, William H.; Strashny, Alex; Romney, A. Kimball

    Cultural consensus theory (CCT) consists of cognitive models for aggregating responses of "informants" to test items about some domain of their shared cultural knowledge. This paper develops a CCT model for items requiring bounded numerical responses, e.g. probability estimates, confidence judgments, or similarity judgments. The model assumes that each item generates a latent random representation in each informant, with mean equal to the consensus answer and variance depending jointly on the informant and the location of the consensus answer. The manifest responses may reflect biases of the informants. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods were used to estimate the model, and simulation studies validated the approach. The model was applied to an existing cross-cultural dataset involving native Japanese and English speakers judging the similarity of emotion terms. The results sharpened earlier studies that showed that both cultures appear to have very similar cognitive representations of emotion terms.

  11. Interpreting nanoscale size-effects in aggregated Fe-oxide suspensions: Reaction of Fe(II) with Goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cwiertny, David M.; Handler, Robert M.; Schaefer, Michael V.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Scherer, Michelle M.

    2008-03-01

    The Fe(II)/Fe(III) redox couple plays an important role in both the subsurface fate and transport of groundwater pollutants and the global cycling of carbon and nitrogen in iron-limited marine environments. Iron oxide particles involved in these redox processes exhibit broad size distributions, and the recent demonstrations of dramatic nanoscale size-effects with various metal oxides has compelled us, as well as many others, to consider whether the rate and extent of Fe(II)/Fe(III) cycling depends upon oxide particle size in natural systems. Here, we investigated the reaction of Fe(II) with three different goethite particle sizes in pH 7.5 suspensions. Acicular goethite rods with primary particle dimensions ranging from 7 by 80 nm to 25 by 670 nm were studied. Similar behavior with respect to Fe(II) sorption, electron transfer and nitrobenzene reduction was observed on a mass-normalized basis despite almost a threefold difference in goethite specific surface areas. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and sedimentation measurements all indicated that, at pH 7.5, significant aggregation occurred with all three sizes of goethite particles. SEM images further revealed that nanoscale particles formed dense aggregates on the order of several microns in diameter. The clear formation of particle aggregates in solution raises questions regarding the use of primary particle surface area as a basis for assessing nanoscale size-effects in iron oxide suspensions at circum-neutral pH values. In our case, normalizing the Fe(II) sorption densities and rate constants for nitrobenzene reduction by BET surface area implies that goethite nanoparticles are less reactive than larger particles. We suspect, however, that aggregation is responsible for this observed size-dependence, and argue that BET values should not be used to assess differences in surface site density or intrinsic surface reactivity in aggregated particle suspensions. In order to

  12. Phenylpropanoid metabolism in suspension cultures of Vanilla planifolia Andr

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, C.; Brodelius, P.E. )

    1990-09-01

    Feeding of cinnamic acid and ferulic acid to non-treated and chitosan-treated cell suspension cultures of Vanilla planifolia resulted in the formation of trace amounts of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (5.2 micrograms per gram fresh weight of cells) and vanillic acid (6.4 micrograms per gram fresh weight of cells), respectively. Addition of a 4-hydroxycinnamate: CoA-ligase inhibitor, 3,4-(methylenedioxy)-cinnamic acid (MDCA), resulted in a reduced biosynthesis of ligneous material with a simultaneous significant increased vanillic acid formation (around 75 micrograms per gram fresh weight of cells). A K{sub i} of 100 micromolar for 4-hydroxycinnamate: CoA-ligase in a crude preparation was estimated for this inhibitor. It is suggested that the conversion of cinnamic acids into benzoic acids does not involve cinnamoyl CoA esters as intermediates. Feeding of {sup 14}C-cinnamic acid and {sup 14}C-ferulic acid to cells treated with MDCA indicate that cinnamic acid, but not ferulic acid, is a precursor of vanillic acid in these cultivated cells of V. planifolia.

  13. Beryllium toxicity testing in the suspension culture of mouse fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Rössner, P; Bencko, V

    1980-01-01

    Suspension culture of mouse fibroblast cell line L-A 115 was used to test beryllium toxicity in the presence of magnesium ions. Beryllium added to the MEM cultivation medium was bound in a complex with sulphosalicylic acid BeSSA complex, because the use of beryllium chloride turned out to yield ineffective beryllium phosphate that formed macroscopically detectable insoluble opacities. The BeSSA complex was used in the concentration range: 10(-3)--10(-9)M, magnesium was used in 3 concentrations: 10(-1)M, 5 x 10(-2)M and 10(-2)M. Growth curve analysis revealed pronounced beryllium toxicity at the concentration of 10(-3)M, magnesium-produced toxic changes were observed only at the concentration of 10(-1)M. No competition between the beryllium and magnesium ions was recorded. It is assumed that the possible beryllium-magnesium competition was significantly modified by the use of BeSSA complex-bound beryllium.

  14. Diacylglycerol Kinase from Suspension Cultured Plant Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Wissing, Josef; Heim, Sabina; Wagner, Karl G.

    1989-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase (ATP:1,2-diacylglycerol 3-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.107) from suspension-cultured Catharanthus roseus cells was extracted from a membrane fraction with 0.6% Triton X-100 and 150 millimolar NaCl and was purified about 900-fold by DEAE-cellulose, blue Sepharose, gel permeation, and phenyl-Sepharose chromatography. The enzyme is obviously membrane bound as activity in the cytosol could not be detected. In the presence of detergents such as Triton X-100 (3-[3-cholamidopropyl]dimethylamino)-1-propanesulfonate (Chaps), or deoxycholate, a molecular weight of about 250,000 was determined by gel filtration. In glycerol density gradients, the enzyme sedimented slightly more slowly than bovine serum albumin, indicating a molecular weight of less than 68,000. On sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis enzyme activity could be assigned to a protein of 51,000 daltons. As found previously for bacterial and animal diacylglycerol kinases, the purified enzyme was completely devoid of activity without the addition of phospholipids or deoxycholate. Cardiolipin was found to be most effective, whereas higher amounts of detergent were inhibitory. The enzyme needs divalent cations for activity, with Mg2+ ions being the most effective. Apparent Km values for ATP and diacylglycerol were determined as 100 and 250 micromolar, respectively. PMID:16666963

  15. Effects of aqueous suspensions of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on Artemia salina: assessment of nanoparticle aggregation, accumulation and toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ates, Mehmet; Daniels, James; Arslan, Zikri; Farah, Ibrahim O.

    2012-01-01

    Aquatic stability and impact of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs, 10-30 nm) was investigated using Artemia salina. Acute exposure was conducted on nauplii (larvae) and adults in seawater in a concentration range from 10 to 100 mg/L TiO2 NPs for 24 h and 96 h. Rapid aggregation occurred in all suspensions of TiO2 NPs to form micrometer size particles. Yet, both nauplii and adults accumulated the aggregates significantly. Average TiO2 content in nauplii ranged from 0.47 to 3.19 mg/g and from 1.29 to 4.43 mg/g in 24 h and 96 h, respectively. Accumulation in adults was higher ranging from 2.30 to 4.19 mg/g and from 4.38 to 6.20 mg/g in 24 h and 96 h, respectively. Phase contrast microscopy images revealed that Artemia were unable to excrete the particles. Thus, the TiO2 aggregates filled inside the guts. No significant mortality or toxicity occurred within 24 h at any dose. Lipid peroxidation levels characterized with malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations were not statistically different from those of the controls (p>0.05). These results suggested that suspensions of the TiO2 NPs were nontoxic to Artemia, most likely due to the formation of benign TiO2 aggregates in water. In contrast, both mortality and lipid peroxidation increased in extended exposure to 96 h. Highest mortality occurred in 100 mg/L TiO2 NP suspensions; 18% for nauplii and 14% for adults (LC50 > 100 mg/L). These effects were attributed to the particle loading inside the guts leading to oxidative stress as a result of impaired food uptake for a long period of time. PMID:22810381

  16. Anaerobic bacteria grow within Candida albicans biofilms and induce biofilm formation in suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Fox, Emily P; Cowley, Elise S; Nobile, Clarissa J; Hartooni, Nairi; Newman, Dianne K; Johnson, Alexander D

    2014-10-20

    The human microbiome contains diverse microorganisms, which share and compete for the same environmental niches. A major microbial growth form in the human body is the biofilm state, where tightly packed bacterial, archaeal, and fungal cells must cooperate and/or compete for resources in order to survive. We examined mixed biofilms composed of the major fungal species of the gut microbiome, Candida albicans, and each of five prevalent bacterial gastrointestinal inhabitants: Bacteroides fragilis, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Enterococcus faecalis. We observed that biofilms formed by C. albicans provide a hypoxic microenvironment that supports the growth of two anaerobic bacteria, even when cultured in ambient oxic conditions that are normally toxic to the bacteria. We also found that coculture with bacteria in biofilms induces massive gene expression changes in C. albicans, including upregulation of WOR1, which encodes a transcription regulator that controls a phenotypic switch in C. albicans, from the "white" cell type to the "opaque" cell type. Finally, we observed that in suspension cultures, C. perfringens induces aggregation of C. albicans into "mini-biofilms," which allow C. perfringens cells to survive in a normally toxic environment. This work indicates that bacteria and C. albicans interactions modulate the local chemistry of their environment in multiple ways to create niches favorable to their growth and survival.

  17. Suspension culture of human pluripotent stem cells in controlled, stirred bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Olmer, Ruth; Lange, Andreas; Selzer, Sebastian; Kasper, Cornelia; Haverich, Axel; Martin, Ulrich; Zweigerdt, Robert

    2012-10-01

    Therapeutic and industrial applications of pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives require large cell quantities generated in defined conditions. To this end, we have translated single cell-inoculated suspension cultures of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs; including human induced pluripotent stem cells [hiPS] and human embryonic stem cells [hESC]) to stirred tank bioreactors. These systems that are widely used in biopharmaceutical industry allow straightforward scale up and detailed online monitoring of key process parameters. To ensure minimum medium consumption, but in parallel functional integration of all probes mandatory for process monitoring, that is, for pO₂ and pH, experiments were performed in 100 mL culture volume in a "mini reactor platform" consisting of four independently controlled vessels. By establishing defined parameters for tightly controlled cell inoculation and aggregate formation up to 2×10⁸ hiPSCs/100 mL were generated in a single process run in 7 days. Expression of pluripotency markers and ability of cells to differentiate into derivates of all three germ layers in vitro was maintained, underlining practical utility of this new process. The presented data provide key steps toward scalable mass expansion of human iPS and ES cells thereby enabling translation of stem cell research to (pre)clinical application in relevant large animal models and valuable in vitro assays for drug development and validation as well.

  18. Suspension Culture of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells in Controlled, Stirred Bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Olmer, Ruth; Lange, Andreas; Selzer, Sebastian; Kasper, Cornelia; Haverich, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic and industrial applications of pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives require large cell quantities generated in defined conditions. To this end, we have translated single cell-inoculated suspension cultures of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs; including human induced pluripotent stem cells [hiPS] and human embryonic stem cells [hESC]) to stirred tank bioreactors. These systems that are widely used in biopharmaceutical industry allow straightforward scale up and detailed online monitoring of key process parameters. To ensure minimum medium consumption, but in parallel functional integration of all probes mandatory for process monitoring, that is, for pO2 and pH, experiments were performed in 100 mL culture volume in a “mini reactor platform” consisting of four independently controlled vessels. By establishing defined parameters for tightly controlled cell inoculation and aggregate formation up to 2×108 hiPSCs/100 mL were generated in a single process run in 7 days. Expression of pluripotency markers and ability of cells to differentiate into derivates of all three germ layers in vitro was maintained, underlining practical utility of this new process. The presented data provide key steps toward scalable mass expansion of human iPS and ES cells thereby enabling translation of stem cell research to (pre)clinical application in relevant large animal models and valuable in vitro assays for drug development and validation as well. PMID:22519745

  19. Plastid transformation of sporelings and suspension-cultured cells from the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha L.

    PubMed

    Chiyoda, Shota; Yamato, Katsuyuki T; Kohchi, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    We describe simple and efficient plastid transformation methods for suspension-cultured cells and sporelings of the liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha L. Use of rapidly proliferating cells such as suspension-cultured cells and sporelings, which are immature thalli developing from spores, as targets made plastid transformation by particle bombardment efficient. Selection on a sucrose-free medium and linearization of the transformation vector significantly improved the recovery rate of plastid transformants. With the methods described here, a few plastid transformants are obtained from a single bombardment of sporelings, while more efficient plastid transformation is expected in suspension-cultured cells, ~60 transformants from a single bombardment. Homoplasmic transformants of thalli are obtained immediately after primary selection, whereas homoplasmic transformants from suspension-cultured cells are obtained after 12-16 weeks of repeated subculture. PMID:24599873

  20. Controlling expansion and cardiomyogenic differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells in scalable suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Kempf, Henning; Olmer, Ruth; Kropp, Christina; Rückert, Michael; Jara-Avaca, Monica; Robles-Diaz, Diana; Franke, Annika; Elliott, David A; Wojciechowski, Daniel; Fischer, Martin; Roa Lara, Angelica; Kensah, George; Gruh, Ina; Haverich, Axel; Martin, Ulrich; Zweigerdt, Robert

    2014-12-01

    To harness the potential of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), an abundant supply of their progenies is required. Here, hPSC expansion as matrix-independent aggregates in suspension culture was combined with cardiomyogenic differentiation using chemical Wnt pathway modulators. A multiwell screen was scaled up to stirred Erlenmeyer flasks and subsequently to tank bioreactors, applying controlled feeding strategies (batch and cyclic perfusion). Cardiomyogenesis was sensitive to the GSK3 inhibitor CHIR99021 concentration, whereas the aggregate size was no prevailing factor across culture platforms. However, in bioreactors, the pattern of aggregate formation in the expansion phase dominated subsequent differentiation. Global profiling revealed a culture-dependent expression of BMP agonists/antagonists, suggesting their decisive role in cell-fate determination. Furthermore, metallothionein was discovered as a potentially stress-related marker in hPSCs. In 100 ml bioreactors, the production of 40 million predominantly ventricular-like cardiomyocytes (up to 85% purity) was enabled that were directly applicable to bioartificial cardiac tissue formation. PMID:25454631

  1. Optimization of culture parameters for production of podophyllotoxin in suspension culture of Podophyllum hexandrum.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Srivastava, A K; Bisaria, V S

    2002-01-01

    The root explants of the germinated seedlings of Podophyllum hexandrum were grown in MS medium supplemented with indole acetic acid (IAA) (2 mg/L) and activated charcoal (0.5%), and healthy callus culture was obtained after incubation for 3 wk at 20 degrees C. The cultivation of plant cells in shake flask was associated with problems such as clumping of cells and browning of media, which were solved by the addition of pectinase and polyvinylpyrrolidone. The effect of major media components and carbon source was studied on the growth and podophyllotoxin production in suspension culture. It was found that glucose was a better carbon source than sucrose and that NH4+:NO3- ratio (total nitrogen concentration of 60 mM) and PO4(3-) did not have much effect on the growth and product formation. The relative effect of culture parameters (inoculum level, pH, IAA, glucose, NH4+:NO3- ratio, and PO4(3-)) on the overall growth and product response of the plant cell suspension culture was further investigated by Plackett-Burman design. This indicated that inoculum level, glucose, IAA, and pH had significant effects on growth and production of podophyllotoxin. To identify the exact optimum concentrations of these parameters on culture growth and podophyllotoxin production, central composite design experiments were formulated. The overall response equations with respect to growth and podophyllotoxin production as a function of these culture parameters were developed and used to determine the optimum concentrations of these parameters, which were pH 6.0, 1.25 mg/L of IAA, 72 g/L of glucose, and inoculum level of 8 g/L.

  2. Photoautotrophic Growth of Soybean Cells in Suspension Culture

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Michael E.; Sherrard, Joseph H.; Widholm, Jack M.

    1983-01-01

    Highly chlorophyllous photomixotrophic callus was visually selected from callus originating from soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr. var. Corsoy) cotyledon. Suspension cultures initiated from this callus became photoautotrophic under continuous light with an atmosphere of 5% CO2 (balance air). Dry weight increases of 1000 to 1400% in the 2-week subculture period have been observed. The cellular Chl content ranged from 4.4 to 5.9 micrograms per milligram dry weight which is about 75 to 90% of the Chl content in soybean leaves under equivalent illumination (300 micro-Einsteins per square meter per second). No growth can be observed in the dark in sucrose-lacking medium or in the presence of 0.5 micromolar 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea, a concentration which does not inhibit heterotrophic growth (on sucrose). Photoautotrophic growth has an absolute requirement for elevated CO2 concentrations (>1%). During the 14-day subculture period, growth (fresh weight and dry weight) is logarithmic. Photosynthesis quickly increases after day 4, reaching a peak of 83 micromoles CO2 incorporated per milligram Chl per hour while dark respiration decreases 90% from day 2 to day 6. The pH of the growth medium quickly drops from 7.0 to 4.5 before slowly increasing to 5.0 by day 14. At this pH range and light intensity (200-300 microEinsteins per square meter per second), no O2 evolution could be detected although at high pH and light intensity O2 evolution was recorded. PMID:16663019

  3. Detection of bacterial aggregation in cell suspensions treated with pathogenic bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The early interaction between plant cells and pathogenic bacteria were studied using tobacco cell suspensions treated with pathogenic and nonpathogenic Pseudomonas species. Previous studies of this system have documented that interactions with pathogens that cause a hypersensitive response on whole...

  4. The effect of magnetically induced linear aggregates on proton transverse relaxation rates of aqueous suspensions of polymer coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Saville, Steven L; Woodward, Robert C; House, Michael J; Tokarev, Alexander; Hammers, Jacob; Qi, Bin; Shaw, Jeremy; Saunders, Martin; Varsani, Rahi R; St Pierre, Tim G; Mefford, O Thompson

    2013-03-01

    It has been recently reported that for some suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles the transverse proton relaxation rate, R(2), is dependent on the time that the sample is exposed to an applied magnetic field. This time dependence has been linked to the formation of linear aggregates or chains in an applied magnetic field via numerical modeling. It is widely known that chain formation occurs in more concentrated ferrofluids systems and that this has an affect on the ferrofluid properties. In this work we examine the relationships between colloidal stability, the formation of these linear structures, and changes observed in the proton transverse relaxation rate of aqueous suspensions of magnetic particles. A series of iron oxide nanoparticles with varying stabilizing ligand brush lengths were synthesized. These systems were characterized with dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, dark-field optical microscopy, and proton transverse relaxation rate measurements. The dark field optical microscopy and R(2) measurements were made in similar magnetic fields over the same time scale so as to correlate the reduction of the transverse relaxivity with the formation of linear aggregates. Our results indicate that varying the ligand length has a direct effect on the colloidal arrangement of the system in a magnetic field, producing differences in the rate and size of chain formation, and hence systematic changes in transverse relaxation rates over time. With increasing ligand brush length, attractive inter-particle interactions are reduced, which results in slower aggregate formation and shorter linear aggregate length. These results have implications for the stabilization, characterization and potentially the toxicity of magnetic nanoparticle systems used in biomedical applications. PMID:23389324

  5. Comparison of the compressive yield response of aggregated suspensions: Pressure filtration, centrifugation, and osmotic consolidation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.T.; Melant, R.M.; Zukoski, C.F.

    1996-10-01

    The compressive rheological responses of suspensions containing flocculated kaolin, alumina (average particle sizes of 0.2 and 0.5 {micro}m), and hydrous zirconia (average particle sizes of 8, 57, and 139 nm) particles have been measured using three different techniques: pressure filtration, volume fraction profile during centrifugation, and sediment height during centrifugation at multiple spinning speeds. While the volume fraction profile technique appears to be experimentally most robust, equivalent responses are found using the different techniques, indicating that the compressive yield stress is a material property of a given suspension. The compressive yield stress of each suspension increases rapidly with volume fraction but cannot be generally described using simple power-law or exponential fits. The compressive yield stress also increases with the inverse square of particle size. The packing behavior of the suspensions undergoing osmotic consolidation is compared with the mechanical compressive yield response. Some suspensions exhibited the same packing behavior as in the mechanical techniques, while others consistently packed to higher densities during osmotic consolidation. Although equivalent osmotic and mechanical loads do not always result in the same volume fractions, the similar increases in volume fraction with applied driving force suggest that both the osmotic and mechanical techniques are controlled by the force needed to rearrange the particle network.

  6. Particle Formation and Aggregation of a Therapeutic Protein in Nanobubble Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Snell, Jared R; Zhou, Chen; Carpenter, John F; Randolph, Theodore W

    2016-10-01

    The generation of nanobubbles following reconstitution of lyophilized trehalose formulations has recently been reported. Here, we characterize particle formation and aggregation of recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (rhIL-1ra) in reconstituted formulations of lyophilized trehalose. Particle characterization methods including resonant mass measurement and nanoparticle tracking analysis were used to count and size particles generated upon reconstitution of lyophilized trehalose formulations. In addition, accelerated degradation studies were conducted to monitor rhIL-1ra aggregation in solutions containing various concentrations of suspended nanobubbles. Reconstitution of lyophilized trehalose formulations with solutions containing rhIL-1ra reduced nanobubble concentrations and generated negatively buoyant particles attributed to aggregated rhIL-1ra. Furthermore, levels of rhIL-1ra aggregation following incubation in aqueous solution correlated with concentrations of suspended nanobubbles. The results of this study suggest that nanobubbles may be a contributor to protein aggregation and particle formation in reconstituted, lyophilized therapeutic protein formulations.

  7. Growing Arabidopsis in vitro: cell suspensions, in vitro culture, and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Barkla, Bronwyn J; Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Pantoja, Omar

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of basic methods in Arabidopsis tissue culture is beneficial for any laboratory working on this model plant. Tissue culture refers to the aseptic growth of cells, organs, or plants in a controlled environment, in which physical, nutrient, and hormonal conditions can all be easily manipulated and monitored. The methodology facilitates the production of a large number of plants that are genetically identical over a relatively short growth period. Techniques, including callus production, cell suspension cultures, and plant regeneration, are all indispensable tools for the study of cellular biochemical and molecular processes. Plant regeneration is a key technology for successful stable plant transformation, while cell suspension cultures can be exploited for metabolite profiling and mining. In this chapter we report methods for the successful and highly efficient in vitro regeneration of plants and production of stable cell suspension lines from leaf explants of both Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis halleri.

  8. Rapid kinetic labeling of Arabidopsis cell suspension cultures: Implications for models of lipid export from plastids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    T-87 suspension cell cultures are increasingly used in Arabidopsis research, but there are no reports describing their lipid composition or biosynthesis. To evaluate if T-87 cell cultures as a model system for analysis of lipid metabolism, including tests of gene candidate functions, we have deter...

  9. Biotechnological enhancement of capsaicin biosynthesis in cell suspension cultures of Naga King Chili (Capsicum chinense Jacq.).

    PubMed

    Kehie, Mechuselie; Kumaria, Suman; Tandon, Pramod

    2016-01-01

    Cell suspension cultures were initiated from hypocotyl derived callus to induce capsaicin biosynthesis in suspension cultures of Naga King Chili (Capsicum chinense Jacq.). Efficient capsaicin production with high growth index (GI) was obtained by exposing cells to salicylic acid (SA) and calcium channel modulators in suspension cultures. The time course of capsaicin formation is related to the cell growth profile in a batch culture. Cells cultivated in the standard medium (SM) initially showed low level of capsaicin yield during active growth. When the cells approached stationary phase, cell growth and cell viability decreased whereas capsaicin production increased continuously. In the fed-batch cultures, the highest capsaicin yield (567.4 ± 8.1 μgg(1) fresh weight) (f.wt) was obtained by feeding the cells with 1 mM SA. However, SA feeding during cultivation repressed the cell growth. Enhanced cell growth (3.1 ± 0.1 GI/culture) and capsaicin yield (534 ± 7.8 μgg(-1)f.wt) were obtained when the cells were fed with calcium ionophore A23187 (0.5 mM) on day 25 as compared to the control. Addition of the calcium channel blocker verapamil hydrochloride (100 mM) inhibited cell growth and capsaicin production in Naga King Chili suspension cell cultures. PMID:26578343

  10. Biotechnological enhancement of capsaicin biosynthesis in cell suspension cultures of Naga King Chili (Capsicum chinense Jacq.).

    PubMed

    Kehie, Mechuselie; Kumaria, Suman; Tandon, Pramod

    2016-01-01

    Cell suspension cultures were initiated from hypocotyl derived callus to induce capsaicin biosynthesis in suspension cultures of Naga King Chili (Capsicum chinense Jacq.). Efficient capsaicin production with high growth index (GI) was obtained by exposing cells to salicylic acid (SA) and calcium channel modulators in suspension cultures. The time course of capsaicin formation is related to the cell growth profile in a batch culture. Cells cultivated in the standard medium (SM) initially showed low level of capsaicin yield during active growth. When the cells approached stationary phase, cell growth and cell viability decreased whereas capsaicin production increased continuously. In the fed-batch cultures, the highest capsaicin yield (567.4 ± 8.1 μgg(1) fresh weight) (f.wt) was obtained by feeding the cells with 1 mM SA. However, SA feeding during cultivation repressed the cell growth. Enhanced cell growth (3.1 ± 0.1 GI/culture) and capsaicin yield (534 ± 7.8 μgg(-1)f.wt) were obtained when the cells were fed with calcium ionophore A23187 (0.5 mM) on day 25 as compared to the control. Addition of the calcium channel blocker verapamil hydrochloride (100 mM) inhibited cell growth and capsaicin production in Naga King Chili suspension cell cultures.

  11. Putrescine facilitated enhancement of capsaicin production in cell suspension cultures of Capsicum frutescens.

    PubMed

    Sudha, Govindaswamy; Ravishankar, Gokare A

    2003-04-01

    Putrescine treatment (0.1 mmol/L) influenced enhancement of growth and capsaicin production in the cell suspension cultures of C. frutescens. The administration of polyamine inhibitor DFMA (alpha-DL-difluoromethylarginine) resulted in a reduction of the growth, capsaicin content and the endogenous titres of polyamines (PAs). The capsaicin synthase activity was also higher in the putrescine (Put) treated cultures. Ethylene levels were lower in the cultures treated with putrescine. This study suggested that Put facilitates growth and capsaicin production.

  12. Bioconversion of artemisinin to its nonperoxidic derivative deoxyartemisinin through suspension cultures of Withania somnifera Dunal.

    PubMed

    Sabir, Farzana; Kumar, Anil; Tiwari, Pragya; Pathak, Neelam; Sangwan, Rajender S; Bhakuni, Rajendra S; Sangwan, Neelam S

    2010-01-01

    Biotransformation of artemisinin was investigated with two different cell lines of suspension cultures of Withania somnifera. Both cell lines exhibited potential to transform artemisinin into its nonperoxidic analogue, deoxyartemisinin, by eliminating the peroxo bridge of artemisinin. The enzyme involved in the reaction is assumed to be artemisinin peroxidase, and its activity in extracts of W. somnifera leaves was detected. Thus, the non-native cell-free extract of W. somnifera and suspension culture-mediated bioconversion can be a promising tool for further manipulation of pharmaceutical compounds. PMID:21138064

  13. Particle Restabilization in Silica/PEG/Ethanol Suspensions: How Strongly do Polymers Need To Adsorb To Stabilize Against Aggregation?

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, So Youn; Zukoski, Charles F.

    2014-09-24

    We study the effects of increasing the concentration of a low molecular weight polyethylene glycol on the stability of 44 nm diameter silica nanoparticles suspended in ethanol. Polymer concentration, c{sub p}, is increased from zero to that characterizing the polymer melt. Particle stability is accessed through measurement of the particle second-virial coefficient, B{sub -2}, performed by light scattering and ultrasmall angle X-ray scattering (USAXS). The results show that at low polymer concentration, c{sub p} < 3 wt %, B{sub -2} values are positive, indicating repulsive interactions between particles. B{sub -2} decreases at intermediate concentrations (3 wt % < c{sub p} < 50 wt %), and particles aggregates are formed. At high concentrations (50 wt % < c{sub p}) B{sub -2} increases and stabilizes at a value expected for hard spheres with a diameter near 44 nm, indicating the particles are thermodynamically stable. At intermediate polymer concentrations, rates of aggregation are determined by measuring time-dependent changes in the suspension turbidity, revealing that aggregation is slowed by the necessity of the particles diffusing over a repulsive barrier in the pair potential. The magnitude of the barrier passes through a minimum at c{sub p} {approx} 12 wt % where it has a value of {approx}12kT. These results are understood in terms of a reduction of electrostatic repulsion and van der Waals attractions with increasing c{sub p}. Depletion attractions are found to play a minor role in particle stability. A model is presented suggesting displacement of weakly adsorbed polymer leads to slow aggregation at intermediate concentration, and we conclude that a general model of depletion restabilization may involve increased strength of polymer adsorption with increasing polymer concentration.

  14. A predictive aggregate transport model for microfiltration of combined macromolecular solutions and poly-disperse suspensions: model development.

    PubMed

    Baruah, Gautam Lal; Belfort, Georges

    2003-01-01

    A methodology, called the aggregate transport model, is presented that can a priori predict both the pressure-independent permeation flux and yield of target species for the microfiltration of poly-disperse solutions. The model captures the phenomenon of critical shear rate. Beyond the critical shear rate (expressed as a ratio of shear rate to permeation flux), the transmission of proteins drops sharply as a result of cake classification. The widely reported benefits of operating at uniform transmembrane pressure and constant wall concentration follow from this method. The methodology is general in nature and can be used predictively to obtain an optimal balance between flux and yield of target species during the microfiltration of many commercial poly-disperse suspensions. In the accompanying paper we test this model for microfiltration of transgenic whole goat milk.

  15. Impact of Environmental Conditions (pH, Ionic Strength, And Electrolyte Type) On The Surface Charge And Aggregation Of Silver Nanoparticles Suspensions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of capping agents and environmental conditions (pH, ionic strength, and background electrolytes) on surface charge and aggregation potential of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) suspensions were investigated. Capping agents are chemicals used in the synthesis of nanopartic...

  16. Simplified extraction of bisphenols from bacterial culture suspensions and solid matrices.

    PubMed

    Im, Jeongdae; Yip, Dan; Lee, Jaejin; Löffler, Frank E

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate the utility of a simple and fast methanol extraction method that achieves similar bisphenols recovery efficiencies from microbial culture suspensions and sediment material than more laborious and costly extraction procedures. The methanol extraction method may have broad application for the rapid analysis of hydrophobic compounds in biodegradation studies. PMID:27179438

  17. Establishment of cell suspension cultures of two Costa Rican Jatropha species (Euphorbiaceae).

    PubMed

    Solís-Ramos, Laura Yesenia; Carballo, Laura Miranda; Valdez-Melara, Marta

    2013-09-01

    J. curcas has been studied in different countries and some interesting agronomic, pharmacological and industrial properties have been reported. More recently, it has been considered an important alternative source for biofuel production. The objective of this study was to establish a long-term method for the maintenance of calli and cell suspension cultures of the local species J. curcas and J. gossypifolia, in order to allow future studies for novel compounds with pharmaceutical or industrial applications. For this, friable calli were successfully induced from hypocotyl segments of.. curcas and J. gossypifolia that were cultured in semisolid MS media supplemented with 1.5 mg/L, and 0.5 mg/L of 2,4-D, respectively. Cell suspension cultures of J. curcas were established using 1 g of 35 and 60-day calli, in 50 mL of liquid MS media supplied with 1.5 mg/L of 2,4-D; sucrose and maltose were additionally evaluated as carbon sources. After 35 days, cell suspension cultures initiated with 35-day calli, showed greater cell growth with a maximum biomass of 194.9 g/L fresh weight, 6.59 g/L dry weight and 17.3% packed volume. The exponential phase ended at day 35 for cultures initiated with 35-day calli, and at day 21 for cultures initiated with 60-day calli. Higher biomass production was obtained with sucrose. Cell cultures were established with 35-day calli in MS media with the same 2,4-D concentration used for calli induction and 30g/L sucrose. This medium was considered optimum for the maintenance and growth of cell suspensions for both species, with sub-cultures every 20 days. The biotechnological potential for the production of bioactive compounds in these species for pharmacological, agricultural and industrial applications is being evaluated.

  18. [Effects of several factors on cell growth and ginsenoside accumulation of Panax ginseng suspension culture].

    PubMed

    Li, Tie-Jun; Lian, Mei-Lan; Yu, Dan; Shao, Chun-Hui; Piao, Xuan-Chun

    2013-12-01

    To improve cell suspension culture system of Panax ginseng, the dynamic of cell growth and medium consumption were studied, and the effects of filter on the culture vessel, revolution number, and inoculation density on cell growth and ginsenoside accumulation were also investigated. The maximum cell growth and ginsenoside accumulation was found on the 20th days of suspension culture, therefore, 20 days were confirmed as a suitable culture period for mass production of ginsenoside. Cell growth and ginsenoside content were promoted when the culture vessel had a ventilated filter. Revolution speed during suspension culture affected cell growth, but not ginsenoside content, a peak of ginsenoside productivity was found in the treatment of 120 r x min(-1). Inoculation density also influenced cell growth and ginsenoside accumulation, inoculation density of 6 g was better than other inoculation densities, the ginsenoside content and productivity were up to 12.8 mg x g(-1) DW and 146.6 mg x L(-1), respectively. PMID:24791486

  19. Growth inhibition by exogenous proline and its metabolism in saltgrass (Distichlis spicata) suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, M M; Heyser, J W

    1988-08-01

    The growth of Distichlis spicata suspension cultures in LS medium without NaCl was inhibited 54% by 2 mM proline. In medium containing 260 mM NaCl, 10 mM proline inhibited growth by only 22%. The uptake and metabolism of 10 mM L-[1-(13)C] proline was followed by (13)C NMR and ninhydrin analyses of suspensions cultured in the presence of 0 or 260 mM NaCl. Uptake of 85 to 92% of the exogenous proline occurred within 72 h in all media. In 10 mM proline and no NaCl, cellular proline reached a maximm of 51.5 μmoles/g FW compared to 1.9 μmoles/g FW in suspensions not grown on proline. In medium containing 260 mM NaCl and proline, cellular proline reached 59-65 μmoles/g FW compared to 30-40 μmoles/g FW in controls grown without proline. The (13)C-label in the proline-C1 was either retained in proline or disappeared, presumably released as carbon dioxide, by catabolism through the TCA cycle. Since no metabolite of (13)C-proline was detected by NMR, proline was considered to be the molecule which inhibited the suspension culture growth.

  20. Effects of Selected Physicochemical Parameters on Zerumbone Production of Zingiber zerumbet Smith Cell Suspension Culture

    PubMed Central

    Annuar, Mohamad Suffian Mohamad; Khalid, Norzulaani

    2015-01-01

    Zingiber zerumbet Smith is an important herb that contains bioactive phytomedicinal compound, zerumbone. To enhance cell growth and production of this useful compound, we investigated the growth conditions of cell suspension culture. Embryogenic callus generated from shoot bud was used to initiate cell suspension culture. The highest specific growth rate of cells was recorded when it was cultured in liquid Murashige and Skoog basal medium containing 3% sucrose with pH 5.7 and incubated under continuous shaking condition of 70 rpm for 16 h light and 8 h dark cycle at 24°C. Our results also revealed that the type of carbohydrate substrate, light regime, agitation speed, and incubation temperature could affect the production of zerumbone. Although the zerumbone produced in this study was not abundant compared to rhizome of Z. zerumbet, the possibility of producing zerumbone during early stage could serve as a model for subsequent improvement. PMID:25767555

  1. Somatic Embryogenesis of Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) Through Cell Suspension Culture.

    PubMed

    Naik, Poornananda M; Al-Khayri, Jameel M

    2016-01-01

    Date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) is the oldest and most economically important plant species distributed in the hot arid regions of the world. Propagation of date palm by seeds produces heterogeneous offspring with inferior field performance and poor fruit quality. Traditionally, date palm is propagated by offshoots, but this method is inefficient for mass propagation because of limited availability of offshoots. Plant regeneration through tissue culture is able to provide technologies for the large-scale propagation of healthy true-to-type plants. The most commonly used technology approach is somatic embryogenesis which presents a great potential for the rapid propagation and genetic resource preservation of this species. Significant progress has been made in the development and optimization of this regeneration pathway through the establishment of embryogenic suspension cultures. This chapter focuses on the methods employed for the induction of callus from shoot tip explants, establishment of cell suspension culture, and subsequent somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration. PMID:27108330

  2. Production of betacyanins by a cell suspension culture of table beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Akita, T; Hina, Y; Nishi, T

    2000-09-01

    A cell suspension culture of table beet (Beta vulgaris L.) was established for efficient betacyanin production from violet callus induced from the hypocotyls of aseptic seedlings. This suspension culture produced large amounts of betacyanins. The betacyanin content increased with increasing cell growth during the log phase. Reducing the total nitrogen concentration (30 mM) and modifying the ratio of ammonium to nitrate (1:14) resulted in an increased betacyanin content. Supplementation of Fe2+ to the LS medium also promoted betacyanin production. The maximal betacyanin yield was achieved with a 2 mM Fe2+ concentration. Combining these conditions, we established a revised LS medium to improve betacyanin productivity (250 mg/l for a 14-day culture).

  3. Advantages and limitations of the synchrotron based transmission X-ray microscopy in the study of the clay aggregate structure in aqueous suspensions.

    PubMed

    Zbik, Marek S; Frost, Ray L; Song, Yen-Fang

    2008-03-01

    This paper reports new application of new transmission X-ray microscopy powered by a synchrotron source for the study of aqueous based clay suspensions. This paper delineates the advantages and limitations of this method. The tested transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) technique has shown good agreement with the cryo-stage SEM technique. The spacial resolution of this TXM technique is 60 nm and clay particles with diameter below 500 nm are clearly visible and their pseudohexagonal symmetry is recognizable in detail. It is clearly demonstrated the methodology of implementing TXM to study aqueous based clay suspensions that are close to approximately 60 nm tomographic resolution. The technique enables us to study discrete structure of clay suspensions in water and within aggregates. This has never been previously possible. Larger crystals, more compact aggregates and less colloidal fraction present in kaolinite from Georgia has impact on faster settling and gelling in denser suspension than for Birdwood kaolinite in which colloidal particles create gel-like networking in less dense aqueous suspension. PMID:18067907

  4. Acid and Alkaline Invertases in Suspension Cultures of Sugar Beet Cells

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Toshimasa; Sugawara, Shiro

    1988-01-01

    Alkaline invertase was induced during the initiation of suspension cultures of single cells from leaf explants of sugar beets in Murashige-Skoog liquid medium which contained benzyladenine. This activity was barely detectable in the leaves themselves. In suspension cultures, the presence of both acid and alkaline invertases was detected; alkaline invertase was only present in the cytoplasm of the cultured cells, whereas acid invertase was present in the cytoplasm and cell walls, and was also detected in the culture medium. The cell wall contained at least three types of acid invertase; two of these activities were solubilized by saline (saline-released) and EDTA (EDTA-released), respectively, and the third remained tightly associated with the cell wall. Saline-released and EDTA-released invertases from the cell wall showed the significant differences in their properties: the saline-released enzyme had the highest affinity for sucrose among the invertases tested, and was easily bound to cell walls, to DNA, and to a cation exchanger, unlike the EDTA-released enzyme. Sucrose is the source of carbon for plant cells in suspension culture and is probably degraded in the cell wall by the saline-released invertase, which had the highest activity and the highest affinity for sucrose. Hexose products of this degradation would be transported to cytoplasm. Soluble invertase, EDTA-released invertase from the cell wall, and one of two extracellular invertases behaved similarly upon chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. They had similar activity profiles with changing pH, and similar Km values for sucrose. Thus it appears that they are identical. Two extracellular invertases found in the growth medium of the suspension cultures were probably identical with those in the soluble fraction of callus and seedlings of sugar beets, because they showed similar behaviors during chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, and had similar activity profiles with changing pH and Km values for sucrose. PMID

  5. Immobilization of Rubia tinctorum L. Suspension Cultures and Biomass Production.

    PubMed

    Nartop, Pınar

    2016-01-01

    Plants are natural sources of valuable secondary metabolites used as pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, flavors, fragrances, colors, biopesticides, and food additives. There is an increasing demand to obtain these metabolites through more productive plant tissue applications and cell culture methods due to the importance of secondary metabolites.Immobilization of plant cells is a method used in plant cell cultures to induce secondary metabolite production. In this method, plant cells are fixed in or on a supporting material or matrix such as agar, agarose, calcium alginate, glass, or polyurethane foam. In the present study, three natural lignocellulosic materials, loofah sponge, and the long fibers of sisal and jute, were used to immobilize suspended R. tinctorum cells. PMID:27108315

  6. Immobilization of Rubia tinctorum L. Suspension Cultures and Biomass Production.

    PubMed

    Nartop, Pınar

    2016-01-01

    Plants are natural sources of valuable secondary metabolites used as pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, flavors, fragrances, colors, biopesticides, and food additives. There is an increasing demand to obtain these metabolites through more productive plant tissue applications and cell culture methods due to the importance of secondary metabolites.Immobilization of plant cells is a method used in plant cell cultures to induce secondary metabolite production. In this method, plant cells are fixed in or on a supporting material or matrix such as agar, agarose, calcium alginate, glass, or polyurethane foam. In the present study, three natural lignocellulosic materials, loofah sponge, and the long fibers of sisal and jute, were used to immobilize suspended R. tinctorum cells.

  7. Out-of-School Suspensions of Black Youths: Culture, Ability, Disability, Gender, and Perspective.

    PubMed

    Haight, Wendy; Kayama, Misa; Gibson, Priscilla Ann

    2016-07-01

    Racial disproportionality in out-of-school suspensions is a persistent social justice issue in public schools. This article examines out-of-school suspensions of four black youths from the perspectives of the youths, their caregivers, and educators. The case involving David, a 14-year-old African American with a learning disability, illustrates the challenges of students experiencing the intersection of disability and race. The case involving George, a 14-year-old Liberian immigrant, illustrates how parents and teachers may form alliances around shared goals and values despite profound cultural differences in understanding of youths' misbehavior. The case involving Nina, a 12-year-old African American, illustrates how educators' failure to consider the context of her misbehaviors as responses to sexual harassment, along with their subsequent harsh punishment and failure to protect her, led to her disengagement from school. The case involving Craig, a 16-year-old African American, provides a glimpse into how the use of criminal justice language to refer to youths' misbehaviors can support the development of a criminalized self- and social identity. These cases illustrate the diversity of black students--including ability, disability, culture, and gender--and how events surrounding suspensions are interpreted by students, caregivers, and educators. Understanding such diversity will undergird implementation of effective alternatives to suspensions.

  8. Out-of-School Suspensions of Black Youths: Culture, Ability, Disability, Gender, and Perspective.

    PubMed

    Haight, Wendy; Kayama, Misa; Gibson, Priscilla Ann

    2016-07-01

    Racial disproportionality in out-of-school suspensions is a persistent social justice issue in public schools. This article examines out-of-school suspensions of four black youths from the perspectives of the youths, their caregivers, and educators. The case involving David, a 14-year-old African American with a learning disability, illustrates the challenges of students experiencing the intersection of disability and race. The case involving George, a 14-year-old Liberian immigrant, illustrates how parents and teachers may form alliances around shared goals and values despite profound cultural differences in understanding of youths' misbehavior. The case involving Nina, a 12-year-old African American, illustrates how educators' failure to consider the context of her misbehaviors as responses to sexual harassment, along with their subsequent harsh punishment and failure to protect her, led to her disengagement from school. The case involving Craig, a 16-year-old African American, provides a glimpse into how the use of criminal justice language to refer to youths' misbehaviors can support the development of a criminalized self- and social identity. These cases illustrate the diversity of black students--including ability, disability, culture, and gender--and how events surrounding suspensions are interpreted by students, caregivers, and educators. Understanding such diversity will undergird implementation of effective alternatives to suspensions. PMID:27501641

  9. Production of honokiol and magnolol in suspension cultures of Magnolia dealbata Zucc.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Fabiola; Chivez, Marco; Garduñ-Ramírez, Maria Luisa; Chávez-Avila, Víctor M; Mata, Martin; Cruz-Sosa, Francisco

    2009-07-01

    Honokiol and magnolol, important anxiolytic and anti-cancer agents, have been produced in cell-suspension cultures of the endangered Mexican plant Magnolia dealbata Zucc. In vitro cultures of the plant were established, and the accumulation of honokiol and magnolol in callus and cell-suspension cultures was measured. Leaf samples were the best explants for callus establishment and metabolite production, and Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 1 mg/L 2, 4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and 1 mg/L kinetin yielded 2.3 mg/g of honokiol and 5.9 mg/g of magnolol. Bacterial and fungal contamination was inhibited with a multiple-step tissue sterilization procedure. Oxidation was inhibited with 1 g/L activated charcoal. Cell-suspension batch cultures derived from friable callus obtained from leaves of this species were grown for 30 days in shaker flasks containing Murashige and Skoog medium. Throughout the growth cycle, honokiol and magnolol levels, fresh and dry weight, and sucrose uptake were determined. The effects of carbon source concentration on biomass accumulation and the synthesis of bioactive compounds were studied. By using 3 mL of inocula supplemented with 3% (w/v) sucrose, maximum yields of honokiol (8.1 mg/g) and magnolol (13.4 mg/g) were obtained after 25 days. These yields were 300% and 382%, respectively, of the yields of honokiol and magnolol obtained from field-grown plants.

  10. Effects of auxins on growth and scopoletin accumulation in cell suspension cultures of Angelica archangelica L.

    PubMed

    Siatka, T; Kasparová, M

    2008-01-01

    Scopoletin is a coumarin possessing many interesting biological effects, e.g., spasmolytic, anti-inflammatory, antimutagenic, antioxidant, antifungal, apoptosis-inducing, antiproliferative, acetylcholinesterase-inhibitory, and hypouricemic activities. Plant tissue cultures represent a promising alternative source of valuable plant-derived substances. A number of physical and chemical factors influence the cell growth and secondary metabolite biosynthesis in plant tissue cultures. The mechanism of their action is not completely understood. Besides other factors, plant growth regulators and light conditions play an important role. Effects of four auxins (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 2,4-D, alpha-naphthaleneacetic acid, NAA, beta-indoleacetic acid, IAA or beta-indolebutyric acid, IBA) at four concentrations (0.2, 2, 10 or 20 mg/l) on the culture growth and accumulation of scopoletin in the medium were tested in Angelica archangelica cell suspension cultures cultured under continuous light or in the dark. The highest culture growth was achieved with 2 mg/l 2,4-D, and 10 mg/l IAA. The best scopoletin levels were obtained with 0.2 mg/l 2,4-D, 2 mg/l 2,4-D, 10 mg/l NAA, and 20 mg/l IAA. The effects of light conditions were less marked than those of auxins and their concentrations in influencing both the cell growth and scopoletin accumulation in Angelica archangelica cell suspension cultures. The changes brought about by auxins were modified by light conditions. PMID:18383919

  11. Selection, Isolation, and Characterization of Cadmium-Resistant Datura innoxia Suspension Cultures 1

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Paul J.; Roth, E. Jill; McClure, Peter R.; Naranjo, Cleo M.

    1984-01-01

    Datura innoxia cells from suspension cultures were selected for their ability to grow and divide rapidly in normally lethal concentrations of cadmium. Cells resistant to 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 160, 200, and 250 micromolar cadmium chloride were isolated and utilized to initiate cell suspension cultures resistant to this toxic metal ion. Variant cell lines retained their ability to grow in cadmium after being grown in its absence for more than 400 generations. Resistance to cadmium was correlated with the synthesis of low molecular weight, cysteine-rich, cadium-binding proteins. Synthesis of these proteins was induced rapidly in cadmium-resistant cells in response to a challenge of cadmium. Induction was detectable within one hour after exposure of the cells to the metal ion. Accumulation of protein bound cadmium reached a maximum eight to twelve hours following exposure. Metal-binding proteins were not detectable in the cadmium sensitive D. innoxia cells from which resistant cells were derived. PMID:16663759

  12. Selection, Isolation, and Characterization of Cadmium-Resistant Datura innoxia Suspension Cultures.

    PubMed

    Jackson, P J; Roth, E J; McClure, P R; Naranjo, C M

    1984-08-01

    Datura innoxia cells from suspension cultures were selected for their ability to grow and divide rapidly in normally lethal concentrations of cadmium. Cells resistant to 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 160, 200, and 250 micromolar cadmium chloride were isolated and utilized to initiate cell suspension cultures resistant to this toxic metal ion. Variant cell lines retained their ability to grow in cadmium after being grown in its absence for more than 400 generations. Resistance to cadmium was correlated with the synthesis of low molecular weight, cysteine-rich, cadium-binding proteins. Synthesis of these proteins was induced rapidly in cadmium-resistant cells in response to a challenge of cadmium. Induction was detectable within one hour after exposure of the cells to the metal ion. Accumulation of protein bound cadmium reached a maximum eight to twelve hours following exposure. Metal-binding proteins were not detectable in the cadmium sensitive D. innoxia cells from which resistant cells were derived.

  13. Isolation of fatty acids and aromatics from cell suspension cultures of Lavandula angustifolia.

    PubMed

    Topçu, Gülaçti; Herrmann, Gabriele; Kolak, Ufuk; Gören, C; Porzel, Andrea; Kutchan, Toni M

    2007-02-01

    Cell suspension cultures of Lavandula angustifolia Mill. ssp. angustifolia (syn.: L. officinalis Chaix.) afforded a fatty acid composition, cis and trans p-coumaric acids (=p-hydroxy cinnamic acids), and beta-sitosterol. The fatty acid composition was analyzed by GC-MS, and the structures of the isolated three compounds were determined by 1H- and 13C-NMR, and MS spectroscopic techniques.

  14. Involvement of lipoxygenase in elicitor-stimulated sanguinarine accumulation in Papaver somniferum suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Holková, Ivana; Bezáková, Lýdia; Bilka, František; Balažová, Andrea; Vanko, Marián; Blanáriková, Vítazoslava

    2010-01-01

    The involvement of lipoxygenase (LOX, EC 1.13.11.12) in elicitor-induced opium poppy defense response was investigated. Papaver somniferum L. suspension cultures were treated with abiotic elicitor methyl jasmonate (MJ), fungal elicitor (Botrytis cinerea homogenate) and phenidone (specific inhibitor of LOX) to determine the involvement of this enzyme in production of sanguinarine, the major secondary metabolite of opium poppy cultures. P. somniferum suspension cultures responded to elicitor treatment with strong and transient increase of LOX activity followed by sanguinarine accumulation. LOX activity increased in elicited cultures, reaching 9.8 times of the initial value at 10 h after MJ application and 2.9 times after B. cinerea application. Sanguinarine accumulated to maximal levels of 169.5 ± 12.5 μg g⁻¹ dry cell weight in MJ-elicited cultures and 288.0 ± 10.0 μg g⁻¹ dry cell weight in B. cinerea-elicited cultures. The treatment of cells with phenidone before elicitor addition, significantly reduced sanguinarine production. The relative molecular weight of P. somniferum LOX (83 kDa) was estimated by using immunobloting and its pH optimum was shown to be pH 6.5.

  15. A microwell cell culture platform for the aggregation of pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Abigail B; Lin, Chien-Chi; Anseth, Kristi S

    2012-08-01

    Cell-cell contact between pancreatic β-cells is important for maintaining survival and normal insulin secretion. Various techniques have been developed to promote cell-cell contact between β-cells, but a simple yet robust method that affords precise control over three-dimensional (3D) β-cell cluster size has not been demonstrated. To address this need, we developed a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel microwell platform using photolithography. This microwell cell-culture platform promotes the formation of 3D β-cell aggregates of defined sizes from 25 to 210 μm in diameter. Using this platform, mouse insulinoma 6 (MIN6) β-cells formed aggregates with cell-cell adherin junctions. These naturally formed cell aggregates with controllable sizes can be removed from the microwells for macroencapsulation, implantation, or other biological assays. When removed and subsequently encapsulated in PEG hydrogels, the aggregated cell clusters demonstrated improved cellular viability (>90%) over 7 days in culture, while the β-cells encapsulated as single cells maintained only 20% viability. Aggregated MIN6 cells also exhibited more than fourfold higher insulin secretion in response to a glucose challenge compared with encapsulated single β-cells. Further, the cell aggregates stained positively for E-cadherin, indicative of the formation of cell junctions. Using this hydrogel microwell cell-culture method, viable and functional β-cell aggregates of specific sizes were created, providing a platform from which other biologically relevant questions may be answered. PMID:22320435

  16. A Microwell Cell Culture Platform for the Aggregation of Pancreatic β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Abigail B.; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2012-01-01

    Cell–cell contact between pancreatic β-cells is important for maintaining survival and normal insulin secretion. Various techniques have been developed to promote cell–cell contact between β-cells, but a simple yet robust method that affords precise control over three-dimensional (3D) β-cell cluster size has not been demonstrated. To address this need, we developed a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel microwell platform using photolithography. This microwell cell-culture platform promotes the formation of 3D β-cell aggregates of defined sizes from 25 to 210 μm in diameter. Using this platform, mouse insulinoma 6 (MIN6) β-cells formed aggregates with cell–cell adherin junctions. These naturally formed cell aggregates with controllable sizes can be removed from the microwells for macroencapsulation, implantation, or other biological assays. When removed and subsequently encapsulated in PEG hydrogels, the aggregated cell clusters demonstrated improved cellular viability (>90%) over 7 days in culture, while the β-cells encapsulated as single cells maintained only 20% viability. Aggregated MIN6 cells also exhibited more than fourfold higher insulin secretion in response to a glucose challenge compared with encapsulated single β-cells. Further, the cell aggregates stained positively for E-cadherin, indicative of the formation of cell junctions. Using this hydrogel microwell cell-culture method, viable and functional β-cell aggregates of specific sizes were created, providing a platform from which other biologically relevant questions may be answered. PMID:22320435

  17. Silymarin synthesis and degradation by peroxidases of cell suspension cultures of Silybum marianum.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sampedro, María Angeles; Fernández-Tárrago, Jorge; Corchete, Purificación

    2007-05-01

    Treatment of Silybum marianum cell cultures with methyl jasmonate elicits the production of the antihepatotoxic drug silymarin and its release into the culture medium. In this work, we investigated the involvement of peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7; donor hydrogen peroxidase oxido-reductase) in silymarin turnover in cell cultures as well as the influence of elicitation on the activity towards several substrates. Peroxidases from cell extracts and, to a higher degree from the spent medium, used the silymarin precursors taxifolin and coniferyl alcohol as substrates. Silymarin compounds were also degraded by suspension culture peroxidases; however, the oxidation efficiency was not modified by elicitation. S. marianum peroxidases were able to catalyse the oxidative coupling of taxifolin and coniferyl alcohol to silybinins. The synthetic activity was mainly associated with the extracellular compartment and as before, methyl jasmonate did not modify oxidative coupling activity. Changes in the isoenzyme profiles were not observed in elicited cultures.

  18. Selective uptake of pyrrolizidine N-oxides by cell suspension cultures from pyrrolizidine alkaloid producing plants.

    PubMed

    von Borstel, K; Hartmann, T

    1986-02-01

    The N-oxides of pyrrolizidine alkaloids such as senecionine or monocrotaline are rapidly taken up and accumulated by cell suspension cultures obtained from plants known to produce pyrrolizidines, i.e. Senecio vernalis, vulgaris, viscosus (Asteraceae) and Symphytum officinale (Boraginaceae). The transport of the N-oxides into the cells is a specific and selective process. Other alkaloid N-oxides such as sparteine N-oxide are not taken up. Cell cultures from plant species which do not synthesize pyrrolizidine alkaloids are unable to accumulate pyrrolizidine N-oxides. The suitability of the pyrrolizidine N-oxides in alkaloid storage and accumulation is emphasized. PMID:24247963

  19. Survival of Suspension-cultured Sycamore Cells Cooled to the Temperature of Liquid Nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Y; Sakai, A

    1974-11-01

    Suspension-cultured cells of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) which were immersed in liquid nitrogen after prefreezing to the temperatures from -30 to -50 C in the presence of dimethylsulfoxide and glucose as cryoprotective additive could proliferate vigorously when rewarmed rapidly in water at 40 C. For maintaining high viability of the cells after immersion in liquid nitrogen, it seems to be essential to use the cells at the later lag phase or the early cell division phase. This study provides a possibility for long term preservation in liquid nitrogen of plant-cultured lines.

  20. Translational Modification of an 18 Kilodalton Polypeptide by Spermidine in Rice Cell Suspension Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Arkesh M.; Saftner, Robert A.; Schaeffer, Gideon W.; Mattoo, Autar K.

    1991-01-01

    When rice (Oryza sativa) cell suspension cultures are grown in the presence of [terminal methylenes-3H]spermidine, label is incorporated in a single polypeptide with a molecular mass of 18 kilodaltons on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Preincubation of cell cultures with polyamine biosynthesis inhibitors difluoromethylarginine and difluoromethylornithine, resulted in increased incorporation of the label into the 18 kilodalton polypeptide. In cells in which protein synthesis was arrested by cycloheximide, no label was detected in the 18 kilodalton polypeptide, suggesting a requirement for de novo protein synthesis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:16668128

  1. Development of ultrastructural specializations during the formation of acetylcholine receptor aggregates on cultured myotubes.

    PubMed

    Olek, A J; Ling, A; Daniels, M P

    1986-02-01

    The ultrastructure of cultured rat myotubes was examined at stages in the initial assembly of acetylcholine receptor (AChR) aggregates in order to elucidate the role of cell-surface specializations in aggregate formation. Within 4-6 hr, embryonic brain extract (EBX) induces the formation of sites of AChR density elevated 5-9 X above that of surrounding regions, and the appearance of these aggregates is preceded by the formation of clouds of punctate microaggregates (Olek et al., 1983). A video image-intensification system was used to monitor this redistribution of fluorescently labeled AChR, and sites of aggregation were mapped on identified myotubes. After processing the cultures for electron microscopy, thin sections were taken through identified aggregate sites at various stages in assembly. Specializations, including a basal lamina, mound-shaped plasma membrane contours with occasional deep infoldings, and a subjacent dense cytoskeletal specialization, which tended to exclude other cytoplasmic organelles, were associated with newly formed aggregates found 4-6 hr after adding EBX to the cultures. Analysis of random thin sections through EBX-treated and untreated myotubes showed that the extent of specializations of the basal lamina and cytoplasm was approximately threefold greater in cells exposed to EBX for 4 hr, suggesting a concurrent, and possibly interdependent, organization of such specializations with AChR aggregate assembly. Examination of sections through clouds of microaggregates, which formed within 90 min, revealed mound-shaped plasma membrane contours and underlying cytoplasm depleted of organelles but relatively little basal lamina and submembrane cytoskeletal density. These results suggest that the initial stage of AChR aggregate assembly involves relatively subtle changes in the structure of the cell cortex and that the evolution of microaggregates to aggregates may require the formation of additional cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix

  2. Cultural Heritage Content Re-Use: An Aggregators's Point of View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilis, D.; Ioannides, M.; Theofanous, E.

    2015-08-01

    This paper introduces a use case of re-using aggregated and enriched metadata for the tourism creative industry. The MORe aggregation and enrichment framework is presented along with an example for enriching cultural heritage objects harvested from a number of Omeka repositories. The enriched content is then published both to the EU Digital Library Europeana (http://www.europeana.eu) and to an Elastic Search component that feeds a portal aimed at providing tourists with interesting information.

  3. Semicontinuous Bioreactor Production of Recombinant Butyrylcholinesterase in Transgenic Rice Cell Suspension Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Corbin, Jasmine M.; Hashimoto, Bryce I.; Karuppanan, Kalimuthu; Kyser, Zachary R.; Wu, Liying; Roberts, Brian A.; Noe, Amy R.; Rodriguez, Raymond L.; McDonald, Karen A.; Nandi, Somen

    2016-01-01

    An active and tetrameric form of recombinant butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), a large and complex human enzyme, was produced via semicontinuous operation in a transgenic rice cell suspension culture. After transformation of rice callus and screening of transformants, the cultures were scaled up from culture flask to a lab scale bioreactor. The bioreactor was operated through two phases each of growth and expression. The cells were able to produce BChE during both expression phases, with a maximum yield of 1.6 mg BChE/L of culture during the second expression phase. Cells successfully regrew during a 5-day growth phase. A combination of activity assays and Western blot analysis indicated production of an active and fully assembled tetramer of BChE. PMID:27066048

  4. Quantitative proteome changes in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension-cultured cells in response to plant natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Turek, Ilona; Wheeler, Janet I; Gehring, Chris; Irving, Helen R; Marondedze, Claudius

    2015-09-01

    Proteome changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells in response to the A. thaliana plant natriuretic peptide (PNP), AtPNP-A (At2g18660) were assessed using quantitative proteomics employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In this study, we characterized temporal responses of suspension-cultured cells to 1 nM and 10 pM AtPNP-A at 0, 10 and 30 min post-treatment. Both concentrations we found to yield a distinct differential proteome signature. The data shown in this article are associated with the article "Plant natriuretic peptides induce a specific set of proteins diagnostic for an adaptive response to abiotic stress" by Turek et al. (Front. Plant Sci. 5 (2014) 661) and have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001386. PMID:26217812

  5. Protein Adsorption Alters Hydrophobic Surfaces Used for Suspension Culture of Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Steven J.; Stieg, Adam Z.; Richardson, Wade; Guo, Shuling; Powers, David N.; Wohlschlegel, James; Dunn, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    This Letter examines the physical and chemical changes that occur at the interface of methyl-terminated alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) after exposure to cell culture media used to derive embryoid bodies (EBs) from pluripotent stem cells. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy analysis of the SAMs indicates that protein components within the EB cell culture medium preferentially adsorb at the hydrophobic interface. In addition, we examined the adsorption process using surface plasmon resonance and atomic force microscopy. These studies identify the formation of a porous, mat-like adsorbed protein film with an approximate thickness of 2.5 nm. Captive bubble contact angle analysis reveals a shift toward superhydrophilic wetting behavior at the cell culture interface due to adsorption of these proteins. These results show how EBs are able to remain in suspension when derived on hydrophobic materials, which carries implications for the rational design of suspension culture interfaces for lineage specific stem-cell differentiation. PMID:26261952

  6. [Research on ursolic acid production of Eriobotrya japonica cell suspension culture in WAVE bioreactor].

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-hua; Yao, De-heng; Xu, Jian; Wang, Wei; Chang, Qiang; Su, Ming-hua

    2015-05-01

    Through scale-up cultivation of Eriobotrya japonica suspension cells using WAVE bioreactor, the cell growth and ursolic acid (UA) accumulation were studied. The comparison test was carried out in the flask and the reactor with cell dry weight (DW) and UA content as evaluation indexes. The culture medium, DW and UA content were compared in 1 L and 5 L working volumes of bioreactor. The orthogonal test with main actors of inoculation amount, speed and angle of rotation was developed to find the optimal combination, in 1 L working volume of bioreactor. DW of the cell growth and the UA content in bioreactor were higher than those of the shaker by 105.5% and 27.65% respectively. In bioreactor, the dynamic changes of elements in the fluid culture, the dry weight of the cell growth and the UA content in 1 L and 5 L working volumes were similar. Inoculation of 80 g, rotational speed of 26 r · min(-1), and angle of 6 ° was the optimal combination, and the cell biomass of 19.01 g · L(-1) and the UA content of 27.750 mg · g(-1) were achieved after 100 h cultivation in 1 L working volume of bioreactor. WAVE Bioreactor is more suitable than flasks for the E. japonica cell suspension culture, and culture parameters can be achieved from 1 L to 5 L amplification.

  7. [Research on ursolic acid production of Eriobotrya japonica cell suspension culture in WAVE bioreactor].

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-hua; Yao, De-heng; Xu, Jian; Wang, Wei; Chang, Qiang; Su, Ming-hua

    2015-05-01

    Through scale-up cultivation of Eriobotrya japonica suspension cells using WAVE bioreactor, the cell growth and ursolic acid (UA) accumulation were studied. The comparison test was carried out in the flask and the reactor with cell dry weight (DW) and UA content as evaluation indexes. The culture medium, DW and UA content were compared in 1 L and 5 L working volumes of bioreactor. The orthogonal test with main actors of inoculation amount, speed and angle of rotation was developed to find the optimal combination, in 1 L working volume of bioreactor. DW of the cell growth and the UA content in bioreactor were higher than those of the shaker by 105.5% and 27.65% respectively. In bioreactor, the dynamic changes of elements in the fluid culture, the dry weight of the cell growth and the UA content in 1 L and 5 L working volumes were similar. Inoculation of 80 g, rotational speed of 26 r · min(-1), and angle of 6 ° was the optimal combination, and the cell biomass of 19.01 g · L(-1) and the UA content of 27.750 mg · g(-1) were achieved after 100 h cultivation in 1 L working volume of bioreactor. WAVE Bioreactor is more suitable than flasks for the E. japonica cell suspension culture, and culture parameters can be achieved from 1 L to 5 L amplification. PMID:26323131

  8. Serum-free suspension culturing of human cells: adaptation, growth, and cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Biaggio, Rafael Tagé; Abreu-Neto, Mário Soares; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Swiech, Kamilla

    2015-08-01

    Human cell lines have attracted great interest because they are capable of producing glycosylated proteins that are more similar to native human proteins, thereby reducing the potential for immune responses. However, these cells have not been extensively characterized and cultured under serum-free suspension conditions. In this work, we describe the adaptation, growth, and cryopreservation of the human cell lines SK-Hep-1, HepG2, and HKB-11 under serum-free suspension conditions. The results showed that both HKB-11 and SK-Hep-1 adapted to serum-free suspension cultures in FreeStyle and SFM II, respectively. Kinetic characterization showed that the HKB-11 and SK-Hep-1 cells reached cell densities as high as 8.6 × 10(6) and 1.9 × 10(6) cells/mL, respectively. The maximum specific growth rates (μ max) were similar for both cells (0.0159/h for HKB-11 and 0.0186/h for SK-Hep-1). The growth limitation of adapted cells does not appear to be associated with glucose or glutamine depletion, nor with the formation of lactate in inhibitory concentrations. However, in both cases, ammonia production reached concentrations that are considered inhibitory to mammalian cells (2-5 mM). The adapted cells were also successfully cryopreserved under serum-free formulations. The SK-HEP-1 and HKB-11 cells that were adapted to serum-free suspension conditions might be suitable for use in the manufacturing of recombinant proteins, thereby eliminating the potential for the introduction of adventitious process contamination and greatly simplifying downstream protein purification. PMID:25822314

  9. Serum-free suspension culturing of human cells: adaptation, growth, and cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Biaggio, Rafael Tagé; Abreu-Neto, Mário Soares; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Swiech, Kamilla

    2015-08-01

    Human cell lines have attracted great interest because they are capable of producing glycosylated proteins that are more similar to native human proteins, thereby reducing the potential for immune responses. However, these cells have not been extensively characterized and cultured under serum-free suspension conditions. In this work, we describe the adaptation, growth, and cryopreservation of the human cell lines SK-Hep-1, HepG2, and HKB-11 under serum-free suspension conditions. The results showed that both HKB-11 and SK-Hep-1 adapted to serum-free suspension cultures in FreeStyle and SFM II, respectively. Kinetic characterization showed that the HKB-11 and SK-Hep-1 cells reached cell densities as high as 8.6 × 10(6) and 1.9 × 10(6) cells/mL, respectively. The maximum specific growth rates (μ max) were similar for both cells (0.0159/h for HKB-11 and 0.0186/h for SK-Hep-1). The growth limitation of adapted cells does not appear to be associated with glucose or glutamine depletion, nor with the formation of lactate in inhibitory concentrations. However, in both cases, ammonia production reached concentrations that are considered inhibitory to mammalian cells (2-5 mM). The adapted cells were also successfully cryopreserved under serum-free formulations. The SK-HEP-1 and HKB-11 cells that were adapted to serum-free suspension conditions might be suitable for use in the manufacturing of recombinant proteins, thereby eliminating the potential for the introduction of adventitious process contamination and greatly simplifying downstream protein purification.

  10. Effect of subculture and elicitation on instability of taxol production in Taxus sp. suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beum Jun; Gibson, Donna M; Shuler, Michael L

    2004-01-01

    The production of secondary metabolites through plant cell suspension cultures is challenging because the level and pattern of production is often unstable and unpredictable. To investigate the factors affecting instability of secondary metabolite production, high Taxol (paclitaxel)-producing Taxus cultures induced by methyl jasmonate elicitation and their low Taxol-producing counterparts were compared with respect to growth and Taxol production kinetics. With Taxus subcultures we observe alternating states of high and low productivity. Parental cultures and their subcultures from five different cell lines were used to test whether a high-producing culture grows more slowly or dies more rapidly than a low-producing one. These cell lines were of three types: (1) Taxol-producing with and without methyl jasmonate, (2) Taxol-producing only upon elicitation, and (3) nonproducing. High-producing cultures show growth inhibition upon subculture, whereas nonproducing elicited cultures show little growth inhibition. Thus, growth inhibition is primarily due to Taxol or taxane accumulation and not a direct result of methyl jasmonate treatment. Through media exchange between high- and low-producing cultures, it appears that culture components generated by cells alter culture properties. To assess variability as a function of culture lineage, two groups of replicate cultures were generated either with a mixing of the parental flasks or segregation of parental flasks at each subculture. Although parental culture mixing did not reduce flask-to-flask variation, the production level of Taxol in subcultures resulting from mixing inocula was sustained at a higher level relative to segregated subcultures. The results are consistent with the possibility of cell signaling within the population that can induce Taxol production.

  11. Suspension cell culture in microgravity and development of a space bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1987-01-01

    NASA has methodically developed unique suspension type cell and recovery apparatus culture systems for bioprocess technology experiments and production of biological products in microgravity. The first space bioreactor has been designed for microprocessor control, no gaseous headspace, circulation and resupply of culture medium, and slow mixing in very low shear regimes. Various ground based bioreactors are being used to test reactor vessel design, on-line sensors, effects of shear, nutrient supply, and waste removal from continuous culture of human cells attached to microcarriers. The small (500 ml) bioreactor is being constructed for flight experiments in the Shuttle middeck to verify systems operation under microgravity conditions and to measure the efficiencies of mass transport, gas transfer, oxygen consumption, and control of low shear stress on cells.

  12. Towards high-yield production of pharmaceutical proteins with plant cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianfeng; Ge, Xumeng; Dolan, Maureen C

    2011-01-01

    "Molecular farming" in plants with significant advantages in cost and safety is touted as a promising platform for the production of complex pharmaceutical proteins. While whole-plant produced biopharmaceuticals account for a significant portion of the preclinical and clinical pipeline, plant cell suspension culture, which integrates the merits of whole-plant systems with those of microbial fermentation, is emerging as a more compliant alternative "factory". However, low protein productivity remains a major obstacle that limits extensive commercialization of plant cell bioproduction platform. This review highlights the advantages and recent progress in plant cell culture technology and outlines viable strategies at both the biological and process engineering levels for advancing the economic feasibility of plant cell-based protein production. Approaches to overcome and solve the associated challenges of this culture system that include non-mammalian glycosylation and genetic instability will also be discussed. PMID:21236330

  13. Accumulation of phenylpropanoid derivatives in chitosan-induced cell suspension culture of Cocos nucifera.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Moumita; Karun, Anitha; Mitra, Adinpunya

    2009-01-01

    Chitosan-induced elicitation responses of dark-incubated Cocos nucifera (coconut) endosperm cell suspension cultures led to the rapid formation of phenylpropanoid derivatives, which essentially mimics the defense-induced biochemical changes in coconut palm as observed under in vivo conditions. An enhanced accumulation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid as the major wall-bound phenolics was evident. This was followed by p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid. Along with enhanced peroxidases activities in elicited lines, the increase in activities of the early phenylpropanoid pathway enzymes such as, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), p-coumaroyl-CoA ligase (4CL) and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde dehydrogenase (HBD) in elicited cell cultures were also observed. Furthermore, supplementation of specific inhibitors of PAL, C4H and 4CL in elicited cell cultures led to suppressed accumulation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid, which opens up interesting questions regarding the probable route of the biosynthesis of this phenolic acid in C. nucifera.

  14. Accumulation of phenylpropanoid derivatives in chitosan-induced cell suspension culture of Cocos nucifera.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Moumita; Karun, Anitha; Mitra, Adinpunya

    2009-01-01

    Chitosan-induced elicitation responses of dark-incubated Cocos nucifera (coconut) endosperm cell suspension cultures led to the rapid formation of phenylpropanoid derivatives, which essentially mimics the defense-induced biochemical changes in coconut palm as observed under in vivo conditions. An enhanced accumulation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid as the major wall-bound phenolics was evident. This was followed by p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid. Along with enhanced peroxidases activities in elicited lines, the increase in activities of the early phenylpropanoid pathway enzymes such as, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), p-coumaroyl-CoA ligase (4CL) and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde dehydrogenase (HBD) in elicited cell cultures were also observed. Furthermore, supplementation of specific inhibitors of PAL, C4H and 4CL in elicited cell cultures led to suppressed accumulation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid, which opens up interesting questions regarding the probable route of the biosynthesis of this phenolic acid in C. nucifera. PMID:18448193

  15. Towards high-yield production of pharmaceutical proteins with plant cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianfeng; Ge, Xumeng; Dolan, Maureen C

    2011-01-01

    "Molecular farming" in plants with significant advantages in cost and safety is touted as a promising platform for the production of complex pharmaceutical proteins. While whole-plant produced biopharmaceuticals account for a significant portion of the preclinical and clinical pipeline, plant cell suspension culture, which integrates the merits of whole-plant systems with those of microbial fermentation, is emerging as a more compliant alternative "factory". However, low protein productivity remains a major obstacle that limits extensive commercialization of plant cell bioproduction platform. This review highlights the advantages and recent progress in plant cell culture technology and outlines viable strategies at both the biological and process engineering levels for advancing the economic feasibility of plant cell-based protein production. Approaches to overcome and solve the associated challenges of this culture system that include non-mammalian glycosylation and genetic instability will also be discussed.

  16. Uptake and metabolism of sugars by suspension-cultured catharanthus roseus cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ashihara, Hiroshi; Sagishima, Kyoko; Kubota, Kaoru )

    1989-04-01

    The Uptake and metabolism of sugars by suspension-cultured Catharanthus roseus cells were investigated. Substantially all the sucrose in the culture medium was hydrolyzed to glucose and fructose before being taken up by the cells. The activity of invertase bound to cell walls, determined in situ, was high at the early stage of culture. Glucose was more easily taken up by the cells than was fructose. Tracer experiments using (U-{sup 14}C)glucose and (U-{sup 14}C)fructose indicated that glucose is a better precursor for respiration than fructose, while fructose is preferentially utilized for the synthesis of sucrose, especially in the early phase of cell growth. These results suggest that fructose is utilized for the synthesis of sucrose via the reaction catalyzed by sucrose synthase, prior to the phosphorylation by hexokinase or fructokinase.

  17. Serum-Free Suspension Culture of MDCK Cells for Production of Influenza H1N1 Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ding; Peng, Wen-Juan; Ye, Qian; Liu, Xu-Ping; Zhao, Liang; Fan, Li; Xia-Hou, Kang; Jia, Han-Jing; Luo, Jian; Zhou, Lin-Ting; Li, Bei-Bei; Wang, Shi-Lei; Xu, Wen-Ting; Chen, Ze; Tan, Wen-Song

    2015-01-01

    Development of serum-free suspension cell culture processes is very important for influenza vaccine production. Previously, we developed a MDCK suspension cell line in a serum-free medium. In the present study, the growth kinetics of suspension MDCK cells and influenza virus production in the serum-free medium were investigated, in comparison with those of adherent MDCK cells in both serum-containing and serum-free medium. It was found that the serum-free medium supported the stable subculture and growth of both adherent and suspension cells. In batch culture, for both cell lines, the growth kinetics in the serum-free medium was comparable with those in the serum-containing medium and a commercialized serum-free medium. In the serum-free medium, peak viable cell density (VCD), haemagglutinin (HA) and median tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) titers of the two cell lines reached 4.51×106 cells/mL, 2.94Log10(HAU/50 μL) and 8.49Log10(virions/mL), and 5.97×106 cells/mL, 3.88Log10(HAU/50 μL), and 10.34Log10(virions/mL), respectively. While virus yield of adherent cells in the serum-free medium was similar to that in the serum-containing medium, suspension culture in the serum-free medium showed a higher virus yield than adherent cells in the serum-containing medium and suspension cells in the commercialized serum-free medium. However, the percentage of infectious viruses was lower for suspension culture in the serum-free medium. These results demonstrate the great potential of this suspension MDCK cell line in serum-free medium for influenza vaccine production and further improvements are warranted. PMID:26540170

  18. [Effect of precursors on the production of coumarins in a suspension culture of Angelica archangelica L].

    PubMed

    Siatka, T; Kasparová, M

    2002-01-01

    The effect of potential precursors (cinnamic acid, phenylalanine, tyrosine) in three concentrations (0.01; 0.1; 1 mmol/l) on the growth of the culture and coumarin production was investigated in the suspension culture of Angelica archangelica L. The cultures were cultivated under constant illumination (3500 lux) and in the dark. The growth of the culture in the dark was not affected by the precursors, cinnamic acid in a concentration of 1 mmol/l exerted toxic action. The growth of the culture cultivated under constant illumination was stimulated by tyrosine in a concentration of 0.1 and 1 mmol/l, and phenylalanine in a concentration of 0.1 mmol/l; phenylalanine and cinnamic acid in a concentration of 1 mmol/l inhibited the growth of the culture. In the cultivation in the dark, coumarin production was increased by phenylalanine in a concentration 0.01 mmol/l and by tyrosine in a concentration of 1 mmol/l. In the cultivation under constant illumination, coumarin production was decreased by the action of cinnamic acid, was not affected by tyrosine, and phenylalanine (0.01 and 0.1 mmol/l) increased it in comparison with the culture without precursors. PMID:11910743

  19. Effect of magnetic nanoparticles on tobacco BY-2 cell suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Krystofova, Olga; Sochor, Jiri; Zitka, Ondrej; Babula, Petr; Kudrle, Vit; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2013-01-01

    Nanomaterials are structures whose exceptionality is based on their large surface, which is closely connected with reactivity and modification possibilities. Due to these properties nanomaterials are used in textile industry (antibacterial textiles with silver nanoparticles), electronics (high-resolution imaging, logical circuits on the molecular level) and medicine. Medicine represents one of the most important fields of application of nanomaterials. They are investigated in connection with targeted therapy (infectious diseases, malignant diseases) or imaging (contrast agents). Nanomaterials including nanoparticles have a great application potential in the targeted transport of pharmaceuticals. However, there are some negative properties of nanoparticles, which must be carefully solved, as hydrophobic properties leading to instability in aqueous environment, and especially their possible toxicity. Data about toxicity of nanomaterials are still scarce. Due to this fact, in this work we focused on studying of the effect of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) and modified magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) on tobacco BY-2 plant cell suspension culture. We aimed at examining the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth, proteosynthesis - total protein content, thiols - reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, phytochelatins PC2-5, glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and antioxidant activity of BY-2 cells. Whereas the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth of cell suspension culture was only moderate, significant changes were detected in all other biochemical parameters. Significant changes in protein content, phytochelatins levels and GST activity were observed in BY-2 cells treated with MNPs nanoparticles treatment. Changes were also clearly evident in the case of application of NPs. Our results demonstrate the ability of MNPs to negatively affect metabolism and induce biosynthesis of protective compounds in a plant cell model represented by BY-2 cell suspension culture. The

  20. Effect of Magnetic Nanoparticles on Tobacco BY-2 Cell Suspension Culture

    PubMed Central

    Krystofova, Olga; Sochor, Jiri; Zitka, Ondrej; Babula, Petr; Kudrle, Vit; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2012-01-01

    Nanomaterials are structures whose exceptionality is based on their large surface, which is closely connected with reactivity and modification possibilities. Due to these properties nanomaterials are used in textile industry (antibacterial textiles with silver nanoparticles), electronics (high-resolution imaging, logical circuits on the molecular level) and medicine. Medicine represents one of the most important fields of application of nanomaterials. They are investigated in connection with targeted therapy (infectious diseases, malignant diseases) or imaging (contrast agents). Nanomaterials including nanoparticles have a great application potential in the targeted transport of pharmaceuticals. However, there are some negative properties of nanoparticles, which must be carefully solved, as hydrophobic properties leading to instability in aqueous environment, and especially their possible toxicity. Data about toxicity of nanomaterials are still scarce. Due to this fact, in this work we focused on studying of the effect of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) and modified magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) on tobacco BY-2 plant cell suspension culture. We aimed at examining the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth, proteosynthesis—total protein content, thiols—reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, phytochelatins PC2-5, glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and antioxidant activity of BY-2 cells. Whereas the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth of cell suspension culture was only moderate, significant changes were detected in all other biochemical parameters. Significant changes in protein content, phytochelatins levels and GST activity were observed in BY-2 cells treated with MNPs nanoparticles treatment. Changes were also clearly evident in the case of application of NPs. Our results demonstrate the ability of MNPs to negatively affect metabolism and induce biosynthesis of protective compounds in a plant cell model represented by BY-2 cell suspension culture. The

  1. Characterization of transmembrane auxin transport in Arabidopsis suspension-cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Seifertová, Daniela; Skůpa, Petr; Rychtář, Jan; Laňková, Martina; Pařezová, Markéta; Dobrev, Petre I; Hoyerová, Klára; Petrášek, Jan; Zažímalová, Eva

    2014-03-15

    Polar auxin transport is a crucial process for control and coordination of plant development. Studies of auxin transport through plant tissues and organs showed that auxin is transported by a combination of phloem flow and the active, carrier-mediated cell-to-cell transport. Since plant organs and even tissues are too complex for determination of the kinetics of carrier-mediated auxin uptake and efflux on the cellular level, simplified models of cell suspension cultures are often used, and several tobacco cell lines have been established for auxin transport assays. However, there are very few data available on the specificity and kinetics of auxin transport across the plasma membrane for Arabidopsis thaliana suspension-cultured cells. In this report, the characteristics of carrier-mediated uptake (influx) and efflux for the native auxin indole-3-acetic acid and synthetic auxins, naphthalene-1-acetic and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acids (NAA and 2,4-D, respectively) in A. thaliana ecotype Landsberg erecta suspension-cultured cells (LE line) are provided. By auxin competition assays and inhibitor treatments, we show that, similarly to tobacco cells, uptake carriers have high affinity towards 2,4-D and that NAA is a good tool for studies of auxin efflux in LE cells. In contrast to tobacco cells, metabolic profiling showed that only a small proportion of NAA is metabolized in LE cells. These results show that the LE cell line is a useful experimental system for measurements of kinetics of auxin carriers on the cellular level that is complementary to tobacco cells.

  2. Effect of magnetic nanoparticles on tobacco BY-2 cell suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Krystofova, Olga; Sochor, Jiri; Zitka, Ondrej; Babula, Petr; Kudrle, Vit; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2012-12-20

    Nanomaterials are structures whose exceptionality is based on their large surface, which is closely connected with reactivity and modification possibilities. Due to these properties nanomaterials are used in textile industry (antibacterial textiles with silver nanoparticles), electronics (high-resolution imaging, logical circuits on the molecular level) and medicine. Medicine represents one of the most important fields of application of nanomaterials. They are investigated in connection with targeted therapy (infectious diseases, malignant diseases) or imaging (contrast agents). Nanomaterials including nanoparticles have a great application potential in the targeted transport of pharmaceuticals. However, there are some negative properties of nanoparticles, which must be carefully solved, as hydrophobic properties leading to instability in aqueous environment, and especially their possible toxicity. Data about toxicity of nanomaterials are still scarce. Due to this fact, in this work we focused on studying of the effect of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) and modified magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) on tobacco BY-2 plant cell suspension culture. We aimed at examining the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth, proteosynthesis - total protein content, thiols - reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, phytochelatins PC2-5, glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and antioxidant activity of BY-2 cells. Whereas the effect of NPs and MNPs on growth of cell suspension culture was only moderate, significant changes were detected in all other biochemical parameters. Significant changes in protein content, phytochelatins levels and GST activity were observed in BY-2 cells treated with MNPs nanoparticles treatment. Changes were also clearly evident in the case of application of NPs. Our results demonstrate the ability of MNPs to negatively affect metabolism and induce biosynthesis of protective compounds in a plant cell model represented by BY-2 cell suspension culture. The

  3. Enhanced production of silymarin by Ag+ elicitor in cell suspension cultures of Silybum marianum.

    PubMed

    Ashtiani, S Rahimi; Hasanloo, T; Bihamta, M R

    2010-06-01

    Cell suspension cultures of Silybum marianum L. Gaertn (Compositae) produce silymarin, a mixture of flavonolignans. In an attempt to increase cell growth and silymarin production, we exposed cell cultures to various levels of Ag+ (0.2, 0.4, 0.8, 1, and 2 mM) for different exposure times (12, 24, 48, 72, 144, and 216 h). A dramatic increase in cell growth was observed after 12 h in media supplemented with 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, and 1 mM Ag+, and the value in medium treated by 1 mM Ag+ after 72 h was 7.21 g, which was about two-fold that of the control (3.32 g). The highest silymarin production reached about 56 microg g(-1) DW, 24 h after treatment with Ag+ (0.8 mM), which was 30-fold that of the control. Silybin, isosilybin, silychristin, silydianin, and taxifolin were abundant flavonolignans. Ag+ in low concentrations is a positive elicitor for cell growth and silymarin production in cell suspension cultures of Silybum marianum.

  4. Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene expression changes during rotating wall vessel suspension culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johanson, Kelly; Allen, Patricia L.; Lewis, Fawn; Cubano, Luis A.; Hyman, Linda E.; Hammond, Timothy G.

    2002-01-01

    This study utilizes Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study genetic responses to suspension culture. The suspension culture system used in this study is the high-aspect-ratio vessel, one type of the rotating wall vessel, that provides a high rate of gas exchange necessary for rapidly dividing cells. Cells were grown in the high-aspect-ratio vessel, and DNA microarray and metabolic analyses were used to determine the resulting changes in yeast gene expression. A significant number of genes were found to be up- or downregulated by at least twofold as a result of rotational growth. By using Gibbs promoter alignment, clusters of genes were examined for promoter elements mediating these genetic changes. Candidate binding motifs similar to the Rap1p binding site and the stress-responsive element were identified in the promoter regions of differentially regulated genes. This study shows that, as in higher order organisms, S. cerevisiae changes gene expression in response to rotational culture and also provides clues for investigations into the signaling pathways involved in gravitational response.

  5. Induced accumulation of oleanolic acid and ursolic acid in cell suspension cultures of Uncaria tomentosa.

    PubMed

    Feria-Romero, Iris; Lazo, Elizabeth; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2005-06-01

    Increasing sucrose from 20 to 50 g l(-1) in Uncaria tomentosa cell suspension cultures enhanced ursolic acid and oleanolic acid production from 129 +/- 61 to 553 +/- 193 microg g(-1) cell dry wt. The maximal concentration of both triterpenes (1680 +/- 39 microg g(-1) cell dry wt) was 8 days after elicitation by jasmonic acid, while yeast extract or citrus pectin treatments produced 1189 +/- 20 or 1120 +/- 26 microg g(-1) cell dry wt, respectively. The ratio of ursolic acid:oleanolic acid was constant at 70:30.

  6. Evaluation of Antioxidant and Antibacterial Potentials of Nigella sativa L. Suspension Cultures under Elicitation.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Hera; Fatima, Nida; Ahmad, Iffat Zareen

    2015-01-01

    Nigella sativa L. (family Ranunculaceae) is an annual herb of immense medicinal properties because of its major active components (i.e., thymoquinone (TQ), thymohydroquinone (THQ), and thymol (THY)). Plant tissue culture techniques like elicitation, Agrobacterium mediated transformation, hairy root culture, and so on, are applied for substantial metabolite production. This study enumerates the antibacterial and antioxidant potentials of N. sativa epicotyl suspension cultures under biotic and abiotic elicitation along with concentration optimization of the elicitors for enhanced TQ and THY production. Cultures under different concentrations of pectin and manganese chloride (MnCl2) elicitation (i.e., 5 mg/L, 10 mg/L, and 15 mg/L) showed that the control, MnCl2 10 mg/L, and pectin 15 mg/L suspension extracts greatly inhibited the growth of E. coli, S. typhimurium, and S. aureus (MIC against E. coli, i.e., 2.35 ± 0.8, 2.4 ± 0.2, and 2.46 ± 0.5, resp.). Elicitation decreased SOD enzyme activity whereas CAT enzyme activity increased remarkably under MnCl2 elicitation. MnCl2 10 mg/L and pectin 15 mg/L elicitation enhanced the DPPH radical inhibition ability, but ferric scavenging activity was comparable to the control. TQ and THY were quantified by LC-MS/MS in the cultures with high bioactive properties revealing maximum content under MnCl2 10 mg/L elicitation. Therefore, MnCl2 elicitation can be undertaken on large scale for sustainable metabolite production.

  7. Transport of flavonolignans to the culture medium of elicited cell suspensions of Silybum marianum.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Daniel; Corchete, Purificación

    2014-01-15

    Cell suspension cultures of Silybum marianum are able to excrete silymarin compounds into the medium upon elicitation with methyl jasmonate or cyclodextrins. Knowledge of transport mechanism is important to understand Sm metabolism and to develop strategies aimed at increasing production by means of cell cultures. For these reasons, a pharmacological approach was undertaken in this work in order to elucidate the possible mechanism involved in the release of this class of secondary metabolites into the extracellular medium of suspensions. Treatment with an ionophore or NH4Cl displayed little effect in elicited cultures, thus indicating that secondary transport, which uses electrochemical gradients, is not involved in the release. Several inhibitors of ABC transporters showed differential effects. Sodium ortho-vanadate, a typical suppressor of ATPase activity, was highly toxic to cultures even at very low concentrations. The common Ca-channel blocker verapamil did not influence extracellular secondary metabolite accumulation. Glybenclamide and probenecid, both effective inhibitors of ABCC-type ABC transporters, strongly reduced silymarin secretion. A partial cDNA, SmABC1, which showed similarity to ABCC-type ABC transporters, was isolated by RT-PCR from silymarin-producing cultures. SmABC1 expression was enhanced by methyljasmonate and cyclodextrins. Brefeldin A, a fungal metabolite which affects vesicular trafficking by preventing GTP/GDP exchange, inhibited release in a dose dependent manner. These results suggest that excretion of silymarin and their precursors is a transporter-dependent active transport and that yet another mechanism involving a vesicle trafficking system seems to participate in driving this class of secondary metabolites to the extracellular compartment.

  8. Evaluation of Antioxidant and Antibacterial Potentials of Nigella sativa L. Suspension Cultures under Elicitation

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Hera; Fatima, Nida; Ahmad, Iffat Zareen

    2015-01-01

    Nigella sativa L. (family Ranunculaceae) is an annual herb of immense medicinal properties because of its major active components (i.e., thymoquinone (TQ), thymohydroquinone (THQ), and thymol (THY)). Plant tissue culture techniques like elicitation, Agrobacterium mediated transformation, hairy root culture, and so on, are applied for substantial metabolite production. This study enumerates the antibacterial and antioxidant potentials of N. sativa epicotyl suspension cultures under biotic and abiotic elicitation along with concentration optimization of the elicitors for enhanced TQ and THY production. Cultures under different concentrations of pectin and manganese chloride (MnCl2) elicitation (i.e., 5 mg/L, 10 mg/L, and 15 mg/L) showed that the control, MnCl2 10 mg/L, and pectin 15 mg/L suspension extracts greatly inhibited the growth of E. coli, S. typhimurium, and S. aureus (MIC against E. coli, i.e., 2.35 ± 0.8, 2.4 ± 0.2, and 2.46 ± 0.5, resp.). Elicitation decreased SOD enzyme activity whereas CAT enzyme activity increased remarkably under MnCl2 elicitation. MnCl2 10 mg/L and pectin 15 mg/L elicitation enhanced the DPPH radical inhibition ability, but ferric scavenging activity was comparable to the control. TQ and THY were quantified by LC-MS/MS in the cultures with high bioactive properties revealing maximum content under MnCl2 10 mg/L elicitation. Therefore, MnCl2 elicitation can be undertaken on large scale for sustainable metabolite production. PMID:26347883

  9. Plant cell suspension cultures as model systems for investigating growth regulating compounds.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, K; Rademacher, W; Jung, J

    1982-12-01

    Several plant growth regulators were investigated for their activity in cell suspension cultures of Glycine max, Gossypium hirsutum and Zea mays. The effect on the growth of the cell cultures was traced by means of cell counting and determining packed cell volume and turbidity of the suspensions. The growth retardant 5-(4-chlorophenyl)-3,4,5,9,10-pentaaza-tetracyclo-5,4,10(2,6) ,0(8,11)-dodeca-3,9-diene (NDA) and, to a slightly lesser extent, ancymidol proved to be the compounds with the greatest inhibitory action on cell division growth of all three cell cultures. In the case of cotton this effect was accompanied by increased synthesis and secretion of cell-wall material. Staining methods showed that, especially in the case of NDA, a high percentage of cells could be considered as viable, and showed thus that NDA inhibits the cell division process while the cells remain metabolically active. The effects of 1,1-Dimethyl-piperidiniumchloride (DPC), a genuine growth retardant of cell propagation, and, with less efficiency, N-trimethyl-(β-chloroethyl)-ammoniumchloride (CCC) in cotton, the triazole LAB 117 682 in soybean and maize, and, to a lesser extent, (2-isopropyl-5-methyl-4-trimethyl-ammoniumchloride)-phenyl-l-piperidiniumcarboxylate (AM0-1618) in soybean can be regarded as species-specific. Otherwise, CCC and particularly daminozide exhibited no action at the concentrations used. A comparison of the data from hydroculture studies with soybean and maize seedlings showed considerable agreement with the effectiveness of the substances in the corresponding cell cultures. Thus, cell cultures can be used to identify and screen substances with growth-influencing activity, and may also offer new ways to elucidate the mode of action of plant growth regulators. PMID:24257776

  10. Production of the triterpenoid quassin in callus and cell suspension cultures of Picrasma quassioides Bennett.

    PubMed

    Scragg, A H; Allan, E J

    1986-10-01

    Plant cell and suspension cultures have been established from stem cuttings of Picrasma quassioides Bennett. The effect of 244 different types/concentrations of plant growth regulators on growth and quassin accumulation in callus tissue was investigated. Best growth, in terms of wet/dry weight after four weeks growth, was obtained on B5 media supplemented with 2% glucose, 10% coconut milk, 0.5 mg.l(-1) zeatin riboside and 1.5 mg.l(-1) IBA. The highest yields of quassin (0.014-0.018%) were detected on this same media supplemented with 1.0 mg.l(-1) IBA and varying concentrations of zeatin riboside. Suspension cultures were easily established on B5 media supplemented with 2% glucose, 1.0 mg.l(-1) 2,4-D and 0.5 mg.l(-1) kinetin. The carbon source had a marked effect on quassin accumulation with 0.32% quassin being detected when cells were grown in 2% galactose. This is comparable to the highest reported quassin yield for the whole plant. PMID:24248298

  11. Production of Gymnemic Acid from Cell Suspension Cultures of Gymnema sylvestre.

    PubMed

    Nagella, Praveen; Dandin, Vijayalaxmi S; Murthy, Hosakatte Niranjana

    2016-01-01

    Gymnema sylvestre R. Br. is a popular herbal medicine. It has been used in ayurvedic system of medicine for thousands of years. It is popularly called as "Gur-mar" for its distinctive property of temporarily destroying the taste of sweetness and is used in the treatment of diabetes. The leaves of gymnema possess antidiabetic, antimicrobial, anti-hypercholesterolemic, anti-sweetener, anti-inflammatory, and hepatoprotective properties and have traditional uses in the treatment of asthma, eye complaints, and snake bite. The leaves contain triterpene saponins such as gymnemic acid which is an active ingredient of Gymnema. Since the cultivation of G. sylvestre is a very slow process and the content of gymnemic acid depends on the environmental factors, cell suspension culture is sought as an alternative means for the production of Gymnema biomass and to enhance the gymnemic acid content. In this chapter, the methods employed for the induction of callus and subsequent establishment of cell suspension cultures for the production of biomass and analysis of gymnemic acid using high performance liquid chromatography are described. PMID:27108321

  12. Characterization of anthocyanic vacuolar inclusions in Vitis vinifera L. cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Conn, Simon; Franco, Chris; Zhang, Wei

    2010-05-01

    Anthocyanic vacuolar inclusions (AVIs) are intra-vacuolar structures capable of concentrating anthocyanins and are present in over 50 of the highest anthocyanin-accumulating plant species. Presence of AVIs alters pigment intensity, total anthocyanin levels, pigment hue and causes bathochromic shifts in a spatio-temporal manner within various flowers, vegetables and fruits. A year-long study on Vitis vinifera cell suspension cultures found a strong correlation between AVI prevalence and anthocyanin content, but not the number of pigmented cells, growth rate or stilbene content. Furthermore, enhancement of the prevalence of AVIs and anthocyanins was achieved by treatment of V. vinifera cell suspension cultures with sucrose, jasmonic acid and white light. A unique autofluorescence of anthocyanins was used to demonstrate microscopically that AVIs proceed from the cytosol across the tonoplast and were able to coalesce intravacuolarly, with fewer, larger AVIs predominating as cells mature. Purification and characterisation of these bodies were performed, showing that they were dense, highly organic structures, with a lipid component indicative of membrane-encasement. These purified AVIs were also shown to comprise long-chain tannins and possessed an increased affinity for binding acylated anthocyanins, though no unique protein component was detected.

  13. Acid-growth response and alpha-expansins in suspension cultures of bright yellow 2 tobacco

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Link, B. M.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    The possibility that Bright Yellow 2 (BY2) tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) suspension-cultured cells possess an expansin-mediated acid-growth mechanism was examined by multiple approaches. BY2 cells grew three times faster upon treatment with fusicoccin, which induces an acidification of the cell wall. Exogenous expansins likewise stimulated BY2 cell growth 3-fold. Protein extracted from BY2 cell walls possessed the expansin-like ability to induce extension of isolated walls. In western-blot analysis of BY2 wall protein, one band of 29 kD was recognized by anti-expansin antibody. Six different classes of alpha-expansin mRNA were identified in a BY2 cDNA library. Northern-blot analysis indicated moderate to low abundance of multiple alpha-expansin mRNAs in BY2 cells. From these results we conclude that BY2 suspension-cultured cells have the necessary components for expansin-mediated cell wall enlargement.

  14. Fate and metabolism of the brominated flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) in rice cell suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Songfeng; Cao, Siqi; Wang, Yongfeng; Jiang, Bingqi; Wang, Lianhong; Sun, Feifei; Ji, Rong

    2016-07-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is the brominated flame retardant with the highest production volume and its bioaccumulation in environment has caused both human health and environmental concerns, however the fate and metabolism of TBBPA in plants is unknown. We studied the fate, metabolites, and transformation of (14)C-labeled TBBPA in rice cell suspension culture. During the incubation for 14 days, TBBPA degradation occurred continuously in the culture, accompanied by formation of one anisolic metabolite [2,6-dibromo-4-(2-(2-hydroxy)-propyl)-anisole] (DBHPA) (50% of the degraded TBBPA) and cellular debris-bound residues (46.4%) as well as mineralization (3.6%). The cells continuously accumulated TBBPA in the cytoplasm, while a small amount of DBHPA (2.1% of the initially applied TBBPA) was detectable inside the cells only at the end of incubation. The majority of the accumulated residues in the cells was attributed to the cellular debris-bound residues, accounting for 70-79% of the accumulation after the first incubation day. About 5.4% of the accumulation was associated with cell organelles, which contributed 7.5% to the cellular debris-bound residues. Based on the fate and metabolism of TBBPA in the rice cell suspension culture, a type II ipso-substitution pathway was proposed to describe the initial step for TBBPA degradation in the culture and balance the fate of TBBPA in the cells. To the best of our knowledge, our study provides for the first time the insights into the fate and metabolism of TBBPA in plants and points out the potential role of type II ipso-hydroxylation substitution in degradation of alkylphenols in plants. Further studies are required to reveal the mechanisms for the bound-residue formation (e.g., binding of residues to specific cell wall components), nature of the binding, and toxicological effects of the bound residues and DBHPA.

  15. [Impact of subculture cycles and inoculum sizes on suspension cultures of Vitis vinifera].

    PubMed

    Qu, Jun-Ge; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Quan-Li; Jin, Mei-Fang

    2006-11-01

    The commercial application of plant cell cultures is often hindered by the instability of secondary metabolite biosynthesis, where the metabolite yield fluctuates and decline dramatically over subcultures. This study proposed that such instability is due to the fluctuations of culture variables. To validate this hypothesis, the effects of the fluctuations of two culture variables (subculture cycle and inoculum size) on the biomass, anthocyanin biosynthesig, intracellular carbon, nitrogen and phosphate during continuous 10 subculture cycles were investigated. The subculture cycle was fluctuated for 12h in a 7 day cycle (6.5, 7 and 7.5 d), and the inoculum size was fluctuated by 20% on basis of 2.00 g (1.60, 2.00 and 2.40 g). It was found that all the measured culture parameters fluctuated over the 10 subculture cycles. The fluctuation in terms of inoculum sizes had a greater effect on the stability of anthocyanin biosynthesis in suspension cultures of V. vinifera. Among all the subculture conditions investigated, 7d-subculture cycle and 1.60 g-inoculum size was the best one to hold the relatively stable anthocyanin production. The anthocyanin yield presented a negative correlation with intracellular sucrose content or intracellular total phosphate content.

  16. Induction of linalool as a pharmaceutical and medicinal metabolite via cell suspension culture of cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.).

    PubMed

    Kazemi, N; Kahrizi, D; Mansouri, M; Karim, H; Vaziri, S; Zargooshi, J; Khanahmadi, M; Shokrinia, M; Mohammadi, N

    2016-05-30

    Cumin is an important medicinal plant in Iran. Plant cell suspension culture is a method for the production of medicinal and secondary metabolites. The linalool is a plant secondary metabolite that has been recognized as a neuroprotective agent. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of salicylic acid elicitor on induction of linalool in cell suspension culture of cumin. For this purpose, the cumin seeds were prepared, to obtain sterile seedling, were disinfected with sodium hypochlorite and alcohol, and were cultured on MS basal medium. This research was conducted in two separate experiments including callus induction and suspension cultures. Leaf explants were prepared from sterile seedlings and used to produce callus on MS medium supplemented with 1 mg/l NAA and 0.5 mg/l BAP. In order to establish suspension culture, the appropriate calli were transferred to liquid medium. Then cell cultures were treated with elicitors. The effects of elicitor on the production of linalool secondary metabolite and cell viability were assessed by GC-Mass and tetrazolium test respectively. For this purpose, the salicylic acid (at concentrations of 0, 1, 2, 4 and 8 mg/l) was used. The experimental design was a completely randomized design with five treatments and three replications. The results of cell culture and GC-Mass analysis showed that salicylic acid had significant effects on the linalool production (<0.01). At all concentrations of salicylic acid, viability of the cells in suspension culture experiments was lower than control. Increasing the elicitor concentrations lead to reduction in cell survival. In conclusion it is possible to produce linalool as a secondary metabolite and pharmaceutical agent in cell culture of cumin. It is necessary to determine the best combination of medium and elicitor.

  17. Induction of linalool as a pharmaceutical and medicinal metabolite via cell suspension culture of cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.).

    PubMed

    Kazemi, N; Kahrizi, D; Mansouri, M; Karim, H; Vaziri, S; Zargooshi, J; Khanahmadi, M; Shokrinia, M; Mohammadi, N

    2016-01-01

    Cumin is an important medicinal plant in Iran. Plant cell suspension culture is a method for the production of medicinal and secondary metabolites. The linalool is a plant secondary metabolite that has been recognized as a neuroprotective agent. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of salicylic acid elicitor on induction of linalool in cell suspension culture of cumin. For this purpose, the cumin seeds were prepared, to obtain sterile seedling, were disinfected with sodium hypochlorite and alcohol, and were cultured on MS basal medium. This research was conducted in two separate experiments including callus induction and suspension cultures. Leaf explants were prepared from sterile seedlings and used to produce callus on MS medium supplemented with 1 mg/l NAA and 0.5 mg/l BAP. In order to establish suspension culture, the appropriate calli were transferred to liquid medium. Then cell cultures were treated with elicitors. The effects of elicitor on the production of linalool secondary metabolite and cell viability were assessed by GC-Mass and tetrazolium test respectively. For this purpose, the salicylic acid (at concentrations of 0, 1, 2, 4 and 8 mg/l) was used. The experimental design was a completely randomized design with five treatments and three replications. The results of cell culture and GC-Mass analysis showed that salicylic acid had significant effects on the linalool production (<0.01). At all concentrations of salicylic acid, viability of the cells in suspension culture experiments was lower than control. Increasing the elicitor concentrations lead to reduction in cell survival. In conclusion it is possible to produce linalool as a secondary metabolite and pharmaceutical agent in cell culture of cumin. It is necessary to determine the best combination of medium and elicitor. PMID:27262805

  18. Scalable expansion of human induced pluripotent stem cells in the defined xeno-free E8 medium under adherent and suspension culture conditions☆

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Chou, Bin-Kuan; Dowey, Sarah; He, Chaoxia; Gerecht, Sharon; Cheng, Linzhao

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale production of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) by robust and economic methods has been one of the major challenges for translational realization of hiPSC technology. Here we demonstrate a scalable culture system for hiPSC expansion using the E8 chemically defined and xeno-free medium under either adherent or suspension conditions. To optimize suspension conditions guided by a computational simulation, we developed a method to efficiently expand hiPSCs as undifferentiated aggregates in spinner flasks. Serial passaging of two different hiPSC lines in the spinner flasks using the E8 medium preserved their normal karyotype and expression of undifferentiated state markers of TRA-1–60, SSEA4, OCT4, and NANOG. The hiPSCs cultured in spinner flasks for more than 10 passages not only could be remained pluripotent as indicated by in vitro and in vivo assays, but also could be efficiently induced toward mesodermal and hematopoietic differentiation. Furthermore, we established a xeno-free protocol of single-cell cryopreservation and recovery for the scalable production of hiPSCs in spinner flasks. This system is the first to enable an efficient scale-up bioprocess in completely xeno-free condition for the expansion and cryopreservation of hiPSCs with the quantity and quality compliant for clinical applications. PMID:23973800

  19. Differential protein expression following low temperature culture of suspension CHO-K1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Niraj; Gammell, Patrick; Meleady, Paula; Henry, Michael; Clynes, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Background To ensure maximal productivity of recombinant proteins (rP) during production culture it is typical to encourage an initial phase of rapid cell proliferation to achieve high biomass followed by a stationary phase where cellular energies are directed towards production of rP. During many such biphasic cultures, the initial phase of rapid cell growth at 37°C is followed by a growth arrest phase induced through reduction of the culture temperature. Low temperature induced growth arrest is associated with many positive phenotypes including increased productivity, sustained viability and an extended production phase, although the mechanisms regulating these phenotypes during mild hypothermia are poorly understood. Results In this study differential protein expression in suspension CHO-K1 cells was investigated following a reduction of the culture temperature from 37°C to 31°C in comparison to standard batch culture maintained at 37°C using 2D-DIGE (Fluorescence 2-D Difference Gel Electrophoresis) and mass spectrometry (MS). There is only limited proteomic analysis of suspension-grown CHO cells describing a direct comparison of temperature shifted versus non-temperature shifted cultures using 2D-DIGE. This investigation has enabled the identification of temperature-dependent as well as temperature-independent proteomic changes. 201 proteins were observed as differentially expressed following temperature shift, of which 118 were up regulated. Of the 53 proteins identified by MALDI-ToF MS, 23 were specifically differentially expressed upon reduction of the culture temperature and were found related to a variety of cellular functions such as regulation of growth (HNRPC), cap-independent translation (EIF4A), apoptosis (importin-α), the cytoskeleton (vimentin) and glycoprotein quality control (alpha glucosidase 2). Conclusion These results indicate the extent of the temperature response in CHO-K1 cells and suggest a number of key regulatory proteins and

  20. Virus morphogenesis of Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus in Helicoverpa zea serum-free suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Lua, L H; Reid, S

    2000-10-01

    Helicoverpa armigera single nucleopolyhedrovirus (HaSNPV) replication in Helicoverpa zea serum-free suspension culture was studied in detail and the sequence of virus morphogenesis was determined by transmission electron microscopy. By 16 h post-infection (p.i.), virus replication was observed in the virogenic stroma by the appearance of nucleocapsids. Polyhedron formation was detected by 24 h p.i. and the polyhedron envelope (PE) was completely formed by 72 h p.i. PE morphogenesis of HaSNPV is significantly different compared to the extensively studied Autograph californica (Ac)MNPV. In AcMNPV-infected cells, fibrillar structures are found in both cytoplasm and nuclei, and the fibrillar structures in nuclei are in close association with maturing polyhedra during PE formation. Fibrillar structures that resemble the AcMNPV fibrillar structures were detected only in the cytoplasm of HaSNPV-infected cells and appeared to interact with calyx precursors there, but their role in PE formation is unclear. However, prominent calyx precursor structures of various shapes and sizes were observed in the nuclei of HaSNPV-infected cells as well, and they appeared to interact with polyhedra during PE formation. Both the calyx precursor structure and the cytoplasmic fibrillar structure were detected only after HaSNPV virion occlusion had started, indicating that they might have a role in formation of PE. Similar calyx precursor structures and cytoplasmic fibrillar structures were observed in both serum-supplemented and serum-free suspension cultures, as well as in HaSNPV-infected larval tissues, indicating that the structures observed are not cell culture artefacts.

  1. An embryogenic suspension cell culture system for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of citrus.

    PubMed

    Dutt, M; Grosser, J W

    2010-11-01

    A method for the genetic transformation of several citrus cultivars is described, including cultivars observed to be recalcitrant to conventional epicotyl-mediated transformation. Embryogenic cell suspension cultures, established from unfertilized ovules were used as target tissues for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Several modifications were made to the culture environment to investigate factors required for efficient transfer of the T-DNA and the subsequent regeneration of transgenic citrus plants. It was determined that co-cultivation of citrus cells and Agrobacterium in EME medium supplemented with maltose (EME-M) and 100 μM acetosyringone for 5 days at 25°C was optimum for transformation of each of the citrus cultivars. Efficient selection was obtained and escapes were prevented when the antibiotic hygromycin B was used as a selection antibiotic following transformation with an Agrobacterium strain containing hptII in the T-DNA region. Transgenic embryo regeneration and development was enhanced in medium that contained a liquid overlay consisting of a 1:2 mixture of 0.6 M BH3 and 0.15 M EME-M media. PCR and Southern blot analyses confirmed the presence of the T-DNA and the stable integration into the genome of regenerated plants, while RT-PCR demonstrated variable amounts of RNA being transcribed in different transgenic lines. This protocol can create an avenue for insertion of useful traits into any polyembryonic citrus cultivar that can be established as embryogenic cell suspension cultures, including popular specialty mandarins and seedless cultivars.

  2. High-level production of human interleukin-10 fusions in tobacco cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Kaldis, Angelo; Ahmad, Adil; Reid, Alexandra; McGarvey, Brian; Brandle, Jim; Ma, Shengwu; Jevnikar, Anthony; Kohalmi, Susanne E; Menassa, Rima

    2013-06-01

    The production of pharmaceutical proteins in plants has made much progress in recent years with the development of transient expression systems, transplastomic technology and humanizing glycosylation patterns in plants. However, the first therapeutic proteins approved for administration to humans and animals were made in plant cell suspensions for reasons of containment, rapid scale-up and lack of toxic contaminants. In this study, we have investigated the production of human interleukin-10 (IL-10) in tobacco BY-2 cell suspension and evaluated the effect of an elastin-like polypeptide tag (ELP) and a green fluorescent protein (GFP) tag on IL-10 accumulation. We report the highest accumulation levels of hIL-10 obtained with any stable plant expression system using the ELP fusion strategy. Although IL-10-ELP has cytokine activity, its activity is reduced compared to unfused IL-10, likely caused by interference of ELP with folding of IL-10. Green fluorescent protein has no effect on IL-10 accumulation, but examining the trafficking of IL-10-GFP over the cell culture cycle revealed fluorescence in the vacuole during the stationary phase of the culture growth cycle. Analysis of isolated vacuoles indicated that GFP alone is found in vacuoles, while the full-size fusion remains in the whole-cell extract. This indicates that GFP is cleaved off prior to its trafficking to the vacuole. On the other hand, IL-10-GFP-ELP remains mostly in the ER and accumulates to high levels. Protein bodies were observed at the end of the culture cycle and are thought to arise as a consequence of high levels of accumulation in the ER. PMID:23297698

  3. Reduced receptor aggregation and altered cytoskeleton in cultured myocytes after space-flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruener, R.; Roberts, R.; Reitstetter, R.

    1994-01-01

    We carried out parallel experiments first on the slow clinostat and then in space-flight to examine the effects of altered gravity on the aggregation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and the structure of the cytoskeleton in cultured Xenopus embryonic muscle cells. By examining the concordance between results from space flight and the clinostat, we tested whether the slow clinostat is a relevant simulation paradigm. Space-flown cells showed marked changes in the distribution and organization of actin filaments and had a reduced incidence of acetylcholine receptor aggregates at the site of contact with polystyrene beads. Similar effects were found after clinostat rotation. The sensitivity of synaptic receptor aggregation and cytoskeletal morphology suggests that in the microgravity of space cell behavior may be importantly altered.

  4. Characterisation of the membrane transport of pilocarpine in cell suspension cultures of Pilocarpus microphyllus.

    PubMed

    Andreazza, Nathalia Luiza; Abreu, Ilka Nacif; Sawaya, Alexandra Christine Helena Frankland; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2015-03-01

    Pilocarpine is an alkaloid obtained from the leaves of Pilocarpus genus, with important pharmaceutical applications. Previous reports have investigated the production of pilocarpine by Pilocarpus microphyllus cell cultures and tried to establish the alkaloid biosynthetic route. However, the site of pilocarpine accumulation inside of the cell and its exchange to the medium culture is still unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the intracellular accumulation of pilocarpine and characterise its transport across membranes in cell suspension cultures of P. microphyllus. Histochemical analysis and toxicity assays indicated that pilocarpine is most likely stored in the vacuoles probably to avoid cell toxicity. Assays with exogenous pilocarpine supplementation to the culture medium showed that the alkaloid is promptly uptaken but it is rapidly metabolised. Treatment with specific ABC protein transporter inhibitors and substances that disturb the activity of secondary active transporters suppressed pilocarpine uptake and release suggesting that both proteins may participate in the traffic of pilocarpine to inside and outside of the cells. As bafilomicin A1, a specific V-type ATPase inhibitor, had little effect and NH4Cl (induces membrane proton gradient dissipation) had moderate effect, while cyclosporin A and nifedipine (ABC proteins inhibitors) strongly inhibited the transport of pilocarpine, it is believed that ABC proteins play a major role in the alkaloid transport across membranes but it is not the exclusive one. Kinetic studies supported these results.

  5. Effect of cell lysates on retroviral transduction efficiency of cells in suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Beauchesne, Pascal R; Bruce, Katherine J; Bowen, Bruce D; Piret, James M

    2010-04-15

    Recombinant retroviruses are effective vectors able to integrate transgenes into the target cell's genome to achieve longer-term expression. This study investigates the effect of cell lysis products, a common cell culture by-product, on the transduction of suspension cells by gammaretroviral vectors. Cell lysates derived from human and murine suspension cell lines significantly increased the transduction of human TF-1 and K-562 cell lines by gibbon ape leukemia virus-pseudotyped retroviral vectors without altering tropism. The transduction efficiency of TF-1 cells increased as a function of lysate concentration and decreased with increasing target cell concentrations. This was adequately predicted using a saturation equation based on the lysed-to-target cell concentration ratio, R, where: Fold increase = 1+Fold_(Max) (R/(K_(L)+R)). Lysate completely masked the effects of fibronectin when the two were added in combination. With protamine sulfate, the transduction efficiency was increased by lysate to 58% from 20% for protamine sulfate alone. Overall, the presence of cell lysate significantly influenced the outcome of the transduction process, either alone or in the presence of protamine sulfate or fibronectin. PMID:20014140

  6. Thrombin action decreases acetylcholine receptor aggregate number and stability in cultured mouse myotubes.

    PubMed

    Davenport, R W; Lanuza, M; Kim, S; Jia, M; Snyder, E; Nelson, P G

    2000-08-30

    Neurons develop and make very stable, long-term synaptic connections with other nerve cells and with muscle. Synaptic stability at the neuromuscular junction changes over development in that a proliferation of synaptic input are made to individual myotubes and synapses from all but one neuron are lost during development. In an established co-culture paradigm in which spinal motoneurons synaptically contact myotubes, thrombin and associated protease inhibitors have been shown to affect the loss of functional synaptic contacts [6]. Evidence has not been provided which clearly demonstrate whether protease/protease inhibitors affect either the pre- or postsynaptic terminal, or both. In an effort to determine whether these reagents directly affect postsynaptic receptors on myotubes, myotubes were cultured in the absence of neurons and the spontaneous presence and stability of aggregates of acetylcholine receptors (AChR) in control and thrombin-containing media were evaluated. In dishes fixed after treatment and in dishes in which individual aggregates were observed live, thrombin action appeared to increase loss of AChR aggregates over time. Hirudin, a specific inhibitor of the thrombin protease, diminished this loss. Neither reagent affected the overall incorporation or degradation of AChR; therefore, it appears these protease/protease inhibitors affect the state of AChR aggregation. PMID:10960680

  7. Turgor pressure and water transport properties of suspension-cultured cells of Chenopodium rubrum L.

    PubMed

    Büchner, K H; Zimmermann, U; Bentrup, F W

    1981-01-01

    The turgor pressure and water relation parameters were determined in single photoautotrophically grown suspension cells and in individual cells of intact leaves of Chenopodium rubrum using the miniaturized pressure probe. The stationary turgor pressure in suspension-cultured cells was in the range of betwen 3 and 5 bar. From the turgor pressure relaxation process, induced either hydrostatically (by means of the pressure probe) or osmotically, the halftime of water exchange was estimated to be 20±10 s. No polarity was observed for both ex- and endosmotic water flow. The volumetric elastic modulus, ε, determined from measurements of turgor pressure changes, and the corresponding changes in the fractional cell volume was determined to be in the range of between 20 and 50 bar. ε increases with increasing turgor pressure as observed for other higher plant and algal cells. The hydraulic conductivity, Lp, is calculated to be about 0,5-2·10(-6) cm s(-1) bar(-1). Similar results were obtained for individual leaf cells of Ch. rubrum. Suspension cells immobilized in a cross-linked matrix of alginate (6 to 8% w/w) revealed the same values for the half-time of water exchange and for the hydraulic conductivity, Lp, provided that the turgor pressure relaxation process was generated hydrostatically by means of the pressure probe. Thus, it can be concluded that the unstirred layer from the immobilized matrix has no effect on the calculation of Lp from the turgor pressure relaxation process, using the water transport equation derived for a single cell surrounded by a large external volume. By analogy, this also holds true for Lp-values derived from turgor pressure changes generated by the pressure probe in a single cell within the leaf tissue. The fair similarity between the Lp-values measured in mesophyll cells in situ and mesophyll-like suspension cells suggests that the water transport relations of a cell within a leaf are not fundamentally different from those measured in a

  8. Effect of major nutrients on podophyllotoxin production in Podophyllum hexandrum suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, S; Mehra, R S; Srivastava, A K; Bhojwani, S S; Bisaria, V S

    2003-01-01

    The effect of major medium ingredients (sugar, nitrogen source and phosphate) in Podophyllum hexandrum suspension cultures was investigated in order to increase the production of podophyllotoxin, the raw material in the synthesis of anticancer drugs. Amongst B5, Eriksson, MS, Nitsch, Street and White's medium, MS medium resulted in high growth and podophyllotoxin accumulation. The optimum level of nitrogen was found to be 60 mM, with a combination of ammonium salts and nitrate in the ratio of 1:2. The highest level of podophyllotoxin was obtained at 60 g glucose/l and at 1.25 mM phosphate after 30 days. Statistical design was adopted to determine the optimum levels of the parameters for cell growth and podophyllotoxin production.

  9. Legume Lectin FRIL Preserves Neural Progenitor Cells in Suspension Culture In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hailei; Xie, Xiaoyan; Li, Yanhua; Wang, Dongmei; Han, Shu; Shi, Shuangshuang; Nan, Xue; Bai, Cixian; Wang, Yunfang; Pei, Xuetao

    2008-01-01

    In vitro maintenance of stem cells is crucial for many clinical applications. Stem cell preservation factor FRIL (Flt3 receptor-interacting lectin) is a plant lectin extracted from Dolichos Lablab and has been found preserve hematopoietic stem cells in vitro for a month in our previous studies. To investigate whether FRIL can preserve neural progenitor cells (NPCs), it was supplemented into serum-free suspension culture media. FRIL made NPC grow slowly, induced cell adhesion, and delayed neurospheres formation. However, FRIL did not initiate NPC differentiation according to immunofluorescence and semiquantitive RT-PCR results. In conclusion, FRIL could also preserve neural progenitor cells in vitro by inhibiting both cell proliferation and differentiation. PMID:18695740

  10. Cell Size Clues for the Allee Effect in Vegetative Amoeba Suspension Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, Carl; Rappazzo, Brendan; Wang, Xiaoning; Segota, Igor

    That cells proliferate at higher rates with increasing density helps us appreciate and understand the development of multicellular behavior through the study of dilute cell systems. However, arduous cell counting with a microscope reveals that in the model eukaryote, Dictyostelium discoideum this transition is difficult to ascertain and thereby further explore despite our earlier progress (Phys. Rev. E 77, 041905, (2008)). Here we report preliminary evidence that the slow proliferation phase is well characterized by reduced cell size compared to the wide distribution of cell sizes in the familiar exponential proliferation phase of moderate densities. This observation is enabled by a new system for characterizing cells in stirred suspension cultures. Our technique relies on quickly acquiring magnitude distributions of detected flashes of laser light scattered in situ by cell targets.

  11. [Effect of auxins on production of coumarin in a suspension culture of Angelica archangelica L].

    PubMed

    Siatka, T; Kasparová, M

    2003-07-01

    The paper examined the effect of selected auxins (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, alpha-naphthalene-acetic acid, beta-indoleacetic acid, beta-indoleburytic acid; each in four concentrations--0.2, 2, 10, and 20 mg/l) on the production of coumarins in the suspension culture of Angelica archangelica L. cultinated in the dark and under permanent lighting(3500 lux). The effect of the light regimen is, in comparison with auxins, less marked--the content of coumarins is mostly comparable both under permanent lighting and in the dark. The highest coumarin content was achieved with the use of alpha-naphthalene-acetic acid in a concentration of 0.2 mg/l with cultivation in the dark. PMID:12924070

  12. Proteomic Characterization of Golgi Membranes Enriched from Arabidopsis Suspension Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Sara Fasmer; Ebert, Berit; Rautengarten, Carsten; Heazlewood, Joshua L

    2016-01-01

    The plant Golgi apparatus has a central role in the secretory pathway and is the principal site within the cell for the assembly and processing of macromolecules. The stacked membrane structure of the Golgi apparatus along with its interactions with the cytoskeleton and endoplasmic reticulum has historically made the isolation and purification of this organelle difficult. Density centrifugation has typically been used to enrich Golgi membranes from plant microsomal preparations, and aside from minor adaptations, the approach is still widely employed. Here we outline the enrichment of Golgi membranes from an Arabidopsis cell suspension culture that can be used to investigate the proteome of this organelle. We also provide a useful workflow for the examination of proteomic data as the result of multiple analyses. Finally, we highlight a simple technique to validate the subcellular localization of proteins by fluorescent tags after their identification by tandem mass spectrometry. PMID:27632004

  13. Biosynthesis of sterols and triterpenes in cell suspension cultures of Uncaria tomentosa.

    PubMed

    Flores-Sánchez, Isvett J; Ortega-López, Jaime; del Carmen Montes-Horcasitas, María; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2002-12-01

    Pectin administered to Uncaria tomentosa cell suspension cultures, was found to increase the production of triterpene acids (ursolic and oleanolic acid), however, neither growth nor sterol accumulation were affected. Cell cultures showed that pectin treatment caused a rapid threefold increase in the activities of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of C(5) and C(30 )isoprenoid, such as isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase and squalene synthase. The activity of a farnesyl diphosphatase, which could divert the flux of farnesyl diphosphate to farnesol, was two times lower in elicited than in control cells. Elicited cells also transformed more rapidly a higher percentage of [5-(3)H]mevalonic acid into triterpene acids. Interestingly, addition of terbinafine, an inhibitor of squalene epoxidase, to elicited cell cultures inhibited sterol accumulation while triterpene production was not inhibited. These results suggest that in U. tomentosa cells, both the previously mentioned enzymes and those involved in squalene 2,3-oxide formation play an important regulatory role in the biosynthesis of sterols and triterpenes.

  14. Secretion of active recombinant phytase from soybean cell-suspension cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Li, J; Hegeman, C E; Hanlon, R W; Lacy, G H; Denbow, M D; Grabau, E A

    1997-01-01

    Phytase, an enzyme that degrades the phosphorus storage compound phytate, has the potential to enhance phosphorus availability in animal diets when engineered into soybean (Glycine max) seeds. The phytase gene from Aspergillus niger was inserted into soybean transformation plasmids under control of constitutive and seed-specific promoters, with and without a plant signal sequence. Suspension cultures were used to confirm phytase expression in soybean cells. Phytase mRNA was observed in cultures containing constitutively expressed constructs. Phytase activity was detected in the culture medium from transformants that received constructs containing the plant signal sequence, confirming expectations that the protein would follow the default secretory pathway. Secretion also facilitated characterization of the biochemical properties of recombinant phytase. Soybean-synthesized phytase had a lower molecular mass than did the fungal enzyme. However, deglycosylation of the recombinant and fungal phytase yielded polypeptides of identical molecular mass (49 kD). Temperature and pH optima of the recombinant phytase were indistinguishable from the commercially available fungal phytase. Thermal inactivation studies of the recombinant phytase suggested that the additional protein stability would be required to withstand the elevated temperatures involved in soybean processing. PMID:9232886

  15. Three sesquiterpene compounds biosynthesised from artemisinic acid using suspension-cultured cells of Averrhoa carambola (Oxalidaceae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Zhu, Jianhua; Song, Liyan; Shi, Xiaojian; Li, Xingyi; Yu, Rongmin

    2012-01-01

    A new sesquiterpene glycoside, artemisinic acid 3-β-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (3, 31.24%) and other two biotransformation products, 3-β-hydroxyartemisinic acid (2, 36.69%) and 3-β-hydroxyartemisinic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester (4, 7.03%), were biosynthesised after artemisinic acid (1) was administered to the cultured cells of Averrhoa carambola. The three biotransformation products were obtained for the first time by using the suspension-cultured cells of A. carambola as a new biocatalyst system, and their structures were identified on the basis of the physico-chemical properties, NMR and mass spectral analyses. The results indicate that the cultured cells of A. carambola have the abilities to hydroxylate and glycosylate sesquiterpene compounds in a regio- and stereoselective manner. Furthermore, the anti-tumour activity of compounds 3 and 4 was evaluated against K562 and HeLa cell lines. Compound 4 showed strong activity against HeLa cell line, with the IC₅₀ value of 0.56 µmol mL⁻¹.

  16. Synthesis and Turnover of Cell-Wall Polysaccharides and Starch in Photosynthetic Soybean Suspension Cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Lozovaya, V. V.; Zabotina, O. A.; Widholm, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) suspension cultures grown under photoautotrophic and photomixotrophic (1% sucrose) culture conditions were used in 14CO2 pulse-chase experiments to follow cell-wall polysaccharide and starch biosynthesis and turnover. Following a 30-min pulse with 14CO2, about one-fourth of the 14C of the photoautotrophic cells was incorporated into the cell wall; this increased to about 80% during a 96-h chase in unlabeled CO2. Cells early in the cell culture cycle (3 d) incorporated more 14C per sample and also exhibited greater turnover of the pectin and hemicellulose fractions as shown by loss of 14C during the 96-h chase than did 10- and 16-d cells. When the chase occurred in the dark, less 14C was incorporated into the cell wall because of the cessation of growth and higher respiratory loss. The dark effect was much less pronounced with the photomixotrophic cells. Even though the cell starch levels were much lower than in leaves, high 14C incorporation was found during the pulse, especially in older cells. The label was largely lost during the chase, indicating that starch is involved in the short-term storage of photosynthate. Thus, these easily labeled and manipulated photosynthetic cells demonstrated extensive turnover of the cell-wall pectin and hemicellulose fractions and starch during the normal growth process. PMID:12226338

  17. Lipoxygenase activity and sanguinarine production in cell suspension cultures of California poppy (Eschscholtzia californica CHAM.).

    PubMed

    Kollárová, R; Oblozinský, M; Kováciková, V; Holková, I; Balazová, A; Pekárová, M; Hoffman, P; Bezáková, L

    2014-08-01

    In this study we investigated the influence of biotic elicitor (phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea) and abiotic elicitors (methyljasmonate [MJ] and salicylic acid [SA]) on lipoxygenase (LOX) activity and sanguinarine production in cell suspension cultures of California poppy (Eschscholtzia californica CHAM.). We have observed different time effects of elicitors (10, 24, 48 and 72 h) on LOX activity and production of sanguinarine in in vitro cultures. All elicitors used in the experiments evidently increased the LOX activity and sanguinarine production in contrast to control samples. The highest LOX activities were determined in samples elicitated by MJ after 48 h and 72 h and the lowest LOX activities (in contrast to control samples) were detected after biotic elicitation by Botrytis cinerea. These activities showed about 50% lower level against the activities after MJ elicitation. The maximal amount of sanguinarine was observed after 48 h in MJ treated cultures (429.91 mg/g DCW) in comparision with control samples. Although all elicitors affect the sanguinarine production, effect of SA and biotic elicitor on sanguinarine accumulation in in vitrocultures was not so significant than after MJ elicitation.

  18. Effect of ultrasound on the isoflavonoid production in Genista tinctoria L. suspension cultures

    PubMed Central

    Tůmová, Lenka; Tůma, Jiří; Hendrychová, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Background: Application of ultrasound (US) to biotechnology is relatively new but several processes that take place in the presence of cells or enzymes are activated by ultrasonic waves. Genista tinctoria L. (Fabaceae) is rich on various kind of flavonoids, including isoflavones with valuable estrogenic activity. Objective: This study verified use of low-energy US elicitor to enhance secondary metabolite production in plant cell cultures. Materials and Methods: Suspension cultures of G. tinctoria cells was exposed to low-power US (with fixed frequency 35 kHz and power level 0.1 mW/cm3) for period 1-5 min. Results: The US exposure significantly stimulated genistin content (0.8 mg/g DW) after 3 min of US treatment (sampled after 72 h). The highest daidzein level (1.4 mg/g DW) was reached after US irradiation for 5 min and 168 h sampling. Conclusion: The achieved results suggest that US can act as a potent abiotic elicitor to induce the defense responses of plant cells and to stimulate secondary metabolite production in plant cell cultures. PMID:24991122

  19. [Effect of calcium on medium alkalinization induced by salicylic acid in Salvia miltiorrhiza suspension cultures].

    PubMed

    Liu, Liancheng; Wang, Cong; Dong, Juan'e; Su, Hui; Zhuo, Zequn; Xue, Yaxin

    2013-07-01

    We studied medium alkalinization in Salvia miltiorrhiza suspension cultures treated with salicylic acid and the effect of Ca2+ in this process through application of calcium channel antagonists (Verapamil, LaCl3, LiCl, 2-APB) and ionophore A23187. The results show that salicylic acid could induce significant medium alkalinization in S. miltiorrhiza culture. Verapamil and LaCl3 or LiCl and 2-APB, two different groups of calcium channel antagonist, significantly inhibited the medium alkalinization induced by salicylic acid. However, the suppression effect of verapamil or LaCl3 on medium alkalinization induced by salicylic acid was higher than that of LiCl or 2-APB. When two types of calcium channel inhibitor (LaCl3 and 2-APB) were used together, the medium alkalinization induced by salicylic acid was completely suppressed and even reduced the pH in medium. On the other hand, A23187 could promote the medium alkalinization. Based on the results above, we speculated that salicylic acid could induce significant medium alkalinization in S. miltiorrhiza culture, depending on the calcium from both extracell and intracell. Moreover, calcium from extracell plays a more dominant role in this process. Reveal of relationship in this research between Ca2+ and medium alkalinization can provide theory evidence for mechanism of the plant secondary metabolism.

  20. Factors Influencing Protoplast Viability of Suspension-Cultured Rice Cells during Isolation Process.

    PubMed

    Ishii, S

    1988-09-01

    Callus cells of rice (Oryza sativa L.) that were actively dividing in suspension culture had lost the ability to divide during the isolation process of protoplasts. Factors influencing the protoplast viability were examined using highly purified preparations of cellulase C(1), xylanase, and pectin lyase, which were essential enzymes for the isolation of protoplasts from the rice cells. The treatment of the cells with xylanase and pectin lyase, both of which are macerating enzymes, caused cellular damage. Xylanase treatment was more detrimental to the cells. Osmotic stress, cell wall fragments solubilized by xylanase, and disassembly of cortical microtubules were not the primary factors which damaged the rice cells and protoplasts. The addition of AgNO(3), an inhibitor of ethylene action, to the protoplast isolation medium increased the number of colonies formed from the cultured protoplasts, although the yield of protoplasts was reduced by the addition. Superoxide radical (O(2)-) was generated from the cells treated with xylanase or pectin lyase. The addition of superoxide dismutase and catalase to the protoplast isolation medium resulted in a marked improvement in protoplast viability especially when the non-additive control protoplasts formed colonies with a low frequency. The addition of glutathione peroxidase and phospholipase A(2), which have been known to reduce and detoxify lipid hydroperoxides in membranes, to the protoplast culture medium significantly increased the frequency of colony formation. These results suggested that some of the damage to rice protoplasts may be caused by oxygen toxicity.

  1. Metabolomics driven analysis of Erythrina lysistemon cell suspension culture in response to methyl jasmonate elicitation.

    PubMed

    Farag, Mohamed A; Mekky, Hattem; El-Masry, Sawsan

    2016-09-01

    An MS-based metabolomic approach was used to profile the secondary metabolite of the ornamental plant Erythrina lysistemon via ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to photodiode array detection and high resolution q-TOF mass spectrometry (UPLC-PDA-MS). Cultures maintained the capacity to produce E. lysistemon flavonoid subclasses with pterocarpans amounting for the most abundant ones suggesting that it could provide a resource of such flavonoid subclass. In contrast, alkaloids, major constituents of Erythrina genus, were detected at trace levels in suspension cultures. Methyl jasmonate (MeJA), phytohormone, was further supplied to culture with the aim of increasing secondary metabolites production and with metabolite profiles subjected to multivariate data analysis to evaluate its effect. Results revealed that triterpene i.e. oleanolic acid and fatty acid i.e. hydroxy-octadecadienoic acid were elicited in response to methyl jasmonate, whereas pterocarpans i.e., isoneorautenol showed a decline in response to elicitation suggesting for the induction of terpenoid biosynthetic pathway and concurrent with a down regulation of pterocarpans. In conclusion, a total of 53 secondary metabolites including 3 flavones, 12 isoflavones, 4 isoflavanones, 4 alkaloids, 11 pterocarpans, and 5 phenolic acids were identified. PMID:27504198

  2. Association of heterotrophic bacteria with aggregated Arthrospira platensis exopolysaccharides: implications in the induction of axenic cultures.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Inducing an axenic culture of the edible cyanobacterium Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis using differential filtration alone is never successful; thus, it has been thought that, in non-axenic cultures, a portion of contaminating bacteria is strongly associated with Arthrospira cells. However, examination of the behavior of these bacteria during filtration revealed that they were not associated with Arthrospira cells but with aggregates of exopolysaccharides present in the medium away from the Arthrospira cells. Based on this finding, a rapid and reliable method for preparing axenic trichomes of A. platensis was established. After verifying the axenicity of the resulting trichomes on enriched agar plates, they were individually transferred to fresh sterile medium using a handmade tool, a microtrowel, to produce axenic cultures. With this technique, axenic cultures of various A. platensis strains were successfully produced. The technique described in this study is potentially applicable to a wider range of filamentous cyanobacteria. PMID:25333502

  3. Influence of NaCl on Growth, Proline, and Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Levels in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum Suspension Cultures 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, John C.; De Armond, Richard L.; Bohnert, Hans J.

    1992-01-01

    The facultative halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum responds to salt stress by increasing the levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase) and other enzymes associated with Crassulacean acid metabolism. A more common response to salt stress in sensitive and tolerant species, including M. crystallinum, is the accumulation of proline. We have established M. crystallinum suspension cultures to investigate whether both these salt-induced responses occur at the cellular level. Leaf-and root-derived cultures maintain 5% of the total soluble amino acids as proline. Cell culture growth slows upon addition of 400 millimolar NaCl, and proline levels increase to 40% of the total soluble amino acids. These results suggest a functional salt-stress and response program in Mesembryanthemum cells. Suspension cultures grown with or without 400 millimolar NaCl have PEPCase levels that compare with those from roots and unstressed leaves. The predominant protein cross-reacting with an anti-PEPCase antibody corresponds to 105 kilodaltons (apparent molecular mass), whereas a second species of approximately 110 kilodaltons is present at low levels. In salt-stressed leaves, the 110 kilodalton protein is more prevalent. Levels of mRNA for both ppc1 (salt stress induced in leaves) and ppc2 (constitutive) genes in salt-treated suspensions cultures are equal to unstressed leaves, and only twice the levels found in untreated suspension cultures. Whereas cells accumulate proline in response to NaCl, PEPCase protein amounts remain similar in salt-treated and untreated cultures. The induction upon salt stress of the 110 kilodalton PEPCase protein and other Crassulacean acid metabolism enzymes in organized tissues is not observed in cell culture and may depend on tissue-dependent or photoautotrophy-dependent programs. ImagesFigure 4Figure 5 PMID:16668687

  4. Milk protein suspensions enriched with three essential minerals: Physicochemical characterization and aggregation induced by a novel enzymatic pool.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Julia; Spelzini, Darío; Corrêa, Ana Paula Folmer; Brandelli, Adriano; Risso, Patricia; Boeris, Valeria

    2016-04-01

    Structural changes of casein micelles and their aggregation induced by a novel enzymatic pool isolated from Bacillus spp. in the presence of calcium, magnesium or zinc were investigated. The effect of cations on milk protein structure was studied using fluorescence and dynamic light scattering. In the presence of cations, milk protein structure rearrangements and larger casein micelle size were observed. The interaction of milk proteins with zinc appears to be of a different nature than that with calcium or magnesium. Under the experimental conditions assayed, the affinity of each cation for some groups present in milk proteins seems to play an important role, besides electrostatic interaction. On the other hand, the lowest aggregation times were achieved at the highest calcium and zinc concentrations (15 mM and 0.25 mM, respectively). The study found that the faster the aggregation of casein micelles, the less compact the gel matrix obtained. Cation concentrations affected milk protein aggregation kinetics and the structure of the aggregates formed.

  5. Optimization and comparison of two different 3D culture methods to prepare cell aggregates as a bioink for organ printing.

    PubMed

    Imani, Rana; Hojjati Emami, Shahriar; Fakhrzadeh, Hossein; Baheiraei, Nafiseh; Sharifi, Ali M

    2012-04-01

    The ultimate goal of tissue engineering is to design and fabricate functional human tissues that are similar to natural cells and are capable of regeneration. Preparation of cell aggregates is one of the important steps in 3D tissue engineering technology, particularly in organ printing. Two simple methods, hanging drop (HD) and conical tube (CT) were utilized to prepare cell aggregates. The size and viability of the aggregates obtained at different initial cell densities and pre-culture duration were compared. The proliferative ability of the cell aggregates and their ability to spread in culture plates were also investigated. In both methods, the optimum average size of the aggregates was less than 500 microm. CT aggregates were smaller than HD aggregates. 5,000 cells per drop HD aggregates showed a marked ability to attach and spread on the culture surface. The proliferative ability reduced when the initial cell density was increased. Comparing these methods, we found that the HD method having better size controlling ability as well as enhanced ability to maintain higher rates of viability, spreading, and proliferation. In conclusion, smaller HD aggregates might be a suitable choice as building blocks for making bioink particles in bioprinting technique.

  6. Monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloid production by Uncaria tomentosa (Willd) D.C. cell suspension cultures in a stirred tank bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Trejo-Tapia, Gabriela; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Rodríguez-Monroy, Mario; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2005-01-01

    Cell growth, monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloid (MOA) production, and morphological properties of Uncaria tomentosa cell suspension cultures in a 2-L stirred tank bioreactor were investigated. U. tomentosa (cell line green Uth-3) was able to grow in a stirred tank at an impeller tip speed of 95 cm/s (agitation speed of 400 rpm), showing a maximum biomass yield of 11.9 +/- 0.6 g DW/L and a specific growth rate of 0.102 d(-1). U. tomentosa cells growing in a stirred tank achieved maximum volumetric and specific MOA concentration (467.7 +/- 40.0 microg/L, 44.6 +/- 5.2 microg/g DW) at 16 days of culture. MOA chemical profile of cell suspension cultures growing in a stirred tank resembled that of the plant. Depending on culture time, from the total MOA produced, 37-100% was found in the medium in the bioreactor culture. MOA concentration achieved in a stirred tank was up to 10-fold higher than that obtained in Erlenmeyer flasks (agitated at 110 rpm). In a stirred tank, average area of the single cells of U. tomentosa increased up to 4-fold, and elliptical form factor increased from 1.40 to 2.55, indicating enlargement of U. tomentosa single cells. This work presents the first report of U. tomentosa green cell suspension cultures that grow and produce MOA in a stirred tank bioreactor.

  7. Spheroidal aggregate culture of rat liver cells: histotypic reorganization, biomatrix deposition, and maintenance of functional activities

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Liver cells isolated from newborn rats and seeded on a non-adherent plastic substratum were found to spontaneously re-aggregate and to form, within a few days, spheroidal aggregates that eventually reached a plateaued diameter of 150-175 micron. Analyses on frozen sections from these spheroids by immunofluorescence microscopy using antibodies to various cytoskeletal elements and extracellular matrix components revealed a sorting out and a histotypic reorganization of three major cell types. A first type consisted of cells that segregated out on the aggregate surface forming a monolayer cell lining; a second type was identified as hepatocytes that regrouped in small islands often defining a central lumen; and a third group of cells reorganized into bile duct-like structures. This intercellular organization in the aggregates was paralleled by the accumulation of extracellular matrix components (laminin, fibronectin, and collagen) and their deposition following a specific pattern around each cell population structure. Determinations of albumin secretion and tyrosine aminotransferase induction by dexamethasone and glucagon at various times after the initiation of the cultures revealed a maintenance of the hepatocyte- differentiated functions for at least up to 2 mo at the levels measured at 3-5 d. It is concluded that cells dispersed as single cells from newborn rat liver conserve in part the necessary information to reconstruct a proper three-dimensional cyto-architecture and that the microenvironment so generated most likely represents a basic requirement for the optimal functioning of these differentiated cells. PMID:2411740

  8. Effects of mercury (II) species on cell suspension cultures of catharanthus roseus

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, L. ); Cullen, W.R. )

    1994-11-01

    Mercury has received considerable attention because of its high toxicity. Widespread contamination with mercury poses severe environmental problems despite our extensive knowledge of its toxicity in living systems. It is generally accepted that the toxicity of mercury is related to its oxidation states and species, the organic forms being more toxic than the inorganic forms. In the aquatic environment, the toxicity of mercury depends on the aqueous speciation of the mercuric ion (Hg[sup 2+]). Because of the complex coordination chemistry of mercury in aqueous systems, the nature of the Hg[sup 2+] species present in aquatic environments is influenced greatly by water chemistry (e. g, pH, inorganic ion composition, and dissolved organics). Consequently, the influence of environmental factors on the aqueous speciation of mercury has been the focus of much attention. However, there is very little information available regarding the effects of the species and speciation on Hg (II) toxicity in plant-tissue cultures. Catharanthus roseus (C. roseus), commonly called the Madagascar Periwinkle, is a member of the alkaloid rich family Apocynaceae. The present investigation was concerned with the toxicity of mercury on the growth of C. roseus cell suspension cultures as influenced by mercury (II) species and speciation. The specific objectives of the study were to (a) study the effects of mercury species on the growth of C. roseus cultures from the point of view of environmental biology and toxicology; (b) evaluate the effects of selenate, selenite and selected ligands such as chloride, 1-cysteine in the media on the acute toxicity of mercuric oxide; (c) determine the impact of the initial pH of the culture media on the toxicities of mercuric compounds; (d) discuss the dependence of the toxicity on the chemical species and speciation of Hg (II). 11 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Manipulation of culture strategies to enhance capsaicin biosynthesis in suspension and immobilized cell cultures of Capsicum chinense Jacq. cv. Naga King Chili.

    PubMed

    Kehie, Mechuselie; Kumaria, Suman; Tandon, Pramod

    2014-06-01

    Manipulation of culture strategies was adopted to study the influence of nutrient stress, pH stress and precursor feeding on the biosynthesis of capsaicin in suspension and immobilized cell cultures of C. chinense. Cells cultured in the absence of one of the four nutrients (ammonium and potassium nitrate for nitrate and potassium stress, potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate for phosphorus stress, and sucrose for sugar stress) influenced the accumulation of capsaicin. Among the stress factors studied, nitrate stress showed maximal capsaicin production on day 20 (505.9 ± 2.8 μg g(-1) f.wt) in immobilized cell, whereas in suspension cultures the maximum accumulation (345.5 ± 2.9 μg g(-1) f.wt) was obtained on day 10. Different pH affected capsaicin accumulation; enhanced accumulation of capsaicin (261.6 ± 3.4 μg g(-1) f.wt) was observed in suspension cultures at pH 6 on day 15, whereas in case of immobilized cultures the highest capsaicin content (433.3 ± 3.3 μg g(-1) f.wt) was obtained at pH 5 on day 10. Addition of capsaicin precursors and intermediates significantly enhanced the biosynthesis of capsaicin, incorporation of vanillin at 100 μM in both suspension and immobilized cell cultures resulted in maximum capsaicin content with 499.1 ± 5.5 μg g(-1) f.wt on day 20 and 1,315.3 ± 10 μg g(-1) f.wt on day 10, respectively. Among the different culture strategies adopted to enhance capsaicin biosynthesis in cell cultures of C. chinense, cells fed with vanillin resulted in the maximum capsaicin accumulation. The rate of capsaicin production was significantly higher in immobilized cells as compared to freely suspended cells. PMID:24141419

  10. Manipulation of culture strategies to enhance capsaicin biosynthesis in suspension and immobilized cell cultures of Capsicum chinense Jacq. cv. Naga King Chili.

    PubMed

    Kehie, Mechuselie; Kumaria, Suman; Tandon, Pramod

    2014-06-01

    Manipulation of culture strategies was adopted to study the influence of nutrient stress, pH stress and precursor feeding on the biosynthesis of capsaicin in suspension and immobilized cell cultures of C. chinense. Cells cultured in the absence of one of the four nutrients (ammonium and potassium nitrate for nitrate and potassium stress, potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate for phosphorus stress, and sucrose for sugar stress) influenced the accumulation of capsaicin. Among the stress factors studied, nitrate stress showed maximal capsaicin production on day 20 (505.9 ± 2.8 μg g(-1) f.wt) in immobilized cell, whereas in suspension cultures the maximum accumulation (345.5 ± 2.9 μg g(-1) f.wt) was obtained on day 10. Different pH affected capsaicin accumulation; enhanced accumulation of capsaicin (261.6 ± 3.4 μg g(-1) f.wt) was observed in suspension cultures at pH 6 on day 15, whereas in case of immobilized cultures the highest capsaicin content (433.3 ± 3.3 μg g(-1) f.wt) was obtained at pH 5 on day 10. Addition of capsaicin precursors and intermediates significantly enhanced the biosynthesis of capsaicin, incorporation of vanillin at 100 μM in both suspension and immobilized cell cultures resulted in maximum capsaicin content with 499.1 ± 5.5 μg g(-1) f.wt on day 20 and 1,315.3 ± 10 μg g(-1) f.wt on day 10, respectively. Among the different culture strategies adopted to enhance capsaicin biosynthesis in cell cultures of C. chinense, cells fed with vanillin resulted in the maximum capsaicin accumulation. The rate of capsaicin production was significantly higher in immobilized cells as compared to freely suspended cells.

  11. Growth of bone marrow and skeletal muscle side population stem cells in suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Pacak, Christina A; Cowan, Douglas B

    2014-01-01

    The ability to efficiently isolate and expand various stem cell populations in vitro is crucial for successful translation of cell-based therapies to the clinical setting. One such heterogeneous population that possesses a remarkable potential for the development of cell-based treatments for a variety of degenerative diseases and disorders is called the Side Population (SP). For many years, investigators have isolated these primitive cells based upon their ability to efflux the fluorophore Hoechst 33342. This attribute enabled separation of SP cells derived from multiple tissue sources from other endogenous cell populations using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). While all tissue-specific SP fractions appear to contain cells with multi-potent stem cell activity, the therapeutic utility of these cells has yet to be fully realized because of the scarcity of this fraction in vivo. In view of that, we developed a method to expand adult murine bone marrow and skeletal muscle-derived SP cells in vitro. Here, we describe a spinner-flask culture system that supports the growth of SP cells in suspension when they are combined with feeder cells cultured on spherical microcarriers. In this way, their distinguishing biological characteristics can be maintained, attachment-stimulated differentiation is avoided, and therapeutically relevant quantities of SP cells are generated. Modification of the described procedure may permit expansion of the SP from other relevant tissue sources and our method is amenable to establishing compliance with current good manufacturing practices. PMID:25173160

  12. Effects of cadmium on growth and respiration in suspension-cultured tobacco cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, R.N.

    1984-01-01

    Cadmium uptake and its effects on growth and cellular respiration in tobacco cell suspension cultures were examined. The cells were grown in Gamborg's B5 medium for a 5 day period, and cadmium, at concentrations of 44.5, 89, and 178 ..mu..M, was added to the medium on day 0. Cadmium is accumulated in the tobacco cells at concentrations two or more times the levels in the surrounding media. The addition of 44.5 ..mu..M cadmium stimulated growth as measured by dry weight and packed cell volume measurements, whereas higher levels were inhibitory. At all concentrations tested, cadmium decreased mitotic indices and total DNA content of the tobacco cells. Light and transmission electron microscopic analyses demonstrated cadmium induced increased cell volume per mg dry weight and the formation of small vacuole-like bodies in the cytoplasm of the cultured tobacco cells. Oxygen uptake measurements on whole cells showed cadmium inhibits respiration in the tobacco cells at all levels examined. Measurements of malate, ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate, and succinate oxidation in isolated mitochondria demonstrated that the inhibition of respiration resulted from decreased succinate utilization in the tobacco cells, when cadmium was applied in vivo. The implications of these findings and the potential for future research are discussed.

  13. Design of serum-free medium for suspension culture of CHO cells on the basis of general commercial media.

    PubMed

    Miki, Hideo; Takagi, Mutsumi

    2015-08-01

    The design of serum-free media for suspension culture of genetically engineered Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using general commercial media as a basis was investigated. Subcultivation using a commercial serum-free medium containing insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 with or without FCS necessitated additives other than IGF-1 to compensate for the lack of FCS and improve cell growth. Suspension culture with media containing several combinations of growth factors suggested the effectiveness of addition of both IGF-1 and the lipid signaling molecule lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) for promoting cell growth. Subcultivation of CHO cells in suspension culture using the commercial serum-free medium EX-CELL™302, which contained an IGF-1 analog, supplemented with LPA resulted in gradually increasing specific growth rate comparable to the serum-containing medium and in almost the same high antibody production regardless of the number of generations. The culture with EX-CELL™302 supplemented with LPA in a jar fermentor with pH control at 6.9 showed an apparently higher cell growth rate than the cultures without pH control and with pH control at 6.8. The cell growth in the medium supplemented with aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA), which was much cheaper than IGF-1, in combination with LPA was synergistically promoted similarly to that in the medium supplemented with IGF-1 and LPA. In conclusion, the serum-free medium designed on the basis of general commercial media could support the growth of CHO cells and antibody production comparable to serum-containing medium in suspension culture. Moreover, the possibility of cost reduction by the substitution of IGF-1 with ATA was also shown.

  14. Influence of auxins and sucrose in monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloid production by Uncaria tomentosa cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Luna-Palencia, Gabriela R; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Rodríguez-Monroy, Mario; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2005-01-01

    Growth and alkaloid production in Uncaria tomentosa cell suspension cultures were studied in Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 10 microM 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 10 microM kinetin, and 58 mM sucrose for maintenance and with 10 microM indole-3-acetic acid, 10 microM kinetin, and 58 mM sucrose for production. A U. tomentosa pale Uth-3 cell line, cultured in the production medium, showed a reduced lag phase and a specific growth rate (mu) of 0.27 day(-1), while cells growing in the maintenance medium showed mu = 0.20 day(-1). U. tomentosa cells growing in the production medium produced monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloids (MOA) in amounts of 10.2 +/- 1.6 microg g(-1) dry weight (DW). The chemical profile of MOA produced by in vitro cell cultures was similar to that found in the plant. After 10 subcultures, maximum MOA production decreased to 2.0 +/- 0.7 microg g(-1) DW, while tryptamine alkaloids (TA) were produced with a maximum of 6.2 +/- 0.4 microg g(-1) DW. The increase of initial sucrose concentration up to 145 mM in the production medium enhanced the cell biomass by 3.2-fold (from 10.2 +/- 0.1 to 32.8 +/- 1.1 g DW L(-1)), reduced mu from 0.27 to 0.23 day(-1), and provoked a substantial accumulation of TA (23.1 +/- 4.7 microg g(-1) DW). A high sucrose concentration stimulated MOA production in the maintenance medium (2.7 +/- 0.5 microg g(-1) DW), even in the presence of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid.

  15. Efficient Secretion of Recombinant Proteins from Rice Suspension-Cultured Cells Modulated by the Choice of Signal Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li-Fen; Tan, Chia-Chun; Yeh, Ju-Fang; Liu, Hsin-Yi; Liu, Yu-Kuo; Ho, Shin-Lon; Lu, Chung-An

    2015-01-01

    Plant-based expression systems have emerged as a competitive platform in the large-scale production of recombinant proteins. By adding a signal peptide, αAmy3sp, the desired recombinant proteins can be secreted outside transgenic rice cells, making them easy to harvest. In this work, to improve the secretion efficiency of recombinant proteins in rice expression systems, various signal peptides including αAmy3sp, CIN1sp, and 33KDsp have been fused to the N-terminus of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and introduced into rice cells to explore the efficiency of secretion of foreign proteins. 33KDsp had better efficiency than αAmy3sp and CIN1sp for the secretion of GFP from calli and suspension-cultured cells. 33KDsp was further applied for the secretion of mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mGM-CSF) from transgenic rice suspension-cultured cells; approximately 76%–92% of total rice-derived mGM-CSF (rmGM-CSF) was detected in the culture medium. The rmGM-CSF was bioactive and could stimulate the proliferation of a murine myeloblastic leukemia cell line, NSF-60. The extracellular yield of rmGM-CSF reached 31.7 mg/L. Our study indicates that 33KDsp is better at promoting the secretion of recombinant proteins in rice suspension-cultured cell systems than the commonly used αAmy3sp. PMID:26473722

  16. Biomass Yield and Steviol Glycoside Production in Callus and Suspension Culture of Stevia rebaudiana Treated with Proline and Polyethylene Glycol.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pratibha; Sharma, Satyawati; Saxena, Sanjay

    2015-06-01

    Enhanced production of steviol glycosides (SGs) was observed in callus and suspension culture of Stevia rebaudiana treated with proline and polyethylene glycol (PEG). To study their effect, yellow-green and compact calli obtained from in vitro raised Stevia leaves were sub-cultured on MS medium supplemented with 2.0 mg l(-1) NAA and different concentrations of proline (2.5-10 mM) and PEG (2.5-10 %) for 2 weeks, and incubated at 24 ± 1 °C and 22.4 μmol m(-2) s(-1) light intensity provided by white fluorescent tubes for 16 h. Callus and suspension culture biomass (i.e. both fresh and dry weight content) was increased with 5 mM proline and 5 % PEG, while at further higher concentrations, they got reduced. Further, quantification of SGs content in callus (collected at 15th day) and suspension culture (collected at 10th and 15th day) treated with and without elicitors was analysed by HPLC. It was observed that chemical stress enhanced the production of SGs significantly. In callus, the content of SGs increased from 0.27 (control) to 1.09 and 1.83 % with 7.5 mM proline and 5 % PEG, respectively, which was about 4.0 and 7.0 times higher than control. However, in the case of suspension culture, the same concentrations of proline and polyethylene glycol enhanced the SG content from 1.36 (control) to 5.03 and 6.38 %, respectively, on 10th day which were 3.7 times and 4.7 times higher than control. PMID:25940589

  17. Biomass Yield and Steviol Glycoside Production in Callus and Suspension Culture of Stevia rebaudiana Treated with Proline and Polyethylene Glycol.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pratibha; Sharma, Satyawati; Saxena, Sanjay

    2015-06-01

    Enhanced production of steviol glycosides (SGs) was observed in callus and suspension culture of Stevia rebaudiana treated with proline and polyethylene glycol (PEG). To study their effect, yellow-green and compact calli obtained from in vitro raised Stevia leaves were sub-cultured on MS medium supplemented with 2.0 mg l(-1) NAA and different concentrations of proline (2.5-10 mM) and PEG (2.5-10 %) for 2 weeks, and incubated at 24 ± 1 °C and 22.4 μmol m(-2) s(-1) light intensity provided by white fluorescent tubes for 16 h. Callus and suspension culture biomass (i.e. both fresh and dry weight content) was increased with 5 mM proline and 5 % PEG, while at further higher concentrations, they got reduced. Further, quantification of SGs content in callus (collected at 15th day) and suspension culture (collected at 10th and 15th day) treated with and without elicitors was analysed by HPLC. It was observed that chemical stress enhanced the production of SGs significantly. In callus, the content of SGs increased from 0.27 (control) to 1.09 and 1.83 % with 7.5 mM proline and 5 % PEG, respectively, which was about 4.0 and 7.0 times higher than control. However, in the case of suspension culture, the same concentrations of proline and polyethylene glycol enhanced the SG content from 1.36 (control) to 5.03 and 6.38 %, respectively, on 10th day which were 3.7 times and 4.7 times higher than control.

  18. Birds, seals and the suspension culture of mussels in Bantry Bay, a non-seaduck area in Southwest Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roycroft, D.; Kelly, T. C.; Lewis, L. J.

    2004-12-01

    Concerns about the environmental impacts of mariculture have grown in recent years in response to the rapid expansion of the industry. The blue mussel ( Mytilus edulis) is the main product of shellfish mariculture in the Northeast Atlantic and Baltic Sea, with approximately one third of the harvest cultured using suspended longlines within sheltered marine areas. The main aim of this study was to examine the interactions, and assess the impacts (if any) of mussel suspension culture on the seabird and seal community, employing a simultaneous study of culture and control sites. The study spanned a 20-month period (from November 2001 to August 2003) and encompassed six sites in Bantry Bay (Southwest Ireland). There was no significant difference in species richness between mussel and control sites. Similarly, species diversity did not significantly differ between the mussel and control sites although control sites were generally more diverse than mussel sites, the latter particularly dominated by large numbers of Laridae. Significantly higher numbers of Phalacrocoracidae, Laridae and Alcidae were recorded in mussel sites than in control sites. However, no significant difference was found between Gaviidae or common seal ( Phoca vitulina) numbers in mussel and control sites. Seasonal patterns of abundance were similar in mussel and control sites, with peak numbers of most species groups occurring in spring. Mussel suspension culture does not appear to have an adverse effect on the abundance of seabirds or common seals in this area. The safe perching platforms provided by suspension culture floats, combined with a number of other factors, contribute to an increased abundance of a number of seabird species, particularly Laridae. The possible interactions between vertebrate predators and mussel suspension aquaculture are discussed and possible explanations for the increased seabird abundance observed in these areas are offered.

  19. Quercetin-induced benzophenanthridine alkaloid production in suspension cell cultures of Sanguinaria canadensis.

    PubMed

    Mahady, G B; Beecher, C W

    1994-12-01

    Addition of micromolar concentrations of quercetin or rutin to suspension cell cultures of Sanguinaria canadensis L. (bloodroot) induced the biosynthesis of sanguinarine and chelerythrine in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, related compounds: baicalein, naringin, naringenin, catechin, caffeic acid and benzoic acid displayed very weak inductive activity. Of the two active flavonoids, quercetin was the most effective for inducing benzophenanthridine alkaloid biosynthesis, with doses of 100 microM increasing alkaloid production over 375% as compared to negative controls. Quercetin's inductive effects were similar to that of an elicitor derived from fungus Penicillium expansum (PE-elicitor). Suppression of quercetin and PE-induced alkaloid biosynthesis by low doses of actinomycin D (5 micrograms/ml, alpha-amanitin (20 micrograms/ml), or cycloheximide (1 microgram/ml) demonstrate a requirement for both RNA and de novo cytoplasmic protein synthesis and suggest that alterations in gene expression are involved in the inductive mechanism. Furthermore, quercetin-induced alkaloid biosynthesis was significantly reduced by pretreatment of the cells with the calcium chelator, EGTA (3 mM), or the calcium channel inhibitor, verapamil (100 microM), suggesting that this process was calcium dependent.

  20. Alteration of Gene Expression during the Induction of Freezing Tolerance in Brassica napus Suspension Cultures.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Flanagan, A M; Singh, J

    1987-11-01

    Brassica napus suspension-cultured cells can be hardened to a lethal temperature for 50% of the sample of -20 degrees C in eight days at room temperature with abscisic acid. During the induction of freezing tolerance, changes were observed in the electrophoretic pattern of [(35)S]methionine labeled polypeptides. In hardening cells, a 20 kilodalton polypeptide was induced on day 2 and its level increased during hardening. The induction of freezing tolerance with nonmaximal hardening regimens also resulted in increases in the 20 kilodalton polypeptide. The 20 kilodalton polypeptide was associated with a membrane fraction enriched in endoplasmic reticulum and was resolved as a single spot by two-dimensional electrophoresis. In vitro translation of mRNA indicate alteration of gene expression during abscisic acid induction of freezing tolerance. The new mRNA encodes a 20 kilodalton polypeptide associated with increased freezing tolerance induced by either abscisic acid or high sucrose. A 20 kilodalton polypeptide was also translated by mRNA isolated from cold-hardened B. napus plants. PMID:16665763

  1. Alteration of gene expression during the induction of freezing tolerance in Brassica napus suspension cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson-Flanagan, A.M.; Singh, J.

    1987-11-01

    Brassica napus suspension-cultured cells can be hardened to a lethal temperature for 50% of the sample of -20/sup 0/C in eight days at room temperature with abscisic acid. During the induction of freezing tolerance, changes were observed in the electrophoretic pattern of (/sup 35/S)methionine labeled polypeptides. In hardening cells, a 20 kilodalton polypeptide was induced on day 2 and its level increased during hardening. The induction of freezing tolerance with nonmaximal hardening regimens also resulted in increases in the 20 kilodalton polypeptide. The 20 kilodalton polypeptide was associated with a membrane fraction enriched in endoplasmic reticulum and was resolved as a single spot by two-dimensional electrophoresis. In vitro translation of mRNA indicate alteration of gene expression during abscisic acid induction of freezing tolerance. The new mRNA encodes a 20 kilodalton polypeptide associated with increased freezing tolerance induced by either abscisic acid or high sucrose. A 20 kilodalton polypeptide was also translated by mRNA isolated from cold-hardened B. napus plants.

  2. Complete solubilization of pectins from cotton suspension culture cell walls with retention of most structural features

    SciTech Connect

    Mort, A.J.; Oiu, Feng; Otiko, G.; Maness, N.O.; West, P. ); An, Jinhua Univ. of Georgia, Athens ); Oi, Xiaoyang Univ. of Cincinnati, OH )

    1993-05-01

    Cotton suspension culture cell walls contain four major pectin substructures: (1) rhamnogalacturonan I (RGI), (2) rhamnogalacturonan II, (3) highly methyl esterified homogalacturonan, and (4) homogalacturonan of low degree of methyl esterification. Methods are described to solubilize and isolate each of the four major substructures from the cell walls in high yields. RGII is completely solubilized by an easily purified endopolygalacturonase (EPG). Around 40% of RGI can be solubilized by the sequential action of this EPG and a commercially available cellulase. Almost all of the RGI along with xyloglucan can be solubilized after the EPG treatment using strong alkali. Highly methyl esterified homogalacturonan (degree of methyl esterification [approximately]40%) is solubilized into water after HF treatment of the untreated walls, at [minus]23[degrees], and homogalacturonans with a very low degree of methyl esterification ([approximately]10%) can subsequently be solubilized into 500 mM imidazole buffer. the highly methyl esterified homogalacturonan co-solubilizes with the RGI during several extraction procedures and co-chromatographs with it, indicating that they are covalently attached to each other in the cell walls. Little of the RGI is solubilized from cotton walls by EPG digestion without a subsequent treatment that co-solubilizes the xyloglucan or degrades the xyloglucan, indicating crosslinks exist between the RGI and much of the xyloglucan.

  3. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Vitis Cv. Monastrell suspension-cultured cells: Determination of critical parameters.

    PubMed

    Chu, Mingyu; Quiñonero, Carmen; Akdemir, Hülya; Alburquerque, Nuria; Pedreño, María Ángeles; Burgos, Lorenzo

    2016-05-01

    Although some works have explored the transformation of differentiated, embryogenic suspension-cultured cells (SCC) to produce transgenic grapevine plants, to our knowledge this is one of the first reports on the efficient transformation of dedifferentiated Vitis vinifera cv Monastrell SCC. This protocol has been developed using the sonication-assisted Agrobacterium-mediated transformation (SAAT) method. A construct harboring the selectable nptII and the eyfp/IV2 marker genes was used in the study and transformation efficiencies reached over 50 independent transformed SCC per gram of infected cells. Best results were obtained when cells were infected at the exponential phase. A high density plating (500 mg/dish) gave significantly better results. As selective agent, kanamycin was inefficient for the selection of Monastrell transformed SCC since wild type cells were almost insensitive to this antibiotic whereas application of paromomycin resulted in very effective selection. Selected eyfp-expressing microcalli were grown until enough tissue was available to scale up a new transgenic SCC. These transgenic SCC lines were evaluated molecularly and phenotypically demonstrating the presence and integration of both transgenes, the absence of Agrobacterium contamination and the ability of the transformed SCC to grow in highly selective liquid medium. The methodology described here opens the possibility of improving the production of valuable metabolites. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:725-734, 2016.

  4. Contribution of Nonautotrophic Carbon Dioxide Fixation to Protein Synthesis in Suspension Cultures of Paul's Scarlet Rose

    PubMed Central

    Nesius, Kneeland K.; Fletcher, John S.

    1975-01-01

    Bicarbonate-14C was provided to 5- and 11-day-old suspension cultures of Paul's Scarlet rose, and the incorporation of 14C into lipid, protein, amino acids, and organic acids was determined. The rate of bicarbonate uptake was approximately the same by 5- and 11-day-old cells, but the distribution of 14C among cell constituents was markedly different. In 5-day-old cells a larger proportion of the 14C entered protein, whereas in 11-day-old cells there was a greater tendency for 14C to accumulate in malate. The 14C in protein was distributed among 10 amino acids each having greater than 1% of the total 14C recovered in protein. The distribution of 14C among tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates indicated that the aspartate family of amino acids was synthesized directly from oxaloacetate produced as a result of nonautotrophic CO2 fixation. However, this was not the sole source of oxaloacetate used for the synthesis of aspartate, for in a double labeling study with bicarbonate-14C and acetate-3H it was shown that oxaloacetate was drained simultaneously from the tricarboxylic acid cycle for this purpose. PMID:16659140

  5. Ectopic lignification in primary cellulose-deficient cell walls of maize cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Mélida, Hugo; Largo-Gosens, Asier; Novo-Uzal, Esther; Santiago, Rogelio; Pomar, Federico; García, Pedro; García-Angulo, Penélope; Acebes, José Luis; Álvarez, Jesús; Encina, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) suspension-cultured cells with up to 70% less cellulose were obtained by stepwise habituation to dichlobenil (DCB), a cellulose biosynthesis inhibitor. Cellulose deficiency was accompanied by marked changes in cell wall matrix polysaccharides and phenolics as revealed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Cell wall compositional analysis indicated that the cellulose-deficient cell walls showed an enhancement of highly branched and cross-linked arabinoxylans, as well as an increased content in ferulic acid, diferulates and p-coumaric acid, and the presence of a polymer that stained positive for phloroglucinol. In accordance with this, cellulose-deficient cell walls showed a fivefold increase in Klason-type lignin. Thioacidolysis/GC-MS analysis of cellulose-deficient cell walls indicated the presence of a lignin-like polymer with a Syringyl/Guaiacyl ratio of 1.45, which differed from the sensu stricto stress-related lignin that arose in response to short-term DCB-treatments. Gene expression analysis of these cells indicated an overexpression of genes specific for the biosynthesis of monolignol units of lignin. A study of stress signaling pathways revealed an overexpression of some of the jasmonate signaling pathway genes, which might trigger ectopic lignification in response to cell wall integrity disruptions. In summary, the structural plasticity of primary cell walls is proven, since a lignification process is possible in response to cellulose impoverishment. PMID:25735403

  6. Ectopic lignification in primary cellulose-deficient cell walls of maize cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Mélida, Hugo; Largo-Gosens, Asier; Novo-Uzal, Esther; Santiago, Rogelio; Pomar, Federico; García, Pedro; García-Angulo, Penélope; Acebes, José Luis; Álvarez, Jesús; Encina, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) suspension-cultured cells with up to 70% less cellulose were obtained by stepwise habituation to dichlobenil (DCB), a cellulose biosynthesis inhibitor. Cellulose deficiency was accompanied by marked changes in cell wall matrix polysaccharides and phenolics as revealed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Cell wall compositional analysis indicated that the cellulose-deficient cell walls showed an enhancement of highly branched and cross-linked arabinoxylans, as well as an increased content in ferulic acid, diferulates and p-coumaric acid, and the presence of a polymer that stained positive for phloroglucinol. In accordance with this, cellulose-deficient cell walls showed a fivefold increase in Klason-type lignin. Thioacidolysis/GC-MS analysis of cellulose-deficient cell walls indicated the presence of a lignin-like polymer with a Syringyl/Guaiacyl ratio of 1.45, which differed from the sensu stricto stress-related lignin that arose in response to short-term DCB-treatments. Gene expression analysis of these cells indicated an overexpression of genes specific for the biosynthesis of monolignol units of lignin. A study of stress signaling pathways revealed an overexpression of some of the jasmonate signaling pathway genes, which might trigger ectopic lignification in response to cell wall integrity disruptions. In summary, the structural plasticity of primary cell walls is proven, since a lignification process is possible in response to cellulose impoverishment.

  7. Proteins differentially expressed in elicited cell suspension culture of Podophyllum hexandrum with enhanced podophyllotoxin content

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Podophyllotoxin (PTOX), the precursor for semi-synthesis of cancer therapeutics like etoposide, teniposide and etophos, is primarily obtained from an endangered medicinal herb, Podophyllum hexandrum Royle. PTOX, a lignan is biosynthetically derived from the phenylpropanoid pathway. The aim of this study is to investigate changes in the P. hexandrum cell proteome potentially related to PTOX accumulation in response to methyl jasmonate (MeJA) elicitation. High-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) followed by colloidal Coomassie staining and mass spectrometric analysis was used to detect statistically significant changes in cell’s proteome. Result The HPLC analysis showed approximately 7–8 fold change in accumulation of PTOX, in the 12day old cell suspension culture (i.e. after 9days of elicitation) elicited with 100 μM MeJA as compared to the control. Using 2-DE a total of 233 spots was detected, out of which 105 spots were identified by MALDI TOF-TOF MS/MS. Data were subjected to functional annotation from a biological point of view through KEGG. The phenylpropanoid and monolignol pathway enzymes were identified, amongst these, chalcone synthase, polyphenol oxidase, caffeoyl CoA 3-O-methyltransferase, S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent methyltransferases, caffeic acid-O-methyl transferase etc. are noted as important. The relation of other differentially accumulated proteins with varied effects caused by elicitors on P. hexandrum cells namely stress and defense related protein, transcription and DNA replication and signaling are also discussed. Conclusions Elicitor-induced PTOX accumulation in P. hexandrum cell cultures provides a responsive model system to profile modulations in proteins related to phenylpropanoid/monolignol biosynthesis and other defense responses. Present findings form a baseline for future investigation on a non-sequenced medicinal herb P. hexandrum at molecular level. PMID:22621772

  8. Proper selection of 1 g controls in simulated microgravity research as illustrated with clinorotated plant cell suspension cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal, Khaled Y.; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Medina, F. Javier; Herranz, Raúl

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the physical and biological effects of the absence of gravity is necessary to conduct operations on space environments. It has been previously shown that the microgravity environment induces the dissociation of cell proliferation from cell growth in young seedling root meristems, but this source material is limited to few cells in each row of meristematic layers. Plant cell cultures, composed by a large and homogeneous population of proliferating cells, are an ideal model to study the effects of altered gravity on cellular mechanisms regulating cell proliferation and associated cell growth. Cell suspension cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana cell line (MM2d) were exposed to 2D-clinorotation in a pipette clinostat for 3.5 or 14 h, respectively, and were then processed either by quick freezing, to be used in flow cytometry, or by chemical fixation, for microscopy techniques. After long-term clinorotation, the proportion of cells in G1 phase was increased and the nucleolus area, as revealed by immunofluorescence staining with anti-nucleolin, was decreased. Despite the compatibility of these results with those obtained in real microgravity on seedling meristems, we provide a technical discussion in the context of clinorotation and proper 1 g controls with respect to suspension cultures. Standard 1 g procedure of sustaining the cell suspension is achieved by continuously shaking. Thus, we compare the mechanical forces acting on cells in clinorotated samples, in a control static sample and in the standard 1 g conditions of suspension cultures in order to define the conditions of a complete and reliable experiment in simulated microgravity with corresponding 1 g controls.

  9. Proper selection of 1 g controls in simulated microgravity research as illustrated with clinorotated plant cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Khaled Y; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Medina, F Javier; Herranz, Raúl

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the physical and biological effects of the absence of gravity is necessary to conduct operations on space environments. It has been previously shown that the microgravity environment induces the dissociation of cell proliferation from cell growth in young seedling root meristems, but this source material is limited to few cells in each row of meristematic layers. Plant cell cultures, composed by a large and homogeneous population of proliferating cells, are an ideal model to study the effects of altered gravity on cellular mechanisms regulating cell proliferation and associated cell growth. Cell suspension cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana cell line (MM2d) were exposed to 2D-clinorotation in a pipette clinostat for 3.5 or 14 h, respectively, and were then processed either by quick freezing, to be used in flow cytometry, or by chemical fixation, for microscopy techniques. After long-term clinorotation, the proportion of cells in G1 phase was increased and the nucleolus area, as revealed by immunofluorescence staining with anti-nucleolin, was decreased. Despite the compatibility of these results with those obtained in real microgravity on seedling meristems, we provide a technical discussion in the context of clinorotation and proper 1 g controls with respect to suspension cultures. Standard 1 g procedure of sustaining the cell suspension is achieved by continuously shaking. Thus, we compare the mechanical forces acting on cells in clinorotated samples, in a control static sample and in the standard 1 g conditions of suspension cultures in order to define the conditions of a complete and reliable experiment in simulated microgravity with corresponding 1 g controls. PMID:26177849

  10. In vitro induction of α-pinene, pulegone, menthol, menthone and limonene in cell suspension culture of pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium).

    PubMed

    Darvishi, E; Kahrizi, D; Bahraminejad, S; Mansouri, M

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal plants are known as important sources of secondary metabolites. Because of the economic value of pennyroyal [Mentha pulegium L. (Lamiaceae)] in food industries, propagation of this valuable plant has special importance. Plant cell suspension culture can increase some produced components. The aim of this research was performing cell culture for induction of some secondary metabolites of M. pulegium and compares it with native one. The MS medium was used for suspension culture. To investigate quantitative materials, 4 levels of yeast extract elicitor (20, 40, 60 and 80 mg/L) and salicylic acid in 4 levels (2, 4, 6 and 8 mg/L) were used. Obtained extracts were analyzed by GC-MS. Statistical analysis showed that the amount of limonene, menthone, menthol and α-pinene were more than mentioned compounds in natural plant as control. The maximum amount of this metabolites were obtained as limonene (in 60 mg/l yeast extract), menthone (in 40 mg/l yeast extract and 2 mg/l salicylic acid), menthol (in 6 mg/l salicylic acid) and α-pinene (in 4 mg/l salicylic acid) in the M. pulegium cell culture. The Pulegone was fond more in natural plants than cell culture mass. The most important secondary metabolites were increased by cell culture containing of salicylic acid and yeast extract elicitors in M. pulegume. PMID:27064866

  11. Stereo and region-selective biosynthesis of two new dihydroartemisinic acid glycosides by suspension-cultured cells of Artemisia annua

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianhua; Zeng, Zihan; Song, Liyan; Hu, Yanshan; Wen, Wei; Yu, Rongming

    2014-01-01

    Background: The system of plant-cultured cells is one of the optimal systems to investigate biosynthesis pathway and their bioactive intermediates. Objective: To study the biosynthesis of dihydroartemisinic acid (1) by suspension-cultured cells of Artemisia annua. Materials and Methods: Substrate (compound 1) was administered into the suspension-cultured cells of A. annua and co-cultured for 2 days. The methanol extract was separated on various column chromatography methods and the structures of two biosynthesis products were elucidated based on the analysis of 1H NMR, 13C NMR, 2D NMR, and ESI-MS. Time-course curve was also established. Furthermore, in vitro antitumor activities of compounds 1-3 against HepG2, K562, and A549 cell lines were evaluated by MTT assay. Results: Two new compounds were obtained, namely 3α-hydroxy-dihydroartemisinic acid-α-D-glucopyranosyl ester (2) and 15-hydroxy-cadin-4-en-12-oic acid-β-d-glucopyranosyl ester (3). The results demonstrated that the cultured cells of A. annua possessed the abilities to stereo-selective hydroxylate and region-selective glycosylate sesquiterpene compounds in a highly efficient manner. Inhibitory effects of compounds 1-3 on proliferation of HepG2, K562, and A549 cell lines in vitro were also investigated. Conclusion: Two new dihydroartemisinic acid glycosides were obtained by stereo- and region-selective biosynthesis with cultured cells of A. annua. PMID:24914289

  12. In vitro induction of α-pinene, pulegone, menthol, menthone and limonene in cell suspension culture of pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium).

    PubMed

    Darvishi, E; Kahrizi, D; Bahraminejad, S; Mansouri, M

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal plants are known as important sources of secondary metabolites. Because of the economic value of pennyroyal [Mentha pulegium L. (Lamiaceae)] in food industries, propagation of this valuable plant has special importance. Plant cell suspension culture can increase some produced components. The aim of this research was performing cell culture for induction of some secondary metabolites of M. pulegium and compares it with native one. The MS medium was used for suspension culture. To investigate quantitative materials, 4 levels of yeast extract elicitor (20, 40, 60 and 80 mg/L) and salicylic acid in 4 levels (2, 4, 6 and 8 mg/L) were used. Obtained extracts were analyzed by GC-MS. Statistical analysis showed that the amount of limonene, menthone, menthol and α-pinene were more than mentioned compounds in natural plant as control. The maximum amount of this metabolites were obtained as limonene (in 60 mg/l yeast extract), menthone (in 40 mg/l yeast extract and 2 mg/l salicylic acid), menthol (in 6 mg/l salicylic acid) and α-pinene (in 4 mg/l salicylic acid) in the M. pulegium cell culture. The Pulegone was fond more in natural plants than cell culture mass. The most important secondary metabolites were increased by cell culture containing of salicylic acid and yeast extract elicitors in M. pulegume.

  13. More for less: Improving the biomass yield of a pear cell suspension culture by design of experiments

    PubMed Central

    Rasche, Stefan; Herwartz, Denise; Schuster, Flora; Jablonka, Natalia; Weber, Andrea; Fischer, Rainer; Schillberg, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell suspension cultures are widely used for the production of recombinant proteins and secondary metabolites. One of the most important steps during process development is the optimization of yields by testing different cultivation parameters, including the components of the growth medium. However, we have shown that the biomass yield of a cell suspension culture derived from the pear cultivar Pyrus communis cv. Champagner Bratbirne can be significantly improved solely by varying the temperature, inoculum density, illumination, and incubation time. In contrast to medium optimization, these simple physical factors are easily controlled and varied, thereby reducing the effort required. Using an experimental design approach, we improved the biomass yield from 146 g fresh weight (FW)/L to 407 g FW/L in only 5 weeks, simultaneously reducing the costs of goods sold per kg biomass from €125 to €45. Our simple approach therefore offers a rapid, efficient and economical process for the optimization of plant cell suspension cultures. PMID:26988402

  14. Immune suppression of human lymphoid tissues and cells in rotating suspension culture and onboard the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Wendy; Chen, Silvia; Walz, Carl; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Margolis, Leonid; Grivel, Jean-Charles

    2009-12-01

    The immune responses of human lymphoid tissue explants or cells isolated from this tissue were studied quantitatively under normal gravity and microgravity. Microgravity was either modeled by solid body suspension in a rotating, oxygenated culture vessel or was actually achieved on the International Space Station (ISS). Our experiments demonstrate that tissues or cells challenged by recall antigen or by polyclonal activator in modeled microgravity lose all their ability to produce antibodies and cytokines and to increase their metabolic activity. In contrast, if the cells were challenged before being exposed to modeled microgravity suspension culture, they maintained their responses. Similarly, in microgravity in the ISS, lymphoid cells did not respond to antigenic or polyclonal challenge, whereas cells challenged prior to the space flight maintained their antibody and cytokine responses in space. Thus, immune activation of cells of lymphoid tissue is severely blunted both in modeled and true microgravity. This suggests that suspension culture via solid body rotation is sufficient to induce the changes in cellular physiology seen in true microgravity. This phenomenon may reflect immune dysfunction observed in astronauts during space flights. If so, the ex vivo system described above can be used to understand cellular and molecular mechanisms of this dysfunction.

  15. Inter-microcarrier transfer and phenotypic stability of stem cell-derived Schwann cells in stirred suspension bioreactor culture.

    PubMed

    Shakhbazau, Antos; Mirfeizi, Leila; Walsh, Tylor; Wobma, Holly M; Kumar, Ranjan; Singh, Bhagat; Kallos, Michael S; Midha, Rajiv

    2016-02-01

    Emerging bioreactor technologies offer an effective way for scaled-up production of large numbers of cells for cell therapy applications. One of the clinical paradigms where cell therapy can be an asset is restorative neurosciences. Nerve repair can benefit from the injections of stem cells and/or Schwann cells, acting as a source for axon myelination, myelin debris clearance, and trophic support. We have adapted microcarrier-based suspension bioreactor culture for Schwann cells (SCs) differentiated from a new stem cell source - skin-derived precursors (SKPs). SKP-derived SCs attach and grow on different types of microcarriers in both static and stirred culture, with Cytodex 3 and CultiSpher-S found most effective. Inter-microcarrier migration of SKP-SCs represents a key mechanism for rapid expansion and colonization in stirred suspension culture. We have shown that microcarrier-expanded SKP-SCs cells express Schwann cell markers p75-NTR, GFAP and S100 and retain their key ability to myelinate axons both in vitro and in vivo. Scaled-up microcarrier-based production of SKP-SCs in suspension bioreactors appears feasible for timely generation of sufficient cell numbers for nerve repair strategies.

  16. Enhanced Biosynthesis of Withanolides by Elicitation and Precursor Feeding in Cell Suspension Culture of Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal in Shake-Flask Culture and Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Sivanandhan, Ganeshan; Selvaraj, Natesan; Ganapathi, Andy; Manickavasagam, Markandan

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the biosynthesis of major and minor withanolides of Withania somnifera in cell suspension culture using shake-flask culture and bioreactor by exploiting elicitation and precursor feeding strategies. Elicitors like cadmium chloride, aluminium chloride and chitosan, precursors such as cholesterol, mevalonic acid and squalene were examined. Maximum total withanolides detected [withanolide A (7606.75 mg), withanolide B (4826.05 mg), withaferin A (3732.81 mg), withanone (6538.65 mg), 12 deoxy withanstramonolide (3176.63 mg), withanoside IV (2623.21 mg) and withanoside V (2861.18 mg)] were achieved in the combined treatment of chitosan (100 mg/l) and squalene (6 mM) along with 1 mg/l picloram, 0.5 mg/l KN, 200 mg/l L-glutamine and 5% sucrose in culture at 4 h and 48 h exposure times respectively on 28th day of culture in bioreactor. We obtained higher concentrations of total withanolides in shake-flask culture (2.13-fold) as well as bioreactor (1.66-fold) when compared to control treatments. This optimized protocol can be utilized for commercial level production of withanolides from suspension culture using industrial bioreactors in a short culture period. PMID:25089711

  17. Enhanced biosynthesis of withanolides by elicitation and precursor feeding in cell suspension culture of Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal in shake-flask culture and bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Sivanandhan, Ganeshan; Selvaraj, Natesan; Ganapathi, Andy; Manickavasagam, Markandan

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the biosynthesis of major and minor withanolides of Withania somnifera in cell suspension culture using shake-flask culture and bioreactor by exploiting elicitation and precursor feeding strategies. Elicitors like cadmium chloride, aluminium chloride and chitosan, precursors such as cholesterol, mevalonic acid and squalene were examined. Maximum total withanolides detected [withanolide A (7606.75 mg), withanolide B (4826.05 mg), withaferin A (3732.81 mg), withanone (6538.65 mg), 12 deoxy withanstramonolide (3176.63 mg), withanoside IV (2623.21 mg) and withanoside V (2861.18 mg)] were achieved in the combined treatment of chitosan (100 mg/l) and squalene (6 mM) along with 1 mg/l picloram, 0.5 mg/l KN, 200 mg/l L-glutamine and 5% sucrose in culture at 4 h and 48 h exposure times respectively on 28th day of culture in bioreactor. We obtained higher concentrations of total withanolides in shake-flask culture (2.13-fold) as well as bioreactor (1.66-fold) when compared to control treatments. This optimized protocol can be utilized for commercial level production of withanolides from suspension culture using industrial bioreactors in a short culture period.

  18. Structural characterization of 15-hydroxytrichodiene, a sesquiterpenoid produced by transformed tobacco cell suspension cultures expressing a trichodiene synthase gene from Fusarium sporotrichioides.

    PubMed

    Zook, M; Johnson, K; Hohn, T; Hammerschmidt, R

    1996-12-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabaccum) cell suspension cultures transformed with a gene encoding trichodiene synthase, a sesquiterpene synthase from the fungus Fusarium sporotrichioides, produced a novel sesquiterpenoid derived from the in vivo production of trichodiene. Mass and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analyses identified the new compound as 15-hydroxytrichodiene. The in vivo hydroxylation of trichodiene by transformant tobacco cell suspension cultures demonstrates that the introduction of a foreign sesquiterpene synthase gene can result in the production of novel sesquiterpenoid metabolites. PMID:8987907

  19. cDNA cloning of FRIL, a lectin from Dolichos lablab, that preserves hematopoietic progenitors in suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Colucci, G; Moore, J G; Feldman, M; Chrispeels, M J

    1999-01-19

    Ex vivo culture of hematopoietic stem cells is limited by the inability of cytokines to maintain primitive cells without inducing proliferation, differentiation, and subsequent loss of repopulating capacity. We identified recently in extracts of kidney bean and hyacinth bean a mannose-binding lectin, called FRIL, and provide here evidence that this protein appears to satisfy properties of a stem cell preservation factor. FRIL was first identified based on its ability to stimulate NIH 3T3 cells transfected with Flt3, a tyrosine kinase receptor central to regulation of stem cells. Molecular characterization from polypeptide sequencing and identification of the cDNA of hyacinth bean FRIL shows 78% amino acid identity with a mannose-binding lectin of hyacinth beans. Treatment of primitive hematopoietic progenitors in suspension culture with purified hyacinth FRIL alone is able to preserve cells for 1 month without medium changes. In vitro progenitor assays for human hematopoietic cells cultured 3 weeks in FRIL displayed small blast-like colonies that were capable of serial replating and persisted even in the presence of cytokines known to induce differentiation. These results suggest that FRIL is capable of preserving primitive progenitors in suspension culture for prolonged periods. FRIL's clinical utility involving procedures for stem cell transplantation, tumor cell purging before autologous transplantation, and ex vivo cultures used for expansion and stem cell gene therapy currently are being explored. PMID:9892687

  20. cDNA cloning of FRIL, a lectin from Dolichos lablab, that preserves hematopoietic progenitors in suspension culture

    PubMed Central

    Colucci, Gabriella; Moore, Jeffrey G.; Feldman, Michael; Chrispeels, Maarten J.

    1999-01-01

    Ex vivo culture of hematopoietic stem cells is limited by the inability of cytokines to maintain primitive cells without inducing proliferation, differentiation, and subsequent loss of repopulating capacity. We identified recently in extracts of kidney bean and hyacinth bean a mannose-binding lectin, called FRIL, and provide here evidence that this protein appears to satisfy properties of a stem cell preservation factor. FRIL was first identified based on its ability to stimulate NIH 3T3 cells transfected with Flt3, a tyrosine kinase receptor central to regulation of stem cells. Molecular characterization from polypeptide sequencing and identification of the cDNA of hyacinth bean FRIL shows 78% amino acid identity with a mannose-binding lectin of hyacinth beans. Treatment of primitive hematopoietic progenitors in suspension culture with purified hyacinth FRIL alone is able to preserve cells for 1 month without medium changes. In vitro progenitor assays for human hematopoietic cells cultured 3 weeks in FRIL displayed small blast-like colonies that were capable of serial replating and persisted even in the presence of cytokines known to induce differentiation. These results suggest that FRIL is capable of preserving primitive progenitors in suspension culture for prolonged periods. FRIL’s clinical utility involving procedures for stem cell transplantation, tumor cell purging before autologous transplantation, and ex vivo cultures used for expansion and stem cell gene therapy currently are being explored. PMID:9892687

  1. Site of clomazone action in tolerant-soybean and susceptible-cotton photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Norman, M A; Liebl, R A; Widholm, J M

    1990-10-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the herbicidal site of clomazone action in tolerant-soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Corsoy) (SB-M) and susceptible-cotton (Gossypium hirsutum [L.] cv Stoneville 825) (COT-M) photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures. Although a 10 micromolar clomazone treatment did not significantly reduce the terpene or mixed terpenoid content (microgram per gram fresh weight) of the SB-M cell line, there was over a 70% reduction in the chlorophyll (Chl), carotenoid (CAR), and plastoquinone (PQ) content of the COT-M cell line. The tocopherol (TOC) content was reduced only 35.6%. Reductions in the levels of Chl, CAR, TOC, and PQ indicate that the site of clomazone action in COT-M cells is prior to geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP). The clomazone treatment did not significantly reduce the flow of [(14)C]mevalonate ([(14)C]MEV) (nanocuries per gram fresh weight) into CAR and the three mixed terpenoid compounds of SB-M cells. Conversely, [(14)C]MEV incorporation into CAR and the terpene moieties of Chl, PQ, and TOC in COT-M cells was reduced at least 73%, indicating that the site of clomazone action must be after MEV. Sequestration of clomazone away from the chloroplast cannot account for soybean tolerance to clomazone since chloroplasts isolated from both cell lines incubated with [(14)C]clomazone contained a similar amount of radioactivity (disintegrations per minute per microgram of Chl). The possible site(s) of clomazone inhibition include mevalonate kinase, phosphomevalonate kinase, pyrophosphomevalonate decarboxylase, isopentenyl pyrophosphate isomerase, and/or a prenyl transferase.

  2. Programmed cell death activated by Rose Bengal in Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension cultures requires functional chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Jorge; González-Pérez, Sergio; García-García, Francisco; Daly, Cara T.; Lorenzo, Óscar; Revuelta, José L.; McCabe, Paul F.; Arellano, Juan B.

    2014-01-01

    Light-grown Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture (ACSC) were subjected to mild photooxidative damage with Rose Bengal (RB) with the aim of gaining a better understanding of singlet oxygen-mediated defence responses in plants. Additionally, ACSC were treated with H2O2 at concentrations that induced comparable levels of protein oxidation damage. Under low to medium light conditions, both RB and H2O2 treatments activated transcriptional defence responses and inhibited photosynthetic activity, but they differed in that programmed cell death (PCD) was only observed in cells treated with RB. When dark-grown ACSC were subjected to RB in the light, PCD was suppressed, indicating that the singlet oxygen-mediated signalling pathway in ACSC requires functional chloroplasts. Analysis of up-regulated transcripts in light-grown ACSC, treated with RB in the light, showed that both singlet oxygen-responsive transcripts and transcripts with a key role in hormone-activated PCD (i.e. ethylene and jasmonic acid) were present. A co-regulation analysis proved that ACSC treated with RB exhibited higher correlation with the conditional fluorescence (flu) mutant than with other singlet oxygen-producing mutants or wild-type plants subjected to high light. However, there was no evidence for the up-regulation of EDS1, suggesting that activation of PCD was not associated with the EXECUTER- and EDS1-dependent signalling pathway described in the flu mutant. Indigo Carmine and Methylene Violet, two photosensitizers unable to enter chloroplasts, did not activate transcriptional defence responses in ACSC; however, whether this was due to their location or to their inherently low singlet oxygen quantum efficiencies was not determined. PMID:24723397

  3. Programmed cell death activated by Rose Bengal in Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension cultures requires functional chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Jorge; González-Pérez, Sergio; García-García, Francisco; Daly, Cara T; Lorenzo, Oscar; Revuelta, José L; McCabe, Paul F; Arellano, Juan B

    2014-07-01

    Light-grown Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture (ACSC) were subjected to mild photooxidative damage with Rose Bengal (RB) with the aim of gaining a better understanding of singlet oxygen-mediated defence responses in plants. Additionally, ACSC were treated with H2O2 at concentrations that induced comparable levels of protein oxidation damage. Under low to medium light conditions, both RB and H2O2 treatments activated transcriptional defence responses and inhibited photosynthetic activity, but they differed in that programmed cell death (PCD) was only observed in cells treated with RB. When dark-grown ACSC were subjected to RB in the light, PCD was suppressed, indicating that the singlet oxygen-mediated signalling pathway in ACSC requires functional chloroplasts. Analysis of up-regulated transcripts in light-grown ACSC, treated with RB in the light, showed that both singlet oxygen-responsive transcripts and transcripts with a key role in hormone-activated PCD (i.e. ethylene and jasmonic acid) were present. A co-regulation analysis proved that ACSC treated with RB exhibited higher correlation with the conditional fluorescence (flu) mutant than with other singlet oxygen-producing mutants or wild-type plants subjected to high light. However, there was no evidence for the up-regulation of EDS1, suggesting that activation of PCD was not associated with the EXECUTER- and EDS1-dependent signalling pathway described in the flu mutant. Indigo Carmine and Methylene Violet, two photosensitizers unable to enter chloroplasts, did not activate transcriptional defence responses in ACSC; however, whether this was due to their location or to their inherently low singlet oxygen quantum efficiencies was not determined.

  4. Glyphosate inhibition of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate synthease from suspension-cultured cells of Nicotiana silvestris

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, J.L.; Gaines, C.G.; Jensen, R.A.

    1984-07-01

    Treatment of isogenic suspension-cultured cells of Nicotiana silvestris Speg, et Comes with glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) led to elevated levels of intracellular shikimate (364-fold increase by 1.0 millimolar glyphosate). In the presence of glyphosate, it is likely that most molecules of shikimate originate from the action of 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate (DAHP) synthase-Mn since this isozyme, in contrast to the DAHP synthase-Co isozyme, is insensitive to inhibition by glyphosate. 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase (EC 2.5.1.19) from N. silvestris was sensitive to micromolar concentrations of glyphosate and possessed a single inhibitor binding site. Rigorous kinetic studies of EPSP synthase required resolution from the multiple phosphatase activities present in crude extracts, a result achieved by ion-exchange column chromatography. Although EPSP synthase exhibited a broad pH profile (50% of maximal activity between pH 6.2 and 8.5), sensitivity to glyphosate increased dramatically with increasing pH within this range. In accordance with these data and the pK/sub a/ values of glyphosate, it is likely that the ionic form of glyphosate inhibiting EPSP synthase is COO/sup -/CH/sub 2/NH/sub 2//sup +/CH/sub 2/PO/sub 3//sup 2 -/, and that a completely ionized phosphono group is essential for inhibition. At pH 7.0, inhibition was competitive with respect to phosphoenolpyruvate (K/sub i/ = 1.25 micromolar) and uncompetitive with respect to shikimate-3-P (K/sub i/ = 18.3 micromolar). All data were consistent with a mechanism of inhibition in which glyphosate competes with PEP for binding to an (enzyme:shikimate-3-P) complex and ultimately forms the dead-end complex of (enzyme:shikimate-3-P:glyphosate). 36 references, 8 figures, 1 table.

  5. Elevation of cytosolic calcium precedes anoxic gene expression in maize suspension-cultured cells.

    PubMed Central

    Subbaiah, C C; Bush, D S; Sachs, M M

    1994-01-01

    Based on pharmacological evidence, we previously proposed that intracellular Ca2+ mediates the perception of O2 deprivation in maize seedlings. Herein, using fluorescence imaging and photometry of Ca2+ in maize suspension-cultured cells, the proposal was further investigated. Two complementary approaches were taken: (1) real time analysis of anoxia-induced changes in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca]i) and (2) experimental manipulation of [Ca]i and then assay of the resultant anoxia-specific responses. O2 depletion caused an immediate increase in [Ca2+]i, and this was reversible within a few seconds of reoxygenation. The [Ca]i elevation proceeded independent of extracellular Ca2+. The kinetics of the Ca2+ response showed that it occurred much earlier than any detectable changes in gene expression. Ruthenium red blocked the anoxic [Ca]i elevation and also the induction of adh1 (encoding alcohol dehydrogenase) and sh1 (encoding sucrose synthase) mRNA. Ca2+, when added along with ruthenium red, prevented the effects of the antagonist on the anoxic responses. Verapamil and bepridil failed to block the [Ca]i rise induced by anoxia and were equally ineffective on anoxic gene expression. Caffeine induced an elevation of [Ca]i as well as ADH activity under normoxia. The data provide direct evidence for [Ca]i elevation in maize cells as a result of anoxia-induced mobilization of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Furthermore, any manipulation that modified the [Ca]i rise brought about a parallel change in the expression of two anoxia-inducible genes. Thus, these results corroborate our proposal that [Ca]i is a physiological transducer of anoxia signals in plants. PMID:7866021

  6. Xyloglucan biosynthesis by Golgi membranes from suspension-cultured sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cells

    SciTech Connect

    White, A.R.; Xin, Yi )

    1990-05-01

    Xyloglucan is a major hemicellulose polysaccharide in plant cell walls. Biosynthesis of such cell wall polysaccharides is closely linked to the process of plant cell growth and development. Xyloglucan polysaccharides consist of a {beta}-1,4 glucan backbone synthesized by xyloglucan synthase and sidechains of xylose, galactose, and fucose added by other transferase enzymes. Most plant Golgi and plasma membranes also contain glucan synthases I II, which make {beta}-1,4 and {beta}-1,3 glucans, respectively. All of these enzymes have very similar activities. Cell walls on suspension-cultured cells from Acer pseudoplatanus (sycamore maple) were enzymatically softened prior to cell disruption by passing through a 30 {mu}m nylon screen. Cell membranes from homogenates were separated by ultracentrifugation on top-loaded or flotation sucrose density gradients. Samples were collected by gradient fractionation and assayed for membrane markers and xyloglucan and glucan synthase activities. Standard marker assays (cyt. c reductase for eR, IDPase UDPase for Golgi, and eosin 5{prime}-malelmide binding for plasma membrane) showed partial separation of these three membrane types. Golgi and plasma membrane markers overlapped in most gradients. Incorporation of {sup 14}C-labeled sugars from UDP-glucose and UDP-xylose was used to detect xyloglucan synthase, glucan synthases I II, and xylosyl transferase in Golgi membrane fractions. These activities overlapped, although distinct peaks of xyloglucan synthase and xylosyl transferase were found. Ca{sup ++} had a stimulatory effect on glucan synthases I II, while Mn{sup ++} had an inhibitory effect on glucan synthase I in the presence of Ca{sup ++}. The similarity of these various synthase activities demonstrates the need for careful structural characterization of newly synthesized polysaccharides.

  7. NO way back: nitric oxide and programmed cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Clarke, A; Desikan, R; Hurst, R D; Hancock, J T; Neill, S J

    2000-12-01

    Recent research has implicated nitric oxide (NO) in the induction of the hypersensitive response (HR) during plant-pathogen interactions. Here we demonstrate that Arabidopsis suspension cultures generate elevated levels of NO in response to challenge by avirulent bacteria, and, using NO donors, show that these elevated levels of NO are sufficient to induce cell death in Arabidopsis cells independently of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also provide evidence that NO-induced cell death is a form of programmed cell death (PCD), requiring gene expression, and has a number of characteristics of PCD of mammalian cells: NO induced chromatin condensation and caspase-like activity in Arabidopsis cells, while the caspase-1 inhibitor, Ac-YVAD-CMK, blocked NO-induced cell death. A well-established second messenger mediating NO responses in mammalian cells is cGMP, produced by the enzyme guanylate cyclase. A specific inhibitor of guanylate cyclase blocked NO-induced cell death in Arabidopsis cells, and this inhibition was reversed by the cell-permeable cGMP analogue, 8Br-cGMP, although 8Br-cGMP alone did not induce cell death or potentiate NO-induced cell death. This suggests that cGMP synthesis is required but not sufficient for NO-induced cell death in Arabidopsis. In-gel protein kinase assays showed that NO activates a potential mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), although a specific inhibitor of mammalian MAPK activation, PD98059, which blocked H2O2-induced cell death, did not inhibit the effects of NO.

  8. Early stages in the formation and stabilization of acetylcholine receptor aggregates on cultured myotubes: sensitivity to temperature and azide.

    PubMed

    Olek, A J; Krikorian, J G; Daniels, M P

    1986-09-01

    We have studied the effects of temperature and sodium azide on the formation and stability of embryonic brain extract (EBX)2-induced acetylcholine receptor (AChR) aggregates on myotubes. Sequential changes in AChR distribution were studied on living myotubes in culture by video-intensified fluorescence microscopy. Aggregate formation was temperature dependent, increasing sharply from 24-36 degrees, maximal at 36-37 degrees, and virtually blocked at 38-40 degrees. Whereas aggregate size increased rapidly with time (up to 4 hr) at 36 degrees, at 18-24 degrees small (less than or equal to 1 micron) "microaggregates" formed and accumulated for up to 10 hr. Aggregates formed within 1.5 hr at the sites of microaggregates (formed after 4 hr at 23 degrees) if the temperature was raised to 36 degrees. However, if EBX was removed, the microaggregates on 50% of myotubes disassembled within 1.5 hr. The formation of microaggregates at 23 degrees and aggregates at 36 degrees was reversibly inhibited by sodium azide. These results show that clusters of microaggregates are the precursors of aggregates, and suggest that microaggregate clouds represent a discrete, labile, ATP-dependent stage in aggregate formation. Aggregates that had formed after 4 hr in the presence of EBX disassembled slowly (within 12-14 hr) following removal of EBX at 36 degrees, and even more slowly at 23-30 degrees. However, a temperature shift to 38 degrees, or the addition of azide, resulted in a rapid but reversible disassembly of aggregates (within 4 hr). Thus, newly formed aggregates appear to be relatively stable structures, while microaggregate clouds are labile, tending to disassemble or evolve into aggregates.

  9. A genotype of modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) that facilitates replication in suspension cultures in chemically defined medium.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Ingo; Horn, Deborah; John, Katrin; Sandig, Volker

    2013-01-21

    While vectored vaccines, based on hyperattenuated viruses, may lead to new treatment options against infectious diseases and certain cancers, they are also complex products and sometimes difficult to provide in sufficient amount and purity. To facilitate vaccine programs utilizing host-restricted poxviruses, we established avian suspension cell lines (CR and CR.pIX) and developed a robust, chemically defined, culturing process for production of this class of vectors. For one prominent member, modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), we now describe a new strain that appears to replicate to greater yields of infectious units, especially in the cell-free supernatant of cultures in chemically defined media. The new strain was obtained by repeated passaging in CR suspension cultures and, consistent with reports on the exceptional genetic stability of MVA, sequencing of 135 kb of the viral genomic DNA revealed that only three structural proteins (A3L, A9L and A34R) each carry a single amino acid exchange (H639Y, K75E and D86Y, respectively). Host restriction in a plaque-purified isolate of the new genotype appears to be maintained in cell culture. Processing towards an injectable vaccine preparation may be simplified with this strain as a complete lysate, containing the main burden of host cell contaminants, may not be required anymore to obtain adequate yields.

  10. Rheological properties of mammalian cell culture suspensions: Hybridoma and HeLa cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shi, Y; Ryu, D D; Ballica, R

    1993-03-25

    Data on viscous (eta') and elastic (eta'') components of the complex viscosity versus oscillatory angular frequency (0.01 to 4.0 rad/s) with increasing strains were obtained for hybridoma cell (62'D3) and HeLa cell (S3) suspensions in PBS at 0.9 (mL/mL) cell volume fraction using a Weissenberg rheogoniometer equipped with two parallel plate geometry at ambient temperature. Both cell suspensions exhibited shear thinning behavior. From the measured viscoelastic properties, the yield stress was calculated. Hybridoma cell suspension (15 microm as the mean diameter of cells) showed the yield stress at 550 dyne/cm(2) that was 1.8 times higher than the value of HeLa cell suspension (22 microm mean diameter) as measured at the oscillatory angular frequency, 4.0 rad/s. The apparent viscosities of HeLa cell suspension at four concentrations and varying steady shear rate were also determined using the Brookfield rotational viscometer. The yield stress to steady shear test was about 130 dyne/cm(2) for HeLa cell suspension at 0.9 (mL/mL) cell volume fraction. The apparent viscosity was in the range about 1 approximately 1000 Poise depending on the cell concentration and shear rate applied. A modified semiempirical Mooney equation, eta = eta(0) exp[K gamma(.)(-beta)phi(c)(1 - K'' sigmaphi(c) /D)] was derived based on the cell concentration, the cell morphology, and the steady shear rate. The beta, shear rate index, was estimated as 0.159 in the range of shear rate, 0.16 to 22.1 s(-1), for the cell volume fractions from 0.6 to 0.9 (mL/mL). In this study, the methods of determining the shear sensitivity and the viscous and the elastic components of mammalian cell suspensions are described under the steady shear field.

  11. Induction and analysis of the alkaloid mitragynine content of a Mitragyna speciosa suspension culture system upon elicitation and precursor feeding.

    PubMed

    Mohamad Zuldin, Nor Nahazima; Said, Ikram Md; Mohd Noor, Normah; Zainal, Zamri; Jin Kiat, Chew; Ismail, Ismanizan

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of different concentrations and combinations of the phytohormones 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D), kinetin, 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP), and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) on callus induction and to demonstrate the role of elicitors and exogenous precursors on the production of mitragynine in a Mitragyna speciosa suspension culture. The best callus induction was achieved from petiole explants cultured on WPM that was supplemented with 4 mg L⁻¹ 2,4-D (70.83%). Calli were transferred to liquid media and agitated on rotary shakers to establish Mitragyna speciosa cell suspension cultures. The optimum settled cell volume was achieved in the presence of WPM that contained 3 mg L⁻¹ 2,4-D and 3% sucrose (9.47 ± 0.4667 mL). The treatment of cultures with different concentrations of yeast extract and salicylic acid for different inoculation periods revealed that the highest mitragynine content as determined by HPLC was achieved from the culture treated with 250 mg L⁻¹ yeast extract (9.275 ± 0.082 mg L⁻¹) that was harvested on day 6 of culturing; salicylic acid showed low mitragynine content in all concentrations used. Tryptophan and loganin were used as exogenous precursors; the highest level of mitragynine production was achieved in cultures treated with 3  μM tryptophan and harvested at 6 days (13.226 ± 1.98 mg L⁻¹). PMID:24065873

  12. Induction and Analysis of the Alkaloid Mitragynine Content of a Mitragyna speciosa Suspension Culture System upon Elicitation and Precursor Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Mohamad Zuldin, Nor Nahazima; Said, Ikram Md.; Mohd Noor, Normah; Zainal, Zamri; Jin Kiat, Chew; Ismail, Ismanizan

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of different concentrations and combinations of the phytohormones 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D), kinetin, 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP), and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) on callus induction and to demonstrate the role of elicitors and exogenous precursors on the production of mitragynine in a Mitragyna speciosa suspension culture. The best callus induction was achieved from petiole explants cultured on WPM that was supplemented with 4 mg L−1 2, 4-D (70.83%). Calli were transferred to liquid media and agitated on rotary shakers to establish Mitragyna speciosa cell suspension cultures. The optimum settled cell volume was achieved in the presence of WPM that contained 3 mg L−1 2,4-D and 3% sucrose (9.47 ± 0.4667 mL). The treatment of cultures with different concentrations of yeast extract and salicylic acid for different inoculation periods revealed that the highest mitragynine content as determined by HPLC was achieved from the culture treated with 250 mg L−1 yeast extract (9.275 ± 0.082 mg L−1) that was harvested on day 6 of culturing; salicylic acid showed low mitragynine content in all concentrations used. Tryptophan and loganin were used as exogenous precursors; the highest level of mitragynine production was achieved in cultures treated with 3 μM tryptophan and harvested at 6 days (13.226 ± 1.98 mg L−1). PMID:24065873

  13. Optimization of the basal medium for improving production and secretion of taxanes from suspension cell culture of Taxus baccata L

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose of the study Taxol is one of the most effective anticancer drugs that isolated from Taxus sp. due to the slow growth of Taxus trees and low concentration of Taxol in the tissues, the biotechnological approaches especially plant cell culture have been considered to produce Taxol in commercial scale. Methods We investigated the effects of basal medium type used in culture media on production of Taxol and other taxane compounds from cell suspension culture of T. baccata L. Briefly, five commonly basal media including Gamborg, Murashige and Skoog, Woody Plant, Schenk and Hildebrandt, and Driver and Kuniyuki medium were used for preparing separate suspension culture media. The intra- and extra-cellular yields of taxanes were analyzed by using HPLC after 21 days period of culturing. Results The yields of taxanes were significantly different for the cultures prepared by different basal media. Moreover, the effects of basal medium on the yield of products differed for varius taxane compounds. Maximum yields of Baccatin III (10.03 mgl-1) and 10-deacetyl baccatin III (4.2 mgl-1) were achieved from the DKW basal media, but the yield of Taxol was maximum (16.58 mgl-1) in the WPM basal media. Furthermore, the secretion of taxanes from the cells into medium was also considerably affected by the type of basal medium. The maximum extra-cellular yield of Taxol (7.81 mgl-1), Baccatin III (5.0 mgl-1), and 10-deacetyl baccatin III (1.45 mgl-1) were also obtained by using DKW basal medium that were significantly higher than those obtained from other culture media. PMID:23352123

  14. Efficient embryogenic suspension culturing and rapid transformation of a range of elite genotypes of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam.).

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Bi, Hui-Ping; Fan, Wei-Juan; Zhang, Min; Wang, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Peng

    2011-12-01

    Efficient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation was developed using embryogenic suspension cell cultures of elite sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam.) cultivars, including Ayamurasaki, Sushu2, Sushu9, Sushu11, Wanshu1, Xushu18 and Xushu22. Embryogenic suspension cultures were established in LCP medium using embryogenic calli induced from apical or axillary buds on an induction medium containing 2 mg l(-1) 2,4-D. Suspension cultures were co-cultivated with A. tumefaciens strain LBA4404 harboring the binary plasmid pCAMBIA1301 with the hpt gene as a selectable marker and an intron-interrupted uidA gene as a visible marker. Several key steps of the sweet potato transformation system have been investigated and optimized, including the appropriate antibiotics and their concentrations for suppressing Agrobacterium growth and the optimal doses of hygromycin for transformant selection. A total of 485 putative transgenic plant lines were produced from the transformed calli via somatic embryogenesis and germination to plants under 10 mg l(-1) hygromycin and 200 mg l(-1) cefotaxime. PCR, GUS and Southern blot analyses of the regenerated plants showed that 92.35% of them were transgenic. The number of T-DNA insertions varied from one to three in most transgenic plant lines. Plants showed 100% survival when 308 transgenics were transferred to soil in the greenhouse and then to the field. Most of them were morphologically normal, with the production of storage roots after 3 months of cultivation in the greenhouse or fields. The development of such a robust transformation method suitable to a range of sweet potato genotypes not only provides a routine tool for genetic improvement via transgenesis but also allows us to conduct a functional verification of endogenous genes in sweet potato. PMID:21958713

  15. A promising approach on biomass accumulation and withanolides production in cell suspension culture of Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal.

    PubMed

    Sivanandhan, Ganeshan; Kapil Dev, Gnanajothi; Jeyaraj, Murugaraj; Rajesh, Manoharan; Muthuselvam, Manickam; Selvaraj, Natesan; Manickavasagam, Markandan; Ganapathi, Andy

    2013-08-01

    Withanolide is one of the most extensively exploited steroidal lactones, which are biosynthesized in Withania somnifera. Its production from cell suspension culture was analyzed to defeat limitations coupled with its regular supply from the plant organs. In order to optimize the different factors for sustainable production of withanolides and biomass accumulations, different concentrations of auxins or cytokinins and their combinations, carbon sources, agitation speed, organic additives and seaweed extracts was studied in cell suspension culture. Maximum biomass accumulation (16.72 g fresh weight [FW] and 4.18 g dry weight [DW]) and withanolides production (withanolide A 7.21 mg/g DW, withanolide B 4.23 mg/g DW, withaferin A 3.88 mg/g DW and withanone 6.72 mg/g DW) were achieved in the treatment of Gracilaria edulis extract at 40 % level. Organic additive L-glutamine at 200 mg/l in combination with picloram (1 mg/l) and KN (0.5 mg/l) promoted growth characteristics (11.87 g FW and 2.96 g DW) and withanolides synthesis (withanolide A 5.04 mg/g DW, withanolide B 2.59 mg/g DW, withaferin A 2.36 mg/g DW and withanone 4.32 mg/g DW). Sucrose at 5 % level revolved out to be a superior carbon source yielded highest withanolides production (withanolide A 2.88 mg/g DW, withanolide B 1.48 mg/g DW, withaferin A 1.35 mg/g DW and withanone 2.47 mg/g DW), whereas biomass (7.28 g FW and 1.82 g DW) was gratefully increased at 2 % level of sucrose in cell suspension culture. This optimized protocol can be utilized for large scale cultivation of W. somnifera cells in industrial bioreactors for mass synthesis of major withanolides.

  16. The Structure of Plant Cell Walls: II. The Hemicellulose of the Walls of Suspension-cultured Sycamore Cells.

    PubMed

    Bauer, W D; Talmadge, K W; Keegstra, K; Albersheim, P

    1973-01-01

    The molecular structure, chemical properties, and biological function of the xyloglucan polysaccharide isolated from cell walls of suspension-cultured sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cells are described. The sycamore wall xyloglucan is compared to the extracellular xyloglucan secreted by suspension-cultured sycamore cells into their culture medium and is also compared to the seed "amyloid" xyloglucans.Xyloglucan-or fragments of xyloglucan-and acidic fragments of the pectic polysaccharides are released from endopolygalacturonase-pretreated sycamore walls by treatment of these walls with 8 m urea, endoglucanase, or 0.5 n NaOH. Some of the xyloglucan thus released is found to cochromatograph with the acidic pectic fragments on diethylaminoethyl Sephadex. The chemical or enzymic treatments required for the release of xyloglucan from the walls and the cochromatography of xyloglucan with the acidic pectic fragments indicate that xyloglucan is covalently linked to the pectic polysaccharides and is noncovalently bound to the cellulose fibrils of the sycamore cell wall.The molecular structure of sycamore xyloglucan was characterized by methylation analysis of the oligosaccharides obtained by endoglucanase treatment of the polymer. The structure of the polymer is based on a repeating heptasaccharide unit which consists of 4 residues of beta-1-4-linked glucose and 3 residues of terminal xylose. A single xylose residue is glycosidically linked to carbon 6 of 3 of the glucosyl residues.

  17. Incorporation and Degradation of 14C and 3H-labeled Thymidine by Sugarcane Cells in Suspension Culture 12

    PubMed Central

    Lesley, Stanley M.; Maretzki, Andrew; Nickell, Louis G.

    1980-01-01

    Sugarcane cells growing in suspension culture degrade exogenous thymidine, releasing thymine. Thymine is not utilized for DNA synthesis. Thymine is rapidly catabolized to β-aminoisobutyric acid which is found within the cell. Thymidine in the medium is used for DNA synthesis. The label of [2-14C]thymidine is lost as 14CO2, but the label of [3H]methylthymidine is found in the cell as [3H]β-aminoisobutyric acid, some of which is used for the synthesis of other cell components. The degradation of thymidine can be partially inhibited by addition of certain substituted pyrimidines. PMID:16661365

  18. Tanshinones inhibit amyloid aggregation by amyloid-β peptide, disaggregate amyloid fibrils, and protect cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiuming; Yu, Xiang; Patal, Kunal; Hu, Rundong; Chuang, Steven; Zhang, Ge; Zheng, Jie

    2013-06-19

    The misfolding and aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides into amyloid fibrils is regarded as one of the causative events in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tanshinones extracted from Chinese herb Danshen (Salvia Miltiorrhiza Bunge) were traditionally used as anti-inflammation and cerebrovascular drugs due to their antioxidation and antiacetylcholinesterase effects. A number of studies have suggested that tanshinones could protect neuronal cells. In this work, we examine the inhibitory activity of tanshinone I (TS1) and tanshinone IIA (TS2), the two major components in the Danshen herb, on the aggregation and toxicity of Aβ1-42 using atomic force microscopy (AFM), thioflavin-T (ThT) fluorescence assay, cell viability assay, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. AFM and ThT results show that both TS1 and TS2 exhibit different inhibitory abilities to prevent unseeded amyloid fibril formation and to disaggregate preformed amyloid fibrils, in which TS1 shows better inhibitory potency than TS2. Live/dead assay further confirms that introduction of a very small amount of tanshinones enables protection of cultured SH-SY5Y cells against Aβ-induced cell toxicity. Comparative MD simulation results reveal a general tanshinone binding mode to prevent Aβ peptide association, showing that both TS1 and TS2 preferentially bind to a hydrophobic β-sheet groove formed by the C-terminal residues of I31-M35 and M35-V39 and several aromatic residues. Meanwhile, the differences in binding distribution, residues, sites, population, and affinity between TS1-Aβ and TS2-Aβ systems also interpret different inhibitory effects on Aβ aggregation as observed by in vitro experiments. More importantly, due to nonspecific binding mode of tanshinones, it is expected that tanshinones would have a general inhibitory efficacy of a wide range of amyloid peptides. These findings suggest that tanshinones, particularly TS1 compound, offer promising lead compounds with dual

  19. [Metabolism of nicotinic acid in plant cell suspension cultures, IV: Occurrence and metabolism of nicotinic acid N-alpha-arabinoside (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Leienbach, K W; Heeger, V; Barz, W

    1976-08-01

    Application of nicotinic acid to cell suspension cultures of Petroselinum hortense Hoffm., Daucus carota, Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana glauca leads to the formation of the recently isolated[2] nicotinic acid N-alpha-L-arabinoside. In these cell cultures the arabinoside is a metabolically active compound; the nicotinic acid moiety is used for NAD synthesis and nicotinic acid degradation involving decarboxylation and ring fission. N-Methylnicotinic acid (trigonelline) and nicotinic acid N-alpha-L-arabinoside occur alternatively in plant cell suspension cultures, but seem to fulfil the same function as a reserve form for nicotinic acid. Catabolism of nicotinic acid in parsley cell suspension cultures does not involve 6-hydroxynicotinic acid as an intermediate.

  20. Carbon starvation increases endoglycosidase activities and production of "unconjugated N-glycans" in Silene alba cell-suspension cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Lhernould, S; Karamanos, Y; Priem, B; Morvan, H

    1994-01-01

    We previously reported the occurrence of oligomannosides and xylomannosides corresponding to unconjugated N-glycans (UNGs) in the medium of a white campion (Silene alba) cell suspension. Attention has been focused on these oligosaccharides since it was shown that they confer biological activities in plants. In an attempt to elucidate the origin of these oligosaccharides, we studied two endoglycosidase activities, putative enzymes involved in their formation. The previously described peptide-N4-(N-acetyl-glucosaminyl) asparagine amidase activity and the endo-N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase activity described in this paper were both quantified in white campion cells during the culture cycle with variable initial concentrations of sucrose. The lower the sucrose supply, the higher the two activities. Furthermore, endoglycosidase activities were greatly enhanced after the disappearance of sugar from the medium. The production of UNGs in the culture medium rose correlatively. These data strongly suggest that the production of UNGs in our white campion cell-suspension system is due to the increase of these endoglycosidase activities, which reach their highest levels of activity during conditions of carbon starvation. PMID:7991689

  1. Subcellular localization of chorismate-mutase isoenzymes in protoplasts from mesophyll and suspension-cultured cells of Nicotiana silvestris.

    PubMed

    d'Amato, T A; Ganson, R J; Gaines, C G; Jensen, R A

    1984-09-01

    The subcellular locations of two readily discriminated chorismate-mutase (EC 5.4.99.5) isoenzymes from Nicotiana silvestris Speg. et Comes were determined in protoplasts prepared from both leaf tissue and isogenic suspension-cultured cells. Differential centrifugation was used to obtain fractions containing plastids, a mixture of mitochondria and microbodies, and soluble cytosolic proteins. Isoenzyme CM-1 is sensitive to feedback inhibition by L-tyrosine and comprises the major fraction of total chorismate mutase in suspension-cultured cells. Isoenzyme CM-2 is not inhibited by L-tyrosine and its expression is maximal in organismal (leaf) tissue. Isoenzyme CM-1 is located in the plastid compartment since (i) proplastids contained more CM-1 activity than chloroplasts, (ii) both chloroplast and proplastid fractions possessed the tyrosine-sensitive isoenzyme, and (iii) latency determinations on washed chloroplast preparations confirmed the internal location of a tyrosine-sensitive isoenzyme. Isoenzyme CM-2 is located in the cytosol since (i) the supernatant fractions were heavily enriched for the tyrosineinsensitive activity, and (ii) a relatively greater amount of tyrosine-insensitive enzyme was present in the supernatant fraction derived from organismal tissue.

  2. Panax ginseng Adventitious Root Suspension Culture: Protocol for Biomass Production and Analysis of Ginsenosides by High Pressure Liquid Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Hosakatte Niranjana; Paek, Kee Yoeup

    2016-01-01

    Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (Korean ginseng) is a popular herbal medicine. It has been used in Chinese and Oriental medicines since thousands of years. Ginseng products are generally used as a tonic and an adaptogen to resist the adverse influence of a wide range of physical, chemical and biological factors, and to restore homeostasis. Ginsenosides or ginseng saponins are the principal active ingredients of ginseng. Since ginseng cultivation process is very slow and needs specific environment for field cultivation, cell and tissue cultures are sought as alternatives for the production of ginseng biomass and bioactive compounds. In this chapter, we focus on methods of induction of adventitious roots from ginseng roots, establishment of adventitious root suspension cultures using bioreactors, procedures for processing of adventitious roots, and analysis of ginsenosides by high pressure liquid chromatography. PMID:27108314

  3. Regulation of Glutamate Dehydrogenase Activity in Relation to Carbon Limitation and Protein Catabolism in Carrot Cell Suspension Cultures 1

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Sharon A.; Stewart, George R.; Phillips, Richard

    1992-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) specific activity and function have been studied in cell suspension cultures of carrot (Daucus carota L. cv Chantenay) in response to carbon and nitrogen supply in the culture medium. The specific activity of GDH was derepressed in sucrose-starved cells concomitant with protein catabolism, ammonium excretion, and the accumulation of metabolically active amino acids. The addition of sucrose led to a rapid decrease in GDH specific activity, an uptake of ammonium from the medium, and a decrease in amino acid levels. The extent of GDH derepression was correlated positively with cellular glutamate concentration. These findings strengthen the view that the function of GDH is the catabolism of glutamate, which under conditions of carbon stress provides carbon skeletons for tricarboxylic acid cycle activity. PMID:16668745

  4. Panax ginseng Adventitious Root Suspension Culture: Protocol for Biomass Production and Analysis of Ginsenosides by High Pressure Liquid Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Hosakatte Niranjana; Paek, Kee Yoeup

    2016-01-01

    Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (Korean ginseng) is a popular herbal medicine. It has been used in Chinese and Oriental medicines since thousands of years. Ginseng products are generally used as a tonic and an adaptogen to resist the adverse influence of a wide range of physical, chemical and biological factors, and to restore homeostasis. Ginsenosides or ginseng saponins are the principal active ingredients of ginseng. Since ginseng cultivation process is very slow and needs specific environment for field cultivation, cell and tissue cultures are sought as alternatives for the production of ginseng biomass and bioactive compounds. In this chapter, we focus on methods of induction of adventitious roots from ginseng roots, establishment of adventitious root suspension cultures using bioreactors, procedures for processing of adventitious roots, and analysis of ginsenosides by high pressure liquid chromatography.

  5. Opposite extremes in ethylene/nitric oxide ratio induce cell death in suspension culture and root apices of tomato exposed to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Poór, P; Borbély, P; Kovács, Judit; Papp, Anita; Szepesi, Ágnes; Takács, Z; Tari, Irma

    2014-12-01

    The plant hormone ethylene or the gaseous signalling molecule nitric oxide (NO) may enhance salt stress tolerance by maintaining ion homeostasis, first of all K+/Na+ ratio of tissues. Ethylene and NO accumulation increased in the root apices and suspension culture cells of tomato at sublethal salt stress caused by 100 mM NaCl, however, the induction phase of programmed cell death (PCD) was different at lethal salt concentration. The production of ethylene by root apices and the accumulation of NO in the cells of suspension culture did not increase during the initiation of PCD after 250 mM NaCl treatment. Moreover, cells in suspension culture accumulated higher amount of reactive oxygen species which, along with NO deficiency contributed to cell death induction. The absence of ethylene in the apical root segments and the absence of NO accumulation in the cell suspension resulted in similar ion disequilibrium, namely K+/Na+ ratio of 1.41 ± 0.1 and 1.68 ± 0.3 in intact plant tissues and suspension culture cells, respectively that was not tolerated by tomato. PMID:25475982

  6. Method for Producing Non-Neoplastic, Three Dimensional, Mammalian Tissue and Cell Aggregates Under Microgravity Culture Conditions and the Products Produced Therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Prewett, Tracey L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural, and blood tissue. The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cells aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  7. Influence of rare earth elements on metabolism and related enzyme activity and isozyme expression in Tetrastigma hemsleyanum cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Xin, Peng; Shuang-Lin, Zhou; Jun-Yao, He; Li, Ding

    2013-04-01

    The effects of rare earth elements (REEs) not only on cell growth and flavonoid accumulation of Tetrastigma hemsleyanum suspension cells but also on the isoenzyme patterns and activities of related enzymes were studied in this paper. There were no significant differences in enhancement of flavonoid accumulation in T. hemsleyanum suspension cells among La(3+), Ce(3+), and Nd(3+). Whereas their inductive effects on cell proliferation varied greatly. The most significant effects were achieved with 100 μM Ce(3+)and Nd(3+). Under treatment over a 25-day culture period, the maximal biomass levels reached 1.92- and 1.74-fold and the total flavonoid contents are 1.45- and 1.49-fold, than that of control, respectively. Catalase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), and peroxidase (POD) activity was activated significantly when the REE concentration range from 0 to 300 μM, whereas no significant changes were found in superoxide dismutase activity. Differences of esterase isozymes under REE treatment only laid in expression level, and there were no specific bands. The expression level of some POD isozymes strengthened with increasing concentration of REEs within the range of 50-200 μM. When REE concentration was higher than 300 μM, the expression of some POD isozymes was inhibited; meanwhile, some other new POD isozymes were induced. Our results also showed REEs did not directly influence PAL activity. So, we speculated that 50-200 μM REEs could activate some of antioxidant enzymes, adjust some isozymes expression, trigger the defense responses of T. hemsleyanum suspension cells, and stimulate flavonoid accumulation by inducing PAL activity.

  8. The A53E α-synuclein pathological mutation demonstrates reduced aggregation propensity in vitro and in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Nicola J; Giasson, Benoit I

    2015-06-15

    Mutations in the gene that encodes α-synuclein (αS) are a known cause of Parkinson's disease. αS is also the major component of pathological inclusions that characterize this disorder and a spectrum of other neurodegenerative diseases termed synucleinopathies. The effects of the most recently identified αS mutation, A53E, on αS aggregation were studied in vitro and in cell culture models. The A53E mutation in αS impedes the formation of aggregated, amyloid protein in vitro compared to wild-type αS. Under certain conditions, A53E αS can still form elongated amyloid fibrils with similar morphology, but with thinner width compared to wild-type αS. Using amyloid seeding of αS in cell culture studies, we demonstrate that significantly less A53E αS could be induced to aggregate compared to wild-type αS, although the mutant protein was still able to form mature inclusions within some cells. Furthermore, expression of A53E αS enhanced toxicity in cells experiencing mitochondrial stress. These findings indicate that the A53E mutation in αS reduces the propensity of αS to aggregate both in vitro and in the cellular environment, and may lead to cellular toxicity through other mechanisms.

  9. [Suspension cultures of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells as a test system for the study of cytotoxic effects of anaesthetics (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hack, G; Karzel, K

    1981-02-01

    Cultures of a permanently in suspension growing line of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EATC) were studied regarding their use as a test system for the determination of cytotoxic effects of anaesthetics. These cells, having a comparatively high reduplication rate, are cultured at 37 degrees C in vitro in a chemically defined liquid medium supplemented by 15% horse serum without agitation in a closed system. In order to detect drug effects on the cultures various cellular parameters can be determined due to the suspension character of the cultures without complicated preparatory measures, e.g. cell number or multiplication rate, cell volume, cell volume distribution. Moreover biochemical parameters, such as protein or nucleic acid content, may be estimated after centrifugation of the cultures separately in the cell sediment and the medium supernatant. Applying drugs of various pharmacological groups (cytostatic and anti-inflammatory drugs, local and general anaesthetics) the usefulness of some of these parameters for the detection of cytotoxic effects was studied.

  10. Chemical Elicitor-Induced Modulation of Antioxidant Metabolism and Enhancement of Secondary Metabolite Accumulation in Cell Suspension Cultures of Scrophularia kakudensis Franch

    PubMed Central

    Manivannan, Abinaya; Soundararajan, Prabhakaran; Park, Yoo Gyeong; Jeong, Byoung Ryong

    2016-01-01

    Scrophularia kakudensis is an important medicinal plant with pharmaceutically valuable secondary metabolites. To develop a sustainable source of naturaceuticals with vital therapeutic importance, a cell suspension culture was established in S. kakudensis for the first time. Friable calli were induced from the leaf explants cultured on a Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium containing 3.0 mg·L−1 6-benzyladenine (BA) in a combination with 2 mg·L−1 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D). From the callus cultures, a cell suspension culture was initiated and the cellular differentiation was investigated. In addition, the effect of biotic elicitors such as methyl jasmonate (MeJa), salicylic acid (SA), and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) on the accumulation of secondary metabolites and antioxidant properties was demonstrated. Among the elicitors, the MeJa elicited the accumulation of total phenols, flavonoids, and acacetin, a flavonoid compound with multiple pharmaceutical values. Similarly, the higher concentrations of the MeJa significantly modulated the activities of antioxidant enzymes and enhanced the scavenging potentials of free radicals of cell suspension extracts. Overall, the outcomes of this study can be utilized for the large scale production of pharmaceutically important secondary metabolites from S. kakudensis through cell suspension cultures. PMID:26999126

  11. Effect of phenylalanine on Taxol production and antioxidant activity of extracts of suspension-cultured hazel (Corylus avellana L.) cells.

    PubMed

    Bemani, Ebrahim; Ghanati, Faezeh; Rezaei, Ayatollah; Jamshidi, Mitra

    2013-07-01

    Taxol is produced by a few microorganisms and plants such as yew (Taxus sp.). Recent researches have shown that hazel (Corylus avellana L.) is also able to produce Taxol. In the present study, effects of different concentrations of phenylalanine (Phe) on the production of Taxol, antioxidant activity, and cytotoxic effects of extracts of suspension-cultured hazel cells were investigated. The cells were treated with different concentrations of Phe on day 7 of subculture and were harvested on day 14. The results showed that the amounts of Taxol and antioxidant activity were increased by increasing the phenylalanine supply. Interestingly, the cytotoxic effects of hazel cell extract were even stronger than that of pure Taxol (standard), suggesting hazel cell extract as a novel and suitable probe for treating human cancer. Application of phenylalanine to hazel cells exaggerates their effects.

  12. Distinct isoforms of ADPglucose pyrophosphatase and ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase occur in the suspension-cultured cells of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.).

    PubMed

    Baroja-Fernández, E; Zandueta-Criado, A; Rodríguez-López, M; Akazawa, T; Pozueta-Romero, J

    2000-09-01

    The intracellular localizations of ADPglucose pyrophosphatase (AGPPase) and ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) have been studied using protoplasts prepared from suspension-cultured cells of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.). Subcellular fractionation studies revealed that all the AGPPase present in the protoplasts is associated with amyloplasts, whereas more than 60% of AGPase is in the extraplastidial compartment. Immunoblots of amyloplast- and extraplastid-enriched extracts further confirmed that AGPase is located mainly outside the amyloplast. Experiments carried out to identify possible different isoforms of AGPPase in the amyloplast revealed the presence of soluble and starch granule-bound isoforms. We thus propose that ADPglucose levels linked to starch biosynthesis in sycamore cells are controlled by enzymatic reactions catalyzing the synthesis and breakdown of ADPglucose, which take place both inside and outside the amyloplast.

  13. Structure of Plant Cell Walls : XVIII. An Analysis of the Extracellular Polysaccharides of Suspension-Cultured Sycamore Cells.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, T T; McNeil, M; Darvill, A G; Albersheim, P

    1986-04-01

    The water-soluble polysaccharides (SEPS) secreted into the medium by suspension-cultured sycamore cells were examined to determine whether the polysaccharides were the same as those present in the walls of sycamore cells. The SEPS were made more amenable to fractionation by treatment with a highly purified alpha-1,4-endopolygalacturonase (EPG). The EPG-treated SEPS were fractionated by anion-exchange and gelpermeation chromatography. The following polysaccharides were found: xyloglucan, arabinoxylan, at least two arabinogalactans, a rhamnogalacturonan-II-like polysaccharide, and a polygalacturonic acid-rich polysaccharide. The oligogalacturonide fragments expected from EPG-digested homogalacturonan were also identified. Evidence was obtained for the presence of a rhamnogalacturonan-I-like polysaccharide. All of the above polysaccharides have been isolated from or are believed to be present in sycamore cell walls. Furthermore, all of the noncellulosic polysaccharides known to be present in sycamore cell-walls appear to be present in the SEPS.

  14. Im"plant"ing of Mammalian Glycosyltransferase Gene into Plant Suspension-Cultured Cells Using Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation.

    PubMed

    Kajiura, Hiroyuki; Fujiyama, Kazuhito

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic activity assay of exogenous glycosyltransferase (GT) and glycosylhydrolase (GH) expressed in plants is an important analysis for determination of the expression of the gene of interest. However, generations and establishment of in planta transgenic lines are time-consuming. Furthermore, the expression levels and the activities of the exogenous GTs and GHs are quite low and weak, the radiolabeled donor substrate had to be used to analyze the enzymatic activity. Here, we describe a protocol for the generation of transgenic plants using suspension-cultured cells and a high sensitive assay for GT, especially β1,4-galactosyltransferase, using microsomal fraction from plant cells and fluorescent-labeled sugar chains as an acceptor substrate. This method enables less-time-consuming preparation of stable transgenic plants, non-radiolabeled, high-throughput detail analysis which includes mass spectrometric analysis and exo-glycosidase digestions.

  15. Structure of plant cell walls: XIX. Isolation and characterization of wall polysaccharides from suspension-cultured Douglas fir cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.R.; McNeil, M.; Darvill, A.G.; Albersheim, P.

    1987-03-01

    The partial purification and characterization of cell wall polysaccharides isolated from suspension-cultured Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) cells are described. Extraction of isolated cell walls from 1.0 M LiCl solubilized pectic polysaccharides with glycosyl-linkage compositions similar to those of rhamnogalacturonans I and II, pectic polysaccharides isolated from walls of suspension-cultured sycamore cells. Treatment of LiCl-extracted Douglas fir walls with an endo-..cap alpha..-1,4-polygalacturonase released only small, additional amounts of pectic polysaccharide, which had a glycosyl-linkage composition similar to that of rhamnogalacturonan I. Xyloglucan oligosaccharides were released from the endo-..cap alpha..-1,4-polygalacturonase-treated walls by treatment with an endo-..beta..-1,4-glucanase. These oligosaccharides included hepta- and nonasaccharides similar or identical to those released from sycamore cell walls by the same enzyme, and structurally related octa- and decasaccharides similar to those isolated from various angiosperms. Finally, additional xyloglucan and small amounts of xylan were extracted from the endo-..beta..-1,4-glucanase-treated walls by 0.5 N NaOH. The xylan resembled that extracted by NaOH from dicot cell walls in that it contained 2,4- but not 3,4-linked xylosyl residues. In this study, a total of 15% of the cell wall was isolated as pectic material, 10% as xyloglucan, and less than 1% as xylan. The noncellulosic polysaccharides accounted for 25% of the cell walls, cellulose for 23%, protein for 34%, and ash for 5%, for a total of 88% of the cell wall.

  16. Efficacy of low-temperature high hydrostatic pressure processing in inactivating Vibrio parahaemolyticus in culture suspension and oyster homogenate.

    PubMed

    Phuvasate, Sureerat; Su, Yi-Cheng

    2015-03-01

    Culture suspensions of five clinical and five environmental Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains in 2% NaCl solution were subjected to high pressure processing (HPP) under various conditions (200-300MPa for 5 and 10 min at 1.5-20°C) to study differences in pressure resistance among the strains. The most pressure-resistant and pressure-sensitive strains were selected to investigate the effects of low temperatures (15, 5 and 1.5°C) on HPP (200 or 250MPa for 5 min) to inactivate V. parahaemolyticus in sterile oyster homogenates. Inactivation of V. parahaemolyticus cells in culture suspensions and oyster homogenates was greatly enhanced by lowering the processing temperature from 15 to 5 or 1.5°C. A treatment of oyster homogenates at 250MPa for 5 min at 5°C decreased the populations of V. parahaemolyticus by 6.2logCFU/g for strains 10290 and 100311Y11 and by >7.4logCFU/g for strain 10292. Decreasing the processing temperature of the same treatment to 1.5°C reduced all the V. parahaemolyticus strains inoculated to oyster homogenates to non-detectable (<10CFU/g) levels. Factors including pressure level, processing temperature and time all need to be considered for developing effective HPP for eliminating pathogens from foods. Further studies are needed to validate the efficacy of the HPP (250MPa for 5 min at 1.5°C) in inactivating V. parahaemolyticus cells in whole oysters.

  17. Salicylic acid differentially affects suspension cell cultures of Lotus japonicus and one of its non-symbiotic mutants.

    PubMed

    Bastianelli, Fiorenza; Costa, Alex; Vescovi, Marco; D'Apuzzo, Enrica; Zottini, Michela; Chiurazzi, Maurizio; Lo Schiavo, Fiorella

    2010-03-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is known to play an important role in the interaction between plant and micro-organisms, both symbiotic and pathogen. In particular, high levels of SA block nodule formation and mycorrhizal colonization in plants. A mutant of Lotus japonicus, named Ljsym4-2, was characterized as unable to establish positive interactions with Rhizobium and fungi (NOD(-), MYC(-)); in particular, it does not recognize signal molecules released by symbiotic micro-organisms so that eventually, epidermal cells undergo PCD at the contact area. We performed a detailed characterization of wild-type and Ljsym4-2 cultured cells by taking into account several parameters characterizing cell responses to SA, a molecule strongly involved in defense signaling pathways. In the presence of 0.5 mM SA, Ljsym4-2 suspension-cultured cells reduce their growth and eventually die, whereas in order to induce the same effects in wt suspension cells, SA concentration must be raised to 1.5 mM. An early and short production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected in wt-treated cells. In contrast, a continuous production of NO and a double-peak ROS response, similar to that reported after a pathogenic attack, was observed in the mutant Ljsym4-2 cells. At the molecular level, a constitutive higher level of a SA-inducible pathogenesis related gene was observed. The analysis in planta revealed a strong induction of the LjPR1 gene in the Ljsym4-2 mutant inoculated with Mesorhizobium loti. PMID:20012170

  18. Medicinal plant cell suspension cultures: pharmaceutical applications and high-yielding strategies for the desired secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Yue, Wei; Ming, Qian-Liang; Lin, Bing; Rahman, Khalid; Zheng, Cheng-Jian; Han, Ting; Qin, Lu-Ping

    2016-01-01

    The development of plant tissue (including organ and cell) cultures for the production of secondary metabolites has been underway for more than three decades. Plant cell cultures with the production of high-value secondary metabolites are promising potential alternative sources for the production of pharmaceutical agents of industrial importance. Medicinal plant cell suspension cultures (MPCSC), which are characterized with the feature of fermentation with plant cell totipotency, could be a promising alternative "chemical factory". However, low productivity becomes an inevitable obstacle limiting further commercialization of MPCSC and the application to large-scale production is still limited to a few processes. This review generalizes and analyzes the recent progress of this bioproduction platform for the provision of medicinal chemicals and outlines a range of trials taken or underway to increase product yields from MPCSC. The scale-up of MPCSC, which could lead to an unlimited supply of pharmaceuticals, including strategies to overcome and solution of the associated challenges, is discussed. PMID:24963701

  19. Hydrodynamic stress induces monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloid accumulation by Uncaria tomentosa (Willd) D. C. cell suspension cultures via oxidative burst.

    PubMed

    Trejo-Tapia, Gabriela; Sepúlveda-Jiménez, Gabriela; Trejo-Espino, José Luis; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; de la Torre, Mayra; Rodríguez-Monroy, Mario; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2007-09-01

    Uncaria tomentosa cell suspension cultures were grown in a 2-L stirred tank bioreactor operating at a shear rate gamma(.)(avg)=86 s(-1). The cultures showed an early monophasic oxidative burst measured as H2O2 production (2.15 micromol H2O2 g(-1) dw). This response was followed by a transient production of monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloids (178 +/- 40 microg L(-1) at 24 h). At the stationary phase (144 h), the increase of the shear rate gamma(.)(avg) up to 150 s(-1) and/or oxygen tension up to 85% generated H2O2, restoring oxindole alkaloid production. U. tomentosa cells cultured in Erlenmeyer flasks also exhibited the monophasic oxidative burst but the H2O2 production was 16-fold lower and the alkaloids were not detected. These cells exposed to H2O2 generated in situ produced oxindole alkaloids reaching a maximum of 234 +/- 40 microg L(-1). A positive correlation was observed between the oxindole alkaloid production and the endogenous H2O2 level. On the other hand, addition of 1 microM diphenyleneiodonium (NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor) or 10 microM sodium azide (peroxidases inhibitor) reduced both H2O2 production and oxindole alkaloids build up, suggesting that these enzymes might play a role in the oxidative burst induced by the hydrodynamic stress.

  20. Growth characteristics of Sanguinaria canadensis L. cell suspensions and immobilized cultures for production of benzophenanthridine alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Rho, D; Chauret, N; Laberge, N; Archambault, J

    1992-02-01

    Sanguinaria canadensis L. plants were harvested from a local forest and calli were initiated from leaf explants. The production of benzophenanthridine alkaloids (i.e. sanguinarine, sanguilutine, sanguirubine, chelerythrine, chelilutine and chelirubine) by S. canadensis cell grown in modified B5 and IM2 media was compared to the alkaloid content of rhizomes. Sanguinarine accounted for approximately 80% of the total alkaloid content of cultured cells (1.3%, g g-1) while sanguinarine and sanguirubine accounted for 70% of rhizome alkaloids (9.0%, g g-1). Sanguinarine, chelirubine and chelerythrine were the only known alkaloids detected in cultured S. canadensis cells. Maximum alkaloid production of cultures performed using B5 medium, containing half the original nitrate concentration, was observed following extracellular nitrate and sugar depletion. The scale-up of this culture was successfully performed in a 2-1 immobilization bioreactor. The consumption of sugar and nitrate as well as the oxygen (OTR) and carbon dioxide (CTR) transfer rates of the immobilized cell culture were monitored for 15 days. The maximum sugar and nitrate consumption rates were 1.8 g l-1 per day and 2.3 mM per day respectively. The maximum OTR and CTR of the immobilized cell culture were 0.8 mmol O2 l-1 h-1 and 0.95 mmol CO2 l-1 h-1 respectively. The sanguinarine yield of this culture reached 1.0% based on biomass dry weight (g g-1 dw) by day 15.

  1. Two-stage culture for producing berberine by cell suspension and shoot cultures of Berberis buxifolia Lam.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, María A; Eraso, Natalia Fernandez; Pitta-Alvarez, Sandra I; Marconi, Patricia L

    2009-03-01

    In vitro cultures of Berberis buxifolia were established using thidiazuron (4.5, 23 and 45 mM) or picloram (4 and 40 mM) as plant growth regulators for sustaining growth. For producing berberine, a two-stage culture was performed. In the first step, thidiazuron or picloram were used for biomass production followed by the production stage where benzylaminopurine (4.4 mM) was added as a plant growth regulator. Berberine yields (102 mg g(-1) DW) and in vitro shoot cultures (200 mg g(-1) DW) were significantly lower than those of whole plants in the field (416 mg g(-1) DW). The highest productivity (0.18 mg 1(-1) day(-1)) was attained using picloram (either 4 on 40 mM) in the first stage for producing biomass. PMID:18979211

  2. Biotransformation of perfumery terpenoids, (−)-ambrox® by a fungal culture Macrophomina phaseolina and a plant cell suspension culture of Peganum harmala

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Biotransformation offers chemo enzymatic system to modify the compounds into their novel analogues which are difficult to synthesize by chemical methods. This paper describes the biotransformational studies of ambrox, one of the most important components of natural Ambergris (wale sperm) with fungal and plant cell culture. Results Biotransformation of (−)-ambrox (1) with a fungal cell culture of Macrophomina phaseolina and a plant cell suspension cultures of Peganum harmala yielded oxygenated products, 3β-hydroxyambrox (2), 6β-hydroxyambrox (3), 1α-hydroxy-3oxoambrox (4), 1α,3β-dihydroxyambrox (5), 13,14,15,16-tetranorlabdane-3-oxo-8,12-diol (6), 3-oxoambrox (7), 2α-hydroxyambrox (8), 3β-hydroxysclareolide (9), and 2α,3β-dihydroxyambrox (10). Metabolite 4 was found to be new compound. These metabolites were structurally characterized on the basis of spectroscopic studies. Conclusion Nine oxygenated metabolites of (−)-ambrox (1) were obtained from Macrophomina phaseolina and Peganum harmala. Enzymatic system of screened organisms introduced hydroxyl and keto functionalities at various positions of compound 1 in a stereo- and regio-controlled manner. PMID:22863186

  3. Metabolomic alterations in elicitor treated Silybum marianum suspension cultures monitored by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sampedro, Angeles; Kim, Hye Kyong; Choi, Young Hae; Verpoorte, Robert; Corchete, Purificación

    2007-06-15

    A comprehensive metabolomic profiling of Silybum marianum (L.) Gaernt cell cultures elicited with yeast extract or methyl jasmonate for the production of silymarin was carried out using one- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. With these techniques we were able to detect both temporal quantitative variations in the metabolite pool in yeast extract-elicited cultures and qualitative differences in cultures treated with the two types of elicitors. Yeast extract and methyl jasmonate caused a metabolic reprogramming that affected amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism; upon elicitation sucrose decreased and glucose levels increased, these changes being dependent on "de novo" protein synthesis. Also dependent on protein synthesis were the increase seen in alanine and glutamine in elicited cultures. Yeast extract differentially acted on threonine and valine metabolism and promoted accumulation of choline and alpha-linolenic acid in cells thus suggesting its action on membranes and the involvement of the octadecanoid pathway in the induction of silymarin in S. marianum cultures. Phenylpropanoid metabolism was altered by elicitation but, depending on elicitor, different phenylpropanoid profile was produced. The results obtained in this study will permit in the future to identify candidate components of the signalling pathway involved in the stimulation of the constitutive pathway of silymarin.

  4. Improved production of ginsenosides in suspension cultures of ginseng by medium replenishment strategy.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Cheol-Seung; Murthy, Hosakatte Niranjana; Hahn, Eun-Joo; Paek, Kee-Yoeup

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this study was to improve the accumulation of ginsenosides by the adventitious root cultures of ginseng, which are important secondary metabolites with pharmaceutical applications. The adventitious roots were cultured in bioreactors for 50 d using 1.5-strength Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 10 mg/l indole acetic acid and 75 g/l sucrose. Kinetic studies of the nutrient composition of the spent medium revealed the gradual depletion of various inorganic nutrients and sugars. Cultures were supplied with fresh nutrient medium (medium exchange or replenishment with 0.75- and 1.0-strength MS medium) after 10 and 20 d of culture initiation to fulfill the nutritional requirements of adventitious roots. Medium replenishment strategy (with 1.0-strength MS medium after 20 d of culture) significantly improved the growth of adventitious roots and the biosynthesis of ginsenosides by the adventitious roots. This work is useful for the large-scale cultivation of adventitious roots for the production of ginsenosides. PMID:18397781

  5. Increased sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis and an apparent decrease in sterol biosynthesis in elicitor-treated tobacco cell suspension cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Voegeli, U.; Bhatt, P.N.; Chappell, J.

    1987-04-01

    Addition of fungel elicitor prepared from Phytophthora parasitica to tobacco cell suspension cultures leads to an increased production of the phytoalexin capsidiol. Capsidiol is a sesquiterpenoid which is most likely synthesized from farnesylpyrophosphat (FPP) by a bicyclic cyclase reaction. Because FPP is also a substrate for squalene synthetase and therefore a precursor of sterol biosynthesis, the question arises whether or not the accumulation of capsidiol in elicitor-treated cells occurs at the expense of sterol biosynthesis. (/sup 14/C)-acetate was given to elicitor-treated and control (no treatment) cell cultures and incorporation into sterols and capsidiol determined. No labeled capsidiol was detected in control cells. In elicitor-treated cells about 12-15% of the radioactivity taken up by the cells was incorporated into capsidiol. In contrast, control cells incorporated 4 times more radioactivity into sterols than elicitor-treated cells. Similar results were obtained using (/sup 3/H)-mevalonate as a precursor of capsidiol and sterol biosynthesis. Likely explanations for the apparently decline in sterol biosynthesis in elicitor-treated cells include: (1) inhibition of squalene synthetase; (2) induction of capsidiol synthesizing enzymes; and (3) metabolic channeling of FPP into capsidiol versus sterols. These possibilities will be discussed further together with other results.

  6. Plant peroxisomes are degraded by starvation-induced and constitutive autophagy in tobacco BY-2 suspension-cultured cells

    PubMed Central

    Voitsekhovskaja, Olga V.; Schiermeyer, Andreas; Reumann, Sigrun

    2014-01-01

    Very recently, autophagy has been recognized as an important degradation pathway for quality control of peroxisomes in Arabidopsis plants. To further characterize the role of autophagy in plant peroxisome degradation, we generated stable transgenic suspension-cultured cell lines of heterotrophic Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Bright Yellow 2 expressing a peroxisome-targeted version of enhanced yellow fluorescent protein. Indeed, this cell line model system proved advantageous for detailed cytological analyses of autophagy stages and for quantification of cellular peroxisome pools under different culturing conditions and upon inhibitor applications. Complementary biochemical, cytological, and pharmacological analyses provided convincing evidence for peroxisome degradation by bulk autophagy during carbohydrate starvation. This degradation was slowed down by the inhibitor of autophagy, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), but the 3-MA effect ceased at advanced stages of starvation, indicating that another degradation mechanism for peroxisomes might have taken over. 3-MA also caused an increase particularly in peroxisomal proteins and cellular peroxisome numbers when applied under nutrient-rich conditions in the logarithmic growth phase, suggesting a high turnover rate for peroxisomes by basal autophagy under non-stress conditions. Together, our data demonstrate that a great fraction of the peroxisome pool is subject to extensive autophagy-mediated turnover under both nutrient starvation and optimal growth conditions. Our analyses of the cellular pool size of peroxisomes provide a new tool for quantitative investigations of the role of plant peroxisomes in reactive oxygen species metabolism. PMID:25477890

  7. Selection and optimization of transfection enhancer additives for increased virus-like particle production in HEK293 suspension cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Cervera, Laura; Fuenmayor, Javier; González-Domínguez, Irene; Gutiérrez-Granados, Sonia; Segura, Maria Mercedes; Gòdia, Francesc

    2015-12-01

    The manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals in mammalian cells typically relies on the use of stable producer cell lines. However, in recent years, transient gene expression has emerged as a suitable technology for rapid production of biopharmaceuticals. Transient gene expression is particularly well suited for early developmental phases, where several potential therapeutic targets need to be produced and tested in vivo. As a relatively new bioprocessing modality, a number of opportunities exist for improving cell culture productivity upon transient transfection. For instance, several compounds have shown positive effects on transient gene expression. These transfection enhancers either facilitate entry of PEI/DNA transfection complexes into the cell or nucleus or increase levels of gene expression. In this work, the potential of combining transfection enhancers to increase Gag-based virus-like particle production levels upon transfection of suspension-growing HEK 293 cells is evaluated. Using Plackett-Burman design of experiments, it is first tested the effect of eight transfection enhancers: trichostatin A, valproic acid, sodium butyrate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), lithium acetate, caffeine, hydroxyurea, and nocodazole. An optimal combination of compounds exhibiting the highest effect on gene expression levels was subsequently identified using a surface response experimental design. The optimal consisted on the addition of 20 mM lithium acetate, 3.36 mM valproic acid, and 5.04 mM caffeine which increased VLP production levels 3.8-fold, while maintaining cell culture viability at 94%. PMID:26278533

  8. Yield enhancement strategies for artemisinin production by suspension cultures of Artemisia annua.

    PubMed

    Baldi, Ashish; Dixit, V K

    2008-07-01

    Artemisinin, isolated from the shrub-Artemisia annua, is a sesquiterpene lactone used to treat multi-drug resistant strains of falciparum malaria. It is also effective against a wide variety of cancers such as leukemia and colon cancer. To counter the present low content in leaves and uneconomical chemical synthesis, alternate ways to produce artemisinin have been sought. But this compound remains elusive in cell cultures of A. annua despite the extensive studies undertaken. This work reports the first successful approach for production of artemisinin by cell cultures of Indian variety of A. annua. In the present study, an integrated yield enhancement strategy, developed by addition of selected precursor (mevalonic acid lactone) and elicitor (methyl jasmonate) at optimized concentrations, resulted in 15.2g/l biomass and 110.2mg/l artemisinin, which was 5.93 times higher in productivity in comparison to control cultures. PMID:17804216

  9. Effects of Mg-ATP on the flavonoid production in the Scutellaria baicalensis Georgii suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Krsková, Z; Martin, J; Pec, J; Dusek, J

    2008-06-01

    This work focused on the cultivation of S. baicalensis Georgii in vitro cultures and on the possibilities of increasing the production of secondary metabolites in these cultures. The aim of the Sstudy was to determine whether the baicalin transport through vacuolar membrane is dependent on the presence of Mg-ATP. Our results showed that Mg-ATP had a significant effect on the ratio of baicalin and baicalein content and on the transport speed of these flavonoids. Therefore, the transport mechanism for baicalin are probably some of the MRP proteins which are the subfamily of the ABC transporte

  10. Chemostatic Concentrated Cultures of Heteroploid Mammalian Cell Suspensions in Dialyzing Fermentors

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Gio B.

    1965-01-01

    Concentrated chemostatic cultures of HeLa S3-1, KB, and HEp # 2 cells have been grown in a dialysis fermentor. Stationary cell concentrations of approximately 1.2 × 106 cells per ml have been produced at rates of 15 × 10-3 to 20 × 10-3 cells per hour for as long as 40 days. The dialysis fermentor appears to be useful in controlling the effects of nutrients on the growth rate of the cultures. Theoretical considerations are offered. Images Fig. 2 PMID:14264855

  11. [Obtaining of hairy-root, callus and suspension carrot culture (Daucus carota L.) able to accumulate human interferon alpha-2b].

    PubMed

    Luchakivskaia, Iu S; Olevinskaia, Z M; Kishchenko, E M; Spivak, N Ia; Kuchuk, N V

    2012-01-01

    Here we report the obtaining of suspension, callus and hairy root culture initiated from carrot plants of Nantskaya and Perfektzya variety with the highest level of recombinant human interferon alpha-2b accumulation exhibited the highest level of plant protein extract antiviral activity (up to 12.8 x 10(3) IU/mg TSP). The antiviral activity of callus extracts was significantly lower comparing to the activity of plant extracts from parent organisms. However, the antiviral activity level of suspension culture extracts (up to 4.42 x 10(3) IU/mg TSP) and Ri-root ones (up to 4.42 x 10(3) IU/mg TSP) appeared to be comparable to analogical data of antiviral activity of transgenic carrot leaf extracts, this way the described cultures could be possibly used for comparatively speedy obtaining of recombinant therapeutic protein for curing and preventing of virus diseases.

  12. [Metabolism of nicotinic acid in plant cell suspension cultures: II; Isolation, characterization and enzymology of nicotinic acid N-alpha-arabinoside (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Leienbach, K W; Barz, W

    1976-08-01

    A very hydrophilic compound was isolated from parsley cell suspension cultures in high yield after application of nicotinic acid. Using chemical, chromatographic and spectroscopic procedures the structure of this new plant constituent has been elucidated as nicotinic acid N-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside. This structure has been proved by chemical synthesis. An arabinosyltransferase was isolated from parsley cell suspension cultures and purified about 19-fold. The enzyme converted nicotinic acid N-alpha-arabinoside with UDP to nicotinic acid and UDP-arabinose. pH-Optimum (pH 7.0-8.0), Km value for nicotinic acid N-alpha-L-arabinoside (2.2 X 10(-4) mol/l) and mol. wt. (app. 70 000) of the transferase were measured. Function and biosynthesis of the arabinoside in cell cultures are discussed.

  13. Positive and negative aggregation responses to cultured human tumor cell lines among different normal individuals.

    PubMed

    Bastida, E; Ordinas, A; Jamieson, G A

    1982-01-01

    Platelets from approximately 50% (7/16) of normal individuals have been shown to have greater sensitivity to aggregation induced by critical threshold concentrations of three human tumor cell lines. These results may have implications for the genetics and epidemiology of human neoplastic disease.

  14. Effect of salts (NaCl and Na2CO3) on callus and suspension culture of Stevia rebaudiana for Steviol glycoside production.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pratibha; Sharma, Satyawati; Saxena, Sanjay

    2014-03-01

    Steviol glycosides are natural non-caloric sweeteners which are extracted from the leaves of Stevia rebaudiana plant. Present study deals the effect of salts (NaCl and Na2CO3) on callus and suspension culture of Stevia plant for steviol glycoside (SGs) production. Yellow-green and compact calli obtained from in vitro raised Stevia leaves sub-cultured on MS medium supplemented with 2.0 mg l(-1) NAA and different concentrations of NaCl (0.05-0.20%) and Na2CO3 (0.0125-0.10%) for 2 weeks, and incubated at 24 ± 1 °C and 22.4 μmol m(-2) s(-1) light intensity provided by white fluorescent tubes for 16 h. Callus and suspension biomass cultured on salts showed less growth as well as browning of medium when compared with control. Quantification of SGs content in callus culture (collected on 15th day) and suspension cultures (collected at 10th and 15th days) treated with and without salts were analyzed by HPLC. It was found that abiotic stress induced by the salts increased the concentration of SGs significantly. In callus, the quantity of SGs got increased from 0.27 (control) to 1.43 and 1.57% with 0.10% NaCl, and 0.025% Na2CO3, respectively. However, in case of suspension culture, the same concentrations of NaCl and Na2CO3 enhanced the SGs content from 1.36 (control) to 2.61 and 5.14%, respectively, on the 10th day.

  15. Detection of an O-methyltransferase synthesising acetosyringone in methyl jasmonate-treated tobacco cell-suspensions cultures.

    PubMed

    Negrel, Jonathan; Javelle, Francine; Wipf, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Acetosyringone (3',5'-dimethoxy-4'-hydroxyacetophenone) is a well-known and very effective inducer of the virulence genes of Agrobacterium tumefaciens but the precise pathway of its biosynthesis in plants is still unknown. We have used two tobacco cell lines, cultured in suspension and exhibiting different patterns of accumulation of acetosyringone in their culture medium upon treatment with methyl jasmonate, to study different steps of acetosyringone biosynthesis. In the two cell lines studied, treatment with 100 μM methyl jasmonate triggered a rapid and transient increase in acetovanillone synthase activity followed by a progressive increase in S-adenosyl-L-methionine: 5-hydroxyacetovanillone 5-O-methyltransferase activity which paralleled the rise in acetosyringone concentration in the culture medium. This O-methyltransferase displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with an apparent Km value of 18 μM for 5-hydroxyacetovanillone and its activity was magnesium-independent. Its molecular mass was estimated by gel permeation on an FPLC column and was found to be of ca. 81 kDa. 5-Hydroxyacetovanillone was the best substrate among the different o-diphenolic compounds tested as methyl acceptors in the O-methyltransferase assay. No formation of 5-hydroxyacetovanillone could be detected in vitro from 5-hydroxyferuloyl-CoA and NAD in the extracts used to measure acetovanillone synthase activity, indicating that 5-hydroxyacetovanillone is probably formed by direct hydroxylation of acetovanillone rather than by β-oxidation of 5-hydroxyferulic acid. Taken together our results strongly support the hypothesis that acetosyringone biosynthesis in tobacco proceeds from feruloyl-CoA via acetovanillone and 5-hydroxyacetovanillone. PMID:24445177

  16. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen (ROS and RNS) species generation and cell death in tomato suspension cultures--Botrytis cinerea interaction.

    PubMed

    Pietrowska, E; Różalska, S; Kaźmierczak, A; Nawrocka, J; Małolepsza, U

    2015-01-01

    This article reports events connected to cell survival and Botrytis cinerea infection development in cell suspension cultures of two tomato cultivars which show different levels of susceptibility to the pathogen: cv. Corindo (more susceptible) and cv. Perkoz (less susceptible). In parallel changes in reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species generation and in S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) activity were studied. In vivo staining methods with acridine orange (AO) and ethidium bromide (EB) as well as fluorescent microscopy were used to assess tomato and B. cinerea cells death. The biochemical studies of ROS and RNS concentrations in plant cell extract were complemented by in vivo ROS and nitric oxide (NO) imaging using nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT), diaminobenzidine (DAB) and diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-DA) staining methods, and confocal microscope technique. B. cinerea infection proceeded slower in Perkoz cell cultures. It was evidenced by measuring the pathogen conidia germination and germination tube development in which nuclei revealing cell death dominated. Two different types of tomato cell death were observed: cells with necrotic nuclei dominated in Corindo whereas in Perkoz cells with characteristic of vacuolar death type prevailed. In Perkoz cells, constitutive levels of NO and S-nitrosothiols (SNO) were significantly higher and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and superoxide anion (O₂(-)) concentrations were slightly higher as compared with Corindo cells. Moreover, increases in these molecule concentrations as a result of B. cinerea inoculation were observed in both, Perkoz and Corindo cell cultures. The enzymatic GSNOR activity seems to be an important player in controlling the SNO level in tomato cells. Involvements of the studied compounds in molecular mechanisms of tomato resistance to B. cinerea are discussed in the paper. PMID:25064634

  17. Biotic elicitor enhanced production of psoralen in suspension cultures of Psoralea corylifolia L.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Syed Abrar; Baig, Mirza Mushtaq Vaseem

    2014-01-01

    Cell cultures of Psoralea corylifolia L. were established from the leaf disk derived callus. The effect of different biotic elicitors prepared from the fungal extract (Aspergillus niger and Penicillium notatum), yeast extract and chitosan with different concentrations was studied. The increased synthesis of psoralen in 16-day old cell cultures under 16 h of light and 8 h of dark period was studied. Elicitation of psoralen in A. niger elicitor treated cells was found 9-fold higher over control cells. Treating the cells with P. notatum, yeast extract and chitosan elicitors lead to four to seven-fold higher psoralen accumulation over control cells. The extract of A. niger at 1.0% v/v increased the significant accumulation of psoralen (9850 μg/g DCW) in the cultured cells. Our study clearly shows that all the elicitors had the potential to increase the accumulation of psoralen but the A. niger elicitor at 1.0% v/v induced maximum accumulation. PMID:25313287

  18. Chloride secretagogues stimulate inositol phosphate formation in shark rectal gland tubules cultured in suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Ecay, T.W.; Valentich, J.D. )

    1991-03-01

    Neuroendocrine activation of transepithelial chloride secretion by shark rectal gland cells is associated with increases in cellular cAMP, cGMP, and free calcium concentrations. We report here on the effects of several chloride secretagogues on inositol phosphate formation in cultured rectal gland tubules. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), atriopeptin (AP), and ionomycin increase the total inositol phosphate levels of cultured tubules, as measured by ion exchange chromatography. Forskolin, a potent chloride secretagogue, has no effect on inositol phosphate formation. The uptake of {sup 3}H-myo-inositol into phospholipids is very slow, preventing the detection of increased levels of inositol trisphosphate. However, significant increases in inositol monophosphate (IP1) and inositol biphosphate (IP2) were measured. The time course of VIP- and AP-stimulated IP1 and IP2 formation is similar to the effects of these agents on the short-circuit current responses of rectal gland monolayer cultures. In addition, aluminum fluoride, an artificial activator of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, stimulates IP1 and IP2 formation. We conclude that rectal gland cells contain VIP and AP receptors coupled to the activation of phospholipase C. Coupling may be mediated by G-proteins. Receptor-stimulated increases in inositol phospholipid metabolism is one mechanism leading to increased intracellular free calcium concentrations, an important regulatory event in the activation of transepithelial chloride secretion by shark rectal gland epithelial cells.

  19. Two parametric cell cycle analyses of plant cell suspension cultures with fragile, isolated nuclei to investigate heterogeneity in growth of batch cultivations.

    PubMed

    Haas, Christiane; Hegner, Richard; Helbig, Karsten; Bartels, Kristin; Bley, Thomas; Weber, Jost

    2016-06-01

    Plant cell suspensions are frequently considered to be heterogeneous with respect to growth in terms of progression of the cells through the cell cycle and biomass accumulation. Thus, segregated data of fractions in different cycle phases during cultivation is needed to develop robust production processes. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and BrdU-antibodies or 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) click-it chemistry are frequently used to acquire such information. However, their use requires centrifugation steps that cannot be readily applied to sensitive cells, particularly if nuclei have to be extracted from the protective cellular milieu and envelopes for DNA analysis. Therefore, we have established a BrdU-Hoechst stain quenching protocol for analyzing nuclei directly isolated from delicate plant cell suspension cultures. After adding BrdU to test Harpagophytum procumbens cell suspension cultures the cell cycle distribution could be adequately resolved using its incorporation for the following 72 h (after which BrdU slowed biomass accumulation). Despite this limitation, the protocol allows resolution of the cell cycle distribution of cultures that cannot be analyzed using commonly applied methods due to the cells' fragility. The presented protocol enabled analysis of cycling heterogeneities in H. procumbens batch cultivations, and thus should facilitate process control of secondary metabolite production from fragile plant in vitro cultures. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1244-1250. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26614913

  20. Two parametric cell cycle analyses of plant cell suspension cultures with fragile, isolated nuclei to investigate heterogeneity in growth of batch cultivations.

    PubMed

    Haas, Christiane; Hegner, Richard; Helbig, Karsten; Bartels, Kristin; Bley, Thomas; Weber, Jost

    2016-06-01

    Plant cell suspensions are frequently considered to be heterogeneous with respect to growth in terms of progression of the cells through the cell cycle and biomass accumulation. Thus, segregated data of fractions in different cycle phases during cultivation is needed to develop robust production processes. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and BrdU-antibodies or 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) click-it chemistry are frequently used to acquire such information. However, their use requires centrifugation steps that cannot be readily applied to sensitive cells, particularly if nuclei have to be extracted from the protective cellular milieu and envelopes for DNA analysis. Therefore, we have established a BrdU-Hoechst stain quenching protocol for analyzing nuclei directly isolated from delicate plant cell suspension cultures. After adding BrdU to test Harpagophytum procumbens cell suspension cultures the cell cycle distribution could be adequately resolved using its incorporation for the following 72 h (after which BrdU slowed biomass accumulation). Despite this limitation, the protocol allows resolution of the cell cycle distribution of cultures that cannot be analyzed using commonly applied methods due to the cells' fragility. The presented protocol enabled analysis of cycling heterogeneities in H. procumbens batch cultivations, and thus should facilitate process control of secondary metabolite production from fragile plant in vitro cultures. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1244-1250. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Production and characterization of recombinant human acid α-glucosidase in transgenic rice cell suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae-Wan; Kim, Nan-Sun; Jang, Seon-Hui; Shin, Yun-Ji; Yang, Moon-Sik

    2016-05-20

    Pompe disease is a fatal genetic muscle disorder caused by a deficiency of acid α-glucosidase (GAA), a glycogen-degrading lysosomal enzyme. In this study, the human GAA cDNA gene was synthesized from human placenta cells and cloned into a plant expression vector under the control of the rice α-amylase 3D (RAmy3D) promoter. The plant expression vector was introduced into rice calli (Oryza sativa L. cv. Dongjin) mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Genomic DNA PCR and Northern blot analysis were used to determine the integration and mRNA expression of the hGAA gene in the putative transgenic rice cells. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis showed that the glycosylated precursor recombinant hGAA had a molecular mass of 110kDa due to the presence of seven N-glycosylation sites. The accumulation of hGAA protein in the culture medium was approximately 37mg/L after 11 days of culturing in a sugar depletion medium. The His tagged-hGAA protein was purified using an Ni-NTA column and confirmed as the precursor form of hGAA without the signal peptide encoded by the cDNA on the N-terminal amino acid sequence. The acid alpha-glucosidase activity of hGAA produced in transgenic rice cells gave results similar to those of the enzyme produced by CHO cells. PMID:27050503

  2. Enhanced accumulation of phytosterols and phenolic compounds in cyclodextrin-elicited cell suspension culture of Daucus carota.

    PubMed

    Miras-Moreno, Begoña; Almagro, Lorena; Pedreño, M A; Sabater-Jara, Ana Belén

    2016-09-01

    In this work, suspension-cultured cells of Daucus carota were used to evaluate the effect of β-cyclodextrins on the production of isoprenoid and phenolic compounds. The results showed that the phytosterols and phenolic compounds were accumulated in the extracellular medium (15100μgL(-1) and 477.46μgL(-1), respectively) in the presence of cyclodextrins. Unlike the phytosterol and phenolic compound content, β-carotene (1138.03μgL(-1)), lutein (25949.54μgL(-1)) and α-tocopherol (8063.82μgL(-1)) chlorophyll a (1625.13μgL(-1)) and b (9.958 (9958.33μgL(-1)) were mainly accumulated inside the cells. Therefore, cyclodextrins were able to induce the cytosolic mevalonate pathway, increasing the biosynthesis of phytosterols and phenolic compounds, and accumulate them outside the cells. However, in the absence of these cyclic oligosaccharidic elicitors, carrot cells mainly accumulated carotenoids through the methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway. Therefore, the use of cyclodextrins would allow the extracellular accumulation of both phytosterols and phenolic compounds by diverting the carbon flux towards the cytosolic mevalonate/phenylpropanoid pathway. PMID:27457992

  3. Characterization of Acetate and Pyruvate Metabolism in Suspension Cultures of Zea mays by 13C NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ashworth, Dennis J.; Lee, Rino Y.; Adams, Douglas O.

    1987-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been applied to the direct observation of acetate and pyruvate metabolism in suspension cultures of Zea mays (var Black Mexican Sweet). Growth of the corn cells in the presence of 2 millimolar [2-13C]acetate resulted in a rapid uptake of the substrate from the medium and initial labeling (0-4 hours) of primarily the intracellular glutamate and malate pools. Further metabolism of these intermediates resulted in labeling of glutamine, aspartate, and alanine. With [1-13C]acetate as the substrate very little incorporation into intermediary metabolites was observed in the 13C NMR spectra due to loss of the label as 13CO2. Uptake of [3-13C]pyruvate by the cells was considerably slower than with [2-13C]acetate; however, the labelling patterns were similar with the exception of increased [3-13C] alanine generation with pyruvate as the substrate. Growth of the cells for up to 96 hours with 2 millimolar [3-13C]pyruvate ultimately resulted in labeling of valine, leucine, isoleucine, threonine, and the polyamine putrescine. PMID:16665721

  4. Changes in Cell Wall Properties Coincide with Overexpression of Extensin Fusion Proteins in Suspension Cultured Tobacco Cells

    DOE PAGES

    Tan, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Avci, Utku; Qian, Jin; Arter, Allison; Chen, Liwei; Hahn, Michael G.; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Kieliszewski, Marcia J.

    2014-12-23

    Extensins are one subfamily of the cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins, containing characteristic SerHyp4 glycosylation motifs and intermolecular cross-linking motifs such as the TyrXaaTyr sequence. Extensins are believed to form a cross-linked network in the plant cell wall through the tyrosine-derivatives isodityrosine, pulcherosine, and di-isodityrosine. Overexpression of three synthetic genes encoding different elastin-arabinogalactan protein-extensin hybrids in tobacco suspension cultured cells yielded novel cross-linking glycoproteins that shared features of the extensins, arabinogalactan proteins and elastin. The cell wall properties of the three transgenic cell lines were all changed, but in different ways. One transgenic cell line showed decreased cellulose crystallinity and increasedmore » wall xyloglucan content; the second transgenic cell line contained dramatically increased hydration capacity and notably increased cell wall biomass, increased di-isodityrosine, and increased protein content; the third transgenic cell line displayed wall phenotypes similar to wild type cells, except changed xyloglucan epitope extractability. In conclusion, these data indicate that overexpression of modified extensins may be a route to engineer plants for bioenergy and biomaterial production.« less

  5. Enhanced accumulation of phytosterols and phenolic compounds in cyclodextrin-elicited cell suspension culture of Daucus carota.

    PubMed

    Miras-Moreno, Begoña; Almagro, Lorena; Pedreño, M A; Sabater-Jara, Ana Belén

    2016-09-01

    In this work, suspension-cultured cells of Daucus carota were used to evaluate the effect of β-cyclodextrins on the production of isoprenoid and phenolic compounds. The results showed that the phytosterols and phenolic compounds were accumulated in the extracellular medium (15100μgL(-1) and 477.46μgL(-1), respectively) in the presence of cyclodextrins. Unlike the phytosterol and phenolic compound content, β-carotene (1138.03μgL(-1)), lutein (25949.54μgL(-1)) and α-tocopherol (8063.82μgL(-1)) chlorophyll a (1625.13μgL(-1)) and b (9.958 (9958.33μgL(-1)) were mainly accumulated inside the cells. Therefore, cyclodextrins were able to induce the cytosolic mevalonate pathway, increasing the biosynthesis of phytosterols and phenolic compounds, and accumulate them outside the cells. However, in the absence of these cyclic oligosaccharidic elicitors, carrot cells mainly accumulated carotenoids through the methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway. Therefore, the use of cyclodextrins would allow the extracellular accumulation of both phytosterols and phenolic compounds by diverting the carbon flux towards the cytosolic mevalonate/phenylpropanoid pathway.

  6. Embedding in a collagen gel stabilizes the polarity of epithelial cells in thyroid follicles in suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Garbi, C; Nitsch, L; Wollman, S H

    1984-04-01

    Separated thyroid follicles are stable in suspension culture in Coon's modified Ham's F12 medium containing 0.5% calf serum. They resemble follicles in vivo except for the absence of a basal lamina. However, the epithelial cells reverse polarity and the follicles invert when the serum concentration is raised to 5%. A number of substances, especially components of extracellular matrix, were added to the medium to ascertain if they could stabilize the follicles against inversion in 5% serum. Cellular and plasma fibronectin, gelatin, heat-denatured collagen, methylcellulose and laminin did not stabilize. The addition to the medium of as little as 50 micrograms/ml of acid-soluble collagen prepared from calf skin or rat tail tendons resulted in the formation of small clouds of gel. Follicles embedded within the gel were stabilized. Follicles in the same dish but not embedded in the gel inverted. Stabilization was not specific for collagen, since follicles embedded in a plasma clot were also stabilized. A gel was not sufficient for stabilization, since embedding in an agarose gel did not stabilize. Ultrastructural studies indicate that adherence to a limited number of gelled fibers of collagen covering only a small fraction of the basal plasma membrane may be sufficient to stabilize and that a basal lamina formed in the presence of laminin but without added collagen does not stabilize.

  7. Enhancement of anthraquinone production in Morinda citrifolia cell suspension cultures after stimulation of the proline cycle with two proline analogs.

    PubMed

    Quevedo, Carla V; Perassolo, María; Giulietti, Ana M; Rodríguez Talou, Julián

    2012-03-01

    Synthesis of anthraquinones (AQs) involves the shikimate and 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathways. The proline cycle is linked to the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) to generate NADPH needed in the first steps of this pathway. The effect of two proline analogs, azetidine-2-carboxylic acid (A2C) and thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (T4C), were evaluated in Morinda citrifolia suspension cultures. Both analogs gave higher proline accumulation after 6 and 10 days (68 and 179% after 6 days with A2C at 25 and 50 μM, respectively, and 111% with T4C added at 100 μM). Induction of the proline cycle increased the AQ content after 6 days (~40% for 50 μM A2C and 100 μM T4C). Whereas A2C (50 μM) increased only AQ production, T4C also enhanced total phenolics. However, no induction of the PPP was observed with any of the treatments. This pathway therefore does not limit the supply of carbon skeletons to secondary metabolic pathways.

  8. Analysis of the Proteins Secreted from the Oryza meyeriana Suspension-Cultured Cells Induced by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xian; Dong, Yan; Yu, Chulang; Fang, XianPing; Deng, Zhiping; Yan, Chengqi; Chen, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Oryza meyeriana, a wild species of rice from China, shows high resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), the cause of rice bacterial blight, one of the most serious rice pathogens. To better understand the resistance mechanism, a proteomic study was conducted to identify changes in the proteins secreted in embryo cell suspension cultures in response to Xoo. After two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), 72 differentially expressed protein spots corresponding to 34 proteins were identified by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/ Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry. Of the 34 proteins, 10 were up regulated and 24 down regulated. The secreted proteins identified were predicted to be involved in various biological processes, including signal transduction, defense, ROS and cell wall modification. 77% of the 34 proteins were predicted to have a signal peptide by Signal P. Quantitative Real-Time PCR showed that transcript levels of 14 secreted proteins were not well correlated with secreted protein levels. Peroxidase activity was up regulated in both O. meyriana and susceptible rice but was about three times higher in O. meyeriana. This suggests that peroxidases may play an important role in the early response to Xoo in O. meyeriana. These results not only provide a better understanding of the resistance mechanism of O. meyeriana, but have implications for studies of the interactions between other plants and their pathogens. PMID:27196123

  9. Isolation and Characterization of S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine:Tetrahydroberberine-cis-N-Methyltransferase from Suspension Cultures of Sanguinaria canadensis L.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, B. R.; Beecher, CWW.

    1994-05-01

    As part of a continuing study of the induction of alkaloid biosynthesis, we report the isolation to homogeneity and characterization of S-adenosyl-L-methionine:tetrahydroberberine-cis-N-mehtyltransferase from suspension cultures of Sanguinaria canadensis that were induced to produce alkaloids by hormone depletion. This enzyme catalyzes the stereospecific transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to the tertiary nitrogen of the protoberberine alkaloid tetrahydroberberine (canadine). The enzyme was purified 315-fold by ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel permeation chromatography, affinity dye chromatography, and both diethylaminoethyl and Mono-Q ion-exchange chromatography. The enzyme was further purified to an optimum specific activity of 225 nkat/mg of protein (3500-fold) and electrophoretic homogeneity by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). In contrast to previous reports with partially purified enzyme, the isolated protein was found to have a pH optimum of 7.0, a temperature optimum of 25 to 30[deg]C, and an isoelectric point of 5.1. Furthermore, the molecular weight of the homogeneous protein was found to be 39,000 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE. The homogeneous enzyme preferred tetrahydroberberine over all other substrates tested, showing an apparent Km of 2.1 [mu]M, but also showed partial activity with tetrahydrojatrorrhizine and tetrahydropalmatrubine.

  10. Changes in cell wall properties coincide with overexpression of extensin fusion proteins in suspension cultured tobacco cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Avci, Utku; Qian, Jin; Arter, Allison; Chen, Liwei; Hahn, Michael G; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Kieliszewski, Marcia J

    2014-01-01

    Extensins are one subfamily of the cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins, containing characteristic SerHyp4 glycosylation motifs and intermolecular cross-linking motifs such as the TyrXaaTyr sequence. Extensins are believed to form a cross-linked network in the plant cell wall through the tyrosine-derivatives isodityrosine, pulcherosine, and di-isodityrosine. Overexpression of three synthetic genes encoding different elastin-arabinogalactan protein-extensin hybrids in tobacco suspension cultured cells yielded novel cross-linking glycoproteins that shared features of the extensins, arabinogalactan proteins and elastin. The cell wall properties of the three transgenic cell lines were all changed, but in different ways. One transgenic cell line showed decreased cellulose crystallinity and increased wall xyloglucan content; the second transgenic cell line contained dramatically increased hydration capacity and notably increased cell wall biomass, increased di-isodityrosine, and increased protein content; the third transgenic cell line displayed wall phenotypes similar to wild type cells, except changed xyloglucan epitope extractability. These data indicate that overexpression of modified extensins may be a route to engineer plants for bioenergy and biomaterial production.

  11. Changes in Cell Wall Properties Coincide with Overexpression of Extensin Fusion Proteins in Suspension Cultured Tobacco Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Avci, Utku; Qian, Jin; Arter, Allison; Chen, Liwei; Hahn, Michael G.; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Kieliszewski, Marcia J.

    2014-12-23

    Extensins are one subfamily of the cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins, containing characteristic SerHyp4 glycosylation motifs and intermolecular cross-linking motifs such as the TyrXaaTyr sequence. Extensins are believed to form a cross-linked network in the plant cell wall through the tyrosine-derivatives isodityrosine, pulcherosine, and di-isodityrosine. Overexpression of three synthetic genes encoding different elastin-arabinogalactan protein-extensin hybrids in tobacco suspension cultured cells yielded novel cross-linking glycoproteins that shared features of the extensins, arabinogalactan proteins and elastin. The cell wall properties of the three transgenic cell lines were all changed, but in different ways. One transgenic cell line showed decreased cellulose crystallinity and increased wall xyloglucan content; the second transgenic cell line contained dramatically increased hydration capacity and notably increased cell wall biomass, increased di-isodityrosine, and increased protein content; the third transgenic cell line displayed wall phenotypes similar to wild type cells, except changed xyloglucan epitope extractability. In conclusion, these data indicate that overexpression of modified extensins may be a route to engineer plants for bioenergy and biomaterial production.

  12. Highly protein-resistant coatings and suspension cell culture thereon from amphiphilic block copolymers prepared by RAFT polymerization.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Kazutoshi; Kubota, Kazuomi; Takada, Tetsuo; Mahara, Saori

    2014-06-01

    Novel amphiphilic block copolymers composed of hydrophobic (poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate): M) and hydrophilic (poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide): D) segments were synthesized by living radical polymerization: a reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization. Two types of amphiphilic block copolymers, triblock (MDM) and 4-arm block ((MD)4) copolymers with specific compositions (D/M = (750-1500)/250), were prepared by a versatile one-pot synthesis. These copolymers show good adhesion to various types of substrates (e.g., polystyrene, polycarbonate, polypropylene, Ti, and glass), and the surface coating showed high protein repellency and a low contact angle for water, regardless of the substrate. The two opposing characteristics of high protein repellency and good substrate adhesion were achieved by the combined effects of the molecular architecture of the block copolymers, the high molecular weight, and the characteristics of each segment, that is, low protein adsorption capability of both segments and low glass transition temperature of the hydrophobic segment. Further, a polystyrene dish coated with the MDM block copolymer could be sterilized by γ-ray irradiation and used as a good substrate for a suspension cell culture that exhibits low cell adhesion and good cell growth. PMID:24773089

  13. Immunogold localization of xyloglucan and rhamnogalacturonan I in the cell walls of suspension-cultured sycamore cells.

    PubMed

    Moore, P J; Darvill, A G; Albersheim, P; Staehelin, L A

    1986-11-01

    PLANT CELL WALLS SERVE SEVERAL FUNCTIONS: they impart rigidity to the plant, provide a physical and chemical barrier between the cell and its environment, and regulate the size and shape of each cell. Chemical studies have provided information on the biochemical composition of the plant cell walls as well as detailed knowledge of individual cell wall molecules. In contrast, very little is known about the distribution of specific cell wall components around individual cells and throughout tissues. To address this problem, we have produced polyclonal antibodies against two cell wall matrix components; rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I), a pectic polysaccharide, and xyloglucan (XG), a hemicellulose. By using the antibiodies as specific markers we have been able to localize these polymers on thin sections of suspension-cultured sycamore cells (Acer pseudoplatanus). Our results reveal that each molecule has a unique distribution. XG is localized throughout the entire wall and middle lamella. RG-I is restricted to the middle lamella and is especially evident in the junctions between cells. These observations indicate that plant cell walls may have more distinct chemical (and functional?) domains than previously envisaged.

  14. Golgi-specific localization of transglycosylases engaged in glycoprotein biosynthesis in suspension-cultured cells of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.).

    PubMed

    Ali, M S; Mitsui, T; Akazawa, T

    1986-12-01

    Golgi complex and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) were isolated from suspension-cultured cells of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) by stepwise sucrose density gradient centrifugation using protoplasts as starting material. The purity of the two organelle fractions isolated was assessed by measuring marker enzyme activities. Localization of glycolipid and glycoprotein glycosyltransferase activities in the isolated Golgi and ER fractions was examined; three glycosyltransferases, i.e., galactosyltransferase, fucosyltransferase, and xylosyltransferase, proved to be almost exclusively confined to the Golgi, whereas the ER fractions contained glycolipid glycosyltransferase. The Golgi complex was further subfractionated on a discontinuous sucrose density gradient into two components, migrating at densities of 1.118 and 1.127 g/cm3. The two fractions differed in their compositional polypeptide bands discernible from Na-dodecylsulfate gel electrophoresis. Galactosyltransferase distributed nearly equally between the two protein peaks and xylosyltransferase activities using the endogenous acceptor also appeared to be localized in the two subcompartments. By contrast, fucosyltransferase, engaged in the terminal stage of glycosylation, banded in the lower density fractions. Golgi-specific alpha-mannosidase, which is presumably engaged in the sugar trimming of Asn-N-linked glycoprotein carbohydrate core, was enriched fourfold in specific activity in the fractions of the higher density. The overall experimental results indicate that the cotranslational glycosylation of Asn-N-linked glycoproteins, e.g., polyphenol oxidase (laccase), takes place in the ER, while subsequent post-translational processing of the oligosaccharide moiety proceeds successively in the two physically separable compartments of the Golgi complex.

  15. Induction of two prenyltransferases for the accumulation of coumarin phytoalexins in elicitor-treated Ammi majus cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Hamerski, D; Schmitt, D; Matern, U

    1990-01-01

    Two dimethylallyl diphosphate:umbelliferone dimethylallyltransferase (prenyltransferase) activities, catalysing the 6-prenylation and the 7-O-prenylation, respectively, of umbelliferone in the course of phytoalexin synthesis, increased in Ammi majus cell suspension cultures in response to elicitor treatment. Both enzyme activities were dependent on Mg2+ or Mn2+ with significant preference for Mg2+ in the 6-prenylation reaction. Whereas dark-grown cells did not contain these activities, both prenyltransferase activities were induced rapidly by the addition of elicitor reaching a first maximum after 10-14 hr and a second maximum beyond 30 hr. Other coumarin specific, elicitor-induced enzyme activities of A. majus cells, in contrast, showed only one maximum of activity within the 50 hr experimental period, while the pattern of induction of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity resembled that of the prenyltransferases with maxima at ca 8 hr and 20-30 hr. Preliminary data suggest that the apparent biphasic induction of these enzyme activities is due to post-translational enzyme modifications.

  16. Chilling-Induced Inactivation and Its Recovery of Tonoplast H+-ATPase in Mung Bean Cell Suspension Cultures 12

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Shizuo

    1991-01-01

    The processes involved in adaptation to cold temperature were examined by growing suspension cultured cells of mung bean (Vigna radiata [L.] Wilczek) at 2°C for various periods of time and assaying the activities of various membrane-bound enzymes in vitro. The tonoplast H+-ATPase activity and the ATP-proton transport extracted from cells incubated at 2°C declined rapidly and reached a minimum level after 10 hours. The inactivation was reversible within 24 hours of chilling. The recovery of the cold-inactivated H+-ATPase was found to proceed in two steps, a faster recovery of ATP hydrolysis activity and a slower recovery of the proton transport. The recovery was markedly inhibited by the presence of azide, but not affected by 0.578 millimolar cycloheximide. This suggested the involvement of an energy process that had no requirement for de novo synthesis of protein. The cold-induced inactivation of the H+-ATPase may be due to a structural alteration of the enzyme. The slower recovery of proton transport relative to ATP hydrolysis during warming suggests that the protogenic domains in the enzyme may be affected differently by chilling. PMID:16668005

  17. Highly protein-resistant coatings and suspension cell culture thereon from amphiphilic block copolymers prepared by RAFT polymerization.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Kazutoshi; Kubota, Kazuomi; Takada, Tetsuo; Mahara, Saori

    2014-06-01

    Novel amphiphilic block copolymers composed of hydrophobic (poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate): M) and hydrophilic (poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide): D) segments were synthesized by living radical polymerization: a reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization. Two types of amphiphilic block copolymers, triblock (MDM) and 4-arm block ((MD)4) copolymers with specific compositions (D/M = (750-1500)/250), were prepared by a versatile one-pot synthesis. These copolymers show good adhesion to various types of substrates (e.g., polystyrene, polycarbonate, polypropylene, Ti, and glass), and the surface coating showed high protein repellency and a low contact angle for water, regardless of the substrate. The two opposing characteristics of high protein repellency and good substrate adhesion were achieved by the combined effects of the molecular architecture of the block copolymers, the high molecular weight, and the characteristics of each segment, that is, low protein adsorption capability of both segments and low glass transition temperature of the hydrophobic segment. Further, a polystyrene dish coated with the MDM block copolymer could be sterilized by γ-ray irradiation and used as a good substrate for a suspension cell culture that exhibits low cell adhesion and good cell growth.

  18. New Synthetic Pyridine Derivate as Potential Elicitor in Production of Isoflavonoids and Flavonoids in Trifolium pratense L. Suspension Culture

    PubMed Central

    Kašparová, Marie; Siatka, Tomáš; Klimešová, Věra; Dušek, Jaroslav

    2012-01-01

    The production of secondary metabolites in Trifolium pratense L. suspension culture of the family of legume plants (Fabaceae) is low, and therefore there was an attempt to increase it by elicitation. New synthetic substance, 2-(2-fluoro-6-nitrobenzylsulfanyl)pyridine-4-carbothioamide, was tested as elicitor—a substance that showed the best elicitation effect after 48-hour application of 1 μmol L−1 concentration. Maximum contents of genistin (11.60 mg g−1 DW), daidzein (8.31 mg g−1 DW), and genistein (1.50 mg g−1 DW) were recorded, and the production of these isoflavonoids thus significantly increased, when compared with the control, by 152%, 151%, and 400%. The maximum content of flavonoids (5.78 mg g−1 DW) and the increase in the production by 142%, when compared with the control, were induced by 6-hour application of 100 μmol L−1 concentration. The tested substance showed to be an effective elicitor of phenylpropane metabolism. PMID:22489201

  19. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol accumulation, metabolism and cell-type-specific adverse effects in aggregating brain cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Monnet-Tschudi, Florianne Hazekamp, Arno; Perret, Nicolas; Zurich, Marie-Gabrielle; Mangin, Patrice; Giroud, Christian; Honegger, Paul

    2008-04-01

    Despite the widespread use of Cannabis as recreational drug or as medicine, little is known about its toxicity. The accumulation, metabolism and toxicity of THC were analyzed 10 days after a single treatment, and after repeated exposures during 10 days. Mixed-cell aggregate cultures of fetal rat telencephalon were used as in vitro model, as well as aggregates enriched either in neurons or in glial cells. It was found that THC accumulated preferentially in neurons, and that glia-neuron interactions decreased THC accumulation. The quantification of 11-OH-THC and of THC-COOH showed that brain aggregates were capable of THC metabolism. No cell-type difference was found for the metabolite 11-OH-THC, whereas the THC-COOH content was higher in mixed-cell cultures. No cell death was found at THC concentrations of 2 {mu}M in single treatment and of 1 {mu}M and 2 {mu}M in repeated treatments. Neurons, and particularly GABAergic neurons, were most sensitive to THC. Only the GABAergic marker was affected after the single treatment, whereas the GABAergic, cholinergic and astrocytic markers were decreased after the repeated treatments. JWH 015, a CB2 receptor agonist, showed effects similar to THC, whereas ACEA, a CB1 receptor agonist, had no effect. The expression of the cytokine IL-6 was upregulated 48 h after the single treatment with 5 {mu}M of THC or JWH 015, whereas the expression of TNF-{alpha} remained unchanged. These results suggest that the adverse effects of THC were related either to THC accumulation or to cannabinoid receptor activation and associated with IL-6 upregulation.

  20. Human adipose stem cells maintain proliferative, synthetic and multipotential properties when suspension cultured as self-assembling spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, S K; Wang, X; Shang, H; Yun, S; Li, X; Feng, G; Khurgel, M; Katz, A J

    2012-01-01

    Adipose Derived Stromal/Stem Cells (ASCs) have been gaining recognition as extremely versatile cell source in tissue engineering. The usefulness of ASCs in biofabrication is further enhanced by our demonstration of unique properties of these cells when they are cultured as three dimensional cellular aggregates or spheroids. As described herein, three-dimensional formulations or self-assembling ASC spheroids develop their own extracellular matrix that serves to increase the robustness of the cells to mechanical stresses. The composition of the extracellular matrix can be altered based on the external environment of the spheroids and these constructs can be grown in a reproducible manner and to a consistent size. The spheroid formulation helps preserve the viability and developmental plasticity of ASCs even in defined, serum-free media conditions. For the first time, we show that multiple generations of adherent ASCs produced from these spheroids retain their developmental plasticity and their ability to differentiate into multiple cell/tissue types. These demonstrated properties support the fact that culture expanded ASCs are an excellent candidate cellular material for “organ printing” – the approach of developing complex tissue structures from a standardized cell “ink” or cell formulation. PMID:22522924

  1. Diverse Growth Kinetics in Suspension Culture of a Model Eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum, Confirmation of Lagless Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, Carl; Zhou, Xaio-Qiao S.; Deshmukh, Amrish; Bogart, Elijah; Lau, Sharon; Daie, Kayvon; Bae, Albert

    2010-03-01

    In recent work we explored the notion that the transition between slow and fast growth, the lag-log transition, with increasing density seen in shaken cell culture represents a collective effect. (Phys. Rev. E 77, 041905 (2008)). We reported preliminary observations in which the lag phase was apparently missing. Here, we present significantly more measurements than in our original work as well as increased sensitivity at low densities. We confirm that instances of nearly exponential (``log'') growth do in fact appear, but more frequently, we find evidence of lagging. The degree of lagging fluctuates significantly from run to run, in contrast to our earlier observations and theory, but in all cases exponential growth is established with increasing density once the range of 10^4 to 10^5 cells/ml is reached. We present evidence against two natural explanations for these fluctuations: 1) a mixture of strains which have different growth phenotypes or 2) a single strain variation due to an epigenetic switch which can be set to the low growth state by subjecting cells to high density environments. The appearance of such growth variations has considerable practical significance and suggests that there is an additional dynamical variable besides density in play.

  2. Cleavage of E-cadherin and β-catenin by calpain affects Wnt signaling and spheroid formation in suspension cultures of human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Konze, Sarah A; van Diepen, Laura; Schröder, Anke; Olmer, Ruth; Möller, Hanna; Pich, Andreas; Weißmann, Robert; Kuss, Andreas W; Zweigerdt, Robert; Buettner, Falk F R

    2014-04-01

    The envisioned clinical and industrial use of human pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives has given major momentum to the establishment of suspension culture protocols that enable the mass production of cells. Understanding molecular changes accompanying the transfer from adherent to suspension culture is of utmost importance because this information can have a direct effect on the development of optimized culture conditions. In this study we assessed the gene expression of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells grown in surface-adherent culture (two-dimensional) versus free-floating suspension culture spheroids (three-dimensional). We combined a quantitative proteomic approach based on stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with deep-sequencing-based transcriptomics. Cells in three-dimensional culture showed reduced expression of proteins forming structural components of cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix junctions. However, fully unexpected, we found up-regulation of secreted inhibitors of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway and, concomitantly, a reduction in the level of active β-catenin and in the expression of Wnt target genes. In Western blot analyses the cysteine protease calpain was shown to cleave E-cadherin and β-catenin under three-dimensional culture conditions. Our data allowed the development of a model in which calpain cleavage of E-cadherin induces the disintegration of focal cell contacts and generates a 100-kDa E-cadherin fragment required for the formation of three-dimensional cell-cell contacts in spheroids. The parallel release of β-catenin and its potential activation by calpain cleavage are counterbalanced by the overexpression of soluble Wnt pathway inhibitors. According to this model, calpain has a key function in the interplay between E-cadherin and β-catenin-mediated intercellular adhesion and the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Supporting this model, we show that pharmacological

  3. Cleavage of E-Cadherin and β-Catenin by Calpain Affects Wnt Signaling and Spheroid Formation in Suspension Cultures of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Konze, Sarah A.; van Diepen, Laura; Schröder, Anke; Olmer, Ruth; Möller, Hanna; Pich, Andreas; Weißmann, Robert; Kuss, Andreas W.; Zweigerdt, Robert; Buettner, Falk F. R.

    2014-01-01

    The envisioned clinical and industrial use of human pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives has given major momentum to the establishment of suspension culture protocols that enable the mass production of cells. Understanding molecular changes accompanying the transfer from adherent to suspension culture is of utmost importance because this information can have a direct effect on the development of optimized culture conditions. In this study we assessed the gene expression of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells grown in surface-adherent culture (two-dimensional) versus free-floating suspension culture spheroids (three-dimensional). We combined a quantitative proteomic approach based on stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with deep-sequencing-based transcriptomics. Cells in three-dimensional culture showed reduced expression of proteins forming structural components of cell–cell and cell–extracellular matrix junctions. However, fully unexpected, we found up-regulation of secreted inhibitors of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway and, concomitantly, a reduction in the level of active β-catenin and in the expression of Wnt target genes. In Western blot analyses the cysteine protease calpain was shown to cleave E-cadherin and β-catenin under three-dimensional culture conditions. Our data allowed the development of a model in which calpain cleavage of E-cadherin induces the disintegration of focal cell contacts and generates a 100-kDa E-cadherin fragment required for the formation of three-dimensional cell–cell contacts in spheroids. The parallel release of β-catenin and its potential activation by calpain cleavage are counterbalanced by the overexpression of soluble Wnt pathway inhibitors. According to this model, calpain has a key function in the interplay between E-cadherin and β-catenin-mediated intercellular adhesion and the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Supporting this model, we show that

  4. Differential enhancement of benzophenanthridine alkaloid content in cell suspension cultures of Sanguinaria canadensis under conditions of combined hormonal deprivation and fungal elicitation.

    PubMed

    Cline, S D; McHale, R J; Coscia, C J

    1993-08-01

    An elicitation protocol, resulting in the accumulation of sanguinarine in suspension cultures of Papaver bracteatum, was assessed for induction of the same alkaloid in Sanguinaria canadensis. Although only a trace constituent of P. bracteatum plants, sanguinarine is a major alkaloid (1-3% dry wt) of S. canadensis rhizomes. By combining hormonal deprivation for various intervals and a 3-day fungal (Verticillium dahliae) elicitation, benzophenanthridine alkaloid accumulation was induced in S. canadensis cell suspensions. Chelirubine content increased (0.1-1.3% dry wt) consistently in elicited cell cultures while chelerythrine (0.01-0.10% dry wt) and sanguinarine (0-0.02% dry wt) levels were considerably less. Alkaloid accumulation always occurred upon removal of hormone but only at certain time intervals in the log phase upon fungal elicitation. Levels of dopamine, a precursor of the alkaloids, fluctuated over the incubation period, but displayed a 2- to 6-fold increase in cell suspensions grown without hormone. In some experiments dopamine accumulated to levels > 20% dry wt, and these increases were enhanced by the addition of fungal elicitor. Although the same fungal elicitor induces benzophenanthridines in taxonomically related S. canadensis and P. bracteatum, it did not elicit the accumulation of the same alkaloid in the two different plant cultures.

  5. Expression of Amyloplast and Chloroplast DNA in Suspension-Cultured Cells of Sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.).

    PubMed

    Ngernprasirtsiri, J; Macherel, D; Kobayashi, H; Akazawa, T

    1988-01-01

    Green mutant cells of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.), which had been selected by mutagenic treatment of the white wild type, grow photoheterotrophically in auxin-depleted culture medium. In contrast to the wild-type cells, mutant cells exhibit photosynthetic O(2)-evolution activity during their growth coincident with increases of (a) chlorophyll, (b) protein, and (c) ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase activity. Functionally competent chloroplasts were isolated from the green cells. Mechanism(s) governing gene expression of amyloplast DNA in the heterotrophically grown white cells were compared with those of the chloroplast DNA isolated from the mutant cells. We have demonstrated in both amyloplast and chloroplast DNAs the presence of sequences homologous to the maize chloroplast genes for photosynthesis, including the large subunit of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO)(rbcL), the 32 kDa Q(B) protein (PG32) (psbA), the apoprotein of P700 (psaA) and subunits of CF(1) (atpA, atpB, and atpE). However, employing either enzyme assays or immunological techniques, RuBisCO and CF(1) cannot be detected in the white wild type cells. Northern blot hybridization of the RNA from the white cells showed high levels of transcripts for the 16S rRNA gene and low level of transcripts for psbA; based on comparison with results obtained using the green mutant cells, we propose that the amyloplast genome is mostly inactive except for the 16S rRNA gene and psbA which is presumably regulated at the transcriptional level.

  6. Fast Filtration of Bacterial or Mammalian Suspension Cell Cultures for Optimal Metabolomics Results

    PubMed Central

    Bordag, Natalie; Janakiraman, Vijay; Nachtigall, Jonny; González Maldonado, Sandra; Bethan, Bianca; Laine, Jean-Philippe; Fux, Elie

    2016-01-01

    The metabolome offers real time detection of the adaptive, multi-parametric response of the organisms to environmental changes, pathophysiological stimuli or genetic modifications and thus rationalizes the optimization of cell cultures in bioprocessing. In bioprocessing the measurement of physiological intracellular metabolite levels is imperative for successful applications. However, a sampling method applicable to all cell types with little to no validation effort which simultaneously offers high recovery rates, high metabolite coverage and sufficient removal of extracellular contaminations is still missing. Here, quenching, centrifugation and fast filtration were compared and fast filtration in combination with a stabilizing washing solution was identified as the most promising sampling method. Different influencing factors such as filter type, vacuum pressure, washing solutions were comprehensively tested. The improved fast filtration method (MxP® FastQuench) followed by routine lipid/polar extraction delivers a broad metabolite coverage and recovery reflecting well physiological intracellular metabolite levels for different cell types, such as bacteria (Escherichia coli) as well as mammalian cells chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and mouse myeloma cells (NS0).The proposed MxP® FastQuench allows sampling, i.e. separation of cells from medium with washing and quenching, in less than 30 seconds and is robustly designed to be applicable to all cell types. The washing solution contains the carbon source respectively the 13C-labeled carbon source to avoid nutritional stress during sampling. This method is also compatible with automation which would further reduce sampling times and the variability of metabolite profiling data. PMID:27438065

  7. Site of Clomazone Action in Tolerant-Soybean and Susceptible-Cotton Photomixotrophic Cell Suspension Cultures 1

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Michael A.; Liebl, Rex A.; Widholm, Jack M.

    1990-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the herbicidal site of clomazone action in tolerant-soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Corsoy) (SB-M) and susceptible-cotton (Gossypium hirsutum [L.] cv Stoneville 825) (COT-M) photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures. Although a 10 micromolar clomazone treatment did not significantly reduce the terpene or mixed terpenoid content (microgram per gram fresh weight) of the SB-M cell line, there was over a 70% reduction in the chlorophyll (Chl), carotenoid (CAR), and plastoquinone (PQ) content of the COT-M cell line. The tocopherol (TOC) content was reduced only 35.6%. Reductions in the levels of Chl, CAR, TOC, and PQ indicate that the site of clomazone action in COT-M cells is prior to geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP). The clomazone treatment did not significantly reduce the flow of [14C]mevalonate ([14C]MEV) (nanocuries per gram fresh weight) into CAR and the three mixed terpenoid compounds of SB-M cells. Conversely, [14C]MEV incorporation into CAR and the terpene moieties of Chl, PQ, and TOC in COT-M cells was reduced at least 73%, indicating that the site of clomazone action must be after MEV. Sequestration of clomazone away from the chloroplast cannot account for soybean tolerance to clomazone since chloroplasts isolated from both cell lines incubated with [14C]clomazone contained a similar amount of radioactivity (disintegrations per minute per microgram of Chl). The possible site(s) of clomazone inhibition include mevalonate kinase, phosphomevalonate kinase, pyrophosphomevalonate decarboxylase, isopentenyl pyrophosphate isomerase, and/or a prenyl transferase. PMID:16667768

  8. Factors Influencing β-Glucan Synthesis by Particulate Enzymes from Suspension-Cultured Lolium multiflorum Endosperm Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Robert J.; Stone, Bruce A.

    1982-01-01

    Particulate enzymes from suspension-cultured ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) endosperm cells incorporated glucosyl residues from UDP-glucose and GDP-glucose into β-glucans. Three types of β-glucans were produced from UDP-glucose: 1,3-β-glucan; 1,4-β-glucan; and mixed-linkage 1,3;1,4-β-glucan. As in other systems, relatively more 1,4-β-glucan was produced from a low (10 micromolar) UDP-glucose concentration, and relatively more 1,3-β-glucan was produced from a high (1 millimolar) UDP-glucose concentration. However, in ryegrass, 1,3;1,4-β-glucan represented a major proportion of the products at both low and high UDP-glucose concentrations. The arrangement of linkages in the 1,3;1,4-β-glucan was different at the two concentrations; at the low UDP-glucose concentration, more sequences of three consecutive 1,4-linkages were produced. The effects of pH, temperature, and metal ion concentrations on incorporation were dependent on the UDP-glucose concentration. At the low UDP-glucose concentration, incorporation into all three types of β-glucan increased with increasing pH. At the high UDP-glucose concentration, 1,3-β-glucan was the major product at pH 7 and below; 1,4-β-glucan synthesis was optimal at pH 8; and synthesis of 1,3;1,4-β-glucan was greatest above pH 8. With 10 micromolar GDP-glucose as substrate, 1,4-β-glucan, but no 1,3;1,4-β-glucan, was produced. Incorporation from either UDP-glucose or GDP-glucose was not influenced by the presence of the other. PMID:16662263

  9. The impact of CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots in cells of Medicago sativa in suspension culture

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nanotechnology has the potential to provide agriculture with new tools that may be used in the rapid detection and molecular treatment of diseases and enhancement of plant ability to absorb nutrients, among others. Data on nanoparticle toxicity in plants is largely heterogeneous with a diversity of physicochemical parameters reported, which difficult generalizations. Here a cell biology approach was used to evaluate the impact of Quantum Dots (QDs) nanocrystals on plant cells, including their effect on cell growth, cell viability, oxidative stress and ROS accumulation, besides their cytomobility. Results A plant cell suspension culture of Medicago sativa was settled for the assessment of the impact of the addition of mercaptopropanoic acid coated CdSe/ZnS QDs. Cell growth was significantly reduced when 100 mM of mercaptopropanoic acid -QDs was added during the exponential growth phase, with less than 50% of the cells viable 72 hours after mercaptopropanoic acid -QDs addition. They were up taken by Medicago sativa cells and accumulated in the cytoplasm and nucleus as revealed by optical thin confocal imaging. As part of the cellular response to internalization, Medicago sativa cells were found to increase the production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in a dose and time dependent manner. Using the fluorescent dye H2DCFDA it was observable that mercaptopropanoic acid-QDs concentrations between 5-180 nM led to a progressive and linear increase of ROS accumulation. Conclusions Our results showed that the extent of mercaptopropanoic acid coated CdSe/ZnS QDs cytotoxicity in plant cells is dependent upon a number of factors including QDs properties, dose and the environmental conditions of administration and that, for Medicago sativa cells, a safe range of 1-5 nM should not be exceeded for biological applications. PMID:20929583

  10. An Intracellular Arrangement of Histoplasma capsulatum Yeast-Aggregates Generates Nuclear Damage to the Cultured Murine Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Pitangui, Nayla de Souza; Sardi, Janaina de Cássia Orlandi; Voltan, Aline R.; dos Santos, Claudia T.; da Silva, Julhiany de Fátima; da Silva, Rosangela A. M.; Souza, Felipe O.; Soares, Christiane P.; Rodríguez-Arellanes, Gabriela; Taylor, Maria Lucia; Mendes-Giannini, Maria J. S.; Fusco-Almeida, Ana M.

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum is responsible for a human systemic mycosis that primarily affects lung tissue. Macrophages are the major effector cells in humans that respond to the fungus, and the development of respiratory disease depends on the ability of Histoplasma yeast cells to survive and replicate within alveolar macrophages. Therefore, the interaction between macrophages and H. capsulatum is a decisive step in the yeast dissemination into host tissues. Although the role played by components of cell-mediated immunity in the host's defense system and the mechanisms used by the pathogen to evade the host immune response are well understood, knowledge regarding the effects induced by H. capsulatum in host cells at the nuclear level is limited. According to the present findings, H. capsulatum yeast cells display a unique architectural arrangement during the intracellular infection of cultured murine alveolar macrophages, characterized as a formation of aggregates that seem to surround the host cell nucleus, resembling a “crown.” This extranuclear organization of yeast-aggregates generates damage on the nucleus of the host cell, producing DNA fragmentation and inducing apoptosis, even though the yeast cells are not located inside the nucleus and do not trigger changes in nuclear proteins. The current study highlights a singular intracellular arrangement of H. capsulatum yeast near to the nucleus of infected murine alveolar macrophages that may contribute to the yeast's persistence under intracellular conditions, since this fungal pathogen may display different strategies to prevent elimination by the host's phagocytic mechanisms. PMID:26793172

  11. Hemagglutinin and neuraminidase containing virus-like particles produced in HEK-293 suspension culture: An effective influenza vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Venereo-Sanchez, Alina; Gilbert, Renald; Simoneau, Melanie; Caron, Antoine; Chahal, Parminder; Chen, Wangxue; Ansorge, Sven; Li, Xuguang; Henry, Olivier; Kamen, Amine

    2016-06-17

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) constitute a promising alternative as influenza vaccine. They are non-replicative particles that mimic the morphology of native viruses which make them more immunogenic than classical subunit vaccines. In this study, we propose HEK-293 cells in suspension culture in serum-free medium as an efficient platform to produce large quantities of VLPs. For this purpose, a stable cell line expressing the main influenza viral antigens hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) (subtype H1N1) under the regulation of a cumate inducible promoter was developed (293HA-NA cells). The production of VLPs was evaluated by transient transfection of plasmids encoding human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Gag or M1 influenza matrix protein. To facilitate the monitoring of VLPs production, Gag was fused to the green fluorescence protein (GFP). The transient transfection of the gag containing plasmid in 293HA-NA cells increased the release of HA and NA seven times more than its counterpart transfected with the M1 encoding plasmid. Consequently, the production of HA-NA containing VLPs using Gag as scaffold was evaluated in a 3-L controlled stirred tank bioreactor. The VLPs secreted in the culture medium were recovered by ultracentrifugation on a sucrose cushion and ultrafiltered by tangential flow filtration. Transmission electron micrographs of final sample revealed the presence of particles with the average typical size (150-200nm) and morphology of HIV-1 immature particles. The concentration of the influenza glycoproteins on the Gag-VLPs was estimated by single radial immunodiffusion and hemagglutination assay for HA and by Dot-Blot for HA and NA. More significantly, intranasal immunization of mice with influenza Gag-VLPs induced strong antigen-specific mucosal and systemic antibody responses and provided full protection against a lethal intranasal challenge with the homologous virus strain. These data suggest that, with further optimization and characterization

  12. Single cell dual adherent-suspension co-culture micro-environment for studying tumor-stromal interactions with functionally selected cancer stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Zhang, Zhixiong; Fouladdel, Shamileh; Deol, Yadwinder; Ingram, Patrick N; McDermott, Sean P; Azizi, Ebrahim; Wicha, Max S; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-08-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are critical in tumor pathogenesis, but their rarity and transience has led to much controversy about their exact nature. Although CSCs can be functionally identified using dish-based tumorsphere assays, it is difficult to handle and monitor single cells in dish-based approaches; single cell-based microfluidic approaches offer better control and reliable single cell derived sphere formation. However, like normal stem cells, CSCs are heavily regulated by their microenvironment, requiring tumor-stromal interactions for tumorigenic and proliferative behaviors. To enable single cell derived tumorsphere formation within a stromal microenvironment, we present a dual adherent/suspension co-culture device, which combines a suspension environment for single-cell tumorsphere assays and an adherent environment for co-culturing stromal cells in close proximity by selectively patterning polyHEMA in indented microwells. By minimizing dead volume and improving cell capture efficiency, the presented platform allows for the use of small numbers of cells (<100 cells). As a proof of concept, we co-cultured single T47D (breast cancer) cells and primary cancer associated fibroblasts (CAF) on-chip for 14 days to monitor sphere formation and growth. Compared to mono-culture, co-cultured T47D have higher tumorigenic potential (sphere formation rate) and proliferation rates (larger sphere size). Furthermore, 96-multiplexed single-cell transcriptome analyses were performed to compare the gene expression of co-cultured and mono-cultured T47D cells. Phenotypic changes observed in co-culture correlated with expression changes in genes associated with proliferation, apoptotic suppression, tumorigenicity and even epithelial-to-mesechymal transition. Combining the presented platform with single cell transcriptome analysis, we successfully identified functional CSCs and investigated the phenotypic and transcriptome effects induced

  13. [Titration of the antibodies to the Crimean hemorrhagic fever virus in a drop of the cell suspension from infected tissue cultures by means of indirect immunofluorescence].

    PubMed

    Zgurskaia, G N; Chumakov, M P

    1977-01-01

    A comparatively simple method has been developed and tested for the detection and titration of antibody to Crimean hemorrhagic fever virus (CHF) by indirect immunofluorescence on slides with previously prepared acetone-inactivated virus in drops of cell suspension from infected BHK-21 and 6619 cell cultures. The antibody titers determined by the indirect immunofluorescence procedures were 4- and 8-fold higher than those determined by the complement-fixation test. This opens the possibility of using non-infectious antigens of cell suspensions for detection or titration by the FA procedure of antibody to CHF virus which may be of importance to diagnostic laboratories which have no conditions for work with live virus.

  14. Production of puerarin and isoflavones in cell suspension cultures of Pueraria lobata (Willd.): effects of medium supplementation with casein hydrolysate and coconut milk.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Zhang, C R

    2006-01-01

    Callus induced from leaf explants of Pueraria lobata seedlings were suspended in Gamborg B5 medium supplemented with 1 mg l(-1) 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 1 mg l(-1) naphthalene acetic acid, 0.5 mg l(-1) kinetin and 30 g l(-1) sucrose. The effects of coconut milk and casein hydrolysate (CH) on cell growth and yields of puerarin and isoflavones in cells suspension were studied. The contents of total isoflavones and puerarin in suspension cultures were determined by spectrophotometry and HPLC. Coconut milk (10%, filter sterilized) decreased the growth of cell cultures and the accumulation of total isoflavones, while 0.2% CH promoted the growth of cell cultures and the accumulation and release of puerarin and total isoflavones. The total yield of puerarin and isoflavones were 34% and 40.8% higher than in the control, respectively. The optimum medium for cell cultures of leaves of P. lobata seedlings was B5 liquid medium supplemented with 2% sucrose, 1.0 mg l(-1) 2,4-D, 1.0 mg l(-1) NAA, 0.5 mg l(-1) kinetin and 20 mg l(-1) CH. The procedure use is a potentially useful for the production of isoflavones. PMID:16850870

  15. Evaluation of nutrient uptake and physical parameters on cell biomass growth and production of spilanthol in suspension cultures of Spilanthes acmella Murr.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mithilesh; Chaturvedi, Rakhi

    2012-08-01

    Spilanthes acmella Murr. has a plethora of highly valuable biologically active compounds and has been listed as one of the important medicinal plants of the world. However, no perceptible biotechnological advances have been made for this genus to exploit or enhance its utility. To nullify the effect of seasonal variations, the present report is the first attempt to establish in vitro cell suspension cultures and to evaluate the production of spilanthol from them, a key component of the plant responsible for most of its pharmaceutical activities. The study examined the biomass growth in relation to the consumption of major nutrients and sucrose, agitation speed and dynamic change in pH. Results indicated that the consumption of phosphate resulted in the onset of decline phase in cultures. Spilanthol production was observed to be growth associated and maximum production occurred on the 15th day. Among the carbon sources, the highest production of spilanthol as 91.4 µg g(-1) DW was recorded in the medium supplemented with sucrose, followed by glucose which produced 56.8 µg g(-1) DW of spilanthol. Spilanthol could not be detected in fructose containing medium. Maximum viable cultures were obtained at a rotation speed of cells at 120 rpm. This study signifies the utility of Spilanthes suspension cultures for biosynthesis and constant production of spilanthol, throughout the year. The results of present study are useful for further scale-up process. PMID:22237684

  16. Food availability and reproduction affects lipid and fatty acid composition of the brown mussel, Perna perna, raised in suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Narváez, Mirle; Freites, L; Guevara, M; Mendoza, J; Guderley, H; Lodeiros, C J; Salazar, G

    2008-02-01

    We examined the influence of the reproductive cycle and environmental factors on variations of the condition index (CI), tissue dry mass, shell size, total lipid content, and relative percent of fatty acids in the mussel, Perna perna. Spat or juveniles were reared to commercial size (70 mm) in suspension culture in the Golfo de Cariaco, Venezuela between May and October 2004. The dry mass of soft tissues and shell, a visual assessment of gonadal status and the organism lipid profile were established every fortnight. In parallel, we measured the environmental conditions, following chlorophyll a, salinity, temperature and seston levels. After an initial decrease, the CI rose and remained high until August after which it decreased continuously until October. Total lipid values also decreased initially, after which they showed two periods of rapid recuperation and depletion, the first between May and August and the second between August and October. Similar tendencies were noted in the fatty acids, C18:3n-3, C18:4n-3 and C22:6n-3. Correlation analysis found no significant relationships between environmental parameters and the variations in total lipids. However, significant correlations were noted between fatty acids and specific environmental parameters. In particular, temperature was inversely correlated with C14:0, C16:1n-7, C18:0, C18:1n-9 and 20:5n-3. Chlorophyll a was positively correlated with C14:0, C16:1n-7, C18:1n-7, C18:4n-3 and 20:4n-6. On the other hand, gametogenesis had an effect on C14:0, C16:1n-7, C18:1n-9 and C18:1n-7, while spawned and gonadal regression states had an effect on fatty acid 20:4n-6. Temperature and chlorophyll a levels strongly influenced the proportion of mussels spawning, suggesting that their influence upon lipid composition may be secondary to their impact upon reproduction. Despite the thermal stability of this tropical system, the lipid composition of mussels changed markedly during the study, reflecting the central role of diet

  17. Cell suspension culture of Eriobotrya japonica regulates the diabetic and hyperlipidemic signs of high-fat-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chun-Ching; Ciou, Jiun-Lin; Lin, Cheng-Hsiu; Wu, Jin-Bin; Ho, Hui-Ya

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the anti-hyperlipidemic and antihyperglycemic effects and mechanism in high-fat (HF)-fed mice of cell suspension culture of Eriobotrya japonica (TA), which contains a great number of pentacyclic terpenoids. Firstly, C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into two groups: the control (CON) group was fed with a low-fat diet (n = 9), whereas the experimental group was fed a 45% HF diet for 8 weeks. Afterwards, the CON group was treated with vehicle, whereas the HF group was subdivided into five groups and was orally given TA or rosiglitazone or not for 4 weeks. Blood and visceral adipose tissue, liver tissue and skeletal muscle were examined. Treatment with TA reduced body weight gain, weights of white adipose tissue (WAT) (including epididymal, perirenal, mesenteric WAT and visceral fat), and hepatic triacylglycerol content significantly without affecting food intake in diet-induced diabetic mice. TA effectively prevented HF diet-induced increases in the levels of blood glucose, insulin, leptin and HOMA-IR index (p < 0.001, p < 0.05, p < 0.05, p < 0.01, respectively) and attenuated insulin resistance. Treatment with TA, adipocytes in the visceral depots showed a reduction in size. TA effectively significantly increased the protein contents of phosphorylation of AMPK-α (Thr172) both in liver and adipose tissue. It is shown that TA exhibits hypolipidemic effect in HF-fed mice by decreasing gene expressions of fatty acid synthesis, including acyl-coenzyme A: diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) 2, which catalyzes the final step in the synthesis of triglycerides, and antidiabetic properties occurred as a result of decreased hepatic glucose production via phosphenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) down- regulation, improved insulin sensitization and TA (at 1.0 g/kg dose) decreased expression of hepatic and adipose 11-β-hydroxysteroid dehydroxygenase (11β-HSD1) gene, which contributed in attenuating diabetic state. Futhermore, TA at doses of 0

  18. Cell suspension culture of Eriobotrya japonica regulates the diabetic and hyperlipidemic signs of high-fat-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chun-Ching; Ciou, Jiun-Lin; Lin, Cheng-Hsiu; Wu, Jin-Bin; Ho, Hui-Ya

    2013-03-01

    The present study investigates the anti-hyperlipidemic and antihyperglycemic effects and mechanism in high-fat (HF)-fed mice of cell suspension culture of Eriobotrya japonica (TA), which contains a great number of pentacyclic terpenoids. Firstly, C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into two groups: the control (CON) group was fed with a low-fat diet (n = 9), whereas the experimental group was fed a 45% HF diet for 8 weeks. Afterwards, the CON group was treated with vehicle, whereas the HF group was subdivided into five groups and was orally given TA or rosiglitazone or not for 4 weeks. Blood and visceral adipose tissue, liver tissue and skeletal muscle were examined. Treatment with TA reduced body weight gain, weights of white adipose tissue (WAT) (including epididymal, perirenal, mesenteric WAT and visceral fat), and hepatic triacylglycerol content significantly without affecting food intake in diet-induced diabetic mice. TA effectively prevented HF diet-induced increases in the levels of blood glucose, insulin, leptin and HOMA-IR index (p < 0.001, p < 0.05, p < 0.05, p < 0.01, respectively) and attenuated insulin resistance. Treatment with TA, adipocytes in the visceral depots showed a reduction in size. TA effectively significantly increased the protein contents of phosphorylation of AMPK-α (Thr172) both in liver and adipose tissue. It is shown that TA exhibits hypolipidemic effect in HF-fed mice by decreasing gene expressions of fatty acid synthesis, including acyl-coenzyme A: diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) 2, which catalyzes the final step in the synthesis of triglycerides, and antidiabetic properties occurred as a result of decreased hepatic glucose production via phosphenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) down- regulation, improved insulin sensitization and TA (at 1.0 g/kg dose) decreased expression of hepatic and adipose 11-β-hydroxysteroid dehydroxygenase (11β-HSD1) gene, which contributed in attenuating diabetic state. Futhermore, TA at doses of 0

  19. Purification to homogeneity and properties of glucosidase II from mung bean seedlings and suspension-cultured soybean cells.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, G P; Pastuszak, I; Hatanaka, K; Elbein, A D

    1990-09-25

    Glucosidase II was purified approximately 1700-fold to homogeneity from Triton X-100 extracts of mung bean microsomes. A single band with a molecular mass of 110 kDa was seen on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. This band was susceptible to digestion by endoglucosaminidase H or peptide glycosidase F, and the change in mobility of the treated protein indicated the loss of one or two oligosaccharide chains. By gel filtration, the native enzyme was estimated to have a molecular mass of about 220 kDa, suggesting it was composed of two identical subunits. Glucosidase II showed a broad pH optima between 6.8 and 7.5 with reasonable activity even at 8.5, but there was almost no activity below pH 6.0. The purified enzyme could use p-nitrophenyl-alpha-D-glucopyranoside as a substrate but was also active with a number of glucose-containing high-mannose oligosaccharides. Glc2Man9GlcNAc was the best substrate while activity was significantly reduced when several mannose residues were removed, i.e. Glc2Man7-GlcNAc. The rate of activity was lowest with Glc1Man9GlcNAc, demonstrating that the innermost glucose is released the slowest. Evidence that the enzyme is specific for alpha 1,3-glucosidic linkages is shown by the fact that its activity on Glc2Man9GlcNAc was inhibited by nigerose, an alpha 1,3-linked glucose disaccharide, but not by alpha 1,2 (kojibiose)-, alpha 1,4(maltose)-, or alpha 1,6 (isomaltose)-linked glucose disaccharides. Glucosidase II was strongly inhibited by the glucosidase processing inhibitors deoxynojirimycin and 2,6-dideoxy-2,6-imino-7-O-(beta-D- glucopyranosyl)-D-glycero-L-guloheptitol, but less strongly by castanospermine and not at all by australine. Polyclonal antibodies prepared against the mung bean glucosidase II reacted with a 95-kDa protein from suspension-cultured soybean cells that also showed glucosidase II activity. Soybean cells were labeled with either [2-3H]mannose or [6-3H]galactose, and the glucosidase II was isolated by immunoprecipitation

  20. Diadenosine triphosphate is a novel factor which in combination with cyclodextrins synergistically enhances the biosynthesis of trans-resveratrol in Vitis vinifera cv. Monastrell suspension cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Pietrowska-Borek, Małgorzata; Czekała, Lukasz; Belchí-Navarro, Sarai; Pedreño, María Angeles; Guranowski, Andrzej

    2014-11-01

    Dinucleoside polyphosphates are considered as signal molecules that may evoke response of plant cells to stress. Other compounds whose biological effects have been recognized are cyclodextrins. They are cyclic oligosaccharides that chemically resemble the alkyl-derived pectic oligosaccharides naturally released from the cell walls during fungal attack, and they act as true elicitors, since, when added to plant cell culture, they induce the expression of genes involved in some secondary metabolism pathways. Previously, we demonstrated that some dinucleoside polyphosphates triggered the biosynthesis of enzymes involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana. In Vitis vinifera suspension cultured cells, cyclodextrins were shown to enhance the accumulation of trans-resveratrol, one of the basic units of the stilbenes derived from the phenylpropanoid pathway. Here, we show that diadenosine triphosphate, applied alone or in combination with cyclodextrins to the grapevine suspension-cultured cells, increased the transcript level of genes encoding key phenylpropanoid-pathway enzymes as well as the trans-resveratrol production inside cells and its secretion into the extracellular medium. In the latter case, these two compounds acted synergistically. However, the accumulation of trans-resveratrol and its glucoside trans-piceid inside cells were stimulated much better by diadenosine triphosphate than by cyclodextrins.

  1. Production of Limonoids with Insect Antifeedant Activity in a Two-Stage Bioreactor Process with Cell Suspension Culture of Azadirachta indica.

    PubMed

    Vásquez-Rivera, Andrés; Chicaiza-Finley, Diego; Hoyos, Rodrigo A; Orozco-Sánchez, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    Neem tree (Azadirachta indica) cell suspension culture is an alternative for the production of limonoids for insect control that overcomes limitations related to the supply of neem seeds. To establish conditions for cell growth and azadiracthin-related limonoid production, the effect of different sucrose concentrations, nitrate and phosphate in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium, and the addition of one precursor and three elicitors was evaluated in shake flasks. The process was scaled up to a 3-l stirred tank bioreactor in one- and two-stage batch cultivation. In shake flasks, more than fivefold increase in the production of limonoids with the modified MS medium was observed (increase from 0.77 to 4.52 mg limonoids/g dry cell weight, DCW), while an increase of more than fourfold was achieved by adding the elicitors chitosan, salicylic acid, and jasmonic acid together (increase from 1.03 to 4.32 mg limonoids/g DCW). In the bioreactor, the volumetric production of limonoids was increased more than threefold with a two-stage culture in day 18 (13.82 mg limonoids/l in control single-stage process and 41.44 mg/l in two-stage process). The cultivation and operating mode of the bioreactor reported in this study may be adapted and used in optimization and process plant development for production of insect antifeedant limonoids with A. indica cell suspension cultures.

  2. Expression pattern of genes encoding farnesyl diphosphate synthase and sesquiterpene cyclase in cotton suspension-cultured cells treated with fungal elicitors.

    PubMed

    Liu, C J; Heinstein, P; Chen, X Y

    1999-12-01

    Cotton plants accumulate sesquiterpene aldehydes in pigment glands. The two enzymes farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPS) and (+)-delta-cadinene synthase (CAD), a sesquiterpene cyclase, are involved in the biosynthesis of these secondary metabolites. A full-length cDNA (garfps) encoding FPS was isolated from Gossypium arboreum and identified by in vitro enzymatic assay of the garfps protein heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. Treatment of G. arboreum suspension-cultured cells with an elicitor preparation obtained from the phytopathogenic fungus Verticillium dahliae dramatically induced transcription of both FPS and CAD, paralleling the accumulation of the sesquiterpene aldehydes in these cells. For G. australe, a wild species from Australia, the V. dahliae elicitor preparation also caused an induction of FPS but only a low rate of induction of CAD, apparently because of a constitutive expression of the sesquiterpene cyclase gene in suspension-cultured cells. Two transcripts and proteins of FPS were detected in the elicited G. australe cells; the smaller FPS seemed to be de novo synthesized after elicitation. Furthermore, G. australe-cultured cells accumulated the cadinene, instead of sesquiterpene aldehydes, indicating that the biosynthetic pathway leading to sesquiterpene aldehydes was absent or blocked after FPP cyclization. PMID:10624017

  3. A two-dimensional electrophoresis proteomic reference map and systematic identification of 1367 proteins from a cell suspension culture of the model legume Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhentian; Elmer, Aaron M; Watson, Bonnie S; Dixon, Richard A; Mendes, Pedro J; Sumner, Lloyd W

    2005-11-01

    The proteome of a Medicago truncatula cell suspension culture was analyzed using two-dimensional electrophoresis and nanoscale HPLC coupled to a tandem Q-TOF mass spectrometer (QSTAR Pulsar i) to yield an extensive protein reference map. Coomassie Brilliant Blue R-250 was used to visualize more than 1661 proteins, which were excised, subjected to in-gel trypsin digestion, and analyzed using nanoscale HPLC/MS/MS. The resulting spectral data were queried against a custom legume protein database using the MASCOT search engine. A total of 1367 of the 1661 proteins were identified with high rigor, yielding an identification success rate of 83% and 907 unique protein accession numbers. Functional annotation of the M. truncatula suspension cell proteins revealed a complete tricarboxylic acid cycle, a nearly complete glycolytic pathway, a significant portion of the ubiquitin pathway with the associated proteolytic and regulatory complexes, and many enzymes involved in secondary metabolism such as flavonoid/isoflavonoid, chalcone, and lignin biosynthesis. Proteins were also identified from most other functional classes including primary metabolism, energy production, disease/defense, protein destination/storage, protein synthesis, transcription, cell growth/division, and signal transduction. This work represents the most extensive proteomic description of M. truncatula suspension cells to date and provides a reference map for future comparative proteomic and functional genomic studies of the response of these cells to biotic and abiotic stress.

  4. Host-Pathogen Interactions : XXIV. Fragments Isolated from Suspension-Cultured Sycamore Cell Walls Inhibit the Ability of the Cells to Incorporate [C]Leucine into Proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, N; Fry, S C; Darvill, A G; Albersheim, P

    1983-07-01

    A bioassay to measure the incorporation of [(14)C]leucine into acid-precipitable polymers of suspension-cultured sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cells is described. Using this assay, cell wall fragments solubilized from sycamore cell walls by partial acid hydrolysis are shown to contain components that inhibit the incorporation of [(14)C]leucine into the acid-precipitable polymers. This inhibition was not attributable to a suppression of [(14)C]leucine uptake. The effectiveness of the wall fragments in inhibiting [(14)C]leucine incorporation was substantially relieved by plasmolysis of the cells. Fragments released from starch and citrus pectin are shown not to possess such inhibitory activities.

  5. Biotransformation of citronellal by Solanum aviculare suspension cultures: preparation of p-menthane-3,8-diols and determination of their absolute configurations.

    PubMed

    Vanek, Tomás; Novotný, Michal; Podlipná, Radka; Saman, David; Valterová, Irena

    2003-09-01

    Citronellal was transformed by Solanum aviculare suspension cultures to menthane-3,8-diols. cis-Menthane-3,8-diol dominated over the trans-isomer (39% and 15%, respectively). Absolute configurations of menthane-3,8-diols were assigned by critical analysis of 1H and 19F NMR spectra of prepared esters with 2-methoxy-2-phenyl-3,3,3-trifluoropropanoic acid. Citronellol and isopulegol were other products of the transformation (23% and 17%, respectively). The reaction course was identical for both citronellal enantiomers. PMID:14510606

  6. Biotransformation of citronellal by Solanum aviculare suspension cultures: preparation of p-menthane-3,8-diols and determination of their absolute configurations.

    PubMed

    Vanek, Tomás; Novotný, Michal; Podlipná, Radka; Saman, David; Valterová, Irena

    2003-09-01

    Citronellal was transformed by Solanum aviculare suspension cultures to menthane-3,8-diols. cis-Menthane-3,8-diol dominated over the trans-isomer (39% and 15%, respectively). Absolute configurations of menthane-3,8-diols were assigned by critical analysis of 1H and 19F NMR spectra of prepared esters with 2-methoxy-2-phenyl-3,3,3-trifluoropropanoic acid. Citronellol and isopulegol were other products of the transformation (23% and 17%, respectively). The reaction course was identical for both citronellal enantiomers.

  7. Conversion of MDCK cell line to suspension culture by transfecting with human siat7e gene and its application for influenza virus production.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chia; Lugovtsev, Vladimir; Golding, Hana; Betenbaugh, Michael; Shiloach, Joseph

    2009-09-01

    MDCK cells are currently being considered as an alternative to embryonated eggs for influenza virus propagation and hemagglutinin (HA) production intended for vaccine manufacturing. MDCK cells were found suitable for the virus production but their inability to grow in suspension burdens the process of scale up and hence their production capability. Anchorage-dependent MDCK cells were converted to anchorage-independent cells, capable of growing in suspension as a result of transfection with the human siat7e gene (ST6GalNac V). This gene was previously identified as having an important role in cellular adhesion when the transcriptions of genes from anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent HeLa cells were compared. Unlike the parental MDCK cells, the siat7e-expressing cells were capable of growing in shake flasks as suspension cultures, achieving maximum concentration of 7 x 10(5) cells/mL while keeping close to 100% viability throughout the growth phase. In production experiments, the siat7e-expressing cells were infected with the Influenza B/Victoria/504/2000 strain. It was determined that the cell-derived viruses retained similar antigenic properties as those obtained from egg-derived viruses and their nucleotide sequences were identical. The specific production of hemagglutinin (expressed in hemagglutination units per 10(6) cells) from the siat7e-expressing cells was approximately 20 times higher than the specific production from the parental MDCK cells. If this suspension process scales up, the production potential of HA from 10 L of siat7e-expressing cells at a concentration of 10(6) cells/mL would be equivalent to the amount of HA obtained from 10,000 embryonated eggs. PMID:19706449

  8. Conversion of MDCK cell line to suspension culture by transfecting with human siat7e gene and its application for influenza virus production

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chia; Lugovtsev, Vladimir; Golding, Hana; Betenbaugh, Michael; Shiloach, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    MDCK cells are currently being considered as an alternative to embryonated eggs for influenza virus propagation and hemagglutinin (HA) production intended for vaccine manufacturing. MDCK cells were found suitable for the virus production but their inability to grow in suspension burdens the process of scale up and hence their production capability. Anchorage-dependent MDCK cells were converted to anchorage-independent cells, capable of growing in suspension as a result of transfection with the human siat7e gene (ST6GalNac V). This gene was previously identified as having an important role in cellular adhesion when the transcriptions of genes from anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent HeLa cells were compared. Unlike the parental MDCK cells, the siat7e-expressing cells were capable of growing in shake flasks as suspension cultures, achieving maximum concentration of 7 × 105 cells/mL while keeping close to 100% viability throughout the growth phase. In production experiments, the siat7e-expressing cells were infected with the Influenza B/Victoria/504/2000 strain. It was determined that the cell-derived viruses retained similar antigenic properties as those obtained from egg-derived viruses and their nucleotide sequences were identical. The specific production of hemagglutinin (expressed in hemagglutination units per 106 cells) from the siat7e-expressing cells was approximately 20 times higher than the specific production from the parental MDCK cells. If this suspension process scales up, the production potential of HA from 10 L of siat7e-expressing cells at a concentration of 106 cells/mL would be equivalent to the amount of HA obtained from 10,000 embryonated eggs. PMID:19706449

  9. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 stimulates synthesis of proteoglycan aggregates in calf articular cartilage organ cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, T.I. )

    1991-04-01

    Previous work showed that transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1), added alone to bovine cartilage organ cultures, stimulated (35S)sulfate incorporation into macromolecular material but did not investigate the fidelity of the stimulated system to maintain synthesis of cartilage-type proteoglycans. This paper provides evidence that chondrocytes synthesize the appropriate proteoglycan matrix under TGF-beta 1 stimulation: (1) there is a coordinated increase in hyaluronic acid and proteoglycan monomer synthesis, (2) link-stable proteoglycan aggregates are assembled, (3) the hybrid chondroitin sulfate/keratan sulfate monomeric species is synthesized, and (4) there is an increase in protein core synthesis. Some variation in glycosylation patterns was observed when proteoglycans synthesized under TGF-beta 1 stimulation were compared to those synthesized under basal conditions. Thus comparing TGF-beta 1 to basal samples respectively, the monomers were larger (Kav on Sepharose CL-2B = 0.29 vs 0.41), the chondroitin sulfate chains were longer by approximately 3.5 kDa, the percentage of total glycosaminoglycan in keratan sulfate increased slightly from approximately 4% (basal) to approximately 6%, and the unsulfated disaccharide decreased from 28% (basal) to 12%. All of these variations are in the direction of a more anionic proteoglycan. Since the ability of proteoglycans to confer resiliency to the cartilage matrix is directly related to their anionic nature, these changes would presumably have a beneficial effect on tissue function.

  10. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Metabolic and Lipidomic Sample Preparation Workflow for Suspension-Cultured Mammalian Cells using Jurkat T lymphocyte Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ulmer, Candice Z.; Yost, Richard A.; Chen, Jing; Mathews, Clayton E.; Garrett, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics is the comprehensive study of metabolism as it pertains to an organism or biological system. Lipidomics, a subset discipline of metabolomics, encompasses the study of cellular lipid functions: including pathways, networks, and interactions. The abundance of metabolites and lipids, along with their contribution to health and disease, makes metabolomics a valuable tool for biomarker research. Disease biomarker identification requires a reproducible, sensitive, and accurate analytical platform. Although transcriptomic and proteomic areas have well-established protocols for sample preparation and data processing, the metabolomics field is still developing comparable standardized conventions. Furthermore, of the few comparative LC-MS metabolomic studies that have been applied to mammalian cell cultures, most are targeted to adherent cell lines. The purpose of this work was to optimize a sample preparation workflow for the cellular metabolomic analysis of suspension-cultured mammalian cells using commercially available Jurkat T lymphocytes as a model system. The current investigation evaluated commonly used sample preparation techniques for reproducibility, accuracy, and applicability to untargeted biomarker discovery. Results show ammoniated cell rinsing solutions to be an effective means to remove extracellular components present in the media without causing ion suppression or affecting the integrity of the cellular membrane. Additionally, a novel workflow was designed to allow for the combined analysis of metabolites and lipids from mammalian suspension cells from a single cell pellet. The Folch lipid extraction protocol was coupled to an 80% MeOH metabolite isolation to ensure high extraction efficiency for phospholipids and triacylglycerides. While the workflow was tailored to cells in suspension, it could also be applied to adherent cell lines. PMID:26401069

  11. Hydrogen sulfide donor sodium hydrosulfide-induced heat tolerance in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L) suspension cultured cells and involvement of Ca(2+) and calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong-Guang; Gong, Ming; Xie, Hong; Yang, Lan; Li, Jing

    2012-04-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is considered as a new emerging cell signal in higher plants. Hydrogen sulfide donor, sodium hydrosulfide, pretreatment significantly increased survival percentage of tobacco suspension cultured cells under heat stress and regrowth ability after heat stress, and alleviated decrease in vitality of cells, increase in electrolyte leakage and accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA). In addition, sodium hydrosulfide-induced heat tolerance was markedly strengthened by application of exogenous Ca(2+) and its ionophore A23187, respectively, while this heat tolerance was weakened by addition of Ca(2+) chelator ethylene glycol-bis(b-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), plasma membrane channel blocker La(3+), as well as calmodulin (CaM) antagonists chlorpromazine (CPZ) and trifluoperazine (TFP), respectively, but intracellular channel blocker ruthenium red (RR) did not. These results suggested that sodium hydrosulfide pretreatment could improve heat tolerance in tobacco suspension cultured cells and the acquisition of this heat tolerance requires the entry of extracellular Ca(2+) into cells across the plasma membrane and the mediation of intracellular CaM.

  12. Structure of Plant Cell Walls : XXVI. The Walls of Suspension-Cultured Sycamore Cells Contain a Family of Rhamnogalacturonan-I-Like Pectic Polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Ishii, T; Thomas, J; Darvill, A; Albersheim, P

    1989-02-01

    Considerable information has been obtained about the primary structures of suspension-cultured sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cell-wall pectic polysaccharides, i.e. rhamnogalacturonan I, rhamnogalacturonan II, and homogalacturonan. However, these polysaccharides, which are solubilized from the walls by endo-alpha-1,4-polygalacturonase, account for only about half of the pectic polysaccharides known to be present in sycamore cell walls. We now report that, after exhaustive treatment with endo-alpha-1,4-polygalacturonase, additional pectic polysaccharides were extracted from sycamore cell walls by treatment with Na(2)CO(3) at 1 and 22 degrees C. These previously uncharacterized polysaccharides accounted for approximately 4% of the cell wall. Based on the glycosyl and glycosyl-linkage compositions and the nature of the products obtained by treating the quantitatively predominant NaCO(3)-extracted polysaccharides with lithium metal dissolved in ethylenediamine, the polysaccharides were found to strongly resemble rhamnogalacturonan I. However, unlike rhamnogalacturonan I that characteristically had equal amounts of 2- and 2,4-linked rhamnosyl residues in its backbone, the polysaccharides extracted in Na(2)CO(3) at 1 degrees C had markedly disparate ratios of 2- to 2,4-linked rhamnosyl residues. We concluded that polysaccharides similar to rhamnogalacturonan I but with different degrees of branching are present in the walls of suspension-cultured sycamore cells.

  13. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Cultured Suspension Cells of the Halophyte Halogeton glomeratus by iTRAQ Provides Insights into Response Mechanisms to Salt Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juncheng; Yao, Lirong; Li, Baochun; Meng, Yaxiong; Ma, Xiaole; Lai, Yong; Si, Erjing; Ren, Panrong; Yang, Ke; Shang, Xunwu; Wang, Huajun

    2016-01-01

    Soil salinity severely threatens land use capability and crop yields worldwide. An analysis of the molecular mechanisms of salt tolerance in halophytes will contribute to the development of salt-tolerant crops. In this study, a combination of physiological characteristics and iTRAQ-based proteomic approaches was conducted to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the salt response of suspension cell cultures of halophytic Halogeton glomeratus. These cells showed halophytic growth responses comparable to those of the whole plant. In total, 97 up-regulated proteins and 192 down-regulated proteins were identified as common to both 200 and 400 mM NaCl concentration treatments. Such salinity responsive proteins were mainly involved in energy, carbohydrate metabolism, stress defense, protein metabolism, signal transduction, cell growth, and cytoskeleton metabolism. Effective regulatory protein expression related to energy, stress defense, and carbohydrate metabolism play important roles in the salt-tolerance of H. glomeratus suspension cell cultures. However, known proteins regulating Na+ efflux from the cytoplasm and its compartmentalization into the vacuole did not change significantly under salinity stress suggesting our existing knowledge concerning Na+ extrusion and compartmentalization in halophytes needs to be evaluated further. Such data are discussed in the context of our current understandings of the mechanisms involved in the salinity response of the halophyte, H. glomeratus. PMID:26904073

  14. Instability of anthocyanin composition under different subculture conditions during long-term suspension cultures of Vitis vinifera L. var. Gamay Fréaux.

    PubMed

    Qu, Junge; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Xingju

    2011-11-01

    The instability of secondary metabolite production is a ubiquitous problem in plant cell culture. In order to understand the instability in plant cell culture, we investigated anthocyanin accumulation in suspension cultures of Vitis vinifera, as a model system, in our laboratory. Not only the anthocyanin contents but also its composition exhibited instability along with the long-term subculture. New methods were developed to indicate the instability of plant cell culture. Both the definition of instability coefficient (delta) and the application of factor scores were the first time in this field. To examine the effects of culture conditions on instability of anthocyanin biosynthesis, different subculture cycles and inoculum sizes had been investigated. Subculture cycle and inoculum size were both environmental cues driving the instability. Compared with subculture cycle, inoculum size was more effective in working on the instability of anthocyanin accumulation. Among all the conditions investigated in our study, (6.5 d, 2.00 g), (7 d, 2.00 g), (7.5 d, 2.00 g), (7 d, 1.60 g) and (7 d, 2.40 g), the condition of 7 d-subculture cycle together with 1.60 g-inoculum size was the best one to keep the stable production of anthocyanins. PMID:22393716

  15. Instability of anthocyanin composition under different subculture conditions during long-term suspension cultures of Vitis vinifera L. var. Gamay Fréaux.

    PubMed

    Qu, Junge; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Xingju

    2011-11-01

    The instability of secondary metabolite production is a ubiquitous problem in plant cell culture. In order to understand the instability in plant cell culture, we investigated anthocyanin accumulation in suspension cultures of Vitis vinifera, as a model system, in our laboratory. Not only the anthocyanin contents but also its composition exhibited instability along with the long-term subculture. New methods were developed to indicate the instability of plant cell culture. Both the definition of instability coefficient (delta) and the application of factor scores were the first time in this field. To examine the effects of culture conditions on instability of anthocyanin biosynthesis, different subculture cycles and inoculum sizes had been investigated. Subculture cycle and inoculum size were both environmental cues driving the instability. Compared with subculture cycle, inoculum size was more effective in working on the instability of anthocyanin accumulation. Among all the conditions investigated in our study, (6.5 d, 2.00 g), (7 d, 2.00 g), (7.5 d, 2.00 g), (7 d, 1.60 g) and (7 d, 2.40 g), the condition of 7 d-subculture cycle together with 1.60 g-inoculum size was the best one to keep the stable production of anthocyanins.

  16. Cell aggregation on agar as an indicator for cell-matrix adhesion: effects of opioids.

    PubMed

    Debruyne, Delphine; Mareel, Marc; Vanhoecke, Barbara; Bracke, Marc

    2009-09-01

    The slow aggregation assay is generally used to study the functionality of cell-cell adhesion complexes. Single cells are seeded on a semisolid agar substrate in a 96-well plate and the cells spontaneously aggregate. We used HEK FLAG-MOP cells that stably overexpress the mu opioid receptor and the mu-opioid-receptor-selective agonists DAMGO and morphine to study whether other factors than functionality of cell-cell adhesions complexes can contribute to changes in the pattern of slow aggregation on agar. HEK FLAG-MOP cells formed small compact aggregates. In the presence of DAMGO and morphine, larger and fewer aggregates were formed in comparison to the vehicle control. These aggregates were localized in the center of the agar surface, whereas in the vehicle control they were dispersed over the substrate. However, in suspension culture on a Gyrotory shaker, no stimulation of aggregation was observed by DAMGO and morphine, showing that opioids do not affect affinity. A dissociation experiment revealed that HEK FLAG-MOP aggregates formed in the absence or presence of opioids are resistant to de-adhesion. We demonstrated that the larger aggregates are neither the result of cell growth stimulation by DAMGO and morphine. Since manipulations of the substrate such as increasing the agar concentration or mixing agar with agarose induced the same changes in the pattern of slow aggregation as treatment with opioids, we suggest that cell-substrate adhesion may be involved in opioid-stimulated aggregation.

  17. Biogrid--a microfluidic device for large-scale enzyme-free dissociation of stem cell aggregates.

    PubMed

    Wallman, Lars; Åkesson, Elisabet; Ceric, Dario; Andersson, Per Henrik; Day, Kelly; Hovatta, Outi; Falci, Scott; Laurell, Thomas; Sundström, Erik

    2011-10-01

    Culturing stem cells as free-floating aggregates in suspension facilitates large-scale production of cells in closed systems, for clinical use. To comply with GMP standards, the use of substances such as proteolytic enzymes should be avoided. Instead of enzymatic dissociation, the growing cell aggregates may be mechanically cut at passage, but available methods are not compatible with large-scale cell production and hence translation into the clinic becomes a severe bottle-neck. We have developed the Biogrid device, which consists of an array of micrometerscale knife edges, micro-fabricated in silicon, and a manifold in which the microgrid is placed across the central fluid channel. By connecting one side of the Biogrid to a syringe or a pump and the other side to the cell culture, the culture medium with suspended cell aggregates can be aspirated, forcing the aggregates through the microgrid, and ejected back to the cell culture container. Large aggregates are thereby dissociated into smaller fragments while small aggregates pass through the microgrid unaffected. As proof-of-concept, we demonstrate that the Biogrid device can be successfully used for repeated passage of human neural stem/progenitor cells cultured as so-called neurospheres, as well as for passage of suspension cultures of human embryonic stem cells. We also show that human neural stem/progenitor cells tolerate transient pressure changes far exceeding those that will occur in a fluidic system incorporating the Biogrid microgrids. Thus, by using the Biogrid device it is possible to mechanically passage large quantities of cells in suspension cultures in closed fluidic systems, without the use of proteolytic enzymes. PMID:21850297

  18. Effects of zinc and cadmium ions on cell growth and production of coumarins in cell suspension cultures of Angelica archangelica L.

    PubMed

    Siatka, Tomáš; Kašparová, Marie; Spilková, Jiřina

    2012-12-01

    The plant cell may respond to the excess of heavy metals in its environment by various mechanisms, including enhanced biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. In this study, zinc (0 to 1500 μM) and cadmium ions (0 to 100 μM) were tested as potential elicitors of the production of coumarins in angelica cell suspension cultures. In addition, the toxicity of both metals was assessed by evaluating their effect on cell growth (characterized by fresh and dry biomass at the end of a two-week subculture). It has been found that fresh biomass was not influenced up to zinc concentrations of 150 and 300 μM in the dark-grown and light-grown cultures, resp. Then it declined with an increasing zinc level. Zinc at 1500 μM diminished it by 54% and 24% in the dark-grown and light-grown cultures, resp. Dry biomass was influenced in a similar way. Zinc at 1500 μM reduced dry cell weight by 30% and 20% in cultures in the dark and in the light, resp. Cadmium ions did not affect fresh and dry weights of cells up to concentrations of 10 μM and 50 μM in cultures in the dark and in the light, resp. Toxic concentrations of cadmium are by an order of magnitude lower than those of zinc. Cadmium at 50 μM reduced fresh and dry cell weights by 66% and 59%, resp., in the dark-grown cultures. Cadmium at 100 μM caused a decrease in fresh and dry biomass by 40% and 44%, resp., in the light-grown cultures. Neither zinc nor cadmium improved production of coumarins. PMID:23387854

  19. Phospholipase C/diacylglycerol kinase-mediated signalling is required for benzothiadiazole-induced oxidative burst and hypersensitive cell death in rice suspension-cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Zhang, Weidong; Song, Fengming; Zheng, Zhong

    2007-01-01

    The involvement of phospholipase C/diacylglycerol kinase (PLC/DGK)-mediated signalling in oxidative burst and hypersensitive cell death was studied in rice suspension-cultured cells treated with benzothiadiazole (BTH) and infected by Xanthomonas oryza pv. oryza (Xoo), the causal agent of rice leaf blight disease. Treatment of rice suspension cells with BTH resulted in a significant oxidative burst, as indicated by accumulation of superoxide anion and H(2)O(2), and hypersensitive cell death, as determined by Evans blue staining. A peak in oxidative burst was detected 3-4 h after BTH treatment and hypersensitive cell death was observed 8 h after treatment. In addition, significant oxidative burst and hypersensitive cell death were detected in BTH-treated suspension cells, but not in untreated control cells, after Xoo infection. Scavengers and antioxidants of active oxygen species, e.g., superoxide dismutase, catalase, N-acetylcysteine, and flavone, reduced significantly the BTH-induced oxidative burst and hypersensitive cell death, indicating that oxidative burst is required for BTH-induced hypersensitive cell death. Expression of the PLC/DGK pathway genes, a diacylglycerol kinase gene, OsDAGK1, and a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C gene, OsPI-PLC1, and a defence-related EREBP transcriptional factor gene, OsBIERF3, was activated in rice cells after BTH treatment and in the BTH-treated cells after Xoo infection. Treatment of rice cells with phosphatidic acid, a phospholipid signalling molecule, resulted in the production of oxidative burst and hypersensitive cell death. However, neomycin, a PLC inhibitor, inhibited partially but not completely the production of oxidative burst, hypersensitive cell death, and expression of OsBIERF3 and OsDAGK1 induced by BTH in rice cells. These results suggest that PLC/DGK-mediated signalling plays an important role in BTH-induced oxidative burst, hypersensitive response, and activation of defence response in rice.

  20. Enhanced anthocyanins and resveratrol production in Vitis vinifera cell suspension culture by indanoyl-isoleucine, N-linolenoyl-L-glutamine and insect saliva.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhenzhen; Knorr, Dietrich; Smetanska, Iryna

    2012-01-01

    The effects of two synthetic elicitor indanoyl-isoleucine (In-Ile), N-linolenoyl-L-glutamine (Lin-Gln) and one biotic elicitor insect saliva (from Manduca sexta larvae) on plant cell cultures with respect to the induction of secondary metabolite production were investigated. Stimulated production of secondary metabolites, particularly anthocyanins in plant cells and phenolic acids in culture medium, was studied by using suspension culture of Vitis vinifera L. cv. Gamay Fréaux as a model system. In the treatments with In-Ile, the production of anthocyanins was enhanced 2.6-fold. In-Ile, Lin-Gln and saliva significantly elevated the accumulation of phenolic acids, particularly 3-O-glucosyl-resveratrol. The used elicitors did not suppress cell growth. Secondary metabolites were differently responsive to elicitation. 3-O-glucosyl-resveratrol was the predominant phenolic acid in V. vinifera cell culture, and its production was significantly stimulated by saliva, with 7.0-fold of the control level 24 h after treatment. The production of 4-(3,5-dihydroxy-phenyl)-phenol was significantly stimulated by In-Ile with 6.4-fold of the control level 24 h after treatment. PMID:22133437

  1. An inverse relationship between allelopathic activity and salt tolerance in suspension cultures of three mangrove species, Sonneratia alba, S. caseolaris and S. ovata: development of a bioassay method for allelopathy, the protoplast co-culture method.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Ai; Oyanagi, Tomoya; Minagawa, Reiko; Fujii, Yoshiharu; Sasamoto, Hamako

    2014-11-01

    A bioassay method for allelopathy, the 'protoplast co-culture method' was developed to study the relationship between salt tolerance and allelopathy of three mangrove species, Sonneratia alba, S. caseolaris, and S. ovata. Plants of S. alba grow in the seaward-side high salinity region and plants of the latter two species grow in upstream-side regions of a mangrove forest, respectively. Effects of five sea salts (NaCl, KCl, MgCl2, MgSO4 and CaCl2) on the growth of the suspension cells of the latter two species were first investigated by a small-scale method using 24-well culture plates. S. ovata cells showed higher tolerance than S. caseolaris cells to NaCl and other salts, but were not as halophilic as S. alba cells. Protoplasts isolated from suspension cells were co-cultured with lettuce protoplasts in Murashige and Skoog's (MS) basal medium containing 1 μM 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 0.1 μM benzyladenine, 3% sucrose and 0.6-0.8 M osmoticum. S. caseolaris protoplasts had a higher inhibitory effect on lettuce protoplast cell divisions than S. alba protoplasts at any lettuce protoplast density, and the effect of S. ovata was intermediate between the two. These results were similar to those obtained from a different in vitro bioassay method for allelopathy, the 'sandwich method' with dried leaves. The inverse relationship between allelopathic activity and salt tolerance in suspension cells of Sonneratia mangroves is discussed. PMID:25062702

  2. Rethinking Suspensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetson, Frank H.; Collins, Betty J.

    2010-01-01

    The overrepresentation of the Black and Hispanic subgroups in suspension data is a national problem and a troubling issue for schools and school systems across the United States. In Maryland, an analysis of student suspensions by school districts for the 2006-2007 school year revealed disproportionality issues. In 23 of the 24 jurisdictions,…

  3. Stem Cells in Aggregate Form to Enhance Chondrogenesis in Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, BanuPriya; Lin, Staphany M; Hwu, Alexander T; Laflin, Amy D; Detamore, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    There are a variety of exciting hydrogel technologies being explored for cartilage regenerative medicine. Our overall goal is to explore whether using stem cells in an aggregate form may be advantageous in these applications. 3D stem cell aggregates hold great promise as they may recapitulate the in vivo skeletal tissue condensation, a property that is not typically observed in 2D culture. We considered two different stem cell sources, human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly cells (hWJCs, currently being used in clinical trials) and rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs). The objective of the current study was to compare the influence of cell phenotype, aggregate size, and aggregate number on chondrogenic differentiation in a generic hydrogel (agarose) platform. Despite being differing cell sources, both rBMSC and hWJC aggregates were consistent in outperforming cell suspension control groups in biosynthesis and chondrogenesis. Higher cell density impacted biosynthesis favorably, and the number of aggregates positively influenced chondrogenesis. Therefore, we recommend that investigators employing hydrogels consider using cells in an aggregate form for enhanced chondrogenic performance.

  4. Stem Cells in Aggregate Form to Enhance Chondrogenesis in Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, BanuPriya; Lin, Staphany M.; Hwu, Alexander T.; Laflin, Amy D.; Detamore, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    There are a variety of exciting hydrogel technologies being explored for cartilage regenerative medicine. Our overall goal is to explore whether using stem cells in an aggregate form may be advantageous in these applications. 3D stem cell aggregates hold great promise as they may recapitulate the in vivo skeletal tissue condensation, a property that is not typically observed in 2D culture. We considered two different stem cell sources, human umbilical cord Wharton’s jelly cells (hWJCs, currently being used in clinical trials) and rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs). The objective of the current study was to compare the influence of cell phenotype, aggregate size, and aggregate number on chondrogenic differentiation in a generic hydrogel (agarose) platform. Despite being differing cell sources, both rBMSC and hWJC aggregates were consistent in outperforming cell suspension control groups in biosynthesis and chondrogenesis. Higher cell density impacted biosynthesis favorably, and the number of aggregates positively influenced chondrogenesis. Therefore, we recommend that investigators employing hydrogels consider using cells in an aggregate form for enhanced chondrogenic performance. PMID:26719986

  5. Spatial and temporal control of cell aggregation efficiently directs human pluripotent stem cells towards neural commitment.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Cláudia C; Fernandes, Tiago G; Pascoal, Jorge F; Haupt, Simone; Brüstle, Oliver; Cabral, Joaquim M S; Diogo, Maria Margarida

    2015-10-01

    3D suspension culture is generally considered a promising method to achieve efficient expansion and controlled differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). In this work, we focused on developing an integrated culture platform for expansion and neural commitment of hPSCs into neural precursors using 3D suspension conditions and chemically-defined culture media. We evaluated different inoculation methodologies for hPSC expansion as 3D aggregates and characterized the resulting cultures in terms of aggregate size distribution. It was demonstrated that upon single-cell inoculation, after four days of culture, 3D aggregates were composed of homogenous populations of hPSC and were characterized by an average diameter of 139 ± 26 μm, which was determined to be the optimal size to initiate neural commitment. Temporal analysis revealed that upon neural specification it is possible to maximize the percentage of neural precursor cells expressing the neural markers Sox1 and Pax6 after nine days of culture. These results highlight our ability to define a robust method for production of hPSC-derived neural precursors that minimizes processing steps and that constitutes a promising alternative to the traditional planar adherent culture system due to a high potential for scaling-up. PMID:25866360

  6. Structure of Plant Cell Walls: XI. GLUCURONOARABINOXYLAN, A SECOND HEMICELLULOSE IN THE PRIMARY CELL WALLS OF SUSPENSION-CULTURED SYCAMORE CELLS.

    PubMed

    Darvill, J E; McNeil, M; Darvill, A G; Albersheim, P

    1980-12-01

    The isolation, purification, and partial characterization of a glucuronoarabinoxylan, a previously unobserved component of the primary cell walls of dicotyledonous plants, are described. The glucuronoarabinoxylan constitutes approximately 5% of the primary walls of suspension-cultured sycamore cells. This glucuronoarabinoxylan possesses many of the structural characteristics of analogous polysaccharides that have been isolated from the primary and secondary cell walls of monocots as well as from the secondary cell walls of dicots. The glucuronoarabinoxylan of primary dicot cell walls has a linear beta-1,4-linked d-xylopyranosyl backbone with both neutral and acidic sidechains attached at intervals along its length. The acidic sidechains are terminated with glucuronosyl or 4-O-methyl glucuronosyl residues, whereas the neutral sidechains are composed of arabinosyl and/or xylosyl residues.

  7. Efficient and high-throughput vector construction and Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Arabidopsis thaliana suspension-cultured cells for functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yoichi; Dansako, Tomoko; Yano, Kentaro; Sakurai, Nozomu; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Aoki, Koh; Noji, Masaaki; Saito, Kazuki; Shibata, Daisuke

    2008-02-01

    We established a large-scale, high-throughput protocol to construct Arabidopsis thaliana suspension-cultured cell lines, each of which carries a single transgene, using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. We took advantage of RIKEN Arabidopsis full-length (RAFL) cDNA clones and the Gateway cloning system for high-throughput preparation of binary vectors carrying individual full-length cDNA sequences. Throughout all cloning steps, multiple-well plates were used to treat 96 samples simultaneously in a high-throughput manner. The optimal conditions for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of 96 independent binary vector constructs were established to obtain transgenic cell lines efficiently. We evaluated the protocol by generating transgenic Arabidopsis T87 cell lines carrying individual 96 metabolism-related RAFL cDNA fragments, and showed that the protocol was useful for high-throughput and large-scale production of gain-of-function lines for functional genomics.

  8. Reconstruction of a seminiferous tubule-like structure in a 3 dimensional culture system of re-aggregated mouse neonatal testicular cells within a collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jidong; Hatakeyama, Jun; Eto, Ko; Abe, Shin-Ichi

    2014-09-01

    Male gonad development is initiated by the aggregation of pre-Sertoli cells (SCs), which surround germ cells to form cords. Several attempts to reconstruct testes from dissociated testicular cells have been made; however, only very limited morphogenesis beyond seminiferous cord formation has been achieved. Therefore, we aimed to reconstruct seminiferous tubules using a 3-dimensional (D) re-aggregate culture of testicular cells, which were dissociated from 6-dpp neonatal mice, inside a collagen matrix. We performed a short-term culture (for 3 days) and a long-term culture (up to 3 wks). The addition of KnockOut Serum Replacement (KSR) promoted (1) the enlargement of SC re-aggregates; (2) the attachment of peritubular myoid (PTM) cells around the SC re-aggregates; (3) the sorting of germ cells inside, and Leydig cells outside, seminiferous cord-like structures; (4) the alignment of SC polarity inside a seminiferous cord-like structure relative to the basement membrane; (5) the differentiation of SCs (the expression of the androgen receptor); (6) the formation of a blood-testis-barrier between the SCs; (7) SC elongation and lumen formation; and (8) the proliferation of SCs and spermatogonia, as well as the differentiation of spermatogonia into primary spermatocytes. Eventually, KSR promoted the formation of seminiferous tubule-like structures, which accompanied germ cell differentiation. However, these morphogenetic events did not occur in the absence of KSR. This in vitro system presents an excellent model with which to identify the possible factors that induce these events and to analyze the mechanisms that underlie cellular interactions during testicular morphogenesis and germ cell differentiation.

  9. Molecular cloning of abscisic acid-responsive mRNAs expressed during the induction of freezing tolerance in bromegrass (Bromus inermis Leyss) suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Lee, S P; Chen, T H

    1993-03-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) increases the freezing tolerance of bromegrass (Bromus inermis Leyss) cell-suspension cultures at 23 degrees C and elicits many metabolic changes similar to those observed during cold acclimation. Induction and maintenance of freezing tolerance by ABA is accompanied by the expression of novel polypeptides and translatable RNAs. The objective of this study was to isolate and characterize ABA-responsive cDNAs associated with ABA-induced freezing tolerance in bromegrass cell cultures. Among the 16 ABA-responsive cDNA clones isolated, 9 were expressed only with ABA treatment, 7 showed increased transcript level, and 1 was transiently expressed. Cold responsiveness was determined in three clones with increased transcript levels and in the transiently expressed clone. Deacclimation of ABA-hardened cells was a relatively slow process, because all of the novel transcripts persisted for at least 7 d after cells were cultured in ABA-free medium. Preliminary sequencing of cDNAs has identified several clones that share high sequence homology with genes associated with sugar metabolism, osmotic stress, and protease activity. Clone pBGA61 was fully sequenced and tentatively identified as an NADPH-dependent aldose reductase. The predicted amino acid sequence of the coding region shared 92% similarity with that predicted for barley aldose reductase cDNA. It is proposed that expression of genes related to sugar metabolism and osmotic stress may be required for ABA-induced hardening. PMID:8310047

  10. Effects of polysaccharide elicitors from endophytic Fusarium oxysporium Dzf17 on growth and diosgenin production in cell suspension culture of Dioscorea zingiberensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Peiqin; Mou, Yan; Shan, Tijiang; Xu, Jianmei; Li, Yan; Lu, Shiqiong; Zhou, Ligang

    2011-10-26

    Three polysaccharides, namely exopolysaccharide (EPS), water-extracted mycelial polysaccharide (WPS) and sodium hydroxide-extracted mycelial polysaccharide (SPS), were prepared from the endophytic fungus Fusarium oxysporium Dzf17 isolated from the rhizomes of Dioscorea zingiberensis. The effects of the time of addition and polysaccharide concentration on the growth and diosgenin accumulation in cell suspension culture of D. zingiberensis were studied. Among them, WPS was found to be the most effective polysaccharide. When WPS was added to the medium at 20 mg/L on the 25th day of culture, the cell dry weight was increased 1.34-fold, diosgenin content 2.85-fold, and diosgenin yield 3.83-fold in comparison to those of control. EPS and SPS showed moderate and relatively weak enhancement effects on cell growth and diosgenin accumulation, respectively. The dynamics of cell growth and diosgenin accumulation when WPS was added to the medium at 20 mg/L on the 25th day of culture were investigated, and results showed that dry weight of cells reached a maximum value on day 30 but the maximum diosgenin content was achieved on day 31.

  11. Development of a Scalable, High-Throughput-Compatible Assay to Detect Tau Aggregates Using iPSC-Derived Cortical Neurons Maintained in a Three-Dimensional Culture Format.

    PubMed

    Medda, X; Mertens, L; Versweyveld, S; Diels, A; Barnham, L; Bretteville, A; Buist, A; Verheyen, A; Royaux, I; Ebneth, A; Cabrera-Socorro, A

    2016-09-01

    Tau aggregation is the pathological hallmark that best correlates with the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The presence of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), formed of hyperphosphorylated tau, leads to neuronal dysfunction and loss, and is directly associated with the cognitive decline observed in AD patients. The limited success in targeting β-amyloid pathologies has reinforced the hypothesis of blocking tau phosphorylation, aggregation, and/or spreading as alternative therapeutic entry points to treat AD. Identification of novel therapies requires disease-relevant and scalable assays capable of reproducing key features of the pathology in an in vitro setting. Here we use induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as a virtually unlimited source of human cortical neurons to develop a robust and scalable tau aggregation model compatible with high-throughput screening (HTS). We downscaled cell culture conditions to 384-well plate format and used Matrigel to introduce an extra physical protection against cell detachment that reduces shearing stress and better recapitulates pathological conditions. We complemented the assay with AlphaLISA technology for the detection of tau aggregates in a high-throughput-compatible format. The assay is reproducible across users and works with different commercially available iPSC lines, representing a highly translational tool for the identification of novel treatments against tauopathies, including AD. PMID:26984927

  12. The age-dependent epigenetic and physiological changes in an Arabidopsis T87 cell suspension culture during long-term cultivation

    SciTech Connect

    Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Zebrowski, Jacek; Oklejewicz, Bernadetta; Czarnik, Justyna; Halibart-Puzio, Joanna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • A decrease in proliferation rate during long-term cultivation of Arabidopsis cells. • Age-dependent increase in senescence-associated gene expression in Arabidopsis cells. • Age-related increase in DNA methylation, H3K9me2, and H3K27me3 in Arabidopsis cells. • High potential of photosynthetic efficiency of long-term cultured Arabidopsis cells. - Abstract: Plant cell suspension cultures represent good model systems applicable for both basic research and biotechnological purposes. Nevertheless, it is widely known that a prolonged in vitro cultivation of plant cells is associated with genetic and epigenetic instabilities, which may limit the usefulness of plant lines. In this study, the age-dependent epigenetic and physiological changes in an asynchronous Arabidopsis T87 cell culture were examined. A prolonged cultivation period was found to be correlated with a decrease in the proliferation rate and a simultaneous increase in the expression of senescence-associated genes, indicating that the aging process started at the late growth phase of the culture. In addition, increases in the heterochromatin-specific epigenetic markers, i.e., global DNA methylation, H3K9 dimethylation, and H3K27 trimethylation, were observed, suggesting the onset of chromatin condensation, a hallmark of the early stages of plant senescence. Although the number of live cells decreased with an increase in the age of the culture, the remaining viable cells retained a high potential to efficiently perform photosynthesis and did not exhibit any symptoms of photosystem II damage.

  13. Bioactive metabolite production and stress-related hormones in Devil's claw cell suspension cultures grown in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, Milen; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Weber, Jost; Stancheva, Nina; Bley, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    In a previous report, we showed that cell cultures of Harpagophytum procumbens, a South African plant with high medicinal value, accumulate high amounts of anti-inflammatory phenylethanoid glycosides during cultivation in shake-flasks. The aim of the present study was to transfer the phenylethanoid biosynthetic process to a 3-L stirred tank reactor and a 1-L glass-column bioreactor (operated with pulsed aeration). We found that, with stepwise increases in aeration, the stirred tank reactor yielded similar productivities of verbascoside (the major phenylethanoid glycoside in the cells) to those reported for shake-flask cultures (55.68 vs. 54.78 mg verbascoside/L/day, respectively). Transfer in the pulse-aerated column reactor resulted in 165.42 mg verbascoside/L/day, one of the highest yields reported to date. Further, to evaluate the physiological status of the suspended cells in the bioreactors cultures, we examined their hormone levels and compared them to those of cells in shake-flask cultures. While indole-3-acetic acid levels did not differ significantly between the bioreactor and shake-flask cultures, there were considerable differences in their levels of abscisic, jasmonic, and salicylic acids. These results are discussed with respect to relative stress levels in the different cultivation systems. PMID:21104241

  14. Changes in fractal dimension during aggregation.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, Rajat K; Gardner, Kevin H; Atkinson, Joseph F; Van Benschoten, John E

    2003-02-01

    Experiments were performed to evaluate temporal changes in the fractal dimension of aggregates formed during flocculation of an initially monodisperse suspension of latex microspheres. Particle size distributions and aggregate geometrical information at different mixing times were obtained using a non-intrusive optical sampling and digital image analysis technique, under variable conditions of mixing speed, coagulant (alum) dose and particle concentration. Pixel resolution required to determine aggregate size and geometric measures including the fractal dimension is discussed and a quantitative measure of accuracy is developed. The two-dimensional fractal dimension was found to range from 1.94 to 1.48, corresponding to aggregates that are either relatively compact or loosely structured, respectively. Changes in fractal dimension are explained using a conceptual model, which describes changes in fractal dimension associated with aggregate growth and changes in aggregate structure. For aggregation of an initially monodisperse suspension, the fractal dimension was found to decrease over time in the initial stages of floc formation.

  15. [Effect of a fungal elicitor on levels of sanguinarine and polyphenoloxidase activity in a suspension culture of Papaver somniferum L].

    PubMed

    Balazová, A; Bilka, F; Blanáriková, V; Psenák, M

    2002-07-01

    The opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.) is still a source for isolation of codeine and morphine. Cell cultures from this plant lose their ability to produce morphinans. Their major alkaloid is sanguinarine. The elicitation of the opium poppy cell cultures by fungal preparation lead to a nine-fold increase in the content of sanguinarine. The specific activity of polyphenoloxidase (PPO) was three-times higher in the elicited compared to the nonelicited cells. Two isoforms of PPO (Mr 63 kDa, 41 kDa) were identified in opium poppy cell cultures by PAGE. The number of PPO isoforms was not affected by elicitation. Phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B was used for affinity purification of PPO. In a single purification step the specific activity of PPO was enriched 14-fold.

  16. Enhanced hepatic differentiation of rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in spheroidal aggregate culture on a decellularized liver scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Ji; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Yujia; Li, Yi; Li, Li; Chen, Fei; Wu, Xiujuan; Xie, Mingjun; Bu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to determine whether the combination of aggregate culture and decellularized liver scaffolds (DLSs) promoted the hepatic differentiation of murine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) into high yields of mature hepatocytes in vitro. Four culturing methods for differentiation [single cell (2D), spheroids (3D), 2D + DLS and 3D + DLS] were studied. To determine the differentiation stages of the MSCs, RT-qPCR of the hepatocyte genes, immunostaining of hepatocyte markers, and functional analyses were all performed. Compared with the other groups, hepatocyte-like cells which differentiated from BM-MSC spheroids on extracellular matrix (ECM) exhibited more intensive staining of stored glycogen, an elevated level of urea biosynthesis and albumin secretion as well as the higher expression of hepatocyte-specific genes. Our results indicated that DLSs combined with spheroidal aggregate culture may be used as an effective method to facilitate the hepatic maturation of BM-MSCs and may have future applications in stem cell-based liver regenerative medicine. PMID:27314916

  17. Production of high-titer human influenza A virus with adherent and suspension MDCK cells cultured in a single-use hollow fiber bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Felipe; Vogel, Thomas; Genzel, Yvonne; Behrendt, Ilona; Hirschel, Mark; Gangemi, J David; Reichl, Udo

    2014-02-12

    Hollow fiber bioreactors (HFBRs) have been widely described as capable of supporting the production of highly concentrated monoclonal antibodies and recombinant proteins. Only recently HFBRs have been proposed as new single-use platforms for production of high-titer influenza A virus. These bioreactors contain multiple hollow fiber capillary tubes that separate the bioreactor in an intra- and an extra-capillary space. Cells are usually cultured in the extra-capillary space and can grow to a very high cell concentration. This work describes the evaluation of the single-use hollow fiber bioreactor PRIMER HF (Biovest International Inc., USA) for production of influenza A virus. The process was setup, characterized and optimized by running a total of 15 cultivations. The HFBRs were seeded with either adherent or suspension MDCK cells, and infected with influenza virus A/PR/8/34 (H1N1), and the pandemic strain A/Mexico/4108/2009 (H1N1). High HA titers and TCID₅₀ of up to 3.87 log₁₀(HA units/100 μL) and 1.8 × 10(10)virions/mL, respectively, were obtained for A/PR/8/34 influenza strain. Influenza virus was collected by performing multiple harvests of the extra-capillary space during a virus production time of up to 12 days. Cell-specific virus yields between 2,000 and 8,000 virions/cell were estimated for adherent MDCK cells, and between 11,000 and 19,000 virions/cell for suspension MDCK.SUS2 cells. These results do not only coincide with the cell-specific virus yields obtained with cultivations in stirred tank bioreactors and other high cell density systems, but also demonstrate that HFBRs are promising and competitive single-use platforms that can be considered for commercial production of influenza virus.

  18. [Effect of vanadium compounds on the growth and production of coumarins in the suspension culture of Angelica archangelica L].

    PubMed

    Siatka, T; Kasparová, M

    2007-10-01

    Plant tissue cultures represent a promising source of substances of natural origin. The main problem of their use is a low production of the majority of secondary metabolites. One of the methods of increasing the production of these substances is elicitation, because the biosynthesis of many secondary metabolites in plant cells is part of the defensive reaction against biological or abiotic stress influences. The paper tested vanadium compounds as potential elicitors of the production of coumarins: sodium vanadate (0.2; 1; 10; 100 and 1000 microM/l of medium) and vanadyl sulfate (10; 20; 50; 100; 200 and 500 microM/l of medium). The toxicity of these substances for the culture was simultaneously monitored by means of the evaluation of the effects on growth (characterized by fresh and dry weights of biomass at the end of two-week cultivation). The cultures were grown both in the light and dark. The growth of the cultures was not influenced by sodium vanadate at concentrations of 0.2 to 100 microM. A vanadate concentration of 1000 microM acted already toxically (in comparison with the control culture, the fresh weight was decreased by 28 % and the dry weight by 41% when cultivated in the light; the fresh weight by 69% and the dry weight by 66% when cultivated in the dark). Vanadyl sulfate in concentrations of 10 to 50 microM did not affect the growth of the culture, at higher concentrations it decreased it gradually: a concentration of 500 microM acted already toxically, again more markedly when cultivated in the light (in comparison with the control culture, the fresh weight was decreased by 27% and dry weight by 38% when cultivated in the light; the fresh weight by 65% and the dry weight by 61% when cultivated in the dark). The production of coumarins was stimulated by sodium vanadate in a concentration of 0.2 and 1 microM when cultivated in the light. The content of coumarins increased in comparison with the control culture mainly in the medium by 46% and by 25

  19. Holographic characterization of protein aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen; Zhong, Xiao; Ruffner, David; Stutt, Alexandra; Philips, Laura; Ward, Michael; Grier, David

    Holographic characterization directly measures the size distribution of subvisible protein aggregates in suspension and offers insights into their morphology. Based on holographic video microscopy, this analytical technique records and interprets holograms of individual aggregates in protein solutions as they flow down a microfluidic channel, without requiring labeling or other exceptional sample preparation. The hologram of an individual protein aggregate is analyzed in real time with the Lorenz-Mie theory of light scattering to measure that aggregate's size and optical properties. Detecting, counting and characterizing subvisible aggregates proceeds fast enough for time-resolved studies, and lends itself to tracking trends in protein aggregation arising from changing environmental factors. No other analytical technique provides such a wealth of particle-resolved characterization data in situ. Holographic characterization promises accelerated development of therapeutic protein formulations, improved process control during manufacturing, and streamlined quality assurance during storage and at the point of use. Mrsec and MRI program of the NSF, Spheryx Inc.

  20. The Effect of Various Media and Hormones via Suspension Culture on Secondary Metabolic Activities of (Cape Jasmine) Gardenia jasminoides Ellis

    PubMed Central

    Mat Taha, Rosna; Rashid, Kamaludin; Syafawati Yaacob, Jamilah

    2014-01-01

    The leaf of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis was used as explants and was cultured on MS and WPM media supplemented with various concentrations of NAA, IAA, 2,4-D, IBA, TDZ, and Kn (0 to 5 mg L−1 with 0.5 increment). After six months, the higher percentage of callus (100%) and the best dry and fresh weight of callus were formed on WPM medium supplemented with 2,4-D and NAA (2.0-3.0 mg L−1) and this amount was decreased from (84%) to (69%) when this media supplemented with Kinetin and TDZ (1 mg L−1) respectively were used. Leaf segments cultured on WPM media added with Kn (1 mg L−1) and TDZ (2 mg L−1) yielded the least amount of callus. It was found that WPM media added with IAA (4.5–5.0 mg L−1) were optimum for root induction from G. jasminoides plantlets. Antibacterial screening of leaf extracts (in vivo) showed no inhibitory effect against E. coli, P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, and B. cereus, in contrast to callus extracts from leaf cultures supplemented with NAA, which showed inhibition activity against E. coli and B. cereus. The callus extracts from leaf cultures grown on both MS and WPM media showed higher antioxidant and superoxide dismutase activities than leaf extracts. PMID:24967432

  1. The effect of various media and hormones via suspension culture on secondary metabolic activities of (Cape Jasmine) Gardenia jasminoides Ellis.

    PubMed

    Farzinebrahimi, Reza; Mat Taha, Rosna; Rashid, Kamaludin; Syafawati Yaacob, Jamilah

    2014-01-01

    The leaf of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis was used as explants and was cultured on MS and WPM media supplemented with various concentrations of NAA, IAA, 2,4-D, IBA, TDZ, and Kn (0 to 5 mg L(-1) with 0.5 increment). After six months, the higher percentage of callus (100%) and the best dry and fresh weight of callus were formed on WPM medium supplemented with 2,4-D and NAA (2.0-3.0 mg L(-1)) and this amount was decreased from (84%) to (69%) when this media supplemented with Kinetin and TDZ (1 mg L(-1)) respectively were used. Leaf segments cultured on WPM media added with Kn (1 mg L(-1)) and TDZ (2 mg L(-1)) yielded the least amount of callus. It was found that WPM media added with IAA (4.5-5.0 mg L(-1)) were optimum for root induction from G. jasminoides plantlets. Antibacterial screening of leaf extracts (in vivo) showed no inhibitory effect against E. coli, P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, and B. cereus, in contrast to callus extracts from leaf cultures supplemented with NAA, which showed inhibition activity against E. coli and B. cereus. The callus extracts from leaf cultures grown on both MS and WPM media showed higher antioxidant and superoxide dismutase activities than leaf extracts. PMID:24967432

  2. Role of cellular antioxidants (glutathione and ascorbic acid) in the growth and development of wild carrot suspension cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Earnshaw, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    Determinations of endogenous glutathione (GSH), glutathione disulfide (GSSG), ascorbic acid (AA) and dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) in proliferating and developing wild carrot cultures showed that lower levels of GSH and AA were associated with developing cultures. The GSSG and DHA levels did not account for the changes in the levels of antioxidants between proliferating and developing cultures. Studies were designed to test an observed auxin (2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 2,4-D)-antioxidant association. Two fractions (embryo and less developed) were obtained by screening developed cultures which were previously grown in the presence of /sup 14/C-2, 4-D. The embryo fraction had a lower concentration of /sup 14/C than the less developed fraction, supporting the association, since the two fractions showed this relationship with respect to GSH and AA concentrations. Determinations of GSH and AA levels of cells grown in various concentrations of 2,4-D showed the association, decreases in the 2,4-D concentration correlated with decreases in the GSH and AA concentrations. The existence of a respiratory pathway involving GSSG reductase, DHA reductase, and AA oxidase was investigated to test whether inhibition of AA oxidase by 2,4-D could explain the auxin-antioxidant association; however, AA oxidase activity was not detected.

  3. Uptake and metabolism of clomazone in tolerant-soybean and susceptible-cotton photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Norman, M A; Liebl, R A; Widholm, J M

    1990-03-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the uptake and metabolism of the pigment synthesis inhibiting herbicide clomazone in tolerant-soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Corsoy) and susceptible-cotton (Gossypium hirsutum [L.] cv Stoneville 825) photomixotrophic cell suspensions. Soybean and cotton on a whole plant level are tolerant and susceptible to clomazone, respectively. Preliminary studies indicated that I(50) values for growth, chlorophyll (Chl), beta-carotene, and lutein were, respectively, >22, 14, 19, and 23 times greater for the soybean cell line (SB-M) 8 days after treatment (DAT) compared to the cotton cell line (COT-M) 16 DAT. Differences in [(14)C]clomazone uptake cannot account for selectivity since there were significantly greater levels of clomazone absorbed by the SB-M cells compared to the COT-M cells for each treatment. The percentage of absorbed clomazone converted to more polar metabolite(s) was significantly greater by the SB-M cells relative to COT-M cells at 6 and 24 hours after treatment, however, only small differences existed between the cell lines by 48 hours after treatment. Nearly identical levels of parental clomazone was recovered from both cell lines for all treatments. A pooled metabolite fraction isolated from SB-M cells had no effect on the leaf pigment content of susceptible velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti Medic.) or soybean seedlings. Conversely, a pooled metabolite fraction from COT-M cells reduced the leaf Chl content of velvetleaf. Soybean tolerance to clomazone appears to be due to differential metabolism (bioactivation) and/or differences at the site of action.

  4. Uptake and Metabolism of Clomazone in Tolerant-Soybean and Susceptible-Cotton Photomixotrophic Cell Suspension Cultures 1

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Michael A.; Liebl, Rex A.; Widholm, Jack M.

    1990-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the uptake and metabolism of the pigment synthesis inhibiting herbicide clomazone in tolerant-soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Corsoy) and susceptible-cotton (Gossypium hirsutum [L.] cv Stoneville 825) photomixotrophic cell suspensions. Soybean and cotton on a whole plant level are tolerant and susceptible to clomazone, respectively. Preliminary studies indicated that I50 values for growth, chlorophyll (Chl), β-carotene, and lutein were, respectively, >22, 14, 19, and 23 times greater for the soybean cell line (SB-M) 8 days after treatment (DAT) compared to the cotton cell line (COT-M) 16 DAT. Differences in [14C]clomazone uptake cannot account for selectivity since there were significantly greater levels of clomazone absorbed by the SB-M cells compared to the COT-M cells for each treatment. The percentage of absorbed clomazone converted to more polar metabolite(s) was significantly greater by the SB-M cells relative to COT-M cells at 6 and 24 hours after treatment, however, only small differences existed between the cell lines by 48 hours after treatment. Nearly identical levels of parental clomazone was recovered from both cell lines for all treatments. A pooled metabolite fraction isolated from SB-M cells had no effect on the leaf pigment content of susceptible velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti Medic.) or soybean seedlings. Conversely, a pooled metabolite fraction from COT-M cells reduced the leaf Chl content of velvetleaf. Soybean tolerance to clomazone appears to be due to differential metabolism (bioactivation) and/or differences at the site of action. PMID:16667349

  5. Uptake and metabolism of clomazone in tolerant-soybean and susceptible-cotton photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, M.A.; Liebl, R.A.; Widholm, J.M. )

    1990-03-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the uptake and metabolism of the pigment synthesis inhibiting herbicide clomazone in tolerant-soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv Corsoy) and susceptible-cotton (Gossypium hirsutum (L.) cv Stoneville 825) photomixotrophic cell suspensions. Soybean and cotton on a whole plant level are tolerant and susceptible to clomazone, respectively. Preliminary studies indicated that I{sub 50} values for growth, chlorophyll (Chl), {beta}-carotene, and lutein were, respectively, >22, 14, 19, and 23 times greater for the soybean cell line (SB-M) 8 days after treatment (DAT) compared to the cotton cell line (COT-M) 16 DAT. Differences in ({sup 14}C)clomazone uptake cannot account for selectivity since there were significantly greater levels of domazone absorbed by the SB-M cells compared to the COT-M cells for each treatment. The percentage of absorbed clomazone converted to more polar metabolite(s) was significantly greater by the SB-M cells relative to COT-M cells at 6 and 24 hours after treatment, however, only small differences existed between the cell lines by 48 hours after treatment. Nearly identical levels of parental clomazone was recovered from both cell lines for all treatments. A pooled metabolite fraction isolated from SB-M cells had no effect on the leaf pigment content of susceptible velvetleaf or soybean seedlings. Conversely, a pooled metabolite fraction from COT-M cells reduced the leaf Chl content of velvetleaf. Soybean tolerance to clomazone appears to be due to differential metabolism (bioactivation) and/or differences at the site of action.

  6. Effect of light wavelength on cell growth, content of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity in cell suspension cultures of Thevetia peruviana.

    PubMed

    Arias, J P; Zapata, K; Rojano, B; Arias, M

    2016-10-01

    Thevetia peruviana (T. peruviana) has been considered as a potentially important plant for industrial and pharmacological application. Among the number of compounds which are produced by T. peruviana, antioxidants and polyphenols are of particular interest due to their benefits on human health. Cell suspension cultures of T. peruviana were established under different conditions: 1) constant illumination (24h/day) at different light wavelengths (red, green, blue, yellow and white), 2) darkness and 3) control (12h/12h: day light/dark) to investigate their biomass, substrate uptake, polyphenols production and oxidizing activity. The results showed biomass concentrations between 17.1g dry weight (DW)/l (green light) and 18.2g DW/l (control) after 13days. The cultures that grew under green light conditions consumed completely all substrates after 10days, while other cultures required at least 13days or more. The total phenolic content was between 7.21 and 9.46mg gallic acid (GA)/g DW for all light conditions. In addition the ferric reducing antioxidant power and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid antioxidant activity ranged from 5.41-6.58mg ascorbic acid (AA)/g DW and 82.93-110.39μmol Trolox/g DW, respectively. Interestingly, the samples which grew under the darkness presented a higher phenolic content and antioxidant capacity when compared to the light conditions. All together, these results demonstrate the extraordinary effect of different lighting conditions on polyphenols production and antioxidant compounds by T. peruviana.

  7. Effect of light wavelength on cell growth, content of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity in cell suspension cultures of Thevetia peruviana.

    PubMed

    Arias, J P; Zapata, K; Rojano, B; Arias, M

    2016-10-01

    Thevetia peruviana (T. peruviana) has been considered as a potentially important plant for industrial and pharmacological application. Among the number of compounds which are produced by T. peruviana, antioxidants and polyphenols are of particular interest due to their benefits on human health. Cell suspension cultures of T. peruviana were established under different conditions: 1) constant illumination (24h/day) at different light wavelengths (red, green, blue, yellow and white), 2) darkness and 3) control (12h/12h: day light/dark) to investigate their biomass, substrate uptake, polyphenols production and oxidizing activity. The results showed biomass concentrations between 17.1g dry weight (DW)/l (green light) and 18.2g DW/l (control) after 13days. The cultures that grew under green light conditions consumed completely all substrates after 10days, while other cultures required at least 13days or more. The total phenolic content was between 7.21 and 9.46mg gallic acid (GA)/g DW for all light conditions. In addition the ferric reducing antioxidant power and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid antioxidant activity ranged from 5.41-6.58mg ascorbic acid (AA)/g DW and 82.93-110.39μmol Trolox/g DW, respectively. Interestingly, the samples which grew under the darkness presented a higher phenolic content and antioxidant capacity when compared to the light conditions. All together, these results demonstrate the extraordinary effect of different lighting conditions on polyphenols production and antioxidant compounds by T. peruviana. PMID:27541569

  8. Composition analysis of fractions of extracellular polymeric substances from an activated sludge culture and identification of dominant forces affecting microbial aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xuan; Wang, Xu; Liu, Junxin

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) appear to play a critical role in the formation of bioaggregates, such as sludge flocs, in activated sludge processes. Here, we systematically investigated the composition and chemical structure of various EPS fractions excreted from an activated sludge culture using multi-analysis techniques to examine the ability of the sludge to aggregate. Chemical analysis was used with a three-dimensional excitation emission matrix and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, applying inter-particle forces theory. The combined findings revealed that hydrophobic groups, especially protein-related N–H, were present in a greater proportion in tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS). This result, which explained the specificity of TB-EPS in the chemical structure, was consistent with data indicating that TB-EPS contained a large amount of protein-like substances (86.7 mg/g of mixed liquor volatile suspended solids, 39.7% of the total EPS). Subsequently, a novel experimental procedure was developed to pinpoint key inter-particle forces in sludge aggregation. The result revealed that hydrogen bonds are the predominant triggers that promote sludge aggregation. This comprehensive analysis indicated that hydrophobic proteins in TB-EPS are responsible for the critical role played by hydrogen bonds in sludge formation. Our findings highlight the need to elucidate the mechanisms of TB-EPS-mediated flocculation in future efforts. PMID:27311788

  9. Composition analysis of fractions of extracellular polymeric substances from an activated sludge culture and identification of dominant forces affecting microbial aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xuan; Wang, Xu; Liu, Junxin

    2016-06-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) appear to play a critical role in the formation of bioaggregates, such as sludge flocs, in activated sludge processes. Here, we systematically investigated the composition and chemical structure of various EPS fractions excreted from an activated sludge culture using multi-analysis techniques to examine the ability of the sludge to aggregate. Chemical analysis was used with a three-dimensional excitation emission matrix and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, applying inter-particle forces theory. The combined findings revealed that hydrophobic groups, especially protein-related N–H, were present in a greater proportion in tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS). This result, which explained the specificity of TB-EPS in the chemical structure, was consistent with data indicating that TB-EPS contained a large amount of protein-like substances (86.7 mg/g of mixed liquor volatile suspended solids, 39.7% of the total EPS). Subsequently, a novel experimental procedure was developed to pinpoint key inter-particle forces in sludge aggregation. The result revealed that hydrogen bonds are the predominant triggers that promote sludge aggregation. This comprehensive analysis indicated that hydrophobic proteins in TB-EPS are responsible for the critical role played by hydrogen bonds in sludge formation. Our findings highlight the need to elucidate the mechanisms of TB-EPS-mediated flocculation in future efforts.

  10. Reprogramming of enteroendocrine K cells to pancreatic β-cells through the combined expression of Nkx6.1 and Neurogenin3, and reaggregation in suspension culture

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Esder; Ryu, Gyeong Ryul; Moon, Sung-Dae; Ko, Seung-Hyun; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Song, Ki-Ho

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •K cells were selected from STC-1 cells, a heterogeneous enteroendocrine cell line. •K cells did not express Nkx6.1 and Neurogenin3. •Combined expression of Nkx6.1 and Neurogenin3 reprogrammed K cells to β-cells. •Reprogramming of K cells to β-cells was not complete. -- Abstract: Recent studies have demonstrated that adult cells such as pancreatic exocrine cells can be converted to pancreatic β-cells in a process called cell reprogramming. Enteroendocrine cells and β-cells share similar pathways of differentiation during embryonic development. Notably, enteroendocrine K cells express many of the key proteins found in β-cells. Thus, K cells could be reprogrammed to β-cells under certain conditions. However, there is no clear evidence on whether these cells convert to β-cells. K cells were selected from STC-1 cells, an enteroendocrine cell line expressing multiple hormones. K cells were found to express many genes of transcription factors crucial for islet development and differentiation except for Nkx6.1 and Neurogenin3. A K cell clone stably expressing Nkx6.1 (Nkx6.1{sup +}-K cells) was established. Induction of Neurogenin3 expression in Nkx6.1{sup +}-K cells, by either treatment with a γ-secretase inhibitor or infection with a recombinant adenovirus expressing Neurogenin3, led to a significant increase in Insulin1 mRNA expression. After infection with the adenovirus expressing Neurogenin3 and reaggregation in suspension culture, about 50% of Nkx6.1{sup +}-K cells expressed insulin as determined by immunostaining. The intracellular insulin content was increased markedly. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of insulin granules. However, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was defective, and there was no glucose lowering effect after transplantation of these cells in diabetic mice. In conclusion, we demonstrated that K cells could be reprogrammed partially to β-cells through the combined expression of Nkx6.1 and Neurogenin3, and

  11. Functional compartmentation of the Golgi apparatus of plant cells : immunocytochemical analysis of high-pressure frozen- and freeze-substituted sycamore maple suspension culture cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G F; Staehelin, L A

    1992-07-01

    The Golgi apparatus of plant cells is engaged in both the processing of glycoproteins and the synthesis of complex polysaccharides. To investigate the compartmentalization of these functions within individual Golgi stacks, we have analyzed the ultrastructure and the immunolabeling patterns of high-pressure frozen and freeze-substituted suspension-cultured sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cells. As a result of the improved structural preservation, three morphological types of Golgi cisternae, designated cis, medial, and trans, as well as the trans Golgi network, could be identified. The number of cis cisternae per Golgi stack was found to be fairly constant at approximately 1, whereas the number of medial and trans cisternae per stack was variable and accounted for the varying number of cisternae (3-10) among the many Golgi stacks examined. By using a battery of seven antibodies whose specific sugar epitopes on secreted polysaccharides and glycoproteins are known, we have been able to determine in which types of cisternae specific sugars are added to N-linked glycans, and to xyloglucan and polygalacturonic acid/rhamnogalacturonan-I, two complex polysaccharides. The findings are as follows. The beta-1,4-linked d-glucosyl backbone of xyloglucan is synthesized in trans cisternae, and the terminal fucosyl residues on the trisaccharide side chains of xyloglucan are partly added in the trans cisternae, and partly in the trans Golgi network. In contrast, the polygalacturonic/rhamnogalacturonan-I backbone is assembled in cis and medial cisternae, methylesterification of the carboxyl groups of the galacturonic acid residues in the polygalacturonic acid domains occurs mostly in medial cisternae, and arabinose-containing side chains of the polygalacturonic acid domains are added to the nascent polygalacturonic acid/rhamnogalacturonan-I molecules in the trans cisternae. Double labeling experiments demonstrate that xyloglucan and polygalacturonic acid

  12. Arginine–glycine–aspartic acid–polyethylene glycol–polyamidoamine dendrimer conjugate improves liver-cell aggregation and function in 3-D spheroid culture

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhanfei; Lian, Fen; Wang, Xiaoqian; Chen, Yanling; Tang, Nanhong

    2016-01-01

    The polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer, a type of macromolecule material, has been used in spheroidal cell culture and drug delivery in recent years. However, PAMAM is not involved in the study of hepatic cell-spheroid culture or its biological activity, particularly in detoxification function. Here, we constructed a PAMAM-dendrimer conjugate decorated by an integrin ligand: arginine–glycine–aspartic acid (RGD) peptide. Our studies demonstrate that RGD–polyethylene glycol (PEG)–PAMAM conjugates can promote singly floating hepatic cells to aggregate together in a sphere-like growth with a weak reactive oxygen species. Moreover, RGD-PEG-PAMAM conjugates can activate the AKT–MAPK pathway in hepatic cells to promote cell proliferation and improve basic function and ammonia metabolism. Together, our data support the hepatocyte sphere treated by RGD-PEG-PAMAM conjugates as a potential source of hepatic cells for a biological artificial liver system.

  13. Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-polyethylene glycol-polyamidoamine dendrimer conjugate improves liver-cell aggregation and function in 3-D spheroid culture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhanfei; Lian, Fen; Wang, Xiaoqian; Chen, Yanling; Tang, Nanhong

    2016-01-01

    The polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer, a type of macromolecule material, has been used in spheroidal cell culture and drug delivery in recent years. However, PAMAM is not involved in the study of hepatic cell-spheroid culture or its biological activity, particularly in detoxification function. Here, we constructed a PAMAM-dendrimer conjugate decorated by an integrin ligand: arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide. Our studies demonstrate that RGD-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-PAMAM conjugates can promote singly floating hepatic cells to aggregate together in a sphere-like growth with a weak reactive oxygen species. Moreover, RGD-PEG-PAMAM conjugates can activate the AKT-MAPK pathway in hepatic cells to promote cell proliferation and improve basic function and ammonia metabolism. Together, our data support the hepatocyte sphere treated by RGD-PEG-PAMAM conjugates as a potential source of hepatic cells for a biological artificial liver system. PMID:27621619

  14. Arginine–glycine–aspartic acid–polyethylene glycol–polyamidoamine dendrimer conjugate improves liver-cell aggregation and function in 3-D spheroid culture

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhanfei; Lian, Fen; Wang, Xiaoqian; Chen, Yanling; Tang, Nanhong

    2016-01-01

    The polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer, a type of macromolecule material, has been used in spheroidal cell culture and drug delivery in recent years. However, PAMAM is not involved in the study of hepatic cell-spheroid culture or its biological activity, particularly in detoxification function. Here, we constructed a PAMAM-dendrimer conjugate decorated by an integrin ligand: arginine–glycine–aspartic acid (RGD) peptide. Our studies demonstrate that RGD–polyethylene glycol (PEG)–PAMAM conjugates can promote singly floating hepatic cells to aggregate together in a sphere-like growth with a weak reactive oxygen species. Moreover, RGD-PEG-PAMAM conjugates can activate the AKT–MAPK pathway in hepatic cells to promote cell proliferation and improve basic function and ammonia metabolism. Together, our data support the hepatocyte sphere treated by RGD-PEG-PAMAM conjugates as a potential source of hepatic cells for a biological artificial liver system. PMID:27621619

  15. Effect of NaCl on ionic content and distribution in suspension-cultured cells of the halophyte Sonneratia alba versus the glycophyte Oryza sativa.

    PubMed

    Hayatsu, Manabu; Suzuki, Suechika; Hasegawa, Ai; Tsuchiya, Shinpei; Sasamoto, Hamako

    2014-09-15

    The effect of a high concentration of NaCl on the intra- (cytoplasmic matrix and vacuole) and extracellular (cell wall) distribution of Na, Cl, K, Mg, Ca, S, and P was investigated in suspension-cultured cells of the mangrove halophyte Sonneratia alba and compared to cultured cells of glycophytic rice (Oryza sativa). No significant differences were observed in ultrastructural features of cluster cells of both species cultured with and without 50mM NaCl. Quantitative X-ray microanalysis of cryosections of the cells cultured in the presence of 50mM NaCl showed that the Na concentration ([Na]) and Cl concentration ([Cl]) significantly increased in all three cell components measured. In S. alba, the [Na] was highest in the vacuole and lowest in the cytoplasmic matrix, while the [Cl] was highest in the cell wall and lowest in the cytoplasmic matrix. In O. sativa, however, the [Na] and [Cl] were highest in the cell wall, and the [Na] was lowest in the cytoplasmic matrix. Thus, the possible activities for Na and Cl transport from the cytoplasmic matrix into the vacuole were greater in S. alba than in O. sativa, suggesting that halophilic mangrove cells gain salt tolerance by transporting Na and Cl into their vacuoles. In O. sativa, the addition of NaCl to the culture medium caused no significant changes to the intracellular concentrations of various elements, such as K, P, S, Ca, and Mg, which suggests the absence of a direct relationship with the transport Na and Cl. In contrast, a marked decrease in the Ca concentration ([Ca]) in the cytoplasmic matrix and vacuole and an approximately two-fold increase in the P concentration ([P]) in the cytoplasmic matrix were found in S. alba, suggesting that the decrease in the [Ca] is related to the halophilic nature of S. alba (as indicated by the inward movement of Na(+) and Cl(-)). The possible roles of a Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange mechanism in halophilism and the effect of the [P] on the metabolic activity under saline conditions are

  16. Enhancement of phenolics, resveratrol and antioxidant activity by nitrogen enrichment in cell suspension culture of Vitis vinifera.

    PubMed

    Sae-Lee, Napaporn; Kerdchoechuen, Orapin; Laohakunjit, Natta

    2014-01-01

    Ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3), an important nitrogen source (34% N), has been used as an elicitor to stimulate plant growth and development as well as induce secondary metabolites under controlled conditions. In the present paper, we investigated the enhancement of cell biomass, total phenolics, resveratrol levels, and antioxidant activity of Vitis vinifera cv. Pok Dum by nitrogen enrichment (MS medium supplemented with NH4NO3 at 0, 500, 1,000, 5,000 and 10,000 mg/L). The highest accumulations of biomass, phenolics and resveratrol contents were observed at 8.8-fold (86.6 g DW/L), 15.9-fold (71.91 mg GAE/g DW) and 5.6-fold (277.89 µg/g DW) by the 14th day, in the medium supplemented with 500 mg/L NH4NO3. Moreover, the antioxidant activities of cultured grape cells estimated by the DPPH· and ABTS·+ assay were positively correlated with phenolics and resveratrol, and the maximum activity was also observed in cultured cells with 500 mg/L NH4NO3 at 176.11 and 267.79 mmol TE/100 g DW, respectively. PMID:24962393

  17. Enhancement of phenolics, resveratrol and antioxidant activity by nitrogen enrichment in cell suspension culture of Vitis vinifera.

    PubMed

    Sae-Lee, Napaporn; Kerdchoechuen, Orapin; Laohakunjit, Natta

    2014-01-01

    Ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3), an important nitrogen source (34% N), has been used as an elicitor to stimulate plant growth and development as well as induce secondary metabolites under controlled conditions. In the present paper, we investigated the enhancement of cell biomass, total phenolics, resveratrol levels, and antioxidant activity of Vitis vinifera cv. Pok Dum by nitrogen enrichment (MS medium supplemented with NH4NO3 at 0, 500, 1,000, 5,000 and 10,000 mg/L). The highest accumulations of biomass, phenolics and resveratrol contents were observed at 8.8-fold (86.6 g DW/L), 15.9-fold (71.91 mg GAE/g DW) and 5.6-fold (277.89 µg/g DW) by the 14th day, in the medium supplemented with 500 mg/L NH4NO3. Moreover, the antioxidant activities of cultured grape cells estimated by the DPPH· and ABTS·+ assay were positively correlated with phenolics and resveratrol, and the maximum activity was also observed in cultured cells with 500 mg/L NH4NO3 at 176.11 and 267.79 mmol TE/100 g DW, respectively.

  18. Chlorogenic acid biosynthesis: characterization of a light-induced microsomal 5-O-(4-coumaroyl)-D-quinate/shikimate 3'-hydroxylase from carrot (Daucus carota L. ) cell suspension cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehnl, T.K.; Koch, U.; Heller, W.; Wellmann, E.

    1987-10-01

    Microsomal preparations from carrot (Daucus carota L.) cell suspension cultures catalyze the formation of trans-5-O-caffeoyl-D-quinate (chlorogenate) from trans-5-O-(4-coumaroyl)-D-quinate. trans-5-O-(4-Coumaroyl)shikimate is converted to about the same extent to trans-5-O-caffeoylshikimate. trans-4-O-(4-Coumaroyl)-D-quinate, trans-3-O-(4-coumaroyl)-D-quinate, trans-4-coumarate, and cis-5-O-(4-coumaroyl)-D-quinate do not act as substrates. The reaction is strictly dependent on molecular oxygen and on NADPH as reducing cofactor. NADH and ascorbic acid cannot substitute for NADPH. Cytochrome c, Tetcyclacis, and carbon monoxide inhibit the reaction suggesting a cytochrome P-450-dependent mixed-function monooxygenase. Competition experiments as well as induction and inhibition phenomena indicate that there is only one enzyme species which is responsible for the hydroxylation of the 5-O-(4-coumaric) esters of both D-quinate and shikimate. The activity of this enzyme is greatly increased by in vivo irradiation of the cells with blue/uv light. We conclude that the biosynthesis of the predominant caffeic acid conjugates in carrot cells occurs via the corresponding 4-coumaric acid esters. Thus, in this system, 5-O-(4-coumaroyl)-D-quinate can be seen as the final intermediate in the chlorogenic acid pathway.

  19. Role of reactive oxygen species and proline cycle in anthraquinone accumulation in Rubia tinctorum cell suspension cultures subjected to methyl jasmonate elicitation.

    PubMed

    Perassolo, María; Quevedo, Carla Verónica; Busto, Víctor Daniel; Giulietti, Ana María; Talou, Julián Rodríguez

    2011-07-01

    Elicitors are compounds or factors capable of triggering a defense response in plants. This kind of response involves signal transduction pathways, second messengers and events such as Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation, proline accumulation and secondary metabolite production. Anthraquinone (AQs) biosynthesis in Rubia tinctorum L. involves different metabolic routes, including shikimate and 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathways. It has been proposed that the proline cycle could be coupled with the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), since the NADP+ generated by this cycle could act as a cofactor of the first enzymes of the PPP. The end-product of this pathway is erithrose-4-phosphate, which becomes the substrate of the shikimate pathway. The aim of this work was to study the effect of methyl jasmonate (MeJ), a well-known endogenous elicitor, on the PPP, the proline cycle and AQs production in R. tinctorum cell suspension cultures, and to elucidate the role of ROS in MeJ elicitation. Treatment with MeJ resulted in AQs as well as proline accumulation, which was mimicked by the treatment with a H₂O₂-generating system. Both MeJ-induced effects were abolished in the presence of diphenyliodonium (DPI), a NADPH oxidase inhibitor (main source of ROS). Treatment with the elicitor failed to induce PPP; therefore, this route did not turn out to be limiting the carbon flux to the shikimate pathway.

  20. Capillary electrophoresis for automated on-line monitoring of suspension cultures: Correlating cell density, nutrients and metabolites in near real-time.

    PubMed

    Alhusban, Ala A; Breadmore, Michael C; Gueven, Nuri; Guijt, Rosanne M

    2016-05-12

    Increasingly stringent demands on the production of biopharmaceuticals demand monitoring of process parameters that impact on their quality. We developed an automated platform for on-line, near real-time monitoring of suspension cultures by integrating microfluidic components for cell counting and filtration with a high-resolution separation technique. This enabled the correlation of the growth of a human lymphocyte cell line with changes in the essential metabolic markers, glucose, glutamine, leucine/isoleucine and lactate, determined by Sequential Injection-Capillary Electrophoresis (SI-CE). Using 8.1 mL of media (41 μL per run), the metabolic status and cell density were recorded every 30 min over 4 days. The presented platform is flexible, simple and automated and allows for fast, robust and sensitive analysis with low sample consumption and high sample throughput. It is compatible with up- and out-scaling, and as such provides a promising new solution to meet the future demands in process monitoring in the biopharmaceutical industry. PMID:27114228

  1. [Effects of germanium on cell growth, polysaccharide production and cellular redox status in suspension cultures of protocorm-like bodies of Dendrobium huoshanense].

    PubMed

    Wei, Ming; Yang, Chaoying; Jiang, Shaotong

    2010-03-01

    To solve the problem of low growth rate and metabolism level in suspension cultures of protocorm-like bodies (PLBs) of Dendrobium huoshanense. The effects of germanium on PLB proliferation and accumulation of polysaccharides together with nutrient utilization were investigated and the contents of reducing sugars, soluble proteins, the activities of antioxidant enzymes and redox status of the cells of PLB were analyzed. The results indicated that the optimum concentration of germanium dioxide (4.0 mg/L) significantly enhanced the cell growth and accumulation of polysaccharides, greatly improved contents of reducing sugars and soluble proteins, increased the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) but decreased the activity of peroxidase(POD). The cell dry weight and production of polysaccharides were 32.6 g/L and 3.78 g/L, respectively. The analysis of cellular redox status showed that the ratio of reduced glutathione (GSH) to oxidized glutathione (GSSG) in cells and the activity of glutathione reductase were significantly increased by the addition of germanium dioxide. The suitable concentration of germanium dioxide was beneficial to the cell growth and the accumulation of polysaccharides.

  2. NMR spectroscopicsearch module for Spektraris, an online resource for plant natural product identification – taxane diterpenoids from Taxus × media cell suspension cultures as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Fischedick, Justin T.; Johnson, Sean R.; Ketchum, Raymond E.B.; Croteau, Rodney B.; Lange, B. Markus

    2014-01-01

    Development and testing of Spektraris-NMR an online spectral resource, is reported for the NMR-based structural identification of plant natural products (PNPs). Spektraris-NMRallows users to search with multiple spectra at once and returns a table with alist of hits arranged according to the goodness of fit between query data and database entries. For each hit, a link to a tabulated alignment of 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR spectroscopic peaks (query versus database entry) is provided. Furthermore, full spectroscopic records and experimental meta information about each database entry can be accessed online. To test the utility of Spektraris-NMR for PNP identification, the database was populated with NMR data (total of 466 spectra) for ∼250 taxanes, which are structurally complex diterpenoids (including the anticancer drug taxol) commonly found in the genus Taxus. NMR data generated used was then generated with metabolites purified from Taxus cell suspension cultures to search Spektraris-NMR, and were able to identify eight taxanes with high confidence. A ninth isolated metabolite could be assigned, based on spectral searches, to a taxane skeletal class, but no high confidence hit was produced. Using various spectroscopic methods, this metabolite was characterized as the taxane 2-deacetylbaccatin IV, a novel taxane. These results indicate that Spektraris-NMR is a valuable resource for rapid and reliable identification of known metabolites and has the potential to contribute to de-replication efforts in the search for novel PNPs. PMID:25534952

  3. Rice suspension cultured cells are evaluated as a model system to study salt responsive networks in plants using a combined proteomic and metabolomic profiling approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dawei; Ford, Kristina L; Roessner, Ute; Natera, Siria; Cassin, Andrew M; Patterson, John H; Bacic, Antony

    2013-06-01

    Salinity is one of the major abiotic stresses affecting plant productivity but surprisingly, a thorough understanding of the salt-responsive networks responsible for sustaining growth and maintaining crop yield remains a significant challenge. Rice suspension culture cells (SCCs), a single cell type, were evaluated as a model system as they provide a ready source of a homogenous cell type and avoid the complications of multicellular tissue types in planta. A combination of growth performance, and transcriptional analyses using known salt-induced genes was performed on control and 100 mM NaCl cultured cells to validate the biological system. Protein profiling was conducted using both DIGE- and iTRAQ-based proteomics approaches. In total, 106 proteins were identified in DIGE experiments and 521 proteins in iTRAQ experiments with 58 proteins common to both approaches. Metabolomic analysis provided insights into both developmental changes and salt-induced changes of rice SCCs at the metabolite level; 134 known metabolites were identified, including 30 amines and amides, 40 organic acids, 40 sugars, sugar acids and sugar alcohols, 21 fatty acids and sterols, and 3 miscellaneous compounds. Our results from proteomic and metabolomic studies indicate that the salt-responsive networks of rice SCCs are extremely complex and share some similarities with thee cellular responses observed in planta. For instance, carbohydrate and energy metabolism pathways, redox signaling pathways, auxin/indole-3-acetic acid pathways and biosynthesis pathways for osmoprotectants are all salt responsive in SCCs enabling cells to maintain cellular function under stress condition. These data are discussed in the context of our understanding of in planta salt-responses. PMID:23661342

  4. Rice suspension cultured cells are evaluated as a model system to study salt responsive networks in plants using a combined proteomic and metabolomic profiling approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dawei; Ford, Kristina L; Roessner, Ute; Natera, Siria; Cassin, Andrew M; Patterson, John H; Bacic, Antony

    2013-06-01

    Salinity is one of the major abiotic stresses affecting plant productivity but surprisingly, a thorough understanding of the salt-responsive networks responsible for sustaining growth and maintaining crop yield remains a significant challenge. Rice suspension culture cells (SCCs), a single cell type, were evaluated as a model system as they provide a ready source of a homogenous cell type and avoid the complications of multicellular tissue types in planta. A combination of growth performance, and transcriptional analyses using known salt-induced genes was performed on control and 100 mM NaCl cultured cells to validate the biological system. Protein profiling was conducted using both DIGE- and iTRAQ-based proteomics approaches. In total, 106 proteins were identified in DIGE experiments and 521 proteins in iTRAQ experiments with 58 proteins common to both approaches. Metabolomic analysis provided insights into both developmental changes and salt-induced changes of rice SCCs at the metabolite level; 134 known metabolites were identified, including 30 amines and amides, 40 organic acids, 40 sugars, sugar acids and sugar alcohols, 21 fatty acids and sterols, and 3 miscellaneous compounds. Our results from proteomic and metabolomic studies indicate that the salt-responsive networks of rice SCCs are extremely complex and share some similarities with thee cellular responses observed in planta. For instance, carbohydrate and energy metabolism pathways, redox signaling pathways, auxin/indole-3-acetic acid pathways and biosynthesis pathways for osmoprotectants are all salt responsive in SCCs enabling cells to maintain cellular function under stress condition. These data are discussed in the context of our understanding of in planta salt-responses.

  5. Cell aggregation and sedimentation.

    PubMed

    Davis, R H

    1995-01-01

    The aggregation of cells into clumps or flocs has been exploited for decades in such applications as biological wastewater treatment, beer brewing, antibiotic fermentation, and enhanced sedimentation to aid in cell recovery or retention. More recent research has included the use of cell aggregation and sedimentation to selectively separate subpopulations of cells. Potential biotechnological applications include overcoming contamination, maintaining plasmid-bearing cells in continuous fermentors, and selectively removing nonviable hybridoma cells from perfusion cultures.

  6. α-Synuclein propagates from mouse brain to grafted dopaminergic neurons and seeds aggregation in cultured human cells

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Christian; Angot, Elodie; Bergström, Ann-Louise; Steiner, Jennifer A.; Pieri, Laura; Paul, Gesine; Outeiro, Tiago F.; Melki, Ronald; Kallunki, Pekka; Fog, Karina; Li, Jia-Yi; Brundin, Patrik

    2011-01-01

    Post-mortem analyses of brains from patients with Parkinson disease who received fetal mesencephalic transplants show that α-synuclein–containing (α-syn–containing) Lewy bodies gradually appear in grafted neurons. Here, we explored whether intercellular transfer of α-syn from host to graft, followed by seeding of α-syn aggregation in recipient neurons, can contribute to this phenomenon. We assessed α-syn cell-to-cell transfer using microscopy, flow cytometry, and high-content screening in several coculture model systems. Coculturing cells engineered to express either GFP– or DsRed-tagged α-syn resulted in a gradual increase in double-labeled cells. Importantly, α-syn–GFP derived from 1 neuroblastoma cell line localized to red fluorescent aggregates in other cells expressing DsRed–α-syn, suggesting a seeding effect of transmitted α-syn. Extracellular α-syn was taken up by cells through endocytosis and interacted with intracellular α-syn. Next, following intracortical injection of recombinant α-syn in rats, we found neuronal uptake was attenuated by coinjection of an endocytosis inhibitor. Finally, we demonstrated in vivo transfer of α-syn between host cells and grafted dopaminergic neurons in mice overexpressing human α-syn. In summary, intercellularly transferred α-syn interacts with cytoplasmic α-syn and can propagate α-syn pathology. These results suggest that α-syn propagation is a key element in the progression of Parkinson disease pathology. PMID:21245577

  7. Further characterization and regulation of malonyl-coenzyme A: flavonoid glucoside malonyltransferases from parsley cell suspension cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Matern, U.; Feser, C.; Hammer, D.

    1983-10-01

    Two malonyltransferases, malonyl-CoA:flavone/flavonol 7-O-glucoside malonyltransferase and malonyl-CoA:flavonol 3-O-glucoside malonyltransferase, were purified to apparent homogeneity from uv-irradiated parsley cell cultures. Both purified enzymes appear to be specific for flavonoid glycosides. Additional malonyltransferases, active toward several phenol glucosides other than flavonoids, were present in partially purified 7-O-glucoside malonyltransferase preparations. Antibodies raised against the purified 3-O-glucoside malonyltransferase did not inhibit the activity of the 7-O-glucoside malonyltransferase over a wide antibody concentration range. Determination of the rate of synthesis in vivo of the 3-O-glucoside malonyltransferase after ultraviolet light-pulse induction of parsley cells revealed two maxima at 6 and 30 h, respectively. These results indicate that the induced changes in 3-O-glucoside malonyltransferase activity were the consequence of either a repeated change in the rate of synthesis of one enzyme species or changes in the synthesis rates of more than one enzyme species.

  8. Microbial protein production in activated suspension tanks manipulating C:N ratio in feed and the implications for fish culture.

    PubMed

    Azim, M E; Little, D C; Bron, J E

    2008-06-01

    The present experiment investigated the possibility of microbial protein production in 250 l indoor tanks by manipulating C:N ratio in fish feed applied. Two different levels of protein feed (35% and 22% CP) resulting in C:N ratio of 8.4 and 11.6, respectively, were applied at 25 g daily in each tank. Tanks were aerated and agitated continuously using a dome diffuser. The experiment was carried out for eight weeks. The biofloc development in terms of VSS and BOD5 was better in the low protein fed tanks than in the high protein fed tanks. An estimated biofloc productivity ranged 3-5 g Cm(-3)day(-1). A 3-D image stained with DAPI indicates that the biofloc is comprised of hundreds of bacterial nuclei, size being ranged from 100 to 200 microm. Biofloc quality was independent of the quality of feed applied and contained more than 50% crude protein, 2.5% crude lipid, 4% fibre, 7% ash and 22 kJ g(-1) energy on dry matter basis. The dietary composition and size of biofloc can be considered as appropriate for all omnivorous fish species. The underlying ecological processes are explained through factor analysis. The potential of using biofloc in fish culture is also discussed. PMID:17869097

  9. Microbial protein production in activated suspension tanks manipulating C:N ratio in feed and the implications for fish culture.

    PubMed

    Azim, M E; Little, D C; Bron, J E

    2008-06-01

    The present experiment investigated the possibility of microbial protein production in 250 l indoor tanks by manipulating C:N ratio in fish feed applied. Two different levels of protein feed (35% and 22% CP) resulting in C:N ratio of 8.4 and 11.6, respectively, were applied at 25 g daily in each tank. Tanks were aerated and agitated continuously using a dome diffuser. The experiment was carried out for eight weeks. The biofloc development in terms of VSS and BOD5 was better in the low protein fed tanks than in the high protein fed tanks. An estimated biofloc productivity ranged 3-5 g Cm(-3)day(-1). A 3-D image stained with DAPI indicates that the biofloc is comprised of hundreds of bacterial nuclei, size being ranged from 100 to 200 microm. Biofloc quality was independent of the quality of feed applied and contained more than 50% crude protein, 2.5% crude lipid, 4% fibre, 7% ash and 22 kJ g(-1) energy on dry matter basis. The dietary composition and size of biofloc can be considered as appropriate for all omnivorous fish species. The underlying ecological processes are explained through factor analysis. The potential of using biofloc in fish culture is also discussed.

  10. Molecular cloning and characterization of cDNAs for anionic and neutral peroxidases from suspension-cultured-cells of sweet potato and their differential expression in response to stress.

    PubMed

    Huh, G H; Lee, S J; Bae, Y S; Liu, J R; Kwak, S S

    1997-07-01

    Two peroxidase (POD) cDNAs, swpal and swpn1, were isolated and characterized from suspension-cultured cells of sweet potato in order to understand the physiological function of POD isozymes. Sequence analysis showed that swpa1 encoded an anionic POD and swpn1 encoded a neutral POD. The swpa1 and swpn1 genes were both highly expressed in suspension-cultured cells in accordance with the high POD activity of these cells. Although both gene transcripts were detected in the stems of intact plants, their transcription levels were much lower than in suspension-cultured cells. During cell growth the pattern of mRNA accumulation of swpa1 differed from that of swpn1, suggesting that expression of these genes is differentially regulated by cell growth stage. In addition, the swpa1 and swpn1 genes responded differently to oxidative stress induced by chilling. The expression of swpa1 was weakly induced by 15 degrees C acclimation and strongly induced by 4 degrees C chilling, whereas the mRNA level of swpn1 was increased by 15 degrees C acclimation and reduced by 4 degrees chilling. This indicates that the two isozymes encoded by swpa1 and swpn1 might contribute to protection against cold-induced oxidative stress through different signaling pathways. In leaves, both genes were induced by wounding with broadly similar expression. patterns. Genomic analysis suggests that the two isozymes are encoded by different loci in the sweet potato genome.

  11. Suspension trauma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Caroline; Porter, Keith M

    2007-01-01

    Suspension trauma (also known as “harness‐induced pathology” or “orthostatic shock while suspended”) is the development of presyncopal symptoms and loss of consciousness if the human body is held motionless in a vertical position for a period of time. It has been described in experiments of personal fall protection, and has been implicated in causes of death in mountaineering accidents, but it seems neither to be widely known about nor to have been presented to the medical profession. This article highlights the potential existence of suspension trauma and suggests that more robust medical research using modern harnesses and healthy volunteers would be beneficial to assess whether this is purely a theoretical risk. PMID:17384373

  12. Triiodothyronine expands the lactotroph and maintains the lactosomatotroph population, whereas thyrotrophin-releasing hormone augments thyrotroph abundance in aggregate cell cultures of postnatal rat pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Pals, K; Vankelecom, H; Denef, C

    2006-03-01

    In the present study, we used a three-dimensional pituitary cell culture system from early postnatal rats to examine the in vitro developmental potential of triiodothyronine (T3) and thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (TRH). Cell types were identified at the hormone mRNA level by single-cell reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and any change in abundance was further examined by immunofluorescence staining of the corresponding hormone protein. In aggregates from 14-day-old rats, long-term (12-16 days) treatment with T3 (0.5 nM) increased the abundance of cells expressing prolactin mRNA (PRLmRNA cells) by 2.5-fold and lowered that of nonhormonal cells and thyroid-stimulating hormone beta (TSHbeta)mRNA cells. The abundance of growth hormone (GH)mRNA cells decreased during culture compared to that in the freshly dispersed pituitary gland and T3 did not significantly affect this cell population. Cells coexpressing PRL mRNA and GH mRNA virtually disappeared during culture but reappeared in the presence of T3. T3 increased the abundance of PRL-immunoreactive (ir) cells in aggregates from 14-day-old rats, as well as in aggregates from newborn and 1-week-old rats. As estimated by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labelling, a 3-day treatment with T3 enhanced the number of PRL-ir cells that had incorporated BrdU, but did not yet expand the total population of PRL-ir cells. Long-term treatment with TRH (100 nM) did not affect the proportion of PRLmRNA or GHmRNA cells, but consistently increased the proportional number of TSHbeta(mRNA) and TSHbeta-ir cells. The present data confirm the findings obtained in recent in vivo loss of function genetic studies suggesting that T3 plays a prominent role in postnatal expansion of the lactotroph population and that TRH is important for thyrotroph development. The data suggest that the effect of T3 is brought about by a direct action on the pituitary gland through a cell proliferation mechanism. T3 also appears to support the

  13. Osmotic consolidation of suspensions and gels

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.T.; Zukoski, C.F. )

    1994-09-01

    An osmotic method for the consolidation of suspensions of ceramic particles is demonstrated. Concentrated solutions of poly(ethylene oxide) are separated from a suspension of ceramic particles by a semipermeable membrane, creating a gradient in solvent chemical potential. Solvent passes from the suspension into the polymer solution, lowering its free energy and consolidating the suspension. Dispersions of stable 8-nm hydrous zirconia particles were consolidated to over 47% by volume. Suspensions of [alpha]-alumina in three states of aggregation (dispersed, weakly flocculated, and strongly flocculated) were consolidated to densities greater than or equal to those produced in conventional pressure filtration. Moreover, the as-consolidated alumina bodies were partially drained of fluid during the osmotic consolidation process, producing cohesive partially dried bodies with improved handling characteristics.

  14. LPS ligand and culture additives improve production of monomeric MD-1 and 2 in Pichia pastoris by decreasing aggregation and intermolecular disulfide bonding.

    PubMed

    Mengwasser, Kristen E; Bryant, Clare E; Gay, Nick J; Gangloff, Monique

    2011-04-01

    Myeloid differentiation proteins MD-1 and MD-2 have both been shown to form a heterogeneous collection of oligomers when expressed in absence of their respective receptor, RP105 and TLR4. The biological relevance of these oligomers is not clear. Only monomeric proteins have been found to be active and able to trigger an immune response to endotoxin by modulating the TLR4 pathway. In this study, we produced variants of MD-1 and MD-2 in Pichia pastoris. To minimize the time and expense of initial expression tests, small-scale cultures have been set up to allow the rapid identification of the highest expressing clone and the optimal expression conditions. The expression vectors used, the site of linearization and the locus of integration affected the yield of transformation. Next we screened culture additives and found that they significantly increased the fraction of monomeric proteins secreted in the culture medium (up to 15% of the total MD protein produced). We confirmed their presence by size-exclusion chromatography. Optimal anti-aggregation agents were protein-dependent except for LPS that presented stabilizing effects for all MD proteins. Contrary to previous reports, this study suggests that MD-1 can bind to LPS. PMID:21130168

  15. Multiple signaling pathways in gene expression during sugar starvation. Pharmacological analysis of din gene expression in suspension-cultured cells of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Fujiki, Y; Ito, M; Nishida, I; Watanabe, A

    2000-11-01

    We have identified many dark-inducible (din) genes that are expressed in Arabidopsis leaves kept in the dark. In the present study we addressed the question of how plant cells sense the depletion of sugars, and how sugar starvation triggers din gene expression in suspension-cultured cells of Arabidopsis. Depletion of sucrose in the medium triggered marked accumulation of din transcripts. Suppression of din gene expression by 2-deoxy-Glc, and a non-suppressive effect exerted by 3-O-methyl-Glc, suggested that sugar-repressible expression of din genes is mediated through the phosphorylation of hexose by hexokinase, as exemplified in the repression of photosynthetic genes by sugars. We have further shown that the signaling triggered by sugar starvation involves protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events, and have provided the first evidence that multiple pathways of protein dephosphorylation exist in sugar starvation-induced gene expression. An inhibitor of serine/threonine protein kinase, K-252a, inhibited din gene expression in sugar-depleted cells. Okadaic acid, which may preferentially inhibit type 2A protein phosphatases over type 1, enhanced the transcript levels of all din genes, except din6 and din10, under sugar starvation. Conversely, a more potent inhibitor of type 1 and 2A protein phosphatases, calyculin A, increased transcripts from din2 and din9, but decreased those from other din genes, in sugar-depleted cells. On the other hand, calyculin A, but not okadaic acid, completely inhibited the gene expression of chlorophyll a/b-binding protein under sugar starvation. These results indicate that multiple signaling pathways, mediated by different types of protein phosphatases, regulate gene expression during sugar starvation. PMID:11080291

  16. Induction of extracellular defense-related proteins in suspension cultured-cells of Daucus carota elicited with cyclodextrins and methyl jasmonate.

    PubMed

    Sabater-Jara, Ana B; Almagro, Lorena; Pedreño, María A

    2014-04-01

    Suspension cultured-cells (SCC) of Daucus carota were used to evaluate the effect of methyl jasmonate and cyclodextrins, separately or in combination, on the induction of defense responses, particularly the accumulation of pathogenesis-related proteins. A comparative study of the extracellular proteome (secretome) between control and elicited carrot SCC pointed to the presence of amino acid sequences homologous to glycoproteins which have inhibitory activity against the cell-wall-degrading enzymes secreted by pathogens and/or are induced when carrot cells are exposed to a pathogen elicitor. Other amino acid sequences were homologous to Leucine-Rich Repeat domain-containing proteins, which play an essential role in defense against pathogens, as well as in the recognition of microorganisms, making them important players in the innate immunity of this plant. Also, some tryptic peptides were shown to be homologous to a thaumatin-like protein, showing high specificity to abiotic stress and to different reticuline oxidase-like proteins that displayed high levels of antifungal activity, suggesting that methyl jasmonate and cyclodextrins could play a role in mediating defense-related gene product expression in SCC of D. carota. Apart from these elicitor-inducible proteins, we observed the presence of PR-proteins in both control and elicited carrot SCC, suggesting that their expression is mainly constitutive. These PR-proteins are putative class IV chitinases, which also have inhibitory activity against pathogen growth and the class III peroxidases that participate in response to environmental stress (e.g. pathogen attack and oxidative), meaning that they are involved in defense responses triggered by both biotic and abiotic factors.

  17. Site of clomazone action in tolerant-soybean and susceptible-cotton photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures. [Glycine max (L. ); Gossypium hirsutum

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, M.A.; Liebl, R.A.; Widholm, J.M. )

    1990-10-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the herbicidal site of clomazone action in tolerant-soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv Corsoy) (SB-M) and susceptible-cotton (Gossypium hirsutum (L.) cv Stoneville 825) (COT-M) photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures. Although a 10 micromolar clomazone treatment did not significantly reduce the terpene or mixed terpenoid content (microgram per gram fresh weight) of the SB-M cell line, there was over a 70% reduction in the chlorophyll (Chl), carotenoid (CAR), and plastoquinone (PQ) content of the COT-M cell line. The tocopherol (TOC) content was reduced only 35.6%. Reductions in the levels of Chl, CAR, TOC, and PQ indicate that the site of clomazone action in COT-M cells is prior to geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP). The clomazone treatment did not significantly reduce the flow of ({sup 14}C)mevalonate (({sup 14}C)MEV) (nanocuries per gram fresh weight) into CAR and the three mixed terpenoid compounds of SB-M cells. Conversely, ({sup 14}C)MEV incorporation into CAR and the terpene moieties of Chl, PQ, and TOC in COT-M cells was reduced at least 73%, indicating that the site of clomazone action must be after MEV. Sequestration of clomazone away from the chloroplast cannot account for soybean tolerance to clomazone since chloroplasts isolated from both cell lines incubated with ({sup 14}C)clomazone contained a similar amount of radioactivity (disintegrations per minute per microgram of Chl). The possible site(s) of clomazone inhibition include mevalonate kinase, phosphomevalonate kinase, pyrophosphomevalonate decarboxylase, isopentenyl pyrophosphate isomerase, and/or a prenyl transferase.

  18. Association of H-Translocating ATPase in the Golgi Membrane System from Suspension-Cultured Cells of Sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.).

    PubMed

    Ali, M S; Akazawa, T

    1986-05-01

    The Golgi complex and the disrupted vesicular membranes were prepared from suspension-cultured cells of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) using protoplasts as the starting material and employing linear sucrose density gradient centrifugation followed by osmolysis (Ali et al. [1985] Plant Cell Physiol 26: 1119-1133). The isolated Golgi fraction was found to be enriched with marker enzyme activities and depleted of the activity of a typical mitochondrial marker enzyme, cytochrome c oxidase. Golgi complex, and vesicular membranes derived thereof were found to contain the specific ATPase (specific activity of about 0.5 to 0.7 micromoles per minute per milligram protein). Inhibitor studies suggested that the ATPase of Golgi was different from plasma membrane, tonoplast and mitochondrial ATPases as it was not inhibited by sodium vanadate, potassium nitrate, oligomycin and sodium azide. The sensitivity to N-ethylmaleimide further distinguished the Golgi ATPase from F(0) to F(1) ATPase of mitochondria. The internal acidification was measured by monitoring the difference in absorbance at 550 nanometers minus 600 nanometers using neutral red as a probe. The maximum rate detected with Golgi and disrupted membrane system was 0.49 and 0.61 optical density unit per minute per milligram protein, at pH 7.5, respectively, indicating that the proton pump activity was tightly associated with the Golgi membranes. In both cases, the acidification was inhibited 70 to 90% by various ionophores, indicating that the proton pump was electrogenic in nature. Both the Golgi ATPase activity and ATP-dependent acidification were profoundly inhibited by N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, which also indicate that the two activities are catalyzed by the same enzyme.

  19. The Structure of Plant Cell Walls: I. The Macromolecular Components of the Walls of Suspension-cultured Sycamore Cells with a Detailed Analysis of the Pectic Polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Talmadge, K W; Keegstra, K; Bauer, W D; Albersheim, P

    1973-01-01

    This is the first in a series of papers dealing with the structure of cell walls isolated from suspension-cultured sycamore cells (Acer pseudoplatanus). These studies have been made possible by the availability of purified hydrolytic enzymes and by recent improvements in the techniques of methylation analysis. These techniques have permitted us to identify and quantitate the macromolecular components of sycamore cell walls. These walls are composed of 10% arabinan, 2% 3,6-linked arabinogalactan, 23% cellulose, 9% oligo-arabinosides (attached to hydroxyproline), 8% 4-linked galactan, 10% hydroxyproline-rich protein, 16% rhamnogalacturonan, and 21% xyloglucan.The structures of the pectic polymers (the neutral arabinan, the neutral galactan, and the acidic rhamnogalacturonan) were obtained, in part, by methylation analysis of fragments of these polymers which were released from the sycamore walls by the action of a highly purified endopolygalacturonase. The data suggest a branched arabinan and a linear 4-linked galactan occurring as side chains on the rhamnogalacturonan. Small amounts or pieces of a xyloglucan, the wall hemicellulose, appear to be covalently linked to some of the galactan chains. Thus, the galactan appears to serve as a bridge between the xyloglucan and rhamnogalacturonan components of the wall.The rhamnogalacturonan consists of an alpha-(1 --> 4)-linked galacturonan chain which is interspersed with 2-linked rhamnosyl residues. The rhamnosyl residues are not randomly distributed in the chain but probably occur in units of rhamnosyl- (1 --> 4)-galacturonosyl- (1 --> 2)-rhamnosyl. This sequence appears to alternate with a homogalacturonan sequence containing approximately 8 residues of 4-linked galacturonic acid. About half of the rhamnosyl residues are branched, having a substituent attached to carbon 4. This is likely to be the site of attachment of the 4-linked galactan.The hydroxyprolyl oligo-arabinosides of the hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein

  20. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    Part of the 1994 Industrial Minerals Review. The production, consumption, and applications of construction aggregates are reviewed. In 1994, the production of construction aggregates, which includes crushed stone and construction sand and gravel combined, increased 7.7 percent to 2.14 Gt compared with the previous year. These record production levels are mostly a result of funding for highway construction work provided by the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991. Demand is expected to increase for construction aggregates in 1995.

  1. Microarray analysis of cultured human brain aggregates following cortisol exposure: implications for cellular functions relevant to mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Salaria, S; Chana, G; Caldara, F; Feltrin, E; Altieri, M; Faggioni, F; Domenici, E; Merlo-Pich, E; Everall, I P

    2006-09-01

    Increased cortisol levels in humans are often observed in patients suffering from mood disorders. In this study human fetal brain aggregates were exposed to cortisol at 500 nM for 3 weeks, as an in-vitro model of chronic cortisol exposure. Microarray analysis on extracted mRNA using the Affymetrix U133A platform was then performed. Our results demonstrated a significant effect of cortisol on 1648 transcripts; 736 up-regulated and 912 down-regulated genes. The most differentially regulated biological categories were: RNA processing, protein metabolism, and cell growth. Within these categories we observed a down-regulation of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) (-1.5-fold) and aquaporin4 (AQP4) (-1.7-fold), alongside an up-regulation of fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9) (+1.7-fold) and vesicle associated membrane protein2 (VAMP2) (+1.7-fold). FGF2, FGF9, AQP4 and VAMP2 changes were confirmed at the protein level by immunohistochemistry. Alterations in FGF transcripts are in keeping with recent literature demonstrating such effects in patients with mood disorders. PMID:16844382

  2. Consolidation of colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Wei-Heng; Kim, Seong Il; Shih, Wan Y.; Aksay, I.A. ); Schilling, C.H. Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA )

    1990-08-01

    A key step in the processing of ceramics is the consolidation of powders into engineered shapes. Colloidal processing uses solvents (usually water) and dispersants to break up powder agglomerates in suspension and thereby reduce the pore size in a consolidated compact. However, agglomeration and particle rearrangement leading to pore enlargement can still occur during drying. Therefore, it is beneficial to consolidate the compact as densely as possible during the suspension stage. The consolidation techniques of pressure filtration and centrifugation were studied and the results are reported in this paper. In particular, the steady-state pressure- density relationship was studied, and information was obtained regarding the consolidation process, the microstructure, and the average density profile of consolidated cakes. Recently, we performed Monte Carlo simulations on a cluster-cluster aggregation model with restructuring, and found the exponential relationship between pressure and density is indeed the result of the breaking up of the fractal structural units. Furthermore, we calculated density profiles from the bottom to the top of the consolidated cakes by solving the local static force balance equation in the continuum particulate network. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Expansion and long-term maintenance of induced pluripotent stem cells in stirred suspension bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Shafa, Mehdi; Sjonnesen, Kirsten; Yamashita, Akihiro; Liu, Shiying; Michalak, Marek; Kallos, Michael S; Rancourt, Derrick E

    2012-06-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can provide an important source of cells for the next-generation of cell therapies in regenerative medicine, in part due to their similarity to embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Patient-specific iPSCs represent an opportunity for autologous cell therapies that are not restricted by immunological, ethical and technical obstacles. One of the technical hurdles that must be overcome before iPSCs can be clinically implemented is the scalable, reproducible production of iPSCs and their differentiated progeny. All of the iPSC lines established thus far have been generated and expanded with static tissue culture protocols, which are time-consuming and suffer from batch-to-batch variability. Alternatively, stirred suspension bioreactors propose several benefits and their homogeneous culture environment facilitates the large-scale expansion required for clinical studies at less cost. We have previously developed protocols for expanding murine and human ESCs as undifferentiated aggregates in stirred suspension bioreactors. The resulting cells were karyotypically normal, expressed pluripotency markers and could be differentiated into all three germ lineages, both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we demonstrate that stirred suspension bioreactors yield 58-fold expansion of undifferentiated pluripotent iPSCs over 4 days. In vitro differentiation into cartilage, bone and cardiomyocytes lineages, in addition to in vivo teratoma formation, further confirmed the existence of fully functional and undifferentiated pluripotent iPSC aggregates following long-term passaging. Stirred suspension bioreactor culture represents an efficient process for the large-scale expansion and maintenance of iPSCs, which is an important first step in their clinical application.

  4. Effect of brefeldin A on the structure of the Golgi apparatus and on the synthesis and secretion of proteins and polysaccharides in sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus) suspension-cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Driouich, A; Zhang, G F; Staehelin, L A

    1993-04-01

    Brefeldin A (BFA), a specific inhibitor of Golgi-mediated secretion in animal cells, has been used to study the organization of the secretory pathway and the function of the Golgi apparatus in plant cells. To this end, we have employed a combination of electron microscopical, immunocytochemical, and biochemical techniques to investigate the effects of this drug on the architecture of the Golgi apparatus as well as on the secretion of proteins and complex cell wall polysaccharides in sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus) suspension-cultured cells. We have used 2.5 and 7.5 micrograms/mL of BFA, which is comparable to the 1 to 10 micrograms/mL used in experiments with animal cells. Electron micrographs of high-pressure frozen and freeze-substituted cells show that although BFA causes swelling of the endoplasmic reticulum cisternae, unlike in animal cells, it does not induce the disassembly of sycamore maple Golgi stacks. Instead, BFA induces the formation of large clusters of Golgi stacks, an increase in the number of trans-like Golgi cisternae, and the accumulation in the cytoplasm of very dense vesicles that appear to be derived from trans Golgi cisternae. These vesicles contain large amounts of xyloglucan (XG), the major hemicellulosic cell wall polysaccharide, as shown by immunocytochemical labeling with anti-XG antibodies. All of these structural changes disappear within 120 min after removal of the drug. In vivo labeling experiments using [3H]leucine demonstrate that protein secretion into the culture medium, but not protein synthesis, is inhibited by approximately 80% in the presence of BFA. In contrast, the incorporation of [3H]fucose into N-linked glycoproteins, which occurs in trans-Golgi cisternae, appears to be affected to a greater extent than the incorporation of [3H]xylose, which has been localized to medial Golgi cisternae. BFA also affects secretion of complex polysaccharides as evidenced by the approximate 50% drop in incorporation of [3H]xylose and

  5. Secretion and membrane recycling in plant cells: novel intermediary structures visualized in ultrarapidly frozen sycamore and carrot suspension-culture cells.

    PubMed

    Staehelin, L A; Chapman, R L

    1987-05-01

    Freeze-fracture electron microscopy of propane-jet-frozen samples has been employed to investigate vesicle-mediated secretion and membrane recycling events in carrot (Daucus carota L.) and sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) suspension-culture cells. Stabilization of the cells by means of ultrarapid freezing has enabled us to preserve the cells in a turgid state and to visualize new intermediate membrane configurations related to these events. Indeed, many of the observed membrane configurations, such as flattened membrane vesicles with slit-shaped membrane fusion sites and horseshoe-shaped membrane infoldings, appear to result from the action of turgor forces on the plasma membrane. Individual cells exhibited great variations in numbers and types of membrane configurations postulated to be related to secretion and membrane-recycling events. In the majority of cells, the different membrane profiles displayed a patchy distribution, and within each patch the membrane configurations tended to be of the same stage. This result indicates that secretory events are triggered in domains measuring from 0.1 to about 10 μm in diameter. Based on an extensive analysis of the different membrane configurations seen in our samples, we have formulated the following model of vesicle-mediated secretion in plant cells: Fusion of a secretory vesicle with the plasma membrane leads to the formation of a single, narrow-necked pore that increases in diameter up to about 60 nm. During discharge, the vesicle is flattened, forming a disc-shaped structure perpendicular to the plane of the plasma membrane. As the vesicle is flattened, the pore is converted to a slit, the maximum length of which coincides with the diameter of the flattened vesicle. The flattened vesicle then tips over and concomitantly the plasma-membrane slit becomes curved into a horseshoe-shaped configuration as it extends along the outer margins of the tipped-over vesicle. Some coated pits are present interspersed

  6. Influence of the dose levels of cocarcinogen ferric oxide on the metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene by pulmonary alveolar macorphages in suspension culture

    SciTech Connect

    Greife, A.L. ); Warshawsky, D. )

    1993-01-01

    The concurrent administration of a cocarcinogenic carrier particle such as ferric oxide (Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3]) and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon lung carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) results in a decreased latency and an increased incidence in the production of lung tumors in hamsters compared to the administration of BaP alone. The pulmonary alveolar macrophage (AM), the primary lung defense cell, has been shown to endoctyze BaP, metabolize BaP to a more biologically active form, and then release metabolites. Therefore, a study was undertaken to determine in a dose-response manner the effect of AM phagocysosis of a carrier particle (Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3]) on the metabolism of a carcinogen (BaP) and on the production of reactive oxygen. The AM were lavaged from hamsters and cultured in suspension (2.5 [times] 10[sup 6] cells/vial) with bAp (62.5 NMOL, [sup 14]c labeled) alone or adsorbed onto 0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 mg Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3] in the presence of cytochrome c. Following separate ethyl acetate extractions of the AM and medium, the metabolites were isolated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and quantified by liquid scintillation spectrometry. The production of superoxide anions was monitored by the reduction of cyctochrome c. Concurrent exposure of AM to BaP-coated Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3] resulted in a significant increase in the amount of BaP metabolites and superoxide anions produced with dose of Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3]. The following metabolites and superoxide anions produced with dose of Fe[sub e]O[sub 3]. The following metabolites were identified in both the medium and the AM: 9,10-dihydrodiol, 7,8-dihydrodiol, 4,5-dihydrodiol, 9-hydroxy, 3-hydroxy, and 3,6 quinone. 44 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Microgravity combustion of dust suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, John H. S.; Peraldi, Olivier; Knystautas, Rom

    1993-01-01

    Unlike the combustion of homogeneous gas mixtures, there are practically no reliable fundamental data (i.e., laminar burning velocity, flammability limits, quenching distance, minimum ignition energy) for the combustion of heterogeneous dust suspensions. Even the equilibrium thermodynamic data such as the constant pressure volume combustion pressure and the constant pressure adiabatic flame temperature are not accurately known for dust mixtures. This is mainly due to the problem of gravity sedimentation. In normal gravity, turbulence, convective flow, electric and acoustic fields are required to maintain a dust in suspension. These external influences have a dominating effect on the combustion processes. Microgravity offers a unique environment where a quiescent dust cloud can in principle be maintained for a sufficiently long duration for almost all combustion experiments (dust suspensions are inherently unstable due to Brownian motion and particle aggregation). Thus, the microgravity duration provided by drop towers, parabolic flights, and the space shuttle, can all be exploited for different kinds of dust combustion experiments. The present paper describes some recent studies on microgravity combustion of dust suspension carried out on the KC-135 and the Caravelle aircraft. The results reported are obtained from three parabolic flight campaigns.

  8. Fibronectin Aggregation and Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Tomoo; Erickson, Harold P.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of fibronectin (FN) assembly and the self-association sites are still unclear and contradictory, although the N-terminal 70-kDa region (I1–9) is commonly accepted as one of the assembly sites. We previously found that I1–9 binds to superfibronectin, which is an artificial FN aggregate induced by anastellin. In the present study, we found that I1–9 bound to the aggregate formed by anastellin and a small FN fragment, III1–2. An engineered disulfide bond in III2, which stabilizes folding, inhibited aggregation, but a disulfide bond in III1 did not. A gelatin precipitation assay showed that I1–9 did not interact with anastellin, III1, III2, III1–2, or several III1–2 mutants including III1–2KADA. (In contrast to previous studies, we found that the III1–2KADA mutant was identical in conformation to wild-type III1–2.) Because I1–9 only bound to the aggregate and the unfolding of III2 played a role in aggregation, we generated a III2 domain that was destabilized by deletion of the G strand. This mutant bound I1–9 as shown by the gelatin precipitation assay and fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis, and it inhibited FN matrix assembly when added to cell culture. Next, we introduced disulfide mutations into full-length FN. Three disulfide locks in III2, III3, and III11 were required to dramatically reduce anastellin-induced aggregation. When we tested the disulfide mutants in cell culture, only the disulfide bond in III2 reduced the FN matrix. These results suggest that the unfolding of III2 is one of the key factors for FN aggregation and assembly. PMID:21949131

  9. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, W.H.; Tepordei, V.V.; Bolen, W.P.

    2000-01-01

    Construction aggregates consist primarily of crushed stone and construction sand and gravel. Total estimated production of construction aggregates increased in 1999 by about 2% to 2.39 Gt (2.64 billion st) compared with 1998. This record production level continued an expansion that began in 1992. By commodities, crushed stone production increased 3.3%, while sand and gravel production increased by about 0.5%.

  10. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    Part of a special section on industrial minerals in 1993. The 1993 production of construction aggregates increased 6.3 percent over the 1992 figure, to reach 2.01 Gt. This represents the highest estimated annual production of combined crushed stone and construction sand and gravel ever recorded in the U.S. The outlook for construction aggregates and the issues facing the industry are discussed.

  11. Flow-induced aggregation of colloidal particles in viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Donglin; Qiao, Greg G.; Dunstan, Dave E.

    2016-08-01

    The flow-induced aggregation of dilute colloidal polystyrene nanoparticles suspended in Newtonian and viscoelastic solutions is reported. A rheo-optical method has been used to detect real-time aggregation processes via measuring optical absorption or scattering in a quartz Couette cell. The observed absorbance decreases over time are attributed to the flow-induced coagulation. Numerical simulations show that the aggregation processes still follow the Smoluchowski coagulation equation in a revised version. Suspensions in a series of media are studied to evaluate the effect of the media rheological properties on the particle aggregation. The data shows that elasticity reduces the aggregation while the solution viscosity enhances the aggregation processes.

  12. Estrogen response of MCF-7 cells grown on diverse substrates and in suspension culture: promotion of morphological heterogeneity, modulation of progestin receptor induction; cell-substrate interactions on collagen gels.

    PubMed

    Pourreau-Schneider, N; Berthois, Y; Mittre, H; Charpin, C; Jacquemier, J; Martin, P M

    1984-12-01

    In this study we observed the incidence of hormone sensitivity in the response of MCF-7 cells to estrogen stimulation when the cells were cultured in different contact environments (hydrophilic plastic, bovine corneal extracellular matrix, type I collagen and in suspension culture). The major purpose was to describe the influence of cell to cell and cell to substrate contacts on the morphological response to estrogen treatment. However, other parameters including growth and induction of progestin receptor were also explored, keeping in mind that the MCF-7 cell line, although representative of normal mammary epithelium in that it contains a similar hormone receptivity, was selected in vitro from a metastatic population in a pleural effusion. Although substrate conditions did not modify growth enhancement by estrogens, progestin receptor levels were significantly higher in three-dimensional spheroid cultures in which cell to cell contacts were optimal due to elimination of basal contact. A careful morphological survey of large surfaces lead to an objective opinion of the overall effect of the hormone treatment on the non-cloned cell line in which a marked heterogeneity in the response of individual cells was observed. In terms of morphofunctional differentiation, the edification of acini with dense microvillus coating was best in suspension culture. When sections were made perpendicular to the plane of cultures on collagen gel rafts two other phenomena were noted: decrease in intercellular junctions, resulting in reduced cell to cell cohesion, and accumulation biodegradation products in the collagen lattice. This suggested a hormone-mediated interaction between the metastatic cells and the fibrillar substrate, collagen I, one of the major constituents of tissue stroma. This estrogen response might be related to the metastatic phenotype and must be distinct from their hormone sensitivity in terms of growth and differentiation since hormone receptivity is generally

  13. Expansion of embryonic stem cells in suspension and fibrous bed bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Li, Yan; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2014-05-20

    Applications of embryonic stem (ES) cells in cellular transplantation and tissue engineering require scalable processes for mass production of these cells with controlled qualities. The main objective of this work was to evaluate two cell culture processes for long-term expansion of murine embryonic stem (mES) cells. With serial passaging, suspension cultures in spinner flasks were able to expand mES cells as aggregates for 12.5-fold in each passage of 4 days. However, extending the culturing time to 6 days in each passage caused significant loss in cell viability and induced differentiation as indicated by the reduced expression levels of SSEA-1 and Oct-4. Long-term expansion of mES cells in a fibrous bed bioreactor (FBB) was also studied for 30 days in 2 passages, 15 days in each passage. With periodically refreshing the culture medium, a high expansion fold of 60-77 was achieved in each passage. Flow cytometry and RT-PCR were used to analyze key pluripotency and differentiation markers. The results showed that the expanded cells in both suspension and FBB cultures remained in a highly pluripotent state, which was also confirmed with the embryoid body (EB) forming efficiency test. It is concluded that both the suspension and FBB cultures are suitable to support long-term expansion of undifferentiated mES cells. However, the FBB culture can sustain cell growth for a longer period without frequent passaging, requires less media and labor, and is thus more economical to use for mass production of ES cells.

  14. Equilibrium structure of ferrofluid aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Mina; Tomanek, David

    2010-01-01

    We study the equilibrium structure of large but finite aggregates of magnetic dipoles, representing a colloidal suspension of magnetite particles in a ferrofluid. With increasing system size, the structural motif evolves from chains and rings to multi-chain and multi-ring assemblies. Very large systems form single- and multi-wall coils, tubes and scrolls. These structural changes result from a competition between various energy terms, which can be approximated analytically within a continuum model. We also study the effect of external parameters such as magnetic field on the relative stability of these structures. Our results may give insight into experimental data obtained during solidification of ferrofluid aggregates at temperatures where thermal fluctuations become negligible in comparison to inter-particle interactions. These data may also help to experimentally control the aggregation of magnetic particles.

  15. The Structure of Plant Cell Walls: IV. A Structural Comparison of the Wall Hemicellulose of Cell Suspension Cultures of Sycamore (Acer PseudoPlatAnus) and of Red Kidney Bean (Phaseolus Vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Wilder, B M; Albersheim, P

    1973-05-01

    The molecular structure and chemical properties of the hemicellulose present in the isolated cell walls of suspension cultures of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cells has recently been described by Bauer et al. (Plant Physiol. 51: 174-187). The hemicellulose of the sycamore primary cell wall is a xyloglucan. This polymer functions as an important cross-link in the structure of the cell wall; the xyloglucan is hydrogen-bonded to cellulose and covalently attached to the pectic polymers.The present paper describes the structure of a xyloglucan present in the walls and in the extracellular medium of suspension-cultured Red Kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) cells and compares the structure of the bean xyloglucan with the structure of the sycamore xyloglucan. Although some minor differences were found, the basic structure of the xyloglucans in the cell walls of these distantly related species is the same. The structure is based on a repeating heptasaccharide unit which consists of four residues of beta-1, 4-linked glucose and three residues of terminal xylose linked to the 6 position of three of the glucosyl residues.

  16. Effects of biodegradable plastics on the predominant culturable bacteria associated with soil aggregate formation and stability after 9 months of incubation in natural soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An in vitro study of the effects of biodegradable plastics on the predominant soil aggregating bacteria associated to soil aggregate formation and stability after 9 months of incubation in soil. Caesar-TonThat TC, Fukui R*, Caesar AJ., Lartey, RT, and Gaskin, JF. USDA-Agricultural Research Service, ...

  17. Effect of aging on rheology of ball clay suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonthai, Tienchai

    2002-01-01

    The behaviors of clay-water suspensions such as deflocculation or rheological properties are not constant but change with time. Aging has been recognized for changing the rheological properties of clay suspensions. This work provided information about the effects of the moisture contents in ball clay lumps and clay air exposure time on their processability. Dynamic oscillatory rheometry using a vane-in-cup geometry was used to characterize the rheological behavior of ball clay suspensions in terms of elastic modulus, viscous modulus and yield stress as a function of aging time. A light scattering size analyzer was used to examine the agglomerate size distribution of ball clay suspensions which affected the rheological behavior. Soluble ion release (both cations and anions) in the filtrate of suspensions was measured by ion chromatography. Low and high lignitic ball clay suspensions were dispersed with sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) or sodium polyacrylate at specific gravity 1.3 and 1.6 in two dispersion states: fully deflocculated (minimum viscosity) and under deflocculated. Suspensions prepared using freshly mined ball clays required more dispersant than suspensions prepared using dry ball clays to achieve minimum viscosity due to a difference in agglomerate size distribution. The agglomerate size distribution of suspensions prepared using dry clays was broader than that of suspensions prepared using freshly mined clays. In suspensions prepared using freshly mined clays, there were many uniformly small agglomerates having loose water inside, while in suspensions prepared using dry clays, the capillary effect and bonding between clay particles resulting from drying broke clay aggregates apart into agglomerate structures composed of a few to many clay particles. For suspensions prepared using dry clays after one day suspension aging, the elastic modulus and yield stress decreased due to the change in agglomerate size distribution of suspensions but increased for

  18. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Special issue in honour of Henk Lekkerkerker's 65th birthday Professor Henk N W Lekkerkerker is a world-leading authority in the field of experimental and theoretical soft condensed matter. On the occasion of his 65th birthday in the summer of 2011, this special issue celebrates his many contributions to science. Henk Lekkerkerker obtained his undergraduate degree in chemistry at the University of Utrecht (1968) and moved to Calgary where he received his PhD in 1971. He moved to Brussels as a NATO fellow at the Université Libre de Bruxelles and was appointed to an assistant professorship (1974), an associate professorship (1977) and a full professorship (1980) in physical chemistry at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. In 1985 he returned to The Netherlands to take up a professorship at the Van 't Hoff Laboratory, where he has been ever since. He has received a series of awards during his career, including the Onsager Medal (1999) of the University of Trondheim, the Bakhuys Roozeboom Gold Medal (2003) of the Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), the ECIS-Rhodia European Colloid and Interface Prize (2003), and the Liquid Matter Prize of the European Physical Society (2008). He was elected a member of KNAW in 1996, was awarded an Academy Chair position in 2005, and has held several visiting lectureships. Henk's work focuses on phase transitions in soft condensed matter, and he has made seminal contributions to both the theoretical and experimental aspects of this field. Here we highlight three major themes running through his work, and a few selected publications. So-called depletion interactions may lead to phase separation in colloid-polymer mixtures, and Henk realised that the partitioning of polymer needs to be taken into account to describe the phase behaviour correctly [1]. Colloidal suspensions can be used as model fluids, with the time- and length-scales involved leading to novel opportunities, notably the direct observation of capillary waves at a

  19. Blood viscosity: influence of erythrocyte aggregation.

    PubMed

    Chien, S; Usami, S; Dellenback, R J; Gregersen, M I; Nanninga, L B; Guest, M M

    1967-08-18

    The addition of purified canine or bovine fibrinogen to suspensions of canine erythocytes in Ringer solution caused an increase in viscosity and the formation of aggregates of erythocytes. Both of these effects became increasingly pronounced as the fibrinogen concentration was raised, and they approached plateaus with 1 gram of fibrinogen per 100 milliliters. An increase in shear rate (or shear stress) reduced both the effect on viscosity and the aggregate size. The data suggest that fibrinogen causes an increase in blood viscosity and a departure from Newtonian behavior by interacting with erythrocytes to form cell aggregates which can be dispersed by shear stress. PMID:17842794

  20. Generation of Aggregates of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells that Show Symmetry Breaking, Polarization and Emergent Collective Behaviour In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Baillie-Johnson, Peter; van den Brink, Susanne Carina; Balayo, Tina; Turner, David Andrew; Martinez Arias, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a protocol improving current Embryoid Body (EB) culture which allows the study of self-organization, symmetry breaking, axial elongation and cell fate specification using aggregates of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) in suspension culture. Small numbers of mESCs are aggregated in basal medium for 48 hr in non-tissue-culture-treated, U-bottomed 96-well plates, after which they are competent to respond to experimental signals. Following treatment, these aggregates begin to show signs of polarized gene expression and gradually alter their morphology from a spherical mass of cells to an elongated, well organized structure in the absence of external asymmetry cues. These structures are not only able to display markers of the three germ layers, but actively display gastrulation-like movements, evidenced by a directional dislodgement of individual cells from the aggregate, which crucially occurs at one region of the elongated structure. This protocol provides a detailed method for the reproducible formation of these aggregates, their stimulation with signals such as Wnt/β-Catenin activation and BMP inhibition and their analysis by single time-point or time-lapse fluorescent microscopy. In addition, we describe modifications to current whole-mount mouse embryo staining procedures for immunocytochemical analysis of specific markers within fixed aggregates. The changes in morphology, gene expression and length of the aggregates can be quantitatively measured, providing information on how signals can alter axial fates. It is envisaged that this system can be applied both to the study of early developmental events such as axial development and organization, and more broadly, the processes of self-organization and cellular decision-making. It may also provide a suitable niche for the generation of cell types present in the embryo that are unobtainable from conventional adherent culture such as spinal cord and motor neurones. PMID:26650833

  1. The Suspension School: An Alternative to Suspension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Robert L.; And Others

    A suspension school for secondary students, established in the 1977-78 school year in an Arkansas school district has developed specific program goals and procedures. Following a discussion of the school's origins, this paper describes operating procedures, philosophy, support system, and student reaction. Suspensions declined considerably through…

  2. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Special issue in honour of Henk Lekkerkerker's 65th birthday Professor Henk N W Lekkerkerker is a world-leading authority in the field of experimental and theoretical soft condensed matter. On the occasion of his 65th birthday in the summer of 2011, this special issue celebrates his many contributions to science. Henk Lekkerkerker obtained his undergraduate degree in chemistry at the University of Utrecht (1968) and moved to Calgary where he received his PhD in 1971. He moved to Brussels as a NATO fellow at the Université Libre de Bruxelles and was appointed to an assistant professorship (1974), an associate professorship (1977) and a full professorship (1980) in physical chemistry at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. In 1985 he returned to The Netherlands to take up a professorship at the Van 't Hoff Laboratory, where he has been ever since. He has received a series of awards during his career, including the Onsager Medal (1999) of the University of Trondheim, the Bakhuys Roozeboom Gold Medal (2003) of the Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), the ECIS-Rhodia European Colloid and Interface Prize (2003), and the Liquid Matter Prize of the European Physical Society (2008). He was elected a member of KNAW in 1996, was awarded an Academy Chair position in 2005, and has held several visiting lectureships. Henk's work focuses on phase transitions in soft condensed matter, and he has made seminal contributions to both the theoretical and experimental aspects of this field. Here we highlight three major themes running through his work, and a few selected publications. So-called depletion interactions may lead to phase separation in colloid-polymer mixtures, and Henk realised that the partitioning of polymer needs to be taken into account to describe the phase behaviour correctly [1]. Colloidal suspensions can be used as model fluids, with the time- and length-scales involved leading to novel opportunities, notably the direct observation of capillary waves at a

  3. Controlled, scalable embryonic stem cell differentiation culture.

    PubMed

    Dang, Stephen M; Gerecht-Nir, Sharon; Chen, Jinny; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Zandstra, Peter W

    2004-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are of significant interest as a renewable source of therapeutically useful cells. ES cell aggregation is important for both human and mouse embryoid body (EB) formation and the subsequent generation of ES cell derivatives. Aggregation between EBs (agglomeration), however, inhibits cell growth and differentiation in stirred or high-cell-density static cultures. We demonstrate that the agglomeration of two EBs is initiated by E-cadherin-mediated cell attachment and followed by active cell migration. We report the development of a technology capable of controlling cell-cell interactions in scalable culture by the mass encapsulation of ES cells in size-specified agarose capsules. When placed in stirred-suspension bioreactors, encapsulated ES cells can be used to produce scalable quantities of hematopoietic progenitor cells in a controlled environment.

  4. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, T.I.; Bolen, W.P.

    2007-01-01

    Construction aggregates, primarily stone, sand and gravel, are recovered from widespread naturally occurring mineral deposits and processed for use primarily in the construction industry. They are mined, crushed, sorted by size and sold loose or combined with portland cement or asphaltic cement to make concrete products to build roads, houses, buildings, and other structures. Much smaller quantities are used in agriculture, cement manufacture, chemical and metallurgical processes, glass production and many other products.

  5. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Part of the Annual Commodities Review 1995. Production of construction aggregates such as crushed stone and construction sand and gravel showed a marginal increase in 1995. Most of the 1995 increases were due to funding for highway construction work. The major areas of concern to the industry included issues relating to wetlands classification and the classification of crystalline silica as a probable human carcinogen. Despite this, an increase in demand is anticipated for 1996.

  6. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    Part of a special section on the market performance of industrial minerals in 1992. Production of construction aggregates increased by 4.6 percent in 1992. This increase was due, in part, to the increased funding for transportation and infrastructure projects. The U.S. produced about 1.05 Gt of crushed stone and an estimated 734 Mt of construction sand and gravel in 1992. Demand is expected to increase by about 5 percent in 1993.

  7. Beta vulgaris L. suspension cultures permeabilized with triton X-100 retain cell viability and betacyanines production ability: a digital image analysis study.

    PubMed

    Trejo-Tapia, Gabriela; Cuevas-Celis, Jonathan; Salcedo-Morales, Guadalupe; Trejo-Espino, José Luis; Arenas-Ocampo, Martha L; Jiménez-Aparicio, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    The influence of Triton X-100 on Beta vulgaris L. permeabilized cell culture viability, regrowth, and ability to produce betacyanines was evaluated in this study. A non-destructive method based on the analysis of images in the RGB (red, green, blue) system was developed to estimate betacyanines content. A treatment for 15 min with 0.7 mM Triton X-100 induced the release of 30% of betacyanines without loss of cell viability (>or=70%). After this permeabilization treatment, B. vulgaris cultures regrew normally, reaching a maximum biomass concentration of 48% higher than non-permeabilized cultures after 14 days of culture. Also, maximum betacyanines concentration was only 25% lower than that of non-permeabilized cultures.

  8. A 3D Sphere Culture System Containing Functional Polymers for Large-Scale Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Production

    PubMed Central

    Otsuji, Tomomi G.; Bin, Jiang; Yoshimura, Azumi; Tomura, Misayo; Tateyama, Daiki; Minami, Itsunari; Yoshikawa, Yoshihiro; Aiba, Kazuhiro; Heuser, John E.; Nishino, Taito; Hasegawa, Kouichi; Nakatsuji, Norio

    2014-01-01

    Summary Utilizing human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) in cell-based therapy and drug discovery requires large-scale cell production. However, scaling up conventional adherent cultures presents challenges of maintaining a uniform high quality at low cost. In this regard, suspension cultures are a viable alternative, because they are scalable and do not require adhesion surfaces. 3D culture systems such as bioreactors can be exploited for large-scale production. However, the limitations of current suspension culture methods include spontaneous fusion between cell aggregates and suboptimal passaging methods by dissociation and reaggregation. 3D culture systems that dynamically stir carrier beads or cell aggregates should be refined to reduce shearing forces that damage hPSCs. Here, we report a simple 3D sphere culture system that incorporates mechanical passaging and functional polymers. This setup resolves major problems associated with suspension culture methods and dynamic stirring systems and may be optimal for applications involving large-scale hPSC production. PMID:24936458

  9. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bolen, W.P.; Tepordei, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    The estimated production during 2000 of construction aggregates, crushed stone, and construction sand and gravel increased by about 2.6% to 2.7 Gt (3 billion st), compared with 1999. The expansion that started in 1992 continued with record production levels for the ninth consecutive year. By commodity, construction sand and gravel production increased by 4.5% to 1.16 Gt (1.28 billion st), while crushed stone production increased by 1.3% to 1.56 Gt (1.72 billion st).

  10. Derivation of iPSCs in stirred suspension bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Shafa, Mehdi; Day, Brad; Yamashita, Akihiro; Meng, Guoliang; Liu, Shiying; Krawetz, Roman; Rancourt, Derrick E

    2012-04-08

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are typically derived in adherent culture. Here we report fast and efficient derivation of mouse iPSCs in stirred suspension bioreactors, with and without the use of c-Myc. Suspension-reprogrammed cells expressed pluripotency markers, showed multilineage differentiation in vitro and in vivo, and contributed to the germline in chimeric mice. Suspension reprogramming has the potential to accelerate and standardize iPSC research.

  11. Fractal dimension and mechanism of aggregation of apple juice particles.

    PubMed

    Benítez, E I; Lozano, J E; Genovese, D B

    2010-04-01

    Turbidity of freshly squeezed apple juice is produced by a polydisperse suspension of particles coming from the cellular tissue. After precipitation of coarse particles by gravity, only fine-colloidal particles remain in suspension. Aggregation of colloidal particles leads to the formation of fractal structures. The fractal dimension is a measure of the internal density of these aggregates and depends on their mechanism of aggregation. Digitized images of primary particles and aggregates of depectinized, diafiltered cloudy apple juice were obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Average radius of the primary particles was found to be a = 40 ± 11 nm. Maximum radius of the aggregates, R(L), ranged between 250 and 7750 nm. Fractal dimension of the aggregates was determined by analyzing SEM images with the variogram method, obtaining an average value of D(f) = 2.3 ± 0.1. This value is typical of aggregates formed by rapid flocculation or diffusion limited aggregation. Diafiltration process was found to reduce the average size and polydispersity of the aggregates, determined by photon correlation spectroscopy. Average gyration radius of the aggregates before juice diafiltration was found to be R(g) = 629 ± 87 nm. Average number of primary particles per aggregate was calculated to be N = 1174. PMID:21339133

  12. Effects of chemical mechanical planarization slurry additives on the agglomeration of alumina nanoparticles II: aggregation rate analysis.

    PubMed

    Brahma, Neil; Talbot, Jan B

    2014-04-01

    The aggregation rate and mechanism of 150 nm alumina particles in 1mM KNO3 with various additives used in chemical mechanical planarization of copper were investigated. The pH of each suspension was ∼8 such that the aggregation rate was slow enough to be measured and analyzed over ∼120 min. In general, an initial exponential growth was observed for most suspensions indicating reaction-limited aggregation. After aggregate sizes increase to >500 nm, the rate followed a power law suggesting diffusion-limited aggregation. Stability ratios and fractal dimension numbers were also calculated to further elucidate the aggregation mechanism. PMID:24491325

  13. Chain Dynamics in Magnetorheological Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gast, A. P.; Furst, E. M.

    1999-01-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) suspensions are composed of colloidal particles which acquire dipole moments when subjected to an external magnetic field. At sufficient field strengths and concentrations, the dipolar particles rapidly aggregate to form long chains. Subsequent lateral cross-linking of the dipolar chains is responsible for a rapid liquid-to-solid-like rheological transition. The unique, magnetically-activated rheological properties of MR suspensions make them ideal for interfacing mechanical systems to electronic controls. Additionally, the ability to experimentally probe colloidal suspensions interacting through tunable anisotropic potentials is of fundamental interest. Our current experimental work has focused on understanding the fluctuations of dipolar chains. It has been proposed by Halsey and Toor (HT) that the strong Landau-Peierls thermal fluctuations of dipolar chains could be responsible for long-range attractions between chains. Such interactions will govern the long-time relaxation of MR suspensions. We have synthesized monodisperse neutrally buoyant MR suspensions by density matching stabilized ferrofluid emulsion droplets with D2O. This allows us to probe the dynamics of the dipolar chains using light scattering without gravitational, interfacial, and polydispersity effects to resolve the short-wavelength dynamics of the dipolar chains. We used diffusing wave spectroscopy to measure these dynamics. The particle displacements at short times that show an independence to the field strength, but at long times exhibit a constrained, sub-diffusive motion that slows as the dipole strength is increased. The experiments are in good qualitative agreement with Brownian dynamics simulations of dipolar chains. Although there have been several important and detailed studies of the structure and interactions in MR suspensions, there has not been conclusive evidence that supports or contradicts the HT model prediction that long-range interactions exist between

  14. The Multiparametric Effects of Hydrodynamic Environments on Stem Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Kinney, Melissa A.; Sargent, Carolyn Y.

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells possess the unique capacity to differentiate into many clinically relevant somatic cell types, making them a promising cell source for tissue engineering applications and regenerative medicine therapies. However, in order for the therapeutic promise of stem cells to be fully realized, scalable approaches to efficiently direct differentiation must be developed. Traditionally, suspension culture systems are employed for the scale-up manufacturing of biologics via bioprocessing systems that heavily rely upon various types of bioreactors. However, in contrast to conventional bench-scale static cultures, large-scale suspension cultures impart complex hydrodynamic forces on cells and aggregates due to fluid mixing conditions. Stem cells are exquisitely sensitive to environmental perturbations, thus motivating the need for a more systematic understanding of the effects of hydrodynamic environments on stem cell expansion and differentiation. This article discusses the interdependent relationships between stem cell aggregation, metabolism, and phenotype in the context of hydrodynamic culture environments. Ultimately, an improved understanding of the multifactorial response of stem cells to mixed culture conditions will enable the design of bioreactors and bioprocessing systems for scalable directed differentiation approaches. PMID:21491967

  15. Formation Kinetics of Aqueous Suspensions of Fullerenes:Meeting in New Orleans.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable colloidal suspension of C60 is commonly achieved through various solvent exchange techniques. Nevertheless, the additives such as tetrahydrofuran may be retained in the C60 aggregates, which may influence the surface properties of the suspension. In this study, colloidal...

  16. [Effect of manganese (II), cobalt (II), and nickel (II) ions on the growth and production of coumarins in the suspension culture of Angelica archangelica L].

    PubMed

    Siatka, T; Kasparová, M; Sklenárová, H; Solich, P

    2005-01-01

    The plant cell reacts to an increased concentration of metals in the environment by various mechanisms. They include an increase in the formation of heat-shock proteins, metallothioneins, phytochelatins, amino acids (cysteine, histidine), organic acids (citric, malic), or secondary metabolites. The latter mechanism is being investigated for its possible use in explant cultures for the stimulation of secondary metabolism, which is the source of substances of pharmaceutical importance. The study tested manganese (II) (0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 50 mM in the medium), cobalt (II), and nickel (II) ions (0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, 10, 50, 100, 200, and 500 microM in the medium) as potential elicitors of coumarin production. At the same time, toxicity of these metals for the culture was examined by evaluating their effect on growth (characterized by fresh and dry weight of biomass at the end of a two-week cultivation). Cultures were cultivated in the dark and in the light. It has been found that the growth of cultures is not influenced by manganese in concentrations ranging from 0 to 2 mM, then it slightly decreases, at a concentration of 50 mM it is lower by 20 % when cultivated in the dark and by 30 % when cultivated in the light in comparison with the control. Cobalt in concentrations of 0 to 50 microM does not significantly influence the growth of the culture, higher concentrations decrease the biomass yields, more markedly when cultivated in the light (at 500 microM Co by 60 %, in the dark only by 30 % in comparison with the controls). Nickel in concentrations of 0.1 to 200 microM does not influence growth, and in a concentration of 500 microM decreases it by approximately 30 % in comparison with the control both in the light and dark. Production of coumarins was not stimulated by any metal in comparison with the control cultures, only the removal of manganese from the medium in the culture cultivated in the dark increased production by about 15 % versus the

  17. Incorporation of biomaterials in multicellular aggregates modulates pluripotent stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bratt-Leal, Andrés M; Carpenedo, Richard L; Ungrin, Mark D; Zandstra, Peter W; McDevitt, Todd C

    2011-01-01

    Biomaterials are increasingly being used to engineer the biochemical and biophysical properties of the extracellular stem cell microenvironment in order to tailor niche characteristics and direct cell phenotype. To date, stem cell-biomaterial interactions have largely been studied by introducing stem cells into artificial environments, such as 2D cell culture on biomaterial surfaces, encapsulation of cell suspensions within hydrogel materials, or cell seeding on 3D polymeric scaffolds. In this study, microparticles fabricated from different materials, such as agarose, PLGA and gelatin, were stably integrated, in a dose-dependent manner, within aggregates of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) prior to differentiation as a means to directly examine stem cell-biomaterial interactions in 3D. Interestingly, the presence of the materials within the stem cell aggregates differentially modulated the gene and protein expression patterns of several differentiation markers without adversely affecting cell viability. Microparticle incorporation within 3D stem cell aggregates can control the spatial presentation of extracellular environmental cues (i.e. soluble factors, extracellular matrix and intercellular adhesion molecules) as a means to direct the differentiation of stem cells for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. In addition, these results suggest that the physical presence of microparticles within stem cell aggregates does not compromise PSC differentiation, but in fact the choice of biomaterials can impact the propensity of stem cells to adopt particular differentiated cell phenotypes. PMID:20864164

  18. Sponge cell reaggregation: Cellular structure and morphogenetic potencies of multicellular aggregates.

    PubMed

    Lavrov, Andrey I; Kosevich, Igor A

    2016-02-01

    Sponges (phylum Porifera) are one of the most ancient extant multicellular animals and can provide valuable insights into origin and early evolution of Metazoa. High plasticity of cell differentiations and anatomical structure is characteristic feature of sponges. Present study deals with sponge cell reaggregation after dissociation as the most outstanding case of sponge plasticity. Dynamic of cell reaggregation and structure of multicellular aggregates of three demosponge species (Halichondria panicea (Pallas, 1766), Haliclona aquaeductus (Sсhmidt, 1862), and Halisarca dujardinii Johnston, 1842) were studied. Sponge tissue dissociation was performed mechanically. Resulting cell suspensions were cultured at 8-10°C for at least 5 days. Structure of multicellular aggregates was studied by light, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Studied species share common stages of cell reaggregation-primary multicellular aggregates, early-stage primmorphs and primmorphs, but the rate of reaggregation varies considerably among species. Only cells of H. dujardinii are able to reconstruct functional and viable sponge after primmorphs formation. Sponge reconstruction in this species occurs due to active cell locomotion. Development of H. aquaeductus and H. panicea cells ceases at the stages of early primmorphs and primmorphs, respectively. Development of aggregates of these species is most likely arrested due to immobility of the majority of cells inside them. However, the inability of certain sponge species to reconstruct functional and viable individuals during cell reaggregation may be not a permanent species-specific characteristic, but depends on various factors, including the stage of the life cycle and experimental conditions. PMID:26863993

  19. Sponge cell reaggregation: Cellular structure and morphogenetic potencies of multicellular aggregates.

    PubMed

    Lavrov, Andrey I; Kosevich, Igor A

    2016-02-01

    Sponges (phylum Porifera) are one of the most ancient extant multicellular animals and can provide valuable insights into origin and early evolution of Metazoa. High plasticity of cell differentiations and anatomical structure is characteristic feature of sponges. Present study deals with sponge cell reaggregation after dissociation as the most outstanding case of sponge plasticity. Dynamic of cell reaggregation and structure of multicellular aggregates of three demosponge species (Halichondria panicea (Pallas, 1766), Haliclona aquaeductus (Sсhmidt, 1862), and Halisarca dujardinii Johnston, 1842) were studied. Sponge tissue dissociation was performed mechanically. Resulting cell suspensions were cultured at 8-10°C for at least 5 days. Structure of multicellular aggregates was studied by light, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Studied species share common stages of cell reaggregation-primary multicellular aggregates, early-stage primmorphs and primmorphs, but the rate of reaggregation varies considerably among species. Only cells of H. dujardinii are able to reconstruct functional and viable sponge after primmorphs formation. Sponge reconstruction in this species occurs due to active cell locomotion. Development of H. aquaeductus and H. panicea cells ceases at the stages of early primmorphs and primmorphs, respectively. Development of aggregates of these species is most likely arrested due to immobility of the majority of cells inside them. However, the inability of certain sponge species to reconstruct functional and viable individuals during cell reaggregation may be not a permanent species-specific characteristic, but depends on various factors, including the stage of the life cycle and experimental conditions.

  20. Investigating the feasibility of scale up and automation of human induced pluripotent stem cells cultured in aggregates in feeder free conditions.

    PubMed

    Soares, Filipa A C; Chandra, Amit; Thomas, Robert J; Pedersen, Roger A; Vallier, Ludovic; Williams, David J

    2014-03-10

    The transfer of a laboratory process into a manufacturing facility is one of the most critical steps required for the large scale production of cell-based therapy products. This study describes the first published protocol for scalable automated expansion of human induced pluripotent stem cell lines growing in aggregates in feeder-free and chemically defined medium. Cells were successfully transferred between different sites representative of research and manufacturing settings; and passaged manually and using the CompacT SelecT automation platform. Modified protocols were developed for the automated system and the management of cells aggregates (clumps) was identified as the critical step. Cellular morphology, pluripotency gene expression and differentiation into the three germ layers have been used compare the outcomes of manual and automated processes.

  1. Modelling a Suspension Bridge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawlins, Phil

    1991-01-01

    The quadratic function can be modeled in real life by a suspension bridge that supports a uniform weight. This activity uses concrete models and computer generated graphs to discover the mathematical model of the shape of the main cable of a suspension bridge. (MDH)

  2. Research on School Suspension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iselin, Anne-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Schools across the nation report increases in the use of punitive disciplinary methods (e.g., suspension). The need for these disciplinary practices to address serious student misconduct is undisputed. What research has questioned is why some students seem to be suspended more often than others, what effects suspension has on students, and whether…

  3. Stress Responses in Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) (XIV. Changes in the Levels of Phenylpropanoid Pathway Intermediates in Relation to Regulation of L-Phenylalanine Ammonia-Lyase in Elicitor-Treated Cell-Suspension Cultures).

    PubMed Central

    Orr, J. D.; Edwards, R.; Dixon, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    We have used high-resolution gas chromatography to determine the levels of trans-cinnamic acid (CA) and trans-4-coumaric acid (4CA) in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) cell-suspension cultures to address the role of these phenylpropanoid pathway intermediates as potential negative regulators of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) in vivo. Exogenous addition of CA to elicitor-treated cultures resulted in rapid increases in endogenous CA, 4CA, and CA-conjugate levels associated with inhibition of the appearance of PAL transcripts. Treatment of elicited cultures with [alpha]-aminooxy-[beta]-phenylpropionic acid (AOPP), a potent and specific inhibitor of PAL activity in vivo, resulted in reductions of CA and 4CA, with concomitant increases in PAL transcripts and extractable enzyme activity. In contrast, treatment with tetcyclacis, an inhibitor of CA 4-hydroxylase, resulted in increased CA and CA-conjugate levels, decreased 4CA levels, and decreased PAL transcript levels and enzyme activity. In tetcyclasis-treated cells, the inhibition of PAL transcript appearance preceded the increase in the levels of free CA and its conjugates. In elicited cells in which the phenylpropanoid pathway was not perturbed by metabolic inhibitors, PAL transcripts accumulated rapidly and transiently, beginning to decline by 2 h postelicitation. Changes in levels of total free or conjugated CA or 4CA did not consistently correlate with these changes in transcript levels. We propose that regulation of PAL transcript levels by endogenous phenylpropanoid pathway intermediates could involve compartmentalized pools that may exist because of the microsomal localization of cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase. PMID:12231735

  4. A Novel Method to Quantify Soil Aggregate Stability by Measuring Aggregate Bond Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efrat, Rachel; Rawlins, Barry G.; Quinton, John N.; Watts, Chris W.; Whitmore, Andy P.

    2016-04-01

    energy (Pb; input energy used in aggregate breakdown) can be calculated by the following equation: ΣPi - Ph = Pb The novel technique was tested by comparing the bond energies measured from a series of soil aggregates sampled from different land management histories, to the samples corresponding stability measurement obtained from standard modern stability tests. The effectiveness of the heavy liquid as a suspension (as opposed to water) was evaluated by comparing the bond energies of samples measured in both suspensions. Our results determine i) how disruptive water is in aggregate stability tests, ii) how accurate and representative standard aggregate stability tests are, and iii) how bond strength varies depending on land use. Keywords: Aggregate; Bond; Fragmentation; Soil; Sonication; Stability References: Zhu, Z. L., Minasny, B. & Field D. J. 2009. Measurement of aggregate bond energy using ultrasonic dispersion. European Journal of Soil Science, 60, 695-705

  5. Early habituation of maize (Zea mays) suspension-cultured cells to 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile is associated with the enhancement of antioxidant status.

    PubMed

    Largo-Gosens, Asier; Encina, Antonio; de Castro, María; Mélida, Hugo; Acebes, José L; García-Angulo, Penélope; Álvarez, Jesús M

    2016-06-01

    The cellulose biosynthesis inhibitor 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB) has been widely used to gain insights into cell wall composition and architecture. Studies of changes during early habituation to DCB can provide information on mechanisms that allow tolerance/habituation to DCB. In this context, maize-cultured cells with a reduced amount of cellulose (∼20%) were obtained by stepwise habituation to low DCB concentrations. The results reported here attempt to elucidate the putative role of an antioxidant strategy during incipient habituation. The short-term exposure to DCB of non-habituated maize-cultured cells induced a substantial increase in oxidative damage. Concomitantly, short-term treated cells presented an increase in class III peroxidase and glutathione S-transferase activities and total glutathione content. Maize cells habituated to 0.3-1 µM DCB (incipient habituation) were characterized by a reduction in the relative cell growth rate, an enhancement of ascorbate peroxidase and class III peroxidase activities, and a net increment in total glutathione content. Moreover, these cell lines showed increased levels of glutathione S-transferase activity. Changes in antioxidant/conjugation status enabled 0.3 and 0.5 µM DCB-habituated cells to control lipid peroxidation levels, but this was not the case of maize cells habituated to 1 μM DCB, which despite showing an increased antioxidant capacity were not capable of reducing the oxidative damage to control levels. The results reported here confirm that exposure and incipient habituation of maize cells to DCB are associated with an enhancement in antioxidant/conjugation activities which could play a role in incipient DCB habituation of maize-cultured cells.

  6. Inhibition of sup 125 I organification and thyroid hormone release by interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma in human thyrocytes in suspension culture

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, K.; Satoh, T.; Shizume, K.; Ozawa, M.; Han, D.C.; Imamura, H.; Tsushima, T.; Demura, H.; Kanaji, Y.; Ito, Y. )

    1990-06-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of decreased 131I uptake by the thyroid gland in patients with subacute thyroiditis and painless thyroiditis, human thyroid follicles were cultured with interleukin-1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha), and/or interferon-gamma (IFN gamma), and the effects of these cytokines on thyroid function were studied in vitro. When human thyrocytes were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium containing 0.5% fetal calf serum and TSH for 5-8 days, the cells incorporated 125I, synthesized de novo (125I)iodotyrosines and (125I)iodothyronines, and secreted (125I)T4 and (125I)T3 into the medium. IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta inhibited 125I incorporation and (125I)iodothyronine release in a concentration-dependent manner. The minimal inhibitory effect was detected at 10 pg/ml. Electron microscopic examination revealed a marked decrease in lysosome formation in IL-1-treated thyrocytes. TNF alpha and IFN gamma also inhibited thyroid function in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, when thyrocytes were cultured with IL-1, TNF alpha and IFN gamma, these cytokines more than additively inhibited thyroid function. Although the main mechanism of 131I uptake suppression in the thyroid gland in subacute thyroiditis is due to cellular damage and suppression of TSH release, our present findings suggest that IL-1, TNF alpha, and IFN gamma produced in the inflammatory process within the thyroid gland further inhibit iodine incorporation and at least partly account for the decreased 131I uptake by the thyroid gland in destruction-induced hyperthyroidism.

  7. Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    Twelve conference papers on cultural aspects of second language instruction include: "Towards True Multiculturalism: Ideas for Teachers" (Brian McVeigh); Comparing Cultures Through Critical Thinking: Development and Interpretations of Meaningful Observations" (Laurel D. Kamada); "Authority and Individualism in Japan and the USA" (Alisa Woodring);…

  8. Synthesis, characterization, and controlled aggregation of biotemplated polystyrene nanodisks

    SciTech Connect

    Tekobo, Samuel; Richter, Andrew; Dergunov, Sergey; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Urban, Volker S; Yan, Bing; Pinkhassik, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Cross-linked polystyrene nanodisks were prepared by controlled polymerization of styrene and divinylbenzene in the interior of bicelles, discoidal lipid aggregates. Aggregation behavior of polymer nanodisks was studied in water, organic solvents, and solid phase. Nanodisks form stable dispersions in aqueous solutions of surfactants, such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Varying SDS/nanodisk ratio allowed us to control the size of nanodisk aggregates. Nanodisks are readily solubilized in nonpolar organic solvents, such as toluene and carbon tetrachloride, to yield stable monodisperse suspensions. These findings open opportunities for creating nanodisk-based nanocomposite materials. Stable nanodisk suspension in toluene enabled small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements. SANS data confirmed the nanodisk diameter and allowed accurate measurement of nanodisk thickness (19.5 1.0 ). In solid phase, nanodisks aggregate in sub-micron platelets.

  9. Synthesis, characterization, and controlled aggregation of biotemplated polystyrene nanodisks.

    SciTech Connect

    Tekobo, S.; Richter, A.G.; Dergunov, S.A.; Pingali, S.V.; Urban, V.; Yan, B.; Pinkhassik, E.

    2011-01-01

    Cross-linked polystyrene nanodisks were prepared by controlled polymerization of styrene and divinylbenzene in the interior of bicelles, discoidal lipid aggregates. Aggregation behavior of polymer nanodisks was studied in water, organic solvents, and solid phase. Nanodisks form stable dispersions in aqueous solutions of surfactants, such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Varying SDS/nanodisk ratio allowed us to control the size of nanodisk aggregates. Nanodisks are readily solubilized in nonpolar organic solvents, such as toluene and carbon tetrachloride, to yield stable monodisperse suspensions. These findings open opportunities for creating nanodisk-based nanocomposite materials. Stable nanodisk suspension in toluene enabled small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements. SANS data confirmed the nanodisk diameter and allowed accurate measurement of nanodisk thickness (19.5 {+-} 1.0 {angstrom}). In solid phase, nanodisks aggregate in sub-micron platelets.

  10. The Metabolic Fate of Deoxynivalenol and Its Acetylated Derivatives in a Wheat Suspension Culture: Identification and Detection of DON-15-O-Glucoside, 15-Acetyl-DON-3-O-Glucoside and 15-Acetyl-DON-3-Sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Schmeitzl, Clemens; Warth, Benedikt; Fruhmann, Philipp; Michlmayr, Herbert; Malachová, Alexandra; Berthiller, Franz; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Krska, Rudolf; Adam, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a protein synthesis inhibitor produced by the Fusarium species, which frequently contaminates grains used for human or animal consumption. We treated a wheat suspension culture with DON or one of its acetylated derivatives, 3-acetyl-DON (3-ADON), 15-acetyl-DON (15-ADON) and 3,15-diacetyl-DON (3,15-diADON), and monitored the metabolization over a course of 96 h. Supernatant and cell extract samples were analyzed using a tailored LC-MS/MS method for the quantification of DON metabolites. We report the formation of tentatively identified DON-15-O-β-D-glucoside (D15G) and of 15-acetyl-DON-3-sulfate (15-ADON3S) as novel deoxynivalenol metabolites in wheat. Furthermore, we found that the recently identified 15-acetyl-DON-3-O-β-D-glucoside (15-ADON3G) is the major metabolite produced after 15-ADON challenge. 3-ADON treatment led to a higher intracellular content of toxic metabolites after six hours compared to all other treatments. 3-ADON was exclusively metabolized into DON before phase II reactions occurred. In contrast, we found that 15-ADON was directly converted into 15-ADON3G and 15-ADON3S in addition to metabolization into deoxynivalenol-3-O-β-D-glucoside (D3G). This study highlights significant differences in the metabolization of DON and its acetylated derivatives. PMID:26274975

  11. The Metabolic Fate of Deoxynivalenol and Its Acetylated Derivatives in a Wheat Suspension Culture: Identification and Detection of DON-15-O-Glucoside, 15-Acetyl-DON-3-O-Glucoside and 15-Acetyl-DON-3-Sulfate.

    PubMed

    Schmeitzl, Clemens; Warth, Benedikt; Fruhmann, Philipp; Michlmayr, Herbert; Malachová, Alexandra; Berthiller, Franz; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Krska, Rudolf; Adam, Gerhard

    2015-08-12

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a protein synthesis inhibitor produced by the Fusarium species, which frequently contaminates grains used for human or animal consumption. We treated a wheat suspension culture with DON or one of its acetylated derivatives, 3-acetyl-DON (3-ADON), 15-acetyl-DON (15-ADON) and 3,15-diacetyl-DON (3,15-diADON), and monitored the metabolization over a course of 96 h. Supernatant and cell extract samples were analyzed using a tailored LC-MS/MS method for the quantification of DON metabolites. We report the formation of tentatively identified DON-15-O-β-D-glucoside (D15G) and of 15-acetyl-DON-3-sulfate (15-ADON3S) as novel deoxynivalenol metabolites in wheat. Furthermore, we found that the recently identified 15-acetyl-DON-3-O-β-D-glucoside (15-ADON3G) is the major metabolite produced after 15-ADON challenge. 3-ADON treatment led to a higher intracellular content of toxic metabolites after six hours compared to all other treatments. 3-ADON was exclusively metabolized into DON before phase II reactions occurred. In contrast, we found that 15-ADON was directly converted into 15-ADON3G and 15-ADON3S in addition to metabolization into deoxynivalenol-3-O-β-D-glucoside (D3G). This study highlights significant differences in the metabolization of DON and its acetylated derivatives.

  12. Rod Climbing of Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Youjing; Wang, Xiaorong

    We wish to report an unexpected effect observed for particle suspensions sucked to pass through a vertical pipe. Above a critical concentration, the suspension on the outside of the pipe may climb along the outside wall of the pipe and then display a surprising rod-climbing effect. Our study shows that the phenomenon is influenced mainly by the suspension composition, the pipe dimension and the suction speed. The effects of the pipe materials of different kinds are negligible. Increasing the suction force and the concentration increases the climbing height. Increasing the pipe diameter and wall thickness reduces the climbing effect. This behavior may be relevant to that the suspensions of the type described are all displaying markedly shear-thickening.

  13. Impact of Particle Aggregation on Nanoparticle Reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassby, David

    2011-12-01

    nanoparticle that photoluminesces after exposure to UV; TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles---photocatalytic nanoparticles that generate reactive oxygen species upon UV irradition; and, fullerene nanoparticles used in the filtration experiments, selected for their potential use, small size, and surface chemistry. Our primary methods used to characterize particle and aggregate characteristics include dynamic light scattering used to describe particle size, static light scattering used to characterize aggregate structure (fractal dimension), transmission electron microscopy used to verify primary particle sizes, and electrophoretic mobility measurements to evaluate suspension stability. The reactive property of ZnS that was measured as a function of aggregation was photoluminescence, which was measured using a spectrofluorometer. The reactive property of TiO2 and ZnO that was studied was their ability to generate hydroxyl radicals; these were measured by employing a fluorescent probe that becomes luminescent upon interaction with the hydroxyl radical. To detect the presence of fullerene nanoparticles and calculate removal efficiencies, we used total organic carbon measurements. Additionally, we used UV-vis spectroscopy to approximate the impact of particle shadowing in TiO2 and ZnO aggregates, and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy to determine how different electrolytes interact with fullerene surface groups. Our findings indicate that the impact of aggregation on nanoparticle reactivity is material specific. ZnS nanoparticles exhibit a 2-fold increase in band-edge photoluminescence alongside a significant decrease in defect-site photoluminescence. This is attributed to aggregate size-dependent surface tension. Additionally, we used photoluminescence measurements to develop a new method for calculating the critical coagulation concentration of a nanoparticle suspension. The ability of both TiO2 and ZnO to generate hydroxyl radicals was significantly hampered by aggregation. The

  14. Flow-induced aggregation of colloidal particles in viscoelastic fluids.

    PubMed

    Xie, Donglin; Qiao, Greg G; Dunstan, Dave E

    2016-08-01

    The flow-induced aggregation of dilute colloidal polystyrene nanoparticles suspended in Newtonian and viscoelastic solutions is reported. A rheo-optical method has been used to detect real-time aggregation processes via measuring optical absorption or scattering in a quartz Couette cell. The observed absorbance decreases over time are attributed to the flow-induced coagulation. Numerical simulations show that the aggregation processes still follow the Smoluchowski coagulation equation in a revised version. Suspensions in a series of media are studied to evaluate the effect of the media rheological properties on the particle aggregation. The data shows that elasticity reduces the aggregation while the solution viscosity enhances the aggregation processes. PMID:27627363

  15. Quantifying intra- and extracellular aggregation of iron oxide nanoparticles and its influence on specific absorption rate.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seongho; Hurley, Katie R; Bischof, John C; Haynes, Christy L; Hogan, Christopher J

    2016-09-21

    A promising route to cancer treatment is hyperthermia, facilitated by superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). After exposure to an alternating external magnetic field, SPIONs generate heat, quantified by their specific absorption rate (SAR, in W g(-1) Fe). However, without surface functionalization, commercially available, high SAR SPIONs (EMG 308, Ferrotec, USA) aggregate in aqueous suspensions; this has been shown to reduce SAR. Further reduction in SAR has been observed for SPIONs in suspensions containing cells, but the origin of this further reduction has not been made clear. Here, we use image analysis methods to quantify the structures of SPION aggregates in the extra- and intracellular milieu of LNCaP cell suspensions. We couple image characterization with nanoparticle tracking analysis and SAR measurements of SPION aggregates in cell-free suspensions, to better quantify the influence of cellular uptake on SPION aggregates and ultimately its influence on SAR. We find that in both the intra- and extracellular milieu, SPION aggregates are well-described by a quasifractal model, with most aggregates having fractal dimensions in the 1.6-2.2 range. Intracellular aggregates are found to be significantly larger than extracellular aggregates and are commonly composed of more than 10(3) primary SPION particles (hence they are "superaggregates"). By using high salt concentrations to generate such superaggregates and measuring the SAR of suspensions, we confirm that it is the formation of superaggregates in the intracellular milieu that negatively impacts SAR, reducing it from above 200 W g(-1) Fe for aggregates composed of fewer than 50 primary particles to below 50 W g(-1) for superaggregates. While the underlying physical mechanism by which aggregation leads to reduction in SAR remains to be determined, the methods developed in this study provide insight into how cellular uptake influences the extent of SPION aggregation, and enable estimation of the

  16. Dynamic clustering in suspension of motile bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao; Yang, Xiang; Yang, Mingcheng; Zhang, H. P.

    2015-09-01

    Bacteria suspension exhibits a wide range of collective phenomena, arising from interactions between individual cells. Here we show Serratia marcescens cells near an air-liquid interface spontaneously aggregate into dynamic clusters through surface-mediated hydrodynamic interactions. These long-lived clusters translate randomly and rotate in the counterclockwise direction; they continuously evolve, merge with others and split into smaller ones. Measurements indicate that long-ranged hydrodynamic interactions have strong influences on cluster properties. Bacterial clusters change material and fluid transport near the interface and hence may have environmental and biological consequences.

  17. Comparative Analysis of Short- and Long-Term Changes in Gene Expression Caused by Low Water Potential in Potato (Solanum tuberosum) Cell-Suspension Cultures.

    PubMed

    Leone, A.; Costa, A.; Tucci, M.; Grillo, S.

    1994-10-01

    To dissect the cellular response to water stress and compare changes induced as a generalized response with those involved in tolerance/acclimation mechanisms, we analyzed changes in two-dimensional electrophoretic patterns of in vivo [35S]methionine-labeled polypeptides of cultured potato (Solanum tuberosum) cells after gradual and long exposure to polyethylene glycol (PEG)- mediated low water potential versus those induced in cells abruptly exposed to the same stress intensity. Protein synthesis was not inhibited by gradual stress imposition, and the expression of 17 proteins was induced in adapted cells. Some polypeptides were inducible under mild stress conditions (5% PEG) and accumulated further when cells were exposed to a higher stress intensity (10 and 20% PEG). The synthesis of another set of polypeptides was up-regulated only when more severe water-stress conditions were applied, suggesting that plant cells were able to monitor different levels of stress intensity and modulate gene expression accordingly. In contrast, in potato cells abruptly exposed to 20% PEG, protein synthesis was strongly inhibited. Nevertheless, a large set of polypeptides was identified whose expression was increased. Most of these polypeptides were not induced in adapted cells, but many of them were common to those observed in abscisic acid (ABA)-treated cells. These data, along with the finding that cellular ABA content increased in PEG-shocked cells but not in PEG-adapted cells, suggested that this hormone is mainly involved in the rapid response to stress rather than long-term adaptation. A further group of proteins included those induced after long exposure to both water stress and shock. Western blot analysis revealed that osmotin was one protein belonging to this common group. This class may represent induced proteins that accumulate specifically in response to low water potential and that are putatively involved in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis under prolonged

  18. Cell and Particle Interactions and Aggregation During Electrophoretic Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hua; Zeng, Shulin; Loewenberg, Michael; Todd, Paul; Davis, Robert H.

    1996-01-01

    The stability and pairwise aggregation rates of small spherical particles under the collective effects of buoyancy-driven motion and electrophoretic migration are analyzed. The particles are assumed to be non-Brownian, with thin double-layers and different zeta potentials. The particle aggregation rates may be enhanced or reduced, respectively, by parallel and antiparallel alignments of the buoyancy-driven and electrophoretic velocities. For antiparallel alignments, with the buoyancy-driven relative velocity exceeding the electrophoretic relative velocity between two widely-separated particles, there is a 'collision-forbidden region' in parameter space due to hydrodynamic interactions; thus, the suspension becomes stable against aggregation.

  19. Hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Tixador, P.; Hiebel, P.; Brunet, Y.

    1996-07-01

    Superconductors, especially high T{sub c} ones, are the most attractive materials to design stable and fully passive magnetic suspensions which have to control five degrees of freedom. The hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions present high performances and a simple cooling mode. They consist of a permanent magnet bearing, stabilized by a suitable magnet-superconductor structure. Several designs are given and compared in terms of forces and stiffnesses. The design of the magnet bearing plays an important part. The superconducting magnetic bearing participates less in levitation but must provide a high stabilizing stiffness. This is achieved by the magnet configuration, a good material in term of critical current density and field cooling. A hybrid superconducting suspension for a flywheel is presented. This system consists of a magnet thrust bearing stabilized by superconductors interacting with an alternating polarity magnet structure. First tests and results are reported. Superconducting materials are magnetically melt-textured YBaCuO.

  20. [Tyndall's hypochromism in suspensions].

    PubMed

    Vekshin, N L; Frolova, M S; Kovalev, V I; Begunova, E A

    2015-01-01

    Since the passage of light through each individual particle in a suspension includes the competition of processes of absorption and scattering, it leads to hypochromism--a decrease in the extinction coefficient. Such "scattering" hypochromism increases with the particle size and its refractive index. Since the Tyndall's light scattering in suspensions, where the size of each particle is substantially larger with respect to wavelengths of light, is not strongly dependent on the wavelength, the absorption spectrum (and excitation spectrum) attenuated almost uniformly at different wavelengths. A simple method to find true extinction coefficients from the absorption (or excitation) spectra of diluted suspensions (not having multiple light scattering) is suggested. The experimental data on spectra of hemoglobin in erythrocytes, actinomycin in DNA and flavins in mitochondria are given.

  1. Suspension Bridge Structural Systems: Cable Suspension & Anchorage; Warren Stiffening ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Suspension Bridge Structural Systems: Cable Suspension & Anchorage; Warren Stiffening Truss; Upper & Lower Decks; Assembled System - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  2. Nuclear Factor-kappaB controls the reaggregation of 3D neurosphere cultures in vitro.

    PubMed

    Widera, D; Mikenberg, I; Kaus, A; Kaltschmidt, C; Kaltschmidt, B

    2006-01-01

    The approach of reaggregation involves the regeneration and self-renewal of histotypical 3D spheres from isolated tissue kept in suspension culture. Reaggregated spheres can be used as tumour, genetic, biohybrid and neurosphere models. In addition the functional superiority of 3D aggregates over conventional 2D cultures developed the use of neurospheres for brain engineering of CNS diseases. Thus 3D aggregate cultures created enormous interest in mechanisms that regulate the formation of multicellular aggregates in vitro. Here we analyzed mechanisms guiding the development of 3D neurosphere cultures. Adult neural stem cells can be cultured as self-adherent clusters, called neurospheres. Neurospheres are characterised as heterogeneous clusters containing unequal stem cell sub-types. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha is one of the crucial inflammatory cytokines with multiple actions on several cell types. TNF-alpha strongly activates the canonical Nuclear Factor Kappa-B (NF- kappaB) pathway. In order to investigate further functions of TNF in neural stem cells (NSCs) we tested the hypothesis that TNF is able to modulate the motility and/or migratory behaviour of SVZ derived adult neural stem cells. We observed a significantly faster sphere formation in TNF treated cultures than in untreated controls. The very fast aggregation of isolated NSCs (<2h) is a commonly observed phenomenon, though the mechanisms of 3D neurosphere formation remain largely unclear. Here we demonstrate for the first time, increased aggregation and enhanced motility of isolated NSCs in response to the TNF-stimulus. Moreover, this phenomenon is largely dependent on activated transcription factor NF-kappaB. Both, the pharmacological blockade of NF-kappaB pathway by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) or Bay11-7082 and genetic blockade by expression of a transdominant-negative super-repressor IkappaB-AA1 led to decreased aggregation.

  3. Aggregation kinetics and colloidal stability of functionalized nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gambinossi, Filippo; Mylon, Steven E; Ferri, James K

    2015-08-01

    The functionalization of nanoparticles has primarily been used as a means to impart stability in nanoparticle suspensions. In most cases even the most advanced nanomaterials lose their function should suspensions aggregate and settle, but with the capping agents designed for specific solution chemistries, functionalized nanomaterials generally remain monodisperse in order to maintain their function. The importance of this cannot be underestimated in light of the growing use of functionalized nanomaterials for wide range of applications. Advanced functionalization schemes seek to exert fine control over suspension stability with small adjustments to a single, controllable variable. This review is specific to functionalized nanoparticles and highlights the synthesis and attachment of novel functionalization schemes whose design is meant to affect controllable aggregation. Some examples of these materials include stimulus responsive polymers for functionalization which rely on a bulk solution physicochemical threshold (temperature or pH) to transition from a stable (monodisperse) to aggregated state. Also discussed herein are the primary methods for measuring the kinetics of particle aggregation and theoretical descriptions of conventional and novel models which have demonstrated the most promise for the appropriate reduction of experimental data. Also highlighted are the additional factors that control nanoparticle stability such as the core composition, surface chemistry and solution condition. For completeness, a case study of gold nanoparticles functionalized using homologous block copolymers is discussed to demonstrate fine control over the aggregation state of this type of material. PMID:25150615

  4. Magnetic Suspension Technology Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keckler, Claude R. (Editor); Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    In order to identify the state of magnetic suspension technology in such areas as rotating systems, pointing of experiments or subsystems, payload isolation, and superconducting materials, a workshop on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, on 2-4 Feb. 1988. The workshop included five technical sessions in which a total of 24 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of pointing, isolation, and measurement, rotating systems, modeling and control, and superconductors. A list of attendees is provided.

  5. Networking and rheology of concentrated clay suspensions "matured" in mineral medicinal water.

    PubMed

    Aguzzi, Carola; Sánchez-Espejo, Rita; Cerezo, Pilar; Machado, José; Bonferoni, Cristina; Rossi, Silvia; Salcedo, Inmaculada; Viseras, César

    2013-09-10

    This work studied the influence of "maturation" conditions (time and agitation) on aggregation states, gel structure and rheological behaviour of a special kind of pharmaceutical semisolid products made of concentrated clay suspensions in mineral medicinal water. Maturation of the samples was carried out in distilled and sulphated mineral medicinal water, both in static conditions (without agitation) and with manual stirring once a week, during a maximum period of three months. At the measured pH interval (7.5-8.0), three-dimensional band-type networks resulting from face/face contacts were predominant in the laminar (disc-like) clay suspensions, whereas the fibrous (rod-like) particles formed micro-aggregates by van der Waals attractions. The high concentration of solids in the studied systems greatly determined their behaviour. Rod-like sepiolite particles tend to align the major axis in aggregates promoted by low shearing maturation, whereas aggregates of disc-like smectite particles did not have a preferential orientation and their complete swelling required long maturation time, being independent of stirring. Maturation of both kinds of suspensions resulted in improved rheological properties. Laminar clay suspensions became more structured with time, independently from static or dynamic maturation conditions, whereas for fibrous clay periodic agitation was also required. Rheological properties of the studied systems have been related to aggregation states and networking mechanisms, depending on the type of clay minerals constituents. Physical stability of the suspensions was not impaired by the specific composition of the Graena medicinal water.

  6. Highly efficient uptake of ultrafine mesoporous silica nanoparticles with excellent biocompatibility by Liriodendron hybrid suspension cells.

    PubMed

    Xia, Bing; Dong, Chen; Zhang, WenYi; Lu, Ye; Chen, JinHui; Shi, JiSen

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of the interactions co-cultures of ultrafine mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) and the Liriodendron hybrid suspension cells were systematically investigated using laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeling, the LSCM observations demonstrated that MSNs (size, 5-15 nm) with attached FITC molecules efficiently penetrated walled plant cells through endocytic pathways, but free FITC could not enter the intact plant cells. The SEM measurements indicated that MSNs readily aggregated on the surface of intact plant cells, and also directly confirmed that MSNs could enter intact plant cells; this was achieved by determining the amount of silicon present. After 24 h of incubation with 1.0 mg mL(-1) of MSNs, the viability of the plant cells was analyzed using fluorescein diacetate staining; the results showed that these cells retained high viability, and no cell death was observed. Interestingly, after the incubation with MSNs, the Liriodendron hybrid suspension cells retained the capability for plant regeneration via somatic embryogenesis. Our results indicate that ultrafine MSNs hold considerable potential as nano-carriers of extracellular molecules, and can be used to investigate in vitro gene-delivery in plant cells.

  7. Thermodynamics of Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Kenneth L.; Barz, Bogdan; Bachmann, Michael; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloid protein aggregation characterizes many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Creutz- feldt-Jakob disease. Evidence suggests that amyloid aggregates may share similar aggregation pathways, implying simulation of full-length amyloid proteins is not necessary for understanding amyloid formation. In this study we simulate GNNQQNY, the N-terminal prion-determining domain of the yeast protein Sup35 to investigate the thermodynamics of structural transitions during aggregation. We use a coarse-grained model with replica-exchange molecular dynamics to investigate the association of 3-, 6-, and 12-chain GNNQQNY systems and we determine the aggregation pathway by studying aggregation states of GN- NQQNY. We find that the aggregation of the hydrophilic GNNQQNY sequence is mainly driven by H-bond formation, leading to the formation of /3-sheets from the very beginning of the assembly process. Condensation (aggregation) and ordering take place simultaneously, which is underpinned by the occurrence of a single heat capacity peak only.

  8. Study of colloidal particle Brownian aggregation by low-coherence fiber optic dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hui; Pang, Ru Yi; Zhang, Rui; Miao, Cai Xia; Wu, Xiao Yun; Hou, Xue Shun; Zhong, Cheng

    2012-06-15

    The aggregation kinetics of particles in dense polystyrene latex suspensions is studied by low-coherence fiber optic dynamic light scattering. Low-coherence fiber optic dynamic light scattering is used to measure the hydrodynamic radius of the aggregates. The aggregation kinetics data obtained can be fitted into a single exponential function, which is the characteristic of slow aggregation. It is found that the aggregation rate of particles increased with higher electrolyte levels and with larger particle concentrations. The experimental results can be explained by use of the Derjaruin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeer (DLVO) theory. PMID:22446146

  9. Clustering in Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenit, Roberto

    2000-11-01

    A monidisperse bubble suspension is studied experimentally for the limit in which the Weber number is small and the Reynolds number is large. For this regime the suspension can be modeled using potential flow theory to describe the dynamics of the interstitial fluid. Complete theoretical descriptions have been composed (Spelt and Sangani, 1998) to model the behavior of these suspensions. Bubble clustering is a natural instability that arises from the potential flow considerations, in which bubbles tend to align in horizontal rafts as they move upwards. The appearance of bubble clusters was recently corroborated experimentally by Zenit et al. (2000), who found that although clusters did appear, their strength was not as strong as the predictions. Experiments involving gravity driven shear flows are used to explain the nature of the clustering observed in these type of flows. Balances of the bubble phase pressure (in terms of a calculated diffusion coefficient) and the Maxwell pressure (from the potential flow description) are presented to predict the stability of the bubble suspension. The predictions are compared with experimental results.

  10. Keep solids in suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Gladki, H.Z.

    1997-10-01

    Mixing is an important operation in the CPI. It is not synonymous with agitation. Mixing is a random distribution into and through one another of two or more initially separate phases. Within that broad definition is the important specialty area of liquid-solid dispersion. This paper addresses the dispersion of solids in lower concentrations that don`t affect the rheological properties of the fluid. The just suspended condition represents the lowest grade of complete suspension, but this level of agitation is the most efficient for solids-liquid agitation. Higher mixing speeds waste energy. Undersized mixers need replacing. The top-entering mixer has a long history in the CPI and the environmental area. Many suspension studies were run with this type. These papers result in empirical correlations for just suspension conditions to scale up from laboratory measurement. Variables considered are the agitation speed, liquid and solids physical properties, solids concentration, system geometry and impeller type. Lately, submersible mixers are becoming more popular, but there are no published sizing methods. This article will explain how to define the critical hydraulic conditions in the tank to reach just solids suspension for a submersible agitator of the type described here as FJFA (Free Jet Flow Agitator).

  11. Stability of Metronidazole Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Ronald F; Ying, James

    2015-01-01

    Metronidazole is an antiprotozoal agent used in the treatment of bacterial and protozoal anaerobic infections. The objectives of this study were to develop concentrated metronidazole suspensions that are inexpensive and easy to prepare and determine the stability of these suspensions after storage in amber polyvinyl chloride bottles at room temperature (23°C) and under refrigeration (5°C). Metronidazole suspensions (50 mg/mL) were prepared from powder using Ora-Blend or simple syrup as the vehicles. Samples were collected in triplicate from each container on days 0, 7, 14, 28, 56, and 93. Samples were assayed using a high-performance liquid chromatography method that had been validated as stability indicating. Color, change in physical appearance, and pH were also monitored at each time interval. There was no apparent change in color or physical appearance. The pH values changed by less than 0.20 units over the 93 days. The stability of metronidazole suspensions compounded from United States Pharmacopeia powder using Ora-Blend or simple syrup and packaged in amber polyvinyl chloride bottles was determined to be 93 days when stored at either room temperature or under refrigeration. PMID:26714365

  12. Alternatives to Student Suspension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinett, David

    2012-01-01

    Seven years ago, James A. Garfield High School in East Los Angeles set a school record with 613 student suspensions, out of a total enrollment of 5,000 students. The school, made famous by the 1988 film "Stand and Deliver", was no stranger to the high rates of student discipline all too common within the Los Angeles Unified School District.…

  13. Viscosity of colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, E.G.D.; Schepper, I.M. de

    1995-12-31

    Simple expressions are given for the effective Newtonian viscosity as a function of concentration as well as for the effective visco-elastic response as a function of concentration and imposed frequency, of monodisperse neutral colloidal suspensions over the entire fluid range. The basic physical mechanisms underlying these formulae are discussed. The agreement with existing experiments is very good.

  14. Flywheel Magnetic Suspension Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazzolo, Alan; Kenny, Andrew; Sifford, Curtiss; Thomas, Erwin; Bhuiyan, Mohammad; Provenza, Andrew; Kascak, Albert; Montague, Gerald; Lei, Shuliang; Kim, Yeonkyu; Sun, Guangyoung; Chon, ChonHee; Tucker, Randy; Preuss, Jason; Li, Ming; Minihan, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of many areas of the flywheel magnetic suspension (MS) R&D being performed at the Texas A&M Vibration Control and Electromechanics Lab (TAMU-VCEL). This includes system response prediction, actuator optimization and redundancy, controller realizations and stages, sensor enhancements and backup bearing reliability.

  15. Crewbot Suspension Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Nathan A.

    2005-01-01

    Planetary Surface Robot Work Crews (RWC) represent a new class of construction robots for future deployment in planetary exploration. Rovers currently being used for the RWC platform lack the load carrying capabilities required in regular work. Two new rovers, dubbed CrewBots, being designed in JPL's Planetary Robotics Lab specifically for RWC applications greatly increase the load carrying capabilities of the platform. A major component of the rover design was the design of the rocker type suspension, which increases rover mobility. The design of the suspension for the Crewbots departed from the design of recent rovers. While many previous rovers have used internal bevel gear differentials, the increased load requirements of the Crewbots calls for a more robust system. The solution presented is the use of an external modified three-bar, slider-linkage, rocker-style suspension that increases the moment arm of the differential. The final product is a suspension system capable of supporting the extreme loading cases the RWC platform presents, without consuming a large portion of the Crewbots' internal space.

  16. Cryonic Suspension and the Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, George P.; Hall, Clare

    1987-01-01

    Analyzes three central problems which adversely affect use, development, and perfection of cryonic suspension of individuals: the extent to which a physician may be guilty of malpractice in assisting with a suspension; the need for a recognition of suspension; and the present effect of the law's anachronistic treatment of estate devolution upon a…

  17. Coarsening mechanics of a colloidal suspension in toggled fields.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Jonathan L; Liu, Yifei; Kurian, Martin J; Swan, James W; Furst, Eric M

    2015-08-21

    Suspensions of paramagnetic colloids are driven to phase separate and self-assemble in toggled magnetic fields. At field strengths above 575 A/m and toggle frequencies between 0.66 and 2 Hz, an initial gel-like, arrested network collapses into condensed, ellipsoidal aggregates. The evolution to this equilibrium structure occurs via a Rayleigh-Plateau instability. The toggle frequency ν determines the fluidity of the breakup process. At frequencies between 0.66 and 1.5 Hz, the suspension breaks up similar to a viscous, Newtonian fluid. At frequencies ν > 1.5 Hz, the network ruptures like a viscoplastic material. The field strength alters the onset time of the instability. A power law relationship emerges as the scaled frequency and field strength can be used to predict the onset of breakup. These results further aid in understanding the mechanics and dynamics of the phase separation process of suspensions of polarizable colloids in toggled external fields. PMID:26298150

  18. Coarsening mechanics of a colloidal suspension in toggled fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Jonathan L.; Liu, Yifei; Kurian, Martin J.; Swan, James W.; Furst, Eric M.

    2015-08-01

    Suspensions of paramagnetic colloids are driven to phase separate and self-assemble in toggled magnetic fields. At field strengths above 575 A/m and toggle frequencies between 0.66 and 2 Hz, an initial gel-like, arrested network collapses into condensed, ellipsoidal aggregates. The evolution to this equilibrium structure occurs via a Rayleigh-Plateau instability. The toggle frequency ν determines the fluidity of the breakup process. At frequencies between 0.66 and 1.5 Hz, the suspension breaks up similar to a viscous, Newtonian fluid. At frequencies ν > 1.5 Hz, the network ruptures like a viscoplastic material. The field strength alters the onset time of the instability. A power law relationship emerges as the scaled frequency and field strength can be used to predict the onset of breakup. These results further aid in understanding the mechanics and dynamics of the phase separation process of suspensions of polarizable colloids in toggled external fields.

  19. Coarsening mechanics of a colloidal suspension in toggled fields.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Jonathan L; Liu, Yifei; Kurian, Martin J; Swan, James W; Furst, Eric M

    2015-08-21

    Suspensions of paramagnetic colloids are driven to phase separate and self-assemble in toggled magnetic fields. At field strengths above 575 A/m and toggle frequencies between 0.66 and 2 Hz, an initial gel-like, arrested network collapses into condensed, ellipsoidal aggregates. The evolution to this equilibrium structure occurs via a Rayleigh-Plateau instability. The toggle frequency ν determines the fluidity of the breakup process. At frequencies between 0.66 and 1.5 Hz, the suspension breaks up similar to a viscous, Newtonian fluid. At frequencies ν > 1.5 Hz, the network ruptures like a viscoplastic material. The field strength alters the onset time of the instability. A power law relationship emerges as the scaled frequency and field strength can be used to predict the onset of breakup. These results further aid in understanding the mechanics and dynamics of the phase separation process of suspensions of polarizable colloids in toggled external fields.

  20. Particle-based simulations of self-motile suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinz, Denis F.; Panchenko, Alexander; Kim, Tae-Yeon; Fried, Eliot

    2015-11-01

    A simple model for simulating flows of active suspensions is investigated. The approach is based on dissipative particle dynamics. While the model is potentially applicable to a wide range of self-propelled particle systems, the specific class of self-motile bacterial suspensions is considered as a modeling scenario. To mimic the rod-like geometry of a bacterium, two dissipative particle dynamics particles are connected by a stiff harmonic spring to form an aggregate dissipative particle dynamics molecule. Bacterial motility is modeled through a constant self-propulsion force applied along the axis of each such aggregate molecule. The model accounts for hydrodynamic interactions between self-propelled agents through the pairwise dissipative interactions conventional to dissipative particle dynamics. Numerical simulations are performed using a customized version of the open-source software package LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator) software package. Detailed studies of the influence of agent concentration, pairwise dissipative interactions, and Stokes friction on the statistics of the system are provided. The simulations are used to explore the influence of hydrodynamic interactions in active suspensions. For high agent concentrations in combination with dominating pairwise dissipative forces, strongly correlated motion patterns and a fluid-like spectral distributions of kinetic energy are found. In contrast, systems dominated by Stokes friction exhibit weaker spatial correlations of the velocity field. These results indicate that hydrodynamic interactions may play an important role in the formation of spatially extended structures in active suspensions.

  1. Suspension for automotive vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, W.C.

    1986-10-07

    This patent describes a vehicle suspension system for mounting ground-engaging wheels to a vehicle frame. The suspension system comprises at least two substantially rigid arms secured to opposite sides of the frame through substantially aligned pivot mounts; at least one wheel-carrying axle between the arms; and a bracket means securing the at least one axle to each of the arms. The improvements described here is in each of the bracket means comprising: an axle plate means rigidly secured to the axle and having an elongated planar complementary surface at least partially wrapping around the axle; two spaced connecting plates secured transversely to the axle plate means and to one of the arms; and a bracing means comprising at least one curved gusset plate rigidly and angularly secured to and between the axle plate means and one of the connecting plates.

  2. Articulated Suspension Without Springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, Donald B.

    1990-01-01

    Wheels negotiate bumps and holes with minimal tilting of vehicle body. In new suspension, wheel climbs obstacle as high as 1 1/2 times its diameter without excessive tilting of chassis. Provides highly stable ride over rough ground for such vehicles as wheelchairs, military scout cars, and police and fire robots. System of levers distributes weight to wheels. Sized to distribute equal or other desired portions of load among wheels.

  3. Assessment of formulation robustness for nano-crystalline suspensions using failure mode analysis or derisking approach.

    PubMed

    Nakach, Mostafa; Authelin, Jean-René; Voignier, Cecile; Tadros, Tharwat; Galet, Laurence; Chamayou, Alain

    2016-06-15

    The small particle size of nano-crystalline suspensions can be responsible for their physical instability during drug product preparation (downstream processing), storage and administration. For that purpose, the commercial formulation needs to be sufficiently robust to various triggering conditions, such as ionic strength, shear rate, wetting/dispersing agent desorption by dilution, temperature and pH variation. In our previous work we described a systematic approach to select the suitable wetting/dispersant agent for the stabilization of nano-crystalline suspension. In this paper, we described the assessment of the formulation robustness (stabilized using a mixture of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and) by measuring the rate of perikinetic (diffusion-controlled) and orthokinetic (shear-induced) aggregation as a function of ionic strength, temperature, pH and dilution. The results showed that, using the SDS/PVP system, the critical coagulation concentration is about five times higher than that observed in the literature for suspension colloidaly stable at high concentration. The nano-suspension was also found to be very stable at ambient temperature and at different pH conditions. Desorption test confirmed the high affinity between API and wetting/dispersing agent. However, the suspension undergoes aggregation at high temperature due to the desorption of the wetting/dispersing agent and disaggregation of SDS micelles. Furthermore, aggregation occurs at very high shear rate (orhokinetic aggregation) by overcoming the energy barrier responsible for colloidal stability of the system. PMID:27102992

  4. Stress in dilute suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Passman, Stephen L.

    1989-01-01

    Generally, two types of theory are used to describe the field equations for suspensions. The so-called postulated equations are based on the kinetic theory of mixtures, which logically should give reasonable equations for solutions. The basis for the use of such theory for suspensions is tenuous, though it at least gives a logical path for mathematical arguments. It has the disadvantage that it leads to a system of equations which is underdetermined, in a sense that can be made precise. On the other hand, the so-called averaging theory starts with a determined system, but the very process of averaging renders the resulting system underdetermined. A third type of theory is proposed in which the kinetic theory of gases is used to motivate continuum equations for the suspended particles. This entails an interpretation of the stress in the particles that is different from the usual one. Classical theory is used to describe the motion of the suspending medium. The result is a determined system for a dilute suspension. Extension of the theory to more concentrated systems is discussed.

  5. The Tail Suspension Test

    PubMed Central

    Terrillion, Chantelle E.; Piantadosi, Sean C.; Bhat, Shambhu; Gould, Todd D.

    2012-01-01

    The tail-suspension test is a mouse behavioral test useful in the screening of potential antidepressant drugs, and assessing of other manipulations that are expected to affect depression related behaviors. Mice are suspended by their tails with tape, in such a position that it cannot escape or hold on to nearby surfaces. During this test, typically six minutes in duration, the resulting escape oriented behaviors are quantified. The tail-suspension test is a valuable tool in drug discovery for high-throughput screening of prospective antidepressant compounds. Here, we describe the details required for implementation of this test with additional emphasis on potential problems that may occur and how to avoid them. We also offer a solution to the tail climbing behavior, a common problem that renders this test useless in some mouse strains, such as the widely used C57BL/6. Specifically, we prevent tail climbing behaviors by passing mouse tails through a small plastic cylinder prior to suspension. Finally, we detail how to manually score the behaviors that are manifested in this test. PMID:22315011

  6. A rapid method for simultaneous evaluation of free light chain content and aggregate content in culture media of Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing monoclonal antibodies for cell line screening.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Yoichi; Tsukahara, Masayoshi; Wakamatsu, Kaori

    2016-04-01

    The goal of developing a monoclonal antibody (mAb) production process is high productivity and high quality. Because the productivity and quality of mAbs depend on cell line properties, the selection of cell lines suitable for large-scale production is an important stage in process development for mAb production. The light chain (LC) is important for antibody folding and assembly in the endoplasmic reticulum; cell lines that secrete a large amount of LCs in the medium secrete high-quality antibodies with high productivity. LC contents in culture media have been estimated by western blotting, reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. However, these analyses require fine tuning of experimental conditions for each antibody analyzed. Here we report a rapid and simple high-sensitivity size-exclusion chromatography (HS-SEC) method to evaluate the contents of low-molecular weight species (LMWS, mainly consisting of LC monomers and dimers) and high-molecular weight species (HMWS, aggregates) in the media for cell line screening. Because LMWS and HMWS are important indicators of productivity and quality, respectively, for cell line screening, HS-SEC will be useful in the first step of cell line selection needed for large-scale production. PMID:26467692

  7. Comparative Proteomics of Ovarian Cancer Aggregate Formation Reveals an Increased Expression of Calcium-activated Chloride Channel Regulator 1 (CLCA1)*

    PubMed Central

    Musrap, Natasha; Tuccitto, Alessandra; Karagiannis, George S.; Saraon, Punit; Batruch, Ihor; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a lethal gynecological disease that is characterized by peritoneal metastasis and increased resistance to conventional chemotherapies. This increased resistance and the ability to spread is often attributed to the formation of multicellular aggregates or spheroids in the peritoneal cavity, which seed abdominal surfaces and organs. Given that the presence of metastatic implants is a predictor of poor survival, a better understanding of how spheroids form is critical to improving patient outcome, and may result in the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Thus, we attempted to gain insight into the proteomic changes that occur during anchorage-independent cancer cell aggregation. As such, an ovarian cancer cell line, OV-90, was cultured in adherent and non-adherent conditions using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). Anchorage-dependent cells (OV-90AD) were grown in tissue culture flasks, whereas anchorage-independent cells (OV-90AI) were grown in suspension using the hanging-drop method. Cellular proteins from both conditions were then identified using LC-MS/MS, which resulted in the quantification of 1533 proteins. Of these, 13 and 6 proteins were up-regulated and down-regulated, respectively, in aggregate-forming cells compared with cells grown as monolayers. Relative gene expression and protein expression of candidates were examined in other cell line models of aggregate formation (TOV-112D and ES-2), which revealed an increased expression of calcium-activated chloride channel regulator 1 (CLCA1). Moreover, inhibitor and siRNA transfection studies demonstrated an apparent effect of CLCA1 on cancer cell aggregation. Further elucidation of the role of CLCA1 in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is warranted. PMID:26004777

  8. Comparative Proteomics of Ovarian Cancer Aggregate Formation Reveals an Increased Expression of Calcium-activated Chloride Channel Regulator 1 (CLCA1).

    PubMed

    Musrap, Natasha; Tuccitto, Alessandra; Karagiannis, George S; Saraon, Punit; Batruch, Ihor; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2015-07-10

    Ovarian cancer is a lethal gynecological disease that is characterized by peritoneal metastasis and increased resistance to conventional chemotherapies. This increased resistance and the ability to spread is often attributed to the formation of multicellular aggregates or spheroids in the peritoneal cavity, which seed abdominal surfaces and organs. Given that the presence of metastatic implants is a predictor of poor survival, a better understanding of how spheroids form is critical to improving patient outcome, and may result in the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Thus, we attempted to gain insight into the proteomic changes that occur during anchorage-independent cancer cell aggregation. As such, an ovarian cancer cell line, OV-90, was cultured in adherent and non-adherent conditions using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). Anchorage-dependent cells (OV-90AD) were grown in tissue culture flasks, whereas anchorage-independent cells (OV-90AI) were grown in suspension using the hanging-drop method. Cellular proteins from both conditions were then identified using LC-MS/MS, which resulted in the quantification of 1533 proteins. Of these, 13 and 6 proteins were up-regulated and down-regulated, respectively, in aggregate-forming cells compared with cells grown as monolayers. Relative gene expression and protein expression of candidates were examined in other cell line models of aggregate formation (TOV-112D and ES-2), which revealed an increased expression of calcium-activated chloride channel regulator 1 (CLCA1). Moreover, inhibitor and siRNA transfection studies demonstrated an apparent effect of CLCA1 on cancer cell aggregation. Further elucidation of the role of CLCA1 in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is warranted.

  9. Growth hormone aggregates in the rat adenohypophysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrington, M.; Hymer, W. C.

    1990-01-01

    Although it has been known for some time that GH aggregates are contained within the rat anterior pituitary gland, the role that they might play in pituitary function is unknown. The present study examines this issue using the technique of Western blotting, which permitted visualization of 11 GH variants with apparent mol wt ranging from 14-88K. Electroelution of the higher mol wt variants from gels followed by their chemical reduction with beta-mercaptoethanol increased GH immunoassayability by about 5-fold. With the blot procedure we found 1) that GH aggregates greater than 44K were associated with a 40,000 x g sedimentable fraction; 2) that GH aggregates were not present in glands from thyroidectomized rats, but were in glands from the thyroidectomized rats injected with T4; 3) that GH aggregates were uniquely associated with a heavily granulated somatotroph subpopulation isolated by density gradient centrifugation; and 4) that high mol wt GH forms were released from the dense somatotrophs in culture, since treatment of the culture medium with beta-mercaptoethanol increased GH immunoassayability by about 5-fold. Taken together, the results show that high mol wt GH aggregates are contained in secretory granules of certain somatotrophs and are also released in aggregate form from these cells in vitro.

  10. Novel oral suspensions: a review.

    PubMed

    Kathpalia, Harsha; Phadke, Chetan

    2014-01-01

    An oral pharmaceutical suspension has been one of the most favorable dosage forms for pediatric and geriatric patients or patients unable to tolerate solid dosage forms. The liquid form is preferred because of the ease of swallowing and flexibility in the administration of doses. This emerging area of suspensions as applied to the pharmaceutical field are discussed in the current article enlightening the vision of the readers towards pharmaceutical formulations including nanosuspensions, non-aqueous suspensions and modified release suspensions. The emphasis in the article focuses on the essential principles involved in the process of formation of different types of suspensions and their applications, since novel oral suspensions have potential to provide various strategy systems.

  11. Investigation of the hydrodynamic behavior of diatom aggregates using particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Feng; Li, Xiaoyan; Lam, Kitming; Wang, Dongsheng

    2012-01-01

    The hydrodynamic behavior of diatom aggregates has a significant influence on the interactions and flocculation kinetics of algae. However, characterization of the hydrodynamics of diatoms and diatom aggregates in water is rather difficult. In this laboratory study, an advanced visualization technique in particle image velocimetry (PIV) was employed to investigate the hydrodynamic properties of settling diatom aggregates. The experiments were conducted in a settling column filled with a suspension of fluorescent polymeric beads as seed tracers. A laser light sheet was generated by the PIV setup to illuminate a thin vertical planar region in the settling column, while the motions of particles were recorded by a high speed charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. This technique was able to capture the trajectories of the tracers when a diatom aggregate settled through the tracer suspension. The PIV results indicated directly the curvilinear feature of the streamlines around diatom aggregates. The rectilinear collision model largely overestimated the collision areas of the settling particles. Algae aggregates appeared to be highly porous and fractal, which allowed streamlines to penetrate into the aggregate interior. The diatom aggregates have a fluid collection efficiency of 10%-40%. The permeable feature of aggregates can significantly enhance the collisions and flocculation between the aggregates and other small particles including algal cells in water.

  12. Characterization of Ovine Dermal Papilla Cell Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Sari, Agnes Rosarina Prita; Rufaut, Nicholas Wolfgang; Jones, Leslie Norman; Sinclair, Rodney Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Context: The dermal papilla (DP) is a condensation of mesenchymal cells at the proximal end of the hair follicle, which determines hair shaft size and regulates matrix cell proliferation and differentiation. DP cells have the ability to regenerate new hair follicles. These cells tend to aggregate both in vitro and in vivo. This tendency is associated with the ability of papilla cells to induce hair growth. However, human papilla cells lose their hair-inducing activity in later passage number. Ovine DP cells are different from human DP cells since they do not lose their aggregative behavior or hair-inducing activity in culture. Nonetheless, our understanding of ovine DP cells is still limited. Aim: The aim of this study was to observe the expression of established DP markers in ovine cells and their association with aggregation. Subjects and Methods: Ovine DP cells from three different sheep were compared. Histochemistry, immunoflourescence, and polymerase chain reaction experiments were done to analyze the DP markers. Results: We found that ovine DP aggregates expressed all the 16 markers evaluated, including alkaline phosphatase and versican. Expression of the versican V0 and V3 isoforms, neural cell adhesion molecule, and corin was increased significantly with aggregation, while hey-1 expression was significantly decreased. Conclusions: Overall, the stable expression of numerous markers suggests that aggregating ovine DP cells have a similar phenotype to papillae in vivo. The stability of their molecular phenotype is consistent with their robust aggregative behavior and retained follicle-inducing activity after prolonged culture. Their phenotypic stability in culture contrasts with DP cells from other species, and suggests that a better understanding of ovine DP cells might provide opportunities to improve the hair-inducing activity and therapeutic potential of human cells. PMID:27625564

  13. Characterization of Ovine Dermal Papilla Cell Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Sari, Agnes Rosarina Prita; Rufaut, Nicholas Wolfgang; Jones, Leslie Norman; Sinclair, Rodney Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Context: The dermal papilla (DP) is a condensation of mesenchymal cells at the proximal end of the hair follicle, which determines hair shaft size and regulates matrix cell proliferation and differentiation. DP cells have the ability to regenerate new hair follicles. These cells tend to aggregate both in vitro and in vivo. This tendency is associated with the ability of papilla cells to induce hair growth. However, human papilla cells lose their hair-inducing activity in later passage number. Ovine DP cells are different from human DP cells since they do not lose their aggregative behavior or hair-inducing activity in culture. Nonetheless, our understanding of ovine DP cells is still limited. Aim: The aim of this study was to observe the expression of established DP markers in ovine cells and their association with aggregation. Subjects and Methods: Ovine DP cells from three different sheep were compared. Histochemistry, immunoflourescence, and polymerase chain reaction experiments were done to analyze the DP markers. Results: We found that ovine DP aggregates expressed all the 16 markers evaluated, including alkaline phosphatase and versican. Expression of the versican V0 and V3 isoforms, neural cell adhesion molecule, and corin was increased significantly with aggregation, while hey-1 expression was significantly decreased. Conclusions: Overall, the stable expression of numerous markers suggests that aggregating ovine DP cells have a similar phenotype to papillae in vivo. The stability of their molecular phenotype is consistent with their robust aggregative behavior and retained follicle-inducing activity after prolonged culture. Their phenotypic stability in culture contrasts with DP cells from other species, and suggests that a better understanding of ovine DP cells might provide opportunities to improve the hair-inducing activity and therapeutic potential of human cells.

  14. Controls of maglev suspension systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Zhu, S.; Chen, S.S.; Rote, D.M.

    1993-06-01

    This study investigates alternative control designs of maglev vehicle suspension systems. Active and semi-active control law designs are introduced into primary and secondary suspensions of maglev vehicles. A one-dimensional vehicle with two degrees of freedom, to simulate the German Transrapid Maglev System, is used for suspension control designs. The transient and frequency responses of suspension systems and PSDs of vehicle accelerations are calculated to evaluate different control designs. The results show that active and semi-active control designs indeed improve the response of vehicle and provide an acceptable ride comfort for maglev systems.

  15. Aggregations in Flatworms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liffen, C. L.; Hunter, M.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a school project to investigate aggregations in flatworms which may be influenced by light intensity, temperature, and some form of chemical stimulus released by already aggregating flatworms. Such investigations could be adopted to suit many educational levels of science laboratory activities. (DS)

  16. 20 CFR 416.1320 - Suspensions; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspensions; general. 416.1320 Section 416..., BLIND, AND DISABLED Suspensions and Terminations § 416.1320 Suspensions; general. (a) When suspension is proper. Suspension of benefit payments is required when a recipient is alive but no longer meets...

  17. 20 CFR 416.1320 - Suspensions; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Suspensions; general. 416.1320 Section 416..., BLIND, AND DISABLED Suspensions and Terminations § 416.1320 Suspensions; general. (a) When suspension is proper. Suspension of benefit payments is required when a recipient is alive but no longer meets...

  18. Electrofiltration of Aqueous Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Zhang; Tan; Neoh; Tien

    2000-08-15

    Electrofiltration of hydrosols in fixed-bed filters was studied experimentally. The experimental variables examined included media type, electric field strength, and suspension pH values. The extent of particle removal was found to improve with the application of the electric field, and lower pH values favor particle collection. The filtrate quality displayed the transient behavior of increasing particle concentration with time. A simple model which assumes that the filter coefficient decreases linearly with the extent of deposition was developed and found capable of predicting the observed behavior. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  19. Modelling of strongly coupled particle growth and aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruy, F.; Touboul, E.

    2013-02-01

    The mathematical modelling of the dynamics of particle suspension is based on the population balance equation (PBE). PBE is an integro-differential equation for the population density that is a function of time t, space coordinates and internal parameters. Usually, the particle is characterized by a unique parameter, e.g. the matter volume v. PBE consists of several terms: for instance, the growth rate and the aggregation rate. So, the growth rate is a function of v and t. In classical modelling, the growth and the aggregation are independently considered, i.e. they are not coupled. However, current applications occur where the growth and the aggregation are coupled, i.e. the change of the particle volume with time is depending on its initial value v0, that in turn is related to an aggregation event. As a consequence, the dynamics of the suspension does not obey the classical Von Smoluchowski equation. This paper revisits this problem by proposing a new modelling by using a bivariate PBE (with two internal variables: v and v0) and by solving the PBE by means of a numerical method and Monte Carlo simulations. This is applied to a physicochemical system with a simple growth law and a constant aggregation kernel.

  20. Neonatal rat heart cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, Robert E.; Schroedl, Nancy A.; Gonda, Steve R.; Hartzell, Charles R.

    1994-01-01

    In vitro characteristics of cardiac cells cultured in simulated microgravity are reported. Tissue culture methods performed at unit gravity constrain cells to propagate, differentiate, and interact in a two dimensional (2D) plane. Neonatal rat cardiac cells in 2D culture organize predominantly as bundles of cardiomyocytes with the intervening areas filled by non-myocyte cell types. Such cardiac cell cultures respond predictably to the addition of exogenous compounds, and in many ways they represent an excellent in vitro model system. The gravity-induced 2D organization of the cells, however, does not accurately reflect the distribution of cells in the intact tissue. We have begun characterizations of a three-dimensional (3D) culturing system designed to mimic microgravity. The NASA designed High-Aspect-Ratio-Vessel (HARV) bioreactors provide a low shear environment which allows cells to be cultured in static suspension. HARV-3D cultures were prepared on microcarrier beads and compared to control-2D cultures using a combination of microscopic and biochemical techniques. Both systems were uniformly inoculated and medium exchanged at standard intervals. Cells in control cultures adhered to the polystyrene surface of the tissue culture dishes and exhibited typical 2D organization. Cells in cultured in HARV's adhered to microcarrier beads, the beads aggregated into defined clusters containing 8 to 15 beads per cluster, and the clusters exhibited distinct 3D layers: myocytes and fibroblasts appeared attached to the surfaces of beads and were overlaid by an outer cell type. In addition, cultures prepared in HARV's using alternative support matrices also displayed morphological formations not seen in control cultures. Generally, the cells prepared in HARV and control cultures were similar, however, the dramatic alterations in 3D organization recommend the HARV as an ideal vessel for the generation of tissue-like organizations of cardiac cells in simulated microgravity.

  1. Neonatal rat heart cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, R. E.; Schroedl, N. A.; Gonda, S. R.; Hartzell, C. R.

    1997-01-01

    In vitro characteristics of cardiac cells cultured in simulated microgravity are reported. Tissue culture methods performed at unit gravity constrain cells to propagate, differentiate, and interact in a two-dimensional (2D) plane. Neonatal rat cardiac cells in 2D culture organize predominantly as bundles of cardiomyocytes with the intervening areas filled by nonmyocyte cell types. Such cardiac cell cultures respond predictably to the addition of exogenous compounds, and in many ways they represent an excellent in vitro model system. The gravity-induced 2D organization of the cells, however, does not accurately reflect the distribution of cells in the intact tissue. We have begun characterizations of a three-dimensional (3D) culturing system designed to mimic microgravity. The NASA-designed High-Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) bioreactors provide a low shear environment that allows cells to be cultured in static suspension. HARV-3D cultures were prepared on microcarrier beads and compared to control-2D cultures using a combination of microscopic and biochemical techniques. Both systems were uniformly inoculated and medium exchanged at standard intervals. Cells in control cultures adhered to the polystyrene surface of the tissue culture dishes and exhibited typical 2D organization. Cells cultured in HARVs adhered to microcarrier beads, the beads aggregated into defined clusters containing 8 to 15 beads per cluster, and the clusters exhibited distinct 3D layers: myocytes and fibroblasts appeared attached to the surfaces of beads and were overlaid by an outer cell type. In addition, cultures prepared in HARVs using alternative support matrices also displayed morphological formations not seen in control cultures. Generally, the cells prepared in HARV and control cultures were similar; however, the dramatic alterations in 3D organization recommend the HARV as an ideal vessel for the generation of tissuelike organization of cardiac cells in vitro.

  2. Magnetic Suspension Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, Colin

    1998-01-01

    This Cooperative Agreement, intended to support focused research efforts in the area of magnetic suspension systems, was initiated between NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and Old Dominion University (ODU) starting January 1, 1997. The original proposal called for a three-year effort, but funding for the second year proved to be unavailable, leading to termination of the agreement following a 5-month no-cost extension. This report covers work completed during the entire 17-month period of the award. This research built on work that had taken place over recent years involving both NASA LARC and the Principal Investigator (PI). The research was of a rather fundamental nature, although specific applications were kept in mind at all times, such as wind tunnel Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems (MSBS), space payload pointing and vibration isolation systems, magnetic bearings for unconventional applications, magnetically levitated ground transportation and electromagnetic launch systems. Fundamental work was undertaken in areas such as the development of optimized magnetic configurations, analysis and modelling of eddy current effects, control strategies for magnetically levitated wind tunnel models and system calibration procedures. Despite the termination of this Cooperative Agreement, several aspects of the research work are currently continuing with alternative forms of support.

  3. 48 CFR 209.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension. 209.407... OF DEFENSE ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 209.407 Suspension....

  4. 48 CFR 209.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 209.407... OF DEFENSE ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 209.407 Suspension....

  5. 48 CFR 3409.407 - Suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension. 3409.407... COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 3409.407 Suspension....

  6. Diesel Technology: Steering and Suspension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Roger; Scarberry, Terry; Tesch, Carl; Kellum, Mary

    Competency-based teacher and student materials on steering and suspension are provided for a diesel technology curriculum. Eleven units of instruction cover the following topics: chassis, tires, and wheels; steering; and suspension. The materials are based on the curriculum-alignment concept of first stating the objectives, then developing…

  7. TECHNICAL NOTE: Electroconductive magnetorheological suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bica, Ioan

    2006-12-01

    A magnetorheological suspension (MRS) is obtained by thermal decomposition of Fe2(CO)9 in mineral oil with stearic acid. For well-chosen values of the intensity of the magnetic field, the suspension becomes electroconductive. By addition of styrene acrylate copolymer iron oxide, MRSs are obtained with prescribed domains of electrical conductivity. The experimental results obtained are presented and discussed.

  8. Flow properties of concentrated suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatt