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Sample records for aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans aa

  1. Evolutionary Divergence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Kittichotirat, W; Bumgarner, R E; Chen, C

    2016-01-01

    Gram-negative facultative Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral pathogen associated with periodontitis. The genetic heterogeneity among A. actinomycetemcomitans strains has been long recognized. This study provides a comprehensive genomic analysis of A. actinomycetemcomitans and the closely related nonpathogenic Aggregatibacter aphrophilus. Whole genome sequencing by Illumina MiSeq platform was performed for 31 A. actinomycetemcomitans and 2 A. aphrophilus strains. Sequence similarity analysis shows a total of 3,220 unique genes across the 2 species, where 1,550 are core genes present in all genomes and 1,670 are variable genes (accessory genes) missing in at least 1 genome. Phylogenetic analysis based on 397 concatenated core genes distinguished A. aphrophilus and A. actinomycetemcomitans. The latter was in turn divided into 5 clades: clade b (serotype b), clade c (serotype c), clade e/f (serotypes e and f), clade a/d (serotypes a and d), and clade e' (serotype e strains). Accessory genes accounted for 14.1% to 23.2% of the A. actinomycetemcomitans genomes, with a majority belonging to the category of poorly characterized by Cluster of Orthologous Groups classification. These accessory genes were often organized into genomic islands (n = 387) with base composition biases, suggesting their acquisitions via horizontal gene transfer. There was a greater degree of similarity in gene content and genomic islands among strains within clades than between clades. Strains of clade e' isolated from human were found to be missing the genomic island that carries genes encoding cytolethal distending toxins. Taken together, the results suggest a pattern of sequential divergence, starting from the separation of A. aphrophilus and A. actinomycetemcomitans through gain and loss of genes and ending with the divergence of the latter species into distinct clades and serotypes. With differing constellations of genes, the A. actinomycetemcomitans clades may have evolved

  2. Aggregatibacter Actinomycetemcomitans – A Tooth Killer?

    PubMed Central

    Ummer, Fajar; Dhivakar, C.P

    2014-01-01

    Strong evidence is available on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A.a) on its role as the causative agent of localised juvenile periodontitis (LJP), a disease characterised by rapid destruction of the tooth-supporting tissues. This organism possesses a large number of virulence factors with a wide range of activities which enable it to colonise the oral cavity, invade periodontal tissues, evade host defences, initiate connective tissue destruction and interfere with tissue repair. Adhesion to epithelial and tooth surfaces is dependent on the presence of surface proteins and structures such as microvesicles and fimbriae. Invasion has been demonstrated in vivo and in vitro. The organism has a number of means of evading host defences which include: (i) production of leukotoxin; (ii) producing immunosuppressive factors; (iv) secreting proteases capable of cleaving IgG; and (v) producing Fc-binding. PMID:25302290

  3. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Zijnge, Vincent; Granström, Elisabeth; Oscarsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and leukotoxin (LtxA) into human host cells and to act as triggers of innate immunity upon carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). To improve our understanding of the pathogenicity-associated functions that A. actinomycetemcomitans exports via OMVs, we studied the proteome of density gradient-purified OMVs from a rough-colony type clinical isolate, strain 173 (serotype e) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This analysis yielded the identification of 151 proteins, which were found in at least three out of four independent experiments. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002509. Through this study, we not only confirmed the vesicle-associated release of LtxA, and the presence of proteins, which are known to act as immunoreactive antigens in the human host, but we also identified numerous additional putative virulence-related proteins in the A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV proteome. The known and putative functions of these proteins include immune evasion, drug targeting, and iron/nutrient acquisition. In summary, our findings are consistent with an OMV-associated proteome that exhibits several offensive and defensive functions, and they provide a comprehensive basis to further disclose roles of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs in periodontal and systemic disease.

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Strain IDH781

    PubMed Central

    May, Anthony C.; Ehrlich, Rachel L.; Balashov, Sergey; Ehrlich, Garth D.; Shanmugam, Mayilvahanan; Fine, Daniel H.; Ramasubbu, Narayanan

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genomic sequence and methylome of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans strain IDH781. This rough strain is used extensively as a model organism to characterize localized aggressive periodontitis pathogenesis, the basic biology and oral cavity colonization of A. actinomycetemcomitans, and its interactions with other members of the oral microbiome. PMID:27834722

  5. The cell envelope proteome of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Smith, K P; Fields, J G; Voogt, R D; Deng, B; Lam, Y-W; Mintz, K P

    2015-04-01

    The cell envelope of gram-negative bacteria serves a critical role in maintenance of cellular homeostasis, resistance to external stress, and host-pathogen interactions. Envelope protein composition is influenced by the physiological and environmental demands placed on the bacterium. In this study, we report a comprehensive compilation of cell envelope proteins from the periodontal and systemic pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans VT1169, an afimbriated serotype b strain. The urea-extracted membrane proteins were identified by mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics. The membrane proteome, isolated from actively growing bacteria under normal laboratory conditions, included 648 proteins representing 27% of the predicted open reading frames in the genome. Bioinformatic analyses were used to annotate and predict the cellular location and function of the proteins. Surface adhesins, porins, lipoproteins, numerous influx and efflux pumps, multiple sugar, amino acid and iron transporters, and components of the type I, II and V secretion systems were identified. Periplasmic space and cytoplasmic proteins with chaperone function were also identified. A total of 107 proteins with unknown function were associated with the cell envelope. Orthologs of a subset of these uncharacterized proteins are present in other bacterial genomes, whereas others are found exclusively in A. actinomycetemcomitans. This knowledge will contribute to elucidating the role of cell envelope proteins in bacterial growth and survival in the oral cavity.

  6. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans induces Th17 cells in atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ru; Hashizume-Takizawa, Tomomi; Du, Yuan; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko

    2015-04-01

    Th17 cells have been linked to the pathogenesis of several chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. However, the role of Th17 cells and IL-17 in atherosclerosis remains poorly understood. We previously reported that Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) bacteremia accelerated atherosclerosis accompanied by inflammation in apolipoprotein E-deficient spontaneously hyperlipidemic (Apoe(shl)) mice. In this study, we investigated whether Aa promotes the Th17 inducing pathway in Aa-challenged Apoe(shl) mice. Mice were intravenously injected with live Aa HK1651 or vehicles. Time-course analysis of splenic IL-17(+)CD4(+) cell frequencies, the proximal aorta lesion area, serum IL-17, IL-6, TGF-β and IL-1β levels, the mRNA expression of Th17-related molecules such as IL-1β, IL-6, IL17RA, STAT3, IL-21, IL-23, TGF-β and RORγt, Th17-related microRNA levels and the levels of AIM-2, Mincle and NLRP3 were examined. Challenge with Aa time dependently induced tropism of Th17 cells in the spleen and increase in atheromatous lesions in the aortic sinus of Apoe(shl) mice. Serum IL-17, IL-6, TGF-β and IL-1β levels were significantly enhanced by Aa. The gene expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17RA, IL-21, IL-23, TGF-β, STAT3, RORγt, AIM-2, Mincle and NLRP3 was also time dependently stimulated in the aorta of Aa-challenged mice. Furthermore, Aa challenge significantly increased the expression of miR-146b and miR-155 in the aorta. Based on the results, it seems that Aa stimulates Th17 induction that affects the progression of Aa-accelerated atherosclerosis.

  7. AI-2 of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans inhibits Candida albicans biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Bachtiar, Endang W; Bachtiar, Boy M; Jarosz, Lucja M; Amir, Lisa R; Sunarto, Hari; Ganin, Hadas; Meijler, Michael M; Krom, Bastiaan P

    2014-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a Gram-negative bacterium, and Candida albicans, a polymorphic fungus, are both commensals of the oral cavity but both are opportunistic pathogens that can cause oral diseases. A. actinomycetemcomitans produces a quorum-sensing molecule called autoinducer-2 (AI-2), synthesized by LuxS, that plays an important role in expression of virulence factors, in intra- but also in interspecies communication. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of AI-2 based signaling in the interactions between C. albicans and A. actinomycetemcomitans. A. actinomycetemcomitans adhered to C. albicans and inhibited biofilm formation by means of a molecule that was secreted during growth. C. albicans biofilm formation increased significantly when co-cultured with A. actinomycetemcomitans luxS, lacking AI-2 production. Addition of wild-type-derived spent medium or synthetic AI-2 to spent medium of the luxS strain, restored inhibition of C. albicans biofilm formation to wild-type levels. Addition of synthetic AI-2 significantly inhibited hypha formation of C. albicans possibly explaining the inhibition of biofilm formation. AI-2 of A. actinomycetemcomitans is synthesized by LuxS, accumulates during growth and inhibits C. albicans hypha- and biofilm formation. Identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between bacteria and fungi may provide important insight into the balance within complex oral microbial communities.

  8. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans infection mimicking lung cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Matzumura-Kuan, Melissa; Jennings, Jeffrey

    2014-09-01

    Pulmonary infections can mimic a pulmonary neoplasm. Multiple organisms, including bacteria, viruses, and fungi, can present with similar clinical, radiographic, and surgical findings as neoplastic processes. Because treatment and the prognosis are completely different, an accurate diagnosis is crucial, and lung biopsy is usually required. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is part of the normal oral flora and is a rare cause of invasive infection due to hematogenous dissemination or aspiration, particularly infective endocarditis. We present a case of A. actinomycetemcomitans and Actinomyces co-infection that presented as a mediastinal mass, with surgical findings similar to lung malignancy but with biopsy and culture showing an infectious origin. After antibiotic treatment, follow-up images showed resolution of the mass.

  9. Actinomycetemcomitin: a new bacteriocin produced by Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Lima, Francisca Lúcia; de Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora Roque; Apolônio, Ana Carolina Morais; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Santoro, Marcelo Matos; Oliveira, Jamil Silvano; Alviano, Celuta Sales; Farias, Luiz de Macêdo

    2008-02-01

    Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans P(7-20) strain isolated from a periodontally diseased patient has produced a bacteriocin (named as actinomycetemcomitin) that is active against Peptostreptococcus anaerobius ATCC 27337. Actinomycetemcomitin was produced during exponential and stationary growth phases, and its amount decreased until it disappeared during the decline growth phase. It was purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation (30-60% saturation), and further by FPLC (mono-Q ionic exchange and Phenyl Superose hydrophobic interaction) and HPLC (C-18 reversed-phase). This bacteriocin loses its activity after incubation at a pH below 7.0 or above 8.0, following heating for 30 min at 45 degrees C, and after treatment with proteolytic enzymes such as trypsin, alpha-chymotrypsin, and papain. Actinomycetemcomitin has a molecular mass of 20.3 KDa and it represents a new bacteriocin from A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  10. Stability of the JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Haubek, D; Ennibi, O-K; Vaeth, M; Poulsen, S; Poulsen, K

    2009-09-01

    The JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is strongly associated with aggressive periodontitis. To obtain information about colonization dynamics of the JP2 clone, we used PCR to examine its presence in 365 Moroccan juveniles from whom periodontal plaque samples were collected at baseline and after one and two years. Periodontal attachment loss was measured at baseline and at the two-year follow-up. At baseline, 43 (12%) carriers of the JP2 clone were found. Nearly half (44 %) of these were persistently colonized with the clone. The relative risk for the development of aggressive periodontitis, adjusted for the concomitant presence of other genotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans, was highest for individuals continuously infected by the JP2 clone (RR = 13.9; 95% CI, 9.0 to 21.4), indicating a relationship between infectious dose and disease, which further substantiates the evidence for the JP2 clone as a causal factor in aggressive periodontitis.

  11. Azithromycin kills invasive Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in gingival epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lai, Pin-Chuang; Walters, John D

    2013-03-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans invades periodontal pocket epithelium and is therefore difficult to eliminate by periodontal scaling and root planing. It is susceptible to azithromycin, which is taken up by many types of mammalian cells. This led us to hypothesize that azithromycin accumulation by gingival epithelium could enhance the killing of intraepithelial A. actinomycetemcomitans. [(3)H]azithromycin transport by Smulow-Glickman gingival epithelial cells and SCC-25 oral epithelial cells was characterized. To test our hypothesis, we infected cultured Smulow-Glickman cell monolayers with A. actinomycetemcomitans (Y4 or SUNY 465 strain) for 2 h, treated them with gentamicin to eliminate extracellular bacteria, and then incubated them with azithromycin for 1 to 4 h. Viable intracellular bacteria were released, plated, and enumerated. Azithromycin transport by both cell lines exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics and was competitively inhibited by l-carnitine and several other organic cations. Cell incubation in medium containing 5 μg/ml azithromycin yielded steady-state intracellular concentrations of 144 μg/ml in SCC-25 cells and 118 μg/ml in Smulow-Glickman cells. Azithromycin induced dose- and time-dependent intraepithelial killing of both A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. Treatment of infected Smulow-Glickman cells with 0.125 μg/ml azithromycin killed approximately 29% of the intraepithelial CFU of both strains within 4 h, while treatment with 8 μg/ml azithromycin killed ≥82% of the CFU of both strains (P < 0.05). Addition of carnitine inhibited the killing of intracellular bacteria by azithromycin (P < 0.05). Thus, human gingival epithelial cells actively accumulate azithromycin through a transport system that facilitates the killing of intraepithelial A. actinomycetemcomitans and is shared with organic cations.

  12. A gene cluster for the synthesis of serotype g-specific polysaccharide antigen in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Tsuzukibashi, Osamu; Saito, Masanori; Kobayashi, Taira; Umezawa, Koji; Nagahama, Fumio; Hiroi, Takachika; Hirasawa, Masatomo; Takada, Kazuko

    2014-04-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an important pathogen related to aggressively progressive periodontal breakdown in adolescents and adults. The species can be divided into six serotypes (a-f) according to their surface carbohydrate antigens. Recently, a new serotype g of A. actinomycetemcomitans was proposed. The aim of the present study was to sequence the gene cluster associated with the biosynthesis of the serotype g-specific polysaccharide antigen and develop serotype-specific primers for PCR assay to identify serotype g strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans. The serotype-specific polysaccharide (SSPS) gene cluster of the NUM-Aa 4039 strain contained 21 genes in 21,842-bp nucleotides. The similarity of the SSPS gene cluster sequence was 96.7 % compared with that of the serotype e strain. Seventeen serotype g genes showed more than 90 % homology both in nucleotide and amino acids to the serotype e strain. Three additional genes with 1,579 bp in NUM-Aa 4039 were inserted into the corresponding ORF13 of the serotype e strain. The serotype g-specific primers were designed from the insertion region of NUM-Aa 4039. Serotypes of the a-f strains were not amplified by serotype-specific g primers; only NUM-Aa 4039 showed an amplicon band. The NUM-Aa 4039 strain was three genes in the SSPS gene cluster different from those of serotype e strain. The specific primers derived from these different regions are useful for identification and distribution of serotype g strain among A. actinomycetemcomitans from clinical samples.

  13. Leukotoxic activity of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and periodontal attachment loss.

    PubMed

    Höglund Åberg, Carola; Haubek, Dorte; Kwamin, Francis; Johansson, Anders; Claesson, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a Gram-negative periodontitis-associated bacterium that expresses a toxin that selectively affects leukocytes. This leukotoxin is encoded by an operon belonging to the core genome of this bacterial species. Variations in the expression of the leukotoxin have been reported, and a well-characterized specific clonal type (JP2) of this bacterium with enhanced leukotoxin expression has been isolated. In particular, the presence of the JP2 genotype significantly increases the risk for the progression of periodontal attachment loss (AL). Based on these findings we hypothesized that variations in the leukotoxicity are linked to disease progression in infected individuals. In the present study, the leukotoxicity of 239 clinical isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans was analysed with different bioassays, and the genetic peculiarities of the isolates were related to their leukotoxicity based on examination with molecular techniques. The periodontal status of the individuals sampled for the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans was examined longitudinally, and the importance of the observed variations in leukotoxicity was evaluated in relation to disease progression. Our data show that high leukotoxicity correlates with an enhanced risk for the progression of AL. The JP2 genotype isolates were all highly leukotoxic, while the isolates with an intact leukotoxin promoter (non-JP2 genotypes) showed substantial variation in leukotoxicity. Genetic characterization of the non-JP2 genotype isolates indicated the presence of highly leukotoxic genotypes of serotype b with similarities to the JP2 genotype. Based on these results, we conclude that A. actinomycetemcomitans harbours other highly virulent genotypes besides the previously described JP2 genotype. In addition, the results from the present study further highlight the importance of the leukotoxin as a key virulence factor in aggressive forms of periodontitis.

  14. The cytolethal distending toxin of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans inhibits macrophage phagocytosis and subverts cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Ando-Suguimoto, Ellen Sayuri; da Silva, Maike Paulino; Kawamoto, Dione; Chen, Casey; DiRienzo, Joseph M; Mayer, Marcia Pinto Alves

    2014-03-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an important periodontal pathogen that can participate in periodontitis and other non-oral infections. The cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt) is among the virulence factors produced by this bacterium. The Cdt is also secreted by several mucosa-associated Gram-negative pathogens and may play a role in perpetuating the infection by modulating the immune response. Although the toxin targets a wide range of eukaryotic cell types little is known about its activity on macrophages which play a key part in alerting the rest of the immune system to the presence of pathogens and their virulence factors. In view of this, we tested the hypothesis that the A. actinomycetemcomitans Cdt (AaCdt) disrupts macrophage function by inhibiting phagocytic activity as well as affecting the production of cytokines. Murine macrophages were co-cultured with either wild-type A. actinomycetemcomitans or a Cdt(-) mutant. Viable counts and qPCR showed that phagocytosis of the wild-type strain was significantly reduced relative to that of the Cdt(-) mutant. Addition of recombinant Aa(r)Cdt to co-cultures along with the Cdt(-) mutant diminished the phagocytic activity similar to that observed with the wild type strain. High concentrations of Aa(r)Cdt resulted in decreased phagocytosis of fluorescent bioparticles. Nitric oxide production was modulated by the presence of Cdt and the levels of IL-1β, IL-12 and IL-10 were increased. Production of TNF-α did not differ in the co-culture assays but was increased by the presence of Aa(r)Cdt. These data suggest that the Cdt may modulate macrophage function in A. actinomycetemcomitans infected sites by impairing phagocytosis and modifying the pro-inflammatory/anti-inflammatory cytokine balance.

  15. Effects of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin on endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dietmann, Anelia; Millonig, Alban; Combes, Valery; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Kachlany, Scott C; Grau, Georges E

    2013-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a human pathogen that produces leukotoxin (LtxA) as a major virulence factor. In this study the effect of LtxA on microvascular endothelial cell viability and phenotype was studied. High doses of single LtxA treatment (500 ng/ml to 5 μg/ml) significantly and irreversibly decreased cell proliferation and induced apoptosis, as assessed by tetrazolium salt and annexin V assay, respectively. Apoptosis was partially inhibited by the pan-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk. LtxA caused a cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase after 72 h. Between 500 ng/ml and 5 μg/ml, after long- or short-term stimulation LtxA increased the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, as well as the percentages of endothelial cells expressing these adhesion molecules. Thus, A. actinomycetemcomitans LtxA has substantial pro-inflammatory effects on human brain endothelial cells by upregulation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Furthermore, LtxA in higher concentration was found to decrease proliferation and induces apoptosis in microvascular endothelial cells.

  16. Profound Effects of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Leukotoxin Mutation on Adherence Properties Are Clarified in in vitro Experiments.

    PubMed

    Velusamy, Senthil Kumar; Sampathkumar, Vandana; Godboley, Dipti; Fine, Daniel H

    2016-01-01

    Leukotoxin (Ltx) is a prominent virulence factor produced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, an oral microorganism highly associated with aggressive periodontitis. Ltx compromises host responsiveness by altering the viability of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages. Previously, we developed a Rhesus (Rh) monkey colonization model designed to determine the effect of virulence gene mutations on colonization of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Unexpectedly, an A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin (ltxA) mutant (RhAa-VS2) failed to colonize in the Rh model. No previous literature suggested that Ltx was associated with A. actinomycetemcomitans binding to tooth surfaces. These results led us to explore the broad effects of the ltxA mutation in vitro. Results indicated that LtxA activity was completely abolished in RhAa-VS2 strain, while complementation significantly (P<0.0001) restored leukotoxicity compared to RhAa-VS2 strain. RT-PCR analysis of ltx gene expression ruled out polar effects. Furthermore, binding of RhAa-VS2 to salivary-coated hydroxyapatite (SHA) was significantly decreased (P<0.0001) compared to wild type RhAa3 strain. Real time RT-PCR analysis of the genes related to SHA binding in RhAa-VS2 showed that genes related to binding were downregulated [rcpA (P = 0.018), rcpB (P = 0.02), tadA (P = 0.002)] as compared to wild type RhAa3. RhAa-VS2 also exhibited decreased biofilm depth (P = 0.008) and exo-polysaccharide production (P<0.0001). Buccal epithelial cell (BEC) binding of RhAa-VS2 was unaffected. Complementation with ltxA restored binding to SHA (P<0.002) but had no effect on biofilm formation when compared to RhAa3. In conclusion, mutation of ltxA diminished hard tissue binding in vitro, which helps explain the previous in vivo failure of a ltxA knockout to colonize the Rh oral cavity. These results suggest that; 1) one specific gene knockout (in this case ltxA) could affect other seemingly unrelated genes (such as rcpA, rcpB tadA etc), and 2

  17. Profound Effects of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Leukotoxin Mutation on Adherence Properties Are Clarified in in vitro Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Godboley, Dipti; Fine, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Leukotoxin (Ltx) is a prominent virulence factor produced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, an oral microorganism highly associated with aggressive periodontitis. Ltx compromises host responsiveness by altering the viability of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages. Previously, we developed a Rhesus (Rh) monkey colonization model designed to determine the effect of virulence gene mutations on colonization of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Unexpectedly, an A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin (ltxA) mutant (RhAa-VS2) failed to colonize in the Rh model. No previous literature suggested that Ltx was associated with A. actinomycetemcomitans binding to tooth surfaces. These results led us to explore the broad effects of the ltxA mutation in vitro. Results indicated that LtxA activity was completely abolished in RhAa-VS2 strain, while complementation significantly (P<0.0001) restored leukotoxicity compared to RhAa-VS2 strain. RT-PCR analysis of ltx gene expression ruled out polar effects. Furthermore, binding of RhAa-VS2 to salivary-coated hydroxyapatite (SHA) was significantly decreased (P<0.0001) compared to wild type RhAa3 strain. Real time RT-PCR analysis of the genes related to SHA binding in RhAa-VS2 showed that genes related to binding were downregulated [rcpA (P = 0.018), rcpB (P = 0.02), tadA (P = 0.002)] as compared to wild type RhAa3. RhAa-VS2 also exhibited decreased biofilm depth (P = 0.008) and exo-polysaccharide production (P<0.0001). Buccal epithelial cell (BEC) binding of RhAa-VS2 was unaffected. Complementation with ltxA restored binding to SHA (P<0.002) but had no effect on biofilm formation when compared to RhAa3. In conclusion, mutation of ltxA diminished hard tissue binding in vitro, which helps explain the previous in vivo failure of a ltxA knockout to colonize the Rh oral cavity. These results suggest that; 1) one specific gene knockout (in this case ltxA) could affect other seemingly unrelated genes (such as rcpA, rcpB tadA etc), and 2

  18. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin cytotoxicity occurs through bilayer destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Angela C.; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen; Du, Yurong; Stefano, Frank P.; Kieba, Irene R.; Epand, Raquel F.; Kakalis, Lazaros; Yeagle, Philip L.; Epand, Richard M.; Lally, Edward T.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The Gram-negative bacterium, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, is a common inhabitant of the human upper aerodigestive tract. The organism produces an RTX (Repeats in ToXin) toxin (LtxA) that kills human white blood cells. LtxA is believed to be a membrane-damaging toxin, but details of the cell surface interaction for this and several other RTX toxins have yet to be elucidated. Initial morphological studies suggested that LtxA was bending the target cell membrane. Because the ability of a membrane to bend is a function of its lipid composition, we assessed the proficiency of LtxA to release of a fluorescent dye from a panel of liposomes composed of various lipids. Liposomes composed of lipids that form nonlamellar phases were susceptible to LtxA-induced damage while liposomes composed of lipids that do not form non-bilayer structures were not. Differential scanning calorimetry demonstrated that the toxin decreased the temperature at which the lipid transitions from a bilayer to a nonlamellar phase, while 31P nuclear magnetic resonance studies showed that the LtxA-induced transition from a bilayer to an inverted hexagonal phase occurs through the formation of an isotropic intermediate phase. These results indicate that LtxA cytotoxicity occurs through a process of membrane destabilization. PMID:22309134

  19. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide affects human gingival fibroblast cytoskeletal organization.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Contreras-Marmolejo, Luis Arturo; Román-Alvárez, Patricia; Barajas-Torres, Carolina

    2008-04-01

    The cytoskeleton is a dynamic structure that plays a key role in maintaining cell morphology and function. This study investigates the effect of bacterial wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a strong inflammatory agent, on the dynamics and organization of actin, tubulin, vimentin, and vinculin proteins in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). A time-dependent study showed a noticeable change in actin architecture after 1.5 h of incubation with LPS (1 microg/ml) with the formation of orthogonal fibers and further accumulation of actin filament at the cell periphery by 24 h. When 0.01-10 microg/ml of LPS was added to human gingival fibroblast cultures, cells acquired a round, flat shape and gradually developed cytoplasmic ruffling. Lipopolysaccharides extracted from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans periodontopathogenic bacteria promoted alterations in F-actin stress fibres of human gingival cells. Normally, human gingival cells have F-actin fibres that are organized in linear distribution throughout the cells, extending along the cell's length. LPS-treated cells exhibited changes in cytoskeletal protein organization, and F-actin was reorganized by the formation of bundles underneath and parallel to the cell membrane. We also found the reorganization of the vimentin network into vimentin bundling after 1.5 h of treatment. HGF cells exhibited diffuse and granular gamma-tubulin stain. There was no change in LPS-treated HGF. However, vinculin plaques distributed in the cell body diminished after LPS treatment. We conclude that the dynamic and structured organization of cytoskeletal filaments and actin assembly in human gingival fibroblasts is altered by LPS treatment and is accompanied by a decrease in F-actin pools.

  20. Occurrence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in Indian chronic periodontitis patients and periodontally healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Vinayak Mahableshwar; Bhat, Kishore Gajanan; Kugaji, Manohar Suresh; Ingalgi, Preeti Shivaji

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), an important primary periodontal pathogen, is known for its strong virulence characteristics that cause periodontal disease. We investigated Aa occurrence in Indian individuals using culture and 16 s rDNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study with 100 participants each in the healthy and chronic periodontitis (CP) groups was conducted. The subgingival plaque was collected and immediately plated on selective media for Aa. The remaining plaque samples were used for DNA extraction. PCR was performed using specific primers for Aa. Statistical Analysis Used: The detection of bacteria and the clinical parameters between the groups were compared using the Mann–Whitney U-test. For assessing the agreement between the results of anaerobic culture and PCR, Kappa analyses were performed. Results: Aa levels using culture and PCR was 51% and 69% in the CP group and 12% and 30% in the healthy group, respectively. The two groups showed significant differences (P < 0.00001). The detection accuracy of culture and PCR was assessed, and the coefficient of accuracy (k) was highly significant in the healthy (0.3103; P < 0.0001) and CP groups (0.1536; P < 0.0497). Conclusions: Aa was predominantly found in the CP group compared with the healthy group, which is consistent with previous findings. Our results showed that both techniques can be used for detecting Aa. An ideal technique for detecting subgingival microorganisms should be carefully selected depending on the scope of the intended future work. PMID:27143824

  1. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Invasion Induces Interleukin-1β Production Through Reactive Oxygen Species and Cathepsin B.

    PubMed

    Okinaga, Toshinori; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Nishihara, Tatsuji

    2015-06-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) cytokines, IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-18 play a crucial role in inflammatory responses in a variety of diseases including periodontitis. In this study, the periodontopathic bacterial pathogen, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, induced cell death and cytokine release in macrophages. Cell viability was reduced by A. actinomycetemcomitans invasion using (3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The production of IL-1β in A. actinomycetemcomitans-invaded macrophage cells was detected by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Treatment with a caspase-1 inhibitor and silencing of the caspase-1 gene had no effect on IL-1β secretion induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans invasion. Pattern recognition receptor, NLRP3 was upregulated in A. actinomycetemcomitans-invaded macrophages. However, NLRP3 knockdown had no effect on the secretion of IL-1β in A. actinomycetemcomitans-invaded RAW 264 cells. In addition, A. actinomycetemcomitans invasion induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the release of cathepsin B in RAW 264 cells. Interestingly, CA074-Me, a cathepsin B inhibitor, and N-Acetyl-l-cysteine, a ROS inhibitor, prevented the production of IL-1β induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans. Taken together, these results suggest A. actinomycetemcomitans induce IL-1β production in RAW 264 cells through the production of ROS and cathepsin B, but not through the NLRP3/caspase-1 pathway.

  2. Alteration of Homeostasis in Pre-osteoclasts Induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans CDT.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Dione; Ando-Suguimoto, Ellen S; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; DiRienzo, Joseph M; Mayer, Marcia P A

    2016-01-01

    The dysbiotic microbiota associated with aggressive periodontitis includes Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, the only oral species known to produce a cytolethal distending toxin (AaCDT). Give that CDT alters the cytokine profile in monocytic cells, we aimed to test the hypothesis that CDT plays a role in bone homeostasis by affecting the differentiation of precursor cells into osteoclasts. Recombinant AaCDT was added to murine bone marrow monocytes (BMMC) in the presence or absence of RANKL and the cell viability and cytokine profile of osteoclast precursor cells were determined. Multinucleated TRAP(+) cell numbers, and relative transcription of genes related to osteoclastogenesis were also evaluated. The addition of AaCDT did not lead to loss in cell viability but promoted an increase in the average number of TRAP(+) cells with 1-2 nuclei in the absence or presence of RANKL (Tukey, p < 0.05). This increase was also observed for TRAP(+) cells with ≥3nuclei, although this difference was not significant. Levels of TGF-β, TNF-α, and IL-6, in the supernatant fraction of cells, were higher when in AaCDT exposed cells, whereas levels of IL-1β and IL-10 were lower than controls under the same conditions. After interaction with AaCDT, transcription of the rank (encoding the receptor RANK), nfatc1 (transcription factor), and ctpK (encoding cathepsin K) genes was downregulated in pre-osteoclastic cells. The data indicated that despite the presence of RANKL and M-CSF, AaCDT may inhibit osteoclast differentiation by altering cytokine profiles and repressing transcription of genes involved in osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, the CDT may impair host defense mechanisms in periodontitis.

  3. Alteration of Homeostasis in Pre-osteoclasts Induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans CDT

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Dione; Ando-Suguimoto, Ellen S.; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; DiRienzo, Joseph M.; Mayer, Marcia P. A.

    2016-01-01

    The dysbiotic microbiota associated with aggressive periodontitis includes Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, the only oral species known to produce a cytolethal distending toxin (AaCDT). Give that CDT alters the cytokine profile in monocytic cells, we aimed to test the hypothesis that CDT plays a role in bone homeostasis by affecting the differentiation of precursor cells into osteoclasts. Recombinant AaCDT was added to murine bone marrow monocytes (BMMC) in the presence or absence of RANKL and the cell viability and cytokine profile of osteoclast precursor cells were determined. Multinucleated TRAP+ cell numbers, and relative transcription of genes related to osteoclastogenesis were also evaluated. The addition of AaCDT did not lead to loss in cell viability but promoted an increase in the average number of TRAP+ cells with 1-2 nuclei in the absence or presence of RANKL (Tukey, p < 0.05). This increase was also observed for TRAP+ cells with ≥3nuclei, although this difference was not significant. Levels of TGF-β, TNF-α, and IL-6, in the supernatant fraction of cells, were higher when in AaCDT exposed cells, whereas levels of IL-1β and IL-10 were lower than controls under the same conditions. After interaction with AaCDT, transcription of the rank (encoding the receptor RANK), nfatc1 (transcription factor), and ctpK (encoding cathepsin K) genes was downregulated in pre-osteoclastic cells. The data indicated that despite the presence of RANKL and M-CSF, AaCDT may inhibit osteoclast differentiation by altering cytokine profiles and repressing transcription of genes involved in osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, the CDT may impair host defense mechanisms in periodontitis. PMID:27064424

  4. Enterococcus faecalis lipoteichoic acid suppresses Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-8 expression in human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Im, Jintaek; Baik, Jung Eun; Kim, Kyoung Whun; Kang, Seok-Seong; Jeon, Jun Ho; Park, Ok-Jin; Kim, Hyun Young; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-08-01

    Periodontitis is caused by multi-bacterial infection and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Enterococcus faecalis are closely associated with inflammatory periodontal diseases. Although lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of A. actinomycetemcomitans (Aa.LPS) and lipoteichoic acid of E. faecalis (Ef.LTA) are considered to be major virulence factors evoking inflammatory responses, their combinatorial effect on the induction of chemokines has not been investigated. In this study, we investigated the interaction between Aa.LPS and Ef.LTA on IL-8 expression in human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells. Aa.LPS, but not Ef.LTA, substantially induced IL-8 expression at the protein and mRNA levels. Interestingly, Ef.LTA suppressed Aa.LPS-induced IL-8 expression without affecting the binding of Aa.LPS to Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. Ef.LTA reduced Aa.LPS-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, including ERK, JNK and p38 kinase. Furthermore, Ef.LTA inhibited the Aa.LPS-induced transcriptional activities of the activating protein 1, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein and nuclear factor-kappa B transcription factors, all of which are known to regulate IL-8 gene expression. Ef.LTA augmented the expression of IL-1 receptor-associated kinase-M (IRAK-M), a negative regulator of TLR intracellular signaling pathways, in the presence of Aa.LPS at both the mRNA and protein levels. Small interfering RNA silencing IRAK-M reversed the attenuation of Aa.LPS-induced IL-8 expression by Ef.LTA. Collectively, these results suggest that Ef.LTA down-regulates Aa.LPS-induced IL-8 expression in human PDL cells through up-regulation of the negative regulator IRAK-M.

  5. Phenotypic changes in nonfimbriated smooth strains of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans grown in low-humidity solid medium.

    PubMed

    Pei, Zhenhua; Niu, Zhongying; Shi, Shenggen; Shi, Liang; Tang, Chuhua

    2013-04-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is the primary etiologic agent of localized aggressive periodontitis. In vitro, it can undergo fimbriated rough to nonfimbriated smooth phenotypic transition, accompanied by an increase in invasive ability and a decrease in adhesive ability. No opposite direction phenotypic transition was reported. To better understand its pathogenicity, the authors studied the morphological changes of nonfimbriated smooth strains induced by growth environmental humidity. Transmission electron microscopy was used to identify fimbriae expression change. It was found that the lower medium humidity, the more fimbriae reexpressed. In conclusion, the smooth strain of A. actinomycetemcomitans can reexpress the fimbriae in lower humidity environment.

  6. Sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase activation with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans causes inflammatory bone loss.

    PubMed

    Dunmyer, J; Herbert, B; Li, Q; Zinna, R; Martin, K; Yu, H; Kirkwood, K L

    2012-10-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a gram-negative facultative capnophile involved in pathogenesis of aggressive forms of periodontal disease. In the present study, we interrogated the ability of A. actinomycetemcomitans to stimulate innate immune signaling and cytokine production and established that A. actinomycetemcomitans causes bone loss in a novel rat calvarial model. In vitro studies indicated that A. actinomycetemcomitans stimulated considerable production of soluble cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and interleukin-10 in both primary bone marrow-derived macrophages and NR8383 macrophages. Immunoblot analysis indicated that A. actinomycetemcomitans exhibits sustained activation of all major mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, as well as the negative regulator of MAPK signaling, MAPK phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), for at least 8 h. In a rat calvarial model of inflammatory bone loss, high and low doses of formalin-fixed A. actinomycetemcomitans were microinjected into the supraperiosteal calvarial space for 1-2 weeks. Histological staining and micro-computed tomography of rat calvariae revealed a significant increase of inflammatory and fibroblast infiltrate and increased bone resorption as measured by total lacunar pit formation. From these data, we provide new evidence that fixed whole cell A. actinomycetemcomitans stimulation elicits a pro-inflammatory host response through sustained MAPK signaling, leading to enhanced bone resorption within the rat calvarial bone.

  7. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a potent immunoregulator of the periodontal host defense system and alveolar bone homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Herbert, B A; Novince, C M; Kirkwood, K L

    2016-06-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a perio-pathogenic bacteria that has long been associated with localized aggressive periodontitis. The mechanisms of its pathogenicity have been studied in humans and preclinical experimental models. Although different serotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans have differential virulence factor expression, A. actinomycetemcomitans cytolethal distending toxin (CDT), leukotoxin, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) have been most extensively studied in the context of modulating the host immune response. Following colonization and attachment in the oral cavity, A. actinomycetemcomitans employs CDT, leukotoxin, and LPS to evade host innate defense mechanisms and drive a pathophysiologic inflammatory response. This supra-physiologic immune response state perturbs normal periodontal tissue remodeling/turnover and ultimately has catabolic effects on periodontal tissue homeostasis. In this review, we have divided the host response into two systems: non-hematopoietic and hematopoietic. Non-hematopoietic barriers include epithelium and fibroblasts that initiate the innate immune host response. The hematopoietic system contains lymphoid and myeloid-derived cell lineages that are responsible for expanding the immune response and driving the pathophysiologic inflammatory state in the local periodontal microenvironment. Effector systems and signaling transduction pathways activated and utilized in response to A. actinomycetemcomitans will be discussed to further delineate immune cell mechanisms during A. actinomycetemcomitans infection. Finally, we will discuss the osteo-immunomodulatory effects induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans and dissect the catabolic disruption of balanced osteoclast-osteoblast-mediated bone remodeling, which subsequently leads to net alveolar bone loss.

  8. Porphyromonas gingivalis gingipain is involved in the detachment and aggregation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilm.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, A; Miura, M; Fujise, O; Hamachi, T; Nishimura, F

    2014-06-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans are major periodontal pathogens that cause several types of periodontal disease. Our previous study suggested that P. gingivalis gingipains secreted in the subgingival environment are related to the detachment of A.actinomycetemcomitans biofilms. However, it remains unclear whether arginine-specific cysteine proteinase (Rgp) and lysine-specific proteinase (Kgp) play different roles in the detachment of A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilm. The aim of this study was to investigate possible disruptive roles of Kgp and Rgp in the aggregation and attachment of A. actinomycetemcomitans. While P. gingivalis ATCC33277 culture supernatant has an ability to decrease autoaggregation and coaggregation of A. actinomycetemcomitans cells, neither the boiled culture supernatant of ATCC33277 nor the culture supernatant of KDP136 showed this ability. The addition of KYT-1 and KYT-36, specific inhibitors of Rgp and Kgp, respectively, showed no influence on the ability of P. gingivalis culture supernatant. The result of gelatin zymography suggested that other proteases processed by gingipains mediated the decrease of A. actinomycetemcomitans aggregations. We also examined the biofilm-destructive effect of gingipains by assessing the detachment of A. actinomycetemcomitans from polystyrene surfaces. Scanning electron microscope analysis indicated that A. actinomycetemcomitans cells were detached by P. gingivalis Kgp. The quantity of A. actinomycetemcomitans in biofilm was decreased in co-culture with P. gingivalis. However, this was not found after the addition of KYT-36. These findings suggest that Kgp is a critical component for the detachment and decrease of A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilms.

  9. In vitro efficacy of diallyl sulfides against the periodontopathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Velliyagounder, Kabilan; Ganeshnarayan, Krishnaraj; Velusamy, Senthil Kumar; Fine, Daniel H

    2012-05-01

    The in vitro antibacterial effects of diallyl sulfide (DAS) against the Gram-negative periodontopathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, the key etiologic agent of the severe form of localized aggressive periodontitis and other nonoral infections, were studied. A. actinomycetemcomitans was treated with garlic extract, allicin, or DAS, and the anti-A. actinomycetemcomitans effects of the treatment were evaluated. Garlic extract, allicin, and DAS significantly inhibited the growth of A. actinomycetemcomitans (greater than 3 log; P < 0.01) compared to control cells. Heat inactivation of the garlic extracts significantly reduced the protein concentration; however, the antimicrobial effect was retained. Purified proteins from garlic extract did not exhibit antimicrobial activity. Allicin lost all its antimicrobial effect when it was subjected to heat treatment, whereas DAS demonstrated an antimicrobial effect similar to that of the garlic extract, suggesting that the antimicrobial activity of garlic extract is mainly due to DAS. An A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilm-killing assay performed with DAS showed a significant reduction in biofilm cell numbers, as evidenced by both confocal microscopy and culture. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of DAS-treated A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilms showed alterations of colony architecture indicating severe stress. Flow cytometry analysis of OBA9 cells did not demonstrate apoptosis or cell cycle arrest at therapeutic concentrations of DAS (0.01 and 0.1 μg/ml). DAS-treated A. actinomycetemcomitans cells demonstrated complete inhibition of glutathione (GSH) S-transferase (GST) activity. However, OBA9 cells, when exposed to DAS at similar concentrations, showed no significant differences in GST activity, suggesting that DAS-induced GST inhibition might be involved in A. actinomycetemcomitans cell death. These findings demonstrate that DAS exhibits significant antibacterial activity against A. actinomycetemcomitans and

  10. In Vitro Efficacy of Diallyl Sulfides against the Periodontopathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Ganeshnarayan, Krishnaraj; Velusamy, Senthil Kumar; Fine, Daniel H.

    2012-01-01

    The in vitro antibacterial effects of diallyl sulfide (DAS) against the Gram-negative periodontopathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, the key etiologic agent of the severe form of localized aggressive periodontitis and other nonoral infections, were studied. A. actinomycetemcomitans was treated with garlic extract, allicin, or DAS, and the anti-A. actinomycetemcomitans effects of the treatment were evaluated. Garlic extract, allicin, and DAS significantly inhibited the growth of A. actinomycetemcomitans (greater than 3 log; P < 0.01) compared to control cells. Heat inactivation of the garlic extracts significantly reduced the protein concentration; however, the antimicrobial effect was retained. Purified proteins from garlic extract did not exhibit antimicrobial activity. Allicin lost all its antimicrobial effect when it was subjected to heat treatment, whereas DAS demonstrated an antimicrobial effect similar to that of the garlic extract, suggesting that the antimicrobial activity of garlic extract is mainly due to DAS. An A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilm-killing assay performed with DAS showed a significant reduction in biofilm cell numbers, as evidenced by both confocal microscopy and culture. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of DAS-treated A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilms showed alterations of colony architecture indicating severe stress. Flow cytometry analysis of OBA9 cells did not demonstrate apoptosis or cell cycle arrest at therapeutic concentrations of DAS (0.01 and 0.1 μg/ml). DAS-treated A. actinomycetemcomitans cells demonstrated complete inhibition of glutathione (GSH) S-transferase (GST) activity. However, OBA9 cells, when exposed to DAS at similar concentrations, showed no significant differences in GST activity, suggesting that DAS-induced GST inhibition might be involved in A. actinomycetemcomitans cell death. These findings demonstrate that DAS exhibits significant antibacterial activity against A. actinomycetemcomitans and

  11. Quantitative proteomics reveal distinct protein regulations caused by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans within subgingival biofilms.

    PubMed

    Bao, Kai; Bostanci, Nagihan; Selevsek, Nathalie; Thurnheer, Thomas; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious disease that causes the inflammatory destruction of the tooth-supporting (periodontal) tissues, caused by polymicrobial biofilm communities growing on the tooth surface. Aggressive periodontitis is strongly associated with the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in the subgingival biofilms. Nevertheless, whether and how A. actinomycetemcomitans orchestrates molecular changes within the biofilm is unclear. The aim of this work was to decipher the interactions between A. actinomycetemcomitans and other bacterial species in a multi-species biofilm using proteomic analysis. An in vitro 10-species "subgingival" biofilm model, or its derivative that included additionally A. actinomycetemcomitans, were anaerobically cultivated on hydroxyapatite discs for 64 h. When present, A. actinomycetemcomitans formed dense intra-species clumps within the biofilm mass, and did not affect the numbers of the other species in the biofilm. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify the proteomic content of the biofilm lysate. A total of 3225 and 3352 proteins were identified in the biofilm, in presence or absence of A. actinomycetemcomitans, respectively. Label-free quantitative proteomics revealed that 483 out of the 728 quantified bacterial proteins (excluding those of A. actinomycetemcomitans) were accordingly regulated. Interestingly, all quantified proteins from Prevotella intermedia were up-regulated, and most quantified proteins from Campylobacter rectus, Streptococcus anginosus, and Porphyromonas gingivalis were down-regulated in presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Enrichment of Gene Ontology pathway analysis showed that the regulated groups of proteins were responsible primarily for changes in the metabolic rate, the ferric iron-binding, and the 5S RNA binding capacities, on the universal biofilm level. While the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans did not affect the numeric composition or absolute protein

  12. Quantitative Proteomics Reveal Distinct Protein Regulations Caused by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans within Subgingival Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Kai; Bostanci, Nagihan; Selevsek, Nathalie; Thurnheer, Thomas; Belibasakis, Georgios N.

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious disease that causes the inflammatory destruction of the tooth-supporting (periodontal) tissues, caused by polymicrobial biofilm communities growing on the tooth surface. Aggressive periodontitis is strongly associated with the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in the subgingival biofilms. Nevertheless, whether and how A. actinomycetemcomitans orchestrates molecular changes within the biofilm is unclear. The aim of this work was to decipher the interactions between A. actinomycetemcomitans and other bacterial species in a multi-species biofilm using proteomic analysis. An in vitro 10-species “subgingival” biofilm model, or its derivative that included additionally A. actinomycetemcomitans, were anaerobically cultivated on hydroxyapatite discs for 64 h. When present, A. actinomycetemcomitans formed dense intra-species clumps within the biofilm mass, and did not affect the numbers of the other species in the biofilm. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify the proteomic content of the biofilm lysate. A total of 3225 and 3352 proteins were identified in the biofilm, in presence or absence of A. actinomycetemcomitans, respectively. Label-free quantitative proteomics revealed that 483 out of the 728 quantified bacterial proteins (excluding those of A. actinomycetemcomitans) were accordingly regulated. Interestingly, all quantified proteins from Prevotella intermedia were up-regulated, and most quantified proteins from Campylobacter rectus, Streptococcus anginosus, and Porphyromonas gingivalis were down-regulated in presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Enrichment of Gene Ontology pathway analysis showed that the regulated groups of proteins were responsible primarily for changes in the metabolic rate, the ferric iron-binding, and the 5S RNA binding capacities, on the universal biofilm level. While the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans did not affect the numeric composition or absolute

  13. Mature Biofilm Degradation by Potential Probiotics: Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans versus Lactobacillus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Kouhei; Okinaga, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    The biofilm degradation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is essential as a complete periodontal disease therapy, and here we show the effects of potential probiotic bacteria such as Lactobacillus spp. for the biofilm of several serotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. Eight of the 13 species showed the competent biofilm degradation of ≥ 90% reduction in biofilm values in A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 (serotype b) as well as four of the seven species for the biofilm of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMZ 534 (serotype e). In contrast, the probiotic bacteria did not have a big impact for the degradation of A. actinomycetemcomitans SUNY 75 (serotype a) biofilm. The dispersed A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 cells through the biofilm detachment were still viable and plausible factors for the biofilm degradation were not due to the lactic acid and low pH conditions. The three enzymes, protease, lipase, and amylase may be responsible for the biofilm degradation; in particular, lipase was the most effective enzyme for the biofilm degradation of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 along with the protease activity which should be also important for the other serotypes. Remarkable lipase enzyme activities were detected from some of the potential probiotics and a supporting result using a lipase inhibitor presented corroborating evidence that lipase activity is one of the contributing factors for biofilm degradation outside of the protease which is also another possible factor for the biofilm of the other serotype of A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. On the other hand, the biofilm of A. actinomycetemcomitans SUNY 75 (serotype a) was not powerfully degraded by the lipase enzyme because the lipase inhibitor was slightly functional for only two of potential probiotics. PMID:27438340

  14. Antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilms associated with peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Kadkhoda, Zeinab; Amarlu, Zeinab; Eshraghi, Saeed; Samiei, Nazanin

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to assessthe antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine (CHX) on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilms isolated from subgingival plaque of peri-implantitis lesions. Methods. Thirteen patients requiring peri-implantitis treatment were consecutively selected and their subgingival biofilm was collected by inserting fine sterile paper points into peri-implant pockets for 15 seconds. A. actinomycetemcomitans was isolated from the subgingival biofilm and cultured. In this study, the standard strain of A. actinomycetemcomitans served as the positive control group and a blank disc impregnated with water served as the negative control; 0.1 mL of the bacterial suspension was cultured on specific culture medium and blank discs (6 mm in diameter) impregnated with 0.2%CHX mouthrinse (Behsa Pharmaceutical Co.) and negative control discs were placed on two sides of the bacterial culture plate. The size of growth inhibition zone was measured by a blinded independent observer in millimetres. Results. According to the results of disc diffusion test, the mean diameter of growth inhibition zone of A. actinomycetemcomitans around discs impregnated with CHX was larger in both standard (positive control) and biofilm samples of A. actinomycetemcomitans compared to the negative control group (blank disc) (P<0.001). Conclusion . Use of0.2% CHX mouthwash had antibacterial effects on A. actinomycetemcomitans species isolated from peri-implantitis sites.

  15. Distribution of biotypes and leukotoxic activity of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans isolated from Brazilian patients with chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Gaetti-Jardim, Elerson; Wahasugui, Thais Cristiane; Tomazinho, Paulo Henrique; Marques, Márcia Martins; Nakano, Viviane; Avila-Campos, Mario Julio

    2008-10-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an important etiologic agent of the periodontitis and is associated with extra-oral infections. In this study, the detection of the ltxA gene as well as the ltx promoter region from leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans isolated from 50 Brazilian patients with periodontitis and 50 healthy subjects was performed. The leukotoxic activity on HL-60 cells was also evaluated. Leukotoxic activity was determined using a trypan blue exclusion method. The 530 bp deletion in the promoter region was evaluated by PCR using a PRO primer pair. A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected by culture and directly from crude subgingival biofilm by PCR using specific primers. By culture, A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected in nine (18%) of the periodontal patients and one (2%) healthy subject. However, by PCR, this organism was detected in 44% of the periodontal patients and in 16% of the healthy subjects. It was verified a great discrepancy between PCR detection of the ltx operon promoter directly from crude subgingival biofilm and from bacterial DNA. Only one periodontal sample harbored highly leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans. Moreover, biotype II was the most prevalent and no correlation between biotypes and leukotoxic activity was observed. The diversity of leukotoxin expression by A. actinomycetemcomitans suggests a role of this toxin in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease and other infectious diseases.

  16. Distribution of biotypes and leukotoxic activity of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans isolated from Brazilian patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Gaetti-Jardim Jr., Elerson; Wahasugui, Thais Cristiane; Tomazinho, Paulo Henrique; Marques, Márcia Martins; Nakano, Viviane; Avila-Campos, Mario Julio

    2008-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an important etiologic agent of the periodontitis and is associated with extra-oral infections. In this study, the detection of the ltxA gene as well as the ltx promoter region from leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans isolated from 50 Brazilian patients with periodontitis and 50 healthy subjects was performed. The leukotoxic activity on HL-60 cells was also evaluated. Leukotoxic activity was determined using a trypan blue exclusion method. The 530 bp deletion in the promoter region was evaluated by PCR using a PRO primer pair. A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected by culture and directly from crude subgingival biofilm by PCR using specific primers. By culture, A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected in nine (18%) of the periodontal patients and one (2%) healthy subject. However, by PCR, this organism was detected in 44% of the periodontal patients and in 16% of the healthy subjects. It was verified a great discrepancy between PCR detection of the ltx operon promoter directly from crude subgingival biofilm and from bacterial DNA. Only one periodontal sample harbored highly leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans. Moreover, biotype II was the most prevalent and no correlation between biotypes and leukotoxic activity was observed. The diversity of leukotoxin expression by A. actinomycetemcomitans suggests a role of this toxin in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease and other infectious diseases. PMID:24031284

  17. Antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilms associated with peri-implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Kadkhoda, Zeinab; Amarlu, Zeinab; Eshraghi, Saeed; Samiei, Nazanin

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to assessthe antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine (CHX) on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilms isolated from subgingival plaque of peri-implantitis lesions. Methods. Thirteen patients requiring peri-implantitis treatment were consecutively selected and their subgingival biofilm was collected by inserting fine sterile paper points into peri-implant pockets for 15 seconds. A. actinomycetemcomitans was isolated from the subgingival biofilm and cultured. In this study, the standard strain of A. actinomycetemcomitans served as the positive control group and a blank disc impregnated with water served as the negative control; 0.1 mL of the bacterial suspension was cultured on specific culture medium and blank discs (6 mm in diameter) impregnated with 0.2%CHX mouthrinse (Behsa Pharmaceutical Co.) and negative control discs were placed on two sides of the bacterial culture plate. The size of growth inhibition zone was measured by a blinded independent observer in millimetres. Results. According to the results of disc diffusion test, the mean diameter of growth inhibition zone of A. actinomycetemcomitans around discs impregnated with CHX was larger in both standard (positive control) and biofilm samples of A. actinomycetemcomitans compared to the negative control group (blank disc) (P<0.001). Conclusion. Use of0.2% CHX mouthwash had antibacterial effects on A. actinomycetemcomitans species isolated from peri-implantitis sites. PMID:27651884

  18. Diverse Toll-like receptors mediate cytokine production by Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Park, Se-Ra; Kim, Dong-Jae; Han, Seung-Hyun; Kang, Min-Jung; Lee, Jun-Young; Jeong, Yu-Jin; Lee, Sang-Jin; Kim, Tae-Hyoun; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Park, Jong-Hwan

    2014-05-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) orchestrate a repertoire of immune responses in macrophages against various pathogens. Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans are two important periodontal pathogens. In the present study, we investigated TLR signaling regulating cytokine production of macrophages in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans. TLR2 and TLR4 are redundant in the production of cytokines (interleukin-6 [IL-6] and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) in F. nucleatum- and A. actinomycetemcomitans-infected macrophages. The production of cytokines by macrophages in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans infection was impaired in MyD88-deficient macrophages. Moreover, cytokine concentrations were lower in MyD88-deficient macrophages than in TLR2/TLR4 (TLR2/4) double-deficient cells. An endosomal TLR inhibitor, chloroquine, reduced cytokine production in TLR2/4-deficient macrophages in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans, and DNA from F. nucleatum or A. actinomycetemcomitans induced IL-6 production in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs), which was abolished by chloroquine. Western blot analysis revealed that TLR2/4 and MyD88 were required for optimal activation of NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in macrophages in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans, with different kinetics. An inhibitor assay showed that NF-κB and all MAPKs (p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase [ERK], and Jun N-terminal protein kinase [JNK]) mediate F. nucleatum-induced production of cytokines in macrophages, whereas NF-κB and p38, but not ERK and JNK, are involved in A. actinomycetemcomitans-mediated cytokine production. These findings suggest that multiple TLRs may participate in the cytokine production of macrophages against periodontal bacteria.

  19. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: virulence of its leukotoxin and association with aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Åberg, Carola Höglund; Kelk, Peyman; Johansson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infection-induced inflammatory disease that causes loss of the tooth supporting tissues. Much focus has been put on comparison of the microbial biofilm in the healthy periodontium with the diseased one. The information arising from such studies is limited due to difficulties to compare the microbial composition in these two completely different ecological niches. A few longitudinal studies have contributed with information that makes it possible to predict which individuals who might have an increased risk of developing aggressive forms of periodontitis, and the predictors are either microbial or/and host-derived factors. The most conspicuous condition that is associated with disease risk is the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans at the individual level. This Gram-negative bacterium has a great genetic variation with a number of virulence factors. In this review we focus in particular on the leukotoxin that, based on resent knowledge, might be one of the most important virulence factors of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  20. NADPH Oxidase Contributes to Resistance against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-Induced Periodontitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bast, Antje; Kubis, Helen; Holtfreter, Birte; Ribback, Silvia; Martin, Heiner; Schreiner, Helen C; Dominik, Malte J; Breitbach, Katrin; Dombrowski, Frank; Kocher, Thomas; Steinmetz, Ivo

    2017-02-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a Gram-negative commensal bacterium of the oral cavity which has been associated with the pathogenesis of periodontitis with severe alveolar bone destruction. The role of host factors such as reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates in periodontal A. actinomycetemcomitans infection and progression to periodontitis is still ill-defined. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze the role of NADPH oxidase and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in a murine model of A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced periodontitis. NADPH oxidase-deficient (gp91(phox) knockout [KO]), iNOS-deficient (iNOS KO), and C57BL/6 wild-type mice were orally infected with A. actinomycetemcomitans and analyzed for bacterial colonization at various time points. Alveolar bone mineral density and alveolar bone volume were quantified by three-dimensional micro-computed tomography, and the degree of tissue inflammation was calculated by histological analyses. At 5 weeks after infection, A. actinomycetemcomitans persisted at significantly higher levels in the murine oral cavities of infected gp91(phox) KO mice than in those of iNOS KO and C57BL/6 mice. Concomitantly, alveolar bone mineral density was significantly lower in all three infected groups than in uninfected controls, but with the highest loss of bone density in infected gp91(phox) KO mice. Only infected gp91(phox) KO mice revealed significant loss of alveolar bone volume and enhanced inflammatory cell infiltration, as well as an increased number of osteoclasts. Our results indicate that NADPH oxidase is important to control A. actinomycetemcomitans infection in the murine oral cavity and to prevent subsequent alveolar bone destruction and osteoclastogenesis.

  1. Human Serum-Specific Activation of Alternative Sigma Factors, the Stress Responders in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Tang-Siegel, Gaoyan; Bumgarner, Roger; Ruiz, Teresa; Kittichotirat, Weerayuth; Chen, Weizhen; Chen, Casey

    2016-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a known pathogen causing periodontal disease and infective endocarditis, is a survivor in the periodontal pocket and blood stream; both environments contain serum as a nutrient source. To screen for unknown virulence factors associated with this microorganism, A. actinomycetemcomitans was grown in serum-based media to simulate its in vivo environment. Different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans showed distinct growth phenotypes only in the presence of human serum, and they were grouped into high- and low-responder groups. High-responders comprised mainly serotype c strains, and showed an unusual growth phenomenon, featuring a second, rapid increase in turbidity after 9-h incubation that reached a final optical density 2- to 7-fold higher than low-responders. Upon further investigation, the second increase in turbidity was not caused by cell multiplication, but by cell death. Whole transcriptomic analysis via RNA-seq identified 35 genes that were up-regulated by human serum, but not horse serum, in high-responders but not in low-responders, including prominently an alternative sigma factor rpoE (σE). A lacZ reporter construct driven by the 132-bp rpoE promoter sequence of A. actinomycetemcomitans responded dramatically to human serum within 90 min of incubation only when the construct was carried by a high responder strain. The rpoE promoter is 100% identical among high- and low-responder strains. Proteomic investigation showed potential interactions between human serum protein, e.g. apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) and A. actinomycetemcomitans. The data clearly indicated a different activation process for rpoE in high- versus low-responder strains. This differential human serum-specific activation of rpoE, a putative extra-cytoplasmic stress responder and global regulator, suggests distinct in vivo adaptations among different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:27490177

  2. Virulence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans serotypes and DGGE subtypes isolated from chronic adult periodontitis in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pahumunto, Nuntiya; Ruangsri, Praphansri; Wongsuwanlert, Mutita; Piwat, Supatcharin; Dahlen, Gunnar; Teanpaisan, Rawee

    2015-12-01

    A high proportion of non-serotypeable isolates of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans among Thai periodontitis cases has been previously reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of leukotoxin and toxicity, cytolethal distending toxin (Cdts), and internalization and the killing effect on fibroblasts by A. actinomycetemcomitans subtypes from Thai chronic periodontitis cases. A total of 96 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains from 37 periodontitis cases, previously serotyped with PCR and subtyped with DGGE, were examined for the presence of the ltx gene and cdt genes (cdtBC), and tested for leukotoxin expression, leukotoxicity, internalization, and apoptosis of fibroblast cells. The ltx gene was present in all isolates, while 84.4% showed the cdtBC gene. Two strains with a JP2-like ltx gene with a deletion of 530 bp in the promoter region, serotyped as c, showed virulence of similar magnitude to the JP2 strain. Furthermore, a higher virulence was found in the two non-serotypeable DGGE subtypes, NS1 and NS2, compared with the serotypeable strains (serotype a-f, serotype b and d were absent). Generally, the virulence of strains obtained from deep periodontal pockets was higher than those isolated from shallow non-bleeding pockets. A. actinomycetemcomitans subtypes isolated from adult Thais with chronic periodontitis showed a highly variable virulence, leukotoxin expression, leukotoxicity, internalization and apoptosis of fibroblast, and are regulated both genetically and environmentally.

  3. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans arcB influences hydrophobic properties, biofilm formation and adhesion to hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Longo, PL; Ota-Tsuzuki, C; Nunes, ACR; Fernandes, BL; Mintz, K; Fives-Taylor, P; Mayer, MPA

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression in the oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is still not fully elucidated. ArcAB is a two-component system which allows facultative anaerobic bacteria to sense various respiratory growth conditions and adapt their gene expression accordingly.This study investigated in A. actinomycetemcomitans the role of ArcB on the regulation of biofilm formation, adhesion to saliva coated hydroxyapatite (SHA) and the hydrophobic properties of the cell. These phenotypic traits were determined for an A. actinomycetemcomitans arcB deficient type and a wild type strain. Differences in hydrophobic properties were shown at early and late exponential growth phases under microaerobic incubation and at late exponential phase under anaerobiosis.The arcB mutant formed less biofilm than the wild type strain when grown under anaerobic incubation, but displayed higher biofilm formation activity under microaerobic conditions. The adherence to SHA was significantly lower in the mutant when compared with the wild type strain. These results suggest that the transmembrane sensor kinase ArcB, in A. actinomycetemcomitans, senses redox growth conditions and regulates the expression of surface components of the bacterial cell related to biofilm formation and adhesion to saliva coated surfaces. PMID:24031399

  4. Integration host factor is required for replication of pYGK-derived plasmids in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Juárez-Rodríguez, María D; Demuth, Donald R

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we show that integration host factor protein (IHF) is required for replication of pYGK plasmids in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. YGK plasmids were not replicated in A. actinomycetemcomitans strains lacking either the α- or β- subunit of IHF. However, the deletion mutants were complemented, and plasmid replication was restored when the promoter region and gene for either ihfA or ihfB was cloned into pYGK. We also identified two motifs that resemble the consensus IHF-binding site in a 813-bp fragment containing the pYGK origin of replication. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, purified IHFα-IHFβ protein complex was shown to bind to probes containing either of these motifs. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that plasmid replication is IHF-dependent in the family Pasteurellaceae. In addition, using site-direct mutagenesis, the XbaI and KpnI restriction sites in the suicide vector pJT1 were modified to generate plasmid pJT10. The introduction of these new unique sites in pJT10 facilitates the transfer of transcriptional or translational lacZ fusion constructs for the generation of single-copy chromosomal insertion of the reporter construct. Plasmid pJT10 and its derivatives will be useful for genetic studies in Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) and probably other genera of Pasteurellaceae, including Haemophilus, Pasteurella, and Mannheimia.

  5. Serotype b of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans increases osteoclast and memory T-lymphocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Melgar-Rodríguez, S; Díaz-Zúñiga, J; Alvarez, C; Rojas, L; Monasterio, G; Carvajal, P; Escobar, A; Sanz, M; Vernal, R

    2016-04-01

    During periodontitis, alveolar bone resorption is associated with activation of T helper type 17 (Th17) lymphocytes and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) -induced osteoclasts. We previously reported that serotype b of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has a higher capacity to trigger Th17-type differentiation and function in activated T lymphocytes and its lipopolysaccharide is a more potent immunogen compared with the other serotypes. This study aimed to investigate whether serotype b of A. actinomycetemcomitans induces higher Th17-associated RANKL production, RANKL-induced osteoclast activation, and antigen-specific memory T lymphocyte proliferation. On naive CD4(+) T lymphocytes stimulated with autologous dendritic cells primed with different A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes, RANKL production, T-bet, GATA-3, RORC2 and Foxp3 expression, RORC2/RANKL intracellular double-expression, TRAP(+) osteoclast activation, and bone resorption were quantified. The frequency of proliferating memory T lymphocytes in response to A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes was determined in periodontitis and healthy subjects. Naive CD4(+) T lymphocytes stimulated by serotype b-primed dendritic cells elicited higher levels of RANKL, RORC2, TRAP(+) osteoclasts, and bone resorption than the same cells stimulated with the other serotypes. RANKL positively correlated and co-expressed with RORC2. Memory T lymphocytes responding to serotype b were more frequently detected in periodontitis patients than healthy subjects. These results indicate that serotype b of A. actinomycetemcomitans is associated with higher production of RANKL and these increased levels are associated with Th17 lymphocyte induction, osteoclast activation, and bone resorption.

  6. NLRP3 inflammasome is required for apoptosis of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-infected human osteoblastic MG63 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Panyu; Liu, Junchao; Pan, Chunling; Pan, Yaping

    2014-09-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans) is a Gram-negative bacterium which is implicated in the pathogenesis of human periodontal disease and in particular aggressive periodontitis. Virulence factors from A. actinomycetemcomitans have been shown to induce apoptosis of osteoblasts, however, the underlying mechanisms of the induction of apoptosis are poorly understood. In the present study, the infection of A. actinomycetemcomitans in human osteoblastic MG63 cells was established. Accordingly, A. actinomycetemcomitans infection enhanced significant apoptosis of MG63 cells. We found that both expression levels of NLRP3 and ASC were increased dramatically after MG63 cell cultures exposed to A. actinomycetemcomitans. Moreover, the secretion of mature interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 were extensively induced in A. actinomycetemcomitans-infected cells as compared with non-invasion group of MG63 cell cultures, indicating the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome during infection. Finally, we found that the knockdown expression of NLRP3 by specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) attenuated apoptosis of A. actinomycetemcomitans-infected MG63 cells. Our data suggest that A. actinomycetemcomitans promotes apoptosis of human osteoblasts at least partially through the NLRP3 inflammasome.

  7. MyD88 is essential for alveolar bone loss induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide in mice.

    PubMed

    Madeira, M F M; Queiroz-Junior, C M; Cisalpino, D; Werneck, S M C; Kikuchi, H; Fujise, O; Ryffel, B; Silva, T A; Teixeira, M M; Souza, D G

    2013-12-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a Gram-negative bacteria highly associated with localized aggressive periodontitis. The recognition of microbial factors, such as lipopolysaccharide from A. actinomycetemcomitans ((Aa)LPS), in the oral environment is made mainly by surface receptors known as Toll-like receptors (TLR). TLR4 is the major LPS receptor. This interaction leads to the production of inflammatory cytokines by myeloid differentiation primary-response protein 88 (MyD88) -dependent and -independent pathways, which may involve the adaptor Toll/interleukin-1 receptor-domain-containing adaptor inducing interferon-β (TRIF). The aim of this study was to assess the involvement of MyD88 in alveolar bone loss induced by (Aa)LPS in mice. C57BL6/J wild-type (WT) mice, MyD88, TRIF or TRIF/MyD88 knockout mice received 10 injections of Aa LPS strain FDC Y4 (5 μg in 3 μl), in the palatal gingival tissue of the right first molar, every 48 h. Phosphate-buffered saline was injected in the opposite side and used as control. Animals were sacrificed 24 h after the 10th injection and the maxillae were removed for macroscopic and biochemical analyses. The injections of Aa LPS induced significant alveolar bone loss in WT mice. In the absence of MyD88 or TRIF/MyD88 no bone loss induced by (Aa)LPS was observed. In contrast, responses in TRIF(-/-) mice were similar to those in WT mice. Diminished bone loss in the absence of MyD88 was associated with fewer TRAP-positive cells and increased expression of osteoblast markers, RUNX2 and osteopontin. There was also reduced tumor necrosis factor-α production in MyD88(-/-) mice. There was less osteoclast differentiation of hematopoietic bone marrow cells from MyD88(-/-) mice after (Aa)LPS stimulation. Hence, the signaling through MyD88 is pivotal for (Aa)LPS-induced osteoclast formation and alveolar bone loss.

  8. Determination of antibacterial activity of green coffee bean extract on periodontogenic bacteria like Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Bharath, Nagaraj; Sowmya, Nagur Karibasappa; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of pure green coffee bean extract on periodonto pathogenic bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Prevotella intermedia (Pi), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa). Materials and Methods: Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were used to assess the antibacterial effect of pure green coffee bean extract against periodonto pathogenic bacteria by micro dilution method and culture method, respectively. Results: MIC values of Pg, Pi and Aa were 0.2 μg/ml whereas Fn showed sensitive at concentration of 3.125 μg/ml. MBC values mirrors the values same as that of MIC. Conclusion: Antimicrobial activity of pure green coffee bean extract against Pg, Pi, Fn and Aa suggests that it could be recommended as an adjunct to mechanical therapy in the management of periodontal disease. PMID:26097349

  9. [Microbiological approach to a possible infective endocarditis case caused by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans].

    PubMed

    Gürcan, Şaban; Ünlü, Selahattin; Kuloğlu, Figen; Karadenizli, Aynur; Kuşkucu, Mert Ahmet

    2016-04-01

    Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans, a small, gram-negative coccobacillus that grows slow and fastidious, is generally colonized in the oral cavity. It is a rarely seen bacterium because of the difficulty of isolation but it can be a causative agent for dental infections and infective endocarditis (IE) particularly in the persons having prosthetic heart valves. In this report, a possible IE case caused by A.actinomycetemcomitans in a patient with aortic valve replacement has been presented. A 36-year-old man has admitted to Trakya University Hospital, Health Center for Medical Research and Practice, with the complaints of chills, malaise, intermittent fever, severe arthralgia and weight loss (20 kg). During his follow-up period, the blood cultures that were obtained three week intervals yielded the identical gram-negative coccobacilli morphology. The patient was then diagnosed as possible IE on the basis of having one major (growth of the typical microorganisms that may cause IE in two different blood cultures) and two minor (presence of prosthetic valve and high fever) criterias. The isolate could not be identified with conventional methods, while it was identified as Francisella tularensis with VITEK 2 (bioMerieux, France) system. Hence this identification was not confirmed by real-time Taqman polymerase chain reaction, so MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was used to identify this bacteria. In the first run of the study, the isolate was named as Shigella dysenteriae initially, however when it was retested the next day it was identified as A.actinomycetemcomitans. In order to enlighten these conflicting results, 16S and 23S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis was performed, and consequently the bacterium was identified as A.actinomycetemcomitans. Doxycycline (2 x 100 mg po, 20 days) and streptomycin (2 x 10 mg/kg im, 10 days) therapy were initiated, considering the initial suspicious identification (F.tularensis), and on the fifth day of therapy the

  10. Identification of a novel bacterial outer membrane interleukin-1Β-binding protein from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Paino, Annamari; Ahlstrand, Tuuli; Nuutila, Jari; Navickaite, Indre; Lahti, Maria; Tuominen, Heidi; Välimaa, Hannamari; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Pöllänen, Marja T; Ihalin, Riikka

    2013-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a gram-negative opportunistic oral pathogen. It is frequently associated with subgingival biofilms of both chronic and aggressive periodontitis, and the diseased sites of the periodontium exhibit increased levels of the proinflammatory mediator interleukin (IL)-1β. Some bacterial species can alter their physiological properties as a result of sensing IL-1β. We have recently shown that this cytokine localizes to the cytoplasm of A. actinomycetemcomitans in co-cultures with organotypic gingival mucosa. However, current knowledge about the mechanism underlying bacterial IL-1β sensing is still limited. In this study, we characterized the interaction of A. actinomycetemcomitans total membrane protein with IL-1β through electrophoretic mobility shift assays. The interacting protein, which we have designated bacterial interleukin receptor I (BilRI), was identified through mass spectrometry and was found to be Pasteurellaceae specific. Based on the results obtained using protein function prediction tools, this protein localizes to the outer membrane and contains a typical lipoprotein signal sequence. All six tested biofilm cultures of clinical A. actinomycetemcomitans strains expressed the protein according to phage display-derived antibody detection. Moreover, proteinase K treatment of whole A. actinomycetemcomitans cells eliminated BilRI forms that were outer membrane specific, as determined through immunoblotting. The protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli in both the outer membrane-associated form and a soluble cytoplasmic form. When assessed using flow cytometry, the BilRI-overexpressing E. coli cells were observed to bind 2.5 times more biotinylated-IL-1β than the control cells, as detected with avidin-FITC. Overexpression of BilRI did not cause binding of a biotinylated negative control protein. In a microplate assay, soluble BilRI bound to IL-1β, but this binding was not specific, as a control protein for IL-1

  11. Prophage induction in lysogenic Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans cells co-cultured with human gingival fibroblasts, and its effect on leukotoxin release.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Roy H; de Moura Martins Lobo Dos Santos, Caroline; Zuanazzi, David; de Accioly Mattos, Marcelo Barbosas; Ferreira, Davis Fernandes; Kachlany, Scott C; Tinoco, Eduardo M B

    2013-01-01

    Lysogeny is common among strains of the periodontal pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Since lysogenic induction is known to result in the increased synthesis and release of bacterial toxins from lysogens, it would be important to elucidate the conditions under which induction of these bacteria may occur. Co-cultures of A. actinomycetemcomitans strains (either lysogenic or non-lysogenic) and human cells (either gingival fibroblasts or pharyngeal epithelial cells) were prepared. Following incubation, bacteriophage titers of up to 6.2 × 10(7) pfu/ml were detected in the cell-free, spent culture media from the co-cultures of the lysogenic A. actinomycetemcomitans strains and the fibroblasts. Little (maximum of 2 × 10(0) pfu/ml) or no titers of phage could be detected in the mono-cultures of the lysogenic A. actinomycetemcomitans strains alone. In contrast, no phage were detectable in the cell-free spent culture media of the lysogens cocultured with the epithelial cells. Futhermore, co-culture of the A. actinomycetemcomitans lysogens with the fibroblasts resulted in enhanced release of the A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin into the culture medium, in comparison with the spent culture media from mono-cultures of the lysogens alone. These results are consistent with the concept that interaction with fibroblasts may mediate prophage induction in lysogenic strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans, and that leukotoxin release is greatly augmented following induction of the lysogens.

  12. Photosensitization of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans with methylene blue: a microbiological and spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada Júnior, Aécio M.; Prates, Renato A.; Cai, Silvana; Ribeiro, Martha S.

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determinate the efficiency of methylene blue (MB) to kill cultures of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans under red light and to investigate MB photobleaching by optical absorption spectroscopy. Bacteria were diluted in aqueous solution, putted in glass tubes and distributed in 5 groups: (L-MB-) control group; (L+MB-) laser alone by 5min; (L-MB+) MB alone through 5min; (3L+MB+) MB+laser 3min; (5L+MB+) MB+laser 5min. Laser parameters were P=30mW, λ=660nm, E=9J in 5min and E=5.4J in 3min. The samples were diluted and bacterial colonies were counted and converted into colony forming units (CFU). Absorption spectra of the MB-stained bacterial suspension and photosensitized bacterial suspension were obtained. Groups L-MB-, L+MB-, and L-MB+ did not show a decrease in CFU/mL. L+MB+ groups showed a significant decrease in CFU/mL but no statistically significant differences were observed between 3min and 5min. Spectroscopy showed that MB is photodegraded after irradiation and that dimer species are more notably consumed than monomeric species. These results suggest that MB is a suitable photosensitizer to reduce A. actinomycetemcomitans, and that 3min of irradiation are enough to produce a significant effect. Due to the spectral changes observed on MB solution after irradiation a type I mechanism may be involved.

  13. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin: a powerful tool with capacity to cause imbalance in the host inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anders

    2011-03-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has been described as a member of the indigenous oral microbiota of humans, and is involved in the pathology of periodontitis and various non-oral infections. This bacterium selectively kills human leukocytes through expression of leukotoxin, a large pore-forming protein that belongs to the Repeat in Toxin (RTX) family. The specificity of the toxin is related to its prerequisite for a specific target cell receptor, LFA-1, which is solely expressed on leukocytes. The leukotoxin causes death of different leukocyte populations in a variety of ways. It activates a rapid release of lysosomal enzymes and MMPs from neutrophils and causes apoptosis in lymphocytes. In the monocytes/macrophages, the toxin activates caspase-1, a cysteine proteinase, which causes a proinflammatory response by the activation and secretion of IL-1β and IL-18. A specific clone (JP2) of A. actinomycetemcomitans with enhanced leukotoxin expression significantly correlates to disease onset in infected individuals. Taken together, the mechanisms by which this toxin kills leukocytes are closely related to the pathogenic mechanisms of inflammatory disorders, such as periodontitis. Therapeutic strategies targeting the cellular and molecular inflammatory host response in periodontal diseases might be a future treatment alternative.

  14. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: Virulence of its leukotoxin and association with aggressive periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Åberg, Carola Höglund; Kelk, Peyman; Johansson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infection-induced inflammatory disease that causes loss of the tooth supporting tissues. Much focus has been put on comparison of the microbial biofilm in the healthy periodontium with the diseased one. The information arising from such studies is limited due to difficulties to compare the microbial composition in these two completely different ecological niches. A few longitudinal studies have contributed with information that makes it possible to predict which individuals who might have an increased risk of developing aggressive forms of periodontitis, and the predictors are either microbial or/and host-derived factors. The most conspicuous condition that is associated with disease risk is the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans at the individual level. This Gram-negative bacterium has a great genetic variation with a number of virulence factors. In this review we focus in particular on the leukotoxin that, based on resent knowledge, might be one of the most important virulence factors of A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:25494963

  15. Effects of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin on neutrophil migration and extracellular trap formation

    PubMed Central

    Hirschfeld, Josefine; Roberts, Helen M.; Chapple, Iain L. C.; Parčina, Marijo; Jepsen, Søren; Johansson, Anders; Claesson, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Background Aggressive periodontitis is associated with the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a leukotoxin (Ltx)-producing periodontal pathogen. Ltx has the ability to lyse white blood cells including neutrophils. Objectives This study was aimed at investigating the interactions between neutrophils and Ltx with regard to the chemotactic properties of Ltx and the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Methods Neutrophils from healthy blood donors were isolated and incubated for 30 min and 3 h with increasing concentrations of Ltx (1, 10, and 100 ng/mL) as well as with A. actinomycetemcomitans strains (NCTC 9710 and HK 1651) producing different levels of Ltx. Formation of NETs and cell lysis were assessed by microscopy, fluorescence-based assays, and measurement of released lactate dehydrogenase. Neutrophil migration in response to different Ltx gradients was monitored by real-time video microscopy, and image analysis was performed using ImageJ software. Results Although Ltx (10 and 100 ng/mL) and the leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans strain HK 1651 lysed some neutrophils, other cells were still capable of performing NETosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Low doses of Ltx and the weakly leukotoxic strain NCTC 9710 did not lead to neutrophil lysis, but did induce some NETosis. Furthermore, all three concentrations of Ltx enhanced random neutrophil movement; however, low directional accuracy was observed compared with the positive control (fMLP). Conclusions The results indicate that Ltx acts both as a neutrophil activator and also causes cell death. In addition, Ltx directly induces NETosis in neutrophils prior to cell lysis. In future studies, the underlying pathways involved in Ltx-meditated neutrophil activation and NETosis need to be investigated further. PMID:27834173

  16. The conserved carboxyl domain of MorC, an inner membrane protein of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, is essential for membrane function.

    PubMed

    Smith, K P; Voogt, R D; Ruiz, T; Mintz, K P

    2016-02-01

    Morphogenesis protein C (MorC) of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is important for maintaining the membrane morphology and integrity of the cell envelope of this oral pathogen. The MorC sequence and operon organization were found to be conserved in Gammaproteobacteria, based on a bioinformatic analysis of 435 sequences from representative organisms. Functional conservation of MorC was investigated using an A. actinomycetemcomitans morC mutant as a model system to express MorC homologs from four phylogenetically diverse representatives of the Gammaproteobacteria: Haemophilus influenzae, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Moraxella catarrhalis. The A. actinomycetemcomitans strains expressing the homologous proteins were assessed for sensitivity to bile salts, leukotoxin secretion, autoaggregation and membrane morphology. MorC from the most closely related organism (H. influenzae) was functionally identical to MorC from A. actinomycetemcomitans. However, the genes from more distantly related organisms restored some but not all A. actinomycetemcomitans mutant phenotypes. In addition, deletion mutagenesis indicated that the most conserved portion of the protein, the C-terminus DUF490 domain, was necessary to maintain the integrity of the membrane. Deletion of the last 10 amino acids of this domain of the A. actinomycetemcomitans MorC protein was sufficient to disrupt membrane stability and leukotoxin secretion. The data suggest that the MorC sequence is functionally conserved across Gammaproteobacteria and the C-terminus of the protein is essential for maintaining membrane physiology.

  17. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 2 Signaling Shapes Macrophage Plasticity in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-Induced Bone Loss.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Bethany A; Steinkamp, Heidi M; Gaestel, Matthias; Kirkwood, Keith L

    2017-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is associated with aggressive periodontal disease, which is characterized by inflammation-driven alveolar bone loss. A. actinomycetemcomitans activates the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2) stress pathways in macrophages that are involved in host responses. During the inflammatory process in periodontal disease, chemokines are upregulated to promote recruitment of inflammatory cells. The objective of this study was to determine the role of MK2 signaling in chemokine regulation during A. actinomycetemcomitans pathogenesis. Utilizing a murine calvarial model, Mk2(+/+) and Mk2(-/-) mice were treated with live A. actinomycetemcomitans bacteria at the midsagittal suture. MK2 positively regulated the following macrophage RNA: Emr1 (F4/80), Itgam (CD11b), Csf1r (M-CSF Receptor), Itgal (CD11a), Tnf, and Nos2 Additionally, RNA analysis revealed that MK2 signaling regulated chemokines CCL3 and CCL4 in murine calvarial tissue. Utilizing the chimeric murine air pouch model, MK2 signaling differentially regulated CCL3 and CCL4 in the hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic compartments. Bone resorption pits in calvaria, observed by micro-computed tomography, and osteoclast formation were decreased in Mk2(-/-) mice compared to Mk2(+/+) mice after A. actinomycetemcomitans treatment. In conclusion, these data suggest that MK2 in macrophages contributes to regulation of chemokine signaling during A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced inflammation and bone loss.

  18. Role of exopolysaccharide in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-induced bone resorption in a rat model for periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Mayilvahanan; Gopal, Prerna; El Abbar, Faiha; Schreiner, Helen C; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Fine, Daniel H; Ramasubbu, Narayanan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans a causative agent of periodontal disease in humans, forms biofilm on biotic and abiotic surfaces. A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilm is heterogeneous in nature and is composed of proteins, extracellular DNA and exopolysaccharide. To explore the role played by the exopolysaccharide in the colonization and disease progression, we employed genetic reduction approach using our rat model of A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced periodontitis. To this end, a genetically modified strain of A. actinomycetemcomitans lacking the pga operon was compared with the wild-type strain in the rat infection model. The parent and mutant strains were primarily evaluated for bone resorption and disease. Our study showed that colonization, bone resorption/disease and antibody response were all elevated in the wild-type fed rats. The bone resorption/disease caused by the pga mutant strain, lacking the exopolysaccharide, was significantly less (P < 0.05) than the bone resorption/disease caused by the wild-type strain. Further analysis of the expression levels of selected virulence genes through RT-PCR showed that the decrease in colonization, bone resorption and antibody titer in the absence of the exopolysaccharide might be due to attenuated levels of colonization genes, flp-1, apiA and aae in the mutant strain. This study demonstrates that the effect exerted by the exopolysaccharide in A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced bone resorption has hitherto not been recognized and underscores the role played by the exopolysaccharide in A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced disease.

  19. Detection of antimicrobial activity of banana peel (Musa paradisiaca L.) on Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kapadia, Suraj Premal; Pudakalkatti, Pushpa S.; Shivanaikar, Sachin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Aim: Banana is used widely because of its nutritional values. In past, there are studies that show banana plant parts, and their fruits can be used to treat the human diseases. Banana peel is a part of banana fruit that also has the antibacterial activity against microorganisms but has not been studied extensively. Since, there are no studies that relate the antibacterial activity of banana peel against periodontal pathogens. Hence, the aim of this study is to determine the antimicrobial activity of banana peel extract on Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans). Material and Methods: Standard strains of P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans were used in this study which was obtained from the in-house bacterial bank of Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology at Maratha Mandal's Nathajirao G. Halgekar Institute of Dental Sciences and Research Centre. The banana peel extract was prepared, and the antibacterial activity was assessed using well agar diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentration was assessed using serial broth dilution method. Results: In the current study, both the tested microorganisms showed antibacterial activity. In well diffusion method, P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans showed 15 mm and 12 mm inhibition zone against an alcoholic extract of banana peel, respectively. In serial broth dilution method P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans were sensitive until 31.25 μg/ml dilutions. Conclusion: From results of the study, it is suggested that an alcoholic extract of banana peel has antimicrobial activity against P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:26681854

  20. Construction of new cloning, lacZ reporter and scarless-markerless suicide vectors for genetic studies in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Demuth, Donald R

    2013-05-01

    To elucidate the putative function of a gene, effective tools are required for genetic characterization that facilitate its inactivation, deletion or modification on the bacterial chromosome. In the present study, the nucleotide sequence of the Escherichia coli/Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans shuttle vector pYGK was determined, allowing us to redesign and construct a new shuttle cloning vector, pJT4, and promoterless lacZ transcriptional/translational fusion plasmids, pJT3 and pJT5. Plasmids pJT4 and pJT5 contain the origin of replication necessary to maintain shuttle vector replication. In addition, a new suicide vector, pJT1, was constructed for the generation of scarless and markerless deletion mutations of genes in the oral pathogen A. actinomycetemcomitans. Plasmid pJT1 is a pUC-based suicide vector that is counter-selectable for sucrose sensitivity. This vector does not leave antibiotic markers or scars on the chromosome after gene deletion and thus provides the option to combine several mutations in the same genetic background. The effectiveness of pJT1 was demonstrated by the construction of A. actinomycetemcomitans isogenic qseB single deletion (ΔqseB) mutant and lsrRK double deletion mutants (ΔlsrRK). These new vectors may offer alternatives for genetic studies in A. actinomycetemcomitans and other members of the HACEK (Haemophilus spp., A. actinomycetemcomitans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella kingae) group of Gram-negative bacteria.

  1. Construction of new cloning, lacZ reporter and scarless-markerless suicide vectors for genetic studies in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Juárez-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Demuth, Donald R.

    2013-01-01

    To elucidate the putative function of a gene, effective tools are required for genetic characterization that facilitate its inactivation, deletion or modification on the bacterial chromosome. In the present study, the nucleotide sequence of the Escherichia coli/Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans shuttle vector pYGK was determined, allowing us to redesign and construct a new shuttle cloning vector, pJT4, and promoterless lacZ transcriptional/translational fusion plasmids, pJT3 and pJT5. Plasmids pJT4 and pJT5 contain the origin of replication necessary to maintain shuttle vector replication. In addition, a new suicide vector, pJT1, was constructed for the generation of scarless and markerless deletion mutations of genes in the oral pathogen A. actinomycetemcomitans. Plasmid pJT1 is a pUC-based suicide vector that is counter-selectable for sucrose sensitivity. This vector does not leave antibiotic markers or scars on the chromosome after gene deletion and thus provides the option to combine several mutations in the same genetic background. The effectiveness of pJT1 was demonstrated by the construction of A. actinomycetemcomitans isogenic qseB single deletion (ΔqseB) mutant and lsrRK double deletion mutants (ΔlsrRK). These new vectors may offer alternatives for genetic studies in A. actinomycetemcomitans and other members of the HACEK (Haemophilus spp., A. actinomycetemcomitans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella kingae) group of Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:23353051

  2. Lipopolysaccharide of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans induces the expression of chemokines MCP-1, MIP-1α, and IP-10 via similar but distinct signaling pathways in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Park, Ok-Jin; Cho, Min-Kyung; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a Gram-negative bacterium frequently isolated from lesions of patients with localized aggressive periodontitis. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major cell wall component of Gram-negative bacteria, stimulates innate immune cells via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) to initiate inflammatory responses. In this study, we purified LPS from A. actinomycetemcomitans (AaLPS) and investigated its ability to induce the expression of chemokines, which play an important role in recruitment of leukocytes to the infection site. AaLPS induced the expression of chemokines, MCP-1, MIP-1α, and IP-10 in murine macrophages, leading to the infiltration of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in a transwell system. Although TLR4 was essential for the induction of all these chemokines by AaLPS, MCP-1 and MIP-1α expressions were MyD88-dependent, but IP-10 expression was MyD88-independent, as determined using macrophages from mice deficient in TLR4 or MyD88. Furthermore, the activation of ERK and JNK were necessary for the expression of MCP-1 and MIP-1α, whereas p38 MAP kinase and JNK activations were required for IP-10 expression. In addition, IFN-β/STAT1 signaling was exclusively involved in IP-10 expression but not in MCP-1 or MIP-1α expression. AaLPS also activated the transcription factors, NF-κB, AP-1, NF-IL6, and ISRE, all of which are involved in chemokine gene expression. These results suggest that AaLPS induces the expression of chemokines MCP-1, MIP-1α, and IP-10 through TLR4 in murine macrophages. Further, the induction of MCP-1 and MIP-1α requires MyD88, ERK, and JNK, whereas the induction of IP-10 requires JNK, p38 MAP kinase, and IFN-β/STAT1.

  3. A consortium of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Streptococcus parasanguinis, and Filifactor alocis is present in sites prior to bone loss in a longitudinal study of localized aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Fine, Daniel H; Markowitz, Kenneth; Fairlie, Karen; Tischio-Bereski, Debbie; Ferrendiz, Javier; Furgang, David; Paster, Bruce J; Dewhirst, Floyd E

    2013-09-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-induced localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP) in African-American adolescents has been documented but is poorly understood. Two thousand fifty-eight adolescents aged 11 to 17 years were screened for their periodontal status and the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans in their oral cavity. Seventy-one A. actinomycetemcomitans-negative and 63 A. actinomycetemcomitans-positive periodontally healthy subjects were enrolled, sampled, examined, and radiographed yearly for 3 years. Gingival and periodontal pocket depth and attachment levels were recorded. Disease presentation was characterized by bone loss (BL). Subgingival sites were sampled every 6 months to assess (i) the role of A. actinomycetemcomitans in BL and (ii) the association of A. actinomycetemcomitans and other microbes in their relationships to BL. Sixteen of 63 subjects with A. actinomycetemcomitans developed BL (the other 47 subjects with A. actinomycetemcomitans had no BL). No A. actinomycetemcomitans-negative subjects developed BL. Human oral microbe identification microarray (HOMIM) was used for subgingival microbial assessment. On a subject level, pooled data from A. actinomycetemcomitans-positive subjects who remained healthy had higher prevalences of Streptococcus and Actinomyces species, while A. actinomycetemcomitans-positive subjects with BL had higher prevalences of Parvimonas micra, Filifactor alocis, A. actinomycetemcomitans, and Peptostreptococcus sp. human oral taxon 113 (HOT-113). At vulnerable sites, A. actinomycetemcomitans, Streptococcus parasanguinis, and F. alocis levels were elevated prior to BL. In cases where the three-organism consortium (versus A. actinomycetemcomitans alone) was detected, the specificity for detecting sites of future BL increased from 62% to 99%, with a sensitivity of 89%. We conclude that detecting the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans, S. parasanguinis, and F. alocis together indicates sites of future BL in LAP. A

  4. A Consortium of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Streptococcus parasanguinis, and Filifactor alocis Is Present in Sites Prior to Bone Loss in a Longitudinal Study of Localized Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, Kenneth; Fairlie, Karen; Tischio-Bereski, Debbie; Ferrendiz, Javier; Furgang, David; Paster, Bruce J.; Dewhirst, Floyd E.

    2013-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-induced localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP) in African-American adolescents has been documented but is poorly understood. Two thousand fifty-eight adolescents aged 11 to 17 years were screened for their periodontal status and the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans in their oral cavity. Seventy-one A. actinomycetemcomitans-negative and 63 A. actinomycetemcomitans-positive periodontally healthy subjects were enrolled, sampled, examined, and radiographed yearly for 3 years. Gingival and periodontal pocket depth and attachment levels were recorded. Disease presentation was characterized by bone loss (BL). Subgingival sites were sampled every 6 months to assess (i) the role of A. actinomycetemcomitans in BL and (ii) the association of A. actinomycetemcomitans and other microbes in their relationships to BL. Sixteen of 63 subjects with A. actinomycetemcomitans developed BL (the other 47 subjects with A. actinomycetemcomitans had no BL). No A. actinomycetemcomitans-negative subjects developed BL. Human oral microbe identification microarray (HOMIM) was used for subgingival microbial assessment. On a subject level, pooled data from A. actinomycetemcomitans-positive subjects who remained healthy had higher prevalences of Streptococcus and Actinomyces species, while A. actinomycetemcomitans-positive subjects with BL had higher prevalences of Parvimonas micra, Filifactor alocis, A. actinomycetemcomitans, and Peptostreptococcus sp. human oral taxon 113 (HOT-113). At vulnerable sites, A. actinomycetemcomitans, Streptococcus parasanguinis, and F. alocis levels were elevated prior to BL. In cases where the three-organism consortium (versus A. actinomycetemcomitans alone) was detected, the specificity for detecting sites of future BL increased from 62% to 99%, with a sensitivity of 89%. We conclude that detecting the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans, S. parasanguinis, and F. alocis together indicates sites of future BL in LAP. A

  5. Transcriptome Profiling of Wild-Type and pga-Knockout Mutant Strains Reveal the Role of Exopolysaccharide in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Mayilvahanan; El Abbar, Faiha; Ramasubbu, Narayanan

    2015-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides have a diverse set of functions in most bacteria including a mechanistic role in protecting bacteria against environmental stresses. Among the many functions attributed to the exopolysaccharides, biofilm formation, antibiotic resistance, immune evasion and colonization have been studied most extensively. The exopolysaccharide produced by many Gram positive as well as Gram negative bacteria including the oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is the homopolymer of β(1,6)-linked N-acetylglucosamine. Recently, we reported that the PGA-deficient mutant of A. actinomycetemcomitans failed to colonize or induce bone resorption in a rat model of periodontal disease, and the colonization genes, apiA and aae, were significantly down regulated in the mutant strain. To understand the role of exopolysaccharide and the pga locus in the global expression of A. actinomycetemcomitans, we have used comparative transcriptome profiling to identify differentially expressed genes in the wild-type strain in relation to the PGA-deficient strain. Transcriptome analysis revealed that about 50% of the genes are differently expressed (P < 0.05 and fold change >1.5). Our study demonstrated that the absence of the pga locus affects the genes involved in peptidoglycan recycling, glycogen storage, and virulence. Further, using confocal microscopy and plating assays, we show that the viability of pga mutant strain is significantly reduced during biofilm growth. Thus, this study highlights the importance of pga genes and the exopolysaccharide in the virulence of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  6. Pathogenicity of the highly leukotoxic JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and its geographic dissemination and role in aggressive periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Haubek, Dorte; Johansson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    For decades, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has been associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis in adolescents. In the middle of the 1990s, a specific JP2 clone of A. actinomycetemcomitans, belonging to the cluster of serotype b strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans and having a number of other characteristics, was found to be strongly associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis, particularly in North Africa. Although several longitudinal studies still point to the bacterial species, A. actinomycetemcomitans as a risk factor of aggressive periodontitis, it is now also widely accepted that the highly leukotoxic JP2 clone of A. actinomycetemcomitans is implicated in rapidly progressing forms of aggressive periodontitis. The JP2 clone strains are highly prevalent in human populations living in Northern and Western parts of Africa. These strains are also prevalent in geographically widespread populations that have originated from the Northwest Africa. Only sporadic signs of a dissemination of the JP2 clone strains to non-African populations have been found despite Africans living geographically widespread for hundreds of years. It remains an unanswered question if a particular host tropism exists as a possible explanation for the frequent colonization of the Northwest African population with the JP2 clone. Two exotoxins of A. actinomycetemcomitans are known, leukotoxin (LtxA) and cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt). LtxA is able to kill human immune cells, and Cdt can block cell cycle progression in eukaryotic cells and thus induce cell cycle arrest. Whereas the leukotoxin production is enhanced in JP2 clone strains thus increasing the virulence potential of A. actinomycetemcomitans, it has not been possible so far to demonstrate such a role for Cdt. Lines of evidence have led to the understanding of the highly leukotoxic JP2 clone of A. actinomycetemcomitans as an aetiological factor of aggressive periodontitis. Patients, who are colonized with the JP2

  7. Pathogenicity of the highly leukotoxic JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and its geographic dissemination and role in aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Haubek, Dorte; Johansson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    For decades, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has been associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis in adolescents. In the middle of the 1990s, a specific JP2 clone of A. actinomycetemcomitans, belonging to the cluster of serotype b strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans and having a number of other characteristics, was found to be strongly associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis, particularly in North Africa. Although several longitudinal studies still point to the bacterial species, A. actinomycetemcomitans as a risk factor of aggressive periodontitis, it is now also widely accepted that the highly leukotoxic JP2 clone of A. actinomycetemcomitans is implicated in rapidly progressing forms of aggressive periodontitis. The JP2 clone strains are highly prevalent in human populations living in Northern and Western parts of Africa. These strains are also prevalent in geographically widespread populations that have originated from the Northwest Africa. Only sporadic signs of a dissemination of the JP2 clone strains to non-African populations have been found despite Africans living geographically widespread for hundreds of years. It remains an unanswered question if a particular host tropism exists as a possible explanation for the frequent colonization of the Northwest African population with the JP2 clone. Two exotoxins of A. actinomycetemcomitans are known, leukotoxin (LtxA) and cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt). LtxA is able to kill human immune cells, and Cdt can block cell cycle progression in eukaryotic cells and thus induce cell cycle arrest. Whereas the leukotoxin production is enhanced in JP2 clone strains thus increasing the virulence potential of A. actinomycetemcomitans, it has not been possible so far to demonstrate such a role for Cdt. Lines of evidence have led to the understanding of the highly leukotoxic JP2 clone of A. actinomycetemcomitans as an aetiological factor of aggressive periodontitis. Patients, who are colonized with the JP2

  8. Bioactive glass combined with bisphosphonates provides protection against biofilms formed by the periodontal pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Hiltunen, Anna K; Skogman, Malena E; Rosenqvist, Kirsi; Juvonen, Helka; Ihalainen, Petri; Peltonen, Jouko; Juppo, Anne; Fallarero, Adyary

    2016-03-30

    Biofilms play a pivotal role in the progression of periodontitis and they can be treated with antiseptics (i.e. chlorhexidine) or antibiotics, but these therapeutic alternatives are unable of ameliorating periodontal alveolar bone loss, which has been, on the other hand, successfully treated with bone-preserving agents. The improved bone formation achieved in animal models by the combination of two such agents: bioactive glass (BAG) and bisphosphonates has attracted the interest for further exploring dental applications. However, the antimicrobial effects that may result from combining them have not been yet investigated. Here, our aim was to explore the anti-biofilm effects that could result from combining BAG with bisphosphonates, particularly in a dental biofilm model. The experiments were performed with an oral cavity single-specie (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans) biofilm assay, which was optimized in this contribution. Risedronate displayed an intrinsic anti-biofilm effect, and all bisphosphonates, except clodronate, reduced biofilm formation when combined with BAG. In particular, the anti-biofilm activity of risedronate was significantly increased by the combination with BAG. Since it has been proposed that some of the antimicrobial effects of BAG are caused by local pH changes, studies of pH variations were performed to gain a mechanistic understanding. However, the observed anti-biofilm effects could not be explained with lowered pHs. Overall, these results do provide further support for the promising use of bisphosphonate-BAG combinations in dental applications. These findings are particularly relevant for patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy, or osteoporotic patients, which are known to be more vulnerable to periodontitis. In such cases, bisphosphonate treatment could play a double positive effect: local treatment of periodontitis (in combination with BAG) and systemic treatment of osteoporosis, prevention of hypercalcemia and metastases.

  9. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin induces cytosol acidification in LFA-1 expressing immune cells.

    PubMed

    Balashova, N; Dhingra, A; Boesze-Battaglia, K; Lally, E T

    2016-02-01

    Studies have suggested that Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin (LtxA) kills human lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1; CD11a/CD18)-bearing immune cells through a lysosomal-mediated mechanism. Lysosomes are membrane-bound cellular organelles that contain an array of acid hydrolases that are capable of breaking down biomolecules. The lysosomal membrane bilayer confines the pH-sensitive enzymes within an optimal acidic (pH 4.8) environment thereby protecting the slightly basic cytosol (pH 6.8-7.5). In the current study, we have probed the effect of LtxA-induced cytolysis on lysosomal integrity in two different K562 erythroleukemia cell lines. K562-puro/LFA-1 cells were stably transfected with CD11a and CD18 cDNA to express LFA-1 on the cell surface while K562-puro, which does not express LFA-1, served as a control. Following treatment with 100 ng ml(-1) LtxA cells were analyzed by live cell imaging in conjunction with time-lapse confocal microscopy and by flow cytometry. Using a pH-sensitive indicator (pHrodo(®)) we demonstrated that the toxin causes a decrease in the intracellular pH in K562-puro/LFA-1 cells that is noticeable within the first 15 min of treatment. This process correlated with the disappearance of lysosomes in the cytosol as determined by both acridine orange and LysoTracker(®) Red DND-99 staining. These changes were not observed in K562-puro cells or when heat inactivated toxin was added to K562-puro/LFA-1. Our results suggest that LtxA induces lysosomal damage, cytosol acidification, which is followed by cell death in K562-puro/LFA-1 cells.

  10. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin induces cytosol acidification in LFA-1 expressing immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Balashova, Nataliya; Dhingra, Anuradha; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen; Lally, Edward T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Studies have suggested that Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin (LtxA) kills human LFA-1(CD11a/CD18)-bearing immune cells through a lysosomal-mediated mechanism. Lysosomes are membrane-bound cellular organelles that contain an array of acid hydrolases that are capable of breaking down biomolecules. The lysosomal membrane bilayer confines the pH-sensitive enzymes within an optimal acidic (pH 4.8) environment thereby protecting the slightly basic cytosol (pH 6.8–7.5). In the current study, we have probed the effect of LtxA-induced cytolysis on lysosomal integrity in two different K562 erythroleukemia cell lines. K562-puro/LFA-1 cells were stably transfected with CD11a and CD18 cDNA to express LFA-1 on the cell surface while K562-puro, which does not express LFA-1, served as a control. Following treatment with 100 ng/ml LtxA cells were analyzed by live cell imaging in conjunction with time-lapse confocal microscopy and by flow cytometry. Using a pH sensitive indicator (pHrodo®, Life Technologies) we demonstrated that the toxin causes a decrease in the intracellular pH in K562-puro/LFA-1 cells noticeable within the first 15 min of treatment. This process correlated with the disappearance of lysosomes in the cytosol as determined by both acridine orange and LysoTracker® Red DND-99 (Life Technologies) staining. These changes were not observed in K562-puro cells or when heat inactivated toxin was added to K562-puro/LFA-1. Our results suggest that LtxA induces lysosomal damage, cytosol acidification, which is followed by cell death in K562-puro/LFA-1 cells. PMID:26361372

  11. Correlation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Detection with Clinical/Immunoinflammatory Profile of Localized Aggressive Periodontitis Using a 16S rRNA Microarray Method: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Patricia F.; Klepac-Ceraj, Vanja; Huang, Hong; Paster, Bruce J.; Aukhil, Ikramuddin; Wallet, Shannon M.; Shaddox, Luciana M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine whether the detection of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) correlates with the clinical and immunoinflammatory profile of Localized Aggressive Periodontitis (LAP), as determined by by 16S rRNA gene-based microarray. Subjects and Methods Subgingival plaque samples from the deepest diseased site of 30 LAP patients [PD ≥ 5 mm, BoP and bone loss] were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene-based microarrays. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) samples were analyzed for 14 cyto/chemokines. Peripheral blood was obtained and stimulated in vitro with P.gingivalis and E.coli to evaluate inflammatory response profiles. Plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels were also measured. Results Aa was detected in 56% of LAP patients and was shown to be an indicator for different bacterial community structures (p<0.01). Elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cyto/chemokines were detected in LPS-stimulated blood samples in both Aa-detected and Aa-non-detected groups (p>0.05). Clinical parameters and serum LPS levels were similar between groups. However, Aa-non-detected GCF contained higher concentration of IL-8 than Aa-detected sites (p<0.05). TNFα and IL1β were elevated upon E.coli LPS stimulation of peripheral blood cells derived from patients with Aa-detected sites. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that the detection of Aa in LAP affected sites, did not correlate with clinical severity of the disease at the time of sampling in this cross-sectional study, although it did associate with lower local levels of IL-8, a different subgingival bacterial profile and elevated LPS-induced levels of TNFα and IL1β. PMID:24376864

  12. Mlc is a transcriptional activator with a key role in integrating cyclic AMP receptor protein and integration host factor regulation of leukotoxin RNA synthesis in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a periodontal pathogen, synthesizes leukotoxin (LtxA), a protein that helps the bacterium evade the host immune response. Transcription of the ltxA operon is induced during anaerobic growth. The cAMP receptor protein (CRP) indirectly increases ltxA expression...

  13. Interleukin-1β is internalised by viable Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilm and locates to the outer edges of nucleoids.

    PubMed

    Paino, Annamari; Lohermaa, Elina; Sormunen, Raija; Tuominen, Heidi; Korhonen, Jari; Pöllänen, Marja T; Ihalin, Riikka

    2012-11-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans causes periodontitis, which is a biofilm infection that destroys tooth-supportive tissues. Interleukin (IL)-1β, a central proinflammatory cytokine of periodontitis, is an essential first line cytokine for local inflammation that modulates the cell proliferation and anti-pathogen response of human gingival keratinocytes. Previously, we demonstrated that A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilms bind IL-1β; however, whether this binding is an active process is not known. In this study, we showed for the first time with immuno-electron microscopy that viable bacterial biofilm cells internalised IL-1β when co-cultured with an organotypic mucosa. Decreased biofilm viability hindered the ability of biofilm to sequester IL-1β and caused IL-1β leakage into the culture medium. In some A. actinomycetemcomitans cells, intracellular IL-1β localized to the outer edges of the nucleoids. We identified the DNA-binding protein HU as an IL-1β interacting protein with mass spectroscopy and showed the interaction of recombinant HU and IL-1βin vitro using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Close contact with a viable A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilm decreased the proliferation and apoptosis of human gingival keratinocytes as demonstrated using Ki-67 and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) staining, respectively. Our results suggest that viable A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilms may disturb the critical first steps of local inflammation in periodontitis by binding and internalising IL-1β. The interaction of IL-1β with conserved HU provides a potential mechanism for shaping bacterial gene expression.

  14. Antibacterial Effect of an Herbal Product Persica on Porphyromonas Gingivalis and Aggregatibacter Actinomycetemcomitans: An In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Jelvehgaran Esfahani, Zahra; Kadkhoda, Zeinab; Eshraghi, Seyed Saeed; Salehi Surmaghi, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The plant Salvadora persica is used for oral hygiene in many parts of the world. It has been suggested that it has antibacterial properties, in addition to its ability to mechanically remove plaques. The aim of this study was to assess the antimicrobial activity of the herbal product Persica containing Salvadora persica against periodontopathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in vitro. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with moderate and severe periodontitis were recruited. Using paper points, subgingival plaque samples were taken from pockets with attachment loss ≥ 3mm. The samples were subjected to microbial culture to yield P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans. The ditch plate method was used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of the bacteria to Persica compared to chlorhexidine and distilled water. The growth inhibition zones of microorganisms around the ditches were measured in millimeters. The data were analyzed using SPSS 16. Freidman test and Wilcoxon signed ranks test with Bonferroni adjustment were used for analysis of variance with 5% significance level. P<0.05 for main comparisons and P< 0.017 for multiple comparisons were considered statistically significant. Results: P. gingivalis was sensitive to chlorhexidine and persica. There was a significant difference (P=0.001) between antimicrobial activity of chlorhexidine (mean 28.733mm, SD 5.216) and Persica (mean 16.333mm, SD 5.259) compared to water against P. gingivalis. There was a significant difference (P< 0.001) between the antimicrobial activity of chlorhexidine (24.045mm, SD 3.897) and Persica (0.545mm, SD 2.558) with respect to A. actinomycetemcomitans. There was no significant difference (P=0.317) between the antimicrobial activity of Persica and water against A. actinomycetemcomitans. Conclusion: The herbal product Persica had significant antimicrobial activity against P. gingivalis and negligible antimicrobial activity against A

  15. The pga gene cluster in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is necessary for the development of natural competence in Ca(2+) -promoted biofilms.

    PubMed

    Hisano, K; Fujise, O; Miura, M; Hamachi, T; Matsuzaki, E; Nishimura, F

    2014-04-01

    Natural competence is the ability of bacteria to incorporate extracellular DNA into their genomes. This competence is affected by a number of factors, including Ca(2+) utilization and biofilm formation. As bacteria can form thick biofilms in the presence of extracellular Ca(2+) , the additive effects of Ca(2+) -promoted biofilm formation on natural competence should be examined. We evaluated natural competence in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, an important periodontal pathogen, in the context of Ca(2+) -promoted biofilms, and examined whether the pga gene cluster, required for bacterial cell aggregation, is necessary for competence development. The A. actinomycetemcomitans cells grown in the presence of 1 mm CaCl2 exhibited enhanced cell aggregation and increased levels of cell-associated Ca(2+) . Biofilm-derived cells grown in the presence of Ca(2+) exhibited the highest levels of natural transformation frequency and enhanced expression of the competence regulator gene, tfoX. Natural competence was enhanced by the additive effects of Ca(2+) -promoted biofilms, in which high levels of pga gene expression were also detected. Mutation of the pga gene cluster disrupted biofilm formation and competence development, suggesting that these genes play a critical role in the ability of A. actinomycetemcomitans to adapt to its natural environment. The Ca(2+) -promoted biofilms may enhance the ability of bacteria to acquire extracellular DNA.

  16. Inflammatory Bone Loss in Experimental Periodontitis Induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Izawa, A.; Mizutani, H.; Kobayashi, S.; Goto, H.; Okabe, E.; Takeda, H.; Ozawa, Y.; Kamiya, Y.; Sugita, Y.; Kubo, K.; Kamei, H.; Kikuchi, T.; Mitani, A.; Hayashi, J.; Nishihara, T.; Maeda, H.; Noguchi, T.

    2014-01-01

    The interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) binds to IL-1 receptors and inhibits IL-1 activity. However, it is not clear whether IL-1Ra plays a protective role in periodontal disease. This study was undertaken to compare experimental periodontitis induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in IL-1Ra knockout (KO) mice and wild-type (WT) mice. Computed tomography (CT) analysis and hematoxylin-and-eosin (H&E) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining were performed. In addition, osteoblasts were isolated; the mRNA expression of relevant genes was assessed by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR); and calcification was detected by Alizarin Red staining. Infected IL-1Ra KO mice exhibited elevated (P, <0.05) levels of antibody against A. actinomycetemcomitans, bone loss in furcation areas, and alveolar fenestrations. Moreover, protein for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and IL-6, mRNA for macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) in IL-1Ra KO mouse osteoblasts stimulated with A. actinomycetemcomitans were increased (P, <0.05) compared to in WT mice. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein (BSP), osteocalcin (OCN)/bone gla protein (BGP), and runt-related gene 2 (Runx2) mRNA levels were decreased (P, <0.05). IL-1α mRNA expression was increased, and calcification was not observed, in IL-1 Ra KO mouse osteoblasts. In brief, IL-1Ra deficiency promoted the expression of inflammatory cytokines beyond IL-1 and altered the expression of genes involved in bone resorption in A. actinomycetemcomitans-infected osteoblasts. Alterations consistent with rapid bone loss in infected IL-Ra KO mice were also observed for genes expressed in bone formation and calcification. In short, these data suggest that IL-1Ra may serve as a potential therapeutic drug for periodontal disease. PMID:24566623

  17. Photocatalytical Antibacterial Activity of Mixed-Phase TiO2 Nanocomposite Thin Films against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Yeniyol, Sinem; Mutlu, Ilven; He, Zhiming; Yüksel, Behiye; Boylan, Robert Joseph; Ürgen, Mustafa; Karabuda, Zihni Cüneyt; Basegmez, Cansu; Ricci, John Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Mixed-phase TiO2 nanocomposite thin films consisting of anatase and rutile prepared on commercially pure Ti sheets via the electrochemical anodization and annealing treatments were investigated in terms of their photocatalytic activity for antibacterial use around dental implants. The resulting films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The topology was assessed by White Light Optical Profiling (WLOP) in the Vertical Scanning Interferometer (VSI) mode. Representative height descriptive parameters of roughness R a and R z were calculated. The photocatalytic activity of the resulting TiO2 films was evaluated by the photodegradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) dye solution. The antibacterial ability of the photocatalyst was examined by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans suspensions in a colony-forming assay. XRD showed that anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films were predominantly in anatase and rutile that were 54.6 wt% and 41.9 wt%, respectively. Craters (2-5 µm) and protruding hills (10-50 µm) on Ti substrates were produced after electrochemical anodization with higher R a and R z surface roughness values. Anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films showed 26% photocatalytic decolorization toward RhB dye solution. The number of colonizing bacteria on anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films was decreased significantly in vitro. The photocatalyst was effective against A. actinomycetemcomitans colonization.

  18. Photocatalytical Antibacterial Activity of Mixed-Phase TiO2 Nanocomposite Thin Films against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Yeniyol, Sinem; Mutlu, Ilven; He, Zhiming; Yüksel, Behiye; Boylan, Robert Joseph; Ürgen, Mustafa; Karabuda, Zihni Cüneyt; Basegmez, Cansu; Ricci, John Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Mixed-phase TiO2 nanocomposite thin films consisting of anatase and rutile prepared on commercially pure Ti sheets via the electrochemical anodization and annealing treatments were investigated in terms of their photocatalytic activity for antibacterial use around dental implants. The resulting films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The topology was assessed by White Light Optical Profiling (WLOP) in the Vertical Scanning Interferometer (VSI) mode. Representative height descriptive parameters of roughness Ra and Rz were calculated. The photocatalytic activity of the resulting TiO2 films was evaluated by the photodegradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) dye solution. The antibacterial ability of the photocatalyst was examined by  Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans suspensions in a colony-forming assay. XRD showed that anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films were predominantly in anatase and rutile that were 54.6 wt% and 41.9 wt%, respectively. Craters (2–5 µm) and protruding hills (10–50 µm) on Ti substrates were produced after electrochemical anodization with higher Ra and Rz surface roughness values. Anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films showed 26% photocatalytic decolorization toward RhB dye solution. The number of colonizing bacteria on anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films was decreased significantly in vitro. The photocatalyst was effective against A. actinomycetemcomitans colonization. PMID:26576430

  19. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans cytolethal distending toxin activates the NLRP3 inflammasome in human macrophages, leading to the release of proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Shenker, Bruce J; Ojcius, David M; Walker, Lisa P; Zekavat, Ali; Scuron, Monika Damek; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen

    2015-04-01

    The cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt) is produced from a number of bacteria capable of causing infection and inflammatory disease. Our previous studies with Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Cdt demonstrate not only that the active toxin subunit functions as a phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3) phosphatase but also that macrophages exposed to the toxin were stimulated to produce proinflammatory cytokines. We now demonstrate that the Cdt-induced proinflammatory response involves the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Specific inhibitors and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) were employed to demonstrate requirements for NLRP3 and ASC as well as caspase-1. Furthermore, Cdt-mediated inflammasome activation is dependent upon upstream signals, including reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and Cdt-induced increases in extracellular ATP levels. Increases in extracellular ATP levels contribute to the activation of the P2X7 purinergic receptor, leading to K+ efflux. The relationship between the abilities of the active toxin subunit CdtB to function as a lipid phosphatase, activate the NLRP3 inflammasome, and induce a proinflammatory cytokine response is discussed. These studies provide new insight into the virulence potential of Cdt in mediating the pathogenesis of disease caused by Cdt-producing organisms such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

  20. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Cytolethal Distending Toxin Activates the NLRP3 Inflammasome in Human Macrophages, Leading to the Release of Proinflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Ojcius, David M.; Walker, Lisa P.; Zekavat, Ali; Scuron, Monika Damek; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    The cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt) is produced from a number of bacteria capable of causing infection and inflammatory disease. Our previous studies with Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Cdt demonstrate not only that the active toxin subunit functions as a phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3) phosphatase but also that macrophages exposed to the toxin were stimulated to produce proinflammatory cytokines. We now demonstrate that the Cdt-induced proinflammatory response involves the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Specific inhibitors and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) were employed to demonstrate requirements for NLRP3 and ASC as well as caspase-1. Furthermore, Cdt-mediated inflammasome activation is dependent upon upstream signals, including reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and Cdt-induced increases in extracellular ATP levels. Increases in extracellular ATP levels contribute to the activation of the P2X7 purinergic receptor, leading to K+ efflux. The relationship between the abilities of the active toxin subunit CdtB to function as a lipid phosphatase, activate the NLRP3 inflammasome, and induce a proinflammatory cytokine response is discussed. These studies provide new insight into the virulence potential of Cdt in mediating the pathogenesis of disease caused by Cdt-producing organisms such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:25644004

  1. Transcriptional regulation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lsrACDBFG and lsrRK operons and their role in biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Juárez-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Lamont, Richard J; Demuth, Donald R

    2013-01-01

    Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) is required for biofilm formation and virulence of the oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and we previously showed that lsrB codes for a receptor for AI-2. The lsrB gene is expressed as part of the lsrACDBFG operon, which is divergently transcribed from an adjacent lsrRK operon. In Escherichia coli, lsrRK encodes a repressor and AI-2 kinase that function to regulate lsrACDBFG. To determine if lsrRK controls lsrACDBFG expression and influences biofilm growth of A. actinomycetemcomitans, we first defined the promoters for each operon. Transcriptional reporter plasmids containing the 255-bp lsrACDBFG-lsrRK intergenic region (IGR) fused to lacZ showed that essential elements of lsrR promoter reside 89 to 255 bp upstream from the lsrR start codon. Two inverted repeat sequences that represent potential binding sites for LsrR and two sequences resembling the consensus cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) binding site were identified in this region. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), purified LsrR and CRP proteins were shown to bind probes containing these sequences. Surprisingly, the 255-bp IGR did not contain the lsrA promoter. Instead, a fragment encompassing nucleotides +1 to +159 of lsrA together with the 255-bp IGR was required to promote lsrA transcription. This suggests that a region within the lsrA coding sequence influences transcription, or alternatively that the start codon of A. actinomycetemcomitans lsrA has been incorrectly annotated. Transformation of ΔlsrR, ΔlsrK, ΔlsrRK, and Δcrp deletion mutants with lacZ reporters containing the lsrA or lsrR promoter showed that LsrR negatively regulates and CRP positively regulates both lsrACDBFG and lsrRK. However, in contrast to what occurs in E. coli, deletion of lsrK had no effect on the transcriptional activity of the lsrA or lsrR promoters, suggesting that another kinase may be capable of phosphorylating AI-2 in A. actinomycetemcomitans. Finally, biofilm

  2. Differential transcriptional regulation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lsrACDBFG and lsrRK operons by integration host factor protein.

    PubMed

    Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Juárez-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Demuth, Donald R

    2014-04-01

    We previously showed that the Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lsrACDBFG and lsrRK operons are regulated by LsrR and cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) and that proper regulation of the lsr locus is required for optimal biofilm growth by A. actinomycetemcomitans. Here, we identified sequences that reside immediately upstream from both the lsrA and lsrR start codons that closely resemble the consensus recognition sequence of Escherichia coli integration host factor (IHF) protein. A. actinomycetemcomitans IHFα and IHFβ were expressed and purified as hexahistidine fusion proteins, and using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs), the IHFα-IHFβ protein complex was shown to bind to probes containing the putative IHF recognition sequences. In addition, single-copy chromosomal insertions of lsrR promoter-lacZ and lsrA promoter-lacZ transcriptional fusions in wild-type A. actinomycetemcomitans and ΔihfA and ΔihfB mutant strains showed that IHF differentially regulates the lsr locus and functions as a negative regulator of lsrRK and a positive regulator of lsrACDBFG. Deletion of ihfA or ihfB also reduced biofilm formation and altered biofilm architecture relative to the wild-type strain, and these phenotypes were partially complemented by a plasmid-borne copy of ihfA or ihfB. Finally, using 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), two transcriptional start sites (TSSs) and two putative promoters were identified for lsrRK and three TSSs and putative promoters were identified for lsrACDBFG. The function of the two lsrRK promoters and the positive regulatory role of IHF in regulating lsrACDBFG expression were confirmed with a series of lacZ transcriptional fusion constructs. Together, our results highlight the complex transcriptional regulation of the lsrACDBFG and lsrRK operons and suggest that multiple promoters and the architecture of the lsrACDBFG-lsrRK intergenic region may control the expression of these operons.

  3. Inner-membrane protein MorC is involved in fimbriae production and biofilm formation in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kenneth P; Ruiz, Teresa; Mintz, Keith P

    2016-03-01

    Fimbrial subunit synthesis, secretion and assembly on the surface of the periodontal pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans are essential for biofilm formation. A recent quantitative proteomics study employing an afimbriated strain and a developed mutant isogenic for the inner-membrane protein morphogenesis protein C (MorC) revealed that the abundance of the proteins of the fimbrial secretion apparatus in the membrane is dependent on MorC. To investigate further the relationship between MorC and fimbriation, we identified and complemented the defect in fimbriae production in the afimbriated laboratory strain. The transformed strain expressing a plasmid containing genes encoding the WT fimbrial subunit and the prepilin peptidase displayed all of the hallmarks of a fimbriated bacterium including the distinct star-like colony morphology, robust biofilm formation, biofilm architecture composed of discrete microcolonies and the presence of fimbriae. When the identical plasmid was transformed into a morC mutant strain, the bacterium did not display any of the phenotypes of fimbriated strains. Extension of these studies to a naturally fimbriated clinical strain showed that the resulting morC mutant maintained the characteristic colony morphology of fimbriated strains. There was, however, a reduction in the secretion of fimbrial subunits, and fewer fimbriae were observed on the surface of the mutant strain. Furthermore, the morC mutant of the fimbriated strain displayed a significantly altered biofilm microcolony architecture, while maintaining a similar biofilm mass to the parent strain. These results suggest that MorC influences fimbrial secretion and microcolony formation in A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  4. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin (LtxA; Leukothera) induces cofilin dephosphorylation and actin depolymerization during killing of malignant monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Manpreet

    2014-01-01

    Leukotoxin (LtxA; Leukothera), a protein toxin secreted by the oral bacterium Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, specifically kills white blood cells (WBCs). LtxA binds to the receptor known as lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), a β2 integrin expressed only on the surface of WBCs. LtxA is being studied as a virulence factor that helps A. actinomycetemcomitans evade host defences and as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of WBC diseases. LtxA-mediated cell death in monocytes involves both caspases and lysosomes; however, the signalling proteins that regulate and mediate cell death remain largely unknown. We used a 2D-gel proteomics approach to analyse the global protein expression changes that occur in response to LtxA. This approach identified the protein cofilin, which underwent dephosphorylation upon LtxA treatment. Cofilin is a ubiquitous actin-binding protein known to regulate actin dynamics and is regulated by LIM kinase (LIMK)-mediated phosphorylation. LtxA-mediated cofilin dephosphorylation was dependent on LFA-1 and cofilin dephosphorylation did not occur when LFA-1 bound to its natural ligand, ICAM-1. Treatment of cells with an inhibitor of LIMK (LIMKi) also led to cofilin dephosphorylation and enhanced killing by LtxA. This enhanced sensitivity to LtxA coincided with an increase in lysosomal disruption, and an increase in LFA-1 surface expression and clustering. Both LIMKi and LtxA treatment also induced actin depolymerization, which could play a role in trafficking and surface distribution of LFA-1. We propose a model in which LtxA-mediated cofilin dephosphorylation leads to actin depolymerization, LFA-1 overexpression/clustering, and enhanced lysosomal-mediated cell death. PMID:25169107

  5. Prevalence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia in Japanese patients with generalized chronic and aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Sachiyo; Komiya-Ito, Akiyo; Imamura, Kentaro; Kita, Daichi; Ota, Koki; Takayama, Saori; Makino-Oi, Asako; Kinumatsu, Takashi; Ota, Mikio; Saito, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and levels of major periodontal pathogens, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia in subgingival plaque samples of a group of Japanese patients with aggressive periodontitis (AgP) and chronic periodontitis (CP). A total of 40 patients with clinical diagnosis of AgP or CP and 10 periodontally healthy volunteers were subjected to clinical and microbiological analysis. Subgingival plaque samples were analyzed for A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis and T. forsythia with a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The prevalence of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia was relatively high in patients with periodontitis: over 60% of AgP or CP patients harbored these pathogens whereas they were not detected in the subgingival plaque samples from periodontally healthy individuals. P. gingivalis and T. forsythia were relatively frequently detected together in AgP and CP patients. No significant differences in the prevalence or level of the 3 pathogens were found between periodontitis groups. The proportion of T. forsythia was approximately 4-fold higher in CP group than in AgP group (P = 0.02). In periodontitis patients, a significant positive correlation was found between periodontal parameters (probing depth and clinical attachment level) and the numbers of total bacteria, P. gingivalis and T. forsythia. No distinct pattern of the subgingival profile of these pathogens was discerned between the two disease entities, except for the difference in the proportion of T. forsythia. The red complex bacteria, P. gingivalis and T. forsythia were highly prevalent in this population of Japanese AgP and CP patients, collaborating their roles in periodontitis.

  6. ygiW and qseBC are co-expressed in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and regulate biofilm growth.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Demuth, Donald R

    2013-06-01

    The quorum-sensing Escherichia coli regulators B and C (QseBC) two-component system were previously shown to regulate biofilm growth of the oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and to be essential for virulence. In this study, we use RT-PCR to show that an open reading frame, ygiW, residing upstream of qseBC and encoding a hypothetical protein is co-expressed with qseBC. In addition, using a series of lacZ transcriptional fusion constructs and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE), the promoter that drives expression of the ygiW-qseBC operon and the transcriptional start site was mapped to the 372 bp intergenic region upstream from ygiW. No internal promoters drive qseBC expression independently from ygiW. However, qseBC expression is attenuated by approximately ninefold by a putative attenuator stem-loop (ΔG = -77.0 KJ/mol) that resides in the 137 bp intergenic region between ygiW and qseB. The QseB response regulator activates expression of the ygiW-qseBC operon and transcription from the ygiW promoter is drastically reduced in ΔqseB and ΔqseBC mutants of A. actinomycetemcomitans. In addition, transcriptional activity of the ygiW promoter is significantly reduced in a mutant expressing an in-frame deletion of qseC that lacks the sensor domain of QseC, suggesting that a periplasmic signal is required for QseB activation. Finally, a non-polar in-frame deletion in ygiW had little effect on biofilm depth but caused a significant increase in surface coverage relative to wild-type. Complementation of the mutant with a plasmid-borne copy of ygiW reduced surface coverage back to wild-type levels. Interestingly, deletion of the sensor domain of QseC or of the entire qseC open reading frame resulted in significant reductions in biofilm depth, biomass and surface coverage, indicating that the sensor domain is essential for optimal biofilm formation by A. actinomycetemcomitans. Thus, although ygiW and qseBC are co-expressed, they regulate biofilm

  7. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans outer membrane vesicles are internalized in human host cells and trigger NOD1- and NOD2-dependent NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Thay, Bernard; Damm, Anna; Kufer, Thomas A; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Oscarsson, Jan

    2014-10-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. We recently demonstrated that outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) disseminated by A. actinomycetemcomitans could deliver multiple proteins, including biologically active cytolethal distending toxin (CDT), into the cytosol of HeLa cells and human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). In the present work, we have used immunoelectron and confocal microscopy analysis and fluorescently labeled vesicles to further investigate mechanisms for A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV-mediated delivery of bacterial antigens to these host cells. Our results supported that OMVs were internalized into the perinuclear region of HeLa cells and HGF. Colocalization analysis revealed that internalized OMVs colocalized with the endoplasmic reticulum and carried antigens, detected using an antibody specific to whole A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype a cells. Consistent with OMV internalization mediating intracellular antigen exposure, the vesicles acted as strong inducers of cytoplasmic peptidoglycan sensor NOD1- and NOD2-dependent NF-κB activation in human embryonic kidney cells. Moreover, NOD1 was the main sensor of OMV-delivered peptidoglycan in myeloid THP1 cells, contributing to the overall inflammatory responses induced by the vesicles. This work reveals a role of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs as a trigger of innate immunity via carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs).

  8. Amphotericin B down-regulates Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-induced production of IL-8 and IL-6 in human gingival epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Imai, Haruka; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Kajiya, Mikihito; Ouhara, Kazuhisa; Miyagawa, Tsuyoshi; Matsuda, Shinji; Shiba, Hideki; Kurihara, Hidemi

    2014-08-01

    Gingival epithelium is the primary barrier against microorganism invasion and produces inflammatory cytokines. Amphotericin B, a major antifungal drug, binds to cholesterol in the mammalian cell membrane in addition to fungal ergosterol. Amphotericin B has been shown to regulate inflammatory cytokines in host cells. To investigate the suppressive effect of amphotericin B on the gingival epithelium, we examined the expression of interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-6 and involvement of MAP kinase in human gingival epithelial cells (HGEC) stimulated by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Amphotericin B and the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor down-regulated the A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced increase in the expression of IL-8 and IL-6 at the mRNA. The ERK inhibitor suppressed the A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced IL-8 mRNA expression. Amphotericin B inhibited the A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced phosphorylation of ERK and p38 MAP kinase. Furthermore, amphotericin B inhibited the A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced production of prostaglandin E2. These results suggest that amphotericin B regulate inflammatory responses in HGEC.

  9. A Cytolethal Distending Toxin Variant from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans with an Aberrant CdtB That Lacks the Conserved Catalytic Histidine 160

    PubMed Central

    Obradović, Davor; Gašperšič, Rok; Caserman, Simon; Leonardi, Adrijana; Jamnik, Maja; Podlesek, Zdravko; Seme, Katja; Anderluh, Gregor; Križaj, Igor; Maček, Peter; Butala, Matej

    2016-01-01

    The periodontopathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans synthesizes several virulence factors, including cytolethal distending toxin (CDT). The active CDT holoenzyme is an AB-type tripartite genotoxin that affects eukaryotic cells. Subunits CdtA and CdtC (B-components) allow binding and intracellular translocation of the active CdtB (A-component), which elicits nuclear DNA damage. Different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans have diverse virulence genotypes, which results in varied pathogenic potential and disease progression. Here, we identified an A. actinomycetemcomitans strain isolated from two patients with advance chronic periodontitis that has a regular cdtABC operon, which, however, codes for a unique, shorter, variant of the CdtB subunit. We describe the characteristics of this CdtBΔ116–188, which lacks the intact nuclear localisation signal and the catalytic histidine 160. We show that the A. actinomycetemcomitans DO15 isolate secretes CdtBΔ116–188, and that this subunit cannot form a holotoxin and is also not genotoxic if expressed ectopically in HeLa cells. Furthermore, the A. actinomycetemcomitans DO15 isolate is not toxic, nor does it induce cellular distention upon infection of co-cultivated HeLa cells. Biological significance of this deletion in the cdtB remains to be explained. PMID:27414641

  10. Breaking the Gingival Epithelial Barrier: Role of the Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Cytolethal Distending Toxin in Oral Infectious Disease

    PubMed Central

    DiRienzo, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is part of the HACEK group that causes infective endocarditis, a constituent of the oral flora that promotes some forms of periodontal disease and a member of the family of species that secrete a cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt). The family of bacteria that express the cdt genes participate in diseases that involve the disruption of a mucosal or epithelial layer. In vitro studies have shown that human gingival epithelial cells (HGEC) are native targets of the Cdt that typically induces DNA damage that signals growth arrest at the G2/M interphase of the cell cycle. The gingival epithelium is an early line of defense in the oral cavity against microbial assault. When damaged, bacteria collectively gain entry into the underlying connective tissue where microbial products can affect processes and pathways in infiltrating inflammatory cells culminating in the destruction of the attachment apparatus of the tooth. One approach has been the use of an ex vivo gingival explant model to assess the effects of the Cdt on the morphology and integrity of the tissue. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of these studies and to critically examine the potential contribution of the Cdt to the breakdown of the protective gingival barrier. PMID:24861975

  11. Identification of a Novel Bacterial Outer Membrane Interleukin-1Β-Binding Protein from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Paino, Annamari; Ahlstrand, Tuuli; Nuutila, Jari; Navickaite, Indre; Lahti, Maria; Tuominen, Heidi; Välimaa, Hannamari; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Pöllänen, Marja T.; Ihalin, Riikka

    2013-01-01

    Aggregatibacteractinomycetemcomitans is a gram-negative opportunistic oral pathogen. It is frequently associated with subgingival biofilms of both chronic and aggressive periodontitis, and the diseased sites of the periodontium exhibit increased levels of the proinflammatory mediator interleukin (IL)-1β. Some bacterial species can alter their physiological properties as a result of sensing IL-1β. We have recently shown that this cytokine localizes to the cytoplasm of A. actinomycetemcomitans in co-cultures with organotypic gingival mucosa. However, current knowledge about the mechanism underlying bacterial IL-1β sensing is still limited. In this study, we characterized the interaction of A. actinomycetemcomitans total membrane protein with IL-1β through electrophoretic mobility shift assays. The interacting protein, which we have designated bacterial interleukin receptor I (BilRI), was identified through mass spectrometry and was found to be Pasteurellaceae specific. Based on the results obtained using protein function prediction tools, this protein localizes to the outer membrane and contains a typical lipoprotein signal sequence. All six tested biofilm cultures of clinical A. actinomycetemcomitans strains expressed the protein according to phage display-derived antibody detection. Moreover, proteinase K treatment of whole A. actinomycetemcomitans cells eliminated BilRI forms that were outer membrane specific, as determined through immunoblotting. The protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli in both the outer membrane-associated form and a soluble cytoplasmic form. When assessed using flow cytometry, the BilRI-overexpressing E. coli cells were observed to bind 2.5 times more biotinylated-IL-1β than the control cells, as detected with avidin-FITC. Overexpression of BilRI did not cause binding of a biotinylated negative control protein. In a microplate assay, soluble BilRI bound to IL-1β, but this binding was not specific, as a control protein for IL-1

  12. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and Treponema denticola / Prevotella intermedia Co-Infection Are Associated with Severe Periodontitis in a Thai Population.

    PubMed

    Torrungruang, Kitti; Jitpakdeebordin, Supawadee; Charatkulangkun, Orawan; Gleebbua, Yingampa

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial infection of tooth-supporting tissues. This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the associations between five target species and severe periodontitis in a Thai population. Using the CDC/AAP case definition, individuals diagnosed with no/mild and severe periodontitis were included. Quantitative analyses of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Tannerella forsythia (Tf), Treponema denticola (Td), and Prevotella intermedia (Pi) in subgingival plaque were performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The association between target species and severe periodontitis was examined using logistic regression analysis. The study subjects comprised 479 individuals with no/mild periodontitis and 883 with severe periodontitis. Bacterial prevalence and quantity were higher in subjects with severe periodontitis than in those with no/mild disease. In the fully adjusted model, all species except Tf showed a dose-dependent relationship with periodontitis. The mere presence of Pg, even in low amount, was significantly associated with severe periodontitis, while the amount of Aa, Td, and Pi had to reach the critical thresholds to be significantly associated with disease. Compared to individuals with low levels of both Td and Pi, high colonization by either Td or Pi alone significantly increased the odds of having severe periodontitis by 2.5 (95%CI 1.7-3.5) folds. The odds ratio was further increased to 14.8 (95%CI 9.2-23.8) in individuals who were highly colonized by both species. Moreover, the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa were independently associated with severe periodontitis with odds ratios of 5.6 (95%CI 3.4-9.1) and 2.2 (95%CI 1.5-3.3), respectively. Our findings suggest that the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa, Td, and Pi play an important role in severe periodontitis in this study population. We also demonstrate for the first time that individuals co-infected with Td and Pi

  13. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and Treponema denticola / Prevotella intermedia Co-Infection Are Associated with Severe Periodontitis in a Thai Population

    PubMed Central

    Torrungruang, Kitti; Jitpakdeebordin, Supawadee; Charatkulangkun, Orawan; Gleebbua, Yingampa

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial infection of tooth-supporting tissues. This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the associations between five target species and severe periodontitis in a Thai population. Using the CDC/AAP case definition, individuals diagnosed with no/mild and severe periodontitis were included. Quantitative analyses of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Tannerella forsythia (Tf), Treponema denticola (Td), and Prevotella intermedia (Pi) in subgingival plaque were performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The association between target species and severe periodontitis was examined using logistic regression analysis. The study subjects comprised 479 individuals with no/mild periodontitis and 883 with severe periodontitis. Bacterial prevalence and quantity were higher in subjects with severe periodontitis than in those with no/mild disease. In the fully adjusted model, all species except Tf showed a dose-dependent relationship with periodontitis. The mere presence of Pg, even in low amount, was significantly associated with severe periodontitis, while the amount of Aa, Td, and Pi had to reach the critical thresholds to be significantly associated with disease. Compared to individuals with low levels of both Td and Pi, high colonization by either Td or Pi alone significantly increased the odds of having severe periodontitis by 2.5 (95%CI 1.7–3.5) folds. The odds ratio was further increased to 14.8 (95%CI 9.2–23.8) in individuals who were highly colonized by both species. Moreover, the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa were independently associated with severe periodontitis with odds ratios of 5.6 (95%CI 3.4–9.1) and 2.2 (95%CI 1.5–3.3), respectively. Our findings suggest that the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa, Td, and Pi play an important role in severe periodontitis in this study population. We also demonstrate for the first time that individuals co-infected with Td

  14. Structural proteins of the Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans bacteriophage phi Aa.

    PubMed

    Stevens, R H; Hammond, B F; Fine, D H

    1990-08-01

    øAa is an A1 morphotype bacteriophage which infects certain strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis of dissociated, purified phi Aa particles revealed 7 major structural proteins (P1-P7) ranging in size from 17.5 to 52.7 kilodaltons (Kd). Treatment of the intact phage particles with 67% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) resulted in the separation of the virion head and tail subunits. Purification of the head subunits was accomplished by sucrose density gradient centrifugation of the DMSO-treated phage particles. The purified head subunits were composed of a single protein having an electrophoretic mobility which corresponded to a 39.5 Kd protein (P3) of the intact virus. Raising the pH of a purified phi Aa suspension to 12.7 disrupted the head subunits, as well as the tail tube and tail fibers, releasing intact contractile tail sheaths. The tail sheaths were collected by centrifugation. The purified tail sheaths were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and were found to be composed of two proteins (P1 and P2) having molecular weights of 52.7 and 41.2 Kd respectively. The location of each of the 4 remaining major structural proteins in the phi Aa virion remains to be determined.

  15. Comparative genomic hybridization and transcriptome analysis with a pan-genome microarray reveal distinctions between JP2 and non-JP2 genotypes of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Kittichotirat, W; Mayer, M P A; Hall, R; Bumgarner, R; Chen, C

    2013-02-01

    It was postulated that the highly virulent JP2 genotype of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans may possess a constellation of distinct virulence determinants not found in non-JP2 genotypes. This study compared the genome content and the transcriptome of the serotype b JP2 genotype and the closely related serotype b non-JP2 genotype of A. actinomycetemcomitans. A custom-designed pan-genomic microarray of A. actinomycetemcomitans was constructed and validated against a panel of 11 sequenced reference strains. The microarray was subsequently used for comparative genomic hybridization of serotype b strains of JP2 (six strains) and non-JP2 (six strains) genotypes, and for transcriptome analysis of strains of JP2 (three strains) and non-JP2 (two strains). Two JP2-specific and two non-JP2-specific genomic islands were identified. In one instance, distinct genomic islands were found to be inserted into the same locus among strains of different genotypes. Transcriptome analysis identified five operons, including the leukotoxin operon, to have at least two genes with an expression ratio of 2 or greater between genotypes. Two of the differentially expressed operons were members of the membrane-bound nitrate reductase system (nap operon) and the Tol-Pal system of gram-negative bacterial species. This study is the first to demonstrate the differences in the full genome content and gene expression between A. actinomycetemcomitans strains of JP2 and non-JP2 genotypes. The information is essential for designing hypothesis-driven experiments to examine the pathogenic mechanisms of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  16. Inverse Association of Plasma IgG Antibody to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and High C-Reactive Protein Levels in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome and Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Thanakun, Supanee; Pornprasertsuk-Damrongsri, Suchaya; Gokyu, Misa; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    The association between clinically diagnosed periodontitis, a common chronic oral infection, and metabolic syndrome has been previously reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of plasma IgG levels against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia, C-reactive protein, and periodontal status with metabolic syndrome. Plasma IgG levels and C-reactive protein were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and salivary levels of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Among 127 individuals aged 35-76 years, 57 participants had metabolic syndrome and severe periodontitis, 25 had metabolic syndrome and an absence of severe periodontitis, 17 healthy individuals had severe periodontitis, and 28 healthy individuals were without severe periodontitis. Patients with metabolic syndrome had reduced humoral immune response to A. actinomycetemcomitans (p = 0.008), regardless of their salivary levels or periodontitis status compared with healthy participants. The IgG antibody response to P. gingivalis, regardless of their salivary levels or participants' health condition, was significantly higher in severe periodontitis patients (p<0.001). Plasma IgG titers for P. intermedia were inconsistent among metabolic syndrome or periodontal participants. Our results indicate that the presence of lower levels of IgG antibodies to A. actinomycetemcomitans (OR = 0.1; 95%CI 0.0-0.7), but not P. gingivalis, a severe periodontitis status (OR = 7.8; 95%CI 1.1-57.0), high C-reactive protein levels (OR = 9.4; 95%CI 1.0-88.2) and body mass index (OR = 3.0; 95%CI 1.7-5.2), are associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. The role of the decreased IgG antibody response to A. actinomycetemcomitans, increased C-reactive protein levels on the association between periodontal disease and metabolic syndrome in a group of Thai patients is suggested.

  17. Al(III), Pd(II), and Zn(II) phthalocyanines for inactivation of dental pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans as planktonic and biofilm-cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kussovski, V.; Mantareva, V.; Angelov, I.; Avramov, L.; Popova, E.; Dimitrov, S.

    2012-06-01

    The Gram-negative, oral bacterium Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has been implicated as the causative agent of several forms of periodontal disease in humans. The new periodontal disease treatments are emergence in order to prevent infection progression. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (a-PDT) can be a useful tool for this purpose. It involves the use of light of specific wavelength to activate a nontoxic photosensitizing agent in the presence of oxygen for eradication of target cells, and appears effective in photoinactivation of microorganisms. The phthalocyanine metal complexes of Pd(II)- (PdPcC) and Al(III)- (AlPc1) were evaluated as photodynamic sensitizers towards a dental pathogen A. actinomycetemcomitans in comparison to the known methylpyridyloxy-substituted Zn(II) phthalocyanine (ZnPcMe). The planktonic and biofilm-cultivated species of A. actinomycetemcomitans were treated. The photophysical results showed intensive and far-red absorbance with high tendency of aggregation for Pd(II)-phthalocyanine. The dark toxicities of both photosensitizers were negligible at concentrations used (< 0.5 log decrease of viable cells). The photodynamic response for planktonic cultured bacteria was full photoinactivation after a-PDT with ZnPcMe. In case of the newly studied complexes, the effect was lower for PdPcC (4 log) as well as for AlPc1 (1.5-2 log). As it is known the bacterial biofilms were more resistant to a-PDT, which was confirmed for A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilms with 3 log reductions of viable cells after treatment with ZnPcMe and approximately 1 log reduction of biofilms after PdPcC and AlPc1. The initial results suggest that a-PDT can be useful for effective inactivation of dental pathogen A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  18. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC is activated by catecholamines and iron and regulates genes encoding proteins associated with anaerobic respiration and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, WA; Demuth, DR; Torres-Escobar, A; Juárez-Rodríguez, MD

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC regulates its own expression and is essential for biofilm growth and virulence. However, the signal that activates the QseC sensor has not been identified and the qseBC regulon has not been defined. In this study, we show that QseC is activated by catecholamine hormones and iron but not by either component alone. Activation of QseC requires an EYRDD motif in the periplasmic domain of the sensor and site-specific mutations in EYRDD or the deletion of the periplasmic domain inhibits catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of the ygiW-qseBC operon. Catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of transcription also requires interaction of the QseB response regulator with its binding site in the ygiW-qseBC promoter. Whole genome microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles of A. actinomycetemcomitans grown in a chemically defined medium with and without catecholamine and iron supplementation. Approximately 11.5% of the A. actinomycetemcomitans genome was differentially expressed by at least two-fold upon exposure to catecholamines and iron. The expression of ferritin was strongly induced, suggesting that intracellular iron storage capacity is increased upon QseBC activation. Consistent with this, genes encoding iron binding and transport proteins were down-regulated by QseBC. Strikingly, 57% of the QseBC up-regulated genes (56/99) encode proteins associated with anaerobic metabolism and respiration. Most of these up-regulated genes were recently reported to be induced during in vivo growth of A. actinomycetemcomitans. These results suggest that detection of catecholamines and iron by QseBC may alter the cellular metabolism of A. actinomycetemcomitans for increased fitness and growth in an anaerobic host environment. PMID:25923132

  19. Inactivation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans by two different modalities of photodynamic therapy using Toluidine blue O or Radachlorin as photosensitizers: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Moslemi, Neda; Soleiman-Zadeh Azar, Pardis; Bahador, Abbas; Rouzmeh, Nina; Chiniforush, Nasim; Paknejad, Mojgan; Fekrazad, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans) is one of the periodontopathogens strongly associated with aggressive periodontitis. The aim of this investigation was to compare the effect of laser and light-emitting diode on the photodynamic inactivation of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Eighty-four samples of bacterial suspensions (200 μL) were prepared and divided in seven groups: control group (no treatment), laser group (indium-gallium-aluminum-phosphate laser with wavelength of 662 ± 0.1 nm, energy density of 6 j/cm(2), and irradiation time of 34 s), light-emitting diode (LED) group (wavelength 625-635 nm, energy density 6 j/cm(2), time of irradiation 30 s), Toluidine blue O (TBO) group (0.1 mg/mL), Radachlorin group (0.1 %), Radachlorin + laser group (after pre-irradiation time of 10 min, laser was irradiated), and TBO + LED group (after preirradiation time of 10 min, LED was irradiated). Then, 100 μL of each sample was cultured in brain heart infusion (BHI) plates and incubated for 48-72 h in microaerophilic atmosphere for colony counting. Application of Radachlorin + laser resulted in a significant decrease in the concentration of A. actinomycetemcomitans (P values <0.05). Photodynamic therapy with laser + Radachlorin was more effective than that of LED + TBO in suppression of this microorganism (P value <0.05). Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that photodynamic inactivation using laser and Radachlorin was more effective than that of LED and TBO in eradication of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  20. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC is activated by catecholamines and iron and regulates genes encoding proteins associated with anaerobic respiration and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Weigel, W A; Demuth, D R; Torres-Escobar, A; Juárez-Rodríguez, M D

    2015-10-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC regulates its own expression and is essential for biofilm growth and virulence. However, the signal that activates the QseC sensor has not been identified and the qseBC regulon has not been defined. In this study, we show that QseC is activated by catecholamine hormones and iron but not by either component alone. Activation of QseC requires an EYRDD motif in the periplasmic domain of the sensor and site-specific mutations in EYRDD or the deletion of the periplasmic domain inhibits catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of the ygiW-qseBC operon. Catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of transcription also requires interaction of the QseB response regulator with its binding site in the ygiW-qseBC promoter. Whole genome microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles of A. actinomycetemcomitans grown in a chemically defined medium with and without catecholamine and iron supplementation. Approximately 11.5% of the A. actinomycetemcomitans genome was differentially expressed by at least two-fold upon exposure to catecholamines and iron. The expression of ferritin was strongly induced, suggesting that intracellular iron storage capacity is increased upon QseBC activation. Consistent with this, genes encoding iron binding and transport proteins were down-regulated by QseBC. Strikingly, 57% of the QseBC up-regulated genes (56/99) encode proteins associated with anaerobic metabolism and respiration. Most of these up-regulated genes were recently reported to be induced during in vivo growth of A. actinomycetemcomitans. These results suggest that detection of catecholamines and iron by QseBC may alter the cellular metabolism of A. actinomycetemcomitans for increased fitness and growth in an anaerobic host environment.

  1. Disease severity associated with presence in subgingival plaque of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and Tannerella forsythia, singly or in combination, as detected by nested multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Ready, D; D'Aiuto, F; Spratt, D A; Suvan, J; Tonetti, M S; Wilson, M

    2008-10-01

    This study used a nested multiplex PCR method to detect three periodontal pathogens in subgingival plaque collected before treatment and at 2 and 6 months posttreatment from 107 patients with severe, generalized periodontitis. The proportions of the patients who harbored these bacteria before periodontal treatment were as follows: Tannerella forsythia, 81%; Porphyromonas gingivalis, 78%; and Aggregatibacter (formerly Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans, 47%. At 2 months posttreatment there was a significant reduction in the numbers of patients harboring P. gingivalis (46%; P < 0.001) or T. forsythia (63%; P = 0.043) but not A. actinomycetemcomitans (50%) compared to pretreatment data. At 6 months posttreatment, significantly fewer patients harbored P. gingivalis (43%; P < 0.001); A. actinomycetemcomitans, (31%; P = 0.025), or T. forsythia (63%; P = 0.030). Interestingly, at baseline and at 2 months posttherapy, subjects who harbored only a single pathogen had a greater level of periodontal disease than subjects who harbored two, or all three, of these periodontal pathogens. These data suggest that a reduction in the number of species present may be associated with an increase in the severity of periodontal diseases.

  2. Presence of bacteriophage Aa phi 23 correlates with the population genetic structure of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Haubek, D; Willi, K; Poulsen, K; Meyer, J; Kilian, M

    1997-02-01

    Several bacteriophages associated with the oral bacterium Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans have been identified. Lysogeny might affect the virulence of this bacterium, which has been implicated in the etiology of juvenile and adult periodontitis. We have determined the presence of bacteriophage Aa phi 23-related DNA sequences among 185 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains belonging to 2 well-characterized collections and have related the findings to the population genetic structure of the collections. 2 cloned Aa phi 23-specific DNA probes were used in Southern blot hybridization experiments to detect homologous sequences in whole-cell DNA of the strains. DNA from 65 (35%) of the 185 strains hybridized to either of the DNA probes. The majority (74%) of the hybridizing strains showed an identical hybridization pattern, indicating presence of phage Aa phi 23. Whole-cell DNA from the remaining hybridizing strains hybridized to the probes with different patterns, indicating that DNA sequences related to but different from phage Aa phi 23 occur in these strains. The majority (81%) of the strains which harbored phage Aa phi 23 were of serotype a, whereas serotype d strains appeared to be resistant to infection with this phage. There was a clear correlation between hybridization patterns and genetic subdivisions based on our previous population genetic analyses of A. actinomycetemcomitans. However, there was no significant correlation between occurrence of Aa phi 23 among A. actinomycetemcomitans strains and the periodontal status of the patients from whom the isolates were obtained, suggesting that this bacteriophage does not significantly influence the virulence of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  3. Evaluation of antimicrobial action of Carie Care™ and Papacarie Duo™ on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans a major periodontal pathogen using polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Kush, Anil; Thakur, Rachna; Patil, Sandya Devi S.; Paul, Santhosh T.; Kakanur, Madhu

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the present scenario, we are made available with chemomechanical caries removal system containing a natural proteolytic enzyme for the ease in the excavation of infected dentine. The additive action for these agents is providing antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. Aim: This study was undertaken for assessing the action of Carie Care™ and Papacarie Duo™ on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Materials and Methods: The samples were collected for cultivation of the periodontal pathogen from the clinical periodontal pockets using sterile paper points. The samples cultured under suitable conditions were analyzed with quantitative polymerase chain reaction targeting 16s r-DNA. The samples were divided into three groups namely, Group A: Control, Group B: With Papacarie Duo, Group C: With Carie Care. The pathogen inoculums plugs were inserted in the petri dishes containing chemically defined medium and the experimental gels at different concentrations and were incubated under optimal conditions. The inhibition of growth of the pathogen was studied visually. Results: There was visual inhibition of growth for Group B and C and also exhibited a dose-dependent effect also. Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, Carie Care™ gel demonstrated better antimicrobial action against A. actinomycetemcomitans which is a major periodontal disease causing pathogen. PMID:26681861

  4. Quantitative PCR studies of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Treponema denticola/Tanerella forsythensis Complex as Etiological Factors of Chronic Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Yanushevich, O O; Ayvazova, R A; Shibaeva, A V; Rebrikov, D V; Trubnikova, E V; Kudykina, Yu K; Zylnikova, M V; Zaripova, R S; Shevelev, A B

    2016-02-01

    Real-time quantitative PCR (Dentofl or kit) was used to detect DNA of periodontal pathogens in specimens from 92 patients with chronic periodontitis and from a control sample of 12 normal subjects. A bimodal distribution of patients by periodontium colonization with A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, P. intermedia, T. forsythensis, and T. denticola was demonstrated. A new approach to interpretation of the results of quantitative evaluation of periodontal pathogens, including the notion of pathological colonization level, led to classification of all cases with chronic generalized periodontitis into 3 groups: associated with A. actinomycetemcomitans, with T. forsythensis/T. denticola complex, and cases of uncertain genesis.

  5. A novel intrinsically disordered outer membrane lipoprotein of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans binds various cytokines and plays a role in biofilm response to interleukin-1β and interleukin-8

    PubMed Central

    Ahlstrand, Tuuli; Tuominen, Heidi; Beklen, Arzu; Torittu, Annamari; Oscarsson, Jan; Sormunen, Raija; Pöllänen, Marja T.; Permi, Perttu; Ihalin, Riikka

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) do not have a well-defined and stable 3-dimensional fold. Some IDPs can function as either transient or permanent binders of other proteins and may interact with an array of ligands by adopting different conformations. A novel outer membrane lipoprotein, bacterial interleukin receptor I (BilRI) of the opportunistic oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans binds a key gatekeeper proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β. Because the amino acid sequence of the novel lipoprotein resembles that of fibrinogen binder A of Haemophilus ducreyi, BilRI could have the potential to bind other proteins, such as host matrix proteins. However, from the tested host matrix proteins, BilRI interacted with neither collagen nor fibrinogen. Instead, the recombinant non-lipidated BilRI, which was intrinsically disordered, bound various pro/anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-10. Moreover, BilRI played a role in the in vitro sensing of IL-1β and IL-8 because low concentrations of cytokines did not decrease the amount of extracellular DNA in the matrix of bilRI− mutant biofilm as they did in the matrix of wild-type biofilm when the biofilms were exposed to recombinant cytokines for 22 hours. BilRI played a role in the internalization of IL-1β in the gingival model system but did not affect either IL-8 or IL-6 uptake. However, bilRI deletion did not entirely prevent IL-1β internalization, and the binding of cytokines to BilRI was relatively weak. Thus, BilRI might sequester cytokines on the surface of A. actinomycetemcomitans to facilitate the internalization process in low local cytokine concentrations. PMID:27459270

  6. A novel intrinsically disordered outer membrane lipoprotein of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans binds various cytokines and plays a role in biofilm response to interleukin-1β and interleukin-8.

    PubMed

    Ahlstrand, Tuuli; Tuominen, Heidi; Beklen, Arzu; Torittu, Annamari; Oscarsson, Jan; Sormunen, Raija; Pöllänen, Marja T; Permi, Perttu; Ihalin, Riikka

    2017-02-17

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) do not have a well-defined and stable 3-dimensional fold. Some IDPs can function as either transient or permanent binders of other proteins and may interact with an array of ligands by adopting different conformations. A novel outer membrane lipoprotein, bacterial interleukin receptor I (BilRI) of the opportunistic oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans binds a key gatekeeper proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β. Because the amino acid sequence of the novel lipoprotein resembles that of fibrinogen binder A of Haemophilus ducreyi, BilRI could have the potential to bind other proteins, such as host matrix proteins. However, from the tested host matrix proteins, BilRI interacted with neither collagen nor fibrinogen. Instead, the recombinant non-lipidated BilRI, which was intrinsically disordered, bound various pro/anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-10. Moreover, BilRI played a role in the in vitro sensing of IL-1β and IL-8 because low concentrations of cytokines did not decrease the amount of extracellular DNA in the matrix of bilRI(-) mutant biofilm as they did in the matrix of wild-type biofilm when the biofilms were exposed to recombinant cytokines for 22 hours. BilRI played a role in the internalization of IL-1β in the gingival model system but did not affect either IL-8 or IL-6 uptake. However, bilRI deletion did not entirely prevent IL-1β internalization, and the binding of cytokines to BilRI was relatively weak. Thus, BilRI might sequester cytokines on the surface of A. actinomycetemcomitans to facilitate the internalization process in low local cytokine concentrations.

  7. Transcriptional regulation of the Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans ygiW-qseBC operon by QseB and integration host factor proteins.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Demuth, Donald R

    2014-12-01

    The QseBC two-component system plays a pivotal role in regulating virulence and biofilm growth of the oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. We previously showed that QseBC autoregulates the ygiW-qseBC operon. In this study, we characterized the promoter that drives ygiW-qseBC expression. Using lacZ transcriptional fusion constructs and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends, we showed that ygiW-qseBC expression is driven by a promoter that initiates transcription 53 bases upstream of ygiW and identified putative cis-acting promoter elements, whose function was confirmed using site-specific mutagenesis. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, two trans-acting proteins were shown to interact with the ygiW-qseBC promoter. The QseB response regulator bound to probes containing the direct repeat sequence CTTAA-N6-CTTAA, where the CTTAA repeats flank the -35 element of the promoter. The ygiW-qseBC expression could not be detected in A. actinomycetemcomitans ΔqseB or ΔqseBC strains, but was restored to WT levels in the ΔqseBC mutant when complemented by single copy chromosomal insertion of qseBC. Interestingly, qseB partially complemented the ΔqseBC strain, suggesting that QseB could be activated in the absence of QseC. QseB activation required its phosphorylation since complementation did not occur using qseB(pho-), encoding a protein with the active site aspartate substituted with alanine. These results suggest that QseB is a strong positive regulator of ygiW-qseBC expression. In addition, integration host factor (IHF) bound to two sites in the promoter region and an additional site near the 5' end of the ygiW ORF. The expression of ygiW-qseBC was increased by twofold in ΔihfA and ΔihfB strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans, suggesting that IHF is a negative regulator of the ygiW-qseBC operon.

  8. The Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Cytolethal Distending Toxin Active Subunit CdtB Contains a Cholesterol Recognition Sequence Required for Toxin Binding and Subunit Internalization.

    PubMed

    Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen; Walker, Lisa P; Zekavat, Ali; Dlakić, Mensur; Scuron, Monika Damek; Nygren, Patrik; Shenker, Bruce J

    2015-10-01

    Induction of cell cycle arrest in lymphocytes following exposure to the Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt) is dependent upon the integrity of lipid membrane microdomains. Moreover, we have previously demonstrated that the association of Cdt with target cells involves the CdtC subunit which binds to cholesterol via a cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus sequence (CRAC site). In this study, we demonstrate that the active Cdt subunit, CdtB, also is capable of binding to large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) containing cholesterol. Furthermore, CdtB binding to cholesterol involves a similar CRAC site as that demonstrated for CdtC. Mutation of the CRAC site reduces binding to model membranes as well as toxin binding and CdtB internalization in both Jurkat cells and human macrophages. A concomitant reduction in Cdt-induced toxicity was also noted, indicated by reduced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in Jurkat cells and a reduction in the proinflammatory response in macrophages (interleukin 1β [IL-1β] and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α] release). Collectively, these observations indicate that membrane cholesterol serves as an essential ligand for both CdtC and CdtB and, further, that this binding is necessary for both internalization of CdtB and subsequent molecular events leading to intoxication of cells.

  9. MicroRNAs responsive to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS modulate expression of genes regulating innate immunity in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Afsar R; Fordham, Jezrom B; Khan, Asma; Nares, Salvador

    2014-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, noncoding RNAs that regulate post-transcriptional expression of their respective target genes and are responsive to various stimuli, including LPS. Here we examined the early (4 h) miRNA responses of THP1-differentiated macrophages challenged with LPS derived from the periodontal pathogens, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis or environmentally-modified LPS obtained from P. gingivalis grown in cigarette smoke extract. Predicted miRNA-gene target interactions for LPS-responsive miR-29b and let-7f were confirmed using dual-luciferase assays and by transfection experiments using miRNA mimics and inhibitors. Convergent and divergent miRNA profiles were observed in treated samples where differences in miRNA levels related to the type, concentration and incubation times of LPS challenge. Dual-luciferase experiments revealed miR-29b targeting of interleukin-6 receptorα (IL-6Rα) and IFN-γ inducible protein 30 and let-7f targeting of suppressor of cytokine signaling 4 and thrombospondin-1. Transfection experiments confirmed miR-29b and let-7f modulation of IL-6Rα and SOCS4 protein expression levels, respectively. Thus, we have demonstrated convergent/divergent miRNA responses to wild type LPS and its environmentally-modified LPS, and demonstrate miRNA targeting of key genes linked to inflammation and immunity. Our data indicate that these LPS-responsive miRNAs may play a key role in fine-tuning the host response to periodontal pathogens.

  10. Detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans after Systemic Administration of Amoxicillin Plus Metronidazole as an Adjunct to Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dakic, Aleksandar; Boillot, Adrien; Colliot, Cyrille; Carra, Maria-Clotilde; Czernichow, Sébastien; Bouchard, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the variations in the detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis and/or Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans before and after systemic administration of amoxicillin plus metronidazole in association with non-surgical periodontal therapy (NSPT). Background: The adjunctive use of antibiotics has been advocated to improve the clinical outcomes of NSPT. However, no systematic review has investigated the microbiological benefit of this combination. Materials and Methods: An electronic search was conducted up to December 2015. Randomized clinical trials comparing the number of patients testing positive for P. gingivalis and/or A. actinomycetemcomitans before and after NSPT with (test group) or without (control group) amoxicillin plus metronidazole were included. The difference between groups in the variation of positive patients was calculated using the inverse variance method with a random effects model. Results: The frequency of patients positive for A. actinomycetemcomitans was decreased by 30% (p = 0.002) and by 25% (p = 0.01) in the test group compared to the control group at 3- and 6-month follow-up, respectively. Similar findings were observed when considering the frequency of patients positive for Porphyromonas gingivalis, with a reduction by 28% (p < 0.0001), 32% (p < 0.0001), and 34% (p = 0.03) in the test group compared to the control group at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up, respectively. Conclusion: The systemic administration of amoxicillin plus metronidazole as an adjunct to NSPT significantly decreased the number of patients positive for P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans compared with periodontal therapy alone or with a placebo. PMID:27594851

  11. DNA analysis of temperate bacteriophage Aa(phi)23 isolated from actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Willi, K; Meyer, J

    1998-05-01

    The DNA of the temperate bacteriophage Aaphi23 isolated from the oral bacterium Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was examined structurally both in the phage head and in the prophage. The DNA in phage particles comprises 44 kb linear molecules with a terminal redundancy of 1.6 kb, which represent circular permutations. Thus, DNA is packaged into phage heads by the headful mechanism. The Aaphi23 prophage is integrated into the host chromosome.

  12. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis in young Chinese adults.

    PubMed

    Mombelli, A; Gmür, R; Frey, J; Meyer, J; Zee, K Y; Tam, J O; Lo, E C; Di Rienzo, J; Lang, N P; Corbet, E F

    1998-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the presence or absence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis in young Chinese adults and to examine the A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates from positive subjects with regard to the serotype distribution, presence of the leukotoxin gene lktA and the promoter for the leukotoxin operon as well as the incidence of phage Aa phi 23. Sixty subjects, working in a knitting factory in the Province of Guangzhou, People's Republic of China, were investigated. Subgingival microbial samples were taken from both upper first molars. They were cultured both anaerobically and in 5% CO2. P. gingivalis was found in 33 subjects. On average, it constituted 7% of the total anaerobic cultivable counts. A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected in 37 subjects of which seven yielded counts > 10(5). Twenty-one subjects were positive for both organisms. A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype a was found in 9 subjects, serotype c was found in 23 and serotype e in 5. A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes b and d were not detected in any subjects. Presence of the leukotoxin gene lktA was demonstrated for all A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates; however, none of the A. actinomycetemcomitans strains from the present study had a deletion in the promoter region of the leukotoxin operon. The results of this investigation show a high frequency of the putative periodontal pathogens P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans and corroborate the concept that there is variation in virulence and pathogenic potential among isolates from different subjects.

  13. Avidity of antibody responses to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Dell, D S; Ebersole, J L

    1995-01-01

    We designed a study to examine the serum IgG antibody avidity characteristics in: (i) normal subjects (N); (ii) Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-infected adult periodontitis (AP Aa+); (iii) A. actinomycetemcomitans-infected localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP Aa+); and (iv) AP subjects (AP) with various antibody patterns and disease presentation. Although there were significant elevations in antibody levels for AP Aa+ and LJP Aa+ patients compared with AP and normal patients (P < 0.0001), there were no significant differences in the avidity indices (AI). Correlations of antibody levels to avidity revealed that functional activity of the antibody as measured by avidity was independent of antibody levels. Increasing antibody levels correlated with an increase in the number of infected sites, yet there was a trend for A1 to decrease with increased infection. Avidity indices for all patient groups did not appear to show a strong biologic relationship to plaque; however, in AP Aa+ and LJP Aa+ patients there was a generally positive relationship between avidity and bleeding on probing or pocket depth. In AP Aa+ and LJP Aa+ patients, and in AP patients there was a positive relationship of avidity through a threshold of approximately 8 active disease sites. This study hypothesized that antibody avidity to A. actinomycetemcomitans could help to explain the relationship between the active host response and chronic infection with this pathogen. The results provide evidence that both antibody levels and avidity may contribute to the variation in host resistance to infection and disease associated with A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:7648712

  14. Classification, Identification, and Clinical Significance of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter Species with Host Specificity for Humans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive update on the current classification and identification of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter species with exclusive or predominant host specificity for humans. Haemophilus influenzae and some of the other Haemophilus species are commonly encountered in the clinical microbiology laboratory and demonstrate a wide range of pathogenicity, from life-threatening invasive disease to respiratory infections to a nonpathogenic, commensal lifestyle. New species of Haemophilus have been described (Haemophilus pittmaniae and Haemophilus sputorum), and the new genus Aggregatibacter was created to accommodate some former Haemophilus and Actinobacillus species (Aggregatibacter aphrophilus, Aggregatibacter segnis, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans). Aggregatibacter species are now a dominant etiology of infective endocarditis caused by fastidious organisms (HACEK endocarditis), and A. aphrophilus has emerged as an important cause of brain abscesses. Correct identification of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter species based on phenotypic characterization can be challenging. It has become clear that 15 to 20% of presumptive H. influenzae isolates from the respiratory tracts of healthy individuals do not belong to this species but represent nonhemolytic variants of Haemophilus haemolyticus. Due to the limited pathogenicity of H. haemolyticus, the proportion of misidentified strains may be lower in clinical samples, but even among invasive strains, a misidentification rate of 0.5 to 2% can be found. Several methods have been investigated for differentiation of H. influenzae from its less pathogenic relatives, but a simple method for reliable discrimination is not available. With the implementation of identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry, the more rarely encountered species of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter will increasingly be identified in clinical microbiology

  15. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Affias, S.; West, A.; Stewart, J. W.; Haldane, E. V.

    1978-01-01

    Two patients had infective endocarditis due to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. One, a 52-year-old woman with a prosthetic aortic valve, was successfully treated with carbenicillin and gentamicin. The other, a 47-year old man with calcific aortic valve disease, required emergency valvectomy and prosthetic valve replacement and responded to a combination of penicillin and gentamicin. PMID:647545

  16. Monoclonal antibodies to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Place, D A; Scidmore, N C; McArthur, W P

    1988-01-01

    Murine hybridoma cell lines were developed which synthesized monoclonal antibodies against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-associated antigens. Monoclonal antibodies specific for an antigen(s) common to all A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates tested but not detected on other gram-negative oral plaque microorganisms or other Actinobacillus species were identified. Monoclonal antibodies specific for each serotype group of A. actinomycetemcomitans which did not bind to other Actinobacillus species or oral plaque microorganisms were also identified. PMID:3356470

  17. Periodontitis‐associated pathogens P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans activate human CD14+ monocytes leading to enhanced Th17/IL‐17 responses

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wan‐Chien; van Asten, Saskia D.; Burns, Lachrissa A.; Evans, Hayley G.; Walter, Gina J.; Hashim, Ahmed; Hughes, Francis J.

    2016-01-01

    The Th17/IL‐17 pathway is implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontitis (PD), however the mechanisms are not fully understood. We investigated the mechanism by which the periodontal pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) promote a Th17/IL‐17 response in vitro, and studied IL‐17+ CD4+ T‐cell frequencies in gingival tissue and peripheral blood from patients with PD versus periodontally healthy controls. Addition of Pg or Aa to monocyte/CD4+ T‐cell co‐cultures promoted a Th17/IL‐17 response in vitro in a dose‐ and time‐dependent manner. Pg or Aa stimulation of monocytes resulted in increased CD40, CD54 and HLA‐DR expression, and enhanced TNF‐α, IL‐1β, IL‐6 and IL‐23 production. Mechanistically, IL‐17 production in Pg‐stimulated co‐cultures was partially dependent on IL‐1β, IL‐23 and TLR2/TLR4 signalling. Increased frequencies of IL‐17+ cells were observed in gingival tissue from patients with PD compared to healthy subjects. No differences were observed in IL‐17+ CD4+ T‐cell frequencies in peripheral blood. In vitro, Pg induced significantly higher IL‐17 production in anti‐CD3 mAb‐stimulated monocyte/CD4+ T‐cell co‐cultures from patients with PD compared to healthy controls. Our data suggest that periodontal pathogens can activate monocytes, resulting in increased IL‐17 production by human CD4+ T cells, a process that appears enhanced in patients with PD. PMID:27334899

  18. Dataset of the proteome of purified outer membrane vesicles from the human pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomintans.

    PubMed

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Oscarsson, Jan

    2017-02-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen, which is linked to aggressive forms of periodontitis and can be associated with endocarditis. The outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) of this species contain effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and leukotoxin (LtxA), which they can deliver into human host cells. The OMVs can also activate innate immunity through NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns. This dataset provides a proteome of highly purified OMVs from A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype e strain 173. The experimental data do not only include the raw data of the LC-MS/MS analysis of four independent preparations of purified OMVs but also the mass lists of the processed data and the Mascot.dat files from the database searches. In total 501 proteins are identified, of which 151 are detected in at least three of four independent preparations. In addition, this dataset contains the COG definitions and the predicted subcellular locations (PSORTb 3.0) for the entire genome of A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype e strain SC1083, which is used for the evaluation of the LC-MS/MS data. These data are deposited in ProteomeXchange in the public dataset PXD002509. In addition, a scientific interpretation of this dataset by Kieselbach et al. (2015) [2] is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0138591.

  19. [Role of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in human infection].

    PubMed

    Giglio, C; Aránguiz, V; Giglio, M S; Fernández, A

    1990-04-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (AA), is a cocobacillus thin and small, non motile, uncapsulate and capnophilic. AA, is: one of the species encountered in the mouth's comensal flora being able to be isolated in gingival crevices culture and oral mucosa in a 20% of the healthy population. An important number of pathogenic factors make it well equipped, to protect itself from host's defense mechanisms, and to destroy the periodontal tissue. Between the most important we find lipopolisacarides and leucotoxines which promote tisular invasion and destructive qualities of this microorganism. Since 1912, there are numerous reports of infectious process associated to it, between which we find: endocarditis in native and prothesic valve, soft tissues abscess, pneumonia, brain's abscess, urethritis, vertebral osteomielitis, thyroid's abscess, pericarditis and periodontal juvenile illness, being this one in which its isolation is more frequent. In vitro, AA is very susceptible to tetracicline. This antibiotic reaches high concentrations in gingival crevices, has significant affinity to the alveolar bone and contributes to protect the collagen. These special feature make them the election drug in periodontal disease produced by this microorganism.

  20. A bacteriocin of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, B F; Lillard, S E; Stevens, R H

    1987-01-01

    An inhibitory factor from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 was isolated, and its properties indicated that it was a bacteriocin (actinobacillicin). The bacteriocin was active against Streptococcus sanguis strains, Streptococcus uberis (FDC1), and Actinomyces viscosus T14 as well as other strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans, but not against other crevicular bacteria, including other streptococci and actinomycetes. The activity of this bacteriocin was inhibited by pronase, trypsin, and heat (45 min at 56 degrees C) but not by DNase, RNase, phospholipase, exposure to UV light, or low pH (1.0 to 6.5). Although actinobacillicin markedly inhibited glycolysis in S. sanguis, the primary mechanism of its bactericidal action appears to be alterations in cell permeability, with the resultant leakage of RNA, DNA, and other essential intracellular macromolecules. These findings provide an ecologic explanation for the reciprocal growth relationship between A. actinomycetemcomitans and S. sanguis/Actinomyces viscosus observed in localized juvenile periodontitis. Images PMID:3818090

  1. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Slots, J; Evans, R T; Lobbins, P M; Genco, R J

    1980-01-01

    The agar dilution technique was used for determination of the antibiotic susceptibilities of 57 oral isolates and 2 nonoral isolates of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Tetracycline, minocycline, and chloramphenicol inhibited more than 96% of the strains tested at a concentration of less than or equal to 2 micrograms/ml; 89% of the strains were inhibited by 2 micrograms of carbenicillin per ml. The other antimicrobial agents tested were less active. Approximately 10% of the A. actinomycetemcomitans strains were resistant to ampicillin, erythromycin, and penicillin G at concentrations of 32 to 64 micrograms/ml. These data suggest that tetracycline and minocycline may be valuable drugs in the treatment of A. actinomycetemcomitans infections. PMID:6903116

  2. Effect of adoptive transfer of cloned Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-specific T helper cells on periodontal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, K; Eastcott, J W; Taubman, M A; Smith, D J; Cox, D S

    1991-01-01

    Previously we isolated several Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-specific T-cell clones from the spleens and lymph nodes of immunized Rowett rats. These clones were characterized as W3/13+, W3/25+, OX8-, and OX22-, suggesting a T helper (Th) phenotype. In the current experiments, 10(6) cells from a single A. actinomycetemcomitans-specific clone (A3) were adoptively transferred to a group (AaTh; n = 13) of normal heterozygous rats (rnu/+) at 28 days of age. A second group received no T cells (AaNT; n = 15), and a third group also received no T cells (NAaNT, n = 11). Beginning 1 day after transfer, the first and second groups were infected orally with A. actinomycetemcomitans for 5 consecutive days. The presence of infection was confirmed immediately after challenge and after 5 months, when the experiments were ended. Significantly higher numbers of lymphocytes were recovered from the gingival tissues of the first group than from those of either of the other groups. Also, this group showed significantly elevated (P less than 0.01) serum immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M antibody to A. actinomycetemcomitans in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay when compared with both other groups. Bone loss was significantly lower (P less than 0.01) in recipients of A. actinomycetemcomitans-specific cloned cells when compared with the other infected group and was approximately equal to the bone loss of the uninfected group. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that T-cell regulation can affect periodontal disease. In this regulation, T helper cells appear to interfere with periodontal bone loss. PMID:1825991

  3. Selective medium for isolation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Slots, J

    1982-01-01

    A selective medium, TSBV (tryptic soy-serum-bacitracin-vancomycin) agar, was developed for the isolation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, TSBV agar contained (per liter) 40 g of tryptic soy agar, 1 g of yeast extract, 100 ml of horse serum. 75 mg of bacitracin, and 5 mg of vancomycin. The TSBV medium suppressed most oral species and permitted significantly higher recovery of A. actinomycetemcomitans than nonselective blood agar medium. The distinct colonial morphology and positive catalase reaction of A. actinomycetemcomitans easily distinguished this bacterium from Haemophilus aphrophilus, Capnocytophaga species, and a few other contaminating organisms. With the TSBV medium, even modestly equipped laboratories will be able to isolate and identify A. actinomycetemcomitans from clinical specimens. Images PMID:7068837

  4. Occurrence of temperate bacteriophages in different Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans serotypes isolated from periodontally healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Willi, K; Sandmeier, H; Asikainen, S; Saarela, M; Meyer, J

    1997-02-01

    The occurrence of temperate bacteriophages was studied in 34 isolates of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans derived from 27 periodontally healthy Finnish individuals both by lysis/plaque assays and by DNA hybridizations. In addition the serotype, the ribotype and the arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR) profile were determined for each A. actinomycetemcomitans strain. Fourteen isolates showed hybridization patterns very similar to that of a known lysogen when probed with the genome of the previously characterized temperate phage Aa phi 23. Only 6 of these 14 strains had produced lysis or single plaques on suitable indicator strains. Phage Aa phi 247 derived from one of these lysogens was indistinguishable from Aa phi 23 by electron microscopy, and the genomes showed highly related DNA hybridization patterns. The remaining 20 isolates exhibited hybridization patterns very different from that of Aa phi 23 DNA. Seven of these strains also gave lysis or single plaques, suggesting that 21 of the 34 strains were lysogenic. These data indicate that the prophages per se do not represent a virulence factor exclusively associated with periodontal disease. Presence of an Aa phi 23-related prophage correlated with serotype a and AP-PCR type 1 of the bacterial host. This may indicate that Aa phi 23 and related phages have a limited host range.

  5. Immunosuppressive properties of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Rabie, G; Lally, E T; Shenker, B J

    1988-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans produces a leukotoxin that kills human polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) and monocytes but not lymphocytes. In this study, we examined A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin for its ability to alter human peripheral blood lymphocyte (HPBL) responsiveness. After a 90-min exposure to the leukotoxin, all monocytes were killed and HPBL responsiveness to mitogens and antigens was significantly inhibited. The ability of the leukotoxin to inhibit HPBL responses was not surprising, since monocytes and macrophages are required for many lymphocyte functions. However, we were unable to totally restore HPBL responsiveness when adherent autologous monocytes were added back to cultures of leukotoxin-treated lymphocytes. These studies demonstrate that A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin may also exert nonlethal effects directly on lymphocytes. Furthermore, impaired lymphocyte function did not appear to be the result of indirect effects of products released by dying monocytes. Although it is not clear how A. actinomycetemcomitans acts to cause disease, several investigators have proposed that impaired host defenses may play a pivotal role. Several studies have demonstrated defects in PMN, monocyte, and lymphocyte function in patients with periodontal disease. These findings, along with the data presented in this paper, support the hypothesis that patients who harbor A. actinomycetemcomitans could suffer from local or systemic immune suppression. The effects of this suppression may be to enhance the pathogenicity of A. actinomycetemcomitans itself or that of some other opportunistic organism. PMID:3335399

  6. Microevolution and Patterns of Dissemination of the JP2 Clone of Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans▿

    PubMed Central

    Haubek, Dorte; Poulsen, Knud; Kilian, Mogens

    2007-01-01

    The natural history, microevolution, and patterns of interindividual transmission and global dissemination of the JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans were studied by population genetic analysis. The JP2 clone is strongly associated with aggressive periodontitis in adolescents of African descent and differs from other clones of the species by several genetic peculiarities, including a 530-bp deletion in the promoter region of the leukotoxin gene operon, which results in increased leukotoxic activity. Multilocus sequence analysis of 82 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains, 66 of which were JP2 clone strains collected over a period of more than 20 years, confirmed that there is a clonal population structure with evolutionary lineages corresponding to serotypes. Although genetically highly conserved, as shown by alignment of sequences of eight housekeeping genes, strains belonging to the JP2 clone had a number of point mutations, particularly in the pseudogenes hbpA and tbpA. Characteristic mutations allowed isolates from individuals from the Mediterranean area and from West Africa, including the Cape Verde Islands, to be distinguished. The patterns of mutations indicate that the JP2 clone initially emerged as a distinct genotype in the Mediterranean part of Africa approximately 2,400 years ago and subsequently spread to West Africa, from which it was transferred to the American continents during the transatlantic slave trade. The sustained exclusive colonization of individuals of African descent despite geographical separation for centuries suggests that the JP2 clone has a distinct host tropism. The colonization of family members by JP2 clone strains with unique point mutations provides strong evidence that there is intrafamilial transmission and suggests that dissemination of the JP2 clone is restricted to close contacts. PMID:17353281

  7. Infective Endocarditis by Aggregatibacter paraphrophilus: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Smita

    2013-01-01

    Aggregatibacter paraphrophilus (former name, Haemophilus paraphrophilus) is a normal inhabitant of the naso- and oropharynx and has been rarely reported as a cause of human infections. A case of infective endocarditis by this organism is being reported and literature of endocarditis cases caused by Aggregatibacter paraphrophilus is being reviewed. PMID:24392406

  8. Killing of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by human lactoferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Kalmar, J R; Arnold, R R

    1988-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a fastidious, facultative gram-negative rod associated with endocarditis, certain forms of periodontal disease, and other focal infections. Human neutrophils have demonstrated bactericidal activity against A. actinomycetemcomitans, and much of the oxygen-dependent killing has been attributed to the myeloperoxidase-H2O2-halide system. However, the contribution of other neutrophil components to killing activity is obscure. Lactoferrin, an iron-binding glycoprotein, is a major constituent of neutrophil-specific granules and is also found in mucosal secretions. In this report, we show that human lactoferrin is bactericidal for A. actinomycetemcomitans. Killing activity required an unsaturated (iron- and anion-free) molecule that produced a 2-log decrease in viability within 120 min at 37 degrees C at a concentration of 1.9 microM. Besides exhibiting concentration dependence, killing kinetics were affected by minor variations in temperature and pH. Magnesium, a divalent cation thought to stabilize lipopolysaccharide interactions on the surface of gram-negative organisms, enhanced lactoferrin killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans, while other cations, such as potassium and calcium, had no effect. Our data suggest that lactoferrin contributes to killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans by human neutrophils and that it may also play a significant role in innate secretory defense against this potential periodontopathogen. PMID:3417349

  9. Inhibition of fibroblast proliferation by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Shenker, B J; Kushner, M E; Tsai, C C

    1982-01-01

    We have examined soluble sonic extracts of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans for their ability to alter human and murine fibroblast proliferation. We found that extracts of all A. actinomycetemcomitans strains examined (both leukotoxic and nonleukotoxic) caused a dose-dependent inhibition of both murine and human fibroblast proliferation as assessed by DNA synthesis ([3H]thymidine incorporation). Addition of sonic extract simultaneously with [3H]thymidine had no effect on incorporation, indicating that suppression was not due to the presence of excessive amounts of cold thymidine. Inhibition of DNA synthesis was also paralleled by decreased RNA synthesis ([3H]uridine incorporation) and by a decrease in cell growth as assessed by direct cell counts; there was no effect on cell viability. The suppressive factor(s) is heat labile; preliminary purification and characterization studies indicate that it is a distinct and separate moiety from other A. actinomycetemcomitans mediators previously reported, including leukotoxin, immune suppressive factor, and endotoxin. Although it is not clear how A. actinomycetemcomitans acts to cause disease, we propose that one aspect of the pathogenicity of this organism rests in its ability to inhibit fibroblast growth, which in turn could contribute to the collagen loss associated with certain forms of periodontal disease, in particular juvenile periodontitis. PMID:7152684

  10. Transformation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by electroporation, utilizing constructed shuttle plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasan, P K; LeBlanc, D J; Lee, L N; Fives-Taylor, P

    1991-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, a periodontal pathogen, has been strongly implicated in human periodontal disease. Advances in the molecular analysis of A. actinomycetemcomitans virulence factors have been limited due to the unavailability of systems for genetic transfer, transposon mutagenesis, and gene complementation. Slow progress can be traced almost exclusively to the lack of gene vector systems and methods for the introduction of DNA into A. actinomycetemcomitans. An electrotransformation system that allowed at least five strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans to be transformed with stable shuttle plasmids which efficiently replicated in both Escherichia coli and A. actinomycetemcomitans was developed. One plasmid, a potential shuttle vector designated pDL282, is 5.7 kb in size, has several unique restriction enzyme sites, and codes for resistance to spectinomycin and ampicillin. E. coli and A. actinomycetemcomitans were transformed with equal efficiencies of approximately 10(5) transformants per micrograms of DNA. Similar transformation efficiencies were obtained whether the plasmid DNA was isolated from A. actinomycetemcomitans or E. coli. In addition, frozen competent cells of A. actinomycetemcomitans yielded comparable efficiencies of transformation. Restriction enzyme analysis of pDL282 isolated after transformation confirmed the presence of intact donor plasmids. A plasmid isolated from A. pleuropneumoniae was also capable of transforming some isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans, although generally at a lower frequency. The availability of these shuttle plasmids and an efficient transformation procedure should significantly facilitate the molecular analysis of virulence factors of A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:1937823

  11. Monoclonal antibodies to leukotoxin of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    DiRienzo, J M; Tsai, C C; Shenker, B J; Taichman, N S; Lally, E T

    1985-01-01

    Hybridoma cell lines which produce monoclonal antibodies to a leukotoxin from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans were prepared. The monoclonal antibodies were selected for their ability to neutralize the cytotoxic activity of the leukotoxin and recognize the toxin on nitrocellulose blots. The antibodies belonged to either the immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) or IgG2 subclass and differed in their ability to bind to the leukotoxin on nitrocellulose blots. However, only slight differences in neutralization titers were observed. Use of the monoclonal antibodies revealed that polymyxin B-extracted or osmotic shock-released leukotoxin could be separated into several high-molecular-weight polypeptides by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunoblot analysis with the monoclonal antibodies also demonstrated that the leukotoxin was present in eight oral strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans that had been previously classified by a biological assay as leukotoxic. The availability of these monoclonal antibodies should facilitate and expand studies concerning the role of the leukotoxin in the pathogenicity of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Images PMID:3965404

  12. Requirements for invasion of epithelial cells by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasan, P K; Meyer, D H; Fives-Taylor, P M

    1993-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, an oral bacterium implicated in human periodontal disease, was recently demonstrated to invade cultured epithelial cells (D. H. Meyer, P. K. Sreenivasan, and P. M. Fives-Taylor, Infect. Immun. 59:2719-2726, 1991). This report characterizes the requirements for invasion of KB cells by A. actinomycetemcomitans. The roles of bacterial and host factors were investigated by using selective agents that influence specific bacterial or host cell functions. Inhibition of bacterial protein synthesis decreased invasion, suggesting the absence of a preformed pool of proteins involved in A. actinomycetemcomitans invasion. Inhibition of bacterial and eukaryotic energy synthesis also decreased invasion, confirming that A. actinomycetemcomitans invasion is an active process. Bacterial adherence to KB cells was indicated by scanning electron microscopy of infected KB cells. Further, the addition of A. actinomycetemcomitans-specific serum to the bacterial inoculum reduced invasion substantially, suggesting a role for bacterial attachment in invasion. Many of the adherent bacteria invaded the epithelial cells under optimal conditions. Inhibitors of receptor-mediated endocytosis inhibited invasion by A. actinomycetemcomitans. Like that of many facultatively intracellular bacteria, A. actinomycetemcomitans invasion was not affected by eukaryotic endosomal acidification. These are the first published observations describing the requirements for epithelial cell invasion by a periodontopathogen. They demonstrate that A. actinomycetemcomitans utilizes a mechanism similar to those used by many but not all invasive bacteria to gain entry into eukaryotic cells. Images PMID:8454326

  13. Aggregatibacter aphrophilus Sacroiliitis Following Gastroscopy in a Young Sportsman.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Shelanah A; Gottlieb, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of Aggregatibacter aphrophilus sacroiliitis in a young sportsman, presenting 48 hours after endoscopy and biopsy. Microbiological diagnosis was made only after repeated attempt at joint aspiration. The patient was cured after radiologically guided drainage and a prolonged course of directed antibiotics.

  14. Activation of rat B lymphocytes by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshie, H; Taubman, M A; Ebersole, J L; Olson, C L; Smith, D J; Pappo, J

    1985-01-01

    We examined the lymphoproliferative responses of cervical lymphocytes and splenocytes of homozygous (rnu/rnu) congenitally athymic nude and normal heterozygous (rnu/+) Rowett rats to whole cells of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, a suspected periodontal disease pathogen. Previously sensitized cells from immunized only, infected only, or immunized and infected, normal rats demonstrated proliferation in response to formalinized A. actinomycetemcomitans, but cells from nude rats did not proliferate. The maximum antigenic response was observed at day 5 of culture. A. actinomycetemcomitans caused cervical lymphocytes and splenocytes from untreated naive normal and nude rats to undergo increased DNA synthesis at day 2 of culture. Highly enriched nonsensitized spleen T cells prepared on a nylon wool column did not respond to A. actinomycetemcomitans, whereas enriched nonsensitized B cells proliferated. Differences in response were probably not attributable to contributions from macrophages in the T- or B-cell populations, since macrophage percentages were approximately the same in both preparations. T-cell reconstitution of nude rats with neonatal thymus cells from rnu/+rats resulted in partial recovery of T-cell function but had no effect on the mitogenic response to A. actinomycetemcomitans. It is suggested that the antigenic responses to A. actinomycetemcomitans are dependent on T cells and that A. actinomycetemcomitans cells have mitogenic activity for B cells. The potential importance of these findings in periodontal disease is discussed. PMID:3871196

  15. Electron microscopy of phages in serotypes of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Olsen, I; Namork, E; Myhrvold, V

    1993-12-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Actinobacillus ureae, Haemophilus aphrophilus, Haemophilus paraphrophilus, Haemophilus influenzae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Pasteurella haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida strains were examined by transmission electron microscopy for the presence of bacteriophages. Phages were detected in serotype a (SUNY 75) and e (UOH 1705) and in the fresh clinical isolates UOH Q1243 and UOH Q1247 of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Phages were not found in serotype b, c and d strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans, in the fresh clinical isolate UOH Q1244 of this species or in old strains (including reference strains) of related species from the Actinobacillus-Haemophilus-Pasteurella group.

  16. Complete genome sequence of Aggregatibacter (Haemophilus) aphrophilus NJ8700.

    PubMed

    Di Bonaventura, Maria Pia; DeSalle, Rob; Pop, Mihai; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Figurski, David H; Fine, Daniel H; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Planet, Paul J

    2009-07-01

    We report the finished and annotated genome sequence of Aggregatibacter aphrophilus strain NJ8700, a strain isolated from the oral flora of a healthy individual, and discuss characteristics that may affect its dual roles in human health and disease. This strain has a rough appearance, and its genome contains genes encoding a type VI secretion system and several factors that may participate in host colonization.

  17. Evidence that extracellular components function in adherence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, D H; Fives-Taylor, P M

    1993-01-01

    Extracellular microvesicles and a highly proteinaceous polymer associated with a leukotoxin-producing strain, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans SUNY 75, were shown to increase adherence of other weakly adherent A. actinomycetemcomitans strains to KB epithelial cells. Images PMID:8406899

  18. Cloning and expression of the leukotoxin gene from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Kolodrubetz, D; Dailey, T; Ebersole, J; Kraig, E

    1989-01-01

    The leukotoxin produced by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans has been implicated in the etiology of juvenile periodontitis. To initiate a genetic analysis of the role of this protein in disease, we have cloned the leukotoxin gene in Escherichia coli. Recombinant colonies carrying toxin gene sequences were isolated by screening a genomic A. actinomycetemcomitans library with a DNA probe for the leukotoxin gene from a related bacterium, Pasteurella haemolytica. To demonstrate that the cloned A. actinomycetemcomitans DNA contained a functional leukotoxin gene, protein extracts of E. coli containing the A. actinomycetemcomitans clone were tested directly for leukotoxic activity against human cell lines in chromium release assays. A construct containing the entire cloned region produced a functional toxin. No cytotoxicity was seen when extracts from cells containing plasmids with deletions in the putative coding region were used. Furthermore, the toxin produced by the cloned gene has the same target cell specificity as the leukotoxin extracted directly from A. actinomycetemcomitans. These results indicate that sequences encoding a functional leukotoxin have been cloned and are expressed in E. coli. Southern blot analysis of DNA from leukotoxin-producing (Lkt+) and non-leukotoxin-producing (Lkt-) strains indicated that the Lkt- strain also contained a copy of the gene. Images PMID:2707855

  19. Update on Actinobacillus Actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis in human periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Slots, J

    1999-10-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is an important pathogen of periodontitis in young individuals. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major pathogen of severe adult periodontitis. A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis can be transmitted from family member to family member and may cause periodontitis in the recipient individual. In the USA, A. actinomycetemcomitans occurs more frequently in Hispanics and Asians than in Caucasians. P. gingivalis is more common in Hispanics, Asians and Blacks than in Caucasians. A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis strains differ in genotype, serotype, toxin and enzyme production, and cellular invasiveness. Variation in virulence may help explain differing clinical outcomes of periodontal A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis infections. A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis cannot be eradicated from the great majority of deep periodontal pockets by mechanical debridement alone. A. actinomycetemcomitans may be removed from subgingival sites by adjunctive systemic amoxicillin-metronidazole or other appropriate antibiotic therapies. Subgingival eradication of P. gingivalis may require periodontal surgery as well as antibiotic therapy.

  20. Adhesion of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to a human oral cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Mintz, K P; Fives-Taylor, P M

    1994-01-01

    Two quantitative, rapid assays were developed to study the adhesion of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, an oral bacterium associated with periodontal disease, to human epithelial cells. The human oral carcinoma cell line KB was grown in microtiter plates, and adherent bacteria were detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with purified anti-A. actinomycetemcomitans serum and horseradish peroxidase-conjugated secondary antibody or [3H]thymidine-labeled bacteria. Adhesion was found to be time dependent and increased linearly with increasing numbers of bacteria added. Variation in the level of adhesion was noted among strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Adhesion was not significantly altered by changes in pH (from pH 5 to 9) but was sensitive to sodium chloride concentrations greater than 0.15 M. Pooled human saliva was inhibitory for adhesion when bacteria were pretreated with saliva before being added to the cells. Pretreatment of the KB cells with saliva did not inhibit adhesion. Protease treatment of A. actinomycetemcomitans reduced adhesion of the bacteria to KB cells. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that a protein(s) is required for bacterial adhesion and that host components may play a role in modulating adhesion to epithelial cells. Images PMID:8063383

  1. Oxidative and nonoxidative killing of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaki, K T; Wilson, M E; Brunetti, A J; Genco, R J

    1986-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a facultative gram-negative microorganism which has been implicated as an etiologic agent in localized juvenile periodontitis and in subacute bacterial endocarditis and abscesses. Although resistant to serum bactericidal action and to oxidant injury mediated by superoxide anion (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), this organism is sensitive to killing by the myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system (K.T. Miyasaki, M.E. Wilson, and R.J. Genco, Infect. Immun. 53:161-165, 1986). In this study, we examined the sensitivity of A. actinomycetemcomitans to killing by intact neutrophils under aerobic conditions, under anaerobic conditions, and under aerobic conditions in the presence of the heme-protein inhibitor sodium cyanide. Intact neutrophils killed opsonized A. actinomycetemcomitans under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and the kinetics of these reactions indicated that both oxidative and nonoxidative mechanisms were operative. Oxidative mechanisms contributed significantly, and most of the killing attributable to oxidative mechanisms was inhibited by sodium cyanide, which suggested that the myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system participated in the oxidative process. We conclude that human neutrophils are capable of killing A. actinomycetemcomitans by both oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent pathways, and that most oxygen-dependent killing requires myeloperoxidase activity. PMID:3013778

  2. The presence of phage-infected Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in localized juvenile periodontitis patients.

    PubMed

    Preus, H R; Olsen, I; Namork, E

    1987-11-01

    Electron microscopy revealed 2 different types of bacteriophages isolated from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans colonizing exclusively diseased sites in 4 patients with localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP). All sites infected with phage were undergoing periodontal destruction, as judged from consecutive routine radiographs. The phages isolated had a wide host range as assessed from their ability to infect a series of reference strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans. A 5th patient harboured non-infected A. actinomycetemcomitans in a surgically treated site which had undergone no bone destruction during the last 12 months. The present findings suggested that the pathogenic potential of A. actinomycetemcomitans in LJP may increase due to phage infection.

  3. Detection and strain identification of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by nested PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Leys, E J; Griffen, A L; Strong, S J; Fuerst, P A

    1994-01-01

    By using PCR, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strains were identified directly from plaque samples without the need to isolate or culture bacteria. DNA fragments were generated by a nested, two-step PCR amplification of the ribosomal spacer region between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes. For the first amplification, primers homologous to sequences common to all bacterial species were used. This was followed by a second amplification with primers specific to A. actinomycetemcomitans. The ribosomal DNA spacer region was amplified from as few as 10 bacterial cells within a total population of 10(8) cells (0.00001%), and cross-reactivity between species was not observed. DNA fragments specific for Porphyromonas gingivalis were generated from the same samples by using a P. gingivalis-specific primer, and equivalent sensitivity and specificity were observed. A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected in 60% and P. gingivalis was detected in 79% of 52 subjects tested. Sequence analysis of the spacer region DNA fragment for A. actinomycetemcomitans gave precise strain identification, producing unique sequences for seven reference strains and identification of nine plaque-derived isolates. A phylogenetic tree based on quantitative sequence relationships was constructed. Two-step PCR amplification directly from plaque samples combined with sequence analysis of the ribosomal DNA spacer region provides a sensitive assay for detection and strain identification of multiple species directly from a single plaque sample. This simplified approach provides a practical method for large-scale studies on the transmission and pathogenicity of periodontitis-associated bacteria. Images PMID:8051258

  4. Identification of an immunoglobulin Fc receptor of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Mintz, K P; Fives-Taylor, P M

    1994-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans expresses proteins that bind to the Fc portion of immunoglobulins. The immunoglobulin Fc receptors on the surface of A. actinomycetemcomitans were detected by the binding of biotinylated human or murine Fc molecules to strain SUNY 465 adsorbed to the bottom of microtiter wells. Biotinylated Fc binding was inhibited by unlabeled Fc molecules and human plasma. Fc receptors were identified by the binding of biotinylated Fc molecules to bacterial membrane proteins separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and transferred to nitrocellulose. Multiple bands were identified, and the major Fc-binding protein was determined to be a heat-modifiable protein. This protein migrated with approximate molecular weights of 25,000 and 32,000 (unheated and heated, respectively). Amino-terminal sequence analysis of this protein revealed a sequence identical to the heat-modifiable protein described for A. actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 43718. This protein sequence exhibits significant homology with the N termini of outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of Escherichia coli and related OmpA-like proteins from other gram-negative bacteria. Images PMID:7927715

  5. Serum antibody in Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-infected patients with periodontal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, J L; Sandoval, M N; Steffen, M J; Cappelli, D

    1991-01-01

    This study was designed to (i) delineate the characteristics of serum antibody responses to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in patients with periodontitis who are infected with A. actinomycetemcomitans; irrespective of disease classification; (ii) assess the relationship of the elevated antibody levels to colonization of the oral cavity by A. actinomycetemcomitans; and (iii) describe the serotype distribution of A. actinomycetemcomitans and antibodies to the microorganism in infected patients with various clinical classifications. To compare the levels of various isotype-specific antibodies to the different antigens, studies were performed that allowed quantitation of each isotype-specific antibody in a human reference standard. By using this reference standard, it was shown that the levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgM, and IgA responses to A. actinomycetemcomitans were similar among the infected patients, irrespective of disease classification. Also, we demonstrated that the serum antibody response to serotype b was quantitatively greater in all isotypes. Our findings indicate that b was the most frequent A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype detected in the patients and appears to be capable of initiating a substantial serum IgG antibody response that may contain cross-reactive antibodies to other serotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Generally, in cases in which the response to a single serotype was elevated, only that type of A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected in the plaque. Individuals exhibiting elevated antibodies to multiple serotypes were most consistently colonized by the serotype b microorganism. This study represents the first report detailing the distribution of IgG subclass antibodies to A. actinomycetemcomitans in periodontal disease. The results demonstrated that the primary responses of patients with periodontitis to A. actinomycetemcomitans were of the IgG1 and IgG3 subclasses, which is consistent with elicited responses to protein antigens

  6. Lytic sensitivity of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 to lysozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Iacono, V J; Boldt, P R; MacKay, B J; Cho, M I; Pollock, J J

    1983-01-01

    The ability of both human and hen egg white lysozymes to lyse Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 was investigated. Lysis was followed optically at 540 nm by measuring the percent reduction in turbidity of freshly harvested log-phase cells suspended in Tris-maleate buffers within a wide range of pH (5.2 to 8.5) and molarity (0.01 to 0.2 M) and containing various amounts of enzyme and EDTA. In several instances, treated microorganisms were subsequently examined in thin sections by electron microscopy. Reductions in turbidity and clearing of suspensions occurred with small amounts of lysozyme (less than 1 microgram) under relatively alkaline conditions and at low ionic strength and in the presence of small amounts of EDTA (greater than 0.01 mM). Under the most alkaline conditions, EDTA alone effected turbidity reductions similar to those observed in the presence of lysozyme, which suggested that EDTA not only increased outer membrane permeability but also caused cell lysis. Ultrastructural analysis did not always correspond to turbidimetric observations. Cell lysis was virtually complete in suspensions containing both lysozyme and EDTA. However, in contrast to turbidimetric findings, a significant percentage of cells (greater than 25%) was lysed in the presence of lysozyme alone. Furthermore, significant damage occurred in the presence of EDTA alone. Spheroplast-like cell ghosts were present which surrounded condensed cytoplasm or relatively clear spaces. These findings further support the concept of the requirement for electron microscopy to assess lytic damage in addition to turbidimetric and biochemical methods. Our results are the first to demonstrate the remarkable sensitivity of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 to lysozyme and to show that EDTA not only affects outer membrane permeability but effects cell lysis, possibly through activation of autolytic enzymes at the cytoplasmic membrane. The exquisite sensitivity of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 to lysis could be

  7. Interleukin-1-like activity in capsular material from Haemophilus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, W; Kamin, S; Meghji, S; Wilson, M

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the activity of a bacterial surface component (capsular material, CM) in biological assays for interleukin-1 (IL-1). CM from the periodontal pathogen Haemophilus actinomycetemcomitans was tested in the following in vitro assays: mouse thymocyte proliferation (LAF assay), stimulation of collagenase and prostaglandin (PG) E2 synthesis by articular chondrocytes, and stimulation of PGE2 synthesis by fibroblasts. In all these assays, CM gave a response similar to an IL-1 preparation. This ability to mimic IL-1 suggests an important role for CM in both cell-mediated immunity and connective tissue destruction in localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP). PMID:3032779

  8. Characterization of the transduction pathway involved in c-fos and c-jun expression induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharides in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Castillo-Alemán, Ramiro

    2008-11-01

    Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disease caused by infection with oral bacteria that results in tooth exfoliation. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are a major component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative microorganisms and are involved in the inflammatory response. c-fos and c-jun are involved in pathological conditions such as inflammatory disorders. Inflammatory signaling cascades leading to c-fos activation in human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) are not well characterized. Thus, we have investigated the kinase pathways involved in c-fos and c-jun activation induced by LPS in human gingival fibroblasts. LPS promoted a dose- and time-dependent increase in c-fos transcription. Phosphoinositide-phospholipase C inhibitor (U-73122), protein kinase A inhibitor (H89), MEK1 inhibitor (PD 98,059), p38 inhibitor (SB203580), and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (genistein and herbimycin) attenuated the LPS effect, while the PI-3 K inhibitor (Wortmannin) had no effect on LPS-induced c-fos transcription. Protein kinase C inhibitors (Ro 31-8220, calphostin C, staurosporine, and chelerythrine chloride) also inhibited LPS-induced c-fos transcription. However, long-term treatment (24 -h) with the PKC activator tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (PMA) had no significant effect on LPS-induced transcription in HGFs. We also found an increase in c-jun expression in HGF stimulated with LPS. In addition, experiments using pharmacological inhibitors of individual mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and of protein kinase C (PKC) revealed that p38, ERK 1/2, and PKC are involved in LPS-induced c-jun expression. Our results indicate that LPS-induced c-fos and c-jun expressions are mediated by two different signaling pathways: one through phosphoinositide-phospholipase C via an upstream protein tyrosine kinase, which activates PKC isoforms that are insensitive to phorbol stress, and the second through activation of protein kinase A (PKA). Both kinases regulate the phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase ERK 1/2 and p38.

  9. Identification of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by leukotoxin gene-specific hybridization and polymerase chain reaction assays.

    PubMed Central

    Tønjum, T; Haas, R

    1993-01-01

    Eleven strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolated from cases of systemic infections, local abscesses, and periodontitis were identified by genetic assays using the leukotoxin gene as the target. We have developed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, based on the leukotoxin structural gene of this pathogen, which clearly identified all tested strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans and separated them from the closely related Haemophilus aphrophilus as well as other bacterial species. Furthermore, DNA-DNA hybridization was performed with the cloned partial leukotoxin structural gene (lktA) as a probe, which again clearly distinguished A. actinomycetemcomitans from H. aphrophilus, parts of the normal oral flora, and species harboring RTX (repeats in toxin) family-related cytotoxins. The PCR fragment amplified from the leukotoxin structural gene gave results similar to those given by the cloned leukotoxin gene when used as a probe in hybridization experiments. The hybridization and PCR assays described here are fundamental improvements for the identification of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Images PMID:8349764

  10. A longitudinal microbiological investigation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Eikenella corrodens in juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mandell, R L

    1984-01-01

    Longitudinal clinical and microbiological monitoring of subjects with localized juvenile periodontitis indicated that Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Eikenella corrodens were significantly associated (P less than 0.05) with active tissue destruction. PMID:6381313

  11. Serology of oral Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and serotype distribution in human periodontal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Zambon, J J; Slots, J; Genco, R J

    1983-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans from the human oral cavity was serologically characterized with rabbit antisera to the type strain NCTC 9710; a number of reference strains, including Y4, ATCC 29522, ATCC 29523, ATCC 29524, NCTC 9709; and our own isolates representative of each of 10 biotypes. Using immunoabsorbed antisera, we identified three distinct serotypes by immunodiffusion and indirect immunofluorescence. Serotype a was represented by ATCC 29523 and SUNYaB 75; serotype b was represented by ATCC 29522 and Y4; and serotype c was represented by NCTC 9710 and SUNYaB 67. Indirect immunofluorescence revealed no reaction between the three A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype-specific antisera and 62 strains representing 23 major oral bacterial species. Distinct from the serotype antigens were at least one A. actinomycetemcomitans species common antigen and an antigen shared with other Actinobacillus species, Haemophilus aphrophilus, and Haemophilus paraphrophilus. All serotype a A. actinomycetemcomitans strains failed to ferment xylose, whereas all serotype b organisms fermented xylose. Serotype c included xylose-positive as well as xylose-negative strains. A total of 301 isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans from the oral cavity of 74 subjects were serologically categorized by indirect immunofluorescence with serotype-specific rabbit antisera. Each patient harbored only one serotype of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Fourteen healthy subjects, five diabetics, and seventeen adult periodontitis patients exhibited serotypes a and b in approximately equal frequency, whereas serotype c was found less frequently. In contrast, in 29 localized juvenile periodontitis patients, the incidence of serotype b was approximately two times higher than that of serotypes a or c, suggesting a particularly high periodontopathic potential of A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype b strains. In subjects infected with A. actinomycetemcomitans, serum antibodies were detected to the serotype

  12. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans adheres to human gingival fibroblasts and modifies cytoskeletal organization.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Kawasaki-Cárdenas, Perla; Garcés, Carla Portillo; Román-Alvárez, Patricia; Barajas-Torres, Carolina; Contreras-Marmolejo, Luis Arturo

    2007-09-01

    Adherence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to human gingival fibroblast cells induces cytoskeletal reorganization. A. actinomycetemcomitans is considered a pathogenic bacteria involved in localized aggressive periodontitis. Studies with epithelial cells have shown an adherent capacity of bacteria that is increased under anaerobic conditions. For adherence to take place, there is a need for interaction between extracellular vesicles and bacterial fimbriae. However, molecular events associated with the adherence process are still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether A. actinomycetemcomitans adherence to human gingival fibroblasts promotes cytoskeletal reorganization. Adherence was determined with light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. For F-actin visualization, cells were treated with fluorescein-isothiocyanate-phalloidin and samples were examined with epifluorescence optics. Fluorescent was recorded on Kodak T-Max 400 film. We showed that A. actinomycetemcomitans adheres to human gingival fibroblast primary cultures, this property stimulating an increase in the intracellular calcium levels. In human gingival fibroblast primary cultures, we observed that maximal A. actinomycetemcomitans adherence took place 1.5h after culture infection occurred and remained for 6h. The adherence was associated with morphologic alterations and an increased in the intracellular calcium levels. These experiments suggest that A. actinomycetemcomitans adherence cause morphological alterations, induce actin stress fibers and recruitment of intracellular calcium levels.

  13. Studies of leukotoxin from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans using the promyelocytic HL-60 cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Zambon, J J; DeLuca, C; Slots, J; Genco, R J

    1983-01-01

    The promyelocytic HL-60 cell line was examined for susceptibility to leukotoxin from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans which caused lysis of human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes also lysed HL-60 cells as determined by release of intracellular lactate dehydrogenase. The killing of HL-60 cells by A. actinomycetemcomitans was dose dependent and temperature dependent, reached maximal levels after 45 min of incubation, and was inhibited by rabbit antisera to A. actinomycetemcomitans. Of 100 oral isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans from 55 subjects, 16% from 11 healthy subjects, 43% from 13 adult periodontitis patients, 75% from 4 insulin-dependent diabetics, 66% from 2 generalized juvenile periodontitis patients, and 55% from 25 localized juvenile periodontitis patients produced leukotoxin. The same subject could harbor both leukotoxin-producing and -nonproducing isolates. The significantly higher proportion of leukotoxin-producing isolates in the disease groups compared with the healthy group is consistent with the hypothesis that leukotoxin from A. actinomycetemcomitans is an important virulence factor in the pathogenesis of certain forms of periodontal disease. PMID:6572616

  14. Cellular fatty acid composition of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Haemophilus aphrophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Braunthal, S D; Holt, S C; Tanner, A C; Socransky, S S

    1980-01-01

    Strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolated from deep pockets of patients with juvenile periodontitis were analyzed for their content of cellular fatty acids. Oral Haemophilus strains, morphologically and biochemically similar to Haemophilus aphrophilus, were also examined for their content of cellular fatty acids. The extractable lipids of the actinobacilli represented approximately 10% of the cell dry weight, with the bound lipids representing 2 to 5%. The major fatty acids consisted of myristic (C14:0) and palmitic (C16:0) acids and a C16:1 acid, possibly palmitoleic acid, accounting for 21, 35, and 31% of the total extractable fatty acids, respectively. Haemophilus strains had a similar cellular fatty acid content. PMID:7430333

  15. Intra- and Interspecies Regulation of Gene Expression by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans LuxS

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Karen P.; Chung, Whasun O.; Lamont, Richard J.; Demuth, Donald R.

    2001-01-01

    The cell density-dependent control of gene expression is employed by many bacteria for regulating a variety of physiological functions, including the generation of bioluminescence, sporulation, formation of biofilms, and the expression of virulence factors. Although periodontal organisms do not appear to secrete acyl-homoserine lactone signals, several species, e.g., Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum, have recently been shown to secrete a signal related to the autoinducer II (AI-2) of the signal system 2 pathway in Vibrio harveyi. Here, we report that the periodontal pathogen Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans expresses a homolog of V. harveyi luxS and secretes an AI-2-like signal. Cell-free conditioned medium from A. actinomycetemcomitans or from a recombinant Escherichia coli strain (E. coli AIS) expressing A. actinomycetemcomitans luxS induced luminescence in V. harveyi BB170 >200-fold over controls. AI-2 levels peaked in mid-exponential-phase cultures of A. actinomycetemcomitans and were significantly reduced in late-log- and stationary-phase cultures. Incubation of early-log-phase A. actinomycetemcomitans cells with conditioned medium from A. actinomycetemcomitans or from E. coli AIS resulted in a threefold induction of leukotoxic activity and a concomitant increase in leukotoxin polypeptide. In contrast, no increase in leukotoxin expression occurred when cells were exposed to sterile medium or to conditioned broth from E. coli AIS−, a recombinant strain in which luxS was insertionally inactivated. A. actinomycetemcomitans AI-2 also induced expression of afuA, encoding a periplasmic iron transport protein, approximately eightfold, suggesting that LuxS-dependent signaling may play a role in the regulation of iron acquisition by A. actinomycetemcomitans. Finally, A. actinomycetemcomitans AI-2 added in trans complemented a luxS knockout mutation in P. gingivalis by modulating the expression of the lux

  16. Aggregatibacter aphrophilus brain abscess secondary to primary tooth extraction: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Maraki, Sofia; Papadakis, Ioannis S; Chronakis, Efkleidis; Panagopoulos, Dimitrios; Vakis, Antonis

    2016-02-01

    We report on a rare case of Aggregatibacter aphrophilus brain abscess of odontogenic origin in a 6-year-old previously healthy boy, who had close contact with a pet dog. The poodle was the most likely source of the infecting organism, which subsequently colonized the patient's oral cavity. The abscess was surgically removed and he recovered completely after prolonged antibiotic treatment with meropenem. We also review the relevant medical literature on A. aphrophilus pediatric brain abscesses.

  17. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and localized juvenile periodontitis. Clinical, microbiologic and histologic studies.

    PubMed

    Christersson, L A

    1993-01-01

    The present studies examined Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and its role in localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP). The distribution of the bacteria was studied in healthy normals, patients with adult periodontitis, diabetics, and those with LJP. Over 95% of the LJP patients harbored A. actinomycetemcomitans, whereas only 17% of healthy subjects, 21% of adult periodontitis patients, and 5% of diabetics were positive. All members of a LJP family harboring the organism yielded isolates of the same biotype and serotype. The transmission of the bacteria was studied after transfer of the bacteria, with periodontal probes from infected to healthy gingival sites, within the oral cavity of LJP patients. Newly colonized gingival sites, 50% of those involved, became free of A. actinomycetemcomitans after only 3 weeks. A purposely forceful inoculation contributed to a more predictable colonization (89%), but only prolonged the colonization with one week. Treatment of LJP lesions with scaling and root planing resulted in minimal clinical and microbiological changes during a 16 week follow-up period. However, gingival curettage and modified Widman flap surgery suppressed A. actinomycetemcomitans in 75% and 89% of the sites, and resulted in resolution of periodontal pocket depth and gain in attachment level. Gingival tissue specimens, from 35 LJP sites, 3 control sites, and one monkey biopsy, were studied to verify the hypothesis of gingival infiltration of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Bacteria were identified immunohistologically with rabbit antisera serospecific to the three A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes. Positive staining was observed in the tissue from all but one LJP patient. Twenty-eight (80%) lesions were positive for A. actinomycetemcomitans antigens in the gingival connective tissue, often with antigens located both between and within cells. The specimen from a culture positive control demonstrated no signs of invasion, similar to the monkey specimen

  18. In vitro susceptibilities of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to a number of antimicrobial combinations.

    PubMed Central

    Pavicić, M J; van Winkelhoff, A J; de Graaff, J

    1992-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibilities of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to 14 antimicrobial combinations were studied by using the checkerboard titration technique. The results, expressed as the range of the fractional inhibitory concentration indices, were as follows: for metronidazole or its hydroxymetabolite combined with cefixime, 0.2 to 0.6; for moxalactam, 0.2 to 0.6; for penicillin G, 0.3 to 0.6; for tobramycin, 0.8 to 2.0; for erythromycin, 0.8 to 1.7; for ciprofloxacin, 0.2 to 0.6; for tetracycline, 0.8 to 1.2. Our observations indicated that the beta-lactam antibiotics as well as ciprofloxacin act synergistically with both metronidazole and its hydroxymetabolite against A. actinomycetemcomitans. Synergistic interactions were independent of the individual MICs of the antibiotics tested. Erythromycin, tobramycin, and tetracycline combined with either metronidazole or its hydroxymetabolite showed additive to indifferent effects against the five strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans, with the fractional inhibitory concentration indices ranging from 0.8 to 2.0. A. actinomycetemcomitans was found to be highly susceptible to ciprofloxacin (MIC of ciprofloxacin for 90% of strains tested, 0.010 micrograms/ml) and cefixime (MIC of cefixime for 90% of strains tested, 0.8 micrograms/ml). The results indicate that in patients who are allergic to penicillin, cefixime and ciprofloxacin may be useful alternative antibiotics in combination with metronidazole for the treatment of A. actinomycetemcomitans-associated periodontitis. PMID:1482130

  19. Opsonic antibody activity against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in patients with rapidly progressive periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Sjöström, K; Darveau, R; Page, R; Whitney, C; Engel, D

    1992-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans has been closely associated with early-onset, severe periodontitis, and such patients often have serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies reactive with antigens of this gram-negative pathogen. We examined the functionality and potential importance of these antibodies. The opsonic activity against A. actinomycetemcomitans of sera from 30 patients with rapidly progressive periodontitis (RPP) and from 28 periodontally normal subjects was tested by using polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) chemiluminescence and bactericidal assays. Peak chemiluminescence values correlated strongly with killing observed in the PMN-dependent bactericidal assay (r = 0.88; P < 0.001). Neither the mean IgG titer nor the mean peak chemiluminescence differed significantly between the two groups. However, when the relationship between chemiluminescence and titer was examined, regression analysis showed that antibodies present in low-titer normal sera were significantly more effective at opsonizing A. actinomycetemcomitans than antibodies present in low-titer RPP patient sera (P = 0.04). Thus, periodontally normal individuals may be better able than RPP patients to clear A. actinomycetemcomitans in early stages of colonization, and anti-A. actinomycetemcomitans antibodies in RPP patients may be relatively ineffective in preventing infection by this organism. PMID:1398993

  20. The heat-modifiable outer membrane protein of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans: relationship to OmpA proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, M E

    1991-01-01

    The outer membrane of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans contains a 29-kDa protein which exhibits heat modifiability on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and represents a major target for immunoglobulin G antibody in sera of periodontitis patients colonized by this organism. In the present study, the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the 29-kDa outer membrane protein was determined and compared with reported sequences for other known proteins. The heat-modifiable outer membrane protein of A. actinomycetemcomitans was found to exhibit significant N-terminal homology with the OmpA proteins of other gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, this protein reacted with antiserum raised against the purified OmpA protein of Escherichia coli K-12. Whether the heat-modifiable OMP of A. actinomycetemcomitans also shares functional properties of OmpA proteins, particularly with respect to bacteriophage receptor activity, is presently under investigation. Images PMID:2050416

  1. Evidence for invasion of a human oral cell line by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, D H; Sreenivasan, P K; Fives-Taylor, P M

    1991-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, an oral bacterial species associated with periodontal disease, was found to invade human cell lines. Invasion was demonstrated by recovery of viable organisms from gentamicin-treated KB cell monolayers and by light and electron microscopy. Internalization occurred through a cytochalasin D-sensitive process. Invasion efficiencies of some A. actinomycetemcomitans strains were comparable to those of invasive members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Differences in invasiveness were correlated with bacterial colonial morphology. Smooth variants invaded more proficiently than rough variants. A. actinomycetemcomitans can undergo a smooth-to-rough colonial morphology shift which results in the loss of invasiveness. Coordinated regulation of genes involved in the rough-to-smooth phenotypic transitions may play a role in the episodic nature of periodontal disease. Images PMID:1855989

  2. Subclass and molecular form of immunoglobulin A antibodies to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, T A; Byres, L; Gardner, M; Van Dyke, T E

    1991-01-01

    Patients with juvenile periodontitis frequently have elevated levels of serum immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies to antigens of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. IgA occurs in two subclasses, IgA1 and IgA2, and in monomeric and polymeric forms. Because IgA1 is susceptible to cleavage by IgA1 proteases produced by microorganisms found at mucosal sites and in the gingival crevice, we wished to determine the IgA subclass distribution of antibodies to antigens of A. actinomycetemcomitans. The molecular form was examined because it may indicate the origin of the IgA and because the form differs in acute and chronic infections. There is also evidence that monomeric and polymeric IgA have different biological functions. Serum was taken from patients with juvenile periodontitis before and at intervals during and after initiation of therapy. IgA subclass distribution was determined against a sonic extracts of A. actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 2952a (serotype b) by using monoclonal anti-subclass reagents in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. To determine the molecular form of the antibodies, sera were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography on a size-exclusion column. Fractions were assayed for antibody activity by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and described above. The results of the subclass analysis of the sera indicated that while both IgA1 and IgA2 antibodies to A. actinomycetemcomitans sonic extract are often found before, during, and after treatment, IgA1 antibodies dominated the response. There was a predominance of monomeric IgA1 antibodies to A. actinomycetemcomitans sonic extracts in most samples before, during, and after treatment. The monomeric form is consistent with what is seen in other chronic infections. The predominance of IgA1 antibodies implies that any protective effects of the IgA response to A. actinomycetemcomitans could be compromised by microbial IgA1 proteases. PMID:1997415

  3. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strains Y4 and N27 adhere to hydroxyapatite by distinctive mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Kagermeier, A S; London, J

    1985-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strains Y4 and N27 absorb to spheroidal hydroxyapatite in roughly the same numbers per milligram of substrate and with the same tenacity as two previously tested Cytophaga species. Although the two strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans exhibited similar affinities and number of binding sites for SHA, their response to enzyme treatment and heating were very different. The capacity of strain Y4 to attach to spheroidal hydroxyapatite was diminished by treatment with proteases and phospholipases and was unaffected by neuraminidase, while strain N27 was unaffected by proteases and phospholipases and lost its binding capabilities when treated with neuraminidase. Images PMID:3972445

  4. Identification of genomic clonal types of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by restriction endonuclease analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Han, N; Hoover, C I; Winkler, J R; Ng, C Y; Armitage, G C

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate its utility in discriminating different strains, restriction endonuclease analysis was applied to 12 strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (3 serotype a, 5 serotype b, and 4 serotype c strains). DNA isolated from each strain was digested by 12 different restriction endonucleases, and the electrophoretic banding patterns of the resulting DNA fragments were compared. The DNA fragment patterns produced by SalI, XhoI, and XbaI for the 12 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains were simple (less than 30 bands) and allowed us to recognize easily 10 distinct genomic clonal types. The three serotype a strains exhibited distinctly different clonal types from one another, the five serotype b strains exhibited an additional four distinct clonal types, and the four serotype c strains showed another three different clonal types. The other endonucleases tested were less useful in typing A. actinomycetemcomitans. We conclude that restriction endonuclease analysis is a powerful tool for typing and discerning genetic heterogeneity and homogeneity among A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. It should, therefore, be very useful for epidemiologic studies. Images PMID:1761677

  5. Differential regulation of the leukotoxin operon in highly leukotoxic and minimally leukotoxic strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Hritz, M; Fisher, E; Demuth, D R

    1996-01-01

    The expression of the leukotoxin (ltx) operon varies significantly among Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strains. The dual promoters driving ltx expression in the highly toxic strain JP2 have been previously characterized (J. M. Brogan, E. T. Lally, K. Poulsen, M. Kilian, and D. R. Demuth, Infect. Immun. 62:501-508, 1994), and genetic analyses of A. actinomycetemcomitans suggest that highly toxic strains like JP2 arose from minimally toxic strains, presumably by deletion of a 530-bp domain within the ltx promoter region (K. Poulsen, E. Theilade, E.T. Lally, D. R. Demuth, and M. Kilian, Microbiology 140:2049-2060, 1994). However, the ltx promoter of minimally toxic A. actinomycetemcomitans strains has not been well characterized. In this study, deletion and primer extension analyses showed that the ltx promoter of A. actinomycetemcomitans 652 is situated approximately 150 bp upstream of the ltxC gene and initiates transcription 138 nucleotides upstream of ltxC. In contrast to strain JP2, only a single promoter appears to drive ltx expression in 652. The 652 promoter resides within the 530-bp region that is absent from the JP2 promoter sequence, suggesting that the specific sequences controlling ltx expression differ in highly toxic and minimally toxic A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. In addition, ltx expression in strain 652 was shown to be induced three- to fourfold when cells were grown under anaerobic conditions. The induction of whole cell leukotoxicity, was accompanied by increases in the levels of Ltx polypeptide and the steady-state levels of ltx mRNA, suggesting that regulation occurred at the level of transcription. In contrast, the levels of leukotoxicity, Ltx polypeptide, and fix mRNA in strain JP2 were unaffected by anaerobic growth. These results suggest that the ltx operon is differentially regulated in highly toxic and minimally toxic A. actinomycetemcomitans strains and that the sequences controlling the oxygen-dependent regulation of ltx

  6. Immunoglobulin G subclass response of localized juvenile periodontitis patients to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, M E; Hamilton, R G

    1992-01-01

    Sera from patients with localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP) often contain markedly elevated immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody titers to serospecific determinants of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. The objective of the present study was to define the subclass distribution of the IgG antibody response of LJP patients to this key cell envelope antigen. IgG subclass antibody responses to A. actinomycetemcomitans LPS were quantified in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with human IgG subclass-restricted monoclonal antibodies. Serum antibody concentrations were calculated by heterologous interpolation of a dose-response curve constructed by using human-mouse chimeric antibodies. Sixteen of 17 LJP serum samples tested contained significantly greater concentrations of IgG2 than IgG1 antibodies reactive toward A. actinomycetemcomitans LPS. Geometric mean antibody concentrations of IgG1 and IgG2 were 7.8 and 136.5 micrograms/ml, respectively, among LJP patients with elevated IgG titers to LPS (94% of whom were black). However, both IgG1 and IgG2 antibody concentrations were significantly greater than the corresponding values obtained from sera from LJP patients with low IgG titers to LPS. Among LJP patients with elevated IgG titers to A. actinomycetemcomitans LPS, serum IgG2 concentration and total IgG concentration were also significantly elevated compared with both low-titered LJP sera and sera from periodontally healthy race-matched controls. The results of this study indicate that the humoral response of a predominantly black population of LJP patients to A. actinomycetemcomitans includes the production of LPS-reactive IgG antibodies which are primarily of the IgG2 subclass. PMID:1563768

  7. Extraction and isolation of a leukotoxin from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans with polymyxin B.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C C; Shenker, B J; DiRienzo, J M; Malamud, D; Taichman, N S

    1984-01-01

    A leukotoxin from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was isolated by a procedure that includes polymyxin B extraction, ion-exchange chromatography, and gel filtration chromatography. The procedure resulted in the recovery of 48% of the toxin with a 99-fold increase in specific activity. The isolated toxin has a molecular mass of 180,000 daltons by gel filtration and 115,000 daltons by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. It retains all the major biological characteristics previously documented for crude leukotoxin preparations, including susceptibility to heat and proteolytic enzymes and neutralization by sera from patients with juvenile periodontitis. The isolated leukotoxin destroys human but not rat or guinea pig polymorphonuclear leukocytes and has no apparent effect on human erythrocytes. The availability of the A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin should facilitate studies on its chemistry and mode of action as well as its role in the pathogenesis of human periodontal disease. Images PMID:6319288

  8. Cellular fatty acid and soluble protein composition of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and related organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Calhoon, D A; Mayberry, W R; Slots, J

    1981-01-01

    The cellular fatty acid and protein content of twenty-five representative strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetecomitans isolated from juvenile and adult periodontitis patients was compared to that of 15 reference strains of oral and nonoral Actinobacillus species and Haemophilus aphrophilus. Trimethylsilyl derivatives of the fatty acid methyl esters were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography. The predominant fatty acids of all 40 strains examined were 14:0, 3-OH 14:0, 16 delta, and 16:0. Actinobacillus seminis (ATCC 15768) was unlike the other strains examined because of a greater amount of 14:0 detected. The soluble protein analysis using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that A. actinomycetemcomitans, H. aphrophilus, and nonoral Actinobacillus species possessed distinct protein profiles attesting to the validity of separating these organisms into different species. Established biotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans could not be differentiated on the basis of fatty acid or protein profiles. PMID:7287893

  9. Immune suppression induced by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans: effects on immunoglobulin production by human B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shenker, B J; Vitale, L A; Welham, D A

    1990-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans produces an immunosuppressive factor (ISF) which has been shown to suppress mitogen- and antigen-induced DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis in human T lymphocytes. In this study, we examined purified A. actinomycetemcomitans ISF for its ability to alter immunoglobulin production by human B cells. The ISF caused a dose-dependent inhibition of pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-induced immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM production. Preexposure to ISF was not required to achieve maximal inhibition of immunoglobulin synthesis, as previously observed for its effect on T-cell activation. Nevertheless, the ISF appeared to act by irreversibly affecting the early stages of cell activation. While PWM-induced immunoglobulin production is under the influence of T-regulatory circuits, it appears that the ISF interacts directly with B cells. First, ISF failed to alter either the synthesis of interleukin-2 (IL-2) or the expression of IL-2 receptors on T cells. Second, experiments in which individual purified populations of cells were exposed to ISF, washed, and placed back into tissue culture indicated that when all cells (i.e., T cells, B cells, and monocytes) were exposed to ISF, significant suppression was observed. However, when only one cell population was treated with ISF, suppression of both IgG and IgM synthesis was observed only when the B-cell-enriched population was exposed to ISF. These results in conjunction with our earlier findings suggest that the ISF functions via the activation of a regulatory subpopulation of B lymphocytes, which in turn either directly or indirectly (via suppressor T cells) downregulate both B- and T-cell responsiveness. Furthermore, it is hypothesized that patients who harbor A. actinomycetemcomitans could suffer from local or systemic immune suppression. This suppression may enhance the pathogenicity of A. actinomycetemcomitans itself or that of some other opportunistic organism. Images PMID:2254014

  10. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans serotype e--biotypes, genetic diversity and distribution in relation to periodontal status.

    PubMed

    Doğan, B; Saarela, M H; Jousimies-Somer, H; Alaluusua, S; Asikainen, S

    1999-04-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolates from 356 individuals were screened for identification of serotype e in order to investigate its distribution in relation to periodontal status. From subjects with serotype e, 1-6 isolates per subject (n = 61) were genotyped using arbitrarily primed-polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR) and apaH gene polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment-length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis to determine the genetic heterogeneity within the serotype. Furthermore, one serotype e strain per subject was tested for fermentation of 8 carbohydrates for biotyping. Among patients with adult periodontitis (n = 219), localized juvenile periodontitis (n = 55) and other forms of early-onset periodontitis (n = 18) serotypes b, a and c, respectively, were the most frequently detected serotypes. Non-periodontitis subjects (n = 64) were predominantly colonized with serotype c. Serotype e was found in 30 (14%) adult periodontitis patients, 2 (11%) early-onset periodontitis patients and in 5 (8%) non-periodontitis individuals, but in none of the 55 localized juvenile periodontitis patients. AP-PCR distinguished 3 and apaH gene PCR-RFLP analysis 2 genotypes among the 61 A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype e isolates, one genotype per subject. The AP-PCR genotypes 1 and 3 represented the apaH genotype 1 and the AP-PCR genotype 2 the apaH genotype 2. On the basis of variable fermentation of galactose and xylose, 3 biotypes among A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype e were established. Contrary to the absence of A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype e in localized juvenile periodontitis patients, its detection frequency was comparable among other forms of periodontitis and periodontal health. Clinical serotype e isolates form at least 2 genetic types and 3 biotypes.

  11. Rating AAs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Susan J.

    2001-01-01

    Why alternative investments? In a word: performance. Many higher education endowment and foundation managers are making increasing commitments to alternative investments, or AAs, in order to obtain higher returns and broader diversification for their investment portfolios than public securities instruments can usually provide. Learn how to handle…

  12. Nucleotide sequence of the leukotoxin gene from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans: homology to the alpha-hemolysin/leukotoxin gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Kraig, E; Dailey, T; Kolodrubetz, D

    1990-01-01

    The leukotoxin produced by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans has been implicated in the etiology of localized juvenile periodontitis. To initiate a genetic analysis into the role of this protein in disease, we have cloned its gene, lktA. We now present the complete nucleotide sequence of the lktA gene from A. actinomycetemcomitans. When the deduced amino acid sequence of the leukotoxin protein was compared with those of other proteins, it was found to be homologous to the leukotoxin from Pasteurella haemolytica and to the alpha-hemolysins from Escherichia coli and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Each alignment showed at least 42% identity. As in the other organisms, the lktA gene of A. actinomycetemcomitans was linked to another gene, lktC, which is thought to be involved in the activation of the leukotoxin. The predicted LktC protein was related to the leukotoxin/hemolysin C proteins from the other bacteria, since they shared a minimum of 49% amino acid identity. Surprisingly, although actinobacillus species are more closely related to pasteurellae than to members of the family Enterobacteriaciae, LktA and LktC from A. actinomycetemcomitans shared significantly greater sequence identity with the E. coli alpha-hemolysin proteins than with the P. haemolytica leukotoxin proteins. Despite the overall homology to the other leukotoxin/hemolysin proteins, the LktA protein from A. actinomycetemcomitans has several unique properties. Most strikingly, it is a very basic protein with a calculated pI of 9.7; the other toxins have estimated pIs around 6.2. The unusual features of the A. actinomycetemcomitans protein are discussed in light of the different species and target-cell specificities of the hemolysins and the leukotoxins. Images PMID:2318535

  13. Antigens of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans recognized by patients with juvenile periodontitis and periodontally normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Sims, T J; Moncla, B J; Darveau, R P; Page, R C

    1991-01-01

    Most juvenile periodontitis patients respond to infection by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by producing serum antibodies. Specific antigens inducing the humoral immune response have not been identified, nor has the role of the resulting antibodies in disease progression been determined. Adsorbed and unadsorbed sera from juvenile periodontitis patients and normal subjects were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blots (immunoblots), using digested and undigested bacterial sonicates and French pressure cell fractions to determine the biochemical class, cross-reactivity, and cellular location of the antigens in different A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes. Antigens detected by using high-titer sera included the following: (i) serotype-specific nonprotein material located on the cell surface, (ii) soluble-fraction proteins showing highly variable antibody binding, (iii) cross-reactive proteins, and (iv) a protein present in soluble and cell wall fractions and immunopositive for all sera tested. In addition, one apparently nonprotein component that was enriched in the cell wall fraction was observed. Sera with high immunoglobulin G titers to one, two, three, or none of the three A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes were observed. There was a high degree of variation from one patient to another in the humoral immune response to serotype-specific and cross-reactive antigens. As demonstrated by whole-cell adsorption experiments, the serotype-specific surface antigen accounted for approximately 72 to 90% of the total antibody-binding activity for sera with titers greater than 100-fold above background, while cross-reactive antigen accounted for less than 28%. Antibody binding the whole-cell sonicate for high-titer sera was inhibited 90% by lipopolysaccharide from the same serotype, strongly suggesting that lipopolysaccharide is the immunodominant antigen class. Images PMID:1705243

  14. Regulation of leukotoxin in leukotoxic and nonleukotoxic strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Spitznagel, J; Kraig, E; Kolodrubetz, D

    1991-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a gram-negative bacterium that has been implicated in the etiology of several forms of periodontitis, especially localized juvenile periodontitis. A potent leukotoxin (Lkt) is produced by most A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates from patients with periodontal disease, but some isolates are leukotoxin nonproducing (Lkt-). The molecular bases for the differences in leukotoxin expression are being explored to clarify the role of leukotoxin in pathogenesis. We have previously cloned the leukotoxin structural gene, lktA, from the leukotoxin-producing (Lkt+) strain JP2 and have shown that it is linked to three other genes, lktB, lktC, and lktD, whose gene products are thought to be required for activation and localization of the leukotoxin. These genes have now been used in Southern blot analysis to demonstrate that Lkt- strains, like Lkt+ strains, contain all four genes of the lkt gene cluster. While restriction fragment length polymorphisms were detected, they did not correlate with toxin phenotype. RNA blot analysis demonstrated that Lkt+ strains produced two transcripts, one 9.3 kb in length and the other 4.3 kb. They encode lktCABD and lktCA. respectively. Lkt- strains contained significantly lower levels of the 4.3-kb transcript with no discernible 9.3-kb message. The leukotoxic activity of the A. actinomycetemcomitans strains, measured by chromium release assays, correlated with the lkt RNA content. Therefore, a major component of leukotoxin regulation is at the level of RNA transcription or stability. Interestingly, the lkt RNAs in JP2 are regulated during growth phase, being greatly reduced in cells approaching stationary phase. Thus, the regulation of lkt RNA can be affected by both genotype and environment. Images PMID:2004819

  15. Identification and characterization of genetic cluster groups of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolated from the human oral cavity.

    PubMed Central

    DiRienzo, J M; McKay, T L

    1994-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is recognized as a primary pathogen in localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP). Restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) within a collection of subgingival plaque isolates of this bacterium were identified and characterized as the first step in understanding the pathogenesis of LJP. Over 800 isolates, from members of 18 families (LJP families) with at least one member with active LJP or a documented history of the disease and one or more siblings, less than 13 years of age, having no clinical evidence of LJP and 32 healthy control subjects, were assigned to one of 13 distinct RFLP groups (II to XIV) by using a previously characterized 4.7-kb DNA probe cloned from the reference strain FDC Y4. Isolates belonging to RFLP groups II, IV, V, and XIII predominated subgingival sites in the subjects. Members of RFLP groups II, IV, VII, VIII, X, and XI were recovered only from LJP family subjects, while group XIII and XIV variants were found exclusively in healthy controls. A synthetic oligonucleotide, homologous to the 5' end of the leukotoxin gene (lktA), and the A. actinomycetemcomitans plasmid, pVT745, were tested for their abilities to subdivide the 13 RFLP groups. The leukotoxin probe specifically identified all RFLP group II variants because of the absence of a HindIII site in the upstream noncoding region of the lkt gene complex. The plasmid probe was not as selective but may be useful for identifying clinical isolates belonging to RFLP group I. The use of these probes for the identification of genetic variants of A. actinomycetemcomitans that may be preferentially colonize diseased and healthy subjects will facilitate the study of the role of this important pathogen in periodontal diseases. Images PMID:7907346

  16. Killing of human myelomonocytic leukemia and lymphocytic cell lines by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, D L; Berthold, P; Taichman, N S

    1988-01-01

    The purified leukotoxin of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans kills human leukemic cell lines (e.g., HL-60, U937, and KG-1) and human T- and B-cell lines (e.g., JURKAT, MOLT-4, Daudi, and Raji) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The 50% effective doses for these cell lines are similar to those established for human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes. In contrast, other human and nonhuman tumor cell lines are not susceptible to the leukotoxin. These human leukemia and lymphoid cell lines will serve as useful model systems with which to study the molecular specificity and mechanism(s) of action of the actinobacillus leukotoxin. Images PMID:3258584

  17. Cloning and sequencing of part of the S10 operon from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans FDC Y4.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, H; Hotokezaka, H; Ohara, N; Kimura, M; Takagi, O; Yamada, T

    1997-06-01

    We have cloned and sequenced the 5.2 kb EcoRI fragment that contained part of the S10 operon from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans FDC Y4. The order of the ribosomal protein genes was identical to that of the S10 operon of Haemophilus influenzae and Escherichia coli. The deduced amino acid sequences of ribosomal proteins in this operon displayed significant homologies (65.3%-100%) to those of H. influenzae, E. coli, Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Phylogenetic trees obtained for these ribosomal proteins were similar to that obtained for 16S rRNA.

  18. Unconventional N-Linked Glycosylation Promotes Trimeric Autotransporter Function in Kingella kingae and Aggregatibacter aphrophilus

    PubMed Central

    Rempe, Katherine A.; Spruce, Lynn A.; Porsch, Eric A.; Seeholzer, Steven H.; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glycosylation is a widespread mechanism employed by both eukaryotes and bacteria to increase the functional diversity of their proteomes. The nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae glycosyltransferase HMW1C mediates unconventional N-linked glycosylation of the adhesive protein HMW1, which is encoded in a two-partner secretion system gene cluster that also encodes HMW1C. In this system, HMW1 is modified in the cytoplasm by sequential transfer of hexose residues. In the present study, we examined Kingella kingae and Aggregatibacter aphrophilus homologues of HMW1C that are not encoded near a gene encoding an obvious acceptor protein. We found both homologues to be functional glycosyltransferases and identified their substrates as the K. kingae Knh and the A. aphrophilus EmaA trimeric autotransporter proteins. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis revealed multiple sites of N-linked glycosylation on Knh and EmaA. Without glycosylation, Knh and EmaA failed to facilitate wild-type levels of bacterial autoaggregation or adherence to human epithelial cells, establishing that glycosylation is essential for proper protein function. PMID:26307167

  19. Gene cloning of an Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 antigen which reacts with peripheral blood sera in patients with advanced destructive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, S; Hata, S; Ishikawa, I; Tsuchida, N

    1990-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans has been implicated in the aetiology of juvenile periodontitis and advanced destructive periodontitis. Levels of IgG antibody against A. actinomycetemcomitans in peripheral blood sera of patients with advanced destructive periodontitis are high, as are those against Bacteroides gingivalis. To clone the genes of antigens reactive with sera of such patients, a library of the A. actinomycetemcomitans strain Y4 DNA in lambda L47 was constructed and then screened, using an immunochemical detection method, with serum from a patient with the advanced disease. Six clones from among nearly 1000 reacted with the serum and also with that of another patient. They were designated 3, 4, 6, 7, 8 and 9. Restriction enzyme and Southern blot analyses indicated that clones 8 and 9 were identical and that all the clones were overlapping because they shared in common the 4 and 5 kbp HincII DNA fragments of A. actinomycetemcomitans. The cloned DNA fragment hybridized to the DNA of two other strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans but not to those of six periodontopathic bacteria examined. These findings suggest that a DNA sequence encoding an A. actinomycetemcomitans strain Y4 antigen strongly reactive with sera of patients with advanced destructive periodontitis was cloned. This sequence is present specifically in A. actinomycetemcomitans but not in other bacteria isolated from patients with periodontal diseases. Thus, the cloned DNA could serve as a probe for the diagnosis of periodontitis.

  20. Distinctive characteristics of transcriptional profiles from two epithelial cell lines upon interaction with Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Mans, J J; Baker, H V; Oda, D; Lamont, R J; Handfield, M

    2006-08-01

    Transcriptional profiling and gene ontology analyses were performed to investigate the unique responses of two different epithelial cell lines to an Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans challenge. A total of 2867 genes were differentially regulated among all experimental conditions. The analysis of these 2867 genes revealed that the predominant specific response to infection in HeLa cells was associated with the regulation of enzyme activity, RNA metabolism, nucleoside and nucleic acid transport and protein modification. The predominant specific response in immortalized human gingival keratinocytes (IHGK) was associated with the regulation of angiogenesis, chemotaxis, transmembrane receptor protein tyrosine kinase signaling, cell differentiation, apoptosis and response to stress. Of particular interest, stress response genes were significantly - yet differently - affected in both cell lines. In HeLa cells, only three regulated genes impacted the response to stress, and the response to unfolded protein was the only term that passed the ontology filters. This strikingly contrasted with the profiles obtained for IHGK, in which 61 regulated genes impacted the response to stress and constituted an extensive network of cell responses to A. actinomycetemcomitans interaction (response to pathogens, oxidative stress, unfolded proteins, DNA damage, starvation and wounding). Hence, while extensive similarities were found in the transcriptional profiles of these two epithelial cell lines, significant differences were highlighted. These differences were predominantly found in pathways that are associated with host-pathogen interactions.

  1. Purification and characterization of the serotype c antigen from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Zambon, J J; Slots, J; Miyasaki, K; Linzer, R; Cohen, R; Levine, M; Genco, R J

    1984-01-01

    The serotype c antigen from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was purified with fractional ethanol precipitation of cell-free culture supernatant, sequential ion-exchange chromatography, and gel filtration chromatography. The preparation obtained demonstrated a single precipitin line in immunodiffusion, immunoelectrophoresis, and crossed immunoelectrophoresis when rabbit antisera to serotype c whole bacterial cells were used. No immunological reaction was detected with antisera to serotype c lipopolysaccharide, indicating that lipopolysaccharide was not present in the preparation. The serotype c antigen was composed of 95% carbohydrate, 2% protein, and 3.1% phosphate. Gas chromatographic analysis of the antigen obtained from growth in either complex or chemically defined media revealed that the carbohydrate constituent was composed of 84 to 90.1% mannose, 4.8 to 16% glucose, 1.9% N-acetylglucosamine, 1.4% fucose, and 0.2% galactose. The present data suggest that A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype c antigen is predominantly a mannose-containing carbohydrate suggestive of a mannan. Images PMID:6423542

  2. Identification and characterization of the major cell envelope proteins of oral strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Di Rienzo, J M; Spieler, E L

    1983-01-01

    The major cell envelope protein compositions of seven Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strains of human origin were compared by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The major envelope polypeptides were homogeneous, in relation to molecular weight, in all of the strains that were examined. The characterization of the five major proteins, designated Env1 through Env5, in the leukotoxic strain Y4 revealed that proteins Env2 to -5 may reside in the outer membrane as suggested by differential detergent extractions and 125I-labeling experiments. The proteins did not demonstrate covalent or ionic interactions with the peptidoglycan; however, one protein, Env2, displayed heat-modifiable properties, having apparent molecular weights of 32,000 and 45,000 when heated in sodium dodecyl sulfate at 50 and 100 degrees C, respectively. The protein composition of the extracellular "bleb" material, normally released by strain Y4, was determined, and proteins Env1 to -4 were the predominant protein species found. A comparison of the cell envelope proteins of strain Y4 with those of other members of the human oral flora, including species within the genera Capnocytophaga, Bacteroides, and Fusobacterium, revealed distinct differences on the basis of molecular size and heat-modifiable properties. However, the membrane proteins of Haemophilus aphrophilus showed a remarkable degree of homology with those of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Images PMID:6401694

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of MacA from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans

    SciTech Connect

    Piao, Shunfu; Xu, Yongbin; Ha, Nam-Chul

    2008-05-01

    A periplasmic membrane-fusion protein MacA from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, an essential component of the multidrug efflux pump in Gram-negative bacteria, was crystallized. Periplasmic membrane-fusion proteins (MFPs) are an essential component of the multidrug efflux pump in Gram-negative bacteria. They play a crucial role in bridging the outer membrane porin TolC and two distinct types of inner membrane transporters. The MFP MacA bridges the inner membrane ABC-type multidrug transporter MacB and the outer membrane porin TolC. MacA from the pathogenic bacterium Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was expressed in Escherichia coli B834 (DE3) and the recombinant protein was purified using Ni–NTA affinity, Q anion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatography. The purified MacA protein was crystallized using the vapour-diffusion method. A MAD diffraction data set was collected to a resolution of 3.0 Å at 100 K. The crystal belongs to space group P622, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 109.2, c = 255.4 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°, and contains one molecule in the asymmetric unit.

  4. Resistance of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and differential susceptibility of oral Haemophilus species to the bactericidal effects of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaki, K T; Wilson, M E; Reynolds, H S; Genco, R J

    1984-01-01

    We compared the sensitivities of oral and nonoral isolates of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Haemophilus segnis, H. aphrophilus, and H. paraphrophilus to the bactericidal action of reagent hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Susceptibility to a range of H2O2 concentrations (10(-6) to 10(-3) M) was assessed by incubating bacterial suspensions for 1 h at 37 degrees C in the presence of H2O2 and plating on chocolate agar to determine the concentration of H2O2 that would produce a 50% reduction in CFU (50% lethal dose). As a group, A. actinomycetemcomitans was more resistant to H2O2 than the oral haemophili, and H. aphrophilus was much more sensitive than all other organisms tested. The range of 50% lethal dose values for A. actinomycetemcomitans was between 8.5 X 10(-5) and 10(-3) M H2O2 or above. In contrast, H. aphrophilus exhibited 50% lethal dose values from below 1 X 10(-6) to 3.4 X 10(-4) M H2O2. The resistance of A. actinomycetemcomitans to H2O2 may be sufficient to protect these organisms from direct H2O2-mediated killing by host phagocytes. PMID:6500706

  5. Bacterial Heat Shock Protein GroEL (Hsp64) Exerts Immunoregulatory Effects on T Cells by Utilizing Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Nalbant, Ayten; Kant, Melis

    2016-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) expresses a 64-kDa GroEL protein belonging to the heat shock family of proteins. This protein has been shown to influence human host cells, but the apoptotic capacity of the GroEL protein regarding T cells is not yet known. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of A. actinomycetemcomitans GroEL (AaGroEL) protein to induce human peripheral blood T-cell apoptosis. Endogenous, purified AaGroEL protein was used as an antigen. In AaGroEL-treated T cells, the data indicated that phosphatidylserine exposure, an early apoptotic event, was dose- and time-dependent. The AaGroEL-treated T cells were also positive for active caspase-3 in a dose-dependent manner. The rate of AaGroEL-induced apoptosis was suppressed by the addition of the general caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK. Furthermore, cleaved caspase-8 bands (40/36 kDa and 23 kDa) were identified in cells responding to AaGroEL. DNA fragmentation was also detected in the AaGroEL-treated T cells. Overall, we demonstrated that the endogenous GroEL from A. actinomycetemcomitans has the capacity to induce T-cell apoptosis.

  6. Bacterial Heat Shock Protein GroEL (Hsp64) Exerts Immunoregulatory Effects on T Cells by Utilizing Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Nalbant, Ayten; Kant, Melis

    2016-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) expresses a 64-kDa GroEL protein belonging to the heat shock family of proteins. This protein has been shown to influence human host cells, but the apoptotic capacity of the GroEL protein regarding T cells is not yet known. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of A. actinomycetemcomitans GroEL (AaGroEL) protein to induce human peripheral blood T-cell apoptosis. Endogenous, purified AaGroEL protein was used as an antigen. In AaGroEL-treated T cells, the data indicated that phosphatidylserine exposure, an early apoptotic event, was dose- and time-dependent. The AaGroEL-treated T cells were also positive for active caspase-3 in a dose-dependent manner. The rate of AaGroEL-induced apoptosis was suppressed by the addition of the general caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK. Furthermore, cleaved caspase-8 bands (40/36 kDa and 23 kDa) were identified in cells responding to AaGroEL. DNA fragmentation was also detected in the AaGroEL-treated T cells. Overall, we demonstrated that the endogenous GroEL from A. actinomycetemcomitans has the capacity to induce T-cell apoptosis. PMID:27736933

  7. Association of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin with nucleic acids on the bacterial cell surface.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, H; Hara, H; Fukui, K; Kurihara, H; Murayama, Y; Kato, K

    1993-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, a periodontopathic gram-negative bacterium, produces a leukotoxin that is a member of the RTX cytotoxin family. Although genes may function in toxin secretion, the leukotoxin is not secreted extracellularly but remains associated with the bacterial cell surface. We report here that this toxin-cell surface association is mediated by nucleic acids and directly demonstrate that the extracellular secretion of toxin occurs in growing cultures with increased ionic strength of medium. All examinations were performed with freshly harvested A. actinomycetemcomitans 301-b from anaerobic fructose-limited chemostat cultures. The occurrence of cell surface-localized DNA was shown by directly digesting whole cells with the restriction endonuclease EcoRI or HindIII, which yielded many DNA fragments. The cell surface DNA constituted about 20% of the total cellular DNA. The leukotoxin was released from the whole cells by digestion with DNase I as well as restriction endonucleases. Because the leukotoxin binds ionically to DNA, it is dependent on the ionic strength of buffers or media. Accordingly, the toxin was released from cells suspended in saline at pH 7.5 in the presence of increasing amounts of MgCl2 (0 to 10 mM) or NaCl (0 to 50 mM). Moreover, a considerable quantity of leukotoxin was detected in the culture supernatant of fructose-limited chemostat cultures when sodium succinate solution was pumped into the steady state as an additional salt (30 and then 50 mM). This toxin-DNA association was also found in well-characterized strains including not only the leukotoxin-producing ATCC 29522 but also the toxin production-variable ATCC 29523 and the non-leukotoxin-producing ATCC 33384 when these strains were grown in the chemostat culture. Images PMID:8406888

  8. Despite large-scale T cell activation, only a minor subset of T cells responding in vitro to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans differentiate into effector T cells.

    PubMed

    Zadeh, H H; Tanavoli, S; Haines, D D; Kreutzer, D L

    2000-06-01

    Recent studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans has a potent T cell stimulatory effect, activating more than half of all T cells. However, since the fate of these activated T cells was not known, the present study sought to determine whether all of these T cells differentiate into effector cells. To that end, the intracellular expression of T cell cytokines (IL-2, IFN-gamma, IL-4 and IL-10) in response to A. actinomycetemcomitans was determined by flow cytometry. Results demonstrated a time-dependent increase in the expression of the cytokines, most reaching peak levels at 24-48 h. At 48 h, the proportion of T cells expressing each of the cytokines were as follows: IL-2 (1.7%+/-0.3), IFN-gamma (1.8%+/-0.5), IL-4 (1.0%+/-0.2) and IL-10 (1.5%+/-0.5). These data indicated that only 2-5% of all T cells stimulated with A. actinomycetemcomitans expressed any T cell cytokines. The finding of large-scale T cell activation in the absence of cytokine expression suggests that the activation of T cells in response to A. actinomycetemcomitans is incomplete. To investigate this phenomenon, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were cultured with A. actinomycetemcomitans for 24 h followed by sorting of the activated (CD69+) cells by immunomagnetic separation and restimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin. Results demonstrated that nearly 90% of the T cells were unresponsive to further restimulation. A possible explanation for this unresponsiveness is the induction of clonal anergy among the responding T cells. To determine possible preferential effects of the stimulation on specific cytokines, the expression of each cytokine among T cells responding to A. actinomycetemcomitans was compared to the maximum levels achieved by PMA + ionomycin stimulation. Results showed that number of IL-2+ and IFN-gamma+ T cells observed in response to A. actinomycetemcomitans were between 2% and 7% of those seen in

  9. cis Elements and trans factors are both important in strain-specific regulation of the leukotoxin gene in Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Kolodrubetz, D; Spitznagel, J; Wang, B; Phillips, L H; Jacobs, C; Kraig, E

    1996-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, the etiologic agent of localized juvenile periodontitis, produces a potent leukotoxin that kills human neutrophils. The production of leukotoxin RNA can vary more than 50-fold among isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans, and strains expressing high levels of leukotoxin RNA are most often found at sites of periodontal disease. To assess the relative contributions of transcription factors and promoter sequences in setting the disparate levels of leukotoxin RNA found, we have undertaken classical cis/trans analyses. First, the leukotoxin promoter regions from moderately leukotoxic (Y4) and minimally leukotoxic (ATCC 33384) strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans were cloned, sequenced, and compared with the previously sequences leukotoxin promoter region of the high-producer strain JP2. The Y4 and ATCC 33384 promoter regions each contain a 528-bp segment that is absent from JP2. Interestingly, the analysis of various deletion constructs in A. actinomycetemcomitans indicated that Y4, despite the large insertion, initiates leukotoxin RNA synthesis at the same promoter as JP2 does. To perform cis/trans analyses, these three leukotoxin promoter regions were cloned into a plasmid upstream of the reporter gene beta-galactosidase. Each plasmid was transformed into JP2, Y4, and ATCC 33384, and the beta-galactosidase levels were determined. The results indicated that the sequences responsible for down-regulating leukotoxin RNA levels in Y4 relative to JP2 are found within the transcribed region of the Y4 leukotoxin operon. Importantly, in ATCC 33384, strain-specific trans factors and promoter sequence differences are equally significant in determining the lower levels of leukotoxin RNA. We hypothesize that either strain ATCC 33384 has a negative regulatory protein (which is missing or mutated in JP2/Y4) or that JP2 and Y4 carry an activator that is missing or mutated in ATCC 33384. PMID:8751884

  10. Bacteriocin production by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolated from the oral cavity of humans with periodontal disease, periodontally healthy subjects and marmosets.

    PubMed

    Lúcia, Lima Francisca; Farias, Flávio F; Eustáquio, Costa José; Auxiliadora, Maria; Carvalho, R; Alviano, Celuta S; Farias, Luiz M

    2002-01-01

    The ability of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to produce bacteriocin has rarely been reported. Antagonistic substance production may confer an important ecological advantage for the producer microorganisms, especially in a competitive ecosystem such as the oral cavity. In the present study, 75 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains isolated from the oral cavity of human patients with periodontal disease, periodontally healthy subjects and marmosets, as well as two reference strains (A. actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 29523 and FDC Y4) were evaluated for auto-, iso-, and heteroantagonistic activity. Fifty-one (68.00%) strains exhibited antagonistic activity; heteroantagonism was observed more often than isoantagonism. Isolated strains antagonized 17 different species of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria from the oral and nonoral microbiota. Sensitivity to heat and to proteolytic enzymes constituted strong evidence that the antagonistic substance has a proteic nature. Taken together, our data enabled us to confirm that the antagonistic substance detected was a bacteriocin. The wide spectrum of activity indicates the possibility that more than one antagonistic substance is produced and that these substances play an important role in the ecological balance of the oral ecosystem.

  11. Specific genetic variants of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans correlate with disease and health in a regional population of families with localized juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    DiRienzo, J M; Slots, J; Sixou, M; Sol, M A; Harmon, R; McKay, T L

    1994-01-01

    A geographically homogeneous population of 83 subjects, from 21 families with localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP), and 35 healthy control subjects was monitored, over a 5-year period, for the presence of the periodontal pathogen Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis was used to monitor the distribution of genetic variants of this bacterium in LJP-susceptible subjects that converted from a healthy to a diseased periodontal status. A. actinomycetemcomitans was cultured from 57% of the LJP family members accessioned into the study. Nine of 36 LJP-susceptible subjects, in seven families, developed signs of periodontal destruction. All but one of these conversion subjects harbored A. actinomycetemcomitans. Bacterial variants representative of a single RFLP group (II) showed the strongest correlation with conversion (P < 0.002). Six of nine conversion subjects were infected with A. actinomycetemcomitans from this group. RFLP group II variants also prevailed in 8 of 22 probands but were absent in the 35 healthy control subjects. In contrast to the selective distribution of group II variants is diseased individuals, variants belonging to RFLP groups XIII and XIV were found exclusively in the control subjects. Thus, the use of RFLP to type clinical isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans has resulted in the identification of genetic variants that predominate in LJP and health. These results indicate that studies concerned with the pathogenicity of this bacterium in LJP should be focused on the group II variants. PMID:7913695

  12. Application of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for Identification of the Fastidious Pediatric Pathogens Aggregatibacter, Eikenella, Haemophilus, and Kingella

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Eleanor A.; Blecker-Shelly, Deborah; Montgomery, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of matrix-assisted laser desorption–ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in the identification of Haemophilus, Aggregatibacter, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, and Kingella (HACEK) species was compared to that of phenotypic methods (Remel RapID and Vitek 2). Overall, Vitek MS correctly identified more isolates, incorrectly identified fewer isolates, and failed to identify fewer isolates than both phenotypic methods. PMID:23966506

  13. Nuclease-sensitive binding of an Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin to the bacterial cell surface.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, H; Kato, K; Kokeguchi, S; Hara, H; Fukui, K; Murayama, Y

    1991-01-01

    A leukotoxin of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans 301-b was solubilized from cell-associated membrane vesicles by treatment with externally added DNase and RNase and was further purified by a procedure which included ammonium sulfate fractionation, gel filtration chromatography, and ion-exchange chromatography. The purified toxin had a molecular mass of 113,000 Da by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and a high isoelectric point (approximately 8.8). From these characteristics, it was to be expected that the membrane vesicle toxin was almost identical to the leukotoxin extracted with polymyxin B in an earlier study (C.-C. Tsai, B. J. Shenker, J. M. DiRienzo, D. Malamud, and N. S. Taichman, Infect, Immun. 43:700-705, 1984). The treatment with DNase and RNase was also highly effective for solubilizing the leukotoxin directly from whole cells, suggesting that the toxin is secreted extracellularly but retained in nucleic acids on the outermost surface of bacterial cells. Images PMID:1937819

  14. Murine macrophage interleukin-1 release by capsularlike serotype-specific polysaccharide antigens of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, T; Nishihara, T; Ishihara, Y; Amano, K; Shibuya, N; Moro, I; Koga, T

    1991-01-01

    Serotype-specific polysaccharide antigens (SPAs) were extracted from whole cells of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 29523 (serotype a), Y4 (serotype b), and NCTC 9710 (serotype c) by autoclaving and purified by chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-25 and Sephacryl S-300 columns. Y4 SPA induced interleukin-1 (IL-1) release by P388D1 murine macrophages. Polymyxin B had virtually no effect on the release of IL-1. Rabbit anti-murine IL-1 serum strongly suppressed the proliferation of C3H/HeJ mouse thymocytes induced with the culture supernatants of Y4 SPA-stimulated P388D1 cells and a submitogenic dose of concanavalin A. Gel filtration of the culture supernatants of Y4 SPA-stimulated macrophages on Sephacryl S-200 showed that an IL-1 peak at a point corresponding to approximately 16.5 kDa was eluted. The ability of SPAs from strains ATCC 29523 and NCTC 9710 to induce the release of IL-1 was lower than that of Y4 SPA. The IL-1-releasing ability of serotype a and c antigens was enhanced by deacetylation of both polysaccharides, suggesting that acetyl groups of these antigens might hinder the interaction between the antigens and macrophages. PMID:1987032

  15. Evidence that the serotype b antigenic determinant of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 resides in the polysaccharide moiety of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, M E; Schifferle, R E

    1991-01-01

    A high-molecular-weight polysaccharide-containing antigen was isolated from a phenol-water extract of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 43718 (formerly Y4) by gel permeation chromatography in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-disaggregating buffer. The polysaccharide antigen formed a precipitin band with rabbit serotype b-specific antiserum but not with rabbit antisera to serotype a or c. Electroblotted serotype b antigen was probed with serum from a patient with localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP), resulting in a diffuse "smear" in the upper region of the lane. By utilizing an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, it was demonstrated that the geometric mean immunoglobulin G antibody titer to the serotype b polysaccharide was significantly higher in sera from LJP patients than in sera from periodontally healthy individuals. Moreover, LJP antibody titers to the serotype b polysaccharide exhibited age-dependent variation. Double immunodiffusion analysis revealed that the serotype b antigen formed a line of identity with low-molecular-weight LPS following reaction with serotype b-specific antiserum. Incubation of LJP serum in the presence of a lipid-free polysaccharide moiety obtained by mild acid hydrolysis of LPS from A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 markedly reduced immunoglobulin G titer to the serotype b antigen. In contrast, solubilized lipid A was only weakly inhibitory. The results of this study indicate that the serotype b-specific determinant of A. actinomycetemcomitans resides in the polysaccharide moiety of LPS and represents a major target for immunoglobulin G antibody in serum of LJP subjects colonized by this organism. Images PMID:1706323

  16. Identification of the Exported Proteins of the Oral Opportunistic Pathogen Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by Using Alkaline Phosphatase Fusions

    PubMed Central

    Ward, John; Fletcher, Julie; Nair, Sean P.; Wilson, Michael; Williams, Rachel J.; Poole, Stephen; Henderson, Brian

    2001-01-01

    A phoA fusion library of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans genomic DNA has been screened to identify genes encoding exported and secreted proteins. A total of 8,000 colonies were screened, and 80 positive colonies were detected. From these, 48 genes were identified with (i) more than half having homology to known or hypothetical Haemophilus influenzae genes, (ii) 14 having no ascribed function, and (iii) 4 having very limited or no homology to known genes. The proteins encoded by these genes may, by virtue of their presence on the cell surface, be novel virulence determinants. PMID:11254647

  17. Section AA Pre2004 Fire, Section AA 2009, Section AA, South ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Section A-A Pre-2004 Fire, Section A-A 2009, Section A-A, South Elevation - Boston & Maine Railroad, Berlin Branch Bridge #148.81, Formerly spanning Moose Brook at former Boston & Maine Railroad, Gorham, Coos County, NH

  18. The AAS Workforce Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postman, Marc; Norman, D. J.; Evans, N. R.; Ivie, R.

    2014-01-01

    The AAS Demographics Committee, on behalf of the AAS, was tasked with initiating a biennial survey to improve the Society's ability to serve its members and to inform the community about changes in the community's demographics. A survey, based in part on similar surveys for other scientific societies, was developed in the summer of 2012 and was publicly launched in January 2013. The survey randomly targeted 2500 astronomers who are members of the AAS. The survey was closed 4 months later (April 2013). The response rate was excellent - 63% (1583 people) completed the survey. I will summarize the results from this survey, highlighting key results and plans for their broad dissemination.

  19. AAS 228: Welcome!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Greetings from the 228th American Astronomical Society meeting in San Diego, California! This week, along with a team of fellow authorsfrom astrobites, Iwill bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. You can follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.If youre at the meeting, come stop by the AAS booth (Booth #211-213) to learn about the newly-announced partnership between AAS and astrobites and pick up some swag.And dont forget to visit the IOP booth in the Exhibit Hall (Booth #223) to learn more about the new corridors for AAS Journals and to pick up a badge pin to representyour corridor!

  20. AAS 227: Welcome!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Greetings from the 227th American Astronomical Society meeting in Kissimmee, Florida! This week, along with several fellow authors from astrobites, Iwill bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. You can follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.If youre an author or referee (or plan to be!) and youre here at the meeting, consider joining us at our Author and Referee Workshop on Wednesday in the Tallahassee room, where well be sharingsome of the exciting new features of the AAS journals. You can drop intoeither of the two-hour sessions(10 AM 12 PM or 1 PM 3 PM), and there will be afree buffet lunch at noon.Heres the agenda:Morning SessionTopic Speaker10:00 am 10:05 amIntroductionsJulie Steffen10:05 am 10:35 amChanges at AAS Journals; How to Be a Successful AAS AuthorEthan Vishniac10:35 am 11:00 amThe Peer Review ProcessButler Burton11:00 am 11:15 amAAS Nova: Sharing AAS Authors Research with the Broader CommunitySusanna Kohler11:15 am 11:30 amFixing Software and Instrumentation Publishing: New Paper Styles in AAS JournalsChris Lintott11:30 am 11:45 amMaking Article Writing Easier with the New AASTeX v6.0Greg Schwarz11:45 am 12:00 pmBringing JavaScript and Interactivity to Your AAS Journal FiguresGus MuenchLunch SessionTopic Speaker12:00 pm 12:15 pmUnified Astronomy ThesaurusKatie Frey12:15 pm 12:30 pmAAS/ADS ORCID Integration ToolAlberto Accomazzi12:30 pm 12:45 pmWorldWide Telescope and Video AbstractsJosh Peek12:45 pm 01:00 pmArizona Astronomical Data Hub (AADH)Bryan HeidornAfternoon SessionTopic Speaker01:00 pm 01:05 pmIntroductionsJulie Steffen01:05 pm 01:35 pmChanges at AAS Journals; How to Be a Successful AAS AuthorEthan Vishniac01:35 pm 02:00 pmThe Peer Review ProcessButler Burton02:00 pm 02:15 pmAAS Nova: Sharing AAS Authors Research with the Broader CommunitySusanna Kohler02:15 pm 02:30 pm

  1. AAS Career Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvel, Kevin B.

    2012-08-01

    The American Astronomical Society provides substantial programs in the area of Career Services.Motivated by the Society's mission to enhance and share humanity's understanding of the Universe, the AAS provides a central resource for advertising positions, interviewing opportunities at its annual winter meeting and information, workshops and networks to enable astronomers to find employment.The programs of the Society in this area are overseen by an active committee on employment and the AAS Council itself.Additional resources that help characterize the field, its growth and facts about employment such as salaries and type of jobs available are regularly summarized and reported on by the American Institute of Physics.

  2. AAS Oral History Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; Holbrook, Jarita; AAS Oral History Team

    2016-06-01

    Now in its fourth year, the AAS Oral History Project has interviewed over 80 astronomers from all over the world. Led by the AAS Historical Astronomy Division (HAD) and partially funded by the American Institute of Physics Niels Bohr Library and ongoing support from the AAS, volunteers have collected oral histories from astronomers at professional meetings starting in 2015, including AAS, DPS, and the IAU general assembly. Each interview lasts one and a half to two hours and focuses on interviewees’ personal and professional lives. Questions include those about one’s family, childhood, strong influences on one’s scientific career, career path, successes and challenges, perspectives on how astronomy is changing as a field, and advice to the next generation. Each interview is audio recorded and transcribed, the content of which is checked with each interviewee. Once complete, interview transcripts are posted online as part of a larger oral history library at https://www.aip.org/history-programs/niels-bohr-library/oral-histories. Future analysis will reveal a rich story of astronomers and will help the community address issues of diversity, controversies, and the changing landscape of science. We are still recruiting individuals to be interviewed from all stages of career from undergraduate students to retired and emeritus astronomers. Contact Jarita Holbrook to schedule an interview or to find out more information about the project (astroholbrook@gmail.com). Also, contact Jarita Holbrook if you would like to become an interviewer for the project.

  3. Biochemical and morphological characterization of the killing of human monocytes by a leukotoxin derived from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Taichman, N S; Dean, R T; Sanderson, C J

    1980-01-01

    A potent, heat-labile leukotoxic material was extracted from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (strain Y4), an anaerobic gram-negative microorganism originally isolated from subgingival plaque in a patient with juvenile periodontitis. The cytopathic effects of Y4 toxin on purified monocytes were studied by the extracellular release of radioactive cytoplasmic markers and cell enzymes and by time-lapse microcinematography. Y4 toxin rapidly bound to the cells, producing dose- and time-dependent alterations culminating in cell death and release of intracellular constituents into the culture medium. The evidence to be presented suggests that the cell membrane of the monocyte may be the primary target in the development of these phenomena. Previous studies have shown that Y4 toxin also kills human polymorphonuclear leukocytes but not other cell types. It is conceivable that disruption of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes by Y4 toxin in the gingival crevice area may be relevant in the pathogenesis of juvenile periodontitis. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6155347

  4. The immunodominant outer membrane antigen of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is located in the serotype-specific high-molecular-mass carbohydrate moiety of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Page, R C; Sims, T J; Engel, L D; Moncla, B J; Bainbridge, B; Stray, J; Darveau, R P

    1991-01-01

    Most patients with juvenile periodontitis manifest serum antibodies, sometimes at very high titers, to antigens of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, but the antigens inducing the immune response have been only partly characterized. We separated A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype b cells into protein, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and soluble polysaccharide fractions and characterized them. Coomassie blue- and silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels were used to detect protein and LPS components, and gas-liquid chromatography was used to determine their carbohydrate and fatty acid composition. Western blots, dot blots, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay inhibition with high-titer sera from juvenile periodontitis patients revealed which components were highest in antibody binding activity. These results showed that the major portion of the immunoglobulin G binding activity resides in the purified mannan-free LPS, with lesser amounts in the total protein fraction. Using Sephacryl S-300 chromatography, we separated LPS into high-molecular-mass components with high carbohydrate contents by gas-liquid chromatography and a low-molecular-mass component consisting mainly of lipid A and the inner core sugar heptulose. The results of quantitative dot blot assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay inhibition show that the serotype-specific antibody binding activity is highly concentrated in the high-molecular-mass carbohydrate-rich LPS fraction and is almost completely absent in the low-molecular-weight lipid-rich fraction. Our observations contrast with previous reports that the predominant serotype antigen of A. actinomycetemcomitans resides in a mannan-rich polysaccharide isolated from spent culture medium. These observations support the conclusion that the immunodominant antigen of the outer membrane is the O antigen of the LPS. Images PMID:1716610

  5. AAS 227: Day 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 2 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Plenary Session: Black Hole Physics with the Event Horizon Telescope (by Susanna Kohler)If anyone needed motivation to wake up early this morning, they got it in the form of Feryal Ozel (University of Arizona) enthralling us all with exciting pictures, videos, and words about black holes and the Event Horizon Telescope. Ozel spoke to a packed room (at 8:30am!) about where the project currently stands, and where its heading in the future.The EHT has pretty much the coolest goal ever: actually image the event horizons of black holes in our universe. The problem is that the largest black hole we can look at (Sgr A*, in the center of our galaxy) has an event horizon size of 50 as. For this kind of resolution roughly equivalent to trying to image a DVD on the Moon! wed need an Earth-sized telescope. EHT has solved this problem by linking telescopes around the world, creating one giant, mm-wavelength effective telescope with a baseline the size of Earth.Besides producing awesome images, the EHT will be able to test properties of black-hole spacetime, the no-hair theorem, and general relativity (GR) in new regimes.Ozel walked us through some of the theory prep work we need to do now in order to get the most science out of the EHT, including devising new

  6. AAS 227: Day 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or at astrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the @astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Things kicked off last night at our undergraduate reception booth. Thanks to all of you who stopped by we were delightedto have so many people tell us that they already know about and useastrobites, and we were excited to introduce a new cohort of students at AAS to astrobites for the first time.Tuesday morning was the official start of the meeting. Here are just a few of the talks and workshops astrobiters attended today.Opening Address (by Becky Smethurst)The President of the AAS, aka our fearless leader Meg Urry kicked off the meeting this morning at the purely coffee powered hour of 8am this morning. She spoke about the importance of young astronomers at the meeting (heres looking at you reader!) and also the importance of the new Working Group for Accessibility and Disabilities (aka WGAD pronounced like wicked) at the AAS. The Society has made extra effort this year to make the conference accessible to all,a message which was very well received by everyone in attendance.Kavli Lecture: New Horizons Alan Stern (by Becky Smethurst)We were definitely spoilt with the first Plenary lecture at this years conference Alan Stern gave us a a review of the New Horizons mission of the Pluto Fly By (astrobites covered the mission back in July with this post). We were treated to beautiful images, wonderful results and a foray into geology.Before (Hubble) and after #NewHorizons. #thatisall #science #astro alanstern #aas227 pic.twitter.com/kkMt6RsSIR Science News (@topsciencething) January 5, 2016Some awesome facts from the lecture that blew my mind:New Horizons is now 2AU (!) beyond Pluto

  7. AAS 227: Day 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 3 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Henry Norris Russell Lecture: Viewing the Universe with Infrared Eyes: The Spitzer Space Telescope (by Erika Nesvold)The Henry Norris Russell Award is the highest honor given by the AAS, for a lifetime of eminence in astronomy research. This years award went to Giovanni Fazio of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Fazio became a leader in gamma ray astronomy before switching mid-career to the study of infrared astronomy, and he gave his award lecture on the latter subject, specifically on the Spitzer Space Telescope, one of the most successful infrared telescopes of all time.Artists rendering of the Spitzer space telescope. [NASA/JPL-Caltech]Spitzer has been operating for more than twelve years, and has resulted in over six thousand papers in refereed journals in that time. The telescope sits in an Earth-trailing orbit around the Sun, and is now farther from the Earth (1.4 AU) than the Earth is from the Sun. Fazio gave the audience a fascinating overview of the science done by Spitzer over more than a decade. One of the most productive areas of research for Spitzer is the study of exoplanets, which hadnt even been discovered when the Spitzer Telescope was first conceived. Spitzers high sensitivity and ability to observe exoplanets over

  8. Immunoglobulin class and subclass distribution of antibodies reactive with the immunodominant antigen of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans serotype b.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, H; Califano, J V; Schenkein, H A; Tew, J G

    1993-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the immunodominant antigens of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans serotype b (Aab) for the different immunoglobulin (Ig) classes and subclasses and to determine the relative levels of these different Igs in serum. Seropositive early-onset periodontitis patients were sampled, and the Ig classes IgG, IgA, and IgM and subclasses IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4, IgA1, and IgA2 were studied. Reactivity with Aab antigens was assessed by using the Western blot (immunoblot) in limiting dilution analysis and radioimmunoassay with sera from 13 early-onset periodontitis subjects. A smeared antigen in the upper portion of the immunoblots, typical of high-molecular-weight LPS, was immunodominant for IgG, IgA, IgM, IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgA1, and IgA2. This smeared antigen was present in every patient for all of these Igs at the endpoint. A few additional antigens were also present at the endpoint in some patients, but none were present in more than half of the subjects. The distribution of antibody titers by Ig classes reactive with the Aab immunodominant antigen was IgG > IgA > IgM. The distribution of antibody titers by IgG subclass was IgG2 > IgG1 approximately IgG3. Further quantitation by radioimmunoassay revealed that the mean concentration of IgG2 (65.7 micrograms/ml) was significantly greater than that of IgG1 (8.8 micrograms/ml). The IgA subclass distribution was IgA1 >> IgA2, with IgA1 apparently being second only to IgG2. Therefore, the Aab antigen eliciting the highest antibody level in virtually all Ig classes and subclasses appeared to be lipopolysaccharide, and IgG2 was markedly elevated over all other serum Ig classes or subclasses reactive with Aab. Images PMID:8500879

  9. Bacterial fight-and-flight responses enhance virulence in a polymicrobial infection.

    PubMed

    Stacy, Apollo; Everett, Jake; Jorth, Peter; Trivedi, Urvish; Rumbaugh, Kendra P; Whiteley, Marvin

    2014-05-27

    The oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) resides in infection sites with many microbes, including commensal streptococci such as Streptococcus gordonii (Sg). During infection, Sg promotes the virulence of Aa by producing its preferred carbon source, l-lactate, a phenomenon referred to as cross-feeding. However, as with many streptococci, Sg also produces high levels of the antimicrobial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), leading to the question of how Aa deals with this potent antimicrobial during coinfection. Here, we show that Aa possesses two complementary responses to H2O2: a detoxification or fight response mediated by catalase (KatA) and a dispersion or flight response mediated by Dispersin B (DspB), an enzyme that dissolves Aa biofilms. Using a murine abscess infection model, we show that both of these responses are required for Sg to promote Aa virulence. Although the role of KatA is to detoxify H2O2 during coinfection, 3D spatial analysis of mixed infections revealed that DspB is required for Aa to spatially organize itself at an optimal distance (>4 µm) from Sg, which we propose allows cross-feeding but reduces exposure to inhibitory levels of H2O2. In addition, these behaviors benefit not only Aa but also Sg, suggesting that fight and flight stimulate the fitness of the community. These results reveal that an antimicrobial produced by a human commensal bacterium enhances the virulence of a pathogenic bacterium by modulating its spatial location in the infection site.

  10. Mouse interleukin-1 receptor antagonist induced by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide blocks the effects of interleukin-1 on bone resorption and osteoclast-like cell formation.

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, T; Ohsaki, Y; Ueda, N; Saito, N; Mundy, G R

    1994-01-01

    We have reported that P388D1 cell line murine macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans release interleukin-1 (IL-1) inhibitor. The IL-1 inhibitor was purified from conditioned media of P388D1 cells stimulated with A. actinomycetemcomitans LPS for 72 h to homogeneity by a four-step procedure: acetic acid extraction from conditioned media; Bio-Gel P-60 gel filtration chromatography; DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B column chromatography; and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography on a C18 hydrophobic support. The purified IL-1 inhibitor gave a single band of protein with a molecular mass of 26 kDa on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The purified IL-1 inhibitor was a heat- and acid-stable protein that was inactivated by digestion with trypsin and reduction with dithiothreitol. This inhibitory factor suppressed the proliferation of C3H/HeJ mouse thymocytes and the proliferation of IL-1-dependent cell lines, D10.G4.1 and RPMI 1788, induced by IL-1. However, this inhibitor did not affect the proliferation of IL-2-dependent CTLL-2 cells induced by IL-2, the proliferation of C3H/HeJ mouse thymocytes stimulated with a mitogenic dose of concanavalin A, and the proliferation of IL-6-dependent B9 cells induced by IL-6. Furthermore, the IL-1 inhibitor significantly blocked stimulation of bone resorption in organ cultures of newborn mouse calvaria and inhibited the osteoclast-like cell formation in mouse marrow cultures. A monoclonal antibody prepared against the purified IL-1 inhibitor reacted with mouse recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist (rIL-1ra), and a polyclonal antibody to mouse rIL-1ra reacted with the IL-1 inhibitor by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. These results indicate that the IL-1 inhibitor is an identical molecule to rIL-1ra, suggesting that the IL-1 inhibitor (IL-1ra) released by macrophages stimulated with LPS from A. actinomycetemcomitans may play an important mediative role

  11. AAS 228: Day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note: Lastweek we were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Here is a final post aboutselectedevents on the last day of the meeting, written by authors fromastrobites.com, a grad-student collaborative project with which we recently announced a new partnership! Starting in July,keep an eye out for astrobites postsat AAS Nova in between Highlights(i.e., on Tuesdays and Thursdays).Were excited to be working together to bring you more recent astronomy research from AAS journals!Extrasolar Planets: Detection (by Leonardo dos Santos)Thursdays first session on exoplanets was about detecting these distant worlds, and the opening talk was given by Robert Siverd (Las Cumbres Observatory). He describes the NRES, a network of spectrographs that will look for exoplanets using the radial velocity method. One of the coolest aspects of this instrument is that it will feature an on the fly scheduling system that will perform observations as efficiently as possible. The spectrograph is still being tested, but a unit will be deployed at CTIO later this year.@lcogt contracted by @NASA_TESS for follow up of their candidates. #aas228 Jessie Christiansen (@aussiastronomer) June 16, 2016Measuring the depths of transits and eclipses in Spitzer has been problematic in the past, since the Spitzer instrument IRAC (InfraRed Array Camera) has a non-uniform response in its detectors pixels. But, as reported by James Ingalls (Spitzer Science Center, Caltech), observers are circumventing this issue by using what they call the staring mode (avoiding large pointing jumps) and an algorithm to pick sweet spot pixels. Moreover, the results from the IRAC Data Challenge are helping to better understand its behavior. Giuseppe Morello (University College London), on the other hand, explained how his research group gets rid of instrumental effects from IRAC using machine learning. This method removes systematics from exoplanet transit data no matter if the noise source is from an instrument or

  12. AAS 227: Day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 4 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Helen B. Warner Prize: Origins of Structure in Planetary Systems (by Erika Nesvold)Another excellent prize lecture started off todays sessions. The Helen B. Warner Prize is awarded for achievement in observational or theoretical astrophysics by a young researcher (no more than eight years after their Ph.D.). This years Warner Prize was presented to Ruth Murray-Clay of UC Santa Barbara. For her award lecture, Murray-Clay told us all about planetary system architecture: the number, masses, and orbits of planets in a given system.Ruth Murray-Clay [photo from http://web.physics.ucsb.edu/ ~murray/biocv.html]The underlying question motivating this type of research is: How rare is the Solar System? In other words, how likely is it that a given planetary system will have rocky planets close to their star, gas giants farther out, and ice giants at the outer reaches of the system? Answering this question will help us solve the physics problem of how and where planets form, and will also help us on our search for other planets like Earth.The data on exoplanet population from transit and radial velocity observations and from direct imaging tell us that our Solar System is not common (many systems we observe have much more eccentric gas giants), but that doesnt

  13. A.A., constructivism, and reflecting teams.

    PubMed

    Nevels, B

    1997-12-01

    Numerous studies and clinical anecdotes reveal a relationship between attendance at A.A. meetings and/or degree of involvement in A.A. and maintenance of sobriety. Hypotheses as to how A.A. and/or the A.A. meeting is helpful to its members have ranged from a focus on factors common to all therapy groups, to aspects of A.A. "treatment" which are behavioral in nature. Presented here is another way of understanding A.A.'s effectiveness within the frame of more recent, constructivistic approaches to family therapy. In particular, the A.A. topic meeting is compared to the reflecting team concept of Tom Anderson.

  14. Real-time mapping of a hydrogen peroxide concentration profile across a polymicrobial bacterial biofilm using scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiuhui; Ramsey, Matthew M; Chen, Xiaole; Koley, Dipankar; Whiteley, Marvin; Bard, Allen J

    2011-02-15

    Quantitative detection of hydrogen peroxide in solution above a Streptococcus gordonii (Sg) bacterial biofilm was studied in real time by scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The concentration of hydrogen peroxide was determined to be 0.7 mM to 1.6 mM in the presence of 10 mM glucose over a period of 2 to 8 h. The hydrogen peroxide production measured was higher near the biofilm surface in comparison to Sg grown planktonically. Differential hydrogen peroxide production was observed both by fluorometric as well as by SECM measurements. The interaction between two different species in a bacterial biofilm of Sg and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) in terms of hydrogen peroxide production was also studied by SECM. One-directional y-scan SECM measurements showed the unique spatial mapping of hydrogen peroxide concentration across a mixed species biofilm and revealed that hydrogen peroxide concentration varies greatly dependent upon local species composition.

  15. Laboratory Astrophysics Division of The AAS (LAD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Farid; Drake, R. P.; Federman, S. R.; Haxton, W. C.; Savin, D. W.

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD) is to advance our understanding of the Universe through the promotion of fundamental theoretical and experimental research into the underlying processes that drive the Cosmos. LAD represents all areas of astrophysics and planetary sciences. The first new AAS Division in more than 30 years, the LAD traces its history back to the recommendation from the scientific community via the White Paper from the 2006 NASA-sponsored Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop. This recommendation was endorsed by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee (AAAC), which advises the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on selected issues within the fields of astronomy and astrophysics that are of mutual interest and concern to the agencies. In January 2007, at the 209th AAS meeting, the AAS Council set up a Steering Committee to formulate Bylaws for a Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA). The AAS Council formally established the WGLA with a five-year mandate in May 2007, at the 210th AAS meeting. From 2008 through 2012, the WGLA annually sponsored Meetings in-a-Meeting at the AAS Summer Meetings. In May 2011, at the 218th AAS meeting, the AAS Council voted to convert the WGLA, at the end of its mandate, into a Division of the AAS and requested draft Bylaws from the Steering Committee. In January 2012, at the 219th AAS Meeting, the AAS Council formally approved the Bylaws and the creation of the LAD. The inaugural gathering and the first business meeting of the LAD were held at the 220th AAS meeting in Anchorage in June 2012. You can learn more about LAD by visiting its website at http://lad.aas.org/ and by subscribing to its mailing list.

  16. Laboratory Astrophysics Division of the AAS (LAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; Drake, R. P.; Federman, S. R.; Haxton, W. C.; Savin, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD) is to advance our understanding of the Universe through the promotion of fundamental theoretical and experimental research into the underlying processes that drive the Cosmos. LAD represents all areas of astrophysics and planetary sciences. The first new AAS Division in more than 30 years, the LAD traces its history back to the recommendation from the scientific community via the White Paper from the 2006 NASA-sponsored Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop. This recommendation was endorsed by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee (AAAC), which advises the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on selected issues within the fields of astronomy and astrophysics that are of mutual interest and concern to the agencies. In January 2007, at the 209th AAS meeting, the AAS Council set up a Steering Committee to formulate Bylaws for a Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA). The AAS Council formally established the WGLA with a five-year mandate in May 2007, at the 210th AAS meeting. From 2008 through 2012, the WGLA annually sponsored Meetings in-a-Meeting at the AAS Summer Meetings. In May 2011, at the 218th AAS meeting, the AAS Council voted to convert the WGLA, at the end of its mandate, into a Division of the AAS and requested draft Bylaws from the Steering Committee. In January 2012, at the 219th AAS Meeting, the AAS Council formally approved the Bylaws and the creation of the LAD. The inaugural gathering and the first business meeting of the LAD were held at the 220th AAS meeting in Anchorage in June 2012. You can learn more about LAD by visiting its website at http://lad.aas.org/ and by subscribing to its mailing list.

  17. Orbit of 1976 AA. [asteroid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsden, B. G.; Williams, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    The orbit of Asteroid 1976 AA is described, with attention given to calculations of its period and its distance from earth, both of which could be accurately and quickly determined by measuring the minor planet's position over wide ranges of hour angle on one to three nights. The geometry of the asteroid's orbit is compared to that of earth's orbit, and the periodicity of the minor planet's approaches to earth is projected. The motion of 1976 AA over an interval of seven centuries into both past and future is also studied; the possibility of its libration with respect to earth or to Venus is examined. Some data on closest approaches of the asteroid to Mars and Venus, as well as to earth, are given.

  18. Human immune responses to oral micro-organisms. I. Association of localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP) with serum antibody responses to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, J L; Taubman, M A; Smith, D J; Genco, R J; Frey, D E

    1982-01-01

    The association between periodontal disease in humans and serum and salivary antibody to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strain Y4 was determined. An Elisa was used to examine anti-Y4 antibody of the IgM, IgG, IgA and IgE isotypes in serum from 127 individuals and IgA in parotid saliva. Patients diagnosed as having localized juvenile periodontitis (n = 37) had significantly higher levels and frequency of serum IgG antibodies to Y4 than all other groups. Serum and salivary IgA and serum IgE antibody levels were significantly increased in patients with both localized and generalized types of juvenile periodontitis (n = 48) when compared to all other patient groups. Specificity studies suggested that the antigenic determinants that were differentiating the group responses were unique to the Y4 organism. These results indicate that serum antibodies to Y4 may reflect an infectious process with this micro-organism and that these responses may provide some diagnostic value in delineating different types of periodontal diseases. PMID:7094425

  19. Microstructural and Mechanical Characterization of a Dissimilar Friction Stir-Welded AA5083-AA7B04 Butt Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Ding, Hua; Cai, Zhihui; Zhao, Jingwei; Li, Jizhong

    2016-12-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has been used for joining AA5083 and AA7B04 alloy sheets with the aim of studying the microstructure and the mechanical properties of dissimilar FSW joints obtained by varying the initial base metal state of AA7B04 alloy. The results show that the initial base metal state has a significant impact on the material flow during dissimilar FSW. As compared with the joints placing hard alloy (artificially aged AA7B04-AA or naturally aged AA7B04-NA) on the retreating side, it becomes easier transporting AA5083 from advancing side to retreating side when soft alloy (annealed AA7B04-O) is placed on the retreating side. The atomic diffusion does not occur at the interface between AA5083 and AA7B04, indicating that the mixing of the two materials is merely mechanical. Grain refinement is observed in the stir zone. The failure location during tensile tests is different depending on the initial base metal state. The joints (AA5083/AA7B04-AA and AA5083/AA7B04-O) fail in the base metal on the soft material side which corresponds to the minimum values in hardness profiles. Differently, the joints (AA5083/AA5083 and AA5083/AA7B04-O) fail in the stir zone due to the presence of defects including "zigzag line," kissing bond and discontinuous voids.

  20. Microstructural and Mechanical Characterization of a Dissimilar Friction Stir-Welded AA5083-AA7B04 Butt Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Ding, Hua; Cai, Zhihui; Zhao, Jingwei; Li, Jizhong

    2017-02-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has been used for joining AA5083 and AA7B04 alloy sheets with the aim of studying the microstructure and the mechanical properties of dissimilar FSW joints obtained by varying the initial base metal state of AA7B04 alloy. The results show that the initial base metal state has a significant impact on the material flow during dissimilar FSW. As compared with the joints placing hard alloy (artificially aged AA7B04-AA or naturally aged AA7B04-NA) on the retreating side, it becomes easier transporting AA5083 from advancing side to retreating side when soft alloy (annealed AA7B04-O) is placed on the retreating side. The atomic diffusion does not occur at the interface between AA5083 and AA7B04, indicating that the mixing of the two materials is merely mechanical. Grain refinement is observed in the stir zone. The failure location during tensile tests is different depending on the initial base metal state. The joints (AA5083/AA7B04-AA and AA5083/AA7B04-O) fail in the base metal on the soft material side which corresponds to the minimum values in hardness profiles. Differently, the joints (AA5083/AA5083 and AA5083/AA7B04-O) fail in the stir zone due to the presence of defects including "zigzag line," kissing bond and discontinuous voids.

  1. Buccal microbiology analyzed by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Abreu, Geraldo Magno Alves; da Silva, Gislene Rodrigues; Khouri, Sônia; Favero, Priscila Pereira; Raniero, Leandro; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2012-01-01

    Rapid microbiological identification and characterization are very important in dentistry and medicine. In addition to dental diseases, pathogens are directly linked to cases of endocarditis, premature delivery, low birth weight, and loss of organ transplants. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to analyze oral pathogens Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 29523, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-JP2, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans which was clinically isolated from the human blood-CI. Significant spectra differences were found among each organism allowing the identification and characterization of each bacterial species. Vibrational modes in the regions of 3500-2800 cm-1, the 1484-1420 cm-1, and 1000-750 cm-1 were used in this differentiation. The identification and classification of each strain were performed by cluster analysis achieving 100% separation of strains. This study demonstrated that FTIR can be used to decrease the identification time, compared to the traditional methods, of fastidious buccal microorganisms associated with the etiology of the manifestation of periodontitis.

  2. Interface Formation During Fusion™ Casting of AA3003/AA4045 Aluminum Alloy Ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Ciano, Massimo; Caron, E. J. F. R.; Weckman, D. C.; Wells, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Fusion™ casting is a unique Direct Chill continuous casting process whereby two different alloys can be cast simultaneously, producing a laminated ingot for rolling into clad sheet metal such as AA3003/AA4045 brazing sheet. Better understanding of the wetting and interface formation process during Fusion™ casting is required to further improve process yields and also explore use of other alloy systems for new applications. In this research, AA3003-core/AA4045-clad ingots were cast using a well-instrumented lab-scale Fusion™ casting system. As-cast Fusion™ interfaces were examined metallurgically and by mechanical testing. Computational fluid dynamic analyses of the FusionTM casts were also performed. It was shown that the liquid AA4045-clad alloy was able to successfully wet and create an oxide-free, metallurgical, and mechanically sound interface with the lightly oxidized AA3003-core shell material. Based on the results of this study, it is proposed that the bond formation process at the alloys interface during casting is a result of discrete penetration of AA4045 liquid at defects in the preexisting AA3003 oxide, dissolution of underlying AA3003 by liquid AA4045, and subsequent bridging between penetration sites. Spot exudation on the AA3003 chill cast surface due to remelting and inverse segregation may also improve the wetting and bonding process.

  3. AAS 228: Day 3 afternoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Wikipedia Year of Science Editathon (by Meredith Rawls)Whats your first go-to source for an unfamiliar topic on the internet? If you said Wikipedia, youre not alone. For many people, Wikipedia is the primary source of information about astronomy and science. However, many Wikipedia articles about science topics are incomplete or missing, and women are underrepresented among scientists with biographies.To address this, the AAS Astronomy Education Board teamed up with the Wiki Education Foundation to host an edit-a-thon as part of the Wikipedia Year of Science. More than forty attendees spent the better part of three hours working through tutorials, creating new articles, and editing existing ones. The session was generously sponsored by the Simons Foundation.The Year of Science initiative seeks to bring Wikipedia editing skills to the classroom and help new editors find sustainable ways to contribute to Wikipedia in the long term. Anybody can create a free account and start editing!As a first-time Wikipedia contributor, I took the time to go through nearly all the tutorial exercises and familiarize myself with the process of editing a page. I decided to flesh out one section in an existing page about asteroseismology. Others created biography pages from scratch or selected various astronomical topics to write about. To me, the editing process felt like a cross between writing a blog post and a journal article, in a hack day type environment. Working through the tutorial and some examples renewed my empathy for learners who are tackling a new skill set for the first time. A full summary of our

  4. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide stimulates the phosphorylation of p44 and p42 MAP kinases through CD14 and TLR-4 receptor activation in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Kawasaki-Cárdenas, Perla; Cruz-Arroyo, Santa Rita; Pérez-Garzón, Miguel; Maldonado-Frías, Silvia

    2006-04-25

    Tyrosine phosphorylation is an early step in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated monocytes and macrophages that appears to play a key role in signal transduction. We have demonstrated that LPS purified from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans also increases protein tyrosine phosphorylation in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). This effect was elicited rapidly after LPS stimulation at concentrations that stimulate anti-bacterial responses in human gingival fibroblasts. Two main proteins, with an apparent molecular weight of 44 and 42 kDa, were phosphorylated after LPS stimulation of the human gingival fibroblasts. The phosphorylation was detected after 5 to 15 min and reached the maximum at 30 min of treatment. The increase in tyrosine phosphorylation was apparent following stimulation with LPS at 10 ng/ml and the response was dose dependent up to 10 microg/ml. Pretreatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, herbimycin A and genistein inhibited the LPS-stimulated phosphorylation of p44 and p42 MAP kinases in a dose dependent manner. Pretreatment of human gingival fibroblasts with antibodies anti-CD14 or anti-TLR-4 but not anti-TLR-2 inhibited the LPS-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of p44 and p42. Additionally, LPS-induced p44 and p42 phosphorylation was inhibited by polymyxin treatment. These findings demonstrate that LPS from A. actinomycetemcomintans increases rapidly p44 and p42 phosphorylation (ERK 1 and ERK 2, respectively) in human gingival fibroblasts. Our data also suggest that CD14 and TLR-4 receptors are involved in the LPS effects in human gingival fibroblasts.

  5. Involvement of Ganglioside GM3 in G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest of Human Monocytic Cells Induced by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Cytolethal Distending Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Mise, Koji; Akifusa, Sumio; Watarai, Shinobu; Ansai, Toshihiro; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Takehara, Tadamichi

    2005-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans produces a toxin called cytolethal distending toxin (CDT), which causes host cell DNA damage leading to the induction of DNA damage checkpoint pathways. CDT consists of three subunits, CdtA, CdtB, and CdtC. CdtB is the active subunit of CDT and exerts its effect as a nuclease that damages nuclear DNA, triggering cell cycle arrest. In the present study, we confirmed that the only combination of toxin proteins causing cell cycle arrest was that of all three recombinant CDT (rCDT) protein subunits. Furthermore, in order for rCDT to demonstrate toxicity, it was necessary for CdtA and CdtC to access the cell before CdtB. The coexistence of CdtA and CdtC was necessary for these subunits to bind to the cell. Cells treated with the glucosylceramide synthesis inhibitor 1-phenyl-2-palmitoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol showed resistance to the cytotoxicity induced by rCDT. Furthermore, LY-B cells, which are deficient in the biosynthesis of sphingolipid, also showed resistance to the cytotoxicity induced by rCDT. To evaluate the binding of each subunit for glucosylceramides, we performed thin-layer chromatography immunostaining. The results indicated that each subunit reacted with the glycosphingolipids GM1, GM2, GM3, Gb3, and Gb4. The rCDT mixture incubated with liposomes containing GM3 displayed partially reduced toxicity. These results indicate that GM3 can act as a CDT receptor. PMID:16040998

  6. AAS 228: Day 1 morning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Come visit astrobites at the AAS booth we have swag!Things kicked off last night at our undergraduate reception booth. Thanks to all of you who stopped by we were delightedto hear from undergrads who already know and love the site, educators who want to use it in their classrooms, and students who had not yet been introduced to astrobites and were excited about a new resource!For the rest of the meeting we will be stationed at theAAS booth in the exhibit hall (booth #211-213), so drop by if you want to learn more (or pick up swag: weve got lots of stickers and sunglasses)!Mondaymorning was the official start of the meeting. Here are just a few of the talks and workshops astrobiters attended this morning.Opening Address(by Susanna Kohler)AAS President Meg Urry kicked off the meeting this morning at 8am with an overview of some of the great endeavors AAS is supporting. We astrobiters had personal motivation to drag ourselves out of bed that early: during this session, Urryannounced the new partnership between AAS and astrobites!Urry touched on some difficult topics in her welcome, including yesterdays tragedy in Orlando. Shereiteratedthe AASs support fortheCommittee for Sexual-Orientation and Gender Minorities in Astronomy (SGMA). She also reminded meeting attendees about the importance ofkeeping conference interactions professional, and pointed to the meetings anti-harassment policy.Partnership Announcement (by Michael Zevin)This morning, the American Astronomical Society announced the new partnership that it will have with Astrobites! We are beyond excited to embark on this new partnership with the

  7. AAS 228: Day 3 morning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Plenary Session 2015 Newton Lacy Pierce Prize Lecture: The Elephant in the Room: Effects of Distant, Massive Companions on Planetary System Architectures (by Leonardo dos Santos)The first session on Wednesday at 228th AAS Meeting was the Newton Lacy Pierce Prize Lecture by Heather Knutson (California Institute of Technology). This talk featured a broad range of research efforts on exoplanets, with the main focus on how we study the composition of their atmospheres, and how multi-body interactions carve the structure of the planetary systems we observe.One of her first points is the well-known idea that the Solar System is an oddball, compared to the exoplanet systems we have found so far: most of these systems contain hot Jupiters and mini-Neptunes at very close-in orbits around their host stars. Moreover, even when studying their transmission spectra, it is difficult to know the exact composition of their atmospheres.Knutson: it is difficult to constrain atmospheric composition of exoplanets (H-poor or H-rich+clouds?) #aas228pic.twitter.com/LdyN4o9RC7 astrobites (@astrobites) June 15, 2016The main proposal on how these systems formed is the migration scenario. In order to validate this idea, Dr. Knutson and her group The Friends of Hot Jupiters study systems with close-in gas giants and their frequency of binary companions, which are supposed to be the main culprits causing gas-giant migration. They found that approximately half of the observed systems have long-distance companions, providing strong validation of the migration scenario. Moreover, Dr. Knutson speculates that wide binaries have more

  8. Reaction of Human Sera from Juvenile Periodontitis, Rapidly Progressive Periodontitis, and Adult Periodontitis Patients with Selected Periodontopathogens,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-13

    Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Y-4) serving as antigens. Increased i ii ~. DD I 1473 EDITION OF I NOV 6 , IS OBSOLETE...Bacteroides ging1valis, Capnocytophaga (Bacteroides) ochraceus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Y-4) serving as...thio-dependent collagenolytic activity has been identified in the culture filtrate of B. gingivalis. 3’ Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) has

  9. AAS 228: Day 1 afternoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Plenary Session: From Space Archeology to Serving the World Today: A 20-year Journey from the Jungles of Guatemala to a Network of Satellite Remote Sensing Facilities Around the World(by Michael Zevin)In the conferences second plenary session, NASAs Daniel Irwin turned the eyes of the conference back to Earth by highlighting the huge impact that NASA missions play in protecting and developing our own planet.Daniel Irwin: using satellite imagery to detect differences in vegetation and find ancient Mayan cities. #aas228 pic.twitter.com/9LFPQdCHTM astrobites (@astrobites) June 13, 2016Irwin came to be involved in NASA through his work mapping Guatemalan jungles, where he would spend 22 days at a time exploring the treacherous jungles on foot armed with a 1st generation GPS, a compass, and a machete. A colleague introduced Irwin to the satellite imagery thathe was exploring, demonstratinghow these images are a strong complement to field work. The sharing of this satellite data with nearby villages helped to show the encroachment of agriculture and the necessity of connecting space to the village. Satellite imagery also played a role in archeological endeavors, uncovering dozens of Mayan cities that have been buried for over a millennia by vegetation, and it provided evidence that the fall of the Mayan civilization may have been due to massive deforestation that ledto drought.Glacial retreat in Chile imaged by ISERV.Irwin displayed the constellation of NASAs Earth-monitoring satellites that have played an integral role in conserving our planet and alerting the world of natural disasters. He also showed

  10. 7 CFR 51.596 - U.S. Grade AA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Grades § 51.596 U.S. Grade AA. U.S. Grade AA shall consist of stalks of celery of similar varietal characteristics, which are well developed, and have good...

  11. 7 CFR 51.596 - U.S. Grade AA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Grades § 51.596 U.S. Grade AA. U.S. Grade AA shall consist of stalks of celery of similar varietal characteristics, which are well developed, and have good...

  12. 7 CFR 51.596 - U.S. Grade AA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Grades § 51.596 U.S. Grade AA. U.S. Grade AA shall consist of stalks of celery of similar varietal characteristics, which are...

  13. 7 CFR 51.596 - U.S. Grade AA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Celery Stalks Grades § 51.596 U.S. Grade AA. U.S. Grade AA shall consist of stalks of celery of similar varietal characteristics, which are...

  14. The AAS: Its Next 100 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, S.

    1999-05-01

    The AAS: Its Next Hundred Years "We are probably nearing the limit of all we can know about astronomy."-- Simon Newcomb, 1888. The best way to celebrate the centennial of the AAS is to look forward, not backward, and to begin planning for the next 100 years. However, predicting the future is even more difficult than it was in Newcomb's time. We live in an era characterized by an unprecedented rate of change in the kinds of scientific questions we ask, the tools we use to answer them, and the way we communicate our results. This talk will highlight some of the issues that we will face as a community during the next 10--but not the next 100!--years and suggests that the AAS has a fundamental role to play in shaping the community response to these issues.

  15. Cytochrome aa3 in Haloferax volcanii

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Mikiei; Ogawa, Naohide; Ihara, Kunio; Sugiyama, Yasuo; Mukohata, Yasuo

    2002-01-01

    A cytochrome in an extremely halophilic archaeon, Haloferax volcanii, was purified to homogeneity. This protein displayed a redox difference spectrum that is characteristic of a-type cytochromes and a CN− complex spectrum that indicates the presence of heme a and heme a3. This cytochrome aa3 consisted of 44- and 35-kDa subunits. The amino acid sequence of the 44-kDa subunit was similar to that of the heme-copper oxidase subunit I, and critical amino acid residues for metal binding, such as histidines, were highly conserved. The reduced cytochrome c partially purified from the bacterial membrane fraction was oxidized by the cytochrome aa3, providing physiological evidence for electron transfer from cytochrome c to cytochrome aa3 in archaea. PMID:11790755

  16. AAS Nova and Astrobites: Making current astronomy research accessible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna; Astrobites Team

    2016-10-01

    AAS Nova and Astrobites are two resources available for astronomers, astronomy students, and astronomy enthusiasts to keep up with some of the most recent research published across the field of astronomy. Both supported by the AAS, these two daily astrophysical literature blogs provide accessible summaries of recent publications on the arXiv and in AAS journals. We present the goals, content, and readership of AAS Nova and Astrobites, and discuss how they might be used as tools in the undergraduate classroom.

  17. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Aa of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants From Phosphoric Acid Manufacturing Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. AA, App. A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA 40...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Aa of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants From Phosphoric Acid Manufacturing Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. AA, App. A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA 40...

  19. The TadV Protein of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Is a Novel Aspartic Acid Prepilin Peptidase Required for Maturation of the Flp1 Pilin and TadE and TadF Pseudopilins†

    PubMed Central

    Tomich, Mladen; Fine, Daniel H.; Figurski, David H.

    2006-01-01

    The tad locus of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans encodes genes for the biogenesis of Flp pili, which allow the bacterium to adhere tenaciously to surfaces and form strong biofilms. Although tad (tight adherence) loci are widespread among bacterial and archaeal species, very little is known about the functions of the individual components of the Tad secretion apparatus. Here we characterize the mechanism by which the pre-Flp1 prepilin is processed to the mature pilus subunit. We demonstrate that the tadV gene encodes a prepilin peptidase that is both necessary and sufficient for proteolytic maturation of Flp1. TadV was also found to be required for maturation of the TadE and TadF pilin-like proteins, which we term pseudopilins. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we show that processing of pre-Flp1, pre-TadE, and pre-TadF is required for biofilm formation. Mutation of a highly conserved glutamic acid residue at position +5 of Flp1, relative to the cleavage site, resulted in a processed pilin that was blocked in assembly. In contrast, identical mutations in TadE or TadF had no effect on biofilm formation, indicating that the mechanisms by which Flp1 pilin and the pseudopilins function are distinct. We also determined that two conserved aspartic acid residues in TadV are critical for function of the prepilin peptidase. Together, our results indicate that the A. actinomycetemcomitans TadV protein is a member of a novel subclass of nonmethylating aspartic acid prepilin peptidases. PMID:16980493

  20. AAS 228: Day 2 afternoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.The Limits of Scientific Cosmology: Setting the Stage: Accepted Facts, and Testing Limitations in Theory and Data (by Gourav Khullar)With a stellar lineup of speakers to talk about current and future prospects of cosmology and its limits (or lack thereof), the first session kicked off with talks by Risa Wechsler, Joseph Silk, and Sean Carroll (his talk on Multiverses is described below, by Nathan Sanders). Risa set the stage with an elaborate description of the current accepted facts in the era of precision cosmology including the standard model of concordance cosmology, described by seven parameters and an accepted Lambda-CDM paradigm (with a cosmological constant and cold dark matter). The talk stressed on the fact that all these parameters are understood to a percent order precision, which is a remarkable deviation from the time in 1990s when according to Risa, Alan Guth never thought that any of these numbers could be measured precisely!Risa Wechsler describing our current constraints on what Dark Matter could constitute.Joseph Silk discussing limits on cosmological parameters.The CMB measurements, Big Bang Nucleosynthesis estimates and galaxy clustering statistics all contribute to locking down the description of our universe. She emphasized on the tensions between different probes to measure expansion rate H0 of the universe, and small scale predictions of cold dark matter simulations, but she is hopeful that these shall be resolved eventually. Joe Silk followed this up with his interpretation of trying to understand our place in the universe and placing limits on different parameters and

  1. Activity of vegetative insecticidal proteins Vip3Aa58 and Vip3Aa59 of Bacillus thuringiensis against lepidopteran pests.

    PubMed

    Baranek, Jakub; Kaznowski, Adam; Konecka, Edyta; Naimov, Samir

    2015-09-01

    Vegetative insecticidal proteins (Vips) secreted by some isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis show activity against insects and are regarded as insecticides against pests. A number of B. thuringiensis strains harbouring vip3A genes were isolated from different sources and identified by using a PCR based approach. The isolates with the highest insecticidal activity were indicated in screening tests, and their vip genes were cloned and sequenced. The analysis revealed two polymorphic Vip protein forms, which were classified as Vip3Aa58 and Vip3Aa59. After expression of the vip genes, the proteins were isolated and characterized. The activity of both toxins was estimated against economically important lepidopteran pests of woodlands (Dendrolimus pini), orchards (Cydia pomonella) and field crops (Spodoptera exigua). Vip3Aa58 and Vip3Aa59 were highly toxic and their potency surpassed those of many Cry proteins used in commercial bioinsecticides. Vip3Aa59 revealed similar larvicidal activity as Vip3Aa58 against S. exigua and C. pomonella. Despite 98% similarity of amino acid sequences of both proteins, Vip3Aa59 was significantly more active against D. pini. Additionally the effect of proteolytic activation of Vip58Aa and Vip3Aa59 on toxicity of D. pini and S. exigua was studied. Both Vip3Aa proteins did not show any activity against Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera) larvae. The results suggest that the Vip3Aa58 and Vip3Aa59 toxins might be useful for controlling populations of insect pests of crops and forests.

  2. AAS 228: Day 2 morning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Plenary Session (Day 1) The Galaxy Zoo(by Benny Tsang)Galaxy Zoo was so hot that the servers hosting the galaxy images got melted down soon after being launched.Kevin Schawinski from ETH Zurich took us on a tour ofhis wonderful Galaxy Zoo. It is a huge zoo with about a quarter million zookeepers, they are citizen astronomers who collaboratively classify galaxies by their looks as an attempt to understand galaxy evolution. The big question that is being answered is: how do blue, actively star-forming galaxies evolve into red, quiescent (non-star-forming) galaxies? The Zoo helped reveal that blue galaxies turn into red galaxies via two possible paths galaxies might run out of supply of gas and shut off star formation slowly; or they could merge with one another and turn off star formation by destroying the gas reservoir rapidly!The Galaxy Zoo project also led to the discoveries of:Green Peas: they are the living fossils of galaxy evolution; compact, bright, green galaxies that are actively forming starsOverlapping galaxies: they are pairs of galaxies that are separated physically but happen to lie on the same line of sight; they provide excellent laboratories for studying dust extinctionHannys Voorwerp: an unusual object named after Hanny the discoverer, which is believed to be the first detection of quasar light echoThe idea of Galaxy Zoo in getting help from citizen scientists was further extended into an award-winningproject known as the Zooniverse, which is an online platform for streamlined crowd-sourcing for scientific research that requires human input. The future of astronomy is going to be

  3. Systemic AA amyloidosis: epidemiology, diagnosis, and management

    PubMed Central

    Real de Asúa, Diego; Costa, Ramón; Galván, Jose María; Filigheddu, María Teresa; Trujillo, Davinia; Cadiñanos, Julen

    2014-01-01

    The term “amyloidosis” encompasses the heterogeneous group of diseases caused by the extracellular deposition of autologous fibrillar proteins. The global incidence of amyloidosis is estimated at five to nine cases per million patient-years. While amyloid light-chain (AL) amyloidosis is more frequent in developed countries, amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis is more common in some European regions and in developing countries. The spectrum of AA amyloidosis has changed in recent decades owing to: an increase in the median age at diagnosis; a percent increase in the frequency of primary AL amyloidosis with respect to the AA type; and a substantial change in the epidemiology of the underlying diseases. Diagnosis of amyloidosis is based on clinical organ involvement and histological evidence of amyloid deposits. Among the many tinctorial characteristics of amyloid deposits, avidity for Congo red and metachromatic birefringence under unidirectional polarized light remain the gold standard. Once the initial diagnosis has been made, the amyloid subtype must be identified and systemic organ involvement evaluated. In this sense, the 123I-labeled serum amyloid P component scintigraphy is a safe and noninvasive technique that has revolutionized the diagnosis and monitoring of treatment in systemic amyloidosis. It can successfully identify anatomical patterns of amyloid deposition throughout the body and enables not only an initial estimation of prognosis, but also the monitoring of the course of the disease and the response to treatment. Given the etiologic diversity of AA amyloidosis, common therapeutic strategies are scarce. All treatment options should be based upon a greater control of the underlying disease, adequate organ support, and treatment of symptoms. Nevertheless, novel therapeutic strategies targeting the formation of amyloid fibrils and amyloid deposition may generate new expectations for patients with AA amyloidosis. PMID:25378951

  4. High cycle fatigue of AA6082 and AA6063 aluminum extrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanninga, Nicholas E.

    The high cycle fatigue behavior of hollow extruded AA6082 and AA6063 aluminum extrusions has been studied. Hollow extruded aluminum profiles can be processed into intricate shapes, and may be suitable replacements for fatigue critical automotive applications requiring reduced weight. There are several features inherent in hollow aluminum extrusions, such as seam welds, charge welds, microstructural variations and die lines. The effects of such extrusion variables on high cycle fatigue properties were studied by taking specimens from an actual car bumper extrusion. It appears that extrusion die lines create large anisotropy differences in fatigue properties, while welds themselves have little effect on fatigue lives. Removal of die lines greatly increased fatigue properties of AA6082 specimens taken transverse to the extrusion direction. Without die lines, anisotropy in fatigue properties between AA6082 specimens taken longitudinal and transverse to the extrusion direction, was significantly reduced, and properties associated with the orientation of the microstructure appears to be isotropic. A fibrous microstructure for AA6082 specimens showed great improvements in fatigue behavior. The effects of elevated temperatures and exposure of specimens to NaCl solutions was also studied. Exposure to the salt solution greatly reduced the fatigue lives of specimens, while elevated temperatures showed more moderate reductions in fatigue lives.

  5. Colchicine use in isolated renal AA amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Carlos F; Egües, César A; Uriarte, Miren; Belzunegui, Joaquín; Rezola, Marta

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 45-year-old woman, with two-year history of chronic renal insufficiency and proteinuria. A kidney biopsy showed the presence of AA amyloidosis (positive Congo red staining and immunohistochemistry). There was no evidence of amyloid deposits in other organs and there was no underlying disease. AA amyloidosis normally is secondary to chronic inflammatory or infectious diseases. High levels of IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α play a role in the pathogenesis of amyloidosis and induce the synthesis of serum amyloid A protein (SAA), a precursor of tissue amyloid deposits. We empirically treated the patient with a low dose colchicine. The patient responded well. Colchicine has been used for the treatment of Familiar Mediterranean Fever and related auto-inflammatory diseases. To monitor treatment responses, we measured SAA finding low titers. Soon after treatment onset there were signs of improvement pertaining to proteinuria and stabilization of renal function.

  6. AAS Oral History Project - Seeking Planetary Scientist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; Holbrook, Jarita

    2016-10-01

    Now in its fourth year, the AAS Oral History Project has interviewed over 100 space scientists from all over the world. Led by the AAS Historical Astronomy Division (HAD) and partially funded by the American Institute of Physics Niels Bohr Library and ongoing support from the AAS, volunteers have collected oral histories from space scientists at professional meetings starting in 2015, including AAS, DPS, and the IAU general assembly. Each interview lasts one and a half to two hours and focuses on interviewees' personal and professional lives. Questions include those about one's family, childhood, strong influences on one's scientific career, career path, successes and challenges, perspectives on how astronomy is changing as a field, and advice to the next generation. Each interview is audio recorded and transcribed, the content of which is checked with each interviewee. Once complete, interview transcripts are posted online as part of a larger oral history library at https://www.aip.org/history-programs/niels-bohr-library/oral-histories. We will present preliminary analysis of those interviewed including characterizing career status, age range, nationality, and primary field. Additionally, we will discuss trends beginning to emerge in analysis of participants' responses about data driven science and advice to the next generation. Future analysis will reveal a rich story of space scientists and will help the community address issues of diversity, controversies, and the changing landscape of science. We are actively recruiting individuals to be interviewed at this meeting from all stages of career from undergraduate students to retired and emeritus astronomers. We are especially interested in interviewing 40+E members of DPS. Contact Sanlyn Buxner to schedule an interview or to find out more information about the project (buxner@psi.edu). Contact Jarita Holbrook if you would like to become an interviewer for the project (astroholbrook@gmail.com).

  7. The Effectiveness of the AAS REU Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, M. K.; Boyce, P. B.; Milkey, R. W.

    1996-05-01

    In an attempt to address the particular needs of astronomy faculty and undergraduate students, in 1991 the Education Office of the American Astronomical Society approached the National Science Foundation with a unique proposal for funding through the Research Experiences for Undergraduates program. The goals of the AAS program were to "slow the hemorrhage of students out of science...", extend the REU program to non-NSF-funded scientists, to reach under-represented women and minority students particularly in small educational institutions, and to encourage research scientists there to mentor students. As this grant has now expired, the AAS has surveyed the 44 mentors and their students to assess the program's effect on the mentor and the mentor's career; the educational institution; and the student's education and career choices. More than half the mentors responded by the abstract deadline. The program clearly had an effect upon the individuals involved. The greatest effect (in 85% of the cases) was to develop more interest in the mentor's research project both among the students and among the mentor's faculty colleagues. The mentors rated the grant to be a medium or strong factor in their student's decision to pursue graduate study, which 90% of them did. All but one of the AAS-REU students attended an AAS meeting and 3/4 of those gave a paper on their project research. Over 90% of the mentors felt that the research experience strongly promoted a greater interest in science, a greater understanding of science and a desire to continue in science. According to the mentors, this was a very positive and beneficial program for the students as well as for themselves.

  8. Data Behind the Figures in AAS Journals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biemesderfer, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Substantial amounts of digital data are produced in the scientific enterprise, and much of it is carefully analyzed and processed. Often resulting from a good deal of intellectual effort, many of these highly-processed products are published in the scholarly literature. Many of these data - or more precisely, representations of these data - are committed to the scholarly record in the forms of figures and tables that appear within articles: the AAS journals publish more than 30,000 figures and nearly 10,000 tables each year. For more than a decade, the AAS journals have accepted machine-readable tables that provide the data behind (some of) the tables, and recently the journals have started to encourage the submission of the data behind figures. (See the related poster by Greg Schwarz.) During this time, the journals have been refining techniques for acquiring and managing the digital data that underlie figures and tables. In 2012 the AAS was awarded a grant by the US NSF so that the journals can extend the methods for providing access to these data objects, through a deeper collaboration with the VO and with organizations like DataCite, and by spearheading discussions about the formats and metadata that will best facilitate long-term data management and access. An important component of these activities is educating scientists about the importance and benefits of making such data sets available.

  9. Introducing the AAS Astronomy Ambassadors Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurton, S.; Fienberg, R. T.; Fraknoi, A.; Prather, E. E.

    2013-04-01

    Newly established by the American Astronomical Society (AAS), the Astronomy Ambassadors program is designed to support early-career AAS members with training in resources and techniques for effective outreach to students and/or the public. A pilot Astronomy Ambassadors workshop will be held at the January 2013 AAS meeting. Workshop participants will learn to communicate effectively with public and school audiences; find outreach opportunities and establish ongoing partnerships with local schools, science centers, museums, parks, and/or community centers; reach audiences with personal stories, hands-on activities, and jargon-free language; identify strategies and techniques to improve their presentation skills; gain access to a menu of outreach resources that work in a variety of settings; and become part of an active community of astronomers who do outreach. Applications are welcome from advanced undergraduates (those doing research and committed to continuing in astronomy), graduate students, and postdocs and new faculty in their first two years after receipt of the PhD. We especially encourage applications from members of groups that are presently underrepresented in science.

  10. AAS Publishing News: Astronomical Software Citation Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-07-01

    Do you write code for your research? Use astronomical software? Do you wish there were a better way of citing, sharing, archiving, or discovering software for astronomy research? You're not alone! In April 2015, AAS's publishing team joined other leaders in the astronomical software community in a meeting funded by the Sloan Foundation, with the purpose of discussing these issues and potential solutions. In attendance were representatives from academic astronomy, publishing, libraries, for-profit software sharing platforms, telescope facilities, and grantmaking institutions. The goal of the group was to establish “protocols, policies, and platforms for astronomical software citation, sharing, and archiving,” in the hopes of encouraging a set of normalized standards across the field. The AAS is now collaborating with leaders at GitHub to write grant proposals for a project to develop strategies for software discoverability and citation, in astronomy and beyond. If this topic interests you, you can find more details in this document released by the group after the meeting: http://astronomy-software-index.github.io/2015-workshop/ The group hopes to move this project forward with input and support from the broader community. Please share the above document, discuss it on social media using the hashtag #astroware (so that your conversations can be found!), or send private comments to julie.steffen@aas.org.

  11. Waldenström's macroglobulinemia associated with AA amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Gardyn, J; Schwartz, A; Gal, R; Lewinski, U; Kristt, D; Cohen, A M

    2001-07-01

    It is widely accepted that amyloidosis in Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM) is exclusively due to amyloid light-chain deposition. However, only a small number of previous reports have actually characterized the type of amyloid in WM. We now report the third patient with WM and amyloid A protein (AA) amyloidosis. This patient developed malabsorption, nephrotic syndrome, and orthostatic hypotension. AA was immunohistochemically demonstrated in the rectal biopsy. In conjunction with previous examples of AA amyloidosis, the present report raises the possibility that AA amyloidosis may also occur in WM patients.

  12. Detection of five potentially periodontal pathogenic bacteria in peri-implant disease: A comparison of PCR and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Schmalz, Gerhard; Tsigaras, Sandra; Rinke, Sven; Kottmann, Tanja; Haak, Rainer; Ziebolz, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the microbial analysis methods of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR (RT-PCR) in terms of detection of five selected potentially periodontal pathogenic bacteria in peri-implant disease. Therefore 45 samples of healthy, mucositis and peri-implantitis (n = 15 each) were assessed according to presence of the following bacteria using PCR (DNA-strip technology) and RT-PCR (fluorescent dye SYBR green-system): Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Treponema denticola (Td), Tanerella forsythia (Tf), and Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn). There were no significant correlations between the bacterial and disease patterns, so the benefit of using microbiological tests for the diagnosis of peri-implant diseases is questionable. Correlations between the methods were highest for Tf (Kendall's Tau: 0.65, Spearman: 0.78), Fn (0.49, 0.61) and Td (0.49, 0.59). For Aa (0.38, 0.42) and Pg (0.04, 0.04), lower correlation values were detected. Accordingly, conventional semi-quantitative PCR seems to be sufficient for analyzing potentially periodontal pathogenic bacterial species.

  13. Scaling and root planning, and locally delivered minocycline reduces the load of Prevotella intermedia in an interdependent pattern, correlating with symptomatic improvements of chronic periodontitis: a short-term randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shuli; Wang, Ying; Sun, Wei; Chen, Hui; Wu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate the respective or combinatory efficacy of locally delivered 2% minocycline (MO), and scaling and root planning (SRP) by assessing both clinical parameters and the loads of four main periodontal pathogens in treating chronic periodontitis (CP). Methods Seventy adults with CP were randomly assigned to the three treatment groups: 1) SRP alone; 2) MO alone; and 3) combinatory use of SRP and MO (SRP + MO). Before and 7 days after the treatments, we evaluated both clinical parameters (pocket depth [PD] and sulcus bleeding index [SBI]) and the gene load of four main periodontal pathogens (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans [Aa], Fusobacterium nucleatum [Fn], Porphyromonas gingivalis [Pg], and Prevotella intermedia [Pi]). Results The bacterial prevalence per patient was: Aa, 31.25%; Fn, 100%; Pg, 95.31%; and Pi, 98.44%. Seven days after treatment, the three treatments significantly reduced both PD and SBI, but not detection frequencies of the four pathogens. For PD, the reduction efficacy of SRP + MO was significantly higher than that of either MO or SRP. Only Pg responded significantly to SRP. Pg and Fn were significantly reduced in the presence of MO. Only SRP + MO showed a significant reduction effect on the gene load of Pi. The reduction of PD significantly correlated with the gene load of Pi (r=0.26; P=0.042) but not of the other bacteria. Conclusion SRP and MO reduced the load of Pi in an interdependent pattern, which correlated with symptomatic improvements of CP. PMID:26676022

  14. The effect of spiramycin on Porphyromonas gingivalis and other "classic" periopathogens.

    PubMed

    Chiappe, Verónica; Gómez, Mariel; Fernández-Canigia, Liliana; Romanelli, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    In clinical trials, Spiramycin has shown additional benefit overscaling and root planing on pocket depth reduction, but its effect on periodontal microbiota was evaluated only by darkfield microscopy. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the effect of Spiramycin administration on Porphyromonas gingivalis and other periodontopathic bacteria using 16S rARN PCR technique. Thirty two non-smoker adults with untreated periodontitis and pocket depth > or = 7 mm. were evaluated to participate in this randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial. Clinical measurements were performed on day -15, 15, 30 and 90 from baseline. Subgingival samples were analyzed for detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Tannerella forsythia (TJ), Treponema denticola (Td) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) on days -15, 30 and 90. On day 0, 25 Pg positive subjects were randomly assigned to receive either systemically administered Spiramycinfor 7 days (Test group SP) or identical placebo tablets (Placebo group PL). After Spiramycin administration Pg, Tf and Td were suppressed showingstatistically significant difference (p<0.05) with the Placebo group. None of the groups showed changes in Aa detection. These data indicate that bacteria currently associated with advanced periodontitis (Pg, Tf and Td) are suppressed after 7 days of systemic administration of Spiramycin.

  15. Novel bioactive tetracycline-containing electrospun polymer fibers as a potential antibacterial dental implant coating.

    PubMed

    Shahi, R G; Albuquerque, M T P; Münchow, E A; Blanchard, S B; Gregory, R L; Bottino, M C

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the ability of tetracycline-containing fibers to inhibit biofilm formation of peri-implantitis-associated pathogens [i.e., Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn), Prevotella intermedia (Pi), and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa)]. Tetracycline hydrochloride (TCH) was added to a poly(DL-lactide) [PLA], poly(ε-caprolactone) [PCL], and gelatin [GEL] polymer blend solution at distinct concentrations to obtain the following fibers: PLA:PCL/GEL (TCH-free, control), PLA:PCL/GEL + 5 % TCH, PLA:PCL/GEL + 10 % TCH, and PLA:PCL/GEL + 25 % TCH. The inhibitory effect of TCH-containing fibers on biofilm formation was assessed by colony-forming units (CFU/mL). Qualitative analysis of biofilm inhibition was done via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Statistical significance was reported at p < 0.05. Complete inhibition of biofilm formation on the fibers was observed in groups containing TCH at 10 and 25 wt%. Fibers containing TCH at 5 wt% demonstrated complete inhibition of Aa biofilm. Even though a marked reduction in CFU/mL was observed with an increase in TCH concentration, Pi proved to be the most resilient microorganism. SEM images revealed the absence of or a notable decrease in bacterial biofilm on the TCH-containing nanofibers. Collectively, our data suggest that tetracycline-containing fibers hold great potential as an antibacterial dental implant coating.

  16. Experimental immunologically mediated aplastic anemia (AA) in mice: cyclosporin A fails to protect against AA

    SciTech Connect

    Knospe, W.H.; Steinberg, D.; Gratwohl, A.; Speck, B.

    1984-07-01

    Immunologically mediated aplastic anemia (AA) in mice was induced by the i.v. injection of 10(7) lymph node cells (LNC) from H-2k identical but Mls mismatched CBA/J donor mice into previously irradiated (600 rad total body gamma) C3H/HeJ mice. Cyclosporin A (CsA), 25 mg/kg, was administered subcutaneously from day -1 to day 30. Control mice included C3H/HeJ mice which received 600 rad alone, C3H/HeJ mice which received 600 rad plus CsA as above, and C3H/HeJ mice which received 600 rad total body irradiation followed by 10(7) LNC from CBA/J donors. CsA failed to prevent lethal AA. These results suggest that the pathogenetic mechanisms operating in immunologically mediated AA differ from the mechanisms operating in rodents transplanted with allogeneically mismatched marrow or spleen cells which develop graft-versus-host disease. The results are consistent with a non-T cell-dependent mechanism causing the AA.

  17. Study on Fabrication of AA4032/AA6069 Cladding Billet Using Direct Chill Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xing; Zhang, Haitao; Shao, Bo; Li, Lei; Liu, Xuan; Cui, Jianzhong

    2016-04-01

    AA4032/AA6069 cladding billet in size of φ130 mm/φ110 mm was prepared by the modified direct chill casting process, and the parametric effect on casting performance was investigated using numerical simulation. Microstructures, elements distribution, and mechanical properties of the bonding interface were examined. The results show that metallurgical bonding interface can be obtained with the optimal parameters: the casting speed of 130 to 140 mm/min, the internal liquid level height of 50 to 60 mm, and the contact height of 40 to 50 mm. The metallurgical bonding interface is free of any discontinuities due to the fact that the alloying elements diffused across the interface and formed Ni-containing phase. Tensile strength of the cladding billet reaches 225.3 MPa, and the fracture position was located in AA6069 side, suggesting that the interface bonding strength is higher than the strength of AA6069. The interfacial shearing strength is 159.3 MPa, indicating excellent metallurgical bonding.

  18. Simultaneous measurement of the viability, aggregation, and live and dead adherence of Streptococcus crista, Streptococcus mutans and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in human saliva in relation to indices of caries, dental plaque and periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Rudney, J D; Staikov, R K

    2002-05-01

    Salivary proteins have multiple functions and many share similar functions, which may be why it has been difficult to relate variations in their concentrations to oral health and ecology. An alternative is to focus on variations in the major functions of saliva. An hydroxyapatite-coated microplate model has been developed that simultaneously measures saliva-promoted bacterial viability, bacterial aggregation, and live and dead bacterial adherence, while simulating oral temperature and shearing forces from swallowing. That model was applied to resting whole and stimulated parotid saliva from 149 individuals, using representative strains of Streptococcus crista, S. mutans, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Two major factors were defined by multivariate analysis (this was successful only for whole-saliva). One factor was correlated with aggregation, live adherence and dead adherence for all three strains; the other was correlated with total viability of all three strains. Participants were grouped <25th percentile and >75th percentile for each factor. Those groups were compared for clinical indices of oral health. Caries scores were significantly lower in those with high scores for aggregation-adherence, regardless of whether total viability scores were low or high. Live bacteria always predominated on surfaces when live and dead adherence scores were expressed as ratios. However, participants with high scores for aggregation-adherence showed significantly more dead adherent bacteria than those with low scores (these ratios were uncorrelated with total viability). This finding may indicate that extreme differences in the ability to kill bacteria on surfaces can influence caries risk.

  19. AAS Special Session: Policy Making in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardelli, J. A.; Massa, D.

    1995-12-01

    The professional astronomical community today is more diverse than at any time in its history. Individuals participating in creative research programs can be found in a wide range of positions. This type of diversity, which mixes research, education, and service (e.g. contract) work, represents the strength of contemporary astronomy. While recognizing the unavoidable reductions in funding and restructuring of organizations like NASA, it is imperative that the significance of the current diversity be considered during these processes. Creative ideas are one of the cornerstones of quality research, and they can originate anywhere. Consequently, it is essential that adequate research resources remain available for free and open competition by all astronomers. Our goal in this session is to bring together officials from the AAS, NASA, and the NSF to discuss how the policy and decision making process operates and whether it should be changed to better serve the general needs of the professional astronomical community. Examples of the issues we believe are important include: In establishing new policy, how can the needs of the average research astronomer be better addressed? How could input from such astronomers be provided to those who craft NASA/NSF policy? How can/should the AAS serve as an interface between policy/decision making bodies and its membership? Should the AAS membership become more actively/effectively involved in the decision making process and, if so, how? More information on this session and related issues can be found at the Association of Research Astronomers Home Page: http://www.phy.vill.edu/astro/faculty/ara/ara_home.htm

  20. Macroscopic anisotropy in AA5019A sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, S.H.; Brem, J.C.; Barlat, F.; Oh, K.H.

    2000-05-11

    The macroscopic anisotropy for typical texture components in aluminum alloys and AA5019A sheet samples (H48 and O temper conditions) were investigated. In order to simultaneously consider the effects of morphological texture and crystallographic texture on macroscopic anisotropy, predictions of plastic properties were carried out using a full-constraints Taylor model and a visco-plastic self-consistent (VPSC) polycrystal model. The yield stress and r-value (width-to-thickness plastic strain ratio in uniaxial tension) anisotropy predicted using the VPSC model were in good agreement with experimental data.

  1. Swift Observations of SN 2007aa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immler, S.; Brown, P. J.; Milne, P.

    2007-03-01

    Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) and X-Ray Telescope (XRT) observed the type II SN 2007aa (CBET #850, IAUC #8814) on 2007-02-24.63 UT. The following UVOT magnitudes were measured: V = 15.8 (322 s exposure time), B = 16.4 (367 s), U = 16.9 (367 s), UVW1 [181-321nm] = 18.6 (737 s), UVM2 [166-268 nm] > 19.5 (3-sigma upper limit; 236 s), and UVW2 [112-264 nm] = 19.7 (725 s). The magnitudes have not been corrected for extinction.

  2. The cytochrome P450 2AA gene cluster in zebrafish (Danio rerio): Expression of CYP2AA1 and CYP2AA2 and response to phenobarbital-type inducers

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Akira; Bainy, Afonso C.D.; Woodin, Bruce R.; Goldstone, Jared V.; Stegeman, John J.

    2013-10-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2 gene family is the largest and most diverse CYP gene family in vertebrates. In zebrafish, we have identified 10 genes in a new subfamily, CYP2AA, which does not show orthology to any human or other mammalian CYP genes. Here we report evolutionary and structural relationships of the 10 CYP2AA genes and expression of the first two genes, CYP2AA1 and CYP2AA2. Parsimony reconstruction of the tandem duplication pattern for the CYP2AA cluster suggests that CYP2AA1, CYP2AA2 and CYP2AA3 likely arose in the earlier duplication events and thus are most diverged in function from the other CYP2AAs. On the other hand, CYP2AA8 and CYP2AA9 are genes that arose in the latest duplication event, implying functional similarity between these two CYPs. A molecular model of CYP2AA1 showing the sequence conservation across the CYP2AA cluster reveals that the regions with the highest variability within the cluster map onto CYP2AA1 near the substrate access channels, suggesting differing substrate specificities. Zebrafish CYP2AA1 transcript was expressed predominantly in the intestine, while CYP2AA2 was most highly expressed in the kidney, suggesting differing roles in physiology. In the liver CYP2AA2 expression but not that of CYP2AA1, was increased by 1,4-bis [2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)] benzene (TCPOBOP) and, to a lesser extent, by phenobarbital (PB). In contrast, pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile (PCN) increased CYP2AA1 expression, but not CYP2AA2 in the liver. The results identify a CYP2 subfamily in zebrafish that includes genes apparently induced by PB-type chemicals and PXR agonists, the first concrete in vivo evidence for a PB-type response in fish. - Highlights: • A tandemly duplicated cluster of ten CYP2AA genes was described in zebrafish. • Parsimony and duplication analyses suggest pathways to CYP2AA diversity. • Homology models reveal amino acid positions possibly related to functional diversity. • The CYP2AA locus does not share synteny with

  3. Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cell (GMSC) Delivery System Based on RGD-Coupled Alginate Hydrogel with Antimicrobial Properties: A Novel Treatment Modality for Peri-Implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Diniz, Ivana M. A.; Chen, Chider; Ansari, Sahar; Zadeh, Homayoun H.; Moshaverinia, Maryam; Chee, Daniel; Marques, Márcia M.; Shi, Songtao; Moshaverinia, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Peri-implantitis is one of the most common inflammatory complications in dental implantology. Similar to periodontitis, in peri-implantitis, destructive inflammatory changes take place in the tissues surrounding a dental implant. Bacterial flora at the failing implant sites resemble the pathogens in periodontal disease and consist of Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa). Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of a silver lactate (SL)-containing RGD-coupled alginate hydrogel scaffold as a promising stem cell delivery vehicle with antimicrobial properties. Materials and Methods Gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) or human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) were encapsulated in SL-loaded alginate hydrogel microspheres. Stem cell viability, proliferation, and osteo-differentiation capacity were analyzed. Results Our results showed that SL exhibited antimicrobial properties against Aa in a dose-dependent manner, with 0.50 mg/ml showing the greatest antimicrobial properties while still maintaining cell viability. At this concentration, SL-containing alginate hydrogel was able to inhibit Aa on the surface of Ti discs and significantly reduce the bacterial load in Aa suspensions. Silver ions were effectively released from the SL-loaded alginate microspheres for up to 2 weeks. Osteogenic differentiation of GMSCs and hBMMSCs encapsulated in the SL-loaded alginate microspheres were confirmed by the intense mineral matrix deposition and high expression of osteogenesis-related genes. Conclusion Taken together, our findings confirm that GMSCs encapsulated in RGD-modified alginate hydrogel containing SL show promise for bone tissue engineering with antimicrobial properties against Aa bacteria in vitro. PMID:26216081

  4. Idiopathic systemic AA-amyloidosis in a skunk (Mephitis mephitis).

    PubMed

    Elhensheri, Mohamed; Linke, Reinhold P; Blankenburg, Anja; Beineke, Andreas

    2012-03-01

    This report describes a case of systemic amyloidosis in a captive striped skunk. At necropsy, bilateral alopecia, as well as reno-, hepato-, and splenomegaly were present. Congo red staining and immunohistochemistry revealed depositions of AA-amyloid in different organs. The lack of a predisposing disease is suggestive of idiopathic systemic AA-amyloidosis.

  5. Floor Plans: Section "AA", Section "BB"; Floor Framing Plans: Section ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Floor Plans: Section "A-A", Section "B-B"; Floor Framing Plans: Section "A-A", Section "B-B" - Fort Washington, Fort Washington Light, Northeast side of Potomac River at Fort Washington Park, Fort Washington, Prince George's County, MD

  6. Rational recovery: alternative to AA for addiction?

    PubMed

    Galanter, M; Egelko, S; Edwards, H

    1993-01-01

    Rational Recovery (RR) is a new self-help movement for substance abusers, with a cognitive orientation. It has been suggested as an alternative to Alcoholics Anonymous. This study was designed to examine the nature of RR and its impact on those who join. A national sample of 433 substance-abusing people attending 63 established RR groups was evaluated, using codable self-report questionnaires completed at RR meetings. Members were mostly men with college experience who had previously attended AA. Among recruits who attended their first RR meeting in the last month, 38% were abstinent in the last month. Among members who had joined 3 or more months before, 73% were abstinent in the last month; they had attended an average of 4.1 RR meetings in that month, and carried out exercises at home based on Rational Emotive Therapy. Among those who joined 6 or more months before, 58% reported at least 6 months of abstinence. Among members with a history of heavy cocaine use, the portion reporting abstinence in the last month was not significantly different from those who had never used cocaine. The minority of members who were engaged for 3 months were still drinking, though, and did so on an average of 9.9 days in the last month. RR succeeded in engaging substance abusers and promoting abstinence among many of them while presenting a cognitive orientation that is different from the spiritual one of AA. Its utility in substance abuse treatment warrants further assessment.

  7. States' Flexibility Waiver Plans for Alternate Assessments Based on Alternate Achievement Standards (AA-AAS). Synthesis Report 96

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Sheryl S.; Edwards, Lynn M.; Thurlow, Martha L.; Hodgson, Jennifer R.

    2014-01-01

    All states have alternate assessments based on alternate achievement standards (AA-AAS) for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities. For accountability purposes, the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) allows up to 1% of students to be counted as proficient with this assessment option. In 2011 the U.S. Department of…

  8. Design and construction of a synthetic Bacillus thuringiensis Cry4Aa gene: hyperexpression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Tohru; Howlader, Mohammad Tofazzal Hossain; Yamagiwa, Masashi; Sakai, Hiroshi

    2008-10-01

    Cry4Aa produced by Bacillus thuringiensis is a dipteran-specific toxin and is, therefore, of great interest for developing a bioinsecticide to control mosquitoes. However, the expression of Cry4Aa in Escherichia coli is relatively low, which is a major disadvantage in its development as a bioinsecticide. In this study, to establish an effective production system, a 1,914-bp modified gene (cry4Aa-S1) encoding Cry4Aa was designed and synthesized in accordance with the G + C content and codon preference of E. coli genes without altering the encoded amino acid sequence. The cry4Aa-S1 gene allowed a significant improvement in expression level, over five-fold, compared to that of the original cry4Aa gene. The product of the cry4Aa-S1 gene showed the same level of insecticidal activity against Culex pipiens larvae as that from cry4Aa. This suggested that unfavorable codon usage was one of the reasons for poor expression of cry4Aa in E. coli, and, therefore, changing the cry4Aa codons to accord with the codon usage in E. coli led to efficient production of Cry4Aa. Efficient production of Cry4Aa in E. coli can be a powerful measure to prepare a sufficient amount of Cry4Aa protein for both basic analytical and applied researches.

  9. Nephrotic Syndrome Associated with Lung Cancer: A Rare Case of Malignancy Associated with AA Amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Gueutin, Victor; Langlois, Anne-Lyse; Shehwaro, Nathalie; Elharraqui, Ryme; Rouvier, Philippe; Izzedine, Hassane

    2013-01-01

    Nonhematologic malignancies are rarely reported to be associated with AA amyloidosis. Although the association between renal cell carcinoma and systemic AA amyloidosis has been established, the evidence linking pulmonary cancer to AA amyloidosis is scarce. Here, a case of biopsy-proven renal AA amyloidosis complicated with nephrotic syndrome associated with lung carcinoma is reported.

  10. Nephrotic Syndrome Associated with Lung Cancer: A Rare Case of Malignancy Associated with AA Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Gueutin, Victor; Langlois, Anne-Lyse; Shehwaro, Nathalie; Elharraqui, Ryme; Rouvier, Philippe; Izzedine, Hassane

    2013-01-01

    Nonhematologic malignancies are rarely reported to be associated with AA amyloidosis. Although the association between renal cell carcinoma and systemic AA amyloidosis has been established, the evidence linking pulmonary cancer to AA amyloidosis is scarce. Here, a case of biopsy-proven renal AA amyloidosis complicated with nephrotic syndrome associated with lung carcinoma is reported. PMID:24558629

  11. Hot stamping of AA7075 aluminum sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendiguren, J.; Saenz de Argandona, E.; Galdos, L.

    2016-11-01

    In this work the formability of a high strength aluminium alloy (AA7075-T6) for the stamping of an automotive component has been studied. Due to the low formability of the selected alloy, two different heat assisted forming strategies have been analysed. On the one hand, the W-temper process, where the thermal process is carried out prior to the forming operation. On the other hand, the hot stamping process, where the thermal process is carried out at the same time as the forming. The results showed that both technology were able to form the component avoiding any failure of the material. On the contrary, both processes reduced the final mechanical properties of the material compared to the as received material condition. However, the obtained mechanical properties doubled the strength of commonly used 5xxx and 6xxx aluminium alloys.

  12. Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-1α Shows Predictive Value as a Risk Marker for Subjects and Sites Vulnerable to Bone Loss in a Longitudinal Model of Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Fine, Daniel H.; Markowitz, Kenneth; Fairlie, Karen; Tischio-Bereski, Debbie; Ferrandiz, Javier; Godboley, Dipti; Furgang, David; Gunsolley, John; Best, Al

    2014-01-01

    Improved diagnostics remains a fundamental goal of biomedical research. This study was designed to assess cytokine biomarkers that could predict bone loss (BL) in localized aggressive periodontitis. 2,058 adolescents were screened. Two groups of 50 periodontally healthy adolescents were enrolled in the longitudinal study. One group had Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), the putative pathogen, while the matched cohort did not. Cytokine levels were assessed in saliva and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF). Participants were sampled, examined, and radiographed every 6 months for 2–3 years. Disease was defined as radiographic evidence of BL. Saliva and GCF was collected at each visit, frozen, and then tested retrospectively after detection of BL. Sixteen subjects with Aa developed BL. Saliva from Aa-positive and Aa-negative healthy subjects was compared to subjects who developed BL. GCF was collected from 16 subjects with BL and from another 38 subjects who remained healthy. GCF from BL sites in the 16 subjects was compared to healthy sites in these same subjects and to healthy sites in subjects who remained healthy. Results showed that cytokines in saliva associated with acute inflammation were elevated in subjects who developed BL (i.e., MIP-1α MIP-1β IL-α, IL-1β and IL-8; p<0.01). MIP-1α was elevated 13-fold, 6 months prior to BL. When MIP-1α levels were set at 40 pg/ml, 98% of healthy sites were below that level (Specificity); whereas, 93% of sites with BL were higher (Sensitivity), with comparable Predictive Values of 98%; p<0.0001; 95% C.I. = 42.5–52.7). MIP-1α consistently showed elevated levels as a biomarker for BL in both saliva and GCF, 6 months prior to BL. MIP-1α continues to demonstrate its strong candidacy as a diagnostic biomarker for both subject and site vulnerability to BL. PMID:24901458

  13. Revelation of Viral – Bacterial Interrelationship in Aggressive Periodontitis via Polymerase Chain Reaction: A Microbiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sumit; Tapashetti, Roopali P; Patil, Sudhir R; Kalra, Sonali Medsinge; Bhat, Geetha K; Guvva, Sowjanya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Periodontal disease is one of the most common and complex disease affecting mankind. Being multifactorial in etiology it encompasses a variety of infectious entities with various unique microbial constellations and immune responses. A bacteriologic cause alone seems insufficient in explaining several clinical features of the periodontal disease. Recent studies suggest that periodontal herpes viruses comprise an important source of triggering periodontal tissue destruction. The following study aims to assess human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-I) interaction with the established periodontopathic bacteriae, Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) in pathogenesis of aggressive periodontitis (AgP) using Hotstart polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Materials and Methods: A total of 30 subjects, 15 with AgP and 15 healthy controls contributed random subgingival plaque samples. PCR methodology was used to identify the subgingival herpesviruses, Pg, and Aa. Yates corrected Chi-square test was employed to identify a statistical association between herpesviruses and periodontopathic bacteriae. Results: Findings suggested that viruses may be pertinent to disease progression. The prevalence of the periodontopathic bacteria Aa was found in 53.33% (P = 0.0168, S) and Pg in 40% (P = 0.2155, NS) of the AgP patients. Herpesviruses, HCMV and EBV-I were found to have a prevalence of 46.67% (P = 0.039, S) and 40% (P = 0.084, NS). The viral and bacterial co-infection was found to be 77.78% (P = 0.0002, S) with Aa and HCMV. Conclusion: The present data reveals, viruses may exert periodontopathic effect by causing local immunosupression which may set a stage for the subgingival colonization and multiplication of periodontal bacteriae. Further studies are needed to develop an understanding into the significance of herpesviruses in human periodontitis which, may allow for improved diagnosis, more specific therapy and

  14. A&A Painting and Restoration Co., Inc. Information Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A&A Painting and Restoration Co., Inc. (the Company) is located in Great Mills, Maryland. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at properties constructed prior to 1978, located in Drayden, Maryland.

  15. 40 CFR Table Aa-2 to Subpart Aa of... - Kraft Lime Kiln and Calciner Emissions Factors for CH4 and N2O

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Kraft Lime Kiln and Calciner Emissions... Manufacturing Pt. 98, Subpt. AA, Table AA -2 Table AA-2 to Subpart AA of Part 98—Kraft Lime Kiln and Calciner... CH4 N2O Kraft calciners CH4 N2O Residual Oil (any type) 0.0027 0 0.0027 0.0003 Distillate Oil...

  16. Section AA through main entrance gates & west stairs. San ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Section AA through main entrance gates & west stairs. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Science Building. Also includes plans and sections of boys' and girls' toilets. Howard E. Jones, Architect, San Bernardino, California. Sheet 5, job no. 311. Scales 1/4 inch to the foot (section AA) and 1/2 inch to the foot (toilet rooms). February 15, 1927. - San Bernardino Valley College, Life Science Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  17. Fecal transmission of AA amyloidosis in the cheetah contributes to high incidence of disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Beiru; Une, Yumi; Fu, Xiaoying; Yan, Jingmin; Ge, FengXia; Yao, Junjie; Sawashita, Jinko; Mori, Masayuki; Tomozawa, Hiroshi; Kametani, Fuyuki; Higuchi, Keiichi

    2008-05-20

    AA amyloidosis is one of the principal causes of morbidity and mortality in captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus), which are in danger of extinction, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms. Given the transmissible characteristics of AA amyloidosis, transmission between captive cheetahs may be a possible mechanism involved in the high incidence of AA amyloidosis. In this study of animals with AA amyloidosis, we found that cheetah feces contained AA amyloid fibrils that were different from those of the liver with regard to molecular weight and shape and had greater transmissibility. The infectious activity of fecal AA amyloid fibrils was reduced or abolished by the protein denaturants 6 M guanidine.HCl and formic acid or by AA immunodepletion. Thus, we propose that feces are a vehicle of transmission that may accelerate AA amyloidosis in captive cheetah populations. These results provide a pathogenesis for AA amyloidosis and suggest possible measures for rescuing cheetahs from extinction.

  18. Characterization of the radical-scavenging reaction of 2-O-substituted ascorbic acid derivatives, AA-2G, AA-2P, and AA-2S: a kinetic and stoichiometric study.

    PubMed

    Takebayashi, Jun; Tai, Akihiro; Gohda, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Itaru

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the antioxidant activity of three ascorbic acid (AA) derivatives O-substituted at the C-2 position of AA: ascorbic acid 2-glucoside (AA-2G), ascorbic acid 2-phosphate (AA-2P), and ascorbic acid 2-sulfate (AA-2S). The radical-scavenging activities of these AA derivatives and some common low molecular-weight antioxidants such as uric acid or glutathione against 1,1-diphenyl-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical cation (ABTS+), or galvinoxyl radical were kinetically and stoichiometrically evaluated under pH-controlled conditions. Those AA derivatives slowly and continuously reacted with DPPH radical and ABTS+, but not with galvinoxyl radical. They effectively reacted with DPPH radical under acidic conditions and with ABTS+ under neutral conditions. In contrast, AA immediately quenched all species of radicals tested at all pH values investigated. The reactivity of Trolox, a water-soluble vitamin E analogue, was comparable to that of AA in terms of kinetics and stoichiometrics. Uric acid and glutathione exhibited long-lasting radical-scavenging activity against these radicals under certain pH conditions. The radical-scavenging profiles of AA derivatives were closer to those of uric acid and glutathione rather than to that of AA. The number of radicals scavenged by one molecule of AA derivatives, uric acid, or glutathione was equal to or greater than that by AA or Trolox under the appropriate conditions. These data suggest the potential usage of AA derivatives as radical scavengers.

  19. Recrystallization behaviour of AA6063 extrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Pettersen, T.; Paulsen, C. O.; Marthinsen, K.; Holmedal, B.; Segatori, A.

    2015-08-01

    Cylindrical profiles of an AA6063 aluminium alloy were produced in a lab-scale direct extrusion set-up. The extrusion was performed at 300 °C, 450 °C and 550 °C, respectively, with the same ram speed. Immediate water quenching was applied to the profiles and the end of billet (butt-end) after extrusion. Microstructure and texture of the material in different states were measured by electron back-scattered diffraction. Only the profile extruded at 300 °C, was found in the deformed state after extrusion, featuring a fibrous grain structure and a strong <111> and weak <100> double fibre texture. Post-extrusion annealing of this profile at 450 °C resulted in an almost fully recrystallized structure (recrystallized fraction of 87%) and with a texture similar to that of the as-deformed state. The profile extruded at 450 °C was almost fully recrystallized (recrystallization fraction 91%) already after quenching, and with a texture characterized by a weak <111> and strong <100> double fibre. The profile extruded at 550 °C showed a partially recrystallized grain structure with recrystallization fraction of 71%, and with a texture dominated by a <100> fibre. The influence of the deformation conditions on the recrystallization behaviour, in terms of recrystallization kinetics and mechanisms, are discussed in view of these results.

  20. Observations of AA Tau requested to schedule XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-08-01

    Dr. Hans Moritz Guenther (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) has requested nightly observations of the classical T Tauri star AA Tau in order to schedule x-ray observations with XMM-Newton that have been planned for between 2013 August 15 and September 15. The purpose of the AAVSO observations is to determine whether AA Tau is at a suitable magnitude for the satellite observations. Taurus is difficult to observe during this time period but that is exactly why AAVSO assistance is needed! AA Tau is a morning object, and also, many of the professional ground-based telescopes are offline because of the US southwest monsoon season. Since it is critical to know the brightness of AA Tau, AAVSO observations will be truly essential. Nightly visual and snapshot (not more than once per night) observations beginning now and continuing through September 20 are needed. Coverage beginning ahead of the XMM window is requested because there is a one- to two-week lead time for the target to be inserted into the telescope schedule. Continuing the nightly observations a few days beyond the end of the XMM window will give better optical context for the x-ray data. AA Tau ranges between ~12.8V and ~16.1V; since December 2011 or earlier it has been at ~14.5V. The most recent observation in the AAVSO International Database shows it at 14.779V on 2013 Feb 5 (J. Roe, Bourbon, MO). Dr. Guenther writes, "AA Tau is surrounded by a thick accretion disk which is seen nearly edge-on. For decades the light curve of AA Tau showed regular eclipsing events when the accretion funnel rotated through the line of sight. However, earlier this year J. Bouvier and his group found that this behavior changed dramatically: AA Tau now seems to be deeply absorbed all the time (V band 14.5 mag). In collaboration with this group we will perform X-ray observations of AA Tau with the XMM-Newton satellite." Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plo! tter (http

  1. The 9aaTAD Transactivation Domains: From Gal4 to p53

    PubMed Central

    Havelka, Marek; Rezacova, Martina

    2016-01-01

    The family of the Nine amino acid Transactivation Domain, 9aaTAD family, comprises currently over 40 members. The 9aaTAD domains are universally recognized by the transcriptional machinery from yeast to man. We had identified the 9aaTAD domains in the p53, Msn2, Pdr1 and B42 activators by our prediction algorithm. In this study, their competence to activate transcription as small peptides was proven. Not surprisingly, we elicited immense 9aaTAD divergence in hundreds of identified orthologs and numerous examples of the 9aaTAD species' convergence. We found unforeseen similarity of the mammalian p53 with yeast Gal4 9aaTAD domains. Furthermore, we identified artificial 9aaTAD domains generated accidentally by others. From an evolutionary perspective, the observed easiness to generate 9aaTAD transactivation domains indicates the natural advantage for spontaneous generation of transcription factors from DNA binding precursors. PMID:27618436

  2. Antimicrobial peptides and nitric oxide production by neutrophils from periodontitis subjects

    PubMed Central

    Mariano, F.S.; Campanelli, A.P.; Nociti, F.H.; Mattos-Graner, R.O.; Gonçalves, R.B.

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in periodontitis by producing nitric oxide (NO) and antimicrobial peptides, molecules with microbicidal activity via oxygen-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. It is unknown whether variation in the production of antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37, human neutrophil peptides (HNP) 1-3, and NO by neutrophils influences the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. We compared the production of these peptides and NO by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated neutrophils isolated from healthy subjects and from patients with periodontitis. Peripheral blood neutrophils were cultured with or without Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-LPS (Aa-LPS), Porphyromonas gingivalis-LPS (Pg-LPS) and Escherichia coli-LPS (Ec-LPS). qRT-PCR was used to determine quantities of HNP 1-3 and LL-37 mRNA in neutrophils. Amounts of HNP 1-3 and LL-37 proteins in the cell culture supernatants were also determined by ELISA. In addition, NO levels in neutrophil culture supernatants were quantitated by the Griess reaction. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients cultured with Aa-LPS, Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS expressed higher HNP 1-3 mRNA than neutrophils from healthy subjects. LL-37 mRNA expression was higher in neutrophils from patients stimulated with Aa-LPS. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients produced significantly higher LL-37 protein levels than neutrophils from healthy subjects when stimulated with Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS, but no difference was observed in HNP 1-3 production. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients cultured or not with Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS produced significantly lower NO levels than neutrophils from healthy subjects. The significant differences in the production of LL-37 and NO between neutrophils from healthy and periodontitis subjects indicate that production of these molecules might influence individual susceptibility to important periodontal pathogens. PMID:22850872

  3. Introducing structured abstracts for A&A articles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertout, Claude; Schneider, Peter

    2005-10-01

    Context: Due to their wide availability, abstracts have become the most important part of any astrophysical paper. Aims: Having noticed that abstracts published in astronomical journals are not always optimal, we introduce the concept of structured abstracts for A&A articles. Methods: We explain what structured abstracts are and where they come from, provide examples showing how to structure an abstract, and discuss the advantages and drawbacks of this novel concept. In an on-line appendix, we show what some published abstracts look like once they are structured. Results: We demonstrate the improvements in information content, readability, and style that can be made when writing structured abstracts instead of traditional ones. Conclusions: A new version 6.0 of the A&A LaTeX macro is now available for structuring the abstracts of articles, and A&A authors are kindly invited to use it for their new submissions.

  4. Outcomes From AAS Hack Day at the 227th AAS Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This is a final post from the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. This special summary of AAS Hack Day, a meeting of AAS members to collaboratively work on various small projects, was written by Meredith Rawls (@Merrdiff) and was originally posted on astrobites.com.As the 227thAmerican Astronomical Society meeting drew to a close (see highlights from Day 1, Day 2, Day 3, and Day 4), a group of at least 50 attendees spent Day 4working on small projects fondly called hacks. Thanks to sponsorship from LSST and Northrup Grumman, the industrious hackers werewell-caffeinated and fed so we could devote time and energy toworking in groups on one-day projects.TheHack Day beganat 10am with pitches. Anybody with a project idea was welcome to briefly speak and try to convince others to work with them. Only someideas panned out, but the enthusiasm was palpable. Its not every day you get a full room of astronomers and affiliates eager to spend hours working on fun and useful projects to benefit the community.#hackAAS is getting underway! #aas227 pic.twitter.com/yX7jlOnSCK James R A Davenport (@jradavenport) January 8, 2016Here is a rundown of what we accomplished. Pretty impressive for a single day! Many thanks to fellow astrobiter Erika Nesvold (now at Carnegie DTM; @erikanesvold) whose hack was live-documenting all the other hacks. Her tweets as @astrobites appeared with the #hackaas hashtag, and her notes made this recap post infinitely easier to write.Interested in joining the fun? Sign up for Hack Day at the 2017 JanuaryAAS meeting (its free with meeting registration), and consider applying for the .Astronomy conference this summer.Towards Optimal Session Scheduling:Adrian Price-Whelan (Columbia), David Hogg (NYU), and Scott Idem (AAS) began writing a program to take all submitted abstracts to a conference like AAS and sort them using keywords to avoid scheduling similar talks in parallel sessions. Its impossible to make everyone happy, but minimizing conflicts

  5. Wear Behaviour of Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Nanocrystalline AA 4032 Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthil Saravanari, M. S.; Kumaresh Babu, S. P.; Sivaprasad, K.

    2016-09-01

    The present paper emphasizes the friction and wear properties of Carbon Nanotubes reinforced AA 4032 nanocomposites prepared by powder metallurgy technique. CNTs are multi-wall in nature and prepared by electric arc discharge method. Multi-walled CNTs are blended with AA 4032 elemental powders and compaction followed by sintering to get bulk nanocomposites. The strength of the composites has been evaluated by microhardness and the surface contact between the nanocomposites and EN 32 steel has been evaluated by Pin on disk tester. The results are proven that reinforcement of CNTs play a major role in the enhancement of hardness and wear.

  6. Characterization of amyloid in equine recurrent uveitis as AA amyloid.

    PubMed

    Ostevik, L; de Souza, G A; Wien, T N; Gunnes, G; Sørby, R

    2014-01-01

    Two horses with chronic uveitis and histological lesions consistent with equine recurrent uveitis (ERU) were examined. Microscopical findings in the ciliary body included deposits of amyloid lining the non-pigmented epithelium, intracytoplasmic, rod-shaped, eosinophilic inclusions and intraepithelial infiltration of T lymphocytes. Ultrastructural examination of the ciliary body of one horse confirmed the presence of abundant extracellular deposits of non-branching fibrils (9-11 nm in diameter) consistent with amyloid. Immunohistochemistry revealed strong positive labelling for AA amyloid and mass spectrometry showed the amyloid to consist primarily of serum amyloid A1 in both cases. The findings suggest that localized, intraocular AA amyloidosis may occur in horses with ERU.

  7. An Existential Approach: An Alternative to the AA Model of Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Maria A.; Cobia, Debra

    2008-01-01

    Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is the most widely used organization for the treatment of alcoholism. AA's philosophy has changed how many people view themselves and their substance use. The majority of substance abuse programs in the United States use the 12 steps, either by making them the basis of their treatment program, or by introducing AA to…

  8. Displaying Now-Understanding: The Finnish Change-of-State Token "aa"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koivisto, Aino

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the use of the Finnish change-of-state token "aa" that has previously not been identified. The central claim is that even though "aa" indicates a cognitive shift experienced by the speaker, it does not function as a receipt of new information. Instead, the token "aa" indicates that the speaker…

  9. An Analysis of the Rise and Fall of the AA-MAS Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Sheryl S.; Thurlow, Martha L.; Ysseldyke, James E.; Edwards, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    In 2005, to address concerns about students who might fall in the "gap" between the regular assessment and the alternate assessment based on alternate achievement standards (AA-AAS), the U.S. Department of Education announced that states could develop alternate assessments based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS). This article…

  10. [Expression of mosquitocidal Cyt1Aa toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis in Asticcacaulis excentricus].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Da-sheng; Crickmore, Neil; Cai, Ya-jun; Yan, Jian-ping; Yuan, Zhi-ming

    2007-04-01

    Asticcacaulis excentricus, who lives in upper-layer waters providing food resource to the mosquito larvae and has been proven to be a successful host to produce the mosquitocidal binary toxins or Cry11Aa toxin from Bacilli (Liu et al., 1996, Nat Biotech 14: 343; Armengol, et al. , 2005, Curr Microbiol 51: 430), was developed to express cyt1Aa gene from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti). Two A. excentricus transformants were constructed with the attempt of producing CytlAa alone and alongside with Cry11Aa, repectively. Detection of expressed Cry11Aa and CytlAa proteins by immunoblot in the recombinant A. excentricus clones showed that either cry11Aa or cyt1Aa was expressed well solely but not simultaneously although both restriction analyses of plasmid DNA and DNA sequencing showed that the transformed plasmid was identical to scheme. To investigate the reason why the recombinant A. excentricus harboring both genes and their ribosome binding site (RBS) sequences expressed only Cry11Aa, the total RNA of A. excentricus cells was extracted and revealed three-band pattern in which all RNA molecule weights are not greater than 16S RNA of Escherichia coli by formamide agarose gel electrophoresis, indicating that different RNA systems within these two Gram-negative strains required distinguishingly organised constructs to express multiple foreign genes. It is hypothesized that an extra promoter upstream of RBS sequence is required to express cyt1Aa in the cry11Aa-cyt1Aa tandom plasmid.

  11. 49 CFR 178.56 - Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.56 Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4AA480 cylinder is a welded steel cylinder having a...

  12. 49 CFR 178.37 - Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.37 Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel... conform to the following: (1) A DOT-3AA cylinder is a seamless steel cylinder with a water...

  13. 49 CFR 178.56 - Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.56 Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4AA480 cylinder is a welded steel cylinder having a...

  14. 49 CFR 178.37 - Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.37 Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel... conform to the following: (1) A DOT-3AA cylinder is a seamless steel cylinder with a water...

  15. 49 CFR 178.56 - Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.56 Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4AA480 cylinder is a welded steel cylinder having a...

  16. 49 CFR 178.56 - Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.56 Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4AA480 cylinder is a welded steel cylinder having a...

  17. 49 CFR 178.37 - Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.37 Specification 3AA and 3AAX seamless steel... conform to the following: (1) A DOT-3AA cylinder is a seamless steel cylinder with a water...

  18. DEVELOPMENTAL AND WITHDRAWAL EFFECTS OF ADOLESCENT AAS EXPOSURE ON THE GLUTAMATERGIC SYSTEM IN HAMSTERS

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, Maria; Ricci, Lesley A.; Melloni, Richard H.

    2011-01-01

    In the Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) glutamate activity has been implicated in the modulation of adolescent anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS)-induced aggression. The current study investigated the time course of adolescent AAS-induced neurodevelopmental and withdrawal effects on the glutamatergic system and examined whether these changes paralleled those of adolescent AAS-induced aggression. Glutamate activity in brain areas comprising the aggression circuit in hamsters and aggression were examined following 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks of AAS treatment or 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks following the cessation of AAS exposure. In these studies glutamate activity was examined using vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2). The onset of aggression was observed following 2 weeks exposure to AAS and continued to increase showing maximal aggression levels after 4 weeks of AAS treatment. This aggressive phenotype was detected after 2 weeks of withdrawal from AAS. The time-course of AAS-induced changes in latero anterior hypothalamus (LAH)-VGLUT2 closely paralleled increases in aggression. Increases in LAH-VGLUT2 were first detected in animals exposed to AAS for 2 weeks and were maintained up to 3 weeks following the cessation of AAS treatment. AAS treatment also produced developmental and long-term alterations in VGLUT2 expression within other aggression areas. However, AAS-induced changes in glutamate activity within these regions did not coincide with changes in aggression. Together, these data indicate that adolescent AAS treatment leads to alterations in the glutamatergic system in brain areas implicated in aggression control, yet only alterations in LAH-glutamate parallel the time course of AAS-induced changes in the aggressive phenotype. PMID:21500881

  19. Developmental and withdrawal effects of adolescent AAS exposure on the glutamatergic system in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Maria; Ricci, Lesley A; Melloni, Richard H

    2011-06-01

    In the Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) glutamate activity has been implicated in the modulation of adolescent anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS)-induced aggression. The current study investigated the time course of adolescent AAS-induced neurodevelopmental and withdrawal effects on the glutamatergic system and examined whether these changes paralleled those of adolescent AAS-induced aggression. Glutamate activity in brain areas comprising the aggression circuit in hamsters and aggression levels were examined following 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks of AAS treatment or 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks following the cessation of AAS exposure. In these studies glutamate activity was examined using vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2). The onset of aggression was observed following 2 weeks exposure to AAS and continued to increase showing maximal aggression levels after 4 weeks of AAS treatment. This aggressive phenotype was detected after 2 weeks of withdrawal from AAS. The time-course of AAS-induced changes in latero-anterior hypothalamus (LAH)-VGLUT2 closely paralleled increases in aggression. Increases in LAH-VGLUT2 were first detected in animals exposed to AAS for 2 weeks and were maintained up to 3 weeks following the cessation of AAS treatment. AAS treatment also produced developmental and long-term alterations in VGLUT2 expression within other aggression areas. However, AAS-induced changes in glutamate activity within these regions did not coincide with changes in aggression. Together, these data indicate that adolescent AAS treatment leads to alterations in the glutamatergic system in brain areas implicated in aggression control, yet only alterations in LAH-glutamate parallel the time course of AAS-induced changes in the aggressive phenotype.

  20. 40 CFR Table Aa-1 to Subpart Aa of... - Kraft Pulping Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Kraft Pulping Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O AA Table AA-1 to Subpart AA of Part 98 Protection of Environment... Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O Wood furnish Biomass-based emissions...

  1. 40 CFR Table Aa-1 to Subpart Aa of... - Kraft Pulping Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Kraft Pulping Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O AA Table AA-1 to Subpart AA of Part 98 Protection of Environment... Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O Wood furnish Biomass-based emissions...

  2. 40 CFR Table Aa-1 to Subpart Aa of... - Kraft Pulping Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Kraft Pulping Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O AA Table AA-1 to Subpart AA of Part 98 Protection of Environment... Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O Wood furnish Biomass-based emissions...

  3. 40 CFR Table Aa-1 to Subpart Aa of... - Kraft Pulping Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Kraft Pulping Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O AA Table AA-1 to Subpart AA of Part 98 Protection of Environment... Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O Wood furnish Biomass-based emissions...

  4. Controlling Works, Section AA at Bear Trap Dam, Section BB ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Controlling Works, Section A-A at Bear Trap Dam, Section B-B at Bear-Trap Dam, Section C-C at Sluice Gate - Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, Lockport Controlling Works, Illinois Waterway River Mile 293.2, Lockport, Will County, IL

  5. 32. SECTIONS AA, BB, CC, DD, AND EE WASTE CALCINATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. SECTIONS A-A, B-B, C-C, D-D, AND E-E WASTE CALCINATION FACILITY SHOWING RELATIONSHIPS OF DIFFERENT FLOOR LEVELS TO ONE ANOTHER. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106353. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-633-A-3. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. Fatigue properties of as-welded AA6005 and AA6082 aluminium alloys in T1 and T5 temper condition

    SciTech Connect

    Ranes, M.; Kluken, A.O.; Midling, O.T.

    1996-12-31

    The present investigation was undertaken to determine the as-welded fatigue properties of AA6005 and AA6082 aluminium alloys in the T1 and T5 temper conditions. Extruded flat bars of the base materials were welded by means of the Metal Inert Gas (MIG), Friction Stir and Plasma-keyhole techniques. The latter technique was only employed for alloy AA6005. The weldments were subsequently fatigue tested at a load ratio of 0.5. The results revealed that the friction stir welds had fatigue properties superior to both the MIG and Plasma-keyhole welds. For alloy AA6005 the fatigue properties of the friction stir weld was close to the base material properties. The shortest fatigue life was exhibited by the MIG welds. The fatigue strength of these weldments appear to be affected by the base metal temper condition. For this reason, MIG welds on alloy AA6082 should be performed in the T5 temper condition, while alloy AA6005 should be welded in the T1 temper condition. Plasma-keyhole welds should be performed on T1 tempered material rather than on T5 tempered material. Repair welding of MIG welds on the T1 tempered base material resulted in improved fatigue properties of AA6082 weldments, while the fatigue strength of AA6005 weldments remained unaffected. The fatigue properties of MIG welds in alloy AA6082 correspond well with the static strength properties.

  7. Core-corona PSt/P(BA-AA) composite particles by two-stage emulsion polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Delong; Ren, Xiaolin; Zhang, Xinya; Liao, Shijun

    2016-03-01

    Raspberry-shaped composite particles with polystyrene (PSt) as core and poly(n-butyl acrylate-co-acrylic acid) (P(BA-AA)) as corona were synthesized via emulsion polymerization. The random copolymer, P(BA-AA), was pre-prepared and used as a polymeric surfactant, its emulsifying properties adjusted by changing the mass ratio of BA and AA. The morphology of the resulting core-corona composite particles, P(St/P(BA-AA)), could be regulated and controlled by varying the concentrations of P(BA-AA) or the mass ratio of BA:AA in P(BA-AA). The experimental results indicate that 3.0-6.0 wt% of P(BA-AA) is required to obtain stable composite emulsions, and P(BA-AA) with a mass ratio of BA:AA = 1:2 is able to generate distinct core-corona structures. A mechanism of composite particle formation is proposed based on the high affinity between the PSt core and the hydrophobic segments of P(BA-A). The regular morphology of the colloidal film is expected to facilitate potential application of core-corona particles in the field of light scattering. Furthermore, the diversity of core-corona particles can be expanded by replacing P(BA-AA) corona particles with other amphiphilic particles.

  8. New perspectives on contributing factors to the monthly behavior of the aa geomagnetic index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Blanca; Pazos, Marni; González, Luis Xavier

    2016-12-01

    We studied the Aa geomagnetic index ( aa index daily average) behavior on a monthly timescale using data from 1868 to 2015 for cycles 11-24. We identified solar- and lunar-associated periodicities in the Aa time series and found statistically significant Aa minima values a few days before the full Moon and high Aa values during the new Moon. When considering all the cycles, it was clear that the deepest Aa minima occurred during the Aa descending activity phase. However, when the cycles were separated according to the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), the Aa minima came from the contribution of cycles with the IMF pointing toward the Sun (Type 1). Furthermore, during the descending phase of cycles with the IMF pointing away from the Sun (Type 2), the smallest Aa index values were found along with smaller changes compared to Type 1 cases. This behavior implies that during Type 1 cycles there are larger Aa perturbations than during Type 2 cycles. It is very likely that the mechanisms responsible for the Aa monthly behavior are a combination of solar and lunar effects that depend on several factors: (a) the Moon phases (new and full Moon), (b) the phase of the solar cycle (ascending or descending), and (c) the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field (away or toward the Sun).

  9. A Status Report on the AAS Astronomy Ambassadors Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fienberg, Richard Tresch; Fraknoi, Andrew; Gurton, Suzanne; Hurst, Anna; Schatz, Dennis L.

    2014-06-01

    The American Astronomical Society, in partnership with the Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP), has launched a series of professional-development workshops and a community of practice designed to improve early-career astronomers’ ability to communicate effectively with students and the public. Called AAS Astronomy Ambassadors, the program provides training and mentoring for young astronomers, from advanced undergraduates to beginning faculty; it also provides them access to resources and a network of contacts within the astronomy education and public outreach (EPO) community. Ambassadors are provided with a library of outreach activities and resource materials suitable for a range of venues and audiences. For much of this library we are using resources developed by organizations such as the ASP, the Pacific Science Center, and the Center for Astronomy Education for other outreach programs, though some resources have been created by one of us (AF) specifically for this program. After a period of evaluation and revision, the program’s “Menu of Outreach Opportunities for Science Education” (MOOSE) is now posted on the AAS website at http://aas.org/outreach/moose-menu-outreach-opportunities-science-education.The first two Astronomy Ambassadors workshops were held at AAS meetings in January 2013 and January 2014; each served 30 young astronomers chosen from about twice that many applicants. Web-based follow-up activities are being provided through a website at the ASP designed to keep cohorts of educators trained in their programs in touch with one another. The AAS is exploring ways to fund additional workshops at future winter meetings; suggestions are most welcome. Meanwhile, the Astronomy Ambassadors trained to date have logged more than 150 outreach events, reaching many thousands of children and adults across the U.S. and Canada.

  10. Parasporal body formation via overexpression of the Cry10Aa toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis, and Cry10Aa-Cyt1Aa synergism.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Soto, Alejandro; Del Rincón-Castro, M Cristina; Espinoza, Ana M; Ibarra, Jorge E

    2009-07-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis is the most widely used microbial control agent against mosquitoes and blackflies. Its insecticidal success is based on an arsenal of toxins, such as Cry4A, Cry4B, Cry11A, and Cyt1A, harbored in the parasporal crystal of the bacterium. A fifth toxin, Cry10Aa, is synthesized at very low levels; previous attempts to clone and express Cry10Aa were limited, and no parasporal body was formed. By using a new strategy, the whole Cry10A operon was cloned in the pSTAB vector, where both open reading frames ORF1 and ORF2 (and the gap between the two) were located, under the control of the cyt1A operon and the STAB-SD stabilizer sequence characteristic of this vector. Once the acrystalliferous mutant 4Q7 of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis was transformed with this construct, parasporal bodies were observed by phase-contrast microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Discrete, ca. 0.9-microm amorphous parasporal bodies were observed in the mature sporangia, which were readily purified by gradient centrifugation once autolysis had occurred. Pure parasporal bodies showed two major bands of ca. 68 and 56 kDa on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis. These bands were further characterized by N-terminal sequencing of tryptic fragments using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry analysis, which identified both bands as the products of ORF1 and ORF2, respectively. Bioassays against fourth-instar larvae of Aedes aegypti of spore-crystal complex and pure crystals of Cry10Aa gave estimated 50% lethal concentrations of 2,061 ng/ml and 239 ng/ml, respectively. Additionally, synergism was clearly detected between Cry10A and Cyt1A, as the synergistic levels (potentiation rates) were estimated at 13.3 for the mixture of Cyt1A crystals and Cry10Aa spore-crystal complex and 12.6 for the combination of Cyt1A and Cry10Aa pure crystals.

  11. The T Cell Response to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    disease (11). Other clinical features of the disease include deep pain on mastication, first molar mobility, distolabial migration of maxillary incisors...transformed into one shot chemically competent E. coli TOP -10 (InVitrogen). 40 .tl from each transformation was grown at 37°C overnight on LB plates...5. Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) isolation The 13 ml vacutainer with SST Gel and Clot Activator, or "Tiger Top ," was centrifuged at 3800

  12. Interaction of oral bacteria with gingival epithelial cell multilayers.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, B C; Moffatt, C E; Hagerty, D; Whitmore, S E; Brown, T A; Graves, D T; Lamont, R J

    2011-06-01

    Primary gingival epithelial cells were cultured in multilayers as a model for the study of interactions with oral bacteria associated with health and periodontal disease. Multilayers maintained at an air-liquid interface in low-calcium medium displayed differentiation and cytokeratin properties characteristic of junctional epithelium. Multilayers were infected with fluorescently labeled Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum or Streptococcus gordonii, and bacterial association was determined by confocal microscopy and quantitative image analysis. Porphyromonas gingivalis invaded intracellularly and spread from cell to cell; A. actinomycetemcomitans and F. nucleatum remained extracellular and showed intercellular movement through the multilayer; whereas S. gordonii remained extracellular and predominantly associated with the superficial cell layer. None of the bacterial species disrupted barrier function as measured by transepithelial electrical resistance. P. gingivalis did not elicit secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. However, A. actinomycetemcomitans and S. gordonii induced interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-6 and IL-8 secretion; and F. nucleatum stimulated production of IL-1β and TNF-α. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, F. nucleatum and S. gordonii, but not P. gingivalis, increased levels of apoptosis after 24 h infection. The results indicate that the organisms with pathogenic potential were able to traverse the epithelium, whereas the commensal bacteria did not. In addition, distinct host responses characterized the interaction between the junctional epithelium and oral bacteria.

  13. An improved OPLS-AA force field for carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Kony, D; Damm, W; Stoll, S; Van Gunsteren, W F

    2002-11-30

    This work describes an improved version of the original OPLS-all atom (OPLS-AA) force field for carbohydrates (Damm et al., J Comp Chem 1997, 18, 1955). The improvement is achieved by applying additional scaling factors for the electrostatic interactions between 1,5- and 1,6-interactions. This new model is tested first for improving the conformational energetics of 1,2-ethanediol, the smallest polyol. With a 1,5-scaling factor of 1.25 the force field calculated relative energies are in excellent agreement with the ab initio-derived data. Applying the new 1,5-scaling makes it also necessary to use a 1,6-scaling factor for the interactions between the C4 and C6 atoms in hexopyranoses. After torsional parameter fitting, this improves the conformational energetics in comparison to the OPLS-AA force field. The set of hexopyranoses included in the torsional parameter derivation consists of the two anomers of D-glucose, D-mannose, and D-galactose, as well as of the methyl-pyranosides of D-glucose, D-mannose. Rotational profiles for the rotation of the exocyclic group and of different hydroxyl groups are also compared for the two force fields and at the ab initio level of theory. The new force field reduces the overly high barriers calculated using the OPLS-AA force field. This leads to better sampling, which was shown to produce more realistic conformational behavior for hexopyranoses in liquid simulation. From 10-ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of alpha-D-glucose and alpha-D-galactose the ratios for the three different conformations of the hydroxymethylene group and the average (3)J(H,H) coupling constants are derived and compared to experimental values. The results obtained for OPLS-AA-SEI force field are in good agreement with experiment whereas the properties derived for the OPLS-AA force field suffer from sampling problems. The undertaken investigations show that the newly derived OPLS-AA-SEI force field will allow simulating larger carbohydrates or

  14. Association between periodontal condition and subgingival microbiota in women during pregnancy: a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    BORGO, Priscila Viola; RODRIGUES, Viviane Aparecida Arenas; FEITOSA, Alfredo Carlos Rodrigues; XAVIER, Karla Correa Barcelos; AVILA-CAMPOS, Mario Julio

    2014-01-01

    Objectivo In this study, the gingival conditions and the quantitative detection for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia in pregnant women were determined. Material and Methods Quantitative determinations of periodontal bacteria by using a SyBr green system in women during pregnancy were performed. Women at the 2nd and 3rd trimesters of pregnancy and non-pregnant women were included in this study. A. actinomycetemcomitans was observed in high numbers in women at the 2nd and 3rd trimesters of pregnancy with a significant difference (p<0.05). F. nucleatum and P. intermedia were also observed in high levels. Results and Conclusion Our results show that pregnant women are more susceptible to gingivitis, and the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans in subgingival biofilm might be taken into account for the treatment of periodontal disease. PMID:25591021

  15. Promoters of AaGL2 and AaMIXTA-Like1 genes of Artemisia annua direct reporter gene expression in glandular and non-glandular trichomes

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Sunita; Longchar, Bendangchuchang; Singh, Alka; Gupta, Vikrant

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report cloning and analysis of promoters of GLABRA2 (AaGL2) homolog and a MIXTA-Like (AaMIXTA-Like1) gene from Artemisia annua. The upstream regulatory regions of AaGL2 and AaMIXTA-Like1 showed the presence of several crucial cis-acting elements. Arabidopsis and A. annua seedlings were transiently transfected with the promoter-GUS constructs using a robust agro-infiltration method. Both AaGL2 and AaMIXTA-Like1 promoters showed GUS expression preferentially in Arabidopsis single-celled trichomes and glandular as well as T-shaped trichomes of A. annua. Transgenic Arabidopsis harboring constructs in which AaGL2 or AaMIXTA-Like1 promoters would control GFP expression, showed fluorescence emanating specifically from trichome cells. Our study provides a fast and efficient method to study trichome-specific expression, and 2 promoters that have potential for targeted metabolic engineering in plants. PMID:26340695

  16. Frictional conditions between alloy AA6060 aluminium and tool steel

    SciTech Connect

    Wideroee, Fredrik; Welo, Torgeir

    2011-05-04

    The frictional conditions in the new process of screw extrusion of aluminium have been investigated. The contact behaviour between the aluminum alloy and the tool steel in the extruder is vital for understanding the extrusion process. Using a compressive-rotational method for frictional measurements the conditions for unlubricated sticking friction between aluminum alloy AA6060 and tool steel at different combinations of temperatures and pressures have been investigated. In this method the samples in the form of disks are put under hydrostatic pressure while simultaneously being rotated at one end. Pins made from contrast material have been inserted into the samples to measure the deformation introduced. This approach along with 3D simulations form a method for determining the frictional conditions. The paper describes the test method and the results. It was found that the necessary pressure for sticking to occur between the aluminum AA6060 and the different parts of the extruder is heavily influenced by the temperature.

  17. Critical optical properties of AA-stacked multilayer graphenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Chih-Wei; Chen, Szu-Chao; Huang, Yuan-Cheng; Shyu, Feng-Lin; Lin, Ming-Fa

    2013-07-01

    The band structures and optical properties of AA-stacked multilayer graphenes are calculated by the tight-binding model and gradient approximation. For a nL-layer AA-stacked graphene, there are nL peaks at both low and middle frequencies. The threshold energy of odd-layer graphene is much lower than that of even-layer graphene for nL<10. The differences in the electronic structures and optical properties between the odd and even layers are reduced with increasing nL. When nL grows to 30 (200), the spectra of 2D graphene are almost identical to those of 3D graphite at middle (low) frequencies.

  18. HIST1H2AA — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    HIST1H2AA, a member of the histone 2A family, is a core component of the nucleosome. The nucleosome is a histone octamer containing two molecules each of H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 assembled in one H3-H4 heterotetramer and two H2A-H2B heterodimers. Nucleosomes wrap and compact DNA into chromatin, limiting DNA accessibility to the cellular machineries which require DNA as a template (the octamer wraps approximately 147 bp of DNA). Histones thereby play a central role in transcription regulation, DNA repair, DNA replication and chromosomal stability. DNA accessibility is regulated via a complex set of post-translational modifications of histones, also called histone code, and nucleosome remodeling. The HIST1H2AA gene is intronless and encodes a member of the histone H2A family. Transcripts from this gene contain a palindromic termination element.

  19. AA amyloidosis associated with systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Saha, Abhijeet; Chopra, Yogiraj; Theis, Jason D; Vrana, Julie A; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2013-10-01

    We report a 12-year-old boy with nephrotic syndrome due to renal AA amyloidosis. The AA amyloidosis was associated with a 3-year history of systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The presence of serum amyloid A protein was confirmed by laser microdissection of Congo Red-positive glomeruli and vessels followed by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry; this analysis excluded hereditary and familial amyloidosis. Aggressive management of the systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis resulted in improvement in clinical and laboratory parameters. The case represents an unusual cause of nephrotic syndrome in children. Early diagnosis of renal amyloidosis and management of systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis is paramount to preventing progression of kidney disease.

  20. The periodontal health of lead-exposed children living in a shipyard industrial area.

    PubMed

    Youravong, Nattaporn; Teanpaisan, Rawee

    2015-05-01

    In a cross-sectional design, 292 schoolchildren living around a shipyard area, known to be contaminated with lead from shipyard industry, were examined to verify the association between lead exposure and periodontal health. The probing pocket depth (PD), bleeding on probing, plaque and calculus, and the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) in subgingival crevices were recorded. Gingival inflammation was the most common (98%) among children in the area. No significant difference in gingival inflammation was observed between high blood lead (PbB) and low PbB children. The prevalence rate of probing PD of ≥5 mm was 14%. The high PbB group showed more deep pockets at tooth 16 (upper right first permanent molar) and tooth 46 (lower right first permanent molar) than the low PbB group. The odds ratios (ORs) for having probing PD ≥5 mm after adjusting for other factors were 3.63 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.24-10.61; p = 0.02) for tooth 16 and 3.93 (95% CI, 1.18-13.00; p = 0.02) for tooth 46. The presence of Aa was observed in 17% of the children and it significantly increased in high PbB compared with low PbB children at tooth 46 (OR = 5.53, 95% CI: 1.68-18.15; p = 0.005). This study may suggest no association between lead exposure and gingival inflammation, yet there was the involvement of deeper periodontal tissue in lead-exposed children.

  1. Co-expression and synergism analysis of Vip3Aa29 and Cyt2Aa3 insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiumei; Liu, Tao; Sun, Zhiguang; Guan, Peng; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Shiquan; Li, Shuangcheng; Deng, Qiming; Wang, Lingxia; Zheng, Aiping; Li, Ping

    2012-04-01

    Vegetative insecticidal protein (Vip3) from Bacillus thuringiensis shows high activity against lepidopteran insects. Cytolytic δ-endotoxin (Cyt) also has high toxicity to dipteran larvae and synergism with other crystal proteins (Cry), but synergism between Cyt and Vip3 proteins has not been tested. We analyzed for synergism between Cyt2Aa3 and Vip3Aa29. Both cyt2Aa3 and vip3Aa29 genes were co-expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 carried on vector pCOLADuet-1. Vip3Aa29 showed insecticidal activity against Chilo suppressalis and Spodoptera exigua, with 50% lethal concentration (LC(50)) at 24.0 and 36.6 μg ml(-1), respectively. It could also inhibit Helicoverpa armigera growth, with 50% inhibition concentration at 22.6 μg ml(-1). While Cyt2Aa3 was toxic to Culex quinquefasciatus (LC(50): 0.53 μg ml(-1)) and Chironomus tepperi (LC(50): 36 μg ml(-1)), it did not inhibit C. suppressalis, S. exigua, and H. armigera. However, the co-expression of Cyt2Aa3 and Vip3Aa29 showed synergistic effect on C. suppressalis and S. exigua, and the individual activities were strengthened 3.35- and 4.34-fold, respectively. The co-expression had no synergism against C. tepperi and H. armigera, but exerted some antagonistic effect on Cx. quinquefasciatus. The synergism between Cyt2Aa and Vip3Aa was thus discovered for the first time, which confirmed that Cyt toxin can enhance the toxicity of other toxins against some non-target insects. By synergism analysis, the effectiveness of microbial insecticides can be verified.

  2. Cell volume regulation in hemoglobin CC and AA erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, L.R.; Orringer, E.P.

    1987-03-01

    Swelling hemoglobin CC erythrocytes stimulates a ouabain-insensitive K flux that restores original cell volume. Studies were performed with the K analog, /sup 86/Rb. This volume regulatory pathway was characterized for its anion dependence, sensitivity to loop diuretics, and requirement for Na. The swelling-induced K flux was eliminated if intracellular chloride was replaced by nitrate and both swelling-activated K influx and efflux were partially inhibited by 1 mM furosemide or bumetanide. K influx in swollen hemoglobin CC cells was not diminished when Na in the incubation medium was replaced with choline, indicating Na independence of the swelling-induced flux. Identical experiments with hemoglobin AA cells also demonstrated a swelling-induced increase in K flux, but the magnitude and duration of this increase were considerably less than that seen with hemoglobin CC cells. The increased K flux in hemoglobin AA cells was likewise sensitive to anion replacement and to loop diuretics and did not require the presence of Na. These data indicate that a volume-activated K pathway with similar transport characteristics exists in both hemoglobin CC and AA red cells.

  3. Long-term biases in geomagnetic K and aa indices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis is made of the geomagnetic-activity aa index and its source K-index data from groups of ground-based observatories in Britain, and Australia, 1868.0-2009.0, solar cycles 11-23. The K data show persistent biases, especially for high (low) K-activity levels at British (Australian) observatories. From examination of multiple subsets of the K data we infer that the biases are not predominantly the result of changes in observatory location, localized induced magnetotelluric currents, changes in magnetometer technology, or the modernization of K-value estimation methods. Instead, the biases appear to be artifacts of the latitude-dependent scaling used to assign K values to particular local levels of geomagnetic activity. The biases are not effectively removed by weighting factors used to estimate aa. We show that long-term averages of the aa index, such as annual averages, are dominated by medium-level geomagnetic activity levels having K values of 3 and 4. ?? 2011 Author(s).

  4. Isolation of a cytochrome aa3 gene from Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    PubMed Central

    O'Brian, Mark R.; Maier, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    Bradyhizobium japonicum strain LO501 is a Tn5-induced mutant that does not express the terminal oxidase cytochrome aa3 (cytochrome-c oxidase, EC 1.9.3.1). Two and one-half kilobase pairs of LO501 genomic DNA that flanks the transposon was isolated and used as a hybridization probe to obtain the wild-type gene from a cosmid library. Two subcloned fragments from two of the isolated cosmids were ligated into broad host range vectors, and restriction maps of these fragments were generated. The resultant plasmids, pCA1 and pBL33, each contained DNA homologous to that mutated in strain LO501. The two plasmids were each introduced into strain LO501 by conjugal transfer, and it was found that pCA1, but not pBL33, complemented the oxidase mutant. The transconjugant strain LO501[pCA1] expressed wild-type levels of cytochrome aa3, as discerned spectrophotometrically, and had restored N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine oxidase activity. Furthermore, the frequency of complementation of LO501 cells that received pCA1 by conjugation was 1.0, demonstrating that pCA1 complemented the mutant in trans. The results show that pCA1 contains the entire wild-type gene that was mutated in strain LO501, and this gene is required for cytochrome aa3 expression. Images PMID:16593835

  5. The amino acid sequence of protein AA from a burro (Equus asinus).

    PubMed

    Sletten, Knut; Johnson, Kenneth H; Westermark, Per

    2003-09-01

    The primary structure of amyloid fibril protein AA of a burro has been determined by Edman degradation. The 80 amino acid residue long protein shows strong resemblance to that of other mammalian AA-proteins and differs from equine protein AA at 5 positions: Burro/horse positions 20 (Q/N), 44 (R,Q, K/K,Q), 59 (G,L/G,A), 61 (Q/E) and 65 (N/R).

  6. Aedes cadherin mediates the in vivo toxicity of the Cry11Aa toxin to Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Aimanova, Karlygash G.; Gill, Sarjeet S.

    2014-01-01

    Cadherin plays an important role in the toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry proteins. We previously cloned a full-length cadherin from Aedes aegypti larvae and reported this protein binds Cry11Aa toxin from B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis with high affinity, ≈ 16.7 nM. Based on these results, we investigated if Aedes cadherin is involved in the in vivo toxicity of Cry11Aa toxin to Ae. aegypti. We established a mosquito cell line stably expressing the full-length Aedes cadherin and transgenic mosquitoes with silenced Aedes cadherin expression. Cells expressing the Aedes cadherin showed increased sensitivity to Cry11Aa toxin. Cry11Aa toxin at 400 nM killed approximately 37% of the cells in 3 h. Otherwise, transgenic mosquitoes with silenced Aedes cadherin expression showed increased tolerance to Cry11Aa toxin. Furthermore, cells expressing Aedes cadherin triggered Cry11Aa oligomerization. These results show the Aedes cadherin plays a pivotal role in Cry11Aa toxicity to Ae. aegypti larvae by mediating Cry11Aa oligomerization. However, since high toxicity was not obtained in cadherin-expressing cells, an additional receptor may be needed for manifestation of full toxicity. Moreover, cells expressing Aedes cadherin were sensitive to Cry4Aa and Cry11Ba but not Cry4Ba. However transgenic mosquitoes with silenced Aedes cadherin expression showed no tolerance to Cry4Aa, Cry4Ba, and Cry11Ba toxins. These results suggest that while Aedes cadherin may mediate Cry4Aa and Cry11Ba toxicity, this cadherin but is not the main receptor of Cry4Aa, Cry4Ba and Cry11Ba toxin in Ae. aegypti. PMID:25064814

  7. Aedes cadherin mediates the in vivo toxicity of the Cry11Aa toxin to Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Bum; Chen, Jianwu; Aimanova, Karlygash G; Gill, Sarjeet S

    2015-06-01

    Cadherin plays an important role in the toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry proteins. We previously cloned a full-length cadherin from Aedes aegypti larvae and reported this protein binds Cry11Aa toxin from B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis with high affinity, ≈16.7nM. Based on these results, we investigated if Aedes cadherin is involved in the in vivo toxicity of Cry11Aa toxin to Ae. aegypti. We established a mosquito cell line stably expressing the full-length Aedes cadherin and transgenic mosquitoes with silenced Aedes cadherin expression. Cells expressing the Aedes cadherin showed increased sensitivity to Cry11Aa toxin. Cry11Aa toxin at 400nM killed approximately 37% of the cells in 3h. Otherwise, transgenic mosquitoes with silenced Aedes cadherin expression showed increased tolerance to Cry11Aa toxin. Furthermore, cells expressing Aedes cadherin triggered Cry11Aa oligomerization. These results show the Aedes cadherin plays a pivotal role in Cry11Aa toxicity to Ae. aegypti larvae by mediating Cry11Aa oligomerization. However, since high toxicity was not obtained in cadherin-expressing cells, an additional receptor may be needed for manifestation of full toxicity. Moreover, cells expressing Aedes cadherin were sensitive to Cry4Aa and Cry11Ba, but not Cry4Ba. However transgenic mosquitoes with silenced Aedes cadherin expression showed no tolerance to Cry4Aa, Cry4Ba, and Cry11Ba toxins. These results suggest that while Aedes cadherin may mediate Cry4Aa and Cry11Ba toxicity, this cadherin but is not the main receptor of Cry4Aa, Cry4Ba and Cry11Ba toxin in Ae. aegypti.

  8. Computational Investigation of Hardness Evolution During Friction-Stir Welding of AA5083 and AA2139 Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    is combined with the basic physical metallurgy of two wrought aluminum alloys to predict/assess their FSW behaviors. The two alloys selected are AA5083... Aluminum Alloys Report Title ABSTRACT A fully coupled thermo-mechanical finite-element analysis of the friction-stir welding ( FSW ) process developed in our...previous work is combined with the basic physical metallurgy of two wrought aluminum alloys to predict/assess their FSW behaviors. The two alloys

  9. Through-thickness recrystallization characteristics of a laminated AA3xxx–AA6xxx aluminum alloy system

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, L.H.; Jin, H.; Gallerneault, M.; Esmaeili, S.

    2015-03-15

    The through-thickness annealing behavior of a laminated AA3xxx–AA6xxx alloy system at 300 °C has been studied by scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction analysis, electron probe micro-analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and hardness measurement. Results show that the recrystallization process starts at the interface region between the AA3xxx (clad) and AA6xxx (core) layers. Subsequently, the recrystallization process front progresses into the core layer, while the clad layer is the last region to recrystallize. It is also found that precipitation precedes recrystallization in the entire laminate at the investigated temperature. The preferential onset of recrystallization at the interface region is attributed to the net driving pressure being the highest in this region. The factors that lead to such enhanced net driving pressure are (a) deformation incompatibility between the two alloy layers, (b) lower solute content of the interface, which also leads to lower volume fraction of precipitates, and (c) an accelerated rate of precipitate coarsening due to the presence of a higher density of dislocations. The gradual progress of recrystallization from the interface towards the core layer is dictated by precipitate coarsening and the dependence of its rate on the density of deformation-induced dislocations. The lower driving pressure due to lower work hardening capacity, high solute drag pressure due to Mn, and additional Zener drag from precipitates that form due to solute redistribution during annealing explain the late initiation of recrystallization in the clad layer. - Highlights: • The through-thickness recrystallization of a laminated system is investigated. • The early onset of recrystallization at the interface is discussed. • The effects of precipitation and coarsening on recrystallization are analyzed.

  10. AA amyloidosis in the renal allograft: a report of two cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Rebecca; Josephson, Michelle A.; Chang, Anthony; Meehan, Shane M.

    2012-01-01

    AA amyloidosis is a disorder characterized by the abnormal formation, accumulation and systemic deposition of fibrillary material that frequently involves the kidney. Recurrent AA amyloidosis in the renal allograft has been documented in patients with tuberculosis, familial Mediterranean fever, ankylosing spondylitis, chronic pyelonephritis and rheumatoid arthritis. De novo AA amyloidosis is rarely described. We report two cases of AA amyloidosis in the renal allograft. Our first case is a 47-year-old male with a history of ankylosing spondylitis who developed end-stage renal disease reportedly from tubulointerstitial nephritis from non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent use. A biopsy was never performed. One year after transplantation, AA amyloidosis was identified in the femoral head and 8 years post-transplantation, AA amyloidosis was identified in the renal allograft. He was treated with colchicine and adalimumab and has stable renal function at 1 year-follow-up. Our second case is a 57-year-old male with a long history of intravenous drug use and hepatitis C infection who developed end-stage kidney disease due to AA amyloidosis. Our second patient's course was complicated by renal adenovirus, pulmonary aspergillosis and hepatitis C with AA amyloidosis subsequently being identified in the allograft 2.5 years post-transplantation. Renal allograft function remains stable 4-years post-transplantation. These reports describe clinical and pathologic features of two cases of AA amyloidosis presenting with proteinuria and focal involvement of the renal allograft. PMID:22833808

  11. Overexpression of AaWRKY1 Leads to an Enhanced Content of Artemisinin in Artemisia annua

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Weimin; Fu, Xueqing; Pan, Qifang; Tang, Yueli; Shen, Qian; Lv, Zongyou; Yan, Tingxiang; Shi, Pu; Li, Ling; Zhang, Lida; Wang, Guofeng; Sun, Xiaofen; Tang, Kexuan

    2016-01-01

    Artemisinin is an effective component of drugs against malaria. The regulation of artemisinin biosynthesis is at the forefront of artemisinin research. Previous studies showed that AaWRKY1 can regulate the expression of ADS, which is the first key enzyme in artemisinin biosynthetic pathway. In this study, AaWRKY1 was cloned, and it activated ADSpro and CYPpro in tobacco using dual-LUC assay. To further study the function of AaWRKY1, pCAMBIA2300-AaWRKY1 construct under 35S promoter was generated. Transgenic plants containing AaWRKY1 were obtained, and four independent lines with high expression of AaWRKY1 were analyzed. The expression of ADS and CYP, the key enzymes in artemisinin biosynthetic pathway, was dramatically increased in AaWRKY1-overexpressing A. annua plants. Furthermore, the artemisinin yield increased significantly in AaWRKY1-overexpressing A. annua plants. These results showed that AaWRKY1 increased the content of artemisinin by regulating the expression of both ADS and CYP. It provides a new insight into the mechanism of regulation on artemisinin biosynthesis via transcription factors in the future. PMID:27064403

  12. Experimental transmission of systemic AA amyloidosis in autoimmune disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus model mice

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Mayuko; Murakami, Tomoaki; Muhammad, Naeem; Inoshima, Yasuo; Ishiguro, Naotaka

    2016-01-01

    AA amyloidosis is a protein misfolding disease characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid A (AA) fibrils. AA amyloidosis has been identified in food animals, and it has been postulated that AA amyloidosis may be transmissible to different animal species. Since the precursor protein of AA fibrils is serum amyloid A (SAA), which is an inflammatory acute phase protein, AA amyloidosis is considered to be associated with inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Chronic diseases such as autoimmune disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus could be potential factors for AA amyloidosis. In this study, to examine the relationship between the induction of AA amyloidosis and chromic abnormalities such as autoimmune disease or type 2 diabetes mellitus, amyloid fibrils from mice, cattle, or chickens were experimentally injected into disease model mice. Wild-type mice were used as controls. The concentrations of SAA, IL-6, and IL-10 in autoimmune disease model mice were higher than those of control mice. However, induction of AA amyloidosis in autoimmune disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus model mice was lower than that in control mice, and the amount of amyloid deposits in the spleens of both mouse models was lower than that of control mice according to Congo red staining and immunohistochemistry. These results suggest that factors other than SAA levels, such as an inflammatory or anti-inflammatory environment in the immune response, may be involved in amyloid deposition. PMID:27321428

  13. Microsolvation of the acetanilide cation (AA(+)) in a nonpolar solvent: IR spectra of AA(+)-L(n) clusters (L = He, Ar, N2; n ≤ 10).

    PubMed

    Schmies, Matthias; Patzer, Alexander; Schütz, Markus; Miyazaki, Mitsuhiko; Fujii, Masaaki; Dopfer, Otto

    2014-05-07

    Infrared photodissociation (IRPD) spectra of mass-selected cluster ions of acetanilide (N-phenylacetamide), AA(+)-Ln, with the ligands L = He (n = 1-2), Ar (n = 1-7), and N2 (n = 1-10) are recorded in the hydride stretch (amide A, νNH, νCH) and fingerprint (amide I-III) ranges of AA(+) in its (2)A'' ground electronic state. Cold AA(+)-Ln clusters are generated in an electron impact ion source, which predominantly produces the most stable isomer of a given cluster ion. Systematic vibrational frequency shifts of the N-H stretch fundamentals (νNH) provide detailed information about the sequential microsolvation process of AA(+) in a nonpolar (L = He and Ar) and quadrupolar (L = N2) solvent. In the most stable AA(+)-Ln clusters, the first ligand forms a hydrogen bond (H-bond) with the N-H proton of trans-AA(+) (t-AA(+)), whereas further ligands bind weakly to the aromatic ring (π-stacking). There is no experimental evidence for complexes with the less stable cis-AA(+) isomer. Quantum chemical calculations at the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ level confirm the cluster growth sequence derived from the IR spectra. The calculated binding energies of De(H) = 720 and 1227 cm(-1) for H-bonded and De(π) = 585 and 715 cm(-1) for π-bonded Ar and N2 ligands in t-AA(+)-L are consistent with the observed photofragmentation branching ratios of AA(+)-Ln. Comparison between charged and neutral AA((+))-L dimers indicates that ionization switches the preferred ion-ligand binding motif from π-stacking to H-bonding. Electron removal from the HOMO of AA(+) delocalized over both the aromatic ring and the amide group significantly strengthens the C[double bond, length as m-dash]O bond and weakens the N-H bond of the amide group.

  14. Immunological evaluation of OMV(PagL)+Bap(1-487aa) and AbOmpA(8-346aa)+Bap(1-487aa) as vaccine candidates against Acinetobacter baumannii sepsis infection.

    PubMed

    Badmasti, Farzad; Ajdary, Soheila; Bouzari, Saeid; Fooladi, Abbas Ali Imani; Shahcheraghi, Fereshteh; Siadat, Seyed Davar

    2015-10-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen that causes a high morbidity and mortality rate in infected patients with sepsis form. The surface exposed virulence proteins and serum resistance factors helping to dissemination of this bacterium to bloodstream are the most promising vaccine candidates against this microorganism. In this project we immunologically evaluated OMV(PagL)+Bap(1-487aa) and AbOmpA (8-346aa)+Bap(1-487aa) as combination forms as well as Bap(1-487aa), AbOmpA(8-346aa) and OMV(PagL) singly, with addition of alum adjuvant as vaccine candidates. The titers of total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2c as well as concentration of IL-4 and IFN-γ and survival rates were measured in a C57BL/6 murine model with disseminated sepsis. The ratio of IgG1/IgG2c and profile of IL-4/IFN-γ in OMV (PagL)+Bap (1-487aa) formulation shows the humoral and cellular immune responses have been induced robustly and have created a full protection against A. baumannii ATCC 19606 and MDR AB-44 strains. We found that the two combination vaccine candidates were protective and induced both Th1 and Th2 responses.

  15. Introducing the AAS Working Group on Astroinformatics and Astrostatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivezic, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    In response to two White Papers submitted to the Astro2010 Decadal Survey (1,2), a new AAS Working Group on Astroinformatics and Astrostatistics (WGAA) has been approved by the AAS Council at the 220th Meeting, June 2012, in Anchorage. The motivation for this WG is the growing importance of the interface between astronomy and various branches of applied mathematics, computer science and the emerging field of data science. With the new data-intensive projects envisioned for the coming decade, the need for advice derived from the focused attention of a group of AAS members who work in these areas is bound to increase. The Working Group is charged with spreading awareness of rapidly advancing computational techniques, sophsticated statistical methods, and highly capble software to further the goals of astronomical and astrophysical research. The three main strategic goals adopted by the WGAA Steering Committee for the next few years are to: (i) develop, organize and maintain methodological resources (such as software tools, papers, books, and lectures); (ii) enhance human resources (such as foster the creation of career paths, establish a Speakers' Bureau, establish and maintain an archived discussion forum, enable periodic news distribution); and (iii) organize topical meetings. The WGAA Steering Committee at this time includes twelve members: Kirk Borne, George Djorgovski, Eric Feigelson, Eric Ford, Alyssa Goodman, Joe Hilbe, Zeljko Ivezic (chair), Ashish Mahabal, Aneta Siemiginowska, Alex Szalay, Rick White, and Padma Yanamandra-Fisher. I will summarize our accomplishments since July 2012. (1) Astroinformatics: A 21st Century Approach to Astronomy (Borne & 90 coauthors), (2) The Astronomical Information Sciences: A Keystone for 21st-Century Astronomy (Loredo & 72 coauthors)

  16. 184AA3: A Xenograft Model of ER+ Breast Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hines, William C.; Kuhn, Irene; Thi, Kate; Chu, Berbie; Stanford-Moore, Gaelen; Sampayo, Rocío; Garbe, James C.; Stampfer, Martha; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Bissell, Mina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Despite the prevalence and significant morbidity resulting from estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast adenocarcinomas, there are only a few models of this cancer subtype available for drug development, and arguably none for studying etiology. Those models that do exist have questionable clinical relevance. Methods Given our goal of developing luminal models, we focused on six cell lines derived by minimal mutagenesis from normal human breast cells, and asked if any could generate clinically relevant xenografts, which we then extensively characterized. Results Xenografts of one cell line, 184AA3, consistently formed ER+ adenocarcinomas that had a high proliferative rate and other features consistent with “luminal B” intrinsic subtype. Squamous and spindle cell/mesenchymal differentiation was absent, in stark contrast to other cell lines that we examined or others have reported. We explored intratumoral heterogeneity produced by 184AA3 by immunophenotyping xenograft tumors and cultured cells, and characterized marker expression by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. A CD44High subpopulation was discovered, yet their tumor forming ability was far less than CD44Low cells. Single cell cloning revealed the phenotypic plasticity of 184AA3, consistent with the intratumoral heterogeneity observed in xenografts. Characterization of ER expression in cultures revealed ER protein and signaling is intact, yet when estrogen was depleted in culture, and in vivo, it did not impact cell or tumor growth, analogous to therapeutically resistant ER+ cancers. Conclusions This model is appropriate for studies of the etiology of ovarian hormone independent adenocarcinomas, for identification of therapeutic targets, predictive testing and drug development. PMID:26661596

  17. 23. VIEW OF SECTION DRAWINGS. THE SECTION LINES FOR AA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW OF SECTION DRAWINGS. THE SECTION LINES FOR A-A AND C-C CUT THE BUILDING EAST-WEST; SECTION LINE B-B CUTS THE BUILDING NORTH-SOUTH. THE ORIGINAL DRAWING HAS BEEN ARCHIVED ON MICROFILM. THE DRAWING WAS REPRODUCED AT THE BEST QUALITY POSSIBLE. LETTERS AND NUMBERS IN THE CIRCLES INDICATE FOOTER AND/OR COLUMN LOCATIONS. - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  18. Antacids Revisited with Modern Chemical Instruments: GCMS, AAS, and CCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burden, Stanley L.; Petzold, Christopher J.

    1999-11-01

    Data from multiple analytical methods are often required to identify or characterize samples. Typical undergraduate experiments utilize only one or two techniques in a given experiment. This paper describes a novel experiment that requires students to obtain and interpret data from several analytical techniques to identify the brand name of a commercial antacid. Students receive a ground sample of a commercial antacid. They are required to design a set of experiments utilizing computer controlled titrations (CCT), atomic absorption (AA), gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GCMS), and careful quantitative manual titrations using a visual indicator of their choice to determine the brand name of their sample from a list of six to eight choices.

  19. Professional Ethics in Astronomy: The AAS Ethics Statement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvel, Kevin B.

    2013-01-01

    It is fundamental to the advancement of science that practicing scientists adhere to a consistent set of professional ethical principles. Recent violations of these principles have led a decreased trust in the process of science and scientific results. Although astronomy is less in the spotlight on these issues than medical science or climate change research, it is still incumbent on the field to follow sound scientific process guided by basic ethical guidelines. The American Astronomical Society, developed a set of such guidelines in 2010. This contribution summarizes the motivation and process by which the AAS Ethics Statement was produced.

  20. Reframing Spirituality: AA, the 12 Steps, and the Mental Health Counselor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Fred J.

    1992-01-01

    Surveys literature and explores ways to understand spirituality in Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). Topics explored range from Jungian and Jamesian psychology, to Stoicism, the work of Bateson, and transpersonal psychology and therapy. Speculates that difficulty some mental health counselors have in accepting AA as therapy could be a result of…

  1. AR, HEA and AAS in Rural Development Projects--Benchmarking towards the Best Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westermarck, Harri

    In most countries, agricultural research (AR), institutions of higher education in agriculture (HEA), and agricultural advisory services (AAS) function as separate agencies. So far, in most countries, AR, HEA, and AAS have not had a common vision for rural development. In Finland, domination of agricultural production in Finland has led to a lack…

  2. Bacterial cellulose based hydrogel (BC-g-AA) and preliminary result of swelling behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Hakam, Adil; Lazim, Azwan Mat; Abdul Rahman, I. Irman

    2013-11-27

    In this study, hydrogel based on Bacterial cellulose (BC) or local known as Nata de Coco, which grafted with monomer: Acrylic acid (AA) is synthesis by using gamma radiation technique. These hydrogel (BC-g-AA) has unique characteristic whereby responsive to pH buffer solution.

  3. Interfacial characteristics and properties of a low-clad-ratio AA4045/AA3003 cladding billet fabricated by semi-continuous casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xing; Zhang, Hai-tao; Shao, Bo; Li, Lei; Qin, Ke; Cui, Jian-zhong

    2016-09-01

    A low-clad-ratio AA4045/AA3003 cladding billet was fabricated using a semi-continuous casting process and was subsequently extruded indirectly into a cladding pipe. The temperature distribution near the interface was measured. The microstructures, elemental distribution, Vickers hardness around the bonding interface, and the interfacial shear strength were examined. The results showed that the interface temperature rebounded when AA4045 melt contacted the supporting layer. The two alloys bonded well, with few defects, via the diffusion of Si and Mn in the temperature range from 569°C to 632°C. The mean shear strength of the bonding interface was 82.3 MPa, which was greater than that of AA3003 (75.8 MPa), indicating that the two alloys bonded with each other metallurgically via elemental interdiffusion. Moreover, no relative slip occurred between the two alloys during the extrusion process.

  4. Co-expression of the mosquitocidal toxins Cyt1Aa and Cry11Aa from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis in Asticcacaulis excentricus.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dasheng; Valdez-Cruz, Norma Adriana; Armengol, Gemma; Sevrez, Chloe; Munoz-Olaya, Jose Maurilio; Yuan, Zhiming; Orduz, Sergio; Crickmore, Neil

    2007-01-01

    The cyt1Aa gene from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti), whose product synergizes other mosquitocidal toxins, and functions as a repressor of resistance developed by mosquitoes against Bacilli insecticides, was introduced into the aquatic Gram-negative bacterium Asticcacaulis excentricus alongside the cry11Aa gene. The genes were introduced as an operon, but although mRNA was detected for both genes, no Cyt1Aa toxin was detected. Both proteins were expressed using a construct in which a promoter was inserted upstream of each gene. Recombinant A. excentricus expressing both toxins was found to be approximately twice as toxic to third instar larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus as transformants expressing just Cry11Aa.

  5. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Aa of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Alternative Test Method Yes. 63.7(g) Data Analysis Yes. 63.7(h) Waiver of Tests Yes. 63.8(a)(1) Monitoring...) Alternative to RATA Test No Subpart AA does not require CEMS. 63.8(g)(1) Data Reduction Yes. 63.8(g)(2) No...) COMS Data Reports No Subpart AA does not require COMS. 63.10(f) Recordkeeping/Reporting Waiver Yes....

  6. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Aa of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Alternative Test Method Yes. 63.7(g) Data Analysis Yes. 63.7(h) Waiver of Tests Yes. 63.8(a)(1) Monitoring...) Alternative to RATA Test No Subpart AA does not require CEMS. 63.8(g)(1) Data Reduction Yes. 63.8(g)(2) No...) COMS Data Reports No Subpart AA does not require COMS. 63.10(f) Recordkeeping/Reporting Waiver Yes....

  7. 17 CFR 249.801 - Form X-15AA-1, for application for registration as a national securities association or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Form X-15AA-1, for application....801 Form X-15AA-1, for application for registration as a national securities association or affiliated...). Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form X-15AA-1, see the List of CFR...

  8. 33 CFR 110.72aa - Elizabeth River Spectator Vessel Anchorage Areas, between Norfolk and Portsmouth, Virginia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Anchorage Areas, between Norfolk and Portsmouth, Virginia. 110.72aa Section 110.72aa Navigation and... Anchorage Areas § 110.72aa Elizabeth River Spectator Vessel Anchorage Areas, between Norfolk and Portsmouth, Virginia. (a) Special Anchorage Areas. (1) The waters of the Elizabeth River bounded by the shore and...

  9. 17 CFR 240.13Aa-2T - Interim rule for reporting pre-enactment security-based swap transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-enactment security-based swap transactions. 240.13Aa-2T Section 240.13Aa-2T Commodity and Securities....13Aa-2T Interim rule for reporting pre-enactment security-based swap transactions. (a) Definitions. For... Exchange Act of 1934, as amended; (3) Major security-based swap participant shall have the meaning...

  10. 17 CFR 249.801 - Form X-15AA-1, for application for registration as a national securities association or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Form X-15AA-1, for application....801 Form X-15AA-1, for application for registration as a national securities association or affiliated...). Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form X-15AA-1, see the List of CFR...

  11. 17 CFR 249.801 - Form X-15AA-1, for application for registration as a national securities association or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Form X-15AA-1, for application....801 Form X-15AA-1, for application for registration as a national securities association or affiliated...). Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form X-15AA-1, see the List of CFR...

  12. 17 CFR 249.801 - Form X-15AA-1, for application for registration as a national securities association or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Form X-15AA-1, for application....801 Form X-15AA-1, for application for registration as a national securities association or affiliated...). Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form X-15AA-1, see the List of CFR...

  13. 17 CFR 249.801 - Form X-15AA-1, for application for registration as a national securities association or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Form X-15AA-1, for application....801 Form X-15AA-1, for application for registration as a national securities association or affiliated...). Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form X-15AA-1, see the List of CFR...

  14. DFW microburst model based on AA-539 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, Walter J.; Roetcisoender, Guy G.; Parks, Edwin K.

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of the August 2, 1985 crash for an L-1011 jumbo jet (DL-191) on approach to the Dallas-Ft. Worth International Airport (DFW) in a thunderstorm indicates that the severe windshear microburst that caused the crash was composed not only of a strong downflow and outflow but also included several large-scale vortex rings entrained in the flowfield. This paper presents a detailed two-dimensional model of the DFW microburst based on data from the MD-80 (AA-539) that followed behind DL-191 and flew through the microburst about two minutes after the crash of DL-191. The model was developed using wind-vector and flight-path data reconstructed by NASA Ames Research Center and a combination of interactive graphics and least-squares error best fit between the modeled and measured wind vectors along the AA-539 flight path. The model indicates that the flowfield contains some significant elements and vortices not previously reported. The alternating direction of rotation of the vortices in the model suggests a microburst structure based on a von Karman vortex street rather than on a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The model also indicates that the reconstructed wind-vector data contain a time lag of at least one second in the horizontal winds.

  15. Springback analysis on AA 6061 aluminum alloy sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramulu, Perumalla Janaki; Rao, P. Srinivasa; Yimer, Wassihun

    2016-10-01

    In automotive industry, sheet metal forming process play a key role with respect to economy and weight reduction ratio. In sheet metal forming, one of the operations is bending operation in which sheet will not go under sever deformation. The end components are made by applying the continuous load on the sheet in the bending process. In bending process, elastic limits of materials are exceeded, but flow limit thereof cannot be exceeded. Therefore, the material still keeps a portion of its original flexibility character. When the load is released, the material on forcing compress side tries to enlarge, whereas the material on tensile side tries to shrink. As a result, the material tries to spring back and the bended material by flexing slightly tries to open. Springback varies according to thickness of the material, material and process parameters, type of material, period when punch load stays on the material, dimensions of die, force applied, and bending radius. In order to make bending at a desired angle, springback amounts should be avoided. In the present work, experimentation on AA 6061 alloy sheet springback analysis has done with seven different rolling directions. Results are noted with respect to load, displacement, and die angle on the springback effect. It observed that springback affect is existed notably in the AA 6061 alloys with respect to die angle.

  16. AAS Publishing News: Preparing Your Manuscript Just Got Easier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    Watermarking using the command watermark{DRAFT, v2}.Are you an astronomer considering submitting a paper to an AAS journal (i.e., AJ, ApJ, ApJ Letters, or ApJ Supplements)? If so, this post is for you! Read on to find out about the exciting new things you can do with the AASs newest LaTeX class file, available for download now.Why the Update?AAS publishing has maintained a consistent class file for LaTeX manuscript preparation for the past decade. But academic publishing is changing rapidly in todays era of electronic journals! Since its journals went fully electronic, the AAS has been continuously adding new publishing capabilities based on the recommendations of the Journals Task Force and the needs and requests of AAS authors. The AASs manuscript preparation tools are now being updated accordingly.Whats New in AASTex 6.0?There are many exciting new features and capabilities in AASTex 6.0. Here are just a few:Tracking options for author revisions include added{text}, deleted{text}, replaced{old}{new}, and explain{text}.Based on emulateapjDo you use the popular class file emulateapj to prepare your manuscripts? AASTex 6.0 is based on emulateapj, rather than on the older AASTex 5.2 (though 5.2 is still supported). This means that it is easy to produce a double-columned, single-spaced, and astro-ph-ready manuscript. Since two thirds of the AAS journals authors use emulateapj, this transition was designed to make manuscript preparation and sharing an easier and more seamless process.Tools for collaborationsDo you work in a large collaboration? AASTex now includes new tools to make preparing a manuscript within a collaboration easier. Drafts can now be watermarked to differentiate between versions. New markup for large author lists streamlines the display so that readers can access article information immediately, yet they can still access the full author list and affiliations at the end of the paper. And author revision markup allows members of a collaboration to

  17. Microbial Community Composition Impacts Pathogen Iron Availability during Polymicrobial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Stacy, Apollo; Whiteley, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for bacterial pathogenesis, but in the host, iron is tightly sequestered, limiting its availability for bacterial growth. Although this is an important arm of host immunity, most studies examine how bacteria respond to iron restriction in laboratory rather than host settings, where the microbiome can potentially alter pathogen strategies for acquiring iron. One of the most important transcriptional regulators controlling bacterial iron homeostasis is Fur. Here we used a combination of RNA-seq and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-seq to characterize the iron-restricted and Fur regulons of the biofilm-forming opportunistic pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. We discovered that iron restriction and Fur regulate 4% and 3.5% of the genome, respectively. While most genes in these regulons were related to iron uptake and metabolism, we found that Fur also directly regulates the biofilm-dispersing enzyme Dispersin B, allowing A. actinomycetemcomitans to escape from iron-scarce environments. We then leveraged these datasets to assess the availability of iron to A. actinomycetemcomitans in its primary infection sites, abscesses and the oral cavity. We found that A. actinomycetemcomitans is not restricted for iron in a murine abscess mono-infection, but becomes restricted for iron upon co-infection with the oral commensal Streptococcus gordonii. Furthermore, in the transition from health to disease in human gum infection, A. actinomycetemcomitans also becomes restricted for iron. These results suggest that host iron availability is heterogeneous and dependent on the infecting bacterial community. PMID:27973608

  18. Goldsinny wrasse (Ctenolabrus rupestris) is an extreme vtgAa-type pelagophil teleost.

    PubMed

    Kolarevic, Jelena; Nerland, Audun; Nilsen, Frank; Finn, Roderick Nigel

    2008-06-01

    During oocyte maturation in the goldsinny wrasse (Ctenolabrus rupestris) extensive proteolysis of yolk proteins generates a large pool of free amino acids that drive hydration of the pelagic egg. By cloning hepatic vitellogenins (vtg) and using mass spectrometry, N-terminal microsequencing, and Western-immunoblotting to identify the yolk proteins (Yp), we show that multiple forms of vitellogenin mRNAs (vtgAa, vtgAb, and vtgC) are expressed in the liver, but only a single major class of the Yps derived from vtgAa predominates in the oocytes. Some Yps derived from vtgAb and vtgC appear also to be incorporated in the oocytes and eggs, but only at background levels. During oocyte hydration the vtgAa-derived lipovitellin heavy chain (LvH-Aa) and its cleavage variants are completely degraded leaving only a processed lipovitellin light chain (LvL-Aa) fragment as the major yolk protein for embryonic development. The maturational cleavage site of the LvL-Aa is identified as two amino acids downstream from the conserved Tyr(1168) of VtgAa in Atlantic halibut. In addition, although a beta'-component (approximately 18 kDa) is present in the oocytes, it is not fully degraded during the hydration process.

  19. Daily Aa-nat gene expression in the camel (Camelus dromedarius) pineal gland.

    PubMed

    El Allali, Khalid; Sinitskaya, Natalia; Bothorel, Béatrice; Achaaban, Rachid; Pévet, Paul; Simonneaux, Valérie

    2008-09-01

    Arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) is the rhythm-generating enzyme for the synthesis of pineal melatonin. Molecular investigations have revealed two biological models for the activation of AA-NAT. In rodent species, Aa-nat gene transcription is turned off during the daytime and markedly activated at night. In primates, sheep, and cows, the Aa-nat gene is constitutively transcripted with no visible daily variations. This inter-species difference in Aa-nat gene regulation leads to different daily profiles in melatonin synthesis and release. Thus, the nighttime onset of the rise in circulating melatonin is delayed and slow in rodents, whereas it is fast and sharp in sheep. In the camel (Camelus dromedarius), we have observed that circulating melatonin rises immediately after sunset, suggesting AA-NAT activity is regulated at the post-transcriptional level. In agreement with this hypothesis, we report herein the amount of Aa-nat mRNA in the camel pineal gland is high, during both the day and night with no daily variations, while melatonin concentration in the same pineal tissue is five times higher during the night than daytime.

  20. MurAA Is Required for Intrinsic Cephalosporin Resistance of Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Vesić, Dušanka

    2012-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a low-GC Gram-positive bacterium that is intrinsically resistant to cephalosporins, antibiotics that target cell wall biosynthesis. To probe the mechanistic basis for intrinsic resistance, a library of transposon mutants was screened to identify E. faecalis strains that are highly susceptible to ceftriaxone, revealing a transposon mutant with a disruption in murAA. murAA is predicted to encode a UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyl transferase that catalyzes the first committed step in peptidoglycan synthesis: phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent conversion of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine to UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-enolpyruvate. In-frame deletion of murAA, but not its homolog in the E. faecalis genome (murAB), led to increased susceptibility of E. faecalis to cephalosporins. Furthermore, expression of murAA enhanced cephalosporin resistance in an E. faecalis mutant lacking IreK (formerly PrkC), a key kinase required for cephalosporin resistance. Further genetic analysis revealed that MurAA catalytic activity is necessary but not sufficient for this role. Collectively, our data indicate that MurAA and MurAB have distinct roles in E. faecalis physiology and suggest that MurAA possesses a unique property or activity that enables it to enhance intrinsic resistance of E. faecalis to cephalosporins. PMID:22290954

  1. Cyp2aa9 regulates haematopoietic stem cell development in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingying; He, Jianbo; Li, Li; Yang, Deqin; Luo, Lingfei

    2016-01-01

    Definitive haematopoiesis occurs during the lifetime of an individual, which continuously replenishes all blood and immune cells. During embryonic development, haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) formation is tightly controlled by growth factors, signalling molecules and transcription factors. But little is known about roles of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2 family member in the haematopoiesis. Here we report characterization and functional studies of Cyp2aa9, a novel zebrafish Cyp2 family member. And demonstrate that the cyp2aa9 is required for the HSC formation and homeostasis. Knockdown of cyp2aa9 by antisense morpholino oligos resulted the definitive HSC development is defective and the Wnt/β-catenin activity becomes reduced. The impaired HSC formation caused by cyp2aa9 morpholino can be rescued by administration of PGE2 through the cAMP/PKA pathway. Furthermore, the in vivo PGE2 level decreases in the cyp2aa9 morphants, and none of the PGE2 precursors is able to rescue phenotypes in the Cyp2aa9-deficient embryos. Taken together, these data indicate that Cyp2aa9 is functional in the step of PGE2 synthesis from PGH2, thus promoting Wnt activation and definitive HSC development. PMID:27197559

  2. Proteomic analysis of Cry2Aa-binding proteins and their receptor function in Spodoptera exigua

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Lin; Zhang, Boyao; Liu, Lang; Ma, Weihua; Wang, Xiaoping; Lei, Chaoliang; Chen, Lizhen

    2017-01-01

    The bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis produces Crystal (Cry) proteins that are toxic to a diverse range of insects. Transgenic crops that produce Bt Cry proteins are grown worldwide because of their improved resistance to insect pests. Although Bt “pyramid” cotton that produces both Cry1A and Cry2A is predicted to be more resistant to several lepidopteran pests, including Spodoptera exigua, than plants that produce Cry1Ac alone, the mechanisms responsible for the toxicity of Cry2Aa in S. exigua are not well understood. We identified several proteins that bind Cry2Aa (polycalin, V-ATPase subunits A and B, actin, 4-hydroxybutyrate CoA-transferase [4-HB-CoAT]), and a receptor for activated protein kinase C (Rack), in S. exigua. Recombinant, expressed versions of these proteins were able to bind the Cry2Aa toxin in vitro assays. RNA interference gene knockdown of the Se-V-ATPase subunit B significantly decreased the susceptibility of S. exigua larvae to Cry2Aa, whereas knockdown of the other putative binding proteins did not. Moreover, an in vitro homologous competition assay demonstrated that the Se-V-ATPase subunit B binds specifically to the Cry2Aa toxin, suggesting that this protein acts as a functional receptor of Cry2Aa in S. exigua. This the first Cry2Aa toxin receptor identified in S. exigua brush-border membrane vesicles. PMID:28067269

  3. Bacillus thuringiensis Cyt2Aa2 toxin disrupts cell membranes by forming large protein aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Tharad, Sudarat; Toca-Herrera, José L.; Promdonkoy, Boonhiang; Krittanai, Chartchai

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cyt2Aa2 showed toxicity against Dipteran insect larvae and in vitro lysis activity on several cells. It has potential applications in the biological control of insect larvae. Although pore-forming and/or detergent-like mechanisms were proposed, the mechanism underlying cytolytic activity remains unclear. Analysis of the haemolytic activity of Cyt2Aa2 with osmotic stabilizers revealed partial toxin inhibition, suggesting a distinctive mechanism from the putative pore formation model. Membrane permeability was studied using fluorescent dye entrapped in large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) at various protein/lipid molar ratios. Binding of Cyt2Aa2 monomer to the lipid membrane did not disturb membrane integrity until the critical protein/lipid molar ratio was reached, when Cyt2Aa2 complexes and cytolytic activity were detected. The complexes are large aggregates that appeared as a ladder when separated by agarose gel electrophoresis. Interaction of Cyt2Aa2 with Aedes albopictus cells was investigated by confocal microscopy and total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy (TIRF). The results showed that Cyt2Aa2 binds on the cell membrane at an early stage without cell membrane disruption. Protein aggregation on the cell membrane was detected later which coincided with cell swelling. Cyt2Aa2 aggregations on supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) were visualized by AFM. The AFM topographic images revealed Cyt2Aa2 aggregates on the lipid bilayer at low protein concentration and subsequently disrupts the lipid bilayer by forming a lesion as the protein concentration increased. These results supported the mechanism whereby Cyt2Aa2 binds and aggregates on the lipid membrane leading to the formation of non-specific hole and disruption of the cell membrane. PMID:27612497

  4. The photometric variability of ζ Ori Aa observed by BRITE* **

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buysschaert, B.; Neiner, C.

    2016-12-01

    Using BRITE photometry, we investigated the photometric variability of the magnetic O-type supergiant ζOri Aa. We found two independent frequencies, leading to several higher harmonics and simple linear combinations. One frequency is related to the rotation period, f_{rot} = 0.15±0.02 d^{-1}. The derived rotation period from this frequency and its higher harmonics, P_{rot} = 6.65±0.28 d, is compatible with the literature value (P_{rot} = 6.83±0.08 d). Thanks to simultaneous CHIRON spectroscopy, we locate the origin of the second frequency, f_{env} = 0.10±0.02 d^{-1}, at the circumstellar environment. We propose mass-loss events as the underlying origin.

  5. AAS, growth hormone, and insulin abuse: psychological and neuroendocrine effects

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Michael R; Evans, Peter; Davies, Bruce; Baker, Julien S

    2008-01-01

    The nontherapeutic use of prescription medicines by individuals involved in sport is increasing. Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are the most widely abused drug. Much of our knowledge of the psychological and physiological effects of human growth hormone (hGH) and insulin has been learned from deficiency states. As a consequence of the Internet revolution, previously unobtainable and expensive designer drugs, particularly recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) and insulin, have become freely available at ridiculously discounted prices from countries such as China and are being abused. These drugs have various physiological and psychological effects and medical personnel must become aware that such prescription medicine abuse appears to be used not only for performance and cosmetic reasons, but as a consequence of psychological pre-morbidity. PMID:18827854

  6. FRICTION-STIR-LAP-WELDS OF AA6111 ALUMINUM ALLOY

    SciTech Connect

    Yadava, Manasij; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Chen, Y. L.; Gayden, X.; Grant, Glenn J.

    2007-01-09

    Lap joints of 1 mm thick AA6111 aluminum sheets were made by friction stir welding, using robotic and conventional machines. Welds were made for advancing as well as retreating side loading. Thinning in welds was quantified. Lap shear test of welds was conducted in as-welded and paint-baked conditions. Conventional machine welds showed less thinning and better strength than robotic machine welds. Process forces in conventional machine welding were higher. Paint bake treatment improved the weld strength; but the improvement varied with process parameters. Advancing side loaded welds achieved higher strength than the retreating side loaded welds. Fracture location was found to occur on the loaded side of the weld and along the thinning defect.

  7. A profile of Keith AA Fox, cardiologist and researcher.

    PubMed

    Fox, Keith A A; Telfer, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Professor Keith AA Fox speaks to Caroline Telfer, Commissioning Editor. Professor Keith AA Fox is the British Heart Foundation and the Duke of Edinburgh Professor of Cardiology at the University of Edinburgh (UK). He is a founding fellow of the European Society of Cardiology and is currently Chair of the Programme of the European Society of Cardiology. In addition, he was President of the British Cardiovascular Society from 2009 to 2012. Professor Fox gave the State-of-the-Art lecture on acute coronary syndromes at the American Heart Association, as well as the 2009 Plenary lecture at the European Society of Cardiology-American College of Cardiology Symposium, the Lord Rayner lecture of the Royal College of Physicians (London, UK) and the Sir Stanley Davidson Lecture of the Royal College (Edinburgh, UK). He was awarded the Silver Medal of the European Society of Cardiology in 2010. Professor Fox's major research interest lies in the mechanisms and manifestations of acute coronary arterial disease; his work extends from underlying biological mechanisms to in vitro and in vivo studies and clinical trials. He is the author of more than 587 scientific papers (H-index Web of Science 73, Citations: 30,261 to March 2013). Professor Fox is chairman of the RITA program, co-chairman of ROCKET-AF and OASIS program, and chair of the GRACE program (the largest multinational study in acute coronary syndromes), and a lead investigator for studies on novel antithrombins, anticoagulants and antiplatelets. He is an International Associate Editor of the European Heart Journal and a member of the editorial boards of a number of journals. His current areas of research include the inhibition of coronary thrombosis and the role of platelets and inflammation in acute coronary syndromes.

  8. An Update on the AAS Astronomy Ambassadors Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fienberg, Richard T.; Gurton, S.; Fraknoi, A.; Prather, E. E.; Hurst, A.; Schatz, D. L.

    2013-06-01

    The American Astronomical Society, partnering with organizations active in science education and public outreach (EPO), has launched a series of professional-development workshops and a community of practice designed to help improve early-career astronomers’ ability to effectively communicate with students and the public. Called Astronomy Ambassadors, the program provides mentoring and training experiences for young astronomers, from advanced undergraduates to beginning faculty; it also provides access to resources and a network of contacts within the astronomy EPO community. By learning how to implement effective education and outreach strategies, Astronomy Ambassadors become better teachers, better presenters at meetings, and better representatives of our science to the public and to government. And because young astronomers are a more diverse group than those who currently do the majority of outreach, they help the astronomical community present a more multicultural and gender-balanced face to the public, enabling members of underserved groups to see themselves as scientists. Ambassadors are provided with a large library of outreach activities and materials that are suitable for a range of venues and audiences and that will grow with time. For much of this library we are using resources developed by organizations such as the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, the Pacific Science Center, and the Center for Astronomy Education for other outreach programs, though some resources have been created by one of us (AF) specifically for this program. The first Astronomy Ambassadors workshop was held at the 221st meeting of the AAS in January 2013 and served 30 young astronomers chosen from more than 75 applicants. Incorporating feedback from workshop participants and lessons learned from the reports they’ve submitted after conducting their own outreach events, we are now planning the second annual workshop to be held 4-5 January 2014 at the 223rd AAS meeting in

  9. Comparative evaluation of the efficacy of curcumin gel with and without photo activation as an adjunct to scaling and root planing in the treatment of chronic periodontitis: A split mouth clinical and microbiological study

    PubMed Central

    Sreedhar, Annaji; Sarkar, Indranil; Rajan, Padma; Pai, Jagdish; Malagi, Sachin; Kamath, Vinesh; Barmappa, Radhikka

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Harnessing Mother Nature's bountiful remedies for rejuvenation has been in vogue since time immemorial. Turmeric contains the polyphenol Curcumin in its rhizome. It produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) with visible light irradiation as photodynamic therapy (PDT) - which validates its use in the treatment of periodontitis. This study compares Curcumin and Curcumin PDT as an adjunct to conventional Scaling and Root Planing (SRP) with SRP alone in the treatment of patients with chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Sixty sites in fifteen untreated chronic periodontitis patients were randomly assigned in a split mouth design for one of the treatment modalities; 1) Scaling and root planing (SRP) alone, (2) SRP + Curcumin application for 5 min, (3) SRP + Curcumin application for 5 min + irradiation with blue light emitting diode of wavelength 470 nm for 5 min. (Curcumin PDT) on 0 day.(4) SRP + Curcumin PDT on “0”, 7th and 21st day. The clinical parameters included plaque index (PI), bleeding on probing (BOP) measured by sulcus bleeding index (SBI), probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL) recorded at the baseline & 3rd month. The site with greatest probing pocket depth (PPD) was selected from each quadrant for bacterial sampling and culturing for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) and other black pigment producing microorganisms (BPB) like Porphyromonas gingivalis & Prevotella intermedia. Conclusion: The present study showed that Curcumin photodynamic therapy is a valuable treatment modality adjunctive to conventional scaling and root planing over Curcumin application. Moreover, multiple adjunctive applications of photodynamic therapy are more beneficial than single application in reducing clinical & microbiological parameters. PMID:26604595

  10. Molecular cloning of the cytochrome aa3 gene from the archaeon (Archaebacterium) Halobacterium halobium.

    PubMed

    Denda, K; Fujiwara, T; Seki, M; Yoshida, M; Fukumori, Y; Yamanaka, T

    1991-11-27

    A novel aa3-type cytochrome oxidase from the extremely halophilic archaeon, Halobacterium halobium, differs significantly from those of other prokaryotic and eukaryotic cytochrome oxidases (Fujiwara, T., Fukumori, Y., and Yamanaka, T. (1989) J. Biochem. 105, 287-292). In the present study, we cloned and sequenced the gene which encodes the cytochrome aa3 by using the polymerase chain reaction methods. The deduced amino acid sequence of subunit I of H. halobium cytochrome aa3 was more similar to that of subunit I of the eukaryotic cytochrome (44%, maize mitochondria) than that of the cytochrome from other bacteria (36%, Paracoccus denitrificans). The consensus sequence in putative metal binding residues is well-conserved also in H. halobium cytochrome aa3.

  11. Vip3Aa induces apoptosis in cultured Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kun; Mei, Si-Qi; Wang, Ting-Ting; Pan, Jin-Hua; Chen, Yue-Hua; Cai, Jun

    2016-09-15

    The vegetative insecticidal proteins (Vip) secreted by many Bacillus thuringiensis strains during their vegetative growth stage are regarded as second generation insecticidal proteins, as they share no sequence or structural homology with known crystal insecticidal proteins (Cry) and have a broad insecticidal spectrum. Compared with insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs), the insecticidal mechanisms of Vips have been little studied. Here we investigated the mechanism responsible for Vip3Aa toxicity in cultured insect cells. Using, flow cytometry analyzes, TUNEL staining and DNA fragmentation assays, we show that Vip3Aa can induce apoptosis in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells and cause cells to arrest at the G2/M phase. We also show that Vip3Aa can disrupt mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), leading to the activation of Sf-caspase-1, suggesting that a mitochondrial mediated and caspase dependent pathway may be involved in Vip3Aa-induced apoptosis in Sf9 cells.

  12. Homocysteine induced cardiovascular events: a consequence of long term anabolic‐androgenic steroid (AAS) abuse

    PubMed Central

    Graham, M R; Grace, F M; Boobier, W; Hullin, D; Kicman, A; Cowan, D; Davies, B; Baker, J S

    2006-01-01

    Objectives The long term effects (>20 years) of anabolic‐androgenic steroid (AAS) use on plasma concentrations of homocysteine (HCY), folate, testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), free androgen index, urea, creatinine, haematocrit (HCT), vitamin B12, and urinary testosterone/epitestosterone (T/E) ratio, were examined in a cohort of self‐prescribing bodybuilders. Methods Subjects (n = 40) were divided into four distinct groups: (1) AAS users still using AAS (SU; n = 10); (2) AAS users abstinent from AAS administration for 3 months (SA; n = 10); (3) non‐drug using bodybuilding controls (BC; n = 10); and (4) sedentary male controls (SC; n = 10). Results HCY levels were significantly higher in SU compared with BC and SC (p<0.01), and with SA (p<0.05). Fat free mass was significantly higher in both groups of AAS users (p<0.01). Daily energy intake (kJ) and daily protein intake (g/day) were significantly higher in SU and SA (p<0.05) compared with BC and SC, but were unlikely to be responsible for the observed HCY increases. HCT concentrations were significantly higher in the SU group (p<0.01). A significant linear inverse relationship was observed in the SU group between SHBG and HCY (r = −0.828, p<0.01), indicating a possible influence of the sex hormones in determining HCY levels. Conclusions With mounting evidence linking AAS to adverse effects on some clotting factors, the significantly higher levels of HCY and HCT observed in the SU group suggest long term AAS users have increased risk of future thromboembolic events. PMID:16488899

  13. Enhanced morphine- and cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization in alcohol-preferring AA rats.

    PubMed

    Honkanen, A; Mikkola, J; Korpi, E R; Hyytiä, P; Seppälä, T; Ahtee, L

    1999-03-01

    Locomotor stimulation and behavioral sensitization induced by acute and repeated treatment with alcohol, cocaine or morphine were studied in the alcohol-preferring AA (Alko, Alcohol), alcohol-avoiding ANA (Alko, Non-Alcohol) rats and non-selected Wistar rats. Daily treatment with alcohol (ethanol, 0.4 or 1.0 g/kg, IP) for 6 days had no effect on locomotor activity either in the AA or ANA rats. Acute cocaine (5, 10 or 20 mg/kg, IP) produced a locomotor stimulation in the animals of all lines studied, and there was no difference in this effect between the AA and ANA rats. During a 4-day repeated cocaine treatment, the AA rats became sensitized with the 10 mg/kg dose, while the ANA rats did not show any sensitization with this dose. With the 20 mg/kg cocaine dose, in addition to locomotor stimulation, the rats of all lines studied showed stereotyped behavior, which response was enhanced during repeated treatment. Morphine-induced locomotor stimulation was larger in the AA rats than in the ANA or Wistar rats both with 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg doses and only the AA rats were sensitized during 4-day treatment with the 1 mg/kg dose. With the 3.0 mg/kg morphine dose, only the AA rats showed a weak sensitization evident only during the initial 30 min after morphine injection. As the drug-induced behavioral sensitization is an important factor in the development of drug addiction, it is possible that mechanisms underlying the enhanced susceptibility of the AA rats to morphine- and cocaine-induced sensitization contribute to the high intake of alcohol and other abused drugs by these animals.

  14. Modeling of AA5083 Material-Microstructure Evolution During Butt Friction-Stir Welding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    FSW behavior of a prototypical solution-strengthened and strain-hardened aluminum alloy, AA5083-H131, is modeled using a fully coupled thermo...is followed by a computational investigation in which FSW behavior of a prototypical solution-strengthened and strain-hardened aluminum alloy, AA5083...provided. This is followed by a computational investigation in which FSW behavior of a prototypical solution-strengthened and strain-hardened aluminum

  15. Insecticidal Activity and Histopathological Effects of Vip3Aa Protein from Bacillus thuringiensis on Spodoptera litura.

    PubMed

    Song, Feifei; Lin, Yunfeng; Chen, Chen; Shao, Ensi; Guan, Xiong; Huang, Zhipeng

    2016-10-28

    Vegetative insecticidal proteins (Vips) are insecticidal proteins synthesized by Bacillus thuringiensis during the vegetative stage of growth. In this study, Vip3Aa protein, obtained by in vitro expression of the vip3Aa gene from B. thuringiensis WB5, displayed high insecticidal activity against Spodoptera litura aside from Spodoptera exigua and Helicoverpa armigera. Bioassay results showed that the toxicity of Vip3Aa protein against S. litura larvae statistically decreased along with the increase of the age of the larvae, with LC50 = 2.609 ng/cm(2) for neonatal larvae, LC50 = 28.778 ng/cm(2) for first instar larvae, LC50 = 70.460 ng/cm(2) for second instar larvae, and LC50 = 200.627 ng/cm(2) for third instar larvae. The accumulative mortality of 100% larvae appeared at 72 h for all instars of S. litura larvae, when feeding respectively with 83.22, 213.04, 341.40, and 613.20 ng/cm(2) of Vip3Aa toxin to the neonatal and first to third instar larvae. The histopathological effects of Vip3Aa toxin on the midgut epithelial cells of S. litura larvae was also investigated. The TEM observations showed wide damage of the epithelial cell in the midgut of S. litura larvae fed with Vip3Aa toxin.

  16. The 9aaTAD Is Exclusive Activation Domain in Gal4

    PubMed Central

    Havelka, Marek; Rezacova, Martina

    2017-01-01

    The Gal4 protein is a well-known prototypic acidic activator that has multiple activation domains. We have previously identified a new activation domain called the nine amino acid transactivation domain (9aaTAD) in Gal4 protein. The family of the 9aaTAD activators currently comprises over 40 members including p53, MLL, E2A and other members of the Gal4 family; Oaf1, Pip2, Pdr1 and Pdr3. In this study, we revised function of all reported Gal4 activation domains. Surprisingly, we found that beside of the activation domain 9aaTAD none of the previously reported activation domains had considerable transactivation potential and were not involved in the activation of transcription. Our results demonstrated that the 9aaTAD domain is the only decisive activation domain in the Gal4 protein. We found that the artificial peptides included in the original Gal4 constructs were results of an unintended consequence of cloning that were responsible for the artificial transcriptional activity. Importantly, the activation domain 9aaTAD, which is the exclusive activation domain in Gal4, is also the central part of a conserved sequence recognized by the inhibitory protein Gal80. We propose a revision of the Gal4 regulation, in which the activation domain 9aaTAD is directly linked to both activation function and Gal80 mediated inhibition. PMID:28056036

  17. [Exposure degree of important non-target arthropods to Cry2Aa in Bt rice fields].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Ling; Li, Yun-He; Hua, Hong-Xia; Yang, Chang-Ju; Wu, Hong-Jin; Peng, Yu-Fa

    2013-06-01

    Based on the principle of "risk = hazard x exposure", the selected representative nontarget organisms in the assessment of the potential effects of insect-resistant genetically modified (GM) crops on non-target arthropods in laboratory are generally the arthropod species highly exposed to the insecticidal proteins expressed by the GM crops in farmland ecosystem. In order to understand the exposure degree of the important arthropod species to Cry proteins in Bt rice fields, and to select the appropriate non-target arthropods in the risk assessment of insect-resistant GM crops, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was conducted to measure the Cry2Aa protein concentration in the arthropods collected from the cry2Aa rice fields at different rice growth stages. The results showed that there was a significant difference in the Cry2Aa content protein concentration in different arthropod species. Some species did not contain Cry2Aa protein, while some species contained larger amounts of Cry2Aa protein. Relative to the arthropods colleted after rice anthesis, the arthropods colleted in rice anthesis contained relative higher concentrations of Cry2Aa protein, especially for the predacious arthropods. No Cry proteins were detected in parasitic arthropods. This study provided references for the laboratory assessment of the effects of GM rice on nontarget arthropods.

  18. Multiple Dirac particles in AA-stacked graphite and multilayers of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobato, I.; Partoens, B.

    2011-04-01

    Using the tight-binding formalism we show that in the recently experimentally realized AA-stacked graphite in essence two types of massless relativistic Dirac particles are present with a different effective speed of light. We also investigate how the electronic structure evolves from a single graphene sheet into AA-stacked graphite. It is shown that in contrast to AB-stacked graphene layers, the spectrum of AA-stacked graphene layers can be considered as a superposition of single-layer spectra and only particles with a linear spectrum at the Fermi energy around the K point are present. From the evolution of the band overlap we show that 6 multilayers of AA-stacked graphene already behave as AA-stacked graphite. The evolution of the effective speeds of light of the Dirac particles to their bulk values shows exactly the same behavior. The tight-binding parameters we use to describe AA-stacked graphite and multilayers of graphene are obtained by ab initio calculations.

  19. Doping with anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS): Adverse effects on non-reproductive organs and functions.

    PubMed

    Nieschlag, Eberhard; Vorona, Elena

    2015-09-01

    Since the 1970s anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) have been abused at ever increasing rates in competitive athletics, in recreational sports and in bodybuilding. Exceedingly high doses are often consumed over long periods, in particular by bodybuilders, causing acute or chronic adverse side effects frequently complicated by additional polypharmacy. This review summarizes side effects on non-reproductive organs and functions; effects on male and female reproduction have been recently reviewed in a parallel paper. Among the most striking AAS side effects are increases in haematocrit and coagulation causing thromboembolism, intracardiac thrombosis and stroke as well as other cardiac disturbances including arrhythmias, cardiomyopathies and possibly sudden death. 17α-alkylated AAS are liver toxic leading to cholestasis, peliosis, adenomas and carcinomas. Hyperbilirubinaemia can cause cholemic nephrosis and kidney failure. AAS abuse may induce exaggerated self-confidence, reckless behavior, aggressiveness and psychotic symptoms. AAS withdrawal may be accompanied by depression and suicidal intentions. Since AAS abuse is not or only reluctantly admitted physicians should be aware of the multitude of serious side effects when confronted with unclear symptoms.

  20. AA-PMe, a novel asiatic acid derivative, induces apoptosis and suppresses proliferation, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yue; Wang, Gang; Ge, Ying; Xu, Minjie; Tang, Shuainan; Gong, Zhunan

    2016-01-01

    Asiatic acid (AA; 2α,3β,23-trihydroxyurs-12-ene-28-oic acid) is widely used for medicinal purposes in many Asian countries due to its various bioactivities. A series of AA derivatives has been synthesized in attempts to improve its therapeutic potencies. Herein we investigated the anti-tumor activities of N-(2α,3β,23-acetoxyurs-12-en-28-oyl)-l-proline methyl ester (AA-PMe), a novel AA derivative. AA-PMe exhibited a stronger anti-cancer activity than its parent compound AA. AA-PMe inhibited the proliferation of SGC7901 and HGC27 human gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner but had no significant toxicity in human gastric mucosa epithelial cells (GES-1). AA-PMe induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and blocked G1-S transition, which correlated well with marked decreases in levels of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase CKD4, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein, and increase in cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor P15. Further, AA-PMe induced apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells by affecting Bcl-2, Bax, c-Myc, and caspase-3. Moreover, AA-PMe suppressed the migration and invasion of human gastric cancer cells (SGC7901 and HGC27) cells by downregulating the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Overall, this study investigated the potential anti-cancer activities of AA-PMe including inducing apoptosis and suppressing proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells, as well as the underlying mechanisms, suggesting that AA-PMe is a promising anti-cancer drug candidate in gastric cancer therapy.

  1. AA-PMe, a novel asiatic acid derivative, induces apoptosis and suppresses proliferation, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Yue; Wang, Gang; Ge, Ying; Xu, Minjie; Tang, Shuainan; Gong, Zhunan

    2016-01-01

    Asiatic acid (AA; 2α,3β,23-trihydroxyurs-12-ene-28-oic acid) is widely used for medicinal purposes in many Asian countries due to its various bioactivities. A series of AA derivatives has been synthesized in attempts to improve its therapeutic potencies. Herein we investigated the anti-tumor activities of N-(2α,3β,23-acetoxyurs-12-en-28-oyl)-l-proline methyl ester (AA-PMe), a novel AA derivative. AA-PMe exhibited a stronger anti-cancer activity than its parent compound AA. AA-PMe inhibited the proliferation of SGC7901 and HGC27 human gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner but had no significant toxicity in human gastric mucosa epithelial cells (GES-1). AA-PMe induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and blocked G1-S transition, which correlated well with marked decreases in levels of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase CKD4, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein, and increase in cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor P15. Further, AA-PMe induced apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells by affecting Bcl-2, Bax, c-Myc, and caspase-3. Moreover, AA-PMe suppressed the migration and invasion of human gastric cancer cells (SGC7901 and HGC27) cells by downregulating the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Overall, this study investigated the potential anti-cancer activities of AA-PMe including inducing apoptosis and suppressing proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells, as well as the underlying mechanisms, suggesting that AA-PMe is a promising anti-cancer drug candidate in gastric cancer therapy. PMID:27073325

  2. Multifunctional cellulolytic auxiliary activity protein HcAA10-2 from Hahella chejuensis enhances enzymatic hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose.

    PubMed

    Ghatge, Sunil S; Telke, Amar A; Waghmode, Tatoba R; Lee, Yuno; Lee, Keun-Woo; Oh, Doo-Byoung; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Kim, Seon-Won

    2015-04-01

    The modular auxiliary activity (AA) family of proteins is believed to cause amorphogenesis in addition to oxidative cleavage of crystalline cellulose although the supporting evidence is limited. HcAA10-2 is a modular AA10 family protein (58 kDa) composed of a AA10 module and a family two carbohydrate binding module (CBM2), joined by a long stretch of 222 amino acids of unknown function. The protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis of Avicel treated with HcAA10-2 provided evidence for the disruption of the cellulose microfibrils ("amorphogenesis") and reduction of the crystallinity index, resulting in a twofold increase of cellulase adsorption on the polysaccharide surface. HcAA10-2 exhibited weak endoglucanase-like activity toward soluble cellulose and cello-oligosaccharides with an optimum at pH 6.5 and 45 °C. HcAA10-2 catalyzed oxidative cleavage of crystalline cellulose released native and oxidized cello-oligosaccharides in the presence of copper and an electron donor such as ascorbic acid. Multiple sequence alignment indicated that His1, His109, and Phe197 in the AA10 module formed the conserved copper-binding site. The reducing sugar released from Avicel by the endoglucanase Cel5 and Celluclast accompanying HcAA10-2 was increased by four- and sixfold, respectively. Moreover, HcAA10-2 and Celluclast acted synergistically on pretreated wheat straw biomass resulting in a threefold increase in reducing sugar than Celluclast alone. Taken together, these results suggest that HcAA10-2 is a novel multifunctional modular AA10 protein possessing amorphogenesis, weak endoglucanase, and oxidative cleavage activities useful for efficient degradation of crystalline cellulose.

  3. Determination of elements in ayurvedic medicinal plants by AAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teerthe, Santoshkumar S.; Kerur, B. R.

    2015-08-01

    India has a rich country for the uses of Ayurvedic medicinal plants for treatment and also the north- Karnataka boasts an unparallel diversity of medicinal plants. The present study attempts to estimate and compare the level of trace and heavy metals in some selected leaves and root samples of Ayurvedic medicinal plants such as Mg, Al, K, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Cd. The samples are collected from different places of North-Karnataka regions and sample solutions prepared as the ratio of 1:25:25+950ml=1000ppm.the trace and heavy elemental concentration was estimated using Atomic Absorption Spectrometric (AAS) Method. The average concentrations of Mg, Mn, Fe and Zn, are ranging from 2ppm to 5250.2ppm and potassium (K) has more concentration as compare to all other. The other elements likes Al, Cr, Cu, and Cd were also estimed and presented in the table. Therefore, these medicinal plants are rich in some essential minerals, especially K, Mg, Mn, Fe and Zn which are essential for human health

  4. Renal AA Amyloidosis in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Díez, Ramón; Madero, Magdalena; Gamba, Gerardo; Soriano, Juan; Soto, Virgilia

    2014-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is the leading cause of chronic kidney disease and a major cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality. Inflammation is closely involved in the pathogenesis of T2DM, and reactive amyloidosis occurs in the presence of chronic inflammation. We hypothesized that patients with T2DM may have a higher prevalence of renal AA amyloidosis (RAAA) and that this could contribute to worse atherosclerosis and CVD. Materials and Methods We analyzed 330 autopsy kidneys from patients with a previous T2DM diagnosis. The kidney tissue was evaluated in order to determine the presence of diabetic nephropathy and RAAA, and systemic vessels were evaluated for the presence of atherosclerosis. Results RAAA was detected in 9% of our study population and was associated with an increased risk for nodular sclerosis [OR (95% CI)] [11 (2.04-59.16)], for chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy [4.59 (2.02-10.42)], for myocardial infarction [3.41 (1.52-7.64)] as well as for aortic [4.75 (1.09-20.69)], coronary [3.22 (1.47-7.04)], and intrarenal atherosclerosis [3.84 (1.46-10.09)]. Conclusions RAAA is prevalent in T2DM and is associated with worse CVD and renal disease, likely because RAAA is a marker of severe chronic inflammation. PMID:25337080

  5. Determination of elements in ayurvedic medicinal plants by AAS

    SciTech Connect

    Teerthe, Santoshkumar S.; Kerur, B. R.

    2015-08-28

    India has a rich country for the uses of Ayurvedic medicinal plants for treatment and also the north- Karnataka boasts an unparallel diversity of medicinal plants. The present study attempts to estimate and compare the level of trace and heavy metals in some selected leaves and root samples of Ayurvedic medicinal plants such as Mg, Al, K, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Cd. The samples are collected from different places of North-Karnataka regions and sample solutions prepared as the ratio of 1:25:25+950ml=1000ppm.the trace and heavy elemental concentration was estimated using Atomic Absorption Spectrometric (AAS) Method. The average concentrations of Mg, Mn, Fe and Zn, are ranging from 2ppm to 5250.2ppm and potassium (K) has more concentration as compare to all other. The other elements likes Al, Cr, Cu, and Cd were also estimed and presented in the table. Therefore, these medicinal plants are rich in some essential minerals, especially K, Mg, Mn, Fe and Zn which are essential for human health.

  6. Characterization of proteoglycans associated with mouse splenic AA amyloidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Stenstad, T; Magnus, J H; Husby, G

    1994-01-01

    We here report for the first time on the chemical characteristics of proteoglycans associated with mouse splenic reactive AA amyloid. Amyloid was induced in CBA/J mice by two different procedures; conventional casein treatment and by employing Freund's complete adjuvant, accelerated by Trypan Blue. Pulse-labelling was employed at distinct stages during amyloid development, followed by [35S]proteoglycan characterization of organ extracts. Repetitive 35S injections were also administered during the phase where amyloid deposition occurred most rapidly. Proteoglycans were extracted with guanidine in the presence of protease inhibitors and purified. The results showed that the production of proteoglycans is dramatically enhanced during amyloidogenesis, the glycosaminoglycan and proteoglycan accumulation being not only dependent on alterations in proteoglycan catabolism, but rather on increased synthesis. The increment could be demonstrated even at the stage before microscopic detection of amyloid deposits, clearly suggesting that the upregulation of proteoglycan expression precedes amyloid fibril formation. Two major proteoglycans were found to accumulate in advanced splenic amyloid; one a heparan sulphate proteoglycan of approx. 200 kDa with a core protein of 70 kDa, the other a chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan of smaller size. Moreover, free dermatan sulphate chains seemed to specifically accumulate in the organs during amyloid fibrillogenesis. We suggest that free glycosaminoglycans may be a specific feature of amyloidosis and that different proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans play a role in formation and stabilization of amyloid fibrils in vivo. Images Figure 2 Figure 6 PMID:7980430

  7. Cylindrical diffractive lenses recorded on PVA/AA photopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, R.; Gallego, S.; Márquez, A.; Navarro-Fuster, V.; Francés, J.; Neipp, C.; Beléndez, A.; Pascual, I.

    2016-04-01

    Photopolymers are optical recording materials appealing for many different applications such as holography, data storage, interconnectors, solar concentrations, or wave-guides fabrication. Recently the capacity of photopolymers to record diffractive optical elements (DOE's) has been investigated. Different authors have reported proposes to record DOE like fork gratings, photonics structures, lenses, sinusoidal, blazed or fork gratings. In these experiments there are different experimental set-ups and different photopolymers. In this work due to the improvement in the spatial light modulation technology together with the photopolymer science we propose a recording experimental system of DOE using a Liquid Cristal based on Silicon (LCoS) display as a master to store complex DOE like cylindrical lenses. This technology permits us an accurate control of the phase and the amplitude of the recording beam, with a very small pixel size. The main advantage of this display is that permit us to modify the DOE automatically, we use the software of the LCoS to send the voltage to each pixel In this work we use a photopolymer composed by acrylamide (AA) as polymerizable monomer and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). We use a coverplated and index matched photopolymer to avoid the influence of the thickness variation on the transmitted light. In order to reproduce the material behaviour during polymerization, we have designed our model to simulate cylindrical lenses and used Fresnel propagation to simulate the light propagation through the DOE and analyze the focal plane and the properties of the recorded lenses.

  8. Fully Digital: Policy and Process Implications for the AAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biemesderfer, Chris

    Over the past two decades, every scholarly publisher has migrated at least the mechanical aspects of their journal publishing so that they utilize digital means. The academy was comfortable with that for a while, but publishers are under increasing pressure to adapt further. At the American Astronomical Society (AAS), we think that means bringing our publishing program to the point of being fully digital, by establishing procedures and policies that regard the digital objects of publication primarily. We have always thought about our electronic journals as databases of digital articles, from which we can publish and syndicate articles one at a time, and we must now put flesh on those bones by developing practices that are consistent with the realities of article at a time publication online. As a learned society that holds the long-term rights to the literature, we have actively taken responsibility for the preservation of the digital assets that constitute our journals, and in so doing we have not forsaken the legacy pre-digital assets. All of us who serve as the long-term stewards of scholarship must begin to evolve into fully digital publishers.

  9. Periodic barrier structure in AA-stacked bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redouani, Ilham; Jellal, Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    We study the charge carriers transport in an AA-stacked bilayer graphene modulated by a lateral one-dimensional multibarrier structure. We investigate the band structures of our system, that is made up of two shifted Dirac cones, for finite and zero gap. We use the boundary conditions to explicitly determine the transmission probability of each individual cone (τ =+/- 1) for single, double and finite periodic barrier structure. We find that the Klein tunneling is only possible when the band structure is gapless and can occur at normal incidence as a result of the Dirac nature of the quasiparticles. We observe that the band structure of the barriers can have more than one Dirac points for finite periodic barrier. The resonance peaks appear in the transmission probability, which correspond to the positions of new cones index like associated with τ =+/- 1. Two conductance channels through different cones (τ =+/- 1) are found where the total conductance has been studied and compared to the cases of single layer and AB-stacked bilayer graphene.

  10. AA-stacked bilayer graphene quantum dots in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belouad, Abdelhadi; Zahidi, Youness; Jellal, Ahmed

    2016-05-01

    By applying the infinite-mass boundary condition, we analytically calculate the confined states and the corresponding wave functions of AA-stacked bilayer graphene (BLG) quantum dots (QDs) in the presence of an uniform magnetic field B. It is found that the energy spectrum shows two set of levels, which are the double copies of the energy spectrum for single layer graphene, shifted up-down by +γ and -γ , respectively. However, the obtained spectrum exhibits different symmetries between the electron and hole states as well as the intervalley symmetries. It is noticed that, the applied magnetic field breaks all symmetries, except one related to the intervalley electron-hole symmetry, i.e. {E}{{e}}(τ ,m)=-{E}{{h}}(τ ,m). Two different regimes of confinement are found: the first one is due to the infinite-mass barrier at weak B and the second is dominated by the magnetic field as long as B is large. We numerically investigated the basics features of the energy spectrum to show the main similarities and differences with respect to monolayer graphene, AB-stacked BLG and semiconductor QDs. Dedicated to Professor Dr Hachim A Yamani on the occasion of his 70th birthday.

  11. Cyt1Aa Protein of Bacillus thuringiensis Is Toxic to the Cottonwood Leaf Beetle, Chrysomela scripta, and Suppresses High Levels of Resistance to Cry3Aa

    PubMed Central

    Federici, Brian A.; Bauer, Leah S.

    1998-01-01

    The insecticidal activity of Bacillus thuringiensis is due primarily to Cry and Cyt proteins. Cry proteins are typically toxic to lepidopterous, coleopterous, or dipterous insects, whereas the known toxicity of Cyt proteins is limited to dipterans. We report here that a Cyt protein, Cyt1Aa, is also highly toxic to the cottonwood leaf beetle, Chrysomela scripta, with a median lethal concentration of 2.5 ng/mm2 of leaf surface for second-instar larvae. Additionally, we show that Cyt1Aa suppresses resistance to Cry3Aa greater than 5,000-fold in C. scripta, a level only partially overcome by Cry1Ba due to cross-resistance. Studies of the histopathology of C. scripta larvae treated with Cyt1Aa revealed disruption and sloughing of midgut epithelial cells, indicating that its mechanism of action against C. scripta is similar to that observed in mosquito and blackfly larvae. These novel properties suggest that Cyt proteins may have an even broader spectrum of activity against insects and, owing to their different mechanism of action in comparison to Cry proteins, might be useful in managing resistance to Cry3 and possibly other Cry toxins used in microbial insecticides and transgenic plants. PMID:9797292

  12. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Aa of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... citation Requirement Applies tosubpart AA Comment 63.1(a)(1) through (4) General Applicability Yes. 63.1(a...) Alternative Test Method Yes. 63.7(g) Data Analysis Yes. 63.7(h) Waiver of Tests Yes. 63.8(a)(1)...

  13. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis tenebrionis 4AA1, a typical strain with toxicity to Coleopteran insects.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiuling; Zheng, Jinshui; Zhu, Lei; Ruan, Lifang; Peng, Donghai; Sun, Ming

    2015-06-20

    Bacillus thuringiensis serovar morrisoni biovar tenebrionis has been developed as an bioinsecticide to control Coleopteran insects in agriculture and forestry for a few decades. Its major crystal protein Cry3Aa was also applied to transgenic crops. Here we report the complete genome sequence of strain tenebrionis 4AA1, which has one chromosome of 5,652,292bp and six plasmids. Two crystal protein genes, cry3Aa and cry15Aa, locate on one single plasmid named pBMB51. This strain also possesses plentiful virulence factors besides crystal proteins.

  14. HACEK endocarditis: state-of-the-art.

    PubMed

    Revest, Matthieu; Egmann, Gérald; Cattoir, Vincent; Tattevin, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The HACEK group of bacteria - Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Aggregatibacter spp. (A. actinomycetemcomitans, A. aphrophilus, A. paraphrophilus, and A. segnis), Cardiobacterium spp. (C. hominis, C. valvarum), Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella spp. (K. kingae, K. denitrificans) - are fastidious gram-negative bacteria, part of the normal microbiota of oral and upper respiratory tract in humans. Although their pathogenicity is limited, they are responsible for 1-3% of all infective endocarditis. HACEK endocarditis mostly affect patients with underlying heart disease or prosthetic valves, and are characterized by an insidious course, with a mean diagnosis delay of 1 month (Haemophilus spp.) to 3 months (Aggregatibacter and Cardiobacterium spp.). The advent of continuously monitored blood culture systems with enriched media has erased the need for extended incubation for the diagnosis of HACEK endocarditis. Medical treatment relies on third-generation cephalosporin, with a favorable outcome in 80-90% of cases, with or without cardiac surgery.

  15. Overview of AA and Research Progress: What Have We Learned and Where Are We Headed?

    PubMed

    Norris, David A

    2015-11-01

    During its 25th anniversary year, the National Alopecia Areata Foundation undertook a project to completely re-evaluate their research program and to help focus and direct future directions of alopecia areata research to better meet the goals of people with alopecia areata (AA) and the scientists working to discover mechanisms of disease and better treatments for AA. This project was embodied in four research summits in 2008, 2009, 2010, and 2012, as part of the Foundation's main strategic initiative, the Alopecia Areata Treatment Development Program to accelerate progress toward a viable alopecia areata treatment. The first summit was an evaluation of the progress of AA research in a global sense, with an emphasis on how to use the research programs to bring better treatments to patients. The second summit focused on immunology and how to better understand the autoimmune nature of AA. The third summit focused on developing a clinical research network that could most effectively bring new treatments to patients. The fourth summit consolidated the considerable evidence of the mechanisms of AA, and how these mechanisms could be targeted by modern therapies, many of which were being used effectively in other autoimmune diseases. These four summits laid the foundation for the fifth summit in the series: From Targets to Treatments: Bridging Autoimmune Research to Advance Understanding of Alopecia Areata.

  16. Mechanism of decay of the cry1Aa mRNA in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Cruz, C; Olmedo-Alvarez, G

    1997-01-01

    We undertook the study of the decay process of the cry1Aa mRNA of Bacillus thuringiensis expressed in B. subtilis. The cry1Aa transcript is a 3.7-kb mRNA expressed during sporulation whose transcriptional control has previously been studied in both B. subtilis and B. thuringiensis. We found that the cry1Aa mRNA has a half-life of around 9 min and that its decay occurs through endoribonucleolytic cleavages which result in three groups of high-molecular-weight mRNA intermediates ranging in size from 2.7 to 0.5 kb. A comparative study carried out with Escherichia coli showed a similar pattern of degradation intermediates. Primer extension analysis carried out on RNA from B. subtilis revealed that most cleavages occur within two regions located toward the 5' and 3' ends of the mRNA. The most prominent processing site observed for the cry1Aa mRNA isolated from B. subtilis is only two bases away from that occurring on RNA isolated from E. coli. Most cleavage sites occur at seemingly single-stranded RNA segments rich in A and U nucleotides, suggesting that a common and conserved mechanism may process the cry1Aa mRNA. PMID:9335281

  17. The Impact of Reclassification from Division II to DI-AA and from Division I-AA to I-A on NCAA Member Institutions from 1993 to 2003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frieder, Laura L., Comp.; Fulks, Daniel L., Comp.

    2007-01-01

    Recent years have seen a number of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division II institutions seeking reclassification to Division I-AA and Division I-AA institutions moving to Division I-A. Yet, other schools that seem like natural candidates to reclassify have resisted. The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of the…

  18. Trends in Susceptibility to Aggressive Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shahabuddin, Nishat; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen; Lally, Edward T

    2016-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a gram-negative microbe involved in periodontitis. Strains with varying degrees of virulence have been identified, in healthy and periodontally compromised individuals alike. Hosts mount differential immune responses to its various serotypes and virulence factors. Studies have explored host immune response in terms of antibody titers, leukocyte responses, and specific inflammatory mediators, questioning the ways in which the infectious microorganism survives. This mini-review will identify the key themes in immune response patterns of individuals both affected by and free from aggressive periodontal disease, thereby using it to understand various forms of periodontitis. PMID:28008419

  19. Impact of CDT Toxin on Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Faïs, Tiphanie; Delmas, Julien; Serres, Arnaud; Bonnet, Richard; Dalmasso, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) is found in Gram-negative bacteria, especially in certain Proteobacteria such as the Pasteurellaceae family, including Haemophilus ducreyi and Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans, in the Enterobacteriaceae family and the Campylobacterales order, including the Campylobacter and Helicobacter species. In vitro and in vivo studies have clearly shown that this toxin has a strong effect on cellular physiology (inflammation, immune response modulation, tissue damage). Some works even suggest a potential involvement of CDT in cancers. In this review, we will discuss these different aspects. PMID:27429000

  20. Impact of CDT Toxin on Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Faïs, Tiphanie; Delmas, Julien; Serres, Arnaud; Bonnet, Richard; Dalmasso, Guillaume

    2016-07-15

    Cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) is found in Gram-negative bacteria, especially in certain Proteobacteria such as the Pasteurellaceae family, including Haemophilus ducreyi and Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans, in the Enterobacteriaceae family and the Campylobacterales order, including the Campylobacter and Helicobacter species. In vitro and in vivo studies have clearly shown that this toxin has a strong effect on cellular physiology (inflammation, immune response modulation, tissue damage). Some works even suggest a potential involvement of CDT in cancers. In this review, we will discuss these different aspects.

  1. Inhibitory activity of Aloe vera gel on some clinically isolated cariogenic and periodontopathic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fani, Mohammadmehdi; Kohanteb, Jamshid

    2012-03-01

    Aloe vera is a medicinal plant with anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antidiabetic and immune-boosting properties. In the present study we investigated the inhibitory activities of Aloe vera gel on some cariogenic (Streptococcus mutans), periodontopathic (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis) and an opportunistic periodontopathogen (Bacteroides fragilis) isolated from patients with dental caries and periodontal diseases. Twenty isolates of each of these bacteria were investigated for their sensitivity to Aloe vera gel using the disk diffusion and microdilution methods. S. mutans was the species most sensitive to Aloe vera gel with a MIC of 12.5 µg/ml, while A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, and B. fragilis were less sensitive, with a MIC of 25-50 µg/ml (P < 0.01). Based on our present findings it is concluded that Aloe vera gel at optimum concentration could be used as an antiseptic for prevention of dental caries and periodontal diseases.

  2. Generalized AA-amyloidosis in Siberian tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) with predominant renal medullary amyloid deposition.

    PubMed

    Schulze, C; Brügmann, M; Böer, M; Brandt, H P; Pohlenz, J; Linke, R P

    1998-01-01

    Generalized amyloidosis with predominant renal medullary amyloid deposition was found in four closely related Siberian tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) suffering from end stage kidney diseases. Only minimal to mild amounts of amyloid were deposited in various organs outside the kidneys with individually variable organ involvement. The Congo red staining affinity of amyloid deposits was sensitive to potassium permanganate oxidation. The deposits were further characterized as being of the amyloid-A (AA) type by immunohistochemistry using the mouse monoclonal antibody mc4 directed against a conserved region of the human AA-protein. A combination of immunohistochemistry and Congo red staining was much more sensitive for the diagnosis of amyloid deposits than Congo red staining alone. With this combination, even minimal amyloid deposits were detected that had been missed in the first reading using Congo-red-stained slides alone. Since no common primary cause was identified, the amyloidosis was classified as idiopathic generalized AA-amyloidosis with a potential familial predisposition.

  3. Novel strategy for protein production using a peptide tag derived from Bacillus thuringiensis Cry4Aa.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Tohru; Sato, Shinya; Iwamoto, Shigehisa; Sudo, Shigeo; Sakamoto, Yoshiki; Yamashita, Takaaki; Uchida, Motoaki; Matsushima, Kenji; Kashino, Yohko; Sakai, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    Numerous proteins cannot be sufficiently prepared by ordinary recombinant DNA techniques because they are unstable or have deleterious effects on the host cell. One idea to prepare such proteins is to produce them as protein inclusions. Here we developed a novel system to effectively prepare proteins by using peptide tags derived from the insecticidal Cry toxin of a soil bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis. Fusion with this peptide tag, designated 4AaCter, facilitates the formation of protein inclusions of glutathione S-transferase in Escherichia coli without losing the enzyme activity. Application of 4AaCter to the production of syphilis antigens TpN15, TpN17 and TpN47 from Treponema pallidum yielded excellent results, including a dramatic increase in the production level, simplification of the product purification and high reactivity with syphilis antibody. The use of 4AaCter may provide an innovational strategy for the efficient production of proteins.

  4. An Essential Role for Senescent Cells in Optimal Wound Healing through Secretion of PDGF-AA

    PubMed Central

    Demaria, Marco; Ohtani, Naoko; Youssef, Sameh A.; Rodier, Francis; Toussaint, Wendy; Mitchell, James R.; Laberge, Remi-Martin; Vijg, Jan; Van Steeg, Harry; Dollé, Martijn E.T.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H.J.; de Bruin, Alain; Hara, Eiji; Campisi, Judith

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by halting the growth of premalignant cells, yet the accumulation of senescent cells is thought to drive age-related pathology through a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), the function of which is unclear. To understand the physiological role(s) of the complex senescent phenotype, we generated a mouse model in which senescent cells can be visualized and eliminated in living animals. We show that senescent fibroblasts and endothelial cells appear very early in response to a cutaneous wound, where they accelerate wound closure by inducing myofibroblast differentiation through the secretion of platelet-derived growth factor AA (PDGF-AA). In two mouse models, topical treatment of senescence-free wounds with recombinant PDGF-AA rescued the delayed wound closure and lack of myofibroblast differentiation. These findings define a beneficial role for the SASP in tissue repair and help to explain why the SASP evolved. PMID:25499914

  5. An essential role for senescent cells in optimal wound healing through secretion of PDGF-AA.

    PubMed

    Demaria, Marco; Ohtani, Naoko; Youssef, Sameh A; Rodier, Francis; Toussaint, Wendy; Mitchell, James R; Laberge, Remi-Martin; Vijg, Jan; Van Steeg, Harry; Dollé, Martijn E T; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; de Bruin, Alain; Hara, Eiji; Campisi, Judith

    2014-12-22

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by halting the growth of premalignant cells, yet the accumulation of senescent cells is thought to drive age-related pathology through a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), the function of which is unclear. To understand the physiological role(s) of the complex senescent phenotype, we generated a mouse model in which senescent cells can be visualized and eliminated in living animals. We show that senescent fibroblasts and endothelial cells appear very early in response to a cutaneous wound, where they accelerate wound closure by inducing myofibroblast differentiation through the secretion of platelet-derived growth factor AA (PDGF-AA). In two mouse models, topical treatment of senescence-free wounds with recombinant PDGF-AA rescued the delayed wound closure and lack of myofibroblast differentiation. These findings define a beneficial role for the SASP in tissue repair and help to explain why the SASP evolved.

  6. Comparison of preliminary results from Airborne Aster Simulator (AAS) with TIMS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kannari, Yoshiaki; Mills, Franklin; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ezaka, Teruya; Narita, Tatsuhiko; Chang, Sheng-Huei

    1992-01-01

    The Japanese Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection radiometer (ASTER), being developed for a NASA EOS-A satellite, will have 3 VNIR, 6 SWIR, and 5 TIR (8-12 micron) bands. An Airborne ASTER Simulator (AAS) was developed for Japan Resources Observation System Organization (JAROS) by the Geophysical Environmental Research Group (GER) Corp. to research surface temperature and emission features in the MWIR/TIR, to simulate ASTER's TIR bands, and to study further possibility of MWIR/TIR bands. ASTER Simulator has 1 VNIR, 3 MWIR (3-5 microns), and 20 (currently 24) TIR bands. Data was collected over 3 sites - Cuprite, Nevada; Long Valley/Mono Lake, California; and Death Valley, California - with simultaneous ground truth measurements. Preliminary data collected by AAS for Cuprite, Nevada is presented and AAS data is compared with Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) data.

  7. AA479 antiserum: new reagent for the serotype characterization of atypical variants of Shigella flexneri.

    PubMed

    van der Ploeg, Claudia A; Rogé, Ariel D; Bordagorria, Ximena L; de Urquiza, María T; Viñas, María R; Pichel, Mariana G; Bruno, Susana B

    2015-01-01

    Shigella flexneri is divided into 13 serotypes based on the combination of antigenic determinants present in the O-antigen. A new O-antigen modification with phosphoethanolamine has been identified. The presence of this antigenic determinant (called E1037) is recognized by monoclonal antibody MASF IV-1. Given the increasing incidence of these new variants and the difficulty in supplying the monoclonal antibody to our country, we produced a polyclonal antiserum (AA479) through immunization with a S. flexneri Xv strain. The antiserum specificity was assessed by slide agglutination against isolates from clinical cases and a culture collection representing all Shigella serotypes. The results obtained demonstrated a 100% correlation between AA479 absorbed antiserum and monoclonal antibody MASF IV-1. The availability of AA479 antiserum in every public hospital in Argentina will allow us to identify atypical S. flexneri isolates in order to strengthen Shigella surveillance in our country and to compare with global epidemiological data.

  8. 32 CFR 1630.48 - Class 4-A-A: Registrant who has performed military service for a foreign nation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... military service for a foreign nation. 1630.48 Section 1630.48 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM CLASSIFICATION RULES § 1630.48 Class 4-A-A: Registrant who has performed military service for a foreign nation. In Class 4-A-A shall be placed any...

  9. Transcription factors may frame Aa-nat gene expression and melatonin synthesis at night in the Syrian hamster pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Garidou, Marie-Laure; Diaz, Elena; Calgari, Christiane; Pévet, Paul; Simonneaux, Valérie

    2003-06-01

    Pineal melatonin synthesis is stimulated at night following an increase in arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) activity. Depending on the species, two mechanisms of enzyme activation have been described: a cAMP/phospho-cAMP response element-binding protein-dependent stimulation of Aa-nat gene transcription in the rat, presumed to occur in all rodents, or a posttranslational regulation of AA-NAT protein in ongulates. The present data obtained in the Syrian hamster indicate another route of AA-NAT regulation. Elevated nocturnal levels of Aa-nat mRNA were strongly suppressed following light exposure or adrenergic antagonist administration, demonstrating the involvement of norepinephrine in the stimulation of melatonin synthesis. However, administration of adrenergic agonists during the day did not increase Aa-nat mRNA unless a protein synthesis inhibitor was given during the previous night. This indicates that an inhibitory protein, synthesized at night, prevents melatonin synthesis during the day. By contrast, a protein synthesis inhibitor given at the beginning of the night markedly reduced Aa-nat mRNA, suggesting that a stimulatory protein (transcription factor?) is necessary for Aa-nat gene transcription at night. Noteworthy, hamsters raised in long photoperiod were responsive to adrenergic agonist injection only in the first hour after light onset, a response that may be important in this photoperiodic species in which the melatonin peak extends into the morning hours in a short photoperiod.

  10. Participation and Performance Reporting for the Alternate Assessment Based on Modified Achievement Standards (AA-MAS). Technical Report 58

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albus, Deb; Thurlow, Martha L.; Lazarus, Sheryl S.

    2011-01-01

    This report examines publicly reported participation and performance data for the alternate assessment based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS). The authors' analysis of these data included all states publicly reporting AA-MAS data, regardless of whether they had received approval to use the results for Title I accountability calculations.…

  11. 76 FR 6794 - 30-Day Submission Period for Requests for ONC-Approved Accreditor (ONC-AA) Status

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 30-Day Submission Period for Requests for ONC-Approved Accreditor (ONC-AA) Status AGENCY... ONC-Approved Accreditor (ONC-AA) status. Authority: 42 U.S.C. 300jj-11. DATES: The 30-day submission... a notice in the Federal Register to announce the 30-day period during which requests for...

  12. States' Participation Guidelines for Alternate Assessments Based on Modified Academic Achievement Standards (AA-MAS) in 2009. Synthesis Report 75

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Sheryl S.; Hodgson, Jennifer; Thurlow, Martha L.

    2010-01-01

    All students, including students with disabilities, must be included in state accountability systems as required by law. In April 2007, federal regulations provided states the flexibility to offer another assessment option--an Alternate Assessment based on Modified Achievement Standards (AA-MAS) for some students with disabilities. The AA-MAS is…

  13. States' Participation Guidelines for Alternate Assessments Based on Modified Academic Achievement Standards (AA-MAS) in 2010. Synthesis Report 82

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Sheryl S.; Hodgson, Jennifer R.; Price, Lynn M.; Thurlow, Martha L.

    2011-01-01

    Federal legislation requires that all students participate in state accountability systems. Most students with disabilities participate in the regular assessment, with or without accommodations. Students with more significant cognitive disabilities participate in the Alternate Assessment based on Alternate Achievement Standards (AA-AAS). A few…

  14. Response of cyt a,a3 in the situ canine heart to transient ischemic episodes.

    PubMed

    Snow, T R; Kleinmann, L H; LaManna, J C; Wechsler, A S; Jöbsis, F F

    1981-01-01

    Experiments were performed to examine the response of cyt a,a3 to transient ischemic and hypoxic episodes in the empty, fibrillating canine heart in situ. Using a dual wavelength, differential spectrophotometer, reaction spectra show an absorption peak at approximately 605 nm consistent with that obtained from purified cyt a,a3. The characteristics of the averaged reaction spectrum in the interval 590 nm to 610 nm indicate that hemoglobin/myoglobin contribute no more than 23% to the signal measured at 605 nm. A regimen of one 30 sec global ischemia (GI) repeated once every 3 minutes over a 90 min period showed no appreciable signal deterioration. Therefore, five such interventions were subsequently used as the test perturbation. Studies of the effects of ischemic episodes of 30 and 60 min show that the response of cyt a,a3 to this test intervention was smaller (90 +/- 6% and 89 +/- 7%) than that observed prior to the ischemic episode. Changes in coronary perfusion pressure (+/- 10 Torr) produced an immediate oxidation/reduction of cyt a,a3. In the working heart, just prior to fibrillation, 6 sec to interrupted ventilation resulted in a continuous reduction of cyt a,a3. The data from these studies show: 1) The redox state of cyt a,a3 may be continuously monitored in the canine heart in situ. 2) Following ischemias of 30 and 60 min duration, respiratory chain function may be impaired; and 3) The well-perfused epicardium is extremely sensitive to small changes in oxygen delivery.

  15. The twelve-step recovery model of AA: a voluntary mutual help association.

    PubMed

    Borkman, Thomasina

    2008-01-01

    Alcoholism treatment has evolved to mean professionalized, scientifically based rehabilitation. Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is not a treatment method; it is far better understood as a Twelve-Step Recovery Program within a voluntary self-help/mutual aid organization of self-defined alcoholics. The Twelve-Step Recovery Model is elaborated in three sections, patterned on the AA logo (a triangle within a circle): The triangle's legs represent recovery, service, and unity; the circle represents the reinforcing effect of the three legs upon each other as well as the "technology" of the sharing circle and the fellowship. The first leg of the triangle, recovery, refers to the journey of individuals to abstinence and a new "way of living." The second leg, service, refers to helping other alcoholics which also connects the participants into a fellowship. The third leg, unity, refers to the fellowship of recovering alcoholics, their groups, and organizations. The distinctive AA organizational structure of an inverted pyramid is one in which the members in autonomous local groups direct input to the national service bodies creating a democratic, egalitarian organization maximizing recovery. Analysts describe the AA recovery program as complex, implicitly grounded in sound psychological principles, and more sophisticated than is typically understood. AA provides a nonmedicalized and anonymous "way of living" in the community and should probably be referred to as the Twelve-Step/Twelve Tradition Recovery Model in order to clearly differentiate it from professionally based twelve-step treatments. There are additional self-help/mutual aid groups for alcoholics who prefer philosophies other than AA.

  16. DARPP-32 and Akt regulation in ethanol-preferring AA and ethanol-avoiding ANA rats.

    PubMed

    Nuutinen, Saara; Kiianmaa, Kalervo; Panula, Pertti

    2011-09-26

    Ethanol and other addictive drugs affect many intracellular phosphorylation and dephosphorylation cascades. These cascades are thought to be highly important in the regulation of neuronal activity. The present experiments characterized the regulation of three key signaling molecules, DARPP-32 (dopamine and cAMP regulated phosphoprotein, 32kDa), Akt kinase and ERK1/2 (extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2) in ethanol-preferring AA (Alko, alcohol) and ethanol-avoiding ANA (Alko, non-alcohol) rat lines. Radioactive in situ hybridization was used in drug naïve animals and Western blotting after acute ethanol administration in striatum, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. The mRNA levels of DARPP-32 in striatal areas were higher in ANA rats than in AA rats. There was no difference in the striatal enriched phosphatase (STEP61), the downstream target of DARPP-32 expression between the rat lines. Ethanol (1.5g/kg) increased phosphorylation of DARPP-32 at threonine 34 in both AA and in ANA rats indicating that acute ethanol activates DARPP-32 similarly in these rat lines. The expression of Akt kinase was higher in the CA1 of hippocampus in ANA than in AA rats and acute ethanol activated Akt in hippocampus in ANA but not in AA rats. No significant alterations in the regulation of ERK1/2 were found in either rat line. Our findings suggest that DARPP-32 and Akt are regulated by ethanol and differences in the regulation of these molecules might contribute to the dramatically different ethanol drinking patterns seen in AA and ANA rats.

  17. ORBITAL AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF THE σ Ori Aa, Ab, B TRIPLE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Simón-Díaz, S.; Caballero, J. A.; Apellániz, J. Maíz; Lorenzo, J.; Negueruela, I.; Dorda, R.; Marco, A.; Schneider, F. R. N.; Barbá, R. H.; Montes, D.; Pellerin, A.; Sanchez-Bermudez, J.; Sota, A.

    2015-02-01

    We provide a complete characterization of the astrophysical properties of the σ Ori Aa, Ab, B hierarchical triple system and an improved set of orbital parameters for the highly eccentric σ Ori Aa, Ab spectroscopic binary. We compiled a spectroscopic data set comprising 90 high-resolution spectra covering a total time span of 1963 days. We applied the Lehman-Filhés method for a detailed orbital analysis of the radial velocity curves and performed a combined quantitative spectroscopic analysis of the σ Ori Aa, Ab, B system by means of the stellar atmosphere code FASTWIND. We used our own plus other available information on photometry and distance to the system for measuring the radii, luminosities, and spectroscopic masses of the three components. We also inferred evolutionary masses and stellar ages using the Bayesian code BONNSAI. The orbital analysis of the new radial velocity curves led to a very accurate orbital solution of the σ Ori Aa, Ab pair. We provided indirect arguments indicating that σ Ori B is a fast-rotating early B dwarf. The FASTWIND+BONNSAI analysis showed that the Aa, Ab pair contains the hottest and most massive components of the triple system while σ Ori B is a bit cooler and less massive. The derived stellar ages of the inner pair are intriguingly younger than the one widely accepted for the σ Orionis cluster, at 3 ± 1 Ma. The outcome of this study will be of key importance for a precise determination of the distance to the σ Orionis cluster, the interpretation of the strong X-ray emission detected for σ Ori Aa, Ab, B, and the investigation of the formation and evolution of multiple massive stellar systems and substellar objects.

  18. Transgenic cotton expressing Cry10Aa toxin confers high resistance to the cotton boll weevil.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Thuanne Pires; Arraes, Fabricio Barbosa Monteiro; Lourenço-Tessutti, Isabela Tristan; Silva, Marilia Santos; Lisei-de-Sá, Maria Eugênia; Lucena, Wagner Alexandre; Macedo, Leonardo Lima Pepino; Lima, Janaina Nascimento; Santos Amorim, Regina Maria; Artico, Sinara; Alves-Ferreira, Márcio; Mattar Silva, Maria Cristina; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria Fatima

    2017-01-12

    Genetically modified (GM) cotton plants that effectively control cotton boll weevil (CBW), which is the most destructive cotton insect pest in South America, are reported here for the first time. This work presents the successful development of a new GM cotton with high resistance to CBW conferred by Cry10Aa toxin, a protein encoded by entomopathogenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) gene. The plant transformation vector harbouring cry10Aa gene driven by the cotton ubiquitination-related promoter uceA1.7 was introduced into a Brazilian cotton cultivar by biolistic transformation. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays revealed high transcription levels of cry10Aa in both T0 GM cotton leaf and flower bud tissues. Southern blot and qPCR-based 2(-ΔΔCt) analyses revealed that T0 GM plants had either one or two transgene copies. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of Cry10Aa protein expression showed variable protein expression levels in both flower buds and leaves tissues of T0 GM cotton plants, ranging from approximately 3.0 to 14.0 μg g(-1) fresh tissue. CBW susceptibility bioassays, performed by feeding adults and larvae with T0 GM cotton leaves and flower buds, respectively, demonstrated a significant entomotoxic effect and a high level of CBW mortality (up to 100%). Molecular analysis revealed that transgene stability and entomotoxic effect to CBW were maintained in T1 generation as the Cry10Aa toxin expression levels remained high in both tissues, ranging from 4.05 to 19.57 μg g(-1) fresh tissue, and the CBW mortality rate remained around 100%. In conclusion, these Cry10Aa GM cotton plants represent a great advance in the control of the devastating CBW insect pest and can substantially impact cotton agribusiness.

  19. Transition of basaltic lava from pahoehoe to aa, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii: Field observations and key factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, D.W.; Tilling, R.I.

    1980-01-01

    Nearly all Hawaiian basaltic lava erupts as pahoehoe, and some changes to aa during flowage and cooling; factors governing the transition involve certain critical relations between viscosity and rate of shear strain. If the lava slows, cools, and stops in direct response to concomitant increase in viscosity before these critical relations are reached, it remains pahoehoe. But, if flow mechanics (flow rate, flow dimensions, slope, momentum, etc.) impel the lava to continue to move and deform even after it has become highly viscous, the critical relations may be reached and the lava changes to aa. Typical modes of transition from pahoehoe to aa include: (1) spontaneous formation of relatively stiff clots in parts of the flowing lava where shear rate is highest; these clots grow into discrete, rough, sticky masses to which the remaining fluid lava incrementally adheres; (2) fragmentation and immersion of solid or semi-solid surface crusts of pahoehoe by roiling movements of the flow, forming cores of discrete, tacky masses; (3) sudden renewed movement of lava stored and cooled within surface reservoirs to form clots. The masses, fragments, and clots in these transition modes are characterized by spinose, granulated surfaces; as flow movement continues, the masses and fragments aggregate, fracture, and grind together, completing the transition to aa. Observations show that the critical relation between viscosity and rate of shear strain is inverse: if viscosity is low, a high rate of shear is required to begin the transition to aa; conversely, if viscosity is high, a much lower rate of shear will induce the transition. These relations can be demonstrated qualitatively with simple graphs, which can be used to examine the flow history of any selected finite lava element by tracing the path represented by its changing viscosity and shear rate. A broad, diffuse "transition threshold zone" in these graphs portrays the inverse critical relation between viscosity and shear

  20. Simulation on friction taper plug welding of AA6063-20Gr metal matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss; Nithin, Abeyram M.

    2016-05-01

    Friction taper plug welding a variant of friction welding is useful in welding of similar and dissimilar materials. It could be used for joining of composites to metals in sophisticated aerospace applications. In the present work numerical simulation of friction taper plug welding process is carried out using finite element based software. Graphite reinforced AA6063 is modelled using the software ANSYS 15.0 and temperature distribution is predicted. Effect of friction time on temperature distribution is numerically investigated. When the friction time is increased to 30 seconds, the tapered part of plug gets detached and fills the hole in the AA6063 plate perfectly.

  1. Spectroscopic signatures of AA' and AB stacking of chemical vapor deposited bilayer MoS2

    DOE PAGES

    Xia, Ming; Li, Bo; Yin, Kuibo; ...

    2015-11-04

    We discuss prominent resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopic differences between AA'and AB stacked bilayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) grown by chemical vapor deposition are reported. Bilayer MoS2 islands consisting of the two stacking orders were obtained under identical growth conditions. Also, resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectra of AA' and AB stacked bilayer MoS2 were obtained on Au nanopyramid surfaces under strong plasmon resonance. Both resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectra show distinct features indicating clear differences in interlayer interaction between these two phases. The implication of these findings on device applications based on spin and valley degrees of freedom.

  2. Safety and Abuse Testing of Energizer LiFeS2 AA Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Judith A.; Baldwin, Laura; Bragg, Bobby J.

    2003-01-01

    The LiFeS2 test program was part of the study on state-of-the-art batteries/cells available in the commercial market. It was carried out in an effort to replace alkaline AA cells for Shuttle and Station applications. A large number of alkaline cells are used for numerous Shuttle and Station applications as loose cells. Other government agencies reported good performance and abuse tolerance of the AA LiFeS2 cells. In this study, only abuse testing was performed on the cells to determine their tolerance. The tests carried out were over-discharge, external short circuit, heat-to-vent, vibration and drop.

  3. Constant amplitude and post-overload fatigue crack growth behavior in PM aluminum alloy AA 8009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, A. P.

    1991-01-01

    A recently developed, rapidly solidified, powder metallurgy, dispersion strengthened aluminum alloy, AA 8009, was fatigue tested at room temperature in lab air. Constant amplitude/constant delta kappa and single spike overload conditions were examined. High fatigue crack growth rates and low crack closure levels compared to typical ingot metallurgy aluminum alloys were observed. It was proposed that minimal crack roughness, crack path deflection, and limited slip reversibility, resulting from ultra-fine microstructure, were responsible for the relatively poor da/dN-delta kappa performance of AA 8009 as compared to that of typical IM aluminum alloys.

  4. Alkaline phosphatases and aminopeptidases are altered in a Cry11Aa resistant strain of Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su-Bum; Aimanova, Karlygash G.; Gill, Sarjeet S.

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) has been widely for the biological control of mosquito populations. However, the mechanism of Bti toxins is still not fully understood. To further elucidate the mechanism of Bti toxins, we developed an Aedes aegypti resistant strain that shows high-level resistance to Cry11Aa toxin. After 27 selections with Cry11Aa toxin, the larvae showed a 124-fold resistance ratio for Cry11Aa (strain G30). G30 larvae showed cross-resistance to Cry4Aa (66-fold resistance), less to Cry4Ba (13-fold), but not to Cry11Ba (2-fold). Midguts from these resistant larvae did not show detectable difference in the processing of the Cry11Aa toxin compared to that in susceptible larvae (WT). Brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) from resistant larvae bound slightly less Cry11Aa compared to WT BBMV. To identify potential proteins associated with Cry11A resistance, not only transcript changes in the larval midgut were analyzed using Illumina sequencing and qPCR, but alterations of previously identified receptor proteins were investigated using immunoblots. The transcripts of 375 genes were significantly increased and those of 208 genes were down regulated in the resistant larvae midgut compared to the WT. None of the transcripts for previously identified receptors of Cry11Aa (Aedes cadherin, ALP1, APN1, and APN2) were altered in these analyses. The genes for the identified functional receptors in resistant larvae midgut did not contain any mutation in their sequences nor was there any change in their transcript expression levels compared to WT. However, ALP proteins were expressed at reduced levels (~40%) in the resistant strain BBMV. APN proteins and their activity were also slightly reduced in resistance strain. The transcript levels of ALPs (AAEL013330 and AAEL015070) and APNs (AAEL008158, AAEL008162) were significantly reduced. These results strongly suggest that ALPs and APNs could be associated with Cry11Aa resistance in Ae. aegypti. PMID

  5. Expression of the Bacillus thuringiensis mosquitocidal toxin Cry11Aa in the aquatic bacterium Asticcacaulis excentricus.

    PubMed

    Armengol, Gemma; Guevara, Oscar Enrique; Orduz, Sergio; Crickmore, Neil

    2005-12-01

    A mosquitocidal aquatic bacterium has been developed by introducing an operon containing the cry11Aa, and p20 genes from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) into the gram-negative aquatic bacterium Asticcacaulis excentricus. After transformation, the cry11Aa gene was successfully expressed in recombinant A. excentricus under the tac promoter, at the level of 0.04 pg/cell. The recombinant bacteria were toxic to Aedes aegypti larvae with an LC(50) of 6.83 x 10(5) cells/mL. We believe that these bacteria may have potential as genetically engineered microorganisms for the control of mosquito larvae.

  6. Survey of Volatiles in the Disks Around GV Tau N and AA Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibb, Erika

    2010-02-01

    We propose to use NIRSPEC to characterize the gas phase volatiles, particularly organic molecules, in circumstellar disks toward Tauri stars GV Tau N and AA Tau. These sources have recently been found to exhibit rich molecular absorption (GV Tau N; Gibb et al. 2007) and emission (AA Tau; Carr et al. 2008) spectra that sample distinct regions of the circumstellar disk. If we are to understand the distribution of materials in disks and place our solar system in context, these systems must be studied in detail. As such, we propose to perform a near-infrared survey of these two sources.

  7. Multi-Response Optimization of Friction-Stir-Welded AA1100 Aluminum Alloy Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajakumar, S.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2012-06-01

    AA1100 aluminum alloy has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures. Friction stir welding process (FSW) is an emerging solid state joining process in which the material that is being welded does not melt and recast. The process and tool parameters of FSW play a major role in deciding the joint characteristics. In this research, the relationships between the FSW parameters (rotational speed, welding speed, axial force, shoulder diameter, pin diameter, and tool hardness) and the responses (tensile strength, hardness, and corrosion rate) were established. The optimal welding conditions to maximize the tensile strength and minimize the corrosion rate were identified for AA1100 aluminum alloy and reported here.

  8. Electrochemical test for predicting microbiologically influenced corrosion of aluminum and AA 7005 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ayllon, E.S. ); Rosales, B.M. )

    1994-08-01

    The susceptibility of pure aluminum (Al) and Aluminum Association (AA) 7005 alloy (UNS A97005) to pitting by microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) in an integral jet fuel tank was determined through polarization measurements. Usually, the most corrosive reported species is the fungus Hormonconis resinae. The effect of its proliferation on pure Al and AA 7005-T6 alloy was studied through anodic and cathodic potentiodynamic polarization. The type and relative amount of corrosion damage to the metal were determined. Morphology of the attack was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Distribution of the alloying elements was determined using energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDXA).

  9. Expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand by B cells in response to oral bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Han, X.; Lin, X.; Seliger, A. R.; Eastcott, J.; Kawai, T.; Taubman, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction We investigated receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) expression by B lymphocytes during early and late aspects of the immune response to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a gram-negative, anaerobic bacterium associated with aggressive periodontal disease. Methods Expression of messenger RNA transcripts (tumor necrosis factor-α, Toll-like receptors 4 and 9, interleukins 4 and 10, and RANKL) involved in early (1-day) and late (10-day) responses in cultured rat splenocytes was examined by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The immune cell distribution (T, B, and natural killer cells and macrophages) in cultured rat splenocytes and RANKL expression in B cells were determined by flow cytometric analyses. B-cell capacity for induction of osteoclast differentiation was evaluated by coculture with RAW 264.7 cells followed by a tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity assay. Results The expression levels of interleukins 4 and 10 in cultured cells were not changed in the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans until cultured for 3 days, and peaked after 7 days. After culture for 10 days, the percentages of B and T cells, the overall RANKL messenger RNA transcripts, and the percentage of RANKL-expressing immunoglobulin G-positive cells were significantly increased in the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans. These increases were considerably greater in cells isolated from A. actinomycetemcomitans-immunized animals than from non-immunized animals. RAW 264.7 cells demonstrated significantly increased TRAP activity when cocultured with B cells from A. actinomycetemcomitans-immunized animals. The addition of human osteoprotegerin-Fc to the culture significantly diminished such increases. Conclusion This study suggests that B-lymphocyte involvement in the immune response to A. actinomycetemcomitans through upregulation of RANKL expression potentially contribute to bone resorption in periodontal disease. PMID

  10. [Comparison of texture distribution of cold rolled DC and CC AA 5052 aluminum alloy at different positions through thickness direction by XRD].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-biao; Ma, Min; Yang, Qing-xiang; Wang, Shan; Liu, Wen-chang; Zhao, Ying-mei

    2013-09-01

    To provide gist of DC AA 5052 and CC AA 5052 aluminum alloy to industry production and application, the texture variation of cold rolled sheets through thickness direction was studied by X-ray diffraction method, and the difference in texture at surface, quarter and center layer was analyzed. The hot plates of direct chill cast (DC) AA 5052 and continuous cast (CC) AA 5052 aluminum alloy were annealed at 454 degrees C for 4 hours and then cold rolled to different reductions. The strength and volume fraction of the fiber in CC AA 5052 aluminum alloy is larger than in DC AA 5052 aluminum alloy after same rolling reduction The volume fraction of the recrystallization texture cube in the CC AA 5052 aluminum alloy is less than in the DC AA 5052 aluminum alloy, which result in that CC AA 5052 aluminum alloy needs less cold rolling reduction than DC AA 5052 aluminum alloy for generating the texture with same intensity and volume fraction at surface layer, quarter layer and center layer. The manufacturability and performance of CC AA 5052 aluminum alloy is superior to DC AA 5052 aluminum alloy for use in stamping.

  11. Infection with Marek’s disease virus induces high levels of CD8a/a cells in chickens resistant to Marek’s disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The CD8a/a cells have non-traditional roles. CD8a/a cells (T'' cells) usually recognize monomorphic antigen like bacterial lipids presented by non-traditional class I glycoproteins such as BF1 (minor) or Rfp-Y. CD8a/a cells have also been implicated in natural killing with approximately 80% of NK ...

  12. Essential Oils from Ugandan Aromatic Medicinal Plants: Chemical Composition and Growth Inhibitory Effects on Oral Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Ocheng, Francis; Bwanga, Freddie; Joloba, Moses; Softrata, Abier; Azeem, Muhammad; Pütsep, Katrin; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Obua, Celestino; Gustafsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The study assessed the growth inhibitory effects of essential oils extracted from ten Ugandan medicinal plants (Bidens pilosa, Helichrysum odoratissimum, Vernonia amygdalina, Hoslundia opposita, Ocimum gratissimum, Cymbopogon citratus, Cymbopogon nardus, Teclea nobilis, Zanthoxylum chalybeum, and Lantana trifolia) used traditionally in the management of oral diseases against oral pathogens. Chemical compositions of the oils were explored by GC-MS. Inhibitory effects of the oils were assessed on periodontopathic Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and cariogenic Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus using broth dilution methods at concentrations of 1%, 0.1%, and 0.01%. The most sensitive organism was A. actinomycetemcomitans. Its growth was markedly inhibited by six of the oils at all the concentrations tested. Essential oil from C. nardus exhibited the highest activity with complete growth inhibition of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis at all the three concentrations tested, the major constituents in the oil being mainly oxygenated sesquiterpenes. Most of the oils exhibited limited effects on L. acidophilus. We conclude that essential oils from the studied plants show marked growth inhibitory effects on periodontopathic A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis, moderate effects on cariogenic S. mutans, and the least effect on L. acidophilus. The present study constitutes a basis for further investigations and development of certain oils into alternative antiplaque agents. PMID:26170872

  13. Essential Oils from Ugandan Aromatic Medicinal Plants: Chemical Composition and Growth Inhibitory Effects on Oral Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ocheng, Francis; Bwanga, Freddie; Joloba, Moses; Softrata, Abier; Azeem, Muhammad; Pütsep, Katrin; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Obua, Celestino; Gustafsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The study assessed the growth inhibitory effects of essential oils extracted from ten Ugandan medicinal plants (Bidens pilosa, Helichrysum odoratissimum, Vernonia amygdalina, Hoslundia opposita, Ocimum gratissimum, Cymbopogon citratus, Cymbopogon nardus, Teclea nobilis, Zanthoxylum chalybeum, and Lantana trifolia) used traditionally in the management of oral diseases against oral pathogens. Chemical compositions of the oils were explored by GC-MS. Inhibitory effects of the oils were assessed on periodontopathic Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and cariogenic Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus using broth dilution methods at concentrations of 1%, 0.1%, and 0.01%. The most sensitive organism was A. actinomycetemcomitans. Its growth was markedly inhibited by six of the oils at all the concentrations tested. Essential oil from C. nardus exhibited the highest activity with complete growth inhibition of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis at all the three concentrations tested, the major constituents in the oil being mainly oxygenated sesquiterpenes. Most of the oils exhibited limited effects on L. acidophilus. We conclude that essential oils from the studied plants show marked growth inhibitory effects on periodontopathic A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis, moderate effects on cariogenic S. mutans, and the least effect on L. acidophilus. The present study constitutes a basis for further investigations and development of certain oils into alternative antiplaque agents.

  14. Effects of Initial Temper Condition and Postweld Heat Treatment on the Properties of Dissimilar Friction-Stir-Welded Joints between AA7075 and AA6061 Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    İpekoğlu, Güven; Çam, Gürel

    2014-06-01

    In this study, dissimilar AA7075-O/6061-O and AA7075-T6/6061-T6 butt joints were produced by friction stir welding (FSW), and postweld heat treatment (PWHT) was applied to the joints obtained. The effects of initial temper condition and PWHT on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the dissimilar joints were thus investigated. It was demonstrated that sound dissimilar joints can be produced for both temper conditions. A hardness increase in the joint area ( i.e., strength overmatching) was obtained in the joints produced in the O-temper condition, whereas a hardness loss was observed in the joint area of the joints obtained in the T6 temper condition. It was also well demonstrated that PWHT could be used in order to improve the joint properties for both O and T6 joints provided that the joint is defect-free prior to subsequent heat treatment.

  15. Investigation of Microstructure and Microhardness in Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welded AA2014-T6 and AA2219-T87

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, K. Renee; McGill, Preston; Barkey, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process with potential advantages for aerospace and automotive industries dealing with light alloys. Self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW) is one variation of the FSW process being developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for use in the fabrication of propellant tanks. This work reports on the microstructure and microhardness of SR-FSW between two dissimilar aluminum alloys. Specifically, the study examines the cross section of the weld joint formed between an AA2014-T6 plate on the advancing side and an AA2219-T87 plate on the retreating side. The microstructural analysis shows an irregularly displaced weld seam from the advancing side past the thermo-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ) into the weld nugget region. There are sharp variations in the microhardness across the weld. These variations are described in the paper and mechanisms for their formation are discussed.

  16. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa toxin increases the susceptibility of Crioceris quatuordecimpunctata to Beauveria bassiana infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The spotted asparagus beetle, Crioceris quatuordecimpunctata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is one of the most devastating pests of asparagus in China and elsewhere. In this study, we investigated the interaction of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry3Aa toxin and the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bas...

  17. Chromosomal-gene-mediated inhibition of intestinal and foodborne pathogens by Lactobacillus acidophilus AA11.

    PubMed

    Abo-Amer, Aly E

    2006-01-01

    Approximately 63 strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus were isolated from Egyptian home-made cheese and examined for production of antagonism. Only eight strains demonstrated inhibitory activity against spoilage microorganisms (i.e. Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) and pathogens (i.e. E. coli, Salmonella sp. and Shigella sp.). Lactobacillus acidophilus AA11 produced a more antimicrobial activity with a wide range of inhibition. The agent AA11 was sensitive to proteolytic enzymes and retained full activity after 30 min at 100 degrees C. Activity against sensitive cells was bactericidal but not bacteriolytic. The compound was produced during growth phase and can be extracted from the culture supernatant fluids with n-Butanol. 12 % SDS-PAGE analysis of 40% ammonium sulphate precipitated agent showed two peptides with molecular weights of approximately 36 kDa and approximately 29 kDa. No plasmid was identified in Lactobacillus acidophilus AA11 indicating that the genes encoding the inhibitory agent located on the chromosome. These characteristics identify the inhibitory substance as a bacteriocin, designated acidocin AA11 and confer the agent an application potential as a biopreservative.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of the Putrescine-Producing Strain Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 1AA59

    PubMed Central

    del Rio, Beatriz; Linares, Daniel M.; Fernandez, María; Mayo, Baltasar; Martín, M. Cruz

    2015-01-01

    We report here the 2,576,542-bp genome annotated draft assembly sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 1AA59. This strain—isolated from a traditional cheese—produces putrescine, one of the most frequently biogenic amines found in dairy products. PMID:26089428

  19. Prediction of the Hot Flow Stress Behavior of AA6063 Including Mg2Si Dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odoh, Daniel; Mahmoodkhani, Yahya; Whitney, Mark; Wells, Mary

    2017-02-01

    A constitutive model that includes the effect of Mg2Si dissolution during pre-deformation heating and holding has been developed for the prediction of the hot flow stress behavior of AA6063 aluminum alloy. The deformation behavior of homogenized AA6063 aluminum alloy was studied by performing compression tests on a Gleeble 3500 thermomechanical simulator at temperatures ranging from 400 to 550 °C and strain rates from 0.01 to 10 s-1. A one-dimensional model of particle dissolution in spherical coordinate system was developed to determine the Mg-Si solute content during pre-deformation heating and holding. Using the Mg solute content determined from the particle dissolution model, the flow stress during the deformation of AA6063 aluminum alloy at specific temperatures and strain rates was predicted using a modified hyperbolic sine equation. The constitutive model developed was found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements in this study as well as other experimental and model results published in the literature. A 14% increase in flow stress of the alloy was observed for an increase in hold time from 60 to 1500 s at 450 °C. This is due to increased deformation resistance of the alloy as the Mg-Si solute content increases. The modified hyperbolic sine equation developed in this study clearly shows that accounting for Mg-Si solute content improves the ability to accurately predict the flow stress behavior of AA6063 aluminum alloy.

  20. High Bias of DCAP and Aa Analyses of Hg(I)

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, H.P.

    2001-05-17

    This brief, but definitive, study indicates that the relatively new spectrometric techniques, DCAP and AA (Atomic Absorption), give high values for mercury when employed to analyze solutions that contain Hg(I) per se or that contain soluble mercury which is or has been subject to reducing conditions.

  1. Optimization of the OPLS-AA Force Field for Long Hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Siu, Shirley W I; Pluhackova, Kristyna; Böckmann, Rainer A

    2012-04-10

    The all-atom optimized potentials for liquid simulations (OPLS-AA) force field is a popular force field for simulating biomolecules. However, the current OPLS parameters for hydrocarbons developed using short alkanes cannot reproduce the liquid properties of long alkanes in molecular dynamics simulations. Therefore, the extension of OPLS-AA to (phospho)lipid molecules required for the study of biological membranes was hampered in the past. Here, we optimized the OPLS-AA force field for both short and long hydrocarbons. Following the framework of the OPLS-AA parametrization, we refined the torsional parameters for hydrocarbons by fitting to the gas-phase ab initio energy profiles calculated at the accurate MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ theory level. Additionally, the depth of the Lennard-Jones potential for methylene hydrogen atoms was adjusted to reproduce the densities and the heats of vaporization of alkanes and alkenes of different lengths. Optimization of partial charges finally allowed to reproduce the gel-to-liquid-phase transition temperature for pentadecane and solvation free energies. It is shown that the optimized parameter set (L-OPLS) yields improved hydrocarbon diffusion coefficients, viscosities, and gauche-trans ratios. Moreover, its applicability for lipid bilayer simulations is shown for a GMO bilayer in its liquid-crystalline phase.

  2. 45 CFR 170.575 - Removal of the ONC-AA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS, IMPLEMENTATION SPECIFICATIONS, AND CERTIFICATION CRITERIA AND CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS FOR HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ONC HIT Certification Program § 170.575 Removal of the ONC-AA....

  3. 45 CFR 170.575 - Removal of the ONC-AA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS, IMPLEMENTATION SPECIFICATIONS, AND CERTIFICATION CRITERIA AND CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS FOR HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ONC HIT Certification Program § 170.575 Removal of the ONC-AA....

  4. Suppression of the high-p(T) charged-hadron R(AA) at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Majumder, A; Shen, C

    2012-11-16

    We present a parameter-free postdiction of the high-p(T) charged-hadron nuclear modification factor (R(AA)) in two centralities, measured by the CMS Collaboration in Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC. The evolution of the bulk medium is modeled using viscous fluid dynamics, with parameters adjusted to describe the soft hadron yields and elliptic flow. Assuming the dominance of radiative energy loss, we compute the medium modification of the R(AA) using a perturbative QCD-based formalism, the higher twist scheme. The transverse momentum diffusion coefficient q[over ^] is assumed to scale with the entropy density and is normalized by fitting the R(AA) in the most central Au-Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider. This setup is validated in noncentral Au-Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider and then extrapolated to Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC, keeping the relation between q[over ^] and entropy density unchanged. We obtain a satisfactory description of the CMS R(AA) over the p(T) range from 10 to 100 GeV.

  5. Larvicidal activity of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis Cry11Aa toxin against Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    DE Lara, Ana Paula DE Souza Stori; Lorenzon, Lucas Bigolin; Vianna, Ana Muñoz; Santos, Francisco Denis Souza; Pinto, Luciano Silva; Aires Berne, Maria Elisabeth; Leite, Fábio Pereira Leivas

    2016-10-01

    Effective control of gastrointestinal parasites is necessary in sheep production. The development of anthelmintics resistance is causing the available chemically based anthelmintics to become less effective. Biological control strategies present an alternative to this problem. In the current study, we tested the larvicidal effects of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis Cry11Aa toxin against Haemonchus contortus larvae. Bacterial suspensions [2 × 108 colony-forming units (CFU) g-1 of the feces] of B. thuringiensis var. israelensis and recombinant Escherichia coli expressing Cry11Aa toxin were added to naturally H. contortus egg-contaminated feces. The larvae were quantified, and significant reductions of 62 and 81% (P < 0·001) were, respectively observed, compared with the control group. A 30 mL bacterial suspension (1 × 108 CFU mL-1) of B. thuringiensis var. israelensis and recombinant E. coli expressing Cry11Aa toxin were then orally administered to lambs naturally infected with H. contortus. Twelve hours after administration, feces were collected and submitted to coprocultures. Significant larvae reductions (P < 0·001) of 79 and 90% were observed respectively compared with the control group. The results suggest that the Cry11Aa toxin of B. thuringiensis var. israelensis is a promising new class of biological anthelmintics for treating sheep against H. contortus.

  6. Optimization of arylindenopyrimidines as potent adenosine A(2A)/A(1) antagonists.

    PubMed

    Shook, Brian C; Rassnick, Stefanie; Chakravarty, Devraj; Wallace, Nathaniel; Ault, Mark; Crooke, Jeffrey; Barbay, J Kent; Wang, Aihua; Leonard, Kristi; Powell, Mark T; Alford, Vernon; Hall, Daniel; Rupert, Kenneth C; Heintzelman, Geoffrey R; Hansen, Kristen; Bullington, James L; Scannevin, Robert H; Carroll, Karen; Lampron, Lisa; Westover, Lori; Russell, Ronald; Branum, Shawn; Wells, Kenneth; Damon, Sandra; Youells, Scott; Beauchamp, Derek; Li, Xun; Rhodes, Kenneth; Jackson, Paul F

    2010-05-01

    Two reactive metabolites were identified in vivo for the dual A(2A)/A(1) receptor antagonist 1. Two strategies were implemented to successfully mitigate the metabolic liabilities associated with 1. Optimization of the arylindenopyrimidines led to a number of amide, ether, and amino analogs having comparable in vitro and in vivo activity.

  7. 49 CFR 178.56 - Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4AA480 cylinder is a welded steel cylinder having a water capacity (nominal) not over 1,000 pounds water capacity and a service pressure of 480 psig. Closures welded... the required thickness of the side wall. Seams must be made as follows: (1) Circumferential seams...

  8. Considerations for Consortia as States Transition Away from AA-MAS. NCEO Brief. Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Educational Outcomes, 2014

    2014-01-01

    States with an alternate assessment based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS) that received a flexibility waiver from some of the requirements of No Child Left Behind are required to phase out their use of this assessment. And, on August 23, 2013, the U.S. Department of Education published a proposed rollback of regulation that allowed the…

  9. Successfully Transitioning from the AA-MAS to the General Assessment. NCEO Policy Directions. Number 22

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Sheryl; Thurlow, Martha; Christensen, Laurene; Shyyan, Vitaliy

    2014-01-01

    Federal policy initiatives such as the flexibility waivers for accountability are requiring that states transition away from the use of an alternate assessment based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS). It is expected that those students who had participated in that assessment will instead participate in the state's general assessment (or a…

  10. The AAS to BAS Pathway: Heating Up the Educational Aspiration of CTE Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kujawa, Tricia A.

    2013-01-01

    The enrollment and transfer behaviors of college students are diverse. As a result, college students travel various pathways to the baccalaureate degree. The purpose of this qualitative study was to better understand the lived experience of students who entered higher education through an associate of applied science (AAS) program and then…

  11. Manufacturing Systems Demonstration: Bimetallic Friction STIR Joining of AA6061 and High Hardness Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-31

    DESCRIPTION OF FRICTION STIR PROCESSES ................................................... 2 D. DEVELOPMENT OF BIMETALLIC ( ALUMINUM - STEEL ) FRICTION STIR...to successfully join AA6061 aluminum alloy and High Hardness Armor (HHA) steel using the friction stir process (FSP). Metallographic analysis...32262: Detail Specification, Armor Plate Aluminum Alloy, Unweldable Applique 6061 2 MIL-DTL-46100E: Armor Plate, Steel , Wrought, High-Hardness

  12. The effect of welding parameters on surface quality of AA6351 aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yacob, S.; MAli, M. A.; Ahsan, Q.; Ariffin, N.; Ali, R.; Arshad, A.; Wahab, M. I. A.; Ismail, S. A.; Roji, NS M.; Din, W. B. W.; Zakaria, M. H.; Abdullah, A.; Yusof, M. I.; Kamarulzaman, K. Z.; Mahyuddin, A.; Hamzah, M. N.; Roslan, R.

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, the effects of gas metal arc welding-cold metal transfer (GMAW-CMT) parameters on surface roughness are experimentally assessed. The purpose of this study is to develop a better understanding of the effects of welding speed, material thickness and contact tip to work distance on the surface roughness. Experiments are conducted using single pass gas metal arc welding-cold metal transfer (GMAW-CMT) welding technique to join the material. The material used in this experiment was AA6351 aluminum alloy with the thickness of 5mm and 6mm. A Mahr Marsuft XR 20 machine was used to measure the average roughness (Ra) of AA6351 joints. The main and interaction effect analysis was carried out to identify process parameters that affect the surface roughness. The results show that all the input process parameters affect the surface roughness of AA6351 joints. Additionally, the average roughness (Ra) results also show a decreasing trend with increased of welding speed. It is proven that gas metal arc welding-cold metal transfer (GMAW-CMT)welding process has been successful in term of providing weld joint of good surface quality for AA6351 based on the low value surface roughness condition obtained in this setup. The outcome of this experimental shall be valuable for future fabrication process in order to obtained high good quality weld.

  13. Influence of FSW pin tool geometry on plastic flow of AA7075 T651

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lertora, Enrico; Mandolfino, Chiara; Gambaro, Carla

    2016-10-01

    In this paper the behaviour of the plastic flow during Friction Stir Welding of AA7075 T651 plates, realized with different shaped tools, has been investigated. In particular, the influence of the shape of three tools was studied using copper strips placed along the welds. After welding, radiography and metallurgical analysis were used in order to investigate the marker movement and its fragmentation.

  14. RETRACTED ARTICLE: Microstructural evolution of AA7449 aerospace alloy refined by intensive shearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghayeghi, R.; Nastac, L.

    2012-10-01

    Many aerospace alloys are sensitive to their composition thus cannot be chemically grain refined. In addition, only 1% grain refiners can act as nuclei for refining the structure. In this paper, physical refinement by intensive shearing above liquidus as an alternative technique will be investigated for AA7449 aerospace alloy. The results can open a new gateway for aerospace industry for refining their microstructure.

  15. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017aas as a Type Ia Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jujia; Lu, Kaixin; Xu, Zhijian; Li, Wenxiong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Bin; Zhao, Haibin; Wang, Lifan; Tan, Hanjie; Rui, Liming; Yang, Zesheng

    2017-02-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 340-830 nm) of SN 2017aas (=PTSS-17dib),discovered by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS, http://www.cneost.org/ptss/), on UT Feb.04.86 2017 with the 2.4 m telescope (LJT + YFOSC) at LiJiang Gaomeigu Observatory of Yunnan Observatories (YNAO).

  16. Susceptibility of Spodoptera frugiperda and S. exigua to Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa insecticidal protein.

    PubMed

    Chakroun, Maissa; Bel, Yolanda; Caccia, Silvia; Abdelkefi-Mesrati, Lobna; Escriche, Baltasar; Ferré, Juan

    2012-07-01

    The Vip3Aa protein is an insecticidal protein secreted by Bacillus thuringiensis during the vegetative stage of growth. The activity of this protein has been tested after different steps/protocols of purification using Spodoptera frugiperda as a control insect. The results showed that the Vip3Aa protoxin was stable and retained full toxicity after being subjected to common biochemical steps used in protein purification. Bioassays with the protoxin in S. frugiperda and S. exigua showed pronounced differences in LC(50) values when mortality was measured at 7 vs. 10d. At 7d most live larvae were arrested in their development. LC(50) values of "functional mortality" (dead larvae plus larvae remaining in the first instar), measured at 7d, were similar or even lower than the LC(50) values of mortality at 10d. This strong growth inhibition was not observed when testing the trypsin-activated protein (62 kDa) in either species. S. exigua was less susceptible than S. frugiperda to the protoxin form, with LC(50) values around 10-fold higher. However, both species were equally susceptible to the trypsin-activated form. Processing of Vip3Aa protoxin to the activated form was faster with S. frugiperda midgut juice than with S. exigua midgut juice. The results strongly suggest that the differences in the rate of activation of the Vip3Aa protoxin between both species are the basis for the differences in susceptibility towards the protoxin form.

  17. Echocardiographic diagnosis of systemic AA amyloidosis presenting with acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Sergio; Bonfiglio, Daniele; Galasso, Laura

    2010-08-01

    We report the case of a 73-year-old man admitted to our hospital for acute hepatic failure. Antemortem diagnosis of systemic AA amyloidosis was made because of typical electrocardiographic and echocardiographic findings, in the absence of the classic clinical picture of kidney involvement.

  18. 7 CFR 51.1176 - U.S. Grade AA Juice (Double A).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Florida Oranges and Tangelos Standards for Internal Quality of Common Sweet Oranges (citrus Sinensis (l) Osbeck) § 51.1176 U.S. Grade AA Juice (Double A). Any lot of oranges, the juice content of which meets the following requirements, may be designated...

  19. 7 CFR 51.1176 - U.S. Grade AA Juice (Double A).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Florida Oranges and Tangelos Standards for Internal Quality of Common Sweet Oranges (citrus Sinensis (l) Osbeck) § 51.1176 U.S. Grade AA Juice (Double A). Any lot of oranges, the juice content of which meets the following requirements, may be designated...

  20. 7 CFR 51.1176 - U.S. Grade AA Juice (Double A).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Florida Oranges and Tangelos Standards for Internal Quality of Common Sweet Oranges (citrus Sinensis (l) Osbeck) § 51.1176 U.S. Grade AA Juice (Double A). Any lot of oranges, the juice content of which meets the following requirements, may be designated...

  1. Prediction of the Hot Flow Stress Behavior of AA6063 Including Mg2Si Dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odoh, Daniel; Mahmoodkhani, Yahya; Whitney, Mark; Wells, Mary

    2017-03-01

    A constitutive model that includes the effect of Mg2Si dissolution during pre-deformation heating and holding has been developed for the prediction of the hot flow stress behavior of AA6063 aluminum alloy. The deformation behavior of homogenized AA6063 aluminum alloy was studied by performing compression tests on a Gleeble 3500 thermomechanical simulator at temperatures ranging from 400 to 550 °C and strain rates from 0.01 to 10 s-1. A one-dimensional model of particle dissolution in spherical coordinate system was developed to determine the Mg-Si solute content during pre-deformation heating and holding. Using the Mg solute content determined from the particle dissolution model, the flow stress during the deformation of AA6063 aluminum alloy at specific temperatures and strain rates was predicted using a modified hyperbolic sine equation. The constitutive model developed was found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements in this study as well as other experimental and model results published in the literature. A 14% increase in flow stress of the alloy was observed for an increase in hold time from 60 to 1500 s at 450 °C. This is due to increased deformation resistance of the alloy as the Mg-Si solute content increases. The modified hyperbolic sine equation developed in this study clearly shows that accounting for Mg-Si solute content improves the ability to accurately predict the flow stress behavior of AA6063 aluminum alloy.

  2. 7 CFR 51.1176 - U.S. Grade AA Juice (Double A).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Florida Oranges and Tangelos Standards for Internal Quality of Common Sweet Oranges (citrus Sinensis (l) Osbeck) § 51.1176 U.S. Grade AA Juice (Double A). Any lot of oranges, the juice content of which meets the following requirements,...

  3. SN 2012aa: A transient between Type Ibc core-collapse and superluminous supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, R.; Sollerman, J.; Silverman, J. M.; Pastorello, A.; Fransson, C.; Drake, A.; Taddia, F.; Fremling, C.; Kankare, E.; Kumar, B.; Cappellaro, E.; Bose, S.; Benetti, S.; Filippenko, A. V.; Valenti, S.; Nyholm, A.; Ergon, M.; Sutaria, F.; Kumar, B.; Pandey, S. B.; Nicholl, M.; Garcia-Álvarez, D.; Tomasella, L.; Karamehmetoglu, E.; Migotto, K.

    2016-12-01

    Context. Research on supernovae (SNe) over the past decade has confirmed that there is a distinct class of events which are much more luminous (by 2 mag) than canonical core-collapse SNe (CCSNe). These events with visual peak magnitudes ≲-21 are called superluminous SNe (SLSNe). The mechanism that powers the light curves of SLSNe is still not well understood. The proposed scenarios are circumstellar interaction, the emergence of a magnetar after core collapse, or disruption of a massive star through pair production. Aims: There are a few intermediate events which have luminosities between these two classes. They are important for constraining the nature of the progenitors of these two different populations and their environments and powering mechanisms. Here we study one such object, SN 2012aa. Methods: We observed and analysed the evolution of the luminous Type Ic SN 2012aa. The event was discovered by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search in an anonymous galaxy (z ≈ 0.08). The optical photometric and spectroscopic follow-up observations were conducted over a time span of about 120 days. Results: With an absolute V-band peak of - 20 mag, the SN is an intermediate-luminosity transient between regular SNe Ibc and SLSNe. SN 2012aa also exhibits an unusual secondary bump after the maximum in its light curve. For SN 2012aa, we interpret this as a manifestation of SN-shock interaction with the circumstellar medium (CSM). If we assume a 56Ni-powered ejecta, the quasi-bolometric light curve requires roughly 1.3 M⊙ of 56Ni and an ejected mass of 14M⊙. This also implies a high kinetic energy of the explosion, 5.4 × 1051 erg. On the other hand, the unusually broad light curve along with the secondary peak indicate the possibility of interaction with CSM. The third alternative is the presence of a central engine releasing spin energy that eventually powers the light curve over a long time. The host of SN 2012aa is a star-forming Sa/Sb/Sbc galaxy. Conclusions

  4. Transplantation of PDGF-AA-Overexpressing Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells Promotes Recovery in Rat Following Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zong-Feng; Wang, Ying; Lin, Yu-Hong; Wu, Yan; Zhu, An-You; Wang, Rui; Shen, Lin; Xi, Jin; Qi, Qi; Jiang, Zhi-Quan; Lü, He-Zuo; Hu, Jian-Guo

    2017-01-01

    Our previous study showed that Schwann cells (SCs) promote survival, proliferation and migration of co-transplanted oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) and neurological recovery in rats with spinal cord injury (SCI). A subsequent in vitro study confirmed that SCs modulated OPC proliferation and migration by secreting platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF)-2. We also found that PDGF-AA stimulated OPC proliferation and their differentiation into oligodendrocytes (OLs) at later stages. We therefore speculated that PDGF-AA administration can exert the same effect as SC co-transplantation in SCI repair. To test this hypothesis, in this study we investigated the effect of transplanting PDGF-AA-overexpressing OPCs in a rat model of SCI. We found that PDGF-AA overexpression in OPCs promoted their survival, proliferation, and migration and differentiation into OLs in vivo. OPCs overexpressing PDGF-AA were also associated with increased myelination and tissue repair after SCI, leading to the recovery of neurological function. These results indicate that PDGF-AA-overexpressing OPCs may be an effective treatment for SCI.

  5. Transplantation of PDGF-AA-Overexpressing Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells Promotes Recovery in Rat Following Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zong-Feng; Wang, Ying; Lin, Yu-Hong; Wu, Yan; Zhu, An-You; Wang, Rui; Shen, Lin; Xi, Jin; Qi, Qi; Jiang, Zhi-Quan; Lü, He-Zuo; Hu, Jian-Guo

    2017-01-01

    Our previous study showed that Schwann cells (SCs) promote survival, proliferation and migration of co-transplanted oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) and neurological recovery in rats with spinal cord injury (SCI). A subsequent in vitro study confirmed that SCs modulated OPC proliferation and migration by secreting platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF)-2. We also found that PDGF-AA stimulated OPC proliferation and their differentiation into oligodendrocytes (OLs) at later stages. We therefore speculated that PDGF-AA administration can exert the same effect as SC co-transplantation in SCI repair. To test this hypothesis, in this study we investigated the effect of transplanting PDGF-AA-overexpressing OPCs in a rat model of SCI. We found that PDGF-AA overexpression in OPCs promoted their survival, proliferation, and migration and differentiation into OLs in vivo. OPCs overexpressing PDGF-AA were also associated with increased myelination and tissue repair after SCI, leading to the recovery of neurological function. These results indicate that PDGF-AA-overexpressing OPCs may be an effective treatment for SCI. PMID:28377695

  6. Experimental study of albumin and lysozyme adsorption onto acrylic acid (AA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Omid; Modarress, Hamid; Noroozi, Mehdi

    2004-03-01

    Many commercial soft contact lenses are based on poly-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and acrylic acid (AA) hydrogels. The adsorption of proteins, albumin and lysozyme, on such contact lens surfaces may cause problems in their applications. In this work the adsorption of proteins, albumin and lysozyme, on hydrogel surfaces, AA and HEMA, was investigated as a function of concentration of protein. Also the effects of pH and ionic strength of protein solution on the adsorption of protein were examined. The obtained results indicated that the degree of adsorption of protein increased with the concentration of protein, and the adsorption of albumin on HEMA surface at the studied pHs (6.2-8.6) was higher than AA surface, whereas the adsorption of lysozyme on AA surface at the same pHs was higher than HEMA. The change in ionic strength of protein solution affected the proteins adsorption on both AA and HEMA surfaces. Also, the amount of sodium ions deposited on the AA surface was much higher than HEMA surface. This effect can be related to the negative surface charge of AA and its higher tendency for adsorption of sodium ions compared to the HEMA surface.

  7. Cloning of an arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (aaNAT1) from Drosophila melanogaster expressed in the nervous system and the gut.

    PubMed Central

    Hintermann, E; Grieder, N C; Amherd, R; Brodbeck, D; Meyer, U A

    1996-01-01

    In insects, neurotransmitter catabolism, melatonin precursor formation, and sclerotization involve arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (aaNAT, EC 2.3.1.87) activity. It is not known if one or multiple aaNAT enzymes are responsible for these activities. We recently have purified an aaNAT from Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we report the cloning of the corresponding aaNAT cDNA (aaNAT1) that upon COS cell expression acetylates dopamine, tryptamine, and the immediate melatonin precursor serotonin. aaNAT1 represents a novel gene family unrelated to known acetyl-transferases, except in two weakly conserved amino acid motifs. In situ hybridization studies of aaNAT1 mRNA in embryos reveal hybridization signals in the brain, the ventral cord, the gut, and probably in oenocytes, indicating a broad tissue distribution of aaNAT1 transcripts. Moreover, in day/ night studies we demonstrate a diurnal rhythm of melatonin concentration without a clear-cut change in aaNAT1 mRNA levels. The data suggest that tissue-specific regulation of aaNAT1 may be associated with different enzymatic functions and do not exclude the possibility of additional aaNAT genes. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8901578

  8. Mapping CSF biomarker profiles onto NIA-AA guidelines for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Roesler, Jennifer; Thierjung, Nathalie; Werle, Lukas; Buck, Dorothea; Yakushev, Igor; Gleixner, Lena; Kagerbauer, Simone; Ortner, Marion; Grimmer, Timo; Kübler, Hubert; Martin, Jan; Laskaris, Nikolaos; Kurz, Alexander; Perneczky, Robert

    2016-10-01

    The National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association (NIA-AA) guidelines for Alzheimer's disease (AD) propose the categorization of individuals according to their biomarker constellation. Though the NIA-AA criteria for preclinical AD and AD dementia have already been applied in conjunction with imaging AD biomarkers, the application of the criteria using comprehensive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker information has not been thoroughly studied yet. The study included a monocentric cohort with healthy (N = 41) and disease (N = 22) controls and patients with AD dementia (N = 119), and a multicentric sample with healthy controls (N = 116) and patients with AD dementia (N = 102). The CSF biomarkers β-amyloid 1-42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau at threonine 181 were measured with commercially available assays. Biomarker values were trichotomized into positive for AD, negative, or borderline. In controls the presence of normal CSF profiles varied between 13.6 and 25.4 % across the studied groups, while up to 8.6 % of them had abnormal CSF biomarkers. In 40.3-52.9 % of patients with AD dementia, a typical CSF profile for AD was detected. Approximately 40 % of the potential biomarker constellations are not considered in the NIA-AA guidelines, and more than 40 % of participants could not be classified into the NIA-AA categories with distinct biomarker constellations. Here, a refined scheme covering all potential biomarker constellations is proposed. These results enrich the discussion on the NIA-AA guidelines and point to a discordance between clinical symptomatology and CSF biomarkers even in patients with full-blown AD dementia, who are supposed to have a clearly positive for AD neurochemical profile.

  9. The AAS ``Semi-centennial" Meeting: Northwestern University and Yerkes Observatory, September 1947

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterbrock, D. E.

    1999-05-01

    The AAS celebrated its "semi-centennial" fifty-two years ago! It was actually the fiftieth anniversary of the "First Conference" of astronomers and astrophysicists held at the dedication of Yerkes Observatory in 1897, which led to the actual formation of the Society two years later. Otto Struve, president of the AAS, was publicizing the fiftieth anniversary of his Yerkes Observatory in 1947, and he simply announced it was also the semi-centennial of the Society. Joel Stebbins, the grand old man of the AAS who had joined it as a graduate student in 1900, and held nearly every office in the Society from councilor to president, supported Struve's early celebration of the anniversary, probably largely because he was to retire himself in 1948. The meeting was held at Northwestern University and at Yerkes. There were then 625 AAS members. About 140 of them attended the meeting, and presented some 50 papers, all oral, with no parallel sessions. Struve organized a symposium on stellar atmospheres, with 5 invited speakers, and the great majority of the contributed papers were also on stars, a few on nebulae and interstellar matter, one on galaxies, and none on cosmology. Not to be outdone, Gerard P. Kuiper, who had recently succeeded Struve as director of Yerkes Observatory, organized a second symposium on the atmospheres of the planets, held at Yerkes immediately after the AAS meeting. After two days of sessions at Evanston, the members had driven to Williams Bay for the closing session Saturday, at which Struve and Stebbins gave their versions of the history of the observatory and of the Society. The two symposia formed the bases for two important books, Astrophysics: A Topical Symposium, and The Atmospheres of the Earth and the Planets, edited by J. Allen Hynek and Kuiper respectively.

  10. Enhancement of the Stress Corrosion Sensitivity of AA5083 by Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jie; Quesnel, David J.

    2011-02-01

    In this study, the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of AA5083 is intentionally degraded by a series of progressively longer annealing treatments at 448 K (175 °C) that create a two-phase microstructure. Precipitation of strongly anodic Mg2Al3, known as β-phase, occurs heterogeneously with substantial precipitation along the grain boundaries, as observed by differential interference microscopy. Ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and strain to failure of AA5083 alloy were found to be independent of the amount of β-phase precipitates, making AA5083 an ideal system to study the relative contributions of anodic dissolution and hydrogen embrittlement. Open circuit dropwise exposure SCC tests with precracked double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens made from the AA5083 alloy with different heat treatment conditions were conducted using 3.5 pct NaCl solution at an initial stress intensity factor ( K I ) of 1 5 {{ksi}}sqrt {{in}} .( { 1 6. 5 {{MPa}}sqrt {{m}} } ). Two SCC characteristics, initial crack growth rate and incubation time, were found to be strongly dependent on the amount of β-phase precipitates. Initial crack growth rate increased sigmoidally as a function of heat treatment time with an inflection point between 120 and 240 hours of sensitization time, while the incubation time decreases monotonically with sensitization time. Additionally, fracture surfaces investigated by scanning electron microscopy demonstrated characteristics of intergranular cracking with multiple crack tips. Discussion centers on the evidence supporting anodic dissolution of β-phase grain boundary precipitates as a primary mechanism of SCC in severely sensitized AA5083 alloy and the potential contribution of hydrogen embrittlement in the failure of grain boundary ligaments between β-phase grain boundary precipitates in less severely sensitized conditions.

  11. Comparative Evaluation of Antimicrobial Activity of Pomegranate-Containing Mouthwash Against Oral-Biofilm Forming Organisms: An Invitro Microbial Study

    PubMed Central

    Dabholkar, Charuta Sadanand; Shah, Mona; Bajaj, Monika; Doshi, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pomegranate is considered “A pharmacy unto itself”. Hydrolysable tannins called punicalagins which have free scavenging properties are the most abundant polyphenols found in pomegranate-containing mouthwash. Aim To evaluate antimicrobial effect of pomegranate- containing mouthwash on oral biofilm-forming bacteria. Materials and Methods The mouthwashes used were divided into three groups- Group A: Chlorhexidine mouthwash (Hexidine); Group B: Herbal Mouthwash (Hiora) and Group C: Pomegranate-containing Mouthwash (Life-extension). Each mouthwash was diluted to five different concentrations. Reference strains of Streptococcus mutans (S.mutans) (ATCC 25175), Streptococcus salivarius (S.salivarius) (ATCC 7073), and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A.a) (NCTC 9710) were selected as being colonizers in dental biofilm formation. On each culture plate, five wells of 5mm were prepared and mouthwashes with different concentrations were added, followed by incubation in a CO2 jar for 24 hours at 37°C. Inhibition zone diameters were measured using a digital caliper. Results Chlorhexidine (0.12%) presented a zone of inhibition between 38.46% to 96.15% for all the three organisms, while Hiora presented zone of inhibition ranging from 33.33% to 69.23% but was resistant at <10 ml of dilution. Pomegranate mouthwash presented a zone of inhibition ranging from 38.48 to 57.69%, but was resistant at <10ml for S.mutans, and <25ml for A.a and S.salivarius. ANOVA test was done to compare the dilution of mouthwashes for a particular organism and Tukey’s multiple comparison tests were done to find the exact difference. A significant difference was seen between all the three groups at 50ml and 75 ml of dilution. At 75 ml concentration, a statistical difference was found between Groups B & C and Groups A & B; and at 50 ml between Groups A&C. Conclusion All the three types of mouthwash exhibit anti-microbial activity against biofilm forming organisms but at varying

  12. Performance of AA5052 alloy anode in alkaline ethylene glycol electrolyte with dicarboxylic acids additives for aluminium-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, DaPeng; Zhang, DaQuan; Lee, KangYong; Gao, LiXin

    2015-11-01

    Dicarboxylic acid compounds, i.e. succinic acid (SUA), adipic acid (ADA) and sebacic acid (SEA), are used as electrolyte additives in the alkaline ethylene glycol solution for AA5052 aluminium-air batteries. It shows that the addition of dicarboxylic acids lowers the hydrogen gas evolution rate of commercial AA5052 aluminium alloy anode. AA5052 aluminium alloy has wide potential window for electrochemical activity and better discharge performance in alkaline ethylene glycol solution containing dicarboxylic acid additives. ADA has the best inhibition effect for the self-corrosion of AA5052 anode among the three dicarboxylic acid additives. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) reveals that dicarboxylic acids and aluminium ions can form coordination complexes. Quantum chemical calculations shows that ADA has a smaller energy gap (ΔE, the energy difference between the lowest unoccupied orbital and the highest occupied orbital), indicating that ADA has the strongest interaction with aluminium ions.

  13. Interfacial and Mechanical Behavior of AA5456 Filling Friction-Stir-Welded Lap Joints Using Similar and Dissimilar Pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behmand, Saleh Alaei; Mirsalehi, Seyyed Ehsan; Omidvar, Hamid; Safarkhanian, Mohammad Ali

    2016-10-01

    In this article, filling friction stir welding (FFSW) of the remaining exit holes of AA5456 alloy friction-stir-welded lap joints was studied. For this purpose, the influences of different rotating speeds, holding times, and pin materials, AA5456 and AA2024, on the metallurgical structure and joint strength were investigated. The observations showed that defect-free lap joints are successfully obtainable by this method using similar and dissimilar consumable pins. The results indicated that the higher rotating speed and holding time adversely affect the weld performance. The best result was achieved for 30 seconds holding time, 500 rpm rotating speed, and AA2024 consumable pin. In this condition, a lap shear strength of 10 pct higher than that of the nonfilled joint, equivalent to about 94 pct of the original defect-free FSW joint, was obtained, whereas the GTAW filled joint showed only approximately 87 pct of the continuous FSW joint strength.

  14. Lu AA21004, a multimodal psychotropic agent, in the prevention of relapse in adult patients with generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, David S; Loft, Henrik; Florea, Ioana

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term maintenance of the efficacy of Lu AA21004 5 or 10 mg/day in the prevention of relapse in patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Patients (n = 687) with a primary diagnosis of GAD (DSM-IV criteria) and a baseline Hamilton Anxiety (HAM-A) total score of at least 20 underwent a 20-week, open-label Lu AA21004 treatment. In all, 459 patients responded and were randomized to 24-56 weeks of a double-blind treatment with Lu AA21004 (n = 229) or placebo (n = 230). The predefined primary efficacy endpoint was time to relapse (HAM-A total score ≥ 15) using a Cox model; the key secondary efficacy endpoint under multiplicity control was time to relapse for patients responding to treatment for at least 12 weeks. The primary analysis showed a statistically significant effect of Lu AA21004 relative to the placebo on the time to relapse of GAD, with a hazard ratio of 2.71 (P < 0.001). There was a statistically significant effect of Lu AA21004 in the stable responders (hazard ratio = 3.06, P < 0.001). Lu AA21004 was well tolerated, with withdrawal rates due to adverse events of 9% (open-label) and 3% (placebo) and 4% (Lu AA21004) in the double-blind period. In this study, Lu AA21004 5 or 10 mg/day was efficacious in preventing relapse and was well tolerated in the maintenance treatment of GAD.

  15. Alanine scanning analyses of the three major loops in domain II of Bacillus thuringiensis mosquitocidal toxin Cry4Aa.

    PubMed

    Howlader, Mohammad Tofazzal Hossain; Kagawa, Yasuhiro; Miyakawa, Ai; Yamamoto, Ayaka; Taniguchi, Tetsuya; Hayakawa, Tohru; Sakai, Hiroshi

    2010-02-01

    Cry4Aa produced by Bacillus thuringiensis is a dipteran-specific toxin and is of great interest for developing a bioinsecticide to control mosquitoes. Therefore, it is very important to characterize the functional motif of Cry4Aa that is responsible for its mosquitocidal activity. In this study, to characterize a potential receptor binding site, namely, loops 1, 2, and 3 in domain II, we constructed a series of Cry4Aa mutants in which a residue in these three loops was replaced with alanine. A bioassay using Culex pipiens larvae revealed that replacement of some residues affected the mosquitocidal activity of Cry4Aa, but the effect was limited. This finding was partially inconsistent with previous results which suggested that replacement of the Cry4Aa loop 2 results in a significant loss of mosquitocidal activity. Therefore, we constructed additional mutants in which multiple (five or six) residues in loop 2 were replaced with alanine. Although the replacement of multiple residues also resulted in some decrease in mosquitocidal activity, the mutants still showed relatively high activity. Since the insecticidal spectrum of Cry4Aa is specific, Cry4Aa must have a specific receptor on the surface of the target tissue, and loss of binding to the receptor should result in a complete loss of mosquitocidal activity. Our results suggested that, unlike the receptor binding site of the well-characterized molecule Cry1, the receptor binding site of Cry4Aa is different from loops 1, 2, and 3 or that there are multiple binding sites that work cooperatively for receptor binding.

  16. Bifunctional CYP81AA proteins catalyse identical hydroxylations but alternative regioselective phenol couplings in plant xanthone biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    El-Awaad, Islam; Bocola, Marco; Beuerle, Till; Liu, Benye; Beerhues, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    Xanthones are natural products present in plants and microorganisms. In plants, their biosynthesis starts with regioselective cyclization of 2,3′,4,6-tetrahydroxybenzophenone to either 1,3,5- or 1,3,7-trihydroxyxanthones, catalysed by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. Here we isolate and express CYP81AA-coding sequences from Hypericum calycinum and H. perforatum in yeast. Microsomes catalyse two consecutive reactions, that is, 3′-hydroxylation of 2,4,6-trihydroxybenzophenone and C–O phenol coupling of the resulting 2,3′,4,6-tetrahydroxybenzophenone. Relative to the inserted 3′-hydroxyl, the orthologues Hc/HpCYP81AA1 cyclize via the para position to form 1,3,7-trihydroxyxanthone, whereas the paralogue HpCYP81AA2 directs cyclization to the ortho position, yielding the isomeric 1,3,5-trihydroxyxanthone. Homology modelling and reciprocal mutagenesis reveal the impact of S375, L378 and A483 on controlling the regioselectivity of HpCYP81AA2, which is converted into HpCYP81AA1 by sextuple mutation. However, the reciprocal mutations in HpCYP81AA1 barely affect its regiospecificity. Product docking rationalizes the alternative C–O phenol coupling reactions. Our results help understand the machinery of bifunctional CYPs. PMID:27145837

  17. Expression, purification, kinetic, and structural characterization of an alpha-class carbonic anhydrase from Aedes aegypti (AaCA1).

    PubMed

    Fisher, S Zoë; Tariku, Iyerus; Case, Nicolette M; Tu, Chingkuang; Seron, Teri; Silverman, David N; Linser, Paul J; McKenna, Robert

    2006-08-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are zinc-containing metalloenzymes that catalyze the interconversion of carbon dioxide and bicarbonate. The alpha-class CAs are found predominantly in vertebrates, but they are also expressed in insects like mosquitoes. Recently, an alpha-CA from the midgut of Aedes aegypti larvae (AaCA1) was identified, cloned, and subsequently shown to share high sequence homologous to human CA I (HCA I). This paper presents the bacterial expression, purification, and kinetic characterization of the soluble CA domain of AaCA1. The data show AaCA1 is a highly active CA that displays inhibition by methazolamide and ethoxzolamide with nM affinity. Additionally, a homology model of AaCA1, based on the crystal structure of HCA I, is presented and the overall structure, active site, and surface charge properties are compared to those of HCA I and II. Measurements of catalysis show that AaCA1 is more like HCA II in terms of proton transfer, but more similar to HCA I in terms of conversion of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate, and these differences are rationalized in terms of structure. These results also indicate that amino acid differences in the active site of AaCA1 compared to human CAs could be used to design specific CA inhibitors for the management of mosquito populations.

  18. Specific binding of activated Vip3Aa10 to Helicoverpa armigera brush border membrane vesicles results in pore formation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Guo; Yang, Ai-Zhen; Shen, Xiao-Hong; Hua, Bao-Guang; Shi, Guang-Lu

    2011-10-01

    Helicoverpa armigera is one of the most harmful pests in China. Although it had been successfully controlled by Cry1A toxins, some H. armigera populations are building up resistance to Cry1A toxins in the laboratory. Vip3A, secreted by Bacillus thuringiensis, is another potential toxin against H. armigera. Previous reports showed that activated Vip3A performs its function by inserting into the midgut brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) of susceptible insects. To further investigate the binding of Vip3A to BBMV of H. armigera, the full-length Vip3Aa10 toxin expressed in Escherichia coli was digested by trypsin or midgut juice extract, respectively. Among the fragments of digested Vip3Aa10, only a 62kDa fragment (Vip3Aa10-T) exhibited binding to BBMV of H. armigera and has insecticidal activity. Moreover, this interaction was specific and was not affected by the presence of Cry1Ab toxin. Binding of Vip3Aa10-T to BBMV resulted in the formation of an ion channel. Unlike Cry1A toxins, Vip3Aa10-T was just slightly associated with lipid rafts of BBMV. These data suggest that although activated Vip3Aa10 specifically interacts with BBMV of H. armigera and forms an ion channel, the mode of action of it may be different from that of Cry1A toxins.

  19. The Disk and Jet of the Classical T Tauri Star AA Tau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Carol A.; Woodgate, Bruce E.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies of the classical T-Tauri star AA Tau have interpreted the UX Ononis-like photopolarimetric variability as being due to a warp in the inner disk caused by an inclined stellar magnetic dipole field. We test that these effects are macroscopically observable in the inclination and alignment of the disk. We use HST/STIS coronagraphic detection of the disk to measure the outer disk radius and inclination and find that the inner disk is both misinclined and misaligned with respect to the outer disk. AA Tau drives a faint jet which is also misaligned with respect to the outer disk minor axis. The jet is also poorly colimated near the sun. The measured inclination 71 +/- 1 deg is above the inclination range suggested for stars with UX Ononis-like variability, indicating that dust grains in the disk have grown and settled toward the disk midplane.

  20. An update on the correlation between the cosmic radiation intensity and the geomagnetic AA index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shea, M. A.; Smart, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    A statistical study between the cosmic ray intensity, as observed by a neutron monitor, and of the geomagnetic aa index, as representative of perturbations in the plasma and interplanetary magnetic field in the heliosphere, has been updated to specifically exclude time periods around the reversal of the solar magnetic field. The results of this study show a strong negative correlation for the period 1960 through 1968 with a correlation coefficient of approximately -0.86. However, there is essentially no correlation between the cosmic ray intensity and the aa index for the period 1972-1979 (i.e. correlation coefficient less than 0.16). These results would appear to support the theory of preferential particle propagation into the heliosphere vis the ecliptic during the period 1960-1968 and via the solar polar regions during 1972-1979.

  1. Surface Tension of Organic Liquids Using the OPLS/AA Force Field.

    PubMed

    Zubillaga, Rafael A; Labastida, Ariana; Cruz, Bibiana; Martínez, Juan Carlos; Sánchez, Enrique; Alejandre, José

    2013-03-12

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to obtain the surface tension of 61 organic liquids using the OPLS/AA (all-atom optimized potential for liquid simulations). The force field parameters are the same as those recently used (Caleman et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput.2012, 8, 61) to determine several thermodynamic properties of 146 organic liquids. The correct evaluation of surface tension using slab simulations of liquids requires one to properly take into account the long-range interactions (Trukhymchuk and Alejandre J. Chem. Phys.1999, 111, 8510). In addition, the liquid density from slab simulations has to be the same as that obtained in liquid simulations at constant temperature and pressure. The new results of surface tensions from this work improve those reported by Caleman et al. The OPLS/AA force field gives good surface tensions compared with experimental data for most of the systems studied in this work, although it was developed to simulate liquids.

  2. Immobilization of aminoglycosidic aminocyclitols antibiotic onto soap-free poly(MMA-EA-AA) latex particles.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kai; Kan, Chengyou; Du, Yi; Liu, Deshan; Yeung, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Monodispersed soap-free poly(MMA-EA-AA) latex particles with surface carboxyl groups were synthesized by emulsion polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA), ethyl acrylate (EA) and acrylic acid (AA) in aqueous medium, and streptomycin sulfate (SMS) was immobilized onto these particles using three different methods. A model experiment was designed to test the feasibility of the reaction between the carboxyl groups of polymer and the amino groups of the medicine. The covalent coupling between the latex particles and the medicine was confirmed by XPS. Results showed that the medicine molecules were located on the particle surface after immobilization, and the coupling efficiency of SMS in pre-adsorption method was higher than that in direct method. The highest coupling efficiency of this medicine was achieved using the spacer-arm method. It was demonstrated that the immobilized medicine had similar antimicrobial activity as the free form using Escherichia coli as an evaluating organism.

  3. Work capacity and anticipation in A.A. Ukhtomsky's concept of dominance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, L. P.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the results of theoretical and experimental investigations of human activity and anticipation based on A.A. Ukhtomsky's concept of brain dominance - a non-equilibrium system-forming factor in living systems. Facts on the stages of dominance formation are presented in relation to the creative abilities of the human brain and the role of fatigue as a "lever" for increasing systems' work capacity on the basis of "trace exaltation". Individually, specific features of dominantogenesis are compared with variations in behavioural types. On the basis of chronotopic EEG analysis, we delineate cortical dominants that underlie individual specifics of cognitive processes. The relation is shown between anticipation and the "expansion of dominants" - the broadening of "distal perception" in time and space, as framed by A.A. Ukhtomsky.

  4. PVA/AA photopolymers and PA-LCoS devices combined for holographic data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez, Andrés.; Martínez, Francisco J.; Fernández, Roberto; Gallego, Sergi; Álvarez, Mariela L.; Pascual, Inmaculada; Beléndez, Augusto

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a polyvinil alcohol/acrylamide (PVA/AA) photopolymer compound in a holographic memory testing platform to provide experimental results for storage and retrieval of information. We also investigate different codification schemes for the data pages addressed onto the parallel-addressed liquid crystal on silicon (PA-LCoS) device, used as the data pager, such as binary intensity modulation (BIM), and hybrid-ternary modulation (HTM), and we will see that an actual approximation for HTM can be obtained with a PA-LCoS device. We will also evaluate the effect of the time fluctuations in the PA-LCoS microdisplays onto the BIM and HTM regimes. Good results in terms of signal-tonoise ratio and bit-error ratio are provided with the experimental system and using the PVA/AA photopolymer produced in our lab, thus showing its potential and interest for future research focused on this material with highly tunable properties.

  5. hcp metal nanoclusters with hexagonal A-A bilayer stacking stabilized by enhanced covalent bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shunfang; Li, Haisheng; Xue, Xinlian; Jia, Yu; Guo, Zheng Xiao; Zhang, Zhenyu; Gong, Xingao

    2010-01-01

    First-principles total energy calculations within density functional theory have been performed to study the geometric and electronic structures of Ru{sub n} nanoclusters of varying size n (14{<=}n{<=}42). Strikingly, for the size range of n=14 to 38, the clusters always prefer a hexagonal bilayer structure with A-A stacking, rather than some of the more closely packed forms, or bilayer with A-B stacking. Such an intriguing 'molecular double-wheel' form is stabilized by substantially enhanced interlayer covalent bonding associated with strong s-d hybridization. Similar A-A stacking is also observed in the ground states or low-lying isomers of the clusters composed of other hcp elements, such as Os, Tc, Re, and Co. Note that these 'molecular double-wheels' show enhanced chemical activity toward H{sub 2}O splitting relative to their bulk counterpart, implying its potential applications as nanocatalysts.

  6. AAS and spectrophotometric methods for the determination metoprolol tartrate in tablets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpdoğan, Güzin; Sungur, Sidika

    1999-11-01

    Sensitive and specific atomic adsorption spectroscopy (AAS) and spectrophotometric methods have been developed for the determination of beta adrenergic blocking drug, metoprolol tartrate.The method is based on the formation of Cu(II) dithiocarbamate complex by derivatization of the secondary amino group of metoprolol with CS 2 and CuCl 2 in the presence of ammonia.The copper-bis(dithiocarbamate) complex was extracted into chloroform and the concentration of metoprolol tartrate was determined directly by spectrophotometric and indirectly by AAS measurement of copper.The two methods developed were applied to the assay of metoprolol tartrate in commercial tablet formulations.The methods were compared statistically with each other and with the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method of USPXXII using t- and F-tests.

  7. The Disk and Jet of the Classical T Tauri Star AA Tau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, A. W.; Grady, C. A.; Hamel, H.; Hornbeck, Jeremy; Russell, R.; Sitko, M.; Woodgate, B.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of the classical T Tauri star AA Tau have interpreted the UX Orionis-like photopolarimetric variability as being due to a warp in the inner disk caused by an inclined stellar magnetic dipolefield. We test that these effects are macroscopically observable in the inclination and alignment of the disk. We use the HST/STIS coronagraphic detection of the disk to measure the outer disk radius and inclination, and find that the inner disk is both misinclined and misaligned with respect to the outer disk. AA Tau drives a faint jet which is also misaligned with respect to the projection of the outer disk minor axis. The jet is also poorly collimated near the star.