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Sample records for aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin

  1. Effects of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin on endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dietmann, Anelia; Millonig, Alban; Combes, Valery; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Kachlany, Scott C; Grau, Georges E

    2013-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a human pathogen that produces leukotoxin (LtxA) as a major virulence factor. In this study the effect of LtxA on microvascular endothelial cell viability and phenotype was studied. High doses of single LtxA treatment (500 ng/ml to 5 μg/ml) significantly and irreversibly decreased cell proliferation and induced apoptosis, as assessed by tetrazolium salt and annexin V assay, respectively. Apoptosis was partially inhibited by the pan-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk. LtxA caused a cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase after 72 h. Between 500 ng/ml and 5 μg/ml, after long- or short-term stimulation LtxA increased the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, as well as the percentages of endothelial cells expressing these adhesion molecules. Thus, A. actinomycetemcomitans LtxA has substantial pro-inflammatory effects on human brain endothelial cells by upregulation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Furthermore, LtxA in higher concentration was found to decrease proliferation and induces apoptosis in microvascular endothelial cells.

  2. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin cytotoxicity occurs through bilayer destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Angela C.; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen; Du, Yurong; Stefano, Frank P.; Kieba, Irene R.; Epand, Raquel F.; Kakalis, Lazaros; Yeagle, Philip L.; Epand, Richard M.; Lally, Edward T.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The Gram-negative bacterium, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, is a common inhabitant of the human upper aerodigestive tract. The organism produces an RTX (Repeats in ToXin) toxin (LtxA) that kills human white blood cells. LtxA is believed to be a membrane-damaging toxin, but details of the cell surface interaction for this and several other RTX toxins have yet to be elucidated. Initial morphological studies suggested that LtxA was bending the target cell membrane. Because the ability of a membrane to bend is a function of its lipid composition, we assessed the proficiency of LtxA to release of a fluorescent dye from a panel of liposomes composed of various lipids. Liposomes composed of lipids that form nonlamellar phases were susceptible to LtxA-induced damage while liposomes composed of lipids that do not form non-bilayer structures were not. Differential scanning calorimetry demonstrated that the toxin decreased the temperature at which the lipid transitions from a bilayer to a nonlamellar phase, while 31P nuclear magnetic resonance studies showed that the LtxA-induced transition from a bilayer to an inverted hexagonal phase occurs through the formation of an isotropic intermediate phase. These results indicate that LtxA cytotoxicity occurs through a process of membrane destabilization. PMID:22309134

  3. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin: a powerful tool with capacity to cause imbalance in the host inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anders

    2011-03-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has been described as a member of the indigenous oral microbiota of humans, and is involved in the pathology of periodontitis and various non-oral infections. This bacterium selectively kills human leukocytes through expression of leukotoxin, a large pore-forming protein that belongs to the Repeat in Toxin (RTX) family. The specificity of the toxin is related to its prerequisite for a specific target cell receptor, LFA-1, which is solely expressed on leukocytes. The leukotoxin causes death of different leukocyte populations in a variety of ways. It activates a rapid release of lysosomal enzymes and MMPs from neutrophils and causes apoptosis in lymphocytes. In the monocytes/macrophages, the toxin activates caspase-1, a cysteine proteinase, which causes a proinflammatory response by the activation and secretion of IL-1β and IL-18. A specific clone (JP2) of A. actinomycetemcomitans with enhanced leukotoxin expression significantly correlates to disease onset in infected individuals. Taken together, the mechanisms by which this toxin kills leukocytes are closely related to the pathogenic mechanisms of inflammatory disorders, such as periodontitis. Therapeutic strategies targeting the cellular and molecular inflammatory host response in periodontal diseases might be a future treatment alternative.

  4. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: virulence of its leukotoxin and association with aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Åberg, Carola Höglund; Kelk, Peyman; Johansson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infection-induced inflammatory disease that causes loss of the tooth supporting tissues. Much focus has been put on comparison of the microbial biofilm in the healthy periodontium with the diseased one. The information arising from such studies is limited due to difficulties to compare the microbial composition in these two completely different ecological niches. A few longitudinal studies have contributed with information that makes it possible to predict which individuals who might have an increased risk of developing aggressive forms of periodontitis, and the predictors are either microbial or/and host-derived factors. The most conspicuous condition that is associated with disease risk is the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans at the individual level. This Gram-negative bacterium has a great genetic variation with a number of virulence factors. In this review we focus in particular on the leukotoxin that, based on resent knowledge, might be one of the most important virulence factors of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  5. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: Virulence of its leukotoxin and association with aggressive periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Åberg, Carola Höglund; Kelk, Peyman; Johansson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infection-induced inflammatory disease that causes loss of the tooth supporting tissues. Much focus has been put on comparison of the microbial biofilm in the healthy periodontium with the diseased one. The information arising from such studies is limited due to difficulties to compare the microbial composition in these two completely different ecological niches. A few longitudinal studies have contributed with information that makes it possible to predict which individuals who might have an increased risk of developing aggressive forms of periodontitis, and the predictors are either microbial or/and host-derived factors. The most conspicuous condition that is associated with disease risk is the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans at the individual level. This Gram-negative bacterium has a great genetic variation with a number of virulence factors. In this review we focus in particular on the leukotoxin that, based on resent knowledge, might be one of the most important virulence factors of A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:25494963

  6. Profound Effects of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Leukotoxin Mutation on Adherence Properties Are Clarified in in vitro Experiments.

    PubMed

    Velusamy, Senthil Kumar; Sampathkumar, Vandana; Godboley, Dipti; Fine, Daniel H

    2016-01-01

    Leukotoxin (Ltx) is a prominent virulence factor produced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, an oral microorganism highly associated with aggressive periodontitis. Ltx compromises host responsiveness by altering the viability of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages. Previously, we developed a Rhesus (Rh) monkey colonization model designed to determine the effect of virulence gene mutations on colonization of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Unexpectedly, an A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin (ltxA) mutant (RhAa-VS2) failed to colonize in the Rh model. No previous literature suggested that Ltx was associated with A. actinomycetemcomitans binding to tooth surfaces. These results led us to explore the broad effects of the ltxA mutation in vitro. Results indicated that LtxA activity was completely abolished in RhAa-VS2 strain, while complementation significantly (P<0.0001) restored leukotoxicity compared to RhAa-VS2 strain. RT-PCR analysis of ltx gene expression ruled out polar effects. Furthermore, binding of RhAa-VS2 to salivary-coated hydroxyapatite (SHA) was significantly decreased (P<0.0001) compared to wild type RhAa3 strain. Real time RT-PCR analysis of the genes related to SHA binding in RhAa-VS2 showed that genes related to binding were downregulated [rcpA (P = 0.018), rcpB (P = 0.02), tadA (P = 0.002)] as compared to wild type RhAa3. RhAa-VS2 also exhibited decreased biofilm depth (P = 0.008) and exo-polysaccharide production (P<0.0001). Buccal epithelial cell (BEC) binding of RhAa-VS2 was unaffected. Complementation with ltxA restored binding to SHA (P<0.002) but had no effect on biofilm formation when compared to RhAa3. In conclusion, mutation of ltxA diminished hard tissue binding in vitro, which helps explain the previous in vivo failure of a ltxA knockout to colonize the Rh oral cavity. These results suggest that; 1) one specific gene knockout (in this case ltxA) could affect other seemingly unrelated genes (such as rcpA, rcpB tadA etc), and 2

  7. Profound Effects of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Leukotoxin Mutation on Adherence Properties Are Clarified in in vitro Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Godboley, Dipti; Fine, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Leukotoxin (Ltx) is a prominent virulence factor produced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, an oral microorganism highly associated with aggressive periodontitis. Ltx compromises host responsiveness by altering the viability of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages. Previously, we developed a Rhesus (Rh) monkey colonization model designed to determine the effect of virulence gene mutations on colonization of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Unexpectedly, an A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin (ltxA) mutant (RhAa-VS2) failed to colonize in the Rh model. No previous literature suggested that Ltx was associated with A. actinomycetemcomitans binding to tooth surfaces. These results led us to explore the broad effects of the ltxA mutation in vitro. Results indicated that LtxA activity was completely abolished in RhAa-VS2 strain, while complementation significantly (P<0.0001) restored leukotoxicity compared to RhAa-VS2 strain. RT-PCR analysis of ltx gene expression ruled out polar effects. Furthermore, binding of RhAa-VS2 to salivary-coated hydroxyapatite (SHA) was significantly decreased (P<0.0001) compared to wild type RhAa3 strain. Real time RT-PCR analysis of the genes related to SHA binding in RhAa-VS2 showed that genes related to binding were downregulated [rcpA (P = 0.018), rcpB (P = 0.02), tadA (P = 0.002)] as compared to wild type RhAa3. RhAa-VS2 also exhibited decreased biofilm depth (P = 0.008) and exo-polysaccharide production (P<0.0001). Buccal epithelial cell (BEC) binding of RhAa-VS2 was unaffected. Complementation with ltxA restored binding to SHA (P<0.002) but had no effect on biofilm formation when compared to RhAa3. In conclusion, mutation of ltxA diminished hard tissue binding in vitro, which helps explain the previous in vivo failure of a ltxA knockout to colonize the Rh oral cavity. These results suggest that; 1) one specific gene knockout (in this case ltxA) could affect other seemingly unrelated genes (such as rcpA, rcpB tadA etc), and 2

  8. Effects of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin on neutrophil migration and extracellular trap formation

    PubMed Central

    Hirschfeld, Josefine; Roberts, Helen M.; Chapple, Iain L. C.; Parčina, Marijo; Jepsen, Søren; Johansson, Anders; Claesson, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Background Aggressive periodontitis is associated with the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a leukotoxin (Ltx)-producing periodontal pathogen. Ltx has the ability to lyse white blood cells including neutrophils. Objectives This study was aimed at investigating the interactions between neutrophils and Ltx with regard to the chemotactic properties of Ltx and the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Methods Neutrophils from healthy blood donors were isolated and incubated for 30 min and 3 h with increasing concentrations of Ltx (1, 10, and 100 ng/mL) as well as with A. actinomycetemcomitans strains (NCTC 9710 and HK 1651) producing different levels of Ltx. Formation of NETs and cell lysis were assessed by microscopy, fluorescence-based assays, and measurement of released lactate dehydrogenase. Neutrophil migration in response to different Ltx gradients was monitored by real-time video microscopy, and image analysis was performed using ImageJ software. Results Although Ltx (10 and 100 ng/mL) and the leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans strain HK 1651 lysed some neutrophils, other cells were still capable of performing NETosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Low doses of Ltx and the weakly leukotoxic strain NCTC 9710 did not lead to neutrophil lysis, but did induce some NETosis. Furthermore, all three concentrations of Ltx enhanced random neutrophil movement; however, low directional accuracy was observed compared with the positive control (fMLP). Conclusions The results indicate that Ltx acts both as a neutrophil activator and also causes cell death. In addition, Ltx directly induces NETosis in neutrophils prior to cell lysis. In future studies, the underlying pathways involved in Ltx-meditated neutrophil activation and NETosis need to be investigated further. PMID:27834173

  9. Prophage induction in lysogenic Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans cells co-cultured with human gingival fibroblasts, and its effect on leukotoxin release.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Roy H; de Moura Martins Lobo Dos Santos, Caroline; Zuanazzi, David; de Accioly Mattos, Marcelo Barbosas; Ferreira, Davis Fernandes; Kachlany, Scott C; Tinoco, Eduardo M B

    2013-01-01

    Lysogeny is common among strains of the periodontal pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Since lysogenic induction is known to result in the increased synthesis and release of bacterial toxins from lysogens, it would be important to elucidate the conditions under which induction of these bacteria may occur. Co-cultures of A. actinomycetemcomitans strains (either lysogenic or non-lysogenic) and human cells (either gingival fibroblasts or pharyngeal epithelial cells) were prepared. Following incubation, bacteriophage titers of up to 6.2 × 10(7) pfu/ml were detected in the cell-free, spent culture media from the co-cultures of the lysogenic A. actinomycetemcomitans strains and the fibroblasts. Little (maximum of 2 × 10(0) pfu/ml) or no titers of phage could be detected in the mono-cultures of the lysogenic A. actinomycetemcomitans strains alone. In contrast, no phage were detectable in the cell-free spent culture media of the lysogens cocultured with the epithelial cells. Futhermore, co-culture of the A. actinomycetemcomitans lysogens with the fibroblasts resulted in enhanced release of the A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin into the culture medium, in comparison with the spent culture media from mono-cultures of the lysogens alone. These results are consistent with the concept that interaction with fibroblasts may mediate prophage induction in lysogenic strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans, and that leukotoxin release is greatly augmented following induction of the lysogens.

  10. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin induces cytosol acidification in LFA-1 expressing immune cells.

    PubMed

    Balashova, N; Dhingra, A; Boesze-Battaglia, K; Lally, E T

    2016-02-01

    Studies have suggested that Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin (LtxA) kills human lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1; CD11a/CD18)-bearing immune cells through a lysosomal-mediated mechanism. Lysosomes are membrane-bound cellular organelles that contain an array of acid hydrolases that are capable of breaking down biomolecules. The lysosomal membrane bilayer confines the pH-sensitive enzymes within an optimal acidic (pH 4.8) environment thereby protecting the slightly basic cytosol (pH 6.8-7.5). In the current study, we have probed the effect of LtxA-induced cytolysis on lysosomal integrity in two different K562 erythroleukemia cell lines. K562-puro/LFA-1 cells were stably transfected with CD11a and CD18 cDNA to express LFA-1 on the cell surface while K562-puro, which does not express LFA-1, served as a control. Following treatment with 100 ng ml(-1) LtxA cells were analyzed by live cell imaging in conjunction with time-lapse confocal microscopy and by flow cytometry. Using a pH-sensitive indicator (pHrodo(®)) we demonstrated that the toxin causes a decrease in the intracellular pH in K562-puro/LFA-1 cells that is noticeable within the first 15 min of treatment. This process correlated with the disappearance of lysosomes in the cytosol as determined by both acridine orange and LysoTracker(®) Red DND-99 staining. These changes were not observed in K562-puro cells or when heat inactivated toxin was added to K562-puro/LFA-1. Our results suggest that LtxA induces lysosomal damage, cytosol acidification, which is followed by cell death in K562-puro/LFA-1 cells.

  11. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin induces cytosol acidification in LFA-1 expressing immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Balashova, Nataliya; Dhingra, Anuradha; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen; Lally, Edward T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Studies have suggested that Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin (LtxA) kills human LFA-1(CD11a/CD18)-bearing immune cells through a lysosomal-mediated mechanism. Lysosomes are membrane-bound cellular organelles that contain an array of acid hydrolases that are capable of breaking down biomolecules. The lysosomal membrane bilayer confines the pH-sensitive enzymes within an optimal acidic (pH 4.8) environment thereby protecting the slightly basic cytosol (pH 6.8–7.5). In the current study, we have probed the effect of LtxA-induced cytolysis on lysosomal integrity in two different K562 erythroleukemia cell lines. K562-puro/LFA-1 cells were stably transfected with CD11a and CD18 cDNA to express LFA-1 on the cell surface while K562-puro, which does not express LFA-1, served as a control. Following treatment with 100 ng/ml LtxA cells were analyzed by live cell imaging in conjunction with time-lapse confocal microscopy and by flow cytometry. Using a pH sensitive indicator (pHrodo®, Life Technologies) we demonstrated that the toxin causes a decrease in the intracellular pH in K562-puro/LFA-1 cells noticeable within the first 15 min of treatment. This process correlated with the disappearance of lysosomes in the cytosol as determined by both acridine orange and LysoTracker® Red DND-99 (Life Technologies) staining. These changes were not observed in K562-puro cells or when heat inactivated toxin was added to K562-puro/LFA-1. Our results suggest that LtxA induces lysosomal damage, cytosol acidification, which is followed by cell death in K562-puro/LFA-1 cells. PMID:26361372

  12. Mlc is a transcriptional activator with a key role in integrating cyclic AMP receptor protein and integration host factor regulation of leukotoxin RNA synthesis in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a periodontal pathogen, synthesizes leukotoxin (LtxA), a protein that helps the bacterium evade the host immune response. Transcription of the ltxA operon is induced during anaerobic growth. The cAMP receptor protein (CRP) indirectly increases ltxA expression...

  13. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin (LtxA; Leukothera) induces cofilin dephosphorylation and actin depolymerization during killing of malignant monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Manpreet

    2014-01-01

    Leukotoxin (LtxA; Leukothera), a protein toxin secreted by the oral bacterium Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, specifically kills white blood cells (WBCs). LtxA binds to the receptor known as lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), a β2 integrin expressed only on the surface of WBCs. LtxA is being studied as a virulence factor that helps A. actinomycetemcomitans evade host defences and as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of WBC diseases. LtxA-mediated cell death in monocytes involves both caspases and lysosomes; however, the signalling proteins that regulate and mediate cell death remain largely unknown. We used a 2D-gel proteomics approach to analyse the global protein expression changes that occur in response to LtxA. This approach identified the protein cofilin, which underwent dephosphorylation upon LtxA treatment. Cofilin is a ubiquitous actin-binding protein known to regulate actin dynamics and is regulated by LIM kinase (LIMK)-mediated phosphorylation. LtxA-mediated cofilin dephosphorylation was dependent on LFA-1 and cofilin dephosphorylation did not occur when LFA-1 bound to its natural ligand, ICAM-1. Treatment of cells with an inhibitor of LIMK (LIMKi) also led to cofilin dephosphorylation and enhanced killing by LtxA. This enhanced sensitivity to LtxA coincided with an increase in lysosomal disruption, and an increase in LFA-1 surface expression and clustering. Both LIMKi and LtxA treatment also induced actin depolymerization, which could play a role in trafficking and surface distribution of LFA-1. We propose a model in which LtxA-mediated cofilin dephosphorylation leads to actin depolymerization, LFA-1 overexpression/clustering, and enhanced lysosomal-mediated cell death. PMID:25169107

  14. Immunosuppressive properties of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Rabie, G; Lally, E T; Shenker, B J

    1988-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans produces a leukotoxin that kills human polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) and monocytes but not lymphocytes. In this study, we examined A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin for its ability to alter human peripheral blood lymphocyte (HPBL) responsiveness. After a 90-min exposure to the leukotoxin, all monocytes were killed and HPBL responsiveness to mitogens and antigens was significantly inhibited. The ability of the leukotoxin to inhibit HPBL responses was not surprising, since monocytes and macrophages are required for many lymphocyte functions. However, we were unable to totally restore HPBL responsiveness when adherent autologous monocytes were added back to cultures of leukotoxin-treated lymphocytes. These studies demonstrate that A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin may also exert nonlethal effects directly on lymphocytes. Furthermore, impaired lymphocyte function did not appear to be the result of indirect effects of products released by dying monocytes. Although it is not clear how A. actinomycetemcomitans acts to cause disease, several investigators have proposed that impaired host defenses may play a pivotal role. Several studies have demonstrated defects in PMN, monocyte, and lymphocyte function in patients with periodontal disease. These findings, along with the data presented in this paper, support the hypothesis that patients who harbor A. actinomycetemcomitans could suffer from local or systemic immune suppression. The effects of this suppression may be to enhance the pathogenicity of A. actinomycetemcomitans itself or that of some other opportunistic organism. PMID:3335399

  15. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Zijnge, Vincent; Granström, Elisabeth; Oscarsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and leukotoxin (LtxA) into human host cells and to act as triggers of innate immunity upon carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). To improve our understanding of the pathogenicity-associated functions that A. actinomycetemcomitans exports via OMVs, we studied the proteome of density gradient-purified OMVs from a rough-colony type clinical isolate, strain 173 (serotype e) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This analysis yielded the identification of 151 proteins, which were found in at least three out of four independent experiments. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002509. Through this study, we not only confirmed the vesicle-associated release of LtxA, and the presence of proteins, which are known to act as immunoreactive antigens in the human host, but we also identified numerous additional putative virulence-related proteins in the A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV proteome. The known and putative functions of these proteins include immune evasion, drug targeting, and iron/nutrient acquisition. In summary, our findings are consistent with an OMV-associated proteome that exhibits several offensive and defensive functions, and they provide a comprehensive basis to further disclose roles of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs in periodontal and systemic disease.

  16. Aggregatibacter Actinomycetemcomitans – A Tooth Killer?

    PubMed Central

    Ummer, Fajar; Dhivakar, C.P

    2014-01-01

    Strong evidence is available on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A.a) on its role as the causative agent of localised juvenile periodontitis (LJP), a disease characterised by rapid destruction of the tooth-supporting tissues. This organism possesses a large number of virulence factors with a wide range of activities which enable it to colonise the oral cavity, invade periodontal tissues, evade host defences, initiate connective tissue destruction and interfere with tissue repair. Adhesion to epithelial and tooth surfaces is dependent on the presence of surface proteins and structures such as microvesicles and fimbriae. Invasion has been demonstrated in vivo and in vitro. The organism has a number of means of evading host defences which include: (i) production of leukotoxin; (ii) producing immunosuppressive factors; (iv) secreting proteases capable of cleaving IgG; and (v) producing Fc-binding. PMID:25302290

  17. Evolutionary Divergence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Kittichotirat, W; Bumgarner, R E; Chen, C

    2016-01-01

    Gram-negative facultative Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral pathogen associated with periodontitis. The genetic heterogeneity among A. actinomycetemcomitans strains has been long recognized. This study provides a comprehensive genomic analysis of A. actinomycetemcomitans and the closely related nonpathogenic Aggregatibacter aphrophilus. Whole genome sequencing by Illumina MiSeq platform was performed for 31 A. actinomycetemcomitans and 2 A. aphrophilus strains. Sequence similarity analysis shows a total of 3,220 unique genes across the 2 species, where 1,550 are core genes present in all genomes and 1,670 are variable genes (accessory genes) missing in at least 1 genome. Phylogenetic analysis based on 397 concatenated core genes distinguished A. aphrophilus and A. actinomycetemcomitans. The latter was in turn divided into 5 clades: clade b (serotype b), clade c (serotype c), clade e/f (serotypes e and f), clade a/d (serotypes a and d), and clade e' (serotype e strains). Accessory genes accounted for 14.1% to 23.2% of the A. actinomycetemcomitans genomes, with a majority belonging to the category of poorly characterized by Cluster of Orthologous Groups classification. These accessory genes were often organized into genomic islands (n = 387) with base composition biases, suggesting their acquisitions via horizontal gene transfer. There was a greater degree of similarity in gene content and genomic islands among strains within clades than between clades. Strains of clade e' isolated from human were found to be missing the genomic island that carries genes encoding cytolethal distending toxins. Taken together, the results suggest a pattern of sequential divergence, starting from the separation of A. aphrophilus and A. actinomycetemcomitans through gain and loss of genes and ending with the divergence of the latter species into distinct clades and serotypes. With differing constellations of genes, the A. actinomycetemcomitans clades may have evolved

  18. Monoclonal antibodies to leukotoxin of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    DiRienzo, J M; Tsai, C C; Shenker, B J; Taichman, N S; Lally, E T

    1985-01-01

    Hybridoma cell lines which produce monoclonal antibodies to a leukotoxin from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans were prepared. The monoclonal antibodies were selected for their ability to neutralize the cytotoxic activity of the leukotoxin and recognize the toxin on nitrocellulose blots. The antibodies belonged to either the immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) or IgG2 subclass and differed in their ability to bind to the leukotoxin on nitrocellulose blots. However, only slight differences in neutralization titers were observed. Use of the monoclonal antibodies revealed that polymyxin B-extracted or osmotic shock-released leukotoxin could be separated into several high-molecular-weight polypeptides by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunoblot analysis with the monoclonal antibodies also demonstrated that the leukotoxin was present in eight oral strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans that had been previously classified by a biological assay as leukotoxic. The availability of these monoclonal antibodies should facilitate and expand studies concerning the role of the leukotoxin in the pathogenicity of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Images PMID:3965404

  19. Leukotoxic activity of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and periodontal attachment loss.

    PubMed

    Höglund Åberg, Carola; Haubek, Dorte; Kwamin, Francis; Johansson, Anders; Claesson, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a Gram-negative periodontitis-associated bacterium that expresses a toxin that selectively affects leukocytes. This leukotoxin is encoded by an operon belonging to the core genome of this bacterial species. Variations in the expression of the leukotoxin have been reported, and a well-characterized specific clonal type (JP2) of this bacterium with enhanced leukotoxin expression has been isolated. In particular, the presence of the JP2 genotype significantly increases the risk for the progression of periodontal attachment loss (AL). Based on these findings we hypothesized that variations in the leukotoxicity are linked to disease progression in infected individuals. In the present study, the leukotoxicity of 239 clinical isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans was analysed with different bioassays, and the genetic peculiarities of the isolates were related to their leukotoxicity based on examination with molecular techniques. The periodontal status of the individuals sampled for the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans was examined longitudinally, and the importance of the observed variations in leukotoxicity was evaluated in relation to disease progression. Our data show that high leukotoxicity correlates with an enhanced risk for the progression of AL. The JP2 genotype isolates were all highly leukotoxic, while the isolates with an intact leukotoxin promoter (non-JP2 genotypes) showed substantial variation in leukotoxicity. Genetic characterization of the non-JP2 genotype isolates indicated the presence of highly leukotoxic genotypes of serotype b with similarities to the JP2 genotype. Based on these results, we conclude that A. actinomycetemcomitans harbours other highly virulent genotypes besides the previously described JP2 genotype. In addition, the results from the present study further highlight the importance of the leukotoxin as a key virulence factor in aggressive forms of periodontitis.

  20. Cloning and expression of the leukotoxin gene from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Kolodrubetz, D; Dailey, T; Ebersole, J; Kraig, E

    1989-01-01

    The leukotoxin produced by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans has been implicated in the etiology of juvenile periodontitis. To initiate a genetic analysis of the role of this protein in disease, we have cloned the leukotoxin gene in Escherichia coli. Recombinant colonies carrying toxin gene sequences were isolated by screening a genomic A. actinomycetemcomitans library with a DNA probe for the leukotoxin gene from a related bacterium, Pasteurella haemolytica. To demonstrate that the cloned A. actinomycetemcomitans DNA contained a functional leukotoxin gene, protein extracts of E. coli containing the A. actinomycetemcomitans clone were tested directly for leukotoxic activity against human cell lines in chromium release assays. A construct containing the entire cloned region produced a functional toxin. No cytotoxicity was seen when extracts from cells containing plasmids with deletions in the putative coding region were used. Furthermore, the toxin produced by the cloned gene has the same target cell specificity as the leukotoxin extracted directly from A. actinomycetemcomitans. These results indicate that sequences encoding a functional leukotoxin have been cloned and are expressed in E. coli. Southern blot analysis of DNA from leukotoxin-producing (Lkt+) and non-leukotoxin-producing (Lkt-) strains indicated that the Lkt- strain also contained a copy of the gene. Images PMID:2707855

  1. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a potent immunoregulator of the periodontal host defense system and alveolar bone homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Herbert, B A; Novince, C M; Kirkwood, K L

    2016-06-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a perio-pathogenic bacteria that has long been associated with localized aggressive periodontitis. The mechanisms of its pathogenicity have been studied in humans and preclinical experimental models. Although different serotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans have differential virulence factor expression, A. actinomycetemcomitans cytolethal distending toxin (CDT), leukotoxin, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) have been most extensively studied in the context of modulating the host immune response. Following colonization and attachment in the oral cavity, A. actinomycetemcomitans employs CDT, leukotoxin, and LPS to evade host innate defense mechanisms and drive a pathophysiologic inflammatory response. This supra-physiologic immune response state perturbs normal periodontal tissue remodeling/turnover and ultimately has catabolic effects on periodontal tissue homeostasis. In this review, we have divided the host response into two systems: non-hematopoietic and hematopoietic. Non-hematopoietic barriers include epithelium and fibroblasts that initiate the innate immune host response. The hematopoietic system contains lymphoid and myeloid-derived cell lineages that are responsible for expanding the immune response and driving the pathophysiologic inflammatory state in the local periodontal microenvironment. Effector systems and signaling transduction pathways activated and utilized in response to A. actinomycetemcomitans will be discussed to further delineate immune cell mechanisms during A. actinomycetemcomitans infection. Finally, we will discuss the osteo-immunomodulatory effects induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans and dissect the catabolic disruption of balanced osteoclast-osteoblast-mediated bone remodeling, which subsequently leads to net alveolar bone loss.

  2. Virulence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans serotypes and DGGE subtypes isolated from chronic adult periodontitis in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pahumunto, Nuntiya; Ruangsri, Praphansri; Wongsuwanlert, Mutita; Piwat, Supatcharin; Dahlen, Gunnar; Teanpaisan, Rawee

    2015-12-01

    A high proportion of non-serotypeable isolates of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans among Thai periodontitis cases has been previously reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of leukotoxin and toxicity, cytolethal distending toxin (Cdts), and internalization and the killing effect on fibroblasts by A. actinomycetemcomitans subtypes from Thai chronic periodontitis cases. A total of 96 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains from 37 periodontitis cases, previously serotyped with PCR and subtyped with DGGE, were examined for the presence of the ltx gene and cdt genes (cdtBC), and tested for leukotoxin expression, leukotoxicity, internalization, and apoptosis of fibroblast cells. The ltx gene was present in all isolates, while 84.4% showed the cdtBC gene. Two strains with a JP2-like ltx gene with a deletion of 530 bp in the promoter region, serotyped as c, showed virulence of similar magnitude to the JP2 strain. Furthermore, a higher virulence was found in the two non-serotypeable DGGE subtypes, NS1 and NS2, compared with the serotypeable strains (serotype a-f, serotype b and d were absent). Generally, the virulence of strains obtained from deep periodontal pockets was higher than those isolated from shallow non-bleeding pockets. A. actinomycetemcomitans subtypes isolated from adult Thais with chronic periodontitis showed a highly variable virulence, leukotoxin expression, leukotoxicity, internalization and apoptosis of fibroblast, and are regulated both genetically and environmentally.

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Strain IDH781

    PubMed Central

    May, Anthony C.; Ehrlich, Rachel L.; Balashov, Sergey; Ehrlich, Garth D.; Shanmugam, Mayilvahanan; Fine, Daniel H.; Ramasubbu, Narayanan

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genomic sequence and methylome of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans strain IDH781. This rough strain is used extensively as a model organism to characterize localized aggressive periodontitis pathogenesis, the basic biology and oral cavity colonization of A. actinomycetemcomitans, and its interactions with other members of the oral microbiome. PMID:27834722

  4. The cell envelope proteome of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Smith, K P; Fields, J G; Voogt, R D; Deng, B; Lam, Y-W; Mintz, K P

    2015-04-01

    The cell envelope of gram-negative bacteria serves a critical role in maintenance of cellular homeostasis, resistance to external stress, and host-pathogen interactions. Envelope protein composition is influenced by the physiological and environmental demands placed on the bacterium. In this study, we report a comprehensive compilation of cell envelope proteins from the periodontal and systemic pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans VT1169, an afimbriated serotype b strain. The urea-extracted membrane proteins were identified by mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics. The membrane proteome, isolated from actively growing bacteria under normal laboratory conditions, included 648 proteins representing 27% of the predicted open reading frames in the genome. Bioinformatic analyses were used to annotate and predict the cellular location and function of the proteins. Surface adhesins, porins, lipoproteins, numerous influx and efflux pumps, multiple sugar, amino acid and iron transporters, and components of the type I, II and V secretion systems were identified. Periplasmic space and cytoplasmic proteins with chaperone function were also identified. A total of 107 proteins with unknown function were associated with the cell envelope. Orthologs of a subset of these uncharacterized proteins are present in other bacterial genomes, whereas others are found exclusively in A. actinomycetemcomitans. This knowledge will contribute to elucidating the role of cell envelope proteins in bacterial growth and survival in the oral cavity.

  5. Distribution of biotypes and leukotoxic activity of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans isolated from Brazilian patients with chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Gaetti-Jardim, Elerson; Wahasugui, Thais Cristiane; Tomazinho, Paulo Henrique; Marques, Márcia Martins; Nakano, Viviane; Avila-Campos, Mario Julio

    2008-10-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an important etiologic agent of the periodontitis and is associated with extra-oral infections. In this study, the detection of the ltxA gene as well as the ltx promoter region from leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans isolated from 50 Brazilian patients with periodontitis and 50 healthy subjects was performed. The leukotoxic activity on HL-60 cells was also evaluated. Leukotoxic activity was determined using a trypan blue exclusion method. The 530 bp deletion in the promoter region was evaluated by PCR using a PRO primer pair. A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected by culture and directly from crude subgingival biofilm by PCR using specific primers. By culture, A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected in nine (18%) of the periodontal patients and one (2%) healthy subject. However, by PCR, this organism was detected in 44% of the periodontal patients and in 16% of the healthy subjects. It was verified a great discrepancy between PCR detection of the ltx operon promoter directly from crude subgingival biofilm and from bacterial DNA. Only one periodontal sample harbored highly leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans. Moreover, biotype II was the most prevalent and no correlation between biotypes and leukotoxic activity was observed. The diversity of leukotoxin expression by A. actinomycetemcomitans suggests a role of this toxin in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease and other infectious diseases.

  6. Distribution of biotypes and leukotoxic activity of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans isolated from Brazilian patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Gaetti-Jardim Jr., Elerson; Wahasugui, Thais Cristiane; Tomazinho, Paulo Henrique; Marques, Márcia Martins; Nakano, Viviane; Avila-Campos, Mario Julio

    2008-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an important etiologic agent of the periodontitis and is associated with extra-oral infections. In this study, the detection of the ltxA gene as well as the ltx promoter region from leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans isolated from 50 Brazilian patients with periodontitis and 50 healthy subjects was performed. The leukotoxic activity on HL-60 cells was also evaluated. Leukotoxic activity was determined using a trypan blue exclusion method. The 530 bp deletion in the promoter region was evaluated by PCR using a PRO primer pair. A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected by culture and directly from crude subgingival biofilm by PCR using specific primers. By culture, A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected in nine (18%) of the periodontal patients and one (2%) healthy subject. However, by PCR, this organism was detected in 44% of the periodontal patients and in 16% of the healthy subjects. It was verified a great discrepancy between PCR detection of the ltx operon promoter directly from crude subgingival biofilm and from bacterial DNA. Only one periodontal sample harbored highly leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans. Moreover, biotype II was the most prevalent and no correlation between biotypes and leukotoxic activity was observed. The diversity of leukotoxin expression by A. actinomycetemcomitans suggests a role of this toxin in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease and other infectious diseases. PMID:24031284

  7. Nucleotide sequence of the leukotoxin gene from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans: homology to the alpha-hemolysin/leukotoxin gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Kraig, E; Dailey, T; Kolodrubetz, D

    1990-01-01

    The leukotoxin produced by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans has been implicated in the etiology of localized juvenile periodontitis. To initiate a genetic analysis into the role of this protein in disease, we have cloned its gene, lktA. We now present the complete nucleotide sequence of the lktA gene from A. actinomycetemcomitans. When the deduced amino acid sequence of the leukotoxin protein was compared with those of other proteins, it was found to be homologous to the leukotoxin from Pasteurella haemolytica and to the alpha-hemolysins from Escherichia coli and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Each alignment showed at least 42% identity. As in the other organisms, the lktA gene of A. actinomycetemcomitans was linked to another gene, lktC, which is thought to be involved in the activation of the leukotoxin. The predicted LktC protein was related to the leukotoxin/hemolysin C proteins from the other bacteria, since they shared a minimum of 49% amino acid identity. Surprisingly, although actinobacillus species are more closely related to pasteurellae than to members of the family Enterobacteriaciae, LktA and LktC from A. actinomycetemcomitans shared significantly greater sequence identity with the E. coli alpha-hemolysin proteins than with the P. haemolytica leukotoxin proteins. Despite the overall homology to the other leukotoxin/hemolysin proteins, the LktA protein from A. actinomycetemcomitans has several unique properties. Most strikingly, it is a very basic protein with a calculated pI of 9.7; the other toxins have estimated pIs around 6.2. The unusual features of the A. actinomycetemcomitans protein are discussed in light of the different species and target-cell specificities of the hemolysins and the leukotoxins. Images PMID:2318535

  8. Identification of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by leukotoxin gene-specific hybridization and polymerase chain reaction assays.

    PubMed Central

    Tønjum, T; Haas, R

    1993-01-01

    Eleven strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolated from cases of systemic infections, local abscesses, and periodontitis were identified by genetic assays using the leukotoxin gene as the target. We have developed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, based on the leukotoxin structural gene of this pathogen, which clearly identified all tested strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans and separated them from the closely related Haemophilus aphrophilus as well as other bacterial species. Furthermore, DNA-DNA hybridization was performed with the cloned partial leukotoxin structural gene (lktA) as a probe, which again clearly distinguished A. actinomycetemcomitans from H. aphrophilus, parts of the normal oral flora, and species harboring RTX (repeats in toxin) family-related cytotoxins. The PCR fragment amplified from the leukotoxin structural gene gave results similar to those given by the cloned leukotoxin gene when used as a probe in hybridization experiments. The hybridization and PCR assays described here are fundamental improvements for the identification of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Images PMID:8349764

  9. The conserved carboxyl domain of MorC, an inner membrane protein of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, is essential for membrane function.

    PubMed

    Smith, K P; Voogt, R D; Ruiz, T; Mintz, K P

    2016-02-01

    Morphogenesis protein C (MorC) of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is important for maintaining the membrane morphology and integrity of the cell envelope of this oral pathogen. The MorC sequence and operon organization were found to be conserved in Gammaproteobacteria, based on a bioinformatic analysis of 435 sequences from representative organisms. Functional conservation of MorC was investigated using an A. actinomycetemcomitans morC mutant as a model system to express MorC homologs from four phylogenetically diverse representatives of the Gammaproteobacteria: Haemophilus influenzae, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Moraxella catarrhalis. The A. actinomycetemcomitans strains expressing the homologous proteins were assessed for sensitivity to bile salts, leukotoxin secretion, autoaggregation and membrane morphology. MorC from the most closely related organism (H. influenzae) was functionally identical to MorC from A. actinomycetemcomitans. However, the genes from more distantly related organisms restored some but not all A. actinomycetemcomitans mutant phenotypes. In addition, deletion mutagenesis indicated that the most conserved portion of the protein, the C-terminus DUF490 domain, was necessary to maintain the integrity of the membrane. Deletion of the last 10 amino acids of this domain of the A. actinomycetemcomitans MorC protein was sufficient to disrupt membrane stability and leukotoxin secretion. The data suggest that the MorC sequence is functionally conserved across Gammaproteobacteria and the C-terminus of the protein is essential for maintaining membrane physiology.

  10. Studies of leukotoxin from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans using the promyelocytic HL-60 cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Zambon, J J; DeLuca, C; Slots, J; Genco, R J

    1983-01-01

    The promyelocytic HL-60 cell line was examined for susceptibility to leukotoxin from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans which caused lysis of human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes also lysed HL-60 cells as determined by release of intracellular lactate dehydrogenase. The killing of HL-60 cells by A. actinomycetemcomitans was dose dependent and temperature dependent, reached maximal levels after 45 min of incubation, and was inhibited by rabbit antisera to A. actinomycetemcomitans. Of 100 oral isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans from 55 subjects, 16% from 11 healthy subjects, 43% from 13 adult periodontitis patients, 75% from 4 insulin-dependent diabetics, 66% from 2 generalized juvenile periodontitis patients, and 55% from 25 localized juvenile periodontitis patients produced leukotoxin. The same subject could harbor both leukotoxin-producing and -nonproducing isolates. The significantly higher proportion of leukotoxin-producing isolates in the disease groups compared with the healthy group is consistent with the hypothesis that leukotoxin from A. actinomycetemcomitans is an important virulence factor in the pathogenesis of certain forms of periodontal disease. PMID:6572616

  11. AI-2 of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans inhibits Candida albicans biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Bachtiar, Endang W; Bachtiar, Boy M; Jarosz, Lucja M; Amir, Lisa R; Sunarto, Hari; Ganin, Hadas; Meijler, Michael M; Krom, Bastiaan P

    2014-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a Gram-negative bacterium, and Candida albicans, a polymorphic fungus, are both commensals of the oral cavity but both are opportunistic pathogens that can cause oral diseases. A. actinomycetemcomitans produces a quorum-sensing molecule called autoinducer-2 (AI-2), synthesized by LuxS, that plays an important role in expression of virulence factors, in intra- but also in interspecies communication. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of AI-2 based signaling in the interactions between C. albicans and A. actinomycetemcomitans. A. actinomycetemcomitans adhered to C. albicans and inhibited biofilm formation by means of a molecule that was secreted during growth. C. albicans biofilm formation increased significantly when co-cultured with A. actinomycetemcomitans luxS, lacking AI-2 production. Addition of wild-type-derived spent medium or synthetic AI-2 to spent medium of the luxS strain, restored inhibition of C. albicans biofilm formation to wild-type levels. Addition of synthetic AI-2 significantly inhibited hypha formation of C. albicans possibly explaining the inhibition of biofilm formation. AI-2 of A. actinomycetemcomitans is synthesized by LuxS, accumulates during growth and inhibits C. albicans hypha- and biofilm formation. Identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between bacteria and fungi may provide important insight into the balance within complex oral microbial communities.

  12. Extraction and isolation of a leukotoxin from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans with polymyxin B.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C C; Shenker, B J; DiRienzo, J M; Malamud, D; Taichman, N S

    1984-01-01

    A leukotoxin from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was isolated by a procedure that includes polymyxin B extraction, ion-exchange chromatography, and gel filtration chromatography. The procedure resulted in the recovery of 48% of the toxin with a 99-fold increase in specific activity. The isolated toxin has a molecular mass of 180,000 daltons by gel filtration and 115,000 daltons by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. It retains all the major biological characteristics previously documented for crude leukotoxin preparations, including susceptibility to heat and proteolytic enzymes and neutralization by sera from patients with juvenile periodontitis. The isolated leukotoxin destroys human but not rat or guinea pig polymorphonuclear leukocytes and has no apparent effect on human erythrocytes. The availability of the A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin should facilitate studies on its chemistry and mode of action as well as its role in the pathogenesis of human periodontal disease. Images PMID:6319288

  13. Killing of human myelomonocytic leukemia and lymphocytic cell lines by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, D L; Berthold, P; Taichman, N S

    1988-01-01

    The purified leukotoxin of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans kills human leukemic cell lines (e.g., HL-60, U937, and KG-1) and human T- and B-cell lines (e.g., JURKAT, MOLT-4, Daudi, and Raji) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The 50% effective doses for these cell lines are similar to those established for human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes. In contrast, other human and nonhuman tumor cell lines are not susceptible to the leukotoxin. These human leukemia and lymphoid cell lines will serve as useful model systems with which to study the molecular specificity and mechanism(s) of action of the actinobacillus leukotoxin. Images PMID:3258584

  14. Regulation of leukotoxin in leukotoxic and nonleukotoxic strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Spitznagel, J; Kraig, E; Kolodrubetz, D

    1991-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a gram-negative bacterium that has been implicated in the etiology of several forms of periodontitis, especially localized juvenile periodontitis. A potent leukotoxin (Lkt) is produced by most A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates from patients with periodontal disease, but some isolates are leukotoxin nonproducing (Lkt-). The molecular bases for the differences in leukotoxin expression are being explored to clarify the role of leukotoxin in pathogenesis. We have previously cloned the leukotoxin structural gene, lktA, from the leukotoxin-producing (Lkt+) strain JP2 and have shown that it is linked to three other genes, lktB, lktC, and lktD, whose gene products are thought to be required for activation and localization of the leukotoxin. These genes have now been used in Southern blot analysis to demonstrate that Lkt- strains, like Lkt+ strains, contain all four genes of the lkt gene cluster. While restriction fragment length polymorphisms were detected, they did not correlate with toxin phenotype. RNA blot analysis demonstrated that Lkt+ strains produced two transcripts, one 9.3 kb in length and the other 4.3 kb. They encode lktCABD and lktCA. respectively. Lkt- strains contained significantly lower levels of the 4.3-kb transcript with no discernible 9.3-kb message. The leukotoxic activity of the A. actinomycetemcomitans strains, measured by chromium release assays, correlated with the lkt RNA content. Therefore, a major component of leukotoxin regulation is at the level of RNA transcription or stability. Interestingly, the lkt RNAs in JP2 are regulated during growth phase, being greatly reduced in cells approaching stationary phase. Thus, the regulation of lkt RNA can be affected by both genotype and environment. Images PMID:2004819

  15. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans infection mimicking lung cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Matzumura-Kuan, Melissa; Jennings, Jeffrey

    2014-09-01

    Pulmonary infections can mimic a pulmonary neoplasm. Multiple organisms, including bacteria, viruses, and fungi, can present with similar clinical, radiographic, and surgical findings as neoplastic processes. Because treatment and the prognosis are completely different, an accurate diagnosis is crucial, and lung biopsy is usually required. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is part of the normal oral flora and is a rare cause of invasive infection due to hematogenous dissemination or aspiration, particularly infective endocarditis. We present a case of A. actinomycetemcomitans and Actinomyces co-infection that presented as a mediastinal mass, with surgical findings similar to lung malignancy but with biopsy and culture showing an infectious origin. After antibiotic treatment, follow-up images showed resolution of the mass.

  16. Actinomycetemcomitin: a new bacteriocin produced by Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Lima, Francisca Lúcia; de Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora Roque; Apolônio, Ana Carolina Morais; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Santoro, Marcelo Matos; Oliveira, Jamil Silvano; Alviano, Celuta Sales; Farias, Luiz de Macêdo

    2008-02-01

    Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans P(7-20) strain isolated from a periodontally diseased patient has produced a bacteriocin (named as actinomycetemcomitin) that is active against Peptostreptococcus anaerobius ATCC 27337. Actinomycetemcomitin was produced during exponential and stationary growth phases, and its amount decreased until it disappeared during the decline growth phase. It was purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation (30-60% saturation), and further by FPLC (mono-Q ionic exchange and Phenyl Superose hydrophobic interaction) and HPLC (C-18 reversed-phase). This bacteriocin loses its activity after incubation at a pH below 7.0 or above 8.0, following heating for 30 min at 45 degrees C, and after treatment with proteolytic enzymes such as trypsin, alpha-chymotrypsin, and papain. Actinomycetemcomitin has a molecular mass of 20.3 KDa and it represents a new bacteriocin from A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  17. Stability of the JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Haubek, D; Ennibi, O-K; Vaeth, M; Poulsen, S; Poulsen, K

    2009-09-01

    The JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is strongly associated with aggressive periodontitis. To obtain information about colonization dynamics of the JP2 clone, we used PCR to examine its presence in 365 Moroccan juveniles from whom periodontal plaque samples were collected at baseline and after one and two years. Periodontal attachment loss was measured at baseline and at the two-year follow-up. At baseline, 43 (12%) carriers of the JP2 clone were found. Nearly half (44 %) of these were persistently colonized with the clone. The relative risk for the development of aggressive periodontitis, adjusted for the concomitant presence of other genotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans, was highest for individuals continuously infected by the JP2 clone (RR = 13.9; 95% CI, 9.0 to 21.4), indicating a relationship between infectious dose and disease, which further substantiates the evidence for the JP2 clone as a causal factor in aggressive periodontitis.

  18. Pathogenicity of the highly leukotoxic JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and its geographic dissemination and role in aggressive periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Haubek, Dorte; Johansson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    For decades, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has been associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis in adolescents. In the middle of the 1990s, a specific JP2 clone of A. actinomycetemcomitans, belonging to the cluster of serotype b strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans and having a number of other characteristics, was found to be strongly associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis, particularly in North Africa. Although several longitudinal studies still point to the bacterial species, A. actinomycetemcomitans as a risk factor of aggressive periodontitis, it is now also widely accepted that the highly leukotoxic JP2 clone of A. actinomycetemcomitans is implicated in rapidly progressing forms of aggressive periodontitis. The JP2 clone strains are highly prevalent in human populations living in Northern and Western parts of Africa. These strains are also prevalent in geographically widespread populations that have originated from the Northwest Africa. Only sporadic signs of a dissemination of the JP2 clone strains to non-African populations have been found despite Africans living geographically widespread for hundreds of years. It remains an unanswered question if a particular host tropism exists as a possible explanation for the frequent colonization of the Northwest African population with the JP2 clone. Two exotoxins of A. actinomycetemcomitans are known, leukotoxin (LtxA) and cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt). LtxA is able to kill human immune cells, and Cdt can block cell cycle progression in eukaryotic cells and thus induce cell cycle arrest. Whereas the leukotoxin production is enhanced in JP2 clone strains thus increasing the virulence potential of A. actinomycetemcomitans, it has not been possible so far to demonstrate such a role for Cdt. Lines of evidence have led to the understanding of the highly leukotoxic JP2 clone of A. actinomycetemcomitans as an aetiological factor of aggressive periodontitis. Patients, who are colonized with the JP2

  19. Pathogenicity of the highly leukotoxic JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and its geographic dissemination and role in aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Haubek, Dorte; Johansson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    For decades, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has been associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis in adolescents. In the middle of the 1990s, a specific JP2 clone of A. actinomycetemcomitans, belonging to the cluster of serotype b strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans and having a number of other characteristics, was found to be strongly associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis, particularly in North Africa. Although several longitudinal studies still point to the bacterial species, A. actinomycetemcomitans as a risk factor of aggressive periodontitis, it is now also widely accepted that the highly leukotoxic JP2 clone of A. actinomycetemcomitans is implicated in rapidly progressing forms of aggressive periodontitis. The JP2 clone strains are highly prevalent in human populations living in Northern and Western parts of Africa. These strains are also prevalent in geographically widespread populations that have originated from the Northwest Africa. Only sporadic signs of a dissemination of the JP2 clone strains to non-African populations have been found despite Africans living geographically widespread for hundreds of years. It remains an unanswered question if a particular host tropism exists as a possible explanation for the frequent colonization of the Northwest African population with the JP2 clone. Two exotoxins of A. actinomycetemcomitans are known, leukotoxin (LtxA) and cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt). LtxA is able to kill human immune cells, and Cdt can block cell cycle progression in eukaryotic cells and thus induce cell cycle arrest. Whereas the leukotoxin production is enhanced in JP2 clone strains thus increasing the virulence potential of A. actinomycetemcomitans, it has not been possible so far to demonstrate such a role for Cdt. Lines of evidence have led to the understanding of the highly leukotoxic JP2 clone of A. actinomycetemcomitans as an aetiological factor of aggressive periodontitis. Patients, who are colonized with the JP2

  20. Azithromycin kills invasive Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in gingival epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lai, Pin-Chuang; Walters, John D

    2013-03-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans invades periodontal pocket epithelium and is therefore difficult to eliminate by periodontal scaling and root planing. It is susceptible to azithromycin, which is taken up by many types of mammalian cells. This led us to hypothesize that azithromycin accumulation by gingival epithelium could enhance the killing of intraepithelial A. actinomycetemcomitans. [(3)H]azithromycin transport by Smulow-Glickman gingival epithelial cells and SCC-25 oral epithelial cells was characterized. To test our hypothesis, we infected cultured Smulow-Glickman cell monolayers with A. actinomycetemcomitans (Y4 or SUNY 465 strain) for 2 h, treated them with gentamicin to eliminate extracellular bacteria, and then incubated them with azithromycin for 1 to 4 h. Viable intracellular bacteria were released, plated, and enumerated. Azithromycin transport by both cell lines exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics and was competitively inhibited by l-carnitine and several other organic cations. Cell incubation in medium containing 5 μg/ml azithromycin yielded steady-state intracellular concentrations of 144 μg/ml in SCC-25 cells and 118 μg/ml in Smulow-Glickman cells. Azithromycin induced dose- and time-dependent intraepithelial killing of both A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. Treatment of infected Smulow-Glickman cells with 0.125 μg/ml azithromycin killed approximately 29% of the intraepithelial CFU of both strains within 4 h, while treatment with 8 μg/ml azithromycin killed ≥82% of the CFU of both strains (P < 0.05). Addition of carnitine inhibited the killing of intracellular bacteria by azithromycin (P < 0.05). Thus, human gingival epithelial cells actively accumulate azithromycin through a transport system that facilitates the killing of intraepithelial A. actinomycetemcomitans and is shared with organic cations.

  1. Association of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin with nucleic acids on the bacterial cell surface.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, H; Hara, H; Fukui, K; Kurihara, H; Murayama, Y; Kato, K

    1993-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, a periodontopathic gram-negative bacterium, produces a leukotoxin that is a member of the RTX cytotoxin family. Although genes may function in toxin secretion, the leukotoxin is not secreted extracellularly but remains associated with the bacterial cell surface. We report here that this toxin-cell surface association is mediated by nucleic acids and directly demonstrate that the extracellular secretion of toxin occurs in growing cultures with increased ionic strength of medium. All examinations were performed with freshly harvested A. actinomycetemcomitans 301-b from anaerobic fructose-limited chemostat cultures. The occurrence of cell surface-localized DNA was shown by directly digesting whole cells with the restriction endonuclease EcoRI or HindIII, which yielded many DNA fragments. The cell surface DNA constituted about 20% of the total cellular DNA. The leukotoxin was released from the whole cells by digestion with DNase I as well as restriction endonucleases. Because the leukotoxin binds ionically to DNA, it is dependent on the ionic strength of buffers or media. Accordingly, the toxin was released from cells suspended in saline at pH 7.5 in the presence of increasing amounts of MgCl2 (0 to 10 mM) or NaCl (0 to 50 mM). Moreover, a considerable quantity of leukotoxin was detected in the culture supernatant of fructose-limited chemostat cultures when sodium succinate solution was pumped into the steady state as an additional salt (30 and then 50 mM). This toxin-DNA association was also found in well-characterized strains including not only the leukotoxin-producing ATCC 29522 but also the toxin production-variable ATCC 29523 and the non-leukotoxin-producing ATCC 33384 when these strains were grown in the chemostat culture. Images PMID:8406888

  2. cis Elements and trans factors are both important in strain-specific regulation of the leukotoxin gene in Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Kolodrubetz, D; Spitznagel, J; Wang, B; Phillips, L H; Jacobs, C; Kraig, E

    1996-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, the etiologic agent of localized juvenile periodontitis, produces a potent leukotoxin that kills human neutrophils. The production of leukotoxin RNA can vary more than 50-fold among isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans, and strains expressing high levels of leukotoxin RNA are most often found at sites of periodontal disease. To assess the relative contributions of transcription factors and promoter sequences in setting the disparate levels of leukotoxin RNA found, we have undertaken classical cis/trans analyses. First, the leukotoxin promoter regions from moderately leukotoxic (Y4) and minimally leukotoxic (ATCC 33384) strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans were cloned, sequenced, and compared with the previously sequences leukotoxin promoter region of the high-producer strain JP2. The Y4 and ATCC 33384 promoter regions each contain a 528-bp segment that is absent from JP2. Interestingly, the analysis of various deletion constructs in A. actinomycetemcomitans indicated that Y4, despite the large insertion, initiates leukotoxin RNA synthesis at the same promoter as JP2 does. To perform cis/trans analyses, these three leukotoxin promoter regions were cloned into a plasmid upstream of the reporter gene beta-galactosidase. Each plasmid was transformed into JP2, Y4, and ATCC 33384, and the beta-galactosidase levels were determined. The results indicated that the sequences responsible for down-regulating leukotoxin RNA levels in Y4 relative to JP2 are found within the transcribed region of the Y4 leukotoxin operon. Importantly, in ATCC 33384, strain-specific trans factors and promoter sequence differences are equally significant in determining the lower levels of leukotoxin RNA. We hypothesize that either strain ATCC 33384 has a negative regulatory protein (which is missing or mutated in JP2/Y4) or that JP2 and Y4 carry an activator that is missing or mutated in ATCC 33384. PMID:8751884

  3. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide affects human gingival fibroblast cytoskeletal organization.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Contreras-Marmolejo, Luis Arturo; Román-Alvárez, Patricia; Barajas-Torres, Carolina

    2008-04-01

    The cytoskeleton is a dynamic structure that plays a key role in maintaining cell morphology and function. This study investigates the effect of bacterial wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a strong inflammatory agent, on the dynamics and organization of actin, tubulin, vimentin, and vinculin proteins in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). A time-dependent study showed a noticeable change in actin architecture after 1.5 h of incubation with LPS (1 microg/ml) with the formation of orthogonal fibers and further accumulation of actin filament at the cell periphery by 24 h. When 0.01-10 microg/ml of LPS was added to human gingival fibroblast cultures, cells acquired a round, flat shape and gradually developed cytoplasmic ruffling. Lipopolysaccharides extracted from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans periodontopathogenic bacteria promoted alterations in F-actin stress fibres of human gingival cells. Normally, human gingival cells have F-actin fibres that are organized in linear distribution throughout the cells, extending along the cell's length. LPS-treated cells exhibited changes in cytoskeletal protein organization, and F-actin was reorganized by the formation of bundles underneath and parallel to the cell membrane. We also found the reorganization of the vimentin network into vimentin bundling after 1.5 h of treatment. HGF cells exhibited diffuse and granular gamma-tubulin stain. There was no change in LPS-treated HGF. However, vinculin plaques distributed in the cell body diminished after LPS treatment. We conclude that the dynamic and structured organization of cytoskeletal filaments and actin assembly in human gingival fibroblasts is altered by LPS treatment and is accompanied by a decrease in F-actin pools.

  4. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans induces Th17 cells in atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ru; Hashizume-Takizawa, Tomomi; Du, Yuan; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko

    2015-04-01

    Th17 cells have been linked to the pathogenesis of several chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. However, the role of Th17 cells and IL-17 in atherosclerosis remains poorly understood. We previously reported that Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) bacteremia accelerated atherosclerosis accompanied by inflammation in apolipoprotein E-deficient spontaneously hyperlipidemic (Apoe(shl)) mice. In this study, we investigated whether Aa promotes the Th17 inducing pathway in Aa-challenged Apoe(shl) mice. Mice were intravenously injected with live Aa HK1651 or vehicles. Time-course analysis of splenic IL-17(+)CD4(+) cell frequencies, the proximal aorta lesion area, serum IL-17, IL-6, TGF-β and IL-1β levels, the mRNA expression of Th17-related molecules such as IL-1β, IL-6, IL17RA, STAT3, IL-21, IL-23, TGF-β and RORγt, Th17-related microRNA levels and the levels of AIM-2, Mincle and NLRP3 were examined. Challenge with Aa time dependently induced tropism of Th17 cells in the spleen and increase in atheromatous lesions in the aortic sinus of Apoe(shl) mice. Serum IL-17, IL-6, TGF-β and IL-1β levels were significantly enhanced by Aa. The gene expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17RA, IL-21, IL-23, TGF-β, STAT3, RORγt, AIM-2, Mincle and NLRP3 was also time dependently stimulated in the aorta of Aa-challenged mice. Furthermore, Aa challenge significantly increased the expression of miR-146b and miR-155 in the aorta. Based on the results, it seems that Aa stimulates Th17 induction that affects the progression of Aa-accelerated atherosclerosis.

  5. Nuclease-sensitive binding of an Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin to the bacterial cell surface.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, H; Kato, K; Kokeguchi, S; Hara, H; Fukui, K; Murayama, Y

    1991-01-01

    A leukotoxin of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans 301-b was solubilized from cell-associated membrane vesicles by treatment with externally added DNase and RNase and was further purified by a procedure which included ammonium sulfate fractionation, gel filtration chromatography, and ion-exchange chromatography. The purified toxin had a molecular mass of 113,000 Da by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and a high isoelectric point (approximately 8.8). From these characteristics, it was to be expected that the membrane vesicle toxin was almost identical to the leukotoxin extracted with polymyxin B in an earlier study (C.-C. Tsai, B. J. Shenker, J. M. DiRienzo, D. Malamud, and N. S. Taichman, Infect, Immun. 43:700-705, 1984). The treatment with DNase and RNase was also highly effective for solubilizing the leukotoxin directly from whole cells, suggesting that the toxin is secreted extracellularly but retained in nucleic acids on the outermost surface of bacterial cells. Images PMID:1937819

  6. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Invasion Induces Interleukin-1β Production Through Reactive Oxygen Species and Cathepsin B.

    PubMed

    Okinaga, Toshinori; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Nishihara, Tatsuji

    2015-06-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) cytokines, IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-18 play a crucial role in inflammatory responses in a variety of diseases including periodontitis. In this study, the periodontopathic bacterial pathogen, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, induced cell death and cytokine release in macrophages. Cell viability was reduced by A. actinomycetemcomitans invasion using (3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The production of IL-1β in A. actinomycetemcomitans-invaded macrophage cells was detected by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Treatment with a caspase-1 inhibitor and silencing of the caspase-1 gene had no effect on IL-1β secretion induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans invasion. Pattern recognition receptor, NLRP3 was upregulated in A. actinomycetemcomitans-invaded macrophages. However, NLRP3 knockdown had no effect on the secretion of IL-1β in A. actinomycetemcomitans-invaded RAW 264 cells. In addition, A. actinomycetemcomitans invasion induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the release of cathepsin B in RAW 264 cells. Interestingly, CA074-Me, a cathepsin B inhibitor, and N-Acetyl-l-cysteine, a ROS inhibitor, prevented the production of IL-1β induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans. Taken together, these results suggest A. actinomycetemcomitans induce IL-1β production in RAW 264 cells through the production of ROS and cathepsin B, but not through the NLRP3/caspase-1 pathway.

  7. Differential regulation of the leukotoxin operon in highly leukotoxic and minimally leukotoxic strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Hritz, M; Fisher, E; Demuth, D R

    1996-01-01

    The expression of the leukotoxin (ltx) operon varies significantly among Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strains. The dual promoters driving ltx expression in the highly toxic strain JP2 have been previously characterized (J. M. Brogan, E. T. Lally, K. Poulsen, M. Kilian, and D. R. Demuth, Infect. Immun. 62:501-508, 1994), and genetic analyses of A. actinomycetemcomitans suggest that highly toxic strains like JP2 arose from minimally toxic strains, presumably by deletion of a 530-bp domain within the ltx promoter region (K. Poulsen, E. Theilade, E.T. Lally, D. R. Demuth, and M. Kilian, Microbiology 140:2049-2060, 1994). However, the ltx promoter of minimally toxic A. actinomycetemcomitans strains has not been well characterized. In this study, deletion and primer extension analyses showed that the ltx promoter of A. actinomycetemcomitans 652 is situated approximately 150 bp upstream of the ltxC gene and initiates transcription 138 nucleotides upstream of ltxC. In contrast to strain JP2, only a single promoter appears to drive ltx expression in 652. The 652 promoter resides within the 530-bp region that is absent from the JP2 promoter sequence, suggesting that the specific sequences controlling ltx expression differ in highly toxic and minimally toxic A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. In addition, ltx expression in strain 652 was shown to be induced three- to fourfold when cells were grown under anaerobic conditions. The induction of whole cell leukotoxicity, was accompanied by increases in the levels of Ltx polypeptide and the steady-state levels of ltx mRNA, suggesting that regulation occurred at the level of transcription. In contrast, the levels of leukotoxicity, Ltx polypeptide, and fix mRNA in strain JP2 were unaffected by anaerobic growth. These results suggest that the ltx operon is differentially regulated in highly toxic and minimally toxic A. actinomycetemcomitans strains and that the sequences controlling the oxygen-dependent regulation of ltx

  8. Phenotypic changes in nonfimbriated smooth strains of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans grown in low-humidity solid medium.

    PubMed

    Pei, Zhenhua; Niu, Zhongying; Shi, Shenggen; Shi, Liang; Tang, Chuhua

    2013-04-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is the primary etiologic agent of localized aggressive periodontitis. In vitro, it can undergo fimbriated rough to nonfimbriated smooth phenotypic transition, accompanied by an increase in invasive ability and a decrease in adhesive ability. No opposite direction phenotypic transition was reported. To better understand its pathogenicity, the authors studied the morphological changes of nonfimbriated smooth strains induced by growth environmental humidity. Transmission electron microscopy was used to identify fimbriae expression change. It was found that the lower medium humidity, the more fimbriae reexpressed. In conclusion, the smooth strain of A. actinomycetemcomitans can reexpress the fimbriae in lower humidity environment.

  9. Sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase activation with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans causes inflammatory bone loss.

    PubMed

    Dunmyer, J; Herbert, B; Li, Q; Zinna, R; Martin, K; Yu, H; Kirkwood, K L

    2012-10-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a gram-negative facultative capnophile involved in pathogenesis of aggressive forms of periodontal disease. In the present study, we interrogated the ability of A. actinomycetemcomitans to stimulate innate immune signaling and cytokine production and established that A. actinomycetemcomitans causes bone loss in a novel rat calvarial model. In vitro studies indicated that A. actinomycetemcomitans stimulated considerable production of soluble cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and interleukin-10 in both primary bone marrow-derived macrophages and NR8383 macrophages. Immunoblot analysis indicated that A. actinomycetemcomitans exhibits sustained activation of all major mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, as well as the negative regulator of MAPK signaling, MAPK phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), for at least 8 h. In a rat calvarial model of inflammatory bone loss, high and low doses of formalin-fixed A. actinomycetemcomitans were microinjected into the supraperiosteal calvarial space for 1-2 weeks. Histological staining and micro-computed tomography of rat calvariae revealed a significant increase of inflammatory and fibroblast infiltrate and increased bone resorption as measured by total lacunar pit formation. From these data, we provide new evidence that fixed whole cell A. actinomycetemcomitans stimulation elicits a pro-inflammatory host response through sustained MAPK signaling, leading to enhanced bone resorption within the rat calvarial bone.

  10. Porphyromonas gingivalis gingipain is involved in the detachment and aggregation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilm.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, A; Miura, M; Fujise, O; Hamachi, T; Nishimura, F

    2014-06-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans are major periodontal pathogens that cause several types of periodontal disease. Our previous study suggested that P. gingivalis gingipains secreted in the subgingival environment are related to the detachment of A.actinomycetemcomitans biofilms. However, it remains unclear whether arginine-specific cysteine proteinase (Rgp) and lysine-specific proteinase (Kgp) play different roles in the detachment of A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilm. The aim of this study was to investigate possible disruptive roles of Kgp and Rgp in the aggregation and attachment of A. actinomycetemcomitans. While P. gingivalis ATCC33277 culture supernatant has an ability to decrease autoaggregation and coaggregation of A. actinomycetemcomitans cells, neither the boiled culture supernatant of ATCC33277 nor the culture supernatant of KDP136 showed this ability. The addition of KYT-1 and KYT-36, specific inhibitors of Rgp and Kgp, respectively, showed no influence on the ability of P. gingivalis culture supernatant. The result of gelatin zymography suggested that other proteases processed by gingipains mediated the decrease of A. actinomycetemcomitans aggregations. We also examined the biofilm-destructive effect of gingipains by assessing the detachment of A. actinomycetemcomitans from polystyrene surfaces. Scanning electron microscope analysis indicated that A. actinomycetemcomitans cells were detached by P. gingivalis Kgp. The quantity of A. actinomycetemcomitans in biofilm was decreased in co-culture with P. gingivalis. However, this was not found after the addition of KYT-36. These findings suggest that Kgp is a critical component for the detachment and decrease of A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilms.

  11. In vitro efficacy of diallyl sulfides against the periodontopathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Velliyagounder, Kabilan; Ganeshnarayan, Krishnaraj; Velusamy, Senthil Kumar; Fine, Daniel H

    2012-05-01

    The in vitro antibacterial effects of diallyl sulfide (DAS) against the Gram-negative periodontopathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, the key etiologic agent of the severe form of localized aggressive periodontitis and other nonoral infections, were studied. A. actinomycetemcomitans was treated with garlic extract, allicin, or DAS, and the anti-A. actinomycetemcomitans effects of the treatment were evaluated. Garlic extract, allicin, and DAS significantly inhibited the growth of A. actinomycetemcomitans (greater than 3 log; P < 0.01) compared to control cells. Heat inactivation of the garlic extracts significantly reduced the protein concentration; however, the antimicrobial effect was retained. Purified proteins from garlic extract did not exhibit antimicrobial activity. Allicin lost all its antimicrobial effect when it was subjected to heat treatment, whereas DAS demonstrated an antimicrobial effect similar to that of the garlic extract, suggesting that the antimicrobial activity of garlic extract is mainly due to DAS. An A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilm-killing assay performed with DAS showed a significant reduction in biofilm cell numbers, as evidenced by both confocal microscopy and culture. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of DAS-treated A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilms showed alterations of colony architecture indicating severe stress. Flow cytometry analysis of OBA9 cells did not demonstrate apoptosis or cell cycle arrest at therapeutic concentrations of DAS (0.01 and 0.1 μg/ml). DAS-treated A. actinomycetemcomitans cells demonstrated complete inhibition of glutathione (GSH) S-transferase (GST) activity. However, OBA9 cells, when exposed to DAS at similar concentrations, showed no significant differences in GST activity, suggesting that DAS-induced GST inhibition might be involved in A. actinomycetemcomitans cell death. These findings demonstrate that DAS exhibits significant antibacterial activity against A. actinomycetemcomitans and

  12. In Vitro Efficacy of Diallyl Sulfides against the Periodontopathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Ganeshnarayan, Krishnaraj; Velusamy, Senthil Kumar; Fine, Daniel H.

    2012-01-01

    The in vitro antibacterial effects of diallyl sulfide (DAS) against the Gram-negative periodontopathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, the key etiologic agent of the severe form of localized aggressive periodontitis and other nonoral infections, were studied. A. actinomycetemcomitans was treated with garlic extract, allicin, or DAS, and the anti-A. actinomycetemcomitans effects of the treatment were evaluated. Garlic extract, allicin, and DAS significantly inhibited the growth of A. actinomycetemcomitans (greater than 3 log; P < 0.01) compared to control cells. Heat inactivation of the garlic extracts significantly reduced the protein concentration; however, the antimicrobial effect was retained. Purified proteins from garlic extract did not exhibit antimicrobial activity. Allicin lost all its antimicrobial effect when it was subjected to heat treatment, whereas DAS demonstrated an antimicrobial effect similar to that of the garlic extract, suggesting that the antimicrobial activity of garlic extract is mainly due to DAS. An A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilm-killing assay performed with DAS showed a significant reduction in biofilm cell numbers, as evidenced by both confocal microscopy and culture. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of DAS-treated A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilms showed alterations of colony architecture indicating severe stress. Flow cytometry analysis of OBA9 cells did not demonstrate apoptosis or cell cycle arrest at therapeutic concentrations of DAS (0.01 and 0.1 μg/ml). DAS-treated A. actinomycetemcomitans cells demonstrated complete inhibition of glutathione (GSH) S-transferase (GST) activity. However, OBA9 cells, when exposed to DAS at similar concentrations, showed no significant differences in GST activity, suggesting that DAS-induced GST inhibition might be involved in A. actinomycetemcomitans cell death. These findings demonstrate that DAS exhibits significant antibacterial activity against A. actinomycetemcomitans and

  13. Comparative genomic hybridization and transcriptome analysis with a pan-genome microarray reveal distinctions between JP2 and non-JP2 genotypes of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Kittichotirat, W; Mayer, M P A; Hall, R; Bumgarner, R; Chen, C

    2013-02-01

    It was postulated that the highly virulent JP2 genotype of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans may possess a constellation of distinct virulence determinants not found in non-JP2 genotypes. This study compared the genome content and the transcriptome of the serotype b JP2 genotype and the closely related serotype b non-JP2 genotype of A. actinomycetemcomitans. A custom-designed pan-genomic microarray of A. actinomycetemcomitans was constructed and validated against a panel of 11 sequenced reference strains. The microarray was subsequently used for comparative genomic hybridization of serotype b strains of JP2 (six strains) and non-JP2 (six strains) genotypes, and for transcriptome analysis of strains of JP2 (three strains) and non-JP2 (two strains). Two JP2-specific and two non-JP2-specific genomic islands were identified. In one instance, distinct genomic islands were found to be inserted into the same locus among strains of different genotypes. Transcriptome analysis identified five operons, including the leukotoxin operon, to have at least two genes with an expression ratio of 2 or greater between genotypes. Two of the differentially expressed operons were members of the membrane-bound nitrate reductase system (nap operon) and the Tol-Pal system of gram-negative bacterial species. This study is the first to demonstrate the differences in the full genome content and gene expression between A. actinomycetemcomitans strains of JP2 and non-JP2 genotypes. The information is essential for designing hypothesis-driven experiments to examine the pathogenic mechanisms of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  14. Quantitative proteomics reveal distinct protein regulations caused by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans within subgingival biofilms.

    PubMed

    Bao, Kai; Bostanci, Nagihan; Selevsek, Nathalie; Thurnheer, Thomas; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious disease that causes the inflammatory destruction of the tooth-supporting (periodontal) tissues, caused by polymicrobial biofilm communities growing on the tooth surface. Aggressive periodontitis is strongly associated with the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in the subgingival biofilms. Nevertheless, whether and how A. actinomycetemcomitans orchestrates molecular changes within the biofilm is unclear. The aim of this work was to decipher the interactions between A. actinomycetemcomitans and other bacterial species in a multi-species biofilm using proteomic analysis. An in vitro 10-species "subgingival" biofilm model, or its derivative that included additionally A. actinomycetemcomitans, were anaerobically cultivated on hydroxyapatite discs for 64 h. When present, A. actinomycetemcomitans formed dense intra-species clumps within the biofilm mass, and did not affect the numbers of the other species in the biofilm. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify the proteomic content of the biofilm lysate. A total of 3225 and 3352 proteins were identified in the biofilm, in presence or absence of A. actinomycetemcomitans, respectively. Label-free quantitative proteomics revealed that 483 out of the 728 quantified bacterial proteins (excluding those of A. actinomycetemcomitans) were accordingly regulated. Interestingly, all quantified proteins from Prevotella intermedia were up-regulated, and most quantified proteins from Campylobacter rectus, Streptococcus anginosus, and Porphyromonas gingivalis were down-regulated in presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Enrichment of Gene Ontology pathway analysis showed that the regulated groups of proteins were responsible primarily for changes in the metabolic rate, the ferric iron-binding, and the 5S RNA binding capacities, on the universal biofilm level. While the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans did not affect the numeric composition or absolute protein

  15. Quantitative Proteomics Reveal Distinct Protein Regulations Caused by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans within Subgingival Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Kai; Bostanci, Nagihan; Selevsek, Nathalie; Thurnheer, Thomas; Belibasakis, Georgios N.

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious disease that causes the inflammatory destruction of the tooth-supporting (periodontal) tissues, caused by polymicrobial biofilm communities growing on the tooth surface. Aggressive periodontitis is strongly associated with the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in the subgingival biofilms. Nevertheless, whether and how A. actinomycetemcomitans orchestrates molecular changes within the biofilm is unclear. The aim of this work was to decipher the interactions between A. actinomycetemcomitans and other bacterial species in a multi-species biofilm using proteomic analysis. An in vitro 10-species “subgingival” biofilm model, or its derivative that included additionally A. actinomycetemcomitans, were anaerobically cultivated on hydroxyapatite discs for 64 h. When present, A. actinomycetemcomitans formed dense intra-species clumps within the biofilm mass, and did not affect the numbers of the other species in the biofilm. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify the proteomic content of the biofilm lysate. A total of 3225 and 3352 proteins were identified in the biofilm, in presence or absence of A. actinomycetemcomitans, respectively. Label-free quantitative proteomics revealed that 483 out of the 728 quantified bacterial proteins (excluding those of A. actinomycetemcomitans) were accordingly regulated. Interestingly, all quantified proteins from Prevotella intermedia were up-regulated, and most quantified proteins from Campylobacter rectus, Streptococcus anginosus, and Porphyromonas gingivalis were down-regulated in presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Enrichment of Gene Ontology pathway analysis showed that the regulated groups of proteins were responsible primarily for changes in the metabolic rate, the ferric iron-binding, and the 5S RNA binding capacities, on the universal biofilm level. While the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans did not affect the numeric composition or absolute

  16. Mature Biofilm Degradation by Potential Probiotics: Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans versus Lactobacillus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Kouhei; Okinaga, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    The biofilm degradation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is essential as a complete periodontal disease therapy, and here we show the effects of potential probiotic bacteria such as Lactobacillus spp. for the biofilm of several serotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. Eight of the 13 species showed the competent biofilm degradation of ≥ 90% reduction in biofilm values in A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 (serotype b) as well as four of the seven species for the biofilm of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMZ 534 (serotype e). In contrast, the probiotic bacteria did not have a big impact for the degradation of A. actinomycetemcomitans SUNY 75 (serotype a) biofilm. The dispersed A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 cells through the biofilm detachment were still viable and plausible factors for the biofilm degradation were not due to the lactic acid and low pH conditions. The three enzymes, protease, lipase, and amylase may be responsible for the biofilm degradation; in particular, lipase was the most effective enzyme for the biofilm degradation of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 along with the protease activity which should be also important for the other serotypes. Remarkable lipase enzyme activities were detected from some of the potential probiotics and a supporting result using a lipase inhibitor presented corroborating evidence that lipase activity is one of the contributing factors for biofilm degradation outside of the protease which is also another possible factor for the biofilm of the other serotype of A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. On the other hand, the biofilm of A. actinomycetemcomitans SUNY 75 (serotype a) was not powerfully degraded by the lipase enzyme because the lipase inhibitor was slightly functional for only two of potential probiotics. PMID:27438340

  17. Antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilms associated with peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Kadkhoda, Zeinab; Amarlu, Zeinab; Eshraghi, Saeed; Samiei, Nazanin

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to assessthe antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine (CHX) on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilms isolated from subgingival plaque of peri-implantitis lesions. Methods. Thirteen patients requiring peri-implantitis treatment were consecutively selected and their subgingival biofilm was collected by inserting fine sterile paper points into peri-implant pockets for 15 seconds. A. actinomycetemcomitans was isolated from the subgingival biofilm and cultured. In this study, the standard strain of A. actinomycetemcomitans served as the positive control group and a blank disc impregnated with water served as the negative control; 0.1 mL of the bacterial suspension was cultured on specific culture medium and blank discs (6 mm in diameter) impregnated with 0.2%CHX mouthrinse (Behsa Pharmaceutical Co.) and negative control discs were placed on two sides of the bacterial culture plate. The size of growth inhibition zone was measured by a blinded independent observer in millimetres. Results. According to the results of disc diffusion test, the mean diameter of growth inhibition zone of A. actinomycetemcomitans around discs impregnated with CHX was larger in both standard (positive control) and biofilm samples of A. actinomycetemcomitans compared to the negative control group (blank disc) (P<0.001). Conclusion . Use of0.2% CHX mouthwash had antibacterial effects on A. actinomycetemcomitans species isolated from peri-implantitis sites.

  18. Antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilms associated with peri-implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Kadkhoda, Zeinab; Amarlu, Zeinab; Eshraghi, Saeed; Samiei, Nazanin

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to assessthe antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine (CHX) on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilms isolated from subgingival plaque of peri-implantitis lesions. Methods. Thirteen patients requiring peri-implantitis treatment were consecutively selected and their subgingival biofilm was collected by inserting fine sterile paper points into peri-implant pockets for 15 seconds. A. actinomycetemcomitans was isolated from the subgingival biofilm and cultured. In this study, the standard strain of A. actinomycetemcomitans served as the positive control group and a blank disc impregnated with water served as the negative control; 0.1 mL of the bacterial suspension was cultured on specific culture medium and blank discs (6 mm in diameter) impregnated with 0.2%CHX mouthrinse (Behsa Pharmaceutical Co.) and negative control discs were placed on two sides of the bacterial culture plate. The size of growth inhibition zone was measured by a blinded independent observer in millimetres. Results. According to the results of disc diffusion test, the mean diameter of growth inhibition zone of A. actinomycetemcomitans around discs impregnated with CHX was larger in both standard (positive control) and biofilm samples of A. actinomycetemcomitans compared to the negative control group (blank disc) (P<0.001). Conclusion. Use of0.2% CHX mouthwash had antibacterial effects on A. actinomycetemcomitans species isolated from peri-implantitis sites. PMID:27651884

  19. Diverse Toll-like receptors mediate cytokine production by Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Park, Se-Ra; Kim, Dong-Jae; Han, Seung-Hyun; Kang, Min-Jung; Lee, Jun-Young; Jeong, Yu-Jin; Lee, Sang-Jin; Kim, Tae-Hyoun; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Park, Jong-Hwan

    2014-05-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) orchestrate a repertoire of immune responses in macrophages against various pathogens. Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans are two important periodontal pathogens. In the present study, we investigated TLR signaling regulating cytokine production of macrophages in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans. TLR2 and TLR4 are redundant in the production of cytokines (interleukin-6 [IL-6] and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) in F. nucleatum- and A. actinomycetemcomitans-infected macrophages. The production of cytokines by macrophages in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans infection was impaired in MyD88-deficient macrophages. Moreover, cytokine concentrations were lower in MyD88-deficient macrophages than in TLR2/TLR4 (TLR2/4) double-deficient cells. An endosomal TLR inhibitor, chloroquine, reduced cytokine production in TLR2/4-deficient macrophages in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans, and DNA from F. nucleatum or A. actinomycetemcomitans induced IL-6 production in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs), which was abolished by chloroquine. Western blot analysis revealed that TLR2/4 and MyD88 were required for optimal activation of NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in macrophages in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans, with different kinetics. An inhibitor assay showed that NF-κB and all MAPKs (p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase [ERK], and Jun N-terminal protein kinase [JNK]) mediate F. nucleatum-induced production of cytokines in macrophages, whereas NF-κB and p38, but not ERK and JNK, are involved in A. actinomycetemcomitans-mediated cytokine production. These findings suggest that multiple TLRs may participate in the cytokine production of macrophages against periodontal bacteria.

  20. NADPH Oxidase Contributes to Resistance against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-Induced Periodontitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bast, Antje; Kubis, Helen; Holtfreter, Birte; Ribback, Silvia; Martin, Heiner; Schreiner, Helen C; Dominik, Malte J; Breitbach, Katrin; Dombrowski, Frank; Kocher, Thomas; Steinmetz, Ivo

    2017-02-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a Gram-negative commensal bacterium of the oral cavity which has been associated with the pathogenesis of periodontitis with severe alveolar bone destruction. The role of host factors such as reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates in periodontal A. actinomycetemcomitans infection and progression to periodontitis is still ill-defined. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze the role of NADPH oxidase and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in a murine model of A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced periodontitis. NADPH oxidase-deficient (gp91(phox) knockout [KO]), iNOS-deficient (iNOS KO), and C57BL/6 wild-type mice were orally infected with A. actinomycetemcomitans and analyzed for bacterial colonization at various time points. Alveolar bone mineral density and alveolar bone volume were quantified by three-dimensional micro-computed tomography, and the degree of tissue inflammation was calculated by histological analyses. At 5 weeks after infection, A. actinomycetemcomitans persisted at significantly higher levels in the murine oral cavities of infected gp91(phox) KO mice than in those of iNOS KO and C57BL/6 mice. Concomitantly, alveolar bone mineral density was significantly lower in all three infected groups than in uninfected controls, but with the highest loss of bone density in infected gp91(phox) KO mice. Only infected gp91(phox) KO mice revealed significant loss of alveolar bone volume and enhanced inflammatory cell infiltration, as well as an increased number of osteoclasts. Our results indicate that NADPH oxidase is important to control A. actinomycetemcomitans infection in the murine oral cavity and to prevent subsequent alveolar bone destruction and osteoclastogenesis.

  1. Human Serum-Specific Activation of Alternative Sigma Factors, the Stress Responders in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Tang-Siegel, Gaoyan; Bumgarner, Roger; Ruiz, Teresa; Kittichotirat, Weerayuth; Chen, Weizhen; Chen, Casey

    2016-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a known pathogen causing periodontal disease and infective endocarditis, is a survivor in the periodontal pocket and blood stream; both environments contain serum as a nutrient source. To screen for unknown virulence factors associated with this microorganism, A. actinomycetemcomitans was grown in serum-based media to simulate its in vivo environment. Different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans showed distinct growth phenotypes only in the presence of human serum, and they were grouped into high- and low-responder groups. High-responders comprised mainly serotype c strains, and showed an unusual growth phenomenon, featuring a second, rapid increase in turbidity after 9-h incubation that reached a final optical density 2- to 7-fold higher than low-responders. Upon further investigation, the second increase in turbidity was not caused by cell multiplication, but by cell death. Whole transcriptomic analysis via RNA-seq identified 35 genes that were up-regulated by human serum, but not horse serum, in high-responders but not in low-responders, including prominently an alternative sigma factor rpoE (σE). A lacZ reporter construct driven by the 132-bp rpoE promoter sequence of A. actinomycetemcomitans responded dramatically to human serum within 90 min of incubation only when the construct was carried by a high responder strain. The rpoE promoter is 100% identical among high- and low-responder strains. Proteomic investigation showed potential interactions between human serum protein, e.g. apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) and A. actinomycetemcomitans. The data clearly indicated a different activation process for rpoE in high- versus low-responder strains. This differential human serum-specific activation of rpoE, a putative extra-cytoplasmic stress responder and global regulator, suggests distinct in vivo adaptations among different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:27490177

  2. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans arcB influences hydrophobic properties, biofilm formation and adhesion to hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Longo, PL; Ota-Tsuzuki, C; Nunes, ACR; Fernandes, BL; Mintz, K; Fives-Taylor, P; Mayer, MPA

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression in the oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is still not fully elucidated. ArcAB is a two-component system which allows facultative anaerobic bacteria to sense various respiratory growth conditions and adapt their gene expression accordingly.This study investigated in A. actinomycetemcomitans the role of ArcB on the regulation of biofilm formation, adhesion to saliva coated hydroxyapatite (SHA) and the hydrophobic properties of the cell. These phenotypic traits were determined for an A. actinomycetemcomitans arcB deficient type and a wild type strain. Differences in hydrophobic properties were shown at early and late exponential growth phases under microaerobic incubation and at late exponential phase under anaerobiosis.The arcB mutant formed less biofilm than the wild type strain when grown under anaerobic incubation, but displayed higher biofilm formation activity under microaerobic conditions. The adherence to SHA was significantly lower in the mutant when compared with the wild type strain. These results suggest that the transmembrane sensor kinase ArcB, in A. actinomycetemcomitans, senses redox growth conditions and regulates the expression of surface components of the bacterial cell related to biofilm formation and adhesion to saliva coated surfaces. PMID:24031399

  3. Integration host factor is required for replication of pYGK-derived plasmids in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Juárez-Rodríguez, María D; Demuth, Donald R

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we show that integration host factor protein (IHF) is required for replication of pYGK plasmids in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. YGK plasmids were not replicated in A. actinomycetemcomitans strains lacking either the α- or β- subunit of IHF. However, the deletion mutants were complemented, and plasmid replication was restored when the promoter region and gene for either ihfA or ihfB was cloned into pYGK. We also identified two motifs that resemble the consensus IHF-binding site in a 813-bp fragment containing the pYGK origin of replication. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, purified IHFα-IHFβ protein complex was shown to bind to probes containing either of these motifs. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that plasmid replication is IHF-dependent in the family Pasteurellaceae. In addition, using site-direct mutagenesis, the XbaI and KpnI restriction sites in the suicide vector pJT1 were modified to generate plasmid pJT10. The introduction of these new unique sites in pJT10 facilitates the transfer of transcriptional or translational lacZ fusion constructs for the generation of single-copy chromosomal insertion of the reporter construct. Plasmid pJT10 and its derivatives will be useful for genetic studies in Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) and probably other genera of Pasteurellaceae, including Haemophilus, Pasteurella, and Mannheimia.

  4. Serotype b of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans increases osteoclast and memory T-lymphocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Melgar-Rodríguez, S; Díaz-Zúñiga, J; Alvarez, C; Rojas, L; Monasterio, G; Carvajal, P; Escobar, A; Sanz, M; Vernal, R

    2016-04-01

    During periodontitis, alveolar bone resorption is associated with activation of T helper type 17 (Th17) lymphocytes and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) -induced osteoclasts. We previously reported that serotype b of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has a higher capacity to trigger Th17-type differentiation and function in activated T lymphocytes and its lipopolysaccharide is a more potent immunogen compared with the other serotypes. This study aimed to investigate whether serotype b of A. actinomycetemcomitans induces higher Th17-associated RANKL production, RANKL-induced osteoclast activation, and antigen-specific memory T lymphocyte proliferation. On naive CD4(+) T lymphocytes stimulated with autologous dendritic cells primed with different A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes, RANKL production, T-bet, GATA-3, RORC2 and Foxp3 expression, RORC2/RANKL intracellular double-expression, TRAP(+) osteoclast activation, and bone resorption were quantified. The frequency of proliferating memory T lymphocytes in response to A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes was determined in periodontitis and healthy subjects. Naive CD4(+) T lymphocytes stimulated by serotype b-primed dendritic cells elicited higher levels of RANKL, RORC2, TRAP(+) osteoclasts, and bone resorption than the same cells stimulated with the other serotypes. RANKL positively correlated and co-expressed with RORC2. Memory T lymphocytes responding to serotype b were more frequently detected in periodontitis patients than healthy subjects. These results indicate that serotype b of A. actinomycetemcomitans is associated with higher production of RANKL and these increased levels are associated with Th17 lymphocyte induction, osteoclast activation, and bone resorption.

  5. NLRP3 inflammasome is required for apoptosis of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-infected human osteoblastic MG63 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Panyu; Liu, Junchao; Pan, Chunling; Pan, Yaping

    2014-09-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans) is a Gram-negative bacterium which is implicated in the pathogenesis of human periodontal disease and in particular aggressive periodontitis. Virulence factors from A. actinomycetemcomitans have been shown to induce apoptosis of osteoblasts, however, the underlying mechanisms of the induction of apoptosis are poorly understood. In the present study, the infection of A. actinomycetemcomitans in human osteoblastic MG63 cells was established. Accordingly, A. actinomycetemcomitans infection enhanced significant apoptosis of MG63 cells. We found that both expression levels of NLRP3 and ASC were increased dramatically after MG63 cell cultures exposed to A. actinomycetemcomitans. Moreover, the secretion of mature interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 were extensively induced in A. actinomycetemcomitans-infected cells as compared with non-invasion group of MG63 cell cultures, indicating the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome during infection. Finally, we found that the knockdown expression of NLRP3 by specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) attenuated apoptosis of A. actinomycetemcomitans-infected MG63 cells. Our data suggest that A. actinomycetemcomitans promotes apoptosis of human osteoblasts at least partially through the NLRP3 inflammasome.

  6. A gene cluster for the synthesis of serotype g-specific polysaccharide antigen in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Tsuzukibashi, Osamu; Saito, Masanori; Kobayashi, Taira; Umezawa, Koji; Nagahama, Fumio; Hiroi, Takachika; Hirasawa, Masatomo; Takada, Kazuko

    2014-04-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an important pathogen related to aggressively progressive periodontal breakdown in adolescents and adults. The species can be divided into six serotypes (a-f) according to their surface carbohydrate antigens. Recently, a new serotype g of A. actinomycetemcomitans was proposed. The aim of the present study was to sequence the gene cluster associated with the biosynthesis of the serotype g-specific polysaccharide antigen and develop serotype-specific primers for PCR assay to identify serotype g strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans. The serotype-specific polysaccharide (SSPS) gene cluster of the NUM-Aa 4039 strain contained 21 genes in 21,842-bp nucleotides. The similarity of the SSPS gene cluster sequence was 96.7 % compared with that of the serotype e strain. Seventeen serotype g genes showed more than 90 % homology both in nucleotide and amino acids to the serotype e strain. Three additional genes with 1,579 bp in NUM-Aa 4039 were inserted into the corresponding ORF13 of the serotype e strain. The serotype g-specific primers were designed from the insertion region of NUM-Aa 4039. Serotypes of the a-f strains were not amplified by serotype-specific g primers; only NUM-Aa 4039 showed an amplicon band. The NUM-Aa 4039 strain was three genes in the SSPS gene cluster different from those of serotype e strain. The specific primers derived from these different regions are useful for identification and distribution of serotype g strain among A. actinomycetemcomitans from clinical samples.

  7. The cytolethal distending toxin of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans inhibits macrophage phagocytosis and subverts cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Ando-Suguimoto, Ellen Sayuri; da Silva, Maike Paulino; Kawamoto, Dione; Chen, Casey; DiRienzo, Joseph M; Mayer, Marcia Pinto Alves

    2014-03-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an important periodontal pathogen that can participate in periodontitis and other non-oral infections. The cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt) is among the virulence factors produced by this bacterium. The Cdt is also secreted by several mucosa-associated Gram-negative pathogens and may play a role in perpetuating the infection by modulating the immune response. Although the toxin targets a wide range of eukaryotic cell types little is known about its activity on macrophages which play a key part in alerting the rest of the immune system to the presence of pathogens and their virulence factors. In view of this, we tested the hypothesis that the A. actinomycetemcomitans Cdt (AaCdt) disrupts macrophage function by inhibiting phagocytic activity as well as affecting the production of cytokines. Murine macrophages were co-cultured with either wild-type A. actinomycetemcomitans or a Cdt(-) mutant. Viable counts and qPCR showed that phagocytosis of the wild-type strain was significantly reduced relative to that of the Cdt(-) mutant. Addition of recombinant Aa(r)Cdt to co-cultures along with the Cdt(-) mutant diminished the phagocytic activity similar to that observed with the wild type strain. High concentrations of Aa(r)Cdt resulted in decreased phagocytosis of fluorescent bioparticles. Nitric oxide production was modulated by the presence of Cdt and the levels of IL-1β, IL-12 and IL-10 were increased. Production of TNF-α did not differ in the co-culture assays but was increased by the presence of Aa(r)Cdt. These data suggest that the Cdt may modulate macrophage function in A. actinomycetemcomitans infected sites by impairing phagocytosis and modifying the pro-inflammatory/anti-inflammatory cytokine balance.

  8. [Microbiological approach to a possible infective endocarditis case caused by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans].

    PubMed

    Gürcan, Şaban; Ünlü, Selahattin; Kuloğlu, Figen; Karadenizli, Aynur; Kuşkucu, Mert Ahmet

    2016-04-01

    Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans, a small, gram-negative coccobacillus that grows slow and fastidious, is generally colonized in the oral cavity. It is a rarely seen bacterium because of the difficulty of isolation but it can be a causative agent for dental infections and infective endocarditis (IE) particularly in the persons having prosthetic heart valves. In this report, a possible IE case caused by A.actinomycetemcomitans in a patient with aortic valve replacement has been presented. A 36-year-old man has admitted to Trakya University Hospital, Health Center for Medical Research and Practice, with the complaints of chills, malaise, intermittent fever, severe arthralgia and weight loss (20 kg). During his follow-up period, the blood cultures that were obtained three week intervals yielded the identical gram-negative coccobacilli morphology. The patient was then diagnosed as possible IE on the basis of having one major (growth of the typical microorganisms that may cause IE in two different blood cultures) and two minor (presence of prosthetic valve and high fever) criterias. The isolate could not be identified with conventional methods, while it was identified as Francisella tularensis with VITEK 2 (bioMerieux, France) system. Hence this identification was not confirmed by real-time Taqman polymerase chain reaction, so MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was used to identify this bacteria. In the first run of the study, the isolate was named as Shigella dysenteriae initially, however when it was retested the next day it was identified as A.actinomycetemcomitans. In order to enlighten these conflicting results, 16S and 23S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis was performed, and consequently the bacterium was identified as A.actinomycetemcomitans. Doxycycline (2 x 100 mg po, 20 days) and streptomycin (2 x 10 mg/kg im, 10 days) therapy were initiated, considering the initial suspicious identification (F.tularensis), and on the fifth day of therapy the

  9. Identification of a novel bacterial outer membrane interleukin-1Β-binding protein from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Paino, Annamari; Ahlstrand, Tuuli; Nuutila, Jari; Navickaite, Indre; Lahti, Maria; Tuominen, Heidi; Välimaa, Hannamari; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Pöllänen, Marja T; Ihalin, Riikka

    2013-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a gram-negative opportunistic oral pathogen. It is frequently associated with subgingival biofilms of both chronic and aggressive periodontitis, and the diseased sites of the periodontium exhibit increased levels of the proinflammatory mediator interleukin (IL)-1β. Some bacterial species can alter their physiological properties as a result of sensing IL-1β. We have recently shown that this cytokine localizes to the cytoplasm of A. actinomycetemcomitans in co-cultures with organotypic gingival mucosa. However, current knowledge about the mechanism underlying bacterial IL-1β sensing is still limited. In this study, we characterized the interaction of A. actinomycetemcomitans total membrane protein with IL-1β through electrophoretic mobility shift assays. The interacting protein, which we have designated bacterial interleukin receptor I (BilRI), was identified through mass spectrometry and was found to be Pasteurellaceae specific. Based on the results obtained using protein function prediction tools, this protein localizes to the outer membrane and contains a typical lipoprotein signal sequence. All six tested biofilm cultures of clinical A. actinomycetemcomitans strains expressed the protein according to phage display-derived antibody detection. Moreover, proteinase K treatment of whole A. actinomycetemcomitans cells eliminated BilRI forms that were outer membrane specific, as determined through immunoblotting. The protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli in both the outer membrane-associated form and a soluble cytoplasmic form. When assessed using flow cytometry, the BilRI-overexpressing E. coli cells were observed to bind 2.5 times more biotinylated-IL-1β than the control cells, as detected with avidin-FITC. Overexpression of BilRI did not cause binding of a biotinylated negative control protein. In a microplate assay, soluble BilRI bound to IL-1β, but this binding was not specific, as a control protein for IL-1

  10. Photosensitization of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans with methylene blue: a microbiological and spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada Júnior, Aécio M.; Prates, Renato A.; Cai, Silvana; Ribeiro, Martha S.

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determinate the efficiency of methylene blue (MB) to kill cultures of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans under red light and to investigate MB photobleaching by optical absorption spectroscopy. Bacteria were diluted in aqueous solution, putted in glass tubes and distributed in 5 groups: (L-MB-) control group; (L+MB-) laser alone by 5min; (L-MB+) MB alone through 5min; (3L+MB+) MB+laser 3min; (5L+MB+) MB+laser 5min. Laser parameters were P=30mW, λ=660nm, E=9J in 5min and E=5.4J in 3min. The samples were diluted and bacterial colonies were counted and converted into colony forming units (CFU). Absorption spectra of the MB-stained bacterial suspension and photosensitized bacterial suspension were obtained. Groups L-MB-, L+MB-, and L-MB+ did not show a decrease in CFU/mL. L+MB+ groups showed a significant decrease in CFU/mL but no statistically significant differences were observed between 3min and 5min. Spectroscopy showed that MB is photodegraded after irradiation and that dimer species are more notably consumed than monomeric species. These results suggest that MB is a suitable photosensitizer to reduce A. actinomycetemcomitans, and that 3min of irradiation are enough to produce a significant effect. Due to the spectral changes observed on MB solution after irradiation a type I mechanism may be involved.

  11. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 2 Signaling Shapes Macrophage Plasticity in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-Induced Bone Loss.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Bethany A; Steinkamp, Heidi M; Gaestel, Matthias; Kirkwood, Keith L

    2017-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is associated with aggressive periodontal disease, which is characterized by inflammation-driven alveolar bone loss. A. actinomycetemcomitans activates the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2) stress pathways in macrophages that are involved in host responses. During the inflammatory process in periodontal disease, chemokines are upregulated to promote recruitment of inflammatory cells. The objective of this study was to determine the role of MK2 signaling in chemokine regulation during A. actinomycetemcomitans pathogenesis. Utilizing a murine calvarial model, Mk2(+/+) and Mk2(-/-) mice were treated with live A. actinomycetemcomitans bacteria at the midsagittal suture. MK2 positively regulated the following macrophage RNA: Emr1 (F4/80), Itgam (CD11b), Csf1r (M-CSF Receptor), Itgal (CD11a), Tnf, and Nos2 Additionally, RNA analysis revealed that MK2 signaling regulated chemokines CCL3 and CCL4 in murine calvarial tissue. Utilizing the chimeric murine air pouch model, MK2 signaling differentially regulated CCL3 and CCL4 in the hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic compartments. Bone resorption pits in calvaria, observed by micro-computed tomography, and osteoclast formation were decreased in Mk2(-/-) mice compared to Mk2(+/+) mice after A. actinomycetemcomitans treatment. In conclusion, these data suggest that MK2 in macrophages contributes to regulation of chemokine signaling during A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced inflammation and bone loss.

  12. Role of exopolysaccharide in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-induced bone resorption in a rat model for periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Mayilvahanan; Gopal, Prerna; El Abbar, Faiha; Schreiner, Helen C; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Fine, Daniel H; Ramasubbu, Narayanan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans a causative agent of periodontal disease in humans, forms biofilm on biotic and abiotic surfaces. A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilm is heterogeneous in nature and is composed of proteins, extracellular DNA and exopolysaccharide. To explore the role played by the exopolysaccharide in the colonization and disease progression, we employed genetic reduction approach using our rat model of A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced periodontitis. To this end, a genetically modified strain of A. actinomycetemcomitans lacking the pga operon was compared with the wild-type strain in the rat infection model. The parent and mutant strains were primarily evaluated for bone resorption and disease. Our study showed that colonization, bone resorption/disease and antibody response were all elevated in the wild-type fed rats. The bone resorption/disease caused by the pga mutant strain, lacking the exopolysaccharide, was significantly less (P < 0.05) than the bone resorption/disease caused by the wild-type strain. Further analysis of the expression levels of selected virulence genes through RT-PCR showed that the decrease in colonization, bone resorption and antibody titer in the absence of the exopolysaccharide might be due to attenuated levels of colonization genes, flp-1, apiA and aae in the mutant strain. This study demonstrates that the effect exerted by the exopolysaccharide in A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced bone resorption has hitherto not been recognized and underscores the role played by the exopolysaccharide in A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced disease.

  13. Detection of antimicrobial activity of banana peel (Musa paradisiaca L.) on Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kapadia, Suraj Premal; Pudakalkatti, Pushpa S.; Shivanaikar, Sachin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Aim: Banana is used widely because of its nutritional values. In past, there are studies that show banana plant parts, and their fruits can be used to treat the human diseases. Banana peel is a part of banana fruit that also has the antibacterial activity against microorganisms but has not been studied extensively. Since, there are no studies that relate the antibacterial activity of banana peel against periodontal pathogens. Hence, the aim of this study is to determine the antimicrobial activity of banana peel extract on Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans). Material and Methods: Standard strains of P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans were used in this study which was obtained from the in-house bacterial bank of Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology at Maratha Mandal's Nathajirao G. Halgekar Institute of Dental Sciences and Research Centre. The banana peel extract was prepared, and the antibacterial activity was assessed using well agar diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentration was assessed using serial broth dilution method. Results: In the current study, both the tested microorganisms showed antibacterial activity. In well diffusion method, P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans showed 15 mm and 12 mm inhibition zone against an alcoholic extract of banana peel, respectively. In serial broth dilution method P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans were sensitive until 31.25 μg/ml dilutions. Conclusion: From results of the study, it is suggested that an alcoholic extract of banana peel has antimicrobial activity against P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:26681854

  14. Construction of new cloning, lacZ reporter and scarless-markerless suicide vectors for genetic studies in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Demuth, Donald R

    2013-05-01

    To elucidate the putative function of a gene, effective tools are required for genetic characterization that facilitate its inactivation, deletion or modification on the bacterial chromosome. In the present study, the nucleotide sequence of the Escherichia coli/Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans shuttle vector pYGK was determined, allowing us to redesign and construct a new shuttle cloning vector, pJT4, and promoterless lacZ transcriptional/translational fusion plasmids, pJT3 and pJT5. Plasmids pJT4 and pJT5 contain the origin of replication necessary to maintain shuttle vector replication. In addition, a new suicide vector, pJT1, was constructed for the generation of scarless and markerless deletion mutations of genes in the oral pathogen A. actinomycetemcomitans. Plasmid pJT1 is a pUC-based suicide vector that is counter-selectable for sucrose sensitivity. This vector does not leave antibiotic markers or scars on the chromosome after gene deletion and thus provides the option to combine several mutations in the same genetic background. The effectiveness of pJT1 was demonstrated by the construction of A. actinomycetemcomitans isogenic qseB single deletion (ΔqseB) mutant and lsrRK double deletion mutants (ΔlsrRK). These new vectors may offer alternatives for genetic studies in A. actinomycetemcomitans and other members of the HACEK (Haemophilus spp., A. actinomycetemcomitans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella kingae) group of Gram-negative bacteria.

  15. Construction of new cloning, lacZ reporter and scarless-markerless suicide vectors for genetic studies in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Juárez-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Demuth, Donald R.

    2013-01-01

    To elucidate the putative function of a gene, effective tools are required for genetic characterization that facilitate its inactivation, deletion or modification on the bacterial chromosome. In the present study, the nucleotide sequence of the Escherichia coli/Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans shuttle vector pYGK was determined, allowing us to redesign and construct a new shuttle cloning vector, pJT4, and promoterless lacZ transcriptional/translational fusion plasmids, pJT3 and pJT5. Plasmids pJT4 and pJT5 contain the origin of replication necessary to maintain shuttle vector replication. In addition, a new suicide vector, pJT1, was constructed for the generation of scarless and markerless deletion mutations of genes in the oral pathogen A. actinomycetemcomitans. Plasmid pJT1 is a pUC-based suicide vector that is counter-selectable for sucrose sensitivity. This vector does not leave antibiotic markers or scars on the chromosome after gene deletion and thus provides the option to combine several mutations in the same genetic background. The effectiveness of pJT1 was demonstrated by the construction of A. actinomycetemcomitans isogenic qseB single deletion (ΔqseB) mutant and lsrRK double deletion mutants (ΔlsrRK). These new vectors may offer alternatives for genetic studies in A. actinomycetemcomitans and other members of the HACEK (Haemophilus spp., A. actinomycetemcomitans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella kingae) group of Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:23353051

  16. A consortium of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Streptococcus parasanguinis, and Filifactor alocis is present in sites prior to bone loss in a longitudinal study of localized aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Fine, Daniel H; Markowitz, Kenneth; Fairlie, Karen; Tischio-Bereski, Debbie; Ferrendiz, Javier; Furgang, David; Paster, Bruce J; Dewhirst, Floyd E

    2013-09-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-induced localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP) in African-American adolescents has been documented but is poorly understood. Two thousand fifty-eight adolescents aged 11 to 17 years were screened for their periodontal status and the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans in their oral cavity. Seventy-one A. actinomycetemcomitans-negative and 63 A. actinomycetemcomitans-positive periodontally healthy subjects were enrolled, sampled, examined, and radiographed yearly for 3 years. Gingival and periodontal pocket depth and attachment levels were recorded. Disease presentation was characterized by bone loss (BL). Subgingival sites were sampled every 6 months to assess (i) the role of A. actinomycetemcomitans in BL and (ii) the association of A. actinomycetemcomitans and other microbes in their relationships to BL. Sixteen of 63 subjects with A. actinomycetemcomitans developed BL (the other 47 subjects with A. actinomycetemcomitans had no BL). No A. actinomycetemcomitans-negative subjects developed BL. Human oral microbe identification microarray (HOMIM) was used for subgingival microbial assessment. On a subject level, pooled data from A. actinomycetemcomitans-positive subjects who remained healthy had higher prevalences of Streptococcus and Actinomyces species, while A. actinomycetemcomitans-positive subjects with BL had higher prevalences of Parvimonas micra, Filifactor alocis, A. actinomycetemcomitans, and Peptostreptococcus sp. human oral taxon 113 (HOT-113). At vulnerable sites, A. actinomycetemcomitans, Streptococcus parasanguinis, and F. alocis levels were elevated prior to BL. In cases where the three-organism consortium (versus A. actinomycetemcomitans alone) was detected, the specificity for detecting sites of future BL increased from 62% to 99%, with a sensitivity of 89%. We conclude that detecting the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans, S. parasanguinis, and F. alocis together indicates sites of future BL in LAP. A

  17. A Consortium of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Streptococcus parasanguinis, and Filifactor alocis Is Present in Sites Prior to Bone Loss in a Longitudinal Study of Localized Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, Kenneth; Fairlie, Karen; Tischio-Bereski, Debbie; Ferrendiz, Javier; Furgang, David; Paster, Bruce J.; Dewhirst, Floyd E.

    2013-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-induced localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP) in African-American adolescents has been documented but is poorly understood. Two thousand fifty-eight adolescents aged 11 to 17 years were screened for their periodontal status and the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans in their oral cavity. Seventy-one A. actinomycetemcomitans-negative and 63 A. actinomycetemcomitans-positive periodontally healthy subjects were enrolled, sampled, examined, and radiographed yearly for 3 years. Gingival and periodontal pocket depth and attachment levels were recorded. Disease presentation was characterized by bone loss (BL). Subgingival sites were sampled every 6 months to assess (i) the role of A. actinomycetemcomitans in BL and (ii) the association of A. actinomycetemcomitans and other microbes in their relationships to BL. Sixteen of 63 subjects with A. actinomycetemcomitans developed BL (the other 47 subjects with A. actinomycetemcomitans had no BL). No A. actinomycetemcomitans-negative subjects developed BL. Human oral microbe identification microarray (HOMIM) was used for subgingival microbial assessment. On a subject level, pooled data from A. actinomycetemcomitans-positive subjects who remained healthy had higher prevalences of Streptococcus and Actinomyces species, while A. actinomycetemcomitans-positive subjects with BL had higher prevalences of Parvimonas micra, Filifactor alocis, A. actinomycetemcomitans, and Peptostreptococcus sp. human oral taxon 113 (HOT-113). At vulnerable sites, A. actinomycetemcomitans, Streptococcus parasanguinis, and F. alocis levels were elevated prior to BL. In cases where the three-organism consortium (versus A. actinomycetemcomitans alone) was detected, the specificity for detecting sites of future BL increased from 62% to 99%, with a sensitivity of 89%. We conclude that detecting the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans, S. parasanguinis, and F. alocis together indicates sites of future BL in LAP. A

  18. Transcriptome Profiling of Wild-Type and pga-Knockout Mutant Strains Reveal the Role of Exopolysaccharide in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Mayilvahanan; El Abbar, Faiha; Ramasubbu, Narayanan

    2015-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides have a diverse set of functions in most bacteria including a mechanistic role in protecting bacteria against environmental stresses. Among the many functions attributed to the exopolysaccharides, biofilm formation, antibiotic resistance, immune evasion and colonization have been studied most extensively. The exopolysaccharide produced by many Gram positive as well as Gram negative bacteria including the oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is the homopolymer of β(1,6)-linked N-acetylglucosamine. Recently, we reported that the PGA-deficient mutant of A. actinomycetemcomitans failed to colonize or induce bone resorption in a rat model of periodontal disease, and the colonization genes, apiA and aae, were significantly down regulated in the mutant strain. To understand the role of exopolysaccharide and the pga locus in the global expression of A. actinomycetemcomitans, we have used comparative transcriptome profiling to identify differentially expressed genes in the wild-type strain in relation to the PGA-deficient strain. Transcriptome analysis revealed that about 50% of the genes are differently expressed (P < 0.05 and fold change >1.5). Our study demonstrated that the absence of the pga locus affects the genes involved in peptidoglycan recycling, glycogen storage, and virulence. Further, using confocal microscopy and plating assays, we show that the viability of pga mutant strain is significantly reduced during biofilm growth. Thus, this study highlights the importance of pga genes and the exopolysaccharide in the virulence of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  19. Alteration of Homeostasis in Pre-osteoclasts Induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans CDT.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Dione; Ando-Suguimoto, Ellen S; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; DiRienzo, Joseph M; Mayer, Marcia P A

    2016-01-01

    The dysbiotic microbiota associated with aggressive periodontitis includes Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, the only oral species known to produce a cytolethal distending toxin (AaCDT). Give that CDT alters the cytokine profile in monocytic cells, we aimed to test the hypothesis that CDT plays a role in bone homeostasis by affecting the differentiation of precursor cells into osteoclasts. Recombinant AaCDT was added to murine bone marrow monocytes (BMMC) in the presence or absence of RANKL and the cell viability and cytokine profile of osteoclast precursor cells were determined. Multinucleated TRAP(+) cell numbers, and relative transcription of genes related to osteoclastogenesis were also evaluated. The addition of AaCDT did not lead to loss in cell viability but promoted an increase in the average number of TRAP(+) cells with 1-2 nuclei in the absence or presence of RANKL (Tukey, p < 0.05). This increase was also observed for TRAP(+) cells with ≥3nuclei, although this difference was not significant. Levels of TGF-β, TNF-α, and IL-6, in the supernatant fraction of cells, were higher when in AaCDT exposed cells, whereas levels of IL-1β and IL-10 were lower than controls under the same conditions. After interaction with AaCDT, transcription of the rank (encoding the receptor RANK), nfatc1 (transcription factor), and ctpK (encoding cathepsin K) genes was downregulated in pre-osteoclastic cells. The data indicated that despite the presence of RANKL and M-CSF, AaCDT may inhibit osteoclast differentiation by altering cytokine profiles and repressing transcription of genes involved in osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, the CDT may impair host defense mechanisms in periodontitis.

  20. Bioactive glass combined with bisphosphonates provides protection against biofilms formed by the periodontal pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Hiltunen, Anna K; Skogman, Malena E; Rosenqvist, Kirsi; Juvonen, Helka; Ihalainen, Petri; Peltonen, Jouko; Juppo, Anne; Fallarero, Adyary

    2016-03-30

    Biofilms play a pivotal role in the progression of periodontitis and they can be treated with antiseptics (i.e. chlorhexidine) or antibiotics, but these therapeutic alternatives are unable of ameliorating periodontal alveolar bone loss, which has been, on the other hand, successfully treated with bone-preserving agents. The improved bone formation achieved in animal models by the combination of two such agents: bioactive glass (BAG) and bisphosphonates has attracted the interest for further exploring dental applications. However, the antimicrobial effects that may result from combining them have not been yet investigated. Here, our aim was to explore the anti-biofilm effects that could result from combining BAG with bisphosphonates, particularly in a dental biofilm model. The experiments were performed with an oral cavity single-specie (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans) biofilm assay, which was optimized in this contribution. Risedronate displayed an intrinsic anti-biofilm effect, and all bisphosphonates, except clodronate, reduced biofilm formation when combined with BAG. In particular, the anti-biofilm activity of risedronate was significantly increased by the combination with BAG. Since it has been proposed that some of the antimicrobial effects of BAG are caused by local pH changes, studies of pH variations were performed to gain a mechanistic understanding. However, the observed anti-biofilm effects could not be explained with lowered pHs. Overall, these results do provide further support for the promising use of bisphosphonate-BAG combinations in dental applications. These findings are particularly relevant for patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy, or osteoporotic patients, which are known to be more vulnerable to periodontitis. In such cases, bisphosphonate treatment could play a double positive effect: local treatment of periodontitis (in combination with BAG) and systemic treatment of osteoporosis, prevention of hypercalcemia and metastases.

  1. Alteration of Homeostasis in Pre-osteoclasts Induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans CDT

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Dione; Ando-Suguimoto, Ellen S.; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; DiRienzo, Joseph M.; Mayer, Marcia P. A.

    2016-01-01

    The dysbiotic microbiota associated with aggressive periodontitis includes Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, the only oral species known to produce a cytolethal distending toxin (AaCDT). Give that CDT alters the cytokine profile in monocytic cells, we aimed to test the hypothesis that CDT plays a role in bone homeostasis by affecting the differentiation of precursor cells into osteoclasts. Recombinant AaCDT was added to murine bone marrow monocytes (BMMC) in the presence or absence of RANKL and the cell viability and cytokine profile of osteoclast precursor cells were determined. Multinucleated TRAP+ cell numbers, and relative transcription of genes related to osteoclastogenesis were also evaluated. The addition of AaCDT did not lead to loss in cell viability but promoted an increase in the average number of TRAP+ cells with 1-2 nuclei in the absence or presence of RANKL (Tukey, p < 0.05). This increase was also observed for TRAP+ cells with ≥3nuclei, although this difference was not significant. Levels of TGF-β, TNF-α, and IL-6, in the supernatant fraction of cells, were higher when in AaCDT exposed cells, whereas levels of IL-1β and IL-10 were lower than controls under the same conditions. After interaction with AaCDT, transcription of the rank (encoding the receptor RANK), nfatc1 (transcription factor), and ctpK (encoding cathepsin K) genes was downregulated in pre-osteoclastic cells. The data indicated that despite the presence of RANKL and M-CSF, AaCDT may inhibit osteoclast differentiation by altering cytokine profiles and repressing transcription of genes involved in osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, the CDT may impair host defense mechanisms in periodontitis. PMID:27064424

  2. Occurrence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in Indian chronic periodontitis patients and periodontally healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Vinayak Mahableshwar; Bhat, Kishore Gajanan; Kugaji, Manohar Suresh; Ingalgi, Preeti Shivaji

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), an important primary periodontal pathogen, is known for its strong virulence characteristics that cause periodontal disease. We investigated Aa occurrence in Indian individuals using culture and 16 s rDNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study with 100 participants each in the healthy and chronic periodontitis (CP) groups was conducted. The subgingival plaque was collected and immediately plated on selective media for Aa. The remaining plaque samples were used for DNA extraction. PCR was performed using specific primers for Aa. Statistical Analysis Used: The detection of bacteria and the clinical parameters between the groups were compared using the Mann–Whitney U-test. For assessing the agreement between the results of anaerobic culture and PCR, Kappa analyses were performed. Results: Aa levels using culture and PCR was 51% and 69% in the CP group and 12% and 30% in the healthy group, respectively. The two groups showed significant differences (P < 0.00001). The detection accuracy of culture and PCR was assessed, and the coefficient of accuracy (k) was highly significant in the healthy (0.3103; P < 0.0001) and CP groups (0.1536; P < 0.0497). Conclusions: Aa was predominantly found in the CP group compared with the healthy group, which is consistent with previous findings. Our results showed that both techniques can be used for detecting Aa. An ideal technique for detecting subgingival microorganisms should be carefully selected depending on the scope of the intended future work. PMID:27143824

  3. Interleukin-1β is internalised by viable Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilm and locates to the outer edges of nucleoids.

    PubMed

    Paino, Annamari; Lohermaa, Elina; Sormunen, Raija; Tuominen, Heidi; Korhonen, Jari; Pöllänen, Marja T; Ihalin, Riikka

    2012-11-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans causes periodontitis, which is a biofilm infection that destroys tooth-supportive tissues. Interleukin (IL)-1β, a central proinflammatory cytokine of periodontitis, is an essential first line cytokine for local inflammation that modulates the cell proliferation and anti-pathogen response of human gingival keratinocytes. Previously, we demonstrated that A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilms bind IL-1β; however, whether this binding is an active process is not known. In this study, we showed for the first time with immuno-electron microscopy that viable bacterial biofilm cells internalised IL-1β when co-cultured with an organotypic mucosa. Decreased biofilm viability hindered the ability of biofilm to sequester IL-1β and caused IL-1β leakage into the culture medium. In some A. actinomycetemcomitans cells, intracellular IL-1β localized to the outer edges of the nucleoids. We identified the DNA-binding protein HU as an IL-1β interacting protein with mass spectroscopy and showed the interaction of recombinant HU and IL-1βin vitro using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Close contact with a viable A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilm decreased the proliferation and apoptosis of human gingival keratinocytes as demonstrated using Ki-67 and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) staining, respectively. Our results suggest that viable A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilms may disturb the critical first steps of local inflammation in periodontitis by binding and internalising IL-1β. The interaction of IL-1β with conserved HU provides a potential mechanism for shaping bacterial gene expression.

  4. Antibacterial Effect of an Herbal Product Persica on Porphyromonas Gingivalis and Aggregatibacter Actinomycetemcomitans: An In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Jelvehgaran Esfahani, Zahra; Kadkhoda, Zeinab; Eshraghi, Seyed Saeed; Salehi Surmaghi, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The plant Salvadora persica is used for oral hygiene in many parts of the world. It has been suggested that it has antibacterial properties, in addition to its ability to mechanically remove plaques. The aim of this study was to assess the antimicrobial activity of the herbal product Persica containing Salvadora persica against periodontopathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in vitro. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with moderate and severe periodontitis were recruited. Using paper points, subgingival plaque samples were taken from pockets with attachment loss ≥ 3mm. The samples were subjected to microbial culture to yield P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans. The ditch plate method was used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of the bacteria to Persica compared to chlorhexidine and distilled water. The growth inhibition zones of microorganisms around the ditches were measured in millimeters. The data were analyzed using SPSS 16. Freidman test and Wilcoxon signed ranks test with Bonferroni adjustment were used for analysis of variance with 5% significance level. P<0.05 for main comparisons and P< 0.017 for multiple comparisons were considered statistically significant. Results: P. gingivalis was sensitive to chlorhexidine and persica. There was a significant difference (P=0.001) between antimicrobial activity of chlorhexidine (mean 28.733mm, SD 5.216) and Persica (mean 16.333mm, SD 5.259) compared to water against P. gingivalis. There was a significant difference (P< 0.001) between the antimicrobial activity of chlorhexidine (24.045mm, SD 3.897) and Persica (0.545mm, SD 2.558) with respect to A. actinomycetemcomitans. There was no significant difference (P=0.317) between the antimicrobial activity of Persica and water against A. actinomycetemcomitans. Conclusion: The herbal product Persica had significant antimicrobial activity against P. gingivalis and negligible antimicrobial activity against A

  5. The pga gene cluster in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is necessary for the development of natural competence in Ca(2+) -promoted biofilms.

    PubMed

    Hisano, K; Fujise, O; Miura, M; Hamachi, T; Matsuzaki, E; Nishimura, F

    2014-04-01

    Natural competence is the ability of bacteria to incorporate extracellular DNA into their genomes. This competence is affected by a number of factors, including Ca(2+) utilization and biofilm formation. As bacteria can form thick biofilms in the presence of extracellular Ca(2+) , the additive effects of Ca(2+) -promoted biofilm formation on natural competence should be examined. We evaluated natural competence in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, an important periodontal pathogen, in the context of Ca(2+) -promoted biofilms, and examined whether the pga gene cluster, required for bacterial cell aggregation, is necessary for competence development. The A. actinomycetemcomitans cells grown in the presence of 1 mm CaCl2 exhibited enhanced cell aggregation and increased levels of cell-associated Ca(2+) . Biofilm-derived cells grown in the presence of Ca(2+) exhibited the highest levels of natural transformation frequency and enhanced expression of the competence regulator gene, tfoX. Natural competence was enhanced by the additive effects of Ca(2+) -promoted biofilms, in which high levels of pga gene expression were also detected. Mutation of the pga gene cluster disrupted biofilm formation and competence development, suggesting that these genes play a critical role in the ability of A. actinomycetemcomitans to adapt to its natural environment. The Ca(2+) -promoted biofilms may enhance the ability of bacteria to acquire extracellular DNA.

  6. Inflammatory Bone Loss in Experimental Periodontitis Induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Izawa, A.; Mizutani, H.; Kobayashi, S.; Goto, H.; Okabe, E.; Takeda, H.; Ozawa, Y.; Kamiya, Y.; Sugita, Y.; Kubo, K.; Kamei, H.; Kikuchi, T.; Mitani, A.; Hayashi, J.; Nishihara, T.; Maeda, H.; Noguchi, T.

    2014-01-01

    The interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) binds to IL-1 receptors and inhibits IL-1 activity. However, it is not clear whether IL-1Ra plays a protective role in periodontal disease. This study was undertaken to compare experimental periodontitis induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in IL-1Ra knockout (KO) mice and wild-type (WT) mice. Computed tomography (CT) analysis and hematoxylin-and-eosin (H&E) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining were performed. In addition, osteoblasts were isolated; the mRNA expression of relevant genes was assessed by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR); and calcification was detected by Alizarin Red staining. Infected IL-1Ra KO mice exhibited elevated (P, <0.05) levels of antibody against A. actinomycetemcomitans, bone loss in furcation areas, and alveolar fenestrations. Moreover, protein for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and IL-6, mRNA for macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) in IL-1Ra KO mouse osteoblasts stimulated with A. actinomycetemcomitans were increased (P, <0.05) compared to in WT mice. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein (BSP), osteocalcin (OCN)/bone gla protein (BGP), and runt-related gene 2 (Runx2) mRNA levels were decreased (P, <0.05). IL-1α mRNA expression was increased, and calcification was not observed, in IL-1 Ra KO mouse osteoblasts. In brief, IL-1Ra deficiency promoted the expression of inflammatory cytokines beyond IL-1 and altered the expression of genes involved in bone resorption in A. actinomycetemcomitans-infected osteoblasts. Alterations consistent with rapid bone loss in infected IL-Ra KO mice were also observed for genes expressed in bone formation and calcification. In short, these data suggest that IL-1Ra may serve as a potential therapeutic drug for periodontal disease. PMID:24566623

  7. Photocatalytical Antibacterial Activity of Mixed-Phase TiO2 Nanocomposite Thin Films against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Yeniyol, Sinem; Mutlu, Ilven; He, Zhiming; Yüksel, Behiye; Boylan, Robert Joseph; Ürgen, Mustafa; Karabuda, Zihni Cüneyt; Basegmez, Cansu; Ricci, John Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Mixed-phase TiO2 nanocomposite thin films consisting of anatase and rutile prepared on commercially pure Ti sheets via the electrochemical anodization and annealing treatments were investigated in terms of their photocatalytic activity for antibacterial use around dental implants. The resulting films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The topology was assessed by White Light Optical Profiling (WLOP) in the Vertical Scanning Interferometer (VSI) mode. Representative height descriptive parameters of roughness R a and R z were calculated. The photocatalytic activity of the resulting TiO2 films was evaluated by the photodegradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) dye solution. The antibacterial ability of the photocatalyst was examined by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans suspensions in a colony-forming assay. XRD showed that anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films were predominantly in anatase and rutile that were 54.6 wt% and 41.9 wt%, respectively. Craters (2-5 µm) and protruding hills (10-50 µm) on Ti substrates were produced after electrochemical anodization with higher R a and R z surface roughness values. Anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films showed 26% photocatalytic decolorization toward RhB dye solution. The number of colonizing bacteria on anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films was decreased significantly in vitro. The photocatalyst was effective against A. actinomycetemcomitans colonization.

  8. Photocatalytical Antibacterial Activity of Mixed-Phase TiO2 Nanocomposite Thin Films against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Yeniyol, Sinem; Mutlu, Ilven; He, Zhiming; Yüksel, Behiye; Boylan, Robert Joseph; Ürgen, Mustafa; Karabuda, Zihni Cüneyt; Basegmez, Cansu; Ricci, John Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Mixed-phase TiO2 nanocomposite thin films consisting of anatase and rutile prepared on commercially pure Ti sheets via the electrochemical anodization and annealing treatments were investigated in terms of their photocatalytic activity for antibacterial use around dental implants. The resulting films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The topology was assessed by White Light Optical Profiling (WLOP) in the Vertical Scanning Interferometer (VSI) mode. Representative height descriptive parameters of roughness Ra and Rz were calculated. The photocatalytic activity of the resulting TiO2 films was evaluated by the photodegradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) dye solution. The antibacterial ability of the photocatalyst was examined by  Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans suspensions in a colony-forming assay. XRD showed that anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films were predominantly in anatase and rutile that were 54.6 wt% and 41.9 wt%, respectively. Craters (2–5 µm) and protruding hills (10–50 µm) on Ti substrates were produced after electrochemical anodization with higher Ra and Rz surface roughness values. Anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films showed 26% photocatalytic decolorization toward RhB dye solution. The number of colonizing bacteria on anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films was decreased significantly in vitro. The photocatalyst was effective against A. actinomycetemcomitans colonization. PMID:26576430

  9. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans cytolethal distending toxin activates the NLRP3 inflammasome in human macrophages, leading to the release of proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Shenker, Bruce J; Ojcius, David M; Walker, Lisa P; Zekavat, Ali; Scuron, Monika Damek; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen

    2015-04-01

    The cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt) is produced from a number of bacteria capable of causing infection and inflammatory disease. Our previous studies with Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Cdt demonstrate not only that the active toxin subunit functions as a phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3) phosphatase but also that macrophages exposed to the toxin were stimulated to produce proinflammatory cytokines. We now demonstrate that the Cdt-induced proinflammatory response involves the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Specific inhibitors and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) were employed to demonstrate requirements for NLRP3 and ASC as well as caspase-1. Furthermore, Cdt-mediated inflammasome activation is dependent upon upstream signals, including reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and Cdt-induced increases in extracellular ATP levels. Increases in extracellular ATP levels contribute to the activation of the P2X7 purinergic receptor, leading to K+ efflux. The relationship between the abilities of the active toxin subunit CdtB to function as a lipid phosphatase, activate the NLRP3 inflammasome, and induce a proinflammatory cytokine response is discussed. These studies provide new insight into the virulence potential of Cdt in mediating the pathogenesis of disease caused by Cdt-producing organisms such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

  10. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Cytolethal Distending Toxin Activates the NLRP3 Inflammasome in Human Macrophages, Leading to the Release of Proinflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Ojcius, David M.; Walker, Lisa P.; Zekavat, Ali; Scuron, Monika Damek; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    The cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt) is produced from a number of bacteria capable of causing infection and inflammatory disease. Our previous studies with Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Cdt demonstrate not only that the active toxin subunit functions as a phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3) phosphatase but also that macrophages exposed to the toxin were stimulated to produce proinflammatory cytokines. We now demonstrate that the Cdt-induced proinflammatory response involves the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Specific inhibitors and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) were employed to demonstrate requirements for NLRP3 and ASC as well as caspase-1. Furthermore, Cdt-mediated inflammasome activation is dependent upon upstream signals, including reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and Cdt-induced increases in extracellular ATP levels. Increases in extracellular ATP levels contribute to the activation of the P2X7 purinergic receptor, leading to K+ efflux. The relationship between the abilities of the active toxin subunit CdtB to function as a lipid phosphatase, activate the NLRP3 inflammasome, and induce a proinflammatory cytokine response is discussed. These studies provide new insight into the virulence potential of Cdt in mediating the pathogenesis of disease caused by Cdt-producing organisms such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:25644004

  11. Transcriptional regulation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lsrACDBFG and lsrRK operons and their role in biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Juárez-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Lamont, Richard J; Demuth, Donald R

    2013-01-01

    Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) is required for biofilm formation and virulence of the oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and we previously showed that lsrB codes for a receptor for AI-2. The lsrB gene is expressed as part of the lsrACDBFG operon, which is divergently transcribed from an adjacent lsrRK operon. In Escherichia coli, lsrRK encodes a repressor and AI-2 kinase that function to regulate lsrACDBFG. To determine if lsrRK controls lsrACDBFG expression and influences biofilm growth of A. actinomycetemcomitans, we first defined the promoters for each operon. Transcriptional reporter plasmids containing the 255-bp lsrACDBFG-lsrRK intergenic region (IGR) fused to lacZ showed that essential elements of lsrR promoter reside 89 to 255 bp upstream from the lsrR start codon. Two inverted repeat sequences that represent potential binding sites for LsrR and two sequences resembling the consensus cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) binding site were identified in this region. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), purified LsrR and CRP proteins were shown to bind probes containing these sequences. Surprisingly, the 255-bp IGR did not contain the lsrA promoter. Instead, a fragment encompassing nucleotides +1 to +159 of lsrA together with the 255-bp IGR was required to promote lsrA transcription. This suggests that a region within the lsrA coding sequence influences transcription, or alternatively that the start codon of A. actinomycetemcomitans lsrA has been incorrectly annotated. Transformation of ΔlsrR, ΔlsrK, ΔlsrRK, and Δcrp deletion mutants with lacZ reporters containing the lsrA or lsrR promoter showed that LsrR negatively regulates and CRP positively regulates both lsrACDBFG and lsrRK. However, in contrast to what occurs in E. coli, deletion of lsrK had no effect on the transcriptional activity of the lsrA or lsrR promoters, suggesting that another kinase may be capable of phosphorylating AI-2 in A. actinomycetemcomitans. Finally, biofilm

  12. Differential transcriptional regulation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lsrACDBFG and lsrRK operons by integration host factor protein.

    PubMed

    Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Juárez-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Demuth, Donald R

    2014-04-01

    We previously showed that the Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lsrACDBFG and lsrRK operons are regulated by LsrR and cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) and that proper regulation of the lsr locus is required for optimal biofilm growth by A. actinomycetemcomitans. Here, we identified sequences that reside immediately upstream from both the lsrA and lsrR start codons that closely resemble the consensus recognition sequence of Escherichia coli integration host factor (IHF) protein. A. actinomycetemcomitans IHFα and IHFβ were expressed and purified as hexahistidine fusion proteins, and using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs), the IHFα-IHFβ protein complex was shown to bind to probes containing the putative IHF recognition sequences. In addition, single-copy chromosomal insertions of lsrR promoter-lacZ and lsrA promoter-lacZ transcriptional fusions in wild-type A. actinomycetemcomitans and ΔihfA and ΔihfB mutant strains showed that IHF differentially regulates the lsr locus and functions as a negative regulator of lsrRK and a positive regulator of lsrACDBFG. Deletion of ihfA or ihfB also reduced biofilm formation and altered biofilm architecture relative to the wild-type strain, and these phenotypes were partially complemented by a plasmid-borne copy of ihfA or ihfB. Finally, using 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), two transcriptional start sites (TSSs) and two putative promoters were identified for lsrRK and three TSSs and putative promoters were identified for lsrACDBFG. The function of the two lsrRK promoters and the positive regulatory role of IHF in regulating lsrACDBFG expression were confirmed with a series of lacZ transcriptional fusion constructs. Together, our results highlight the complex transcriptional regulation of the lsrACDBFG and lsrRK operons and suggest that multiple promoters and the architecture of the lsrACDBFG-lsrRK intergenic region may control the expression of these operons.

  13. Enterococcus faecalis lipoteichoic acid suppresses Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-8 expression in human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Im, Jintaek; Baik, Jung Eun; Kim, Kyoung Whun; Kang, Seok-Seong; Jeon, Jun Ho; Park, Ok-Jin; Kim, Hyun Young; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-08-01

    Periodontitis is caused by multi-bacterial infection and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Enterococcus faecalis are closely associated with inflammatory periodontal diseases. Although lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of A. actinomycetemcomitans (Aa.LPS) and lipoteichoic acid of E. faecalis (Ef.LTA) are considered to be major virulence factors evoking inflammatory responses, their combinatorial effect on the induction of chemokines has not been investigated. In this study, we investigated the interaction between Aa.LPS and Ef.LTA on IL-8 expression in human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells. Aa.LPS, but not Ef.LTA, substantially induced IL-8 expression at the protein and mRNA levels. Interestingly, Ef.LTA suppressed Aa.LPS-induced IL-8 expression without affecting the binding of Aa.LPS to Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. Ef.LTA reduced Aa.LPS-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, including ERK, JNK and p38 kinase. Furthermore, Ef.LTA inhibited the Aa.LPS-induced transcriptional activities of the activating protein 1, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein and nuclear factor-kappa B transcription factors, all of which are known to regulate IL-8 gene expression. Ef.LTA augmented the expression of IL-1 receptor-associated kinase-M (IRAK-M), a negative regulator of TLR intracellular signaling pathways, in the presence of Aa.LPS at both the mRNA and protein levels. Small interfering RNA silencing IRAK-M reversed the attenuation of Aa.LPS-induced IL-8 expression by Ef.LTA. Collectively, these results suggest that Ef.LTA down-regulates Aa.LPS-induced IL-8 expression in human PDL cells through up-regulation of the negative regulator IRAK-M.

  14. Inner-membrane protein MorC is involved in fimbriae production and biofilm formation in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kenneth P; Ruiz, Teresa; Mintz, Keith P

    2016-03-01

    Fimbrial subunit synthesis, secretion and assembly on the surface of the periodontal pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans are essential for biofilm formation. A recent quantitative proteomics study employing an afimbriated strain and a developed mutant isogenic for the inner-membrane protein morphogenesis protein C (MorC) revealed that the abundance of the proteins of the fimbrial secretion apparatus in the membrane is dependent on MorC. To investigate further the relationship between MorC and fimbriation, we identified and complemented the defect in fimbriae production in the afimbriated laboratory strain. The transformed strain expressing a plasmid containing genes encoding the WT fimbrial subunit and the prepilin peptidase displayed all of the hallmarks of a fimbriated bacterium including the distinct star-like colony morphology, robust biofilm formation, biofilm architecture composed of discrete microcolonies and the presence of fimbriae. When the identical plasmid was transformed into a morC mutant strain, the bacterium did not display any of the phenotypes of fimbriated strains. Extension of these studies to a naturally fimbriated clinical strain showed that the resulting morC mutant maintained the characteristic colony morphology of fimbriated strains. There was, however, a reduction in the secretion of fimbrial subunits, and fewer fimbriae were observed on the surface of the mutant strain. Furthermore, the morC mutant of the fimbriated strain displayed a significantly altered biofilm microcolony architecture, while maintaining a similar biofilm mass to the parent strain. These results suggest that MorC influences fimbrial secretion and microcolony formation in A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  15. Prevalence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia in Japanese patients with generalized chronic and aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Sachiyo; Komiya-Ito, Akiyo; Imamura, Kentaro; Kita, Daichi; Ota, Koki; Takayama, Saori; Makino-Oi, Asako; Kinumatsu, Takashi; Ota, Mikio; Saito, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and levels of major periodontal pathogens, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia in subgingival plaque samples of a group of Japanese patients with aggressive periodontitis (AgP) and chronic periodontitis (CP). A total of 40 patients with clinical diagnosis of AgP or CP and 10 periodontally healthy volunteers were subjected to clinical and microbiological analysis. Subgingival plaque samples were analyzed for A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis and T. forsythia with a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The prevalence of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia was relatively high in patients with periodontitis: over 60% of AgP or CP patients harbored these pathogens whereas they were not detected in the subgingival plaque samples from periodontally healthy individuals. P. gingivalis and T. forsythia were relatively frequently detected together in AgP and CP patients. No significant differences in the prevalence or level of the 3 pathogens were found between periodontitis groups. The proportion of T. forsythia was approximately 4-fold higher in CP group than in AgP group (P = 0.02). In periodontitis patients, a significant positive correlation was found between periodontal parameters (probing depth and clinical attachment level) and the numbers of total bacteria, P. gingivalis and T. forsythia. No distinct pattern of the subgingival profile of these pathogens was discerned between the two disease entities, except for the difference in the proportion of T. forsythia. The red complex bacteria, P. gingivalis and T. forsythia were highly prevalent in this population of Japanese AgP and CP patients, collaborating their roles in periodontitis.

  16. ygiW and qseBC are co-expressed in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and regulate biofilm growth.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Demuth, Donald R

    2013-06-01

    The quorum-sensing Escherichia coli regulators B and C (QseBC) two-component system were previously shown to regulate biofilm growth of the oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and to be essential for virulence. In this study, we use RT-PCR to show that an open reading frame, ygiW, residing upstream of qseBC and encoding a hypothetical protein is co-expressed with qseBC. In addition, using a series of lacZ transcriptional fusion constructs and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE), the promoter that drives expression of the ygiW-qseBC operon and the transcriptional start site was mapped to the 372 bp intergenic region upstream from ygiW. No internal promoters drive qseBC expression independently from ygiW. However, qseBC expression is attenuated by approximately ninefold by a putative attenuator stem-loop (ΔG = -77.0 KJ/mol) that resides in the 137 bp intergenic region between ygiW and qseB. The QseB response regulator activates expression of the ygiW-qseBC operon and transcription from the ygiW promoter is drastically reduced in ΔqseB and ΔqseBC mutants of A. actinomycetemcomitans. In addition, transcriptional activity of the ygiW promoter is significantly reduced in a mutant expressing an in-frame deletion of qseC that lacks the sensor domain of QseC, suggesting that a periplasmic signal is required for QseB activation. Finally, a non-polar in-frame deletion in ygiW had little effect on biofilm depth but caused a significant increase in surface coverage relative to wild-type. Complementation of the mutant with a plasmid-borne copy of ygiW reduced surface coverage back to wild-type levels. Interestingly, deletion of the sensor domain of QseC or of the entire qseC open reading frame resulted in significant reductions in biofilm depth, biomass and surface coverage, indicating that the sensor domain is essential for optimal biofilm formation by A. actinomycetemcomitans. Thus, although ygiW and qseBC are co-expressed, they regulate biofilm

  17. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans outer membrane vesicles are internalized in human host cells and trigger NOD1- and NOD2-dependent NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Thay, Bernard; Damm, Anna; Kufer, Thomas A; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Oscarsson, Jan

    2014-10-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. We recently demonstrated that outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) disseminated by A. actinomycetemcomitans could deliver multiple proteins, including biologically active cytolethal distending toxin (CDT), into the cytosol of HeLa cells and human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). In the present work, we have used immunoelectron and confocal microscopy analysis and fluorescently labeled vesicles to further investigate mechanisms for A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV-mediated delivery of bacterial antigens to these host cells. Our results supported that OMVs were internalized into the perinuclear region of HeLa cells and HGF. Colocalization analysis revealed that internalized OMVs colocalized with the endoplasmic reticulum and carried antigens, detected using an antibody specific to whole A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype a cells. Consistent with OMV internalization mediating intracellular antigen exposure, the vesicles acted as strong inducers of cytoplasmic peptidoglycan sensor NOD1- and NOD2-dependent NF-κB activation in human embryonic kidney cells. Moreover, NOD1 was the main sensor of OMV-delivered peptidoglycan in myeloid THP1 cells, contributing to the overall inflammatory responses induced by the vesicles. This work reveals a role of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs as a trigger of innate immunity via carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs).

  18. Amphotericin B down-regulates Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-induced production of IL-8 and IL-6 in human gingival epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Imai, Haruka; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Kajiya, Mikihito; Ouhara, Kazuhisa; Miyagawa, Tsuyoshi; Matsuda, Shinji; Shiba, Hideki; Kurihara, Hidemi

    2014-08-01

    Gingival epithelium is the primary barrier against microorganism invasion and produces inflammatory cytokines. Amphotericin B, a major antifungal drug, binds to cholesterol in the mammalian cell membrane in addition to fungal ergosterol. Amphotericin B has been shown to regulate inflammatory cytokines in host cells. To investigate the suppressive effect of amphotericin B on the gingival epithelium, we examined the expression of interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-6 and involvement of MAP kinase in human gingival epithelial cells (HGEC) stimulated by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Amphotericin B and the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor down-regulated the A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced increase in the expression of IL-8 and IL-6 at the mRNA. The ERK inhibitor suppressed the A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced IL-8 mRNA expression. Amphotericin B inhibited the A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced phosphorylation of ERK and p38 MAP kinase. Furthermore, amphotericin B inhibited the A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced production of prostaglandin E2. These results suggest that amphotericin B regulate inflammatory responses in HGEC.

  19. A Cytolethal Distending Toxin Variant from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans with an Aberrant CdtB That Lacks the Conserved Catalytic Histidine 160

    PubMed Central

    Obradović, Davor; Gašperšič, Rok; Caserman, Simon; Leonardi, Adrijana; Jamnik, Maja; Podlesek, Zdravko; Seme, Katja; Anderluh, Gregor; Križaj, Igor; Maček, Peter; Butala, Matej

    2016-01-01

    The periodontopathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans synthesizes several virulence factors, including cytolethal distending toxin (CDT). The active CDT holoenzyme is an AB-type tripartite genotoxin that affects eukaryotic cells. Subunits CdtA and CdtC (B-components) allow binding and intracellular translocation of the active CdtB (A-component), which elicits nuclear DNA damage. Different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans have diverse virulence genotypes, which results in varied pathogenic potential and disease progression. Here, we identified an A. actinomycetemcomitans strain isolated from two patients with advance chronic periodontitis that has a regular cdtABC operon, which, however, codes for a unique, shorter, variant of the CdtB subunit. We describe the characteristics of this CdtBΔ116–188, which lacks the intact nuclear localisation signal and the catalytic histidine 160. We show that the A. actinomycetemcomitans DO15 isolate secretes CdtBΔ116–188, and that this subunit cannot form a holotoxin and is also not genotoxic if expressed ectopically in HeLa cells. Furthermore, the A. actinomycetemcomitans DO15 isolate is not toxic, nor does it induce cellular distention upon infection of co-cultivated HeLa cells. Biological significance of this deletion in the cdtB remains to be explained. PMID:27414641

  20. Breaking the Gingival Epithelial Barrier: Role of the Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Cytolethal Distending Toxin in Oral Infectious Disease

    PubMed Central

    DiRienzo, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is part of the HACEK group that causes infective endocarditis, a constituent of the oral flora that promotes some forms of periodontal disease and a member of the family of species that secrete a cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt). The family of bacteria that express the cdt genes participate in diseases that involve the disruption of a mucosal or epithelial layer. In vitro studies have shown that human gingival epithelial cells (HGEC) are native targets of the Cdt that typically induces DNA damage that signals growth arrest at the G2/M interphase of the cell cycle. The gingival epithelium is an early line of defense in the oral cavity against microbial assault. When damaged, bacteria collectively gain entry into the underlying connective tissue where microbial products can affect processes and pathways in infiltrating inflammatory cells culminating in the destruction of the attachment apparatus of the tooth. One approach has been the use of an ex vivo gingival explant model to assess the effects of the Cdt on the morphology and integrity of the tissue. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of these studies and to critically examine the potential contribution of the Cdt to the breakdown of the protective gingival barrier. PMID:24861975

  1. Identification of a Novel Bacterial Outer Membrane Interleukin-1Β-Binding Protein from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Paino, Annamari; Ahlstrand, Tuuli; Nuutila, Jari; Navickaite, Indre; Lahti, Maria; Tuominen, Heidi; Välimaa, Hannamari; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Pöllänen, Marja T.; Ihalin, Riikka

    2013-01-01

    Aggregatibacteractinomycetemcomitans is a gram-negative opportunistic oral pathogen. It is frequently associated with subgingival biofilms of both chronic and aggressive periodontitis, and the diseased sites of the periodontium exhibit increased levels of the proinflammatory mediator interleukin (IL)-1β. Some bacterial species can alter their physiological properties as a result of sensing IL-1β. We have recently shown that this cytokine localizes to the cytoplasm of A. actinomycetemcomitans in co-cultures with organotypic gingival mucosa. However, current knowledge about the mechanism underlying bacterial IL-1β sensing is still limited. In this study, we characterized the interaction of A. actinomycetemcomitans total membrane protein with IL-1β through electrophoretic mobility shift assays. The interacting protein, which we have designated bacterial interleukin receptor I (BilRI), was identified through mass spectrometry and was found to be Pasteurellaceae specific. Based on the results obtained using protein function prediction tools, this protein localizes to the outer membrane and contains a typical lipoprotein signal sequence. All six tested biofilm cultures of clinical A. actinomycetemcomitans strains expressed the protein according to phage display-derived antibody detection. Moreover, proteinase K treatment of whole A. actinomycetemcomitans cells eliminated BilRI forms that were outer membrane specific, as determined through immunoblotting. The protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli in both the outer membrane-associated form and a soluble cytoplasmic form. When assessed using flow cytometry, the BilRI-overexpressing E. coli cells were observed to bind 2.5 times more biotinylated-IL-1β than the control cells, as detected with avidin-FITC. Overexpression of BilRI did not cause binding of a biotinylated negative control protein. In a microplate assay, soluble BilRI bound to IL-1β, but this binding was not specific, as a control protein for IL-1

  2. MyD88 is essential for alveolar bone loss induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide in mice.

    PubMed

    Madeira, M F M; Queiroz-Junior, C M; Cisalpino, D; Werneck, S M C; Kikuchi, H; Fujise, O; Ryffel, B; Silva, T A; Teixeira, M M; Souza, D G

    2013-12-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a Gram-negative bacteria highly associated with localized aggressive periodontitis. The recognition of microbial factors, such as lipopolysaccharide from A. actinomycetemcomitans ((Aa)LPS), in the oral environment is made mainly by surface receptors known as Toll-like receptors (TLR). TLR4 is the major LPS receptor. This interaction leads to the production of inflammatory cytokines by myeloid differentiation primary-response protein 88 (MyD88) -dependent and -independent pathways, which may involve the adaptor Toll/interleukin-1 receptor-domain-containing adaptor inducing interferon-β (TRIF). The aim of this study was to assess the involvement of MyD88 in alveolar bone loss induced by (Aa)LPS in mice. C57BL6/J wild-type (WT) mice, MyD88, TRIF or TRIF/MyD88 knockout mice received 10 injections of Aa LPS strain FDC Y4 (5 μg in 3 μl), in the palatal gingival tissue of the right first molar, every 48 h. Phosphate-buffered saline was injected in the opposite side and used as control. Animals were sacrificed 24 h after the 10th injection and the maxillae were removed for macroscopic and biochemical analyses. The injections of Aa LPS induced significant alveolar bone loss in WT mice. In the absence of MyD88 or TRIF/MyD88 no bone loss induced by (Aa)LPS was observed. In contrast, responses in TRIF(-/-) mice were similar to those in WT mice. Diminished bone loss in the absence of MyD88 was associated with fewer TRAP-positive cells and increased expression of osteoblast markers, RUNX2 and osteopontin. There was also reduced tumor necrosis factor-α production in MyD88(-/-) mice. There was less osteoclast differentiation of hematopoietic bone marrow cells from MyD88(-/-) mice after (Aa)LPS stimulation. Hence, the signaling through MyD88 is pivotal for (Aa)LPS-induced osteoclast formation and alveolar bone loss.

  3. Inverse Association of Plasma IgG Antibody to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and High C-Reactive Protein Levels in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome and Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Thanakun, Supanee; Pornprasertsuk-Damrongsri, Suchaya; Gokyu, Misa; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    The association between clinically diagnosed periodontitis, a common chronic oral infection, and metabolic syndrome has been previously reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of plasma IgG levels against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia, C-reactive protein, and periodontal status with metabolic syndrome. Plasma IgG levels and C-reactive protein were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and salivary levels of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Among 127 individuals aged 35-76 years, 57 participants had metabolic syndrome and severe periodontitis, 25 had metabolic syndrome and an absence of severe periodontitis, 17 healthy individuals had severe periodontitis, and 28 healthy individuals were without severe periodontitis. Patients with metabolic syndrome had reduced humoral immune response to A. actinomycetemcomitans (p = 0.008), regardless of their salivary levels or periodontitis status compared with healthy participants. The IgG antibody response to P. gingivalis, regardless of their salivary levels or participants' health condition, was significantly higher in severe periodontitis patients (p<0.001). Plasma IgG titers for P. intermedia were inconsistent among metabolic syndrome or periodontal participants. Our results indicate that the presence of lower levels of IgG antibodies to A. actinomycetemcomitans (OR = 0.1; 95%CI 0.0-0.7), but not P. gingivalis, a severe periodontitis status (OR = 7.8; 95%CI 1.1-57.0), high C-reactive protein levels (OR = 9.4; 95%CI 1.0-88.2) and body mass index (OR = 3.0; 95%CI 1.7-5.2), are associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. The role of the decreased IgG antibody response to A. actinomycetemcomitans, increased C-reactive protein levels on the association between periodontal disease and metabolic syndrome in a group of Thai patients is suggested.

  4. Al(III), Pd(II), and Zn(II) phthalocyanines for inactivation of dental pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans as planktonic and biofilm-cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kussovski, V.; Mantareva, V.; Angelov, I.; Avramov, L.; Popova, E.; Dimitrov, S.

    2012-06-01

    The Gram-negative, oral bacterium Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has been implicated as the causative agent of several forms of periodontal disease in humans. The new periodontal disease treatments are emergence in order to prevent infection progression. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (a-PDT) can be a useful tool for this purpose. It involves the use of light of specific wavelength to activate a nontoxic photosensitizing agent in the presence of oxygen for eradication of target cells, and appears effective in photoinactivation of microorganisms. The phthalocyanine metal complexes of Pd(II)- (PdPcC) and Al(III)- (AlPc1) were evaluated as photodynamic sensitizers towards a dental pathogen A. actinomycetemcomitans in comparison to the known methylpyridyloxy-substituted Zn(II) phthalocyanine (ZnPcMe). The planktonic and biofilm-cultivated species of A. actinomycetemcomitans were treated. The photophysical results showed intensive and far-red absorbance with high tendency of aggregation for Pd(II)-phthalocyanine. The dark toxicities of both photosensitizers were negligible at concentrations used (< 0.5 log decrease of viable cells). The photodynamic response for planktonic cultured bacteria was full photoinactivation after a-PDT with ZnPcMe. In case of the newly studied complexes, the effect was lower for PdPcC (4 log) as well as for AlPc1 (1.5-2 log). As it is known the bacterial biofilms were more resistant to a-PDT, which was confirmed for A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilms with 3 log reductions of viable cells after treatment with ZnPcMe and approximately 1 log reduction of biofilms after PdPcC and AlPc1. The initial results suggest that a-PDT can be useful for effective inactivation of dental pathogen A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  5. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC is activated by catecholamines and iron and regulates genes encoding proteins associated with anaerobic respiration and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, WA; Demuth, DR; Torres-Escobar, A; Juárez-Rodríguez, MD

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC regulates its own expression and is essential for biofilm growth and virulence. However, the signal that activates the QseC sensor has not been identified and the qseBC regulon has not been defined. In this study, we show that QseC is activated by catecholamine hormones and iron but not by either component alone. Activation of QseC requires an EYRDD motif in the periplasmic domain of the sensor and site-specific mutations in EYRDD or the deletion of the periplasmic domain inhibits catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of the ygiW-qseBC operon. Catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of transcription also requires interaction of the QseB response regulator with its binding site in the ygiW-qseBC promoter. Whole genome microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles of A. actinomycetemcomitans grown in a chemically defined medium with and without catecholamine and iron supplementation. Approximately 11.5% of the A. actinomycetemcomitans genome was differentially expressed by at least two-fold upon exposure to catecholamines and iron. The expression of ferritin was strongly induced, suggesting that intracellular iron storage capacity is increased upon QseBC activation. Consistent with this, genes encoding iron binding and transport proteins were down-regulated by QseBC. Strikingly, 57% of the QseBC up-regulated genes (56/99) encode proteins associated with anaerobic metabolism and respiration. Most of these up-regulated genes were recently reported to be induced during in vivo growth of A. actinomycetemcomitans. These results suggest that detection of catecholamines and iron by QseBC may alter the cellular metabolism of A. actinomycetemcomitans for increased fitness and growth in an anaerobic host environment. PMID:25923132

  6. Inactivation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans by two different modalities of photodynamic therapy using Toluidine blue O or Radachlorin as photosensitizers: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Moslemi, Neda; Soleiman-Zadeh Azar, Pardis; Bahador, Abbas; Rouzmeh, Nina; Chiniforush, Nasim; Paknejad, Mojgan; Fekrazad, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans) is one of the periodontopathogens strongly associated with aggressive periodontitis. The aim of this investigation was to compare the effect of laser and light-emitting diode on the photodynamic inactivation of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Eighty-four samples of bacterial suspensions (200 μL) were prepared and divided in seven groups: control group (no treatment), laser group (indium-gallium-aluminum-phosphate laser with wavelength of 662 ± 0.1 nm, energy density of 6 j/cm(2), and irradiation time of 34 s), light-emitting diode (LED) group (wavelength 625-635 nm, energy density 6 j/cm(2), time of irradiation 30 s), Toluidine blue O (TBO) group (0.1 mg/mL), Radachlorin group (0.1 %), Radachlorin + laser group (after pre-irradiation time of 10 min, laser was irradiated), and TBO + LED group (after preirradiation time of 10 min, LED was irradiated). Then, 100 μL of each sample was cultured in brain heart infusion (BHI) plates and incubated for 48-72 h in microaerophilic atmosphere for colony counting. Application of Radachlorin + laser resulted in a significant decrease in the concentration of A. actinomycetemcomitans (P values <0.05). Photodynamic therapy with laser + Radachlorin was more effective than that of LED + TBO in suppression of this microorganism (P value <0.05). Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that photodynamic inactivation using laser and Radachlorin was more effective than that of LED and TBO in eradication of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  7. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC is activated by catecholamines and iron and regulates genes encoding proteins associated with anaerobic respiration and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Weigel, W A; Demuth, D R; Torres-Escobar, A; Juárez-Rodríguez, M D

    2015-10-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC regulates its own expression and is essential for biofilm growth and virulence. However, the signal that activates the QseC sensor has not been identified and the qseBC regulon has not been defined. In this study, we show that QseC is activated by catecholamine hormones and iron but not by either component alone. Activation of QseC requires an EYRDD motif in the periplasmic domain of the sensor and site-specific mutations in EYRDD or the deletion of the periplasmic domain inhibits catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of the ygiW-qseBC operon. Catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of transcription also requires interaction of the QseB response regulator with its binding site in the ygiW-qseBC promoter. Whole genome microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles of A. actinomycetemcomitans grown in a chemically defined medium with and without catecholamine and iron supplementation. Approximately 11.5% of the A. actinomycetemcomitans genome was differentially expressed by at least two-fold upon exposure to catecholamines and iron. The expression of ferritin was strongly induced, suggesting that intracellular iron storage capacity is increased upon QseBC activation. Consistent with this, genes encoding iron binding and transport proteins were down-regulated by QseBC. Strikingly, 57% of the QseBC up-regulated genes (56/99) encode proteins associated with anaerobic metabolism and respiration. Most of these up-regulated genes were recently reported to be induced during in vivo growth of A. actinomycetemcomitans. These results suggest that detection of catecholamines and iron by QseBC may alter the cellular metabolism of A. actinomycetemcomitans for increased fitness and growth in an anaerobic host environment.

  8. Disease severity associated with presence in subgingival plaque of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and Tannerella forsythia, singly or in combination, as detected by nested multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Ready, D; D'Aiuto, F; Spratt, D A; Suvan, J; Tonetti, M S; Wilson, M

    2008-10-01

    This study used a nested multiplex PCR method to detect three periodontal pathogens in subgingival plaque collected before treatment and at 2 and 6 months posttreatment from 107 patients with severe, generalized periodontitis. The proportions of the patients who harbored these bacteria before periodontal treatment were as follows: Tannerella forsythia, 81%; Porphyromonas gingivalis, 78%; and Aggregatibacter (formerly Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans, 47%. At 2 months posttreatment there was a significant reduction in the numbers of patients harboring P. gingivalis (46%; P < 0.001) or T. forsythia (63%; P = 0.043) but not A. actinomycetemcomitans (50%) compared to pretreatment data. At 6 months posttreatment, significantly fewer patients harbored P. gingivalis (43%; P < 0.001); A. actinomycetemcomitans, (31%; P = 0.025), or T. forsythia (63%; P = 0.030). Interestingly, at baseline and at 2 months posttherapy, subjects who harbored only a single pathogen had a greater level of periodontal disease than subjects who harbored two, or all three, of these periodontal pathogens. These data suggest that a reduction in the number of species present may be associated with an increase in the severity of periodontal diseases.

  9. Determination of antibacterial activity of green coffee bean extract on periodontogenic bacteria like Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Bharath, Nagaraj; Sowmya, Nagur Karibasappa; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of pure green coffee bean extract on periodonto pathogenic bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Prevotella intermedia (Pi), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa). Materials and Methods: Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were used to assess the antibacterial effect of pure green coffee bean extract against periodonto pathogenic bacteria by micro dilution method and culture method, respectively. Results: MIC values of Pg, Pi and Aa were 0.2 μg/ml whereas Fn showed sensitive at concentration of 3.125 μg/ml. MBC values mirrors the values same as that of MIC. Conclusion: Antimicrobial activity of pure green coffee bean extract against Pg, Pi, Fn and Aa suggests that it could be recommended as an adjunct to mechanical therapy in the management of periodontal disease. PMID:26097349

  10. Evaluation of antimicrobial action of Carie Care™ and Papacarie Duo™ on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans a major periodontal pathogen using polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Kush, Anil; Thakur, Rachna; Patil, Sandya Devi S.; Paul, Santhosh T.; Kakanur, Madhu

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the present scenario, we are made available with chemomechanical caries removal system containing a natural proteolytic enzyme for the ease in the excavation of infected dentine. The additive action for these agents is providing antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. Aim: This study was undertaken for assessing the action of Carie Care™ and Papacarie Duo™ on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Materials and Methods: The samples were collected for cultivation of the periodontal pathogen from the clinical periodontal pockets using sterile paper points. The samples cultured under suitable conditions were analyzed with quantitative polymerase chain reaction targeting 16s r-DNA. The samples were divided into three groups namely, Group A: Control, Group B: With Papacarie Duo, Group C: With Carie Care. The pathogen inoculums plugs were inserted in the petri dishes containing chemically defined medium and the experimental gels at different concentrations and were incubated under optimal conditions. The inhibition of growth of the pathogen was studied visually. Results: There was visual inhibition of growth for Group B and C and also exhibited a dose-dependent effect also. Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, Carie Care™ gel demonstrated better antimicrobial action against A. actinomycetemcomitans which is a major periodontal disease causing pathogen. PMID:26681861

  11. Biochemical and morphological characterization of the killing of human monocytes by a leukotoxin derived from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Taichman, N S; Dean, R T; Sanderson, C J

    1980-01-01

    A potent, heat-labile leukotoxic material was extracted from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (strain Y4), an anaerobic gram-negative microorganism originally isolated from subgingival plaque in a patient with juvenile periodontitis. The cytopathic effects of Y4 toxin on purified monocytes were studied by the extracellular release of radioactive cytoplasmic markers and cell enzymes and by time-lapse microcinematography. Y4 toxin rapidly bound to the cells, producing dose- and time-dependent alterations culminating in cell death and release of intracellular constituents into the culture medium. The evidence to be presented suggests that the cell membrane of the monocyte may be the primary target in the development of these phenomena. Previous studies have shown that Y4 toxin also kills human polymorphonuclear leukocytes but not other cell types. It is conceivable that disruption of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes by Y4 toxin in the gingival crevice area may be relevant in the pathogenesis of juvenile periodontitis. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6155347

  12. Quantitative PCR studies of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Treponema denticola/Tanerella forsythensis Complex as Etiological Factors of Chronic Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Yanushevich, O O; Ayvazova, R A; Shibaeva, A V; Rebrikov, D V; Trubnikova, E V; Kudykina, Yu K; Zylnikova, M V; Zaripova, R S; Shevelev, A B

    2016-02-01

    Real-time quantitative PCR (Dentofl or kit) was used to detect DNA of periodontal pathogens in specimens from 92 patients with chronic periodontitis and from a control sample of 12 normal subjects. A bimodal distribution of patients by periodontium colonization with A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, P. intermedia, T. forsythensis, and T. denticola was demonstrated. A new approach to interpretation of the results of quantitative evaluation of periodontal pathogens, including the notion of pathological colonization level, led to classification of all cases with chronic generalized periodontitis into 3 groups: associated with A. actinomycetemcomitans, with T. forsythensis/T. denticola complex, and cases of uncertain genesis.

  13. Lipopolysaccharide of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans induces the expression of chemokines MCP-1, MIP-1α, and IP-10 via similar but distinct signaling pathways in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Park, Ok-Jin; Cho, Min-Kyung; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a Gram-negative bacterium frequently isolated from lesions of patients with localized aggressive periodontitis. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major cell wall component of Gram-negative bacteria, stimulates innate immune cells via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) to initiate inflammatory responses. In this study, we purified LPS from A. actinomycetemcomitans (AaLPS) and investigated its ability to induce the expression of chemokines, which play an important role in recruitment of leukocytes to the infection site. AaLPS induced the expression of chemokines, MCP-1, MIP-1α, and IP-10 in murine macrophages, leading to the infiltration of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in a transwell system. Although TLR4 was essential for the induction of all these chemokines by AaLPS, MCP-1 and MIP-1α expressions were MyD88-dependent, but IP-10 expression was MyD88-independent, as determined using macrophages from mice deficient in TLR4 or MyD88. Furthermore, the activation of ERK and JNK were necessary for the expression of MCP-1 and MIP-1α, whereas p38 MAP kinase and JNK activations were required for IP-10 expression. In addition, IFN-β/STAT1 signaling was exclusively involved in IP-10 expression but not in MCP-1 or MIP-1α expression. AaLPS also activated the transcription factors, NF-κB, AP-1, NF-IL6, and ISRE, all of which are involved in chemokine gene expression. These results suggest that AaLPS induces the expression of chemokines MCP-1, MIP-1α, and IP-10 through TLR4 in murine macrophages. Further, the induction of MCP-1 and MIP-1α requires MyD88, ERK, and JNK, whereas the induction of IP-10 requires JNK, p38 MAP kinase, and IFN-β/STAT1.

  14. A novel intrinsically disordered outer membrane lipoprotein of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans binds various cytokines and plays a role in biofilm response to interleukin-1β and interleukin-8

    PubMed Central

    Ahlstrand, Tuuli; Tuominen, Heidi; Beklen, Arzu; Torittu, Annamari; Oscarsson, Jan; Sormunen, Raija; Pöllänen, Marja T.; Permi, Perttu; Ihalin, Riikka

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) do not have a well-defined and stable 3-dimensional fold. Some IDPs can function as either transient or permanent binders of other proteins and may interact with an array of ligands by adopting different conformations. A novel outer membrane lipoprotein, bacterial interleukin receptor I (BilRI) of the opportunistic oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans binds a key gatekeeper proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β. Because the amino acid sequence of the novel lipoprotein resembles that of fibrinogen binder A of Haemophilus ducreyi, BilRI could have the potential to bind other proteins, such as host matrix proteins. However, from the tested host matrix proteins, BilRI interacted with neither collagen nor fibrinogen. Instead, the recombinant non-lipidated BilRI, which was intrinsically disordered, bound various pro/anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-10. Moreover, BilRI played a role in the in vitro sensing of IL-1β and IL-8 because low concentrations of cytokines did not decrease the amount of extracellular DNA in the matrix of bilRI− mutant biofilm as they did in the matrix of wild-type biofilm when the biofilms were exposed to recombinant cytokines for 22 hours. BilRI played a role in the internalization of IL-1β in the gingival model system but did not affect either IL-8 or IL-6 uptake. However, bilRI deletion did not entirely prevent IL-1β internalization, and the binding of cytokines to BilRI was relatively weak. Thus, BilRI might sequester cytokines on the surface of A. actinomycetemcomitans to facilitate the internalization process in low local cytokine concentrations. PMID:27459270

  15. A novel intrinsically disordered outer membrane lipoprotein of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans binds various cytokines and plays a role in biofilm response to interleukin-1β and interleukin-8.

    PubMed

    Ahlstrand, Tuuli; Tuominen, Heidi; Beklen, Arzu; Torittu, Annamari; Oscarsson, Jan; Sormunen, Raija; Pöllänen, Marja T; Permi, Perttu; Ihalin, Riikka

    2017-02-17

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) do not have a well-defined and stable 3-dimensional fold. Some IDPs can function as either transient or permanent binders of other proteins and may interact with an array of ligands by adopting different conformations. A novel outer membrane lipoprotein, bacterial interleukin receptor I (BilRI) of the opportunistic oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans binds a key gatekeeper proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β. Because the amino acid sequence of the novel lipoprotein resembles that of fibrinogen binder A of Haemophilus ducreyi, BilRI could have the potential to bind other proteins, such as host matrix proteins. However, from the tested host matrix proteins, BilRI interacted with neither collagen nor fibrinogen. Instead, the recombinant non-lipidated BilRI, which was intrinsically disordered, bound various pro/anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-10. Moreover, BilRI played a role in the in vitro sensing of IL-1β and IL-8 because low concentrations of cytokines did not decrease the amount of extracellular DNA in the matrix of bilRI(-) mutant biofilm as they did in the matrix of wild-type biofilm when the biofilms were exposed to recombinant cytokines for 22 hours. BilRI played a role in the internalization of IL-1β in the gingival model system but did not affect either IL-8 or IL-6 uptake. However, bilRI deletion did not entirely prevent IL-1β internalization, and the binding of cytokines to BilRI was relatively weak. Thus, BilRI might sequester cytokines on the surface of A. actinomycetemcomitans to facilitate the internalization process in low local cytokine concentrations.

  16. Transcriptional regulation of the Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans ygiW-qseBC operon by QseB and integration host factor proteins.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Demuth, Donald R

    2014-12-01

    The QseBC two-component system plays a pivotal role in regulating virulence and biofilm growth of the oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. We previously showed that QseBC autoregulates the ygiW-qseBC operon. In this study, we characterized the promoter that drives ygiW-qseBC expression. Using lacZ transcriptional fusion constructs and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends, we showed that ygiW-qseBC expression is driven by a promoter that initiates transcription 53 bases upstream of ygiW and identified putative cis-acting promoter elements, whose function was confirmed using site-specific mutagenesis. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, two trans-acting proteins were shown to interact with the ygiW-qseBC promoter. The QseB response regulator bound to probes containing the direct repeat sequence CTTAA-N6-CTTAA, where the CTTAA repeats flank the -35 element of the promoter. The ygiW-qseBC expression could not be detected in A. actinomycetemcomitans ΔqseB or ΔqseBC strains, but was restored to WT levels in the ΔqseBC mutant when complemented by single copy chromosomal insertion of qseBC. Interestingly, qseB partially complemented the ΔqseBC strain, suggesting that QseB could be activated in the absence of QseC. QseB activation required its phosphorylation since complementation did not occur using qseB(pho-), encoding a protein with the active site aspartate substituted with alanine. These results suggest that QseB is a strong positive regulator of ygiW-qseBC expression. In addition, integration host factor (IHF) bound to two sites in the promoter region and an additional site near the 5' end of the ygiW ORF. The expression of ygiW-qseBC was increased by twofold in ΔihfA and ΔihfB strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans, suggesting that IHF is a negative regulator of the ygiW-qseBC operon.

  17. The Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Cytolethal Distending Toxin Active Subunit CdtB Contains a Cholesterol Recognition Sequence Required for Toxin Binding and Subunit Internalization.

    PubMed

    Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen; Walker, Lisa P; Zekavat, Ali; Dlakić, Mensur; Scuron, Monika Damek; Nygren, Patrik; Shenker, Bruce J

    2015-10-01

    Induction of cell cycle arrest in lymphocytes following exposure to the Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt) is dependent upon the integrity of lipid membrane microdomains. Moreover, we have previously demonstrated that the association of Cdt with target cells involves the CdtC subunit which binds to cholesterol via a cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus sequence (CRAC site). In this study, we demonstrate that the active Cdt subunit, CdtB, also is capable of binding to large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) containing cholesterol. Furthermore, CdtB binding to cholesterol involves a similar CRAC site as that demonstrated for CdtC. Mutation of the CRAC site reduces binding to model membranes as well as toxin binding and CdtB internalization in both Jurkat cells and human macrophages. A concomitant reduction in Cdt-induced toxicity was also noted, indicated by reduced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in Jurkat cells and a reduction in the proinflammatory response in macrophages (interleukin 1β [IL-1β] and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α] release). Collectively, these observations indicate that membrane cholesterol serves as an essential ligand for both CdtC and CdtB and, further, that this binding is necessary for both internalization of CdtB and subsequent molecular events leading to intoxication of cells.

  18. MicroRNAs responsive to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS modulate expression of genes regulating innate immunity in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Afsar R; Fordham, Jezrom B; Khan, Asma; Nares, Salvador

    2014-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, noncoding RNAs that regulate post-transcriptional expression of their respective target genes and are responsive to various stimuli, including LPS. Here we examined the early (4 h) miRNA responses of THP1-differentiated macrophages challenged with LPS derived from the periodontal pathogens, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis or environmentally-modified LPS obtained from P. gingivalis grown in cigarette smoke extract. Predicted miRNA-gene target interactions for LPS-responsive miR-29b and let-7f were confirmed using dual-luciferase assays and by transfection experiments using miRNA mimics and inhibitors. Convergent and divergent miRNA profiles were observed in treated samples where differences in miRNA levels related to the type, concentration and incubation times of LPS challenge. Dual-luciferase experiments revealed miR-29b targeting of interleukin-6 receptorα (IL-6Rα) and IFN-γ inducible protein 30 and let-7f targeting of suppressor of cytokine signaling 4 and thrombospondin-1. Transfection experiments confirmed miR-29b and let-7f modulation of IL-6Rα and SOCS4 protein expression levels, respectively. Thus, we have demonstrated convergent/divergent miRNA responses to wild type LPS and its environmentally-modified LPS, and demonstrate miRNA targeting of key genes linked to inflammation and immunity. Our data indicate that these LPS-responsive miRNAs may play a key role in fine-tuning the host response to periodontal pathogens.

  19. Correlation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Detection with Clinical/Immunoinflammatory Profile of Localized Aggressive Periodontitis Using a 16S rRNA Microarray Method: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Patricia F.; Klepac-Ceraj, Vanja; Huang, Hong; Paster, Bruce J.; Aukhil, Ikramuddin; Wallet, Shannon M.; Shaddox, Luciana M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine whether the detection of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) correlates with the clinical and immunoinflammatory profile of Localized Aggressive Periodontitis (LAP), as determined by by 16S rRNA gene-based microarray. Subjects and Methods Subgingival plaque samples from the deepest diseased site of 30 LAP patients [PD ≥ 5 mm, BoP and bone loss] were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene-based microarrays. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) samples were analyzed for 14 cyto/chemokines. Peripheral blood was obtained and stimulated in vitro with P.gingivalis and E.coli to evaluate inflammatory response profiles. Plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels were also measured. Results Aa was detected in 56% of LAP patients and was shown to be an indicator for different bacterial community structures (p<0.01). Elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cyto/chemokines were detected in LPS-stimulated blood samples in both Aa-detected and Aa-non-detected groups (p>0.05). Clinical parameters and serum LPS levels were similar between groups. However, Aa-non-detected GCF contained higher concentration of IL-8 than Aa-detected sites (p<0.05). TNFα and IL1β were elevated upon E.coli LPS stimulation of peripheral blood cells derived from patients with Aa-detected sites. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that the detection of Aa in LAP affected sites, did not correlate with clinical severity of the disease at the time of sampling in this cross-sectional study, although it did associate with lower local levels of IL-8, a different subgingival bacterial profile and elevated LPS-induced levels of TNFα and IL1β. PMID:24376864

  20. Evidence that extracellular components function in adherence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, D H; Fives-Taylor, P M

    1993-01-01

    Extracellular microvesicles and a highly proteinaceous polymer associated with a leukotoxin-producing strain, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans SUNY 75, were shown to increase adherence of other weakly adherent A. actinomycetemcomitans strains to KB epithelial cells. Images PMID:8406899

  1. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and Treponema denticola / Prevotella intermedia Co-Infection Are Associated with Severe Periodontitis in a Thai Population.

    PubMed

    Torrungruang, Kitti; Jitpakdeebordin, Supawadee; Charatkulangkun, Orawan; Gleebbua, Yingampa

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial infection of tooth-supporting tissues. This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the associations between five target species and severe periodontitis in a Thai population. Using the CDC/AAP case definition, individuals diagnosed with no/mild and severe periodontitis were included. Quantitative analyses of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Tannerella forsythia (Tf), Treponema denticola (Td), and Prevotella intermedia (Pi) in subgingival plaque were performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The association between target species and severe periodontitis was examined using logistic regression analysis. The study subjects comprised 479 individuals with no/mild periodontitis and 883 with severe periodontitis. Bacterial prevalence and quantity were higher in subjects with severe periodontitis than in those with no/mild disease. In the fully adjusted model, all species except Tf showed a dose-dependent relationship with periodontitis. The mere presence of Pg, even in low amount, was significantly associated with severe periodontitis, while the amount of Aa, Td, and Pi had to reach the critical thresholds to be significantly associated with disease. Compared to individuals with low levels of both Td and Pi, high colonization by either Td or Pi alone significantly increased the odds of having severe periodontitis by 2.5 (95%CI 1.7-3.5) folds. The odds ratio was further increased to 14.8 (95%CI 9.2-23.8) in individuals who were highly colonized by both species. Moreover, the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa were independently associated with severe periodontitis with odds ratios of 5.6 (95%CI 3.4-9.1) and 2.2 (95%CI 1.5-3.3), respectively. Our findings suggest that the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa, Td, and Pi play an important role in severe periodontitis in this study population. We also demonstrate for the first time that individuals co-infected with Td and Pi

  2. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and Treponema denticola / Prevotella intermedia Co-Infection Are Associated with Severe Periodontitis in a Thai Population

    PubMed Central

    Torrungruang, Kitti; Jitpakdeebordin, Supawadee; Charatkulangkun, Orawan; Gleebbua, Yingampa

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial infection of tooth-supporting tissues. This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the associations between five target species and severe periodontitis in a Thai population. Using the CDC/AAP case definition, individuals diagnosed with no/mild and severe periodontitis were included. Quantitative analyses of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Tannerella forsythia (Tf), Treponema denticola (Td), and Prevotella intermedia (Pi) in subgingival plaque were performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The association between target species and severe periodontitis was examined using logistic regression analysis. The study subjects comprised 479 individuals with no/mild periodontitis and 883 with severe periodontitis. Bacterial prevalence and quantity were higher in subjects with severe periodontitis than in those with no/mild disease. In the fully adjusted model, all species except Tf showed a dose-dependent relationship with periodontitis. The mere presence of Pg, even in low amount, was significantly associated with severe periodontitis, while the amount of Aa, Td, and Pi had to reach the critical thresholds to be significantly associated with disease. Compared to individuals with low levels of both Td and Pi, high colonization by either Td or Pi alone significantly increased the odds of having severe periodontitis by 2.5 (95%CI 1.7–3.5) folds. The odds ratio was further increased to 14.8 (95%CI 9.2–23.8) in individuals who were highly colonized by both species. Moreover, the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa were independently associated with severe periodontitis with odds ratios of 5.6 (95%CI 3.4–9.1) and 2.2 (95%CI 1.5–3.3), respectively. Our findings suggest that the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa, Td, and Pi play an important role in severe periodontitis in this study population. We also demonstrate for the first time that individuals co-infected with Td

  3. Detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans after Systemic Administration of Amoxicillin Plus Metronidazole as an Adjunct to Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dakic, Aleksandar; Boillot, Adrien; Colliot, Cyrille; Carra, Maria-Clotilde; Czernichow, Sébastien; Bouchard, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the variations in the detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis and/or Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans before and after systemic administration of amoxicillin plus metronidazole in association with non-surgical periodontal therapy (NSPT). Background: The adjunctive use of antibiotics has been advocated to improve the clinical outcomes of NSPT. However, no systematic review has investigated the microbiological benefit of this combination. Materials and Methods: An electronic search was conducted up to December 2015. Randomized clinical trials comparing the number of patients testing positive for P. gingivalis and/or A. actinomycetemcomitans before and after NSPT with (test group) or without (control group) amoxicillin plus metronidazole were included. The difference between groups in the variation of positive patients was calculated using the inverse variance method with a random effects model. Results: The frequency of patients positive for A. actinomycetemcomitans was decreased by 30% (p = 0.002) and by 25% (p = 0.01) in the test group compared to the control group at 3- and 6-month follow-up, respectively. Similar findings were observed when considering the frequency of patients positive for Porphyromonas gingivalis, with a reduction by 28% (p < 0.0001), 32% (p < 0.0001), and 34% (p = 0.03) in the test group compared to the control group at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up, respectively. Conclusion: The systemic administration of amoxicillin plus metronidazole as an adjunct to NSPT significantly decreased the number of patients positive for P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans compared with periodontal therapy alone or with a placebo. PMID:27594851

  4. Dataset of the proteome of purified outer membrane vesicles from the human pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomintans.

    PubMed

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Oscarsson, Jan

    2017-02-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen, which is linked to aggressive forms of periodontitis and can be associated with endocarditis. The outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) of this species contain effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and leukotoxin (LtxA), which they can deliver into human host cells. The OMVs can also activate innate immunity through NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns. This dataset provides a proteome of highly purified OMVs from A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype e strain 173. The experimental data do not only include the raw data of the LC-MS/MS analysis of four independent preparations of purified OMVs but also the mass lists of the processed data and the Mascot.dat files from the database searches. In total 501 proteins are identified, of which 151 are detected in at least three of four independent preparations. In addition, this dataset contains the COG definitions and the predicted subcellular locations (PSORTb 3.0) for the entire genome of A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype e strain SC1083, which is used for the evaluation of the LC-MS/MS data. These data are deposited in ProteomeXchange in the public dataset PXD002509. In addition, a scientific interpretation of this dataset by Kieselbach et al. (2015) [2] is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0138591.

  5. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis in young Chinese adults.

    PubMed

    Mombelli, A; Gmür, R; Frey, J; Meyer, J; Zee, K Y; Tam, J O; Lo, E C; Di Rienzo, J; Lang, N P; Corbet, E F

    1998-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the presence or absence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis in young Chinese adults and to examine the A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates from positive subjects with regard to the serotype distribution, presence of the leukotoxin gene lktA and the promoter for the leukotoxin operon as well as the incidence of phage Aa phi 23. Sixty subjects, working in a knitting factory in the Province of Guangzhou, People's Republic of China, were investigated. Subgingival microbial samples were taken from both upper first molars. They were cultured both anaerobically and in 5% CO2. P. gingivalis was found in 33 subjects. On average, it constituted 7% of the total anaerobic cultivable counts. A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected in 37 subjects of which seven yielded counts > 10(5). Twenty-one subjects were positive for both organisms. A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype a was found in 9 subjects, serotype c was found in 23 and serotype e in 5. A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes b and d were not detected in any subjects. Presence of the leukotoxin gene lktA was demonstrated for all A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates; however, none of the A. actinomycetemcomitans strains from the present study had a deletion in the promoter region of the leukotoxin operon. The results of this investigation show a high frequency of the putative periodontal pathogens P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans and corroborate the concept that there is variation in virulence and pathogenic potential among isolates from different subjects.

  6. Microevolution and Patterns of Dissemination of the JP2 Clone of Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans▿

    PubMed Central

    Haubek, Dorte; Poulsen, Knud; Kilian, Mogens

    2007-01-01

    The natural history, microevolution, and patterns of interindividual transmission and global dissemination of the JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans were studied by population genetic analysis. The JP2 clone is strongly associated with aggressive periodontitis in adolescents of African descent and differs from other clones of the species by several genetic peculiarities, including a 530-bp deletion in the promoter region of the leukotoxin gene operon, which results in increased leukotoxic activity. Multilocus sequence analysis of 82 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains, 66 of which were JP2 clone strains collected over a period of more than 20 years, confirmed that there is a clonal population structure with evolutionary lineages corresponding to serotypes. Although genetically highly conserved, as shown by alignment of sequences of eight housekeeping genes, strains belonging to the JP2 clone had a number of point mutations, particularly in the pseudogenes hbpA and tbpA. Characteristic mutations allowed isolates from individuals from the Mediterranean area and from West Africa, including the Cape Verde Islands, to be distinguished. The patterns of mutations indicate that the JP2 clone initially emerged as a distinct genotype in the Mediterranean part of Africa approximately 2,400 years ago and subsequently spread to West Africa, from which it was transferred to the American continents during the transatlantic slave trade. The sustained exclusive colonization of individuals of African descent despite geographical separation for centuries suggests that the JP2 clone has a distinct host tropism. The colonization of family members by JP2 clone strains with unique point mutations provides strong evidence that there is intrafamilial transmission and suggests that dissemination of the JP2 clone is restricted to close contacts. PMID:17353281

  7. Inhibition of fibroblast proliferation by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Shenker, B J; Kushner, M E; Tsai, C C

    1982-01-01

    We have examined soluble sonic extracts of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans for their ability to alter human and murine fibroblast proliferation. We found that extracts of all A. actinomycetemcomitans strains examined (both leukotoxic and nonleukotoxic) caused a dose-dependent inhibition of both murine and human fibroblast proliferation as assessed by DNA synthesis ([3H]thymidine incorporation). Addition of sonic extract simultaneously with [3H]thymidine had no effect on incorporation, indicating that suppression was not due to the presence of excessive amounts of cold thymidine. Inhibition of DNA synthesis was also paralleled by decreased RNA synthesis ([3H]uridine incorporation) and by a decrease in cell growth as assessed by direct cell counts; there was no effect on cell viability. The suppressive factor(s) is heat labile; preliminary purification and characterization studies indicate that it is a distinct and separate moiety from other A. actinomycetemcomitans mediators previously reported, including leukotoxin, immune suppressive factor, and endotoxin. Although it is not clear how A. actinomycetemcomitans acts to cause disease, we propose that one aspect of the pathogenicity of this organism rests in its ability to inhibit fibroblast growth, which in turn could contribute to the collagen loss associated with certain forms of periodontal disease, in particular juvenile periodontitis. PMID:7152684

  8. Intra- and Interspecies Regulation of Gene Expression by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans LuxS

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Karen P.; Chung, Whasun O.; Lamont, Richard J.; Demuth, Donald R.

    2001-01-01

    The cell density-dependent control of gene expression is employed by many bacteria for regulating a variety of physiological functions, including the generation of bioluminescence, sporulation, formation of biofilms, and the expression of virulence factors. Although periodontal organisms do not appear to secrete acyl-homoserine lactone signals, several species, e.g., Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum, have recently been shown to secrete a signal related to the autoinducer II (AI-2) of the signal system 2 pathway in Vibrio harveyi. Here, we report that the periodontal pathogen Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans expresses a homolog of V. harveyi luxS and secretes an AI-2-like signal. Cell-free conditioned medium from A. actinomycetemcomitans or from a recombinant Escherichia coli strain (E. coli AIS) expressing A. actinomycetemcomitans luxS induced luminescence in V. harveyi BB170 >200-fold over controls. AI-2 levels peaked in mid-exponential-phase cultures of A. actinomycetemcomitans and were significantly reduced in late-log- and stationary-phase cultures. Incubation of early-log-phase A. actinomycetemcomitans cells with conditioned medium from A. actinomycetemcomitans or from E. coli AIS resulted in a threefold induction of leukotoxic activity and a concomitant increase in leukotoxin polypeptide. In contrast, no increase in leukotoxin expression occurred when cells were exposed to sterile medium or to conditioned broth from E. coli AIS−, a recombinant strain in which luxS was insertionally inactivated. A. actinomycetemcomitans AI-2 also induced expression of afuA, encoding a periplasmic iron transport protein, approximately eightfold, suggesting that LuxS-dependent signaling may play a role in the regulation of iron acquisition by A. actinomycetemcomitans. Finally, A. actinomycetemcomitans AI-2 added in trans complemented a luxS knockout mutation in P. gingivalis by modulating the expression of the lux

  9. Classification, Identification, and Clinical Significance of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter Species with Host Specificity for Humans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive update on the current classification and identification of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter species with exclusive or predominant host specificity for humans. Haemophilus influenzae and some of the other Haemophilus species are commonly encountered in the clinical microbiology laboratory and demonstrate a wide range of pathogenicity, from life-threatening invasive disease to respiratory infections to a nonpathogenic, commensal lifestyle. New species of Haemophilus have been described (Haemophilus pittmaniae and Haemophilus sputorum), and the new genus Aggregatibacter was created to accommodate some former Haemophilus and Actinobacillus species (Aggregatibacter aphrophilus, Aggregatibacter segnis, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans). Aggregatibacter species are now a dominant etiology of infective endocarditis caused by fastidious organisms (HACEK endocarditis), and A. aphrophilus has emerged as an important cause of brain abscesses. Correct identification of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter species based on phenotypic characterization can be challenging. It has become clear that 15 to 20% of presumptive H. influenzae isolates from the respiratory tracts of healthy individuals do not belong to this species but represent nonhemolytic variants of Haemophilus haemolyticus. Due to the limited pathogenicity of H. haemolyticus, the proportion of misidentified strains may be lower in clinical samples, but even among invasive strains, a misidentification rate of 0.5 to 2% can be found. Several methods have been investigated for differentiation of H. influenzae from its less pathogenic relatives, but a simple method for reliable discrimination is not available. With the implementation of identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry, the more rarely encountered species of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter will increasingly be identified in clinical microbiology

  10. Isolation of Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Chidambaram, M; Sharma, B; Petras, S F; Reese, C P; Froshauer, S; Weinstock, G M

    1995-01-01

    Two mutants of Pasteurella haemolytica A1 that do not produce leukotoxin were isolated. Following mutagenesis, colonies were screened with antiserum by a filter assay for absence of the secreted leukotoxin. The two mutants both appeared to produce normal amounts of other antigens, as judged by reactivity with polyclonal serum from an animal with pasteurellosis, and were not altered in beta-hemolytic activity as seen on blood agar plates. There was no evidence of either cell-associated or secreted leukotoxin protein when Western blots (immunoblots) were carried out with the polyclonal serum or with a monoclonal antibody directed against the leukotoxin. Southern blots revealed that both mutants show the wild-type restriction pattern at the leukotoxin locus, although the strain with the lktA2 mutation showed differences in other regions of the chromosome on analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The strain with the lktA2 mutation grew more slowly than did the wild-type strain, while the strain with the lktA1 mutation was indistinguishable from the wild-type strain in its growth properties. The strain with the lktA1 mutation should be valuable in determining the role of the leukotoxin in virulence as well as in identifying other virulence factors of P. haemolytica. PMID:7868223

  11. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Affias, S.; West, A.; Stewart, J. W.; Haldane, E. V.

    1978-01-01

    Two patients had infective endocarditis due to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. One, a 52-year-old woman with a prosthetic aortic valve, was successfully treated with carbenicillin and gentamicin. The other, a 47-year old man with calcific aortic valve disease, required emergency valvectomy and prosthetic valve replacement and responded to a combination of penicillin and gentamicin. PMID:647545

  12. Monoclonal antibodies to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Place, D A; Scidmore, N C; McArthur, W P

    1988-01-01

    Murine hybridoma cell lines were developed which synthesized monoclonal antibodies against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-associated antigens. Monoclonal antibodies specific for an antigen(s) common to all A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates tested but not detected on other gram-negative oral plaque microorganisms or other Actinobacillus species were identified. Monoclonal antibodies specific for each serotype group of A. actinomycetemcomitans which did not bind to other Actinobacillus species or oral plaque microorganisms were also identified. PMID:3356470

  13. Identification and characterization of genetic cluster groups of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolated from the human oral cavity.

    PubMed Central

    DiRienzo, J M; McKay, T L

    1994-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is recognized as a primary pathogen in localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP). Restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) within a collection of subgingival plaque isolates of this bacterium were identified and characterized as the first step in understanding the pathogenesis of LJP. Over 800 isolates, from members of 18 families (LJP families) with at least one member with active LJP or a documented history of the disease and one or more siblings, less than 13 years of age, having no clinical evidence of LJP and 32 healthy control subjects, were assigned to one of 13 distinct RFLP groups (II to XIV) by using a previously characterized 4.7-kb DNA probe cloned from the reference strain FDC Y4. Isolates belonging to RFLP groups II, IV, V, and XIII predominated subgingival sites in the subjects. Members of RFLP groups II, IV, VII, VIII, X, and XI were recovered only from LJP family subjects, while group XIII and XIV variants were found exclusively in healthy controls. A synthetic oligonucleotide, homologous to the 5' end of the leukotoxin gene (lktA), and the A. actinomycetemcomitans plasmid, pVT745, were tested for their abilities to subdivide the 13 RFLP groups. The leukotoxin probe specifically identified all RFLP group II variants because of the absence of a HindIII site in the upstream noncoding region of the lkt gene complex. The plasmid probe was not as selective but may be useful for identifying clinical isolates belonging to RFLP group I. The use of these probes for the identification of genetic variants of A. actinomycetemcomitans that may be preferentially colonize diseased and healthy subjects will facilitate the study of the role of this important pathogen in periodontal diseases. Images PMID:7907346

  14. Secretion and expression of the Pasteurella haemolytica Leukotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Highlander, S K; Engler, M J; Weinstock, G M

    1990-01-01

    The Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin gene cluster (lktCABD) is homologous to the Escherichia coli hemolysin locus (hlyCABD). Since the cloned leukotoxin (LktA) is not secreted from E. coli cells, a heteroplasmid complementation system was developed that permits secretion of the leukotoxin from cells expressing the hemolysin transport proteins HlyB and HlyD. We observed that the secreted leukotoxin protein had weak hemolytic activity when activated by either the HlyC or LktC proteins and that LktC expressed in E. coli could confer weak hemolytic activity upon hemolysin. Thus, it appears that the accessory proteins of the leukotoxin and hemolysin gene clusters are functionally similar, although their expression in E. coli is not equivalent. Northern (RNA) blot analysis of the P. haemolytica leukotoxin gene cluster revealed a major 3.5-kilobase transcript that includes the lktC and lktA genes. The start site for this transcript mapped to a cytosine residue 30 nucleotides upstream from the putative start of lktC; a similar initiation site was observed in E. coli, although adjacent cytosine and adenine residues were also utilized. The 3.5-kilobase transcript terminated near the rho-independent terminator structure between lktA and lktB, but transcription may continue, via antitermination or de novo transcription initiation, into the downstream lktB and lktD genes. We propose that the lack of LktB and LktD function in E. coli is a result, at least in part, of poor lktBD transcription and suggest that a P. haemolytica-specific regulator is required for optimal expression of the leukotoxin genes. Images PMID:2185213

  15. A bacteriocin of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, B F; Lillard, S E; Stevens, R H

    1987-01-01

    An inhibitory factor from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 was isolated, and its properties indicated that it was a bacteriocin (actinobacillicin). The bacteriocin was active against Streptococcus sanguis strains, Streptococcus uberis (FDC1), and Actinomyces viscosus T14 as well as other strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans, but not against other crevicular bacteria, including other streptococci and actinomycetes. The activity of this bacteriocin was inhibited by pronase, trypsin, and heat (45 min at 56 degrees C) but not by DNase, RNase, phospholipase, exposure to UV light, or low pH (1.0 to 6.5). Although actinobacillicin markedly inhibited glycolysis in S. sanguis, the primary mechanism of its bactericidal action appears to be alterations in cell permeability, with the resultant leakage of RNA, DNA, and other essential intracellular macromolecules. These findings provide an ecologic explanation for the reciprocal growth relationship between A. actinomycetemcomitans and S. sanguis/Actinomyces viscosus observed in localized juvenile periodontitis. Images PMID:3818090

  16. Antigenic and virulence properties of Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Petras, S F; Chidambaram, M; Illyes, E F; Froshauer, S; Weinstock, G M; Reese, C P

    1995-01-01

    Antigenic properties of two mutants of Pasteurella haemolytica, strains 59B0071 and 59B0072, that do not produce detectable leukotoxin were investigated. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis with a number of polyclonal sera from animals recovering from pasteurellosis revealed that both mutants secreted a variety of antigens that were also present in cultures of several wild-type strains. These antigens ranged from about 100 to 15 kDa. Mutant strain 59B0071 was found to be totally deficient in leukotoxin, as judged not only by Western blotting but also by cytotoxicity assays with bovine lymphoma (BL-3) cells or bovine polymorphonuclear cells as targets. The mutant strain 59B0071 had normal levels of a secreted sialylglycoprotease, however. When strains were tested for virulence in goat and cattle challenge experiments, a reduction in mortality and lung lesions was observed with the mutant 59B0071 in comparison with results obtained with wild-type strains. These results are consistent with an important role for leukotoxin in P. haemolytica virulence and suggest that leukotoxin-negative mutants may be useful tools in the investigation of other virulence properties involved in P. haemolytica infections. PMID:7868224

  17. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Slots, J; Evans, R T; Lobbins, P M; Genco, R J

    1980-01-01

    The agar dilution technique was used for determination of the antibiotic susceptibilities of 57 oral isolates and 2 nonoral isolates of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Tetracycline, minocycline, and chloramphenicol inhibited more than 96% of the strains tested at a concentration of less than or equal to 2 micrograms/ml; 89% of the strains were inhibited by 2 micrograms of carbenicillin per ml. The other antimicrobial agents tested were less active. Approximately 10% of the A. actinomycetemcomitans strains were resistant to ampicillin, erythromycin, and penicillin G at concentrations of 32 to 64 micrograms/ml. These data suggest that tetracycline and minocycline may be valuable drugs in the treatment of A. actinomycetemcomitans infections. PMID:6903116

  18. Selective medium for isolation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Slots, J

    1982-01-01

    A selective medium, TSBV (tryptic soy-serum-bacitracin-vancomycin) agar, was developed for the isolation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, TSBV agar contained (per liter) 40 g of tryptic soy agar, 1 g of yeast extract, 100 ml of horse serum. 75 mg of bacitracin, and 5 mg of vancomycin. The TSBV medium suppressed most oral species and permitted significantly higher recovery of A. actinomycetemcomitans than nonselective blood agar medium. The distinct colonial morphology and positive catalase reaction of A. actinomycetemcomitans easily distinguished this bacterium from Haemophilus aphrophilus, Capnocytophaga species, and a few other contaminating organisms. With the TSBV medium, even modestly equipped laboratories will be able to isolate and identify A. actinomycetemcomitans from clinical specimens. Images PMID:7068837

  19. Infective Endocarditis by Aggregatibacter paraphrophilus: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Smita

    2013-01-01

    Aggregatibacter paraphrophilus (former name, Haemophilus paraphrophilus) is a normal inhabitant of the naso- and oropharynx and has been rarely reported as a cause of human infections. A case of infective endocarditis by this organism is being reported and literature of endocarditis cases caused by Aggregatibacter paraphrophilus is being reviewed. PMID:24392406

  20. Killing of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by human lactoferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Kalmar, J R; Arnold, R R

    1988-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a fastidious, facultative gram-negative rod associated with endocarditis, certain forms of periodontal disease, and other focal infections. Human neutrophils have demonstrated bactericidal activity against A. actinomycetemcomitans, and much of the oxygen-dependent killing has been attributed to the myeloperoxidase-H2O2-halide system. However, the contribution of other neutrophil components to killing activity is obscure. Lactoferrin, an iron-binding glycoprotein, is a major constituent of neutrophil-specific granules and is also found in mucosal secretions. In this report, we show that human lactoferrin is bactericidal for A. actinomycetemcomitans. Killing activity required an unsaturated (iron- and anion-free) molecule that produced a 2-log decrease in viability within 120 min at 37 degrees C at a concentration of 1.9 microM. Besides exhibiting concentration dependence, killing kinetics were affected by minor variations in temperature and pH. Magnesium, a divalent cation thought to stabilize lipopolysaccharide interactions on the surface of gram-negative organisms, enhanced lactoferrin killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans, while other cations, such as potassium and calcium, had no effect. Our data suggest that lactoferrin contributes to killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans by human neutrophils and that it may also play a significant role in innate secretory defense against this potential periodontopathogen. PMID:3417349

  1. Effect of simulated stress on susceptibility of bighorn sheep neutrophils to Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin.

    PubMed

    Kraabel, B J; Miller, M W

    1997-07-01

    We examined the effects of simulated stress on susceptibility of Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis canadensis) neutrophils to Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin in a blocked, crossover experiment. Ten captive-raised bighorn sheep were sampled 10 hr after separate administrations of long-acting adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) gel and normal saline (control). We then compared in vitro leukotoxin-dependent neutrophil death rates after exposure to culture supernatants from four unique P. haemolytica isolates (one from domestic and three from bighorn sheep). Simulated stress effects were evidenced by elevated (P = 0.002) mean plasma cortisol concentrations, more neutrophils (P = 0.037), and fewer lymphocytes and eosinophils (P < or = 0.043) in ACTH-treated bighorn sheep. Maximum leukotoxin-dependent neutrophil death rates were > or = 61% for three of four P. haemolytica isolates tested. For all three cytotoxic isolates, neutrophil death rates at 150 micrograms/50 microliters supernatant were about 1.13 times higher (P = 0.0001) after bighorns received ACTH; for two of these, overall neutrophil death rates were higher (P < or = 0.001) in ACTH-treated bighorn sheep. Although variable leukotoxin production among P. haemolytica strains appeared principally responsible for differences in leukotoxin-dependent neutrophil death rates, susceptibility of bighorn sheep neutrophils to leukotoxin was increased by prior exposure to elevated plasma cortisol concentrations. It follows that if similar processes occur in neutrophils and alveolar macrophages in vivo, they could contribute to greater susceptibility of stressed bighorn sheep to pneumonic pasteurellosis.

  2. Transformation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by electroporation, utilizing constructed shuttle plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasan, P K; LeBlanc, D J; Lee, L N; Fives-Taylor, P

    1991-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, a periodontal pathogen, has been strongly implicated in human periodontal disease. Advances in the molecular analysis of A. actinomycetemcomitans virulence factors have been limited due to the unavailability of systems for genetic transfer, transposon mutagenesis, and gene complementation. Slow progress can be traced almost exclusively to the lack of gene vector systems and methods for the introduction of DNA into A. actinomycetemcomitans. An electrotransformation system that allowed at least five strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans to be transformed with stable shuttle plasmids which efficiently replicated in both Escherichia coli and A. actinomycetemcomitans was developed. One plasmid, a potential shuttle vector designated pDL282, is 5.7 kb in size, has several unique restriction enzyme sites, and codes for resistance to spectinomycin and ampicillin. E. coli and A. actinomycetemcomitans were transformed with equal efficiencies of approximately 10(5) transformants per micrograms of DNA. Similar transformation efficiencies were obtained whether the plasmid DNA was isolated from A. actinomycetemcomitans or E. coli. In addition, frozen competent cells of A. actinomycetemcomitans yielded comparable efficiencies of transformation. Restriction enzyme analysis of pDL282 isolated after transformation confirmed the presence of intact donor plasmids. A plasmid isolated from A. pleuropneumoniae was also capable of transforming some isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans, although generally at a lower frequency. The availability of these shuttle plasmids and an efficient transformation procedure should significantly facilitate the molecular analysis of virulence factors of A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:1937823

  3. Co-expression of ovine LPS receptor CD14 with Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin receptor LFA-1 or Mac-1 does not enhance leukotoxin-induced cytotoxicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leukotoxin (Lkt) and LPS are the major virulence determinants of Mannheimia haemolytica that contribute to the pathogenesis of bovine and ovine pneumonic pasteurellosis. We have previously identified bovine and ovine CD18 as the functional receptor for Lkt. LPS complexes with Lkt resulting in incre...

  4. Requirements for invasion of epithelial cells by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasan, P K; Meyer, D H; Fives-Taylor, P M

    1993-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, an oral bacterium implicated in human periodontal disease, was recently demonstrated to invade cultured epithelial cells (D. H. Meyer, P. K. Sreenivasan, and P. M. Fives-Taylor, Infect. Immun. 59:2719-2726, 1991). This report characterizes the requirements for invasion of KB cells by A. actinomycetemcomitans. The roles of bacterial and host factors were investigated by using selective agents that influence specific bacterial or host cell functions. Inhibition of bacterial protein synthesis decreased invasion, suggesting the absence of a preformed pool of proteins involved in A. actinomycetemcomitans invasion. Inhibition of bacterial and eukaryotic energy synthesis also decreased invasion, confirming that A. actinomycetemcomitans invasion is an active process. Bacterial adherence to KB cells was indicated by scanning electron microscopy of infected KB cells. Further, the addition of A. actinomycetemcomitans-specific serum to the bacterial inoculum reduced invasion substantially, suggesting a role for bacterial attachment in invasion. Many of the adherent bacteria invaded the epithelial cells under optimal conditions. Inhibitors of receptor-mediated endocytosis inhibited invasion by A. actinomycetemcomitans. Like that of many facultatively intracellular bacteria, A. actinomycetemcomitans invasion was not affected by eukaryotic endosomal acidification. These are the first published observations describing the requirements for epithelial cell invasion by a periodontopathogen. They demonstrate that A. actinomycetemcomitans utilizes a mechanism similar to those used by many but not all invasive bacteria to gain entry into eukaryotic cells. Images PMID:8454326

  5. Aggregatibacter aphrophilus Sacroiliitis Following Gastroscopy in a Young Sportsman.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Shelanah A; Gottlieb, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of Aggregatibacter aphrophilus sacroiliitis in a young sportsman, presenting 48 hours after endoscopy and biopsy. Microbiological diagnosis was made only after repeated attempt at joint aspiration. The patient was cured after radiologically guided drainage and a prolonged course of directed antibiotics.

  6. Activation of rat B lymphocytes by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshie, H; Taubman, M A; Ebersole, J L; Olson, C L; Smith, D J; Pappo, J

    1985-01-01

    We examined the lymphoproliferative responses of cervical lymphocytes and splenocytes of homozygous (rnu/rnu) congenitally athymic nude and normal heterozygous (rnu/+) Rowett rats to whole cells of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, a suspected periodontal disease pathogen. Previously sensitized cells from immunized only, infected only, or immunized and infected, normal rats demonstrated proliferation in response to formalinized A. actinomycetemcomitans, but cells from nude rats did not proliferate. The maximum antigenic response was observed at day 5 of culture. A. actinomycetemcomitans caused cervical lymphocytes and splenocytes from untreated naive normal and nude rats to undergo increased DNA synthesis at day 2 of culture. Highly enriched nonsensitized spleen T cells prepared on a nylon wool column did not respond to A. actinomycetemcomitans, whereas enriched nonsensitized B cells proliferated. Differences in response were probably not attributable to contributions from macrophages in the T- or B-cell populations, since macrophage percentages were approximately the same in both preparations. T-cell reconstitution of nude rats with neonatal thymus cells from rnu/+rats resulted in partial recovery of T-cell function but had no effect on the mitogenic response to A. actinomycetemcomitans. It is suggested that the antigenic responses to A. actinomycetemcomitans are dependent on T cells and that A. actinomycetemcomitans cells have mitogenic activity for B cells. The potential importance of these findings in periodontal disease is discussed. PMID:3871196

  7. Electron microscopy of phages in serotypes of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Olsen, I; Namork, E; Myhrvold, V

    1993-12-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Actinobacillus ureae, Haemophilus aphrophilus, Haemophilus paraphrophilus, Haemophilus influenzae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Pasteurella haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida strains were examined by transmission electron microscopy for the presence of bacteriophages. Phages were detected in serotype a (SUNY 75) and e (UOH 1705) and in the fresh clinical isolates UOH Q1243 and UOH Q1247 of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Phages were not found in serotype b, c and d strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans, in the fresh clinical isolate UOH Q1244 of this species or in old strains (including reference strains) of related species from the Actinobacillus-Haemophilus-Pasteurella group.

  8. Complete genome sequence of Aggregatibacter (Haemophilus) aphrophilus NJ8700.

    PubMed

    Di Bonaventura, Maria Pia; DeSalle, Rob; Pop, Mihai; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Figurski, David H; Fine, Daniel H; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Planet, Paul J

    2009-07-01

    We report the finished and annotated genome sequence of Aggregatibacter aphrophilus strain NJ8700, a strain isolated from the oral flora of a healthy individual, and discuss characteristics that may affect its dual roles in human health and disease. This strain has a rough appearance, and its genome contains genes encoding a type VI secretion system and several factors that may participate in host colonization.

  9. Cloning and expression of the leukotoxin gene of Pasteurella haemolytica A1 in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Lo, R Y; Shewen, P E; Strathdee, C A; Greer, C N

    1985-01-01

    A clone bank of Pasteurella haemolytica A1 was constructed by partial digestion of the genomic DNA with Sau3A and ligation of 5- to 10-kilobase-pair fragments into the BamHI site of the plasmid vector pBR322. After transformation into Escherichia coli K-12, a total of 4 X 10(3) recombinant clones was obtained. These were screened for the production of P. haemolytica soluble antigens by a colony enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay blot method with a rabbit antiserum raised against the soluble antigens. The clones producing P. haemolytica soluble antigens were then analyzed for the production of the leukotoxin by a cytotoxicity assay with cells from a bovine leukemia-derived B-lymphocyte cell line as the target cells. Positive clones were identified, and subsequent restriction analysis of the recombinant plasmids showed that the same 6.3 kilobase pairs of insert DNA was cloned in either of the two orientations into the plasmid vector pBR322. One of the clones was selected for further characterization of the leukotoxin as produced in E. coli. Tests for heat lability and target cell species specificity with canine, porcine, and human peripheral blood lymphocytes indicated that the activity of the cloned leukotoxin was identical to that of the P. haemolytica leukotoxin. Furthermore, the E. coli-produced leukotoxin was also neutralized by bovine or rabbit antiserum known to have antitoxic activity. When cellular proteins from the E. coli clones were subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis, a 100,000-dalton protein was identified which corresponded to one of the soluble antigens found in the leukotoxic culture supernatant of P. haemolytica. These results demonstrated that the gene(s) for the P. haemolytica leukotoxin have been cloned and that the leukotoxin was expressed in E. coli. Images PMID:3905610

  10. Precise gene editing paves the way for derivation of Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin-resistant cattle.

    PubMed

    Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Tibary, Ahmed; Beever, Jonathan E; Kasinathan, Poothapillai; Brown, Wendy C; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2016-11-15

    Signal peptides of membrane proteins are cleaved by signal peptidase once the nascent proteins reach the endoplasmic reticulum. Previously, we reported that, contrary to the paradigm, the signal peptide of ruminant CD18, the β subunit of β2 integrins, is not cleaved and hence remains intact on mature CD18 molecules expressed on the surface of ruminant leukocytes. Leukotoxin secreted by Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica binds to the intact signal peptide and causes cytolysis of ruminant leukocytes, resulting in acute inflammation and lung tissue damage. We also demonstrated that site-directed mutagenesis leading to substitution of cleavage-inhibiting glutamine (Q), at amino acid position 5 upstream of the signal peptide cleavage site, with cleavage-inducing glycine (G) results in the cleavage of the signal peptide and abrogation of leukotoxin-induced cytolysis of target cells. In this proof-of-principle study, we used precise gene editing to induce Q(‒5)G substitution in both alleles of CD18 in bovine fetal fibroblast cells. The gene-edited fibroblasts were used for somatic nuclear transfer and cloning to produce a bovine fetus homozygous for the Q(‒5)G substitution. The leukocyte population of this engineered ruminant expressed CD18 without the signal peptide. More importantly, these leukocytes were absolutely resistant to leukotoxin-induced cytolysis. This report demonstrates the feasibility of developing lines of cattle genetically resistant to M. haemolytica-caused pneumonia, which inflicts an economic loss of over $1 billion to the US cattle industry alone.

  11. [Role of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in human infection].

    PubMed

    Giglio, C; Aránguiz, V; Giglio, M S; Fernández, A

    1990-04-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (AA), is a cocobacillus thin and small, non motile, uncapsulate and capnophilic. AA, is: one of the species encountered in the mouth's comensal flora being able to be isolated in gingival crevices culture and oral mucosa in a 20% of the healthy population. An important number of pathogenic factors make it well equipped, to protect itself from host's defense mechanisms, and to destroy the periodontal tissue. Between the most important we find lipopolisacarides and leucotoxines which promote tisular invasion and destructive qualities of this microorganism. Since 1912, there are numerous reports of infectious process associated to it, between which we find: endocarditis in native and prothesic valve, soft tissues abscess, pneumonia, brain's abscess, urethritis, vertebral osteomielitis, thyroid's abscess, pericarditis and periodontal juvenile illness, being this one in which its isolation is more frequent. In vitro, AA is very susceptible to tetracicline. This antibiotic reaches high concentrations in gingival crevices, has significant affinity to the alveolar bone and contributes to protect the collagen. These special feature make them the election drug in periodontal disease produced by this microorganism.

  12. Update on Actinobacillus Actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis in human periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Slots, J

    1999-10-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is an important pathogen of periodontitis in young individuals. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major pathogen of severe adult periodontitis. A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis can be transmitted from family member to family member and may cause periodontitis in the recipient individual. In the USA, A. actinomycetemcomitans occurs more frequently in Hispanics and Asians than in Caucasians. P. gingivalis is more common in Hispanics, Asians and Blacks than in Caucasians. A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis strains differ in genotype, serotype, toxin and enzyme production, and cellular invasiveness. Variation in virulence may help explain differing clinical outcomes of periodontal A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis infections. A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis cannot be eradicated from the great majority of deep periodontal pockets by mechanical debridement alone. A. actinomycetemcomitans may be removed from subgingival sites by adjunctive systemic amoxicillin-metronidazole or other appropriate antibiotic therapies. Subgingival eradication of P. gingivalis may require periodontal surgery as well as antibiotic therapy.

  13. Precise gene editing paves the way for derivation of Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin-resistant cattle

    PubMed Central

    Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Tibary, Ahmed; Beever, Jonathan E.; Kasinathan, Poothapillai; Brown, Wendy C.; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2016-01-01

    Signal peptides of membrane proteins are cleaved by signal peptidase once the nascent proteins reach the endoplasmic reticulum. Previously, we reported that, contrary to the paradigm, the signal peptide of ruminant CD18, the β subunit of β2 integrins, is not cleaved and hence remains intact on mature CD18 molecules expressed on the surface of ruminant leukocytes. Leukotoxin secreted by Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica binds to the intact signal peptide and causes cytolysis of ruminant leukocytes, resulting in acute inflammation and lung tissue damage. We also demonstrated that site-directed mutagenesis leading to substitution of cleavage-inhibiting glutamine (Q), at amino acid position 5 upstream of the signal peptide cleavage site, with cleavage-inducing glycine (G) results in the cleavage of the signal peptide and abrogation of leukotoxin-induced cytolysis of target cells. In this proof-of-principle study, we used precise gene editing to induce Q(‒5)G substitution in both alleles of CD18 in bovine fetal fibroblast cells. The gene-edited fibroblasts were used for somatic nuclear transfer and cloning to produce a bovine fetus homozygous for the Q(‒5)G substitution. The leukocyte population of this engineered ruminant expressed CD18 without the signal peptide. More importantly, these leukocytes were absolutely resistant to leukotoxin-induced cytolysis. This report demonstrates the feasibility of developing lines of cattle genetically resistant to M. haemolytica-caused pneumonia, which inflicts an economic loss of over $1 billion to the US cattle industry alone. PMID:27799556

  14. Hematological changes in calves exposed to a mixture of lipopolysaccharide and crude leukotoxin of Pasteurella haemolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Bowersock, T L; Walker, R D; Maddux, J M; Fenner, D; Moore, R N

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if culture supernatants of Pasteurella haemolytica containing crude leukotoxin and lipopolysaccharide (CLCL) causes disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) when injected into calves. The effect of intraduodenal (ID) exposure followed by a subsequent subcutaneous (SC) inoculation of either heat-treated or untreated CLCL was evaluated. The relative contribution of the crude leukotoxin and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to the virulence of P. haemolytica was evaluated. One group of calves received an ID inoculation of CLCL followed two weeks later by a SC inoculation of CLCL; one group received an ID inoculation of tissue culture medium followed two weeks later by a SC inoculation of CLCL; and a third group received an ID inoculation of CLCL followed two weeks later by a SC inoculation of heat-treated CLCL. Hematological parameters used to evaluate DIC included white cell count, platelet count, neutrophil number, fibrinogen, fibrin degradation products, one stage prothrombin time (OSPT), activated partial thromboplastin time, body temperature and clinical signs. Each parameter was measured in calves at 0, 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 h following the SC inoculation of CLCL. Each group had significant changes over time in all parameters except body temperature. Calves that received a SC inoculation of heat-treated CLCL had smaller changes in all parameters except OSPT compared to the other groups. Results suggest that the LPS and leukotoxin of P. haemolytica exert additive effects on the coagulation cascade and number of peripheral leukocytes, and that the ID inoculation of CLCL does not affect the response of calves to a SC inoculation of toxin. PMID:2249175

  15. Adhesion of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to a human oral cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Mintz, K P; Fives-Taylor, P M

    1994-01-01

    Two quantitative, rapid assays were developed to study the adhesion of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, an oral bacterium associated with periodontal disease, to human epithelial cells. The human oral carcinoma cell line KB was grown in microtiter plates, and adherent bacteria were detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with purified anti-A. actinomycetemcomitans serum and horseradish peroxidase-conjugated secondary antibody or [3H]thymidine-labeled bacteria. Adhesion was found to be time dependent and increased linearly with increasing numbers of bacteria added. Variation in the level of adhesion was noted among strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Adhesion was not significantly altered by changes in pH (from pH 5 to 9) but was sensitive to sodium chloride concentrations greater than 0.15 M. Pooled human saliva was inhibitory for adhesion when bacteria were pretreated with saliva before being added to the cells. Pretreatment of the KB cells with saliva did not inhibit adhesion. Protease treatment of A. actinomycetemcomitans reduced adhesion of the bacteria to KB cells. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that a protein(s) is required for bacterial adhesion and that host components may play a role in modulating adhesion to epithelial cells. Images PMID:8063383

  16. Avidity of antibody responses to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Dell, D S; Ebersole, J L

    1995-01-01

    We designed a study to examine the serum IgG antibody avidity characteristics in: (i) normal subjects (N); (ii) Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-infected adult periodontitis (AP Aa+); (iii) A. actinomycetemcomitans-infected localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP Aa+); and (iv) AP subjects (AP) with various antibody patterns and disease presentation. Although there were significant elevations in antibody levels for AP Aa+ and LJP Aa+ patients compared with AP and normal patients (P < 0.0001), there were no significant differences in the avidity indices (AI). Correlations of antibody levels to avidity revealed that functional activity of the antibody as measured by avidity was independent of antibody levels. Increasing antibody levels correlated with an increase in the number of infected sites, yet there was a trend for A1 to decrease with increased infection. Avidity indices for all patient groups did not appear to show a strong biologic relationship to plaque; however, in AP Aa+ and LJP Aa+ patients there was a generally positive relationship between avidity and bleeding on probing or pocket depth. In AP Aa+ and LJP Aa+ patients, and in AP patients there was a positive relationship of avidity through a threshold of approximately 8 active disease sites. This study hypothesized that antibody avidity to A. actinomycetemcomitans could help to explain the relationship between the active host response and chronic infection with this pathogen. The results provide evidence that both antibody levels and avidity may contribute to the variation in host resistance to infection and disease associated with A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:7648712

  17. Oxidative and nonoxidative killing of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaki, K T; Wilson, M E; Brunetti, A J; Genco, R J

    1986-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a facultative gram-negative microorganism which has been implicated as an etiologic agent in localized juvenile periodontitis and in subacute bacterial endocarditis and abscesses. Although resistant to serum bactericidal action and to oxidant injury mediated by superoxide anion (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), this organism is sensitive to killing by the myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system (K.T. Miyasaki, M.E. Wilson, and R.J. Genco, Infect. Immun. 53:161-165, 1986). In this study, we examined the sensitivity of A. actinomycetemcomitans to killing by intact neutrophils under aerobic conditions, under anaerobic conditions, and under aerobic conditions in the presence of the heme-protein inhibitor sodium cyanide. Intact neutrophils killed opsonized A. actinomycetemcomitans under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and the kinetics of these reactions indicated that both oxidative and nonoxidative mechanisms were operative. Oxidative mechanisms contributed significantly, and most of the killing attributable to oxidative mechanisms was inhibited by sodium cyanide, which suggested that the myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system participated in the oxidative process. We conclude that human neutrophils are capable of killing A. actinomycetemcomitans by both oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent pathways, and that most oxygen-dependent killing requires myeloperoxidase activity. PMID:3013778

  18. Complete closed genome sequences of a Mannheimia haemolytica serotype A1 leukotoxin deletion mutant and its wild type parent strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannheimia haemolytica is a bacterial pathogen associated with bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC). It secretes a leukotoxin that binds to CD18 on leukocyte membranes and causes acute inflammation and lung injury characteristic of BRDC. We report the complete closed genome sequences of a leu...

  19. The effect of Pasteurella haemolytica and the leukotoxin of Pasteurella haemolytica on bovine lung explants.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, I W; Fallding, M H; Shewen, P E; Yager, J A

    1990-01-01

    Bovine lung explants were used in a study designed to compare the pathogenic effects of Pasteurella haemolytica type 1, a nonpathogenic organism Neisseria subflava, or the crude leukotoxin of P. haemolytica on alveolar macrophages and lung parenchymal cells. Concentrated, purified peripheral blood neutrophil suspensions were added with the bacteria to some explants. Duplicate pairs of cultures from each treatment group were fixed at regular intervals up to 24 hours after seeding and morphological changes were assessed by light and electron microscopy. Pasteurella haemolytica caused deterioration of alveolar macrophages within one hour but did not affect parenchymal cells for more than 12 hours. Neisseria subflava did not affect alveolar macrophages initially, but caused an accelerated deterioration after four hours. After 24 hours, bacterial overgrowth caused similar deterioration of all cells in explants seeded with either bacterium. Alveolar macrophages phagocytosed large numbers of N. subflava but rarely ingested P. haemolytica. Added neutrophils did not have any discernible effect on any of the explants and did not potentiate bacterial effects. Addition of crude leukotoxin of P. haemolytica to the culture medium significantly accelerated alveolar macrophage deterioration without apparent effect on parenchymal cell survival. These results support the hypothesis that the severe tissue destruction of fulminant pneumonic pasteurellosis is not a direct result of bacterial infection. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:2306666

  20. The presence of phage-infected Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in localized juvenile periodontitis patients.

    PubMed

    Preus, H R; Olsen, I; Namork, E

    1987-11-01

    Electron microscopy revealed 2 different types of bacteriophages isolated from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans colonizing exclusively diseased sites in 4 patients with localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP). All sites infected with phage were undergoing periodontal destruction, as judged from consecutive routine radiographs. The phages isolated had a wide host range as assessed from their ability to infect a series of reference strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans. A 5th patient harboured non-infected A. actinomycetemcomitans in a surgically treated site which had undergone no bone destruction during the last 12 months. The present findings suggested that the pathogenic potential of A. actinomycetemcomitans in LJP may increase due to phage infection.

  1. Differential Susceptibility of Bighorn Sheep (Ovis Canadensis) and Domestic Sheep (Ovis Aries) Neutrophils to Mannheimia Haemolytica Leukotoxin is not due to Differential Expression of Cell Surface CD18.

    PubMed

    Dassanayake, Rohana P; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Liu, Weiguo; Casas, Eduardo; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2017-03-21

    Bighorn sheep ( Ovis canadensis ) are more susceptible to pneumonia caused by Mannheimia haemolytica than are domestic sheep ( Ovis aries ). Leukotoxin produced by M. haemolytica is the principal virulence factor involved in pneumonia pathogenesis. Although leukotoxin is cytolytic to all subsets of ruminant leukocytes, neutrophils are the most susceptible subset. Bighorn sheep neutrophils are 4- to 8-fold more susceptible to leukotoxin-induced cytolysis than are domestic sheep neutrophils. We hypothesized that the higher susceptibility of bighorn sheep neutrophils, in comparison to domestic sheep neutrophils, is due to higher expression of CD18, the receptor for leukotoxin on leukocytes. Our objective was to quantify CD18 expression on neutrophils of bighorn sheep and domestic sheep. Cell-surface CD18 expression on bighorn sheep and domestic sheep neutrophils was measured as antibody binding capacity of cells by flow cytometric analysis with two fluorochrome-conjugated anti-CD18 monoclonal antibodies (BAQ30A and HUH82A) and microspheres. Contrary to our expectations, CD18 expression was higher (P=0.000) with monoclonal antibody BAQ30A and was higher (P=0.000) as well with monoclonal antibody HUH80A on domestic sheep neutrophils in comparison to bighorn sheep neutrophils. These findings suggest that the higher in vitro susceptibility to leukotoxin of bighorn sheep neutrophils compared to domestic sheep neutrophils is not due to higher expression of the leukotoxin receptor CD18 on bighorn sheep neutrophils.

  2. Detection and strain identification of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by nested PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Leys, E J; Griffen, A L; Strong, S J; Fuerst, P A

    1994-01-01

    By using PCR, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strains were identified directly from plaque samples without the need to isolate or culture bacteria. DNA fragments were generated by a nested, two-step PCR amplification of the ribosomal spacer region between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes. For the first amplification, primers homologous to sequences common to all bacterial species were used. This was followed by a second amplification with primers specific to A. actinomycetemcomitans. The ribosomal DNA spacer region was amplified from as few as 10 bacterial cells within a total population of 10(8) cells (0.00001%), and cross-reactivity between species was not observed. DNA fragments specific for Porphyromonas gingivalis were generated from the same samples by using a P. gingivalis-specific primer, and equivalent sensitivity and specificity were observed. A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected in 60% and P. gingivalis was detected in 79% of 52 subjects tested. Sequence analysis of the spacer region DNA fragment for A. actinomycetemcomitans gave precise strain identification, producing unique sequences for seven reference strains and identification of nine plaque-derived isolates. A phylogenetic tree based on quantitative sequence relationships was constructed. Two-step PCR amplification directly from plaque samples combined with sequence analysis of the ribosomal DNA spacer region provides a sensitive assay for detection and strain identification of multiple species directly from a single plaque sample. This simplified approach provides a practical method for large-scale studies on the transmission and pathogenicity of periodontitis-associated bacteria. Images PMID:8051258

  3. Identification of an immunoglobulin Fc receptor of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Mintz, K P; Fives-Taylor, P M

    1994-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans expresses proteins that bind to the Fc portion of immunoglobulins. The immunoglobulin Fc receptors on the surface of A. actinomycetemcomitans were detected by the binding of biotinylated human or murine Fc molecules to strain SUNY 465 adsorbed to the bottom of microtiter wells. Biotinylated Fc binding was inhibited by unlabeled Fc molecules and human plasma. Fc receptors were identified by the binding of biotinylated Fc molecules to bacterial membrane proteins separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and transferred to nitrocellulose. Multiple bands were identified, and the major Fc-binding protein was determined to be a heat-modifiable protein. This protein migrated with approximate molecular weights of 25,000 and 32,000 (unheated and heated, respectively). Amino-terminal sequence analysis of this protein revealed a sequence identical to the heat-modifiable protein described for A. actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 43718. This protein sequence exhibits significant homology with the N termini of outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of Escherichia coli and related OmpA-like proteins from other gram-negative bacteria. Images PMID:7927715

  4. Efficacy of recombinant leukotoxin in protection against pneumonic challenge with live Pasteurella haemolytica A1.

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, J A; Shewen, P E; Lo, R Y

    1991-01-01

    The recombinant leukotoxin (rLKT) of the bacterium Pasteurella haemolytica A1 was examined for its ability to protect cattle from experimental challenge with logarithmic-phase P. haemolytica. Six different vaccines were utilized in the experiment: P. haemolytica culture supernatant, P. haemolytica culture supernatant enriched with rLKT, rLKT alone, P. haemolytica culture supernatant enriched with Escherichia coli supernatant not containing LKT, E. coli supernatant alone, and phosphate-buffered saline. rLKT alone showed no protective capacity against development of clinical signs of respiratory disease or against development of postmortem lung lesions after experimental challenge. It was, however, shown to enhance the efficacy of the culture supernatant vaccine and decrease clinical signs and pneumonic lesions. The complexity of protective immunity in this disease is emphasized in this study, and, although LKT is an important virulence factor of the organism, an immune response to LKT alone does not protect animals against disease. PMID:1987075

  5. Serum antibody in Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-infected patients with periodontal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, J L; Sandoval, M N; Steffen, M J; Cappelli, D

    1991-01-01

    This study was designed to (i) delineate the characteristics of serum antibody responses to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in patients with periodontitis who are infected with A. actinomycetemcomitans; irrespective of disease classification; (ii) assess the relationship of the elevated antibody levels to colonization of the oral cavity by A. actinomycetemcomitans; and (iii) describe the serotype distribution of A. actinomycetemcomitans and antibodies to the microorganism in infected patients with various clinical classifications. To compare the levels of various isotype-specific antibodies to the different antigens, studies were performed that allowed quantitation of each isotype-specific antibody in a human reference standard. By using this reference standard, it was shown that the levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgM, and IgA responses to A. actinomycetemcomitans were similar among the infected patients, irrespective of disease classification. Also, we demonstrated that the serum antibody response to serotype b was quantitatively greater in all isotypes. Our findings indicate that b was the most frequent A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype detected in the patients and appears to be capable of initiating a substantial serum IgG antibody response that may contain cross-reactive antibodies to other serotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Generally, in cases in which the response to a single serotype was elevated, only that type of A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected in the plaque. Individuals exhibiting elevated antibodies to multiple serotypes were most consistently colonized by the serotype b microorganism. This study represents the first report detailing the distribution of IgG subclass antibodies to A. actinomycetemcomitans in periodontal disease. The results demonstrated that the primary responses of patients with periodontitis to A. actinomycetemcomitans were of the IgG1 and IgG3 subclasses, which is consistent with elicited responses to protein antigens

  6. Differential susceptibility of bighorn sheep (Ovis Canadensis)and domestic sheep (Ovis Aries) neutrophils to Mannheimia Haemolytica Leukotoxin is not due to differential expression of cell surface CD18

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bighorn sheep (BHS) are more susceptible to pneumonia caused by Mannheimia haemolytica than domestic sheep (DS). Leukotoxin produced by M. haemolytica is the principal virulence factor involved in pneumonia pathogenesis. Although leukotoxin is cytolytic to all subsets of ruminant leukocytes, neutrop...

  7. Lytic sensitivity of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 to lysozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Iacono, V J; Boldt, P R; MacKay, B J; Cho, M I; Pollock, J J

    1983-01-01

    The ability of both human and hen egg white lysozymes to lyse Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 was investigated. Lysis was followed optically at 540 nm by measuring the percent reduction in turbidity of freshly harvested log-phase cells suspended in Tris-maleate buffers within a wide range of pH (5.2 to 8.5) and molarity (0.01 to 0.2 M) and containing various amounts of enzyme and EDTA. In several instances, treated microorganisms were subsequently examined in thin sections by electron microscopy. Reductions in turbidity and clearing of suspensions occurred with small amounts of lysozyme (less than 1 microgram) under relatively alkaline conditions and at low ionic strength and in the presence of small amounts of EDTA (greater than 0.01 mM). Under the most alkaline conditions, EDTA alone effected turbidity reductions similar to those observed in the presence of lysozyme, which suggested that EDTA not only increased outer membrane permeability but also caused cell lysis. Ultrastructural analysis did not always correspond to turbidimetric observations. Cell lysis was virtually complete in suspensions containing both lysozyme and EDTA. However, in contrast to turbidimetric findings, a significant percentage of cells (greater than 25%) was lysed in the presence of lysozyme alone. Furthermore, significant damage occurred in the presence of EDTA alone. Spheroplast-like cell ghosts were present which surrounded condensed cytoplasm or relatively clear spaces. These findings further support the concept of the requirement for electron microscopy to assess lytic damage in addition to turbidimetric and biochemical methods. Our results are the first to demonstrate the remarkable sensitivity of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 to lysozyme and to show that EDTA not only affects outer membrane permeability but effects cell lysis, possibly through activation of autolytic enzymes at the cytoplasmic membrane. The exquisite sensitivity of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 to lysis could be

  8. Interleukin-1-like activity in capsular material from Haemophilus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, W; Kamin, S; Meghji, S; Wilson, M

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the activity of a bacterial surface component (capsular material, CM) in biological assays for interleukin-1 (IL-1). CM from the periodontal pathogen Haemophilus actinomycetemcomitans was tested in the following in vitro assays: mouse thymocyte proliferation (LAF assay), stimulation of collagenase and prostaglandin (PG) E2 synthesis by articular chondrocytes, and stimulation of PGE2 synthesis by fibroblasts. In all these assays, CM gave a response similar to an IL-1 preparation. This ability to mimic IL-1 suggests an important role for CM in both cell-mediated immunity and connective tissue destruction in localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP). PMID:3032779

  9. Characterization of the transduction pathway involved in c-fos and c-jun expression induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharides in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Castillo-Alemán, Ramiro

    2008-11-01

    Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disease caused by infection with oral bacteria that results in tooth exfoliation. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are a major component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative microorganisms and are involved in the inflammatory response. c-fos and c-jun are involved in pathological conditions such as inflammatory disorders. Inflammatory signaling cascades leading to c-fos activation in human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) are not well characterized. Thus, we have investigated the kinase pathways involved in c-fos and c-jun activation induced by LPS in human gingival fibroblasts. LPS promoted a dose- and time-dependent increase in c-fos transcription. Phosphoinositide-phospholipase C inhibitor (U-73122), protein kinase A inhibitor (H89), MEK1 inhibitor (PD 98,059), p38 inhibitor (SB203580), and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (genistein and herbimycin) attenuated the LPS effect, while the PI-3 K inhibitor (Wortmannin) had no effect on LPS-induced c-fos transcription. Protein kinase C inhibitors (Ro 31-8220, calphostin C, staurosporine, and chelerythrine chloride) also inhibited LPS-induced c-fos transcription. However, long-term treatment (24 -h) with the PKC activator tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (PMA) had no significant effect on LPS-induced transcription in HGFs. We also found an increase in c-jun expression in HGF stimulated with LPS. In addition, experiments using pharmacological inhibitors of individual mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and of protein kinase C (PKC) revealed that p38, ERK 1/2, and PKC are involved in LPS-induced c-jun expression. Our results indicate that LPS-induced c-fos and c-jun expressions are mediated by two different signaling pathways: one through phosphoinositide-phospholipase C via an upstream protein tyrosine kinase, which activates PKC isoforms that are insensitive to phorbol stress, and the second through activation of protein kinase A (PKA). Both kinases regulate the phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase ERK 1/2 and p38.

  10. Mannheimia haemolytica and Its Leukotoxin Cause Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation by Bovine Neutrophils▿

    PubMed Central

    Aulik, Nicole A.; Hellenbrand, Katrina M.; Klos, Heather; Czuprynski, Charles J.

    2010-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica is an important member of the bovine respiratory disease complex, which is characterized by abundant neutrophil infiltration into the alveoli and fibrin deposition. Recently several authors have reported that human neutrophils release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which are protein-studded DNA matrices capable of trapping and killing pathogens. Here, we demonstrate that the leukotoxin (LKT) of M. haemolytica causes NET formation by bovine neutrophils in a CD18-dependent manner. Using an unacylated, noncytotoxic pro-LKT produced by an ΔlktC mutant of M. haemolytica, we show that binding of unacylated pro-LKT stimulates NET formation despite a lack of cytotoxicity. Inhibition of LKT binding to the CD18 chain of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) on bovine neutrophils reduced NET formation in response to LKT or M. haemolytica cells. Further investigation revealed that NETs formed in response to M. haemolytica are capable of trapping and killing a portion of the bacterial cells. NET formation was confirmed by confocal microscopy and by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Prior exposure of bovine neutrophils to LKT enhanced subsequent trapping and killing of M. haemolytica cells in bovine NETs. Understanding NET formation in response to M. haemolytica and its LKT provides a new perspective on how neutrophils contribute to the pathogenesis of bovine respiratory disease. PMID:20823211

  11. A longitudinal microbiological investigation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Eikenella corrodens in juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mandell, R L

    1984-01-01

    Longitudinal clinical and microbiological monitoring of subjects with localized juvenile periodontitis indicated that Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Eikenella corrodens were significantly associated (P less than 0.05) with active tissue destruction. PMID:6381313

  12. Sequence diversity, cytotoxicity and antigenic similarities of the leukotoxin of isolates of Mannheimia species from mastitis in domestic sheep.

    PubMed

    Omaleki, Lida; Browning, Glenn F; Barber, Stuart R; Allen, Joanne L; Srikumaran, Subramaniam; Markham, Philip F

    2014-11-07

    Species within the genus Mannheimia are among the most important causes of ovine mastitis. Isolates of these species can express leukotoxin A (LktA), a primary virulence factor of these bacteria. To examine the significance of variation in the LktA, the sequences of the lktA genes in a panel of isolates from cases of ovine mastitis were compared. The cross-neutralising capacities of rat antisera raised against LktA of one Mannheimia glucosida, one haemolytic Mannheimia ruminalis, and two Mannheimia haemolytica isolates were also examined to assess the effect that variation in the lktA gene can have on protective immunity against leukotoxins with differing sequences. The lktA nucleotide distance between the M. haemolytica isolates was greater than between the M. glucosida isolates, with the M. haemolytica isolates divisible into two groups based on their lktA sequences. Comparison of the topology of phylogenetic trees of 16S rDNA and lktA sequences revealed differences in the relationships between some isolates, suggesting horizontal gene transfer. Cross neutralisation data obtained with monospecific anti-LktA rat sera were used to derive antigenic similarity coefficients for LktA from the four Mannheimia species isolates. Similarity coefficients indicated that LktA of the two M. haemolytica isolates were least similar, while LktA from M. glucosida was most similar to those for one of the M. haemolytica isolates and the haemolytic M. ruminalis isolate. The results suggested that vaccination with the M. glucosida leukotoxin would generate the greatest cross-protection against ovine mastitis caused by Mannheimia species with these alleles.

  13. Serology of oral Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and serotype distribution in human periodontal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Zambon, J J; Slots, J; Genco, R J

    1983-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans from the human oral cavity was serologically characterized with rabbit antisera to the type strain NCTC 9710; a number of reference strains, including Y4, ATCC 29522, ATCC 29523, ATCC 29524, NCTC 9709; and our own isolates representative of each of 10 biotypes. Using immunoabsorbed antisera, we identified three distinct serotypes by immunodiffusion and indirect immunofluorescence. Serotype a was represented by ATCC 29523 and SUNYaB 75; serotype b was represented by ATCC 29522 and Y4; and serotype c was represented by NCTC 9710 and SUNYaB 67. Indirect immunofluorescence revealed no reaction between the three A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype-specific antisera and 62 strains representing 23 major oral bacterial species. Distinct from the serotype antigens were at least one A. actinomycetemcomitans species common antigen and an antigen shared with other Actinobacillus species, Haemophilus aphrophilus, and Haemophilus paraphrophilus. All serotype a A. actinomycetemcomitans strains failed to ferment xylose, whereas all serotype b organisms fermented xylose. Serotype c included xylose-positive as well as xylose-negative strains. A total of 301 isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans from the oral cavity of 74 subjects were serologically categorized by indirect immunofluorescence with serotype-specific rabbit antisera. Each patient harbored only one serotype of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Fourteen healthy subjects, five diabetics, and seventeen adult periodontitis patients exhibited serotypes a and b in approximately equal frequency, whereas serotype c was found less frequently. In contrast, in 29 localized juvenile periodontitis patients, the incidence of serotype b was approximately two times higher than that of serotypes a or c, suggesting a particularly high periodontopathic potential of A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype b strains. In subjects infected with A. actinomycetemcomitans, serum antibodies were detected to the serotype

  14. Periodontitis‐associated pathogens P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans activate human CD14+ monocytes leading to enhanced Th17/IL‐17 responses

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wan‐Chien; van Asten, Saskia D.; Burns, Lachrissa A.; Evans, Hayley G.; Walter, Gina J.; Hashim, Ahmed; Hughes, Francis J.

    2016-01-01

    The Th17/IL‐17 pathway is implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontitis (PD), however the mechanisms are not fully understood. We investigated the mechanism by which the periodontal pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) promote a Th17/IL‐17 response in vitro, and studied IL‐17+ CD4+ T‐cell frequencies in gingival tissue and peripheral blood from patients with PD versus periodontally healthy controls. Addition of Pg or Aa to monocyte/CD4+ T‐cell co‐cultures promoted a Th17/IL‐17 response in vitro in a dose‐ and time‐dependent manner. Pg or Aa stimulation of monocytes resulted in increased CD40, CD54 and HLA‐DR expression, and enhanced TNF‐α, IL‐1β, IL‐6 and IL‐23 production. Mechanistically, IL‐17 production in Pg‐stimulated co‐cultures was partially dependent on IL‐1β, IL‐23 and TLR2/TLR4 signalling. Increased frequencies of IL‐17+ cells were observed in gingival tissue from patients with PD compared to healthy subjects. No differences were observed in IL‐17+ CD4+ T‐cell frequencies in peripheral blood. In vitro, Pg induced significantly higher IL‐17 production in anti‐CD3 mAb‐stimulated monocyte/CD4+ T‐cell co‐cultures from patients with PD compared to healthy controls. Our data suggest that periodontal pathogens can activate monocytes, resulting in increased IL‐17 production by human CD4+ T cells, a process that appears enhanced in patients with PD. PMID:27334899

  15. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans adheres to human gingival fibroblasts and modifies cytoskeletal organization.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Kawasaki-Cárdenas, Perla; Garcés, Carla Portillo; Román-Alvárez, Patricia; Barajas-Torres, Carolina; Contreras-Marmolejo, Luis Arturo

    2007-09-01

    Adherence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to human gingival fibroblast cells induces cytoskeletal reorganization. A. actinomycetemcomitans is considered a pathogenic bacteria involved in localized aggressive periodontitis. Studies with epithelial cells have shown an adherent capacity of bacteria that is increased under anaerobic conditions. For adherence to take place, there is a need for interaction between extracellular vesicles and bacterial fimbriae. However, molecular events associated with the adherence process are still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether A. actinomycetemcomitans adherence to human gingival fibroblasts promotes cytoskeletal reorganization. Adherence was determined with light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. For F-actin visualization, cells were treated with fluorescein-isothiocyanate-phalloidin and samples were examined with epifluorescence optics. Fluorescent was recorded on Kodak T-Max 400 film. We showed that A. actinomycetemcomitans adheres to human gingival fibroblast primary cultures, this property stimulating an increase in the intracellular calcium levels. In human gingival fibroblast primary cultures, we observed that maximal A. actinomycetemcomitans adherence took place 1.5h after culture infection occurred and remained for 6h. The adherence was associated with morphologic alterations and an increased in the intracellular calcium levels. These experiments suggest that A. actinomycetemcomitans adherence cause morphological alterations, induce actin stress fibers and recruitment of intracellular calcium levels.

  16. Cellular fatty acid composition of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Haemophilus aphrophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Braunthal, S D; Holt, S C; Tanner, A C; Socransky, S S

    1980-01-01

    Strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolated from deep pockets of patients with juvenile periodontitis were analyzed for their content of cellular fatty acids. Oral Haemophilus strains, morphologically and biochemically similar to Haemophilus aphrophilus, were also examined for their content of cellular fatty acids. The extractable lipids of the actinobacilli represented approximately 10% of the cell dry weight, with the bound lipids representing 2 to 5%. The major fatty acids consisted of myristic (C14:0) and palmitic (C16:0) acids and a C16:1 acid, possibly palmitoleic acid, accounting for 21, 35, and 31% of the total extractable fatty acids, respectively. Haemophilus strains had a similar cellular fatty acid content. PMID:7430333

  17. Transfection of non-susceptible cells with Ovis aries recombinant lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 renders susceptibility to Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannheimia haemolytica is an important etiological agent of pneumonia in domestic sheep (DS, Ovis aries). Leukotoxin (Lkt) produced by this organism is the principal virulence factor responsible for the acute inflammation and lung injury characteristic of M. haemolytica caused disease. Previously, w...

  18. Differential susceptibility of bighorn sheep and domestic sheep neutrophils to Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin is not due to differential expression of cell surface CD18

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bighorn sheep (BHS) are more susceptible to pneumonia caused by Mannheimia haemolytica (M. haemolytica) than are domestic sheep (DS). Leukotoxin produced by M. haemolytica is accepted as the critical virulence factor for BHS, based on the fact that Lkt-deletion mutants do not cause death of BHS. Al...

  19. Leukotoxin Diols from Ground Corncob Bedding Disrupt Estrous Cyclicity in Rats and Stimulate MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Markaverich, Barry M.; Crowley, Jan R.; Alejandro, Mary A.; Shoulars, Kevin; Casajuna, Nancy; Mani, Shaila; Reyna, Andrea; Sharp, John

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory demonstrated that high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of ground corncob bedding extracts characterized two components (peak I and peak II) that disrupted endocrine function in male and female rats and stimulated breast and prostate cancer cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. The active substances in peak I were identified as an isomeric mixture of 9,12-oxy-10,13-dihydroxyoctadecanoic acid and 10,13-oxy-9,12-dihydroxyoctadecanoic acid, collectively designated tetrahydrofurandiols (THF-diols). Studies presented here describe the purification and identification of the HPLC peak II component as 9,10-dihydroxy-12-octadecenoic acid (leukotoxin diol; LTX-diol), a well-known leukotoxin. A synthetic mixture of LTX-diol and 12,13-dihydroxy-9-octadecenoic acid (isoleukotoxin diol; i-LTX-diol) isomers was separated by HPLC, and each isomer stimulated (p < 0.001) MCF-7 cell proliferation in an equivalent fashion. The LTX-diol isomers failed to compete for [3H]estradiol binding to the estrogen receptor or nuclear type II sites, even though oral administration of very low doses of these compounds (>> 0.8 mg/kg body weight/day) disrupted estrous cyclicity in female rats. The LTX-diols did not disrupt male sexual behavior, suggesting that sex differences exist in response to these endocrine-disruptive agents. PMID:16330350

  20. Aggregatibacter aphrophilus brain abscess secondary to primary tooth extraction: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Maraki, Sofia; Papadakis, Ioannis S; Chronakis, Efkleidis; Panagopoulos, Dimitrios; Vakis, Antonis

    2016-02-01

    We report on a rare case of Aggregatibacter aphrophilus brain abscess of odontogenic origin in a 6-year-old previously healthy boy, who had close contact with a pet dog. The poodle was the most likely source of the infecting organism, which subsequently colonized the patient's oral cavity. The abscess was surgically removed and he recovered completely after prolonged antibiotic treatment with meropenem. We also review the relevant medical literature on A. aphrophilus pediatric brain abscesses.

  1. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and localized juvenile periodontitis. Clinical, microbiologic and histologic studies.

    PubMed

    Christersson, L A

    1993-01-01

    The present studies examined Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and its role in localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP). The distribution of the bacteria was studied in healthy normals, patients with adult periodontitis, diabetics, and those with LJP. Over 95% of the LJP patients harbored A. actinomycetemcomitans, whereas only 17% of healthy subjects, 21% of adult periodontitis patients, and 5% of diabetics were positive. All members of a LJP family harboring the organism yielded isolates of the same biotype and serotype. The transmission of the bacteria was studied after transfer of the bacteria, with periodontal probes from infected to healthy gingival sites, within the oral cavity of LJP patients. Newly colonized gingival sites, 50% of those involved, became free of A. actinomycetemcomitans after only 3 weeks. A purposely forceful inoculation contributed to a more predictable colonization (89%), but only prolonged the colonization with one week. Treatment of LJP lesions with scaling and root planing resulted in minimal clinical and microbiological changes during a 16 week follow-up period. However, gingival curettage and modified Widman flap surgery suppressed A. actinomycetemcomitans in 75% and 89% of the sites, and resulted in resolution of periodontal pocket depth and gain in attachment level. Gingival tissue specimens, from 35 LJP sites, 3 control sites, and one monkey biopsy, were studied to verify the hypothesis of gingival infiltration of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Bacteria were identified immunohistologically with rabbit antisera serospecific to the three A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes. Positive staining was observed in the tissue from all but one LJP patient. Twenty-eight (80%) lesions were positive for A. actinomycetemcomitans antigens in the gingival connective tissue, often with antigens located both between and within cells. The specimen from a culture positive control demonstrated no signs of invasion, similar to the monkey specimen

  2. In vitro susceptibilities of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to a number of antimicrobial combinations.

    PubMed Central

    Pavicić, M J; van Winkelhoff, A J; de Graaff, J

    1992-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibilities of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to 14 antimicrobial combinations were studied by using the checkerboard titration technique. The results, expressed as the range of the fractional inhibitory concentration indices, were as follows: for metronidazole or its hydroxymetabolite combined with cefixime, 0.2 to 0.6; for moxalactam, 0.2 to 0.6; for penicillin G, 0.3 to 0.6; for tobramycin, 0.8 to 2.0; for erythromycin, 0.8 to 1.7; for ciprofloxacin, 0.2 to 0.6; for tetracycline, 0.8 to 1.2. Our observations indicated that the beta-lactam antibiotics as well as ciprofloxacin act synergistically with both metronidazole and its hydroxymetabolite against A. actinomycetemcomitans. Synergistic interactions were independent of the individual MICs of the antibiotics tested. Erythromycin, tobramycin, and tetracycline combined with either metronidazole or its hydroxymetabolite showed additive to indifferent effects against the five strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans, with the fractional inhibitory concentration indices ranging from 0.8 to 2.0. A. actinomycetemcomitans was found to be highly susceptible to ciprofloxacin (MIC of ciprofloxacin for 90% of strains tested, 0.010 micrograms/ml) and cefixime (MIC of cefixime for 90% of strains tested, 0.8 micrograms/ml). The results indicate that in patients who are allergic to penicillin, cefixime and ciprofloxacin may be useful alternative antibiotics in combination with metronidazole for the treatment of A. actinomycetemcomitans-associated periodontitis. PMID:1482130

  3. Opsonic antibody activity against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in patients with rapidly progressive periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Sjöström, K; Darveau, R; Page, R; Whitney, C; Engel, D

    1992-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans has been closely associated with early-onset, severe periodontitis, and such patients often have serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies reactive with antigens of this gram-negative pathogen. We examined the functionality and potential importance of these antibodies. The opsonic activity against A. actinomycetemcomitans of sera from 30 patients with rapidly progressive periodontitis (RPP) and from 28 periodontally normal subjects was tested by using polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) chemiluminescence and bactericidal assays. Peak chemiluminescence values correlated strongly with killing observed in the PMN-dependent bactericidal assay (r = 0.88; P < 0.001). Neither the mean IgG titer nor the mean peak chemiluminescence differed significantly between the two groups. However, when the relationship between chemiluminescence and titer was examined, regression analysis showed that antibodies present in low-titer normal sera were significantly more effective at opsonizing A. actinomycetemcomitans than antibodies present in low-titer RPP patient sera (P = 0.04). Thus, periodontally normal individuals may be better able than RPP patients to clear A. actinomycetemcomitans in early stages of colonization, and anti-A. actinomycetemcomitans antibodies in RPP patients may be relatively ineffective in preventing infection by this organism. PMID:1398993

  4. Presence of bacteriophage Aa phi 23 correlates with the population genetic structure of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Haubek, D; Willi, K; Poulsen, K; Meyer, J; Kilian, M

    1997-02-01

    Several bacteriophages associated with the oral bacterium Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans have been identified. Lysogeny might affect the virulence of this bacterium, which has been implicated in the etiology of juvenile and adult periodontitis. We have determined the presence of bacteriophage Aa phi 23-related DNA sequences among 185 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains belonging to 2 well-characterized collections and have related the findings to the population genetic structure of the collections. 2 cloned Aa phi 23-specific DNA probes were used in Southern blot hybridization experiments to detect homologous sequences in whole-cell DNA of the strains. DNA from 65 (35%) of the 185 strains hybridized to either of the DNA probes. The majority (74%) of the hybridizing strains showed an identical hybridization pattern, indicating presence of phage Aa phi 23. Whole-cell DNA from the remaining hybridizing strains hybridized to the probes with different patterns, indicating that DNA sequences related to but different from phage Aa phi 23 occur in these strains. The majority (81%) of the strains which harbored phage Aa phi 23 were of serotype a, whereas serotype d strains appeared to be resistant to infection with this phage. There was a clear correlation between hybridization patterns and genetic subdivisions based on our previous population genetic analyses of A. actinomycetemcomitans. However, there was no significant correlation between occurrence of Aa phi 23 among A. actinomycetemcomitans strains and the periodontal status of the patients from whom the isolates were obtained, suggesting that this bacteriophage does not significantly influence the virulence of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  5. Phylogenetic diversity of Pasteurellaceae and horizontal gene transfer of leukotoxin in wild and domestic sheep.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Scott T; Cassirer, E Frances; Weiser, Glen C; Safaee, Shirin

    2007-01-01

    Wild and domestic animal populations are known to be sources and reservoirs of emerging diseases. There is also a growing recognition that horizontal genetic transfer (HGT) plays an important role in bacterial pathogenesis. We used molecular phylogenetic methods to assess diversity and cross-transmission rates of Pasteurellaceae bacteria in populations of bighorn sheep, Dall's sheep, domestic sheep and domestic goats. Members of the Pasteurellaceae cause an array of deadly illnesses including bacterial pneumonia known as "pasteurellosis", a particularly devastating disease for bighorn sheep. A phylogenetic analysis of a combined dataset of two RNA genes (16S ribosomal RNA and RNAse P RNA) revealed remarkable evolutionary diversity among Pasteurella trehalosi and Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica bacteria isolated from sheep and goats. Several phylotypes appeared to associate with particular host species, though we found numerous instances of apparent cross-transmission among species and populations. Statistical analyses revealed that host species, geographic locale and biovariant classification, but not virulence, correlated strongly with Pasteurellaceae phylogeny. Sheep host species correlated with P. trehalosi isolates phylogeny (PTP test; P=0.002), but not with the phylogeny of M. haemolytica isolates, suggesting that P. trehalosi bacteria may be more host specific. With regards to populations within species, we also discovered a strong correlation between geographic locale and isolate phylogeny in the Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep (PTP test; P=0.001). We also investigated the potential for HGT of the leukotoxin A (lktA) gene, which produces a toxin that plays an integral role in causing disease. Comparative analysis of the combined RNA gene phylogeny and the lktA phylogenies revealed considerable incongruence between the phylogenies, suggestive of HGT. Furthermore, we found identical lktA alleles in unrelated bacterial species, some of which had been isolated

  6. Structural proteins of the Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans bacteriophage phi Aa.

    PubMed

    Stevens, R H; Hammond, B F; Fine, D H

    1990-08-01

    øAa is an A1 morphotype bacteriophage which infects certain strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis of dissociated, purified phi Aa particles revealed 7 major structural proteins (P1-P7) ranging in size from 17.5 to 52.7 kilodaltons (Kd). Treatment of the intact phage particles with 67% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) resulted in the separation of the virion head and tail subunits. Purification of the head subunits was accomplished by sucrose density gradient centrifugation of the DMSO-treated phage particles. The purified head subunits were composed of a single protein having an electrophoretic mobility which corresponded to a 39.5 Kd protein (P3) of the intact virus. Raising the pH of a purified phi Aa suspension to 12.7 disrupted the head subunits, as well as the tail tube and tail fibers, releasing intact contractile tail sheaths. The tail sheaths were collected by centrifugation. The purified tail sheaths were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and were found to be composed of two proteins (P1 and P2) having molecular weights of 52.7 and 41.2 Kd respectively. The location of each of the 4 remaining major structural proteins in the phi Aa virion remains to be determined.

  7. The heat-modifiable outer membrane protein of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans: relationship to OmpA proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, M E

    1991-01-01

    The outer membrane of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans contains a 29-kDa protein which exhibits heat modifiability on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and represents a major target for immunoglobulin G antibody in sera of periodontitis patients colonized by this organism. In the present study, the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the 29-kDa outer membrane protein was determined and compared with reported sequences for other known proteins. The heat-modifiable outer membrane protein of A. actinomycetemcomitans was found to exhibit significant N-terminal homology with the OmpA proteins of other gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, this protein reacted with antiserum raised against the purified OmpA protein of Escherichia coli K-12. Whether the heat-modifiable OMP of A. actinomycetemcomitans also shares functional properties of OmpA proteins, particularly with respect to bacteriophage receptor activity, is presently under investigation. Images PMID:2050416

  8. Evidence for invasion of a human oral cell line by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, D H; Sreenivasan, P K; Fives-Taylor, P M

    1991-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, an oral bacterial species associated with periodontal disease, was found to invade human cell lines. Invasion was demonstrated by recovery of viable organisms from gentamicin-treated KB cell monolayers and by light and electron microscopy. Internalization occurred through a cytochalasin D-sensitive process. Invasion efficiencies of some A. actinomycetemcomitans strains were comparable to those of invasive members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Differences in invasiveness were correlated with bacterial colonial morphology. Smooth variants invaded more proficiently than rough variants. A. actinomycetemcomitans can undergo a smooth-to-rough colonial morphology shift which results in the loss of invasiveness. Coordinated regulation of genes involved in the rough-to-smooth phenotypic transitions may play a role in the episodic nature of periodontal disease. Images PMID:1855989

  9. Subclass and molecular form of immunoglobulin A antibodies to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, T A; Byres, L; Gardner, M; Van Dyke, T E

    1991-01-01

    Patients with juvenile periodontitis frequently have elevated levels of serum immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies to antigens of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. IgA occurs in two subclasses, IgA1 and IgA2, and in monomeric and polymeric forms. Because IgA1 is susceptible to cleavage by IgA1 proteases produced by microorganisms found at mucosal sites and in the gingival crevice, we wished to determine the IgA subclass distribution of antibodies to antigens of A. actinomycetemcomitans. The molecular form was examined because it may indicate the origin of the IgA and because the form differs in acute and chronic infections. There is also evidence that monomeric and polymeric IgA have different biological functions. Serum was taken from patients with juvenile periodontitis before and at intervals during and after initiation of therapy. IgA subclass distribution was determined against a sonic extracts of A. actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 2952a (serotype b) by using monoclonal anti-subclass reagents in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. To determine the molecular form of the antibodies, sera were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography on a size-exclusion column. Fractions were assayed for antibody activity by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and described above. The results of the subclass analysis of the sera indicated that while both IgA1 and IgA2 antibodies to A. actinomycetemcomitans sonic extract are often found before, during, and after treatment, IgA1 antibodies dominated the response. There was a predominance of monomeric IgA1 antibodies to A. actinomycetemcomitans sonic extracts in most samples before, during, and after treatment. The monomeric form is consistent with what is seen in other chronic infections. The predominance of IgA1 antibodies implies that any protective effects of the IgA response to A. actinomycetemcomitans could be compromised by microbial IgA1 proteases. PMID:1997415

  10. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strains Y4 and N27 adhere to hydroxyapatite by distinctive mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Kagermeier, A S; London, J

    1985-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strains Y4 and N27 absorb to spheroidal hydroxyapatite in roughly the same numbers per milligram of substrate and with the same tenacity as two previously tested Cytophaga species. Although the two strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans exhibited similar affinities and number of binding sites for SHA, their response to enzyme treatment and heating were very different. The capacity of strain Y4 to attach to spheroidal hydroxyapatite was diminished by treatment with proteases and phospholipases and was unaffected by neuraminidase, while strain N27 was unaffected by proteases and phospholipases and lost its binding capabilities when treated with neuraminidase. Images PMID:3972445

  11. Identification of genomic clonal types of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by restriction endonuclease analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Han, N; Hoover, C I; Winkler, J R; Ng, C Y; Armitage, G C

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate its utility in discriminating different strains, restriction endonuclease analysis was applied to 12 strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (3 serotype a, 5 serotype b, and 4 serotype c strains). DNA isolated from each strain was digested by 12 different restriction endonucleases, and the electrophoretic banding patterns of the resulting DNA fragments were compared. The DNA fragment patterns produced by SalI, XhoI, and XbaI for the 12 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains were simple (less than 30 bands) and allowed us to recognize easily 10 distinct genomic clonal types. The three serotype a strains exhibited distinctly different clonal types from one another, the five serotype b strains exhibited an additional four distinct clonal types, and the four serotype c strains showed another three different clonal types. The other endonucleases tested were less useful in typing A. actinomycetemcomitans. We conclude that restriction endonuclease analysis is a powerful tool for typing and discerning genetic heterogeneity and homogeneity among A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. It should, therefore, be very useful for epidemiologic studies. Images PMID:1761677

  12. Immunoglobulin G subclass response of localized juvenile periodontitis patients to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, M E; Hamilton, R G

    1992-01-01

    Sera from patients with localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP) often contain markedly elevated immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody titers to serospecific determinants of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. The objective of the present study was to define the subclass distribution of the IgG antibody response of LJP patients to this key cell envelope antigen. IgG subclass antibody responses to A. actinomycetemcomitans LPS were quantified in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with human IgG subclass-restricted monoclonal antibodies. Serum antibody concentrations were calculated by heterologous interpolation of a dose-response curve constructed by using human-mouse chimeric antibodies. Sixteen of 17 LJP serum samples tested contained significantly greater concentrations of IgG2 than IgG1 antibodies reactive toward A. actinomycetemcomitans LPS. Geometric mean antibody concentrations of IgG1 and IgG2 were 7.8 and 136.5 micrograms/ml, respectively, among LJP patients with elevated IgG titers to LPS (94% of whom were black). However, both IgG1 and IgG2 antibody concentrations were significantly greater than the corresponding values obtained from sera from LJP patients with low IgG titers to LPS. Among LJP patients with elevated IgG titers to A. actinomycetemcomitans LPS, serum IgG2 concentration and total IgG concentration were also significantly elevated compared with both low-titered LJP sera and sera from periodontally healthy race-matched controls. The results of this study indicate that the humoral response of a predominantly black population of LJP patients to A. actinomycetemcomitans includes the production of LPS-reactive IgG antibodies which are primarily of the IgG2 subclass. PMID:1563768

  13. Effect of adoptive transfer of cloned Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-specific T helper cells on periodontal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, K; Eastcott, J W; Taubman, M A; Smith, D J; Cox, D S

    1991-01-01

    Previously we isolated several Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-specific T-cell clones from the spleens and lymph nodes of immunized Rowett rats. These clones were characterized as W3/13+, W3/25+, OX8-, and OX22-, suggesting a T helper (Th) phenotype. In the current experiments, 10(6) cells from a single A. actinomycetemcomitans-specific clone (A3) were adoptively transferred to a group (AaTh; n = 13) of normal heterozygous rats (rnu/+) at 28 days of age. A second group received no T cells (AaNT; n = 15), and a third group also received no T cells (NAaNT, n = 11). Beginning 1 day after transfer, the first and second groups were infected orally with A. actinomycetemcomitans for 5 consecutive days. The presence of infection was confirmed immediately after challenge and after 5 months, when the experiments were ended. Significantly higher numbers of lymphocytes were recovered from the gingival tissues of the first group than from those of either of the other groups. Also, this group showed significantly elevated (P less than 0.01) serum immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M antibody to A. actinomycetemcomitans in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay when compared with both other groups. Bone loss was significantly lower (P less than 0.01) in recipients of A. actinomycetemcomitans-specific cloned cells when compared with the other infected group and was approximately equal to the bone loss of the uninfected group. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that T-cell regulation can affect periodontal disease. In this regulation, T helper cells appear to interfere with periodontal bone loss. PMID:1825991

  14. Cellular fatty acid and soluble protein composition of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and related organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Calhoon, D A; Mayberry, W R; Slots, J

    1981-01-01

    The cellular fatty acid and protein content of twenty-five representative strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetecomitans isolated from juvenile and adult periodontitis patients was compared to that of 15 reference strains of oral and nonoral Actinobacillus species and Haemophilus aphrophilus. Trimethylsilyl derivatives of the fatty acid methyl esters were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography. The predominant fatty acids of all 40 strains examined were 14:0, 3-OH 14:0, 16 delta, and 16:0. Actinobacillus seminis (ATCC 15768) was unlike the other strains examined because of a greater amount of 14:0 detected. The soluble protein analysis using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that A. actinomycetemcomitans, H. aphrophilus, and nonoral Actinobacillus species possessed distinct protein profiles attesting to the validity of separating these organisms into different species. Established biotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans could not be differentiated on the basis of fatty acid or protein profiles. PMID:7287893

  15. Immune suppression induced by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans: effects on immunoglobulin production by human B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shenker, B J; Vitale, L A; Welham, D A

    1990-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans produces an immunosuppressive factor (ISF) which has been shown to suppress mitogen- and antigen-induced DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis in human T lymphocytes. In this study, we examined purified A. actinomycetemcomitans ISF for its ability to alter immunoglobulin production by human B cells. The ISF caused a dose-dependent inhibition of pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-induced immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM production. Preexposure to ISF was not required to achieve maximal inhibition of immunoglobulin synthesis, as previously observed for its effect on T-cell activation. Nevertheless, the ISF appeared to act by irreversibly affecting the early stages of cell activation. While PWM-induced immunoglobulin production is under the influence of T-regulatory circuits, it appears that the ISF interacts directly with B cells. First, ISF failed to alter either the synthesis of interleukin-2 (IL-2) or the expression of IL-2 receptors on T cells. Second, experiments in which individual purified populations of cells were exposed to ISF, washed, and placed back into tissue culture indicated that when all cells (i.e., T cells, B cells, and monocytes) were exposed to ISF, significant suppression was observed. However, when only one cell population was treated with ISF, suppression of both IgG and IgM synthesis was observed only when the B-cell-enriched population was exposed to ISF. These results in conjunction with our earlier findings suggest that the ISF functions via the activation of a regulatory subpopulation of B lymphocytes, which in turn either directly or indirectly (via suppressor T cells) downregulate both B- and T-cell responsiveness. Furthermore, it is hypothesized that patients who harbor A. actinomycetemcomitans could suffer from local or systemic immune suppression. This suppression may enhance the pathogenicity of A. actinomycetemcomitans itself or that of some other opportunistic organism. Images PMID:2254014

  16. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans serotype e--biotypes, genetic diversity and distribution in relation to periodontal status.

    PubMed

    Doğan, B; Saarela, M H; Jousimies-Somer, H; Alaluusua, S; Asikainen, S

    1999-04-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolates from 356 individuals were screened for identification of serotype e in order to investigate its distribution in relation to periodontal status. From subjects with serotype e, 1-6 isolates per subject (n = 61) were genotyped using arbitrarily primed-polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR) and apaH gene polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment-length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis to determine the genetic heterogeneity within the serotype. Furthermore, one serotype e strain per subject was tested for fermentation of 8 carbohydrates for biotyping. Among patients with adult periodontitis (n = 219), localized juvenile periodontitis (n = 55) and other forms of early-onset periodontitis (n = 18) serotypes b, a and c, respectively, were the most frequently detected serotypes. Non-periodontitis subjects (n = 64) were predominantly colonized with serotype c. Serotype e was found in 30 (14%) adult periodontitis patients, 2 (11%) early-onset periodontitis patients and in 5 (8%) non-periodontitis individuals, but in none of the 55 localized juvenile periodontitis patients. AP-PCR distinguished 3 and apaH gene PCR-RFLP analysis 2 genotypes among the 61 A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype e isolates, one genotype per subject. The AP-PCR genotypes 1 and 3 represented the apaH genotype 1 and the AP-PCR genotype 2 the apaH genotype 2. On the basis of variable fermentation of galactose and xylose, 3 biotypes among A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype e were established. Contrary to the absence of A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype e in localized juvenile periodontitis patients, its detection frequency was comparable among other forms of periodontitis and periodontal health. Clinical serotype e isolates form at least 2 genetic types and 3 biotypes.

  17. DNA analysis of temperate bacteriophage Aa(phi)23 isolated from actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Willi, K; Meyer, J

    1998-05-01

    The DNA of the temperate bacteriophage Aaphi23 isolated from the oral bacterium Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was examined structurally both in the phage head and in the prophage. The DNA in phage particles comprises 44 kb linear molecules with a terminal redundancy of 1.6 kb, which represent circular permutations. Thus, DNA is packaged into phage heads by the headful mechanism. The Aaphi23 prophage is integrated into the host chromosome.

  18. Antigens of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans recognized by patients with juvenile periodontitis and periodontally normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Sims, T J; Moncla, B J; Darveau, R P; Page, R C

    1991-01-01

    Most juvenile periodontitis patients respond to infection by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by producing serum antibodies. Specific antigens inducing the humoral immune response have not been identified, nor has the role of the resulting antibodies in disease progression been determined. Adsorbed and unadsorbed sera from juvenile periodontitis patients and normal subjects were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blots (immunoblots), using digested and undigested bacterial sonicates and French pressure cell fractions to determine the biochemical class, cross-reactivity, and cellular location of the antigens in different A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes. Antigens detected by using high-titer sera included the following: (i) serotype-specific nonprotein material located on the cell surface, (ii) soluble-fraction proteins showing highly variable antibody binding, (iii) cross-reactive proteins, and (iv) a protein present in soluble and cell wall fractions and immunopositive for all sera tested. In addition, one apparently nonprotein component that was enriched in the cell wall fraction was observed. Sera with high immunoglobulin G titers to one, two, three, or none of the three A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes were observed. There was a high degree of variation from one patient to another in the humoral immune response to serotype-specific and cross-reactive antigens. As demonstrated by whole-cell adsorption experiments, the serotype-specific surface antigen accounted for approximately 72 to 90% of the total antibody-binding activity for sera with titers greater than 100-fold above background, while cross-reactive antigen accounted for less than 28%. Antibody binding the whole-cell sonicate for high-titer sera was inhibited 90% by lipopolysaccharide from the same serotype, strongly suggesting that lipopolysaccharide is the immunodominant antigen class. Images PMID:1705243

  19. Cloning and sequencing of part of the S10 operon from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans FDC Y4.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, H; Hotokezaka, H; Ohara, N; Kimura, M; Takagi, O; Yamada, T

    1997-06-01

    We have cloned and sequenced the 5.2 kb EcoRI fragment that contained part of the S10 operon from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans FDC Y4. The order of the ribosomal protein genes was identical to that of the S10 operon of Haemophilus influenzae and Escherichia coli. The deduced amino acid sequences of ribosomal proteins in this operon displayed significant homologies (65.3%-100%) to those of H. influenzae, E. coli, Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Phylogenetic trees obtained for these ribosomal proteins were similar to that obtained for 16S rRNA.

  20. Unconventional N-Linked Glycosylation Promotes Trimeric Autotransporter Function in Kingella kingae and Aggregatibacter aphrophilus

    PubMed Central

    Rempe, Katherine A.; Spruce, Lynn A.; Porsch, Eric A.; Seeholzer, Steven H.; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glycosylation is a widespread mechanism employed by both eukaryotes and bacteria to increase the functional diversity of their proteomes. The nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae glycosyltransferase HMW1C mediates unconventional N-linked glycosylation of the adhesive protein HMW1, which is encoded in a two-partner secretion system gene cluster that also encodes HMW1C. In this system, HMW1 is modified in the cytoplasm by sequential transfer of hexose residues. In the present study, we examined Kingella kingae and Aggregatibacter aphrophilus homologues of HMW1C that are not encoded near a gene encoding an obvious acceptor protein. We found both homologues to be functional glycosyltransferases and identified their substrates as the K. kingae Knh and the A. aphrophilus EmaA trimeric autotransporter proteins. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis revealed multiple sites of N-linked glycosylation on Knh and EmaA. Without glycosylation, Knh and EmaA failed to facilitate wild-type levels of bacterial autoaggregation or adherence to human epithelial cells, establishing that glycosylation is essential for proper protein function. PMID:26307167

  1. Gene cloning of an Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 antigen which reacts with peripheral blood sera in patients with advanced destructive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, S; Hata, S; Ishikawa, I; Tsuchida, N

    1990-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans has been implicated in the aetiology of juvenile periodontitis and advanced destructive periodontitis. Levels of IgG antibody against A. actinomycetemcomitans in peripheral blood sera of patients with advanced destructive periodontitis are high, as are those against Bacteroides gingivalis. To clone the genes of antigens reactive with sera of such patients, a library of the A. actinomycetemcomitans strain Y4 DNA in lambda L47 was constructed and then screened, using an immunochemical detection method, with serum from a patient with the advanced disease. Six clones from among nearly 1000 reacted with the serum and also with that of another patient. They were designated 3, 4, 6, 7, 8 and 9. Restriction enzyme and Southern blot analyses indicated that clones 8 and 9 were identical and that all the clones were overlapping because they shared in common the 4 and 5 kbp HincII DNA fragments of A. actinomycetemcomitans. The cloned DNA fragment hybridized to the DNA of two other strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans but not to those of six periodontopathic bacteria examined. These findings suggest that a DNA sequence encoding an A. actinomycetemcomitans strain Y4 antigen strongly reactive with sera of patients with advanced destructive periodontitis was cloned. This sequence is present specifically in A. actinomycetemcomitans but not in other bacteria isolated from patients with periodontal diseases. Thus, the cloned DNA could serve as a probe for the diagnosis of periodontitis.

  2. Distinctive characteristics of transcriptional profiles from two epithelial cell lines upon interaction with Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Mans, J J; Baker, H V; Oda, D; Lamont, R J; Handfield, M

    2006-08-01

    Transcriptional profiling and gene ontology analyses were performed to investigate the unique responses of two different epithelial cell lines to an Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans challenge. A total of 2867 genes were differentially regulated among all experimental conditions. The analysis of these 2867 genes revealed that the predominant specific response to infection in HeLa cells was associated with the regulation of enzyme activity, RNA metabolism, nucleoside and nucleic acid transport and protein modification. The predominant specific response in immortalized human gingival keratinocytes (IHGK) was associated with the regulation of angiogenesis, chemotaxis, transmembrane receptor protein tyrosine kinase signaling, cell differentiation, apoptosis and response to stress. Of particular interest, stress response genes were significantly - yet differently - affected in both cell lines. In HeLa cells, only three regulated genes impacted the response to stress, and the response to unfolded protein was the only term that passed the ontology filters. This strikingly contrasted with the profiles obtained for IHGK, in which 61 regulated genes impacted the response to stress and constituted an extensive network of cell responses to A. actinomycetemcomitans interaction (response to pathogens, oxidative stress, unfolded proteins, DNA damage, starvation and wounding). Hence, while extensive similarities were found in the transcriptional profiles of these two epithelial cell lines, significant differences were highlighted. These differences were predominantly found in pathways that are associated with host-pathogen interactions.

  3. Purification and characterization of the serotype c antigen from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Zambon, J J; Slots, J; Miyasaki, K; Linzer, R; Cohen, R; Levine, M; Genco, R J

    1984-01-01

    The serotype c antigen from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was purified with fractional ethanol precipitation of cell-free culture supernatant, sequential ion-exchange chromatography, and gel filtration chromatography. The preparation obtained demonstrated a single precipitin line in immunodiffusion, immunoelectrophoresis, and crossed immunoelectrophoresis when rabbit antisera to serotype c whole bacterial cells were used. No immunological reaction was detected with antisera to serotype c lipopolysaccharide, indicating that lipopolysaccharide was not present in the preparation. The serotype c antigen was composed of 95% carbohydrate, 2% protein, and 3.1% phosphate. Gas chromatographic analysis of the antigen obtained from growth in either complex or chemically defined media revealed that the carbohydrate constituent was composed of 84 to 90.1% mannose, 4.8 to 16% glucose, 1.9% N-acetylglucosamine, 1.4% fucose, and 0.2% galactose. The present data suggest that A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype c antigen is predominantly a mannose-containing carbohydrate suggestive of a mannan. Images PMID:6423542

  4. Identification and characterization of the major cell envelope proteins of oral strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Di Rienzo, J M; Spieler, E L

    1983-01-01

    The major cell envelope protein compositions of seven Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strains of human origin were compared by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The major envelope polypeptides were homogeneous, in relation to molecular weight, in all of the strains that were examined. The characterization of the five major proteins, designated Env1 through Env5, in the leukotoxic strain Y4 revealed that proteins Env2 to -5 may reside in the outer membrane as suggested by differential detergent extractions and 125I-labeling experiments. The proteins did not demonstrate covalent or ionic interactions with the peptidoglycan; however, one protein, Env2, displayed heat-modifiable properties, having apparent molecular weights of 32,000 and 45,000 when heated in sodium dodecyl sulfate at 50 and 100 degrees C, respectively. The protein composition of the extracellular "bleb" material, normally released by strain Y4, was determined, and proteins Env1 to -4 were the predominant protein species found. A comparison of the cell envelope proteins of strain Y4 with those of other members of the human oral flora, including species within the genera Capnocytophaga, Bacteroides, and Fusobacterium, revealed distinct differences on the basis of molecular size and heat-modifiable properties. However, the membrane proteins of Haemophilus aphrophilus showed a remarkable degree of homology with those of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Images PMID:6401694

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of MacA from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans

    SciTech Connect

    Piao, Shunfu; Xu, Yongbin; Ha, Nam-Chul

    2008-05-01

    A periplasmic membrane-fusion protein MacA from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, an essential component of the multidrug efflux pump in Gram-negative bacteria, was crystallized. Periplasmic membrane-fusion proteins (MFPs) are an essential component of the multidrug efflux pump in Gram-negative bacteria. They play a crucial role in bridging the outer membrane porin TolC and two distinct types of inner membrane transporters. The MFP MacA bridges the inner membrane ABC-type multidrug transporter MacB and the outer membrane porin TolC. MacA from the pathogenic bacterium Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was expressed in Escherichia coli B834 (DE3) and the recombinant protein was purified using Ni–NTA affinity, Q anion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatography. The purified MacA protein was crystallized using the vapour-diffusion method. A MAD diffraction data set was collected to a resolution of 3.0 Å at 100 K. The crystal belongs to space group P622, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 109.2, c = 255.4 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°, and contains one molecule in the asymmetric unit.

  6. Occurrence of temperate bacteriophages in different Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans serotypes isolated from periodontally healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Willi, K; Sandmeier, H; Asikainen, S; Saarela, M; Meyer, J

    1997-02-01

    The occurrence of temperate bacteriophages was studied in 34 isolates of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans derived from 27 periodontally healthy Finnish individuals both by lysis/plaque assays and by DNA hybridizations. In addition the serotype, the ribotype and the arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR) profile were determined for each A. actinomycetemcomitans strain. Fourteen isolates showed hybridization patterns very similar to that of a known lysogen when probed with the genome of the previously characterized temperate phage Aa phi 23. Only 6 of these 14 strains had produced lysis or single plaques on suitable indicator strains. Phage Aa phi 247 derived from one of these lysogens was indistinguishable from Aa phi 23 by electron microscopy, and the genomes showed highly related DNA hybridization patterns. The remaining 20 isolates exhibited hybridization patterns very different from that of Aa phi 23 DNA. Seven of these strains also gave lysis or single plaques, suggesting that 21 of the 34 strains were lysogenic. These data indicate that the prophages per se do not represent a virulence factor exclusively associated with periodontal disease. Presence of an Aa phi 23-related prophage correlated with serotype a and AP-PCR type 1 of the bacterial host. This may indicate that Aa phi 23 and related phages have a limited host range.

  7. Resistance of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and differential susceptibility of oral Haemophilus species to the bactericidal effects of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaki, K T; Wilson, M E; Reynolds, H S; Genco, R J

    1984-01-01

    We compared the sensitivities of oral and nonoral isolates of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Haemophilus segnis, H. aphrophilus, and H. paraphrophilus to the bactericidal action of reagent hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Susceptibility to a range of H2O2 concentrations (10(-6) to 10(-3) M) was assessed by incubating bacterial suspensions for 1 h at 37 degrees C in the presence of H2O2 and plating on chocolate agar to determine the concentration of H2O2 that would produce a 50% reduction in CFU (50% lethal dose). As a group, A. actinomycetemcomitans was more resistant to H2O2 than the oral haemophili, and H. aphrophilus was much more sensitive than all other organisms tested. The range of 50% lethal dose values for A. actinomycetemcomitans was between 8.5 X 10(-5) and 10(-3) M H2O2 or above. In contrast, H. aphrophilus exhibited 50% lethal dose values from below 1 X 10(-6) to 3.4 X 10(-4) M H2O2. The resistance of A. actinomycetemcomitans to H2O2 may be sufficient to protect these organisms from direct H2O2-mediated killing by host phagocytes. PMID:6500706

  8. Despite large-scale T cell activation, only a minor subset of T cells responding in vitro to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans differentiate into effector T cells.

    PubMed

    Zadeh, H H; Tanavoli, S; Haines, D D; Kreutzer, D L

    2000-06-01

    Recent studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans has a potent T cell stimulatory effect, activating more than half of all T cells. However, since the fate of these activated T cells was not known, the present study sought to determine whether all of these T cells differentiate into effector cells. To that end, the intracellular expression of T cell cytokines (IL-2, IFN-gamma, IL-4 and IL-10) in response to A. actinomycetemcomitans was determined by flow cytometry. Results demonstrated a time-dependent increase in the expression of the cytokines, most reaching peak levels at 24-48 h. At 48 h, the proportion of T cells expressing each of the cytokines were as follows: IL-2 (1.7%+/-0.3), IFN-gamma (1.8%+/-0.5), IL-4 (1.0%+/-0.2) and IL-10 (1.5%+/-0.5). These data indicated that only 2-5% of all T cells stimulated with A. actinomycetemcomitans expressed any T cell cytokines. The finding of large-scale T cell activation in the absence of cytokine expression suggests that the activation of T cells in response to A. actinomycetemcomitans is incomplete. To investigate this phenomenon, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were cultured with A. actinomycetemcomitans for 24 h followed by sorting of the activated (CD69+) cells by immunomagnetic separation and restimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin. Results demonstrated that nearly 90% of the T cells were unresponsive to further restimulation. A possible explanation for this unresponsiveness is the induction of clonal anergy among the responding T cells. To determine possible preferential effects of the stimulation on specific cytokines, the expression of each cytokine among T cells responding to A. actinomycetemcomitans was compared to the maximum levels achieved by PMA + ionomycin stimulation. Results showed that number of IL-2+ and IFN-gamma+ T cells observed in response to A. actinomycetemcomitans were between 2% and 7% of those seen in

  9. Bacteriocin production by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolated from the oral cavity of humans with periodontal disease, periodontally healthy subjects and marmosets.

    PubMed

    Lúcia, Lima Francisca; Farias, Flávio F; Eustáquio, Costa José; Auxiliadora, Maria; Carvalho, R; Alviano, Celuta S; Farias, Luiz M

    2002-01-01

    The ability of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to produce bacteriocin has rarely been reported. Antagonistic substance production may confer an important ecological advantage for the producer microorganisms, especially in a competitive ecosystem such as the oral cavity. In the present study, 75 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains isolated from the oral cavity of human patients with periodontal disease, periodontally healthy subjects and marmosets, as well as two reference strains (A. actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 29523 and FDC Y4) were evaluated for auto-, iso-, and heteroantagonistic activity. Fifty-one (68.00%) strains exhibited antagonistic activity; heteroantagonism was observed more often than isoantagonism. Isolated strains antagonized 17 different species of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria from the oral and nonoral microbiota. Sensitivity to heat and to proteolytic enzymes constituted strong evidence that the antagonistic substance has a proteic nature. Taken together, our data enabled us to confirm that the antagonistic substance detected was a bacteriocin. The wide spectrum of activity indicates the possibility that more than one antagonistic substance is produced and that these substances play an important role in the ecological balance of the oral ecosystem.

  10. Specific genetic variants of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans correlate with disease and health in a regional population of families with localized juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    DiRienzo, J M; Slots, J; Sixou, M; Sol, M A; Harmon, R; McKay, T L

    1994-01-01

    A geographically homogeneous population of 83 subjects, from 21 families with localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP), and 35 healthy control subjects was monitored, over a 5-year period, for the presence of the periodontal pathogen Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis was used to monitor the distribution of genetic variants of this bacterium in LJP-susceptible subjects that converted from a healthy to a diseased periodontal status. A. actinomycetemcomitans was cultured from 57% of the LJP family members accessioned into the study. Nine of 36 LJP-susceptible subjects, in seven families, developed signs of periodontal destruction. All but one of these conversion subjects harbored A. actinomycetemcomitans. Bacterial variants representative of a single RFLP group (II) showed the strongest correlation with conversion (P < 0.002). Six of nine conversion subjects were infected with A. actinomycetemcomitans from this group. RFLP group II variants also prevailed in 8 of 22 probands but were absent in the 35 healthy control subjects. In contrast to the selective distribution of group II variants is diseased individuals, variants belonging to RFLP groups XIII and XIV were found exclusively in the control subjects. Thus, the use of RFLP to type clinical isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans has resulted in the identification of genetic variants that predominate in LJP and health. These results indicate that studies concerned with the pathogenicity of this bacterium in LJP should be focused on the group II variants. PMID:7913695

  11. Application of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for Identification of the Fastidious Pediatric Pathogens Aggregatibacter, Eikenella, Haemophilus, and Kingella

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Eleanor A.; Blecker-Shelly, Deborah; Montgomery, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of matrix-assisted laser desorption–ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in the identification of Haemophilus, Aggregatibacter, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, and Kingella (HACEK) species was compared to that of phenotypic methods (Remel RapID and Vitek 2). Overall, Vitek MS correctly identified more isolates, incorrectly identified fewer isolates, and failed to identify fewer isolates than both phenotypic methods. PMID:23966506

  12. Murine macrophage interleukin-1 release by capsularlike serotype-specific polysaccharide antigens of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, T; Nishihara, T; Ishihara, Y; Amano, K; Shibuya, N; Moro, I; Koga, T

    1991-01-01

    Serotype-specific polysaccharide antigens (SPAs) were extracted from whole cells of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 29523 (serotype a), Y4 (serotype b), and NCTC 9710 (serotype c) by autoclaving and purified by chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-25 and Sephacryl S-300 columns. Y4 SPA induced interleukin-1 (IL-1) release by P388D1 murine macrophages. Polymyxin B had virtually no effect on the release of IL-1. Rabbit anti-murine IL-1 serum strongly suppressed the proliferation of C3H/HeJ mouse thymocytes induced with the culture supernatants of Y4 SPA-stimulated P388D1 cells and a submitogenic dose of concanavalin A. Gel filtration of the culture supernatants of Y4 SPA-stimulated macrophages on Sephacryl S-200 showed that an IL-1 peak at a point corresponding to approximately 16.5 kDa was eluted. The ability of SPAs from strains ATCC 29523 and NCTC 9710 to induce the release of IL-1 was lower than that of Y4 SPA. The IL-1-releasing ability of serotype a and c antigens was enhanced by deacetylation of both polysaccharides, suggesting that acetyl groups of these antigens might hinder the interaction between the antigens and macrophages. PMID:1987032

  13. Evidence that the serotype b antigenic determinant of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 resides in the polysaccharide moiety of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, M E; Schifferle, R E

    1991-01-01

    A high-molecular-weight polysaccharide-containing antigen was isolated from a phenol-water extract of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 43718 (formerly Y4) by gel permeation chromatography in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-disaggregating buffer. The polysaccharide antigen formed a precipitin band with rabbit serotype b-specific antiserum but not with rabbit antisera to serotype a or c. Electroblotted serotype b antigen was probed with serum from a patient with localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP), resulting in a diffuse "smear" in the upper region of the lane. By utilizing an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, it was demonstrated that the geometric mean immunoglobulin G antibody titer to the serotype b polysaccharide was significantly higher in sera from LJP patients than in sera from periodontally healthy individuals. Moreover, LJP antibody titers to the serotype b polysaccharide exhibited age-dependent variation. Double immunodiffusion analysis revealed that the serotype b antigen formed a line of identity with low-molecular-weight LPS following reaction with serotype b-specific antiserum. Incubation of LJP serum in the presence of a lipid-free polysaccharide moiety obtained by mild acid hydrolysis of LPS from A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 markedly reduced immunoglobulin G titer to the serotype b antigen. In contrast, solubilized lipid A was only weakly inhibitory. The results of this study indicate that the serotype b-specific determinant of A. actinomycetemcomitans resides in the polysaccharide moiety of LPS and represents a major target for immunoglobulin G antibody in serum of LJP subjects colonized by this organism. Images PMID:1706323

  14. Identification of the Exported Proteins of the Oral Opportunistic Pathogen Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by Using Alkaline Phosphatase Fusions

    PubMed Central

    Ward, John; Fletcher, Julie; Nair, Sean P.; Wilson, Michael; Williams, Rachel J.; Poole, Stephen; Henderson, Brian

    2001-01-01

    A phoA fusion library of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans genomic DNA has been screened to identify genes encoding exported and secreted proteins. A total of 8,000 colonies were screened, and 80 positive colonies were detected. From these, 48 genes were identified with (i) more than half having homology to known or hypothetical Haemophilus influenzae genes, (ii) 14 having no ascribed function, and (iii) 4 having very limited or no homology to known genes. The proteins encoded by these genes may, by virtue of their presence on the cell surface, be novel virulence determinants. PMID:11254647

  15. Inhibition of LtxA toxicity by blocking cholesterol binding with peptides.

    PubMed

    Brown, A C; Koufos, E; Balashova, N V; Boesze-Battaglia, K; Lally, E T

    2016-02-01

    The leukotoxin (LtxA) produced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans kills host immune cells, allowing the bacterium to establish an ecological niche in the upper aerodigestive tract of its human host. The interaction of LtxA with human immune cells is both complex and multifaceted, involving membrane lipids as well as cell-surface proteins. In the initial encounter with the host cell, LtxA associates with lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1, a cell surface adhesion glycoprotein. However, we have also demonstrated that the toxin associates strongly with the plasma membrane lipids, specifically cholesterol. This association with cholesterol is regulated by a cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC) motif, with a sequence of (334) LEEYSKR(340), in the N-terminal region of the toxin. Here, we have demonstrated that removal of cholesterol from the plasma membrane or mutation of the LtxA CRAC motif inhibits the activity of the toxin in THP-1 cells. To inhibit LtxA activity, we designed a short peptide corresponding to the CRAC(336) motif of LtxA (CRAC(336WT)). This peptide binds to cholesterol and thereby inhibits the toxicity of LtxA in THP-1 cells. Previously, we showed that this peptide inhibits LtxA toxicity against Jn.9 (Jurkat) cells, indicating that peptides derived from the cholesterol-binding site of LtxA may have a potential clinical applicability in controlling infections of repeats-in-toxin-producing organisms.

  16. Inhibition of LtxA Toxicity by Blocking Cholesterol Binding With Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Angela C.; Koufos, Evan; Balashova, Nataliya; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen; Lally, Edward T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The leukotoxin (LtxA) produced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans kills host immune cells, allowing the bacterium to establish an ecological niche in the upper aerodigestive tract of its human host. The interaction of LtxA with human immune cells is both complex and multifaceted, involving membrane lipids as well as cell-surface proteins. In the initial encounter with the host cell, LtxA associates with lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), a cell surface adhesion glycoprotein. However, we have also demonstrated that the toxin associates strongly with the plasma membrane lipids, specifically cholesterol. This association with cholesterol is regulated by a cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC) motif, with a sequence of 334LEEYSKR340, in the N-terminal region of the toxin. Here, we have demonstrated that removal of cholesterol from the plasma membrane or mutation of the LtxA CRAC motif inhibits the activity of the toxin in THP-1 cells. To inhibit LtxA activity, we designed a short peptide corresponding to the CRAC336 motif of LtxA (CRAC336WT). This peptide binds to cholesterol and thereby inhibits the toxicity of LtxA in THP-1 cells. Previously, we showed that this peptide inhibits LtxA toxicity against Jn.9 (Jurkat) cells, indicating that peptides derived from the cholesterol-binding site of LtxA may have a potential clinical applicability in controlling infections of RTX-producing organisms. PMID:26352738

  17. The immunodominant outer membrane antigen of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is located in the serotype-specific high-molecular-mass carbohydrate moiety of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Page, R C; Sims, T J; Engel, L D; Moncla, B J; Bainbridge, B; Stray, J; Darveau, R P

    1991-01-01

    Most patients with juvenile periodontitis manifest serum antibodies, sometimes at very high titers, to antigens of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, but the antigens inducing the immune response have been only partly characterized. We separated A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype b cells into protein, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and soluble polysaccharide fractions and characterized them. Coomassie blue- and silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels were used to detect protein and LPS components, and gas-liquid chromatography was used to determine their carbohydrate and fatty acid composition. Western blots, dot blots, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay inhibition with high-titer sera from juvenile periodontitis patients revealed which components were highest in antibody binding activity. These results showed that the major portion of the immunoglobulin G binding activity resides in the purified mannan-free LPS, with lesser amounts in the total protein fraction. Using Sephacryl S-300 chromatography, we separated LPS into high-molecular-mass components with high carbohydrate contents by gas-liquid chromatography and a low-molecular-mass component consisting mainly of lipid A and the inner core sugar heptulose. The results of quantitative dot blot assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay inhibition show that the serotype-specific antibody binding activity is highly concentrated in the high-molecular-mass carbohydrate-rich LPS fraction and is almost completely absent in the low-molecular-weight lipid-rich fraction. Our observations contrast with previous reports that the predominant serotype antigen of A. actinomycetemcomitans resides in a mannan-rich polysaccharide isolated from spent culture medium. These observations support the conclusion that the immunodominant antigen of the outer membrane is the O antigen of the LPS. Images PMID:1716610

  18. Immunoglobulin class and subclass distribution of antibodies reactive with the immunodominant antigen of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans serotype b.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, H; Califano, J V; Schenkein, H A; Tew, J G

    1993-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the immunodominant antigens of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans serotype b (Aab) for the different immunoglobulin (Ig) classes and subclasses and to determine the relative levels of these different Igs in serum. Seropositive early-onset periodontitis patients were sampled, and the Ig classes IgG, IgA, and IgM and subclasses IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4, IgA1, and IgA2 were studied. Reactivity with Aab antigens was assessed by using the Western blot (immunoblot) in limiting dilution analysis and radioimmunoassay with sera from 13 early-onset periodontitis subjects. A smeared antigen in the upper portion of the immunoblots, typical of high-molecular-weight LPS, was immunodominant for IgG, IgA, IgM, IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgA1, and IgA2. This smeared antigen was present in every patient for all of these Igs at the endpoint. A few additional antigens were also present at the endpoint in some patients, but none were present in more than half of the subjects. The distribution of antibody titers by Ig classes reactive with the Aab immunodominant antigen was IgG > IgA > IgM. The distribution of antibody titers by IgG subclass was IgG2 > IgG1 approximately IgG3. Further quantitation by radioimmunoassay revealed that the mean concentration of IgG2 (65.7 micrograms/ml) was significantly greater than that of IgG1 (8.8 micrograms/ml). The IgA subclass distribution was IgA1 >> IgA2, with IgA1 apparently being second only to IgG2. Therefore, the Aab antigen eliciting the highest antibody level in virtually all Ig classes and subclasses appeared to be lipopolysaccharide, and IgG2 was markedly elevated over all other serum Ig classes or subclasses reactive with Aab. Images PMID:8500879

  19. Mouse interleukin-1 receptor antagonist induced by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide blocks the effects of interleukin-1 on bone resorption and osteoclast-like cell formation.

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, T; Ohsaki, Y; Ueda, N; Saito, N; Mundy, G R

    1994-01-01

    We have reported that P388D1 cell line murine macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans release interleukin-1 (IL-1) inhibitor. The IL-1 inhibitor was purified from conditioned media of P388D1 cells stimulated with A. actinomycetemcomitans LPS for 72 h to homogeneity by a four-step procedure: acetic acid extraction from conditioned media; Bio-Gel P-60 gel filtration chromatography; DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B column chromatography; and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography on a C18 hydrophobic support. The purified IL-1 inhibitor gave a single band of protein with a molecular mass of 26 kDa on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The purified IL-1 inhibitor was a heat- and acid-stable protein that was inactivated by digestion with trypsin and reduction with dithiothreitol. This inhibitory factor suppressed the proliferation of C3H/HeJ mouse thymocytes and the proliferation of IL-1-dependent cell lines, D10.G4.1 and RPMI 1788, induced by IL-1. However, this inhibitor did not affect the proliferation of IL-2-dependent CTLL-2 cells induced by IL-2, the proliferation of C3H/HeJ mouse thymocytes stimulated with a mitogenic dose of concanavalin A, and the proliferation of IL-6-dependent B9 cells induced by IL-6. Furthermore, the IL-1 inhibitor significantly blocked stimulation of bone resorption in organ cultures of newborn mouse calvaria and inhibited the osteoclast-like cell formation in mouse marrow cultures. A monoclonal antibody prepared against the purified IL-1 inhibitor reacted with mouse recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist (rIL-1ra), and a polyclonal antibody to mouse rIL-1ra reacted with the IL-1 inhibitor by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. These results indicate that the IL-1 inhibitor is an identical molecule to rIL-1ra, suggesting that the IL-1 inhibitor (IL-1ra) released by macrophages stimulated with LPS from A. actinomycetemcomitans may play an important mediative role

  20. Human immune responses to oral micro-organisms. I. Association of localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP) with serum antibody responses to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, J L; Taubman, M A; Smith, D J; Genco, R J; Frey, D E

    1982-01-01

    The association between periodontal disease in humans and serum and salivary antibody to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strain Y4 was determined. An Elisa was used to examine anti-Y4 antibody of the IgM, IgG, IgA and IgE isotypes in serum from 127 individuals and IgA in parotid saliva. Patients diagnosed as having localized juvenile periodontitis (n = 37) had significantly higher levels and frequency of serum IgG antibodies to Y4 than all other groups. Serum and salivary IgA and serum IgE antibody levels were significantly increased in patients with both localized and generalized types of juvenile periodontitis (n = 48) when compared to all other patient groups. Specificity studies suggested that the antigenic determinants that were differentiating the group responses were unique to the Y4 organism. These results indicate that serum antibodies to Y4 may reflect an infectious process with this micro-organism and that these responses may provide some diagnostic value in delineating different types of periodontal diseases. PMID:7094425

  1. Buccal microbiology analyzed by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Abreu, Geraldo Magno Alves; da Silva, Gislene Rodrigues; Khouri, Sônia; Favero, Priscila Pereira; Raniero, Leandro; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2012-01-01

    Rapid microbiological identification and characterization are very important in dentistry and medicine. In addition to dental diseases, pathogens are directly linked to cases of endocarditis, premature delivery, low birth weight, and loss of organ transplants. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to analyze oral pathogens Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 29523, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-JP2, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans which was clinically isolated from the human blood-CI. Significant spectra differences were found among each organism allowing the identification and characterization of each bacterial species. Vibrational modes in the regions of 3500-2800 cm-1, the 1484-1420 cm-1, and 1000-750 cm-1 were used in this differentiation. The identification and classification of each strain were performed by cluster analysis achieving 100% separation of strains. This study demonstrated that FTIR can be used to decrease the identification time, compared to the traditional methods, of fastidious buccal microorganisms associated with the etiology of the manifestation of periodontitis.

  2. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide stimulates the phosphorylation of p44 and p42 MAP kinases through CD14 and TLR-4 receptor activation in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Kawasaki-Cárdenas, Perla; Cruz-Arroyo, Santa Rita; Pérez-Garzón, Miguel; Maldonado-Frías, Silvia

    2006-04-25

    Tyrosine phosphorylation is an early step in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated monocytes and macrophages that appears to play a key role in signal transduction. We have demonstrated that LPS purified from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans also increases protein tyrosine phosphorylation in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). This effect was elicited rapidly after LPS stimulation at concentrations that stimulate anti-bacterial responses in human gingival fibroblasts. Two main proteins, with an apparent molecular weight of 44 and 42 kDa, were phosphorylated after LPS stimulation of the human gingival fibroblasts. The phosphorylation was detected after 5 to 15 min and reached the maximum at 30 min of treatment. The increase in tyrosine phosphorylation was apparent following stimulation with LPS at 10 ng/ml and the response was dose dependent up to 10 microg/ml. Pretreatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, herbimycin A and genistein inhibited the LPS-stimulated phosphorylation of p44 and p42 MAP kinases in a dose dependent manner. Pretreatment of human gingival fibroblasts with antibodies anti-CD14 or anti-TLR-4 but not anti-TLR-2 inhibited the LPS-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of p44 and p42. Additionally, LPS-induced p44 and p42 phosphorylation was inhibited by polymyxin treatment. These findings demonstrate that LPS from A. actinomycetemcomintans increases rapidly p44 and p42 phosphorylation (ERK 1 and ERK 2, respectively) in human gingival fibroblasts. Our data also suggest that CD14 and TLR-4 receptors are involved in the LPS effects in human gingival fibroblasts.

  3. Involvement of Ganglioside GM3 in G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest of Human Monocytic Cells Induced by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Cytolethal Distending Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Mise, Koji; Akifusa, Sumio; Watarai, Shinobu; Ansai, Toshihiro; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Takehara, Tadamichi

    2005-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans produces a toxin called cytolethal distending toxin (CDT), which causes host cell DNA damage leading to the induction of DNA damage checkpoint pathways. CDT consists of three subunits, CdtA, CdtB, and CdtC. CdtB is the active subunit of CDT and exerts its effect as a nuclease that damages nuclear DNA, triggering cell cycle arrest. In the present study, we confirmed that the only combination of toxin proteins causing cell cycle arrest was that of all three recombinant CDT (rCDT) protein subunits. Furthermore, in order for rCDT to demonstrate toxicity, it was necessary for CdtA and CdtC to access the cell before CdtB. The coexistence of CdtA and CdtC was necessary for these subunits to bind to the cell. Cells treated with the glucosylceramide synthesis inhibitor 1-phenyl-2-palmitoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol showed resistance to the cytotoxicity induced by rCDT. Furthermore, LY-B cells, which are deficient in the biosynthesis of sphingolipid, also showed resistance to the cytotoxicity induced by rCDT. To evaluate the binding of each subunit for glucosylceramides, we performed thin-layer chromatography immunostaining. The results indicated that each subunit reacted with the glycosphingolipids GM1, GM2, GM3, Gb3, and Gb4. The rCDT mixture incubated with liposomes containing GM3 displayed partially reduced toxicity. These results indicate that GM3 can act as a CDT receptor. PMID:16040998

  4. The TadV Protein of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Is a Novel Aspartic Acid Prepilin Peptidase Required for Maturation of the Flp1 Pilin and TadE and TadF Pseudopilins†

    PubMed Central

    Tomich, Mladen; Fine, Daniel H.; Figurski, David H.

    2006-01-01

    The tad locus of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans encodes genes for the biogenesis of Flp pili, which allow the bacterium to adhere tenaciously to surfaces and form strong biofilms. Although tad (tight adherence) loci are widespread among bacterial and archaeal species, very little is known about the functions of the individual components of the Tad secretion apparatus. Here we characterize the mechanism by which the pre-Flp1 prepilin is processed to the mature pilus subunit. We demonstrate that the tadV gene encodes a prepilin peptidase that is both necessary and sufficient for proteolytic maturation of Flp1. TadV was also found to be required for maturation of the TadE and TadF pilin-like proteins, which we term pseudopilins. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we show that processing of pre-Flp1, pre-TadE, and pre-TadF is required for biofilm formation. Mutation of a highly conserved glutamic acid residue at position +5 of Flp1, relative to the cleavage site, resulted in a processed pilin that was blocked in assembly. In contrast, identical mutations in TadE or TadF had no effect on biofilm formation, indicating that the mechanisms by which Flp1 pilin and the pseudopilins function are distinct. We also determined that two conserved aspartic acid residues in TadV are critical for function of the prepilin peptidase. Together, our results indicate that the A. actinomycetemcomitans TadV protein is a member of a novel subclass of nonmethylating aspartic acid prepilin peptidases. PMID:16980493

  5. Simultaneous measurement of the viability, aggregation, and live and dead adherence of Streptococcus crista, Streptococcus mutans and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in human saliva in relation to indices of caries, dental plaque and periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Rudney, J D; Staikov, R K

    2002-05-01

    Salivary proteins have multiple functions and many share similar functions, which may be why it has been difficult to relate variations in their concentrations to oral health and ecology. An alternative is to focus on variations in the major functions of saliva. An hydroxyapatite-coated microplate model has been developed that simultaneously measures saliva-promoted bacterial viability, bacterial aggregation, and live and dead bacterial adherence, while simulating oral temperature and shearing forces from swallowing. That model was applied to resting whole and stimulated parotid saliva from 149 individuals, using representative strains of Streptococcus crista, S. mutans, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Two major factors were defined by multivariate analysis (this was successful only for whole-saliva). One factor was correlated with aggregation, live adherence and dead adherence for all three strains; the other was correlated with total viability of all three strains. Participants were grouped <25th percentile and >75th percentile for each factor. Those groups were compared for clinical indices of oral health. Caries scores were significantly lower in those with high scores for aggregation-adherence, regardless of whether total viability scores were low or high. Live bacteria always predominated on surfaces when live and dead adherence scores were expressed as ratios. However, participants with high scores for aggregation-adherence showed significantly more dead adherent bacteria than those with low scores (these ratios were uncorrelated with total viability). This finding may indicate that extreme differences in the ability to kill bacteria on surfaces can influence caries risk.

  6. Functional Contributions of Positive Charges in the Pore-Lining Helix 3 of the Bordetella pertussis CyaA-Hemolysin to Hemolytic Activity and Ion-Channel Opening

    PubMed Central

    Kurehong, Chattip; Kanchanawarin, Chalermpol; Powthongchin, Busaba; Prangkio, Panchika; Katzenmeier, Gerd; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2017-01-01

    The Bordetella pertussis CyaA-hemolysin (CyaA-Hly) domain was previously demonstrated to be an important determinant for hemolysis against target erythrocytes and ion-channel formation in planar lipid bilayers (PLBs). Here, net-charge variations in the pore-lining helix of thirteen related RTX cytolysins including CyaA-Hly were revealed by amino acid sequence alignments, reflecting their different degrees of hemolytic activity. To analyze possible functional effects of net-charge alterations on hemolytic activity and channel formation of CyaA-Hly, specific mutations were made at Gln574 or Glu581 in its pore-lining α3 of which both residues are highly conserved Lys in the three highly active RTX cytolysins (i.e., Escherichia coli α-hemolysin, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae toxin, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin). All six constructed CyaA-Hly mutants that were over-expressed in E. coli as 126 kDa His-tagged soluble proteins were successfully purified via immobilized Ni2+-affinity chromatography. Both positive-charge substitutions (Q574K, Q574R, E581K, E581R) and negative-charge elimination (E581Q) appeared to increase the kinetics of toxin-induced hemolysis while the substitution with a negatively-charged side-chain (Q574E) completely abolished its hemolytic activity. When incorporated into PLBs under symmetrical conditions (1.0 M KCl, pH 7.4), all five mutant toxins with the increased hemolytic activity produced clearly-resolved single channels with higher open probability and longer lifetime than the wild-type toxin, albeit with a half decrease in their maximum conductance. Molecular dynamics simulations for 50 ns of a trimeric CyaA-Hly pore model comprising three α2-loop-α3 transmembrane hairpins revealed a significant role of the positive charge at both target positions in the structural stability and enlarged diameter of the simulated pore. Altogether, our present data have disclosed functional contributions of positively-charged side

  7. Functional Contributions of Positive Charges in the Pore-Lining Helix 3 of the Bordetella pertussis CyaA-Hemolysin to Hemolytic Activity and Ion-Channel Opening.

    PubMed

    Kurehong, Chattip; Kanchanawarin, Chalermpol; Powthongchin, Busaba; Prangkio, Panchika; Katzenmeier, Gerd; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2017-03-16

    The Bordetella pertussis CyaA-hemolysin (CyaA-Hly) domain was previously demonstrated to be an important determinant for hemolysis against target erythrocytes and ion-channel formation in planar lipid bilayers (PLBs). Here, net-charge variations in the pore-lining helix of thirteen related RTX cytolysins including CyaA-Hly were revealed by amino acid sequence alignments, reflecting their different degrees of hemolytic activity. To analyze possible functional effects of net-charge alterations on hemolytic activity and channel formation of CyaA-Hly, specific mutations were made at Gln(574) or Glu(581) in its pore-lining α3 of which both residues are highly conserved Lys in the three highly active RTX cytolysins (i.e., Escherichia coli α-hemolysin, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae toxin, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin). All six constructed CyaA-Hly mutants that were over-expressed in E. coli as 126 kDa His-tagged soluble proteins were successfully purified via immobilized Ni(2+)-affinity chromatography. Both positive-charge substitutions (Q574K, Q574R, E581K, E581R) and negative-charge elimination (E581Q) appeared to increase the kinetics of toxin-induced hemolysis while the substitution with a negatively-charged side-chain (Q574E) completely abolished its hemolytic activity. When incorporated into PLBs under symmetrical conditions (1.0 M KCl, pH 7.4), all five mutant toxins with the increased hemolytic activity produced clearly-resolved single channels with higher open probability and longer lifetime than the wild-type toxin, albeit with a half decrease in their maximum conductance. Molecular dynamics simulations for 50 ns of a trimeric CyaA-Hly pore model comprising three α2-loop-α3 transmembrane hairpins revealed a significant role of the positive charge at both target positions in the structural stability and enlarged diameter of the simulated pore. Altogether, our present data have disclosed functional contributions of positively

  8. The T Cell Response to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    disease (11). Other clinical features of the disease include deep pain on mastication, first molar mobility, distolabial migration of maxillary incisors...transformed into one shot chemically competent E. coli TOP -10 (InVitrogen). 40 .tl from each transformation was grown at 37°C overnight on LB plates...5. Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) isolation The 13 ml vacutainer with SST Gel and Clot Activator, or "Tiger Top ," was centrifuged at 3800

  9. Interaction of oral bacteria with gingival epithelial cell multilayers.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, B C; Moffatt, C E; Hagerty, D; Whitmore, S E; Brown, T A; Graves, D T; Lamont, R J

    2011-06-01

    Primary gingival epithelial cells were cultured in multilayers as a model for the study of interactions with oral bacteria associated with health and periodontal disease. Multilayers maintained at an air-liquid interface in low-calcium medium displayed differentiation and cytokeratin properties characteristic of junctional epithelium. Multilayers were infected with fluorescently labeled Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum or Streptococcus gordonii, and bacterial association was determined by confocal microscopy and quantitative image analysis. Porphyromonas gingivalis invaded intracellularly and spread from cell to cell; A. actinomycetemcomitans and F. nucleatum remained extracellular and showed intercellular movement through the multilayer; whereas S. gordonii remained extracellular and predominantly associated with the superficial cell layer. None of the bacterial species disrupted barrier function as measured by transepithelial electrical resistance. P. gingivalis did not elicit secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. However, A. actinomycetemcomitans and S. gordonii induced interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-6 and IL-8 secretion; and F. nucleatum stimulated production of IL-1β and TNF-α. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, F. nucleatum and S. gordonii, but not P. gingivalis, increased levels of apoptosis after 24 h infection. The results indicate that the organisms with pathogenic potential were able to traverse the epithelium, whereas the commensal bacteria did not. In addition, distinct host responses characterized the interaction between the junctional epithelium and oral bacteria.

  10. Association between periodontal condition and subgingival microbiota in women during pregnancy: a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    BORGO, Priscila Viola; RODRIGUES, Viviane Aparecida Arenas; FEITOSA, Alfredo Carlos Rodrigues; XAVIER, Karla Correa Barcelos; AVILA-CAMPOS, Mario Julio

    2014-01-01

    Objectivo In this study, the gingival conditions and the quantitative detection for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia in pregnant women were determined. Material and Methods Quantitative determinations of periodontal bacteria by using a SyBr green system in women during pregnancy were performed. Women at the 2nd and 3rd trimesters of pregnancy and non-pregnant women were included in this study. A. actinomycetemcomitans was observed in high numbers in women at the 2nd and 3rd trimesters of pregnancy with a significant difference (p<0.05). F. nucleatum and P. intermedia were also observed in high levels. Results and Conclusion Our results show that pregnant women are more susceptible to gingivitis, and the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans in subgingival biofilm might be taken into account for the treatment of periodontal disease. PMID:25591021

  11. Microbial Community Composition Impacts Pathogen Iron Availability during Polymicrobial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Stacy, Apollo; Whiteley, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for bacterial pathogenesis, but in the host, iron is tightly sequestered, limiting its availability for bacterial growth. Although this is an important arm of host immunity, most studies examine how bacteria respond to iron restriction in laboratory rather than host settings, where the microbiome can potentially alter pathogen strategies for acquiring iron. One of the most important transcriptional regulators controlling bacterial iron homeostasis is Fur. Here we used a combination of RNA-seq and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-seq to characterize the iron-restricted and Fur regulons of the biofilm-forming opportunistic pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. We discovered that iron restriction and Fur regulate 4% and 3.5% of the genome, respectively. While most genes in these regulons were related to iron uptake and metabolism, we found that Fur also directly regulates the biofilm-dispersing enzyme Dispersin B, allowing A. actinomycetemcomitans to escape from iron-scarce environments. We then leveraged these datasets to assess the availability of iron to A. actinomycetemcomitans in its primary infection sites, abscesses and the oral cavity. We found that A. actinomycetemcomitans is not restricted for iron in a murine abscess mono-infection, but becomes restricted for iron upon co-infection with the oral commensal Streptococcus gordonii. Furthermore, in the transition from health to disease in human gum infection, A. actinomycetemcomitans also becomes restricted for iron. These results suggest that host iron availability is heterogeneous and dependent on the infecting bacterial community. PMID:27973608

  12. HACEK endocarditis: state-of-the-art.

    PubMed

    Revest, Matthieu; Egmann, Gérald; Cattoir, Vincent; Tattevin, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The HACEK group of bacteria - Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Aggregatibacter spp. (A. actinomycetemcomitans, A. aphrophilus, A. paraphrophilus, and A. segnis), Cardiobacterium spp. (C. hominis, C. valvarum), Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella spp. (K. kingae, K. denitrificans) - are fastidious gram-negative bacteria, part of the normal microbiota of oral and upper respiratory tract in humans. Although their pathogenicity is limited, they are responsible for 1-3% of all infective endocarditis. HACEK endocarditis mostly affect patients with underlying heart disease or prosthetic valves, and are characterized by an insidious course, with a mean diagnosis delay of 1 month (Haemophilus spp.) to 3 months (Aggregatibacter and Cardiobacterium spp.). The advent of continuously monitored blood culture systems with enriched media has erased the need for extended incubation for the diagnosis of HACEK endocarditis. Medical treatment relies on third-generation cephalosporin, with a favorable outcome in 80-90% of cases, with or without cardiac surgery.

  13. Trends in Susceptibility to Aggressive Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shahabuddin, Nishat; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen; Lally, Edward T

    2016-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a gram-negative microbe involved in periodontitis. Strains with varying degrees of virulence have been identified, in healthy and periodontally compromised individuals alike. Hosts mount differential immune responses to its various serotypes and virulence factors. Studies have explored host immune response in terms of antibody titers, leukocyte responses, and specific inflammatory mediators, questioning the ways in which the infectious microorganism survives. This mini-review will identify the key themes in immune response patterns of individuals both affected by and free from aggressive periodontal disease, thereby using it to understand various forms of periodontitis. PMID:28008419

  14. Impact of CDT Toxin on Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Faïs, Tiphanie; Delmas, Julien; Serres, Arnaud; Bonnet, Richard; Dalmasso, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) is found in Gram-negative bacteria, especially in certain Proteobacteria such as the Pasteurellaceae family, including Haemophilus ducreyi and Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans, in the Enterobacteriaceae family and the Campylobacterales order, including the Campylobacter and Helicobacter species. In vitro and in vivo studies have clearly shown that this toxin has a strong effect on cellular physiology (inflammation, immune response modulation, tissue damage). Some works even suggest a potential involvement of CDT in cancers. In this review, we will discuss these different aspects. PMID:27429000

  15. Impact of CDT Toxin on Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Faïs, Tiphanie; Delmas, Julien; Serres, Arnaud; Bonnet, Richard; Dalmasso, Guillaume

    2016-07-15

    Cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) is found in Gram-negative bacteria, especially in certain Proteobacteria such as the Pasteurellaceae family, including Haemophilus ducreyi and Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans, in the Enterobacteriaceae family and the Campylobacterales order, including the Campylobacter and Helicobacter species. In vitro and in vivo studies have clearly shown that this toxin has a strong effect on cellular physiology (inflammation, immune response modulation, tissue damage). Some works even suggest a potential involvement of CDT in cancers. In this review, we will discuss these different aspects.

  16. Inhibitory activity of Aloe vera gel on some clinically isolated cariogenic and periodontopathic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fani, Mohammadmehdi; Kohanteb, Jamshid

    2012-03-01

    Aloe vera is a medicinal plant with anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antidiabetic and immune-boosting properties. In the present study we investigated the inhibitory activities of Aloe vera gel on some cariogenic (Streptococcus mutans), periodontopathic (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis) and an opportunistic periodontopathogen (Bacteroides fragilis) isolated from patients with dental caries and periodontal diseases. Twenty isolates of each of these bacteria were investigated for their sensitivity to Aloe vera gel using the disk diffusion and microdilution methods. S. mutans was the species most sensitive to Aloe vera gel with a MIC of 12.5 µg/ml, while A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, and B. fragilis were less sensitive, with a MIC of 25-50 µg/ml (P < 0.01). Based on our present findings it is concluded that Aloe vera gel at optimum concentration could be used as an antiseptic for prevention of dental caries and periodontal diseases.

  17. Expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand by B cells in response to oral bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Han, X.; Lin, X.; Seliger, A. R.; Eastcott, J.; Kawai, T.; Taubman, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction We investigated receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) expression by B lymphocytes during early and late aspects of the immune response to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a gram-negative, anaerobic bacterium associated with aggressive periodontal disease. Methods Expression of messenger RNA transcripts (tumor necrosis factor-α, Toll-like receptors 4 and 9, interleukins 4 and 10, and RANKL) involved in early (1-day) and late (10-day) responses in cultured rat splenocytes was examined by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The immune cell distribution (T, B, and natural killer cells and macrophages) in cultured rat splenocytes and RANKL expression in B cells were determined by flow cytometric analyses. B-cell capacity for induction of osteoclast differentiation was evaluated by coculture with RAW 264.7 cells followed by a tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity assay. Results The expression levels of interleukins 4 and 10 in cultured cells were not changed in the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans until cultured for 3 days, and peaked after 7 days. After culture for 10 days, the percentages of B and T cells, the overall RANKL messenger RNA transcripts, and the percentage of RANKL-expressing immunoglobulin G-positive cells were significantly increased in the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans. These increases were considerably greater in cells isolated from A. actinomycetemcomitans-immunized animals than from non-immunized animals. RAW 264.7 cells demonstrated significantly increased TRAP activity when cocultured with B cells from A. actinomycetemcomitans-immunized animals. The addition of human osteoprotegerin-Fc to the culture significantly diminished such increases. Conclusion This study suggests that B-lymphocyte involvement in the immune response to A. actinomycetemcomitans through upregulation of RANKL expression potentially contribute to bone resorption in periodontal disease. PMID

  18. Essential Oils from Ugandan Aromatic Medicinal Plants: Chemical Composition and Growth Inhibitory Effects on Oral Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Ocheng, Francis; Bwanga, Freddie; Joloba, Moses; Softrata, Abier; Azeem, Muhammad; Pütsep, Katrin; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Obua, Celestino; Gustafsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The study assessed the growth inhibitory effects of essential oils extracted from ten Ugandan medicinal plants (Bidens pilosa, Helichrysum odoratissimum, Vernonia amygdalina, Hoslundia opposita, Ocimum gratissimum, Cymbopogon citratus, Cymbopogon nardus, Teclea nobilis, Zanthoxylum chalybeum, and Lantana trifolia) used traditionally in the management of oral diseases against oral pathogens. Chemical compositions of the oils were explored by GC-MS. Inhibitory effects of the oils were assessed on periodontopathic Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and cariogenic Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus using broth dilution methods at concentrations of 1%, 0.1%, and 0.01%. The most sensitive organism was A. actinomycetemcomitans. Its growth was markedly inhibited by six of the oils at all the concentrations tested. Essential oil from C. nardus exhibited the highest activity with complete growth inhibition of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis at all the three concentrations tested, the major constituents in the oil being mainly oxygenated sesquiterpenes. Most of the oils exhibited limited effects on L. acidophilus. We conclude that essential oils from the studied plants show marked growth inhibitory effects on periodontopathic A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis, moderate effects on cariogenic S. mutans, and the least effect on L. acidophilus. The present study constitutes a basis for further investigations and development of certain oils into alternative antiplaque agents. PMID:26170872

  19. Essential Oils from Ugandan Aromatic Medicinal Plants: Chemical Composition and Growth Inhibitory Effects on Oral Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ocheng, Francis; Bwanga, Freddie; Joloba, Moses; Softrata, Abier; Azeem, Muhammad; Pütsep, Katrin; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Obua, Celestino; Gustafsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The study assessed the growth inhibitory effects of essential oils extracted from ten Ugandan medicinal plants (Bidens pilosa, Helichrysum odoratissimum, Vernonia amygdalina, Hoslundia opposita, Ocimum gratissimum, Cymbopogon citratus, Cymbopogon nardus, Teclea nobilis, Zanthoxylum chalybeum, and Lantana trifolia) used traditionally in the management of oral diseases against oral pathogens. Chemical compositions of the oils were explored by GC-MS. Inhibitory effects of the oils were assessed on periodontopathic Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and cariogenic Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus using broth dilution methods at concentrations of 1%, 0.1%, and 0.01%. The most sensitive organism was A. actinomycetemcomitans. Its growth was markedly inhibited by six of the oils at all the concentrations tested. Essential oil from C. nardus exhibited the highest activity with complete growth inhibition of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis at all the three concentrations tested, the major constituents in the oil being mainly oxygenated sesquiterpenes. Most of the oils exhibited limited effects on L. acidophilus. We conclude that essential oils from the studied plants show marked growth inhibitory effects on periodontopathic A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis, moderate effects on cariogenic S. mutans, and the least effect on L. acidophilus. The present study constitutes a basis for further investigations and development of certain oils into alternative antiplaque agents.

  20. Microbiological effects of periodontal therapy plus azithromycin in patients with diabetes: results from a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Hincapié, Juan P; Castrillón, Cesar A; Yepes, Fanny L; Roldan, Natalia; Becerra, María A; Moreno, Sandra M; Consuegra, Jessika; Contreras, Adolfo; Botero, Javier E

    2014-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that periodontal infection may aggravate diabetes control. The aim of this study was to determine the changes in the frequency with which Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were detected in patients with diabetes with the use of non-surgical therapy plus azithromycin in a randomized clinical trial. One hundred and five (105) patients with diabetes and chronic periodontitis were randomly assigned to three treatment groups: subgingival mechanical therapy with azithromycin, subgingival mechanical therapy with placebo and supragingival prophylaxis with azithromycin. Complete periodontal clinical examinations and detection of periodontal pathogens using polymerase chain reaction were carried out at baseline, 3, 6 and 9 months after periodontal therapy. The frequency with which Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponemadenticola and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were detected decreased at 3 months in all groups. Tannerella forsythia increased after3 months in all groups. All organisms had similar frequencies at 9 months in all groups. Subgingival mechanical therapy with adjunctive azithromycin had no additional effect on the frequency with which the periodontal pathogens investigated were detected in patients with diabetes.

  1. [Study of mutual dependence of periodontal and colonic microbiome in health and pathology using NSG-sequencing].

    PubMed

    Petrukhina, N B; Zorina, O A; Shikh, E V; Shibaeva, A V; Shevelev, A B

    2016-01-01

    By using NGS-sequencing libraries of DNA from periodontal swabs with primers specific to V6 region of 16S rDNA prevalence of bacterial genera and species in periodontal and colonic microbiota of patients with periodontitis of different severity and healthy donors was analyzed. Hyper-colonization of the colon with Akkermansia muciniphila was found to be the most important maker of negative predisposition to periodontitis (t=133,7 at р=10(-6)). This result is in a good agreement with communications about positive impact of hyper-colonization of the colon with this species on type 2 diabetes, obesity, atopic dermatitis, and antibiotic-induced diarrhea associated with Clostridium dificile. Analysis of the periodontal protectors at the periodontium elucidated a number of close taxonomic relatives of the periodontal pathogens by Socransky, e.g. Aggregatibacter segnis and Aggregatibacter aphrophilus are closely related to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans; Treponema vencentii is a relative of Treponema denticola; Prevotella baroniae, Prevotella salivae and Prevotella spp. are relatives of Prevotella intermedia; Campylobacter concisus is a relative of Campylobacter jejuni, causative agent of enterocolitis.

  2. Oxygen as a Virulence Determinant in Polymicrobial Infections

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infections caused by multiple organisms, or polymicrobial infections, are likely more common than is broadly appreciated. Interaction among microbial communities (and with their host) can change the infection landscape by subverting immunity, providing nutrients and inhibiting competing microbes. Stacy et al. (A. Stacy, D. Fleming, R. J. Lamont, K. P. Rumbaugh, and M. Whiteley, mBio 7:e00782-16, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.00782-16) described a novel mechanism that results in synergistic growth of oral microbes Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Streptococcus gordonii. The authors used whole-genome fitness profiling by transposon sequencing (Tn-seq) to identify genes differentially required for growth in vitro versus in a mono- or coinfection in a thigh abscess model. They found that coinfection with S. gordonii allowed A. actinomycetemcomitans to shift from an anaerobic to an aerobic mode of growth. This shift involved the production of a terminal electron acceptor H2O2 by S. gordonii and increased A. actinomycetemcomitans persistence—an interaction termed “cross-respiration.” PMID:27531913

  3. Bacterial Heat Shock Protein GroEL (Hsp64) Exerts Immunoregulatory Effects on T Cells by Utilizing Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Nalbant, Ayten; Kant, Melis

    2016-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) expresses a 64-kDa GroEL protein belonging to the heat shock family of proteins. This protein has been shown to influence human host cells, but the apoptotic capacity of the GroEL protein regarding T cells is not yet known. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of A. actinomycetemcomitans GroEL (AaGroEL) protein to induce human peripheral blood T-cell apoptosis. Endogenous, purified AaGroEL protein was used as an antigen. In AaGroEL-treated T cells, the data indicated that phosphatidylserine exposure, an early apoptotic event, was dose- and time-dependent. The AaGroEL-treated T cells were also positive for active caspase-3 in a dose-dependent manner. The rate of AaGroEL-induced apoptosis was suppressed by the addition of the general caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK. Furthermore, cleaved caspase-8 bands (40/36 kDa and 23 kDa) were identified in cells responding to AaGroEL. DNA fragmentation was also detected in the AaGroEL-treated T cells. Overall, we demonstrated that the endogenous GroEL from A. actinomycetemcomitans has the capacity to induce T-cell apoptosis.

  4. Essential oils and isolated compounds from Lippia alba leaves and flowers: antimicrobial activity and osteoclast apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Juiz, Paulo José Lima; Lucchese, Angelica Maria; Gambari, Roberto; Piva, Roberta; Penolazzi, Letizia; Di Ciano, Martina; Uetanabaro, Ana Paula Trovatti; Silva, Franceli; Avila-Campos, Mario Julio

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, essential oils extracted from the leaves and flowers of Lippia alba (Mill.) N.E.Br. (L. alba) were analyzed for their antimicrobial activity and their effects on osteoclasts. The periodontal pathogens, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans; ATCC 43717), Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum; ATCC 25586) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis); ATCC 33277) were used in antimicrobial activity assays for determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC), whereas Bacteroides fragilis (B. fragilis; ATCC 25285) was used as the control microorganism. Osteoclast (OC) apoptosis was assessed by TUNEL assay and Fas receptor expression was detected by immunocytochemistry. The analysis of antimicrobial activity revealed that P. gingivalis had the lowest MIC values, whereas A. actinomycetemcomitans had the highest. L. alba essential oils were found to be toxic to human cells, although the compounds, carvone, limonene and citral, were non-toxic and induced apoptosis in the OCs. This study demonstrates that L. alba has potential biotechnological application in dentistry. In fact periodontal disease has a multifactorial etiology, and the immune response to microbial challenge leads to osteoclast activation and the resorption of the alveolar bone, resulting in tooth loss.

  5. Effects of ozone nano-bubble water on periodontopathic bacteria and oral cells - in vitro studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakumo, Sae; Arakawa, Shinichi; Takahashi, Masayoshi; Kondo, Keiko; Mano, Yoshihiro; Izumi, Yuichi

    2014-10-01

    The aims of the present study were to evaluate the bactericidal activity of a new antiseptic agent, ozone nano-bubble water (NBW3), against periodontopathogenic bacteria and to assess the cytotoxicity of NBW3 against human oral cells. The bactericidal activities of NBW3 against representative periodontopathogenic bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans) were evaluated using in vitro time-kill assays. The cytotoxicity of NBW3 was evaluated using three-dimensional human buccal and gingival tissue models. The numbers of colony forming units (CFUs)/mL of P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans exposed to NBW3 dropped to below the lower limit of detection (<10 CFUs mL-1) after only 0.5 min of exposure. There were only minor decreases in the viability of oral tissue cells after 24 h of exposure to NBW3. These results suggest that NBW3 possesses potent bactericidal activity against representative periodontopathogenic bacteria and is not cytotoxic to cells of human oral tissues. The use of NBW3 as an adjunct to periodontal therapy would be promising.

  6. Effects of ozone nano-bubble water on periodontopathic bacteria and oral cells - in vitro studies

    PubMed Central

    Hayakumo, Sae; Arakawa, Shinichi; Takahashi, Masayoshi; Kondo, Keiko; Mano, Yoshihiro; Izumi, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to evaluate the bactericidal activity of a new antiseptic agent, ozone nano-bubble water (NBW3), against periodontopathogenic bacteria and to assess the cytotoxicity of NBW3 against human oral cells. The bactericidal activities of NBW3 against representative periodontopathogenic bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans) were evaluated using in vitro time-kill assays. The cytotoxicity of NBW3 was evaluated using three-dimensional human buccal and gingival tissue models. The numbers of colony forming units (CFUs)/mL of P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans exposed to NBW3 dropped to below the lower limit of detection (<10 CFUs mL−1) after only 0.5 min of exposure. There were only minor decreases in the viability of oral tissue cells after 24 h of exposure to NBW3. These results suggest that NBW3 possesses potent bactericidal activity against representative periodontopathogenic bacteria and is not cytotoxic to cells of human oral tissues. The use of NBW3 as an adjunct to periodontal therapy would be promising. PMID:27877715

  7. Bacterial Heat Shock Protein GroEL (Hsp64) Exerts Immunoregulatory Effects on T Cells by Utilizing Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Nalbant, Ayten; Kant, Melis

    2016-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) expresses a 64-kDa GroEL protein belonging to the heat shock family of proteins. This protein has been shown to influence human host cells, but the apoptotic capacity of the GroEL protein regarding T cells is not yet known. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of A. actinomycetemcomitans GroEL (AaGroEL) protein to induce human peripheral blood T-cell apoptosis. Endogenous, purified AaGroEL protein was used as an antigen. In AaGroEL-treated T cells, the data indicated that phosphatidylserine exposure, an early apoptotic event, was dose- and time-dependent. The AaGroEL-treated T cells were also positive for active caspase-3 in a dose-dependent manner. The rate of AaGroEL-induced apoptosis was suppressed by the addition of the general caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK. Furthermore, cleaved caspase-8 bands (40/36 kDa and 23 kDa) were identified in cells responding to AaGroEL. DNA fragmentation was also detected in the AaGroEL-treated T cells. Overall, we demonstrated that the endogenous GroEL from A. actinomycetemcomitans has the capacity to induce T-cell apoptosis. PMID:27736933

  8. Setup of an In Vitro Test System for Basic Studies on Biofilm Behavior of Mixed-Species Cultures with Dental and Periodontal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Standar, Kerstin; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Redanz, Sylvio; Münter, Wanja L.; Laue, Michael; Podbielski, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Background Caries and periodontitis are important human diseases associated with formation of multi-species biofilms. The involved bacteria are intensively studied to understand the molecular basis of the interactions in such biofilms. This study established a basic in vitro single and mixed-species culture model for oral bacteria combining three complimentary methods. The setup allows a rapid screening for effects in the mutual species interaction. Furthermore, it is easy to handle, inexpensive, and reproducible. Methods Streptococcus mitis, S. salivarius and S. sanguinis, typical inhabitants of the healthy oral cavity, S. mutans as main carriogenic species, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micra, S. intermedius and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans as periodontitis-associated bacteria, were investigated for their biofilm forming ability. Different liquid growth media were evaluated. Safranin-staining allowed monitoring of biofilm formation under the chosen conditions. Viable counts and microscopy permitted investigation of biofilm behavior in mixed-species and transwell setups. Findings S. mitis, F. nucleatum, P. gingivalis and P. micra failed to form biofilm structures. S. mutans, S. sanguinis, S. intermedius and S. salivarius established abundant biofilm masses in CDM/sucrose. A. actinomycetemcomitans formed patchy monolayers. For in depth analysis S. mitis, S. mutans and A. actinomycetemcomitans were chosen, because i) they are representatives of the physiological-, cariogenic and periodontitis-associated bacterial flora, respectively and ii) their difference in their biofilm forming ability. Microscopic analysis confirmed the results of safranin staining. Investigation of two species combinations of S. mitis with either S. mutans or A. actinomycetemcomitans revealed bacterial interactions influencing biofilm mass, biofilm structure and cell viability. Conclusions This setup shows safranin staining, microscopic analysis and

  9. Bactericidal Activity and Mechanism of Photoirradiated Polyphenols against Gram-Positive and -Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Ishiyama, Kirika; Sheng, Hong; Ikai, Hiroyo; Kanno, Taro; Niwano, Yoshimi

    2015-09-09

    The bactericidal effect of various types of photoirradiated polyphenols against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria was evaluated in relation to the mode of action. Gram-positive bacteria (Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus mutans) and Gram-negative bacteria (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) suspended in a 1 mg/mL polyphenol aqueous solution (caffeic acid, gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, epigallocatechin, epigallocatechin gallate, and proanthocyanidin) were exposed to LED light (wavelength, 400 nm; irradiance, 260 mW/cm(2)) for 5 or 10 min. Caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid exerted the highest bactericidal activity followed by gallic acid and proanthocyanidin against both Gram-positive and -negative bacteria. It was also demonstrated that the disinfection treatment induced oxidative damage of bacterial DNA, which suggests that polyphenols are incorporated into bacterial cells. The present study suggests that blue light irradiation of polyphenols could be a novel disinfection treatment.

  10. Real-time mapping of a hydrogen peroxide concentration profile across a polymicrobial bacterial biofilm using scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiuhui; Ramsey, Matthew M; Chen, Xiaole; Koley, Dipankar; Whiteley, Marvin; Bard, Allen J

    2011-02-15

    Quantitative detection of hydrogen peroxide in solution above a Streptococcus gordonii (Sg) bacterial biofilm was studied in real time by scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The concentration of hydrogen peroxide was determined to be 0.7 mM to 1.6 mM in the presence of 10 mM glucose over a period of 2 to 8 h. The hydrogen peroxide production measured was higher near the biofilm surface in comparison to Sg grown planktonically. Differential hydrogen peroxide production was observed both by fluorometric as well as by SECM measurements. The interaction between two different species in a bacterial biofilm of Sg and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) in terms of hydrogen peroxide production was also studied by SECM. One-directional y-scan SECM measurements showed the unique spatial mapping of hydrogen peroxide concentration across a mixed species biofilm and revealed that hydrogen peroxide concentration varies greatly dependent upon local species composition.

  11. Antibacterial Efficacy of Exogenous Nitric Oxide on Periodontal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Backlund, C.J.; Sergesketter, A.R.; Offenbacher, S.; Schoenfisch, M.H.

    2014-01-01

    Current treatments for periodontitis (e.g., scaling/root planing and chlorhexidine) have limited efficacy since they fail to suppress microbial biofilms satisfactorily over time, and the use of adjunctive antimicrobials can promote the emergence of antibiotic-resistant organisms. Herein, we report the novel application of nitric oxide (NO)-releasing scaffolds (i.e., dendrimers and silica particles) as anti-periodontopathogenic agents. The effectiveness of macromolecular NO release was demonstrated by a 3-log reduction in periodontopathogenic Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis viability. In contrast, Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis, caries-associated organisms, were substantially less sensitive to NO treatment. Both dendrimer- and silica-based NO release exhibited substantially less toxicity to human gingival fibroblasts at concentrations necessary to eradicate periodontopathogens than did clinical concentrations of chlorhexidine. These results suggest the potential utility of macromolecular NO-release scaffolds as a novel platform for the development of periodontal disease therapeutics. PMID:25139363

  12. Anti-inflammatory, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Effects of Artemisinin Extracts from Artemisia annua L.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wan-Su; Choi, Woo Jin; Lee, Sunwoo; Kim, Woo Joong; Lee, Dong Chae; Sohn, Uy Dong; Shin, Hyoung-Shik

    2015-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial properties of artemisinin derived from water, methanol, ethanol, or acetone extracts of Artemisia annua L. were evaluated. All 4 artemisinin-containing extracts had anti-inflammatory effects. Of these, the acetone extract had the greatest inhibitory effect on lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and proinflammatory cytokine (IL-1β , IL-6, and IL-10) production. Antioxidant activity evaluations revealed that the ethanol extract had the highest free radical scavenging activity, (91.0±3.2%), similar to α-tocopherol (99.9%). The extracts had antimicrobial activity against the periodontopathic microorganisms Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. animalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. polymorphum, and Prevotella intermedia. This study shows that Artemisia annua L. extracts contain anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial substances and should be considered for use in pharmaceutical products for the treatment of dental diseases. PMID:25605993

  13. Nonsyndromic localized aggressive periodontitis of primary dentition: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Muppa, Radhika; Nallanchakrava, Srinivas; Chinta, Mahesh; Manthena, Ravi Teja

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of the gingiva and tissues of the periodontium. It is characterized by pocket formation and destruction of supporting alveolar bone. Periodontal diseases of aggressive nature are not very common in children. They are usually associated with systemic conditions. The present case report is of a 5-year-old male child who reported with rapid attachment loss and bony defects of the gingiva and supporting structures. His family and medical history gave no contribution for the diagnosis. Blood investigations did not reveal any abnormality. The microbial examination of culture revealed the presence of periodontal pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. The treatment objective in the present case was to prevent the further progress of the condition, restore esthetic and function in the child which would psychologically benefit the child. PMID:27307682

  14. [Amalgam, composite and compomer: microbiological study].

    PubMed

    Zogheib, C M; Hardan, L; Khoury, C Kassis; Naaman, N Bou Abboud

    2012-03-01

    Restorative materials have different consequences on the periodontium. The surface of these materials may influence gingival health and cause in some instances gingival inflammation. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare, in a healthy periodontium, intracrevicular plaque bacteria (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythensis and Treponema denticola), at day 0 and at 6 months, around subgingivally located amalgam, composite and compomer fillings. All the tests were negative (less than 0.1% of the sum of 103 cells), since none of the investigated pathogens were detected. It has been concluded that the material used does not have direct effect on the bacteria species developed around the restorations at this short time period.

  15. Kingella kingae endocarditis: A rare case of mitral valve perforation

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Anthony A; Hung, Tawny; Human, Derek G; Campbell, Andrew I M

    2011-01-01

    Kingella kingae, a HACEK (Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Aggregatibacter aphrophilus, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, Kingella kingae) organism, is a common resident of the upper airway in children; it has been associated with endocarditis in children with pre-existing heart conditions. This case report describes K. kingae endocarditis leading to valvular damage in a previously healthy 18-month-old child. Our patient developed a K. kingae bacteremia that was later complicated by meningitis, septic embolic stroke, and endocarditis of the mitral valve, leading to perforation of the posterolateral leaflet. The patient was initially treated conservatively with cefotaxime but, subsequently, required a mitral valve repair with a pericardial patch and annuloplasty. This report draws attention to the need for clinicians to be aware of the potentially serious complications of K. kingae infection in young children. If K. kingae infection is suspected then therapy should be initiated promptly with a β-lactam, followed by early echocardiographic assessment. This case also highlights the lack of specific guidelines available for K. kingae endocarditis. PMID:21976892

  16. Kingella kingae endocarditis: A rare case of mitral valve perforation.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Anthony A; Hung, Tawny; Human, Derek G; Campbell, Andrew I M

    2011-07-01

    Kingella kingae, a HACEK (Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Aggregatibacter aphrophilus, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, Kingella kingae) organism, is a common resident of the upper airway in children; it has been associated with endocarditis in children with pre-existing heart conditions. This case report describes K. kingae endocarditis leading to valvular damage in a previously healthy 18-month-old child. Our patient developed a K. kingae bacteremia that was later complicated by meningitis, septic embolic stroke, and endocarditis of the mitral valve, leading to perforation of the posterolateral leaflet. The patient was initially treated conservatively with cefotaxime but, subsequently, required a mitral valve repair with a pericardial patch and annuloplasty. This report draws attention to the need for clinicians to be aware of the potentially serious complications of K. kingae infection in young children. If K. kingae infection is suspected then therapy should be initiated promptly with a β-lactam, followed by early echocardiographic assessment. This case also highlights the lack of specific guidelines available for K. kingae endocarditis.

  17. The Comparative Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Effect of Propolis with Chlorhexidine against Oral Pathogens: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Akca, Gülçin; Topçu, Fulya Toksoy; Macit, Enis; Pikdöken, Levent; Özgen, I. Şerif

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the antimicrobial effectiveness of ethanolic extract of propolis (EEP) to chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) on planktonic Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus salivarius subsp. salivarius, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Prevotella intermedia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Actinomyces israelii, Candida albicans, and their single-species biofilms by agar dilution and broth microdilution test methods. Both agents inhibited the growth of all planktonic species. On the other hand, CHX exhibited lower minimum bactericidal concentrations than EEP against biofilms of A. actinomycetemcomitans, S. aureus, and E. faecalis whereas EEP yielded a better result against Lactobacilli and P. intermedia. The bactericidal and fungicidal concentrations of both agents were found to be equal against biofilms of Streptecocci, P. gingivalis, A. israelii, and C. albicans. The results of this study revealed that propolis was more effective in inhibiting Gram-positive bacteria than the Gram-negative bacteria in their planktonic state and it was suggested that EEP could be as effective as CHX on oral microorganisms in their biofilm state. PMID:26949701

  18. Determination of periodontopathogens in patients with Cri du chat syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ballesta-Mudarra, Sofía; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Rodríguez-Caballero, Ángela; Yáñez-Vico, Rosa M.; Solano-Reina, Enrique; Perea-Pérez, Evelio

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Cri du chat syndrome is a genetic alteration associated with some oral pathologies. However, it has not been described previously any clinical relationship between the periodontal disease and the syndrome. The purpose of this comparative study was to compare periodontopathogenic flora in a group with Cri du chat syndrome and another without the síndrome, to assess a potential microbiological predisposition to suffer a periodontitis. Study Design: The study compared nineteen subjects with Cri du chat Syndrome with a control group of nineteen patients without it. All patients were clinically evaluated by periodontal probing, valuing the pocket depth, the clinical attachmente level and bleeding on probing. There were no significant differences between both groups. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola were detected by multiplex-PCR using 16S rDNA (microIDENT). Results: When A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, P. intermedia and T. denticola were compared, no statistically significant differences were found between the two groups (p>0.05). The value of T. forsythia was significantly higher for Cri du chat syndrome (31.6%) than for the control group (5.3%). The odds ratio for T. forsythia was 8.3. Conclusions: In the present study T. forsythia is associated with Cri du chat syndrome subjects and not with healthy subjects. Key words:Cri du Chat syndrome, periodontal health, microbiology, special care dentistry. PMID:24121919

  19. The in Vitro Antimicrobial Efficacy of PDT against Periodontopathogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Haag, Philippe A; Steiger-Ronay, Valerie; Schmidlin, Patrick R

    2015-11-13

    Periodontitis, an inflammatory disease, is caused by biofilms with a mixed microbial etiology and involves the progressive destruction of the tooth-supporting tissues. A rising number of studies investigate the clinical potential of photodynamic therapy (PDT) as an adjunct during active therapy. The aim of the present review was to evaluate the available literature for the in vitro antimicrobial efficacy of photodynamic therapy focusing on the periodontopathogenic bacteria Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum. The focused question was: "Is it possible to decrease (at least 3 log steps or 99.9%) or even eliminate bacterial growth by photodynamic therapy in vitro when compared to untreated control groups or control groups treated by placebo?" In general, PDT resulted in a substantial reduction of surviving bacteria. However, not all studies showed the desired reduction or elimination. The ranges of log10-reduction were 0.38 (58%) to a complete eradication (100%) for P. gingivalis, 0.21 (39%) to 100% for A. actinomycetemcomitans and 0.3 (50%) to 100% for F. nucleatum. In conclusion, further and particularly more comparable studies are needed to evaluate if PDT can be clinically successful as an adjuvant in periodontal therapy.

  20. Effect of teenage smoking on the prevalence of periodontal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Anna Maria; Pitkäniemi, Janne; Kari, Kirsti; Pajukanta, Riitta; Elonheimo, Outi; Koskenvuo, Markku; Meurman, Jukka H

    2012-04-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate how teenage smoking affects the prevalence of periodontal bacteria and periodontal health with the hypothesis that smoking increases the prevalence of the bacteria. Oral health of 264 adolescents (15- to 16-year-olds) was clinically examined, and their smoking history was recorded. The participants also filled in a structured questionnaire recording their general health and health habits. Pooled subgingival plaque samples were taken for polymerase chain reaction analysis of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens, and Treponema denticola. The prevalence of P. intermedia (21% vs. 4%, p = 0.01) and T. forsythia and T. denticola (23% vs. 8%, p < 0.05, for both) was higher among female smokers than among non-smokers. T. forsythia and T. denticola were more often associated with bleeding on probing (29% vs. 12%; 25% vs. 10%, respectively) and deep pockets (25% vs. 15%; 23% vs. 10%, respectively) with smokers than non-smokers. Among the girls, a significant association was found between pack-years and the prevalence of P. nigrescens (p < 0.007). In both genders, A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis were rare in this study. To conclude, periodontal bacteria were associated with higher periodontal index scores among all teenage smokers. Smoking girls harbored more frequently certain periodontal bacteria than non-smokers, but this was not seen in boys. Hence, our study hypothesis was only partly confirmed.

  1. The pathogenic persona of community-associated oral streptococci.

    PubMed

    Whitmore, Sarah E; Lamont, Richard J

    2011-07-01

    The mitis group streptococci (MGS) are widespread in the oral cavity and are traditionally associated with oral health. However, these organisms have many attributes that contribute to the development of pathogenic oral communities. MGS adhere rapidly to saliva-coated tooth surfaces, thereby providing an attachment substratum for more overtly pathogenic organisms such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, and the two species assemble into heterotypic communities. Close physical association facilitates physiologic support, and pathogens such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans display resource partitioning to favour carbon sources generated by streptococcal metabolism. MGS exchange information with community members through a number of interspecies signalling systems including AI-2 and contact dependent mechanisms. Signal transduction systems induced in P. gingivalis are based on protein dephosphorylation mediated by the tyrosine phosphatase Ltp1, and converge on a LuxR-family transcriptional regulator, CdhR. Phenotypic responses in P. gingivalis include regulation of hemin uptake systems and gingipain activity, processes that are intimately linked to the virulence of the organism. Furthermore, communities of S. gordonii with P. gingivalis or with A. actinomycetemcomitans are more pathogenic in animal models than the constituent species alone. We propose that MGS should be considered accessory pathogens, organisms whose pathogenic potential only becomes evident in the context of a heterotypic microbial community.

  2. Effectiveness of ozone against periodontal pathogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Huth, Karin C; Quirling, Martina; Lenzke, Stefanie; Paschos, Ekaterini; Kamereck, Klaus; Brand, Korbinian; Hickel, Reinhard; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2011-06-01

    Ozone has been proposed as an adjunct antiseptic in periodontitis therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial effectiveness of gaseous/aqueous ozone, in comparison with that of the established antiseptic chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX), against periodontal microorganisms. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Parvimonas micra in planktonic or biofilm cultures were exposed, for 1 min, to gaseous ozone, aqueous ozone, CHX, or phosphate-buffered saline (control). None of the agents was able to substantially reduce the A. actinomycetemcomitans count in biofilm cultures. In contrast, P. gingivalis, T. forsythia, and P. micra could be eliminated by 2% CHX or by ozone gas at 53 gm(-3) . Significantly greater antimicrobial effects were observed against planktonic cultures than against biofilm-associated bacteria. The rate of killing was influenced by the species of bacteria, and by the type and concentration of agent. There were no significant differences in the effectiveness of aqueous ozone (20 μg ml(-1) ) or gaseous ozone (≥ 4 gm(-3) ) compared with 2% CHX but they were more effective than 0.2% CHX. Therefore, high-concentrated gaseous and aqueous ozone merit further investigation as antiseptics in periodontitis therapy. A safe system for applying gaseous ozone into the periodontal pocket that avoids inhalation still needs to be developed.

  3. Systemic Immune Responses in Pregnancy and Periodontitis: Relationship to Pregnancy Outcomes in the Obstetrics and Periodontal Therapy (OPT) Study

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Novak, M. John; Michalowicz, Bryan S.; Hodges, James S.; Steffen, Michelle J.; Ferguson, James E.; DiAngelis, Anthony; Buchanan, William; Mitchell, Dennis A.; Papapanou, Panos N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Our previous studies reported on the obstetric, periodontal, and microbiologic outcomes of women participating in the Obstetrics and Periodontal Therapy (OPT) Study. This article describes the systemic antibody responses to selected periodontal bacteria in the same patients. Methods Serum samples, obtained from pregnant women at baseline (13 to 16 weeks; 6 days of gestation) and 29 to 32 weeks, were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (previously Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans), Campylobacter rectus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia (previously T. forsythensis), and Treponema denticola. Results At baseline, women who delivered live preterm infants had significantly lower total serum levels of IgG antibody to the panel of periodontal pathogens (P = 0.0018), to P. gingivalis (P = 0.0013), and to F. nucleatum (P = 0.0200) than women who delivered at term. These differences were not significant at 29 to 32 weeks. Changes in IgG levels between baseline and 29 to 32 weeks were not associated with preterm birth when adjusted for treatment group, clinical center, race, or age. In addition, delivery of low birth weight infants was not associated with levels of antibody at baseline or with antibody changes during pregnancy. Conclusions Live preterm birth is associated with decreased levels of IgG antibody to periodontal pathogens in women with periodontitis when assessed during the second trimester. Changes in IgG antibody during pregnancy are not associated with birth outcomes. PMID:19485826

  4. Antibacterial activity of moxifloxacin on bacteria associated with periodontitis within a biofilm.

    PubMed

    Tsaousoglou, Phoebus; Nietzsche, Sandor; Cachovan, Georg; Sculean, Anton; Eick, Sigrun

    2014-02-01

    The activity of moxifloxacin was compared with ofloxacin and doxycycline against bacteria associated with periodontitis within a biofilm (single strain and mixed population) in vitro. MICs and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of moxifloxacin, ofloxacin and doxycyline were determined against single strains and mixed populations in a planktonic state. Single-species biofilms of two Porphyromonas gingivalis and two Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans strains and a multispecies biofilm consisting of 12 species were formed for 3 days. The minimal biofilm eradication concentrations (MBECs) were determined after exposing the biofilms to the antibacterials (0.002-512 µg ml(-1)) for 18 h, addition of nutrient broth for 3 days and subsequent subcultivation. Photographs were taken using confocal laser-scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The MICs and MBCs did not differ between ofloxacin and moxifloxacin against A. actinomycetemcomitans, whilst moxifloxacin was more active than the other tested antibacterials against anaerobes and the mixed population. The single-species biofilms were eradicated by moderate concentrations of the antibacterials, and the lowest MBECs were always found for moxifloxacin (2-8 µg ml(-1)). MBECs against the multispecies biofilms were 128, >512 and >512 µg ml(-1) for moxifloxacin, ofloxacin and doxycycline, respectively. In summary, moxifloxacin in a topical formulation may have potential as an adjunct to mechanical removal of the biofilms.

  5. The in Vitro Antimicrobial Efficacy of PDT against Periodontopathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Haag, Philippe A.; Steiger-Ronay, Valerie; Schmidlin, Patrick R.

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis, an inflammatory disease, is caused by biofilms with a mixed microbial etiology and involves the progressive destruction of the tooth-supporting tissues. A rising number of studies investigate the clinical potential of photodynamic therapy (PDT) as an adjunct during active therapy. The aim of the present review was to evaluate the available literature for the in vitro antimicrobial efficacy of photodynamic therapy focusing on the periodontopathogenic bacteria Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum. The focused question was: “Is it possible to decrease (at least 3 log steps or 99.9%) or even eliminate bacterial growth by photodynamic therapy in vitro when compared to untreated control groups or control groups treated by placebo?” In general, PDT resulted in a substantial reduction of surviving bacteria. However, not all studies showed the desired reduction or elimination. The ranges of log10-reduction were 0.38 (58%) to a complete eradication (100%) for P. gingivalis, 0.21 (39%) to 100% for A. actinomycetemcomitans and 0.3 (50%) to 100% for F. nucleatum. In conclusion, further and particularly more comparable studies are needed to evaluate if PDT can be clinically successful as an adjuvant in periodontal therapy. PMID:26580607

  6. Assessment of Photodynamic Inactivation against Periodontal Bacteria Mediated by a Chitosan Hydrogel in a 3D Gingival Model

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Po-Chun; Hsieh, Chien-Ming; Chen, Chueh-Pin; Tsai, Tsuimin; Chen, Chin-Tin

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan hydrogels containing hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and toluidine blue O were prepared and assessed for their mucoadhesive property and antimicrobial efficacy of photodynamic inactivation (PDI). Increased HPMC content in the hydrogels resulted in increased mucoadhesiveness. Furthermore, we developed a simple In Vitro 3D gingival model resembling the oral periodontal pocket to culture the biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans), and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis). The PDI efficacy of chitosan hydrogel was examined against periodontal biofilms cultured in this 3D gingival model. We found that the PDI effectiveness was limited due to leaving some of the innermost bacteria alive at the non-illuminated site. Using this 3D gingival model, we further optimized PDI procedures with various adjustments of light energy and irradiation sites. The PDI efficacy of the chitosan hydrogel against periodontal biofilms can significantly improve via four sides of irradiation. In conclusion, this study not only showed the clinical applicability of this chitosan hydrogel but also the importance of the light irradiation pattern in performing PDI for periodontal disease. PMID:27809278

  7. The Comparative Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Effect of Propolis with Chlorhexidine against Oral Pathogens: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Akca, A Eralp; Akca, Gülçin; Topçu, Fulya Toksoy; Macit, Enis; Pikdöken, Levent; Özgen, I Şerif

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the antimicrobial effectiveness of ethanolic extract of propolis (EEP) to chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) on planktonic Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus salivarius subsp. salivarius, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Prevotella intermedia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Actinomyces israelii, Candida albicans, and their single-species biofilms by agar dilution and broth microdilution test methods. Both agents inhibited the growth of all planktonic species. On the other hand, CHX exhibited lower minimum bactericidal concentrations than EEP against biofilms of A. actinomycetemcomitans, S. aureus, and E. faecalis whereas EEP yielded a better result against Lactobacilli and P. intermedia. The bactericidal and fungicidal concentrations of both agents were found to be equal against biofilms of Streptecocci, P. gingivalis, A. israelii, and C. albicans. The results of this study revealed that propolis was more effective in inhibiting Gram-positive bacteria than the Gram-negative bacteria in their planktonic state and it was suggested that EEP could be as effective as CHX on oral microorganisms in their biofilm state.

  8. Subgingival microbial profiles of Sudanese patients with aggressive periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Elabdeen, H. R. Z.; Mustafa, M.; Hasturk, H.; Klepac-Ceraj, V.; Ali, R. W.; Paster, B. J.; Dyke, T. Van; Bolstad, A. I.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective Aggressive periodontitis (AgP) is prevalent and shows a rapid course in African individuals. Although a strong focus has been placed on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, new methods support the existence of a complex subgingival microflora in AgP. The purpose of the present study was to map the subgingival microbiota as well as explore the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans and the JP2 clone in a group of Sudanese individuals with AgP, using different analytical methods. Material and Methods A study population consisting of 19 patients with AgP was recruited from patients seeking treatment at University of Science and Technology (UST) in Khartoum. Fifteen healthy subjects were included as controls. Plaque samples were analyzed for 272 taxa using human oral microbe identification microarrays and for 26 periodontal taxa using DNA-DNA hybridization checkerboard. Conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was applied for the detection of A. actinomycetemcomitans and the JP2 clone in plaque. Saliva from patients with AgP was analyzed using quantitative PCR (qPCR) for the detection of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Results Eubacterium yurii was detected more frequently in patients with AgP than in controls, and E. nodatum was found in patients with AgP only. A. actinomycetemcomitans was found in plaque samples of two (12%) patients by human oral microbe identification microarrays and in five (29%) patients with AgP by conventional PCR, as well as in six (32%) of the AgP saliva samples by qPCR. The JP2 clone was identified in only one patient. Conclusion The classical periodontal pathogens were not present in high amounts in AgP in the population studied here. Species of Eubacterium, which are not typically associated with AgP, were often detected in individuals with disease. Using laboratory methods with different sensitivities and detection levels allowed identification of variances in microbial communities. The findings reported in this

  9. Inhibition of Bacterial Toxin Activity by the Nuclear Stain, DRAQ5™.

    PubMed

    Webb, Joshua N; Koufos, Evan; Brown, Angela C

    2016-08-01

    The repeats-in-toxin family of toxins includes proteins produced by Gram negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli (α-hemolysin), Bordetella pertussis (adenylate cyclase toxin), and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (LtxA), which contribute to the pathogenesis of these organisms by killing host cells. In the case of LtxA produced by A. actinomycetemcomitans, white blood cells are targeted, allowing the bacteria to avoid clearance by the host immune system. In its association with target cells, LtxA binds to a receptor, lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1, as well as membrane lipids and cholesterol, before being internalized via a lysosomal-mediated pathway. The motivation for this project comes from our discovery that DRAQ5™, a membrane-permeable nuclear stain, prevents the internalization of LtxA in a Jurkat T cell line. We hypothesized that DRAQ5™, in crossing the plasma membrane, alters the properties of the membrane to inhibit LtxA internalization. To investigate how DRAQ5™ interacts with the lipid membrane to prevent LtxA internalization, we used studied DRAQ5™-mediated membrane changes in model membranes using a variety of techniques, including differential scanning calorimetry and fluorescence spectroscopy. Our results suggest that DRAQ5™ inhibits the activity of LtxA by decreasing the fluidity of the cellular lipid membrane, which decreases LtxA binding. These results present an interesting possible anti-virulence strategy; by altering bacterial toxin activity by modifying membrane fluidity, it may be possible to inhibit the pathogenicity of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  10. Integration of non-oral bacteria into in vitro oral biofilms.

    PubMed

    Thurnheer, Thomas; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are polymicrobial communities that grow on surfaces in nature. Oral bacteria can spontaneously form biofilms on the surface of teeth, which may compromise the health of the teeth, or their surrounding (periodontal) tissues. While the oral bacteria exhibit high tropism for their specialized ecological niche, it is not clear if bacteria that are not part of the normal oral microbiota can efficiently colonize and grow within oral biofilms. By using an in vitro "supragingival" biofilm model of 6 oral species, this study aimed to investigate if 3 individual bacterial species that are not part of the normal oral microbiota (Eschericia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecails) and one not previously tested oral species (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans) can be incorporated into this established supragingival biofilm model. Staphylococcus aureus and A. actinomycetemcomitans were able to grow efficiently in the biofilm, without disrupting the growth of the remaining species. They localized in sparse small aggregates within the biofilm mass. Enterococcus faecalis and E. coli were both able to populate the biofilm at high numbers, and suppressed the growth of A. oris and S. mutants. Enterococcus faecalis was arranged in a chain-like conformation, whereas E. coli was densely and evenly spread throughout the biofilm mass. In conclusion, it is possible for selected species that are not part of the normal oral microbiota to be introduced into an oral biofilm, under the given experimental micro-environmental conditions. Moreover, the equilibrated incorporation of A. actinomycetemcomitans and S. aureus in this oral biofilm model could be a useful tool in the study of aggressive periodontitis and peri-implantitis, in which these organisms are involved, respectively.

  11. Innate Immune Response of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Fibroblasts and Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Periodontopathogens

    PubMed Central

    Seneviratne, Chaminda Jayampath

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis involves complex interplay of bacteria and host immune response resulting in destruction of supporting tissues of the tooth. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a role in recognizing microbial pathogens and eliciting an innate immune response. Recently, the potential application of multipotent stem cells and pluripotent stem cells including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in periodontal regenerative therapy has been proposed. However, little is known about the impact of periodontopathogens on hESC-derived progenies. This study investigates the effects of heat-killed periodontopathogens, namely, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, on TLR and cytokine expression profile of hESC-derived progenies, namely, fibroblasts (hESC-Fib) and mesenchymal stem cells (hESC-MSCs). Additionally, the serotype-dependent effect of A. actinomycetemcomitans on hESC-derived progenies was explored. Both hESC-Fib and hESC-MSCs constitutively expressed TLR-2 and TLR-4. hESC-Fib upon exposure to periodontopathogens displayed upregulation of TLRs and release of cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8). In contrast, hESC-MSCs were largely nonresponsive to bacterial challenge, especially in terms of cytokine production. Further, exposure of hESC-Fib to A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype c was associated with higher IL-8 production than serotype b. In contrast, the hESC-MSCs displayed no serotype-dependent response. Differential response of the two hESC progenies implies a phenotype-dependent response to periodontopathogens and supports the concept of immunomodulatory properties of MSCs. PMID:27642305

  12. Efficacy of Natural and Allopathic Antimicrobial Agents Incorporated onto Guided Tissue Regeneration Membrane Against Periodontal Pathogens: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Reddy Palle, Ajay; Kumar Gedela, Rajani; Vasudevan, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Periodontal disease is one of the most prevalent afflictions worldwide. It is an infection of the periodontium as a result of subgingival colonization of the specific microbiota, leading to loss of attachment, which requires optimal care for regeneration to its pre-disease state. Guided Tissue Regeneration (GTR) is one of the successful treatment modalities in Periodontal Regenerative Therapy, but is vulnerable to bacterial colonization. The conflict between usage of classical antibiotics and plant origin antimicrobial agents has recently been in the limelight. Aim The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro antimicrobial activity of amoxicillin, metronidazole and green coffee extract loaded onto GTR membrane against periodonto-pathogens. Materials and Methods Pure form of amoxicillin, metronidazole and green coffee extract were obtained. One percent concentration of each antimicrobial agent was prepared by appropriate dilution with distilled water. GTR membrane was cut into a size of 1x0.5 cm under sterile conditions and was coated with the antimicrobial agents respectively and with distilled water as the negative control. Antimicrobial activity was checked against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) using agar disc diffusion method. The statistical analysis was done using Kruskal Wallis ANOVA and Mann-Whitney U test. Results One percent amoxicillin showed level of significance (p>0.05) against both A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis. Green coffee extract showed no zone of inhibition against both the bacterial species. Conclusion Loading of commercially available antimicrobial agents onto GTR membrane can prevent its bacterial colonization leading to better treatment outcomes for periodontal regeneration. PMID:28274052

  13. A Modified Glycosaminoglycan, GM-0111, Inhibits Molecular Signaling Involved in Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Justin R.; Pulsipher, Abigail; Rao, Narayanam V.; Kennedy, Thomas P.; Prestwich, Glenn D.; Ryan, Maria E.; Lee, Won Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background Periodontitis is characterized by microbial infection, inflammation, tissue breakdown, and accelerated loss of alveolar bone matrix. Treatment targeting these multiple stages of the disease provides ways to treat or prevent periodontitis. Certain glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) block multiple inflammatory mediators as well as suppress bacterial growth, suggesting that these GAGs may be exploited as a therapeutic for periodontitis. Methods We investigated the effects of a synthetic GAG, GM-0111, on various molecular events associated with periodontitis: growth of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans) pathogenic bacteria associated with periodontitis; activation of pro-inflammatory signaling through TLR2 and TLR4 in mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cells and heterologously expressed HEK 293 cells; osteoclast formation and bone matrix resorption in cultured mouse pre-osteoclasts. Results (1) GM-0111 suppressed the growth of P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans even at 1% (w/v) solution. The antibacterial effects of GM-0111 were stronger than hyaluronic acid (HA) or xylitol in P. gingivalis at all concentrations and comparable to xylitol in A. actinomycetemcomitans at ≥2% (w/v) solution. We also observed that GM-0111 suppressed biofilm formation of P. gingivalis and these effects were much stronger than HA. (2) GM-0111 inhibited TLR-mediated pro-inflammatory cellular signaling both in macrophage and HEK 293 cells with higher selectivity for TLR2 than TLR4 (IC50 of 1–10 ng/mL vs. > 100 μg/mL, respectively). (3) GM-0111 blocked RANKL-induced osteoclast formation (as low as 300 ng/mL) and bone matrix resorption. While GM-0111 showed high affinity binding to RANKL, it did not interfere with RANKL/RANK/NF-κB signaling, suggesting that GM-0111 inhibits osteoclast formation by a RANKL-RANK-independent mechanism. Conclusions We report that GM-0111 inhibits multiple molecular events involved in

  14. Antimicrobial activity against periodontopathogenic bacteria, antioxidant and cytotoxic effects of various extracts from endemic Thermopsis turcica

    PubMed Central

    Bali, Elif Burcu; Açık, Leyla; Akca, Gülçin; Sarper, Meral; Elçi, Mualla Pınar; Avcu, Ferit; Vural, Mecit

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the in vitro antimicrobial potential of Thermopsis turcica Kit Tan, Vural & Küçüködük against periodontopathogenic bacteria, its antioxidant activity and cytotoxic effect on various cancer cell lines. Methods In vitro antimicrobial activities of ethanol, methanol, ethyl acetate (EtAc), n-hexane and water extracts of Thermopsis turcica herb against periodontopathogenic bacteria, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 29523 and Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 were tested by agar well diffusion, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC). Antioxidant properties of the extracts were evaluated by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl radical scavenging activity and β-carotene bleaching methods. Amounts of phenolic contents of the extracts were also analysed by using the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent. Additionally, cytotoxic activity of the extracts on androgen-insensitive prostate cancer, androgen-sensitive prostate cancer, chronic myelogenous leukemia and acute promyelocytic leukemia human cancer cell lines were determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Human gingival fibroblast cells were used as a control. Results Our data showed that EtAc extract had the highest antimicrobial effect on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (MIC: 1.562 mg/mL, MBC: 3.124 mg/mL) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (MIC: 0.781 mg/mL, MBC: 1.562 mg/mL). In antioxidant assays, EtAc extract exhibited also the highest radical scavenging activity [IC50=(30.0±0.3) µg/mL] and the highest inhibition [(74.35±0.30)%] against lineloic acide oxidation. The amount of phenolic content of it was also the highest [(162.5±1.2) µg/mg gallic acid]. In cytotoxic assay, only ethanol [IC50=(80.00±1.21) µg/mL] and EtAc extract [IC50=(70.0±0.9) µg/mL] were toxic on acute promyelocytic leukemia cells at 20-100 µg/mL (P<0.05). However, no toxic effect was observed on human gingival fibroblast cells

  15. Bacterial inactivation/sterilization by argon plasma treatment on contaminated titanium implant surfaces:In vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Annunziata, Marco; Donnarumma, Giovanna; Caputo, Pina; Nastri, Livia; Guida, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Background Surface treatment by argon plasma is widely used as the last step of the manufacturing process of titanium implant fixtures before their sterilization by gamma rays. The possibility of using such a technology in the daily clinical practice is particularly fascinating. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of the argon plasma treatment on different titanium implant surfaces previously exposed In vitro to bacterial contamination. Material and Methods Sterile c.p. titanium implant discs with turned (T, Sa: 0.8 µm ), sandblasted/acid-etched (SAE, Sa: 1.3 µm) and titanium plasma sprayed (TPS, Sa: 3.0µm) surface were used in this study. A strain of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans ATCC3718 was grown at 37°C under anaerobic conditions for 24 h and then transferred on six discs for each of the three surface types. After 24 hours, a half of the contaminated discs (control group) were directly used to evaluate the colony forming units (CFUs). The other half of the contaminated discs (test group) were treated in an argon plasma chamber for 12 minutes at room temperature prior to be analyzed for CFU counting. All assays were performed using triplicate samples of each material in 3 different experiments. Results When the CFU counting was carried out on control discs, a total of 1.50x106±1.4x105, 1.55x106±7.07x104 and 3.15x106±2.12x105 CFU was respectively assessed for T, SAE and TPS discs, without statistically significant differences among the three surfaces. On the contrary, any trace of bacterial contamination was assessed for titanium discs treated in the argon plasma chamber prior to be analyzed, irrespectively to the implant surface tested. Conclusions Within the limit of this study, reported data suggested that the argon plasma technology could be efficiently used to decontaminate/sterilize previously infected titanium implant surfaces. Key words:Argon plasma, titanium implant surface, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. PMID

  16. Selected dietary (poly)phenols inhibit periodontal pathogen growth and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Muhammad; Millhouse, Emma; Culshaw, Shauna; Edwards, Christine A; Ramage, Gordon; Combet, Emilie

    2015-03-01

    Periodontitis (PD) is a chronic infectious disease mediated by bacteria in the oral cavity. (Poly)phenols (PPs), ubiquitous in plant foods, possess antimicrobial activities and may be useful in the prevention and management of periodontitis. The objective of this study was to test the antibacterial effects of selected PPs on periodontal pathogens, on both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. Selected PPs (n = 48) were screened against Streptococcus mitis (S. mitis), Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans), Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis). The antibacterial potential of each compound was evaluated in terms of planktonic minimum inhibitory concentration (PMIC) and planktonic minimum bactericidal concentration (PMBC) using standardized broth microdilution assays. The most active PPs were further tested for their effect on mono-species and multi-species biofilms using a colorimetric resazurin-based viability assay and scanning electron microscopy. Of the 48 PPs tested, 43 showed effective inhibition of planktonic growth of one or more test strains, of which curcumin was the most potent (PMIC range = 7.8-62.5 μg mL(-1)), followed by pyrogallol (PMIC range = 2.4-2500 μg mL(-1)), pyrocatechol (MIC range = 4.9-312.5 μg mL(-1)) and quercetin (PMIC range = 31.2-500 μg mL(-1)). At this concentration, adhesion of curcumin and quercetin to the substrate also inhibited adhesion of S. mitis, and biofilm formation and maturation. While both curcumin and quercetin were able to alter architecture of mature multi-species biofilms, only curcumin-treated biofilms displayed a significantly reduced metabolic activity. Overall, PPs possess antibacterial activities against periodontopathic bacteria in both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. Further cellular and in vivo studies are necessary to confirm their beneficial activities and potential use in the prevention and or treatment of periodontal

  17. Increased levels of Porphyromonas gingivalis are associated with ischemic and hemorrhagic cerebrovascular disease in humans: an in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    GHIZONI, Janaina Salomon; TAVEIRA, Luís Antônio de Assis; GARLET, Gustavo Pompermaier; GHIZONI, Marcos Flávio; PEREIRA, Jefferson Ricardo; DIONÍSIO, Thiago José; BROZOSKI, Daniel Thomas; SANTOS, Carlos Ferreira; SANT'ANA, Adriana Campos Passanezi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the role of periodontal disease in the development of stroke or cerebral infarction in patients by evaluating the clinical periodontal conditions and the subgingival levels of periodontopathogens. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with ischemic (I-CVA) or hemorrhagic (H-CVA) cerebrovascular episodes (test group) and 60 systemically healthy patients (control group) were evaluated for: probing depth, clinical attachment level, bleeding on probing and plaque index. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were both identified and quantified in subgingival plaque samples by conventional and real-time PCR, respectively. Results: The test group showed a significant increase in each of the following parameters: pocket depth, clinical attachment loss, bleeding on probing, plaque index and number of missing teeth when compared to control values (p<0.05, unpaired t-test). Likewise, the test group had increased numbers of sites that were contaminated with P. gingivalis (60%x10%; p<0.001; chi-squared test) and displayed greater prevalence of periodontal disease, with an odds ratio of 48.06 (95% CI: 5.96-387.72; p<0.001). Notably, a positive correlation between probing depth and the levels of P. gingivalis in ischemic stroke was found (r=0.60; p=0.03; Spearman's rank correlation coefficient test). A. actinomycetemcomitans DNA was not detected in any of the groups by conventional or real-time PCR. Conclusions: Stroke patients had deeper pockets, more severe attachment loss, increased bleeding on probing, increased plaque indexes, and in their pockets harbored increased levels of P. gingivalis. These findings suggest that periodontal disease is a risk factor for the development of cerebral hemorrhage or infarction. Early treatment of periodontitis may counteract the development of cerebrovascular episodes. PMID:22437687

  18. Subgingival bacteria in Ghanaian adolescents with or without progression of attachment loss

    PubMed Central

    Dahlén, Gunnar; Claesson, Rolf; Åberg, Carola Höglund; Haubek, Dorte; Johansson, Anders; Kwamin, Francis

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study describes subgingival bacterial profiles associated with clinical periodontal status in Ghanaian adolescents with or without progression of attachment loss. Materials and methods Among 500 adolescents included in a cohort study, 397 returned 2 years later for a periodontal re-examination, including full-mouth CAL measurements. At follow-up, a subgroup of 98 adolescents was also subjected to bacterial sampling with paper points at four periodontal sites (mesial aspect of 11, 26, 31, and 46) and analyzed with the checkerboard DNA–DNA hybridization technique against DNA-probes from nine periodontitis-associated bacterial species. Results The 98 Ghanaian adolescents examined in the present study were similar to the entire group examined at the 2-year follow-up with respect to age, gender, and CAL ≥3 mm. A high detection frequency of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Prevotella intermedia (>99%) using checkerboard analysis was found, while for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans the detection frequency was <50%. A strong correlation was found at the individual level between the presence of P. intermedia and the total CAL change, and P. intermedia and Porphyromonas gingivalis were strongly correlated with a change in CAL and probing pocket depth (PPD) at the sampled sites. In a linear regression model, a significant discriminating factor for the total CAL change in the dentition during the 2-year follow-up period was obtained for P. intermedia and public school. Conclusion This study indicates that subgingival bacterial species other than A. actinomycetemcomitans, for example, P. intermedia, have a significant association with periodontal breakdown (change in CAL) in Ghanaian adolescents with progression of periodontal attachment loss. PMID:24834145

  19. Localization and expression pattern of amelotin, odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein and follicular dendritic cell-secreted protein in the junctional epithelium of inflamed gingiva.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yohei; Kobayashi, Ryoki; Matsui, Sari; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Iwai, Yasunobu; Noda, Keisuke; Yamazaki, Mizuho; Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Yoshimura, Atsutoshi; Shinomura, Tamayuki; Ganss, Bernhard; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2016-11-02

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate the localization of amelotin (AMTN), odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM) and follicular dendritic cell-secreted protein (FDC-SP) at the junctional epithelium (JE) in Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans infected mice and inflamed and non-inflamed human gingiva. We performed immunostaining to determine the localization and expression pattern of AMTN, ODAM and FDC-SP. AMTN, ODAM and FDC-SP in A. actinomycetemcomitans infected mice did not change dramatically compared with non-infected mice. AMTN and FDC-SP expressions were observed stronger in P. gingivalis infected mice at early stage. However, at the following stage, the coronal part of the AMTN expression disappeared from the JE, and FDC-SP expression decreased due to severe inflammation by P. gingivalis. ODAM expressed internal and external basal lamina, and the expression increased not only at early stage but also at the following stage in the inflammatory JE induced by P. gingivalis. In the human gingival tissues, AMTN was detected at the surface of the sulcular epithelium and JE in the non-inflamed and inflamed gingiva, and the localization did not change the process of inflammation. ODAM and FDC-SP were more widely detected at the sulcular epithelium and JE in the non-inflamed gingiva. In the inflamed gingiva, localization of ODAM and FDC-SP was spread into the gingival epithelium, compared to AMTN. These studies demonstrated that the expression pattern of AMTN, ODAM and FDC-SP at the JE were changed during inflammation process and these three proteins might play an important role in the resistance to inflammation.

  20. Synergistic Antibacterial Effects of Nanoparticles Encapsulated with Scutellaria baicalensis and Pure Chlorhexidine on Oral Bacterial Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Ken Cham-Fai; Seneviratne, Chaminda Jayampath; Li, Xuan; Leung, Ping Chung; Lau, Clara Bik San; Wong, Chi-Hin; Pang, Ka Yan; Wong, Chun Wai; Wat, Elaine; Jin, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    Scutellaria baicalensis (SB) is a traditional Chinese medicine for treating infectious and inflammatory diseases. Our recent study shows potent antibacterial effects of nanoparticle-encapsulated chlorhexidine (Nano-CHX). Herein, we explored the synergistic effects of the nanoparticle-encapsulated SB (Nano-SB) and Nano-CHX on oral bacterial biofilms. Loading efficiency of Nano-SB was determined by thermogravimetric analysis, and its releasing profile was assessed by high-performance liquid chromatographyusing baicalin (a flavonoid compound of SB) as the marker. The mucosal diffusion assay on Nano-SB was undertaken in a porcine model. The antibacterial effects of the mixed nanoparticles (Nano-MIX) of Nano-SB and Nano-CHX at 9:1 (w/w) ratio were analyzed in both planktonic and biofilm modes of representative oral bacteria. The Nano-MIX was effective on the mono-species biofilms of Streptococcus (S.) mutans, S. sobrinus, Fusobacterium (F.) nucleatum, and Aggregatibacter (A.) actinomycetemcomitans (MIC 50 μg/mL) at 24 h, and exhibited an enhanced effect against the multi-species biofilms such as S. mutans, F. nucleatum, A. actinomycetemcomitans, and Porphyromonas (P.) gingivalis (MIC 12.5 μg/mL) at 24 h that was supported by the findings of both scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal scanning laser microscopy (CLSM). This study shows enhanced synergistic antibacterial effects of the Nano-MIX on common oral bacterial biofilms, which could be potentially developed as a novel antimicrobial agent for clinical oral/periodontal care. PMID:28335189

  1. In-vitro activity of taurolidine on single species and a multispecies population associated with periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Zollinger, Lilly; Schnyder, Simone; Nietzsche, Sandor; Sculean, Anton; Eick, Sigrun

    2015-04-01

    The antimicrobial activity of taurolidine was compared with minocycline against microbial species associated with periodontitis (four single strains and a 12-species mixture). Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs), killing as well as activities on established and forming single-species biofilms and a 12-species biofilm were determined. The MICs of taurolidine against single species were always 0.31 mg/ml, the MBCs were 0.64 mg/ml. The used mixed microbiota was less sensitive to taurolidine, MIC and the MBC was 2.5 mg/ml. The strains and the mixture were completely killed by 2.5 mg/ml taurolidine, whereas 256 μg/ml minocycline reduced the bacterial counts of the mixture by 5 log10 colony forming units (cfu). Coating the surface with 10 mg/ml taurolidine or 256 μg/ml minocycline prevented completely biofilm formation of Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 but not of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Y4 and the mixture. On 4.5 d old biofilms, taurolidine acted concentration dependent with a reduction by 5 log10 cfu (P. gingivalis ATCC 33277) and 7 log10 cfu (A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4) when applying 10 mg/ml. Minocycline decreased the cfu counts by 1-2 log10 cfu independent of the used concentration. The reduction of the cfu counts in the 4.5 d old multi-species biofilms was about 3 log10 cfu after application of any minocycline concentration and after using 10 mg/ml taurolidine. Taurolidine is active against species associated with periodontitis, even within biofilms. Nevertheless a complete elimination of complex biofilms by taurolidine seems to be impossible and underlines the importance of a mechanical removal of biofilms prior to application of taurolidine.

  2. Effect of ozone on periodontopathogenic species--an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Eick, Sigrun; Tigan, Marius; Sculean, Anton

    2012-04-01

    The in vitro study was aimed to determine the effect of ozone on periodontopathogenic microorganisms. Ozone was generated for 6 s-2 × 24 s (corresponding to 0.56 mg-2 × 2.24 mg of ozone) against 23 mainly anaerobic periodontopathogenic species. Agar diffusion test was used as a screening method. Then, the killing activity was tested in a serum-free environment and with 25% v/v inactivated serum. Further, the effect of ozone on bactericidal activity of native serum was analyzed against Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Agar diffusion test showed a high efficacy of ozone against microorganisms, especially against Porphyromonas gingivalis. This result was confirmed by the killing tests; most of the strains in a concentration of 10(5) were completely eliminated after twofold 18-s application of ozone. Only four of the six potentially "superinfecting" species (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterobacter cloacae, Candida albicans) survived in part. Addition of heat-inactivated serum reduced the killing rate of ozone by 78% after 6-s and by 47% after twofold 18-s exposures; no strain was completely eradicated after any application of ozone. The bactericidal effect of native serum was enhanced after application of ozone; no effect was visible on the included A. actinomycetemcomitans strain which was found to be completely resistant to the bactericidal action of serum. In conclusion, (a) ozone has a strong antibacterial activity against putative periodontopathogenic microorganisms, and (b) the bactericidal effect is reduced in the presence of serum. Ozone may have potential as an adjunctive application to mechanical treatment in periodontitis patients.

  3. C-reactive protein as a systemic marker of inflammation in periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Pejcic, A; Kesic, L J; Milasin, J

    2011-03-01

    Periodontitis has been identified as a potential risk factor for systemic pathologies such as cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aims of this investigation were to assess the relationship between periodontitis and systemic inflammatory factor, as well as to discover whether there is a relation to the severity of periodontitis and to the periodontopathogens. Periodontal examinations and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) level measurements were performed in 50 patients with periodontitis. Periodontal health indicators included the gingival bleeding on probing index and periodontal disease status. The patients with moderate periodontitis had low attachment loss and pocket depth <4 mm. The patients with severe periodontitis had high attachment loss and pocket depth >5 mm. The control group comprised 25 volunteers with healthy gingiva, gingival sulcus <2 mm and no attachment loss. The presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in subgingival plaque samples was analysed by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. The periodontal parameters and CRP levels were significantly higher in the patients with periodontitis. Patients who had severe periodontitis, with high levels of mean clinical attachment loss, and subjects with moderate periodontitis had higher mean CRP levels. The percentage of subjects with elevated levels of CRP >5 mg/l was greater in the higher clinical attachment loss group compared to the group with lower attachment loss. The presence of P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans were also associated with elevated CRP levels and poor periodontal status. Periodontitis and the presence of P. gingivalis are associated with an enhanced inflammatory response expressed by higher CRP levels. The association of periodontitis with CRP levels appears to be a contributing factor for CVD and might be a possible intermediate pathway in this association.

  4. Influence of topography and hydrophilicity on initial oral biofilm formation on microstructured titanium surfaces in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Almaguer-Flores, A.; Olivares-Navarrete, R.; Wieland, M.; Ximénez-Fyvie, L. A.; Schwartz, Z.; Boyan, B. D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of the microtopography and hydrophilicity of titanium (Ti) substrates on initial oral biofilm formation. Materials and methods Nine bacterial species belonging to the normal oral microbiota, including: Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Actinomyces israelii, Campylobacter rectus, Eikenella corrodens, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micra, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Streptococcus sanguinis were tested on Ti surfaces: pretreatment (PT [Ra<0.2 μm]), acid-etched (A [Ra<0.8 μm]), A modified to be hydrophilic (modA), sand-blasted/acid-etched (SLA [Ra = 4 μm]), and hydrophilic SLA (modSLA). Disks were incubated for 24 h in anaerobic conditions using a normal culture medium (CM) or human saliva (HS). The total counts of bacteria and the proportion of each bacterial species were analysed by checkerboard DNA–DNA hybridization. Results: Higher counts of bacteria were observed on all surfaces incubated with CM compared with the samples incubated with HS. PT, SLA, and modSLA exhibited higher numbers of attached bacteria in CM, whereas SLA and modSLA had a significant increase in bacterial adhesion in HS. The proportion of the species in the initial biofilms was also influenced by the surface properties and the media used: SLA and modSLA increased the proportion of species like A. actinomycetemcomitans and S. sanguinis in both media, while the adhesion of A. israelii and P. gingivalis on the same surfaces was affected in the presence of saliva. Conclusions The initial biofilm formation and composition were affected by the microtopography and hydrophilicity of the surface and by the media used. PMID:21492236

  5. Cyclodextrin modulates the cytotoxic effects of chlorhexidine on microrganisms and cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, K I R; Denadai, A M L; Sinisterra, R D; Cortés, M E

    2015-05-01

    Although several studies have shown that chlorhexidine (Cx) has bactericidal activity and exerts toxic effects on periodontal tissues a few studies evaluated mechanisms to reduce its adverse effects maintaining the antimicrobial properties. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro antimicrobial activity and cellular cytotoxicity of Cx included on cyclodextrins (Cd), α, β or Hp-β-cyclodextrins (Hp-β-Cd). The influence of Cds was determined by increasing its molar rate 1:1 to 1:4 in relation with free Cx. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for Candida albicans, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans actinomycemcomitans and Streptococcus mutans were determined. An ergosterol solubilization assay was carried out using the C. albicans model and osteoblasts, fibroblasts and tumoral Caco-2 cells for cytotoxicity assay. The antimicrobial activity results in a significant growth inhibition of C. albicans when it was treated with Cx:α-Cd complexes, whereas Cx:β-Cd was more effective for A. actinomycetemcomitans, and Cx:Hp-β-Cd complexes was for S. mutans when compared to the other complexes. The cytotoxicity for fibroblasts and osteoblasts decreased in relation with each kind of Cd been β-Cd ≤ Hp-β-Cd ≤ α-Cd. Although the Hp-β-Cd inclusion complexes had more severe effects on Caco-2 cells, all complexes exhibited less cytotoxicity than free Cx. The α-Cd, β-Cd and Hp-β-Cd increase the antimicrobial activity of Cx, but decrease its cytotoxic effects on mammalian cells. Taken together these findings suggest that cyclodextrins are a tool for modulation of effects of Cx. It could be useful to design Cx/Cd delivery systems with high efficacy and minimum cytotoxic effects.

  6. Malva sylvestris Inhibits Inflammatory Response in Oral Human Cells. An In Vitro Infection Model.

    PubMed

    Benso, Bruna; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz; Alencar, Severino Matias; Murata, Ramiro Mendonça

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of Malva sylvestris extract (MSE) and fractions in a co-culture model of cells infected by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. In addition, we evaluated the phytochemical content in the extract and fractions of M. sylvestris and demonstrated that polyphenols were the most frequent group in all samples studied. An in vitro dual-chamber model to mimic the periodontal structure was developed using a monolayer of epithelial keratinocytes (OBA-9) and a subepithelial layer of fibroblasts (HGF-1). The invasive periodontopathogen A. actinomycetemcomitans (D7S-1) was applied to migrate through the cell layers and induce the synthesis of immune factors and cytokines in the host cells. In an attempt to analyze the antimicrobial properties of MSE and fractions, a susceptibility test was carried out. The extract (MIC 175 μg/mL, MBC 500μg/mL) and chloroform fraction (MIC 150 μg/mL, MBC 250 μg/mL) were found to have inhibitory activity. The extract and all fractions were assessed using a cytotoxicity test and results showed that concentrations under 100 μg/mL did not significantly reduce cell viability compared to the control group (p > 0.05, viability > 90%). In order to analyze the inflammatory response, transcriptional factors and cytokines were quantified in the supernatant released from the cells. The chloroform fraction was the most effective in reducing the bacterial colonization (p< 0.05) and controlling inflammatory mediators, and promoted the down-regulation of genes including IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-10, CD14, PTGS, MMP-1 and FOS as well as the reduction of the IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8 and GM-CSF protein levels (p< 0.05). Malva sylvestris and its chloroform fraction minimized the A. actinomycetemcomitans infection and inflammation processes in oral human cells by a putative pathway that involves important cytokines and receptors. Therefore, this natural product may be considered as a

  7. Malva sylvestris Inhibits Inflammatory Response in Oral Human Cells. An In Vitro Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Benso, Bruna; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz; Alencar, Severino Matias; Murata, Ramiro Mendonça

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of Malva sylvestris extract (MSE) and fractions in a co-culture model of cells infected by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. In addition, we evaluated the phytochemical content in the extract and fractions of M. sylvestris and demonstrated that polyphenols were the most frequent group in all samples studied. An in vitro dual-chamber model to mimic the periodontal structure was developed using a monolayer of epithelial keratinocytes (OBA-9) and a subepithelial layer of fibroblasts (HGF-1). The invasive periodontopathogen A. actinomycetemcomitans (D7S-1) was applied to migrate through the cell layers and induce the synthesis of immune factors and cytokines in the host cells. In an attempt to analyze the antimicrobial properties of MSE and fractions, a susceptibility test was carried out. The extract (MIC 175 μg/mL, MBC 500μg/mL) and chloroform fraction (MIC 150 μg/mL, MBC 250 μg/mL) were found to have inhibitory activity. The extract and all fractions were assessed using a cytotoxicity test and results showed that concentrations under 100 μg/mL did not significantly reduce cell viability compared to the control group (p > 0.05, viability > 90%). In order to analyze the inflammatory response, transcriptional factors and cytokines were quantified in the supernatant released from the cells. The chloroform fraction was the most effective in reducing the bacterial colonization (p< 0.05) and controlling inflammatory mediators, and promoted the down-regulation of genes including IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-10, CD14, PTGS, MMP-1 and FOS as well as the reduction of the IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8 and GM-CSF protein levels (p< 0.05). Malva sylvestris and its chloroform fraction minimized the A. actinomycetemcomitans infection and inflammation processes in oral human cells by a putative pathway that involves important cytokines and receptors. Therefore, this natural product may be considered as a

  8. Antimicrobial properties and dentin bonding strength of magnesium phosphate cements.

    PubMed

    Mestres, G; Abdolhosseini, M; Bowles, W; Huang, S-H; Aparicio, C; Gorr, S-U; Ginebra, M-P

    2013-09-01

    The main objective of this work was to assess the antimicrobial properties and the dentin-bonding strength of novel magnesium phosphate cements (MPC). Three formulations of MPC, consisting of magnesium oxide and a phosphate salt, NH4H2PO4, NaH2PO4 or a mixture of both, were evaluated. As a result of the setting reaction, MPC transformed into either struvite (MgNH4PO4·6H2O) when NH4H2PO4 was used or an amorphous magnesium sodium phosphate when NaH2PO4 was used. The MPC had appropriate setting times for hard tissue applications, high early compressive strengths and higher strength of bonding to dentin than commercial mineral trioxide aggregate cement. Bacteriological studies were performed with fresh and aged cements against three bacterial strains, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (planktonic and in biofilm) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. These bacteria have been associated with infected implants, as well as other frequent hard tissue related infections. Extracts of different compositions of MPC had bactericidal or bacteriostatic properties against the three bacterial strains tested. This was associated mainly with a synergistic effect between the high osmolarity and alkaline pH of the MPC. These intrinsic antimicrobial properties make MPC preferential candidates for applications in dentistry, such as root fillers, pulp capping agents and cavity liners.

  9. Prevalence of periodontal pathogens as predictor of the evolution of periodontal status.

    PubMed

    Puig-Silla, Miriam; Montiel-Company, José María; Dasí-Fernández, Francisco; Almerich-Silla, José Manuel

    2016-11-25

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis, its fimA genotypes, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola and the evolution of periodontal health. In a longitudinal prospective study, samples of subgingival plaque were taken from 114 patients (37 with chronic periodontitis, 17 with gingivitis, and 60 periodontally healthy) in the course of a full periodontal examination. PCR was employed to determine the presence of the periodontopathogenic bacteria. Four years later, a second examination and sample collection were performed in 90 of these patients (20 with chronic periodontitis, 12 with gingivitis, and 58 periodontally healthy). T. forsythia, P. gingivalis, and T. denticola are the most prevalent bacteria in patients with chronic periodontitis (78.4%, 62.2 y 56.8%, respectively). The P. gingivalis bacterium and its fimA genotypes I, II, and IV showed the highest correlation between the baseline and follow-up assessments. P. gingivalis fimA genotype II and T. forsythia were associated to a significant degree with unfavourable periodontal evolution. Of the variables studied, P. gingivalis fimA genotype II and T. forsythia increase the risk of an unfavourable evolution of periodontal status.

  10. Prevalence of fimA genotypes of Porphyromonas gingivalis and other periodontal bacteria in a Spanish population with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Puig-Silla, Miriam; Dasí-Fernánde, Francisco; Montiel-Company, José-María

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of the different fimA genotypes of Porphyromonas gingivalis in adult Spanish patients with chronic periodontitis, patients with gingivitis and periodontally healthy subjects, and the relationship between these genotypes and other periodontopathogenic bacteria. Study design: Samples of subgingival plaque were taken from 86 patients (33 with chronic periodontitis, 16 with gingivitis, and 37 periodontally healthy) in the course of a full periodontal examination. PCR was employed to determine the presence of the 6 fimA genotypes of Porphyromonas gingivalis (I-V and Ib) and of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola. Results: Porphyromonas gingivalis fimA genotypes II and Ib were present in significantly higher percentages in periodontal patients (39.4% and 12.1% respectively) than in healthy or gingivitis subjects. The prevalence of Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Porphyromonas gingivalis fimA genotype IV was significantly higher in the group that presented bleeding greater than 30%. A positive correlation was found between Porphyromonas gingivalis fimA genotype IV and Treponema denticola. Conclusions: A strong association between Porphyromonas gingivalis fimA genotypes II and Ib and chronic periodontitis exists in the Spanish population. The most prevalent genotype in periodontal patients is II. Key words:Periodontitis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, fimA genotype, periodontal bacteria, polymerase chain reaction. PMID:22549664

  11. Antimicrobial effect of adjunctive use of chlorhexidine mouthrinse in untreated gingivitis: a randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Becerik, Sema; Türkoğlu, Oya; Emingil, Gülnur; Vural, Caner; Ozdemir, Güven; Atilla, Gül

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of chlorhexidine mouthrinse (CHX) in addition to daily plaque control on subgingival microbiota in patients with untreated gingivitis. Fifty gingivitis patients were randomized to CHX or placebo groups. CHX group rinsed with 0.2% CHX, while placebo group rinsed with placebo mouthrinse for 4 weeks. Subgingival plaque samples were collected and plaque index (PI), papilla bleeding index (PBI), calculus index, and probing pocket depth (PPD) were recorded at baseline and at 4 weeks. The amounts of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and total bacteria were detected by quantitative real-time PCR method. In the CHX group the total bacteria count was significantly reduced in posterior teeth at 4 weeks (p < 0.05), while no significant decrease was observed in the placebo group (p > 0.05). CHX mouthrinse as an adjunct to daily plaque control could be useful in the management of plaque-associated gingivitis and in reducing the subgingival total bacteria count especially in posterior teeth.

  12. Bacterial fight-and-flight responses enhance virulence in a polymicrobial infection.

    PubMed

    Stacy, Apollo; Everett, Jake; Jorth, Peter; Trivedi, Urvish; Rumbaugh, Kendra P; Whiteley, Marvin

    2014-05-27

    The oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) resides in infection sites with many microbes, including commensal streptococci such as Streptococcus gordonii (Sg). During infection, Sg promotes the virulence of Aa by producing its preferred carbon source, l-lactate, a phenomenon referred to as cross-feeding. However, as with many streptococci, Sg also produces high levels of the antimicrobial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), leading to the question of how Aa deals with this potent antimicrobial during coinfection. Here, we show that Aa possesses two complementary responses to H2O2: a detoxification or fight response mediated by catalase (KatA) and a dispersion or flight response mediated by Dispersin B (DspB), an enzyme that dissolves Aa biofilms. Using a murine abscess infection model, we show that both of these responses are required for Sg to promote Aa virulence. Although the role of KatA is to detoxify H2O2 during coinfection, 3D spatial analysis of mixed infections revealed that DspB is required for Aa to spatially organize itself at an optimal distance (>4 µm) from Sg, which we propose allows cross-feeding but reduces exposure to inhibitory levels of H2O2. In addition, these behaviors benefit not only Aa but also Sg, suggesting that fight and flight stimulate the fitness of the community. These results reveal that an antimicrobial produced by a human commensal bacterium enhances the virulence of a pathogenic bacterium by modulating its spatial location in the infection site.

  13. Broad-Spectrum Biofilm Inhibition by Kingella kingae Exopolysaccharide▿

    PubMed Central

    Bendaoud, Meriem; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Balashova, Nataliya V.; Kadouri, Daniel E.; Kachlany, Scott C.; Kaplan, Jeffrey B.

    2011-01-01

    Cell-free extracts prepared from Kingella kingae colony biofilms were found to inhibit biofilm formation by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Candida albicans, and K. kingae. The extracts evidently inhibited biofilm formation by modifying the physicochemical properties of the cell surface, the biofilm matrix, and the substrate. Chemical and biochemical analyses indicated that the biofilm inhibition activity in the K. kingae extract was due to polysaccharide. Structural analyses showed that the extract contained two major polysaccharides. One was a linear polysaccharide with the structure →6)-α-d-GlcNAcp-(1→5)-β-d-OclAp-(2→, which was identical to a capsular polysaccharide produced by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5. The second was a novel linear polysaccharide, designated PAM galactan, with the structure →3)-β-d-Galf-(1→6)-β-d-Galf-(1→. Purified PAM galactan exhibited broad-spectrum biofilm inhibition activity. A cluster of three K. kingae genes encoding UDP-galactopyranose mutase (ugm) and two putative galactofuranosyl transferases was sufficient for the synthesis of PAM galactan in Escherichia coli. PAM galactan is one of a growing number of bacterial polysaccharides that exhibit antibiofilm activity. The biological roles and potential technological applications of these molecules remain unknown. PMID:21602333

  14. Porphyromonas gingivalis Fim-A genotype distribution among Colombians

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo, Adriana; Parra, Beatriz; Botero, Javier Enrique; Contreras, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Porphyromonas gingivalis is associated with periodontitis and exhibit a wide array of virulence factors, including fimbriae which is encoded by the FimA gene representing six known genotypes. Objetive: To identify FimA genotypes of P. gingivalis in subjects from Cali-Colombia, including the co-infection with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia. Methods: Subgingival samples were collected from 151 people exhibiting diverse periodontal condition. The occurrence of P. gingivalis, FimA genotypes and other bacteria was determined by PCR. Results: P. gingivalis was positive in 85 patients. Genotype FimA II was more prevalent without reach significant differences among study groups (54.3%), FimA IV was also prevalent in gingivitis (13.0%). A high correlation (p= 0.000) was found among P. gingivalis, T. denticola, and T. forsythia co-infection. The FimA II genotype correlated with concomitant detection of T. denticola and T. forsythia. Conclusions: Porphyromonas gingivalis was high even in the healthy group at the study population. A trend toward a greater frequency of FimA II genotype in patients with moderate and severe periodontitis was determined. The FimA II genotype was also associated with increased pocket depth, greater loss of attachment level, and patients co-infected with T. denticola and T. forsythia. PMID:26600627

  15. Relationship of Clinical and Microbiological Variables in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Sakalauskiene, Jurgina; Kubilius, Ricardas; Gleiznys, Alvydas; Vitkauskiene, Astra; Ivanauskiene, Egle; Šaferis, Viktoras

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to analyze how metabolic control of type 1 diabetes is related to clinical and microbiological periodontal parameters. Material/Methods The study involved 56 subjects aged from 19 to 50 years divided into 2 groups: healthy subjects (the H group), and diabetic (type 1 diabetes) patients with chronic untreated generalized periodontitis (the DM group). The glycosylated hemoglobin value (HbA1c) was determined using the UniCel DxC 800 SYNCHRON System (Beckman Coulter, USA), and the concentration in blood was measured by the turbidimetric immunoinhibition method. A molecular genetic assay (Micro-IDent plus, Germany) was used to detect periodontopathogenic bacteria in plaque samples. Periodontitis was confirmed by clinical and radiological examination. Results Fusobacterium nucleatum, Capnocytophaga species, and Eikenella corrodens were the most frequently found bacteria in dental plaque samples (77.8%, 66.7%, and 33.4%, respectively), whereas Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans was identified 40.7% less frequently in the DM group than in the H group. The strongest relationship was observed between the presence of 2 periodontal pathogens – F. nucleatum and Capnocytophaga spp. – and poorer metabolic control in type 1 diabetes patients (HbA1c) and all clinical parameters of periodontal pathology. Conclusions Periodontal disease was more evident in type 1 diabetic patients, and the prevalence of periodontitis was greatly increased in subjects with poorer metabolic control. PMID:25294115

  16. Photolysis of hydrogen peroxide, an effective disinfection system via hydroxyl radical formation.

    PubMed

    Ikai, Hiroyo; Nakamura, Keisuke; Shirato, Midori; Kanno, Taro; Iwasawa, Atsuo; Sasaki, Keiichi; Niwano, Yoshimi; Kohno, Masahiro

    2010-12-01

    The relationship between the amount of hydroxyl radicals generated by photolysis of H(2)O(2) and bactericidal activity was examined. H(2)O(2) (1 M) was irradiated with laser light at a wavelength of 405 nm to generate hydroxyl radicals. Electron spin resonance spin trapping analysis showed that the amount of hydroxyl radicals produced increased with the irradiation time. Four species of pathogenic oral bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Streptococcus mutans, and Enterococcus faecalis, were used in the bactericidal assay. S. mutans in a model biofilm was also examined. Laser irradiation of suspensions in 1 M H(2)O(2) resulted in a >99.99% reduction of the viable counts of each of the test species within 3 min of treatment. Treatment of S. mutans in a biofilm resulted in a >99.999% reduction of viable counts within 3 min. Other results demonstrated that the bactericidal activity was dependent on the amount of hydroxyl radicals generated. Treatment of bacteria with 200 to 300 μM hydroxyl radicals would result in reductions of viable counts of >99.99%.

  17. Development of a flow chamber system for the reproducible in vitro analysis of biofilm formation on implant materials

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Henryke; Stumpp, Sascha Nico; Stiesch, Meike

    2017-01-01

    Since the introduction of modern dental implants in the 1980s, the number of inserted implants has steadily increased. Implant systems have become more sophisticated and have enormously enhanced patients’ quality of life. Although there has been tremendous development in implant materials and clinical methods, bacterial infections are still one of the major causes of implant failure. These infections involve the formation of sessile microbial communities, called biofilms. Biofilms possess unique physical and biochemical properties and are hard to treat conventionally. There is a great demand for innovative methods to functionalize surfaces antibacterially, which could be used as the basis of new implant technologies. Present, there are few test systems to evaluate bacterial growth on these surfaces under physiological flow conditions. We developed a flow chamber model optimized for the assessment of dental implant materials. As a result it could be shown that biofilms of the five important oral bacteria Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus salivarius, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, can be reproducibly formed on the surface of titanium, a frequent implant material. This system can be run automatically in combination with an appropriate microscopic device and is a promising approach for testing the antibacterial effect of innovative dental materials. PMID:28187188

  18. The Use of Rodent Models to Investigate Host-Bacteria Interactions Related to Periodontal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Dana T.; Fine, Daniel; Teng, Yen-Tung A.; Van Dyke, Tom E.; Hajishengallis, George

    2009-01-01

    Even though animal models have limitations they are often superior to in vitro or clinical studies in addressing mechanistic questions and serve as an essential link between hypotheses and human patients. Periodontal disease can be viewed as a process that involves four major stages: bacterial colonization, invasion, induction of a destructive host response in connective tissue and a repair process that reduces the extent of tissue breakdown. Animal studies should be evaluated in terms of their capacity to test specific hypotheses rather than their fidelity to all aspects of periodontal disease initiation and progression. Thus, each of the models described below can be adapted to test discrete components of these four major steps, but not all of them. This review describes five different animal models that are appropriate for examining components of host-bacteria interactions that can lead to breakdown of hard and soft connective tissue or conditions that limit its repair as follows: the mouse calvarial model, murine oral gavage models with or without adoptive transfer of human lymphocytes, rat ligature model and rat Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans feeding model. PMID:18199146

  19. In Vitro Antimicrobial and Antiproliferative Activity of Amphipterygium adstringens

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Garcia, A.; Peixoto, I. T. A.; Verde-Star, M. J.; De la Torre-Zavala, S.; Aviles-Arnaut, H.; Ruiz, A. L. T. G.

    2015-01-01

    Amphipterygium adstringens is a plant widely used in Mexican traditional medicine for its known anti-inflammatory and antiulcer properties. In this work, we evaluated the in vitro antimicrobial and antiproliferative activities of the methanolic extract of A. adstringens against oral pathogens such as Streptococcus mutans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Candida albicans, and Candida dubliniensis, using microdilution (MIC) and agar diffusion methods (MBC), and the antiproliferative activity evaluating total growth inhibition (TGI) by staining the protein content with sulforhodamine B (SRB), using nine human cancer cell lines. Crude extract (CE) of A. adstringens showed some degree of activity against one or more of the strains with a MIC from 0.125 mg/mL to 63 mg/mL and MBC from 1.6 to 6.3 mg/mL and cytotoxic activity, particularly against NCI-ADR/RES, an ovarian cell line expressing multiple resistance drugs phenotype. The CE is a complex mixture of possible multitarget metabolites that could be responsible for both antimicrobial and antiproliferative activities, and further investigation is required to elucidate the identity of active compounds. Nevertheless the CE itself is useful in the development of new antimicrobial treatment based on natural products to prevent oral diseases and as alternative natural source for cancer treatment and prevention. PMID:26451151

  20. Active principles of Grindelia robusta exert antiinflammatory properties in a macrophage model.

    PubMed

    La, Vu Dang; Lazzarin, Francesco; Ricci, Donata; Fraternale, Daniele; Genovese, Salvatore; Epifano, Francesco; Grenier, Daniel

    2010-11-01

    Plant extracts and/or secondary metabolites are receiving considerable attention as therapeutic agents for treating inflammatory diseases such as periodontitis, which affects the tooth supporting tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a Grindelia robusta extract enriched in saponins and polyphenols on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory mediator (IL-6, TNF-a, RANTES, MCP-1, PGE(2) ) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-1, -3, -7, -8, -9, -13) secretion by macrophages. LPS induced a marked increase in the secretion of all inflammatory mediators and MMPs tested by macrophages, as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. At non-cytotoxic concentrations, the G. robusta extract inhibited dose-dependently the secretion of IL-6, RANTES, MCP-1 and, to a lesser extent, PGE(2) and TNF-a. Such inhibition was also observed for MMP-1, -3, -7, -8, -9 and -13 secretion. This ability of G. robusta extract to reduce the LPS-induced secretion of inflammatory mediators and MMPs was associated with a reduction of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) p65 activation. The results suggest that G. robusta extract possesses an antiinflammatory therapeutic potential through its capacity to reduce the accumulation of inflammatory mediators and MMPs.

  1. Tannerella forsythia and the HLA-DQB1 allele are associated with susceptibility to periodontal disease in Japanese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Shimomura-Kuroki, Junko; Yamashita, Kie; Shimooka, Shohachi

    2009-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a multiple factor disease caused by genetic factors, environmental factors, and periodontal bacteria (periodontal pathogens). The present study aimed to elucidate the risk factors for periodontal disease in Japanese adolescents. Subjects (11-16 years old) were classified into three groups: localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP), periodontal attachment loss (PAL), and periodontally healthy (PH) groups. Genomic DNA isolated from the buccal mucosa was used for single-nucleotide polymorphism analyses of the candidate genes (interleukin-1alpha-889; interleukin-1alpha +4845; interleukin-1beta +3954; an immunoglobulin G Fc gamma receptor, FcgammaRIIa-R/H131; and a human leukocyte antigen class II allele, HLA-DQB1) of aggressive periodontitis. Subgingival plaque samples obtained from the same subjects were used for 16S rRNAbased polymerase chain reaction analysis of five important periodontal pathogens (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia). Tannerella forsythia was detected in the deepest periodontal pockets in all subjects in the LAP and PAL groups. The prevalence of an atypical BamHI restriction site in HLA-DQB1 of the LAP group was significantly higher than that in the PH and PAL groups. Furthermore, all subjects who had the atypical BamHI restriction site in HLA-DQB1 had T. forsythia infection. These results suggested that T. forsythia is associated with periodontal disease in Japanese adolescents and also suggested that HLA-DQB1 is related to LAP and is associated with T. forsythia infection.

  2. Efficacy of Photodynamic Therapy and Lasers as an Adjunct to Scaling and Root Planing in the Treatment of Aggressive Periodontitis – A Clinical and Microbiologic Short Term Study

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Indranil; Rajan, Padma; Pai, Jagdish; Malagi, Sachin; Bharmappa, Radhika; Kamath, Vinesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Aggressive periodontitis comprises a group of rare, severe, rapidly progressive form of periodontitis. Conventional treatment includes mechanical debridement augmented with adjunctive antimicrobial therapy. Development of antibiotic resistance has led to use of lasers. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a novel non-invasive therapeutic approach with increased site and pathogen specificity. This study compares PDT and Lasers as an adjunct to conventional Scaling in the treatment of patients with aggressive periodontitis. Materials and Methods Fifteen untreated aggressive periodo-ntitis patients were randomly assigned in a split mouth design for one of the following treatment modalities: 1) SRP alone; (2) SRP + Diode Laser irradiation with 810 nm at 1W, continuous mode for 30 sec per tooth; (3) SRP + PDT on “0” day; (4) SRP + PDT on “0”, 7th and 21st day. The clinical parameters included PI, BOP, PPD, CAL recorded at the baseline & 3rd month. The site with greatest probing pocket depth (PPD) was selected from each quadrant for bacterial sampling and cultured for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis & Prevotella intermedia. Results Statistically significant reduction in clinical & microbial parameters was seen. Sites 4 showed a greater reduction compared to other groups. Conclusion Photodynamic therapy is a valuable treatment modality adjunctive to conventional scaling and root planing. PMID:27042576

  3. Total Antioxidant Capacity and Total Oxidant Status in Saliva of Periodontitis Patients in Relation to Bacterial Load

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Taowen; Andrukhov, Oleh; Haririan, Hady; Müller-Kern, Michael; Liu, Shutai; Liu, Zhonghao; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    The detection of salivary biomarkers has a potential application in early diagnosis and monitoring of periodontal inflammation. However, searching sensitive salivary biomarkers for periodontitis is still ongoing. Oxidative stress is supposed to play an important role in periodontitis progression and tissue destruction. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total oxidant status (TOS) in saliva of periodontitis patients compared to healthy controls and their relationship with periodontopathic bacteria and periodontal disease severity. Unstimulated saliva was collected from 45 patients with generalized severe periodontitis and 37 healthy individuals and the TAC/TOS were measured. In addition, salivary levels of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Fusobacterium nucleatum in saliva were measured. Salivary TAC was lower in periodontitis patients compared to healthy controls. Moreover, a significant negative correlation of salivary TAC with clinical attachment loss was observed in periodontitis patients. No significant difference in the salivary TOS was observed between periodontitis patients and healthy controls. Bacterial load was enhanced in periodontitis patients and exhibited correlation with periodontal disease severity but not with salivary TAC/TOS. Our data suggest that changes in antioxidant capacity in periodontitis patients are not associated with increased bacterial load and are probably due to a dysregulated immune response. PMID:26779448

  4. In Vitro Evaluation of the Risk of Inducing Bacterial Resistance to Disinfection Treatment with Photolysis of Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Ikai, Hiroyo; Odashima, Yu; Kanno, Taro; Nakamura, Keisuke; Shirato, Midori; Sasaki, Keiichi; Niwano, Yoshimi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the risk of inducing bacterial resistance to disinfection treatment with photolysis of H2O2 and comparing this with existing antibacterial agents. We tested seven antibacterial agents, including amoxicillin, cefepime hydrochloride, erythromycin, ofloxacin, clindamycin hydrochloride, ciprofloxacin hydrochloride, and minocycline hydrochloride, as positive controls for validation of the assay protocol. For all of the agents tested, at least one of the four bacterial species (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus salivarius) was resistant to these agents by repeated exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of the agents up to 10 times. In contrast, antibacterial activity against any of the bacterial species tested (S. aureus, E. faecalis, E. coli, S. salivarius, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus mutans, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans) was not affected by repeated exposure to the disinfection treatment up to 40 times. This finding suggested that the risk of inducing bacterial resistance by disinfection treatment was low. The active ingredient of this disinfection treatment is hydroxyl radicals generated by photolysis of H2O2. Therefore, hydroxyl radicals interact with several cell structures and different metabolic pathways in microbial cells, probably resulting in a lack of development of bacterial resistance. In conclusion, disinfection treatment with photolysis of H2O2 appears to be a potential alternative for existing antimicrobial agents in terms of a low risk of inducing bacterial resistance. PMID:24282582

  5. In vitro evaluation of DispersinB on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius biofilm.

    PubMed

    Turk, Ryen; Singh, Ameet; Rousseau, Joyce; Weese, J Scott

    2013-10-25

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) is an important canine pathogen that has been shown to produce biofilm in vitro. Biofilm production may be an important virulence factor and methods to eliminate biofilm-associated infections are required. An enzyme of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, DispersinB, has been shown to degrade the extracellular matrix in the biofilm of a variety of bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of DispersinB on MRSP biofilm production and eradication in vitro. A quantitative microtitre plate assay was used to assess the impact of DispersinB on 30 MRSP isolates from dogs. While DispersinB did not have any effect on MRSP growth (P=0.98), it reduced biofilm formation (P=0.0002) and degraded established biofilm (P=0.0001). These data indicate that in vivo study of the effect of this enzyme in indicated to determine if it may be a useful treatment option for MRSP biofilm-associated infections.

  6. Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilms: Functional Molecules, Relation to Virulence, and Vaccine Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Dietrich; Davies, Angharad P.; Harris, Llinos G.; Knobloch, Johannes K. M.; Rohde, Holger

    Medical device-associated infections, most frequently caused by Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, are of increasing importance in modern medicine. The formation of adherent, multilayered bacterial biofilms is crucial in the pathogenesis of these infections. Polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA), a homoglycan of β-1,6-linked 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-d-glucopyranosyl residues, of which about 15% are non-N-acetylated, is central to biofilm accumulation in staphylococci. It transpires that polysaccharides - structurally very similar to PIA - are also key to biofilm formation in a number of other organisms including the important human pathogens Escherichia coli, Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans, Yersinia pestis, and Bordetella spp. Apparently, synthesis of PIA and related polysaccharides is a general feature important for biofilm formation in diverse bacterial genera. Current knowledge about the structure and biosynthesis of PIA and related polysaccharides is reviewed. Additionally, information on their role in pathogenesis of biomaterial-related and other type of infections and the potential use of PIA and related compounds for prevention of infection is evaluated.

  7. Kinetic-dependent Killing of Oral Pathogens with Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Backlund, C.J.; Worley, B.V.; Sergesketter, A.R.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO)–releasing silica nanoparticles were synthesized via the co-condensation of tetramethyl orthosilicate with aminosilanes and subsequent conversion of secondary amines to N-diazeniumdiolate NO donors. A series of ~150 nm NO-releasing particles with different NO totals and release kinetics (i.e., half-lives) were achieved by altering both the identity and mol% composition of the aminosilane precursors. Independent of identical 2 h NO-release totals, enhanced antibacterial action was observed against the periodontopathogens Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis with extended NO-release kinetics at pH 7.4. Negligible bactericidal effect was observed against cariogenic Streptococcus mutans at pH 7.4, even when using NO-releasing silica particles with greater NO-release totals. However, antibacterial activity was observed against S. mutans at lower pH (6.4). This result was attributed to more rapid proton-initiated decomposition of the N-diazeniumdiolate NO donors and greater NO-release payloads. The data suggest a differential sensitivity to NO between cariogenic and periodontopathogenic bacteria with implications for the future development of NO-releasing oral care therapeutics. PMID:26078424

  8. Oxidative Stress Parameters in Saliva and Its Association with Periodontal Disease and Types of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Almerich-Silla, Jose Manuel; Montiel-Company, Jose María; Pastor, Sara; Serrano, Felipe; Puig-Silla, Miriam; Dasí, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine the association between oxidative stress parameters with periodontal disease, bleeding, and the presence of different periodontal bacteria. Methods. A cross-sectional study in a sample of eighty-six patients, divided into three groups depending on their periodontal status. Thirty-three with chronic periodontitis, sixteen with gingivitis, and thirty-seven with periodontal healthy as control. Oxidative stress biomarkers (8-OHdG and MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), and the activity of two antioxidant enzymes (GPx and SOD) were determined in saliva. Subgingival plaque samples were obtained from the deepest periodontal pocket and PCR was used to determine the presence of the 6 fimA genotypes of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola. Results. Periodontal disease was found to be associated with increased oxidative stress parameter levels. These levels rose according to the number and type of different periodontal bacteria found in the periodontal pockets. The presence of different types of periodontal bacteria is predictive independent variables in linear regresion models of oxidative stress parameters as dependent variable, above all 8-OHdG. Conclusions. Oxidative stress parameter levels are correlated with the presence of different types of bacteria. Determination of these levels and periodontal bacteria could be a potent tool for controlling periodontal disease development. PMID:26494938

  9. Detection of five potentially periodontal pathogenic bacteria in peri-implant disease: A comparison of PCR and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Schmalz, Gerhard; Tsigaras, Sandra; Rinke, Sven; Kottmann, Tanja; Haak, Rainer; Ziebolz, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the microbial analysis methods of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR (RT-PCR) in terms of detection of five selected potentially periodontal pathogenic bacteria in peri-implant disease. Therefore 45 samples of healthy, mucositis and peri-implantitis (n = 15 each) were assessed according to presence of the following bacteria using PCR (DNA-strip technology) and RT-PCR (fluorescent dye SYBR green-system): Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Treponema denticola (Td), Tanerella forsythia (Tf), and Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn). There were no significant correlations between the bacterial and disease patterns, so the benefit of using microbiological tests for the diagnosis of peri-implant diseases is questionable. Correlations between the methods were highest for Tf (Kendall's Tau: 0.65, Spearman: 0.78), Fn (0.49, 0.61) and Td (0.49, 0.59). For Aa (0.38, 0.42) and Pg (0.04, 0.04), lower correlation values were detected. Accordingly, conventional semi-quantitative PCR seems to be sufficient for analyzing potentially periodontal pathogenic bacterial species.

  10. Scaling and root planning, and locally delivered minocycline reduces the load of Prevotella intermedia in an interdependent pattern, correlating with symptomatic improvements of chronic periodontitis: a short-term randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shuli; Wang, Ying; Sun, Wei; Chen, Hui; Wu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate the respective or combinatory efficacy of locally delivered 2% minocycline (MO), and scaling and root planning (SRP) by assessing both clinical parameters and the loads of four main periodontal pathogens in treating chronic periodontitis (CP). Methods Seventy adults with CP were randomly assigned to the three treatment groups: 1) SRP alone; 2) MO alone; and 3) combinatory use of SRP and MO (SRP + MO). Before and 7 days after the treatments, we evaluated both clinical parameters (pocket depth [PD] and sulcus bleeding index [SBI]) and the gene load of four main periodontal pathogens (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans [Aa], Fusobacterium nucleatum [Fn], Porphyromonas gingivalis [Pg], and Prevotella intermedia [Pi]). Results The bacterial prevalence per patient was: Aa, 31.25%; Fn, 100%; Pg, 95.31%; and Pi, 98.44%. Seven days after treatment, the three treatments significantly reduced both PD and SBI, but not detection frequencies of the four pathogens. For PD, the reduction efficacy of SRP + MO was significantly higher than that of either MO or SRP. Only Pg responded significantly to SRP. Pg and Fn were significantly reduced in the presence of MO. Only SRP + MO showed a significant reduction effect on the gene load of Pi. The reduction of PD significantly correlated with the gene load of Pi (r=0.26; P=0.042) but not of the other bacteria. Conclusion SRP and MO reduced the load of Pi in an interdependent pattern, which correlated with symptomatic improvements of CP. PMID:26676022

  11. Comparison of the detection of periodontal pathogens in bacteraemia after tooth brushing by culture and molecular techniques

    PubMed Central

    Figuero, Elena; González, Itziar; O´Connor, Ana; Diz, Pedro; Álvarez, Maximiliano; Herrera, David; Sanz, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence and amounts of periodontal pathogens detected in bacteraemia samples after tooth brushing-induced by means of four diagnostic technique, three based on culture and one in a molecular-based technique, have been compared in this study. Material and Methods Blood samples were collected from thirty-six subjects with different periodontal status (17 were healthy, 10 with gingivitis and 9 with periodontitis) at baseline and 2 minutes after tooth brushing. Each sample was analyzed by three culture-based methods [direct anaerobic culturing (DAC), hemo-culture (BACTEC), and lysis-centrifugation (LC)] and one molecular-based technique [quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)]. With culture any bacterial isolate was detected and quantified, while with qPCR only Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were detected and quantified. Descriptive analyses, ANOVA and Chi-squared tests, were performed. Results Neither BACTEC nor qPCR detected any type of bacteria in the blood samples. Only LC (2.7%) and DAC (8.3%) detected bacteraemia, although not in the same patients. Fusobacterium nucleatum was the most frequently detected bacterial species. Conclusions The disparity in the results when the same samples were analyzed with four different microbiological detection methods highlights the need for a proper validation of the methodology to detect periodontal pathogens in bacteraemia samples, mainly when the presence of periodontal pathogens in blood samples after tooth brushing was very seldom. Key words:Bacteraemia, periodontitis, culture, PCR, tooth brushing. PMID:26946197

  12. Arthritis-induced alveolar bone loss is associated with changes in the composition of oral microbiota.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Jôice Dias; Saraiva, Adriana Machado; Queiroz-Junior, Celso Martins; Madeira, Mila Fernandes Moreira; Duarte, Poliana Mendes; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Souza, Danielle Glória; da Silva, Tarcília Aparecida

    2016-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis (PD) are chronic inflammatory disorders that cause bone loss. PD tends to be more prevalent and severe in RA patients. Previous experimental studies demonstrated that RA triggers alveolar bone loss similarly to PD. The aim of this study was to investigate if arthritis-induced alveolar bone loss is associated with modification in the oral microbiota. Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization was employed to analyze forty oral bacterial species in 3 groups of C57BL/6 mice: control (n = 12; without any challenge); Y4 (n = 8; received oral inoculation of Aggregatibacter Actinomycetemcomitans strain FDC Y4) and AIA group (n = 12; chronic antigen-induced arthritis). The results showed that AIA and Y4 group exhibited similar patterns of bone loss. The AIA group exhibited higher counts of most bacterial species analyzed with predominance of Gram-negative species similarly to infection-induced PD. Prevotella nigrescens and Treponema denticola were detected only in the Y4 group whereas Campylobacter showae, Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus oralis were only found in the AIA group. Counts of Parvimonas micra, Selenomonas Noxia and Veillonella parvula were greater in the AIA group whereas Actinomyces viscosus and Neisseira mucosa were in large proportion in Y4 group. In conclusion, AIA is associated with changes in the composition of the oral microbiota, which might account for the alveolar bone loss observed in AIA mice.

  13. Nucleases from Prevotella intermedia can degrade neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Doke, M; Fukamachi, H; Morisaki, H; Arimoto, T; Kataoka, H; Kuwata, H

    2016-08-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease caused by periodontal bacteria in subgingival plaque. These bacteria are able to colonize the periodontal region by evading the host immune response. Neutrophils, the host's first line of defense against infection, use various strategies to kill invading pathogens, including neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These are extracellular net-like fibers comprising DNA and antimicrobial components such as histones, LL-37, defensins, myeloperoxidase, and neutrophil elastase from neutrophils that disarm and kill bacteria extracellularly. Bacterial nuclease degrades the NETs to escape NET killing. It has now been shown that extracellular nucleases enable bacteria to evade this host antimicrobial mechanism, leading to increased pathogenicity. Here, we compared the DNA degradation activity of major Gram-negative periodontopathogenic bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. We found that Pr. intermedia showed the highest DNA degradation activity. A genome search of Pr. intermedia revealed the presence of two genes, nucA and nucD, putatively encoding secreted nucleases, although their enzymatic and biological activities are unknown. We cloned nucA- and nucD-encoding nucleases from Pr. intermedia ATCC 25611 and characterized their gene products. Recombinant NucA and NucD digested DNA and RNA, which required both Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) for optimal activity. In addition, NucA and NucD were able to degrade the DNA matrix comprising NETs.

  14. The effect of spiramycin on Porphyromonas gingivalis and other "classic" periopathogens.

    PubMed

    Chiappe, Verónica; Gómez, Mariel; Fernández-Canigia, Liliana; Romanelli, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    In clinical trials, Spiramycin has shown additional benefit overscaling and root planing on pocket depth reduction, but its effect on periodontal microbiota was evaluated only by darkfield microscopy. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the effect of Spiramycin administration on Porphyromonas gingivalis and other periodontopathic bacteria using 16S rARN PCR technique. Thirty two non-smoker adults with untreated periodontitis and pocket depth > or = 7 mm. were evaluated to participate in this randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial. Clinical measurements were performed on day -15, 15, 30 and 90 from baseline. Subgingival samples were analyzed for detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Tannerella forsythia (TJ), Treponema denticola (Td) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) on days -15, 30 and 90. On day 0, 25 Pg positive subjects were randomly assigned to receive either systemically administered Spiramycinfor 7 days (Test group SP) or identical placebo tablets (Placebo group PL). After Spiramycin administration Pg, Tf and Td were suppressed showingstatistically significant difference (p<0.05) with the Placebo group. None of the groups showed changes in Aa detection. These data indicate that bacteria currently associated with advanced periodontitis (Pg, Tf and Td) are suppressed after 7 days of systemic administration of Spiramycin.

  15. Total Antioxidant Capacity and Total Oxidant Status in Saliva of Periodontitis Patients in Relation to Bacterial Load.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Taowen; Andrukhov, Oleh; Haririan, Hady; Müller-Kern, Michael; Liu, Shutai; Liu, Zhonghao; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    The detection of salivary biomarkers has a potential application in early diagnosis and monitoring of periodontal inflammation. However, searching sensitive salivary biomarkers for periodontitis is still ongoing. Oxidative stress is supposed to play an important role in periodontitis progression and tissue destruction. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total oxidant status (TOS) in saliva of periodontitis patients compared to healthy controls and their relationship with periodontopathic bacteria and periodontal disease severity. Unstimulated saliva was collected from 45 patients with generalized severe periodontitis and 37 healthy individuals and the TAC/TOS were measured. In addition, salivary levels of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Fusobacterium nucleatum in saliva were measured. Salivary TAC was lower in periodontitis patients compared to healthy controls. Moreover, a significant negative correlation of salivary TAC with clinical attachment loss was observed in periodontitis patients. No significant difference in the salivary TOS was observed between periodontitis patients and healthy controls. Bacterial load was enhanced in periodontitis patients and exhibited correlation with periodontal disease severity but not with salivary TAC/TOS. Our data suggest that changes in antioxidant capacity in periodontitis patients are not associated with increased bacterial load and are probably due to a dysregulated immune response.

  16. Detection of Periodontal Markers in Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Leonhardt, Åsa; Carlén, Anette; Bengtsson, Lisbeth; Dahlén, Gunnar

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to compare the detection frequency of periodontopathogens by using the Pado Test 4.5 and checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique in chronic periodontitis patients. Thirty patients with chronic periodontitis were tested cross-sectionally with DNA/RNA oligogenomic probe method (IAI Pado Test 4.5) and DNA/DNA whole genomic probe (checkerboard) method. Samples were taken by two paper points at the deepest site in each of the four quadrants and pooled into one sample for each of the two methods. The samples were sent to the two laboratories (IAI, Zuchwil, Switzerland, and Oral Microbiology Laboratory, University of Gothenburg, Sweden) and were analyzed in a routine setting for the presence and amount of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola. While Pado Test 4.5 detected the four periodontal pathogens in 11 (36.7%) of the patients, the checkerboard method showed presence in all patients (100%) using the lower score (Score 1 corresponding to 104 bacterial cells) and 16 (53.3%) using a higher treshold (score 3 corresponding to between >105 and 106 cells). The results of the present study showed low agreement for a positive microbiological outcome using the two diagnostic methods. It was also concluded that microbiological analysis in practice should include a larger number of bacterial species to better serve as markers for a diseased associated flora in chronic periodontitis cases. PMID:21769304

  17. Inflammatory and bone remodeling responses to the cytolethal distending toxins.

    PubMed

    Belibasakis, Georgios N; Bostanci, Nagihan

    2014-04-04

    The cytolethal distending toxins (CDTs) are a family of exotoxins produced by a wide range of Gram-negative bacteria. They are known for causing genotoxic stress to the cell, resulting in growth arrest and eventually apoptotic cell death. Nevertheless, there is evidence that CDTs can also perturb the innate immune responses, by regulating inflammatory cytokine production and molecular mediators of bone remodeling in various cell types. These cellular and molecular events may in turn have an effect in enhancing local inflammation in diseases where CDT-producing bacteria are involved, such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Haemophilus ducreyi, Campylobacter jejuni and Helicobacter hepaticus. One special example is the induction of pathological bone destruction in periodontitis. The opportunistic oral pathogen Aggregatibatcer actinoycemetemcomitans, which is involved in the aggressive form of the disease, can regulate the molecular mechanisms of bone remodeling in a manner that favors bone resorption, with the potential involvement of its CDT. The present review provides an overview of all known to-date inflammatory or bone remodeling responses of CDTs produced by various bacterial species, and discusses their potential contribution to the pathogenesis of the associated diseases.

  18. [Cytolethal distending toxins].

    PubMed

    Curová, K; Kmeťová, M; Siegfried, L

    2014-06-01

    Cytolethal distending toxins (CDT) are intracellularly acting proteins which interfere with the eukaryotic cell cycle. They are produced by Gram-negative bacteria with affinity to mucocutaneous surfaces and could play a role in the pathogenesis of various mammalian diseases. The functional toxin is composed of three proteins: CdtB entering the nucleus and by its nuclease activity inducing nuclear fragmentation and chromatin disintegration, CdtA, and CdtC, the two latter being responsible for toxin attachment to the surface of the target cell. Cytotoxic effect of CDT leads to the cell cycle arrest before the cell enters mitosis and to further changes (cell distension and death, apoptosis) depending on the cell type. Thus, CDT may function as a virulence factor in pathogenic bacteria that produce it and thus may contribute to the initiation of certain diseases. Most important are inflammatory bowel diseases caused by intestinal bacteria, periodontitis with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans as the aetiologic agent and ulcus molle where Haemophilus ducreyi is the causative agent.

  19. Laser Supported Reduction of Specific Microorganisms in the Periodontal Pocket with the Aid of an Er,Cr:YSGG Laser: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Gutknecht, N.; Van Betteray, C.; Ozturan, S.; Vanweersch, L.; Franzen, R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a radial firing tip of an Er,Cr:YSGG laser as an adjunct to a nonsurgical periodontal treatment. Methods. Twelve patients with chronic or aggressive periodontitis were treated by conventional periodontal treatment using ultrasonic devices and hand instruments and, additionally, in two quadrants with an Er,Cr:YSGG laser. A new radial firing tip (RFPT 14-5, Biolase) was used with 1.5 W, 30 Hz, 11% air, 20% water, and pulse duration 140 μs. Microbiological smears were taken before treatment, one day after lasing, and three and six months after lasing. Pocket depths of all periodontal sites were measured before and six months after treatment. Results. The total bacterial load of Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans inside the pocket was reduced significantly throughout the whole examination time. Greater pocket depth reductions were observed in all groups. There was a slight higher reduction of pocket depth in the lased group after six months. Conclusions. These results support the thesis that Er,Cr:YSGG laser supported periodontal treatment leads to a significant reduction of periopathogenes and thereby helps the maintenance of periodontal health. PMID:25879057

  20. Differentiation of oral bacteria in in vitro cultures and human saliva by secondary electrospray ionization - mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregy, Lukas; Müggler, Annick R.; Martinez-Lozano Sinues, Pablo; García-Gómez, Diego; Suter, Yannick; Belibasakis, Georgios N.; Kohler, Malcolm; Schmidlin, Patrick R.; Zenobi, Renato

    2015-10-01

    The detection of bacterial-specific volatile metabolites may be a valuable tool to predict infection. Here we applied a real-time mass spectrometric technique to investigate differences in volatile metabolic profiles of oral bacteria that cause periodontitis. We coupled a secondary electrospray ionization (SESI) source to a commercial high-resolution mass spectrometer to interrogate the headspace from bacterial cultures and human saliva. We identified 120 potential markers characteristic for periodontal pathogens Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (n = 13), Porphyromonas gingivalis (n = 70), Tanerella forsythia (n = 30) and Treponema denticola (n = 7) in in vitro cultures. In a second proof-of-principle phase, we found 18 (P. gingivalis, T. forsythia and T. denticola) of the 120 in vitro compounds in the saliva from a periodontitis patient with confirmed infection with P. gingivalis, T. forsythia and T. denticola with enhanced ion intensity compared to two healthy controls. In conclusion, this method has the ability to identify individual metabolites of microbial pathogens in a complex medium such as saliva.

  1. Efficacy of taurolidine against periodontopathic species--an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Eick, Sigrun; Radakovic, Sabrina; Pfister, Wolfgang; Nietzsche, Sandor; Sculean, Anton

    2012-06-01

    The antimicrobial effect of taurolidine was tested against periodontopathic species in comparison to chlorhexidine digluconate in the presence or absence of serum. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC), microbiocidal concentrations (MBC), as well as killing were determined against 32 different microbial strains including 3 Porphyromonas gingivalis, 3 Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and 15 potentially superinfecting species with and without 25% v/v human serum. The MIC(50) of taurolidine against the tested microbial strains was 0.025% and the MIC(90) 0.05%. The respective values for the MBCs were 0.05% and 0.1%. Addition of 25% serum (heat-inactivated) did not change the MIC and MBC values of taurolidine. In contrast, MICs and MBCs of chlorhexidine (CHX) increased by two steps after addition of serum. Taurolidine killed microorganisms in a concentration and time-dependent manner, the killing rate of 1.6% taurolidine was 99.08% ± 2.27% in mean after 2 h. Again, killing activity of taurolidine was not affected if serum was added, whereas addition of inactivated serum clearly reduced the killing rate of all selected bacterial strains by CHX. Therefore, taurolidine possesses antimicrobial properties which are not reduced in the presence of serum as a main component in gingival crevicular fluid and wound fluid. Taurolidine may have potential as an antimicrobial agent in non-surgical and surgical periodontal treatment.

  2. A Journey of Cytolethal Distending Toxins through Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen; Alexander, Desiree; Dlakić, Mensur; Shenker, Bruce J.

    2016-01-01

    The multifunctional role of lipids as structural components of membranes, signaling molecules, and metabolic substrates makes them an ideal partner for pathogens to hijack host cell processes for their own survival. The properties and composition of unique membrane micro-domains such as membrane rafts make these regions a natural target for pathogens as it affords them an opportunity to hijack cell signaling and intracellular trafficking pathways. Cytolethal distending toxins (Cdts), members of the AB2 family of toxins are comprised of three subunits, the active, CdtB unit, and the binding, CdtA-CdtC unit. Cdts are cyclomodulins leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a wide variety of cell types. Cdts from several species share a requirement for membrane rafts, and often cholesterol specifically for cell binding and CdtB mediated cytotoxicity. In this review we focus on how host–cell membrane bilayer organization contributes to the cell surface association, internalization, and action of bacteria derived cytolethal distending toxins (Cdts), with an emphasis on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Cdt. PMID:27559534

  3. In vitro evaluation of the risk of inducing bacterial resistance to disinfection treatment with photolysis of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Ikai, Hiroyo; Odashima, Yu; Kanno, Taro; Nakamura, Keisuke; Shirato, Midori; Sasaki, Keiichi; Niwano, Yoshimi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the risk of inducing bacterial resistance to disinfection treatment with photolysis of H2O2 and comparing this with existing antibacterial agents. We tested seven antibacterial agents, including amoxicillin, cefepime hydrochloride, erythromycin, ofloxacin, clindamycin hydrochloride, ciprofloxacin hydrochloride, and minocycline hydrochloride, as positive controls for validation of the assay protocol. For all of the agents tested, at least one of the four bacterial species (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus salivarius) was resistant to these agents by repeated exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of the agents up to 10 times. In contrast, antibacterial activity against any of the bacterial species tested (S. aureus, E. faecalis, E. coli, S. salivarius, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus mutans, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans) was not affected by repeated exposure to the disinfection treatment up to 40 times. This finding suggested that the risk of inducing bacterial resistance by disinfection treatment was low. The active ingredient of this disinfection treatment is hydroxyl radicals generated by photolysis of H2O2. Therefore, hydroxyl radicals interact with several cell structures and different metabolic pathways in microbial cells, probably resulting in a lack of development of bacterial resistance. In conclusion, disinfection treatment with photolysis of H2O2 appears to be a potential alternative for existing antimicrobial agents in terms of a low risk of inducing bacterial resistance.

  4. The green tea polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin gallate precipitates salivary proteins including alpha-amylase: biochemical implications for oral health.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kumiko; Ohara, Masaru; Hayashi, Ikue; Hino, Takamune; Nishimura, Rumi; Iwasaki, Yoriko; Ogawa, Tetsuji; Ohyama, Yoshihiko; Sugiyama, Masaru; Amano, Hideaki

    2012-04-01

    Green tea is a popular drink throughout the world, and it contains various components, including the green tea polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). Tea interacts with saliva upon entering the mouth, so the interaction between saliva and EGCG interested us, especially with respect to EGCG-protein binding. SDS-PAGE revealed that several salivary proteins were precipitated after adding EGCG to saliva. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) peptide mass fingerprinting indicated that the major proteins precipitated by EGCG were alpha-amylase, S100, and cystatins. Surface plasmon resonance revealed that EGCG bound to alpha-amylase at dissociation constant (K(d)) = 2.74 × 10(-6) M, suggesting that EGCG interacts with salivary proteins with a relatively strong affinity. In addition, EGCG inhibited the activity of alpha-amylase by non-competitive inhibition, indicating that EGCG is effective at inhibiting the formation of fermentable carbohydrates involved in caries formation. Interestingly, alpha-amylase reduced the antimicrobial activity of EGCG against the periodontal bacterium Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Therefore, we considered that EGCG-salivary protein interactions might have both protective and detrimental effects with respect to oral health.

  5. Comparison of Riboflavin and Toluidine Blue O as Photosensitizers for Photoactivated Disinfection on Endodontic and Periodontal Pathogens In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Henrik Krarup; Garcia, Javier; Væth, Michael; Schlafer, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Photoactivated disinfection has a strong local antimicrobial effect. In the field of dentistry it is an emerging adjunct to mechanical debridement during endodontic and periodontal treatment. In the present study, we investigate the effect of photoactivated disinfection using riboflavin as a photosensitizer and blue LED light for activation, and compare it to photoactivated disinfection with the widely used combination of toluidine blue O and red light. Riboflavin is highly biocompatible and can be activated with LED lamps at hand in the dental office. To date, no reports are available on the antimicrobial effect of photoactivated disinfection using riboflavin/blue light on oral microorganisms. Planktonic cultures of eight organisms frequently isolated from periodontal and/or endodontic lesions (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Candida albicans, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherischia coli, Lactobacillus paracasei, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and Propionibacterium acnes) were subjected to photoactivated disinfection with riboflavin/blue light and toluidine blue O/red light, and survival rates were determined by CFU counts. Within the limited irradiation time of one minute, photoactivated disinfection with riboflavin/blue light only resulted in minor reductions in CFU counts, whereas full kills were achieved for all organisms when using toluidine blue O/red light. The black pigmented anaerobes P. gingivalis and P. intermedia were eradicated completely by riboflavin/blue light, but also by blue light treatment alone, suggesting that endogenous chromophores acted as photosensitizers in these bacteria. On the basis of our results, riboflavin cannot be recommended as a photosensitizer used for photoactivated disinfection of periodontal or endodontic infections.

  6. Acquisition of Oral Microbes and Associated Systemic Responses of Newborn Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Holt, S. C.; Delaney, J. E.

    2014-01-01

    The acquisition and development of the complex oral microbiome remain ill defined. While selected species of oral bacteria have been examined in relation to their initial colonization in neonates, a more detailed understanding of the dynamics of the microbiome has been developed only in adults. The current investigation used a nonhuman primate model to document the kinetics of colonization of the oral cavities of newborns and infants by a range of oral commensals and pathogens. Differences in colonization were evaluated in newborns from mothers who were maintained on an oral hygiene regimen pre- and postparturition with those displaying naturally acquired gingivitis/periodontitis. The results demonstrate distinct profiles of acquisition of selected oral bacteria, with the transmission of targeted pathogens, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, being passed on primarily from mothers with gingivitis/periodontitis. This colonization resulted in defined patterns of systemic antibody responses in the infants. The significant relative risk measures for infection with the pathogens, as well as the relationship of oral infection and blood serum antibody levels, were consistent with those of the newborns from mothers with gingivitis/periodontitis. These findings indicate that the early acquisition of potentially pathogenic oral bacterial species might impact the development of mucosal responses in the gingiva and may provide an enhanced risk for the development of periodontitis later in life. PMID:24173024

  7. The Effect of IL-4 Gene Polymorphisms on Cytokine Production in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis and in Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Bartova, Jirina; Janatova, Tatjana; Svobodova, Kazi; Fassmann, Antonin; Belacek, Jaromir

    2014-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease of the teeth-supporting tissues in which genetic predisposition, dental plaque bacteria, and immune mechanisms all play important roles. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of IL-4 gene polymorphisms in chronic periodontitis and to investigate the association between polymorphisms and cytokines production after bacterial stimulation. Sixty-two subjects (47 CP patients and 15 healthy controls) with detected two polymorphisms in the IL-4 gene (-590C/T and intron 3 VNTR) were examined. Production of cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17, TNFα, INFγ, and VEGF) was studied after in vitro stimulation of isolated peripheral blood by mitogens (Pokeweed mitogen, Concanavalin A), dental plaque bacteria (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia), and Heat Shock Protein (HSP) 70 by the Luminex multiplex cytokine analysis system. The results were correlated with IL-4 genotypes in patients with CP and healthy controls. The mononuclear cells isolated from peripheral blood of CP patients with selected IL-4 polymorphisms significantly altered the production of IFNγ, IL-10, IL-1β, IL-1α, TNFα, and IL-6 after stimulation by HSP 70 or selected bacteria (from P < 0.001 to P < 0.05). IL-4 gene polymorphisms may influence the function of mononuclear cells to produce not only interleukin-4 but also other cytokines, especially in patients with CP. PMID:25530681

  8. Periodontitis and myocardial hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Jun-Ichi; Sato, Hiroki; Kaneko, Makoto; Yoshida, Asuka; Aoyama, Norio; Akimoto, Shouta; Wakayama, Kouji; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Izumi, Yuichi; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Komuro, Issei

    2017-04-01

    There is a deep relationship between cardiovascular disease and periodontitis. It has been reported that myocardial hypertrophy may be affected by periodontitis in clinical settings. Although these clinical observations had some study limitations, they strongly suggest a direct association between severity of periodontitis and left ventricular hypertrophy. However, the detailed mechanisms between myocardial hypertrophy and periodontitis have not yet been elucidated. Recently, we demonstrated that periodontal bacteria infection is closely related to myocardial hypertrophy. In murine transverse aortic constriction models, a periodontal pathogen, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans markedly enhanced cardiac hypertrophy with matrix metalloproteinase-2 activation, while another pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.) did not accelerate these pathological changes. In the isoproterenol-induced myocardial hypertrophy model, P.g. induced myocardial hypertrophy through Toll-like receptor-2 signaling. From our results and other reports, regulation of chronic inflammation induced by periodontitis may have a key role in the treatment of myocardial hypertrophy. In this article, we review the pathophysiological mechanism between myocardial hypertrophy and periodontitis.

  9. Differentiation of oral bacteria in in vitro cultures and human saliva by secondary electrospray ionization – mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bregy, Lukas; Müggler, Annick R.; Martinez-Lozano Sinues, Pablo; García-Gómez, Diego; Suter, Yannick; Belibasakis, Georgios N.; Kohler, Malcolm; Schmidlin, Patrick R.; Zenobi, Renato

    2015-01-01

    The detection of bacterial-specific volatile metabolites may be a valuable tool to predict infection. Here we applied a real-time mass spectrometric technique to investigate differences in volatile metabolic profiles of oral bacteria that cause periodontitis. We coupled a secondary electrospray ionization (SESI) source to a commercial high-resolution mass spectrometer to interrogate the headspace from bacterial cultures and human saliva. We identified 120 potential markers characteristic for periodontal pathogens Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (n = 13), Porphyromonas gingivalis (n = 70), Tanerella forsythia (n = 30) and Treponema denticola (n = 7) in in vitro cultures. In a second proof-of-principle phase, we found 18 (P. gingivalis, T. forsythia and T. denticola) of the 120 in vitro compounds in the saliva from a periodontitis patient with confirmed infection with P. gingivalis, T. forsythia and T. denticola with enhanced ion intensity compared to two healthy controls. In conclusion, this method has the ability to identify individual metabolites of microbial pathogens in a complex medium such as saliva. PMID:26477831

  10. Antimicrobial photodynamic efficiency of novel cationic porphyrins towards periodontal Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Prasanth, Chandra Sekhar; Karunakaran, Suneesh C; Paul, Albish K; Kussovski, Vesselin; Mantareva, Vanya; Ramaiah, Danaboyina; Selvaraj, Leslie; Angelov, Ivan; Avramov, Latchezar; Nandakumar, Krishnankutty; Subhash, Narayanan

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Fusobacterium nucleatum are major causative agents of aggressive periodontal disease. Due to increase in the number of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, antimicrobial Photodynamic therapy (aPDT) seems to be a plausible alternative. In this work, photosensitization was performed on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in pure culture using new-age cationic porphyrins, namely mesoimidazolium-substituted porphyrin derivative (ImP) and pyridinium-substituted porphyrin derivative (PyP). The photophysical properties of both the sensitizers including absorption, fluorescence emission, quantum yields of the triplet excited states and singlet oxygen generation efficiencies were evaluated in the context of aPDT application. The studied porphyrins exhibited high ability to accumulate into bacterial cells with complete penetration into early stage biofilms. As compared with ImP, PyP was found to be more effective for photoinactivation of bacterial strains associated with periodontitis, without any signs of dark toxicity, owing to its high photocytotoxicity.

  11. Microarray Analysis of Microbiota of Gingival Lesions in Noma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huyghe, Antoine; François, Patrice; Mombelli, Andrea; Tangomo, Manuela; Girard, Myriam; Baratti-Mayer, Denise; Bolivar, Ignacio; Pittet, Didier; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Noma (cancrum oris) is a gangrenous disease of unknown etiology affecting the maxillo-facial region of young children in extremely limited resource countries. In an attempt to better understand the microbiological events occurring during this disease, we used phylogenetic and low-density microarrays targeting the 16S rRNA gene to characterize the gingival flora of acute noma and acute necrotizing gingivitis (ANG) lesions, and compared them to healthy control subjects of the same geographical and social background. Our observations raise doubts about Fusobacterium necrophorum, a previously suspected causative agent of noma, as this species was not associated with noma lesions. Various oral pathogens were more abundant in noma lesions, notably Atopobium spp., Prevotella intermedia, Peptostreptococcus spp., Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus anginosus. On the other hand, pathogens associated with periodontal diseases such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Capnocytophaga spp., Porphyromonas spp. and Fusobacteriales were more abundant in healthy controls. Importantly, the overall loss of bacterial diversity observed in noma samples as well as its homology to that of ANG microbiota supports the hypothesis that ANG might be the immediate step preceding noma. PMID:24086784

  12. Essential Oil from Berries of Lebanese Juniperus excelsa M. Bieb Displays Similar Antibacterial Activity to Chlorhexidine but Higher Cytocompatibility with Human Oral Primary Cells.

    PubMed

    Azzimonti, Barbara; Cochis, Andrea; Beyrouthy, Marc El; Iriti, Marcello; Uberti, Francesca; Sorrentino, Rita; Landini, Manuela Miriam; Rimondini, Lia; Varoni, Elena Maria

    2015-05-21

    Chlorhexidine (CHX), one of the most effective drugs administered for periodontal treatment, presents collateral effects including toxicity when used for prolonged periods; here, we have evaluated the bactericidal potency and the cytocompatibility of Juniperus excelsa M. Bieb essential oil (EO) in comparison with 0.05% CHX. The EO was extracted from berries by hydrodistillation and components identified by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Bacterial inhibition halo analysis, quantitative cell viability 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulphophenyl)-5-[(phenyl amino) carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide assay (XTT), and colony forming unit (CFU) count were evaluated against the two biofilm formers Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Streptococcus mutans. Finally, cytocompatibility was assessed with human primary gingival fibroblasts (HGF) and mucosal keratinocytes (HK). The resulting EO was mainly composed of monoterpene hydrocarbons and oxygenated monoterpenes. An inhibition halo test demonstrated that both bacteria were sensitive to the EO; XTT analysis and CFU counts confirmed that 10-fold-diluted EO determined a statistically significant (p < 0.05) reduction in bacteria count and viability towards both biofilm and planktonic forms in a comparable manner to those obtained with CHX. Moreover, EO displayed higher cytocompatibility than CHX (p < 0.05). In conclusion, EO exhibited bactericidal activity similar to CHX, but a superior cytocompatibility, making it a promising antiseptic alternative to CHX.

  13. Novel bioactive tetracycline-containing electrospun polymer fibers as a potential antibacterial dental implant coating.

    PubMed

    Shahi, R G; Albuquerque, M T P; Münchow, E A; Blanchard, S B; Gregory, R L; Bottino, M C

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the ability of tetracycline-containing fibers to inhibit biofilm formation of peri-implantitis-associated pathogens [i.e., Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn), Prevotella intermedia (Pi), and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa)]. Tetracycline hydrochloride (TCH) was added to a poly(DL-lactide) [PLA], poly(ε-caprolactone) [PCL], and gelatin [GEL] polymer blend solution at distinct concentrations to obtain the following fibers: PLA:PCL/GEL (TCH-free, control), PLA:PCL/GEL + 5 % TCH, PLA:PCL/GEL + 10 % TCH, and PLA:PCL/GEL + 25 % TCH. The inhibitory effect of TCH-containing fibers on biofilm formation was assessed by colony-forming units (CFU/mL). Qualitative analysis of biofilm inhibition was done via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Statistical significance was reported at p < 0.05. Complete inhibition of biofilm formation on the fibers was observed in groups containing TCH at 10 and 25 wt%. Fibers containing TCH at 5 wt% demonstrated complete inhibition of Aa biofilm. Even though a marked reduction in CFU/mL was observed with an increase in TCH concentration, Pi proved to be the most resilient microorganism. SEM images revealed the absence of or a notable decrease in bacterial biofilm on the TCH-containing nanofibers. Collectively, our data suggest that tetracycline-containing fibers hold great potential as an antibacterial dental implant coating.

  14. Synthesis of new antibacterial composite coating for titanium based on highly ordered nanoporous silica and silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Massa, Miguel A; Covarrubias, Cristian; Bittner, Mauricio; Fuentevilla, Ignacio Andrés; Capetillo, Pavel; Von Marttens, Alfredo; Carvajal, Juan Carlos

    2014-12-01

    Infection is the most common factor that leads to dental titanium implant failure. Antibacterial implant surfaces based on nano-scale modifications of the titanium appear as an attractive strategy for control of peri-implantitis. In the present work, the preparation and antibacterial properties of a novel composite coating for titanium based on nanoporous silica and silver nanoparticles are presented. Starch-capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized and then incorporated into sol-gel based solution system. The AgNP-doped nanoporous silica coatings were prepared on titanium surface using a combined sol-gel and evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA) method. The coating nanostructure was characterized by XRD, SEM-EDX, and HR-TEM. Antibacterial activity was evaluated against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a representative pathogen of dental peri-implantitis. Colony-forming units (CFUs) were counted within the biofilm and at the planktonic state. Biofilm development was quantified using crystal violet staining and viability of adherent bacteria was confirmed with the Live/Dead fluorescence assay. Silica-based composite coating containing AgNPs (AgNP/NSC) was prepared on titanium surface by direct incorporation of AgNP suspension into the sol-gel system. The self-assembly technique enabled the spontaneous formation of a highly ordered nanoporosity in the coating structure, which is a desired property for osseointegration aspects of titanium implant surface. AgNP/NSC coating produces a strong antibacterial effect on titanium surface by not only killing the adherent bacteria but also reducing the extent of biofilm formation. Biofilm survival is reduced by more than 70% on the AgNP/NSC-modified titanium surface, compared to the control. This antibacterial effect was verified for up to 7 days of incubation. The long-term antibacterial activity exhibited by the nanostructured AgNP/NSC-titanium surface against A. actinomycetemcomitans suggests that this

  15. Periodontal Bacteria and Prediabetes Prevalence in ORIGINS: The Oral Infections, Glucose Intolerance, and Insulin Resistance Study.

    PubMed

    Demmer, R T; Jacobs, D R; Singh, R; Zuk, A; Rosenbaum, M; Papapanou, P N; Desvarieux, M

    2015-09-01

    Periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus are known to be associated. The relationship between periodontal microbiota and early diabetes risk has not been studied. We investigated the association between periodontal bacteria and prediabetes prevalence among diabetes-free adults. ORIGINS (the Oral Infections, Glucose Intolerance and Insulin Resistance Study) cross sectionally enrolled 300 diabetes-free adults aged 20 to 55 y (mean ± SD, 34 ± 10 y; 77% female). Prediabetes was defined as follows: 1) hemoglobin A1c values ranging from 5.7% to 6.4% or 2) fasting plasma glucose ranging from 100 to 125 mg/dL. In 1,188 subgingival plaque samples, 11 bacterial species were assessed at baseline, including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Actinomyces naeslundii. Full-mouth clinical periodontal examinations were performed, and participants were defined as having no/mild periodontitis vs. moderate/severe periodontitis per the definition of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention / American Academy of Periodontology. Modified Poisson regression evaluated prediabetes prevalence across bacterial tertiles. Prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals for third vs. first tertiles are presented. All analyses were adjusted for cardiometabolic risk factors. All results presented currently arise from the baseline cross section. Prediabetes prevalence was 18%, and 58% of participants had moderate/severe periodontitis. Prevalence ratios (95% confidence intervals) summarizing associations between bacterial levels and prediabetes were as follows: A. actinomycetemcomitans, 2.48 (1.34, 4.58), P = 0.004; P. gingivalis, 3.41 (1.78, 6.58), P = 0.0003; T. denticola, 1.99 (0.992, 4.00), P = 0.052; T. forsythia, 1.95 (1.0, 3.84), P = 0.05; A. naeslundii, 0.46 (0.25, 0.85), P = 0.01. The prevalence ratio for prediabetes among participants with moderate/severe vs. no/mild periodontitis was 1.47 (0.78, 2.74), P

  16. Quantitative PCR analysis of salivary pathogen burden in periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Salminen, Aino; Kopra, K. A. Elisa; Hyvärinen, Kati; Paju, Susanna; Mäntylä, Päivi; Buhlin, Kåre; Nieminen, Markku S.; Sinisalo, Juha; Pussinen, Pirkko J.

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the value of salivary concentrations of four major periodontal pathogens and their combination in diagnostics of periodontitis. The Parogene study included 462 dentate subjects (mean age 62.9 ± 9.2 years) with coronary artery disease (CAD) diagnosis who underwent an extensive clinical and radiographic oral examination. Salivary levels of four major periodontal bacteria were measured by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Median salivary concentrations of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Prevotella intermedia, as well as the sum of the concentrations of the four bacteria, were higher in subjects with moderate to severe periodontitis compared to subjects with no to mild periodontitis. Median salivary Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans concentrations did not differ significantly between the subjects with no to mild periodontitis and subjects with moderate to severe periodontitis. In logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, gender, diabetes, and the number of teeth and implants, high salivary concentrations of P. gingivalis, T. forsythia, and P. intermedia were significantly associated with moderate to severe periodontitis. When looking at different clinical and radiographic parameters of periodontitis, high concentrations of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia were significantly associated with the number of 4–5 mm periodontal pockets, ≥6 mm pockets, and alveolar bone loss (ABL). High level of T. forsythia was associated also with bleeding on probing (BOP). The combination of the four bacteria, i.e., the bacterial burden index, was associated with moderate to severe periodontitis with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.40 (95% CI 1.39–4.13). When A. actinomycetemcomitans was excluded from the combination of the bacteria, the OR was improved to 2.61 (95% CI 1.51–4.52). The highest OR 3.59 (95% CI 1.94–6.63) was achieved when P. intermedia was further excluded from the combination and only the levels of P. gingivalis and

  17. Quantitative Molecular Detection of 19 Major Pathogens in the Interdental Biofilm of Periodontally Healthy Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Carrouel, Florence; Viennot, Stéphane; Santamaria, Julie; Veber, Philippe; Bourgeois, Denis

    2016-01-01

    In oral health, the interdental spaces are a real ecological niche for which the body has few or no alternative defenses and where the traditional daily methods for control by disrupting biofilm are not adequate. The interdental spaces are the source of many hypotheses regarding their potential associations with and/or causes of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, degenerative disease, and depression. This PCR study is the first to describe the interdental microbiota in healthy adults aged 18–35 years-old with reference to the Socransky complexes. The complexes tended to reflect microbial succession events in developing dental biofilms. Early colonizers included members of the yellow, green, and purple complexes. The orange complex bacteria generally appear after the early colonizers and include many putative periodontal pathogens, such as Fusobacterium nucleatum. The red complex (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola) was considered the climax community and is on the list of putative periodontal pathogens. The 19 major periodontal pathogens tested were expressed at various levels. F. nucleatum was the most abundant species, and the least abundant were Actinomyces viscosus, P. gingivalis, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. The genome counts for Eikenella corrodens, Campylobacter concisus, Campylobacter rectus, T. denticola, and Tannerella forsythensis increased significantly with subject age. The study highlights the observation that bacteria from the yellow complex (Streptococcus spp., S. mitis), the green complex (E. corrodens, Campylobacter gracilis, Capnocytophaga ochracea, Capnocytophaga sputigena, A. actinomycetemcomitans), the purple complex (Veillonella parvula, Actinomyces odontolyticus) and the blue complex (A. viscosus) are correlated. Concerning the orange complex, F. nucleatum is the most abundant species in interdental biofilm. The red complex, which is recognized as the most important

  18. Periodontal Bacteria and Prediabetes Prevalence in ORIGINS

    PubMed Central

    Demmer, R.T.; Jacobs, D.R.; Singh, R.; Zuk, A.; Rosenbaum, M.; Papapanou, P.N.; Desvarieux, M.

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus are known to be associated. The relationship between periodontal microbiota and early diabetes risk has not been studied. We investigated the association between periodontal bacteria and prediabetes prevalence among diabetes-free adults. ORIGINS (the Oral Infections, Glucose Intolerance and Insulin Resistance Study) cross sectionally enrolled 300 diabetes-free adults aged 20 to 55 y (mean ± SD, 34 ± 10 y; 77% female). Prediabetes was defined as follows: 1) hemoglobin A1c values ranging from 5.7% to 6.4% or 2) fasting plasma glucose ranging from 100 to 125 mg/dL. In 1,188 subgingival plaque samples, 11 bacterial species were assessed at baseline, including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Actinomyces naeslundii. Full-mouth clinical periodontal examinations were performed, and participants were defined as having no/mild periodontitis vs. moderate/severe periodontitis per the definition of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention / American Academy of Periodontology. Modified Poisson regression evaluated prediabetes prevalence across bacterial tertiles. Prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals for third vs. first tertiles are presented. All analyses were adjusted for cardiometabolic risk factors. All results presented currently arise from the baseline cross section. Prediabetes prevalence was 18%, and 58% of participants had moderate/severe periodontitis. Prevalence ratios (95% confidence intervals) summarizing associations between bacterial levels and prediabetes were as follows: A. actinomycetemcomitans, 2.48 (1.34, 4.58), P = 0.004; P. gingivalis, 3.41 (1.78, 6.58), P = 0.0003; T. denticola, 1.99 (0.992, 4.00), P = 0.052; T. forsythia, 1.95 (1.0, 3.84), P = 0.05; A. naeslundii, 0.46 (0.25, 0.85), P = 0.01. The prevalence ratio for prediabetes among participants with moderate/severe vs. no/mild periodontitis was 1.47 (0.78, 2.74), P

  19. Quantitative PCR analysis of salivary pathogen burden in periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Aino; Kopra, K A Elisa; Hyvärinen, Kati; Paju, Susanna; Mäntylä, Päivi; Buhlin, Kåre; Nieminen, Markku S; Sinisalo, Juha; Pussinen, Pirkko J

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the value of salivary concentrations of four major periodontal pathogens and their combination in diagnostics of periodontitis. The Parogene study included 462 dentate subjects (mean age 62.9 ± 9.2 years) with coronary artery disease (CAD) diagnosis who underwent an extensive clinical and radiographic oral examination. Salivary levels of four major periodontal bacteria were measured by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Median salivary concentrations of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Prevotella intermedia, as well as the sum of the concentrations of the four bacteria, were higher in subjects with moderate to severe periodontitis compared to subjects with no to mild periodontitis. Median salivary Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans concentrations did not differ significantly between the subjects with no to mild periodontitis and subjects with moderate to severe periodontitis. In logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, gender, diabetes, and the number of teeth and implants, high salivary concentrations of P. gingivalis, T. forsythia, and P. intermedia were significantly associated with moderate to severe periodontitis. When looking at different clinical and radiographic parameters of periodontitis, high concentrations of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia were significantly associated with the number of 4-5 mm periodontal pockets, ≥6 mm pockets, and alveolar bone loss (ABL). High level of T. forsythia was associated also with bleeding on probing (BOP). The combination of the four bacteria, i.e., the bacterial burden index, was associated with moderate to severe periodontitis with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.40 (95% CI 1.39-4.13). When A. actinomycetemcomitans was excluded from the combination of the bacteria, the OR was improved to 2.61 (95% CI 1.51-4.52). The highest OR 3.59 (95% CI 1.94-6.63) was achieved when P. intermedia was further excluded from the combination and only the levels of P. gingivalis and T

  20. Comparative evaluation of the efficacy of curcumin gel with and without photo activation as an adjunct to scaling and root planing in the treatment of chronic periodontitis: A split mouth clinical and microbiological study

    PubMed Central

    Sreedhar, Annaji; Sarkar, Indranil; Rajan, Padma; Pai, Jagdish; Malagi, Sachin; Kamath, Vinesh; Barmappa, Radhikka

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Harnessing Mother Nature's bountiful remedies for rejuvenation has been in vogue since time immemorial. Turmeric contains the polyphenol Curcumin in its rhizome. It produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) with visible light irradiation as photodynamic therapy (PDT) - which validates its use in the treatment of periodontitis. This study compares Curcumin and Curcumin PDT as an adjunct to conventional Scaling and Root Planing (SRP) with SRP alone in the treatment of patients with chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Sixty sites in fifteen untreated chronic periodontitis patients were randomly assigned in a split mouth design for one of the treatment modalities; 1) Scaling and root planing (SRP) alone, (2) SRP + Curcumin application for 5 min, (3) SRP + Curcumin application for 5 min + irradiation with blue light emitting diode of wavelength 470 nm for 5 min. (Curcumin PDT) on 0 day.(4) SRP + Curcumin PDT on “0”, 7th and 21st day. The clinical parameters included plaque index (PI), bleeding on probing (BOP) measured by sulcus bleeding index (SBI), probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL) recorded at the baseline & 3rd month. The site with greatest probing pocket depth (PPD) was selected from each quadrant for bacterial sampling and culturing for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) and other black pigment producing microorganisms (BPB) like Porphyromonas gingivalis & Prevotella intermedia. Conclusion: The present study showed that Curcumin photodynamic therapy is a valuable treatment modality adjunctive to conventional scaling and root planing over Curcumin application. Moreover, multiple adjunctive applications of photodynamic therapy are more beneficial than single application in reducing clinical & microbiological parameters. PMID:26604595

  1. Oral pathogens change proliferation properties of oral tumor cells by affecting gene expression of human defensins.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, T; Kraus, D; Novak, N; Probstmeier, R; Frentzen, M; Wenghoefer, M; Jepsen, S; Winter, J

    2016-10-01

    The impact of oral pathogens onto the generation and variability of oral tumors has only recently been investigated. To get further insights, oral cancer cells were treated with pathogens and additionally, as a result of this bacterial cellular infection, with human defensins, which are as anti-microbial peptide members of the innate immune system. After cell stimulation, proliferation behavior, expression analysis of oncogenic relevant defensin genes, and effects on EGFR signaling were investigated. The expression of oncogenic relevant anti-microbial peptides was analyzed with real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Cell culture experiments were performed to examine cellular impacts caused by stimulation, i.e., altered gene expression, proliferation rate, and EGF receptor-dependent signaling. Incubation of oral tumor cells with an oral pathogen (Porphyromonas gingivalis) and human α-defensins led to an increase in cell proliferation. In contrast, another oral bacterium used, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, enhanced cell death. The bacteria and anti-microbial peptides exhibited diverse effects on the transcript levels of oncogenic relevant defensin genes and epidermal growth factor receptor signaling. These two oral pathogens exhibited opposite primary effects on the proliferation behavior of oral tumor cells. Nevertheless, both microbe species led to similar secondary impacts on the proliferation rate by modifying expression levels of oncogenic relevant α-defensin genes. In this respect, oral pathogens exerted multiplying effects on tumor cell proliferation. Additionally, human defensins were shown to differently influence epidermal growth factor receptor signaling, supporting the hypothesis that these anti-microbial peptides serve as ligands of EGFR, thus modifying the proliferation behavior of oral tumor cells.

  2. Effects of Areca Nut Extracts on Phagocytosis of Actinobacillus actinomycete mcomitans ATCC 33384 by Neutrophils in Patients with Chronic Periondontitis

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Kavita Gangaram; Metgud, Sharada Chidanand

    2013-01-01

    Background & Objective: A higher prevalence of periodontal disease among areca nut chewers than non chewers has been demonstrated. Neutrophils, the first line of defence mechanism against microbial infection play an important role in maintaining the periodontal health. In this context our aim was to evaluate the effects of areca nut extracts on phagocytic activity by neutrophils isolated from gingival crevicular washing of healthy subjects and patients with chronic periodontitis. Material and Methods: Sample size consisted of a total of 60 subjects which were divided into two groups of 30 each. Group I consisted healthy subjects and Group II consisted clinically diagnosed cases of chronic periodontitis. Neutrophils isolated from gingival crevicular washings of both groups were treated with aqueous extracts of ripe areca nut (rANE) and tender areca nut (tANE) and examined for their effect on cellular viability of neutrophils using typan blue exclusion assay. The possible/ ableffects on the phagocytic activity of neutrophils against a periodontal pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans(ATCC 33384) was determined by using microscopic method. Results: Both rANE and tANE affected the phagocytic activity by neutrophils in healthy and patients with chronic periodontitis. Ripe areca nut extract has altered the neutrophil functions more than tender areca nut in both the groups. There was no difference seen in the cell viability of neutrophils when treated with rANE and tANE in both the groups (p> 0.05). Conclusion: Both ripe and tender arecanut extract affected the neutrophil function in healthy and patients with chronic periodontitis. Ripe arecanut extract significantly altered the neutrophils functions more than tender areca nut extract. Thus, alterations in these functions of neutrophils may lead to signs of clinical diseases associated with areca chewing. PMID:24298462

  3. Incorporation of silver nanoparticles on the surface of orthodontic microimplants to achieve antimicrobial properties

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Adith; Muthuchamy, Nallal; Tejani, Harsh; Gopalan, Anantha-Iyengar; Lee, Kwang-Pill; Lee, Heon-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Objective Microbial aggregation around dental implants can lead to loss/loosening of the implants. This study was aimed at surface treating titanium microimplants with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) to achieve antibacterial properties. Methods AgNP-modified titanium microimplants (Ti-nAg) were prepared using two methods. The first method involved coating the microimplants with regular AgNPs (Ti-AgNP) and the second involved coating them with a AgNP-coated biopolymer (Ti-BP-AgNP). The topologies, microstructures, and chemical compositions of the surfaces of the Ti-nAg were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Disk diffusion tests using Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguinis, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were performed to test the antibacterial activity of the Ti-nAg microimplants. Results SEM revealed that only a meager amount of AgNPs was sparsely deposited on the Ti-AgNP surface with the first method, while a layer of AgNP-coated biopolymer extended along the Ti-BP-AgNP surface in the second method. The diameters of the coated nanoparticles were in the range of 10 to 30 nm. EDS revealed 1.05 atomic % of Ag on the surface of the Ti-AgNP and an astounding 21.2 atomic % on the surface of the Ti-BP-AgNP. XPS confirmed the metallic state of silver on the Ti-BP-AgNP surface. After 24 hours of incubation, clear zones of inhibition were seen around the Ti-BP-AgNP microimplants in all three test bacterial culture plates, whereas no antibacterial effect was observed with the Ti-AgNP microimplants. Conclusions Titanium microimplants modified with Ti-BP-AgNP exhibit excellent antibacterial properties, making them a promising implantable biomaterial. PMID:28127534

  4. Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-1α Shows Predictive Value as a Risk Marker for Subjects and Sites Vulnerable to Bone Loss in a Longitudinal Model of Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Fine, Daniel H.; Markowitz, Kenneth; Fairlie, Karen; Tischio-Bereski, Debbie; Ferrandiz, Javier; Godboley, Dipti; Furgang, David; Gunsolley, John; Best, Al

    2014-01-01

    Improved diagnostics remains a fundamental goal of biomedical research. This study was designed to assess cytokine biomarkers that could predict bone loss (BL) in localized aggressive periodontitis. 2,058 adolescents were screened. Two groups of 50 periodontally healthy adolescents were enrolled in the longitudinal study. One group had Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), the putative pathogen, while the matched cohort did not. Cytokine levels were assessed in saliva and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF). Participants were sampled, examined, and radiographed every 6 months for 2–3 years. Disease was defined as radiographic evidence of BL. Saliva and GCF was collected at each visit, frozen, and then tested retrospectively after detection of BL. Sixteen subjects with Aa developed BL. Saliva from Aa-positive and Aa-negative healthy subjects was compared to subjects who developed BL. GCF was collected from 16 subjects with BL and from another 38 subjects who remained healthy. GCF from BL sites in the 16 subjects was compared to healthy sites in these same subjects and to healthy sites in subjects who remained healthy. Results showed that cytokines in saliva associated with acute inflammation were elevated in subjects who developed BL (i.e., MIP-1α MIP-1β IL-α, IL-1β and IL-8; p<0.01). MIP-1α was elevated 13-fold, 6 months prior to BL. When MIP-1α levels were set at 40 pg/ml, 98% of healthy sites were below that level (Specificity); whereas, 93% of sites with BL were higher (Sensitivity), with comparable Predictive Values of 98%; p<0.0001; 95% C.I. = 42.5–52.7). MIP-1α consistently showed elevated levels as a biomarker for BL in both saliva and GCF, 6 months prior to BL. MIP-1α continues to demonstrate its strong candidacy as a diagnostic biomarker for both subject and site vulnerability to BL. PMID:24901458

  5. Short- and medium-chain fatty acids exhibit antimicrobial activity for oral microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chifu B.; Altimova, Yelena; Myers, Taylor M.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study assessed the antibacterial activity of short-, medium-, and long-chain fatty acids against various oral microorganisms. Methods The short-chain fatty acids [formic acid (C1), acetic acid (C2), propionic acid (C3), butyric acid (C4), isobutyric acid (C4), isovaleric acid (C5), hexanoic acid (C6)], medium-chain fatty acids [octanoic acid (C8), capric acid (C10), lauric acid (12)], and long-chain fatty acids [myristic acid (C14), palmitic acid (C16)], were investigated for antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans, S. gordonii, S. sanguis, Candida albicans, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Results The data demonstrated that the fatty acids exhibited patterns of inhibition against oral bacteria with some specificity that appeared related more to the bacterial species that the general structural characteristics of the microorganism. As a group the fatty acids were much less effective against C. albicans than the oral bacteria, with effectiveness limited to hexanoic, octanoic, and lauric acids. Formic acid, capric, and lauric acids were broadly inhibitory for the bacteria. Interestingly, fatty acids that are produced at metabolic end-products by a number of these bacteria, were specifically inactive against the producing species, while substantially inhibiting the growth of other oral microorganisms. Conclusions The results indicate that the antimicrobial activity of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs), long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) could influence the microbial ecology in the oral cavity via at least 2 potential pathways. First, the agents delivered exogenously as therapeutic adjuncts could be packaged to enhance a microbial-regulatory environment in the subgingival sulcus. Second, it would be the intrinsic nature of these fatty acid inhibitors in contributing to the characteristics of the microbial biofilms, their evolution, and emergence of

  6. Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cell (GMSC) Delivery System Based on RGD-Coupled Alginate Hydrogel with Antimicrobial Properties: A Novel Treatment Modality for Peri-Implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Diniz, Ivana M. A.; Chen, Chider; Ansari, Sahar; Zadeh, Homayoun H.; Moshaverinia, Maryam; Chee, Daniel; Marques, Márcia M.; Shi, Songtao; Moshaverinia, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Peri-implantitis is one of the most common inflammatory complications in dental implantology. Similar to periodontitis, in peri-implantitis, destructive inflammatory changes take place in the tissues surrounding a dental implant. Bacterial flora at the failing implant sites resemble the pathogens in periodontal disease and consist of Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa). Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of a silver lactate (SL)-containing RGD-coupled alginate hydrogel scaffold as a promising stem cell delivery vehicle with antimicrobial properties. Materials and Methods Gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) or human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) were encapsulated in SL-loaded alginate hydrogel microspheres. Stem cell viability, proliferation, and osteo-differentiation capacity were analyzed. Results Our results showed that SL exhibited antimicrobial properties against Aa in a dose-dependent manner, with 0.50 mg/ml showing the greatest antimicrobial properties while still maintaining cell viability. At this concentration, SL-containing alginate hydrogel was able to inhibit Aa on the surface of Ti discs and significantly reduce the bacterial load in Aa suspensions. Silver ions were effectively released from the SL-loaded alginate microspheres for up to 2 weeks. Osteogenic differentiation of GMSCs and hBMMSCs encapsulated in the SL-loaded alginate microspheres were confirmed by the intense mineral matrix deposition and high expression of osteogenesis-related genes. Conclusion Taken together, our findings confirm that GMSCs encapsulated in RGD-modified alginate hydrogel containing SL show promise for bone tissue engineering with antimicrobial properties against Aa bacteria in vitro. PMID:26216081

  7. Role and regulation of the Flp/Tad pilus in the virulence of Pectobacterium atrosepticum SCRI1043 and Pectobacterium wasabiae SCC3193.

    PubMed

    Nykyri, Johanna; Mattinen, Laura; Niemi, Outi; Adhikari, Satish; Kõiv, Viia; Somervuo, Panu; Fang, Xin; Auvinen, Petri; Mäe, Andres; Palva, E Tapio; Pirhonen, Minna

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we characterized a putative Flp/Tad pilus-encoding gene cluster, and we examined its regulation at the transcriptional level and its role in the virulence of potato pathogenic enterobacteria of the genus Pectobacterium. The Flp/Tad pilus-encoding gene clusters in Pectobacterium atrosepticum, Pectobacterium wasabiae and Pectobacterium aroidearum were compared to previously characterized flp/tad gene clusters, including that of the well-studied Flp/Tad pilus model organism Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, in which this pilus is a major virulence determinant. Comparative analyses revealed substantial protein sequence similarity and open reading frame synteny between the previously characterized flp/tad gene clusters and the cluster in Pectobacterium, suggesting that the predicted flp/tad gene cluster in Pectobacterium encodes a Flp/Tad pilus-like structure. We detected genes for a novel two-component system adjacent to the flp/tad gene cluster in Pectobacterium, and mutant analysis demonstrated that this system has a positive effect on the transcription of selected Flp/Tad pilus biogenesis genes, suggesting that this response regulator regulate the flp/tad gene cluster. Mutagenesis of either the predicted regulator gene or selected Flp/Tad pilus biogenesis genes had a significant impact on the maceration ability of the bacterial strains in potato tubers, indicating that the Flp/Tad pilus-encoding gene cluster represents a novel virulence determinant in Pectobacterium. Soft-rot enterobacteria in the genera Pectobacterium and Dickeya are of great agricultural importance, and an investigation of the virulence of these pathogens could facilitate improvements in agricultural practices, thus benefiting farmers, the potato industry and consumers.

  8. Generalized aggressive periodontitis: microbiological composition and clinical parameters in non-surgical therapy.

    PubMed

    Usin, María M; Tabares, Sandra M; Menso, Julieta; de Albera, Estela R; Sembaj, Adela

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the variations in periodontal parameters and microbiological composition in periodontal pockets at the baseline and 3 and 6 months post treatmentin patients with Generalized Aggressive Periodontitis(GAP) undergoing non surgical periodontal treatment combined with chlorhexidine and systemic antibiotics. Medical and dental history was taken from 10 subjects, average age 30.6±2.7 years, diagnosed with GAP. A non surgical periodontal treatment combined with 0.12% chlorhexidine, 875 mg amoxicillin and 500 mg metronidazole every 12 hours for ten days was conducted. At each visit, the following measurements wererecorded: bacterial plaque (BP), bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), hypermobility, and furcation lesions, and a sample of subgingivalplaque was taken from the site of the deepest probing depth of each sextant to identify Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponemadenticola, Tannerella forsythia, Prevotella intermedia and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans using molecular biology techniques. After 6 months, the Wilcoxon test showed an increase of 0.97 mm in CAL (p=0.0047) and 2.54 mm in PD(p=0.009). A healthy site was defined as having a PD <5 mm, negative BOP and no pathogenic bacteria detected at 6 months, indicating significant improvement (p=0.008), with OR (95%CI) =4.7 (1.102220.11).With the treatment protocol used in this study, 6 months after treatment, patients had an approximately 4- fold higher possibility of presenting PD <5 mm and periodontal pockets without periodontal pathogenic bacteria.

  9. D-Galactose as an autoinducer 2 inhibitor to control the biofilm formation of periodontopathogens.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Eun-Ju; Sim, Jaehyun; Sim, Jun; Lee, Julian; Choi, Bong-Kyu

    2016-09-01

    Autoinducer 2 (AI-2) is a quorum sensing molecule to which bacteria respond to regulate various phenotypes, including virulence and biofilm formation. AI-2 plays an important role in the formation of a subgingival biofilm composed mostly of Gram-negative anaerobes, by which periodontitis is initiated. The aim of this study was to evaluate D-galactose as an inhibitor of AI-2 activity and thus of the biofilm formation of periodontopathogens. In a search for an AI-2 receptor of Fusobacterium nucleatum, D-galactose binding protein (Gbp, Gene ID FN1165) showed high sequence similarity with the ribose binding protein (RbsB), a known AI-2 receptor of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. D-Galactose was evaluated for its inhibitory effect on the AI-2 activity of Vibrio harveyi BB152 and F. nucleatum, the major coaggregation bridge organism, which connects early colonizing commensals and late pathogenic colonizers in dental biofilms. The inhibitory effect of D-galactose on the biofilm formation of periodontopathogens was assessed by crystal violet staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy in the absence or presence of AI-2 and secreted molecules of F. nucleatum. D-Galactose significantly inhibited the AI-2 activity of V. harveyi and F. nucleatum. In addition, D-galactose markedly inhibited the biofilm formation of F. nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Tannerella forsythia induced by the AI-2 of F. nucleatum without affecting bacterial growth. Our results demonstrate that the Gbp may function as an AI-2 receptor and that galactose may be used for prevention of the biofilm formation of periodontopathogens by targeting AI-2 activity.

  10. Antibacterial Activity of Myristica fragrans against Oral Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Shafiei, Zaleha; Shuhairi, Nadia Najwa; Md Fazly Shah Yap, Nordiyana; Harry Sibungkil, Carrie-Anne; Latip, Jalifah

    2012-01-01

    Myristica fragrans Houtt is mostly cultivated for spices in Penang Island, Malaysia. The ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts of flesh, mace and seed of Myristica fragrans was evaluated the bactericidal potential against three Gram-positive cariogenic bacteria (Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175, Streptococcus mitis ATCC 6249, and Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 13419) and three Gram-negative periodontopathic bacteria (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 29522, Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277, and Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586). Antibacterial activities of the extracts was determined by twofold serial microdilution, with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ranging from 1.25 to 640 mg/mL and 0.075 to 40 mg/mL. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was obtained by subculturing method. Among all extracts tested, ethyl acetate extract of flesh has the highest significant inhibitory effects against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria with mean MIC value ranging from 0.625 to 1.25 ± 0.00 (SD) mg/mL; P = 0.017) and highest bactericidal effects at mean MBC value ranging from 0.625 mg/mL to 20 ± 0.00 (SD) mg/mL. While for seed and mace of Myristica fragrans, their ethanol extracts exhibited good antibacterial activity against both groups of test pathogens compared to its ethyl acetate extracts. All of the extracts of Myristica fragrans did not show any antibacterial activities against Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586. Thus, our study showed the potential effect of ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts from flesh, seed and mace of Myristica fragrans to be new natural agent that can be incorporated in oral care products. PMID:23049613

  11. Antimicrobial activity of nanoparticulate metal oxides against peri-implantitis pathogens.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Reus, Miguel A; Memarzadeh, Kaveh; Huang, Jie; Ren, Guogang G; Allaker, Robert P

    2012-08-01

    Dental plaque accumulation may result in peri-implantitis, an inflammatory process causing loss of supporting bone that may lead to dental implant failure. The antimicrobial activities of six metal and metal oxide nanoparticles and two of their composites against bacterial pathogens associated with peri-implantitis were examined under anaerobic conditions. The activities of nanoparticles of silver (Ag), cuprous oxide (Cu(2)O), cupric oxide (CuO), zinc oxide (ZnO), titanium dioxide (TiO(2)), tungsten oxide (WO(3)), Ag+CuO composite and Ag+ZnO composite were assessed by minimum inhibitory (bacteriostatic) concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) determination against Prevotella intermedia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Time-kill assays were carried out to examine the dynamics of the antimicrobial activity with ZnO nanoparticles. MIC and MBC values were in the range of <100 μg/mL to 2500 μg/mL and <100 μg/mL to >2500 μg/mL, respectively. The activity of the nanoparticles tested in descending order was Ag>Ag+CuO>Cu(2)O>CuO>Ag+ZnO>ZnO>TiO(2)>WO(3). Time-kill assays with ZnO demonstrated a significant decrease in growth of all species tested within 4h, reaching 100% within 2h for P. gingivalis and within 3h for F. nucleatum and P. intermedia. Coating titanium surfaces of dental and orthopaedic implants with antimicrobial nanoparticles should lead to an increased rate of implant success.

  12. Revelation of Viral – Bacterial Interrelationship in Aggressive Periodontitis via Polymerase Chain Reaction: A Microbiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sumit; Tapashetti, Roopali P; Patil, Sudhir R; Kalra, Sonali Medsinge; Bhat, Geetha K; Guvva, Sowjanya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Periodontal disease is one of the most common and complex disease affecting mankind. Being multifactorial in etiology it encompasses a variety of infectious entities with various unique microbial constellations and immune responses. A bacteriologic cause alone seems insufficient in explaining several clinical features of the periodontal disease. Recent studies suggest that periodontal herpes viruses comprise an important source of triggering periodontal tissue destruction. The following study aims to assess human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-I) interaction with the established periodontopathic bacteriae, Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) in pathogenesis of aggressive periodontitis (AgP) using Hotstart polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Materials and Methods: A total of 30 subjects, 15 with AgP and 15 healthy controls contributed random subgingival plaque samples. PCR methodology was used to identify the subgingival herpesviruses, Pg, and Aa. Yates corrected Chi-square test was employed to identify a statistical association between herpesviruses and periodontopathic bacteriae. Results: Findings suggested that viruses may be pertinent to disease progression. The prevalence of the periodontopathic bacteria Aa was found in 53.33% (P = 0.0168, S) and Pg in 40% (P = 0.2155, NS) of the AgP patients. Herpesviruses, HCMV and EBV-I were found to have a prevalence of 46.67% (P = 0.039, S) and 40% (P = 0.084, NS). The viral and bacterial co-infection was found to be 77.78% (P = 0.0002, S) with Aa and HCMV. Conclusion: The present data reveals, viruses may exert periodontopathic effect by causing local immunosupression which may set a stage for the subgingival colonization and multiplication of periodontal bacteriae. Further studies are needed to develop an understanding into the significance of herpesviruses in human periodontitis which, may allow for improved diagnosis, more specific therapy and

  13. Activity of antimicrobial peptide mimetics in the oral cavity: II. Activity against periopathogenic biofilms and anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Hua, J; Scott, R W; Diamond, G

    2010-12-01

    Whereas periodontal disease is ultimately of bacterial etiology, from multispecies biofilms of gram-negative anaerobic microorganisms, much of the deleterious effects are caused by the resultant epithelial inflammatory response. Hence, development of a treatment that combines anti-biofilm antibiotic activity with anti-inflammatory activity would be of great utility. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) such as defensins are naturally occurring peptides that exhibit broad-spectrum activity as well as a variety of immunomodulatory activities. Furthermore, bacteria do not readily develop resistance to these agents. However, clinical studies have suggested that they do not represent optimal candidates for exogenous therapeutic agents. Small-molecule mimetics of these AMPs exhibit similar activities to the parent peptides, in addition to having low toxicity, high stability and low cost. To determine whether AMP mimetics have the potential for treatment of periodontal disease, we examined the activity of one mimetic, mPE, against biofilm cultures of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Metabolic assays as well as culture and biomass measurement assays demonstrated that mPE exhibits potent activity against biofilm cultures of both species. Furthermore, as little as 2 μg ml(-1) mPE was sufficient to inhibit interleukin-1β-induced secretion of interleukin-8 in both gingival epithelial cells and THP-1 cells. This anti-inflammatory activity is associated with a reduction in activation of nuclear factor-κB, suggesting that mPE can act both as an anti-biofilm agent in an anaerobic environment and as an anti-inflammatory agent in infected tissues.

  14. Antibacterial Activity of Myristica fragrans against Oral Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Zaleha; Shuhairi, Nadia Najwa; Md Fazly Shah Yap, Nordiyana; Harry Sibungkil, Carrie-Anne; Latip, Jalifah

    2012-01-01

    Myristica fragrans Houtt is mostly cultivated for spices in Penang Island, Malaysia. The ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts of flesh, mace and seed of Myristica fragrans was evaluated the bactericidal potential against three Gram-positive cariogenic bacteria (Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175, Streptococcus mitis ATCC 6249, and Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 13419) and three Gram-negative periodontopathic bacteria (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 29522, Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277, and Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586). Antibacterial activities of the extracts was determined by twofold serial microdilution, with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ranging from 1.25 to 640 mg/mL and 0.075 to 40 mg/mL. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was obtained by subculturing method. Among all extracts tested, ethyl acetate extract of flesh has the highest significant inhibitory effects against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria with mean MIC value ranging from 0.625 to 1.25 ± 0.00 (SD) mg/mL; P = 0.017) and highest bactericidal effects at mean MBC value ranging from 0.625 mg/mL to 20 ± 0.00 (SD) mg/mL. While for seed and mace of Myristica fragrans, their ethanol extracts exhibited good antibacterial activity against both groups of test pathogens compared to its ethyl acetate extracts. All of the extracts of Myristica fragrans did not show any antibacterial activities against Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586. Thus, our study showed the potential effect of ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts from flesh, seed and mace of Myristica fragrans to be new natural agent that can be incorporated in oral care products.

  15. Effect of bioactive dental adhesive on periodontal and endodontic pathogens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Xie, Xianju; Weir, Michael D; Fouad, Ashraf F; Zhao, Liang; Xu, Hockin H K

    2016-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a new bioactive dental bonding agent with nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate and dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate for tooth root caries restorations and endodontic applications, and (2) investigate biofilm inhibition by the bioactive bonding agent against eight species of periodontal and endodontic pathogens for the first time. Bonding agent was formulated with 5 % of dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate. Nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate at 30 wt% was mixed into adhesive. Eight species of biofilms were grown on resins: Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micra, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium. Colony-forming units, live/dead assay, biomass, metabolic activity and polysaccharide of biofilms were determined. The results showed that adding dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate and nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate into bonding agent did not decrease dentin bond strength (P > 0.1). Adding dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate reduced the colony-forming units of all eight species of biofilms by nearly three orders of magnitude. The killing efficacy of dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate resin was: P. gingivalis > A. actinomycetemcomitans > P. intermedia > P. nigrescens > F. nucleatum > P. micra > E. faecalis > E. faecium. Dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate resin had much less biomass, metabolic activity and polysaccharide of biofilms than those without dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (P < 0.05). In conclusion, a novel dental adhesive was developed for root caries and endodontic applications, showing potent inhibition of biofilms of eight species of periodontal and endodontic pathogens, and reducing colony-forming units by three orders of magnitude. The bioactive adhesive is promising for tooth root restorations to provide

  16. Oral bacterial DNA findings in pericardial fluid

    PubMed Central

    Louhelainen, Anne-Mari; Aho, Joonas; Tuomisto, Sari; Aittoniemi, Janne; Vuento, Risto; Karhunen, Pekka J.; Pessi, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    Background We recently reported that large amounts of oral bacterial DNA can be found in thrombus aspirates of myocardial infarction patients. Some case reports describe bacterial findings in pericardial fluid, mostly done with conventional culturing and a few with PCR; in purulent pericarditis, nevertheless, bacterial PCR has not been used as a diagnostic method before. Objective To find out whether bacterial DNA can be measured in the pericardial fluid and if it correlates with pathologic–anatomic findings linked to cardiovascular diseases. Methods Twenty-two pericardial aspirates were collected aseptically prior to forensic autopsy at Tampere University Hospital during 2009–2010. Of the autopsies, 10 (45.5%) were free of coronary artery disease (CAD), 7 (31.8%) had mild and 5 (22.7%) had severe CAD. Bacterial DNA amounts were determined using real-time quantitative PCR with specific primers and probes for all bacterial strains associated with endodontic disease (Streptococcus mitis group, Streptococcus anginosus group, Staphylococcus aureus/Staphylococcus epidermidis, Prevotella intermedia, Parvimonas micra) and periodontal disease (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Fusobacterium nucleatus, and Dialister pneumosintes). Results Of 22 cases, 14 (63.6%) were positive for endodontic and 8 (36.4%) for periodontal-disease-associated bacteria. Only one case was positive for bacterial culturing. There was a statistically significant association between the relative amount of bacterial DNA in the pericardial fluid and the severity of CAD (p=0.035). Conclusions Oral bacterial DNA was detectable in pericardial fluid and an association between the severity of CAD and the total amount of bacterial DNA in pericardial fluid was found, suggesting that this kind of measurement might be useful for clinical purposes. PMID:25412607

  17. Transcriptome Analysis of B Cell Immune Functions in Periodontitis: Mucosal Tissue Responses to the Oral Microbiome in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Kirakodu, Sreenatha S.; Novak, M. John; Orraca, Luis; Martinez, Janis Gonzalez; Cunningham, Larry L.; Thomas, Mark V.; Stromberg, Arnold; Pandruvada, Subramanya N.; Gonzalez, Octavio A.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence has shown activation of T and B cells in gingival tissues in experimental models and in humans diagnosed with periodontitis. The results of this adaptive immune response are noted both locally and systemically with antigenic specificity for an array of oral bacteria, including periodontopathic species, e.g., Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. It has been recognized through epidemiological studies and clinical observations that the prevalence of periodontitis increases with age. This report describes our studies evaluating gingival tissue transcriptomes in humans and specifically exploiting the use of a non-human primate model of naturally occurring periodontitis to delineate gingival mucosal tissue gene expression profiles focusing on cells/genes critical for the development of humoral adaptive immune responses. Patterns of B cell and plasmacyte genes were altered in aging healthy gingival tissues. Substantial increases in a large number of genes reflecting antigen-dependent activation, B cell activation, B cell proliferation, and B cell differentiation/maturation were observed in periodontitis in adults and aged animals. Finally, evaluation of the relationship of these gene expression patterns with those of various tissue destructive molecules (MMP2, MMP9, CTSK, TNFα, and RANKL) showed a greater frequency of positive correlations in healthy tissues versus periodontitis tissues, with only MMP9 correlations similar between the two tissue types. These results are consistent with B cell response activities in healthy tissues potentially contributing to muting the effects of the tissue destructive biomolecules, whereas with periodontitis this relationship is adversely affected and enabling a progression of tissue destructive events. PMID:27486459

  18. Periowave demonstrates bactericidal activity against periopathogens and leads to improved clinical outcomes in the treatment of adult periodontitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Street, Cale N.; Andersen, Roger; Loebel, Nicolas G.

    2009-02-01

    Periodontitis affects half of the U.S. population over 50, and is the leading cause of tooth loss after 35. It is believed to be caused by growth of complex bacterial biofilms on the tooth surface below the gumline. Photodynamic therapy, a technology used commonly in antitumor applications, has more recently been shown to exhibit antimicrobial efficacy. We have demonstrated eradication of the periopathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in vitro using PeriowaveTM; a commercial photodisinfection system. In addition, several clinical studies have now demonstrated the efficacy of this treatment. A pilot study in the U.S. showed that 68% of patients treated with PeriowaveTM adjunctively to scaling and root planing (SRP) showed clinical attachment level increase of >1 mm, as opposed to 30% with SRP alone. In a subsequent larger study, a second PeriowaveTM treatment 6 weeks after initial treatment led to pocket depth improvements of >1.5 mm in 89% of patients. Finally, in the most recent multicenter, randomized, examiner-blinded study conducted on 121 subjects in Canada, PeriowaveTM treatment produced highly significant gains in attachment level (0.88 mm vs. 0.57 mm; p=0.003) and pocket depth (0.87 mm vs. 0.63 mm; p=0.01) as compared to SRP alone. In summary, PeriowaveTM demonstrated strong bactericidal activity against known periopathogens, and treatment of periodontitis using this system produced significantly better clinical outcomes than SRP alone. This, along with the absence of any adverse events in patients treated to date demonstrates that PDT is a safe and effective treatment for adult chronic periodontitis.

  19. Antimicrobial peptides and nitric oxide production by neutrophils from periodontitis subjects

    PubMed Central

    Mariano, F.S.; Campanelli, A.P.; Nociti, F.H.; Mattos-Graner, R.O.; Gonçalves, R.B.

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in periodontitis by producing nitric oxide (NO) and antimicrobial peptides, molecules with microbicidal activity via oxygen-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. It is unknown whether variation in the production of antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37, human neutrophil peptides (HNP) 1-3, and NO by neutrophils influences the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. We compared the production of these peptides and NO by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated neutrophils isolated from healthy subjects and from patients with periodontitis. Peripheral blood neutrophils were cultured with or without Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-LPS (Aa-LPS), Porphyromonas gingivalis-LPS (Pg-LPS) and Escherichia coli-LPS (Ec-LPS). qRT-PCR was used to determine quantities of HNP 1-3 and LL-37 mRNA in neutrophils. Amounts of HNP 1-3 and LL-37 proteins in the cell culture supernatants were also determined by ELISA. In addition, NO levels in neutrophil culture supernatants were quantitated by the Griess reaction. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients cultured with Aa-LPS, Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS expressed higher HNP 1-3 mRNA than neutrophils from healthy subjects. LL-37 mRNA expression was higher in neutrophils from patients stimulated with Aa-LPS. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients produced significantly higher LL-37 protein levels than neutrophils from healthy subjects when stimulated with Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS, but no difference was observed in HNP 1-3 production. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients cultured or not with Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS produced significantly lower NO levels than neutrophils from healthy subjects. The significant differences in the production of LL-37 and NO between neutrophils from healthy and periodontitis subjects indicate that production of these molecules might influence individual susceptibility to important periodontal pathogens. PMID:22850872

  20. In Vitro Effect of Porphyromonas gingivalis Methionine Gamma Lyase on Biofilm Composition and Oral Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, Abish S.; Millhouse, Emma; Sherry, Leighann; Aduse-Opoku, Joseph; Culshaw, Shauna; Ramage, Gordon; Bradshaw, David J.; Burnett, Gary R.; Allaker, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    Methanethiol (methyl mercaptan) is an important contributor to oral malodour and periodontal tissue destruction. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and Fusobacterium nucleatum are key oral microbial species that produce methanethiol via methionine gamma lyase (mgl) activity. The aim of this study was to compare an mgl knockout strain of P. gingivalis with its wild type using a 10-species biofilm co-culture model with oral keratinocytes and its effect on biofilm composition and inflammatory cytokine production. A P. gingivalis mgl knockout strain was constructed using insertion mutagenesis from wild type W50 with gas chromatographic head space analysis confirming lack of methanethiol production. 10-species biofilms consisting of Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus intermedius, Fusobacterium nucleatum ssp polymorphum, Fusobacterium nucleatum ssp vincentii, Veillonella dispar, Actinomyces naeslundii, Prevotella intermedia and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans with either the wild type or mutant P. gingivalis were grown on Thermanox cover slips and used to stimulate oral keratinocytes (OKF6-TERT2), under anaerobic conditions for 4 and 24 hours. Biofilms were analysed by quantitative PCR with SYBR Green for changes in microbial ecology. Keratinocyte culture supernatants were analysed using a multiplex bead immunoassay for cytokines. Significant population differences were observed between mutant and wild type biofilms; V. dispar proportions increased (p<0.001), whilst A. naeslundii (p<0.01) and Streptococcus spp. (p<0.05) decreased in mutant biofilms. Keratinocytes produced less IL-8, IL-6 and IL-1α when stimulated with the mutant biofilms compared to wild type. Lack of mgl in P. gingivalis has been shown to affect microbial ecology in vitro, giving rise to a markedly different biofilm composition, with a more pro-inflammatory cytokine response from the keratinocytes observed. A possible role for methanethiol in biofilm formation

  1. Phototoxic effect of blue light on the planktonic and biofilm state of anaerobic periodontal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun-Hwa; Lee, Jae-Kwan; Um, Heung-Sik; Lee, Si-Young; Lee, Min-Ku

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the phototoxic effects of blue light exposure on periodontal pathogens in both planktonic and biofilm cultures. Methods Strains of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, in planktonic or biofilm states, were exposed to visible light at wavelengths of 400.520 nm. A quartz-tungsten-halogen lamp at a power density of 500 mW/cm2 was used for the light source. Each sample was exposed to 15, 30, 60, 90, or 120 seconds of each bacterial strain in the planktonic or biofilm state. Confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) was used to observe the distribution of live/dead bacterial cells in biofilms. After light exposure, the bacterial killing rates were calculated from colony forming unit (CFU) counts. Results CLSM images that were obtained from biofilms showed a mixture of dead and live bacterial cells extending to a depth of 30-45 µm. Obvious differences in the live-to-dead bacterial cell ratio were found in P. gingivalis biofilm according to light exposure time. In the planktonic state, almost all bacteria were killed with 60 seconds of light exposure to F. nucleatum (99.1%) and with 15 seconds to P. gingivalis (100%). In the biofilm state, however, only the CFU of P. gingivalis demonstrated a decreasing tendency with increasing light exposure time, and there was a lower efficacy of phototoxicity to P. gingivalis as biofilm than in the planktonic state. Conclusions Blue light exposure using a dental halogen curing unit is effective in reducing periodontal pathogens in the planktonic state. It is recommended that an adjunctive exogenous photosensitizer be used and that pathogens be exposed to visible light for clinical antimicrobial periodontal therapy. PMID:23678390

  2. The periodontal health of lead-exposed children living in a shipyard industrial area.

    PubMed

    Youravong, Nattaporn; Teanpaisan, Rawee

    2015-05-01

    In a cross-sectional design, 292 schoolchildren living around a shipyard area, known to be contaminated with lead from shipyard industry, were examined to verify the association between lead exposure and periodontal health. The probing pocket depth (PD), bleeding on probing, plaque and calculus, and the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) in subgingival crevices were recorded. Gingival inflammation was the most common (98%) among children in the area. No significant difference in gingival inflammation was observed between high blood lead (PbB) and low PbB children. The prevalence rate of probing PD of ≥5 mm was 14%. The high PbB group showed more deep pockets at tooth 16 (upper right first permanent molar) and tooth 46 (lower right first permanent molar) than the low PbB group. The odds ratios (ORs) for having probing PD ≥5 mm after adjusting for other factors were 3.63 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.24-10.61; p = 0.02) for tooth 16 and 3.93 (95% CI, 1.18-13.00; p = 0.02) for tooth 46. The presence of Aa was observed in 17% of the children and it significantly increased in high PbB compared with low PbB children at tooth 46 (OR = 5.53, 95% CI: 1.68-18.15; p = 0.005). This study may suggest no association between lead exposure and gingival inflammation, yet there was the involvement of deeper periodontal tissue in lead-exposed children.

  3. Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on chronic periodontitis by the change of microecology and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhekai; Zhang, Yu; Li, Zhiyu; Yu, Yuedi; Kang, Wenyan; Han, Yingnan; Geng, Xiwen; Ge, Shaohua; Sun, Yundong

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a pathogen inducing peptic disease, is recently found to be binding to the progress of periodontitis. Most previous studies are case-controlled, and they investigate the risk of H. pylori infection in disease the development of while few studies evaluate the correlation between H. pylori and periodontal pathogens. Therefore, we investigated the correlation between H. pylori infection with periodontal parameters, periodontal pathogens and inflammation. The results indicated that patients with H. pylori showed significantly higher probing depth and attachment loss than those without (p < 0.05). Among 28 subgingival plaque samples from 14 patients, the frequencies of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Treponema denticola were significantly higher with H. pylori infection than those without H. pylori infection (p < 0.05). However, the frequency of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans was lower (p < 0.05). Furthermore, after human acute monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1) was stimulated with cagA-positive standard strains (cagA+ H. pylori 26695), the expression of periodontitis-related molecules Wnt5a, interleukin 8 (IL-8), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) significantly increased (p < 0.05). Conversely, the expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was almost stable. Meanwhile, cagA+ H. pylori promoted significantly higher expression of IL-8 and Wnt5a than isogenic cagA mutants strains (cagA− H. pylori 26695) did. Taken together, our data suggested that H. pylori might promote the growth of some periodontal pathogens and aggravate the progress of chronic periodontitis. PMID:27602578

  4. Subgingival bacterial colonization profiles correlate with gingival tissue gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by the microbiota of the periodontal pocket. We investigated the association between subgingival bacterial profiles and gene expression patterns in gingival tissues of patients with periodontitis. A total of 120 patients undergoing periodontal surgery contributed with a minimum of two interproximal gingival papillae (range 2-4) from a maxillary posterior region. Prior to tissue harvesting, subgingival plaque samples were collected from the mesial and distal aspects of each tissue sample. Gingival tissue RNA was extracted, reverse-transcribed, labeled, and hybridized with whole-genome microarrays (310 in total). Plaque samples were analyzed using checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridizations with respect to 11 bacterial species. Random effects linear regression models considered bacterial levels as exposure and expression profiles as outcome variables. Gene Ontology analyses summarized the expression patterns into biologically relevant categories. Results Wide inter-species variation was noted in the number of differentially expressed gingival tissue genes according to subgingival bacterial levels: Using a Bonferroni correction (p < 9.15 × 10-7), 9,392 probe sets were differentially associated with levels of Tannerella forsythia, 8,537 with Porphyromonas gingivalis, 6,460 with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, 506 with Eikenella corrodens and only 8 with Actinomyces naeslundii. Cluster analysis identified commonalities and differences among tissue gene expression patterns differentially regulated according to bacterial levels. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the microbial content of the periodontal pocket is a determinant of gene expression in the gingival tissues and provide new insights into the differential ability of periodontal species to elicit a local host response. PMID:19835625

  5. A Five-Species Transcriptome Array for Oral Mixed-Biofilm Studies

    PubMed Central

    Podbielski, Andreas; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    Background Oral polymicrobial interactions and biofilm formation are associated with initiation and progression of caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis. Transcriptome studies of such interactions, allowing a first mechanistic insight, are hampered by current single-species array designs. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we used 385 K NimbleGene™ technology for design and evaluation of an array covering the full genomes of 5 important physiological-, cariogenic-, and periodontitis-associated microorganisms (Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus mutans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and Porphyromonas gingivalis). Array hybridization was done with cDNA from cultures grown for 24 h anaerobically. Single species experiments identified cross-species hybridizing array probes. These probes could be neglected in a mixed-species experimental setting without the need to exclude the whole genes from the analysis. Between 69% and almost 99% of the genomes were actively transcribed under the mono-species planktonic, monolayer, and biofilm conditions. The influence of Streptococcus mitis (not represented on the array) on S. mutans gene transcription was determined as a test for a dual-species mixed biofilm setup. Phenotypically, under the influence of S. mitis an increase in S. mutans biofilm mass and a decrease in media pH-value were noticed, thereby confirming previously published data. Employing a stringent cut-off (2-fold, p<0.05), 19 S. mutans transcripts were identified with increased abundance, and 11 with decreased abundance compared to a S. mutans mono-species biofilm. Several of these genes have previously been found differentially regulated under general and acid stress, thereby confirming the value of this array. Conclusions/Significance This new array allows transcriptome studies on multi-species oral biofilm interactions. It may become an important asset in future oral biofilm and inhibitor/therapy studies. PMID

  6. Analysis of microbiota associated with peri-implantitis using 16S rRNA gene clone library

    PubMed Central

    Koyanagi, Tatsuro; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Ohkuma, Moriya; Izumi, Yuichi

    2010-01-01

    Background Peri-implantitis (PI) is an inflammatory disease which leads to the destruction of soft and hard tissues around osseointegrated implants. The subgingival microbiota appears to be responsible for peri-implant lesions and although the complexity of the microbiota has been reported in PI, the microbiota responsible for PI has not been identified. Objective The purpose of this study was to identify the microbiota in subjects who have PI, clinically healthy implants, and periodontitis-affected teeth using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis to clarify the microbial differences. Design Three subjects participated in this study. The conditions around the teeth and implants were evaluated based on clinical and radiographic examinations and diseased implants, clinically healthy implants, and periodontally diseased teeth were selected. Subgingival plaque samples were taken from the deepest pockets using sterile paper points. Prevalence and identity of bacteria was analyzed using a 16S rRNA gene clone library technique. Results A total of 112 different species were identified from 335 clones sequenced. Among the 112 species, 51 (46%) were uncultivated phylotypes, of which 22 were novel phylotypes. The numbers of bacterial species identified at the sites of PI, periodontitis, and periodontally healthy implants were 77, 57, and 12, respectively. Microbiota in PI mainly included Gram-negative species and the composition was more diverse when compared to that of the healthy implant and periodontitis. The phyla Chloroflexi, Tenericutes, and Synergistetes were only detected at PI sites, as were Parvimonas micra, Peptostreptococcus stomatis, Pseudoramibacter alactolyticus, and Solobacterium moorei. Low levels of periodontopathic bacteria, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, were seen in peri-implant lesions. Conclusions The biofilm in PI showed a more complex microbiota when compared to periodontitis and periodontally healthy teeth

  7. Evaluation of the Antibacterial Potential of Liquid and Vapor Phase Phenolic Essential Oil Compounds against Oral Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong-Hong; Hsia, Shih-Min; Wu, Chi-Hao; Ko, Shun-Yao; Chen, Michael Yuanchien; Shih, Yin-Hua; Shieh, Tzong-Ming; Chuang, Li-Chuan; Wu, Ching-Yi

    The aim of the present study was to determine the antibacterial activities of the phenolic essential oil (EO) compounds hinokitiol, carvacrol, thymol, and menthol against oral pathogens. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Streptococcus mutans, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and Escherichia. coli were used in this study. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs), minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs), bacterial growth curves, temperature and pH stabilities, and synergistic effects of the liquid and vapor EO compounds were tested. The MIC/MBC of the EO compounds, ranging from the strongest to weakest, were hinokitiol (40-60 μg/mL/40-100 μg/mL), thymol (100-200 μg/mL/200-400 μg/mL), carvacrol (200-400 μg/mL/200-600 μg/mL), and menthol (500-more than 2500 μg/mL/1000-more than 2500 μg/mL). The antibacterial activities of the four EO phenolic compound based on the agar diffusion test and bacterial growth curves showed that the four EO phenolic compounds were stable under different temperatures for 24 h, but the thymol activity decreased when the temperature was higher than 80°C. The combination of liquid carvacrol with thymol did not show any synergistic effects. The activities of the vaporous carvacrol and thymol were inhibited by the presence of water. Continual violent shaking during culture enhanced the activity of menthol. Both liquid and vaporous hinokitiol were stable at different temperatures and pH conditions. The combination of vaporous hinokitiol with zinc oxide did not show synergistic effects. These results showed that the liquid and vapor phases of hinokitiol have strong anti-oral bacteria abilities. Hinokitiol has the potential to be applied in oral health care products, dental materials, and infection controls to exert antimicrobial activity.

  8. Anaerobic culture to detect periodontal and caries pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Anne C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Anaerobic culture has been critical in our understanding of the oral microbiotas. Highlight Studies in advanced periodontitis in the 1970’s revealed microbial complexes that associated with different clinical presentations. Taxonomy studies identified species newly-observed in periodontitis as Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans, Campylobacter (Wolinella) rectus and other Campylobacter species, and Tannerella (Bacteroides) forsythia. Anaerobic culture of initial periodontitis showed overlap in the microbiota with gingivitis, and added Selenomonas noxia and Filifactor alocis as putative periodontal pathogens. Porphyromonas gingivalis and T. forsythia were found to be associated with initial periodontitis in adults. The dominant microbiota of dental caries differs from that of periodontitis. The major cariogenic species are acidogenic and acid tolerant species particularly Streptococcus mutans, and Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species. Anaerobic culture of severe early childhood caries revealed a widely diverse microbiota, comparable to that observed using cloning and sequencing. The PCR-based cloning approach, however, underestimated Actinobacteria compared with culture. Only a subset of the caries-associated microbiota was acid tolerant, with different segments of the microbiota cultured on blood agar compared to a low pH acid agar. While the major caries-associated species was S. mutans, a new species, Scardovia wiggsiae, was significantly associated with early childhood caries. Higher counts of S. wiggsiae were also observed in initial white spot carious lesions in adolescents. Conclusion In periodontitis and dental caries, anaerobic culture studies of advanced disease provided a comprehensive analysis of the microbiota of these infections. Anaerobic culture highlighted the limitation of PCR with standard primers that underestimate detection of Actinobacteria. PMID:25678835

  9. Frequency of periodontal pathogens and Helicobacter pylori in the mouths and stomachs of obese individuals submitted to bariatric surgery: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    PATARO, André Luiz; CORTELLI, Sheila Cavalca; ABREU, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães; CORTELLI, José Roberto; FRANCO, Gilson Cesar Nobre; AQUINO, Davi Romeiro; COTA, Luis Otavio Miranda; COSTA, Fernando Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives This cross-sectional study compared the frequency of oral periodontopathogens and H. pylori in the mouths and stomachs of obese individuals with or without periodontitis submitted to bariatric surgery. Material and Methods One hundred and fifty-four men and women aged 18-65 were conveniently distributed into four groups. Two groups were composed of individuals who underwent bariatric surgery with (BP) (n=40) and without (BNP) (n=39) periodontitis and two obese control groups with (CP) (n=35) and without (CNP) (n=40) periodontitis. The oral pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Parvimonas micra, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, Campylobacter rectus, and Helicobacter pylori were detected by a polymerase chain reaction technique using saliva, tongue and stomach biopsy samples. Results Statistical analysis demonstrated that periodontopathogens were highly frequent in the mouth (up to 91.4%). In the bariatric surgically treated group, orally, P. gingivalis, T. denticola and T. forsythia were more frequent in periodontitis, while C. rectus was more frequent in non-periodontitis subjects. Stomach biopsies also revealed the high frequency of five oral species in both candidates for bariatric surgery (91.6%) and the bariatric (83.3%) groups. H. pylori was frequently detected in the mouth (50.0%) and stomach (83.3%). In the stomach, oral species and H. pylori appeared in lower frequency in the bariatric group. Conclusions Obese individuals showed high frequencies of periodontopathogens and H. pylori in their mouths and stomachs. Bariatric surgery showed an inverse microbial effect on oral and stomach environments by revealing higher oral and lower stomach bacterial frequencies. PMID:27383704

  10. Host response mechanisms in periodontal diseases

    PubMed Central

    SILVA, Nora; ABUSLEME, Loreto; BRAVO, Denisse; DUTZAN, Nicolás; GARCIA-SESNICH, Jocelyn; VERNAL, Rolando; HERNÁNDEZ, Marcela; GAMONAL, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal diseases usually refer to common inflammatory disorders known as gingivitis and periodontitis, which are caused by a pathogenic microbiota in the subgingival biofilm, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola that trigger innate, inflammatory, and adaptive immune responses. These processes result in the destruction of the tissues surrounding and supporting the teeth, and eventually in tissue, bone and finally, tooth loss. The innate immune response constitutes a homeostatic system, which is the first line of defense, and is able to recognize invading microorganisms as non-self, triggering immune responses to eliminate them. In addition to the innate immunity, adaptive immunity cells and characteristic cytokines have been described as important players in the periodontal disease pathogenesis scenario, with a special attention to CD4+ T-cells (T-helper cells). Interestingly, the T cell-mediated adaptive immunity development is highly dependent on innate immunity-associated antigen presenting cells, which after antigen capture undergo into a maturation process and migrate towards the lymph nodes, where they produce distinct patterns of cytokines that will contribute to the subsequent polarization and activation of specific T CD4+ lymphocytes. Skeletal homeostasis depends on a dynamic balance between the activities of the bone-forming osteoblasts (OBLs) and bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCLs). This balance is tightly controlled by various regulatory systems, such as the endocrine system, and is influenced by the immune system, an osteoimmunological regulation depending on lymphocyte- and macrophage-derived cytokines. All these cytokines and inflammatory mediators are capable of acting alone or in concert, to stimulate periodontal breakdown and collagen destruction via tissue-derived matrix metalloproteinases, a characterization of the progression of periodontitis as a stage that

  11. Evaluation of the Antibacterial Potential of Liquid and Vapor Phase Phenolic Essential Oil Compounds against Oral Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chi-Hao; Ko, Shun-Yao; Chen, Michael Yuanchien; Shih, Yin-Hua; Shieh, Tzong-Ming; Chuang, Li-Chuan; Wu, Ching-Yi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the antibacterial activities of the phenolic essential oil (EO) compounds hinokitiol, carvacrol, thymol, and menthol against oral pathogens. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Streptococcus mutans, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and Escherichia. coli were used in this study. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs), minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs), bacterial growth curves, temperature and pH stabilities, and synergistic effects of the liquid and vapor EO compounds were tested. The MIC/MBC of the EO compounds, ranging from the strongest to weakest, were hinokitiol (40–60 μg/mL/40-100 μg/mL), thymol (100–200 μg/mL/200-400 μg/mL), carvacrol (200–400 μg/mL/200-600 μg/mL), and menthol (500-more than 2500 μg/mL/1000-more than 2500 μg/mL). The antibacterial activities of the four EO phenolic compound based on the agar diffusion test and bacterial growth curves showed that the four EO phenolic compounds were stable under different temperatures for 24 h, but the thymol activity decreased when the temperature was higher than 80°C. The combination of liquid carvacrol with thymol did not show any synergistic effects. The activities of the vaporous carvacrol and thymol were inhibited by the presence of water. Continual violent shaking during culture enhanced the activity of menthol. Both liquid and vaporous hinokitiol were stable at different temperatures and pH conditions. The combination of vaporous hinokitiol with zinc oxide did not show synergistic effects. These results showed that the liquid and vapor phases of hinokitiol have strong anti-oral bacteria abilities. Hinokitiol has the potential to be applied in oral health care products, dental materials, and infection controls to exert antimicrobial activity. PMID:27681039

  12. Reaction of Human Sera from Juvenile Periodontitis, Rapidly Progressive Periodontitis, and Adult Periodontitis Patients with Selected Periodontopathogens,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-13

    Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Y-4) serving as antigens. Increased i ii ~. DD I 1473 EDITION OF I NOV 6 , IS OBSOLETE...Bacteroides ging1valis, Capnocytophaga (Bacteroides) ochraceus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Y-4) serving as...thio-dependent collagenolytic activity has been identified in the culture filtrate of B. gingivalis. 3’ Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) has

  13. Fusobacterium necrophorum in North American Bighorn Sheep ( Ovis canadensis ) Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Narayanan, Sanjeevkumar; Batra, Sai Arun; Jegarubee, Bavananthasivam; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2016-07-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum has been detected in pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis ) lungs, in addition to the aerobic respiratory pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica , Bibersteinia trehalosi , Pasteurella multocida , and Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae . Similar to M. haemolytica , F. necrophorum produces a leukotoxin. Leukotoxin-induced lysis and degranulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and macrophages are responsible for acute inflammation and lung tissue damage characteristic of M. haemolytica -caused pneumonia. As one approach in elucidating the role of F. necrophorum in BHS pneumonia, we determined the frequency of the presence of F. necrophorum in archived pneumonic BHS lung tissues, and susceptibility of BHS leukocytes to F. necrophorum leukotoxin. A species-specific PCR assay detected F. necrophorum in 37% of pneumonic BHS lung tissues (total tested n=70). Sequences of PCR amplicons were similar to the less virulent F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme. Fusobacterium necrophorum leukotoxin exhibited cytotoxicity to BHS PMNs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. As with the M. haemolytica leukotoxin, F. necrophorum leukotoxin was more toxic to BHS PMNs than domestic sheep PMNs. It is likely that F. necrophorum enters the lungs after M. haemolytica and other aerobic respiratory pathogens enter the lungs and initiate tissue damage, thereby creating a microenvironment that is conducive for anaerobic bacterial growth. In summary, Fusobacterium leukotoxin is highly toxic for BHS leukocytes; however, based on the PCR findings, it is unlikely to play a direct role in the development of BHS pneumonia.

  14. Comparative Evaluation of Antimicrobial Activity of Pomegranate-Containing Mouthwash Against Oral-Biofilm Forming Organisms: An Invitro Microbial Study

    PubMed Central

    Dabholkar, Charuta Sadanand; Shah, Mona; Bajaj, Monika; Doshi, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pomegranate is considered “A pharmacy unto itself”. Hydrolysable tannins called punicalagins which have free scavenging properties are the most abundant polyphenols found in pomegranate-containing mouthwash. Aim To evaluate antimicrobial effect of pomegranate- containing mouthwash on oral biofilm-forming bacteria. Materials and Methods The mouthwashes used were divided into three groups- Group A: Chlorhexidine mouthwash (Hexidine); Group B: Herbal Mouthwash (Hiora) and Group C: Pomegranate-containing Mouthwash (Life-extension). Each mouthwash was diluted to five different concentrations. Reference strains of Streptococcus mutans (S.mutans) (ATCC 25175), Streptococcus salivarius (S.salivarius) (ATCC 7073), and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A.a) (NCTC 9710) were selected as being colonizers in dental biofilm formation. On each culture plate, five wells of 5mm were prepared and mouthwashes with different concentrations were added, followed by incubation in a CO2 jar for 24 hours at 37°C. Inhibition zone diameters were measured using a digital caliper. Results Chlorhexidine (0.12%) presented a zone of inhibition between 38.46% to 96.15% for all the three organisms, while Hiora presented zone of inhibition ranging from 33.33% to 69.23% but was resistant at <10 ml of dilution. Pomegranate mouthwash presented a zone of inhibition ranging from 38.48 to 57.69%, but was resistant at <10ml for S.mutans, and <25ml for A.a and S.salivarius. ANOVA test was done to compare the dilution of mouthwashes for a particular organism and Tukey’s multiple comparison tests were done to find the exact difference. A significant difference was seen between all the three groups at 50ml and 75 ml of dilution. At 75 ml concentration, a statistical difference was found between Groups B & C and Groups A & B; and at 50 ml between Groups A&C. Conclusion All the three types of mouthwash exhibit anti-microbial activity against biofilm forming organisms but at varying

  15. Evaluation of moxifloxacin-hydroxyapatite composite graft in the regeneration of intrabony defects: A clinical, radiographic, and microbiological study

    PubMed Central

    Nagarjuna Reddy, Y. V.; Deepika, P. C.; Venkatesh, M. P.; Rajeshwari, K. G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The formation of new connective periodontal attachment is contingent upon the elimination or marked reduction of pathogens at the treated periodontal site. An anti-microbial agent, i.e. moxifloxacin has been incorporated into the bone graft to control infection and facilitate healing during and after periodontal therapy. Materials and Methods: By purposive sampling, 15 patients with at least two contralateral vertical defect sites were selected. The selected sites in each individual were divided randomly into test and control sites according to split-mouth design. Test site received moxifloxacin-hydroxyapatite composite graft and control site received hydroxyapatite-placebo gel composite graft. Probing depth (PD) and Clinical attachment level (CAL) were assessed at baseline, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Bone probing depth (BPD) and hard tissue parameters such as amount of defect fill, percentage of defect fill, and changes in alveolar crest were assessed at baseline, 6, and 12 months. Changes in subgingival microflora were also assessed by culturing the subgingival plaque samples at baseline and at 3-month follow-up. The clinical, radiographic, and microbiological data obtained were subjected to statistical analysis using descriptive statistics, paired sample t-test, independent t-test, and contingency test. Results: On intragroup comparison at test and control sites, there was a significant improvement in all clinical and radiographic parameters. However, on intergroup comparison of the same, there was no statistically significant difference between test and control sites at any interval. Although test sites showed slightly higher amount of bone fill, it was not statistically significant. There was a significant reduction in the counts of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis at both sites from baseline to 3 months. In addition, there was a significant reduction at test sites as compared to control sites at 3-month follow-up (P

  16. Photoinactivation Using Visible Light Plus Water-Filtered Infrared-A (vis+wIRA) and Chlorine e6 (Ce6) Eradicates Planktonic Periodontal Pathogens and Subgingival Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ahmad, Ali; Walankiewicz, Aleksander; Hellwig, Elmar; Follo, Marie; Tennert, Christian; Wittmer, Annette; Karygianni, Lamprini

    2016-01-01

    Alternative treatment methods for pathogens and microbial biofilms are required due to the widespread rise in antibiotic resistance. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) has recently gained attention as a novel method to eradicate pathogens. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of a novel aPDT method using visible light (vis) and water infiltrated infrared A (wIRA) in combination with chlorine e6 (Ce6) against different periodontal pathogens in planktonic form and within in situ subgingival oral biofilms. Eight different periodontal pathogens were exposed to aPDT using vis+wIRA and 100 μg/ml Ce6 in planktonic culture. Additionally, pooled subgingival dental biofilm was also treated by aPDT and the number of viable cells determined as colony forming units (CFU). Live/dead staining was used in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy to visualize and quantify antimicrobial effects within the biofilm samples. Untreated negative controls as well as 0.2% chlorhexidine-treated positive controls were used. All eight tested periodontal pathogens including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Eikenella corrodens, Actinomyces odontolyticus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micra, Slackia exigua, and Atopobium rimae and the aPDT-treated subgingival biofilm were eliminated over the ranges of 3.43–8.34 and 3.91–4.28 log10 CFU in the log10 scale, respectively. Thus, aPDT showed bactericidal effects on the representative pathogens as well as on the in situ subgingival biofilm. The live/dead staining also revealed a significant reduction (33.45%) of active cells within the aPDT-treated subgingival biofilm. Taking the favorable tissue healing effects of vis+wIRA into consideration, the significant antimicrobial effects revealed in this study highlight the potential of aPDT using this light source in combination with Ce6 as an adjunctive method to treat periodontitis as well as periimplantitis. The

  17. Photoinactivation Using Visible Light Plus Water-Filtered Infrared-A (vis+wIRA) and Chlorine e6 (Ce6) Eradicates Planktonic Periodontal Pathogens and Subgingival Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Al-Ahmad, Ali; Walankiewicz, Aleksander; Hellwig, Elmar; Follo, Marie; Tennert, Christian; Wittmer, Annette; Karygianni, Lamprini

    2016-01-01

    Alternative treatment methods for pathogens and microbial biofilms are required due to the widespread rise in antibiotic resistance. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) has recently gained attention as a novel method to eradicate pathogens. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of a novel aPDT method using visible light (vis) and water infiltrated infrared A (wIRA) in combination with chlorine e6 (Ce6) against different periodontal pathogens in planktonic form and within in situ subgingival oral biofilms. Eight different periodontal pathogens were exposed to aPDT using vis+wIRA and 100 μg/ml Ce6 in planktonic culture. Additionally, pooled subgingival dental biofilm was also treated by aPDT and the number of viable cells determined as colony forming units (CFU). Live/dead staining was used in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy to visualize and quantify antimicrobial effects within the biofilm samples. Untreated negative controls as well as 0.2% chlorhexidine-treated positive controls were used. All eight tested periodontal pathogens including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Eikenella corrodens, Actinomyces odontolyticus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micra, Slackia exigua, and Atopobium rimae and the aPDT-treated subgingival biofilm were eliminated over the ranges of 3.43-8.34 and 3.91-4.28 log10 CFU in the log10 scale, respectively. Thus, aPDT showed bactericidal effects on the representative pathogens as well as on the in situ subgingival biofilm. The live/dead staining also revealed a significant reduction (33.45%) of active cells within the aPDT-treated subgingival biofilm. Taking the favorable tissue healing effects of vis+wIRA into consideration, the significant antimicrobial effects revealed in this study highlight the potential of aPDT using this light source in combination with Ce6 as an adjunctive method to treat periodontitis as well as periimplantitis. The present

  18. Comparison of passively transferred antibodies in bighorn and domestic lambs reveals one factor in differential susceptibility of these species to Mannheimia haemolytica-induced pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Caroline N; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Knowles, Donald P; Call, Douglas R; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2011-07-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica consistently causes fatal bronchopneumonia in bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis) under natural and experimental conditions. Leukotoxin is the primary virulence factor of this organism. BHS are more susceptible to developing fatal pneumonia than the related species Ovis aries (domestic sheep [DS]). In BHS herds affected by pneumonia, lamb recruitment is severely impaired for years subsequent to an outbreak. We hypothesized that a lack of maternally derived antibodies (Abs) against M. haemolytica provides an immunologic basis for enhanced susceptibility of BH lambs to population-limiting pneumonia. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the titers of Abs directed against M. haemolytica in the sera of BH and domestic lambs at birth through 12 weeks of age. Results revealed that BH lambs had approximately 18-fold lower titers of Ab against surface antigens of M. haemolytica and approximately 20-fold lower titers of leukotoxin-neutralizing Abs than domestic lambs. The titers of leukotoxin-neutralizing Abs in the serum and colostrum samples of BH ewes were approximately 157- and 50-fold lower than those for domestic ewes, respectively. Comparatively, the higher titers of parainfluenza 3 virus-neutralizing Abs in the BH lambs ruled out the possibility that these BHS had an impaired ability to passively transfer Abs to their lambs. These results suggest that lower levels of leukotoxin-neutralizing Abs in the sera of BH ewes, and resultant low Ab titers in their lambs, may be a critical factor in the poor lamb recruitment in herds affected by pneumonia.

  19. Mucosal and parenteral vaccination against pneumonic pasteurellosis in cattle with a modified-live in-frame lktA deletion mutant of Mannheimia haemolytica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new temperature-conditional shuttle vector, pBB80C, was constructed and utilized to generate an in-frame deletion in the leukotoxin structural gene of Mannheimia haemolytica serotype 1. Culture supernatants from the mutant contained no detectable cytotoxicity to BL-3 lymphocyte targets, and contai...

  20. MHC class II DR allelic diversity in bighorn sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that decreased diversity and/or unique polymorphisms in MHC class II alleles of bighorn sheep (BHS, Ovis canadensis) are responsible for lower titer of antibodies against Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin, in comparison to domestic sheep (DS, Ovis aries). To test this hypothesis, DRA...

  1. Characterization of Fusobacterium necrophorum isolated from llama and alpaca.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Anderson, David; Amachawadi, Raghavendra G; Nagaraja, Tiruvoor G; Narayanan, Sanjeev K

    2013-07-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum, a Gram-negative, anaerobic bacterium, is an opportunistic animal and human pathogen that causes a variety of infections termed necrobacillosis. There are 2 subspecies of F. necrophorum (subsp. necrophorum and subsp. funduliforme) that differ morphologically and biochemically and in virulence. Leukotoxin, a secreted protein, is considered to be the major virulence factor. In camelids, F. necrophorum causes a variety of infections, generally involving the lips, tongue, pharynx, interdigital spaces, foot pad, larynx, mandible, or maxillary bones. The objective of the current study was to characterize the presumptive Fusobacterium isolates from a variety of necrotic infections in llama (Lama glama) and alpaca (Vicugna pacos) and determine whether the strains possess leukotoxin activities. A total of 7 isolates from alpaca and 2 isolates from llama were characterized. Based on growth characteristics in broth culture, and biochemical and polymerase chain reaction analyses, all 9 isolates belonged to subsp. necrophorum and possessed the putative hemagglutinin gene. Western blot analysis with antileukotoxin antibodies raised in rabbit showed the presence of leukotoxin protein in the culture supernatant of all isolates. Furthermore, flow cytometry of the culture supernatants demonstrated cytotoxicity to bovine and alpaca polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). The extent of cytotoxicity to either alpaca or bovine PMNs differed among camelid strains. The cytotoxicity of many of the camelid strains was higher (P < 0.05) toward alpaca PMNs compared to bovine PMNs. Fusobacterium necrophorum isolates from llama and alpaca are similar to bovine isolates, and leukotoxin may be a major virulence factor.

  2. Differentiation among closely related organisms of the Actinobacillus-Haemophilus-Pasteurella group by means of lysozyme and EDTA.

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, I; Brondz, I

    1985-01-01

    Bacteriolysis in Tris-maleate buffer (0.005 M, pH 7.2) supplemented with EDTA (0.01 M) and hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL, 1.0 microgram/ml) was set up to assist differentiation between the taxonomically closely related Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Haemophilus aphrophilus. A. actinomycetemcomitans was more sensitive to lysis in this system than H. aphrophilus. The standard method for bacteriolysis separated the 10 tested strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans into two groups (I and II) based on their lysis patterns, whereas the 7 strains of H. aphrophilus examined were homogeneous. In group I of A. actinomycetemcomitans, EDTA displayed a considerable lytic effect, which was not increased by supplementation with HEWL. In group II, the lytic effect of EDTA was much less, but HEWL had a considerable supplementary lytic effect. When the turbidity of A. actinomycetemcomitans (ATCC 29522) or H. aphrophilus (ATCC 33389) suspended in Tris buffer was monitored at close pH intervals (0.2) from pH 5.2 to 9.2, maximal lysis of ATCC 29522 occurred with EDTA at pH 8.0 and with EDTA-HEWL at pH 7.6, while ATCC 33389 lysed with EDTA at pH 9.0 and with EDTA-HEWL at pH 9.2. When other members of the family Pasteurellaceae (Haemophilus influenzae type b, Haemophilus paraphrophilus, Pasteurella multocida, Pasteurella haemolytica, and Pasteurella ureae) were included for comparison, the group I strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans were the most rapidly lysed by EDTA. H. paraphrophilus was the least sensitive of the gram-negative strains tested, but not as resistant as Micrococcus luteus (control). M. luteus was the organism most sensitive to lysozyme, followed by P. ureae and the group II strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans, while the group I strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans, H. paraphrophilus, and P. haemolytica were the least sensitive organisms. Images PMID:3935663

  3. Potent Urea and Carbamate Inhibitors of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisseau, Christophe; Goodrow, Marvin H.; Dowdy, Deanna; Zheng, Jiang; Greene, Jessica F.; Sanborn, James R.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    1999-08-01

    The soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) plays a significant role in the biosynthesis of inflammation mediators as well as xenobiotic transformations. Herein, we report the discovery of substituted ureas and carbamates as potent inhibitors of sEH. Some of these selective, competitive tightbinding inhibitors with nanomolar Ki values interacted stoichiometrically with the homogenous recombinant murine and human sEHs. These inhibitors enhance cytotoxicity of trans-stilbene oxide, which is active as the epoxide, but reduce cytotoxicity of leukotoxin, which is activated by epoxide hydrolase to its toxic diol. They also reduce toxicity of leukotoxin in vivo in mice and prevent symptoms suggestive of acute respiratory distress syndrome. These potent inhibitors may be valuable tools for testing hypotheses of involvement of diol and epoxide lipids in chemical mediation in vitro or in vivo systems.

  4. Role of Bibersteinia trehalosi, respiratory syncytial virus, and parainfluenza-3 virus in bighorn sheep pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Dassanayake, Rohana P; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Subramaniam, Renuka; Herndon, Caroline N; Bavananthasivam, Jegarubee; Haldorson, Gary J; Foreyt, William J; Evermann, James F; Herrmann-Hoesing, Lynn M; Knowles, Donald P; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2013-02-22

    Pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS) have been found to be culture- and/or sero-positive for Bibersteinia trehalosi, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and parainfluenza-3 virus (PI-3). The objective of this study was to determine whether these pathogens can cause fatal pneumonia in BHS. In the first study, two groups of four BHS each were intra-tracheally administered with leukotoxin-positive (Group I) or leukotoxin-negative (Group II) B. trehalosi. All four animals in Group I developed severe pneumonia, and two of them died within 3 days. The other two animals showed severe pneumonic lesions on euthanasia and necropsy. Animals in Group II neither died nor showed gross pneumonic lesions on necropsy, suggesting that leukotoxin-positive, but not leukotoxin-negative, B. trehalosi can cause fatal pneumonia in BHS. In the second study, two other groups of four BHS (Groups III and IV) were intra-nasally administered with a mixture of RSV and PI-3. Four days later, RSV/PI-3-inoculated Group IV and another group of four BHS (Group V, positive control) were intra-nasally administered with Mannheimia haemolytica, the pathogen that consistently causes fatal pneumonia in BHS. All four animals in group III developed pneumonia, but did not die during the study period. However all four animals in Group IV, and three animals in Group V developed severe pneumonia and died within two days of M. haemolytica inoculation. The fourth animal in Group V showed severe pneumonic lesions on euthanasia and necropsy. These findings suggest that RSV/PI-3 can cause non-fatal pneumonia, but are not necessary predisposing agents for M. haemolytica-caused pneumonia of BHS.

  5. Role of carriers in the transmission of pneumonia in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis)

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Bindu; Erickson, Kayla; Kugadas, Abirami; Batra, Sai A.; Call, Douglas R.; Davis, Margaret A.; Foreyt, William J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the absence of livestock contact, recurring lamb mortality in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) populations previously exposed to pneumonia indicates the likely presence of carriers of pneumonia-causing pathogens, and possibly inadequate maternally derived immunity. To investigate this problem we commingled naïve, pregnant ewes (n=3) with previously exposed rams (n=2). Post-commingling, all ewes and lambs born to them acquired pneumonia-causing pathogens (leukotoxin-producing Pasteurellaceae and Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae), with subsequent lamb mortality between 4-9 weeks of age. Infected ewes became carriers for two subsequent years and lambs born to them succumbed to pneumonia. In another experiment, we attempted to suppress the carriage of leukotoxin-producing Pasteurellaceae by administering an antibiotic to carrier ewes, and evaluated lamb survival. Lambs born to both treatment and control ewes (n=4 each) acquired pneumonia and died. Antibody titers against leukotoxin-producing Pasteurellaceae in all eight ewes were ‘protective’ (>1:800 and no apparent respiratory disease); however their lambs were either born with comparatively low titers, or with high (but non-protective) titers that declined rapidly within 2-8 weeks of age, rendering them susceptible to fatal disease. Thus, exposure to pneumonia-causing pathogens from carrier ewes, and inadequate titers of maternally derived protective antibodies, are likely to render bighorn lambs susceptible to fatal pneumonia. PMID:27185269

  6. Pasteurella haemolytica antigens associated with resistance to pneumonic pasteurellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, D A; Simons, K R; Confer, A W; Panciera, R J; Clinkenbeard, K D

    1989-01-01

    Antigens associated with whole Pasteurella haemolytica biotype A serotype 1, a capsular carbohydrate-protein extract of the organism, and P. haemolytica leukotoxin were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Antigens of the electrophoresed preparations were detected by Western blotting (immunoblotting) with sera from cattle which were either nonvaccinated or vaccinated with live or killed P. haemolytica vaccines and had variable degrees of resistance to experimental pneumonic pasteurellosis. Distinct, easily recognizable antigens of these preparations were identified, and the antibody responses to these antigens were quantified by densitometry. To determine their importance to disease resistance, we then compared antibody responses with experimental lesion scores. Antibody reactivity to surface antigens which were significantly correlated with resistance and present in two or more of the preparations were detected at 86, 66, 51, 49, 34, 31, and 16 kilodaltons (kDa). Of these, antibody responses to antigens at 86, 49, and 31 kDa appeared most important based on their concentration and significance levels. Antibody reactivity to leukotoxin antigens which were significantly correlated with resistance and common with important surface antigens were detected at 86, 66, and 49 kDa. Antibody responses to unique leukotoxin antigens which were significantly correlated with resistance were present at 92 and 58 kDa. Images PMID:2917783

  7. G(-) anaerobes-reactive CD4+ T-cells trigger RANKL-mediated enhanced alveolar bone loss in diabetic NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Mahamed, Deeqa A; Marleau, Annette; Alnaeeli, Mawadda; Singh, Bhagirath; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Penninger, Joseph M; Teng, Yen-Tung A

    2005-05-01

    Diabetic patients experience a higher risk for severe periodontitis; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. We investigated the contribution of antibacterial T-cell-mediated immunity to enhanced alveolar bone loss during periodontal infection in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice by oral inoculation with Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, a G(-) anaerobe responsible for juvenile and severe periodontitis. The results show that 1) inoculation with A. actinomycetemcomitans in pre-diabetic NOD mice does not alter the onset, incidence, and severity of diabetes; 2) after A. actinomycetemcomitans inoculation, diabetic NOD mice (blood glucose >200 mg/dl and with severe insulitis) exhibit significantly higher alveolar bone loss compared with pre-diabetic and nondiabetic NOD mice; and 3) A. actinomycetemcomitans-reactive CD4+ T-cells in diabetic mice exhibit significantly higher proliferation and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB ligand (RANKL) expression. When diabetic mice are treated with the RANKL antagonist osteoprotegerin (OPG), there is a significant reversal of alveolar bone loss, as well as reduced RANKL expression in A. actinomycetemcomitans-reactive CD4+ T-cells. This study clearly describes the impact of autoimmunity to anaerobic infection in an experimental periodontitis model of type 1 diabetes. Thus, microorganism-reactive CD4+ T-cells and the RANKL-OPG axis provide the molecular basis of the advanced periodontal breakdown in diabetes and, therefore, OPG may hold therapeutic potential for treating bone loss in diabetic subjects at high risk.

  8. Use of the rapid fermentation test in determining carbohydrate reactions of fastidious bacteria in clinical laboratories.

    PubMed Central

    Hollis, D G; Sottnek, F O; Brown, W J; Weaver, R E

    1980-01-01

    The rapid fermentation test was used to determine the carbohydrate reactions of some of the fastidious bacteria encountered in clinical laboratories, such as: Haemophilus species, including Haemophilus vaginalis; Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans; Cardiobacterium hominis; Kingella species; Corynebacterium species; Propionibacterium species; and Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae. Results were usually obtained within 4 h by using inocula from 24- or 48-h blood or chocolate agar media. PMID:6999028

  9. Persistence of associated gram-negative bacteria in experimental actinomycotic lesions in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, H V; Kelly, D M

    1983-01-01

    Mixed actinomycotic infections were established in a susceptible weanling mouse model by using combinations of Actinomyces israelii and Eikenella corrodens or A. israelii and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Acute lesions caused by either of the gram-negative organisms alone were resolved within a few weeks; however, these organisms persisted up to 3 months in chronic lesions in combination with A. israelii. PMID:6341251

  10. Nucleotide sequence of the hemolysin I gene from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Frey, J; Meier, R; Gygi, D; Nicolet, J

    1991-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the gene encoding the structural protein of hemolysin I (HlyI) of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 strain 4074 was analyzed. The nucleotide sequence shows a 3,072-bp reading frame encoding a protein of 1,023 amino acids with a calculated molecular size of 110.1 kDa. This corresponds to the HlyI protein, which has an apparent molecular size on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels of 105 kDa. The structure of the protein derived from the DNA sequence shows three hydrophobic regions in the N-terminal part of the protein, 13 glycine-rich domains in the second half of the protein, and a hydrophilic C-terminal area, all of which are typical of the cytotoxins of the RTX (repeats in the structural toxin) toxin family. The derived amino acid sequence of HlyI shows 42% homology with the hemolysin of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5, 41% homology with the leukotoxin of Pasteurella haemolytica, and 56% homology with the Escherichia coli alpha-hemolysin. The 13 glycine-rich repeats and three hydrophobic areas of the HlyI sequence show more similarity to the E. coli alpha-hemolysin than to either the A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 hemolysin or the leukotoxin (while the last two are more similar to each other). Two types of RTX hemolysins therefore seem to be present in A. pleuropneumoniae, one (HlyI) resembling the alpha-hemolysin and a second more closely related to the leukotoxin. Ca(2+)-binding experiments using HlyI and recombinant A. pleuropneumoniae prohemolysin (HlyIA) that was produced in E. coli shows that HlyI binds 45Ca2+, probably because of the 13 glycine-rich repeated domains. Activation of the prohemolysin is not required for Ca2+ binding. Images PMID:1879928

  11. Bivalent vaccination against pneumonic pasteurellosis in domestic sheep and goats with modified-live in-frame lktA deletion mutants of Mannheimia haemolytica.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Robert E; Hauglund, Melissa J; Maheswaran, Samuel K; Tatum, Fred M

    2013-11-01

    A temperature-sensitive shuttle vector, pBB80C, was utilized to generate in-frame deletion mutants of the leukotoxin structural gene (lktA) of Mannheimia haemolytica serotypes 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 12. Culture supernatants from the mutants contained a truncated protein with an approximate molecular weight of 66 kDa which was reactive to anti-leukotoxin monoclonal antibody. No protein reactive to anti-LktA monoclonal antibody was detected at the molecular weight 100-105 kDa of native LktA. Sheep and goats vaccinated intramuscularly with a mixture of serotypes 5 and 6 mutants were resistant to virulent challenge with a mixture of the wild-type parent strains. These vaccinates responded serologically to both vaccine serotypes and exhibited markedly-reduced lung lesion volume and pulmonary infectious load compared to control animals. Control animals yielded a mixture of serotypes from lung lobes, but the proportion even within an individual animal varied widely from 95% serotype 5-95% serotype 6. Cultures recovered from liver were homogeneous, but two animals yielded serotype 5 and the other two yielded serotype 6 in pure culture.

  12. Immunization routes in cattle impact the levels and neutralizing capacity of antibodies induced against S. aureus immune evasion proteins.

    PubMed

    Boerhout, Eveline; Vrieling, Manouk; Benedictus, Lindert; Daemen, Ineke; Ravesloot, Lars; Rutten, Victor; Nuijten, Piet; van Strijp, Jos; Koets, Ad; Eisenberg, Susanne

    2015-09-28

    Vaccines against S. aureus bovine mastitis are scarce and show limited protection only. All currently available vaccines are applied via the parenteral (usually intramuscular) route. It is unknown, however, whether this route is the most suitable to specifically increase intramammary immunity to combat S. aureus at the site of infection. Hence, in the present study, immunization via mucosal (intranasal; IN), intramuscular (triangle of the neck; IM), intramammary (IMM) and subcutaneous (suspensory ligament; SC) routes were analyzed for their effects on the quantity of the antibody responses in serum and milk as well as the neutralizing capacity of the antibodies within serum. The experimental vaccine comprised the recombinant S. aureus immune evasion proteins extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb) and the leukotoxin subunit LukM in an oil-in-water adjuvant combined with a hydrogel and alginate. The highest titer increases for both Efb and LukM specific IgG1 and IgG2 antibody levels in serum and milk were observed following SC/SC immunizations. Furthermore, the harmful effects of Efb and leukotoxin LukMF' on host-defense were neutralized by serum antibodies in a route-dependent manner. SC/SC immunization resulted in a significant increase in the neutralizing capacity of serum antibodies towards Efb and LukMF', shown by increased phagocytosis of S. aureus and increased viability of bovine leukocytes. Therefore, a SC immunization route should be considered when aiming to optimize humoral immunity against S. aureus mastitis in cattle.

  13. Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition does not prevent cardiac remodeling and dysfunction after aortic constriction in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Lisa A; Olzinski, Alan R; Upson, John J; Zhao, Shufang; Wang, Tao; Eisennagel, Stephen H; Hoang, Bao; Tunstead, James R; Marino, Joseph P; Willette, Robert N; Jucker, Beat M; Behm, David J

    2013-04-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, substrates for soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), exhibit vasodilatory and antihypertrophic activities. Inhibitors of sEH might therefore hold promise as heart failure therapeutics. We examined the ability of sEH inhibitors GSK2188931 and GSK2256294 to modulate cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and function after transverse aortic constriction (TAC) in rats and mice. GSK2188931 administration was initiated in rats 1 day before TAC, whereas GSK2256294 treatment was initiated in mice 2 weeks after TAC. Four weeks later, cardiovascular function was assessed, plasma was collected for drug and sEH biomarker concentrations, and left ventricle was isolated for messenger RNA and histological analyses. In rats, although GSK2188931 prevented TAC-mediated increases in certain genes associated with hypertrophy and fibrosis (α-skeletal actin and connective tissue growth factor), the compound failed to attenuate TAC-induced increases in left ventricle mass, posterior wall thickness, end-diastolic volume and pressure, and perivascular fibrosis. Similarly, in mice, GSK2256294 did not reverse cardiac remodeling or systolic dysfunction induced by TAC. Both compounds increased the sEH substrate/product (leukotoxin/leukotoxin diol) ratio, indicating sEH inhibition. In summary, sEH inhibition does not prevent cardiac remodeling or dysfunction after TAC. Thus, targeting sEH seems to be insufficient for reducing pressure overload hypertrophy.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of tannin components from Vaccinium vitis-idaea L.

    PubMed

    Ho, K Y; Tsai, C C; Huang, J S; Chen, C P; Lin, T C; Lin, C C

    2001-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species have been implicated as important pathological mediators in many clinical disorders, including periodontal disease. As a possible alternative for the treatment of periodontal disease, the antimicrobial activity of six tannins isolated from Vaccinium vitis-idaea L., with confirmed antioxidant activity, were assayed by the agar dilution method against selected periodontal pathogens, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia. The results showed that epicatechin-(4beta-->8)-epicatechin-(4beta-->8, 2beta-->O-->7)-catechin had strong antimicrobial activity against P. gingivalis and P. intermedia, but not A. actinomycetemcomitans. The other tannins tested did not show antimicrobial activity. We conclude that tannins isolated from V. vitis-idaea L. with antimicrobial activity could potentially be used for the treatment of periodontal disease.

  15. Cardiobacterium hominis-induced acute dacryocystitis and lacrimal abscess

    PubMed Central

    Manderwad, Guru Prasad; Kodiganti, Manjulatha; Ali, Mohammad Javed

    2014-01-01

    Cardiobacterium hominis is a member of the HACEK (Haemophilus sp., Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, C. hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella kingae) group commonly associated with endocarditits and is normally present in the respiratory tract. We describe the first case of acute dacryocystitis with lacrimal abscess caused by C. hominis along with a brief review of the literature. The patient responded to oral and topical ciprofloxacin after incision and drainage and awaits dacryocystorhinostomy. PMID:24008805

  16. Activity of human beta-defensin 3 alone or combined with other antimicrobial agents against oral bacteria.

    PubMed

    Maisetta, Giuseppantonio; Batoni, Giovanna; Esin, Semih; Luperini, Filippo; Pardini, Manuela; Bottai, Daria; Florio, Walter; Giuca, Maria Rita; Gabriele, Mario; Campa, Mario

    2003-10-01

    The in vitro activities of human beta-defensin 3 (hBD-3) alone or combined with lysozyme, metronidazole, amoxicillin, and chlorhexidine were investigated with the oral bacteria Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus sobrinus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. hBD-3 showed bactericidal activity against all of the bacterial species tested. The bactericidal effect was enhanced when the peptide was used in combination with the antimicrobial agents mentioned above.

  17. Development of a Rapid Qualitative Assay for Determining Elevated Antibody Levels to Periodontopathic Organisms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Slots, J. (1 983a) Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in human periodontal disease: prevalence in patient groups and distribution of biotypes and...AD-A220 865 SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0181-7 la. REPORT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION Ib...RESTR ’rIVE MARKINGS UNCLASSIFIED NONE 2a. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION AUTHORITY 3. DISTRIBOTION/AVAILABILITY OF REPORT APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; 2b

  18. Antibacterial effect of visible light reactive TiO2/Ag nanocomposite thin film on the orthodontic appliances.

    PubMed

    Yun, Kwidug; Oh, Gyejeong; Vang, Mongsook; Yang, Hongso; Lim, Hyunpil; Koh, Jeongtae; Jeong, Woonjo; Yoon, Dongjoo; Lee, Kyungku; Lee, Kwangmin; Park, Sangwon

    2011-08-01

    This study evaluated the antibacterial effect of a visible light reactive TiO2/Ag nanocomposite thin film on dental orthodontic wire (STS 304 wire). The growth of S. mutans and A. actinomycetemcomitans was suppressed on the specimens coated with TiO2/Ag compared to the uncoated specimens. The antibacterial effect of the TiO2/Ag nanocomposite thin film was improved under visible light irradiation.

  19. In vitro sensitivity of oral, gram-negative, facultative bacteria to the bactericidal activity of human neutrophil defensins.

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaki, K T; Bodeau, A L; Ganz, T; Selsted, M E; Lehrer, R I

    1990-01-01

    Neutrophils play a major role in defending the periodontium against infection by oral, gram-negative, facultative bacteria, such as Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Eikenella corrodens, and Capnocytophaga spp. We examined the sensitivity of these bacteria to a mixture of low-molecular-weight peptides and highly purified individual defensin peptides (HNP-1, HNP-2, and HNP-3) isolated from human neutrophils. Whereas the Capnocytophaga spp. strains were killed significantly by the mixed human neutrophil peptides, the A. actinomycetemcomitans and E. corrodens strains were resistant. Killing was attributable to the defensins. The bactericidal activities of purified defensins HNP-1 and HNP-2 were equal, and both of these activities were greater than HNP-3 activity against strains of Capnocytophaga sputigena and Capnocytophaga gingivalis. The strain of Capnocytophaga ochracea was more sensitive to defensin-mediated bactericidal activity than either C. sputigena or C. gingivalis was. The three human defensins were equipotent in killing C. ochracea. C. ochracea was killed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions and over a broad pH range. Killing was most effective under hypotonic conditions but also occurred at physiologic salt concentrations. We concluded that Capnocytophaga spp. are sensitive to oxygen-independent killing by human defensins. Additional studies will be required to identify other components that may equip human neutrophils to kill A. actinomycetemcomitans, E. corrodens, and other oral gram-negative bacteria. Images PMID:2254020

  20. Antigenic secreted proteins from Haemophilus paragallinarum. A 110-kDa putative RTX protein.

    PubMed

    Mena-Rojas, Erika; Vázquez Cruz, Candelario; Vaca Pacheco, Sergio; García González, Octavio; Pérez-Márquez, Víctor M; Pérez-Méndez, Alma; Ibarra-Caballero, Jorge; de la Garza, Mireya; Zenteno, Edgar; Negrete-Abascal, Erasmo

    2004-03-12

    Haemophilus paragallinarum is the causal agent of infectious coryza, an economically important disease for the poultry industry. This bacterium secreted proteins of 25-110 kDa during its growth in brain heart infusion, tryptic soy broth, or Luria-Bertani glucose phosphate media, all lacking serum. Some of these proteins were recognized by sera from chickens experimentally infected with H. paragallinarum. A 110-kDa protein was recognized by a serum pool from convalescent-phase pigs naturally infected with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, and also by a rabbit polyclonal serum against Apx I as well as a rabbit serum against Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin, suggesting the presence of an RTX-like protein in H. paragallinarum. H. paragallinarum secreted proteins could be important immunogens in the control of infectious coryza.

  1. LKTA and PlpE small fragments fusion protein protect against Mannheimia haemolytica challenge.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Brambila, Carolina; Quintero-Fabián, Saray; González-Castillo, Celia; de Obeso-Fernández del Valle, Álvaro; Flores-Samaniego, Beatriz; de la Mora, Germán; Rojas-Mayorquín, Argelia E; Ortuño-Sahagún, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) complex is a major cause of economic losses for the cattle backgrounding and feedlot industries. Mannheimia haemolytica is considered the most important pathogen associated with this disease. Vaccines against M. haemolytica have been prepared and used for many decades, but traditional bacterins have failed to demonstrate effective protection and their use has often exacerbated disease in vaccinated animals. Thus, the BRD complex continues to exert a strong adverse effect on the health and wellbeing of stocker and feeder cattle. Therefore, generation of recombinant proteins has been helpful in formulating enhanced vaccines against M. haemolytica, which could confer better protection against BRD. In the present study, we formulated a vaccine preparation enriched with recombinant small fragments of leukotoxin A (LKTA) and outer-membrane lipoprotein (PlpE) proteins, and demonstrated its ability to generate high antibody titers in rabbits and sheep, which protected against M. haemolytica bacterial challenge in mice.

  2. Exotoxin gene backgrounds in bloodstream and wound Staphylococcus aureus isolates from geriatric patients attending a long-term care Spanish hospital.

    PubMed

    Argudín, M Ángeles; Mendoza, M Carmen; Vázquez, Fernando; Rodicio, M Rosario

    2011-11-01

    The exotoxin gene content was established for 62 Staphylococcus aureus isolates causing bloodstream (n = 31) and wound (n = 31) infections in geriatric patients attending a long-term care Spanish hospital from 1996 to 2006. Content was determined based on PCR screening of genes encoding five haemolysins, three exfoliatins, three leukotoxins and 21 pyrogenic toxin superantigens (PTSAgs), in addition to markers of genomic (νSaβ) and pathogenicity (SaPIs) islands. Exotoxin genes were abundant in both bloodstream (11-23 genes) and wound (8-19 genes) isolates, and they were arranged in 55 combinations with only two represented in both groups. All isolates were positive for genes encoding haemolysins (hl; 3-5) and PTSAgs (tst, se and sel; 5-14), whereas exfoliatin (et) and leukotoxin (luk) genes appeared in 98.4 and 51.6 % of isolates, respectively. The hlg, lukPV, tst, sec and selu genes were found significantly more frequently in bloodstream than in wound isolates, whereas hlg-variant, sea, seb, see and selk-selq were more frequent in wound isolates (P<0.05). Distinctive exotoxin gene combinations could potentially be associated with specific mobile genetic elements, including genomic islands [lukED, egc1 (seg, seln, sei, selm, selo) and egc2 (seg, seln, selu, sei, selm, selo)]; pathogenicity islands (etd, seb, sec, sell, selq, selk and tst); bacteriophages (eta, lukPV, sea, selp, selk, selq and see); and plasmids (sed, selj, ser, ses and set). The abundance of exotoxin genes and variety of arrangements shown by S. aureus from geriatric patients could play a role in the adaptation of the pathogen.

  3. Bighorn sheep × domestic sheep hybrids survive Mannheimia haemolytica challenge in the absence of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, R; Shanthalingam, S; Bavananthasivam, J; Kugadas, A; Raghavan, B; Batra, S A; Herndon, C N; Rodriguez, J; Tibary, A; Nelson, D; Potter, K A; Foreyt, W J; Srikumaran, S

    2014-06-04

    Bighorn sheep (BHS, Ovis canadensis) are much more susceptible than domestic sheep (DS, Ovis aries) to pneumonia caused by leukotoxin (Lkt)-producing members of the Family Pasteurellaceae, particularly Mannheimia haemolytica and Bibersteinia trehalosi. Leukotoxin is widely accepted as the critical virulence factor of these bacteria since Lkt-negative mutants do not cause death of BHS. Typically, DS carry Lkt-positive M. haemolytica and/or B. trehalosi as commensal bacteria in their nasopharynx. In contrast, most BHS do not carry Lkt-positive M. haemolytica or B. trehalosi, or carry Lkt-negative strains in their nasopharynx. In previous studies, we demonstrated that unimmunized DS resist M. haemolytica challenge while BHS succumb to it. We hypothesized that Lkt-neutralizing antibodies, induced by Lkt-positive M. haemolytica and/or B. trehalosi innately carried by DS in their nasopharynx, render them less susceptible to infection by these bacteria. In this study we developed BHS×DS F1 hybrids by artificial insemination of domestic ewes with BHS semen. F1 hybrids were fertile, and produced F2 hybrids and back-crosses. The F1, F2, and back-crosses were raised together with domestic ewes. All these animals acquired Lkt-positive M. haemolytica and/or B. trehalosi, and developed high titers of Lkt-neutralizing antibodies in the absence of vaccination. Furthermore, all of these animals resisted challenge with lethal dose of M. haemolytica. These results suggest that lack of previous exposure to Lkt is at least partially responsible for fatal pneumonia in BHS when they acquire Lkt-positive M. haemolytica and/or B. trehalosi from DS when the two species commingle.

  4. Comparison of various detection methods for periodontopathic bacteria: can culture be considered the primary reference standard?

    PubMed Central

    Loesche, W J; Lopatin, D E; Stoll, J; van Poperin, N; Hujoel, P P

    1992-01-01

    The development of diagnostic tests for a periodontal infection raises the issue as to what the appropriate reference standard, or "gold standard," should be for the evaluation of a new test. The present research was initiated to compare the ability of several detection methods, i.e., a serial dilution anaerobic culture and/or microscopic procedure, a DNA probe procedure, and immunological reagents using both an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and an indirect immunofluorescence assay to detect Treponema denticola, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bacteroides forsythus, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in subgingival plaque samples taken from 204 periodontally diseased tooth sites. The prevalence of the four monitored species varied as a function of both the species and the detection method. Spirochetes were present in 99% of the plaques, whereas A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected at the lowest frequency. The culture method yielded the lowest prevalence values for the three cultivable species. This raised the question as to which results, those obtained by culture or those obtained by the DNA probes and the immunological reagents, were the most reliable. This issue was addressed by looking at the prevalence profile of the monitored organisms, as determined by all the detection methods. If the species was detected by three or four of the detection methods, then it was considered present, whereas if it was absent by three or four of the detection methods, then it was considered absent. This approach showed the DNA probes and immunological reagents to be significantly superior (P less than 0.05) to the culture approach for the detection of P. gingivalis, A. actinomycetemcomitans, and B. forsythus and to be comparable to the microscopic approach in the detection of T. denticola. PMID:1537912

  5. Subtle bacterial endocarditis due to Kingella kingae in an infant: a case report.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Dany; Henaine, Roland; Di Filippo, Sylvie

    2010-08-01

    A 9-month-old infant presented with fever, dyspnoea, and a murmur. Echocardiography showed a mitral vegetation with significant regurgitation. Mitral valve plasty was performed on day 6, and was polymerase chain reaction positive for Kingella kingae. The cardiac outcome was favourable. This case illustrates a subtle presentation of K. kingae mitral valve infective endocarditis in a normal-cardaic infant, treated with early surgery, and the agent belonged to the HACEK (Haemophilus spp Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Capnocytophaga spp, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella kingae) group.

  6. Anti-microbial Activity of Tulsi {Ocimum Sanctum (Linn.)} Extract on a Periodontal Pathogen in Human Dental Plaque: An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Devaraj, C.G.; Agarwal, Payal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tulsi is a popular healing herb in Ayurvedic medicine. It is widely used in the treatment of several systemic diseases because of its anti-microbial property. However, studies documenting the effect of Tulsi on oral disease causing organisms are rare. Hence, an attempt was made to determine the effect of Tulsi on a periodontal microorganism in human dental plaque. Aim To determine if Ocimum sanctum (Linn.) has an anti-microbial activity (Minimum Inhibitory Concentration and zone of inhibition) against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in human dental plaque and to compare the antimicrobial activity of Ocimum sanctum(Linn.) extract with 0.2% chlorhexidine as the positive control and dimethyl sulfoxide as the negative control. Materials and Methods A lab based invitro experimental study design was adopted. Ethanolic extract of Ocimum sanctum (Linn.) was prepared by the cold extraction method. The extract was diluted with an inert solvent, dimethyl sulfoxide, to obtain ten different concentrations (1%, 2%, 3%, 4%, 5%, 6%, 7%, 8%, 9%, 10%) of extract. Plaque sample was collected from 05 subjects diagnosed with periodontal disease. Isolation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans from plaque samples was done using Tryptic Soy Serum Bacitracin Vancomycin agar (TSBV) medium. Identification of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was done based on cultural, microscopic, biochemical characterization and multiple drug resistance patterns. Anti-microbial activity of Ocimum sanctum (Linn.) extract was tested by agar well-diffusion method against 0.2% chlorhexidine as a positive control and dimethyl sulfoxide as a negative control. The zone of inhibition was measured in millimeters using Vernier callipers. Results At the 6% w/v concentration of Ocimum sanctum (Linn.) extract, a zone of inhibition of 22 mm was obtained. This was the widest zone of inhibition observed among all the 10 different concentrations tested. The zone of inhibition for positive control

  7. In vitro antibacterial activity and cytocompatibility of bismuth doped micro-arc oxidized titanium.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dan-Jae; Tsai, Ming-Tzu; Shieh, Tzong-Ming; Huang, Heng-Li; Hsu, Jui-Ting; Ko, Yi-Chun; Fuh, Lih-Jyh

    2013-01-01

    Chemical manipulations of the implant surface produce a bactericidal feature to prevent infections around dental implants. Despite the successful use of bismuth against mucosal and dermis infections, the antibacterial effect of bismuth in the oral cavity remains under investigation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activities of bismuth compounds against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Staphylococcus mutans, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and to investigate the antimicrobial effects of bismuth doped micro-arc oxidation (MAO) titanium via an agar diffusion test. Cell viability, alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineralization level of MG63 osteoblast-like cells seeded on the coatings were evaluated at 1, 7, and 14 days. The results demonstrate that bismuth nitrate possess superior antibacterial activity when compared with bismuth acetate, bismuth subgallate, and silver nitrate. The bismuth doped MAO coating (contained 6.2 atomic percentage bismuth) had good biological affinities to the MG63 cells and showed a higher antibacterial efficacy against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and MRSA, where the reduction rates of colony numbers is higher than that of the control group by 1.5 and 1.9 times, respectively. These in vitro evaluations demonstrate that titanium implants with bismuth on the surface may be useful for better infection control.

  8. Natural occurrence of black-pigmented Bacteroides species in the gingival crevice of the squirrel monkey.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, W B; Magnusson, I; Abee, C; Collins, B; Beem, J E; McArthur, W P

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the squirrel monkey (Saimiri scuireus) is indigenously colonized with black-pigmented bacteroides (BPB) resembling human Bacteroides gingivalis and Bacteroides intermedius (suspected periodontal pathogens) and to determine the usefulness of the squirrel monkey as an in vivo model for studying colonization by putative pathogens. We assayed the subgingival plaques of 138 monkeys of various ages and in four different colonies for the presence of anaerobic BPB microorganisms. We also tested half the animals for the presence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Clinical indices and levels of serum antibody to B. gingivalis were recorded. We detected BPB in 50% of the animals and A. actinomycetemcomitans in 69% of the animals. The presence of BPB was generally associated with increased age, increased gingival index, presence of calculus, and increased levels of serum antibody. These data indicate that the squirrel monkey may be a good model for studying the parameters of natural infection of the gingival crevice with suspected periodontopathogenic BPB microorganisms. PMID:3410543

  9. Project 1: Microbial Genomes: A Genomic Approach to Understanding the Evolution of Virulence. Project 2: From Genomes to Life: Drosophilia Development in Space and Time

    SciTech Connect

    Robert DeSalle

    2004-09-10

    This project seeks to use the genomes of two close relatives, A. actinomycetemcomitans and H. aphrophilus, to understand the evolutionary changes that take place in a genome to make it more or less virulent. Our primary specific aim of this project was to sequence, annotate, and analyze the genomes of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (CU1000, serotype f) and Haemophilus aphrophilus. With these genome sequences we have then compared the whole genome sequences to each other and to the current Aa (HK1651 www.genome.ou.edu) genome project sequence along with other fully sequenced Pasteurellaceae to determine inter and intra species differences that may account for the differences and similarities in disease. We also propose to create and curate a comprehensive database where sequence information and analysis for the Pasteurellaceae (family that includes the genera Actinobacillus and Haemophilus) are readily accessible. And finally we have proposed to develop phylogenetic techniques that can be used to efficiently and accurately examine the evolution of genomes. Below we report on progress we have made on these major specific aims. Progress on the specific aims is reported below under two major headings--experimental approaches and bioinformatics and systematic biology approaches.

  10. Uptake of photosensitizers by bacteria is influenced by the presence of cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishen, A.; George, S.

    2007-05-01

    This investigation studies the influence of cations on photosensitizer uptake by Enterococcus faecalis (gram positive) and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (gram negative). Methods- The uptake of Methylene blue (MB) and Indocyanine Green (ICG), by bacteria were studied under the influence of divalent cations (CaCl II & MgCl II) and EDTA. Further, E. faecalis cells subjected to trypsinisation and calcium channel blocker (verapamil) were also analysed for MB and ICG uptake inorder to understand the mechanism of photosensitizer uptake. Results- Uptake of ICG was enhanced in the presence of divalent cations in E. faecalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans. Treating cells with EDTA had no significant effect on the photosensitizer uptake, although the highest concentration tested showed an enhancement of uptake. In contrast to ICG, MB showed a decreased uptake by bacterial cells on subjecting them to divalent cations and EDTA. Calcium channel blocker had no significant inhibitory effect on photosensitizers uptake. However, trypsin treatment resulted in significant reduction of ICG uptake. The result suggested that ICG uptake by bacteria is mediated through specific transporter protein while MB is associated with the outer surface structures of bacterial cells.

  11. Antibacterial potential of Manuka honey against three oral bacteria in vitro.

    PubMed

    Schmidlin, PatrickSchmidlin R; English, Helen; Duncan, Warwick; Belibasakis, Georgios N; Thurnheer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Honey is an ancient natural remedy for the treatment of infected wounds. It has regained attention in the medical profession, as it has recently been reported to have a broad-spectrum inhibitory effect against bacteria. Data concerning Manuka honey of New Zealand origin, which is claimed to provide additional non-peroxide antimicrobial activity (so-called standard NPA) against oral pathogens, is still scarce. Therefore, this study aimed to screen for the antibacterial efficacy of different Manuka honey products against S. mutans (OMZ 918), P. gingivalis (OMZ 925) and A. actinomycetemcomitans (OMZ 299). Chlorhexidine and saline served as positive and negative controls, respectively, whereas a Swiss multifloral honey served as control honey without intrinsic non-peroxide activity. Chlorhexidine showed the highest inhibiting potential against all specimens tested. Manuka honey below an NPA value of 15 showed the least bacterial growth-inhibiting potential, even less – although not significantly so – than multifloral Swiss honey. Manuka honey above an NPA value of 15 showed a significantly higher antibacterial effect compared to the other honeys tested. All Manuka honey preparations were more effective in inhibiting the growth of P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans, rather than S. mutans. In conclusion, the study showed an NPA dose-dependent antibacterial efficacy of Manuka honey. Further investigations of this natural product are now open for scrutiny.

  12. Periodontal profile and presence of periodontal pathogens in young African-Americans from Salvador, Ba, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Ligia Valéria; Cortelli, Sheila Cavalca; Aquino, Davi Romeiro; de Carvalho Filho, Jonas; Cortelli, José Roberto

    2008-01-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluated the periodontal status and the presence of periodontopathogens in 132 young, black ethnic subjects who live in Salvador/Bahia-Brazil and have never smoked. Periodontal Probing Depth (PPD), Clinical Attachment Level (CAL), Plaque Index (PI) and Gingival Index (GI) were measured and analyzed by ANOVA and Wilcoxon tests (p<0.05) according to gender and age. The presence of A.actinomycetemcomitans, P.gingivalis, E.corrodens and F.nucleatum was determined by PCR and was analyzed by ANOVA, Wilcoxon, Student-t tests (p<0.05). Mean values of PPD and CAL were 2.18 and 1.0mm, respectively. Clinical parameters did not show differences between subjects of varying gender and age. The microbial prevalence was observed to be 95.45% for E.corrodens followed by F.nucleatum with 68.18%, A.actinomycetemcomitans with 45.45% and P gingivalis with 40.9%. An association between the presence of pathogens and gender and age was not observed (p<0.05). PPD, CAL and PI were not associated with P.gingivalis; however, GI appeared in higher frequencies among subjects without P.gingivalis. In this young, black ethnic, Brazilian population, a high percentage (96.96%) of subjects harbored at least one selected periodontal pathogen, but most subjects showed a healthy periodontal status. Further investigations are required to evaluate the actual influence of the presence of these bacterial species. PMID:24031206

  13. A microbiological study of Papillon-Lefévre syndrome in two patients

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, K; Drucker, D; James, J; Blinkhorn, A; Hamlet, S; Bird, P

    2001-01-01

    Aim—To analyse the microflora of subgingival plaque from patients with Papillon-Lefévre syndrome (PLS), which is a very rare disease characterised by palmar-plantar hyperkeratosis with precocious periodontal destruction. Methods—Bacterial isolates were identified using a combination of commercial identification kits, traditional laboratory tests, and gas liquid chromatography. Some isolates were also subjected to partial 16S rDNA sequencing. Plaque samples were also assayed for the presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in a quantitative enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using monoclonal antibodies. Results—The culture results showed that most isolates were capnophilic and facultatively anaerobic species—mainly Capnocytophaga spp and Streptococcus spp. The latter included S constellatus, S oralis, and S sanguis. Other facultative bacteria belonged to the genera gemella, kingella, leuconostoc, and stomatococcus. The aerobic bacteria isolated were species of neisseria and bacillus. Anaerobic species included Prevotella intermedia, P melaninogenica, and P nigrescens, as well as Peptostreptococcus spp. ELISA detected P gingivalis in one patient in all sites sampled, whereas A actinomycetemcomitans was detected in only one site from the other patient. Prevotella intermedia was present in low numbers. Conclusions—Patients with PLS have a very complex subgingival flora including recognised periodontal pathogens. However, no particular periodontopathogen is invariably associated with PLS. Key Words: Papillon-Lefévre syndrome • periodontopathogens PMID:11328836

  14. Enzymatic degradation of collagen-guided tissue regeneration membranes by periodontal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sela, Michael N; Kohavi, David; Krausz, Emanuela; Steinberg, Doron; Rosen, Graciela

    2003-06-01

    Bacterial infection in the vicinity of guided tissue regeneration barrier membranes was shown to have a negative effect on the clinical outcomes of this increasingly used technique. Several oral and specifically periodontal bacteria were shown to adhere to such membranes in vivo and in vitro with a higher affinity to membranes constructed from collagen. The present study examined the role of periodontal bacteria and their enzymes in the degradation of commercially used collagen membranes. Degradation of two collagen membranes [Biomend (Calcitek, Colla-Tec Inc., Plainsboro, NJ) and Bio-Gide (Geistlich Biomaterials, Wolhousen, Switzerland)] labeled by fluorescein isothiocyanate was examined by measuring soluble fluorescence. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and their enzymes were evaluated. Collagenase from Clostridium hystolyticum was used as a positive control. While whole cells of P. gingivalis were able to degrade both types of membranes, T. denticola could degrade Bio-Gide membranes only and A. actinomycetemcomitans whole cells could degrade none of the membranes. Fractionation of P. gingivalis cells revealed that cell membrane associated proteases were responsible for the degradation of the two collagen membranes. In T. denticola, the purified major phenylalanine protease was found to be responsible for the degradation of Bio-Gide membranes. These results suggest that proteolytic bacterial enzymes may take part in the degradation of collagen barrier membranes used for guided tissue regeneration.

  15. Recovery of periodontopathogenic bacteria from embalmed human cadavers.

    PubMed

    Wood, Nelson; Johnson, Roger B

    2005-01-01

    There is recent interest in recovery of periodontopathogenic bacteria from arterial and bronchial tissues to identify a link between periodontal and cardiovascular or pulmonary diseases. This interest could provide a useful clinical correlation exercise for gross anatomy. Our objective was to perform a feasibility study to determine whether these bacteria could be recovered from two sites within eight (4 dentate, 4 edentulous) human embalmed cadavers from an anatomical dissection laboratory. Bacterial samples were collected from the right coronary artery and the right superior secondary bronchus and assayed for the presence and concentrations of the DNA of A. actinomycetemcomitans, E. corrodens, C. rectus, P. intermedia, P. gingivalis, B. forsythus, T. denticola, and F. nucleatum. Frequencies were compared using a Kruskal-Wallis H-test. Correlations between the presence of teeth, bacterial species, and site were determined by a Spearman's rho correlation test. A. actinomycetemcomitans and B. forsythus frequencies were different between the sites in edentulous subjects (P <0.05); the frequency of B. forsythus was different in dentate and edentulous subjects at the bronchus site (P <0.05). Numerous significant correlations were identified between strains of bacteria, site, and presence of teeth. Thus, it is possible for the DNA of periodontopathogenic bacteria to be recovered from human embalmed cadavers. Collection and identification of these bacteria from these cadavers could be a useful clinical correlation exercise for dental students in a gross anatomy class.

  16. Genetic relatedness of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) isolated from a dog and the dog owner.

    PubMed

    Soedarmanto, I; Kanbar, T; Ülbegi-Mohyla, H; Hijazin, M; Alber, J; Lämmler, C; Akineden, Ö; Weiss, R; Moritz, A; Zschöck, M

    2011-12-01

    In the present study four methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) strains isolated from a dog (n=3) and the anterior nares of the dog owner (n=1) were investigated by conventional and molecular methods. The species identity of the four S. pseudintermedius strains was confirmed by conventional methods, by PCR mediated amplification of S. intermedius/S. pseudintermedius specific segments of thermonuclease encoding gene nuc and by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of phosphoacetyltransferase encoding gene pta. Investigation of the four S. pseudintermedius for toxinogenic potential revealed that all four strains were positive for the exfoliative toxin encoding gene siet and the leukotoxin encoding genes lukS, lukF. The oxacillin and penicillin resistance of the four S. pseudintermedius strains could be determined by cultivation of the strains on oxacillin resistant screening agar base, ChromID MRSA Agar and Brilliance MRSA Agar and by multiplex PCR detecting the resistance genes mecA and blaZ. The genetic relatedness of the strains was studied by macrorestriction analysis of their chromosomal DNA using pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). According to PFGE all four S. pseudintermedius strains represent an identical bacterial clone indicating a cross transmission between the dog and the dog owner.

  17. Metabolomics reveals increased isoleukotoxin diol (12,13-DHOME) in human plasma after acute Intralipid infusion.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Lindsay M; Lawler, Nathan G; Nikolic, Sonja B; Peters, James M; Horne, James; Wilson, Richard; Davies, Noel W; Sharman, James E

    2012-09-01

    Intralipid is a fat emulsion that is regularly infused into humans and animals. Despite its routine use, Intralipid infusion can cause serious adverse reactions, including immunosuppression. Intralipid is a complex mix of proteins, lipids, and other small molecules, and the effect of its infusion on the human plasma metabolome is unknown. We hypothesized that untargeted metabolomics of human plasma after an Intralipid infusion would reveal novel insights into its effects. We infused Intralipid and saline into 10 healthy men in a double-blind, placebo-controlled experiment and used GC/MS, LC/MS, and NMR to profile the small-molecule composition of their plasma before and after infusion. Multivariate statistical analysis of the 40 resulting plasma samples revealed that after Intralipid infusion, a less-well-characterized pathway of linoleic acid metabolism had resulted in the appearance of (9Z)-12,13-dihydroxyoctadec-9-enoic acid (12,13-DHOME, P < 10(-3)), a leukotoxin that has powerful physiological effects and is known to inhibit the neutrophil respiratory burst. Intralipid infusion caused increased plasma 12,13-DHOME. Given that 12,13-DHOME is known to directly affect neutrophil function, we conclude that untargeted metabolomics may have revealed a hitherto-unknown mechanism of intralipid-induced immunosuppression.

  18. Cloning and comparison of bighorn sheep CD18 with that of domestic sheep, goats, cattle, humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weiguo; Brayton, Kelly A; Lagerquist, John; Foreyt, William J; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2006-03-15

    Previously, we have shown that CD18, the beta-subunit of beta(2)-integrins, serves as a receptor for leukotoxin (Lkt) secreted by Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica on bovine leukocytes. Anti-CD18 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) inhibit Lkt-induced cytolysis of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) leukocytes suggesting that CD18 may serve as a receptor for Lkt on the leukocytes of this species as well. Confirmation of bighorn sheep CD18 as a receptor for Lkt, and elucidation of the enhanced Lkt-susceptibility of bighorn sheep polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), necessitates the cloning and sequencing of cDNA encoding bighorn sheep CD18. Hence, in this study we cloned and sequenced the cDNA encoding CD18 of bighorn sheep, and compared with that of other animal species. The cDNA of bighorn sheep CD18 has an open reading frame (ORF) of 2310bp. CD18 sequences obtained individually from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and PMNs were identical to each other. Comparison of the deduced 770-amino acid sequence of CD18 of bighorn sheep with that of domestic sheep, goats, cattle, humans and mice revealed 99, 98, 95, 82 and 80% identity, respectively. Availability of cloned bighorn sheep CD18 cDNA should allow the molecular characterization of M. haemolytica Lkt-receptor interactions in bighorn sheep and other ruminants that are susceptible to this disease.

  19. RTX proteins: a highly diverse family secreted by a common mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Linhartová, Irena; Bumba, Ladislav; Mašín, Jiří; Basler, Marek; Osička, Radim; Kamanová, Jana; Procházková, Kateřina; Adkins, Irena; Hejnová-Holubová, Jana; Sadílková, Lenka; Morová, Jana; Šebo, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Repeats-in-toxin (RTX) exoproteins of Gram-negative bacteria form a steadily growing family of proteins with diverse biological functions. Their common feature is the unique mode of export across the bacterial envelope via the type I secretion system and the characteristic, typically nonapeptide, glycine- and aspartate-rich repeats binding Ca2+ ions. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge on the organization of rtx loci and on the biological and biochemical activities of therein encoded proteins. Applying several types of bioinformatic screens on the steadily growing set of sequenced bacterial genomes, over 1000 RTX family members were detected, with the biological functions of most of them remaining to be characterized. Activities of the so far characterized RTX family members are then discussed and classified according to functional categories, ranging from the historically first characterized pore-forming RTX leukotoxins, through the large multifunctional enzymatic toxins, bacteriocins, nodulation proteins, surface layer proteins, up to secreted hydrolytic enzymes exhibiting metalloprotease or lipase activities of industrial interest. PMID:20528947

  20. Metabolomics reveals increased isoleukotoxin diol (12,13-DHOME) in human plasma after acute Intralipid infusion

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Lindsay M.; Lawler, Nathan G.; Nikolic, Sonja B.; Peters, James M.; Horne, James; Wilson, Richard; Davies, Noel W.; Sharman, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Intralipid is a fat emulsion that is regularly infused into humans and animals. Despite its routine use, Intralipid infusion can cause serious adverse reactions, including immunosuppression. Intralipid is a complex mix of proteins, lipids, and other small molecules, and the effect of its infusion on the human plasma metabolome is unknown. We hypothesized that untargeted metabolomics of human plasma after an Intralipid infusion would reveal novel insights into its effects. We infused Intralipid and saline into 10 healthy men in a double-blind, placebo-controlled experiment and used GC/MS, LC/MS, and NMR to profile the small-molecule composition of their plasma before and after infusion. Multivariate statistical analysis of the 40 resulting plasma samples revealed that after Intralipid infusion, a less-well-characterized pathway of linoleic acid metabolism had resulted in the appearance of (9Z)-12,13-dihydroxyoctadec-9-enoic acid (12,13-DHOME, P < 10−3), a leukotoxin that has powerful physiological effects and is known to inhibit the neutrophil respiratory burst. Intralipid infusion caused increased plasma 12,13-DHOME. Given that 12,13-DHOME is known to directly affect neutrophil function, we conclude that untargeted metabolomics may have revealed a hitherto-unknown mechanism of intralipid-induced immunosuppression. PMID:22715155

  1. Antibacterial Effect of Aloe Vera Gel against Oral Pathogens: An In-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Supreet; Rathod, Nirav; Sur, Jaideep; Laheji, Afshan; Gupta, Naveen; Agrawal, Priyanka; Prasad, Swati

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Natural herbal remedies have shown promising anti-microbial property and fewer side effects compared to synthetic anti-microbial therapy. Aloe Vera is a medicinal plant used for management of various infections since ancient times as it has anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, and immune-boosting properties. Aim The aim of the present study was to determine the anti-microbial and inhibitory activities of various concentration of Aloe Vera Gel (AVG) against oral pathogenic bacteria. Materials and Methods Subgingival calculus and aspiration of periapical abscess and periodontal abscess was done in 20 patients and the sample transferred to thioglycolate broth, which was incubated in Mutans Sanguis agar, blood agar and cultured in anaerobic gas chamber. The colonies formed were identified further by gram staining methods and biochemical fermentation tests (IMViC). Each isolated colony of identified bacteria were cultured separately in Muller-Hilton broth and incubated at 37°C for 24 hours. Anti-microbial activity of the AVG was tested by the disc diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentration was determined by broth micro-dilution method. Result Various staining and biochemical tests confirmed that the sample contained Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans), Clostridium bacilli (C. bacilli), Streptcoccus mutans (S. mutans) and Staphlococcus aureus (Staph. aureus). AVG showed anti-bacterial property at 100% and 50% concentration (‘t’ value = 7.504, p-value <0.001). At lower concentration there was no effect against the bacteria. At 100% AVG concentration, zone of inhibition measured was 6.9mm in A. actinomycetemcomitans, 6.3mm in C. bacilli, 6.8mm in S. mutans and 6.6mm in Staph. aureus. The standard drugs were also used to compare anti-bacterial property of AVG. Result showed that higher concentration (100%, 50%) of AVG has comparable zone of inhibition with Ofloxacin (5mcg) and Ciprofloxacin (30mcg). Conclusion AVG at

  2. Bacterial markers of periodontal diseases and their practical significance in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Chukhlovin, A B; Solovyova, A M; Matelo, S K; Kobiyasova, I V; Morosova, E B; Hokhlacheva, A V; Teplyakov, B G; Syssoev, K A; Konstantinova, V E; Matelo, L N; Totolian, Areg A

    2007-10-01

    The incidence and prevalence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyronmonas gingivalis, and Tannerella forsythensis in specimens of subgingival dental deposit were evaluated in 495 residents of St. Petersburg aged 6-82 years. The microorganisms were detected by gene-specific PCR of 16S rDNA. In accordance with age-specific increase in the incidence of gingival diseases, the percentage of samples containing T. forsythensis and P. gingivalis was significantly higher in adult and elderly patients in comparison with adolescents. The presence of T. forsythensis significantly correlated with the presence of gingivitis and dental deposit. In addition, the incidence of T. forsythensis was significantly higher in tobacco smokers. These results attest to a relationship between T. forsythensis infection and more frequent periodontal diseases associated with aging and tobacco smoking.

  3. Bacteriocin production by Fusobacterium isolates recovered from the oral cavity of human subjects with and without periodontal disease and of marmosets.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A A; Farias, L M; Nicoli, J R; Costa, J E; Carvalho, M A

    1998-09-01

    Bacteriocin production has been studied in very few anaerobic bacteria, and no report is available for Fusobacterium species. In the present study a total of 167 Fusobacterium isolates were tested for bacteriocin production: 70 isolates were obtained from the oral cavity of patients with periodontal disease, 47 were recovered from healthy oral sites of human subjects and 50 from the oral cavity of Callithrix penicillata. Autoantagonism and isoantagonism were observed when the bacteriocin-producing isolates were tested against themselves. Heteroantagonism was detected by testing the Fusobacterium isolates against 14 reference strains and 2 strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans from our laboratory collection. The auto-, iso- and heteroantagonism phenomena observed in this comparative study suggest a possible ecological role for this (these) antagonistic substance(s) in the oral environment.

  4. A numerical taxonomic study of Actinobacillus, Pasteurella and Yersinia.

    PubMed

    Sneath, P H; Stevens, M

    1985-10-01

    A numerical taxonomic study of strains of Actinobacillus, Pasteurella and Yersinia, with some allied bacteria, showed 23 reasonably distinct groups. These fell into three major areas. Area A contained species of Actinobacillus and Pasteurella: A. suis, A. equuli, A. lignieresii, P. haemolytica biovar A, P. haemolytica biovar T, P. multocida, A. actinomycetemcomitans, 'P. bettii', 'A. seminis', P. ureae and P. aerogenes. Also included in A was a composite group of Pasteurella pneumotropica and P. gallinarum, together with unnamed groups referred to as 'BLG', 'Mair', 'Ross' and 'aer-2'. Area B contained species of Yersinia: Y. enterocolitica, Y. pseudotuberculosis, Y. pestis and a group 'ent-b' similar to Y. enterocolitica. Area C contained non-fermenting strains: Y. philomiragia, Moraxella anatipestifer and a miscellaneous group 'past-b'. There were also a small number of unnamed single strains.

  5. Serum immunoglobulin G subclass concentrations in periodontally healthy and diseased individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, H; Wang, M; Gunsolley, J C; Schenkein, H A; Tew, J G

    1994-01-01

    Patients with localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP) often have high titers of antibody reactive with the serotype-specific immunodominant carbohydrate antigen of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans serotype b. The vast majority of this A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype b-specific antibody is immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2). The present study was undertaken to determine whether the overall total levels of IgG2 in the sera of LJP patients are elevated. LJP patients and nonperiodontitis (NP) controls matched for age, race (black and white), and gender were studied. Additional controls included patients with adult periodontitis (AP) and patients similar in age to LJP patients but with the more-severe, generalized form of early-onset periodontitis (SP). Sera from over 700 periodontally characterized subjects were examined by using radial immunodiffusion to quantitate IgG2 as well as IgG1, -3, and -4, which were included for comparison. Serum IgG2 levels increased with age, and this was most dramatic around puberty. Black subjects in all periodontal groups had nearly 1 mg more IgG2 per ml than their white counterparts. Serum IgG2 levels were elevated (about 30 to 40%) in LJP patients of both races compared with their age- and race-matched NP controls (P < 0.01). In contrast, SP patients and AP patients had IgG2 levels comparable to their age- and race-matched NP controls. No other IgG subclass concentration correlated with periodontal diagnosis except for IgG3, which was elevated in white LJP patients. We reason that the high levels of serum IgG2 in LJP may be helpful in localizing periodontal destruction. PMID:8168929

  6. Physicochemical and structural investigation of the surfaces of some anaerobic subgingival bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, M M; van der Mei, H C; Rouxhet, P G; Busscher, H J

    1992-01-01

    The surfaces of nine clinical isolates of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, and Peptostreptococcus micros and that of laboratory strain P. gingivalis W83 were studied by using contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, microelectrophoresis of whole cells, and transmission electron microscopy of whole and sectioned cells. P. intermedia strains were hydrophilic, as judged from their small water contact angles, and had highly negative zeta potentials, consistent with the presence of a prominent ruthenium red (RR)-staining layer and fibrillar appendages which are probably partly carbohydrate. The two clinical isolates of P. gingivalis were also hydrophilic and highly negatively charged despite the presence of prominent fibrils, which usually yield less negative zeta potentials. This finding suggests that the RR-staining layer dominates the suspension characteristics of P. gingivalis and P. intermedia strains. P. gingivalis W83 had no demonstrable fibrils and a morphologically distinct RR-staining layer, and it was more hydrophobic than the two clinical isolates of P. gingivalis. P. micros isolates were hydrophobic and much less negatively charged than the other species. The A. actinomycetemcomitans strains displayed long, prominent fibrils and a very thin RR-staining layer, which resulted in high hydrophobicity but distinctly different zeta potentials for the two. Physicochemical data on microbial cell surfaces usually have clear and predictable relationships with each other. For the strains in this study that did not follow these relationships, their aberrant behavior could be explained as due to a masking effect caused by specific surface architecture. We conclude that this combined analysis provides a detailed image of subgingival bacterial surface architecture. Images PMID:1599251

  7. Antibacterial Activity of As-Annealed TiO2 Nanotubes Doped with Ag Nanoparticles against Periodontal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Yeniyol, Sinem; He, Zhiming; Yüksel, Behiye; Boylan, Robert Joseph; Ürgen, Mustafa; Özdemir, Tayfun; Ricci, John Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    It is important to develop functional transmucosal implant surfaces that reduce the number of initially adhering bacteria and they need to be modified to improve the anti-bacterial performance. Commercially pure Ti sheets were anodized in an electrolyte containing ethylene glycol, distilled water and ammonium fluoride at room temperature to produce TiO2 nanotubes. These structures were then annealed at 450°C to transform them to anatase. As-annealed TiO2 nanotubes were then treated in an electrolyte containing 80.7 g/L NiSO4·7H2O, 41 g/L MgSO4·7H2O, 45 g/L H3BO3, and 1.44 g/L Ag2SO4 at 20°C by the application of 9 V AC voltage for doping them with silver. As-annealed TiO2 nanotubes and as-annealed Ag doped TiO2 nanotubes were evaluated by SEM, FESEM, and XRD. Antibacterial activity was assessed by determining the adherence of A. actinomycetemcomitans, T. forsythia, and C. rectus to the surface of the nanotubes. Bacterial morphology was examined using an SEM. As-annealed Ag doped TiO2 nanotubes revealed intense peak of Ag. Bacterial death against the as-annealed Ag doped TiO2 nanotubes were detected against A. actinomycetemcomitans, T. forsythia, and C. rectus indicating antibacterial efficacy. PMID:25202230

  8. Differential expression of interleukin-8 by polymorphonuclear leukocytes of two closely related species, Ovis canadensis and Ovis aries, in response to Mannheimia haemolytica infection.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Caroline N; Foreyt, William J; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2010-08-01

    The pneumonic lesions and mortality caused by Mannheimia haemolytica in bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis) are more severe than those in the related species, domestic sheep (DS; Ovis aries), under both natural and experimental conditions. Leukotoxin (Lkt) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are the most important virulence factors of this organism. One hallmark of pathogenesis of pneumonia is the influx of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) into the lungs. Lkt-induced cytolysis of PMNs results in the release of cytotoxic compounds capable of damaging lung tissue. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is a potent PMN chemoattractant. The objective of the present study was to determine if there is differential expression of IL-8 by the macrophages and PMNs of BHS and DS in response to M. haemolytica. Macrophages and PMNs of BHS and DS were stimulated with heat-killed M. haemolytica or LPS. IL-8 expression by the cells was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). The PMNs of BHS expressed severalfold higher levels of IL-8 than those of DS upon stimulation. Lesional lung tissue of M. haemolytica-infected BHS contained significantly higher levels of IL-8 than nonlesional tissue. The bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of infected BHS also contained higher levels of IL-8 than that of infected DS. Depletion of IL-8 reduced migration of PMNs toward BAL fluid by approximately 50%, indicating that IL-8 is integral to PMN recruitment to the lung during M. haemolytica infection. Excessive production of IL-8, enhanced recruitment of PMNs, and PMN lysis by Lkt are likely responsible for the severity of the lung lesions in M. haemolytica-infected BHS.

  9. Subcutaneous Immunization with Inactivated Bacterial Components and Purified Protein of Escherichia coli, Fusobacterium necrophorum and Trueperella pyogenes Prevents Puerperal Metritis in Holstein Dairy Cows

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Vinícius Silva; Bicalho, Marcela Luccas de Souza; Meira Junior, Enoch Brandão de Souza; Rossi, Rodolfo; Ribeiro, Bruno Leonardo; Lima, Svetlana; Santos, Thiago; Kussler, Arieli; Foditsch, Carla; Ganda, Erika Korzune; Oikonomou, Georgios; Cheong, Soon Hon; Gilbert, Robert Owen; Bicalho, Rodrigo Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    In this study we evaluate the efficacy of five vaccine formulations containing different combinations of proteins (FimH; leukotoxin, LKT; and pyolysin, PLO) and/or inactivated whole cells (Escherichia coli, Fusobacterium necrophorum, and Trueperella pyogenes) in preventing postpartum uterine diseases. Inactivated whole cells were produced using two genetically distinct strains of each bacterial species (E. coli, F. necrophorum, and T. pyogenes). FimH and PLO subunits were produced using recombinant protein expression, and LKT was recovered from culturing a wild F. necrophorum strain. Three subcutaneous vaccines were formulated: Vaccine 1 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells and proteins; Vaccine 2 was composed of proteins only; and Vaccine 3 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells only. Two intravaginal vaccines were formulated: Vaccine 4 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells and proteins; and Vaccine 5 was composed of PLO and LKT. To evaluate vaccine efficacy, a randomized clinical trial was conducted at a commercial dairy farm; 371 spring heifers were allocated randomly into one of six different treatments groups: control, Vaccine 1, Vaccine 2, Vaccine 3, Vaccine 4 and Vaccine 5. Late pregnant heifers assigned to one of the vaccine groups were each vaccinated twice: at 230 and 260 days of pregnancy. When vaccines were evaluated grouped as subcutaneous and intravaginal, the subcutaneous ones were found to significantly reduce the incidence of puerperal metritis. Additionally, subcutaneous vaccination significantly reduced rectal temperature at 6±1 days in milk. Reproduction was improved for cows that received subcutaneous vaccines. In general, vaccination induced a significant increase in serum IgG titers against all antigens, with subcutaneous vaccination again being more effective. In conclusion, subcutaneous vaccination with inactivated bacterial components and/or protein subunits of E. coli, F. necrophorum and T. pyogenes

  10. Clonal Complexes and Diversity of Exotoxin Gene Profiles in Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Patients in a Spanish Hospital▿

    PubMed Central

    Argudín, M. A.; Mendoza, M. C.; Méndez, F. J.; Martín, M. C.; Guerra, B.; Rodicio, M. R.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology studies have allowed the identification of the methicillin (meticillin)-resistant (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) clonal complexes (CCs) and clones of Staphylococcus aureus circulating in a Spanish hospital recently. Of 81 isolates tested, 32.1% were MRSA. Most of them carried staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) IVc (88.5%) and belonged to CC5 (88.5%; multilocus sequence typing types ST125 [mainly associated with spa type t067], ST5, and ST228). A higher diversity was found among MSSA isolates (67.9%). Eighty percent shared the genetic background of major MRSA lineages (CC5 [38.2%; ST125 and ST5], CC30 [25.5%; ST30], CC45 [14.5%; ST45 and ST47], and CC8 [1.8%; ST8]), but CC12, CC15, CC51, and CC59 were also detected. Many exotoxin genes were present in each of the 81 isolates, independent of whether they were involved in sepsis (11 to 22) or other types of infections (13 to 21), and they appeared in 73 combinations. The relevant data are that (i) all isolates were positive for hemolysin and leukotoxin genes (98.8% for lukED and 25.9% for lukPV); (ii) all contained an enterotoxin gene cluster (egc with or without seu), frequently with one or more genes encoding classical enterotoxins; (iii) about half were positive for tst and 95% were positive for exfoliatin-encoding genes (eta, etb, and/or etd); and (iv) the four agr groups were detected, with agrII (55.6%) and agrIII (23.5%) being the most frequent. Taken together, results of the present study suggest a frequent acquisition and/or loss of exotoxin genes, which may be mediated by efficient intralineage transfer of mobile genetic elements and exotoxin genes therein and by eventual breakage of interlineage barriers. PMID:19458176

  11. Differences in purinergic amplification of osmotic cell lysis by the pore-forming RTX toxins Bordetella pertussis CyaA and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae ApxIA: the role of pore size.

    PubMed

    Masin, Jiri; Fiser, Radovan; Linhartova, Irena; Osicka, Radim; Bumba, Ladislav; Hewlett, Erik L; Benz, Roland; Sebo, Peter

    2013-12-01

    A large subgroup of the repeat in toxin (RTX) family of leukotoxins of Gram-negative pathogens consists of pore-forming hemolysins. These can permeabilize mammalian erythrocytes (RBCs) and provoke their colloid osmotic lysis (hemolytic activity). Recently, ATP leakage through pannexin channels and P2X receptor-mediated opening of cellular calcium and potassium channels were implicated in cell permeabilization by pore-forming toxins. In the study described here, we examined the role played by purinergic signaling in the cytolytic action of two RTX toxins that form pores of different sizes. The cytolytic potency of ApxIA hemolysin of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, which forms pores about 2.4 nm wide, was clearly reduced in the presence of P2X7 receptor antagonists or an ATP scavenger, such as pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid (PPADS), Brilliant Blue G, ATP oxidized sodium salt, or hexokinase. In contrast, antagonists of purinergic signaling had no impact on the hemolytic potency of the adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA) of Bordetella pertussis, which forms pores of 0.6 to 0.8 nm in diameter. Moreover, the conductance of pores formed by ApxIA increased with the toxin concentration, while the conductance of the CyaA single pore units was constant at various toxin concentrations. However, the P2X7 receptor antagonist PPADS inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the exacerbated hemolytic activity of a CyaA-ΔN489 construct (lacking 489 N-terminal residues of CyaA), which exhibited a strongly enhanced pore-forming propensity (>20-fold) and also formed severalfold larger conductance units in planar lipid bilayers than intact CyaA. These results point to a pore size threshold of purinergic amplification involvement in cell permeabilization by pore-forming RTX toxins.

  12. Expression and characterization of an epoxide hydrolase from Anopheles gambiae with high activity on epoxy fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiawen; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    In insects, epoxide hydrolases (EHs) play critical roles in the metabolism of xenobiotic epoxides from the food resources and in the regulation of endogenous chemical mediators, such as juvenile hormones. Using the baculovirus expression system, we expressed and characterized an epoxide hydrolase from Anopheles gambiae (AgEH) that is distinct in evolutionary history from insect juvenile hormone epoxide hydrolases (JHEHs). We partially purified the enzyme by ion exchange chromatography and isoelectric focusing. The experimentally determined molecular weight and pI were estimated to be 35kD and 6.3 respectively, different than the theoretical ones. The AgEH had the greatest activity on long chain epoxy fatty acids such as 14,15-epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (14,15-EET) and 9,10-epoxy-12Z-octadecenoic acids (9,10-EpOME or leukotoxin) among the substrates evaluated. Juvenile hormone III, a terpenoid insect growth regulator, was the next best substrate tested. The AgEH showed kinetics comparable to the mammalian soluble epoxide hydrolases, and the activity could be inhibited by AUDA [12-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido) dodecanoic acid], a urea-based inhibitor designed to inhibit the mammalian soluble epoxide hydrolases. The rabbit serum generated against the soluble epoxide hydrolase of Mus musculus can both cross-react with natural and denatured forms of the AgEH, suggesting immunologically they are similar. The study suggests there are mammalian sEH homologs in insects, and epoxy fatty acids may be important chemical mediators in insects. PMID:25173592

  13. Concordance in diagnostic testing for respiratory pathogens of bighorn sheep

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, Daniel P.; Cassirer, E. Frances; Bonds, Michael D.; Brown, Daniel R.; Edwards, William H.; Weiser, Glen C.; Drew, Mark L.; Briggs, Robert E.; Fox, Karen A.; Miller, Michael W.; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Srikumaran, Subramaniam; Besser, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Reliable diagnostic tests are essential for disease investigation and management. This is particularly true for diseases of free-ranging wildlife where sampling is logistically difficult precluding retesting. Clinical assays for wildlife diseases frequently vary among laboratories because of lack of appropriate standardized commercial kits. Results of diagnostic testing may also be called into question when investigators report different etiologies for disease outbreaks, despite similar clinical and pathologic findings. To evaluate reliability of diagnostic testing for respiratory pathogens of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis), we conducted a series of ring tests across 6 laboratories routinely involved in detection of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae, Pasteurellaceae, lktA (the Pasteurellaceae gene encoding leukotoxin), and 3 reference laboratories. Consistency of results for replicate samples within laboratories was high (median agreement = 1.0). Agreement between laboratories was high for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of M. ovipneumoniae and culture isolation of Mannheimia spp. and Bibersteinia trehalosi(median agreement = 0.89–0.95, Kappa = 0.65–0.74), and lower for PCR detection of Mannheimiaspp. lktA (median agreement = 0.58, Kappa = 0.12). Most errors on defined status samples were false negatives, suggesting test sensitivity was a greater problem than specificity. However, tests for M. haemolytica and lktA yielded some false positive results. Despite differences in testing protocols, median agreement among laboratories and correct classification of controls for most agents was ≥0.80, meeting or exceeding the standard required by federal proficiency testing programs. This information is valuable for interpreting test results, laboratory quality assessments, and advancing diagnosis of respiratory disease in wild sheep. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  14. Campylobacter fetus Surface Layer Proteins Are Transported by a Type I Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Stuart A.; Shedd, Omer L.; Ray, Kevin C.; Beins, Michael H.; Jorgensen, Jesse P.; Blaser, Martin J.

    1998-01-01

    The virulence of Campylobacter fetus, a bacterial pathogen of ungulates and humans, is mediated in part by the presence of a paracrystalline surface layer (S-layer) that confers serum resistance. The subunits of the S-layer are S-layer proteins (SLPs) that are secreted in the absence of an N-terminal signal sequence and attach to either type A or B C. fetus lipopolysaccharide in a serospecific manner. Antigenic variation of multiple SLPs (encoded by sapA homologs) of type A strain 23D occurs by inversion of a promoter-containing DNA element flanked by two sapA homologs. Cloning and sequencing of the entire 6.2-kb invertible region from C. fetus 23D revealed a probable 5.6-kb operon of four overlapping genes (sapCDEF, with sizes of 1,035, 1,752, 1,284, and 1,302 bp, respectively) transcribed in the opposite direction from sapA. The four genes also were present in the invertible region of type B strain 84-107 and were virtually identical to their counterparts in the type A strain. Although SapC had no database homologies, SapD, SapE, and SapF had predicted amino acid homologies with type I protein secretion systems (typified by Escherichia coli HlyBD/TolC or Erwinia chrysanthemi PrtDEF) that utilize C-terminal secretion signals to mediate the secretion of hemolysins, leukotoxins, or proteases from other bacterial species. Analysis of the C termini of four C. fetus SLPs revealed conserved structures that are potential secretion signals. A C. fetus sapD mutant neither produced nor secreted SLPs. E. coli expressing C. fetus sapA and sapCDEF secreted SapA, indicating that the sapCDEF genes are sufficient for SLP secretion. C. fetus SLPs therefore are transported to the cell surface by a type I secretion system. PMID:9851986

  15. Characterization of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolated from diseased dogs in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Ruzauskas, M; Couto, N; Pavilonis, A; Klimiene, I; Siugzdiniene, R; Virgailis, M; Vaskeviciute, L; Anskiene, L; Pomba, C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize Staphylococcus pseudintermedius for its antimicrobial resistance and virulence factors with a special focus on methicillin-resistant (MRSP) strains isolated from sick dogs in Lithuania. Clinically sick adult dogs suffering from infections (n=214) and bitches with reproductive disorders (n=36) from kennels were selected for the study. Samples (n=192) from the 250 tested (76.8%) dogs were positive for Staphylococcus spp. Molecular profiling using the species-specific nuc gene identified 51 isolates as S. pseudintermedius (26.6% from a total number of isolated staphylococci) of which 15 isolates were identified as MRSP. Ten MRSP isolates were isolated from bitches with reproductive disorders from two large breeding kennels. Data on susceptibility of S. pseudintermedius to different antimicrobials revealed that all isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, daptomycin and linezolid. Two isolates (3.9%) were resistant to rifampicin. A high resistance was seen towards penicillin G (94.1%), tetracycline (64.7%) and macrolides (68.7%). Resistance to fluoroquinolones ranged from 25.5% (gatifloxacin) to 31.4% (ciprofloxacin). The most prevalent genes encoding resistance included blaZ, aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia, mecA, and tet(M). The Luk-I gene encoding a leukotoxin was detected in 29% of the isolates, whereas the siet gene encoding exfoliative toxin was detected in 69% of the S. pseudintermedius isolates. This report of MRSP in companion animals represents a major challenge for veterinarians in terms of antibiotic therapy and is a concern for both animal and public health.

  16. Virulence determinants in clinical Staphylococcus aureus from monomicrobial and polymicrobial infections of diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Shettigar, Kavitha; Jain, Spoorthi; Bhat, Deepika V; Acharya, Raviraj; Ramachandra, Lingadakai; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Murali, Thokur Sreepathy

    2016-12-01

    Antibiotic resistance in Staphyloc