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Sample records for aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide

  1. Serotype-dependent expression patterns of stabilized lipopolysaccharide aggregates in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans strains.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Haruko; Fujise, Osamu; Miura, Mayumi; Tanaka, Ayako; Hisano, Kyoko; Haraguchi, Akira; Hamachi, Takafumi; Maeda, Katsumasa

    2012-10-01

    Above a critical concentration, amphiphilic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules in an aqueous environment form aggregate structures, probably because of interactions involving hydrophobic bonds. Ionic bonds involving divalent cations stabilize these aggregate structures, making them resistant to breakdown by detergents. The aim of this study was to examine expression patterns of stabilized LPS aggregates in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a microorganism that causes periodontitis. A. actinomycetemcomitans strains of various serotypes and truncated LPS mutants were prepared for this study. Following treatment with a two-phase separation system using the detergent Triton X-114, crude LPS extracts of the study strains were separated into detergent-phase LPS (DP-LPS) and aqueous-phase LPS (AP-LPS). Repeated treatment of the aqueous phase with the two-phase separation system produced only a slight decrease in AP-LPS, suggesting that AP-LPS was resistant to the detergent and thus distinguishable from DP-LPS. The presence of divalent cations increased the yield of AP-LPS. AP-LPS expression patterns were serotype-dependent; serotypes b and f showing early expression, and serotypes a and c late expression. In addition, highly truncated LPS from a waaD (rfaD) mutant were unable to generate AP-LPS, suggesting involvement of the LPS structure in the generation of AP-LPS. The two-phase separation was able to distinguish two types of LPS with different physical states at the supramolecular structure level. Hence, AP-LPS likely represents stabilized LPS aggregates, whereas DP-LPS might be derived from non-stabilized aggregates. Furthermore, time-dependent expression of stabilized LPS aggregates was found to be serotype-dependent in A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  2. Enterococcus faecalis lipoteichoic acid suppresses Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-8 expression in human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Im, Jintaek; Baik, Jung Eun; Kim, Kyoung Whun; Kang, Seok-Seong; Jeon, Jun Ho; Park, Ok-Jin; Kim, Hyun Young; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-08-01

    Periodontitis is caused by multi-bacterial infection and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Enterococcus faecalis are closely associated with inflammatory periodontal diseases. Although lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of A. actinomycetemcomitans (Aa.LPS) and lipoteichoic acid of E. faecalis (Ef.LTA) are considered to be major virulence factors evoking inflammatory responses, their combinatorial effect on the induction of chemokines has not been investigated. In this study, we investigated the interaction between Aa.LPS and Ef.LTA on IL-8 expression in human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells. Aa.LPS, but not Ef.LTA, substantially induced IL-8 expression at the protein and mRNA levels. Interestingly, Ef.LTA suppressed Aa.LPS-induced IL-8 expression without affecting the binding of Aa.LPS to Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. Ef.LTA reduced Aa.LPS-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, including ERK, JNK and p38 kinase. Furthermore, Ef.LTA inhibited the Aa.LPS-induced transcriptional activities of the activating protein 1, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein and nuclear factor-kappa B transcription factors, all of which are known to regulate IL-8 gene expression. Ef.LTA augmented the expression of IL-1 receptor-associated kinase-M (IRAK-M), a negative regulator of TLR intracellular signaling pathways, in the presence of Aa.LPS at both the mRNA and protein levels. Small interfering RNA silencing IRAK-M reversed the attenuation of Aa.LPS-induced IL-8 expression by Ef.LTA. Collectively, these results suggest that Ef.LTA down-regulates Aa.LPS-induced IL-8 expression in human PDL cells through up-regulation of the negative regulator IRAK-M.

  3. Lipopolysaccharide of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans induces the expression of chemokines MCP-1, MIP-1α, and IP-10 via similar but distinct signaling pathways in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Park, Ok-Jin; Cho, Min-Kyung; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a Gram-negative bacterium frequently isolated from lesions of patients with localized aggressive periodontitis. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major cell wall component of Gram-negative bacteria, stimulates innate immune cells via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) to initiate inflammatory responses. In this study, we purified LPS from A. actinomycetemcomitans (AaLPS) and investigated its ability to induce the expression of chemokines, which play an important role in recruitment of leukocytes to the infection site. AaLPS induced the expression of chemokines, MCP-1, MIP-1α, and IP-10 in murine macrophages, leading to the infiltration of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in a transwell system. Although TLR4 was essential for the induction of all these chemokines by AaLPS, MCP-1 and MIP-1α expressions were MyD88-dependent, but IP-10 expression was MyD88-independent, as determined using macrophages from mice deficient in TLR4 or MyD88. Furthermore, the activation of ERK and JNK were necessary for the expression of MCP-1 and MIP-1α, whereas p38 MAP kinase and JNK activations were required for IP-10 expression. In addition, IFN-β/STAT1 signaling was exclusively involved in IP-10 expression but not in MCP-1 or MIP-1α expression. AaLPS also activated the transcription factors, NF-κB, AP-1, NF-IL6, and ISRE, all of which are involved in chemokine gene expression. These results suggest that AaLPS induces the expression of chemokines MCP-1, MIP-1α, and IP-10 through TLR4 in murine macrophages. Further, the induction of MCP-1 and MIP-1α requires MyD88, ERK, and JNK, whereas the induction of IP-10 requires JNK, p38 MAP kinase, and IFN-β/STAT1.

  4. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Zijnge, Vincent; Granström, Elisabeth; Oscarsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and leukotoxin (LtxA) into human host cells and to act as triggers of innate immunity upon carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). To improve our understanding of the pathogenicity-associated functions that A. actinomycetemcomitans exports via OMVs, we studied the proteome of density gradient-purified OMVs from a rough-colony type clinical isolate, strain 173 (serotype e) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This analysis yielded the identification of 151 proteins, which were found in at least three out of four independent experiments. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002509. Through this study, we not only confirmed the vesicle-associated release of LtxA, and the presence of proteins, which are known to act as immunoreactive antigens in the human host, but we also identified numerous additional putative virulence-related proteins in the A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV proteome. The known and putative functions of these proteins include immune evasion, drug targeting, and iron/nutrient acquisition. In summary, our findings are consistent with an OMV-associated proteome that exhibits several offensive and defensive functions, and they provide a comprehensive basis to further disclose roles of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs in periodontal and systemic disease. PMID:26381655

  5. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Zijnge, Vincent; Granström, Elisabeth; Oscarsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and leukotoxin (LtxA) into human host cells and to act as triggers of innate immunity upon carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). To improve our understanding of the pathogenicity-associated functions that A. actinomycetemcomitans exports via OMVs, we studied the proteome of density gradient-purified OMVs from a rough-colony type clinical isolate, strain 173 (serotype e) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This analysis yielded the identification of 151 proteins, which were found in at least three out of four independent experiments. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002509. Through this study, we not only confirmed the vesicle-associated release of LtxA, and the presence of proteins, which are known to act as immunoreactive antigens in the human host, but we also identified numerous additional putative virulence-related proteins in the A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV proteome. The known and putative functions of these proteins include immune evasion, drug targeting, and iron/nutrient acquisition. In summary, our findings are consistent with an OMV-associated proteome that exhibits several offensive and defensive functions, and they provide a comprehensive basis to further disclose roles of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs in periodontal and systemic disease. PMID:26381655

  6. The cell envelope proteome of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kenneth P.; Fields, Julia G.; Voogt, Richard D.; Deng, Bin; Lam, Ying-Wai; Mintz, Keith P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria serves a critical role in maintenance of cellular homeostasis, resistance to external stress, and host-pathogen interactions. Envelope protein composition is influenced by the physiological and environmental demands placed on the bacterium. In this study, we report a comprehensive compilation of cell envelope proteins from the periodontal and systemic pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans VT1169, an afimbriated serotype b strain. The urea-extracted membrane proteins were identified by mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics. The membrane proteome, isolated from actively growing bacteria under normal laboratory conditions, included 648 proteins representing 28% of the predicted ORFs in the genome. Bioinformatic analyses were used to annotate and predict the cellular location and function of the proteins. Surface adhesins, porins, lipoproteins, numerous influx and efflux pumps, multiple sugar, amino acid and iron transporters, and components of the type I, II and V secretion systems were identified. Periplasmic space and cytoplasmic proteins with chaperone function were also identified. 107 proteins with unknown function were associated with the cell envelope. Orthologs of a subset of these uncharacterized proteins are present in other bacterial genomes, while others are found exclusively in A. actinomycetemcomitans. This knowledge will contribute to elucidating the role of cell envelope proteins in bacterial growth and survival in the oral cavity. PMID:25055881

  7. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans accelerates atherosclerosis with an increase in atherogenic factors in spontaneously hyperlipidemic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Hashizume, Tomomi; Du, Yuan; Oguchi, Sumito; Yamamoto, Masafumi

    2010-07-01

    Cariogenic and periodontal pathogens are thought to be etiological factors in the development of cardiovascular disease. We assessed the involvement of the periodontal pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and cariogenic pathogen Streptococcus mutans in the development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient spontaneously hyperlipidemic (Apoe(shl)) mice. The mice were treated intravenously with A. actinomycetemcomitans HK1651, S. mutans GS-5, or phosphate-buffered saline three times a week for 3 weeks and killed at 15 weeks of age. The areas of the aortic sinus that were covered with atherosclerotic plaque were significantly larger in Apoe(shl) mice challenged with A. actinomycetemcomitans compared with S. mutans- or vehicle-challenged mice. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans challenge increased serum high-sensitive C-reactive protein and lipopolysaccharide levels. Bacterial DNA was detected in the blood, heart, and spleen, but not in the liver. Furthermore, serum interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and MCP-1 levels and Toll-like receptor (TLR)2, TLR4, ICAM-1, E-selectin, P-selectin, LOX-1, HSP60, CCL19, CCL21, CCR7, and MCP-1 expressions in the aorta were significantly increased in mice challenged with A. actinomycetemcomitans. These results suggest that systemic infection with A. actinomycetemcomitans accelerates atherosclerosis in Apoe(shl) mice by exposing the whole microorganisms or their products, followed by initiating inflammation. Increases in proatherogenic factors may explain the aggravation of atherosclerosis by A. actinomycetemcomitans infection. PMID:20482627

  8. Stability of the JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Haubek, D; Ennibi, O-K; Vaeth, M; Poulsen, S; Poulsen, K

    2009-09-01

    The JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is strongly associated with aggressive periodontitis. To obtain information about colonization dynamics of the JP2 clone, we used PCR to examine its presence in 365 Moroccan juveniles from whom periodontal plaque samples were collected at baseline and after one and two years. Periodontal attachment loss was measured at baseline and at the two-year follow-up. At baseline, 43 (12%) carriers of the JP2 clone were found. Nearly half (44 %) of these were persistently colonized with the clone. The relative risk for the development of aggressive periodontitis, adjusted for the concomitant presence of other genotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans, was highest for individuals continuously infected by the JP2 clone (RR = 13.9; 95% CI, 9.0 to 21.4), indicating a relationship between infectious dose and disease, which further substantiates the evidence for the JP2 clone as a causal factor in aggressive periodontitis.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Serotype g Strain NUM4039 (JCM 30399)

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Masanori; Hirasawa, Masaaki; Kuwahara, Noriko; Okada, Tamami; Umezawa, Koji; Kobayashi, Taira; Okamoto, Masaaki; Naito, Mariko; Hirasawa, Masatomo

    2016-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is considered to be a major etiological agent of aggressive periodontitis and includes serotype a to g strains. We herein report the first complete genome sequence of A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype g strain NUM4039. The genome is 2,382,853 bp in length with a G+C content of 44.34%. PMID:26988057

  10. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin cytotoxicity occurs through bilayer destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Angela C.; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen; Du, Yurong; Stefano, Frank P.; Kieba, Irene R.; Epand, Raquel F.; Kakalis, Lazaros; Yeagle, Philip L.; Epand, Richard M.; Lally, Edward T.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The Gram-negative bacterium, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, is a common inhabitant of the human upper aerodigestive tract. The organism produces an RTX (Repeats in ToXin) toxin (LtxA) that kills human white blood cells. LtxA is believed to be a membrane-damaging toxin, but details of the cell surface interaction for this and several other RTX toxins have yet to be elucidated. Initial morphological studies suggested that LtxA was bending the target cell membrane. Because the ability of a membrane to bend is a function of its lipid composition, we assessed the proficiency of LtxA to release of a fluorescent dye from a panel of liposomes composed of various lipids. Liposomes composed of lipids that form nonlamellar phases were susceptible to LtxA-induced damage while liposomes composed of lipids that do not form non-bilayer structures were not. Differential scanning calorimetry demonstrated that the toxin decreased the temperature at which the lipid transitions from a bilayer to a nonlamellar phase, while 31P nuclear magnetic resonance studies showed that the LtxA-induced transition from a bilayer to an inverted hexagonal phase occurs through the formation of an isotropic intermediate phase. These results indicate that LtxA cytotoxicity occurs through a process of membrane destabilization. PMID:22309134

  11. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans induces Th17 cells in atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ru; Hashizume-Takizawa, Tomomi; Du, Yuan; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko

    2015-04-01

    Th17 cells have been linked to the pathogenesis of several chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. However, the role of Th17 cells and IL-17 in atherosclerosis remains poorly understood. We previously reported that Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) bacteremia accelerated atherosclerosis accompanied by inflammation in apolipoprotein E-deficient spontaneously hyperlipidemic (Apoe(shl)) mice. In this study, we investigated whether Aa promotes the Th17 inducing pathway in Aa-challenged Apoe(shl) mice. Mice were intravenously injected with live Aa HK1651 or vehicles. Time-course analysis of splenic IL-17(+)CD4(+) cell frequencies, the proximal aorta lesion area, serum IL-17, IL-6, TGF-β and IL-1β levels, the mRNA expression of Th17-related molecules such as IL-1β, IL-6, IL17RA, STAT3, IL-21, IL-23, TGF-β and RORγt, Th17-related microRNA levels and the levels of AIM-2, Mincle and NLRP3 were examined. Challenge with Aa time dependently induced tropism of Th17 cells in the spleen and increase in atheromatous lesions in the aortic sinus of Apoe(shl) mice. Serum IL-17, IL-6, TGF-β and IL-1β levels were significantly enhanced by Aa. The gene expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17RA, IL-21, IL-23, TGF-β, STAT3, RORγt, AIM-2, Mincle and NLRP3 was also time dependently stimulated in the aorta of Aa-challenged mice. Furthermore, Aa challenge significantly increased the expression of miR-146b and miR-155 in the aorta. Based on the results, it seems that Aa stimulates Th17 induction that affects the progression of Aa-accelerated atherosclerosis. PMID:25743474

  12. LL-37 opsonizes and inhibits biofilm formation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans at subbactericidal concentrations.

    PubMed

    Sol, Asaf; Ginesin, Ofir; Chaushu, Stella; Karra, Laila; Coppenhagen-Glazer, Shunit; Ginsburg, Isaac; Bachrach, Gilad

    2013-10-01

    Host defense peptides are immediate responders of the innate immunity that express antimicrobial, immunoregulatory, and wound-healing activities. Neutrophils are a major source for oral host defense peptides, and phagocytosis by neutrophils is a major mechanism for bacterial clearance in the gingival tissue. Dysfunction of or reduction in the numbers of neutrophils or deficiency in the LL-37 host defense peptide was each previously linked with proliferation of oral Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans which resulted in an aggressive periodontal disease. Surprisingly, A. actinomycetemcomitans shows resistance to high concentrations of LL-37. In this study, we demonstrated that submicrocidal concentrations of LL-37 inhibit biofilm formation by A. actinomycetemcomitans and act as opsonins and agglutinins that greatly enhance its clearance by neutrophils and macrophages. Improved uptake of A. actinomycetemcomitans by neutrophils was mediated by their opsonization with LL-37. Enhanced phagocytosis and killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans by murine macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells were dependent on their preagglutination by LL-37. Although A. actinomycetemcomitans is resistant to the bactericidal effect of LL-37, our results offer a rationale for the epidemiological association between LL-37 deficiency and the expansion of oral A. actinomycetemcomitans and indicate a possible therapeutic use of cationic peptides for host defense.

  13. Mature Biofilm Degradation by Potential Probiotics: Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans versus Lactobacillus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Kouhei; Okinaga, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    The biofilm degradation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is essential as a complete periodontal disease therapy, and here we show the effects of potential probiotic bacteria such as Lactobacillus spp. for the biofilm of several serotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. Eight of the 13 species showed the competent biofilm degradation of ≥ 90% reduction in biofilm values in A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 (serotype b) as well as four of the seven species for the biofilm of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMZ 534 (serotype e). In contrast, the probiotic bacteria did not have a big impact for the degradation of A. actinomycetemcomitans SUNY 75 (serotype a) biofilm. The dispersed A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 cells through the biofilm detachment were still viable and plausible factors for the biofilm degradation were not due to the lactic acid and low pH conditions. The three enzymes, protease, lipase, and amylase may be responsible for the biofilm degradation; in particular, lipase was the most effective enzyme for the biofilm degradation of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 along with the protease activity which should be also important for the other serotypes. Remarkable lipase enzyme activities were detected from some of the potential probiotics and a supporting result using a lipase inhibitor presented corroborating evidence that lipase activity is one of the contributing factors for biofilm degradation outside of the protease which is also another possible factor for the biofilm of the other serotype of A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. On the other hand, the biofilm of A. actinomycetemcomitans SUNY 75 (serotype a) was not powerfully degraded by the lipase enzyme because the lipase inhibitor was slightly functional for only two of potential probiotics. PMID:27438340

  14. Antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilms associated with peri-implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Kadkhoda, Zeinab; Amarlu, Zeinab; Eshraghi, Saeed; Samiei, Nazanin

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to assessthe antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine (CHX) on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilms isolated from subgingival plaque of peri-implantitis lesions. Methods. Thirteen patients requiring peri-implantitis treatment were consecutively selected and their subgingival biofilm was collected by inserting fine sterile paper points into peri-implant pockets for 15 seconds. A. actinomycetemcomitans was isolated from the subgingival biofilm and cultured. In this study, the standard strain of A. actinomycetemcomitans served as the positive control group and a blank disc impregnated with water served as the negative control; 0.1 mL of the bacterial suspension was cultured on specific culture medium and blank discs (6 mm in diameter) impregnated with 0.2%CHX mouthrinse (Behsa Pharmaceutical Co.) and negative control discs were placed on two sides of the bacterial culture plate. The size of growth inhibition zone was measured by a blinded independent observer in millimetres. Results. According to the results of disc diffusion test, the mean diameter of growth inhibition zone of A. actinomycetemcomitans around discs impregnated with CHX was larger in both standard (positive control) and biofilm samples of A. actinomycetemcomitans compared to the negative control group (blank disc) (P<0.001). Conclusion. Use of0.2% CHX mouthwash had antibacterial effects on A. actinomycetemcomitans species isolated from peri-implantitis sites.

  15. Distribution of biotypes and leukotoxic activity of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans isolated from Brazilian patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Gaetti-Jardim Jr., Elerson; Wahasugui, Thais Cristiane; Tomazinho, Paulo Henrique; Marques, Márcia Martins; Nakano, Viviane; Avila-Campos, Mario Julio

    2008-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an important etiologic agent of the periodontitis and is associated with extra-oral infections. In this study, the detection of the ltxA gene as well as the ltx promoter region from leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans isolated from 50 Brazilian patients with periodontitis and 50 healthy subjects was performed. The leukotoxic activity on HL-60 cells was also evaluated. Leukotoxic activity was determined using a trypan blue exclusion method. The 530 bp deletion in the promoter region was evaluated by PCR using a PRO primer pair. A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected by culture and directly from crude subgingival biofilm by PCR using specific primers. By culture, A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected in nine (18%) of the periodontal patients and one (2%) healthy subject. However, by PCR, this organism was detected in 44% of the periodontal patients and in 16% of the healthy subjects. It was verified a great discrepancy between PCR detection of the ltx operon promoter directly from crude subgingival biofilm and from bacterial DNA. Only one periodontal sample harbored highly leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans. Moreover, biotype II was the most prevalent and no correlation between biotypes and leukotoxic activity was observed. The diversity of leukotoxin expression by A. actinomycetemcomitans suggests a role of this toxin in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease and other infectious diseases. PMID:24031284

  16. Antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilms associated with peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Kadkhoda, Zeinab; Amarlu, Zeinab; Eshraghi, Saeed; Samiei, Nazanin

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to assessthe antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine (CHX) on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilms isolated from subgingival plaque of peri-implantitis lesions. Methods. Thirteen patients requiring peri-implantitis treatment were consecutively selected and their subgingival biofilm was collected by inserting fine sterile paper points into peri-implant pockets for 15 seconds. A. actinomycetemcomitans was isolated from the subgingival biofilm and cultured. In this study, the standard strain of A. actinomycetemcomitans served as the positive control group and a blank disc impregnated with water served as the negative control; 0.1 mL of the bacterial suspension was cultured on specific culture medium and blank discs (6 mm in diameter) impregnated with 0.2%CHX mouthrinse (Behsa Pharmaceutical Co.) and negative control discs were placed on two sides of the bacterial culture plate. The size of growth inhibition zone was measured by a blinded independent observer in millimetres. Results. According to the results of disc diffusion test, the mean diameter of growth inhibition zone of A. actinomycetemcomitans around discs impregnated with CHX was larger in both standard (positive control) and biofilm samples of A. actinomycetemcomitans compared to the negative control group (blank disc) (P<0.001). Conclusion . Use of0.2% CHX mouthwash had antibacterial effects on A. actinomycetemcomitans species isolated from peri-implantitis sites. PMID:27651884

  17. Antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilms associated with peri-implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Kadkhoda, Zeinab; Amarlu, Zeinab; Eshraghi, Saeed; Samiei, Nazanin

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to assessthe antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine (CHX) on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilms isolated from subgingival plaque of peri-implantitis lesions. Methods. Thirteen patients requiring peri-implantitis treatment were consecutively selected and their subgingival biofilm was collected by inserting fine sterile paper points into peri-implant pockets for 15 seconds. A. actinomycetemcomitans was isolated from the subgingival biofilm and cultured. In this study, the standard strain of A. actinomycetemcomitans served as the positive control group and a blank disc impregnated with water served as the negative control; 0.1 mL of the bacterial suspension was cultured on specific culture medium and blank discs (6 mm in diameter) impregnated with 0.2%CHX mouthrinse (Behsa Pharmaceutical Co.) and negative control discs were placed on two sides of the bacterial culture plate. The size of growth inhibition zone was measured by a blinded independent observer in millimetres. Results. According to the results of disc diffusion test, the mean diameter of growth inhibition zone of A. actinomycetemcomitans around discs impregnated with CHX was larger in both standard (positive control) and biofilm samples of A. actinomycetemcomitans compared to the negative control group (blank disc) (P<0.001). Conclusion. Use of0.2% CHX mouthwash had antibacterial effects on A. actinomycetemcomitans species isolated from peri-implantitis sites. PMID:27651884

  18. Diverse Toll-like receptors mediate cytokine production by Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Park, Se-Ra; Kim, Dong-Jae; Han, Seung-Hyun; Kang, Min-Jung; Lee, Jun-Young; Jeong, Yu-Jin; Lee, Sang-Jin; Kim, Tae-Hyoun; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Park, Jong-Hwan

    2014-05-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) orchestrate a repertoire of immune responses in macrophages against various pathogens. Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans are two important periodontal pathogens. In the present study, we investigated TLR signaling regulating cytokine production of macrophages in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans. TLR2 and TLR4 are redundant in the production of cytokines (interleukin-6 [IL-6] and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) in F. nucleatum- and A. actinomycetemcomitans-infected macrophages. The production of cytokines by macrophages in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans infection was impaired in MyD88-deficient macrophages. Moreover, cytokine concentrations were lower in MyD88-deficient macrophages than in TLR2/TLR4 (TLR2/4) double-deficient cells. An endosomal TLR inhibitor, chloroquine, reduced cytokine production in TLR2/4-deficient macrophages in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans, and DNA from F. nucleatum or A. actinomycetemcomitans induced IL-6 production in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs), which was abolished by chloroquine. Western blot analysis revealed that TLR2/4 and MyD88 were required for optimal activation of NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in macrophages in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans, with different kinetics. An inhibitor assay showed that NF-κB and all MAPKs (p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase [ERK], and Jun N-terminal protein kinase [JNK]) mediate F. nucleatum-induced production of cytokines in macrophages, whereas NF-κB and p38, but not ERK and JNK, are involved in A. actinomycetemcomitans-mediated cytokine production. These findings suggest that multiple TLRs may participate in the cytokine production of macrophages against periodontal bacteria.

  19. Monodisperse and LPS-free Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin: interactions with human β2 integrins and erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Reinholdt, Jesper; Poulsen, Knud; Brinkmann, Christel R; Hoffmann, Søren V; Stapulionis, Romualdas; Enghild, Jan J; Jensen, Uffe B; Boesen, Thomas; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic cocco-bacillus and a frequent member of the human oral flora. It produces a leukotoxin, LtxA, belonging to the repeats-in-toxin (RTX) family of bacterial cytotoxins. LtxA efficiently kills neutrophils and mononuclear phagocytes. The known receptor for LtxA on leukocytes is integrin α(L)β(2) (LFA-1 or CD11a/CD18). However, the molecular mechanisms involved in LtxA-mediated cytotoxicity are poorly understood, partly because LtxA has proven difficult to prepare for experiments as free of contaminants and with its native structure. Here, we describe a protocol for the purification of LtxA from bacterial culture supernatant, which does not involve denaturing procedures. The purified LtxA was monodisperse, well folded as judged by the combined use of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy (SRCD) and in silico prediction of the secondary structure content, and free of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. The analysis by SRCD and similarity to a lipase from Pseudomonas with a known three dimensional structure supports the presence of a so-called beta-ladder domain in the C-terminal part of LtxA. LtxA rapidly killed K562 target cells transfected to express β(2) integrin. Cells expressing α(M)β(2) (CD11b/CD18) or α(X)β(2) (CD11c/CD18) were killed as efficiently as cells expressing α(L)β(2). Erythrocytes, which do not express β(2) integrins, were lysed more slowly. In ligand blotting experiments, LtxA bound only to the β(2) chain (CD18). These data support a previous suggestion that CD18 harbors the major binding site for LtxA as well as identifies integrins α(M)β(2) and α(X)β(2) as novel receptors for LtxA.

  20. Trimeric Form of Intracellular ATP Synthase Subunit β of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Binds Human Interleukin-1β

    PubMed Central

    Paino, Annamari; Tuominen, Heidi; Jääskeläinen, Mari; Alanko, Jonna; Nuutila, Jari; Asikainen, Sirkka E.; Pelliniemi, Lauri J.; Pöllänen, Marja T.; Chen, Casey; Ihalin, Riikka

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms resist host defenses and antibiotics partly because of their decreased metabolism. Some bacteria use proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1β, as cues to promote biofilm formation and to alter virulence. Although one potential bacterial IL-1β receptor has been identified, current knowledge of the bacterial IL-1β sensing mechanism is limited. In chronic biofilm infection, periodontitis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans requires tight adherence (tad)-locus to form biofilms, and tissue destroying active lesions contain more IL-1β than inactive ones. The effect of IL-1β on the metabolic activity of A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilm was tested using alamarBlue™. The binding of IL-1β to A. actinomycetemcomitans cells was investigated using transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry. To identify the proteins which interacted with IL-1β, different protein fractions from A. actinomycetemcomitans were run in native-PAGE and blotted using biotinylated IL-1β and avidin-HRP, and identified using mass spectroscopy. We show that although IL-1β slightly increases the biofilm formation of A. actinomycetemcomitans, it reduces the metabolic activity of the biofilm. A similar reduction was observed with all tad-locus mutants except the secretin mutant, although all tested mutant strains as well as wild type strains bound IL-1β. Our results suggest that IL-1β might be transported into the A. actinomycetemcomitans cells, and the trimeric form of intracellular ATP synthase subunit β interacted with IL-1β, possibly explaining the decreased metabolic activity. Because ATP synthase is highly conserved, it might universally enhance biofilm resistance to host defense by binding IL-1β during inflammation. PMID:21533109

  1. Human Serum-Specific Activation of Alternative Sigma Factors, the Stress Responders in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Tang-Siegel, Gaoyan; Bumgarner, Roger; Ruiz, Teresa; Kittichotirat, Weerayuth; Chen, Weizhen; Chen, Casey

    2016-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a known pathogen causing periodontal disease and infective endocarditis, is a survivor in the periodontal pocket and blood stream; both environments contain serum as a nutrient source. To screen for unknown virulence factors associated with this microorganism, A. actinomycetemcomitans was grown in serum-based media to simulate its in vivo environment. Different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans showed distinct growth phenotypes only in the presence of human serum, and they were grouped into high- and low-responder groups. High-responders comprised mainly serotype c strains, and showed an unusual growth phenomenon, featuring a second, rapid increase in turbidity after 9-h incubation that reached a final optical density 2- to 7-fold higher than low-responders. Upon further investigation, the second increase in turbidity was not caused by cell multiplication, but by cell death. Whole transcriptomic analysis via RNA-seq identified 35 genes that were up-regulated by human serum, but not horse serum, in high-responders but not in low-responders, including prominently an alternative sigma factor rpoE (σE). A lacZ reporter construct driven by the 132-bp rpoE promoter sequence of A. actinomycetemcomitans responded dramatically to human serum within 90 min of incubation only when the construct was carried by a high responder strain. The rpoE promoter is 100% identical among high- and low-responder strains. Proteomic investigation showed potential interactions between human serum protein, e.g. apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) and A. actinomycetemcomitans. The data clearly indicated a different activation process for rpoE in high- versus low-responder strains. This differential human serum-specific activation of rpoE, a putative extra-cytoplasmic stress responder and global regulator, suggests distinct in vivo adaptations among different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:27490177

  2. Human Serum-Specific Activation of Alternative Sigma Factors, the Stress Responders in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Tang-Siegel, Gaoyan; Bumgarner, Roger; Ruiz, Teresa; Kittichotirat, Weerayuth; Chen, Weizhen; Chen, Casey

    2016-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a known pathogen causing periodontal disease and infective endocarditis, is a survivor in the periodontal pocket and blood stream; both environments contain serum as a nutrient source. To screen for unknown virulence factors associated with this microorganism, A. actinomycetemcomitans was grown in serum-based media to simulate its in vivo environment. Different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans showed distinct growth phenotypes only in the presence of human serum, and they were grouped into high- and low-responder groups. High-responders comprised mainly serotype c strains, and showed an unusual growth phenomenon, featuring a second, rapid increase in turbidity after 9-h incubation that reached a final optical density 2- to 7-fold higher than low-responders. Upon further investigation, the second increase in turbidity was not caused by cell multiplication, but by cell death. Whole transcriptomic analysis via RNA-seq identified 35 genes that were up-regulated by human serum, but not horse serum, in high-responders but not in low-responders, including prominently an alternative sigma factor rpoE (σE). A lacZ reporter construct driven by the 132-bp rpoE promoter sequence of A. actinomycetemcomitans responded dramatically to human serum within 90 min of incubation only when the construct was carried by a high responder strain. The rpoE promoter is 100% identical among high- and low-responder strains. Proteomic investigation showed potential interactions between human serum protein, e.g. apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) and A. actinomycetemcomitans. The data clearly indicated a different activation process for rpoE in high- versus low-responder strains. This differential human serum-specific activation of rpoE, a putative extra-cytoplasmic stress responder and global regulator, suggests distinct in vivo adaptations among different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:27490177

  3. Virulence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans serotypes and DGGE subtypes isolated from chronic adult periodontitis in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pahumunto, Nuntiya; Ruangsri, Praphansri; Wongsuwanlert, Mutita; Piwat, Supatcharin; Dahlen, Gunnar; Teanpaisan, Rawee

    2015-12-01

    A high proportion of non-serotypeable isolates of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans among Thai periodontitis cases has been previously reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of leukotoxin and toxicity, cytolethal distending toxin (Cdts), and internalization and the killing effect on fibroblasts by A. actinomycetemcomitans subtypes from Thai chronic periodontitis cases. A total of 96 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains from 37 periodontitis cases, previously serotyped with PCR and subtyped with DGGE, were examined for the presence of the ltx gene and cdt genes (cdtBC), and tested for leukotoxin expression, leukotoxicity, internalization, and apoptosis of fibroblast cells. The ltx gene was present in all isolates, while 84.4% showed the cdtBC gene. Two strains with a JP2-like ltx gene with a deletion of 530 bp in the promoter region, serotyped as c, showed virulence of similar magnitude to the JP2 strain. Furthermore, a higher virulence was found in the two non-serotypeable DGGE subtypes, NS1 and NS2, compared with the serotypeable strains (serotype a-f, serotype b and d were absent). Generally, the virulence of strains obtained from deep periodontal pockets was higher than those isolated from shallow non-bleeding pockets. A. actinomycetemcomitans subtypes isolated from adult Thais with chronic periodontitis showed a highly variable virulence, leukotoxin expression, leukotoxicity, internalization and apoptosis of fibroblast, and are regulated both genetically and environmentally. PMID:26529053

  4. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans arcB influences hydrophobic properties, biofilm formation and adhesion to hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Longo, PL; Ota-Tsuzuki, C; Nunes, ACR; Fernandes, BL; Mintz, K; Fives-Taylor, P; Mayer, MPA

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression in the oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is still not fully elucidated. ArcAB is a two-component system which allows facultative anaerobic bacteria to sense various respiratory growth conditions and adapt their gene expression accordingly.This study investigated in A. actinomycetemcomitans the role of ArcB on the regulation of biofilm formation, adhesion to saliva coated hydroxyapatite (SHA) and the hydrophobic properties of the cell. These phenotypic traits were determined for an A. actinomycetemcomitans arcB deficient type and a wild type strain. Differences in hydrophobic properties were shown at early and late exponential growth phases under microaerobic incubation and at late exponential phase under anaerobiosis.The arcB mutant formed less biofilm than the wild type strain when grown under anaerobic incubation, but displayed higher biofilm formation activity under microaerobic conditions. The adherence to SHA was significantly lower in the mutant when compared with the wild type strain. These results suggest that the transmembrane sensor kinase ArcB, in A. actinomycetemcomitans, senses redox growth conditions and regulates the expression of surface components of the bacterial cell related to biofilm formation and adhesion to saliva coated surfaces. PMID:24031399

  5. Azithromycin Enhances Phagocytic Killing of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Y4 by Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Pin-Chuang; Schibler, Mark R.; Walters, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans resists killing by neutrophils and is inhibited by azithromycin (AZM) and amoxicillin (AMX). AZM actively concentrates inside host cells, whereas AMX enters by diffusion. The present study is conducted to determine whether AZM is more effective than AMX at enhancing phagocytic killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans by neutrophils. Methods Killing assays were conducted in the presence of either 2 μg/mL AZM or 16 μg/mL AMX (equipotent against A. actinomycetemcomitans). Neutrophils were loaded by incubation with the appropriate antibiotic. Opsonized A. actinomycetemcomitans strain Y4 was incubated with the indicated antibiotic alone, with loaded neutrophils and antibiotic, or with control neutrophils (without antibiotic) at multiplicities of infection (MOIs) of 30 and 90 bacteria per neutrophil. Results Neutrophil incubation with 2 μg/mL AZM yielded an intracellular concentration of 10 μg/mL. At an MOI of 30, neutrophils loaded with AZM failed to kill significantly more bacteria than control neutrophils during the 60- and 90-minute assay periods. At an MOI of 90, neutrophils loaded with AZM killed significantly more bacteria than either AZM alone or control neutrophils during 60- and 90-minute incubations (P <0.05), and killed significantly more bacteria after 90 minutes than the sum of the killing produced by AZM alone or neutrophils alone. Neutrophils incubated with AMX under identical conditions also killed significantly more bacteria than either AMX alone or control neutrophils, but there was no evidence of synergism between AMX and neutrophils. Conclusions Neutrophils possess a concentrative transport system for AZM that may enhance killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Its effects are most pronounced when neutrophils are greatly outnumbered by bacteria. PMID:25186779

  6. Membrane Association and Destabilization by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Leukotoxin Requires Changes in Secondary Structures

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Michael J.; Brown, Angela C.; Edrington, Thomas C.; Baranwal, Somesh; Du, Yurong; Lally, Edward T.; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a common inhabitant of the upper aerodigestive tract of humans and non-human primates and is associated with disseminated infections, including lung and brain abscesses, pediatric infective endocarditis in children, and localized aggressive periodontitis. A. actinomycetemcomitans secretes a repeats-in-toxin protein, leukotoxin, which exclusively kills lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1-bearing cells. The toxin's pathological mechanism is not fully understood; however, experimental evidence indicates that it involves the association with and subsequent destabilization of the target cell's plasma membrane. We have long hypothesized that leukotoxin secondary structure is strongly correlated with membrane association and/or destabilization. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by analyzing lipid-induced changes in leukotoxin conformation. Upon incubation of leukotoxin with lipids that favor leukotoxin-membrane association, we observed an increase in leukotoxin α-helical content that was not observed with lipids that favor membrane destabilization. The change in leukotoxin conformation after incubation with these lipids suggests that membrane binding and membrane destabilization have distinct secondary structural requirements, suggesting that they are independent events. These studies thus provide insight into the mechanism of cell damage that leads to disease progression by A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:23678967

  7. [Microbiological approach to a possible infective endocarditis case caused by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans].

    PubMed

    Gürcan, Şaban; Ünlü, Selahattin; Kuloğlu, Figen; Karadenizli, Aynur; Kuşkucu, Mert Ahmet

    2016-04-01

    Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans, a small, gram-negative coccobacillus that grows slow and fastidious, is generally colonized in the oral cavity. It is a rarely seen bacterium because of the difficulty of isolation but it can be a causative agent for dental infections and infective endocarditis (IE) particularly in the persons having prosthetic heart valves. In this report, a possible IE case caused by A.actinomycetemcomitans in a patient with aortic valve replacement has been presented. A 36-year-old man has admitted to Trakya University Hospital, Health Center for Medical Research and Practice, with the complaints of chills, malaise, intermittent fever, severe arthralgia and weight loss (20 kg). During his follow-up period, the blood cultures that were obtained three week intervals yielded the identical gram-negative coccobacilli morphology. The patient was then diagnosed as possible IE on the basis of having one major (growth of the typical microorganisms that may cause IE in two different blood cultures) and two minor (presence of prosthetic valve and high fever) criterias. The isolate could not be identified with conventional methods, while it was identified as Francisella tularensis with VITEK 2 (bioMerieux, France) system. Hence this identification was not confirmed by real-time Taqman polymerase chain reaction, so MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was used to identify this bacteria. In the first run of the study, the isolate was named as Shigella dysenteriae initially, however when it was retested the next day it was identified as A.actinomycetemcomitans. In order to enlighten these conflicting results, 16S and 23S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis was performed, and consequently the bacterium was identified as A.actinomycetemcomitans. Doxycycline (2 x 100 mg po, 20 days) and streptomycin (2 x 10 mg/kg im, 10 days) therapy were initiated, considering the initial suspicious identification (F.tularensis), and on the fifth day of therapy the

  8. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin: a powerful tool with capacity to cause imbalance in the host inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anders

    2011-03-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has been described as a member of the indigenous oral microbiota of humans, and is involved in the pathology of periodontitis and various non-oral infections. This bacterium selectively kills human leukocytes through expression of leukotoxin, a large pore-forming protein that belongs to the Repeat in Toxin (RTX) family. The specificity of the toxin is related to its prerequisite for a specific target cell receptor, LFA-1, which is solely expressed on leukocytes. The leukotoxin causes death of different leukocyte populations in a variety of ways. It activates a rapid release of lysosomal enzymes and MMPs from neutrophils and causes apoptosis in lymphocytes. In the monocytes/macrophages, the toxin activates caspase-1, a cysteine proteinase, which causes a proinflammatory response by the activation and secretion of IL-1β and IL-18. A specific clone (JP2) of A. actinomycetemcomitans with enhanced leukotoxin expression significantly correlates to disease onset in infected individuals. Taken together, the mechanisms by which this toxin kills leukocytes are closely related to the pathogenic mechanisms of inflammatory disorders, such as periodontitis. Therapeutic strategies targeting the cellular and molecular inflammatory host response in periodontal diseases might be a future treatment alternative.

  9. Photosensitization of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans with methylene blue: a microbiological and spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada Júnior, Aécio M.; Prates, Renato A.; Cai, Silvana; Ribeiro, Martha S.

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determinate the efficiency of methylene blue (MB) to kill cultures of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans under red light and to investigate MB photobleaching by optical absorption spectroscopy. Bacteria were diluted in aqueous solution, putted in glass tubes and distributed in 5 groups: (L-MB-) control group; (L+MB-) laser alone by 5min; (L-MB+) MB alone through 5min; (3L+MB+) MB+laser 3min; (5L+MB+) MB+laser 5min. Laser parameters were P=30mW, λ=660nm, E=9J in 5min and E=5.4J in 3min. The samples were diluted and bacterial colonies were counted and converted into colony forming units (CFU). Absorption spectra of the MB-stained bacterial suspension and photosensitized bacterial suspension were obtained. Groups L-MB-, L+MB-, and L-MB+ did not show a decrease in CFU/mL. L+MB+ groups showed a significant decrease in CFU/mL but no statistically significant differences were observed between 3min and 5min. Spectroscopy showed that MB is photodegraded after irradiation and that dimer species are more notably consumed than monomeric species. These results suggest that MB is a suitable photosensitizer to reduce A. actinomycetemcomitans, and that 3min of irradiation are enough to produce a significant effect. Due to the spectral changes observed on MB solution after irradiation a type I mechanism may be involved.

  10. Prophage induction in lysogenic Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans cells co-cultured with human gingival fibroblasts, and its effect on leukotoxin release.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Roy H; de Moura Martins Lobo Dos Santos, Caroline; Zuanazzi, David; de Accioly Mattos, Marcelo Barbosas; Ferreira, Davis Fernandes; Kachlany, Scott C; Tinoco, Eduardo M B

    2013-01-01

    Lysogeny is common among strains of the periodontal pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Since lysogenic induction is known to result in the increased synthesis and release of bacterial toxins from lysogens, it would be important to elucidate the conditions under which induction of these bacteria may occur. Co-cultures of A. actinomycetemcomitans strains (either lysogenic or non-lysogenic) and human cells (either gingival fibroblasts or pharyngeal epithelial cells) were prepared. Following incubation, bacteriophage titers of up to 6.2 × 10(7) pfu/ml were detected in the cell-free, spent culture media from the co-cultures of the lysogenic A. actinomycetemcomitans strains and the fibroblasts. Little (maximum of 2 × 10(0) pfu/ml) or no titers of phage could be detected in the mono-cultures of the lysogenic A. actinomycetemcomitans strains alone. In contrast, no phage were detectable in the cell-free spent culture media of the lysogens cocultured with the epithelial cells. Futhermore, co-culture of the A. actinomycetemcomitans lysogens with the fibroblasts resulted in enhanced release of the A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin into the culture medium, in comparison with the spent culture media from mono-cultures of the lysogens alone. These results are consistent with the concept that interaction with fibroblasts may mediate prophage induction in lysogenic strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans, and that leukotoxin release is greatly augmented following induction of the lysogens. PMID:23022667

  11. Profound Effects of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Leukotoxin Mutation on Adherence Properties Are Clarified in in vitro Experiments.

    PubMed

    Velusamy, Senthil Kumar; Sampathkumar, Vandana; Godboley, Dipti; Fine, Daniel H

    2016-01-01

    Leukotoxin (Ltx) is a prominent virulence factor produced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, an oral microorganism highly associated with aggressive periodontitis. Ltx compromises host responsiveness by altering the viability of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages. Previously, we developed a Rhesus (Rh) monkey colonization model designed to determine the effect of virulence gene mutations on colonization of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Unexpectedly, an A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin (ltxA) mutant (RhAa-VS2) failed to colonize in the Rh model. No previous literature suggested that Ltx was associated with A. actinomycetemcomitans binding to tooth surfaces. These results led us to explore the broad effects of the ltxA mutation in vitro. Results indicated that LtxA activity was completely abolished in RhAa-VS2 strain, while complementation significantly (P<0.0001) restored leukotoxicity compared to RhAa-VS2 strain. RT-PCR analysis of ltx gene expression ruled out polar effects. Furthermore, binding of RhAa-VS2 to salivary-coated hydroxyapatite (SHA) was significantly decreased (P<0.0001) compared to wild type RhAa3 strain. Real time RT-PCR analysis of the genes related to SHA binding in RhAa-VS2 showed that genes related to binding were downregulated [rcpA (P = 0.018), rcpB (P = 0.02), tadA (P = 0.002)] as compared to wild type RhAa3. RhAa-VS2 also exhibited decreased biofilm depth (P = 0.008) and exo-polysaccharide production (P<0.0001). Buccal epithelial cell (BEC) binding of RhAa-VS2 was unaffected. Complementation with ltxA restored binding to SHA (P<0.002) but had no effect on biofilm formation when compared to RhAa3. In conclusion, mutation of ltxA diminished hard tissue binding in vitro, which helps explain the previous in vivo failure of a ltxA knockout to colonize the Rh oral cavity. These results suggest that; 1) one specific gene knockout (in this case ltxA) could affect other seemingly unrelated genes (such as rcpA, rcpB tadA etc), and 2

  12. Profound Effects of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Leukotoxin Mutation on Adherence Properties Are Clarified in in vitro Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Godboley, Dipti; Fine, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Leukotoxin (Ltx) is a prominent virulence factor produced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, an oral microorganism highly associated with aggressive periodontitis. Ltx compromises host responsiveness by altering the viability of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages. Previously, we developed a Rhesus (Rh) monkey colonization model designed to determine the effect of virulence gene mutations on colonization of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Unexpectedly, an A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin (ltxA) mutant (RhAa-VS2) failed to colonize in the Rh model. No previous literature suggested that Ltx was associated with A. actinomycetemcomitans binding to tooth surfaces. These results led us to explore the broad effects of the ltxA mutation in vitro. Results indicated that LtxA activity was completely abolished in RhAa-VS2 strain, while complementation significantly (P<0.0001) restored leukotoxicity compared to RhAa-VS2 strain. RT-PCR analysis of ltx gene expression ruled out polar effects. Furthermore, binding of RhAa-VS2 to salivary-coated hydroxyapatite (SHA) was significantly decreased (P<0.0001) compared to wild type RhAa3 strain. Real time RT-PCR analysis of the genes related to SHA binding in RhAa-VS2 showed that genes related to binding were downregulated [rcpA (P = 0.018), rcpB (P = 0.02), tadA (P = 0.002)] as compared to wild type RhAa3. RhAa-VS2 also exhibited decreased biofilm depth (P = 0.008) and exo-polysaccharide production (P<0.0001). Buccal epithelial cell (BEC) binding of RhAa-VS2 was unaffected. Complementation with ltxA restored binding to SHA (P<0.002) but had no effect on biofilm formation when compared to RhAa3. In conclusion, mutation of ltxA diminished hard tissue binding in vitro, which helps explain the previous in vivo failure of a ltxA knockout to colonize the Rh oral cavity. These results suggest that; 1) one specific gene knockout (in this case ltxA) could affect other seemingly unrelated genes (such as rcpA, rcpB tadA etc), and 2

  13. Profound Effects of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Leukotoxin Mutation on Adherence Properties Are Clarified in in vitro Experiments.

    PubMed

    Velusamy, Senthil Kumar; Sampathkumar, Vandana; Godboley, Dipti; Fine, Daniel H

    2016-01-01

    Leukotoxin (Ltx) is a prominent virulence factor produced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, an oral microorganism highly associated with aggressive periodontitis. Ltx compromises host responsiveness by altering the viability of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages. Previously, we developed a Rhesus (Rh) monkey colonization model designed to determine the effect of virulence gene mutations on colonization of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Unexpectedly, an A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin (ltxA) mutant (RhAa-VS2) failed to colonize in the Rh model. No previous literature suggested that Ltx was associated with A. actinomycetemcomitans binding to tooth surfaces. These results led us to explore the broad effects of the ltxA mutation in vitro. Results indicated that LtxA activity was completely abolished in RhAa-VS2 strain, while complementation significantly (P<0.0001) restored leukotoxicity compared to RhAa-VS2 strain. RT-PCR analysis of ltx gene expression ruled out polar effects. Furthermore, binding of RhAa-VS2 to salivary-coated hydroxyapatite (SHA) was significantly decreased (P<0.0001) compared to wild type RhAa3 strain. Real time RT-PCR analysis of the genes related to SHA binding in RhAa-VS2 showed that genes related to binding were downregulated [rcpA (P = 0.018), rcpB (P = 0.02), tadA (P = 0.002)] as compared to wild type RhAa3. RhAa-VS2 also exhibited decreased biofilm depth (P = 0.008) and exo-polysaccharide production (P<0.0001). Buccal epithelial cell (BEC) binding of RhAa-VS2 was unaffected. Complementation with ltxA restored binding to SHA (P<0.002) but had no effect on biofilm formation when compared to RhAa3. In conclusion, mutation of ltxA diminished hard tissue binding in vitro, which helps explain the previous in vivo failure of a ltxA knockout to colonize the Rh oral cavity. These results suggest that; 1) one specific gene knockout (in this case ltxA) could affect other seemingly unrelated genes (such as rcpA, rcpB tadA etc), and 2

  14. Detection of antimicrobial activity of banana peel (Musa paradisiaca L.) on Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kapadia, Suraj Premal; Pudakalkatti, Pushpa S.; Shivanaikar, Sachin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Aim: Banana is used widely because of its nutritional values. In past, there are studies that show banana plant parts, and their fruits can be used to treat the human diseases. Banana peel is a part of banana fruit that also has the antibacterial activity against microorganisms but has not been studied extensively. Since, there are no studies that relate the antibacterial activity of banana peel against periodontal pathogens. Hence, the aim of this study is to determine the antimicrobial activity of banana peel extract on Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans). Material and Methods: Standard strains of P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans were used in this study which was obtained from the in-house bacterial bank of Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology at Maratha Mandal's Nathajirao G. Halgekar Institute of Dental Sciences and Research Centre. The banana peel extract was prepared, and the antibacterial activity was assessed using well agar diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentration was assessed using serial broth dilution method. Results: In the current study, both the tested microorganisms showed antibacterial activity. In well diffusion method, P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans showed 15 mm and 12 mm inhibition zone against an alcoholic extract of banana peel, respectively. In serial broth dilution method P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans were sensitive until 31.25 μg/ml dilutions. Conclusion: From results of the study, it is suggested that an alcoholic extract of banana peel has antimicrobial activity against P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:26681854

  15. Construction of new cloning, lacZ reporter and scarless-markerless suicide vectors for genetic studies in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Demuth, Donald R

    2013-05-01

    To elucidate the putative function of a gene, effective tools are required for genetic characterization that facilitate its inactivation, deletion or modification on the bacterial chromosome. In the present study, the nucleotide sequence of the Escherichia coli/Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans shuttle vector pYGK was determined, allowing us to redesign and construct a new shuttle cloning vector, pJT4, and promoterless lacZ transcriptional/translational fusion plasmids, pJT3 and pJT5. Plasmids pJT4 and pJT5 contain the origin of replication necessary to maintain shuttle vector replication. In addition, a new suicide vector, pJT1, was constructed for the generation of scarless and markerless deletion mutations of genes in the oral pathogen A. actinomycetemcomitans. Plasmid pJT1 is a pUC-based suicide vector that is counter-selectable for sucrose sensitivity. This vector does not leave antibiotic markers or scars on the chromosome after gene deletion and thus provides the option to combine several mutations in the same genetic background. The effectiveness of pJT1 was demonstrated by the construction of A. actinomycetemcomitans isogenic qseB single deletion (ΔqseB) mutant and lsrRK double deletion mutants (ΔlsrRK). These new vectors may offer alternatives for genetic studies in A. actinomycetemcomitans and other members of the HACEK (Haemophilus spp., A. actinomycetemcomitans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella kingae) group of Gram-negative bacteria.

  16. Development of an Animal Model for Aggregatibacter Actinomycetemcomitans Biofilm-Mediated Oral Osteolytic Infection: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Freire, Marcelo O.; Sedghizadeh, Parish P.; Schaudinn, Christoph; Gorur, Amita; Downey, Jennifer S.; Choi, Jeong-Ho; Chen, Weizhen; Kook, Joong-Ki; Chen, Casey; Goodman, Steven D.; Zadeh, Homayoun H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Biofilm-induced inflammatory osteolytic oral infections, such as periodontitis and peri-implantitis, have complex etiology and pathogenesis. A significant obstacle to research has been the lack of appropriate animal models where the inflammatory response to biofilms can be investigated. The aim of this study is to develop a novel animal model to study the host response to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (previously Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans)–biofilm colonizing titanium implants. Methods Titanium implants were inoculated in vitro with A. actinomycetemcomitans, establishing a biofilm for 1 to 3 days. Biofilm-inoculated and control implants were transmucosally placed into rat hard palate or alveolar ridge. Analysis included documentation of clinical inflammation, polymerase chain reaction, and culture detection of A. actinomycetemcomitans and microcomputed tomography quantitation of peri-implant bone volume. Results Viable A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilm was successfully established on titanium implants in vitro, detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. An inflammatory response characterized by clinical inflammation, bleeding, ulceration, hyperplasia, and necrosis was observed around biofilm-inoculated implants. A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected by polymerase chain reaction and culture analysis on 100%of biofilm-inoculated implants for up to 3 weeks and 25%for up to 6 weeks. Microcomputed tomography analysis demonstrated significantly lower bone volume (P <0.05) around biofilm-inoculated implants (29.6% ± 7.6%) compared to non-inoculated implants (50.5% ± 9.6%) after 6 weeks. Conclusions These results describe a novel animal model where A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilm was established in vitro on titanium implants before placement in rat oral cavity, leading to an inflammatory response, osteolysis, and tissue destruction. This model may have potential use for investigation of host responses to biofilm pathogens and

  17. A Consortium of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Streptococcus parasanguinis, and Filifactor alocis Is Present in Sites Prior to Bone Loss in a Longitudinal Study of Localized Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, Kenneth; Fairlie, Karen; Tischio-Bereski, Debbie; Ferrendiz, Javier; Furgang, David; Paster, Bruce J.; Dewhirst, Floyd E.

    2013-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-induced localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP) in African-American adolescents has been documented but is poorly understood. Two thousand fifty-eight adolescents aged 11 to 17 years were screened for their periodontal status and the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans in their oral cavity. Seventy-one A. actinomycetemcomitans-negative and 63 A. actinomycetemcomitans-positive periodontally healthy subjects were enrolled, sampled, examined, and radiographed yearly for 3 years. Gingival and periodontal pocket depth and attachment levels were recorded. Disease presentation was characterized by bone loss (BL). Subgingival sites were sampled every 6 months to assess (i) the role of A. actinomycetemcomitans in BL and (ii) the association of A. actinomycetemcomitans and other microbes in their relationships to BL. Sixteen of 63 subjects with A. actinomycetemcomitans developed BL (the other 47 subjects with A. actinomycetemcomitans had no BL). No A. actinomycetemcomitans-negative subjects developed BL. Human oral microbe identification microarray (HOMIM) was used for subgingival microbial assessment. On a subject level, pooled data from A. actinomycetemcomitans-positive subjects who remained healthy had higher prevalences of Streptococcus and Actinomyces species, while A. actinomycetemcomitans-positive subjects with BL had higher prevalences of Parvimonas micra, Filifactor alocis, A. actinomycetemcomitans, and Peptostreptococcus sp. human oral taxon 113 (HOT-113). At vulnerable sites, A. actinomycetemcomitans, Streptococcus parasanguinis, and F. alocis levels were elevated prior to BL. In cases where the three-organism consortium (versus A. actinomycetemcomitans alone) was detected, the specificity for detecting sites of future BL increased from 62% to 99%, with a sensitivity of 89%. We conclude that detecting the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans, S. parasanguinis, and F. alocis together indicates sites of future BL in LAP. A

  18. Transcriptome Profiling of Wild-Type and pga-Knockout Mutant Strains Reveal the Role of Exopolysaccharide in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Mayilvahanan; El Abbar, Faiha; Ramasubbu, Narayanan

    2015-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides have a diverse set of functions in most bacteria including a mechanistic role in protecting bacteria against environmental stresses. Among the many functions attributed to the exopolysaccharides, biofilm formation, antibiotic resistance, immune evasion and colonization have been studied most extensively. The exopolysaccharide produced by many Gram positive as well as Gram negative bacteria including the oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is the homopolymer of β(1,6)-linked N-acetylglucosamine. Recently, we reported that the PGA-deficient mutant of A. actinomycetemcomitans failed to colonize or induce bone resorption in a rat model of periodontal disease, and the colonization genes, apiA and aae, were significantly down regulated in the mutant strain. To understand the role of exopolysaccharide and the pga locus in the global expression of A. actinomycetemcomitans, we have used comparative transcriptome profiling to identify differentially expressed genes in the wild-type strain in relation to the PGA-deficient strain. Transcriptome analysis revealed that about 50% of the genes are differently expressed (P < 0.05 and fold change >1.5). Our study demonstrated that the absence of the pga locus affects the genes involved in peptidoglycan recycling, glycogen storage, and virulence. Further, using confocal microscopy and plating assays, we show that the viability of pga mutant strain is significantly reduced during biofilm growth. Thus, this study highlights the importance of pga genes and the exopolysaccharide in the virulence of A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:26221956

  19. Serotypes of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in relation to periodontal status and geographic origin of individuals-a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    da Silveira, Virginia R S.; Rego, Rodrigo O.; Nogueira, Nádia A P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Several studies have focused on the relationship among serotype distribution, ethnical status and geographic populations, and periodontal conditions. Studies that have investigated the prevalence and the distribution of A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes and the relation between the different serotypes of the bacterium and periodontal status were reviewed. Material and Methods: A systematic literature search for publications regarding the distribution of A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes in subgingival samples of periodontitis patients and periodontally healthy subjects by employing polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was conducted. Results: From the 85 studies identified in the first analysis, only 12 met all inclusion and exclusion criteria. Clinical isolates from diverse geographic populations with different periodontal conditions were evaluated. Serotypes a, b and c were largely found, and serotype c was the most prevalent. They were isolated from various periodontal conditions, including aggressive periodontitis. Conclusions: The available literature suggests that serotypes a, b, and c are globally dominant, serotypes d and e are rare, and the prevalence of the most recently identified serotype fis still unknown. It is widely accepted that distribution patterns of A. actinomycetemcomitans vary among subjects of different ethnicity and geographic regions. The correlation of different serotypes with various periodontal conditions remains unclear. Key words:Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, serotypes, periodontal disease, prevalence. PMID:24316700

  20. Surface display of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans autotransporter Aae and dispersin B hybrid act as antibiofilm agents.

    PubMed

    Ragunath, C; DiFranco, K; Shanmugam, M; Gopal, P; Vyas, V; Fine, D H; Cugini, C; Ramasubbu, N

    2016-08-01

    Among the various proteins expressed by the periodontopathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, two proteins play important roles for survival in the oral cavity. The autotransporter Aae facilitates the attachment of the pathogen to oral epithelial cells, which act as a reservoir, while the biofilm-degrading glycoside hydrolase dispersin B facilitates the movement of daughter cells from the mature biofilm to a new site. The objective of this study was to use the potential of these two proteins to control biofilms. To this end, we generated a hybrid construct between the Aae C-terminal translocating domain and dispersin B, and mobilized it into Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3) pLysS cells. Immunofluorescence analysis of the modified E. coli cells confirmed the presence of dispersin B on the surface. Further, the membrane localization of the displayed dispersin B was confirmed with Western blot analysis. The integrity of the E. coli cells displaying the dispersin B was confirmed through FACS analysis. The hydrolytic activity of the surface-displayed dispersin B was confirmed by using 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-d-glucopyranoside as the substrate. The detachment ability of the dispersin B surface-displaying E. coli cells was shown using Staphylococcus epidermidis and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae biofilms in a microtiter assay. We concluded that the Aae β-domain is sufficient to translocate foreign enzymes in the native folded form and that the method of Aae-mediated translocation of surface displayed enzymes might be useful for control of biofilms. PMID:26280561

  1. Alteration of Homeostasis in Pre-osteoclasts Induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans CDT

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Dione; Ando-Suguimoto, Ellen S.; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; DiRienzo, Joseph M.; Mayer, Marcia P. A.

    2016-01-01

    The dysbiotic microbiota associated with aggressive periodontitis includes Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, the only oral species known to produce a cytolethal distending toxin (AaCDT). Give that CDT alters the cytokine profile in monocytic cells, we aimed to test the hypothesis that CDT plays a role in bone homeostasis by affecting the differentiation of precursor cells into osteoclasts. Recombinant AaCDT was added to murine bone marrow monocytes (BMMC) in the presence or absence of RANKL and the cell viability and cytokine profile of osteoclast precursor cells were determined. Multinucleated TRAP+ cell numbers, and relative transcription of genes related to osteoclastogenesis were also evaluated. The addition of AaCDT did not lead to loss in cell viability but promoted an increase in the average number of TRAP+ cells with 1-2 nuclei in the absence or presence of RANKL (Tukey, p < 0.05). This increase was also observed for TRAP+ cells with ≥3nuclei, although this difference was not significant. Levels of TGF-β, TNF-α, and IL-6, in the supernatant fraction of cells, were higher when in AaCDT exposed cells, whereas levels of IL-1β and IL-10 were lower than controls under the same conditions. After interaction with AaCDT, transcription of the rank (encoding the receptor RANK), nfatc1 (transcription factor), and ctpK (encoding cathepsin K) genes was downregulated in pre-osteoclastic cells. The data indicated that despite the presence of RANKL and M-CSF, AaCDT may inhibit osteoclast differentiation by altering cytokine profiles and repressing transcription of genes involved in osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, the CDT may impair host defense mechanisms in periodontitis. PMID:27064424

  2. Pathogenicity of the highly leukotoxic JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and its geographic dissemination and role in aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Haubek, Dorte; Johansson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    For decades, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has been associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis in adolescents. In the middle of the 1990s, a specific JP2 clone of A. actinomycetemcomitans, belonging to the cluster of serotype b strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans and having a number of other characteristics, was found to be strongly associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis, particularly in North Africa. Although several longitudinal studies still point to the bacterial species, A. actinomycetemcomitans as a risk factor of aggressive periodontitis, it is now also widely accepted that the highly leukotoxic JP2 clone of A. actinomycetemcomitans is implicated in rapidly progressing forms of aggressive periodontitis. The JP2 clone strains are highly prevalent in human populations living in Northern and Western parts of Africa. These strains are also prevalent in geographically widespread populations that have originated from the Northwest Africa. Only sporadic signs of a dissemination of the JP2 clone strains to non-African populations have been found despite Africans living geographically widespread for hundreds of years. It remains an unanswered question if a particular host tropism exists as a possible explanation for the frequent colonization of the Northwest African population with the JP2 clone. Two exotoxins of A. actinomycetemcomitans are known, leukotoxin (LtxA) and cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt). LtxA is able to kill human immune cells, and Cdt can block cell cycle progression in eukaryotic cells and thus induce cell cycle arrest. Whereas the leukotoxin production is enhanced in JP2 clone strains thus increasing the virulence potential of A. actinomycetemcomitans, it has not been possible so far to demonstrate such a role for Cdt. Lines of evidence have led to the understanding of the highly leukotoxic JP2 clone of A. actinomycetemcomitans as an aetiological factor of aggressive periodontitis. Patients, who are colonized with the JP2

  3. Pathogenicity of the highly leukotoxic JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and its geographic dissemination and role in aggressive periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Haubek, Dorte; Johansson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    For decades, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has been associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis in adolescents. In the middle of the 1990s, a specific JP2 clone of A. actinomycetemcomitans, belonging to the cluster of serotype b strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans and having a number of other characteristics, was found to be strongly associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis, particularly in North Africa. Although several longitudinal studies still point to the bacterial species, A. actinomycetemcomitans as a risk factor of aggressive periodontitis, it is now also widely accepted that the highly leukotoxic JP2 clone of A. actinomycetemcomitans is implicated in rapidly progressing forms of aggressive periodontitis. The JP2 clone strains are highly prevalent in human populations living in Northern and Western parts of Africa. These strains are also prevalent in geographically widespread populations that have originated from the Northwest Africa. Only sporadic signs of a dissemination of the JP2 clone strains to non-African populations have been found despite Africans living geographically widespread for hundreds of years. It remains an unanswered question if a particular host tropism exists as a possible explanation for the frequent colonization of the Northwest African population with the JP2 clone. Two exotoxins of A. actinomycetemcomitans are known, leukotoxin (LtxA) and cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt). LtxA is able to kill human immune cells, and Cdt can block cell cycle progression in eukaryotic cells and thus induce cell cycle arrest. Whereas the leukotoxin production is enhanced in JP2 clone strains thus increasing the virulence potential of A. actinomycetemcomitans, it has not been possible so far to demonstrate such a role for Cdt. Lines of evidence have led to the understanding of the highly leukotoxic JP2 clone of A. actinomycetemcomitans as an aetiological factor of aggressive periodontitis. Patients, who are colonized with the JP2

  4. Mlc is a transcriptional activator with a key role in integrating cyclic AMP receptor protein and integration host factor regulation of leukotoxin RNA synthesis in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a periodontal pathogen, synthesizes leukotoxin (LtxA), a protein that helps the bacterium evade the host immune response. Transcription of the ltxA operon is induced during anaerobic growth. The cAMP receptor protein (CRP) indirectly increases ltxA expression...

  5. Antibacterial Effect of an Herbal Product Persica on Porphyromonas Gingivalis and Aggregatibacter Actinomycetemcomitans: An In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Jelvehgaran Esfahani, Zahra; Kadkhoda, Zeinab; Eshraghi, Seyed Saeed; Salehi Surmaghi, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The plant Salvadora persica is used for oral hygiene in many parts of the world. It has been suggested that it has antibacterial properties, in addition to its ability to mechanically remove plaques. The aim of this study was to assess the antimicrobial activity of the herbal product Persica containing Salvadora persica against periodontopathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in vitro. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with moderate and severe periodontitis were recruited. Using paper points, subgingival plaque samples were taken from pockets with attachment loss ≥ 3mm. The samples were subjected to microbial culture to yield P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans. The ditch plate method was used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of the bacteria to Persica compared to chlorhexidine and distilled water. The growth inhibition zones of microorganisms around the ditches were measured in millimeters. The data were analyzed using SPSS 16. Freidman test and Wilcoxon signed ranks test with Bonferroni adjustment were used for analysis of variance with 5% significance level. P<0.05 for main comparisons and P< 0.017 for multiple comparisons were considered statistically significant. Results: P. gingivalis was sensitive to chlorhexidine and persica. There was a significant difference (P=0.001) between antimicrobial activity of chlorhexidine (mean 28.733mm, SD 5.216) and Persica (mean 16.333mm, SD 5.259) compared to water against P. gingivalis. There was a significant difference (P< 0.001) between the antimicrobial activity of chlorhexidine (24.045mm, SD 3.897) and Persica (0.545mm, SD 2.558) with respect to A. actinomycetemcomitans. There was no significant difference (P=0.317) between the antimicrobial activity of Persica and water against A. actinomycetemcomitans. Conclusion: The herbal product Persica had significant antimicrobial activity against P. gingivalis and negligible antimicrobial activity against A

  6. Differential expression of CC chemokines (CCLs) and receptors (CCRs) by human T lymphocytes in response to different Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans serotypes

    PubMed Central

    ALVAREZ, Carla; BENÍTEZ, Alvaro; ROJAS, Leticia; PUJOL, Myriam; CARVAJAL, Paola; DÍAZ-ZÚÑIGA, Jaime; VERNAL, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    In Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, different serotypes have been described based on LPS antigenicity. Recently, our research group has reported a differential immunogenicity when T lymphocytes were stimulated with these different serotypes. In particular, it was demonstrated that the serotype b of A. actinomycetemcomitans has a stronger capacity to trigger Th1- and Th17-type cytokine production. Objective This study aimed to quantify the expression of different CC chemokines (CCLs) and receptors (CCRs) in T lymphocytes stimulated with the different A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes. In addition, the expression of the transcription factors T-bet, GATA-3, RORC2, and Foxp3, master-switch genes implied in the Th1, Th2, Th17, and T-regulatory differentiation, respectively, was analysed in order to determine T-cell phenotype-specific patterns of CCL and CCR expression upon A. actinomycetemcomitans stimulation. Material and Methods Human naïve CD4+ T lymphocytes were obtained from healthy subjects and stimulated with autologous dendritic cells primed with the different A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes. The expression levels for the chemokines CCL1, CCL2, CCL3, CCL5, CCL11, CCL17, CCL20, CCL21, CCL25, and CCL28, as well as the chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2, CCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR6, CCR7, CCR8, CCR9, and CCR10 were quantified by qPCR. Similarly, the expression levels for the transcription factors T-bet, GATA-3, RORC2, and Foxp3 were quantified and correlated with the CCL and CCR expression levels. Results Higher expression levels of CCL2, CCL3, CCL5, CCL20, CCL21, CCL28, CCR1, CCR2, CCR5, CCR6, CCR7, and CCR9 were detected in T lymphocytes stimulated with the serotype b of A. actinomycetemcomitans compared with the other serotypes. In addition, these higher expression levels of CCLs and CCRs positively correlated with the increased levels of T-bet and RORC2 when T lymphocytes were stimulated with the serotype b. Conclusion A T-lymphocyte response biased towards a

  7. Differential expression of CC chemokines (CCLs) and receptors (CCRs) by human T lymphocytes in response to different Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans serotypes

    PubMed Central

    ALVAREZ, Carla; BENÍTEZ, Alvaro; ROJAS, Leticia; PUJOL, Myriam; CARVAJAL, Paola; DÍAZ-ZÚÑIGA, Jaime; VERNAL, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, different serotypes have been described based on LPS antigenicity. Recently, our research group has reported a differential immunogenicity when T lymphocytes were stimulated with these different serotypes. In particular, it was demonstrated that the serotype b of A. actinomycetemcomitans has a stronger capacity to trigger Th1- and Th17-type cytokine production. Objective This study aimed to quantify the expression of different CC chemokines (CCLs) and receptors (CCRs) in T lymphocytes stimulated with the different A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes. In addition, the expression of the transcription factors T-bet, GATA-3, RORC2, and Foxp3, master-switch genes implied in the Th1, Th2, Th17, and T-regulatory differentiation, respectively, was analyzed in order to determine T-cell phenotype-specific patterns of CCL and CCR expression upon A. actinomycetemcomitans stimulation. Material and Methods Human naïve CD4+ T lymphocytes were obtained from healthy subjects and stimulated with autologous dendritic cells primed with the different A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes. The expression levels for the chemokines CCL1, CCL2, CCL3, CCL5, CCL11, CCL17, CCL20, CCL21, CCL25, and CCL28, as well as the chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2, CCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR6, CCR7, CCR8, CCR9, and CCR10 were quantified by qPCR. Similarly, the expression levels for the transcription factors T-bet, GATA-3, RORC2, and Foxp3 were quantified and correlated with the CCL and CCR expression levels. Results Higher expression levels of CCL2, CCL3, CCL5, CCL20, CCL21, CCL28, CCR1, CCR2, CCR5, CCR6, CCR7, and CCR9 were detected in T lymphocytes stimulated with the serotype b of A. actinomycetemcomitans compared with the other serotypes. In addition, these higher expression levels of CCLs and CCRs positively correlated with the increased levels of T-bet and RORC2 when T lymphocytes were stimulated with the serotype b. Conclusion A T-lymphocyte response biased

  8. Inflammatory bone loss in experimental periodontitis induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in interleukin-1 receptor antagonist knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Izawa, A; Ishihara, Y; Mizutani, H; Kobayashi, S; Goto, H; Okabe, E; Takeda, H; Ozawa, Y; Kamiya, Y; Sugita, Y; Kubo, K; Kamei, H; Kikuchi, T; Mitani, A; Hayashi, J; Nishihara, T; Maeda, H; Noguchi, T

    2014-05-01

    The interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) binds to IL-1 receptors and inhibits IL-1 activity. However, it is not clear whether IL-1Ra plays a protective role in periodontal disease. This study was undertaken to compare experimental periodontitis induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in IL-1Ra knockout (KO) mice and wild-type (WT) mice. Computed tomography (CT) analysis and hematoxylin-and-eosin (H&E) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining were performed. In addition, osteoblasts were isolated; the mRNA expression of relevant genes was assessed by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR); and calcification was detected by Alizarin Red staining. Infected IL-1Ra KO mice exhibited elevated (P, <0.05) levels of antibody against A. actinomycetemcomitans, bone loss in furcation areas, and alveolar fenestrations. Moreover, protein for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and IL-6, mRNA for macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) in IL-1Ra KO mouse osteoblasts stimulated with A. actinomycetemcomitans were increased (P, <0.05) compared to in WT mice. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein (BSP), osteocalcin (OCN)/bone gla protein (BGP), and runt-related gene 2 (Runx2) mRNA levels were decreased (P, <0.05). IL-1α mRNA expression was increased, and calcification was not observed, in IL-1 Ra KO mouse osteoblasts. In brief, IL-1Ra deficiency promoted the expression of inflammatory cytokines beyond IL-1 and altered the expression of genes involved in bone resorption in A. actinomycetemcomitans-infected osteoblasts. Alterations consistent with rapid bone loss in infected IL-Ra KO mice were also observed for genes expressed in bone formation and calcification. In short, these data suggest that IL-1Ra may serve as a potential therapeutic drug for periodontal disease.

  9. Inflammatory bone loss in experimental periodontitis induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in interleukin-1 receptor antagonist knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Izawa, A; Ishihara, Y; Mizutani, H; Kobayashi, S; Goto, H; Okabe, E; Takeda, H; Ozawa, Y; Kamiya, Y; Sugita, Y; Kubo, K; Kamei, H; Kikuchi, T; Mitani, A; Hayashi, J; Nishihara, T; Maeda, H; Noguchi, T

    2014-05-01

    The interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) binds to IL-1 receptors and inhibits IL-1 activity. However, it is not clear whether IL-1Ra plays a protective role in periodontal disease. This study was undertaken to compare experimental periodontitis induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in IL-1Ra knockout (KO) mice and wild-type (WT) mice. Computed tomography (CT) analysis and hematoxylin-and-eosin (H&E) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining were performed. In addition, osteoblasts were isolated; the mRNA expression of relevant genes was assessed by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR); and calcification was detected by Alizarin Red staining. Infected IL-1Ra KO mice exhibited elevated (P, <0.05) levels of antibody against A. actinomycetemcomitans, bone loss in furcation areas, and alveolar fenestrations. Moreover, protein for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and IL-6, mRNA for macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) in IL-1Ra KO mouse osteoblasts stimulated with A. actinomycetemcomitans were increased (P, <0.05) compared to in WT mice. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein (BSP), osteocalcin (OCN)/bone gla protein (BGP), and runt-related gene 2 (Runx2) mRNA levels were decreased (P, <0.05). IL-1α mRNA expression was increased, and calcification was not observed, in IL-1 Ra KO mouse osteoblasts. In brief, IL-1Ra deficiency promoted the expression of inflammatory cytokines beyond IL-1 and altered the expression of genes involved in bone resorption in A. actinomycetemcomitans-infected osteoblasts. Alterations consistent with rapid bone loss in infected IL-Ra KO mice were also observed for genes expressed in bone formation and calcification. In short, these data suggest that IL-1Ra may serve as a potential therapeutic drug for periodontal disease. PMID:24566623

  10. Photocatalytical Antibacterial Activity of Mixed-Phase TiO2 Nanocomposite Thin Films against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Yeniyol, Sinem; Mutlu, Ilven; He, Zhiming; Yüksel, Behiye; Boylan, Robert Joseph; Ürgen, Mustafa; Karabuda, Zihni Cüneyt; Basegmez, Cansu; Ricci, John Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Mixed-phase TiO2 nanocomposite thin films consisting of anatase and rutile prepared on commercially pure Ti sheets via the electrochemical anodization and annealing treatments were investigated in terms of their photocatalytic activity for antibacterial use around dental implants. The resulting films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The topology was assessed by White Light Optical Profiling (WLOP) in the Vertical Scanning Interferometer (VSI) mode. Representative height descriptive parameters of roughness R a and R z were calculated. The photocatalytic activity of the resulting TiO2 films was evaluated by the photodegradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) dye solution. The antibacterial ability of the photocatalyst was examined by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans suspensions in a colony-forming assay. XRD showed that anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films were predominantly in anatase and rutile that were 54.6 wt% and 41.9 wt%, respectively. Craters (2-5 µm) and protruding hills (10-50 µm) on Ti substrates were produced after electrochemical anodization with higher R a and R z surface roughness values. Anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films showed 26% photocatalytic decolorization toward RhB dye solution. The number of colonizing bacteria on anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films was decreased significantly in vitro. The photocatalyst was effective against A. actinomycetemcomitans colonization. PMID:26576430

  11. Photocatalytical Antibacterial Activity of Mixed-Phase TiO2 Nanocomposite Thin Films against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Yeniyol, Sinem; Mutlu, Ilven; He, Zhiming; Yüksel, Behiye; Boylan, Robert Joseph; Ürgen, Mustafa; Karabuda, Zihni Cüneyt; Basegmez, Cansu; Ricci, John Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Mixed-phase TiO2 nanocomposite thin films consisting of anatase and rutile prepared on commercially pure Ti sheets via the electrochemical anodization and annealing treatments were investigated in terms of their photocatalytic activity for antibacterial use around dental implants. The resulting films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The topology was assessed by White Light Optical Profiling (WLOP) in the Vertical Scanning Interferometer (VSI) mode. Representative height descriptive parameters of roughness Ra and Rz were calculated. The photocatalytic activity of the resulting TiO2 films was evaluated by the photodegradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) dye solution. The antibacterial ability of the photocatalyst was examined by  Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans suspensions in a colony-forming assay. XRD showed that anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films were predominantly in anatase and rutile that were 54.6 wt% and 41.9 wt%, respectively. Craters (2–5 µm) and protruding hills (10–50 µm) on Ti substrates were produced after electrochemical anodization with higher Ra and Rz surface roughness values. Anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films showed 26% photocatalytic decolorization toward RhB dye solution. The number of colonizing bacteria on anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films was decreased significantly in vitro. The photocatalyst was effective against A. actinomycetemcomitans colonization. PMID:26576430

  12. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin (LtxA; Leukothera) induces cofilin dephosphorylation and actin depolymerization during killing of malignant monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manpreet; Kachlany, Scott C

    2014-11-01

    Leukotoxin (LtxA; Leukothera), a protein toxin secreted by the oral bacterium Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, specifically kills white blood cells (WBCs). LtxA binds to the receptor known as lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), a β2 integrin expressed only on the surface of WBCs. LtxA is being studied as a virulence factor that helps A. actinomycetemcomitans evade host defences and as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of WBC diseases. LtxA-mediated cell death in monocytes involves both caspases and lysosomes; however, the signalling proteins that regulate and mediate cell death remain largely unknown. We used a 2D-gel proteomics approach to analyse the global protein expression changes that occur in response to LtxA. This approach identified the protein cofilin, which underwent dephosphorylation upon LtxA treatment. Cofilin is a ubiquitous actin-binding protein known to regulate actin dynamics and is regulated by LIM kinase (LIMK)-mediated phosphorylation. LtxA-mediated cofilin dephosphorylation was dependent on LFA-1 and cofilin dephosphorylation did not occur when LFA-1 bound to its natural ligand, ICAM-1. Treatment of cells with an inhibitor of LIMK (LIMKi) also led to cofilin dephosphorylation and enhanced killing by LtxA. This enhanced sensitivity to LtxA coincided with an increase in lysosomal disruption, and an increase in LFA-1 surface expression and clustering. Both LIMKi and LtxA treatment also induced actin depolymerization, which could play a role in trafficking and surface distribution of LFA-1. We propose a model in which LtxA-mediated cofilin dephosphorylation leads to actin depolymerization, LFA-1 overexpression/clustering, and enhanced lysosomal-mediated cell death.

  13. ygiW and qseBC are co-expressed in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and regulate biofilm growth.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Demuth, Donald R

    2013-06-01

    The quorum-sensing Escherichia coli regulators B and C (QseBC) two-component system were previously shown to regulate biofilm growth of the oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and to be essential for virulence. In this study, we use RT-PCR to show that an open reading frame, ygiW, residing upstream of qseBC and encoding a hypothetical protein is co-expressed with qseBC. In addition, using a series of lacZ transcriptional fusion constructs and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE), the promoter that drives expression of the ygiW-qseBC operon and the transcriptional start site was mapped to the 372 bp intergenic region upstream from ygiW. No internal promoters drive qseBC expression independently from ygiW. However, qseBC expression is attenuated by approximately ninefold by a putative attenuator stem-loop (ΔG = -77.0 KJ/mol) that resides in the 137 bp intergenic region between ygiW and qseB. The QseB response regulator activates expression of the ygiW-qseBC operon and transcription from the ygiW promoter is drastically reduced in ΔqseB and ΔqseBC mutants of A. actinomycetemcomitans. In addition, transcriptional activity of the ygiW promoter is significantly reduced in a mutant expressing an in-frame deletion of qseC that lacks the sensor domain of QseC, suggesting that a periplasmic signal is required for QseB activation. Finally, a non-polar in-frame deletion in ygiW had little effect on biofilm depth but caused a significant increase in surface coverage relative to wild-type. Complementation of the mutant with a plasmid-borne copy of ygiW reduced surface coverage back to wild-type levels. Interestingly, deletion of the sensor domain of QseC or of the entire qseC open reading frame resulted in significant reductions in biofilm depth, biomass and surface coverage, indicating that the sensor domain is essential for optimal biofilm formation by A. actinomycetemcomitans. Thus, although ygiW and qseBC are co-expressed, they regulate biofilm

  14. Identification of a Novel Bacterial Outer Membrane Interleukin-1Β-Binding Protein from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Paino, Annamari; Ahlstrand, Tuuli; Nuutila, Jari; Navickaite, Indre; Lahti, Maria; Tuominen, Heidi; Välimaa, Hannamari; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Pöllänen, Marja T.; Ihalin, Riikka

    2013-01-01

    Aggregatibacteractinomycetemcomitans is a gram-negative opportunistic oral pathogen. It is frequently associated with subgingival biofilms of both chronic and aggressive periodontitis, and the diseased sites of the periodontium exhibit increased levels of the proinflammatory mediator interleukin (IL)-1β. Some bacterial species can alter their physiological properties as a result of sensing IL-1β. We have recently shown that this cytokine localizes to the cytoplasm of A. actinomycetemcomitans in co-cultures with organotypic gingival mucosa. However, current knowledge about the mechanism underlying bacterial IL-1β sensing is still limited. In this study, we characterized the interaction of A. actinomycetemcomitans total membrane protein with IL-1β through electrophoretic mobility shift assays. The interacting protein, which we have designated bacterial interleukin receptor I (BilRI), was identified through mass spectrometry and was found to be Pasteurellaceae specific. Based on the results obtained using protein function prediction tools, this protein localizes to the outer membrane and contains a typical lipoprotein signal sequence. All six tested biofilm cultures of clinical A. actinomycetemcomitans strains expressed the protein according to phage display-derived antibody detection. Moreover, proteinase K treatment of whole A. actinomycetemcomitans cells eliminated BilRI forms that were outer membrane specific, as determined through immunoblotting. The protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli in both the outer membrane-associated form and a soluble cytoplasmic form. When assessed using flow cytometry, the BilRI-overexpressing E. coli cells were observed to bind 2.5 times more biotinylated-IL-1β than the control cells, as detected with avidin-FITC. Overexpression of BilRI did not cause binding of a biotinylated negative control protein. In a microplate assay, soluble BilRI bound to IL-1β, but this binding was not specific, as a control protein for IL-1

  15. A Cytolethal Distending Toxin Variant from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans with an Aberrant CdtB That Lacks the Conserved Catalytic Histidine 160.

    PubMed

    Obradović, Davor; Gašperšič, Rok; Caserman, Simon; Leonardi, Adrijana; Jamnik, Maja; Podlesek, Zdravko; Seme, Katja; Anderluh, Gregor; Križaj, Igor; Maček, Peter; Butala, Matej

    2016-01-01

    The periodontopathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans synthesizes several virulence factors, including cytolethal distending toxin (CDT). The active CDT holoenzyme is an AB-type tripartite genotoxin that affects eukaryotic cells. Subunits CdtA and CdtC (B-components) allow binding and intracellular translocation of the active CdtB (A-component), which elicits nuclear DNA damage. Different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans have diverse virulence genotypes, which results in varied pathogenic potential and disease progression. Here, we identified an A. actinomycetemcomitans strain isolated from two patients with advance chronic periodontitis that has a regular cdtABC operon, which, however, codes for a unique, shorter, variant of the CdtB subunit. We describe the characteristics of this CdtBΔ116-188, which lacks the intact nuclear localisation signal and the catalytic histidine 160. We show that the A. actinomycetemcomitans DO15 isolate secretes CdtBΔ116-188, and that this subunit cannot form a holotoxin and is also not genotoxic if expressed ectopically in HeLa cells. Furthermore, the A. actinomycetemcomitans DO15 isolate is not toxic, nor does it induce cellular distention upon infection of co-cultivated HeLa cells. Biological significance of this deletion in the cdtB remains to be explained. PMID:27414641

  16. A Cytolethal Distending Toxin Variant from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans with an Aberrant CdtB That Lacks the Conserved Catalytic Histidine 160

    PubMed Central

    Obradović, Davor; Gašperšič, Rok; Caserman, Simon; Leonardi, Adrijana; Jamnik, Maja; Podlesek, Zdravko; Seme, Katja; Anderluh, Gregor; Križaj, Igor; Maček, Peter; Butala, Matej

    2016-01-01

    The periodontopathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans synthesizes several virulence factors, including cytolethal distending toxin (CDT). The active CDT holoenzyme is an AB-type tripartite genotoxin that affects eukaryotic cells. Subunits CdtA and CdtC (B-components) allow binding and intracellular translocation of the active CdtB (A-component), which elicits nuclear DNA damage. Different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans have diverse virulence genotypes, which results in varied pathogenic potential and disease progression. Here, we identified an A. actinomycetemcomitans strain isolated from two patients with advance chronic periodontitis that has a regular cdtABC operon, which, however, codes for a unique, shorter, variant of the CdtB subunit. We describe the characteristics of this CdtBΔ116–188, which lacks the intact nuclear localisation signal and the catalytic histidine 160. We show that the A. actinomycetemcomitans DO15 isolate secretes CdtBΔ116–188, and that this subunit cannot form a holotoxin and is also not genotoxic if expressed ectopically in HeLa cells. Furthermore, the A. actinomycetemcomitans DO15 isolate is not toxic, nor does it induce cellular distention upon infection of co-cultivated HeLa cells. Biological significance of this deletion in the cdtB remains to be explained. PMID:27414641

  17. Evaluation of chemical composition and efficacy of Chinese propolis extract on Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Garima; Vemanaradhya, Gayathri G.; Mehta, Dhoom S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Propolis as a natural remedy has maintained its popularity over long periods of time. The aim of this study was to determine the chemical composition in terms of total phenolic compounds and flavonoids present in Chinese propolis and to carry out an in vitro evaluation of its antimicrobial activity and the minimal inhibitory concentrations for Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa). Materials and Methods: From the ethanolic extract of propolis (EEP), total phenol content was determined by the Folin–Ciocalteau method, flavones and flavonols by the modified aluminum chloride colorimetric method, and flavanones by the 2.4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNP) method. Agar well diffusion assay was used to evaluate the antimicrobial potential of propolis against Pg and Aa. The minimum inhibitory concentration of propolis against the two bacteria was determined using serial tube dilution technique. Results: The total concentration of phenol in the EEP was 19.44%, flavones and flavonols 2.616%, and flavanones 16.176%. The inhibitory zone depicting antimicrobial activity ranged from 18 to 25 mm for Pg and from 12 to 14 mm for Aa. The concentration range of Chinese propolis that is sensitive to inhibit the growth of Pg was 0.1–0.0125 μg/ml and for Aa it was 0.1–0.025 μg/ml. Conclusion: These data suggest that Chinese propolis has potent antimicrobial activity against the two periodontopathogens, suggesting its possible use as a natural alternative to the widely used synthetic antibiotics for periodontal therapy. PMID:23293477

  18. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC is activated by catecholamines and iron and regulates genes encoding proteins associated with anaerobic respiration and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Weigel, W A; Demuth, D R; Torres-Escobar, A; Juárez-Rodríguez, M D

    2015-10-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC regulates its own expression and is essential for biofilm growth and virulence. However, the signal that activates the QseC sensor has not been identified and the qseBC regulon has not been defined. In this study, we show that QseC is activated by catecholamine hormones and iron but not by either component alone. Activation of QseC requires an EYRDD motif in the periplasmic domain of the sensor and site-specific mutations in EYRDD or the deletion of the periplasmic domain inhibits catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of the ygiW-qseBC operon. Catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of transcription also requires interaction of the QseB response regulator with its binding site in the ygiW-qseBC promoter. Whole genome microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles of A. actinomycetemcomitans grown in a chemically defined medium with and without catecholamine and iron supplementation. Approximately 11.5% of the A. actinomycetemcomitans genome was differentially expressed by at least two-fold upon exposure to catecholamines and iron. The expression of ferritin was strongly induced, suggesting that intracellular iron storage capacity is increased upon QseBC activation. Consistent with this, genes encoding iron binding and transport proteins were down-regulated by QseBC. Strikingly, 57% of the QseBC up-regulated genes (56/99) encode proteins associated with anaerobic metabolism and respiration. Most of these up-regulated genes were recently reported to be induced during in vivo growth of A. actinomycetemcomitans. These results suggest that detection of catecholamines and iron by QseBC may alter the cellular metabolism of A. actinomycetemcomitans for increased fitness and growth in an anaerobic host environment.

  19. Al(III), Pd(II), and Zn(II) phthalocyanines for inactivation of dental pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans as planktonic and biofilm-cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kussovski, V.; Mantareva, V.; Angelov, I.; Avramov, L.; Popova, E.; Dimitrov, S.

    2012-06-01

    The Gram-negative, oral bacterium Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has been implicated as the causative agent of several forms of periodontal disease in humans. The new periodontal disease treatments are emergence in order to prevent infection progression. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (a-PDT) can be a useful tool for this purpose. It involves the use of light of specific wavelength to activate a nontoxic photosensitizing agent in the presence of oxygen for eradication of target cells, and appears effective in photoinactivation of microorganisms. The phthalocyanine metal complexes of Pd(II)- (PdPcC) and Al(III)- (AlPc1) were evaluated as photodynamic sensitizers towards a dental pathogen A. actinomycetemcomitans in comparison to the known methylpyridyloxy-substituted Zn(II) phthalocyanine (ZnPcMe). The planktonic and biofilm-cultivated species of A. actinomycetemcomitans were treated. The photophysical results showed intensive and far-red absorbance with high tendency of aggregation for Pd(II)-phthalocyanine. The dark toxicities of both photosensitizers were negligible at concentrations used (< 0.5 log decrease of viable cells). The photodynamic response for planktonic cultured bacteria was full photoinactivation after a-PDT with ZnPcMe. In case of the newly studied complexes, the effect was lower for PdPcC (4 log) as well as for AlPc1 (1.5-2 log). As it is known the bacterial biofilms were more resistant to a-PDT, which was confirmed for A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilms with 3 log reductions of viable cells after treatment with ZnPcMe and approximately 1 log reduction of biofilms after PdPcC and AlPc1. The initial results suggest that a-PDT can be useful for effective inactivation of dental pathogen A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  20. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC is activated by catecholamines and iron and regulates genes encoding proteins associated with anaerobic respiration and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, WA; Demuth, DR; Torres-Escobar, A; Juárez-Rodríguez, MD

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC regulates its own expression and is essential for biofilm growth and virulence. However, the signal that activates the QseC sensor has not been identified and the qseBC regulon has not been defined. In this study, we show that QseC is activated by catecholamine hormones and iron but not by either component alone. Activation of QseC requires an EYRDD motif in the periplasmic domain of the sensor and site-specific mutations in EYRDD or the deletion of the periplasmic domain inhibits catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of the ygiW-qseBC operon. Catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of transcription also requires interaction of the QseB response regulator with its binding site in the ygiW-qseBC promoter. Whole genome microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles of A. actinomycetemcomitans grown in a chemically defined medium with and without catecholamine and iron supplementation. Approximately 11.5% of the A. actinomycetemcomitans genome was differentially expressed by at least two-fold upon exposure to catecholamines and iron. The expression of ferritin was strongly induced, suggesting that intracellular iron storage capacity is increased upon QseBC activation. Consistent with this, genes encoding iron binding and transport proteins were down-regulated by QseBC. Strikingly, 57% of the QseBC up-regulated genes (56/99) encode proteins associated with anaerobic metabolism and respiration. Most of these up-regulated genes were recently reported to be induced during in vivo growth of A. actinomycetemcomitans. These results suggest that detection of catecholamines and iron by QseBC may alter the cellular metabolism of A. actinomycetemcomitans for increased fitness and growth in an anaerobic host environment. PMID:25923132

  1. Inverse Association of Plasma IgG Antibody to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and High C-Reactive Protein Levels in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome and Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Thanakun, Supanee; Pornprasertsuk-Damrongsri, Suchaya; Gokyu, Misa; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    The association between clinically diagnosed periodontitis, a common chronic oral infection, and metabolic syndrome has been previously reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of plasma IgG levels against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia, C-reactive protein, and periodontal status with metabolic syndrome. Plasma IgG levels and C-reactive protein were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and salivary levels of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Among 127 individuals aged 35-76 years, 57 participants had metabolic syndrome and severe periodontitis, 25 had metabolic syndrome and an absence of severe periodontitis, 17 healthy individuals had severe periodontitis, and 28 healthy individuals were without severe periodontitis. Patients with metabolic syndrome had reduced humoral immune response to A. actinomycetemcomitans (p = 0.008), regardless of their salivary levels or periodontitis status compared with healthy participants. The IgG antibody response to P. gingivalis, regardless of their salivary levels or participants' health condition, was significantly higher in severe periodontitis patients (p<0.001). Plasma IgG titers for P. intermedia were inconsistent among metabolic syndrome or periodontal participants. Our results indicate that the presence of lower levels of IgG antibodies to A. actinomycetemcomitans (OR = 0.1; 95%CI 0.0-0.7), but not P. gingivalis, a severe periodontitis status (OR = 7.8; 95%CI 1.1-57.0), high C-reactive protein levels (OR = 9.4; 95%CI 1.0-88.2) and body mass index (OR = 3.0; 95%CI 1.7-5.2), are associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. The role of the decreased IgG antibody response to A. actinomycetemcomitans, increased C-reactive protein levels on the association between periodontal disease and metabolic syndrome in a group of Thai patients is suggested. PMID

  2. Inactivation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans by two different modalities of photodynamic therapy using Toluidine blue O or Radachlorin as photosensitizers: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Moslemi, Neda; Soleiman-Zadeh Azar, Pardis; Bahador, Abbas; Rouzmeh, Nina; Chiniforush, Nasim; Paknejad, Mojgan; Fekrazad, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans) is one of the periodontopathogens strongly associated with aggressive periodontitis. The aim of this investigation was to compare the effect of laser and light-emitting diode on the photodynamic inactivation of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Eighty-four samples of bacterial suspensions (200 μL) were prepared and divided in seven groups: control group (no treatment), laser group (indium-gallium-aluminum-phosphate laser with wavelength of 662 ± 0.1 nm, energy density of 6 j/cm(2), and irradiation time of 34 s), light-emitting diode (LED) group (wavelength 625-635 nm, energy density 6 j/cm(2), time of irradiation 30 s), Toluidine blue O (TBO) group (0.1 mg/mL), Radachlorin group (0.1 %), Radachlorin + laser group (after pre-irradiation time of 10 min, laser was irradiated), and TBO + LED group (after preirradiation time of 10 min, LED was irradiated). Then, 100 μL of each sample was cultured in brain heart infusion (BHI) plates and incubated for 48-72 h in microaerophilic atmosphere for colony counting. Application of Radachlorin + laser resulted in a significant decrease in the concentration of A. actinomycetemcomitans (P values <0.05). Photodynamic therapy with laser + Radachlorin was more effective than that of LED + TBO in suppression of this microorganism (P value <0.05). Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that photodynamic inactivation using laser and Radachlorin was more effective than that of LED and TBO in eradication of A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:24981641

  3. Colonization and Persistence of Labeled and “Foreign” Strains of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Inoculated into the Mouths of Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Fine, Daniel H.; Karched, Maribasappa; Furgang, David; Sampathkumar, Vandana; Velusamy, Senthil; Godboley, Dipti

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) is a pathobiont and part of a consortium of bacteria that can lead to periodontitis in humans. Our aim was to develop a model for oral inoculation of labeled Aa into a suitable host in order to study Aa traits and ecological factors that either enhance or repress its persistence. Primate species were screened for Aa to select a host for colonization studies. Macaca mulatta (Rhesus/Rh) was selected. Rh Aa strains were isolated, subjected to sequencing and functional analysis for comparison to human strains. “Best” methods for microbial decontamination prior to inoculation were assessed. Three groups were studied; Group 1 (N=5) was inoculated with Aa Spectinomycin resistant (SpecR) Rh strain 4.35, Group 2 (N=5) inoculated with Aa SpecR human strain IDH 781, and Group 3 (N=5) the un-inoculated control. Repeated feeding with pancakes spiked with SpecRAa followed high dose oral inoculation. Cheek, tongue, and plaque samples collected at baseline 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after inoculation were plated on agar; 1) selective for Aa, 2) enriched for total counts, and 3) containing 50 µg/ml of Spec. Aa was identified by colonial morphology and DNA analysis. Rh and human Aa had > 93–98 % genome identity. Rh Aa attached to tissues better than IDH 781 in vitro (p < 0.05). SpecR IDH 781 was not recovered from any tissue at any time; whereas, RhSpecR 4.35 was detected in plaque, but never tongue or cheek, in all monkeys at all times (> 1 × 105 colonies/ml; p < 0.001). In conclusion, the primate model provides a useful platform for studying integration of Aa strains into a reduced but established oral habitat. Primate derived SpecRAa was consistently detected in plaque at all collection periods; however, human derived Aa was never detected. The model demonstrated both microbial as well as tissue specificity. PMID:26213715

  4. Determination of antibacterial activity of green coffee bean extract on periodontogenic bacteria like Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Bharath, Nagaraj; Sowmya, Nagur Karibasappa; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of pure green coffee bean extract on periodonto pathogenic bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Prevotella intermedia (Pi), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa). Materials and Methods: Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were used to assess the antibacterial effect of pure green coffee bean extract against periodonto pathogenic bacteria by micro dilution method and culture method, respectively. Results: MIC values of Pg, Pi and Aa were 0.2 μg/ml whereas Fn showed sensitive at concentration of 3.125 μg/ml. MBC values mirrors the values same as that of MIC. Conclusion: Antimicrobial activity of pure green coffee bean extract against Pg, Pi, Fn and Aa suggests that it could be recommended as an adjunct to mechanical therapy in the management of periodontal disease. PMID:26097349

  5. Evaluation of antimicrobial action of Carie Care™ and Papacarie Duo™ on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans a major periodontal pathogen using polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Kush, Anil; Thakur, Rachna; Patil, Sandya Devi S.; Paul, Santhosh T.; Kakanur, Madhu

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the present scenario, we are made available with chemomechanical caries removal system containing a natural proteolytic enzyme for the ease in the excavation of infected dentine. The additive action for these agents is providing antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. Aim: This study was undertaken for assessing the action of Carie Care™ and Papacarie Duo™ on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Materials and Methods: The samples were collected for cultivation of the periodontal pathogen from the clinical periodontal pockets using sterile paper points. The samples cultured under suitable conditions were analyzed with quantitative polymerase chain reaction targeting 16s r-DNA. The samples were divided into three groups namely, Group A: Control, Group B: With Papacarie Duo, Group C: With Carie Care. The pathogen inoculums plugs were inserted in the petri dishes containing chemically defined medium and the experimental gels at different concentrations and were incubated under optimal conditions. The inhibition of growth of the pathogen was studied visually. Results: There was visual inhibition of growth for Group B and C and also exhibited a dose-dependent effect also. Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, Carie Care™ gel demonstrated better antimicrobial action against A. actinomycetemcomitans which is a major periodontal disease causing pathogen. PMID:26681861

  6. Inverse Association of Plasma IgG Antibody to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and High C-Reactive Protein Levels in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome and Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Thanakun, Supanee; Pornprasertsuk-Damrongsri, Suchaya; Gokyu, Misa; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    The association between clinically diagnosed periodontitis, a common chronic oral infection, and metabolic syndrome has been previously reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of plasma IgG levels against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia, C-reactive protein, and periodontal status with metabolic syndrome. Plasma IgG levels and C-reactive protein were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and salivary levels of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Among 127 individuals aged 35–76 years, 57 participants had metabolic syndrome and severe periodontitis, 25 had metabolic syndrome and an absence of severe periodontitis, 17 healthy individuals had severe periodontitis, and 28 healthy individuals were without severe periodontitis. Patients with metabolic syndrome had reduced humoral immune response to A. actinomycetemcomitans (p = 0.008), regardless of their salivary levels or periodontitis status compared with healthy participants. The IgG antibody response to P. gingivalis, regardless of their salivary levels or participants’ health condition, was significantly higher in severe periodontitis patients (p<0.001). Plasma IgG titers for P. intermedia were inconsistent among metabolic syndrome or periodontal participants. Our results indicate that the presence of lower levels of IgG antibodies to A. actinomycetemcomitans (OR = 0.1; 95%CI 0.0–0.7), but not P. gingivalis, a severe periodontitis status (OR = 7.8; 95%CI 1.1–57.0), high C-reactive protein levels (OR = 9.4; 95%CI 1.0–88.2) and body mass index (OR = 3.0; 95%CI 1.7–5.2), are associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. The role of the decreased IgG antibody response to A. actinomycetemcomitans, increased C-reactive protein levels on the association between periodontal disease and metabolic syndrome in a group of Thai patients is

  7. Alteration in abundance of specific membrane proteins of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is attributed to deletion of the inner membrane protein MorC

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kenneth P.; Fields, Julia G.; Voogt, Richard D.; Deng, Bin; Lam, Ying-Wai; Mintz, Keith P.

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an important pathogen in the etiology of human periodontal and systemic diseases. Inactivation of the gene coding for the inner membrane protein, morphogenesis protein C (MorC), results is pleotropic effects pertaining to the membrane structure and function of this bacterium. The role of this protein in membrane biogenesis is unknown. To begin to understand the role of this conserved protein, stable isotope dimethyl labeling in conjunction with mass spectrometry was used to quantitatively analyze differences in the membrane proteomes of the isogenic mutant and wild-type strain. A total of 613 proteins were quantified and 601 of these proteins were found to be equal in abundance between the two strains. The remaining 12 proteins were found in lesser (10) or greater (2) abundance in the membrane preparation of the mutant strain compared with the wild-type strain. The 12 proteins were ascribed functions associated with protein quality control systems, oxidative stress responses, and protein secretion. The potential relationship between these proteins and the phenotypes of the morC mutant strain is discussed. PMID:25684173

  8. Characterization of the lipopolysaccharide from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 and N27.

    PubMed Central

    Kiley, P; Holt, S C

    1980-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strains Y4 and N27 was isolated by the phenol-water procedure. Morphologically, the molecule consisted of ribbon and branched filaments which comprised 3% of the cellular dry weight. Chemical analysis of the isolated and purified LPSs of both strains showed them to consist of carbohydrate, lipid, 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate, heptose, hexosamine, and phosphate. The major fatty acids of the lipid A moiety were saturated C14 and beta-OH C14 compounds. Rhamnose, fucose, galactose, glucose, heptose, glucosamine, and galactosamine comprised the monosaccharide portion of the LPS. Biological activity studies revealed both LPS molecules to be active in the Schwartzman reaction and in in vitro 45Ca bone resorption, as well as in macrophage activation and lethality and in platelet aggregation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7228391

  9. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and Treponema denticola / Prevotella intermedia Co-Infection Are Associated with Severe Periodontitis in a Thai Population.

    PubMed

    Torrungruang, Kitti; Jitpakdeebordin, Supawadee; Charatkulangkun, Orawan; Gleebbua, Yingampa

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial infection of tooth-supporting tissues. This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the associations between five target species and severe periodontitis in a Thai population. Using the CDC/AAP case definition, individuals diagnosed with no/mild and severe periodontitis were included. Quantitative analyses of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Tannerella forsythia (Tf), Treponema denticola (Td), and Prevotella intermedia (Pi) in subgingival plaque were performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The association between target species and severe periodontitis was examined using logistic regression analysis. The study subjects comprised 479 individuals with no/mild periodontitis and 883 with severe periodontitis. Bacterial prevalence and quantity were higher in subjects with severe periodontitis than in those with no/mild disease. In the fully adjusted model, all species except Tf showed a dose-dependent relationship with periodontitis. The mere presence of Pg, even in low amount, was significantly associated with severe periodontitis, while the amount of Aa, Td, and Pi had to reach the critical thresholds to be significantly associated with disease. Compared to individuals with low levels of both Td and Pi, high colonization by either Td or Pi alone significantly increased the odds of having severe periodontitis by 2.5 (95%CI 1.7-3.5) folds. The odds ratio was further increased to 14.8 (95%CI 9.2-23.8) in individuals who were highly colonized by both species. Moreover, the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa were independently associated with severe periodontitis with odds ratios of 5.6 (95%CI 3.4-9.1) and 2.2 (95%CI 1.5-3.3), respectively. Our findings suggest that the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa, Td, and Pi play an important role in severe periodontitis in this study population. We also demonstrate for the first time that individuals co-infected with Td and Pi

  10. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and Treponema denticola / Prevotella intermedia Co-Infection Are Associated with Severe Periodontitis in a Thai Population

    PubMed Central

    Torrungruang, Kitti; Jitpakdeebordin, Supawadee; Charatkulangkun, Orawan; Gleebbua, Yingampa

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial infection of tooth-supporting tissues. This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the associations between five target species and severe periodontitis in a Thai population. Using the CDC/AAP case definition, individuals diagnosed with no/mild and severe periodontitis were included. Quantitative analyses of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Tannerella forsythia (Tf), Treponema denticola (Td), and Prevotella intermedia (Pi) in subgingival plaque were performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The association between target species and severe periodontitis was examined using logistic regression analysis. The study subjects comprised 479 individuals with no/mild periodontitis and 883 with severe periodontitis. Bacterial prevalence and quantity were higher in subjects with severe periodontitis than in those with no/mild disease. In the fully adjusted model, all species except Tf showed a dose-dependent relationship with periodontitis. The mere presence of Pg, even in low amount, was significantly associated with severe periodontitis, while the amount of Aa, Td, and Pi had to reach the critical thresholds to be significantly associated with disease. Compared to individuals with low levels of both Td and Pi, high colonization by either Td or Pi alone significantly increased the odds of having severe periodontitis by 2.5 (95%CI 1.7–3.5) folds. The odds ratio was further increased to 14.8 (95%CI 9.2–23.8) in individuals who were highly colonized by both species. Moreover, the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa were independently associated with severe periodontitis with odds ratios of 5.6 (95%CI 3.4–9.1) and 2.2 (95%CI 1.5–3.3), respectively. Our findings suggest that the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa, Td, and Pi play an important role in severe periodontitis in this study population. We also demonstrate for the first time that individuals co-infected with Td

  11. Evidence that the serotype b antigenic determinant of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 resides in the polysaccharide moiety of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M E; Schifferle, R E

    1991-04-01

    A high-molecular-weight polysaccharide-containing antigen was isolated from a phenol-water extract of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 43718 (formerly Y4) by gel permeation chromatography in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-disaggregating buffer. The polysaccharide antigen formed a precipitin band with rabbit serotype b-specific antiserum but not with rabbit antisera to serotype a or c. Electroblotted serotype b antigen was probed with serum from a patient with localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP), resulting in a diffuse "smear" in the upper region of the lane. By utilizing an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, it was demonstrated that the geometric mean immunoglobulin G antibody titer to the serotype b polysaccharide was significantly higher in sera from LJP patients than in sera from periodontally healthy individuals. Moreover, LJP antibody titers to the serotype b polysaccharide exhibited age-dependent variation. Double immunodiffusion analysis revealed that the serotype b antigen formed a line of identity with low-molecular-weight LPS following reaction with serotype b-specific antiserum. Incubation of LJP serum in the presence of a lipid-free polysaccharide moiety obtained by mild acid hydrolysis of LPS from A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 markedly reduced immunoglobulin G titer to the serotype b antigen. In contrast, solubilized lipid A was only weakly inhibitory. The results of this study indicate that the serotype b-specific determinant of A. actinomycetemcomitans resides in the polysaccharide moiety of LPS and represents a major target for immunoglobulin G antibody in serum of LJP subjects colonized by this organism.

  12. Detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans after Systemic Administration of Amoxicillin Plus Metronidazole as an Adjunct to Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dakic, Aleksandar; Boillot, Adrien; Colliot, Cyrille; Carra, Maria-Clotilde; Czernichow, Sébastien; Bouchard, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the variations in the detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis and/or Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans before and after systemic administration of amoxicillin plus metronidazole in association with non-surgical periodontal therapy (NSPT). Background: The adjunctive use of antibiotics has been advocated to improve the clinical outcomes of NSPT. However, no systematic review has investigated the microbiological benefit of this combination. Materials and Methods: An electronic search was conducted up to December 2015. Randomized clinical trials comparing the number of patients testing positive for P. gingivalis and/or A. actinomycetemcomitans before and after NSPT with (test group) or without (control group) amoxicillin plus metronidazole were included. The difference between groups in the variation of positive patients was calculated using the inverse variance method with a random effects model. Results: The frequency of patients positive for A. actinomycetemcomitans was decreased by 30% (p = 0.002) and by 25% (p = 0.01) in the test group compared to the control group at 3- and 6-month follow-up, respectively. Similar findings were observed when considering the frequency of patients positive for Porphyromonas gingivalis, with a reduction by 28% (p < 0.0001), 32% (p < 0.0001), and 34% (p = 0.03) in the test group compared to the control group at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up, respectively. Conclusion: The systemic administration of amoxicillin plus metronidazole as an adjunct to NSPT significantly decreased the number of patients positive for P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans compared with periodontal therapy alone or with a placebo. PMID:27594851

  13. Detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans after Systemic Administration of Amoxicillin Plus Metronidazole as an Adjunct to Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dakic, Aleksandar; Boillot, Adrien; Colliot, Cyrille; Carra, Maria-Clotilde; Czernichow, Sébastien; Bouchard, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the variations in the detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis and/or Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans before and after systemic administration of amoxicillin plus metronidazole in association with non-surgical periodontal therapy (NSPT). Background: The adjunctive use of antibiotics has been advocated to improve the clinical outcomes of NSPT. However, no systematic review has investigated the microbiological benefit of this combination. Materials and Methods: An electronic search was conducted up to December 2015. Randomized clinical trials comparing the number of patients testing positive for P. gingivalis and/or A. actinomycetemcomitans before and after NSPT with (test group) or without (control group) amoxicillin plus metronidazole were included. The difference between groups in the variation of positive patients was calculated using the inverse variance method with a random effects model. Results: The frequency of patients positive for A. actinomycetemcomitans was decreased by 30% (p = 0.002) and by 25% (p = 0.01) in the test group compared to the control group at 3- and 6-month follow-up, respectively. Similar findings were observed when considering the frequency of patients positive for Porphyromonas gingivalis, with a reduction by 28% (p < 0.0001), 32% (p < 0.0001), and 34% (p = 0.03) in the test group compared to the control group at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up, respectively. Conclusion: The systemic administration of amoxicillin plus metronidazole as an adjunct to NSPT significantly decreased the number of patients positive for P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans compared with periodontal therapy alone or with a placebo.

  14. Killing of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by human lactoferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Kalmar, J R; Arnold, R R

    1988-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a fastidious, facultative gram-negative rod associated with endocarditis, certain forms of periodontal disease, and other focal infections. Human neutrophils have demonstrated bactericidal activity against A. actinomycetemcomitans, and much of the oxygen-dependent killing has been attributed to the myeloperoxidase-H2O2-halide system. However, the contribution of other neutrophil components to killing activity is obscure. Lactoferrin, an iron-binding glycoprotein, is a major constituent of neutrophil-specific granules and is also found in mucosal secretions. In this report, we show that human lactoferrin is bactericidal for A. actinomycetemcomitans. Killing activity required an unsaturated (iron- and anion-free) molecule that produced a 2-log decrease in viability within 120 min at 37 degrees C at a concentration of 1.9 microM. Besides exhibiting concentration dependence, killing kinetics were affected by minor variations in temperature and pH. Magnesium, a divalent cation thought to stabilize lipopolysaccharide interactions on the surface of gram-negative organisms, enhanced lactoferrin killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans, while other cations, such as potassium and calcium, had no effect. Our data suggest that lactoferrin contributes to killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans by human neutrophils and that it may also play a significant role in innate secretory defense against this potential periodontopathogen. PMID:3417349

  15. Classification, Identification, and Clinical Significance of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter Species with Host Specificity for Humans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive update on the current classification and identification of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter species with exclusive or predominant host specificity for humans. Haemophilus influenzae and some of the other Haemophilus species are commonly encountered in the clinical microbiology laboratory and demonstrate a wide range of pathogenicity, from life-threatening invasive disease to respiratory infections to a nonpathogenic, commensal lifestyle. New species of Haemophilus have been described (Haemophilus pittmaniae and Haemophilus sputorum), and the new genus Aggregatibacter was created to accommodate some former Haemophilus and Actinobacillus species (Aggregatibacter aphrophilus, Aggregatibacter segnis, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans). Aggregatibacter species are now a dominant etiology of infective endocarditis caused by fastidious organisms (HACEK endocarditis), and A. aphrophilus has emerged as an important cause of brain abscesses. Correct identification of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter species based on phenotypic characterization can be challenging. It has become clear that 15 to 20% of presumptive H. influenzae isolates from the respiratory tracts of healthy individuals do not belong to this species but represent nonhemolytic variants of Haemophilus haemolyticus. Due to the limited pathogenicity of H. haemolyticus, the proportion of misidentified strains may be lower in clinical samples, but even among invasive strains, a misidentification rate of 0.5 to 2% can be found. Several methods have been investigated for differentiation of H. influenzae from its less pathogenic relatives, but a simple method for reliable discrimination is not available. With the implementation of identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry, the more rarely encountered species of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter will increasingly be identified in clinical microbiology

  16. Monoclonal antibodies to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Place, D A; Scidmore, N C; McArthur, W P

    1988-01-01

    Murine hybridoma cell lines were developed which synthesized monoclonal antibodies against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-associated antigens. Monoclonal antibodies specific for an antigen(s) common to all A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates tested but not detected on other gram-negative oral plaque microorganisms or other Actinobacillus species were identified. Monoclonal antibodies specific for each serotype group of A. actinomycetemcomitans which did not bind to other Actinobacillus species or oral plaque microorganisms were also identified. PMID:3356470

  17. microRNAs responsive to A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis LPS modulate expression of genes regulating innate immunity in human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Afsar R.; Fordham, Jezrom B.; Khan, Asma; Nares, Salvador

    2013-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNA) are a class of small noncoding RNAs that regulate post-transcriptional expression of their respective target genes and are responsive to various stimuli, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here we examined the early (4h) miRNA responses of THP1-differentiated macrophages challenged with LPS derived from the periodontal pathogens, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) or environmentally modified LPS obtained from Pg grown in cigarette smoke extract. Predicted miRNA-gene target interactions for LPS-responsive miR-29b and let-7f were confirmed using dual-luciferase assays and by transfection experiments using miRNA mimics and inhibitors. Convergent and divergent miRNA profiles were observed in treated samples where differences in miRNA levels related to the type, concentration and incubation times of LPS challenge. Dual-luciferase experiments revealed miR-29b targeting of IL-6Rα and IFN-γ inducible protein 30 (IFI30) and let-7f targeting of suppressor of cytokine signaling 4 (SOCS4) and Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1). Transfection experiments confirmed miR-29b and let-7f modulation of IL-6R and SOCS4 protein expression levels, respectively. Thus, we demonstrate convergent/divergent miRNA responses to wild type and its environmentally-modified LPS and demonstrate miRNA targeting of key genes linked to inflammation and immunity. Our data indicate that these LPS-responsive miRNAs may play a key role in fine-tuning the host response to periodontal pathogens. PMID:24062196

  18. Localization of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Cytolethal Distending Toxin Subunits during Intoxication of Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Damek-Poprawa, Monika; Jang, Jae Yeon; Volgina, Alla; Korostoff, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    The cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt), produced by some clinically important Gram-negative bacterial species, is related to the family of AB-type toxins. Three heterologous proteins (CdtA, CdtB, and CdtC) and a genotoxin mode of action distinguish the Cdt from others in this toxin class. Crystal structures of several species-specific Cdts have provided a basis for predicting subunit interactions and functions. In addition, empirical studies have yielded significant insights into the in vivo interactions of the Cdt subunits. However, there are still critical gaps in information about the intoxication process. In this study, a novel protein tagging technology was used to localize the subunits in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1). A tetracysteine motif was engineered in each subunit, and in subunits with mutations in predicted functional domains, to permit detection with the fluorescein arsenical hairpin binding (FlAsH) dye Lumio green. Live-cell imaging, in conjunction with confocal microscopy, was used to capture the locations of the individual subunits in cells intoxicated, under various conditions, with hybrid heterotrimers. Using this approach, we observed the following. (i) The CdtA subunit remains on the cell surface of CHO cells in association with cholesterol-containing and cholesterol-depleted membrane. (ii) The CdtB subunit is exclusively in the cytosol and, after longer exposure times, localizes to the nucleus. (iii) The CdtC subunit is present on the cell surface and, to a greater extent, in the cytosol. These observations suggest that CdtC, but not CdtA, functions as a chaperone for CdtB entry into cells. PMID:22645284

  19. A Comparison of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) Virulence Traits in a Rat Model for Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schreiner, Helen; Li, Yu; Cline, Joshua; Tsiagbe, Vincent K.; Fine, Daniel H.

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to explore the effects of Cytolethal Distending toxin (Cdt) in a well established rat model of periodontal disease where leukotoxin (LtxA) was thought to have no known effect. In vitro studies, were used to assess CdtB activity using Aa Leukotoxin as a negative control. These studies showed that both CdtB and LtxA (unexpectedly) exerted significant effects on CD4+ T cells. As a result we decided to compare the effects of these two prominent Aa virulence factors on bone loss using our rat model of Aa-induced periodontitis. In this model, Aa strains, mutant in cdtB and ltxA, were compared to their parent non-mutant strains and evaluated for colonization, antibody response to Aa, bone loss and disease. We found that bone loss/disease caused by the ltxA mutant strain, in which cdtB was expressed, was significantly less (p<0.05) than that due to the wild type strain. On the other hand, the disease caused by cdtB mutant strain, in which ltxA was expressed, was not significantly different from the wild type strain. This data indicates that Aa LtxA exerts a greater effect on bone loss than Cdt in this rat model of periodontal disease and supports the utility of this model to dissect specific virulence factors as they relate to immunopathology in studies of Aa-induced disease. PMID:23936002

  20. Inhibition of fibroblast proliferation by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Shenker, B J; Kushner, M E; Tsai, C C

    1982-01-01

    We have examined soluble sonic extracts of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans for their ability to alter human and murine fibroblast proliferation. We found that extracts of all A. actinomycetemcomitans strains examined (both leukotoxic and nonleukotoxic) caused a dose-dependent inhibition of both murine and human fibroblast proliferation as assessed by DNA synthesis ([3H]thymidine incorporation). Addition of sonic extract simultaneously with [3H]thymidine had no effect on incorporation, indicating that suppression was not due to the presence of excessive amounts of cold thymidine. Inhibition of DNA synthesis was also paralleled by decreased RNA synthesis ([3H]uridine incorporation) and by a decrease in cell growth as assessed by direct cell counts; there was no effect on cell viability. The suppressive factor(s) is heat labile; preliminary purification and characterization studies indicate that it is a distinct and separate moiety from other A. actinomycetemcomitans mediators previously reported, including leukotoxin, immune suppressive factor, and endotoxin. Although it is not clear how A. actinomycetemcomitans acts to cause disease, we propose that one aspect of the pathogenicity of this organism rests in its ability to inhibit fibroblast growth, which in turn could contribute to the collagen loss associated with certain forms of periodontal disease, in particular juvenile periodontitis. PMID:7152684

  1. Purification and characterization of the serotype c antigen from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Zambon, J J; Slots, J; Miyasaki, K; Linzer, R; Cohen, R; Levine, M; Genco, R J

    1984-01-01

    The serotype c antigen from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was purified with fractional ethanol precipitation of cell-free culture supernatant, sequential ion-exchange chromatography, and gel filtration chromatography. The preparation obtained demonstrated a single precipitin line in immunodiffusion, immunoelectrophoresis, and crossed immunoelectrophoresis when rabbit antisera to serotype c whole bacterial cells were used. No immunological reaction was detected with antisera to serotype c lipopolysaccharide, indicating that lipopolysaccharide was not present in the preparation. The serotype c antigen was composed of 95% carbohydrate, 2% protein, and 3.1% phosphate. Gas chromatographic analysis of the antigen obtained from growth in either complex or chemically defined media revealed that the carbohydrate constituent was composed of 84 to 90.1% mannose, 4.8 to 16% glucose, 1.9% N-acetylglucosamine, 1.4% fucose, and 0.2% galactose. The present data suggest that A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype c antigen is predominantly a mannose-containing carbohydrate suggestive of a mannan. Images PMID:6423542

  2. Morphology and ultrastructure of oral strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Haemophilus aphrophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Holt, S C; Tanner, A C; Socransky, S S

    1980-01-01

    Selected human oral and nonoral strains of the genera Actinobacillus and Haemophilus were examined by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The strains examined were morphologically identical to recognized Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Haemophilus aphrophilus, and Haemophilus paraphrophilus. By transmission electron microscopy, the cells were typically gram negative in morphology, with several strains possessing some extracellular ruthenium red-staining polymeric material. Numerous vesicular structures, morphologically identical to lipopolysaccharide vesicles, were seen to originate from and be continuous with the surface of the outer membrane. Large numbers of these vesicles were also found in the external environment. Scanning electron microscopic observations revealed that both actinobacilli and haemophili possessed surface projections and an amorphous surface material which connected and covered adjacent cells. Images Fig. 6 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 7 PMID:7439996

  3. Identification of Fur-regulated genes in Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Haraszthy, Violet I; Jordan, Shawn F; Zambon, Joseph J

    2006-03-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is an oral pathogen that causes aggressive periodontitis as well as sometimes life-threatening, extra-oral infections. Iron regulation is thought to be important in the pathogenesis of A. actinomycetemcomitans infections and, consistent with this hypothesis, the fur gene has recently been identified and characterized in A. actinomycetemcomitans. In this study, 14 putatively Fur-regulated genes were identified by Fur titration assay (Furta) in A. actinomycetemcomitans, including afuA, dgt, eno, hemA, tbpA, recO and yfe - some of which are known to be Fur regulated in other species. A fur mutant A. actinomycetemcomitans strain was created by selecting for manganese resistance in order to study the Fur regulon. Comparisons between the fur gene sequences revealed that nucleotide 66 changed from C in the wild-type to T in the mutant strain, changing leucine to isoleucine. The fur mutant strain expressed a nonfunctional Fur protein as determined by Escherichia coli-based ferric uptake assays and Western blotting. It was also more sensitive to acid stress and expressed higher levels of minC than the wild-type strain. minC, which inhibits cell division in other bacterial species and whose regulation by iron has not been previously described, was found to be Fur regulated in A. actinomycetemcomitans by Furta, by gel shift assays, and by RT-qPCR assays for gene expression. PMID:16514158

  4. Lipopolysaccharide Endotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Raetz, Christian R. H.; Whitfield, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Summary Since lipopolysaccharide endotoxins of Gram-negative bacteria were last reviewed in this series in 1990, much has been learned about the assembly and signaling functions of these remarkable glycoconjugates. Lipopolysaccharides typically consist of a hydrophobic domain known as lipid A (or endotoxin), a non-repeating “core” oligosaccharide, and a distal polysaccharide (or O-antigen). The flood of recent genomic data has made it possible to study lipopolysaccharide assembly in diverse Gram-negative bacteria, many of which are human or plant pathogens, and to create mutants or hybrid constructs with novel properties. Unexpectedly, key genes for lipid A biosynthesis have also been found in higher plants, indicating that eucaryotic lipid A-like molecules may exist. The carbohydrate diversity of lipopolysaccharides is better appreciated now than ten years ago, but much remains to be learned about function. Sequence comparisons suggest that extensive lateral transfer of genes for the assembly of O-antigens has occurred among bacteria. The most significant finding in the field of endotoxin biology since 1990 has been the identification of the plasma membrane protein TLR4 as the lipid A signaling receptor of animal cells. The latter belongs to a family of innate immunity receptors, all of which possess a large extracellular domain of leucine-rich repeats, a single trans-membrane segment and a smaller cytoplasmic signaling region that engages the adaptor protein MyD88. The expanding knowledge of TLR4 specificity and its downstream signaling pathways should provide new opportunities for blocking the inflammatory side effects of sepsis. Future progress will require insights into lipopolysaccharide-protein recognition at the atomic level, greater understanding of intra- and inter-cellular lipopolysaccharide trafficking, and incisive biological approaches that combine the tools of bacterial and animal genetics. PMID:12045108

  5. Characterization of leukotoxin from a clinical strain of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Roger; Ghofaily, Lourdes Al; Patel, Jigna; Balashova, Nataliya V; Freitas, Anna C; Labib, Irene; Kachlany, Scott C

    2006-02-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a Gram negative pathogen that is the etiologic agent of localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP), a rapidly progressing and severe disease of the oral cavity that affects predominantly adolescents. A. actinomycetemcomitans is also found in extraoral infections including infective endocarditis. As one of its many virulence determinants, A. actinomycetemcomitans produces the RTX (repeats in toxin) exotoxin, leukotoxin (LtxA). LtxA specifically kills leukocytes of humans and Old World Monkeys. All of our current knowledge of A. actinomycetemcomitans LtxA is based on the protein from strain JP2, a nonadherent laboratory isolate. Because laboratory isolates can lose virulence properties, we wished to examine LtxA from a clinical isolate, NJ4500. We show that localization patterns of LtxA do not differ between the strains. Subcellular localization studies with NJ4500 revealed that LtxA localizes to the outer membrane and that the interaction between LtxA and the surface of cells is specific. Surface localized LtxA was not removed with NaCl treatment and protease protection experiments revealed that approximately 10 kDa of LtxA is exposed. We purified secreted LtxA from NJ4500 and found that the specific activity of this toxin was greater than that of secreted LtxA from JP2. For other RTX toxins, fatty acid modification affects toxin activity, and A. actinomycetemcomitans LtxA is predicted to be modified. We show by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis that NJ4500 LtxA is more highly modified than JP2 LtxA, suggesting that the difference in activities could be due to differential modification. Studies of A. actinomycetemcomitans pathogenesis should therefore consider LtxA from clinical isolates.

  6. Recurrent infective endocarditis due to Aggregatibacter aphrophilus and Staphylococcus lugdunensis.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-García, L; Hurtado-Mingo, A; Olbrich, P; Moruno-Tirado, A; Neth, O; Obando, I

    2015-03-01

    Uncommon microorganisms are increasingly being recognized as causative agents of paediatric infectious endocarditis (IE). We report a 4-year old girl with congenital heart disease, who suffered from 2 IE episodes secondary to Aggregatibacter aphrophilus (formerly Haemophilus aphrophilus) and Staphylococcus lugdunensis, both rarely reported pathogens in this age group. The patient was initially successfully treated with prolonged intravenous antibiotic courses, however removal of the Contegra valved conduit during the second episode was required due to recurrence of fever and development of pulmonary embolism despite completion of antibiotic therapy. A. aphrohilus is a member of the fastidious gram negative microorganisms of the HACEK group (Haemophilus spp., Aggregatibacter spp, Cardiobaterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens and Kingella kingae), that colonize the oropharynx and are a recognised cause of IE. Prognosis of children with IE due to HACEK group members varies, half of them suffering from complications and mortality rates of 10-12.5%. Although S. lugdunensis belongs to coagulase negative staphylococci (CONS), it behaves more like S. aureus species rather than CONS. This microorganism is a well-described cause of endocarditis in adult patients, associated with high requirements of surgical procedures and mortality (42-78%). In conclusion, paediatric IE can be caused by uncommon microorganisms associated with severe complications and potential fatality. The isolation of S. lugdunensis or A. aphrophilus in febrile patients should be considered clinically relevant and cardiac involvement must be ruled out. Those patients with proved IE will require prolonged intravenous antibiotic courses and in complicated cases surgical intervention.

  7. Immunodominant antigen of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 in high-responder patients.

    PubMed Central

    Califano, J V; Schenkein, H A; Tew, J G

    1989-01-01

    This study was undertaken to look for characteristics of the immunodominant antigen(s) of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 that might help explain the high antibody titers in periodontitis patients. Radioimmunoassays (RIA) were performed on sera from 481 patients; sera from the 32 patients with the highest anti-Y4 titers (above 128,000 RIA U/ml) were further analyzed. Y4 antigen was boiled for 45 min or treated with papain, and antibody responses were analyzed by RIA and Western blotting (immunoblotting). In addition, carbohydrate was purified from Y4 and examined by Western blotting. The results indicated that the immunodominant antigen of Y4 in high responders was stable after papain treatment or boiling for 45 min. Papain or boiling eliminated protein bands but a large diffuse band persisted on Western blots. With increasing dilutions of sera, bands on Western blots corresponding to protein antigens disappeared, while the large diffuse band resembling that of carbohydrate persisted. Partially purified Y4 carbohydrate contained the large diffuse band. Double-immunodiffusion analysis indicated that rabbit serotype b-specific antiserum and patient sera recognized the same antigen. When the carbohydrate extract was passed over a lipid A-binding column to remove lipopolysaccharide, the smear corresponding to the immunodominant antigen was still present on Western blots. The immunodominant antigen of Y4 in high-responder individuals appears to be a carbohydrate and is possibly the capsular polysaccharide. Images PMID:2496034

  8. Characterization of an antiproliferative surface-associated protein from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans which can be neutralized by sera from a proportion of patients with localized juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    White, P A; Wilson, M; Nair, S P; Kirby, A C; Reddi, K; Henderson, B

    1995-01-01

    The gentle agitation of suspensions of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans serotype a, b, or c in saline resulted in the release of a proteinaceous surface-associated material (SAM) which produced a dose-dependent inhibition of tritiated thymidine incorporation by the osteoblast-like cell line MG63 in culture. This cell line was sensitive to low concentrations of SAM (50% inhibitory concentration, 200 ng/ml for serotype c). Immunoglobulin G antibodies to constituents of the SAM were found in the blood of patients with localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP). Sera from 9 of 16 patients with LJP significantly neutralized the antiproliferative activity of the SAM, while sera from 15 controls, with no evidence of periodontal disease, were unable to neutralize this activity. Neutralization was not directly related to the patient's antibody titer to the whole SAM. Characterization of the antiproliferative activity in the SAM demonstrated that it was not cytotoxic and was heat and trypsin sensitive. The active component separated in a well-defined peak in anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) which, when further analyzed by size exclusion HPLC, revealed a single active peak, which had an apparent molecular mass of approximately 8 kDa. The lipopolysaccharide from A. actinomycetemcomitans was only weakly active. SAM from Porphyromonas gingivalis W50 and Eikenella corrodens NCTC 10596 did not exhibit any antiproliferative activity with this cell line, even at concentrations as high as 10 micrograms/ml. This study has shown that SAM from A. actinomycetemcomitans contains a potent antiproliferative protein whose activity can be neutralized by antibodies in the sera from some patients with LJP. PMID:7790076

  9. Lytic sensitivity of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 to lysozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Iacono, V J; Boldt, P R; MacKay, B J; Cho, M I; Pollock, J J

    1983-01-01

    The ability of both human and hen egg white lysozymes to lyse Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 was investigated. Lysis was followed optically at 540 nm by measuring the percent reduction in turbidity of freshly harvested log-phase cells suspended in Tris-maleate buffers within a wide range of pH (5.2 to 8.5) and molarity (0.01 to 0.2 M) and containing various amounts of enzyme and EDTA. In several instances, treated microorganisms were subsequently examined in thin sections by electron microscopy. Reductions in turbidity and clearing of suspensions occurred with small amounts of lysozyme (less than 1 microgram) under relatively alkaline conditions and at low ionic strength and in the presence of small amounts of EDTA (greater than 0.01 mM). Under the most alkaline conditions, EDTA alone effected turbidity reductions similar to those observed in the presence of lysozyme, which suggested that EDTA not only increased outer membrane permeability but also caused cell lysis. Ultrastructural analysis did not always correspond to turbidimetric observations. Cell lysis was virtually complete in suspensions containing both lysozyme and EDTA. However, in contrast to turbidimetric findings, a significant percentage of cells (greater than 25%) was lysed in the presence of lysozyme alone. Furthermore, significant damage occurred in the presence of EDTA alone. Spheroplast-like cell ghosts were present which surrounded condensed cytoplasm or relatively clear spaces. These findings further support the concept of the requirement for electron microscopy to assess lytic damage in addition to turbidimetric and biochemical methods. Our results are the first to demonstrate the remarkable sensitivity of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 to lysozyme and to show that EDTA not only affects outer membrane permeability but effects cell lysis, possibly through activation of autolytic enzymes at the cytoplasmic membrane. The exquisite sensitivity of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 to lysis could be

  10. In vitro activity of azithromycin compared with that of erythromycin against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Pajukanta, R; Asikainen, S; Saarela, M; Alaluusua, S; Jousimies-Somer, H

    1992-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibility of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to azithromycin, a new macrolide antibiotic of a new class known as azalides, was compared with that of erythromycin by the agar dilution method on Mueller-Hinton Haemophilus test medium. Eighty-two A. actinomycetemcomitans strains, 79 recent clinical isolates obtained from 40 periodontally healthy or diseased subjects, and 3 type strains were included in the study. Erythromycin showed poor in vitro activity against A. actinomycetemcomitans. Azithromycin, however, was highly effective against A. actinomycetemcomitans: all strains were inhibited at 2.0 micrograms/ml. Azithromycin exhibited the best in vitro activity against the serotype a subpopulation of A. actinomycetemcomitans: 100% of the strains were inhibited at 1.0 micrograms/ml. The lowest MICs were, however, recorded by serotype b strains. Since azithromycin has favorable pharmacokinetic properties, including excellent distribution into tissues, it could be expected to pass into gingival crevicular fluid at levels sufficient to inhibit A. actinomycetemcomitans in vivo. Therefore, it is a good candidate for future clinical trials in A. actinomycetemcomitans-associated periodontitis. PMID:1329617

  11. Immunosuppressive factor from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans down regulates cytokine production.

    PubMed Central

    Kurita-Ochiai, T; Ochiai, K

    1996-01-01

    A cytoplasmic soluble fraction of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 was isolated and characterized as suppressing mitogen-stimulated proliferation of and cytokine production by C3H/HeN mouse splenic T cells. This factor, designated suppressive factor 1 (SF1), was isolated from the supernatant of sonicated whole bacteria and purified by Q-Sepharose Fast Flow column chromatography, DEAE-Sepharose Fast Flow column chromatography, hydroxyapatite high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), and Protein Pack 300 & 125 gel filtration HPLC. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that the purified SF1 migrated as a single band corresponding to a molecular mass of 14 kDa. This molecule was protease labile, heat resistant, and noncytotoxic. N'-terminal sequence analysis revealed no homology with any known peptides of periodontopathic bacteria or with any host-derived growth factors. Purified SF1 suppressed the proliferation of mouse splenic T cells which had been stimulated with concanavalin A, as well as suppressing the production of interleukin-2 (IL-2), gamma interferon, IL-4, and IL-5 from CD4+ T cells as 0.1 microgram/ml or more. These data suggest that SF1 produced by the periodontal pathogen A. actinomycetemcomitans functions as a virulence factor by down regulating T-cell proliferation and cytokine production at local defense sites. PMID:8557373

  12. A longitudinal microbiological investigation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Eikenella corrodens in juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mandell, R L

    1984-01-01

    Longitudinal clinical and microbiological monitoring of subjects with localized juvenile periodontitis indicated that Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Eikenella corrodens were significantly associated (P less than 0.05) with active tissue destruction. PMID:6381313

  13. Role of high-avidity binding of human neutrophil myeloperoxidase in the killing of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaki, K T; Zambon, J J; Jones, C A; Wilson, M E

    1987-01-01

    The binding of the neutrophil enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO) to microbial surfaces is believed to be the first step in its microbicidal activity. The MPO-H2O2-Cl- system is responsible for most oxidative killing of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by human neutrophils. There appear to be three forms of MPO (MPO I, II, and III), all of which can kill this organism in the presence of H2O2 and chloride. In this study, we characterized the binding of native human neutrophil MPO to A. actinomycetemcomitans by an elution procedure dependent on the cationic detergent cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. Binding of native MPO was rapid and reached apparent equilibrium within 1 min. A proportion of binding under equilibrium conditions was saturable and highly avid, with a capacity of 4,500 sites per cell and a dissociation constant of 7.9 X 10(-10) M. At equal protein concentrations, more MPO III bound than MPO II, and more MPO II bound than MPO I. The high-avidity interaction was inhibitable with yeast mannan and with the serotype-defining mannan of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Binding was also partially reversible with yeast mannan. MPO bound to the high-avidity sites did not oxidize guaiacol but oxidized chloride, as detected by the chlorination of taurine. MPO bound to the high-avidity sites was incapable of killing A. actinomycetemcomitans alone in the presence of H2O2 and Cl-, but potentiated killing when sufficient additional MPO was provided. The killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans by the MPO-H2O2-Cl- system was inhibited by yeast mannan and a serotype-defining mannan of A. actinomycetemcomitans. We conclude that high-avidity binding of MPO to the surface of A. actinomycetemcomitans is a mannan-specific interaction and that MPO bound to the high-avidity sites is essential but not alone sufficient to kill A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:3032796

  14. Conjugal transfer of broad-host-range incompatibility group P and Q plasmids from Escherichia coli to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Goncharoff, P; Yip, J K; Wang, H; Schreiner, H C; Pai, J A; Furgang, D; Stevens, R H; Figurski, D H; Fine, D H

    1993-01-01

    The first example of conjugal transfer of DNA from Escherichia coli to the periodontal pathogen Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is presented. Derivatives of the incompatibility group P (IncP) plasmid RK2 successfully transferred from an E. coli donor to an A. actinomycetemcomitans recipient. The resulting A. actinomycetemcomitans transconjugants transferred the plasmids back to E. coli recipients. The IncP transfer functions were also used in trans to mobilize the IncQ plasmid pBK1 from E. coli to A. actinomycetemcomitans. The IncP and IncQ plasmids both transferred into A. actinomycetemcomitans at high frequencies (0.3 to 0.5 transconjugants per donor) and showed no gross deletions, insertions, or rearrangements. Determinations of MICs of various antibiotics for the A. actinomycetemcomitans transconjugant strains demonstrated the expression of ampicillin, chloramphenicol, and kanamycin resistance determinants. Images PMID:8335386

  15. Cellular fatty acid composition of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Haemophilus aphrophilus.

    PubMed

    Braunthal, S D; Holt, S C; Tanner, A C; Socransky, S S

    1980-06-01

    Strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolated from deep pockets of patients with juvenile periodontitis were analyzed for their content of cellular fatty acids. Oral Haemophilus strains, morphologically and biochemically similar to Haemophilus aphrophilus, were also examined for their content of cellular fatty acids. The extractable lipids of the actinobacilli represented approximately 10% of the cell dry weight, with the bound lipids representing 2 to 5%. The major fatty acids consisted of myristic (C14:0) and palmitic (C16:0) acids and a C16:1 acid, possibly palmitoleic acid, accounting for 21, 35, and 31% of the total extractable fatty acids, respectively. Haemophilus strains had a similar cellular fatty acid content. PMID:7430333

  16. Cellular fatty acid composition of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Haemophilus aphrophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Braunthal, S D; Holt, S C; Tanner, A C; Socransky, S S

    1980-01-01

    Strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolated from deep pockets of patients with juvenile periodontitis were analyzed for their content of cellular fatty acids. Oral Haemophilus strains, morphologically and biochemically similar to Haemophilus aphrophilus, were also examined for their content of cellular fatty acids. The extractable lipids of the actinobacilli represented approximately 10% of the cell dry weight, with the bound lipids representing 2 to 5%. The major fatty acids consisted of myristic (C14:0) and palmitic (C16:0) acids and a C16:1 acid, possibly palmitoleic acid, accounting for 21, 35, and 31% of the total extractable fatty acids, respectively. Haemophilus strains had a similar cellular fatty acid content. PMID:7430333

  17. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans contamination of toothbrushes from patients harbouring the organism.

    PubMed

    Müller, H P; Lange, D E; Müller, R F

    1989-07-01

    The main ecological niche of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (A.a.) seems to be the periodontal pocket, but it can also be isolated from supragingival plaque, buccal and tongue mucosa, or saliva. We examined toothbrushes from 21 patients, all identified as harbouring moderate to large numbers of A.a. in subgingival plaque, for contamination with this organism. 29% of the toothbrushes presented by our patients yielded detectable numbers of A.a. Immediately after toothbrushing this figure rose to 62%, but dropped to 50% after 1 h. Numbers of isolated A.a. on toothbrushes were weakly correlated with the degree of periodontal destruction, and significantly more numbers of A.a. on toothbrushes could be detected if the organism was found on mucous membranes or in saliva. There was no association with gingival inflammation, supragingival plaque nor mean numbers of isolated subgingival A.a. PMID:2760252

  18. Introns in the Cytolethal Distending Toxin Gene of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Kai Soo; Ong, Grace; Song, Keang Peng

    2005-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, genes are interrupted by intervening sequences called introns. Introns are transcribed as part of a precursor RNA that is subsequently removed by splicing, giving rise to mature mRNA. However, introns are rarely found in bacteria. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a periodontal pathogen implicated in aggressive forms of periodontal disease. This organism has been shown to produce cytolethal distending toxin (CDT), which causes sensitive eukaryotic cells to become irreversibly blocked at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. In this study, we report the presence of introns within the cdt gene of A. actinomycetemcomitans. By use of reverse transcription-PCR, cdt transcripts of 2.123, 1.572, and 0.882 kb (RTA1, RTA2, and RTA3, respectively) were detected. In contrast, a single 2.123-kb amplicon was obtained by PCR with the genomic DNA. Similar results were obtained when a plasmid carrying cdt was cloned into Escherichia coli. Sequence analysis of RTA1, RTA2, and RTA3 revealed that RTA1 had undergone splicing, giving rise to RTA2 and RTA3. Two exon-intron boundaries, or splice sites, were identified at positions 863 to 868 and 1553 to 1558 of RTA1. Site-directed and deletion mutation studies of the splice site sequence indicated that sequence conservation was important in order for accurate splicing to occur. The catalytic region of the cdt RNA was located within the cdtC gene. This 0.56-kb RNA behaved independently as a catalytically active RNA molecule (a ribozyme) in vitro, capable of splicing heterologous RNA in both cis and trans configurations. PMID:15629928

  19. Periodontitis‐associated pathogens P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans activate human CD14+ monocytes leading to enhanced Th17/IL‐17 responses

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wan‐Chien; van Asten, Saskia D.; Burns, Lachrissa A.; Evans, Hayley G.; Walter, Gina J.; Hashim, Ahmed; Hughes, Francis J.

    2016-01-01

    The Th17/IL‐17 pathway is implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontitis (PD), however the mechanisms are not fully understood. We investigated the mechanism by which the periodontal pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) promote a Th17/IL‐17 response in vitro, and studied IL‐17+ CD4+ T‐cell frequencies in gingival tissue and peripheral blood from patients with PD versus periodontally healthy controls. Addition of Pg or Aa to monocyte/CD4+ T‐cell co‐cultures promoted a Th17/IL‐17 response in vitro in a dose‐ and time‐dependent manner. Pg or Aa stimulation of monocytes resulted in increased CD40, CD54 and HLA‐DR expression, and enhanced TNF‐α, IL‐1β, IL‐6 and IL‐23 production. Mechanistically, IL‐17 production in Pg‐stimulated co‐cultures was partially dependent on IL‐1β, IL‐23 and TLR2/TLR4 signalling. Increased frequencies of IL‐17+ cells were observed in gingival tissue from patients with PD compared to healthy subjects. No differences were observed in IL‐17+ CD4+ T‐cell frequencies in peripheral blood. In vitro, Pg induced significantly higher IL‐17 production in anti‐CD3 mAb‐stimulated monocyte/CD4+ T‐cell co‐cultures from patients with PD compared to healthy controls. Our data suggest that periodontal pathogens can activate monocytes, resulting in increased IL‐17 production by human CD4+ T cells, a process that appears enhanced in patients with PD. PMID:27334899

  20. Expression cloning of a periodontitis-associated apoptotic effector, cagE homologue, in Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yen-Tung A; Hu, Wenqi

    2003-04-18

    To study anti-bacterial immunity and to identify critical bacterial antigens associated with specific periodontal infection, we screened the genomic library of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, a major Gram(-) anaerobe causing human periodontitis, by expression cloning using disease-associated periodontal CD4(+)T cells derived from HuPBL-engrafted NOD/SCID mice. Here, we report one of the novel genes identified and designated, cagE homologue (in short: cagE) of A. actinomycetemcomitans, which encodes a putative bacterial type IV secretion system with significant homology to Helicobacter pylori CagE and Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirB4. All serum samples from A. actinomycetemcomitans-infected periodontitis patients, but not from the healthy controls, readily recognized CagE by ELISA and Western blot, suggesting its biological and clinical significance. The CagE protein, upon secretion, elicited significant apoptosis on primary human epithelia, endothelia, osteoblasts, and T cells by 4-12h in vitro. Importantly, both cagE(-) mutant strain and N-terminus truncated CagE protein drastically reduced (p<0.001) the induction of apoptosis on human epithelia in vitro. These data strongly suggest that a novel effector protein, CagE in A. actinomycetemcomitans, induces apoptosis of human cells and destructive immunity, thereby it may play an important role in the pathogenesis of A. actinomycetemcomitans-mediated infections. PMID:12684047

  1. The gingival immune response to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Hall, E R; Falkler, W A; Martin, S A; Suzuki, J B

    1991-12-01

    The established and advanced lesions of juvenile periodontitis-localized form (JP) are predominated by B-lymphocytes and plasma cells. Local immune processes may participate in protective or immunopathologic roles in the pathogenesis of this disease. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (A.a.) is implicated as a primary etiologic agent in JP. An in vitro gingival explant culture system was utilized to study the specificity of immunoglobulins produced by diseased JP tissues. A dot-immunobinding assay demonstrated that 46% of the supernatant fluids (SF) from explant cultures of diseased tissues (n = 39) were positive for the presence of antibody to A.a. Y4, while 61% of autologous JP sera (n = 39) tested positive. For rapidly progressive (RP) and adult periodontitis (AP) SF, 50% and 40% were positive for A.a. Y4, respectively. Seventeen percent of SF from healthy tissue were positive for A.a. Y4. There was no significant difference between JP SF reactivities to A.a. Y4 when compared to reactivities of SF from AP and RP patients. Only 10% of JP SF were positive for Porphyromonas asaccharolytica, a non-oral control microorganism. The de novo biosynthesis of antibody in JP tissue, reactive with A.a. Y4, was demonstrated with Staph Protein A isolated 14C-labeled IgG (SPAG) and the use of a dot-immunobinding assay and autoradiography. The in vitro gingival tissue explant culture system described provides a useful model for the study of the synthesis and specificity of localized immunoglobulins produced by diseased tissues of JP patients. PMID:1765941

  2. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Keratitis After Glaucoma Infiltration Surgery: A Clinical Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jiaxu; Xu, Jianjiang; Cao, Wenjun; Ji, Jian; Sun, Xinghuai

    2016-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans infection is a rare and easily misdiagnosed ocular disease. In this article, the authors report a chronic, purulent, and difficult-to-treat case of A actinomycetemcomitans keratitis following a glaucoma infiltration surgery.A 56-year-old man with a long-standing history of open-angle glaucoma in both eyes presented with a 12-week history of ocular pain, redness, and blurred vision in his right eye. He underwent a glaucoma infiltration surgery in his right eye 6 months ago. Three months postoperatively, he developed peripheral corneal stromal opacities associated with a white, thin, cystic bleb, and conjunctival injection. These opacities grew despite topical treatment with topical tobramycin, levofloxacin, natamycin, amikacin, and metronidazole eye drops.Multiple corneal scrapings revealed no organisms, and no organisms grew on aerobic, anaerobic, fungal, or mycobacterial cultures. The patient's right eye developed a severe purulent corneal ulcer with a dense hypopyon and required a corneal transplantation. Histopathologic analysis and 16S ribosomalribonucleic acid polymerase chain reaction sequencing revealed A actinomycetemcomitans as the causative organism. Postoperatively, treatment was initiated with topical levofloxacin and cyclosporine, as well as oral levofloxacin and cyclosporine. Graft and host corneal transparency were maintained at the checkup 1 month after surgery.Although it is a rare cause of corneal disease, A actinomycetemcomitans should be suspected in patients with keratitis refractory to topical antibiotic therapy. Delay in diagnosis and appropriate treatment can result in vision loss. PMID:26817919

  3. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Keratitis After Glaucoma Infiltration Surgery: A Clinical Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jiaxu; Xu, Jianjiang; Cao, Wenjun; Ji, Jian; Sun, Xinghuai

    2016-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans infection is a rare and easily misdiagnosed ocular disease. In this article, the authors report a chronic, purulent, and difficult-to-treat case of A actinomycetemcomitans keratitis following a glaucoma infiltration surgery.A 56-year-old man with a long-standing history of open-angle glaucoma in both eyes presented with a 12-week history of ocular pain, redness, and blurred vision in his right eye. He underwent a glaucoma infiltration surgery in his right eye 6 months ago. Three months postoperatively, he developed peripheral corneal stromal opacities associated with a white, thin, cystic bleb, and conjunctival injection. These opacities grew despite topical treatment with topical tobramycin, levofloxacin, natamycin, amikacin, and metronidazole eye drops.Multiple corneal scrapings revealed no organisms, and no organisms grew on aerobic, anaerobic, fungal, or mycobacterial cultures. The patient's right eye developed a severe purulent corneal ulcer with a dense hypopyon and required a corneal transplantation. Histopathologic analysis and 16S ribosomalribonucleic acid polymerase chain reaction sequencing revealed A actinomycetemcomitans as the causative organism. Postoperatively, treatment was initiated with topical levofloxacin and cyclosporine, as well as oral levofloxacin and cyclosporine. Graft and host corneal transparency were maintained at the checkup 1 month after surgery.Although it is a rare cause of corneal disease, A actinomycetemcomitans should be suspected in patients with keratitis refractory to topical antibiotic therapy. Delay in diagnosis and appropriate treatment can result in vision loss.

  4. Identification of genomic clonal types of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by restriction endonuclease analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Han, N; Hoover, C I; Winkler, J R; Ng, C Y; Armitage, G C

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate its utility in discriminating different strains, restriction endonuclease analysis was applied to 12 strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (3 serotype a, 5 serotype b, and 4 serotype c strains). DNA isolated from each strain was digested by 12 different restriction endonucleases, and the electrophoretic banding patterns of the resulting DNA fragments were compared. The DNA fragment patterns produced by SalI, XhoI, and XbaI for the 12 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains were simple (less than 30 bands) and allowed us to recognize easily 10 distinct genomic clonal types. The three serotype a strains exhibited distinctly different clonal types from one another, the five serotype b strains exhibited an additional four distinct clonal types, and the four serotype c strains showed another three different clonal types. The other endonucleases tested were less useful in typing A. actinomycetemcomitans. We conclude that restriction endonuclease analysis is a powerful tool for typing and discerning genetic heterogeneity and homogeneity among A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. It should, therefore, be very useful for epidemiologic studies. Images PMID:1761677

  5. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans toxin induces both cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ohguchi, M; Ishisaki, A; Okahashi, N; Koide, M; Koseki, T; Yamato, K; Noguchi, T; Nishihara, T

    1998-12-01

    We found that the culture supernatant of the periodontopathic bacterium Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans had a cytotoxic effect on several cell lines. In this study, we purified the toxin from the culture supernatant of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 by a four-step procedure: ammonium sulfate precipitation, POROS HQ/M column chromatography, polymyxin B matrix column chromatography, and Mono-Q column chromatography. The purified toxin gave two major bands of protein with molecular masses of 80 and 85 kDa upon sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The mechanism of cell death of the B-cell hybridoma cell line HS-72 was examined by observing changes in nuclear morphology, an increase in the proportion of fragmented DNA, and the typical ladder pattern of degraded chromosomal DNA, indicating the induction of apoptosis. Overexpression of human Bcl-2 suppressed apoptosis in HS-72 cells, indicating that the toxin from A. actinomycetemcomitans induces apoptosis by a Bcl-2-inhibitable mechanism. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the toxin caused cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and apoptosis in HS-72 cells. In addition, aurintricarboxylic acid, a DNA endonuclease inhibitor, markedly decreased the percentage of apoptotic cells but had no effect on cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. Taken together, these findings suggest that the toxin from A. actinomycetemcomitans could mediate the development of periodontal diseases through cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and apoptosis in B lymphocytes of periodontal tissue. PMID:9826381

  6. Nonspecific Adherence by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Requires Genes Widespread in Bacteria and Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Kachlany, Scott C.; Planet, Paul J.; Bhattacharjee, Mrinal K.; Kollia, Evyenia; DeSalle, Rob; Fine, Daniel H.; Figurski, David H.

    2000-01-01

    The gram-negative coccobacillus, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, is the putative agent for localized juvenile periodontitis, a particularly destructive form of periodontal disease in adolescents. This bacterium has also been isolated from a variety of other infections, notably endocarditis. Fresh clinical isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans form tenacious biofilms, a property likely to be critical for colonization of teeth and other surfaces. Here we report the identification of a locus of seven genes required for nonspecific adherence of A. actinomycetemcomitans to surfaces. The recently developed transposon IS903φkan was used to isolate mutants of the rough clinical isolate CU1000 that are defective in tight adherence to surfaces (Tad−). Unlike wild-type cells, Tad− mutant cells adhere poorly to surfaces, fail to form large autoaggregates, and lack long, bundled fibrils. Nucleotide sequencing and genetic complementation analysis revealed a 6.7-kb region of the genome with seven adjacent genes (tadABCDEFG) required for tight adherence. The predicted TadA polypeptide is similar to VirB11, an ATPase involved in macromolecular transport. The predicted amino acid sequences of the other Tad polypeptides indicate membrane localization but no obvious functions. We suggest that the tad genes are involved in secretion of factors required for tight adherence of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Remarkably, complete and highly conserved tad gene clusters are present in the genomes of the bubonic plague bacillus Yersinia pestis and the human and animal pathogen Pasteurella multocida. Partial tad loci also occur in strikingly diverse Bacteria and Archaea. Our results show that the tad genes are required for tight adherence of A. actinomycetemcomitans to surfaces and are therefore likely to be essential for colonization and pathogenesis. The occurrence of similar genes in a wide array of microorganisms indicates that they have important functions. We propose that tad

  7. Iron-Chelating Activity of Tetracyclines and Its Impact on the Susceptibility of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to These Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, Daniel; Huot, Marie-Pierre; Mayrand, Denis

    2000-01-01

    Three tetracyclines (tetracycline, doxycycline, and minocycline) were found to possess iron-chelating activity in a colorimetric siderophore assay. Determination of MICs indicated that the activity of doxycycline against the periodontopathogen Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was only slightly influenced by the presence of an excess of iron that likely saturates the antibiotic. On the other hand, the MICs of doxycycline and minocycline were significantly lower for A. actinomycetemcomitans cultivated under iron-poor conditions than under iron-rich conditions. PMID:10681353

  8. Cellular fatty acid and soluble protein composition of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and related organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Calhoon, D A; Mayberry, W R; Slots, J

    1981-01-01

    The cellular fatty acid and protein content of twenty-five representative strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetecomitans isolated from juvenile and adult periodontitis patients was compared to that of 15 reference strains of oral and nonoral Actinobacillus species and Haemophilus aphrophilus. Trimethylsilyl derivatives of the fatty acid methyl esters were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography. The predominant fatty acids of all 40 strains examined were 14:0, 3-OH 14:0, 16 delta, and 16:0. Actinobacillus seminis (ATCC 15768) was unlike the other strains examined because of a greater amount of 14:0 detected. The soluble protein analysis using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that A. actinomycetemcomitans, H. aphrophilus, and nonoral Actinobacillus species possessed distinct protein profiles attesting to the validity of separating these organisms into different species. Established biotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans could not be differentiated on the basis of fatty acid or protein profiles. PMID:7287893

  9. Microbial ecology of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Eikenella corrodens and Capnocytophaga spp. in adult periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Müller, H P; Heinecke, A; Borneff, M; Knopf, A; Kiencke, C; Pohl, S

    1997-08-01

    Information on intraoral distribution of putative periodontal pathogens might be essential for controlling different forms of periodontal disease. Colonization may be either promoted or impeded by other bacteria competing in the subgingival ecosystem. In recent investigations microbial associations between dental organisms have been determined in a multitude of subgingival plaque samples within multiple patients and described by odds ratios, in most circumstances without taking into account the correlated structure of the observations within a single individual. The present investigation had 3 major objectives: (i) to describe the intraoral distribution of some facultatively anaerobic, Gram-negative rods, i.e. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Eikenella corrodens-like organisms and Capnocytophaga spp., in a multitude of subgingival and extracrevicular samples of 10 adult subjects with A. actinomycetemcomitans-associated periodontitis; (ii) to analyse possible inconsistencies of microbial associations between these periodontal organisms; and (iii) to determine factors increasing the likelihood of isolating these bacteria in a given subgingival site by employing Generalized Estimation Equation (GEE) methods. Clinical examinations were carried out at 6 sites of every tooth present. In each subject, 13 extracrevicular (2 cheek mucosa, 3 tongue, 4 gingival, 2 tonsillar samples, 1 palatinal, 1 saliva sample) and between 22 and 44 subgingival samples from deepest sites of every tooth present (n = 296) were selectively cultivated for A. actinomycetemcomitans, E. corrodens and Capnocytophaga spp. In extracrevicular material, A. actinomycetemcomitans, Capnocytophaga spp. and E. corrodens were isolated in 9, 10 and 6 patients, and from 65, 82 and 15% samples, respectively. The organisms were recovered from 51, 62 and 27% subgingival plaque samples, respectively. Heterogeneity tests did not reveal significant inconsistencies of microbial associations between bacteria in

  10. In vitro activity of antibiotics alone and in combination against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Yogev, R; Shulman, D; Shulman, S T; Glogowski, W G

    1986-01-01

    The MICs for 90% of the organisms tested (MIC90S) of 11 antibiotics against 24 clinical isolates of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans were determined by the MIC 2000 system. The lowest MIC90S (16 micrograms/ml) were observed with ceftriaxone and rifampin. The next lowest MIC90S were found with cephapirin, tetracycline, and chloramphenicol (3.12 micrograms/ml). The MIC90S of penicillin, ampicillin, ticarcillin, piperacillin, and amikacin were each greater than or equal to 12.5 micrograms/ml. Antibiotic synergy was studied by the killing curve method and was defined as a greater than or equal to 2 log10 reduction in CFU when two antibiotics were used in combination at one-fourth the MBC for each compared with the effect of each antibiotic alone at one-half the MBC. Synergism between rifampin and penicillin, cephapirin, or ceftriaxone was tested for with 12 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. In 7 of 37 instances, synergism was demonstrated for the combinations rifampin plus ceftriaxone (n = 3) or rifampin plus penicillin (n = 4); in 9 instances, an additive effect was noted, and impaired killing with drug combinations compared with the effect of a single antibiotic was suggested in 4 strains. The majority of strains were indifferent to the combinations. Similarly, variable results were observed when the combination of trimethoprim and cephapirin was tested against eight A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. Our data suggest that rifampin and cephapirin are the most active of the 11 antibiotics studied against A. actinomycetemcomitans. In addition, in vitro synergism between rifampin and other antibiotics or between trimethoprim and cephapirin was not consistently demonstrable.

  11. Molecular Characterization of an Outer Membrane Protein of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Belonging to the OmpA Family

    PubMed Central

    White, Peter A.; Nair, Sean P.; Kim, Mi-Jurng; Wilson, Michael; Henderson, Brian

    1998-01-01

    The major outer membrane protein (OMP) of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is an OmpA homolog that demonstrates electrophoretic heat modifiability. The gene encoding this protein was isolated from a genomic library of A. actinomycetemcomitans NCTC 9710 by immunoscreening with serum from a patient with localized juvenile periodontitis. Expression of the cloned gene in Escherichia coli and subsequent Western blot analysis revealed a protein with an approximate molecular mass of 34 kDa. The amino acid sequence predicted from the cloned gene demonstrated that the mature protein had a molecular mass of 34,911 Da and significant identity to members of the OmpA family of proteins. We have named the major OMP of A. actinomycetemcomitans Omp34, and its corresponding gene has been named omp34. PMID:9423883

  12. Unconventional N-Linked Glycosylation Promotes Trimeric Autotransporter Function in Kingella kingae and Aggregatibacter aphrophilus

    PubMed Central

    Rempe, Katherine A.; Spruce, Lynn A.; Porsch, Eric A.; Seeholzer, Steven H.; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glycosylation is a widespread mechanism employed by both eukaryotes and bacteria to increase the functional diversity of their proteomes. The nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae glycosyltransferase HMW1C mediates unconventional N-linked glycosylation of the adhesive protein HMW1, which is encoded in a two-partner secretion system gene cluster that also encodes HMW1C. In this system, HMW1 is modified in the cytoplasm by sequential transfer of hexose residues. In the present study, we examined Kingella kingae and Aggregatibacter aphrophilus homologues of HMW1C that are not encoded near a gene encoding an obvious acceptor protein. We found both homologues to be functional glycosyltransferases and identified their substrates as the K. kingae Knh and the A. aphrophilus EmaA trimeric autotransporter proteins. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis revealed multiple sites of N-linked glycosylation on Knh and EmaA. Without glycosylation, Knh and EmaA failed to facilitate wild-type levels of bacterial autoaggregation or adherence to human epithelial cells, establishing that glycosylation is essential for proper protein function. PMID:26307167

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of MacA from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans

    SciTech Connect

    Piao, Shunfu; Xu, Yongbin; Ha, Nam-Chul

    2008-05-01

    A periplasmic membrane-fusion protein MacA from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, an essential component of the multidrug efflux pump in Gram-negative bacteria, was crystallized. Periplasmic membrane-fusion proteins (MFPs) are an essential component of the multidrug efflux pump in Gram-negative bacteria. They play a crucial role in bridging the outer membrane porin TolC and two distinct types of inner membrane transporters. The MFP MacA bridges the inner membrane ABC-type multidrug transporter MacB and the outer membrane porin TolC. MacA from the pathogenic bacterium Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was expressed in Escherichia coli B834 (DE3) and the recombinant protein was purified using Ni–NTA affinity, Q anion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatography. The purified MacA protein was crystallized using the vapour-diffusion method. A MAD diffraction data set was collected to a resolution of 3.0 Å at 100 K. The crystal belongs to space group P622, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 109.2, c = 255.4 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°, and contains one molecule in the asymmetric unit.

  14. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in Brazilian insulin-dependent individuals with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Feitosa, A C; de Uzeda, M; Novaes, A B

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) in subgingival plaque specimens from 26 insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus patients, 11-25 years of age, was determined between January 1987 and December 1989. One hundred and thirty subgingival plaque samples were collected with sterile periodontal curettes. The specimens were weighted, diluted, inoculated on trypticase-soy-serum-bacitracin-vancomycin agar medium (TSBV) and incubated under microacrophilic conditions. Aa was isolated from 2.3% of healthy periodontal areas in these patients, while the microorganism was found in 12.5% of the sites with gingivitis and in 2.6% of the periodontal pockets examined. Although biochemical tests used for the characterization of Aa strains showed homogeneous results, different biotypes were isolated from one or more periodontal sites in the same patient.

  15. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-polysaccharide-like polysaccharide promotes osteoclast-like cell formation by interleukin-1 alpha production in mouse marrow cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, T; Ueda, N; Amano, K; Ishihara, Y; Hayakawa, H; Kuroyanagi, T; Ohsaki, Y; Nagata, K; Noguchi, T

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism of osteoclast-like cell formation induced by periodontopathic bacterium Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 (serotype b) capsular-polysaccharide-like polysaccharide (capsular-like polysaccharide) was examined in a mouse bone marrow culture system. When mouse bone marrow cells were cultured with A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-like polysaccharide for 9 days, many multinucleated cells were formed. The multinucleated cells showed several characteristics of osteoclasts, including tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP) and the ability to resorb the calcified dentine. In this study, we examined the effects of antisera to interleukins on the formation of osteoclast-like cells induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-like polysaccharide. Monospecific anti-mouse recombinant interleukin-1 alpha (rIL-1 alpha) serum completely inhibited the formation of osteoclast-like cells in the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-like polysaccharide. However, anti-mouse rIL-1 beta and anti-mouse rIL-6 sera showed no effect on osteoclast-like cell formation. IL-1 receptor antagonist significantly inhibited the osteoclast-like cell formation mediated by A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-like polysaccharide in mouse marrow cultures. The bioactive IL-1 was detected in the culture media of mouse bone marrow cells stimulated with A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-like polysaccharide. These results indicate that IL-1 alpha is involved in the mechanism of the formation of osteoclast-like cells induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-like polysaccharide. We sought to determine whether osteoclast-like cell formation induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 capsular-like polysaccharide could be modulated by the protein kinase inhibitors H8 and HA1004. The formation of osteoclast-like cells was suppressed by H8 and HA1004. These findings suggest that the signals by protein kinases may regulate osteoclast-like cell formation induced by A

  16. Genetic and Functional Analyses of the Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans AfeABCD Siderophore-Independent Iron Acquisition System

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Eric R.; Tomaras, Andrew P.; McGillivary, Glen; Connerly, Pamela L.; Actis, Luis A.

    2005-01-01

    The Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans afeABCD iron transport system, the expression of which is controlled by iron and Fur, was identified in three different isolates. The protein products of this locus are related to bacterial ABC transporters involved in metal transport. Transformation of the Escherichia coli 1017 iron acquisition mutant with a plasmid harboring afeABCD promoted cell growth under iron-chelated conditions. However, insertion disruption of each of the afeABCD coding regions abolished this growth-relieving effect. The replacement of the parental afeA allele with the derivative afeA::EZ::TN drastically reduced the ability of A. actinomycetemcomitans cells to grow under iron-chelated conditions. PMID:15908408

  17. Bacteriocin production by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolated from the oral cavity of humans with periodontal disease, periodontally healthy subjects and marmosets.

    PubMed

    Lúcia, Lima Francisca; Farias, Flávio F; Eustáquio, Costa José; Auxiliadora, Maria; Carvalho, R; Alviano, Celuta S; Farias, Luiz M

    2002-01-01

    The ability of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to produce bacteriocin has rarely been reported. Antagonistic substance production may confer an important ecological advantage for the producer microorganisms, especially in a competitive ecosystem such as the oral cavity. In the present study, 75 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains isolated from the oral cavity of human patients with periodontal disease, periodontally healthy subjects and marmosets, as well as two reference strains (A. actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 29523 and FDC Y4) were evaluated for auto-, iso-, and heteroantagonistic activity. Fifty-one (68.00%) strains exhibited antagonistic activity; heteroantagonism was observed more often than isoantagonism. Isolated strains antagonized 17 different species of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria from the oral and nonoral microbiota. Sensitivity to heat and to proteolytic enzymes constituted strong evidence that the antagonistic substance has a proteic nature. Taken together, our data enabled us to confirm that the antagonistic substance detected was a bacteriocin. The wide spectrum of activity indicates the possibility that more than one antagonistic substance is produced and that these substances play an important role in the ecological balance of the oral ecosystem.

  18. 16S rDNA PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis in determining proportions of coexisting Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strains.

    PubMed

    Ihalin, Riikka; Asikainen, Sirkka

    2006-06-01

    Certain serotypes of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans seem to prefer coexistence in vivo. The 16S rDNA PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was tested for its capability to distinguish coexisting A. actinomycetemcomitans strains of different serotypes or genetic lineages and to determine their proportions in vitro. The migration pattern of the PCR amplicon from serotype c differed from those of the other serotypes. Contrary to the strains of serotypes c, d, and e, strains of serotypes a, b, and f consistently demonstrated intra-serotype migration patterns similar to each other. Since the migration patterns differed between serotype c and b strains a strain of each was used to determine their proportional representation in a strain mixture. The strains were distinguishable from each other above the 5% PCR-DGGE detection level (12.5 ng DNA/1.5 x 10(6) cells). DGGE provides a promising tool for in vitro studies on the coexistence of different genetic lineages of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  19. Augmentation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Invasion of Human Oral Epithelial Cells and Up-Regulation of Interleukin-8 Production by Saliva CD14

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Atsuko; Satoh, Aya; Ngai, Tomoko; Nishimura, Takashi; Ikawa, Keiji; Matsuyama, Takami; Shimauchi, Hidetoshi; Takada, Haruhiko; Sugawara, Shunji

    2003-01-01

    It has recently been shown that human salivary glands constitutively express CD14, an important molecule in innate immunity, and that a soluble form of CD14 is secreted in saliva. The concentration of CD14 in parotid (a serous gland) saliva was comparable to that in normal serum and 10-fold the amount in whole saliva, although the physiological function of saliva CD14 remained unclear. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a periodontopathic bacterium and is able to invade oral epithelial cells. The present study showed that upon exposure to live A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 for 2 h, human oral epithelial HSC-2 cells produced interleukin-8 (IL-8) for a further 24 h and whole saliva augmented the production induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4. Parotid saliva showed a more pronounced effect on the production of IL-8 than whole saliva. Neither saliva preparation itself had IL-8-inducing activity. Parotid saliva exhibited antibacterial activity against a low concentration of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4, but recombinant CD14 did not show the activity. The internalization of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 into HSC-2 cells was inhibited by cytochalasin B, indicating that the process was actin dependent, and depletion of CD14 from parotid saliva inhibited the invasion and, as a consequence, inhibited production of IL-8. Furthermore, human recombinant CD14 augmented invasion and IL-8 production. These results suggest that saliva CD14 promoted the invasion of oral epithelial cells by A. actinomycetemcomitans and consequently augmented the production of IL-8, playing an important role in innate immunity in the oral cavity. PMID:14500479

  20. Chlamydial hemagglutinin identified as lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Watkins, N G; Caldwell, H D; Hackstadt, T

    1987-08-01

    Chlamydial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) agglutinated mouse and rabbit erythrocytes but not human, guinea pig, or pronghorn antelope erythrocytes. Hemagglutination was not specific for Chlamydia spp., as rough LPSs from Coxiella burnetii and Escherichia coli also agglutinated erythrocytes from the same animal species. Nonagglutinated and agglutinated erythrocytes bound equivalent amounts of LPS, indicating that hemagglutination was not due to a specific interaction of chlamydial LPS with erythrocytes. Thus, hemagglutination by chlamydial LPS is not mediated by specific receptor-ligand interactions but is a property of the altered surface of the LPS-coated erythrocytes. PMID:3301820

  1. Spontaneous release of lipopolysaccharide by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Cadieux, J E; Kuzio, J; Milazzo, F H; Kropinski, A M

    1983-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO grown in glucose mineral salts medium released lipopolysaccharide which was chemically and immunologically similar to the cellular lipopolysaccharide. In addition, it possessed identical phage E79-inactivating properties. Through neutralization of phage activity and hemolysis inhibition assays, the organism was found to liberate lipopolysaccharide at a constant rate during log-phase growth equivalent to 1.3 to 2.2 ng/10(8) cells over a growth temperature range of 25 to 42 degrees C. At 19 degrees C, a lipopolysaccharide was released which was deficient in phage-inactivating activity but retained its immunological properties. Chemical analysis of lipopolysaccharide extracted from cells grown at 19 degrees C showed a deficiency in the O-side-chain component fucosamine. Gel exclusion chromatography of the polysaccharide fraction derived from lipopolysaccharide isolated from cells grown at 19 degrees C exhibited a decreased content of side-chain polysaccharide as well as a difference in the hexosamine:hexose ratio. The results of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analysis confirmed these results as well as establishing that an essentially normal distribution of side-chain repeating unit lengths were to be found in the 19 degrees C preparation. These results suggest a decrease in the frequency of capping R-form lipopolysaccharide at 19 degrees C. Images PMID:6409883

  2. Lipopolysaccharide Membrane Building and Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Sunhwan; Wu, Emilia L.; Stuhlsatz, Danielle; Klauda, Jeffery B.; Widmalm, Göran; Im, Wonpil

    2015-01-01

    Summary While membrane simulations are widely employed to study the structure and dynamics of various lipid bilayers and membrane proteins in the bilayers, simulations of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in membrane environments have been limited due to its structural complexity, difficulties in building LPS-membrane systems, and lack of appropriate molecular force field. In this work, as a first step to extend CHARMM-GUI Membrane Builder to incorporate LPS molecules and to explore their structures and dynamics in membrane environments using molecular dynamics simulations, we describe step-by-step procedures to build LPS bilayer systems using CHARMM and the recently developed CHARMM carbohydrate and lipid force fields. Such procedures are illustrated by building various bilayers of Escherichia coli O6 LPS and their preliminary simulation results are given in terms of per-LPS area and density distributions of various components along the membrane normal. PMID:25753722

  3. The survival rate of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Bacteroides forsythus following 4 randomized treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Shiloah, J; Patters, M R; Dean, J W; Bland, P; Toledo, G

    1997-08-01

    The overall goal of this clinical study was to determine the short-term anti-infective effects of four randomized treatment modalities on Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), and Bacteroides forsythus (Bf) and determine the effects of bacterial survival on treatment outcomes in patients with adult periodontitis. Twelve adult patients requiring therapy for moderate periodontitis were selected for this study. All patients had at least one tooth in each quadrant that had an inflamed pocket of probing depth > or =5 mm with probing attachment loss that harbored at least one of the following three periodontal pathogens: Aa, Pg, or Bf. The number of target organisms per site was determined pre-operatively, at 1 week, and 1 month and 3 months postoperatively utilizing DNA probes. One quadrant in each patient was randomly assigned to each one of the following four treatment groups: 1) scaling and root planing (SRP group); 2) pocket reduction through osseous surgery and apically-positioned flap (OS group); 3) modified Widman flap (MWF group); and 4) modified Widman flap and topical application of saturated citric acid at pH 1 for 3 minutes (CA group). The 4 treatment modalities were performed in one appointment. No postoperative antibiotics were used. Patients were instructed to supplement their daily oral hygiene with chlorohexidine oral rinse during the study. The results of this investigation indicated that: 1) none of the treatment modalities was effective in eliminating the target species; 2) the incidence of infected sites for all groups was 100% preoperatively; 62.5%, 33.3%, and 31.3% at 1 week, and 1 and 3 months postoperatively, respectively; 3) these infected sites lost 1.1 +/- 0.4 mm of probing attachment compared to gain of 0.0 +/- 0.3 mm for uninfected sites; 4) the infected sites had higher plaque and bleeding on probing 0.9 +/- 0.3, 73 +/- 12%, respectively, compared to 0.3 +/- 0.1 and 30 +/- 8% for the uninfected sites

  4. Site-specific subgingival colonization by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Paolantonio, M; Festa, F; di Placido, G; D'Attilio, M; Catamo, G; Piccolomini, R

    1999-04-01

    A high prevalence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) in subgingival plaque in patients for orthodontia already has been observed. The present study had the following aims: 1) to ascertain a direct relationship between the orthodontic appliance placement and the subgingival colonization by Aa, and 2) to determine whether the Aa growth specifically occurred on teeth with braces attached or whether the presence of orthodontic appliances could also cause the isolation of Aa in teeth free from therapeutic appliances. Twenty-four young systemically and periodontally healthy subjects with malaligned and crowded teeth in the anterior sextants of both dental arches participated in this study. After 1 session of ultrasonic scaling with oral hygiene instructions during the first experimental session, the mesiobuccal sites of the first molars and the distobuccal sites of the lateral incisors in both dental arches in each participant were subjected to clinical and microbiologic examination for the recovery of Aa. Clinical examination consisted of recording the presence of plaque and the examination of gingival bleeding on probing and probing depth. Microbiologic sampling was obtained with the insertion of 3 sterile paper points at the deepest part of each gingival sulcus. Altogether, 192 periodontal sites were examined. After the examinations, the patients received fixed orthodontic appliances in only 1 dental arch (test sites) and the other one was left free from appliances (control sites). Clinical examination and microbiologic sampling were repeated in the same experimental test and control sites after 4, 8, and 12 weeks. At the 12-week session, the orthodontic appliance was removed from the test arch, and, 4 weeks later, a further clinical and microbiologic examination was performed. The results showed that, during the period with orthodontic appliances, the presence of plaque scores and the gingival bleeding on probing scores were increased significantly and that

  5. Physical properties of defined lipopolysaccharide salts.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, R T; Haug, A; McGroarty, E J

    1983-04-12

    The electron spin resonance probes 5-doxylstearate and 4-(dodecyldimethylammonio)-1-oxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine bromide were used to characterize the fluidity of the acyl chain and head-group regions, respectively, of defined salts of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Escherichia coli K12. The removal of the weakly bound divalent cations from native LPS by electrodialysis and their replacement by sodium had little effect on the midpoint of the lipid-phase transition or on head-group mobility. In contrast, lipopolysaccharide acyl chain mobility increased following electrodialysis. The replacement of most of the remaining cations with sodium resulted in a further dramatic increase in mobility in both the polar and nonpolar regions of lipopolysaccharide. Head-group mobility of the sodium salt of LPS was shown to be reduced with the addition of divalent cations. Furthermore, evidence is presented which suggests that low magnesium concentrations may induce phase separations in the sodium salt. The magnesium salt of lipopolysaccharide closely resembled the native form in both head-group and acyl chain mobility although the cation charge to phosphorus ratio in the magnesium salt was greater than that detected in the native isolate. Analyses of other lipopolysaccharide salts support our hypothesis that many of the observed differences in the physical and pathological properties of lipopolysaccharide salts may simply be explained by the degree of charge neutralization. PMID:6303400

  6. Immunoglobulin allotypes and immunoglobulin G subclass responses to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis in early-onset periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Choi, J I; Ha, M H; Kim, J H; Kim, S J

    1996-01-01

    The present study was performed to estimate the observed frequencies of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain (Gm) and light-chain (Km) allotypes among patients with early-onset periodontitis (EOP) and their effect on the IgG2 subclass responses against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 and Porphyromonas gingivalis 381, respectively. Sixty-nine EOP patients, including 11 with localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP), 19 who had LJP, 15 with LJP-rapidly progressing periodontitis (RPP), and 24 with RPP, were examined for the Gm and Km allotypes by a hemagglutination inhibition test. Levels of immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) antibodies against the two organisms were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Fifty race- and age-matched, periodontally healthy subjects were also included as a control group. The observed frequencies of the Gm haplotype afnb and Km(1) were significantly higher in the RPP and LJP groups, respectively. The G2m(n)+ group of those with RPP and the Km(1)+ group of those with LJP had significantly higher levels of IgG2 antibodies to A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis, respectively. The results indicate that linkage disequilibrium of the G2m(n) locus in RPP patients or the Km(1) locus in LJP patients may be associated with high IgG2 antibody responses to the respective bacteria. It was reasoned that the IgG2 antibody responses are associated with the immunoglobulin allotypes. The function of IgG2 antibodies in their reaction to different bacterial antigens may be interpreted as either protective or nonprotective in the two different types of EOP (i.e., LJP and RPP). PMID:8926092

  7. Lipopolysaccharide Engineering in Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Pupo, Elder; Hamstra, Hendrik-Jan; Meiring, Hugo; van der Ley, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Engineering the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthetic pathway offers the potential to obtain modified derivatives with optimized adjuvant properties. Neisseria meningitidis strain H44/76 was modified by expression of the pagL gene encoding lipid A 3-O-deacylase from Bordetella bronchiseptica and by inactivation of the lgtB gene encoding the terminal oligosaccharide galactosyltransferase. Mass spectrometry analysis of purified mutant LPS was used for detailed compositional analysis of all present molecular species. This determined that the modified LPS was mainly pentaacylated, demonstrating high efficiency of conversion from the hexaacyl to the 3-O-deacylated form by heterologous lipid A 3-O-deacylase (PagL) expression. MS analyses also provided evidence for expression of only one major oligosaccharide glycoform, which lacked the terminal galactose residue as expected from inactivation of the lgtB gene. The immunomodulatory properties of PagL-deacylated LPS were compared with another pentaacyl form obtained from an lpxL1− mutant, which lacks the 2′ secondary acyl chain. Although both LPS mutants displayed impaired capacity to induce production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 in the monocytic cell line Mono Mac 6, induction of the Toll-interleukin-1 receptor domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon-β-dependent chemokine interferon-γ-induced protein 10 was largely retained only for the lgtB−/pagL+ mutant. Removal of remaining hexaacyl species exclusively present in lgtB−/pagL+ LPS demonstrated that these minor species potentiate but do not determine the activity of this LPS. These results are the first to indicate a qualitatively different response of human innate cells to pentaacyl lpxL1− and pagL+ LPS and show the importance of detailed structure-function analysis when working with modified lipid A structures. The pagL+ LPS has significant potential as immune modulator in humans. PMID:24492609

  8. Analytical performance of an immunologic-based periodontal bacterial test for simultaneous detection and differentiation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia.

    PubMed

    Snyder, B; Ryerson, C C; Corona, H; Grogan, E A; Reynolds, H S; Contestable, P B; Boyer, B P; Mayer, J; Mangan, T; Norkus, N; Zambon, J J; Genco, R J

    1996-05-01

    The analytical performance of a membrane-based immunoassay for the simultaneous detection and differentiation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia (including Prevotella nigrescens) was investigated. Positive reactions were observed for 71 of 71 reference strains and recent oral isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, and P. intermedia. No cross-reactivity was observed with 39 other common oral and environmental species. The specificity of the test was unaffected by the presence of potential oral interferents including whole blood, white blood cells, mucin, saliva, toothpastes, and oral rinses. A proficiency test by dental professionals using a standardized set of unknown simulated samples yielded a sensitivity of 97% (116/120) and a 100% specificity (240/ 240). An additional group including dental professionals and high school students was shown to be 99% proficient (1385/1397) in distinguishing proper from improper test function when processing control samples with normal test devices and devices with simulated error conditions. Comparisons to a culture standard for 104 subgingival plaque samples collected from 26 adult periodontitis patients yielded > 98% specificity for each of the test bacteria. In addition, the detection threshold for the test was determined to be equivalent to 10(4) cultivable test bacteria when compared to the culture standard. The data indicate that this membrane immunoassay is a valid and easy-to-use method for the detection of A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, and P. intermedia in subgingival plaque, at levels above the detection threshold of the test.

  9. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans serotype b-specific polysaccharide antigen stimulates production of chemotactic factors and inflammatory cytokines by human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, N; Yamashita, Y; Ikeda, D; Koga, T

    1996-01-01

    Serotype b-specific polysaccharide antigen (SPA) was extracted from whole cells of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 by autoclaving and purified by chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-25 and Sephacryl S-300. SPA induced the release of monocyte and leukocyte chemotactic factors by human monocytes. Polymyxin B had almost no effect on the release of monocyte chemotactic factor, but a monoclonal antibody against SPA markedly inhibited it. Human monocytes stimulated with SPA exhibited the increased mRNA expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and a neutrophil chemotactic factor, interleukin-8 (IL-8). On the other hand, SPA induced the release of IL-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and enhanced the expression of IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNF alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNAs. Human monocytes expressed MCP-1 and IL-8 mRNAs when stimulated by human recombinant IL-1alpha, I1-1beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha, suggesting that these inflammatory cytokines induced by SPA might participate in the production of chemotactic factors in human monocytes. PMID:8698480

  10. Cell cycle-specific growth inhibitory effect on human gingival fibroblasts of a toxin isolated from the culture medium of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Helgeland, K; Nordby, O

    1993-05-01

    A toxin isolated from the growth medium of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by ammonium sulfate precipitation was shown to inhibit irreversibly the multiplication of human gingival fibroblasts. DNA histograms from flow cytometric measurements showed that the cells accumulated preferentially in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Such cells exhibited sheetlike protrusions, and an increased frequency of micronuclei was evident in cells treated with low concentrations of the toxin. Toxin-treated cells were viable for several weeks, as shown by staining with trypan blue and fluorescein diacetate, and the general cell metabolism as measured by oxygen consumption was unimpaired. PMID:8496779

  11. [Phytotoxic properties of Ralstonia solanacearum lipopolysaccharides].

    PubMed

    Hrytsaĭ, R V; Iakovleva, L M; Varbanets', L D

    2014-01-01

    The study is dedicated to research of phytotoxic properties of Ralstonia solanacearum lipopolysaccharides. This causative agent is one of the most dangerous among potato bacterial diseases. It is revealed that the inhibitory effect of LPS solution on seedlings germination is more noticeable on crops susceptible to brown rot. Maximal total phytotoxic properties have been shown by LPS from strains 35, 52b, TX1 and TS3, which were characterized by relatively low rhamnose content. Relative to the control plants LPS may diminish and some ones--increase the root length, height and weight of seedlings, subject to particular strain. But the stimulation revealed is minor.

  12. Export of O-specific lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Valvano, Miguel A

    2003-05-01

    The O antigen is the most surface-exposed component of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecule and its biogenesis involves several complex mechanisms not completely well understood. All of these mechanisms involve biochemical reactions that occur on the cytoplasmic side of the plasma membrane as well as several different translocation pathways that deliver the nascent O antigens in a glycolipid form to the periplasmic side of the plasma membrane. This article discusses our current understanding of the mechanisms operating in the biogenesis of the O-specific LPS.

  13. Lipopolysaccharide potentiates hyperthermia-induced seizures

    PubMed Central

    Eun, Baik-Lin; Abraham, Jayne; Mlsna, Lauren; Kim, Min Jung; Koh, Sookyong

    2015-01-01

    Background Prolonged febrile seizures (FS) have both acute and long-lasting effects on the developing brain. Because FS are often associated with peripheral infection, we aimed to develop a preclinical model of FS that simulates fever and immune activation in order to facilitate the implementation of targeted therapy after prolonged FS in young children. Methods The innate immune activator lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was administered to postnatal day 14 rat (200 μg/kg) and mouse (100 μg/kg) pups 2–2.5 h prior to hyperthermic seizures (HT) induced by hair dryer or heat lamp. To determine whether simulation of infection enhances neuronal excitability, latency to seizure onset, threshold temperature and total number of seizures were quantified. Behavioral seizures were correlated with electroencephalographic changes in rat pups. Seizure-induced proinflammatory cytokine production was assessed in blood samples at various time points after HT. Seizure-induced microglia activation in the hippocampus was quantified using Cx3cr1GFP/+ mice. Results Lipopolysaccharide priming increased susceptibility of rats and mice to hyperthemic seizures and enhanced seizure-induced proinflammatory cytokine production and microglial activation. Conclusions Peripheral inflammation appears to work synergistically with hyperthermia to potentiate seizures and to exacerbate seizure-induced immune responses. By simulating fever, a regulated increase in body temperature from an immune challenge, we developed a more clinically relevant animal model of prolonged FS. PMID:26357586

  14. Core region in Proteus mirabilis lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Kotełko, K; Gromska, W; Papierz, M; Sidorczyk, Z; Krajewska, D; Szer, K

    1977-01-01

    Four R mutants of P. mirabilis were isolated. The composition of their degraded polysaccharides (PS) obtained from the respective lipopolysaccharides (LPS) as well as the composition and properties of the PS-fractions separated by column chromatography were examined. The results were compared with those obtained with PS of the wild type. One of the mutants could be classified as an Ra-type mutant, presenting a complete LPS core. This polysaccharide core contains: galacturonic acid, glucosamine, glucose, D-glycero-D-mannoheptose, L-glycero-D-mannoheptose in a molar ratio of 1 : 1 : 1 : 1 : 2 and 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate. Taking into consideration the common sugars described previously in the LPS chemotypes of P. hauseri, the composition of the complete core region mentioned above represents the LPS core part of all the chemotypes, containing two different heptoses.

  15. Anti-inflammatory, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Effects of Artemisinin Extracts from Artemisia annua L.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wan-Su; Choi, Woo Jin; Lee, Sunwoo; Kim, Woo Joong; Lee, Dong Chae; Sohn, Uy Dong; Shin, Hyoung-Shik

    2015-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial properties of artemisinin derived from water, methanol, ethanol, or acetone extracts of Artemisia annua L. were evaluated. All 4 artemisinin-containing extracts had anti-inflammatory effects. Of these, the acetone extract had the greatest inhibitory effect on lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and proinflammatory cytokine (IL-1β , IL-6, and IL-10) production. Antioxidant activity evaluations revealed that the ethanol extract had the highest free radical scavenging activity, (91.0±3.2%), similar to α-tocopherol (99.9%). The extracts had antimicrobial activity against the periodontopathic microorganisms Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. animalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. polymorphum, and Prevotella intermedia. This study shows that Artemisia annua L. extracts contain anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial substances and should be considered for use in pharmaceutical products for the treatment of dental diseases. PMID:25605993

  16. [Regulation of thyroid and pituitary functions by lipopolysaccharide].

    PubMed

    Iaglova, N V; Berezov, T T

    2010-01-01

    Activation of toll-like receptors-4 by bacterial lipopolysaccharide downregulates pituitary and thyroid function. Besides decrease of thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion lipopolysaccharide affects secretion in follicular thyroid cells directly. The endotoxin partially activates and inhibits different phases of follicular thyrocytes' secretion. Lipopolysaccharide enhances thyroglobulin synthesis and exocytosis into follicular lumen and suppresses its resorbtion. It results in sharp drop of blood thyroxine concentration without decrease of deiodinases-mediated thiroxine to triiodothyronine conversion. Stimulation of the lipopolysaccharide-pretreated thyroid gland with thyroid-stimulating hormone increases resorbtion of thyroglobulin and thyroid hormone production. Combined stimulation of the thyroid gland increases protein bound thyroxine and triiodothyronine serum concentration unlike only TSH stimulation resulting in increase of free thyroid hormone levels. It also proves that binding capacity of thyroid hormone serum transport proteins during nonthyroidal illness syndrome remains normal. PMID:21341506

  17. Fatty Acids Present in the Lipopolysaccharide of Rhizobium trifolii

    PubMed Central

    Russa, R.; Lorkiewicz, Z.

    1974-01-01

    Approximately 70% of the fatty acids recovered after acid or alkaline hydrolysis of the lipopolysaccharide of Rhizobium trifolii were hydroxy fatty acids identified as hydroxymyristic and hydroxypalmitic acids. Palmitic acid was the only saturated fatty acid found in the lipopolysaccharide of R. trifolii. Octadecenoic and a small amount of hexadecenoic acids were also identified. The results of BF3 methanolysis and hydroxylaminolysis suggest that hydroxypalmitic acid is N-acyl bound. PMID:4852028

  18. Absence of lipopolysaccharide in the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, K; Rothenberg, R J; Barbour, A G

    1987-01-01

    We were unable to demonstrate the presence of the classic enterobacterium-type lipopolysaccharide in the cells of the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi B31. This finding was primarily based on chemical analysis and the absence of free lipid A upon mild acid hydrolysis of the appropriate cell extracts. These results do not preclude the possible existence of an unusual lipopolysaccharide-like compound(s) in B. burgdorferi. Images PMID:3623705

  19. [Modulation of immune response by bacterial lipopolysaccharides].

    PubMed

    Aldapa-Vega, Gustavo; Pastelín-Palacios, Rodolfo; Isibasi, Armando; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; López-Macías, Constantino

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a molecule that is profusely found on the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and is also a potent stimulator of the immune response. As the main molecule on the bacterial surface, is also the most biologically active. The immune response of the host is activated by the recognition of LPS through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and this receptor-ligand interaction is closely linked to LPS structure. Microorganisms have evolved systems to control the expression and structure of LPS, producing structural variants that are used for modulating the host immune responses during infection. Examples of this include Helicobacter pylori, Francisella tularensis, Chlamydia trachomatis and Salmonella spp. High concentrations of LPS can cause fever, increased heart rate and lead to septic shock and death. However, at relatively low concentrations some LPS are highly active immunomodulators, which can induce non-specific resistance to invading microorganisms. The elucidation of the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the recognition of LPS and its structural variants has been fundamental to understand inflammation and is currently a pivotal field of research to understand the innate immune response, inflammation, the complex host-pathogen relationship and has important implications for the rational development of new immunomodulators and adjuvants. PMID:27560917

  20. Structure and Effects of Cyanobacterial Lipopolysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Durai, Prasannavenkatesh; Batool, Maria; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a component of the outer membrane of mainly Gram-negative bacteria and cyanobacteria. The LPS molecules from marine and terrestrial bacteria show structural variations, even among strains within the same species living in the same environment. Cyanobacterial LPS has a unique structure, since it lacks heptose and 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (also known as keto-deoxyoctulosonate (KDO)), which are present in the core region of common Gram-negative LPS. In addition, the cyanobacterial lipid A region lacks phosphates and contains odd-chain hydroxylated fatty acids. While the role of Gram-negative lipid A in the regulation of the innate immune response through Toll-like Receptor (TLR) 4 signaling is well characterized, the role of the structurally different cyanobacterial lipid A in TLR4 signaling is not well understood. The uncontrolled inflammatory response of TLR4 leads to autoimmune diseases such as sepsis, and thus the less virulent marine cyanobacterial LPS molecules can be effective to inhibit TLR4 signaling. This review highlights the structural comparison of LPS molecules from marine cyanobacteria and Gram-negative bacteria. We discuss the potential use of marine cyanobacterial LPS as a TLR4 antagonist, and the effects of cyanobacterial LPS on humans and marine organisms. PMID:26198237

  1. Structure and Effects of Cyanobacterial Lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Durai, Prasannavenkatesh; Batool, Maria; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-07-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a component of the outer membrane of mainly Gram-negative bacteria and cyanobacteria. The LPS molecules from marine and terrestrial bacteria show structural variations, even among strains within the same species living in the same environment. Cyanobacterial LPS has a unique structure, since it lacks heptose and 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (also known as keto-deoxyoctulosonate (KDO)), which are present in the core region of common Gram-negative LPS. In addition, the cyanobacterial lipid A region lacks phosphates and contains odd-chain hydroxylated fatty acids. While the role of Gram-negative lipid A in the regulation of the innate immune response through Toll-like Receptor (TLR) 4 signaling is well characterized, the role of the structurally different cyanobacterial lipid A in TLR4 signaling is not well understood. The uncontrolled inflammatory response of TLR4 leads to autoimmune diseases such as sepsis, and thus the less virulent marine cyanobacterial LPS molecules can be effective to inhibit TLR4 signaling. This review highlights the structural comparison of LPS molecules from marine cyanobacteria and Gram-negative bacteria. We discuss the potential use of marine cyanobacterial LPS as a TLR4 antagonist, and the effects of cyanobacterial LPS on humans and marine organisms. PMID:26198237

  2. Immunochemical characterization of Brucella lipopolysaccharides and polysaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, E; Speth, S L; Jones, L M; Berman, D T

    1981-01-01

    Purified lipopolysaccharide (LPS) extracted with phenol-water from smooth Brucella abortus was hydrolyzed with 1% acetic acid at 100 degrees C. The degraded polysaccharide (AH) released gave reactions of identity with the native polysaccharide hapten (NH) in phenol-water- or trichloroacetic acid-extracted endotoxin preparations of B. abortus and with the polysaccharide (poly B) extracted by trichloroacetic acid from rough B. melitensis strain B115. Poly B was present in the soluble cytoplasmic fraction but not in the membrane fraction, of disrupted B115 cells. It could not be extracted from three rough mutants of B. abortus or from B canis or B. ovis cells. Both AH and NH shared determinants present on smooth LPS and missing from poly B. Sugars found in purified LPS, NH, and AH included mannose, glucose, quinovosamine, glucosamine, and 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate. Poly B contained only a trace amount of quinovosamine and no 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate detectable by the thiobarbiturate assay. Sera from some rabbits immunized with pure smooth LPS and some, but not all, cows infected with field strains of B. abortus recognized the determinants missing from poly B. A subclass-specific enzyme-linked immunoassay showed that most of the antibody in sera from infected cows which binds to smooth LPS and to NH is of the immunoglobulin G1 subclass. Images PMID:6163716

  3. [Modulation of immune response by bacterial lipopolysaccharides].

    PubMed

    Aldapa-Vega, Gustavo; Pastelín-Palacios, Rodolfo; Isibasi, Armando; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; López-Macías, Constantino

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a molecule that is profusely found on the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and is also a potent stimulator of the immune response. As the main molecule on the bacterial surface, is also the most biologically active. The immune response of the host is activated by the recognition of LPS through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and this receptor-ligand interaction is closely linked to LPS structure. Microorganisms have evolved systems to control the expression and structure of LPS, producing structural variants that are used for modulating the host immune responses during infection. Examples of this include Helicobacter pylori, Francisella tularensis, Chlamydia trachomatis and Salmonella spp. High concentrations of LPS can cause fever, increased heart rate and lead to septic shock and death. However, at relatively low concentrations some LPS are highly active immunomodulators, which can induce non-specific resistance to invading microorganisms. The elucidation of the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the recognition of LPS and its structural variants has been fundamental to understand inflammation and is currently a pivotal field of research to understand the innate immune response, inflammation, the complex host-pathogen relationship and has important implications for the rational development of new immunomodulators and adjuvants.

  4. Immunochemical identification of Brucella abortus lipopolysaccharide epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, N; Freer, E; Weintraub, A; Ramirez, M; Lind, S; Moreno, E

    1994-01-01

    Sera from Brucella abortus-infected and -vaccinated bovines recognized four lipopolysaccharide (LPS) determinants: two in the O-polysaccharide (A and C), one in the core oligosaccharide from rough Brucella LPS (R), and one in lipid A (LA). From 46 different hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against various LPS moieties, 9 different specificities were identified. Two epitopes, A and C/Y, were present in the O-polysaccharide. Two epitopes were found in the core oligosaccharide (R1 and R2) of rough Brucella LPS. MAbs against R1 and R2 epitopes reacted against LPS from different rough Brucella species; however, MAbs directed to the R2 epitope also reacted against enterobacterial LPS from deep rough mutants. Three epitopes (LA1, LA2, and LA3) were located in the lipid A backbone. Different sets of MAbs recognized two epitopes in the lipid A-associated outer membrane protein (LAOmp3-1 and LAOmp3-2). LPS preparations from smooth brucellae had small amounts of rough-type LPS. Although LPS from rough brucellae did not show smooth-type LPS in western blots (immunoblots), two hybridomas generated from mice immunized with rough B. abortus produced antibodies against smooth B. abortus LPS. Results are discussed in relation to the structure and function of B. abortus LPS and to previous findings on the epitopic density of the molecule. Images PMID:7496947

  5. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation of fungal secondary metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Zeinab G.; Kalansuriya, Pabasara; Capon, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a preliminary investigation of the use the Gram-negative bacterial cell wall constituent lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a natural chemical cue to stimulate and alter the expression of fungal secondary metabolism. Integrated high-throughput micro-cultivation and micro-analysis methods determined that 6 of 40 (15%) of fungi tested responded to an optimal exposure to LPS (0.6 ng/mL) by activating, enhancing or accelerating secondary metabolite production. To explore the possible mechanisms behind this effect, we employed light and fluorescent microscopy in conjunction with a nitric oxide (NO)-sensitive fluorescent dye and an NO scavenger to provide evidence that LPS stimulation of fungal secondary metabolism coincided with LPS activation of NO. Several case studies demonstrated that LPS stimulation can be scaled from single microplate well (1.5 mL) to preparative (>400 mL) scale cultures. For example, LPS treatment of Penicillium sp. (ACM-4616) enhanced pseurotin A and activated pseurotin A1 and pseurotin A2 biosynthesis, whereas LPS treatment of Aspergillus sp. (CMB-M81F) substantially accelerated and enhanced the biosynthesis of shornephine A and a series of biosynthetically related ardeemins and activated production of neoasterriquinone. As an indication of broader potential, we provide evidence that cultures of Penicillium sp. (CMB-TF0411), Aspergillus niger (ACM-4993F), Rhizopus oryzae (ACM-165F) and Thanatephorus cucumeris (ACM-194F) were responsive to LPS stimulation, the latter two examples being particular noteworthy as neither are known to produce secondary metabolites. Our results encourage the view that LPS stimulation can be used as a valuable tool to expand the molecular discovery potential of fungal strains that either have been exhaustively studied by or are unresponsive to traditional culture methodology. PMID:25379339

  6. Acetate supplementation attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Reisenauer, Chris J; Bhatt, Dhaval P; Mitteness, Dane J; Slanczka, Evan R; Gienger, Heidi M; Watt, John A; Rosenberger, Thad A

    2011-04-01

    Glyceryl triacetate (GTA), a compound effective at increasing circulating and tissue levels of acetate was used to treat rats subjected to a continual 28 day intra-ventricular infusion of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). This model produces a neuroinflammatory injury characterized by global neuroglial activation and a decrease in choline acetyltransferase immunoreactivity in the basal forebrain. During the LPS infusion, rats were given a daily treatment of either water or GTA at a dose of 6 g/kg by oral gavage. In parallel experiments, free-CoA and acetyl-CoA levels were measured in microwave fixed brains and flash frozen heart, liver, kidney and muscle following a single oral dose of GTA. We found that a single oral dose of GTA significantly increased plasma acetate levels by 15 min and remained elevated for up to 4 h. At 30 min the acetyl-CoA levels in microwave-fixed brain and flash frozen heart and liver were increased at least 2.2-fold. The concentrations of brain acetyl-CoA was significantly increased between 30 and 45 min following treatment and remained elevated for up to 4 h. The concentration of free-CoA in brain was significantly decreased compared to controls at 240 min. Immunohistochemical and morphological analysis demonstrated that a daily treatment with GTA significantly reduced the percentage of reactive glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes and activated CD11b-positive microglia by 40-50% in rats subjected to LPS-induced neuroinflammation. Further, in rats subjected to neuroinflammation, GTA significantly increased the number of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-positive cells by 40% in the basal forebrain compared to untreated controls. These data suggest that acetate supplementation increases intermediary short chain acetyl-CoA metabolism and that treatment is potentially anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective with regards to attenuating neuroglial activation and increasing ChAT immunoreactivity in this model. PMID:21272004

  7. Genetics of lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis in enteric bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Schnaitman, C A; Klena, J D

    1993-01-01

    From a historical perspective, the study of both the biochemistry and the genetics of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis began with the enteric bacteria. These organisms have again come to the forefront as the blocks of genes involved in LPS synthesis have been sequenced and analyzed. A number of new and unanticipated genes were found in these clusters, indicating a complexity of the biochemical pathways which was not predicted from the older studies. One of the most dramatic areas of LPS research has been the elucidation of the lipid A biosynthetic pathway. Four of the genes in this pathway have now been identified and sequenced, and three of them are located in a complex operon which also contains genes involved in DNA and phospholipid synthesis. The rfa gene cluster, which contains many of the genes for LPS core synthesis, includes at least 17 genes. One of the remarkable findings in this cluster is a group of several genes which appear to be involved in the synthesis of alternate rough core species which are modified so that they cannot be acceptors for O-specific polysaccharides. The rfb gene clusters which encode O-antigen synthesis have been sequenced from a number of serotypes and exhibit the genetic polymorphism anticipated on the basis of the chemical complexity of the O antigens. These clusters appear to have originated by the exchange of blocks of genes among ancestral organisms. Among the large number of LPS genes which have now been sequenced from these rfa and rfb clusters, there are none which encode proteins that appear to be secreted across the cytoplasmic membrane and surprisingly few which encode integral membrane proteins or proteins with extensive hydrophobic domains. These data, together with sequence comparison and complementation experiments across strain and species lines, suggest that the LPS biosynthetic enzymes may be organized into clusters on the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane which are organized around a few key membrane

  8. Proteomic analysis of macrophage activated with salmonella lipopolysaccharide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macrophages play pivotal role in immunity. They are activated by many pathogen derived molecules such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) which trigger the production of various proteins and peptides that drive and resolve inflammation. There are numerous studies on the effect of LPS at the genome level bu...

  9. Proteomic changes in chicken plasma induced by Salmonella typhimurium lipopolysaccharides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are cell wall components of gram-negative bacteria that cause inflammation and sickness through genetic and proteomic activation. The objective of our study was to identify the proteomic changes in plasma associated with inflammation induced by LPS treatment. Five-week-old ...

  10. Endotoxic lipopolysaccharides stimulate steroidogenesis and adenylate cyclase in adrenal tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Wolff, J; Cook, G H

    1975-12-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (endotoxins) from Escherichia coli, Serratia marcesens and Salmonella typhosa stimulated steroid production in Y-1 adrenal tumor cells in culture with a latent period of 3-4 h. Lipid A, derived from Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide, also stimulated steroidogenesis. Lipopolysaccharides and lipid A also stimulate adenylate cyclase activity and cause rounding of the cells. In contrast, lipopolysaccharides do not stimulate steroidogenesis in receptor-deficient adrenal tumor cells (OS-3) or Leydig tumor cells (I-10). This tends to rule out contamination by enterotoxin to which these lines respond. Although both hormone and lipopolysaccharide responses are lost in these lines, there was no interaction between these sites as judged by the failure of lipopolysaccharides to block, during their latency, the response to corticotropin in Y-1 cells. The possibility that the lipopolysaccharide effect is one on membrane conformation is discussed.

  11. Buccal microbiology analyzed by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Abreu, Geraldo Magno Alves; da Silva, Gislene Rodrigues; Khouri, Sônia; Favero, Priscila Pereira; Raniero, Leandro; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2012-01-01

    Rapid microbiological identification and characterization are very important in dentistry and medicine. In addition to dental diseases, pathogens are directly linked to cases of endocarditis, premature delivery, low birth weight, and loss of organ transplants. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to analyze oral pathogens Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 29523, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-JP2, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans which was clinically isolated from the human blood-CI. Significant spectra differences were found among each organism allowing the identification and characterization of each bacterial species. Vibrational modes in the regions of 3500-2800 cm-1, the 1484-1420 cm-1, and 1000-750 cm-1 were used in this differentiation. The identification and classification of each strain were performed by cluster analysis achieving 100% separation of strains. This study demonstrated that FTIR can be used to decrease the identification time, compared to the traditional methods, of fastidious buccal microorganisms associated with the etiology of the manifestation of periodontitis.

  12. Removal of lipopolysaccharides from protein-lipopolysaccharide complexes by nonflammable solvents.

    PubMed

    Lin, Miao-Fang; Williams, Christie; Murray, Michael V; Ropp, Philip A

    2005-02-25

    During the recovery of recombinant proteins from gram negative bacteria, many of the methods used to extract proteins from cells release lipopolysaccharides (LPS, endotoxin) along with the protein of interest. In many instances, LPS will co-purify with the target protein due to specific or non-specific protein-LPS interactions. We have investigated the ability of alkanediols to effect the separation of LPS from protein-LPS complexes while the complexes are immobilized on ion exchange chromatographic resins. Proteins were complexed with fluorescently labeled LPS and bound to ion exchange resin. Alkanediol washes of the resins were preformed and the proteins eluted. Column eluates were monitored for LPS and protein by fluorescence and UV spectroscopy, respectively. Alkanediols were effective agents for dissociating LPS from protein-LPS complexes. The efficiency of LPS removal increased with increasing alkanediol chain length. The 1,2-alkanediol isomers were more effective than terminal alkanediol isomers in the separation of LPS from protein-LPS complexes, while the separation of LPS from protein-LPS complexes was more efficient on cation exchangers than on anion exchangers. In addition, it was noted during these investigations that the 1,2-alkanediols increased the retention time of the proteins on the ion exchange resins. Alkanediols provide a safer alternative to the use of other organics such as alcohols or acetonitrile for the separation of LPS from protein due to their lower toxicity and decreased inflammability. In addition, they are less costly than many of the detergents that have been used for similar purposes.

  13. Lipopolysaccharide-specific bacteriophage for Klebsiella pneumoniae C3.

    PubMed Central

    Tomás, J M; Jofre, J T

    1985-01-01

    Bacteriophage FC3-1 is one of several specific bacteriophages of Klebsiella pneumoniae C3 isolated in our laboratory. Unlike receptors for other Klebsiella phages, the bacteriophage FC3-1 receptor was shown to be lipopolysaccharide, specifically the polysaccharide fraction (O-antigen and core region). We concluded that capsular polysaccharide, outer membrane proteins, and lipid A were not involved in phage binding. Mutants resistant to this phage were isolated and were found to be devoid of lipopolysaccharide O-antigen by several criteria but to contain capsular material serologically identical to that of the wild type. The polysaccharide fraction was concluded to be the primary phage receptor, indicating that it is available to the phage. Images PMID:3888963

  14. Non-typhoidal Salmonella encephalopathy involving lipopolysaccharide in cattle.

    PubMed

    Xiong, N; Brewer, M T; Anderson, K L; Carlson, S A

    2013-02-22

    This study assessed the involvement of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the non-typhoidal Salmonella encephalopathy (NTSE) caused by a unique isolate of Salmonella enterica serovar Saint-paul (SstpNPG). NTSE was prevented by genetic (deletion of murE) or pharmacologic (polymyxin) disruption of LPS on SstpNPG although the disruption of LPS did not deter brain penetration of the strain. This is the first study to demonstrate that LPS is involved in the manifestations of NTSE. PMID:22939987

  15. SIRT2 ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ae Sin; Jung, Yu Jin; Kim, Dal; Nguyen-Thanh, Tung; Kang, Kyung Pyo; Lee, Sik; Park, Sung Kwang; Kim, Won

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Knockout of SIRT2 attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced iNOS expression. • Lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production is decreased in SIRT2 KO macrophage. • SIRT2 deficiency suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced ROS production in macrophage. • M1-macrophage related factors are decreased in SIRT2 deficient cells. • SIRT2 deficiency decreases lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of NFκB. - Abstract: Introduction: SIRT2 is a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylases and associated with numerous processes such as infection, carcinogenesis, DNA damage and cell cycle regulation. However, the role of SIRT2 in inflammatory process in macrophage remains unclear. Materials and methods: In the present study, we have evaluated the regulatory effects of SIRT2 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages isolated from SIRT2 knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) mice or Raw264.7 macrophage cells. As inflammatory parameters, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), the productions of nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and M1-macrophage-related factors were evaluated. We also examined the effects of SIRT2 on activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NFκB) signaling. Results: SIRT2 deficiency inhibits LPS-induced iNOS mRNA and protein expression in bone marrow derived macrophages. SIRT2-siRNA transfection also suppressed LPS-induced iNOS expression in Raw264.7 macrophage cells. Bone marrow derived macrophages isolated from SIRT2 KO mice produced lower nitric oxide and expressed lower levels of M1-macrophage related markers including iNOS and CD86 in response to LPS than WT mice. Decrease of SIRT2 reduced the LPS-induced reactive oxygen species production. Deficiency of SIRT2 resulted in inhibition of NFκB activation through reducing the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα. The phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of p65 was significantly decreased in SIRT2-deficient macrophages after LPS stimulation. Discussion: Our data suggested that

  16. Lipopolysaccharide structure required for in vitro trimerization of Escherichia coli OmpF porin.

    PubMed Central

    Sen, K; Nikaido, H

    1991-01-01

    Deep rought mutants, which produce very defective lipopolysaccharides, are unable to export normal levels of porins into the outer membrane. In this study, we showed that lipopolysaccharides from such mutants were also unable to facilitate the trimerization, in vitro, of monomeric OmpF porin secreted by spheroplasts of Escherichia coli B/r. In contrast, lipopolysaccharides containing most or all of the core oligosaccharides were able to facilitate trimerization. Images PMID:1702785

  17. Mild alkaline hydrolysis of lipopolysaccharide endotoxin enhances its mitogencity for murine B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, G W; Sultzer, B M

    1977-01-01

    Mild alkaline hydrolysis was found to enhance the mitogenicity of lipopolysaccharide endotoxin for murine B lymphocytes. Alkaline treated lipopolysaccharide also retained its property as a polyclonal activator. Whereas this treatment reduced the lethality of endotoxin for mice, its toxicity for lymphocytes cultured in the absence of fetal calf serum was increased. Lipid analysis indicated that there were no significant changes in the fatty acids of lipid A, but particle size was significantly reduced and the material was more homogeneous and soluble than untreated lipopolysaccharide. The relationship of these effect on the structure of lipopolysaccharide endotoxin to the mechanism of B-lymphocyte activation is discussed. Images PMID:18405

  18. Relation between the bronchial obstructive response to inhaled lipopolysaccharide and bronchial responsiveness to histamine.

    PubMed Central

    Michel, O; Ginanni, R; Sergysels, R

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bronchoconstriction has developed after inhalation of lipopolysaccharide in a dose of 20 micrograms in asthmatic patients and of 200 micrograms in normal subjects. This study set out to determine whether the bronchial response to lipopolysaccharide was related to non-specific bronchial responsiveness and atopy. METHODS: Sixteen subjects with a fall in specific airway conductance of 40% (PD40sGaw) after inhaling up to 900 micrograms histamine inhaled 20 micrograms lipopolysaccharide (from Escherichia coli type 026:B6) a week after bronchial challenge with a control solution of saline. The bronchial response over five hours was measured as change in FEV1 and area under the FEV1-time curve. RESULTS: FEV1 fell significantly more after lipopolysaccharide than after diluent inhalation, the difference in mean (SE) FEV1 being 4.6% (5.4%); response was maximal 60 minutes after lipopolysaccharide inhalation and lasted more than five hours. Histamine PD20FEV1 and PD40sGaw correlated with the fall in FEV1 after lipopolysaccharide inhalation. There was no difference in the proportions of responders and non-responders to lipopolysaccharide who were atopic. CONCLUSION: Lipopolysaccharide induced bronchial obstruction is associated with non-specific responsiveness but not with atopy. PMID:1585294

  19. Prolonged sleep fragmentation of mice exacerbates febrile responses to lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Ringgold, Kristyn M.; Barf, R. Paulien; George, Amrita; Sutton, Blair C.; Opp, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Sleep disruption is a frequent occurrence in modern society. Whereas many studies have focused on the consequences of total sleep deprivation, few have investigated the condition of sleep disruption. New Method We disrupted sleep of mice during the light period for 9 consecutive days using an intermittently-rotating disc. Results Electroencephalogram (EEG) data demonstrated that non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep was severely fragmented and REM sleep was essentially abolished during the 12 h light period. During the dark period, when sleep was not disrupted, neither NREM sleep nor REM sleep times differed from control values. Analysis of the EEG revealed a trend for increased power in the peak frequency of the NREM EEG spectra during the dark period. The fragmentation protocol was not overly stressful as body weights and water consumption remained unchanged, and plasma corticosterone did not differ between mice subjected to 3 or 9 days of sleep disruption and home cage controls. However, mice subjected to 9 days of sleep disruption by this method responded to lipopolysaccharide with an exacerbated febrile response. Comparison with existing methods Existing methods to disrupt sleep of laboratory rodents often subject the animal to excessive locomotion, vibration, or sudden movements. This method does not suffer from any of these confounds. Conclusions This study demonstrates that prolonged sleep disruption of mice exacerbates febrile responses to lipopolysaccharide. This device provides a method to determine mechanisms by which chronic insufficient sleep contributes to the etiology of many pathologies, particularly those with an inflammatory component. PMID:23872243

  20. Deciphering the dual effect of lipopolysaccharides from plant pathogenic Pectobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Kettani-Halabi; Daniel, Tran; Aurélien, Dauphin; El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Rafik, Errakhi; Arbelet-Bonnin, Delphine; Biligui, Bernadette; Florence, Val; Mustapha, Ennaji Moulay; François, Bouteau

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are a component of the outer cell surface of almost all Gram-negative bacteria and play an essential role for bacterial growth and survival. Lipopolysaccharides represent typical microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecules and have been reported to induce defense-related responses, including the expression of defense genes and the suppression of the hypersensitive response in plants. However, depending on their origin and the challenged plant, LPS were shown to have complex and different roles. In this study we showed that LPS from plant pathogens Pectobacterium atrosepticum and Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum induce common and different responses in A. thaliana cells when compared to those induced by LPS from non-phytopathogens Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Among common responses to both types of LPS are the transcription of defense genes and their ability to limit of cell death induced by Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp carotovorum. However, the differential kinetics and amplitude in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation seemed to regulate defense gene transcription and be determinant to induce programmed cell death in response to LPS from the plant pathogenic Pectobacterium. These data suggest that different signaling pathways could be activated by LPS in A. thaliana cells. PMID:25760034

  1. Deciphering the dual effect of lipopolysaccharides from plant pathogenic Pectobacterium.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Kettani-Halabi; Daniel, Tran; Aurélien, Dauphin; El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Rafik, Errakhi; Arbelet-Bonnin, Delphine; Biligui, Bernadette; Florence, Val; Mustapha, Ennaji Moulay; François, Bouteau

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are a component of the outer cell surface of almost all Gram-negative bacteria and play an essential role for bacterial growth and survival. Lipopolysaccharides represent typical microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecules and have been reported to induce defense-related responses, including the expression of defense genes and the suppression of the hypersensitive response in plants. However, depending on their origin and the challenged plant, LPS were shown to have complex and different roles. In this study we showed that LPS from plant pathogens Pectobacterium atrosepticum and Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum induce common and different responses in A. thaliana cells when compared to those induced by LPS from non-phytopathogens Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Among common responses to both types of LPS are the transcription of defense genes and their ability to limit of cell death induced by Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp carotovorum. However, the differential kinetics and amplitude in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation seemed to regulate defense gene transcription and be determinant to induce programmed cell death in response to LPS from the plant pathogenic Pectobacterium. These data suggest that different signaling pathways could be activated by LPS in A. thaliana cells.

  2. Interactions of Bacterial Lipopolysaccharides with Gold Nanorod Surfaces Investigated by Refractometric Sensing.

    PubMed

    Abadeer, Nardine S; Fülöp, Gergő; Chen, Si; Käll, Mikael; Murphy, Catherine J

    2015-11-11

    The interface between nanoparticles and bacterial surfaces is of great interest for applications in nanomedicine and food safety. Here, we demonstrate that interactions between gold nanorods and bacterial surface molecules are governed by the nanoparticle surface coating. Polymer-coated gold nanorod substrates are exposed to lipopolysaccharides extracted from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli, and attachment is monitored using localized surface plasmon resonance refractometric sensing. The number of lipopolysaccharide molecules attached per nanorod is calculated from the shift in the plasmon maximum, which results from the change in refractive index after analyte binding. Colloidal gold nanorods in water are also incubated with lipopolysaccharides to demonstrate the effect of lipopolysaccharide concentration on plasmon shift, ζ-potential, and association constant. Both gold nanorod surface charge and surface chemistry affect gold nanorod-lipopolysaccharide interactions. In general, anionic lipopolysaccharides was found to attach more effectively to cationic gold nanorods than to neutral or anionic gold nanorods. Some variation in lipopolysaccharide attachment is also observed between the three strains studied, demonstrating the potential complexity of bacteria-nanoparticle interactions.

  3. Lipopolysaccharide mutants of Rhizobium meliloti are not defective in symbiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Clover, R.H.; Kieber, J.; Signer, E.R. )

    1989-07-01

    Mutants of Rhizobium meliloti selected primarily for bacteriophage resistance fall into 13 groups. Mutants in the four best-characterized groups (class A, lpsB, lpsC, and class D), which map to the rhizobial chromosome, appear to affect lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as judged by the reactivity with monoclonal antibodies and behavior on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels of extracted LPS. Mutations in all 13 groups, in an otherwise wild-type genetic background, are Fix{sup +} on alfalfa. This suggests that LPS does not play a major role in symbiosis. Mutations in lpsB, however, are Fix{sup {minus}} in one particular genetic background, evidently because of the cumulative effect of several independent background mutations. In addition, an auxotrophic mutation evidently equivalent to Escherichia coli carAB is Fix{sup {minus}} on alfalfa.

  4. Revisiting the interaction between the chaperone Skp and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Burmann, Björn M; Holdbrook, Daniel A; Callon, Morgane; Bond, Peter J; Hiller, Sebastian

    2015-03-24

    The bacterial outer membrane comprises two main classes of components, lipids and membrane proteins. These nonsoluble compounds are conveyed across the aqueous periplasm along specific molecular transport routes: the lipid lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is shuttled by the Lpt system, whereas outer membrane proteins (Omps) are transported by chaperones, including the periplasmic Skp. In this study, we revisit the specificity of the chaperone-lipid interaction of Skp and LPS. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy measurements indicate that LPS interacts with Skp nonspecifically, accompanied by destabilization of the Skp trimer and similar to denaturation by the nonnatural detergent lauryldimethylamine-N-oxide (LDAO). Bioinformatic analysis of amino acid conservation, structural analysis of LPS-binding proteins, and MD simulations further confirm the absence of a specific LPS binding site on Skp, making a biological relevance of the interaction unlikely. Instead, our analysis reveals a highly conserved salt-bridge network, which likely has a role for Skp function.

  5. The detergent octylglucoside neutralizes lipopolysaccharide in a specific manner.

    PubMed

    Henrich, B; Guadarrama, R; Zähringer, U; MacKenzie, C R

    2001-04-01

    The stimulatory effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on human macrophages was found to be neutralized by the detergent octylglucoside (OG). Both macrophage stimulation and reactivity in a limulus amebocyte lysate test were suppressed by suspension of LPS in OG at concentrations between 0.25 and 2.5 mM, whereas other stimulatory lipopeptides and lipid containing stimulants were unaffected by OG. LPS at concentrations causing maximal stimulation of macrophages could be completely neutralized by non-toxic concentrations of OG. In addition, it was found that the neutralization in complex mixtures of macromolecules, such as bacterial cell lysate, was specific for LPS and that the stimulatory activity of the other substances in the mixture was not affected by the OG.

  6. Specificity of monoclonal antibodies to Campylobacter jejuni lipopolysaccharide antigens.

    PubMed

    Brooks, B W; Mihowich, J G; Blais, B W; Yamazaki, H

    1998-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) were produced to the lipopolysaccharide antigens of Campylobacter jejuni strain 1249 (Penner serotype O:2/63). A polymyxin-cloth based enzyme immunoassay (pCEIA) was used for initial screening and for evaluating the specificity of these antibodies. Seven Mabs reacted with at least 11 and as many as 14 of 15 C. jejuni strains (representing 8 different Penner serotypes). These seven Mabs did not cross-react with any of 16 non-Campylobacter bacteria commonly encountered in food, with only two exceptions. Several combinations of these Mabs in pairs reacted with all 15 C. jejuni strains. These results suggest that pCEIA employing two of these Mabs in combination is potentially useful for detection of Campylobacter jejuni in foods and other samples.

  7. Octanoylation of early intermediates of mycobacterial methylglucose lipopolysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Maranha, Ana; Moynihan, Patrick J.; Miranda, Vanessa; Correia Lourenço, Eva; Nunes-Costa, Daniela; Fraga, Joana S.; José Barbosa Pereira, Pedro; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Ventura, M. Rita; Clarke, Anthony J.; Empadinhas, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacteria synthesize unique intracellular methylglucose lipopolysaccharides (MGLP) proposed to modulate fatty acid metabolism. In addition to the partial esterification of glucose or methylglucose units with short-chain fatty acids, octanoate was invariably detected on the MGLP reducing end. We have identified a novel sugar octanoyltransferase (OctT) that efficiently transfers octanoate to glucosylglycerate (GG) and diglucosylglycerate (DGG), the earliest intermediates in MGLP biosynthesis. Enzymatic studies, synthetic chemistry, NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry approaches suggest that, in contrast to the prevailing consensus, octanoate is not esterified to the primary hydroxyl group of glycerate but instead to the C6 OH of the second glucose in DGG. These observations raise important new questions about the MGLP reducing end architecture and about subsequent biosynthetic steps. Functional characterization of this unique octanoyltransferase, whose gene has been proposed to be essential for M. tuberculosis growth, adds new insights into a vital mycobacterial pathway, which may inspire new drug discovery strategies. PMID:26324178

  8. [Immunostimulating activity of the lipopolysaccharides of blue-green algae].

    PubMed

    Besednova, N N; Smolina, T P; Mikheĭskaia, L V; Ovodova, R G

    1979-12-01

    The whole cells of blue-gree algae and lipopolysaccharides isolated from these cells were shown to stimulate the production of macro-(mainly) and microglobulin antibodies in rabbits. The macro- and microphage indices in rabbits increased significantly after the injection of LPS isolated from blue-green algae 24--48 hours before infecting the animals with a virulent Y. pseudotuberculosis strain. Besides, the inhibiting action of this strain on the migration of phagocytes to the site of infection was abolished immediately after the injection. The use of the indirect hemagglutination test allowed to prove the absence of close antigenic interrelations between blue-green algae and the following organisms: Spirulina platensis, Microcystis aeruginosa, Phormidium africanum and P. uncinatum. PMID:117655

  9. Functional Identification of the Proteus mirabilis Core Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis Genes▿

    PubMed Central

    Aquilini, Eleonora; Azevedo, Joana; Jimenez, Natalia; Bouamama, Lamiaa; Tomás, Juan M.; Regué, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we report the identification of genes required for the biosynthesis of the core lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) of two strains of Proteus mirabilis. Since P. mirabilis and Klebsiella pneumoniae share a core LPS carbohydrate backbone extending up to the second outer-core residue, the functions of the common P. mirabilis genes was elucidated by genetic complementation studies using well-defined mutants of K. pneumoniae. The functions of strain-specific outer-core genes were identified by using as surrogate acceptors LPSs from two well-defined K. pneumoniae core LPS mutants. This approach allowed the identification of two new heptosyltransferases (WamA and WamC), a galactosyltransferase (WamB), and an N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (WamD). In both strains, most of these genes were found in the so-called waa gene cluster, although one common core biosynthetic gene (wabO) was found outside this cluster. PMID:20622068

  10. Revisiting the Interaction between the Chaperone Skp and Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Burmann, Björn M.; Holdbrook, Daniel A.; Callon, Morgane; Bond, Peter J.; Hiller, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial outer membrane comprises two main classes of components, lipids and membrane proteins. These nonsoluble compounds are conveyed across the aqueous periplasm along specific molecular transport routes: the lipid lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is shuttled by the Lpt system, whereas outer membrane proteins (Omps) are transported by chaperones, including the periplasmic Skp. In this study, we revisit the specificity of the chaperone-lipid interaction of Skp and LPS. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy measurements indicate that LPS interacts with Skp nonspecifically, accompanied by destabilization of the Skp trimer and similar to denaturation by the nonnatural detergent lauryldimethylamine-N-oxide (LDAO). Bioinformatic analysis of amino acid conservation, structural analysis of LPS-binding proteins, and MD simulations further confirm the absence of a specific LPS binding site on Skp, making a biological relevance of the interaction unlikely. Instead, our analysis reveals a highly conserved salt-bridge network, which likely has a role for Skp function. PMID:25809264

  11. Cyanobacterial lipopolysaccharides and human health – a review

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Ian; Schluter, Philip J; Shaw, Glen R

    2006-01-01

    Cyanobacterial lipopolysaccharide/s (LPS) are frequently cited in the cyanobacteria literature as toxins responsible for a variety of heath effects in humans, from skin rashes to gastrointestinal, respiratory and allergic reactions. The attribution of toxic properties to cyanobacterial LPS dates from the 1970s, when it was thought that lipid A, the toxic moiety of LPS, was structurally and functionally conserved across all Gram-negative bacteria. However, more recent research has shown that this is not the case, and lipid A structures are now known to be very different, expressing properties ranging from LPS agonists, through weak endotoxicity to LPS antagonists. Although cyanobacterial LPS is widely cited as a putative toxin, most of the small number of formal research reports describe cyanobacterial LPS as weakly toxic compared to LPS from the Enterobacteriaceae. We systematically reviewed the literature on cyanobacterial LPS, and also examined the much lager body of literature relating to heterotrophic bacterial LPS and the atypical lipid A structures of some photosynthetic bacteria. While the literature on the biological activity of heterotrophic bacterial LPS is overwhelmingly large and therefore difficult to review for the purposes of exclusion, we were unable to find a convincing body of evidence to suggest that heterotrophic bacterial LPS, in the absence of other virulence factors, is responsible for acute gastrointestinal, dermatological or allergic reactions via natural exposure routes in humans. There is a danger that initial speculation about cyanobacterial LPS may evolve into orthodoxy without basis in research findings. No cyanobacterial lipid A structures have been described and published to date, so a recommendation is made that cyanobacteriologists should not continue to attribute such a diverse range of clinical symptoms to cyanobacterial LPS without research confirmation. PMID:16563160

  12. Antibacterial activity of the lactoperoxidase system combined with edible Laminaria hot-water extract as a source of halide ions.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kouichirou; Nakano, Manabu; Yamauchi, Koji; Toida, Tomohiro; Iwatsuki, Keiji

    2012-01-01

    Hot-water extracts prepared from nine out of 12 samples of dried edible Laminaria reduced the viable numbers of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Staphylococcus aureus, and Esherichia coli below the detection limit after incubation for 5 min when combined with lactoperoxidase, glucose oxidase, and glucose. Some extracts showed higher bactericidal activity and a higher OI(-) concentration in the assay mixture after ultrafiltration.

  13. Dry-heat destruction of lipopolysaccharide: dry-heat destruction kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, K; Harrison, S J

    1978-01-01

    Dry-heat destruction kinetics of lipopolysaccharides from Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, and Salmonella typhosa at 170 to 250 degrees C are described. The destruction rate seems to follow the second order and can be linearized by the equation, log y = a + b . -10cx. Because c is the slope, 1/c = D3. Both a and b are constant at a given temperature and are linear functions of temperature. The D(3)170, D(3)190, D(3)210, D(3)230, and D(3)250 values for E. coli lipopolysaccharide are 251, 99.4, 33.3, 12.3, and 4.99 min, respectively, with a z value of 46.4 min. The D values for lipopolysaccharides from S. marcescens and S. typhosa are not significantly different from those from E. coli lipopolysaccharide. PMID:103502

  14. Comparative airway inflammatory response of normal volunteers to ozone and lipopolysaccharide challenge

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are environmental pollutants with adverse heatth effects noted in both healthy and asthmatic individuals. The authors and others have shown that inhalation of ozone and LPS both induce airway neutrophilia. Based on these similarities, the author...

  15. Examination of Lipopolysaccharide (O-Antigen) Populations of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans from Two Mine Tailings

    PubMed Central

    Southam, G.; Beveridge, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    Net acid-generating capacities of 39.74 kg of H2SO4 per ton (ca. 0.05 kg/kg) (pH 2.68) for the Lemoine copper mine tailings (closed ca. 8 years ago; located 40 km west of Chibougamau, Quebec, Canada) and 16.07 kg of H2SO4 per ton (ca. 0.02 kg/kg) (pH 3.01) for the Copper Rand tailings (in current use and 50 km distant [east] from those of Lemoine) demonstrate that these sulfide tailings can support populations of acidophilic thiobacilli. Oxidized regions in both tailings environments were readily visible, were extremely acidic (Lemoine, pH 2.36; Copper Rand, pH 3.07), and provided natural isolates for our study. A 10% (wt/vol) oxalic acid treatment, which solubilizes both ferric sulfate and ferric hydroxide precipitates (B. Ramsay, J. Ramsay, M. deTremblay, and C. Chavarie, Geomicrobiol. J. 6:171-177, 1988), enabled the recovery of intact bacterial cells from the tailings material and from liquid synthetic medium for lipopolysaccharide analysis. No viable cells could be cultured after this oxalic acid treatment. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electro-phoretic profiles of lipopolysaccharides extracted from the Lemoine tailings were complex, indicating a heterogeneous population of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. Six T. ferrooxidans subspecies as identified by lipopolysaccharide analysis (i.e., lipopolysaccharide chemotypes) were eventually isolated from a total of 112 cultures from the Lemoine tailings. Using the same isolate and lipopolysaccharide typing techniques, we identified only a single lipopolysaccharide chemotype from 20 cultures of T. ferrooxidans isolated from the Copper Rand tailings. This homogeneity of lipopolysaccharide chemotype was much different from what was found for the older Lemoine tailings and may reflect a progressive lipopolysaccharide heterogeneity of Thiobacillus isolates as tailings leach and age. Images PMID:16348925

  16. Blockade of the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Glutamate Receptor Ameliorates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Renal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ho-Shiang; Ma, Ming-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation in rat kidney reduces renal perfusion and ultrafiltration. Hypoperfusion-induced ischemia is the most frequent cause of functional insufficiency in the endotoxemic kidney. Here, we used non-hypotensive rat model of lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia to examine whether NMDA receptor hyperfunction contributes to acute kidney injury. Lipopolysaccharide-induced renal damage via increased enzymuria and hemodynamic impairments were ameliorated by co-treatment with the NMDA receptor blocker, MK-801. The NMDA receptor NR1 subunit in the rat kidney mainly co-localized with serine racemase, an enzyme responsible for synthesizing the NMDA receptor co-agonist, D-serine. The NMDA receptor hyperfunction in lipopolysaccharide-treated kidneys was demonstrated by NR1 and serine racemase upregulation, particularly in renal tubules, and by increased D-serine levels. Lipopolysaccharide also induced cell damage in cultured tubular cell lines and primary rat proximal tubular cells. This damage was mitigated by MK-801 and by small interfering RNA targeting NR1. Lipopolysaccharide increased cytokine release in tubular cell lines via toll-like receptor 4. The release of interleukin-1β from these cells are the most abundant. An interleukin-1 receptor antagonist not only attenuated cell death but also abolished lipopolysaccharide-induced NR1 and serine racemase upregulation and increases in D-serine secretion, suggesting that interleukin-1β-mediated NMDA receptor hyperfunction participates in lipopolysaccharide-induced tubular damage. The results of this study indicate NMDA receptor hyperfunction via cytokine effect participates in lipopolysaccharide-induced renal insufficiency. Blockade of NMDA receptors may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of sepsis-associated renal failure. PMID:26133372

  17. Structural Analysis and Involvement in Plant Innate Immunity of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri Lipopolysaccharide*

    PubMed Central

    Casabuono, Adriana; Petrocelli, Silvana; Ottado, Jorgelina; Orellano, Elena G.; Couto, Alicia S.

    2011-01-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) causes citrus canker, provoking defoliation and premature fruit drop with concomitant economical damage. In plant pathogenic bacteria, lipopolysaccharides are important virulence factors, and they are being increasingly recognized as major pathogen-associated molecular patterns for plants. In general, three domains are recognized in a lipopolysaccharide: the hydrophobic lipid A, the hydrophilic O-antigen polysaccharide, and the core oligosaccharide, connecting lipid A and O-antigen. In this work, we have determined the structure of purified lipopolysaccharides obtained from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri wild type and a mutant of the O-antigen ABC transporter encoded by the wzt gene. High pH anion exchange chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrum analysis were performed, enabling determination of the structure not only of the released oligosaccharides and lipid A moieties but also the intact lipopolysaccharides. The results demonstrate that Xac wild type and Xacwzt LPSs are composed mainly of a penta- or tetra-acylated diglucosamine backbone attached to either two pyrophosphorylethanolamine groups or to one pyrophosphorylethanolamine group and one phosphorylethanolamine group. The core region consists of a branched oligosaccharide formed by Kdo2Hex6GalA3Fuc3NAcRha4 and two phosphate groups. As expected, the presence of a rhamnose homo-oligosaccharide as O-antigen was determined only in the Xac wild type lipopolysaccharide. In addition, we have examined how lipopolysaccharides from Xac function in the pathogenesis process. We analyzed the response of the different lipopolysaccharides during the stomata aperture closure cycle, the callose deposition, the expression of defense-related genes, and reactive oxygen species production in citrus leaves, suggesting a functional role of the O-antigen from Xac lipopolysaccharides in the basal response. PMID:21596742

  18. Structural analysis and involvement in plant innate immunity of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Casabuono, Adriana; Petrocelli, Silvana; Ottado, Jorgelina; Orellano, Elena G; Couto, Alicia S

    2011-07-22

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) causes citrus canker, provoking defoliation and premature fruit drop with concomitant economical damage. In plant pathogenic bacteria, lipopolysaccharides are important virulence factors, and they are being increasingly recognized as major pathogen-associated molecular patterns for plants. In general, three domains are recognized in a lipopolysaccharide: the hydrophobic lipid A, the hydrophilic O-antigen polysaccharide, and the core oligosaccharide, connecting lipid A and O-antigen. In this work, we have determined the structure of purified lipopolysaccharides obtained from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri wild type and a mutant of the O-antigen ABC transporter encoded by the wzt gene. High pH anion exchange chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrum analysis were performed, enabling determination of the structure not only of the released oligosaccharides and lipid A moieties but also the intact lipopolysaccharides. The results demonstrate that Xac wild type and Xacwzt LPSs are composed mainly of a penta- or tetra-acylated diglucosamine backbone attached to either two pyrophosphorylethanolamine groups or to one pyrophosphorylethanolamine group and one phosphorylethanolamine group. The core region consists of a branched oligosaccharide formed by Kdo₂Hex₆GalA₃Fuc3NAcRha₄ and two phosphate groups. As expected, the presence of a rhamnose homo-oligosaccharide as O-antigen was determined only in the Xac wild type lipopolysaccharide. In addition, we have examined how lipopolysaccharides from Xac function in the pathogenesis process. We analyzed the response of the different lipopolysaccharides during the stomata aperture closure cycle, the callose deposition, the expression of defense-related genes, and reactive oxygen species production in citrus leaves, suggesting a functional role of the O-antigen from Xac lipopolysaccharides in the basal response. PMID:21596742

  19. Modification of Salmonella Lipopolysaccharides Prevents the Outer Membrane Penetration of Novobiocin.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Thatyane M; Martynowycz, Michael W; Andreev, Konstantin; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Nikaido, Hiroshi; Gidalevitz, David

    2015-12-15

    Small hydrophilic antibiotics traverse the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria through porin channels. Large lipophilic agents traverse the outer membrane through its bilayer, containing a majority of lipopolysaccharides in its outer leaflet. Genes controlled by the two-component regulatory system PhoPQ modify lipopolysaccharides. We isolate lipopolysaccharides from isogenic mutants of Salmonella sp., one lacking the modification, the other fully modified. These lipopolysaccharides were reconstituted as monolayers at the air-water interface, and their properties, as well as their interaction with a large lipophilic drug, novobiocin, was studied. X-ray reflectivity showed that the drug penetrated the monolayer of the unmodified lipopolysaccharides reaching the hydrophobic region, but was prevented from this penetration into the modified lipopolysaccharides. Results correlate with behavior of bacterial cells, which become resistant to antibiotics after PhoPQ-regulated modifications. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction showed that novobiocin produced a striking increase in crystalline coherence length, and the size of the near-crystalline domains. PMID:26682812

  20. A possible mechanism of maxillofacial abscess formation: involvement of Porphyromonas endodontalis lipopolysaccharide via the expression of inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Y; Hanazawa, S; Tanaka, S; Iwahashi, H; Yamamoto, Y; Fujisawa, S

    2001-12-01

    In a previous study, we developed a specific monoclonal antibody against Porphyromonas endodontalis lipopolysaccharide, and demonstrated that this lipopolysaccharide was detected in bacterially infected root canal fluid. We suggest here that P. endodontalis lipopolysaccharide in the infectious materials plays a stimulatory role in maxillofacial abscess formation via the expression of inflammatory cytokines. Our epidemiological study showed that this lipopolysaccharide was detected in significant levels the infectious material of patients with periapical periodontitis and odontogenic abscesses. Interestingly, infectious material-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta, or neutrophil chemoattractant KC genes in mouse macrophages, was significantly neutralized by monoclonal antibody against the lipopolysaccharide. In addition, we also detected a significant amount of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the infectious material. These results suggest that P. endodontalis lipopolysaccharide plays an important role in the pathogenic mechanism of maxillofacial abscess formation via the expression of inflammatory cytokines.

  1. Macrophage cytokine response to particles and lipopolysaccharide in vitro.

    PubMed

    Daniels, A U; Barnes, F H; Charlebois, S J; Smith, R A

    2000-03-15

    Several investigators have suggested that biologic molecules adsorbed onto particles may play a key role in determining macrophage response. Adsorbed endotoxins (bacterial debris) may be of particular importance since they are widely present exogenously and endogenously and adhere strongly to many materials. Murine-transformed peritoneal macrophages (IC-21) were used in this in vitro study. Secretions of IL-1 beta, TNF alpha, and IL-6 were used as a measure of macrophage response to micron-range particles of high-density polyethylene and Co-Cr-Mo alloy, with and without adsorbed lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin. Little cytokine secretion was measured in response to particles (and to polypropylene experimental chambers) cleaned with ethanol and saline and not exposed to LPS. The lack of macrophage response to cleaned particles has been reported by others and may help reconcile conflicting reports in the literature. Cytokine secretion levels were high in all cases if the chambers (with or without particles) were exposed to LPS (and rinsed to minimize nonbound LPS). Secretion patterns were different with particles present and for polymer versus metal particles. Overall, these results suggest that (1) adsorbed molecules on material surfaces strongly affect macrophage response and (2) particle surface chemistry and microstructure affect the concentration and configuration of adsorbed molecules, further influencing particle interaction with macrophage surface receptors. PMID:10602080

  2. Visualization and analysis of lipopolysaccharide distribution in binary phospholipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, Maria Florencia; Sanchez, Susana; Bakas, Laura

    2009-05-22

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an endotoxin released from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria during infections. It have been reported that LPS may play a role in the outer membrane of bacteria similar to that of cholesterol in eukaryotic plasma membranes. In this article we compare the effect of introducing LPS or cholesterol in liposomes made of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine on the solubilization process by Triton X-100. The results show that liposomes containing LPS or cholesterol are more resistant to solubilization by Triton X-100 than the binary phospholipid mixtures at 4 {sup o}C. The LPS distribution was analyzed on GUVs of DPPC:DOPC using FITC-LPS. Solid and liquid-crystalline domains were visualized labeling the GUVs with LAURDAN and GP images were acquired using a two-photon microscope. The images show a selective distribution of LPS in gel domains. Our results support the hypothesis that LPS could aggregate and concentrate selectively in biological membranes providing a mechanism to bring together several components of the LPS-sensing machinery.

  3. A critical postnatal period of heightened vulnerability to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Rourke, Kyle S; Mayer, Catherine A; MacFarlane, Peter M

    2016-10-01

    Evidence of respiratory abnormalities and vulnerability to infection during a critical period of development have been implicated in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Here we investigated whether the acute hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) exhibits a heightened vulnerability to the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) during a critical period of development. The acute HVR was measured 2h after an i.p. injection of saline or LPS (0.1mg/kg) at various postnatal (P) ages (P5, P10, or P20days). LPS attenuated the early (1-2min) and late (4-6min) phase of the acute HVR in P10 but not P5 or P20 rats. The P10 age group exhibited the largest increase in brainstem TNFα and iNOS mRNA expression following LPS. LPS also caused a higher mortality rate in P10 rats (48%) compared to P5 (12%) and P20 (0%) age groups. After stratifying LPS treated P10 rats into survivors vs non-survivors, only the latter exhibited an attenuated HVR (specifically the early phase). Thus, the heightened vulnerability to endotoxin exposure during this critical period of development is characterized by a depression of the ventilatory response to acute hypoxia in association with an increased incidence of mortality. These data share similarities with some of the circumstances surrounding a SIDS scenario, including evidence of infection, increased brainstem cytokine expression, a disturbance in respiratory control, and a peak incidence of mortality during a critical period of development.

  4. Genomic and Proteomic Studies on Plesiomonas shigelloides Lipopolysaccharide Core Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Aquilini, Eleonora; Merino, Susana; Regué, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    We report here the identification of waa clusters with the genes required for the biosynthesis of the core lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of two Plesiomonas shigelloides strains. Both P. shigelloides waa clusters shared all of the genes besides the ones flanking waaL. In both strains, all of the genes were found in the waa gene cluster, although one common core biosynthetic gene (wapG) was found in a different chromosome location outside the cluster. Since P. shigelloides and Klebsiella pneumoniae share a core LPS carbohydrate backbone extending up at least to the second outer-core residue, the functions of the common P. shigelloides genes were elucidated by genetic complementation studies using well-defined K. pneumoniae mutants. The function of strain-specific inner- or outer-core genes was identified by using as a surrogate acceptor LPS from three well-defined K. pneumoniae core LPS mutants. Using this strategy, we were able to assign a proteomic function to all of the P. shigelloides waa genes identified in the two strains encoding six new glycosyltransferases (WapA, -B, -C, -D, -F, and -G). P. shigelloides demonstrated an important variety of core LPS structures, despite being a single species of the genus, as well as high homologous recombination in housekeeping genes. PMID:24244003

  5. Proteomic Changes in Chicken Plasma Induced by Salmonella typhimurium Lipopolysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Packialakshmi, Balamurugan; Liyanage, Rohana; Lay, Jackson O.; Makkar, Sarbjeet K.; Rath, Narayan C.

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are cell wall components of Gram-negative bacteria that produce inflammation and sickness in higher animals. The objective was to identify plasma proteomic changes in an avian model of inflammation. Chickens were treated with either saline or LPS, and blood was collected at 24 hours postinjection. The pooled plasma samples were depleted of high-abundant proteins and analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS). MALDI analyses showed an increase in fibrinogen beta-derived peptide and a decrease in apolipoprotein-AII-derived peptide in LPS samples. Label-free quantitation of LC–MS/MS spectra revealed an increase in the levels of α1-acid glycoprotein, a chemokine CCLI10, and cathelicidin-2, but a decrease in an interferon-stimulated gene-12-2 protein in the LPS group. These differentially expressed proteins are associated with immunomodulation, cytokine changes, and defense mechanisms, which may be useful as candidate biomarkers of infection and inflammation. PMID:27053921

  6. Inhibition of lipopolysaccharide induced acute inflammation in lung by chlorination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinshan; Xue, Jinling; Xu, Bi; Xie, Jiani; Qiao, Juan; Lu, Yun

    2016-02-13

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, also called endotoxin) is a pro-inflammatory constituent of gram negative bacteria and cyanobacteria, which causes a potential health risk in the process of routine urban application of reclaimed water, such as car wash, irrigation, scenic water refilling, etc. Previous studies indicated that the common disinfection treatment, chlorination, has little effect on endotoxin activity removal measured by Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay. However, in this study, significant decrease of acute inflammatory effects was observed in mouse lung, while LAL assay still presented a moderate increase of endotoxin activity. To explore the possible mechanisms, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results showed the chlorination happened in alkyl chain of LPS molecules, which could affect the interaction between LPS and LPS-binding protein. Also the size of LPS aggregates was found to drop significantly after treatment, which could be another results of chlorination caused polarity change. In conclusion, our observation demonstrated that chlorination is effective to reduce the LPS induced inflammation in lung, and it is recommended to use health effect-based methods to assess risk removal of water treatment technologies. PMID:26530889

  7. Potentiation of methamphetamine neurotoxicity by intrastriatal lipopolysaccharide administration.

    PubMed

    Jung, Bae Dong; Shin, Eun-Joo; Nguyen, Xuan-Khanh Thi; Jin, Chun-Hui; Bach, Jae-Hyung; Park, Seok Joo; Nah, Seung-Yeol; Wie, Myung-Bok; Bing, Guoying; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2010-01-01

    Accumulated evidence has indicated that neuroinflammation is one of the important etiologic factors of Parkinson's disease (PD). Earlier studies have employed the inflammogen lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce inflammation of dopaminergic neurons. Methamphetamine (MA) dopaminergic toxicity similar to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) toxicity is frequently cited as a model of PD. In the present study, we examined whether striatal LPS exposure potentiates MA-induced dopaminergic toxicity. Combined treatment with LPS and MA significantly potentiates behavioral impairment and dopaminergic deficit. However, this combination did not significantly alter the other monoaminergic systems (e.g., serotonin, norepinephrine, and histamine). Consistently, microglial activation, labeled by F4/80 or Iba-1 in the nigrostriatal region was more pronounced with the combined treatment of LPS and MA compared to either treatment alone, but this combination did not significantly alter the microglial activation in other brain regions (e.g., hippocampus, dorsal raphe nuclei, and locus ceruleus). Furthermore, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and pro-apoptotic changes in the striatum were more accentuated with combined treatment of LPS and MA compared to either treatment alone. In addition, it is important that cytoplasmic accumulation of alpha-synuclein was observed in the substantia nigra of mice treated with LPS plus MA, and that L-Dopa treatment significantly attenuated behavioral changes and dopaminergic deficits induced by LPS plus MA. These results suggest that combined treatment of LPS with MA is a potential animal model for PD.

  8. Passive transfer of leishmania lipopolysaccharide confers parasite survival in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Handman, E.; Schnur, L.F.; Spithill, T.W.; Mitchell, G.F.

    1986-12-01

    Infection of macrophages by the intracellular protozoan parasite Leishmania involves specific attachment to the host membrane, followed by phagocytosis and intracellular survival and growth. Two parasite molecules have been implicated in the attachment event: Leishmania lipopolysaccharide (L-LPS) and a glycoprotein (gp63). This study was designed to clarify the role of L-LPS in infection and the stage in the process of infection at which it operates. The authors have recently identified a Leishmania major strain (LRC-L119) which lacks the L-LPS molecule and is not infective for hamsters or mice. This parasite was isolated from a gerbil in Kenya and was identified phenotypically as L. major by isoenzyme and fatty acid analysis. In this study they have confirmed at the genotype level that LRC-L119 is L. major by analyzing and comparing the organization of cloned DNA sequences in the genome of different strains of L. major. Here they show that LRC-L119 promastigotes are phagocytosed rapidly by macrophages in vitro, but in contrast to virulent strains of L. major, they are then killed over a period of 18 hr. In addition, they show that transfer of purified L-LPS from a virulent clone of L. major (V121) into LRC-L119 promastigotes confers on them the ability to survive in macrophages in vitro.

  9. Arctigenin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianbao; Sun, Hongzhi; Zhou, Dun; Xi, Huanjiu; Shan, Lina

    2015-04-01

    Arctigenin (ATG) has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effects of ATG on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) remains not well understood. In the present study, our investigation was designed to reveal the effect of ATG on LPS-induced ALI in rats. We found that ATG pretreatment attenuated the LPS-induced ALI, as evidenced by the reduced histological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and wet-to-dry weight ratio in the lung tissues. This was accompanied by the decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-1 (IL-6) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Furthermore, ATG downregulated the expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65, promoted the phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB-α (IκBα) and activated the adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPKα) in the lung tissues. Our results suggested that ATG attenuates the LPS-induced ALI via activation of AMPK and suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway.

  10. Lipopolysaccharide-induced hemolysis: Evidence for direct membrane interactions

    PubMed Central

    Brauckmann, Stephan; Effenberger-Neidnicht, Katharina; de Groot, Herbert; Nagel, Michael; Mayer, Christian; Peters, Jürgen; Hartmann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    While hemolysis in patients with sepsis is associated with increased mortality its mechanisms are unknown and Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 mediated effects, complement-mediated hemolysis, or direct cell membrane effects are all conceivable mechanisms. In this study, we tested the hypotheses that toxic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as well as non-toxic RS-LPS evokes hemolysis (1) by direct membrane effects, and (2) independent of the complement system and TLR-4 activation. We found, that incubation with LPS resulted in a marked time and concentration dependent increase of free hemoglobin concentration and LDH activity in whole blood and washed red cells. Red cell integrity was diminished as shown by decreased osmotic resistance, formation of schistocytes and rolls, and a decrease in red cell membrane stiffness. Non-toxic RS-LPS inhibited the LPS-evoked increase in TNF-α concentration demonstrating its TLR-4 antagonism, but augmented LPS-induced increase in supernatant hemoglobin concentration and membrane disturbances. Removal of plasma components in washed red cell assays failed to attenuate hemolysis. In summary, this study demonstrates direct physicochemical interactions of LPS with red cell membranes resulting in hemolysis under in vitro conditions. It might thus be hypothesized, that not all effects of LPS are mediated by TLR and may explain LPS toxicity in cells missing TLR. PMID:27759044

  11. Lipopolysaccharide induced acute red eye and corneal ulcers.

    PubMed

    Schultz, C L; Morck, D W; McKay, S G; Olson, M E; Buret, A

    1997-01-01

    Using a new animal model, the aims of this study were to assess the role played by purified lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and neutrophils in the pathogenesis of acute red-eye reactions (ARE) and corneal ulcers. In addition, IL-1 alpha was assessed for its implications in the formation of corneal ulcers. Following corneal abrasion, eyes of rabbits underwent single or double exposures to various doses of LPS from Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Serratia marcescens. This protocol induced ARE symptoms, and their severity depended on the dosage, number of LPS exposures, and type of LPS used (LPS from S. marcescens showing highest virulence). Corneal ulcers were induced by delivering a high dose of Serratia LPS (100 micrograms) followed by a low dose (10 micrograms). Histopathological examination revealed that both ARE and corneal ulceration were associated with prominent neutrophil infiltration. In addition, many lymphocytes and other monocytic cells infiltrated ulcerated ocular tissue. Tear fluids obtained from ulcerated eyes contained high concentrations of a protein recognized by anti-rabbit IL-1 alpha antibodies as demonstrated by immunoblotting studies. The results indicate that LPS can induce ARE and corneal ulceration in the absence of any live bacteria. Moreover, the findings implicate the accumulation of neutrophils and IL-1 alpha-related proteins in the pathogenesis of ARE and corneal ulcers.

  12. Characterization of lipopolysaccharides from Escherichia coli K-12 mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Boman, H G; Monner, D A

    1975-01-01

    Chemical analyses of the carbohydrate composition of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from a number of LPS mutants were used to propose a schematic composition for the LPS from Escherichia coli K-12. The formula contains four regions: the first consists of lipid A, ketodeoxyoctonoic acid, and a phosphorous component; the second contains only heptose; the third only glucose; and the fourth additional glucose, galactose, and rhamnose. LPS from E. coli B may have a similar composition but lacks the galactose and rhamnose units. A set of LPS-specific bacteriophages were used for comparing three mutants of Salmonella with a number of LPS mutants of E. coli K-12. The results confirm that there are basic similarities in the first and second regions of the LPS structure; they also support the four region divisions of the LPS formula. Paper chromatography was used for characterization of 32-P-labeled LPS from different strains of E. coli and Salmonella. The Rf values for LPS varied from 0.27 to 0.75 depending on the amounts of carbohydrates in the molecule. LPS from all strains studied was homogenous except for strain D31 which produced two types of LPS. Mild acid hydrolysis of labeled LPS liberated lipid A and two other components with phosphate, one of which was assigned to the first region. It is suggested that paper chromatography can be used in biosynthetic studies concerning regions 2 to 4. Images PMID:1089628

  13. Deterioration of spatial learning performances in lipopolysaccharide-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Arai, K; Matsuki, N; Ikegaya, Y; Nishiyama, N

    2001-11-01

    It is well demonstrated that acute or chronic stress leads to reduction of learning ability. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, induces profound physiological and behavioral changes, including fever, decrease in food motivation, and decrease in social behavior. These changes might be interpreted as an acute stress reaction to the LPS. In the present study, therefore, we investigated the effects of LPS (400-800 microg/kg, i.p.) on spatial learning performances using C57BL/6J male mice. In the Morris water-maze task, spatial learning performances were examined in six trials of training for two consecutive days. LPS-treated mice took a longer time to reach the hidden platform than control mice (F(1,60)=4.80801, P<0.05 at 600 microg/kg). In addition, injection of LPS decreased the percent of correct choices in the Y-maze test (P<0.05 at 800 microg/kg). LPS, however, did not alter the body weight, grip tone, motor activity or swimming speed. Taken together, these results indicate that LPS treatment specifically impaired spatial learning performances.

  14. [Extraction and characterization of the lipopolysaccharide of Bartonella quintana

    PubMed

    Matera, G.; Liberto, M.C.; Pollio, A.; Diana, R.; Martucci, M.; Parlato, G.; Gulletta, E.; Foca', A.

    1999-01-01

    Bartonella quintana has been reported as the cause of trench fever, persistent endocarditis, bacteriaemia and has been isolated with an increasing incidence in clinical specimens from AIDS patients. One of the main pathogenic factors of gram-negative bacteria, including B. quintana, is the lipopolysaccharide (LPS). However, very little information is available on the features of Bartonella LPS. The aim of the present study was to extract, purify and characterise B. quintana LPS. The effect of the LPS under scrutiny was also evaluated on TNFa release by means of the "in vitro" human whole blood model of sepsis. The Oklahoma strain of B. quintana was grown on sheep blood agar, at 37 C, in a moist atmosphere containing 5% carbon dioxide. Cells were harvested and washed in sterile and apyrogenic saline solution and LPS extracted following the procedure of Westphal e Jann (1965), modified by Minnick (1994). The LPS of B. quintana showed the migration pattern of a deep rough chemotype, and the chromogenic limulus amoebocyte lysate test (LAL test) revealed strong reactivity at low concentrations (6.2 pg/ml). Samples of human whole blood stimulated by 1000 ng/ml of B. quintana LPS released 1707 378 pg/ml of TNFa.

  15. Biological activities of Eikenella corrodens outer membrane and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Progulske, A; Mishell, R; Trummel, C; Holt, S C

    1984-01-01

    Highly purified preparations of the outer membrane and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Eikenella corrodens strain ATCC 23834 and the outer membrane fraction (OMF) of strain 470 were tested in in vitro biological assays. The OMFs of both strains were found to be mitogenic for BDF and C3H/HeJ murine splenocytes. The E. corrodens LPS was mitogenic for BDF spleen cells; however, doses of LPS as high as 50 micrograms/ml failed to stimulate C3H/HeJ cells. When incubated with T-lymphocyte-depleted C3H/HeJ splenocytes, the strain 23834 OMF demonstrated significant mitogenic activity, indicating that the OMF is a B-cell mitogen by a mechanism other than that elicited by conventional LPS. The E. corrodens 23834 OMF and LPS were stimulators of bone resorption when tested in organ cultures of fetal rat long bones. In contrast, the strain 470 OMF was only weakly stimulatory. Both OMFs and LPSs demonstrated "endotoxic" activity, since as little as 0.062 micrograms of E. corrodens LPS and 0.015 micrograms of the OMFs induced gelation in the Limulus amebocyte clotting assay. Thus, despite having a "nonclassical" LPS biochemistry, the E. corrodens LPS elicits classical endotoxic activities. These results also indicate that the surface structures of E. corrodens have significant biological activities as measured in vitro. The expression of such activities in vivo may play an important role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis as well as other E. corrodens infections. PMID:6360893

  16. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on the hemocyte apoptosis of Eriocheir sinensis *

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hai-sheng; Lyu, Sun-jian; Xu, Jie-hao; Lu, Bin-jie; Zhao, Jing; Li, Song; Li, Yi-qun; Chen, Yu-yin

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the possible toxicity mechanism of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) extracted from Gram-negative bacteria in Eriocheir sinensis hemocytes. Apoptotic hemocytes and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production induced by the LPS were monitored by the combination of flow cytometry and microscope observation. It was shown that LPS induced serious damage on the DNA and morphological changes in hemocytes, including cell shrinkage, fracture of nucleus membrane, margination, condensation and fragmentation of chromatin, and formation of apoptotic bodies indicating obvious hemocyte apoptosis. As compared with the control group, the apoptotic cell ratio increased to 30.61% and 39.01% after 1-h exposure and 57.72% and 75.01% after 2-h exposure to 1 and 10 μg/ml LPS, respectively (P<0.05). Significant outburst of ROS production was observed in LPS-treated hemocytes with approximately 176.6% of relative dichlorofluorescein mean fluorescence at 1-h exposure, followed by a drastic decline (P<0.05). These results indicated that LPS would induce oxidative stress on hemocytes from E. sinensis and cause ROS burst, DNA damage, and subsequently apoptosis. The process of ROS-mediated apoptosis might be one of the potential toxicity mechanisms of LPS on crustacean hemocytes. PMID:26642180

  17. Effects of lipopolysaccharide on the catabolic activity of macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Cluff, C.; Ziegler, H.K.

    1986-03-05

    The ability of macrophages to degrade and catabolize antigens is of relevance both as a means to process complex antigens prior to presentation to T cells, as well as a way to down regulate immune responses by destroying the antigenicity of polypeptides. With these considerations, the authors have investigated the regulation of macrophage catabolic activity by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Catabolic activity was quantitated by following the distribution and molecular form of /sup 125/-I labelled surface components of heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes (HKLM) subsequent to their uptake by macrophages. They have compared the catabolic activity of macrophages from peritoneal exudates of mice injected i.p. with saline or LPS and have found that LPS-elicited macrophages display a greatly enhanced (3 fold) rate of catabolism. This increase in catabolic activity peaks 3 days after LPS injection and steadily declines thereafter, approaching a baseline level after 3 weeks. The enhancement of catabolic activity is under LPS gene control. LPS-elicited macrophages rapidly destroy the antigenicity of bacterial antigens and function poorly as antigen presenting cells in vitro. These results suggest that LPS elicits a macrophage population specialized for antigen degradation functions with negative regulatory effects on the induction of specific immune responses.

  18. Immobilization and molecular interactions between bacteriophage and lipopolysaccharide bilayers.

    PubMed

    Handa, Hitesh; Gurczynski, Stephen; Jackson, Matthew P; Mao, Guangzhao

    2010-07-20

    The paper describes immobilization methods of bacteriophage P22 and tailspike gp9 proteins isolated from P22 on atomic force microscope (AFM) probes. The paper also reports single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) using AFM of the immobilized P22 (or gp9) interactions with substrate-supported O-antigenic lipopolysaccharides (LPS) bilayers. LPS covers the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, such as Salmonella typhimurium. Evidence from AFM imaging and SMFS shows that immobilized P22 (or gp9) are capable of strong and multivalent binding to supported LPS. The most common rupture forces between P22 and LPS were identified to be 72, 130, 206, and 279 pN at force loading rate of 12,000 pN/s. The quantized unbinding force was found to decrease with decreasing force loading rate as predicted by the Bell model. By fitting the force data with the Bell model, an energy barrier of 55 kJ/mol was obtained. Evidence is also provided that demonstrates the resilience of phage to pH and temperature fluctuation as well as dehydration/rehydration cycles. The biospecific interactions between P22 and the LPS are relevant to cell infection, inflammation, cancer progression and metastasis, food safety, pharmaceuticals, and biosensor development. PMID:20481467

  19. Pharmacokinetics of DS-96, an alkylpolyamine lipopolysaccharide sequestrant, in rodents.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Anurupa; Li, Rongti; Sil, Diptesh; Pardeshi, Neha N; Schwarting, Nancy; Schorno, Karl S; Rajewski, Roger A; Datta, Apurba; David, Sunil A

    2008-12-01

    The pharmacokinetics of DS-96, an N-alkylhomospermine analog designed to sequester bacterial lipopolysaccharides, has been determined in rodent species. The elimination half-life in mice and rats are about 400 and 500 min, respectively, with other PK parameters being quite similar in the two rodent species. Interestingly, the mouse intravenous plasma concentration time curves exhibit an apparent absorption phase. While the rat intravenous data did not exhibit a pronounced apparent absorption phase immediately following injection, plasma levels did increase between 10 and 30 min following an expected drop from time 0 to 5 min. The data are consistent with first-pass uptake, possibly by the lung, with back diffusion as a function of time. The observed C(max) values of 1.36 microg/mL in the mouse intraperitoneal model suggest that a plasma concentration of 0.5-1 microg/mL corresponds to complete protection for a 200 ng/animal dose of intraperitoneally administered LPS in the D-galactosamine-primed model of endotoxin-induced lethality.

  20. Alpinetin inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced acute kidney injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi; Zhou, Li-shan; Yan, Li; Ren, Juan; Zhou, Dai-xing; Li, Shu-Sheng

    2015-10-01

    Alpinetin, a novel plant flavonoid isolated from Alpinia katsumadai Hayata, has been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. However, the effects of alpinetin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute kidney injury have not been reported. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects and the underlying mechanism of alpinetin against LPS-induced acute kidney injury in mice. The results showed that alpinetin inhibited LPS-induced kidney histopathologic changes, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine levels. Alpinetin also inhibited LPS-induced ROS, MDA, and inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production in kidney tissues. Meanwhile, Western blot analysis showed that alpinetin suppressed LPS-induced TLR4 expression and NF-κB activation in kidney tissues. In addition, alpinetin was found to up-regulate the expression of Nrf2 and HO-1 in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, alpinetin protected LPS-induced kidney injury through activating Nrf2 and inhibiting TLR4 expression.

  1. Lipopolysaccharide Attenuates the Cytotoxicity of Resveratrol in Transformed Mouse Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Achy-Brou, Christelle A Adiabouah; Billack, Blase

    2016-09-01

    Resveratrol and pterostilbene are natural products that are present in plants and have been incorporated into various dietary supplements. Numerous beneficial pharmacologic effects have been reported for these stilbenes; however, the mechanism by which these compounds exert a cytotoxic effect in RAW 264.7 macrophages has not been well characterized. We have previously described that resveratrol is toxic to these tumor-derived macrophages and that stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reduces resveratrol toxicity via a mechanism that involves activation of toll like receptor 4. In the present work, we examined the cellular and molecular effects of resveratrol and the related compound pterostilbene by determining cell viability and caspase 3 activity in control and LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages incubated with these stilbenes for 24 h. We found that LPS stimulation reduced the cytotoxicity of resveratrol but not of pterostilbene in these cells. When examined for effects on caspase 3 activation after a 24 h incubation, resveratrol and pterostilbene were each found to separately and significantly increase caspase 3 activity in these cells. LPS stimulation prevented caspase 3 activation by pterostilbene and reduced caspase 3 activation by resveratrol in RAW 264.7 macrophages. The data presented here indicate that LPS induces a phenotype switch in tumor-derived RAW 264.7 macrophages in which cells experiencing LPS in the presence of resveratrol or pterostilbene become less likely to activate the pro-apoptotic factor caspase 3. PMID:27277074

  2. Arctigenin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianbao; Sun, Hongzhi; Zhou, Dun; Xi, Huanjiu; Shan, Lina

    2015-04-01

    Arctigenin (ATG) has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effects of ATG on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) remains not well understood. In the present study, our investigation was designed to reveal the effect of ATG on LPS-induced ALI in rats. We found that ATG pretreatment attenuated the LPS-induced ALI, as evidenced by the reduced histological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and wet-to-dry weight ratio in the lung tissues. This was accompanied by the decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-1 (IL-6) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Furthermore, ATG downregulated the expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65, promoted the phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB-α (IκBα) and activated the adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPKα) in the lung tissues. Our results suggested that ATG attenuates the LPS-induced ALI via activation of AMPK and suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:25008149

  3. Lipopolysaccharide Neutralization by Cationic-Amphiphilic Polymers through Pseudoaggregate Formation.

    PubMed

    Uppu, Divakara S S M; Haldar, Jayanta

    2016-03-14

    Synthetic polymers incorporating the cationic charge and hydrophobicity to mimic the function of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been developed. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers bind to bacterial membranes that generally contain negatively charged phospholipids and cause membrane disintegration resulting in cell death; however, cationic-amphiphilic antibacterial polymers with endotoxin neutralization properties, to the best of our knowledge, have not been reported. Bacterial endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cause sepsis that is responsible for a great amount of mortality worldwide. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers can also bind to negatively charged and hydrophobic LPS and cause detoxification. Hence, we envisaged that cationic-amphiphilic polymers can have both antibacterial as well as LPS binding properties. Here we report synthetic amphiphilic polymers with both antibacterial as well as endotoxin neutralizing properties. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines in human monocytes caused by LPS stimulation were inhibited by >80% when coincubated with these polymers. These reductions were found to be dependent on concentration and, more importantly, on the side-chain chemical structure due to variations in the hydrophobicity profiles of these polymers. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers bind and cause LPS neutralization and detoxification. Investigations of polymer interaction with LPS using fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that these polymers bind but neither dissociate nor promote LPS aggregation. We show that polymer binding to LPS leads to sort of a pseudoaggregate formation resulting in LPS neutralization/detoxification. These findings provide an unusual mechanism of LPS neutralization using novel synthetic cationic-amphiphilic polymers.

  4. Lipopolysaccharide Attenuates the Cytotoxicity of Resveratrol in Transformed Mouse Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Achy-Brou, Christelle A Adiabouah; Billack, Blase

    2016-09-01

    Resveratrol and pterostilbene are natural products that are present in plants and have been incorporated into various dietary supplements. Numerous beneficial pharmacologic effects have been reported for these stilbenes; however, the mechanism by which these compounds exert a cytotoxic effect in RAW 264.7 macrophages has not been well characterized. We have previously described that resveratrol is toxic to these tumor-derived macrophages and that stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reduces resveratrol toxicity via a mechanism that involves activation of toll like receptor 4. In the present work, we examined the cellular and molecular effects of resveratrol and the related compound pterostilbene by determining cell viability and caspase 3 activity in control and LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages incubated with these stilbenes for 24 h. We found that LPS stimulation reduced the cytotoxicity of resveratrol but not of pterostilbene in these cells. When examined for effects on caspase 3 activation after a 24 h incubation, resveratrol and pterostilbene were each found to separately and significantly increase caspase 3 activity in these cells. LPS stimulation prevented caspase 3 activation by pterostilbene and reduced caspase 3 activation by resveratrol in RAW 264.7 macrophages. The data presented here indicate that LPS induces a phenotype switch in tumor-derived RAW 264.7 macrophages in which cells experiencing LPS in the presence of resveratrol or pterostilbene become less likely to activate the pro-apoptotic factor caspase 3.

  5. The effect of lipopolysaccharide on bovine mammary macrophage function.

    PubMed Central

    Politis, I; Zhao, X; McBride, B W; Burton, J H

    1991-01-01

    The effect of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules by bovine mammary macrophages was examined. The ability of LPS-treated mammary macrophages to support antigen-specific T-cell proliferation, as a measure of their antigen presentation ability, was also evaluated. For this purpose, control and LPS-treated macrophages were pulsed with heat-killed Staphylococcus aureus and then cultured with S. aureus-sensitized T-cells. Our data show that LPS had no significant effect on the expression of MHC class II molecules on the surface of mammary macrophages. Furthermore, LPS-induced macrophages were no more active in supporting T-cell proliferation on a per cell basis than unstimulated macrophages. The lack of macrophage response to LPS with respect to expression of MHC class II molecules and the antigen presentation ability is another example of the hyporesponsive nature of macrophages isolated from the bovine mammary gland. PMID:1889031

  6. Genomic and proteomic studies on Plesiomonas shigelloides lipopolysaccharide core biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Aquilini, Eleonora; Merino, Susana; Regué, Miguel; Tomás, Juan M

    2014-02-01

    We report here the identification of waa clusters with the genes required for the biosynthesis of the core lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of two Plesiomonas shigelloides strains. Both P. shigelloides waa clusters shared all of the genes besides the ones flanking waaL. In both strains, all of the genes were found in the waa gene cluster, although one common core biosynthetic gene (wapG) was found in a different chromosome location outside the cluster. Since P. shigelloides and Klebsiella pneumoniae share a core LPS carbohydrate backbone extending up at least to the second outer-core residue, the functions of the common P. shigelloides genes were elucidated by genetic complementation studies using well-defined K. pneumoniae mutants. The function of strain-specific inner- or outer-core genes was identified by using as a surrogate acceptor LPS from three well-defined K. pneumoniae core LPS mutants. Using this strategy, we were able to assign a proteomic function to all of the P. shigelloides waa genes identified in the two strains encoding six new glycosyltransferases (WapA, -B, -C, -D, -F, and -G). P. shigelloides demonstrated an important variety of core LPS structures, despite being a single species of the genus, as well as high homologous recombination in housekeeping genes.

  7. Self-assembly of lipopolysaccharide layers on allantoin crystals.

    PubMed

    Vagenende, Vincent; Ching, Tim-Jang; Chua, Rui-Jing; Jiang, Qiu Zhen; Gagnon, Pete

    2014-08-01

    Self-assembly of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) on solid surfaces is important for the study of bacterial membranes, but has not been possible due to technical difficulties and the lack of suitable solid supports. Recently we found that crystals of the natural compound allantoin selectively bind pure LPS with sub-nanomolar affinity. The physicochemical origins of this selectivity and the adsorption mode of LPS on allantoin crystals remain, however, unknown. In this study we present evidence that LPS adsorption on allantoin crystals is initiated through hydrogen-bond attachment of hydrophilic LPS regions. Hydrophobic interactions between alkyl chains of adjacently adsorbed LPS molecules subsequently promote self-assembly of LPS layers. The essential role of hydrogen-bond interactions is corroborated by our finding that allantoin crystals bind to practically any hydrophilic surface chemistry. Binding contributions of hydrophobic interactions between LPS alkyl chains are evidenced by the endothermic nature of the adsorption process and explain why the binding affinity for LPS is several orders of magnitude higher than for proteins (lysozyme, BSA and IgG) and polysaccharides. Self-assembly of LPS layers via hydrogen-bond attachment on allantoin crystals emerges as a novel binding mechanism and could be considered as a practical method for preparing biomimetic membranes on a solid support.

  8. Inhibitory Effects of Antimicrobial Peptides on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yue; Shang, Dejing

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are usually small molecule peptides, which display broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, high efficiency, and stability. For the multiple-antibiotic-resistant strains, AMPs play a significant role in the development of novel antibiotics because of their broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and specific antimicrobial mechanism. Besides broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, AMPs also have anti-inflammatory activity. The neutralization of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) plays a key role in anti-inflammatory action of AMPs. On the one hand, AMPs can readily penetrate the cell wall barrier by neutralizing LPS to remove Gram-negative bacteria that can lead to infection. On the contrary, AMPs can also inhibit the production of biological inflammatory cytokines to reduce the inflammatory response through neutralizing circulating LPS. In addition, AMPs also modulate the host immune system by chemotaxis of leukocytes, to promote immune cell proliferation, epithelialization, and angiogenesis and thus play a protective role. This review summarizes some recent researches about anti-inflammatory AMPs, with a focus on the interaction of AMPs and LPS on the past decade. PMID:26612970

  9. Monoclonal Antibodies to Shigella Lipopolysaccharide Are Useful for Vaccine Production.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jisheng; Smith, Mark A; Benjamin, William H; Kaminski, Robert W; Wenzel, Heather; Nahm, Moon H

    2016-08-01

    There is a significant need for an effective multivalent Shigella vaccine that targets the most prevalent serotypes. Most Shigella vaccines under development utilize serotype-specific lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) as a major component based on protection and epidemiological data. As vaccine formulations advance from monovalent to multivalent, assays and reagents need to be developed to accurately and reproducibly quantitate the amount of LPSs from multiple serotypes in the final product. To facilitate this effort, we produced 36 hybridomas that secrete monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the O antigen on the LPS from Shigella flexneri 2a, Shigella flexneri 3a, and Shigella sonnei We used six of these monoclonal antibodies for an inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA), measuring LPSs with high sensitivity and specificity. It was also demonstrated that the Shigella serotype-specific MAbs were useful for bacterial surface staining detected by flow cytometry. These MAbs are also useful for standardizing the serum bactericidal assay (SBA) for Shigella Functional assays, such as the in vitro bactericidal assay, are necessary for vaccine evaluation and may serve as immunological correlates of immunity. An S. flexneri 2a-specific monoclonal antibody killed S. flexneri 2b isolates, suggesting that S. flexneri 2a LPS may induce cross-protection against S. flexneri 2b. Overall, the Shigella LPS-specific MAbs described have potential utility to the vaccine development community for assessing multivalent vaccine composition and as a reliable control for multiple immunoassays used to assess vaccine potency.

  10. Deacylation of bacterial lipopolysaccharide in rat hepatocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, I.; Tanamoto, K.; Kanegasaki, S.; Yajima, Y.; Goto, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The possible role of liver parenchymal cells in the uptake and degradation of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was investigated in vitro by employing radiolabelled LPS as substrate. Hepatocytes obtained from Wistar rats by collagenase treatment were found to take up LPS only when it was not linked to the polysaccharide of O-antigen. The amount of LPS taken up increased with time and after 48 h incubation it increased in a dose-dependent manner up to at least 30 micrograms. When incubated with LPS radiolabelled exclusively in the fatty-acid moiety, cultured hepatocytes released lipophilic materials into the culture medium. These were identified as beta-hydroxytetradecanoic acid and triglyceride, in the ratio of 7:I. These results indicate that the R-form of LPS which lacks the O-antigen polysaccharide is taken up and deacylated in hepatocytes, and the derived fatty acids are released into the culture medium either in the free form or after conversion to triglyceride. Images Fig. 6 PMID:2669923

  11. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide activates CD57-negative human NK cells.

    PubMed

    Kanevskiy, L M; Erokhina, S A; Streltsova, M A; Telford, W G; Sapozhnikov, A M; Kovalenko, E I

    2014-12-01

    NK cells play an important regulatory role in sepsis by induction and augmentation of proinflammatory reactions in early stages of the septic process and by suppression of immune response in later stages of inflammation. The present work was aimed at the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the main pathogenic factor of sepsis development, on human NK cells ex vivo. We show that LPS activates immature CD57-negative NK cells, which typically constitute less than half of the normal NK cell population in human peripheral blood. Under conditions of NK cell stimulation with IL-2, addition of LPS provokes an increase in IFN-γ production. However, LPS both increased and inhibited NK cell cytotoxic activity. It is important to note that the activation of NK cells on LPS addition was observed in the absence of TLR4 on the NK cell surface. These results confirm our previous data arguing for a direct interaction of LPS with NK cells and evidence an atypical mechanism of LPS-induced NK cell activation without the involvement of surface TLR4.

  12. Lipopolysaccharides of Vibrio cholerae. I. Physical and chemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, S N; Chaudhuri, Keya

    2003-10-15

    Vibrio cholerae is the causative organism of the disease cholera. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of V. cholerae plays an important role in eliciting the antibacterial immune response of the host and in classifying the vibrios into some 200 or more serogroups. This review presents an account of our up-to-date knowledge of the physical and chemical characteristics of the three constituents, lipid-A, core-polysaccharide (core-PS) and O-antigen polysaccharide (O-PS), of the LPS of V. cholerae of different serogroups including the disease-causing ones, O1 and O139. The structure and occurrence of the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) on V. cholerae O139 have been discussed as a relevant topic. Similarity and dissimilarity between the structures of LPS of different serogroups, and particularly between O22 and O139, have been analysed with a view to learning their role in the causation of the epidemic form of the disease by avoiding the host defence mechanism and in the evolution of the newer pathogenic strains in future. An idea of the emerging trends of research involving the use of immunogens prepared from synthetic oligosaccharides that mimic terminal epitopes of the O-PS of V. cholerae O1 in the development of a conjugate anti cholera vaccine is also discussed.

  13. Lipopolysaccharide does not affect acoustic startle reflex in mice.

    PubMed

    Juszczak, Grzegorz R; Blaszczyk, Janusz; Sadowski, Bogdan; Sliwa, Adam T; Wolak, Patrycja; Tymosiak-Zielinska, Agnieszka; Lisowski, Pawel; Swiergiel, Artur H

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) evokes in rodents an adaptive sickness behavior. It also produces changes in stress hormones secretion and activity of brain serotonergic and noradrenergic systems that have been implicated in stress responses, fear, and anxiety. Acoustic startle reflex (ASR) is regarded as a protective behavioral response that is enhanced in threatening situations or following an aversive event, and it can be modulated by physiological and emotional state of an animal. Effects of intraperitoneal injections of LPS on ASR, prepulse inhibition (PPI), locomotor activity in open field, and blood plasma corticosterone concentration were studied in lines of mice that display high (HA line) or low (LA line) swim stress-induced analgesia and also differ in emotional behaviors, including the magnitude of ASR. In both lines LPS produced robust sickness behavior, as evidenced by a decrease in locomotion and body weight, and an increase in corticosterone concentration. However, in neither line LPS injections affected responses to acoustic stimuli as assessed by the ASR and PPI magnitudes. The findings suggest that in sickness behavior induced by LPS the protective responses to salient environmental stimuli are not impaired. The significance of this finding for the concept of sickness behavior is discussed. PMID:17651939

  14. Roles of different forms of lipopolysaccharides in Ralstonia solanacearum pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Chien-Hui; Wang, Kuan-Chung; Hong, Yu-Hau; Chu, Tai-Hsiang; Chu, Yu-Ju; Chou, I-Chun; Lu, Der-Kang; Chen, Chiao-Yen; Yang, Wen-Chieh; Lin, Yu-Mei; Cheng, Chiu-Ping

    2014-05-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are critical components for the fitness of most gram-negative bacteria. Ralstonia solanacearum causes a deadly wilting disease in many crops; however, the pathogenic roles of different forms of LPS and their pathways of biogenesis remain unknown. By screening for phage-resistant mutants of R. solanacearum Pss4, whose genome sequence is unavailable, mutants with various types of structural defects in LPS were isolated. Pathogenesis assays of the mutants revealed that production of rough LPS (R-LPS), which does not contain O-polysaccharides, was sufficient to cause necrosis on Nicotiana benthamiana and induce the hypersensitive response on N. tabacum. However, biosynthesis of smooth LPS (S-LPS), which contains O-polysaccharides, was required for bacterial proliferation at infection sites on N. benthamiana leaves and for proliferation and causing wilt on tomato. Complementation tests confirmed the involvement of the previously unidentified cluster RSc2201 to RSc2204 in the formation of R. solanacearum S-LPS. With these data and the availability of the annotated genomic sequence of strain GMI1000, certain loci involved in key steps of R. solanacearum LPS biosynthesis were identified. The strategy of this work could be useful for similar studies in other bacteria without available genome sequences.

  15. Lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Hamesch, K; Borkham-Kamphorst, E; Strnad, P; Weiskirchen, R

    2015-04-01

    The intraperitoneal application of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) alone or in combination with other hepatotoxins is an experimental model for inducing systemic and hepatic inflammation in rodents applied worldwide. The endotoxin is recognized by the LPS-binding protein. This complex binds together with the lymphocyte antigen 96 (MD2) and the pattern-recognition receptor CD14 to members of the toll-like receptor family. The activated receptor complex in turn transduces signals to well characterized intracellular cascades that result in a multifaceted network of intracellular responses ending in inflammation. The most prominent among these is the activation of the NF-κB pathway and the production of a multitude of inflammatory cytokines. Although the application of LPS is in general easy to perform, unintended variations in preparation of the injection solution or in handling of the animals might affect the reproducibility or the outcome of a specific experiment. Here, we present a well-standardized protocol that allows for an induction of highly reproducible acute hepatic inflammation in mice. Furthermore, examples of appropriate readouts for the resulting inflammatory response are given. PMID:25835737

  16. A method for generating pulmonary neutrophilia using aerosolized lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Roos, Abraham B; Berg, Tove; Ahlgren, Kerstin M; Grunewald, Johan; Nord, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a severe disease characterized by alveolar neutrophilia, with limited treatment options and high mortality. Experimental models of ALI are key in enhancing our understanding of disease pathogenesis. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) derived from gram positive bacteria induces neutrophilic inflammation in the airways and lung parenchyma of mice. Efficient pulmonary delivery of compounds such as LPS is, however, difficult to achieve. In the approach described here, pulmonary delivery in mice is achieved by challenge to aerosolized Pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS. Dissolved LPS was aerosolized by a nebulizer connected to compressed air. Mice were exposed to a continuous flow of LPS aerosol in a Plexiglas box for 10 min, followed by 2 min conditioning after the aerosol was discontinued. Tracheal intubation and subsequent bronchoalveolar lavage, followed by formalin perfusion was next performed, which allows for characterization of the sterile pulmonary inflammation. Aerosolized LPS generates a pulmonary inflammation characterized by alveolar neutrophilia, detected in bronchoalveolar lavage and by histological assessment. This technique can be set up at a small cost with few appliances, and requires minimal training and expertise. The exposure system can thus be routinely performed at any laboratory, with the potential to enhance our understanding of lung pathology. PMID:25548888

  17. Lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Hamesch, K; Borkham-Kamphorst, E; Strnad, P; Weiskirchen, R

    2015-04-01

    The intraperitoneal application of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) alone or in combination with other hepatotoxins is an experimental model for inducing systemic and hepatic inflammation in rodents applied worldwide. The endotoxin is recognized by the LPS-binding protein. This complex binds together with the lymphocyte antigen 96 (MD2) and the pattern-recognition receptor CD14 to members of the toll-like receptor family. The activated receptor complex in turn transduces signals to well characterized intracellular cascades that result in a multifaceted network of intracellular responses ending in inflammation. The most prominent among these is the activation of the NF-κB pathway and the production of a multitude of inflammatory cytokines. Although the application of LPS is in general easy to perform, unintended variations in preparation of the injection solution or in handling of the animals might affect the reproducibility or the outcome of a specific experiment. Here, we present a well-standardized protocol that allows for an induction of highly reproducible acute hepatic inflammation in mice. Furthermore, examples of appropriate readouts for the resulting inflammatory response are given.

  18. Astrocytes Release Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids by Lipopolysaccharide Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Fuka; Nishinaka, Takashi; Yamashita, Takuya; Nakamoto, Kazuo; Koyama, Yutaka; Kasuya, Fumiyo; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that levels of long-chain fatty acids (FAs) including docosahexaenoic acids (DHA) increase in the hypothalamus of inflammatory pain model mice. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the increment of free fatty acids (FFAs) in the brain during inflammation remains unknown. In this study, we characterized FFAs released by inflammatory stimulation in rat primary cultured astrocytes, and tested the involvement of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) on these mechanisms. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation significantly increased the levels of several FAs in the astrocytes. Under these conditions, mRNA expression of cytosolic PLA2 (cPLA2) and calcium-independent PLA2 (iPLA2) in LPS-treated group increased compared with the control group. Furthermore, in the culture media, the levels of DHA and arachidonic acid (ARA) significantly increased by LPS stimuli compared with those of a vehicle-treated control group whereas the levels of saturated FAs (SFAs), namely palmitic acid (PAM) and stearic acid (STA), did not change. In summary, our findings suggest that astrocytes specifically release DHA and ARA by inflammatory conditions. Therefore astrocytes might function as a regulatory factor of DHA and ARA in the brain. PMID:27374285

  19. Theophylline improves lipopolysaccharide-induced alveolarization arrest through inflammatory regulation.

    PubMed

    He, Hua; Chen, Fei; Ni, Wensi; Li, Jianhui; Zhang, Yongjun

    2014-07-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is characterized by alveolar simplification with decreased numbers of alveoli and increased airspace. BPD, frequently suffered by very low birth weight infants, has been closely associated with intrauterine infection. However, the underlying mechanisms of BPD remain unclear. In the present study, it was identified that administration of intra-amniotic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to pregnant rats on embryonal day 16.5 (E16.5) induced significant alveolarization arrest similar to that of BPD in neonatal pups, and theophylline injected subcutaneously into the newborns improved the pathological changes. To further investigate the underlying mechanism of the morphogenesis amelioration of theophylline, cytokine antibody arrays were performed with the lung lysates of neonatal rats. The results indicated that LPS upregulated a series of pro-inflammatory cytokines and theophylline significantly attenuated the expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor‑α, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α and MIP-2, and markedly elevated the production of tumor growth factor (TGF)-β family members TGF-β1, TGF-β2 and TGF-β3, which are anti‑inflammatory cytokines. Accordingly, it was hypothesized that theophylline may protect against BPD and improve chorioamnionitis‑induced alveolar arrest by regulating the balance between pro‑and anti-inflammatory cytokine expression.

  20. Antioxidant Effects of Cranberry Powder in Lipopolysaccharide Treated Hypercholesterolemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Joung; Kim, Jung Hee; Kwak, Ho-Kyung

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of cranberry power on antioxidant defense system in rats fed an atherogenic diet and injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into the following 5 groups: normal diet+saline (NS), atherogenic diet+saline (AS), atherogenic diet+LPS (AL), atherogenic diet with 5% cranberry powder+LPS (AL-C5), and atherogenic diet with 10% cranberry powder+LPS (AL-C10). Total antioxidant status measured by ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) was significantly reduced by LPS injection (24%) and was restored by the cranberry powder treatment (P<0.05). In addition, the mean level of plasma total phenolics was significantly decreased by LPS injection (P<0.05) and tended to be increased when cranberry powder was incorporated in to the diet. Activity of serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) tended to be lowered by LPS injection and declined further in cranberry powder fortified groups. Overall results indicate that dietary cranberry powder may provide appropriate antioxidants to counter the diminished antioxidant status induced by exposing hypercholesterolemic rats to LPS. PMID:25054105

  1. Methylprednisolone Stiffens Aortas in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Chronic Inflammation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Ya-Hui; Tsai, Ming-Shian; Lee, Po-Huang; Liang, Jin-Tung; Chang, Kuo-Chu

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Glucocorticoids are commonly used as therapeutic agents in many acute and chronic inflammatory and auto-immune diseases. The current study investigated the effects of methylprednisolone (a synthetic glucocorticoid) on aortic distensibility and vascular resistance in lipopolysaccharide-induced chronic inflammation in male Wistar rats. Methods Chronic inflammation was induced by implanting a subcutaneous slow-release ALZET osmotic pump (1 mg kg−1 day−1 lipopolysaccharide) for either 2 or 4 weeks. Arterial wave transit time (τ) was derived to describe the elastic properties of aortas using the impulse response function of the filtered aortic input impedance spectra. Results Long-term lipopolysaccharide challenge enhanced the expression of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in the aortas. Lipopolysaccharide also upregulated the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase to produce high levels of nitric oxide (NO), which resulted in vasodilation, as evidenced by the fall in total peripheral resistance (Rp). However, lipopolysaccharide challenge did not influence the elastic properties of aortas, as shown by the unaltered τ. The NO-mediated vascular relaxation may counterbalance the AGEs-induced arterial stiffening so that the aortic distensibility remained unaltered. Treating lipopolysaccharide-challenged rats with methylprednisolone prevented peripheral vasodilation because of its ability to increase Rp. However, methylprednisolone produced an increase in aorta stiffness, as manifested by the significant decline in τ. The diminished aortic distensibility by methylprednisolone paralleled a significant reduction in NO plasma levels, in the absence of any significant changes in AGEs content. Conclusion Methylprednisolone stiffens aortas and elastic arteries in lipopolysaccharide-induced chronic inflammation in rats, for NO activity may be dominant as a counteraction of AGEs. PMID:23874978

  2. Lipopolysaccharide Density and Structure Govern the Extent and Distance of Nanoparticle Interaction with Actual and Model Bacterial Outer Membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Jacobson, Kurt H.; Gunsolus, Ian L.; Kuech, Thomas R.; Troiano, Julianne M.; Melby, Eric S.; Lohse, Samuel E.; Hu, Dehong; Chrisler, William B.; Murphy, Catherine J.; Orr, Galya; et al

    2015-07-24

    We report that design of nanomedicines and nanoparticle-based antimicrobial and antifouling formulations, and assessment of the potential implications of nanoparticle release into the environment require understanding nanoparticle interaction with bacterial surfaces. Here we demonstrate electrostatically driven association of functionalized nanoparticles with lipopolysaccharides of Gram-negative bacterial outer membranes and find that lipopolysaccharide structure influences the extent and location of binding relative to the lipid-solution interface. By manipulating the lipopolysaccharide content in Shewanella oneidensis outer membranes, we observed electrostatically driven interaction of cationic gold nanoparticles with the lipopolysaccharide-containing leaflet. We probed this interaction by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) andmore » second harmonic generation (SHG) using solid-supported lipopolysaccharide-containing bilayers. Association of cationic nanoparticles increased with lipopolysaccharide content, while no association of anionic nanoparticles was observed. The harmonic-dependence of QCM-D measurements suggested that a population of the cationic nanoparticles was held at a distance from the outer leaflet-solution interface of bilayers containing smooth lipopolysaccharides (those bearing a long O-polysaccharide). Additionally, smooth lipopolysaccharides held the bulk of the associated cationic particles outside of the interfacial zone probed by SHG. Lastly, our results demonstrate that positively charged nanoparticles are more likely to interact with Gram-negative bacteria than are negatively charged particles, and this interaction occurs primarily through lipopolysaccharides.« less

  3. Lipopolysaccharide Density and Structure Govern the Extent and Distance of Nanoparticle Interaction with Actual and Model Bacterial Outer Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, Kurt H.; Gunsolus, Ian L.; Kuech, Thomas R.; Troiano, Julianne M.; Melby, Eric S.; Lohse, Samuel E.; Hu, Dehong; Chrisler, William B.; Murphy, Catherine J.; Orr, Galya; Geiger, Franz M.; Haynes, Christy L.; Pedersen, Joel A.

    2015-07-24

    We report that design of nanomedicines and nanoparticle-based antimicrobial and antifouling formulations, and assessment of the potential implications of nanoparticle release into the environment require understanding nanoparticle interaction with bacterial surfaces. Here we demonstrate electrostatically driven association of functionalized nanoparticles with lipopolysaccharides of Gram-negative bacterial outer membranes and find that lipopolysaccharide structure influences the extent and location of binding relative to the lipid-solution interface. By manipulating the lipopolysaccharide content in Shewanella oneidensis outer membranes, we observed electrostatically driven interaction of cationic gold nanoparticles with the lipopolysaccharide-containing leaflet. We probed this interaction by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and second harmonic generation (SHG) using solid-supported lipopolysaccharide-containing bilayers. Association of cationic nanoparticles increased with lipopolysaccharide content, while no association of anionic nanoparticles was observed. The harmonic-dependence of QCM-D measurements suggested that a population of the cationic nanoparticles was held at a distance from the outer leaflet-solution interface of bilayers containing smooth lipopolysaccharides (those bearing a long O-polysaccharide). Additionally, smooth lipopolysaccharides held the bulk of the associated cationic particles outside of the interfacial zone probed by SHG. Lastly, our results demonstrate that positively charged nanoparticles are more likely to interact with Gram-negative bacteria than are negatively charged particles, and this interaction occurs primarily through lipopolysaccharides.

  4. Lipopolysaccharide Density and Structure Govern the Extent and Distance of Nanoparticle Interaction with Actual and Model Bacterial Outer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kurt H.; Gunsolus, Ian L.; Kuech, Thomas R.; Troiano, Julianne M.; Melby, Eric S.; Lohse, Samuel E.; Hu, Dehong; Chrisler, William B.; Murphy, Catherine J.; Orr, Galya; Geiger, Franz M.; Haynes, Christy L.; Pedersen, Joel A.

    2015-01-01

    Design of nanomedicines and nanoparticle-based antimicrobial and antifouling formulations and assessment of the potential implications of nanoparticle release into the environment requires understanding nanoparticle interaction with bacterial surfaces. Here we demonstrate the electrostatically driven association of functionalized nanoparticles with lipopolysaccharides of Gram-negative bacterial outer membranes and find that lipopolysaccharide structure influences the extent and location of binding relative to the outer leaflet-solution interface. By manipulating the lipopolysaccharide content in Shewanella oneidensis outer membranes, we observed the electrostatically driven interaction of cationic gold nanoparticles with the lipopolysaccharide-containing leaflet. We probed this interaction by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and second harmonic generation (SHG) using solid-supported lipopolysaccharide-containing bilayers. The association of cationic nanoparticles increased with lipopolysaccharide content, while no association of anionic nanoparticles was observed. The harmonic-dependence of QCM-D measurements suggested that a population of the cationic nanoparticles was held at a distance from the outer leaflet-solution interface of bilayers containing smooth lipopolysaccharides (those bearing a long O-polysaccharide). Additionally, smooth lipopolysaccharides held the bulk of the associated cationic particles outside of the interfacial zone probed by SHG. Our results demonstrate that positively charged nanoparticles are more likely to interact with Gram-negative bacteria than are negatively charged particles, and this interaction occurs primarily through lipopolysaccharides. PMID:26207769

  5. Lipopolysaccharide Density and Structure Govern the Extent and Distance of Nanoparticle Interaction with Actual and Model Bacterial Outer Membranes.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Kurt H; Gunsolus, Ian L; Kuech, Thomas R; Troiano, Julianne M; Melby, Eric S; Lohse, Samuel E; Hu, Dehong; Chrisler, William B; Murphy, Catherine J; Orr, Galya; Geiger, Franz M; Haynes, Christy L; Pedersen, Joel A

    2015-09-01

    Design of nanomedicines and nanoparticle-based antimicrobial and antifouling formulations and assessment of the potential implications of nanoparticle release into the environment requires understanding nanoparticle interaction with bacterial surfaces. Here we demonstrate the electrostatically driven association of functionalized nanoparticles with lipopolysaccharides of Gram-negative bacterial outer membranes and find that lipopolysaccharide structure influences the extent and location of binding relative to the outer leaflet-solution interface. By manipulating the lipopolysaccharide content in Shewanella oneidensis outer membranes, we observed the electrostatically driven interaction of cationic gold nanoparticles with the lipopolysaccharide-containing leaflet. We probed this interaction by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and second harmonic generation (SHG) using solid-supported lipopolysaccharide-containing bilayers. The association of cationic nanoparticles increased with lipopolysaccharide content, while no association of anionic nanoparticles was observed. The harmonic-dependence of QCM-D measurements suggested that a population of the cationic nanoparticles was held at a distance from the outer leaflet-solution interface of bilayers containing smooth lipopolysaccharides (those bearing a long O-polysaccharide). Additionally, smooth lipopolysaccharides held the bulk of the associated cationic particles outside of the interfacial zone probed by SHG. Our results demonstrate that positively charged nanoparticles are more likely to interact with Gram-negative bacteria than are negatively charged particles, and this interaction occurs primarily through lipopolysaccharides.

  6. Simultaneous measurement of the viability, aggregation, and live and dead adherence of Streptococcus crista, Streptococcus mutans and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in human saliva in relation to indices of caries, dental plaque and periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Rudney, J D; Staikov, R K

    2002-05-01

    Salivary proteins have multiple functions and many share similar functions, which may be why it has been difficult to relate variations in their concentrations to oral health and ecology. An alternative is to focus on variations in the major functions of saliva. An hydroxyapatite-coated microplate model has been developed that simultaneously measures saliva-promoted bacterial viability, bacterial aggregation, and live and dead bacterial adherence, while simulating oral temperature and shearing forces from swallowing. That model was applied to resting whole and stimulated parotid saliva from 149 individuals, using representative strains of Streptococcus crista, S. mutans, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Two major factors were defined by multivariate analysis (this was successful only for whole-saliva). One factor was correlated with aggregation, live adherence and dead adherence for all three strains; the other was correlated with total viability of all three strains. Participants were grouped <25th percentile and >75th percentile for each factor. Those groups were compared for clinical indices of oral health. Caries scores were significantly lower in those with high scores for aggregation-adherence, regardless of whether total viability scores were low or high. Live bacteria always predominated on surfaces when live and dead adherence scores were expressed as ratios. However, participants with high scores for aggregation-adherence showed significantly more dead adherent bacteria than those with low scores (these ratios were uncorrelated with total viability). This finding may indicate that extreme differences in the ability to kill bacteria on surfaces can influence caries risk.

  7. OCCURRENCE OF ACTINOBACILLUS ACTINOMYCETEMCOMITANS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS, AGGRESSIVE PERIODONTITIS, HEALTHY SUBJECTS AND CHILDREN WITH GINGIVITIS IN TWO CITIES OF THE STATE OF SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Jardim, Elerson Gaetti; Bosco, Joseane Maria Dias; Lopes, Angélica Marquezim; Landucci, Luís Fernando; Jardim, Ellen Cristina Gaetti; Carneiro, Sílvia Rosana Soares

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of isolation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) in 100 patients with chronic periodontitis, 14 patients with aggressive periodontitis, 142 pre-school children with gingivitis and 134 periodontally healthy subjects. Samples of subgingival plaque were taken using sterilized paper points introduced into periodontal pockets or gingival crevice for 60 seconds and inoculated on TSBV agar, which was incubated under anaerobiosis at 37°C, for 4 days. Microbial identification was performed through biochemical methods and morphocellular and morphocolonial analysis. Aa was detected in 40.3% of healthy subjects, 68% of patients with chronic periodontitis, 92.86% of patients with aggressive periodontitis and 40.14% of children with gingivitis. The rate of recovery of Aa in the tested human groups proved to be higher than previously reported and in agreement with participation of this facultative anaerobe as a member of native microbiota of the periodontium and its relation with aggressive and chronic periodontitis in Brazil. PMID:19089064

  8. Genetics and Proteomics of Aeromonas salmonicida Lipopolysaccharide Core Biosynthesis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Natalia; Lacasta, Anna; Vilches, Silvia; Reyes, Mercé; Vazquez, Judit; Aquillini, Eleonora; Merino, Susana; Regué, Miguel; Tomás, Juan M.

    2009-01-01

    Comparison between the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core structures of Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida A450 and Aeromonas hydrophila AH-3 shows great similarity in the inner LPS core and part of the outer LPS core but some differences in the distal part of the outer LPS core (residues ld-Hep, d-Gal, and d-GalNAc). The three genomic regions encoding LPS core biosynthetic genes in A. salmonicida A450, of which regions 2 and 3 have genes identical to those of A. hydrophila AH-3, were fully sequenced. A. salmonicida A450 region 1 showed seven genes: three identical to those of A. hydrophila AH-3, three similar but not identical to those of A. hydrophila AH-3, and one without any homology to any well-characterized gene. A. salmonicida A450 mutants with alterations in the genes that were not identical to those of A. hydrophila AH-3 were constructed, and their LPS core structures were fully elucidated. At the same time, all the A. salmonicida A450 genes identical to those of A. hydrophila AH-3 were used to complement the previously obtained A. hydrophila AH-3 mutants for each of these genes. Combining the gene sequence and complementation test data with the structural data and phenotypic characterization of the mutant LPSs enabled a presumptive assignment of all LPS core biosynthesis gene functions in A. salmonicida A450. Furthermore, hybridization studies with internal probes for the A. salmonicida-specific genes using different A. salmonicida strains (strains of different subspecies or atypical strains) showed a unique or prevalent LPS core type, which is the one fully characterized for A. salmonicida A450. PMID:19151135

  9. Flow cytometric analysis of crayfish haemocytes activated by lipopolysaccharides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cardenas, W.; Dankert, J.R.; Jenkins, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria are strong stimulators of white river crayfish, Procambarus zonangulus, haemocytes in vitro. Following haemocyte treatment with LPS and with LPS from rough mutant R5 (LPS Rc) from Salmonella minnesota, flow cytometric analysis revealed a conspicuous and reproducible decrease in cell size as compared to control haemocytes. These LPS molecules also caused a reduction in haemocyte viability as assessed by flow cytometry with the fluorescent dyes calcein-AM and ethidium homodimer. The onset of cell size reduction was gradual and occurred prior to cell death. Haemocytes treated with LPS from S. minnesota without the Lipid A moiety (detoxified LPS) decreased in size without a reduction of viability. The action of LPS on crayfish haemocytes appeared to be related to the activation of the prophenoloxidase system because phenoloxidase (PO)-specific activity in the supernatants from control and detoxified LPS-treated cells was significantly lower than that from LPS and LPS-Rc treated cells (P < 0.05). Furthermore, addition of trypsin inhibitor to the LPS treatments caused noticeable delays in cell size and viability changes. These patterns of cellular activation by LPS formulations indicated that crayfish haemocytes react differently to the polysaccharide and lipid A moieties of LPS, where lipid A is cytotoxic and the polysaccharide portion is stimulatory. These effects concur with the general pattern of mammalian cell activation by LPS, thereby indicting commone innate immune recognition mechanisms to bacterial antigens between cells from mammals and invertebrates. These definitive molecular approaches used to verify and identify mechanisms of invertbrate haemocyte responses to LPS could be applied with other glycoconjugates, soluble mediators, or xenobiotic compounds.

  10. Sickness behaviour after lipopolysaccharide treatment in ghrelin deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Szentirmai, Éva; Krueger, James M

    2014-02-01

    Ghrelin is an orexigenic hormone produced mainly by the gastrointestinal system and the brain. Much evidence also indicates a role for ghrelin in sleep and thermoregulation. Further, ghrelin was recently implicated in immune system modulation. Administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces fever, anorexia, and increased non-rapid-eye movement sleep (NREMS) and these actions are mediated primarily by proinflammatory cytokines. Ghrelin reduces LPS-induced fever, suppresses circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines and reduces the severity and mortality of various models of experimental endotoxemia. In the present study, we determined the role of intact ghrelin signaling in LPS-induced sleep, feeding, and thermoregulatory responses in mice. Sleep-wake activity was determined after intraperitoneal, dark onset administration of 0.4, 2 and 10 μg LPS in preproghrelin knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. In addition, body temperature, motor activity and changes in 24-h food intake and body weight were measured. LPS induced dose-dependent increases in NREMS, and suppressed rapid-eye movement sleep, electroencephalographic slow-wave activity, motor activity, food intake and body weight in both Ppg KO and WT mice. Body temperature changes showed a biphasic pattern with a decrease during the dark period followed by an increase in the light phase. The effects of the low and middle doses of LPS were indistinguishable between the two genotypes. Administration of 10 μg LPS, however, induced significantly larger changes in NREMS and wakefulness amounts, body temperature, food intake and body weight in the Ppg KO mice. These findings support a role for ghrelin as an endogenous modulator of inflammatory responses and a central component of arousal and feeding circuits.

  11. Intermittent fasting attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammation and memory impairment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Systemic bacterial infections often result in enduring cognitive impairment and are a risk factor for dementia. There are currently no effective treatments for infection-induced cognitive impairment. Previous studies have shown that intermittent fasting (IF) can increase the resistance of neurons to injury and disease by stimulating adaptive cellular stress responses. However, the impact of IF on the cognitive sequelae of systemic and brain inflammation is unknown. Methods Rats on IF for 30 days received 1 mg/kg of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline intravenously. Half of the rats were subjected to behavioral tests and the other half were euthanized two hours after LPS administration and the hippocampus was dissected and frozen for analyses. Results Here, we report that IF ameliorates cognitive deficits in a rat model of sepsis by a mechanism involving NF-κB activation, suppression of the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and enhancement of neurotrophic support. Treatment of rats with LPS resulted in deficits in cognitive performance in the Barnes maze and inhibitory avoidance tests, without changing locomotor activity, that were ameliorated in rats that had been maintained on the IF diet. IF also resulted in reduced levels of mRNAs encoding the LPS receptor TLR4 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the hippocampus. Moreover, IF prevented LPS-induced elevation of IL-1α, IL-1β and TNF-α levels, and prevented the LPS-induced reduction of BDNF levels in the hippocampus. IF also significantly attenuated LPS-induced elevations of serum IL-1β, IFN-γ, RANTES, TNF-α and IL-6 levels. Conclusions Taken together, our results suggest that IF induces adaptive responses in the brain and periphery that can suppress inflammation and preserve cognitive function in an animal model of systemic bacterial infection. PMID:24886300

  12. Montelukast attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced cardiac injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Khodir, A E; Ghoneim, H A; Rahim, M A; Suddek, G M

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the possible protective effects of montelukast (MNT) against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cardiac injury, in comparison to dexamethasone (DEX), a standard anti-inflammatory. Male Sprague Dawley rats (160-180 g) were assigned to five groups (n = 8/group): (1) control; (2) LPS (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal (i.p.)); (3) LPS + MNT (10 mg/kg, per os (p.o.)); (4) LPS + MNT (20 mg/kg, p.o.); and (5) LPS + DEX (1 mg/kg, i.p.). Twenty-four hours after LPS injection, heart/body weight (BW) ratio and percent survival of rats were determined. Serum total protein, creatine kinase muscle/brain (CK-MB), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities were measured. Heart samples were taken for histological assessment and for determination of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) contents. Cardiac tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) expression was evaluated immunohistochemically. LPS significantly increased heart/BW ratio, serum CK-MB, ALP, and LDH activities and decreased percent survival and serum total protein levels. MDA content increased in heart tissues with a concomitant reduction in GSH content. Immunohistochemical staining of heart specimens from LPS-treated rats revealed high expression of TNF-α. MNT significantly reduced percent mortality and suppressed the release of inflammatory and oxidative stress markers when compared with LPS group. Additionally, MNT effectively preserved tissue morphology as evidenced by histological evaluation. MNT (20 mg/kg) was more effective in alleviating LPS-induced heart injury when compared with both MNT (10 mg/kg) and DEX (1 mg/kg), as evidenced by decrease in positive staining by TNF-α immunohistochemically, decrease MDA, and increase GSH content in heart tissue. This study demonstrates that MNT might have cardioprotective effects against the inflammatory process during endotoxemia. This effect can be attributed to its antioxidant and/or anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:26089034

  13. Sickness behaviour after lipopolysaccharide treatment in ghrelin deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Szentirmai, Éva; Krueger, James M

    2014-02-01

    Ghrelin is an orexigenic hormone produced mainly by the gastrointestinal system and the brain. Much evidence also indicates a role for ghrelin in sleep and thermoregulation. Further, ghrelin was recently implicated in immune system modulation. Administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces fever, anorexia, and increased non-rapid-eye movement sleep (NREMS) and these actions are mediated primarily by proinflammatory cytokines. Ghrelin reduces LPS-induced fever, suppresses circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines and reduces the severity and mortality of various models of experimental endotoxemia. In the present study, we determined the role of intact ghrelin signaling in LPS-induced sleep, feeding, and thermoregulatory responses in mice. Sleep-wake activity was determined after intraperitoneal, dark onset administration of 0.4, 2 and 10 μg LPS in preproghrelin knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. In addition, body temperature, motor activity and changes in 24-h food intake and body weight were measured. LPS induced dose-dependent increases in NREMS, and suppressed rapid-eye movement sleep, electroencephalographic slow-wave activity, motor activity, food intake and body weight in both Ppg KO and WT mice. Body temperature changes showed a biphasic pattern with a decrease during the dark period followed by an increase in the light phase. The effects of the low and middle doses of LPS were indistinguishable between the two genotypes. Administration of 10 μg LPS, however, induced significantly larger changes in NREMS and wakefulness amounts, body temperature, food intake and body weight in the Ppg KO mice. These findings support a role for ghrelin as an endogenous modulator of inflammatory responses and a central component of arousal and feeding circuits. PMID:24309634

  14. Lactoferrin during lactation reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ginet, Vanessa; van de Looij, Yohan; Petrenko, Volodymyr; Toulotte, Audrey; Kiss, Jozsef; Hüppi, Petra S; Sizonenko, Stéphane V

    2016-05-01

    Lactoferrin (Lf), component of maternal milk, has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties. Neuroprotective effects of Lf on the immature brain have been recently shown in rodent models of intrauterine growth restriction and cerebral hypoxia/ischemia. Here we postulated that Lf could also have beneficial effects on preterm inflammatory brain injury. Lf was supplemented in maternal food during lactation and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was injected in subcortical white matter of rat pups at postnatal day 3 (P3). Effect of maternal Lf supplementation was investigated 24 h (P4), 4 (P7), or 21 days (P24) after LPS injection mainly on the striatum. Lateral ventricle and brain structures volumes were quantified. Microstructure was evaluated by diffusion tensor imaging, neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging as well as electron microscopy. Neurochemical profile was measured by (1) H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy. GFAP protein, proinflammatory cytokines mRNA expression microglial activation were assessed. Lf displayed neuroprotective effects as shown by reduced LPS-induced ventriculomegaly, brain tissue loss, and microstructural modifications, including myelination deficit. (1) H-MRS neurochemical profile was less altered through an antioxidant action of Lf. Despite the lack of effect on LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokines genes expression and on reactive gliosis, microglia was less activated under Lf treatment. In conclusion, Lf supplemented in food during lactation attenuated acute and long-term cerebral LPS-induced alterations. This provides a new evidence for a promising use of Lf as a preventive neuroprotective approach in preterm encephalopathy. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(3):323-336, 2016. PMID:27313089

  15. Lipopolysaccharides as Determinants of Serological Variability in Pseudomonas corrugata

    PubMed Central

    Siverio, F.; Cambra, M.; Gorris, M. T.; Corzo, J.; Lopez, M. M.

    1993-01-01

    The variation in biochemical and serological features of 128 isolates of Pseudomonas corrugata has been studied with 56 isolates from Spain and 72 isolates from other countries. Isolates were analyzed with common diagnostic tests and with the AP150CHE system. Variability among isolates for some standard tests usually listed as positive or negative for this species, such as arginine dihydrolase and gelatin hydrolysis, lipase and lecithinase activities, pigment production, and wrinkled colony morphology, was observed. Three antisera were raised against the type strain and two Spanish isolates from tomato and pepper plants. Serological reactions were studied by indirect immunofluorescence and indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Eighty-three isolates reacted with a single antiserum, 6 reacted with two antisera, and none reacted with three antisera. Thirty-nine isolates did not react with any of the three antisera. These results suggest that serology will not be a useful method for routine diagnosis of P. corrugata unless common antigens can be identified. Electrophoresis and immunoelectrotransfer were used to study the antigens involved. Each antiserum reacted with whole-cell lysates, giving two common bands for P. corrugata isolates and other Pseudomonas species and a ladder-like pattern characteristic of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Common bands were not observed after proteinase K treatment. More than 10 LPS patterns were distinguished in 98 isolates after silver staining of polyacrylamide gels. There was no correlation between the geographical origin or host of the isolates and the LPS patterns. A correlation between LPS groups and serological reaction was observed. Images PMID:16348957

  16. Lumican overexpression exacerbates lipopolysaccharide-induced renal injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Mei; Ma, Ling; Jin, Yu-Nan; Yu, Yan-Qiu

    2015-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of lumican in mice with endotoxin-induced acute renal failure (ARF). Lumican transgenic mice and wild‑type mice were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 10 mg/kg) to establish a model of ARF. The mice were sacrificed at 24 h and the blood and renal tissue samples were collected. The value of serum creatinine (SCr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were measured to determine renal function. An ELISA was used to determined the concentrations of renal cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, interleukin (IL)‑6, IL‑4 and IL‑10. The protein expression levels of Toll-like receptor (TLR4) and nuclear factor (NF)κB in renal tissues were assessed using western blot analysis. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase‑mediated dUTP nick end labeling was performed to monitor apoptosis of renal tissue. Light microscopy and electron microscopy were used to observe structural changes in the renal tissues. Following the administration of LPS, the SCr and BUN values of mice in the lumican transgenic group were higher compared with those in the control group. The expression levels of renal TLR4, NFκB, TNFα, IL‑6, IL‑4 and IL‑10 were upregulated in the lumican transgenic mice compared with those in the wild‑type control group. Apoptosis was detected predominantly on the renal tubule. There was a significant difference in the optical density of apoptotic bodies between the control mice and the lumican transgenic mice. Light and electron microscopy demonstrated more severe renal tissue injury in the lumican transgenic mice compared with that in the control mice. In conclusion, LPS may cause excessive apoptosis in the renal tubular cells via the TLR4 signal transduction pathway, a decrease in the number of renal tubular cells and ARF. Lumican may be important in mice with LPS-induced ARF.

  17. Toxicity and immunogenicity of Neisseria meningitidis lipopolysaccharide incorporated into liposomes.

    PubMed

    Petrov, A B; Semenov, B F; Vartanyan, Y P; Zakirov, M M; Torchilin, V P; Trubetskoy, V S; Koshkina, N V; L'Vov, V L; Verner, I K; Lopyrev, I V

    1992-09-01

    To obtain nontoxic and highly immunogenic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for immunization, we incorporated Neisseria meningitidis LPS into liposomes. Native LPS and its salts were incorporated by the method of dehydration-rehydration of vesicles or prolonged cosonication. The most complete incorporation of LPS into liposomes and a decrease in toxicity were achieved by the method of dehydration-rehydration of vesicles. Three forms of LPS (H+ form, Mg2+ salt, and triethanolamine salt) showed different solubilities in water, the acidic form of LPS, with the most pronounced hydrophobic properties, being capable of practically complete association with liposomal membranes. An evaluation of the activity of liposomal LPS in vitro (by the Limulus amoebocyte test) and in vivo (by monitoring the pyrogenic reaction in rabbits) revealed a decrease in endotoxin activity of up to 1,000-fold. In addition, the pyrogenic activity of liposomal LPS was comparable to that of a meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine. Liposomes had a pronounced adjuvant effect on the immune response to LPS. Thus, the level of anti-LPS plaque-forming cells in the spleens of mice immunized with liposomal LPS was 1 order of magnitude higher and could be observed for a longer time (until day 21, i.e., the term of observation) than in mice immunized with free LPS. The same regularity was revealed in a study done with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This study also established that antibodies induced by immunization belonged to the immunoglobulin M and G classes, which are capable of prolonged circulation. Moreover, liposomal LPS induced a pronounced immune response in CBA/N mice (defective in B lymphocytes of the LyB-5+ subpopulation). The latter results indicate that the immunogenic action of liposomal LPS occurs at an early age.

  18. Toxicity and immunogenicity of Neisseria meningitidis lipopolysaccharide incorporated into liposomes.

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, A B; Semenov, B F; Vartanyan, Y P; Zakirov, M M; Torchilin, V P; Trubetskoy, V S; Koshkina, N V; L'Vov, V L; Verner, I K; Lopyrev, I V

    1992-01-01

    To obtain nontoxic and highly immunogenic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for immunization, we incorporated Neisseria meningitidis LPS into liposomes. Native LPS and its salts were incorporated by the method of dehydration-rehydration of vesicles or prolonged cosonication. The most complete incorporation of LPS into liposomes and a decrease in toxicity were achieved by the method of dehydration-rehydration of vesicles. Three forms of LPS (H+ form, Mg2+ salt, and triethanolamine salt) showed different solubilities in water, the acidic form of LPS, with the most pronounced hydrophobic properties, being capable of practically complete association with liposomal membranes. An evaluation of the activity of liposomal LPS in vitro (by the Limulus amoebocyte test) and in vivo (by monitoring the pyrogenic reaction in rabbits) revealed a decrease in endotoxin activity of up to 1,000-fold. In addition, the pyrogenic activity of liposomal LPS was comparable to that of a meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine. Liposomes had a pronounced adjuvant effect on the immune response to LPS. Thus, the level of anti-LPS plaque-forming cells in the spleens of mice immunized with liposomal LPS was 1 order of magnitude higher and could be observed for a longer time (until day 21, i.e., the term of observation) than in mice immunized with free LPS. The same regularity was revealed in a study done with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This study also established that antibodies induced by immunization belonged to the immunoglobulin M and G classes, which are capable of prolonged circulation. Moreover, liposomal LPS induced a pronounced immune response in CBA/N mice (defective in B lymphocytes of the LyB-5+ subpopulation). The latter results indicate that the immunogenic action of liposomal LPS occurs at an early age. PMID:1500196

  19. Theophylline potentiates lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production in cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Mizue; Takano, Katsura; Kawabe, Kenji; Moriyama, Mitsuaki; Ihara, Hideshi; Nakamura, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    Elucidation of the functions of astrocytes is important for understanding of the pathogenic mechanism of various neurodegenerative diseases. Theophylline is a common drug for bronchial asthma and occasionally develops side-effects, such as acute encephalopathy; although the pathogenic mechanism of the side-effects is unknown. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitricoxide (NO) production is generally used for an index of the activation of astrocyte in vitro. In this study, in order to elucidate the effect of theophylline on the astrocytic functions, we examined the LPS-induced NO production and the expression of iNOS in cultured rat cortex astrocytes.Theophylline alone could not induce the NO production; however, NO production induced by LPS was enhanced by theophylline in a dose-dependent manner; and by isobutylmethylxanthine, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor. The theophylline enhancement of LPS-induced NO production was further increased by dibutyryl cyclic AMP, a membrane-permeable cAMP analog; and by forskolin, an adenylate cyclase activator. When the cells were preincubated with Rp-8-Br-cAMP, an inhibitor of protein kinase A, the theophylline enhancement of LPS-induced NO production was decreased. The extent of iNOS protein expression induced by LPS was also enhanced by theophylline.It is likely that phosphodiesterase inhibition is a major action mechanism for the theophylline enhancement of LPS-induced NO production in astrocytes. Theophylline-induced acute encephalopathy might be due to the hyper-activation of astrocytes via cAMP signaling to produce excess amount of NO.

  20. Beryllium alters lipopolysaccharide-mediated intracellular phosphorylation and cytokine release in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Silva, Shannon; Ganguly, Kumkum; Fresquez, Theresa M; Gupta, Goutam; McCleskey, T Mark; Chaudhary, Anu

    2009-12-01

    Beryllium exposure in susceptible individuals leads to the development of chronic beryllium disease, a lung disorder marked by release of inflammatory cytokine and granuloma formation. We have previously reported that beryllium induces an immune response even in blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals. In this study, we investigate the effects of beryllium on lipopolysaccharide-mediated cytokine release in blood mononuclear and dendritic cells from healthy individuals. We found that in vitro treatment of beryllium sulfate inhibits the secretion of lipopolysaccharide-mediated interleukin 10, while the release of interleukin 1beta is enhanced. In addition, not all lipopolysaccharide-mediated responses are altered, as interleukin 6 release in unaffected upon beryllium treatment. Beryllium sulfate-treated cells show altered phosphotyrosine levels upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Significantly, beryllium inhibits the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transducer 3, induced by lipopolysaccharide. Finally, inhibitors of phosphoinositide-3 kinase mimic the effects of beryllium in inhibition of interleukin 10 release, while they have no effect on interleukin 1beta secretion. This study strongly suggests that prior exposures to beryllium could alter host immune responses to bacterial infections in healthy individuals, by altering intracellular signaling.

  1. Isolation of lipopolysaccharide from the walls of Micropolyspora faeni: chemical composition and serological reactivity.

    PubMed

    Hollingdale, M R

    1975-02-01

    Extraction of mycelium or walls of Micropolyspora faeni with cold or hot aqueous phenol yielded a lipopolysaccharide consisting of lipid A, phosphate, galactose, arabinose, glucose, glucosamine, and a dideoxy sugar. Extraction with trichloroacetic acid (TCA) yielded an incomplete molecule lacking lipid A. Part of an O-chain was secreted into the culture medium. Phenol and TCA extracts gave three lines of precipitation with human serum from cases of farmer's lung disease, and one of these was given by the culture medium polysaccharide. Serologically-reactive sugars were arabinose, galactose and glucose. The lipopolysaccharide fixed on to red cells which agglutinated in the presence of specific antibody and lysed on the addition of complement. The lipopolysaccharide appeared to elicit mainly IgM antibodies in animals, but IgM and IgG antibodies in humans.

  2. Lipopolysaccharide Profiles from Nodules as Markers of Bradyrhizobium Strains Nodulating Wild Legumes

    PubMed Central

    Santamaría, Mónica; Gutiérrez-Navarro, Ángel M.; Corzo, Javier

    1998-01-01

    To develop the use of electrophoretic lipopolysaccharide profiles for Bradyrhizobium strain identification, we studied the feasibility of using electrophoresis of whole legume nodule homogenates to obtain distinctive lipopolysaccharide profiles. The electrophoretic patterns were the same whether we used nodule extracts, bacteroids, or cultured bacteria as samples, and there was no evidence of changes in the ladder-like pattern during the nodulation process. To assess the reliability of using lipopolysaccharide profiling performed with individual nodules for studying the diversity and microdistribution of the rhizobia nodulating wild shrub legumes, we used a population of Adenocarpus foliolosus seedlings. We obtained 75 different profiles from the 147 nodules studied. There was no dominant profile in the sample, and a plant with different nodules generally produced different profiles. Electrophoresis of legume root nodules proved to be a fast and discriminating technique for determining the diversity of a bradyrhizobial population, although it did not allow the genetic relationships among the nodulating strains to be studied. PMID:16349529

  3. Molecular Basis of Lipopolysaccharide Heterogeneity in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Gracjana; Lindner, Buko; Brade, Helmut; Raina, Satish

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometric analyses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from isogenic Escherichia coli strains with nonpolar mutations in the waa locus or overexpression of their cognate genes revealed that waaZ and waaS are the structural genes required for the incorporation of the third 3-deoxy-α-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo) linked to Kdo disaccharide and rhamnose, respectively. The incorporation of rhamnose requires prior sequential incorporation of the Kdo trisaccharide. The minimal in vivo lipid A-anchored core structure Kdo2Hep2Hex2P1 in the LPS from ΔwaaO (lacking α-1,3-glucosyltransferase) could incorporate Kdo3Rha, without the overexpression of the waaZ and waaS genes. Examination of LPS heterogeneity revealed overlapping control by RpoE σ factor, two-component systems (BasS/R and PhoB/R), and ppGpp. Deletion of RpoE-specific anti-σ factor rseA led to near-exclusive incorporation of glycoforms with the third Kdo linked to Kdo disaccharide. This was accompanied by concomitant incorporation of rhamnose, linked to either the terminal third Kdo or to the second Kdo, depending upon the presence or absence of phosphoethanolamine on the second Kdo with truncation of the outer core. This truncation in ΔrseA was ascribed to decreased levels of WaaR glycosyltransferase, which was restored to wild-type levels, including overall LPS composition, upon the introduction of rybB sRNA deletion. Thus, ΔwaaR contained LPS primarily with Kdo3 without any requirement for lipid A modifications. Accumulation of a glycoform with Kdo3 and 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose in lipid A in ΔrseA required ppGpp, being abolished in a Δ(ppGpp0 rseA). Furthermore, Δ(waaZ lpxLMP) synthesizing tetraacylated lipid A exhibited synthetic lethality at 21–23°C pointing to the significance of the incorporation of the third Kdo. PMID:22021036

  4. Moesin Functions as a Lipopolysaccharide Receptor on Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tohme, Ziad N.; Amar, Salomon; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    1999-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]), a glycolipid found in the outer membranes of gram-negative bacteria, induces the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and IL-6 by monocytes/macrophages. The secretion of these biologically active compounds leads to multiple pathological conditions, such as septic shock. There is substantial evidence that chronic exposure to LPS mediates, at least in part, the tissue destruction associated with gram-negative infection. CD14, a 55-kDa protein, has been identified as an LPS receptor. In conjunction with a serum protein, LPS binding protein (LBP), LPS-CD14 interactions mediate many LPS functions in the inflammatory response. However, CD14 lacks a cytoplasmic domain, or any known signal transduction sequence motif, suggesting the existence of another cell surface domain capable of transducing signals. In this paper, we report a second, CD14-independent LPS binding site, which, based on biological activity, appears to be a functional LPS receptor. Cross-linking experiments were performed to identify LPS binding sites. Two molecules were identified: a 55-kDa protein (CD14) and a second, 78-kDa band. Sequencing of the 78-kDa protein by mass spectroscopic analysis revealed 100% homology with moesin (membrane-organizing extension spike protein). Antibody to CD14 induced partial blocking of the LPS response. However, antimoesin monoclonal antibody completely blocked the LPS-induced TNF-α response in human monocytes, without blocking CD14 binding of LPS. Irrelevant isotype controls had no effect. Additional experiments were performed to evaluate the specificity of the antimoesin blocking. Separate experiments evaluated antimoesin effects on monocyte chemotaxis, IL-1 production in response to IL-1 stimulation, and TNF-α secretion in response to Staphylococcus aureus stimulation. Antimoesin blocked only LPS-mediated events. The data suggest that moesin

  5. Lipopolysaccharide Pretreatment Protects from Renal Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Heemann, Uwe; Szabo, Attila; Hamar, Peter; Müller, Veronika; Witzke, Oliver; Lutz, Jens; Philipp, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    In vivo administration of low doses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to rodents can protect these animals from subsequently administrated, usually lethal doses of endotoxin or LPS. In this study we tested the effects of LPS pretreatment on ischemia/reperfusion injury in the kidney. Male C57/B1 mice were pretreated with different doses of LPS or phosphate-buffered saline on days −4 and −3. The right kidney was removed, and the vessels of the left kidney were clamped for 30 or 45 minutes on day 0. Creatinine levels and survival of animals were monitored. To test the involvement of cytokines, additional animals were harvested before (“time 0”) and 15 minutes, 1, 2, 8, and 16 hours after reperfusion for histology, immunohistochemistry, terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated UTP end-labeling assay, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis (including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and interferon (IFN)-γ messenger RNA (mRNA)). In controls, renal ischemia of 30 minutes was nonlethal, whereas 73% of the animals died within 48 ± 18 hours, after 45 minutes of ischemia. All different doses of LPS protected the animals from lethal renal ischemia/reperfusion injury. Starting at similar levels, serum creatinine increased significantly in controls but not in LPS-pretreated animals over time. As early as 2 hours after reperfusion, tubular cell damage was significantly more pronounced in controls than in LPS-treated mice. In controls, tubules deteriorated progressively until 8 hours of reperfusion. At this time, more than 50% of tubular cells were destroyed. This destruction was accompanied by a pronounced leukocytic infiltration, predominantly by macrophages. In contrast, LPS pretreatment prevented the destruction of kidney tissue and infiltration by leukocytes. The terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated UTP end-labeling assay revealed significantly more apoptotic cells in

  6. Human monocyte CD14 is upregulated by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Landmann, R; Knopf, H P; Link, S; Sansano, S; Schumann, R; Zimmerli, W

    1996-01-01

    Membrane CD14 is involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced monocyte activation; it binds LPS, and antibodies against CD14 block the effects of low-dose LPS. It is unknown how LPS regulates its own receptor CD14 in vitro. Therefore, we investigated the effects of LPS on CD14 mRNA and membrane and soluble CD14 (mCD14 and sCD14, respectively) in human monocytes and macrophages. No changes were observed during the first 3 h of LPS stimulation. After 6 to 15 h, LPS weakly reduced CD14 mRNA and mCD14 and transiently enhanced sCD14 release. A 2-day incubation with LPS caused increases in the levels of CD14 mRNA (2-fold), mCD14 (2-fold), sCD14 (1.5-fold), and LPS-fluorescein isothiocyanate binding (1.5-fold); a 5-h incubation with LPS was sufficient to induce the late effects on mCD14 and sCD14. The maximal effect on mCD14 and sCD14 was reached with > or = 1 ng of LPS per ml; the proportional distribution of the two sCD14 isoforms was not modified by LPS. Besides rough and smooth LPS, lipid A, heat-killed Escherichia coli, lipoteichoic acid, and Staphylococcus aureus cell wall extract (10 micrograms/ml) caused similar increases of mCD14. The LPS effect was blocked by polymyxin B but not by anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha, anti-interleukin-6, anti-gamma interferon, and anti-LPS-binding protein. LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha production was abolished after a second 4-h challenge. In contrast, the LPS-induced increases CD14 mRNA, mCD14, and sCD14 were stronger and appeared earlier after a second LPS challenge. In conclusion, CD14 is transcriptionally upregulated by LPS and other bacterial cell wall constituents. PMID:8613389

  7. Modulation of lipopolysaccharide-induced oxidative stress by capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Salam, Omar M E; Abdel-Rahman, Rehab Fawzy; Sleem, Amany A; Farrag, Abdel Razik

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of capsaicin (the active principle of hot red pepper and a sensory excitotoxin) on oxidative stress after systemic administration of the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (100 μg/kg, i.p.) in rats. Capsaicin (15, 150 or 1,500 μg/kg; 10, 100 or 400 μg/mL) was given via intragastric (i.g.) or intraperitoneal (i.p.) routes at time of endotoxin administration. Rats were killed 4 h later. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were measured in brain, liver, and lungs. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), nitric oxide, and glucose were measured in serum. In addition, histopathological examination of liver tissue was performed. In LPS-treated rats, hepatic GSH increased significantly by 40.8% after i.p. capsaicin at 1,500 μg/kg. Liver MDA increased significantly by 32.9% after the administration of i.g. capsaicin at 1,500 μg/kg and by 27.8 and 37.6% after the administration of i.p. capsaicin at 150 and 1,500 μg/kg, respectively. In lung tissue, both MDA and GSH were decreased by capsaicin administration. MDA decreased by 19-20.8% after i.g. capsaicin and by 17.5-23.2% after i.p. capsaicin (150-1,500 μg/kg), respectively. GSH decreased by 39.3-64.3% and by 35.7-41.1% after i.g. or i.p. capsaicin (150-1,500 μg/kg), respectively. Brain GSH increased significantly after the highest dose of i.g. or i.p. capsaicin (by 20.6 and 15.9%, respectively). The increase in serum ALT and ALP after endotoxin administration was decreased by oral or i.p. capsaicin. Serum nitric oxide showed marked increase after LPS injection, but was markedly decreased after capsaicin (1,500 μg/kg, i.p.). Serum glucose increased markedly after the administration of LPS, and was normalized by capsaicin treatment. It is suggested that in the presence of mild systemic inflammation, acute capsaicin administration might alter oxidative status in some tissues and exert an anti-inflammatory effect

  8. Nilotinib ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats

    SciTech Connect

    El-Agamy, Dina S.

    2011-06-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of the new tyrosine kinase inhibitor, nilotinib on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in rats and explore its possible mechanisms. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given nilotinib (10 mg/kg) by oral gavage twice daily for 1 week prior to exposure to aerosolized LPS. At 24 h after LPS exposure, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) samples and lung tissue were collected. The lung wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio, protein level and the number of inflammatory cells in the BALF were determined. Optical microscopy was performed to examine the pathological changes in lungs. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content, superoxidase dismutase (SOD) and reduced glutathione (GSH) activities as well as nitrite/nitrate (NO{sub 2}{sup -}/NO{sub 3}{sup -}) levels were measured in lung tissues. The expression of inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), transforming growth factor-{beta}{sub 1} (TGF-{beta}{sub 1}) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were determined in lung tissues. Treatment with nilotinib prior to LPS exposure significantly attenuated the LPS-induced pulmonary edema, as it significantly decreased lung W/D ratio, protein concentration and the accumulation of the inflammatory cells in the BALF. This was supported by the histopathological examination which revealed marked attenuation of LPS-induced ALI in nilotinib treated rats. In addition, nilotinib significantly increased SOD and GSH activities with significant decrease in MDA content in the lung. Nilotinib also reduced LPS mediated overproduction of pulmonary NO{sub 2}{sup -}/NO{sub 3}{sup -} levels. Importantly, nilotinib caused down-regulation of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-{alpha}, TGF-{beta}{sub 1} and iNOS levels in the lung. Taken together, these results demonstrate the protective effects of nilotinib against the LPS-induced ALI. This effect can be attributed to nilotinib ability to counteract the inflammatory cells

  9. [Chemical composition and immunochemical characteristics of the lipopolysaccharide of nitrogen-fixing rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense CD].

    PubMed

    Konnova, O N; Burygin, G L; Fedonenko, Iu P; Matora, L Iu; Pankin, K E; Konnova, S A; Ignatov, V V

    2006-01-01

    The chemical composition of the lipopolysaccharide of the associative diazotrophic rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense Cd has been studied. Among the main components of the hydrophobic part of the lipopolysaccharide, we identified 3-hydroxytetradecanoic, hexadecenoic, 3-hydroxyhexadecanoic, hexadecanoic, octadecenoic, and nanodecanoic fatty acids; the carbohydrate part contained rhamnose, galactose, and mannose. Polyclonal antibodies against the preparation under study were raised in rabbits. Serological relations between A. brasilense Cd and other strains of Azospirillum spp. were studied using double radial immunodiffusion and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

  10. Structural and functional peculiarities of the lipopolysaccharide of Azospirillum brasilense SR55, isolated from the roots of Triticum durum.

    PubMed

    Boyko, Alevtina S; Konnova, Svetlana A; Fedonenko, Yulia P; Zdorovenko, Evelina L; Smol'kina, Olga N; Kachala, Vadim V; Ignatov, Vladimir V

    2011-10-20

    Azospirillum brasilense SR55, isolated from the rhizosphere of Triticum durum, was classified as serogroup II on the basis of serological tests. Such serogroup affiliation is uncharacteristic of wheat-associated Azospirillum species. The lipid A of A. brasilense SR55 lipopolysaccharide contained 3-hydroxytetradecanoic, 3-hydroxyhexadecanoic, hexadecanoic and octadecenoic fatty acids. The structure of the lipopolysaccharide's O polysaccharide was established, with the branched octasaccharide repeating unit being represented by l-rhamnose, l-3-O-Me-rhamnose, d-galactose and d-glucuronic acid. The SR55 lipopolysaccharide induced deformations of wheat root hairs. The lipopolysaccharide was not involved in bacterial cell aggregation, but its use to pretreat wheat roots was conducive to cell adsorption. This study shows that Azospirillum bacteria can utilise their own lipopolysaccharide as a carbon source, which may give them an advantage in competitive natural environments.

  11. Anti-inflammatory and wound healing potential of citrus auraptene.

    PubMed

    La, Vu Dang; Zhao, Lei; Epifano, Francesco; Genovese, Salvatore; Grenier, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    Auraptene is the most abundant naturally occurring geranyloxycoumarin. It is primarily isolated from plants in the Rutaceae family, many of which, like citrus fruits, are used as food in many countries. Auraptene is a biologically active secondary metabolite with valuable properties. The aim of our study was to identify novel properties of auraptene with potential for managing periodontal diseases, an inflammatory disease of bacterial origin affecting the tissues surrounding and supporting the teeth. In vitro assays showed that auraptene decreased, in a dose-dependent manner, the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase 2 as well as key inflammatory mediators, including interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand-5 secreted by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide-stimulated oral epithelial cells. Using gingival fibroblasts, auraptene showed a significant (P<.05) wound healing effect by its capacity to increase cell migration. In conclusion, auraptene shows promise for promoting wound healing and controlling periodontal diseases through its capacity to interfere with inflammatory mediator secretion.

  12. A natural therapeutic approach for the treatment of periodontitis by MK615.

    PubMed

    Morimoto-Yamashita, Yoko; Kawakami, Yoshiko; Tatsuyama, Syoko; Miyashita, Keiko; Emoto, Makiko; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Kawahara, Ko-ichi; Tokuda, Masayuki

    2015-11-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the tooth-supporting tissues. Gingival fibroblasts are the most abundant cells in periodontal tissues and they participate actively in the host inflammatory response to periodontal pathogens that is known to mediate local tissue destruction in periodontitis. The Japanese apricot, known as Ume in Japanese, has been a traditional Japanese medicine for centuries and is a familiar and commonly consumed food. The health benefits of Ume are widely recognized and have been confirmed in recent studies showing that MK615, an extract of compounds from Ume, has strong anticancer and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the potential role of MK615 in oral health is unknown. We hypothesized that the anti-inflammatory activities of MK615 could be exploited to inhibit the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produced by periodontal bacterial pathogens, such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Here, we show that LPS-induced interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 production by gingival fibroblasts was dose-dependently inhibited by MK615. As a potent inhibitor of the inflammatory responses induced by periodontal pathogens, MK615 merits further testing as a therapeutic agent in inflammatory diseases such as periodontitis. PMID:26305447

  13. High Glucose and Lipopolysaccharide Prime NLRP3 Inflammasome via ROS/TXNIP Pathway in Mesangial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Hong; Gu, Junling; Gou, Fang; Huang, Wei; Gao, Chenlin; Chen, Guo; Long, Yang; Zhou, Xueqin; Yang, Maojun; Liu, Shuang; Lü, Shishi; Luo, Qiaoyan; Xu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    While inflammation is considered a central component in the development in diabetic nephropathy, the mechanism remains unclear. The NLRP3 inflammasome acts as both a sensor and a regulator of the inflammatory response. The NLRP3 inflammasome responds to exogenous and endogenous danger signals, resulting in cleavage of procaspase-1 and activation of cytokines IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-33, ultimately triggering an inflammatory cascade reaction. This study observed the expression of NLRP3 inflammasome signaling stimulated by high glucose, lipopolysaccharide, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibitor N-acetyl-L-cysteine in glomerular mesangial cells, aiming to elucidate the mechanism by which the NLRP3 inflammasome signaling pathway may contribute to diabetic nephropathy. We found that the expression of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP), NLRP3, and IL-1β was observed by immunohistochemistry in vivo. Simultaneously, the mRNA and protein levels of TXNIP, NLRP3, procaspase-1, and IL-1β were significantly induced by high glucose concentration and lipopolysaccharide in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner in vitro. This induction by both high glucose and lipopolysaccharide was significantly inhibited by N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Our results firstly reveal that high glucose and lipopolysaccharide activate ROS/TXNIP/ NLRP3/IL-1β inflammasome signaling in glomerular mesangial cells, suggesting a mechanism by which inflammation may contribute to the development of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26881256

  14. EFFECTS OF CHRONIC EXERCISE CONDITIONING ON THERMAL RESPONSES TO LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE AND TURPENTINE ABSCESS IN FEMALE RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic exercise conditioning has been shown to alter basal thermoregulatory processes as well as the response to inflammatory agents. Two such agents, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and turpentine (TPT) are inducers of fever in rats. LPS, given intraperitoneally (i.p.), involves a sys...

  15. Fatty acid composition of lipopolysaccharides of the strains of different species of Yersinia.

    PubMed

    Frolov, A F; Ruban, N M; Vasyurenko, Z P

    1989-01-01

    The fatty acid composition of lipopolysaccharides of the strains of Y. enterocolitica, Y. intermedia, Y. frederiksenii and Y. ruckeri studied during cultivation on meat-peptone agar is characterized by the predominance of 3-hydroxytetradecanoic and dodecanoic acids. Closely related to the mentioned bacteria is the strain of Y. kristensenii which is distinguished only by its higher level of hexadecanoic acid. The strains of Y. pseudotuberculosis and the vaccine strain of Y. pestis have a uniform fatty acid composition of lipopolysaccharides with predominance of 3-hydroxytetradecanoic acid. Their relatively low level of dodecanoic acid conditions the characteristic fatty acid spectrum of lipopolysaccharides which differs from that of the above mentioned group of Yersinia. The peculiarities of the fatty acid composition of lipopolysaccharides of both groups of Yersinia are preserved during growth on meat-peptone broth, but the increase in the level of hexadecanoic acid balances the differences between Y. kristensenii, the other Y. enterocolitica-like bacteria and Y. ruckeri. The obtained results confirm close relationship of Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. pestis, and also of Y. enterocolitica and Y. enterocolitica-like bacteria, showing propinquity of Y. ruckeri to the latter.

  16. In Utero Exposure to Lipopolysaccharide Alters the Postnatal Acute Phase Response in Beef Heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the potential effect of prenatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure on the postnatal acute phase response (APR) to an LPS challenge in heifers. Pregnant crossbred cows (n = 50) were separated into prenatal immune stimulation (PIS; n = 25; administered 0.1 microgr...

  17. EFFECTS OF DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES ON HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGE RESPONSIVENESS TO LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of diesel exhaust particles on human alveolar macrophage responsiveness to lipopolysaccharide
    S. Mundandhara1 , S. Becker2 and M. Madden2, 1UNC Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, and Lung Biology, 2US EPA, NHEERL, HSD, Chapel Hill, NC, US

    Epidemiological...

  18. Exposure to Lipopolysaccharide in Utero Alters the Postnatal Metabolic Response in Heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the effect of prenatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure on the postnatal metabolic response to an LPS challenge in beef heifers. Pregnant crossbred cows (n = 50) were assigned to a prenatal immune stimulation (PIS; n = 25; administered 0.1 micrograms/kg BW LPS s...

  19. Garlic (Allium sativum) Extracts Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Toll-Like Receptor 4 Dimerization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Garlic has been used as a folk medicine for a long history. Numerous studies demonstrated that garlic extracts and its sulfur-containing compounds inhibit nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) activation induced by various receptor agonist including lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These effects suggest that garl...

  20. In utero exposure to lipopolysaccharide alters the postnatal metabolic response in heifers.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the effect of prenatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure on the postnatal metabolic response to LPS challenge in heifer calves. Pregnant crossbred cows (n=50) were separated into prenatal stress (PNS; n=25; administered 0.1 microgram per kilogram body weight LPS ...

  1. The exposure to lipopolysaccharide in utero alters growth performance of calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the effect of prenatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure on the postnatal growth performance of calves. Pregnant crossbred cows (n=50) were separated into prenatal stress (PNS; n=25; administered 0.1 microgram per kilogram body weight LPS subcutaneously) and sali...

  2. Alpha-lipoic acid protects mitochondrial enzymes and attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced hypothermia in mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Hypothermia is a key symptom of sepsis and the mechanism(s) leading to hypothermia during sepsis is largely unknown. To investigate a potential mechanism and find an effective treatment for hypothermia in sepsis, we induced hypothermia in mice by lipopolysaccharide (LP...

  3. Prenatal transportation alters the metabolic response of Brahman bull calves exposed to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine if prenatal transportation influences the metabolic response to a postnatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pregnant Brahman cows (n=96) matched by age and parity were separated into transported (TRANS; n=48; transported for 2 hours on gestational day 60, 80,...

  4. Effect of Sodium Butyrate on Growth Performance and Response to Lipopolysaccharide in Weanling Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of dietary sodium butyrate on growth performance and response to E. coli. lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in weanling pigs. In the first 28 d experiment, 180 pigs (initial BW 6.3 kg) were fed 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4% sodium butyrate, or 110 mg/kg d...

  5. BRP, a polysaccharide fraction isolated from Boschniakia rossica, protects against galactosamine and lipopolysaccharide induced hepatic failure in mice.

    PubMed

    Quan, Jishu; Jin, Meihua; Xu, Huixian; Qiu, Delai; Yin, Xuezhe

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the hepatoprotective effect of BRP, a polysaccharide fraction isolated from Boschniakia rossica, against galactosamine and lipopolysaccharide induced fulminant hepatic failure. Mice were injected with a single dose of galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide with or without pretreatment of BRP. Results showed marked reduction of hepatic necrosis, serum marker enzymes and levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in BRP pretreated mice when compared with galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide-challenged mice. Mice pretreated with BRP decreased the activation of caspases-3 and caspase-8, and showed a reduced level of DNA fragmentation of liver cells. BRP also reduced hepatic lipid peroxidation, increased potential of hepatic antioxidative defense system, and reduced hepatic nitric oxide level which was elevated by galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide injection. Immunoblot analysis showed down-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 proteins of liver tissues in BRP pretreated group when compared with galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide-challenged group. Furthermore, treatment with galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide markedly increased toll-like receptor 4, nuclear level of nuclear factor-κB, and phosphorylation of both extracellular signal-regulated kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase in liver tissues. However, these increases were attenuated by pretreatment with BRP. The results suggest that BRP alleviates galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury by enhancing antioxidative defense system, suppressing inflammatory responses and reducing apoptotic signaling.

  6. Influence of Core Oligosaccharide of Lipopolysaccharide to Outer Membrane Behavior of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhou; Wang, Jianli; Ren, Ge; Li, Ye; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides, major molecules in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, play important roles on membrane integrity of the cell. However, how the core oligosaccharide of lipopolysaccharide affect the membrane behavior is not well understood. In this study, the relationship between the core oligosaccharide of lipopolysaccharide and the membrane behavior was investigated using a series of Escherichia coli mutants defective in genes to affect the biosynthesis of core oligosaccharide of lipopolysaccharide. Cell surface hydrophobicity, outer membrane permeability, biofilm formation and auto-aggregation of these mutant cells were compared. Compared to the wild type W3110, cell surface hydrophobicities of mutant ΔwaaC, ΔwaaF, ΔwaaG, ΔwaaO, ΔwaaP, ΔwaaY and ΔwaaB were enhanced, outer membrane permeabilities of ΔwaaC, ΔwaaF, ΔwaaG and ΔwaaP were significantly increased, abilities of biofilm formation by ΔwaaC, ΔwaaF, ΔwaaG, ΔwaaO, ΔwaaR, ΔwaaP, ΔwaaQ and ΔwaaY decreased, and auto-aggregation abilities of ΔwaaC, ΔwaaF, ΔwaaG, ΔwaaO, ΔwaaR, ΔwaaU, ΔwaaP and ΔwaaY were strongly enhanced. These results give new insight into the influence of core oligosaccharide of lipopolysaccharide on bacterial cell membrane behavior. PMID:26023839

  7. Methylprednisolone Protects Cardiac Pumping Mechanics from Deteriorating in Lipopolysaccharide-Treated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Ya-Hui; Tsai, Ming-Shian; Chang, Ru-Wen; Chang, Chun-Yi; Wang, Chih-Hsien; Wu, Ming-Shiou; Liang, Jin-Tung; Chang, Kuo-Chu

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that a prolonged low-dose corticosteroid treatment attenuates the severity of inflammation and the intensity and duration of organ system failure. In the present study, we determined whether low-dose methylprednisolone (a synthetic glucocorticoid) can protect male Wistar rats against cardiac pumping defects caused by lipopolysaccharide-induced chronic inflammation. For the induction of chronic inflammation, a slow-release ALZET osmotic pump was subcutaneously implanted to infuse lipopolysaccharide (1 mg kg−1 d−1) for 2 weeks. The lipopolysaccharide-challenged rats were treated on a daily basis with intraperitoneal injection of methylprednisolone (5 mg kg−1 d−1) for 2 weeks. Under conditions of anesthesia and open chest, we recorded left ventricular (LV) pressure and ascending aortic flow signals to calculate the maximal systolic elastance (Emax) and the theoretical maximum flow (Qmax), using the elastance-resistance model. Physically, Emax reflects the contractility of the myocardium as an intact heart, whereas Qmax has an inverse relationship with the LV internal resistance. Compared with the sham rats, the cardiodynamic condition was characterized by a decline in Emax associated with the increased Qmax in the lipopolysaccharide-treated rats. Methylprednisolone therapy increased Emax, which suggests that the drug may have protected the contractile status from deteriorating in the inflamed heart. By contrast, methylprednisolone therapy considerably reduced Qmax, indicating that the drug may have normalized the LV internal resistance. In parallel, the benefits of methylprednisolone on the LV systolic pumping mechanics were associated with the reduced cardiac levels of negative inotropic molecules such as peroxynitrite, malondialdehyde, and high-mobility group box 1 protein. Based on these data, we suggested that low-dose methylprednisolone might prevent lipopolysaccharide-induced decline in cardiac intrinsic contractility and LV internal

  8. Protective effect of mangiferin against lipopolysaccharide-induced depressive and anxiety-like behaviour in mice.

    PubMed

    Jangra, Ashok; Lukhi, Manish M; Sulakhiya, Kunjbihari; Baruah, Chandana C; Lahkar, Mangala

    2014-10-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that inflammation, oxidative stress and altered level of neurotrophins are involved in the pathogenesis of depressive illness. Mangiferin, a C-glucosylxanthone is abundant in the stem and bark of Mangifera indica L. The compound has been shown to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. The present study was performed to investigate the effect of mangiferin pretreatment on lipopolysaccharide-induced increased proinflammatory cytokines, oxidative stress and neurobehavioural abnormalities. Mice were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (0.83 mg/kg, i.p.) after 14 days of mangiferin (20 and 40 mg/kg, p.o.) pretreatment. Mangiferin pretreatment significantly ameliorated the anxiety-like behaviour as evident from the results of an elevated plus maze, light-dark box and open field test. Mangiferin pretreatment also improved the anhedonic behaviour as revealed by sucrose preference test and increased social interaction time. It also prevented the lipopolysaccharide-evoked depressive-like effect by reducing the immobility time in forced swim and tail suspension test. Lipopolysaccharide-induced elevated oxidative stress was decreased with mangiferin pretreatment due to its potential to increase reduced glutathione concentration, Superoxide dismutase and catalase activity and decrease lipid peroxidation and nitrite level in the hippocampus as well as in the prefrontal cortex. Mangiferin pretreatment also attenuated neuroinflammation by reducing the interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) level in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that mangiferin possessed antidepressant and anti-anxiety properties due to its ability to attenuate IL-1β level and oxidative stress evoked by intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide. Mangiferin may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of depressive and anxiety illness. PMID:25064341

  9. Protective effect of mangiferin against lipopolysaccharide-induced depressive and anxiety-like behaviour in mice.

    PubMed

    Jangra, Ashok; Lukhi, Manish M; Sulakhiya, Kunjbihari; Baruah, Chandana C; Lahkar, Mangala

    2014-10-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that inflammation, oxidative stress and altered level of neurotrophins are involved in the pathogenesis of depressive illness. Mangiferin, a C-glucosylxanthone is abundant in the stem and bark of Mangifera indica L. The compound has been shown to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. The present study was performed to investigate the effect of mangiferin pretreatment on lipopolysaccharide-induced increased proinflammatory cytokines, oxidative stress and neurobehavioural abnormalities. Mice were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (0.83 mg/kg, i.p.) after 14 days of mangiferin (20 and 40 mg/kg, p.o.) pretreatment. Mangiferin pretreatment significantly ameliorated the anxiety-like behaviour as evident from the results of an elevated plus maze, light-dark box and open field test. Mangiferin pretreatment also improved the anhedonic behaviour as revealed by sucrose preference test and increased social interaction time. It also prevented the lipopolysaccharide-evoked depressive-like effect by reducing the immobility time in forced swim and tail suspension test. Lipopolysaccharide-induced elevated oxidative stress was decreased with mangiferin pretreatment due to its potential to increase reduced glutathione concentration, Superoxide dismutase and catalase activity and decrease lipid peroxidation and nitrite level in the hippocampus as well as in the prefrontal cortex. Mangiferin pretreatment also attenuated neuroinflammation by reducing the interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) level in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that mangiferin possessed antidepressant and anti-anxiety properties due to its ability to attenuate IL-1β level and oxidative stress evoked by intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide. Mangiferin may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of depressive and anxiety illness.

  10. Quercetin inhibits inflammatory bone resorption in a mouse periodontitis model.

    PubMed

    Napimoga, Marcelo H; Clemente-Napimoga, Juliana T; Macedo, Cristina G; Freitas, Fabiana F; Stipp, Rafael N; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2013-12-27

    Periodontitis is a disease that leads to bone destruction and represents the main cause of tooth loss in adults. The development of aggressive periodontitis has been associated with increased inflammatory response that is induced by the presence of a subgingival biofilm containing Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. The flavonoid quercetin (1) is widespread in vegetables and fruits and exhibits many biological properties for possible medical and clinical applications such as its anti-inflamatory and antioxidant effects. Thus, in the present study, the properties of 1 have been evaluated in bone loss and inflammation using a mouse periodontitis model induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans infection. Subcutaneous treatment with 1 reduced A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced bone loss and IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-17, RANKL, and ICAM-1 production in the gingival tissue without affecting bacterial counts. These results demonstrated that quercetin exhibits protective effects in A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced periodontitis in mice by modulating cytokine and ICAM-1 production.

  11. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on the physical conformation of the erythrocyte cytoskeletal proteins.

    PubMed

    Bellary, S S; Anderson, K W; Arden, W A; Butterfield, D A

    1995-01-01

    Red blood cell deformability is important for effective circulation in the capillaries. It is known that red cell deformability is significantly reduced during septic shock. Surface to volume ratio, physical effects of the cytoskeletal proteins and the fluidity of lipid bilayer are some of the important intrinsic factors that regulate this mechanical function. Alterations in the physical conformation of cytoskeletal proteins in septic conditions could significantly alter their function. In this study, erythrocytes in whole blood were treated with lipopolysaccharide, the outer covering of Gram-negative bacteria released during Gram-negative sepsis. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in conjunction with a protein-specific maleimide nitroxide spin label covalently bound to cytoskeletal proteins was used to investigate the resulting changes occurring in the physical state of cytoskeletal proteins in isolated membranes. Treatment of red blood cells with a lipopolysaccharide concentration as low as 40 micrograms/mL of blood solution for 90 minutes showed a significant decrease in the relevant EPR parameter (p < 0.01) of the spin label bound to subsequently isolated membranes, suggestive of a decreased segmental motion of the spin label and an increase in cytoskeletal protein-protein interactions. These results suggest a marked conformational alteration in the cytoskeletal proteins induced by the lipopolysaccharide and may explain, in part, the marked reduction in red blood cell deformability during septic shock. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide does not exert most of its effects on the host directly, but rather elicits the production of host factors that leads to complex septic shock. Leukocytes, endothelial tissue and many other cells release these mediators. Leukocytes are thought to be a particularly important source of such mediators, including cytokines (tumor necrosis factor, interleukins, etc.), oxygen free radicals, proteases, and hydrolyses. In order to

  12. The effect of lipopolysaccharide-induced obesity and its chronic inflammation on influenza virus-related pathology.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sun-Young; Sohn, Sung-Hwa; Lee, Sang-Yeon; Park, Hye-Lim; Park, Yong-Wook; Kim, Hun; Nam, Jae-Hwan

    2015-11-01

    Obese individuals show increased susceptibility to infection, low vaccine efficacy, and worse pathophysiology. However, it is unclear how obesity affects these events. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of obesity-triggered chronic inflammation on immune cells after influenza virus infection. Control and lipopolysaccharide mice, in which an osmotic pump continually released Tween saline or lipopolysaccharide, were prepared and 3 weeks later were infected with pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza A virus. In lipopolysaccharide mice, we found a reduction in macrophage activation markers in the steady state, and reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6, in restimulated peritoneal macrophages. Interestingly, lipopolysaccharide-triggered chronic inflammation exacerbated the severity of pathological symptoms in the lungs after challenge with influenza virus. Taken together, the increased severity of virus-induced symptoms in obese individuals with chronic inflammation may be, at least partially, caused by macrophage dysfunction.

  13. Interaction of lipopolysaccharide with detergents and its possible role in the detergent resistance of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nixdorff, K; Gmeiner, J; Martin, H H

    1978-06-16

    In the presence of MgCl2, amounts of detergents which disrupted phospholipid vesicles caused lipopolysaccharide I from Proteus mirabilis to aggregate and form vesicular, membrane-like structures. Vesicle formation with P. mirabilis lipopolysaccharide II containing longer O-polysaccharide chains was extremely poor. Lipopolysaccharides of Salmonella minnesota R mutants (chemotypes Ra, Rc and Re) displayed a growing tendency for vesicle formation with increasing deficiency of the R core polysaccharide. Lipopolysaccharides of chemotypes Rc and Re produced vesicles even in the absence of MgCl2 and detergent. Spherical aggregates consisting of P. mirabilis lipopolysaccharide I MgCl2 and detergent were unable to either entrap or retain [14C]-sucrose, [3H=inulin or [3H]dextran. On the other hand, S. minnesota R mutant lipopolysaccharides of chemotypes Rc and Re could entrap all three saccharides and retain them for at least short periods of time. Leakage of [3H]-inulin out of re-lipopolysaccharide vesicles was greatly retarded by addition of MgCl2 to the vesicle system. Incorporation of P. mirabilis lipopolysaccharide I or S. minnesota Rc lipopolysaccharide into phospholipid vesicles protected these model membranes from disruption by detergent. This suggested a similar protective function of lipopolysaccharide in the outer membrane of enteric bacteria against the action of surfactants occurring in their normal intestinal habitat.

  14. Activity of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein-bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein fusion peptide in an experimental model of Pseudomonas sepsis.

    PubMed Central

    Opal, S M; Palardy, J E; Jhung, J W; Donsky, C; Romulo, R L; Parejo, N; Marra, M N

    1995-01-01

    A chimeric protein consisting of the N-terminal domain of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein and the C-terminal domain of bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein demonstrated a dose-dependent survival benefit (P = 0.001) and reduced endotoxin levels (P < 0.01) in neutropenic rats with Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis. This lipopolysaccharide-binding protein-bactericidal/ permeability-increasing peptide has favorable pharmacokinetics and antiendotoxin properties which may be of value for human sepsis. PMID:8593028

  15. Structural studies of the O-specific polysaccharide(s) from the lipopolysaccharide of Azospirillum brasilense type strain Sp7.

    PubMed

    Sigida, Elena N; Fedonenko, Yuliya P; Shashkov, Alexander S; Zdorovenko, Evelina L; Konnova, Svetlana A; Ignatov, Vladimir V; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2013-10-18

    Lipopolysaccharide was obtained by phenol-water extraction from dried bacterial cells of Azospirillum brasilense type strain Sp7. Mild acid hydrolysis of the lipopolysaccharide followed by GPC on Sephadex G-50 resulted in a polysaccharide mixture, which was studied by composition and methylation analyses, Smith degradation and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The following polysaccharide structures were established, where italics indicate a non-stoichiometric (∼40%) 2-O-methylation of l-rhamnose.

  16. Lipopolysaccharide structure and serum sensitivity of non-serogroupable Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, C C; Winstanley, F P; Weir, D M; Kinane, D F

    1987-09-01

    Bactericidal activities of normal human serum for non-serogroupable strains of Neisseria meningitidis were determined. In similar experiments with isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae from localized infections, strains with group I lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were uniformly serum resistant and those with group II were serum sensitive. We found no similar association between serum sensitivity of the meningococcal strains and their lipopolysaccharide groups determined by the same pyocin typing system used to classify the gonococcal isolates. Immune mouse sera raised against non-serogroupable meningococci of either LPS group I or II were bactericidal for non-serogroupable strains of the same LPS group and also cross-reactive for strains of the opposite group. They were not bactericidal for the majority (13/17) of the serogroupable strains tested. These findings suggest there are antigens, in addition to the LPS and capsules, that elicit some of the "natural" bactericidal antibodies to pathogenic meningococci.

  17. Lipopolysaccharide and Interleukin 1 Augment the Effects of Hypoxia and Inflammation in Human Pulmonary Arterial Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziesche, Rolf; Petkov, Venzeslav; Williams, John; Zakeri, Schaker M.; Mosgoller, Wilhelm; Knofler, Martin; Block, Lutz H.

    1996-10-01

    The combined effects of hypoxia and interleukin 1, lipopolysaccharide, or tumor necrosis factor α on the expression of genes encoding endothelial constitutive and inducible nitric oxide synthases, endothelin 1, interleukin 6, and interleukin 8 were investigated in human primary pulmonary endothelial cells and whole pulmonary artery organoid cultures. Hypoxia decreased the expression of constitutive endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS-3) mRNA and NOS-3 protein as compared with normoxic conditions. The inhibition of expression of NOS-3 corresponded with a reduced production of NO. A combination of hypoxia with bacterial lipopolysaccharide, interleukin 1β , or tumor necrosis factor α augmented both effects. In contrast, the combination of hypoxia and the inflammatory mediators superinduced the expression of endothelin 1, interleukin 6, and interleukin 8. Here, we have shown that inflammatory mediators aggravate the effect of hypoxia on the down-regulation of NOS-3 and increase the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in human pulmonary endothelial cells and whole pulmonary artery organoid cultures.

  18. Bacterial phagocytosis by macrophages from lipopolysaccharide responder and nonresponder mouse strains.

    PubMed Central

    Cuffini, A; Carlone, N A; Forni, G

    1980-01-01

    The phagocytic capacity of macrophages from C3H/H3J mice was assessed against lipopolysaccharide-producing (Escherichia coli) and -nonproducing (Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria. Despite their gene-coded unresponsiveness to lipopolysaccharide endotoxin and lymphokines and their defective tumoricidal activity, proteose peptone-induced C3H/HeJ macrophages did not display a defective phagocytic capacity, but rather displayed an enhanced phagocytosis of both bacterial strains compared with macrophages from closely related C3H/HeN mice. Unstimulated peritoneal resident C3H/HeJ macrophages, on the other hand, displayed a normal phagocytic activity toward E. coli and enhanced phagocytosis toward S. aureus. PMID:6995321

  19. Lipopolysaccharide transport to the cell surface: periplasmic transport and assembly into the outer membrane.

    PubMed

    May, Janine M; Sherman, David J; Simpson, Brent W; Ruiz, Natividad; Kahne, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Gram-negative bacteria possess an outer membrane (OM) containing lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Proper assembly of the OM not only prevents certain antibiotics from entering the cell, but also allows others to be pumped out. To assemble this barrier, the seven-protein lipopolysaccharide transport (Lpt) system extracts LPS from the outer leaflet of the inner membrane (IM), transports it across the periplasm and inserts it selectively into the outer leaflet of the OM. As LPS is important, if not essential, in most Gram-negative bacteria, the LPS biosynthesis and biogenesis pathways are attractive targets in the development of new classes of antibiotics. The accompanying paper (Simpson BW, May JM, Sherman DJ, Kahne D, Ruiz N. 2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 370, 20150029. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2015.0029)) reviewed the biosynthesis of LPS and its extraction from the IM. This paper will trace its journey across the periplasm and insertion into the OM.

  20. Transcriptional Activation of Mucin by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lipopolysaccharide in the Pathogenesis of Cystic Fibrosis Lung Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Dong; Dohrman, Austin F.; Gallup, Marianne; Miyata, Susumu; Gum, James R.; Kim, Young S.; Nadel, Jay A.; Prince, Alice; Basbaum, Carol B.

    1997-02-01

    An unresolved question in cystic fibrosis (CF) research is how mutations of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator, a CI ion channel, cause airway mucus obstruction leading to fatal lung disease. Recent evidence has linked the CF transmembrane conductance regulator mutation to the onset and persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in the airways, and here we provide evidence directly linking P. aeruginosa infection to mucus overproduction. We show that P. aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide profoundly upregulates transcription of the mucin gene MUC 2 in epithelial cells via inducible enhancer elements and that this effect is blocked by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and tyrphostin AG 126. These findings improve our understanding of CF pathogenesis and suggest that the attenuation of mucin production by lipopolysaccharide antagonists and tyrosine kinase inhibitors could reduce morbidity and mortality in this disease.

  1. Lipopolysaccharide transport to the cell surface: periplasmic transport and assembly into the outer membrane

    PubMed Central

    May, Janine M.; Sherman, David J.; Simpson, Brent W.; Ruiz, Natividad; Kahne, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria possess an outer membrane (OM) containing lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Proper assembly of the OM not only prevents certain antibiotics from entering the cell, but also allows others to be pumped out. To assemble this barrier, the seven-protein lipopolysaccharide transport (Lpt) system extracts LPS from the outer leaflet of the inner membrane (IM), transports it across the periplasm and inserts it selectively into the outer leaflet of the OM. As LPS is important, if not essential, in most Gram-negative bacteria, the LPS biosynthesis and biogenesis pathways are attractive targets in the development of new classes of antibiotics. The accompanying paper (Simpson BW, May JM, Sherman DJ, Kahne D, Ruiz N. 2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 370, 20150029. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2015.0029)) reviewed the biosynthesis of LPS and its extraction from the IM. This paper will trace its journey across the periplasm and insertion into the OM. PMID:26370939

  2. The Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Model of Azithromycin for Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Depressive-Like Behavior in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Kun; Qi, Qu; Hao, Haiping; Wang, Guangji; Chen, Yuancheng; Liang, Yan; Xie, Lin

    2013-01-01

    A mechanism-based model was developed to describe the time course of lipopolysaccharide-induced depressive-like behavior and azithromycin pharmacodynamics in mice. The lipopolysaccharide-induced disease progression was monitored by lipopolysaccharide, proinflammatory cytokines, and kynrenine concentration in plasma. The depressive-like behavior was investigated by forced swimming test and tail suspension test. Azithromycin was selected to inhibit the surge of proinflammatory cytokines induced by lipopolysaccharide. Disease progression model and azithromycin pharmacodynamics were constructed from transduction and indirect response models. A delay in the onset of increased proinflammatory cytokines, kynrenine, and behavior test compared to lipopolysaccharide was successfully characterized by series transduction models. The inhibition of azithromycin on proinflammatory cytokines was described by an indirect response model. After lipopolysaccharide challenging, the proinflammatory cytokines, kynrenine and behavior tests would peak approximately at 3, 12, and 24 h respectively, and then the time courses slowly declined toward a baseline state after peak response. During azithromycin administration, the peak levels of proinflammatory cytokines, kynrenine and behavior indexes decreased. Model parameters indicated that azithromycin significantly inhibited the proinflammatory cytokines level in plasma and improved the depressive-like behavior induced by inflammation. The integrated model for disease progression and drug intervention captures turnovers of proinflammatory cytokines, kynrenine and the behavior results in the different time phases and conditions. PMID:23358536

  3. Transport of lipopolysaccharide across the cell envelope: the long road of discovery.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Natividad; Kahne, Daniel; Silhavy, Thomas J

    2009-09-01

    Intracellular lipid transport is poorly understood. Genetic studies to identify lipid-transport factors are complicated by the essentiality of many lipids, whereas biochemical and cell biology approaches aiming to determine localization and mechanisms of lipid transport are often challenged by the lack of adequate technology. Here, we review the epic history of how different approaches, technological advances and ingenuity contributed to the recent discovery of a multi-protein pathway that transports lipopolysaccharide across the envelope of Gram-negative bacteria.

  4. Structural investigation of the lipopolysaccharide O-chain isolated from Burkholderia fungorum strain DSM 17061.

    PubMed

    De Felice, Antonia; Di Lorenzo, Flaviana; Scherlach, Kirstin; Ross, Claudia; Silipo, Alba; Hertweck, Christian; Molinaro, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    Gram-negative bacteria exhibit lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) on their outer membrane surface. LPS is considered one of the most potent bacterial virulence factors. Here we report the elucidation of the LPS O-chain structure isolated from Burkholderia fungorum, a bacterium isolated from the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium that can act as a pathogen for plants and domesticated animals. The structure was determined by the employment of detailed chemical and NMR spectroscopy analyses as the following.

  5. OpsX from Haemophilus influenzae Represents a Novel Type of Heptosyltransferase I in Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gronow, Sabine; Brabetz, Werner; Lindner, Buko; Brade, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    The inner core region of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Haemophilus influenzae is characterized by the presence of a phosphorylated 3-deoxy-α-d-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo). In this study, we show that the heptosyltransferase I adding the first l-glycero-d-manno-heptose residue to this acceptor is encoded by the gene opsX, which differs in substrate specificity from the other heptosyltransferase I, known as WaaC. PMID:16109967

  6. The structure of the Morganella morganii lipopolysaccharide core region and identification of its genomic loci.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Evgeny; Nash, John H E; Foote, Simon; Young, N Martin

    2015-01-30

    The core region of the lipopolysaccharide of Morganella morganii serotype O:1ab was obtained by hydrolysis of the LPS and studied by 2D NMR, ESI MS, and chemical methods. Its structure was highly homologous to those from the two major members of the same Proteeae tribe, Proteus mirabilis and Providencia alcalifaciens, and analysis of the M. morganii genome disclosed that the loci for its outer core, lipid A and Ara4N moieties are similarly conserved.

  7. Tiratricol neutralizes bacterial endotoxins and reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-alpha production in the cell.

    PubMed

    Cascales, Laura; Mas-Moruno, Carlos; Tamborero, Silvia; Aceña, José Luis; Sanz-Cervera, Juan F; Fustero, Santos; Cruz, Luis J; Mora, Puig; Albericio, Fernando; Pérez-Payá, Enrique

    2008-10-01

    The screening of a commercially available library of compounds has proved a successful strategy for the identification of a lead compound in a drug discovery programme. Here, we analysed 880 off-patent drugs, which initially comprised the Prestwick Chemical library, as sources of bacterial endotoxin neutralizers. We identified 3,3',5-triiodo-thyroacetic acid (tiratricol) as a non-antibacterial compound that neutralizes the toxic lipopolysaccharide. PMID:18844678

  8. Dimethyl sulfoxide modulates NF-kappa B and cytokine activation in lipopolysaccharide-treated murine macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, K A; Hill, M R; Youkhana, K; Wanker, F; Gimble, J M

    1994-01-01

    Antioxidants are protective against septic shock in animal models. Recently, free radical scavengers have been found to inhibit the activation of the NF-kappa B protein in a number of cell lines. This transcriptional regulatory protein binds to the promoters of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-6, and the macrophage inflammatory proteins. The current work examined lipopolysaccharide-induced NF-kappa B activation in the J774 macrophage-like cell line and primary peritoneal macrophages from lipopolysaccharide-responsive (C3HeB/Fej) and -nonresponsive (C3H/HeJ) murine strains. The DNA-binding activity of the NF-kappa B protein directly correlated with mRNA expression for the genes encoding the proinflammatory cytokines and the free radical scavenging enzyme, superoxide dismutase. Both the p50 and p65 NF-kappa B subunits were detected on gel supershift assays. Minimal NF-kappa B activity was observed following exposure of C3H/HeJ macrophages to lipopolysaccharide. The antioxidant dimethyl sulfoxide decreased the level of NF-kappa B activation in the J774 cells. This correlated with decreased expression of cytokine mRNAs and tumor necrosis factor bioactivity. These results suggest that modulation of NF-kappa B activation may provide a mechanism through which antioxidants protect against endotoxemia in murine models. Images PMID:8039880

  9. Effect of Capparis spinosa Linn. extract on lipopolysaccharide-induced cognitive impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Goel, Ashish; Digvijaya; Garg, Arun; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-02-01

    Cognitive disorders in mankind are not uncommon. Apart from neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's (AD), various stresses also affect cognitive functions. Plants are known to be potential source of compounds that ameliorate several diseases including cognitive impairment. Here, we evaluated effect of aqueous extract of caper (Capparis spinosa) buds on lipopolysaccharide-induced cognitive impairment in rats using two different oral doses i.e. 10 (pre-treatment) and 30 mg/rat(post-treatment) through assessment of behavioural (Morris Water maze test and Y maze test), biochemical (Cholinesterase assay) and histopathological (H&E staining) parameters. Lipopolysaccharide (from E. coli) administration resulted in an increased neurodegeneration and time taken to reach the platform (in Morris water maze). The increased neurodegeneration in CA1 region of hippocampus was significantly reduced in animals which received caper bud extract; they showed marked reduction in time taken to reach the platform at both the dose levels. The experiment demonstrated that caper bud extract exhibits potential protective effect against learning and memory damage induced by chronic administration of lipopolysaccharide (175 μg/kg) for 7 days. The results suggest that the caper bud extract could be explored for its use in the treatment of cognitive disorders.

  10. Sirtuin inhibition attenuates the production of inflammatory cytokines in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, Claudia A.; Fievez, Laurence; Neyrinck, Audrey M.; Delzenne, Nathalie M.; Bureau, Fabrice; Vanbever, Rita

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages were treated with cambinol and sirtinol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cambinol and sirtinol decreased lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cambinol decreased NF-{kappa}B activity but had no impact on p38 MAPK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sirtuins are an interesting target for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. -- Abstract: In several inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis or sepsis, the regulatory mechanisms of inflammation are inefficient and the excessive inflammatory response leads to damage to the host. Sirtuins are class III histone deacetylases that modulate the activity of several transcription factors that are implicated in immune responses. In this study, we evaluated the impact of sirtuin inhibition on the activation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated J774 macrophages by assessing the production of inflammatory cytokines. The pharmacologic inhibition of sirtuins decreased the production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) interleukin 6 (IL-6) and Rantes. The reduction of cytokine production was associated with decreased nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activity and inhibitor kappa B alpha (I{kappa}B{alpha}) phosphorylation while no impact was observed on the phosphorylation status of p38 mitogen-activated kinase (p38 MAPK). This work shows that sirtuin pharmacologic inhibitors are a promising tool for the treatment of inflammatory conditions.

  11. Structure and heterogeneity of the O-antigen chain of Salmonella Agona lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Szafranek, Janusz; Kumirska, Jolanta; Czerwicka, Małgorzata; Kunikowska, Danuta; Dziadziuszko, Halina; Głośnicka, Renata

    2006-11-01

    Lipopolysaccharide of Salmonella Agona smooth-type cells was obtained from bacteria by a hot phenol-water extraction procedure. Mild acid hydrolysis of lipopolysaccharide, followed by gel filtration, yielded the pure O-polysaccharide. Abequose, rhamnose, mannose, galactose and glucose in the molar ratio 0.8 : 1.0 : 1.0 : 1.1 : 0.5 were detected, and their linkages were established. Sugar configurations were determined by gas chromatography. Two repeating units, namely -->2)-[alpha-Abep-(1-->3)-]-alpha-d-Manp-(1-->4)-alpha-l-Rhap-(1-->3)-alpha-d-Galp-(1-->and -->2)-[alpha-Abep-(1-->3)-]-alpha-d-Manp-(1-->4)-alpha-l-Rhap-(1-->3)-[alpha-d-Glcp-(1-->4)-]-alpha-d-Galp-(1-->, were deduced from nuclear magnetic resonance studies. The effort to separate them was unsuccessful. An immunochemical test performed by means of Western blotting with anti O12 serum demonstrated that glucose was present in the longer lipopolysaccharide chains, at some distance from the core region.

  12. Effect of Capparis spinosa Linn. extract on lipopolysaccharide-induced cognitive impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Goel, Ashish; Digvijaya; Garg, Arun; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-02-01

    Cognitive disorders in mankind are not uncommon. Apart from neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's (AD), various stresses also affect cognitive functions. Plants are known to be potential source of compounds that ameliorate several diseases including cognitive impairment. Here, we evaluated effect of aqueous extract of caper (Capparis spinosa) buds on lipopolysaccharide-induced cognitive impairment in rats using two different oral doses i.e. 10 (pre-treatment) and 30 mg/rat(post-treatment) through assessment of behavioural (Morris Water maze test and Y maze test), biochemical (Cholinesterase assay) and histopathological (H&E staining) parameters. Lipopolysaccharide (from E. coli) administration resulted in an increased neurodegeneration and time taken to reach the platform (in Morris water maze). The increased neurodegeneration in CA1 region of hippocampus was significantly reduced in animals which received caper bud extract; they showed marked reduction in time taken to reach the platform at both the dose levels. The experiment demonstrated that caper bud extract exhibits potential protective effect against learning and memory damage induced by chronic administration of lipopolysaccharide (175 μg/kg) for 7 days. The results suggest that the caper bud extract could be explored for its use in the treatment of cognitive disorders. PMID:26934780

  13. The N-terminal Arg residue is essential for autocatalytic activation of a lipopolysaccharide-responsive protease zymogen.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Shiga, Takafumi; Shibata, Toshio; Sako, Miyuki; Maenaka, Katsumi; Koshiba, Takumi; Mizumura, Hikaru; Oda, Toshio; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2014-09-12

    Factor C, a serine protease zymogen involved in innate immune responses in horseshoe crabs, is known to be autocatalytically activated on the surface of bacterial lipopolysaccharides, but the molecular mechanism of this activation remains unknown. In this study, we show that wild-type factor C expressed in HEK293S cells exhibits a lipopolysaccharide-induced activity equivalent to that of native factor C. Analysis of the N-terminal addition, deletion, or substitution mutants shows that the N-terminal Arg residue and the distance between the N terminus and the tripartite of lipopolysaccharide-binding site are essential factors for autocatalytic activation, and that the positive charge of the N terminus may interact with an acidic amino acid(s) of the molecule to convert the zymogen into an active form. Chemical cross-linking experiments indicate that the N terminus is required to form a complex of the factor C molecules in a sufficiently close vicinity to be chemically cross-linked on the surface of lipopolysaccharides. We propose a molecular mechanism of the autocatalytic activation of the protease zymogen on lipopolysaccharides functioning as a platform to induce specific protein-protein interaction between the factor C molecules. PMID:25077965

  14. The N-terminal Arg Residue Is Essential for Autocatalytic Activation of a Lipopolysaccharide-responsive Protease Zymogen*

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Shiga, Takafumi; Shibata, Toshio; Sako, Miyuki; Maenaka, Katsumi; Koshiba, Takumi; Mizumura, Hikaru; Oda, Toshio; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Factor C, a serine protease zymogen involved in innate immune responses in horseshoe crabs, is known to be autocatalytically activated on the surface of bacterial lipopolysaccharides, but the molecular mechanism of this activation remains unknown. In this study, we show that wild-type factor C expressed in HEK293S cells exhibits a lipopolysaccharide-induced activity equivalent to that of native factor C. Analysis of the N-terminal addition, deletion, or substitution mutants shows that the N-terminal Arg residue and the distance between the N terminus and the tripartite of lipopolysaccharide-binding site are essential factors for autocatalytic activation, and that the positive charge of the N terminus may interact with an acidic amino acid(s) of the molecule to convert the zymogen into an active form. Chemical cross-linking experiments indicate that the N terminus is required to form a complex of the factor C molecules in a sufficiently close vicinity to be chemically cross-linked on the surface of lipopolysaccharides. We propose a molecular mechanism of the autocatalytic activation of the protease zymogen on lipopolysaccharides functioning as a platform to induce specific protein-protein interaction between the factor C molecules. PMID:25077965

  15. The N-terminal Arg residue is essential for autocatalytic activation of a lipopolysaccharide-responsive protease zymogen.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Shiga, Takafumi; Shibata, Toshio; Sako, Miyuki; Maenaka, Katsumi; Koshiba, Takumi; Mizumura, Hikaru; Oda, Toshio; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2014-09-12

    Factor C, a serine protease zymogen involved in innate immune responses in horseshoe crabs, is known to be autocatalytically activated on the surface of bacterial lipopolysaccharides, but the molecular mechanism of this activation remains unknown. In this study, we show that wild-type factor C expressed in HEK293S cells exhibits a lipopolysaccharide-induced activity equivalent to that of native factor C. Analysis of the N-terminal addition, deletion, or substitution mutants shows that the N-terminal Arg residue and the distance between the N terminus and the tripartite of lipopolysaccharide-binding site are essential factors for autocatalytic activation, and that the positive charge of the N terminus may interact with an acidic amino acid(s) of the molecule to convert the zymogen into an active form. Chemical cross-linking experiments indicate that the N terminus is required to form a complex of the factor C molecules in a sufficiently close vicinity to be chemically cross-linked on the surface of lipopolysaccharides. We propose a molecular mechanism of the autocatalytic activation of the protease zymogen on lipopolysaccharides functioning as a platform to induce specific protein-protein interaction between the factor C molecules.

  16. Anti-inflammatory effects and antioxidant activity of dihydroasparagusic acid in lipopolysaccharide-activated microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Salemme, Adele; Togna, Anna Rita; Mastrofrancesco, Arianna; Cammisotto, Vittoria; Ottaviani, Monica; Bianco, Armandodoriano; Venditti, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The activation of microglia and subsequent release of toxic pro-inflammatory factors are crucially associated with neurodegenerative disease, characterized by increased oxidative stress and neuroinflammation, including Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases and multiple sclerosis. Dihydroasparagusic acid is the reduced form of asparagusic acid, a sulfur-containing flavor component produced by Asparagus plants. It has two thiolic functions able to coordinate the metal ions, and a carboxylic moiety, a polar function, which may enhance excretion of the complexes. Thiol functions are also present in several biomolecules with important physiological antioxidant role as glutathione. The aim of this study is to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant potential effect of dihydroasparagusic acid on microglial activation in an in vitro model of neuroinflammation. We have used lipopolysaccharide to induce an inflammatory response in primary rat microglial cultures. Our results suggest that dihydroasparagusic acid significantly prevented lipopolysaccharide-induced production of pro-inflammatory and neurotoxic mediators such as nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α, prostaglandin E2, as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 protein expression and lipoxygenase activity in microglia cells. Moreover it effectively suppressed the level of reactive oxygen species and affected lipopolysaccharide-stimulated activation of mitogen activated protein kinase, including p38, and nuclear factor-kB pathway. These results suggest that dihydroasparagusic acid's neuroprotective properties may be due to its ability to dampen induction of microglial activation. It is a compound that can effectively inhibit inflammatory and oxidative processes that are important factors of the etiopathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26592472

  17. Neonatal host defense mechanisms against Listeria monocytogenes infection: the role of lipopolysaccharides and interferons.

    PubMed

    Bortolussi, R; Issekutz, T; Burbridge, S; Schellekens, H

    1989-03-01

    The human newborn infant is susceptible to lethal infection caused by a number of bacterial species including Listeria monocytogenes, a gram-positive rod which is pathogenic by virtue of its ability to survive intracellularly. In adult animals interferon (IFN)-alpha/beta and IFN-gamma or agents that induce or augment IFN production confer protection against lethal L. monocytogenes infection. Regulation and production of IFN is poorly understood during the neonatal period. We therefore evaluated the role of IFN-alpha/beta and IFN-gamma, IFN-inducers (polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid, amino-bromo-phenyl-pyrimidinone, amino-iodophenyl pyrimidinone) and lipopolysaccharide in modifying neonatal L. monocytogenes infection. Pretreatment of juvenile rats with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid or lipopolysaccharide protected them against a lethal challenge with L. monocytogenes. Among newborn rats, polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid, amino-iodo-phenyl pyrimidinone and amino-bromophenyl-pyrimidinone gave significant protection, however, lipopolysaccharide did not influence survival. The role of IFN was further examined. Pretreatment of 3-d-old rats with purified IFN-alpha/beta, native rat IFN-gamma or rDNA rat IFN-gamma protected them against the lethality of subsequent L. monocytogenes injection. At 3 d after bacterial challenge, bacterial content in the spleens of 3-d-old rats pretreated with rIFN-gamma were significantly decreased compared to controls: IFN-alpha/beta-pretreated animals had less of a decrease, which become significant only 5 d after challenge. Our experiments indicate a role for IFN in neonatal host defense against L. monocytogenes infection.

  18. Highly sensitive fluorescent stain for detecting lipopolysaccharides in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Zhou, Ayi; Cai, Wanhui; Yu, Dongdong; Zhu, Zhongxin; Jiang, Chengxi; Jin, Litai

    2015-08-01

    A sensitive and simple technique was developed for the visualization of gel-separated lipopolysaccharides by using a hydrazide derivative, UGF202. As low as 0.5-1 ng total LPS could be detected by UGF202 stain, which is 2- and 16-fold more sensitive than that of the commonly used Pro-Q Emerald 300 and Keenan et al. developed silver stain, respectively. The results indicated that UGF202 stain could be a good choice for LPS determination in polyacrylamide gels. PMID:25930092

  19. Structural analysis of lipopolysaccharides from Eikenella corrodens by use of murine monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, T; Takazoe, I; Okuda, K

    1989-01-01

    The structure of lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) of Eikenella corrodens was analyzed with prepared murine monoclonal antibodies. A common core epitope was found in three of seven LPS preparations from E. corrodens strains and Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586. Four E. corrodens LPSs were found to possess an O-side-chain epitope which cross-reacted with LPSs from Fusobacterium necrophorum ATCC 25286 and Capnocytophaga ochracea M-12. Lipid A of E. corrodens LPS shared an epitope common among LPSs from various gram-negative rods. Images PMID:2643582

  20. Rhizobium meliloti chromosomal loci required for suppression of exopolysaccharide mutations by lipopolysaccharide

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.N.V.; Brzoska, P.M.; Signer, E.R. ); Hollingsworth, R.I. )

    1990-11-01

    Mutants of alfalfa symbiont Rhizobium meliloti SU47 that fail to make extracellular polysaccharide (exo mutants) induce the formation of nodules that are devoid of bacteria and consequently do not fix nitrogen. This Fix{sup {minus}} phenotype can be suppressed by an R. meliloti Rm41 gene that affects lipopolysaccharide structure. Here we describe mutations preventing suppression that map at two new chromosomal loci, lpsY and lpsX, present in both strains. Two other lps mutations isolated previously from SU47 also prevented suppression.

  1. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Hyptis albida Chloroform Extract on Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Peritoneal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez Miranda, Elizabeth; Pérez Ramos, Julia; Fresán Orozco, Cristina; Zavala Sánchez, Miguel Angel; Pérez Gutiérrez, Salud

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effects of a chloroform extract of Hyptis albida (CHA) on inflammatory responses in mouse lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced peritoneal macrophages. Our findings indicate that CHA inhibits LPS-induced production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). During the process, levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and nitric oxide (NO) increased in the mouse peritoneal macrophages; however, the extract suppressed them significantly. These results provide novel insights into the anti-inflammatory actions of CHA and support its potential use in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23970974

  2. [Piezoquartz immunosensors for assessing the interactions between Yersinia enterocolitica lipopolysaccharides and antibodies to them].

    PubMed

    Kalmykova, E N; Dergunova, E S; Ermolaeva, T N; Gorshkova, R P; Komandrova, N A

    2008-01-01

    The utility of a piezoquartz immunosensor coated with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) for the quantification of antibody specificities was demonstrated. Immunochemical reactions were monitored according to the changes in the weight of sensor bioreceptor layer with high sensitivity (detection limit, 1.3 microg/ml) and assay rate (10 min) without any additional labels. The capabilities of this sensor were demonstrated by the example of quantifying the cross-reactivity of blood serum antibodies with the LPS of Yersinia enterocolitica serotypes O:3, O:5, O:5.27, O:6.30, and O:6.31. The proposed approach is promising for clinical diagnostics of yersiniosis, an infectious intestinal disease. PMID:18924407

  3. Human complement activation by lipopolysaccharides from bacteroides oralis, fusobacterium nucleatum, and veillonella parvula.

    PubMed Central

    Nygren, H; Dahlén, G; Nilsson, L A

    1979-01-01

    The properties of different lipopolysaccharide (LPS) preparations to induce C3 conversion in human serum was studied by means of crossed immunoelectrophoresis. C3 conversion by the alternative pathway was evaluated after calcium depletion, and lipid A-dependent activation was measured by means of inhibition with polymyxin B sulfate. LPS from Bacteroides oralis converted Co mainly via the alternative pathway, whereas LPS from Fusobacterium nucleatum and Veillonella parvula const pronounced lipid A-dependent conversion. The results are discussed in relation to the chemical composition of the LPS preparations. Images PMID:121108

  4. Genes of the adaptive immune system are expressed early in zebrafish larval development following lipopolysaccharide stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fengling; Zhang, Shicui; Wang, Zhiping; Li, Hongyan

    2011-03-01

    Information regarding immunocompetence of the adaptive immune system (AIS) in zebrafish Danio rerio remains limited. Here, we stimulated an immune response in fish embryos, larvae and adults using lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and measured the upregulation of a number of AIS-related genes ( Rag2, AID, TCRAC, IgLC-1, mIg, sIg, IgZ and DAB) 3 and 18 h later. We found that all of the genes evaluated were strongly induced following LPS stimulation, with most of them responding at 8 d post fertilization. This confirms that a functional adaptive immune response is present in D. rerio larvae, and provides a window for further functional analyses.

  5. Structure of the polysaccharides from the lipopolysaccharide of Azospirillum brasilense Jm125A2.

    PubMed

    Sigida, Elena N; Fedonenko, Yuliya P; Shashkov, Alexander S; Zdorovenko, Evelina L; Konnova, Svetlana A; Ignatov, Vladimir V; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2015-10-30

    Two polysaccharides were obtained by mild acid degradation of the lipopolysaccharide of associative nitrogen-fixing bacteria Azospirillum brasilense Jm125A2 isolated from the rhizosphere of a pearl millet. The following structures of the polysaccharides were established by sugar and methylation analyses, Smith degradation, and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy: [Formula: see text] Structure 1 has been reported earlier for a polysaccharide from A. brasilense S17 (Fedonenko YP, Konnova ON, Zdorovenko EL, Konnova SA, Zatonsky GV, Shaskov AS, Ignatov VV, Knirel YA. Carbohydr Res 2008;343:810-6), whereas to our knowledge structure 2 has not been hitherto found in bacterial polysaccharides.

  6. Exogenous heat shock protein HSP70 reduces response of human neuroblastoma cells to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Yurinskaya, M M; Funikov, S Y; Evgen'ev, M B; Vinokurov, M G

    2016-07-01

    The effect of exogenous heat shock protein HSP70 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), TNFα secretion, and mRNA expression by human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. It was shown that exogenous HSP70 protects neuroblastoma cells from the action of LPS. The protection mechanism of HSP70 includes a reduction in the production of ROS and TNFα and a decrease in the expression of TLR4 and IL-1β mRNA in SK-N-SH cells induced by LPS. PMID:27599502

  7. Changes in endothelial cell proliferation and vascular permeability after systemic lipopolysaccharide administration in the subfornical organ.

    PubMed

    Morita-Takemura, Shoko; Nakahara, Kazuki; Tatsumi, Kouko; Okuda, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Tatsuhide; Isonishi, Ayami; Wanaka, Akio

    2016-09-15

    The subfornical organ (SFO) has highly permeable fenestrated vasculature and is a key site for immune-to-brain communications. Recently, we showed the occurrence of continuous angiogenesis in the SFO. In the present study, we found that systemic administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reduced the vascular permeability and endothelial cell proliferation. In LPS-administered mice, the SFO vasculature showed a significant decrease in the immunoreactivity of plasmalemma vesicle associated protein-1, a marker of endothelial fenestral diaphragms. These data suggest that vasculature undergoes structural change to decrease vascular permeability in response to systemic LPS administration. PMID:27609286

  8. Exogenous heat shock protein HSP70 reduces response of human neuroblastoma cells to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Yurinskaya, M M; Funikov, S Y; Evgen'ev, M B; Vinokurov, M G

    2016-07-01

    The effect of exogenous heat shock protein HSP70 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), TNFα secretion, and mRNA expression by human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. It was shown that exogenous HSP70 protects neuroblastoma cells from the action of LPS. The protection mechanism of HSP70 includes a reduction in the production of ROS and TNFα and a decrease in the expression of TLR4 and IL-1β mRNA in SK-N-SH cells induced by LPS.

  9. Lipopolysaccharide Membranes and Membrane Proteins of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Studied by Computer Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Straatsma, TP

    2006-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous environmental Gram-negative bacterium with high metabolic versatility and an exceptional ability to adapt to a wide range of ecological environments, including soil, marches, coastal habitats, plant and animal tissues. Gram-negative microbes are characterized by the asymmetric lipopolysaccharide outer membrane, the study of which is important for a number of applications. The adhesion to mineral surfaces plays a central role in characterizing their contribution to the fate of contaminants in complex environmental systems by effecting microbial transport through soils, respiration redox chemistry, and ion mobility. Another important application stems from the fact that it is also a major opportunistic human pathogen that can result in life-threatening infections in many immunocompromised patients, such as lung infections in children with cystic fibrosis, bacteraemia in burn victims, urinary-tract infections in catheterized patients, hospital-acquired pneumonia in patients on respirators, infections in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, and keratitis and corneal ulcers in users of extended-wear soft contact lenses. The inherent resistance against antibiotics which has been linked with the specific interactions in the outer membrane of P. aeruginosa makes these infections difficult to treat. Developments in simulation methodologies as well as computer hardware have enabled the molecular simulation of biological systems of increasing size and with increasing accuracy, providing detail that is difficult or impossible to obtain experimentally. Computer simulation studies contribute to our understanding of the behavior of proteins, protein-protein and protein-DNA complexes. In recent years, a number of research groups have made significant progress in applying these methods to the study of biological membranes. However, these applications have been focused exclusively on lipid bilayer membranes and on membrane proteins in lipid

  10. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Hyptis albida Chloroform Extract on Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Peritoneal Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Miranda, Elizabeth; Pérez Ramos, Julia; Fresán Orozco, Cristina; Zavala Sánchez, Miguel Angel; Pérez Gutiérrez, Salud

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effects of a chloroform extract of Hyptis albida (CHA) on inflammatory responses in mouse lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced peritoneal macrophages. Our findings indicate that CHA inhibits LPS-induced production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF- α ) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). During the process, levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and nitric oxide (NO) increased in the mouse peritoneal macrophages; however, the extract suppressed them significantly. These results provide novel insights into the anti-inflammatory actions of CHA and support its potential use in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23970974

  11. [Immunosuppressive components of extracellular lipopolysaccharide highly virulent strain Salmonella typhimurium 1468].

    PubMed

    Molozhavaia, O S; Borisova, E V

    2002-01-01

    Immunosuppressive activity of culture liquid substrate (CFS) of highly virulent strain Salmonella typhimurium has been studied. A model of delayed hypersensitivity (DHS) to nonbacterial antigen in mice, a method of gel-filtration through the sephadex column G-200, immunosorbents were used. Three components with immunosuppressive activity: thermolabile component and thermostable one with direct immunosuppressive action and the third thermolabile component which manifested inductive immunosuppressive activity only after redox treatment have been revealed in the strain CFS. O-specific and lipid parts were found in the composition of all the components. This allowed them to be related to lipopolysaccharide.

  12. Fimbriae and lipopolysaccharides are necessary for co-aggregation between Lactobacilli and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kouhei; Furukawa, Soichi; Usui, Yumi; Ishiba, Madoka; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    Cells of Lactobacilli co-aggregated with Escherichia coli K-12 cells to form co-aggregates under mixed-culture conditions at 37 °C for 24 h. Co-aggregation was inhibited by sodium dodecyl sulfate but not by protease. E. coli deletion mutants of fimbriae formation and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) formation did not co-aggregate with Lactobacilli. These results showed that fimbriae and LPS are necessary for co-aggregation between Lactobacilli and E. coli. PMID:25209514

  13. Lipopolysaccharide phosphorylating enzymes encoded in the genomes of Gram-negative bacteria are related to the eukaryotic protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Krupa, A.; Srinivasan, N.

    2002-01-01

    By means of profile-matching procedures, conservation of functionally important residues, and fold-recognition techniques, we show that two distinct families of lipopolysaccharide kinases encoded in the genomes of Gram-negative bacteria are related to each other and to two distinct classes of proteins, namely eukaryotic protein kinases and right open reading frame (RIO1). Members of one of the lipopolysaccharide kinase families are identified only in pathogenic bacteria. Phosphorylation by these enzymes is relevant in the construction of outer membrane, immune response, and pathogenic virulence. The class of proteins called RIO1, also related to eukaryotic protein kinases and previously known to occur only in archaea and eukaryotes, are now identified in eubacteria as well. It has been suggested here that RIO1 proteins are intermediately related to lipopolysaccharide kinases and eukaryotic protein kinases implying an evolutionary relationship between the three classes of proteins. PMID:12021457

  14. Essential regions of the lipopolysaccharide of Pseudomonas aeruginosa responsible for pyrogenicity and activation of the proclotting enzyme of horseshoe crabs. Comparison with antitumor, interferon-inducing and adjuvant activities.

    PubMed

    Tanamoto, K; Homma, J Y

    1982-03-01

    Regions of lipopolysaccharide derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa essential for pyrogenicity and activation of the proclotting enzyme of the horseshoe crab were examined. Free lipid A with intact fatty acids showed strong pyrogenicity but showed little activation of the proclotting enzyme. Chemical modification of the polysaccharide portion and deacylation of the lipopolysaccharide diminished activation of the proclotting enzyme. The native-protein portion attached to the lipopolysaccharide also inhibited the activation of proclotting enzyme by lipopolysaccharide, but not pyrogenicity. These results indicate that free lipid A is sufficient for pyrogenicity, whereas the complete lipopolysaccharide is the strongest activator of the proclotting enzyme. The lipopolysaccharide of P. aeruginosa, which showed the strongest activation of proclotting enzyme, showed the weakest pyrogenicity of all the lipopolysaccharides tested here. All these results demonstrate that there is not correlation between pyrogenicity and proclotting enzyme activation induced by lipopolysaccharides.

  15. Structural studies of the polysaccharides from the lipopolysaccharides of Azospirillum brasilense Sp246 and SpBr14.

    PubMed

    Sigida, Elena N; Fedonenko, Yuliya P; Shashkov, Alexander S; Grinev, Vyacheslav S; Zdorovenko, Evelina L; Konnova, Svetlana A; Ignatov, Vladimir V; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2014-10-29

    Lipopolysaccharides from closely related Azospirillum brasilense strains, Sp246 and SpBr14, were obtained by phenol-water extraction. Mild acid hydrolysis of the lipopolysaccharides followed by GPC on Sephadex G-50 resulted in polysaccharide mixtures. On the basis of sugar and methylation analyses, Smith degradation and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy data, it was concluded that both bacteria possess the same two distinct polysaccharides having structures 1 and 2: [structure: see text]. Structure 1 has been reported earlier for a polysaccharide of A. brasilense 54 [Fedonenko et al., 2011] whereas to our knowledge structure 2 has not been hitherto found in bacterial polysaccharides.

  16. Placental-mediated increased cytokine response to lipopolysaccharides: a potential mechanism for enhanced inflammation susceptibility of the preterm fetus

    PubMed Central

    Boles, Julie L; Ross, Michael G; Beloosesky, Ron; Desai, Mina; Belkacemi, Louiza

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cerebral palsy is a nonprogressive motor impairment syndrome that has no effective cure. The etiology of most cases of cerebral palsy remains unknown; however, recent epidemiologic data have demonstrated an association between fetal neurologic injury and infection/inflammation. Maternal infection/inflammation may be associated with the induction of placental cytokines that could result in increased fetal proinflammatory cytokine exposure, and development of neonatal neurologic injury. Therefore, we sought to explore the mechanism by which maternal infection may produce a placental inflammatory response. We specifically examined rat placental cytokine production and activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathway in response to lipopolysaccharide exposure at preterm and near-term gestational ages. Methods: Preterm (e16) or near-term (e20) placental explants from pregnant rats were treated with 0, 1, or 10 μg/mL lipopolysaccharide. Explant integrity was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase assay. Interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis alpha levels were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. TLR4 and phosphorylated nuclear factor kappa light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) protein expression levels were determined by Western blot analysis. Results: At both e16 and e20, lactate dehydrogenase levels were unchanged by treatment with lipopolysaccharide. After exposure to lipopolysaccharide, the release of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis alpha from e16 placental explants increased by 4-fold and 8–9-fold, respectively (P < 0.05 versus vehicle). Conversely, interleukin-6 release from e20 explants was not significantly different compared with vehicle, and tumor necrosis alpha release was only 2-fold higher (P < 0.05 versus vehicle) following exposure to lipopolysaccharide. Phosphorylated NFκB protein expression was significantly increased in the nuclear fraction from placental explants exposed to lipopolysaccharide at both e16 and e

  17. Lipopolysaccharide from Proteus mirabilis O29 induces changes in red blood cell membrane lipids and proteins.

    PubMed

    Gwoździński, Krzysztof; Pieniazek, Anna; Kaca, Wiesław

    2003-03-01

    Alterations in red blood cell (RBC) plasma membranes, i.e. in lipids and proteins, and osmotic fragility of these cells after treatment with Proteus mirabilis O29 endotoxin (lipolysaccharide (LPS)) were examined using a spin labelling method. At the highest concentration of LPS, insignificantly decreased fluidity of membrane lipids was observed. Changes in conformation of membrane proteins were determined by two covalently bound spin labels, 4-maleimido-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (MSL) and 4-iodoacetamido-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (ISL). The analysis of spectra of MSL and ISL showed modifications in membrane proteins in red blood cells treated with the highest concentration of lipopolysaccharide. On the other hand, in the case of isolated membranes, disturbances in membrane were observed for all concentrations of LPS. The alterations in membrane lipids and proteins are paralleled in a significant rise in osmotic fragility of RBCs upon endotoxin treatment. These results provide experimental evidence that P. mirabilis O29 LPS causes deleterious changes in membranes of human red blood cells. They show that action of lipopolysaccharide mainly concerns the membrane cytoskeleton. PMID:12531246

  18. Lipopolysaccharide activated TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway of fibroblasts from uterine fibroids.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Zheng, Lihua; Chen, Li; Luo, Ning; Yang, Weihong; Qu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Mingmin; Cheng, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Uterine fibroids (UF) are the most common benign tumor of the female reproductive tract. The aim of this study was to explore the role of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation of TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway on stromal fibroblasts in the pathogenesis of UF. Here, TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway was more activated in UF, and UF cells (UFC) and UF derived fibroblasts (TAF) than in smooth muscle tissues, smooth muscle cell (SMC) and myometrial fibroblasts (fib) respectively. After lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, the activity of fib was enhanced, characterized by the increased expression of fibroblast activation protein (FAP), and increased secretion of collagen I and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Moreover, TLR4 inhibitor (VIPER) and siTLR4 can represses LPS-activated fibroblasts and TLR4/NF-κB signaling transduction pathways in fib and UFC cells. Co-cultured with LPS-activated fibroblast enhanced fibroblast activation and TLR4/NF-κB signaling. In conclusion, LPS treatment activated TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway on fibroblasts, which may involve in the development of UF. Our study indicated reproductive tract infection may be associated with fibroid pathogenesis through TLR4/NF-κB signaling. Targeting NF-κB with inhibitors may hold promises of treating uterine fibroid.

  19. Pseudomonas fluorescens adhesion and transport through porous media are affected by lipopolysaccharide composition.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, V; Fletcher, M

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of this work were (i) to use transposon mutagenesis to produce mutants of Pseudomonas fluorescens that were altered in adhesion ability and transport through porous media and (ii) to identify the alterations in surface characteristics that were responsible for the changes in attachment. Mutants of P. fluorescens were generated with TnphoA, which enabled identification of mutants that were altered in surface proteins. Transposon mutants were screened for alterations in adhesion ability by attachment assays on hydrophobic polystyrene and water-wettable polystyrene. Four TnphoA mutants with increased adhesion to the hydrophobic surface and decreased adhesion to the water-wettable surface were obtained. Transport of the strains through porous media was evaluated by passing suspensions of each mutant and the parent through columns containing quartz sand and determining the number of cells retained in the columns. The mutants all demonstrated increased adhesion and retention in the columns. Southern analysis demonstrated two types of mutants with separate transposon insertion sites. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the strains demonstrated that the O antigen on the lipopolysaccharide was either attenuated or absent. Lack of this polysaccharide, and the consequent increased exposure of the lipid moiety of the lipopolysaccharide, is probably responsible for the increase in adhesion to the hydrophobic substrata and retention in the sand column. This work combined with previous studies of attachment of P. fluorescens demonstrates that more than one type of polymer can mediate the adhesion of this organism to nonbiological surfaces. PMID:8572686

  20. Secondary acylation of Klebsiella pneumoniae lipopolysaccharide contributes to sensitivity to antibacterial peptides.

    PubMed

    Clements, Abigail; Tull, Dedreia; Jenney, Adam W; Farn, Jacinta L; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Bishop, Russell E; McPhee, Joseph B; Hancock, Robert E W; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Pearse, Martin J; Wijburg, Odilia L C; Jackson, David C; McConville, Malcolm J; Strugnell, Richard A

    2007-05-25

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important cause of nosocomial Gram-negative sepsis. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is considered to be a major virulence determinant of this encapsulated bacterium and most mutations to the lipid A anchor of LPS are conditionally lethal to the bacterium. We studied the role of LPS acylation in K. pneumoniae disease pathogenesis by using a mutation of lpxM (msbB/waaN), which encodes the enzyme responsible for late secondary acylation of immature lipid A molecules. A K. pneumoniae B5055 (K2:O1) lpxM mutant was found to be attenuated for growth in the lungs in a mouse pneumonia model leading to reduced lethality of the bacterium. B5055DeltalpxM exhibited similar sensitivity to phagocytosis or complement-mediated lysis than B5055, unlike the non-encapsulated mutant B5055nm. In vitro, B5055DeltalpxM showed increased permeability of the outer membrane and an increased susceptibility to certain antibacterial peptides suggesting that in vivo attenuation may be due in part to sensitivity to antibacterial peptides present in the lungs of BALB/c mice. These data support the view that lipopolysaccharide acylation plays a important role in providing Gram-negative bacteria some resistance to structural and innate defenses and especially the antibacterial properties of detergents (e.g. bile) and cationic defensins.

  1. A novel podocyte gene, semaphorin 3G, protects glomerular podocyte from lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Ryoichi; Takemoto, Minoru; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takahiro; He, Peng; Maezawa, Yoshiro; Sakamoto, Kenichi; Tsurutani, Yuya; Ide, Shintaro; Ide, Kana; Kawamura, Harukiyo; Kobayashi, Kazuki; Tokuyama, Hirotake; Tryggvason, Karl; Betsholtz, Christer; Yokote, Koutaro

    2016-01-01

    Kidney diseases including diabetic nephropathy have become huge medical problems, although its precise mechanisms are still far from understood. In order to increase our knowledge about the patho-physiology of kidney, we have previously identified >300 kidney glomerulus-enriched transcripts through large-scale sequencing and microarray profiling of the mouse glomerular transcriptome. One of the glomerulus-specific transcripts identified was semaphorin 3G (Sema3G) which belongs to the semaphorin family. The aim of this study was to analyze both the in vivo and in vitro functions of Sema3G in the kidney. Sema3G was expressed in glomerular podocytes. Although Sema3G knockout mice did not show obvious glomerular defects, ultrastructural analyses revealed partially aberrant podocyte foot processes structures. When these mice were injected with lipopolysaccharide to induce acute inflammation or streptozotocin to induce diabetes, the lack of Sema3G resulted in increased albuminuria. The lack of Sema3G in podocytes also enhanced the expression of inflammatory cytokines including chemokine ligand 2 and interleukin 6. On the other hand, the presence of Sema3G attenuated their expression through the inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced Toll like receptor 4 signaling. Taken together, our results surmise that the Sema3G protein is secreted by podocytes and protects podocytes from inflammatory kidney diseases and diabetic nephropathy. PMID:27180624

  2. Lipopolysaccharide activated TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway of fibroblasts from uterine fibroids.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Zheng, Lihua; Chen, Li; Luo, Ning; Yang, Weihong; Qu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Mingmin; Cheng, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Uterine fibroids (UF) are the most common benign tumor of the female reproductive tract. The aim of this study was to explore the role of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation of TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway on stromal fibroblasts in the pathogenesis of UF. Here, TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway was more activated in UF, and UF cells (UFC) and UF derived fibroblasts (TAF) than in smooth muscle tissues, smooth muscle cell (SMC) and myometrial fibroblasts (fib) respectively. After lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, the activity of fib was enhanced, characterized by the increased expression of fibroblast activation protein (FAP), and increased secretion of collagen I and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Moreover, TLR4 inhibitor (VIPER) and siTLR4 can represses LPS-activated fibroblasts and TLR4/NF-κB signaling transduction pathways in fib and UFC cells. Co-cultured with LPS-activated fibroblast enhanced fibroblast activation and TLR4/NF-κB signaling. In conclusion, LPS treatment activated TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway on fibroblasts, which may involve in the development of UF. Our study indicated reproductive tract infection may be associated with fibroid pathogenesis through TLR4/NF-κB signaling. Targeting NF-κB with inhibitors may hold promises of treating uterine fibroid. PMID:26617709

  3. Lipopolysaccharide activated TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway of fibroblasts from uterine fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jing; Zheng, Lihua; Chen, Li; Luo, Ning; Yang, Weihong; Qu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Mingmin; Cheng, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Uterine fibroids (UF) are the most common benign tumor of the female reproductive tract. The aim of this study was to explore the role of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation of TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway on stromal fibroblasts in the pathogenesis of UF. Here, TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway was more activated in UF, and UF cells (UFC) and UF derived fibroblasts (TAF) than in smooth muscle tissues, smooth muscle cell (SMC) and myometrial fibroblasts (fib) respectively. After lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, the activity of fib was enhanced, characterized by the increased expression of fibroblast activation protein (FAP), and increased secretion of collagen I and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Moreover, TLR4 inhibitor (VIPER) and siTLR4 can represses LPS-activated fibroblasts and TLR4/NF-κB signaling transduction pathways in fib and UFC cells. Co-cultured with LPS-activated fibroblast enhanced fibroblast activation and TLR4/NF-κB signaling. In conclusion, LPS treatment activated TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway on fibroblasts, which may involve in the development of UF. Our study indicated reproductive tract infection may be associated with fibroid pathogenesis through TLR4/NF-κB signaling. Targeting NF-κB with inhibitors may hold promises of treating uterine fibroid. PMID:26617709

  4. Effect of methanolic extract of Asparagus racemosus Willd. on lipopolysaccharide induced-oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mohammad Parwez; Hussain, Arshad; Siddiqui, Hefazat Hussain; Wahab, Shadma; Adak, Manoranjan

    2015-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress and impairment of normal physiological function generally categorized by increased anxiety and reduced mobility. Therefore, the present study was to find out the effect Methanolic extract of Asparagus racemosus (MEAR ) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced oxidative stress in rats . LPS-induced oxidative stress in rats was measured by locomotor activity by photoactometer test, anxiety with elevated plus maze test and also studied the oxidative stress markers, nitric oxide and cytokines. The obtained data shows that LPS markedly exhausted (p<0.001) brain- reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) significantly increased (p<0.001) the level of malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide and the activity of cytokines in the brain. MEAR supplementation resulted in normalization of brain GSH and CAT and SOD and decreases in the levels of MDA with reduction of nitric oxide and cytokines in the brain. The action of the extract at dose of 200 mg/kg was almost similar to the standard drug, quercetin (100mg/kg, p.o.). These present study conclude that MEAR administration significantly (P<0.05) reduced LPS- induced oxidative-stress and intensely suggest that Asparagus racemosus Willd. is a functionally newer type of cerebroprotective agent. PMID:25730806

  5. Murine tissue factor gene expression in vivo. Tissue and cell specificity and regulation by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Mackman, N.; Sawdey, M. S.; Keeton, M. R.; Loskutoff, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Regulation of tissue factor (TF) gene expression was studied in vivo employing a murine model system. In untreated mice, TF mRNA was detected in brain, lung, kidney, and heart by Northern blot analysis. After administration of lipopolysaccharide, steady-state levels of TF mRNA were unchanged in brain, decreased in heart, and increased in both kidney and lung. In the brain, Bergmann glia within the Purkinje cell layer of the cerebellum and neuroglia within the cerebral cortex expressed TF mRNA by in situ hybridization. Epidermal cells of the skin and tongue also expressed TF mRNA. At present, we have not identified the cell type(s) in the kidney and lung responsible for increased TF gene expression. These results demonstrate tissue- and cell-specific TF gene expression in vivo. Lipopolysaccharide-mediated increases in TF expression in the kidney and lung may promote fibrin deposition in these organs during Gram-negative sepsis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8317556

  6. Inflammatory cytokine gene expression in human periodontal ligament fibroblasts stimulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaji, Y; Kubota, T; Sasaguri, K; Sato, S; Suzuki, Y; Kumada, H; Umemoto, T

    1995-01-01

    The effects of Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (P-LPS) and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (E-LPS) on the gene expression and production of inflammatory cytokines of human periodontal ligament fibroblasts (HPLF) were examined by a Northern (RNA blot) assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. mRNAs for interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) were detected in HPLF cells, but IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha, transforming growth factor alpha, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor were not detected by reverse transcription-PCR. The expression of TGF-beta mRNA was not influenced by either LPS. P-LPS (1 to 10 micrograms/ml) and E-LPS (100 micrograms/ml) markedly stimulated the expression of IL-6 and IL-8 mRNAs compared with the control. The synthesis of IL-6 and IL-8 was also stimulated by 10 and 100 micrograms of both LPSs per ml, but IL-8 synthesis was not stimulated with E-LPS at 1 microgram/ml. Secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 into the culture medium was detected at 6 and 3 h, respectively, after exposure to P-LPS (10 micrograms/ml). These findings suggested that P. gingivalis leads to periodontal tissue destruction and alveolar bone resorption through IL-6 and IL-8 released from HPLF cells stimulated with its LPS. PMID:7642293

  7. Protection from endotoxic shock by EVK-203, a novel alkylpolyamine sequestrant of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thuan B; Adisechan, Ashok Kumar; Suresh Kumar, E V K; Balakrishna, Rajalakshmi; Kimbrell, Matthew R; Miller, Kelly A; Datta, Apurba; David, Sunil A

    2007-09-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) play a key role in the pathogenesis of septic shock, a major cause of mortality in the critically ill patient. The only therapeutic option aimed at limiting downstream systemic inflammatory processes by targeting lipopolysaccharide is Toraymyxin, an extracorporeal hemoperfusion device using solid phase-immobilized polymyxin B (PMB). While PMB is known to effectively sequester LPS, its severe systemic toxicity proscribes its parenteral use, and hemoperfusion may not be feasible in patients in shock. In our continuing efforts to develop small-molecule mimics which display the LPS-sequestering properties, but not the toxicity of PMB, a series of mono- and bis-substituted dialkylpolyamines were synthesized and evaluated. We show that EVK-203, an alkylpolyamine compound, specifically binds to and neutralizes the activity of LPS, and affords complete protection in a murine model of endotoxic shock. EVK-203 is without any apparent toxicity when administered to mice at multiples of therapeutic doses for several days. The specific endotoxin-sequestering property along with a very favorable therapeutic index renders this compound an ideal candidate for preclinical development.

  8. Effect of methanolic extract of Asparagus racemosus Willd. on lipopolysaccharide induced-oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mohammad Parwez; Hussain, Arshad; Siddiqui, Hefazat Hussain; Wahab, Shadma; Adak, Manoranjan

    2015-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress and impairment of normal physiological function generally categorized by increased anxiety and reduced mobility. Therefore, the present study was to find out the effect Methanolic extract of Asparagus racemosus (MEAR ) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced oxidative stress in rats . LPS-induced oxidative stress in rats was measured by locomotor activity by photoactometer test, anxiety with elevated plus maze test and also studied the oxidative stress markers, nitric oxide and cytokines. The obtained data shows that LPS markedly exhausted (p<0.001) brain- reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) significantly increased (p<0.001) the level of malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide and the activity of cytokines in the brain. MEAR supplementation resulted in normalization of brain GSH and CAT and SOD and decreases in the levels of MDA with reduction of nitric oxide and cytokines in the brain. The action of the extract at dose of 200 mg/kg was almost similar to the standard drug, quercetin (100mg/kg, p.o.). These present study conclude that MEAR administration significantly (P<0.05) reduced LPS- induced oxidative-stress and intensely suggest that Asparagus racemosus Willd. is a functionally newer type of cerebroprotective agent.

  9. Studies of the polysaccharide fraction from the lipopolysaccharide of Pseudomonas alcaligenes

    PubMed Central

    Lomax, James A.; Gray, George W.; Wilkinson, Stephen G.

    1974-01-01

    Studies of the lipopolysaccharide of Pseudomonas alcaligenes strain BR 1/2 were extended to the polysaccharide moiety. The crude polysaccharide, obtained by mild acid hydrolysis of the lipopolysaccharide, was fractionated by gel filtration. The major fraction was the phosphorylated polysaccharide, for which the approximate proportions of residues were; glucose (2), rhamnose (0.7), heptose (2–3), galactosamine (1), alanine (1), 3-deoxy-2-octulonic acid (1), phosphorus (5–6). The heptose was l-glycero-d-manno-heptose. The minor fractions from gel filtration contained free 3-deoxy-2-octulonic acid, Pi and PPi. The purified polysaccharide was studied by periodate oxidation, methylation analysis, partial hydrolysis, and dephosphorylation. All the rhamnose and part of the glucose and heptose occur as non-reducing terminal residues. Other glucose residues are 3-substituted, and most heptose residues are esterified with condensed phosphate residues, possibly in the C-4 position. Free heptose and a heptosylglucose were isolated from a partial hydrolysate of the polysaccharide. The location of galactosamine in the polysaccharide was not established, but either the C-3 or C-4 position appears to be substituted and a linkage to alanine was indicated. In its composition, the polysaccharide from Ps. alcaligenes resembles core polysaccharides from other pseudomonads: no possible side-chain polysaccharide was detected. PMID:4369226

  10. Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis Genes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Promote Resistance to Antimicrobial Chemokines.

    PubMed

    Erickson, David L; Lew, Cynthia S; Kartchner, Brittany; Porter, Nathan T; McDaniel, S Wade; Jones, Nathan M; Mason, Sara; Wu, Erin; Wilson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial chemokines (AMCs) are a recently described family of host defense peptides that play an important role in protecting a wide variety of organisms from bacterial infection. Very little is known about the bacterial targets of AMCs or factors that influence bacterial susceptibility to AMCs. In an effort to understand how bacterial pathogens resist killing by AMCs, we screened Yersinia pseudotuberculosis transposon mutants for those with increased binding to the AMCs CCL28 and CCL25. Mutants exhibiting increased binding to AMCs were subjected to AMC killing assays, which revealed their increased sensitivity to chemokine-mediated cell death. The majority of the mutants exhibiting increased binding to AMCs contained transposon insertions in genes related to lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis. A particularly strong effect on susceptibility to AMC mediated killing was observed by disruption of the hldD/waaF/waaC operon, necessary for ADP-L-glycero-D-manno-heptose synthesis and a complete lipopolysaccharide core oligosaccharide. Periodate oxidation of surface carbohydrates also enhanced AMC binding, whereas enzymatic removal of surface proteins significantly reduced binding. These results suggest that the structure of Y. pseudotuberculosis LPS greatly affects the antimicrobial activity of AMCs by shielding a protein ligand on the bacterial cell surface.

  11. Identification of cyclophilin as a proinflammatory secretory product of lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, B; Yarlett, N; Strupp, A; Cerami, A

    1992-01-01

    We have isolated an 18-kDa peptide (designated sp18, for 18-kDa secreted protein) from the conditioned medium of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. Purified sp18 had in vivo inflammatory activity and in vitro chemotactic activity for human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes. Surprisingly, N-terminal sequencing and tryptic mapping studies revealed that sp18 and cyclophilin, an intracellular protein that binds the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A, are highly homologous. The in vitro chemotactic activity of sp18 on monocytes was blocked by cyclosporin A but not by cyclosporin H, a structural analog of cyclosporin A that does not bind cyclophilin. Like purified porcine cyclophilin, mouse sp18 exhibited peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity. Medium conditioned by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated resident peritoneal exudate macrophages isolated from C57BL/6 mice contained substantially higher levels of sp18/cyclophilin than medium conditioned by nonstimulated macrophages. The observation that sp18/cyclophilin exhibits proinflammatory activity and is secreted by macrophages in response to endotoxin suggests that this protein may function as a cytokine, and invites the hypothesis that the immunosuppressive action of cyclosporin A results in part from interaction with an extracellular form of cyclophilin released as a mediator of immune and inflammatory functions. Images PMID:1565646

  12. Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis Genes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Promote Resistance to Antimicrobial Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, David L.; Lew, Cynthia S.; Kartchner, Brittany; Porter, Nathan T.; McDaniel, S. Wade; Jones, Nathan M.; Mason, Sara; Wu, Erin; Wilson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial chemokines (AMCs) are a recently described family of host defense peptides that play an important role in protecting a wide variety of organisms from bacterial infection. Very little is known about the bacterial targets of AMCs or factors that influence bacterial susceptibility to AMCs. In an effort to understand how bacterial pathogens resist killing by AMCs, we screened Yersinia pseudotuberculosis transposon mutants for those with increased binding to the AMCs CCL28 and CCL25. Mutants exhibiting increased binding to AMCs were subjected to AMC killing assays, which revealed their increased sensitivity to chemokine-mediated cell death. The majority of the mutants exhibiting increased binding to AMCs contained transposon insertions in genes related to lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis. A particularly strong effect on susceptibility to AMC mediated killing was observed by disruption of the hldD/waaF/waaC operon, necessary for ADP-L-glycero-D-manno-heptose synthesis and a complete lipopolysaccharide core oligosaccharide. Periodate oxidation of surface carbohydrates also enhanced AMC binding, whereas enzymatic removal of surface proteins significantly reduced binding. These results suggest that the structure of Y. pseudotuberculosis LPS greatly affects the antimicrobial activity of AMCs by shielding a protein ligand on the bacterial cell surface. PMID:27275606

  13. Assessment of the convergence of molecular dynamics simulations of lipopolysaccharide membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Soares, Thereza A.; Straatsma, TP

    2008-03-01

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is composed of a phospholipid inner leaflet and a lipopolysaccharide outer leaflet. The chemical structure of lipopolysaccharide confers an asymmetric character to outer membranes that has been shown to play an important role in the in the electrical properties of porins, low permeability and intrinsic antibiotic resistance of Gram-negative bacteria. In the present work, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of two different configurations of the outer membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa under periodic boundary conditions were carried out in order to i) validate model-derived properties against the available experimental data, ii) identify the properties whose dynamics can be sampled on nanosecond timescales, and iii) evaluate the dependence of the convergence of structural and dynamical properties on the initial configuration of the system, within the chosen force field and simulation conditions. Because the relaxation times associated with the motions of individual LPS monomers in outer membranes is very slow, the two initial configurations do not converge to a common ensemble of configuration on the nanosecond time scale. However, a number of properties of the outer membrane that will significantly impact the structural and internal dynamics of transmembrane proteins, most notably the electrostatic potential and molecular density, do converge within the simulated time scale. For these properties, a good agreement with the available experimental data was found. Such molecular model, capable of accounting for the high asymmetry and low fluidity characteristics of outer membranes, will certainly benefit future atomistic simulations of outer membrane proteins.

  14. Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis Genes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Promote Resistance to Antimicrobial Chemokines.

    PubMed

    Erickson, David L; Lew, Cynthia S; Kartchner, Brittany; Porter, Nathan T; McDaniel, S Wade; Jones, Nathan M; Mason, Sara; Wu, Erin; Wilson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial chemokines (AMCs) are a recently described family of host defense peptides that play an important role in protecting a wide variety of organisms from bacterial infection. Very little is known about the bacterial targets of AMCs or factors that influence bacterial susceptibility to AMCs. In an effort to understand how bacterial pathogens resist killing by AMCs, we screened Yersinia pseudotuberculosis transposon mutants for those with increased binding to the AMCs CCL28 and CCL25. Mutants exhibiting increased binding to AMCs were subjected to AMC killing assays, which revealed their increased sensitivity to chemokine-mediated cell death. The majority of the mutants exhibiting increased binding to AMCs contained transposon insertions in genes related to lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis. A particularly strong effect on susceptibility to AMC mediated killing was observed by disruption of the hldD/waaF/waaC operon, necessary for ADP-L-glycero-D-manno-heptose synthesis and a complete lipopolysaccharide core oligosaccharide. Periodate oxidation of surface carbohydrates also enhanced AMC binding, whereas enzymatic removal of surface proteins significantly reduced binding. These results suggest that the structure of Y. pseudotuberculosis LPS greatly affects the antimicrobial activity of AMCs by shielding a protein ligand on the bacterial cell surface. PMID:27275606

  15. Bortezomib Inhibits Osteoclastogenesis and Porphyromonas gingivalis Lipopolysaccharide-induced Alveolar Bone Resorption.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y-G; Kang, J H; Kim, H J; Kim, H J; Kim, H-H; Kim, J-Y; Lee, Y

    2015-09-01

    Healthy bone is maintained by the coordinated activities of osteoblast-mediated bone formation and osteoclast-dependent bone resorption. Pathologic conditions such as hormonal imbalance and inflammation cause increased osteoclastogenesis resulting in osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and periodontitis. Bortezomib is novel antimyeloma agent that has a direct beneficial effect on bone formation. However, the role of bortezomib in osteoclastogenesis and underlying mechanisms remains to be fully comprehended. In the present study, we show that bortezomib directly inhibited the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)- and lipopolysaccharide-dependent osteoclast differentiation. Interestingly, the bortezomib-mediated inhibition of osteoclastogenesis was transient, since the removal of bortezomib from culture completely restored osteoclast differentiation. Bortezomib impeded the induction and nuclear localization of nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1 and reduced both macrophage colony-stimulating factor- and RANKL-induced extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation. In a mouse model of periodontitis, bortezomib prevented alveolar bone erosion induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide. These data not only suggest a previously unappreciated mechanism by which bortezomib regulates bone resorption but also propose novel applications of bortezomib beyond its use as an antimyeloma agent.

  16. Colistin Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii Is Mediated by Complete Loss of Lipopolysaccharide Production ▿

    PubMed Central

    Moffatt, Jennifer H.; Harper, Marina; Harrison, Paul; Hale, John D. F.; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Seemann, Torsten; Henry, Rebekah; Crane, Bethany; St. Michael, Frank; Cox, Andrew D.; Adler, Ben; Nation, Roger L.; Li, Jian; Boyce, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria represent a major global health problem. Polymyxin antibiotics such as colistin have resurfaced as effective last-resort antimicrobials for use against MDR Gram-negative pathogens, including Acinetobacter baumannii. Here we show that A. baumannii can rapidly develop resistance to polymyxin antibiotics by complete loss of the initial binding target, the lipid A component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which has long been considered to be essential for the viability of Gram-negative bacteria. We characterized 13 independent colistin-resistant derivatives of A. baumannii type strain ATCC 19606 and showed that all contained mutations within one of the first three genes of the lipid A biosynthesis pathway: lpxA, lpxC, and lpxD. All of these mutations resulted in the complete loss of LPS production. Furthermore, we showed that loss of LPS occurs in a colistin-resistant clinical isolate of A. baumannii. This is the first report of a spontaneously occurring, lipopolysaccharide-deficient, Gram-negative bacterium. PMID:20855724

  17. n-Butanol extract from Folium isatidis inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages and protects mice against lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxic shock

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lili; Lu, Yili; Jin, Jiahui; Dong, Lili; Xu, Fengli; Chen, Shuangshuang; Wang, Zhanyue; Liang, Guang; Shan, Xiaoou

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis, which is caused by severe infection, is an important cause of mortality, but effective clinical treatment against sepsis is extremely limited. As the main component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plays a major role in inflammatory responses. Studies have shown beneficial pharmacological effects for Folium isatidis. The present study further illuminated the effects of n-butanol extract from Folium isatidis in LPS-induced septic shock and identified the main active chemical components. Our study showed that pretreatment with n-butanol extract from Folium isatidis not only significantly inhibited LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 production but also markedly and dose dependently enhanced the recruitment of MyD88, the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and the degradation of IκB-α. Additionally, the extract exhibited dramatic protective effects against lung injury and death in mice with septic shock. Eight main active compounds were identified, including organic acids, glycoside, indolinones, and flavonoids. These findings provide a perspective on the respiratory protection offered by n-butanol extract from Folium isatidis in LPS-induced sepsis and outline a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of sepsis. PMID:26491261

  18. Use of mice tolerant to lipopolysaccharide to demonstrate requirement of cooperation between macrophages and lymphocytes to generate lipopolysaccharide-induced colony-stimulating factor in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Z; Hertogs, C F; Pluznik, D H

    1983-01-01

    Injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into mice was followed by a rapid elevation of colony-stimulating factor (CSF) in the serum. A second, challenging injection of LPS given 3 to 4 days later failed to induce elevated levels of CSF in the serum. Such mice tolerant to LPS were used as an experimental tool to identify the CSF-producing cells which respond to LPS. We observed that generation of LPS-induced CSF in mice tolerant to LPS could be restored by an intraperitoneal injection of spleen cells 24 h before the challenging injection of LPS. Depletion of the adherent cells from the spleen cells reduced the ability of the splenic lymphocytes to restore the capacity of the mice tolerant to LPS to generate serum CSF. Reconstitution of the splenic lymphocytes with 5% thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal macrophages, however, reestablished the restorative capacity of these cells, whereas almost no restoration was observed after direct injection of elicited peritoneal macrophages. These data suggest that the spleen cells are active in generating CSF, provided that macrophages are present and can interact with the splenic lymphocytes to generate LPS-induced CSF in the serum. PMID:6602767

  19. The O-specific polysaccharide structure from the lipopolysaccharide of the Gram-negative bacterium Raoultella terrigena.

    PubMed

    Leone, Serena; Molinaro, Antonio; Dubery, Ian; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo

    2007-08-13

    The structure of the repeating unit of the O-specific polysaccharide from the lipopolysaccharide of the enterobacterium Raoultella terrigena was determined by means of chemical and spectroscopical methods and was found to be a linear tetrasaccharide containing a cyclic acetal of pyruvic acid (Pyr) as depicted below.[Carbohydrate structure: see text].

  20. Monoclonal antibodies specific for Escherichia coli J5 lipopolysaccharide: cross-reaction with other gram-negative bacterial species.

    PubMed Central

    Mutharia, L M; Crockford, G; Bogard, W C; Hancock, R E

    1984-01-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies against Escherichia coli J5 were studied. Each of these monoclonal antibodies reacted with purified lipopolysaccharides from E. coli J5, the deep rough mutant Salmonella minnesota Re595, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 as well as with the purified lipid A of P. aeruginosa. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays using the outer membranes from a variety of gram-negative bacteria demonstrated that these lipid A-specific monoclonal antibodies interacted with between 84 and 97% of the gram-negative bacterial species tested. One of the monoclonal antibodies, 5E4, was shown to interact with 34 of the 35 outer membrane or lipopolysaccharide antigens tested. Immunoenzymatic staining of Western electrophoretic blots of separated P. aeruginosa outer membrane components was used to demonstrate that antibody 5E4 interacted with a similar fast-migrating band, corresponding to rough lipopolysaccharide, from all 17 serotype strains and all 14 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. Similarly, iodinated goat anti-mouse immunoglobulin was used to detect the binding of monoclonal antibody 8A1 to a fast-migrating band on Western electrophoretic blots of purified lipopolysaccharides from Klebsiella pneumoniae and both smooth and rough strains of E. coli, Salmonella typhimurium, and S. minnesota. These results suggest considerable conservation of single antigenic sites in the lipid A of gram-negative bacteria. Images PMID:6381310

  1. Cytochrome P4502E1 inhibitor, chlormethiazole, decreases lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in rat Kupffer cells with ethanol treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the role of Cytochrome P4502E1 in sensitizing Kupffer cells to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammation after ethanol induction. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a liquid ethanol diet, control diet or ethanol diet supplemented with CYP2E1 inhibitor, chlormethiazole (CMZ), for 4'week...

  2. Supplementation of Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product can attenuate the acute phase response following a lipopolysaccharide challenge in pigs.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine if feeding a Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product to weaned pigs would reduce stress and acute phase responses (APR) following a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pigs (n=30; 6.4±0.1 kilograms body weight) were housed individually in pens with ad libi...

  3. Enhancement of the acute phase response to lipopolysaccharide in feedlot steers supplemented with OmniGen-AF

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the effect of supplementing feedlot steers with OmniGen-AF on the acute phase response to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Steers (n = 18; 270 ± 5 kilograms body weight) were separated into two treatment groups (n=9/treatment): one group was fed a standard ...

  4. Effects of dietary humic and butyric acid on growth performance and response to lipopolysaccharide in young pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Humic acid (MFG) and fat protected butyric acid (BA) has been shown to modulate energy metabolism and inflammation. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the effects of MFG and BA, alone and in combination, on growth performance and response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced in...

  5. Prenatal transportation alters the acute phase response (APR) of bull calves exposed to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine if prenatal transportation influences the acute phase response (APR) to a postnatal Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pregnant Brahman cows (n=96) matched by age and parity were separated into transported (TRANS; n=48; transported for 2 hours on gestational day...

  6. Enhancing the stability and antibiofilm activity of DspB by immobilization on carboxymethyl chitosan nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yulong; Ma, Su; Liu, Chenguang; Yu, Wengong; Han, Feng

    2015-09-01

    A β-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (DspB) from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans CU1000 has been proved to inhibit and detach the biofilms formed by Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus and A. actinomycetemcomitans. However, the application of this enzyme is limited by its poor stability. In the present study, a β-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase encoding gene, dspB, was cloned from A. actinomycetemcomitans HK1651 and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant DspB was loaded on hydrogel nanoparticles, which was prepared by using linoleic acid (LA) modified carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCS) after sonication. The nanoparticles were almost saturated by DspB at 0.3 mg/ml, which gave a loading capacity of 76.7%. The immobilization enhanced thermal stability, storage stability and reusability of DspB significantly. Moreover, it also increased antibiofilm activity due to the dual mechanism, including the improvement of the enzyme stability and the antibiofilm activity of CMCS nanoparticles. PMID:26302845

  7. Enzymatic synthesis of lipopolysaccharide in Escherichia coli. Purification and properties of heptosyltransferase i.

    PubMed

    Kadrmas, J L; Raetz, C R

    1998-01-30

    Heptosyltransferase I, encoded by the rfaC(waaC) gene of Escherichia coli, is thought to add L-glycero-D-manno-heptose to the inner 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo) residue of the lipopolysaccharide core. Lipopolysaccharide isolated from mutants defective in rfaC lack heptose and all other sugars distal to heptose. The putative donor, ADP-L-glycero-D-manno-heptose, has never been fully characterized and is not readily available. In cell extracts, the analog ADP-mannose can serve as an alternative donor for RfaC-catalyzed glycosylation of the acceptor, Kdo2-lipid IVA. Using a T7 promoter construct that overexpresses RfaC approximately 15,000-fold, the enzyme has been purified to near homogeneity. NH2-terminal sequencing confirms that the purified enzyme is the rfaC gene product. The subunit molecular mass is 36 kDa. Enzymatic activity is dependent upon the presence of Triton X-100 and is maximal at pH 7.5. The apparent Km (determined at near saturating concentrations of the second substrate) is 1.5 mM for ADP-mannose and 4.5 microM for Kdo2-lipid IVA. Chemical hydrolysis of the RfaC reaction product at 100 degrees C in the presence of sodium acetate and 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate generates fragments consistent with the inner Kdo residue of Kdo2-lipid IVA as the site of mannosylation. The analog, Kdo-lipid IVA, functions as an acceptor, but is mannosylated at less than 1% the rate of Kdo2-lipid IVA. The purified enzyme displays no activity with ADP-glucose, GDP-mannose, UDP-glucose, or UDP-galactose. Mannosylation of Kdo2-lipid IVA catalyzed by RfaC proceeds in high yield and may be useful for the synthesis of lipopolysaccharide analogs. Pure RfaC can also be used together with Kdo2-[4'-32P]lipid IVA to assay for the physiological donor (presumably ADP-L-glycero-D-manno-heptose) in a crude, low molecular weight fraction isolated from wild type cells.

  8. Development of an activity assay for discovery of inhibitors of lipopolysaccharide transport.

    PubMed

    Gronenberg, Luisa S; Kahne, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    The outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria contains an outer leaflet composed of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that is transported to this location by a pathway that is essential for viability. It has been suggested that inhibitors of this pathway could be useful antibiotics. Herein we reconstitute the activity of the ATPase component (LptB) of the ABC transporter that initiates LPS transport and assembly. We developed a high-throughput assay and screened a library of kinase inhibitors against LptB. We identified two classes of ATP-competitive inhibitors. These are the first inhibitors of the ATPase component of any bacterial ABC transporter. The small-molecule inhibitors will be very useful tools for further biochemical studies of the proteins involved in LPS transport and assembly.

  9. Protective effect of carvacrol on acute lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide in mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaosheng; Jia, Aiqing

    2014-08-01

    Carvacrol, the major component of Plectranthus amboinicus, has been known to exhibit anti-inflammatory activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of carvacrol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia and acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. Mice were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with LPS and the mortality of mice for 7 days were observed twice a day. Meanwhile, the protective effect of carvacrol (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg) on LPS-induced endotoxemia were detected. Using an experimental model of LPS-induced ALI, we examined the effect of carvacrol in resolving lung injury. The results showed that carvacrol could improve survival during lethal endotoxemia and attenuate LPS-induced ALI in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of carvacrol may be due to its ability to inhibit NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways, thereby inhibiting inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production. PMID:24577726

  10. The core and O-polysaccharide structure of the Caulobacter crescentus lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Jones, Michael D; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Nomellini, John F; Smit, John

    2015-01-30

    Here we describe the analysis of the structure of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Caulobacter crescentus strain JS1025, a derivative of C. crescentus CB15 NA1000 with an engineered amber mutation in rsaA, leading to the loss of the protein S-layer and gene CCNA_00471 encoding a putative GDP-L-fucose synthase. LPS was isolated using an aqueous membrane disruption method. Polysaccharide and core oligosaccharide were produced by mild acid hydrolysis and analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and chemical methods. Spectra revealed the presence of two polysaccharides, one of them, a rhamnan, could be removed using periodate oxidation. Another polymer, built from 4-amino-4-deoxy-D-rhamnose (perosamine), mannose, and 3-O-methyl-glucose, should be the O-chain of the LPS according to genetic data. The attribution of the rhamnan as a part of LPS or a separate polymer was not possible.

  11. Characterization of the physiological substrate for lipopolysaccharide heptosyltransferases I and II.

    PubMed

    Gronow, S; Oertelt, C; Ervelä, E; Zamyatina, A; Kosma, P; Skurnik, M; Holst, O

    2001-01-01

    L-Glycero-D-manno-heptopyranose is a characteristic compound of many lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core structures of Gram-negative bacteria. In Escherichia coli two heptosyltransferases, namely WaaC and WaaF, are known to transfer L-glycero-D-manno-heptopyranose to Re-LPS and Rd(2)-LPS, respectively. It had been proposed that both reactions involve ADPL-glycero-D-manno-heptose as a sugar donor; however, the structure of this nucleotide sugar had never been completely elucidated. In the present study, ADPL-glycero-D-manno-heptose was isolated from a heptosyltransferase-deficient E. coli mutant, and its structure was determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry as ADPL-glycero-beta-D-manno-heptopyranose. This compound represented the sole constituent of the bacterial extract that was accepted as a sugar donor by heptosyltransferases I and II in vitro.

  12. Immunological detection of lipopolysaccharide antigens of thermophilic campylobacters captured on polymyxin-coated polyester cloth.

    PubMed

    Gomi, K; Brooks, B; Blais, B; Garcia, M; Yamazaki, H

    1996-05-01

    Cholate-extracted lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigens from thermophilic campylobacters were captured on polymyxin-coated polyester cloth. The captured antigens were detected by sequential reactions with rabbit anti-Campylobacter antibody, anti-rabbit IgG peroxidase conjugate and chromogenic peroxidase substrate. A polyclonal rabbit antibody elicited against a single Campylobacter-jejuni strain detected the reference strains of the twenty most frequently isolated thermophilic campylobacters in the Lior serotyping scheme. Moreover, LPS antigens of six C. Jejuni Penner serotypes fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and examined by immunoblotting were recognized by four antisera prepared against homologous and heterologous Penner serotypes. The results suggest the potential application of polymyxin-cloth enzyme immunoassay for rapid detection of thermophilic campylobacters where monoclonal antibodies can be raised to possible common LPS epitopes.

  13. Hepatoprotective effect of myristicin from nutmeg (Myristica fragrans) on lipopolysaccharide/d-galactosamine-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tatsuya; Jinno, Keiko; Kawagishi, Hirokazu; Arimoto, Yasushi; Suganuma, Hiroyuki; Inakuma, Takahiro; Sugiyama, Kimio

    2003-03-12

    To evaluate the hepatoprotective activity of spices, 21 different spices were fed to rats with liver damage caused by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus d-galactosamine (D-GalN). As assessed by plasma aminotranferase activities, nutmeg showed the most potent hepatoprotective activity. Bioassay-guided isolation of the active compound from nutmeg was carried out in mice by a single oral administration of the respective fractions. Myristicin, one of the major essential oils of nutmeg, was found to possess extraordinarily potent hepatoprotective activity. Myristicin markedly suppressed LPS/D-GalN-induced enhancement of serum TNF-alpha concentrations and hepatic DNA fragmentation in mice. These findings suggest that the hepatoprotective activity of myristicin might be, at least in part, due to the inhibition of TNF-alpha release from macrophages. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the hepatoprotective mechanism(s) of myristicin.

  14. Microglial ablation and lipopolysaccharide preconditioning affects pilocarpine-induced seizures in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Mirrione, M.M.; Mirrione, M.M.; Konomosa, D.K.; Ioradanis, G.; Dewey, S.L.; Agzzid, A.; Heppnerd, F.L.; Tsirka, St.E.

    2010-04-01

    Activated microglia have been associated with neurodegeneration in patients and in animal models of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (TLE), however their precise functions as neurotoxic or neuroprotective is a topic of significant investigation. To explore this, we examined the effects of pilocarpine-induced seizures in transgenic mice where microglia/macrophages were conditionally ablated. We found that unilateral ablation of microglia from the dorsal hippocampus did not alter acute seizure sensitivity. However, when this procedure was coupled with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) preconditioning (1 mg/kg given 24 h prior to acute seizure), we observed a significant pro-convulsant phenomenon. This effect was associated with lower metabolic activation in the ipsilateral hippocampus during acute seizures, and could be attributed to activity in the mossy fiber pathway. These findings reveal that preconditioning with LPS 24 h prior to seizure induction may have a protective effect which is abolished by unilateral hippocampal microglia/macrophage ablation.

  15. Activation of the prophenoloxidase cascade and initiation of nodule formation in locusts by bacterial lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Ratcliffe, N A; Brookman, J L; Rowley, A F

    1991-01-01

    The activation of the prophenoloxidase (proPO) system of the locusts, Schistocerca gregaria and Locusta migratoria, by several bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) is described. Activation of proPO by LPS occurred only in the presence of whole blood homogenates and not with hemocyte lysate preparations alone. Levels of phenoloxidase generated by the different LPSs in vitro were also correlated with numbers of nodules formed in vivo by injection of these LPSs. This further strengthens the evidence for the involvement of proPO activation in the insect cellular defenses. Finally, the wisdom in using anticoagulants in order to stabilize fragile hemocytes in studies on the proPO system is discussed. PMID:1904828

  16. Effect of dietary bovine colostrum on the responses of immune cells to stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mei Ling; Kim, Hyoung Jin; Kim, Hong-Jin

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have revealed that ingestion of bovine colostrum is effective in preventing pathogens from invading through the gastrointestinal tract (GI) and modulating the mucosal immunity of the GI tract, indicating that its effect is principally local. Thus it is unclear if ingestion of bovine colostrum can affect the systemic immune system. In this study, we investigated the effect of taking bovine colostrum (vs phosphate-buffered saline) for 14 days on the behavior of the immune cells of mice. Isolated splenocytes, which are pivotal cells of systemic immunity, were then stimulated with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide. Bovine colostrum significantly reduced NK cell and monocyte activities and lymphoproliferaltive responses to LPS stimulation. Thus dietary bovine colostrum renders immune cells less responsive to LPS stimulation. Dietary bovine colostrum thus affects the systemic immune system and may have anti-inflammatory actions. PMID:24234910

  17. Effects of citrulline malate on bacterial lipopolysaccharide induced endotoxemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Verleye, M; Heulard, I; Stephens, J R; Levy, R H; Gillardin, J M

    1995-06-01

    The administration of endotoxins to rats as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) induces a state of exhaustion, in which the main symptoms are febrile hyperthermia, reduced food intake, decreased body weight, and reduced muscle performance in treadmill tests. Underlying the physiological and behavioral disturbances due to the LPS is the activation of macrophages that release cytokines (interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor a) and NO. The cellular responses are intended to maintain homeostasis. Provision of citrulline as citrulline malate (CAS 54940-97-5, Stimol), an antifatigue substance, improved muscle performance, but had no effect on the body temperature or on the body weight of these animals weakened by LPS. The presence of citrulline in the NO synthesis pathway, or its participation in the speeded up elimination of ammonia and lactates, the main products of muscle metabolism, might explain the effects of citrulline malate in rats treated with LPS. PMID:7646577

  18. A cross-disciplinary perspective on the innate immune responses to bacterial lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yunhao; Kagan, Jonathan C

    2014-01-01

    The study of innate immunity to bacteria has focused heavily on the mechanisms by which mammalian cells detect lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the conserved surface component of gram-negative bacteria. While Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) is responsible for all the host transcriptional responses to LPS, recent discoveries have revealed the existence of several TLR4-independent responses to LPS. These discoveries not only broaden our view of the means by which mammalian cells interact with bacteria, but also highlight new selective pressures that may have promoted the evolution of bacterial immune evasion strategies. In this review, we highlight past and recent discoveries on host LPS sensing mechanisms and discuss bacterial countermeasures that promote infection. By looking at both sides of the host-pathogen interaction equation, we hope to provide comprehensive insights into host defense mechanisms and bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:24766885

  19. Comparison of lipopolysaccharide structures of Bordetella pertussis clinical isolates from pre- and post-vaccine era.

    PubMed

    Albitar-Nehme, Sami; Basheer, Soorej M; Njamkepo, Elisabeth; Brisson, Jean-Robert; Guiso, Nicole; Caroff, Martine

    2013-08-30

    Endotoxins are lipopolysaccharides (LPS), and major constituents of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Bordetella pertussis LPS were the only major antigens, of this agent of whooping-cough, that were not yet analyzed on isolates from the pre- and post-vaccination era. We compared here the LPS structures of four clinical isolates with that of the vaccine strain BP 1414. All physico-chemical analyses, including SDS-PAGE, TLC, and different MALDI mass spectrometry approaches were convergent. They helped demonstrating that, on the contrary to some other B. pertussis major antigens, no modification occurred in the dodecasaccharide core structure, as well as in the whole LPS molecules. These results are rendering these major antigens good potential vaccine components. Molecular modeling of this conserved LPS structure also confirmed the conclusions of previous experiments leading to the production of anti-LPS monoclonal antibodies and defining the main epitopes of these major antigens.

  20. Lacritin Salvages Human Corneal Epithelial Cells from Lipopolysaccharide Induced Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Vantaku, Venkat Rao; Gupta, Geetika; Rapalli, Krishna Chaitanya; Karnati, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Innate immunity of the corneal epithelium is conferred by proteinaceous secretions from the epithelium and associated lacrimal and meibomian glands. Lacritin, an eye-specific protein with anti-microbial, cytoprotective and wound-healing properties, predominantly secreted by lacrimal glands, is absent in conditions such as Dry eye and Keratitis. In view of the biological significance of lacritin in human eye, we investigated its role in human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced infection. LPS-challenged HCE cells demonstrated apoptosis-mediated cell death and elevated lacritin levels. The LPS-induced cell death is alleviated with exogenous supplementation of recombinant lacritin. This cytoprotective effect of lacritin is mediated through Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). This study is the first to highlight the protective role of lacritin and mechanism of its action during bacterial infection of cornea in vitro. PMID:26670139

  1. Immunochemical analysis of lipopolysaccharide-like component extracted from Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato.

    PubMed

    Schwarzová, K; Ciznár, I

    2004-01-01

    Immunoelectrophoresis and its modifications were applied to analysis of a lipopolysaccharide-like component (LPS-LC) extracted from Borrelia garinii strains K24 and K48 isolated from Ixodes ricinus and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto strain B31. A modification of the hot phenol-water method was used for isolation of LPS. Immunoelectrophoresis (IE) and crossed immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) of LPS-LC with polyclonal rabbit antisera revealed a pattern and properties partially similar to LPS from other Gram-negative bacteria. B. garinii LPS-LC formed in CIE a diffuse band extending from the start to the anode. Similarly, the shape and position of the band in IE did not show major differences from LPS of other Gram-negative bacteria. The LPS-LC extracted from the three genomic groups of B. burgdorferi sensu lato were found to have similar immunochemical properties irrespective of their genotype origin.

  2. Efficacy of lipopolysaccharide antigen of Yersinia ruckeri in rainbow trout by intraperitoneal and bath immersion administration.

    PubMed

    Ispir, Unal; Dorucu, Mustafa

    2014-10-01

    In this study, Intraperitoneal (IP) and bath immersion (BI) vaccine trials were conducted in fish with a mean weight of 6.3 g. Rainbow trout vaccinated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was 50 mg/L protein concentration and challenged by IP injection with 9.8 × 10(6) cell/ml of Yersinia ruckeri at 45 days post-immunization had a relative percent survival (RPS). To obtain an effective bath immersion vaccine against yersiniosis, LPS preparation was obtained from the Y. ruckeri and with the LPS antigen. After 28 and 60 days vaccinated fish with first and second immunizations by LPS were challenged via intraperitoneal injection with 9.8 × 10(6) cell/ml of Y. ruckeri for evaluating the mortality rates and calculating the relative percentage of survival (RPS). RPS value of experimental groups, which was significantly (P < 0.05) larger than that of the control group.

  3. Antigenic potential of a highly conserved Neisseria meningitidis lipopolysaccharide inner core structure defined by chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Anika; Yang, You; Claus, Heike; Pereira, Claney L; Cox, Andrew D; Vogel, Ulrich; Anish, Chakkumkal; Seeberger, Peter H

    2015-01-22

    Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis worldwide. We studied the potential of synthetic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inner core structures as broadly protective antigens against N. meningitidis. Based on the specific reactivity of human serum antibodies to synthetic LPS cores, we selected a highly conserved LPS core tetrasaccharide as a promising antigen. This LPS inner core tetrasaccharide induced a robust IgG response in mice when formulated as an immunogenic glycoconjugate. Binding of raised mouse serum to a broad collection of N. meningitidis strains demonstrated the accessibility of the LPS core on viable bacteria. The distal trisaccharide was identified as the crucial epitope, whereas the proximal Kdo moiety was immunodominant and induced mainly nonprotective antibodies that are responsible for lack of functional protection in polyclonal serum. Our results identified key antigenic determinants of LPS core glycan and, hence, may aid the design of a broadly protective immunization against N. meningitidis. PMID:25601073

  4. Detection and classification of related lipopolysaccharides via a small array of immobilized antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Uzarski, Joshua R; Mello, Charlene M

    2012-09-01

    A small array of antimicrobial peptides comprising three cysteine-terminated natural sequences covalently immobilized to pendant surface maleimide groups are used to bind and successfully discriminate five types of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules. Using surface plasmon resonance, LPSs isolated from four strains of Escherichia coli and one strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa yield distinct binding profiles to the three immobilized peptides. Linear discriminant analysis generated 100% training set and 80% validation set classification success for the 40 samples evaluated. This work demonstrates the discriminatory binding capabilities of immobilized antimicrobial peptides toward LPS molecules and alludes to their use as probes in pathogen sensing devices potentially superior to the current state-of-the-art. PMID:22881053

  5. Neuroprotective Activity of (−)-Epigallocatechin Gallate against Lipopolysaccharide-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-Biao; Zhou, Li; Wang, Yi-Zhong; Wang, Xu; Zhou, Yu; Ho, Wen-Zhe; Li, Jie-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) mediated systemic inflammation plays a critical role in neurodegenerative diseases. The present study was conducted to evaluate the protective effects of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the major component in green tea, on LPS-mediated inflammation and neurotoxicity. LPS treatment of macrophages induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6). However, EGCG pretreatment of macrophages significantly inhibited LPS-mediated induction of these cytokines. In addition, EGCG significantly diminished LPS-induced inflammatory cytokines in the peripheral mononuclear blood cells (PBMCs). Supernatant from EGCG-pretreated and LPS-activated macrophage cultures was found to be less cytotoxic to neurons than that from non-EGCG-pretreated and LPS-activated macrophage cultures. Furthermore, EGCG treatment of neurons could inhibit LPS-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Thus EGCG represents a potent and useful neuroprotective agent for inflammation-mediated neurological disorders. PMID:27191001

  6. Genetic linkage analysis to identify a gene required for the addition of phosphoethanolamine to meningococcal lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Tang, Christoph M; Stroud, Dave; Mackinnon, Fiona; Makepeace, Katherine; Plested, Joyce; Moxon, E Richard; Chalmers, Ronald

    2002-02-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is important for the virulence of Neisseria meningitidis, and is the target of immune responses. We took advantage of a monoclonal antibody (Mab B5) that recognises phosphoethanolamine (PEtn) attached to the inner core of meningococcal LPS to identify genes required for the addition of PEtn to LPS. Insertional mutants that lost Mab B5 reactivity were isolated and characterised, but failed to yield genes directly responsible for PEtn substitution. Subsequent genetic linkage analysis was used to define a region of DNA containing a single intact open reading frame which is sufficient to confer B5 reactivity to a B5 negative meningococcal isolate. The results provide an initial characterisation of the genetic basis of a key, immunodominant epitope of meningococcal LPS.

  7. Structure determination of LpxD from the lipopolysaccharide-synthesis pathway of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Badger, John; Chie-Leon, Barbara; Logan, Cheyenne; Sridhar, Vandana; Sankaran, Banumathi; Zwart, Peter H; Nienaber, Vicki

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative bacterium that is resistant to many currently available antibiotics. The protein LpxD is a component of the biosynthetic pathway for lipopolysaccharides in the outer membrane of this bacterium and is a potential target for new antibacterial agents. This paper describes the structure determination of apo forms of LpxD in space groups P2(1) and P4(3)22. These crystals contained six and three copies of the protein molecule in the asymmetric unit and diffracted to 2.8 and 2.7 Å resolution, respectively. A comparison of the multiple protein copies in the asymmetric units of these crystals reveals a common protein conformation and a conformation in which the relative orientation between the two major domains in the protein is altered. PMID:23295477

  8. Calcium ions induce collapse of charged O-side chains of lipopolysaccharides from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Schneck, Emanuel; Papp-Szabo, Erzsebet; Quinn, Bonnie E.; Konovalov, Oleg V.; Beveridge, Terry J.; Pink, David A.; Tanaka, Motomu

    2009-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) monolayers deposited on planar, hydrophobic substrates were used as a defined model of outer membranes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain dps 89. To investigate the influence of ions on the (out-of-plane) monolayer structure, we measured specular X-ray reflectivity at high energy (22 keV) to ensure transmission through water. Electron density profiles were reconstructed from the reflectivity curves, and they indicate that the presence of Ca2+ ions induces a significant change in the conformation of the charged polysaccharide head groups (O-side chains). Monte Carlo simulations based on a minimal computer model of LPS molecules allow for the modelling of 100 or more molecules over 10−3 s and theoretically explained the tendency found by experiments. PMID:19605401

  9. Conformational Dynamics of the Single Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigen in Solution.

    PubMed

    Galochkina, Tatiana; Zlenko, Dmitry; Nesterenko, Alexey; Kovalenko, Ilya; Strakhovskaya, Marina; Averyanov, Alexander; Rubin, Andrey

    2016-09-19

    The O-antigen is the most variable and highly immunogenic part of the lipopolysaccharide molecule that covers the surface of Gram-negative bacteria and makes up the first line of cellular defense. To provide insight into the details of the O-antigen arrangement on the membrane surface, we simulated its behavior in solution by molecular dynamics. We developed the energetically favorable O-antigen conformation by analyzing free-energy distributions for its disaccharide fragments. Starting from this conformation, we simulated the behavior of the O-antigen chain on long timescales. Depending on the force field and temperature, the single molecule can undergo reversible or irreversible coil-to-globule transitions. The mechanism of these transitions is related either to the rotation of the carbohydrate residues around O-glycosidic bonds or to flips of the pyranose rings. We found that the presence of rhamnose in the O-antigen chain crucially increases its conformational mobility.

  10. Lacritin Salvages Human Corneal Epithelial Cells from Lipopolysaccharide Induced Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Vantaku, Venkat Rao; Gupta, Geetika; Rapalli, Krishna Chaitanya; Karnati, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Innate immunity of the corneal epithelium is conferred by proteinaceous secretions from the epithelium and associated lacrimal and meibomian glands. Lacritin, an eye-specific protein with anti-microbial, cytoprotective and wound-healing properties, predominantly secreted by lacrimal glands, is absent in conditions such as Dry eye and Keratitis. In view of the biological significance of lacritin in human eye, we investigated its role in human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced infection. LPS-challenged HCE cells demonstrated apoptosis-mediated cell death and elevated lacritin levels. The LPS-induced cell death is alleviated with exogenous supplementation of recombinant lacritin. This cytoprotective effect of lacritin is mediated through Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). This study is the first to highlight the protective role of lacritin and mechanism of its action during bacterial infection of cornea in vitro. PMID:26670139

  11. Effect of Kramecyne on the Inflammatory Response in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Peritoneal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Miranda, E.; Lemus-Bautista, J.; Pérez, S.; Pérez-Ramos, J.

    2013-01-01

    Kramecyne is a new peroxide, it was isolated from Krameria cytisoides, methanol extract, and this plant was mostly found in North and South America. This compound showed potent anti-inflammatory activity; however, the mechanisms by which this compound exerts its anti-inflammatory effect are not well understood. In this study, we examined the effects of kramecyne on inflammatory responses in mouse lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced peritoneal macrophages. Our findings indicate that kramecyne inhibits LPS-induced production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin- (IL-) 6. During the inflammatory process, levels of cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2, nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and nitric oxide (NO) increased in mouse peritoneal macrophages; however, kramecyne suppressed them significantly. These results provide novel insights into the anti-inflammatory actions and support its potential use in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23573152

  12. Inflammatory markers following acute fuel oil exposure or bacterial lipopolysaccharide in mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Lee, Kelly A; Tell, Lisa A; Mohr, F Charles

    2012-12-01

    Adult mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) were orally dosed with bunker C fuel oil for 5 days, and five different inflammatory markers (haptoglobin, mannan-binding lectin, ceruloplasmin, unsaturated iron-binding capacity, and plasma iron) were measured in blood plasma prior to and 8, 24, 48, and 72 hr following exposure. In order to contrast the response to fuel oil with that of a systemic inflammatory response, an additional five ducks were injected intramuscularly with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Oil-treated birds had an inflammatory marker profile that was significantly different from control and LPS-treated birds, showing decreases in mannan-binding lectin-dependent hemolysis and unsaturated iron-binding capacity, but no changes in any of the other inflammatory markers. Birds treated with oil also exhibited increased liver weights, decreased body and splenic weights, and decreased packed cell volume.

  13. Bacteriophage adhesin-coated long-period gratings for bacterial lipopolysaccharide recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koba, Marcin; Śmietana, Mateusz; Brzozowska, Ewa; Górska, Sabina; Mikulic, Predrag; Bock, Wojtek J.

    2014-05-01

    In this work we report an application of the optical fiber long-period gratings (LPGs) working near the dispersion turning point of higher order cladding modes for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) recognition. We show that when the LPG is functionalized with the bacteriophage adhesin, it is capable of very specific LPS detection. Thus, we compare label-free binding effect for specific to the adhesin LPS-positive and non-specific LPS-negative. The resonance wavelength shift induced by the LPS-positive reaches 2.9 nm, while for LPS-negative the shift is negligible. The LPG-based sensing structure allows for monitoring of the binding phenomenon in real time and with good accuracy.

  14. Conformational Dynamics of the Single Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigen in Solution.

    PubMed

    Galochkina, Tatiana; Zlenko, Dmitry; Nesterenko, Alexey; Kovalenko, Ilya; Strakhovskaya, Marina; Averyanov, Alexander; Rubin, Andrey

    2016-09-19

    The O-antigen is the most variable and highly immunogenic part of the lipopolysaccharide molecule that covers the surface of Gram-negative bacteria and makes up the first line of cellular defense. To provide insight into the details of the O-antigen arrangement on the membrane surface, we simulated its behavior in solution by molecular dynamics. We developed the energetically favorable O-antigen conformation by analyzing free-energy distributions for its disaccharide fragments. Starting from this conformation, we simulated the behavior of the O-antigen chain on long timescales. Depending on the force field and temperature, the single molecule can undergo reversible or irreversible coil-to-globule transitions. The mechanism of these transitions is related either to the rotation of the carbohydrate residues around O-glycosidic bonds or to flips of the pyranose rings. We found that the presence of rhamnose in the O-antigen chain crucially increases its conformational mobility. PMID:27304860

  15. Lipopolysaccharide transport and assembly at the outer membrane: the PEZ model.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Suguru; Sherman, David J; Silhavy, Thomas J; Ruiz, Natividad; Kahne, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Gram-negative bacteria have a double-membrane cellular envelope that enables them to colonize harsh environments and prevents the entry of many clinically available antibiotics. A main component of most outer membranes is lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a glycolipid containing several fatty acyl chains and up to hundreds of sugars that is synthesized in the cytoplasm. In the past two decades, the proteins that are responsible for transporting LPS across the cellular envelope and assembling it at the cell surface in Escherichia coli have been identified, but it remains unclear how they function. In this Review, we discuss recent advances in this area and present a model that explains how energy from the cytoplasm is used to power LPS transport across the cellular envelope to the cell surface. PMID:27026255

  16. Gram-Negative Marine Bacteria: Structural Features of Lipopolysaccharides and Their Relevance for Economically Important Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Choi, Sangdun

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative marine bacteria can thrive in harsh oceanic conditions, partly because of the structural diversity of the cell wall and its components, particularly lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS is composed of three main parts, an O-antigen, lipid A, and a core region, all of which display immense structural variations among different bacterial species. These components not only provide cell integrity but also elicit an immune response in the host, which ranges from other marine organisms to humans. Toll-like receptor 4 and its homologs are the dedicated receptors that detect LPS and trigger the immune system to respond, often causing a wide variety of inflammatory diseases and even death. This review describes the structural organization of selected LPSes and their association with economically important diseases in marine organisms. In addition, the potential therapeutic use of LPS as an immune adjuvant in different diseases is highlighted. PMID:24796306

  17. Iron potentiates bacterial lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide formation in animal organs.

    PubMed

    Kubrina, L N; Mikoyan, V D; Mordvintcev, P I; Vanin, A F

    1993-04-16

    Administration of an Fe(2+)-citrate complex to mongrel mice pretreated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Salmonella typhosa increased LPS-induced NO formation in vivo in the liver, intestine, lung, heart, kidney and spleen by 10-20-fold. This process was monitored by the intensity of the EPR signal due to mononitrosyl iron complex (MNIC) formation with exogenous diethyldithiocarbamate (DETC) recorded in the tissues. The NO synthase inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine, prevented this complex formation in the liver of mice treated with both LPS and Fe(2+)-citrate complex. Thus, administration of LPS and Fe(2+)-citrate complex to mice induced NO biosynthesis in this tissue via an L-arginine-dependent pathway, presumably by facilitating the entry of Ca2+ ions into NO-producing cells through Fe(2+)-induced cell membrane lesions. PMID:7682442

  18. Cytokine release by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated whole blood from patients with typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    House, Deborah; Chinh, Nguyen T; Hien, Tran T; Parry, Christopher P; Ly, Nguyen T; Diep, To S; Wain, John; Dunstan, Sarah; White, Nicholas J; Dougan, Gordon; Farrar, Jeremy J

    2002-07-15

    The ex vivo cytokine response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of whole blood from patients with typhoid fever was investigated. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha release by LPS-stimulated blood was found to be lower during acute typhoid fever than after a course of antimicrobial therapy (P

  19. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide enhances polymorphonuclear leukocyte function independent of changes in intracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Klein, J B; Payne, V; Schepers, T M; McLeish, K R

    1990-10-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) enhanced expression of C3bi receptors (CR3), phagocytosis of opsonized bacteria, and subsequent hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). The role of changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in LPS-induced priming was examined by determining the effect of modulators of intracellular calcium on enhanced PMN function, determining the ability of calcium ionophores to reproduce the effects of LPS, and measuring PMN [Ca2+]i following addition of LPS. Inhibition of intracellular calcium-dependent processes with TMB-8 or quin-2 blocked all three measures of LPS-induced priming. LPS did not stimulate an increase in [Ca2+]i, and calcium ionophores failed to reproduce the effect of LPS. Maintenance of [Ca2+]i is necessary for LPS priming, but an increase in [Ca2+]i is not a component of the signal transduction pathway leading to PMN priming by LPS.

  20. Sepsis progression to multiple organ dysfunction in carotid chemo/baro-denervated rats treated with lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Nardocci, Gino; Martin, Aldo; Abarzúa, Sebastián; Rodríguez, Jorge; Simon, Felipe; Reyes, Edison P; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Navarro, Cristina; Cortes, Paula P; Fernández, Ricardo

    2015-01-15

    Sepsis progresses to multiple organ dysfunction (MOD) due to the uncontrolled release of inflammatory mediators. Carotid chemo/baro-receptors could play a protective role during sepsis. In anesthetized male rats, we measured cardiorespiratory variables and plasma TNF-α, glucocorticoids, epinephrine, and MOD marker levels 90min after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration in control (SHAM surgery) and bilateral carotid chemo/baro-denervated (BCN) rats. BCN prior to LPS blunted the tachypneic response and enhanced tachycardia and hypotension. BCN-LPS rats also showed blunted plasma glucocorticoid responses, boosted epinephrine and TNF-α responses, and earlier MOD onset with a lower survival time compared with SHAM-LPS rats. Consequently, the complete absence of carotid chemo/baro-sensory function modified the neural, endocrine and inflammatory responses to sepsis. Thus, carotid chemo/baro-receptors play a protective role in sepsis.

  1. Functional Identification of Proteus mirabilis eptC Gene Encoding a Core Lipopolysaccharide Phosphoethanolamine Transferase

    PubMed Central

    Aquilini, Eleonora; Merino, Susana; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Regué, Miguel; Tomás, Juan M.

    2014-01-01

    By comparison of the Proteus mirabilis HI4320 genome with known lipopolysaccharide (LPS) phosphoethanolamine transferases, three putative candidates (PMI3040, PMI3576, and PMI3104) were identified. One of them, eptC (PMI3104) was able to modify the LPS of two defined non-polar core LPS mutants of Klebsiella pneumoniae that we use as surrogate substrates. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance showed that eptC directs the incorporation of phosphoethanolamine to the O-6 of l-glycero-d-mano-heptose II. The eptC gene is found in all the P. mirabilis strains analyzed in this study. Putative eptC homologues were found for only two additional genera of the Enterobacteriaceae family, Photobacterium and Providencia. The data obtained in this work supports the role of the eptC (PMI3104) product in the transfer of PEtN to the O-6 of l,d-HepII in P. mirabilis strains. PMID:24756091

  2. New complete structure of Hafnia alvei clinical isolate strain PCM 2670 semi-rough lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Bobko, Ewelina; Tyras, Michal; Jachymek, Wojciech

    2013-06-01

    Hafnia alvei strain PCM 2670 is a clinical isolate from a patient with chronic reproductive tract infection. The novel structure of the semi-rough lipopolysaccharide was established with the use of NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry as well as immunochemical techniques. According to the mass spectrometry data, heptose in the oligosaccharide is partially substituted by glycine. H. alvei PCM 2670 core structure encompasses the common core of H. alvei which is modified with two additional galactose units. [structure: see text]. The 6-substituted galactose is the O-antigen repeating unit substitution residue. The repeating unit consists of five monosaccharide residues and has the following structure: →2)-β-Galp-(1→6)-α-Glcp-(1→6)-αGlcpNAc3OAc-(1→4)-α-GalpA-(1→3)-β-GlcpNAc6OAc-(1→6)-core. PMID:23643833

  3. Microglial ablation and lipopolysaccharide preconditioning affects pilocarpine-induced seizures in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mirrione, Martine M.; Konomos, Dorothy K.; Gravanis, Iordanis; Dewey, Stephen L.; Aguzzi, Adriano; Heppner, Frank L.; Tsirka, Stella E.

    2010-01-01

    Activated microglia have been associated with neurodegeneration in patients and in animal models of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (TLE), however their precise functions as neurotoxic or neuroprotective is a topic of significant investigation. To explore this, we examined the effects of pilocarpine induced seizures in transgenic mice where microglia/macrophages were conditionally ablated. We found that unilateral ablation of microglia from the dorsal hippocampus did not alter acute seizure sensitivity. However, when this procedure was coupled with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) preconditioning (1 mg/kg given 24 hours prior to acute seizure), we observed a significant pro-convulsant phenomenon. This effect was associated with lower metabolic activation in the ipsilateral hippocampus during acute seizures, and could be attributed to activity in the mossy fiber pathway. These findings reveal that preconditioning with LPS 24 hours prior to seizure induction may have a protective effect which is abolished by unilateral hippocampal microglia/macrophage ablation. PMID:20382223

  4. The Lipopolysaccharide Export Pathway in Escherichia coli: Structure, Organization and Regulated Assembly of the Lpt Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Polissi, Alessandra; Sperandeo, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial outer membrane (OM) is a peculiar biological structure with a unique composition that contributes significantly to the fitness of Gram-negative bacteria in hostile environments. OM components are all synthesized in the cytosol and must, then, be transported efficiently across three compartments to the cell surface. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a unique glycolipid that paves the outer leaflet of the OM. Transport of this complex molecule poses several problems to the cells due to its amphipatic nature. In this review, the multiprotein machinery devoted to LPS transport to the OM is discussed together with the challenges associated with this process and the solutions that cells have evolved to address the problem of LPS biogenesis. PMID:24549203

  5. CAF1-knockout mice are more susceptive to lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jia-Xin; Li, Jia-Shu; Hu, Rong; Li, Xiao-Min; Wang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The carbon catabolite repressor protein 4 (CCR4)–negative on TATA (NOT) complex includes multiple subunits and is conserved in the eukaryotic cells. The CCR4–NOT complex can regulate gene expression at different levels. Two subunits of the CCR4–NOT complex, CCR4 and CCR4-associated factor 1 (CAF1), possess deadenylase activity. In yeast, the deadenylase activity is mainly provided by the CCR4 subunit; however, the deadenylase activity is provided by both CCR4 and CAF1 in other eukaryotes. A previous study reported that CAF1 but not CCR4 is required for the decay of a reporter mRNA with AU-rich elements. Our previous study showed that CAF1 is involved in the regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression. Both ICAM-1 and IL-8 play crucial roles in acute lung injury. In the present study, we examined the effects of CAF1 deficiency on IL-8 and ICAM-1 expression and acute lung injury in mice. Here we showed that there were no differences between the wild-type and CAF1-knockout mice on phenotypes. The lung histology and protein and mRNA levels of IL-8 and ICAM-1 in unstimulated wild-type mice were comparable to those in unstimulated CAF1-knockout mice. However, lipopolysaccharide stimulation led to more severe lung histological injury and greatly higher IL-8 and ICAM-1 expression in CAF1-knockout mice compared to the wild-type mice. These results, together with our previous study, suggest that CAF1 is involved in the regulation of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated IL-8 and ICAM-1 expression in vivo and affects the progression of acute lung injury. PMID:27358572

  6. Repeated Oronasal Exposure to Lipopolysaccharide Induced Mucosal IgA Responses in Periparturient Dairy Cows

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Summera; Zebeli, Qendrim; Mansmann, Dominik A.; Dunn, Suzanna M.; Ametaj, Burim N.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of repeated oronasal treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the humoral immune responses in saliva, vaginal mucus, and the plasma markers of the acute phase response in periparturient dairy cows. One hundred pregnant Holstein cows were administered either 3 increasing doses of LPS (n = 50) as follows: 1) 0.01 µg/kg body weight (BW) on d −28, 2) 0.05 µg/kg BW on d −25, and −21, and 3) 0.1 µg/kg BW on d −18, and −14, or sterile saline solution (controls; n = 50) oronasally for 3 consecutive wk starting at 28 d before parturition. Intensive sampling was conducted on thirty cows (n = 15/group). Multiple saliva, vaginal mucus and blood samples were collected around parturition and analyzed for total immunoglobulin-(Ig)A, plasma serum amyloid A (SAA), lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP), anti-LPS IgA, IgG, IgM, tumour necrosis factor(TNF)-α, and interleukin(IL)-1. Results regarding total secretory IgA (sIgA) antibodies showed greater concentrations in the saliva and an overall tendency for higher total sIgA in the vaginal mucus of the LPS-treated cows. Treatment had no effect on plasma sIgA, IgG, IgM anti-LPS antibodies, haptoglobin, SAA, LBP, TNF-α, and IL-1. Treatments by time interactions were observed for SAA and IL-1 with lowered concentrations of both variables in the plasma of LPS-treated cows after parturition. Overall, repeated oronasal LPS treatment clearly enhanced total sIgA antibodies in the saliva, stimulated their production in vaginal mucus shortly before calving, and lowered plasma IL-1 around parturition, but showed limited effects on markers of the acute phase response in the plasma in dairy cows around parturition. PMID:25061754

  7. A Glycam-Based Force Field for Simulations of Lipopolysaccharide Membranes: Parametrization and Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschner, Karl N.; Lins, Roberto D.; Maass, Astrid; Soares, Thereza A.

    2012-11-13

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) comprise the outermost layer of the Gram-negative bacteria cell envelope. Packed onto a lipid layer, the outer membrane displays remarkable physical-chemical differences compared to cell membranes. The carbohydrate-rich region confers a membrane asymmetry that underlies many biological processes such as endotoxicity, antibiotic resistance, and cell adhesion. Furthermore, unlike membrane proteins from other sources, integral outer-membrane proteins do not consist of transmembrane α helices; instead they consist of antiparallel β-barrels, which highlights the importance of the LPS membrane as a medium. In this work, we present an extension of the GLYCAM06 force field that has been specifically developed for LPS membranes using our Wolf2Pack program. This new set of parameters for lipopolysaccharide molecules expands the GLYCAM06 repertoire of monosaccharides to include phosphorylated N- and O-acetylglucosamine, 3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2- ulosonic acid, L-glycero-D-manno-heptose and its O-carbamoylated variant, and N-alanine-D-galactosamine. A total of 1 µs of molecular dynamics simulations of the rough LPS membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01 is used to showcase the added parameter set. The equilibration of the LPS membrane is shown to be signi!cantly slower compared to phospholipid membranes, on the order of 500 ns. It is further shown that water molecules penetrate the hydrocarbon region up to the terminal methyl groups, much deeper than commonly observed for phospholipid bilayers, and in agreement with neutron diffraction measurements. A comparison of simulated structural, dynamical, and electrostatic properties against corresponding experimentally available data shows that the present parameter set reproduces well the overall structure and the permeability of LPS membranes in the liquid-crystalline phase.

  8. Three different anti-lipopolysaccharide factors identified from giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Ren, Qian; Zhang, Zhao; Li, Xin-Chang; Jie-Du; Hui, Kai-Min; Zhang, Chi-Yu; Wang, Wen

    2012-10-01

    Anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) is a type of basic protein and an important antimicrobial peptide that can bind and neutralize lipopolysaccharides (LPS). This protein shows a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity. In this study, three forms of ALF designated as MrALF5, MrALF6, and MrALF7 were identified from giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii. MrALF5, MrALF6, and MrALF7 genes encode 133, 121, and 120 amino acids of the corresponding proteins, respectively. All these ALF proteins contain LPS-binding domain with two conserved cysteine residues. The genomic sequences of MrALF5 and MrALF7 were amplified. The genomic structures of MrALF5 and MrALF7 comprise three exons interrupted by two introns. Phylogenetic analysis showed that MrALF5, MrALF6, and MrALF7 were clustered into clade II. Evolutionary analysis showed that ALF genes from M. rosenbergii may suffer a rapid evolution. MrALF5 was expressed mainly in the hepatopancreas, gills, and heart. MrALF6 was mainly distributed in the intestine and hepatopancreas. The highest expression level of MrALF7 was detected in the hepatopancreas. MrALF6, as well as MrALF7, was downregulated by Escherichia coli challenge, and all three ALF genes were upregulated by Vibrio or white spot syndrome virus challenge. MrALF6 was also upregulated by Staphylococcus aureus challenge. In summary, the three isoforms of ALF genes may participate in the innate immune response against bacteria and virus infecting the giant fresh water prawn. PMID:22800688

  9. 6-Hydroxydopamine and lipopolysaccharides induced DNA damage in astrocytes: involvement of nitric oxide and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sonam; Goswami, Poonam; Biswas, Joyshree; Joshi, Neeraj; Sharma, Sharad; Nath, C; Singh, Sarika

    2015-01-15

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of the neurotoxins 6-hydroxydopamine and lipopolysaccharide on astrocytes. Rat astrocyte C6 cells were treated with different concentration of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)/lipopolysaccharides (LPS) for 24 h. Both neurotoxins significantly decreased the viability of astrocytes, augmented the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the astrocyte marker--glial fibrillar acidic protein. A significantly decreased mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity, mitochondrial membrane potential, augmented reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, caspase-3 mRNA level, chromatin condensation and DNA damage was observed in 6-OHDA/LPS treated astroglial cells. 6-OHDA/LPS treatment also caused the significantly increased expression of iNOS and nitrite level. Findings showed that 6-OHDA/LPS treatment caused mitochondrial dysfunction mediated death of astrocytes, which significantly involve the nitric oxide. Since we have observed significantly increased level of iNOS along with mitochondrial impairment and apoptotic cell death in astrocytes, therefore to validate the role of iNOS, the cells were co-treated with iNOS inhibitor aminoguanidine (AG, 100 μM). Co-treatment of AG significantly attenuated the 6-OHDA/LPS induced cell death, mitochondrial activity, augmented ROS level, chromatin condensation and DNA damage. GFAP and caspase-3 expression were also inhibited with co-treatment of AG, although the extent of inhibition was different in both experimental sets. In conclusion, the findings showed that iNOS mediated increased level of nitric oxide acts as a key regulatory molecule in 6-OHDA/LPS induced mitochondrial dysfunction, DNA damage and apoptotic death of astrocytes.

  10. Effects of lipopolysaccharide and chelator on mercury content in the cerebrum of thimerosal-administered mice.

    PubMed

    Minami, Takeshi; Oda, Keisuke; Gima, Naoya; Yamazaki, Hideo

    2007-11-01

    Thimerosal is one of the best-known preservative agents for vaccines in the world but a relationship between its use and autism has long been suspected so that its effects on the brain need more detailed research. We here examined the influence of lipopolysaccharide injury to the blood-brain barrier on the penetration of mercury from thimerosal into mouse cerebrums, as well as the effect of chelator of heavy metals on cerebrum mercury content. Mercury can be expected to be detected in the cerebrum of normal mice, because the metal is present in standard mouse chow. When 60μg/kg of thimerosal was subcutaneously injected into the mouse, the mercury content in the cerebrum was significantly higher 48h after the thimerosal injection with a maximum peak after 72h. In addition, mercury content in the cerebrum was still higher on day 7 than in the control group. When lipopolysaccharide was pre-injected into mice to induce damage on blood-brain barrier, the mercury content in the cerebrum was significantly higher at 24 and 72h after the injection of 12μg/kg of thimerosal compared to the control group, this dose alone does not cause any increase. The mercury content in the cerebrums of mice was decreased to the control group level on day 7 when a chelator, dimercaprol, was administered once a day from days 3 to 6 after a 60μg/kg, s.c. injection. In addition, d-penicillamine as a chelator decreased the mercury contents in the cerebrum after the high dose administration. In conclusion, a physiological dose of thimerosal did not increase the content of mercury in the cerebrum, but levels were increased when damage to the blood-brain barrier occurred in mice injected with thimerosal. In addition, a chelator of heavy metals may be useful to remove mercury from the cerebrum.

  11. Phase diagram of lipid A from Salmonella minnesota and Escherichia coli rough mutant lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, K; Koch, M H; Seydel, U

    1990-01-01

    We have reported here on the structural polymorphism of lipid A, the "endotoxic principle" of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. For lipid A of rough mutant lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella minnesota and Escherichia coli, the three-dimensional supramolecular structures were determined with x-ray diffraction utilizing synchrotron radiation. The investigations were performed in the water concentration range 10 to 95% by weight, at [lipid A]:[Mg2+] molar ratios from 1:0 to 0.1:1, and in the temperature range from 20 to 70 degrees C. These data were correlated with measurements of the beta----alpha phase behaviour which was monitored with differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. We found that the transition temperature of the acyl chains ranges--in the absence of Mg2(+)-from 45 degrees C at high to 56 degrees C at low water content, and-at an equimolar content of Mg2(+)-from 52 degrees C at high to 59 degrees C at low water concentrations. In the gel phase-in which the lipid A acyl chains are more disordered than those from saturated phospholipids-cubic phases are adopted at high water content (greater than 60%) and at high [lipid A]:[Mg2+] molar ratios. At low water contents, lamellar states are assumed exclusively. In the liquid crystalline state of lipid A, the hexagonal HII state is adopted under all conditions. The structural variability of lipid A is highest at high water concentrations, and structural changes may be induced by only slight changes in temperature, water content, and Mg2+ concentration. Under physiological conditions, however, the lipid A assemblies exhibit a strong preference to cubic structures.

  12. A Glycam-Based Force Field for Simulations of Lipopolysaccharide Membranes: Parametrization and Validation.

    PubMed

    Kirschner, Karl N; Lins, Roberto D; Maass, Astrid; Soares, Thereza A

    2012-11-13

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) comprise the outermost layer of the Gram-negative bacteria cell envelope. Packed onto a lipid layer, the outer membrane displays remarkable physical-chemical differences compared to cell membranes. The carbohydrate-rich region confers a membrane asymmetry that underlies many biological processes such as endotoxicity, antibiotic resistance, and cell adhesion. Furthermore, unlike membrane proteins from other sources, integral outer-membrane proteins do not consist of transmembrane α helices; instead they consist of antiparallel β-barrels, which highlights the importance of the LPS membrane as a medium. In this work, we present an extension of the GLYCAM06 force field that has been specifically developed for LPS membranes using our Wolf2Pack program. This new set of parameters for lipopolysaccharide molecules expands the GLYCAM06 repertoire of monosaccharides to include phosphorylated N- and O-acetylglucosamine, 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid, l-glycero-D-manno-heptose and its O-carbamoylated variant, and N-alanine-d-galactosamine. A total of 1 μs of molecular dynamics simulations of the rough LPS membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01 is used to showcase the added parameter set. The equilibration of the LPS membrane is shown to be significantly slower compared to phospholipid membranes, on the order of 500 ns. It is further shown that water molecules penetrate the hydrocarbon region up to the terminal methyl groups, much deeper than commonly observed for phospholipid bilayers, and in agreement with neutron diffraction measurements. A comparison of simulated structural, dynamical, and electrostatic properties against corresponding experimentally available data shows that the present parameter set reproduces well the overall structure and the permeability of LPS membranes in the liquid-crystalline phase.

  13. New amphiphilic neamine derivatives active against resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and their interactions with lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Sautrey, Guillaume; Zimmermann, Louis; Deleu, Magali; Delbar, Alicia; Souza Machado, Luiza; Jeannot, Katy; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Buyck, Julien M; Decout, Jean-Luc; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule

    2014-08-01

    The development of novel antimicrobial agents is urgently required to curb the widespread emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria like colistin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We previously synthesized a series of amphiphilic neamine derivatives active against bacterial membranes, among which 3',6-di-O-[(2"-naphthyl)propyl]neamine (3',6-di2NP), 3',6-di-O-[(2"-naphthyl)butyl]neamine (3',6-di2NB), and 3',6-di-O-nonylneamine (3',6-diNn) showed high levels of activity and low levels of cytotoxicity (L. Zimmermann et al., J. Med. Chem. 56:7691-7705, 2013). We have now further characterized the activity of these derivatives against colistin-resistant P. aeruginosa and studied their mode of action; specifically, we characterized their ability to interact with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and to alter the bacterial outer membrane (OM). The three amphiphilic neamine derivatives were active against clinical colistin-resistant strains (MICs, about 2 to 8 μg/ml), The most active one (3',6-diNn) was bactericidal at its MIC and inhibited biofilm formation at 2-fold its MIC. They cooperatively bound to LPSs, increasing the outer membrane permeability. Grafting long and linear alkyl chains (nonyl) optimized binding to LPS and outer membrane permeabilization. The effects of amphiphilic neamine derivatives on LPS micelles suggest changes in the cross-bridging of lipopolysaccharides and disordering in the hydrophobic core of the micelles. The molecular shape of the 3',6-dialkyl neamine derivatives induced by the nature of the grafted hydrophobic moieties (naphthylalkyl instead of alkyl) and the flexibility of the hydrophobic moiety are critical for their fluidifying effect and their ability to displace cations bridging LPS. Results from this work could be exploited for the development of new amphiphilic neamine derivatives active against colistin-resistant P. aeruginosa.

  14. Multiple mechanisms involved in diabetes protection by lipopolysaccharide in non-obese diabetic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun; Cao, Hui; Wang, Hongjie; Yin, Guoxiao; Du, Jiao; Xia, Fei; Lu, Jingli; Xiang, Ming

    2015-06-15

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation has been proposed to be important for islet cell inflammation and eventually β cell loss in the course of type 1 diabetes (T1D) development. However, according to the “hygiene hypothesis”, bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an agonist on TLR4, inhibits T1D progression. Here we investigated possible mechanisms for the protective effect of LPS on T1D development in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. We found that LPS administration to NOD mice during the prediabetic state neither prevented nor reversed insulitis, but delayed the onset and decreased the incidence of diabetes, and that a multiple-injection protocol is more effective than a single LPS intervention. Further, LPS administration suppressed spleen T lymphocyte proliferation, increased the generation of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs), reduced the synthesis of strong Th1 proinflammatory cytokines, and downregulated TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. Most importantly, multiple injections of LPS induced a potential tolerogenic dendritic cell (DC) subset with low TLR4 expression without influencing the DC phenotype. Explanting DCs from repeated LPS-treated NOD mice into NOD/SCID diabetic mice conferred sustained protective effects against the progression of diabetes in the recipients. Overall, these results suggest that multiple mechanisms are involved in the protective effects of LPS against the development of diabetes in NOD diabetic mice. These include Treg induction, down-regulation of TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway, and the emergence of a potential tolerogenic DC subset. - Highlights: • Administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) prevented type 1 diabetes in NOD mice. • Downregulating TLR4 level and MyD88-dependent pathway contributed to protection of LPS. • LPS administration also hampered DC maturation and promoted Treg differentiation.

  15. Mutation of the Lipopolysaccharide Core Glycosyltransferase Encoded by waaG Destabilizes the Outer Membrane of Escherichia coli by Interfering with Core Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Yethon, Jeremy A.; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Perry, Malcolm B.; Whitfield, Chris

    2000-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, phosphoryl substituents in the lipopolysaccharide core region are essential for outer membrane stability. Mutation of the core glucosyltransferase encoded by waaG (formerly rfaG) resulted in lipopolysaccharide truncated immediately after the inner core heptose residues, which serve as the sites for phosphorylation. Surprisingly, mutation of waaG also destabilized the outer membrane. Structural analyses of waaG mutant lipopolysaccharide showed that the cause for this phenotype was a decrease in core phosphorylation, an unexpected side effect of the waaG mutation. PMID:10986272

  16. The Majority of In Vitro Macrophage Activation Exhibited by Extracts of Some Immune Enhancing Botanicals is Due to Bacterial Lipoproteins and Lipopolysaccharides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have identified potent monocyte/macrophage activating bacterial lipoproteins within commonly used immune enhancing botanicals such as Echinacea, American ginseng and alfalfa sprouts. These bacterial lipoproteins, along with lipopolysaccharides, were substantially more potent than other bacteriall...

  17. Antimicrobial peptides and nitric oxide production by neutrophils from periodontitis subjects.

    PubMed

    Mariano, F S; Campanelli, A P; Nociti Jr, F H; Mattos-Graner, R O; Gonçalves, R B

    2012-11-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in periodontitis by producing nitric oxide (NO) and antimicrobial peptides, molecules with microbicidal activity via oxygen-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. It is unknown whether variation in the production of antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37, human neutrophil peptides (HNP) 1-3, and NO by neutrophils influences the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. We compared the production of these peptides and NO by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated neutrophils isolated from healthy subjects and from patients with periodontitis. Peripheral blood neutrophils were cultured with or without Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-LPS (Aa-LPS), Porphyromonas gingivalis-LPS (Pg-LPS) and Escherichia coli-LPS (Ec-LPS). qRT-PCR was used to determine quantities of HNP 1-3 and LL-37 mRNA in neutrophils. Amounts of HNP 1-3 and LL-37 proteins in the cell culture supernatants were also determined by ELISA. In addition, NO levels in neutrophil culture supernatants were quantitated by the Griess reaction. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients cultured with Aa-LPS, Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS expressed higher HNP 1-3 mRNA than neutrophils from healthy subjects. LL-37 mRNA expression was higher in neutrophils from patients stimulated with Aa-LPS. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients produced significantly higher LL-37 protein levels than neutrophils from healthy subjects when stimulated with Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS, but no difference was observed in HNP 1-3 production. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients cultured or not with Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS produced significantly lower NO levels than neutrophils from healthy subjects. The significant differences in the production of LL-37 and NO between neutrophils from healthy and periodontitis subjects indicate that production of these molecules might influence individual susceptibility to important periodontal pathogens.

  18. The role of bivalent ions in the inactivation of bacteriophage phi X174 by lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli C.

    PubMed Central

    Rowatt, E

    1984-01-01

    The need for Ca2+ in the inactivation of bacteriophage phi X174 by lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli C was confirmed. Ca2+ could be replaced almost completely by Na+, but the concentration of Na+ needed was greater by more than an order of magnitude. Other bivalent ions caused inactivation in the same way as Ca2+, and the degree of inactivation varied according to the ion. At 50% inactivation of bacteriophage, the relation between the concentrations of NaCl and of bivalent or tervalent ions (Mx+) fitted the conception that NaCl was neutralizing electrostatic repulsion between virus and lipopolysaccharide by an ionic-strength effect: that is, log[Mx+] varies inversely with square root[NaCl]. The variation in effect of bi- and ter-valent ions and the low concentration needed show that this is not an ionic-strength effect but likely to involve binding to more than one site. PMID:6238590

  19. Serratia marcescens induces apoptotic cell death in host immune cells via a lipopolysaccharide- and flagella-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kenichi; Adachi, Tatsuo; Imamura, Katsutoshi; Takano, Shinya; Usui, Kimihito; Suzuki, Kazushi; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Takeshi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2012-10-19

    Injection of Serratia marcescens into the blood (hemolymph) of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, induced the activation of c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), followed by caspase activation and apoptosis of blood cells (hemocytes). This process impaired the innate immune response in which pathogen cell wall components, such as glucan, stimulate hemocytes, leading to the activation of insect cytokine paralytic peptide. S. marcescens induced apoptotic cell death of silkworm hemocytes and mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. We searched for S. marcescens transposon mutants with attenuated ability to induce apoptosis of silkworm hemocytes. Among the genes identified, disruption mutants of wecA (a gene involved in lipopolysaccharide O-antigen synthesis), and flhD and fliR (essential genes in flagella synthesis) showed reduced motility and impaired induction of mouse macrophage cell death. These findings suggest that S. marcescens induces apoptosis of host immune cells via lipopolysaccharide- and flagella-dependent motility, leading to the suppression of host innate immunity.

  20. Brucellosis Vaccines: Assessment of Brucella melitensis Lipopolysaccharide Rough Mutants Defective in Core and O-Polysaccharide Synthesis and Export

    PubMed Central

    González, David; Grilló, María-Jesús; De Miguel, María-Jesús; Ali, Tara; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; Delrue, Rose-May; Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Muñoz, Pilar; López-Goñi, Ignacio; Iriarte, Maite; Marín, Clara-M.; Weintraub, Andrej; Widmalm, Göran; Zygmunt, Michel; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Blasco, José-María; Moriyón, Ignacio

    2008-01-01

    Background The brucellae are facultative intracellular bacteria that cause brucellosis, one of the major neglected zoonoses. In endemic areas, vaccination is the only effective way to control this disease. Brucella melitensis Rev 1 is a vaccine effective against the brucellosis of sheep and goat caused by B. melitensis, the commonest source of human infection. However, Rev 1 carries a smooth lipopolysaccharide with an O-polysaccharide that elicits antibodies interfering in serodiagnosis, a major problem in eradication campaigns. Because of this, rough Brucella mutants lacking the O-polysaccharide have been proposed as vaccines. Methodology/Principal Findings To examine the possibilities of rough vaccines, we screened B. melitensis for lipopolysaccharide genes and obtained mutants representing all main rough phenotypes with regard to core oligosaccharide and O-polysaccharide synthesis and export. Using the mouse model, mutants were classified into four attenuation patterns according to their multiplication and persistence in spleens at different doses. In macrophages, mutants belonging to three of these attenuation patterns reached the Brucella characteristic intracellular niche and multiplied intracellularly, suggesting that they could be suitable vaccine candidates. Virulence patterns, intracellular behavior and lipopolysaccharide defects roughly correlated with the degree of protection afforded by the mutants upon intraperitoneal vaccination of mice. However, when vaccination was applied by the subcutaneous route, only two mutants matched the protection obtained with Rev 1 albeit at doses one thousand fold higher than this reference vaccine. These mutants, which were blocked in O-polysaccharide export and accumulated internal O-polysaccharides, stimulated weak anti-smooth lipopolysaccharide antibodies. Conclusions/Significance The results demonstrate that no rough mutant is equal to Rev 1 in laboratory models and question the notion that rough vaccines are

  1. The second anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (EsALF-2) with antimicrobial activity from Eriocheir sinensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Leilei; Yang, Jialong; Gai, Yunchao; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2010-09-01

    The anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) is a small basic protein that can bind and neutralize lipopolysaccharide (LPS), mediating degranulation and activation of an intracellular coagulation cascade. In the present study, cDNA of the second Eriocheir sinensis ALF (designated as EsALF-2) was cloned and the full-length cDNA of EsALF-2 was of 724bp, consisting of an open reading frame (ORF) of 363bp encoding a polypeptide of 120 amino acids. The deduced amino acid of EsALF-2 shared 82% similarity with EsALF-1 from E. sinensis and about 53-65% similarity with ALFs from other crustaceans. The potential tertiary structures of EsALF-1 and EsALF-2 contained two highly conserved-cysteine residues to define the LPS binding site, but the N-terminal of EsALF-1 formed a single additional alpha-helix compared to EsALF-2, implying that EsALF-1 and EsALF-2 might represent different biological functions in E. sinensis. The mRNA transcript of EsALF-2 was detected in all examined tissues of healthy crabs, including haemocytes, hepatopancreas, gill, muscle, heart and gonad, which suggested that EsALF-2 could be a multifunctional molecule for the host immune defense responses and thereby provided systemic protection against pathogens. The mRNA expression of EsALF-2 was up-regulated after Listonella anguillarum and Pichia pastoris challenge and the recombinant protein of EsALF-2 showed antimicrobial activity against L. anguillarum and P. pastoris, indicating that EsALF-2 was involved in the immune defense responses in Chinese mitten crab against L. anguillarum and P. pastoris. These results together indicated that there were abundant and diverse ALFs in E. sinensis with various biological functions and these ALFs would provide candidate promising therapeutic or prophylactic agents in health management and diseases control of crab aquaculture. PMID:20416335

  2. Sensitive assay, based on hydroxy fatty acids from lipopolysaccharide lipid A, for Gram-negative bacteria in sediments.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, J H; Smith, G A; Fredrickson, H L; Vestal, J R; White, D C

    1982-01-01

    Biochemical measures have provided insight into the biomass and community structure of sedimentary microbiota without the requirement of selection by growth or quantitative removal from the sediment grains. This study used the assay of the hydroxy fatty acids released from the lipid A of the lipopolysaccharide in sediments to provide an estimate of the gram-negative bacteria. The method was sensitive to picomolar amounts of hydroxy fatty acids. The recovery of lipopolysaccharide hydroxy fatty acids from organisms added to sediments was quantitative. The lipids were extracted from the sediments with single-phase chloroform-methanol extraction. The lipid-extraction residue was hydrolyzed in 1 N HCl, and the hydroxy fatty acids of the lipopolysaccharide were recovered in chloroform for analysis by gas-liquid chromatography. This method proved to be about fivefold more sensitive than the classical phenol-water or trichloroacetic acid methods when applied to marine sediments. By examination of the patterns of hydroxy fatty acids, it was also possible to help define the community structure of the sedimentary gram-negative bacteria. PMID:6817712

  3. An antibacterial vaccination strategy based on a glycoconjugate containing the core lipopolysaccharide tetrasaccharide Hep2Kdo2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lingbing; Vijayakrishnan, Balakumar; Kowarik, Michael; Park, Jin; Zakharova, Alexandra N.; Neiwert, Larissa; Faridmoayer, Amirreza; Davis, Benjamin G.

    2016-03-01

    Certain non-mammalian cell wall sugars are conserved across a variety of pathogenic bacteria. This conservation of structure, combined with their structural differences when compared with mammalian sugars, make them potentially powerful epitopes for immunization. Here, we report the synthesis of a glycoconjugate that displays the so-called ‘inner core’ sugars of Gram-negative bacterial cell walls. We also describe an antibacterial vaccination strategy based on immunization with the glycoconjugate and the subsequent administration of an inhibitor that uncovers the corresponding epitope in pathogenic bacteria. The core tetrasaccharide, Hep2Kdo2, a common motif in bacterial lipopolysaccharides, was synthesized and attached via a chain linker to a diphtheria toxin mutant carrier protein. This glycoconjugate generated titres of antibodies towards the inner core tetrasaccharide of the lipopolysaccharide, which were capable of binding the cell-surface sugars of bacterial pathogenic strains including Neisseria meningitidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. Exposure of bacterial lipopolysaccharide in in vitro experiments, using an inhibitor of capsular polysaccharide transport, enabled potent bacterial killing with antiserum.

  4. An anti-lipopolysaccharide factor from red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, exhibited antimicrobial activities in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chen; Xu, Wen-Teng; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Dong, Li-Ping; Zhang, Ting; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2011-01-01

    The anti-lipopolysaccharide factors (ALFs) are a group of effector molecules of innate immunity in arthropods, exhibiting binding and neutralizing activities to lipopolysaccharides. In this study, an ALF cDNA sequence (PcALF1) was identified from red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii. The deduced peptide of PcALF1 was conserved; it manifested the signal peptide and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding domain, especially the two conserved cysteine residues at both ends of the domain. Transcripts of PcALF1 were detected in multiple tissues. Results of quantitative real-time PCR exhibited that the expression level of PcALF1 was induced by virus and Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Purified recombinant protein of PcALF1 revealed multiple biological activities: it gave all the tested bacteria and fungi a tight binding; it could bind microbial polysaccharides (LPS, LTA, and β-glucan) as well. In vitro, the antimicrobial activity assay was demonstrated as a broad spectrum against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and a fungus. The rPcALF1 also exhibited a clearance activity on Vibrio anguillarum in a dose-dependent manner in vivo. PMID:21056107

  5. A low-level diode laser therapy reduces the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced periodontal ligament cell inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, T. H.; Chen, C. C.; Liu, S. L.; Lu, Y. C.; Kao, C. T.

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the cytologic effects of inflammatory periodontal ligament cells in vitro after low-level laser therapy. Human periodontal ligament cells were cultured, exposed to lipopolysaccharide and subjected to low-level laser treatment of 5 J cm-2 or 10 J cm-2 using a 920 nm diode laser. A periodontal ligament cell attachment was observed under a microscope, and the cell viability was quantified by a mitochondrial colorimetric assay. Lipopolysaccharide-treated periodontal ligament cells were irradiated with the low-level laser, and the expression levels of several inflammatory markers, iNOS, TNF-α and IL-1, and pErk kinase, were analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot. The data were collected and analyzed by one-way analysis of variance; p < 0.05 indicated a statistically significant difference. The low-level laser treatment of periodontal ligament cells increased their ability to attach and survive. After irradiation, the expression levels of iNOS, TNF-α and IL-1 in lipopolysaccharide-exposed periodontal ligament cells decreased over time (p < 0.05). In periodontal ligament cells, low-level diode laser treatment increased the cells’ proliferative ability and decreased the expression of the examined inflammatory mediators.

  6. Capture of lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin) by the blood clot: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Margaret T; Rickles, Frederick R; Armstrong, Peter B

    2013-01-01

    In vertebrates and arthropods, blood clotting involves the establishment of a plug of aggregated thrombocytes (the cellular clot) and an extracellular fibrillar clot formed by the polymerization of the structural protein of the clot, which is fibrin in mammals, plasma lipoprotein in crustaceans, and coagulin in the horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus. Both elements of the clot function to staunch bleeding. Additionally, the extracellular clot functions as an agent of the innate immune system by providing a passive anti-microbial barrier and microbial entrapment device, which functions directly at the site of wounds to the integument. Here we show that, in addition to these passive functions in immunity, the plasma lipoprotein clot of lobster, the coagulin clot of Limulus, and both the platelet thrombus and the fibrin clot of mammals (human, mouse) operate to capture lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin). The lipid A core of LPS is the principal agent of gram-negative septicemia, which is responsible for more than 100,000 human deaths annually in the United States and is similarly toxic to arthropods. Quantification using the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) test shows that clots capture significant quantities of LPS and fluorescent-labeled LPS can be seen by microscopy to decorate the clot fibrils. Thrombi generated in the living mouse accumulate LPS in vivo. It is suggested that capture of LPS released from gram-negative bacteria entrapped by the blood clot operates to protect against the disease that might be caused by its systemic dispersal. PMID:24282521

  7. Interaction between tachyplesin I, an antimicrobial peptide derived from horseshoe crab, and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Takahiro; Kamiya, Masakatsu; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Kumaki, Yasuhiro; Kikukawa, Takashi; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Demura, Makoto; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro; Kawano, Keiichi

    2014-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major constituent of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and is the very first site of interactions with antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In order to gain better insight into the interaction between LPS and AMPs, we determined the structure of tachyplesin I (TP I), an antimicrobial peptide derived from horseshoe crab, in its bound state with LPS and proposed the complex structure of TP I and LPS using a docking program. CD and NMR measurements revealed that binding to LPS slightly extends the two β-strands of TP I and stabilizes the whole structure of TP I. The fluorescence wavelength of an intrinsic tryptophan of TP I and fluorescence quenching in the presence or absence of LPS indicated that a tryptophan residue is incorporated into the hydrophobic environment of LPS. Finally, we succeeded in proposing a structural model for the complex of TP I and LPS by using a docking program. The calculated model structure suggested that the cationic residues of TP I interact with phosphate groups and saccharides of LPS, whereas hydrophobic residues interact with the acyl chains of LPS. PMID:24389234

  8. Release of lipopolysaccharide from intracellular compartments containing Salmonella typhimurium to vesicles of the host epithelial cell.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-del Portillo, F; Stein, M A; Finlay, B B

    1997-01-01

    The biological effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on eucaryotic cells have traditionally been characterized following extracellular challenge of LPS on susceptible cells. In this study, we report the capacity of Salmonella typhimurium to release LPS once it is located in the intracellular environment of cultured epithelial cells. LPS is liberated from vacuolar compartments, where intracellular bacteria reside, to vesicles present in the host cell cytosol. The vesicle-associated LPS is detected in infected cells from the time when invading bacteria enter the host cell. Release of LPS is restricted to S. typhimurium-infected cells, with no LPS observed in neighboring uninfected cells, suggesting that dissemination of LPS occurs entirely within the intracellular environment of the infected cell. The amount of LPS present in host vesicles reaches a maximum when intracellular S. typhimurium cells start to proliferate, a time at which the entire host cell cytosol is filled with numerous vesicles containing LPS. All these data support the concept that intracellular bacterial pathogens might signal the host cell from intracellular locations by releasing bioactive bacterial components such as LPS. PMID:8975888

  9. Binding Interactions of Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide and the Cationic Amphiphilic Peptides Polymyxin B and WLBU2

    PubMed Central

    Ryder, Matthew P.; Wu, Xiangming; McKelvey, GregR.; McGuire, Joseph; Schilke, Karl F.

    2014-01-01

    Passage of blood through a sorbent device for removal of bacteria and endotoxin by specific binding with immobilized, membrane-active, bactericidal peptides holds promise for treating severe blood infections. Peptide insertion in the target membrane and rapid/strong binding is desirable, while membrane disruption and release of degradation products to the circulating blood is not. Here we describe interactions between bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) and the membrane-active, bactericidal peptides WLBU2 and polymyxin B (PmB). Analysis of the interfacial behavior of mixtures of LPS and peptide using air-water interfacial tensiometry and optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy strongly suggests insertion of intact LPS vesicles by the peptide WLBU2 without vesicle destabilization. In contrast, dynamic light scattering (DLS) studies show that LPS vesicles appear to undergo peptide-induced destabilization in the presence of PmB. Circular dichroism spectra further confirm that WLBU2, which shows disordered structure in aqueous solution and substantially helical structure in membrane-mimetic environments, is stably located within the LPS membrane in peptide-vesicle mixtures. We therefore expect that presentation of WLBU2 at an interface, if tethered in a fashion which preserves its mobility and solvent accessibility, will enable the capture of bacteria and endotoxin without promoting reintroduction of endotoxin to the circulating blood, thus minimizing adverse clinical outcomes. On the other hand, our results suggest no such favorable outcome of LPS interactions with polymyxin B. PMID:24905681

  10. Astragalus mongholicus polysaccharide inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced production of TNF-α and interleukin-8

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yuan; Sun, Mei; Li, Ke-Shen

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To explore the effect of Astragalus mongholicus polysaccharide (APS) on gene expression and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) transcriptional activity in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). METHODS: IEC were divided into control group, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) group, LPS+ 50 μg/mL APS group, LPS+ 100 μg/mL APS group, LPS+ 200 μg/mL APS group, and LPS+ 500 μg/mL APS group. Levels of mRNAs in LPS-induced inflammatory factors, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-8, were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. MAPK protein level was measured by Western blotting. RESULTS: The levels of TNF-α and IL-8 mRNAs were significantly higher in IEC with LPS-induced damage than in control cells. APS significantly abrogated the LPS-induced expression of the TNF-α and IL-8 genes. APS did not block the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase or c Jun amino-terminal kinase, but inhibited the activation of p38, suggesting that APS inhibits LPS-induced production of TNF-α and IL-8 mRNAs, possibly by suppressing the p38 signaling pathway. CONCLUSION: APS-modulated bacterial product-mediated p38 signaling represents an attractive strategy for prevention and treatment of intestinal inflammation. PMID:19653348

  11. Recognition of bacterial capsular polysaccharides and lipopolysaccharides by the macrophage mannose receptor.

    PubMed

    Zamze, Susanne; Martinez-Pomares, Luisa; Jones, Hannah; Taylor, Philip R; Stillion, Richard J; Gordon, Siamon; Wong, Simon Y C

    2002-11-01

    The in vitro binding of the macrophage mannose receptor to a range of different bacterial polysaccharides was investigated. The receptor was shown to bind to purified capsular polysaccharides from Streptococcus pneumoniae and to the lipopolysaccharides, but not capsular polysaccharides, from Klebsiella pneumoniae. Binding was Ca(2+)-dependent and inhibitable with d-mannose. A fusion protein of the mannose receptor containing carbohydrate recognition domains 4-7 and a full-length soluble form of the mannose receptor containing all domains external to the transmembrane region both displayed very similar binding specificities toward bacterial polysaccharides, suggesting that domains 4-7 are sufficient for recognition of these structures. Surprisingly, no direct correlation could be made between polysaccharide structure and binding to the mannose receptor, suggesting that polysaccharide conformation may play an important role in recognition. The full-length soluble form of the mannose receptor was able to bind simultaneously both polysaccharide via the carbohydrate recognition domains and sulfated oligosaccharide via the cysteine-rich domain. The possible involvement of the mannose receptor, either cell surface or soluble, in the innate and adaptive immune responses to bacterial polysaccharides is discussed.

  12. Commensal enteric bacteria lipopolysaccharide impairs host defense against disseminated Candida albicans fungal infection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, T T; Chaturvedi, V; Ertelt, J M; Xin, L; Clark, D R; Kinder, J M; Way, S S

    2015-07-01

    Commensal enteric bacteria maintain systemic immune responsiveness that protects against disseminated or localized infection in extra-intestinal tissues caused by pathogenic microbes. However, as shifts in infection susceptibility after commensal bacteria eradication have primarily been probed using viruses, the broader applicability to other pathogen types remains undefined. In sharp contrast to diminished antiviral immunity, we show commensal bacteria eradication bolsters protection against disseminated Candida albicans fungal infection. Enhanced antifungal immunity reflects more robust systemic expansion of Ly6G(hi)Ly6C(int) neutrophils, and their mobilization into infected tissues among antibiotic-treated compared with commensal bacteria-replete control mice. Reciprocally, depletion of neutrophils from expanded levels or intestinal lipopolysaccharide reconstitution overrides the antifungal protective benefits conferred by commensal bacteria eradication. This discordance in antifungal compared with antiviral immunity highlights intrinsic differences in how commensal bacteria control responsiveness for specific immune cell subsets, because pathogen-specific CD8(+) T cells that protect against viruses were suppressed similarly after C. albicans and influenza A virus infection. Thus, positive calibration of antiviral immunity by commensal bacteria is counterbalanced by restrained activation of other immune components that confer antifungal immunity.

  13. Asiatic Acid Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiling; Xiao, Xianzhong; Yang, Mingshi

    2016-10-01

    Asiatic acid (AA), a major triterpene isolated from Centella asiatica (L.) Urban, is known to exert various pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of AA on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) and clarify the underlying mechanisms. Lung pathological changes were assessed by H&E staining. The myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was detected by MPO assay. The levels of inflammatory cytokines were measured by ELISA. TLR4 and NF-kB expression was detected by Western blot analysis. AA obviously inhibited LPS-induced lung histopathological changes, MPO activity, and inflammatory cell numbers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Treatment of AA also inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β production. Furthermore, Western blot analysis showed that AA inhibited LPS-induced TLR4 expression and NF-kB activation. In conclusion, AA inhibited LPS-induced ALI in mice by inhibiting inflammatory cytokine production, which is mediated via blocking of the TLR4/NF-kB signaling pathway.

  14. Interaction of human mannose-binding lectin (MBL) with Yersinia enterocolitica lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Kasperkiewicz, Katarzyna; Swierzko, Anna S; Bartlomiejczyk, Marcin A; Cedzynski, Maciej; Noszczynska, Magdalena; Duda, Katarzyna A; Michalski, Mateusz; Skurnik, Mikael

    2015-09-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is involved in the interaction between Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria and host. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), complement-activating soluble pattern-recognition receptor targets microbial glycoconjugates, including LPS. We studied its interactions with a set of Yersinia enterocolitica O:3 LPS mutants. The wild-type strain LPS consists of lipid A (LA) substituted with an inner core oligosaccharide (IC) which in turn is substituted either with the O-specific polysaccharide (OPS) or the outer core hexasaccharide (OC), and sometimes also with the enterobacterial common antigen (ECA). The LPS mutants produced truncated LPS, missing OPS, OC or both, or, in addition, different IC constituents or ECA. MBL bound to LA-IC, LA-IC-OPS and LA-IC-ECA but not LA-IC-OC structures. Moreover, LA-IC substitution with both OPS and ECA prevented the lectin binding. Sequential truncation of the IC heptoses demonstrated that the MBL targets the IC heptose region. Furthermore, microbial growth temperature influenced MBL binding; binding was stronger to bacteria grown at room temperature (22°C) than to bacteria grown at 37°C. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that MBL can interact with Y. enterocolitica LPS, however, the in vivo significance of that interaction remains to be elucidated. PMID:26188838

  15. Lipopolysaccharide transport to the cell surface: biosynthesis and extraction from the inner membrane

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Brent W.; May, Janine M.; Sherman, David J.; Kahne, Daniel; Ruiz, Natividad

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface of most Gram-negative bacteria is covered with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The network of charges and sugars provided by the dense packing of LPS molecules in the outer leaflet of the outer membrane interferes with the entry of hydrophobic compounds into the cell, including many antibiotics. In addition, LPS can be recognized by the immune system and plays a crucial role in many interactions between bacteria and their animal hosts. LPS is synthesized in the inner membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, so it must be transported across their cell envelope to assemble at the cell surface. Over the past two decades, much of the research on LPS biogenesis has focused on the discovery and understanding of Lpt, a multi-protein complex that spans the cell envelope and functions to transport LPS from the inner membrane to the outer membrane. This paper focuses on the early steps of the transport of LPS by the Lpt machinery: the extraction of LPS from the inner membrane. The accompanying paper (May JM, Sherman DJ, Simpson BW, Ruiz N, Kahne D. 2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 370, 20150027. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2015.0027)) describes the subsequent steps as LPS travels through the periplasm and the outer membrane to its final destination at the cell surface. PMID:26370941

  16. Lipopolysaccharide neutralization by antimicrobial peptides: a gambit in the innate host defense strategy.

    PubMed

    Pulido, David; Nogués, M Victòria; Boix, Ester; Torrent, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are nowadays understood as broad multifunctional tools of the innate immune system to fight microbial infections. In addition to its direct antimicrobial action, AMPs can modulate the host immune response by promoting or restraining the recruitment of cells and chemicals to the infection focus. Binding of AMPs to lipopolysaccharide is a critical step for both their antimicrobial action and their immunomodulatory properties. On the one hand, removal of Gram-negative bacteria by AMPs can be an effective strategy to prevent a worsened inflammatory response that may lead to septic shock. On the other hand, by neutralizing circulating endotoxins, AMPs can successfully reduce nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-α production, hence preventing severe tissue damage. Furthermore, AMPs can also interfere with the Toll-like receptor 4 recognition system, suppressing cytokine production and contributing to modulate the inflammatory response. Here, we review the immune system strategies devised by AMPs to avoid an exacerbated inflammatory response and thus prevent a fatal end to the host.

  17. Molecular and Chemical Analysis of the Lipopolysaccharide from Aeromonas hydrophila Strain AH-1 (Serotype O11)

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Susana; Canals, Rocío; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Tomás, Juan M.

    2015-01-01

    A group of virulent Aeromonas hydrophila, A. sobria, and A. veronii biovar sobria strains isolated from humans and fish have been described; these strains classified to serotype O11 are serologically related by their lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigen (O-polysaccharide), and the presence of an S-layer consisting of multiple copies of a crystalline surface array protein with a molecular weight of 52 kDa in the form of a crystalline surface array which lies peripheral to the cell wall. A. hydrophila strain AH-1 is one of them. We isolated the LPS from this strain and determined the structure of the O-polysaccharide, which was similar to that previously described for another strain of serotype O11. The genetics of the O11-antigen showed the genes (wbO11 cluster) in two sections separated by genes involved in biosynthesis and assembly of the S-layer. The O11-antigen LPS is an example of an ABC-2-transporter-dependent pathway for O-antigen heteropolysaccharide (disaccharide) assembly. The genes involved in the biosynthesis of the LPS core (waaO11 cluster) were also identified in three different chromosome regions being nearly identical to the ones described for A. hydrophila AH-3 (serotype O34). The genetic data and preliminary chemical analysis indicated that the LPS core for strain AH-1 is identical to the one for strain AH-3. PMID:25874921

  18. The Aeromonas salmonicida Lipopolysaccharide Core from Different Subspecies: The Unusual subsp. pectinolytica

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Susana; Tomás, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    Initial hydridization tests using Aeromonas salmonicida typical and atypical strains showed the possibility of different lipopolysaccharide (LPS) outer cores among these strains. By chemical structural analysis, LPS-core SDS-PAGE gel migration, and functional and comparative genomics we demonstrated that typical A. salmonicida (subsp. salmonicida) strains and atypical subsp. masoucida and probably smithia strains showed the same LPS outer core. A. salmonicida subsp. achromogenes strains show a similar LPS outer core but lack one of the most external residues (a galactose linked α1-6 to heptose), not affecting the O-antigen LPS linkage. A. salmonicida subsp. pectinolytica strains show a rather changed LPS outer core, which is identical to the LPS outer core from the majority of the A. hydrophila strains studied by genomic analyses. The LPS inner core in all tested A. salmonicida strains, typical and atypical, is well-conserved. Furthermore, the LPS inner core seems to be conserved in all the Aeromonas (psychrophilic or mesophilic) strains studied by genomic analyses. PMID:26904002

  19. Eupatorium lindleyanum DC. flavonoids fraction attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chunjun; Yao, Shi; Chen, Jinglei; Wei, Xiaochen; Xia, Long; Chen, Daofeng; Zhang, Jian

    2016-10-01

    Eupatorium lindleyanum DC., "Ye-Ma-Zhui" called by local residents in China, showed anti-inflammatory activity and is used to treat tracheitis. We had isolated and identified the flavonoids, diterpenoids and sesquiterpenes compounds from the herb. In the present study, we evaluated the protective effects of the flavonoids fraction of E. lindleyanum (EUP-FLA) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice and the possible underlying mechanisms of action. EUP-FLA could significantly decrease lung wet-to-dry weight (W/D) ratio, nitric oxide (NO) and protein concentration in BALF, lower myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, increase superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and down-regulate the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Additionally, EUP-FLA attenuated lung histopathological changes and significantly reduced complement deposition with decreasing the levels of Complement 3 (C3) and Complement 3c (C3c) in serum. These results demonstrated that EUP-FLA may attenuate LPS-induced ALI via reducing productions of pro-inflammatory mediators, decreasing the level of complement and affecting the NO, SOD and MPO activity. PMID:27398612

  20. Deletion of Ovarian Hormones Induces a Sickness Behavior in Rats Comparable to the Effect of Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Azizi-Malekabadi, Hamid; Hosseini, Mahmoud; Pourganji, Masoume; Zabihi, Hoda; Saeedjalali, Mohsen; Anaeigoudari, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimmune factors have been proposed as the contributors to the pathogenesis of sickness behaviors. The effects of female gonadal hormones on both neuroinflammation and depression have also been well considered. In the present study, the capability of deletion of ovarian hormones to induce sickness-like behaviors in rats was compared with the effect lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The groups were including Sham, OVX, Sham-LPS, and OVX-LPS. The Sham-LPS and OVX-LPS groups were treated with LPS (250 μg/kg) two hours before conducting the behavioral tests. In the forced swimming (FST), the immobility times in both OVX and Sham-LPS groups were higher than that of Sham (P < 0.001). In open-field (OP) test, the central crossing number by OVX and Sham-LPS groups were lower than Sham (P < 0.001) while there were no significant differences between OVX-LPS and OVX groups. In elevated plus maze (EPM), the percent of entries to the open arm by both OVX and Sham-LPS groups was lower than that of Sham group (P < 0.001). The results of present study showed that deletion of ovarian hormones induced sickness behaviors in rats which were comparable to the effects of LPS. Moreover, further investigations are required in order to better understand the mechanism(s) involved. PMID:25705518

  1. Upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 by ginsenoside Ro attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in macrophage cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sokho; Oh, Myung-Hoon; Kim, Bum-Seok; Kim, Won-Il; Cho, Ho-Seong; Park, Byoung-Yong; Park, Chul; Shin, Gee-Wook; Kwon, Jungkee

    2015-01-01

    Background The beneficial effects of ginsenoside species have been well demonstrated in a number of studies. However, the function of ginsenoside Ro (GRo), an oleanane-type saponin, has not been sufficiently investigated. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of GRo in vitro using the Raw 264.7 mouse macrophage cell line treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and to clarify the possible mechanism of GRo involving heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which itself plays a critical role in self-defense in the presence of inflammatory stress. Methods Raw 264.7 cells were pretreated with GRo (up to 200μM) for 1 h before treatment with 1 μg/mL LPS, and both cell viability and inflammatory markers involving HO-1 were evaluated. Results GRo significantly increased cell viability in a dose dependent manner following treatment with LPS, and decreased levels of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide. GRo decreased inflammatory cytokines such as nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 induced by LPS. Moreover, GRo increased the expression of HO-1 in a dose dependent manner. Cotreatment of GRo with tin protoporphyrin IX, a selective inhibitor of HO-1, not only inhibited upregulation of HO-1 induced by GRo, but also reversed the anti-inflammatory effect of GRo in LPS treated Raw 264.7 cells. Conclusion GRo induces anti-inflammatory effects following treatment with LPS via upregulation of HO-1. PMID:26869829

  2. Chemical Profiles and Protective Effect of Hedyotis diffusa Willd in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Renal Inflammation Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jian-Hong; Liu, Meng-Hua; Zhang, Xu-Lin; He, Jing-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Protective effect of Hedyotis diffusa (H. diffusa) Willd against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced renal inflammation was evaluated by the productions of cytokines and chemokine, and the bioactive constituents of H. diffusa were detected by the ultra-fast liquid chromatography -diode array detector-quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (UFLC-DAD-Q-TOF-MS/MS) method. As the results showed, water extract of H. diffusa (equal to 5.0 g/kg body weight) obviously protected renal tissues, significantly suppressed the productions of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, as well as significantly promoted the production of IL-10 in serum and renal tissues. According the chemical profiles of H. diffusa, flavonoids, iridoid glycosides and anthraquinones were greatly detected in serum from H. diffusa extract treatment mice. Two main chemotypes, including eight flavonoids and four iridoid glycosides were found in renal tissues from H. diffusa extract treatment mice. The results demonstrated that water extract of H. diffusa had protective effect on renal inflammation, which possibly resulted from the bioactive constituents consisting of flavonoids, iridoids and anthraquinones. PMID:26580602

  3. Crystal twinning of human MD-2 recognizing endotoxin cores of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Ohto, Umeharu; Satow, Yoshinori

    2008-05-01

    Twinning of crystals causes overlapping of two or more reciprocal lattice points, and hence structure amplitudes for a single crystalline domain are hardly obtained from X-ray diffraction intensities. MD-2 protein forms a stable complex with Toll-like receptor 4 and recognizes bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Excessive immune responses activated by LPS cause septic shocks. Saccharide-trimmed human MD-2 crystallizes in the tetragonal form with apparent Laue symmetry of 4/mmm, and diffraction intensities from these crystals indicate crystal twinning. The crystal consists of two different domains, A and B. The c(A) axis of domain A coincides with the c(B) axis of domain B with a smaller lattice, and the a(A) axis corresponds to the (a(B) + b(B)) axis. This twinning severely imposes difficulty in structure determination. Through optimization of cryoprotectant, domain A was thoroughly transformed into domain B. The crystal containing only domain B is in space group P4(1)2(1)2 with one MD-2 molecule in the asymmetric unit. The structure of this form of MD-2 as well as its complex with antiendotoxic lipid IVa was successfully determined using the multiple isomorphous replacement method. PMID:18421154

  4. Bordetella parapertussis PagP Mediates the Addition of Two Palmitates to the Lipopolysaccharide Lipid A

    PubMed Central

    Hittle, L. E.; Jones, J. W.; Hajjar, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica PagP (PagPBB) is a lipid A palmitoyl transferase that is required for resistance to antibody-dependent complement-mediated killing in a murine model of infection. B. parapertussis contains a putative pagP homolog (encoding B. parapertussis PagP [PagPBPa]), but its role in the biosynthesis of lipid A, the membrane anchor of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), has not been investigated. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that wild-type B. parapertussis lipid A consists of a heterogeneous mixture of lipid A structures, with penta- and hexa-acylated structures containing one and two palmitates, respectively. Through mutational analysis, we demonstrate that PagPBPa is required for the modification of lipid A with palmitate. While PagPBB transfers a single palmitate to the lipid A C-3′ position, PagPBPa transfers palmitates to the lipid A C-2 and C-3′ positions. The addition of two palmitate acyl chains is unique to B. parapertussis. Mutation of pagPBPa resulted in a mutant strain with increased sensitivity to antimicrobial peptide killing and decreased endotoxicity, as evidenced by reduced proinflammatory responses via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) to the hypoacylated LPS. Therefore, PagP-mediated modification of lipid A regulates outer membrane function and may be a means to modify interactions between the bacterium and its human host during infection. PMID:25422302

  5. Mutations in the Lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis pathway interfere with crescentin-mediated cell curvature in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Cabeen, Matthew T; Murolo, Michelle A; Briegel, Ariane; Bui, N Khai; Vollmer, Waldemar; Ausmees, Nora; Jensen, Grant J; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2010-07-01

    Bacterial cell morphogenesis requires coordination among multiple cellular systems, including the bacterial cytoskeleton and the cell wall. In the vibrioid bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, the intermediate filament-like protein crescentin forms a cell envelope-associated cytoskeletal structure that controls cell wall growth to generate cell curvature. We undertook a genetic screen to find other cellular components important for cell curvature. Here we report that deletion of a gene (wbqL) involved in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis pathway abolishes cell curvature. Loss of WbqL function leads to the accumulation of an aberrant O-polysaccharide species and to the release of the S layer in the culture medium. Epistasis and microscopy experiments show that neither S-layer nor O-polysaccharide production is required for curved cell morphology per se but that production of the altered O-polysaccharide species abolishes cell curvature by apparently interfering with the ability of the crescentin structure to associate with the cell envelope. Our data suggest that perturbations in a cellular pathway that is itself fully dispensable for cell curvature can cause a disruption of cell morphogenesis, highlighting the delicate harmony among unrelated cellular systems. Using the wbqL mutant, we also show that the normal assembly and growth properties of the crescentin structure are independent of its association with the cell envelope. However, this envelope association is important for facilitating the local disruption of the stable crescentin structure at the division site during cytokinesis.

  6. Complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of an enzyme for Lipopolysaccharide modification

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kyung; Six, David A.; Lee, Hyun-Jung; Raetz, Christian R.H.; Gottesman, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Summary The PhoQ/PhoP two-component system activates many genes for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modification when cells are grown at low Mg2+ concentrations. An additional target of PhoQ and PhoP is MgrR, an Hfq-dependent small RNA that negatively regulates expression of eptB, also encoding a protein that carries out LPS modification. Examination of LPS confirmed that MgrR effectively silences EptB; the phosphoethanolamine modification associated with EptB is found in ΔmgrR::kan but not mgrR+ cells. Sigma E has been reported to positively regulate eptB, although the eptB promoter does not have the expected Sigma E recognition motifs. The effects of Sigma E and deletion of mgrR on levels of eptB mRNA were independent, and the same 5′ end was found in both cases. In vitro transcription and the behavior of transcriptional and translational fusions demonstrate that Sigma E acts directly at the level of transcription initiation for eptB, from the same start point as Sigma 70. The results suggest that when Sigma E is active, synthesis of eptB transcript outstrips MgrR-dependent degradation; presumably the modification of LPS is important under these conditions. Adding to the complexity of eptB regulation is a second sRNA, ArcZ, which also directly and negatively regulates eptB. PMID:23659637

  7. Kdo hydroxylase is an inner core assembly enzyme in the Ko-containing lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hak Suk; Yang, Eun Gyeong; Hwang, Dohyeon; Lee, Ji Eun; Guan, Ziqiang; Raetz, Christian R.H.

    2014-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) isolated from certain important Gram-negative pathogens including a human pathogen Yersinia pestis and opportunistic pathogens Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei contains D-glycero-D-talo-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Ko), an isosteric analog of 3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo). Kdo 3-hydroxylase (KdoO), a Fe2+/α-KG/O2 dependent dioxygenase from Burkholderia ambifaria and Yersinia pestis is responsible for Ko formation with Kdo2-lipid A as a substrate, but in which stage KdoO functions during the LPS biosynthesis has not been established. Here we purify KdoO from B. ambifaria (BaKdoO) to homogeneity for the first time and characterize its substrates. BaKdoO utilizes Kdo2-lipid IVA or Kdo2-lipid A as a substrate, but not Kdo-lipid IVA in vivo as well as in vitro and Kdo-(Hep)kdo-lipid A in vitro. These data suggest that KdoO is an inner core assembly enzyme that functions after the Kdo-transferase KdtA but before the heptosyl-transferase WaaC enzyme during the Ko-containing LPS biosynthesis. PMID:25204504

  8. Lung inflammatory responses and hyperinflation induced by an intratracheal exposure to lipopolysaccharide in rats.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Anne-Helene; Eriksson, Christina; Wang, Xiangdong

    2004-01-01

    Exposure of the respiratory tract to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces acute local inflammation and tissue injury associated with the various deliveries of LPS. To determine potential association of local inflammatory responses with respiratory tract dysfunction, infiltration of inflammatory cells, production of inflammatory mediators, lung hyperinflation and edema were measured in Wister rats 2, 4, and 24 h after an intratracheal administration of LPS at different doses (5, 50, 500 and 5000 microg/ml/kg). Lung hyperinflation determined by an increased excised lung gas volume was significantly increased 2 and 4 h after LPS instillation and lung edema occurred from 2 h onward. Peak BAL levels of TNFalpha appeared at 2 h, MCP-1 at 4 h, and IL-6 at 2 and 4 h, while BAL levels of IL-1beta were increased during 24 h after the intratracheal instillation of LPS. Neutrophilia in BAL fluid was noted from 2 h post-challenge. Our results demonstrate a clear dose-related change in the lung weight at 4 and 24 h, in the BAL levels of MCP-1 at 4 h, and IL-6 and IL-1beta at 2 and 4 h. It seems important to understand polymorphisms of LPS-induced lung hyperinflation and inflammation. Lung hyperinflation and inflammation may be independent during the development of acute lung injury.

  9. Highly sensitive detection of lipopolysaccharides using an aptasensor based on hybridization chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Peiyan; Zhu, Longjiao; Shao, Xiangli; Huang, Kunlun; Tian, Jingjing; Xu, Wentao

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), integral components of the outer membrane of all gram-negative bacteria, are closely associated with foodborne diseases such as fever, diarrhea and hypotension, and thus, the early and sensitive detection of LPS is necessary. In this study, an aptasensor assay based on hybridization chain reaction (HCR) was developed to detect LPS. Briefly, two complementary stable species of biotinylated DNA hairpins coexisted in solution until the introduction of a detection probe triggered a hybridization chain reaction cascade. The DNA conjugates specifically reacted with the LPS, which were captured by the ethanolamine aptamer attached to the reaction well surface. After optimizing the key reaction conditions, such as the reaction time of HCR, the amount of the capture probe and detection probes, the increase in the LPS concentration was readily measured by the optical density value, and a relatively low detection limit (1.73 ng/mL) was obtained, with a linear response range of 1–105 ng/mL. The approach presented herein introduced the use of an aptasensor for LPS discrimination and HCR for signal amplification, offering a promising option for detecting LPS. PMID:27404735

  10. Characterization and function of a cathepsin B in red crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) following lipopolysaccharide challenge.

    PubMed

    Dai, Li-Shang; Sun, Yu; Sun, Yu-Xuan; Zhu, Bao-Jian; Liu, Chao-Liang

    2016-09-01

    Cathepsin B is a lysosomal cysteine protease of the papain-like enzyme family with multiple biological functions. In the present study, a cathepsin B gene (named PcCTSB) was cloned and characterized from the red crayfish, Procambarus clarkii. The cDNA fragments of PcCTSB was 990 bp in length. It encoded a putative protein of 329 amino acid residues with predicted molecular weight of 36.4 kDa and isoelectric point of 7.020. Sequence alignment revealed that PcCTSB protein is 53.6%-80.4% identical with those from other 10 species. The predicted tertiary structure of PcCTSB protein was highly similar to that of animals. The results of the phylogenetic analysis indicated that the PcCTSB protein could be clustered with the Eriocheir sinensis cathepsin B protein. The recombinant protein of PcCTSB was expressed successfully in Escherichia coli cells. The mRNA expressions of PcCTSB were detected in all tested tissues, particularly high in the hepatopancreas. After lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge, the expression levels of PcCTSB were up-regulated significantly at different time points compared with control. Our results suggested that the PcCTSB might play an important role in defending against the pathogenes infection. PMID:27417230

  11. GADD34 suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced sepsis and tissue injury through the regulation of macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Ito, S; Tanaka, Y; Oshino, R; Okado, S; Hori, M; Isobe, K-I

    2016-01-01

    Growth arrest and DNA damage inducible protein 34 (GADD34) is induced by various cellular stresses, such as DNA damage, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and amino-acid deprivation. Although the major roles of GADD34 are regulating ER stress responses and apoptosis, a recent study suggested that GADD34 is linked to innate immune responses. In this report, we investigated the roles of GADD34 in inflammatory responses against bacterial infection. To explore the effects of GADD34 on systemic inflammation in vivo, we employed a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced murine sepsis model and assessed the lethality, serum cytokine levels, and tissue injury in the presence or absence of GADD34. We found that GADD34 deficiency increased the lethality and serum cytokine levels in LPS-induced sepsis. Moreover, GADD34 deficiency enhanced tissue destruction, cell death, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in LPS-induced acute liver injury. Pro-inflammatory cytokine production after LPS stimulation is regulated by the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway. In vitro experiments revealed that GADD34 suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokine production by macrophages through dephosphorylation of IKKβ. In conclusion, GADD34 attenuates LPS-induced sepsis and acute tissue injury through suppressing macrophage activation. Targeting this anti-inflammatory role of GADD34 may be a promising area for the development of therapeutic agents to regulate inflammatory disorders. PMID:27171261

  12. Structure binding relationship of human surfactant protein D and various lipopolysaccharide inner core structures.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Anika; Wehle, Marko; Geissner, Andreas; Crouch, Erika C; Kang, Yu; Yang, You; Anish, Chakkumkal; Santer, Mark; Seeberger, Peter H

    2016-09-01

    As a major player of the innate immune system, surfactant protein D (SP-D) recognizes and promotes elimination of various pathogens such as Gram-negative bacteria. SP-D binds to l-glycero-d-manno-heptose (Hep), a constituent of the partially conserved lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inner core of many Gram-negative bacteria. Binding and affinity of trimeric human SP-D to Hep in distinct LPS inner core glycans differing in linkages and adjacent residues was elucidated using glycan array and surface plasmon resonance measurements that were compared to in silico interaction studies. The combination of in vitro assays using defined glycans and molecular docking and dynamic simulation approaches provides insights into the interaction of trimeric SP-D with those glycan ligands. Trimeric SP-D wildtype recognized larger LPS inner core oligosaccharides with slightly enhanced affinity than smaller compounds suggesting the involvement of stabilizing secondary interactions. A trimeric human SP-D mutant D324N+D325N+R343K resembling rat SP-D bound to various LPS inner core structures in a similar pattern as observed for the wildtype but with higher affinity. The selective mutation of SP-D promotes targeting of LPS inner core oligosaccharides on Gram-negative bacteria to develop novel therapeutic agents. PMID:27350640

  13. Lipopolysaccharide of Yersinia pestis, the Cause of Plague: Structure, Genetics, Biological Properties

    PubMed Central

    Knirel, Y.A.; Anisimov, A.P.

    2012-01-01

    The present review summarizes data pertaining to the composition and structure of the carbohydrate moiety (core oligosaccharide) and lipid component (lipid A) of the various forms of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), one of the major pathogenicity factors ofYersinia pestis, the cause of plague. The review addresses the functions and the biological significance of genes for the biosynthesis of LPS, as well as the biological properties of LPS in strains from various intraspecies groups ofY. pestis and their mutants, including the contribution of LPS to the resistance of bacteria to factors of the innate immunity of both insect-vectors and mammal-hosts. Special attention is paid to temperature-dependent variations in the LPS structure, their genetic control and roles in the pathogenesis of plague. The evolutionary aspect is considered based on a comparison of the structure and genetics of the LPS ofY. pestis and other enteric bacteria, including otherYersinia species. The prospects of development of live plague vaccines created on the basis ofY. pestis strains with the genetically modified LPS are discussed. PMID:23150803

  14. Kdo hydroxylase is an inner core assembly enzyme in the Ko-containing lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hak Suk; Yang, Eun Gyeong; Hwang, Dohyeon; Lee, Ji Eun; Guan, Ziqiang; Raetz, Christian R H

    2014-09-26

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) isolated from certain important Gram-negative pathogens including a human pathogen Yersinia pestis and opportunistic pathogens Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei contains d-glycero-d-talo-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Ko), an isosteric analog of 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo). Kdo 3-hydroxylase (KdoO), a Fe(2+)/α-KG/O2 dependent dioxygenase from Burkholderia ambifaria and Yersinia pestis is responsible for Ko formation with Kdo2-lipid A as a substrate, but in which stage KdoO functions during the LPS biosynthesis has not been established. Here we purify KdoO from B. ambifaria (BaKdoO) to homogeneity for the first time and characterize its substrates. BaKdoO utilizes Kdo2-lipid IVA or Kdo2-lipid A as a substrate, but not Kdo-lipid IVAin vivo as well as in vitro and Kdo-(Hep)kdo-lipid A in vitro. These data suggest that KdoO is an inner core assembly enzyme that functions after the Kdo-transferase KdtA but before the heptosyl-transferase WaaC enzyme during the Ko-containing LPS biosynthesis. PMID:25204504

  15. Tissue-specific molecular immune response to lipopolysaccharide challenge in emaciated anadromous Arctic charr.

    PubMed

    Philip, Anju M; Jørgensen, Even H; Maule, Alec G; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2014-07-01

    Anadromous Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) undergo voluntary winter fasting for months in the Arctic. We tested the hypothesis that extended fasting will compromise the ability of this species to evoke an immune response. Charr were either fed or fasted for 85 days and challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the molecular immune response in the liver and spleen assessed at 8 and 96 h post-injection. LPS increased IL-1β, IL-8, and serum amyloid protein A (SAA) mRNA levels in both groups, but the liver IL-1β and IL-8, and spleen IL-8 responses were reduced in the fasted group. Fasting upregulated SOCS-1 and SOCS-2 mRNA abundance, while LPS stimulated SOCS-3 mRNA abundance and this response was higher in the fasted liver. Collectively, extended fasting and emaciation does not curtail the capacity of charr to evoke an immune response, whereas upregulation of SOCS may be a key adaptation to conserve energy by restricting the inflammatory response.

  16. Combined effects of fine particulate matter and lipopolysaccharide on apoptotic responses in NR8383 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Qi; Ru, Qin; Chen, Lin; Yue, Kai; Tian, Xiang; Ma, Baomiao; Liu, Lu; Wu, Rihui; Xu, Congyue; Pi, Mingshan; Li, Chaoying

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) are the predominant lung cells responsible for both ingestion and clearance of inhaled particulate matter (PM). The aims of this study were (1) to examine effects of fine PM on rat NR8383 cell line apoptosis, and (2) to determine whether NR8383 cell functions are further affected when exposed to fine PM in the presence of inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Standard Reference Material 2786 (SRM 2786) for fine PM was used to measure the following parameters: cytotoxicity, apoptotic rate, Bax/Bcl-2 expression, nitric oxide (NO) production, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in NR8383 cells. Data showed that SRM 2786 alone induced damage and apoptosis in NR8383 cells in a concentration-dependent manner as demonstrated by significant decrease in expression of Bcl-2 and increase in expression of Bax, suggesting fine PM might trigger apoptosis involving a mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway. In addition, there was elevated production of free radicals, such as NO and ROS, suggesting oxidative stress plays a role in the observed apoptotic responses. Further, LPS pretreatment enhanced apoptosis of NR8383 cells induced by SRM 2786. Consequently, data indicate that SRM 2786 triggered cell apoptosis in NR8383 cells, probably by mechanisms involving oxidative stress, as evidenced by elevated NO and ROS levels, while the degree of apoptosis was further aggravated by inflammation.

  17. Keratinocyte growth factor-2 is protective in lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lin; Bi, Jing; Zhu, Xiaodan; Wang, Guifang; Liu, Jie; Rong, Linyi; Wang, Qin; Xu, Nuo; Zhong, Ming; Zhu, Duming; Song, Yuanlin; Bai, Chunxue

    2014-09-15

    Keratinocyte growth factor-2 (KGF-2) plays a key role in lung development, but its role in acute lung injury has not been well characterized. Lipopolysaccharide instillation caused acute lung injury, which significantly elevated lung wet-to-dry weight ratio, protein and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), inhibited surfactant protein A and C expression in lung tissue, and increased pathological injury. Pretreatment with KGF-2 improved the above lung injury parameters, partially restored surfactant protein A and C expression, and KGF-2 given 2-3 days before LPS challenge showed maximum lung injury improvement. Pretreatment with KGF-2 also markedly reduced the levels of TNF-α, MIP-2, IL-1β and IL-6 in BALF and the levels of IL-1β and IL-6 in lung tissue. Histological analysis showed there was increased proliferation of alveolar type II epithelial cells in lung parenchyma, which reached maximal 2 days after KGF-2 instillation. Intratracheal administration of KGF-2 attenuates lung injury induced by LPS, suggesting KGF-2 may be potent in the intervention of acute lung injury.

  18. Withaferin A attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, S; Li, H; Zhou, X-Q; You, J-B; Tu, D-N; Xia, G; Jiang, J-X; Xin, C

    2015-07-31

    Withaferin A (WFA) is an active compound from Withania somnifera and has been reported to exhibit a variety of pharmacological activities such as anti—inflammatory, immunomodulatory and anti—tumor properties. In the present study, we investigated the potential protective role of WFA on acute lung injury in neonatal rats induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that WFA significantly attenuated the pathological changes of lungs induced by LPS injection. Administration with WFA obviously decreased pulmonary neutrophil infiltration accompanied with decreased MPO concentrations. WFA also reduced the expression of pro—inflammatory cytokines including MIP—2, TNF—α, IL—1β and IL—6. Meanwhile, the expression levels of anti—inflammatory mediators such as TGF—β1 and IL—10 were significantly increased following WFA administration. Moreover, WFA protected LPS—treated rats from oxidative damage via up—regulation of TBARS and H2O2 concentrations and down—regulation of ROS contents. Taken together, the present study demonstrated that WFA administration attenuated LPS—induced lung injury through inhibition of inflammatory responses and oxidative stress.

  19. Silencing of Paralemmin-3 Protects Mice from lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoying; Guo, Liang; Zhao, Yunfeng; Qian, Pin; Lv, Xuejun; Qian, Lanlan; Wang, Qin; Qian, Guisheng; Yao, Wei; Wu, Xueling

    2016-02-01

    Excessive inflammatory response induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plays a critical role in the development of acute lung injury (ALI). Paralemmin-3 (PALM3) is a novel protein that can modulate LPS-stimulated inflammatory responses in alveolar epithelial A549 cells. However, it remains unclear whether it is involved in the progression of ALI in vivo. Therefore, we studied the role of PALM3 in the pathogenesis of ALI induced by LPS. ALI was induced by LPS peritoneal injection in C57BL/6J mice. Lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting the mouse PALM3 gene and a negative control siRNA were intranasally administered to the mice. We found that the expression of PALM3 was up-regulated in the lung tissues obtained from the mouse model of LPS-induced ALI. The LPS-evoked inflammatory response (neutrophils and the concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines [IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, MIP-2] in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid [BALF]), histologic lung injury (lung injury score), permeability of the alveolar capillary barrier (lung wet/dry weight ratio and BALF protein concentration) and mortality rates were attenuated in the PALM3 siRNA-treated mice. These results indicate that PALM3 contributes to the development of ALI in mice challenged with LPS. Inhibiting PALM3 through the intranasal application of specific siRNA protected against LPS-induced ALI.

  20. Interaction of Bordetella bronchiseptica and Its Lipopolysaccharide with In Vitro Culture of Respiratory Nasal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Andrew M.; Martínez, Nhora; Romero, Stefany; Iregui, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The nasal septa of fetal rabbits at 26 days of gestation were harvested by cesarean section of the does while under anesthesia and then exposed to Bordetella bronchiseptica or its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for periods of 2 and 4 hours. A total of 240 explants were used. The tissues were examined using the Hematoxylin & Eosin technique. Then, semithin sections (0.5 μm) were stained with toluidine blue and examined with indirect immunoperoxidase (IPI) and lectin histochemistry. The most frequent and statistically significant findings were as follows: (1) cell death and increased goblet cell activity when exposed to bacteria and (2) cell death, cytoplasmic vacuolation and infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes when exposed to LPS. The lesions induced by the bacterium were more severe than with LPS alone, except for the cytoplasmic vacuolation in epithelial cells. IPI stained the ciliated border of the epithelium with the bacterium more intensely, while LPS lectin histochemistry preferentially labeled the cytoplasm of goblet cell. These data indicate that B. bronchiseptica and its LPS may have an affinity for specific glycoproteins that would act as adhesion receptors in both locations. PMID:23555071

  1. Dietary Astragalus polysaccharide alleviated immunological stress in broilers exposed to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Shen, Jing; Zhao, Chao; Wang, Xiaofei; Yao, Junhu; Gong, Yuesheng; Yang, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate whether dietary Astragalus polysaccharide (APS) could alleviate immunological stress response of chickens after challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). A total of 360 one-day-old commercial Arbor Acres broilers were randomly assigned in a 2 × 2 factorial design. The main factors were immunological stress (LPS or saline) and dietary APS (0 or 3g APS/kg feed). At 12, 14, 33 and 35 days of age, chickens were injected intramuscularly with either 500 μg/kg body weight of LPS or sterile saline. The results showed that the decreased daily feed intake and daily weight gain caused by immunological stress were dramatically attenuated by APS supplementation. The LPS challenge led to an increased mRNA abundance of TLR4, NF-κB, IL-1β, IL-6, avian uncoupling protein, α1-acid glycoprotein, hemopexin and y(+)LAT2. However, these negative effects of the LPS administration were ameliorated by APS supplementation. Moreover, dietary APS inhibited the LPS-induced depression of amino acid digestibilities. In conclusion, APS is able to alleviate LPS-induced immunological stress response in chickens. The beneficial effect may be attributed to suppressing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines through reducing the TLR4 and NF-κB genes transcription, and therewith improving energy and protein metabolism. PMID:25239195

  2. THE ABILITY OF BACTERIAL LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE TO MODULATE THE INDUCTION OF UNRESPONSIVENESS TO A STATE OF IMMUNITY

    PubMed Central

    Louis, J. A.; Chiller, J. M.; Weigle, W. O.

    1973-01-01

    Studies were performed to define the cellular parameters involved in the interference with the induction of immunologic unresponsiveness to human gamma globulin (HGG) by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Mice which were injected with deaggregated HGG (tolerogen) and with LPS did not become tolerant to that antigen, but rather became primed to a subsequent challenge with immunogen. The ability to prime with tolerogen and LPS was also demonstrated in an adoptive transfer system. The temporal relationship between the injection of tolerogen and that of LPS was critical for priming to occur. The injection of tolerogen and LPS not only primed mice to HGG, but also resulted in a primary antibody response to HGG. The capacity of LPS to interfere with the induction of tolerance was restricted to B cells and did not affect the ability to induce unresponsiveness in T cells. The secondary response to HGG in mice primed by tolerogen and LPS was found to be T-cell independent. These observations are interpreted and discussed from the standpoint of the ability of LPS to circumvent required T-cell cooperation and to modulate to tolerogenic stimulus into an immunogenic signal. PMID:4128441

  3. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) disrupts particle transport, cilia function and sperm motility in an ex vivo oviduct model

    PubMed Central

    O’Doherty, A. M.; Di Fenza, M.; Kölle, S.

    2016-01-01

    The oviduct functions in the transportation of gametes to the site of fertilization (the ampulla) and is the site of early embryonic development. Alterations of this early developmental environment, such as the presence of sexually transmitted pathogens, may affect oviduct function leading to reduced fertilization rates and contribute to compromised embryonic development. In this study, sperm interactions, particle transport speed (PTS) and cilia beat frequency (CBF) in the ampulla following exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a constituent of the sexually transmitted pathogens Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia abortus, was investigated. Three complementary experiments were performed to analyse; (1) bound sperm motility and cilia function (2) transport velocity in the oviduct and (3) the expression of genes related to immune function and inflammatory response (CASP3, CD14, MYD88, TLR4 and TRAF6). The motility of bound sperm was significantly lower in ampullae that were exposed to LPS. CBF and PTS significantly increased after treatment with LPS for 2 hours. Finally, gene expression analysis revealed that CASP3 and CD14 were significantly upregulated and TLR4 trended towards increased expression following treatment with LPS. These findings provide an insight on the impact of LPS on the oviduct sperm interaction, and have implications for both male and female fertility. PMID:27079521

  4. Interaction between tachyplesin I, an antimicrobial peptide derived from horseshoe crab, and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Takahiro; Kamiya, Masakatsu; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Kumaki, Yasuhiro; Kikukawa, Takashi; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Demura, Makoto; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro; Kawano, Keiichi

    2014-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major constituent of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and is the very first site of interactions with antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In order to gain better insight into the interaction between LPS and AMPs, we determined the structure of tachyplesin I (TP I), an antimicrobial peptide derived from horseshoe crab, in its bound state with LPS and proposed the complex structure of TP I and LPS using a docking program. CD and NMR measurements revealed that binding to LPS slightly extends the two β-strands of TP I and stabilizes the whole structure of TP I. The fluorescence wavelength of an intrinsic tryptophan of TP I and fluorescence quenching in the presence or absence of LPS indicated that a tryptophan residue is incorporated into the hydrophobic environment of LPS. Finally, we succeeded in proposing a structural model for the complex of TP I and LPS by using a docking program. The calculated model structure suggested that the cationic residues of TP I interact with phosphate groups and saccharides of LPS, whereas hydrophobic residues interact with the acyl chains of LPS.

  5. Age-associated metabolic dysregulation in bone marrow-derived macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Fan; Lee, Keith M.; McCarry, Brian E.; Bowdish, Dawn M. E.

    2016-03-01

    Macrophages are major contributors to age-associated inflammation. Metabolic processes such as oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis and the urea cycle regulate inflammatory responses by macrophages. Metabolic profiles changes with age; therefore, we hypothesized that dysregulation of metabolic processes could contribute to macrophage hyporesponsiveness to LPS. We examined the intracellular metabolome of bone marrow-derived macrophages from young (6-8 wk) and old (18-22 mo) mice following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation and tolerance. We discovered known and novel metabolites that were associated with the LPS response of macrophages from young mice, which were not inducible in macrophages from old mice. Macrophages from old mice were largely non-responsive towards LPS stimulation, and we did not observe a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. The critical regulatory metabolites succinate, γ-aminobutyric acid, arginine, ornithine and adenosine were increased in LPS-stimulated macrophages from young mice, but not macrophages from old mice. A shift between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation was not observed during LPS tolerance in macrophages from either young or old mice. Metabolic bottlenecks may be one of the mechanisms that contribute to the dysregulation of LPS responses with age.

  6. Store-operated Ca2+ channels blockers inhibit lipopolysaccharide induced astrocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Hua; Zhao, Shen-Ting; Wu, Cui-Ying; Cao, Xiong; Peng, Miao-Ru; Li, Shu-Ji; Liu, Xiao-Ai; Gao, Tian-Ming

    2013-10-01

    The destruction of calcium homeostasis is an important factor leading to neurological diseases. Store-operated Ca(2+) (SOC) channels are essential for Ca(2+) homeostasis in many cell types. However, whether SOC channels are involved in astrocyte activation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) still remains unknown. In this study, we used LPS as an exogenous stimulation to investigate the role of SOC channels in astrocyte activation. Using calcium imaging technology, we first found that SOC channels blockers, 1-[h-[3-(4-methoxyphenyl)propoxy]-4-methoxyphenethyl]-1H-imidazole (SKF-96365) and 2-aminoethyldiphenyl borate (2-APB), inhibited LPS induced [Ca(2+)]i increase, which prompted us to speculate that SOC channels may be involved in LPS induced astrocyte activation. Further experiments confirmed our speculation shown as SOC channels blockers inhibited LPS induced astrocyte activation characterized as cell proliferation by MTS and BrdU assay, raise in glial fibrillary acidic protein expression by immunofluorescence and Western Blot and secretion of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) by ELISA. So, our studies showed that SOC channels are involved in LPS-induced astrocyte activation.

  7. Neuroprotective Peptide humanin inhibits inflammatory response in astrocytes induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shen-Ting; Zhao, Li; Li, Jian-Hua

    2013-03-01

    Humanin (HN) has been proved to be an extensive neuroprotective peptide against AD-related and unrelated insults, but little is know about the effect of HN in inflammation response. Current studies indicated the receptors of HN have a close relationship with immune system, which led us to hypothesize HN might have a role in inflammatory response. In this study, we used lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce astrocyte inflammation response. This model in vitro allowed us to study the effect of HN on the pure response of astrocyte without the exogenous influence between cells in vivo. Our results showed that 1.0 μg/ml LPS induced a significant activation of astrocyte, shown as the marked increase in the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression, the cell viability and the number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive living cells. Pretreatment with HN (5, 10, 20 μM) led to a significant inhibition in astrocyte overactivation in a concentration dependent manner. We also found pretreatment with HN decreased the level of proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) induced by LPS. Furthermore, we noticed HN couldn't completely reverse the above inflammatory injury. Our findings imply that HN partly antagonizes inflammation injury induced by LPS and the protective effect of HN on astrocyte is concentration-dependent.

  8. Minocycline blocks lipopolysaccharide induced hyperalgesia by suppression of microglia but not astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yoon, S-Y; Patel, D; Dougherty, P M

    2012-09-27

    Systemic injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces a robust immune response as well as thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia. Spinal and peripheral glial cells have been implicated as important mediators in this hyperalgesia but the specific contributions of microglia versus astrocytes are not entirely clear. To better define these mechanisms, this study examined the febrile response, nociceptive sensitivity, glial cell reactivity and cytokine production in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord in rats following systemic treatment with LPS and the effects of minocycline in countering these responses. Intraperitoneal LPS injection resulted in an increase in core body temperature and produced hyperalgesia to heat and mechanical stimuli. Western blot studies revealed increased expression of microgial cell, macrophage and satellite cell markers in DRG and microglial and astrocyte markers in spinal cord following LPS treatment. Real-time RT-PCR indicated that LPS treatment increased cytokine mRNA expression levels in both the DRG and the spinal cord. Minocycline suppressed all LPS-induced behavioral effects but not the febrile response. Moreover, minocycline prevented LPS-induced microglia/macrophage activation and cytokine responses in spinal cord and DRG, but did not affect the activation of astrocytes/satellite cells. These data demonstrate that LPS-induced changes in nociceptive sensitivity are likely mediated by activation of microglial cells and/or macrophages in the spinal cord and DRG.

  9. Cerebrolysin attenuates cerebral and hepatic injury due to lipopolysaccharide in rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Salam, O M E; Omara, E A; Mohammed, N A; Youness, E R; Khadrawy, Y A; Sleem, A A

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of cerebrolysin on oxidative stress in the brain and liver during systemic inflammation. Rats were intraperitoneally challenged with a single subseptic dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 300 μg/kg) without or with cerebrolysin at doses of 21.5, 43 or 86 mg/kg. After 4 h, rats were euthanized and the brain and liver tissues were subjected to biochemical and histopathological analyses. Cerebrolysin revealed inhibitory effects on the elevation of lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide induced by LPS. In contrast, the decrease in reduced glutathione level and paraoxonase activity induced by LPS was attenuated by an injection of cerebrolysin in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, cerebrolysin reduced LPS-induced activation of brain NF-κB and reversed LPS-induced decline of brain butyrylcholinesterase and acetylcholinesterase activities in a dose-dependent manner. Histopathological analyses revealed that neuronal damage and liver necrosis induced by LPS were ameliorated by cerebrolysin dose-dependently. Cerebrolysin treatment dose-dependently attenuated LPS-induced expressions in cyclooxygenase 2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and caspase-3 in the cortex or striatum as well as the liver. These results suggest that cerebrolysin treatment might have beneficial therapeutic effects in cerebral inflammation. Cerebrolysin might also prove of value in liver disease and this possibility requires further exploration.

  10. Prenylated Flavonoids from Cudrania tricuspidata Suppress Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Neuroinflammatory Activities in BV2 Microglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Cheol; Yoon, Chi-Su; Quang, Tran Hong; Ko, Wonmin; Kim, Jong-Su; Oh, Hyuncheol; Kim, Youn-Chul

    2016-01-01

    In Korea and China, Cudrania tricuspidata Bureau (Moraceae) is an important traditional medicinal plant used to treat lumbago, hemoptysis, and contusions. The C. tricuspidata methanol extract suppressed both production of NO and PGE2 in BV2 microglial cells. Cudraflavanone D (1), isolated from this extract, remarkably suppressed the protein expression of inducible NO synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, and decreased the levels of NO and PGE2 in BV2 microglial cells exposed to lipopolysaccharide. Cudraflavanone D (1) also decreased IL-6, TNF-α, IL-12, and IL-1β production, blocked nuclear translocation of NF-κB heterodimers (p50 and p65) by interrupting the degradation and phosphorylation of inhibitor of IκB-α, and inhibited NF-κB binding. In addition, cudraflavanone D (1) suppressed the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAPK pathways. This study indicated that cudraflavanone D (1) can be a potential drug candidate for the cure of neuroinflammation. PMID:26907256

  11. Systemic lipopolysaccharide induces cochlear inflammation and exacerbates the synergistic ototoxicity of kanamycin and furosemide.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Keiko; Li, Song-Zhe; Ohlemiller, Kevin K; Ransohoff, Richard M

    2014-08-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are highly effective agents against gram-negative bacterial infections, but they cause adverse effects on hearing and balance dysfunction as a result of toxicity to hair cells of the cochlea and vestibular organs. While ototoxicity has been comprehensively studied, the contributions of the immune system, which controls the host response to infection, have not been studied in antibiotic ototoxicity. Recently, it has been shown that an inflammatory response is induced by hair cell injury. In this study, we found that lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an important component of bacterial endotoxin, when given in combination with kanamycin and furosemide, augmented the inflammatory response to hair cell injury and exacerbated hearing loss and hair cell injury. LPS injected into the peritoneum of experimental mice induced a brisk cochlear inflammatory response with recruitment of mononuclear phagocytes into the spiral ligament, even in the absence of ototoxic agents. While LPS alone did not affect hearing, animals that received LPS prior to ototoxic agents had worse hearing loss compared to those that did not receive LPS pretreatment. The poorer hearing outcome in LPS-treated mice did not correlate to changes in endocochlear potential. However, LPS-treated mice demonstrated an increased number of CCR2(+) inflammatory monocytes in the inner ear when compared with mice treated with ototoxic agents alone. We conclude that LPS and its associated inflammatory response are harmful to the inner ear when coupled with ototoxic medications and that the immune system may contribute to the final hearing outcome in subjects treated with ototoxic agents.

  12. Unique Structural Modifications Are Present in the Lipopolysaccharide from Colistin-Resistant Strains of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Mark R.; Casella, Leila G.; Jones, Jace W.; Adams, Mark D.; Zurawski, Daniel V.; Hazlett, Karsten R. O.; Doi, Yohei

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial opportunistic pathogen that can cause severe infections, including hospital-acquired pneumonia, wound infections, and sepsis. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains are prevalent, further complicating patient treatment. Due to the increase in MDR strains, the cationic antimicrobial peptide colistin has been used to treat A. baumannii infections. Colistin-resistant strains of A. baumannii with alterations to the lipid A component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) have been reported; specifically, the lipid A structure was shown to be hepta-acylated with a phosphoethanolamine (pEtN) modification present on one of the terminal phosphate residues. Using a tandem mass spectrometry platform, we provide definitive evidence that the lipid A isolated from colistin-resistant A. baumannii MAC204 LPS contains a novel structure corresponding to a diphosphoryl hepta-acylated lipid A structure with both pEtN and galactosamine (GalN) modifications. To correlate our structural studies with clinically relevant samples, we characterized colistin-susceptible and -resistant isolates obtained from patients. These results demonstrated that the clinical colistin-resistant isolate had the same pEtN and GalN modifications as those seen in the laboratory-adapted A. baumannii strain MAC204. In summary, this work has shown complete structure characterization including the accurate assignment of acylation, phosphorylation, and glycosylation of lipid A from A. baumannii, which are important for resistance to colistin. PMID:23877686

  13. Dynamics of Antagonistic Potency of Rhodobacter capsulatus PG Lipopolysaccharide against Endotoxin-Induced Effects.

    PubMed

    Kabanov, D S; Serov, D A; Zubova, S V; Grachev, S V; Prokhorenko, I R

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of antagonistic potency of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) isolated from Rhodobacter capsulatus PG on the synthesis of proinflammatory (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, IL-6, IFN-γ) and antiinflammatory (IL-10, IL-1Ra) cytokines induced by highly stimulatory endotoxins from Escherichia coli or Salmonella enterica have been studied. Using human whole blood, we have shown that R. capsulatus PG LPS inhibited most pronouncedly the endotoxin-induced synthesis of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, and IL-6 during the first 6 h after endotoxin challenge. Similarly, the endotoxin-induced release of IFN-γ was abolished by R. capsulatus PG LPS as well (24 h). In contrast to the above-mentioned cytokines, the relatively weak antagonistic activity of R. capsulatus PG LPS against endotoxin-triggered production of IL-6 and IL-8 was revealed. Since R. capsulatus PG LPS displays more potent antagonistic activity against deleterious effects of S. enterica LPS than those of E. coli LPS in the cases of such cytokines as IL-1β (6 and 24 h), IL-6 and IL-8 (4 h), we conclude that the effectiveness of protective action of antagonist is mostly determined by the primary lipid A structure of the employed agonist.

  14. Prenatal lipopolysaccharide exposure increases depression-like behaviors and reduces hippocampal neurogenesis in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Lung; Wang, Sabrina

    2014-02-01

    Major depression is one of the most prevalent mental disorders in the population. In addition to genetic influences, disturbances in fetal nervous system development might be a contributing factor. Maternal infection during pregnancy may affect fetal brain development and consequently lead to neurological and mental disorders. Previously, we used low-dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure on embryonic day 10.5 to mimic mild maternal infection in rats and found that dopaminergic and serotonergic neurons were reduced in the offspring. The offspring also showed more anxiety-like behavior and an enhanced stress response. In the present study we used forced swim test and chronic mild stress challenge to assess depression-like behaviors in the affected offspring and examined their adult hippocampal neurogenesis and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentration. Our results showed that prenatally LPS-exposed rats (LPS rats) displayed more depression-like behaviors and had reduced adult neurogenesis and BDNF. The behavioral abnormalities and reduction in adult neurogenesis could be reversed by chronic fluoxetine (FLX) treatment. This study demonstrates that during the critical time of embryonic development LPS exposure can produce long-term behavioral changes and reduction in adult neurogenesis. The findings of enhanced depression-like behaviors, reduced adult neurogenesis, and their responsiveness to chronic antidepressant treatment suggest that prenatal LPS exposure could serve as an animal model of depression.

  15. Viola yedoensis liposoluble fraction ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Xie, Jun-Yun; Li, Hong; Zhang, Yun-Yi; Cao, Jie; Cheng, Zhi-Hong; Chen, Dao-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Viola yedoensis is a component of traditional Chinese herb medicine for inflammatory diseases. Chemical constituents of V. yedoensis have been shown to possess antibacterial, anti-HIV, and anticoagulant effects in experimental research; however, their anti-inflammatory properties remain to be demonstrated. In this study, a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury was used to investigate the effect of petroleum ether fraction of V. yedoensis (PEVY) on inflammation in vivo. After being shown to have anti-complementary activity in vitro, PEVY was orally administered to the mice at doses of 2, 4, and 8 mg/kg. Treatment with PEVY significantly decreased the wet-to-dry weight ratio of the lung, total cells, red blood cells, protein concentration, and myeloperoxidase activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. PEVY markedly attenuated lung injury with improved lung morphology and reduced complement deposition. In addition, PEVY suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6. Taken together, PEVY protects the lung from acute injury, potentially via inhibiting the activation of the complement system and excessive production of proinflammatory mediators.

  16. Lipopolysaccharide Induces Human Pulmonary Micro-Vascular Endothelial Apoptosis via the YAP Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Lei; Huang, Xiaoqin; Guo, Feng; Zhou, Zengding; Chang, Mengling; Tang, Jiajun; Huan, Jingning

    2016-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces a pathologic increase in lung vascular leakage under septic conditions. LPS-induced human pulmonary micro-vascular endothelial cell (HPMEC) apoptosis launches and aggravates micro-vascular hyper-permeability and acute lung injury (ALI). Previous studies show that the activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathway is vital for LPS-induced EC apoptosis. Yes-associated protein (YAP) has been reported to positively regulate intrinsic apoptotic pathway in tumor cells apoptosis. However, the potential role of YAP protein in LPS-induced HPMEC apoptosis has not been determined. In this study, we found that LPS-induced activation and nuclear accumulation of YAP accelerated HPMECs apoptosis. LPS-induced YAP translocation from cytoplasm to nucleus by the increased phosphorylation on Y357 resulted in the interaction between YAP and transcription factor P73. Furthermore, inhibition of YAP by small interfering RNA (siRNA) not only suppressed the LPS-induced HPMEC apoptosis but also regulated P73-mediated up-regulation of BAX and down-regulation of BCL-2. Taken together, our results demonstrated that activation of the YAP/P73/(BAX and BCL-2)/caspase-3 signaling pathway played a critical role in LPS-induced HPMEC apoptosis. Inhibition of the YAP might be a potential therapeutic strategy for lung injury under sepsis. PMID:27807512

  17. In Vitro Evaluation of the Interaction of Dextrin-Colistin Conjugates with Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jessica L; Cattoz, Beatrice; Schweins, Ralf; Beck, Konrad; Thomas, David W; Griffiths, Peter C; Ferguson, Elaine L

    2016-01-28

    Dextrin-colistin conjugates have been developed with the aim of achieving reduced clinical toxicity associated with colistin, also known as polymyxin E, and improved targeting to sites of bacterial infection. This study investigated the in vitro ability of such dextrin-colistin conjugates to bind and modulate bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and how this binding affects its biological activity. These results showed that colistin and amylase-activated dextrin-colistin conjugate to a lesser extent induced aggregation of LPS to form a stacked bilayer structure with characteristic dimensions, although this did not cause any substantial change in its secondary structure. In biological studies, both colistin and dextrin-colistin conjugate effectively inhibited LPS-induced hemolysis and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) secretion in a concentration-dependent manner, but only dextrin-colistin conjugate showed no additive toxicity at higher concentrations. This study provides the first direct structural experimental evidence for the binding of dextrin-colistin conjugates and LPS and gives insight into the mode of action of dextrin-colistin conjugates. PMID:26730548

  18. Age-associated metabolic dysregulation in bone marrow-derived macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Fan; Lee, Keith M.; McCarry, Brian E.; Bowdish, Dawn M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are major contributors to age-associated inflammation. Metabolic processes such as oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis and the urea cycle regulate inflammatory responses by macrophages. Metabolic profiles changes with age; therefore, we hypothesized that dysregulation of metabolic processes could contribute to macrophage hyporesponsiveness to LPS. We examined the intracellular metabolome of bone marrow-derived macrophages from young (6–8 wk) and old (18–22 mo) mice following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation and tolerance. We discovered known and novel metabolites that were associated with the LPS response of macrophages from young mice, which were not inducible in macrophages from old mice. Macrophages from old mice were largely non-responsive towards LPS stimulation, and we did not observe a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. The critical regulatory metabolites succinate, γ-aminobutyric acid, arginine, ornithine and adenosine were increased in LPS-stimulated macrophages from young mice, but not macrophages from old mice. A shift between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation was not observed during LPS tolerance in macrophages from either young or old mice. Metabolic bottlenecks may be one of the mechanisms that contribute to the dysregulation of LPS responses with age. PMID:26940652

  19. Peptide-assembled graphene oxide as a fluorescent turn-on sensor for lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin) detection.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seng Koon; Chen, Peng; Lee, Fook Loy; Moochhala, Shabbir; Liedberg, Bo

    2015-09-15

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a toxic inflammatory stimulator released from the outer cell membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, known to be directly related to, for example, septic shock, that causes millions of casualties annually. This number could potentially be lowered significantly if specific, sensitive, and more simply applicable LPS biosensors existed. In this work, we present a facile, sensitive and selective LPS sensor, developed by assembling tetramethylrhodamine-labeled LPS-binding peptides on graphene oxide (GO). The fluorescence of the dye-labeled peptide is quenched upon interaction with GO. Specific binding to LPS triggers the release of the peptide-LPS complex from GO, resulting in fluorescence recovery. This fluorescent turn-on sensor offers an estimated limit of detection of 130 pM, which is the lowest ever reported among all synthetic LPS sensors to date. Importantly, this sensor is applicable for detection of LPS in commonly used clinical injectable fluids, and it enables selective detection of LPS from different bacterial strains as well as LPS on the membrane of living E. coli. PMID:26303386

  20. Arabinoxylan hydrolyzates as immunomodulators in lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mendis, Mihiri; Leclerc, Estelle; Simsek, Senay

    2016-07-13

    Inflammation is an important healthy immune response of the body during lesions and infection. However, uncontrolled excessive inflammation can be damaging to the cells. The specific objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of structural details of enzymatically derived wheat arabinoxylan hydrolyzates (AXH) on their immunomodulatory properties. Out of the 30 AXH, six AXH showed statistically significant reduction in NO production compared to the control, causing an approximately 24 to 12% reduction in NO production. Five AXH exhibited statistically significant pro-inflammatory properties in the LPS induced cells, causing an approximately 10 to 14% increase compared to the control. A negative correlation was seen between NO production and total arabinoxylan (AX) × amount of 1,4-linked xylose with arabinose substituted at the O-3 position. Thus, AXH with higher AX and substitution at the O-3 position are favorable candidates to reduce the lipopolysaccharide induced inflammation. These results suggest that there may be a structure-function relationship for these AXH as immunomodulators.

  1. Interleukin-13 Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced BPIFA1 Expression in Nasal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Yung-An; Lin, Chia-Der; Chen, Hui-Chen; Hsu, Hui-Ying; Wu, Lii-Tzu; Chiang-Ni, Chuan; Chen, Chih-Jung; Wu, Tsu-Fang; Kao, Min-Chuan; Chen, Yu-An; Peng, Ming-Te; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chen, Chuan-Mu; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Short palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone 1 (SPLUNC1) protein is expressed in human nasopharyngeal and respiratory epithelium and has demonstrated antimicrobial activity. SPLUNC1 is now referred to as bactericidal/permeability-increasing fold containing family A, member 1 (BPIFA1). Reduced BPIFA1 expression is associated with bacterial colonization in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP). Interleukin 13 (IL-13), predominately secreted by T helper 2 (TH2) cells, has been found to contribute to airway allergies and suppress BPIFA1 expression in nasal epithelial cells. However, the molecular mechanism of IL-13 perturbation of bacterial infection and BPIFA1 expression in host airways remains unclear. In this study, we found that lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced BPIFA1 expression in nasal epithelial cells was mediated through the JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway and AP-1 activation. We further demonstrated that IL-13 downregulated the LPS-induced activation of phosphorylated JNK and c-Jun, followed by attenuation of BPIFA1 expression. Moreover, the immunohistochemical analysis showed that IL-13 prominently suppressed BPIFA1 expression in eosinophilic CRSwNP patients with bacterial infection. Taken together, these results suggest that IL-13 plays a critical role in attenuation of bacteria-induced BPIFA1 expression that may result in eosinophilic CRSwNP. PMID:26646664

  2. Lipopolysaccharide Inhibits the Channel Activity of the P2X7 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Leiva-Salcedo, Elias; Coddou, Claudio; Rodríguez, Felipe E.; Penna, Antonello; Lopez, Ximena; Neira, Tanya; Fernández, Ricardo; Imarai, Mónica; Rios, Miguel; Escobar, Jorge; Montoya, Margarita; Huidobro-Toro, J. Pablo; Escobar, Alejandro; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    The purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) plays an important role during the immune response, participating in several events such as cytokine release, apoptosis, and necrosis. The bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is one of the strongest stimuli of the immune response, and it has been shown that P2X7R activation can modulate LPS-induced responses. Moreover, a C-terminal binding site for LPS has been proposed. In order to evaluate if LPS can directly modulate the activity of the P2X7R, we tested several signaling pathways associated with P2X7R activation in HEK293 cells that do not express the TLR-4 receptor. We found that LPS alone was unable to induce any P2X7R-related activity, suggesting that the P2X7R is not directly activated by the endotoxin. On the other hand, preapplication of LPS inhibited ATP-induced currents, intracellular calcium increase, and ethidium bromide uptake and had no effect on ERK activation in HEK293 cells. In splenocytes-derived T-regulatory cells, in which ATP-induced apoptosis is driven by the P2X7R, LPS inhibited ATP-induced apoptosis. Altogether, these results demonstrate that LPS modulates the activity of the P2X7R and suggest that this effect could be of physiological relevance. PMID:21941410

  3. pVEGF-loaded lipopolysaccharide-amine nanopolymersomes for therapeutic angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Wei; Huang, Zhonghui; Chen, Ying; Wang, Lichun; Wang, Qinmei; Huang, Hongzhang

    2014-02-01

    Therapeutic angiogenesis via gene delivery is promising for tissue survival and regeneration after injury or ischemia. A stable, safe and efficient gene vector is essential for successful angiogenesis. We have demonstrated that our newly developed lipopolysaccharide-amine nanopolymersomes (LNPs) have higher than 95% transfection efficiency when delivering pEGFP into mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). To explore their clinical potential in therapeutic angiogenesis, in this study, we studied their toxicity, storage stability, protection ability to genes and efficacy to deliver therapeutic genes of pVEGF in MSCs and zebrafish. The results show that LNPs can condense pVEGF to form pVEGF-loaded nanopolymersomes (VNPs), and protect pVEGF against DNase digestion in 6 h. Both LNPs and VNPs have low toxicity to MSCs, erythrocytes and zebrafish embryos. LNPs are stable at 4 °C for at least two years with unchanged size and transfection efficiency. MSCs transfected by VNPs continuously synthesize VEGF for at least four days under control, with a peak (21.25 ng ml-1) ˜35-fold greater than that for the untreated group. VNPs induce significant and dose-dependent angiogenesis in zebrafish without causing death, deformity or delay in growth and development, and the induced maximal vessel area of subintestinal vessel plexus is 2.5-fold higher than that for the untreated group. Our study suggests that VNP has high potential in therapeutic angiogenesis.

  4. Comprehensive analysis of the transcriptional response of human decidual cells to lipopolysaccharide stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Himes, Katherine P.; Handley, Daniel; Chu, Tianjiao; Burke, Brian; Bunce, Kimberly; Simhan, Hyagriv N.; Peters, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Decidual cells are central to innate immunity at the maternal/fetal interface. We sought to characterize the response of decidual cells to stimulation and then removal of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) using a whole genome approach. Decidual cells were isolated from term unlabored cesarean sections. Cells were stimulated with LPS and RNA isolated both prestimulation and 2 and 24 h post-stimulation. Media were changed and RNA extracted 48 h later. Gene expression was measured using Agilent 44K whole genome microarrays. Data were visualized and interpreted using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software and selected (n = 5) target gene expression was verified with quantitative real-time PCR. Genes related to immune function were up-regulated at 2 and 24 h after LPS exposure and then generally returned to baseline or were at least substantially reduced after LPS removal. Pathway analysis also revealed that genes involved in lipid metabolism (specifically cholesterol and steroid biosynthesis), iron metabolism, and the plasminogen system were coordinately altered following exposure to LPS. Our novel, preliminary findings provide insight into possible mechanisms via which the host inflammatory response could contribute to preterm birth and warrant further investigation in preterm samples. PMID:22196106

  5. Effects of Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis Mutations on K1 Polysaccharide Association with the Escherichia coli Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Natalia; Senchenkova, Sofya N.; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Pieretti, Giuseppina; Corsaro, Maria M.; Aquilini, Eleonora; Regué, Miguel; Merino, Susana

    2012-01-01

    The presence of cell-bound K1 capsule and K1 polysaccharide in culture supernatants was determined in a series of in-frame nonpolar core biosynthetic mutants from Escherichia coli KT1094 (K1, R1 core lipopolysaccharide [LPS] type) for which the major core oligosaccharide structures were determined. Cell-bound K1 capsule was absent from mutants devoid of phosphoryl modifications on l-glycero-d-manno-heptose residues (HepI and HepII) of the inner-core LPS and reduced in mutants devoid of phosphoryl modification on HepII or devoid of HepIII. In contrast, in all of the mutants, K1 polysaccharide was found in culture supernatants. These results were confirmed by using a mutant with a deletion spanning from the hldD to waaQ genes of the waa gene cluster to which individual genes were reintroduced. A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of core LPS from HepIII-deficient mutants showed an alteration in the pattern of phosphoryl modifications. A cell extract containing both K1 capsule polysaccharide and LPS obtained from an O-antigen-deficient mutant could be resolved into K1 polysaccharide and core LPS by column chromatography only when EDTA and deoxycholate (DOC) buffer were used. These results suggest that the K1 polysaccharide remains cell associated by ionically interacting with the phosphate-negative charges of the core LPS. PMID:22522903

  6. O-chain structure from the lipopolysaccharide of the human pathogen Halomonas stevensii strain S18214.

    PubMed

    Pieretti, Giuseppina; Carillo, Sara; Kim, Kwang Kyu; Lee, Keun Chul; Lee, Jung-Sook; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Corsaro, M Michela

    2011-02-01

    Halomonas stevensii is a Gram-negative, pathogenic, moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from the blood of a renal care patient. It optimally grows at 30-35°C at pH 8-9 and at a sea salt concentration ranging from 3.0% to 7.5%. Gram-negative bacterial infections are closely associated with the presence of the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) on the outer membrane. These molecules consist of three regions covalently linked: the glycolipid (lipid A), the oligosaccharide region (core region), and the O-specific polysaccharide (O-chain, O-antigen). O-antigen seems to play an important role in the colonization step (adherence) and the ability to bypass host defense mechanisms. For this reason the structure elucidation of the O-chain repeating unit is important to improve knowledge about the role of LPS in the host-pathogen interaction. In this paper, we report the complete structure of the O-chain from the LPS of H. stevensii. The bacterial cells were cultivated and LPS was extracted by the PCP (phenol-chloroform-petroleum ether) method. After mild acid hydrolysis, the lipid A was removed by centrifugation and the obtained polysaccharide was analyzed by means of chemical analysis and one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy giving the following structure:

  7. Interactions between chensinin-1, a natural antimicrobial peptide derived from Rana chensinensis, and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Dong, Weibing; Sun, Yue; Shang, Dejing

    2015-12-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of sepsis caused by gram-negative bacterial infections. Therefore, LPS-neutralizing molecules would have important clinical applications. Chensinin-1, a novel antimicrobial peptide with atypical structural features, was found in the skin secretions of the Chinese brown frog Rana chensinensis. To understand the role of LPS in the bacterial susceptibility to chensinin-1 and to investigate its anti-endotoxin effects, the interactions of chensinin-1 with LPS were investigated in this study using circular dichroism, in situ IR, isothermal titration calorimetry, and zeta potential. This study is the first to use in situ IR spectroscopy to evaluate the secondary structural changes of this peptide. The capacity of chensinin-1 to block the LPS-dependent cytokine secretion of macrophages was also investigated. Our results show that chensinin-1 can form α-helical structures in LPS suspensions. LPS can affect the antimicrobial activity of chensinin-1, and chensinin-1 was able to mitigate the effects of LPS. These data may facilitate the development of antimicrobial peptides with potent antimicrobial and anti-endotoxin activities. PMID:26340228

  8. Interleukin-13 Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced BPIFA1 Expression in Nasal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui-Chen; Hsu, Hui-Ying; Wu, Lii-Tzu; Chiang-Ni, Chuan; Chen, Chih-Jung; Wu, Tsu-Fang; Kao, Min-Chuan; Chen, Yu-An; Peng, Ming-Te; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chen, Chuan-Mu; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Short palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone 1 (SPLUNC1) protein is expressed in human nasopharyngeal and respiratory epithelium and has demonstrated antimicrobial activity. SPLUNC1 is now referred to as bactericidal/permeability-increasing fold containing family A, member 1 (BPIFA1). Reduced BPIFA1 expression is associated with bacterial colonization in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP). Interleukin 13 (IL-13), predominately secreted by T helper 2 (TH2) cells, has been found to contribute to airway allergies and suppress BPIFA1 expression in nasal epithelial cells. However, the molecular mechanism of IL-13 perturbation of bacterial infection and BPIFA1 expression in host airways remains unclear. In this study, we found that lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced BPIFA1 expression in nasal epithelial cells was mediated through the JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway and AP-1 activation. We further demonstrated that IL-13 downregulated the LPS-induced activation of phosphorylated JNK and c-Jun, followed by attenuation of BPIFA1 expression. Moreover, the immunohistochemical analysis showed that IL-13 prominently suppressed BPIFA1 expression in eosinophilic CRSwNP patients with bacterial infection. Taken together, these results suggest that IL-13 plays a critical role in attenuation of bacteria-induced BPIFA1 expression that may result in eosinophilic CRSwNP. PMID:26646664

  9. Protective Role of Proton-Sensing TDAG8 in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Mogi, Chihiro; Aoki-Saito, Haruka; Tobo, Masayuki; Kamide, Yosuke; Yatomi, Masakiyo; Sato, Koichi; Dobashi, Kunio; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Hisada, Takeshi; Yamada, Masanobu; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-12-04

    Acute lung injury is characterized by the infiltration of neutrophils into lungs and the subsequent impairment of lung function. Here we explored the role of TDAG8 in lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administrated intratracheally. In this model, cytokines and chemokines released from resident macrophages are shown to cause neutrophilic inflammation in the lungs. We found that LPS treatment increased TDAG8 expression in the lungs and confirmed its expression in resident macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids. LPS administration remarkably increased neutrophil accumulation without appreciable change in the resident macrophages, which was associated with increased penetration of blood proteins into BAL fluids, interstitial accumulation of inflammatory cells, and damage of the alveolar architecture. The LPS-induced neutrophil accumulation and the associated lung damage were enhanced in TDAG8-deficient mice as compared with those in wild-type mice. LPS also increased several mRNA and protein expressions of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the lungs or BAL fluids. Among these inflammatory mediators, mRNA and protein expression of KC (also known as CXCL1), a chemokine of neutrophils, were significantly enhanced by TDAG8 deficiency. We conclude that TDAG8 is a negative regulator for lung neutrophilic inflammation and injury, in part, through the inhibition of chemokine production.

  10. Impact of Cadmium Exposure on the Association between Lipopolysaccharide and Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seung Jin; Ha, Kyoung Hwa; Jeon, Ja Young; Kim, Hae Jin; Lee, Kwan Woo; Kim, Dae Jung

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental contaminant that has a direct impact on the gut microbiome. Perturbations in the gut microbiome have been linked to metabolic disorders associated with inflammation generated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We investigated the impact of Cd on the association between LPS and metabolic syndrome. The study population consisted of 200 apparently healthy subjects (30–64 years of age; 96 men, 104 women). Serum LPS and blood Cd concentrations were measured by ELISA and graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectrophotometry (GF-AAS), respectively. The highest LPS quartile was associated with a greater prevalence of metabolic syndrome in men. There was a significant association between LPS activity and metabolic syndrome in men with blood Cd concentrations higher than the 50th percentile (OR = 3.05, 95% CI = 1.39–6.70); however, this relationship was not significant in men with blood Cd concentrations lower than the 50th percentile. The results of this study provide evidence for a strong association between high LPS activity and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in men with relatively high blood Cd concentrations. Therefore, exposure to Cd may potentiate the association between LPS and metabolic syndrome in men. PMID:26378560

  11. Induction of the chemotactic S100 protein, CP-10, in monocyte/macrophages by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Hu, S P; Harrison, C; Xu, K; Cornish, C J; Geczy, C L

    1996-05-01

    The murine S100 protein CP-10 is a potent chemotactic factor for murine and human myeloid cells in vivo and in vitro. This is the first report describing regulations of the CP-10 gene by a proinflammatory stimulus, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), in cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. Murine monocyte/macrophage-like WEHI 265 and RAW 264.7 cells preexposed to 5 to 50 ng/mL LPS expressed significant levels of CP-10 mRNA 4 hours, and maximal at 20 hours, after a secondary LPS challenge. This was accompanied by increasing levels of cell-associated and released CP-10 protein. In contrast, a single dose of LPS upregulated CP-10 mRNA in elicited peritoneal macrophages, whereas mRNA and protein levels decreased following LPS challenge. The state of macrophage differentiation may control responsiveness as LPS had no effect on CP-10 basal levels in bone marrow derived macrophages. LPS-induced CP-10 expression was controlled at the transcriptional level and nuclear run-on and protein synthesis inhibition assays indicated that LPS priming and challenge of RAW cells occurred via distinct pathways. MRP14, another S100 protein generally coordinately expressed with human MRP8, was not induced by LPS under the same conditions. We propose that CP-10 may play a key role in recruitment of leukocytes into tissues in response to gram-negative bacterial infection.

  12. Porphyromonas gingivalis Lipopolysaccharide Induced Proliferation and Activation of Natural Killer Cells in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuhua; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Li; Jin, Jun-O

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) promoted different innate immune activation than that promoted by Escherichia coli (E. coli) LPS. In this study, we examined the effect of P. gingivalis LPS on the proliferation and activation of natural killer (NK) cells in vivo and compared that function with that of E. coli LPS. Administration of P. gingivalis LPS to C57BL/6 mice induced stronger proliferation of NK cells in the spleen and submandibular lymph nodes (sLNs) and increased the number of circulating NK cells in blood compared to those treated with E. coli LPS. However, P. gingivalis LPS did not induce interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) production and CD69 expression in the spleen and sLN NK cells in vivo, and this was attributed to the minimal activation of the spleen and sLN dendritic cells (DCs), including low levels of co-stimulatory molecule expression and pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Furthermore, P. gingivalis LPS-treated NK cells showed less cytotoxic activity against Yac-1 target cells than E. coli LPS-treated NK cells. Hence, these data demonstrated that P. gingivalis LPS promoted limited activation of spleen and sLN NK cells in vivo, and this may play a role in the chronic inflammatory state observed in periodontal disease. PMID:27548133

  13. Inflammatory Response to Lipopolysaccharide on the Ocular Surface in a Murine Dry Eye Model

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Ken T.; Xiao, Yangyan; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; de Paiva, Cintia S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) alerts cells to the presence of bacteria by initiating an inflammatory response. We hypothesize that disruption of the ocular surface barrier in dry eye enhances TLR4 signaling. This study determined whether dry eye enhances expression of inflammatory mediators in response to topically applied TLR4 ligand. Methods A single dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or vehicle (endotoxin-free water) was applied to the cornea of nonstressed (NS) mice or mice subjected to 5 days of desiccating stress (DS). After 4 hours, corneal epithelium and conjunctiva were extracted to analyze expression of inflammatory mediators via PCR. Protein expression was confirmed by immunobead assay and immunostaining. Results Topically applied LPS increased expression of inflammatory mediators IL-1β, CXCL10, IL-12a, and IFN-γ in the conjunctiva, and IL-1β and CXCL10 in the cornea of NS mice compared to that in untreated controls. LPS in DS mice produced 3-fold increased expression of IL-1β in cornea and 2-fold increased expression in IL-12a in conjunctiva compared to that in LPS-treated control mice. Conclusions LPS increased expression of inflammatory cytokines on the ocular surface. This expression was further increased in dry eye, which suggests that epithelial barrier disruption enhances exposure of LPS to TLR4+ cells and that the inflammatory response to endotoxin-producing commensal or pathogenic bacteria may be more severe in dry eye disease. PMID:27136463

  14. Deer Bone Oil Extract Suppresses Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Responses in RAW264.7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyeon-Son; Im, Suji; Park, Yooheon; Hong, Ki-Bae; Suh, Hyung Joo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of deer bone oil extract (DBOE) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in RAW264.7 cells. DBOE was fractionated by liquid-liquid extraction to obtain two fractions: methanol fraction (DBO-M) and hexane fraction (DBO-H). TLC showed that DBO-M had relatively more hydrophilic lipid complexes, including unsaturated fatty acids, than DBOE and DBO-H. The relative compositions of tetradecenoyl carnitine, α-linoleic acid, and palmitoleic acid increased in the DBO-M fraction by 61, 38, and 32%, respectively, compared with DBOE. The concentration of sugar moieties was 3-fold higher in the DBO-M fraction than DBOE and DBO-H. DBO-M significantly decreased LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) production in RAW264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. This DBO-M-mediated decrease in NO production was due to downregulation of mRNA and protein levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). In addition, mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, such as cyclooxygenase (COX-2), interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-12β, was suppressed by DBO-M. Our data showed that DBO-M, which has relatively higher sugar content than DBOE and DBO-H, could play an important role in suppressing inflammatory responses by controlling pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediators.

  15. Comparative and genetic analyses of the putative Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide core oligosaccharide biosynthesis (wav) gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Nesper, Jutta; Kraiss, Anita; Schild, Stefan; Blass, Julia; Klose, Karl E; Bockemühl, Jochen; Reidl, Joachim

    2002-05-01

    We identified five different putative wav gene cluster types, which are responsible for the synthesis of the core oligosaccharide (OS) region of Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide. Preliminary evidence that the genes encoded by this cluster are involved in core OS biosynthesis came from analysis of the recently released O1 El Tor V. cholerae genome sequence and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of O1 El Tor mutant strains defective in three genes (waaF, waaL, and wavB). Investigations of 38 different V. cholerae strains by Southern blotting, PCR, and sequencing analyses showed that the O1 El Tor wav gene cluster type is prevalent among clinical isolates of different serogroups associated with cholera and environmental O1 strains. In contrast, we found differences in the wav gene contents of 19 unrelated non-O1, non-O139 environmental and human isolates not associated with cholera. These strains contained four new wav gene cluster types that differ from each other in distinct gene loci, providing evidence for horizontal transfer of wav genes and for limited structural diversity of the core OS among V. cholerae isolates. Our results show genetic diversity in the core OS biosynthesis gene cluster and predominance of the type 1 wav gene locus in strains associated with clinical cholera, suggesting that a specific core OS structure could contribute to V. cholerae virulence.

  16. Prenatal Exposure to Lipopolysaccharide Results in Myocardial Fibrosis in Rat Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Tang, Yujie; Gao, Meng; Qin, Shugang; Zhou, Jianzhi; Li, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    The epigenetic plasticity hypothesis indicates that exposure during pregnancy may cause adult-onset disorders, including hypertension, myocardial infarction and heart failure. Moreover, myocardial fibrosis coincides with hypertension, myocardial infarction and heart failure. This study was designed to investigate the effects of prenatal exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on myocardial fibrosis. The result showed that at six and 16 weeks of age, the LPS-treated offspring exhibited increased collagen synthesis, an elevated cardiac index (CI), higher mRNA levels of TIMP-2 and TGFβ and a reduced mRNA level of MMP2. The protein levels corresponded to the mRNA levels. The offspring that were prenatally treated with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamic acid (PDTC), an inhibitor of NF-κB, displayed improvements in the CI and in collagen synthesis. Moreover, PDTC ameliorated the expression of cytokines and proteins associated with myocardial fibrosis. The results showed that maternal inflammation can induce myocardial fibrosis in offspring during aging accompanied by an imbalance of TIMP-2/MMP2 and TGFβ expression. PMID:26006233

  17. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of a mouse gene upregulated by lipopolysaccharide treatment reveals alternative splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Kejun; Chen, Yaoming; Dai, Zongming; Bi, Yuan; Cai, Tongjian; Hou, Lichao; Chai, Yubo; Song, Qinghe; Chen, Sumin; Luo, Wenjing; Chen, Jingyuan

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of mouse cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) potently initiates an inflammatory response, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We therefore sought to characterize cDNA sequences of a new mouse LPS-responsive gene, and to evaluate the effects of MLrg. Full-length cDNAs were obtained from LPS-treated NIH3T3 cells. We report that the MLrg gene produces two alternative splice products (GenBank Accession Nos. (DQ316984) and (DQ320011)), respectively, encoding MLrgW and MLrgS polypeptides. Both proteins contain zinc finger and leucine zipper domains and are thus potential regulators of transcription. Expression of MLrgW and MLrgS were robustly upregulated following LPS treatment, and the proteins were localized predominantly in the nuclear membrane and cytoplasm. In stable transfectants over-expressing MLrgW the proportion of cells in G1 phase was significantly reduced, while in cells over-expressing MLrgS the proportion of cells in G2 was significantly increased; both proteins are thus potential regulators of cell cycle progression. Upregulation of MLrgW and MLrgS may be an important component of the LPS inflammatory pathway and of the host response to infection with GNB.

  18. Abnormal lipopolysaccharide binding protein as marker of gastrointestinal inflammation in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Gian D.; Shaikh, Maliha; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Ouyang, Bichun; Keshavarzian, Ali; Shannon, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: An inflammation-driven model of PD has been proposed based on the endotoxin lipopolysaccaride (LPS), a potential source of inflammation in the gastrointestinal system linked to neurotoxicity. Systemic exposure to bacterial endotoxin (LPS) can be determined by measuring plasma LPS binding protein (LBP). We aimed to evaluate whether lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) can be used to distinguish PD subjects from control subjects and to assess whether LBP levels correlate with PD disease severity. Methods: We measured plasma LBP (ng/ml) using an ELISA kit in 94 PD subjects of various stages and 97 control subjects. Disease severity was assessed using the UPDRS and Hoehn and Yahr staging. The LBP level between the PD and control groups was compared using analysis of covariance. Spearman correlation was used to explore the relationship between LBP level and disease severity. Results: The mean LBP level in PD subjects (n = 94) was significantly different from control subjects (n = 95, p = 0.018). In PD subjects, we did not find a correlation between mean LBP level and disease severity. Conclusions: Our data suggests that LBP is one GI biomarker related to LPS induced neurotoxicity. However, there was significant variability in LBP levels within the PD and control groups, limiting its utility as a stand-alone biomarker. This study supports the role of LPS induced neurotoxicity in PD and further exploration of this pathway may be useful in developing sensitive and specific biomarkers for PD. PMID:26388718

  19. Dihydroartemisinin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone loss via the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dou, C; Ding, N; Xing, J; Zhao, C; Kang, F; Hou, T; Quan, H; Chen, Y; Dai, Q; Luo, F; Xu, J; Dong, S

    2016-01-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) is a widely used antimalarial drug isolated from the plant Artemisia annua. Recent studies suggested that DHA has antitumor effects utilizing its reactive oxygen species (ROS) yielding mechanism. Here, we reported that DHA is inhibitory on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced osteoclast (OC) differentiation, fusion and bone-resorption activity in vitro. Intracellular ROS detection revealed that DHA could remarkably increase ROS accumulation during LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. Moreover, cell apoptosis was also increased by DHA treatment. We found that DHA-activated caspase-3 increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio during LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. Meanwhile, the translocation of apoptotic inducing factor (AIF) and the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytosol were observed, indicating that ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction is crucial in DHA-induced apoptosis during LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. In vivo study showed that DHA treatment decreased OC number, prevents bone loss, rescues bone microarchitecture and restores bone strength in LPS-induced bone-loss mouse model. Together, our findings indicate that DHA is protective against LPS-induced bone loss through apoptosis induction of osteoclasts via ROS accumulation and the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway. Therefore, DHA may be considered as a new therapeutic candidate for treating inflammatory bone loss. PMID:27031959

  20. Lipopolysaccharide-induced multinuclear cells: Increased internalization of polystyrene beads and possible signals for cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi-Matsui, Mayumi Yano, Shio; Futai, Masamitsu

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •LPS induces multinuclear cells from murine macrophage-derived RAW264.7 cells. •Large beads are internalized by cells actively fusing to become multinuclear. •The multinuclear cell formation is inhibited by anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL10. •Signal transduction for cell fusion is different from that for inflammation. -- Abstract: A murine macrophage-derived line, RAW264.7, becomes multinuclear on stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an outer membrane component of Gram-negative bacteria. These multinuclear cells internalized more polystyrene beads than mononuclear cells or osteoclasts (Nakanishi-Matsui, M., Yano, S., Matsumoto, N., and Futai, M., 2012). In this study, we analyzed the time courses of cell fusion in the presence of large beads. They were internalized into cells actively fusing to become multinuclear. However, the multinuclear cells once formed showed only low phagocytosis activity. These results suggest that formation of the multinuclear cells and bead internalization took place simultaneously. The formation of multinuclear cells was blocked by inhibitors for phosphoinositide 3-kinase, phospholipase C, calcineurin, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. In addition, interleukin 6 and 10 also exhibited inhibitory effects. These signaling molecules and cytokines may play a crucial role in the LPS-induced multinuclear cell formation.

  1. Prenatal lipopolysaccharide reduces motor activity after an immune challenge in adult male offspring.

    PubMed

    Kirsten, Thiago Berti; Taricano, Marina; Flório, Jorge Camilo; Palermo-Neto, João; Bernardi, Maria Martha

    2010-07-29

    Prenatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure causes reproductive, behavioral and neurochemical injuries in both the mother and pups. Previous investigations by our group showed that prenatal LPS administration (100 microg/kg, i.p.) on gestational day 9.5 impaired the male offspring's social behavior in infancy and adulthood. In the present study, we investigated whether these social behavioral changes were associated with motor activity impairment. Male rat pups treated prenatally with LPS or not were tested for reflexological development and open field general activity during infancy. In adulthood, animals were tested for open field general activity, haloperidol-induced catalepsy and apomorphine-induced stereotypy; striatal dopamine levels and turnover were also measured. Moreover, LPS-treated or untreated control pups were challenged with LPS in adulthood and observed for general activity in the open field. In relation to the control group, the motor behavior of prenatally treated male pups was unaffected at basal levels, both in infancy and in adulthood, but decreased general activity was observed in adulthood after an immune challenge. Also, striatal dopamine and metabolite levels were decreased in adulthood. In conclusion, prenatal LPS exposure disrupted the dopaminergic system involved with motor function, but this neurochemical effect was not accompanied by behavioral impairment, probably due to adaptive plasticity processes. Notwithstanding, behavioral impairment was revealed when animals were challenged with LPS, resulting in enhanced sickness behavior.

  2. Lipopolysaccharide subtypes of Haemophilus influenzae type b from an outbreak of invasive disease.

    PubMed Central

    Inzana, T J; Pichichero, M E

    1984-01-01

    Thirty isolates of Haemophilus influenzae type b were obtained during an outbreak of invasive H. influenzae type b disease and were classified by the electrophoretic profile of their lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The LPS was extracted by a rapid micromethod and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining. The isolates could be divided into 1 of 14 subtypes based on the profile of two to four bands. No subtype was predominant. However, all isolates obtained from duplicate sites of the same individual were of the same subtype. Isolates obtained from two patients (6 weeks apart) who attended the same day-care center differed in LPS subtype but were identical in their major outer membrane protein electrophoretic profile. Nasopharyngeal cultures were obtained from healthy children, their immediate families, and employees of the day-care center. Of 13 H. influenzae isolates examined from these contacts, only 1 was type b, which was obtained from a day-care worker and had the same LPS subtype and major outer membrane protein electrophoretic profile as one of the disease isolates. The remaining nasopharyngeal isolates were untypable, and most, but not all, were different in LPS pattern. Thus, LPS subtyping of H. influenzae type b may be useful in examining the predominance or transmission of a strain during an outbreak and may distinguish some strains not differentiated by outer membrane protein pattern. Images PMID:6333433

  3. Enzymatically amplified electrochemical detection for lipopolysaccharide using ferrocene-attached polymyxin B and its analogue.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Seiichiro; Kato, Dai; Yabuki, Soichi; Niwa, Osamu; Mizutani, Fumio

    2011-01-15

    Ferrocene-attached polymyxin B (PMB-Fc) was prepared by the reaction of polymyxin B with ferrocenoyl chloride in a toluene/pyridine mixture. An electrochemical detection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was carried out using a combination of PMB-Fc and an enzyme-modified electrode constructed from a glassy carbon electrode modified with a bovine serum albumin membrane containing glucose oxidase. The ferrocene units of the PMB-Fc molecules were oxidized on the electrode, and then reduced to the original neutral form by a glucose oxidase-catalyzed reaction in the presence of D-glucose. The consumption/regeneration cycle for PMB-Fc resulted in a chemically amplified current response. The current response for PMB-Fc decreased in association with its complexation with LPS, and the magnitude of this current decrease caused by LPS was also amplified by the recycling process. The enzyme-modified electrode exhibited a rapid response of 5 min for LPS with the detection limit as low as 50 ng ml(-1). Further, the addition of D-solbitol or poly(vinyl alcohol) of high concentration over 1 mg ml(-1) substantially induced no response, and three kinds of LPS from different strains exhibited similar magnitudes of current response for the same concentrations; these results suggest the advantages of this detection system for practical applications. Ferrocene-attached colistin, an analogue of PMB-Fc, was also effective for the LPS detection using the glucose oxidase-modified electrode. PMID:20947333

  4. Evolutionary conservation of the lipopolysaccharide binding site of β₂-glycoprotein I.

    PubMed

    Ağar, Çetin; de Groot, Philip G; Marquart, J Arnoud; Meijers, Joost C M

    2011-12-01

    β₂-Glycoprotein I (β₂GPI) is a highly abundant plasma protein and the major antigen for autoantibodies in the antiphospholipid syndrome. Recently, we have described a novel function of β₂GPI as scavenger of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). With this in mind we investigated the conservation of β₂GPI in vertebrates and set out to identify the binding site of LPS within β₂GPI. The genome sequences of 42 species were surveyed. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was performed with peptides to characterise the binding site of β₂GPI for LPS. β₂GPI could be identified in most tested vertebrates with a high overall amino acid homology of 80% or more in mammals. SPR revealed that a synthesised peptide (LAFWKTDA) from domain V of β₂GPI was able to compete for binding of β₂GPI to LPS. The AFWKTDA sequence was completely conserved in all mammals. The peptide containing the LPS binding site attenuated the inhibition by β₂GPI in a cellular model of LPS-induced tissue factor expression. Other important sites, such as the binding site for anionic phospholipids and the antiphospholipid antibody binding epitope, were also preserved. β₂GPI is highly conserved across the animal kingdom, which suggests that the function of β₂GPI may be more important than anticipated. PMID:21947351

  5. Recognition of bacterial lipopolysaccharide using bacteriophage-adhesin-coated long-period gratings.

    PubMed

    Brzozowska, Ewa; Śmietana, Mateusz; Koba, Marcin; Górska, Sabina; Pawlik, Krzysztof; Gamian, Andrzej; Bock, Wojtek J

    2015-05-15

    In this paper we present a new type of highly sensitive label-free sensor based on long-period gratings (LPG) coated with T4 bacteriophage (phage) adhesin. The adhesin (gp37) binds Escherichia coli B (E. coli B) by recognizing its bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The LPG biofunctionalization methodology is based on coating LPG surface with nickel ions capable of gp37 histidine tag reversible binding. For the first time recombinant adhesive phage protein has been used as a receptor molecule in biosensing scheme. The specificity of LPS binding by adhesin has been tested with LPG-based device and confirmed using Western blot, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and BIACORE methods. The LPG-based sensor can measure bacterial contamination in real time and with a high accuracy. We show that T4 phage adhesin binds E. coli B LPS in its native or denatured form. The binding is highly specific and irreversible. The applied procedure allows for obtaining reusable biosensors. PMID:25067838

  6. Heterogeneous Chemistry of Lipopolysaccharides with Gas-Phase Nitric Acid: Reactive Sites and Reaction Pathways.

    PubMed

    Trueblood, Jonathan V; Estillore, Armando D; Lee, Christopher; Dowling, Jacqueline A; Prather, Kimberly A; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-08-18

    Recent studies have shown that sea spray aerosol (SSA) has a size-dependent, complex composition consisting of biomolecules and biologically derived organic compounds in addition to salts. This additional chemical complexity most likely influences the heterogeneous reactivity of SSA, as these other components will have different reactive sites and reaction pathways. In this study, we focus on the reactivity of a class of particles derived from some of the biological components of sea spray aerosol including lipopolysaccharides (LPS) that undergo heterogeneous chemistry within the reactive sites of the biological molecule. Examples of these reactions and the relevant reactive sites are proposed as follows: R-COONa(s) + HNO3(g) → NaNO3 + R-COOH and R-HPO4Na(s) + HNO3(g) → NaNO3 + R-H2PO4. These reactions may be a heterogeneous pathway not only for sea spray aerosol but also for a variety of other types of atmospheric aerosol as well.

  7. Bound to shock: protection from lethal endotoxemic shock by a novel, nontoxic, alkylpolyamine lipopolysaccharide sequestrant.

    PubMed

    Sil, Diptesh; Shrestha, Anurupa; Kimbrell, Matthew R; Nguyen, Thuan B; Adisechan, Ashok K; Balakrishna, Rajalakshmi; Abbo, Benjamin G; Malladi, Subbalakshmi; Miller, Kelly A; Short, Shannon; Cromer, Jens R; Arora, Shravan; Datta, Apurba; David, Sunil A

    2007-08-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or endotoxin, a structural component of gram-negative bacterial outer membranes, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of septic shock, a syndrome of severe systemic inflammation which leads to multiple-system organ failure. Despite advances in antimicrobial chemotherapy, sepsis continues to be the commonest cause of death in the critically ill patient. This is attributable to the lack of therapeutic options that aim at limiting the exposure to the toxin and the prevention of subsequent downstream inflammatory processes. Polymyxin B (PMB), a peptide antibiotic, is a prototype small molecule that binds and neutralizes LPS toxicity. However, the antibiotic is too toxic for systemic use as an LPS sequestrant. Based on a nuclear magnetic resonance-derived model of polymyxin B-LPS complex, we had earlier identified the pharmacophore necessary for optimal recognition and neutralization of the toxin. Iterative cycles of pharmacophore-based ligand design and evaluation have yielded a synthetically easily accessible N(1),mono-alkyl-mono-homologated spermine derivative, DS-96. We have found that DS-96 binds LPS and neutralizes its toxicity with a potency indistinguishable from that of PMB in a wide range of in vitro assays, affords complete protection in a murine model of LPS-induced lethality, and is apparently nontoxic in vertebrate animal models.

  8. Early Postnatal Lipopolysaccharide Exposure Leads to Enhanced Neurogenesis and Impaired Communicative Functions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xuemei; Roller, Anna; Carter, Kathleen; Paul, Ian; Bhatt, Abhay J.; Lin, Rick C. S.; Fan, Lir-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal infection is a well-identified risk factor for a number of neurodevelopmental disorders, including brain white matter injury (WMI) and Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The underlying mechanisms by which early life inflammatory events cause aberrant neural, cytoarchitectural, and network organization, remain elusive. This study is aimed to investigate how systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neuroinflammation affects microglia phenotypes and early neural developmental events in rats. We show here that LPS exposure at early postnatal day 3 leads to a robust microglia activation which is characterized with mixed microglial proinflammatory (M1) and anti-inflammatory (M2) phenotypes. More specifically, we found that microglial M1 markers iNOS and MHC-II were induced at relatively low levels in a regionally restricted manner, whereas M2 markers CD206 and TGFβ were strongly upregulated in a sub-set of activated microglia in multiple white and gray matter structures. This unique microglial response was associated with a marked decrease in naturally occurring apoptosis, but an increase in cell proliferation in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the dentate gyrus (DG) of hippocampus. LPS exposure also leads to a significant increase in oligodendrocyte lineage population without causing discernible hypermyelination. Moreover, LPS-exposed rats exhibited significant impairments in communicative and cognitive functions. These findings suggest a possible role of M2-like microglial activation in abnormal neural development that may underlie ASD-like behavioral impairments. PMID:27723799

  9. Anti-inflammatory properties of Septilin in lipopolysaccharide activated monocytes and macrophage.

    PubMed

    Varma, R Sandeep; Ashok, G; Vidyashankar, S; Patki, P; Nandakumar, K S

    2011-03-01

    In vivo studies have suggested the immunomodulatory properties of Septilin, an herbal preparation. This drug is being used against various types of inflammatory disorders. However, the mechanism of action of Septilin in the modulation of inflammation is not explored using suitable in vitro models. Hence, we decided to study the modulatory role of Septilin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mediated signaling in macrophage and monocyte cells. It was observed from the present study that by employing tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) bioassay and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Septilin inhibited TNF-α production in LPS (1 μg/mL) stimulated RAW 264.7 cells (p < 0.05). 80% inhibition of TNF-α was observed even at 2.5% Septilin. Septilin at all the concentrations tested could also significantly block the LPS mediated nitric oxide (NO) production (p < 0.01) and expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) gene. LPS mediated interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-8 production was also blocked by Septilin at the concentrations tested. This herbal preparation could also inhibit cycloxygenase 2 (COX-2) activity and suppression of COX-2 and phosphodiesterase 4 B (PDE4B) mRNA expression in a concentration dependent manner. Taken together, these findings from the present in vitro study suggest the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties of Septilin.

  10. Highly sensitive detection of lipopolysaccharides using an aptasensor based on hybridization chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Xie, Peiyan; Zhu, Longjiao; Shao, Xiangli; Huang, Kunlun; Tian, Jingjing; Xu, Wentao

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), integral components of the outer membrane of all gram-negative bacteria, are closely associated with foodborne diseases such as fever, diarrhea and hypotension, and thus, the early and sensitive detection of LPS is necessary. In this study, an aptasensor assay based on hybridization chain reaction (HCR) was developed to detect LPS. Briefly, two complementary stable species of biotinylated DNA hairpins coexisted in solution until the introduction of a detection probe triggered a hybridization chain reaction cascade. The DNA conjugates specifically reacted with the LPS, which were captured by the ethanolamine aptamer attached to the reaction well surface. After optimizing the key reaction conditions, such as the reaction time of HCR, the amount of the capture probe and detection probes, the increase in the LPS concentration was readily measured by the optical density value, and a relatively low detection limit (1.73 ng/mL) was obtained, with a linear response range of 1-10(5 )ng/mL. The approach presented herein introduced the use of an aptasensor for LPS discrimination and HCR for signal amplification, offering a promising option for detecting LPS.

  11. Activation of PPARα by Wy-14643 ameliorates systemic lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Seong Ho; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •Activation of PPARα attenuated LPS-mediated acute lung injury. •Pretreatment with Wy-14643 decreased the levels of IFN-γ and IL-6 in ALI. •Nitrosative stress and lipid peroxidation were downregulated by PPARα activation. •PPARα agonists may be potential therapeutic targets for acute lung injury. -- Abstract: Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) by its ligands, which include Wy-14643, has been implicated as a potential anti-inflammatory therapy. To address the beneficial efficacy of Wy-14643 for ALI along with systemic inflammation, the in vivo role of PPARα activation was investigated in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Using age-matched Ppara-null and wild-type mice, we demonstrate that the activation of PPARα by Wy-14643 attenuated LPS-mediated ALI. This was evidenced histologically by the significant alleviation of inflammatory manifestations and apoptosis observed in the lung tissues of wild-type mice, but not in the corresponding Ppara-null mice. This protective effect probably resulted from the inhibition of LPS-induced increases in pro-inflammatory cytokines and nitroxidative stress levels. These results suggest that the pharmacological activation of PPARα might have a therapeutic effect on LPS-induced ALI.

  12. Role of HDL in cholesteryl ester metabolism of lipopolysaccharide-activated P388D1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Uda, Sabrina; Spolitu, Stefano; Angius, Fabrizio; Collu, Maria; Accossu, Simonetta; Banni, Sebastiano; Murru, Elisabetta; Sanna, Francesca; Batetta, Barbara

    2013-11-01

    Infections share with atherosclerosis similar lipid alterations, with accumulation of cholesteryl esters (CEs) in activated macrophages and concomitant decrease of cholesterol-HDL (C-HDL). Yet the precise role of HDL during microbial infection has not been fully elucidated. Activation of P388D1 by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) triggered an increase of CEs and neutral lipid contents, along with a remarkable enhancement in 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate-HDL uptake. Similar results were found in human monocyte-derived macrophages and monocytes cocultured with phytohemagglutinin-activated lymphocytes. Inhibition of cholesterol esterification with Sandoz-58035 resulted in 80% suppression of CE biosynthesis in P388D1. However, only a 35% decrease of CE content, together with increased scavenger receptor class B member 1 (SR-B1) protein expression, was found after 72 h and thereafter up to 16 passages of continuous ACAT suppression. Chronic inhibition blunted the effect of LPS treatment on cholesterol metabolism, increased the ratio of free cholesterol/CE content and enhanced interleukin 6 secretion. These results imply that, besides de novo biosynthesis and acquisition by LDL, HDL contributes probably through SR-B1 to the increased CE content in macrophages, partly explaining the low levels of C-HDL during their activation. Our data suggest that in those conditions where more CEs are required, HDL rather than removing, may supply CEs to the cells. PMID:23956443

  13. The structure of the carbohydrate backbone of the lipopolysaccharide of Pectinatus frisingensis strain VTT E-79104.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Evgeny; Li, Jianjun; Sadovskaya, Irina; Jabbouri, Said; Helander, Ilkka M

    2004-06-22

    The structure of the carbohydrate backbone of the lipopolysaccharide from Pectinatus frisingensis strain VTT E-79104 was analyzed using chemical degradations, NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and chemical methods. The LPS contains two major structural variants, differing in the presence or absence of an octasaccharide fragment. The largest structure of the carbohydrate backbone of the LPS, that could be deduced from experimental results, consists of 20 monosaccharides arranged in a nonrepetitive sequence: [carbohydrate structure: see text] where R is H or 4-O-Me-alpha-L-Fuc-(1-2)-4-O-Me-beta-Hep-(1-3)-alpha-GlcNAc-(1-2)-beta-Man-(1-3)-beta-ManNAc-(1-4)-alpha-Gal-(1-4)-beta-Hep-(1-3)-beta-GalNAc-(1- where Hep is a residue of D-glycero-D-galacto-heptose; all monosaccharides have the D-configuration except for 4-O-Me-L-Fuc and L-Ara4N. This structure is architecturally similar to the oligosaccharide system reported previously in P. frisingensis VTT E-82164 LPS, but differs from the latter in composition and a