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Sample records for aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide

  1. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide affects human gingival fibroblast cytoskeletal organization.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Contreras-Marmolejo, Luis Arturo; Román-Alvárez, Patricia; Barajas-Torres, Carolina

    2008-04-01

    The cytoskeleton is a dynamic structure that plays a key role in maintaining cell morphology and function. This study investigates the effect of bacterial wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a strong inflammatory agent, on the dynamics and organization of actin, tubulin, vimentin, and vinculin proteins in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). A time-dependent study showed a noticeable change in actin architecture after 1.5 h of incubation with LPS (1 microg/ml) with the formation of orthogonal fibers and further accumulation of actin filament at the cell periphery by 24 h. When 0.01-10 microg/ml of LPS was added to human gingival fibroblast cultures, cells acquired a round, flat shape and gradually developed cytoplasmic ruffling. Lipopolysaccharides extracted from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans periodontopathogenic bacteria promoted alterations in F-actin stress fibres of human gingival cells. Normally, human gingival cells have F-actin fibres that are organized in linear distribution throughout the cells, extending along the cell's length. LPS-treated cells exhibited changes in cytoskeletal protein organization, and F-actin was reorganized by the formation of bundles underneath and parallel to the cell membrane. We also found the reorganization of the vimentin network into vimentin bundling after 1.5 h of treatment. HGF cells exhibited diffuse and granular gamma-tubulin stain. There was no change in LPS-treated HGF. However, vinculin plaques distributed in the cell body diminished after LPS treatment. We conclude that the dynamic and structured organization of cytoskeletal filaments and actin assembly in human gingival fibroblasts is altered by LPS treatment and is accompanied by a decrease in F-actin pools.

  2. Evolutionary Divergence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Kittichotirat, W; Bumgarner, R E; Chen, C

    2016-01-01

    Gram-negative facultative Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral pathogen associated with periodontitis. The genetic heterogeneity among A. actinomycetemcomitans strains has been long recognized. This study provides a comprehensive genomic analysis of A. actinomycetemcomitans and the closely related nonpathogenic Aggregatibacter aphrophilus. Whole genome sequencing by Illumina MiSeq platform was performed for 31 A. actinomycetemcomitans and 2 A. aphrophilus strains. Sequence similarity analysis shows a total of 3,220 unique genes across the 2 species, where 1,550 are core genes present in all genomes and 1,670 are variable genes (accessory genes) missing in at least 1 genome. Phylogenetic analysis based on 397 concatenated core genes distinguished A. aphrophilus and A. actinomycetemcomitans. The latter was in turn divided into 5 clades: clade b (serotype b), clade c (serotype c), clade e/f (serotypes e and f), clade a/d (serotypes a and d), and clade e' (serotype e strains). Accessory genes accounted for 14.1% to 23.2% of the A. actinomycetemcomitans genomes, with a majority belonging to the category of poorly characterized by Cluster of Orthologous Groups classification. These accessory genes were often organized into genomic islands (n = 387) with base composition biases, suggesting their acquisitions via horizontal gene transfer. There was a greater degree of similarity in gene content and genomic islands among strains within clades than between clades. Strains of clade e' isolated from human were found to be missing the genomic island that carries genes encoding cytolethal distending toxins. Taken together, the results suggest a pattern of sequential divergence, starting from the separation of A. aphrophilus and A. actinomycetemcomitans through gain and loss of genes and ending with the divergence of the latter species into distinct clades and serotypes. With differing constellations of genes, the A. actinomycetemcomitans clades may have evolved

  3. Enterococcus faecalis lipoteichoic acid suppresses Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-8 expression in human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Im, Jintaek; Baik, Jung Eun; Kim, Kyoung Whun; Kang, Seok-Seong; Jeon, Jun Ho; Park, Ok-Jin; Kim, Hyun Young; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-08-01

    Periodontitis is caused by multi-bacterial infection and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Enterococcus faecalis are closely associated with inflammatory periodontal diseases. Although lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of A. actinomycetemcomitans (Aa.LPS) and lipoteichoic acid of E. faecalis (Ef.LTA) are considered to be major virulence factors evoking inflammatory responses, their combinatorial effect on the induction of chemokines has not been investigated. In this study, we investigated the interaction between Aa.LPS and Ef.LTA on IL-8 expression in human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells. Aa.LPS, but not Ef.LTA, substantially induced IL-8 expression at the protein and mRNA levels. Interestingly, Ef.LTA suppressed Aa.LPS-induced IL-8 expression without affecting the binding of Aa.LPS to Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. Ef.LTA reduced Aa.LPS-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, including ERK, JNK and p38 kinase. Furthermore, Ef.LTA inhibited the Aa.LPS-induced transcriptional activities of the activating protein 1, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein and nuclear factor-kappa B transcription factors, all of which are known to regulate IL-8 gene expression. Ef.LTA augmented the expression of IL-1 receptor-associated kinase-M (IRAK-M), a negative regulator of TLR intracellular signaling pathways, in the presence of Aa.LPS at both the mRNA and protein levels. Small interfering RNA silencing IRAK-M reversed the attenuation of Aa.LPS-induced IL-8 expression by Ef.LTA. Collectively, these results suggest that Ef.LTA down-regulates Aa.LPS-induced IL-8 expression in human PDL cells through up-regulation of the negative regulator IRAK-M.

  4. MyD88 is essential for alveolar bone loss induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide in mice.

    PubMed

    Madeira, M F M; Queiroz-Junior, C M; Cisalpino, D; Werneck, S M C; Kikuchi, H; Fujise, O; Ryffel, B; Silva, T A; Teixeira, M M; Souza, D G

    2013-12-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a Gram-negative bacteria highly associated with localized aggressive periodontitis. The recognition of microbial factors, such as lipopolysaccharide from A. actinomycetemcomitans ((Aa)LPS), in the oral environment is made mainly by surface receptors known as Toll-like receptors (TLR). TLR4 is the major LPS receptor. This interaction leads to the production of inflammatory cytokines by myeloid differentiation primary-response protein 88 (MyD88) -dependent and -independent pathways, which may involve the adaptor Toll/interleukin-1 receptor-domain-containing adaptor inducing interferon-β (TRIF). The aim of this study was to assess the involvement of MyD88 in alveolar bone loss induced by (Aa)LPS in mice. C57BL6/J wild-type (WT) mice, MyD88, TRIF or TRIF/MyD88 knockout mice received 10 injections of Aa LPS strain FDC Y4 (5 μg in 3 μl), in the palatal gingival tissue of the right first molar, every 48 h. Phosphate-buffered saline was injected in the opposite side and used as control. Animals were sacrificed 24 h after the 10th injection and the maxillae were removed for macroscopic and biochemical analyses. The injections of Aa LPS induced significant alveolar bone loss in WT mice. In the absence of MyD88 or TRIF/MyD88 no bone loss induced by (Aa)LPS was observed. In contrast, responses in TRIF(-/-) mice were similar to those in WT mice. Diminished bone loss in the absence of MyD88 was associated with fewer TRAP-positive cells and increased expression of osteoblast markers, RUNX2 and osteopontin. There was also reduced tumor necrosis factor-α production in MyD88(-/-) mice. There was less osteoclast differentiation of hematopoietic bone marrow cells from MyD88(-/-) mice after (Aa)LPS stimulation. Hence, the signaling through MyD88 is pivotal for (Aa)LPS-induced osteoclast formation and alveolar bone loss.

  5. Lipopolysaccharide of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans induces the expression of chemokines MCP-1, MIP-1α, and IP-10 via similar but distinct signaling pathways in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Park, Ok-Jin; Cho, Min-Kyung; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a Gram-negative bacterium frequently isolated from lesions of patients with localized aggressive periodontitis. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major cell wall component of Gram-negative bacteria, stimulates innate immune cells via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) to initiate inflammatory responses. In this study, we purified LPS from A. actinomycetemcomitans (AaLPS) and investigated its ability to induce the expression of chemokines, which play an important role in recruitment of leukocytes to the infection site. AaLPS induced the expression of chemokines, MCP-1, MIP-1α, and IP-10 in murine macrophages, leading to the infiltration of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in a transwell system. Although TLR4 was essential for the induction of all these chemokines by AaLPS, MCP-1 and MIP-1α expressions were MyD88-dependent, but IP-10 expression was MyD88-independent, as determined using macrophages from mice deficient in TLR4 or MyD88. Furthermore, the activation of ERK and JNK were necessary for the expression of MCP-1 and MIP-1α, whereas p38 MAP kinase and JNK activations were required for IP-10 expression. In addition, IFN-β/STAT1 signaling was exclusively involved in IP-10 expression but not in MCP-1 or MIP-1α expression. AaLPS also activated the transcription factors, NF-κB, AP-1, NF-IL6, and ISRE, all of which are involved in chemokine gene expression. These results suggest that AaLPS induces the expression of chemokines MCP-1, MIP-1α, and IP-10 through TLR4 in murine macrophages. Further, the induction of MCP-1 and MIP-1α requires MyD88, ERK, and JNK, whereas the induction of IP-10 requires JNK, p38 MAP kinase, and IFN-β/STAT1.

  6. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Zijnge, Vincent; Granström, Elisabeth; Oscarsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and leukotoxin (LtxA) into human host cells and to act as triggers of innate immunity upon carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). To improve our understanding of the pathogenicity-associated functions that A. actinomycetemcomitans exports via OMVs, we studied the proteome of density gradient-purified OMVs from a rough-colony type clinical isolate, strain 173 (serotype e) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This analysis yielded the identification of 151 proteins, which were found in at least three out of four independent experiments. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002509. Through this study, we not only confirmed the vesicle-associated release of LtxA, and the presence of proteins, which are known to act as immunoreactive antigens in the human host, but we also identified numerous additional putative virulence-related proteins in the A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV proteome. The known and putative functions of these proteins include immune evasion, drug targeting, and iron/nutrient acquisition. In summary, our findings are consistent with an OMV-associated proteome that exhibits several offensive and defensive functions, and they provide a comprehensive basis to further disclose roles of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs in periodontal and systemic disease.

  7. Aggregatibacter Actinomycetemcomitans – A Tooth Killer?

    PubMed Central

    Ummer, Fajar; Dhivakar, C.P

    2014-01-01

    Strong evidence is available on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A.a) on its role as the causative agent of localised juvenile periodontitis (LJP), a disease characterised by rapid destruction of the tooth-supporting tissues. This organism possesses a large number of virulence factors with a wide range of activities which enable it to colonise the oral cavity, invade periodontal tissues, evade host defences, initiate connective tissue destruction and interfere with tissue repair. Adhesion to epithelial and tooth surfaces is dependent on the presence of surface proteins and structures such as microvesicles and fimbriae. Invasion has been demonstrated in vivo and in vitro. The organism has a number of means of evading host defences which include: (i) production of leukotoxin; (ii) producing immunosuppressive factors; (iv) secreting proteases capable of cleaving IgG; and (v) producing Fc-binding. PMID:25302290

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Strain IDH781

    PubMed Central

    May, Anthony C.; Ehrlich, Rachel L.; Balashov, Sergey; Ehrlich, Garth D.; Shanmugam, Mayilvahanan; Fine, Daniel H.; Ramasubbu, Narayanan

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genomic sequence and methylome of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans strain IDH781. This rough strain is used extensively as a model organism to characterize localized aggressive periodontitis pathogenesis, the basic biology and oral cavity colonization of A. actinomycetemcomitans, and its interactions with other members of the oral microbiome. PMID:27834722

  9. The cell envelope proteome of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Smith, K P; Fields, J G; Voogt, R D; Deng, B; Lam, Y-W; Mintz, K P

    2015-04-01

    The cell envelope of gram-negative bacteria serves a critical role in maintenance of cellular homeostasis, resistance to external stress, and host-pathogen interactions. Envelope protein composition is influenced by the physiological and environmental demands placed on the bacterium. In this study, we report a comprehensive compilation of cell envelope proteins from the periodontal and systemic pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans VT1169, an afimbriated serotype b strain. The urea-extracted membrane proteins were identified by mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics. The membrane proteome, isolated from actively growing bacteria under normal laboratory conditions, included 648 proteins representing 27% of the predicted open reading frames in the genome. Bioinformatic analyses were used to annotate and predict the cellular location and function of the proteins. Surface adhesins, porins, lipoproteins, numerous influx and efflux pumps, multiple sugar, amino acid and iron transporters, and components of the type I, II and V secretion systems were identified. Periplasmic space and cytoplasmic proteins with chaperone function were also identified. A total of 107 proteins with unknown function were associated with the cell envelope. Orthologs of a subset of these uncharacterized proteins are present in other bacterial genomes, whereas others are found exclusively in A. actinomycetemcomitans. This knowledge will contribute to elucidating the role of cell envelope proteins in bacterial growth and survival in the oral cavity.

  10. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a potent immunoregulator of the periodontal host defense system and alveolar bone homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Herbert, B A; Novince, C M; Kirkwood, K L

    2016-06-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a perio-pathogenic bacteria that has long been associated with localized aggressive periodontitis. The mechanisms of its pathogenicity have been studied in humans and preclinical experimental models. Although different serotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans have differential virulence factor expression, A. actinomycetemcomitans cytolethal distending toxin (CDT), leukotoxin, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) have been most extensively studied in the context of modulating the host immune response. Following colonization and attachment in the oral cavity, A. actinomycetemcomitans employs CDT, leukotoxin, and LPS to evade host innate defense mechanisms and drive a pathophysiologic inflammatory response. This supra-physiologic immune response state perturbs normal periodontal tissue remodeling/turnover and ultimately has catabolic effects on periodontal tissue homeostasis. In this review, we have divided the host response into two systems: non-hematopoietic and hematopoietic. Non-hematopoietic barriers include epithelium and fibroblasts that initiate the innate immune host response. The hematopoietic system contains lymphoid and myeloid-derived cell lineages that are responsible for expanding the immune response and driving the pathophysiologic inflammatory state in the local periodontal microenvironment. Effector systems and signaling transduction pathways activated and utilized in response to A. actinomycetemcomitans will be discussed to further delineate immune cell mechanisms during A. actinomycetemcomitans infection. Finally, we will discuss the osteo-immunomodulatory effects induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans and dissect the catabolic disruption of balanced osteoclast-osteoblast-mediated bone remodeling, which subsequently leads to net alveolar bone loss.

  11. AI-2 of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans inhibits Candida albicans biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Bachtiar, Endang W; Bachtiar, Boy M; Jarosz, Lucja M; Amir, Lisa R; Sunarto, Hari; Ganin, Hadas; Meijler, Michael M; Krom, Bastiaan P

    2014-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a Gram-negative bacterium, and Candida albicans, a polymorphic fungus, are both commensals of the oral cavity but both are opportunistic pathogens that can cause oral diseases. A. actinomycetemcomitans produces a quorum-sensing molecule called autoinducer-2 (AI-2), synthesized by LuxS, that plays an important role in expression of virulence factors, in intra- but also in interspecies communication. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of AI-2 based signaling in the interactions between C. albicans and A. actinomycetemcomitans. A. actinomycetemcomitans adhered to C. albicans and inhibited biofilm formation by means of a molecule that was secreted during growth. C. albicans biofilm formation increased significantly when co-cultured with A. actinomycetemcomitans luxS, lacking AI-2 production. Addition of wild-type-derived spent medium or synthetic AI-2 to spent medium of the luxS strain, restored inhibition of C. albicans biofilm formation to wild-type levels. Addition of synthetic AI-2 significantly inhibited hypha formation of C. albicans possibly explaining the inhibition of biofilm formation. AI-2 of A. actinomycetemcomitans is synthesized by LuxS, accumulates during growth and inhibits C. albicans hypha- and biofilm formation. Identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between bacteria and fungi may provide important insight into the balance within complex oral microbial communities.

  12. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans infection mimicking lung cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Matzumura-Kuan, Melissa; Jennings, Jeffrey

    2014-09-01

    Pulmonary infections can mimic a pulmonary neoplasm. Multiple organisms, including bacteria, viruses, and fungi, can present with similar clinical, radiographic, and surgical findings as neoplastic processes. Because treatment and the prognosis are completely different, an accurate diagnosis is crucial, and lung biopsy is usually required. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is part of the normal oral flora and is a rare cause of invasive infection due to hematogenous dissemination or aspiration, particularly infective endocarditis. We present a case of A. actinomycetemcomitans and Actinomyces co-infection that presented as a mediastinal mass, with surgical findings similar to lung malignancy but with biopsy and culture showing an infectious origin. After antibiotic treatment, follow-up images showed resolution of the mass.

  13. Actinomycetemcomitin: a new bacteriocin produced by Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Lima, Francisca Lúcia; de Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora Roque; Apolônio, Ana Carolina Morais; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Santoro, Marcelo Matos; Oliveira, Jamil Silvano; Alviano, Celuta Sales; Farias, Luiz de Macêdo

    2008-02-01

    Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans P(7-20) strain isolated from a periodontally diseased patient has produced a bacteriocin (named as actinomycetemcomitin) that is active against Peptostreptococcus anaerobius ATCC 27337. Actinomycetemcomitin was produced during exponential and stationary growth phases, and its amount decreased until it disappeared during the decline growth phase. It was purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation (30-60% saturation), and further by FPLC (mono-Q ionic exchange and Phenyl Superose hydrophobic interaction) and HPLC (C-18 reversed-phase). This bacteriocin loses its activity after incubation at a pH below 7.0 or above 8.0, following heating for 30 min at 45 degrees C, and after treatment with proteolytic enzymes such as trypsin, alpha-chymotrypsin, and papain. Actinomycetemcomitin has a molecular mass of 20.3 KDa and it represents a new bacteriocin from A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  14. Stability of the JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Haubek, D; Ennibi, O-K; Vaeth, M; Poulsen, S; Poulsen, K

    2009-09-01

    The JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is strongly associated with aggressive periodontitis. To obtain information about colonization dynamics of the JP2 clone, we used PCR to examine its presence in 365 Moroccan juveniles from whom periodontal plaque samples were collected at baseline and after one and two years. Periodontal attachment loss was measured at baseline and at the two-year follow-up. At baseline, 43 (12%) carriers of the JP2 clone were found. Nearly half (44 %) of these were persistently colonized with the clone. The relative risk for the development of aggressive periodontitis, adjusted for the concomitant presence of other genotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans, was highest for individuals continuously infected by the JP2 clone (RR = 13.9; 95% CI, 9.0 to 21.4), indicating a relationship between infectious dose and disease, which further substantiates the evidence for the JP2 clone as a causal factor in aggressive periodontitis.

  15. Azithromycin kills invasive Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in gingival epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lai, Pin-Chuang; Walters, John D

    2013-03-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans invades periodontal pocket epithelium and is therefore difficult to eliminate by periodontal scaling and root planing. It is susceptible to azithromycin, which is taken up by many types of mammalian cells. This led us to hypothesize that azithromycin accumulation by gingival epithelium could enhance the killing of intraepithelial A. actinomycetemcomitans. [(3)H]azithromycin transport by Smulow-Glickman gingival epithelial cells and SCC-25 oral epithelial cells was characterized. To test our hypothesis, we infected cultured Smulow-Glickman cell monolayers with A. actinomycetemcomitans (Y4 or SUNY 465 strain) for 2 h, treated them with gentamicin to eliminate extracellular bacteria, and then incubated them with azithromycin for 1 to 4 h. Viable intracellular bacteria were released, plated, and enumerated. Azithromycin transport by both cell lines exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics and was competitively inhibited by l-carnitine and several other organic cations. Cell incubation in medium containing 5 μg/ml azithromycin yielded steady-state intracellular concentrations of 144 μg/ml in SCC-25 cells and 118 μg/ml in Smulow-Glickman cells. Azithromycin induced dose- and time-dependent intraepithelial killing of both A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. Treatment of infected Smulow-Glickman cells with 0.125 μg/ml azithromycin killed approximately 29% of the intraepithelial CFU of both strains within 4 h, while treatment with 8 μg/ml azithromycin killed ≥82% of the CFU of both strains (P < 0.05). Addition of carnitine inhibited the killing of intracellular bacteria by azithromycin (P < 0.05). Thus, human gingival epithelial cells actively accumulate azithromycin through a transport system that facilitates the killing of intraepithelial A. actinomycetemcomitans and is shared with organic cations.

  16. Leukotoxic activity of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and periodontal attachment loss.

    PubMed

    Höglund Åberg, Carola; Haubek, Dorte; Kwamin, Francis; Johansson, Anders; Claesson, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a Gram-negative periodontitis-associated bacterium that expresses a toxin that selectively affects leukocytes. This leukotoxin is encoded by an operon belonging to the core genome of this bacterial species. Variations in the expression of the leukotoxin have been reported, and a well-characterized specific clonal type (JP2) of this bacterium with enhanced leukotoxin expression has been isolated. In particular, the presence of the JP2 genotype significantly increases the risk for the progression of periodontal attachment loss (AL). Based on these findings we hypothesized that variations in the leukotoxicity are linked to disease progression in infected individuals. In the present study, the leukotoxicity of 239 clinical isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans was analysed with different bioassays, and the genetic peculiarities of the isolates were related to their leukotoxicity based on examination with molecular techniques. The periodontal status of the individuals sampled for the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans was examined longitudinally, and the importance of the observed variations in leukotoxicity was evaluated in relation to disease progression. Our data show that high leukotoxicity correlates with an enhanced risk for the progression of AL. The JP2 genotype isolates were all highly leukotoxic, while the isolates with an intact leukotoxin promoter (non-JP2 genotypes) showed substantial variation in leukotoxicity. Genetic characterization of the non-JP2 genotype isolates indicated the presence of highly leukotoxic genotypes of serotype b with similarities to the JP2 genotype. Based on these results, we conclude that A. actinomycetemcomitans harbours other highly virulent genotypes besides the previously described JP2 genotype. In addition, the results from the present study further highlight the importance of the leukotoxin as a key virulence factor in aggressive forms of periodontitis.

  17. Serotype b of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans increases osteoclast and memory T-lymphocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Melgar-Rodríguez, S; Díaz-Zúñiga, J; Alvarez, C; Rojas, L; Monasterio, G; Carvajal, P; Escobar, A; Sanz, M; Vernal, R

    2016-04-01

    During periodontitis, alveolar bone resorption is associated with activation of T helper type 17 (Th17) lymphocytes and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) -induced osteoclasts. We previously reported that serotype b of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has a higher capacity to trigger Th17-type differentiation and function in activated T lymphocytes and its lipopolysaccharide is a more potent immunogen compared with the other serotypes. This study aimed to investigate whether serotype b of A. actinomycetemcomitans induces higher Th17-associated RANKL production, RANKL-induced osteoclast activation, and antigen-specific memory T lymphocyte proliferation. On naive CD4(+) T lymphocytes stimulated with autologous dendritic cells primed with different A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes, RANKL production, T-bet, GATA-3, RORC2 and Foxp3 expression, RORC2/RANKL intracellular double-expression, TRAP(+) osteoclast activation, and bone resorption were quantified. The frequency of proliferating memory T lymphocytes in response to A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes was determined in periodontitis and healthy subjects. Naive CD4(+) T lymphocytes stimulated by serotype b-primed dendritic cells elicited higher levels of RANKL, RORC2, TRAP(+) osteoclasts, and bone resorption than the same cells stimulated with the other serotypes. RANKL positively correlated and co-expressed with RORC2. Memory T lymphocytes responding to serotype b were more frequently detected in periodontitis patients than healthy subjects. These results indicate that serotype b of A. actinomycetemcomitans is associated with higher production of RANKL and these increased levels are associated with Th17 lymphocyte induction, osteoclast activation, and bone resorption.

  18. Effects of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin on endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dietmann, Anelia; Millonig, Alban; Combes, Valery; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Kachlany, Scott C; Grau, Georges E

    2013-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a human pathogen that produces leukotoxin (LtxA) as a major virulence factor. In this study the effect of LtxA on microvascular endothelial cell viability and phenotype was studied. High doses of single LtxA treatment (500 ng/ml to 5 μg/ml) significantly and irreversibly decreased cell proliferation and induced apoptosis, as assessed by tetrazolium salt and annexin V assay, respectively. Apoptosis was partially inhibited by the pan-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk. LtxA caused a cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase after 72 h. Between 500 ng/ml and 5 μg/ml, after long- or short-term stimulation LtxA increased the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, as well as the percentages of endothelial cells expressing these adhesion molecules. Thus, A. actinomycetemcomitans LtxA has substantial pro-inflammatory effects on human brain endothelial cells by upregulation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Furthermore, LtxA in higher concentration was found to decrease proliferation and induces apoptosis in microvascular endothelial cells.

  19. Characterization of the transduction pathway involved in c-fos and c-jun expression induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharides in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Castillo-Alemán, Ramiro

    2008-11-01

    Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disease caused by infection with oral bacteria that results in tooth exfoliation. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are a major component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative microorganisms and are involved in the inflammatory response. c-fos and c-jun are involved in pathological conditions such as inflammatory disorders. Inflammatory signaling cascades leading to c-fos activation in human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) are not well characterized. Thus, we have investigated the kinase pathways involved in c-fos and c-jun activation induced by LPS in human gingival fibroblasts. LPS promoted a dose- and time-dependent increase in c-fos transcription. Phosphoinositide-phospholipase C inhibitor (U-73122), protein kinase A inhibitor (H89), MEK1 inhibitor (PD 98,059), p38 inhibitor (SB203580), and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (genistein and herbimycin) attenuated the LPS effect, while the PI-3 K inhibitor (Wortmannin) had no effect on LPS-induced c-fos transcription. Protein kinase C inhibitors (Ro 31-8220, calphostin C, staurosporine, and chelerythrine chloride) also inhibited LPS-induced c-fos transcription. However, long-term treatment (24 -h) with the PKC activator tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (PMA) had no significant effect on LPS-induced transcription in HGFs. We also found an increase in c-jun expression in HGF stimulated with LPS. In addition, experiments using pharmacological inhibitors of individual mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and of protein kinase C (PKC) revealed that p38, ERK 1/2, and PKC are involved in LPS-induced c-jun expression. Our results indicate that LPS-induced c-fos and c-jun expressions are mediated by two different signaling pathways: one through phosphoinositide-phospholipase C via an upstream protein tyrosine kinase, which activates PKC isoforms that are insensitive to phorbol stress, and the second through activation of protein kinase A (PKA). Both kinases regulate the phosphorylation of the

  20. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin cytotoxicity occurs through bilayer destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Angela C.; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen; Du, Yurong; Stefano, Frank P.; Kieba, Irene R.; Epand, Raquel F.; Kakalis, Lazaros; Yeagle, Philip L.; Epand, Richard M.; Lally, Edward T.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The Gram-negative bacterium, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, is a common inhabitant of the human upper aerodigestive tract. The organism produces an RTX (Repeats in ToXin) toxin (LtxA) that kills human white blood cells. LtxA is believed to be a membrane-damaging toxin, but details of the cell surface interaction for this and several other RTX toxins have yet to be elucidated. Initial morphological studies suggested that LtxA was bending the target cell membrane. Because the ability of a membrane to bend is a function of its lipid composition, we assessed the proficiency of LtxA to release of a fluorescent dye from a panel of liposomes composed of various lipids. Liposomes composed of lipids that form nonlamellar phases were susceptible to LtxA-induced damage while liposomes composed of lipids that do not form non-bilayer structures were not. Differential scanning calorimetry demonstrated that the toxin decreased the temperature at which the lipid transitions from a bilayer to a nonlamellar phase, while 31P nuclear magnetic resonance studies showed that the LtxA-induced transition from a bilayer to an inverted hexagonal phase occurs through the formation of an isotropic intermediate phase. These results indicate that LtxA cytotoxicity occurs through a process of membrane destabilization. PMID:22309134

  1. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans induces Th17 cells in atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ru; Hashizume-Takizawa, Tomomi; Du, Yuan; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko

    2015-04-01

    Th17 cells have been linked to the pathogenesis of several chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. However, the role of Th17 cells and IL-17 in atherosclerosis remains poorly understood. We previously reported that Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) bacteremia accelerated atherosclerosis accompanied by inflammation in apolipoprotein E-deficient spontaneously hyperlipidemic (Apoe(shl)) mice. In this study, we investigated whether Aa promotes the Th17 inducing pathway in Aa-challenged Apoe(shl) mice. Mice were intravenously injected with live Aa HK1651 or vehicles. Time-course analysis of splenic IL-17(+)CD4(+) cell frequencies, the proximal aorta lesion area, serum IL-17, IL-6, TGF-β and IL-1β levels, the mRNA expression of Th17-related molecules such as IL-1β, IL-6, IL17RA, STAT3, IL-21, IL-23, TGF-β and RORγt, Th17-related microRNA levels and the levels of AIM-2, Mincle and NLRP3 were examined. Challenge with Aa time dependently induced tropism of Th17 cells in the spleen and increase in atheromatous lesions in the aortic sinus of Apoe(shl) mice. Serum IL-17, IL-6, TGF-β and IL-1β levels were significantly enhanced by Aa. The gene expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17RA, IL-21, IL-23, TGF-β, STAT3, RORγt, AIM-2, Mincle and NLRP3 was also time dependently stimulated in the aorta of Aa-challenged mice. Furthermore, Aa challenge significantly increased the expression of miR-146b and miR-155 in the aorta. Based on the results, it seems that Aa stimulates Th17 induction that affects the progression of Aa-accelerated atherosclerosis.

  2. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Invasion Induces Interleukin-1β Production Through Reactive Oxygen Species and Cathepsin B.

    PubMed

    Okinaga, Toshinori; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Nishihara, Tatsuji

    2015-06-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) cytokines, IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-18 play a crucial role in inflammatory responses in a variety of diseases including periodontitis. In this study, the periodontopathic bacterial pathogen, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, induced cell death and cytokine release in macrophages. Cell viability was reduced by A. actinomycetemcomitans invasion using (3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The production of IL-1β in A. actinomycetemcomitans-invaded macrophage cells was detected by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Treatment with a caspase-1 inhibitor and silencing of the caspase-1 gene had no effect on IL-1β secretion induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans invasion. Pattern recognition receptor, NLRP3 was upregulated in A. actinomycetemcomitans-invaded macrophages. However, NLRP3 knockdown had no effect on the secretion of IL-1β in A. actinomycetemcomitans-invaded RAW 264 cells. In addition, A. actinomycetemcomitans invasion induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the release of cathepsin B in RAW 264 cells. Interestingly, CA074-Me, a cathepsin B inhibitor, and N-Acetyl-l-cysteine, a ROS inhibitor, prevented the production of IL-1β induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans. Taken together, these results suggest A. actinomycetemcomitans induce IL-1β production in RAW 264 cells through the production of ROS and cathepsin B, but not through the NLRP3/caspase-1 pathway.

  3. Phenotypic changes in nonfimbriated smooth strains of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans grown in low-humidity solid medium.

    PubMed

    Pei, Zhenhua; Niu, Zhongying; Shi, Shenggen; Shi, Liang; Tang, Chuhua

    2013-04-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is the primary etiologic agent of localized aggressive periodontitis. In vitro, it can undergo fimbriated rough to nonfimbriated smooth phenotypic transition, accompanied by an increase in invasive ability and a decrease in adhesive ability. No opposite direction phenotypic transition was reported. To better understand its pathogenicity, the authors studied the morphological changes of nonfimbriated smooth strains induced by growth environmental humidity. Transmission electron microscopy was used to identify fimbriae expression change. It was found that the lower medium humidity, the more fimbriae reexpressed. In conclusion, the smooth strain of A. actinomycetemcomitans can reexpress the fimbriae in lower humidity environment.

  4. Sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase activation with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans causes inflammatory bone loss.

    PubMed

    Dunmyer, J; Herbert, B; Li, Q; Zinna, R; Martin, K; Yu, H; Kirkwood, K L

    2012-10-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a gram-negative facultative capnophile involved in pathogenesis of aggressive forms of periodontal disease. In the present study, we interrogated the ability of A. actinomycetemcomitans to stimulate innate immune signaling and cytokine production and established that A. actinomycetemcomitans causes bone loss in a novel rat calvarial model. In vitro studies indicated that A. actinomycetemcomitans stimulated considerable production of soluble cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and interleukin-10 in both primary bone marrow-derived macrophages and NR8383 macrophages. Immunoblot analysis indicated that A. actinomycetemcomitans exhibits sustained activation of all major mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, as well as the negative regulator of MAPK signaling, MAPK phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), for at least 8 h. In a rat calvarial model of inflammatory bone loss, high and low doses of formalin-fixed A. actinomycetemcomitans were microinjected into the supraperiosteal calvarial space for 1-2 weeks. Histological staining and micro-computed tomography of rat calvariae revealed a significant increase of inflammatory and fibroblast infiltrate and increased bone resorption as measured by total lacunar pit formation. From these data, we provide new evidence that fixed whole cell A. actinomycetemcomitans stimulation elicits a pro-inflammatory host response through sustained MAPK signaling, leading to enhanced bone resorption within the rat calvarial bone.

  5. Porphyromonas gingivalis gingipain is involved in the detachment and aggregation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilm.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, A; Miura, M; Fujise, O; Hamachi, T; Nishimura, F

    2014-06-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans are major periodontal pathogens that cause several types of periodontal disease. Our previous study suggested that P. gingivalis gingipains secreted in the subgingival environment are related to the detachment of A.actinomycetemcomitans biofilms. However, it remains unclear whether arginine-specific cysteine proteinase (Rgp) and lysine-specific proteinase (Kgp) play different roles in the detachment of A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilm. The aim of this study was to investigate possible disruptive roles of Kgp and Rgp in the aggregation and attachment of A. actinomycetemcomitans. While P. gingivalis ATCC33277 culture supernatant has an ability to decrease autoaggregation and coaggregation of A. actinomycetemcomitans cells, neither the boiled culture supernatant of ATCC33277 nor the culture supernatant of KDP136 showed this ability. The addition of KYT-1 and KYT-36, specific inhibitors of Rgp and Kgp, respectively, showed no influence on the ability of P. gingivalis culture supernatant. The result of gelatin zymography suggested that other proteases processed by gingipains mediated the decrease of A. actinomycetemcomitans aggregations. We also examined the biofilm-destructive effect of gingipains by assessing the detachment of A. actinomycetemcomitans from polystyrene surfaces. Scanning electron microscope analysis indicated that A. actinomycetemcomitans cells were detached by P. gingivalis Kgp. The quantity of A. actinomycetemcomitans in biofilm was decreased in co-culture with P. gingivalis. However, this was not found after the addition of KYT-36. These findings suggest that Kgp is a critical component for the detachment and decrease of A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilms.

  6. In vitro efficacy of diallyl sulfides against the periodontopathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Velliyagounder, Kabilan; Ganeshnarayan, Krishnaraj; Velusamy, Senthil Kumar; Fine, Daniel H

    2012-05-01

    The in vitro antibacterial effects of diallyl sulfide (DAS) against the Gram-negative periodontopathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, the key etiologic agent of the severe form of localized aggressive periodontitis and other nonoral infections, were studied. A. actinomycetemcomitans was treated with garlic extract, allicin, or DAS, and the anti-A. actinomycetemcomitans effects of the treatment were evaluated. Garlic extract, allicin, and DAS significantly inhibited the growth of A. actinomycetemcomitans (greater than 3 log; P < 0.01) compared to control cells. Heat inactivation of the garlic extracts significantly reduced the protein concentration; however, the antimicrobial effect was retained. Purified proteins from garlic extract did not exhibit antimicrobial activity. Allicin lost all its antimicrobial effect when it was subjected to heat treatment, whereas DAS demonstrated an antimicrobial effect similar to that of the garlic extract, suggesting that the antimicrobial activity of garlic extract is mainly due to DAS. An A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilm-killing assay performed with DAS showed a significant reduction in biofilm cell numbers, as evidenced by both confocal microscopy and culture. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of DAS-treated A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilms showed alterations of colony architecture indicating severe stress. Flow cytometry analysis of OBA9 cells did not demonstrate apoptosis or cell cycle arrest at therapeutic concentrations of DAS (0.01 and 0.1 μg/ml). DAS-treated A. actinomycetemcomitans cells demonstrated complete inhibition of glutathione (GSH) S-transferase (GST) activity. However, OBA9 cells, when exposed to DAS at similar concentrations, showed no significant differences in GST activity, suggesting that DAS-induced GST inhibition might be involved in A. actinomycetemcomitans cell death. These findings demonstrate that DAS exhibits significant antibacterial activity against A. actinomycetemcomitans and

  7. In Vitro Efficacy of Diallyl Sulfides against the Periodontopathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Ganeshnarayan, Krishnaraj; Velusamy, Senthil Kumar; Fine, Daniel H.

    2012-01-01

    The in vitro antibacterial effects of diallyl sulfide (DAS) against the Gram-negative periodontopathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, the key etiologic agent of the severe form of localized aggressive periodontitis and other nonoral infections, were studied. A. actinomycetemcomitans was treated with garlic extract, allicin, or DAS, and the anti-A. actinomycetemcomitans effects of the treatment were evaluated. Garlic extract, allicin, and DAS significantly inhibited the growth of A. actinomycetemcomitans (greater than 3 log; P < 0.01) compared to control cells. Heat inactivation of the garlic extracts significantly reduced the protein concentration; however, the antimicrobial effect was retained. Purified proteins from garlic extract did not exhibit antimicrobial activity. Allicin lost all its antimicrobial effect when it was subjected to heat treatment, whereas DAS demonstrated an antimicrobial effect similar to that of the garlic extract, suggesting that the antimicrobial activity of garlic extract is mainly due to DAS. An A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilm-killing assay performed with DAS showed a significant reduction in biofilm cell numbers, as evidenced by both confocal microscopy and culture. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of DAS-treated A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilms showed alterations of colony architecture indicating severe stress. Flow cytometry analysis of OBA9 cells did not demonstrate apoptosis or cell cycle arrest at therapeutic concentrations of DAS (0.01 and 0.1 μg/ml). DAS-treated A. actinomycetemcomitans cells demonstrated complete inhibition of glutathione (GSH) S-transferase (GST) activity. However, OBA9 cells, when exposed to DAS at similar concentrations, showed no significant differences in GST activity, suggesting that DAS-induced GST inhibition might be involved in A. actinomycetemcomitans cell death. These findings demonstrate that DAS exhibits significant antibacterial activity against A. actinomycetemcomitans and

  8. Quantitative proteomics reveal distinct protein regulations caused by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans within subgingival biofilms.

    PubMed

    Bao, Kai; Bostanci, Nagihan; Selevsek, Nathalie; Thurnheer, Thomas; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious disease that causes the inflammatory destruction of the tooth-supporting (periodontal) tissues, caused by polymicrobial biofilm communities growing on the tooth surface. Aggressive periodontitis is strongly associated with the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in the subgingival biofilms. Nevertheless, whether and how A. actinomycetemcomitans orchestrates molecular changes within the biofilm is unclear. The aim of this work was to decipher the interactions between A. actinomycetemcomitans and other bacterial species in a multi-species biofilm using proteomic analysis. An in vitro 10-species "subgingival" biofilm model, or its derivative that included additionally A. actinomycetemcomitans, were anaerobically cultivated on hydroxyapatite discs for 64 h. When present, A. actinomycetemcomitans formed dense intra-species clumps within the biofilm mass, and did not affect the numbers of the other species in the biofilm. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify the proteomic content of the biofilm lysate. A total of 3225 and 3352 proteins were identified in the biofilm, in presence or absence of A. actinomycetemcomitans, respectively. Label-free quantitative proteomics revealed that 483 out of the 728 quantified bacterial proteins (excluding those of A. actinomycetemcomitans) were accordingly regulated. Interestingly, all quantified proteins from Prevotella intermedia were up-regulated, and most quantified proteins from Campylobacter rectus, Streptococcus anginosus, and Porphyromonas gingivalis were down-regulated in presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Enrichment of Gene Ontology pathway analysis showed that the regulated groups of proteins were responsible primarily for changes in the metabolic rate, the ferric iron-binding, and the 5S RNA binding capacities, on the universal biofilm level. While the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans did not affect the numeric composition or absolute protein

  9. Quantitative Proteomics Reveal Distinct Protein Regulations Caused by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans within Subgingival Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Kai; Bostanci, Nagihan; Selevsek, Nathalie; Thurnheer, Thomas; Belibasakis, Georgios N.

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious disease that causes the inflammatory destruction of the tooth-supporting (periodontal) tissues, caused by polymicrobial biofilm communities growing on the tooth surface. Aggressive periodontitis is strongly associated with the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in the subgingival biofilms. Nevertheless, whether and how A. actinomycetemcomitans orchestrates molecular changes within the biofilm is unclear. The aim of this work was to decipher the interactions between A. actinomycetemcomitans and other bacterial species in a multi-species biofilm using proteomic analysis. An in vitro 10-species “subgingival” biofilm model, or its derivative that included additionally A. actinomycetemcomitans, were anaerobically cultivated on hydroxyapatite discs for 64 h. When present, A. actinomycetemcomitans formed dense intra-species clumps within the biofilm mass, and did not affect the numbers of the other species in the biofilm. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify the proteomic content of the biofilm lysate. A total of 3225 and 3352 proteins were identified in the biofilm, in presence or absence of A. actinomycetemcomitans, respectively. Label-free quantitative proteomics revealed that 483 out of the 728 quantified bacterial proteins (excluding those of A. actinomycetemcomitans) were accordingly regulated. Interestingly, all quantified proteins from Prevotella intermedia were up-regulated, and most quantified proteins from Campylobacter rectus, Streptococcus anginosus, and Porphyromonas gingivalis were down-regulated in presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Enrichment of Gene Ontology pathway analysis showed that the regulated groups of proteins were responsible primarily for changes in the metabolic rate, the ferric iron-binding, and the 5S RNA binding capacities, on the universal biofilm level. While the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans did not affect the numeric composition or absolute

  10. Mature Biofilm Degradation by Potential Probiotics: Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans versus Lactobacillus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Kouhei; Okinaga, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    The biofilm degradation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is essential as a complete periodontal disease therapy, and here we show the effects of potential probiotic bacteria such as Lactobacillus spp. for the biofilm of several serotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. Eight of the 13 species showed the competent biofilm degradation of ≥ 90% reduction in biofilm values in A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 (serotype b) as well as four of the seven species for the biofilm of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMZ 534 (serotype e). In contrast, the probiotic bacteria did not have a big impact for the degradation of A. actinomycetemcomitans SUNY 75 (serotype a) biofilm. The dispersed A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 cells through the biofilm detachment were still viable and plausible factors for the biofilm degradation were not due to the lactic acid and low pH conditions. The three enzymes, protease, lipase, and amylase may be responsible for the biofilm degradation; in particular, lipase was the most effective enzyme for the biofilm degradation of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 along with the protease activity which should be also important for the other serotypes. Remarkable lipase enzyme activities were detected from some of the potential probiotics and a supporting result using a lipase inhibitor presented corroborating evidence that lipase activity is one of the contributing factors for biofilm degradation outside of the protease which is also another possible factor for the biofilm of the other serotype of A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. On the other hand, the biofilm of A. actinomycetemcomitans SUNY 75 (serotype a) was not powerfully degraded by the lipase enzyme because the lipase inhibitor was slightly functional for only two of potential probiotics. PMID:27438340

  11. Antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilms associated with peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Kadkhoda, Zeinab; Amarlu, Zeinab; Eshraghi, Saeed; Samiei, Nazanin

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to assessthe antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine (CHX) on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilms isolated from subgingival plaque of peri-implantitis lesions. Methods. Thirteen patients requiring peri-implantitis treatment were consecutively selected and their subgingival biofilm was collected by inserting fine sterile paper points into peri-implant pockets for 15 seconds. A. actinomycetemcomitans was isolated from the subgingival biofilm and cultured. In this study, the standard strain of A. actinomycetemcomitans served as the positive control group and a blank disc impregnated with water served as the negative control; 0.1 mL of the bacterial suspension was cultured on specific culture medium and blank discs (6 mm in diameter) impregnated with 0.2%CHX mouthrinse (Behsa Pharmaceutical Co.) and negative control discs were placed on two sides of the bacterial culture plate. The size of growth inhibition zone was measured by a blinded independent observer in millimetres. Results. According to the results of disc diffusion test, the mean diameter of growth inhibition zone of A. actinomycetemcomitans around discs impregnated with CHX was larger in both standard (positive control) and biofilm samples of A. actinomycetemcomitans compared to the negative control group (blank disc) (P<0.001). Conclusion . Use of0.2% CHX mouthwash had antibacterial effects on A. actinomycetemcomitans species isolated from peri-implantitis sites.

  12. Distribution of biotypes and leukotoxic activity of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans isolated from Brazilian patients with chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Gaetti-Jardim, Elerson; Wahasugui, Thais Cristiane; Tomazinho, Paulo Henrique; Marques, Márcia Martins; Nakano, Viviane; Avila-Campos, Mario Julio

    2008-10-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an important etiologic agent of the periodontitis and is associated with extra-oral infections. In this study, the detection of the ltxA gene as well as the ltx promoter region from leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans isolated from 50 Brazilian patients with periodontitis and 50 healthy subjects was performed. The leukotoxic activity on HL-60 cells was also evaluated. Leukotoxic activity was determined using a trypan blue exclusion method. The 530 bp deletion in the promoter region was evaluated by PCR using a PRO primer pair. A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected by culture and directly from crude subgingival biofilm by PCR using specific primers. By culture, A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected in nine (18%) of the periodontal patients and one (2%) healthy subject. However, by PCR, this organism was detected in 44% of the periodontal patients and in 16% of the healthy subjects. It was verified a great discrepancy between PCR detection of the ltx operon promoter directly from crude subgingival biofilm and from bacterial DNA. Only one periodontal sample harbored highly leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans. Moreover, biotype II was the most prevalent and no correlation between biotypes and leukotoxic activity was observed. The diversity of leukotoxin expression by A. actinomycetemcomitans suggests a role of this toxin in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease and other infectious diseases.

  13. Distribution of biotypes and leukotoxic activity of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans isolated from Brazilian patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Gaetti-Jardim Jr., Elerson; Wahasugui, Thais Cristiane; Tomazinho, Paulo Henrique; Marques, Márcia Martins; Nakano, Viviane; Avila-Campos, Mario Julio

    2008-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an important etiologic agent of the periodontitis and is associated with extra-oral infections. In this study, the detection of the ltxA gene as well as the ltx promoter region from leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans isolated from 50 Brazilian patients with periodontitis and 50 healthy subjects was performed. The leukotoxic activity on HL-60 cells was also evaluated. Leukotoxic activity was determined using a trypan blue exclusion method. The 530 bp deletion in the promoter region was evaluated by PCR using a PRO primer pair. A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected by culture and directly from crude subgingival biofilm by PCR using specific primers. By culture, A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected in nine (18%) of the periodontal patients and one (2%) healthy subject. However, by PCR, this organism was detected in 44% of the periodontal patients and in 16% of the healthy subjects. It was verified a great discrepancy between PCR detection of the ltx operon promoter directly from crude subgingival biofilm and from bacterial DNA. Only one periodontal sample harbored highly leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans. Moreover, biotype II was the most prevalent and no correlation between biotypes and leukotoxic activity was observed. The diversity of leukotoxin expression by A. actinomycetemcomitans suggests a role of this toxin in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease and other infectious diseases. PMID:24031284

  14. Antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilms associated with peri-implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Kadkhoda, Zeinab; Amarlu, Zeinab; Eshraghi, Saeed; Samiei, Nazanin

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to assessthe antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine (CHX) on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilms isolated from subgingival plaque of peri-implantitis lesions. Methods. Thirteen patients requiring peri-implantitis treatment were consecutively selected and their subgingival biofilm was collected by inserting fine sterile paper points into peri-implant pockets for 15 seconds. A. actinomycetemcomitans was isolated from the subgingival biofilm and cultured. In this study, the standard strain of A. actinomycetemcomitans served as the positive control group and a blank disc impregnated with water served as the negative control; 0.1 mL of the bacterial suspension was cultured on specific culture medium and blank discs (6 mm in diameter) impregnated with 0.2%CHX mouthrinse (Behsa Pharmaceutical Co.) and negative control discs were placed on two sides of the bacterial culture plate. The size of growth inhibition zone was measured by a blinded independent observer in millimetres. Results. According to the results of disc diffusion test, the mean diameter of growth inhibition zone of A. actinomycetemcomitans around discs impregnated with CHX was larger in both standard (positive control) and biofilm samples of A. actinomycetemcomitans compared to the negative control group (blank disc) (P<0.001). Conclusion. Use of0.2% CHX mouthwash had antibacterial effects on A. actinomycetemcomitans species isolated from peri-implantitis sites. PMID:27651884

  15. Diverse Toll-like receptors mediate cytokine production by Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Park, Se-Ra; Kim, Dong-Jae; Han, Seung-Hyun; Kang, Min-Jung; Lee, Jun-Young; Jeong, Yu-Jin; Lee, Sang-Jin; Kim, Tae-Hyoun; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Park, Jong-Hwan

    2014-05-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) orchestrate a repertoire of immune responses in macrophages against various pathogens. Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans are two important periodontal pathogens. In the present study, we investigated TLR signaling regulating cytokine production of macrophages in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans. TLR2 and TLR4 are redundant in the production of cytokines (interleukin-6 [IL-6] and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) in F. nucleatum- and A. actinomycetemcomitans-infected macrophages. The production of cytokines by macrophages in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans infection was impaired in MyD88-deficient macrophages. Moreover, cytokine concentrations were lower in MyD88-deficient macrophages than in TLR2/TLR4 (TLR2/4) double-deficient cells. An endosomal TLR inhibitor, chloroquine, reduced cytokine production in TLR2/4-deficient macrophages in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans, and DNA from F. nucleatum or A. actinomycetemcomitans induced IL-6 production in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs), which was abolished by chloroquine. Western blot analysis revealed that TLR2/4 and MyD88 were required for optimal activation of NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in macrophages in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans, with different kinetics. An inhibitor assay showed that NF-κB and all MAPKs (p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase [ERK], and Jun N-terminal protein kinase [JNK]) mediate F. nucleatum-induced production of cytokines in macrophages, whereas NF-κB and p38, but not ERK and JNK, are involved in A. actinomycetemcomitans-mediated cytokine production. These findings suggest that multiple TLRs may participate in the cytokine production of macrophages against periodontal bacteria.

  16. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: virulence of its leukotoxin and association with aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Åberg, Carola Höglund; Kelk, Peyman; Johansson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infection-induced inflammatory disease that causes loss of the tooth supporting tissues. Much focus has been put on comparison of the microbial biofilm in the healthy periodontium with the diseased one. The information arising from such studies is limited due to difficulties to compare the microbial composition in these two completely different ecological niches. A few longitudinal studies have contributed with information that makes it possible to predict which individuals who might have an increased risk of developing aggressive forms of periodontitis, and the predictors are either microbial or/and host-derived factors. The most conspicuous condition that is associated with disease risk is the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans at the individual level. This Gram-negative bacterium has a great genetic variation with a number of virulence factors. In this review we focus in particular on the leukotoxin that, based on resent knowledge, might be one of the most important virulence factors of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  17. NADPH Oxidase Contributes to Resistance against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-Induced Periodontitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bast, Antje; Kubis, Helen; Holtfreter, Birte; Ribback, Silvia; Martin, Heiner; Schreiner, Helen C; Dominik, Malte J; Breitbach, Katrin; Dombrowski, Frank; Kocher, Thomas; Steinmetz, Ivo

    2017-02-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a Gram-negative commensal bacterium of the oral cavity which has been associated with the pathogenesis of periodontitis with severe alveolar bone destruction. The role of host factors such as reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates in periodontal A. actinomycetemcomitans infection and progression to periodontitis is still ill-defined. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze the role of NADPH oxidase and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in a murine model of A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced periodontitis. NADPH oxidase-deficient (gp91(phox) knockout [KO]), iNOS-deficient (iNOS KO), and C57BL/6 wild-type mice were orally infected with A. actinomycetemcomitans and analyzed for bacterial colonization at various time points. Alveolar bone mineral density and alveolar bone volume were quantified by three-dimensional micro-computed tomography, and the degree of tissue inflammation was calculated by histological analyses. At 5 weeks after infection, A. actinomycetemcomitans persisted at significantly higher levels in the murine oral cavities of infected gp91(phox) KO mice than in those of iNOS KO and C57BL/6 mice. Concomitantly, alveolar bone mineral density was significantly lower in all three infected groups than in uninfected controls, but with the highest loss of bone density in infected gp91(phox) KO mice. Only infected gp91(phox) KO mice revealed significant loss of alveolar bone volume and enhanced inflammatory cell infiltration, as well as an increased number of osteoclasts. Our results indicate that NADPH oxidase is important to control A. actinomycetemcomitans infection in the murine oral cavity and to prevent subsequent alveolar bone destruction and osteoclastogenesis.

  18. Human Serum-Specific Activation of Alternative Sigma Factors, the Stress Responders in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Tang-Siegel, Gaoyan; Bumgarner, Roger; Ruiz, Teresa; Kittichotirat, Weerayuth; Chen, Weizhen; Chen, Casey

    2016-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a known pathogen causing periodontal disease and infective endocarditis, is a survivor in the periodontal pocket and blood stream; both environments contain serum as a nutrient source. To screen for unknown virulence factors associated with this microorganism, A. actinomycetemcomitans was grown in serum-based media to simulate its in vivo environment. Different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans showed distinct growth phenotypes only in the presence of human serum, and they were grouped into high- and low-responder groups. High-responders comprised mainly serotype c strains, and showed an unusual growth phenomenon, featuring a second, rapid increase in turbidity after 9-h incubation that reached a final optical density 2- to 7-fold higher than low-responders. Upon further investigation, the second increase in turbidity was not caused by cell multiplication, but by cell death. Whole transcriptomic analysis via RNA-seq identified 35 genes that were up-regulated by human serum, but not horse serum, in high-responders but not in low-responders, including prominently an alternative sigma factor rpoE (σE). A lacZ reporter construct driven by the 132-bp rpoE promoter sequence of A. actinomycetemcomitans responded dramatically to human serum within 90 min of incubation only when the construct was carried by a high responder strain. The rpoE promoter is 100% identical among high- and low-responder strains. Proteomic investigation showed potential interactions between human serum protein, e.g. apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) and A. actinomycetemcomitans. The data clearly indicated a different activation process for rpoE in high- versus low-responder strains. This differential human serum-specific activation of rpoE, a putative extra-cytoplasmic stress responder and global regulator, suggests distinct in vivo adaptations among different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:27490177

  19. Virulence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans serotypes and DGGE subtypes isolated from chronic adult periodontitis in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pahumunto, Nuntiya; Ruangsri, Praphansri; Wongsuwanlert, Mutita; Piwat, Supatcharin; Dahlen, Gunnar; Teanpaisan, Rawee

    2015-12-01

    A high proportion of non-serotypeable isolates of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans among Thai periodontitis cases has been previously reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of leukotoxin and toxicity, cytolethal distending toxin (Cdts), and internalization and the killing effect on fibroblasts by A. actinomycetemcomitans subtypes from Thai chronic periodontitis cases. A total of 96 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains from 37 periodontitis cases, previously serotyped with PCR and subtyped with DGGE, were examined for the presence of the ltx gene and cdt genes (cdtBC), and tested for leukotoxin expression, leukotoxicity, internalization, and apoptosis of fibroblast cells. The ltx gene was present in all isolates, while 84.4% showed the cdtBC gene. Two strains with a JP2-like ltx gene with a deletion of 530 bp in the promoter region, serotyped as c, showed virulence of similar magnitude to the JP2 strain. Furthermore, a higher virulence was found in the two non-serotypeable DGGE subtypes, NS1 and NS2, compared with the serotypeable strains (serotype a-f, serotype b and d were absent). Generally, the virulence of strains obtained from deep periodontal pockets was higher than those isolated from shallow non-bleeding pockets. A. actinomycetemcomitans subtypes isolated from adult Thais with chronic periodontitis showed a highly variable virulence, leukotoxin expression, leukotoxicity, internalization and apoptosis of fibroblast, and are regulated both genetically and environmentally.

  20. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans arcB influences hydrophobic properties, biofilm formation and adhesion to hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Longo, PL; Ota-Tsuzuki, C; Nunes, ACR; Fernandes, BL; Mintz, K; Fives-Taylor, P; Mayer, MPA

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression in the oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is still not fully elucidated. ArcAB is a two-component system which allows facultative anaerobic bacteria to sense various respiratory growth conditions and adapt their gene expression accordingly.This study investigated in A. actinomycetemcomitans the role of ArcB on the regulation of biofilm formation, adhesion to saliva coated hydroxyapatite (SHA) and the hydrophobic properties of the cell. These phenotypic traits were determined for an A. actinomycetemcomitans arcB deficient type and a wild type strain. Differences in hydrophobic properties were shown at early and late exponential growth phases under microaerobic incubation and at late exponential phase under anaerobiosis.The arcB mutant formed less biofilm than the wild type strain when grown under anaerobic incubation, but displayed higher biofilm formation activity under microaerobic conditions. The adherence to SHA was significantly lower in the mutant when compared with the wild type strain. These results suggest that the transmembrane sensor kinase ArcB, in A. actinomycetemcomitans, senses redox growth conditions and regulates the expression of surface components of the bacterial cell related to biofilm formation and adhesion to saliva coated surfaces. PMID:24031399

  1. Integration host factor is required for replication of pYGK-derived plasmids in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Juárez-Rodríguez, María D; Demuth, Donald R

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we show that integration host factor protein (IHF) is required for replication of pYGK plasmids in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. YGK plasmids were not replicated in A. actinomycetemcomitans strains lacking either the α- or β- subunit of IHF. However, the deletion mutants were complemented, and plasmid replication was restored when the promoter region and gene for either ihfA or ihfB was cloned into pYGK. We also identified two motifs that resemble the consensus IHF-binding site in a 813-bp fragment containing the pYGK origin of replication. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, purified IHFα-IHFβ protein complex was shown to bind to probes containing either of these motifs. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that plasmid replication is IHF-dependent in the family Pasteurellaceae. In addition, using site-direct mutagenesis, the XbaI and KpnI restriction sites in the suicide vector pJT1 were modified to generate plasmid pJT10. The introduction of these new unique sites in pJT10 facilitates the transfer of transcriptional or translational lacZ fusion constructs for the generation of single-copy chromosomal insertion of the reporter construct. Plasmid pJT10 and its derivatives will be useful for genetic studies in Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) and probably other genera of Pasteurellaceae, including Haemophilus, Pasteurella, and Mannheimia.

  2. NLRP3 inflammasome is required for apoptosis of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-infected human osteoblastic MG63 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Panyu; Liu, Junchao; Pan, Chunling; Pan, Yaping

    2014-09-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans) is a Gram-negative bacterium which is implicated in the pathogenesis of human periodontal disease and in particular aggressive periodontitis. Virulence factors from A. actinomycetemcomitans have been shown to induce apoptosis of osteoblasts, however, the underlying mechanisms of the induction of apoptosis are poorly understood. In the present study, the infection of A. actinomycetemcomitans in human osteoblastic MG63 cells was established. Accordingly, A. actinomycetemcomitans infection enhanced significant apoptosis of MG63 cells. We found that both expression levels of NLRP3 and ASC were increased dramatically after MG63 cell cultures exposed to A. actinomycetemcomitans. Moreover, the secretion of mature interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 were extensively induced in A. actinomycetemcomitans-infected cells as compared with non-invasion group of MG63 cell cultures, indicating the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome during infection. Finally, we found that the knockdown expression of NLRP3 by specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) attenuated apoptosis of A. actinomycetemcomitans-infected MG63 cells. Our data suggest that A. actinomycetemcomitans promotes apoptosis of human osteoblasts at least partially through the NLRP3 inflammasome.

  3. A gene cluster for the synthesis of serotype g-specific polysaccharide antigen in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Tsuzukibashi, Osamu; Saito, Masanori; Kobayashi, Taira; Umezawa, Koji; Nagahama, Fumio; Hiroi, Takachika; Hirasawa, Masatomo; Takada, Kazuko

    2014-04-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an important pathogen related to aggressively progressive periodontal breakdown in adolescents and adults. The species can be divided into six serotypes (a-f) according to their surface carbohydrate antigens. Recently, a new serotype g of A. actinomycetemcomitans was proposed. The aim of the present study was to sequence the gene cluster associated with the biosynthesis of the serotype g-specific polysaccharide antigen and develop serotype-specific primers for PCR assay to identify serotype g strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans. The serotype-specific polysaccharide (SSPS) gene cluster of the NUM-Aa 4039 strain contained 21 genes in 21,842-bp nucleotides. The similarity of the SSPS gene cluster sequence was 96.7 % compared with that of the serotype e strain. Seventeen serotype g genes showed more than 90 % homology both in nucleotide and amino acids to the serotype e strain. Three additional genes with 1,579 bp in NUM-Aa 4039 were inserted into the corresponding ORF13 of the serotype e strain. The serotype g-specific primers were designed from the insertion region of NUM-Aa 4039. Serotypes of the a-f strains were not amplified by serotype-specific g primers; only NUM-Aa 4039 showed an amplicon band. The NUM-Aa 4039 strain was three genes in the SSPS gene cluster different from those of serotype e strain. The specific primers derived from these different regions are useful for identification and distribution of serotype g strain among A. actinomycetemcomitans from clinical samples.

  4. The cytolethal distending toxin of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans inhibits macrophage phagocytosis and subverts cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Ando-Suguimoto, Ellen Sayuri; da Silva, Maike Paulino; Kawamoto, Dione; Chen, Casey; DiRienzo, Joseph M; Mayer, Marcia Pinto Alves

    2014-03-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an important periodontal pathogen that can participate in periodontitis and other non-oral infections. The cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt) is among the virulence factors produced by this bacterium. The Cdt is also secreted by several mucosa-associated Gram-negative pathogens and may play a role in perpetuating the infection by modulating the immune response. Although the toxin targets a wide range of eukaryotic cell types little is known about its activity on macrophages which play a key part in alerting the rest of the immune system to the presence of pathogens and their virulence factors. In view of this, we tested the hypothesis that the A. actinomycetemcomitans Cdt (AaCdt) disrupts macrophage function by inhibiting phagocytic activity as well as affecting the production of cytokines. Murine macrophages were co-cultured with either wild-type A. actinomycetemcomitans or a Cdt(-) mutant. Viable counts and qPCR showed that phagocytosis of the wild-type strain was significantly reduced relative to that of the Cdt(-) mutant. Addition of recombinant Aa(r)Cdt to co-cultures along with the Cdt(-) mutant diminished the phagocytic activity similar to that observed with the wild type strain. High concentrations of Aa(r)Cdt resulted in decreased phagocytosis of fluorescent bioparticles. Nitric oxide production was modulated by the presence of Cdt and the levels of IL-1β, IL-12 and IL-10 were increased. Production of TNF-α did not differ in the co-culture assays but was increased by the presence of Aa(r)Cdt. These data suggest that the Cdt may modulate macrophage function in A. actinomycetemcomitans infected sites by impairing phagocytosis and modifying the pro-inflammatory/anti-inflammatory cytokine balance.

  5. [Microbiological approach to a possible infective endocarditis case caused by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans].

    PubMed

    Gürcan, Şaban; Ünlü, Selahattin; Kuloğlu, Figen; Karadenizli, Aynur; Kuşkucu, Mert Ahmet

    2016-04-01

    Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans, a small, gram-negative coccobacillus that grows slow and fastidious, is generally colonized in the oral cavity. It is a rarely seen bacterium because of the difficulty of isolation but it can be a causative agent for dental infections and infective endocarditis (IE) particularly in the persons having prosthetic heart valves. In this report, a possible IE case caused by A.actinomycetemcomitans in a patient with aortic valve replacement has been presented. A 36-year-old man has admitted to Trakya University Hospital, Health Center for Medical Research and Practice, with the complaints of chills, malaise, intermittent fever, severe arthralgia and weight loss (20 kg). During his follow-up period, the blood cultures that were obtained three week intervals yielded the identical gram-negative coccobacilli morphology. The patient was then diagnosed as possible IE on the basis of having one major (growth of the typical microorganisms that may cause IE in two different blood cultures) and two minor (presence of prosthetic valve and high fever) criterias. The isolate could not be identified with conventional methods, while it was identified as Francisella tularensis with VITEK 2 (bioMerieux, France) system. Hence this identification was not confirmed by real-time Taqman polymerase chain reaction, so MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was used to identify this bacteria. In the first run of the study, the isolate was named as Shigella dysenteriae initially, however when it was retested the next day it was identified as A.actinomycetemcomitans. In order to enlighten these conflicting results, 16S and 23S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis was performed, and consequently the bacterium was identified as A.actinomycetemcomitans. Doxycycline (2 x 100 mg po, 20 days) and streptomycin (2 x 10 mg/kg im, 10 days) therapy were initiated, considering the initial suspicious identification (F.tularensis), and on the fifth day of therapy the

  6. Identification of a novel bacterial outer membrane interleukin-1Β-binding protein from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Paino, Annamari; Ahlstrand, Tuuli; Nuutila, Jari; Navickaite, Indre; Lahti, Maria; Tuominen, Heidi; Välimaa, Hannamari; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Pöllänen, Marja T; Ihalin, Riikka

    2013-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a gram-negative opportunistic oral pathogen. It is frequently associated with subgingival biofilms of both chronic and aggressive periodontitis, and the diseased sites of the periodontium exhibit increased levels of the proinflammatory mediator interleukin (IL)-1β. Some bacterial species can alter their physiological properties as a result of sensing IL-1β. We have recently shown that this cytokine localizes to the cytoplasm of A. actinomycetemcomitans in co-cultures with organotypic gingival mucosa. However, current knowledge about the mechanism underlying bacterial IL-1β sensing is still limited. In this study, we characterized the interaction of A. actinomycetemcomitans total membrane protein with IL-1β through electrophoretic mobility shift assays. The interacting protein, which we have designated bacterial interleukin receptor I (BilRI), was identified through mass spectrometry and was found to be Pasteurellaceae specific. Based on the results obtained using protein function prediction tools, this protein localizes to the outer membrane and contains a typical lipoprotein signal sequence. All six tested biofilm cultures of clinical A. actinomycetemcomitans strains expressed the protein according to phage display-derived antibody detection. Moreover, proteinase K treatment of whole A. actinomycetemcomitans cells eliminated BilRI forms that were outer membrane specific, as determined through immunoblotting. The protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli in both the outer membrane-associated form and a soluble cytoplasmic form. When assessed using flow cytometry, the BilRI-overexpressing E. coli cells were observed to bind 2.5 times more biotinylated-IL-1β than the control cells, as detected with avidin-FITC. Overexpression of BilRI did not cause binding of a biotinylated negative control protein. In a microplate assay, soluble BilRI bound to IL-1β, but this binding was not specific, as a control protein for IL-1

  7. Prophage induction in lysogenic Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans cells co-cultured with human gingival fibroblasts, and its effect on leukotoxin release.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Roy H; de Moura Martins Lobo Dos Santos, Caroline; Zuanazzi, David; de Accioly Mattos, Marcelo Barbosas; Ferreira, Davis Fernandes; Kachlany, Scott C; Tinoco, Eduardo M B

    2013-01-01

    Lysogeny is common among strains of the periodontal pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Since lysogenic induction is known to result in the increased synthesis and release of bacterial toxins from lysogens, it would be important to elucidate the conditions under which induction of these bacteria may occur. Co-cultures of A. actinomycetemcomitans strains (either lysogenic or non-lysogenic) and human cells (either gingival fibroblasts or pharyngeal epithelial cells) were prepared. Following incubation, bacteriophage titers of up to 6.2 × 10(7) pfu/ml were detected in the cell-free, spent culture media from the co-cultures of the lysogenic A. actinomycetemcomitans strains and the fibroblasts. Little (maximum of 2 × 10(0) pfu/ml) or no titers of phage could be detected in the mono-cultures of the lysogenic A. actinomycetemcomitans strains alone. In contrast, no phage were detectable in the cell-free spent culture media of the lysogens cocultured with the epithelial cells. Futhermore, co-culture of the A. actinomycetemcomitans lysogens with the fibroblasts resulted in enhanced release of the A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin into the culture medium, in comparison with the spent culture media from mono-cultures of the lysogens alone. These results are consistent with the concept that interaction with fibroblasts may mediate prophage induction in lysogenic strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans, and that leukotoxin release is greatly augmented following induction of the lysogens.

  8. Photosensitization of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans with methylene blue: a microbiological and spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada Júnior, Aécio M.; Prates, Renato A.; Cai, Silvana; Ribeiro, Martha S.

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determinate the efficiency of methylene blue (MB) to kill cultures of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans under red light and to investigate MB photobleaching by optical absorption spectroscopy. Bacteria were diluted in aqueous solution, putted in glass tubes and distributed in 5 groups: (L-MB-) control group; (L+MB-) laser alone by 5min; (L-MB+) MB alone through 5min; (3L+MB+) MB+laser 3min; (5L+MB+) MB+laser 5min. Laser parameters were P=30mW, λ=660nm, E=9J in 5min and E=5.4J in 3min. The samples were diluted and bacterial colonies were counted and converted into colony forming units (CFU). Absorption spectra of the MB-stained bacterial suspension and photosensitized bacterial suspension were obtained. Groups L-MB-, L+MB-, and L-MB+ did not show a decrease in CFU/mL. L+MB+ groups showed a significant decrease in CFU/mL but no statistically significant differences were observed between 3min and 5min. Spectroscopy showed that MB is photodegraded after irradiation and that dimer species are more notably consumed than monomeric species. These results suggest that MB is a suitable photosensitizer to reduce A. actinomycetemcomitans, and that 3min of irradiation are enough to produce a significant effect. Due to the spectral changes observed on MB solution after irradiation a type I mechanism may be involved.

  9. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin: a powerful tool with capacity to cause imbalance in the host inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anders

    2011-03-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has been described as a member of the indigenous oral microbiota of humans, and is involved in the pathology of periodontitis and various non-oral infections. This bacterium selectively kills human leukocytes through expression of leukotoxin, a large pore-forming protein that belongs to the Repeat in Toxin (RTX) family. The specificity of the toxin is related to its prerequisite for a specific target cell receptor, LFA-1, which is solely expressed on leukocytes. The leukotoxin causes death of different leukocyte populations in a variety of ways. It activates a rapid release of lysosomal enzymes and MMPs from neutrophils and causes apoptosis in lymphocytes. In the monocytes/macrophages, the toxin activates caspase-1, a cysteine proteinase, which causes a proinflammatory response by the activation and secretion of IL-1β and IL-18. A specific clone (JP2) of A. actinomycetemcomitans with enhanced leukotoxin expression significantly correlates to disease onset in infected individuals. Taken together, the mechanisms by which this toxin kills leukocytes are closely related to the pathogenic mechanisms of inflammatory disorders, such as periodontitis. Therapeutic strategies targeting the cellular and molecular inflammatory host response in periodontal diseases might be a future treatment alternative.

  10. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: Virulence of its leukotoxin and association with aggressive periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Åberg, Carola Höglund; Kelk, Peyman; Johansson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infection-induced inflammatory disease that causes loss of the tooth supporting tissues. Much focus has been put on comparison of the microbial biofilm in the healthy periodontium with the diseased one. The information arising from such studies is limited due to difficulties to compare the microbial composition in these two completely different ecological niches. A few longitudinal studies have contributed with information that makes it possible to predict which individuals who might have an increased risk of developing aggressive forms of periodontitis, and the predictors are either microbial or/and host-derived factors. The most conspicuous condition that is associated with disease risk is the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans at the individual level. This Gram-negative bacterium has a great genetic variation with a number of virulence factors. In this review we focus in particular on the leukotoxin that, based on resent knowledge, might be one of the most important virulence factors of A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:25494963

  11. Effects of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin on neutrophil migration and extracellular trap formation

    PubMed Central

    Hirschfeld, Josefine; Roberts, Helen M.; Chapple, Iain L. C.; Parčina, Marijo; Jepsen, Søren; Johansson, Anders; Claesson, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Background Aggressive periodontitis is associated with the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a leukotoxin (Ltx)-producing periodontal pathogen. Ltx has the ability to lyse white blood cells including neutrophils. Objectives This study was aimed at investigating the interactions between neutrophils and Ltx with regard to the chemotactic properties of Ltx and the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Methods Neutrophils from healthy blood donors were isolated and incubated for 30 min and 3 h with increasing concentrations of Ltx (1, 10, and 100 ng/mL) as well as with A. actinomycetemcomitans strains (NCTC 9710 and HK 1651) producing different levels of Ltx. Formation of NETs and cell lysis were assessed by microscopy, fluorescence-based assays, and measurement of released lactate dehydrogenase. Neutrophil migration in response to different Ltx gradients was monitored by real-time video microscopy, and image analysis was performed using ImageJ software. Results Although Ltx (10 and 100 ng/mL) and the leukotoxic A. actinomycetemcomitans strain HK 1651 lysed some neutrophils, other cells were still capable of performing NETosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Low doses of Ltx and the weakly leukotoxic strain NCTC 9710 did not lead to neutrophil lysis, but did induce some NETosis. Furthermore, all three concentrations of Ltx enhanced random neutrophil movement; however, low directional accuracy was observed compared with the positive control (fMLP). Conclusions The results indicate that Ltx acts both as a neutrophil activator and also causes cell death. In addition, Ltx directly induces NETosis in neutrophils prior to cell lysis. In future studies, the underlying pathways involved in Ltx-meditated neutrophil activation and NETosis need to be investigated further. PMID:27834173

  12. Profound Effects of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Leukotoxin Mutation on Adherence Properties Are Clarified in in vitro Experiments.

    PubMed

    Velusamy, Senthil Kumar; Sampathkumar, Vandana; Godboley, Dipti; Fine, Daniel H

    2016-01-01

    Leukotoxin (Ltx) is a prominent virulence factor produced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, an oral microorganism highly associated with aggressive periodontitis. Ltx compromises host responsiveness by altering the viability of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages. Previously, we developed a Rhesus (Rh) monkey colonization model designed to determine the effect of virulence gene mutations on colonization of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Unexpectedly, an A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin (ltxA) mutant (RhAa-VS2) failed to colonize in the Rh model. No previous literature suggested that Ltx was associated with A. actinomycetemcomitans binding to tooth surfaces. These results led us to explore the broad effects of the ltxA mutation in vitro. Results indicated that LtxA activity was completely abolished in RhAa-VS2 strain, while complementation significantly (P<0.0001) restored leukotoxicity compared to RhAa-VS2 strain. RT-PCR analysis of ltx gene expression ruled out polar effects. Furthermore, binding of RhAa-VS2 to salivary-coated hydroxyapatite (SHA) was significantly decreased (P<0.0001) compared to wild type RhAa3 strain. Real time RT-PCR analysis of the genes related to SHA binding in RhAa-VS2 showed that genes related to binding were downregulated [rcpA (P = 0.018), rcpB (P = 0.02), tadA (P = 0.002)] as compared to wild type RhAa3. RhAa-VS2 also exhibited decreased biofilm depth (P = 0.008) and exo-polysaccharide production (P<0.0001). Buccal epithelial cell (BEC) binding of RhAa-VS2 was unaffected. Complementation with ltxA restored binding to SHA (P<0.002) but had no effect on biofilm formation when compared to RhAa3. In conclusion, mutation of ltxA diminished hard tissue binding in vitro, which helps explain the previous in vivo failure of a ltxA knockout to colonize the Rh oral cavity. These results suggest that; 1) one specific gene knockout (in this case ltxA) could affect other seemingly unrelated genes (such as rcpA, rcpB tadA etc), and 2

  13. Profound Effects of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Leukotoxin Mutation on Adherence Properties Are Clarified in in vitro Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Godboley, Dipti; Fine, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Leukotoxin (Ltx) is a prominent virulence factor produced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, an oral microorganism highly associated with aggressive periodontitis. Ltx compromises host responsiveness by altering the viability of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages. Previously, we developed a Rhesus (Rh) monkey colonization model designed to determine the effect of virulence gene mutations on colonization of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Unexpectedly, an A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin (ltxA) mutant (RhAa-VS2) failed to colonize in the Rh model. No previous literature suggested that Ltx was associated with A. actinomycetemcomitans binding to tooth surfaces. These results led us to explore the broad effects of the ltxA mutation in vitro. Results indicated that LtxA activity was completely abolished in RhAa-VS2 strain, while complementation significantly (P<0.0001) restored leukotoxicity compared to RhAa-VS2 strain. RT-PCR analysis of ltx gene expression ruled out polar effects. Furthermore, binding of RhAa-VS2 to salivary-coated hydroxyapatite (SHA) was significantly decreased (P<0.0001) compared to wild type RhAa3 strain. Real time RT-PCR analysis of the genes related to SHA binding in RhAa-VS2 showed that genes related to binding were downregulated [rcpA (P = 0.018), rcpB (P = 0.02), tadA (P = 0.002)] as compared to wild type RhAa3. RhAa-VS2 also exhibited decreased biofilm depth (P = 0.008) and exo-polysaccharide production (P<0.0001). Buccal epithelial cell (BEC) binding of RhAa-VS2 was unaffected. Complementation with ltxA restored binding to SHA (P<0.002) but had no effect on biofilm formation when compared to RhAa3. In conclusion, mutation of ltxA diminished hard tissue binding in vitro, which helps explain the previous in vivo failure of a ltxA knockout to colonize the Rh oral cavity. These results suggest that; 1) one specific gene knockout (in this case ltxA) could affect other seemingly unrelated genes (such as rcpA, rcpB tadA etc), and 2

  14. The conserved carboxyl domain of MorC, an inner membrane protein of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, is essential for membrane function.

    PubMed

    Smith, K P; Voogt, R D; Ruiz, T; Mintz, K P

    2016-02-01

    Morphogenesis protein C (MorC) of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is important for maintaining the membrane morphology and integrity of the cell envelope of this oral pathogen. The MorC sequence and operon organization were found to be conserved in Gammaproteobacteria, based on a bioinformatic analysis of 435 sequences from representative organisms. Functional conservation of MorC was investigated using an A. actinomycetemcomitans morC mutant as a model system to express MorC homologs from four phylogenetically diverse representatives of the Gammaproteobacteria: Haemophilus influenzae, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Moraxella catarrhalis. The A. actinomycetemcomitans strains expressing the homologous proteins were assessed for sensitivity to bile salts, leukotoxin secretion, autoaggregation and membrane morphology. MorC from the most closely related organism (H. influenzae) was functionally identical to MorC from A. actinomycetemcomitans. However, the genes from more distantly related organisms restored some but not all A. actinomycetemcomitans mutant phenotypes. In addition, deletion mutagenesis indicated that the most conserved portion of the protein, the C-terminus DUF490 domain, was necessary to maintain the integrity of the membrane. Deletion of the last 10 amino acids of this domain of the A. actinomycetemcomitans MorC protein was sufficient to disrupt membrane stability and leukotoxin secretion. The data suggest that the MorC sequence is functionally conserved across Gammaproteobacteria and the C-terminus of the protein is essential for maintaining membrane physiology.

  15. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 2 Signaling Shapes Macrophage Plasticity in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-Induced Bone Loss.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Bethany A; Steinkamp, Heidi M; Gaestel, Matthias; Kirkwood, Keith L

    2017-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is associated with aggressive periodontal disease, which is characterized by inflammation-driven alveolar bone loss. A. actinomycetemcomitans activates the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2) stress pathways in macrophages that are involved in host responses. During the inflammatory process in periodontal disease, chemokines are upregulated to promote recruitment of inflammatory cells. The objective of this study was to determine the role of MK2 signaling in chemokine regulation during A. actinomycetemcomitans pathogenesis. Utilizing a murine calvarial model, Mk2(+/+) and Mk2(-/-) mice were treated with live A. actinomycetemcomitans bacteria at the midsagittal suture. MK2 positively regulated the following macrophage RNA: Emr1 (F4/80), Itgam (CD11b), Csf1r (M-CSF Receptor), Itgal (CD11a), Tnf, and Nos2 Additionally, RNA analysis revealed that MK2 signaling regulated chemokines CCL3 and CCL4 in murine calvarial tissue. Utilizing the chimeric murine air pouch model, MK2 signaling differentially regulated CCL3 and CCL4 in the hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic compartments. Bone resorption pits in calvaria, observed by micro-computed tomography, and osteoclast formation were decreased in Mk2(-/-) mice compared to Mk2(+/+) mice after A. actinomycetemcomitans treatment. In conclusion, these data suggest that MK2 in macrophages contributes to regulation of chemokine signaling during A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced inflammation and bone loss.

  16. Role of exopolysaccharide in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-induced bone resorption in a rat model for periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Mayilvahanan; Gopal, Prerna; El Abbar, Faiha; Schreiner, Helen C; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Fine, Daniel H; Ramasubbu, Narayanan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans a causative agent of periodontal disease in humans, forms biofilm on biotic and abiotic surfaces. A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilm is heterogeneous in nature and is composed of proteins, extracellular DNA and exopolysaccharide. To explore the role played by the exopolysaccharide in the colonization and disease progression, we employed genetic reduction approach using our rat model of A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced periodontitis. To this end, a genetically modified strain of A. actinomycetemcomitans lacking the pga operon was compared with the wild-type strain in the rat infection model. The parent and mutant strains were primarily evaluated for bone resorption and disease. Our study showed that colonization, bone resorption/disease and antibody response were all elevated in the wild-type fed rats. The bone resorption/disease caused by the pga mutant strain, lacking the exopolysaccharide, was significantly less (P < 0.05) than the bone resorption/disease caused by the wild-type strain. Further analysis of the expression levels of selected virulence genes through RT-PCR showed that the decrease in colonization, bone resorption and antibody titer in the absence of the exopolysaccharide might be due to attenuated levels of colonization genes, flp-1, apiA and aae in the mutant strain. This study demonstrates that the effect exerted by the exopolysaccharide in A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced bone resorption has hitherto not been recognized and underscores the role played by the exopolysaccharide in A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced disease.

  17. Detection of antimicrobial activity of banana peel (Musa paradisiaca L.) on Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kapadia, Suraj Premal; Pudakalkatti, Pushpa S.; Shivanaikar, Sachin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Aim: Banana is used widely because of its nutritional values. In past, there are studies that show banana plant parts, and their fruits can be used to treat the human diseases. Banana peel is a part of banana fruit that also has the antibacterial activity against microorganisms but has not been studied extensively. Since, there are no studies that relate the antibacterial activity of banana peel against periodontal pathogens. Hence, the aim of this study is to determine the antimicrobial activity of banana peel extract on Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans). Material and Methods: Standard strains of P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans were used in this study which was obtained from the in-house bacterial bank of Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology at Maratha Mandal's Nathajirao G. Halgekar Institute of Dental Sciences and Research Centre. The banana peel extract was prepared, and the antibacterial activity was assessed using well agar diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentration was assessed using serial broth dilution method. Results: In the current study, both the tested microorganisms showed antibacterial activity. In well diffusion method, P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans showed 15 mm and 12 mm inhibition zone against an alcoholic extract of banana peel, respectively. In serial broth dilution method P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans were sensitive until 31.25 μg/ml dilutions. Conclusion: From results of the study, it is suggested that an alcoholic extract of banana peel has antimicrobial activity against P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:26681854

  18. Construction of new cloning, lacZ reporter and scarless-markerless suicide vectors for genetic studies in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Demuth, Donald R

    2013-05-01

    To elucidate the putative function of a gene, effective tools are required for genetic characterization that facilitate its inactivation, deletion or modification on the bacterial chromosome. In the present study, the nucleotide sequence of the Escherichia coli/Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans shuttle vector pYGK was determined, allowing us to redesign and construct a new shuttle cloning vector, pJT4, and promoterless lacZ transcriptional/translational fusion plasmids, pJT3 and pJT5. Plasmids pJT4 and pJT5 contain the origin of replication necessary to maintain shuttle vector replication. In addition, a new suicide vector, pJT1, was constructed for the generation of scarless and markerless deletion mutations of genes in the oral pathogen A. actinomycetemcomitans. Plasmid pJT1 is a pUC-based suicide vector that is counter-selectable for sucrose sensitivity. This vector does not leave antibiotic markers or scars on the chromosome after gene deletion and thus provides the option to combine several mutations in the same genetic background. The effectiveness of pJT1 was demonstrated by the construction of A. actinomycetemcomitans isogenic qseB single deletion (ΔqseB) mutant and lsrRK double deletion mutants (ΔlsrRK). These new vectors may offer alternatives for genetic studies in A. actinomycetemcomitans and other members of the HACEK (Haemophilus spp., A. actinomycetemcomitans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella kingae) group of Gram-negative bacteria.

  19. Construction of new cloning, lacZ reporter and scarless-markerless suicide vectors for genetic studies in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Juárez-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Demuth, Donald R.

    2013-01-01

    To elucidate the putative function of a gene, effective tools are required for genetic characterization that facilitate its inactivation, deletion or modification on the bacterial chromosome. In the present study, the nucleotide sequence of the Escherichia coli/Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans shuttle vector pYGK was determined, allowing us to redesign and construct a new shuttle cloning vector, pJT4, and promoterless lacZ transcriptional/translational fusion plasmids, pJT3 and pJT5. Plasmids pJT4 and pJT5 contain the origin of replication necessary to maintain shuttle vector replication. In addition, a new suicide vector, pJT1, was constructed for the generation of scarless and markerless deletion mutations of genes in the oral pathogen A. actinomycetemcomitans. Plasmid pJT1 is a pUC-based suicide vector that is counter-selectable for sucrose sensitivity. This vector does not leave antibiotic markers or scars on the chromosome after gene deletion and thus provides the option to combine several mutations in the same genetic background. The effectiveness of pJT1 was demonstrated by the construction of A. actinomycetemcomitans isogenic qseB single deletion (ΔqseB) mutant and lsrRK double deletion mutants (ΔlsrRK). These new vectors may offer alternatives for genetic studies in A. actinomycetemcomitans and other members of the HACEK (Haemophilus spp., A. actinomycetemcomitans, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella kingae) group of Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:23353051

  20. A consortium of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Streptococcus parasanguinis, and Filifactor alocis is present in sites prior to bone loss in a longitudinal study of localized aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Fine, Daniel H; Markowitz, Kenneth; Fairlie, Karen; Tischio-Bereski, Debbie; Ferrendiz, Javier; Furgang, David; Paster, Bruce J; Dewhirst, Floyd E

    2013-09-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-induced localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP) in African-American adolescents has been documented but is poorly understood. Two thousand fifty-eight adolescents aged 11 to 17 years were screened for their periodontal status and the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans in their oral cavity. Seventy-one A. actinomycetemcomitans-negative and 63 A. actinomycetemcomitans-positive periodontally healthy subjects were enrolled, sampled, examined, and radiographed yearly for 3 years. Gingival and periodontal pocket depth and attachment levels were recorded. Disease presentation was characterized by bone loss (BL). Subgingival sites were sampled every 6 months to assess (i) the role of A. actinomycetemcomitans in BL and (ii) the association of A. actinomycetemcomitans and other microbes in their relationships to BL. Sixteen of 63 subjects with A. actinomycetemcomitans developed BL (the other 47 subjects with A. actinomycetemcomitans had no BL). No A. actinomycetemcomitans-negative subjects developed BL. Human oral microbe identification microarray (HOMIM) was used for subgingival microbial assessment. On a subject level, pooled data from A. actinomycetemcomitans-positive subjects who remained healthy had higher prevalences of Streptococcus and Actinomyces species, while A. actinomycetemcomitans-positive subjects with BL had higher prevalences of Parvimonas micra, Filifactor alocis, A. actinomycetemcomitans, and Peptostreptococcus sp. human oral taxon 113 (HOT-113). At vulnerable sites, A. actinomycetemcomitans, Streptococcus parasanguinis, and F. alocis levels were elevated prior to BL. In cases where the three-organism consortium (versus A. actinomycetemcomitans alone) was detected, the specificity for detecting sites of future BL increased from 62% to 99%, with a sensitivity of 89%. We conclude that detecting the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans, S. parasanguinis, and F. alocis together indicates sites of future BL in LAP. A

  1. A Consortium of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Streptococcus parasanguinis, and Filifactor alocis Is Present in Sites Prior to Bone Loss in a Longitudinal Study of Localized Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, Kenneth; Fairlie, Karen; Tischio-Bereski, Debbie; Ferrendiz, Javier; Furgang, David; Paster, Bruce J.; Dewhirst, Floyd E.

    2013-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-induced localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP) in African-American adolescents has been documented but is poorly understood. Two thousand fifty-eight adolescents aged 11 to 17 years were screened for their periodontal status and the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans in their oral cavity. Seventy-one A. actinomycetemcomitans-negative and 63 A. actinomycetemcomitans-positive periodontally healthy subjects were enrolled, sampled, examined, and radiographed yearly for 3 years. Gingival and periodontal pocket depth and attachment levels were recorded. Disease presentation was characterized by bone loss (BL). Subgingival sites were sampled every 6 months to assess (i) the role of A. actinomycetemcomitans in BL and (ii) the association of A. actinomycetemcomitans and other microbes in their relationships to BL. Sixteen of 63 subjects with A. actinomycetemcomitans developed BL (the other 47 subjects with A. actinomycetemcomitans had no BL). No A. actinomycetemcomitans-negative subjects developed BL. Human oral microbe identification microarray (HOMIM) was used for subgingival microbial assessment. On a subject level, pooled data from A. actinomycetemcomitans-positive subjects who remained healthy had higher prevalences of Streptococcus and Actinomyces species, while A. actinomycetemcomitans-positive subjects with BL had higher prevalences of Parvimonas micra, Filifactor alocis, A. actinomycetemcomitans, and Peptostreptococcus sp. human oral taxon 113 (HOT-113). At vulnerable sites, A. actinomycetemcomitans, Streptococcus parasanguinis, and F. alocis levels were elevated prior to BL. In cases where the three-organism consortium (versus A. actinomycetemcomitans alone) was detected, the specificity for detecting sites of future BL increased from 62% to 99%, with a sensitivity of 89%. We conclude that detecting the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans, S. parasanguinis, and F. alocis together indicates sites of future BL in LAP. A

  2. Transcriptome Profiling of Wild-Type and pga-Knockout Mutant Strains Reveal the Role of Exopolysaccharide in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Mayilvahanan; El Abbar, Faiha; Ramasubbu, Narayanan

    2015-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides have a diverse set of functions in most bacteria including a mechanistic role in protecting bacteria against environmental stresses. Among the many functions attributed to the exopolysaccharides, biofilm formation, antibiotic resistance, immune evasion and colonization have been studied most extensively. The exopolysaccharide produced by many Gram positive as well as Gram negative bacteria including the oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is the homopolymer of β(1,6)-linked N-acetylglucosamine. Recently, we reported that the PGA-deficient mutant of A. actinomycetemcomitans failed to colonize or induce bone resorption in a rat model of periodontal disease, and the colonization genes, apiA and aae, were significantly down regulated in the mutant strain. To understand the role of exopolysaccharide and the pga locus in the global expression of A. actinomycetemcomitans, we have used comparative transcriptome profiling to identify differentially expressed genes in the wild-type strain in relation to the PGA-deficient strain. Transcriptome analysis revealed that about 50% of the genes are differently expressed (P < 0.05 and fold change >1.5). Our study demonstrated that the absence of the pga locus affects the genes involved in peptidoglycan recycling, glycogen storage, and virulence. Further, using confocal microscopy and plating assays, we show that the viability of pga mutant strain is significantly reduced during biofilm growth. Thus, this study highlights the importance of pga genes and the exopolysaccharide in the virulence of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  3. Pathogenicity of the highly leukotoxic JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and its geographic dissemination and role in aggressive periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Haubek, Dorte; Johansson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    For decades, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has been associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis in adolescents. In the middle of the 1990s, a specific JP2 clone of A. actinomycetemcomitans, belonging to the cluster of serotype b strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans and having a number of other characteristics, was found to be strongly associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis, particularly in North Africa. Although several longitudinal studies still point to the bacterial species, A. actinomycetemcomitans as a risk factor of aggressive periodontitis, it is now also widely accepted that the highly leukotoxic JP2 clone of A. actinomycetemcomitans is implicated in rapidly progressing forms of aggressive periodontitis. The JP2 clone strains are highly prevalent in human populations living in Northern and Western parts of Africa. These strains are also prevalent in geographically widespread populations that have originated from the Northwest Africa. Only sporadic signs of a dissemination of the JP2 clone strains to non-African populations have been found despite Africans living geographically widespread for hundreds of years. It remains an unanswered question if a particular host tropism exists as a possible explanation for the frequent colonization of the Northwest African population with the JP2 clone. Two exotoxins of A. actinomycetemcomitans are known, leukotoxin (LtxA) and cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt). LtxA is able to kill human immune cells, and Cdt can block cell cycle progression in eukaryotic cells and thus induce cell cycle arrest. Whereas the leukotoxin production is enhanced in JP2 clone strains thus increasing the virulence potential of A. actinomycetemcomitans, it has not been possible so far to demonstrate such a role for Cdt. Lines of evidence have led to the understanding of the highly leukotoxic JP2 clone of A. actinomycetemcomitans as an aetiological factor of aggressive periodontitis. Patients, who are colonized with the JP2

  4. Pathogenicity of the highly leukotoxic JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and its geographic dissemination and role in aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Haubek, Dorte; Johansson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    For decades, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has been associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis in adolescents. In the middle of the 1990s, a specific JP2 clone of A. actinomycetemcomitans, belonging to the cluster of serotype b strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans and having a number of other characteristics, was found to be strongly associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis, particularly in North Africa. Although several longitudinal studies still point to the bacterial species, A. actinomycetemcomitans as a risk factor of aggressive periodontitis, it is now also widely accepted that the highly leukotoxic JP2 clone of A. actinomycetemcomitans is implicated in rapidly progressing forms of aggressive periodontitis. The JP2 clone strains are highly prevalent in human populations living in Northern and Western parts of Africa. These strains are also prevalent in geographically widespread populations that have originated from the Northwest Africa. Only sporadic signs of a dissemination of the JP2 clone strains to non-African populations have been found despite Africans living geographically widespread for hundreds of years. It remains an unanswered question if a particular host tropism exists as a possible explanation for the frequent colonization of the Northwest African population with the JP2 clone. Two exotoxins of A. actinomycetemcomitans are known, leukotoxin (LtxA) and cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt). LtxA is able to kill human immune cells, and Cdt can block cell cycle progression in eukaryotic cells and thus induce cell cycle arrest. Whereas the leukotoxin production is enhanced in JP2 clone strains thus increasing the virulence potential of A. actinomycetemcomitans, it has not been possible so far to demonstrate such a role for Cdt. Lines of evidence have led to the understanding of the highly leukotoxic JP2 clone of A. actinomycetemcomitans as an aetiological factor of aggressive periodontitis. Patients, who are colonized with the JP2

  5. Alteration of Homeostasis in Pre-osteoclasts Induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans CDT.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Dione; Ando-Suguimoto, Ellen S; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; DiRienzo, Joseph M; Mayer, Marcia P A

    2016-01-01

    The dysbiotic microbiota associated with aggressive periodontitis includes Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, the only oral species known to produce a cytolethal distending toxin (AaCDT). Give that CDT alters the cytokine profile in monocytic cells, we aimed to test the hypothesis that CDT plays a role in bone homeostasis by affecting the differentiation of precursor cells into osteoclasts. Recombinant AaCDT was added to murine bone marrow monocytes (BMMC) in the presence or absence of RANKL and the cell viability and cytokine profile of osteoclast precursor cells were determined. Multinucleated TRAP(+) cell numbers, and relative transcription of genes related to osteoclastogenesis were also evaluated. The addition of AaCDT did not lead to loss in cell viability but promoted an increase in the average number of TRAP(+) cells with 1-2 nuclei in the absence or presence of RANKL (Tukey, p < 0.05). This increase was also observed for TRAP(+) cells with ≥3nuclei, although this difference was not significant. Levels of TGF-β, TNF-α, and IL-6, in the supernatant fraction of cells, were higher when in AaCDT exposed cells, whereas levels of IL-1β and IL-10 were lower than controls under the same conditions. After interaction with AaCDT, transcription of the rank (encoding the receptor RANK), nfatc1 (transcription factor), and ctpK (encoding cathepsin K) genes was downregulated in pre-osteoclastic cells. The data indicated that despite the presence of RANKL and M-CSF, AaCDT may inhibit osteoclast differentiation by altering cytokine profiles and repressing transcription of genes involved in osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, the CDT may impair host defense mechanisms in periodontitis.

  6. Bioactive glass combined with bisphosphonates provides protection against biofilms formed by the periodontal pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Hiltunen, Anna K; Skogman, Malena E; Rosenqvist, Kirsi; Juvonen, Helka; Ihalainen, Petri; Peltonen, Jouko; Juppo, Anne; Fallarero, Adyary

    2016-03-30

    Biofilms play a pivotal role in the progression of periodontitis and they can be treated with antiseptics (i.e. chlorhexidine) or antibiotics, but these therapeutic alternatives are unable of ameliorating periodontal alveolar bone loss, which has been, on the other hand, successfully treated with bone-preserving agents. The improved bone formation achieved in animal models by the combination of two such agents: bioactive glass (BAG) and bisphosphonates has attracted the interest for further exploring dental applications. However, the antimicrobial effects that may result from combining them have not been yet investigated. Here, our aim was to explore the anti-biofilm effects that could result from combining BAG with bisphosphonates, particularly in a dental biofilm model. The experiments were performed with an oral cavity single-specie (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans) biofilm assay, which was optimized in this contribution. Risedronate displayed an intrinsic anti-biofilm effect, and all bisphosphonates, except clodronate, reduced biofilm formation when combined with BAG. In particular, the anti-biofilm activity of risedronate was significantly increased by the combination with BAG. Since it has been proposed that some of the antimicrobial effects of BAG are caused by local pH changes, studies of pH variations were performed to gain a mechanistic understanding. However, the observed anti-biofilm effects could not be explained with lowered pHs. Overall, these results do provide further support for the promising use of bisphosphonate-BAG combinations in dental applications. These findings are particularly relevant for patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy, or osteoporotic patients, which are known to be more vulnerable to periodontitis. In such cases, bisphosphonate treatment could play a double positive effect: local treatment of periodontitis (in combination with BAG) and systemic treatment of osteoporosis, prevention of hypercalcemia and metastases.

  7. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin induces cytosol acidification in LFA-1 expressing immune cells.

    PubMed

    Balashova, N; Dhingra, A; Boesze-Battaglia, K; Lally, E T

    2016-02-01

    Studies have suggested that Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin (LtxA) kills human lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1; CD11a/CD18)-bearing immune cells through a lysosomal-mediated mechanism. Lysosomes are membrane-bound cellular organelles that contain an array of acid hydrolases that are capable of breaking down biomolecules. The lysosomal membrane bilayer confines the pH-sensitive enzymes within an optimal acidic (pH 4.8) environment thereby protecting the slightly basic cytosol (pH 6.8-7.5). In the current study, we have probed the effect of LtxA-induced cytolysis on lysosomal integrity in two different K562 erythroleukemia cell lines. K562-puro/LFA-1 cells were stably transfected with CD11a and CD18 cDNA to express LFA-1 on the cell surface while K562-puro, which does not express LFA-1, served as a control. Following treatment with 100 ng ml(-1) LtxA cells were analyzed by live cell imaging in conjunction with time-lapse confocal microscopy and by flow cytometry. Using a pH-sensitive indicator (pHrodo(®)) we demonstrated that the toxin causes a decrease in the intracellular pH in K562-puro/LFA-1 cells that is noticeable within the first 15 min of treatment. This process correlated with the disappearance of lysosomes in the cytosol as determined by both acridine orange and LysoTracker(®) Red DND-99 staining. These changes were not observed in K562-puro cells or when heat inactivated toxin was added to K562-puro/LFA-1. Our results suggest that LtxA induces lysosomal damage, cytosol acidification, which is followed by cell death in K562-puro/LFA-1 cells.

  8. Alteration of Homeostasis in Pre-osteoclasts Induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans CDT

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Dione; Ando-Suguimoto, Ellen S.; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; DiRienzo, Joseph M.; Mayer, Marcia P. A.

    2016-01-01

    The dysbiotic microbiota associated with aggressive periodontitis includes Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, the only oral species known to produce a cytolethal distending toxin (AaCDT). Give that CDT alters the cytokine profile in monocytic cells, we aimed to test the hypothesis that CDT plays a role in bone homeostasis by affecting the differentiation of precursor cells into osteoclasts. Recombinant AaCDT was added to murine bone marrow monocytes (BMMC) in the presence or absence of RANKL and the cell viability and cytokine profile of osteoclast precursor cells were determined. Multinucleated TRAP+ cell numbers, and relative transcription of genes related to osteoclastogenesis were also evaluated. The addition of AaCDT did not lead to loss in cell viability but promoted an increase in the average number of TRAP+ cells with 1-2 nuclei in the absence or presence of RANKL (Tukey, p < 0.05). This increase was also observed for TRAP+ cells with ≥3nuclei, although this difference was not significant. Levels of TGF-β, TNF-α, and IL-6, in the supernatant fraction of cells, were higher when in AaCDT exposed cells, whereas levels of IL-1β and IL-10 were lower than controls under the same conditions. After interaction with AaCDT, transcription of the rank (encoding the receptor RANK), nfatc1 (transcription factor), and ctpK (encoding cathepsin K) genes was downregulated in pre-osteoclastic cells. The data indicated that despite the presence of RANKL and M-CSF, AaCDT may inhibit osteoclast differentiation by altering cytokine profiles and repressing transcription of genes involved in osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, the CDT may impair host defense mechanisms in periodontitis. PMID:27064424

  9. Occurrence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in Indian chronic periodontitis patients and periodontally healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Vinayak Mahableshwar; Bhat, Kishore Gajanan; Kugaji, Manohar Suresh; Ingalgi, Preeti Shivaji

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), an important primary periodontal pathogen, is known for its strong virulence characteristics that cause periodontal disease. We investigated Aa occurrence in Indian individuals using culture and 16 s rDNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study with 100 participants each in the healthy and chronic periodontitis (CP) groups was conducted. The subgingival plaque was collected and immediately plated on selective media for Aa. The remaining plaque samples were used for DNA extraction. PCR was performed using specific primers for Aa. Statistical Analysis Used: The detection of bacteria and the clinical parameters between the groups were compared using the Mann–Whitney U-test. For assessing the agreement between the results of anaerobic culture and PCR, Kappa analyses were performed. Results: Aa levels using culture and PCR was 51% and 69% in the CP group and 12% and 30% in the healthy group, respectively. The two groups showed significant differences (P < 0.00001). The detection accuracy of culture and PCR was assessed, and the coefficient of accuracy (k) was highly significant in the healthy (0.3103; P < 0.0001) and CP groups (0.1536; P < 0.0497). Conclusions: Aa was predominantly found in the CP group compared with the healthy group, which is consistent with previous findings. Our results showed that both techniques can be used for detecting Aa. An ideal technique for detecting subgingival microorganisms should be carefully selected depending on the scope of the intended future work. PMID:27143824

  10. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin induces cytosol acidification in LFA-1 expressing immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Balashova, Nataliya; Dhingra, Anuradha; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen; Lally, Edward T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Studies have suggested that Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin (LtxA) kills human LFA-1(CD11a/CD18)-bearing immune cells through a lysosomal-mediated mechanism. Lysosomes are membrane-bound cellular organelles that contain an array of acid hydrolases that are capable of breaking down biomolecules. The lysosomal membrane bilayer confines the pH-sensitive enzymes within an optimal acidic (pH 4.8) environment thereby protecting the slightly basic cytosol (pH 6.8–7.5). In the current study, we have probed the effect of LtxA-induced cytolysis on lysosomal integrity in two different K562 erythroleukemia cell lines. K562-puro/LFA-1 cells were stably transfected with CD11a and CD18 cDNA to express LFA-1 on the cell surface while K562-puro, which does not express LFA-1, served as a control. Following treatment with 100 ng/ml LtxA cells were analyzed by live cell imaging in conjunction with time-lapse confocal microscopy and by flow cytometry. Using a pH sensitive indicator (pHrodo®, Life Technologies) we demonstrated that the toxin causes a decrease in the intracellular pH in K562-puro/LFA-1 cells noticeable within the first 15 min of treatment. This process correlated with the disappearance of lysosomes in the cytosol as determined by both acridine orange and LysoTracker® Red DND-99 (Life Technologies) staining. These changes were not observed in K562-puro cells or when heat inactivated toxin was added to K562-puro/LFA-1. Our results suggest that LtxA induces lysosomal damage, cytosol acidification, which is followed by cell death in K562-puro/LFA-1 cells. PMID:26361372

  11. Mlc is a transcriptional activator with a key role in integrating cyclic AMP receptor protein and integration host factor regulation of leukotoxin RNA synthesis in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a periodontal pathogen, synthesizes leukotoxin (LtxA), a protein that helps the bacterium evade the host immune response. Transcription of the ltxA operon is induced during anaerobic growth. The cAMP receptor protein (CRP) indirectly increases ltxA expression...

  12. Interleukin-1β is internalised by viable Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans biofilm and locates to the outer edges of nucleoids.

    PubMed

    Paino, Annamari; Lohermaa, Elina; Sormunen, Raija; Tuominen, Heidi; Korhonen, Jari; Pöllänen, Marja T; Ihalin, Riikka

    2012-11-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans causes periodontitis, which is a biofilm infection that destroys tooth-supportive tissues. Interleukin (IL)-1β, a central proinflammatory cytokine of periodontitis, is an essential first line cytokine for local inflammation that modulates the cell proliferation and anti-pathogen response of human gingival keratinocytes. Previously, we demonstrated that A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilms bind IL-1β; however, whether this binding is an active process is not known. In this study, we showed for the first time with immuno-electron microscopy that viable bacterial biofilm cells internalised IL-1β when co-cultured with an organotypic mucosa. Decreased biofilm viability hindered the ability of biofilm to sequester IL-1β and caused IL-1β leakage into the culture medium. In some A. actinomycetemcomitans cells, intracellular IL-1β localized to the outer edges of the nucleoids. We identified the DNA-binding protein HU as an IL-1β interacting protein with mass spectroscopy and showed the interaction of recombinant HU and IL-1βin vitro using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Close contact with a viable A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilm decreased the proliferation and apoptosis of human gingival keratinocytes as demonstrated using Ki-67 and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) staining, respectively. Our results suggest that viable A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilms may disturb the critical first steps of local inflammation in periodontitis by binding and internalising IL-1β. The interaction of IL-1β with conserved HU provides a potential mechanism for shaping bacterial gene expression.

  13. Antibacterial Effect of an Herbal Product Persica on Porphyromonas Gingivalis and Aggregatibacter Actinomycetemcomitans: An In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Jelvehgaran Esfahani, Zahra; Kadkhoda, Zeinab; Eshraghi, Seyed Saeed; Salehi Surmaghi, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The plant Salvadora persica is used for oral hygiene in many parts of the world. It has been suggested that it has antibacterial properties, in addition to its ability to mechanically remove plaques. The aim of this study was to assess the antimicrobial activity of the herbal product Persica containing Salvadora persica against periodontopathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in vitro. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with moderate and severe periodontitis were recruited. Using paper points, subgingival plaque samples were taken from pockets with attachment loss ≥ 3mm. The samples were subjected to microbial culture to yield P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans. The ditch plate method was used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of the bacteria to Persica compared to chlorhexidine and distilled water. The growth inhibition zones of microorganisms around the ditches were measured in millimeters. The data were analyzed using SPSS 16. Freidman test and Wilcoxon signed ranks test with Bonferroni adjustment were used for analysis of variance with 5% significance level. P<0.05 for main comparisons and P< 0.017 for multiple comparisons were considered statistically significant. Results: P. gingivalis was sensitive to chlorhexidine and persica. There was a significant difference (P=0.001) between antimicrobial activity of chlorhexidine (mean 28.733mm, SD 5.216) and Persica (mean 16.333mm, SD 5.259) compared to water against P. gingivalis. There was a significant difference (P< 0.001) between the antimicrobial activity of chlorhexidine (24.045mm, SD 3.897) and Persica (0.545mm, SD 2.558) with respect to A. actinomycetemcomitans. There was no significant difference (P=0.317) between the antimicrobial activity of Persica and water against A. actinomycetemcomitans. Conclusion: The herbal product Persica had significant antimicrobial activity against P. gingivalis and negligible antimicrobial activity against A

  14. The pga gene cluster in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is necessary for the development of natural competence in Ca(2+) -promoted biofilms.

    PubMed

    Hisano, K; Fujise, O; Miura, M; Hamachi, T; Matsuzaki, E; Nishimura, F

    2014-04-01

    Natural competence is the ability of bacteria to incorporate extracellular DNA into their genomes. This competence is affected by a number of factors, including Ca(2+) utilization and biofilm formation. As bacteria can form thick biofilms in the presence of extracellular Ca(2+) , the additive effects of Ca(2+) -promoted biofilm formation on natural competence should be examined. We evaluated natural competence in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, an important periodontal pathogen, in the context of Ca(2+) -promoted biofilms, and examined whether the pga gene cluster, required for bacterial cell aggregation, is necessary for competence development. The A. actinomycetemcomitans cells grown in the presence of 1 mm CaCl2 exhibited enhanced cell aggregation and increased levels of cell-associated Ca(2+) . Biofilm-derived cells grown in the presence of Ca(2+) exhibited the highest levels of natural transformation frequency and enhanced expression of the competence regulator gene, tfoX. Natural competence was enhanced by the additive effects of Ca(2+) -promoted biofilms, in which high levels of pga gene expression were also detected. Mutation of the pga gene cluster disrupted biofilm formation and competence development, suggesting that these genes play a critical role in the ability of A. actinomycetemcomitans to adapt to its natural environment. The Ca(2+) -promoted biofilms may enhance the ability of bacteria to acquire extracellular DNA.

  15. Inflammatory Bone Loss in Experimental Periodontitis Induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Izawa, A.; Mizutani, H.; Kobayashi, S.; Goto, H.; Okabe, E.; Takeda, H.; Ozawa, Y.; Kamiya, Y.; Sugita, Y.; Kubo, K.; Kamei, H.; Kikuchi, T.; Mitani, A.; Hayashi, J.; Nishihara, T.; Maeda, H.; Noguchi, T.

    2014-01-01

    The interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) binds to IL-1 receptors and inhibits IL-1 activity. However, it is not clear whether IL-1Ra plays a protective role in periodontal disease. This study was undertaken to compare experimental periodontitis induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in IL-1Ra knockout (KO) mice and wild-type (WT) mice. Computed tomography (CT) analysis and hematoxylin-and-eosin (H&E) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining were performed. In addition, osteoblasts were isolated; the mRNA expression of relevant genes was assessed by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR); and calcification was detected by Alizarin Red staining. Infected IL-1Ra KO mice exhibited elevated (P, <0.05) levels of antibody against A. actinomycetemcomitans, bone loss in furcation areas, and alveolar fenestrations. Moreover, protein for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and IL-6, mRNA for macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) in IL-1Ra KO mouse osteoblasts stimulated with A. actinomycetemcomitans were increased (P, <0.05) compared to in WT mice. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein (BSP), osteocalcin (OCN)/bone gla protein (BGP), and runt-related gene 2 (Runx2) mRNA levels were decreased (P, <0.05). IL-1α mRNA expression was increased, and calcification was not observed, in IL-1 Ra KO mouse osteoblasts. In brief, IL-1Ra deficiency promoted the expression of inflammatory cytokines beyond IL-1 and altered the expression of genes involved in bone resorption in A. actinomycetemcomitans-infected osteoblasts. Alterations consistent with rapid bone loss in infected IL-Ra KO mice were also observed for genes expressed in bone formation and calcification. In short, these data suggest that IL-1Ra may serve as a potential therapeutic drug for periodontal disease. PMID:24566623

  16. Photocatalytical Antibacterial Activity of Mixed-Phase TiO2 Nanocomposite Thin Films against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Yeniyol, Sinem; Mutlu, Ilven; He, Zhiming; Yüksel, Behiye; Boylan, Robert Joseph; Ürgen, Mustafa; Karabuda, Zihni Cüneyt; Basegmez, Cansu; Ricci, John Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Mixed-phase TiO2 nanocomposite thin films consisting of anatase and rutile prepared on commercially pure Ti sheets via the electrochemical anodization and annealing treatments were investigated in terms of their photocatalytic activity for antibacterial use around dental implants. The resulting films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The topology was assessed by White Light Optical Profiling (WLOP) in the Vertical Scanning Interferometer (VSI) mode. Representative height descriptive parameters of roughness R a and R z were calculated. The photocatalytic activity of the resulting TiO2 films was evaluated by the photodegradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) dye solution. The antibacterial ability of the photocatalyst was examined by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans suspensions in a colony-forming assay. XRD showed that anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films were predominantly in anatase and rutile that were 54.6 wt% and 41.9 wt%, respectively. Craters (2-5 µm) and protruding hills (10-50 µm) on Ti substrates were produced after electrochemical anodization with higher R a and R z surface roughness values. Anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films showed 26% photocatalytic decolorization toward RhB dye solution. The number of colonizing bacteria on anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films was decreased significantly in vitro. The photocatalyst was effective against A. actinomycetemcomitans colonization.

  17. Photocatalytical Antibacterial Activity of Mixed-Phase TiO2 Nanocomposite Thin Films against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Yeniyol, Sinem; Mutlu, Ilven; He, Zhiming; Yüksel, Behiye; Boylan, Robert Joseph; Ürgen, Mustafa; Karabuda, Zihni Cüneyt; Basegmez, Cansu; Ricci, John Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Mixed-phase TiO2 nanocomposite thin films consisting of anatase and rutile prepared on commercially pure Ti sheets via the electrochemical anodization and annealing treatments were investigated in terms of their photocatalytic activity for antibacterial use around dental implants. The resulting films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The topology was assessed by White Light Optical Profiling (WLOP) in the Vertical Scanning Interferometer (VSI) mode. Representative height descriptive parameters of roughness Ra and Rz were calculated. The photocatalytic activity of the resulting TiO2 films was evaluated by the photodegradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) dye solution. The antibacterial ability of the photocatalyst was examined by  Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans suspensions in a colony-forming assay. XRD showed that anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films were predominantly in anatase and rutile that were 54.6 wt% and 41.9 wt%, respectively. Craters (2–5 µm) and protruding hills (10–50 µm) on Ti substrates were produced after electrochemical anodization with higher Ra and Rz surface roughness values. Anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films showed 26% photocatalytic decolorization toward RhB dye solution. The number of colonizing bacteria on anatase/rutile mixed-phase TiO2 thin films was decreased significantly in vitro. The photocatalyst was effective against A. actinomycetemcomitans colonization. PMID:26576430

  18. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans cytolethal distending toxin activates the NLRP3 inflammasome in human macrophages, leading to the release of proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Shenker, Bruce J; Ojcius, David M; Walker, Lisa P; Zekavat, Ali; Scuron, Monika Damek; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen

    2015-04-01

    The cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt) is produced from a number of bacteria capable of causing infection and inflammatory disease. Our previous studies with Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Cdt demonstrate not only that the active toxin subunit functions as a phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3) phosphatase but also that macrophages exposed to the toxin were stimulated to produce proinflammatory cytokines. We now demonstrate that the Cdt-induced proinflammatory response involves the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Specific inhibitors and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) were employed to demonstrate requirements for NLRP3 and ASC as well as caspase-1. Furthermore, Cdt-mediated inflammasome activation is dependent upon upstream signals, including reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and Cdt-induced increases in extracellular ATP levels. Increases in extracellular ATP levels contribute to the activation of the P2X7 purinergic receptor, leading to K+ efflux. The relationship between the abilities of the active toxin subunit CdtB to function as a lipid phosphatase, activate the NLRP3 inflammasome, and induce a proinflammatory cytokine response is discussed. These studies provide new insight into the virulence potential of Cdt in mediating the pathogenesis of disease caused by Cdt-producing organisms such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

  19. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Cytolethal Distending Toxin Activates the NLRP3 Inflammasome in Human Macrophages, Leading to the Release of Proinflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Ojcius, David M.; Walker, Lisa P.; Zekavat, Ali; Scuron, Monika Damek; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    The cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt) is produced from a number of bacteria capable of causing infection and inflammatory disease. Our previous studies with Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Cdt demonstrate not only that the active toxin subunit functions as a phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3) phosphatase but also that macrophages exposed to the toxin were stimulated to produce proinflammatory cytokines. We now demonstrate that the Cdt-induced proinflammatory response involves the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Specific inhibitors and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) were employed to demonstrate requirements for NLRP3 and ASC as well as caspase-1. Furthermore, Cdt-mediated inflammasome activation is dependent upon upstream signals, including reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and Cdt-induced increases in extracellular ATP levels. Increases in extracellular ATP levels contribute to the activation of the P2X7 purinergic receptor, leading to K+ efflux. The relationship between the abilities of the active toxin subunit CdtB to function as a lipid phosphatase, activate the NLRP3 inflammasome, and induce a proinflammatory cytokine response is discussed. These studies provide new insight into the virulence potential of Cdt in mediating the pathogenesis of disease caused by Cdt-producing organisms such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:25644004

  20. Transcriptional regulation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lsrACDBFG and lsrRK operons and their role in biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Juárez-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Lamont, Richard J; Demuth, Donald R

    2013-01-01

    Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) is required for biofilm formation and virulence of the oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and we previously showed that lsrB codes for a receptor for AI-2. The lsrB gene is expressed as part of the lsrACDBFG operon, which is divergently transcribed from an adjacent lsrRK operon. In Escherichia coli, lsrRK encodes a repressor and AI-2 kinase that function to regulate lsrACDBFG. To determine if lsrRK controls lsrACDBFG expression and influences biofilm growth of A. actinomycetemcomitans, we first defined the promoters for each operon. Transcriptional reporter plasmids containing the 255-bp lsrACDBFG-lsrRK intergenic region (IGR) fused to lacZ showed that essential elements of lsrR promoter reside 89 to 255 bp upstream from the lsrR start codon. Two inverted repeat sequences that represent potential binding sites for LsrR and two sequences resembling the consensus cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) binding site were identified in this region. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), purified LsrR and CRP proteins were shown to bind probes containing these sequences. Surprisingly, the 255-bp IGR did not contain the lsrA promoter. Instead, a fragment encompassing nucleotides +1 to +159 of lsrA together with the 255-bp IGR was required to promote lsrA transcription. This suggests that a region within the lsrA coding sequence influences transcription, or alternatively that the start codon of A. actinomycetemcomitans lsrA has been incorrectly annotated. Transformation of ΔlsrR, ΔlsrK, ΔlsrRK, and Δcrp deletion mutants with lacZ reporters containing the lsrA or lsrR promoter showed that LsrR negatively regulates and CRP positively regulates both lsrACDBFG and lsrRK. However, in contrast to what occurs in E. coli, deletion of lsrK had no effect on the transcriptional activity of the lsrA or lsrR promoters, suggesting that another kinase may be capable of phosphorylating AI-2 in A. actinomycetemcomitans. Finally, biofilm

  1. Differential transcriptional regulation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lsrACDBFG and lsrRK operons by integration host factor protein.

    PubMed

    Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Juárez-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Demuth, Donald R

    2014-04-01

    We previously showed that the Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lsrACDBFG and lsrRK operons are regulated by LsrR and cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) and that proper regulation of the lsr locus is required for optimal biofilm growth by A. actinomycetemcomitans. Here, we identified sequences that reside immediately upstream from both the lsrA and lsrR start codons that closely resemble the consensus recognition sequence of Escherichia coli integration host factor (IHF) protein. A. actinomycetemcomitans IHFα and IHFβ were expressed and purified as hexahistidine fusion proteins, and using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs), the IHFα-IHFβ protein complex was shown to bind to probes containing the putative IHF recognition sequences. In addition, single-copy chromosomal insertions of lsrR promoter-lacZ and lsrA promoter-lacZ transcriptional fusions in wild-type A. actinomycetemcomitans and ΔihfA and ΔihfB mutant strains showed that IHF differentially regulates the lsr locus and functions as a negative regulator of lsrRK and a positive regulator of lsrACDBFG. Deletion of ihfA or ihfB also reduced biofilm formation and altered biofilm architecture relative to the wild-type strain, and these phenotypes were partially complemented by a plasmid-borne copy of ihfA or ihfB. Finally, using 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), two transcriptional start sites (TSSs) and two putative promoters were identified for lsrRK and three TSSs and putative promoters were identified for lsrACDBFG. The function of the two lsrRK promoters and the positive regulatory role of IHF in regulating lsrACDBFG expression were confirmed with a series of lacZ transcriptional fusion constructs. Together, our results highlight the complex transcriptional regulation of the lsrACDBFG and lsrRK operons and suggest that multiple promoters and the architecture of the lsrACDBFG-lsrRK intergenic region may control the expression of these operons.

  2. Correlation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Detection with Clinical/Immunoinflammatory Profile of Localized Aggressive Periodontitis Using a 16S rRNA Microarray Method: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Patricia F.; Klepac-Ceraj, Vanja; Huang, Hong; Paster, Bruce J.; Aukhil, Ikramuddin; Wallet, Shannon M.; Shaddox, Luciana M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine whether the detection of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) correlates with the clinical and immunoinflammatory profile of Localized Aggressive Periodontitis (LAP), as determined by by 16S rRNA gene-based microarray. Subjects and Methods Subgingival plaque samples from the deepest diseased site of 30 LAP patients [PD ≥ 5 mm, BoP and bone loss] were analyzed by 16S rRNA gene-based microarrays. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) samples were analyzed for 14 cyto/chemokines. Peripheral blood was obtained and stimulated in vitro with P.gingivalis and E.coli to evaluate inflammatory response profiles. Plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels were also measured. Results Aa was detected in 56% of LAP patients and was shown to be an indicator for different bacterial community structures (p<0.01). Elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cyto/chemokines were detected in LPS-stimulated blood samples in both Aa-detected and Aa-non-detected groups (p>0.05). Clinical parameters and serum LPS levels were similar between groups. However, Aa-non-detected GCF contained higher concentration of IL-8 than Aa-detected sites (p<0.05). TNFα and IL1β were elevated upon E.coli LPS stimulation of peripheral blood cells derived from patients with Aa-detected sites. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that the detection of Aa in LAP affected sites, did not correlate with clinical severity of the disease at the time of sampling in this cross-sectional study, although it did associate with lower local levels of IL-8, a different subgingival bacterial profile and elevated LPS-induced levels of TNFα and IL1β. PMID:24376864

  3. Inner-membrane protein MorC is involved in fimbriae production and biofilm formation in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kenneth P; Ruiz, Teresa; Mintz, Keith P

    2016-03-01

    Fimbrial subunit synthesis, secretion and assembly on the surface of the periodontal pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans are essential for biofilm formation. A recent quantitative proteomics study employing an afimbriated strain and a developed mutant isogenic for the inner-membrane protein morphogenesis protein C (MorC) revealed that the abundance of the proteins of the fimbrial secretion apparatus in the membrane is dependent on MorC. To investigate further the relationship between MorC and fimbriation, we identified and complemented the defect in fimbriae production in the afimbriated laboratory strain. The transformed strain expressing a plasmid containing genes encoding the WT fimbrial subunit and the prepilin peptidase displayed all of the hallmarks of a fimbriated bacterium including the distinct star-like colony morphology, robust biofilm formation, biofilm architecture composed of discrete microcolonies and the presence of fimbriae. When the identical plasmid was transformed into a morC mutant strain, the bacterium did not display any of the phenotypes of fimbriated strains. Extension of these studies to a naturally fimbriated clinical strain showed that the resulting morC mutant maintained the characteristic colony morphology of fimbriated strains. There was, however, a reduction in the secretion of fimbrial subunits, and fewer fimbriae were observed on the surface of the mutant strain. Furthermore, the morC mutant of the fimbriated strain displayed a significantly altered biofilm microcolony architecture, while maintaining a similar biofilm mass to the parent strain. These results suggest that MorC influences fimbrial secretion and microcolony formation in A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  4. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin (LtxA; Leukothera) induces cofilin dephosphorylation and actin depolymerization during killing of malignant monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Manpreet

    2014-01-01

    Leukotoxin (LtxA; Leukothera), a protein toxin secreted by the oral bacterium Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, specifically kills white blood cells (WBCs). LtxA binds to the receptor known as lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), a β2 integrin expressed only on the surface of WBCs. LtxA is being studied as a virulence factor that helps A. actinomycetemcomitans evade host defences and as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of WBC diseases. LtxA-mediated cell death in monocytes involves both caspases and lysosomes; however, the signalling proteins that regulate and mediate cell death remain largely unknown. We used a 2D-gel proteomics approach to analyse the global protein expression changes that occur in response to LtxA. This approach identified the protein cofilin, which underwent dephosphorylation upon LtxA treatment. Cofilin is a ubiquitous actin-binding protein known to regulate actin dynamics and is regulated by LIM kinase (LIMK)-mediated phosphorylation. LtxA-mediated cofilin dephosphorylation was dependent on LFA-1 and cofilin dephosphorylation did not occur when LFA-1 bound to its natural ligand, ICAM-1. Treatment of cells with an inhibitor of LIMK (LIMKi) also led to cofilin dephosphorylation and enhanced killing by LtxA. This enhanced sensitivity to LtxA coincided with an increase in lysosomal disruption, and an increase in LFA-1 surface expression and clustering. Both LIMKi and LtxA treatment also induced actin depolymerization, which could play a role in trafficking and surface distribution of LFA-1. We propose a model in which LtxA-mediated cofilin dephosphorylation leads to actin depolymerization, LFA-1 overexpression/clustering, and enhanced lysosomal-mediated cell death. PMID:25169107

  5. Prevalence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia in Japanese patients with generalized chronic and aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Sachiyo; Komiya-Ito, Akiyo; Imamura, Kentaro; Kita, Daichi; Ota, Koki; Takayama, Saori; Makino-Oi, Asako; Kinumatsu, Takashi; Ota, Mikio; Saito, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and levels of major periodontal pathogens, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia in subgingival plaque samples of a group of Japanese patients with aggressive periodontitis (AgP) and chronic periodontitis (CP). A total of 40 patients with clinical diagnosis of AgP or CP and 10 periodontally healthy volunteers were subjected to clinical and microbiological analysis. Subgingival plaque samples were analyzed for A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis and T. forsythia with a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The prevalence of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia was relatively high in patients with periodontitis: over 60% of AgP or CP patients harbored these pathogens whereas they were not detected in the subgingival plaque samples from periodontally healthy individuals. P. gingivalis and T. forsythia were relatively frequently detected together in AgP and CP patients. No significant differences in the prevalence or level of the 3 pathogens were found between periodontitis groups. The proportion of T. forsythia was approximately 4-fold higher in CP group than in AgP group (P = 0.02). In periodontitis patients, a significant positive correlation was found between periodontal parameters (probing depth and clinical attachment level) and the numbers of total bacteria, P. gingivalis and T. forsythia. No distinct pattern of the subgingival profile of these pathogens was discerned between the two disease entities, except for the difference in the proportion of T. forsythia. The red complex bacteria, P. gingivalis and T. forsythia were highly prevalent in this population of Japanese AgP and CP patients, collaborating their roles in periodontitis.

  6. ygiW and qseBC are co-expressed in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and regulate biofilm growth.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Demuth, Donald R

    2013-06-01

    The quorum-sensing Escherichia coli regulators B and C (QseBC) two-component system were previously shown to regulate biofilm growth of the oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and to be essential for virulence. In this study, we use RT-PCR to show that an open reading frame, ygiW, residing upstream of qseBC and encoding a hypothetical protein is co-expressed with qseBC. In addition, using a series of lacZ transcriptional fusion constructs and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE), the promoter that drives expression of the ygiW-qseBC operon and the transcriptional start site was mapped to the 372 bp intergenic region upstream from ygiW. No internal promoters drive qseBC expression independently from ygiW. However, qseBC expression is attenuated by approximately ninefold by a putative attenuator stem-loop (ΔG = -77.0 KJ/mol) that resides in the 137 bp intergenic region between ygiW and qseB. The QseB response regulator activates expression of the ygiW-qseBC operon and transcription from the ygiW promoter is drastically reduced in ΔqseB and ΔqseBC mutants of A. actinomycetemcomitans. In addition, transcriptional activity of the ygiW promoter is significantly reduced in a mutant expressing an in-frame deletion of qseC that lacks the sensor domain of QseC, suggesting that a periplasmic signal is required for QseB activation. Finally, a non-polar in-frame deletion in ygiW had little effect on biofilm depth but caused a significant increase in surface coverage relative to wild-type. Complementation of the mutant with a plasmid-borne copy of ygiW reduced surface coverage back to wild-type levels. Interestingly, deletion of the sensor domain of QseC or of the entire qseC open reading frame resulted in significant reductions in biofilm depth, biomass and surface coverage, indicating that the sensor domain is essential for optimal biofilm formation by A. actinomycetemcomitans. Thus, although ygiW and qseBC are co-expressed, they regulate biofilm

  7. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans outer membrane vesicles are internalized in human host cells and trigger NOD1- and NOD2-dependent NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Thay, Bernard; Damm, Anna; Kufer, Thomas A; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Oscarsson, Jan

    2014-10-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. We recently demonstrated that outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) disseminated by A. actinomycetemcomitans could deliver multiple proteins, including biologically active cytolethal distending toxin (CDT), into the cytosol of HeLa cells and human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). In the present work, we have used immunoelectron and confocal microscopy analysis and fluorescently labeled vesicles to further investigate mechanisms for A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV-mediated delivery of bacterial antigens to these host cells. Our results supported that OMVs were internalized into the perinuclear region of HeLa cells and HGF. Colocalization analysis revealed that internalized OMVs colocalized with the endoplasmic reticulum and carried antigens, detected using an antibody specific to whole A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype a cells. Consistent with OMV internalization mediating intracellular antigen exposure, the vesicles acted as strong inducers of cytoplasmic peptidoglycan sensor NOD1- and NOD2-dependent NF-κB activation in human embryonic kidney cells. Moreover, NOD1 was the main sensor of OMV-delivered peptidoglycan in myeloid THP1 cells, contributing to the overall inflammatory responses induced by the vesicles. This work reveals a role of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs as a trigger of innate immunity via carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs).

  8. Amphotericin B down-regulates Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-induced production of IL-8 and IL-6 in human gingival epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Imai, Haruka; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Kajiya, Mikihito; Ouhara, Kazuhisa; Miyagawa, Tsuyoshi; Matsuda, Shinji; Shiba, Hideki; Kurihara, Hidemi

    2014-08-01

    Gingival epithelium is the primary barrier against microorganism invasion and produces inflammatory cytokines. Amphotericin B, a major antifungal drug, binds to cholesterol in the mammalian cell membrane in addition to fungal ergosterol. Amphotericin B has been shown to regulate inflammatory cytokines in host cells. To investigate the suppressive effect of amphotericin B on the gingival epithelium, we examined the expression of interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-6 and involvement of MAP kinase in human gingival epithelial cells (HGEC) stimulated by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Amphotericin B and the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor down-regulated the A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced increase in the expression of IL-8 and IL-6 at the mRNA. The ERK inhibitor suppressed the A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced IL-8 mRNA expression. Amphotericin B inhibited the A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced phosphorylation of ERK and p38 MAP kinase. Furthermore, amphotericin B inhibited the A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced production of prostaglandin E2. These results suggest that amphotericin B regulate inflammatory responses in HGEC.

  9. A Cytolethal Distending Toxin Variant from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans with an Aberrant CdtB That Lacks the Conserved Catalytic Histidine 160

    PubMed Central

    Obradović, Davor; Gašperšič, Rok; Caserman, Simon; Leonardi, Adrijana; Jamnik, Maja; Podlesek, Zdravko; Seme, Katja; Anderluh, Gregor; Križaj, Igor; Maček, Peter; Butala, Matej

    2016-01-01

    The periodontopathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans synthesizes several virulence factors, including cytolethal distending toxin (CDT). The active CDT holoenzyme is an AB-type tripartite genotoxin that affects eukaryotic cells. Subunits CdtA and CdtC (B-components) allow binding and intracellular translocation of the active CdtB (A-component), which elicits nuclear DNA damage. Different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans have diverse virulence genotypes, which results in varied pathogenic potential and disease progression. Here, we identified an A. actinomycetemcomitans strain isolated from two patients with advance chronic periodontitis that has a regular cdtABC operon, which, however, codes for a unique, shorter, variant of the CdtB subunit. We describe the characteristics of this CdtBΔ116–188, which lacks the intact nuclear localisation signal and the catalytic histidine 160. We show that the A. actinomycetemcomitans DO15 isolate secretes CdtBΔ116–188, and that this subunit cannot form a holotoxin and is also not genotoxic if expressed ectopically in HeLa cells. Furthermore, the A. actinomycetemcomitans DO15 isolate is not toxic, nor does it induce cellular distention upon infection of co-cultivated HeLa cells. Biological significance of this deletion in the cdtB remains to be explained. PMID:27414641

  10. Breaking the Gingival Epithelial Barrier: Role of the Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Cytolethal Distending Toxin in Oral Infectious Disease

    PubMed Central

    DiRienzo, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is part of the HACEK group that causes infective endocarditis, a constituent of the oral flora that promotes some forms of periodontal disease and a member of the family of species that secrete a cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt). The family of bacteria that express the cdt genes participate in diseases that involve the disruption of a mucosal or epithelial layer. In vitro studies have shown that human gingival epithelial cells (HGEC) are native targets of the Cdt that typically induces DNA damage that signals growth arrest at the G2/M interphase of the cell cycle. The gingival epithelium is an early line of defense in the oral cavity against microbial assault. When damaged, bacteria collectively gain entry into the underlying connective tissue where microbial products can affect processes and pathways in infiltrating inflammatory cells culminating in the destruction of the attachment apparatus of the tooth. One approach has been the use of an ex vivo gingival explant model to assess the effects of the Cdt on the morphology and integrity of the tissue. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of these studies and to critically examine the potential contribution of the Cdt to the breakdown of the protective gingival barrier. PMID:24861975

  11. Identification of a Novel Bacterial Outer Membrane Interleukin-1Β-Binding Protein from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Paino, Annamari; Ahlstrand, Tuuli; Nuutila, Jari; Navickaite, Indre; Lahti, Maria; Tuominen, Heidi; Välimaa, Hannamari; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Pöllänen, Marja T.; Ihalin, Riikka

    2013-01-01

    Aggregatibacteractinomycetemcomitans is a gram-negative opportunistic oral pathogen. It is frequently associated with subgingival biofilms of both chronic and aggressive periodontitis, and the diseased sites of the periodontium exhibit increased levels of the proinflammatory mediator interleukin (IL)-1β. Some bacterial species can alter their physiological properties as a result of sensing IL-1β. We have recently shown that this cytokine localizes to the cytoplasm of A. actinomycetemcomitans in co-cultures with organotypic gingival mucosa. However, current knowledge about the mechanism underlying bacterial IL-1β sensing is still limited. In this study, we characterized the interaction of A. actinomycetemcomitans total membrane protein with IL-1β through electrophoretic mobility shift assays. The interacting protein, which we have designated bacterial interleukin receptor I (BilRI), was identified through mass spectrometry and was found to be Pasteurellaceae specific. Based on the results obtained using protein function prediction tools, this protein localizes to the outer membrane and contains a typical lipoprotein signal sequence. All six tested biofilm cultures of clinical A. actinomycetemcomitans strains expressed the protein according to phage display-derived antibody detection. Moreover, proteinase K treatment of whole A. actinomycetemcomitans cells eliminated BilRI forms that were outer membrane specific, as determined through immunoblotting. The protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli in both the outer membrane-associated form and a soluble cytoplasmic form. When assessed using flow cytometry, the BilRI-overexpressing E. coli cells were observed to bind 2.5 times more biotinylated-IL-1β than the control cells, as detected with avidin-FITC. Overexpression of BilRI did not cause binding of a biotinylated negative control protein. In a microplate assay, soluble BilRI bound to IL-1β, but this binding was not specific, as a control protein for IL-1

  12. Comparative genomic hybridization and transcriptome analysis with a pan-genome microarray reveal distinctions between JP2 and non-JP2 genotypes of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Kittichotirat, W; Mayer, M P A; Hall, R; Bumgarner, R; Chen, C

    2013-02-01

    It was postulated that the highly virulent JP2 genotype of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans may possess a constellation of distinct virulence determinants not found in non-JP2 genotypes. This study compared the genome content and the transcriptome of the serotype b JP2 genotype and the closely related serotype b non-JP2 genotype of A. actinomycetemcomitans. A custom-designed pan-genomic microarray of A. actinomycetemcomitans was constructed and validated against a panel of 11 sequenced reference strains. The microarray was subsequently used for comparative genomic hybridization of serotype b strains of JP2 (six strains) and non-JP2 (six strains) genotypes, and for transcriptome analysis of strains of JP2 (three strains) and non-JP2 (two strains). Two JP2-specific and two non-JP2-specific genomic islands were identified. In one instance, distinct genomic islands were found to be inserted into the same locus among strains of different genotypes. Transcriptome analysis identified five operons, including the leukotoxin operon, to have at least two genes with an expression ratio of 2 or greater between genotypes. Two of the differentially expressed operons were members of the membrane-bound nitrate reductase system (nap operon) and the Tol-Pal system of gram-negative bacterial species. This study is the first to demonstrate the differences in the full genome content and gene expression between A. actinomycetemcomitans strains of JP2 and non-JP2 genotypes. The information is essential for designing hypothesis-driven experiments to examine the pathogenic mechanisms of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  13. Inverse Association of Plasma IgG Antibody to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and High C-Reactive Protein Levels in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome and Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Thanakun, Supanee; Pornprasertsuk-Damrongsri, Suchaya; Gokyu, Misa; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    The association between clinically diagnosed periodontitis, a common chronic oral infection, and metabolic syndrome has been previously reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of plasma IgG levels against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia, C-reactive protein, and periodontal status with metabolic syndrome. Plasma IgG levels and C-reactive protein were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and salivary levels of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Among 127 individuals aged 35-76 years, 57 participants had metabolic syndrome and severe periodontitis, 25 had metabolic syndrome and an absence of severe periodontitis, 17 healthy individuals had severe periodontitis, and 28 healthy individuals were without severe periodontitis. Patients with metabolic syndrome had reduced humoral immune response to A. actinomycetemcomitans (p = 0.008), regardless of their salivary levels or periodontitis status compared with healthy participants. The IgG antibody response to P. gingivalis, regardless of their salivary levels or participants' health condition, was significantly higher in severe periodontitis patients (p<0.001). Plasma IgG titers for P. intermedia were inconsistent among metabolic syndrome or periodontal participants. Our results indicate that the presence of lower levels of IgG antibodies to A. actinomycetemcomitans (OR = 0.1; 95%CI 0.0-0.7), but not P. gingivalis, a severe periodontitis status (OR = 7.8; 95%CI 1.1-57.0), high C-reactive protein levels (OR = 9.4; 95%CI 1.0-88.2) and body mass index (OR = 3.0; 95%CI 1.7-5.2), are associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. The role of the decreased IgG antibody response to A. actinomycetemcomitans, increased C-reactive protein levels on the association between periodontal disease and metabolic syndrome in a group of Thai patients is suggested.

  14. Al(III), Pd(II), and Zn(II) phthalocyanines for inactivation of dental pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans as planktonic and biofilm-cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kussovski, V.; Mantareva, V.; Angelov, I.; Avramov, L.; Popova, E.; Dimitrov, S.

    2012-06-01

    The Gram-negative, oral bacterium Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has been implicated as the causative agent of several forms of periodontal disease in humans. The new periodontal disease treatments are emergence in order to prevent infection progression. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (a-PDT) can be a useful tool for this purpose. It involves the use of light of specific wavelength to activate a nontoxic photosensitizing agent in the presence of oxygen for eradication of target cells, and appears effective in photoinactivation of microorganisms. The phthalocyanine metal complexes of Pd(II)- (PdPcC) and Al(III)- (AlPc1) were evaluated as photodynamic sensitizers towards a dental pathogen A. actinomycetemcomitans in comparison to the known methylpyridyloxy-substituted Zn(II) phthalocyanine (ZnPcMe). The planktonic and biofilm-cultivated species of A. actinomycetemcomitans were treated. The photophysical results showed intensive and far-red absorbance with high tendency of aggregation for Pd(II)-phthalocyanine. The dark toxicities of both photosensitizers were negligible at concentrations used (< 0.5 log decrease of viable cells). The photodynamic response for planktonic cultured bacteria was full photoinactivation after a-PDT with ZnPcMe. In case of the newly studied complexes, the effect was lower for PdPcC (4 log) as well as for AlPc1 (1.5-2 log). As it is known the bacterial biofilms were more resistant to a-PDT, which was confirmed for A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilms with 3 log reductions of viable cells after treatment with ZnPcMe and approximately 1 log reduction of biofilms after PdPcC and AlPc1. The initial results suggest that a-PDT can be useful for effective inactivation of dental pathogen A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  15. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC is activated by catecholamines and iron and regulates genes encoding proteins associated with anaerobic respiration and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, WA; Demuth, DR; Torres-Escobar, A; Juárez-Rodríguez, MD

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC regulates its own expression and is essential for biofilm growth and virulence. However, the signal that activates the QseC sensor has not been identified and the qseBC regulon has not been defined. In this study, we show that QseC is activated by catecholamine hormones and iron but not by either component alone. Activation of QseC requires an EYRDD motif in the periplasmic domain of the sensor and site-specific mutations in EYRDD or the deletion of the periplasmic domain inhibits catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of the ygiW-qseBC operon. Catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of transcription also requires interaction of the QseB response regulator with its binding site in the ygiW-qseBC promoter. Whole genome microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles of A. actinomycetemcomitans grown in a chemically defined medium with and without catecholamine and iron supplementation. Approximately 11.5% of the A. actinomycetemcomitans genome was differentially expressed by at least two-fold upon exposure to catecholamines and iron. The expression of ferritin was strongly induced, suggesting that intracellular iron storage capacity is increased upon QseBC activation. Consistent with this, genes encoding iron binding and transport proteins were down-regulated by QseBC. Strikingly, 57% of the QseBC up-regulated genes (56/99) encode proteins associated with anaerobic metabolism and respiration. Most of these up-regulated genes were recently reported to be induced during in vivo growth of A. actinomycetemcomitans. These results suggest that detection of catecholamines and iron by QseBC may alter the cellular metabolism of A. actinomycetemcomitans for increased fitness and growth in an anaerobic host environment. PMID:25923132

  16. Inactivation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans by two different modalities of photodynamic therapy using Toluidine blue O or Radachlorin as photosensitizers: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Moslemi, Neda; Soleiman-Zadeh Azar, Pardis; Bahador, Abbas; Rouzmeh, Nina; Chiniforush, Nasim; Paknejad, Mojgan; Fekrazad, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans) is one of the periodontopathogens strongly associated with aggressive periodontitis. The aim of this investigation was to compare the effect of laser and light-emitting diode on the photodynamic inactivation of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Eighty-four samples of bacterial suspensions (200 μL) were prepared and divided in seven groups: control group (no treatment), laser group (indium-gallium-aluminum-phosphate laser with wavelength of 662 ± 0.1 nm, energy density of 6 j/cm(2), and irradiation time of 34 s), light-emitting diode (LED) group (wavelength 625-635 nm, energy density 6 j/cm(2), time of irradiation 30 s), Toluidine blue O (TBO) group (0.1 mg/mL), Radachlorin group (0.1 %), Radachlorin + laser group (after pre-irradiation time of 10 min, laser was irradiated), and TBO + LED group (after preirradiation time of 10 min, LED was irradiated). Then, 100 μL of each sample was cultured in brain heart infusion (BHI) plates and incubated for 48-72 h in microaerophilic atmosphere for colony counting. Application of Radachlorin + laser resulted in a significant decrease in the concentration of A. actinomycetemcomitans (P values <0.05). Photodynamic therapy with laser + Radachlorin was more effective than that of LED + TBO in suppression of this microorganism (P value <0.05). Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that photodynamic inactivation using laser and Radachlorin was more effective than that of LED and TBO in eradication of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  17. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC is activated by catecholamines and iron and regulates genes encoding proteins associated with anaerobic respiration and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Weigel, W A; Demuth, D R; Torres-Escobar, A; Juárez-Rodríguez, M D

    2015-10-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC regulates its own expression and is essential for biofilm growth and virulence. However, the signal that activates the QseC sensor has not been identified and the qseBC regulon has not been defined. In this study, we show that QseC is activated by catecholamine hormones and iron but not by either component alone. Activation of QseC requires an EYRDD motif in the periplasmic domain of the sensor and site-specific mutations in EYRDD or the deletion of the periplasmic domain inhibits catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of the ygiW-qseBC operon. Catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of transcription also requires interaction of the QseB response regulator with its binding site in the ygiW-qseBC promoter. Whole genome microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles of A. actinomycetemcomitans grown in a chemically defined medium with and without catecholamine and iron supplementation. Approximately 11.5% of the A. actinomycetemcomitans genome was differentially expressed by at least two-fold upon exposure to catecholamines and iron. The expression of ferritin was strongly induced, suggesting that intracellular iron storage capacity is increased upon QseBC activation. Consistent with this, genes encoding iron binding and transport proteins were down-regulated by QseBC. Strikingly, 57% of the QseBC up-regulated genes (56/99) encode proteins associated with anaerobic metabolism and respiration. Most of these up-regulated genes were recently reported to be induced during in vivo growth of A. actinomycetemcomitans. These results suggest that detection of catecholamines and iron by QseBC may alter the cellular metabolism of A. actinomycetemcomitans for increased fitness and growth in an anaerobic host environment.

  18. Disease severity associated with presence in subgingival plaque of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and Tannerella forsythia, singly or in combination, as detected by nested multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Ready, D; D'Aiuto, F; Spratt, D A; Suvan, J; Tonetti, M S; Wilson, M

    2008-10-01

    This study used a nested multiplex PCR method to detect three periodontal pathogens in subgingival plaque collected before treatment and at 2 and 6 months posttreatment from 107 patients with severe, generalized periodontitis. The proportions of the patients who harbored these bacteria before periodontal treatment were as follows: Tannerella forsythia, 81%; Porphyromonas gingivalis, 78%; and Aggregatibacter (formerly Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans, 47%. At 2 months posttreatment there was a significant reduction in the numbers of patients harboring P. gingivalis (46%; P < 0.001) or T. forsythia (63%; P = 0.043) but not A. actinomycetemcomitans (50%) compared to pretreatment data. At 6 months posttreatment, significantly fewer patients harbored P. gingivalis (43%; P < 0.001); A. actinomycetemcomitans, (31%; P = 0.025), or T. forsythia (63%; P = 0.030). Interestingly, at baseline and at 2 months posttherapy, subjects who harbored only a single pathogen had a greater level of periodontal disease than subjects who harbored two, or all three, of these periodontal pathogens. These data suggest that a reduction in the number of species present may be associated with an increase in the severity of periodontal diseases.

  19. Immunoglobulin G subclass response of localized juvenile periodontitis patients to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, M E; Hamilton, R G

    1992-01-01

    Sera from patients with localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP) often contain markedly elevated immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody titers to serospecific determinants of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. The objective of the present study was to define the subclass distribution of the IgG antibody response of LJP patients to this key cell envelope antigen. IgG subclass antibody responses to A. actinomycetemcomitans LPS were quantified in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with human IgG subclass-restricted monoclonal antibodies. Serum antibody concentrations were calculated by heterologous interpolation of a dose-response curve constructed by using human-mouse chimeric antibodies. Sixteen of 17 LJP serum samples tested contained significantly greater concentrations of IgG2 than IgG1 antibodies reactive toward A. actinomycetemcomitans LPS. Geometric mean antibody concentrations of IgG1 and IgG2 were 7.8 and 136.5 micrograms/ml, respectively, among LJP patients with elevated IgG titers to LPS (94% of whom were black). However, both IgG1 and IgG2 antibody concentrations were significantly greater than the corresponding values obtained from sera from LJP patients with low IgG titers to LPS. Among LJP patients with elevated IgG titers to A. actinomycetemcomitans LPS, serum IgG2 concentration and total IgG concentration were also significantly elevated compared with both low-titered LJP sera and sera from periodontally healthy race-matched controls. The results of this study indicate that the humoral response of a predominantly black population of LJP patients to A. actinomycetemcomitans includes the production of LPS-reactive IgG antibodies which are primarily of the IgG2 subclass. PMID:1563768

  20. Determination of antibacterial activity of green coffee bean extract on periodontogenic bacteria like Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Bharath, Nagaraj; Sowmya, Nagur Karibasappa; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of pure green coffee bean extract on periodonto pathogenic bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Prevotella intermedia (Pi), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa). Materials and Methods: Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were used to assess the antibacterial effect of pure green coffee bean extract against periodonto pathogenic bacteria by micro dilution method and culture method, respectively. Results: MIC values of Pg, Pi and Aa were 0.2 μg/ml whereas Fn showed sensitive at concentration of 3.125 μg/ml. MBC values mirrors the values same as that of MIC. Conclusion: Antimicrobial activity of pure green coffee bean extract against Pg, Pi, Fn and Aa suggests that it could be recommended as an adjunct to mechanical therapy in the management of periodontal disease. PMID:26097349

  1. Evaluation of antimicrobial action of Carie Care™ and Papacarie Duo™ on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans a major periodontal pathogen using polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Kush, Anil; Thakur, Rachna; Patil, Sandya Devi S.; Paul, Santhosh T.; Kakanur, Madhu

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the present scenario, we are made available with chemomechanical caries removal system containing a natural proteolytic enzyme for the ease in the excavation of infected dentine. The additive action for these agents is providing antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. Aim: This study was undertaken for assessing the action of Carie Care™ and Papacarie Duo™ on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Materials and Methods: The samples were collected for cultivation of the periodontal pathogen from the clinical periodontal pockets using sterile paper points. The samples cultured under suitable conditions were analyzed with quantitative polymerase chain reaction targeting 16s r-DNA. The samples were divided into three groups namely, Group A: Control, Group B: With Papacarie Duo, Group C: With Carie Care. The pathogen inoculums plugs were inserted in the petri dishes containing chemically defined medium and the experimental gels at different concentrations and were incubated under optimal conditions. The inhibition of growth of the pathogen was studied visually. Results: There was visual inhibition of growth for Group B and C and also exhibited a dose-dependent effect also. Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, Carie Care™ gel demonstrated better antimicrobial action against A. actinomycetemcomitans which is a major periodontal disease causing pathogen. PMID:26681861

  2. Quantitative PCR studies of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Treponema denticola/Tanerella forsythensis Complex as Etiological Factors of Chronic Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Yanushevich, O O; Ayvazova, R A; Shibaeva, A V; Rebrikov, D V; Trubnikova, E V; Kudykina, Yu K; Zylnikova, M V; Zaripova, R S; Shevelev, A B

    2016-02-01

    Real-time quantitative PCR (Dentofl or kit) was used to detect DNA of periodontal pathogens in specimens from 92 patients with chronic periodontitis and from a control sample of 12 normal subjects. A bimodal distribution of patients by periodontium colonization with A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, P. intermedia, T. forsythensis, and T. denticola was demonstrated. A new approach to interpretation of the results of quantitative evaluation of periodontal pathogens, including the notion of pathological colonization level, led to classification of all cases with chronic generalized periodontitis into 3 groups: associated with A. actinomycetemcomitans, with T. forsythensis/T. denticola complex, and cases of uncertain genesis.

  3. A novel intrinsically disordered outer membrane lipoprotein of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans binds various cytokines and plays a role in biofilm response to interleukin-1β and interleukin-8

    PubMed Central

    Ahlstrand, Tuuli; Tuominen, Heidi; Beklen, Arzu; Torittu, Annamari; Oscarsson, Jan; Sormunen, Raija; Pöllänen, Marja T.; Permi, Perttu; Ihalin, Riikka

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) do not have a well-defined and stable 3-dimensional fold. Some IDPs can function as either transient or permanent binders of other proteins and may interact with an array of ligands by adopting different conformations. A novel outer membrane lipoprotein, bacterial interleukin receptor I (BilRI) of the opportunistic oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans binds a key gatekeeper proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β. Because the amino acid sequence of the novel lipoprotein resembles that of fibrinogen binder A of Haemophilus ducreyi, BilRI could have the potential to bind other proteins, such as host matrix proteins. However, from the tested host matrix proteins, BilRI interacted with neither collagen nor fibrinogen. Instead, the recombinant non-lipidated BilRI, which was intrinsically disordered, bound various pro/anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-10. Moreover, BilRI played a role in the in vitro sensing of IL-1β and IL-8 because low concentrations of cytokines did not decrease the amount of extracellular DNA in the matrix of bilRI− mutant biofilm as they did in the matrix of wild-type biofilm when the biofilms were exposed to recombinant cytokines for 22 hours. BilRI played a role in the internalization of IL-1β in the gingival model system but did not affect either IL-8 or IL-6 uptake. However, bilRI deletion did not entirely prevent IL-1β internalization, and the binding of cytokines to BilRI was relatively weak. Thus, BilRI might sequester cytokines on the surface of A. actinomycetemcomitans to facilitate the internalization process in low local cytokine concentrations. PMID:27459270

  4. A novel intrinsically disordered outer membrane lipoprotein of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans binds various cytokines and plays a role in biofilm response to interleukin-1β and interleukin-8.

    PubMed

    Ahlstrand, Tuuli; Tuominen, Heidi; Beklen, Arzu; Torittu, Annamari; Oscarsson, Jan; Sormunen, Raija; Pöllänen, Marja T; Permi, Perttu; Ihalin, Riikka

    2017-02-17

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) do not have a well-defined and stable 3-dimensional fold. Some IDPs can function as either transient or permanent binders of other proteins and may interact with an array of ligands by adopting different conformations. A novel outer membrane lipoprotein, bacterial interleukin receptor I (BilRI) of the opportunistic oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans binds a key gatekeeper proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β. Because the amino acid sequence of the novel lipoprotein resembles that of fibrinogen binder A of Haemophilus ducreyi, BilRI could have the potential to bind other proteins, such as host matrix proteins. However, from the tested host matrix proteins, BilRI interacted with neither collagen nor fibrinogen. Instead, the recombinant non-lipidated BilRI, which was intrinsically disordered, bound various pro/anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-10. Moreover, BilRI played a role in the in vitro sensing of IL-1β and IL-8 because low concentrations of cytokines did not decrease the amount of extracellular DNA in the matrix of bilRI(-) mutant biofilm as they did in the matrix of wild-type biofilm when the biofilms were exposed to recombinant cytokines for 22 hours. BilRI played a role in the internalization of IL-1β in the gingival model system but did not affect either IL-8 or IL-6 uptake. However, bilRI deletion did not entirely prevent IL-1β internalization, and the binding of cytokines to BilRI was relatively weak. Thus, BilRI might sequester cytokines on the surface of A. actinomycetemcomitans to facilitate the internalization process in low local cytokine concentrations.

  5. Transcriptional regulation of the Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans ygiW-qseBC operon by QseB and integration host factor proteins.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Demuth, Donald R

    2014-12-01

    The QseBC two-component system plays a pivotal role in regulating virulence and biofilm growth of the oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. We previously showed that QseBC autoregulates the ygiW-qseBC operon. In this study, we characterized the promoter that drives ygiW-qseBC expression. Using lacZ transcriptional fusion constructs and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends, we showed that ygiW-qseBC expression is driven by a promoter that initiates transcription 53 bases upstream of ygiW and identified putative cis-acting promoter elements, whose function was confirmed using site-specific mutagenesis. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, two trans-acting proteins were shown to interact with the ygiW-qseBC promoter. The QseB response regulator bound to probes containing the direct repeat sequence CTTAA-N6-CTTAA, where the CTTAA repeats flank the -35 element of the promoter. The ygiW-qseBC expression could not be detected in A. actinomycetemcomitans ΔqseB or ΔqseBC strains, but was restored to WT levels in the ΔqseBC mutant when complemented by single copy chromosomal insertion of qseBC. Interestingly, qseB partially complemented the ΔqseBC strain, suggesting that QseB could be activated in the absence of QseC. QseB activation required its phosphorylation since complementation did not occur using qseB(pho-), encoding a protein with the active site aspartate substituted with alanine. These results suggest that QseB is a strong positive regulator of ygiW-qseBC expression. In addition, integration host factor (IHF) bound to two sites in the promoter region and an additional site near the 5' end of the ygiW ORF. The expression of ygiW-qseBC was increased by twofold in ΔihfA and ΔihfB strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans, suggesting that IHF is a negative regulator of the ygiW-qseBC operon.

  6. The Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Cytolethal Distending Toxin Active Subunit CdtB Contains a Cholesterol Recognition Sequence Required for Toxin Binding and Subunit Internalization.

    PubMed

    Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen; Walker, Lisa P; Zekavat, Ali; Dlakić, Mensur; Scuron, Monika Damek; Nygren, Patrik; Shenker, Bruce J

    2015-10-01

    Induction of cell cycle arrest in lymphocytes following exposure to the Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt) is dependent upon the integrity of lipid membrane microdomains. Moreover, we have previously demonstrated that the association of Cdt with target cells involves the CdtC subunit which binds to cholesterol via a cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus sequence (CRAC site). In this study, we demonstrate that the active Cdt subunit, CdtB, also is capable of binding to large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) containing cholesterol. Furthermore, CdtB binding to cholesterol involves a similar CRAC site as that demonstrated for CdtC. Mutation of the CRAC site reduces binding to model membranes as well as toxin binding and CdtB internalization in both Jurkat cells and human macrophages. A concomitant reduction in Cdt-induced toxicity was also noted, indicated by reduced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in Jurkat cells and a reduction in the proinflammatory response in macrophages (interleukin 1β [IL-1β] and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α] release). Collectively, these observations indicate that membrane cholesterol serves as an essential ligand for both CdtC and CdtB and, further, that this binding is necessary for both internalization of CdtB and subsequent molecular events leading to intoxication of cells.

  7. MicroRNAs responsive to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS modulate expression of genes regulating innate immunity in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Afsar R; Fordham, Jezrom B; Khan, Asma; Nares, Salvador

    2014-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, noncoding RNAs that regulate post-transcriptional expression of their respective target genes and are responsive to various stimuli, including LPS. Here we examined the early (4 h) miRNA responses of THP1-differentiated macrophages challenged with LPS derived from the periodontal pathogens, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis or environmentally-modified LPS obtained from P. gingivalis grown in cigarette smoke extract. Predicted miRNA-gene target interactions for LPS-responsive miR-29b and let-7f were confirmed using dual-luciferase assays and by transfection experiments using miRNA mimics and inhibitors. Convergent and divergent miRNA profiles were observed in treated samples where differences in miRNA levels related to the type, concentration and incubation times of LPS challenge. Dual-luciferase experiments revealed miR-29b targeting of interleukin-6 receptorα (IL-6Rα) and IFN-γ inducible protein 30 and let-7f targeting of suppressor of cytokine signaling 4 and thrombospondin-1. Transfection experiments confirmed miR-29b and let-7f modulation of IL-6Rα and SOCS4 protein expression levels, respectively. Thus, we have demonstrated convergent/divergent miRNA responses to wild type LPS and its environmentally-modified LPS, and demonstrate miRNA targeting of key genes linked to inflammation and immunity. Our data indicate that these LPS-responsive miRNAs may play a key role in fine-tuning the host response to periodontal pathogens.

  8. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and Treponema denticola / Prevotella intermedia Co-Infection Are Associated with Severe Periodontitis in a Thai Population.

    PubMed

    Torrungruang, Kitti; Jitpakdeebordin, Supawadee; Charatkulangkun, Orawan; Gleebbua, Yingampa

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial infection of tooth-supporting tissues. This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the associations between five target species and severe periodontitis in a Thai population. Using the CDC/AAP case definition, individuals diagnosed with no/mild and severe periodontitis were included. Quantitative analyses of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Tannerella forsythia (Tf), Treponema denticola (Td), and Prevotella intermedia (Pi) in subgingival plaque were performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The association between target species and severe periodontitis was examined using logistic regression analysis. The study subjects comprised 479 individuals with no/mild periodontitis and 883 with severe periodontitis. Bacterial prevalence and quantity were higher in subjects with severe periodontitis than in those with no/mild disease. In the fully adjusted model, all species except Tf showed a dose-dependent relationship with periodontitis. The mere presence of Pg, even in low amount, was significantly associated with severe periodontitis, while the amount of Aa, Td, and Pi had to reach the critical thresholds to be significantly associated with disease. Compared to individuals with low levels of both Td and Pi, high colonization by either Td or Pi alone significantly increased the odds of having severe periodontitis by 2.5 (95%CI 1.7-3.5) folds. The odds ratio was further increased to 14.8 (95%CI 9.2-23.8) in individuals who were highly colonized by both species. Moreover, the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa were independently associated with severe periodontitis with odds ratios of 5.6 (95%CI 3.4-9.1) and 2.2 (95%CI 1.5-3.3), respectively. Our findings suggest that the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa, Td, and Pi play an important role in severe periodontitis in this study population. We also demonstrate for the first time that individuals co-infected with Td and Pi

  9. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and Treponema denticola / Prevotella intermedia Co-Infection Are Associated with Severe Periodontitis in a Thai Population

    PubMed Central

    Torrungruang, Kitti; Jitpakdeebordin, Supawadee; Charatkulangkun, Orawan; Gleebbua, Yingampa

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial infection of tooth-supporting tissues. This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the associations between five target species and severe periodontitis in a Thai population. Using the CDC/AAP case definition, individuals diagnosed with no/mild and severe periodontitis were included. Quantitative analyses of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Tannerella forsythia (Tf), Treponema denticola (Td), and Prevotella intermedia (Pi) in subgingival plaque were performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The association between target species and severe periodontitis was examined using logistic regression analysis. The study subjects comprised 479 individuals with no/mild periodontitis and 883 with severe periodontitis. Bacterial prevalence and quantity were higher in subjects with severe periodontitis than in those with no/mild disease. In the fully adjusted model, all species except Tf showed a dose-dependent relationship with periodontitis. The mere presence of Pg, even in low amount, was significantly associated with severe periodontitis, while the amount of Aa, Td, and Pi had to reach the critical thresholds to be significantly associated with disease. Compared to individuals with low levels of both Td and Pi, high colonization by either Td or Pi alone significantly increased the odds of having severe periodontitis by 2.5 (95%CI 1.7–3.5) folds. The odds ratio was further increased to 14.8 (95%CI 9.2–23.8) in individuals who were highly colonized by both species. Moreover, the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa were independently associated with severe periodontitis with odds ratios of 5.6 (95%CI 3.4–9.1) and 2.2 (95%CI 1.5–3.3), respectively. Our findings suggest that the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa, Td, and Pi play an important role in severe periodontitis in this study population. We also demonstrate for the first time that individuals co-infected with Td

  10. Detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans after Systemic Administration of Amoxicillin Plus Metronidazole as an Adjunct to Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dakic, Aleksandar; Boillot, Adrien; Colliot, Cyrille; Carra, Maria-Clotilde; Czernichow, Sébastien; Bouchard, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the variations in the detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis and/or Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans before and after systemic administration of amoxicillin plus metronidazole in association with non-surgical periodontal therapy (NSPT). Background: The adjunctive use of antibiotics has been advocated to improve the clinical outcomes of NSPT. However, no systematic review has investigated the microbiological benefit of this combination. Materials and Methods: An electronic search was conducted up to December 2015. Randomized clinical trials comparing the number of patients testing positive for P. gingivalis and/or A. actinomycetemcomitans before and after NSPT with (test group) or without (control group) amoxicillin plus metronidazole were included. The difference between groups in the variation of positive patients was calculated using the inverse variance method with a random effects model. Results: The frequency of patients positive for A. actinomycetemcomitans was decreased by 30% (p = 0.002) and by 25% (p = 0.01) in the test group compared to the control group at 3- and 6-month follow-up, respectively. Similar findings were observed when considering the frequency of patients positive for Porphyromonas gingivalis, with a reduction by 28% (p < 0.0001), 32% (p < 0.0001), and 34% (p = 0.03) in the test group compared to the control group at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up, respectively. Conclusion: The systemic administration of amoxicillin plus metronidazole as an adjunct to NSPT significantly decreased the number of patients positive for P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans compared with periodontal therapy alone or with a placebo. PMID:27594851

  11. Evidence that the serotype b antigenic determinant of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 resides in the polysaccharide moiety of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, M E; Schifferle, R E

    1991-01-01

    A high-molecular-weight polysaccharide-containing antigen was isolated from a phenol-water extract of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 43718 (formerly Y4) by gel permeation chromatography in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-disaggregating buffer. The polysaccharide antigen formed a precipitin band with rabbit serotype b-specific antiserum but not with rabbit antisera to serotype a or c. Electroblotted serotype b antigen was probed with serum from a patient with localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP), resulting in a diffuse "smear" in the upper region of the lane. By utilizing an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, it was demonstrated that the geometric mean immunoglobulin G antibody titer to the serotype b polysaccharide was significantly higher in sera from LJP patients than in sera from periodontally healthy individuals. Moreover, LJP antibody titers to the serotype b polysaccharide exhibited age-dependent variation. Double immunodiffusion analysis revealed that the serotype b antigen formed a line of identity with low-molecular-weight LPS following reaction with serotype b-specific antiserum. Incubation of LJP serum in the presence of a lipid-free polysaccharide moiety obtained by mild acid hydrolysis of LPS from A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 markedly reduced immunoglobulin G titer to the serotype b antigen. In contrast, solubilized lipid A was only weakly inhibitory. The results of this study indicate that the serotype b-specific determinant of A. actinomycetemcomitans resides in the polysaccharide moiety of LPS and represents a major target for immunoglobulin G antibody in serum of LJP subjects colonized by this organism. Images PMID:1706323

  12. The immunodominant outer membrane antigen of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is located in the serotype-specific high-molecular-mass carbohydrate moiety of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Page, R C; Sims, T J; Engel, L D; Moncla, B J; Bainbridge, B; Stray, J; Darveau, R P

    1991-01-01

    Most patients with juvenile periodontitis manifest serum antibodies, sometimes at very high titers, to antigens of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, but the antigens inducing the immune response have been only partly characterized. We separated A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype b cells into protein, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and soluble polysaccharide fractions and characterized them. Coomassie blue- and silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels were used to detect protein and LPS components, and gas-liquid chromatography was used to determine their carbohydrate and fatty acid composition. Western blots, dot blots, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay inhibition with high-titer sera from juvenile periodontitis patients revealed which components were highest in antibody binding activity. These results showed that the major portion of the immunoglobulin G binding activity resides in the purified mannan-free LPS, with lesser amounts in the total protein fraction. Using Sephacryl S-300 chromatography, we separated LPS into high-molecular-mass components with high carbohydrate contents by gas-liquid chromatography and a low-molecular-mass component consisting mainly of lipid A and the inner core sugar heptulose. The results of quantitative dot blot assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay inhibition show that the serotype-specific antibody binding activity is highly concentrated in the high-molecular-mass carbohydrate-rich LPS fraction and is almost completely absent in the low-molecular-weight lipid-rich fraction. Our observations contrast with previous reports that the predominant serotype antigen of A. actinomycetemcomitans resides in a mannan-rich polysaccharide isolated from spent culture medium. These observations support the conclusion that the immunodominant antigen of the outer membrane is the O antigen of the LPS. Images PMID:1716610

  13. Mouse interleukin-1 receptor antagonist induced by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide blocks the effects of interleukin-1 on bone resorption and osteoclast-like cell formation.

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, T; Ohsaki, Y; Ueda, N; Saito, N; Mundy, G R

    1994-01-01

    We have reported that P388D1 cell line murine macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans release interleukin-1 (IL-1) inhibitor. The IL-1 inhibitor was purified from conditioned media of P388D1 cells stimulated with A. actinomycetemcomitans LPS for 72 h to homogeneity by a four-step procedure: acetic acid extraction from conditioned media; Bio-Gel P-60 gel filtration chromatography; DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B column chromatography; and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography on a C18 hydrophobic support. The purified IL-1 inhibitor gave a single band of protein with a molecular mass of 26 kDa on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The purified IL-1 inhibitor was a heat- and acid-stable protein that was inactivated by digestion with trypsin and reduction with dithiothreitol. This inhibitory factor suppressed the proliferation of C3H/HeJ mouse thymocytes and the proliferation of IL-1-dependent cell lines, D10.G4.1 and RPMI 1788, induced by IL-1. However, this inhibitor did not affect the proliferation of IL-2-dependent CTLL-2 cells induced by IL-2, the proliferation of C3H/HeJ mouse thymocytes stimulated with a mitogenic dose of concanavalin A, and the proliferation of IL-6-dependent B9 cells induced by IL-6. Furthermore, the IL-1 inhibitor significantly blocked stimulation of bone resorption in organ cultures of newborn mouse calvaria and inhibited the osteoclast-like cell formation in mouse marrow cultures. A monoclonal antibody prepared against the purified IL-1 inhibitor reacted with mouse recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist (rIL-1ra), and a polyclonal antibody to mouse rIL-1ra reacted with the IL-1 inhibitor by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. These results indicate that the IL-1 inhibitor is an identical molecule to rIL-1ra, suggesting that the IL-1 inhibitor (IL-1ra) released by macrophages stimulated with LPS from A. actinomycetemcomitans may play an important mediative role

  14. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide stimulates the phosphorylation of p44 and p42 MAP kinases through CD14 and TLR-4 receptor activation in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Kawasaki-Cárdenas, Perla; Cruz-Arroyo, Santa Rita; Pérez-Garzón, Miguel; Maldonado-Frías, Silvia

    2006-04-25

    Tyrosine phosphorylation is an early step in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated monocytes and macrophages that appears to play a key role in signal transduction. We have demonstrated that LPS purified from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans also increases protein tyrosine phosphorylation in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). This effect was elicited rapidly after LPS stimulation at concentrations that stimulate anti-bacterial responses in human gingival fibroblasts. Two main proteins, with an apparent molecular weight of 44 and 42 kDa, were phosphorylated after LPS stimulation of the human gingival fibroblasts. The phosphorylation was detected after 5 to 15 min and reached the maximum at 30 min of treatment. The increase in tyrosine phosphorylation was apparent following stimulation with LPS at 10 ng/ml and the response was dose dependent up to 10 microg/ml. Pretreatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, herbimycin A and genistein inhibited the LPS-stimulated phosphorylation of p44 and p42 MAP kinases in a dose dependent manner. Pretreatment of human gingival fibroblasts with antibodies anti-CD14 or anti-TLR-4 but not anti-TLR-2 inhibited the LPS-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of p44 and p42. Additionally, LPS-induced p44 and p42 phosphorylation was inhibited by polymyxin treatment. These findings demonstrate that LPS from A. actinomycetemcomintans increases rapidly p44 and p42 phosphorylation (ERK 1 and ERK 2, respectively) in human gingival fibroblasts. Our data also suggest that CD14 and TLR-4 receptors are involved in the LPS effects in human gingival fibroblasts.

  15. Killing of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by human lactoferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Kalmar, J R; Arnold, R R

    1988-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a fastidious, facultative gram-negative rod associated with endocarditis, certain forms of periodontal disease, and other focal infections. Human neutrophils have demonstrated bactericidal activity against A. actinomycetemcomitans, and much of the oxygen-dependent killing has been attributed to the myeloperoxidase-H2O2-halide system. However, the contribution of other neutrophil components to killing activity is obscure. Lactoferrin, an iron-binding glycoprotein, is a major constituent of neutrophil-specific granules and is also found in mucosal secretions. In this report, we show that human lactoferrin is bactericidal for A. actinomycetemcomitans. Killing activity required an unsaturated (iron- and anion-free) molecule that produced a 2-log decrease in viability within 120 min at 37 degrees C at a concentration of 1.9 microM. Besides exhibiting concentration dependence, killing kinetics were affected by minor variations in temperature and pH. Magnesium, a divalent cation thought to stabilize lipopolysaccharide interactions on the surface of gram-negative organisms, enhanced lactoferrin killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans, while other cations, such as potassium and calcium, had no effect. Our data suggest that lactoferrin contributes to killing of A. actinomycetemcomitans by human neutrophils and that it may also play a significant role in innate secretory defense against this potential periodontopathogen. PMID:3417349

  16. Classification, Identification, and Clinical Significance of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter Species with Host Specificity for Humans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive update on the current classification and identification of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter species with exclusive or predominant host specificity for humans. Haemophilus influenzae and some of the other Haemophilus species are commonly encountered in the clinical microbiology laboratory and demonstrate a wide range of pathogenicity, from life-threatening invasive disease to respiratory infections to a nonpathogenic, commensal lifestyle. New species of Haemophilus have been described (Haemophilus pittmaniae and Haemophilus sputorum), and the new genus Aggregatibacter was created to accommodate some former Haemophilus and Actinobacillus species (Aggregatibacter aphrophilus, Aggregatibacter segnis, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans). Aggregatibacter species are now a dominant etiology of infective endocarditis caused by fastidious organisms (HACEK endocarditis), and A. aphrophilus has emerged as an important cause of brain abscesses. Correct identification of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter species based on phenotypic characterization can be challenging. It has become clear that 15 to 20% of presumptive H. influenzae isolates from the respiratory tracts of healthy individuals do not belong to this species but represent nonhemolytic variants of Haemophilus haemolyticus. Due to the limited pathogenicity of H. haemolyticus, the proportion of misidentified strains may be lower in clinical samples, but even among invasive strains, a misidentification rate of 0.5 to 2% can be found. Several methods have been investigated for differentiation of H. influenzae from its less pathogenic relatives, but a simple method for reliable discrimination is not available. With the implementation of identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry, the more rarely encountered species of Haemophilus and Aggregatibacter will increasingly be identified in clinical microbiology

  17. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Affias, S.; West, A.; Stewart, J. W.; Haldane, E. V.

    1978-01-01

    Two patients had infective endocarditis due to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. One, a 52-year-old woman with a prosthetic aortic valve, was successfully treated with carbenicillin and gentamicin. The other, a 47-year old man with calcific aortic valve disease, required emergency valvectomy and prosthetic valve replacement and responded to a combination of penicillin and gentamicin. PMID:647545

  18. Monoclonal antibodies to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Place, D A; Scidmore, N C; McArthur, W P

    1988-01-01

    Murine hybridoma cell lines were developed which synthesized monoclonal antibodies against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-associated antigens. Monoclonal antibodies specific for an antigen(s) common to all A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates tested but not detected on other gram-negative oral plaque microorganisms or other Actinobacillus species were identified. Monoclonal antibodies specific for each serotype group of A. actinomycetemcomitans which did not bind to other Actinobacillus species or oral plaque microorganisms were also identified. PMID:3356470

  19. Serum antibody in Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-infected patients with periodontal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, J L; Sandoval, M N; Steffen, M J; Cappelli, D

    1991-01-01

    This study was designed to (i) delineate the characteristics of serum antibody responses to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in patients with periodontitis who are infected with A. actinomycetemcomitans; irrespective of disease classification; (ii) assess the relationship of the elevated antibody levels to colonization of the oral cavity by A. actinomycetemcomitans; and (iii) describe the serotype distribution of A. actinomycetemcomitans and antibodies to the microorganism in infected patients with various clinical classifications. To compare the levels of various isotype-specific antibodies to the different antigens, studies were performed that allowed quantitation of each isotype-specific antibody in a human reference standard. By using this reference standard, it was shown that the levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgM, and IgA responses to A. actinomycetemcomitans were similar among the infected patients, irrespective of disease classification. Also, we demonstrated that the serum antibody response to serotype b was quantitatively greater in all isotypes. Our findings indicate that b was the most frequent A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype detected in the patients and appears to be capable of initiating a substantial serum IgG antibody response that may contain cross-reactive antibodies to other serotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Generally, in cases in which the response to a single serotype was elevated, only that type of A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected in the plaque. Individuals exhibiting elevated antibodies to multiple serotypes were most consistently colonized by the serotype b microorganism. This study represents the first report detailing the distribution of IgG subclass antibodies to A. actinomycetemcomitans in periodontal disease. The results demonstrated that the primary responses of patients with periodontitis to A. actinomycetemcomitans were of the IgG1 and IgG3 subclasses, which is consistent with elicited responses to protein antigens

  20. Dataset of the proteome of purified outer membrane vesicles from the human pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomintans.

    PubMed

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Oscarsson, Jan

    2017-02-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen, which is linked to aggressive forms of periodontitis and can be associated with endocarditis. The outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) of this species contain effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and leukotoxin (LtxA), which they can deliver into human host cells. The OMVs can also activate innate immunity through NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns. This dataset provides a proteome of highly purified OMVs from A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype e strain 173. The experimental data do not only include the raw data of the LC-MS/MS analysis of four independent preparations of purified OMVs but also the mass lists of the processed data and the Mascot.dat files from the database searches. In total 501 proteins are identified, of which 151 are detected in at least three of four independent preparations. In addition, this dataset contains the COG definitions and the predicted subcellular locations (PSORTb 3.0) for the entire genome of A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype e strain SC1083, which is used for the evaluation of the LC-MS/MS data. These data are deposited in ProteomeXchange in the public dataset PXD002509. In addition, a scientific interpretation of this dataset by Kieselbach et al. (2015) [2] is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0138591.

  1. A bacteriocin of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, B F; Lillard, S E; Stevens, R H

    1987-01-01

    An inhibitory factor from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 was isolated, and its properties indicated that it was a bacteriocin (actinobacillicin). The bacteriocin was active against Streptococcus sanguis strains, Streptococcus uberis (FDC1), and Actinomyces viscosus T14 as well as other strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans, but not against other crevicular bacteria, including other streptococci and actinomycetes. The activity of this bacteriocin was inhibited by pronase, trypsin, and heat (45 min at 56 degrees C) but not by DNase, RNase, phospholipase, exposure to UV light, or low pH (1.0 to 6.5). Although actinobacillicin markedly inhibited glycolysis in S. sanguis, the primary mechanism of its bactericidal action appears to be alterations in cell permeability, with the resultant leakage of RNA, DNA, and other essential intracellular macromolecules. These findings provide an ecologic explanation for the reciprocal growth relationship between A. actinomycetemcomitans and S. sanguis/Actinomyces viscosus observed in localized juvenile periodontitis. Images PMID:3818090

  2. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Slots, J; Evans, R T; Lobbins, P M; Genco, R J

    1980-01-01

    The agar dilution technique was used for determination of the antibiotic susceptibilities of 57 oral isolates and 2 nonoral isolates of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Tetracycline, minocycline, and chloramphenicol inhibited more than 96% of the strains tested at a concentration of less than or equal to 2 micrograms/ml; 89% of the strains were inhibited by 2 micrograms of carbenicillin per ml. The other antimicrobial agents tested were less active. Approximately 10% of the A. actinomycetemcomitans strains were resistant to ampicillin, erythromycin, and penicillin G at concentrations of 32 to 64 micrograms/ml. These data suggest that tetracycline and minocycline may be valuable drugs in the treatment of A. actinomycetemcomitans infections. PMID:6903116

  3. Selective medium for isolation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Slots, J

    1982-01-01

    A selective medium, TSBV (tryptic soy-serum-bacitracin-vancomycin) agar, was developed for the isolation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, TSBV agar contained (per liter) 40 g of tryptic soy agar, 1 g of yeast extract, 100 ml of horse serum. 75 mg of bacitracin, and 5 mg of vancomycin. The TSBV medium suppressed most oral species and permitted significantly higher recovery of A. actinomycetemcomitans than nonselective blood agar medium. The distinct colonial morphology and positive catalase reaction of A. actinomycetemcomitans easily distinguished this bacterium from Haemophilus aphrophilus, Capnocytophaga species, and a few other contaminating organisms. With the TSBV medium, even modestly equipped laboratories will be able to isolate and identify A. actinomycetemcomitans from clinical specimens. Images PMID:7068837

  4. Immunosuppressive properties of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Rabie, G; Lally, E T; Shenker, B J

    1988-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans produces a leukotoxin that kills human polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) and monocytes but not lymphocytes. In this study, we examined A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin for its ability to alter human peripheral blood lymphocyte (HPBL) responsiveness. After a 90-min exposure to the leukotoxin, all monocytes were killed and HPBL responsiveness to mitogens and antigens was significantly inhibited. The ability of the leukotoxin to inhibit HPBL responses was not surprising, since monocytes and macrophages are required for many lymphocyte functions. However, we were unable to totally restore HPBL responsiveness when adherent autologous monocytes were added back to cultures of leukotoxin-treated lymphocytes. These studies demonstrate that A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin may also exert nonlethal effects directly on lymphocytes. Furthermore, impaired lymphocyte function did not appear to be the result of indirect effects of products released by dying monocytes. Although it is not clear how A. actinomycetemcomitans acts to cause disease, several investigators have proposed that impaired host defenses may play a pivotal role. Several studies have demonstrated defects in PMN, monocyte, and lymphocyte function in patients with periodontal disease. These findings, along with the data presented in this paper, support the hypothesis that patients who harbor A. actinomycetemcomitans could suffer from local or systemic immune suppression. The effects of this suppression may be to enhance the pathogenicity of A. actinomycetemcomitans itself or that of some other opportunistic organism. PMID:3335399

  5. Microevolution and Patterns of Dissemination of the JP2 Clone of Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans▿

    PubMed Central

    Haubek, Dorte; Poulsen, Knud; Kilian, Mogens

    2007-01-01

    The natural history, microevolution, and patterns of interindividual transmission and global dissemination of the JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans were studied by population genetic analysis. The JP2 clone is strongly associated with aggressive periodontitis in adolescents of African descent and differs from other clones of the species by several genetic peculiarities, including a 530-bp deletion in the promoter region of the leukotoxin gene operon, which results in increased leukotoxic activity. Multilocus sequence analysis of 82 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains, 66 of which were JP2 clone strains collected over a period of more than 20 years, confirmed that there is a clonal population structure with evolutionary lineages corresponding to serotypes. Although genetically highly conserved, as shown by alignment of sequences of eight housekeeping genes, strains belonging to the JP2 clone had a number of point mutations, particularly in the pseudogenes hbpA and tbpA. Characteristic mutations allowed isolates from individuals from the Mediterranean area and from West Africa, including the Cape Verde Islands, to be distinguished. The patterns of mutations indicate that the JP2 clone initially emerged as a distinct genotype in the Mediterranean part of Africa approximately 2,400 years ago and subsequently spread to West Africa, from which it was transferred to the American continents during the transatlantic slave trade. The sustained exclusive colonization of individuals of African descent despite geographical separation for centuries suggests that the JP2 clone has a distinct host tropism. The colonization of family members by JP2 clone strains with unique point mutations provides strong evidence that there is intrafamilial transmission and suggests that dissemination of the JP2 clone is restricted to close contacts. PMID:17353281

  6. Infective Endocarditis by Aggregatibacter paraphrophilus: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Smita

    2013-01-01

    Aggregatibacter paraphrophilus (former name, Haemophilus paraphrophilus) is a normal inhabitant of the naso- and oropharynx and has been rarely reported as a cause of human infections. A case of infective endocarditis by this organism is being reported and literature of endocarditis cases caused by Aggregatibacter paraphrophilus is being reviewed. PMID:24392406

  7. Antigens of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans recognized by patients with juvenile periodontitis and periodontally normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Sims, T J; Moncla, B J; Darveau, R P; Page, R C

    1991-01-01

    Most juvenile periodontitis patients respond to infection by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by producing serum antibodies. Specific antigens inducing the humoral immune response have not been identified, nor has the role of the resulting antibodies in disease progression been determined. Adsorbed and unadsorbed sera from juvenile periodontitis patients and normal subjects were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blots (immunoblots), using digested and undigested bacterial sonicates and French pressure cell fractions to determine the biochemical class, cross-reactivity, and cellular location of the antigens in different A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes. Antigens detected by using high-titer sera included the following: (i) serotype-specific nonprotein material located on the cell surface, (ii) soluble-fraction proteins showing highly variable antibody binding, (iii) cross-reactive proteins, and (iv) a protein present in soluble and cell wall fractions and immunopositive for all sera tested. In addition, one apparently nonprotein component that was enriched in the cell wall fraction was observed. Sera with high immunoglobulin G titers to one, two, three, or none of the three A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes were observed. There was a high degree of variation from one patient to another in the humoral immune response to serotype-specific and cross-reactive antigens. As demonstrated by whole-cell adsorption experiments, the serotype-specific surface antigen accounted for approximately 72 to 90% of the total antibody-binding activity for sera with titers greater than 100-fold above background, while cross-reactive antigen accounted for less than 28%. Antibody binding the whole-cell sonicate for high-titer sera was inhibited 90% by lipopolysaccharide from the same serotype, strongly suggesting that lipopolysaccharide is the immunodominant antigen class. Images PMID:1705243

  8. Purification and characterization of the serotype c antigen from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Zambon, J J; Slots, J; Miyasaki, K; Linzer, R; Cohen, R; Levine, M; Genco, R J

    1984-01-01

    The serotype c antigen from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was purified with fractional ethanol precipitation of cell-free culture supernatant, sequential ion-exchange chromatography, and gel filtration chromatography. The preparation obtained demonstrated a single precipitin line in immunodiffusion, immunoelectrophoresis, and crossed immunoelectrophoresis when rabbit antisera to serotype c whole bacterial cells were used. No immunological reaction was detected with antisera to serotype c lipopolysaccharide, indicating that lipopolysaccharide was not present in the preparation. The serotype c antigen was composed of 95% carbohydrate, 2% protein, and 3.1% phosphate. Gas chromatographic analysis of the antigen obtained from growth in either complex or chemically defined media revealed that the carbohydrate constituent was composed of 84 to 90.1% mannose, 4.8 to 16% glucose, 1.9% N-acetylglucosamine, 1.4% fucose, and 0.2% galactose. The present data suggest that A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype c antigen is predominantly a mannose-containing carbohydrate suggestive of a mannan. Images PMID:6423542

  9. Inhibition of fibroblast proliferation by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Shenker, B J; Kushner, M E; Tsai, C C

    1982-01-01

    We have examined soluble sonic extracts of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans for their ability to alter human and murine fibroblast proliferation. We found that extracts of all A. actinomycetemcomitans strains examined (both leukotoxic and nonleukotoxic) caused a dose-dependent inhibition of both murine and human fibroblast proliferation as assessed by DNA synthesis ([3H]thymidine incorporation). Addition of sonic extract simultaneously with [3H]thymidine had no effect on incorporation, indicating that suppression was not due to the presence of excessive amounts of cold thymidine. Inhibition of DNA synthesis was also paralleled by decreased RNA synthesis ([3H]uridine incorporation) and by a decrease in cell growth as assessed by direct cell counts; there was no effect on cell viability. The suppressive factor(s) is heat labile; preliminary purification and characterization studies indicate that it is a distinct and separate moiety from other A. actinomycetemcomitans mediators previously reported, including leukotoxin, immune suppressive factor, and endotoxin. Although it is not clear how A. actinomycetemcomitans acts to cause disease, we propose that one aspect of the pathogenicity of this organism rests in its ability to inhibit fibroblast growth, which in turn could contribute to the collagen loss associated with certain forms of periodontal disease, in particular juvenile periodontitis. PMID:7152684

  10. Transformation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by electroporation, utilizing constructed shuttle plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasan, P K; LeBlanc, D J; Lee, L N; Fives-Taylor, P

    1991-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, a periodontal pathogen, has been strongly implicated in human periodontal disease. Advances in the molecular analysis of A. actinomycetemcomitans virulence factors have been limited due to the unavailability of systems for genetic transfer, transposon mutagenesis, and gene complementation. Slow progress can be traced almost exclusively to the lack of gene vector systems and methods for the introduction of DNA into A. actinomycetemcomitans. An electrotransformation system that allowed at least five strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans to be transformed with stable shuttle plasmids which efficiently replicated in both Escherichia coli and A. actinomycetemcomitans was developed. One plasmid, a potential shuttle vector designated pDL282, is 5.7 kb in size, has several unique restriction enzyme sites, and codes for resistance to spectinomycin and ampicillin. E. coli and A. actinomycetemcomitans were transformed with equal efficiencies of approximately 10(5) transformants per micrograms of DNA. Similar transformation efficiencies were obtained whether the plasmid DNA was isolated from A. actinomycetemcomitans or E. coli. In addition, frozen competent cells of A. actinomycetemcomitans yielded comparable efficiencies of transformation. Restriction enzyme analysis of pDL282 isolated after transformation confirmed the presence of intact donor plasmids. A plasmid isolated from A. pleuropneumoniae was also capable of transforming some isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans, although generally at a lower frequency. The availability of these shuttle plasmids and an efficient transformation procedure should significantly facilitate the molecular analysis of virulence factors of A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:1937823

  11. Monoclonal antibodies to leukotoxin of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    DiRienzo, J M; Tsai, C C; Shenker, B J; Taichman, N S; Lally, E T

    1985-01-01

    Hybridoma cell lines which produce monoclonal antibodies to a leukotoxin from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans were prepared. The monoclonal antibodies were selected for their ability to neutralize the cytotoxic activity of the leukotoxin and recognize the toxin on nitrocellulose blots. The antibodies belonged to either the immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) or IgG2 subclass and differed in their ability to bind to the leukotoxin on nitrocellulose blots. However, only slight differences in neutralization titers were observed. Use of the monoclonal antibodies revealed that polymyxin B-extracted or osmotic shock-released leukotoxin could be separated into several high-molecular-weight polypeptides by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunoblot analysis with the monoclonal antibodies also demonstrated that the leukotoxin was present in eight oral strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans that had been previously classified by a biological assay as leukotoxic. The availability of these monoclonal antibodies should facilitate and expand studies concerning the role of the leukotoxin in the pathogenicity of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Images PMID:3965404

  12. Requirements for invasion of epithelial cells by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasan, P K; Meyer, D H; Fives-Taylor, P M

    1993-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, an oral bacterium implicated in human periodontal disease, was recently demonstrated to invade cultured epithelial cells (D. H. Meyer, P. K. Sreenivasan, and P. M. Fives-Taylor, Infect. Immun. 59:2719-2726, 1991). This report characterizes the requirements for invasion of KB cells by A. actinomycetemcomitans. The roles of bacterial and host factors were investigated by using selective agents that influence specific bacterial or host cell functions. Inhibition of bacterial protein synthesis decreased invasion, suggesting the absence of a preformed pool of proteins involved in A. actinomycetemcomitans invasion. Inhibition of bacterial and eukaryotic energy synthesis also decreased invasion, confirming that A. actinomycetemcomitans invasion is an active process. Bacterial adherence to KB cells was indicated by scanning electron microscopy of infected KB cells. Further, the addition of A. actinomycetemcomitans-specific serum to the bacterial inoculum reduced invasion substantially, suggesting a role for bacterial attachment in invasion. Many of the adherent bacteria invaded the epithelial cells under optimal conditions. Inhibitors of receptor-mediated endocytosis inhibited invasion by A. actinomycetemcomitans. Like that of many facultatively intracellular bacteria, A. actinomycetemcomitans invasion was not affected by eukaryotic endosomal acidification. These are the first published observations describing the requirements for epithelial cell invasion by a periodontopathogen. They demonstrate that A. actinomycetemcomitans utilizes a mechanism similar to those used by many but not all invasive bacteria to gain entry into eukaryotic cells. Images PMID:8454326

  13. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis in young Chinese adults.

    PubMed

    Mombelli, A; Gmür, R; Frey, J; Meyer, J; Zee, K Y; Tam, J O; Lo, E C; Di Rienzo, J; Lang, N P; Corbet, E F

    1998-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the presence or absence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis in young Chinese adults and to examine the A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates from positive subjects with regard to the serotype distribution, presence of the leukotoxin gene lktA and the promoter for the leukotoxin operon as well as the incidence of phage Aa phi 23. Sixty subjects, working in a knitting factory in the Province of Guangzhou, People's Republic of China, were investigated. Subgingival microbial samples were taken from both upper first molars. They were cultured both anaerobically and in 5% CO2. P. gingivalis was found in 33 subjects. On average, it constituted 7% of the total anaerobic cultivable counts. A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected in 37 subjects of which seven yielded counts > 10(5). Twenty-one subjects were positive for both organisms. A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype a was found in 9 subjects, serotype c was found in 23 and serotype e in 5. A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes b and d were not detected in any subjects. Presence of the leukotoxin gene lktA was demonstrated for all A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates; however, none of the A. actinomycetemcomitans strains from the present study had a deletion in the promoter region of the leukotoxin operon. The results of this investigation show a high frequency of the putative periodontal pathogens P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans and corroborate the concept that there is variation in virulence and pathogenic potential among isolates from different subjects.

  14. Lipopolysaccharide Endotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Raetz, Christian R. H.; Whitfield, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Summary Since lipopolysaccharide endotoxins of Gram-negative bacteria were last reviewed in this series in 1990, much has been learned about the assembly and signaling functions of these remarkable glycoconjugates. Lipopolysaccharides typically consist of a hydrophobic domain known as lipid A (or endotoxin), a non-repeating “core” oligosaccharide, and a distal polysaccharide (or O-antigen). The flood of recent genomic data has made it possible to study lipopolysaccharide assembly in diverse Gram-negative bacteria, many of which are human or plant pathogens, and to create mutants or hybrid constructs with novel properties. Unexpectedly, key genes for lipid A biosynthesis have also been found in higher plants, indicating that eucaryotic lipid A-like molecules may exist. The carbohydrate diversity of lipopolysaccharides is better appreciated now than ten years ago, but much remains to be learned about function. Sequence comparisons suggest that extensive lateral transfer of genes for the assembly of O-antigens has occurred among bacteria. The most significant finding in the field of endotoxin biology since 1990 has been the identification of the plasma membrane protein TLR4 as the lipid A signaling receptor of animal cells. The latter belongs to a family of innate immunity receptors, all of which possess a large extracellular domain of leucine-rich repeats, a single trans-membrane segment and a smaller cytoplasmic signaling region that engages the adaptor protein MyD88. The expanding knowledge of TLR4 specificity and its downstream signaling pathways should provide new opportunities for blocking the inflammatory side effects of sepsis. Future progress will require insights into lipopolysaccharide-protein recognition at the atomic level, greater understanding of intra- and inter-cellular lipopolysaccharide trafficking, and incisive biological approaches that combine the tools of bacterial and animal genetics. PMID:12045108

  15. Aggregatibacter aphrophilus Sacroiliitis Following Gastroscopy in a Young Sportsman.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Shelanah A; Gottlieb, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of Aggregatibacter aphrophilus sacroiliitis in a young sportsman, presenting 48 hours after endoscopy and biopsy. Microbiological diagnosis was made only after repeated attempt at joint aspiration. The patient was cured after radiologically guided drainage and a prolonged course of directed antibiotics.

  16. Activation of rat B lymphocytes by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshie, H; Taubman, M A; Ebersole, J L; Olson, C L; Smith, D J; Pappo, J

    1985-01-01

    We examined the lymphoproliferative responses of cervical lymphocytes and splenocytes of homozygous (rnu/rnu) congenitally athymic nude and normal heterozygous (rnu/+) Rowett rats to whole cells of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, a suspected periodontal disease pathogen. Previously sensitized cells from immunized only, infected only, or immunized and infected, normal rats demonstrated proliferation in response to formalinized A. actinomycetemcomitans, but cells from nude rats did not proliferate. The maximum antigenic response was observed at day 5 of culture. A. actinomycetemcomitans caused cervical lymphocytes and splenocytes from untreated naive normal and nude rats to undergo increased DNA synthesis at day 2 of culture. Highly enriched nonsensitized spleen T cells prepared on a nylon wool column did not respond to A. actinomycetemcomitans, whereas enriched nonsensitized B cells proliferated. Differences in response were probably not attributable to contributions from macrophages in the T- or B-cell populations, since macrophage percentages were approximately the same in both preparations. T-cell reconstitution of nude rats with neonatal thymus cells from rnu/+rats resulted in partial recovery of T-cell function but had no effect on the mitogenic response to A. actinomycetemcomitans. It is suggested that the antigenic responses to A. actinomycetemcomitans are dependent on T cells and that A. actinomycetemcomitans cells have mitogenic activity for B cells. The potential importance of these findings in periodontal disease is discussed. PMID:3871196

  17. Electron microscopy of phages in serotypes of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Olsen, I; Namork, E; Myhrvold, V

    1993-12-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Actinobacillus ureae, Haemophilus aphrophilus, Haemophilus paraphrophilus, Haemophilus influenzae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Pasteurella haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida strains were examined by transmission electron microscopy for the presence of bacteriophages. Phages were detected in serotype a (SUNY 75) and e (UOH 1705) and in the fresh clinical isolates UOH Q1243 and UOH Q1247 of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Phages were not found in serotype b, c and d strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans, in the fresh clinical isolate UOH Q1244 of this species or in old strains (including reference strains) of related species from the Actinobacillus-Haemophilus-Pasteurella group.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Aggregatibacter (Haemophilus) aphrophilus NJ8700.

    PubMed

    Di Bonaventura, Maria Pia; DeSalle, Rob; Pop, Mihai; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Figurski, David H; Fine, Daniel H; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Planet, Paul J

    2009-07-01

    We report the finished and annotated genome sequence of Aggregatibacter aphrophilus strain NJ8700, a strain isolated from the oral flora of a healthy individual, and discuss characteristics that may affect its dual roles in human health and disease. This strain has a rough appearance, and its genome contains genes encoding a type VI secretion system and several factors that may participate in host colonization.

  19. Evidence that extracellular components function in adherence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, D H; Fives-Taylor, P M

    1993-01-01

    Extracellular microvesicles and a highly proteinaceous polymer associated with a leukotoxin-producing strain, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans SUNY 75, were shown to increase adherence of other weakly adherent A. actinomycetemcomitans strains to KB epithelial cells. Images PMID:8406899

  20. Cloning and expression of the leukotoxin gene from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Kolodrubetz, D; Dailey, T; Ebersole, J; Kraig, E

    1989-01-01

    The leukotoxin produced by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans has been implicated in the etiology of juvenile periodontitis. To initiate a genetic analysis of the role of this protein in disease, we have cloned the leukotoxin gene in Escherichia coli. Recombinant colonies carrying toxin gene sequences were isolated by screening a genomic A. actinomycetemcomitans library with a DNA probe for the leukotoxin gene from a related bacterium, Pasteurella haemolytica. To demonstrate that the cloned A. actinomycetemcomitans DNA contained a functional leukotoxin gene, protein extracts of E. coli containing the A. actinomycetemcomitans clone were tested directly for leukotoxic activity against human cell lines in chromium release assays. A construct containing the entire cloned region produced a functional toxin. No cytotoxicity was seen when extracts from cells containing plasmids with deletions in the putative coding region were used. Furthermore, the toxin produced by the cloned gene has the same target cell specificity as the leukotoxin extracted directly from A. actinomycetemcomitans. These results indicate that sequences encoding a functional leukotoxin have been cloned and are expressed in E. coli. Southern blot analysis of DNA from leukotoxin-producing (Lkt+) and non-leukotoxin-producing (Lkt-) strains indicated that the Lkt- strain also contained a copy of the gene. Images PMID:2707855

  1. [Role of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in human infection].

    PubMed

    Giglio, C; Aránguiz, V; Giglio, M S; Fernández, A

    1990-04-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (AA), is a cocobacillus thin and small, non motile, uncapsulate and capnophilic. AA, is: one of the species encountered in the mouth's comensal flora being able to be isolated in gingival crevices culture and oral mucosa in a 20% of the healthy population. An important number of pathogenic factors make it well equipped, to protect itself from host's defense mechanisms, and to destroy the periodontal tissue. Between the most important we find lipopolisacarides and leucotoxines which promote tisular invasion and destructive qualities of this microorganism. Since 1912, there are numerous reports of infectious process associated to it, between which we find: endocarditis in native and prothesic valve, soft tissues abscess, pneumonia, brain's abscess, urethritis, vertebral osteomielitis, thyroid's abscess, pericarditis and periodontal juvenile illness, being this one in which its isolation is more frequent. In vitro, AA is very susceptible to tetracicline. This antibiotic reaches high concentrations in gingival crevices, has significant affinity to the alveolar bone and contributes to protect the collagen. These special feature make them the election drug in periodontal disease produced by this microorganism.

  2. Update on Actinobacillus Actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis in human periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Slots, J

    1999-10-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is an important pathogen of periodontitis in young individuals. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major pathogen of severe adult periodontitis. A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis can be transmitted from family member to family member and may cause periodontitis in the recipient individual. In the USA, A. actinomycetemcomitans occurs more frequently in Hispanics and Asians than in Caucasians. P. gingivalis is more common in Hispanics, Asians and Blacks than in Caucasians. A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis strains differ in genotype, serotype, toxin and enzyme production, and cellular invasiveness. Variation in virulence may help explain differing clinical outcomes of periodontal A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis infections. A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis cannot be eradicated from the great majority of deep periodontal pockets by mechanical debridement alone. A. actinomycetemcomitans may be removed from subgingival sites by adjunctive systemic amoxicillin-metronidazole or other appropriate antibiotic therapies. Subgingival eradication of P. gingivalis may require periodontal surgery as well as antibiotic therapy.

  3. Adhesion of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to a human oral cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Mintz, K P; Fives-Taylor, P M

    1994-01-01

    Two quantitative, rapid assays were developed to study the adhesion of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, an oral bacterium associated with periodontal disease, to human epithelial cells. The human oral carcinoma cell line KB was grown in microtiter plates, and adherent bacteria were detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with purified anti-A. actinomycetemcomitans serum and horseradish peroxidase-conjugated secondary antibody or [3H]thymidine-labeled bacteria. Adhesion was found to be time dependent and increased linearly with increasing numbers of bacteria added. Variation in the level of adhesion was noted among strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Adhesion was not significantly altered by changes in pH (from pH 5 to 9) but was sensitive to sodium chloride concentrations greater than 0.15 M. Pooled human saliva was inhibitory for adhesion when bacteria were pretreated with saliva before being added to the cells. Pretreatment of the KB cells with saliva did not inhibit adhesion. Protease treatment of A. actinomycetemcomitans reduced adhesion of the bacteria to KB cells. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that a protein(s) is required for bacterial adhesion and that host components may play a role in modulating adhesion to epithelial cells. Images PMID:8063383

  4. Avidity of antibody responses to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Dell, D S; Ebersole, J L

    1995-01-01

    We designed a study to examine the serum IgG antibody avidity characteristics in: (i) normal subjects (N); (ii) Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-infected adult periodontitis (AP Aa+); (iii) A. actinomycetemcomitans-infected localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP Aa+); and (iv) AP subjects (AP) with various antibody patterns and disease presentation. Although there were significant elevations in antibody levels for AP Aa+ and LJP Aa+ patients compared with AP and normal patients (P < 0.0001), there were no significant differences in the avidity indices (AI). Correlations of antibody levels to avidity revealed that functional activity of the antibody as measured by avidity was independent of antibody levels. Increasing antibody levels correlated with an increase in the number of infected sites, yet there was a trend for A1 to decrease with increased infection. Avidity indices for all patient groups did not appear to show a strong biologic relationship to plaque; however, in AP Aa+ and LJP Aa+ patients there was a generally positive relationship between avidity and bleeding on probing or pocket depth. In AP Aa+ and LJP Aa+ patients, and in AP patients there was a positive relationship of avidity through a threshold of approximately 8 active disease sites. This study hypothesized that antibody avidity to A. actinomycetemcomitans could help to explain the relationship between the active host response and chronic infection with this pathogen. The results provide evidence that both antibody levels and avidity may contribute to the variation in host resistance to infection and disease associated with A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:7648712

  5. Oxidative and nonoxidative killing of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaki, K T; Wilson, M E; Brunetti, A J; Genco, R J

    1986-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a facultative gram-negative microorganism which has been implicated as an etiologic agent in localized juvenile periodontitis and in subacute bacterial endocarditis and abscesses. Although resistant to serum bactericidal action and to oxidant injury mediated by superoxide anion (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), this organism is sensitive to killing by the myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system (K.T. Miyasaki, M.E. Wilson, and R.J. Genco, Infect. Immun. 53:161-165, 1986). In this study, we examined the sensitivity of A. actinomycetemcomitans to killing by intact neutrophils under aerobic conditions, under anaerobic conditions, and under aerobic conditions in the presence of the heme-protein inhibitor sodium cyanide. Intact neutrophils killed opsonized A. actinomycetemcomitans under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and the kinetics of these reactions indicated that both oxidative and nonoxidative mechanisms were operative. Oxidative mechanisms contributed significantly, and most of the killing attributable to oxidative mechanisms was inhibited by sodium cyanide, which suggested that the myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system participated in the oxidative process. We conclude that human neutrophils are capable of killing A. actinomycetemcomitans by both oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent pathways, and that most oxygen-dependent killing requires myeloperoxidase activity. PMID:3013778

  6. The presence of phage-infected Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in localized juvenile periodontitis patients.

    PubMed

    Preus, H R; Olsen, I; Namork, E

    1987-11-01

    Electron microscopy revealed 2 different types of bacteriophages isolated from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans colonizing exclusively diseased sites in 4 patients with localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP). All sites infected with phage were undergoing periodontal destruction, as judged from consecutive routine radiographs. The phages isolated had a wide host range as assessed from their ability to infect a series of reference strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans. A 5th patient harboured non-infected A. actinomycetemcomitans in a surgically treated site which had undergone no bone destruction during the last 12 months. The present findings suggested that the pathogenic potential of A. actinomycetemcomitans in LJP may increase due to phage infection.

  7. Detection and strain identification of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by nested PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Leys, E J; Griffen, A L; Strong, S J; Fuerst, P A

    1994-01-01

    By using PCR, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strains were identified directly from plaque samples without the need to isolate or culture bacteria. DNA fragments were generated by a nested, two-step PCR amplification of the ribosomal spacer region between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes. For the first amplification, primers homologous to sequences common to all bacterial species were used. This was followed by a second amplification with primers specific to A. actinomycetemcomitans. The ribosomal DNA spacer region was amplified from as few as 10 bacterial cells within a total population of 10(8) cells (0.00001%), and cross-reactivity between species was not observed. DNA fragments specific for Porphyromonas gingivalis were generated from the same samples by using a P. gingivalis-specific primer, and equivalent sensitivity and specificity were observed. A. actinomycetemcomitans was detected in 60% and P. gingivalis was detected in 79% of 52 subjects tested. Sequence analysis of the spacer region DNA fragment for A. actinomycetemcomitans gave precise strain identification, producing unique sequences for seven reference strains and identification of nine plaque-derived isolates. A phylogenetic tree based on quantitative sequence relationships was constructed. Two-step PCR amplification directly from plaque samples combined with sequence analysis of the ribosomal DNA spacer region provides a sensitive assay for detection and strain identification of multiple species directly from a single plaque sample. This simplified approach provides a practical method for large-scale studies on the transmission and pathogenicity of periodontitis-associated bacteria. Images PMID:8051258

  8. Identification of an immunoglobulin Fc receptor of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Mintz, K P; Fives-Taylor, P M

    1994-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans expresses proteins that bind to the Fc portion of immunoglobulins. The immunoglobulin Fc receptors on the surface of A. actinomycetemcomitans were detected by the binding of biotinylated human or murine Fc molecules to strain SUNY 465 adsorbed to the bottom of microtiter wells. Biotinylated Fc binding was inhibited by unlabeled Fc molecules and human plasma. Fc receptors were identified by the binding of biotinylated Fc molecules to bacterial membrane proteins separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and transferred to nitrocellulose. Multiple bands were identified, and the major Fc-binding protein was determined to be a heat-modifiable protein. This protein migrated with approximate molecular weights of 25,000 and 32,000 (unheated and heated, respectively). Amino-terminal sequence analysis of this protein revealed a sequence identical to the heat-modifiable protein described for A. actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 43718. This protein sequence exhibits significant homology with the N termini of outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of Escherichia coli and related OmpA-like proteins from other gram-negative bacteria. Images PMID:7927715

  9. Lytic sensitivity of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 to lysozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Iacono, V J; Boldt, P R; MacKay, B J; Cho, M I; Pollock, J J

    1983-01-01

    The ability of both human and hen egg white lysozymes to lyse Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 was investigated. Lysis was followed optically at 540 nm by measuring the percent reduction in turbidity of freshly harvested log-phase cells suspended in Tris-maleate buffers within a wide range of pH (5.2 to 8.5) and molarity (0.01 to 0.2 M) and containing various amounts of enzyme and EDTA. In several instances, treated microorganisms were subsequently examined in thin sections by electron microscopy. Reductions in turbidity and clearing of suspensions occurred with small amounts of lysozyme (less than 1 microgram) under relatively alkaline conditions and at low ionic strength and in the presence of small amounts of EDTA (greater than 0.01 mM). Under the most alkaline conditions, EDTA alone effected turbidity reductions similar to those observed in the presence of lysozyme, which suggested that EDTA not only increased outer membrane permeability but also caused cell lysis. Ultrastructural analysis did not always correspond to turbidimetric observations. Cell lysis was virtually complete in suspensions containing both lysozyme and EDTA. However, in contrast to turbidimetric findings, a significant percentage of cells (greater than 25%) was lysed in the presence of lysozyme alone. Furthermore, significant damage occurred in the presence of EDTA alone. Spheroplast-like cell ghosts were present which surrounded condensed cytoplasm or relatively clear spaces. These findings further support the concept of the requirement for electron microscopy to assess lytic damage in addition to turbidimetric and biochemical methods. Our results are the first to demonstrate the remarkable sensitivity of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 to lysozyme and to show that EDTA not only affects outer membrane permeability but effects cell lysis, possibly through activation of autolytic enzymes at the cytoplasmic membrane. The exquisite sensitivity of A. actinomycetemcomitans Y4 to lysis could be

  10. Interleukin-1-like activity in capsular material from Haemophilus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, W; Kamin, S; Meghji, S; Wilson, M

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the activity of a bacterial surface component (capsular material, CM) in biological assays for interleukin-1 (IL-1). CM from the periodontal pathogen Haemophilus actinomycetemcomitans was tested in the following in vitro assays: mouse thymocyte proliferation (LAF assay), stimulation of collagenase and prostaglandin (PG) E2 synthesis by articular chondrocytes, and stimulation of PGE2 synthesis by fibroblasts. In all these assays, CM gave a response similar to an IL-1 preparation. This ability to mimic IL-1 suggests an important role for CM in both cell-mediated immunity and connective tissue destruction in localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP). PMID:3032779

  11. Identification of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by leukotoxin gene-specific hybridization and polymerase chain reaction assays.

    PubMed Central

    Tønjum, T; Haas, R

    1993-01-01

    Eleven strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolated from cases of systemic infections, local abscesses, and periodontitis were identified by genetic assays using the leukotoxin gene as the target. We have developed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, based on the leukotoxin structural gene of this pathogen, which clearly identified all tested strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans and separated them from the closely related Haemophilus aphrophilus as well as other bacterial species. Furthermore, DNA-DNA hybridization was performed with the cloned partial leukotoxin structural gene (lktA) as a probe, which again clearly distinguished A. actinomycetemcomitans from H. aphrophilus, parts of the normal oral flora, and species harboring RTX (repeats in toxin) family-related cytotoxins. The PCR fragment amplified from the leukotoxin structural gene gave results similar to those given by the cloned leukotoxin gene when used as a probe in hybridization experiments. The hybridization and PCR assays described here are fundamental improvements for the identification of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Images PMID:8349764

  12. A longitudinal microbiological investigation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Eikenella corrodens in juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mandell, R L

    1984-01-01

    Longitudinal clinical and microbiological monitoring of subjects with localized juvenile periodontitis indicated that Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Eikenella corrodens were significantly associated (P less than 0.05) with active tissue destruction. PMID:6381313

  13. Serology of oral Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and serotype distribution in human periodontal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Zambon, J J; Slots, J; Genco, R J

    1983-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans from the human oral cavity was serologically characterized with rabbit antisera to the type strain NCTC 9710; a number of reference strains, including Y4, ATCC 29522, ATCC 29523, ATCC 29524, NCTC 9709; and our own isolates representative of each of 10 biotypes. Using immunoabsorbed antisera, we identified three distinct serotypes by immunodiffusion and indirect immunofluorescence. Serotype a was represented by ATCC 29523 and SUNYaB 75; serotype b was represented by ATCC 29522 and Y4; and serotype c was represented by NCTC 9710 and SUNYaB 67. Indirect immunofluorescence revealed no reaction between the three A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype-specific antisera and 62 strains representing 23 major oral bacterial species. Distinct from the serotype antigens were at least one A. actinomycetemcomitans species common antigen and an antigen shared with other Actinobacillus species, Haemophilus aphrophilus, and Haemophilus paraphrophilus. All serotype a A. actinomycetemcomitans strains failed to ferment xylose, whereas all serotype b organisms fermented xylose. Serotype c included xylose-positive as well as xylose-negative strains. A total of 301 isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans from the oral cavity of 74 subjects were serologically categorized by indirect immunofluorescence with serotype-specific rabbit antisera. Each patient harbored only one serotype of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Fourteen healthy subjects, five diabetics, and seventeen adult periodontitis patients exhibited serotypes a and b in approximately equal frequency, whereas serotype c was found less frequently. In contrast, in 29 localized juvenile periodontitis patients, the incidence of serotype b was approximately two times higher than that of serotypes a or c, suggesting a particularly high periodontopathic potential of A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype b strains. In subjects infected with A. actinomycetemcomitans, serum antibodies were detected to the serotype

  14. Periodontitis‐associated pathogens P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans activate human CD14+ monocytes leading to enhanced Th17/IL‐17 responses

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wan‐Chien; van Asten, Saskia D.; Burns, Lachrissa A.; Evans, Hayley G.; Walter, Gina J.; Hashim, Ahmed; Hughes, Francis J.

    2016-01-01

    The Th17/IL‐17 pathway is implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontitis (PD), however the mechanisms are not fully understood. We investigated the mechanism by which the periodontal pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) promote a Th17/IL‐17 response in vitro, and studied IL‐17+ CD4+ T‐cell frequencies in gingival tissue and peripheral blood from patients with PD versus periodontally healthy controls. Addition of Pg or Aa to monocyte/CD4+ T‐cell co‐cultures promoted a Th17/IL‐17 response in vitro in a dose‐ and time‐dependent manner. Pg or Aa stimulation of monocytes resulted in increased CD40, CD54 and HLA‐DR expression, and enhanced TNF‐α, IL‐1β, IL‐6 and IL‐23 production. Mechanistically, IL‐17 production in Pg‐stimulated co‐cultures was partially dependent on IL‐1β, IL‐23 and TLR2/TLR4 signalling. Increased frequencies of IL‐17+ cells were observed in gingival tissue from patients with PD compared to healthy subjects. No differences were observed in IL‐17+ CD4+ T‐cell frequencies in peripheral blood. In vitro, Pg induced significantly higher IL‐17 production in anti‐CD3 mAb‐stimulated monocyte/CD4+ T‐cell co‐cultures from patients with PD compared to healthy controls. Our data suggest that periodontal pathogens can activate monocytes, resulting in increased IL‐17 production by human CD4+ T cells, a process that appears enhanced in patients with PD. PMID:27334899

  15. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans adheres to human gingival fibroblasts and modifies cytoskeletal organization.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Kawasaki-Cárdenas, Perla; Garcés, Carla Portillo; Román-Alvárez, Patricia; Barajas-Torres, Carolina; Contreras-Marmolejo, Luis Arturo

    2007-09-01

    Adherence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to human gingival fibroblast cells induces cytoskeletal reorganization. A. actinomycetemcomitans is considered a pathogenic bacteria involved in localized aggressive periodontitis. Studies with epithelial cells have shown an adherent capacity of bacteria that is increased under anaerobic conditions. For adherence to take place, there is a need for interaction between extracellular vesicles and bacterial fimbriae. However, molecular events associated with the adherence process are still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether A. actinomycetemcomitans adherence to human gingival fibroblasts promotes cytoskeletal reorganization. Adherence was determined with light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. For F-actin visualization, cells were treated with fluorescein-isothiocyanate-phalloidin and samples were examined with epifluorescence optics. Fluorescent was recorded on Kodak T-Max 400 film. We showed that A. actinomycetemcomitans adheres to human gingival fibroblast primary cultures, this property stimulating an increase in the intracellular calcium levels. In human gingival fibroblast primary cultures, we observed that maximal A. actinomycetemcomitans adherence took place 1.5h after culture infection occurred and remained for 6h. The adherence was associated with morphologic alterations and an increased in the intracellular calcium levels. These experiments suggest that A. actinomycetemcomitans adherence cause morphological alterations, induce actin stress fibers and recruitment of intracellular calcium levels.

  16. Studies of leukotoxin from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans using the promyelocytic HL-60 cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Zambon, J J; DeLuca, C; Slots, J; Genco, R J

    1983-01-01

    The promyelocytic HL-60 cell line was examined for susceptibility to leukotoxin from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans which caused lysis of human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes also lysed HL-60 cells as determined by release of intracellular lactate dehydrogenase. The killing of HL-60 cells by A. actinomycetemcomitans was dose dependent and temperature dependent, reached maximal levels after 45 min of incubation, and was inhibited by rabbit antisera to A. actinomycetemcomitans. Of 100 oral isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans from 55 subjects, 16% from 11 healthy subjects, 43% from 13 adult periodontitis patients, 75% from 4 insulin-dependent diabetics, 66% from 2 generalized juvenile periodontitis patients, and 55% from 25 localized juvenile periodontitis patients produced leukotoxin. The same subject could harbor both leukotoxin-producing and -nonproducing isolates. The significantly higher proportion of leukotoxin-producing isolates in the disease groups compared with the healthy group is consistent with the hypothesis that leukotoxin from A. actinomycetemcomitans is an important virulence factor in the pathogenesis of certain forms of periodontal disease. PMID:6572616

  17. Cellular fatty acid composition of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Haemophilus aphrophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Braunthal, S D; Holt, S C; Tanner, A C; Socransky, S S

    1980-01-01

    Strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolated from deep pockets of patients with juvenile periodontitis were analyzed for their content of cellular fatty acids. Oral Haemophilus strains, morphologically and biochemically similar to Haemophilus aphrophilus, were also examined for their content of cellular fatty acids. The extractable lipids of the actinobacilli represented approximately 10% of the cell dry weight, with the bound lipids representing 2 to 5%. The major fatty acids consisted of myristic (C14:0) and palmitic (C16:0) acids and a C16:1 acid, possibly palmitoleic acid, accounting for 21, 35, and 31% of the total extractable fatty acids, respectively. Haemophilus strains had a similar cellular fatty acid content. PMID:7430333

  18. Intra- and Interspecies Regulation of Gene Expression by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans LuxS

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Karen P.; Chung, Whasun O.; Lamont, Richard J.; Demuth, Donald R.

    2001-01-01

    The cell density-dependent control of gene expression is employed by many bacteria for regulating a variety of physiological functions, including the generation of bioluminescence, sporulation, formation of biofilms, and the expression of virulence factors. Although periodontal organisms do not appear to secrete acyl-homoserine lactone signals, several species, e.g., Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum, have recently been shown to secrete a signal related to the autoinducer II (AI-2) of the signal system 2 pathway in Vibrio harveyi. Here, we report that the periodontal pathogen Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans expresses a homolog of V. harveyi luxS and secretes an AI-2-like signal. Cell-free conditioned medium from A. actinomycetemcomitans or from a recombinant Escherichia coli strain (E. coli AIS) expressing A. actinomycetemcomitans luxS induced luminescence in V. harveyi BB170 >200-fold over controls. AI-2 levels peaked in mid-exponential-phase cultures of A. actinomycetemcomitans and were significantly reduced in late-log- and stationary-phase cultures. Incubation of early-log-phase A. actinomycetemcomitans cells with conditioned medium from A. actinomycetemcomitans or from E. coli AIS resulted in a threefold induction of leukotoxic activity and a concomitant increase in leukotoxin polypeptide. In contrast, no increase in leukotoxin expression occurred when cells were exposed to sterile medium or to conditioned broth from E. coli AIS−, a recombinant strain in which luxS was insertionally inactivated. A. actinomycetemcomitans AI-2 also induced expression of afuA, encoding a periplasmic iron transport protein, approximately eightfold, suggesting that LuxS-dependent signaling may play a role in the regulation of iron acquisition by A. actinomycetemcomitans. Finally, A. actinomycetemcomitans AI-2 added in trans complemented a luxS knockout mutation in P. gingivalis by modulating the expression of the lux

  19. Aggregatibacter aphrophilus brain abscess secondary to primary tooth extraction: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Maraki, Sofia; Papadakis, Ioannis S; Chronakis, Efkleidis; Panagopoulos, Dimitrios; Vakis, Antonis

    2016-02-01

    We report on a rare case of Aggregatibacter aphrophilus brain abscess of odontogenic origin in a 6-year-old previously healthy boy, who had close contact with a pet dog. The poodle was the most likely source of the infecting organism, which subsequently colonized the patient's oral cavity. The abscess was surgically removed and he recovered completely after prolonged antibiotic treatment with meropenem. We also review the relevant medical literature on A. aphrophilus pediatric brain abscesses.

  20. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and localized juvenile periodontitis. Clinical, microbiologic and histologic studies.

    PubMed

    Christersson, L A

    1993-01-01

    The present studies examined Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and its role in localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP). The distribution of the bacteria was studied in healthy normals, patients with adult periodontitis, diabetics, and those with LJP. Over 95% of the LJP patients harbored A. actinomycetemcomitans, whereas only 17% of healthy subjects, 21% of adult periodontitis patients, and 5% of diabetics were positive. All members of a LJP family harboring the organism yielded isolates of the same biotype and serotype. The transmission of the bacteria was studied after transfer of the bacteria, with periodontal probes from infected to healthy gingival sites, within the oral cavity of LJP patients. Newly colonized gingival sites, 50% of those involved, became free of A. actinomycetemcomitans after only 3 weeks. A purposely forceful inoculation contributed to a more predictable colonization (89%), but only prolonged the colonization with one week. Treatment of LJP lesions with scaling and root planing resulted in minimal clinical and microbiological changes during a 16 week follow-up period. However, gingival curettage and modified Widman flap surgery suppressed A. actinomycetemcomitans in 75% and 89% of the sites, and resulted in resolution of periodontal pocket depth and gain in attachment level. Gingival tissue specimens, from 35 LJP sites, 3 control sites, and one monkey biopsy, were studied to verify the hypothesis of gingival infiltration of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Bacteria were identified immunohistologically with rabbit antisera serospecific to the three A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes. Positive staining was observed in the tissue from all but one LJP patient. Twenty-eight (80%) lesions were positive for A. actinomycetemcomitans antigens in the gingival connective tissue, often with antigens located both between and within cells. The specimen from a culture positive control demonstrated no signs of invasion, similar to the monkey specimen

  1. In vitro susceptibilities of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to a number of antimicrobial combinations.

    PubMed Central

    Pavicić, M J; van Winkelhoff, A J; de Graaff, J

    1992-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibilities of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to 14 antimicrobial combinations were studied by using the checkerboard titration technique. The results, expressed as the range of the fractional inhibitory concentration indices, were as follows: for metronidazole or its hydroxymetabolite combined with cefixime, 0.2 to 0.6; for moxalactam, 0.2 to 0.6; for penicillin G, 0.3 to 0.6; for tobramycin, 0.8 to 2.0; for erythromycin, 0.8 to 1.7; for ciprofloxacin, 0.2 to 0.6; for tetracycline, 0.8 to 1.2. Our observations indicated that the beta-lactam antibiotics as well as ciprofloxacin act synergistically with both metronidazole and its hydroxymetabolite against A. actinomycetemcomitans. Synergistic interactions were independent of the individual MICs of the antibiotics tested. Erythromycin, tobramycin, and tetracycline combined with either metronidazole or its hydroxymetabolite showed additive to indifferent effects against the five strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans, with the fractional inhibitory concentration indices ranging from 0.8 to 2.0. A. actinomycetemcomitans was found to be highly susceptible to ciprofloxacin (MIC of ciprofloxacin for 90% of strains tested, 0.010 micrograms/ml) and cefixime (MIC of cefixime for 90% of strains tested, 0.8 micrograms/ml). The results indicate that in patients who are allergic to penicillin, cefixime and ciprofloxacin may be useful alternative antibiotics in combination with metronidazole for the treatment of A. actinomycetemcomitans-associated periodontitis. PMID:1482130

  2. Opsonic antibody activity against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in patients with rapidly progressive periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Sjöström, K; Darveau, R; Page, R; Whitney, C; Engel, D

    1992-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans has been closely associated with early-onset, severe periodontitis, and such patients often have serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies reactive with antigens of this gram-negative pathogen. We examined the functionality and potential importance of these antibodies. The opsonic activity against A. actinomycetemcomitans of sera from 30 patients with rapidly progressive periodontitis (RPP) and from 28 periodontally normal subjects was tested by using polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) chemiluminescence and bactericidal assays. Peak chemiluminescence values correlated strongly with killing observed in the PMN-dependent bactericidal assay (r = 0.88; P < 0.001). Neither the mean IgG titer nor the mean peak chemiluminescence differed significantly between the two groups. However, when the relationship between chemiluminescence and titer was examined, regression analysis showed that antibodies present in low-titer normal sera were significantly more effective at opsonizing A. actinomycetemcomitans than antibodies present in low-titer RPP patient sera (P = 0.04). Thus, periodontally normal individuals may be better able than RPP patients to clear A. actinomycetemcomitans in early stages of colonization, and anti-A. actinomycetemcomitans antibodies in RPP patients may be relatively ineffective in preventing infection by this organism. PMID:1398993

  3. Presence of bacteriophage Aa phi 23 correlates with the population genetic structure of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Haubek, D; Willi, K; Poulsen, K; Meyer, J; Kilian, M

    1997-02-01

    Several bacteriophages associated with the oral bacterium Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans have been identified. Lysogeny might affect the virulence of this bacterium, which has been implicated in the etiology of juvenile and adult periodontitis. We have determined the presence of bacteriophage Aa phi 23-related DNA sequences among 185 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains belonging to 2 well-characterized collections and have related the findings to the population genetic structure of the collections. 2 cloned Aa phi 23-specific DNA probes were used in Southern blot hybridization experiments to detect homologous sequences in whole-cell DNA of the strains. DNA from 65 (35%) of the 185 strains hybridized to either of the DNA probes. The majority (74%) of the hybridizing strains showed an identical hybridization pattern, indicating presence of phage Aa phi 23. Whole-cell DNA from the remaining hybridizing strains hybridized to the probes with different patterns, indicating that DNA sequences related to but different from phage Aa phi 23 occur in these strains. The majority (81%) of the strains which harbored phage Aa phi 23 were of serotype a, whereas serotype d strains appeared to be resistant to infection with this phage. There was a clear correlation between hybridization patterns and genetic subdivisions based on our previous population genetic analyses of A. actinomycetemcomitans. However, there was no significant correlation between occurrence of Aa phi 23 among A. actinomycetemcomitans strains and the periodontal status of the patients from whom the isolates were obtained, suggesting that this bacteriophage does not significantly influence the virulence of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  4. Structural proteins of the Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans bacteriophage phi Aa.

    PubMed

    Stevens, R H; Hammond, B F; Fine, D H

    1990-08-01

    øAa is an A1 morphotype bacteriophage which infects certain strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis of dissociated, purified phi Aa particles revealed 7 major structural proteins (P1-P7) ranging in size from 17.5 to 52.7 kilodaltons (Kd). Treatment of the intact phage particles with 67% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) resulted in the separation of the virion head and tail subunits. Purification of the head subunits was accomplished by sucrose density gradient centrifugation of the DMSO-treated phage particles. The purified head subunits were composed of a single protein having an electrophoretic mobility which corresponded to a 39.5 Kd protein (P3) of the intact virus. Raising the pH of a purified phi Aa suspension to 12.7 disrupted the head subunits, as well as the tail tube and tail fibers, releasing intact contractile tail sheaths. The tail sheaths were collected by centrifugation. The purified tail sheaths were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and were found to be composed of two proteins (P1 and P2) having molecular weights of 52.7 and 41.2 Kd respectively. The location of each of the 4 remaining major structural proteins in the phi Aa virion remains to be determined.

  5. The heat-modifiable outer membrane protein of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans: relationship to OmpA proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, M E

    1991-01-01

    The outer membrane of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans contains a 29-kDa protein which exhibits heat modifiability on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and represents a major target for immunoglobulin G antibody in sera of periodontitis patients colonized by this organism. In the present study, the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the 29-kDa outer membrane protein was determined and compared with reported sequences for other known proteins. The heat-modifiable outer membrane protein of A. actinomycetemcomitans was found to exhibit significant N-terminal homology with the OmpA proteins of other gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, this protein reacted with antiserum raised against the purified OmpA protein of Escherichia coli K-12. Whether the heat-modifiable OMP of A. actinomycetemcomitans also shares functional properties of OmpA proteins, particularly with respect to bacteriophage receptor activity, is presently under investigation. Images PMID:2050416

  6. Evidence for invasion of a human oral cell line by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, D H; Sreenivasan, P K; Fives-Taylor, P M

    1991-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, an oral bacterial species associated with periodontal disease, was found to invade human cell lines. Invasion was demonstrated by recovery of viable organisms from gentamicin-treated KB cell monolayers and by light and electron microscopy. Internalization occurred through a cytochalasin D-sensitive process. Invasion efficiencies of some A. actinomycetemcomitans strains were comparable to those of invasive members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Differences in invasiveness were correlated with bacterial colonial morphology. Smooth variants invaded more proficiently than rough variants. A. actinomycetemcomitans can undergo a smooth-to-rough colonial morphology shift which results in the loss of invasiveness. Coordinated regulation of genes involved in the rough-to-smooth phenotypic transitions may play a role in the episodic nature of periodontal disease. Images PMID:1855989

  7. Subclass and molecular form of immunoglobulin A antibodies to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, T A; Byres, L; Gardner, M; Van Dyke, T E

    1991-01-01

    Patients with juvenile periodontitis frequently have elevated levels of serum immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies to antigens of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. IgA occurs in two subclasses, IgA1 and IgA2, and in monomeric and polymeric forms. Because IgA1 is susceptible to cleavage by IgA1 proteases produced by microorganisms found at mucosal sites and in the gingival crevice, we wished to determine the IgA subclass distribution of antibodies to antigens of A. actinomycetemcomitans. The molecular form was examined because it may indicate the origin of the IgA and because the form differs in acute and chronic infections. There is also evidence that monomeric and polymeric IgA have different biological functions. Serum was taken from patients with juvenile periodontitis before and at intervals during and after initiation of therapy. IgA subclass distribution was determined against a sonic extracts of A. actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 2952a (serotype b) by using monoclonal anti-subclass reagents in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. To determine the molecular form of the antibodies, sera were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography on a size-exclusion column. Fractions were assayed for antibody activity by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and described above. The results of the subclass analysis of the sera indicated that while both IgA1 and IgA2 antibodies to A. actinomycetemcomitans sonic extract are often found before, during, and after treatment, IgA1 antibodies dominated the response. There was a predominance of monomeric IgA1 antibodies to A. actinomycetemcomitans sonic extracts in most samples before, during, and after treatment. The monomeric form is consistent with what is seen in other chronic infections. The predominance of IgA1 antibodies implies that any protective effects of the IgA response to A. actinomycetemcomitans could be compromised by microbial IgA1 proteases. PMID:1997415

  8. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strains Y4 and N27 adhere to hydroxyapatite by distinctive mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Kagermeier, A S; London, J

    1985-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strains Y4 and N27 absorb to spheroidal hydroxyapatite in roughly the same numbers per milligram of substrate and with the same tenacity as two previously tested Cytophaga species. Although the two strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans exhibited similar affinities and number of binding sites for SHA, their response to enzyme treatment and heating were very different. The capacity of strain Y4 to attach to spheroidal hydroxyapatite was diminished by treatment with proteases and phospholipases and was unaffected by neuraminidase, while strain N27 was unaffected by proteases and phospholipases and lost its binding capabilities when treated with neuraminidase. Images PMID:3972445

  9. Lipopolysaccharide characteristics of pathogenic campylobacters.

    PubMed Central

    Perez Perez, G I; Blaser, M J

    1985-01-01

    Most Campylobacter jejuni strains are sensitive and most Campylobacter fetus strains are resistant to the bactericidal activity in normal human serum. We purified lipopolysaccharides from Campylobacter strains to determine whether their composition and structure relate to serum susceptibility. The lipopolysaccharide of two serum-sensitive strains was best isolated by the Galanos procedure, but for two serum-resistant strains a cold-ethanol extraction was optimal. For each lipopolysaccharide preparation, the ratio of 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate to protein was increased by 100 to 1,000-fold over that of whole cells. For serum-resistant strains, total carbohydrates was a high proportion of lipopolysaccharide weight; for serum-sensitive strains, 2-keto-3-deoxyoctanate was a high proportion of total carbohydrates. By polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the lipopolysaccharide of serum-sensitive strains appeared rough, but for serum-resistant strains a smooth-type ladder was seen, with a minimal core region and several high-molecular-weight complexes. Proteinase K-treated whole-cell lysates showed polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis profiles similar to that of pure lipopolysaccharide. Proteinase K-treated whole-cell lysates from seven serum-sensitive C. jejuni strains all had rough profiles, and five serum-resistant C. fetus strains all had smooth profiles. These studies indicate that lipopolysaccharide composition may be an important determinant of serum susceptibility among Campylobacter species and that serum resistance is usually associated with a smooth-type lipopolysaccharide. Images PMID:3967920

  10. Identification of genomic clonal types of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by restriction endonuclease analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Han, N; Hoover, C I; Winkler, J R; Ng, C Y; Armitage, G C

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate its utility in discriminating different strains, restriction endonuclease analysis was applied to 12 strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (3 serotype a, 5 serotype b, and 4 serotype c strains). DNA isolated from each strain was digested by 12 different restriction endonucleases, and the electrophoretic banding patterns of the resulting DNA fragments were compared. The DNA fragment patterns produced by SalI, XhoI, and XbaI for the 12 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains were simple (less than 30 bands) and allowed us to recognize easily 10 distinct genomic clonal types. The three serotype a strains exhibited distinctly different clonal types from one another, the five serotype b strains exhibited an additional four distinct clonal types, and the four serotype c strains showed another three different clonal types. The other endonucleases tested were less useful in typing A. actinomycetemcomitans. We conclude that restriction endonuclease analysis is a powerful tool for typing and discerning genetic heterogeneity and homogeneity among A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. It should, therefore, be very useful for epidemiologic studies. Images PMID:1761677

  11. Differential regulation of the leukotoxin operon in highly leukotoxic and minimally leukotoxic strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Hritz, M; Fisher, E; Demuth, D R

    1996-01-01

    The expression of the leukotoxin (ltx) operon varies significantly among Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strains. The dual promoters driving ltx expression in the highly toxic strain JP2 have been previously characterized (J. M. Brogan, E. T. Lally, K. Poulsen, M. Kilian, and D. R. Demuth, Infect. Immun. 62:501-508, 1994), and genetic analyses of A. actinomycetemcomitans suggest that highly toxic strains like JP2 arose from minimally toxic strains, presumably by deletion of a 530-bp domain within the ltx promoter region (K. Poulsen, E. Theilade, E.T. Lally, D. R. Demuth, and M. Kilian, Microbiology 140:2049-2060, 1994). However, the ltx promoter of minimally toxic A. actinomycetemcomitans strains has not been well characterized. In this study, deletion and primer extension analyses showed that the ltx promoter of A. actinomycetemcomitans 652 is situated approximately 150 bp upstream of the ltxC gene and initiates transcription 138 nucleotides upstream of ltxC. In contrast to strain JP2, only a single promoter appears to drive ltx expression in 652. The 652 promoter resides within the 530-bp region that is absent from the JP2 promoter sequence, suggesting that the specific sequences controlling ltx expression differ in highly toxic and minimally toxic A. actinomycetemcomitans strains. In addition, ltx expression in strain 652 was shown to be induced three- to fourfold when cells were grown under anaerobic conditions. The induction of whole cell leukotoxicity, was accompanied by increases in the levels of Ltx polypeptide and the steady-state levels of ltx mRNA, suggesting that regulation occurred at the level of transcription. In contrast, the levels of leukotoxicity, Ltx polypeptide, and fix mRNA in strain JP2 were unaffected by anaerobic growth. These results suggest that the ltx operon is differentially regulated in highly toxic and minimally toxic A. actinomycetemcomitans strains and that the sequences controlling the oxygen-dependent regulation of ltx

  12. Effect of adoptive transfer of cloned Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-specific T helper cells on periodontal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, K; Eastcott, J W; Taubman, M A; Smith, D J; Cox, D S

    1991-01-01

    Previously we isolated several Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-specific T-cell clones from the spleens and lymph nodes of immunized Rowett rats. These clones were characterized as W3/13+, W3/25+, OX8-, and OX22-, suggesting a T helper (Th) phenotype. In the current experiments, 10(6) cells from a single A. actinomycetemcomitans-specific clone (A3) were adoptively transferred to a group (AaTh; n = 13) of normal heterozygous rats (rnu/+) at 28 days of age. A second group received no T cells (AaNT; n = 15), and a third group also received no T cells (NAaNT, n = 11). Beginning 1 day after transfer, the first and second groups were infected orally with A. actinomycetemcomitans for 5 consecutive days. The presence of infection was confirmed immediately after challenge and after 5 months, when the experiments were ended. Significantly higher numbers of lymphocytes were recovered from the gingival tissues of the first group than from those of either of the other groups. Also, this group showed significantly elevated (P less than 0.01) serum immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M antibody to A. actinomycetemcomitans in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay when compared with both other groups. Bone loss was significantly lower (P less than 0.01) in recipients of A. actinomycetemcomitans-specific cloned cells when compared with the other infected group and was approximately equal to the bone loss of the uninfected group. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that T-cell regulation can affect periodontal disease. In this regulation, T helper cells appear to interfere with periodontal bone loss. PMID:1825991

  13. Lipopolysaccharides in diazotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Serrato, Rodrigo V

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a process in which the atmospheric nitrogen (N2) is transformed into ammonia (NH3) by a select group of nitrogen-fixing organisms, or diazotrophic bacteria. In order to furnish the biologically useful nitrogen to plants, these bacteria must be in constant molecular communication with their host plants. Some of these molecular plant-microbe interactions are very specific, resulting in a symbiotic relationship between the diazotroph and the host. Others are found between associative diazotrophs and plants, resulting in plant infection and colonization of internal tissues. Independent of the type of ecological interaction, glycans, and glycoconjugates produced by these bacteria play an important role in the molecular communication prior and during colonization. Even though exopolysaccharides (EPS) and lipochitooligosaccharides (LCO) produced by diazotrophic bacteria and released onto the environment have their importance in the microbe-plant interaction, it is the lipopolysaccharides (LPS), anchored on the external membrane of these bacteria, that mediates the direct contact of the diazotroph with the host cells. These molecules are extremely variable among the several species of nitrogen fixing-bacteria, and there are evidences of the mechanisms of infection being closely related to their structure.

  14. Extraction and isolation of a leukotoxin from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans with polymyxin B.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C C; Shenker, B J; DiRienzo, J M; Malamud, D; Taichman, N S

    1984-01-01

    A leukotoxin from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was isolated by a procedure that includes polymyxin B extraction, ion-exchange chromatography, and gel filtration chromatography. The procedure resulted in the recovery of 48% of the toxin with a 99-fold increase in specific activity. The isolated toxin has a molecular mass of 180,000 daltons by gel filtration and 115,000 daltons by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. It retains all the major biological characteristics previously documented for crude leukotoxin preparations, including susceptibility to heat and proteolytic enzymes and neutralization by sera from patients with juvenile periodontitis. The isolated leukotoxin destroys human but not rat or guinea pig polymorphonuclear leukocytes and has no apparent effect on human erythrocytes. The availability of the A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin should facilitate studies on its chemistry and mode of action as well as its role in the pathogenesis of human periodontal disease. Images PMID:6319288

  15. Cellular fatty acid and soluble protein composition of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and related organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Calhoon, D A; Mayberry, W R; Slots, J

    1981-01-01

    The cellular fatty acid and protein content of twenty-five representative strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetecomitans isolated from juvenile and adult periodontitis patients was compared to that of 15 reference strains of oral and nonoral Actinobacillus species and Haemophilus aphrophilus. Trimethylsilyl derivatives of the fatty acid methyl esters were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography. The predominant fatty acids of all 40 strains examined were 14:0, 3-OH 14:0, 16 delta, and 16:0. Actinobacillus seminis (ATCC 15768) was unlike the other strains examined because of a greater amount of 14:0 detected. The soluble protein analysis using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that A. actinomycetemcomitans, H. aphrophilus, and nonoral Actinobacillus species possessed distinct protein profiles attesting to the validity of separating these organisms into different species. Established biotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans could not be differentiated on the basis of fatty acid or protein profiles. PMID:7287893

  16. Immune suppression induced by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans: effects on immunoglobulin production by human B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shenker, B J; Vitale, L A; Welham, D A

    1990-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans produces an immunosuppressive factor (ISF) which has been shown to suppress mitogen- and antigen-induced DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis in human T lymphocytes. In this study, we examined purified A. actinomycetemcomitans ISF for its ability to alter immunoglobulin production by human B cells. The ISF caused a dose-dependent inhibition of pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-induced immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM production. Preexposure to ISF was not required to achieve maximal inhibition of immunoglobulin synthesis, as previously observed for its effect on T-cell activation. Nevertheless, the ISF appeared to act by irreversibly affecting the early stages of cell activation. While PWM-induced immunoglobulin production is under the influence of T-regulatory circuits, it appears that the ISF interacts directly with B cells. First, ISF failed to alter either the synthesis of interleukin-2 (IL-2) or the expression of IL-2 receptors on T cells. Second, experiments in which individual purified populations of cells were exposed to ISF, washed, and placed back into tissue culture indicated that when all cells (i.e., T cells, B cells, and monocytes) were exposed to ISF, significant suppression was observed. However, when only one cell population was treated with ISF, suppression of both IgG and IgM synthesis was observed only when the B-cell-enriched population was exposed to ISF. These results in conjunction with our earlier findings suggest that the ISF functions via the activation of a regulatory subpopulation of B lymphocytes, which in turn either directly or indirectly (via suppressor T cells) downregulate both B- and T-cell responsiveness. Furthermore, it is hypothesized that patients who harbor A. actinomycetemcomitans could suffer from local or systemic immune suppression. This suppression may enhance the pathogenicity of A. actinomycetemcomitans itself or that of some other opportunistic organism. Images PMID:2254014

  17. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans serotype e--biotypes, genetic diversity and distribution in relation to periodontal status.

    PubMed

    Doğan, B; Saarela, M H; Jousimies-Somer, H; Alaluusua, S; Asikainen, S

    1999-04-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolates from 356 individuals were screened for identification of serotype e in order to investigate its distribution in relation to periodontal status. From subjects with serotype e, 1-6 isolates per subject (n = 61) were genotyped using arbitrarily primed-polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR) and apaH gene polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment-length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis to determine the genetic heterogeneity within the serotype. Furthermore, one serotype e strain per subject was tested for fermentation of 8 carbohydrates for biotyping. Among patients with adult periodontitis (n = 219), localized juvenile periodontitis (n = 55) and other forms of early-onset periodontitis (n = 18) serotypes b, a and c, respectively, were the most frequently detected serotypes. Non-periodontitis subjects (n = 64) were predominantly colonized with serotype c. Serotype e was found in 30 (14%) adult periodontitis patients, 2 (11%) early-onset periodontitis patients and in 5 (8%) non-periodontitis individuals, but in none of the 55 localized juvenile periodontitis patients. AP-PCR distinguished 3 and apaH gene PCR-RFLP analysis 2 genotypes among the 61 A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype e isolates, one genotype per subject. The AP-PCR genotypes 1 and 3 represented the apaH genotype 1 and the AP-PCR genotype 2 the apaH genotype 2. On the basis of variable fermentation of galactose and xylose, 3 biotypes among A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype e were established. Contrary to the absence of A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype e in localized juvenile periodontitis patients, its detection frequency was comparable among other forms of periodontitis and periodontal health. Clinical serotype e isolates form at least 2 genetic types and 3 biotypes.

  18. DNA analysis of temperate bacteriophage Aa(phi)23 isolated from actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Willi, K; Meyer, J

    1998-05-01

    The DNA of the temperate bacteriophage Aaphi23 isolated from the oral bacterium Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was examined structurally both in the phage head and in the prophage. The DNA in phage particles comprises 44 kb linear molecules with a terminal redundancy of 1.6 kb, which represent circular permutations. Thus, DNA is packaged into phage heads by the headful mechanism. The Aaphi23 prophage is integrated into the host chromosome.

  19. Luteolin inhibits lipopolysaccharide actions on human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Kawasaki-Cárdenas, Perla; Arroyo-Cruz, Santa Rita; Maldonado-Frías, Silvia

    2006-07-10

    Periodontal disease comprises a group of infections that lead to inflammation of the gingiva, periodontal tissue destruction, and in severe cases is accompanied by alveolar bone loss with tooth exfoliation. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a Gram-negative microorganism, which possesses and produces lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules that play a key role in disease development. Human gingival fibroblasts are the major constituents of gingival connective tissue and may interact directly with bacteria and bacterial products including LPS. Flavonoids possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that reduce inflammatory molecule expression in macrophages and monocytes. In this study, we evaluated the ability of diverse flavonoids to regulate nitric oxide production of LPS-stimulated human gingival fibroblasts, and studied the effect of luteolin on diminish phosphorylation in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members as well as in protein kinase B (Akt), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) activation, inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression, and nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. We also found that pretreatment with three flavonoids, including quercetin, genistein, and luteolin, blocked nitric oxide synthesis in a dose-dependent fashion. Luteolin exerted the strongest blocking action on expression of this inflammatory mediator. Luteolin pretreatment attenuated LPS-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, and Akt phosphorylation. LPS treatment of human gingival fibroblasts resulted in NF-kappaB translocation. Cell pretreatment with luteolin abolished LPS effects on NF-kappaB translocation. In addition, luteolin treatment blocked LPS-induced cellular proliferation inhibition without affecting genetic material integrity. We concluded that luteolin interferes with LPS signaling pathways, reducing activation of several mitogen-activated protein kinase family members, and inhibits inflammatory mediator expression.

  20. Immunoglobulin class and subclass distribution of antibodies reactive with the immunodominant antigen of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans serotype b.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, H; Califano, J V; Schenkein, H A; Tew, J G

    1993-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the immunodominant antigens of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans serotype b (Aab) for the different immunoglobulin (Ig) classes and subclasses and to determine the relative levels of these different Igs in serum. Seropositive early-onset periodontitis patients were sampled, and the Ig classes IgG, IgA, and IgM and subclasses IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4, IgA1, and IgA2 were studied. Reactivity with Aab antigens was assessed by using the Western blot (immunoblot) in limiting dilution analysis and radioimmunoassay with sera from 13 early-onset periodontitis subjects. A smeared antigen in the upper portion of the immunoblots, typical of high-molecular-weight LPS, was immunodominant for IgG, IgA, IgM, IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgA1, and IgA2. This smeared antigen was present in every patient for all of these Igs at the endpoint. A few additional antigens were also present at the endpoint in some patients, but none were present in more than half of the subjects. The distribution of antibody titers by Ig classes reactive with the Aab immunodominant antigen was IgG > IgA > IgM. The distribution of antibody titers by IgG subclass was IgG2 > IgG1 approximately IgG3. Further quantitation by radioimmunoassay revealed that the mean concentration of IgG2 (65.7 micrograms/ml) was significantly greater than that of IgG1 (8.8 micrograms/ml). The IgA subclass distribution was IgA1 >> IgA2, with IgA1 apparently being second only to IgG2. Therefore, the Aab antigen eliciting the highest antibody level in virtually all Ig classes and subclasses appeared to be lipopolysaccharide, and IgG2 was markedly elevated over all other serum Ig classes or subclasses reactive with Aab. Images PMID:8500879

  1. Nucleotide sequence of the leukotoxin gene from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans: homology to the alpha-hemolysin/leukotoxin gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Kraig, E; Dailey, T; Kolodrubetz, D

    1990-01-01

    The leukotoxin produced by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans has been implicated in the etiology of localized juvenile periodontitis. To initiate a genetic analysis into the role of this protein in disease, we have cloned its gene, lktA. We now present the complete nucleotide sequence of the lktA gene from A. actinomycetemcomitans. When the deduced amino acid sequence of the leukotoxin protein was compared with those of other proteins, it was found to be homologous to the leukotoxin from Pasteurella haemolytica and to the alpha-hemolysins from Escherichia coli and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Each alignment showed at least 42% identity. As in the other organisms, the lktA gene of A. actinomycetemcomitans was linked to another gene, lktC, which is thought to be involved in the activation of the leukotoxin. The predicted LktC protein was related to the leukotoxin/hemolysin C proteins from the other bacteria, since they shared a minimum of 49% amino acid identity. Surprisingly, although actinobacillus species are more closely related to pasteurellae than to members of the family Enterobacteriaciae, LktA and LktC from A. actinomycetemcomitans shared significantly greater sequence identity with the E. coli alpha-hemolysin proteins than with the P. haemolytica leukotoxin proteins. Despite the overall homology to the other leukotoxin/hemolysin proteins, the LktA protein from A. actinomycetemcomitans has several unique properties. Most strikingly, it is a very basic protein with a calculated pI of 9.7; the other toxins have estimated pIs around 6.2. The unusual features of the A. actinomycetemcomitans protein are discussed in light of the different species and target-cell specificities of the hemolysins and the leukotoxins. Images PMID:2318535

  2. Regulation of leukotoxin in leukotoxic and nonleukotoxic strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Spitznagel, J; Kraig, E; Kolodrubetz, D

    1991-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a gram-negative bacterium that has been implicated in the etiology of several forms of periodontitis, especially localized juvenile periodontitis. A potent leukotoxin (Lkt) is produced by most A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates from patients with periodontal disease, but some isolates are leukotoxin nonproducing (Lkt-). The molecular bases for the differences in leukotoxin expression are being explored to clarify the role of leukotoxin in pathogenesis. We have previously cloned the leukotoxin structural gene, lktA, from the leukotoxin-producing (Lkt+) strain JP2 and have shown that it is linked to three other genes, lktB, lktC, and lktD, whose gene products are thought to be required for activation and localization of the leukotoxin. These genes have now been used in Southern blot analysis to demonstrate that Lkt- strains, like Lkt+ strains, contain all four genes of the lkt gene cluster. While restriction fragment length polymorphisms were detected, they did not correlate with toxin phenotype. RNA blot analysis demonstrated that Lkt+ strains produced two transcripts, one 9.3 kb in length and the other 4.3 kb. They encode lktCABD and lktCA. respectively. Lkt- strains contained significantly lower levels of the 4.3-kb transcript with no discernible 9.3-kb message. The leukotoxic activity of the A. actinomycetemcomitans strains, measured by chromium release assays, correlated with the lkt RNA content. Therefore, a major component of leukotoxin regulation is at the level of RNA transcription or stability. Interestingly, the lkt RNAs in JP2 are regulated during growth phase, being greatly reduced in cells approaching stationary phase. Thus, the regulation of lkt RNA can be affected by both genotype and environment. Images PMID:2004819

  3. Identification and characterization of genetic cluster groups of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolated from the human oral cavity.

    PubMed Central

    DiRienzo, J M; McKay, T L

    1994-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is recognized as a primary pathogen in localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP). Restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) within a collection of subgingival plaque isolates of this bacterium were identified and characterized as the first step in understanding the pathogenesis of LJP. Over 800 isolates, from members of 18 families (LJP families) with at least one member with active LJP or a documented history of the disease and one or more siblings, less than 13 years of age, having no clinical evidence of LJP and 32 healthy control subjects, were assigned to one of 13 distinct RFLP groups (II to XIV) by using a previously characterized 4.7-kb DNA probe cloned from the reference strain FDC Y4. Isolates belonging to RFLP groups II, IV, V, and XIII predominated subgingival sites in the subjects. Members of RFLP groups II, IV, VII, VIII, X, and XI were recovered only from LJP family subjects, while group XIII and XIV variants were found exclusively in healthy controls. A synthetic oligonucleotide, homologous to the 5' end of the leukotoxin gene (lktA), and the A. actinomycetemcomitans plasmid, pVT745, were tested for their abilities to subdivide the 13 RFLP groups. The leukotoxin probe specifically identified all RFLP group II variants because of the absence of a HindIII site in the upstream noncoding region of the lkt gene complex. The plasmid probe was not as selective but may be useful for identifying clinical isolates belonging to RFLP group I. The use of these probes for the identification of genetic variants of A. actinomycetemcomitans that may be preferentially colonize diseased and healthy subjects will facilitate the study of the role of this important pathogen in periodontal diseases. Images PMID:7907346

  4. Killing of human myelomonocytic leukemia and lymphocytic cell lines by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, D L; Berthold, P; Taichman, N S

    1988-01-01

    The purified leukotoxin of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans kills human leukemic cell lines (e.g., HL-60, U937, and KG-1) and human T- and B-cell lines (e.g., JURKAT, MOLT-4, Daudi, and Raji) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The 50% effective doses for these cell lines are similar to those established for human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes. In contrast, other human and nonhuman tumor cell lines are not susceptible to the leukotoxin. These human leukemia and lymphoid cell lines will serve as useful model systems with which to study the molecular specificity and mechanism(s) of action of the actinobacillus leukotoxin. Images PMID:3258584

  5. Cloning and sequencing of part of the S10 operon from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans FDC Y4.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, H; Hotokezaka, H; Ohara, N; Kimura, M; Takagi, O; Yamada, T

    1997-06-01

    We have cloned and sequenced the 5.2 kb EcoRI fragment that contained part of the S10 operon from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans FDC Y4. The order of the ribosomal protein genes was identical to that of the S10 operon of Haemophilus influenzae and Escherichia coli. The deduced amino acid sequences of ribosomal proteins in this operon displayed significant homologies (65.3%-100%) to those of H. influenzae, E. coli, Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Phylogenetic trees obtained for these ribosomal proteins were similar to that obtained for 16S rRNA.

  6. Unconventional N-Linked Glycosylation Promotes Trimeric Autotransporter Function in Kingella kingae and Aggregatibacter aphrophilus

    PubMed Central

    Rempe, Katherine A.; Spruce, Lynn A.; Porsch, Eric A.; Seeholzer, Steven H.; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glycosylation is a widespread mechanism employed by both eukaryotes and bacteria to increase the functional diversity of their proteomes. The nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae glycosyltransferase HMW1C mediates unconventional N-linked glycosylation of the adhesive protein HMW1, which is encoded in a two-partner secretion system gene cluster that also encodes HMW1C. In this system, HMW1 is modified in the cytoplasm by sequential transfer of hexose residues. In the present study, we examined Kingella kingae and Aggregatibacter aphrophilus homologues of HMW1C that are not encoded near a gene encoding an obvious acceptor protein. We found both homologues to be functional glycosyltransferases and identified their substrates as the K. kingae Knh and the A. aphrophilus EmaA trimeric autotransporter proteins. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis revealed multiple sites of N-linked glycosylation on Knh and EmaA. Without glycosylation, Knh and EmaA failed to facilitate wild-type levels of bacterial autoaggregation or adherence to human epithelial cells, establishing that glycosylation is essential for proper protein function. PMID:26307167

  7. Gene cloning of an Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 antigen which reacts with peripheral blood sera in patients with advanced destructive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, S; Hata, S; Ishikawa, I; Tsuchida, N

    1990-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans has been implicated in the aetiology of juvenile periodontitis and advanced destructive periodontitis. Levels of IgG antibody against A. actinomycetemcomitans in peripheral blood sera of patients with advanced destructive periodontitis are high, as are those against Bacteroides gingivalis. To clone the genes of antigens reactive with sera of such patients, a library of the A. actinomycetemcomitans strain Y4 DNA in lambda L47 was constructed and then screened, using an immunochemical detection method, with serum from a patient with the advanced disease. Six clones from among nearly 1000 reacted with the serum and also with that of another patient. They were designated 3, 4, 6, 7, 8 and 9. Restriction enzyme and Southern blot analyses indicated that clones 8 and 9 were identical and that all the clones were overlapping because they shared in common the 4 and 5 kbp HincII DNA fragments of A. actinomycetemcomitans. The cloned DNA fragment hybridized to the DNA of two other strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans but not to those of six periodontopathic bacteria examined. These findings suggest that a DNA sequence encoding an A. actinomycetemcomitans strain Y4 antigen strongly reactive with sera of patients with advanced destructive periodontitis was cloned. This sequence is present specifically in A. actinomycetemcomitans but not in other bacteria isolated from patients with periodontal diseases. Thus, the cloned DNA could serve as a probe for the diagnosis of periodontitis.

  8. Distinctive characteristics of transcriptional profiles from two epithelial cell lines upon interaction with Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Mans, J J; Baker, H V; Oda, D; Lamont, R J; Handfield, M

    2006-08-01

    Transcriptional profiling and gene ontology analyses were performed to investigate the unique responses of two different epithelial cell lines to an Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans challenge. A total of 2867 genes were differentially regulated among all experimental conditions. The analysis of these 2867 genes revealed that the predominant specific response to infection in HeLa cells was associated with the regulation of enzyme activity, RNA metabolism, nucleoside and nucleic acid transport and protein modification. The predominant specific response in immortalized human gingival keratinocytes (IHGK) was associated with the regulation of angiogenesis, chemotaxis, transmembrane receptor protein tyrosine kinase signaling, cell differentiation, apoptosis and response to stress. Of particular interest, stress response genes were significantly - yet differently - affected in both cell lines. In HeLa cells, only three regulated genes impacted the response to stress, and the response to unfolded protein was the only term that passed the ontology filters. This strikingly contrasted with the profiles obtained for IHGK, in which 61 regulated genes impacted the response to stress and constituted an extensive network of cell responses to A. actinomycetemcomitans interaction (response to pathogens, oxidative stress, unfolded proteins, DNA damage, starvation and wounding). Hence, while extensive similarities were found in the transcriptional profiles of these two epithelial cell lines, significant differences were highlighted. These differences were predominantly found in pathways that are associated with host-pathogen interactions.

  9. Identification and characterization of the major cell envelope proteins of oral strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Di Rienzo, J M; Spieler, E L

    1983-01-01

    The major cell envelope protein compositions of seven Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strains of human origin were compared by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The major envelope polypeptides were homogeneous, in relation to molecular weight, in all of the strains that were examined. The characterization of the five major proteins, designated Env1 through Env5, in the leukotoxic strain Y4 revealed that proteins Env2 to -5 may reside in the outer membrane as suggested by differential detergent extractions and 125I-labeling experiments. The proteins did not demonstrate covalent or ionic interactions with the peptidoglycan; however, one protein, Env2, displayed heat-modifiable properties, having apparent molecular weights of 32,000 and 45,000 when heated in sodium dodecyl sulfate at 50 and 100 degrees C, respectively. The protein composition of the extracellular "bleb" material, normally released by strain Y4, was determined, and proteins Env1 to -4 were the predominant protein species found. A comparison of the cell envelope proteins of strain Y4 with those of other members of the human oral flora, including species within the genera Capnocytophaga, Bacteroides, and Fusobacterium, revealed distinct differences on the basis of molecular size and heat-modifiable properties. However, the membrane proteins of Haemophilus aphrophilus showed a remarkable degree of homology with those of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Images PMID:6401694

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of MacA from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans

    SciTech Connect

    Piao, Shunfu; Xu, Yongbin; Ha, Nam-Chul

    2008-05-01

    A periplasmic membrane-fusion protein MacA from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, an essential component of the multidrug efflux pump in Gram-negative bacteria, was crystallized. Periplasmic membrane-fusion proteins (MFPs) are an essential component of the multidrug efflux pump in Gram-negative bacteria. They play a crucial role in bridging the outer membrane porin TolC and two distinct types of inner membrane transporters. The MFP MacA bridges the inner membrane ABC-type multidrug transporter MacB and the outer membrane porin TolC. MacA from the pathogenic bacterium Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was expressed in Escherichia coli B834 (DE3) and the recombinant protein was purified using Ni–NTA affinity, Q anion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatography. The purified MacA protein was crystallized using the vapour-diffusion method. A MAD diffraction data set was collected to a resolution of 3.0 Å at 100 K. The crystal belongs to space group P622, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 109.2, c = 255.4 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°, and contains one molecule in the asymmetric unit.

  11. Occurrence of temperate bacteriophages in different Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans serotypes isolated from periodontally healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Willi, K; Sandmeier, H; Asikainen, S; Saarela, M; Meyer, J

    1997-02-01

    The occurrence of temperate bacteriophages was studied in 34 isolates of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans derived from 27 periodontally healthy Finnish individuals both by lysis/plaque assays and by DNA hybridizations. In addition the serotype, the ribotype and the arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR) profile were determined for each A. actinomycetemcomitans strain. Fourteen isolates showed hybridization patterns very similar to that of a known lysogen when probed with the genome of the previously characterized temperate phage Aa phi 23. Only 6 of these 14 strains had produced lysis or single plaques on suitable indicator strains. Phage Aa phi 247 derived from one of these lysogens was indistinguishable from Aa phi 23 by electron microscopy, and the genomes showed highly related DNA hybridization patterns. The remaining 20 isolates exhibited hybridization patterns very different from that of Aa phi 23 DNA. Seven of these strains also gave lysis or single plaques, suggesting that 21 of the 34 strains were lysogenic. These data indicate that the prophages per se do not represent a virulence factor exclusively associated with periodontal disease. Presence of an Aa phi 23-related prophage correlated with serotype a and AP-PCR type 1 of the bacterial host. This may indicate that Aa phi 23 and related phages have a limited host range.

  12. Resistance of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and differential susceptibility of oral Haemophilus species to the bactericidal effects of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaki, K T; Wilson, M E; Reynolds, H S; Genco, R J

    1984-01-01

    We compared the sensitivities of oral and nonoral isolates of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Haemophilus segnis, H. aphrophilus, and H. paraphrophilus to the bactericidal action of reagent hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Susceptibility to a range of H2O2 concentrations (10(-6) to 10(-3) M) was assessed by incubating bacterial suspensions for 1 h at 37 degrees C in the presence of H2O2 and plating on chocolate agar to determine the concentration of H2O2 that would produce a 50% reduction in CFU (50% lethal dose). As a group, A. actinomycetemcomitans was more resistant to H2O2 than the oral haemophili, and H. aphrophilus was much more sensitive than all other organisms tested. The range of 50% lethal dose values for A. actinomycetemcomitans was between 8.5 X 10(-5) and 10(-3) M H2O2 or above. In contrast, H. aphrophilus exhibited 50% lethal dose values from below 1 X 10(-6) to 3.4 X 10(-4) M H2O2. The resistance of A. actinomycetemcomitans to H2O2 may be sufficient to protect these organisms from direct H2O2-mediated killing by host phagocytes. PMID:6500706

  13. Bacterial activation of human natural killer cells: role of cell surface lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Lindemann, R A

    1988-01-01

    Culture of human peripheral blood lymphocytes with gram-negative bacteria associated with periodontal disease caused a rapid increase in the cytotoxic potential of natural killer (NK) cells. The NK cells were activated to kill NK-resistant targets, the peak cytotoxicity occurring on day 1 of culture. The addition of anti-Tac, anti-CD3, or anti-OKT-11 antibodies to block activation via the interleukin-2 (IL-2), T-cell, or E rosette receptors had a minimal effect on this inductive process. Anti-IL-2 antiserum was effective in blocking a significant amount, but not all, of the cytotoxicity in bacterium-activated cultures. Modest IL-2 production (5 to 6 National Institutes of Health units) was measured in lymphocyte cultures activated by bacteria, but proliferation was not induced during a 1-week period. When polymixin B sulfate was added to bind and block lipopolysaccharides, bacterium-induced cytotoxicity was completely abrogated for all activating bacteria. In addition, when culture supernatants from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans were tested, activation still occurred. However, again, this activation was totally inhibited by polymixin B sulfate. Monocytes were also activated by bacteria to produce tumor necrosis factor (TNF). To exclude the possibility that TNF was responsible for cytotoxicity, an antiserum to TNF was added to cocultures of bacteria and lymphocytes with adherent cells removed. The antiserum had no effect on the inductive process. In addition, exogenous TNF did not kill M14 targets. These results suggest that bacterial cell surface lipopolysaccharides provide a major activation signal for NK cells to enhance cytotoxicity. PMID:2895743

  14. Association of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin with nucleic acids on the bacterial cell surface.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, H; Hara, H; Fukui, K; Kurihara, H; Murayama, Y; Kato, K

    1993-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, a periodontopathic gram-negative bacterium, produces a leukotoxin that is a member of the RTX cytotoxin family. Although genes may function in toxin secretion, the leukotoxin is not secreted extracellularly but remains associated with the bacterial cell surface. We report here that this toxin-cell surface association is mediated by nucleic acids and directly demonstrate that the extracellular secretion of toxin occurs in growing cultures with increased ionic strength of medium. All examinations were performed with freshly harvested A. actinomycetemcomitans 301-b from anaerobic fructose-limited chemostat cultures. The occurrence of cell surface-localized DNA was shown by directly digesting whole cells with the restriction endonuclease EcoRI or HindIII, which yielded many DNA fragments. The cell surface DNA constituted about 20% of the total cellular DNA. The leukotoxin was released from the whole cells by digestion with DNase I as well as restriction endonucleases. Because the leukotoxin binds ionically to DNA, it is dependent on the ionic strength of buffers or media. Accordingly, the toxin was released from cells suspended in saline at pH 7.5 in the presence of increasing amounts of MgCl2 (0 to 10 mM) or NaCl (0 to 50 mM). Moreover, a considerable quantity of leukotoxin was detected in the culture supernatant of fructose-limited chemostat cultures when sodium succinate solution was pumped into the steady state as an additional salt (30 and then 50 mM). This toxin-DNA association was also found in well-characterized strains including not only the leukotoxin-producing ATCC 29522 but also the toxin production-variable ATCC 29523 and the non-leukotoxin-producing ATCC 33384 when these strains were grown in the chemostat culture. Images PMID:8406888

  15. Despite large-scale T cell activation, only a minor subset of T cells responding in vitro to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans differentiate into effector T cells.

    PubMed

    Zadeh, H H; Tanavoli, S; Haines, D D; Kreutzer, D L

    2000-06-01

    Recent studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans has a potent T cell stimulatory effect, activating more than half of all T cells. However, since the fate of these activated T cells was not known, the present study sought to determine whether all of these T cells differentiate into effector cells. To that end, the intracellular expression of T cell cytokines (IL-2, IFN-gamma, IL-4 and IL-10) in response to A. actinomycetemcomitans was determined by flow cytometry. Results demonstrated a time-dependent increase in the expression of the cytokines, most reaching peak levels at 24-48 h. At 48 h, the proportion of T cells expressing each of the cytokines were as follows: IL-2 (1.7%+/-0.3), IFN-gamma (1.8%+/-0.5), IL-4 (1.0%+/-0.2) and IL-10 (1.5%+/-0.5). These data indicated that only 2-5% of all T cells stimulated with A. actinomycetemcomitans expressed any T cell cytokines. The finding of large-scale T cell activation in the absence of cytokine expression suggests that the activation of T cells in response to A. actinomycetemcomitans is incomplete. To investigate this phenomenon, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were cultured with A. actinomycetemcomitans for 24 h followed by sorting of the activated (CD69+) cells by immunomagnetic separation and restimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin. Results demonstrated that nearly 90% of the T cells were unresponsive to further restimulation. A possible explanation for this unresponsiveness is the induction of clonal anergy among the responding T cells. To determine possible preferential effects of the stimulation on specific cytokines, the expression of each cytokine among T cells responding to A. actinomycetemcomitans was compared to the maximum levels achieved by PMA + ionomycin stimulation. Results showed that number of IL-2+ and IFN-gamma+ T cells observed in response to A. actinomycetemcomitans were between 2% and 7% of those seen in

  16. cis Elements and trans factors are both important in strain-specific regulation of the leukotoxin gene in Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Kolodrubetz, D; Spitznagel, J; Wang, B; Phillips, L H; Jacobs, C; Kraig, E

    1996-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, the etiologic agent of localized juvenile periodontitis, produces a potent leukotoxin that kills human neutrophils. The production of leukotoxin RNA can vary more than 50-fold among isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans, and strains expressing high levels of leukotoxin RNA are most often found at sites of periodontal disease. To assess the relative contributions of transcription factors and promoter sequences in setting the disparate levels of leukotoxin RNA found, we have undertaken classical cis/trans analyses. First, the leukotoxin promoter regions from moderately leukotoxic (Y4) and minimally leukotoxic (ATCC 33384) strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans were cloned, sequenced, and compared with the previously sequences leukotoxin promoter region of the high-producer strain JP2. The Y4 and ATCC 33384 promoter regions each contain a 528-bp segment that is absent from JP2. Interestingly, the analysis of various deletion constructs in A. actinomycetemcomitans indicated that Y4, despite the large insertion, initiates leukotoxin RNA synthesis at the same promoter as JP2 does. To perform cis/trans analyses, these three leukotoxin promoter regions were cloned into a plasmid upstream of the reporter gene beta-galactosidase. Each plasmid was transformed into JP2, Y4, and ATCC 33384, and the beta-galactosidase levels were determined. The results indicated that the sequences responsible for down-regulating leukotoxin RNA levels in Y4 relative to JP2 are found within the transcribed region of the Y4 leukotoxin operon. Importantly, in ATCC 33384, strain-specific trans factors and promoter sequence differences are equally significant in determining the lower levels of leukotoxin RNA. We hypothesize that either strain ATCC 33384 has a negative regulatory protein (which is missing or mutated in JP2/Y4) or that JP2 and Y4 carry an activator that is missing or mutated in ATCC 33384. PMID:8751884

  17. Bacteriocin production by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolated from the oral cavity of humans with periodontal disease, periodontally healthy subjects and marmosets.

    PubMed

    Lúcia, Lima Francisca; Farias, Flávio F; Eustáquio, Costa José; Auxiliadora, Maria; Carvalho, R; Alviano, Celuta S; Farias, Luiz M

    2002-01-01

    The ability of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to produce bacteriocin has rarely been reported. Antagonistic substance production may confer an important ecological advantage for the producer microorganisms, especially in a competitive ecosystem such as the oral cavity. In the present study, 75 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains isolated from the oral cavity of human patients with periodontal disease, periodontally healthy subjects and marmosets, as well as two reference strains (A. actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 29523 and FDC Y4) were evaluated for auto-, iso-, and heteroantagonistic activity. Fifty-one (68.00%) strains exhibited antagonistic activity; heteroantagonism was observed more often than isoantagonism. Isolated strains antagonized 17 different species of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria from the oral and nonoral microbiota. Sensitivity to heat and to proteolytic enzymes constituted strong evidence that the antagonistic substance has a proteic nature. Taken together, our data enabled us to confirm that the antagonistic substance detected was a bacteriocin. The wide spectrum of activity indicates the possibility that more than one antagonistic substance is produced and that these substances play an important role in the ecological balance of the oral ecosystem.

  18. Biosynthesis and export of bacterial lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Chris; Trent, M Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide molecules represent a unique family of glycolipids based on a highly conserved lipid moiety known as lipid A. These molecules are produced by most gram-negative bacteria, in which they play important roles in the integrity of the outer-membrane permeability barrier and participate extensively in host-pathogen interplay. Few bacteria contain lipopolysaccharide molecules composed only of lipid A. In most forms, lipid A is glycosylated by addition of the core oligosaccharide that, in some bacteria, provides an attachment site for a long-chain O-antigenic polysaccharide. The complexity of lipopolysaccharide structures is reflected in the processes used for their biosynthesis and export. Rapid growth and cell division depend on the bacterial cell's capacity to synthesize and export lipopolysaccharide efficiently and in large amounts. We review recent advances in those processes, emphasizing the reactions that are essential for viability.

  19. Biosynthesis of mycobacterial methylglucose lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Vitor; Maranha, Ana; Alarico, Susana; Empadinhas, Nuno

    2012-08-01

    Mycobacterial pathogenesis is closely associated with a unique cell envelope rich in complex carbohydrates and unique lipids, among which are the mycolic acids. Mycobacteria also synthesize unique intracellular polymethylated polysaccharides (PMPSs), namely methylglucose lipopolysaccharides (MGLPs), which are acylated with short-chain fatty acids, and methylmannose polysaccharides (MMPs). Since PMPSs modulate the synthesis of long-chain fatty acids in vitro, the possibility of a similar role in vivo and the regulation of mycolic acids assembly have been anticipated. Unlike MGLPs, MMPs have been identified in M. smegmatis and other fast-growing mycobacteria but not in M. tuberculosis, implying an essential role for MGLPs in this pathogen and turning the biosynthetic enzymes into attractive drug targets. The genome of M. tuberculosis was decoded 14 years ago but only recently has the identity of the genes involved in MGLPs biosynthesis been investigated. Two gene clusters (Rv1208-Rv1213 and Rv3030-Rv3037c) containing a few genes considered to be essential for M. tuberculosis growth, have initially been proposed to coordinate MGLPs biosynthesis. Among these genes, only the product of Rv1208 for the first step in the MGLPs pathway has, so far, been crystallized and its three-dimensional structure been determined. However, recent results indicate that at least three additional clusters may be involved in this pathway. The functional assignment of authentic roles to some of these M. tuberculosis H37Rv genes sheds new light on the intricacy of MGLPs biogenesis and renewed interest on their biological role.

  20. Specific genetic variants of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans correlate with disease and health in a regional population of families with localized juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    DiRienzo, J M; Slots, J; Sixou, M; Sol, M A; Harmon, R; McKay, T L

    1994-01-01

    A geographically homogeneous population of 83 subjects, from 21 families with localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP), and 35 healthy control subjects was monitored, over a 5-year period, for the presence of the periodontal pathogen Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis was used to monitor the distribution of genetic variants of this bacterium in LJP-susceptible subjects that converted from a healthy to a diseased periodontal status. A. actinomycetemcomitans was cultured from 57% of the LJP family members accessioned into the study. Nine of 36 LJP-susceptible subjects, in seven families, developed signs of periodontal destruction. All but one of these conversion subjects harbored A. actinomycetemcomitans. Bacterial variants representative of a single RFLP group (II) showed the strongest correlation with conversion (P < 0.002). Six of nine conversion subjects were infected with A. actinomycetemcomitans from this group. RFLP group II variants also prevailed in 8 of 22 probands but were absent in the 35 healthy control subjects. In contrast to the selective distribution of group II variants is diseased individuals, variants belonging to RFLP groups XIII and XIV were found exclusively in the control subjects. Thus, the use of RFLP to type clinical isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans has resulted in the identification of genetic variants that predominate in LJP and health. These results indicate that studies concerned with the pathogenicity of this bacterium in LJP should be focused on the group II variants. PMID:7913695

  1. Application of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for Identification of the Fastidious Pediatric Pathogens Aggregatibacter, Eikenella, Haemophilus, and Kingella

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Eleanor A.; Blecker-Shelly, Deborah; Montgomery, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of matrix-assisted laser desorption–ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in the identification of Haemophilus, Aggregatibacter, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, and Kingella (HACEK) species was compared to that of phenotypic methods (Remel RapID and Vitek 2). Overall, Vitek MS correctly identified more isolates, incorrectly identified fewer isolates, and failed to identify fewer isolates than both phenotypic methods. PMID:23966506

  2. [Characterization of Pantoea agglomerans lipopolysaccharides].

    PubMed

    Varbanets, L D; Brovarskaya, O S; Bulygina, T N; Garkavaya, E G; Zhitkevich, N V

    2014-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from seven Pantoea agglomerans strains isolated from various plants were purified and chemically identified. LPS of the studied P. agglomerans strains were heterogeneous in monosaccharide composition. Thus, the LPS of P. agglomerans 8606 differed considerably from the LPSs of other strains, containing mannose as the predominant monosaccharide (69.8%), as well as ribose (15.1%) and xylose (12.6%), while the content of rhamnose, one of the predominant monosaccharides in other LPS samples, was 2.5%. Analysis of the fatty acid composition revealed the presence of C12-C16 acids. In lipids A of all the studied strains, 3-OH-C14:0 was the predominant acid (31.7 to 39.1%, depending on the strain). C12:0 (8.2 to 31.5%), C14:0 (12.9 to 30.8%), and C16:0 acids (3.4 to 16.9%) were also revealed. The studied P. agglomerans strains fell into three groups according to their fatty acid composition. The differences stemmed from the presence or absence of two fatty acids, 2-OH-C14:0 and C16:1. Ouchterlony double immunodiffusion in agar revealed that all the LPS under study exhibited antigenic activity in homologous systems. The results of serological cross reactions indicated immunochemical heterogeneity of the species P. agglomerans. Comparative investigation of the complex of parameters of peripheral blood cells from a healthy donor before and after treatment with LPS solutions showed that the values of no parameters exceeded the normal range.

  3. Nuclease-sensitive binding of an Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin to the bacterial cell surface.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, H; Kato, K; Kokeguchi, S; Hara, H; Fukui, K; Murayama, Y

    1991-01-01

    A leukotoxin of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans 301-b was solubilized from cell-associated membrane vesicles by treatment with externally added DNase and RNase and was further purified by a procedure which included ammonium sulfate fractionation, gel filtration chromatography, and ion-exchange chromatography. The purified toxin had a molecular mass of 113,000 Da by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and a high isoelectric point (approximately 8.8). From these characteristics, it was to be expected that the membrane vesicle toxin was almost identical to the leukotoxin extracted with polymyxin B in an earlier study (C.-C. Tsai, B. J. Shenker, J. M. DiRienzo, D. Malamud, and N. S. Taichman, Infect, Immun. 43:700-705, 1984). The treatment with DNase and RNase was also highly effective for solubilizing the leukotoxin directly from whole cells, suggesting that the toxin is secreted extracellularly but retained in nucleic acids on the outermost surface of bacterial cells. Images PMID:1937819

  4. Murine macrophage interleukin-1 release by capsularlike serotype-specific polysaccharide antigens of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, T; Nishihara, T; Ishihara, Y; Amano, K; Shibuya, N; Moro, I; Koga, T

    1991-01-01

    Serotype-specific polysaccharide antigens (SPAs) were extracted from whole cells of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 29523 (serotype a), Y4 (serotype b), and NCTC 9710 (serotype c) by autoclaving and purified by chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-25 and Sephacryl S-300 columns. Y4 SPA induced interleukin-1 (IL-1) release by P388D1 murine macrophages. Polymyxin B had virtually no effect on the release of IL-1. Rabbit anti-murine IL-1 serum strongly suppressed the proliferation of C3H/HeJ mouse thymocytes induced with the culture supernatants of Y4 SPA-stimulated P388D1 cells and a submitogenic dose of concanavalin A. Gel filtration of the culture supernatants of Y4 SPA-stimulated macrophages on Sephacryl S-200 showed that an IL-1 peak at a point corresponding to approximately 16.5 kDa was eluted. The ability of SPAs from strains ATCC 29523 and NCTC 9710 to induce the release of IL-1 was lower than that of Y4 SPA. The IL-1-releasing ability of serotype a and c antigens was enhanced by deacetylation of both polysaccharides, suggesting that acetyl groups of these antigens might hinder the interaction between the antigens and macrophages. PMID:1987032

  5. Identification of the Exported Proteins of the Oral Opportunistic Pathogen Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by Using Alkaline Phosphatase Fusions

    PubMed Central

    Ward, John; Fletcher, Julie; Nair, Sean P.; Wilson, Michael; Williams, Rachel J.; Poole, Stephen; Henderson, Brian

    2001-01-01

    A phoA fusion library of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans genomic DNA has been screened to identify genes encoding exported and secreted proteins. A total of 8,000 colonies were screened, and 80 positive colonies were detected. From these, 48 genes were identified with (i) more than half having homology to known or hypothetical Haemophilus influenzae genes, (ii) 14 having no ascribed function, and (iii) 4 having very limited or no homology to known genes. The proteins encoded by these genes may, by virtue of their presence on the cell surface, be novel virulence determinants. PMID:11254647

  6. Structure and Function of Lipopolysaccharide Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Ralf R.; Leong, Steven R.; Flaggs, Gail W.; Gray, Patrick W.; Wright, Samuel D.; Mathison, John C.; Tobias, Peter S.; Ulevitch, Richard J.

    1990-09-01

    The primary structure of lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP), a trace plasma protein that binds to the lipid A moiety of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), was deduced by sequencing cloned complementary DNA. LBP shares sequence identity with another LPS binding protein found in granulocytes, bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein, and with cholesterol ester transport protein of the plasma. LBP may control the response to LPS under physiologic conditions by forming high-affinity complexes with LPS that bind to monocytes and macrophages, which then secrete tumor necrosis factor. The identification of this pathway for LPS-induced monocyte stimulation may aid in the development of treatments for diseases in which Gram-negative sepsis or endotoxemia are involved.

  7. [Phytotoxic properties of Ralstonia solanacearum lipopolysaccharides].

    PubMed

    Hrytsaĭ, R V; Iakovleva, L M; Varbanets', L D

    2014-01-01

    The study is dedicated to research of phytotoxic properties of Ralstonia solanacearum lipopolysaccharides. This causative agent is one of the most dangerous among potato bacterial diseases. It is revealed that the inhibitory effect of LPS solution on seedlings germination is more noticeable on crops susceptible to brown rot. Maximal total phytotoxic properties have been shown by LPS from strains 35, 52b, TX1 and TS3, which were characterized by relatively low rhamnose content. Relative to the control plants LPS may diminish and some ones--increase the root length, height and weight of seedlings, subject to particular strain. But the stimulation revealed is minor.

  8. [Biological activity of Budvicia aquatica lipopolysaccharides].

    PubMed

    Brovarskaia, O S; Varbanets, L D; Pokhil, S I

    2012-01-01

    The fatty acid composition of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) lipids A of Budvicia aquatica strains (n = 6)--representatives of Enterobacteriaceae new species are studied for the first time. It was established that fatty acids with the length of carbon chains from C12 to C18 are presented. All of B. aquatica strains tested have been found to contain 3-hydroxytetradecanoic acid (23.1-43.8%, depending on the strain), which was predominat and characteristic of representatives of Enterobacteriaceae family. LPS of the tested strains displayed toxicity and pyrogeneity.

  9. The structures of core regions from enterobacterial lipopolysaccharides - an update.

    PubMed

    Holst, Otto

    2007-06-01

    To the major virulence factors of Gram-negative bacteria belong the lipopolysaccharides (endotoxins), which are very well characterized for their immunological, pharmacological and pathophysiological effects displayed in eucaryotic cells and organisms. In general, these amphiphilic lipopolysaccharides comprise three regions, which can be differentiated by their structures, function, genetics and biosynthesis: lipid A, the core region and a polysaccharide portion, which may be the O-specific polysaccharide, Enterobacterial Common Antigen (ECA) or a capsular polysaccharide. In the past, much emphasis has been laid on the elucidation of the structure-function relation. The lipid A was proven to represent the toxic principle of endotoxic active lipopolysaccharides, however, its toxicity depends not only on its structure but also on that of the core region, which is covalently linked to lipid A. Thus, and since the core region possesses immunogenic properties, complete structural analyses of lipopolysaccharides core regions and of structure-function relation are highly important for a better understanding of lipopolysaccharides action. To date, quite a number of core structures from lipopolysaccharides of various Gram-negative bacteria have been published and summarized in several overviews. This short review adds to this knowledge those structures of enterobacterial lipopolysaccharides that were published between January 2002 and October 2006.

  10. Primo Vessel Stressed by Lipopolysaccharide in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Rie; Rho, Min-Suk; Hong, Ye-Ji; Ha, Yae-Eun; Kim, Ji-Young; Noh, Young-Il; Park, Do-Young; Kim, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Eun-Jung; Jang, In-Ho; Kang, Suk-Yun; Lee, Sang-Suk

    2015-12-01

    For tracking the primo vascular system, we observed the primo vessels in vivo in situ using the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) response in the lymphatic vessels of a rabbit. Injection of LPS (200 μg/kg) into the lymph nodes resulted in greatly stained primo vessels, which were swollen in some cases. We were able to obtain comparative images through alcian blue and diaminobenzidine staining, which clearly showed different morphologies of the primo vessels. The mechanism causing the response of the primo vessels to the injected LPS is still unclear; however, these results might be a first attempt at giving an explanation of the function of the primo vascular system and identifying the changes in the structure and function of the primo vascular system in response to an external stimulus such as an injection of LPS.

  11. Epigenetic Alterations Induced by Bacterial Lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Chiariotti, Lorenzo; Coretti, Lorena; Pero, Raffaela; Lembo, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is one of the principal bacterial products known to elicit inflammation. Cells of myeloid lineage such as monocytes and macrophages, but also epithelial cells give rise to an inflammatory response upon LPS stimulation. This phenomenon implies reprogramming of cell specific gene expression that can occur through different mechanisms including epigenetic modifications. Given their intrinsic nature, epigenetic modifications may be involved both in the acute response to LPS and in the establishment of a preconditioned genomic state (epigenomic memory) that may potentially influence the host response to further contacts with microorganisms. Information has accumulated during the last years aimed at elucidating the epigenetic mechanisms which underlie the cellular LPS response. These findings, summarized in this chapter, will hopefully be a good basis for a definition of the complete cascade of LPS-induced epigenetic events and their biological significance in different cell types.

  12. Role for moesin in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Iontcheva, Iveta; Amar, Salomon; Zawawi, Khalid H; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Van Dyke, Thomas E

    2004-04-01

    Moesin is a 78-kDa protein with diverse functions in linking the cytoskeleton to the membrane while controlling cell shape, adhesion, locomotion, and signaling. The aim of this study was to characterize the expression and localization of moesin in mononuclear phagocytes by using confocal microscopy, flow cytometry, immunoprecipitation, and Western blotting and to analyze the function of moesin as a lipopolysaccharide receptor, utilizing an antisense oligonucleotide approach to knock down the moesin gene. Results revealed that moesin is expressed on the surface of monocytes/macrophages and surface expression is increased after lipopolysaccharide stimulation. The total protein mass of moesin is increased in monocytes after lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Immunoprecipitation showed that moesin coprecipitates with TLR4, a well-known lipopolysaccharide receptor, suggesting an early role of moesin in the formation of the initiation complex for lipopolysaccharide signaling. Two antisense and two control sense oligonucleotides were synthesized and introduced every 4 h for 48 h in adherent macrophage-like cells. Cells were then stimulated with lipopolysaccharide for 4 h, and the supernatants were assayed for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production. Cell lysates were assayed for moesin expression by Western blotting immediately after the 48-h treatment period and also after 116 h of recovery to assess the return of moesin expression and function. Moesin gene expression was completely suppressed after 48 h of incubation with antisense oligonucleotides. The antisense elimination of moesin gene expression led to a significant reduction of lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-alpha secretion. Restoration of moesin gene expression led to restoration of TNF-alpha production. These data suggest an important role for moesin in lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-alpha production, highlighting its importance in lipopolysaccharide-mediated signal transduction.

  13. Biochemical and morphological characterization of the killing of human monocytes by a leukotoxin derived from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Taichman, N S; Dean, R T; Sanderson, C J

    1980-01-01

    A potent, heat-labile leukotoxic material was extracted from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (strain Y4), an anaerobic gram-negative microorganism originally isolated from subgingival plaque in a patient with juvenile periodontitis. The cytopathic effects of Y4 toxin on purified monocytes were studied by the extracellular release of radioactive cytoplasmic markers and cell enzymes and by time-lapse microcinematography. Y4 toxin rapidly bound to the cells, producing dose- and time-dependent alterations culminating in cell death and release of intracellular constituents into the culture medium. The evidence to be presented suggests that the cell membrane of the monocyte may be the primary target in the development of these phenomena. Previous studies have shown that Y4 toxin also kills human polymorphonuclear leukocytes but not other cell types. It is conceivable that disruption of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes by Y4 toxin in the gingival crevice area may be relevant in the pathogenesis of juvenile periodontitis. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6155347

  14. Lipopolysaccharide binding protein in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Behrendt, D; Dembinski, J; Heep, A; Bartmann, P

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess serum concentrations of lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) in preterm infants with neonatal bacterial infection (NBI). Methods: Blood samples were analysed of 57 preterm (28+1 to 36+6, median 33+2 weeks gestation) and 17 term infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit within the first 72 hours of life with suspicion of NBI. Samples were obtained at first suspicion of sepsis and after 12 and 24 hours. Diagnosis of NBI was confirmed by raised concentrations of C reactive protein and/or interleukin 6. The influence of gestational age and labour was analysed. Results: Maximum LBP concentrations in infants with NBI were greatly increased compared with infants without NBI (13.0–46.0 µg/ml (median 20.0 µg/ml) v 0.6–17.4 µg/ml (median 4.2 µg/ml)). LBP concentrations in infected infants were not yet significantly raised when NBI was first suspected. The LBP concentrations of preterm infants were comparable to those of term infants. Regression analysis revealed no significant effect of labour or gestational age on LBP. Conclusions: Raised LBP concentrations indicate NBI in preterm and term infants. Preterm infants of > 28 weeks gestation seem to be capable of producing LBP as efficiently as term infants. Neonatal LBP concentrations are not influenced by labour. LBP may be a useful diagnostic marker of NBI in preterm infants. PMID:15499153

  15. [Modulation of immune response by bacterial lipopolysaccharides].

    PubMed

    Aldapa-Vega, Gustavo; Pastelín-Palacios, Rodolfo; Isibasi, Armando; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; López-Macías, Constantino

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a molecule that is profusely found on the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and is also a potent stimulator of the immune response. As the main molecule on the bacterial surface, is also the most biologically active. The immune response of the host is activated by the recognition of LPS through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and this receptor-ligand interaction is closely linked to LPS structure. Microorganisms have evolved systems to control the expression and structure of LPS, producing structural variants that are used for modulating the host immune responses during infection. Examples of this include Helicobacter pylori, Francisella tularensis, Chlamydia trachomatis and Salmonella spp. High concentrations of LPS can cause fever, increased heart rate and lead to septic shock and death. However, at relatively low concentrations some LPS are highly active immunomodulators, which can induce non-specific resistance to invading microorganisms. The elucidation of the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the recognition of LPS and its structural variants has been fundamental to understand inflammation and is currently a pivotal field of research to understand the innate immune response, inflammation, the complex host-pathogen relationship and has important implications for the rational development of new immunomodulators and adjuvants.

  16. Structure and Effects of Cyanobacterial Lipopolysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Durai, Prasannavenkatesh; Batool, Maria; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a component of the outer membrane of mainly Gram-negative bacteria and cyanobacteria. The LPS molecules from marine and terrestrial bacteria show structural variations, even among strains within the same species living in the same environment. Cyanobacterial LPS has a unique structure, since it lacks heptose and 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (also known as keto-deoxyoctulosonate (KDO)), which are present in the core region of common Gram-negative LPS. In addition, the cyanobacterial lipid A region lacks phosphates and contains odd-chain hydroxylated fatty acids. While the role of Gram-negative lipid A in the regulation of the innate immune response through Toll-like Receptor (TLR) 4 signaling is well characterized, the role of the structurally different cyanobacterial lipid A in TLR4 signaling is not well understood. The uncontrolled inflammatory response of TLR4 leads to autoimmune diseases such as sepsis, and thus the less virulent marine cyanobacterial LPS molecules can be effective to inhibit TLR4 signaling. This review highlights the structural comparison of LPS molecules from marine cyanobacteria and Gram-negative bacteria. We discuss the potential use of marine cyanobacterial LPS as a TLR4 antagonist, and the effects of cyanobacterial LPS on humans and marine organisms. PMID:26198237

  17. Lipopolysaccharide Structure and Biosynthesis in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Liao, Tingting; Debowski, Aleksandra W; Tang, Hong; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Stubbs, Keith A; Marshall, Barry J; Benghezal, Mohammed

    2016-12-01

    This review covers the current knowledge and gaps in Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure and biosynthesis. H. pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium which colonizes the luminal surface of the human gastric epithelium. Both a constitutive alteration of the lipid A preventing TLR4 elicitation and host mimicry of the Lewis antigen decorated O-antigen of H. pylori LPS promote immune escape and chronic infection. To date, the complete structure of H. pylori LPS is not available, and the proposed model is a linear arrangement composed of the inner core defined as the hexa-saccharide (Kdo-LD-Hep-LD-Hep-DD-Hep-Gal-Glc), the outer core composed of a conserved trisaccharide (-GlcNAc-Fuc-DD-Hep-) linked to the third heptose of the inner core, the glucan, the heptan and a variable O-antigen, generally consisting of a poly-LacNAc decorated with Lewis antigens. Although the glycosyltransferases (GTs) responsible for the biosynthesis of the H. pylori O-antigen chains have been identified and characterized, there are many gaps in regard to the biosynthesis of the core LPS. These limitations warrant additional mutagenesis and structural studies to obtain the complete LPS structure and corresponding biosynthetic pathway of this important gastric bacterium.

  18. Lipopolysaccharide induced conversion of recombinant prion protein

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Fozia; Bjorndahl, Trent C; Ladner, Carol L; Perez-Pineiro, Rolando; Ametaj, Burim N; Wishart, David S

    2014-01-01

    The conformational conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) to the β-rich infectious isoform PrPSc is considered a critical and central feature in prion pathology. Although PrPSc is the critical component of the infectious agent, as proposed in the “protein-only” prion hypothesis, cellular components have been identified as important cofactors in triggering and enhancing the conversion of PrPC to proteinase K resistant PrPSc. A number of in vitro systems using various chemical and/or physical agents such as guanidine hydrochloride, urea, SDS, high temperature, and low pH, have been developed that cause PrPC conversion, their amplification, and amyloid fibril formation often under non-physiological conditions. In our ongoing efforts to look for endogenous and exogenous chemical mediators that might initiate, influence, or result in the natural conversion of PrPC to PrPSc, we discovered that lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of gram-negative bacterial membranes interacts with recombinant prion proteins and induces conversion to an isoform richer in β sheet at near physiological conditions as long as the LPS concentration remains above the critical micelle concentration (CMC). More significant was the LPS mediated conversion that was observed even at sub-molar ratios of LPS to recombinant ShPrP (90–232). PMID:24819168

  19. [Characterization of the Lipopolysaccharides of Pseudomonas chlororaphis].

    PubMed

    Varbanets, L D; Zdorovenko, E L; Kiprianova, E A; Avdeeva, L V; Brovarskaya, O S; Rybalko, S L

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from two strains ot Pseudomonas chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens,UCM B-111 and UCM B-306, were isolated and characterized. The LPS preparations exhibited low toxicity, high pyrogenicity and high antiviral activity. Mild acid hydrolysis was used to obtain the O-specific polysaccharides. Their structures were established by monosaccharide analysis and determination of absolute configurations, as well as by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy. The O-polysaccharides were shown to contain the linear tri- or tetrasaccharide repeating units. Both O-polysaccharides were structurally heterogeneous: P. chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens UCM B-111--> 4)-αD-GalpNAc6Ac-(1 --> 3)-β-D-QuipNAc-(1 --> 6)-αD-GlcpNAc-(l --> βD-GlcpNAc-(l --> 3)] GalNAc -60%; degree of the non-stoichiometric 6-O-acetylation of GalNAc -60%; P. chlorophis subsp. aureofaciens UCM B-306 --> 3)-α-D-Rhap-(1 --> 4)-α-D-GalpNAcAN-(1 --> 3)-αD-QuipNAc4NAc-(1 -->, where GalNAcAN is 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-galacturonamide, the degree of non-stoichiometric amidation of the GalNAcA residue -60%.

  20. Structure and Effects of Cyanobacterial Lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Durai, Prasannavenkatesh; Batool, Maria; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-07-07

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a component of the outer membrane of mainly Gram-negative bacteria and cyanobacteria. The LPS molecules from marine and terrestrial bacteria show structural variations, even among strains within the same species living in the same environment. Cyanobacterial LPS has a unique structure, since it lacks heptose and 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (also known as keto-deoxyoctulosonate (KDO)), which are present in the core region of common Gram-negative LPS. In addition, the cyanobacterial lipid A region lacks phosphates and contains odd-chain hydroxylated fatty acids. While the role of Gram-negative lipid A in the regulation of the innate immune response through Toll-like Receptor (TLR) 4 signaling is well characterized, the role of the structurally different cyanobacterial lipid A in TLR4 signaling is not well understood. The uncontrolled inflammatory response of TLR4 leads to autoimmune diseases such as sepsis, and thus the less virulent marine cyanobacterial LPS molecules can be effective to inhibit TLR4 signaling. This review highlights the structural comparison of LPS molecules from marine cyanobacteria and Gram-negative bacteria. We discuss the potential use of marine cyanobacterial LPS as a TLR4 antagonist, and the effects of cyanobacterial LPS on humans and marine organisms.

  1. Genetics of lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis in enteric bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Schnaitman, C A; Klena, J D

    1993-01-01

    From a historical perspective, the study of both the biochemistry and the genetics of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis began with the enteric bacteria. These organisms have again come to the forefront as the blocks of genes involved in LPS synthesis have been sequenced and analyzed. A number of new and unanticipated genes were found in these clusters, indicating a complexity of the biochemical pathways which was not predicted from the older studies. One of the most dramatic areas of LPS research has been the elucidation of the lipid A biosynthetic pathway. Four of the genes in this pathway have now been identified and sequenced, and three of them are located in a complex operon which also contains genes involved in DNA and phospholipid synthesis. The rfa gene cluster, which contains many of the genes for LPS core synthesis, includes at least 17 genes. One of the remarkable findings in this cluster is a group of several genes which appear to be involved in the synthesis of alternate rough core species which are modified so that they cannot be acceptors for O-specific polysaccharides. The rfb gene clusters which encode O-antigen synthesis have been sequenced from a number of serotypes and exhibit the genetic polymorphism anticipated on the basis of the chemical complexity of the O antigens. These clusters appear to have originated by the exchange of blocks of genes among ancestral organisms. Among the large number of LPS genes which have now been sequenced from these rfa and rfb clusters, there are none which encode proteins that appear to be secreted across the cytoplasmic membrane and surprisingly few which encode integral membrane proteins or proteins with extensive hydrophobic domains. These data, together with sequence comparison and complementation experiments across strain and species lines, suggest that the LPS biosynthetic enzymes may be organized into clusters on the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane which are organized around a few key membrane

  2. Biochemical characterization of Campylobacter fetus lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Moran, A P; O'Malley, D T; Kosunen, T U; Helander, I M

    1994-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of five strains of the human and animal pathogen Campylobacter fetus were electrophoretically and chemically characterized. Analysis with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that all the strains produced smooth-form LPS with O side chains of relatively constant chain length. Upon extraction, LPS partitioned into both the water and phenol phases of phenol-water extracts, which showed that two chemical species of LPS were present in each C. fetus strain. Constituents common to all the LPS, though differing in molar ratios, were L-rhamnose, L-fucose, D-mannose, D-glucose, D-galactose, L-glycero-D-manno-heptose, and D-glycero-D-manno-heptose. L-Acofriose (3-O-methyl-L-rhamnose) was present in only two of the C. fetus strains. On the basis of these differences, it was possible to distinguish between LPS from strains of different serotypes and biotypes. Furthermore, chemical analysis indicated that the phenol phase LPS had a lower level of substitution by certain neutral sugars than did water phase LPS. N-Acetylneuraminic (sialic) acid and D-galactosamine were present in all the C. fetus LPS. Constituents normally found in the core and lipid A regions of LPS, 3-deoxy-D-manno-2-octulosonic acid, D-glucosamine, ethanolamine and its phosphorylated derivatives, and fatty acids [14:0, 16:0 14:0(3-OH), and 16:0(3-OH)] were detected. Unlike Campylobacter jejuni, in which 2,3-diamino-2,3-dideoxy-D-glucose occurs as a constituent of the lipid A backbone, this amino sugar was absent from C. fetus LPS, indicating major structural differences in the lipid A's of these species. Images PMID:8063409

  3. Acetate supplementation attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Reisenauer, Chris J; Bhatt, Dhaval P; Mitteness, Dane J; Slanczka, Evan R; Gienger, Heidi M; Watt, John A; Rosenberger, Thad A

    2011-04-01

    Glyceryl triacetate (GTA), a compound effective at increasing circulating and tissue levels of acetate was used to treat rats subjected to a continual 28 day intra-ventricular infusion of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). This model produces a neuroinflammatory injury characterized by global neuroglial activation and a decrease in choline acetyltransferase immunoreactivity in the basal forebrain. During the LPS infusion, rats were given a daily treatment of either water or GTA at a dose of 6 g/kg by oral gavage. In parallel experiments, free-CoA and acetyl-CoA levels were measured in microwave fixed brains and flash frozen heart, liver, kidney and muscle following a single oral dose of GTA. We found that a single oral dose of GTA significantly increased plasma acetate levels by 15 min and remained elevated for up to 4 h. At 30 min the acetyl-CoA levels in microwave-fixed brain and flash frozen heart and liver were increased at least 2.2-fold. The concentrations of brain acetyl-CoA was significantly increased between 30 and 45 min following treatment and remained elevated for up to 4 h. The concentration of free-CoA in brain was significantly decreased compared to controls at 240 min. Immunohistochemical and morphological analysis demonstrated that a daily treatment with GTA significantly reduced the percentage of reactive glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes and activated CD11b-positive microglia by 40-50% in rats subjected to LPS-induced neuroinflammation. Further, in rats subjected to neuroinflammation, GTA significantly increased the number of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-positive cells by 40% in the basal forebrain compared to untreated controls. These data suggest that acetate supplementation increases intermediary short chain acetyl-CoA metabolism and that treatment is potentially anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective with regards to attenuating neuroglial activation and increasing ChAT immunoreactivity in this model.

  4. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation of fungal secondary metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Zeinab G.; Kalansuriya, Pabasara; Capon, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a preliminary investigation of the use the Gram-negative bacterial cell wall constituent lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a natural chemical cue to stimulate and alter the expression of fungal secondary metabolism. Integrated high-throughput micro-cultivation and micro-analysis methods determined that 6 of 40 (15%) of fungi tested responded to an optimal exposure to LPS (0.6 ng/mL) by activating, enhancing or accelerating secondary metabolite production. To explore the possible mechanisms behind this effect, we employed light and fluorescent microscopy in conjunction with a nitric oxide (NO)-sensitive fluorescent dye and an NO scavenger to provide evidence that LPS stimulation of fungal secondary metabolism coincided with LPS activation of NO. Several case studies demonstrated that LPS stimulation can be scaled from single microplate well (1.5 mL) to preparative (>400 mL) scale cultures. For example, LPS treatment of Penicillium sp. (ACM-4616) enhanced pseurotin A and activated pseurotin A1 and pseurotin A2 biosynthesis, whereas LPS treatment of Aspergillus sp. (CMB-M81F) substantially accelerated and enhanced the biosynthesis of shornephine A and a series of biosynthetically related ardeemins and activated production of neoasterriquinone. As an indication of broader potential, we provide evidence that cultures of Penicillium sp. (CMB-TF0411), Aspergillus niger (ACM-4993F), Rhizopus oryzae (ACM-165F) and Thanatephorus cucumeris (ACM-194F) were responsive to LPS stimulation, the latter two examples being particular noteworthy as neither are known to produce secondary metabolites. Our results encourage the view that LPS stimulation can be used as a valuable tool to expand the molecular discovery potential of fungal strains that either have been exhaustively studied by or are unresponsive to traditional culture methodology. PMID:25379339

  5. Horizontally acquired glycosyltransferase operons drive salmonellae lipopolysaccharide diversity.

    PubMed

    Davies, Mark R; Broadbent, Sarah E; Harris, Simon R; Thomson, Nicholas R; van der Woude, Marjan W

    2013-06-01

    The immunodominant lipopolysaccharide is a key antigenic factor for Gram-negative pathogens such as salmonellae where it plays key roles in host adaptation, virulence, immune evasion, and persistence. Variation in the lipopolysaccharide is also the major differentiating factor that is used to classify Salmonella into over 2600 serovars as part of the Kaufmann-White scheme. While lipopolysaccharide diversity is generally associated with sequence variation in the lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis operon, extraneous genetic factors such as those encoded by the glucosyltransferase (gtr) operons provide further structural heterogeneity by adding additional sugars onto the O-antigen component of the lipopolysaccharide. Here we identify and examine the O-antigen modifying glucosyltransferase genes from the genomes of Salmonella enterica and Salmonella bongori serovars. We show that Salmonella generally carries between 1 and 4 gtr operons that we have classified into 10 families on the basis of gtrC sequence with apparent O-antigen modification detected for five of these families. The gtr operons localize to bacteriophage-associated genomic regions and exhibit a dynamic evolutionary history driven by recombination and gene shuffling events leading to new gene combinations. Furthermore, evidence of Dam- and OxyR-dependent phase variation of gtr gene expression was identified within eight gtr families. Thus, as O-antigen modification generates significant intra- and inter-strain phenotypic diversity, gtr-mediated modification is fundamental in assessing Salmonella strain variability. This will inform appropriate vaccine and diagnostic approaches, in addition to contributing to our understanding of host-pathogen interactions.

  6. Anti-inflammatory, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Effects of Artemisinin Extracts from Artemisia annua L.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wan-Su; Choi, Woo Jin; Lee, Sunwoo; Kim, Woo Joong; Lee, Dong Chae; Sohn, Uy Dong; Shin, Hyoung-Shik

    2015-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial properties of artemisinin derived from water, methanol, ethanol, or acetone extracts of Artemisia annua L. were evaluated. All 4 artemisinin-containing extracts had anti-inflammatory effects. Of these, the acetone extract had the greatest inhibitory effect on lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and proinflammatory cytokine (IL-1β , IL-6, and IL-10) production. Antioxidant activity evaluations revealed that the ethanol extract had the highest free radical scavenging activity, (91.0±3.2%), similar to α-tocopherol (99.9%). The extracts had antimicrobial activity against the periodontopathic microorganisms Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. animalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. polymorphum, and Prevotella intermedia. This study shows that Artemisia annua L. extracts contain anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial substances and should be considered for use in pharmaceutical products for the treatment of dental diseases. PMID:25605993

  7. Proteomic changes in chicken plasma induced by Salmonella typhimurium lipopolysaccharides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are cell wall components of gram-negative bacteria that cause inflammation and sickness through genetic and proteomic activation. The objective of our study was to identify the proteomic changes in plasma associated with inflammation induced by LPS treatment. Five-week-old ...

  8. Proteomic analysis of macrophage activated with salmonella lipopolysaccharide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macrophages play pivotal role in immunity. They are activated by many pathogen derived molecules such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) which trigger the production of various proteins and peptides that drive and resolve inflammation. There are numerous studies on the effect of LPS at the genome level bu...

  9. Horizontally Acquired Glycosyltransferase Operons Drive Salmonellae Lipopolysaccharide Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Mark R.; Broadbent, Sarah E.; Harris, Simon R.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; van der Woude, Marjan W.

    2013-01-01

    The immunodominant lipopolysaccharide is a key antigenic factor for Gram-negative pathogens such as salmonellae where it plays key roles in host adaptation, virulence, immune evasion, and persistence. Variation in the lipopolysaccharide is also the major differentiating factor that is used to classify Salmonella into over 2600 serovars as part of the Kaufmann-White scheme. While lipopolysaccharide diversity is generally associated with sequence variation in the lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis operon, extraneous genetic factors such as those encoded by the glucosyltransferase (gtr) operons provide further structural heterogeneity by adding additional sugars onto the O-antigen component of the lipopolysaccharide. Here we identify and examine the O-antigen modifying glucosyltransferase genes from the genomes of Salmonella enterica and Salmonella bongori serovars. We show that Salmonella generally carries between 1 and 4 gtr operons that we have classified into 10 families on the basis of gtrC sequence with apparent O-antigen modification detected for five of these families. The gtr operons localize to bacteriophage-associated genomic regions and exhibit a dynamic evolutionary history driven by recombination and gene shuffling events leading to new gene combinations. Furthermore, evidence of Dam- and OxyR-dependent phase variation of gtr gene expression was identified within eight gtr families. Thus, as O-antigen modification generates significant intra- and inter-strain phenotypic diversity, gtr-mediated modification is fundamental in assessing Salmonella strain variability. This will inform appropriate vaccine and diagnostic approaches, in addition to contributing to our understanding of host-pathogen interactions. PMID:23818865

  10. Lipopolysaccharide-specific bacteriophage for Klebsiella pneumoniae C3.

    PubMed Central

    Tomás, J M; Jofre, J T

    1985-01-01

    Bacteriophage FC3-1 is one of several specific bacteriophages of Klebsiella pneumoniae C3 isolated in our laboratory. Unlike receptors for other Klebsiella phages, the bacteriophage FC3-1 receptor was shown to be lipopolysaccharide, specifically the polysaccharide fraction (O-antigen and core region). We concluded that capsular polysaccharide, outer membrane proteins, and lipid A were not involved in phage binding. Mutants resistant to this phage were isolated and were found to be devoid of lipopolysaccharide O-antigen by several criteria but to contain capsular material serologically identical to that of the wild type. The polysaccharide fraction was concluded to be the primary phage receptor, indicating that it is available to the phage. Images PMID:3888963

  11. The alteration of copper homeostasis in inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Han, Ming; Lin, Zhexuan; Zhang, Yuan

    2013-08-01

    Significant changes of copper homeostasis were triggered by lipopolysaccharides, which result in systemic inflammatory response and contribute to hepatic injury. Administration of lipopolysaccharides resulted in the increase of plasma "free" copper and total copper concentrations, whereas, the decrease of "free" copper and total copper contents in liver tissue. Copper-associated proteins were detected and showed a down-regulation of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein, and up-regulation of copper metabolism domain containing 1 and copper transporter 1. The alteration of these proteins would lower the apoptotic threshold. Meanwhile, the increasing of circulation copper might cause oxidative injury through Fenton reaction and contribute to tissue injury. Our findings underscored the possibility that these changes in systemic copper homeostasis might provide a novel insight of the characteristic of the acute phase of inflammatory response and the underlying influence on tissue injury.

  12. Innate immunity probed by lipopolysaccharides affinity strategy and proteomics.

    PubMed

    Giangrande, Chiara; Colarusso, Lucia; Lanzetta, Rosa; Molinaro, Antonio; Pucci, Piero; Amoresano, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are ubiquitous and vital components of the cell surface of Gram-negative bacteria that have been shown to play a relevant role in the induction of the immune-system response. In animal and plant cells, innate immune defenses toward microorganisms are triggered by the perception of pathogen associated molecular patterns. These are conserved and generally indispensable microbial structures such as LPSs that are fundamental in the Gram-negative immunity recognition. This paper reports the development of an integrated strategy based on lipopolysaccharide affinity methodology that represents a new starting point to elucidate the molecular mechanisms elicited by bacterial LPS and involved in the different steps of innate immunity response. Biotin-tagged LPS was immobilized on streptavidin column and used as a bait in an affinity capture procedure to identify protein partners from human serum specifically interacting with this effector. The complex proteins/lipopolysaccharide was isolated and the protein partners were fractionated by gel electrophoresis and identified by mass spectrometry. This procedure proved to be very effective in specifically binding proteins functionally correlated with the biological role of LPS. Proteins specifically bound to LPS essentially gathered within two functional groups, regulation of the complement system (factor H, C4b, C4BP, and alpha 2 macroglobulin) and inhibition of LPS-induced inflammation (HRG and Apolipoproteins). The reported strategy might have important applications in the elucidation of biological mechanisms involved in the LPSs-mediated molecular recognition and anti-infection responses.

  13. Early life peripheral lipopolysaccharide challenge reprograms catecholaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Lin Kooi; Fuller, Erin A.; Sominsky, Luba; Hodgson, Deborah M.; Dunkley, Peter R.; Dickson, Phillip W.

    2017-01-01

    Neonatal immune challenge with the bacterial mimetic lipopolysaccharide has the capacity to generate long-term changes in the brain. Neonatal rats were intraperitoneally injected with lipopolysaccharide (0.05 mg/kg) on postnatal day (PND) 3 and again on PND 5. The activation state of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was measured in the locus coeruleus, ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra on PND 85. In the locus coeruleus there was an approximately four-fold increase in TH activity. This was accompanied by a significant increase in TH protein together with increased phosphorylation of all three serine residues in the N-terminal region of TH. In the ventral tegmental area, a significant increase in TH activity and increased phosphorylation of the serine 40 residue was seen. Neonatal lipopolysaccharide had no effect on TH activation in the substantia nigra. These results indicate the capacity of a neonatal immune challenge to generate long-term changes in the activation state of TH, in particular in the locus coeruleus. Overall, the current results demonstrate the enduring outcomes of a neonatal immune challenge on specific brain catecholaminergic regions associated with catecholamine synthesis. This highlights a novel mechanism for long-term physiological and behavioural alterations induced by this model. PMID:28071709

  14. SIRT2 ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ae Sin; Jung, Yu Jin; Kim, Dal; Nguyen-Thanh, Tung; Kang, Kyung Pyo; Lee, Sik; Park, Sung Kwang; Kim, Won

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Knockout of SIRT2 attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced iNOS expression. • Lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production is decreased in SIRT2 KO macrophage. • SIRT2 deficiency suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced ROS production in macrophage. • M1-macrophage related factors are decreased in SIRT2 deficient cells. • SIRT2 deficiency decreases lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of NFκB. - Abstract: Introduction: SIRT2 is a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylases and associated with numerous processes such as infection, carcinogenesis, DNA damage and cell cycle regulation. However, the role of SIRT2 in inflammatory process in macrophage remains unclear. Materials and methods: In the present study, we have evaluated the regulatory effects of SIRT2 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages isolated from SIRT2 knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) mice or Raw264.7 macrophage cells. As inflammatory parameters, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), the productions of nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and M1-macrophage-related factors were evaluated. We also examined the effects of SIRT2 on activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NFκB) signaling. Results: SIRT2 deficiency inhibits LPS-induced iNOS mRNA and protein expression in bone marrow derived macrophages. SIRT2-siRNA transfection also suppressed LPS-induced iNOS expression in Raw264.7 macrophage cells. Bone marrow derived macrophages isolated from SIRT2 KO mice produced lower nitric oxide and expressed lower levels of M1-macrophage related markers including iNOS and CD86 in response to LPS than WT mice. Decrease of SIRT2 reduced the LPS-induced reactive oxygen species production. Deficiency of SIRT2 resulted in inhibition of NFκB activation through reducing the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα. The phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of p65 was significantly decreased in SIRT2-deficient macrophages after LPS stimulation. Discussion: Our data suggested that

  15. Neutrophil adherence induced by lipopolysaccharide in vitro. Role of plasma component interaction with lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Worthen, G S; Avdi, N; Vukajlovich, S; Tobias, P S

    1992-01-01

    Endotoxemia results in neutrophil localization within a number of microcirculatory beds, reflecting in part an adhesive interaction between neutrophils and the vascular endothelial cell. In previous studies, endotoxin or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment of rabbits resulted in neutrophil sequestration at LPS concentrations well below those effective at increasing neutrophil adherence in vitro. We hypothesized that LPS-induced neutrophil adherence involved a plasma component. In the absence of plasma, high concentrations of LPS (10 micrograms/ml) were required to increase human neutrophil adherence to endothelial cells in vitro. With the inclusion of as little as 1% plasma or serum, however, the LPS dose-response curve was markedly shifted, resulting in increments in adherence at 10 ng/ml, and the time course of enhanced adherence was accelerated. Pretreatment studies suggested that the effect of LPS was on the neutrophil rather than the endothelial cell. Immunoprecipitation of 0111:B4 LPS paralleled the loss of functional activity, suggesting that LPS was an integral part of the active complex, rather than altering a plasma component to make it active. The incubation of plasma with LPS decreased the apparent molecular mass of LPS from 500-1,000 kD to approximately 100 kD. The disaggregated 0111:B4 LPS eluted in the range of albumin and was able to increase adherence in the absence of additional plasma. Plasma depleted of lipoproteins or heat treated retained activity, suggesting that the interaction of LPS with HDL or complement did not account for the observed findings. An LPS-binding protein isolated from rabbit serum enhanced the adherence-inducing effects of both 0111:B4 and Re595 LPS. Furthermore, the activity of rabbit serum was abolished after incubation with an antibody directed against this LPS-binding protein (LBP). An antibody directed against CD14, the putative receptor of the LPS-LBP complex, prevented the adhesive response to LPS. These data suggest

  16. Human immune responses to oral micro-organisms. I. Association of localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP) with serum antibody responses to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, J L; Taubman, M A; Smith, D J; Genco, R J; Frey, D E

    1982-01-01

    The association between periodontal disease in humans and serum and salivary antibody to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans strain Y4 was determined. An Elisa was used to examine anti-Y4 antibody of the IgM, IgG, IgA and IgE isotypes in serum from 127 individuals and IgA in parotid saliva. Patients diagnosed as having localized juvenile periodontitis (n = 37) had significantly higher levels and frequency of serum IgG antibodies to Y4 than all other groups. Serum and salivary IgA and serum IgE antibody levels were significantly increased in patients with both localized and generalized types of juvenile periodontitis (n = 48) when compared to all other patient groups. Specificity studies suggested that the antigenic determinants that were differentiating the group responses were unique to the Y4 organism. These results indicate that serum antibodies to Y4 may reflect an infectious process with this micro-organism and that these responses may provide some diagnostic value in delineating different types of periodontal diseases. PMID:7094425

  17. Dexmedetomidine Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide Induced MCP-1 Expression in Primary Astrocyte

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huan; Faez Abdelgawad, Amro

    2017-01-01

    Background. Neuroinflammation which presents as a possible mechanism of delirium is associated with MCP-1, an important proinflammatory factor which is expressed on astrocytes. It is known that dexmedetomidine (DEX) possesses potent anti-inflammatory properties. This study aimed to investigate the potential effects of DEX on the production of MCP-1 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated astrocytes. Materials and Methods. Astrocytes were treated with LPS (10 ng/ml, 50 ng/ml, 100 ng/ml, and 1000 ng/ml), DEX (500 ng/mL), LPS (100 ng/ml), and DEX (10, 100, and 500 ng/mL) for a duration of three hours; expression levels of MCP-1 were measured by real-time PCR. The double immunofluorescence staining protocol was utilized to determine the expression of α2-adrenoceptors (α2AR) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) on astrocytes. Results. Expressions of MCP-1 mRNA in astrocytes were induced dose-dependently by LPS. Administration of DEX significantly inhibited the expression of MCP-1 mRNA (P < 0.001). Double immunofluorescence assay showed that α2AR colocalize with GFAP, which indicates the expression of α2-adrenoceptors in astrocytes. Conclusions. DEX is a potent suppressor of MCP-1 in astrocytes induced with lipopolysaccharide through α2A-adrenergic receptors, which potentially explains its beneficial effects in the treatment of delirium by attenuating neuroinflammation. PMID:28286770

  18. Dexmedetomidine Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide Induced MCP-1 Expression in Primary Astrocyte.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Davis, Jacques R J; Wu, Zhi-Lin; Faez Abdelgawad, Amro

    2017-01-01

    Background. Neuroinflammation which presents as a possible mechanism of delirium is associated with MCP-1, an important proinflammatory factor which is expressed on astrocytes. It is known that dexmedetomidine (DEX) possesses potent anti-inflammatory properties. This study aimed to investigate the potential effects of DEX on the production of MCP-1 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated astrocytes. Materials and Methods. Astrocytes were treated with LPS (10 ng/ml, 50 ng/ml, 100 ng/ml, and 1000 ng/ml), DEX (500 ng/mL), LPS (100 ng/ml), and DEX (10, 100, and 500 ng/mL) for a duration of three hours; expression levels of MCP-1 were measured by real-time PCR. The double immunofluorescence staining protocol was utilized to determine the expression of α2-adrenoceptors (α2AR) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) on astrocytes. Results. Expressions of MCP-1 mRNA in astrocytes were induced dose-dependently by LPS. Administration of DEX significantly inhibited the expression of MCP-1 mRNA (P < 0.001). Double immunofluorescence assay showed that α2AR colocalize with GFAP, which indicates the expression of α2-adrenoceptors in astrocytes. Conclusions. DEX is a potent suppressor of MCP-1 in astrocytes induced with lipopolysaccharide through α2A-adrenergic receptors, which potentially explains its beneficial effects in the treatment of delirium by attenuating neuroinflammation.

  19. Novel polymeric nanoparticles targeting the lipopolysaccharides of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Long, Y; Li, Z; Bi, Q; Deng, C; Chen, Z; Bhattachayya, S; Li, C

    2016-04-11

    Considering outburst of various infectious diseases globally, nanoparticle assisted targeted drug delivery has emerged as a promising strategy that can enhance the therapeutic efficacy and minimize the undesirable side effects of an antimicrobial agents. Molecular imprinting is a newly developed strategy that can synthesize a drug carrier with highly stable ligand-like 'cavity', may serve as a new platform of ligand-free targeted drug delivery systems. In this study, we use the amphiphilic lipopolysaccharides, derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa as imprinting template and obtained an evenly distributed sub-40 nm polymeric nanoparticles by using inverse emulsion method. These molecularly imprinted nanoparticles (MIPNPs) showed specific binding to the lipopolysaccharide as determined by fluorescence polarization and microscale thermophoresis. MIPNPs showed selective recognition of target bacteria as detected by flow cytometry. Additionally, MIPNPs exhibited the in vivo targeting capabilities in both the keratitis model and meningitis model. Moreover, the photosensitizer methylene blue-loaded MIPNPs presented significantly strong inhibition of bacterial Growth, compared to non-imprinted controls for in vitro model of the photodynamic therapy. Our study shows an attempt to design a magic bullet by molecular imprinting that may provide a novel approach to generate synthetic carrier for targeting pathogen and treatment for a variety of infectious human diseases.

  20. Deciphering the dual effect of lipopolysaccharides from plant pathogenic Pectobacterium.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Kettani-Halabi; Daniel, Tran; Aurélien, Dauphin; El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Rafik, Errakhi; Arbelet-Bonnin, Delphine; Biligui, Bernadette; Florence, Val; Mustapha, Ennaji Moulay; François, Bouteau

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are a component of the outer cell surface of almost all Gram-negative bacteria and play an essential role for bacterial growth and survival. Lipopolysaccharides represent typical microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecules and have been reported to induce defense-related responses, including the expression of defense genes and the suppression of the hypersensitive response in plants. However, depending on their origin and the challenged plant, LPS were shown to have complex and different roles. In this study we showed that LPS from plant pathogens Pectobacterium atrosepticum and Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum induce common and different responses in A. thaliana cells when compared to those induced by LPS from non-phytopathogens Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Among common responses to both types of LPS are the transcription of defense genes and their ability to limit of cell death induced by Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp carotovorum. However, the differential kinetics and amplitude in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation seemed to regulate defense gene transcription and be determinant to induce programmed cell death in response to LPS from the plant pathogenic Pectobacterium. These data suggest that different signaling pathways could be activated by LPS in A. thaliana cells.

  1. Buccal microbiology analyzed by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Abreu, Geraldo Magno Alves; da Silva, Gislene Rodrigues; Khouri, Sônia; Favero, Priscila Pereira; Raniero, Leandro; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2012-01-01

    Rapid microbiological identification and characterization are very important in dentistry and medicine. In addition to dental diseases, pathogens are directly linked to cases of endocarditis, premature delivery, low birth weight, and loss of organ transplants. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to analyze oral pathogens Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 29523, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-JP2, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans which was clinically isolated from the human blood-CI. Significant spectra differences were found among each organism allowing the identification and characterization of each bacterial species. Vibrational modes in the regions of 3500-2800 cm-1, the 1484-1420 cm-1, and 1000-750 cm-1 were used in this differentiation. The identification and classification of each strain were performed by cluster analysis achieving 100% separation of strains. This study demonstrated that FTIR can be used to decrease the identification time, compared to the traditional methods, of fastidious buccal microorganisms associated with the etiology of the manifestation of periodontitis.

  2. Structure of the core oligosaccharide in the serotype O8 lipopolysaccharide from Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Severn, W B; Kelly, R F; Richards, J C; Whitfield, C

    1996-01-01

    Two classes of mutants with O-antigen-deficient lipopolysaccharides were isolated from the serotype O8 reference strain, belonging to Klebsiella pneumoniae subspecies ozaenae. These mutants were selected by resistance to bacteriophage KO1-2, which recognizes and lyses strains with lipopolysaccharide molecules containing the D-galactan II O antigen. Strain RFK-11 contains a defect in O-antigen synthesis and has a complete core, including the attachment site for O antigen. This mutation is complemented by a plasmid carrying the rfb (O-antigen biosynthesis) gene cluster from the related K. pneumoniae serotype O1. In sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the lipopolysaccharide from strain RFK-9 has a mobility typical of deep-rough lipopolysaccharide. RFK-9 lipopolysaccharide lacks the attachment site for O antigen. Lipopolysaccharides from strains RFK-9 and RFK-11 were isolated, and their structures were determined by methylation analyses, muclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and mass spectroscopy. The deduced O8 core oligosaccharide includes the partial core structure reported for the K. pneumoniae subspecies pneumoniae serotype O1 lipopolysaccharide (M. Süsskind, S. Müller-Leonnies, W. Nimmich, H. Brade, and O. Holst, Carbohydr. Res. 269:C1-7, 1995), consistent with the possibility of a conserved core structure within the species. The core oligosaccharide differs from those of the genera Salmonella and Escherichia by the absence of a hexose-containing outer core, the lack of phosphate residues in the inner core, and the presence of galacturonic acid residues. PMID:8626303

  3. Uptake and modification of 125I-lipopolysaccharide by isolated rat Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Fox, E S; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A

    1988-01-01

    While it is generally believed that hepatic clearance of lipopolysaccharide involves Kupffer cells, the mechanism involved has not been fully elucidated. This study assesses this phenomenon in terms of in vitro uptake and post-uptake modification experiments with an 125I-labeled Salmonella minnesota lipopolysaccharide. 125I-Lipopolysaccharide was added to Kupffer cells in suspension cultures under a variety of conditions. In vitro uptake of 125I-Lipopolysaccharide was not saturable up to concentrations of 33.33 micrograms per ml. Kinetics experiments performed at 16.67 micrograms per ml demonstrated that Kupffer cells were unsaturable after 60 min of incubation. The kinetics of uptake could be inhibited, however, by incubation in the presence of a 10-fold excess of unlabeled lipopolysaccharide, indicating that a component of the uptake process may be limited. Energy dependence in this process was demonstrated by incubation in the presence of 1 mM 2-deoxyglucose which inhibited 125I-lipopolysaccharide uptake by approximately 30%. Pretreatment with 7.5 x 10(-5) M colchicine had no effect on kinetics, implying no role for the cell cytoskeleton in lipopolysaccharide uptake. These results are inconsistent with a receptor-mediated process as previously suggested. Modification of internalized label has been demonstrated by changes in buoyant density in CsCl isopyknic density gradients following overnight incubation with Kupffer cells. These results indicate that Kupffer cells clear bacterial endotoxin in vitro and post-uptake degradation occurs within 20 hr of incubation.

  4. Interactions of Bacterial Lipopolysaccharides with Gold Nanorod Surfaces Investigated by Refractometric Sensing.

    PubMed

    Abadeer, Nardine S; Fülöp, Gergő; Chen, Si; Käll, Mikael; Murphy, Catherine J

    2015-11-11

    The interface between nanoparticles and bacterial surfaces is of great interest for applications in nanomedicine and food safety. Here, we demonstrate that interactions between gold nanorods and bacterial surface molecules are governed by the nanoparticle surface coating. Polymer-coated gold nanorod substrates are exposed to lipopolysaccharides extracted from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli, and attachment is monitored using localized surface plasmon resonance refractometric sensing. The number of lipopolysaccharide molecules attached per nanorod is calculated from the shift in the plasmon maximum, which results from the change in refractive index after analyte binding. Colloidal gold nanorods in water are also incubated with lipopolysaccharides to demonstrate the effect of lipopolysaccharide concentration on plasmon shift, ζ-potential, and association constant. Both gold nanorod surface charge and surface chemistry affect gold nanorod-lipopolysaccharide interactions. In general, anionic lipopolysaccharides was found to attach more effectively to cationic gold nanorods than to neutral or anionic gold nanorods. Some variation in lipopolysaccharide attachment is also observed between the three strains studied, demonstrating the potential complexity of bacteria-nanoparticle interactions.

  5. Structural Characterization of Core Region in Erwinia amylovora Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Casillo, Angela; Ziaco, Marcello; Lindner, Buko; Merino, Susana; Mendoza-Barberá, Elena; Tomás, Juan M.; Corsaro, Maria Michela

    2017-01-01

    Erwinia amylovora (E. amylovora) is the first bacterial plant pathogen described and demonstrated to cause fire blight, a devastating plant disease affecting a wide range of species including a wide variety of Rosaceae. In this study, we reported the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core structure from E. amylovora strain CFBP1430, the first one for an E. amylovora highly pathogenic strain. The chemical characterization was performed on the mutants waaL (lacking only the O-antigen LPS with a complete LPS-core), wabH and wabG (outer-LPS core mutants). The LPSs were isolated from dry cells and analyzed by means of chemical and spectroscopic methods. In particular, they were subjected to a mild acid hydrolysis and/or a hydrazinolysis and investigated in detail by one and two dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and ElectroSpray Ionization Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance (ESI FT-ICR) mass spectrometry. PMID:28273861

  6. Galangin dampens mice lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Shu, Yu-Sheng; Tao, Wei; Miao, Qian-Bing; Lu, Shi-Chun; Zhu, Ya-Bing

    2014-10-01

    Galangin, an active ingredient of Alpinia galangal, has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. Inflammation and oxidative stress are known to play vital effect in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI). In this study, we determined whether galangin exerts lung protection in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Male BALB/c mice were randomized to receive galangin or vehicle intraperitoneal injection 3 h after LPS challenge. Samples were harvested 24 h post LPS administration. Galangin administration decreased biochemical parameters of oxidative stress and inflammation, and improved oxygenation and lung edema in a dose-dependent manner. These protective effects of galangin were associated with inhibition of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and upregulation of heme oxygenase (HO)-1. Galangin reduces LPS-induced ALI by inhibition of inflammation and oxidative stress.

  7. Structural Characterization of Core Region in Erwinia amylovora Lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Casillo, Angela; Ziaco, Marcello; Lindner, Buko; Merino, Susana; Mendoza-Barberá, Elena; Tomás, Juan M; Corsaro, Maria Michela

    2017-03-04

    Erwinia amylovora (E. amylovora) is the first bacterial plant pathogen described and demonstrated to cause fire blight, a devastating plant disease affecting a wide range of species including a wide variety of Rosaceae. In this study, we reported the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core structure from E. amylovora strain CFBP1430, the first one for an E. amylovora highly pathogenic strain. The chemical characterization was performed on the mutants waaL (lacking only the O-antigen LPS with a complete LPS-core), wabH and wabG (outer-LPS core mutants). The LPSs were isolated from dry cells and analyzed by means of chemical and spectroscopic methods. In particular, they were subjected to a mild acid hydrolysis and/or a hydrazinolysis and investigated in detail by one and two dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and ElectroSpray Ionization Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance (ESI FT-ICR) mass spectrometry.

  8. Revisiting the Interaction between the Chaperone Skp and Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Burmann, Björn M.; Holdbrook, Daniel A.; Callon, Morgane; Bond, Peter J.; Hiller, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial outer membrane comprises two main classes of components, lipids and membrane proteins. These nonsoluble compounds are conveyed across the aqueous periplasm along specific molecular transport routes: the lipid lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is shuttled by the Lpt system, whereas outer membrane proteins (Omps) are transported by chaperones, including the periplasmic Skp. In this study, we revisit the specificity of the chaperone-lipid interaction of Skp and LPS. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy measurements indicate that LPS interacts with Skp nonspecifically, accompanied by destabilization of the Skp trimer and similar to denaturation by the nonnatural detergent lauryldimethylamine-N-oxide (LDAO). Bioinformatic analysis of amino acid conservation, structural analysis of LPS-binding proteins, and MD simulations further confirm the absence of a specific LPS binding site on Skp, making a biological relevance of the interaction unlikely. Instead, our analysis reveals a highly conserved salt-bridge network, which likely has a role for Skp function. PMID:25809264

  9. Octanoylation of early intermediates of mycobacterial methylglucose lipopolysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Maranha, Ana; Moynihan, Patrick J.; Miranda, Vanessa; Correia Lourenço, Eva; Nunes-Costa, Daniela; Fraga, Joana S.; José Barbosa Pereira, Pedro; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Ventura, M. Rita; Clarke, Anthony J.; Empadinhas, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacteria synthesize unique intracellular methylglucose lipopolysaccharides (MGLP) proposed to modulate fatty acid metabolism. In addition to the partial esterification of glucose or methylglucose units with short-chain fatty acids, octanoate was invariably detected on the MGLP reducing end. We have identified a novel sugar octanoyltransferase (OctT) that efficiently transfers octanoate to glucosylglycerate (GG) and diglucosylglycerate (DGG), the earliest intermediates in MGLP biosynthesis. Enzymatic studies, synthetic chemistry, NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry approaches suggest that, in contrast to the prevailing consensus, octanoate is not esterified to the primary hydroxyl group of glycerate but instead to the C6 OH of the second glucose in DGG. These observations raise important new questions about the MGLP reducing end architecture and about subsequent biosynthetic steps. Functional characterization of this unique octanoyltransferase, whose gene has been proposed to be essential for M. tuberculosis growth, adds new insights into a vital mycobacterial pathway, which may inspire new drug discovery strategies. PMID:26324178

  10. Octanoylation of early intermediates of mycobacterial methylglucose lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Maranha, Ana; Moynihan, Patrick J; Miranda, Vanessa; Correia Lourenço, Eva; Nunes-Costa, Daniela; Fraga, Joana S; José Barbosa Pereira, Pedro; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Ventura, M Rita; Clarke, Anthony J; Empadinhas, Nuno

    2015-09-01

    Mycobacteria synthesize unique intracellular methylglucose lipopolysaccharides (MGLP) proposed to modulate fatty acid metabolism. In addition to the partial esterification of glucose or methylglucose units with short-chain fatty acids, octanoate was invariably detected on the MGLP reducing end. We have identified a novel sugar octanoyltransferase (OctT) that efficiently transfers octanoate to glucosylglycerate (GG) and diglucosylglycerate (DGG), the earliest intermediates in MGLP biosynthesis. Enzymatic studies, synthetic chemistry, NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry approaches suggest that, in contrast to the prevailing consensus, octanoate is not esterified to the primary hydroxyl group of glycerate but instead to the C6 OH of the second glucose in DGG. These observations raise important new questions about the MGLP reducing end architecture and about subsequent biosynthetic steps. Functional characterization of this unique octanoyltransferase, whose gene has been proposed to be essential for M. tuberculosis growth, adds new insights into a vital mycobacterial pathway, which may inspire new drug discovery strategies.

  11. Genetic Basis for Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigen Biosynthesis in Bordetellae

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Andrew; Allen, Andrew G.; Cadisch, Joanna; Thomas, Richard; Stevens, Kim; Churcher, Carol M.; Badcock, K. L.; Parkhill, Julian; Barrell, Bart; Maskell, Duncan J.

    1999-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica and Bordetella parapertussis express a surface polysaccharide, attached to a lipopolysaccharide, which has been called O antigen. This structure is absent from Bordetella pertussis. We report the identification of a large genetic locus in B. bronchiseptica and B. parapertussis that is required for O-antigen biosynthesis. The locus is replaced by an insertion sequence in B. pertussis, explaining the lack of O-antigen biosynthesis in this species. The DNA sequence of the B. bronchiseptica locus has been determined and the presence of 21 open reading frames has been revealed. We have ascribed putative functions to many of these open reading frames based on database searches. Mutations in the locus in B. bronchiseptica and B. parapertussis prevent O-antigen biosynthesis and provide tools for the study of the role of O antigen in infections caused by these bacteria. PMID:10417135

  12. Stimulation of peritoneal cell arginase by bacterial lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Ryan, J L; Yohe, W B; Morrison, D C

    1980-05-01

    The conditions under which bacterial endotoxins stimulate arginase production in mouse peritoneal macrophages have been defined. Both lipid-A and lipid-A-associated protein are potent activators. Fetal calf serum and normal mouse serum enhance macrophage arginase levels in the presence and absence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS in the amount of 10(-1) microgram/ml represents a maximal stimulus for macrophage arginase production and release. Thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal cells have increased arginase activity, compared with resident cells. This activity can be stimulated further by the addition of LPS. Arginase levels may alter the outcome of in vitro immunologic processes by depleting arginine and may also serve as a useful indicator of the state of activation of macrophages.

  13. Involvement of Ganglioside GM3 in G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest of Human Monocytic Cells Induced by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Cytolethal Distending Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Mise, Koji; Akifusa, Sumio; Watarai, Shinobu; Ansai, Toshihiro; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Takehara, Tadamichi

    2005-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans produces a toxin called cytolethal distending toxin (CDT), which causes host cell DNA damage leading to the induction of DNA damage checkpoint pathways. CDT consists of three subunits, CdtA, CdtB, and CdtC. CdtB is the active subunit of CDT and exerts its effect as a nuclease that damages nuclear DNA, triggering cell cycle arrest. In the present study, we confirmed that the only combination of toxin proteins causing cell cycle arrest was that of all three recombinant CDT (rCDT) protein subunits. Furthermore, in order for rCDT to demonstrate toxicity, it was necessary for CdtA and CdtC to access the cell before CdtB. The coexistence of CdtA and CdtC was necessary for these subunits to bind to the cell. Cells treated with the glucosylceramide synthesis inhibitor 1-phenyl-2-palmitoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol showed resistance to the cytotoxicity induced by rCDT. Furthermore, LY-B cells, which are deficient in the biosynthesis of sphingolipid, also showed resistance to the cytotoxicity induced by rCDT. To evaluate the binding of each subunit for glucosylceramides, we performed thin-layer chromatography immunostaining. The results indicated that each subunit reacted with the glycosphingolipids GM1, GM2, GM3, Gb3, and Gb4. The rCDT mixture incubated with liposomes containing GM3 displayed partially reduced toxicity. These results indicate that GM3 can act as a CDT receptor. PMID:16040998

  14. The purification and chemical composition of the lipopolysaccharide of Pseudomonas alcaligenes

    PubMed Central

    Key, B. A.; Gray, G. W.; Wilkinson, S. G.

    1970-01-01

    1. A method for obtaining lipopolysaccharide free from glycosaminopeptide from isolated cell walls of Pseudomonas alcaligenes is discussed. 2. About 70–75% of the lipopolysaccharide and 86–90% of the isolated lipid A have been accounted for in terms of identifiable components. 3. Hydrolysates of lipid A contain mainly inorganic phosphate, glucosamine, O-phosphorylglucosamine and fatty acids (dodecanoic acid, dodec-2-enoic acid, 3-hydroxydecanoic acid and 3-hydroxydodecanoic acid), of which the last is the main N-acylating acid of the glucosamine backbone. 4. Material corresponding to the polysaccharide moiety of the lipopolysaccharide is extensively degraded. 5. Solubilization of the lipopolysaccharide by using sodium deoxycholate appreciably affects the chemical composition of the material. PMID:5499968

  15. Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide inhibition of gastric mucosal laminin receptor: effect of sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, J; Czajkowski, A; Yotsumoto, F; Slomiany, A; Slomiany, B L

    1993-11-01

    1. The effect of cell-wall lipopolysaccharide from Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium implicated in the etiology of gastric disease, on the gastric mucosal laminin-receptor was investigated. 2. The receptor, isolated from gastric epithelial cell membrane by affinity chromatography on laminin-coupled Sepharose, was radioiodinated and incorporated into liposomes which exhibited specific affinity towards laminin-coated surface. 3. The binding of liposomal receptor to laminin-coated surface was inhibited by H. pylori lipopolysaccharide, which at 50 micrograms/ml caused a nearly complete (97%) inhibition in binding. 4. The inhibitory effect of the lipopolysaccharide was prevented by a cytoprotective agent, sulglycotide, that evoked a 92% restoration in binding at 40 micrograms/ml. 5. The results demonstrate that through its lipopolysaccharide H. pylori is capable of disrupting the gastric mucosal integrity and that this detrimental effect could be successfully countered by sulglycotide.

  16. Comparative airway inflammatory response of normal volunteers to ozone and lipopolysaccharide challenge

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are environmental pollutants with adverse heatth effects noted in both healthy and asthmatic individuals. The authors and others have shown that inhalation of ozone and LPS both induce airway neutrophilia. Based on these similarities, the author...

  17. Structural analysis and involvement in plant innate immunity of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Casabuono, Adriana; Petrocelli, Silvana; Ottado, Jorgelina; Orellano, Elena G; Couto, Alicia S

    2011-07-22

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) causes citrus canker, provoking defoliation and premature fruit drop with concomitant economical damage. In plant pathogenic bacteria, lipopolysaccharides are important virulence factors, and they are being increasingly recognized as major pathogen-associated molecular patterns for plants. In general, three domains are recognized in a lipopolysaccharide: the hydrophobic lipid A, the hydrophilic O-antigen polysaccharide, and the core oligosaccharide, connecting lipid A and O-antigen. In this work, we have determined the structure of purified lipopolysaccharides obtained from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri wild type and a mutant of the O-antigen ABC transporter encoded by the wzt gene. High pH anion exchange chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrum analysis were performed, enabling determination of the structure not only of the released oligosaccharides and lipid A moieties but also the intact lipopolysaccharides. The results demonstrate that Xac wild type and Xacwzt LPSs are composed mainly of a penta- or tetra-acylated diglucosamine backbone attached to either two pyrophosphorylethanolamine groups or to one pyrophosphorylethanolamine group and one phosphorylethanolamine group. The core region consists of a branched oligosaccharide formed by Kdo₂Hex₆GalA₃Fuc3NAcRha₄ and two phosphate groups. As expected, the presence of a rhamnose homo-oligosaccharide as O-antigen was determined only in the Xac wild type lipopolysaccharide. In addition, we have examined how lipopolysaccharides from Xac function in the pathogenesis process. We analyzed the response of the different lipopolysaccharides during the stomata aperture closure cycle, the callose deposition, the expression of defense-related genes, and reactive oxygen species production in citrus leaves, suggesting a functional role of the O-antigen from Xac lipopolysaccharides in the basal response.

  18. Blockade of the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Glutamate Receptor Ameliorates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Renal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ho-Shiang; Ma, Ming-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation in rat kidney reduces renal perfusion and ultrafiltration. Hypoperfusion-induced ischemia is the most frequent cause of functional insufficiency in the endotoxemic kidney. Here, we used non-hypotensive rat model of lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia to examine whether NMDA receptor hyperfunction contributes to acute kidney injury. Lipopolysaccharide-induced renal damage via increased enzymuria and hemodynamic impairments were ameliorated by co-treatment with the NMDA receptor blocker, MK-801. The NMDA receptor NR1 subunit in the rat kidney mainly co-localized with serine racemase, an enzyme responsible for synthesizing the NMDA receptor co-agonist, D-serine. The NMDA receptor hyperfunction in lipopolysaccharide-treated kidneys was demonstrated by NR1 and serine racemase upregulation, particularly in renal tubules, and by increased D-serine levels. Lipopolysaccharide also induced cell damage in cultured tubular cell lines and primary rat proximal tubular cells. This damage was mitigated by MK-801 and by small interfering RNA targeting NR1. Lipopolysaccharide increased cytokine release in tubular cell lines via toll-like receptor 4. The release of interleukin-1β from these cells are the most abundant. An interleukin-1 receptor antagonist not only attenuated cell death but also abolished lipopolysaccharide-induced NR1 and serine racemase upregulation and increases in D-serine secretion, suggesting that interleukin-1β-mediated NMDA receptor hyperfunction participates in lipopolysaccharide-induced tubular damage. The results of this study indicate NMDA receptor hyperfunction via cytokine effect participates in lipopolysaccharide-induced renal insufficiency. Blockade of NMDA receptors may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of sepsis-associated renal failure. PMID:26133372

  19. Structural Analysis and Involvement in Plant Innate Immunity of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri Lipopolysaccharide*

    PubMed Central

    Casabuono, Adriana; Petrocelli, Silvana; Ottado, Jorgelina; Orellano, Elena G.; Couto, Alicia S.

    2011-01-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) causes citrus canker, provoking defoliation and premature fruit drop with concomitant economical damage. In plant pathogenic bacteria, lipopolysaccharides are important virulence factors, and they are being increasingly recognized as major pathogen-associated molecular patterns for plants. In general, three domains are recognized in a lipopolysaccharide: the hydrophobic lipid A, the hydrophilic O-antigen polysaccharide, and the core oligosaccharide, connecting lipid A and O-antigen. In this work, we have determined the structure of purified lipopolysaccharides obtained from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri wild type and a mutant of the O-antigen ABC transporter encoded by the wzt gene. High pH anion exchange chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrum analysis were performed, enabling determination of the structure not only of the released oligosaccharides and lipid A moieties but also the intact lipopolysaccharides. The results demonstrate that Xac wild type and Xacwzt LPSs are composed mainly of a penta- or tetra-acylated diglucosamine backbone attached to either two pyrophosphorylethanolamine groups or to one pyrophosphorylethanolamine group and one phosphorylethanolamine group. The core region consists of a branched oligosaccharide formed by Kdo2Hex6GalA3Fuc3NAcRha4 and two phosphate groups. As expected, the presence of a rhamnose homo-oligosaccharide as O-antigen was determined only in the Xac wild type lipopolysaccharide. In addition, we have examined how lipopolysaccharides from Xac function in the pathogenesis process. We analyzed the response of the different lipopolysaccharides during the stomata aperture closure cycle, the callose deposition, the expression of defense-related genes, and reactive oxygen species production in citrus leaves, suggesting a functional role of the O-antigen from Xac lipopolysaccharides in the basal response. PMID:21596742

  20. Influence of feeding status on neuronal activity in the hypothalamus during lipopolysaccharide-induced anorexia in rats.

    PubMed

    Gautron, L; Mingam, R; Moranis, A; Combe, C; Layé, S

    2005-01-01

    Fasting attenuates disease-associated anorexia, but the mechanisms underlying this effect are not well understood. In the present study, we investigated the extent to which a 48 h fast alters hypothalamic neuronal activity in response to the anorectic effects of lipopolysaccharide in rats. Male rats were fed ad libitum or fasted, and were injected with i.p. saline or lipopolysaccharide (250 microg/kg). Immunohistochemistry for Fos protein was used to visualize neuronal activity in response to lipopolysaccharide within selected hypothalamic feeding regulatory nuclei. Additionally, food intake, body weight, plasma interleukin-1 and leptin levels, and the expression of mRNA for appetite-related neuropeptides (neuropeptide Y, proopiomelanocortin and cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript) were measured in a time-related manner. Our data show that the pattern of lipopolysaccharide-induced Fos expression was similar in most hypothalamic nuclei whatever the feeding status. However, we observed that fasting significantly reduced lipopolysaccharide-induced Fos expression in the paraventricular nucleus, in association with an attenuated lipopolysaccharide-induced anorexia and body weight loss. Moreover, lipopolysaccharide reduced fasting-induced Fos expression in the perifornical area of the lateral hypothalamus. Lipopolysaccharide-induced circulating levels of interleukin-1 were similar across feeding status. Finally, fasting, but not lipopolysaccharide, affected circulating level of leptin and appetite-related neuropeptides expression in the arcuate nucleus. Together, our data show that fasting modulates lipopolysaccharide-induced anorexia and body weight loss in association with neural changes in specific hypothalamic nuclei.

  1. Lipopolysaccharide a virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori: effect of antiulcer agents.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, J

    1998-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori plays a major role in the pathogenesis of gastric disease. The gastric epithelial integrity is compromised by the H. pylori cell wall lipopolysaccharide untoward effect on the gastric epithelial cell receptors interaction with proteins of extracellular matrix, glycoproteins of mucus coat, and bioactive peptides. These interactions cause the weakening of the mucus coat rendering the underying epithelium vulnerable to noxious luminal contents and disrupting the regulatory feedback of somatostatin and gastrin. Moreover, H. pylori lipopolysaccharide induces histologic lesions typical of acute gastritis and these changes are reflected in the increased epithelial cell apoptosis. These findings thus identify cell wall lipopolysaccharide as a virulent factor responsible for the H. pylori effect on gastric epithelium. The effect of antiulcer agents on the interference of lipopolysaccharide with the laminin receptor was found to be most efficiently countered by ebrotidine, sulglycotide and sucralfate, whereas sulglycotide is the most potent in the reversal of the inhibitory effect of the lipopolysaccharide on mucin receptor binding. In the case of somatostatin-receptor binding, sulglycotide followed by sucralfate and ebrotidine showed the most potency in of reversing the effect of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide. Thus these antiulcer agents have a great promise in the treatment gastric diseases associated with H. pylori infection.

  2. Modification of Salmonella Lipopolysaccharides Prevents the Outer Membrane Penetration of Novobiocin

    PubMed Central

    Nobre, Thatyane M.; Martynowycz, Michael W.; Andreev, Konstantin; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Nikaido, Hiroshi; Gidalevitz, David

    2015-01-01

    Small hydrophilic antibiotics traverse the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria through porin channels. Large lipophilic agents traverse the outer membrane through its bilayer, containing a majority of lipopolysaccharides in its outer leaflet. Genes controlled by the two-component regulatory system PhoPQ modify lipopolysaccharides. We isolate lipopolysaccharides from isogenic mutants of Salmonella sp., one lacking the modification, the other fully modified. These lipopolysaccharides were reconstituted as monolayers at the air-water interface, and their properties, as well as their interaction with a large lipophilic drug, novobiocin, was studied. X-ray reflectivity showed that the drug penetrated the monolayer of the unmodified lipopolysaccharides reaching the hydrophobic region, but was prevented from this penetration into the modified lipopolysaccharides. Results correlate with behavior of bacterial cells, which become resistant to antibiotics after PhoPQ-regulated modifications. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction showed that novobiocin produced a striking increase in crystalline coherence length, and the size of the near-crystalline domains. PMID:26682812

  3. Modification of Salmonella Lipopolysaccharides Prevents the Outer Membrane Penetration of Novobiocin.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Thatyane M; Martynowycz, Michael W; Andreev, Konstantin; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Nikaido, Hiroshi; Gidalevitz, David

    2015-12-15

    Small hydrophilic antibiotics traverse the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria through porin channels. Large lipophilic agents traverse the outer membrane through its bilayer, containing a majority of lipopolysaccharides in its outer leaflet. Genes controlled by the two-component regulatory system PhoPQ modify lipopolysaccharides. We isolate lipopolysaccharides from isogenic mutants of Salmonella sp., one lacking the modification, the other fully modified. These lipopolysaccharides were reconstituted as monolayers at the air-water interface, and their properties, as well as their interaction with a large lipophilic drug, novobiocin, was studied. X-ray reflectivity showed that the drug penetrated the monolayer of the unmodified lipopolysaccharides reaching the hydrophobic region, but was prevented from this penetration into the modified lipopolysaccharides. Results correlate with behavior of bacterial cells, which become resistant to antibiotics after PhoPQ-regulated modifications. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction showed that novobiocin produced a striking increase in crystalline coherence length, and the size of the near-crystalline domains.

  4. Legionella pneumophila lipopolysaccharide activates the classical complement pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Mintz, C S; Schultz, D R; Arnold, P I; Johnson, W

    1992-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative bacterium capable of entering and growing in alveolar macrophages and monocytes. Complement and complement receptors are important in the uptake of L. pneumophila by human mononuclear phagocytes. The surface molecules of L. pneumophila that activate the complement system are unknown. To identify these factors, we investigated the effects of L. pneumophila lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the classical and alternative complement pathways of normal human serum by functional hemolytic assays. Although incubation of LPS in normal human serum at 37 degrees C resulted in the activation of both pathways, complement activation proceeded primarily through the classical pathway. Activation of the classical pathway by LPS was dependent on natural antibodies of the immunoglobulin M class that were present in various quantities in sera from different normal individuals but were absent in an immunoglobulin-deficient serum obtained from an agammaglobulinemic patient. Additional studies using sheep erythrocytes coated with LPS suggested that the antibodies recognized antigenic sites in the carbohydrate portion of LPS. The ability of LPS to interact with the complement system suggests a role for LPS in the uptake of L. pneumophila by mononuclear phagocytes. PMID:1612744

  5. Passive transfer of leishmania lipopolysaccharide confers parasite survival in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Handman, E.; Schnur, L.F.; Spithill, T.W.; Mitchell, G.F.

    1986-12-01

    Infection of macrophages by the intracellular protozoan parasite Leishmania involves specific attachment to the host membrane, followed by phagocytosis and intracellular survival and growth. Two parasite molecules have been implicated in the attachment event: Leishmania lipopolysaccharide (L-LPS) and a glycoprotein (gp63). This study was designed to clarify the role of L-LPS in infection and the stage in the process of infection at which it operates. The authors have recently identified a Leishmania major strain (LRC-L119) which lacks the L-LPS molecule and is not infective for hamsters or mice. This parasite was isolated from a gerbil in Kenya and was identified phenotypically as L. major by isoenzyme and fatty acid analysis. In this study they have confirmed at the genotype level that LRC-L119 is L. major by analyzing and comparing the organization of cloned DNA sequences in the genome of different strains of L. major. Here they show that LRC-L119 promastigotes are phagocytosed rapidly by macrophages in vitro, but in contrast to virulent strains of L. major, they are then killed over a period of 18 hr. In addition, they show that transfer of purified L-LPS from a virulent clone of L. major (V121) into LRC-L119 promastigotes confers on them the ability to survive in macrophages in vitro.

  6. Lipopolysaccharide induced acute red eye and corneal ulcers.

    PubMed

    Schultz, C L; Morck, D W; McKay, S G; Olson, M E; Buret, A

    1997-01-01

    Using a new animal model, the aims of this study were to assess the role played by purified lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and neutrophils in the pathogenesis of acute red-eye reactions (ARE) and corneal ulcers. In addition, IL-1 alpha was assessed for its implications in the formation of corneal ulcers. Following corneal abrasion, eyes of rabbits underwent single or double exposures to various doses of LPS from Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Serratia marcescens. This protocol induced ARE symptoms, and their severity depended on the dosage, number of LPS exposures, and type of LPS used (LPS from S. marcescens showing highest virulence). Corneal ulcers were induced by delivering a high dose of Serratia LPS (100 micrograms) followed by a low dose (10 micrograms). Histopathological examination revealed that both ARE and corneal ulceration were associated with prominent neutrophil infiltration. In addition, many lymphocytes and other monocytic cells infiltrated ulcerated ocular tissue. Tear fluids obtained from ulcerated eyes contained high concentrations of a protein recognized by anti-rabbit IL-1 alpha antibodies as demonstrated by immunoblotting studies. The results indicate that LPS can induce ARE and corneal ulceration in the absence of any live bacteria. Moreover, the findings implicate the accumulation of neutrophils and IL-1 alpha-related proteins in the pathogenesis of ARE and corneal ulcers.

  7. Arctigenin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianbao; Sun, Hongzhi; Zhou, Dun; Xi, Huanjiu; Shan, Lina

    2015-04-01

    Arctigenin (ATG) has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effects of ATG on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) remains not well understood. In the present study, our investigation was designed to reveal the effect of ATG on LPS-induced ALI in rats. We found that ATG pretreatment attenuated the LPS-induced ALI, as evidenced by the reduced histological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and wet-to-dry weight ratio in the lung tissues. This was accompanied by the decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-1 (IL-6) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Furthermore, ATG downregulated the expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65, promoted the phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB-α (IκBα) and activated the adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPKα) in the lung tissues. Our results suggested that ATG attenuates the LPS-induced ALI via activation of AMPK and suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway.

  8. Proteomic Changes in Chicken Plasma Induced by Salmonella typhimurium Lipopolysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Packialakshmi, Balamurugan; Liyanage, Rohana; Lay, Jackson O.; Makkar, Sarbjeet K.; Rath, Narayan C.

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are cell wall components of Gram-negative bacteria that produce inflammation and sickness in higher animals. The objective was to identify plasma proteomic changes in an avian model of inflammation. Chickens were treated with either saline or LPS, and blood was collected at 24 hours postinjection. The pooled plasma samples were depleted of high-abundant proteins and analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS). MALDI analyses showed an increase in fibrinogen beta-derived peptide and a decrease in apolipoprotein-AII-derived peptide in LPS samples. Label-free quantitation of LC–MS/MS spectra revealed an increase in the levels of α1-acid glycoprotein, a chemokine CCLI10, and cathelicidin-2, but a decrease in an interferon-stimulated gene-12-2 protein in the LPS group. These differentially expressed proteins are associated with immunomodulation, cytokine changes, and defense mechanisms, which may be useful as candidate biomarkers of infection and inflammation. PMID:27053921

  9. Visualization and analysis of lipopolysaccharide distribution in binary phospholipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, Maria Florencia; Sanchez, Susana; Bakas, Laura

    2009-05-22

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an endotoxin released from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria during infections. It have been reported that LPS may play a role in the outer membrane of bacteria similar to that of cholesterol in eukaryotic plasma membranes. In this article we compare the effect of introducing LPS or cholesterol in liposomes made of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine on the solubilization process by Triton X-100. The results show that liposomes containing LPS or cholesterol are more resistant to solubilization by Triton X-100 than the binary phospholipid mixtures at 4 {sup o}C. The LPS distribution was analyzed on GUVs of DPPC:DOPC using FITC-LPS. Solid and liquid-crystalline domains were visualized labeling the GUVs with LAURDAN and GP images were acquired using a two-photon microscope. The images show a selective distribution of LPS in gel domains. Our results support the hypothesis that LPS could aggregate and concentrate selectively in biological membranes providing a mechanism to bring together several components of the LPS-sensing machinery.

  10. Classification of Proteus penneri lipopolysaccharides into core region serotypes.

    PubMed

    Palusiak, Agata

    2016-12-01

    The frequency of P. penneri isolation from hospital patients, mostly from urine and wounds, keeps on growing, and numerous isolates are multi-drug resistant. P. penneri rods produce lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which may lead to the septic shock. Until now, O-specific polysaccharide has been the best structurally and serologically characterized region of P. penneri LPS. It is worth having an insight into the serological specificity of both poly- and oligosaccharide parts of P. penneri LPS. The P. penneri core region is less structurally diverse than OPS, but still, among other enterobacterial LPS core regions, it is characterized by structural variability. In the present study, the serological reactivity of 25 P. penneri LPS core regions was analyzed by ELISA, passive immunohemolysis and Western blot technique using five polyclonal P. penneri antisera after or without their adsorption with the respective LPSs. The results allowed the assignment of the tested strains to five new core serotypes, which together with published serological studies led to the creation of the first serotyping scheme based on LPS core reactivities of 35 P. penneri and three P. mirabilis strains. Together with the O types scheme, it will facilitate assigning Proteus LPSs of clinical isolates into appropriate O and R serotypes.

  11. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on the hemocyte apoptosis of Eriocheir sinensis *

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hai-sheng; Lyu, Sun-jian; Xu, Jie-hao; Lu, Bin-jie; Zhao, Jing; Li, Song; Li, Yi-qun; Chen, Yu-yin

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the possible toxicity mechanism of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) extracted from Gram-negative bacteria in Eriocheir sinensis hemocytes. Apoptotic hemocytes and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production induced by the LPS were monitored by the combination of flow cytometry and microscope observation. It was shown that LPS induced serious damage on the DNA and morphological changes in hemocytes, including cell shrinkage, fracture of nucleus membrane, margination, condensation and fragmentation of chromatin, and formation of apoptotic bodies indicating obvious hemocyte apoptosis. As compared with the control group, the apoptotic cell ratio increased to 30.61% and 39.01% after 1-h exposure and 57.72% and 75.01% after 2-h exposure to 1 and 10 μg/ml LPS, respectively (P<0.05). Significant outburst of ROS production was observed in LPS-treated hemocytes with approximately 176.6% of relative dichlorofluorescein mean fluorescence at 1-h exposure, followed by a drastic decline (P<0.05). These results indicated that LPS would induce oxidative stress on hemocytes from E. sinensis and cause ROS burst, DNA damage, and subsequently apoptosis. The process of ROS-mediated apoptosis might be one of the potential toxicity mechanisms of LPS on crustacean hemocytes. PMID:26642180

  12. Meningococcal lipopolysaccharides: virulence factor and potential vaccine component.

    PubMed Central

    Verheul, A F; Snippe, H; Poolman, J T

    1993-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are surface components of the outer membrane of Neisseria meningitidis. Today, 12 different types of meningococcal LPS (immunotypes) are known, of which 3 are prevalent in the western world. The differences between these immunotypes are in the oligosaccharide part of the LPS molecule and consist of small differences in the oligosaccharide structure, the amount and location of phosphoethanolamine groups, and the degree of O acetylation of individual monosaccharides. Although the differences between the various immunotypes are small, they have a profound influence on the immunochemical and immunological properties of these molecules. Furthermore, each individual strain synthesizes a number of different LPS molecules. The expression of the various components (protective epitopes) is influenced by growth conditions and growth phase. Meningococci can endogenously sialyate their LPS, which constitutes one of the mechanisms by which N. meningitidis can evade the response of the human host. Meningococcal LPS play a key role in the induction of septic shock and can probably enhance the invasiveness of meningococcal strains and shield protective epitopes. Therefore, incorporation of (detoxified) LPS or oligosaccharide components derived therefrom might be very beneficial for the efficacy of a vaccine against group B meningococci. An overview of the development of vaccines against group B meningococci is given, and the status and potential of meningococcal LPS-derived (synthetic) oligosaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines are discussed. PMID:8464406

  13. Variability in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lipopolysaccharide Expression during Crude Oil Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Norman, R. Sean; Frontera-Suau, Roberto; Morris, Pamela J.

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial utilization of crude oil components, such as the n-alkanes, requires complex cell surface adaptation to allow adherence to oil. To better understand microbial cell surface adaptation to growth on crude oil, the cell surface characteristics of two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, U1 and U3, both isolated from the same crude oil-degrading microbial community enriched on Bonny Light crude oil (BLC), were compared. Analysis of growth rates demonstrated an increased lag time for U1 cells compared to U3 cells. Amendment with EDTA inhibited U1 and U3 growth and degradation of the n-alkane component of BLC, suggesting a link between cell surface structure and crude oil degradation. U1 cells demonstrated a smooth-to-rough colony morphology transition when grown on BLC, while U3 cells exhibited rough colony morphology at the outset. Combining high-resolution atomic force microscopy of the cell surface and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of extracted lipopolysaccharides (LPS), we demonstrate that isolates grown on BLC have reduced O-antigen expression compared with that of glucose-grown cells. The loss of O-antigen resulted in shorter LPS molecules, increased cell surface hydrophobicity, and increased n-alkane degradation. PMID:12324360

  14. Lipopolysaccharide Neutralization by Cationic-Amphiphilic Polymers through Pseudoaggregate Formation.

    PubMed

    Uppu, Divakara S S M; Haldar, Jayanta

    2016-03-14

    Synthetic polymers incorporating the cationic charge and hydrophobicity to mimic the function of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been developed. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers bind to bacterial membranes that generally contain negatively charged phospholipids and cause membrane disintegration resulting in cell death; however, cationic-amphiphilic antibacterial polymers with endotoxin neutralization properties, to the best of our knowledge, have not been reported. Bacterial endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cause sepsis that is responsible for a great amount of mortality worldwide. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers can also bind to negatively charged and hydrophobic LPS and cause detoxification. Hence, we envisaged that cationic-amphiphilic polymers can have both antibacterial as well as LPS binding properties. Here we report synthetic amphiphilic polymers with both antibacterial as well as endotoxin neutralizing properties. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines in human monocytes caused by LPS stimulation were inhibited by >80% when coincubated with these polymers. These reductions were found to be dependent on concentration and, more importantly, on the side-chain chemical structure due to variations in the hydrophobicity profiles of these polymers. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers bind and cause LPS neutralization and detoxification. Investigations of polymer interaction with LPS using fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that these polymers bind but neither dissociate nor promote LPS aggregation. We show that polymer binding to LPS leads to sort of a pseudoaggregate formation resulting in LPS neutralization/detoxification. These findings provide an unusual mechanism of LPS neutralization using novel synthetic cationic-amphiphilic polymers.

  15. Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide Promotes Destabilization of Lung Surfactant-Like Films

    PubMed Central

    Cañadas, Olga; Keough, Kevin M.W.; Casals, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    The airspaces are lined with a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)-rich film called pulmonary surfactant, which is named for its ability to maintain normal respiratory mechanics by reducing surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Inhaled airborne particles containing bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) may incorporate into the surfactant monolayer. In this study, we evaluated the effect of smooth LPS (S-LPS), containing the entire core oligosaccharide region and the O-antigen, on the biophysical properties of lung surfactant-like films composed of either DPPC or DPPC/palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylglycerol (POPG)/palmitic acid (PA) (28:9:5.6, w/w/w). Our results show that low amounts of S-LPS fluidized DPPC monolayers, as demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy and changes in the compressibility modulus. This promoted early collapse and prevented the attainment of high surface pressures. These destabilizing effects could not be relieved by repeated compression-expansion cycles. Similar effects were observed with surfactant-like films composed of DPPC/POPG/PA. On the other hand, the interaction of SP-A, a surfactant membrane-associated alveolar protein that also binds to LPS, with surfactant-like films containing S-LPS increased monolayer destabilization due to the extraction of lipid molecules from the monolayer, leading to the dissolution of monolayer material in the aqueous subphase. This suggests that SP-A may act as an LPS scavenger. PMID:21190662

  16. Bitter gourd suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Kobori, Masuko; Nakayama, Hirosuke; Fukushima, Kenji; Ohnishi-Kameyama, Mayumi; Ono, Hiroshi; Fukushima, Tatsunobu; Akimoto, Yukari; Masumoto, Saeko; Yukizaki, Chizuko; Hoshi, Yoshikazu; Deguchi, Tomoaki; Yoshida, Mitsuru

    2008-06-11

    Bitter gourd ( Momordica charantia L.) is a popular tropical vegetable in Asian countries. Previously it was shown that bitter gourd placenta extract suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TNFalpha production in RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells. Here it is shown that the butanol-soluble fraction of bitter gourd placenta extract strongly suppresses LPS-induced TNFalpha production in RAW 264.7 cells. Gene expression analysis using a fibrous DNA microarray showed that the bitter gourd butanol fraction suppressed expression of various LPS-induced inflammatory genes, such as those for TNF, IL1alpha, IL1beta, G1p2, and Ccl5. The butanol fraction significantly suppressed NFkappaB DNA binding activity and phosphorylation of p38, JNK, and ERK MAPKs. Components in the active fraction from bitter gourd were identified as 1-alpha-linolenoyl-lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), 2-alpha-linolenoyl-LPC, 1-lynoleoyl-LPC, and 2-linoleoyl-LPC. Purified 1-alpha-linolenoyl-LPC and 1-linoleoyl-LPC suppressed the LPS-induced TNFalpha production of RAW 264.7 cells at a concentration of 10 microg/mL.

  17. [Extraction and characterization of the lipopolysaccharide of Bartonella quintana

    PubMed

    Matera, G.; Liberto, M.C.; Pollio, A.; Diana, R.; Martucci, M.; Parlato, G.; Gulletta, E.; Foca', A.

    1999-01-01

    Bartonella quintana has been reported as the cause of trench fever, persistent endocarditis, bacteriaemia and has been isolated with an increasing incidence in clinical specimens from AIDS patients. One of the main pathogenic factors of gram-negative bacteria, including B. quintana, is the lipopolysaccharide (LPS). However, very little information is available on the features of Bartonella LPS. The aim of the present study was to extract, purify and characterise B. quintana LPS. The effect of the LPS under scrutiny was also evaluated on TNFa release by means of the "in vitro" human whole blood model of sepsis. The Oklahoma strain of B. quintana was grown on sheep blood agar, at 37 C, in a moist atmosphere containing 5% carbon dioxide. Cells were harvested and washed in sterile and apyrogenic saline solution and LPS extracted following the procedure of Westphal e Jann (1965), modified by Minnick (1994). The LPS of B. quintana showed the migration pattern of a deep rough chemotype, and the chromogenic limulus amoebocyte lysate test (LAL test) revealed strong reactivity at low concentrations (6.2 pg/ml). Samples of human whole blood stimulated by 1000 ng/ml of B. quintana LPS released 1707 378 pg/ml of TNFa.

  18. Monoclonal Antibodies to Shigella Lipopolysaccharide Are Useful for Vaccine Production

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jisheng; Smith, Mark A.; Benjamin, William H.; Kaminski, Robert W.; Wenzel, Heather

    2016-01-01

    There is a significant need for an effective multivalent Shigella vaccine that targets the most prevalent serotypes. Most Shigella vaccines under development utilize serotype-specific lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) as a major component based on protection and epidemiological data. As vaccine formulations advance from monovalent to multivalent, assays and reagents need to be developed to accurately and reproducibly quantitate the amount of LPSs from multiple serotypes in the final product. To facilitate this effort, we produced 36 hybridomas that secrete monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the O antigen on the LPS from Shigella flexneri 2a, Shigella flexneri 3a, and Shigella sonnei. We used six of these monoclonal antibodies for an inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA), measuring LPSs with high sensitivity and specificity. It was also demonstrated that the Shigella serotype-specific MAbs were useful for bacterial surface staining detected by flow cytometry. These MAbs are also useful for standardizing the serum bactericidal assay (SBA) for Shigella. Functional assays, such as the in vitro bactericidal assay, are necessary for vaccine evaluation and may serve as immunological correlates of immunity. An S. flexneri 2a-specific monoclonal antibody killed S. flexneri 2b isolates, suggesting that S. flexneri 2a LPS may induce cross-protection against S. flexneri 2b. Overall, the Shigella LPS-specific MAbs described have potential utility to the vaccine development community for assessing multivalent vaccine composition and as a reliable control for multiple immunoassays used to assess vaccine potency. PMID:27280622

  19. Human CAP18: a novel antimicrobial lipopolysaccharide-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Larrick, J W; Hirata, M; Balint, R F; Lee, J; Zhong, J; Wright, S C

    1995-01-01

    CAP18 (18-kDa cationic antimicrobial protein) is a protein originally identified and purified from rabbit leukocytes on the basis of its capacity to bind and inhibit various activities of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here we report the cloning of human CAP18 and characterize the anti-LPS activity of the C-terminal fragment. Oligonucleotide probes designed from the rabbit CAP18 cDNA were used to identify human CAP18 from a bone marrow cDNA library. The cDNA encodes a protein composed of a 30-amino-acid signal peptide, a 103-amino-acid N-terminal domain of unknown function, and a C-terminal domain of 37 amino acids homologous to the LPS-binding antimicrobial domain of rabbit CAP18, designated CAP18(104-140). A human CAP18-specific antiserum was generated by using CAP18 expressed as a fusion protein with the maltose-binding protein. Western blots (immunoblots) with this antiserum showed specific expression of human CAP18 in granulocytes. Synthetic human CAP18(104-140) and a more active truncated fragment, CAP18(104-135), were shown to (i) bind to erythrocytes coated with diverse strains of LPS, (ii) inhibit LPS-induced release of nitric oxide from macrophages, (iii) inhibit LPS-induced generation of tissue factor, and (iv) protect mice from LPS lethality. CAP18(104-140) may have therapeutic utility for conditions associated with elevated concentrations of LPS. PMID:7890387

  20. Lipopolysaccharide induces autotaxin expression in human monocytic THP-1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li Song; Zhang Junjie

    2009-01-09

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a secreted enzyme with lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity, which converts lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) into lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive phospholipid involved in numerous biological activities, including cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration. In the present study, we found that bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a well-known initiator of the inflammatory response, induced ATX expression in monocytic THP-1 cells. The activation of PKR, JNK, and p38 MAPK was required for the ATX induction. The LPS-induced ATX in THP-1 cells was characterized as the {beta} isoform. In the presence of LPC, ATX could promote the migrations of THP-1 and Jurkat cells, which was inhibited by pertussis toxin (PTX), an inhibitor of Gi-mediated LPA receptor signaling. In summary, LPS induces ATX expression in THP-1 cells via a PKR, JNK and p38 MAPK-mediated mechanism, and the ATX induction is likely to enhance immune cell migration in proinflammatory response by regulating LPA levels in the microenvironment.

  1. Lipopolysaccharide-induced hemolysis: Evidence for direct membrane interactions

    PubMed Central

    Brauckmann, Stephan; Effenberger-Neidnicht, Katharina; de Groot, Herbert; Nagel, Michael; Mayer, Christian; Peters, Jürgen; Hartmann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    While hemolysis in patients with sepsis is associated with increased mortality its mechanisms are unknown and Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 mediated effects, complement-mediated hemolysis, or direct cell membrane effects are all conceivable mechanisms. In this study, we tested the hypotheses that toxic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as well as non-toxic RS-LPS evokes hemolysis (1) by direct membrane effects, and (2) independent of the complement system and TLR-4 activation. We found, that incubation with LPS resulted in a marked time and concentration dependent increase of free hemoglobin concentration and LDH activity in whole blood and washed red cells. Red cell integrity was diminished as shown by decreased osmotic resistance, formation of schistocytes and rolls, and a decrease in red cell membrane stiffness. Non-toxic RS-LPS inhibited the LPS-evoked increase in TNF-α concentration demonstrating its TLR-4 antagonism, but augmented LPS-induced increase in supernatant hemoglobin concentration and membrane disturbances. Removal of plasma components in washed red cell assays failed to attenuate hemolysis. In summary, this study demonstrates direct physicochemical interactions of LPS with red cell membranes resulting in hemolysis under in vitro conditions. It might thus be hypothesized, that not all effects of LPS are mediated by TLR and may explain LPS toxicity in cells missing TLR. PMID:27759044

  2. Lipopolysaccharide Attenuates the Cytotoxicity of Resveratrol in Transformed Mouse Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Achy-Brou, Christelle A Adiabouah; Billack, Blase

    2016-09-01

    Resveratrol and pterostilbene are natural products that are present in plants and have been incorporated into various dietary supplements. Numerous beneficial pharmacologic effects have been reported for these stilbenes; however, the mechanism by which these compounds exert a cytotoxic effect in RAW 264.7 macrophages has not been well characterized. We have previously described that resveratrol is toxic to these tumor-derived macrophages and that stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reduces resveratrol toxicity via a mechanism that involves activation of toll like receptor 4. In the present work, we examined the cellular and molecular effects of resveratrol and the related compound pterostilbene by determining cell viability and caspase 3 activity in control and LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages incubated with these stilbenes for 24 h. We found that LPS stimulation reduced the cytotoxicity of resveratrol but not of pterostilbene in these cells. When examined for effects on caspase 3 activation after a 24 h incubation, resveratrol and pterostilbene were each found to separately and significantly increase caspase 3 activity in these cells. LPS stimulation prevented caspase 3 activation by pterostilbene and reduced caspase 3 activation by resveratrol in RAW 264.7 macrophages. The data presented here indicate that LPS induces a phenotype switch in tumor-derived RAW 264.7 macrophages in which cells experiencing LPS in the presence of resveratrol or pterostilbene become less likely to activate the pro-apoptotic factor caspase 3.

  3. Redefining the requisite lipopolysaccharide structure in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Timothy C; Aggarwal, Parag; Mamat, Uwe; Lindner, Buko; Woodard, Ronald W

    2006-02-17

    Gram-negative bacteria possess an asymmetric lipid bilayer surrounding the cell wall, the outer membrane (OM). The OM inner leaflet is primarily composed of various glycerophospholipids, whereas the outer leaflet predominantly contains the unique amphiphilic macromolecule, lipopolysaccharide (LPS or endotoxin). The majority of all gram-negative bacteria elaborate LPS containing at least one 2-keto 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate (Kdo) molecule. The minimal LPS structure required for growth of Escherichia coli has long been recognized as two Kdo residues attached to lipid A, inextricably linking viability to toxicity. Here we report the construction and characterization of the nonconditional E. coli K-12 suppressor strain KPM22 that lacks Kdo and is viable despite predominantly elaborating the endotoxically inactive LPS precursor lipid IV(A). Our results challenge the established E. coli Kdo2-lipid A dogma, indicating that the previously observed and well-documented dependence of cell viability on the synthesis of Kdo stems from a lethal pleiotropy precipitated after the depletion of the carbohydrate, rather than an inherent need for the Kdo molecule itself as an indispensable structural component of the OM LPS layer. Inclusion of the inner membrane LPS transporter MsbA on a multicopy plasmid partially suppresses the lethal deltaKdo phenotype directly in the auxotrophic parent strain, suggesting increased rates of nonglycosylated lipid A transport can, in part, compensate for Kdo depletion. The unprecedented nature of a lipid IV(A) OM redefines the requisite LPS structure for viability in E. coli.

  4. Effects of lipopolysaccharide on the catabolic activity of macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Cluff, C.; Ziegler, H.K.

    1986-03-05

    The ability of macrophages to degrade and catabolize antigens is of relevance both as a means to process complex antigens prior to presentation to T cells, as well as a way to down regulate immune responses by destroying the antigenicity of polypeptides. With these considerations, the authors have investigated the regulation of macrophage catabolic activity by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Catabolic activity was quantitated by following the distribution and molecular form of /sup 125/-I labelled surface components of heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes (HKLM) subsequent to their uptake by macrophages. They have compared the catabolic activity of macrophages from peritoneal exudates of mice injected i.p. with saline or LPS and have found that LPS-elicited macrophages display a greatly enhanced (3 fold) rate of catabolism. This increase in catabolic activity peaks 3 days after LPS injection and steadily declines thereafter, approaching a baseline level after 3 weeks. The enhancement of catabolic activity is under LPS gene control. LPS-elicited macrophages rapidly destroy the antigenicity of bacterial antigens and function poorly as antigen presenting cells in vitro. These results suggest that LPS elicits a macrophage population specialized for antigen degradation functions with negative regulatory effects on the induction of specific immune responses.

  5. The lipopolysaccharide of a chloridazon-degrading bacterium.

    PubMed

    Weisshaar, R; Lingens, F

    1983-12-01

    Lipopolysaccharide of a chloridazon-degrading bacterium was obtained by a two-stage extraction procedure with phenol/EDTA in a yield of 0.3% of dried bacteria. The carbohydrate moiety consisted of heptose, 3-deoxyoctulosonic acid and D-glucose in a molar ratio of 1:2:2 X 3. Lipid A was composed of 1 mol 2,3-diamino-2,3-dideoxy-D-glucose, 2 mol amide-bound and 2.6 mol ester-bound fatty acids/mol. Amide-bound fatty acids were 3-hydroxydodecanoic acid and 3-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid; dodecanoic acid and R-(-)-3-hydroxydodec-5-cis-enoic acid were found to be present in ester linkage. Under conditions of acidic hydrolysis, the latter was converted into the cis and trans isomers of 5-hexyltetrahydrofuran-2-acetic acid. Dodecanoic acid was demonstrated to be linked with the hydroxy groups of the amide-bound fatty acids. The taxonomic significance of these results, especially the demonstration of 2,3-diamino-2, 3-dideoxy-D-glucose, is discussed.

  6. Resurrecting inactive antimicrobial peptides from the lipopolysaccharide trap.

    PubMed

    Mohanram, Harini; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2014-01-01

    Host defense antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a promising source of antibiotics for the treatment of multiple-drug-resistant pathogens. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major component of the outer leaflet of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, functions as a permeability barrier against a variety of molecules, including AMPs. Further, LPS or endotoxin is the causative agent of sepsis killing 100,000 people per year in the United States alone. LPS can restrict the activity of AMPs inducing aggregations at the outer membrane, as observed for frog AMPs, temporins, and also in model AMPs. Aggregated AMPs, "trapped" by the outer membrane, are unable to traverse the cell wall, causing their inactivation. In this work, we show that these inactive AMPs can overcome LPS-induced aggregations while conjugated with a short LPS binding β-boomerang peptide motif and become highly bactericidal. The generated hybrid peptides exhibit activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria in high-salt conditions and detoxify endotoxin. Structural and biophysical studies establish the mechanism of action of these peptides in LPS outer membrane. Most importantly, this study provides a new concept for the development of a potent broad-spectrum antibiotic with efficient outer membrane disruption as the mode of action.

  7. Compositional analysis of Helicobacter pylori rough-form lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Moran, A P; Helander, I M; Kosunen, T U

    1992-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the macromolecular heterogeneity of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from seven fresh clinical isolates and three culture collection strains of the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori. All the clinical isolates produced smooth-form LPS with O side chains of relatively homogeneous chain length, whereas the culture collection strains yielded rough-form LPS. A better yield of the latter LPS was obtained when combined protease pretreatment and hot phenol-water extraction were used than when the conventional phenol-water technique alone was used for extraction. The LPS of the three culture collection strains (S-24, C-5437, and NCTC 11637) were chemically characterized. Constituents common to all the LPS were fucose, D-mannose, D-glucose, D-galactose, D-glycero-D-manno-heptose, L-glycero-D-manno-heptose, and 3-deoxy-D-manno-2-octulosonic acid. The molar ratios of the hexoses differed between different strains, thereby reflecting structural differences. Phosphate, phosphorylethanolamine, and pyrophosphorylethanolamine were present also. Free lipid A contained D-glucosamine and fatty acids, with phosphate and a minor amount of ethanolamine. The major fatty acids were ester- and amide-bound 3-hydroxyoctadecanoic acid and ester-bound octadecanioc and 3-hydroxyhexadecanoic acids, with minor amounts of ester-bound tetradecanoic and hexadecanoic acids. In addition to the uncommonly long 3-hydroxy fatty acids, an unusual phosphorylation pattern was deduced to be present in the lipid A. Images PMID:1735724

  8. Alpinetin inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced acute kidney injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi; Zhou, Li-shan; Yan, Li; Ren, Juan; Zhou, Dai-xing; Li, Shu-Sheng

    2015-10-01

    Alpinetin, a novel plant flavonoid isolated from Alpinia katsumadai Hayata, has been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. However, the effects of alpinetin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute kidney injury have not been reported. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects and the underlying mechanism of alpinetin against LPS-induced acute kidney injury in mice. The results showed that alpinetin inhibited LPS-induced kidney histopathologic changes, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine levels. Alpinetin also inhibited LPS-induced ROS, MDA, and inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production in kidney tissues. Meanwhile, Western blot analysis showed that alpinetin suppressed LPS-induced TLR4 expression and NF-κB activation in kidney tissues. In addition, alpinetin was found to up-regulate the expression of Nrf2 and HO-1 in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, alpinetin protected LPS-induced kidney injury through activating Nrf2 and inhibiting TLR4 expression.

  9. Monoclonal Antibodies to Shigella Lipopolysaccharide Are Useful for Vaccine Production.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jisheng; Smith, Mark A; Benjamin, William H; Kaminski, Robert W; Wenzel, Heather; Nahm, Moon H

    2016-08-01

    There is a significant need for an effective multivalent Shigella vaccine that targets the most prevalent serotypes. Most Shigella vaccines under development utilize serotype-specific lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) as a major component based on protection and epidemiological data. As vaccine formulations advance from monovalent to multivalent, assays and reagents need to be developed to accurately and reproducibly quantitate the amount of LPSs from multiple serotypes in the final product. To facilitate this effort, we produced 36 hybridomas that secrete monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the O antigen on the LPS from Shigella flexneri 2a, Shigella flexneri 3a, and Shigella sonnei We used six of these monoclonal antibodies for an inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA), measuring LPSs with high sensitivity and specificity. It was also demonstrated that the Shigella serotype-specific MAbs were useful for bacterial surface staining detected by flow cytometry. These MAbs are also useful for standardizing the serum bactericidal assay (SBA) for Shigella Functional assays, such as the in vitro bactericidal assay, are necessary for vaccine evaluation and may serve as immunological correlates of immunity. An S. flexneri 2a-specific monoclonal antibody killed S. flexneri 2b isolates, suggesting that S. flexneri 2a LPS may induce cross-protection against S. flexneri 2b. Overall, the Shigella LPS-specific MAbs described have potential utility to the vaccine development community for assessing multivalent vaccine composition and as a reliable control for multiple immunoassays used to assess vaccine potency.

  10. Identification of lipopolysaccharide-binding proteins in porcine milk

    PubMed Central

    Shahriar, Farshid; Gordon, John R.; Simko, Elemir

    2006-01-01

    Septicemia and endotoxemia initiated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are relatively common in suckling and weaned piglets. Maternal milk is a source of both nutrition and immune protection for piglets. Passive transfer of colostral antibodies is necessary for protection of neonatal piglets against diseases, but the concentration of immunoglobulins in milk rapidly declines during the 1st wk of lactation in all mammals. We hypothesized, therefore, that nonimmunoglobulin substances in milk contribute to the innate protection of neonates against septicemia during the suckling period. Using LPS-affinity chromatography for isolation of LPS-binding proteins and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry for their identification, we identified in porcine milk the following proteins with LPS-binding capacity: lactoferrin, soluble CD14, serum amyloid A, α-S1 casein, β-casein, and κ-casein. For lactoferrin, α-S1 casein, and κ-casein, in vitro pepsin digestion did not inhibit LPS-binding activity, whereas combined digestion with pepsin and pancreatin abolished it. The biologic functions of these LPS-binding proteins and peptides were not determined. PMID:17042375

  11. Roles of different forms of lipopolysaccharides in Ralstonia solanacearum pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Chien-Hui; Wang, Kuan-Chung; Hong, Yu-Hau; Chu, Tai-Hsiang; Chu, Yu-Ju; Chou, I-Chun; Lu, Der-Kang; Chen, Chiao-Yen; Yang, Wen-Chieh; Lin, Yu-Mei; Cheng, Chiu-Ping

    2014-05-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are critical components for the fitness of most gram-negative bacteria. Ralstonia solanacearum causes a deadly wilting disease in many crops; however, the pathogenic roles of different forms of LPS and their pathways of biogenesis remain unknown. By screening for phage-resistant mutants of R. solanacearum Pss4, whose genome sequence is unavailable, mutants with various types of structural defects in LPS were isolated. Pathogenesis assays of the mutants revealed that production of rough LPS (R-LPS), which does not contain O-polysaccharides, was sufficient to cause necrosis on Nicotiana benthamiana and induce the hypersensitive response on N. tabacum. However, biosynthesis of smooth LPS (S-LPS), which contains O-polysaccharides, was required for bacterial proliferation at infection sites on N. benthamiana leaves and for proliferation and causing wilt on tomato. Complementation tests confirmed the involvement of the previously unidentified cluster RSc2201 to RSc2204 in the formation of R. solanacearum S-LPS. With these data and the availability of the annotated genomic sequence of strain GMI1000, certain loci involved in key steps of R. solanacearum LPS biosynthesis were identified. The strategy of this work could be useful for similar studies in other bacteria without available genome sequences.

  12. [SEROLOGICAL PROPERTIES AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF PANTOEA AGGLOMERANS LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDES].

    PubMed

    Bulygina, T V; Yakovleva, L M; Brovarska, O S; Varbanets, L D

    2015-01-01

    The serological and phytotoxic properties of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of plant pathogens--Pantoea agglomerans were studied. It is known that the thin variations in the structure of the O-specific polysaccharides determining serological specificity of gram- negative bacteria and used as a molecular basis of serological classification schemes. For P. agglomerans still does not exist a classification scheme based on serology specificity of their LPS. The results of cross serological tests demonstrate immunochemical heterogeneity of species P agglomerans. Only three strains of the 8488, 8490 and 7969 according to the agglutination of O-antigens and direct hemagglutination and inhibition direct hemagglutination can be attributed to a single serogroup. Other strains--each separate group, although some have a relationship. Compared with control plants under the influence of seed treatment of LPS in plants may be reduced, and in some cases increased root length, height and weight sprout, depending on the strain from which the selected LPS. Dive seedlings of tomatoes in the solutions of the studied preparations FSC caused the loss, and after some time, restore turgor.

  13. Chemical, biological, and immunochemical properties of the Chlamydia psittaci lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Brade, L; Schramek, S; Schade, U; Brade, H

    1986-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Chlamydia psittaci was extracted from yolk sac-grown elementary bodies, purified, and characterized chemically, immunochemically, and biologically. The LPS contained D-galactosamine, D-glucosamine, phosphorus, long-chain fatty acids, and 3-deoxy-D-manno-2-octulosonic acid in the molar ratio of approximately 1:2:2:6:5. The antigenic properties of the isolated LPS were compared with those of the LPS from Chlamydia trachomatis and Salmonella minnesota Re by the passive hemolysis and passive hemolysis inhibition tests, absorption, hydrolysis kinetics, and Western blot analysis with rabbit polyclonal antisera against chlamydiae and with a mouse monoclonal antibody recognizing a genus-specific epitope of chlamydial LPS. Two antigenic determinants were identified, one of which was chlamydia specific and the other of which was cross-reactive with Re LPS. Both determinants were destroyed during acid hydrolysis, whereby a third antigen specificity was exposed which was indistinguishable from the lipid A antigenicity. In rabbit polyclonal antisera prepared against Formalin-killed elementary bodies or detergent-solubilized membranes, two antibody specificities were differentiated. One of these was chlamydia specific, and the other was cross-reactive with Re LPS. The LPS of C. psittaci was inactive within typical endotoxin parameters (lethal toxicity, pyrogenicity, local Shwartzman reactivity); it was, however, active in some in vitro assays, such as those testing for mouse B-cell mitogenicity and the induction of prostaglandin E2 in mouse peritoneal macrophages. Images PMID:3770953

  14. Computer simulation of the rough lipopolysaccharide membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Lins, R D; Straatsma, T P

    2001-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) form the major constituent of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, and are believed to play a key role in processes that govern microbial metal binding, microbial adsorption to mineral surfaces, and microbe-mediated oxidation/reduction reactions at the bacterial exterior surface. A computational modeling capability is being developed for the study of geochemical reactions at the outer bacterial envelope of Gram-negative bacteria. A molecular model for the rough LPS of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been designed based on experimentally determined structural information. An electrostatic model was developed based on Hartree-Fock SCF calculations of the complete LPS molecule to obtain partial atomic charges. The exterior of the bacterial membrane was assembled by replication of a single LPS molecule and a single phospholipid molecule. Molecular dynamics simulations of the rough LPS membrane of P. aeruginosa were carried out and trajectories were analyzed for the energetic and structural factors that determine the role of LPS in processes at the cell surface. PMID:11463645

  15. Exemplification of serological cross-reactivity of Neisseria lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Maeland, J A; Smeland, S

    1986-08-01

    Antibodies against the Gc2 serotype determinant of gonococcal lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and antisera against strains of meningococci were tested by ELISA against the Gc2 LPS, and the antibodies examined for inhibition by bacteria of prototype strains of gonococci and meningococci. From one of the anti-meningococcal sera and anti-lactose (anti-lac) type of antibody was isolated. The results showed that antigenic sites belonging to the serotype, variable, and common sets of determinants as defined for gonococcal LPSs, may cross-react with meningococci. The anti-lac antibody combined with all of 34 strains of gonococci, with 41 out of 44 strains of meningococci tested, and with a Neisseria cinerea strain. The anti-lac showed no reactivity with any of a number of other Gram-negative cocci or bacilli examined. The results indicate that LPS from most strains of the pathogenic Neisseria species share a lactosyl moiety, presumably an inner core structure, of similar or identical configuration.

  16. Preventive Effects of Carnosine on Lipopolysaccharide-induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Ken-Ichiro; Sugizaki, Toshifumi; Kanda, Yuki; Tamura, Fumiya; Niino, Tomomi; Kawahara, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a potentially devastating form of acute lung injury, which involves neutrophilic inflammation and pulmonary cell death. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in ARDS development. New compounds for inhibiting the onset and progression of ARDS are required. Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is a small di-peptide with numerous activities, including antioxidant effects, metal chelation, proton buffering capacity and the inhibition of protein carbonylation and glycoxidation. We have examined the preventive effects of carnosine on tissue injury, oedema and inflammation in a murine model for ARDS. Oral administration of carnosine suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced vascular permeability, tissue injury and inflammation in the lung. In vivo imaging analysis revealed that LPS administration increased the level of ROS and that this increase was inhibited by carnosine administration. Carnosine also suppressed LPS-induced neutrophilic inflammation (evaluated by activation of myeloperoxidase in the lung and increased extracellular DNA in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid). Furthermore, carnosine administration suppressed the LPS-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress response in vivo. These results suggest that the oral administration of carnosine suppresses LPS-induced lung injury via carnosine’s ROS-reducing activity. Therefore, carnosine may be beneficial for suppressing the onset and progression of ARDS. PMID:28205623

  17. Lipopolysaccharide Density and Structure Govern the Extent and Distance of Nanoparticle Interaction with Actual and Model Bacterial Outer Membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Jacobson, Kurt H.; Gunsolus, Ian L.; Kuech, Thomas R.; ...

    2015-07-24

    We report that design of nanomedicines and nanoparticle-based antimicrobial and antifouling formulations, and assessment of the potential implications of nanoparticle release into the environment require understanding nanoparticle interaction with bacterial surfaces. Here we demonstrate electrostatically driven association of functionalized nanoparticles with lipopolysaccharides of Gram-negative bacterial outer membranes and find that lipopolysaccharide structure influences the extent and location of binding relative to the lipid-solution interface. By manipulating the lipopolysaccharide content in Shewanella oneidensis outer membranes, we observed electrostatically driven interaction of cationic gold nanoparticles with the lipopolysaccharide-containing leaflet. We probed this interaction by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) andmore » second harmonic generation (SHG) using solid-supported lipopolysaccharide-containing bilayers. Association of cationic nanoparticles increased with lipopolysaccharide content, while no association of anionic nanoparticles was observed. The harmonic-dependence of QCM-D measurements suggested that a population of the cationic nanoparticles was held at a distance from the outer leaflet-solution interface of bilayers containing smooth lipopolysaccharides (those bearing a long O-polysaccharide). Additionally, smooth lipopolysaccharides held the bulk of the associated cationic particles outside of the interfacial zone probed by SHG. Lastly, our results demonstrate that positively charged nanoparticles are more likely to interact with Gram-negative bacteria than are negatively charged particles, and this interaction occurs primarily through lipopolysaccharides.« less

  18. Lipopolysaccharide Density and Structure Govern the Extent and Distance of Nanoparticle Interaction with Actual and Model Bacterial Outer Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, Kurt H.; Gunsolus, Ian L.; Kuech, Thomas R.; Troiano, Julianne M.; Melby, Eric S.; Lohse, Samuel E.; Hu, Dehong; Chrisler, William B.; Murphy, Catherine J.; Orr, Galya; Geiger, Franz M.; Haynes, Christy L.; Pedersen, Joel A.

    2015-07-24

    We report that design of nanomedicines and nanoparticle-based antimicrobial and antifouling formulations, and assessment of the potential implications of nanoparticle release into the environment require understanding nanoparticle interaction with bacterial surfaces. Here we demonstrate electrostatically driven association of functionalized nanoparticles with lipopolysaccharides of Gram-negative bacterial outer membranes and find that lipopolysaccharide structure influences the extent and location of binding relative to the lipid-solution interface. By manipulating the lipopolysaccharide content in Shewanella oneidensis outer membranes, we observed electrostatically driven interaction of cationic gold nanoparticles with the lipopolysaccharide-containing leaflet. We probed this interaction by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and second harmonic generation (SHG) using solid-supported lipopolysaccharide-containing bilayers. Association of cationic nanoparticles increased with lipopolysaccharide content, while no association of anionic nanoparticles was observed. The harmonic-dependence of QCM-D measurements suggested that a population of the cationic nanoparticles was held at a distance from the outer leaflet-solution interface of bilayers containing smooth lipopolysaccharides (those bearing a long O-polysaccharide). Additionally, smooth lipopolysaccharides held the bulk of the associated cationic particles outside of the interfacial zone probed by SHG. Lastly, our results demonstrate that positively charged nanoparticles are more likely to interact with Gram-negative bacteria than are negatively charged particles, and this interaction occurs primarily through lipopolysaccharides.

  19. Lipopolysaccharide Density and Structure Govern the Extent and Distance of Nanoparticle Interaction with Actual and Model Bacterial Outer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kurt H.; Gunsolus, Ian L.; Kuech, Thomas R.; Troiano, Julianne M.; Melby, Eric S.; Lohse, Samuel E.; Hu, Dehong; Chrisler, William B.; Murphy, Catherine J.; Orr, Galya; Geiger, Franz M.; Haynes, Christy L.; Pedersen, Joel A.

    2015-01-01

    Design of nanomedicines and nanoparticle-based antimicrobial and antifouling formulations and assessment of the potential implications of nanoparticle release into the environment requires understanding nanoparticle interaction with bacterial surfaces. Here we demonstrate the electrostatically driven association of functionalized nanoparticles with lipopolysaccharides of Gram-negative bacterial outer membranes and find that lipopolysaccharide structure influences the extent and location of binding relative to the outer leaflet-solution interface. By manipulating the lipopolysaccharide content in Shewanella oneidensis outer membranes, we observed the electrostatically driven interaction of cationic gold nanoparticles with the lipopolysaccharide-containing leaflet. We probed this interaction by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and second harmonic generation (SHG) using solid-supported lipopolysaccharide-containing bilayers. The association of cationic nanoparticles increased with lipopolysaccharide content, while no association of anionic nanoparticles was observed. The harmonic-dependence of QCM-D measurements suggested that a population of the cationic nanoparticles was held at a distance from the outer leaflet-solution interface of bilayers containing smooth lipopolysaccharides (those bearing a long O-polysaccharide). Additionally, smooth lipopolysaccharides held the bulk of the associated cationic particles outside of the interfacial zone probed by SHG. Our results demonstrate that positively charged nanoparticles are more likely to interact with Gram-negative bacteria than are negatively charged particles, and this interaction occurs primarily through lipopolysaccharides. PMID:26207769

  20. Peripheral tumors alter neuroinflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide in female rats.

    PubMed

    Pyter, Leah M; El Mouatassim Bih, Sarah; Sattar, Husain; Prendergast, Brian J

    2014-03-13

    Cancer is associated with an increased prevalence of depression. Peripheral tumors induce inflammatory cytokine production in the brain and depressive-like behaviors. Mounting evidence indicates that cytokines are part of a pathway by which peripheral inflammation causes depression. Neuroinflammatory responses to immune challenges can be exacerbated (primed) by prior immunological activation associated with aging, early-life infection, and drug exposure. This experiment tested the hypothesis that peripheral tumors likewise induce neuroinflammatory sensitization or priming. Female rats with chemically-induced mammary carcinomas were injected with either saline or lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 250μg/kg; i.p.), and expression of mRNAs involved in the pathway linking inflammation and depression (interleukin-1beta [Il-1β], CD11b, IκBα, indolamine 2,3-deoxygenase [Ido]) was quantified by qPCR in the hippocampus, hypothalamus, and frontal cortex, 4 or 24h post-treatment. In the absence of LPS, hippocampal Il-1β and CD11b mRNA expression were elevated in tumor-bearing rats, whereas Ido expression was reduced. Moreover, in saline-treated rats basal hypothalamic Il-1β and CD11b expression were positively correlated with tumor weight; heavier tumors, in turn, were characterized by more inflammatory, necrotic, and granulation tissue. Tumors exacerbated CNS proinflammatory gene expression in response to LPS: CD11b was greater in hippocampus and frontal cortex of tumor-bearing relative to tumor-free rats, IκBα was greater in hippocampus, and Ido was greater in hypothalamus. Greater neuroinflammatory responses in tumor-bearing rats were accompanied by attenuated body weight gain post-LPS. The data indicate that neuroinflammatory pathways are potentiated, or primed, in tumor-bearing rats, which may exacerbate future negative behavioral consequences.

  1. Detoxification of Salmonella typhimurium Lipopolysaccharide by Ionizing Radiation1

    PubMed Central

    Previte, Joseph J.; Chang, Y.; El-Bisi, H. M.

    1967-01-01

    The efficiency of ionizing radiation in detoxifying the lethal determinant(s) of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Salmonella typhimurium, S. enteritidis, and Escherichia coli in aqueous solution and associated with heat-killed S. typhimurium cells in suspension decreased with doses above 1 Mrad. The 50% end point of inactivation was more than 7.0 Mrad for heat-killed salmonellae and 4.8, 4.5, and 1.0 Mrad for the LPS of S. typhimurium, S. enteritidis, and E. coli, respectively. After exposure to 20 Mrad, S. typhimurium LPS retained a small portion of its lethal properties although the ld50 was much greater than 9.5 mg per 20-g mouse. However, at −184 C, no inactivation of the lethal determinant(s) occurred after exposure to as much as 20 Mrad. This demonstrated the significance of the indirect effect and the mobility and formation of free radicals. At 22 C, the optical density at 400 mμ increased and the pH decreased with increasing radiation dose, but no qualitative changes were observed in the infrared spectrum. No change was observed in the pyrogenicity of S. typhimurium LPS; a slight decrease in antigenicity was revealed when 6 days, but not when 1 day, elapsed between vaccination and challenge in the mouse protection test. The results were interpreted as evidence of the existence of two or more lethal and antigenic determinants. The differential effect of radiation on these properties and on the pyrogenic component(s) probably are indicative of separate functional sites for lethal, antigenic, and pyrogenic activities. PMID:5337846

  2. Lipopolysaccharide-induced hepatic injury is enhanced by polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, A P; Schultze, A E; Holdan, W L; Buchweitz, J P; Roth, R A; Ganey, P E

    1996-01-01

    After intravenous administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to rats, polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) rapidly accumulate in the liver, and midzonal hepatic necrosis is prominent by 6 hr. PMNs are required for the development of hepatic injury in rats. Certain polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) can activate PMNs, resulting in production of superoxide anion (O2-.) and release of cytolytic factors from granules. This raises the possibility that PCB exposure might enhance PMN-mediated tissue injury, such as LPS-induced hepatotoxicity. We treated female Sprague-Dawley rats with a minimally toxic dose of LPS in saline (2 mg/kg, intravenous) and 90 min later exposed them to Aroclor 1248 (50 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), a mixture of PCBs. The animals were killed 6 hr after LPS administration, and hepatic injury was assessed. Neither LPS nor Aroclor 1248 alone produced liver injury. Co-treatment with LPS and Aroclor 1248 resulted in pronounced liver injury as demonstrated from increased activities of alanine aminotransferase and isocitrate dehydrogenase in plasma. Histological evaluation indicated increased severity of hepatic necrosis in rats receiving both LPS and Aroclor 1248. Hepatic accumulation of PMNs, normally observed after LPS, was not altered by co-exposure to PCBs. Aroclor 1248 stimulated rat PMNs in vitro to produce O2-. and to degranulate. In addition, PMN-mediated cytotoxicity to isolated rat hepatocytes in culture was increased upon addition of Aroclor 1248. PCBs activate PMNs in vitro and increase PMN-dependent hepatocellular damage in vitro and after LPS treatment in vivo. PCBs may act in vivo as an additional inflammatory stimulus to activate PMNs to become cytotoxic, resulting in increased tissue injury. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. A Figure 2. B Figure 3. Figure 4. A Figure 4. B Figure 5. Figure 6. PMID:8793352

  3. Distribution of core oligosaccharide types in lipopolysaccharides from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Amor, K; Heinrichs, D E; Frirdich, E; Ziebell, K; Johnson, R P; Whitfield, C

    2000-03-01

    In the lipopolysaccharides of Escherichia coli there are five distinct core oligosaccharide (core OS) structures, designated K-12 and R1 to R4. The objective of this work was to determine the prevalences of these core OS types within the species. Unique sequences in the waa (core OS biosynthesis) gene operon were used to develop a PCR-based system that facilitated unequivocal determination of the core OS types in isolates of E. coli. This system was applied to the 72 isolates in the E. coli ECOR collection, a compilation of isolates that is considered to be broadly representative of the genetic diversity of the species. Fifty (69. 4%) of the ECOR isolates contained the R1 core OS, 8 (11.1%) were representatives of R2, 8 (11.1%) were R3, 2 (2.8%) were R4, and only 4 (5.6%) were K-12. R1 is the only core OS type found in all four major phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2, and D) in the ECOR collection. Virulent extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli isolates tend to be closely related to group B2 and, to a lesser extent, group D isolates. All of the ECOR representatives from the B2 and D groups had the R1 core OS. In contrast, commensal E. coli isolates are more closely related to group A, which contains isolates representing each of the five core OS structures. R3 was the only core OS type found in 38 verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) isolates from humans and cattle belonging to the common enterohemorrhagic E. coli serogroups O157, O111, and O26. Although isolates from other VTEC serogroups showed more core OS diversity, the R3 type (83.1% of all VTEC isolates) was still predominant. When non-VTEC commensal isolates from cattle were analyzed, it was found that most possessed the R1 core OS type.

  4. Citrate modulates lipopolysaccharide-induced monocyte inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Ashbrook, M J; McDonough, K L; Pituch, J J; Christopherson, P L; Cornell, T T; Selewski, D T; Shanley, T P; Blatt, N B

    2015-01-01

    Citrate, a central component of cellular metabolism, is a widely used anti-coagulant due to its ability to chelate calcium. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-citrate lyase, which metabolizes citrate, has been shown to be essential for inflammation, but the ability of exogenous citrate to impact inflammatory signalling cascades remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that citrate would modulate inflammatory responses as both a cellular metabolite and calcium chelator, and tested this hypothesis by determining how clinically relevant levels of citrate modulate monocyte proinflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in a human acute monocytic leukaemia cell line (THP-1). In normal medium (0·4 mM calcium), citrate inhibited LPS-induced tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-8 transcripts, whereas in medium supplemented with calcium (1·4 mM), TNF-α and IL-8 levels increased and appeared independent of calcium chelation. Using an IL-8–luciferase plasmid construct, the same increased response was observed in the activation of the IL-8 promoter region, suggesting transcriptional regulation. Tricarballylic acid, an inhibitor of ATP-citrate lyase, blocked the ability of citrate to augment TNF-α, linking citrate's augmentation effect with its metabolism by ATP-citrate lyase. In the presence of citrate, increased histone acetylation was observed in the TNF-α and IL-8 promoter regions of THP-1 cells. We observed that citrate can both augment and inhibit proinflammatory cytokine production via modulation of inflammatory gene transactivation. These findings suggest that citrate anti-coagulation may alter immune function through complex interactions with the inflammatory response. PMID:25619261

  5. Lipopolysaccharide induces a fibrotic-like phenotype in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Echeverría, César; Montorfano, Ignacio; Sarmiento, Daniela; Becerra, Alvaro; Nuñez-Villena, Felipe; Figueroa, Xavier F; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Elorza, Alvaro A; Riedel, Claudia; Simon, Felipe

    2013-06-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is crucial in endotoxaemia-derived sepsis syndrome pathogenesis. It is well accepted that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces endothelial dysfunction through immune system activation. However, LPS can also directly generate actions in endothelial cells (ECs) in the absence of participation by immune cells. Although interactions between LPS and ECs evoke endothelial death, a significant portion of ECs are resistant to LPS challenge. However, the mechanism that confers endothelial resistance to LPS is not known. LPS-resistant ECs exhibit a fibroblast-like morphology, suggesting that these ECs enter a fibrotic programme in response to LPS. Thus, our aim was to investigate whether LPS is able to induce endothelial fibrosis in the absence of immune cells and explore the underlying mechanism. Using primary cultures of ECs and culturing intact blood vessels, we demonstrated that LPS is a crucial factor to induce endothelial fibrosis. We demonstrated that LPS was able and sufficient to promote endothelial fibrosis, in the absence of immune cells through an activin receptor-like kinase 5 (ALK5) activity-dependent mechanism. LPS-challenged ECs showed an up-regulation of both fibroblast-specific protein expression and extracellular matrix proteins secretion, as well as a down-regulation of endothelial markers. These results demonstrate that LPS is a crucial factor in inducing endothelial fibrosis in the absence of immune cells through an ALK5-dependent mechanism. It is noteworthy that LPS-induced endothelial fibrosis perpetuates endothelial dysfunction as a maladaptive process rather than a survival mechanism for protection against LPS. These findings are useful in improving current treatment against endotoxaemia-derived sepsis syndrome and other inflammatory diseases.

  6. Reducing the bioactivity of Tannerella forsythia lipopolysaccharide by Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Jae; Lee, Sung-Hoon

    2014-08-01

    Tannerella forsythia is considered a pathogen of periodontitis and forms a biofilm with multi-species bacteria in oral cavity. Lipopolysaccharide is a powerful immunostimulator and induces inflammation and shock. The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of T. forsythia LPS in its co-cultivation with Fusobacterium nucleatum or Porphyromonas gingivalis. T. forsythia was co-cultured in the presence and absence of F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis and then T. forsythia LPS was extracted. The extracts were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and NF-κB reporter CHO cell lines. THP-1 cells were treated with the LPS and evaluated induction of cytokine expression by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA. For analysis of the bioactivity of T. forsythia LPS, the binding assay on LPS-binding protein (LBP) and CD14 was processed. The extracts did not contaminate other molecules except LPS and showed TLR4 agonists. Co-cultured T. forsythia LPS with P. gingivalis exhibited a lower level of induction of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 expression than single- or co-cultured T. forsythia LPS with F. nucleatum in the conditions of human serum. However, the three T. forsythia LPS did not show difference of cytokine induction in the serum free conditions. Co-cultured T. forsythia LPS with P. gingivalis exhibited a lower affinity to LBP and CD14 as binding site of O-antigen and attached at a lower level to THP-1 cells compared to single- or co-cultured T. forsythia LPS with F. nucleatum. The virulence of T. forsythia LPS was decreased by co-culturing with P. gingivalis and their affinity to LBP and CD14 was reduced, which may due to modification of O-antigen chain by P. gingivalis.

  7. Inflammatory Effects of Edwardsiella ictaluri Lipopolysaccharide Modifications in Catfish Gut

    PubMed Central

    Kilbourne, Jacquelyn; Park, Jie-Yeun; Martin, Taylor; Loh, Amanda; Diaz, Ignacia; Rojas, Robert; Segovia, Cristopher; DeNardo, Dale; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are structural components of the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria and also are potent inducers of inflammation in mammals. Higher vertebrates are extremely sensitive to LPS, but lower vertebrates, like fish, are resistant to their systemic toxic effects. However, the effects of LPS on the fish intestinal mucosa remain unknown. Edwardsiella ictaluri is a primitive member of the Enterobacteriaceae family that causes enteric septicemia in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). E. ictaluri infects and colonizes deep lymphoid tissues upon oral or immersion infection. Both gut and olfactory organs are the primary sites of invasion. At the systemic level, E. ictaluri pathogenesis is relatively well characterized, but our knowledge about E. ictaluri intestinal interaction is limited. Recently, we observed that E. ictaluri oligo-polysaccharide (O-PS) LPS mutants have differential effects on the intestinal epithelia of orally inoculated catfish. Here we evaluate the effects of E. ictaluri O-PS LPS mutants by using a novel catfish intestinal loop model and compare it to the rabbit ileal loop model inoculated with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LPS. We found evident differences in rabbit ileal loop and catfish ileal loop responses to E. ictaluri and S. Typhimurium LPS. We determined that catfish respond to E. ictaluri LPS but not to S. Typhimurium LPS. We also determined that E. ictaluri inhibits cytokine production and induces disruption of the intestinal fish epithelia in an O-PS-dependent fashion. The E. ictaluri wild type and ΔwibT LPS mutant caused intestinal tissue damage and inhibited proinflammatory cytokine synthesis, in contrast to E. ictaluri Δgne and Δugd LPS mutants. We concluded that the E. ictaluri O-PS subunits play a major role during pathogenesis, since they influence the recognition of the LPS by the intestinal mucosal immune system of the catfish. The LPS structure of E. ictaluri mutants is needed to

  8. Isolation and characterization of the lipopolysaccharides from Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed Central

    Carrion, M; Bhat, U R; Reuhs, B; Carlson, R W

    1990-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Bradyrhizobium japonicum 61A123 was isolated and partially characterized. Phenol-water extraction of strain 61A123 yielded LPS exclusively in the phenol phase. The water phase contained low-molecular-weight glucans and extracellular or capsular polysaccharides. The LPSs from B. japonicum 61A76, 61A135, and 61A101C were also extracted exclusively into the phenol phase. The LPSs from strain USDA 110 and its Nod- mutant HS123 were found in both the phenol and water phases. The LPS from strain 61A123 was further characterized by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, composition analysis, and 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Analysis of the LPS by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that it was present in both high- and low-molecular-weight forms (LPS I and LPS II, respectively). Composition analysis was also performed on the isolated lipid A and polysaccharide portions of the LPS, which were purified by mild acid hydrolysis and gel filtration chromatography. The major components of the polysaccharide portion were fucose, fucosamine, glucose, and mannose. The intact LPS had small amounts of 2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonic acid. Other minor components were quinovosamine, glucosamine, 4-O-methylmannose, heptose, and 2,3-diamino-2,3-dideoxyhexose. The lipid A portion of the LPS contained 2,3-diamino-2,3-dideoxyhexose as the only sugar component. The major fatty acids were beta-hydroxymyristic, lauric, and oleic acids. A long-chain fatty acid, 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid, was also present in this lipid A. Separation and analysis of LPS I and LPS II indicated that glucose, mannose, 4-O-methylmannose, and small amounts of 2,2-diamino-2,3-dideozyhexose and heptose were components of the core region of the LPS, whereas fucose, fucosmine, mannose, and small amounts of quinovosamine and glucosamine were components of the LPS O-chain region. Images FIG. 1 PMID:2318801

  9. Chemical Structure of Lipid A Isolated from Flavobacterium meningosepticum Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hitomi; Haishima, Yuji; Iida, Takatoshi; Tanaka, Akira; Tanamoto, Ken-ichi

    1998-01-01

    The chemical structure of the lipid A of the lipopolysaccharide component isolated from Flavobacterium meningosepticum IFO 12535 was elucidated. Methylation and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses showed that two kinds of hydrophilic backbone exist in the free lipid A: a β (1→6)-linked 2-amino-2-deoxy-d-glucose, which is usually present in enterobacterial lipid A’s, and a 2-amino-6-O-(2,3-diamino-2,3-dideoxy-β-d-glucopyranosyl)-2-deoxy-d-glucose, in a molar ratio of 1.00:0.35. Both backbones were α-glycosidically phosphorylated in position 1, and the hydroxyl groups at positions 4, 4′, and 6′ were unsubstituted. Liquid secondary ion-mass spectrometry revealed a pseudomolecular ion at m/z 1673 [M-H]− as a major monophosphoryl lipid A component carrying five acyl groups. Fatty acid analysis showed that the lipid A contained 1 mol each of amide-linked (R)-3-OH iC17:0, ester-linked (R)-3-OH iC15:0, amide-linked (R)-3-O-(iC15:0)-iC17:0, and both amide- and ester-linked (R)-3-OH C16:0. Fatty acid distribution analyses using several mass spectrometry determinations demonstrated that the former two constituents were distributed on positions 2 and 3 of the reducing terminal unit of the backbones and that the latter two were attached to the 2′ and 3′ positions in the nonreducing terminal residue. PMID:9683486

  10. Forming and immunological properties of some lipopolysaccharide-chitosan complexes.

    PubMed

    Yermak, Irina M; Davidova, Viktoria N; Gorbach, Vladimir I; Luk'yanov, Pavel A; Solov'eva, Tamara F; Ulmer, Arthur J; Buwitt-Beckmann, Ute; Rietschel, Ernst T; Ovodov, Yury S

    2006-01-01

    The complex formation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with chitosan (Ch) was demonstrated using sedimentation velocity analysis in the analytical ultracentrifuge, centrifugation in glycerol gradient and isopicnic centrifugation in cesium chloride. An addition of Ch to the Escherichia coli and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis LPS solutions was found to result in formation of the stable LPS-Ch complexes. The interaction is a complicated process and depends on time and reaction temperature, as well as on the molecular weight of chitosan. A stable LPS-Ch complex could be formed only after preliminary incubation of the initial components at an elevated temperature (37 degrees C). It should be noted that process of LPS complexation with Ch is accompanied by additional dissociating of LPS. The complex formation was shown to be a result not only of ionic binding, but also of other types of interactions. The interaction of Ch with LPS was shown to modulate significantly the biological activity of LPS. The LPS-Ch complex (1:5 w/w) was shown to possess much lower toxicity in a comparison with the parent LPS at injection to mice in the similar concentration. The LPS-Ch complex was shown to maintain an ability to induce of IL-8 and TNF, but induction of IL-8 and TNF biosynthesis by the LPS-Ch complex was lower than that by the parent LPS. The complex LPS-Ch, similarly to the parent LPS, was found stimulated the formation of the IL-8 in the dose-dependent manner in the human embryonal kidney cells (HEK 293 cells) transfected with TLR4 in combination with MD2.

  11. Flow cytometric analysis of crayfish haemocytes activated by lipopolysaccharides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cardenas, W.; Dankert, J.R.; Jenkins, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria are strong stimulators of white river crayfish, Procambarus zonangulus, haemocytes in vitro. Following haemocyte treatment with LPS and with LPS from rough mutant R5 (LPS Rc) from Salmonella minnesota, flow cytometric analysis revealed a conspicuous and reproducible decrease in cell size as compared to control haemocytes. These LPS molecules also caused a reduction in haemocyte viability as assessed by flow cytometry with the fluorescent dyes calcein-AM and ethidium homodimer. The onset of cell size reduction was gradual and occurred prior to cell death. Haemocytes treated with LPS from S. minnesota without the Lipid A moiety (detoxified LPS) decreased in size without a reduction of viability. The action of LPS on crayfish haemocytes appeared to be related to the activation of the prophenoloxidase system because phenoloxidase (PO)-specific activity in the supernatants from control and detoxified LPS-treated cells was significantly lower than that from LPS and LPS-Rc treated cells (P < 0.05). Furthermore, addition of trypsin inhibitor to the LPS treatments caused noticeable delays in cell size and viability changes. These patterns of cellular activation by LPS formulations indicated that crayfish haemocytes react differently to the polysaccharide and lipid A moieties of LPS, where lipid A is cytotoxic and the polysaccharide portion is stimulatory. These effects concur with the general pattern of mammalian cell activation by LPS, thereby indicting commone innate immune recognition mechanisms to bacterial antigens between cells from mammals and invertebrates. These definitive molecular approaches used to verify and identify mechanisms of invertbrate haemocyte responses to LPS could be applied with other glycoconjugates, soluble mediators, or xenobiotic compounds.

  12. Brain CB₁ receptor expression following lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hu, H; Ho, W; Mackie, K; Pittman, Q J; Sharkey, K A

    2012-12-27

    Cannabinoid 1 receptors (CB(1)) are highly expressed on presynaptic terminals in the brain where they are importantly involved in the control of neurotransmitter release. Alteration of CB(1) expression is associated with a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. There is now compelling evidence that peripheral inflammatory disorders are associated with depression and cognitive impairments. These can be modeled in rodents with peripheral administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), but central effects of this treatment remain to be fully elucidated. As a reduction in endocannabinoid tone is thought to contribute to depression, we asked whether the expression of CB(1) in the CNS is altered following LPS treatment. CD1 mice received LPS (0.1-1mg/kg, ip) and 6h later activated microglial cells were observed only in circumventricular organs and only at the higher dose. At 24h, activated microglial cells were identified in other brain regions, including the hippocampus, a structure implicated in some mood disorders. Immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were utilized to evaluate the change of CB(1) expression 24h after inflammation. LPS induced an increase of CB(1) mRNA in the hippocampus and brainstem. Subsequent immunohistochemical analysis revealed reduced CB(1) in the hippocampus, especially in CA3 pyramidal layer. Analysis of co-localization with markers of excitatory and inhibitory terminals indicated that the decrease in CB(1) expression was restricted to glutamatergic terminals. Despite widespread microglial activation, these results suggest that peripheral LPS treatment leads to limited changes in CB(1) expression in the brain.

  13. Adrenomedullin ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Takefumi; Obata, Hiroaki; Murakami, Shinsuke; Hamada, Kaoru; Kangawa, Kenji; Kimura, Hiroshi; Nagaya, Noritoshi

    2007-08-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM), an endogenous peptide, has been shown to have a variety of protective effects on the cardiovascular system. However, the effect of AM on acute lung injury remains unknown. Accordingly, we investigated whether AM infusion ameliorates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury in rats. Rats were randomized to receive continuous intravenous infusion of AM (0.1 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)) or vehicle through a microosmotic pump. The animals were intratracheally injected with either LPS (1 mg/kg) or saline. At 6 and 18 h after intratracheal instillation, we performed histological examination and bronchoalveolar lavage and assessed the lung wet/dry weight ratio as an index of acute lung injury. Then we measured the numbers of total cells and neutrophils and the levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). In addition, we evaluated BALF total protein and albumin levels as indexes of lung permeability. LPS instillation caused severe acute lung injury, as indicated by the histological findings and the lung wet/dry weight ratio. However, AM infusion attenuated these LPS-induced abnormalities. AM decreased the numbers of total cells and neutrophils and the levels of TNF-alpha and CINC in BALF. AM also reduced BALF total protein and albumin levels. In addition, AM significantly suppressed apoptosis of alveolar wall cells as indicated by cleaved caspase-3 staining. In conclusion, continuous infusion of AM ameliorated LPS-induced acute lung injury in rats. This beneficial effect of AM on acute lung injury may be mediated by inhibition of inflammation, hyperpermeability, and alveolar wall cell apoptosis.

  14. Lipopolysaccharides as Determinants of Serological Variability in Pseudomonas corrugata

    PubMed Central

    Siverio, F.; Cambra, M.; Gorris, M. T.; Corzo, J.; Lopez, M. M.

    1993-01-01

    The variation in biochemical and serological features of 128 isolates of Pseudomonas corrugata has been studied with 56 isolates from Spain and 72 isolates from other countries. Isolates were analyzed with common diagnostic tests and with the AP150CHE system. Variability among isolates for some standard tests usually listed as positive or negative for this species, such as arginine dihydrolase and gelatin hydrolysis, lipase and lecithinase activities, pigment production, and wrinkled colony morphology, was observed. Three antisera were raised against the type strain and two Spanish isolates from tomato and pepper plants. Serological reactions were studied by indirect immunofluorescence and indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Eighty-three isolates reacted with a single antiserum, 6 reacted with two antisera, and none reacted with three antisera. Thirty-nine isolates did not react with any of the three antisera. These results suggest that serology will not be a useful method for routine diagnosis of P. corrugata unless common antigens can be identified. Electrophoresis and immunoelectrotransfer were used to study the antigens involved. Each antiserum reacted with whole-cell lysates, giving two common bands for P. corrugata isolates and other Pseudomonas species and a ladder-like pattern characteristic of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Common bands were not observed after proteinase K treatment. More than 10 LPS patterns were distinguished in 98 isolates after silver staining of polyacrylamide gels. There was no correlation between the geographical origin or host of the isolates and the LPS patterns. A correlation between LPS groups and serological reaction was observed. Images PMID:16348957

  15. Systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide and interleukin-1beta have different effects on memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Lisa M; Sutherland, Robert J

    2005-09-30

    Sickness behaviour is an adaptive response to infection that includes lethargy, anorexia and of direct relevance to this work, learning and memory impairments. It has been suggested that proinflammatory cytokines may disrupt learning and memory by interfering with memory consolidation [C.R. Pugh, K. Kumagawa, M. Fleshner, L.R. Watkins, S.F. Maier, J.R. Rudy, Selective effects of peripheral lipopolysaccharide administration on contextual and auditory-cue fear conditioning, Brain Behav. Immun. 12 (1998) 212-229]. We tested whether systemic interleukin-1beta is sufficient to induce impairments in memory consolidation by comparing the effects of post-learning administration of interleukin-1beta with, the potent endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide; and saline, on retention of conditioned fear of a context. We administered an acute intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide, interleukin-1beta or saline immediately following a single conditioning episode in which rats received two tone-shock pairings. Two days following the learning episode, animals were tested for strength of conditioned responding to both the context and tone. Lipopolysaccharide-injected animals, but not interleukin-1beta-injected animals, exhibited less conditioned fear of context compared to saline-treated controls. All groups showed similar conditioned fear of tone. Our results suggest that systemic interleukin-1beta is not sufficient to disrupt memory consolidation, but rather, the synergistic actions of the proinflammatory cytokines released by lipopolysaccharide are required to disrupt memory consolidation.

  16. Removal of lipopolysaccharide from protein solution using nanostructured porous supports bearing lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakita, Masa-aki

    2013-11-01

    Polymeric lipid membranes of N-octadecylchitosan, which consists of 70 mol% of 2-(octadecylamino)-2-deoxy- d-glucopyranose, 17 mol% of 2-amino-2-deoxy- d-glucopyranose, and 13 mol% of 2-acetamido-2-deoxy- d-glucopyranose, were covalently immobilized to carboxylated porous supports composed of chitosan and used for the adsorption of pyrogenic lipopolysaccharide. When human serum albumin solution, including 5 mg mL-1 of albumin and 5.6 ng mL-1 of lipopolysaccharide, was passed through a column packed with the resulting porous supports bearing lipid membranes assembled in nanoscale, lipopolysaccharide was removed to as low as a detection limit of 0.020 ng mL-1 with a quantitative recovery of protein. On the other hand, in the case of directly N-octadecylated porous supports having cationic and hydrophobic ligands which are not assembled as lipid membranes, lipopolysaccharide could not be removed to the detection limit and protein recovery was lower than the porous supports bearing lipid membranes. The difference above as well as difference from conventional adsorbents suggested that the selectivity was attributable to an interaction between the cationic lipid membranes of N-octadecylchitosan and lipopolysaccharide as well as protein. The porous supports bearing lipid membranes were stable in 0.5 M NaOH and 0.1 M HCl at ambient temperature. Considering the confirmed excellent selectivity and chemical stability, their practical use as separation media in the pharmaceutical manufacturing can be expected.

  17. The TadV Protein of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Is a Novel Aspartic Acid Prepilin Peptidase Required for Maturation of the Flp1 Pilin and TadE and TadF Pseudopilins†

    PubMed Central

    Tomich, Mladen; Fine, Daniel H.; Figurski, David H.

    2006-01-01

    The tad locus of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans encodes genes for the biogenesis of Flp pili, which allow the bacterium to adhere tenaciously to surfaces and form strong biofilms. Although tad (tight adherence) loci are widespread among bacterial and archaeal species, very little is known about the functions of the individual components of the Tad secretion apparatus. Here we characterize the mechanism by which the pre-Flp1 prepilin is processed to the mature pilus subunit. We demonstrate that the tadV gene encodes a prepilin peptidase that is both necessary and sufficient for proteolytic maturation of Flp1. TadV was also found to be required for maturation of the TadE and TadF pilin-like proteins, which we term pseudopilins. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we show that processing of pre-Flp1, pre-TadE, and pre-TadF is required for biofilm formation. Mutation of a highly conserved glutamic acid residue at position +5 of Flp1, relative to the cleavage site, resulted in a processed pilin that was blocked in assembly. In contrast, identical mutations in TadE or TadF had no effect on biofilm formation, indicating that the mechanisms by which Flp1 pilin and the pseudopilins function are distinct. We also determined that two conserved aspartic acid residues in TadV are critical for function of the prepilin peptidase. Together, our results indicate that the A. actinomycetemcomitans TadV protein is a member of a novel subclass of nonmethylating aspartic acid prepilin peptidases. PMID:16980493

  18. Increase of histidine decarboxylase activity in mice hypothalamus after intracerebroventricular administration of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Niimi, M; Mochizuki, T; Cacabelos, R; Yamatodani, A

    1993-10-01

    The effect of intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of lipopolysaccharide on histidine decarboxylase activity and histamine content in the hypothalamus were investigated in male mice of ddY strain in vivo. Two-fold increase in histidine decarboxylase activity (HDC) was observed 4 h after administration of 50 mcg lipopolysaccharide, and HDC activity returned to the basal level within 12 h after injection. Furthermore, histamine contents showed a slight decrease at 1 and 2 h and a mild increase at 12 h after administration. However, changes in histamine content were not statistically significant. These results suggest that the increase of HDC activity in the hypothalamus by lipopolysaccharide may be involved in the central neuroimmune responses.

  19. An interleukin-1 receptor antagonist blocks lipopolysaccharide-induced colony-stimulating factor production and early endotoxin tolerance.

    PubMed Central

    Henricson, B E; Neta, R; Vogel, S N

    1991-01-01

    In this report, administration of a recombinant interleukin-1 receptor antagonist protein to mice was found to inhibit induction of colony-stimulating factor as well as induction of early endotoxin tolerance by lipopolysaccharide. These findings provide direct evidence that interleukin-1 is an intermediate in these two lipopolysaccharide-induced phenomena. PMID:1825485

  20. Nilotinib ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats

    SciTech Connect

    El-Agamy, Dina S.

    2011-06-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of the new tyrosine kinase inhibitor, nilotinib on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in rats and explore its possible mechanisms. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given nilotinib (10 mg/kg) by oral gavage twice daily for 1 week prior to exposure to aerosolized LPS. At 24 h after LPS exposure, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) samples and lung tissue were collected. The lung wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio, protein level and the number of inflammatory cells in the BALF were determined. Optical microscopy was performed to examine the pathological changes in lungs. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content, superoxidase dismutase (SOD) and reduced glutathione (GSH) activities as well as nitrite/nitrate (NO{sub 2}{sup -}/NO{sub 3}{sup -}) levels were measured in lung tissues. The expression of inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), transforming growth factor-{beta}{sub 1} (TGF-{beta}{sub 1}) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were determined in lung tissues. Treatment with nilotinib prior to LPS exposure significantly attenuated the LPS-induced pulmonary edema, as it significantly decreased lung W/D ratio, protein concentration and the accumulation of the inflammatory cells in the BALF. This was supported by the histopathological examination which revealed marked attenuation of LPS-induced ALI in nilotinib treated rats. In addition, nilotinib significantly increased SOD and GSH activities with significant decrease in MDA content in the lung. Nilotinib also reduced LPS mediated overproduction of pulmonary NO{sub 2}{sup -}/NO{sub 3}{sup -} levels. Importantly, nilotinib caused down-regulation of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-{alpha}, TGF-{beta}{sub 1} and iNOS levels in the lung. Taken together, these results demonstrate the protective effects of nilotinib against the LPS-induced ALI. This effect can be attributed to nilotinib ability to counteract the inflammatory cells

  1. Mechanism of O-antigen distribution in lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, R C; Hunt, F

    1990-01-01

    O-antigen units are nonuniformly distributed among lipid A-core molecules in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from gram-negative bacteria, as revealed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate; the actual distribution patterns are complex, multimodal, and strain specific. Although the basic biochemical steps involved in synthesis and polymerization of O-antigen monomers and their subsequent attachment to lipid A-core are known, the mechanism by which specific multimodal distribution patterns are attained in mature LPS has not been previously considered theoretically or experimentally. We have developed probability equations which completely describe O-antigen distribution among lipid A-core molecules in terms of the probability of finding a nascent polymer (O antigen linked to carrier lipid) of length k (Tk) and the probability that a nascent polymer of length k will be extended to k + 1 by polymerase (pk) or transferred to lipid A-core by ligase (qk). These equations were used to show that multimodal distribution patterns in mature LPS cannot be produced if all pk are equal to p and all qk are equal to q, conditions which indicate a lack of selectivity of polymerase and ligase, respectively, for nascent O-antigen chain lengths. A completely stochastic model (pk = p, qk = q) of O-antigen polymerization and transfer to lipid A-core was also inconsistent with observed effects of mutations which resulted in partial inhibition of O-antigen monomer synthesis, lipid A-core synthesis, or ligase activity. The simplest explanation compatible with experimental observations is that polymerase or ligase, or perhaps both, have specificity for certain O-antigen chain lengths during biosynthesis of LPS. Our mathematical model indicates selectively probably was associated with the polymerase reaction. Although one may argue for a multimodal distribution pattern based on a kinetic mechanism i.e., varying reaction parameters in space or in time during cell growth, such

  2. Modulation of lipopolysaccharide-induced oxidative stress by capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Salam, Omar M E; Abdel-Rahman, Rehab Fawzy; Sleem, Amany A; Farrag, Abdel Razik

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of capsaicin (the active principle of hot red pepper and a sensory excitotoxin) on oxidative stress after systemic administration of the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (100 μg/kg, i.p.) in rats. Capsaicin (15, 150 or 1,500 μg/kg; 10, 100 or 400 μg/mL) was given via intragastric (i.g.) or intraperitoneal (i.p.) routes at time of endotoxin administration. Rats were killed 4 h later. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were measured in brain, liver, and lungs. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), nitric oxide, and glucose were measured in serum. In addition, histopathological examination of liver tissue was performed. In LPS-treated rats, hepatic GSH increased significantly by 40.8% after i.p. capsaicin at 1,500 μg/kg. Liver MDA increased significantly by 32.9% after the administration of i.g. capsaicin at 1,500 μg/kg and by 27.8 and 37.6% after the administration of i.p. capsaicin at 150 and 1,500 μg/kg, respectively. In lung tissue, both MDA and GSH were decreased by capsaicin administration. MDA decreased by 19-20.8% after i.g. capsaicin and by 17.5-23.2% after i.p. capsaicin (150-1,500 μg/kg), respectively. GSH decreased by 39.3-64.3% and by 35.7-41.1% after i.g. or i.p. capsaicin (150-1,500 μg/kg), respectively. Brain GSH increased significantly after the highest dose of i.g. or i.p. capsaicin (by 20.6 and 15.9%, respectively). The increase in serum ALT and ALP after endotoxin administration was decreased by oral or i.p. capsaicin. Serum nitric oxide showed marked increase after LPS injection, but was markedly decreased after capsaicin (1,500 μg/kg, i.p.). Serum glucose increased markedly after the administration of LPS, and was normalized by capsaicin treatment. It is suggested that in the presence of mild systemic inflammation, acute capsaicin administration might alter oxidative status in some tissues and exert an anti-inflammatory effect

  3. Lipopolysaccharide-induced lethality and cytokine production in aged mice.

    PubMed Central

    Tateda, K; Matsumoto, T; Miyazaki, S; Yamaguchi, K

    1996-01-01

    This study was designed to define the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) sensitivity of aged mice in terms of lethality and cytokine production and to determine down-regulating responses of corticosterone and interleukin 10 (IL-10). The 50% lethal doses of LPS in young (6- to 7-week-old) and aged (98- to 102-week-old) mice were 601 and 93 microg per mouse (25.6 and 1.6 mg per kg of body weight), respectively. Aged mice were approximately 6.5-fold more sensitive to the lethal toxicity of LPS in micrograms per mouse (16-fold more sensitive in milligrams per kilogram) than young mice. Levels in sera of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) IL-1alpha, and IL-6 after intraperitoneal injection of 100 microg of LPS peaked at 1.5, 3, and 3 h, respectively, and declined thereafter in both groups of mice. However, the peak values of these cytokines were significantly higher in aged than in young mice (P < 0.05). Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) was detectable at 3 h, and sustained high levels were still detected after 12 h in both age groups. Although there were no significant differences in levels of IFN-gamma in sera from both groups, aged mice showed higher IFN-gamma levels throughout the 3- to 12-h study period. Administration of increasing doses of LPS revealed that aged mice had a lower threshold to IL-1alpha production than young mice. In addition, aged mice were approximately 4-fold more sensitive to the lethal toxicity of exogenous TNF in units per mouse (10-fold more sensitive in units per kilogram) than young mice. With regard to down-regulating factors, corticosterone amounts were similar at basal levels and no differences in kinetics after the LPS challenge were observed, whereas IL-10 levels in sera were significantly higher in aged mice at 1.5 and 3 h than in young mice (P < 0.01). These results indicate that aged mice are more sensitive to the lethal toxicities of LPS and TNF than young mice. We conclude that a relatively activated, or primed, state for LPS

  4. Arginine supplementation does not alter nitrogen metabolism of beef steers during a lipopolysaccharide challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Demand for Arg is reported to increase during immune challenge. This study evaluated the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and abomasal Arg infusion on N metabolism and immune response of 20 ruminally cannulated steers (369 ± 46 kg BW) in a randomized block design. Each block was 20 d and consiste...

  5. Arginine supplementation does not alter nitrogen metabolism of beef steers during a lipopolysaccharide challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Demand for arginine (Arg) is reported to increase during immune challenges. This study evaluated effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and abomasal Arg infusion on nitrogen (N) metabolism and immune response of 20 ruminally cannulated steers (369 ± 46 kg BW) in a randomized block design. Each block co...

  6. Inhibition of gastric mucosal mucin receptor by Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide: effect of sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, J; Majka, J; Murty, V L; Czajkowski, A; Slomiany, A; Slomiany, B L

    1994-09-01

    1. A receptor for mucin was isolated from the solubilized gastric epithelial cell membrane by affinity chromatography on Sepharose-bound wheat germ agglutinin. 2. The receptor protein displayed a molecular weight of 97 kDa and exhibited specific affinity towards mucin-coated surfaces. The optimum for mucin binding occurred at 60-100 micrograms/ml, while the values for the receptor were 2.0-3.1 micrograms/ml. 3. The mucin binding to the receptor was susceptible to Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide which caused maximum inhibition of 91% at 30 mu/ml. This inhibitory effect of the lipopolysaccharide was abolished by a gastroprotective agent, sulglycotide. 4. The effect of sulglycotide was dose dependent and at 50 micrograms/ml produced a 94% restoration in receptor-mucin binding. Furthermore, sulglycotide was also capable of enhancing (97%) the mucin binding to its receptor in the absence of the lipopolysaccharide. 5. The results demonstrate that H. pylori through its lipopolysaccharide interferes in the interaction of mucin with gastric epithelial surfaces and that a gastroprotective agent, sulglycotide, counteracts this effect, and hence is capable of preventing the loss of mucin coat continuity occurring with H. pylori infection.

  7. Reversal of gastric somatostatin receptor inhibition by Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide with ebrotidine and sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, J; Skrodzka, D; Slomiany, A; Slomiany, B L

    1997-05-01

    1. Among the consequences of H. pylori infection is an increase in gastric acid secretion due to the impairement in feedback inhibition by somatostatin. Here, we show that lipopolysaccharide from H. pylori inhibits the binding of somatostatin to gastric mucosal receptor, and that antiulcer agents, ebrotidine and sulglycotide, are capable of countering this effect. 2. The somatostatin receptor was prepared from the solubilized gastric mucosal epithelial cell membranes by affinity chromatography on Affi-Gel-bound [D-Tryp8] SRIF-14 and used in the binding assays for 125I-labeled somatostatin in the presence of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide and antiulcer agents. 3. The assays revealed a dose-dependent inhibition in the receptor-somatostatin binding by the lipopolysaccharide which reached a maximum of 94.1%. The effect of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide was countered by ebrotidine and sulglycotide, which at their optimal doses produced 94.9% and 84% restoration in somatostatin-receptor binding, respectively. 4. The results demonstrate that the antiulcer agents, ebrotidine and sulglycotide, possess the ability to counteract the H. pylori interference with somatostatin regulatory effect on gastric acid secretion.

  8. Alpha-lipoic acid protects mitochondrial enzymes and attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced hypothermia in mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Hypothermia is a key symptom of sepsis and the mechanism(s) leading to hypothermia during sepsis is largely unknown. To investigate a potential mechanism and find an effective treatment for hypothermia in sepsis, we induced hypothermia in mice by lipopolysaccharide (LP...

  9. Effect of prenatal stress on subsequent response to mixing stress and a lipopolysaccharide challenge in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sows subjected to prenatal stress have been found to produce offspring that alter the manner in which they respond to stress. Our objective was to determine if exposing a sow to stress altered the response of the offspring to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at 2 mo of age or their response to mixing stres...

  10. Prenatal transportation alters the metabolic response of Brahman bull calves exposed to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine if prenatal transportation influences the metabolic response to a postnatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pregnant Brahman cows (n=96) matched by age and parity were separated into transported (TRANS; n=48; transported for 2 hours on gestational day 60, 80,...

  11. Exposure to Lipopolysaccharide in Utero Alters the Postnatal Metabolic Response in Heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the effect of prenatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure on the postnatal metabolic response to an LPS challenge in beef heifers. Pregnant crossbred cows (n = 50) were assigned to a prenatal immune stimulation (PIS; n = 25; administered 0.1 micrograms/kg BW LPS s...

  12. In Utero Exposure to Lipopolysaccharide Alters the Postnatal Acute Phase Response in Beef Heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the potential effect of prenatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure on the postnatal acute phase response (APR) to an LPS challenge in heifers. Pregnant crossbred cows (n = 50) were separated into prenatal immune stimulation (PIS; n = 25; administered 0.1 microgr...

  13. EFFECTS OF DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES ON HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGE RESPONSIVENESS TO LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of diesel exhaust particles on human alveolar macrophage responsiveness to lipopolysaccharide
    S. Mundandhara1 , S. Becker2 and M. Madden2, 1UNC Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, and Lung Biology, 2US EPA, NHEERL, HSD, Chapel Hill, NC, US

    Epidemiological...

  14. EFFECTS OF DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES ON HUMAN MACROPHAGE RESPONSIVENESS TO LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES ON HUMAN MACROPHAGE RESPONSIVENESS TO LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE
    S. Mundandhara1 and M.C. Madden2, 1UNC Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, and Lung Biology, 2US EPA, NHEERL, Human Studies Division, Chapel Hill, NC, USA

    Epidemiologica...

  15. EFFECTS OF CHRONIC EXERCISE CONDITIONING ON THERMAL RESPONSES TO LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE AND TURPENTINE ABSCESS IN FEMALE RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic exercise conditioning has been shown to alter basal thermoregulatory processes as well as the response to inflammatory agents. Two such agents, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and turpentine (TPT) are inducers of fever in rats. LPS, given intraperitoneally (i.p.), involves a sys...

  16. High Glucose and Lipopolysaccharide Prime NLRP3 Inflammasome via ROS/TXNIP Pathway in Mesangial Cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hong; Gu, Junling; Gou, Fang; Huang, Wei; Gao, Chenlin; Chen, Guo; Long, Yang; Zhou, Xueqin; Yang, Maojun; Liu, Shuang; Lü, Shishi; Luo, Qiaoyan; Xu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    While inflammation is considered a central component in the development in diabetic nephropathy, the mechanism remains unclear. The NLRP3 inflammasome acts as both a sensor and a regulator of the inflammatory response. The NLRP3 inflammasome responds to exogenous and endogenous danger signals, resulting in cleavage of procaspase-1 and activation of cytokines IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-33, ultimately triggering an inflammatory cascade reaction. This study observed the expression of NLRP3 inflammasome signaling stimulated by high glucose, lipopolysaccharide, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibitor N-acetyl-L-cysteine in glomerular mesangial cells, aiming to elucidate the mechanism by which the NLRP3 inflammasome signaling pathway may contribute to diabetic nephropathy. We found that the expression of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP), NLRP3, and IL-1β was observed by immunohistochemistry in vivo. Simultaneously, the mRNA and protein levels of TXNIP, NLRP3, procaspase-1, and IL-1β were significantly induced by high glucose concentration and lipopolysaccharide in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner in vitro. This induction by both high glucose and lipopolysaccharide was significantly inhibited by N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Our results firstly reveal that high glucose and lipopolysaccharide activate ROS/TXNIP/ NLRP3/IL-1β inflammasome signaling in glomerular mesangial cells, suggesting a mechanism by which inflammation may contribute to the development of diabetic nephropathy.

  17. Photodegradation of lipopolysaccharides and the inhibition of macrophage activation by anthraquinone-boronic acid hybrids.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Miura, Takuya; Toshima, Kazunobu

    2012-08-07

    Target-selective photodegradation of 3-deoxy-D-manno-2-octulopyranosonic acid (KDO) was achieved without additives and under neutral conditions using a designed anthraquinone-boronic acid hybrid and long wavelength UV light irradiation. The hybrid can photodegrade lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and inhibit macrophage activation induced by LPS.

  18. Garlic (Allium sativum) Extracts Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Toll-Like Receptor 4 Dimerization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Garlic has been used as a folk medicine for a long history. Numerous studies demonstrated that garlic extracts and its sulfur-containing compounds inhibit nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) activation induced by various receptor agonist including lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These effects suggest that garl...

  19. Effect of Sodium Butyrate on Growth Performance and Response to Lipopolysaccharide in Weanling Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of dietary sodium butyrate on growth performance and response to E. coli. lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in weanling pigs. In the first 28 d experiment, 180 pigs (initial BW 6.3 kg) were fed 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4% sodium butyrate, or 110 mg/kg d...

  20. Roles of interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor in lipopolysaccharide-induced hypoglycemia.

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, S N; Henricson, B E; Neta, R

    1991-01-01

    In this study, hypoglycemia induced by injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the recombinant cytokine interleukin-1 alpha or tumor necrosis factor alpha (administered alone or in combination) was compared. LPS-induced hypoglycemia was reversed significantly by recombinant interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. PMID:1828792

  1. Suppression of gastric mucosal inflammatory responses to Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide by sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Slomiany, B L; Piotrowski, J; Slomiany, A

    1999-02-01

    The effect of the antiulcer agent sulglycotide on gastric epithelial cell apoptosis and the expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) during Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide-induced acute gastritis was investigated. Rats, pretreated twice daily for 3 consecutive days with sulglycotide at 200 mg/kg or vehicle, were subjected to surface epithelial application of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide (50 microg/animal), and, after 4 additional days on the drug or vehicle regimen, their mucosal tissue was used for histologic assessment, quantitation of TNF-alpha and IL-4, and the assay of epithelial cell apoptosis. In the absence of sulglycotide, H. pylori lipopolysaccharide caused acute mucosal responses manifested by the inflammatory infiltration of the lamina propria with lymphocytes and plasma cells, edema, hyperemia, and epithelial hemorrhage. These responses were accompanied by an 11-fold increase in epithelial cell apoptosis and a 9-fold enhancement of the mucosal expression of proinflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha. However, the mucosal expression of regulatory cytokine IL-4 decreased by 15%. Treatment with sulglycotide produced significant (56.6%) reduction in the extent of acute mucosal inflammatory changes caused by H. pylori lipopolysaccharide. Moreover, the effect of sulglycotide was manifested in an 88.3% reduction in the epithelial cell apoptosis and a 69.1% decrease in the mucosal expression of TNF-alpha, whereas the expression of IL-4 showed only marginal (6%) enhancement. The results suggest that the cytoprotective agent sulglycotide suppresses the inflammatory and apoptotic events elicited in gastric mucosa by H. pylori lipopolysaccharide through stimulation of TNF-alpha expression.

  2. Protective effect of mangiferin against lipopolysaccharide-induced depressive and anxiety-like behaviour in mice.

    PubMed

    Jangra, Ashok; Lukhi, Manish M; Sulakhiya, Kunjbihari; Baruah, Chandana C; Lahkar, Mangala

    2014-10-05

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that inflammation, oxidative stress and altered level of neurotrophins are involved in the pathogenesis of depressive illness. Mangiferin, a C-glucosylxanthone is abundant in the stem and bark of Mangifera indica L. The compound has been shown to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. The present study was performed to investigate the effect of mangiferin pretreatment on lipopolysaccharide-induced increased proinflammatory cytokines, oxidative stress and neurobehavioural abnormalities. Mice were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (0.83 mg/kg, i.p.) after 14 days of mangiferin (20 and 40 mg/kg, p.o.) pretreatment. Mangiferin pretreatment significantly ameliorated the anxiety-like behaviour as evident from the results of an elevated plus maze, light-dark box and open field test. Mangiferin pretreatment also improved the anhedonic behaviour as revealed by sucrose preference test and increased social interaction time. It also prevented the lipopolysaccharide-evoked depressive-like effect by reducing the immobility time in forced swim and tail suspension test. Lipopolysaccharide-induced elevated oxidative stress was decreased with mangiferin pretreatment due to its potential to increase reduced glutathione concentration, Superoxide dismutase and catalase activity and decrease lipid peroxidation and nitrite level in the hippocampus as well as in the prefrontal cortex. Mangiferin pretreatment also attenuated neuroinflammation by reducing the interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) level in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that mangiferin possessed antidepressant and anti-anxiety properties due to its ability to attenuate IL-1β level and oxidative stress evoked by intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide. Mangiferin may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of depressive and anxiety illness.

  3. Cerium dioxide nanoparticles do not modulate the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Salik; Al-Nsour, Faris; Rice, Annette B; Marshburn, Jamie; Ji, Zhaoxia; Zink, Jeffery I; Yingling, Brenda; Walker, Nigel J; Garantziotis, Stavros

    2012-01-01

    Background Cerium dioxide (CeO2) nanoparticles have potential therapeutic applications and are widely used for industrial purposes. However, the effects of these nanoparticles on primary human cells are largely unknown. The ability of nanoparticles to exacerbate pre-existing inflammatory disorders is not well documented for engineered nanoparticles, and is certainly lacking for CeO2 nanoparticles. We investigated the inflammation-modulating effects of CeO2 nanoparticles at noncytotoxic concentrations in human peripheral blood monocytes. Methods CD14+ cells were isolated from peripheral blood samples of human volunteers. Cells were exposed to either 0.5 or 1 μg/mL of CeO2 nanoparticles over a period of 24 or 48 hours with or without lipopolysaccharide (10 ng/mL) prestimulation. Modulation of the inflammatory response was studied by measuring secreted tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta, macrophage chemotactic protein-1, interferon-gamma, and interferon gamma-induced protein 10. Results CeO2 nanoparticle suspensions were thoroughly characterized using dynamic light scattering analysis (194 nm hydrodynamic diameter), zeta potential analysis (−14 mV), and transmission electron microscopy (irregular-shaped particles). Transmission electron microscopy of CD14+ cells exposed to CeO2 nanoparticles revealed that these nanoparticles were efficiently internalized by monocytes and were found either in vesicles or free in the cytoplasm. However, no significant differences in secreted cytokine profiles were observed between CeO2 nanoparticle-treated cells and control cells at noncytotoxic doses. No significant effects of CeO2 nanoparticle exposure subsequent to lipopolysaccharide priming was observed on cytokine secretion. Moreover, no significant difference in lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine production was observed after exposure to CeO2 nanoparticles followed by lipopolysaccharide exposure. Conclusion CeO2 nanoparticles at noncytotoxic concentrations neither

  4. Influence of Core Oligosaccharide of Lipopolysaccharide to Outer Membrane Behavior of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhou; Wang, Jianli; Ren, Ge; Li, Ye; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides, major molecules in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, play important roles on membrane integrity of the cell. However, how the core oligosaccharide of lipopolysaccharide affect the membrane behavior is not well understood. In this study, the relationship between the core oligosaccharide of lipopolysaccharide and the membrane behavior was investigated using a series of Escherichia coli mutants defective in genes to affect the biosynthesis of core oligosaccharide of lipopolysaccharide. Cell surface hydrophobicity, outer membrane permeability, biofilm formation and auto-aggregation of these mutant cells were compared. Compared to the wild type W3110, cell surface hydrophobicities of mutant ΔwaaC, ΔwaaF, ΔwaaG, ΔwaaO, ΔwaaP, ΔwaaY and ΔwaaB were enhanced, outer membrane permeabilities of ΔwaaC, ΔwaaF, ΔwaaG and ΔwaaP were significantly increased, abilities of biofilm formation by ΔwaaC, ΔwaaF, ΔwaaG, ΔwaaO, ΔwaaR, ΔwaaP, ΔwaaQ and ΔwaaY decreased, and auto-aggregation abilities of ΔwaaC, ΔwaaF, ΔwaaG, ΔwaaO, ΔwaaR, ΔwaaU, ΔwaaP and ΔwaaY were strongly enhanced. These results give new insight into the influence of core oligosaccharide of lipopolysaccharide on bacterial cell membrane behavior. PMID:26023839

  5. The redefinition of Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide O-antigen and core-oligosaccharide domains

    PubMed Central

    Debowski, Aleksandra W.; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Fulurija, Alma; Dell, Anne; Stubbs, Keith A.; Marshall, Barry J.

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide promotes chronic gastric colonisation through O-antigen host mimicry and resistance to mucosal antimicrobial peptides mediated primarily by modifications of the lipid A. The structural organisation of the core and O-antigen domains of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide remains unclear, as the O-antigen attachment site has still to be identified experimentally. Here, structural investigations of lipopolysaccharides purified from two wild-type strains and the O-antigen ligase mutant revealed that the H. pylori core-oligosaccharide domain is a short conserved hexasaccharide (Glc-Gal-DD-Hep-LD-Hep-LD-Hep-KDO) decorated with the O-antigen domain encompassing a conserved trisaccharide (-DD-Hep-Fuc-GlcNAc-) and variable glucan, heptan and Lewis antigens. Furthermore, the putative heptosyltransferase HP1284 was found to be required for the transfer of the third heptose residue to the core-oligosaccharide. Interestingly, mutation of HP1284 did not affect the ligation of the O-antigen and resulted in the attachment of the O-antigen onto an incomplete core-oligosaccharide missing the third heptose and the adjoining Glc-Gal residues. Mutants deficient in either HP1284 or O-antigen ligase displayed a moderate increase in susceptibility to polymyxin B but were unable to colonise the mouse gastric mucosa. Finally, mapping mutagenesis and colonisation data of previous studies onto the redefined organisation of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide revealed that only the conserved motifs were essential for colonisation. In conclusion, H. pylori lipopolysaccharide is missing the canonical inner and outer core organisation. Instead it displays a short core and a longer O-antigen encompassing residues previously assigned as the outer core domain. The redefinition of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide domains warrants future studies to dissect the role of each domain in host-pathogen interactions. Also enzymes involved in the assembly of the conserved core structure

  6. The redefinition of Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide O-antigen and core-oligosaccharide domains.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Yang, Tiandi; Liao, Tingting; Debowski, Aleksandra W; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Fulurija, Alma; Haslam, Stuart M; Mulloy, Barbara; Dell, Anne; Stubbs, Keith A; Marshall, Barry J; Benghezal, Mohammed

    2017-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide promotes chronic gastric colonisation through O-antigen host mimicry and resistance to mucosal antimicrobial peptides mediated primarily by modifications of the lipid A. The structural organisation of the core and O-antigen domains of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide remains unclear, as the O-antigen attachment site has still to be identified experimentally. Here, structural investigations of lipopolysaccharides purified from two wild-type strains and the O-antigen ligase mutant revealed that the H. pylori core-oligosaccharide domain is a short conserved hexasaccharide (Glc-Gal-DD-Hep-LD-Hep-LD-Hep-KDO) decorated with the O-antigen domain encompassing a conserved trisaccharide (-DD-Hep-Fuc-GlcNAc-) and variable glucan, heptan and Lewis antigens. Furthermore, the putative heptosyltransferase HP1284 was found to be required for the transfer of the third heptose residue to the core-oligosaccharide. Interestingly, mutation of HP1284 did not affect the ligation of the O-antigen and resulted in the attachment of the O-antigen onto an incomplete core-oligosaccharide missing the third heptose and the adjoining Glc-Gal residues. Mutants deficient in either HP1284 or O-antigen ligase displayed a moderate increase in susceptibility to polymyxin B but were unable to colonise the mouse gastric mucosa. Finally, mapping mutagenesis and colonisation data of previous studies onto the redefined organisation of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide revealed that only the conserved motifs were essential for colonisation. In conclusion, H. pylori lipopolysaccharide is missing the canonical inner and outer core organisation. Instead it displays a short core and a longer O-antigen encompassing residues previously assigned as the outer core domain. The redefinition of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide domains warrants future studies to dissect the role of each domain in host-pathogen interactions. Also enzymes involved in the assembly of the conserved core structure

  7. [Immune-regulating effect of phenibut under lipopolysaccharide-induced immune stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Samotrueva, M A; Tiurenkov, I N; Teplyĭ, D L; Kuleshevskaia, N R; Khlebtsova, E V

    2010-05-01

    The immunoregulating effect of phenibut has been demonstrated on the model of immune stress caused by the injection of lipopolysaccharide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The degree of expression of the specific (in a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction and passive hemagglutination) and nonspecific (phagocytic activity of neutrophils) links of immunomodulation was studied. The formation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced immune stress is characterized by the increase of the indicated parameters of immunity. It is found that phenibut (under intraabdominal injection of 25 mg/kg within 5 days) removes the manifestations of hyperreactivity of the cellular link of immunity, and also restores the amount of phagocytic cells, which is evidence of the immunomodulating properties of the drug under conditions of hyperimmunization.

  8. Surfactant-assisted lipopolysaccharide conjugation employing a cyanopyridinium agent and its application to a competitive assay.

    PubMed

    Pallarola, Diego; Battaglini, Fernando

    2009-05-15

    The activation of a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with 1-cyano-4-dimethylaminopyridinium tetrafluoroborate (CDAP) in the presence of a surfactant allows an efficient conjugation with dansyl hydrazine or horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in an aqueous medium maintaining its biological activity. In order to promote the reaction a series of amphiphilic compounds were tested, sodium deoxycholate being the most suitable. The method presents several advantages: it is carried out in a mild environment, good conjugation ratios are obtained, it is suitable for any label bearing amino, hydrazine, or hydrazide groups, and the LPS endotoxic and HRP enzymatic activities are preserved. The HRP conjugate is applied in an amperometric competitive assay for the detection of lipopolysaccharides in an electrode array combined with a multipotentiostat able to carry out simultaneous determinations. The system is able to detect samples in concentrations as low as 100 pg mL(-1) of LPS.

  9. The N-terminal half of membrane CD14 is a functional cellular lipopolysaccharide receptor.

    PubMed

    Viriyakosol, S; Kirkland, T N

    1996-02-01

    CD14, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein on the surface of monocytes, macrophages, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, is a receptor for lipopolysaccharide (LPS). It was recently reported that an N-terminal 152-amino-acid fragment of soluble CD14 was an active soluble lipopolysaccharide receptor (T. S. -C. Juan, M. J. Kelley, D. A. Johnson, L. A. Busse, E. Hailman, S. D. Wright, and H. S. Lichenstein, J. Biol. Chem. 270:1382-1387, 1995). To determine whether the N-terminal half of the membrane CD14 was a functional LPS receptor on the cell membrane, we engineered a chimeric gene coding for amino acids 1 to 151 of CD14 fused to the C-terminal region of decay-accelerating factor and expressed it in Chinese hamster ovary cells and 70Z/3 cells. We found that the chimeric, truncated CD14 is a fully functional LPS receptor in both cell lines.

  10. Lipopolysaccharide and Interleukin 1 Augment the Effects of Hypoxia and Inflammation in Human Pulmonary Arterial Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziesche, Rolf; Petkov, Venzeslav; Williams, John; Zakeri, Schaker M.; Mosgoller, Wilhelm; Knofler, Martin; Block, Lutz H.

    1996-10-01

    The combined effects of hypoxia and interleukin 1, lipopolysaccharide, or tumor necrosis factor α on the expression of genes encoding endothelial constitutive and inducible nitric oxide synthases, endothelin 1, interleukin 6, and interleukin 8 were investigated in human primary pulmonary endothelial cells and whole pulmonary artery organoid cultures. Hypoxia decreased the expression of constitutive endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS-3) mRNA and NOS-3 protein as compared with normoxic conditions. The inhibition of expression of NOS-3 corresponded with a reduced production of NO. A combination of hypoxia with bacterial lipopolysaccharide, interleukin 1β , or tumor necrosis factor α augmented both effects. In contrast, the combination of hypoxia and the inflammatory mediators superinduced the expression of endothelin 1, interleukin 6, and interleukin 8. Here, we have shown that inflammatory mediators aggravate the effect of hypoxia on the down-regulation of NOS-3 and increase the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in human pulmonary endothelial cells and whole pulmonary artery organoid cultures.

  11. Inhibitory activity of plant stilbenoids against nitric oxide production by lipopolysaccharide-activated microglia.

    PubMed

    Nassra, Merian; Krisa, Stéphanie; Papastamoulis, Yorgos; Kapche, Gilbert Deccaux; Bisson, Jonathan; André, Caroline; Konsman, Jan-Pieter; Schmitter, Jean-Marie; Mérillon, Jean-Michel; Waffo-Téguo, Pierre

    2013-07-01

    Microglia-driven inflammatory processes are thought to play an important role in ageing and several neurological disorders. Since consumption of a diet rich in polyphenols has been associated with anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects, we studied the effects of twenty-five stilbenoids isolated from Milicia excelsa, Morus alba, Gnetum africanum, and Vitis vinifera. These compounds were tested at 5 and 10 µM on BV-2 microglial cells stimulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Ten stilbenoids reduced lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide production at 5 and/or 10 µM. Two tetramers, E-vitisin A and E-vitisin B, were the most effective molecules. Moreover, they attenuated the expression of the inducible NO synthase protein and gene.

  12. Hypoxia augments lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine expression in periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Jian, Congxiang; Li, Chenjun; Ren, Yu; He, Yong; Li, Yunming; Feng, Xiaodan; Zhang, Gang; Tan, Yinghui

    2014-10-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the destruction of tooth supporting tissues. Hypoxia, the mainly changes of the plateau environment, can induce severe periodontitis by animal experiments. There is, however, very little information on hypoxia and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced cytokine expression in periodontal ligament (PDL) cells. In this article, we characterized hypoxia or P. gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (Pg LPS) induced tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 expression by human periodontal ligament (hPDL) cells. We found that hypoxia augmented Pg LPS induced TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 expression in hPDL cells. We also demonstrated that nuclear factor kappa B pathway was involved in hypoxia augmenting Pg LPS induced cytokine expression in hPDL cells. Thus, our results suggest that the hypoxic environment may enhance the immune function of hPDL cells that is induced by Pg LPS.

  13. Transcriptional Activation of Mucin by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lipopolysaccharide in the Pathogenesis of Cystic Fibrosis Lung Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Dong; Dohrman, Austin F.; Gallup, Marianne; Miyata, Susumu; Gum, James R.; Kim, Young S.; Nadel, Jay A.; Prince, Alice; Basbaum, Carol B.

    1997-02-01

    An unresolved question in cystic fibrosis (CF) research is how mutations of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator, a CI ion channel, cause airway mucus obstruction leading to fatal lung disease. Recent evidence has linked the CF transmembrane conductance regulator mutation to the onset and persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in the airways, and here we provide evidence directly linking P. aeruginosa infection to mucus overproduction. We show that P. aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide profoundly upregulates transcription of the mucin gene MUC 2 in epithelial cells via inducible enhancer elements and that this effect is blocked by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and tyrphostin AG 126. These findings improve our understanding of CF pathogenesis and suggest that the attenuation of mucin production by lipopolysaccharide antagonists and tyrosine kinase inhibitors could reduce morbidity and mortality in this disease.

  14. Bacterial phagocytosis by macrophages from lipopolysaccharide responder and nonresponder mouse strains.

    PubMed Central

    Cuffini, A; Carlone, N A; Forni, G

    1980-01-01

    The phagocytic capacity of macrophages from C3H/H3J mice was assessed against lipopolysaccharide-producing (Escherichia coli) and -nonproducing (Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria. Despite their gene-coded unresponsiveness to lipopolysaccharide endotoxin and lymphokines and their defective tumoricidal activity, proteose peptone-induced C3H/HeJ macrophages did not display a defective phagocytic capacity, but rather displayed an enhanced phagocytosis of both bacterial strains compared with macrophages from closely related C3H/HeN mice. Unstimulated peritoneal resident C3H/HeJ macrophages, on the other hand, displayed a normal phagocytic activity toward E. coli and enhanced phagocytosis toward S. aureus. PMID:6995321

  15. The structure of the O-polysaccharide from the lipopolysaccharide of Providencia stuartii O47.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, Olga G; Kocharova, Nina A; Bakinovskiy, Leon V; Torzewska, Agnieszka; Shashkov, Alexander S; Knirel, Yuriy A; Rozalski, Antoni

    2004-10-20

    The O-polysaccharide was obtained by mild acid degradation of the lipopolysaccharide of Providencia stuartii O47:H4, strain 3646/51. Studies by sugar and methylation analyses along with Smith degradation and 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, including two-dimensional 1H,1H COSY, TOCSY, ROESY and H-detected 1H,13C HSQC and HMBC experiments, showed that the polysaccharide has a branched hexasaccharide repeating unit with the following structure: [carbohydrate structure: see text

  16. Role of interleukin-1 in augmenting serum neutralization of bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Riveau, G R; Novitsky, T J; Roslansky, P F; Dinarello, C A; Warren, H S

    1987-01-01

    We have previously described an assay to quantify the serum neutralization of bacterial lipopolysaccharide which is based on a spectrophotometric Limulus amoebocyte lysate test (T.J. Novitsky, P.F. Roslansky, G.R. Siber, and H.S. Warren, J. Clin. Microbiol. 21:211-216, 1985). Studies since have shown that serum samples drawn from patients with leukemia and fever, gram-negative or gram-positive bacterial infections, or shock caused by gram-negative bacteria neutralize approximately 10-fold more lipopolysaccharide than do samples from normal controls. These findings suggested that the increased neutralization might reflect an acute-phase response and raised the question of whether it might be under the control of interleukin-1. To answer this question, we studied the neutralization of lipopolysaccharide in serum samples drawn from rabbits before and after the administration of crude interleukin-1, prepared from activated macrophage supernatants, and recombinant human interleukin-1. Crude interleukin-1 induced a 5.7-fold increase in serum neutralization 24 h after intravenous injection, and cloned interleukin-1 induced a 3.0-fold increase (P less than or equal to 0.01 and 0.05, respectively). In individual rabbits given identical doses of crude interleukin-1 on a weight basis, the serum-neutralizing ability correlated significantly with three activities of interleukin-1: rise in temperature (r2 = 0.558; P less than or equal to 0.01), decrease in serum iron (r2 = 0.534; P less than or equal to 0.01), and increase in serum copper (r2 = 0.323; P less than or equal to 0.05). We conclude that the increase in neutralization of bacterial lipopolysaccharide by serum samples drawn from patients with inflammatory states is mediated, at least in part, by interleukin-1, presumably through the induction of acute-phase serum proteins. Images PMID:3495548

  17. Fimbriae and lipopolysaccharides are necessary for co-aggregation between Lactobacilli and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kouhei; Furukawa, Soichi; Usui, Yumi; Ishiba, Madoka; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    Cells of Lactobacilli co-aggregated with Escherichia coli K-12 cells to form co-aggregates under mixed-culture conditions at 37 °C for 24 h. Co-aggregation was inhibited by sodium dodecyl sulfate but not by protease. E. coli deletion mutants of fimbriae formation and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) formation did not co-aggregate with Lactobacilli. These results showed that fimbriae and LPS are necessary for co-aggregation between Lactobacilli and E. coli.

  18. Effects of D-003 on Lipopolysaccharides-induced Osteonecrosis in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Noa, Miriam; Valle, M; Mendoza, Sarahí; Mas, Rosa; Mendoza, Nilda

    2011-09-01

    D-003, a mixture of high molecular weight acids, inhibits cholesterol synthesis prior to mevalonate and prevents osteoporosis induced by ovariectomy in rats, and both osteoporosis and osteonecrosis induced by corticoids in rats. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of D-003 on lipopolysaccharides-induced osteonecrosis in rabbits. Animals were randomized into 5 groups: a sham and four groups injected with lipopolysaccharides: one treated orally with vehicle and three with D-003 (5, 25 and 200 mg/kg, respectively) during four weeks. We assessed the effects of treatments on the incidence of osteonecrosis (number of animals with osteonecrosis lesions/animals per group), the mean numbers and areas of osteonecrosis per animal and on the mean sizes of the bone marrow fat cells. The incidence of osteonecrosis in the groups of D-003 25 and 200 mg/kg was significantly lower than in the positive controls. The reduction of osteonecrosis increased with the doses, but significant dose-dependence relationship was not achieved. D-003 significantly and dose-dependently decreased the number of osteonecrosis lesions per animal as compared to the positive controls. Likewise, the mean osteonecrosis areas in the proximal femoral and humeral bones were significantly decreased by D-003. The injection of lipopolysaccharides significantly increased the average size of bone marrow fat cells as compared to the negative controls, and such increase was significantly and markedly reduced with D-003. It is concluded that D-003 reduced the incidence, number and percent areas of osteonecrosis lesions, and the size of bone marrow fat cells, a marker of adipogenesis, in rabbits with lipopolysaccharides-induced ostenonecrosis.

  19. Simultaneous measurement of the viability, aggregation, and live and dead adherence of Streptococcus crista, Streptococcus mutans and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans in human saliva in relation to indices of caries, dental plaque and periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Rudney, J D; Staikov, R K

    2002-05-01

    Salivary proteins have multiple functions and many share similar functions, which may be why it has been difficult to relate variations in their concentrations to oral health and ecology. An alternative is to focus on variations in the major functions of saliva. An hydroxyapatite-coated microplate model has been developed that simultaneously measures saliva-promoted bacterial viability, bacterial aggregation, and live and dead bacterial adherence, while simulating oral temperature and shearing forces from swallowing. That model was applied to resting whole and stimulated parotid saliva from 149 individuals, using representative strains of Streptococcus crista, S. mutans, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Two major factors were defined by multivariate analysis (this was successful only for whole-saliva). One factor was correlated with aggregation, live adherence and dead adherence for all three strains; the other was correlated with total viability of all three strains. Participants were grouped <25th percentile and >75th percentile for each factor. Those groups were compared for clinical indices of oral health. Caries scores were significantly lower in those with high scores for aggregation-adherence, regardless of whether total viability scores were low or high. Live bacteria always predominated on surfaces when live and dead adherence scores were expressed as ratios. However, participants with high scores for aggregation-adherence showed significantly more dead adherent bacteria than those with low scores (these ratios were uncorrelated with total viability). This finding may indicate that extreme differences in the ability to kill bacteria on surfaces can influence caries risk.

  20. Pasteurella multocida Heddleston Serovar 3 and 4 Strains Share a Common Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis Locus but Display both Inter- and Intrastrain Lipopolysaccharide Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Marina; St. Michael, Frank; John, Marietta; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Steen, Jennifer A.; van Dorsten, Lieke; Steen, Jason A.; Turni, Conny; Blackall, Patrick J.; Adler, Ben; Cox, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a Gram-negative multispecies pathogen and the causative agent of fowl cholera, a serious disease of poultry which can present in both acute and chronic forms. The major outer membrane component lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is both an important virulence factor and a major immunogen. Our previous studies determined the LPS structures expressed by different P. multocida strains and revealed that a number of strains belonging to different serovars contain the same LPS biosynthesis locus but express different LPS structures due to mutations within glycosyltransferase genes. In this study, we report the full LPS structure of the serovar 4 type strain, P1662, and reveal that it shares the same LPS outer core biosynthesis locus, L3, with the serovar 3 strains P1059 and Pm70. Using directed mutagenesis, the role of each glycosyltransferase gene in LPS outer core assembly was determined. LPS structural analysis of 23 Australian field isolates that contain the L3 locus revealed that at least six different LPS outer core structures can be produced as a result of mutations within the LPS glycosyltransferase genes. Moreover, some field isolates produce multiple but related LPS glycoforms simultaneously, and three LPS outer core structures are remarkably similar to the globo series of vertebrate glycosphingolipids. Our in-depth analysis showing the genetics and full range of P. multocida lipopolysaccharide structures will facilitate the improvement of typing systems and the prediction of the protective efficacy of vaccines. PMID:23974032

  1. Pasteurella multocida Heddleston serovar 3 and 4 strains share a common lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis locus but display both inter- and intrastrain lipopolysaccharide heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Harper, Marina; St Michael, Frank; John, Marietta; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Steen, Jennifer A; van Dorsten, Lieke; Steen, Jason A; Turni, Conny; Blackall, Patrick J; Adler, Ben; Cox, Andrew D; Boyce, John D

    2013-11-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a Gram-negative multispecies pathogen and the causative agent of fowl cholera, a serious disease of poultry which can present in both acute and chronic forms. The major outer membrane component lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is both an important virulence factor and a major immunogen. Our previous studies determined the LPS structures expressed by different P. multocida strains and revealed that a number of strains belonging to different serovars contain the same LPS biosynthesis locus but express different LPS structures due to mutations within glycosyltransferase genes. In this study, we report the full LPS structure of the serovar 4 type strain, P1662, and reveal that it shares the same LPS outer core biosynthesis locus, L3, with the serovar 3 strains P1059 and Pm70. Using directed mutagenesis, the role of each glycosyltransferase gene in LPS outer core assembly was determined. LPS structural analysis of 23 Australian field isolates that contain the L3 locus revealed that at least six different LPS outer core structures can be produced as a result of mutations within the LPS glycosyltransferase genes. Moreover, some field isolates produce multiple but related LPS glycoforms simultaneously, and three LPS outer core structures are remarkably similar to the globo series of vertebrate glycosphingolipids. Our in-depth analysis showing the genetics and full range of P. multocida lipopolysaccharide structures will facilitate the improvement of typing systems and the prediction of the protective efficacy of vaccines.

  2. Sirtuin inhibition attenuates the production of inflammatory cytokines in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, Claudia A.; Fievez, Laurence; Neyrinck, Audrey M.; Delzenne, Nathalie M.; Bureau, Fabrice; Vanbever, Rita

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages were treated with cambinol and sirtinol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cambinol and sirtinol decreased lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cambinol decreased NF-{kappa}B activity but had no impact on p38 MAPK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sirtuins are an interesting target for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. -- Abstract: In several inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis or sepsis, the regulatory mechanisms of inflammation are inefficient and the excessive inflammatory response leads to damage to the host. Sirtuins are class III histone deacetylases that modulate the activity of several transcription factors that are implicated in immune responses. In this study, we evaluated the impact of sirtuin inhibition on the activation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated J774 macrophages by assessing the production of inflammatory cytokines. The pharmacologic inhibition of sirtuins decreased the production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) interleukin 6 (IL-6) and Rantes. The reduction of cytokine production was associated with decreased nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activity and inhibitor kappa B alpha (I{kappa}B{alpha}) phosphorylation while no impact was observed on the phosphorylation status of p38 mitogen-activated kinase (p38 MAPK). This work shows that sirtuin pharmacologic inhibitors are a promising tool for the treatment of inflammatory conditions.

  3. Effect of Capparis spinosa Linn. extract on lipopolysaccharide-induced cognitive impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Goel, Ashish; Digvijaya; Garg, Arun; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-02-01

    Cognitive disorders in mankind are not uncommon. Apart from neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's (AD), various stresses also affect cognitive functions. Plants are known to be potential source of compounds that ameliorate several diseases including cognitive impairment. Here, we evaluated effect of aqueous extract of caper (Capparis spinosa) buds on lipopolysaccharide-induced cognitive impairment in rats using two different oral doses i.e. 10 (pre-treatment) and 30 mg/rat(post-treatment) through assessment of behavioural (Morris Water maze test and Y maze test), biochemical (Cholinesterase assay) and histopathological (H&E staining) parameters. Lipopolysaccharide (from E. coli) administration resulted in an increased neurodegeneration and time taken to reach the platform (in Morris water maze). The increased neurodegeneration in CA1 region of hippocampus was significantly reduced in animals which received caper bud extract; they showed marked reduction in time taken to reach the platform at both the dose levels. The experiment demonstrated that caper bud extract exhibits potential protective effect against learning and memory damage induced by chronic administration of lipopolysaccharide (175 μg/kg) for 7 days. The results suggest that the caper bud extract could be explored for its use in the treatment of cognitive disorders.

  4. Lipopolysaccharide based oral nanocarriers for the improvement of bioavailability and anticancer efficacy of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Sundeep; Patel, Ravi R; Chaubey, Pramila; Kumar, Nagendra; Khan, Gayasuddin; Mishra, Brahmeshwar

    2015-10-05

    Soluthin MD(®), a unique phosphatidylcholine-maltodextrin based hydrophilic lipopolysaccharide, which exhibits superior biocompatibility and bioavailability enhancer properties for poorly water soluble drug(s). Curcumin (CUR) is a potential natural anticancer drug with low bioavailability due to poor aqueous solubility. The study aims at formulation and optimization of CUR loaded lipopolysaccharide nanocarriers (C-LPNCs) to enhance oral bioavailability and anticancer efficacy in colon-26 tumor-bearing mice in vitro and in vivo. The Optimized C-LPNCs demonstrated favorable mean particle size (108 ± 3.4 nm) and percent entrapment efficiency (65.29 ± 1.0%). Pharmacokinetic parameters revealed ∼130-fold increase in oral bioavailability and cytotoxicity studies demonstrated ∼23-fold reduction in 50% cell growth inhibition when treated with optimized C-LPNCs as compared to pure CUR. In vivo anticancer study performed with optimized C-LPNCs showed significant increase in efficacy compared with pure CUR. Thus, lipopolysaccharide nanocarriers show potential delivery strategy to improve oral bioavailability and anticancer efficacy of CUR in the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  5. Active principles of Grindelia robusta exert antiinflammatory properties in a macrophage model.

    PubMed

    La, Vu Dang; Lazzarin, Francesco; Ricci, Donata; Fraternale, Daniele; Genovese, Salvatore; Epifano, Francesco; Grenier, Daniel

    2010-11-01

    Plant extracts and/or secondary metabolites are receiving considerable attention as therapeutic agents for treating inflammatory diseases such as periodontitis, which affects the tooth supporting tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a Grindelia robusta extract enriched in saponins and polyphenols on Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory mediator (IL-6, TNF-a, RANTES, MCP-1, PGE(2) ) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-1, -3, -7, -8, -9, -13) secretion by macrophages. LPS induced a marked increase in the secretion of all inflammatory mediators and MMPs tested by macrophages, as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. At non-cytotoxic concentrations, the G. robusta extract inhibited dose-dependently the secretion of IL-6, RANTES, MCP-1 and, to a lesser extent, PGE(2) and TNF-a. Such inhibition was also observed for MMP-1, -3, -7, -8, -9 and -13 secretion. This ability of G. robusta extract to reduce the LPS-induced secretion of inflammatory mediators and MMPs was associated with a reduction of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) p65 activation. The results suggest that G. robusta extract possesses an antiinflammatory therapeutic potential through its capacity to reduce the accumulation of inflammatory mediators and MMPs.

  6. Lipopolysaccharide mediated regulation of neuroendocrine associated proprotein convertases and neuropeptide precursor processing in the rat spleen.

    PubMed

    Lansac, Guillaume; Dong, Weijia; Dubois, Claire M; Benlarbi, Nadia; Afonso, Carlos; Fournier, Isabelle; Salzet, Michel; Day, Robert

    2006-02-01

    Within the secretory pathway, the family of proprotein convertases cleave inactive precursors at paired basic residues to generate a myriad of biologically active peptides. Within the PC family, PC1/3 and PC2 are well known for their preferential expression within neuroendocrine cells. However, various data now indicate their potential expression in immune cells. The aim of our study was two fold: (1) survey PC expression in immune tissues, with emphasis on PC1/3 and PC2 and (2) examine PC expression under conditions that mimic an infectious state using lipopolysaccharide, known to activate immune cells via toll-like receptors. Spatial and temporal analyses of tissues from control and lipopolysaccharide treated rats were carried out using in situ hybridization histochemistry, Northern blot, mass spectrometry and antibacterial assays. Our tissue survey showed the basal expression of all PCs in the lymph nodes, thymus and spleen including PC1/3 and PC2. Focusing on the spleen, basal expression of PC1/3 was seen in the red pulp/marginal zone areas, suggesting expression within macrophages. Lipopolysaccharide treatment produced significant changes in PC1/3 expression and notably an induction in B lymphocytes within germinal centers. Similarly, PC2, which was undetectable in control spleens, was induced in germinal centers following lipopolysaccharide treatment. The PC1/3 and PC2 substrate proenkephalin was also induced following lipopolysaccharide treatment in the marginal zone, where PC1/3 expression was also found. Mass spectrometry analysis of spleen extracts demonstrated the presence of the antibacterial peptide enkelytin. Our studies confirmed that PC1/3 and PC2 expression was not restricted to neurons and endocrine cells, but was also found under basal conditions in both macrophage and lymphocytes. Additionally, plasticity of PC expression in immune cells was observed under conditions that mimic pathogen-like infections, suggesting a mechanistic link through Toll

  7. Methylprednisolone Protects Cardiac Pumping Mechanics from Deteriorating in Lipopolysaccharide-Treated Rats.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ya-Hui; Tsai, Ming-Shian; Chang, Ru-Wen; Chang, Chun-Yi; Wang, Chih-Hsien; Wu, Ming-Shiou; Liang, Jin-Tung; Chang, Kuo-Chu

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that a prolonged low-dose corticosteroid treatment attenuates the severity of inflammation and the intensity and duration of organ system failure. In the present study, we determined whether low-dose methylprednisolone (a synthetic glucocorticoid) can protect male Wistar rats against cardiac pumping defects caused by lipopolysaccharide-induced chronic inflammation. For the induction of chronic inflammation, a slow-release ALZET osmotic pump was subcutaneously implanted to infuse lipopolysaccharide (1 mg kg(-1) d(-1)) for 2 weeks. The lipopolysaccharide-challenged rats were treated on a daily basis with intraperitoneal injection of methylprednisolone (5 mg kg(-1) d(-1)) for 2 weeks. Under conditions of anesthesia and open chest, we recorded left ventricular (LV) pressure and ascending aortic flow signals to calculate the maximal systolic elastance (E max) and the theoretical maximum flow (Q max), using the elastance-resistance model. Physically, E max reflects the contractility of the myocardium as an intact heart, whereas Q max has an inverse relationship with the LV internal resistance. Compared with the sham rats, the cardiodynamic condition was characterized by a decline in E max associated with the increased Q max in the lipopolysaccharide-treated rats. Methylprednisolone therapy increased E max, which suggests that the drug may have protected the contractile status from deteriorating in the inflamed heart. By contrast, methylprednisolone therapy considerably reduced Q max, indicating that the drug may have normalized the LV internal resistance. In parallel, the benefits of methylprednisolone on the LV systolic pumping mechanics were associated with the reduced cardiac levels of negative inotropic molecules such as peroxynitrite, malondialdehyde, and high-mobility group box 1 protein. Based on these data, we suggested that low-dose methylprednisolone might prevent lipopolysaccharide-induced decline in cardiac intrinsic contractility and LV

  8. Heterotrimeric G proteins physically associated with the lipopolysaccharide receptor CD14 modulate both in vivo and in vitro responses to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, K R; Kurt-Jones, E A; Saladino, R A; Stack, A M; Dunn, I F; Ferretti, M; Golenbock, D; Fleisher, G R; Finberg, R W

    1998-01-01

    Septic shock induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) triggering of cytokine production from monocytes/macrophages is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The major monocyte/macrophage LPS receptor is the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored glycoprotein CD14. Here we demonstrate that CD14 coimmunoprecipitates with Gi/Go heterotrimeric G proteins. Furthermore, we demonstrate that heterotrimeric G proteins specifically regulate CD14-mediated, LPS-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation and cytokine production in normal human monocytes and cultured cells. We report here that a G protein binding peptide protects rats from LPS-induced mortality, suggesting a functional linkage between a GPI-anchored receptor and the intracellular signaling molecules with which it is physically associated. PMID:9835628

  9. Comparison of the effect of recombinant bovine wild and mutant lipopolysaccharide-binding protein in lipopolysaccharide-challenged bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojuan; Li, Lian; Sun, Yu; Wu, Jie; Wang, Genlin

    2016-05-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) plays a crucial role in the recognition of bacterial components, such as LPS that causes an immune response. The aim of this study was to compare the different effects of recombinant bovine wild LBP and mutant LBP (67 Ala → Thr) on the LPS-induced inflammatory response of bovine mammary epithelial cells (BMECs). When BMECs were treated with various concentrations of recombinant bovine lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (RBLBP) (1, 5, 10, and 15 μg/mL) for 12 h, RBLBP of 5 μg/mL increased the apoptosis of BMECs induced by LPS without cytotoxicity, and mutant LBP resulted in a higher cell apoptosis than wild LBP did. By gene-chip microarray and bioinformatics, the data identified 2306 differentially expressed genes that were changed significantly between the LPS-induced inflamed BMECs treated with 5 μg/mL of mutant LBP and the BMECs only treated with 10 μg/mL of LPS (fold change ≥2). Meanwhile, 1585 genes were differently expressed between the inflamed BMECs treated with 5 μg/mL of wild LBP and 10 μg/mL of LPS-treated BMECs. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analyses showed that these differentially expressed genes were involved in different pathways that regulate the inflammation response. It predicted that carriers of this mutation increase the risk for a more severe inflammatory response. Our study provides an overview of the gene expression profile between wild LBP and mutant LBP on the LPS-induced inflammatory response of BMECs, which will lead to further understanding of the potential effects of LBP mutations on bovine mammary glands.

  10. Systemic Inflammatory Response and Serum Lipopolysaccharide Levels Predict Multiple Organ Failure and Death in Alcoholic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Michelena, Javier; Altamirano, José; Abraldes, Juan G.; Affò, Silvia; Morales-Ibanez, Oriol; Sancho-Bru, Pau; Dominguez, Marlene; García-Pagán, Juan Carlos; Fernández, Javier; Arroyo, Vicente; Ginès, Pere; Louvet, Alexandre; Mathurin, Philippe; Mehal, Wajahat Z.; Caballería, Juan; Bataller, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) frequently progresses to multiple organ failure (MOF) and death. However, the driving factors are largely unknown. At admission, patients with AH often show criteria of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) even in the absence of an infection. We hypothesize that the presence of SIRS may predispose to MOF and death. To test this hypothesis, we studied a cohort including 162 patients with biopsy-proven AH. The presence of SIRS and infections was assessed in all patients, and multivariate analyses identified variables independently associated with MOF and 90-day mortality. At admission, 32 (19.8%) patients were diagnosed with a bacterial infection, while 75 (46.3%) fulfilled SIRS criteria; 58 patients (35.8%) developed MOF during hospitalization. Short-term mortality was significantly higher among patients who developed MOF (62.1% versus 3.8%, P <0.001). The presence of SIRS was a major predictor of MOF (odds ratio = 2.69, P=0.025) and strongly correlated with mortality. Importantly, the course of patients with SIRS with and without infection was similar in terms of MOF development and short-term mortality. Finally, we sought to identify serum markers that differentiate SIRS with and without infection. We studied serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, and lipopolysaccharide at admission. All of them predicted mortality. Procalcitonin, but not high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, serum levels identified those patients with SIRS and infection. Lipopolysaccharide serum levels predicted MOF and the response to prednisolone. Conclusion In the presence or absence of infections, SIRS is a major determinant of MOF and mortality in AH, and the mechanisms involved in the development of SIRS should be investigated; procalcitonin serum levels can help to identify patients with infection, and lipopolysaccharide levels may help to predict mortality and the response to steroids. PMID:25761863

  11. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Hyptis albida Chloroform Extract on Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Peritoneal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez Miranda, Elizabeth; Pérez Ramos, Julia; Fresán Orozco, Cristina; Zavala Sánchez, Miguel Angel; Pérez Gutiérrez, Salud

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effects of a chloroform extract of Hyptis albida (CHA) on inflammatory responses in mouse lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced peritoneal macrophages. Our findings indicate that CHA inhibits LPS-induced production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). During the process, levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and nitric oxide (NO) increased in the mouse peritoneal macrophages; however, the extract suppressed them significantly. These results provide novel insights into the anti-inflammatory actions of CHA and support its potential use in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23970974

  12. Structure of the O-polysaccharide from the lipopolysaccharide of Providencia alcalifaciens O33.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, Olga G; Shashkov, Alexander S; Chizhov, Alexander O; Moryl, Magdalena; Rozalski, Antoni; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2014-05-22

    Mild acid degradation of the lipopolysaccharide from Providencia alcalifaciens O33 resulted in an O-polysaccharide along with core and O-unit-bearing core oligosaccharides. Composition of the oligosaccharides was inferred by ESI mass spectrometry. Based on sugar and methylation analyses, Smith degradation and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy data, the following structure of the tetrasaccharide O-unit of the O-polysaccharide was established: Another O-polysaccharide structure has been reported earlier for Providencia stuartii О33 but later found to belong to a P. stuartii О52 strain.

  13. Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide loaded chitosan nanoparticle could save life by induction of specific immunoglobulin isotype.

    PubMed

    Fasihi-Ramandi, Mahdi; Ghobadi-Ghadikolaee, Hamideh; Ahmadi-Renani, Sajjad; Taheri, Ramezan Ali; Ahmadi, Kazem

    2017-02-28

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Vibrio cholerae (V. cholerae) plays an important role in cholera disease and the induction of primary protection. In this study, we evaluate mice humoral immune response in intranasal and intraperitoneal administrated V. cholerae LPS. The results showed that the intranasal administration of LPS-chitosan nanoparticle induced the high level of antibodies compared to intraperitoneal injection of antigen without chitosan (P < .001). These results indicated that intranasal and intraperitoneal administration of LPS has been able to induce the high level of antibodies both in the sera and lavage fluid and confirmed our strategy for using intranasal administration of antigen.

  14. Rhizobium meliloti chromosomal loci required for suppression of exopolysaccharide mutations by lipopolysaccharide

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.N.V.; Brzoska, P.M.; Signer, E.R. ); Hollingsworth, R.I. )

    1990-11-01

    Mutants of alfalfa symbiont Rhizobium meliloti SU47 that fail to make extracellular polysaccharide (exo mutants) induce the formation of nodules that are devoid of bacteria and consequently do not fix nitrogen. This Fix{sup {minus}} phenotype can be suppressed by an R. meliloti Rm41 gene that affects lipopolysaccharide structure. Here we describe mutations preventing suppression that map at two new chromosomal loci, lpsY and lpsX, present in both strains. Two other lps mutations isolated previously from SU47 also prevented suppression.

  15. Immunoreactivity and bioactivity of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein in normal and heat-inactivated sera.

    PubMed Central

    Mészáros, K; Aberle, S; White, M; Parent, J B

    1995-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-potentiating effect of serum is due to LPS-binding protein (LBP), which facilitates the binding of LPS to CD14 receptors. We observed a remarkable heat sensitivity of recombinant LBP and various sera with respect to both immunoreactivity (measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and bioactivity (potentiation of LPS induction of tumor necrosis factor in monocytes). Human sera were more active and more heat sensitive than fetal bovine sera. The commonly practiced heat inactivation of human serum (56 degrees C, 30 min) resulted in a 70% loss of bioactivity, which caused an apparent decrease in the potency of LPS. PMID:7806380

  16. Lipopolysaccharide Membranes and Membrane Proteins of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Studied by Computer Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Straatsma, TP

    2006-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous environmental Gram-negative bacterium with high metabolic versatility and an exceptional ability to adapt to a wide range of ecological environments, including soil, marches, coastal habitats, plant and animal tissues. Gram-negative microbes are characterized by the asymmetric lipopolysaccharide outer membrane, the study of which is important for a number of applications. The adhesion to mineral surfaces plays a central role in characterizing their contribution to the fate of contaminants in complex environmental systems by effecting microbial transport through soils, respiration redox chemistry, and ion mobility. Another important application stems from the fact that it is also a major opportunistic human pathogen that can result in life-threatening infections in many immunocompromised patients, such as lung infections in children with cystic fibrosis, bacteraemia in burn victims, urinary-tract infections in catheterized patients, hospital-acquired pneumonia in patients on respirators, infections in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, and keratitis and corneal ulcers in users of extended-wear soft contact lenses. The inherent resistance against antibiotics which has been linked with the specific interactions in the outer membrane of P. aeruginosa makes these infections difficult to treat. Developments in simulation methodologies as well as computer hardware have enabled the molecular simulation of biological systems of increasing size and with increasing accuracy, providing detail that is difficult or impossible to obtain experimentally. Computer simulation studies contribute to our understanding of the behavior of proteins, protein-protein and protein-DNA complexes. In recent years, a number of research groups have made significant progress in applying these methods to the study of biological membranes. However, these applications have been focused exclusively on lipid bilayer membranes and on membrane proteins in lipid

  17. Highly sensitive fluorescent stain for detecting lipopolysaccharides in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Zhou, Ayi; Cai, Wanhui; Yu, Dongdong; Zhu, Zhongxin; Jiang, Chengxi; Jin, Litai

    2015-08-01

    A sensitive and simple technique was developed for the visualization of gel-separated lipopolysaccharides by using a hydrazide derivative, UGF202. As low as 0.5-1 ng total LPS could be detected by UGF202 stain, which is 2- and 16-fold more sensitive than that of the commonly used Pro-Q Emerald 300 and Keenan et al. developed silver stain, respectively. The results indicated that UGF202 stain could be a good choice for LPS determination in polyacrylamide gels.

  18. Paeonol suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory cytokines in macrophage cells and protects mice from lethal endotoxin shock.

    PubMed

    Chen, Na; Liu, Dianfeng; Soromou, Lanan Wassy; Sun, Jingjing; Zhong, Weiting; Guo, Weixiao; Huo, Meixia; Li, Hongyu; Guan, Shuang; Chen, Zhenwen; Feng, Haihua

    2014-06-01

    Paeonol (2'-hydroxy-4'-methoxyacetophenone) is the main phenolic compound of the radix of Paeonia suffruticosa which has been used as traditional Chinese medicine. In this study, we primarily investigated the anti-inflammatory effects and the underlying mechanisms of paeonol in RAW macrophage cells; and based on these effects, we assessed the protective effects of paeonol on lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia in mice. The in vitro study showed that paeonol regulated the production of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 via inactivation of IκBα, ERK1/2, JNK, and p38 MAPK. In mouse model of lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines are significantly regulated, and thus the survival rates of lipolysaccharide-challenged mice are improved by paeonol (150, 200, or 250 mg/kg). Therefore, paeonol has a beneficial activity against lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in RAW 264.7 cell and mouse models.

  19. [Somatic antigens of the Brucella genus. The structure of the O-specific polysaccharide chain of Brucella melitensis lipopolysaccharide].

    PubMed

    L'vov, V L; Malikov, V E; Shashkov, A S; Dranovskaia, E A; Dmitriev, B A

    1985-07-01

    The phenol-phase soluble antigenic lipopolysaccharide was isolated from Brucella melitensis, strain 565, by the routine phenol/water procedure followed by chromatography on Sepharose 4B. After mild acid hydrolysis and chromatography on Sephadex G-50, the lipopolysaccharide yielded a linear O-specific polysaccharide built up from 1,2-linked 4,6-dideoxy-4-formamido-alpha-D-mannopyranosyl units. The structure of the polysaccharide was deduced mainly from the nuclear magnetic resonance and methylation analyses. The phenol-soluble lipopolysaccharide, isolated from commercial vaccine strain B. abortus 19-BA, on mild hydrolysis afforded material, 13C and 1H-NMR spectra of which were identical to those of the O-specific polysaccharide from B. melitensis 565.

  20. N-(1-carboxyethyl)alanine (alanopine), a new non-sugar component of lipopolysaccharides of Providencia and Proteus.

    PubMed

    Kocharova, Nina A; Kondakova, Anna N; Ovchinnikova, Olga G; Perepelov, Andrei V; Shashkov, Alexander S; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2009-10-12

    O-Polysaccharides were released by mild acid degradation of lipopolysaccharides of Providencia alcalifaciens O35 and Proteus vulgaris O76 and were studied by 1D and 2D (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopies, including HMBC and NOESY (ROESY) experiments. Both polysaccharides were found to contain N-(1-carboxyethyl)alanine (alanopine) that is N-linked to 4-amino-4,6-dideoxyglucose. Analysis of published data [Vinogradov, E.; Perry, M. B. Eur. J. Biochem.2000, 267, 2439-2446] shows that alanopine is present also on the same sugar in the lipopolysaccharide core of Proteus mirabilis O6 and O57.

  1. The role of cyclooxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 in lipopolysaccharide and interleukin-1 stimulated enterocyte prostanoid formation.

    PubMed

    Longo, W E; Damore, L J; Mazuski, J E; Smith, G S; Panesar, N; Kaminski, D L

    1998-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide is an inflammatory agent and interleukin-1 is a cytokine. Their pro-inflammatory effects may be mediated by prostanoids produced by inducible cyclooxygenase-2. The aim of this study was to determine the prostanoids produced by lipopolysaccharide and interleukin-1 stimulated enterocytes through the cyclooxygenase-1 and 2 pathways. Cultured enterocytes were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide or interleukin-1beta with and without cyclooxygenase inhibitors. Low concentrations of indomethacin and valerylsalicylic acid (VSA) were evaluated as cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitors and their effects compared with the effects of a specific cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, SC-58125. Prostaglandin E2, 6-keto prostaglandin F1alpha, prostaglandin D2 and leukotriene B4 levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. Immunoblot analysis using isoform-specific antibodies showed that the inducible cyclooxygenase enzyme (COX-2) was expressed by 4 h in LPS and IL-1beta treated cells while the constitutive COX-1 remained unaltered in its expression. Interleukin-1beta and lipopolysaccharide stimulated the formation of all prostanoids compared with untreated cells, but failed to stimulate leukotriene B4. Indomethacin at 20 microM concentration, and VSA inhibited lipopolysaccharide and interleukin 1beta stimulated prostaglandin E2, but not 6-keto prostaglandin F1alpha formation. SC-58125 inhibited lipopolysaccharide and interleukin-1beta stimulated 6-keto prostaglandin F1alpha but not prostaglandin E2 release. The specific cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor also inhibited lipopolysaccharide produced prostaglandin D2 but not interleukin-1beta stimulated prostaglandin D2. While SC-58125 inhibited basal 6-keto prostaglandin-F1alpha formation it significantly increased basal prostaglandin E2 and prostaglandin D2 formation. As SC-58125 inhibited lipopolysaccharide and interleukin-1beta induced 6-keto prostaglandin F1alpha production but not prostaglandin E2 production, it suggests that these agents

  2. Effect of methanolic extract of Asparagus racemosus Willd. on lipopolysaccharide induced-oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mohammad Parwez; Hussain, Arshad; Siddiqui, Hefazat Hussain; Wahab, Shadma; Adak, Manoranjan

    2015-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress and impairment of normal physiological function generally categorized by increased anxiety and reduced mobility. Therefore, the present study was to find out the effect Methanolic extract of Asparagus racemosus (MEAR ) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced oxidative stress in rats . LPS-induced oxidative stress in rats was measured by locomotor activity by photoactometer test, anxiety with elevated plus maze test and also studied the oxidative stress markers, nitric oxide and cytokines. The obtained data shows that LPS markedly exhausted (p<0.001) brain- reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) significantly increased (p<0.001) the level of malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide and the activity of cytokines in the brain. MEAR supplementation resulted in normalization of brain GSH and CAT and SOD and decreases in the levels of MDA with reduction of nitric oxide and cytokines in the brain. The action of the extract at dose of 200 mg/kg was almost similar to the standard drug, quercetin (100mg/kg, p.o.). These present study conclude that MEAR administration significantly (P<0.05) reduced LPS- induced oxidative-stress and intensely suggest that Asparagus racemosus Willd. is a functionally newer type of cerebroprotective agent.

  3. Effects of tylosin on serum cytokine levels in healthy and lipopolysaccharide-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Er, Ayse; Yazar, Enver; Uney, Kamil; Elmas, Muammer; Altan, Feray; Cetin, Gul

    2010-03-01

    The effects of different doses of tylosin on serum cytokine concentrations were investigated in healthy and lipopolysaccharide-treated mice. The mice were divided into seven groups. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was injected into the positive control group. The other six groups received three different tylosin doses concurrently without or with LPS: 10 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg, 500 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg + LPS, 100 mg/kg + LPS and 500 mg/kg + LPS. After treatment, serum samples were collected at 0, 1, 2, 3, 6, 12 and 24 hours. Serum tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin 1beta (IL1beta) and IL10 levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Tylosin doses of 10 and 100 mg/kg induced no cytokine production in the healthy mice. Tylosin at 500 mg/kg had no effect on TNFalpha or IL1beta production, but it induced IL10 production in healthy mice. All doses of tylosin reduced the elevated TNFalpha and IL1beta in LPS-treated mice but increased their IL10 levels. In conclusion, these data suggest that tylosin has an immunomodulatory effect at the dose recommended for use against infection.

  4. Effects of Lipopolysaccharide and Progesterone Exposures on Embryonic Cerebral Cortex Development in Mice.

    PubMed

    Tronnes, Ashlie A; Koschnitzky, Jenna; Daza, Ray; Hitti, Jane; Ramirez, Jan Marino; Hevner, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Our objective was to determine if progesterone pretreatment could ameliorate the detrimental effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation on cortical neurogenesis. Timed pregnant mouse dams (n = 8) were given intraperitoneal injections of progesterone (42 mg/kg) or vehicle on embryonic day 17.5. Two hours later, mice were given intraperitoneal LPS (140 μg/kg) or vehicle. Mice were sacrificed 16 hours later on embryonic day 18. Two-color immunofluorescence was performed with primary antibodies T-box transcription factor 2 (Tbr2), ionized calcium binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1), cleaved caspase 3 (CC3), and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Cells were counted, and statistical analysis was determined using analysis of variance and Tukey-Kramer method. The Tbr2 intermediate neural progenitor cell density decreased after LPS exposure (P = .0022). Pre-exposure to progesterone statistically increased Tbr2 intermediate neural progenitors compared to LPS treatment alone and was similar to controls (P = .0022). After LPS exposure, microglia displayed an activated phenotype, and cell density was increased (P < .001). Cell death rates were low among study groups but was increased in LPS exposure groups compared to progesterone alone (P = .0015). Lipopolysaccharide-induced systemic inflammation reduces prenatal neurogenesis in mice. Pre-exposure with progesterone is associated with increased neurogenesis. Progesterone may protect the preterm brain from defects of neurogenesis induced by inflammation.

  5. Identification and Characterization of Lipopolysaccharide Induced TNFα Factor from Blunt Snout Bream, Megalobrama amblycephala

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Yina; Xiang, Xinying; Jiang, Yuhong; Tang, Leilei; Zhou, Yi; Zhong, Huan; Xiao, Jun; Yan, Jinpeng

    2017-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide induced TNFα factor (LITAF) is an important transcription factor responsible for regulation of tumor necrosis factor α. In this study, a novel litaf gene (designated as Malitaf) was identified and characterized from blunt snout bream, Megalobrama amblycephala. The full-length cDNA of Malitaf was of 956 bp, encoding a polypeptide of 161 amino acids with high similarity to other known LITAFs. A phylogenetic tree also showed that Malitaf significantly clustered with those of other teleost, indicating that Malitaf was a new member of fish LITAF family. The putative maLITAF protein possessed a highly conserved LITAF domain with two CXXC motifs. The mRNA transcripts of Malitaf were detected in all examined tissues of healthy M. amblycephala, including kidney, head kidney, muscle, liver, spleen, gill, and heart, and with the highest expression in immune organs: spleen and head kidney. The expression level of Malitaf in spleen was rapidly up-regulated and peaked (1.29-fold, p < 0.05) at 2 h after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. Followed the stimulation of Malitaf, Matnfα transcriptional level was also transiently induced to a high level (51.74-fold, p < 0.001) at 4 h after LPS stimulation. Taken together, we have identified a putative fish LITAF ortholog, which was a constitutive and inducible immune response gene involved in M. amblycephala innate immunity during the course of a pathogenic infection. PMID:28212275

  6. Reliability of plasma lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) from repeated measures in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Citronberg, Jessica S; Wilkens, Lynne R; Lim, Unhee; Hullar, Meredith A J; White, Emily; Newcomb, Polly A; Le Marchand, Loïc; Lampe, Johanna W

    2016-09-01

    Plasma lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP), a measure of internal exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide, has been associated with several chronic conditions and may be a marker of chronic inflammation; however, no studies have examined the reliability of this biomarker in a healthy population. We examined the temporal reliability of LBP measured in archived samples from participants in two studies. In Study one, 60 healthy participants had blood drawn at two time points: baseline and follow-up (either three, six, or nine months). In Study two, 24 individuals had blood drawn three to four times over a seven-month period. We measured LBP in archived plasma by ELISA. Test-retest reliability was estimated by calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Plasma LBP concentrations showed moderate reliability in Study one (ICC 0.60, 95 % CI 0.43-0.75) and Study two (ICC 0.46, 95 % CI 0.26-0.69). Restricting the follow-up period improved reliability. In Study one, the reliability of LBP over a three-month period was 0.68 (95 % CI: 0.41-0.87). In Study two, the ICC of samples taken ≤seven days apart was 0.61 (95 % CI 0.29-0.86). Plasma LBP concentrations demonstrated moderate test-retest reliability in healthy individuals with reliability improving over a shorter follow-up period.

  7. Lipopolysaccharide and histaminergic systems interact to mediate food intake in broilers.

    PubMed

    Zendehdel, M; Baghbanzadeh, A; Aghelkohan, P; Hassanpour, S

    2015-09-25

    1. The aim of the current study was to investigate the interaction of the lipopolysaccharide and histaminergic systems on appetite regulation in broilers. The effects of intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of α-fluoromethylhistidine (α-FMH, histidine decarboxylase inhibitor), chlorpheniramine (histamine H1 receptor antagonist), famotidine (histamine H2 receptor antagonist) and thioperamide (histamine H3 receptor antagonist) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced hypophagia in broilers were studied. 2. A total of 128 broilers were randomly allocated into 4 experiments (4 groups and 8 replications in each experiment). A cannula was surgically implanted into the lateral ventricle. In Experiment 1, broilers were ICV injected with LPS (20 ng) prior to α-FMH (250 nmol). In Experiment 2, chickens were ICV injected with LPS followed by chlorpheniramine (300 nmol). In Experiment 3, broilers were ICV injected with famotidine (82 nmol) after LPS (20 ng). In Experiment 4, ICV injection of LPS was followed by thioperamide (300 nmol). The cumulative food intake was recorded until 4 h post injection. 3. LPS decreased food intake; chlorpheniramine amplified food intake and LPS-induced hypophagia was lessened by injection of chlorpheniramine. α-FMH, famotidine and thioperamide had no effect on LPS-induced hypophagia. 4. The results suggest that there is an interaction between central LPS and the histaminergic system where LPS-induced hypophagia is presumably mediated by H1 histamine receptors in 3 h food-deprived broilers.

  8. Mice lacking inducible nitric oxide synthase are not resistant to lipopolysaccharide-induced death.

    PubMed Central

    Laubach, V E; Shesely, E G; Smithies, O; Sherman, P A

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide produced by cytokine-inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is thought to be important in the pathogenesis of septic shock. To further our understanding of the role of iNOS in normal biology and in a variety of inflammatory disorders, including septic shock, we have used gene targeting to generate a mouse strain that lacks iNOS. Mice lacking iNOS were indistinguishable from wild-type mice in appearance and histology. Upon treatment with lipopolysaccharide and interferon gamma, peritoneal macrophages from the mutant mice did not produce nitric oxide measured as nitrite in the culture medium. In addition, lysates of these cells did not contain iNOS protein by immunoblot analysis or iNOS enzyme activity. In a Northern analysis of total RNA, no iNOS transcript of the correct size was detected. No increases in serum nitrite plus nitrate levels were observed in homozygous mutant mice treated with a lethal dose of lipopolysaccharide, but the mutant mice exhibited no significant survival advantage over wild-type mice. These results show that lack of iNOS activity does not prevent mortality in this murine model for septic shock. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7479866

  9. Assessment of the convergence of molecular dynamics simulations of lipopolysaccharide membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Soares, Thereza A.; Straatsma, TP

    2008-03-01

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is composed of a phospholipid inner leaflet and a lipopolysaccharide outer leaflet. The chemical structure of lipopolysaccharide confers an asymmetric character to outer membranes that has been shown to play an important role in the in the electrical properties of porins, low permeability and intrinsic antibiotic resistance of Gram-negative bacteria. In the present work, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of two different configurations of the outer membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa under periodic boundary conditions were carried out in order to i) validate model-derived properties against the available experimental data, ii) identify the properties whose dynamics can be sampled on nanosecond timescales, and iii) evaluate the dependence of the convergence of structural and dynamical properties on the initial configuration of the system, within the chosen force field and simulation conditions. Because the relaxation times associated with the motions of individual LPS monomers in outer membranes is very slow, the two initial configurations do not converge to a common ensemble of configuration on the nanosecond time scale. However, a number of properties of the outer membrane that will significantly impact the structural and internal dynamics of transmembrane proteins, most notably the electrostatic potential and molecular density, do converge within the simulated time scale. For these properties, a good agreement with the available experimental data was found. Such molecular model, capable of accounting for the high asymmetry and low fluidity characteristics of outer membranes, will certainly benefit future atomistic simulations of outer membrane proteins.

  10. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Middle Ear Inflammation Disrupts the cochlear Intra-Strial Fluid–Blood Barrier through Down-Regulation of Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinhui; Chen, Songlin; Hou, Zhiqiang; Cai, Jing; Dong, Mingmin; Shi, Xiaorui

    2015-01-01

    Middle ear infection (or inflammation) is the most common pathological condition that causes fluid to accumulate in the middle ear, disrupting cochlear homeostasis. Lipopolysaccharide, a product of bacteriolysis, activates macrophages and causes release of inflammatory cytokines. Many studies have shown that lipopolysaccharides cause functional and structural changes in the inner ear similar to that of inflammation. However, it is specifically not known how lipopolysaccharides affect the blood-labyrinth barrier in the stria vascularis (intra-strial fluid–blood barrier), nor what the underlying mechanisms are. In this study, we used a cell culture-based in vitro model and animal-based in vivo model, combined with immunohistochemistry and a vascular leakage assay, to investigate lipopolysaccharide effects on the integrity of the mouse intra-strial fluid–blood barrier. Our results show lipopolysaccharide-induced local infection significantly affects intra-strial fluid–blood barrier component cells. Pericytes and perivascular-resident macrophage-like melanocytes are particularly affected, and the morphological and functional changes in these cells are accompanied by substantial changes in barrier integrity. Significant vascular leakage is found in the lipopolysaccharide treated-animals. Consistent with the findings from the in vivo animal model, the permeability of the endothelial cell monolayer to FITC-albumin was significantly higher in the lipopolysaccharide-treated monolayer than in an untreated endothelial cell monolayer. Further study has shown the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation to have a major effect on the expression of tight junctions in the blood barrier. Lipopolysaccharide was also shown to cause high frequency hearing loss, corroborated by previous reports from other laboratories. Our findings show lipopolysaccharide-evoked middle ear infection disrupts inner ear fluid balance, and its particular effects on the intra-strial fluid

  11. Lipopolysaccharide-induced middle ear inflammation disrupts the cochlear intra-strial fluid-blood barrier through down-regulation of tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinhui; Chen, Songlin; Hou, Zhiqiang; Cai, Jing; Dong, Mingmin; Shi, Xiaorui

    2015-01-01

    Middle ear infection (or inflammation) is the most common pathological condition that causes fluid to accumulate in the middle ear, disrupting cochlear homeostasis. Lipopolysaccharide, a product of bacteriolysis, activates macrophages and causes release of inflammatory cytokines. Many studies have shown that lipopolysaccharides cause functional and structural changes in the inner ear similar to that of inflammation. However, it is specifically not known how lipopolysaccharides affect the blood-labyrinth barrier in the stria vascularis (intra-strial fluid-blood barrier), nor what the underlying mechanisms are. In this study, we used a cell culture-based in vitro model and animal-based in vivo model, combined with immunohistochemistry and a vascular leakage assay, to investigate lipopolysaccharide effects on the integrity of the mouse intra-strial fluid-blood barrier. Our results show lipopolysaccharide-induced local infection significantly affects intra-strial fluid-blood barrier component cells. Pericytes and perivascular-resident macrophage-like melanocytes are particularly affected, and the morphological and functional changes in these cells are accompanied by substantial changes in barrier integrity. Significant vascular leakage is found in the lipopolysaccharide treated-animals. Consistent with the findings from the in vivo animal model, the permeability of the endothelial cell monolayer to FITC-albumin was significantly higher in the lipopolysaccharide-treated monolayer than in an untreated endothelial cell monolayer. Further study has shown the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation to have a major effect on the expression of tight junctions in the blood barrier. Lipopolysaccharide was also shown to cause high frequency hearing loss, corroborated by previous reports from other laboratories. Our findings show lipopolysaccharide-evoked middle ear infection disrupts inner ear fluid balance, and its particular effects on the intra-strial fluid-blood barrier

  12. Use of mice tolerant to lipopolysaccharide to demonstrate requirement of cooperation between macrophages and lymphocytes to generate lipopolysaccharide-induced colony-stimulating factor in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Z; Hertogs, C F; Pluznik, D H

    1983-01-01

    Injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into mice was followed by a rapid elevation of colony-stimulating factor (CSF) in the serum. A second, challenging injection of LPS given 3 to 4 days later failed to induce elevated levels of CSF in the serum. Such mice tolerant to LPS were used as an experimental tool to identify the CSF-producing cells which respond to LPS. We observed that generation of LPS-induced CSF in mice tolerant to LPS could be restored by an intraperitoneal injection of spleen cells 24 h before the challenging injection of LPS. Depletion of the adherent cells from the spleen cells reduced the ability of the splenic lymphocytes to restore the capacity of the mice tolerant to LPS to generate serum CSF. Reconstitution of the splenic lymphocytes with 5% thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal macrophages, however, reestablished the restorative capacity of these cells, whereas almost no restoration was observed after direct injection of elicited peritoneal macrophages. These data suggest that the spleen cells are active in generating CSF, provided that macrophages are present and can interact with the splenic lymphocytes to generate LPS-induced CSF in the serum. PMID:6602767

  13. A novel role of kukoamine B: Inhibition of the inflammatory response in the livers of lipopolysaccharide-induced septic mice via its unique property of combining with lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    QIN, WEI-TING; WANG, XU; SHEN, WEI-CHANG; SUN, BING-WEI

    2015-01-01

    Kukoamine B (KB), derived from the traditional Chinese herb cortex Lycii, exerts anti-inflammatory effects due to its potent affinity with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and CpG DNA; however, little is known regarding whether the in vivo administration of KB can effectively inhibit inflammation in septic mice. The present study thus aimed to investigate the inhibitory effects of KB on the inflammatory response in the livers of LPS-induced septic mice. KB treatment in the LPS-induced septic mice significantly decreased the plasma level of LPS. In addition, KB protected against liver injury, as confirmed by improved histology and decreased aminotransferase levels in the serum. Further experiments revealed that KB attenuated liver myeloperoxidase activity and reduced the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1. These effects were accompanied by decreases in the levels of tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin-1β in the liver tissue. In parallel, the activity of nuclear factor-κ-gene binding (NF-κB) in the livers of LPS-induced septic mice was markedly inhibited with KB treatment. In combination, these results demonstrate that KB inhibits inflammation in septic mice by reducing the concentrations of plasma LPS, decreasing leukocyte sequestration and interfering with NF-κB activation, and, therefore, suppressing the pro-adhesive phenotype of endothelial cells. PMID:25667619

  14. Bacteriophage PhiX174's Ecological Niche and the Flexibility of Its Escherichia coli Lipopolysaccharide Receptor▿

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Alix; Clermont, Olivier; Denamur, Erick; Tenaillon, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    To determine bacteriophage PhiX174's ecological niche, 783 Escherichia coli isolates were screened for susceptibility. Sensitive strains are diverse regarding their phylogenies and core lipopolysaccharides (LPS), but all have rough phenotypes. Further analysis of E. coli K-12 LPS mutants revealed that PhiX174 can use a wide diversity of LPS structures to initiate its infectious process. PMID:20833781

  15. Effects of dietary humic and butyric acid on growth performance and response to lipopolysaccharide in young pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Humic acid (MFG) and fat protected butyric acid (BA) has been shown to modulate energy metabolism and inflammation. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the effects of MFG and BA, alone and in combination, on growth performance and response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced in...

  16. Prenatal transportation alters the acute phase response (APR) of bull calves exposed to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine if prenatal transportation influences the acute phase response (APR) to a postnatal Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pregnant Brahman cows (n=96) matched by age and parity were separated into transported (TRANS; n=48; transported for 2 hours on gestational day...

  17. Supplementation with a Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product alters the metabolic response following a lipopolysaccharide challenge in weaned pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine if feeding a Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product to weaned pigs would alter the metabolic response following a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pigs (n=30; 6.4+/-0.1 kg BW) were housed individually with ad libitum access to feed and water. Pigs were...

  18. Supplementation of Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product can attenuate the acute phase response following a lipopolysaccharide challenge in pigs.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine if feeding a Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product to weaned pigs would reduce stress and acute phase responses (APR) following a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pigs (n=30; 6.4±0.1 kilograms body weight) were housed individually in pens with ad libi...

  19. Peptide-perylene diimide functionalized magnetic nano-platforms for fluorescence turn-on detection and clearance of bacterial lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Mu, Jing; Wu, Xiangyang; Bhattacharjya, Surajit; Yeow, Edwin Kok Lee; Xing, Bengang

    2014-06-14

    A simple and unique strategy has been successfully designed for sensitive detection and rapid clearance of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) by integration of core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2 magnetic nanoparticles with a perylene-diimide (PDI) conjugated LPS-recognition peptide.

  20. Effects of fermented soybean meal on innate immunity-related gene expressions in nursery pigs acutely challenged with lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Roh, Sang-Gun; Carroll, Jeffery A; Kim, Sung Woo

    2015-05-01

    This experiment was to determine if replacing soybean meal with fermented soybean meal (FSBM) would reduce the innate immune response after lipopolysaccharide challenge and the changes of gene expression profiles associated with this response. Forty-eight 21 day-old pigs were housed individually and fed three diets for 15 days: CON (a diet without FSBM or spray-dried plasma protein; SDPP), PP7 (a diet with 7% SDPP), and FS10 (a diet with 10% FSBM). Pigs were fitted with a jugular vein catheters receiving lipopolysaccharide challenge (25 μg/kg body weight (BW)) on day 15. Blood was collected for 5 h at 30-min intervals to measure cortisol. Expressions of gene transcripts in total RNA from leukocytes were compared using an oligonucleotide microarray at 210 min after lipopolysaccharides injection. Cortisol of FS10 was lower (P < 0.05) than CON after lipopolysaccharides challenge. The expression levels of 17 transcripts, including cytosolic glutathione peroxidase and glutathione S-transferase A4-4 were increased (P < 0.05), whereas 23 genes including adiponectin, neonatal Fc receptor and tumor necrosis factor ligand superfamily member 5 were decreased (P < 0.05) in FS10. This study suggests that FSBM-fed pigs can modulate expression of genes related to inflammatory response and anti-oxidant activity which can be a potential reason for reduced serum cortisol.

  1. Fetal lipopolysaccharide exposure modulates diet-dependent gut maturation and sensitivity to necrotising enterocolitis in pre-term pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Uterine infections during pregnancy predispose to pre-term birth and postnatal morbidity, but it is unknown how prenatal bacterial exposure affects maturation of the immature gut. We hypothesised that a prenatal exposure to gram-negative lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has immunomodulatory effects that imp...

  2. Copper sulfate pentahydrate reduced epithelial cytotoxicity induced by lipopolysaccharide from enterogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Feyzi, Adel; Delkhosh, Aref; Nasrabadi, Hamid Tayefi; Cheraghi, Omid; Khakpour, Mansour; Barekati-Mowahed, Mazyar; Soltani, Sina; Mohammadi, Seyede Momeneh; Kazemi, Masoumeh; Hassanpour, Mehdi; Rezabakhsh, Aysa; Maleki-Dizaji, Nasrin; Rahbarghazi, Reza; Namdarian, Reza

    2017-02-26

    The over usage of multiple antibiotics contributes to the emergence of a whole range of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria causing enterogenic infections in poultry science. Therefore, finding an appropriate alternative natural substance carrying an antibacterial capacity would be immensely beneficial. It has been previously discovered that the different types of cupric salts, especially copper sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO4·5H2O), to carry a potent bactericidal capacity. We investigated the neutralizing effect of CuSO4·5H2O (6.25μg/ml) on the reactive oxygen species generation, and expression of MyD88, an essential adaptor protein of Toll-like receptor, and NF-κB in three intestinal epithelial cell lines exposed to 50ng/ml lipopolysaccharide. In order to find the optimal cupric sulfate concentration without enteritis-inducing toxicity, broiler chickens were initially fed with water containing 0.4, 0.5, and 1mg/l during a period of 4days. After determination of appropriate dosage, two broiler chickens and turkey flocks with enteritis were fed with cupric compound for 4days. We found that cupric sulfate can lessen the cytotoxic effect of lipopolysaccharide by reducing the reactive oxygen species content (p<0.05). Additionally, the expression of MyD88 and NF-κB was remarkably down-regulated in the presence of lipopolysaccharide and cupric sulfate. The copper sulfate in doses lower than 0.4mg/ml expressed no cytotoxic effect on the liver, kidney, and the intestinal tract while a concentration of 0.5 and 1mg/ml contributed to a moderate to severe tissue injuries. Pearson Chi-Square analysis revealed the copper cation significantly diminished the rate of mortality during 4-day feeding of broiler chicken and turkey with enteritis (p=0.000). Thus, the results briefed above all confirm the potent anti-bactericidal feature of cupric sulfate during the course of enteritis.

  3. Gram-Negative Marine Bacteria: Structural Features of Lipopolysaccharides and Their Relevance for Economically Important Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Choi, Sangdun

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative marine bacteria can thrive in harsh oceanic conditions, partly because of the structural diversity of the cell wall and its components, particularly lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS is composed of three main parts, an O-antigen, lipid A, and a core region, all of which display immense structural variations among different bacterial species. These components not only provide cell integrity but also elicit an immune response in the host, which ranges from other marine organisms to humans. Toll-like receptor 4 and its homologs are the dedicated receptors that detect LPS and trigger the immune system to respond, often causing a wide variety of inflammatory diseases and even death. This review describes the structural organization of selected LPSes and their association with economically important diseases in marine organisms. In addition, the potential therapeutic use of LPS as an immune adjuvant in different diseases is highlighted. PMID:24796306

  4. Protective effect of carvacrol on acute lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide in mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaosheng; Jia, Aiqing

    2014-08-01

    Carvacrol, the major component of Plectranthus amboinicus, has been known to exhibit anti-inflammatory activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of carvacrol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia and acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. Mice were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with LPS and the mortality of mice for 7 days were observed twice a day. Meanwhile, the protective effect of carvacrol (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg) on LPS-induced endotoxemia were detected. Using an experimental model of LPS-induced ALI, we examined the effect of carvacrol in resolving lung injury. The results showed that carvacrol could improve survival during lethal endotoxemia and attenuate LPS-induced ALI in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of carvacrol may be due to its ability to inhibit NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways, thereby inhibiting inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production.

  5. A cross-disciplinary perspective on the innate immune responses to bacterial lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yunhao; Kagan, Jonathan C

    2014-01-01

    The study of innate immunity to bacteria has focused heavily on the mechanisms by which mammalian cells detect lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the conserved surface component of gram-negative bacteria. While Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) is responsible for all the host transcriptional responses to LPS, recent discoveries have revealed the existence of several TLR4-independent responses to LPS. These discoveries not only broaden our view of the means by which mammalian cells interact with bacteria, but also highlight new selective pressures that may have promoted the evolution of bacterial immune evasion strategies. In this review, we highlight past and recent discoveries on host LPS sensing mechanisms and discuss bacterial countermeasures that promote infection. By looking at both sides of the host-pathogen interaction equation, we hope to provide comprehensive insights into host defense mechanisms and bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:24766885

  6. Luteolin and fisetin inhibit the effects of lipopolysaccharide obtained from Porphyromonas gingivalis in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Contreras-Sánchez, Anabel

    2013-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory process of infectious origin that affects the gums and, in severe cases, destroys connective tissue, leading to loss of the dental organ. Gram-negative Porphyromonas gingivalis bacteria are recovered from patients with chronic periodontitis. The polysaccharide obtained from these bacteria induces the expression of interleukin (IL)-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor, and IL-6. Flavonoids are molecules that participate in the control of inflammatory processes. We studied the role of the flavonoids fisetin, luteolin, myricetin, and morin in inhibiting the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and AKT as well as their role in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) transcription. All four of these flavonoids were found to inhibit MAPK and AKT. Fisetin and luteolin blocked the activation of MAPK and AKT to levels below basal levels. All of these flavonoids also blocked LPS-mediated COX-2 expression.

  7. Requirement for tyrosine phosphorylation in lipopolysaccharide-induced murine B-cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Dearden-Badet, M T; Revillard, J P

    1993-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces a strong B-cell proliferative response with subsequent differentiation, through a complex signal transduction pathway. This process is known to be mediated through protein kinase C (PKC) translocation without Ca2+ mobilization. Here, we show that B-cell proliferative responses induced by five different LPS preparations, as well as by F(ab')2 anti-IgM antibodies, are inhibited by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, genistein and herbimycin A. In contrast, B-cell proliferation induced by the combination of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) plus ionomycin was not influenced by treatment with either herbimycin A or genistein. These data indicate that tyrosine phosphorylation is required to initiate B-cell proliferation by LPS. PMID:8307617

  8. Neuroprotective Activity of (−)-Epigallocatechin Gallate against Lipopolysaccharide-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-Biao; Zhou, Li; Wang, Yi-Zhong; Wang, Xu; Zhou, Yu; Ho, Wen-Zhe; Li, Jie-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) mediated systemic inflammation plays a critical role in neurodegenerative diseases. The present study was conducted to evaluate the protective effects of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the major component in green tea, on LPS-mediated inflammation and neurotoxicity. LPS treatment of macrophages induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6). However, EGCG pretreatment of macrophages significantly inhibited LPS-mediated induction of these cytokines. In addition, EGCG significantly diminished LPS-induced inflammatory cytokines in the peripheral mononuclear blood cells (PBMCs). Supernatant from EGCG-pretreated and LPS-activated macrophage cultures was found to be less cytotoxic to neurons than that from non-EGCG-pretreated and LPS-activated macrophage cultures. Furthermore, EGCG treatment of neurons could inhibit LPS-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Thus EGCG represents a potent and useful neuroprotective agent for inflammation-mediated neurological disorders. PMID:27191001

  9. Systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide increases the expression of aquaporin-4 in the rat anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara-Otani, Sachi; Maeda, Seishi; Tanaka, Koichi; Hayakawa, Tetsu; Seki, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia on the expression of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) in the rat anterior pituitary gland, using the real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. After intraperitoneal injection of LPS, the level of AQP4 mRNA doubled at 2, 4 and 8 hr. Immunohistochemical analysis showed an increase with time in AQP4 immunostaining in folliculo-stellate cells following LPS injection; the intensity of immunoreactivity peaked at 8 hr. At the same time, some cyst-like structures, formed by AQP4-positive cells, were observed. These findings indicate that LPS induces the expression of AQP4 in the anterior pituitary gland. The present results should provide an important key to elucidate the pathogenesis of the anterior pituitary gland during endotoxemia.

  10. Interferon-induced guanylate-binding proteins promote cytosolic lipopolysaccharide detection by caspase-11.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Etienne; Broz, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from gram-negative bacteria is a classical pathogen-associated molecular pattern and a strong inducer of immune responses. While the detection of LPS on the cell surface and in the endosome by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been studied for some time, it has only recently been discovered that LPS can also be sensed in the cytosol of cells by a noncanonical inflammasome pathway, resulting in the activation of the cysteine protease caspase-11. Intriguingly, activation of this pathway requires the production of interferons (IFNs) and the induction of a class of IFN-induced GTPases called guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), which have previously been linked to cell-autonomous killing of intracellular microbes. In this study, we review the recent advances in our understanding of cytosolic LPS sensing and the function of mammalian GBPs.

  11. Immunohistochemical diagnosis of typhus rickettsioses using an anti-lipopolysaccharide monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Walker, D H; Feng, H M; Ladner, S; Billings, A N; Zaki, S R; Wear, D J; Hightower, B

    1997-10-01

    A monoclonal antibody directed against an epitope on the lipopolysaccharide of typhus-group rickettsiae was developed for the purpose of detecting this heat-stable, proteinase-resistant antigen in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. Rickettsia prowazekii organisms were identified in endothelium and macrophages in sections of the brains of three Egyptian men who died of epidemic louse-borne typhus in Cairo during World War II and in the brain from a recent case of typhus fever acquired in Burundi. R. typhi organisms were identified in endothelial cells from a fatal case of murine typhus and in experimentally infected mice. This approach is applicable not only to the study of archival tissues and experimental animal models but also could be used to establish a timely diagnosis of typhus-group rickettsiosis by immunohistochemical examination of cutaneous biopsies of rash lesions during the acute stage of illness.

  12. Inflammatory markers following acute fuel oil exposure or bacterial lipopolysaccharide in mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Lee, Kelly A; Tell, Lisa A; Mohr, F Charles

    2012-12-01

    Adult mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) were orally dosed with bunker C fuel oil for 5 days, and five different inflammatory markers (haptoglobin, mannan-binding lectin, ceruloplasmin, unsaturated iron-binding capacity, and plasma iron) were measured in blood plasma prior to and 8, 24, 48, and 72 hr following exposure. In order to contrast the response to fuel oil with that of a systemic inflammatory response, an additional five ducks were injected intramuscularly with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Oil-treated birds had an inflammatory marker profile that was significantly different from control and LPS-treated birds, showing decreases in mannan-binding lectin-dependent hemolysis and unsaturated iron-binding capacity, but no changes in any of the other inflammatory markers. Birds treated with oil also exhibited increased liver weights, decreased body and splenic weights, and decreased packed cell volume.

  13. Lipopolysaccharide can induce errors in anatomical measures of neuronal plasticity by increasing tracing efficacy.

    PubMed

    Weishaupt, Nina; Krajacic, Aleksandra; Fouad, Karim

    2013-11-27

    Evidence suggests that activating certain components of the immune system may increase regeneration and plasticity in the injured central nervous system. Investigating the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a potent endotoxin and immune activator, on neuronal plasticity in rat models of spinal cord injury, we discovered that systemic administration of LPS can increase the number of descending motor axons that transport neuronal tracers anterogradely to the spinal cord. This effect of LPS was not observed across all motor tracts traced in two different experiments, but was significant for two different tracers administered to corticospinal tract neurons. Densitometry measurement of traced corticospinal axons within the cervical gray matter revealed that normalization to the number of traced axons is crucial to avoid false-positive reports of increased plasticity following LPS injection. These findings indicate that assessments of neuronal growth based on neuronal tracing techniques should be normalized when inflammation or immune activation is an experimental variable.

  14. Conformational Dynamics of the Single Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigen in Solution.

    PubMed

    Galochkina, Tatiana; Zlenko, Dmitry; Nesterenko, Alexey; Kovalenko, Ilya; Strakhovskaya, Marina; Averyanov, Alexander; Rubin, Andrey

    2016-09-19

    The O-antigen is the most variable and highly immunogenic part of the lipopolysaccharide molecule that covers the surface of Gram-negative bacteria and makes up the first line of cellular defense. To provide insight into the details of the O-antigen arrangement on the membrane surface, we simulated its behavior in solution by molecular dynamics. We developed the energetically favorable O-antigen conformation by analyzing free-energy distributions for its disaccharide fragments. Starting from this conformation, we simulated the behavior of the O-antigen chain on long timescales. Depending on the force field and temperature, the single molecule can undergo reversible or irreversible coil-to-globule transitions. The mechanism of these transitions is related either to the rotation of the carbohydrate residues around O-glycosidic bonds or to flips of the pyranose rings. We found that the presence of rhamnose in the O-antigen chain crucially increases its conformational mobility.

  15. Effect of Kramecyne on the Inflammatory Response in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Peritoneal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Miranda, E.; Lemus-Bautista, J.; Pérez, S.; Pérez-Ramos, J.

    2013-01-01

    Kramecyne is a new peroxide, it was isolated from Krameria cytisoides, methanol extract, and this plant was mostly found in North and South America. This compound showed potent anti-inflammatory activity; however, the mechanisms by which this compound exerts its anti-inflammatory effect are not well understood. In this study, we examined the effects of kramecyne on inflammatory responses in mouse lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced peritoneal macrophages. Our findings indicate that kramecyne inhibits LPS-induced production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin- (IL-) 6. During the inflammatory process, levels of cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2, nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and nitric oxide (NO) increased in mouse peritoneal macrophages; however, kramecyne suppressed them significantly. These results provide novel insights into the anti-inflammatory actions and support its potential use in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23573152

  16. CXCL10/IP-10 Neutralization Can Ameliorate Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Shan; Li, Libing; Wang, Xuning; Sun, Junping; Xue, Xinying; Xiao, Yongjiu; Zhang, Mingyue; Ao, Ting; Wang, Jianxin

    2017-01-01

    The role of C-X-C motif chemokine 10 (CXCL10), a pro-inflammatory factor, in the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains unclear. In this study, we explored the role of CXCL10 and the effect of CXCL10 neutralization in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ARDS in rats. The expression of CXCL10 and its receptor chemokine receptor 3(CXCR3) increased after LPS induction. Moreover, neutralization of CXCL10 ameliorated the severity of ARDS by reducing pulmonary edema, inhibiting the release of inflammatory mediators (IFN-γ, IL-6 and ICAM-1) and limiting inflammatory cells (neutrophils, macrophages, CD8+ T cells) influx into the lung, with a reduction in CXCR3 expression in neutrophils and macrophages. Therefore, CXCL10 could be a potential therapeutic target in LPS-induced ARDS. PMID:28046003

  17. Involvement of Prokineticin 2 and Prokineticin Receptor 1 in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Testitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Biao; Yu, Lili; Wang, Jiaojiao; Li, Cuiling; Zhao, Kai; Zhang, Huiping

    2016-04-01

    Prokineticin 2, a newly discovered proinflammatory peptide, has been amply evidenced to be involved in the occurrence and progress of local and systematical inflammation. Although the presence of Prokineticn 2 in mammal testis has been documented clearly, research targeting the involvement of prokineticin 2 in testicular pathology, especially testitis, is rather scarce. Employing a lipopolysaccharide-induced testitis rat model, we for the first time demonstrated the expression and upregulation of prokineticin 2 in orchitis at several levels. Our effort also addressed the differential expression patterns of prokineticin 2 and interleukin-1β, a key inflammation indicator, during testitis suggesting Prokineticn 2 serves more than a proinflammatory factor in the context of testitis. Given one of the cognate receptors of prokineticin 2, prokineticin receptor 1 (PKR1) was also significantly upregulated in orchitis as discussed in the current study, it is very likely that PK2/PKR1 signaling contribute to the development of inflammation-related testicular diseases.

  18. Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase Detoxifies Lipopolysaccharide and Prevents Inflammation in Response to the Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Jennifer M.; Akerlund, Janie; Mittge, Erika; Guillemin, Karen

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Vertebrates harbor abundant lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or endotoxin in their gut microbiota. Here we demonstrate that the brush border enzyme intestinal alkaline phosphatase (Iap), which dephosphorylates LPS, is induced during establishment of the microbiota and plays a crucial role in promoting mucosal tolerance to gut bacteria in zebrafish. We demonstrate that Iap deficient animals are hypersensitive to LPS toxicity through a mechanism mediated by Myd88 and Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor (Tnfr). We further show that the endogenous microbiota establish the normal homeostatic level of neutrophils in the intestine through a process involving Myd88 and Tnfr. Iap deficient animals exhibit excessive intestinal neutrophil influx, similar to wild type animals exposed to LPS. When reared germ-free, however, the intestines of Iap deficient animals are devoid of neutrophils, demonstrating that Iap functions to prevent inflammatory responses to resident gut bacteria. PMID:18078689

  19. Lipopolysaccharide induction of autophagy is associated with enhanced bactericidal activity in Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Pflaum, Katherine; Gerdes, Kimberly; Yovo, Kossi; Callahan, Jennifer; Snyder, Michelle L.D.

    2012-01-01

    Innate immune cells respond to microbial invaders using pattern recognition receptors that detect conserved microbial patterns. Among the cellular processes stimulated downstream of pattern recognition machinery is the initiation of autophagy, which plays protective roles against intracellular microbes. We have shown recently that Dictyostelium discoideum, which takes up bacteria for nutritive purposes, may employ pattern recognition machinery to respond to bacterial prey, as D. discoideum cells upregulate bactericidal activity upon stimulation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here we extend these findings, showing that LPS treatment leads to induction of autophagosomal maturation in cells responding to the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus. Cells treated with the autophagy-inducing drug rapamycin clear internalized bacteria at an accelerated rate, while LPS-enhanced clearance of bacteria is reduced in cells deficient for the autophagy-related genes atg1 and atg9. These findings link microbial pattern recognition with autophagy in the social amoeba D. discoideum. PMID:22575510

  20. Lipophilic antioxidants prevent lipopolysaccharide-induced mitochondrial dysfunction through mitochondrial biogenesis improvement.

    PubMed

    Bullón, Pedro; Román-Malo, Lourdes; Marín-Aguilar, Fabiola; Alvarez-Suarez, José Miguel; Giampieri, Francesca; Battino, Maurizio; Cordero, Mario D

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in several infectious diseases. In this regard, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an endotoxic component, induces mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in several pathological events such as periodontal disease or sepsis. In our experiments, LPS-treated fibroblasts provoked increased oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, reduced oxygen consumption and mitochondrial biogenesis. After comparing coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC), we observed a more significant protection of CoQ10 than of NAC, which was comparable with other lipophilic and hydrophilic antioxidants such as vitamin E or BHA respectively. CoQ10 improved mitochondrial biogenesis by activating PGC-1α and TFAM. This lipophilic antioxidant protection was observed in mice after LPS injection. These results show that mitochondria-targeted lipophilic antioxidants could be a possible specific therapeutic strategy in pharmacology in the treatment of infectious diseases and their complications.

  1. Bacteriophage adhesin-coated long-period gratings for bacterial lipopolysaccharide recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koba, Marcin; Śmietana, Mateusz; Brzozowska, Ewa; Górska, Sabina; Mikulic, Predrag; Bock, Wojtek J.

    2014-05-01

    In this work we report an application of the optical fiber long-period gratings (LPGs) working near the dispersion turning point of higher order cladding modes for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) recognition. We show that when the LPG is functionalized with the bacteriophage adhesin, it is capable of very specific LPS detection. Thus, we compare label-free binding effect for specific to the adhesin LPS-positive and non-specific LPS-negative. The resonance wavelength shift induced by the LPS-positive reaches 2.9 nm, while for LPS-negative the shift is negligible. The LPG-based sensing structure allows for monitoring of the binding phenomenon in real time and with good accuracy.

  2. RAPID BREAKING OF TOLERANCE AGAINST ESCHERICHIA COLI LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE IN VIVO AND IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Sjöberg, Olof

    1972-01-01

    The breaking of tolerance against the lipopolysaccharide from E. coli 055:B5 was studied. It was found that immune responsiveness recovered very slowly in vivo, tolerance still existing 3 wk after the last tolerizing injection. However, if spleen cells from tolerant mice were transferred into irradiated syngeneic recipients, the tolerant state was readily broken. Spleen cells transferred 3 days after the last tolerance-maintaining dose did not respond, whereas cells transferred on day 5 or 7 responded equally well as normal spleen cells. It was also possible to break tolerance by incubating tolerant spleen cells, which did not respond after transfer, for 20 hr in vitro before transfer into irradiated recipients. The results suggest that there exist reversibly inactivated cells in tolerant animals and that these cells can be reactivated upon removal of the cells to a neutral environment. PMID:4553014

  3. Hepatoprotective effect of myristicin from nutmeg (Myristica fragrans) on lipopolysaccharide/d-galactosamine-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tatsuya; Jinno, Keiko; Kawagishi, Hirokazu; Arimoto, Yasushi; Suganuma, Hiroyuki; Inakuma, Takahiro; Sugiyama, Kimio

    2003-03-12

    To evaluate the hepatoprotective activity of spices, 21 different spices were fed to rats with liver damage caused by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus d-galactosamine (D-GalN). As assessed by plasma aminotranferase activities, nutmeg showed the most potent hepatoprotective activity. Bioassay-guided isolation of the active compound from nutmeg was carried out in mice by a single oral administration of the respective fractions. Myristicin, one of the major essential oils of nutmeg, was found to possess extraordinarily potent hepatoprotective activity. Myristicin markedly suppressed LPS/D-GalN-induced enhancement of serum TNF-alpha concentrations and hepatic DNA fragmentation in mice. These findings suggest that the hepatoprotective activity of myristicin might be, at least in part, due to the inhibition of TNF-alpha release from macrophages. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the hepatoprotective mechanism(s) of myristicin.

  4. Gene expression profiles in the intestine of lipopolysaccharide-challenged piglets.

    PubMed

    Yi, Dan; Hou, Yongqing; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Di; Ding, Binying; Wu, Tao; Chen, Hongbo; Liu, Yulan; Kang, Ping; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    Bowel diseases are common in human and animals and are characterized by intestinal dysfunction and injury. A well-established porcine model of intestinal injury can be induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an endotoxin released from the cell wall of pathogenic bacteria. LPS affects the expression of genes associated with intestinal immune response, mucosal growth, energy metabolism, absorption, mucosal barrier function, and antiviral function. Transcriptional analysis of intestinal genes reveals that the duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon respond to LPS challenge in a similar pattern. Moreover, the jejunum and ileum exhibit greater responses to LPS challenge than the duodenum and colon with regard to gene expression. Additionally, over 85% of genes are co-expressed along the small and large intestines and there is a clear distinction in gene expression patterns amongst the different intestinal segments in pigs. These findings have important implications for underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for endotoxin-induced intestinal injury and dysfunction.

  5. The intracerebroventricular injection of rimonabant inhibits systemic lipopolysaccharide-induced lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Arnold; Neumann, Paul H; Peng, Jianya; James, Janey; Russo, Vincenzo; MacDonald, Hunter; Gertzberg, Nancy; Feleder, Carlos

    2015-09-15

    We investigated the role of intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of rimonabant (500ng), a CB1 antagonist, on lipopolysaccharide ((LPS) 5mg/kg)-induced pulmonary inflammation in rats in an isolated perfused lung model. There were decreases in pulmonary capillary pressure (Ppc) and increases in the ((Wet-Dry)/Dry lung weight)/(Ppc) ratio in the ICV-vehicle/LPS group at 4h. There were decreases in TLR4 pathway markers, such as interleukin receptor-associated kinase-1, IκBα, Raf1 and phospho-SFK (Tyr416) at 30min and at 4h increases in IL-6, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and myeloperoxidase in lung homogenate. Intracerebroventricular rimonabant attenuated these LPS-induced responses, indicating that ICV rimonabant modulates LPS-initiated pulmonary inflammation.

  6. Follistatin-like protein 1 suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokines expression during neuroinflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kai-Yuan; Liu, Yi; Han, Ying-Guang; Li, Jing-Kun; Jia, Jia-Lin; Chen, Bin; Yao, Zhi-Xiao; Nie, Lin; Cheng, Lei

    2017-04-01

    Follistain-like protein 1 (FSTL1), has been recently demonstrated to be involved in the embryo development of nervous system and glioblastoma. However, the role of FSTL1 in neuroinflammation remains unexplored. In this study, the expression of FSTL1 in astrocytes was verified and its role was studied in neuroinflammation induced by in vivo intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or LPS treatment to astrocytes in vitro. FSTL1 was significantly induced after ICV LPS injection or LPS treatment. FSTL1 suppressed upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines in astrocytes after LPS treatment. Moreover, FSTL1 downregulated expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines through suppressing MAPK/p-ERK1/2 pathway in astrocytes. Our results suggest that FSTL1 may play an anti-inflammatory role in neuroinflammation mediated by astrocytes.

  7. Microglial ablation and lipopolysaccharide preconditioning affects pilocarpine-induced seizures in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Mirrione, M.M.; Mirrione, M.M.; Konomosa, D.K.; Ioradanis, G.; Dewey, S.L.; Agzzid, A.; Heppnerd, F.L.; Tsirka, St.E.

    2010-04-01

    Activated microglia have been associated with neurodegeneration in patients and in animal models of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (TLE), however their precise functions as neurotoxic or neuroprotective is a topic of significant investigation. To explore this, we examined the effects of pilocarpine-induced seizures in transgenic mice where microglia/macrophages were conditionally ablated. We found that unilateral ablation of microglia from the dorsal hippocampus did not alter acute seizure sensitivity. However, when this procedure was coupled with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) preconditioning (1 mg/kg given 24 h prior to acute seizure), we observed a significant pro-convulsant phenomenon. This effect was associated with lower metabolic activation in the ipsilateral hippocampus during acute seizures, and could be attributed to activity in the mossy fiber pathway. These findings reveal that preconditioning with LPS 24 h prior to seizure induction may have a protective effect which is abolished by unilateral hippocampal microglia/macrophage ablation.

  8. Fish Oil Prevents Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Depressive-Like Behavior by Inhibiting Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhe; Ren, Huixia; Huang, Zhijian; Peng, Yu; He, Baixuan; Yao, Xiaoli; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Su, Huanxing

    2016-11-04

    Depression is associated with somatic immune changes, and neuroinflammation is now recognized as hallmark for depressive disorders. N-3 (or omega-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are well known to suppress neuroinflammation, reduce oxidative stress, and protect neuron from injury. We pretreated animals with fish oil and induced acute depression-like behaviors with systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. The levels of cytokines and stress hormones were determined from plasma and different brain areas. The results showed that fish oil treatment prevent LPS-induce depressive behavior by suppression of neuroinflammation. LPS induced acute neuroinflammation in different brain regions, which were prevented in fish oil fed mice. However, neither LPS administration nor fish oil treatment has strong effect on stress hormone secretion in the hypothalamus and adrenal. Fish oil might provide a useful therapy against inflammation-associated depression.

  9. Lipopolysaccharide impairs hepatocyte ureagenesis from ammonia: involvement of mitochondrial aquaporin-8.

    PubMed

    Soria, Leandro R; Marrone, Julieta; Molinas, Sara M; Lehmann, Guillermo L; Calamita, Giuseppe; Marinelli, Raúl A

    2014-05-02

    We recently reported that hepatocyte mitochondrial aquaporin-8 (mtAQP8) channels facilitate the uptake of ammonia and its metabolism into urea. Here we studied the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) on ammonia-derived ureagenesis. In LPS-treated rats, hepatic mtAQP8 protein expression and diffusional ammonia permeability (measured utilizing ammonia analogues) of liver inner mitochondrial membranes were downregulated. NMR studies using 15N-labeled ammonia indicated that basal and glucagon-induced ureagenesis from ammonia were significantly reduced in hepatocytes from LPS-treated rats. Our data suggest that hepatocyte mtAQP8-mediated ammonia removal via ureagenesis is impaired by LPS, a mechanism potentially relevant to the molecular pathogenesis of defective hepatic ammonia detoxification in sepsis.

  10. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide binding enhances virion stability and promotes environmental fitness of an enteric virus.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Christopher M; Jesudhasan, Palmy R; Pfeiffer, Julie K

    2014-01-15

    Enteric viruses, including poliovirus and reovirus, encounter a vast microbial community in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, which has been shown to promote virus replication and pathogenesis. Investigating the underlying mechanisms, we find that poliovirus binds bacterial surface polysaccharides, which enhances virion stability and cell attachment by increasing binding to the viral receptor. Additionally, we identified a poliovirus mutant, VP1-T99K, with reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding. Although T99K and WT poliovirus cell attachment, replication, and pathogenesis in mice are equivalent, VP1-T99K poliovirus was unstable in feces following peroral inoculation of mice. Consequently, the ratio of mutant virus in feces is reduced following additional cycles of infection in mice. Thus, the mutant virus incurs a fitness cost when environmental stability is a factor. These data suggest that poliovirus binds bacterial surface polysaccharides, enhancing cell attachment and environmental stability, potentially promoting transmission to a new host.

  11. The role of bacterial lipopolysaccharides as immune modulator in vaccine and drug development.

    PubMed

    Arenas, Jesús

    2012-09-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) is the major constituent of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. LPS can cause a variety of immune- and cellular disorders that lead to lethal effects and clinical manifestations of infectious diseases. Several molecular and cellular in vitro techniques, besides synthesis of analogous molecules of the LPS active region, have provided insight in the molecular mechanisms of LPS bioactivity in cellular systems. These advances have facilitated the application of diverse LPS-based molecules in relevant areas such as vaccine technology, allergen immunotherapy, treatment of immune-related diseases/disorders, LPS-related inflammatory processes and sepsis. The purpose of this review is to examine the progress in the generation of new LPS-based molecules and their therapeutic potential.

  12. Gram-negative marine bacteria: structural features of lipopolysaccharides and their relevance for economically important diseases.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Choi, Sangdun

    2014-04-30

    Gram-negative marine bacteria can thrive in harsh oceanic conditions, partly because of the structural diversity of the cell wall and its components, particularly lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS is composed of three main parts, an O-antigen, lipid A, and a core region, all of which display immense structural variations among different bacterial species. These components not only provide cell integrity but also elicit an immune response in the host, which ranges from other marine organisms to humans. Toll-like receptor 4 and its homologs are the dedicated receptors that detect LPS and trigger the immune system to respond, often causing a wide variety of inflammatory diseases and even death. This review describes the structural organization of selected LPSes and their association with economically important diseases in marine organisms. In addition, the potential therapeutic use of LPS as an immune adjuvant in different diseases is highlighted.

  13. Lipopolysaccharide smooth-rough phase variation in bacteria of the genus Chlamydia.

    PubMed Central

    Lukácová, M; Baumann, M; Brade, L; Mamat, U; Brade, H

    1994-01-01

    In two strains of Chlamydia psittaci and in Chlamydia trachomatis serotype L1, we have detected a so-far-unknown antigen which (i) is resistant to heat and proteolytic digestion, (ii) can be extracted with phenol-water into the water phase, (iii) gives a ladder-like banding pattern in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, (iv) is immunogenic in rabbits and mice, and (v) contains immunoreactivity of lipid A, a common and characteristic component of gram-negative lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Thus, chlamydiae contain, in addition to the known rough-type LPS, another LPS type which is phenotypically smooth (S-LPS). S-LPS was observed preferentially in chlamydiae grown in the yolk sac of embryonated eggs; it was, however, also detected by immunofluorescence in tissue culture-grown chlamydiae with a monoclonal antibody against S-LPS. Images PMID:8188348

  14. Use of a bilayer stacking gel to improve resolution of lipopolysaccharides and lipooligosaccharides in polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed

    Inzana, T J; Apicella, M A

    1999-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipooligosaccharide (LOS) are important antigenic and integral components of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Alteration or heterogeneity of LPS/LOS structure is most often assessed by alteration of electrophoretic band profiles using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). In order to discern minor differences in the electrophoretic profile of closely spaced bands, particularly the low molecular weight bands of LOS, optimum resolution is required. Unfortunately, many publications of LPS/LOS in polyacrylamide gels show a diffuse, smeared pattern without discernible bands. We report here a formulation for polyacrylamide gels that reproducibly yields LPS/LOS bands with sharp resolution. A key feature of this formulation is the use of a separate comb gel containing electrode buffer layered on top of the conventional stacking gel.

  15. Quinic acid derivatives from Pimpinella brachycarpa exert anti-neuroinflammatory activity in lipopolysaccharide-induced microglia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Young; Moon, Eunjung; Kim, Sun Yeou; Lee, Kang Ro

    2013-04-01

    Five new quinic acid derivatives (1-5), together with 10 known quinic acid derivatives (6-15), were isolated from the MeOH extract of Pimpinella brachycarpa (Umbelliferae). Their structures were established on the basis of spectroscopic analyses including extensive 2D NMR studies (COSY, HMQC and HMBC). Isolated compounds 1-15 were evaluated for their inhibitory activities on nitric oxide (NO) production in an activated murine microglial cell line. Compounds 2, 3, 8 and 11 significantly inhibited NO production without high cell toxicity in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated BV-2 cells, a microglia cell line (IC50=4.66, 12.52, 9.04 and 12.11 μM, respectively).

  16. Circulating leptin mediates lipopolysaccharide-induced anorexia and fever in rats.

    PubMed

    Sachot, Christelle; Poole, Stephen; Luheshi, Giamal N

    2004-11-15

    Anorexia and fever are important features of the host's response to inflammation that can be triggered by the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the appetite suppressant leptin. Previous studies have demonstrated that LPS induces leptin synthesis and secretion in the periphery, and that the action of leptin on appetite suppression and fever are dependent on brain interleukin (IL)-1beta. However, the role of leptin as a neuroimmune mediator of LPS-induced inflammation has not been fully elucidated. To address this issue, we neutralized circulating leptin using a leptin antiserum (LAS) and determined how this neutralization affected LPS-induced anorexia, fever and hypothalamic IL-1beta. Adult male rats were separated into four treatment groups, namely LPS + normal sheep serum (NSS), LPS + LAS, saline + LAS and saline + NSS. Intraperitoneal injection of LPS (100 microg kg(-1)) induced a significant reduction in food intake and body weight, which were significantly reversed in the presence of LAS (1 ml kg(-1)), 8 and 24 h after treatment. In addition, LPS-induced fever was significantly attenuated by LAS over the duration of the fever response (8 h). Lipopolysaccharide induced an increase of circulating IL-6, another potential circulating pyrogen, which was not affected by neutralization of leptin at 2 h. Interleukin-1beta mRNA at 1 and 8 h, and IL-1 receptor antagonist (ra) at 2 h were significantly upregulated in the hypothalamus of LPS-treated animals. The induction of these cytokines was attenuated in the presence of LAS. These results are the first to demonstrate that leptin is a circulating mediator of LPS-induced anorexia and fever, probably through a hypothalamic IL-1beta-dependent mechanism.

  17. Hematological changes in calves exposed to a mixture of lipopolysaccharide and crude leukotoxin of Pasteurella haemolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Bowersock, T L; Walker, R D; Maddux, J M; Fenner, D; Moore, R N

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if culture supernatants of Pasteurella haemolytica containing crude leukotoxin and lipopolysaccharide (CLCL) causes disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) when injected into calves. The effect of intraduodenal (ID) exposure followed by a subsequent subcutaneous (SC) inoculation of either heat-treated or untreated CLCL was evaluated. The relative contribution of the crude leukotoxin and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to the virulence of P. haemolytica was evaluated. One group of calves received an ID inoculation of CLCL followed two weeks later by a SC inoculation of CLCL; one group received an ID inoculation of tissue culture medium followed two weeks later by a SC inoculation of CLCL; and a third group received an ID inoculation of CLCL followed two weeks later by a SC inoculation of heat-treated CLCL. Hematological parameters used to evaluate DIC included white cell count, platelet count, neutrophil number, fibrinogen, fibrin degradation products, one stage prothrombin time (OSPT), activated partial thromboplastin time, body temperature and clinical signs. Each parameter was measured in calves at 0, 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 h following the SC inoculation of CLCL. Each group had significant changes over time in all parameters except body temperature. Calves that received a SC inoculation of heat-treated CLCL had smaller changes in all parameters except OSPT compared to the other groups. Results suggest that the LPS and leukotoxin of P. haemolytica exert additive effects on the coagulation cascade and number of peripheral leukocytes, and that the ID inoculation of CLCL does not affect the response of calves to a SC inoculation of toxin. PMID:2249175

  18. A Glycam-Based Force Field for Simulations of Lipopolysaccharide Membranes: Parametrization and Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschner, Karl N.; Lins, Roberto D.; Maass, Astrid; Soares, Thereza A.

    2012-11-13

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) comprise the outermost layer of the Gram-negative bacteria cell envelope. Packed onto a lipid layer, the outer membrane displays remarkable physical-chemical differences compared to cell membranes. The carbohydrate-rich region confers a membrane asymmetry that underlies many biological processes such as endotoxicity, antibiotic resistance, and cell adhesion. Furthermore, unlike membrane proteins from other sources, integral outer-membrane proteins do not consist of transmembrane α helices; instead they consist of antiparallel β-barrels, which highlights the importance of the LPS membrane as a medium. In this work, we present an extension of the GLYCAM06 force field that has been specifically developed for LPS membranes using our Wolf2Pack program. This new set of parameters for lipopolysaccharide molecules expands the GLYCAM06 repertoire of monosaccharides to include phosphorylated N- and O-acetylglucosamine, 3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2- ulosonic acid, L-glycero-D-manno-heptose and its O-carbamoylated variant, and N-alanine-D-galactosamine. A total of 1 µs of molecular dynamics simulations of the rough LPS membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01 is used to showcase the added parameter set. The equilibration of the LPS membrane is shown to be signi!cantly slower compared to phospholipid membranes, on the order of 500 ns. It is further shown that water molecules penetrate the hydrocarbon region up to the terminal methyl groups, much deeper than commonly observed for phospholipid bilayers, and in agreement with neutron diffraction measurements. A comparison of simulated structural, dynamical, and electrostatic properties against corresponding experimentally available data shows that the present parameter set reproduces well the overall structure and the permeability of LPS membranes in the liquid-crystalline phase.

  19. Multiple mechanisms involved in diabetes protection by lipopolysaccharide in non-obese diabetic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun; Cao, Hui; Wang, Hongjie; Yin, Guoxiao; Du, Jiao; Xia, Fei; Lu, Jingli; Xiang, Ming

    2015-06-15

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation has been proposed to be important for islet cell inflammation and eventually β cell loss in the course of type 1 diabetes (T1D) development. However, according to the “hygiene hypothesis”, bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an agonist on TLR4, inhibits T1D progression. Here we investigated possible mechanisms for the protective effect of LPS on T1D development in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. We found that LPS administration to NOD mice during the prediabetic state neither prevented nor reversed insulitis, but delayed the onset and decreased the incidence of diabetes, and that a multiple-injection protocol is more effective than a single LPS intervention. Further, LPS administration suppressed spleen T lymphocyte proliferation, increased the generation of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs), reduced the synthesis of strong Th1 proinflammatory cytokines, and downregulated TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. Most importantly, multiple injections of LPS induced a potential tolerogenic dendritic cell (DC) subset with low TLR4 expression without influencing the DC phenotype. Explanting DCs from repeated LPS-treated NOD mice into NOD/SCID diabetic mice conferred sustained protective effects against the progression of diabetes in the recipients. Overall, these results suggest that multiple mechanisms are involved in the protective effects of LPS against the development of diabetes in NOD diabetic mice. These include Treg induction, down-regulation of TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway, and the emergence of a potential tolerogenic DC subset. - Highlights: • Administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) prevented type 1 diabetes in NOD mice. • Downregulating TLR4 level and MyD88-dependent pathway contributed to protection of LPS. • LPS administration also hampered DC maturation and promoted Treg differentiation.

  20. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigen Modification Impact on Serum Resistance and Antibody Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Heiss, Christian; Black, Ian; Donohue, Nicholas; Brown, Naj; Davies, Mark R.; Azadi, Parastoo; Baker, Stephen; Kaye, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi is a human-restricted Gram-negative bacterial pathogen responsible for causing an estimated 27 million cases of typhoid fever annually, leading to 217,000 deaths, and current vaccines do not offer full protection. The O-antigen side chain of the lipopolysaccharide is an immunodominant antigen, can define host-pathogen interactions, and is under consideration as a vaccine target for some Gram-negative species. The composition of the O-antigen can be modified by the activity of glycosyltransferase (gtr) operons acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Here we investigate the role of two gtr operons that we identified in the S. Typhi genome. Strains were engineered to express specific gtr operons. Full chemical analysis of the O-antigens of these strains identified gtr-dependent glucosylation and acetylation. The glucosylated form of the O-antigen mediated enhanced survival in human serum and decreased complement binding. A single nucleotide deviation from an epigenetic phase variation signature sequence rendered the expression of this glucosylating gtr operon uniform in the population. In contrast, the expression of the acetylating gtrC gene is controlled by epigenetic phase variation. Acetylation did not affect serum survival, but phase variation can be an immune evasion mechanism, and thus, this modification may contribute to persistence in a host. In murine immunization studies, both O-antigen modifications were generally immunodominant. Our results emphasize that natural O-antigen modifications should be taken into consideration when assessing responses to vaccines, especially O-antigen-based vaccines, and that the Salmonella gtr repertoire may confound the protective efficacy of broad-ranging Salmonella lipopolysaccharide conjugate vaccines. PMID:28167670

  1. Dual labeling of lipopolysaccharides for SPECT-CT imaging and fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Duheron, Vincent; Moreau, Mathieu; Collin, Bertrand; Sali, Wahib; Bernhard, Claire; Goze, Christine; Gautier, Thomas; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Deckert, Valérie; Brunotte, François; Lagrost, Laurent; Denat, Franck

    2014-03-21

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) or endotoxins are amphipathic, pro-inflammatory components of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. In the host, LPS can trigger a systemic inflammatory response syndrome. To bring insight into in vivo tissue distribution and cellular uptake of LPS, dual labeling was performed with a bimodal molecular probe designed for fluorescence and nuclear imaging. LPS were labeled with DOTA-Bodipy-NCS, and pro-inflammatory properties were controlled after each labeling step. LPS were then radiolabeled with (111)In and subsequently injected intravenously into wild-type, C57B16 mice, and their in vivo behavior was followed by single photon emission computed tomography coupled with X-ray computed tomography (SPECT-CT) and fluorescence microscopy. Time course of liver uptake of radiolabeled LPS ((111)In-DOTA-Bodipy-LPS) was visualized over a 24-h period in the whole animal by SPECT-CT. In complementary histological analyses with fluorescent microscopy, the bulk of injected (111)In-DOTA-Bodipy-LPS was found to localize early within the liver. Serum kinetics of unlabeled and DOTA-Bodipy-labeled LPS in mouse plasma were similar as ascertained by direct quantitation of β-hydroxymyristate, and DOTA-Bodipy-LPS was found to retain the potent, pro-inflammatory property of the unlabeled molecule as assessed by serum cytokine assays. It is concluded that the dual labeling process, involving the formation of covalent bonds between a DOTA-Bodipy-NCS probe and LPS molecules is relevant for imaging and kinetic analysis of LPS biodistribution, both in vivo and ex vivo. Data of the present study come in direct and visual support of a lipopolysaccharide transport through which pro-inflammatory LPS can be transported from the periphery to the liver for detoxification. The (111)In-DOTA-Bodipy-LPS probe arises here as a relevant tool to identify key components of LPS detoxification in vivo.

  2. 6-Hydroxydopamine and lipopolysaccharides induced DNA damage in astrocytes: involvement of nitric oxide and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sonam; Goswami, Poonam; Biswas, Joyshree; Joshi, Neeraj; Sharma, Sharad; Nath, C; Singh, Sarika

    2015-01-15

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of the neurotoxins 6-hydroxydopamine and lipopolysaccharide on astrocytes. Rat astrocyte C6 cells were treated with different concentration of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)/lipopolysaccharides (LPS) for 24 h. Both neurotoxins significantly decreased the viability of astrocytes, augmented the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the astrocyte marker--glial fibrillar acidic protein. A significantly decreased mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity, mitochondrial membrane potential, augmented reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, caspase-3 mRNA level, chromatin condensation and DNA damage was observed in 6-OHDA/LPS treated astroglial cells. 6-OHDA/LPS treatment also caused the significantly increased expression of iNOS and nitrite level. Findings showed that 6-OHDA/LPS treatment caused mitochondrial dysfunction mediated death of astrocytes, which significantly involve the nitric oxide. Since we have observed significantly increased level of iNOS along with mitochondrial impairment and apoptotic cell death in astrocytes, therefore to validate the role of iNOS, the cells were co-treated with iNOS inhibitor aminoguanidine (AG, 100 μM). Co-treatment of AG significantly attenuated the 6-OHDA/LPS induced cell death, mitochondrial activity, augmented ROS level, chromatin condensation and DNA damage. GFAP and caspase-3 expression were also inhibited with co-treatment of AG, although the extent of inhibition was different in both experimental sets. In conclusion, the findings showed that iNOS mediated increased level of nitric oxide acts as a key regulatory molecule in 6-OHDA/LPS induced mitochondrial dysfunction, DNA damage and apoptotic death of astrocytes.

  3. New amphiphilic neamine derivatives active against resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and their interactions with lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Sautrey, Guillaume; Zimmermann, Louis; Deleu, Magali; Delbar, Alicia; Souza Machado, Luiza; Jeannot, Katy; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Buyck, Julien M; Decout, Jean-Luc; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule

    2014-08-01

    The development of novel antimicrobial agents is urgently required to curb the widespread emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria like colistin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We previously synthesized a series of amphiphilic neamine derivatives active against bacterial membranes, among which 3',6-di-O-[(2"-naphthyl)propyl]neamine (3',6-di2NP), 3',6-di-O-[(2"-naphthyl)butyl]neamine (3',6-di2NB), and 3',6-di-O-nonylneamine (3',6-diNn) showed high levels of activity and low levels of cytotoxicity (L. Zimmermann et al., J. Med. Chem. 56:7691-7705, 2013). We have now further characterized the activity of these derivatives against colistin-resistant P. aeruginosa and studied their mode of action; specifically, we characterized their ability to interact with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and to alter the bacterial outer membrane (OM). The three amphiphilic neamine derivatives were active against clinical colistin-resistant strains (MICs, about 2 to 8 μg/ml), The most active one (3',6-diNn) was bactericidal at its MIC and inhibited biofilm formation at 2-fold its MIC. They cooperatively bound to LPSs, increasing the outer membrane permeability. Grafting long and linear alkyl chains (nonyl) optimized binding to LPS and outer membrane permeabilization. The effects of amphiphilic neamine derivatives on LPS micelles suggest changes in the cross-bridging of lipopolysaccharides and disordering in the hydrophobic core of the micelles. The molecular shape of the 3',6-dialkyl neamine derivatives induced by the nature of the grafted hydrophobic moieties (naphthylalkyl instead of alkyl) and the flexibility of the hydrophobic moiety are critical for their fluidifying effect and their ability to displace cations bridging LPS. Results from this work could be exploited for the development of new amphiphilic neamine derivatives active against colistin-resistant P. aeruginosa.

  4. The Majority of In Vitro Macrophage Activation Exhibited by Extracts of Some Immune Enhancing Botanicals is Due to Bacterial Lipoproteins and Lipopolysaccharides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have identified potent monocyte/macrophage activating bacterial lipoproteins within commonly used immune enhancing botanicals such as Echinacea, American ginseng and alfalfa sprouts. These bacterial lipoproteins, along with lipopolysaccharides, were substantially more potent than other bacteriall...

  5. Characterization of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum galE gene: its impact on lipopolysaccharide profile and nodulation of soybean.

    PubMed

    Chang, Woo-Suk; Park, Kyoung-Min; Koh, Sung-Cheol; So, Jae-Seong

    2008-03-01

    The galE gene from Bradyrhizobium japonicum 61A101C, a soybean endosymbiont, was cloned and characterized. Its deduced amino-acid sequence showed a high similarity with that of other rhizobia. Functional identification of the galE gene was achieved by complementation of a galE mutant strain, PL2, with a series of pKM subclones. Disruption of the B. japonicum galE gene affects the lipopolysaccharide profile compared with that of the wild type, suggesting that galE is responsible for alteration of lipopolysaccharide structure. Examination of nodule formation by the wild-type and galE mutant revealed that the former displayed normal nodule development on soybean roots, whereas the latter showed no nodule formation at all time points examined except for 20 days after inoculation when <10% of soybean formed pseudo-nodules.

  6. Brucellosis Vaccines: Assessment of Brucella melitensis Lipopolysaccharide Rough Mutants Defective in Core and O-Polysaccharide Synthesis and Export

    PubMed Central

    González, David; Grilló, María-Jesús; De Miguel, María-Jesús; Ali, Tara; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; Delrue, Rose-May; Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Muñoz, Pilar; López-Goñi, Ignacio; Iriarte, Maite; Marín, Clara-M.; Weintraub, Andrej; Widmalm, Göran; Zygmunt, Michel; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Blasco, José-María; Moriyón, Ignacio

    2008-01-01

    Background The brucellae are facultative intracellular bacteria that cause brucellosis, one of the major neglected zoonoses. In endemic areas, vaccination is the only effective way to control this disease. Brucella melitensis Rev 1 is a vaccine effective against the brucellosis of sheep and goat caused by B. melitensis, the commonest source of human infection. However, Rev 1 carries a smooth lipopolysaccharide with an O-polysaccharide that elicits antibodies interfering in serodiagnosis, a major problem in eradication campaigns. Because of this, rough Brucella mutants lacking the O-polysaccharide have been proposed as vaccines. Methodology/Principal Findings To examine the possibilities of rough vaccines, we screened B. melitensis for lipopolysaccharide genes and obtained mutants representing all main rough phenotypes with regard to core oligosaccharide and O-polysaccharide synthesis and export. Using the mouse model, mutants were classified into four attenuation patterns according to their multiplication and persistence in spleens at different doses. In macrophages, mutants belonging to three of these attenuation patterns reached the Brucella characteristic intracellular niche and multiplied intracellularly, suggesting that they could be suitable vaccine candidates. Virulence patterns, intracellular behavior and lipopolysaccharide defects roughly correlated with the degree of protection afforded by the mutants upon intraperitoneal vaccination of mice. However, when vaccination was applied by the subcutaneous route, only two mutants matched the protection obtained with Rev 1 albeit at doses one thousand fold higher than this reference vaccine. These mutants, which were blocked in O-polysaccharide export and accumulated internal O-polysaccharides, stimulated weak anti-smooth lipopolysaccharide antibodies. Conclusions/Significance The results demonstrate that no rough mutant is equal to Rev 1 in laboratory models and question the notion that rough vaccines are

  7. Immunization with lipopolysaccharide-deficient whole cells provides protective immunity in an experimental mouse model of Acinetobacter baumannii infection.

    PubMed

    García-Quintanilla, Meritxell; Pulido, Marina R; Pachón, Jerónimo; McConnell, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The increasing clinical importance of infections caused by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii warrants the development of novel approaches for prevention and treatment. In this context, vaccination of certain patient populations may contribute to reducing the morbidity and mortality caused by this pathogen. Vaccines against Gram-negative bacteria based on inactivated bacterial cells are highly immunogenic and have been shown to produce protective immunity against a number of bacterial species. However, the high endotoxin levels present in these vaccines due to the presence of lipopolysaccharide complicates their use in human vaccination. In the present study, we used a laboratory-derived strain of A. baumannii that completely lacks lipopolysaccharide due to a mutation in the lpxD gene (IB010), one of the genes involved in the first steps of lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, for vaccination. We demonstrate that IB010 has greatly reduced endotoxin content (<1.0 endotoxin unit/106 cells) compared to wild type cells. Immunization with formalin inactivated IB010 produced a robust antibody response consisting of both IgG1 and IgG2c subtypes. Mice immunized with IB010 had significantly lower post-infection tissue bacterial loads and significantly lower serum levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 compared to control mice in a mouse model of disseminated A. baumannii infection. Importantly, immunized mice were protected from infection with the ATCC 19606 strain and an A. baumannii clinical isolate. These data suggest that immunization with inactivated A. baumannii whole cells deficient in lipopolysaccharide could serve as the basis for a vaccine for the prevention of infection caused by A. baumannii.

  8. Plasma and tissue disposition of florfenicol in Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxaemic sheep.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Fernández, Rubén; Cazanga, Victoria; Jeldres, Jessie Ana; Silva, Pedro P; Riquelme, José; Quiroz, Fernando; Palma, Cristina; Carretta, Maria D; Burgos, Rafael A

    2017-05-01

    1. The purpose of this study was to understand the effects of the acute inflammatory response (AIR) induced by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on florfenicol (FFC) and FFC-amine (FFC-a) plasma and tissue concentrations. 2. Ten Suffolk Down sheep, 60.5 ± 4.7 kg, were distributed into two experimental groups: group 1 (LPS) treated with three intravenous doses of 1 μg/kg bw of LPS at 24, 16, and 0.75 h (45 min) before FFC treatment; group 2 (Control) was treated with saline solution (SS) in parallel to group 1. An IM dose of 20 mg FFC/kg was administered at 0.75 h after the last injection of LPS or SS. Blood and tissue samples were taken after FFC administration. 3. The plasma AUC0-4 h values of FFC were higher (p = 0.0313) in sheep treated with LPS (21.8 ± 2.0 μg·min/mL) compared with the control group (12.8 ± 2.3 μg·min/mL). Lipopolysaccharide injections increased FFC concentrations in kidneys, spleen, and brain. Low levels of plasma FFC-a were observed in control sheep (Cmax = 0.14 ± 0.01 μg/mL) with a metabolite ratio (MR) of 4.0 ± 0.87%. While in the LPS group, Cmax increased slightly (0.25 ± 0.01 μg/mL), and MR decreased to 2.8 ± 0.17%. 4. The changes observed in the plasma and tissue concentrations of FFC were attributed to the pathophysiological effects of LPS on renal hemodynamics that modified tissue distribution and reduced elimination of the drug.

  9. A low-level diode laser therapy reduces the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced periodontal ligament cell inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, T. H.; Chen, C. C.; Liu, S. L.; Lu, Y. C.; Kao, C. T.

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the cytologic effects of inflammatory periodontal ligament cells in vitro after low-level laser therapy. Human periodontal ligament cells were cultured, exposed to lipopolysaccharide and subjected to low-level laser treatment of 5 J cm-2 or 10 J cm-2 using a 920 nm diode laser. A periodontal ligament cell attachment was observed under a microscope, and the cell viability was quantified by a mitochondrial colorimetric assay. Lipopolysaccharide-treated periodontal ligament cells were irradiated with the low-level laser, and the expression levels of several inflammatory markers, iNOS, TNF-α and IL-1, and pErk kinase, were analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot. The data were collected and analyzed by one-way analysis of variance; p < 0.05 indicated a statistically significant difference. The low-level laser treatment of periodontal ligament cells increased their ability to attach and survive. After irradiation, the expression levels of iNOS, TNF-α and IL-1 in lipopolysaccharide-exposed periodontal ligament cells decreased over time (p < 0.05). In periodontal ligament cells, low-level diode laser treatment increased the cells’ proliferative ability and decreased the expression of the examined inflammatory mediators.

  10. An antibacterial vaccination strategy based on a glycoconjugate containing the core lipopolysaccharide tetrasaccharide Hep2Kdo2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lingbing; Vijayakrishnan, Balakumar; Kowarik, Michael; Park, Jin; Zakharova, Alexandra N.; Neiwert, Larissa; Faridmoayer, Amirreza; Davis, Benjamin G.

    2016-03-01

    Certain non-mammalian cell wall sugars are conserved across a variety of pathogenic bacteria. This conservation of structure, combined with their structural differences when compared with mammalian sugars, make them potentially powerful epitopes for immunization. Here, we report the synthesis of a glycoconjugate that displays the so-called ‘inner core’ sugars of Gram-negative bacterial cell walls. We also describe an antibacterial vaccination strategy based on immunization with the glycoconjugate and the subsequent administration of an inhibitor that uncovers the corresponding epitope in pathogenic bacteria. The core tetrasaccharide, Hep2Kdo2, a common motif in bacterial lipopolysaccharides, was synthesized and attached via a chain linker to a diphtheria toxin mutant carrier protein. This glycoconjugate generated titres of antibodies towards the inner core tetrasaccharide of the lipopolysaccharide, which were capable of binding the cell-surface sugars of bacterial pathogenic strains including Neisseria meningitidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. Exposure of bacterial lipopolysaccharide in in vitro experiments, using an inhibitor of capsular polysaccharide transport, enabled potent bacterial killing with antiserum.

  11. [Biological activity of lipopolysaccharides from clinical Bacteroides fragilis strains isolated in Poland determined in reaction with limulus amoebocyte lysate].

    PubMed

    Rokosz, Alicja; Górska, Paulina; Michałkiewicz, Jacek; Łuczak, Miroslaw

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine a biological activity of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from clinical Bacterioides fragilis strains isolated in Poland by means of quantitative, photometric BET (LAL) method with Limulus polyphemus amoebocyte lysate and chromogenic substrate S-2423. Lipopolysaccharides were extracted from nine clinical B. fragilis strains by the procedure of Westphal and Jann (1965). Crude LPS preparations were purified with ultracentrifugation. Biological activities of bacterial endotoxins were determined by quantitative BET method with chromogenic substrate S-2423 (ENDOCHROME kit). Tests were performed according to the recommendations of the producer (Charles River Endosafe Ltd., USA). E. coli O55:B5 LPS and LPS preparations from reference B. fragilis strains were applied to compare the results of examinations. Activities of endotoxins from clinical B. fragilis strains isolated in Poland determined in reaction with Limulus amoebocyte lysate were differentiated. Among endotoxins of clinical B. fragilis strains the most active was the preparation from strain cultured in the case of pancreatic ulcer (B. fragilis 80/81 LPS). Lipopolysaccharides of examined B. fragilis strains were less active in BET test than E. coli O55:B5 LPS.

  12. Effect of a waaL mutation on lipopolysaccharide composition, oxidative stress survival, and virulence in Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Berry, Matthew C; McGhee, Gayle C; Zhao, Youfu; Sundin, George W

    2009-02-01

    Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight, is an enterobacterial pathogen of Rosaceous plants including apple and pear. We have been studying the response of E. amylovora to oxidative stress because, during infection, the bacterium elicits an oxidative burst response in host plants. During the screening of a transposon mutant library for hydrogen peroxide sensitivity, we identified a mutant carrying an insertion in waaL, a gene involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, that was more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide than the parental wild-type strain. We also confirmed that a waaL mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibited an increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide compared with the wild-type strain. The E. amylovora waaL mutant was also reduced in virulence, showed a decrease in twitching motility, and was more sensitive to polymyxin B than the wild type. Each of these phenotypes was complemented by the cloned waaL gene. Our results highlight the importance of the lipopolysaccharide layer to virulence in E. amylovora and the unexpected finding of an additional function of lipopolysaccharide in protection from oxidative stress in E. amylovora and P. aeruginosa.

  13. Lovastatin dose-dependently potentiates the pro-inflammatory activity of lipopolysaccharide both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zanin, Valentina; Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Kleiner, Giulio; Piscianz, Elisa; Monasta, Lorenzo; Zacchigna, Serena; Crovella, Sergio; Zauli, Giorgio

    2013-12-01

    Since contradictory findings have been reported on potential effects of statins in modulating the inflammatory response, we have analysed the biological activity of lovastatin both in vitro using the Raw 264.7 murine macrophagic cell line and in vivo using BALB/c mice. When added to Raw 264.7 cells in combination with lipopolysaccharide, lovastatin significantly potentiated the release of interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and interleukin-12 with respect to lipopolysaccharide alone and showed an additive effect on the release of nitric oxide. Similarly, when lovastatin was intraperitoneally administrated to BALB/c mice, it did not induce any pro-inflammatory effect when used alone, but it significantly potentiated the pro-inflammatory activity of lipopolysaccharide, in terms of number of intraperitoneal cells and serum levels of serum amyloid A, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and interleukin-12. A potential clinical implication of our study is that lovastatin might exert a pro-inflammatory activity in subjects affected by inflammatory processes, with clinically evident or subclinical infections.

  14. A Fermented Whole Grain Prevents Lipopolysaccharides-Induced Dysfunction in Human Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gabriele, Morena; Del Prato, Stefano; Pucci, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Endogenous and exogenous signals derived by the gut microbiota such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) orchestrate inflammatory responses contributing to development of the endothelial dysfunction associated with atherosclerosis in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), bone marrow derived stem cells, promote recovery of damaged endothelium playing a pivotal role in cardiovascular repair. Since healthy nutrition improves EPCs functions, we evaluated the effect of a fermented grain, Lisosan G (LG), on early EPCs exposed to LPS. The potential protective effect of LG against LPS-induced alterations was evaluated as cell viability, adhesiveness, ROS production, gene expression, and NF-kB signaling pathway activation. Our results showed that LPS treatment did not affect EPCs viability and adhesiveness but induced endothelial alterations via activation of NF-kB signaling. LG protects EPCs from inflammation as well as from LPS-induced oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress reducing ROS levels, downregulating proinflammatory and proapoptotic factors, and strengthening antioxidant defense. Moreover, LG pretreatment prevented NF-kB translocation from the cytoplasm into the nucleus caused by LPS exposure. In human EPCs, LPS increases ROS and upregulates proinflammatory tone, proapoptotic factors, and antioxidants. LG protects EPCs exposed to LPS reducing ROS, downregulating proinflammatory and proapoptotic factors, and strengthening antioxidant defenses possibly by inhibiting NF-κB nuclear translocation. PMID:28386305

  15. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on thymidine salvage as related to macrophage activation.

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Y; Nagao, S; Nakamura, M; Okada, F; Tanigawa, Y

    1995-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), known as one of the potent activators of macrophages, has inhibitory effects on the proliferation of normal macrophages and macrophage-like cell lines. We report here that LPS dose- and time-dependently suppressed the tritiated thymidine ([3H]TdR) incorporation into the acid-insoluble fraction with a significant inverse correlation to the tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) production in the J774.1 macrophage cell line. Among the three tested enzymes involved in DNA synthesis, only thymidine kinase (TK) activity decreased progressively in parallel with the decline in [3H]TdR incorporation, reaching 97% inhibition within 12 hr of LPS treatment, while changes in the activities of other two enzymes, DNA polymerase alpha and thymidylate synthase (TS), were less significant. On the other hand, LPS inhibited the cell proliferation only incompletely, as judged by 62% inhibition of cell growth at 36 hr. Even in the experiments done in a TdR-free medium, cell growth was inhibited by LPS to the same extent, suggesting that TK was not directly involved in the proliferation of J774 cells. LPS also inhibited the conversion of TdR to thymidine monophosphate (TMP) in murine peritoneal exudate macrophages (PEM). Thus LPS-induced suppression of TdR salvage related to TNF production is common in both normal and neoplastic macrophages, and therefore may be of potential importance in the process of macrophage activation. PMID:7751001

  16. Cross-linked bromelain inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine production involving cellular signaling suppression in rats.

    PubMed

    Hou, Rolis Chien-Wei; Chen, Yuh-Shuen; Huang, Jing-Rong; Jeng, Kee-Ching G

    2006-03-22

    Bromelain has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. It has been cross-linked with organic acids and polysaccharides by gamma irradiation. The cross-linked (CL)-bromelain preparation resisted an acidic environment of pH 3 for 2 h and preserved 80% of its enzyme activity. Pretreatment of rats with CL-bromelain intragastrically for 7 days significantly reduced serum cytokine production induced by injected i.p. with 2.5 mg/kg of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Bromelain significantly reduced serum glutamate-oxalacetate transaminase induced by LPS. The anti-inflammatory effect of CL-bromelain was correlated with reduced LPS-induced NF-kappaB activity and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) mRNA expression in rat livers. In addition, CL-bromelain dose-dependently inhibited LPS-induced COX-2 mRNA and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in BV-2 microglial cells. CL-Bromelain also suppressed the LPS-activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). In conclusion, the anti-inflammatory effects of the CL-bromelain preparation in vivo and in vitro suggest its therapeutic potentials.

  17. Reactive oxygen species contribute to lipopolysaccharide-induced teratogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Wang, Hua; Ji, Yan-Li; Ning, Huan; Wang, Su-Fang; Zhang, Cheng; Lu, Jin-Wei; Duan, Zi-Hao; Xu, De-Xiang

    2008-05-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been associated with adverse developmental outcome, including embryonic resorption, fetal death and growth retardation, and preterm delivery. In the present study, we showed that an ip injection with LPS daily from gestational day (gd) 8 to gd 12 resulted in the incidence of external malformations. The highest incidence of malformed fetuses was observed in fetuses from dams exposed to 20 microg/kg LPS, in which 34.9% of fetuses per litter were externally malformed. In addition, 17.4% of fetuses per litter in 30 microg/kg group and 12.5% of fetuses per litter in 10 microg/kg group were externally malformed. Importantly, external malformations were also observed in fetuses from dams exposed to only two doses of LPS (20 microg/kg, ip) on gd 8, in which 76.5% (13/17) of litters and 39.1% of fetuses per litter were affected. LPS-induced teratogenicity seemed to be associated with oxidative stress in fetal environment, measured by lipid peroxidation, nitrotyrosine residues, and glutathione (GSH) depletion in maternal liver, embryo, and placenta. alpha-Phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN, 100 mg/kg, ip), a free radical spin-trapping agent, abolished LPS-induced lipid peroxidation, nitrotyrosine residues, and GSH depletion. Consistent with its antioxidant effects, PBN decreased the incidence of external malformations. Taken together, these results suggest that reactive oxygen species might be, at least partially, involved in LPS-induced teratogenesis.

  18. Infrared spectroscopic characterization of monocytic microvesicles (microparticles) released upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joonsup; Wen, Beryl; Carter, Elizabeth A; Combes, Valery; Grau, Georges E R; Lay, Peter A

    2017-03-17

    Microvesicles (MVs) are involved in cell-cell interactions, including disease pathogenesis. Nondestructive Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectra from MVs were assessed as a technique to provide new biochemical insights into a LPS-induced monocyte model of septic shock. FTIR spectroscopy provided a quick method to investigate relative differences in biomolecular content of different MV populations that was complementary to traditional semiquantitative omics approaches, with which it is difficult to provide information on relative changes between classes (proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, carbohydrates) or protein conformations. Time-dependent changes were detected in biomolecular contents of MVs and in the monocytes from which they were released. Differences in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine contents were observed in MVs released under stimulation, and higher relative concentrations of RNA and α-helical structured proteins were present in stimulated MVs compared with MVs from resting cells. FTIR spectra of stimulated monocytes displayed changes that were consistent with those observed in the corresponding MVs they released. LPS-stimulated monocytes had reduced concentrations of nucleic acids, α-helical structured proteins, and phosphatidylcholine compared with resting monocytes but had an increase in total lipids. FTIR spectra of MV biomolecular content will be important in shedding new light on the mechanisms of MVs and the different roles they play in physiology and disease pathogenesis.-Lee, J., Wen, B., Carter, E. A., Combes, V., Grau, G. E. R., Lay. P. A. Infrared spectroscopic characterization of monocytic microvesicles (microparticles) released upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation.

  19. Amygdaloid signature of peripheral immune activation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide or staphylococcal enterotoxin B.

    PubMed

    Prager, Geraldine; Hadamitzky, Martin; Engler, Andrea; Doenlen, Raphael; Wirth, Timo; Pacheco-López, Gustavo; Krügel, Ute; Schedlowski, Manfred; Engler, Harald

    2013-03-01

    Activated immune cells produce soluble mediators that not only coordinate local and systemic immune responses but also act on the brain to initiate behavioral, neuroendocrine and metabolic adaptations. Earlier studies have shown that the amygdala, a group of nuclei located in the medial temporal lobe, is engaged in the central processing of afferent signals from the peripheral immune system. Here, we compared amygdaloid responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), two prototypic bacterial products that elicit distinct immune responses. Intraperitoneal administration of LPS (0.1 mg/kg) or SEB (1 mg/kg) in adult rats induced substantial increases in amygdaloid neuronal activity as measured by intracerebral electroencephalography and c-fos gene expression. Amygdaloid neuronal activation was accompanied by an increase in anxiety-related behavior in the elevated plus-maze test. However, only treatment with LPS, but not SEB, enhanced amygdaloid IL-1β and TNF-α mRNA expression. This supports the view of the immune system as a sensory organ that recognizes invading pathogens and rapidly relays this information to the brain, independent of the nature of the immune response induced. The observation that neuronal and behavioral responses to peripheral immune challenges are not necessarily accompanied by increased brain cytokine expression suggests that cytokines are not the only factors driving sickness-related responses in the CNS.

  20. Sesamin inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation and extracellular matrix catabolism in rat intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Li, Kang; Li, Yan; Xu, Bo; Mao, Lu; Zhao, Jie

    2016-09-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration contributes to most spinal degenerative diseases, while treatment inhibiting IVD degeneration is still in the experimental stage. Sesamin, a bioactive component extracted from sesame, has been reported to exert chondroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects. Here, we analyzed the anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic effects of sesamin on rat IVD in vitro and ex vivo. Results show that sesamin significantly inhibits the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of catabolic enzymes (MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-4, ADAMTS-5) and inflammation factors (IL-1β, TNF-α, iNOS, NO, COX-2, PGE2) in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. It is also proven that migration of macrophages induced by LPS can be inhibited by treatment with sesamin. Organ culture experiments demonstrate that sesamin protects the IVD from LPS-induced depletion of the extracellular matrix ex vivo. Moreover, sesamin suppresses LPS-induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway through inhibiting phosphorylation of JNK, the common downstream signaling pathway of LPS and IL-1β, which may be the potential mechanism of the effects of sesamin. In light of our results, sesamin protects the IVD from inflammation and extracellular matrix catabolism, presenting positive prospects in the treatment of IVD degenerative diseases.

  1. Identification and Characterization of a Glycosyltransferase Involved in Acinetobacter baumannii Lipopolysaccharide Core Biosynthesis▿

    PubMed Central

    Luke, Nicole R.; Sauberan, Shauna L.; Russo, Thomas A.; Beanan, Janet M.; Olson, Ruth; Loehfelm, Thomas W.; Cox, Andrew D.; St. Michael, Frank; Vinogradov, Evgeny V.; Campagnari, Anthony A.

    2010-01-01

    Although Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a significant cause of nosocomial infections worldwide, there have been few investigations describing the factors important for A. baumannii persistence and pathogenesis. This paper describes the first reported identification of a glycosyltransferase, LpsB, involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis in A. baumannii. Mutational, structural, and complementation analyses indicated that LpsB is a core oligosaccharide glycosyl transferase. Using a genetic approach, lpsB was compared with the lpsB homologues of several A. baumannii strains. These analyses indicated that LpsB is highly conserved among A. baumannii isolates. Furthermore, we developed a monoclonal antibody, monoclonal antibody 13C11, which reacts to an LPS core epitope expressed by approximately one-third of the A. baumannii clinical isolates evaluated to date. Previous studies describing the heterogeneity of A. baumannii LPS were limited primarily to structural analyses; therefore, studies evaluating the correlation between these surface glycolipids and pathogenesis were warranted. Our data from an evaluation of LpsB mutant 307::TN17, which expresses a deeply truncated LPS glycoform consisting of only two 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid residues and lipid A, suggest that A. baumannii LPS is important for resistance to normal human serum and confers a competitive advantage for survival in vivo. These results have important implications for the role of LPS in A. baumannii infections. PMID:20194587

  2. The effect of flavonoids on transduction mechanisms in lipopolysaccharide-treated human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Jiménez-Estrada, Manuel; Maldonado, Silvia

    2007-09-01

    Periodontal disease comprises a group of infections that lead to inflammation of the gingival and destruction of periodontal tissues and is accompanied by the loss of the alveolar bone with eventual exfoliation of the teeth. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative bacteria obtained from the periodontal pocket of patients with aggressive and chronic periodontitis. This bacteria presents in the external membrane lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Flavonoids are molecules obtained from plants and possess anti-inflammatory properties. Herein we characterize the effect of the flavonoids quercetin, genistein, luteolin, and quercetagetin on LPS-activated transduction mechanism regulation in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). In this study, we investigated the role of the previously mentioned flavonoids on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation induced by LPS obtained from P. gingivalis. Our results showed that LPS treatment induces activation of extracellular signal related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p38, and c-jun-NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK). All flavonoids demonstrated an inhibitory effect on MAPK activation, interleukin, 1beta, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression, IL-1beta and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis. The most active flavonoid was quercetagetin. Finally we found that the treatment with quercetagetin had no effect on cellular viability or in genetic material integrity.

  3. Anti-inflammatory activity of fisetin in human gingival fibroblasts treated with lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Contreras-Sánchez, Anabel; Ventura-Arroyo, Jairo Agustín

    2014-10-01

    Fisetin is an anti-inflammatory flavonoid; however, its anti-inflammatory mechanism is not yet understood. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of fisetin and its association with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor kappa-beta pathways in human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) obtained from Porphyromonas gingivalis. The cell signaling, cell viability, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression of HGFs treated with various concentrations (0, 1, 5, 10, and 15 μM) of fisetin were measured by cell viability assay (MTT), Western blotting, and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis on COX-2. We found that fisetin significantly reduced the synthesis and expression of prostaglandin E2 in HGFs treated with LPS. Activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 MAPK was suppressed consistently by fisetin in HGFs treated with LPS. The data indicate that fisetin inhibits MAPK activation and COX-2 expression without affecting cell viability. These findings may be valuable for understanding the mechanism of the effect of fisetin on periodontal disease.

  4. Protective effect of sodium cromoglycate on lipopolysaccharide-induced bronchial obstruction in asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Michel, O; Ginanni, R; Sergysels, R

    1995-11-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS, the major part of endotoxins) are bacterial proinflammatory substances which can induce in asthmatic patients after inhalation a bronchial obstruction with an increase in both histamine bronchial hyperresponsiveness and blood inflammatory markers. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether an acute inhalation of sodium cromoglycate, an anti-inflammatory and membrane-stabilizating agent, can block the LPS-induced lung function response. Using a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover method, 7 asthmatic subjects were submitted, at 4 days' interval, to a bronchial challenge test with either solvent solution or LPS (20 micrograms) preceded by inhalation of sodium cromoglycate (10 mg) or placebo. Compared to the solvent reaction, LPS induced a significant bronchial obstruction [measured by both the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and the airway resistances] beginning at the 60th minute and lasting more than 300 min (p < 0.01, 2-way ANOVA). On the other hand, acute pretreatment with sodium cromoglycate significantly inhibited the LPS-induced bronchial obstruction. The total lung capacity did not change significantly after LPS inhalation. Thus, this study showed that in asthmatics the LPS-induced FEV1 response is blocked by acute treatment with sodium cromoglycate. Sodium cromoglycate could be an active treatment in asthmatics exposed to house dust containing endotoxin.

  5. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Spatial Memory and Synaptic Plasticity Impairment Is Preventable by Captopril

    PubMed Central

    Abareshi, Azam; Anaeigoudari, Akbar; Norouzi, Fatemeh; Shafei, Mohammad Naser; Khazaei, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Renin-angiotensin system has a role in inflammation and also is involved in many brain functions such as learning, memory, and emotion. Neuroimmune factors have been proposed as the contributors to the pathogenesis of memory impairments. In the present study, the effect of captopril on spatial memory and synaptic plasticity impairments induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was investigated. Methods. The rats were divided and treated into control (saline), LPS (1 mg/kg), LPS-captopril (LPS-Capto; 50 mg/kg captopril before LPS), and captopril groups (50 mg/kg) before saline. Morris water maze was done. Long-term potentiation (LTP) from CA1 area of hippocampus was assessed by 100 Hz stimulation in the ipsilateral Schaffer collateral pathway. Results. In the LPS group, the spent time and traveled path to reach the platform were longer than those in the control, while, in the LPS-Capto group, they were shorter than those in the LPS group. Moreover, the slope and amplitude of field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) decreased in the LPS group, as compared to the control group, whereas, in the LPS-Capto group, they increased compared to the LPS group. Conclusion. The results of the present study showed that captopril improved the LPS-induced memory and LTP impairments induced by LPS in rats. Further investigations are required in order to better understand the exact responsible mechanism(s). PMID:27830176

  6. Evidence that the anorexia induced by lipopolysaccharide is mediated by the 5-HT2C receptor.

    PubMed

    von Meyenburg, Claudia; Langhans, Wolfgang; Hrupka, Brian J

    2003-01-01

    Rats consistently reduce their food intake following injections of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Because inhibition of serotonergic (5-HT) activity by 8-OH-DPAT (5-HT(1A) activation) attenuates LPS-induced anorexia, we conducted a series of studies to examine whether other 5-HT-receptors are involved in the mediation of peripheral LPS-induced anorexia. In all experiments, rats were injected with LPS (100 microg/kg body weight [BW] ip) at lights out (hour 0). Antagonists were administered peripherally at hour 4, shortly after the onset of anorexia, which presumably follows the enhanced cytokine production after LPS. Food intake was then recorded during the subsequent 2 h or longer. 5-HT receptor antagonists cyanopindolol and SB 224289 (5-HT(1B)), ketanserin (5-HT(2A)), RS-102221 (5-HT(2C)), and metoclopramide (5-HT(3)) failed to attenuate LPS-induced anorexia. In contrast, both ritanserin (5-HT(2A/C)-receptor antagonist) (0.5 mg/kg BW) and SB 242084 (5-HT(2C)) (0.3 mg/kg BW) attenuated LPS-induced anorexia at doses that did not alter food intake in non-LPS-treated rats (all P<.01). Our results suggest that at least part of the anorexia following peripheral LPS administration is mediated through an enhanced 5-HT-ergic activity and the 5-HT(2C) receptor.

  7. Cyclic-di-GMP regulates lipopolysaccharide modification and contributes to Pseudomonas aeruginosa immune evasion.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Ronan R; Mazon-Moya, Maria J; Moscoso, Joana A; Hao, Youai; Lam, Joseph S; Bordi, Christophe; Mostowy, Serge; Filloux, Alain

    2017-03-06

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen associated with acute and chronic infections. The universal cyclic-di-GMP second messenger is instrumental in the switch from a motile lifestyle to resilient biofilm as in the cystic fibrosis lung. The SadC diguanylate cyclase is associated with this patho-adaptive transition. Here, we identify an unrecognized SadC partner, WarA, which we show is a methyltransferase in complex with a putative kinase, WarB. We established that WarA binds to cyclic-di-GMP, which potentiates its methyltransferase activity. Together, WarA and WarB have structural similarities with the bifunctional Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O antigen regulator WbdD. Strikingly, WarA influences P. aeruginosa O antigen modal distribution and interacts with the LPS biogenesis machinery. LPS is known to modulate the immune response in the host, and by using a zebrafish infection model, we implicate WarA in the ability of P. aeruginosa to evade detection by the host.

  8. Prunella vulgaris extract and rosmarinic acid suppress lipopolysaccharide-induced alteration in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zdarilová, A; Svobodová, A; Simánek, V; Ulrichová, J

    2009-04-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic disease associated with inflammation of the tooth-supporting tissues. The inflammation is initiated by a group of gram-negative anaerobic bacteria. These express a number of irritating factors including a lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which plays a key role in periodontal disease development. Plant extracts with anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial properties have been shown to inhibit bacterial plaque formation and thus prevent chronic gingivitis. In this study we tested effects of Prunella vulgaris L. extract (PVE; 5, 10, 25microg/ml) and its component rosmarinic acid (RA; 1microg/ml) on LPS-induced oxidative damage and inflammation in human gingival fibroblasts. PVE and RA reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, intracellular glutathione (GSH) depletion as well as lipid peroxidation in LPS-treated cells. Treatment with PVE and RA also inhibited LPS-induced up-regulation of interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and suppressed expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). The results indicate that PVE and RA are able to suppress LPS-induced biological changes in gingival fibroblasts. The effects of PVE and RA are presumably linked to their anti-inflammatory activities and thus use of PVE and RA may be relevant in modulating the inflammation process, including periodontal disease.

  9. Abnormal lipopolysaccharide binding protein as marker of gastrointestinal inflammation in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Gian D.; Shaikh, Maliha; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Ouyang, Bichun; Keshavarzian, Ali; Shannon, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: An inflammation-driven model of PD has been proposed based on the endotoxin lipopolysaccaride (LPS), a potential source of inflammation in the gastrointestinal system linked to neurotoxicity. Systemic exposure to bacterial endotoxin (LPS) can be determined by measuring plasma LPS binding protein (LBP). We aimed to evaluate whether lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) can be used to distinguish PD subjects from control subjects and to assess whether LBP levels correlate with PD disease severity. Methods: We measured plasma LBP (ng/ml) using an ELISA kit in 94 PD subjects of various stages and 97 control subjects. Disease severity was assessed using the UPDRS and Hoehn and Yahr staging. The LBP level between the PD and control groups was compared using analysis of covariance. Spearman correlation was used to explore the relationship between LBP level and disease severity. Results: The mean LBP level in PD subjects (n = 94) was significantly different from control subjects (n = 95, p = 0.018). In PD subjects, we did not find a correlation between mean LBP level and disease severity. Conclusions: Our data suggests that LBP is one GI biomarker related to LPS induced neurotoxicity. However, there was significant variability in LBP levels within the PD and control groups, limiting its utility as a stand-alone biomarker. This study supports the role of LPS induced neurotoxicity in PD and further exploration of this pathway may be useful in developing sensitive and specific biomarkers for PD. PMID:26388718

  10. Interaction between tachyplesin I, an antimicrobial peptide derived from horseshoe crab, and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Takahiro; Kamiya, Masakatsu; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Kumaki, Yasuhiro; Kikukawa, Takashi; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Demura, Makoto; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro; Kawano, Keiichi

    2014-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major constituent of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and is the very first site of interactions with antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In order to gain better insight into the interaction between LPS and AMPs, we determined the structure of tachyplesin I (TP I), an antimicrobial peptide derived from horseshoe crab, in its bound state with LPS and proposed the complex structure of TP I and LPS using a docking program. CD and NMR measurements revealed that binding to LPS slightly extends the two β-strands of TP I and stabilizes the whole structure of TP I. The fluorescence wavelength of an intrinsic tryptophan of TP I and fluorescence quenching in the presence or absence of LPS indicated that a tryptophan residue is incorporated into the hydrophobic environment of LPS. Finally, we succeeded in proposing a structural model for the complex of TP I and LPS by using a docking program. The calculated model structure suggested that the cationic residues of TP I interact with phosphate groups and saccharides of LPS, whereas hydrophobic residues interact with the acyl chains of LPS.

  11. Serum amyloid P component prevents high-density lipoprotein-mediated neutralization of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    de Haas, C J; Poppelier, M J; van Kessel, K P; van Strijp, J A

    2000-09-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an amphipathic macromolecule that is highly aggregated in aqueous preparations. LPS-binding protein (LBP) catalyzes the transfer of single LPS molecules, segregated from an LPS aggregate, to high-density lipoproteins (HDL), which results in the neutralization of LPS. When fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled LPS (FITC-LPS) is used, this transfer of LPS monomers to HDL can be measured as an increase in fluorescence due to dequenching of FITC-LPS. Recently, serum amyloid P component (SAP) was shown to neutralize LPS in vitro, although only in the presence of low concentrations of LBP. In this study, we show that SAP prevented HDL-mediated dequenching of FITC-LPS, even in the presence of high concentrations of LBP. Human bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI), a very potent LPS-binding and -neutralizing protein, also prevented HDL-mediated dequenching of FITC-LPS. Furthermore, SAP inhibited HDL-mediated neutralization of both rough and smooth LPS in a chemiluminescence assay quantifying the LPS-induced priming of neutrophils in human blood. SAP bound both isolated HDL and HDL in serum. Using HDL-coated magnetic beads prebound with SAP, we demonstrated that HDL-bound SAP prevented the binding of LPS to HDL. We suggest that SAP, by preventing LPS binding to HDL, plays a regulatory role, balancing the amount of LPS that, via HDL, is directed to the adrenal glands.

  12. Effect of lithium ions on cementoblasts in the presence of lipopolysaccharide in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shang; Wang, Yuzhuo; Wang, Xiaolong; Lin, Peng; Hu, Min

    2015-04-01

    The applications of lithium ions as an agent to facilitate bone formation have been widely documented; however, the effect of lithium ions in the periodontitis model has not yet been elucidated. The aim of the present study, therefore, was to investigate the effect of single lithium ions in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). A periodontitis model was induced in cementoblasts using LPS. The cytotoxic effect of the lithium ions on the cementoblasts was studied through the MTT assay. Alkaline phosphatase analysis and alizarin red staining were performed to investigate the effect of the lithium ions on differentiation. To examine the effect of lithium ions on osteoclastogenesis, osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) mRNA and protein expression levels were assessed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis and ELISA, respectively. Compared with the effect induced by lithium ions on normal cementoblasts, proliferation and differentiation were downregulated following the co-incubation of the cementoblasts with LPS and lithium ions. Furthermore, the lithium ions appeared to alter osteoclastogenesis by regulating the OPG/RANKL ratio. In conclusion, the present findings suggest that lithium ions can downregulate proliferation and differentiation in a periodontitis model. Further studies should be undertaken prior to the acceptance of lithium ions for use in the clinic.

  13. Imaging robust microglial activation after lipopolysaccharide administration in humans with PET

    PubMed Central

    Sandiego, Christine M.; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Pittman, Brian; Nabulsi, Nabeel; Lim, Keunpoong; Lin, Shu-Fei; Matuskey, David; Lee, Jae-Yun; O’Connor, Kevin C.; Huang, Yiyun; Carson, Richard E.; Hannestad, Jonas; Cosgrove, Kelly P.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is associated with a broad spectrum of neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases. The core process in neuroinflammation is activation of microglia, the innate immune cells of the brain. We measured the neuroinflammatory response produced by a systemic administration of the Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS; also called endotoxin) in humans with the positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer [11C]PBR28, which binds to translocator protein, a molecular marker that is up-regulated by microglial activation. In addition, inflammatory cytokines in serum and sickness behavior profiles were measured before and after LPS administration to relate brain microglial activation with systemic inflammation and behavior. Eight healthy male subjects each had two 120-min [11C]PBR28 PET scans in 1 d, before and after an LPS challenge. LPS (1.0 ng/kg, i.v.) was administered 180 min before the second [11C]PBR28 scan. LPS administration significantly increased [11C]PBR28 binding 30–60%, demonstrating microglial activation throughout the brain. This increase was accompanied by an increase in blood levels of inflammatory cytokines, vital sign changes, and sickness symptoms, well-established consequences of LPS administration. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration in humans that a systemic LPS challenge induces robust increases in microglial activation in the brain. This imaging paradigm to measure brain microglial activation with [11C]PBR28 PET provides an approach to test new medications in humans for their putative antiinflammatory effects. PMID:26385967

  14. Alterations of Thymic Epithelial Cells in Lipopolysaccharide-induced Neonatal Thymus Involution

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yong-Jie; Peng, Hua; Chen, Yan; Liu, Ya-Lan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the thymus was mainly produced by the thymic epithelial cells (TECs), the predominant component of the thymic microenvironment. The progression of TECs and the roles of VEGF in the neonatal thymus during sepsis have not been reported. This study aimed to explore the alterations of TECs and VEGF level in the neonatal thymus involution and to explore the possible mechanisms at the cellular level. Methods: By establishing a model of clinical sepsis, the changes of TECs were measured by hematoxylin-eosin staining, confocal microscopy, and flow cytometry. Moreover, the levels of VEGF in serum and thymus were assessed based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting. Results: The number of thymocytes and TECs was significantly decreased 24 h after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge, (2.40 ± 0.46)×107 vs. (3.93 ± 0.66)×107 and (1.16 ± 0.14)×105 vs. (2.20 ± 0.19)×105, P < 0.05, respectively. Cortical TECs and medullary TECs in the LPS-treated mice were decreased 1.5-fold and 3.9-fold, P < 0.05, respectively, lower than those in the controls. The number of thymic epithelial progenitors was also decreased. VEGF expression in TECs was down-regulated in a time-dependent manner. Conclusion: VEGF in thymic cells subsets might contribute to the development of TECs in neonatal sepsis. PMID:26712434

  15. Dissociation between sickness behavior and emotionality during lipopolysaccharide challenge in lymphocyte deficient Rag2(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Clark, Sarah M; Michael, Kerry C; Klaus, Joseph; Mert, Abdullah; Romano-Verthelyi, Ari; Sand, Joseph; Tonelli, Leonardo H

    2015-02-01

    Inflammatory diseases are highly associated with affective disorders including depression and anxiety. While the role of the innate immune system on emotionality has been extensively studied, the role of adaptive immunity is less understood. Considering that chronic inflammatory conditions are mediated largely by maladaptive lymphocyte function, the role of these cells on brain function and behavior during inflammation warrants investigation. In the present study we employed mice deficient in lymphocyte function and studied behavioral and inflammatory responses during challenge with bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Rag2(-/-) mice lacking mature lymphocytes were susceptible to death under sub-septic (5 mg/kg) doses of LPS and survived only to moderate (1 mg/kg) doses of LPS. Under these conditions, they displayed attenuated TNF-alpha responses and behavioral symptoms of sickness when compared with immunocompetent mice. Nevertheless, Rag2(-/-) mice had protracted motivational impairments after recovery from sickness suggesting a specific function for lymphocytes on the re-establishment of motivational states after activation of the innate immune system. The behavioral impairments in Rag2(-/-) mice were paralleled by an elevation in plasma corticosterone after behavioral tests. These results provide evidence that the absence of adaptive immunity may be associated with emotional deficits during inflammation and suggest that depressive states associated with medical illness may be mediated in part by impaired lymphocyte responses.

  16. Subversion of innate and adaptive immune activation induced by structurally modified lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Pérez-Shibayama, Christian I; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; Cervantes-Barragán, Luisa; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Ludewig, Burkhard; Cunningham, Adam F; García-Zepeda, Eduardo A; Becker, Ingeborg; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura; Gunn, John S; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2011-08-01

    Salmonella are successful pathogens that infect millions of people every year. During infection, Salmonella typhimurium changes the structure of its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in response to the host environment, rendering bacteria resistant to cationic peptide lysis in vitro. However, the role of these structural changes in LPS as in vivo virulence factors and their effects on immune responses and the generation of immunity are largely unknown. We report that modified LPS are less efficient than wild-type LPS at inducing pro-inflammatory responses. The impact of this LPS-mediated subversion of innate immune responses was demonstrated by increased mortality in mice infected with a non-lethal dose of an attenuated S. typhimurium strain mixed with the modified LPS moieties. Up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules on antigen-presenting cells and CD4(+) T-cell activation were affected by these modified LPS. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing specific antibody responses. Immunization with modified LPS moiety preparations combined with experimental antigens, induced an impaired Toll-like receptor 4-mediated adjuvant effect. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing immunity against challenge with virulent S. typhimurium. Hence, changes in S. typhimurium LPS structure impact not only on innate immune responses but also on both humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses.

  17. Subversion of innate and adaptive immune activation induced by structurally modified lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Pérez-Shibayama, Christian I; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; Cervantes-Barragán, Luisa; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Ludewig, Burkhard; Cunningham, Adam F; García-Zepeda, Eduardo A; Becker, Ingeborg; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura; Gunn, John S; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella are successful pathogens that infect millions of people every year. During infection, Salmonella typhimurium changes the structure of its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in response to the host environment, rendering bacteria resistant to cationic peptide lysis in vitro. However, the role of these structural changes in LPS as in vivo virulence factors and their effects on immune responses and the generation of immunity are largely unknown. We report that modified LPS are less efficient than wild-type LPS at inducing pro-inflammatory responses. The impact of this LPS-mediated subversion of innate immune responses was demonstrated by increased mortality in mice infected with a non-lethal dose of an attenuated S. typhimurium strain mixed with the modified LPS moieties. Up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules on antigen-presenting cells and CD4+ T-cell activation were affected by these modified LPS. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing specific antibody responses. Immunization with modified LPS moiety preparations combined with experimental antigens, induced an impaired Toll-like receptor 4-mediated adjuvant effect. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing immunity against challenge with virulent S. typhimurium. Hence, changes in S. typhimurium LPS structure impact not only on innate immune responses but also on both humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses. PMID:21631497

  18. Activation of Macrophages by Lipopolysaccharide for Assessing the Immunomodulatory Property of Biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Han, Shengwei; Chen, Zetao; Han, Pingping; Hu, Qingang; Xiao, Yin

    2017-03-24

    The design paradigm of biomaterials has been changed to ones with favorable immunomodulatory effects, indicating the importance of accurately evaluating the immunomodulatory properties of biomaterials. Among all the immune cells macrophages receive most attention, due to their plasticity and multiple roles in the materials and host interactions, and thereby become model immune cells for the evaluation of immunomodulatory properties of biomaterials in many studies. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), a polysaccharide in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, elicit strong immune responses, which was often applied to activate macrophages, resulting in a proinflammatory M1 phenotype, and the release of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukin (IL)-1, and IL-6. However, there is no consensus on how to apply macrophages and LPS to detect the immunomodulatory properties of biomaterials. The lack of scientific consideration of this issue has led to some inaccurate and insufficient conclusions on the immunomodulatory properties of biomaterials, and inconsistences between different research groups. In this study, we carried out a systemic study to investigate the stimulatory effects of LPS with different times, doses, and conditions on the activation of macrophages. An experimental pathway was proposed accordingly for the activation of macrophages using LPS for assessing the immunomodulatory property of biomaterials.

  19. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of a mouse gene upregulated by lipopolysaccharide treatment reveals alternative